What does Forgiveness mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἄφεσιν release from bondage or imprisonment. / forgiveness or pardon 11
ἄφεσις release from bondage or imprisonment. / forgiveness or pardon 3
ἀφέσει release from bondage or imprisonment. / forgiveness or pardon 1
וְהַסְּלִח֑וֹת forgiveness. 1
הַסְּלִיחָ֑ה forgiveness. 1

Definitions Related to Forgiveness

G859


   1 release from bondage or imprisonment.
   2 Forgiveness or pardon, of sins (letting them go as if they had never been committed), remission of the penalty.
   

H5547


   1 Forgiveness.
   

Frequency of Forgiveness (original languages)

Frequency of Forgiveness (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Forgiveness of Sins
Catholics believe that sins forgiven are removed from the soul (John 20), and not merely covered by the merits of Christ. Only God can forgive sin, since He alone can infuse sanctifying grace by which sin is expelled. God can forgive sin either Immediately, in response to an act of perfect contrition, or mediately, through a sacrament. The sacraments primarily directed to the forgiveness of sin are Baptism and Penance.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Forgive, Forgave, Forgiveness
A — 1: ἀφίημι (Strong's #863 — Verb — aphiemi — af-ee'-ay-mee ) primarily, "to send forth, send away" (apo, "from," hiemi, "to send"), denotes, besides its other meanings, "to remit or forgive" (a) debts, Matthew 6:12 ; 18:27,32 , these being completely cancelled; (b) sins, e.g., Matthew 9:2,5,6 ; 12:31,32 ; Acts 8:22 ("the thought of thine heart"); Romans 4:7 ; James 5:15 ; 1 John 1:9 ; 2:12 . In this latter respect the verb, like its corresponding noun (below), firstly signifies the remission of the punishment due to sinful conduct, the deliverance of the sinner from the penalty Divinely, and therefore righteously, imposed; secondly, it involves the complete removal of the cause of offense; such remission is based upon the vicarious and propitiatory sacrifice of Christ. In the OT atoning sacrifice and "forgiveness" are often associated, e.g., Leviticus 4:20,26 . The verb is used in the NT with reference to trespasses (paraptoma), e.g., Matthew 6:14,15 ; sins (hamartia), e.g., Luke 5:20 ; debts (see above) (opheilema), Matthew 6:12 ; (opheile), Matthew 18:32 ; (daneion), Matthew 18:27 ; the thought (dianoia) of the heart, Acts 8:22 . Cp. kalupto, "to cover," 1 Peter 4:8 ; James 5:20 ; and epikalupto, "to cover over," Romans 4:7 , representing the Hebrew words for "atonement."
Human "forgiveness" is to be strictly analogous to Divine "forgiveness," e.g., Matthew 6:12 . If certain conditions are fulfilled, there is no limitation to Christ's law of "forgiveness," Matthew 18:21,22 . The conditions are repentance and confession, Matthew 18:15-17 ; Luke 17:3 .
As to limits to the possibility of Divine "forgiveness," see Matthew 12:32,2 nd part (see BLASPHEMY) and 1 John 5:16 (see DEATH). See FORSAKE , LAY , Note (2) at end, LEAVE , LET , OMIT, PUT , No. 16, Note, REMIT, SEND, Note, (1), SUFFER, YIELD.
A — 2: χαρίζομαι (Strong's #5483 — Verb — charizomai — khar-id'-zom-ahee ) "to bestow a favor unconditionally," is used of the act of "forgiveness," whether Divine, Ephesians 4:32 ; Colossians 2:13 ; 3:13 ; or human, Luke 7:42,43 (debt); 2 Corinthians 2:7,10 ; 12:13 ; Ephesians 4:32 (1st mention). Paul uses this word frequently, but No. 1 only, in Romans 4:7 , in this sense of the word. See DELIVER.
Note: Apoluo, "to let loose from" (apo, "from," luo, "to loose"), "to release," is translated "forgive," "ye shall be forgiven," Luke 6:37 , AV (RV, "release," "ye shall be released"), the reference being to setting a person free as a quasi-judicial act. The verb does not mean "to forgive." See DISMISS , RELEASE.
B — 1: ἄφεσις (Strong's #859 — Noun Feminine — aphesis — af'-es-is ) denotes "a dismissal, release" (akin to A, No. 1); it is used of the remission of sins, and translated "forgiveness" in Mark 3:29 ; Ephesians 1:7 ; Colossians 1:14 , and in the AV of Acts 5:31 ; 13:38 ; 26:18 , in each of which the RV has "remission." Eleven times it is followed by "of sins," and once by "of trespasses." It is never used of the remission of sins in the Sept., but is especially connected with the Year of Jubilee (Leviticus 25:10 , etc.). Cp. the RV of Luke 4:18 , "release" (AV, "liberty"). For the significance in connection with remission of sins and the propitiatory sacrifice of Christ, see A, No. 1. See DELIVERANCE , LIBERTY , RELEASE , REMISSION. Cp. the different word paresis, "a passing over, a remission," of sins committed under the old covenant, Romans 3:25 . The RV should be used here. This passing over, or by, was neither forgetting nor "forgiving;" it was rather a suspension of the just penalty; cp. Acts 17:30 , "the times of ignorance God overlooked," RV; see also, e.g., Psalm 78:38 .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Forgiveness
An act of God's grace to forget forever and not hold people of faith accountable for sins they confess; to a lesser degree the gracious human act of not holding wrong acts against a person. Forgiveness has both divine and human dimensions. In the divine relationship, it is, first of all, the gracious act of God by which believers are put into a right relationship to God and transferred from spiritual death to spiritual life through the sacrifice of Jesus. It is also, in this divine dimension, the ongoing gift of God without which our lives as Christians would be “out of joint” and full of guilt. In terms of a human dimension, forgiveness is that act and attitude toward those who have wronged us which restores relationships and fellowship. Everyone Needs Forgiveness The basic facts of the Bible are God's creative power and holiness, human rebellion, and the efforts of our merciful God to bring us back to an intended relationship of sonship and fellowship. The need of forgiveness is first seen in the third chapter of Genesis, as Adam and Eve willfully disobeyed God, choosing rather to satisfy their own self-will. The result was guilt (Isaiah 53:3-75 ,John 8:2-113:10 ), separation from God, loss of fellowship (Genesis 3:8 ,Genesis 3:8,3:23-24 ), and a life of hardship, anxiety, and death (Genesis 3:16-24 ) lived under the wrath of God. David expressed this terrible condition of the unforgiven sinner graphically in Psalm 51:1 . He spoke of being unclean (Psalm 51:2 ,Psalms 51:2,51:7 ,Psalms 51:7,51:10 ), of being sinful by his very nature (Psalm 51:5 ), of his grief and sorrow at being separated from God (Psalm 51:8 ,Psalms 51:8,51:11-12 ), and of his guilt (Psalm 51:14 ). Sinners cannot live rightly without God, and yet as a sinner a person is cut off from the holy God. Only through the mercy of God can one find peace and forgiveness.
Forgiveness in the Old Testament The primary means of obtaining forgiveness in the Old Testament is through the sacrificial system of the covenant relationship, which God established when He brought His people out of Egypt. The sacrificial system expressed the dynamics of the sinful human condition. The bringing of the sacrifice showed the sense of need; the laying of the hands on the living sacrifice symbolized identification of the person with the sacrifice, as did the releasing of the life of the animal through the sacrificial slaughter. Emphasis on an unblemished sacrifice stressed the holiness of God contrasted with human sinfulness. The forgiveness of God, channeled through the sacrificial offering, was an act of mercy freely bestowed by God, not purchased by the one bringing the offering.
An emphasis upon God's demand for a repentant heart as the basis for forgiveness, while not totally absent earlier (see Ps. 51), gained its full expression in the prophets (Isaiah 1:10-18 ; Jeremiah 7:21-26 ; Hosea 6:6 ; Amos 5:21-27 ). This element does not negate but rather deepens the understanding of the sacrifice. The Old Testament sacrificial system could never give once-for-all forgiveness. It had to be repeated over and over (Hebrews 10:1-4 ).
Forgiveness in the New Testament Jesus is the perfect and final Sacrifice through which God's forgiveness is mediated to every person (Romans 3:25 ; Hebrews 10:11-12 ). The connection of Jesus with forgiveness is seen in His own self-understanding. According to the Old Testament, only God could forgive sins; yet Jesus declared that He could do so, and He did (Mark 2:1-12 ; John 8:2-11 ). He saw His own death as the fulfillment of the Old Testament sacrificial system. At the Last Supper He spoke of His death as “my blood of the new testament [1]” (Mark 14:24 ). Jesus Himself is the unblemished Sacrifice (1618394054_93 ), offered once for all (Hebrews 9:28 ) not by a human being, but by God Himself in Christ Jesus for the sins of mankind (Hebrews 9:14 ; Romans 3:25 ; Acts 13:38 ). Forgiveness through the sacrifice of Christ is available for everyone who truly repents (Luke 23:39-43 ; 1618394054_16 ). This is the message of the early church. The promised new age has arrived; old things have passed away (Acts 2:36-39 ; Acts 3:13-19 ,Acts 3:13-19,3:26 ; Acts 5:31 ).
The Sin Which is Unforgivable It is true that Jesus spoke of an unforgivable sin (Matthew 12:22-32 ; Mark 3:22-30 ; Luke 12:10 ). It is not a question of God's ability or desire to forgive, but rather a matter of human willingness to meet the conditions for forgiveness. The background of the saying was the controversy between Jesus and the religious leaders of His time. The Pharisees refused to see the merciful hand of God in the work of Jesus, and rather attributed His miracles to the power of Satan. For such who deliberately closed their minds to the work and invitation of God in Christ to draw near, repent, and receive forgiveness, there is no hope. But the fault lies with them, rather than with God.
Human Forgiveness in the New Testament As a part of His teaching about human need for forgiveness and the means of receiving it, Jesus spoke of the human dimension of forgiveness. A firm condition for the receiving of God's forgiveness is the willingness to forgive others. In the Lord's Prayer (Matthew 6:12 ; Luke 11:4 ) and the parable of the Unforgiving Servant (Matthew 18:12-35 ) Jesus clearly indicated such is the case: “But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses” (Matthew 6:15 ). The forgiven life is the forgiving life.
Human forgiveness reflects our experience and understanding of divine forgiveness. Love, not wooden rules, governs forgiveness (Matthew 18:21-22 ). Jesus powerfully demonstrated this teaching on the cross, as He asked for forgiveness for His executioners (Luke 23:34 ). Paul reminded the church at Ephesus of both the grounds of their forgiveness and the basis on which they must forgive one another (Ephesians 4:32 ). See Cross; Mercy; Redemption; Sin .
Earl C. Davis
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Forgiveness of Sin
One of the constituent parts of justification. In pardoning sin, God absolves the sinner from the condemnation of the law, and that on account of the work of Christ, i.e., he removes the guilt of sin, or the sinner's actual liability to eternal wrath on account of it. All sins are forgiven freely (Acts 5:31 ; 13:38 ; 1 John 1:6-9 ). The sinner is by this act of grace for ever freed from the guilt and penalty of his sins. This is the peculiar prerogative of God (Psalm 130:4 ; Mark 2:5 ). It is offered to all in the gospel. (See JUSTIFICATION .)
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Forgiveness of Sins
See PARDON, MERCY.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Forgiveness
The pardon of any offence committed against us. This is a virtue which our Lord expressly inculcates, not as extending to our friends only, but to our enemies. "Ye have heard, " saith he, "Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy; but I say unto you, love your enemies, " &c. "This, " says an ingenious writer, "was a lesson so new, and utterly unknown till taught by his doctrines and enforced by his example, that the wisest moralists of the wisest nations and ages represented the desire of revenge as a mark of a noble mind; but how much more magnanimous, how much more beneficial to mankind, is forgiveness! It is more magnanimous, because every generous and exalted disposition of the human mind is requisite to the practice of it; and it is the most beneficial, because it puts an end to an eternal succession of injuries and retaliation." Let us, therefore, learn to cherish this noble disposition; let the bitterest enemy we have be softened by its effects; let us consider also how friendly it is to our own happiness, and how much it prevents the unhappiness of others. "The feuds and animosities, in families, and between neighbours, which disturb the intercourse of human life, and collectively compose half the misery of it, have their foundation in the want of a forgiving temper, and can never cease but by the exercise of this virtue on one side, or on both." Paley's Mor. Phil. vol. 1: p. 271; Soame Jenyns's Int. Evid. p. 67, 68; Clarke's Sermons, ser. 2. vol. x; Tillotson's Ser. vol. 8: p. 254.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Forgiveness
FORGIVENESS . Like many other words employed to convey ideas connected with the relations of God and man, this covers a variety of thoughts. In both OT and NT we have evidences of a more elastic vocabulary than the EV [1] would lead us to suppose. 1. The OT has at least three different words all tr. [2] ‘forgiveness’ or ‘ pardon ,’ referring either to God’s actions with regard to men (cf. Exodus 34:7 , Psalms 86:5 , Nehemiah 9:17 ) or to forgiveness extended to men by each other (cf. Genesis 50:17 , 1 Samuel 25:28 ). At a very early period of human, or at least of Jewish, history, some sense of the need of forgiveness by God seems to have been felt. This will be especially evident if the words of despairing complaint put into the mouth of Caln be tr. [2] literally (see Driver, The Book of Genesis , on Genesis 4:13 , cf. RVm [4] ). The power to forgive came to be looked on as inherent in God, who not only possessed the authority, but loved thus to exhibit His mercy ( Daniel 9:9 , Nehemiah 9:17 , Jeremiah 36:3 ). In order, however, to obtain this gift, a corresponding condition of humiliation and repentance on man’s part had to be fulfilled ( 2 Chronicles 7:14 , Psalms 86:5 ), and without a conscious determination of the transgressor to amend and turn towards his God, no hope of pardon was held out ( Joshua 24:19 , 2 Kings 24:4 , Jeremiah 5:1 ; Jeremiah 5:7 ). On the other hand, as soon as men acknowledged their errors, and asked God to forgive, no limit was set to His love in this respect ( 1 Kings 8:36 ; 1 Kings 8:50 , Psalms 103:3 ; cf. Deuteronomy 30:1-10 ). Nor could this condition be regarded as unreasonable, for holiness, the essential characteristic of the Divine nature, demanded an answering correspondence on the part of man made in God’s image. Without this correspondence forgiveness was rendered impossible, and that, so to speak, automatically (cf. Leviticus 19:2 , Joshua 24:19 ; see Numbers 14:18 , Job 10:14 , Nahum 1:3 ).
According to the Levitical code, when wrong was done between man and man, the first requlsite in order to Divine pardon was restitution, which had to be followed up by a service of atonement (Leviticus 6:2-7 ). Even in the case of sins of ignorance, repentance and its outward expression in sacrifice had to precede forgiveness ( Leviticus 4:13 ff., Numbers 15:23 ff. etc.). Here the educative influence of the Law must have been powerful, inculcating as it did at once the transcendent holiness of God and the need of a similar holiness on the part of His people ( Leviticus 11:44 ). Thus the Pauline saying, ‘The law hath been our tutor to bring us to Christ’ ( Galatians 3:24 ), is profoundly true, and the great priestly services of the Temple, with the solemn and ornate ritual, must have given glimpses of the approach by which men could feel their way and obtain the help indispensable for the needs adumbrated by the demands of the Mosaic institutions. The burden of the prophetic exhortations, ‘Turn ye, turn ye, why will ye die?’ ( Ezekiel 33:11 ; cf. Isaiah 44:22 , Jeremiah 35:15 ; Jeremiah 18:11 , Hosea 14:1 , Joel 2:13 etc.), would be meaningless if the power to obey were withheld, or the way kept hidden. Indeed, these preachers of moral righteousness did not hesitate to emphasize the converse side of this truth in dwelling on the ‘repentance’ of God and His returning to His afflicted but repentant people ( Jonah 3:9 , Malachi 3:7 etc.). The resultant effect of this mutual approach was the restoration to Divine favour, of those who had been alienated, by the free act of forgiveness on the part of God ( Psalms 85:4 , Isaiah 55:7 ; Isaiah 59:20 , Jeremiah 13:17 ; Jeremiah 13:24 etc.).
2. We are thus not surprised to learn that belief in the forgiveness of sins was a cardinal article of the Jewish faith in the time of Jesus ( Mark 2:7 = Luke 5:21 , cf. Isaiah 43:25 ). Nor was the teaching of Jesus in any instance out of line with the national belief, for, according to His words, the source of all pardon was His Father ( Mark 11:25 f., Matthew 6:14 f.; cf. His appeal on the cross, ‘Father, forgive them,’ Luke 23:34 ). It is true that ‘the Son of Man hath power on earth to forgive sins’ ( Mark 2:10 = Matthew 9:6 = Luke 5:24 ), but the form of the expression shows that Jesus was laying claim to a delegated authority (cf. Luke 7:43 , where, as in the case of the palsied man, the words are declaratory rather than absolute; see Plummer, ICC [5] , in loc. ). This is more clearly seen by a reference to NT epistolary literature, where again and again forgiveness and restoration are spoken of as mediated ‘in’ or ‘through’ Christ ( Ephesians 4:32 , Colossians 2:12 ff., 1 Peter 5:10 ; cf. Ephesians 1:7 , Revelation 1:5 , 1 John 2:12 etc.). Here, as in OT, only more insistently dwelt on, the consciousness of guilt and of the need of personal holiness is the first step on the road to God’s forgiveness ( 1 John 1:9 , cf. Psalms 32:5 ; Psalms 51:3 etc.); and the open acknowledgment of these feelings is looked on as the natural outcome of their existence ( Acts 19:18 ; cf. Romans 10:10 , 1 John 1:9 ). The hopelessness which at times seemed to have settled down on Jesus, when confronted by Pharisaic opposition, was the result of the moral and spiritual blindness of the religious teachers to their real position ( John 9:40 f.).
3. Again, following along the line we have traced in the OT, only more definitely and specifically emphasized, the NT writers affirm the necessity for a moral likeness between God and man (cf. Matthew 5:48 ). It is in this region, perhaps, that the most striking development is to be seen. Without exhibiting, in their relations to each other, the Divine spirit of forgiveness, men need never hope to experience God’s pardon for themselves. This, we are inclined to think, is the most striking feature in the ethical creations of Jesus’ teaching. By almost every method of instruction, from incidental postulate ( Matthew 6:12 = Luke 11:4 , Mark 11:25 ) to deliberate statement ( Matthew 18:21 ff; Matthew 6:15 , Mark 11:25 , Luke 17:4 ) and elaborate parable ( Matthew 18:23-35 ), He sought to attune the minds of His hearers to this high and difficult note of the Christian spirit (cf. Colossians 3:13 , 1 John 4:11 ). Once more, Jesus definitely asserts the limitation to which the pardon and mercy even of God are subjected. Whatever may be the precise meaning attaching to the words ‘an eternal sin’ ( Mark 3:29 ), it is plain that some definite border-line is referred to as the line of demarcation between those who may hope for this evidence of God’s love and those who are outside its scope ( Matthew 12:32 ). See art. Sin, iii. 1.
4. We have lastly to consider the words, recorded only by St. John, of the risen Jesus to His assembled disciples ( John 20:23 ). It is remarkable that this is the only place in the Fourth Gospel where the word tr. [2] ‘forgive’ (RV [7] ) occurs, and we must not forget that the incident of conferring the power of absolution on the body of believers, as they were gathered together, is peculiar to this writer. At the same time, it is instructive to remember that nowhere is St. John much concerned with a simple narrative of events as such; he seems to be engaged rather in choosing those facts which he can subordinate to his teaching purposes. The choice, then, of this circumstance must have been intentional, as having a particular significance, and when the immediately preceding context is read, it is seen that the peculiar power transmitted is consequent upon the gift of the Holy Spirit. On two other occasions somewhat similar powers were promised, once personally to St. Peter as the great representative of that complete faith in the Incarnation of which the Church is the guardian in the world ( Matthew 16:19 ), and once to the Church in its corporate capacity as the final judge of the terms of fellowship for each of its members ( Matthew 18:18 ). In both these instances the words used by Jesus with regard to this spiritual power differ from those found in the narrative of the Fourth Gospel, and the latter is seen to be more definite, profound, and far-reaching in its scope than the former. The abiding presence of the living Spirit in the Church is the sure guarantee that her powers in judging spiritual things are inherent in her (cf. 1 Corinthians 2:12-15 ) as the Body of Christ. Henceforth she carries in her bosom the authority so emphatically claimed by her Lord, to declare the wondrous fact of Divine forgiveness ( Acts 13:38 ) and to set forth the conditions upon which it ultimately rests (see Westcott, Gospel of St. John, in loc. ). Closely connected with the exercise of this Divinely given authority is the rite of Baptism, conditioned by repentance and issuing in ‘the remission of sins’ ( Acts 2:38 ). It is the initial act in virtue of which the Church claims to rule, guide, and upbuild the life of her members. It is symbolic, as was John’s baptism, of a ‘death unto sin and a new birth unto righteousness’ ( Mark 1:4 = Luke 3:3 ; cf. Romans 6:4 , Colossians 2:12 ). It is more than symbolic, for by it, as by a visible channel, the living and active Spirit of God is conveyed to the soul, where the fruition of the promised forgiveness is seen in the fulness of the Christian life ( Acts 2:38 , cf. Acts 10:43 ; Acts 10:47 ; Acts 19:5 f.).
5. On more than one occasion St. Paul speaks of the forgiveness of sins as constituting the redemption of the human race effected by the death of Christ (‘through his blood’ Ephesians 1:7 , cf. Colossians 1:14 ); and the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews emphasizes this aspect of the atoning work of Jesus by showing its harmony with all with which previous revelation had made us familiar, for ‘apart from shedding of blood there is no remission’ ( Hebrews 9:22 ). The same writer, moreover, asserts that once this object has been accomplished, nothing further remains to be done, as ‘there is no more offering for sin’ ( Hebrews 10:18 ) than that which the ‘blood of Jesus’ ( Hebrews 10:19 ) has accomplished. The triumphant cry of the Crucified, ‘It is finished’ ( John 19:30 ), is for this writer the guarantee not only that ‘the Death of Christ is the objective ground on which the sins of men are remitted’ (Dale, The Atonement , p. 430 f.); it is also the assurance that forgiveness of sin is the goal of the life and death of Him whose first words from the cross breathed a prayer for the forgiveness of His tormentors.
J. R. Willis.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Forgiveness
Terminology . There are several Hebrew terms equivalent to the English "to forgive, " as defined below. The three most common are verbs (used transitively): salah [2Col 2:7) and apoluo [ Ezra 9:13-1531 ) express the same idea.
Divine Forgiveness . God's restoration of relationship that entails the removal of objective guilt. Thus, to forgive the offense against God's holiness or the perpetrator of the offense are synonymous. Forgiveness can be extended both to nations (especially Israel) and to individuals.
The Old Testament . God is depicted in the Old Testament as merciful. He is described as "slow to anger" and "abounding in love/mercy, " "compassionate and gracious" (Exodus 34:6 ; Numbers 14:18 ; Nehemiah 9:17 ; Psalm 86:15 ; 103:8 ; 145:8 ; Joel 2:13 ; John 4:2 ). God is lenient toward his people, not treating them as their sin deserves (1618394054_1 ; Psalm 78:35-38 ; 103:8-10 ), and willing to forgive wickedness, rebellion, and sin (Exodus 34:7 ; Numbers 14:18 ).
There is, however, a tension in the character of God as depicted in the Old Testament, because juxtaposed to the characterization of God as merciful is the warning that God as righteous will not forgive sin or at least not leave sin unpunished (Deuteronomy 4:23-24 ; Numbers 14:18 ; Nahum 1:3 ). Although he is predisposed to be merciful, nonetheless he is a jealous God (Ezekiel 18:21-23,27 ; 34:14 ; Exodus 34:7 ; 5:9 ; 6:15 ; Joshua 24:19-20 ; 1:2 ). Amos 7:1-9 illustrates God's character as both merciful and righteous: God forgives and repents of punishing Israel twice but after that, when Israel does not return, he can no longer spare the nation. This tension in God's nature manifests itself in God's dealings with nations—especially Israeland individuals.
National Forgiveness . In one case God forgave a nation other than Israel and did not bring the punishment on it that he had planned. God as righteous was compelled to bring judgment on Nineveh, but God as merciful sent Jonah to warn the city of the impending judgment. The Ninevites, including the king, believed and repented of their evil ways and their violence (Jonah 3:8 ). As a result God as merciful relented from the evil that he had planned to bring on them. This is an illustration of the general principle by which God deals with nations (Jeremiah 18:7-8 ).
Israel is distinguished from other nations as being chosen by God out of all the nations of the earth as his special possession (cf. Exodus 19:15 ; Deuteronomy 7:6 ; 14:2 ; 26:18 ; 1 Kings 3:8 ; 1 Chronicles 16:13 ; Psalm 33:12 ; 105:6 ; 106:4-5 ; 135:4 ; Isaiah 41:8 ; 43:10 ; 44:1-2 ). Israel's election has its roots in God's covenant with Abraham, renewed with Isaac and Jacob, thus giving God's relationship with the nation an unconditional basis (Genesis 12:1-3 ; 15:18 ; 17:8,21 ; 22:17 ; 26:3-5 ; 28:13-15 ; 35:11-12 ; Exodus 2:24 ; 6:4 ; 13:5,11 ; 32:13 ; 33:1 ; Deuteronomy 1:8 ; 4:37 ; 7:8 ; 10:11 ; 26:15 ; 34:4 ; Joshua 1:6 ; 21:43-44 ; 1 Kings 8:40 ; 1 Chronicles 16:16-18 ; 2 Chronicles 20:7 ; Nehemiah 9:7-8 ; Psalm 105:8-11 ). So, in spite of Israel's disobedience, after he has punished the nation, God is committed to dealing mercifully with it because of the covenant made with the fathers and his love for them (Leviticus 26:42 ; Deuteronomy 4:31 ; 9:26-27 ; 2 Kings 13:23 ; Psalm 106:40-46 ; Jeremiah 33:25-26 ; Micah 7:20 ).
Although God made a covenant with the fathers, the generation of the exodus was required to enter into a covenant with him as well. At Mount Sinai the people agreed to do everything that was written in the Book of the Covenant (Exodus 24:1-8 ). About forty years later the children of the generation of the exodus renewed this covenant (Deuteronomy 27-30 ). The covenant entered into by these two generations of Israelites, unlike the covenant made with the fathers, was to be conditional on their obedience. God would bless them with prosperity in the land promised to the fathers, so long as they kept the law revealed through Moses; otherwise they would come under the curses of the covenant. It is significant that Exodus 19:5 makes Israel's status as God's special possession conditional on obedience. Unfortunately, rebellion in the wilderness made the fulfillment of the promises given to the fathers impossible for the generation of the exodus ( Numbers 14:23,30 ; 32:11 ; Deuteronomy 1:35 ); not surprisingly, in Deuteronomy the next generation is advised as to the conditionality of its standing (6:18; 11:8-9; 30:19-20; cf. Jeremiah 11:1-5 ). The covenant made with Moses, in other words, was to be perpetually renewed by Israel.
A tension was thereby created between the indicative and imperative of Israel's life before God: God unconditionally promised the land and prosperity in the land to the fathers and their descendants (Abrahamic covenant). Their descendants, however, would possess the promises only on the condition of their obedience to the Law (Mosaic covenant), and, after they had sinned, would be restored to a state of prosperity and security in the land only on the condition of national repentance (Deuteronomy 30:1-10 ; 31:14-32:47 ; Book of Judges 1 Kings 8:33-40,46-51 ; 2 Chronicles 6:24-31,36-39 ; 7:13-16 ). God as merciful made unconditional promises to Abraham and his descendants, but God as righteous demanded obedience to the Torah as the condition for the realization of these promises for each generation.
Individual Forgiveness . God as righteous required obedience from individual Israelites; by observance of all that God commanded each would live (Leviticus 18:5 ; Nehemiah 9:29 ). Only some violations of the Torah were forgivable, and these through the cult.
In the Torah the intention of the agent is irrelevant to a determination of whether an act needs expiation; any violation of the Torah renders the agent culpable. The expressed purpose of the sin offering, in fact, is to provide expiation for those who sin unintentionally (Leviticus 4:2 ). The stress is on the objective status of the person or community before God. Even unavoidable things like childbirth (12:1-8) and skin disease (14:1-32) render a person in need of expiation. In some cases nonmoral entities, such as the altar (8:15) or houses, must be expiated (14:53).
There is nonetheless the recognition that there is a difference in kind between intentional and unintentional violations of the Torah. With the exception of theft or fraud against one's neighbor (Leviticus 6:1-7 ; Numbers 5:5-8 ), taking careless oaths (Leviticus 5:4-5 ), and a lesser sexual offense (Leviticus 19:20-22 ), intentional violations of the Torah were not forgivable; the perpetrator was to be killed or cut off. Numbers 15:22-31 explicitly distinguishes between one who disobeys unintentionally, for whom a priest can atone, and one who disobeys intentionally, for whom the penalty is extirpation. The one who sins in a defiant manner despises the word of the Lord.
The cult provided the means of expiation for those violations of the Torah that were forgivable. Three types of sacrifice that could be brought by an individual were expiatory (Leviticus 1-7 ): the burnt offering, the sin offering, and the guilt offering. Commonly in Leviticus and Numbers, a priest expiates for the offerer by means of a sacrifice and the offerer is pardoned. One of these sacrifices could also be offered for communal guilt (cf. Numbers 15:22-26 ; 2 Chronicles 29:24 ).
These expiatory sacrifices that could be brought by individuals also formed part of daily, weekly, and monthly sacrifices, as well as special offerings during the festivals. In three instances expiation is said to be effected for all individuals within the community by a public offering comprised of one of these expiatory sacrifices (Numbers 28:22,30 ; 29:5 ). This raises the possibility that all such public sacrifices not explicitly said to expiate do so also.
The Day of Atonement was another means by which individual sins could be forgiven. In Leviticus 16 Aaron (or his descendants) is instructed first to expiate himself and his house annually . Then, taking two goats, Aaron is to offer onechosen by lotas a sin offering for the expiation of the sanctuary (v. 16), while over the other he is to confess all the wickedness of the sons of Israel and all their rebelliontheir sinand release this second goat into the wilderness. The released goat removes all wickedness. This was a national ritual designed to remove individual offenses against God's holiness.
In his dealing with individual Israelites, God as merciful stands in tension with God as righteous. He does not deal with individual sin as it deserves, but forgives and mitigates punishment.
The Day of Atonement seems designed to atone for all the sins of an individualeven those that should result in extirpation. Consistency should demand that the violations of the Torah to be expiated on the Day of Atonement be those unknown and forgivable violations committed by individuals during the past year. But Leviticus 16:21 stipulates that Aaron will confess over the goat "all the wickedness and rebellion of the Israelitesall their sins"; the fact that these three terms are used in tandem to denote sin in its totality implies that otherwise unforgivable violations of the Torah were forgiven on that day. To the objection that what is forgiven must be that which the Torah allows to be forgiven, it can be countered that God is described as one who forgives wickedness, rebellion, and sin ( Exodus 34:6 ).
In addition, God forgives people who should not be forgivable; for the sake of mercy God violates the conditions of his own covenant and often Acts more leniently than the Torah would allow. David murdered Uriah and committed adultery with Bathsheba (2 Samuel 11 ); both actions were punishable by death so that both David and Bathsheba should have been killed. Instead, God forgave David (and presumably Bathsheba), although he was punished for his deeds (2 Samuel 12 ). In Psalm 51 , said to have been occasioned by Nathan's rebuke, David asks God to forgive him (vv. 1-2) and expresses confidence that his sacrifice of a broken spirit and contrite heart are acceptable to God (vv. 16-17). Solomon went so far as to worship other gods, including the detestable god Molech (1 Kings 11 ). Although God removed the kingdom from his son as punishment, Solomon was not judged according to the Torah, which required death for those who turned away from worshiping and serving God (Deuteronomy 17:2-7 ). God's dealings with the subsequent kings of Israel and Judah also reflect a much greater leniency than was allowed in the Torah. In spite of all the evil Ahab had done, God did not kill Ahab, which was the required penalty for his sin of complicity in the murder of Naboth. Because Ahab repented God did not even bring punishment on Ahab's house (1 Kings 21:27-29 ), as he had originally planned.
Repentance is a factor causing God to depart from the standards of the Torah. The individual is understood on analogy to the nation, so that, just as the nation is restored to favor after repentance, so is the individual. Although the prophets mostly spoke to Israel as a nation, in Exodus 20:5 the individual Israelite is addressed and offered God's unconditional forgiveness. Repentance after committing a violation of the Torah punishable by death has the effect of bringing about God's mercy.
The Eschatological Resolution of the Tension . The tension between God as merciful and God as righteous manifesting itself on both national and individual levels was to be resolved by God at the time of Israel's eschatological renewal. The prophets often spoke of a time when the nation would be restored to the land and forgiven. At this time God would also give to individual Israelites the means by which to meet the conditions of the Mosaic covenant, so that the tension between God's unconditional and conditional promises (the Abrahamic and Mosaic covenants) would become irrelevant: since individual Israelites would have a heart to obey God, the nation would be obedient. This restoration is often spoken of as the establishment of another (eschatological) covenant, which will issue in both forgiveness and the spiritual transformation of the people, and is often associated with the giving of the Spirit (Jeremiah 31:31-34 ; 32:27-41 ; 50:5,20 ; Ezekiel 16:59-63 ; 36:24-32 ). Related to the eschatological resolution of the tension is the Isaian servant, who is said to be the servant of the covenant (Isaiah 42:6 ) and whose death is expiatory (Isaiah 53 ).
The New Testament . The tension between God's dealings with human beings in terms of his mercy and righteousness finds resolution in the New Testament. That the eschatological promises of forgiveness and spiritual transformation have become realities through the appearance, death, resurrection, and exaltation of Jesus Christ is assumed throughout the New Testament. This eschatological resolution pertains to the nation, individuals within the nation, and individual Gentiles.
John the Baptist offered eschatological forgiveness to the nation on the condition of repentance (Mark 1:4 ; Luke 3:3 ). His offer exemplified the tension between God as merciful and God as righteous, as shown by the fact John rejected some who had not first produced the fruit of repentance before seeking the baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sin. He evidently assumed that Israel was the totality of Jews who were faithful to the covenant. John the Baptist pointed to the resolution of this tension, however, when he said that the one who would come after him would baptize with the Holy Spirit (Matthew 3:11 ; Mark 1:8 ; Luke 3:16 ).
Jesus proclaimed the kingdom of God, and offered his hearers the possibility of entrance into this kingdom on the condition of repentance. He was the mediator of eschatological salvation, which included the extension of forgiveness (Matthew 9:3-6 ; Mark 2:7-12 ; Luke 5:21-25 ; 7:36-50 ). Like John the Baptist, Jesus required that the offer of eschatological salvation be appropriated by individuals; the process of entering the kingdom was that of becoming a child, by passively receiving God's eschatological forgiveness. It is for this reason that Jesus said to his opponents that "the tax collectors and the prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God ahead of you" (Matthew 21:31 b).
Jesus' offer of the kingdom to all on the condition of repentance led to the charge that he associated with tax-collectors and sinners, which his opponents considered offensive to God's righteousness (Matthew 9:10-13 ; 11:19 ; Mark 2:15-17 ; Luke 5:30-32 ; 7:34 ; 15:2 ). The offense probably lay not in the fact that Jesus taught that God would forgive the repentant, but that Jesus actively sought out sinners and offered them the possibility of eschatological forgiveness. In Jesus' opponents' view, sinners ought to take the initiative.
One must remember that for a Jew repentance meant more than simple remorse; it included moral reformation. This explains why some of Jesus' sayings emphasize the need for righteousness in order to be included in the kingdom of God. The same stress on God as both merciful and righteous found in the Old Testament period is found in Jesus' teaching about the kingdom. The mere fact that Jesus required repentance as a condition of entrance into the kingdom is sufficient to make the point. These two aspects of Jesus' teaching, however, are not in tension, because he saw his time as that of eschatological salvation, the time of the resolution of the tension between God as merciful and God as righteous in his dealings with human beings. Jesus proclaimed the kingdom of God and later taught that his death would be the means by which the new covenant would be realized. He also taught that the Spirit would be given after his return to the Father (John 7:39 ; 14-16 ). Understood against the background of the eschatological promises of the Old Testament, Jesus was saying that the time of Israel's eschatological forgiveness and spiritual transformation had come.
Jesus' preaching of the kingdom of God led to his arrest and execution. This had two consequences. First, in response to the crisis in his ministry that this produced, Jesus incorporated his rejection and impending death into his message. He interpreted his death as vicarious and expiatory, as the means by which eschatological forgiveness and renewal would come to Israel and the nations in spite of Israel's rejection of the messenger of the kingdom. Jesus understood his death in light of the destiny of the Servant as a guilt offering for many (Matthew 20:28 ; Mark 10:45 ; Luke 22:37 ). He also interpreted his impending death at the Last Supper as that of the eschatological Passover lamb whose sacrifice would bring about the possibility of forgiveness and the realization of the new covenant (Matthew 26:26-28 ; Mark 14:22-24 ; Luke 22:19-20 ). Second, Jesus' rejection would bring into being a messianic community, the church (ekklesia [ Acts 1:8 ; 2:1-13 ). Also Gentiles would become part of this community and receive the Holy Spirit (Matthew 28:18-19 ; Acts 10 ). Jesus still foresaw, however, a future for the nation (Luke 21:24 ; Acts 1:6-7 ), when God would bring about eschatological salvation on a national basis.
Paul writes that Jesus' death is the means by which eschatological forgiveness comes not only to the Jew but also to the Gentile (Galatians 3:7-9 ; cf. Acts 3:25 ). Like Jesus, he sees the tension between God as merciful and God as righteous resolved in the realization of the eschatological promises of forgiveness and spiritual transformation.
There are some passages in the New Testament that suggest baptism is a necessary condition for acquiring eschatological forgiveness (Acts 2:38 ; Romans 6:3-4 ; Colossians 2:12 ; 1 Peter 3:21 ). This is a controversial subject; suffice it to say that at the very least baptism is intricately bound up with the reception of eschatological forgiveness.
First John speaks of forgiveness after having received eschatological forgiveness. The author says that the one who is in him (Christ)/born of God does not sin habitually (3:6,9); this person has the Spirit (3:24). But John recognizes that nonhabitual sin is an inevitability and requires a means of expiation (1:7-2:2). Expiation comes by confession, after which the sinner will be cleansed from all unrighteousness by Jesus' expiatory sacrifice.
In the New Testament there are references to sins that are unforgivable. Jesus spoke about blasphemy against the Spirit for which there could be no forgiveness (Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-29 ; Luke 12:10 ). The author of Hebrews also allows for the possibility of sins committed by "believers" that are not forgivable (6:4-8; 10:26-31), and 1John refers to a sin that leads to death (5:16-17). These are difficult passages to interpret, but probably should be understood as denoting apostasy issuing in sins for which there is no repentance. The apostate, moreover, never had a genuine experience of God's eschatological salvation.
Human Forgiveness . In the Lord's Prayer, receiving forgiveness from God is joined to forgiving others (Matthew 6:12 ; Luke 11:4 ). Jesus' parable of the unmerciful servant makes the point that human beings are obliged to forgive because God has forgiven them (Matthew 18:23-35 ). God's forgiveness is actually said to be conditional upon forgiving others (Matthew 6:14 ; 18:35 ; Mark 11:25-26 ; Luke 6:37 ). Jesus says that there ought to be no limit on the number of times that one should forgive another so long as the offender repents and asks for forgiveness (Matthew 18:21-22 ; Luke 17:3-4 ).
Barry D. Smith
See also Atonement ; Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ; Death of Christ ; Faith ; Repentance
Bibliography . A. Bü hler, Studies in Sin and Atonement ; P. Garnet, Salvation and Atonement in the Qumran Scrolls ; M. Hengel, The Atonement ; G. E. Ladd, A Theology of the New Testament ; E. A. Martens, God's Design: A Focus on Old Testament Theology ; J. Milgrom, Cult and Conscience: The Asham and the Priestly Doctrine of Repentance ; G. F. Moore, Judaism in the First Centuries of the Christian Era ; G. F. Oehler, Theology of the Old Testament ; E. P. Sanders, Paul and Palestinian Judaism ; B. D. Smith, Jesus' Last Passover Meal ; V. Taylor, Jesus and His Sacrifice .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Forgiveness
There are three Hebrew words translated to forgive.
1. kaphar , 'to cover,' Deuteronomy 21:8 ; Psalm 78:38 ; Jeremiah 18:23 . It is also translated 'atonement.'
2. nasa , 'to bear,' take away [1]: used by Joseph's brethren when they asked him to forgive them, Genesis 50:17 ; and used of God as "forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin." Exodus 34:7 ; Numbers 14:18 ; and in describing the blessedness of the man "whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered." Psalm 32:1 .
3. salach , 'to pardon,' used only of the forgiveness that God gives. It is employed for the forgiveness attached to the sacrifices: "it shall be forgiven him." Leviticus 4:20,26,31,35 ; Leviticus 5:10,13,16,18 ; etc. It occurs in the prayer of Solomon at the dedication of the temple. 1 Kings 8:30,34,36,39,50 . Also in Psalm 103:3 ; Jeremiah 31:34 ; Jeremiah 36:3 ; Daniel 9:19 .
In the N.T. two words are used: ἄφεσις, from ἀφίημι, 'to send from, release, remit,' several times translated REMISSION;and χαρίζομαι, 'to be gracious, bestow freely, forgive.' Both words are applied to the forgiveness granted by God, as well as that between man and his fellow.
There are two aspects in which forgiveness is brought before us in scripture.
1. The mind and thought of God Himself towards the sinner whom He forgives. On the ground of the sacrifice of Christ, God not only ceases to hold those who have faith in Christ's blood as guilty before Him, but His favour is towards them. "Their sins and iniquities will I remember no more." Hebrews 10:17 . Thus all sense of imputation of guilt is gone from the mind of God. "God for Christ's sake hath forgiven you" (ἐχαρίσατο, graciously forgiven). Ephesians 4:32 . So in the O.T., "I will heal their backsliding, I will love them freely." Hosea 14:4 .
2. The guilty one is released, forgiven. "That they may receive forgiveness of sins." Acts 26:18 . "As far as the east is from the west, so far hath he removed our transgressions from us ." Psalm 103:12 . "Your sins are forgiven you for his name's sake." 1 John 2:12 . Hence it is true of all Christians, that their sins are forgiven. Another thought is included in the forgiveness of sins, namely, that having redemption by Christ, which brings into a new state, the whole guilty past is forgiven, removed from us, so that there is no hindrance to the enjoyment of that into which redemption brings.
The general principle as to forgiveness is stated in 1 John 1:9 ; "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins;" and to this is added, "and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness." This involves honesty of heart, whether in a sinner first coming to God, or in a child who has grieved the heart of the Father by sinning. The two aspects above referred to are here also. The faithfulness and righteousness of God in forgiving, and the cleansing us from all unrighteousness. God is faithful to His own blessed character of grace revealed in His Son, and righteous through the propitiation which He has made.
3. If a Christian is 'put away' from the assembly and is repentant, he is forgiven and restored. 2 Corinthians 2:7,10 . This of course is different from the act of God in forgiving sins, and may be called administrative forgiveness in the church; and if the act of discipline is led of the Spirit, it is ratified in heaven: cf. John 20:22,23 . This is entirely different from any pretended absolution that may be pronounced over poor deluded unconverted persons.
4. There is also a governmental forgiveness in connection with the government of God here below in time, both on God's part, and toward one another. Isaiah 40:1,2 ; Luke 17:3 ; James 5:15,16 ; 1 John 5:16 . We are called upon to forgive one another; and if we indulge in a harsh unforgiving spirit, we must not expect our Father to forgive us in His governmental dealings. Matthew 6:14,15 .
Webster's Dictionary - Forgiveness
(1):
(n.) Disposition to pardon; willingness to forgive.
(2):
(n.) The act of forgiving; the state of being forgiven; as, the forgiveness of sin or of injuries.
King James Dictionary - Forgiveness
FORGIV'ENESS, n. forgiv'ness.
1. The act of forgiving the pardon of an offender, by which he is considered and treated as not guilty. The forgiveness of enemies is a christian duty. 2. The pardon or remission of an offense or crime as the forgiveness of sin or of injuries. 3. Disposition to pardon willingness to forgive. And mild forgiveness intercede to stop the coming blow.
4. Remission of a debt, fine or penalty.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Forgiveness
There are seven words in Scripture that denote the idea of forgiveness: three in Hebrew and four in Greek. No book of religion except Christianity teaches that God completely forgives sins. God remembers our sins no more (Luke 17:3-46). God is the initiator of forgiveness (Colossians 2:13).
There is only one sin for which the Father does not promise forgiveness: blasphemy against the Holy Spirit (Mark 3:28; Matthew 12:32). The contexts suggest this to be the sin of attributing to unclean spirits the work of the Holy Spirit.
For man to receive forgiveness, repentance is necessary (1618394054_45). For the holy God to extend forgiveness, the shedding of blood is necessary (Hebrews 9:22; Leviticus 17:11). Forgiveness is based upon the sacrifice of Christ on the cross.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Forgiveness (2)
FORGIVENESS
Three words are used in the Gospels which are rendered in English by the word ‘forgive’:—ἁτολύειν, to set free, once only, in Luke 6:37; χαριζεσθαι, to show oneself gracious, or forgive frankly, in Luke 7:42-43; and ἀφιέναι, to remit, or let off, 37 times in the Synoptic Gospels. The noun ἀφεσις, ‘remission’ or ‘forgiveness,’ is found 8 times in the Synoptics, the words ‘of sins’ or ‘of trespasses’ being either added or closely implied.
In the treatment of the subject in this article three things must be borne in mind. First, that the words employed by Christ and the ideas they represent are not entirely new as they come from His lips. Our Lord presupposes and then puts His own characteristic impress upon a doctrine of forgiveness with which His hearers were for the most part familiar, and which for us is embodied in the OT. Secondly, that no complete study of Christ’s teaching concerning forgiveness can be made, unless other words, such as ‘save,’ ‘justify,’ and ‘cleanse,’ are taken into account, and the whole subject of release from the guilt and bondage of sin, as promised by Him, is kept in view. And, thirdly, that to stop short with the recorded words of Christ Himself on the matter is—speakingly reverently—not to know His whole mind upon it. It was impossible for Him in the course of His earthly ministry to set forth the full significance of His work for men, before it was accomplished. Hence for a complete account of the significance of His death we turn to the teaching of the Apostles, enlightened as they were by the Holy Spirit whom He had promised. In due course were revealed those ‘many things’ concerning His cross and passion which His disciples could not ‘bear’ during His lifetime. Down even to the very close of His short ministry on earth the rudimentary spiritual intelligence of the Apostles was unequal to carrying the full burden of the gospel as they afterwards understood it. The way in which that gospel was to he emphatically one of forgiveness, that ‘through this man is proclaimed remission of sins, and by him every one that believeth is justified from all things from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses,’ was only made clear afterwards. It being therefore carefully borne in mind that the OT prepared the way for Christ’s teaching on forgiveness, and that the Epistles developed and completed it, this article will deal only with that stage in the biblical doctrine of the subject which is represented by Christ and the Gospels. The consideration of it will be divided into four sections: (1) the Divine forgiveness of man, (2) Christ’s own power to forgive sins, (3) the duty of men to forgive one another, (4) the extent to which authority to forgive is vested in the Christian community.
1. God the Father as forgiving the sins of men.—The first reference chronologically to this subject in the Gospels is found in the Benedictus, or Psalm of Zacharias (Luke 1:77). The prophecy concerning John the Baptist announces that he is to give ‘knowledge of salvation unto his people, in the remission of their sins, according to the tender mercy of our God,’ etc. The whole tenor of the canticle goes to show that God’s ancient promises were about to be fulfilled in the coming of a Saviour through whom the great boon of remission of sins was to be secured in a fuller sense than had hitherto obtained. When the time came, John the Baptist is declared to have preached the baptism of repentance ‘unto remission of sins’ (Mark 1:4, Luke 3:3). In the same connexion may be taken the interpretation of the name Jesus in Matthew 1:21 ‘he shall save his people from their sins,’ and the ‘Saviour, Christ the Lord,’ of Luke 2:11, though the word ‘forgiveness’ does not occur. It was indeed implicit throughout our Lord’s ministry, all His declarations concerning His coming ‘not to call the righteous, but sinners’ (Matthew 9:13), ‘to seek and to save that which was lost’ (Luke 19:10), and His promise of ‘rest to the souls’ of men (Matthew 11:29), showing that the object of His ministry was to reclaim from sin, by bringing men to that forgiveness and cleansing which God had promised through repentance and faith in Him.
The explicit references to forgiveness of sin are comparatively few, but they are clear and definite in character, and quite sufficient to establish doctrine on the subject. They are: (a) the petition in the Lord’s Prayer, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ Matthew 6:12 (‘our sins,’ Luke 11:3), combined with Matthew 6:14-15, Mark 11:25, which assert God’s willingness to forgive under certain conditions. With these join Luke 6:37, a parallel passage with a different turn of expression, ‘Release and ye shall be released,’ the reference clearly being to sin. (b) The parables of Luke 15, especially that of the Prodigal Son, and of the Pharisee and the Publiean in Luke 18:9-14. (c) Our Saviour’s prayer on the cross, ‘Father, forgive them,’ etc., Luke 23:34. (d) Statements concerning God’s willingness to forgive all sins, including those ‘against the Son of man,’ but excluding the unpardonable sin against the Holy Ghost, Matthew 12:32, Mark 3:29, Luke 12:10; add also Mark 4:12, in which Isaiah’s prophecy is represented as being fulfilled, ‘lest they should repent and be forgiven (healed).’
Putting these passages together, we are warranted in concluding that Christ taught the readiness of the Father always to hear the prayer of the truly penitent and in His mercy to pardon their sins, the chief questions being, What is the exact nature of forgiveness? Is it free to all mankind, or to those only who are in covenant relation with Him? Is any condition besides that of repentance laid down?
The meaning of the word ‘forgiveness,’ and the relation between God and man implied in it, must be gathered largely from the OT. Doubtless under the old covenant a progressive revelation is to be recognized, an advance in spirituality of teaching being discernible in its later stages. Doubtless also it is necessary to bear in mind the distinction between the ceremonial standpoint of the Law with its elaborate ritual and appointed sacrifices on the one hand, and the more purely spiritual view of the prophet and psalmist on the other. But, broadly speaking, Christ, like the more ‘Evangelical’ OT prophets, represents forgiveness as a pure act of grace on the part of God, Who on the repentance of the sinner receives him graciously and pardons his transgression in the sense of replacing the offender in his former relation of acceptance and favour. Forgiveness is not mere remission of penalty, the forbearing to inflict deserved punishment, though such release is for the most part included. Punishment may still be exacted, but it has lost its penal character and becomes Divine chastisement inflicted for the improvement of the offender, or for the sake of others. Neither does forgiveness imply any false or arbitrary dealing with the past, any condoning of sin—which is essentially immoral—or ignoring of the transgression, as if it had not been committed—which would imply a weak and false attempt to secure the impossible. Nor, again, can any kind of remission of sins be predicated of God which implies unrighteousness in any form, the solemn sanctions of the eternal law of righteousness being secured by the conditions upon which forgiveness is granted.
But the essence of forgiveness lies in the establishment, or restoration, of a personal relation between sinful man and a grieved and righteously angry God. Omnipotence itself cannot erase the event from the history of the past, and holiness will not permit any concealment or pretence as to the heinousness of the offence committed. But the sin may be ‘covered,’ the guilt cancelled, in the sense that on certain conditions it shall be as if it had never been, so far as the relation between God and the sinner is concerned. Hence sin when forgiven is said to be ‘cast into the depth of the sea’ (Micah 7:19), ‘cast behind thy back’ (Isaiah 38:17), removed ‘as far as the east is from the west’ (Psalms 103:12), ‘remembered no more’ (Jeremiah 31:34) against the sinner.
Ritschl says: ‘God, in forgiving or pardoning sins, exercises His will in the direction of not permitting the contradiction—expressed in guilt—in which sinners stand to Him to hinder that fellowship of men with Him which He intends on higher grounds.’ It does not, he adds, ‘free them altogether from the consciousness of guilt, but from that mistrust which, as an affection of the consciousness of guilt, naturally separates the injured man from the offender.’ And again, it is ‘a reconciliation of such a nature that while memory, indeed, preserves the pain felt at the sin which has been committed, yet at the same time the place of mistrust towards God is taken by the positive assent of the will to God and His saving purpose.’
Forgiveness can never be adequately understood by means of any figure of speech, commercial or other. It represents a relation of persons, and its essence lies in the restoration of impaired confidence, affection, and favourable regard. It has to do not only with the past, but the present and the future, and it is exercised by God towards men just in proportion as they are capable of receiving it.
Repentance is the one condition clearly laid down and repeatedly insisted on in the Gospels. It is necessary as between man and man, much more between man and God. When John the Baptist comes to prepare the way of the Saviour, nothing can be done without that thoroughgoing repentance which implies reformation so far as man can effect it. Repentance is indeed a necessary ingredient of forgiveness if the two terms are rightly understood. Sorrow for sin and complete renunciation of it are not arbitrary conditions which the Sovereign chooses to exact before bestowing a boon; they belong to the very essence of the personal relation between Father and son which has been impaired or broken by error and disobedience, and which is to be restored in forgiveness. For an impenitent sinner not to be punished is conceivable, but for such a one to be forgiven is a contradiction in terms. The necessity for a forgiving spirit in one who hopes himself to be forgiven is dealt with below.
God is then ‘good and ready to forgive’ (Psalms 86:5), a God ‘keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity, transgression, and sin’ (Exodus 34:7). It would, however, be misleading to generalize and say that this attribute of mercy obviates all necessity for an atonement, or vindication of the law of righteousness, and that throughout the whole history of the world nothing more is needed to obtain Divine forgiveness of sin than confession and repentance on the part of man. The promises of the OT were given to those who stood in a covenant relation with God, in which His righteousness was effectually safeguarded. Christ’s ministry was exercised amongst Jews in the first instance, and the presuppositions of OT Scripture must be taken into account.
The same may be said of the two gracious parables of our Lord which chiefly deal with this subject. It is impossible to found accurate doctrine on a parable only, and it is always a mistake to suppose that one parable can cover the whole range of doctrine. The three recorded in Luke 15 were uttered to show the nature of Christ’s mission and His desire to seek and save the worst sinners, as well as the willingness of God to receive such, and the joy of heaven and earth when the penitent returns and is pardoned. The moral basis on which this becomes possible in the Divine government is another matter. The cosmic conditions of forgiveness are described in their proper place in Scripture. But in the parable of the Prodigal Son the lesson is impressed that the utmost failure in filial duty will be readily forgiven, if the wanderer will but repent and return. In the parable of the Pharisee and the Publican the essential teaching is the same—the danger lest those who comply with rules of ordinary morality should so plume themselves on their obedience as to lose the sense of their own deep need and ill-desert, and the fact that grave offenders against the fundamental laws of righteousness, like the publican and the harlot, may find their way into the kingdom of grace before the self-righteous Pharisee. But it would be utterly misleading, even to the subversion of the very foundations of ethics, if the inference were drawn that it matters nothing how deeply a man sins, provided that when his evil course is over he regrets his errors and asks for pardon, and that there is no reason in the moral government of the Universe why such a man should not be at once forgiven without infraction of the eternal law of righteousness.
This general conclusion is borne out by Christ’s strong language concerning sin, and especially that sin which cannot be forgiven (see Matthew 12:32, Mark 3:29, Luke 12:10). In spite of the long controversy which has taken place as to the mysterious sin against the Holy Ghost and the misunderstandings concerning it which have caused unspeakable spiritual anguish to thousands, there seems little question that the only sin thus pronounced unpardonable is that of wilful and persistent sinning against light till light itself is turned into darkness,—the perverting of truth at its very source, where the Holy Spirit Himself instructs the conscience, and thus poisoning the wells of the soul. Therefore, not in virtue of an arbitrary fiat of the Almighty, but by the necessity of the case, such sin cannot be forgiven. ‘A lamp’s death when, replete with oil, it chokes; a stomach’s when, surcharged with food, it starves.’ With this explanation harmonizes the Saviour’s prayer in Luke 23:34 ‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.’ The sin of Christ’s murderers, heinous indeed beyond expression, was a sin against the Son of man, and—at least in the case of most of those implicated and so far as the full gravity of the offence was concerned—it was not such a deliberate and complete perversion of conscience as to amount to a sin against the Holy Spirit. The reason why the unforgiving cannot be forgiven is to be similarly understood. Hence the general doctrine is laid down in the Gospels in unmistakable terms, that God the Father is ready to receive and pardon all sinners except those who shut themselves out from its possibility by wilfully cherishing a spirit known to be evil, and deliberately hardening their own hearts against the grace which was ready to receive and renew them. See Unpardonable Sin.
2. It is clear that Christ’s teaching concerning forgiveness was not exhausted by the proclamation of the Father’s willingness to receive the penitent. He Himself claimed the power to forgive, which was recognized by all to be a Divine prerogative. In Matthew 9, Mark 2, and Luke 5 is recorded the narrative of the healing of the paralytic, which had evidently impressed itself strongly upon tradition, since it is given by all three Synoptists at greater length than usual and almost in the same words. It was one of the grounds of offence which ultimately caused the death of Jesus, that, whilst lowly in demeanour, He put forth claims for Himself so lofty that to a reverent Jew He appeared often to blaspheme. Jesus does not deny the fundamental assumption that none can forgive sins but God only. To a true believer in one God this is an axiom; there is but one Governor and there can be but one Fount of pardon. Jesus did not thereupon disclaim the possession of a Divine prerogative. He put His own claims to an easily applied test, Whether is it easier to tell a sufferer that his sins are forgiven, or to heal him of an incurable malady? In other words, any prophet may speak words of comfort or absolution, but one who shows the power of healing in order to establish his claim to pronounce forgiveness is no ordinary messenger, but proves Himself to be the Son of God with power. The whole incident evidently made a deep impression, for we are told that the people wondered, praised God, and acknowledged that unprecedented and superhuman power had been entrusted to a son of man.
The close connexion between the work that Christ did for the bodies of men and the power that He claimed over their souls in the forgiveness of sin, is suggested in other narratives, though somewhat less clearly. The inference has been drawn from John 5:14 and the early tradition recorded in John 8:11, that Jesus habitually pronounced remission of sin and gave power to amend the life in future, but the brief records in these cases hardly warrant such a conclusion.
The narrative of the woman who was a sinner, recorded in Luke 7:36-50, is full of instruction on the subject of forgiveness. The mission of Christ to save the outcast and the abandoned is here delicately and beautifully shown. The only doubtful point of interpretation relates to the ground of forgiveness as described in Luke 7:47. Many commentators, including the chief Roman Catholic authorities, make the forgiveness extended to the woman to depend upon the love she showed, and at first reading this might seem warranted by the phrase ‘for she loved much.’ But on examination this is seen to be impossible. For (1) the whole scope of the parable of the two debtors shows that forgiveness precedes love; (2) the latter part of Luke 7:47 enforces the same lesson; and so (3) does the absolution pronounced in Luke 7:48. The only ambiguity lies in the pregnant use of ὅτι in Luke 7:47, and the meaning of the clause may be expressed by the paraphrase, ‘This is the reason why I tell you that her many sins are forgiven—for (see) she has shown much love; but he who is forgiven little, loves little.’ Her repentance and acceptance had taken place before, her grateful love was manifested in return by the outpouring of the ointment; and in Luke 7:48 Christ authoritatively confirms the assurance of her free and full pardon as One who had an absolute right to do so.
The doctrine of the forgiveness of sins on the basis of atonement through the death of Christ is not, properly speaking, revealed by Christ Himself. The Fourth Gospel contains passages like John 1:29 and a reference in John 19:36 to the Paschal lamb (?), but neither of these comes from the lips of the Master. The nearest approach to such teaching is found in the institution of the Lord’s Supper and the reference to His blood as shed for the remission of sins in Matthew 26:28, also perhaps in the directions given to the Apostles in Luke 24:47. By the time of St. Paul’s earliest Epistles the doctrine of the atoning death of Christ as the ground of the forgiveness of sins was fairly developed, and the question is, How far had progress been made in this direction before the death of Christ took place? The answer appears to be that—as with the doctrines of the Incarnation and a Future Life in the OT—foreshadowings only had been given, hints and indications of a revelation which could not be clearly and definitely made until Christ’s work was complete and the full gift of the Spirit bestowed. A reference is found in Matthew 20:28 to the giving up of life by the Son of man ‘as a ransom for many,’ but the Apostles could not in Christ’s lifetime understand at all the need for His death and the full meaning of the shedding of His blood upon the cross; and its connexion with the forgiveness of sins dawned upon them only gradually under the illumination of the promised Spirit.
3. One of the most noteworthy features in Christ’s ethical teaching was His inculcation of the duty of almost unlimited forgiveness of man by man. The standard thus set up was practically new. In Pagan ethics to revenge an injury and punish an enemy to the utmost was manly, to forgive was mean-spirited. Some affronts might be passed over by the magnanimous man, simply because it was beneath his dignity, or disturbing to his equanimity, to notice them. But the idea of not only abstaining from vengeance, but actually restoring an offender to a relation of kindly regard, on the ground of human brotherhood and for the sake of helping an erring one to regain his forfeited position, was quite alien to the spirit of ancient morals.
Christ taught not only the duty of forgiveness on repentance, but that it was to be unlimited both in quality and in quantity. No offence was so serious, no repetition of offences so excessive, that forgiveness might be withheld, provided only that penitence were shown. The former of these points is not enlarged on by Christ, but it is involved in the proverbial completeness of the phrase ‘unto seventy times seven’ (Matthew 18:22). Such forgiveness of injuries was based upon two fundamental principles of Christian ethics: (a) the duty of repressing all personal resentment, closely connected with the virtues of meekness and humility; and (b) that love to all men, including enemies, which—paradoxical as it might appear—Christ enjoined as fundamentally incumbent on all His disciples (Matthew 5:44). The ‘love’ and forgiveness thus inculcated do not depend upon personal merits, for they are to be exercised even towards the unthankful and the evil. But the one necessary condition—repentance—is insisted on, else the moral character of forgiveness is lost. For, as already explained, forgiveness is a relation between persons, and if it be included as a duty in a moral code, it must imply an ethical relation, such as is altogether lacking if evil is condoned, or its seriousness slighted. Hence the offender must, so far as in him lies, put away the evil thing, if it is to be no longer a barrier between him and one whose course is determined by the law of righteousness. The truly moral nature of Christian forgiveness is brought out in Luke 17:3, where it is closely joined with the duty of reproving sin—‘If thy brother sin, rebuke him; and if he repent, forgive him.’ With this may be compared Leviticus 19:17, where the reproof of an evil-doer is spoken of as a mark of love. Just as in the Law the righteous man is bidden to rebuke his neighbour and not ‘bear sin because of him,’ so under the gospel he is bidden to forgive the penitent wrong-doer, that he may help him to a better life.
The close connexion between God’s forgiveness of man and man’s forgiveness of injuries against himself is brought out in Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:15, Luke 11:4; see also Luke 6:37 and Mark 11:25-26. In the last passage, as well as in Matthew 5:23-24, the duty of being ‘in love and charity with our neighbours,’ and ‘in perfect charity with all men,’ is laid down as a condition of acceptable prayer to God. The reason is akin to that described above. There are some states of mind in which a worshipper is not fit to pray, in which he asks for blessings that he is not capable of receiving. The principle is not to be understood as a kind of Divine lex talionis, as in the parable of the Unmerciful Debtor (Matthew 18:35)—that a man does not deserve mercy himself, if he will not show it to others, though this is true and appeals to a natural sense of justice. Rather is it to be understood that the unforgiving man shows essential impenitence, or at best an uneducated conscience in respect of his relations with his fellows. A man who cherishes hardness of heart towards those who have injured him so offends against the law of love that he cannot be received by the God of love, and cannot enjoy the restored relationship which he asks for in the Divine forgiveness, the whole significance of which is due to the supremacy of love. Or, as Beyschlag expresses it, ‘he who would belong to the kingdom of love as a recipient must belong to it as an agent.’ The merciful alone can obtain mercy, or rightly use it when it is granted to them.
4. Similar principles to those which regulate the relation of individuals are to be applied where Christian communities are concerned. The two are closely connected, as is shown by the passage Matthew 18:15-18. Christ deals first with the offending individual; if it can be avoided, recourse must not be had to the authority of the Christian society. It may be that personal remonstrance will suffice to set right the offender, or at least the moral influence of the brotherhood exercised in private by the presence of two or three witnesses. If the whole community is compelled to act, the utmost penalty inflicted is expulsion from the brotherhood, the only rights then remaining to the excommunicated person being the inalienable ones of a fellow-man.
The question of forgiveness or condemnation as exercised by the community arises from the phraseology concerning binding and loosing contained in Matthew 18:18, with which should be compared the words addressed to St. Peter in Matthew 16:18, and those addressed to a company which seems certainly to have included more than the Apostles, in John 20:23. The power granted to the Christian community in the words, ‘Whosesoever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whosesoever sins ye retain, they are retained,’ is not to be confused with Divine forgiveness of sins on the one hand, or with individual forgiveness on the other. Whilst more significant than the latter, it stops far short of the former. Individual Christians are to do their best privately to stop the progress of ill-feeling and enmity, but ‘offences’ will still arise. A power of checking them is therefore lodged with the community for the maintenance of purity and the avoidance of scandal. This is described as the power of ‘binding and loosing.’ Acting in the name of Christ, and presumably in the spirit of Christ, His Church will, He says, in a sense exercise His authority, and their action, whether of permission or prohibition, of condemnation or acquittal, will be ratified in heaven. This power, while great and important, is clearly not comparable to the Divine forgiveness of the individual sinner. This involves a full knowledge of circumstances and of the disposition of the inmost heart which no man can possess in relation to his fellow-man. No authority is given by Christ to a community—still less to a ‘priest,’ of whom it is needless to say that the Gospels know absolutely nothing—to exercise or to pronounce ‘forgiveness’ in the case of any individual. But just as an offender belonging to a Christian community needs to be rebuked by the Church in order that the Divine condemnation of wrongdoing may be echoed on earth, and earthly penalties may be inflicted which may arrest further evil and so prevent the terrible danger of worse punishment to come; so the penitent needs assurance from an earthly authority to help him in his upward course of reformation, though the real and ultimate transaction of forgiveness must rest between himself and God alone. The high authority thus conferred upon the Christian society and the responsible character attached to its judgments depend entirely upon its possession of that spiritual discernment which the Holy Spirit alone can bestow, and its acting always in the name of Christ and under the direction and control of the Spirit of Christ.
Literature.—From amongst the numberless books bearing directly or indirectly on the subject may be mentioned: Beyschlag, NT Theology, bk. i. ch. iv. § 11, and ch. vii. §§ 3 and 4; Stevens, NT Theology, pt. i. ch. viii.; Moberly, Atonement and Personality, chs. 2 and 3; Seeley, Ecce Homo, chs. 22 and 23; Knight, Christian Ethic, ch. 11; and especially Ritschl, Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation, 1874, vol. iii. [1]; see also Bethune-Baker, art. ‘Forgiveness’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible.
W. T. Davison
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Forgiveness
The purpose of this article is not to discuss the large theological problems involved (see Atonement), but to consider the passages in which the term actually occurs in the Acts and the Epistles. The general word is ἀφίημι, of very common occurrence in the NT, especially in the Gospels, meaning ‘send away from oneself’ (Matthew 13:36), ‘let go’ (Matthew 4:20) ‘turn away from’ (Matthew 19:29, 1 Corinthians 7:11), ‘pass over’ or ‘neglect’ (Hebrews 6:1, Matthew 23:23), ‘relinquish one’s prey’ (used of robbers [1] or a disease [2]), or simply ‘leave a person free’ (Mark 10:14; Mark 14:6, John 11:44, Acts 5:38), or treat him as if one had no more concern with him. Hence it is used of remitting a debt (Matthew 18:27; Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:14), equivalent to οὐ λογἱζεσθαι (2 Corinthians 5:19; see also Sanday-Headlam, Romans 5 [3], 100); the creditor tears up the bill, so to speak, or never enters the debt in his ledger. The verb, however, is rare outside the Gospels in the sense of ‘forgive.’ It occurs in Acts 8:22 (the forgiveness of the thought of Simon’s heart), James 5:15, 1 John 1:9; 1 John 2:12 (in each case with ‘sins’), and, as a quotation, in Romans 4:7 (the forgiveness of ‘lawlessnesses,’ ἀνομίαι).
Side by side with these instances, however, we must put the noun, ἅφεσις. This is very rare in the Gospels (it is never attributed to Christ Himself, save in quotations and in the institution of the Eucharist in Matthew 26:28 -not in the parallels). It is more frequent in the Acts: Acts 2:38 (baptism for forgiveness of sins in the name of Christ), Acts 5:31 (repentance and forgiveness of sins), Acts 10:43 (forgiveness of sins through His name), Acts 13:38 (through Him the forgiveness of sins is preached), Acts 26:18 (forgiveness of sins … by faith that is in Christ). Here, the object is always ‘sins’; forgiveness is sometimes explicitly joined to repentance and baptism; but more particularly connected with Christ, Christ’s name, or faith in Christ. The procedure suggested by these passages is simple: preaching Christ, belief in Christ, and the resultant acceptance of the new position of freedom from sin. This might be all that was explicit in the experience of the early believers; it is obviously not the last word for the preacher, the theologian, or the believer himself. Hence, the fuller expression of St. Paul in Ephesians 1:7, ‘in whom we have our redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness of our transgressions’ (cf. Colossians 1:14). Here, the figure of the cancelling of a debt is joined to another-rescue from some usurping power; and this (in the passage in Eph., not in Col.) is definitely connected with the shedding of the blood of Christ at His death; so in Hebrews 9:22 (‘apart from shedding of blood there is no remission of sins’). The only other passage in the Epistles where the word occurs is Hebrews 10:18, where forgiveness of sins and lawlessnesses is regarded as equivalent to their being remembered no more (Jeremiah 31:34), and so needing no further sacrifice.
At first sight, it would seem strange that ἀφίημι is not used oftener; it does not occur at all in Rom. in the sense of forgiveness, save in a quotation (Romans 4:7, from Psalms 32:1). But the reason is not far to seek. The conception, as already said, was not final; it was a figure, and one of several possible figures; and it was a single term applied to a mysterious and far-reaching experience which required further analysis. The writers of the Epistles do not neglect the experience, but they pass beyond the expression. In the primitive apostolic teaching of the Acts, it was enough to announce that Jesus was the Messiah, that He had risen from the death to which the rulers of the Jews had condemned Him, and that in Him the old promises of forgiveness of sins wore fulfilled-forgiveness even for the sin of putting Him to death. The cardinal notes of the apostles’ early preaching are the facts of the Resurrection and Messiahship of Jesus, and the necessity of believing in Him for the promised spiritual change. But it was inevitable that further questions should arise. How can this forgiveness be reconciled with God’s unchanging abhorrence of sin? What is the connexion between the death of Christ and the change in me? To answer these, St. Paul takes up the suggestion implied in the word ἄφεσις, ‘a cancelled debt,’ already familiar to Pharisaic thought, and develops it into his doctrine of justification: there is a debt-all men owe it-caused by the nonperformance of the necessary works; judgment must therefore be given against us; but with the Judge who would pronounce the sentence there is also grace. Christ the Son of God dies for our sin; and this same death we also die, by faith, to sin; hence, we are justified before God-that is, we are like men who have never contracted a debt; and there is nothing for us but acquittal. This forensic figure is worked out by St. Paul more fully than any other; but he lays equal stress on the more mystical conceptions of redemption (see above) and death to sin (Romans 6:11 ‘estimate yourselves to be mere corpses with regard to sin’). ‘The importance of faith, however, is never left unexpressed, faith being at once surrender to, reliance on, and identification with its object. Here, St. Paul brings us to the circle of the thought of St. John, which only once refers to forgiveness (see above), but moves round the act of believing which joins man to God.
As kindred expressions we may notice the words χαρίζεσθαι-properly, ‘do a favour to a person,’ or, with the accusative of the thing, ‘make a present of’-sometimes in the sense of making a present of an act of wrong-doing, i.e., not insisting on the penalty for it (2 Corinthians 12:13, Colossians 2:13); πάρεσις (Romans 3:25), ‘a temporary suspension of punishment which may be one day inflicted,’ and therefore entirely distinct from forgiveness (see R. C. Trench, NT Synonyms8, 1876, p. 110ff.); καλύπτειν, ‘to conceal, cover over’ (cf. the Hebrew kipper) (Romans 4:7 [4], 1 Peter 4:8); and λύειν, ‘to loose’ (Revelation 1:5).
Literature.-Forgiveness has very little modern literature devoted to it; but it is discussed in all literature dealing with Atonement and Reconciliation, and, at least Indirectly, in that referring to Sin and Conversion. See the articles Atonement, Conversion, Justification, Repentance, Sin, with the Literature there cited. Reference may also be made to G. B. Stevens, Theology of the NT, 1899; A. Ritschl, The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation, Eng. translation , 1900; W. E. Orchard, Modern Theories of Sin, 1909; W. L. Walker, The Gospel of Reconciliation, 1909; P. T. Forsyth, The Work of Christ, 1910; R. Mackintosh, Christianity and Sin, 1913.
W. F. Lofthouse.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Forgiveness
Forgiveness. The remission of a fault. In the gospel of Christ, free forgiveness of sins is set forth. Acts 5:31; Acts 13:38-39; 1 John 1:6-9; 1 John 2:12. And the full remission, which transgressors have at God's hand for Christ's sake, is made the ground and the pattern of that forgiving spirit which is to be manifested by Christ's true followers. Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:14-15; Matthew 18:21-35; Mark 11:25-26 A. V., but verse 26 is omitted in the R. V.; Ephesians 4:32, and elsewhere. See Justification.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sins, Forgiveness of
Catholics believe that sins forgiven are removed from the soul (John 20), and not merely covered by the merits of Christ. Only God can forgive sin, since He alone can infuse sanctifying grace by which sin is expelled. God can forgive sin either Immediately, in response to an act of perfect contrition, or mediately, through a sacrament. The sacraments primarily directed to the forgiveness of sin are Baptism and Penance.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Forgiveness
Since wrongdoing spoils a relationship, forgiveness is necessary if the relationship is to be restored. Forgiveness does not mean pretending that some wrongdoing did not happen. It means recognizing the wrongdoing for what it is, and then in love forgiving it, forgetting it, and restoring the relationship with the forgiven person (Hebrews 10:17-18).
The basis of forgiveness
Men and women, being sinners, have more than spoiled their relationship with God; they have also fallen under God’s judgment. They are therefore in need of God’s forgiveness if they are to escape that judgment (Exodus 32:32; Romans 3:23-24). God alone can grant this forgiveness (Mark 2:7; Mark 2:10; Psalms 51:16-176), but sinners are in no position to demand it of him. No person has a right to forgiveness. Forgiveness is possible only because of the grace of God – the mercy that he exercises towards people even though they do not deserve it (Numbers 14:19; Psalms 78:38; Romans 5:20; Titus 3:4-7).
God wants to forgive (Nehemiah 9:17; Micah 7:18) but he requires repentance and faith in those who seek his forgiveness (Psalms 32:5; Psalms 51:17; Luke 7:36-50; Acts 3:19; Acts 10:43; Acts 20:21; 1 John 1:9). There is no mechanical way of gaining forgiveness, such as by offering a sacrifice or reciting a formula. Sinners are dependent entirely upon God’s mercy (Psalms 51:1-4; Colossians 2:13).
This was so even in the sacrificial system of the Old Testament. There was no thought of bribing God by offering him sacrifices. On the contrary the sacrificial system was something God graciously gave as a means by which repentant sinners might approach him and obtain forgiveness (Leviticus 17:11; cf. Psalms 130:3).
In the sacrifices, God provided a way whereby people could demonstrate their repentance, faith and obedience. Without such attitudes, they benefited nothing from their sacrifices (Psalms 50:9; Psalms 50:13-14; 1618394054_43; Isaiah 1:11; Isaiah 1:16-20).
The death of the animal in the place of the sinner also showed the sinner clearly that forgiveness of sin was possible only when the penalty of sin had justly been carried out. Forgiveness was costly. Without the shedding of blood there could be no forgiveness (Hebrews 9:22; cf. Leviticus 4:2-7; Leviticus 16:15-19; see SACRIFICE). Christ’s death is the basis on which God forgives all sins, past, present or future (Matthew 26:28; Acts 13:38; Romans 3:24-26; Ephesians 1:7; Hebrews 9:11-14; Hebrews 9:26). And once God has forgiven sins, they are removed for ever (Psalms 103:12; Isaiah 43:25; Colossians 2:13-14; Hebrews 8:12; Hebrews 10:17-18).
Forgiveness in practice
Christ’s followers have the responsibility to preach the forgiveness of sins, and because of this they become the means by which people either believe the gospel and are forgiven, or reject it and remain in their sins (John 20:22-23; Acts 13:38). Jesus on one occasion referred to the deliberate rejection of him as the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit, a sin for which there could be no forgiveness (Matthew 12:31-32; for further discussion see BLASPHEMY).
Once people have been forgiven by God, they have the responsibility to forgive any who sin against them. This is more than a sign of their gratitude to God. It is a requirement laid upon them if they want to experience God’s continued forgiveness of their own failures (Matthew 6:12; Matthew 18:21-35; Mark 11:25; Luke 6:37; Luke 7:47; Luke 17:4; Ephesians 4:32). (Concerning the forgiven person’s subsequent wrongdoings and their relationship to salvation see JUSTIFICATION, sub-heading ‘Justification and forgiveness’.)

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Injuries - Forgiveness of. ...
See Forgiveness
Remission - This is used in the sense of 'forgiveness. ' The Forgiveness or remission of sins is through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and on the ground of His sacrificial death. See Forgiveness
Forgiveness - There are seven words in Scripture that denote the idea of Forgiveness: three in Hebrew and four in Greek. God is the initiator of Forgiveness (Colossians 2:13). ...
There is only one sin for which the Father does not promise Forgiveness: blasphemy against the Holy Spirit (Mark 3:28; Matthew 12:32). ...
For man to receive Forgiveness, repentance is necessary (Luke 17:3-4). For the holy God to extend Forgiveness, the shedding of blood is necessary (Hebrews 9:22; Leviticus 17:11). Forgiveness is based upon the sacrifice of Christ on the cross
Forgiveness - Since wrongdoing spoils a relationship, Forgiveness is necessary if the relationship is to be restored. Forgiveness does not mean pretending that some wrongdoing did not happen. ...
The basis of Forgiveness...
Men and women, being sinners, have more than spoiled their relationship with God; they have also fallen under God’s judgment. They are therefore in need of God’s Forgiveness if they are to escape that judgment (Exodus 32:32; Romans 3:23-24). God alone can grant this Forgiveness (Mark 2:7; Mark 2:10; Acts 5:31), but sinners are in no position to demand it of him. No person has a right to Forgiveness. Forgiveness is possible only because of the grace of God – the mercy that he exercises towards people even though they do not deserve it (Numbers 14:19; Psalms 78:38; Romans 5:20; Titus 3:4-7). ...
God wants to forgive (Nehemiah 9:17; Micah 7:18) but he requires repentance and faith in those who seek his Forgiveness (Psalms 32:5; Psalms 51:17; Luke 7:36-50; Acts 3:19; Acts 10:43; Acts 20:21; Matthew 12:31-328). There is no mechanical way of gaining Forgiveness, such as by offering a sacrifice or reciting a formula. On the contrary the sacrificial system was something God graciously gave as a means by which repentant sinners might approach him and obtain Forgiveness (Leviticus 17:11; cf. ...
The death of the animal in the place of the sinner also showed the sinner clearly that Forgiveness of sin was possible only when the penalty of sin had justly been carried out. Forgiveness was costly. Without the shedding of blood there could be no Forgiveness (Hebrews 9:22; cf. ...
Forgiveness in practice...
Christ’s followers have the responsibility to preach the Forgiveness of sins, and because of this they become the means by which people either believe the gospel and are forgiven, or reject it and remain in their sins (John 20:22-23; Acts 13:38). Jesus on one occasion referred to the deliberate rejection of him as the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit, a sin for which there could be no Forgiveness (1618394054_69; for further discussion see BLASPHEMY). It is a requirement laid upon them if they want to experience God’s continued Forgiveness of their own failures (Matthew 6:12; Matthew 18:21-35; Mark 11:25; Luke 6:37; Luke 7:47; Luke 17:4; Ephesians 4:32). (Concerning the forgiven person’s subsequent wrongdoings and their relationship to salvation see JUSTIFICATION, sub-heading ‘Justification and Forgiveness
Forgiveness - The Forgiveness of enemies is a christian duty. The pardon or remission of an offense or crime as the Forgiveness of sin or of injuries. And mild Forgiveness intercede to stop the coming blow
Remission - See Forgiveness
Pardon - See Forgiveness ...
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Pardon - See Forgiveness
Pardon - See Forgiveness
Cleansing - See ATONEMENT; Forgiveness; UNCLEANNESS
Forgiveness - Forgiveness has both divine and human dimensions. In terms of a human dimension, Forgiveness is that act and attitude toward those who have wronged us which restores relationships and fellowship. Everyone Needs Forgiveness The basic facts of the Bible are God's creative power and holiness, human rebellion, and the efforts of our merciful God to bring us back to an intended relationship of sonship and fellowship. The need of Forgiveness is first seen in the third chapter of Genesis, as Adam and Eve willfully disobeyed God, choosing rather to satisfy their own self-will. Only through the mercy of God can one find peace and Forgiveness. ...
Forgiveness in the Old Testament The primary means of obtaining Forgiveness in the Old Testament is through the sacrificial system of the covenant relationship, which God established when He brought His people out of Egypt. The Forgiveness of God, channeled through the sacrificial offering, was an act of mercy freely bestowed by God, not purchased by the one bringing the offering. ...
An emphasis upon God's demand for a repentant heart as the basis for Forgiveness, while not totally absent earlier (see Ps. The Old Testament sacrificial system could never give once-for-all Forgiveness. ...
Forgiveness in the New Testament Jesus is the perfect and final Sacrifice through which God's Forgiveness is mediated to every person (Romans 3:25 ; Hebrews 10:11-12 ). The connection of Jesus with Forgiveness is seen in His own self-understanding. Forgiveness through the sacrifice of Christ is available for everyone who truly repents (Luke 23:39-43 ; John 8:2-11 ). It is not a question of God's ability or desire to forgive, but rather a matter of human willingness to meet the conditions for Forgiveness. For such who deliberately closed their minds to the work and invitation of God in Christ to draw near, repent, and receive Forgiveness, there is no hope. ...
Human Forgiveness in the New Testament As a part of His teaching about human need for Forgiveness and the means of receiving it, Jesus spoke of the human dimension of Forgiveness. A firm condition for the receiving of God's Forgiveness is the willingness to forgive others. ...
Human Forgiveness reflects our experience and understanding of divine Forgiveness. Love, not wooden rules, governs Forgiveness (Matthew 18:21-22 ). Jesus powerfully demonstrated this teaching on the cross, as He asked for Forgiveness for His executioners (Luke 23:34 ). Paul reminded the church at Ephesus of both the grounds of their Forgiveness and the basis on which they must forgive one another (Ephesians 4:32 )
Unpardonable - ) Not admitting of pardon or Forgiveness; inexcusable
Transgression - See Evil ; Forgiveness ; Repentance ; Salvation; Sin
Forgive - God is always the subject of “forgiveness. ” No other Old Testament verb means “to forgive,” although several verbs include “forgiveness” in the range of meanings given a particular context (e. In the typology of the Old Testament, sacrifices foreshadowed the accomplished work of Jesus Christ, and the Old Testament believer was assured of “forgiveness” based on sacrifice: “And the priest shall make an atonement [2]” ( Forgiveness without the shedding of blood ( Pardon - Prayer for God's pardon for sin is based on the greatness of God's covenant love and on the long history of God's acts of Forgiveness (Numbers 14:19 ; Micah 7:18 ). See Atonement ; Forgiveness ; Reconciliation
Efficacy - Christ's atonement was efficacious; it produced the result of Forgiveness of sins for the elect
Relentless - ) Unmoved by appeals for sympathy or Forgiveness; insensible to the distresses of others; destitute of tenderness; unrelenting; unyielding; unpitying; as, a prey to relentless despotism
Forgiveness - ) The act of forgiving; the state of being forgiven; as, the Forgiveness of sin or of injuries
Forgiveness - Forgiveness. In the gospel of Christ, free Forgiveness of sins is set forth
Forgiveness - ’ It occurs in Acts 8:22 (the Forgiveness of the thought of Simon’s heart), James 5:15, 1 John 1:9; 1 John 2:12 (in each case with ‘sins’), and, as a quotation, in Romans 4:7 (the Forgiveness of ‘lawlessnesses,’ ἀνομίαι). It is more frequent in the Acts: Acts 2:38 (baptism for Forgiveness of sins in the name of Christ), Acts 5:31 (repentance and Forgiveness of sins), Acts 10:43 (forgiveness of sins through His name), Acts 13:38 (through Him the Forgiveness of sins is preached), Acts 26:18 (forgiveness of sins … by faith that is in Christ). Here, the object is always ‘sins’; Forgiveness is sometimes explicitly joined to repentance and baptism; but more particularly connected with Christ, Christ’s name, or faith in Christ. Paul in Ephesians 1:7, ‘in whom we have our redemption through his blood, even the Forgiveness of our transgressions’ (cf. The only other passage in the Epistles where the word occurs is Hebrews 10:18, where Forgiveness of sins and lawlessnesses is regarded as equivalent to their being remembered no more (Jeremiah 31:34), and so needing no further sacrifice. in the sense of Forgiveness, save in a quotation (Romans 4:7, from Psalms 32:1). In the primitive apostolic teaching of the Acts, it was enough to announce that Jesus was the Messiah, that He had risen from the death to which the rulers of the Jews had condemned Him, and that in Him the old promises of Forgiveness of sins wore fulfilled-forgiveness even for the sin of putting Him to death. How can this Forgiveness be reconciled with God’s unchanging abhorrence of sin? What is the connexion between the death of Christ and the change in me? To answer these, St. John, which only once refers to Forgiveness (see above), but moves round the act of believing which joins man to God. , not insisting on the penalty for it (2 Corinthians 12:13, Colossians 2:13); πάρεσις (Romans 3:25), ‘a temporary suspension of punishment which may be one day inflicted,’ and therefore entirely distinct from Forgiveness (see R. -Forgiveness has very little modern literature devoted to it; but it is discussed in all literature dealing with Atonement and Reconciliation, and, at least Indirectly, in that referring to Sin and Conversion
Forgiveness - salach , 'to pardon,' used only of the Forgiveness that God gives. It is employed for the Forgiveness attached to the sacrifices: "it shall be forgiven him. ' Both words are applied to the Forgiveness granted by God, as well as that between man and his fellow. ...
There are two aspects in which Forgiveness is brought before us in scripture. "That they may receive Forgiveness of sins. Another thought is included in the Forgiveness of sins, namely, that having redemption by Christ, which brings into a new state, the whole guilty past is forgiven, removed from us, so that there is no hindrance to the enjoyment of that into which redemption brings. ...
The general principle as to Forgiveness is stated in 1 John 1:9 ; "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins;" and to this is added, "and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. This of course is different from the act of God in forgiving sins, and may be called administrative Forgiveness in the church; and if the act of discipline is led of the Spirit, it is ratified in heaven: cf. There is also a governmental Forgiveness in connection with the government of God here below in time, both on God's part, and toward one another
Condonation - ) Forgiveness, either express or implied, by a husband of his wife or by a wife of her husband, for a breach of marital duty, as adultery, with an implied condition that the offense shall not be repeated
Synergism - Cults are synergistic in that they teach that God's grace combined with our efforts are what makes Forgiveness of sins possible
Schoolmaster - So the law convicts us of our need of a Saviour, and leads us to come to Him for pardon, Forgiveness and eternal life
Forgive, Forgave, Forgiveness - In the OT atoning sacrifice and "forgiveness" are often associated, e. " ...
Human "forgiveness" is to be strictly analogous to Divine "forgiveness," e. If certain conditions are fulfilled, there is no limitation to Christ's law of "forgiveness," Matthew 18:21,22 . ...
As to limits to the possibility of Divine "forgiveness," see Matthew 12:32,2 nd part (see BLASPHEMY) and 1 John 5:16 (see DEATH). ...
A — 2: χαρίζομαι (Strong's #5483 — Verb — charizomai — khar-id'-zom-ahee ) "to bestow a favor unconditionally," is used of the act of "forgiveness," whether Divine, Ephesians 4:32 ; Colossians 2:13 ; 3:13 ; or human, Luke 7:42,43 (debt); 2 Corinthians 2:7,10 ; 12:13 ; Ephesians 4:32 (1st mention). 1); it is used of the remission of sins, and translated "forgiveness" in Mark 3:29 ; Ephesians 1:7 ; Colossians 1:14 , and in the AV of Acts 5:31 ; 13:38 ; 26:18 , in each of which the RV has "remission
Forgiveness (2) - FORGIVENESS...
Three words are used in the Gospels which are rendered in English by the word ‘forgive’:—ἁτολύειν, to set free, once only, in Luke 6:37; χαριζεσθαι, to show oneself gracious, or forgive frankly, in Luke 7:42-43; and ἀφιέναι, to remit, or let off, 37 times in the Synoptic Gospels. The noun ἀφεσις, ‘remission’ or ‘forgiveness,’ is found 8 times in the Synoptics, the words ‘of sins’ or ‘of trespasses’ being either added or closely implied. Our Lord presupposes and then puts His own characteristic impress upon a doctrine of Forgiveness with which His hearers were for the most part familiar, and which for us is embodied in the OT. Secondly, that no complete study of Christ’s teaching concerning Forgiveness can be made, unless other words, such as ‘save,’ ‘justify,’ and ‘cleanse,’ are taken into account, and the whole subject of release from the guilt and bondage of sin, as promised by Him, is kept in view. The way in which that gospel was to he emphatically one of Forgiveness, that ‘through this man is proclaimed remission of sins, and by him every one that believeth is justified from all things from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses,’ was only made clear afterwards. It being therefore carefully borne in mind that the OT prepared the way for Christ’s teaching on Forgiveness, and that the Epistles developed and completed it, this article will deal only with that stage in the biblical doctrine of the subject which is represented by Christ and the Gospels. The consideration of it will be divided into four sections: (1) the Divine Forgiveness of man, (2) Christ’s own power to forgive sins, (3) the duty of men to forgive one another, (4) the extent to which authority to forgive is vested in the Christian community. In the same connexion may be taken the interpretation of the name Jesus in Matthew 1:21 ‘he shall save his people from their sins,’ and the ‘Saviour, Christ the Lord,’ of Luke 2:11, though the word ‘forgiveness’ does not occur. It was indeed implicit throughout our Lord’s ministry, all His declarations concerning His coming ‘not to call the righteous, but sinners’ (Matthew 9:13), ‘to seek and to save that which was lost’ (Luke 19:10), and His promise of ‘rest to the souls’ of men (Matthew 11:29), showing that the object of His ministry was to reclaim from sin, by bringing men to that Forgiveness and cleansing which God had promised through repentance and faith in Him. ...
The explicit references to Forgiveness of sin are comparatively few, but they are clear and definite in character, and quite sufficient to establish doctrine on the subject. ’...
Putting these passages together, we are warranted in concluding that Christ taught the readiness of the Father always to hear the prayer of the truly penitent and in His mercy to pardon their sins, the chief questions being, What is the exact nature of Forgiveness? Is it free to all mankind, or to those only who are in covenant relation with Him? Is any condition besides that of repentance laid down?...
The meaning of the word ‘forgiveness,’ and the relation between God and man implied in it, must be gathered largely from the OT. But, broadly speaking, Christ, like the more ‘Evangelical’ OT prophets, represents Forgiveness as a pure act of grace on the part of God, Who on the repentance of the sinner receives him graciously and pardons his transgression in the sense of replacing the offender in his former relation of acceptance and favour. Forgiveness is not mere remission of penalty, the forbearing to inflict deserved punishment, though such release is for the most part included. Neither does Forgiveness imply any false or arbitrary dealing with the past, any condoning of sin—which is essentially immoral—or ignoring of the transgression, as if it had not been committed—which would imply a weak and false attempt to secure the impossible. Nor, again, can any kind of remission of sins be predicated of God which implies unrighteousness in any form, the solemn sanctions of the eternal law of righteousness being secured by the conditions upon which Forgiveness is granted. ...
But the essence of Forgiveness lies in the establishment, or restoration, of a personal relation between sinful man and a grieved and righteously angry God. ’...
Forgiveness can never be adequately understood by means of any figure of speech, commercial or other. Repentance is indeed a necessary ingredient of Forgiveness if the two terms are rightly understood. Sorrow for sin and complete renunciation of it are not arbitrary conditions which the Sovereign chooses to exact before bestowing a boon; they belong to the very essence of the personal relation between Father and son which has been impaired or broken by error and disobedience, and which is to be restored in Forgiveness. It would, however, be misleading to generalize and say that this attribute of mercy obviates all necessity for an atonement, or vindication of the law of righteousness, and that throughout the whole history of the world nothing more is needed to obtain Divine Forgiveness of sin than confession and repentance on the part of man. The cosmic conditions of Forgiveness are described in their proper place in Scripture. It is clear that Christ’s teaching concerning Forgiveness was not exhausted by the proclamation of the Father’s willingness to receive the penitent. He put His own claims to an easily applied test, Whether is it easier to tell a sufferer that his sins are forgiven, or to heal him of an incurable malady? In other words, any prophet may speak words of comfort or absolution, but one who shows the power of healing in order to establish his claim to pronounce Forgiveness is no ordinary messenger, but proves Himself to be the Son of God with power. ...
The close connexion between the work that Christ did for the bodies of men and the power that He claimed over their souls in the Forgiveness of sin, is suggested in other narratives, though somewhat less clearly. ...
The narrative of the woman who was a sinner, recorded in Luke 7:36-50, is full of instruction on the subject of Forgiveness. The only doubtful point of interpretation relates to the ground of Forgiveness as described in Luke 7:47. Many commentators, including the chief Roman Catholic authorities, make the Forgiveness extended to the woman to depend upon the love she showed, and at first reading this might seem warranted by the phrase ‘for she loved much. For (1) the whole scope of the parable of the two debtors shows that Forgiveness precedes love; (2) the latter part of Luke 7:47 enforces the same lesson; and so (3) does the absolution pronounced in Luke 7:48. ...
The doctrine of the Forgiveness of sins on the basis of atonement through the death of Christ is not, properly speaking, revealed by Christ Himself. Paul’s earliest Epistles the doctrine of the atoning death of Christ as the ground of the Forgiveness of sins was fairly developed, and the question is, How far had progress been made in this direction before the death of Christ took place? The answer appears to be that—as with the doctrines of the Incarnation and a Future Life in the OT—foreshadowings only had been given, hints and indications of a revelation which could not be clearly and definitely made until Christ’s work was complete and the full gift of the Spirit bestowed. A reference is found in Matthew 20:28 to the giving up of life by the Son of man ‘as a ransom for many,’ but the Apostles could not in Christ’s lifetime understand at all the need for His death and the full meaning of the shedding of His blood upon the cross; and its connexion with the Forgiveness of sins dawned upon them only gradually under the illumination of the promised Spirit. One of the most noteworthy features in Christ’s ethical teaching was His inculcation of the duty of almost unlimited Forgiveness of man by man. ...
Christ taught not only the duty of Forgiveness on repentance, but that it was to be unlimited both in quality and in quantity. No offence was so serious, no repetition of offences so excessive, that Forgiveness might be withheld, provided only that penitence were shown. Such Forgiveness of injuries was based upon two fundamental principles of Christian ethics: (a) the duty of repressing all personal resentment, closely connected with the virtues of meekness and humility; and (b) that love to all men, including enemies, which—paradoxical as it might appear—Christ enjoined as fundamentally incumbent on all His disciples (Matthew 5:44). The ‘love’ and Forgiveness thus inculcated do not depend upon personal merits, for they are to be exercised even towards the unthankful and the evil. But the one necessary condition—repentance—is insisted on, else the moral character of Forgiveness is lost. For, as already explained, Forgiveness is a relation between persons, and if it be included as a duty in a moral code, it must imply an ethical relation, such as is altogether lacking if evil is condoned, or its seriousness slighted. The truly moral nature of Christian Forgiveness is brought out in Luke 17:3, where it is closely joined with the duty of reproving sin—‘If thy brother sin, rebuke him; and if he repent, forgive him. ...
The close connexion between God’s Forgiveness of man and man’s Forgiveness of injuries against himself is brought out in Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:15, Luke 11:4; see also Luke 6:37 and Mark 11:25-26. A man who cherishes hardness of heart towards those who have injured him so offends against the law of love that he cannot be received by the God of love, and cannot enjoy the restored relationship which he asks for in the Divine Forgiveness, the whole significance of which is due to the supremacy of love. ...
The question of Forgiveness or condemnation as exercised by the community arises from the phraseology concerning binding and loosing contained in Matthew 18:18, with which should be compared the words addressed to St. The power granted to the Christian community in the words, ‘Whosesoever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whosesoever sins ye retain, they are retained,’ is not to be confused with Divine Forgiveness of sins on the one hand, or with individual Forgiveness on the other. This power, while great and important, is clearly not comparable to the Divine Forgiveness of the individual sinner. No authority is given by Christ to a community—still less to a ‘priest,’ of whom it is needless to say that the Gospels know absolutely nothing—to exercise or to pronounce ‘forgiveness’ in the case of any individual. But just as an offender belonging to a Christian community needs to be rebuked by the Church in order that the Divine condemnation of wrongdoing may be echoed on earth, and earthly penalties may be inflicted which may arrest further evil and so prevent the terrible danger of worse punishment to come; so the penitent needs assurance from an earthly authority to help him in his upward course of reformation, though the real and ultimate transaction of Forgiveness must rest between himself and God alone. ‘Forgiveness’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible
Seventy Times - 98, says: "A definite allusion to the Genesis story is highly probable: Jesus pointedly sets against the natural man's craving for seventy-sevenfold revenge the spiritual man's ambition to exercise the privilege of seventy-sevenfold Forgiveness"). God's Forgiveness is limitless; so should man's be
Past - In Christ no past is irretrievable; Divine Forgiveness may blot out what men consider it impossible to forgive (Luke 18:27). God gives a fresh start for Christ’s sake to each one who prays for Forgiveness in the spirit of Forgiveness (Matthew 6:14)
Forgiveness of Sins - The sacraments primarily directed to the Forgiveness of sin are Baptism and Penance
Sins, Forgiveness of - The sacraments primarily directed to the Forgiveness of sin are Baptism and Penance
Remission, Remit - A — 1: ἄφεσις (Strong's #859 — Noun Feminine — aphesis — af'-es-is ) "a dismissal, release" (from aphiemi, B), is used of the Forgiveness of sins and translated "remission" in Matthew 26:28 ; Mark 1:4 ; Luke 1:77 ; 3:3 ; 24:47 ; Acts 2:38 ; 5:31 (AV, "forgiveness"); 10:43; 13:38, RV (AV, "forgiveness"); 26:18 (ditto); Hebrews 9:22 ; 10:18
Holy Communion, Effects of - Holy Communion, partaking of the Body and Blood of Christ, unites us with Him, increases our love of Him, obtains Forgiveness for venial sin, remission of punishment incurred by sin, preservation from future sin, quieting of the violent passions of anger and lust; it acts as healing remedy of body and soul and pledges us a happy immortality
Effects of Holy Communion - Holy Communion, partaking of the Body and Blood of Christ, unites us with Him, increases our love of Him, obtains Forgiveness for venial sin, remission of punishment incurred by sin, preservation from future sin, quieting of the violent passions of anger and lust; it acts as healing remedy of body and soul and pledges us a happy immortality
Remission - Release, Forgiveness. Modern translations generally substitute the term Forgiveness
Absolution - ) An absolving, or setting free from guilt, sin, or penalty; Forgiveness of an offense
Forgiveness - Forgiveness . ]'>[2] ‘forgiveness’ or ‘ pardon ,’ referring either to God’s actions with regard to men (cf. Exodus 34:7 , Psalms 86:5 , Nehemiah 9:17 ) or to Forgiveness extended to men by each other (cf. At a very early period of human, or at least of Jewish, history, some sense of the need of Forgiveness by God seems to have been felt. Without this correspondence Forgiveness was rendered impossible, and that, so to speak, automatically (cf. Even in the case of sins of ignorance, repentance and its outward expression in sacrifice had to precede Forgiveness ( Leviticus 4:13 ff. The resultant effect of this mutual approach was the restoration to Divine favour, of those who had been alienated, by the free act of Forgiveness on the part of God ( Psalms 85:4 , Isaiah 55:7 ; Isaiah 59:20 , Jeremiah 13:17 ; Jeremiah 13:24 etc. We are thus not surprised to learn that belief in the Forgiveness of sins was a cardinal article of the Jewish faith in the time of Jesus ( Mark 2:7 = Luke 5:21 , cf. This is more clearly seen by a reference to NT epistolary literature, where again and again Forgiveness and restoration are spoken of as mediated ‘in’ or ‘through’ Christ ( Ephesians 4:32 , Colossians 2:12 ff. Here, as in OT, only more insistently dwelt on, the consciousness of guilt and of the need of personal holiness is the first step on the road to God’s Forgiveness ( 1 John 1:9 , cf. Without exhibiting, in their relations to each other, the Divine spirit of Forgiveness, men need never hope to experience God’s pardon for themselves. Henceforth she carries in her bosom the authority so emphatically claimed by her Lord, to declare the wondrous fact of Divine Forgiveness ( Acts 13:38 ) and to set forth the conditions upon which it ultimately rests (see Westcott, Gospel of St. It is more than symbolic, for by it, as by a visible channel, the living and active Spirit of God is conveyed to the soul, where the fruition of the promised Forgiveness is seen in the fulness of the Christian life ( Acts 2:38 , cf. Paul speaks of the Forgiveness of sins as constituting the redemption of the human race effected by the death of Christ (‘through his blood’ Ephesians 1:7 , cf. ); it is also the assurance that Forgiveness of sin is the goal of the life and death of Him whose first words from the cross breathed a prayer for the Forgiveness of His tormentors
Liberty - ...
A — 2: ἄφεσις (Strong's #859 — Noun Feminine — aphesis — af'-es-is ) "dismissal, release, Forgiveness," is rendered "liberty" in the AV of Luke 4:18 , RV, "release. " See Forgiveness
Pardon - The Forgiveness of sins granted freely (Isaiah 43:25 ), readily (Nehemiah 9:17 ; Psalm 86:5 ), abundantly (Isaiah 55:7 ; Romans 5:20 )
Baptismal Regeneration - The belief that baptism is essential to salvation, that it is the means where Forgiveness of sins is made real to the believer
Kiss - ) To salute with the lips, as a mark of affection, reverence, submission, Forgiveness, etc
Pardon - Forgiveness the release of an offense or of the obligation of the offender to suffer a penalty, or to bear the displeasure of the offended party. Forgiveness received
Forgiveness - ...
Divine Forgiveness . Forgiveness can be extended both to nations (especially Israel) and to individuals. ...
National Forgiveness . ...
Individual Forgiveness . Although the prophets mostly spoke to Israel as a nation, in Ezekiel 18:21-23,27 the individual Israelite is addressed and offered God's unconditional Forgiveness. This restoration is often spoken of as the establishment of another (eschatological) covenant, which will issue in both Forgiveness and the spiritual transformation of the people, and is often associated with the giving of the Spirit (Jeremiah 31:31-34 ; 32:27-41 ; 50:5,20 ; Ezekiel 16:59-63 ; 36:24-32 ). That the eschatological promises of Forgiveness and spiritual transformation have become realities through the appearance, death, resurrection, and exaltation of Jesus Christ is assumed throughout the New Testament. ...
John the Baptist offered eschatological Forgiveness to the nation on the condition of repentance (Mark 1:4 ; Luke 3:3 ). His offer exemplified the tension between God as merciful and God as righteous, as shown by the fact John rejected some who had not first produced the fruit of repentance before seeking the baptism of repentance for the Forgiveness of sin. He was the mediator of eschatological salvation, which included the extension of Forgiveness (Matthew 9:3-6 ; Mark 2:7-12 ; Luke 5:21-25 ; 7:36-50 ). Like John the Baptist, Jesus required that the offer of eschatological salvation be appropriated by individuals; the process of entering the kingdom was that of becoming a child, by passively receiving God's eschatological Forgiveness. The offense probably lay not in the fact that Jesus taught that God would forgive the repentant, but that Jesus actively sought out sinners and offered them the possibility of eschatological Forgiveness. Understood against the background of the eschatological promises of the Old Testament, Jesus was saying that the time of Israel's eschatological Forgiveness and spiritual transformation had come. He interpreted his death as vicarious and expiatory, as the means by which eschatological Forgiveness and renewal would come to Israel and the nations in spite of Israel's rejection of the messenger of the kingdom. He also interpreted his impending death at the Last Supper as that of the eschatological Passover lamb whose sacrifice would bring about the possibility of Forgiveness and the realization of the new covenant (Matthew 26:26-28 ; Mark 14:22-24 ; Luke 22:19-20 ). ...
Paul writes that Jesus' death is the means by which eschatological Forgiveness comes not only to the Jew but also to the Gentile (Galatians 3:7-9 ; cf. Like Jesus, he sees the tension between God as merciful and God as righteous resolved in the realization of the eschatological promises of Forgiveness and spiritual transformation. ...
There are some passages in the New Testament that suggest baptism is a necessary condition for acquiring eschatological Forgiveness (Acts 2:38 ; Romans 6:3-4 ; Colossians 2:12 ; 1 Peter 3:21 ). This is a controversial subject; suffice it to say that at the very least baptism is intricately bound up with the reception of eschatological Forgiveness. ...
First John speaks of Forgiveness after having received eschatological Forgiveness. Jesus spoke about blasphemy against the Spirit for which there could be no Forgiveness (Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-29 ; Luke 12:10 ). ...
Human Forgiveness . In the Lord's Prayer, receiving Forgiveness from God is joined to forgiving others (Matthew 6:12 ; Luke 11:4 ). God's Forgiveness is actually said to be conditional upon forgiving others (Matthew 6:14 ; 18:35 ; Mark 11:25-26 ; Luke 6:37 ). Jesus says that there ought to be no limit on the number of times that one should forgive another so long as the offender repents and asks for Forgiveness (Numbers 14:18 ; Luke 17:3-4 )
Peace of Pardon: Not a Mere Forgetfulness - So a man may blot his sins from his memory, and quiet his mind with false hopes, but the peace which this will bring him is widely different from that which arises from God's Forgiveness of sin through the satisfaction which Jesus made in his atonement
Lamech - Jesus may have had this in mind in teaching about unlimited Forgiveness (Matthew 18:22 )
Pardon - salach, 'to pass over,' forgive; used only of God's Forgiveness
Incarnation - By it we understand the true nature of God, the atonement, Forgiveness, grace, etc. Through Jesus we have Forgiveness of sins
Conviction - It shows us our need for Forgiveness
Repent - ) To be sorry for sin as morally evil, and to seek Forgiveness; to cease to love and practice sin
Blasphemy - Jesus is accused of blasphemy for pronouncing Forgiveness and for claiming a unique relationship with God (Matthew 26:65 ; Mark 2:7 ; John 10:33 ). Numbers 15:22-31 distinguishes between unintentional sin committed in ignorance (for which Forgiveness is possible), and defiant sin, called blasphemy, for which there is no Forgiveness. Jesus teaches that the blasphemy for which there is no Forgiveness is that against the Holy Spirit; all other blasphemies, particularly those against "the Son of Man, " may be forgiven. He deliberately accepts the vilification of others and prays for the Forgiveness of those who insult him (Luke 23:34 )
Justification - Removal of original sin by Baptism is called first justification; Forgiveness, in the Sacrament of Penance, of mortal sin committed after Baptism, is called second justification
Money - The type represents everything considered of spiritual value by human beings if it is used to purchase Forgiveness, and obtain entrance into Heaven
Remission - Forgiveness pardon that is, the giving up of the punishment due to a crime as the remission of sins
Cornelius - After an angel appeared to this pious soldier, he sent to Joppa for Simon Peter, who came to him with the message of Forgiveness of sins through faith in the crucified and risen Christ
Clemency - It is most generally used in speaking of the Forgiveness exercised by princes
Hart - ...
Isaiah 35:6 (a) Isaiah uses this type to show the great grace and power of GOD in making a poor, lost, helpless sinner to rejoice in a new-found Saviour, and in His Forgiveness
Sacrament of Penance - The fact that Our Lord empowered His earthly representatives with authority not only to forgive but also to retain sins proves, in the first place, that He willed the exercise of this power to be a judicial process, in which the minister is to judge who are worthy, and who are unworthy, of Forgiveness. Secondly, it shows that the Forgiveness of sins by the use of this power is effected through an external rite or sacrament, since it is only by external communication between judge and culprit that a judicial process can be conducted among human beings. Moreover, Catholic doctrine teaches that the actual reception of Penance is strictly necessary for judicial Forgiveness, and although mortal sins can be taken from the soul by an act of perfect contrition this contrition must imply the intention of submitting them to the sacramental tribunal at the nearest opportunity. Satisfaction, or the sacramental penance, since it is directed to the remission, not of sin, but of the temporal punishment remaining after the Forgiveness of sin, is only an integral part, i. The principal effect of a worthy reception of Penance is the Forgiveness of sin by the infusion of sanctifying grace
Elkesai, Elkesaites - The great controversy then agitating the church of Rome was whether, and with what limitations, Forgiveness might be bestowed on grievous post-baptismal sin. This book of Elkesai announced a new method of Forgiveness of sin, asserted to have been revealed in the third year of Trajan, by which any person, no matter of what sins he might have been guilty (some of the very grossest are expressly mentioned), might obtain Forgiveness by submitting to a new baptism with the use of a certain formula of which we shall speak presently. Hippolytus takes credit for resisting the teaching of Alcibiades, and blames Callistus for having, by the laxity of his doctrine and practice concerning church discipline, pre-disposed men's minds to the easy methods of Forgiveness expounded in this book. The superiority of the Forgiveness of sins by the washing of water over that by the fire of sacrifice is based on the superiority of water to fire (Hipp. 19), thus getting rid of the class of offences as to the Forgiveness of which there was then most controversy
Anger - Even when just, our anger should be mitigated by a due consideration of the circumstances of the offence and the state of mind of the offender; of the folly and ill-results of this passion; of the claims of the gospel, and of our own need of Forgiveness from others, but especially from God, Matthew 6:15
Rags - This refers to self-righteousness, religious pride, character-building far salvation, and good works which are offered to GOD as a reason far salvation and Forgiveness
Pardon - ) The act of pardoning; Forgiveness, as of an offender, or of an offense; release from penalty; remission of punishment; absolution
Sabbath - Colossians 2:16 (a) The sabbath day is a shadow and a type of the perfect rest which every sinner finds in CHRIST JESUS when he ceases to work for his own salvation and trusts the Saviour to blot out all his sins, redeem his soul, bring Forgiveness, give him eternal life, and make him a child of GOD
Regeneration - ,repair of living tissue; with the metaphorical notion of efforescence; with the non-Christian idea of aspiration to new life, or release through metempsychosis; with the Pietistic idea of experience of conversion and of moral righteousness; with the old Protestant notion of Divine dissulation upon our sinfulness; with the Ritschlian notion of reconciliation following Forgiveness
Vengeance (2) - Forgiveness and benevolence must take the place of vengeance; love, not hatred, must be the motive of thought and act. He taught His disciples to forgive a sinning but penitent brother, not with a niggard, but with a generous and inexhaustible Forgiveness (Luke 17:3 f. He even makes God’s Forgiveness of a man depend on the man’s Forgiveness of his fellow (Matthew 6:14; Matthew 18:35, Mark 11:25 f. This teaching of Christ, forbidding vengeance, requiring Forgiveness and love, is built on a firm religious basis. The essence of the Divine nature is love, and the highest manifestation of the Divine love is Forgiveness and benevolence. Therefore it must be banned out of the heart of those who would be sons of God, and replaced by the spirit of Forgiveness, of ungrudging love. It is this conception of the essential love of God issuing in Forgiveness, in love, that is the basis of the high demands of Christ, and the inspiration and possibility of our response (Matthew 5:43-45; Matthew 5:48; Matthew 18:23-35, Luke 6:35. ‘Anger (Wrath) of God,’ ‘Avenge,’ ‘Ethics,’ ‘Forgiveness,’ ‘Goel’; JE Keys - The authority Christ delegated to His disciples to proclaim Forgiveness and pronounce judgment. In their place, through the gift of the Spirit, the disciples received the authority to proclaim Forgiveness and judgment (John 20:23 )
Dionysius of Alexandria, Saint - Dionysius dealt leniently with the Christians who had lapsed during the persecutions and refused Forgiveness to none at the hour of death
Dionysius the Great - Dionysius dealt leniently with the Christians who had lapsed during the persecutions and refused Forgiveness to none at the hour of death
Great, Dionysius the - Dionysius dealt leniently with the Christians who had lapsed during the persecutions and refused Forgiveness to none at the hour of death
Alexandria, Dionysius of - Dionysius dealt leniently with the Christians who had lapsed during the persecutions and refused Forgiveness to none at the hour of death
Sin, Remission of - True, actual Forgiveness of sin
Remission of Sin - True, actual Forgiveness of sin
Guilt - ...
Liability and Forgiveness in the New Testament . ...
Stephen Motyer...
See also Forgiveness ; Sin ...
Bibliography . , Counseling and the Human Predicament: A Study of Sin, Guilt, and Forgiveness ; M
Hosanna - Hosanna Rabba, or Grand Hosanna, is a name they give to their feast of tabernacles, which lasts eight days; because during the course thereof, they are frequently calling for the assistance of God, the Forgiveness of their sins, and his blessing on the new year; and to that purpose they make great use of the prayers above mentioned
Mercy Seat - On the Day of Atonement the high priest sprinkled the blood of a sacrificial lamb on the mercy seat as a plea for Forgiveness for the sins of the nation (Leviticus 16:15 )
Gospel - The Gospel is the good news that we have Forgiveness of sins through Jesus
Absolution - The Forgiveness of sins on earth by the Son of Manthrough His agents, the Bishops and Priests of the Church
Advocate - Inevitably they will sometimes sin and as a result need God’s Forgiveness. In Jesus they have a heavenly advocate who, when they confess their sin, brings their case before the merciful God and asks his Forgiveness
Repentance - They cannot rely upon the work of Christ for the Forgiveness of sin unless they turn from that sin (Mark 1:15; Acts 11:21; Acts 20:21; Acts 26:18; 1 Thessalonians 1:9). ...
Because faith involves repentance and repentance involves faith, the Bible in some places speaks of Forgiveness as depending on faith (Acts 10:43; Acts 13:38-39), in others as depending on repentance (Luke 24:47; Acts 3:19; Acts 3:26). True repentance recognizes the character of sin as deserving God’s judgment, and turns from that sin to ask God’s Forgiveness
the Much Forgiven Debtor And His Much Love - The less Forgiveness, the less love: the more Forgiveness, the more love: no Forgiveness at all, no love at all: but, nothing but Forgiveness, then nothing but love. Simon, being neither a publican nor a sinner, had needed so little Forgiveness that he had not love enough to provide his Saviour with a bason and water wherewith to wash His feet. For, even a very little Forgiveness, even fifty pence forgiven, even five pence, even five farthings, would surely have taught Simon at least ordinary civility. The truth is, grant Forgiveness enough and you will soon convert the greatest churl among you to be the most perfect gentleman among you. Nothing else will do it, but Forgiveness enough will do it. Grant Forgiveness enough, and love enough, and you will have all considerateness, all civility, all generosity, all gratitude, springing up in that man's heart. Would you have a true gentleman for a friend, or for a lover, or for a husband, or for a son? Then manage, somehow, to have him brought to Simon's Guest for a great Forgiveness, and the thing is done. Simon did not need much Forgiveness, if any at all, and in that measure Simon's case was hopeless. And just to the depth and to the poignancy with which the law of God enters your sinful heart, just in that measure will you possess in your broken heart a great or a small Forgiveness, and will manifest before God and man a great or a small gratitude
Accept - ...
In theology, acceptance with God implies Forgiveness of sins and reception into his favor
Cup - ...
1 Corinthians 10:16 (b) This indicates that the Lord expects His own people to drink and to make a part of themselves the Forgiveness, redemption and cleansing that comes through the precious Blood of CHRIST
Expiate - To expiate guilt or a crime, is to perform some act which is supposed to purify the person guilty or some act which is accepted by the offended party as satisfaction for the injury that is, some act by which his wrath is appeased,and his Forgiveness procured
Ark of the Covenant - This was symbolic of the Forgiveness of the sins of the Jewish nation
Lebanon - The Lord is telling us by this figure that though a sinner in his desire to obtain Forgiveness should gather together in one pile all the burnable material on this huge mountain, and then kill all the animals that lived on that huge mountain, that sacrifice would not be sufficient to put away one sin
Cornelius - All who repented of their sins and believed in Jesus would receive Forgiveness, regardless of their nationality (Acts 10:34-43)
Refreshing, Times of - ...
The link between repentance and the Forgiveness of sins is also included in Peter's first sermon (Acts 2:38 a), but there the gift of the Holy Spirit is the promised result (v. , cool by blowing), when linked to the derived meaning of strengthening, can then be interpreted as a definitive age of salvation that comes as a result of repentance and the Forgiveness of sins
Atonement - God, however, gives them a way by which they may obtain Forgiveness and be brought back to God. Whether in Old or New Testament times, Forgiveness is solely by God’s grace and sinners receive it by faith (Psalms 32:5; Psalms 51:17; Micah 7:18; Ephesians 2:8)
Eternal Sin - It has the merit of emphasizing the essential matter, which any interpretation, to be adequate, must take into account, that an ‘eternal sin’ is a sin which ‘hath never Forgiveness. ...
That sin tends to propagate itself is witnessed to by experience, and that continuance in sinning must exclude Forgiveness is an essential principle of all moral judgment. ’ The absoluteness of the sentence is already declared in the words ‘hath never Forgiveness;’ it is the ultimate ground of this judgment which is further declared. ...
The doom of the finally impenitent is here negatively told: ‘hath never Forgiveness’; but that includes the uttermost penalty, exclusion from the Kingdom of the Father, loss of the ‘eternal life
Abel - "The blood of Abel" called from the ground for vengeance, Genesis 4:10 ; but the blood of Christ claims Forgiveness and salvation for his people, Hebrews 12:24 1 John 1:7 ...
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Onesimus - The Apostle would gladly have kept him to minister to him ( Philippians 1:13 ), but would not do so without the consent of Philemon, and therefore sends Onesimus back with the letter to obtain his master’s Forgiveness and his permission to return to St
Enemies - Forgiveness, Hatred, Love
Predestine, Predestination - God is the one who ordains the Christian into Forgiveness, "
Mediator - It is through Him that God has been enabled to approach men in a Man with Forgiveness of sins, and consequently to Him any poor sinner can go, and will in no wise be cast out
Patience - The specific feature of Christian patience is that believers exercise it in a spirit of love, joy, humility and Forgiveness (1 Corinthians 13:4; 1 Corinthians 13:7; Colossians 1:11; Colossians 3:12-13; cf. Those who respond to his patience in faith and repentance receive his Forgiveness; those who despise or ignore it fall under his punishment (Exodus 34:6-7; Romans 2:3-4; Romans 9:22; 1 Timothy 1:16; 2 Peter 3:9)
New Covenant - The new covenant, therefore, has two basic characteristics: an internal spiritual transformation resulting in a new relationship with God and a new possibility of obedience and Forgiveness of sins. In Jeremiah what is denoted as the new covenant in 31:31-33—with the exception of the explicit promise of the Forgiveness of sinsis also called an everlasting covenant (32:37-41; 50:5). ...
In the prophets the promises of restoration, the new possibility of obedience, and national Forgiveness of sin occur frequently without being connected to the concepts of the new covenant, eternal covenant, or covenant of peace. At his last Passover meal Jesus said of the cup of blessing that it was the blood of the covenant poured out for many (Mark 14:24 ); the blood of the covenant poured out for many for the Forgiveness of sins (Matthew 26:28 ); the new covenant in my blood (1 Corinthians 11:25 ); the new covenant in my blood poured out for you (Luke 22:20 ). The focus of the letter is on the Forgiveness of sins promised in the new covenant; the author's purpose is to prove that the levitical sacrificial system, the means of obtaining Forgiveness in the first covenant, has been rendered obsolete and will soon disappear. The benefits of the new covenant received by the church are Forgiveness and the Spirit (the means of the internal spiritual transformation) whereas restored Israel will receive in addition the promised land under the Messiah's kingship and will be subject to the law (written on the heart) as the governing code of the messianic kingdom. ) Paul's citation of Isaiah 59:20-21 in reference to the future salvation and Forgiveness of empirical Israel can be interpreted as meaning that Paul believed that the new covenant had yet another future fulfillment
Redeem, Redemption - , at His second advent; (c) Forgiveness and justification, "redemption" as the result of expiation, deliverance from the guilt of sins, Romans 3:24 , "through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus;" Ephesians 1:7 , defined as "the Forgiveness of our trespasses," RV; so Colossians 1:14 , "the Forgiveness of our sins," indicating both the liberation from the guilt and doom of sin and the introduction into a life of liberty, "newness of life" (Romans 6:4 ); Hebrews 9:15 , "for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first covenant," RV, here "redemption of" is equivalent to "redemption from," the genitive case being used of the object from which the "redemption" is effected, not from the consequence of the transgressions, but from the trangressions themselves; (d) the deliverance of the believer from the presence and power of sin, and of his body from bondage to corruption, at the coming (the Parousia in its inception) of the Lord Jesus, Romans 8:23 ; 1 Corinthians 1:30 ; Ephesians 1:14 ; 4:30
Day of Atonement - Therefore, on this one day of the year, when entrance into God’s presence was available, the high priest brought all the people’s sins to God for his Forgiveness. The sprinkling of the blood on the mercy seat reminded Israelites that even at the climax of their highest religious exercise, they could still not demand Forgiveness. Likewise Jesus Christ, having dealt with sin fully and having obtained eternal Forgiveness for sins, will reappear to bring his people’s salvation to its glorious climax (Hebrews 9:12; Hebrews 9:28; see also BLOOD)
Simon - Simon learned valuable lessons about love, courtesy, and Forgiveness after a sinful woman anointed Jesus at this event
Apphia - As the wife of Philemon, Apphia would have some claim to be consulted in such a matter as the Forgiveness and emancipation of a slave
Repentance - This is that repentance which always accompanies true faith, and to which is promised the free Forgiveness of sin through the merits of Jesus Christ, Matthew 4:17 Acts 3:19 11:18 20:12
Baptism, Holy - The grace conferred in Holy Baptismis threefold, (1) Regeneration, or the New Birth (See REGENERATION);(2) Admission into the Spiritual Kingdom, or the Holy CatholicChurch, and (3) The Forgiveness of all our sins, for in the NiceneCreed we confess, "I acknowledge one Baptism for the Remissions ofsins
Prophetess - Huldah spoke God's words of judgment (2 Kings 22:16-17 ) and Forgiveness (2 Kings 22:18-20 ) to King Josiah
Belong - To the Lord our God belong mercies and Forgiveness
Salvation - When someone appeals to God and seeks Forgiveness in Jesus, his sins are forgiven
Victory - This victory brings with it such blessings as Forgiveness, deliverance from the dominion of sin and from the fear of death, a deep sense of the moral order of the world, peace with God, and life everlasting
Seven Words From the Cross - First He asked Forgiveness for those who were crucifying Him (Luke 23:34 )
Abel - Abel's blood calls for vengeance, but Christ's blood carries with it the idea of Forgiveness ( Matthew 23:35 ; Luke 11:51 ; 1 John 1:7 )
Abba - This adoption into the family of God, inseparably follows our justification; and the power to call God our Father, in this special and appropriative sense, results from the inward testimony given to our Forgiveness by the Holy Spirit
Regeneration - A baptizedChristian may repeatedly fall from Grace, and by repentance, byamendment of life and by Forgiveness he may be again restored,(this is Conversion), but he cannot be said to be again regeneratewithout a grievous misapprehension of the language of the Bible anda total departure from the Doctrine of the Primitive Church
Ignorance (2) - In saying this He renewed that condemnation which He had often passed upon religious ignorance, for He implied that those who slew Him had need of the Father’s Forgiveness—His own Forgiveness the words themselves express. But what the saying immediately proclaims is that the sin of ignorance is not beyond Forgiveness, even when it has led to the darkest of crimes; nay, that ignorance itself may be pleaded in extenuation (γάρ) before Him who knoweth all
Altar - He knew that His laws would be broken, He knew that men would need a sacrifice for their sins; He therefore planned that this altar should be built at once so that men could have a way of Forgiveness and salvation immediately. GOD makes no provision for Forgiveness and salvation after death. We are to be a forgiving people if we expect Forgiveness from Heaven
Retribution (2) - ’ Pious Jews here and there might remember that Forgiveness and free grace were part of the character of Jahweh, ‘but with most Jews this mode of view was overshadowed by the legalistic conception, whereby every act of obedience was regarded as having an exact recompense, and every blessing to be obtained as requiring previous service. The measure we receive is in the nature of things the counterpart of that which we give to others (Matthew 7:2), the judgment the counterpart of our judgment, God’s Forgiveness of our Forgiveness (Matthew 6:14). ...
It is from this point of view alone that we can harmonize the fact of Forgiveness with that of judgment or retribution. So long as we look on the latter as the inevitable result of acts considered each on its merits, there can be no room for Forgiveness, or at least it appears as an arbitrary interference with law. Forgiveness affects the character, being bound up with μετάνοια, the change of character. The unmerciful servant finds his old debt back upon him, because the conditional Forgiveness of his master has not touched his character. Buddhism, strictly interpreted, leaves no loophole for Forgiveness. Schulhof, The Law of Forgiveness (1901), 94
Perfection - The sinner was always sinning, and was coming frequently to the priests with his sacrifice to obtain Forgiveness
Binding And Loosing - It is the responsibility of believers to have a forgiving spirit and to teach the conditions of Forgiveness (Matthew 6:12 )
Ignorant, Ignorance - Jesus extended Forgiveness to his tormentors, noting they did not know what they were doing (Luke 23:34 ). ...
Ignorance requiring mercy and Forgiveness is not then so much a quality of the uneducated as it is the quality of a sinner; it is not so much an intellectual issue as it is a moral one
Confession - (For fuller details see JUSTIFICATION, sub-heading ‘Justification and Forgiveness’. (See also Forgiveness
Assurance - In support of this view, the following remarks may be offered:—...
If it is the doctrine of the inspired records, that man is by nature prone to evil, and that in practice he violates that law under which as a creature he is placed, and is thereby exposed to punishment;—if also it is there stated, that an act of grace and pardon is promised on the conditions of repentance toward God, and faith in our Lord Jesus Christ;—if that repentance implies consideration of our ways, a sense of the displeasure of Almighty God, contrition of heart, and consequently trouble and grief of mind, mixed, however, with a hope inspired by the promise of Forgiveness, and which leads to earnest supplication for the actual pardon of sin so promised, it will follow from these premises—either,...
1. That Forgiveness is not to be expected till after the termination of our course of probation, that is, in another life; and that, therefore, this trouble and apprehension of mind can only be assuaged by the hope we may have of a favourable final decision on our case;—or,...
2. That sin is, in the present life, forgiven as often as it is thus repented of, and as often as we exercise the required and specific acts of trust in the merits of our Saviour; but that this Forgiveness of our sins is not in any way made known unto us: so that we are left, as to our feelings, in precisely the same state as if sin were not forgiven till after death, namely, in grief and trouble of mind, relieved only by hope;—or,...
3. The notion that though an act of Forgiveness may take place, we are unable to ascertain a fact so important to us, is also irreconcilable with many scriptures in which the writers of the New Testament speak of an experience, not confined personally to themselves, or to those Christians who were endowed with spiritual gifts, but common to all Christians
Sin - This sin, or blasphemy, as it should rather be called, many scribes and Pharisees were guilty of, who, beholding our Lord do his miracles, affirmed that he wrought them by Beelzebub, the prince of devils, which was, in effect, calling the Holy Ghost Satan, a most horrible blasphemy; and, as on this ground they rejected Christ, and salvation by him, their sin could certainly have no Forgiveness. " "He that shall blaspheme against the Holy Ghost hath never Forgiveness. If men should ascribe these powers to Beelzebub, or in any respect reject their authority, they would blaspheme the Holy Ghost, from whom they were derived; and that sin would be unpardonable, because this was the completion of the evidence of the divine authority of Christ and his religion; and they who rejected these last means of conviction, could have no other opportunity of being brought to faith in Christ, the only appointed condition of pardon and Forgiveness. But, on the other hand, they who finally rejected the accumulated and complete evidence of Jesus being the Messiah, as exhibited by the inspired Apostles, precluded themselves from the possibility of conviction, because no farther testimony would be afforded them, and consequently, there being no means of repentance, they would be incapable of Forgiveness and redemption
Canticle of Zachary - You my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High; for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way, to give his people knowledge of salvation by the Forgiveness of their sins
Benedictus, the - You my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High; for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way, to give his people knowledge of salvation by the Forgiveness of their sins
Betrothal - This means that Forgiveness takes precedence over stoning or divorce
Repentance - Jesus, it is said, (Acts 5:31) "Is exalted a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel and Forgiveness of sins
Heal - ...
A large number of the uses of râphâ' express the “healing” of the nation—such “healing” not only involves God’s grace and Forgiveness, but also the nation’s repentance
Philemon - He had converted a fugitive slave to the Christian faith; and he here intercedes with his master in the most earnest and affectionate manner for his pardon; he speaks of Onesimus in terms calculated to soften Philemon's resentment, engages to make full compensation for any injury which he might have sustained from him, and conjures him to reconciliation and Forgiveness by the now endearing connection of Christian brotherhood
Zachary, Canticle of - You my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High; for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way, to give his people knowledge of salvation by the Forgiveness of their sins
Bathsheba - David repented of his sin (2 Samuel 12:13; Psalms 51), but God’s Forgiveness did not remove the evil example that David had already set before his family
Areopagus - The death and resurrection of Jesus made Forgiveness of sins available to all, but it also guaranteed judgment for those who refused to repent (Acts 17:22-31)
Lord's Prayer, the - How does "your kingdom come"? It comes by the Father's bringing Forgiveness through the redemptive work of Jesus the Son, who personifies the redeeming reign of God. Accordingly, the kingdom comes as sinners ask Forgiveness of the Lord by acknowledging moral and spiritual obligations, receive saving grace by faith, and then pass along the good news of Jesus to others with a forgiving heart. But they have no right to claim Forgiveness for themselves if they are unwilling to forgive others, for that would undermine the purpose of the disciples' mission: as they have been forgiven by God's grace in Jesus the Son, so they are to share the message of Forgiveness with the world. ...
With the exception of the petition for Forgiveness of sins (Jesus is the sinbearer who provides Forgiveness), the eschatological themes of the Lord's Prayer would have been prayed by Jesus throughout his ministry; they are thus fitting for his followers, who are given the honor and responsibility of sharing in his mission by proclaiming the coming of the kingdom and doing the will of God, to his glory
Confession (of Sin) - —In the OT a large place is given to the confession of sin, as being the necessary expression of true penitence and the condition at the same time of the Divine Forgiveness. But apart from the use of the actual phrase, we shall see that the Gospel narratives take full account of the confession of sin, and that, as in the OT, confession is recognized both as the necessary accompaniment of repentance and as the indispensable condition of Forgiveness and restoration to favour, whether human or Divine. The prayer which He gave His disciples as a pattern for all prayer includes a petition for Forgiveness (Matthew 6:12, Luke 11:4); and such a petition is equivalent, of course, to a confession of sin. Luke, who is pre-eminently the Evangelist of salvation for the sinful, supplies us with the great bulk of the Gospel evidence that the Divine Forgiveness is conditioned by the confession of sin. In Luke 17:4 again, our own Forgiveness of an offender is made to depend on his coming and confessing, ‘I repent. ...
But, above all, it is to be noted that while Jesus taught His disciples to pray for the Forgiveness of sins, we never find Him humbling Himself before God on account of sin, and asking to be forgiven
Seven - Seven is the number of sacrifice (2 Chronicles 29:21 ; Job 42:8 ), of purification and consecration (Leviticus 42:6,17 ; 8:11,33 ; 14:9,51 ), of Forgiveness (Matthew 18:21,22 ; Luke 17:4 ), of reward (Deuteronomy 28:7 ; 1 Samuel 2:5 ), and of punishment (Leviticus 26:21,24,28 ; Deuteronomy 28:25 )
Forgiveness - "This, " says an ingenious writer, "was a lesson so new, and utterly unknown till taught by his doctrines and enforced by his example, that the wisest moralists of the wisest nations and ages represented the desire of revenge as a mark of a noble mind; but how much more magnanimous, how much more beneficial to mankind, is Forgiveness! It is more magnanimous, because every generous and exalted disposition of the human mind is requisite to the practice of it; and it is the most beneficial, because it puts an end to an eternal succession of injuries and retaliation
Revenge - Far from returning evil for evil, they must positively do good to those who do evil to them (Exodus 23:4-5; Leviticus 19:17-18; Matthew 5:44-48; Matthew 18:35; see Forgiveness)
Thanksgiving - Thankfulness was expressed: for personal (Psalm 35:18 ) and national deliverance (Psalm 44:7-8 ); for God's faithfulness to the covenant (Psalm 100:5 ); and for Forgiveness (Psalm 30:4-5 ; Isaiah 12:1 )
Beatitudes - “The merciful” show an attitude of Forgiveness (Matthew 5:7 )
Sacrifice - Other sacrifices were for Forgiveness of sins, a slaughtered animal bearing the penalty that the offerers, because of their sins, should have suffered (Job 42:8). There could be no Forgiveness of their sin, no releasing them from its consequences, apart from death. The only blood that can bring Forgiveness of sins is the blood of Jesus – his death on the cross. The benefit of the sacrificial system was that it gave people a means of communication with God, by which they could demonstrate their faith and seek God’s Forgiveness (1 Samuel 1:3; Isaiah 56:7). Sinners had no right to Forgiveness. They still provided a means of communication by which repentant sinners could approach God, express their repentance and ask God’s Forgiveness. Unlike the animal sacrifices, Christ’s sacrifice removes sin, cleanses the conscience, brings total Forgiveness and secures eternal redemption (Hebrews 9:9-14; Hebrews 9:25-26; Hebrews 10:14-18)
Absolution - In regard to the saying (in John 20:23) about the Forgiveness and retaining of sins, it was spoken in ‘a general gathering of the believers in Jerusalem’ (see Luke 24:33), and ‘there is nothing in the context to show that the gift was confined to any particular group (as the Apostles) among the whole company present. The grace of Forgiveness has not its proper power in transforming their lives unless they know that they have it. It is when they have an assured sense of Forgiveness and reconciliation to God that a great impulse of gratitude, with a new life in their souls, makes them free indeed, and strong in their freedom to serve God. Christ accordingly equips His Church to convey this assurance of Forgiveness, and if a Church does not succeed in doing this, especially if, as often, the current idea in the Church is that to be assured of Forgiveness is abnormal and unusual, the Church is greatly failing in its mission. ...
The words of our Lord before us certainly do not mean that Forgiveness by the mouth and at the will of man is always to be followed by a ratification of God in heaven, even though that man be an apostle. But they do imply that when Christ’s servants do their work in the enlightenment and guidance of the Spirit, they will be able to convey messages of grace which will be according to the truth of things, and therefore valid in heaven: they will be able also to convey assurances of Forgiveness, which will be owned of God as true, and will be made effective by His Spirit in penitent souls. By preaching in the power of the Spirit, thousands of souls have been in all ages receiving remission of sins and an assurance of Forgiveness. So effectual is preaching in the Spirit, that it may perhaps be found that in the Churches in which there is no ordinance with the title of ‘private absolution,’ the sense of Forgiveness of sins is truer, deeper, and more widely spread than in those which have such an ordinance, and count it necessary. ...
In the Middle Ages there were many discussions as to whether the priest had power simply to declare the Forgiveness of sins, God alone having power to forgive, or whether the priest truly himself exercises a power to forgive as representative of God. This dealing has been undoubtedly, when used with spiritual tact and tenderness, a great means of deepening both the sense of sin and the trust of God’s Forgiveness, and it has the effect of giving many who had lost character a new spiritual start. —Absolution, in the full meaning of bringing men into the sense of God’s Forgiveness and keeping them in that sense, may be said to be the primary work of the Church and its ministry
Repentance (2) - He never prays for Forgiveness. Though He teaches insistently that all others must repent and become sons, and even then must pray for the Forgiveness of their sins, yet He Himself knows nothing but that He is the Son of His Heavenly Father, and He never loses by any act the consciousness of the Father’s approval. Popularly, repentance is understood to be a sense of regret and self-abasement, looking to the Forgiveness of the wrong-doings of the past. Faith is the trustful commitment of one’s self to God for Forgiveness of sins, and deliverance from sin; but it is psychologically impossible to commit one’s self thus to God without renouncing and turning away from all that is contrary to God. (4) By working in man through His Spirit that sorrow for sin and hatred of sin which lead men to renounce it and to turn away from it, seeking Forgiveness and deliverance. Peter: ‘Him hath God exalted as Prince and Saviour, to give repentance and Forgiveness of sins’ (Acts 5:31)
Conviction - See Sin ; Forgiveness ; Repentance
Imitate - In Ephesians 5:1 the command to be imitators is again linked with the previous series of commands, especially that of Forgiveness ( Ephesians 4:25-32 )
Shimei - When David returned after Absalom's death, Shimei met him and pleaded for Forgiveness and mercy, which David granted because of the festive occasion (2 Samuel 19:1 )
Sprinkle, Sprinkling - This application of the blood of Christ is necessary for believers, in respect of their committal of sins, which on that ground receive Forgiveness, 1 John 1:9
Nature - Good nature is a disposition to please, and is compounded of kindness, forbearance, Forgiveness, and self-denial
Lamb of God - John 1:29 , therefore, signifies the substitutionary, sacrificial suffering and death of Jesus, the Servant of God, by which redemption and Forgiveness of sin are accomplished
Punishment - ...
The Lord, referring to the law of an individual demanding an eye for an eye, enjoined Forgiveness of personal wrongs; but this in no way interferes with civil government
Faith - Without it there can be no Forgiveness of sins, and no holiness of life; and they who are justified by faith, live and walk by faith, Mark 16:16 John 3:15,16 Acts 16:31 1 John 5:10
Deliverance - word is found 8 times (in Matthew 26:28, Mark 1:4, Luke 3:3; Luke 1:77; Luke 24:47 it is rendered ‘remission’ [1]; in Mark 3:29 ‘forgiveness’; in Luke 4:18 bis (a) ‘deliverance’ [2], ‘release’ [3], (b) [4] ‘at liberty’); while the fact of deliverance underlies all that is recorded of Jesus, and has coloured the entire thought of Christianity. See Forgiveness
Expiation, Propitiation - In the Septuagint, the earliest Greek translation of the Old Testament, hilasmos appears in Leviticus 25:9 in the expression, “day of atonement”; in Psalm 130:4 to confess that there is “forgiveness” with God; in Numbers 5:8 in the expression the “ram of the atonement”; and in Ezekiel 44:27 as a “sin-offering. ” Daniel 9:9 uses the plural form to speak of “forgivenesses” which are a character trait of God. Some scholars would see both ideas present in the word hilasmos , so that God in grace initiated the sacrifice of Jesus to provide covering and Forgiveness for human sin but that He also received the sacrifice which satisfied His anger and justice. Then sacrifice could quickly be viewed as a mechanical way to Forgiveness. God chose to forgive us before the sacrifice was enacted in history, but His Forgiveness could not reach us until this sacrifice took place
Justification - Justification is not the Forgiveness of a man without righteousness, but a declaration that he possesses a righteousness which perfectly and for ever satisfies the law, namely, Christ's righteousness (2 Corinthians 5:21 ; Romans 4:6-8 )
Regeneration - It takes place when people humbly submit to Jesus Christ and trust him for Forgiveness, salvation and life (John 1:12-13; John 3:3-6; Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 2:5; Titus 3:5)
Savior - Here Jesus' saving role involves giving “repentance and Forgiveness of sins” (Acts 5:31 ; compare Matthew 1:21 )
Perfect - Genesis 6:9 Noah was perfect in obedience...
Genesis 17:1 Abraham was perfect in trust...
Job 1:1 Job was perfect in uprightness...
Ezekiel 28:15 Satan was perfect in his actions at that time...
Matthew 5:48 The Christian is to be perfect in Forgiveness of others...
Matthew 19:21 The Christian is to be perfect in devotion to CHRIST...
Luke 6:40 The Christian is to be perfect in discipleship...
Luke 13:32 CHRIST was perfect in His training course on earth...
John 17:23 The Christian is to be perfect in his relationship to GOD...
1 Corinthians 2:6 The Christian is to be perfect in understanding...
2 Corinthians 13:11 The Christian is to be perfect in fellowship...
Ephesians 4:13 The Christian is to be perfect in his development...
Philippians 3:15 The Christian is to be perfect in his efforts and desires...
Colossians 1:28 The Christian is perfect in salvation...
Colossians 4:12 The Christian is to be perfect in obedience...
2 Timothy 3:17 The Christian is to be perfect in instruction...
Hebrews 2:10 CHRIST is perfect in His experience ( 5:9)...
Hebrews 12:23 The Christian is perfect in the culmination...
James 1:4 The Christian is to be perfect in patience...
James 3:2 The Christian is to be perfect in conversation...
1 Peter 5:10 The Christian is to be perfect in his training...
The word "perfect" as it pertains to the Christian always refers to the subject under consideration
Vineyard - If one Sunday-school teacher is teaching her class the true Gospel of salvation by grace alone, and the teacher in the next class is teaching salvation by morals or Forgiveness by merit, then there is little expectation of gathering a crop for GOD
Confession - This was enjoined by the law, and if accompanied with a sacrifice it led to Forgiveness
Henry iv, Emperor - When the German nobles decided to elect another emperor, Henry fled to Italy where he penitently craved Forgiveness from Gregory at Canossa; legend says that he walked barefoot to Rome
Sacramental Confession - The manifestation of one's own actual sins, committed after Baptism, to a priest, in order to obtain their Forgiveness in the Sacrament of Penance
Esau - Fearful of what might happen, Jacob begged Esau’s mercy, but Esau responded with such generous Forgiveness that the dreaded meeting turned into a happy reunion (Genesis 32:1-21; Genesis 33:1-16)
Consecration - ...
Jesus’ priestly work not only brings Forgiveness to believers, but it also sets them apart for God (John 17:19)
Offerings - Forgiveness of injuries (Matthew 5:23 f
Guilt - There the psalmist acknowledged his own transgression and asked for Forgiveness from guilt (Psalm 32:5 ). Asking for and receiving Forgiveness is one of the major ways that we can be absolved from guilt. God in His faithfulness has promised to forgive us from all iniquity (1 John 1:9 ) See Atonement ; Christ; Forgiveness ; Reconciliation; Sin
Confession - But the duty of confessing sin both to God and to man is constantly referred to, and the indispensableness of confession in order to Forgiveness is made very plain ( Luke 18:10 f. This meets us at many points in our Lord’s teaching in His calls to repentance, in which confession is involved ( Matthew 4:17 = Mark 1:15 , Luke 11:29 ; Luke 11:32 ; Luke 24:47 ), in the petition for Forgiveness in the Lord’s Prayer ( Matthew 6:12 , Luke 11:4 ), in the parables of the Prodigal Son ( Luke 15:17-18 ; Luke 15:21 ) and the Pharisee and the Publican ( Luke 18:10 f. Besides confession to God, Christ enjoins confession to the brother we have wronged ( Matthew 5:23-24 ), and He makes it plain that human as well as Divine Forgiveness must depend upon readiness to confess ( Luke 17:4 )
Salvation - ...
Some argue that the Old Testament does not link salvation with the Forgiveness of sins. God's sending of a deliverer is in effect God's act of Forgiveness of the penitent (compare Psalm 79:9 ; Psalm 85:4 ). Jesus offered God's Forgiveness to hurting people (Mark 2:5 ; Luke 7:50 ). See Atonement ; Conversion ; Election ; Eschatology ; Forgiveness ; Future Hope ; Grace ; Justification ; New Birth ; Predestination ; Reconciliation, Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer; Repentance ; Sanctification ; Security of the Believer
Neighbor - An unforgiving attitude on our part would move God to refuse us the Forgiveness of our debts to Him (Matthew 6)
Pride - Proud persons do not think it necessary to ask Forgiveness because they do not admit their sinful condition
Nazirite - If they broke it accidentally, they could ask Forgiveness through offering sacrifices
Whippers - They held, among other things, that whipping was of equal virtue with baptism, and the other sacraments; that the Forgiveness of all sins was to be obtained by it from God without the merits of Jesus Christ; that the old law of Christ was soon to be abolished, and that a new law, enjoining the baptism of blood to be administered by whipping, was to be substituted in its place: upon which Clement VII
Tender - ) Susceptible of the softer passions, as love, compassion, kindness; compassionate; pitiful; anxious for another's good; easily excited to pity, Forgiveness, or favor; sympathetic
Lamentations - In the lengthy third poem the writer admits that Jerusalem’s sufferings are God’s righteous judgment, and urges the people to accept God’s discipline and seek his Forgiveness
Judge - ...
Christians must be prepared to forgive, and this Forgiveness must extend to opponents who are openly anti-Christian (Matthew 5:10-11; 1618394054_12)
Salvation, Saviour - External blessings, deliverance from enemies, return from exile, are still hoped for, but the main stress is laid on a changed heart, Forgiveness, restoration to God’s favour, righteousness. It begins on earth in Forgiveness, renewal, the bestowal of the Holy Spirit, enlightenment, guidance, strengthening, comfort; and is perfected in the blessedness and glory, in which body and soul share, of the life everlasting
Redemption - "In whom we have redemption through his blood, the Forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace," Ephesians 1:7 . Hence, in the above cited and other passages, it is said, "We have redemption through his blood, the Forgiveness of sins," in opposition to guilt; redemption from "the curse of the law;" deliverance from sin, that "we should be set free from sin;" deliverance from the power of Satan; from death, by a resurrection; and from future "wrath," by the gift of eternal life
Leviticus - It taught them the seriousness of sin and gave them a way of approach to him to seek his Forgiveness. People did not have to try to squeeze Forgiveness from an unwilling God; God himself took the initiative by giving them the blood of animals to make atonement for their sin (Leviticus 17:11; see BLOOD; SACRIFICE)
Everlasting Punishment - Though one can find expressions of individual guilt, punishment and Forgiveness in the Psalms, and though one can find the language of universal judgment in the prophets—that is, that unfaithful Israel and all the nations of the world will be historically punished—it is not until after the Old Testament that the notions of “eternal punishment” or “everlasting judgment” are developed
Eternal - ...
"Aionios is also used of the sin that 'hath never Forgiveness,' Mark 3:29 , and of the judgment of God, from which there is no appeal, Hebrews 6:2 , and of the fire, which is one of its instruments, Matthew 18:8 ; 25:41 ; Jude 1:7 , and which is elsewhere said to be 'unquenchable,' Mark 9:43
Prostitution - Some believed in him and found Forgiveness (Matthew 9:11-13; Matthew 21:31-32; Luke 7:37-50; Luke 15:1)
Stumbling Block - ...
The Jews refused to trust in Jesus’ death on the cross for their Forgiveness, but tried instead to win God’s favour by their good deeds
Everlasting Punishment - Though one can find expressions of individual guilt, punishment and Forgiveness in the Psalms, and though one can find the language of universal judgment in the prophets—that is, that unfaithful Israel and all the nations of the world will be historically punished—it is not until after the Old Testament that the notions of “eternal punishment” or “everlasting judgment” are developed
Restitution - Atonement and Forgiveness of the sin were received after restitution had been made to the victim
Mercy - ...
The most striking demonstration of divine mercy is God’s great act of salvation in saving sinners from the just consequences of their sins and giving them Forgiveness and eternal life (Numbers 14:18-19; Psalms 86:5; Isaiah 63:9; Romans 2:4; Romans 11:32; Titus 3:4-5; 1 Peter 2:3)
Memorial - God's remembrance often yields Forgiveness (Jeremiah 31:34 )
Meekness - manu assuetus, used to the hand; which alludes to the taming and reclaiming of creatures wild by nature, and bringing them to be tractable and familiar, James 3:7-8 : so where the grace of meekness reigns, it subdues the impetuous disposition, and learns it submission and Forgiveness
Blaspheme, Blasphemy, Blasphemer, Blasphemous - Divine Forgiveness would be inconsistent with the moral nature of God
Heart - Therefore, the heart must be cleansed to bring Forgiveness; or, to use another picture, it must be re-created to bring new spiritual life
Healing, Divine - They included calling upon the faith of the person or bystanders to be healed, touching the sick person, praying, assuring Forgiveness of sin, uttering commands, and using physical media. ...
3) The methods of healing Jesus used included prayer, laying on of hands, anointing with oil, and assurance of Forgiveness of sins
Confess, Confession - " Making Forgiveness conditional on confession raises theological problems for some. For does not Christ's sacrifice wipe out for the believer the guilt of all sinspast, present, and future? Perhaps it is best to distinguish between the judicial basis for the Forgiveness of sinsthe once-for-all work of Christand the continuing appropriation of the benefits of that sacrificethrough repeated repentance and confession of sins. Secured for us eternally in our justification by faith, Forgiveness is always provided, but we are to ask for it ( Matthew 6:12,14 ), as we confess our sins. Moo...
See also Forgiveness ; Mouth ...
Bibliography
Unpardonable Sin - For there we find Him saying of the man who blasphemes against the Holy Spirit that he ‘hath never Forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin’ (Mark 3:29 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ). Even if it stood by itself, ‘hath never Forgiveness’ would carry a sound of finality with it. The sin is unpardonable because the sinner has no desire for pardon; it ‘hath never Forgiveness’ because it is not repented of. (1) Bunyan at a certain period of his religious history (see Grace Abounding, §§ 96–230) is a type of multitudes who have suffered agonies of spiritual torture through the fear that they have committed a sin for which there is no Forgiveness. There is no mysterious transgression which is sufficient of itself to put a man beyond the power of repentance, and so outside the pale of Forgiveness. Blasphemy, Forgiveness
Eschatology - ), yet another opportunity is being offered, by which all men may escape ‘the wrath to come,’ and receive the Divine Forgiveness. Thus it will be seen that ‘salvation’ and ‘forgiveness,’ as terms of Christian theology, are in their origin eschatological, though they have been found capable of development along non-eschatological lines (see below). So the apostolic preaching was transformed from a denunciation and a warning of impending judgment into an evangel of salvation and Forgiveness. A more serious problem is raised by the difficulty of reconciling the doctrine of a universal Judgment (Acts 17:31, 1 Peter 4:5) with the doctrine of Forgiveness, by which some men are ‘acquitted’ beforehand in anticipation of the Judgment. This is a hard, perhaps an insoluble, problem; but it is not peculiar to eschatology; for it confronts us wherever the ideas of Forgiveness and justice are placed side by side. Christians naturally wished to know how these would be enabled to hear the ‘good tidings,’ and share in the Forgiveness and salvation now offered by Christ
Throne - Although sinful people have no right to enter God’s presence, God in his mercy allows them to approach him in faith and so receive his Forgiveness and help
Sealing - The sealing, based on Forgiveness of sins, gives the consciousness of the benefit gained by faith
Confess - If praise inevitably entails confession of sin, the reverse is also true: The sure word of Forgiveness elicits praise and thanksgiving on the confessor’s part
Aaron - He repented of his sin, and Moses gained Forgiveness for him
Blasphemy - They therefore had no way of receiving his Forgiveness (Matthew 12:22-32; Mark 3:28-30)
Lord's Supper - The bread and wine were symbols of his body and blood, which he was to offer on the cross as a sacrifice for the Forgiveness of sins (Matthew 26:26-28; cf. Through Jeremiah he promised a new covenant, one that would bring Forgiveness of sins and give new life through the indwelling Spirit (Jeremiah 31:31-34; cf
Character - The essential fact of grace is illustrated in the teaching of Christ chiefly in the following doctrines—the Divine Fatherhood, the Divine Forgiveness, the Divine Indwelling, and the Divine Reappearing. ...
(2) The gospel of Divine Forgiveness has had a distinctive and powerful effect upon the characters of those who have accepted it. Forgiveness was by no means a new idea, for it has never been set forth with more beauty and completeness than in the Prophets and the Psalmists of the Old Testament. Their view is necessary as a caution, not only against the Antinomians, who treat the fact of Forgiveness as a term of logic, and argue ‘let us sin that grace may abound,’ but also against all who preach faith as something apart from ethical enthusiasm. The great contribution, then, to the forming of character in the gospel of Forgiveness is not that it adds anything to the ideal of virtue, but that it unseals the great motive of humble and adoring gratitude, and opens the way for that tide of love which is itself the fulfilling of the Law (Luke 7:47; Luke 19:8-9). The character that has learned its worth from the Divine Fatherhood, and found its release in the Divine Forgiveness, gains its strength and means of independence from the Divine Indwelling. When room has been made for the Divine indwelling in immediate sequence to the Divine Forgiveness, there may be an assurance that through grace and with much patience the fruits of Christian character will come (Mark 4:8; Mark 4:20; Mark 4:26-29). There is the place of the breaking forth of Forgiveness (Matthew 26:28), the supreme illustration of that redeeming love by which men’s freedom is purchased (1 Peter 1:18-19, Romans 14:7-9, 1618394054_3)
Galilee - In Galilee our Lord delivered the Sermon on The Mount, and the discourses on 'The Bread of Life,' on 'Purity,' on 'Forgiveness,' and on 'Humility
Healing - However, in those cases where the suffering is a direct result of personal sin, God’s healing is a sign also of his Forgiveness (Psalms 32:1-5; Psalms 41:3-5; Psalms 41:11-12; John 5:13-14; James 5:15-16; see SUFFERING)
Rebuke - The context, however, shows that this rebuke is regarded only as the first step to Forgiveness and reconciliation (Luke 17:4). Repentance is necessary before Forgiveness and reconciliation can be perfected; and the rebuke is to be the act of brotherly love, showing the wrongdoer his fault to win him to that repentance
Repentance - In His name repentance and Forgiveness were to be proclaimed to all nations (Luke 24:47 ). The apostolic preaching virtually identified repentance with belief in Christ: both resulted in the Forgiveness of sins ( Acts 2:38 ; Acts 10:43 )
Simeon - By the parable of the debtor forgiven 500 pence loving the creditor more than the one forgiven only 50, Christ showed that her warm and demonstrative love flowed from consciousness of Forgiveness, his want of love from his fancy that he needed but little God's Forgiveness. Where little or no love is shown, little or no sense of Forgiveness (which answers to her "faith," Luke 7:50) exists to prompt it. Her sins, though many, were forgiven, not on account of her love, but as the moving cause of her love; the "for" in Luke 7:47 is evidential, her much love evidenced her much Forgiveness and much sense of it
Divine Retribution - Humans cannot determine the causes of suffering and should never overlook God's patience, Forgiveness, and mercy
Charity - Towards our enemies, it inspires Forgiveness and humanity
Enemy - Because of this severed relationship, God has made provision for our Forgiveness in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ
Benevolence - ; Schulhof, Law of Forgiveness (1901), 121 ff
Redemption - But believers have it now by faith, in the sense of Forgiveness of sins, in Christ, where it is placed for God
Lawlessness - Together with passages such as Titus 2:14 and Hebrews 10:17 , Romans 4:7 indicates that Acts of lawlessness and the rebellious condition of fallen humankind that issues in these Acts stand in need of God's Forgiveness. People always have the possibility to opt out of this rebellion, but it requires receiving Forgiveness from God
Death of Christ - He told them, This is what is written: The Christ will suffer and rise from the dead on the third day, and repentance and Forgiveness of sins will be preached in his name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. ...
The Death of Christ and the Forgiveness of Sins . When we follow what is said in the New Testament about the meaning and purpose of the death of Christ we find, in a number of different ways, that it is specifically related to the Forgiveness of sins. They are the Forgiveness of sins ( Acts 5:31 ; 13:38 ; 26:18 ; Romans 4:7 ; Ephesians 1:7 ; Colossians 1:14 ; Hebrews 9:22 ; 1 John 1:9 ; 2:12 ), our cleansing from sin ( Ephesians 5:26 ; Hebrews 9:14 ; 10:22 ; 1 John 1:7,9 ), our healing ( 1 Peter 2:24 ), our salvation ( 1 Corinthians 1:18 ), our life ( John 6:51-56 ; 12:24 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:10 ), our justification ( Romans 5:9 ; 8:33 ) or being granted God's righteousness as a gift of grace (2 Corinthians 5:21 ), and our sanctification or being made holy ( Hebrews 13:12 ). The Forgiveness of God means that rebel humanity is reconciled to God. ...
We have noticed the place that Hebrews gives to the understanding of the sacrifice of Christ as making possible the making of a new covenant, a personal relationship with God based on Forgiveness. This is an understanding that goes back to Jesus himself, in particular, to the way that he spoke at his institution of the Lord's Supper: "This is my blood of the covenant which is poured out for many for the Forgiveness of sins" (Matthew 26:28 ; cf
Salvation - Forgiveness of sins and physical healing frequently coexist, as in the healing of the paralytic (Mark 2:1-12 ). In these examples salvation means not only Forgiveness of sin but mitigation of its effects. Since Jesus' death was for all people (John 11:51 ), repentance and Forgiveness of sins were to be proclaimed to all nations (Luke 24:47 ). John the Baptist preached a baptism of repentance for the Forgiveness of sins (Matthew 3:2 ; Mark 1:4 ), a message echoed by Peter (Acts 2:38 ) and Paul (Acts 20:21 )
Color, Symbolic Meaning of - It depicts complete Forgiveness of sin
Oath - If they swore a rash oath and later regretted it, they could ask Forgiveness through presenting a guilt offering and making any compensation that may have been necessary (Leviticus 5:4-6; Leviticus 6:5; cf
Lydia - She heartily yields to her convictions and is forthwith baptized, the waters of Europe then first being sacramentally used to seal her faith and God's Forgiveness in Christ
Ischyras, Egyptian bp - As his friends became ashamed of him (63), Ischyras confessed the fabrication to the archbishop and implored Forgiveness (16, 28, 63, 74)
Scorn - ‘The vain practices of devotees,’ says Renan, ‘the exterior strictness which trusted to formality for salvation, had in Him a mortal enemy … He preferred Forgiveness to sacrifice. The love of God, charity, and mutual Forgiveness were His whole law
Power of the Keys - As in Matthew 16:18 , ‘whatsoever’ not ‘whomsoever’ is the word employed, and here as there the binding and loosing must be taken to refer to the enactment of ordinances for regulating the affairs of the Church, not to the discharge of such a purely spiritual function as the Forgiveness of sins. That society, through its possession of the Holy Spirit ( Luke 24:22 ), is thus empowered to declare the Forgiveness or the retention of sins (cf
Blood - People received Forgiveness through the animal’s blood; that is, through the animal’s death on their behalf (Leviticus 17:11; see ATONEMENT; SACRIFICE). Those who ‘share in Christ’s blood’ share in the benefits of his death through receiving Forgiveness of sins and eternal life (John 6:54-58; 1 Corinthians 10:16)
Christ, Christology - Astounding is Jesus' announcement that Forgiveness of sins is present in response to himself, and still more startling is that lost Gentile sinners (including Jews who have made themselves like Gentiles) are forgiven and welcomed into table fellowship. This mandate for mission implies that Jesus consciously mediates messianic love in his word of Forgiveness and table fellowship with sinners. There is no longer clean and unclean according to the old typologies of food and ethnic priorities, but equality between Jew and Gentile through the far-reaching Forgiveness of the Messiah that brings inner transformation. Thus the petition in the Lord's Prayer, "Forgive us our sins, as we ourselves herewith forgive everyone who has sinned against us" implies not only the presence of Forgiveness in Jesus the Messiah but acknowledges that his disciples are to carry on the messianic mission by sharing the good news of Forgiveness with others. Forgiveness and table fellowship, like the seed, are planted and taking root and anticipate rich blessings to come as the fruition of Jesus' messianic work
Vengeance - Forgiveness rather than vengeance is the basis for Christian morality
Footwashing - Hers was an act of great love which evidenced the Forgiveness of her sins (Luke 7:47 )
Heredity - Sin in the OT is disobedience, a breach of personal relations, needing from God Forgiveness ( Exodus 34:6-7 , Isaiah 43:25 ); and cannot therefore be explained on the principle of hereditary transmission
Follow, Follower - Christians can imitate God's mercy in practicing Forgiveness (Ephesians 4:31-5:1 ; cf
Offering - The sacrifice is that which is given to GOD in exchange for redemption, Forgiveness and His other gifts
Condemnation (2) - Not only, we must suppose, punishment by pain for rebellion, but regret at past indifference, remorse at past folly, shame at past malice, will be the terrible feelings lacerating souls that have found not Forgiveness but condemnation
Antinomians - " "Repentance and confession of sin are not necessary to Forgiveness
Humility - ...
Just as Jesus humbled himself in living and dying for sinners, so sinners must humble themselves in repenting of their sins if they are to receive God’s Forgiveness
Grace - (For further discussion on God’s work of grace through the death and resurrection of Jesus see Forgiveness; JUSTIFICATION; PROPITIATION; RECONCILIATION
Neighbour (2) - When a brother seeks Forgiveness, it must be granted gladly, even unto seventy times seven (Matthew 18:21 || Luke 17:3-4). Yet, on the other hand, Forgiveness must in no case flow from mere weak benevolence which foregoes revenge for injury, and leaves the matter there. It is not for his own but for his brother’s sake that a man must forgive; and Forgiveness is spiritually useless to the offender unless he repent of his offence
Sacrifice (2) - Forgiveness is already offered to all who will do the Father’s will, to all who in love forgive the trespasses of their brethren. By the death of the lamb, which the Israelites appropriated to themselves by eating it, Forgiveness and life were granted to them. Just as the baptism of John was valueless without change of mind, and could confer no Forgiveness without the bringing forth of fruit worthy of repentance, so the sprinkling of the blood expressed the thought that purity and sincerity are necessary for all who would enter into the covenant relationship with God—that there can be no Forgiveness except it be followed by sincere obedience. ’ In this covenant Forgiveness was to be granted in consequence of an internal reformation (Jeremiah 31:34). Repentance and conversion are alone mentioned as essential to Forgiveness; and even when (Acts 8:28 ff. Forgiveness is never thought of by itself as a consequence of the death of the Saviour, but always in connexion with sanctification, its end and aim. But, further, it is also a pledge of Divine Forgiveness
Marriage - Jesus sought out and offered Forgiveness to persons guilty of sexual sins (Matthew 21:31-32 ; Luke 7:36-50 ; John 4:1-42 ; John 8:2-11 ). Forgiveness does not condone such sins, but does offer a new start with God's help. They cite the biblical principles of Forgiveness and renewal. Such a decision would be based on the same biblical principles that apply to any persons considering marriage, plus the biblical principles of Forgiveness and renewal
Manliness - Gentleness, meekness, and Forgiveness are the qualities by which His character was pre-eminently distinguished, and it is too often assumed that these preclude the possession of courage. ...
It is in regard to this duty of Forgiveness that the world has found the greatest difficulty in assimilating the views of Jesus, and has been inclined to treat them as counsels of perfection which cannot be put in practice. This involves at once and without question or limit the Forgiveness of all injuries and the crucifying of the spirit of emulation and self-esteem which so often leads to strife. But the manifestation of heart-forgiveness is to be regulated by a wise conception of the injurer’s welfare and the welfare of others
Sandemanians - They dealt largely in calls and invitations to repent and believe in Christ, in order to Forgiveness; but he rejects the whole of them, maintaining that the Gospel contained no offer but that of evidence, and that it was merely a record or testimony to be credited. They had taught that though acceptance with God, which included the Forgiveness of sins, was merely on account of the imputed righteousness of Christ, yet that none was accepted of God, nor forgiven, till he repented of his sin, and received Christ as the only Saviour; but he insists that there is acceptance with God through Christ for sinners, while such, or before "any act, exercise, or exertion of their minds whatsoever:" consequently before repentance; and that "a passive belief of this quiets the guilty conscience, begets hope, and so lays the foundation for love
Preaching - ” And the Israelites will partake of His light, and will speak:...
“Blessed is the hour when the Messiah shall come!...
Blessed the womb out of which He shall come!...
Blessed His contemporaries who are eye-witnesses!...
Blessed the eye that is honoured with a sight of Him!...
For the opening of His lips is blessing and peace;...
His speech is a moving or the spirits;...
The thoughts of His heart are confidence and cheerfulness;...
The speech of His tongue is pardon and Forgiveness;...
His prayer is the sweet incense of offerings;...
His petitions are holiness and purity. On this depended the Forgiveness of sins, and salvation through Christ
Compassion - Jesus said even slaves should practice compassion as He taught Peter about Forgiveness (Matthew 18:33 ). In compassion He has provided salvation and Forgiveness (Luke 1:78 )
Judgment - Through him believers have the Forgiveness of their sins and so escape the wrath that is to fall on sinners at the final judgment (Romans 3:24-26; Romans 5:9; 2 Corinthians 5:21; Ephesians 1:7; 1 Thessalonians 1:10; 1 Thessalonians 5:9; see Forgiveness; JUSTIFICATION; PROPITIATION)
Luke, Gospel of - After the appointment of twelve apostles (6:12-19), there are further teachings (6:20-49), miracles of compassion (7:1-17), explanations to John’s disciples (7:18-35) and demonstrations of Forgiveness and devotion (7:36-50). Then come teachings and stories about love (10:25-42), prayer (11:1-13), inward cleansing (11:14-36), hypocrisy (11:37-12:3), anxiety (12:4-34), readiness for the crises ahead (12:35-13:9), the nature of Christ’s kingdom (13:10-14:24), true discipleship (14:25-35), repentance (15:1-32), wealth (16:1-31), Forgiveness, faith and gratitude (17:1-19), the coming of the son of Man (17:20-18:8), self-sufficiency (18:9-30), the Messiah’s ministry (18:31-43) and the responsibilities of the Messiah’s servants (19:1-27)
Propitiation - The restoration of God’s favour and the Forgiveness of the worshipper are generally the aim of the propitiatory sacrifice (cf. It became for them a naturally serviceable term in which to state and interpret into current forms of religious speech the new experience of God’s act of Forgiveness of sins, which they unhesitatingly connected directly with the suffering death of Jesus Christ. ’ But lest the persistent exercise of Divine grace in the Forgiveness of sins should be considered as a challenge of God’s righteous opposition to sin, He set forth Christ Jesus a propitiation by His blood that He ‘might himself be just, and the justifier of him that hath faith in Jesus’ (Romans 3:26). Moreover, the declaration is unmistakable that Christ is a propitiation ‘not for our sins only, but also for the whole world,’ implying an objective accomplishment, a finished work for the whole world as the basis on which the individual Forgiveness and cleansing from sin proceed; for the virtue of the propitiation extends beyond the subjective experience of those who actually are made partakers of its grace. Christ is the High Priest who offers Himself; He is at once Victim and Priest in a propitiation that procures Forgiveness of sins and thereby the privilege of direct access to and communion with God. If a Pauline philosophy of redemption lies behind the use in this Epistle of a term common to apostolic thought generally-as seems probable-the meaning would be that the propitiation Christ offered so dealt with sin that there no longer remained in the Divine mind an obstacle to sin’s Forgiveness (cf
Justice (2) - ...
God’s justice is also shown in the Forgiveness of sins on condition of repentance. Repentance is a sign that the disciplinary purpose which accompanies retribution has not missed its mark; and if now God withheld Forgiveness, it would imply a failure of justice. ’ Forgiveness and punishment are alike connected with the justice of God. The justice of Forgiveness further appears from this, that the man who repents is a different moral person from the man who had sinned. In reality, it is holy love that forgives; and this means that love and justice are joined hand in hand in Forgiveness as they are in punishment
Convert, Conversion - In the New Testament conversion seems to summarize the call of the church in response to Jesus' commission to preach repentance for the Forgiveness of sins to all the nations, as the Old Testament called for (Luke 24:43-47 )
Baxterians - The actual Forgiveness of sin as to the spiritual and eternal punishment
Blasphemy - It is a desperate condition that is beyond the situation of Forgiveness because one is not able to recognize and repent of sin
Perseverance - They recognize the way of love and Forgiveness because they understand the nature of human weakness and divine help
Adoption - Salvation is much more than Forgiveness of sins and deliverance from condemnation; it is also a position of great blessing
Pardon - A complete act, a Forgiveness of all the sins of his people, 1 John 1:7
Vengeance - Revenge at the bidding of momentary passion or as the gratification of a selfish emotion is resolutely condemned by the teaching of Christ, and Forgiveness takes the place of the old savage law of retaliation (see Matthew 5:38-48)
Brotherly Love - He also encouraged Forgiveness of a brother (Matthew 18:23-35 ) and offered the Golden Rule as a guide in relating to one's brother (Matthew 7:12 ; Luke 6:31 )
Debt - The word is chosen to emphasize our duty of Forgiveness, and it has a wide meaning, including all we owe to God
Gospel, the, - Then Jesus Christ was preached and the Forgiveness of sins through His death, "the gospel of the grace of God," and this was towards all mankind
Exchange - Exchange Forgiveness with me, noble Hamlet
Anger - ...
We may remember that others have their passions, their prejudices, their favorite aims, their fears, their caution, their interests , their sudden impulses, their varieties of apprehension, as well as we: we may recollect what hath sometimes passed in our own minds when we have got on the wrong side of a quarrel, and imagine the same to be passing in our adversary's mind now: when we became sensible of our misbehavior, what palliations we perceived in it, and expected others to perceive; how we were affected by the kindness, and felt the superiority of a generous reception, and ready Forgiveness; how persecution revived our spirits with our enmity, and seemed to justify the conduct in ourselves, which we before blamed
Blasphemy - But he that should blaspheme against the Holy Ghost hath never Forgiveness, but is in danger of eternal damnation
Sacrifice - The purpose was not just to create communion between God and man; rather, the “sacrifice” represented the principle that, without the shedding of blood, there is no Forgiveness of sins ( Ignorance, Ignorant, Ignorantly - " Yet, as the conscience of the believer receives enlightenment, what formerly may have been done in "ignorance" becomes a sin against the light and demands a special confession, to receive Forgiveness, 1 John 1:8,9
Fornication - ...
There will always be people, both from outside the church and from within, who, being genuinely sorry for their sexual misconduct, turn from it and ask God’s Forgiveness
Gospel - The promised kingdom of God had come, and salvation was available to all who would repent of their sins and trust in him for Forgiveness (Mark 1:14-15; see KINGDOM OF GOD)
Atonement - The Greek term hilaskomai , “to forgive” or “show mercy” along with the nouns hilasmos , “means of Forgiveness,” and hilasterion , “means or place of Forgiveness” are the important words in the discussion of expiation and propitiation. ...
The relation of the cross to Forgiveness of sins was implicit in the earliest Christian preaching (Acts 2:21 ; Acts 3:6 ,Acts 3:6,3:19 ; Acts 4:13 ; Acts 5:31 ; Acts 8:35 ; Acts 10:43 )
Pharisees - ...
The defect in the Pharisees which Christ stigmatized by the parable of the two debtors was not immorality but want of love, from unconsciousness of Forgiveness or of the need of it. Christ recognizes Simon's superiority to the woman in the relative amounts of sin needing Forgiveness, but shows both were on a level in inability to cancel their sin as a debt. Had he realized this, he would not have thought Jesus no prophet for suffering her to touch Him with her kisses of adoring love for His Forgiveness of her, realized by her (Luke 7:36-50; Luke 15:2)
Repentance - When one is guilty of various sins, "he must confess in what way he has sinned" in order to receive atonement and Forgiveness (Leviticus 5:5 ; 26:40-42 ). Thus, confession belongs to repentance, and is needed for divine Forgiveness (cf
Guilt (2) - The expression ‘blotted out’ in Acts 3:19 emphasizes Forgiveness as the cancelling of an account. It is the ‘debts’ which remain as the permanent result of past ‘trespasses,’ for which we ask Forgiveness in the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:12, Luke 11:4); and when we crave deliverance, it is not from the sick will, but from the ‘Evil One’ (Matthew 6:13), the personal enemy of God who has received a guilty allegiance. The importance of this aspect of sin is further marked by the requirement of human Forgiveness as the condition because the pattern of Divine remission (Matthew 6:14; Exodus 34:6-7; Matthew 18:21-35). It is the confession and Forgiveness of sins which the First Epistle represents as effecting the cleansing from sin and unrighteousness through the sacrificial blood and heavenly intercession of our Advocate with the Father (1 John 2:1-2). The Christian life depends, not upon the eradication of evil, but upon the Forgiveness of sins (Ephesians 1:7), the clearing of the guilty on the part of a personal God in consequence of the personal satisfaction offered by Christ (Romans 3:21; Romans 3:28; Romans 5:8, cf
Condemnation - In Romans 5:16; Romans 5:18 condemnation is the consequence of an original act of evil, and suggests the antithesis of a single act of righteousness, the effects of which overflow to the potential justification of all men; and the freedom from condemnation continues beyond the initial stage of Forgiveness and ripens into all the assured experiences of union with Christ (Romans 8:1)
Fierceness - His ‘judge not’ (Matthew 7:1), or His parable of patience that has its part in the ‘wheat and tares’ being allowed to grow together (Matthew 13:30), or His doctrine of unlimited Forgiveness (Luke 17:1-4),—these are thought to be entirely representative
Apostasy - Such action was sin, for which the people had to ask Forgiveness (Jeremiah 14:7-9 ) and repent (Jeremiah 8:4-7 )
Esau - And this is confirmed by what the apostle declared; "Christ is exalted as a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel and Forgiveness of sins
Atonement - We have also salach, 'pardon or Forgiveness. And though it involves Forgiveness, purging from sin, it has always God in view, not merely that the sinner is relieved or forgiven: there is expiation and propitiation in it. A satisfaction is offered suited to the eye and mind of him who is displeased and who judges; and through this there is purgation of the offence, cleansing, Forgiveness, and favour, according to him who takes cognisance of the evil
Atonement (2) - ...
But proclamation of Forgiveness of sins through faith in the name of Jesus, though arising out of the conviction that the Absolver was Himself in the power of His deity still present on earth, was not made until the realization of the promise of the Spirit in the Pentecostal gift. The assurance that Christ was the ever present source of Forgiveness gave its supreme significance to the Cross by which He entered into His glory (John 12:32). The Crucifixion was regarded neither as a bare fact nor as the symbol of a theological system, but as a ‘gospel,’ an event whose reality lay in its significance, a message of Divine favour and Forgiveness. Baptism is the initiatory Christian rite, and whether it conveys or only represents the Forgiveness of sins, stood from the first in close relation to the Death and Resurrection of Christ (Matthew 28:19, Mark 16:15-16, Acts 2:38; Acts 8:13; Acts 8:16; Acts 8:36; Acts 9:18; Acts 10:47-48; Acts 16:33; Acts 19:5; Acts 22:16, Romans 6:3-4, Galatians 3:26-27, Ephesians 4:4-6, Colossians 2:12, Titus 3:4-6; 1 Peter 3:21; cf. A consequence of this method of thought has been the revival, in this country by Bishop Westcott and others, of speculations like those of Rupert of Deutz and the Scotists, which postulate an Incarnation independent of those conditions of human life which demand the Forgiveness of sins
Blood - The vivid imagery of this word receives nowhere a closer definition; its force lies in its suggestion of one aspect of the experience of the man who passes from the consciousness of the bondage of sin to the joyful freedom of Forgiveness. (f) Hence the word is associated with Forgiveness of sins
Judgment, Last - "But it is supposed by others, that though the making known of sin that is subdued and forgiven, tends to the advancement of divine grace, yet it is sufficient to answer this end, as far as God designs it shall be answered, that the sins which have been subdued and forgiven, should be known to themselves, and thus Forgiveness afford matter of praise to God. ...
Again; the expressions of Scripture, whereby Forgiveness of sin is set forth, are such as seem to argue that those sins which were forgiven shall not be made manifest: thus they are said to be blotted out, Isaiah 43:25
Blood - The vivid imagery of this word receives nowhere a closer definition; its force lies in its suggestion of one aspect of the experience of the man who passes from the consciousness of the bondage of sin to the joyful freedom of Forgiveness. (f) Hence the word is associated with Forgiveness of sins
Reconciliation - ...
And when our Lord ordered the offending to go and be reconciled to his offended brother, Matthew 5:1-48 , the plain meaning is, that he should go and try to appease his anger, obtain his Forgiveness, and regain his favour and friendship, by humbling himself to him, asking his pardon, or satisfying him for any injury that he might have done him
Priesthood of the Believer - The ancient role of the priest was to receive the confession of the people and to convey it to God to receive His Forgiveness
Rest (And Forms) - It is a ceasing from one's own work for salvation, or Forgiveness, and a relaxing in GOD's presence because "JESUS paid it all
Baptism - ...
...
Luke 3:21 (c) The baptism of JESUS certainly had nothing whatever to do with salvation, nor the new birth, nor Forgiveness
Atonement, Day of - The earthly saints will have 'the Forgiveness of sins' in the new covenant at the end of days
Philemon, the Epistle to - "...
"Paul was the common friend of the parties at variance; he must conciliate a man who had good reason to be offended; he must commend the offender, yet neither deny nor aggravate the fault; he must assert Christian equality in the face of a system which hardly recognized the humanity of the slave; he could have placed the question on the ground of his own personal rights, yet must waive them to secure an act of spontaneous kindness; his success must be a triumph of love, and nothing be demanded for the sake of the justice which could have claimed everything; he limits his request to a Forgiveness of the wrong and g restoration to favor, yet so guards his words as to leave scope for all the generosity which benevolence might prompt toward one whose condition admitted of so much alleviation
Peter - Among these are, his attempt to walk on the water to meet Christ, Matthew 14:29 ; his avowal of the Messiahship and divinity of the Savior, Matthew 16:16 ; his errors as to the design of Christ's incarnation, Matthew 16:22-23 ; his warm attachment to the divine Teacher, John 6:67-69 ; his cutting off the ear of Malchus, John 18:10 ; his boastful determination to adhere to his Master under all circumstances, and his subsequent denial of Him with oaths, Matthew 26:74 Mark 14:29 John 13:37-38 ; his poignant repentance, Matthew 26:75 , and our Lord's Forgiveness, after receiving an assurance of his love, which was thrice uttered as his denial of Christ had been, John 21:15-18
Onesimus - " (Colossians 3:12-13)...
It is hardly possible, while thus naming the name of Jesus, and in this endearing character of his Forgiveness, it is hardly possible to overlook how eminently the Lord himself stands forth in his high office of Intercessor for every Onisemus of his people, who, like this poor fugitive, have all run away from our Lord and master, and wandered from his service
Promise - The Forgiveness of sins is also regarded as included in the promise (Acts 2:38-39)
Atonement - Although found only once in the NT (Romans 5:11) and there in the Authorized Version alone, this word has become the elect symbol in theological thought to indicate the doctrine in the Apostolic Church which placed the death of Christ in some form of causative connexion with the Forgiveness of sins and with the restoration of men to favour and fellowship with God. Both were closely and instinctively connected with the Forgiveness of sins: ‘The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom ye slew, hanging him upon a tree. -(5) Christ’s death is not distinctly represented as the ground of Forgiveness, by setting forth the Messiah’s death as a satisfaction for sin or as a substitute for sin’s penalty. Paul we find for the first time a philosophy of the death of Christ in relation to the Forgiveness of sins, which is ultimately based upon an analysis of the Divine attributes and their place in the interpretation of the doctrine of the cross. Paul’s method of setting out his interpretation of the death of Christ in his discourses; how he was accustomed to place it in relation to Forgiveness of sin in his earliest preaching does not definitely appear. The discourse at Antioch in Pisidia may illustrate the character of his reference to it: ‘through this man is preached unto you Forgiveness of sins’ (Acts 13:38); but nothing is defined more closely
Lord's Prayer (ii) - It might suggest that the prayer was one which Jesus Himself employed, while not only is there no evidence of His having done so, but the petition for Forgiveness is a sufficient assurance that He cannot have made it His own. For the prayer for bread naturally suggests the request of the child to the Father, the prayer for Forgiveness the petition of the subject to the King, and the prayer for deliverance from the Tempter the cry of one who feels in the presence of the world’s evil his utter dependence upon the strong and holy will of his Master and Lord. Those who pray for Forgiveness must be ready to forgive. ), the words testify at all events to the fact that Jesus was accustomed to lay stress on the relation between human and Divine Forgiveness; see Mark 11:25-26, Luke 6:37, and esp. It teaches us when we ask for bread, or Forgiveness, or guidance and deliverance, to bear the needs of others along with our own on our hearts before God, and to remember that the unspeakable privilege of intercession is of the very essence of Christian prayer
Atonement - His grace shows itself in Forgiveness ( Exodus 34:6-7 ); but even Forgiveness must be bestowed in such a way, and on such conditions, that the interest of holiness shall not be compromised, but shall be upheld and magnified. Hence the bestowal of Forgiveness in connexion with intercession (Moses, etc. to annul guilt and procure Forgiveness. The class of expressions in which this idea is set forth is familiar: Christ ‘bore our sins,’ ‘died for our sins,’ ‘suffered for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous,’ ‘was made sin for us,’ was ‘the propitiation for our sins,’ was ‘a sin-offering,’ ‘reconciled us to God in the body of his flesh through death,’ was our ‘ransom,’ procured for us ‘forgiveness of sins through his blood,’ etc
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - Jesus taught that Forgiveness is not to be limited, even to a full number or complete number of instances. We are to forgive, not merely seven times (already a gracious number of Forgivenesses), but seventy times seven (limitless Forgiveness, beyond keeping count) (Matthew 18:21-22 )
Redemption - His death brought Forgiveness of sins and so released them from sin’s bondage (Matthew 20:28; Romans 3:24-25; Galatians 3:13; Ephesians 1:7; Colossians 1:14; 1 Timothy 2:6; Revelation 1:5)
Blessedness - ...
In the Old Testament this blessedness may involve material things, but Forgiveness is foremost (Psalm 32:1 )
Blessing - He has borne the consequences of the curse for believers (Galatians 3:13 ) and blessed them with the Forgiveness of sins (Romans 4:6-9 ; see Psalm 32:1-2 )
Obedience - ...
Jesus' emphasis on being born again underscores the need of atonement for effecting Forgiveness of sins
Bind - These have no value in obtaining Forgiveness, nor acceptance with GOD
Personality - Paul’s interpretation of the Father’s Forgiveness in forensic terms. ...
Starting from this point, the revelation of God as Father is the means of the enlargement of our personality in three ways, through (a) His Forgiveness of us, (b) our imitation of Him, (c) the communion between Him and us. ...
(a) God’s Forgiveness, gratefully received, is the first stage of man’s moral freedom. Their repentance made joy in heaven (Luke 15:7), while the Divine Forgiveness woke love in their hearts (Luke 7:47). But Forgiveness was more than a ‘word of grace’: it was a gain for the world at the cost of Calvary (Matthew 26:28)
Hosea - Hope for Israel's future lay in their repentance and God's Forgiveness and love that made Him willing to restore their relationship. God's Forgiveness has its limits (Hosea 1:1-9 )
Sin - They can expect victory over sin, and even when they fail they can be assured that genuine confession brings God’s gracious Forgiveness (Matthew 6:12-15; 1 John 1:6-10; Romans 3:20; 1 John 3:10). (See also CONFESSION; Forgiveness; SANCTIFICATION
Mediator, Mediation - Moses both gave directions for building the earthly tabernacle (8:5) and sprinkled the people, the scroll, the tent, and the vessels with blood since "without the shedding of blood there is no Forgiveness" (9:22). From this the author concludes that since Jesus is the mediator of a new covenant of Forgiveness (v
Freedom - Clearly, God was showing his people the greatness of his Forgiveness and the implications of that Forgiveness for their own behavior
Matthew, the Gospel of - ...
Matthew wanted the reader to be aware that Forgiveness of sins comes through the death of the divine Son of God. Jesus left behind a continuing reminder of His role in the Forgiveness of sins when He instituted the Lord's Supper. Prayer is private seeking of Forgiveness, not public search for praise (Matthew 6:5-15 )
Atonement - A government which admitted no Forgiveness, would sink the guilty to despair; a government which never punishes offence, is a contradiction,—it cannot exist. If it then be true, that the release of offending man from future punishment, and his restoration to the divine favour, ought, for the interests of mankind themselves, and for the instruction and caution of other beings, to be so bestowed, that no license shall be given to offence;—...
that God himself, whilst he manifests his compassion, should not appear less just, less holy, than he really is;—that his authority should be felt to be as compelling, and that disobedience should as truly, though not unconditionally, subject us to the deserved penalty, as though no hope of Forgiveness had been exhibited;—we ask, On what scheme, save that which is developed in the New Testament, are these necessary conditions provided for? Necessary they are, unless we contend for a license and an impunity which shall annul all good government in the universe, a point for which no reasonable man will contend; and if so, then we must allow that there is strong internal evidence of the truth of the doctrine of Scripture, when it makes the offer of pardon consequent only upon the securities we have before mentioned. If repentance alone could secure pardon, then all must be pardoned, and government dissolved, as in the case of Forgiveness by the exercise of mere prerogative; but if an arbitrary selection be made, then different and discordant principles of government are introduced into the divine administration, which is a derogatory supposition
Propitiation - God’s act of Forgiveness, being based on love, involved his dealing with sin
Sop - A whole world of blessed possibility lay for Judas in that proffered sop; Divine love was in it, and free Forgiveness, and full restoration—if only he would repent of his meditated crime
Mark, Gospel by - Of the Lord's utterances on the cross, His asking Forgiveness for His murderers; His promise to the repentant thief; His commending His mother to John; His saying, 'I thirst;' 'It is finished;' and His commending His Spirit unto the Father, are not recorded here
Age - , of God, Romans 16:26 , His power, 1 Timothy 6:16 , His glory, 1 Peter 5:10 , the Holy Spirit, Hebrews 9:14 , redemption, Hebrews 9:12 , salvation, 5:9, life in Christ, John 3:16 , the resurrection body, 2 Corinthians 5:1 , the future rule of Christ, 2 Peter 1:11 , which is declared to be without end, Luke 1:33 , of sin that never has Forgiveness, Mark 3:29 , the judgment of God, Hebrews 6:2 , and of fire, one of its instruments, Matthew 18:8 ; 25:41 ; Jude 1:7
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - (Matthew 27:5 ) But, (a) restitution of the silver did not undo the wrong; (b) it was restored in a wrong spirit, --a desire for relief rather than hatred of sin; (c) he confessed to the wrong party, or rather to those who should have been secondary, and who could not grand Forgiveness; (d) "compunction is not conversion
Redemption (2) - —An Apostle writes of Christ—‘in whom we have our redemption through his blood, the Forgiveness of our trespasses’ (Matthew 26:51-53,). Where sin has been the cause of judgments on the individual or nation, redemption includes, in the removal of these evils, Forgiveness and restoration to the Divine favour and to righteousness (cf. A direct connexion between the sacrifices of the Law and the Forgiveness of sin is expressly affirmed (e. Spiritual evil had its root and origin in sin; salvation takes its spring in the grace and mercy of God, and begins with Forgiveness
Lord's Prayer, the - ” “Forgive us our debts or sins” may very well refer to the ultimate Forgiveness of sins on the last day, but it also refers to the continuing Forgiveness of the disciples by their Heavenly Father as they, living in this age, continually forgive those indebted to them
Debt, Debtor (2) - Here comes in the moral grandeur of the Beatitude on mercy (Matthew 5:7), a principle which melts into prayer when we connect it with the tender breathing of the Petition on Forgiveness (Matthew 6:12). See Forgiveness
Discourse - To this class belong: the discourse on Forgiveness, with the parable of the Two Debtors, given at the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36-50); the beginning of the discourse on Tradition (eating with unwashen hands), though later ‘he called the multitudes,’ ‘and the disciples came unto him’ (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-20); the Denunciation of the Pharisees and Lawyers at the house of a chief Pharisee (Luke 11:37-54); the discourse at another Pharisee’s house, where He discussed Modesty, Giving Feasts, and spoke the parable of the Great Feast and Excuses (Luke 14:1-24); finally, the discourse at the house of Zaccbaeus, with the parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:1-27). But of the longer discourses with the chosen few we have the following: the Mission and Instruction of the Twelve (Matthew 10:1-42, Mark 6:7-13, Luke 9:1-6); on Humility, Offences, Forgiveness (Matthew 18:1-35, Mark 9:33-50, Luke 9:46-50); discourse on the Mount of Olives on His Second Coming and the Final Judgment (Matthew 24, 25, Mark 13, Luke 21:7-36); the Farewell Discourse and Prayer (John 14-17)
Zephaniah, Book of - Zephaniah would not presume on God's grace by promising Forgiveness, but he counseled turning to righteousness and meekness as the means for possibly avoiding punishment on the Day of the Lord
Esther, Theology of - God, prayer, the covenant, sacrifice, the temple, the promised land, as well as virtues such as love, kindness, mercy, and Forgiveness are not mentioned
James, Epistle of - Forgiveness and healing are in the governmental dealings of God
Think, Devise - David could praise God for Forgiveness because the Lord will not “impute” iniquity after he had confessed his sin ( Atonement - The proper idea of an atonement is that which brings the Forgiveness of transgressors into harmony with all the perfections of the Godhead
Isaiah - ” God warned him that his ministry would meet with disappointment and meager results but also assured him that Forgiveness would ever attend the penitent (Isaiah 6:5-7 ; Isaiah 1:19-20 ) and that the ultimate promises of God would be realized (Isaiah 6:13 ). ...
Though the indictments were severe, Isaiah still held out the hope of Forgiveness to the penitent (Isaiah 1:18-31 ) and pointed to days coming when God would establish peace (Isaiah 2:1-4 ; Isaiah 4:2-6 ). Assured of divine Forgiveness and comforted in their grief, the exiles were exhorted to identify with their ancient role in the blessing of the earth's population through the dissemination of the religion through which the world would be blessed (Genesis 12:3 )
Winter - ’ As against this rejection by the self-righteous of the message of repentance and Forgiveness, ‘Wisdom’s children’ (here those who had repented at the preaching of John, cf. Jesus’ message of Forgiveness conceived as the ‘wisdom’ of God). It is highly noteworthy that in both groups the condemnation is uttered by Jesus for rejection of the Spirit of God, which in the case of the discourse anent the Baptist is assumed to be manifest in Jesus’ message of Forgiveness, in the case of the blasphemy of the scribes in His healing power
Bible, Theology of - The Bible then proceeds to develop the theme of God's redemptive grace, tracing various stages of God's revelation of Himself: the call of Abraham; the establishment of the covenant with the Israelite community as His chosen people; the institution of the sacrificial system, teaching the people the proper way to approach God for Forgiveness; the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus as the provision of Forgiveness and regeneration for those dead in sin; the church as the new covenant community, the redeemed people of God on mission for Him in the world; finally, the life to come, in heaven for the redeemed, and in hell for the unregenerate. Salvation includes both the Forgiveness of sin and the regeneration of the sinful human nature
Humanity of Christ - —The interest of dogmatics in the humanity of Christ lies in the doctrine of a true Incarnation, which is the foundation of the doctrines of Atonement and Forgiveness. The interest of religion in Christ’s humanity is the interest of believers in the Forgiveness of sins, who need to feel the identification of their Redeemer with themselves. When the Judge knows both the persistency and depth of sin on the one hand, and the weakness and temptations of man on the other,—then only will the sinner be assured that the proffered Forgiveness is for him
Justification (2) - Paul’s meaning as to justification from the fact that in Romans 4:7 he introduces, as synonymous with the imputation of righteousness or justification, the OT idea of the Forgiveness of sins (cf. also Ephesians 1:7), which links his teaching on at once to that of Christ Himself; and it appears that the Pauline conceptions of justification and adoption are simply the equivalent of the Fatherly Forgiveness taught by Jesus (Kaftan, Dogmatik 3, 4, p. The idea that Forgiveness is something merely negative, while justification conveys a positive status, turns on an inadequate conception of the Biblical idea of Forgiveness
Israel, Israelite - ), Forgiveness of sins, righteousness, peace and joy. Mark 12:29), the priesthood (7–10), and, closely connected with the latter, the spiritual covenant of the Forgiveness of sins (Hebrews 10:15-18)
Discipline - Private offences were to be confessed to each other (James 5:18), that prayer might be offered for Forgiveness (James 5:15, 1 John 5:16), and also confessed to God (1 John 1:9). Repentance is to be followed by Forgiveness (1618394054_2 Galatians 6:1, Judges 1:22)
Peter - What happened during this interview is unrecorded, doubtless because it was too sacred to be divulged; but it would certainly be a scene of confession and Forgiveness. On the contrary, He was publishing to the company His Forgiveness of the erring Apostle and His confidence in him for the future
Day - -Oct), was a day when corporate and individual sins were confessed, appropriate sacrifices and rituals were performed, and divine Forgiveness was extended (Leviticus 16 ; 23:26-32 )
Surprise - The multitudes marvelled at His teaching, His healing, His Forgiveness of sins, His wisdom in answering the questions of His opponents, and His grace in preaching the gospel (Mark 1:22; Mark 1:27, Matthew 7:28-29, Mark 2:12; Mark 5:20; Mark 5:42, Matthew 9:8; Matthew 9:33; Matthew 12:23, Luke 9:43; Luke 7:49, Matthew 22:22, Luke 20:26; Luke 4:22)
Mediator, Mediation - The reason is that this perfect and eternal covenant, procuring Forgiveness of sins, and removing all barriers to access to God, could be formed only on the basis of a reconciling sacrifice; and this Jesus alone, the Son of God, had the qualification to offer
Baptism of the Holy Spirit - 134), all seven scriptural references "point not to a second experience, but to an unrepeatable, if complex, plunging into Christ, with repentance and faith, justification and Forgiveness, sonship and public witness, the gift of the Holy Spirit and the seal of belonging, all being part of initiation into Christ, " even if "some parts of the whole [1] seen sooner than others
Blood - It represents the receiving by faith of the sacrifice of CHRIST for Forgiveness and cleansing
Lamaism - He returns not the least sign of respect, nor ever speaks, even to the greatest princes; but only lays his hand upon their heads, and they are fully persuaded that they thereby receive a full Forgiveness of their sins
Marcus, a Gnostic - They taught that the baptism of the visible Jesus was but for the Forgiveness of sins but that the redemption of Him Who in that baptism descended was for perfection; the one was merely psychical the other spiritual
Sacrifice - ); it was not essential to Forgiveness. The Levitical cultus provided sacrifice as the chief vehicle of God’s grace; Forgiveness is mediated through it. ’ But even such sins were not beyond the reach of Forgiveness. These sufferings constituted a ground of Forgiveness of sin in Israel; they are expressly compared, in point of efficacy, to the Day of Atonement (Pesiqta, 174b)
David - in His Services - ' Do you not see, he demanded, that all these Psalms tell us that Forgiveness comes without the law and without works? Forgiveness and peace come to him that believeth. ' That dusts away all merit; that teaches us to uncover our heads before God and to confess that Forgiveness is of His grace and not of our desert at all
Seven Words, the - ’ And Jesus turns to this penitent robber and proclaims the gospel of Forgiveness, ‘To-day shalt thou be with me in paradise. ’—Christ from His cross has interceded for the sinful world, He has proclaimed the gospel of Forgiveness to the penitent robber; but He has yet, in the progressive stages of His ministry of love, another blessing to bestow
Family - Covenants and commitments, in family relationships and faith relationships, were deepened by the new covenant of love which was infused with grace and Forgiveness. Christian family relationships called for a commitment which was based on openness and compassion, Forgiveness and understanding
Reconciliation - It is implied, on its Godward side, in Christ’s doctrine of Forgiveness of sins as a primary blessing of His Kingdom (Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:14-15). The idea here conveyed is that of Forgiveness and restoration to Divine fellowship on the ground of a propitiation
Mercy - Within the relationship, God's mercy is thus closely linked to Forgiveness (Exodus 34:9 ; Numbers 14:19 ; Jeremiah 3:12 ; Daniel 9:9 ), a more basic disposition of compassion (Deuteronomy 13:17 ) leading to Forgiveness, and to the steadfast love by which God sustains the covenant and repeatedly forgives his people (Psalm 25:6 ; 40:11 ; 51:1 ; 69:16 ; 103:4 ; 119:77 ; Jeremiah 3:12 ; 16:5 )
King, Kingship - David grievously sinned in the matter of Bathsheba (2 Samuel 11,12 ), but in contrast to Saul when Nathan, the prophet, confronted him, he repented and sought the Lord's Forgiveness (2 Samuel 12:13 ; Psalm 51 ). Late in his reign he sinned again in taking the census of his fighting men, but again he sought the Lord's Forgiveness (2 Samuel 24 )
Reconciliation - It is implied, on its Godward side, in Christ’s doctrine of Forgiveness of sins as a primary blessing of His Kingdom (Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:14-15). The idea here conveyed is that of Forgiveness and restoration to Divine fellowship on the ground of a propitiation
Deliver, Deliverance, Deliverer - See Forgiveness , REMISSION
Mourning Customs - At times one of the chief mourners leans over the body, wringing her hands or wiping away the fast falling tears, and asking why he has left them, and who will discharge the duties that belonged to him alone, pleading for love’s sake to hear only once more the music of the voice now silent, or begging Forgiveness on account of selfishness and imperfect service in the days that will never return
Ignorance - This passing over (πάρεσις) did not exclude punishment, and was not equivalent to Forgiveness (ἄφεσις); but it prepared the way for repentance (Acts 3:19) and for the receiving of the mercy of God in Christ Jesus (1 Timothy 1:13)
Sermon on the Mount - When we fail while trying our best, we need not despair; God is a God of grace and Forgiveness for all who confess and repent of their sins
Redeem, Redemption - As the means of redemption, the death of Jesus provides a deliverance that involves not only Forgiveness of sin (Ephesians 1:7 ; Colossians 1:14 ), but also newness of life (Romans 6:4 )
Hosea - Iniquity is acknowledged and Forgiveness asked
Temptation, Test - When temptation is yielded to, Forgiveness is available through Christ (Hebrews 2:18 ; 4:14-16 ; 1 John 2:1 )
Enthusiasm - We have abundant evidence that He so inspired men in Galilee by His healing, teaching, Forgiveness of sins, companionship (Mark 1:27; Mark 1:37; Mark 2:12; Mark 2:19), and attracted many (Mark 3:7; Mark 6:53-56)
Cry - According to Jewish tradition, in the solemn prayer for Forgiveness uttered by the high priest on the Day of Atonement in the Holy of Holies, the words אנא השם כפר ‘O Lord, forgive,’ were spoken with heightened voice, so that they could be heard at a distance
Lama, Grand - He returns not the least sign of respect, nor ever speaks even to the greatest princes; but only lays his hand upon their heads, and they are fully persuaded they receive from thence a full Forgiveness of all their sins
Moral Obligation - We applaud the Forgiveness of an injury as magnanimous; a savage despises it as mean
Philemon, Epistle to - Paul sends the slave back, with this letter to secure his Forgiveness and the welcome of one Christian brother for another ( Philippians 1:15-17 )
Lord's Supper - (5) In Christ alone is Forgiveness and salvation from sin, the first need of the soul
Jacob - He humbled himself before Esau and begged his Forgiveness, with the result that instead of further tension and conflict between the two brothers there was friendship and cooperation (Genesis 33:1-17)
Nazarene - The Elkesaites were an offshoot from the same trunk, and appealed to the book Elkesai as a new revelation, bringing new Forgiveness of sins, even the grossest, and new remedies of disease
Prayer (2) - ...
In both these cases, the Publican and the Prodigal, the chief thing prayed for is Forgiveness, as must constantly be the case with sinful man. The Unmerciful Servant (1618394055_87) by asking for Forgiveness for himself thereby bound himself to be forgiving to his fellows. His refusal to recognize this obligation became fatal to his own Forgiveness
Discipline - ...
lu 17:3-4 may represent the seed of an originally interpersonal "reproof, apology, Forgiveness" formula that occurs in expanded form for community action in Matthew 18:15-17 . For the individual offender, the New Testament practice is clearly intended to produce repentance in an atmosphere of support and Forgiveness
Sacrifice And Offering - The physical elements the worshiper brings to the Deity to express devotion, thanksgiving, or the need for Forgiveness. They tended to ignore faith, confession, and devotion, thinking the mere act of sacrifice ensured Forgiveness
Luke, Gospel of - Jesus Fulfilled His Mission in God's Way of Faith, Love, and Forgiveness (Luke 5:1-7:50 ). Jesus' mission emphasized Forgiveness (Luke 7:31-50 )
Paraclete - , for the sacrifice by which the Divine Forgiveness was secured for Israel. This power, moreover, rests also upon the fact that Jesus has by His Cross purchased the world’s Forgiveness from God
Paraclete - , for the sacrifice by which the Divine Forgiveness was secured for Israel. This power, moreover, rests also upon the fact that Jesus has by His Cross purchased the world’s Forgiveness from God
Sacrifice - The first kind were offered to obtain of God the Forgiveness of sins; the second, to procure some favour; and the third, to express thankfulness for favours already received
Doctrine - This is what the earliest preachers proclaimed: fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy; story of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus; the call to repent and to accept the Forgiveness of sins through Jesus the Lord
Kingdom of God - Instead, they began to speak of eternal life, salvation, Forgiveness, and other themes
Kindness - The context of Colossians 3:12 likewise emphasizes the forbearing and forgiving disposition required of the Christian in view of the Forgiveness received from God, and the terms with which χρηστότης is here associated (‘lowliness,’ ‘meekness,’ ‘longsuffering’) are again terms that describe benevolence over against faults observed in fellow-Christians
Blindness (2) - It is the meaning of the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, a sin unforgivable, inasmuch as it does not recognize itself as sin, and thus renders impossible that repentance which is the condition of Forgiveness (but see art
Clean, To Be - ...
However, the rites were not meritorious deeds, earning God’s favor and Forgiveness
Daniel - On one occasion he humbly linked himself with the rebellious Israelite people as a whole in confessing their sin and asking God’s mercy (Daniel 9:1-19), and in reply received God’s assurance of Forgiveness (Daniel 9:20-23)
Sin - Thus he was a friend of sinners (Matthew 9:9-13 ; Luke 15:1-2 ), bestowed Forgiveness of sins, and freed those suffering from its consequences (Mark 2:1-12 ; Luke 7:36-50 ). Jesus earned the right to his name and the right to grant Forgiveness by shedding his blood on the cross for the remission of sins. After his resurrection, Jesus sent out his disciples to proclaim the victory and Forgiveness of sins through his name (Galatians 2:17-208 ; John 20:23 )
Holy Spirit - The Spirit who has spoken in past prophecy (2:17-18), including through Jesus (2:33), now makes himself available as a "gift" along with the Forgiveness of sins to all who repent (2:38) and obey (5:32). Although baptism is closely linked as a testimony to this repentance, Peter does not likely see it as essential for reception of Forgiveness or the Holy Spirit, since his next closely parallel sermon concludes only with the call for repentance (3:19). The four elements of this "Pentecostal package" (repentance, baptism, the coming of the Spirit, and Forgiveness) nevertheless provide a paradigm for much subsequent New Testament theology (cf
Sin (2) - For the true unification between the normal and universal purpose of the gospel—the Forgiveness of sins—and the occasional and particular accessories of it—exorcism and healing—lay not so much in the analogy between bodily disease and spiritual wickedness, as in the fact that both are the exercise of the one Satanic power within the usurped kingdom of evil. It is trespasses which the Heavenly Father must do away, and that by Forgiveness (Matthew 6:15); salvation from sins (Matthew 1:21), i. It is therefore Forgiveness of sins which those for whom it is prevalent receive (1 John 1:9, 1 John 2:12)
Anger - The Forgiveness of sin is distinct from the cancelling of its results, which, in accordance with educative moral law, must run their course. ...
One’s trust in the Forgiveness of God rests upon the sense of the divinity of human Forgiveness-‘By all that He requires of me, I know what God Himself most be’ (Whittier, Revelation)
Pelagianism And Pelagius - Augustine, who had read it, declared that it dwelt almost entirely upon the power and capacity of nature, only referring most cursorily to divine grace, and leaving it doubtful whether by grace Pelagius meant only the Forgiveness of sins and the teaching and example of Christ, or that influence of the Spirit of God which corresponds to grace proper and is an inward inspiration. This novel doctrine appeared to Augustine to deny the teaching of the church, as it virtually involved the denial of any guilt of original sin which needed Forgiveness. When man has actually sinned, he needs Forgiveness. A strong protest was made against the views that the grace of God by which we are justified through Jesus Christ avails only for the Forgiveness of past sin and not for aid against the commission of sin, or that grace is only the revelation of the will of God and not an inspiring principle of righteousness, or that grace only enables us to do more easily what God commands
Priest - takes away the hindrances to the manifestation of His goodwill, and enables His grace to exhibit itself in Forgiveness (Romans 3:25 f. Matthew 5:23, where the advice is to do everything to turn a brother’s coolness or resentment into Forgiveness), but God’s attitude changes from apparent displeasure to evident pleasure (Romans 8:8; Romans 8:16 f. He provides the means whereby Forgiveness may be granted without moral harm, and, the means being used, His unchangeable nature reacts accordingly, and the love that is outraged but not quenched by sin becomes the most assured feature of His relationship with the penitent
Ephesians, Book of - Anger and malice must turn to love, compassion, and Forgiveness. The work of the Son: He brings redemption and Forgiveness from sin through His blood (Ephesians 1:7-12 )
James - , 2:6) records a tradition that James's prosecutor was moved by his bold confession to declare himself a Christian on the spot; he begged James's Forgiveness, and the apostle kissed him, saying "peace be to thee"; they were both beheaded together. Hegesippus says James was often in the temple praying for Forgiveness for the people
Temple - It is not without significance that while Jesus is teaching in the temple precincts, he says, "If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me" (John 7:37 ), and the next day offers Forgiveness to the woman taken in adultery (John 8:1-11 ). Blessing and Forgiveness, priestly functions, are pronounced by Jesus in the shadow of the temple
Abel - The antecedent revelation was, therefore, a promise of a benefit to be conferred, by means of animal sacrifice; and we are taught what this benefit was, by that which was actually received by the offerer,—"He obtained witness that he was righteous;" which must be interpreted in the sense of a declaration of his personal justification, and acceptance as righteous, by the Forgiveness of his sins. If then we refer to the subsequent sacrifices of expiation appointed by Divine authority, and their explanation in the New Testament, it will be obvious to what doctrines and principles of an antecedent revelation the faith of Abel had respect, and which his sacrifice, the exhibition of his faith, proclaimed: confession of the fact of being a sinner,—acknowledgment that the demerit and penalty of sin is death,— submission to an appointed mode of expiation,—animal sacrifice offered vicariously, but in itself a mere type of a better sacrifice, "the Seed of the woman," appointed to be offered at some future period,—and the efficacy of this appointed method of expiation to obtain Forgiveness, and to admit the guilty into the Divine favour
Teach, Teacher - David longs for Forgiveness and cleansing so that he may teach God's ways to sinners (Psalm 51:6-13 )
Cloud, Cloud of the Lord - In a positive sense, clouds represent unlimited extent (of God's faithfulness and truth, Psalm 36:5 ; 57:10 ; 108:4 ; of Babylon's judgment, Jeremiah 51:9 ); life-giving refreshment (of the king's favor, Proverbs 16:15 ); a normal occurrence (cycle of nature, Ecclesiastes 11:3 ); shade or shelter (from the "heat" of the ruthless, Isaiah 25:5 ); calm (of the Lord in his heavenly sanctuary, Isaiah 18:4 ); covering or concealment (of Israel's sins in Forgiveness, Isaiah 44:22 ); speed and mobility (of the Gentiles "flying" to Mount Zion, Isaiah 60:8 ); and an abundant outpouring (of the "rain" of righteousness, Isaiah 45:8 , and of manna in the wilderness, Psalm 78:23 )
Work - Through faith in him and his finished work, people can have Forgiveness of sins and eternal life (John 6:28-29; John 20:30-31; see JESUS CHRIST)
Son of Man - He was misunderstood and rejected (Matthew 11:19 ; Luke 7:34 ), but such personal rejection is forgivable—it is only the rejection of the work of the Spirit that is beyond Forgiveness (Matthew 12:32 ; Luke 12:10 )
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - When a sinful woman interrupted a dinner party to anoint Jesus with precious perfume, Jesus told his shocked host that her action sprang from gratitude for Forgiveness (Luke 7:40-47 )
Numbers as Symbols - Forgiveness is to be 'seventy times seven
Iniquity - The Old Testament teaches that God’s Forgiveness of “iniquity” extends to the actual sin, the guilt of sin, God’s judgment upon that sin, and God’s punishment of the sin
Psalms, the Book of - Religious and moral songs of a general character; containing the poetical expression of emotions and feelings, and therefore subjective: as for example, confidence in God, Psalm 23:1-6 62:1-12 125:1-5 ; devotedness to God, Psalm 16:1-11 ; longing for the worship of the temple, Psalm 42:1-43:5 ; prayers for the Forgiveness of sin, etc
Offerings And Sacrifices - The sin offering was the primary blood atonement offering in the sanctuary system of offerings through which worshipers could receive Forgiveness for their sin and deal with the degree to which they might have contaminated the tabernacle. Once the reparation had been made it was possible for the offender to make atonement and receive Forgiveness from the Lord (vv. 17-18), if he did indeed come to know about it he was still responsible for bringing a guilt offering to make atonement and obtain Forgiveness (vv
Gospel (2) - Therefore the best news that men can have is a message of full and free Forgiveness for all repentant, trustful souls. He removed pardon out of the sphere of material sacrifices in the temple, which limited the scope of Forgiveness to a few, and He made Forgiveness a possible boon for everybody
Matthew, Gospel According to - In relation to their fellow-men they were to cultivate humility, and to suppress self-assertiveness (Matthew 18:1-14); to exercise Forgiveness (Matthew 18:15; Matthew 18:21-35); to be slow to judge their fellows (Matthew 7:1-5); to do to others what they would have done to themselves (Matthew 7:12). In relation to God, they were to pray to Him for their daily needs, for His Forgiveness, and for deliverance from the evil that is in the world (Matthew 6:9-13, Matthew 7:7-11). ...
Of the other parables in the Gospel, Matthew 18:21-35 does not bear directly upon the doctrine of the Kingdom, but emphasizes Forgiveness as a qualification in all who wish to enter it
Sin - For example, in one verse three distinct words occur in connexion with Divine Forgiveness (‘forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin ,’ Exodus 34:7 ), and though there is a certain vagueness in the precise meaning to be attached to each of these words, whether it be guilt or punishment, rebellion or sin-offering, wickedness considered as a condition, or trespass, which is in the writers’ minds, the thoughts underlying each have to do with the relations between God and His people. Whatever the contemporary reasons may have been for regarding his public act as sinful, and even the reckless Joah considered it an act of wanton folly, we find the same features of repentance and Forgiveness, and the same inclusion of others in the suffering consequent on its commission
Rock - The rock was to be spoken to the second time, which indicates that we are only to come to Him m prayer and praise With our petitions and receive again the abundance of Forgiveness, and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit
Ephesians, Epistle to the - Brought into favour in the Beloved, they have in Him redemption, the Forgiveness of sins
Faithfulness - ...
This Divine faithfulness was made by the apostles the ground of Forgiveness and cleansing to those who confessed their sins (1 John 1:9), of deliverance in temptation from the power of evil (1 Corinthians 6:13, 2 Thessalonians 3:3), and of confidence in the final salvation of those who were called into the fellowship of Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 1:9, 1 Thessalonians 5:24)
Judah - And surely, as it is said of Christ in one blessed Scripture, that the names of his people are all "written in the book of life," (Revelation 20:15) and in another he bids his people to "rejoice that their names are written there," (Luke 10:20) as when considering himself the shepherd of his flock, and his people the sheep of his fold, he saith that "he calleth them all by name, and leadeth them out," (John 10:3) and as the whole flocks of the mountains and of the vale, and of the cities of Benjamin, Jerusalem, and Judah, shall all pass again under the hands of him that telleth them, (Jeremiah 33:13) surely it is not stretching the Scripture to say, that the Shebeth of Jehudah is as eminently descriptive of the greatness of his character, when speaking of this use of it, in writing, as in ruling, for sovereignty is implied in both, And the poor feeble hand that is now writing these lines, (earnestly begging Forgiveness if he errs in the matter) cannot conclude this article without first saying, (and will not the reader for himself also join the petition?) Oh, that the almighty Jehudah may have graciously exercised the Shebeth of his power, and written my poor name, worthless as it is, among the millions he hath marked down in the book of life! Amen
Pity Compassion - It would be more accurate to say that ἔλεος has no reference to sin as such, but can have reference to sin in its aspect of misery, as is proved by Matthew 5:7 (ἐλεηθήσονται, eschatologically) 18:33 (with parabolic allusion to God’s Forgiveness), Romans 9:15-16; Romans 9:18; Romans 11:30-32, 2 Corinthians 4:1, 1 Timothy 1:13; 1 Timothy 1:18; 1 Peter 2:10
Gospel - God's grace, which Jesus bears within Himself (John 1:14 ), overcomes sin's power and offers Forgiveness for individual sins (Mark 2:5 ; Romans 6:14 ). ...
The fact that Forgiveness, freedom from sin, and a new life are possible is good news
Ethics - How seriously this demand was taken may be judged from the most searching confession ever penned (Psalm 51 ), and the moving testimonies to God's Forgiveness (103:8-14, five times). It requires initiative toward reconciliation and understanding, and ready Forgiveness (Matthew 5:23-24 ; 18:21,35 ), and, in any need, service as for Christ (Matthew 25:40 )
Matthew, Theology of - In Matthew's Gospel the kingdom of heaven (a Jewish expression for kingdom of God) is understood as the rule of God, through Jesus, in power and righteousness, in love and Forgiveness. Jesus, then, by swallowing up the Passover meal into a remembrance-of-him meal, forms the covenantal basis of the new covenant (26:28) that brings the Forgiveness of sins
Jacob - BE SURE YOUR SIN WILL FIND YOU OUT...
THERE was no Old Testament saint of them all who, first and last, saw more of the favour and Forgiveness of God than Jacob. Your son will send home secret instructions to some old class-fellow who is now at the top of the law to effect a peace, if not Forgiveness and reconciliation, at any price
Devil - People can turn from Satan to find Forgiveness and salvation (Acts 26:18 )
Neonomians - Yet such is the grace of the Gospel, that it promiseth in and by Christ a freedom from the curse, Forgiveness of sin, and eternal life, to every sincere believer: which promise God with certainly perform, notwithstanding the threatening of the law
Samuel, Books of - The call for covenant commitment and obedience, the Forgiveness and mercy of God, the sovereignty of God in human history, the significance of prayer and praise, the faithfulness of God to fulfill prophecy, the need for faithfulness to human leaders, the holy presence of God among His people, the nature of human friendship, and the importance of family relationships all echo forth from these books
Old - Golden - "...
Revelation 18:2 She holds out to the world the promise of Forgiveness, absolution, and a method of cleansing, all of which are represented by the type of "a golden cup
Faith - This is called "repentance toward God," and repentance being the first subject of evangelical preaching, and then the injunction to believe the Gospel, it is plain, that Christ is only immediately held out, in this divine plan of our redemption, as the object, of trust in order to Forgiveness to persons in this state of penitence, and under this sense of danger
Animal - The foundation of it was therefore clearly sacrificial; for before the deluge it could not have reference to health, since animal food was not allowed to men prior to the deluge; and as no other ground for the distinction appears, except that of sacrifice, it must therefore have had reference to the selection of victims to be solemnly offered to God, as a part of worship, and as the means of drawing near to him by expiatory rites for the Forgiveness of sins
Blasphemy - But although there may be now fearful approaches to the unpardonable offence, it is to be remembered that there may be many dangerous and fatal sins against the Holy Ghost, which are not the sin against him, which has no Forgiveness
Love - His act of Forgiveness, being based on love, involves dealing with sin
Blood - They were to pray for the Lord's Forgiveness by atonement: “Be merciful, O Lord, unto thy people Israel, whom thou hast redeemed, and lay not innocent blood unto thy people of Israel's charge
Lord's Prayer - It was delivered unasked, as a specimen of right prayer, in contrast to the hypocritical and superstitious habits which the Master condemned; and it is followed by an instruction on Forgiveness
Abraham - It is by this means, however, that the Abrahamic blessings come into effect when both Jewish and Gentile sinners find Forgiveness and spiritual rebirth in Christ through the proclamation of the gospel
Covenant - On God’s part there is Forgiveness with the quickening of the inner life of man ( Ezekiel 36:24 ff
Parable - Jesus implicitly claimed to be performing the work of God: as the sower, sowing the kingdom and implanting his word in people; as the director of the harvest, assuming God's role as judge in the endtimes; as the rock, providing the only secure foundation; as the shepherd, seeking out his lost sheep and leading his own; as the bridegroom in the wedding feast of the kingdom, where fasting is unthinkable; as the father, welcoming repentant sinners into the kingdom and calling his children into his service; as the giver of Forgiveness, even to grievous sinners; as the vineyard owner, graciously giving undeserved favor; as the lord, who has final authority over his servants, who calls them into responsible participation in the kingdom, and who will ultimately determine the destiny of each of them, depending on their response to his lordship; and as the king, who has authority to allow or refuse entry into the kingdom, and to increase the responsibility of people who develop his resources, or to take away those resources from people who fail to develop them
Joy - Through the restored fellowship with God and the Forgiveness of sin a joy streams into the heart which is coloured by the contrast of the opposite experience belonging to the state of estrangement from God
Gnosticism - While it is the essential feature of the young Christian to have (forgiveness); and of the growing Christian to be (strong); it is that of the ripe Christian to know ( 1 John 2:12-14 )
John the Baptist - ) agrees with Holtzmann that Forgiveness is implied ‘if men really repented’]
Colossians - The life in Christ gives power for unity, mutual love, and Forgiveness (Colossians 3:12-14 )
Punishment (2) - ) would seem to forbid us to reduce it to the mere equivalent of discipline; and He Himself, in speaking of sin that has no Forgiveness (Mark 3:28 ||, cf
Christ in Reformation Theology - It limited the work of Christ to the procuring of Forgiveness of sins, and left room outside Christ for many operations of Divine grace which were supposed to begin when the work of Forgiveness was ended. The influence of Christ was exhausted, they thought, when bare Forgiveness had been won; and the grace needed for all holy living came from operations of the grace of God which did not necessarily come through Jesus Christ
Back to Christ - To believe the gospel is no longer, in the first place at least, to receive God’s message of love and Forgiveness, and to obey His summons to repentance, trust, and service; it is to believe that Jesus is Messiah, a pre-existent, heavenly Being, the second Person in the Trinity. The question as to the rationale of Forgiveness is never raised, and there is no hint of the inability of God to forgive without a propitiation. Forgiveness is presented as flowing directly from God’s fatherly love (Luke 15)
Expiation - There were also offerings for persons and for things prescribed for purification, which were incidental; but even they grew out of the leading notion of expiatory sacrifice, and that legal purification which resulted from the Forgiveness of sins. " So clearly is it made manifest by these actions, and by the description of their nature and end, that the animal bore the punishment of the offender, and that by this appointment he was reconciled to God, and obtained the Forgiveness of his offences. If, then, this is symbolical, it has nothing correspondent with it, it never had or can have any thing correspondent to it but the sacrificial death of Jesus Christ, and the communication of the benefits of his passion in the Forgiveness of sins to those that believe in him, and in their reconciliation with God
Lutherans - They, on the other hand, argued with an inflexibility which admitted of no compromise, that, possessing not merits of his own to plead, man freely received Forgiveness through the mercy of God solely on account of the merits of Christ. He, they argued, who, having disobeyed the laws of Heaven, is desirous of returning into that state of acceptance from which he has fallen, must not expect free Forgiveness; but previously by unfeigned sorrow of heart deserve the restoration of grace, and, with it, the obliteration of his offences. But, after all, and in spite of the boasted authority of the keys, complete confidence in divine Forgiveness was never inculcated; for it was neither the interest nor the inclination of the church of Rome to teach the simple doctrine of Christian faith, but rather to involve it in metaphysical obscurity
Sanctification - ...
Just as all Forgiveness of sin was provisional until the ministry of the Messiah was complete, so all sanctification was provisional (1618394055_9 ; 10:10-12 ). Similarly, insisting that Forgiveness from unremitted guilt requires more "work" or "penance" from the supplicant is legalism masquerading as humility
Propitiation (2) - Through it Forgiveness and access to God are possible. The propitiation puts away sin once for all—puts it out of the way as an obstacle to the Divine favour and Forgiveness
Daniel, Book of - Daniel confesses the nation's sins, seeks Forgiveness, and learns meaning of Jeremiah's 70 weeks as pointing to Messiah and to desolation of Jerusalem (Daniel 9:1-27 )
Judgment - —Jesus Christ the Judge in His glory (Matthew 16:27; Matthew 19:28, Mark 8:38, Luke 9:26) [1]; ‘the throne of his glory’ (Matthew 25:31); the surrounding holy angels as His servitors (cf
Hopkinsians - If Christ's personal righteousness were transferred to believers, they would be as perfectly holy as Christ; and so stand in no need of Forgiveness
Temptation - Smith, Forgiveness of Sins, 51; J
Genesis - God brings reconciliation through trial, confession, acceptance of responsibility, and Forgiveness (41:53lb—Genesis 45:28 )
Sermon on the Mount - The necessity of Forgiveness (18:15-35) is presupposed in loving the enemy (5:38-48)
Preach, Proclaim - Jesus points out that the Messiah had to suffer and rise, and that Forgiveness of sins must be proclaimed (kerysso [16:9-20) contains a use of "proclaim" similar to that of Luke 24:47
Self- Denial - by worshipping our gods, … shall gain Forgiveness’ (Trajan’s letter to Pliny, Ep
Mammon - The steward is not commended because he atoned by beneficence for ill-gotten gains, as if he represented a sinner who insured Forgiveness and welcome in heaven by means of charity to his fellows on earth, finding it impossible to restore, as Zacchaeus did, his fraudulent profits (so even Bruce, Parabolic Teaching of Jesus, pp
Intercession - ...
The teaching and the practice of the mother Church in Jerusalem are reflected in the Epistle of James (James 5:14), where the prayers of the elders of the Church on behalf of the sick are definitely enjoined; nor is sickness of the soul forgotten in prayer for Forgiveness (James 5:16)
David - Though his crimes were heinous, and highly aggravated in the affair of Uriah and Bathsheba, he patiently endured reproof, humbly submitted to the punishment appointed him, deeply repented, and obtained mercy and Forgiveness from God, though not without some severe marks of his displeasure, for the grievous offences of which he had been guilty
Philemon Epistle to - He limits his request to a Forgiveness of the alleged wrong, and a restoration to favor and the enjoyment of future sympathy and affection, and yet would so guard his words as to leave scope for all the generosity which benevolence might prompt’ (including emancipation)
Temptation - Smith, Forgiveness of Sins, 51; J
New Moon - But all can feel the beauty of the prayer: ‘Renew this month unto us for good and for blessing, for joy and gladness, for salvation and consolation, for support and peace, for pardon of sin and Forgiveness of iniquity
Intercession - ...
The teaching and the practice of the mother Church in Jerusalem are reflected in the Epistle of James (James 5:14), where the prayers of the elders of the Church on behalf of the sick are definitely enjoined; nor is sickness of the soul forgotten in prayer for Forgiveness (James 5:16)
Disciple, Discipleship - To "make disciples" is to proclaim the gospel message among those who have not yet received Forgiveness of sins
Disease - He did pronounce Forgiveness for a paralytic before healing him (Mark 2:5 ), possibly to remove from the sufferer's mind the obstacle, based on received doctrine, that healing could not begin until the sin that caused it was pardoned
Atonement - A partial satisfaction would be almost more dishonoring to God's righteousness than a gratuitous Forgiveness without any satisfaction whatever
Mercy, Merciful - Such help covers a broad range, from assistance in finding a bride to God's Forgiveness of sin
Holy Spirit - He is the life-giving presence within the universal Church, the Divine agent in its sacramental and authoritative acts; communicating Himself as a presence and power to the individual Christian; mediating to him Forgiveness and new birth; nourishing, increasing, and purifying his whole personality; knitting him into the fellowship of saints; and finally, through the resurrection of the body, bringing him to the fulness of eternal life
Ransom (2) - Yet Jesus assuredly did view the world as lying under condemnation of God, sunk in estrangement and evil, and needing both Forgiveness and renewal to righteousness, and redemption from this state He connected with His own Person, and in a peculiar way with His death, which He here speaks of as a λύτρον, or redemption-price, to that end
Unity - -(a) For the common human need one common redemption is provided (Romans 14:4-6 Romans 10:4; Romans 10:12, 1 John 2:2), to be received by the same means (Romans 4:11-16, Galatians 2:16, 1 John 1:7-9), working to the same issues of Forgiveness (Romans 8:1, Revelation 1:5), reconciliation to God (Romans 5:1; Romans 5:10, 2 Corinthians 5:18-21), enduement with the Spirit (Romans 8:1-16), eternal life (Romans 5:17; Romans 5:21, 1 John 5:11; 1 John 5:13; 1 John 5:20)
Endurance - It may be summed up in the words ‘forgiveness’ (Matthew 26:28), ‘redemption’ (Mark 10:45), and ‘removal of sin’ (John 1:29); to which, in John 11:50 ff
Head - ...
Psalm 60:7 (c) This strange passage may mean that GOD's constant acts of Forgiveness toward Ephraim, and the many times He restored the nation to a place of prominence prove the character of GOD, and magnified His righteous acts and judgments
Propitiation - ...
It by no means follows, however, that this wrath is a passion in God; or that, though we contend that the awful attribute of his justice requires satisfaction, in order to the Forgiveness of the guilty, we afford reason to any to charge us with attributing vengeful affections to the divine Being
Redemption - The ransoming found-perhaps we may even say stored-in Christ Jesus is here represented as the result of His sacrificial death; this sacrificial death is made the ground of God’s Forgiveness of sins; and this Forgiveness of sins is identified with the justification which God gratuitously grants believing sinners
Jesus Christ - John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness near the Dead Sea preaching a message of baptism and repentance for the Forgiveness of sins. He prayed Forgiveness for his tormentors, went through a sense of abandonment by God, and expired with "It is finished; Father, into your hands, I commit my spirit
Grace - The word "grace" in biblical parlance can, like Forgiveness, repentance, regeneration, and salvation, mean something as broad as describing the whole of God's activity toward man or as narrow as describing one segment of that activity. Hence, concepts of election, salvation, mercy, and Forgiveness are all linked in this first illustration of grace in the Old Testament
Mediator - It also fulfils Jeremiah’s prophecy of a new covenant, of which the very foundation was the Forgiveness of sins (Jeremiah 31:31). God offers Forgiveness to those who are baptized in the name of Jesus Christ, and He offers the bestowal of the Holy Spirit to make a new life possible (Acts 2:38)
Apocalyptic Literature - The sentence upon the fallen angels is communicated to Enoch (12), and he reveals it to them; but, at their urgent request, he composes a petition on their behalf, that they might obtain Forgiveness; while rehearsing this, preparatory to presenting it, he falls asleep and is informed in a dream that their request for Forgiveness will not be granted, and once more makes known to the angels their impending doom (13–16)
Hebrews - Jesus' sacrifice provided perfect Forgiveness and made all other sacrifices unnecessary (
Nehemiah, Theology of - The Lord is a God of Forgiveness, grace, and compassion, slow to anger and abounding in lovingkindness (9:17)
Medicine - ...
Under these circumstances healing was treated as a token of Divine Forgiveness ( Exodus 15:26 )
God - God's grace is shown in Forgiveness, conversion, blessing, nurturing, and chastising of individual persons
Gospel - John's own preaching is gospel, too (Luke 3:18 ): it warns sinners of impending doom and urges them to repent before the axe falls (3:7-9); it assures the repentant of Forgiveness (3:3) and membership in Messiah's community (3:17)
Heal, Health - James offers pastoral counsel for the sick: Send for elders of the church, who will encourage, advise, and intercede for the patient; if sin truly underlies the sickness, let the sick confess and receive Forgiveness; let soothing oil, the universal panacea for all discomforts, be applied
James - 9) relates, on the authority of Clement of Alexandria, that, when he was tried for his life, his accuser was so greatly affected by his constancy that he declared himself a Christian, and died with him after obtaining his Forgiveness and blessing
Kindness (2) - The great trilogy of Luke 15, exhibiting the Divine concern for man as τὸ ἀπολωλός; the parables which show how royally and wonderfully God pities and forgives, whether that Forgiveness is gratefully realized (the Two Debtors, Luke 7:36-50) or is strangely disregarded (the Unmerciful Servant, Matthew 18:23-35); the parable of the Great Supper (Luke 14:16-24), with its comprehensive ‘welcome for the sinner’—these and other such are full of the wide-reaching kindness of God
Good - There is Forgiveness of sin, reconciliation with God, the peace of God (Romans 3:22-26; Romans 5:10; Romans 1:7; Romans 2:10, etc
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - Think shame! Or if you will still presume to pray for Forgiveness, at any rate, wait a little
the Unmerciful Servant - If He suspends my Forgiveness on my forgiving such trespasses as these-who shall be saved? Not one
Peter - Peter, however, obtained Forgiveness; and, when Jesus had risen from the dead, he ordered the glad tidings of his resurrection to be conveyed to St
Aaron - What the motive of Miriam might be does not appear; but she being struck with leprosy, this punishment, as being immediately from God, opened Aaron's eyes; he acknowledged his fault, and asked Forgiveness of Moses both for himself and his sister
Daniel, Book of - These were almost accomplished, and Daniel confessed his sins and the sins of his people; he prayed for Forgiveness, and for the sanctuary which was lying desolate; he begged God to hearken and do, to defer not for His own sake, because the city and the people were called by His name
Chronicles, Books of - God in His merciful Forgiveness of David revealed the place of the altar of sacrifice to be in Jerusalem at the threshing floor of Ornan (1 Chronicles 21:18-22:1 )
God - They can do nothing but repent of their rebellion and surrender before the sovereign God, trusting solely in his grace for Forgiveness (Acts 17:30-31; Ephesians 2:8; see GRACE)
Law - ...
Salvation apart from the law...
People have never received Forgiveness of sins through keeping the law
Sanctification - Through the death of Christ the worshipper has the individual experiences of Forgiveness, freedom from guilt, purification of conscience. Forgiveness is needed and sought for unwilling obedience to an evil power that has now no dominion or authority over us
Holy Spirit (2) - The main interest of the passage Mark 3:20-35 lies in the word of Jesus Himself about the Holy Spirit: ‘Verily I say unto you, All things shall be forgiven to the sons of men, the sins and the blasphemies, all that they have blasphemed: but whoso shall have blasphemed the Holy Spirit hath never Forgiveness, but is guilty of eternal sin: because they said, He hath an unclean spirit’ (Mark 3:28 f. sin which has the character, of finality, and can never be anything but what it is—sin past which one cannot see so as to infer the possibility of Forgiveness either in this world or in the next
Church - Speculations about conscience, sin, and judgment to come, about the efficacy of sacrifices, and the possibility of Forgiveness and of life after death, had prepared men for what Christianity had to offer. ...
It is impossible to say which of the forces which characterized Christianity contributed most to its success: its preaching of the life, death, and resurrection of Christ, its lofty monotheism, its hope of immortality, its doctrine of the Forgiveness of sins, its practical benevolence, its inward cohesion and unity
Tabernacle - (4) The altar of burnt offering, standing before the tabernacle was a perpetual symbol of the atonement,--the greatness of sin, deserving death, hard to be removed and yet Forgiveness possible, and offered freely, but only through blood
Luke, the Gospel According to - Who so likely a person to have communicated it to Luke as Paul, who "received the gospel, not of man but by the revelation of Jesus Christ"? The selection of gospel materials in Luke, exhibiting Forgiveness for the vilest, grace, and justification, is such as accords with Paul's large views as to the Gentiles and free justification by faith (Luke 18:14)
Children (Sons) of God - It is the appeal of Christ to His disciples against hypocrisy, unforgivingness, lack of faith ( Matthew 6:1 ; Matthew 6:15 ; Matthew 6:26 ); it stands as symbol of the Divine providence, Forgiveness, redemption in a word, of the Divine love ( Luke 6:36 ; Luke 11:13 , Mark 11:25 ), and hence it gives the ground and manner of all access to God, ‘Whensoever ye pray, say, Father’ ( Luke 11:2 )
Salvation Save Saviour - In James 5:15 (‘the prayer of faith shall save him that is sick’) σώζειν is interpreted of bodily healing by many commentators; but the general context of a chapter which as a whole relates to what is spiritual, the immediate context associating Forgiveness of sins with the particular command (‘and, if he have committed sins, it shall be forgiven him’), and the use of the word ‘healed’ in the next verse to denote healing from sin, concur to indicate that here also the word, as usually in the Epistles, means spiritual deliverance
Baptism - the result of his preaching was to induce men to seek baptism as an outward sign and pledge of inward repentance on their part, and of their Forgiveness on the part of God
Righteousness - The acceptance of the unique saving deed of God at Calvary by faith in the person of Jesus Christ is that which God has ordained to be the means for sinners (the unrighteous and the disobedient ones) to enter into the right with God, the Father, and receive the Forgiveness of sins
Wages - Consequently God's act of Forgiveness should stimulate believers to forgive each other (Matthew 18:21-35 )
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - Not only does it mirror God's judgment; it also reflects the theme of Forgiveness and grace, which fosters the hope of revival
Tabernacle - Here, in the starkest visual terms, is the representation of the truth that "without the shedding of blood there is no Forgiveness" (Hebrews 9:22 )
the Blind Leaders of the Blind - They rarely, if ever, take up some one topic of moral duty, such as honesty, veracity, impartiality, good temper, Forgiveness of injuries, improvement of time, and such like, and investigate the principles, and the rules, and the discriminations, and the adaptations, of such things
Brotherhood (2) - So in the NT special mention is made of charity (1 John 3:17, 1618394055_72); hospitality (Hebrews 13:1, Romans 12:13); Forgiveness (Colossians 3:13); truthfulness (Ephesians 4:25); mutual admonition (2 Thessalonians 3:15); a humility that prefers others and renders even lowly service (Matthew 18:1-18, 1618394055_1 Romans 12:10, Philippians 2:1-11, 1 Peter 5:5 f
Prayer - Foremost stand the three petitions for hallowing God's name, God's kingdom coming, God's will being done below as above; then our four needs, for bread for body and soul, for Forgiveness producing a forgiving spirit in ourselves, or not being led into temptation, and for deliverance from evil
Mediator - Those who hold the Socinian principles understand a mediator to mean nothing more than a messenger sent from God to give assurance of Forgiveness to his offending creatures
Parables - ...
Jesus lifted the theme to new heights and through His parables portrayed the nature of the kingdom (Mark 4:26-29 ), the grace of the kingdom (Luke 18:9-17 ), the crisis of the kingdom (Luke 12:54-56 ), and the conditions of the kingdom such as commitment (Luke 14:28-30 ), Forgiveness (Matthew 18:23-35 ), and compassion (Luke 10:25-37 )
John, the Epistles of - Confession and consequent Forgiveness of sins, through Christ's propitiation for the world and advocacy for believers, are a necessary preliminary; a further step is positive keeping God's commandments, the sum of which is love as contrasted with hatred, the sum of disobedience
Incarnation (2) - Saviour: (1) the function, bestowal of Forgiveness and of life; (2) the response, personal trust. He who taught others to pray for Forgiveness, and never besought it of the Divine mercy for Himself; He who proclaimed the necessity of regeneration for all men, and Himself never passed through any such phase of experience; He who in tenderest sympathy drew close to the sinner’s side, and yet always manifested a singular aloofness of spirit, and never included Himself among the objects of the Divine compassion; He who made it His vocation to die for the remission of sins, must have been, in actual fact, sinless:—either that, or He must have been sunk in a moral darkness more profound than sin ordinarily produces, even in the worst of men
Enoch Book of - 3) contrasted with sinners’ disobedience; a curse on them, but Forgiveness, peace, and joy for the elect (v. 1) and is sent to the fallen angels (‘Watchers’) with the message: ‘no peace nor Forgiveness’ (xii
Perfection (of Jesus) - His gospel was that there is infinite patience and Forgiveness with God; and yet there are no sterner words in the NT than His. Jesus discerned the spiritual soundness which might underlie sins of passion, the capacity of generosity with its healing power, the quick and deep response to a gospel of Forgiveness in the humility of self-accusing hearts, the sacred soil where love grows (Luke 7:47; Luke 18:13, Matthew 21:28-32)
Demon - Our weapons in this ongoing struggle include our authority as seated with Christ at the right hand of God, far above every power (Ephesians 1:15-2:6 ), the name of Jesus (Philippians 2:10 ), our spiritual armor (Ephesians 6:18 ), prayer (a must in some cases, Mark 9:29 ), simple resistance (James 4:7 ), Forgiveness (Ephesians 4:26-27 ), and exhibiting the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23 ; Ephesians 4:22-29 ; 6:10-18 )
Mediation Mediator - The death of Christ was part of God’s foreseen plan (Acts 2:23), was predicted by the OT prophets (Acts 3:18), was the basis of repentance and Forgiveness of sin (Acts 3:19), and, with His resurrection, proved Him to be the sole hope of salvation (Acts 4:10-12)
Baptize, Baptism - In the gospel, God offers through Christ Forgiveness, life, the Spirit: the baptismal response, hallowed by Christ, expresses faith in the dying and rising Savior-Lord, and registers the resolve to die to former sinfulness and rise to new life
Elect, Election - , the prophet Zechariah proclaimed Forgiveness, saying God would again "choose" (show favor to) Jerusalem (2:12), and he was told "Proclaim further: This is what the Lord Almighty says: My towns will again overflow with prosperity, and the Lord will again comfort Zion and choose Jerusalem'" (1:17)
Eternal Punishment - ‘Eternal life’ is the life of the Kingdom of God, Forgiveness, righteousness, salvation, blessing, whatever that life is declared to be in the teaching of Jesus
Law of God - It is a matter of communion of spirit with spirit, needy souls, humbly conscious of their needs, confessing their wants and desires to One who seeth in secret, the poor in spirit hungering and thirsting after righteousness, and so convinced of their entire dependence upon the Forgiveness and compassion of the All-Merciful as to feel that for them to claim the mercy and grace of God is to bind themselves by the law of love to the duty of forgiving as they would themselves be forgiven
Confession - The teaching of 1 John 1:9 expressly makes it a condition of Forgiveness
Commission - ...
Mark 16:15...
Luke 24:46-49...
John 20:21-23...
Universal Mission...
Universal Mission...
Universal Mission...
Mission of undefined range...
Baptism...
Baptism and Faith...
Repentance and Remission of sins...
Message whose substance is Forgiveness...
Promise of spiritual Presence...
—...
Promise of Comforter...
Gift of Holy Ghost
Acts - Imprisonment lets missionaries preach Forgiveness (Acts 26:1-32 )
Agony - In this surrender He was endowed with such strength from above that He finished the work His Father had given Him to do, and in His obedience even unto death offered the sacrifice of His life, which is a ransom for many, and the seal of the new covenant of Forgiveness, renewal, and fellowship with God for all mankind
Joab - Under Forgiveness, and then under vengeance, as David says, and had such a good right to say
Kingdom of God - And by entering the kingdom they received Forgiveness of sins and eternal life (Matthew 21:31; Mark 10:14-15; John 3:3)
Trinity - The emphasis is laid on the personal experience of Forgiveness and grace, without any attempt to state our Lord’s position in relation to God
Job, the Book of - Fourth, he then pleaded with Job to accept what had happened to him as an expression of God's discipline and to humbly repent and seek His Forgiveness (Job 36:1-37:24 )
Evangelize, Evangelism - And he will get at the spiritual root of the problem by offering Forgiveness to these former sinful oppressors (41:17; 55:1,7)
Ephesians, Theology of - I am sending you to them to open their eyes and turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan to God, so that they may receive Forgiveness of sins and a place among those who are sanctified by faith in me'" (Acts 26:16-18 )
Sacrifices - For in that passage the promise of a covenant between God and His people is connected with the Forgiveness of sin; and in the NT this conjunction is all-important
Leviticus, Theology of - , holiness, purity, sacrificial atonement, Forgiveness, etc
God, Names of - Yahweh is present, accessible, near to those who call on him (Psalm 145:18 ) for deliverance (107:13), Forgiveness (25:11), and guidance (31:3)
Resurrection - The resurrection of Jesus showed that Christ's oblation as the sacrificial lamb was accepted by God, which is the basis for the giving of the Spirit to believers and the Forgiveness of their sins
Grace - The initial and controlling causes of that whole vast change are discovered to the primitive Christian perception in a great surprise of God’s Forgiveness, pronounced and imparted by Christ, and made effective for regeneration by a force none other than, not inferior to, His Holy Spirit
Meekness (2) - When He hung upon the cross in agony, He was so far master of Himself and so deeply moved by compassion for His enemies, that He found some ground for extenuating their conduct and prayed for their Forgiveness
Gifts - The gifts of the one High Priest, ‘the mediator of a better covenant,’ are inward; the new law is written on the heart, and the covenant is one of Forgiveness and grace (Hebrews 5:1; Hebrews 8:1 ff
Gregorius (32) Turonensis, Bishop of Tours - Leudastes rashly tried to force Forgiveness from the queen
Zechariah, Theology of - We must trust God for Forgiveness as Joshua did; then we do not need to fear any accusations
Example - He is our example of mercy and Forgiveness (Ephesians 4:32, Colossians 3:13, 2 Corinthians 2:10); in self-denial and humble service (Philippians 2:5 ff
Heman - Had it been a great temptation, a great fall, a great repentance, a great Forgiveness, and then the light of God's countenance brighter than ever all Heman's after-days
Peter, Second Epistle of - They are therefore urged to enrich their character with virtues, because only from such a soil will a full knowledge of Jesus Christ grow; and entrance into His eternal Kingdom depends upon Forgiveness of sins, and the zealous effort of the believer to make the gospel call effective by a life of virtue ( 2 Peter 1:6-11 )
Predestination - The benefits bestowed upon them in common with the Apostle are enumerated as ‘redemption,’ ‘forgiveness of sins,’ ‘holiness,’ ‘adoption’ as sons of God, ‘a heavenly inheritance,’ and they comprise ‘every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ’-benefits not merely offered but actually enjoyed, and that in accordance with the purpose of God before the foundation of the world
Hannah - And even when some might think your person respected, it may be to this extent, to the great and gracious extent of Forgiveness; while, all the time, a sharp vengeance is taken on your inventions
Mission - The appearance of the Son of Man was a gospel, because, while it condemned sin, it affirmed moral evil to be an intrusion into man’s nature, and it invited the sinful to receive Forgiveness and enter into union with that victorious life which from the first had overcome the world (Matthew 4:1-11, John 8:29; John 16:33; John 17:4)
Church - 1 Peter 2:9 , Titus 2:14 ), identified with the commonwealth of Israel ( Ephesians 2:12 ), and as such the immediate object of redemption ( Ephesians 5:25 ); but through the reconciliation of the Cross extended ( Ephesians 2:14 ), and, as it were, reincorporated on a wider basis ( Ephesians 2:15 ), as the sphere of universal Forgiveness ( Ephesians 2:16 ), the home of the Spirit ( Ephesians 2:18 ), and the one body of Christ ( Ephesians 4:12 etc
Number - ); Forgiveness till 70 times 7 ( Matthew 18:22 ); the seven churches of Asia; seven angels; seven stars, etc
Ethics - Regard for others is imperative; for an unforgiving temper cannot find Forgiveness ( Matthew 6:14-15 ; Matthew 18:23-35 ), worship without brotherliness is rejected ( 1618394055_51 ), and Christian love is a sign of regeneration ( 1 John 5:1 )
Faith - The words of Matthew 26:28 , which must be vindicated as original, make it clear that Jesus regarded His death as the culmination of His mission; at the Last Supper He is ready to offer His ‘blood’ to seal ‘the new covenant’ under which ‘forgiveness of sins’ will be universally guaranteed (cf
Philippians, Theology of - For Paul faith is a glad and open admission that we cannot earn God's approval by meritorious effort but rather a simple reaching out of empty hands to receive God's free offer of Forgiveness, grace, and love in Jesus Christ
Jeremiah, Theology of - The goal of bondedness remains; the means for achieving that bondedness between people and God is Forgiveness and the placing of God's law in people's hearts
Justification - 489), identical with Forgiveness, release from His wrath, enjoyment of His favour, a present status rather than a new character
Hypocrisy - Schulhof, The Law of Forgiveness as presented in the NT, 1901, pp
Individual - Most distinctive is the duty of Forgiveness
Self-Control - By the Forgiveness of sins Christ sets the will free from bondage to past evil, and His Spirit, ruling in the life because in the heart, becomes an unfailing source of strength and peace, reproducing in mortal experience the self-control of Him who never wavered from duty, or yielded to temptation, or allowed the Kingdom within to be disturbed by a breach of will between Himself and the Father
Fire - ...
2 Kings 2:11 (c) This strange picture probably teaches us that those of us who go to Heaven go because of and by virtue of the wrath of GOD which fell upon the Saviour, thereby bringing to us Forgiveness, cleansing and fitness
Children of God - The Kingdom includes the blessings of Forgiveness (Matthew 6:14 ||); of guardian care (Matthew 6:33); of the Holy Spirit (Luke 11:13); of eternal life (John 5:21-26; John 17:3); and finally, the enjoyment of the Father’s house (Matthew 25:34, John 14:2-3)
Fellowship (2) - In this company is found religious fellowship, based upon Forgiveness of sins and eternal life through the knowledge of God revealed by Jesus as Father, of which the OT saints had but partial enjoyment or glad anticipation
Force - He is thus, because of what He is, the Divinely human and the humanly Divine, true way of Forgiveness, of judgment, of life, and of moral government for men
Jeremiah - Tears, when bitter enough, and in secret enough, always gain Forgiveness indeed, which is almost everything, and is on the way to everything
Grace - The initial and controlling causes of that whole vast change are discovered to the primitive Christian perception in a great surprise of God’s Forgiveness, pronounced and imparted by Christ, and made effective for regeneration by a force none other than, not inferior to, His Holy Spirit
Hypocrisy - Schulhof, The Law of Forgiveness as presented in the NT, 1901, pp
Theophilus, Bishop of Alexandria - They were persuaded to ask their pope's Forgiveness, and Theophilus restored them to his communion
Pre-Existence of Christ - His experience of salvation was an experience of Forgiveness and eternal life bestowed with an unspeakable fervour of Divine love-love that by infinite sacrifice reconciled the sinner unto God
Kings, the Books of - Thus, Samuel by His direction anointed Saul and David to reign over His people; Nathan announced God's promise that David's throne and seed should be forever (2 Samuel 7); then when he sinned Nathan remounted his punishment, and upon his repentance immediate Forgiveness (2 Samuel 12); similarly, Gad (2 Samuel 24)
Faith - "...
In anticipation of the more formal analysis of the Epistles, faith in Acts is linked to baptism (8:12-13; 18:8; 19:2), confession (19:18), Forgiveness (10:43), grace (15:11; 18:27), healing (3:16; 14:9), the Holy Spirit (19:2), justification (13:39), purification (15:9), and sanctification (26:18)
Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life - Jesus speaks of the "eternal sin" of blaspheming the Holy Spirit; for this there can be no Forgiveness (Mark 3:29 ), in part perhaps because the perpetrator of such a heinous act cannot muster the will to seek it (Hebrews 12:17 )
Miracles - The cure of the paralytic, which He wrought to confirm His claim to forgive sins, was necessary to assure the sufferer of the reality of His Forgiveness ( Matthew 9:6 )
Election - Romans 5:8-10); (2) is a display of Divine grace calculated to redound to the glory of God by setting forth His love and mercy towards sinful men (Ephesians 1:3-14); (3) is not conditioned upon any good foreseen in the elect, nor in any faith or merit which they may exhibit in time (Romans 9:11-13), but is ‘according to the good pleasure of his will’ (Ephesians 1:5), ‘according to his own purpose of grace’ (2 Timothy 1:9), of God’s sovereign purpose and grace (Romans 9:15; Romans 11:5-7); (4) is carried out ‘in Christ’ (Ephesians 1:4; Ephesians 2:10) through the elect being brought into union with Him by faith, that they may receive Forgiveness of sins and every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places (Ephesians 1:3; Ephesians 1:5); (5) issues in sanctification by the Spirit and assurance of the truth (2 Thessalonians 2:13 f
Gospel - He also was a rich young ruler troubled with the haunting question, ‘What shall I do to inherit eternal life?’ For years he had struggled to put down sin in his own heart, to be righteous in the sight of God, passionately longing to have the assurance of the Forgiveness of sins, that in peace he might will his will and work his work
Doctrines - Such a complete change as these words imply—‘change of mind’ (μετάνοια), ‘convert,’ ‘turn round’ (ἐπιστρέφειν, Matthew 13:15), ‘new birth’ or ‘birth from above’ (γεννηθῇ ἄνωθεν, Matthew 18:21-350), is necessary for all, as Jesus shows by addressing His teaching on this theme not only to Pharisees like Nicodemus, but to His own disciples—notably in the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (1618394055_28), in which, in answer to a question of Peter, He likens the condition of all recipients of the Divine Forgiveness to that of a man who owes a debt of ten thousand talents, clearly meaning by that the infinitude of
Eli - But it was at home that the widespread mischief rose to a height that went beyond human remedy and beyond divine Forgiveness
Eschatology - On one hand, since Jesus was again alive and continuing to offer love and Forgiveness, no one who had rejected Him need remain under God's judgment
Union With Christ - Taylor, Forgiveness and Reconciliation
Peter - To him Jesus sends through Mary Magdalene a special message of His resurrection to assure him of Forgiveness (Mark 16:7)
Jesus Christ - Is the Forgiveness of sin a work of God? The Son of Man hath power to forgive sins, Matthew 9:6
Prayer - What is it that fits man for Forgiveness, but simply repentance? Yet that is expressly said to be the "gift" of Christ, and supposes strong operations of the illuminating and convincing Spirit of truth, the Lord and Giver of spiritual life; and if the mere acts and habit of prayer had efficiency enough to produce a Scriptural repentance, then every formalist attending with ordinary seriousness to his devotions, must, in consequence, become a penitent
Marriage - Entrance into the married state was thought to carry the Forgiveness of sins’ (Edersheim, LT Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - 3, 14 were against the repetition of baptism; which some persons seem to have thought might be repeated not only after heresy, but for Forgiveness of repeated sins
Acts of the Apostles (2) - The method is described in Acts 10:37-43 Acts 13:38 f, Acts 26:18 as the Forgiveness of sins, or, to use the designation adopted in one of St
Arminianism - ]'>[1] They admit in this way, that justification implies not merely Forgiveness of sin, but acceptance to everlasting happiness
Resurrection - The Pentecostal outpouring, the work of healing, the gifts of repentance and Forgiveness of sins, are all described as (flowing from the risen life of Jesus (see Acts 2:33 ; Acts 4:10 ; Acts 5:31 ; cf
Teaching of Jesus - Reception of such knowledge meant repentance for sins as unfitting the sinner for membership in the Kingdom soon to ‘appear,’ and confidence in the Forgiveness which was part of the expected Messianic blessings
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - They were theological in that the observance of the festivals presented the participants with lessons on the reality of sin, judgment, and Forgiveness, on the need for thanksgiving to God, and on the importance of trusting God rather than hoarding possessions
God - No prophet knew that better than Isaiah, who announced the era of restoration as a time when Yahweh would comfort his people and proclaimed Yahweh's Forgiveness of Judah's sins (40:1-2)
Sin - On the one hand, the reality of the sinfulness even of believers is insisted on; to deny sinfulness is self-deception, and even charging God with falsehood (1 John 1:8; 1 John 1:10), and confession is the condition of Forgiveness and cleansing (1 John 1:9)
Man - For single acts of sin confessed there is Forgiveness and cleansing (1 John 1:9)
Lord's Supper (ii) - Wright’s view must be rejected as (a) lacking positive support; (b) not really affording a parallel to the existence of a rite of baptism (John 3:22; John 4:1-2) before the institution of Christian Baptism (Matthew 28:19); (c) being contrary to the tenor of John 6, which implies that, to the disciples as well as to the multitude, the teaching had the element of difficulty which shows that the Eucharist was not yet instituted; and (d) as contrary to the parallels by which the discourse about Baptism in John 3 is prior to the institution in Matthew 28:19, and the teaching about Forgiveness in Mark 2:5-11 (= Matthew 9:2-8, Luke 5:20-24) is prior to John 20:21-23; but its plausibility at first sight is a significant indication of the truth that the discourse in John 6 was destined to find its explanation in the Institution of the Eucharist
Death of Christ - —(7) This internal, immediate union of the individual with Christ, and therefore with God, is the true way of salvation and life for man (John 14:6) This secures not only Forgiveness, but every moral or spiritual blessing that the individual needs for this world and the next, every blessing that God has to give or that it is possible for Him to bestow in Christ and through the work of His Spirit in the heart
Faith - Thus he that believes that Jesus is the Son of God passes by the way of Forgiveness, knowledge, and love into an assured confidence and a great victory over the world and the things that are in the world
Methodists - "Justification," says Mr Wesley, "sometimes means our acquittal at the last day, Matthew 12:37 : but this is altogether out of the present question; for that justification whereof our Articles and Homilies speak, signifies present Forgiveness, pardon of sins, and consequently acceptance with God, who therein declares his righteousness, or justice, and mercy, by or for the remission of sins that are past, Romans 3:25 , saying: ‘I will be merciful to thy unrighteousness, and thine iniquities I will remember no more
Faith - Thus he that believes that Jesus is the Son of God passes by the way of Forgiveness, knowledge, and love into an assured confidence and a great victory over the world and the things that are in the world
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - ’ In these passages Jesus taught plainly that the OT testified that His death and resurrection were necessary antecedents to the preaching of repentance and the Forgiveness of sins
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - In all except two Joseph is held up as an example of chastity or Forgiveness
Vicarious Sacrifice - He has thus become to the Father the Surety for the purification of humanity, and for His sake the Father can offer Forgiveness, if men will receive and obey Him
Psalms, Theology of - Furthermore, petitioners whose distress is due to personal sin would be advised to confess it and to ask for Forgiveness since God's judgments on members of the covenant community can be grievous as well
Ethics (2) - Just as He fervidly announces the royal benignity of God towards both the evil and the good, just as He confidently speaks to the contrite of the Divine Forgiveness, and without misgiving assures the wretched of the Divine succour, so He also undertakes, in face of the law of Moses, ‘that which was spoken to the fathers,’ to set forth a new law, in the glad conviction that He is thus expressing the will of God
Socialism - The prayer for Forgiveness is accompanied by a special clause guarding it against an individualist interpretation
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - Love is the only ground on which we can hope for God’s Forgiveness
Freedom of the Will - Paul’s conception of the Atonement (see article Atonement); but just as his active and untiring mind worked out into a Divine drama what to most of his contemporaries, was the simple experience of the consciousness of Forgiveness of sins through Christ, so, to him, ability to do right was imaged forth as the change from being the slave of a tyrant to being a son in the house of his father
Augustine - He accordingly taught, that baptism brings with it the Forgiveness of sins; that it is so essential, that the omission of it will expose us to condemnation; and that it is attended with regeneration
Gnosticism - Thus the DOCETAE of Hippolytus allow of immense variety of classes, corresponding to the diversity of ideas derived from the world of aeons, which each has received; while again they deny to none a share in our Lord's redemption, but own that members of different sects are entitled, each in his degree, to claim kinship with Jesus and to obtain Forgiveness of sins through Him
Reformation - To this he consented, relying on the promise of Charles for obtaining Forgiveness, and being restored to liberty; but, notwithstanding these expectations, he was unjustly detained prisoner, by a scandalous violation of the most solemn convention
Character of Christ - Mankind: (1) lowliness; (2) considerateness; (3) compassion; (4) forbearance and Forgiveness
Christ in the Early Church - Justin Martyr similarly regards as absolute the teaching of Christ respecting divorce, Forgiveness, charity, endurance of injuries, swearing, and civil obedience (1 Apol
Christianity - ...
The substitution of the worship of the Virgin Mary as an intercessor with her Divine Son for reverent intercourse with Christ Himself; the offering of the sacrifice of the Mass by an officiating priest for the benefit of the living and the dead, instead of a simple observance of communion with Christ and fellow-disciples at the Lord’s Table; the obtaining of absolution only after private confession to a priest Divinely appointed to dispense it, in place of free and direct Forgiveness granted to the penitent believer in Christ,—changes like these made in a religion are not slight and superficial
Criticism - Herrmann himself says that, in face of the seriousness of a desire for a salvation which means Forgiveness of sins and life in spiritual
Hermas, Known as the Shepherd - He announced therefore Forgiveness on repentance for sins of old Christians prior to the date of his revelation but none for those of new converts or for sins subsequent to his revelation
Methodists, Protestant - ...
That justification whereof our articles and homilies speak signifies present Forgiveness, and consequently acceptance with God: I believe the condition of this faith: I mean not only that without faith we cannot be justified, but also that, as soon as any one has true faith, in that moment he is justified
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - All the authority of the emperor and the passionate entreaties of the empress, who even placed her infant son on Chrysostom's knees in the church of the Apostles as an irresistible plea for yielding to her petition, were needed to extort Forgiveness for Severian
Donatus And Donatism - The Catholics received them with love and Forgiveness; and in some cities, as in Carthage, union between Catholics and Donatists was openly asserted and celebrated
Eutyches And Eutychianism - "Yes, we all sinned (at Ephesus); we all implore Forgiveness
Holy Ghost - Paul by the phrase "the Spirit of adoption;" so that it is through him that we receive a direct inward testimony to our personal Forgiveness and acceptance through Christ, and are filled with peace and consolation
Person of Christ - He called all the weary to Himself for rest; most amazing of all, He claimed the power to forgive sin, and actually bestowed Forgiveness on the sick of the palsy and the dying malefactor
Paul (2) - He had not to wait for the Divine Forgiveness, which was vouchsafed to him at once as soon as he became a Christian and was launched upon that career of amendment and advance to which as a Christian he was pledged