What does Gad mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
גָ֖ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 11
גָ֔ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 8
גָּ֔ד a city noted for Baal-worship 6
גָּ֖ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 5
גָּ֥ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 4
גָ֜ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 4
גָּֽד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 3
גָד֙ seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 3
גָ֑ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 3
גָּ֑ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 3
גָ֛ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 3
גָּ֣ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 3
גָ֡ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 2
גָּד֙ a city noted for Baal-worship 2
גָ֣ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 2
גָ֥ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 2
γὰδ the seventh son of the patriarch Jacob 1
לְגָ֕ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
גָד֮ seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
גָד֩ seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
גָ֗ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
וּלְגָ֣ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
וְגָ֡ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
: גָ֔ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
גָּ֞ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
תֵּזְלִ֥י to go 1
הַגָּ֖ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
וְגָ֥ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
גָּ֨ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
גָ֞ד seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah 1
לַגַּד֙ fortune 1
תִּתְחַמָּקִ֔ין to withdraw 1

Definitions Related to Gad

H1410


   1 seventh son of Jacob by Zilpah, Leah’s handmaid, and full brother of Asher.
   2 the tribe descended from Gad.
   3 a prophet during the time of David; appears to have joined David when in the hold; reappears in connection with the punishment for taking a census; also assisted in the arrangements for the musical service of the “house of God”.
   Additional Information: Gad = “troop”.
   

H1171


   1 a city noted for Baal-worship, located at the most northern or northwestern point to which Joshua’s victories extended.
   Additional Information: Baal-Gad = “lord of fortune”.
   

H2559


   1 to withdraw, turn around, turn away.
      1a (Qal) to turn away.
      1b (Hithpael) to turn about, vacillate, turn hither and thither.
      

H235


   1 to go, to go away, to go about.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to go away.
         1a2 to go about.
         1a3 to be used up, be exhausted, be gone, evaporated.
      1b (Pual) to go to and fro.
      

H1409


   1 fortune, good fortune.
   

G1045


   1 the seventh son of the patriarch Jacob, by Zilpah, Leah’s maid.
   Additional Information: Gad = “a troop”.
   

Frequency of Gad (original languages)

Frequency of Gad (English)

Dictionary

Chabad Knowledge Base - Gad
Son of Jacob and Zilpah, seventh of the Twelve Tribes.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gad
The seventh son of Jacob, and the first of Zilpah, Leah's maid. Very little is recorded of Gad, except that he had seven sons. Genesis 30:11 ; Genesis 46:16 ; 1 Chronicles 5:11 . Jacob in blessing his sons said of Gad, "A troop shall overcome him: but he shall overcome at the last." Genesis 49:19 . Moses said, "Blessed be he that enlargeth Gad: he dwelleth as a lion, and teareth the arm with [1] the crown of the head. And he provided the first part for himself, because there, in a portion of the lawgiver, was he seated; and he came with the heads of the people, he executed the justice of the Lord, and his judgements with Israel." Deuteronomy 33:20,21 . On leaving Egypt the number of those able to bear arms was 45,650, but on the crossing of the Jordan their number was about five thousand less.
Being on the east of Jordan, this tribe, with Reuben and Manasseh, would necessarily have to bear the shock of the enemies that attacked Israel on the east. 1 Chronicles 5:18-22 . They were a warlike tribe, suitable for such an exposed position. Of those who joined David it is said they were "men of might, and men of war fit for the battle, that could handle shield and buckler, whose faces were like the faces of lions, and were as swift as the roes upon the mountains." 1 Chronicles 12:8-15 . Jephthah and Barzillai were of this tribe.
Gad possessed a large district from a little above the north corner of the Dead Sea to near the south corner of the Sea of Galilee, then a very fertile plain suitable for their flocks and herds, including the highlands of Gilead. The tribes on the east of the Jordan were the first carried away by the king of Assyria, about B.C. 740; and the Ammonites took possession of the territory of Gad. 1 Chronicles 5:25,26 ; Jeremiah 49:1 . Twelve thousand of this tribe will in a future day be sealed for blessing. Revelation 7:5 . Their allotment will be in the extreme south in the restoration of Israel. Ezekiel 48:27 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Migdal-Gad
Tower of fortune, a town in the plains of Judah, probably the modern el-Mejdel, a little to the north-east of Ascalon (Joshua 15:37 ).
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Gad
We meet with this name in the holy Scriptures, to denote three very different characters. The first is one of Jacob's sons, which he had by Zilpah, Leah's handmaid, (Genesis 30:11) and she called his name Gad, which signifies armed; and, therefore, in the margin of our Bibles it is marked a troop, or company. The second Gad we meet with, is the prophet Gad, David's seer. (2 Samuel 24:11) The character of this man is well spoken of, by his conduct and faithfulness, in Scripture. He was much attached to David; (See 1 Samuel 22:5) yet faithful to the Lord at the time of David's transgression. (See 2 Samuel 24:10-19) We read also, that Gad compiled a history of the acts of David. (See 1 Chronicles 29:29-30) The third mention of Gad is as an idol. There was a Baal-Gad in the valley of Lebanon. (Joshua 11:17) And the prophet Isaiah speaks of some "who prepared a table for that troop" [1] "and that furnished a drink offering for that number." [2] (Isaiah 65:11) The dying patriarch Jacob blessing his sons, made a memorable prophecy concerning Gad: "A troop" (said Jacob) "shall overcome him, but he shall overcome at the last." (Genesis 49:19) Considered in a temporal sense, this was literally true. For the Gadites were a numerous tribe, and a warlike tribe. We find no less than forty-five thousand six hundred and fifty, came out of Egypt, (Numbers 2:15) "men both of might, and men of war, fit for the battle, that could handle shield and buckler; whose faces were like the faces of lions, and were as swift as the roes upon the mountains." (1 Chronicles 12:8) And considered in a spiritual sense, the seed of Israel, though frequently overcome by troops of foes, yet though conquered, still they are a conquering people. Troops of lusts, troops of corruptions, troops from hell, and troops from the world, may, and will, bring the poor exercised soul too often under: yet the victory is still on the side of Jacob's seed. The praying seed of Jacob, at length come off as the prevailing Israel; for they must overcome "by the blood of the Lamb," and be more than conquerors through his grace making them so.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Gad
A Canaanite sanctuary of Baal, as "the lord of fortune." The N.W. limit of Joshua's victories, as Hamath was the N.E. limit (Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 13:5). "Under mount Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon," still retaining the Hebrew name for "the valley," 'el buka , between Lebanon and Antilebanon. Probably now Banias, at the fountain which is one of the Jordan's sources, formerly a sanctuary of Pan. Baalbek ("the city of the sun") is situated too far N. at the lowest declivity of Antilibanus to be identified with Baal.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Migdal Gad
An old sanctuary, probably of Gad, the god of fortune; in the shephelah or "low-rolling hills" of Judah (Joshua 15:37).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Gad
Fortune; luck.
Jacob's seventh son, by Zilpah, Leah's handmaid, and the brother of Asher (Genesis 30:11-13 ; 46:16,18 ). In the Authorized Version of 30:11 the words, "A troop cometh: and she called," etc., should rather be rendered, "In fortune [1]: and she called," etc., or "Fortune cometh," etc. The tribe of Gad during the march through the wilderness had their place with Simeon and Reuben on the south side of the tabernacle (Numbers 2:14 ). The tribes of Reuben and Gad continued all through their history to follow the pastoral pursuits of the patriarchs (Numbers 32:1-5 ).
The portion allotted to the tribe of Gad was on the east of Jordan, and comprehended the half of Gilead, a region of great beauty and fertility (Deuteronomy 3:12 ), bounded on the east by the Arabian desert, on the west by the Jordan (Joshua 13:27 ), and on the north by the river Jabbok. It thus included the whole of the Jordan valley as far north as to the Sea of Galilee, where it narrowed almost to a point.
This tribe was fierce and warlike; they were "strong men of might, men of war for the battle, that could handle shield and buckler, their faces the faces of lions, and like roes upon the mountains for swiftness" (1 Chronicles 12:8 ; 5:19-22 ). Barzillai (2 Samuel 17:27 ) and Elijah (1 Kings 17:1 ) were of this tribe. It was carried into captivity at the same time as the other tribes of the northern kingdom by Tiglath-pileser (1 Chronicles 5:26 ), and in the time of (Jeremiah 49:1 ) their cities were inhabited by the Ammonites.
A prophet who joined David in the "hold," and at whose advice he quitted it for the forest of Hareth (1 Chronicles 29:29 ; 2 Chronicles 29:25 ; 1 Samuel 22:5 ). Many years after we find mention made of him in connection with the punishment inflicted for numbering the people (2 Samuel 24:11-19 ; 1 Chronicles 21:9-19 ). He wrote a book called the "Acts of David" (1 Chronicles 29:29 ), and assisted in the arrangements for the musical services of the "house of God" (2 Chronicles 29:25 ). He bore the title of "the king's seer" (2 Samuel 24:11,13 ; 1 Chronicles 21:9 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Gad
Lord of fortune, or troop of Baal, a Canaanite city in the valley of Lebanon at the foot of Hermon, hence called Baal-hermon (Judge 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), near the source of the Jordan (Joshua 13:5 ; 11:17 ; 12:7 ). It was the most northern point to which Joshua's conquests extended. It probably derived its name from the worship of Baal. Its modern representative is Banias. Some have supposed it to be the same as Baalbec.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - River of Gad
Probably the Arno (2 Samuel 24:5 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Gad
(gad) Personal name meaning, “good fortune.” 1. The seventh son of Jacob and the progenitor of the tribe of Gad (Genesis 30:9-11 ). His mother was Leah's maid Zilpah. At the conclusion of the period of wilderness wandering, when the Israelites were preparing to occupy Canaan, the tribe of Gad requested permission, along with the tribe of Reuben and half the tribe of Manasseh, to settle east of the Jordan. Their reason was that they owned large numbers of livestock and the territory east of the Jordan was particularly suitable for raising livestock (Numbers 32:1 ). This territory became known as Gad (Jeremiah 49:1 ). Though the exact limits of Gad's tribal territory are difficult to determine, the Gadites generally occupied land to the northeast of the Dead Sea (Joshua 13:24-28 ). See Tribes of Israel. 2. Syrian god known from inscriptions from Phoenicia and Palmyra and used in biblical names such as Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 ) and Migdal-gad (Joshua 15:37 ). It also apparently is meant in Isaiah 65:11 where the prophet condemned the people for setting “a table for Fortune” (NAS; Hebrew, Gad ). 3. Prophet who advised David as he fled from Saul (1 Samuel 22:5 ) and who brought God's options for punishment after David took a census of Israel (2 Samuel 24:11-14 ). Gad also brought David God's orders to build an altar, apparently on the site of the future Temple (2 Samuel 24:18-19 ). The Chronicler pointed his readers to records of David's reign by Gad (1 Chronicles 29:29 ) and of Gad's assistance in showing David God's plan for Temple worship (2 Chronicles 29:25 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Migdal-Gad
(mihg' dal-gad) Place name meaning, “Tower of Gad.” Village near Lachish in the Shephelah district of Judah (Joshua 15:37 ). The site is perhaps that of khirbet el-Mejdeleh five miles south of Beit Jibrin.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Gad
A band; a troop
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Gad
(bay' uhl-gad) Place name meaning, “Baal of Gad” or “lord of Gad.” Town representing northern limit of Joshua's conquests (Joshua 11:17 ) in Valley of Lebanon at foot of Mount Hermon. It has been variously located at modern Hasbeya and at Baalbek, over 50 miles east of Beirut where imposing ruins of Greek and Roman worship remain.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Gad
GAD (‘fortunate’). Genesis 30:9 ff. (J [1] ), Genesis 35:26 (P [2] ); the first son of Zilpah, Leah’s handmaid, by Jacob, and full brother of Asher (‘Happy’). This like other of the tribal names, e.g. Dan, Asher , is very probably, despite this popular etymology, the name of a deity (cf. Isaiah 65:11 , where AV [3] renders ‘troop’ but RV [4] ‘ Fortune ’). Another semi-etymology or, better, paronomasia ( Genesis 49:19 ) connects the name of the tribe with its warlike experiences and characteristics, taking note only of this feature of the tribal life:
gâdh gedhûdh yeghûdhennu
wehû’ yâghûdh ’âqçbh:
‘As for Gad, plunderers shall plunder him,
And he shall plunder in the rear’ ( i.e. effect reprisals and plunder in return).
In the Blessing of Moses (Deuteronomy 33:20 ) Gad is compared to a lioness that teareth the arm and the crown of the head, and later ( 1 Chronicles 12:8 ; 1 Chronicles 12:14 ) the Gadites who joined David are described as leonine in appearance and incomparable in combat: ‘Their faces are as the faces of lions, the smallest is equal to a hundred and the greatest to a thousand.’
Upon the genetic relations of Gad and Asher the genealogy throws no light, for the fact that Gad and Asher, as it appears, were names of related divinities of Good Fortune would be sufficient ground for uniting them; but why they should have been brought together under the name of Zilpah is not to be conjectured with any certainty. Leah, unlike Rachel, who was barren until after her maid had brought forth to Jacob, had already borne four sons before Zilpah was called in to help her infirmity.
It appears that Gad, notwithstanding the genealogy, was a late tribe. In the Song of Deborah it is not even mentioned. Gilead there takes its place, but Mesha (9th cent.) knows the inhabitants of Gilead as the ‘men of Gad.’
The families of Gad are given by P [2] in Genesis 46:16 and Numbers 26:15 ff., 1 Chronicles 5:11 ff. repeats them with variations. In the Sinai census P [2] gives 46,650 men of war. By the time they had reached the Wilderness they had decreased to 40,500. Their position on the march through the desert is variously given in Numbers as 3rd, 6th, 11th.
Numbers 32:34-36 (P [2] ) gives eight towns lying within the territory of Gad. The most southerly, Aroer, lay upon the Arnon; the most northerly, Jogbehah, not far from the Jabbok. Ataroth, another of these towns, is mentioned on the Moabite stone (l. 10), and the ‘men of Gad’ are there said to have dwelt within it ‘from of old.’ Within this region, and clustering about Heshbon, P [2] gives six cities to the Reubenites, But in Joshua 13:15 ff. Reuben has all to the south of Heshbon, and Gad all to the north of it. Owing to the divergent statements in the Hexateuch and the historical books, it is quite impossible to say what the northern boundary was. In any case it was not a stable one.
The reason assigned by the traditions for the settlement of Gad and Reuben in Gilead is that they were pastoral tribes, with large herds and flocks, and that they found the land pre-eminently adapted to their needs. They, therefore, obtained from Moses permission to settle on the east side of Jordan after they had first crossed the river and helped the other tribes in the work of conquest (see Numbers 32:1-42 and Deuteronomy 3:18-20 ).
After the conquest, in the time of the Judges, the people of Gilead were overrun by the Ammonites until Jephthah finally wrought their deliverance. In David’s conflicts with Saul, the Gadites and other eastern tribes came to his assistance. As the Mesha stone shows, they had probably at that time absorbed the Reubenites, who had been more exposed previously to Moabite attacks, which at this time fell more directly upon Gad. When the northern tribes revolted, Jeroboam must have found the Gadites among his staunchest supporters, for it was to Penuel in Gadite territory that he moved the capital from Shechem in Ephraim (1 Kings 12:25 ).
In 734 the Gadites with their kinsmen of the East Jordan, Galilee and Naphtali, were carried captive by Tiglath-pileser iii. when Ahaz in his perplexity ventured upon the bold alternative of appealing to him for assistance against the powerful confederation of Syrians, Israelites, and Edomites who had leagued together to dethrone him (1 Kings 15:29 , 2 Chronicles 28:16 ff.). It was clearly a case of Scylla and Charybdis for Ahaz. It was fatal for Gad. See also Tribes of Israel.
James A. Craig.
GAD . A god whose name appears in Genesis 30:11 (‘by the help of Gad’; so in Genesis 30:13 ‘by the help of Asherah’); in the place-names Baal-gad, and Migdal-gad ( Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 ; Joshua 15:37 ); and in the personal name Azgad ( Ezra 2:12 , Nehemiah 7:17 ; Nehemiah 10:15 ). In Isaiah 65:11 Gad (RV [4] ‘ Fortune ’) and Meni are named as two demons with whom the Israelites held communion (see Meni). Gad was probably an appellative before it became a personal name for a divinity, and is of Aramæan, Arabian, and Syrian provenance, but not Babylonian. He was the god who gave good fortune (Gr. Tyche ), and presided over a person, house, or mountain.
W. F. Cobb.
GAD is entitled ‘the seer’ ( 1 Chronicles 29:29 ), ‘David’s’ or ‘the king’s seer’ ( 1 Chronicles 21:9 , 2 Chronicles 29:25 , 2 Samuel 24:11 ), or ‘the prophet’ ( 1 Samuel 22:5 , 2 Samuel 24:11 ), He is represented as having announced the Divine condemnation on the royal census, and as having advised the erection of an altar on Araunah’s threshing-floor ( 2 Samuel 24:11 ff. = 1 Chronicles 21:9 ff.). The Chronicler again ( 1 Chronicles 29:29 ) names him as having written an account of some part of his master’s reign. A late conception associated him with the prophet Nathan ( 2 Chronicles 29:25 ) in the task of planning some of the king’s regulations with reference to the musical part of the service, while ( 1 Samuel 22:5 ) he is also stated to have acted as David’s counsellor in peril during the period when the two dwelt together in ‘the hold.’
GAD (Valley of). Mentioned only in 2 Samuel 24:5 , and there the text should read ‘in the midst of the valley towards Gad,’ the valley ( wady ) here being the Arnon (wh. see).
E. W. G. Masterman.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Gad
Idol of fortune or felicity
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Migdal-Gad
MIGDAL-GAD. A town in the Shephçlah, in the territory of Judah ( Joshua 15:37 ), which cannot be identified with any certainty. Guthe suggests Khirbet el-Mejdeleh , about S miles S. of Belt Jibrîn, with remains of buildings, cisterns, and rock-hewn tombs; or Khirbet el-Mejdel , about 14 miles S. of Beit Jibrîn, with extensive ruins, etc. Warren (Hastings’ DB [1] ) suggests el-Mejdel , a thriving village 2 1 / 2 miles N.E. of Ashkelon. The name ‘Tower of Gad’ probably points to its having been a seat of idolatry, where the Canaanites worshipped Gad ‘Good Luck’ or ‘Fortune.’
W. Ewing.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Gad
See Tribes.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gad
(Hebrew: fortune, luck)
Patriarch, seventh son of Jacob (Genesis 35).
Tribe of Israel dwelling east of the Jordan, between Manasses on the north and Ruben on the south. They were a war-like race whose valor is highly praised in the parting blessing of Moses (Deuteronomy 33), and in the prophecy of Jacob (Genesis 49).
Hebrew prophet (1 Kings 22), contemporary of King David.
Pagan divinity (Isaiah 65:11, where the Hebrew Gad is rendered "fortune").
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Gad (1)
Jacob's seventh son; Leah's maid Zilpah's firstborn; Asher's brother. Genesis 30:11-13, for "a troop cometh," translated "good fortune cometh," answering to Asher, "blessedness," the name of the next son; Genesis 46:16; Genesis 46:18. In Genesis 49:19 translated "Gad, troops shall troop upon him (Gad , gedud ye -guddenu ), but he shall troop upon (yagud ) their rear" in retreat; alluding to the Arab tumultuous tribes near, who would invade Gad, then retire, Gad pressing on them in retreat. Gedud implies not merely a numerous "troop," but a fierce turbulent band. The tribe's position on march was S. of the tabernacle (Numbers 2:14). Eliasaph, Reuel's' son, was their leader. In Numbers 2:10; Numbers 2:14, we find Gad united to Reuben on the S. side of the sanctuary. Companionship in arms and hardships in the wilderness naturally led them to desire neighborhood in their possessions; also similarity of pursuits in tending flocks and herds led Gad to alliance with Reuben.
And their respective numbers were nearly the same; at the first census, Gad 45,650, Reuben 46,500; at the last, Gad 40,500, and Reuben 43,330. These undesigned coincidences confirm the truth of the narrative. Like Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, of the tribes they two alone remained shepherds still after the intervening centuries since Jacob left Canaan for Egypt. They therefore received the pasture lands E. of Jordan for their possession (Numbers 32), as suited for their "multitude of cattle," but accompanied the nine tribes and a half across Jordan to war with the Canaanites; and only after their conquest and the apportionment of the whole land to their brethren "at the doorway of the tabernacle of the congregation in Shiloh, before Jehovah" (Joshua 19:51; Joshua 22:1-8), were they dismissed "to their tents (for still they led a half nomadic life) and the land of their possession."
Gad's allotment lay chiefly about the center of the land E. of Jordan, comprising the high land on the general level, stopping short at the Jabbok, and also the sunk valley of the Jordan itself, the whole eastern side up to the sea of Cinnereth or Gennesaret. The farthest landmark eastward is Aroer facing Rabbah, now Arabian (Joshua 13:25). Half Gilead (Deuteronomy 3:12), and half of the land of Ammon, the mountainous district intersected by Jabbok. (See GILEAD.) Manasseh lay N. and E. (reaching S. as far as Mahanaim), Reuben S., of Gad. Mahanaim the ancient sanctuary was on Gad's northern border; Heshbon lay somewhat S. of its southern border. From western Palestine the territory of Gad looks like a wall of purple mountain with a marked horizontal outline. On a nearer approach picturesque undulating downs are seen on every side clothed with rich grass; and three rivers, the Yarmuk, Jabbok, and Arnon flow down into the Jordan and Dead Sea by deep ravines which seam the horizontal line of hills.
Not the flat sheep walks of Reuben and Moab, but well wooded, especially in the N., with sycamore, beech, terebinth, ilex, cedar, arbutus, and enormous fig trees. In the official record in the days of Jotham king of Judah, and Jeroboam king of Israel, Gad had extended its possessions to Salcah in Bashan (1 Chronicles 5:11; 1 Chronicles 5:16-17), E. of the Hauran plain, while Manasseh was pushed further N. to mount Hermon (1 Chronicles 5:23). Thus Gad and Gilead became synonymous (Judges 5:17).
Jephthah is called "the Gileadite," being a native of Mizpeh of Gad (Judges 11:31; Judges 11:34; Joshua 13:26). In Deuteronomy 33:20-21, Moses said of Gad, "Blessed is He that enlargeth (i.e. God who gives a large territory to) Gad; he lieth down as a lioness, and teareth the arm, yea (aph , not with) the crown of the head (of his foes); and he provided the first part (the first-fruit portion of the land conquered by Israel) for himself, because there was the leader's (Gad's) portion reserved (saphun ), Gad at the head of the tribes asked Moses for the conquered land E. of Jordan (Numbers 32:2; Numbers 32:6; Numbers 32:25; Numbers 32:34, etc.), even as they took the lead above Reuben in fortifying the cities Dibon, etc. Their name accordingly is prominent on the Dibon stone); and he came with the heads of the people (i.e., he according to his stipulation to Moses went at the head of the tribes to conquer Canaan W. of Jordan, along with them: Numbers 32:17; Numbers 32:21; Numbers 32:32; Joshua 1:14; Joshua 4:12), he executed the justice of Jehovah (Moses prophetically foresees Gad will do what Jehovah required of His people as righteousness) and His judgments (in fellowship) with (the rest of) Israel." (See DIBON.)
Their prowess is vividly portrayed in 1 Chronicles 12:8, "men of might and of war, fit, for the battle, that could handle shield and buckler, whose faces were the faces of lions, and as swift as the roes upon the mountains"; "one of the least was a match for a hundred, and the greatest for a thousand." In spite of the Jordan's overflow in the first month, and of the opposition of "all them of the valleys toward the E. and toward the W.," they joined David at Ziklag. Their war, in concert with Reuben, against the Hagarites, with Jetur, Nephish, and Nodab, resulted in the defeat and utter spoiling of the Hagarites, and the dispossessing them of "their steads."
"The war was of God," and the victory was because the Gadites, etc., "cried to God in the battle and He was entreated of then, because they put their trust in Him" (1 Chronicles 5:18-22). Other famous men of Gilead or Gad were the loyal, generous, and unambitious Barzillai (2 Samuel 17:27-29; 2 Samuel 19:31-40) and the prophet Elijah. The land of Gad was the battlefield for long between Syria and Israel (2 Kings 10:33). Gad finally was carried captive by Tiglath Pileser, and Ammon seized their land and cities (2 Kings 15:29; 1 Chronicles 5:26; Jeremiah 49:1).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Gad (3)
Margin Isaiah 65:11, "that troop," rather "that prepare a (sacrificial) table for the Gad," i.e. the deity of fortune, a Babylonian idol worshipped by the Jews, answering to either the moon or Jupiter, related to Syriac gado , and Arab jad "good fortune." The star of luck, for which a couch was laid out and a banqueting "table." Μeni ("that number," margin Isaiah 65:11) was the lesser good fortune, Gad the greater.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Gad (2)
The "seer" of king David (1 Chronicles 29:29). "The acts of David" were recorded "in the book of Gad the seer." He joined David while in "the hold," having probably first become acquainted with David in the latter's visits to Samuel and the schools of the prophets, and by his advice David left it for the forest of Hareth (1 Samuel 22:5). At the numbering of the people Gad was Jehovah's monitor to David (2 Samuel 24:11-19; 1 Chronicles 21:9). He also took part in arranging the musical services of the temple (2 Chronicles 29:25). Jerome compares Gad to Elijah in the abruptness of his introduction; this concentrates all attention on his work and message, none on himself.
King James Dictionary - Gad
GAD, n.
1. A wedge or ingot of steel. 2. A style or graver. 3. A punch of iron with a wooden handle, used by miners. GAD,
1. To walk about to rove or ramble idly or without any fixed purpose. Give the water no passage, neither a wicked woman liberty to gad abroad.
2. To ramble in growth as the gadding vine.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Dibon-Gad
Great understanding; abundance of sons
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gad, the Prophet
He was with David when he fled from Saul, and gave him counsel. 1 Samuel 22:5 . Whether he continued with David during his rejection is not recorded. He was with him at the close of his reign, and to him was given the painful duty of announcing God's judgements upon David for numbering the people. He is called David's 'seer,' which would seem to imply that he had been with him all along. 2 Samuel 24:11-19 ; 1 Chronicles 21:9-19 ; 2 Chronicles 29:25 . The acts of David were written in "THE BOOK OF GAD the seer," of which there is no further record, and which has not been handed down. 1 Chronicles 29:29 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gad, River of
This occurs only in 2 Samuel 24:5 ; 'valley of Gad' in the margin . Identified with Wady Mojib, the same as the ARNON that runs into the Dead Sea about midway north and south.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Gad
Gad (găd), good fortune (?) 1. The seventh son of Jacob, and the first-born of Zilpah, Leah's handmaid. Genesis 30:11. 2. A prophet and particular friend of David, the history of whose reign he wrote. 1 Chronicles 29:29. He came to David when the latter was in the cave of Adullam. 1 Samuel 22:5. He then began his career of counsellor, under divine direction, which eventually won him the title of "the king's Beer," 2 Samuel 24:11; 2 Samuel 24:13; 1 Chronicles 21:9. In Hezekiah's day he was remembered. 2 Chronicles 29:25.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Gad (2)
Gad, the Tribe of. The territory given to the tribe of Gad lay east of the Jordan, north of that allotted to Reuben, and south of that given to Manasseh on that side of the river. It extended from the Jordan eastward to Aroer, Joshua 13:24-25, including half of Mount Gilead and half of Ammon. Deuteronomy 3:12; Joshua 13:24-25. For physical features and history see Gilead. Its chief cities were Ramoth-gilead, Mahanaim, Heshbon, and Aroer. This tribe, in the wilderness, was placed with Simeon and Reuben on the south of the tabernacle; with Reuben and the half of Manasseh, it occupied the pasture grounds on the east of the Jordan. It was warlike, as is graphically stated. 1 Chronicles 12:8. Two famous men came from Gad—Barzillai, 2 Samuel 17:27, and Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1. The territory was the battle field for wars between Syria and Israel. 2 Kings 10:33.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Migdal-Gad
A city of Judah. (Joshua 15:37)
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Gad
This was another of the heathen idols, and as we learn from the book of Joshua, (Joshua 11:17) was set up in the valley of Lebanon.. Gad means fortune; so that Baal-gad means a lord of fortune.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Gad
was the name of the son of Jacob and Zilpah, Leah's servant, Genesis 30:9-11 . Leah, Jacob's wife, gave him also Zilpah, that by her she might have children. Zilpah brought a son, whom Leah called Gad, saying, "A troop cometh." Gad had seven sons, Ziphion, Haggi, Shuni, Ezbon, Eri, Arodi, and Areli, Genesis 46:16 . Jacob, blessing Gad, said, "A troop shall overcome him, but he shall overcome at the last,"
Genesis 49:19 ; and Moses, in his last song, mentions Gad as "a lion which teareth the arm with the crown of the head," &c, Deuteronomy 33:20-21 . The tribe of Gad came out of Egypt in number forty-five thousand six hundred and fifty. After the defeat of the kings Og and Sihon, Gad and Reuben desired to have their lot in the conquered country, and alleged their great number of cattle. Moses granted their request, on condition that they would accompany their brethren, and assist in the conquest of the land beyond Jordan. Gad had his inheritance between Reuben south, and Manasseh north, with the mountains of Gilead east, and Jordan west.
2. GAD, a prophet, David's friend, who followed him when persecuted by Saul. The Scripture calls him a prophet and David's seer, 2 Samuel 24:11 . The first time we find him with this prince is when he fled into the land of Moab, 1 Samuel 22:5 , to secure his father and mother in the first year of Saul's persecution. The Prophet Gad warned him to return into the land of Judah. After David had determined to number his people, the Lord sent to him the Prophet Gad, to offer him his choice of three scourges: seven years' famine, or three months' flight before his enemies, or three days' pestilence. Gad also directed David to erect an altar to the Lord, in the threshing floor of Ornan or Araunah, the Jebusite, 2 Samuel 24:13-19 ; and he wrote a history of David's life, cited in 1 Chronicles 29:29 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Baal-Gad'
A city in the valley of Lebanon at the foot of Hermon; the northernmost point, to which the wars of Joshua reached, Joshua 11:17 ; 12:7 ; 13:5 . It was perhaps the same as Baal-Hermon. Some have supposed it was Baalbek; but this lay further north.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Gad
BAAL-GAD (? ‘Baal of fortune’). A place under Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon, referred to only as the northern limit of the country conquered by Joshua ( Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 ). Various identifications have been suggested, all uncertain. Perhaps Banias is the most probable. See Cæsarea Philippi.
R. A. S. Macalister.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Gad
Prosperity, fortune,
1. Son of Jacob and Zilpah, Leah's servant, Genesis 30:11 . Leah called him Gad, and said, "A troop cometh." Compare Genesis 49:19 ; but many Hebrew scholars prefer the rendering, good fortune or prosperity cometh. The tribe of Gad came out of Egypt in number forty-five thousand six hundred and fifty, Genesis 46:16 Numbers 1:24 . After the defeat of the kings Og and Sihon, Gad and Reuben desired to have their allotment east of Jordan, alleging their great number of cattle. Moses granted their request, on condition that they should accompany their brethren, and assist in conquering the land west of Jordan, Numbers 32:1-42 . The inheritance of the tribe of Gad lay between Manesseh on the north, Reuben on the south, the Jordan on the west, and the Ammonites on the east. The northwest point stretched to the Sea of Galilee. It was a fine pastoral region, though its exposure to the incursion of eastern Arabians compelled the Gadites to be well armed and on the alert, Genesis 49:19 Deuteronomy 33:20 1 Chronicles 5:18-22,25,26 12:8 . The principal cities of Gad are called cities of Gilead, Joshua 13:25 .
2. David's friend, who followed him when persecuted by Saul, and was often sent with a divine message to David, 1 Samuel 22:5 2 Samuel 24:11-19 1 Chronicles 21:9-19 2 Chronicles 29:25 . Scriptures styles him a prophet, and David's seer. He appears to have written a history of David's life;
which is cited in 1 Chronicles 29:29 .
3. Rendered "troops" in Isaiah 65:11 , but generally supposed to be the name of a heathen god of fortune; and perhaps of the planet Jupiter, the star of good fortune. Compare Joshua 11:17 15:37 . MENI in the same verse, translated "number," is supposed by some to mean destiny; by others, the planet Benus, and the goddess of good fortune.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Gad
(a troop ).
Jacob's seventh son, the first-born of Zilpah, Leah's maid, and whole-brother to Asher. (Genesis 30;11-13 ; 46:16,18 ) (B.C. 1753-1740.)
"The seer," or "the king's seer," i.e. David's (1 Chronicles 29:29 ; 2 Chronicles 29:25 ) was a "prophet" who appears to have joined David when in the old. (1 Samuel 22:5 ) (B.C. 1061.) He reappears in connection with the punishment inflicted for the numbering of the people. (2 Samuel 24:11-19 ; 1 Chronicles 21:9-19 ) He wrote a book of the Acts of David, (1 Chronicles 29:29 ) and also assisted in the arrangements for the musical service of the "house of God." (2 Chronicles 29:25 )
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Mig'Dal-Gad
(tower of Gad ), a city of Judah, ( Joshua 15:37 ) in the district of the Shefelah, or maritime lowland.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Gad, the Tribe of
The country allotted to the tribe of Gad appears, speaking roughly, to have lain chiefly about the centre of the land east of Jordan. The sought of that district --from the Arnon (Wady Mojeb ), about halfway down the Dead Sea, to Heshbon, nearly due east of Jerusalem --was occupied by Reuben, and at or about Heshbon the possessions of Gad commenced. They embraced half Gilead, (3:12) or half the land of the children of Ammon, ( Joshua 13:25 ) probably the mountainous district which is intersected by the torrent Jabbok, including, as its most northern town, the ancient sanctuary of Mahanaim. On the east the furthest landmark given is "Aroer that is before Rabbah," the present Amman . ( Joshua 13:25 ) West was the Jordan. ver. (Joshua 13:27 ) The character of the tribe is throughout strongly marked --fierce and warlike.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Gad
A Canaanite sanctuary of Baal, as "the lord of fortune." The N.W. limit of Joshua's victories, as Hamath was the N.E. limit (Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 13:5). "Under mount Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon," still retaining the Hebrew name for "the valley," 'el buka , between Lebanon and Antilebanon. Probably now Banias, at the fountain which is one of the Jordan's sources, formerly a sanctuary of Pan. Baalbek ("the city of the sun") is situated too far N. at the lowest declivity of Antilibanus to be identified with Baal.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Gad
Only nine and a half of Israel’s twelve tribes settled in the area commonly known as Canaan (i.e. the land west of the Jordan River). The other two and a half tribes settled in the area east of Jordan. In this eastern area half of the tribe of Manasseh was in the north, the tribe of Gad in the centre and the tribe of Reuben in the south (Numbers 32:1-5; Numbers 32:33; Joshua 13:8-33). (For the settlement of the two and a half eastern tribes see REUBEN.)
Although the tribe was known as Gad (after the son of Jacob who fathered it; Genesis 30:9-11), the area where it dwelt was commonly known as Gilead. Sometimes the names Gad and Gilead were used interchangeably (Joshua 13:24-25; Judges 5:17; Judges 11:5; Judges 12:4; 1 Samuel 13:7). (For the physical features of the region see GILEAD.)
Gad, like the other eastern tribes, was more open to attack than the western tribes, but the men of Gad were fierce fighters who drove back the invaders (Genesis 49:19). They could not, however, withstand invasions for ever, and when Israel was later destroyed by Assyria, they were among the first Israelites to go into captivity (2 Kings 10:32-33; 2 Kings 15:29).

Sentence search

Gadite - (gad' ite) Member of tribe of Gad. See Gad
Baal-Gad - (bay' uhl-gad) Place name meaning, “Baal of Gad” or “lord of Gad
Meni - A deity named with Gad in Isaiah 65:11 : ‘Ye that … prepare a table for Gad, and that fill up mingled wine for Meni. ’ Gad is Fortune , and Meni Destiny . See Gad
Gad - Zilpah brought a son, whom Leah called Gad, saying, "A troop cometh. " Gad had seven sons, Ziphion, Haggi, Shuni, Ezbon, Eri, Arodi, and Areli, Genesis 46:16 . Jacob, blessing Gad, said, "A troop shall overcome him, but he shall overcome at the last,"...
Genesis 49:19 ; and Moses, in his last song, mentions Gad as "a lion which teareth the arm with the crown of the head," &c, Deuteronomy 33:20-21 . The tribe of Gad came out of Egypt in number forty-five thousand six hundred and fifty. After the defeat of the kings Og and Sihon, Gad and Reuben desired to have their lot in the conquered country, and alleged their great number of cattle. Gad had his inheritance between Reuben south, and Manasseh north, with the mountains of Gilead east, and Jordan west. Gad, a prophet, David's friend, who followed him when persecuted by Saul. The Prophet Gad warned him to return into the land of Judah. After David had determined to number his people, the Lord sent to him the Prophet Gad, to offer him his choice of three scourges: seven years' famine, or three months' flight before his enemies, or three days' pestilence. Gad also directed David to erect an altar to the Lord, in the threshing floor of Ornan or Araunah, the Jebusite, 2 Samuel 24:13-19 ; and he wrote a history of David's life, cited in 1 Chronicles 29:29
Gad - Gad, n. Gad, ...
1. Give the water no passage, neither a wicked woman liberty to Gad abroad. To ramble in growth as the Gadding vine
Gad - (gad) Personal name meaning, “good fortune. The seventh son of Jacob and the progenitor of the tribe of Gad (Genesis 30:9-11 ). At the conclusion of the period of wilderness wandering, when the Israelites were preparing to occupy Canaan, the tribe of Gad requested permission, along with the tribe of Reuben and half the tribe of Manasseh, to settle east of the Jordan. This territory became known as Gad (Jeremiah 49:1 ). Though the exact limits of Gad's tribal territory are difficult to determine, the Gadites generally occupied land to the northeast of the Dead Sea (Joshua 13:24-28 ). Syrian god known from inscriptions from Phoenicia and Palmyra and used in biblical names such as Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 ) and Migdal-gad (Joshua 15:37 ). It also apparently is meant in Isaiah 65:11 where the prophet condemned the people for setting “a table for Fortune” (NAS; Hebrew, Gad ). Gad also brought David God's orders to build an altar, apparently on the site of the future Temple (2 Samuel 24:18-19 ). The Chronicler pointed his readers to records of David's reign by Gad (1 Chronicles 29:29 ) and of Gad's assistance in showing David God's plan for Temple worship (2 Chronicles 29:25 )
Migdal-Gad - (mihg' dal-gad) Place name meaning, “Tower of Gad
Baal-Gad - Gad means fortune; so that Baal-gad means a lord of fortune
Gadites - GadITES . See Gad (tribe)
Addish - ) Disposed to Gad
Fortune - See Gad (tribe and god)
Troop - See Gad 3
Number - See Gad 3
Baal Hermon - ") The mountain had three names (Deuteronomy 3:9); Baal Hermon was probably one used among the Phoenician worshippers of Baal, whose sanctuary Baal Gad was at the base of the mountain. (See BAAL Gad
at'Roth - (crowns ), a city of Gad
Hor-Hagidgad - (hawr-huh gihd' Gad) KJV spelling of Hor-Haggidgad
Nimrah - City in Gad
Ziph'Ion, - son of Gad (Genesis 46:18 ) elsewhere called Zephon
Gad'Ites, the, - the descendants of Gad, and members of his tribe
Adsman - ) One who uses a Gad or goad in driving
Jachan - Head of a family of Gad
Betonim - Town in Gad, east of the Jordan
Zia - Head of a family in Gad
Jorai - Head of a family of Gad
Jahdo - Son of Buz, a descendant of Gad
Jaroah - Son of Gilead, a descendant of Gad
Shapham - A chief of the tribe of Gad
Migdal-Gad - MIGDAL-GAD. The name ‘Tower of Gad’ probably points to its having been a seat of idolatry, where the Canaanites worshipped Gad ‘Good Luck’ or ‘Fortune
Areli, Arelites - Son of Gad, and his descendants
Huri - Son of Jaroah of the tribe of Gad
Jaanai - A chief man of the tribe of Gad
Arod, Arodi, Arodites - Son of Gad, and his descendants
Jeshishai - Son of Jahdo, of the tribe of Gad
Eri , Erites - Son of Gad, and his descendants
Abdiel - Son of Guni, of the family of Gad
Bet'Onim - a town of Gad, apparently on the northern boundary
Gad - Gad (‘fortunate’). Another semi-etymology or, better, paronomasia ( Genesis 49:19 ) connects the name of the tribe with its warlike experiences and characteristics, taking note only of this feature of the tribal life:...
gâdh gedhûdh yeghûdhennu...
wehû’ yâghûdh ’âqçbh:...
‘As for Gad, plunderers shall plunder him,...
And he shall plunder in the rear’ ( i. ...
In the Blessing of Moses (Deuteronomy 33:20 ) Gad is compared to a lioness that teareth the arm and the crown of the head, and later ( 1 Chronicles 12:8 ; 1 Chronicles 12:14 ) the Gadites who joined David are described as leonine in appearance and incomparable in combat: ‘Their faces are as the faces of lions, the smallest is equal to a hundred and the greatest to a thousand. ’...
Upon the genetic relations of Gad and Asher the genealogy throws no light, for the fact that Gad and Asher, as it appears, were names of related divinities of Good Fortune would be sufficient ground for uniting them; but why they should have been brought together under the name of Zilpah is not to be conjectured with any certainty. ...
It appears that Gad, notwithstanding the genealogy, was a late tribe. ) knows the inhabitants of Gilead as the ‘men of Gad. ’...
The families of Gad are given by P [2] ) gives eight towns lying within the territory of Gad. 10), and the ‘men of Gad’ are there said to have dwelt within it ‘from of old. Reuben has all to the south of Heshbon, and Gad all to the north of it. ...
The reason assigned by the traditions for the settlement of Gad and Reuben in Gilead is that they were pastoral tribes, with large herds and flocks, and that they found the land pre-eminently adapted to their needs. In David’s conflicts with Saul, the Gadites and other eastern tribes came to his assistance. As the Mesha stone shows, they had probably at that time absorbed the Reubenites, who had been more exposed previously to Moabite attacks, which at this time fell more directly upon Gad. When the northern tribes revolted, Jeroboam must have found the Gadites among his staunchest supporters, for it was to Penuel in Gadite territory that he moved the capital from Shechem in Ephraim (1 Kings 12:25 ). ...
In 734 the Gadites with their kinsmen of the East Jordan, Galilee and Naphtali, were carried captive by Tiglath-pileser iii. It was fatal for Gad. ...
Gad . A god whose name appears in Genesis 30:11 (‘by the help of Gad’; so in Genesis 30:13 ‘by the help of Asherah’); in the place-names Baal-gad, and Migdal-gad ( Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 ; Joshua 15:37 ); and in the personal name Azgad ( Ezra 2:12 , Nehemiah 7:17 ; Nehemiah 10:15 ). In Isaiah 65:11 Gad (RV
Gad is entitled ‘the seer’ ( 1 Chronicles 29:29 ), ‘David’s’ or ‘the king’s seer’ ( 1 Chronicles 21:9 , 2 Chronicles 29:25 , 2 Samuel 24:11 ), or ‘the prophet’ ( 1 Samuel 22:5 , 2 Samuel 24:11 ), He is represented as having announced the Divine condemnation on the royal census, and as having advised the erection of an altar on Araunah’s threshing-floor ( 2 Samuel 24:11 ff. ’...
Gad (Valley of). Mentioned only in 2 Samuel 24:5 , and there the text should read ‘in the midst of the valley towards Gad,’ the valley ( wady ) here being the Arnon (wh
Azgad - (az' Gad) Personal name meaning, “Gad is strong
Betonim - boundary of Gad (Joshua 13:26)
Gadites - Members of the tribe of Gad
Jaro'ah - (moon ), a chief man of the tribe of Gad ( 1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Shuni - A son of Gad ( Genesis 46:16 , Numbers 26:15 (24) [1])
Zilpah - Drooping, Leah's handmaid, and the mother of Gad and Asher (Genesis 30:9-13 )
Zephon - Son of Gad, from whom sprung the Zephonites (Numbers 26:15)
Haggi - Son of Gad and founder of the Haggites
Zephon, Zephonites - Son of Gad and his descendants
Zilpah - One of Jacob's two concubines, she was mother of Gad and Asher
ja'Chan - (affliction ), one of seven chief men of the tribe of Gad
ja'Ana-i - (whom Jehovah answers ), a chief man in the tribe of Gad
e'ri - (watchful ), son of Gad, ( Genesis 46:16 ) and ancestor of the Erites
Gad - In this eastern area half of the tribe of Manasseh was in the north, the tribe of Gad in the centre and the tribe of Reuben in the south (Numbers 32:1-5; Numbers 32:33; Joshua 13:8-33). )...
Although the tribe was known as Gad (after the son of Jacob who fathered it; Genesis 30:9-11), the area where it dwelt was commonly known as Gilead. Sometimes the names Gad and Gilead were used interchangeably (Joshua 13:24-25; Judges 5:17; Judges 11:5; Judges 12:4; 1 Samuel 13:7). )...
Gad, like the other eastern tribes, was more open to attack than the western tribes, but the men of Gad were fierce fighters who drove back the invaders (Genesis 49:19)
Shapham - Leader of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:12 )
Jacan - A member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Machbanai - (mk' buh nee) Military captain of tribe of Gad who served David (1 Chronicles 12:13 )
Adling - ) See Gad, n. ) Gadding about
Areli - A son of Gad ( Genesis 46:16 , Numbers 26:17 )
a'Rod - (a wild ass ), a son of Gad, ( Numbers 26:17 ) called ARODI in (Genesis 46:16 )
Gad (1) - In Genesis 49:19 translated "Gad, troops shall troop upon him (Gad , gedud ye -guddenu ), but he shall troop upon (yagud ) their rear" in retreat; alluding to the Arab tumultuous tribes near, who would invade Gad, then retire, Gad pressing on them in retreat. In Numbers 2:10; Numbers 2:14, we find Gad united to Reuben on the S. Companionship in arms and hardships in the wilderness naturally led them to desire neighborhood in their possessions; also similarity of pursuits in tending flocks and herds led Gad to alliance with Reuben. ...
And their respective numbers were nearly the same; at the first census, Gad 45,650, Reuben 46,500; at the last, Gad 40,500, and Reuben 43,330. "...
Gad's allotment lay chiefly about the center of the land E. , of Gad. Mahanaim the ancient sanctuary was on Gad's northern border; Heshbon lay somewhat S. From western Palestine the territory of Gad looks like a wall of purple mountain with a marked horizontal outline. In the official record in the days of Jotham king of Judah, and Jeroboam king of Israel, Gad had extended its possessions to Salcah in Bashan (1 Chronicles 5:11; 1 Chronicles 5:16-17), E. Thus Gad and Gilead became synonymous (Judges 5:17). ...
Jephthah is called "the Gileadite," being a native of Mizpeh of Gad (Judges 11:31; Judges 11:34; Joshua 13:26). In Deuteronomy 33:20-21, Moses said of Gad, "Blessed is He that enlargeth (i. God who gives a large territory to) Gad; he lieth down as a lioness, and teareth the arm, yea (aph , not with) the crown of the head (of his foes); and he provided the first part (the first-fruit portion of the land conquered by Israel) for himself, because there was the leader's (Gad's) portion reserved (saphun ), Gad at the head of the tribes asked Moses for the conquered land E. of Jordan, along with them: Numbers 32:17; Numbers 32:21; Numbers 32:32; Joshua 1:14; Joshua 4:12), he executed the justice of Jehovah (Moses prophetically foresees Gad will do what Jehovah required of His people as righteousness) and His judgments (in fellowship) with (the rest of) Israel. "...
"The war was of God," and the victory was because the Gadites, etc. Other famous men of Gilead or Gad were the loyal, generous, and unambitious Barzillai (2 Samuel 17:27-29; 2 Samuel 19:31-40) and the prophet Elijah. The land of Gad was the battlefield for long between Syria and Israel (2 Kings 10:33). Gad finally was carried captive by Tiglath Pileser, and Ammon seized their land and cities (2 Kings 15:29; 1 Chronicles 5:26; Jeremiah 49:1)
Gad - The first is one of Jacob's sons, which he had by Zilpah, Leah's handmaid, (Genesis 30:11) and she called his name Gad, which signifies armed; and, therefore, in the margin of our Bibles it is marked a troop, or company. The second Gad we meet with, is the prophet Gad, David's seer. (See 2 Samuel 24:10-19) We read also, that Gad compiled a history of the acts of David. (See 1 Chronicles 29:29-30) The third mention of Gad is as an idol. There was a Baal-Gad in the valley of Lebanon. (Joshua 11:17) And the prophet Isaiah speaks of some "who prepared a table for that troop" [1] "and that furnished a drink offering for that number. " [2] (Isaiah 65:11) The dying patriarch Jacob blessing his sons, made a memorable prophecy concerning Gad: "A troop" (said Jacob) "shall overcome him, but he shall overcome at the last. For the Gadites were a numerous tribe, and a warlike tribe
Gad (2) - "The acts of David" were recorded "in the book of Gad the seer. At the numbering of the people Gad was Jehovah's monitor to David (2 Samuel 24:11-19; 1 Chronicles 21:9). Jerome compares Gad to Elijah in the abruptness of his introduction; this concentrates all attention on his work and message, none on himself
Jahdo - ” A member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Gadara - (gad' uh ruh) Place name for home of Gadarenes used in TEV (Matthew 8:28 ). See Gadarenes
Arod - A son of Gad ( Numbers 26:17 ) = Arodi Genesis 46:16
Jeshishai - ” Member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Zaphon - City in Gad
za'Phon - (north ), a place mentioned in the enumeration of the allotment of the tribe of Gad
Gad (3) - Margin Isaiah 65:11, "that troop," rather "that prepare a (sacrificial) table for the Gad," i. the deity of fortune, a Babylonian idol worshipped by the Jews, answering to either the moon or Jupiter, related to Syriac Gado , and Arab jad "good fortune. " Μeni ("that number," margin Isaiah 65:11) was the lesser good fortune, Gad the greater
Dibon - DIMON, Isaiah 15:9 , and DI-BON-GAD, Numbers 33:45,46 , a town of Gad, Numbers 32:34 , but afterwards of Reuben, Joshua 13:17
Janai - ” Member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:12 )
Zia - ” Head of a family of the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Are'li - (heroic ), a son of Gad
Mig'Dal-Gad - (tower of Gad ), a city of Judah, ( Joshua 15:37 ) in the district of the Shefelah, or maritime lowland
Jogbehah - City of Gad
Jaroah - ” Member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Shu'ni - (fortunate ), son of Gad, and founder of the family of the Shunites
Shuni - Son of Gad and head of a clan in that tribe (Genesis 46:16 )
Areli - (uh ree' li) ARELITES Son of Gad (Genesis 46:16 ) and original ancestor of clan of Arelites (Numbers 26:17 )
Dibon -
A city in Moab (Numbers 21:30 ); called also Dibon-gad (33:45), because it was built by Gad and Dimon (Isaiah 15:9 )
Dibon - City on the east of the Jordan in Moab, afterwards possessed by Gad; but near the time of the captivity it was again seized by Moab. Also called DIBON-GAD in Numbers 33:45,46
Machi - Spy of tribe of Gad who explored Promised Land
oz'ni - (hearing ), one of the sons of Gad ( Numbers 26:16 ) and founder of the family of the Oznites
Dibon - (di' bahn) or DIBON-GAD (di' bahn-gad) Place name possibly meaning, “pining away” or “fence of tubes. Gad and Reuben asked for it as their tribal territory (Numbers 32:3 ). Gad took control and fortified Dibon (Numbers 32:34 ). It thus became known as Dibon-gad and was one of Israel's camping spots east of the Jordan (Numbers 33:45-46 )
Shebam - of Jordan, assigned to Reuben and Gad (Numbers 32:3)
Migdal Gad - An old sanctuary, probably of Gad, the god of fortune; in the shephelah or "low-rolling hills" of Judah (Joshua 15:37)
Abdiel - ” His son Ahi was a leader in the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:15 )
Haggi - Son of Gad, Genesis 46:16 , Numbers 26:16 (P Ahi - Son of Abdiel, a descendant of Gad
ze'Phon - (watch ), the son of Gad, ( Numbers 26:15 ) and ancestor of the family of the Zephonites
Nimrah - A city of Gad and Reuben
Zilpah - The maid of Leah, who became the secondary wife of Jacob, and the mother of Gad and Asher, Genesis 29:24 ; 30:9-13
Jogbehah - of Jordan, fortified by Gad (Numbers 32:25). , formed the second group of Gadite settlements. Chemosh Gad ("he whose good fortune is Chemosh") the father of Mesha was a Dibonite. The third Gadite settlement lay in the Jordan valley, W
Geuel - ” Spy from tribe of Gad Moses sent to inspect the land before conquering it (Numbers 13:15 )
Sho'Phan - (bareness ), one of the fortified towns on the east of Jordan which were taken possession of and rebuilt by the tribe of Gad
Baalhermon - Town or mount in connection with Mount Hermon: there was probably a shrine of Baal there: see BAAL-GAD
Nodab - An Arab tribe warred with by Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh (1 Chronicles 5:19-22)
Atroth-Shophan - (at' rahth-sshoh' fan) Town built by tribe of Gad of unknown location (Numbers 32:35 )
Atroth - City of Gad, Deuel - Father of Eliasaph, prince of Gad ( Numbers 1:14 ; Numbers 7:42 ; Numbers 7:47 ; Numbers 10:20 ) = Reuel , Numbers 2:14 (perhaps the original name)
Gad (2) - Gad, the Tribe of. The territory given to the tribe of Gad lay east of the Jordan, north of that allotted to Reuben, and south of that given to Manasseh on that side of the river. Two famous men came from Gad—Barzillai, 2 Samuel 17:27, and Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1
Huri - A member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Jorai - ” Member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Zilpah - Handmaid of Leah, by whom Jacob became father of Gad and Asher
Mach-Bana-i - (bond of the Lord ), one of the lion-faced warriors of Gad, who joined the fortunes of David when living in retreat at Ziklag
Gaddiel - (gad' dih uhl) Personal name meaning, “God is my good fortune
Gaddi - (gad' di) Personal name meaning, “my good fortune
Shophan - of Jordan, rebuilt by Gad (Numbers 32:35)
al'Mon-Diblatha'im - (concealing the two cakes ), one of the latest stations of the Israelites between Dibon-gad and the mountains of Abarim ( Numbers 33:46,47 ) It is probably identical with Beth-diblathaim
Jog'Behah - (lofty ), one of the cities on the east of Jordan which were built and fortified by the tribe of Gad when they took possession of their territory
Zaphon - of Jordan, assigned to Gad ( Joshua 13:27 ). with gentilic name Zephonites ( Numbers 26:13 ), described as a ‘son’ of Gad
Meni - The goddess Fortune, Septuagint, answering to the planet Venus, "the lesser good fortune"; the planet Jupiter being the greater, and answering to Gad. Knobel identifies Gad with the sun, Meni with the moon, men, mene in Greek; "the queen of heaven" (Jeremiah 7:18; Jeremiah 44:17-18)
Ataroth - Town desired and built up by tribe of Gad (Numbers 32:3 ,Numbers 32:3,32:34 ). claims he captured Ataroth but admits it belonged to Gad “from of old” and had been built by an Israelite king
Eri - ” A son of Gad and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:16 )
Ahi - Member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:15 ), who lived in Gilead
gu'ni - (Numbers 26:48 ) ...
A descendant of Gad
ez'Bon -
Son of Gad, and founder of one of the Gadite families
Atroth - ) City of Gad, named between Aroer and Jaazer
Kedemoth - It lay not far north-east of Dibon-gad, east of the Dead Sea
Guni - Father of Abdiel, a chief man of Gad
Bethnimrah - City of Gad, on the east of the Jordan, Numbers 32:36 ; Joshua 13:27 : it is called NIMRAH in Numbers 32:3
Zilpah - Leah's handmaid, given by Laban (Genesis 29:24) and by Leah to Jacob, who by her begat Gad and Asher (Genesis 30:9-13; Genesis 35:26; Genesis 37:2; Genesis 46:18)
ha'Reth - (thicket ) , The forest of, in which David took refuge, after at the instigation of the prophet Gad, he had quitted the "hold" or fastness of the cave of Adullam
Haggi - Son of Gad and grandson of Jacob and thus original ancestor of clan of Haggites (Genesis 46:16 ; Numbers 26:15 )
Naphish - Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh made war with Naphish's tribe and were conquerors
Arod - ”...
Arodi (Genesis 46:16 ) or Arod (Numbers 26:17 ) was son of Gad and grandson of Jacob
Gad, River of - This occurs only in 2 Samuel 24:5 ; 'valley of Gad' in the margin
Gad - Leah called him Gad, and said, "A troop cometh. The tribe of Gad came out of Egypt in number forty-five thousand six hundred and fifty, Genesis 46:16 Numbers 1:24 . After the defeat of the kings Og and Sihon, Gad and Reuben desired to have their allotment east of Jordan, alleging their great number of cattle. The inheritance of the tribe of Gad lay between Manesseh on the north, Reuben on the south, the Jordan on the west, and the Ammonites on the east. It was a fine pastoral region, though its exposure to the incursion of eastern Arabians compelled the Gadites to be well armed and on the alert, Genesis 49:19 Deuteronomy 33:20 1 Chronicles 5:18-22,25,26 12:8 . The principal cities of Gad are called cities of Gilead, Joshua 13:25
Zephon - ” Eldest son of Gad and ancestor of the Zephonites (Numbers 26:15 )
Salcah, Salchah - City and district on the border of Bashan allotted to Gad
Almondiblathaim - The one after Dibon-gad, which has been identified with Dhiban in the north border of Moab, 31 30' N, 35 48' E
Beth-Nimrah - Numbers 32:3,36 ; Joshua 13:27 , and Nimrim, Isaiah 15:6 ; Jeremiah 48:34 ; a town in Gad, a little east of the Jordan, on a watercourse leading, from near Ramoth-Gilead, southwest into that river
Atroth-Shophan - of Jordan, near Aroer and Jazer, fortified by Gad ( Numbers 32:35 )
Betonim - ” A border town in tribal allotment of Gad (Joshua 13:26 )
Betharam - A city of Gad, east of the Jordan, between Succoth and Debir
Guni - Member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:15 )
Shophan - Hidden, or hollow, a town east of Jordan (Numbers 32:35 ), built by the children of Gad
Mahanaim - ' It is mentioned as on the border of both Gad and Manasseh, which connects it with the brook Jabbok. It fell to the lot of Gad, and a city was built there which was given to the Levites. Identified by some with ruins at Mahneh, 32 23' N, 35 42' E ; but this is far from the Jabbok, and could scarcely have been in the lot of Gad
Dibon - It was built by Gad, Numbers 32:34, and hence called Dibon-gad; was assigned to Reuben, Joshua 13:9; Joshua 13:17; was also called Dimon
Beth-Haran - ” Town east of the Jordan the tribe of Gad strengthened after Moses gave it to them (Numbers 32:36 )
Eliasaph - Son of Deuel, or Reuel: a chief man of the tribe of Gad
Buz - A member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Deuel - Father of Eliasaph, 'prince' of Gad
Beth'-Aram - (house of the height ), accurately BETH-HARAM, one of the towns of Gad on the east of Jordan, described as in "the valley," ( Joshua 13:27 ) and no doubt the same place as that named BETH-HARAN in (Numbers 32:36 )
Gad - Very little is recorded of Gad, except that he had seven sons. Jacob in blessing his sons said of Gad, "A troop shall overcome him: but he shall overcome at the last. Moses said, "Blessed be he that enlargeth Gad: he dwelleth as a lion, and teareth the arm with [1] the crown of the head. ...
Gad possessed a large district from a little above the north corner of the Dead Sea to near the south corner of the Sea of Galilee, then a very fertile plain suitable for their flocks and herds, including the highlands of Gilead. 740; and the Ammonites took possession of the territory of Gad
Hor-Haggidgad - (hawr-huhg gihd' Gad) Place name perhaps meaning, “hill of crickets
Buz - ...
...
One of the chiefs of the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Zil'Pah - She was the mother of Gad and Asher
Og - After which his country was given to the tribe of Reuben, Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh, Numbers 21:33
Baal-Hermon - Probably identical with Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 )
Coriander - The Gad , Phoenician, goid
Jazer - Or JAAZER, Numbers 21:32 , a city of the Amorites, in Gilead; afterwards a Levitical city in Gad
Nodab - ” Tribe conquered by Reuben, Gad, and the half-tribe of Manasseh (1 Chronicles 5:18 )
Eliasaph - The leader of the tribe of Gad under Moses (Numbers 1:14 )
Baal-Hamon - It has been supposed to be identical with Baal-gad, and also with Hammon in the tribe of Asher (Joshua 19:28 )
Naphish - The tribe dwelt in Transjordan before being displaced by Reuben, Gad, and the half-tribe of Manasseh (1 Chronicles 5:19 )
Coriander Seed - CORIANDER SEED ( Gad , Exodus 16:31 , Numbers 11:7 )
Eliasaph - Son of Deuel, and prince of Gad at the first census ( Numbers 1:14 ; Numbers 2:14 ; Numbers 7:42 ; Numbers 7:47 ; Numbers 10:20 P Zilpah - ” Leah's maid (Genesis 29:24 ; Genesis 46:18 ), given to Jacob as a concubine (Genesis 30:9 ; Genesis 37:2 ); mother of Gad and Asher who were regarded as Leah's sons (Genesis 30:10 ,Genesis 30:10,30:12 ; Genesis 35:26 )
Jogbehah - A town of Gad in Gilead ( Numbers 32:35 ), named also in connexion with Gideon’s pursuit of the Midianites ( Judges 8:11 )
Heshbon - It was probably made over to Gad, since we meet with it among the cities which were given to the Levites, Joshua 21:39
Elealeh - A town of the Moabite plateau, conquered by Gad and Reuben, and rebuilt by the latter tribe
Beth-Haram - A city Moses allotted the tribe of Gad (Joshua 13:27 )
She'Bam - (fragrance ), one of the towns in the pastoral district on the east of Jordan; demanded by and finally ceded to the tribes of Reuben and Gad
Sebam - ” Town east of the Jordan the tribes of Reuben and Gad wanted to settle after God conquered it for them (Numbers 32:3 )
de'Uel, - (invocation of God ), father of Eliasaph, the "captain" of the tribe of Gad at the time of the numbering of the people at Sinai
Nim'Rah - 36, it belonged to the tribe of Gad
Gad, the Tribe of - The country allotted to the tribe of Gad appears, speaking roughly, to have lain chiefly about the centre of the land east of Jordan. The sought of that district --from the Arnon (Wady Mojeb ), about halfway down the Dead Sea, to Heshbon, nearly due east of Jerusalem --was occupied by Reuben, and at or about Heshbon the possessions of Gad commenced
Refuge, Cities of - On the east of Jordan were, (1) Golan, in Bashan; (2) Ramoth-Gilead, in Gad; and (3) Bezer, in Reuben
Almon-Diblathaim - One of the last stages of the Israelites, between Dibon-Gad (or Dhiban, N
Tribes, the Twelve - In Numbers 1 there are two lists of the tribes: one, the heads of the tribes, as given in the following table; the other, when the tribes were numbered, the only difference in the order of the names being that in the latter Gad comes before Judah. 4 Judah...
2 Simeon 2 Simeon 2 Simeon 4 Judah 7 Gad 8 Asher 1 Reuben...
3 Levi 3 Levi 4 Judah 3 Levi 11a Manasseh 6 Naphtali 7 Gad...
4 Judah 4 Judah 9 Issachar 12 Benjamin 4 Judah 11a Manasseh 8 Asher...
5 Dan 10 Zebulun 10 Zebulun 11b Ephraim 11b Ephraim 11b Ephraim 6 Naphtali...
6 Naphtali 9 Issachar 11b Ephraim 11a Manasseh 12 Benjamin 1 Reuben 11a Manasseh...
7 Gad 5 Dan 11a Manasseh 10 Zebulun 2 Simeon 4 Judah 2 Simeon...
8 Asher 7 Gad 12 Benjamin 9 Issachar 10 Zebulun 12 Benjamin 3 Levi...
9 Issachar 8 Asher 5 Dan 7 Gad 9 Issachar 2 Simeon 9 Issachar...
10 Zebulun 6 Naphtali 8 Asher 5 Dan 8 Asher 9 Issachar 10 Zebulun...
11Joseph 11 Joseph 7 Gad 6 Naphtali 6 Naphtali 10 Zebulun 11 Joseph...
12 Benjamin 12 Benjamin 6 Naphtali 8 Asher 5 Dan 7 Gad 12 Benjamin...
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Halhul - There is an old Jewish tradition that Gad, David's seer (2 Samuel 24:11 ), was buried here
Beth-Aram - , "mountain-house", one of the towns of Gad, 3 miles east of Jordan, opposite Jericho (Joshua 13:27 )
Seer - " (1 Samuel 3:20) But concerning the name of seer, we find frequent mention made of this character, not as the Lord's seer, but the king's; thus Gad is called the prophet Gad, but expressly said to be David's seer; (see 2 Samuel 24:11) So Heman is called the king's seer, though he is not said to have been a prophet of the Lord. The offices in this ease no doubt differed, but, as in the instance of Gad, reign, be performed by one and the same person
Deuel - ” In Numbers 1:14 , the father of Eliasaph, the leader in the wilderness of the tribe of Gad
Shaphat - Member of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:12 )
Ataroth - Several places of this name occur in Scripture: one in the tribe of Judah, 1 Chronicles 2:54 ; one or two in Ephraim, Joshua 16:2,5,7 ; 18:13 ; and one or two in Gad, Numbers 32:3,34,35
Jogbehah - The tribe of Gad rebuilt it and settled it (Numbers 32:35 )
Buz - One of the tribe of Gad
Baal-Gad - BAAL-GAD (? ‘Baal of fortune’)
Ed - The words are literally rendered: "And the children of Reuben and the children of Gad named the altar. " After the division of the Promised Land, the tribes of Reuben and Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh, on returning to their own settlements on the east of Jordan (Joshua 22:1-6 ), erected a great altar, which they affirmed, in answer to the challenge of the other tribes, was not for sacrifice, but only as a witness ('Ed) or testimony to future generations that they still retained the same interest in the nation as the other tribes
di'Bon -
A town on the east side of Jordan, in the rich pastoral country, which was taken possession of and rebuilt by the children of Gad. (Numbers 32:3,34 ) From this circumstance it possibly received the name of DIBON-GAD
Zilpah - ]'>[2] ); the mother of Gad and Asher, Genesis 30:10-13 (J Beth-Nimrah - ” City east of the Jordan that tribe of Gad rebuilt after Moses allotted it to them (Numbers 32:36 )
Buz - A man of the tribe of Gad ( 1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Adolinia - ) A rare earth, regarded by some as an oxide of the supposed element Gadolinium, by others as only a mixture of the oxides of yttrium, erbium, ytterbium, etc. ) A rare earth associated with yttria and regarded as the oxide (Gd2O3) of a metallic element, Gad`o*lin"i*um (/), with an assigned atomic weight of 153
Salchah - It was near the border of Gad, 1 Chronicles 5:11 , and where the boundary line between the two tribes ran out farthest into the desert
Beth-Nim'Rah - (house of leopards ) one of the fenced cities on the east of Jordan taken and built by the tribe of Gad ( Numbers 32:36 ) and described as being in the valley beside Beth-haran
Baal-Hermon - Some would equate it with Baal-gad
Sheba - ” Name of a Benjaminite who led a revolt against David (2 Samuel 20:1 ) and of a member of the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Meni - ” God of good luck worshiped together with the god Gad by Jewish apostates, probably in the postexilic period (Isaiah 65:11 NAS margin)
Attai - Warrior of tribe of Gad who served David in the wilderness as he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:11 )
Shaphat - A chief of the tribe of Gad
Abihil - Son of Huri, of the family of Gad
Bamoth-Baal - Mesha says, on the stone, he rebuilt Beth Bamoth, it having been probably destroyed in the struggles between Moab and Reuben or Gad. Israel's halt at Bamoth is identical with that in Numbers 33:45, connected with Dibon Gad, for Dibon and Bamoth Baal were near (Joshua 13:17)
Hareth - ” Forest where David went at advice of Gad, the prophet, as he hid from Saul (1 Samuel 22:5 )
Sihon - The tribes of Reuben and Gad settled in the area formerly held by Sihon, just east of the Jordan River
Jaazer, Jazer - City and district in Gilead: it was taken from the Amorites by Israel, allotted to Gad, and given to the Levites
Reuel - Father of Eliasaph, the captain or prince of Gad
Ruben - The tribe of Ruben was situated east of the Jordan, and shared with the tribe of Gad the territory of the Amorrhites
Reu'el - ) ...
Father of Eliasaph, the leader of the tribe of Gad at the time of the census at Sinai
Gad - ...
Pagan divinity (Isaiah 65:11, where the Hebrew Gad is rendered "fortune")
Lodebar - A place in the tribe of Gad, not far from Mahanaim, north of the Jabbok, east of the Jordan
Mahanaim - It lay north of the Jabbok and near Penuel, and afterwards became a Levitical city in the tribe of Gad, Joshua 21:38
Ramoth Gilead - ) A city of refuge in Gad (Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:38). of Gad (Joshua 13:26), which Es Salt is not
Half Tribe - The term usually refers to that part of Manasseh dwelling to the east of the Jordan along with Reuben and Gad (Numbers 32:33 ; Deuteronomy 3:13 ; Joshua 1:12 ; Joshua 4:12 ; Joshua 22:1 )
Og - Gigantic, the king of Bashan, who was defeated by Moses in a pitched battle at Edrei, and was slain along with his sons (Deuteronomy 1:4 ), and whose kingdom was given to the tribes of Reuben and Gad and half the tribe of Manasseh (Numbers 21:32-35 ; Deuteronomy 3:1-13 )
See r - It is afterwards applied to Zadok, Gad, etc
Ramath-Mizpeh - The height of Mizpeh or of the watch-tower (Joshua 13:26 ), a place mentioned as one of the limits of Gad
Hesh'Bon - ( Numbers 21:26 ) It stood on the western border of the high plain --Mishor, (Joshua 13:17 ) --and on the boundary line between the tribes of Reuben and Gad
Jazer - of Heshbon, taken by Israel ( Numbers 21:32 ), allotted to Gad ( Joshua 13:25 etc
Coriander - Gad, (Exodus 16:31 ; Numbers 11:7 ), seed to which the manna is likened in its form and colour
Ataroth - A town in the land of Jazer and Gilead, taken and "built" by Gad (Numbers 32:3; Numbers 32:34)
Beth Dagon - , the latter retiring to Gad and Gilead (1 Samuel 13:5-7; 1 Samuel 13:17-18; 1 Samuel 29:1; 1 Samuel 31:1)
Sal'Cah, - (migration ), a city named in the early records of Israel as the extreme limit of Bashan, (3:10; Joshua 13:11 ) and of the tribe of Gad
Aroer - City 'before Rabbah,' that is, near Rabbath Ammon, in the valley of the Jabbok, built or rebuilt by the tribe of Gad
Araunah - This spot was indicated by the prophet Gad as the place where an altar should he erected to J″ Gezer - Gezer (gç'zer), steep place, called also Gazer, Gazara, Gazera, and Gad, a royal city of Canaan, and one of the oldest cities of the land
at'ta-i - (1 Chronicles 11:41 ) ...
One of the lion-faced warriors of Gad, captains of the host, who forded the Jordan at the time of its overflow and joined David in the wilderness
Mahanaim - of Jordan on the frontier of Gad and Manasseh ( Joshua 13:25 ; Joshua 13:30 ); it was a Levitical city within the territory of Gad ( Joshua 21:38 ; Joshua 21:40 )
Heshbon - Yet the Israelite tribes of Reuben and Gad ranged with their sheep in this region (Numbers 32:3 ,Numbers 32:3,32:37 ). ...
Heshbon was assigned to the tribe of Gad and designated as a Levitical city according to Joshua 13:27-28 ; Joshua 21:38-39 . See Gad ; Moab; Reuben ; Sihon
Salcah - A city the extreme boundary of Bashan (Joshua 13:11), and of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:11)
Gad - Gad (găd), good fortune (?) 1
Quest - Gad not abroad at every quest and call of an untrain'd hope or passion
Samuel, Books of - The authors of the books of Samuel were probably Samuel, Gad, and Nathan. Gad, the companion of David (1 Samuel 22:5 ), continued the history thus commenced; and Nathan completed it, probably arranging the whole in the form in which we now have it (1 Chronicles 29:29 )
Gad - The tribe of Gad during the march through the wilderness had their place with Simeon and Reuben on the south side of the tabernacle (Numbers 2:14 ). The tribes of Reuben and Gad continued all through their history to follow the pastoral pursuits of the patriarchs (Numbers 32:1-5 ). ...
The portion allotted to the tribe of Gad was on the east of Jordan, and comprehended the half of Gilead, a region of great beauty and fertility (Deuteronomy 3:12 ), bounded on the east by the Arabian desert, on the west by the Jordan (Joshua 13:27 ), and on the north by the river Jabbok
Nut - The name of Betonim, a town in Gad, is derived from it (Joshua 13:26)
Mahanaim - ” City somewhere in the hill country of Gilead on the tribal borders of Gad and eastern Manasseh (Joshua 13:26 ,Joshua 13:26,13:30 )
Succoth - Canaanite city on the east of the Jordan, allotted to the tribe of Gad
Mahanaim - a city of the Levites, of the family of Merari, in the tribe of Gad, upon the brook Jabbok, Joshua 21:38 ; Joshua 13:26
Gilead - Es-Salt, a town close by, is on the site of "Ramoth Gilead," the city of refuge in Gad. Pasturage abounds in Gilead more than in western Palestine, from whence Reuben and Gad chose it for their numerous flocks and herds (Numbers 32). Gad, which lay S. ) (See Gad
Iim - " Between Ije Abarim and Dibon Gad were the rivers Zared and Arnon
Baalbec - , "the city of the sun", because of its famous Temple of the Sun, has by some been supposed to be Solomon's "house of the forest of Lebanon" (1 Kings 7:2 ; 10:17 ; 2 Chronicles 9:16 ); by others it is identified with Baal-gad (q
Heber - Head of a family in the tribe of Gad
Gad, the Prophet - The acts of David were written in "THE BOOK OF Gad the seer," of which there is no further record, and which has not been handed down
Amorites - The Amorites collected and attempted to oppose their progress, but were totally defeated, and their territory taken and divided between the tribes of Reuben and Gad
Ramoth - A city in Gilead, within the limits of the tribe of Gad, Joshua 21:38; called also Ramah and Ramoth-Gilead
Ramoth - It belonged to Gad, was assigned to the Levites, and became one of the cities of refuge beyond Jordan, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:38
Debir - There was another Debir in Gad, and a third on the border of Benjamin, Joshua 13:26 15:7
Jaazer - He (God) helps, a city of the Amorites on the east of Jordan, and assigned, with neighbouring places in Gilead, to Gad (Numbers 32:1,35 ; Joshua 13:25 )
Dawn - A — 1: αὐγάζω (Strong's #826 — Verb — augazo — ow-gad'-zo ) "to shine," is used metaphorically of the light of dawn, in 2 Corinthians 4:4 (some texts have kataugazo). ...
A — 2: διαυγάζω (Strong's #1306 — Verb — diaugazo — dee-ow-gad'-zo ) signifies "to shine through" (dia, "through," auge, "brightness"); it describes the breaking of daylight upon the darkness of night, metaphorically, in 2 Peter 1:19 , of the shining of spiritual light into the heart
Aroer - It figured in territorial claims of Reuben (Joshua 13:16 ), though the tribe of Gad originally built it (Numbers 32:34 ). A city of the tribe of Gad (Joshua 13:25 ) near Rabbah, capital of the Ammonites
Gilead - It fell to the lot of Gad, except its northern part, which, where it joined Bashan, was possessed by Manasseh. Pasturage abounds in Gilead, and accounts for Gad and the others choosing it for their cattle
Gilead - It fell to the lot of Gad, except its northern part, which, where it joined Bashan, was possessed by Manasseh. Pasturage abounds in Gilead, and accounts for Gad and the others choosing it for their cattle
Ramoth-Gilead - It was in the region of the ill-defined border between the tribes of East Manasseh and Gad, and was one of the three cities of refuge in Israel’s trans-Jordan territory (Joshua 20:8-9)
ja'Besh - In its widest sense Gilead included the half tribe of Manasseh, (1 Chronicles 27:21 ) as well as the tribes of Gad and Reuben, (Numbers 32:1-42 ) east of the Jordan; and of the cities of Gilead, Jabesh was the chief
Treasury - 1: γαζοφυλάκιον (Strong's #1049 — Noun Neuter — gazophulakion — Gad-zof-oo-lak'-ee-on ) from gaza, "a treasure," phulake, "a guard," is used by Josephus for a special room in the women's court in the Temple in which gold and silver bullion was kept
Succoth - Joshua assigned the city subsequently built here to the tribe of Gad, Joshua 13:27
Eber - A member of the tribe of Gad, called Heber by KJV (1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Sharon, Plain of - Area of uncertain location east of the Jordan inhabited by the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:16 ) and mentioned by King Mesha of Moab
Salecah - It was assigned to the tribe of Gad, and is always described as being on the eastern frontier of Bashan. It was a Nahatæan and Roman stronghold, and a station on the great trade and military road from Gadara and Edrel eastward through the desert to the Persian Gulf
Succoth - ” A city east of the Jordan in the tribal territory of Gad
Heshbon - Heshbon was subsequently assigned to Reuben, but became a Levitical city in connection with Gad
Ramoth - The city belonged to the tribe of Gad, Deuteronomy 4:43
Succoth - It was allotted to the tribe of Gad
Aroer - ...
...
One of the towns built by the tribe of Gad (Numbers 32:34 ) "before Rabbah" (Joshua 13:25 ), the Ammonite capital
Merari, Merarites - In the land they had twelve cities from among the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and Zebulun, including the city of Ramoth-gilead
Mer'Ari, Mer'Arites - In the division of the land by Joshua, the merarites had twelve cities assigned to them, out of Reuben, Gad and Zebulun
Jazer - The tribe of Gad rebuilt and settled Jazer (Numbers 32:35 ; compare Joshua 13:25 )
Cities of Refuge, - ...
RAMOTH-GILEAD, in the tribe of Gad
Heshbon - On the western border of the "high plain", mishor (Joshua 13:17), on the boundary between Reuben and Gad. Heshbon was rebuilt by Reuben (Numbers 32:37), but assigned to the Levites in connection with Gad (Joshua 21:39)
Mahanaim - It was assigned to the Levites, Joshua 13:26; Joshua 13:30; Joshua 21:38; 1 Chronicles 6:80, and lay within the territory of Gad, north of the torrent Jabbok
Eliel - A warrior from the tribe of Gad who served under David in the wilderness (1 Chronicles 12:11 )
Merarites - The Merarites received an allotment of twelve cities from the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and Zebulun, including Ramoth-Gilead, a city of refuge (Joshua 21:7 ,Joshua 21:7,21:34-40 ; 1Chronicles 6:63,1 Chronicles 6:77-81 )
Leah - Her handmaid, Zilpah, bore two sons to Jacob (Gad, Asher), which by the law of that day were officially Leah's
Fly - zebub, supposed to be the Gad-fly
Ramoth Gilead - Fortified city on the east of the Jordan and south of the Jabbok, in the tribe of Gad
Caesare'a Philip'pi - Caesarea Philippi has no Old Testament history, though it has been not unreasonably identified with Baal-gad
Amorites - The lands which the Amorites possessed on this side Jordan were given to the tribe of Judah, and those beyond the Jordan to the tribes of Reuben and Gad
Perea - It was part of the tableland area that originally belonged to Ammon and Moab, but after Israel’s conquest was occupied by the tribes of East Manasseh, Gad and Reuben
Eliab - A military leader from the tribe of Gad under David (1 Chronicles 12:9 )
Hara - Pul and Tiglath Pileser carried the men of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh away to Hara while most were taken to Habor
Aroer - A city of Gad near Rabbah, i
Dehir - A town east of the Jordan, on the northern border of Gad, and not far from Mahanaim
Debir - Place on the boundary of Gad, mentioned after Mahanaim
Aroer - Another city, situated farther north, over against Rabbah of Ammon, on a brook of Gad, a branch of the Jabbok
Cities of Refuge - Ramoth-gilead, in the tribe of Gad, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 21:38; 1 Kings 22:3
Chinnereth - It formed the eastern border of Canaan, the Promised Land (Numbers 34:11 ), marking the western boundary of the tribe of Gad (Joshua 13:27 )
ar'Oer - ...
Aroer, "that is 'facing' Rahbah" (Rabbah of Ammon), a town built by and belonging to Gad
Reuben - ...
Reuhen is linked with Gad (Numbers 32:1-42 ) in connexion with the conquest. that Joshua sent them back with great riches of spoils to their tents (see Gad). ]'>[2] ) to have included six cities, which appear to have formed a sort of enclave within Gadite territory. Three cities elsewhere assigned to Gad and four assigned elsewhere to Moab are here given to Reuben. It is there followed by Gilead (Gad). ), though the ‘men of Gad’ are referred to as having dwelt in Ataroth ‘from of old,’ the name of Reuben is omitted, though some of the cities ascribed to the tribe in the genealogies are said to have been taken or rebuilt. In all probability, however, it had long before ceased to exist as an independent unit (see Gad)
Dibon - Taken from Sihon with his other possessions by Israel, and assigned to Gad (Numbers 32:33-34); mentioned also as belonging to Reuben (Joshua 13:9), the two pastoral tribes less strictly defining their boundaries than settled populations would. Gad rebuilt it and gave it the name Dibon-Gad (Numbers 33:45). The stone notices expressly Israel's oppression of Moab in the reign of "Omri king of Israel and his son (and 'his son's son' is to be supplied in one gap of the inscription) forty years," and Mesha's breaking off the yoke; after which it says "all Dibon was loyal"; whereas previously "the men of Gad dwelt in the land of Ataroth" (compare Numbers 32:84-88), and "the king of Israel fortified" it. There we read "Israel departed from the Moabite king, and returned to their own land;" ultimately, the Dibon stone informs us Mesha took town after town of Gad, "Medeba, Jahaz, Dibon, and Kir. In three points the Dibon stone confirms Scripture:...
(1) The men of Gad dwelt, in the land of old
Sihon - Heshbon , his capital, was taken; and his land, along with that of Og king of Bashan, became the possession of Reuben, Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh
Gilead - It comprised the possessions of the tribes of Gad and Reuben and the south part of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:13 ; Numbers 32:40 )
c Sarea-Philippi - It was the northern limit of our Lord's journeys, Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27, and was probably Baal-gad of Old Testament history
Amorites - It was subsequently divided between the tribes of Reuben and Gad, Numbers 13:29 ; Numbers 21:13 ; Numbers 21:25 ; Joshua 5:1 ; Joshua 11:3 ; Judges 11:19 ; Judges 11:22
ra'Moth-Gil'Ead - ( 1 Kings 4:13 ) It was the city of refuge for the tribe of Gad, (4:43; Joshua 20:8 ; 21:38 ) and the residence of one of Solomon's commissariat officers
Tribes of Israel - 146) correctly remarks, several of the largest tribes Judah, Ephraim, Manasseh, Gad contained many minor tribes which surpassed in number, possessions, and political significance several of those counted in the twelve tribes. ]'>[2] ’s genealogy (Genesis 29:1-35 ; Genesis 30:1-43 ), is not 12 but 13, and in the following order:...
Leah tribes Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah 4 Bilhah (Rachel) tribes Dan, Naphtali 2 Zilpah (Leah) tribes Gad, Asher 2 Leah tribes Issachar, Zebulun 2 Rachel tribes Joseph = (Manasseh, Ephraim) 2 Benjamin (born in Palestine), Genesis 35:18 1 13 To obtain the number 12 from this scheme it is necessary to omit Levi, or to count Manasseh and Ephraim as one. Dan and Naphtali, Gad and Asher the Canaanite tribes of the concubines who were admitted to union with the other tribes owe their position also to these principles. Asher with Gad as Zilpah tribes, despite their wide separation, Issachar and Zebulun with Judah as Leah tribes, are of doubtful import
Hagarenes - Fell by the hand of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh, in the time of Saul; these occupied their tents and land in eastern Gilead (1 Chronicles 5:10; 1 Chronicles 5:18-20)
Aphek - slopes of Lebanon; mentioned in company with Baal-Gad, the other northern sanctuary
de'Bir - ...
The "border of Debir" is named as forming part of the boundary of Gad, (Joshua 13:26 ) and as apparently not far from Mahanaim
Sharon - And the third a canton beyond Jordan, in the country of Basan, and in the division of the tribe of Gad
de'Bir - ...
The "border of Debir" is named as forming part of the boundary of Gad, (Joshua 13:26 ) and as apparently not far from Mahanaim
Trade - A — 1: ἐργάζομαι (Strong's #2038 — Verb — ergazomai — er-gad'-zom-ahee ) "to work," is rendered "traded" in Matthew 25:16 ; in Revelation 18:17 , AV, "trade," RV, "gain their living
Heshbon - A city of the Moabites, taken by Sihon, king of the Amorites, and made his capital; captured and occupied by the Israelites, Numbers 21:25-26; situated on the boundary between Reuben and Gad; rebuilt by Reuben and made a Levitical city, then being territorially a Gadite city
Aroer - restored and enlarged, by Gad (Numbers 32:34; Judges 11:33); now perhaps Ayra
Gadarene - (gad' uh reene) A resident of Gadara, one of the cities of Decapolis (Mark 5:1 ). In the New Testament, it is mentioned only in the Gospel accounts of the healing of the Gadarene man who was afflicted by demons. The textual tradition in the Greek manuscripts of each of these passages shows confusion among Gadarenes, Gerasenes, and Gergesenes. Textual evidence appears to favor Gadarenes in Matthew, Gerasenes in Mark and Luke. Gadarene, in the context, would have to refer to the larger area, not just the city of Gadara. The designation “country of the Gadarenes” evidently applied to an area that extended as far as the shore of Galilee
Bani - Man from tribe of Gad in David's special thirty warriors (2 Samuel 23:6 )
Nebo - The tribes Reuben and Gad requested the area around Nebo for their flocks (Numbers 32:2-3 )
Caesara Philippi - According to some its original name was Baal-Gad ( Joshua 11:17 ), or Baal-Hermon (Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), when it was a Canaanite sanctuary of Baal
Burden - A fixed quantity of certain commodities as a burden of Gad steel, 120 pounds
Manasseh - ]'>[2] ‘Destiny’) is associated with Gad , the god of Fortune. Siegfried, ‘Gad-Meni u. Gad-Manasse’ in Ztschr. ‘It would appear,’ so runs the conclusion, ‘that in the original story the epithet Manasseh was a fitting title of Jacob himself, which might be borne by his worshippers as in the case of Gad. ]'>[10] ’s story of Reuben’s and Gad’s settlement on the East Jordan, which tells us that the children of Machir, the son of Manasseh, went to Gilead and took it. ]'>[10] ’s account of the settlement of Reuben and Gad ( Numbers 32:1-42 ) there was nothing said originally of this half-tribe being associated with them. (see Gad)
Og - The whole of his kingdom was assigned to the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and half-Manasseh ( Deuteronomy 3:1-13 , Numbers 32:33 ; see also Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Deuteronomy 4:47 ; Deuteronomy 31:4 , Joshua 2:10 ; Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 13:12 ; Joshua 13:30 )
Astronomy - The planets Jupiter and Venus were worshipped under various names, as Baal and Ahtoreth, Gad and Meni, Isaiah 65:11
Burden - ) A fixed quantity of certain commodities; as, a burden of Gad steel, 120 pounds
Treasure - ...
2: γάζα (Strong's #1047 — Noun Feminine — gaza — Gad'-zah ) a Persian word, signifying "royal treasure," occurs in Acts 8:27
Gilead - The eastern part of the tribe of Manasseh lived in the northern half, and the tribe of Gad in the southern half (Deuteronomy 3:12-13). It calls the southern half (Gad) Gilead in Joshua 13:24-25 and half-Gilead in Joshua 12:2. Towns of the region that feature in the New Testament story are Gadara, Gerasa and Bethany-beyond-Jordan (Matthew 4:25; Matthew 8:28; Mark 5:1; Mark 7:31; John 1:28; see DECAPOLIS; PEREA)
Debir - A place, not identified, in the border of the trans-Jordanic territory of Gad ( Joshua 13:26 )
Suc'Coth - (Judges 5:5-17 ) It would appear from this passage that it lay east of the Jordan, which is corroborated by the fact that it was allotted to the tribe of Gad
Mesha - id, a king of Moab, the son of Chemosh-Gad, a man of great wealth in flocks and herds (2 Kings 3:4 )
Numbers Book of - 32 the land east of the Jordan is assigned to Reuben and Gad, and in chap
Camp And Encamp - On the south were three other tribes—Reuben, Simeon, and Gad
Tribe - In the division made by Joshua of the land of Canaan, Reuben, Gad, and half of Manasseh had their lot beyond Jordan, east; all the other tribes, and the remaining half of Manasseh had their distribution on this side the river, west
Dibon - The Israelites dispossessed Sihon, and the territory was assigned to Reuben ( Joshua 13:9 ; Joshua 13:17 ), but the city Dibon is mentioned among those built (or rebuilt) by Gad ( Numbers 32:3 ; Numbers 32:34 ), hence the name Dibon-gab by which it is once called ( Numbers 33:45 )
Issachar - The fifth son of Leah, born after Gad and Asher, the sons of Zilpah, and the ninth of Jacob’s sons ( Genesis 30:18 Ramoth-Gilead, Ramoth in Gilead - Ramah, 5 ), was one of the cities of refuge ( Deuteronomy 4:43 , Joshua 20:8 ), assigned to the Merarite Levites of Gad ( Joshua 21:38 , 1 Chronicles 6:80 )
Nimrah - of Gad and the N
Sharon - A town in the tribe of Gad, in the district of Bashan beyond the Jordan, 1 Chronicles 5:16
Tribes of Israel, the - Jacob's sons through Zilpah, Leah's maid, were Gad and Asher (Genesis 30:9-13 ), while Bilhah, the maid of Rachel, bore Dan and Naphtali (Genesis 30:1-8 ). During the journey through the wilderness, the tribes of Reuben, Simeon, and Gad formed the second unit of the procession with the tribe of Reuben in the lead position (Numbers 10:17-20 ). As the tribes approached the land of Canaan and allotments were made to each tribe, the tribe of Reuben along with Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh occupied the Transjordan, that is the highland plateau region east of the Jordan River (Joshua 13:8-31 ); compare Numbers 32:1 : 1-5,33-42 ). Gad was the seventh son of Jacob and the first of two sons by Zilpah, the maid of Leah (1618067209_39 ). Because Leah saw this birth as a sign of “good fortune,” especially in the light of the fact that she had ceased having children, she named him “Gad” which means “fortune” (Genesis 30:11 NRSV). We know very little about Gad the patriarch beyond the brief details about his birth. According to the blessing of Jacob the tribe of Gad perhaps experienced numerous raids (Genesis 49:19 ) especially from groups like the Ammonites as reflected in the story of Jephthah (Judges 11:1 ). Perhaps such raids were prompted by the fact that Gad occupied some of the best land in the Transjordan (Deuteronomy 33:20-21 ). Apparently the men of Gad achieved great expertise as warriors (1 Chronicles 12:8 ). Asher was the eighth son of Jacob, the second son by Zilpah and the younger full-blooded brother of Gad (Genesis 30:9-13 ). Like Gad, little information is shared about the patriarch Asher
Succoth - of the point at which the Jabbok enters the Jordan), in the territory of Gad, in a ‘vale’ ( Joshua 13:27 , Psalms 60:5 ), presumably, therefore, in that part of the Jordan valley through which the Jabbok flows into the Jordan, and which is very fertile. of the Jabbok, and in the territory of Gad ( Joshua 13:27 )
Kings, Books of - 1,2Kings mention no sources except the "book of Jashar," but they probably contain notes from the pens of Samuel, Nathan, and Gad
Ezer - Member of tribe of Gad who joined David's wilderness army before he became king (1 Chronicles 12:9 )
lo-Debar - ” After Saul and Jonathan had been defeated on Mount Gibeon (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ), Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son (2 Samuel 4:4 ) took refuge with Machir in the city of Lo-Debar (2 Samuel 9:4 )—a city of Gad located in the eastern part of Gilead just south of the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee)
lo-Debar - ” After Saul and Jonathan had been defeated on Mount Gibeon (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ), Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son (2 Samuel 4:4 ) took refuge with Machir in the city of Lo-Debar (2 Samuel 9:4 )—a city of Gad located in the eastern part of Gilead just south of the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee)
Debir - A town in Gad east of the Jordan given various spellings in the Hebrew Bible: Lidebor ( Joshua 13:26 ); Lwo Debar ( 2 Samuel 9:4-5 ); Lo' Debar ( 2 Samuel 17:27 ); Lo' Dabar ( Amos 6:13 )
Merari - Joshua assigned them 12, cities out of Reuben, Gad, and Zebulun (1 Chronicles 15:1-63; Joshua 21:34-40)
Johanan - Member of tribe of Gad who joined David at Ziklag, demonstrating the people east of the Jordan supported him (1 Chronicles 12:12 )
Jaazer - Soon after, Gad occupied it pastorally
Nathan - Nathan along with Gad wrote "the acts of David first and last" (1 Chronicles 29:29). Nathan is designated by the later and higher title "the prophet," but" Gad and Samuel the seer" (compare 1 Samuel 9:9)
Caesarea - Identified with the Baal Gad of Old Testament Herod erected here a temple of white marble to Augustus. (See BAAL Gad
Reuben - of the tabernacle; Gad and Simeon were next Reuben on the same side (Numbers 2:10-16). Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh still retained their forefathers' calling as tending flocks and herds (Numbers 32:1). ) Finally going a whoring after the gods of the people of the land whom God destroyed before them, Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh were first cut short by Hazael (2 Kings 10:32-33), then carried off by Pul and Tiglath Pileser, and placed about the river Khabour "in Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan" (1 Chronicles 5:26)
Numbering of the People - " The prophet Gad was sent to him to put before him three dreadful alternatives (2 Samuel 24:13 ; for "seven years" in this verse, the LXX
Mahanaim - Mahanaim was in Gad; assigned to the Levites (Joshua 21:38-39)
Reuben - ...
When the Israelites conquered and divided Canaan in the time of Joshua, the tribes of Reuben, Gad and half of Manasseh settled east of the Jordan River in territory taken from the Amorites (Numbers 21:11-35; Joshua 13:8-12)
Reuben, Tribe of - This tribe united with that of Gad in asking permission to settle in the "land of Gilead," "on the other side of Jordan" (32:1-5)
Gilead - A' Gadite. Jacob fled toward Gilead, Genesis 31:21; it was conquered by Israel, Numbers 21:24; Judges 10:18; Joshua 12:2; Deuteronomy 2:36; was given to Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, Joshua 17:6; under Jephthah it defeated the Ammonites, Judges 10:18; was a refuge for Saul's son and for David, 2 Samuel 2:9; 2 Samuel 17:22; 2 Samuel 17:24; the home of Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1; taken in part by Syria, 2 Kings 10:33; by Assyria, 2 Kings 15:25-29; referred to in the minor prophets, Hosea 6:8; Hosea 12:11; Amos 1:3; Amos 1:13; Obadiah 1:19; Micah 7:14; Zechariah 10:10
Adullam - David was God's anointed king, and the prophet Gad went to him, and Abiathar the priest; so that with that outcast company were God's prophet, priest, and king, though all the outward forms of worship were elsewhere: typical of the Lord Jesus in His rejection
Ed - The great altar of Ed also was an Israelite work, founded by Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh, to be a witness of their having a share in the national covenant and sanctuary of Jehovah. Gad, and
Gilead - A Gadite, son of Michael ( 1 Chronicles 5:14 ). When that king was defeated, his territory aroused the desires of the pastoral tribes of Reuben and Gad. On the partition of the land, Gilead was divided into two, the southern half being given to Reuben and Gad, the northern half to the trans-Jordanic half of Manasseh
Manasseh (1) - When David was crowned at Hebron western Manasseh sent 18,000, eastern Manasseh with Gad and Reuben 120,000 armed men (1 Chronicles 12:31; 1 Chronicles 12:37). ...
But because of apostasy from the God of their fathers to the gods of the people whom He destroyed before them, Manasseh was first cut short by the Syrian Hazael (2 Kings 10:32), then God stirred up the spirit of Pul and of Tiglath Pileser of Assyria to carry the eastern half of Manasseh, Reuben, and Gad captives to Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan (1 Chronicles 5:25-26). Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh successfully warred with and dispossessed the Hagarites with Jetar, Nephish, and Nodab (1 Chronicles 5:18-22)
Kings, the Books of - But the more probable supposition is that Ezra, after the Captivity, compiled them from documents written perhaps by David, Solomon, Nathan, Gad, and Iddo, and that he arranged them in the order in which they now exist
Witness - (Genesis 21:30 ; 31:47,52 ) The tribes of Reuben and Gad raised an "altar" as a witness to the covenant between themselves and the rest of the nation
Allotment - Gad settled immediately north of Reuben and was bordered on the east by Ammon
Rake - ) To walk about; to Gad or ramble idly
Media - The former prince carried away the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh, on the east side of Jordan, to Halah, and Habor, and Hara, and to the river of Gozan
Camp - |...
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T | REUBEN 46,500 | I | NACLE. ...
JUDAH, with Issachar and Zebulun, ...
The GERSHONITES and the MERARITES with the Tabernacle, ...
REUBEN, with Simeon and Gad, ...
The KOHATHITES with the 'sanctuary,' ...
EPHRAIM, with Manasseh and Benjamin, ...
DAN, with Asher and Naphtali
Sharon - ]'>[2] ‘pasture lands’) of Sharon ( 1 Chronicles 5:16 ) are mentioned as among the possessions of Gad along with Gilead and Bashan
Pekah - But Ahaz at their second inroad applied to Tiglath Pileser, who slew Rezin and carried away the people of Gilead (including the whole territory of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh 1 Chronicles 5:26), Galilee, and Naphtali (2 Kings 15:29)
Last - ...
Gad, a troop shall overcome him but he shall overcome at the last
Reuben - ' It extended northward from the river Arnon about 25 miles, where it joined the possession of Gad
Hazael - For when Jehu broke up the siege of Ramoth-Gilead, and came with his army to Samaria, Hazael took advantage of his absence to fall upon his territories beyond Jordan, destroying all the land of Gilead, Gad, Reuben, and Manasseh, from Aroer to Bashan, 2 Kings 10:32
Camp - Hor-hagidgad...
30 . Dibon-gad...
40
do, Done - ...
4: ἐργάζομαι (Strong's #2038 — Verb — ergazomai — er-gad'-zom-ahee ) denotes "to work" (ergon, "work"). ...
5: κατεργάζομαι (Strong's #2716 — Verb — katergazomai — kat-er-gad'-zom-ahee ) kata (intensive), is a more emphatic verb than No
Baal - Baal-gad (bâ'al-găd), lord of fortune, used to denote the most northern, Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7, or perhaps northwestern, 13:6, point to which Joshua's victories extended. Possibly it was a Phœnician or Canaanite sanctuary of Baal under the aspect of Gad, or Fortune
Moab - Under Nebuchadnezzar the Moabites acted as the auxiliaries of the Chaldeans, 2 Kings 24:2; Ezekiel 25:8-11; and during the exile they took possession once more of their ancient territory, vacated by the tribes of Reuben and Gad; as did the Ammonites also
Succoth - In Joshua 13:27-28 Succoth is assigned to Gad
Arm - Zerôa‛ means "arm," a part of the body: "Blessed be he that enlargeth Gad: he dwelleth as a lion, and teareth the arm with the crown of the head" (Deuteronomy 33:20)
Amorites - Sihon and Og, two Amorite kings, resisted the Israelites' march to Canaan as they approached east of the Jordan (Numbers 21:21-35 ); but after the Israelite victory here, Gad, Reuben and half of Manasseh settled in the conquered area
Command - 32:25, where the sons of Reuben and Gad say to Moses that they “will do as my lord commandeth
Samuel - Thus far it is not improbable that he was the author, while the remaining chapters are commonly attributed to Nathan and Gad, B
Amorites - This combined Amorite territory east of Jordan later became the homeland of the Israelite tribes of Reuben, Gad and the eastern half of Manasseh (Numbers 32:33)
Midianite - The whole of the country on the east of Jordan, now conquered by the Israelites (see SIHON ; OG), was divided between the two tribes of Reuben and Gad and the half tribe of Manasseh
Mizpah - While David resided here he was visited by the prophet Gad, here mentioned for the first time, who was probably sent by Samuel to bid him leave the land of Moab and betake himself to the land of Judah
Samuel, Books of, - In our own time the most prevalent idea in the Anglican Church seems to have been that the first twenty-four chapters of the book of Samuel were written by the prophet himself, and the rest of the chapters by the prophets Nathan and Gad
Baal (1) - Baal-gad, Baalath-beer , and other compounds of this word)
Work, Wrought - ...
B — 1: ἐργάζομαι (Strong's #2038 — Verb — ergazomai — er-gad'-zom-ahee ) is used (I) intransitively, e. ...
B — 2: κατεργάζομαι (Strong's #2716 — Verb — katergazomai — kat-er-gad'-zom-ahee ) an emphatic form of No
Debir (1) - Part of the boundary of Gad (Joshua 13:26); in the high pastures E
Book - Books of Nathan, Gad, Ahijah, and Iddo, concerning the acts of David, and of Solomon, which were doubtless the public records of the nation, with which are associated prophecies of Ahijah and the visions of Iddo
Captivities of Israel - In the year of the world 3264, Tiglath- pileser took several cities, and carried away captives, principally from the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh, 2 Kings 15:29
Tribe - Tiglath-Pileser first took away captive the tribes of Reuben, Gad, Naphtali, and the half tribe of Manasseh, which were beyond Jordan, and carried them beyond the Euphrates, 2 Kings 15:29 ; 1 Chronicles 5:26 ; A
Transjordan - Area immediately east of Jordan River settled by Reuben, Gad, half of Manasseh, Edom, Moab, and Amon. ...
The Israelite tribes of Reuben and Gad along with certain Manassite clans settled in the Transjordan—primarily in Gilead, it seems, although with some spillover into Bashan and into the traditionally Moabite territory immediately north of the Arnon (see especially Numbers 32:1 )
Samuel, the Books of - That Samuel wrote memoirs, which Nathan the prophet and Gad the seer supplemented, appears from 1 Samuel 31:8-1387; "now the acts ("history": dibrei ) of David the king, first and last, behold they are written in the book ("history": dibrei ) of Samuel the seer, and in the book ("history") of Nathan the prophet, and in the book ("history") of Gad the seer. The inspired author being of the prophetic schools naturally embodies Nathan's memoir as to his dealing with David in the Bathsheba sin, and in respect to the promise of permanence to his seed and throne (2 Samuel 7; 12), and Gad's dealing with him at the time of the plague (2 Samuel 24; also 1 Samuel 22:5)
Baal - The noun appears in a number of compound forms which are proper names for locations where Canaanite deities were worshiped, such as Baal-peor (Numbers 25:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:3 ; Psalm 106:28 ; Hosea 9:10 ), Baal-hermon (Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), and Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 )
Commit, Commission - " ...
A — 1: ἐργάζομαι (Strong's #2038 — Verb — ergazomai — er-gad'-zom-ahee ) to work, is translated by the verb "to commit" (of committing sin), in James 2:9
Book(s) - ...
Also mentioned in 1,2Chronicles are books of various prophets: the “Book of Samuel the Seer” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ), the “Book of Nathan the prophet” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ; 2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Book of Gad the Seer” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ), the “Prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite” (2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Visions of Iddo the Seer against Jeroboam the Son of Nebat” (2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Book of Shemaiah the Prophet and Iddo the Seer” (2 Chronicles 12:15 ), the “Story of the Prophet Iddo” (2 Chronicles 13:22 ), the “Book of Jehu the Son of Hanani” (2 Chronicles 20:34 ), the “Acts of Uzziah” (2 Chronicles 26:22 ; written by Isaiah), the “Vision of Isaiah the Prophet” (2 Chronicles 32:32 ), and the “Saying of the Seers” (2 Chronicles 33:19 ). ”...
Various other works are also mentioned in 1,2Chronicles: genealogies of the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:17 ), the “Chronicles of King David” (1 Chronicles 27:24 ), an untitled work containing the plan for the Temple (1 Chronicles 28:19 ), works on the organization of the Levites written by David and Solomon (2 Chronicles 35:4 ), and lamentations for the death of Josiah by Jeremiah and others (2 Chronicles 35:25 )
Ammon, Ammonites - A people inhabiting the territory between the tribe of Gad and the Arabian desert, from the Israelitish conquest of Palestine to the 4th cent. ...
At the time of the conquest the Gadite Israelites did not disturb the Ammonites (Numbers 21:24 , Deuteronomy 2:37 ), or attempt to conquer their territory. Perhaps it was at this period that the Ammonites occupied the territory of Gad ( Jeremiah 49:1 ff
Rabbah - In Joshua 13:25 Rabbah is mentioned in defining the boundaries of the tribe of Gad
Bashan - Fitted for pasture; so assigned with half Gilead from Mahanaim to the half tribe of Manasseh, as the rest of Gilead was to Reuben and Gad, as those tribes abounded in flocks and herds (Joshua 13:29-32; Numbers 32:1-33)
Encampment - Reuben, Leah's oldest son, with Simeon, Leah's second, and Gad, oldest of Leah's handmaid Zilpah's sous, formed the second camp
Ammon - Ammon seized on the cities of Gad from which Tiglath Pileser had carried the Israelites (Jeremiah 49:1-6; Zephaniah 2:8-9)
Lion - The lion symbolizes bravery, so the faces of the warriors of Gad who joined David are designated "the faces of lions" (1 Chronicles 12:8); also might and royalty, as in the winged lion figures with human heads in the Assyrian palace remains, and in Solomon's steps to his throne (1 Kings 10:19-20); so the royal tribe Judah had the lion as its standard
Prophet - In 1 Chronicles 29:29 all these three words are used: "Samuel the seer (ro'eh), Nathan the prophet (nabi'), Gad the seer" (hozeh)
Caesarea Philippi - The Canaanite god Baal-gad, the god of good fortune, was worshiped here in Old Testament times
Bashan - We had quitted too, the districts apportioned to the tribes of Reuben and of Gad, and entered that part which was allotted to the half tribe of Manasseh, beyond Jordan eastward, leaving the land of the children of Ammon on our right, or to the east of the Jabbok, which, according to the authority before quoted, divided Ammon, or Philadelphia, from Gerasa
Cry, Crying - ...
B — 6: κραυγάζω (Strong's #2905 — Verb — kraugazo — krow-gad'-zo ) a stronger form of No
Israel - Four sons of Jacob Dan, Naphtali, Gad, and Asher are said to be the sons of concubines. ]'>[10] document in Numbers 32:1-42 that the conquered cities of this region were divided between the tribes of Reuben and Gad. Perhaps it was at this time that the tribe of Gad came into the confederacy. The genealogies represent Gad as the son of a slave-girl. Probably the Gadites came in from the desert at this period, and in union with the Reubenites won this territory, which extended from the Arnon to a point a little north of Heshbon. It is usually supposed that the territory of Reuben lay to the south of that of Gad, extending from the Arnon to Elealeh, north of Heshbon; but in reality each took certain cities in such a way that their territory interpenetrated ( Numbers 32:34 ). Thus the Gadites had Dibon, Ataroth, and Aroer to the south, Jazer north of Heshbon, and Bethnimrah and Beth-baran in the Jordan valley; while the Reubenites had Baal-meon, Nebo, Heshbon, and Elealeh, which lay between these. The conquests of the tribe of Gad brought the Hebrews into the Jordan valley, but the swiftly flowing river with its banks of clay formed an insuperable obstacle to these primitive folk
Salim - Going on for some time ‘per vallem Jordanis super ripam fluminis ipsius,’ the traveller sees after a little the town of the holy prophet Elia, ‘id est Thesbe,’ where his cave is, and also ‘memoria sancti Gethae,’ of whom we read in the Books of the Judges (this is, of course, Jephthah, and not Gad, as has been suggested by Mommert)
Dan - ’ It is probable that Dan was an appellative, or titular attribute, of some deity whose name has not come down to us in connexion with it, or it may even be the name of a god as Gad was (cf
Damascus - He smote all the coasts of Israel, from Jordan eastward, in Gilead and the lands of Gad, Reuben, and Manasseh
Breastplate - Ligure, Agate, Amethyst, Gad
Joshua, Book of - The area west of Jordan (Canaan itself) was divided between nine and a half tribes; the other two and a half tribes (Reuben, Gad and half of Manasseh) received their inheritance in the land east of Jordan that Israel had conquered in the time of Moses (13:1-14:5)
Tribes - The tribes enumerated are Judah, Reuben, Gad, Asher, Naphtali, Manasseh, Simeon, Levi, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, and Benjamin
Israel, Kingdom of - ( 1 Kings 11:31,35 ) These were probably Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh), Issachar, Zebulun, Asher, Naphtali, Benjamin, Dan, Simeon, Gad and Reuben; Levi being intentionally omitted
Canon - Again, it is said in 1 Chronicles 29:29-30 : "Now, the acts of David the king, first and last, behold they are written in the book of Samuel the seer, and in the book of Nathan the prophet, and in the book of Gad the seer; with all his reign, and his might, and the times that went over him, and over Israel, and over all the kingdoms of the countries. But we have in the canon no books under the name of Nathan and Gad, nor any book of Jasher, nor of the wars of the Lord. Therefore, Shemaiah, and Iddo, and Nathan, and Gad, might have written some things by inspiration which were never intended to form a part of the sacred volume. Thus, different parts of these books might have been penned by Gad, Nathan, Iddo, Shemaiah, &c
da'Vid - (2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 12:26-31 ) Three great calamities may be selected as marking the beginning, middle and close of David's otherwise prosperous reign, which appear to be intimated in the question of Gad, (2 Samuel 24:13 ) "a three-years famine, a three-months flight or a three-days pestilence. This calamity was the three-days pestilence which visited Jerusalem at the warning of the prophet Gad
Simeon - In historical times nothing is heard of them, and the conclusion is justified that they eventually became merged with the neighbouring tribes, and were later, with them, absorbed by Judah, as Reuben was afterwards by Gad
Jephthah - "...
Ammon having rejected his remonstrances, Jephthah gathered his army out of Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh (northern Gilead and Bashan), and went to (translated Judges 11:29 "passed over to") Mizpeh Gilead, the encampment and rendezvous of Israel (Judges 10:17), and thence to Ammon. " Keil translated it "went to Zaphon, the city of Gad in the Jordan valley": Joshua 13:27; Judges 12:1)
Manasseh - ...
The half of this tribe, along with Reuben and Gad, had their territory assigned them by Moses on the east of the Jordan (Joshua 13:7-14 ); but it was left for Joshua to define the limits of each tribe
Samuel, Books of - )...
Authorship...
Though the author of 1 and 2 Samuel is not named, it seems that he took much of his material from the records kept by such people as Samuel, Nathan, Gad, David and the writer of the book of Jasher (1 Samuel 10:25; 2 Samuel 1:18; 1 Chronicles 27:24; 1 Chronicles 29:29). ...
Prophecy - (See 1 Samuel 9:9) Hence afterwards we read of Gad, David's seer, 1 Chronicles 21:9
Land - 32:1: “Now the children of Reuben and the children of Gad had a very great multitude of cattle: and when they saw the land of Jazer, and the land of Gilead, that, behold, the place was a place for cattle
Baal - But they, as well as other nations, gradually degenerating into idolatry, applied this appellation, to their respective idols; and thus were introduced a variety of divinities, called Baalim, or Baal, with some epithet annexed to it, as Baal Berith, Baal Gad, Baal Moloch, Baal Peor, Baal Zebub, &c
Arms And Armor - Israel had expert archers in men from Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:40 ; 2 Chronicles 17:17 ) and the eastern tribes of Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh (1 Chronicles 5:18 ). The tribes of Judah (2 Chronicles 14:8 ), Gad (1 Chronicles 12:8 ), and Naphtali (1 Chronicles 12:34 ) used this type of shield with the long thrusting spear or lance as the offensive weapon in the other hand
Ammonites - Before the Israelites entered Canaan, the Amorites conquered a great part of the country belonging to the Ammonites and Moabites; but it was retaken by Moses, and divided between the tribes of Gad and Reuben. After the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh, were carried into captivity by Tiglath-Pileser, B
Conquest of Canaan - Some of the Israelite tribes—Reuben, Gad, and half of the tribe of Manasseh—chose to settle in this newly conquered territory (Numbers 32:1 )
Damascus - Hazael was defeated by Assyria in his turn, with great loss, at Antilibanus; but repulsed Ahaziah's and Jehoram's attack on Israel (2 Kings 8:28), ravaged Gilead, the land of Gad, Reuben, and Manasseh (2 Kings 10:32-33); took also Gath, and was only diverted from Jerusalem by Jehoash giving the royal and the temple treasures (2 Kings 12:17-18)
Plagues of Egypt - Gesenius gives 'gad-fly' for arob , but in Psalm 78:45 ; Psalm 105:31 , the same word is translated 'divers sorts of flies
Judea - The portion of Gad, also on the east of the Jordan, stretched from the Jabok toward the north, where it was bounded by the other half tribe of Manasseh, which occupied the country east of the lake Gennesareth, to the northern limits of the country. ...
Peraea, though the name would denote any extent of country beyond Jordan, is more particularly applied to that district in 32 north latitude, which formerly composed the territories of Sihon, the Amorite, and Og, king of Bashan; extending from the river Arnon (which flows through an extensive plain into the Dead Sea) to the mount of Gilead, where the Jordan issues from the sea of Tiberias; and which fell to the lot of the tribes of Reuben and Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh. Auranitis, or Ituraea, a mountainous and barren tract north of Batantaea, and bounded on the west by a branch of Mount Hermon, contained Bostra, or Bozra, about fifty miles east from the sea of Tiberias, bordering on Arabia Petraea, afterward enlarged by Trajan, and named Trajana Bostra; and Trachonitis, in 33 15' north latitude, between Hermon and Antilibanus, eastward from the sources of Jordan, and containing Baal-gad, Mispah, Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi, and AEnos, nearly twenty-five miles east of Panaeas, and as far south south-west of Damascus. One of them, namely, Scythopolis, already described in the account of Samaria, was situated to the west of Jordan; but the other nine were all to the east of that river, namely, Gadara, or Kedar, a strong place on a hill, the capital of Peraea in the time of Josephus, about sixty stadia east from the sea of Tiberias, and much frequented for its hot baths: Hippos, sometimes called Susitha, thirty stadia northwest of Gadara; Dium, or Dion, of which the situation is unknown, but conjectured by D'Anville to have been about seven leagues eastward from Pella, a considerable town supplied with copious fountains, on the river Jabbok, fourteen miles south-east of Gadara, and celebrated as the place to which the Christians retired, by divine admonition, before the destruction of Jerusalem; Canatha, south-east of Caesarea, and between the Jordan and Mount Hermon; Garasa, afterward Jaras, three leagues north- east from the upper extremity of the sea of Tiberias, and much noted during the crusades; Rabbath-Ammon, the capital of the Ammonites, south-east of Ramoth, and near the source of the Jabbok, on the confines of Arabia, afterward called Philadelphia by Ptolemy Philadelphus, from whom it had received considerable improvements, of which the ruins are still visible; Abila, four leagues east from Gadara, in a fertile tract between the river Hieromax and Mount Gilead; and Capitolais, a town in Batanaea, five or six leagues east north-east of Gadara
Numbers, Book of - The strange position of Gad in the lists ( Numbers 1:20-47 ; Numbers 1:26 ) is explained by the position assigned to it in ch. Gad and Reuben, and (J Prophesy - 29:29 three words are used for “prophet”: “Now the acts of David the king, first and last, behold, they are written in the Book of Samuel the Seer [2] and in the Book of Nathan the Prophet [3], and in the Book of Gad the Seer [4]
Blood - of Jordan; Bezor in Reuben, Ramoth in Gilead (Gad), Golan in Manasseh, E
Hornet - ...
"About the Alburnian groves, with holly green, Of winged insects mighty swarms are seen; This flying plague, to mark its quality, OESTROS the Grecians call; ASYLUS, we: ...
A fierce loud buzzing breeze; their stings draw blood, And drive the cattle Gadding through the wood. And in his Appendix he has given a drawing of it, magnified, for distinctness' sake, something above twice the natural size: after which he observes, "He has no sting, though he seems to me to be rather of the bee kind; but his motion is more rapid and sudden than that of the bee, ( volitans, ) and resembles that of the Gad-fly in England
Moab, Moabites - ...
According to the Priestly narratives, the Israelites secured at this time the territory north of the Arnon; but the narratives differ as to whether its cities were all assigned to Reuben (so Joshua 13:16-21 ), or whether some of the most southerly (Dibon, Ataroth, and Aroer) were assigned to Gad ( Numbers 32:34 ff. The Gadites obtained some of the southern cities, and the Reubenites some of the northern
Minister - ...
B — 6: ἐργάζομαι (Strong's #2038 — Verb — ergazomai — er-gad'-zom-ahee ) "to work, work out, perform," is translated "minister" in 1 Corinthians 9:13 ; the verb is frequently used of business, or employment, and here the phrase means "those employed in sacred things" or "those who are assiduous in priestly functions
Ammon - Israel in turn conquered the Amorites, took the land for itself and divided it among the tribes of Reuben, Gad and half of Manasseh (2 Kings 24:1-27; Numbers 21:24-26; Numbers 21:32-35; Numbers 32:1-5; Joshua 13:8-12). ...
Joel - Leader of tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:12 )
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - ...
The Testament of Gad (‘concerning hatred,’ β). Gad’s sickness proved that ‘by what things a man transgresses, by the same also is he punished. Prophet - 543) suggests that chozeh designates the king's "seer" (1 Chronicles 21:9; Hosea 1:2-111), not only David's seer Gad (as Smith's Bible Dictionary says) but Iddo in Solomon's reign (2 Chronicles 9:29; 2 Chronicles 12:15). Chozeh "the gazer" upon the spiritual world (1 Chronicles 29:9), "Samuel the seer (roeh ), Nathan the prophet (nabi ), Gad the gazer" (chozeh )
Exile - , Tiglath-pileser captured the cities of Naphtali (2 Kings 15:29 ) and carried away as captives the inhabitants of the tribes of Naphtali, Reuben, Gad, and the half-tribe of Manasseh (1 Chronicles 5:26 )
Samuel, Books of - Many Bible students think Samuel along with Nathan and Gad had major input, pointing to 1 Chronicles 29:29 as evidence
Genealogy - Genealogies were need in reckoning Reuben and Gad, "in the days of Jotham king of: Judah (perhaps in connection with his wars against Ammon, 2 Chronicles 27:5), and of Jeroboam king of Israel" (1 Chronicles 5:17)
Wanderings of the Israelites - |...
| Dibon-gad, Numbers 33:45 ,...
| Almon-diblathaim, Numbers 33:46 ,...
Beer, in the desert, Numbers 21:16,18
Armies - At some distance to the east, were the tribes of Judah, Issachar, and Zebulon; on the south were those of Reuben, Simeon, and Gad; to the west were Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin; to the north, Dan, Asher, and Naphtali
Kings, the Books of - Thus, Samuel by His direction anointed Saul and David to reign over His people; Nathan announced God's promise that David's throne and seed should be forever (2 Samuel 7); then when he sinned Nathan remounted his punishment, and upon his repentance immediate forgiveness (2 Samuel 12); similarly, Gad (2 Samuel 24). ...
Also 2 Chronicles 29:29, "the books of Samuel the seer, Nathan the prophet, and Gad the seer," answer to "the book of the acts of Solomon" in 1 Kings 11:41, and 2 Chronicles 9:29, "the book of Nathan the prophet, the prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite, and the visions of Iddo the seer against Jeroboam
Plagues of Egypt - ...
The visitation of flies, of the Gad fly, or hornet, was more intolerable than any of the preceding. This insect was worshipped in Palestine and elsewhere under the title of Baal-zebub, "lord of the Gad fly," 2 Kings 1:1-2
Idolatry - Gad and Meni ( Isaiah 65:11 ) were possibly star-gods
Land (of Israel) - ...
Gad, Reuben, and the half tribe of Manasseh settled on the east side of the Jordan River (Numbers 32:1-5 ; 34:13-15 )
Peraea - 3, he calls Gadara ‘the metropolis of Peraea. ’ In what sense he uses this term there is no means of ascertaining, but he must intend to include under the name ‘Peraea’ the region extending north from the Jabbok to the Yarmuk (Hieromax), close to which river Gadara stood, that is to say, all that the Hebrews meant by ‘beyond the Jordan. Peraea in its more limited sense corresponded with the kingdom of Sihon, or Reuben and a part of Gad. Guy le Strange, whose translation has just been quoted, thinks that the hot springs of Gadara or Amatha in the Yarmuk valley are those referred to, and he adds in regard to them, that ‘round the large basin may still be seen the remains of vaulted bath-houses. He took Hippos, Gadara, Pella, Dion, and other important towns, and extinguished the Greek culture which had flourished in them. ‘Peraea,’ ‘Gadara,’ ‘Decapolis,’ ‘Machaerus’; Thomson, Land and Book
Captivity - As Pul his predecessor is named with Tiglath Pileser as having carried away Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh to Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan (1 Chronicles 5:25-26), probably Tiglath Pileser carried (740 B
Twelve - ...
Gad means companionship...
Simeon means scholarship. Gaddiel: the Lord is my happiness. Gaddi: a troop of GOD
Moab - , haughtily seizing on the territory vacated by Gad and Reuben, E
Name, Names - In some instances a person has two separate designations: Alcimus, Jacimus; John, Gaddis; Diodotus, Tryphon , etc. Other names evidently imply the existence of local sanctuaries, some of which must have been pre-Israelite: Beth-anath, Anathoth, Bethel, Gilgal, Kedesh-naphtali, Migdal-el, Migdal-gad, Neiel, Penuel, Beth-shemesh
Joshua, Theology of - Although the land west of the Jordan had the unique role of divine promise to the patriarchs and to Moses, the allotments of Reuben, Gad, and part of Manasseh also formed part of what was to become the land of Israel
Altar - Mostly for sacrificing; sometimes only as a memorial, as that named by Moses Jehovah Nissi, the pledge that Jehovah would war against Amalek to all generations (Exodus 17:15-16), and that built by Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh, "not for burnt offering, nor sacrifice, but as a witness" (Joshua 22:26-27)
Simeon - Simeon in the wilderness marched south of the tabernacle, with Reuben and Gad, sons of Zilpah, maid of Leah, Simeon's mother
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - 7, Gad , 8) the idea that the Lord should ‘raise (one) from Levi as priest and from Judah as king
David - His father and mother he had placed with the king of Moab, 1 Samuel 22:3; and he had now the presence of the prophet Gad. At Keilah, too, Abiathar, become high priest on his father's murder, joined him, 1 Samuel 22:20; 1 Samuel 23:4, and various warriors: eleven Gadite chiefs are particularly specified, and some of Judah and Benjamin
Prophecy, Prophets - Gad and Nathan served as prophets to the king
Chronicles, the Books of - The genealogical records of Jotham and Jeroboam probably embodied from contemporary documents the details as to the Reubenites and Gadites (1 Chronicles 5:1-22). ...
The Books of Samuel the seer, Nathan the prophet, and Gad the seer (1 Chronicles 29:29), furnished information for David's reign; "the book of Nathan," and "the prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite," and "the visions of Iddo the seer" (2 Chronicles 9:29), for Solomon's reign; "the story (midrash , 'interpretation') of the prophet Iddo," for king Abijah's "acts, ways, and sayings" (2 Chronicles 12:22). ...
There were besides the national records, "the book of the chronicles" (Nehemiah 12:23), which began as early as David (1 Chronicles 27:24), "the chronicles of king David," probably the same as Samuel's, Nathan's and Gad's books above noticed
Hell - 11-14 ) and endless torment (Jub 36:11; 1Enoch 27:1-3; 103:8; T Gad 7:5)
Music - When Hezekiah restored the temple service, which had been neglected in his predecessor's reign, "he set the Levites in the house of the Lord, with cymbals, with psalteries, and with harps, according to the commandment of David, and of Gad the king's seer, and Nathan the prophet; for so was the commandment of the Lord by his prophets," 2 Chronicles 29:25
David - David escaped to the cave of Adullam, and his brethren and his father's house went to him, also those in distress, and those in debt, and the discontented; the prophet Gad was with him, and soon afterwards Abiathar the priest
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - The name is also applied to David's seer, Gad (2 Samuel 24:11 ), and to Hanani and his son Jehu (2 Chronicles 16:7 ; 19:2 ). Only in 1 Chronicles 29:29 are the three terms, roeh , nabi [3], and hoeh used together while referring to Samuel, Nathan, and Gad respectively
Tabernacle - ; Reuben, Simeon, Gad on the S
Numbers, the Book of - ...
Gad held Dibon when Numbers 32:34 was written, but subsequently Joshua (Joshua 13:9-15; Joshua 13:17) assigned it to Reuben
Testimony - The Transjordan tribes of Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh built a replica of the Lord's altar near the Jordan, not for burnt offerings and sacrifices, but as testimony to Israel that they would remain faithful to God's law given to Moses and that they had a continuing legal right to worship at the Lord's tabernacle even though living outside of the promised land (Micah 6:2,9 )
Canaanites - The Amorites possessed the country on the east side of Jordan, between the river Arnon on the south-east, and Mount Gilead on the north, afterwards the lot of Reuben and Gad. Sicily, Sardinia, Malta, Cyprus, Corfu, Majorca, Minorca, Gades, and Ebutris, are supposed to have been peopled by the Canaanites
Sin - The prophet Gad comes to the king as the revealer of God’s wrath and the messenger of God’s pardon ( 2 Samuel 24:1-25 )
Heman - And it was to Heman, under God, even more than to Nathan or Gad, that David owed that ever-present sight
Palestine - Transjordan Plateau East of the Jordan is an area where the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh settled
Bible - The including of histories among the prophets arose from the fact that they were the inspired productions of such prophetic men as Samuel, Gad the seer of David (1 Chronicles 29:29), Nathan, Ahijah, and Iddo (2 Chronicles 9:29)
Idol - Gad was the sun, or Jupiter, representing fortune, Meni the moon or Venus, representing fate (Isaiah 65:11)
Temple of Jerusalem - David had acquired the Temple hill from Araunah the Jebusite at the advice of the prophet Gad to stay a pestilence from the Lord by building an altar and offering sacrifices on the threshing floor (2 Samuel 24:18-25 )
Jacob - But in the view of Kennicott and Speaker's Commentary Jacob went to Laban at 57; in the first 14 years had sons, Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah by Leah; Dan and Naphtali by Bilhah; in the 20 years (Genesis 35:38) next had Gad and Asher by Zilpah, Issachar and Zebulun by Leah, lastly Dinah by Leah and Joseph by Rachel; then six years' service for cattle, then flees from Padan Aram where he had been 40 years, at 97
Saviour (2) - Gad 8)
David - On his return he is advised by the prophet Gad (doubtless because he had found out that Saul had received information of David’s whereabouts) to leave the stronghold; he therefore takes refuge in the forest of Hereth
Samuel - That school of the prophets to which we owe so much of Samuel himself; to which we owe David, and Gad, and Nathan, and all their still greater successors; that great school was the creation and the care of Samuel's leisure from office
David - ...
The Bible authorities for his biography are the Davidic psalms and poetic fragments in the histories (2 Samuel 1:19-27; Ruth 4:22; 2 Samuel 3:22; 2 Samuel 23:1-7); next the chronicles or state annals of David (1 Chronicles 27:24); the book (history) of Samuel the seer, that of Nathan the prophet, and that of Gad the seer (1 Chronicles 29:29)
Judges (1) - ...
The Book of Judges itself is comprised in Judges 2:6 to Judges 16:31 ; and here it is to be noticed, first of all, that a certain artificiality is observable in the structure; the exploits of twelve men are recounted, and the idea seems to be that each represents one of the twelve tribes of Israel, thus: Judah is represented by Othniel, Benjamin by Ehud, the two halves of the tribe of Manasseh by Gideon (West) and Jair (East), Issachar by Tola, Zebulun by Elon, Naphtali by Barak, Ephralm by Abdon, Gad by Jephthah, and Dan by Samson; besides these ten there are Shamgar and Ibzan, two unimportant Judges, but against them there are the two tribes Reuben and Simeon, who, however, soon disappear; while the tribe of Levi, as always, occupies an exceptional position
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - In the final chapter, when Gad, the prophet, gives David three options for punishment after his sin in the matter of the census taking, David says, "Let us fall into the hands of the Lord, for his mercy is great; but do not let me fall into the hands of men" (2 Samuel 24:14 )
Jeremiah - A warrior of the tribe of Gad, fifth in reputation ( 1 Chronicles 12:10 ). The tenth in reputation ( 1 Chronicles 12:13 ) of the same Gadite band
Canaan - To three of the twelve tribes, however, Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, portions of territory were assigned on the eastern side of the river, which were afterward extended by the subjugation of the neighbouring nations