What does Fall mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
וְנָפְל֖וּ to fall 5
יִפֹּ֔לוּ to fall 5
πέσῃ to descend from a higher place to a lower. 5
יִפְּל֥וּ to fall 5
יִפֹּ֥ל to fall 4
יִפּ֥וֹל to fall 4
πεσοῦνται to descend from a higher place to a lower. 4
יִפֹּֽלוּ to fall 4
יִפֹּ֑לוּ to fall 4
יִפְּל֣וּ to fall 3
σκανδαλισθήσονται to put a stumbling block or impediment in the way 3
יִכָּשְׁל֥וּ to stumble 2
וְהִפַּלְתִּ֥יו to fall 2
יִפּֽוֹל to fall 2
יִלָּבֵֽט to throw down 2
יִפֹּ֤ל to fall 2
וְנָפְל֥וּ to fall 2
וְיִפֹּ֖ל to fall 2
יִפָּל־ to fall 2
יִפֹּ֑ל to fall 2
יִפֹּ֣ל to fall 2
יָחֽוּל to twist 2
וּנְפַלְתֶּ֖ם to fall 2
וְנָֽפְלָה֙ to fall 2
יִפּ֑וֹל to fall 2
וְנָֽפְלוּ֙ to fall 2
ἐμπέσῃ to fall into. 2
πεσεῖται to descend from a higher place to a lower. 2
πέσετε to descend from a higher place to a lower. 2
וְנָ֨פְלָ֜ה to fall 2
תִּפּ֑וֹל to fall 2
יִפֵּ֖ל to fall. 2
σκανδαλισθήσεσθε to put a stumbling block or impediment in the way 2
ἐκπεσεῖν to fall out of 2
וְנָפַ֥ל to fall 2
אַפִּֽיל to fall 1
וְנָ֣פְלוּ to fall 1
וְנִפְל֖וּ to fall 1
תִּפּ֗וֹל to fall 1
וְנָֽפְל֛וּ to fall 1
וְהִפַּלְתִּ֤ים to fall 1
הִפַּ֤לְתִּי to fall 1
נִפְל֥וּ to fall 1
וְנָפְל֣וּ to fall 1
וְתִפֹּ֤ל to fall 1
וַיִּפֹּ֥ל to fall 1
וְנָפַ֣ל to fall 1
בִּנְפֹ֖ל to fall 1
נֹפֵ֔ל to fall 1
יִפּ֔וֹל to fall 1
וְנָפְלָ֖ה to fall 1
וַיַּפֵּל֩ to fall 1
וּלְהִתְנַפֵּ֣ל to fall 1
וְנָפְלָ֗ה to fall 1
וְנָפַ֤ל to fall 1
לִנְפֹּ֖ל to fall 1
אַפִּ֥יל to fall 1
תִּפְּל֣וּן to fall. 1
הַנֹּפְלִ֑ים to fall 1
יִפְּל֑וּ to fall 1
יִפְּלוּ֮ to fall 1
וַ֭יַּפֵּל to fall 1
תִּפֹּֽלוּ to fall 1
תִּפְּל֤וּן to fall. 1
יִפֵּ֥ל to fall. 1
؟ אֶסְגּֽוֹד (Qal) to prostrate oneself (in worship). 1
יִפּ֣וֹל to fall 1
יִפְגָּעֵ֔נוּ to encounter 1
יִפְגְּע֣וּ to encounter 1
לְצֶ֣לַע limping 1
סֵטִ֥ים to swerve 1
יְשׁוּפֵ֑נִי to bruise 1
וְהִֽשְׁתַּחֲו֛וּ to bow down. 1
וְיִשְׁתַּחֲווּ־ to bow down. 1
לִנְפֹּ֑ל to fall 1
(יִפָּל־) to fall 1
תִפֹּ֑ל to fall 1
בַנֹּפְלִ֛ים to fall 1
יִפֹּ֗לוּ to fall 1
וְנָפָֽלוּ to fall 1
נִפְלָ֔ם to fall 1
וְנָפַ֔ל to fall 1
נָפָֽלָה to fall 1
נָפְל֖וּ to fall 1
יִפְּל֧וּ to fall 1
הֲיִפְּל֖וּ to fall 1
תִּפֹּ֤ל to fall 1
בַנֹּפְלִ֗ים to fall 1
תִפּ֑וֹל to fall 1
וְנָפַלְתִּ֖י to fall 1
וְנָפְל֧וּ to fall 1
נָפַ֖לְתִּי to fall 1
לִנְפֹּ֣ל to fall 1
יִפְּל֨וּ to fall 1
יִפְּל֖וּ to fall 1
תִּפּֽוֹל to fall 1
ἀφίστανται to make stand off 1
אַפִּ֣יל to fall 1
יִכָּ֣שֶׁל to stumble 1
תֵּרֵֽד to go down 1
יַכְשִֽׁילְךָ֤ to stumble 1
וְנִכְשָֽׁלוּ to stumble 1
וְנִכְשְׁל֞וּ to stumble 1
וּבְהִכָּ֣שְׁלָ֔ם to stumble 1
יִכָּֽשְׁל֗וּ to stumble 1
וְכָשְׁל֤וּ to stumble 1
תִזְנֶ֣ה to commit fornication 1
וְכָשַׁ֤ל to stumble 1
יִכָּשֵֽׁלוּ to stumble 1
כּוֹשֵׁ֑ל to stumble 1
וְכָ֣שְׁלוּ to stumble 1
(יַכְשִֽׁילוּ) to stumble 1
כִ֝שָּׁל֗וֹן a stumbling 1
וַיּ֥וֹרֶד to go down 1
הֱוֵ֫א Qal). 1
לְמִכְשׁ֣וֹל a stumbling 1
καταπίπτειν to fall down. 1
ἐκπέσωσιν to fall out of 1
ἐκπέσωμεν to fall out of 1
ἐκπέσητε to fall out of 1
ἐμπεσοῦνται to fall into. 1
ἐμπίπτουσιν to fall into. 1
ἐμπεσεῖν to fall into. 1
περιπέσητε so to fall into as to be encompassed. 1
ὑστεροῦνται behind. / to suffer want 1
πέσωσιν to descend from a higher place to a lower. 1
πέσητε to descend from a higher place to a lower. 1
πτῶσις a falling 1
σκανδαλίζονται to put a stumbling block or impediment in the way 1
σκανδαλισθῇ to put a stumbling block or impediment in the way 1
σκανδαλισθήσομαι to put a stumbling block or impediment in the way 1
σκανδαλισθῆτε to put a stumbling block or impediment in the way 1
(יִמּ֥וֹטוּ) to totter 1
מַפַּלְתֵּ֗ךְ carcass 1
תִּפֹּ֑לְנָה to fall 1
וְיִפֹּ֑ל to fall 1
וְנָפַ֖ל to fall 1
נֹפְלִ֣ים to fall 1
לִנְפֹּ֤ל to fall 1
תִּפּ֖וֹל to fall 1
תִּפֹּ֨ל to fall 1
תִּפֹּ֔לוּ to fall 1
תִּפֹּ֔לְנָה to fall 1
אֶפֹּֽלָה to fall 1
βρέχῃ to moisten 1
יִפְּלוּ֙ to fall 1
נָפָֽלוּ to fall 1
תִּפּ֔וֹל to fall 1
בִּנְפֹ֥ל to fall 1
יִפְּלוּ־ to fall 1
וְהִפַּלְתִּ֥י to fall 1
הֲתִפֹּ֤ל to fall 1
נִפְּלָה־ to fall 1
מַפַּלְתֵּ֑ךְ carcass 1
אֶפְּלָה־ to fall 1
מַפַּלְתּוֹ֙ carcass 1
מַפַּלְתֶּֽךָ carcass 1
בְּֽמַפַּלְתָּ֥ם carcass 1
יִבּ֔וֹל to be senseless 1
יַגִּירֻ֥הוּ to pour 1
וְנַ֣חְנוּ to rest. 1
אֶפֹּֽל to fall 1
יִפֹּ֛ל to fall 1
יִפֹּ֞ל to fall 1
לְהַפִּ֥יל to fall 1
הִפִּ֥יל to fall 1
וְנָ֣פַלְתָּ֔ to fall 1
יִפֹּ֜ל to fall 1
וְנָ֣פַלְתָּ֔ה to fall 1
נָפָ֑ל to fall 1
תָּשֹׁ֥לּוּ (Qal) to draw out. / to spoil 1

Definitions Related to Fall

G4098


   1 to descend from a higher place to a lower.
      1a to Fall (either from or upon).
         1a1 to be thrust down.
      1b metaph.
      to Fall under judgment, came under condemnation.
   2 to descend from an erect to a prostrate position.
      2a to Fall down.
         2a1 to be prostrated, Fall prostrate.
         2a2 of those overcome by terror or astonishment or grief or under the attack of an evil spirit or of falling dead suddenly.
         2a3 the dismemberment of a corpse by decay.
         2a4 to prostrate one’s self.
         2a5 used of suppliants and persons rendering homage or worship to one.
         2a6 to Fall out, Fall from i.e. shall perish or be lost.
         2a7 to Fall down, Fall into ruin: of buildings, walls etc.
      2b to be cast down from a state of prosperity.
         2b1 to Fall from a state of uprightness.
         2b2 to perish, i.
         e come to an end, disappear, cease.
            2b2a of virtues.
         2b3 to lose authority, no longer have force.
            2b3a of sayings, precepts, etc.
         2b4 to be removed from power by death.
         2b5 to fail of participating in, miss a share in.
         

H5307


   1 to Fall, lie, be cast down, fail.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to Fall.
         1a2 to Fall (of violent death).
         1a3 to Fall prostrate, prostrate oneself before.
         1a4 to Fall upon, attack, desert, Fall away to, go away to, Fall into the hand of.
         1a5 to Fall short, fail, Fall out, turn out, result.
         1a6 to settle, waste away, be offered, be inferior to.
         1a7 to lie, lie prostrate.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to cause to Fall, fell, throw down, knock out, lay prostrate.
         1b2 to overthrow.
         1b3 to make the lot Fall, assign by lot, apportion by lot.
         1b4 to let drop, cause to fail (fig.
         ).
         1b5 to cause to Fall.
      1c (Hithpael).
         1c1 to throw or prostrate oneself, throw oneself upon.
         1c2 to lie prostrate, prostrate oneself.
      1d (Pilel) to Fall.
      

G4624


   1 to put a stumbling block or impediment in the way, upon which another may trip and Fall, metaph.
   to offend.
      1a to entice to sin.
      1b to cause a person to begin to distrust and desert one whom he ought to trust and obey.
         1b1 to cause to Fall away.
         1b2 to be offended in one, i.e. to see in another what I disapprove of and what hinders me from acknowledging his authority.
         1b3 to cause one to judge unfavourably or unjustly of another.
      1c since one who stumbles or whose foot gets entangled feels annoyed.
         1c1 to cause one displeasure at a thing.
         1c2 to make indignant.
         1c3 to be displeased, indignant.
         

H5034


   1 to be senseless, be foolish.
      1a (Qal) to be foolish.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to regard or treat as foolish.
         1b2 to treat with contempt.
   2 to sink or drop down, languish, wither and Fall, fade.
      2a (Qal).
         2a1 to sink or drop down.
         2a2 to Fall, wither and Fall, fade.
         2a3 to droop.
         

H2342


   1 to twist, whirl, dance, writhe, fear, tremble, travail, be in anguish, be pained.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to dance.
         1a2 to twist, writhe.
         1a3 to whirl, whirl about.
      1b (Polel).
         1b1 to dance.
         1b2 to writhe (in travail with), bear, bring forth.
         1b3 to wait anxiously.
      1c (Pulal).
         1c1 to be made to writhe, be made to bear.
         1c2 to be brought forth.
      1d (Hophal) to be born.
      1e (Hithpolel). 1e1 whirling (participle). 1e2 writhing, suffering torture (participle). 1e3 to wait longingly.
      1f (Hithpalpel) to be distressed.
      

G1601


   1 to Fall out of, to Fall down from, to Fall off.
   2 metaph.
      2a to Fall from a thing, to lose it.
      2b to perish, to Fall.
         2b1 to Fall from a place from which one cannot keep.
         2b2 Fall from a position.
         2b3 to Fall powerless, to Fall to the ground, be without effect.
            2b3a of the divine promise of salvation.
            

H7997


   1 (Qal) to draw out.
   2 to spoil, plunder, take spoil.
      2a (Qal) to spoil, plunder.
      2b (Hithpolel) to be spoiled, be plundered.
      

H3782


   1 to stumble, stagger, totter.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to stumble.
         1a2 to totter.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to stumble.
         1b2 to be tottering, be feeble.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to cause to stumble, bring injury or ruin to, overthrow.
         1c2 to make feeble, make weak.
      1d (Hophal) to be made to stumble.
      1e (Piel) bereave.
      

H2181


   1 to commit fornication, be a harlot, play the harlot.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to be a harlot, act as a harlot, commit fornication.
         1a2 to commit adultery.
         1a3 to be a cult prostitute.
         1a4 to be unfaithful (to God) (fig.
         ).
      1b (Pual) to play the harlot.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to cause to commit adultery.
         1c2 to force into prostitution.
         1c3 to commit fornication.
         

H3832


   1 to throw down, thrust down, thrust out, thrust away.
      1a (Niphal) to be thrust down, be thrust away, be thrown down, be cast aside.
      

G1706


   1 to Fall into.
      1a to Fall among robbers.
      1b Fall into one’s power.
      

H5308


   1 to Fall.
      1a (P’al).
         1a1 to Fall.
         1a2 to Fall down.
         

G4045


   1 so to Fall into as to be encompassed.
   

G1026


   1 to moisten, wet, water.
   2 to water with rain, to cause to rain, to pour the rain, to send down like rain.
   

G5302


   1 behind.
      1a to come late or too tardily.
         1a1 to be left behind in the race and so fail to reach the goal, to Fall short of the end.
         1a2 metaph.
         fail to become a partaker, Fall back from.
      1b to be inferior in power, influence and rank.
         1b1 of the person: to be inferior to.
      1c to fail, be wanting.
      1d to be in want of, lack.
   2 to suffer want, to be devoid of, to lack (be inferior) in excellence, worth.
   

H1933


   1 Qal).
      1a to Fall.
      1b to be, become, exist, happen.
      

H6293


   1 to encounter, meet, reach, entreat, make intercession.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to meet, light upon, join.
         1a2 to meet (of kindness).
         1a3 to encounter, Fall upon (of hostility).
         1a4 to encounter, entreat (of request).
         1a5 to strike, touch (of boundary).
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to cause to light upon.
         1b2 to cause to entreat.
         1b3 to make entreaty, interpose.
         1b4 to make attack.
         1b5 to reach the mark.
         

H6761


   1 limping, stumbling.
   

G2667


   1 to Fall down.
   

H7812


   1 to bow down.
      1a (Qal) to bow down.
      1b (Hiphil) to depress (fig).
      1c (Hithpael).
         1c1 to bow down, prostrate oneself.
            1c1a before superior in homage.
            1c1b before God in worship.
            1c1c before false gods.
            1c1d before angel.
            

G868


   1 to make stand off, cause to withdraw, to remove.
      1a to excite to revolt.
   2 to stand off, to stand aloof.
      2a to go away, to depart from anyone.
      2b to desert, withdraw from one.
      2c to Fall away, become faithless.
      2d to shun, flee from.
      2e to cease to vex one.
      2f to withdraw one’s self from, to Fall away.
      2g to keep one’s self from, absent one’s self from.
      

H5064


   1 to pour, run, flow, pour down.
      1a (Niphal).
         1a1 to be poured, be spilt.
         1a2 to pour oneself, flow, trickle.
         1a3 to vanish (fig.
         ).
         1a4 to be stretched out.
      1b (Hiphil) to pour down.
      1c (Hophal) to melt.
      

H3783


   1 a stumbling, a Fall, a calamity.
   

H4131


   1 to totter, shake, slip.
      1a (Qal) to totter, shake, slip.
      1b (Niphal) to be shaken, be moved, be overthrown.
      1c (Hiphil) to dislodge, let Fall, drop.
      1d (Hithpael) to be greatly shaken.
      

H7779


   1 to bruise, crush, gape upon, desire?, seize?, strike out?.
      1a (Qal) to Fall upon, bruise.
      

H7750


   1 to swerve, Fall away.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to swerve, Fall away.
         1a2 those falling away (participle).
         

H4658


   1 carcass, ruin, overthrow.
      1a carcass.
      1b ruin, overthrow.
      

G4431


   1 a falling, downfall.
   

H3381


   1 to go down, descend, decline, march down, sink down.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to go or come down.
         1a2 to sink.
         1a3 to be prostrated.
         1a4 to come down (of revelation).
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to bring down.
         1b2 to send down.
         1b3 to take down.
         1b4 to lay prostrate.
         1b5 to let down.
      1c (Hophal).
         1c1 to be brought down.
         1c2 to be taken down.
         

H5456


   1 (Qal) to prostrate oneself (in worship).
   

H4383


   1 a stumbling, means or occasion of stumbling, stumbling block.
      1a stumbling, Fall.
      1b means or occasion of stumbling, stumbling block.
      

Frequency of Fall (original languages)

Frequency of Fall (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fall River, Massachusetts, Diocese of
Embraces Bristol, Barnstable, Dukes, and Nantucket counties and the towns of Marion, Mattapoisett, and Wareham in Plymouth County; area, 1,194 square miles; established, 1904; suffragan of Boston. See also:
Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
diocese of Fall River
patron saints index
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fall of Adam
Since by the grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his fall.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Fall of Man
The history of the Fall is recorded in Genesis 2,3 . That history is to be literally interpreted. It records facts which underlie the whole system of revealed truth. It is referred to by our Lord and his apostles not only as being true, but as furnishing the ground of all God's subsequent dispensations and dealings with the children of men. The record of Adam's temptation and fall must be taken as a true historical account, if we are to understand the Bible at all as a revelation of God's purpose of mercy.
The effects of this first sin upon our first parents themselves were (1) "shame, a sense of degradation and pollution; (2) dread of the displeasure of God, or a sense of guilt, and the consequent desire to hide from his presence. These effects were unavoidable. They prove the loss not only of innocence but of original righteousness, and, with it, of the favour and fellowship of God. The state therefore to which Adam was reduced by his disobedience, so far as his subjective condition is concerned, was analogous to that of the fallen angels. He was entirely and absolutely ruined" (Hodge's Theology).
But the unbelief and disobedience of our first parents brought not only on themselves this misery and ruin, it entailed also the same sad consequences on all their descendants.
The guilt, i.e., liability to punishment, of that sin comes by imputation upon all men, because all were represented by Adam in the covenant of works (q.v.). (See IMPUTATION .)
Hence, also, all his descendants inherit a corrupt nature. In all by nature there is an inherent and prevailing tendency to sin. This universal depravity is taught by universal experience. All men sin as soon as they are capable of moral actions. The testimony of the Scriptures to the same effect is most abundant ( Romans 1 ; 2 ; 3:1-19 , etc.).
This innate depravity is total: we are by nature "dead in trespasses and sins," and must be "born again" before we can enter into the kingdom (John 3:7 , etc.).
Resulting from this "corruption of our whole nature" is our absolute moral inability to change our nature or to obey the law of God. Commenting on John 9:3 , Ryle well remarks: "A deep and instructive principle lies in these words. They surely throw some light on that great question, the origin of evil. God has thought fit to allow evil to exist in order that he may have a platform for showing his mercy, grace, and compassion. If man had never fallen there would have been no opportunity of showing divine mercy. But by permitting evil, mysterious as it seems, God's works of grace, mercy, and wisdom in saving sinners have been wonderfully manifested to all his creatures. The redeeming of the church of elect sinners is the means of 'showing to principalities and powers the manifold wisdom of God' (Ephesians 3:10 ). Without the Fall we should have known nothing of the Cross and the Gospel."
On the monuments of Egypt are found representations of a deity in human form, piercing with a spear the head of a serpent. This is regarded as an illustration of the wide dissemination of the tradition of the Fall. The story of the "golden age," which gives place to the "iron age", the age of purity and innocence, which is followed by a time when man becomes a prey to sin and misery, as represented in the mythology of Greece and Rome, has also been regarded as a tradition of the Fall.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Fall, Fallen, Falling, Fell
A — 1: πτῶσις (Strong's #4431 — Noun Feminine — ptosis — pto'-sis ) "a fall" (akin to B, No. 1), is used (a) literally, of the "overthrow of a building," Matthew 7:27 ; (b) metaphorically, Luke 2:34 , of the spiritual "fall" of those in Israel who would reject Christ; the word "again" in the AV of the next clause is misleading; the "rising up" (RV) refers to those who would acknowledge and receive Him, a distinct class from those to whom the "fall" applies. The "fall" would be irretrievable, cp. (a); such a lapse as Peter's is not in view.
A — 2: παράπτωμα (Strong's #3900 — Noun Neuter — paraptoma — par-ap'-to-mah ) primarily "a false step, a blunder" (para, "aside," pipto, "to fall"), then "a lapse from uprightness, a sin, a moral trespass, misdeed," is translated "fall" in Romans 11:11,12 , of the sin and "downfall" of Israel in their refusal to acknowledge God's claims and His Christ; by reason of this the offer of salvation was made to Gentiles; cp. ptaio, "to stumble," in ver. 11. See FAULT , OFFENSE, SIN , TRESPASS.
A — 3: ἀποστασία (Strong's #646 — Noun Feminine — apostasia — ap-os-tas-ee'-ah ) "a defection, revolt, apostasy," is used in the NT of religious apostasy; in Acts 21:21 , it is translated "to forsake," lit., "thou teachest apostasy from Moses." In 2 Thessalonians 2:3 "the falling away" signifies apostasy from the faith. In papyri documents it is used politically of rebels. Note: For "mighty fall," Revelation 18:21 , RV, see VIOLENCE.
B — 1: πίπτω (Strong's #4098 — Verb — pipto — pip'-to, pet'-o ) "to fall," is used (a) of descent, to "fall" down from, e.g., Matthew 10:29 ; 13:4 ; (b) of a lot, Acts 1:26 ; (c) of "falling" under judgment, James 5:12 (cp. Revelation 18:2 , RV); (d) of persons in the act of prostration, to prostrate oneself, e.g., Matthew 17:6 ; John 18:6 ; Revelation 1:17 ; in homage and workship, e.g., Matthew 2:11 ; Mark 5:22 ; Revelation 5:14 ; 19:4 ; (e) of things, "falling" into ruin, or failing, e.g., Matthew 7:25 ; Luke 16:17 , RV, "fall," for AV, "fail;" Hebrews 11:30 ; (f) of "falling" in judgement upon persons, as of the sun's heat, Revelation 7:16 , RV, "strike," AV, "light;" of a mist and darkness, Acts 13:11 (some mss. have epipipto); (g) of persons, in "falling" morally or spiritually, Romans 14:4 ; 1 Corinthians 10:8,12 ; Revelation 2:5 (some mss. have No. 3 here). See FAIL , LIGHT (upon), STRIKE.
B — 2: ἀποπίπτω (Strong's #634 — Verb — apopipto — ap-op-ip'-to ) "to fall from" (apo, "from"), is used in Acts 9:18 , of the scales which "fell" from the eyes of Saul of Tarsus.
B — 3: ἐκπίπτω (Strong's #1601 — Verb — ekpipto — ek-pip'-to ) "to fall out of" (ek, "out," and No. 1), "is used in the NT, literally, of flowers that wither in the course of nature, James 1:11 ; 1 Peter 1:24 ; of a ship not under control, Acts 27:17,26,29,32 ; of shackles loosed from a prisoner's wrist, Acts 12:7 ; figuratively, of the Word of God (the expression of His purpose), which cannot "fall" away from the end to which it is set, Romans 9:6 ; of the believer who is warned lest he "fall" away from the course in which he has been confirmed by the Word of God, 2 Peter 3:17 ." * [1] So of those who seek to be justified by law, Galatians 5:4 , "ye are fallen away from grace." Some mss. have this verb in Mark 13:25 , for No. 1; so in Revelation 2:5 . See CAST , EFFECT.
B — 4: ἐμπίπτω (Strong's #1706 — Verb — empipto — em-pip'-to ) "to fall into, or among" (en, "in," and No. 1), is used (a) literally, Matthew 12:11 ; Luke 6:39 (some mss. have No. 1 here); 10:36; some mss. have it in Luke 14:5 ; (b) metaphorically, into condemnation, 1 Timothy 3:6 ; reproach, 1 Timothy 3:7 ; temptation and snare, 1 Timothy 6:9 ; the hands of God in judgment, Hebrews 10:31 .
B — 5: ἐπιπίπτω (Strong's #1968 — Verb — epipipto — ep-ee-pip'-to ) "to fall upon" (epi, "upon," and No. 1), is used (a) literally, Mark 3:10 , "pressed upon;" Acts 20:10,37 ; (b) metaphorically, of fear, Luke 1:12 ; Acts 19:17 ; Revelation 11:11 (No. 1, in some mss.); reproaches, Romans 15:3 ; of the Holy Spirit, Acts 8:16 ; 10:44 ; 11:15 .
Note: Some mss. have this verb in John 13:25 ; Acts 10:10 ; 13:11 . See PRESS.
B — 6: καταπίπτω (Strong's #2667 — Verb — katapipto — kat-ap-ip'-to ) "to fall down" (kata, "down," and No. 1), is used in Luke 8:6 (in the best mss.); Acts 26:14 ; 28:6 .
B — 7: παραπίπτω (Strong's #3895 — Verb — parapipto — par-ap-ip'-to ) akin to A, No. 2, properly, "to fall in one's way" (para, "by"), signifies "to fall away" (from adherence to the realities and facts of the faith), Hebrews 6:6 .
B — 8: περιπίπτω (Strong's #4045 — Verb — peripipto — per-ee-pip'-to ) "to fall around" (peri, "around"), hence signifies to "fall" in with, or among, to light upon, come across, Luke 10:30 , "among (robbers);" Acts 27:41 , AV, "falling into," RV, "lighting upon," a part of a shore; James 1:2 , into temptation (i.e., trials). See LIGHT (to light upon). In the Sept., Ruth 2:3 ; 2 Samuel 1:6 ; Proverbs 11:5 .
B — 9: προσπίπτω (Strong's #4363 — Verb — prospipto — pros-pip'-to ) "to fall towards anything" (pros, "towards"), "to strike against," is said of "wind," Matthew 7:25 ; it also signifies to "fall" down at one's feet, "fall" prostrate before, Mark 3:11 ; 5:33 ; 7:25 ; Luke 5:8 ; 8:28,47 ; Acts 16:29 .
B — 10: ὑστερέω (Strong's #5302 — Verb — hustereo — hoos-ter-eh'-o ) "to come late, to be last, behind, inferior," is translated "falleth short" in Hebrews 12:15 , RV, for AV, "fail," and "fall short" in Romans 3:23 , for AV, "come short," which, in view of the preceding "have," is ambiguous, and might be taken as a past tense. See BEHIND.
B — 11: ἐπιβάλλω (Strong's #1911 — Verb — epiballo — ep-ee-bal'-lo ) "to cast upon" (epi, "on," ballo, "to throw"), also signifies to "fall" to one's share, Luke 15:12 , "that falleth." The phrase is frequently found in the papyri documents as a technical formula. See CAST , A, No. 7.
B — 12: ἔρχομαι (Strong's #2064 — Verb — erchomai — er'-khom-ahee ) "to come," is translated "have fallen out," in Philippians 1:12 , of the issue of circumstances. See COME.
B — 13: γίνομαι (Strong's #1096 — Verb — ginomai — ghin'-om-ahee ) "to become," is translated "falling" (headlong) in Acts 1:18 . See Note (1) below. See BECOME.
B — 14: ἀφίστημι (Strong's #868 — Verb — aphistemi — af-is'-tay-mee ) when used intransitively, signifies "to stand off" (apo, "from," histemi, "to stand"), "to withdraw from;" hence, "to fall away, to apostatize," 1 Timothy 4:1 , RV, "shall fall away," for AV, "shall depart;" Hebrews 3:12 , RV, "falling away." See DEPART , No. 20.
B — 15: παραβαίνω (Strong's #3845 — Verb — parabaino — par-ab-ah'ee-no ) "to transgress, fall" (para, "away, across," baino, "to go"), is translated "fell away" in Acts 1:25 , RV, for AV, "by transgression fell." See TRANSGRESS.
B — 16: καταβαίνω (Strong's #2597 — Verb — katabaino — kat-ab-ah'ee-no ) denotes "to come (or fall) down," Luke 22:44 ; in Revelation 16:21 , "cometh down," RV. See COME , DESCEND.
Notes: (1) In Revelation 16:2 , ginomai, "to become," is translated "it became," RV, for AV, "there fell." (2) In 2 Peter 1:10 , ptaio, "to stumble," is translated "stumble," RV, for AV, "fall." (3) In Romans 14:13 , skandalon, "a snare, a means of doing wrong," is rendered "an occasion of falling," RV, for AV "an occasion to fall." (4) Koimao, in the Middle Voice, signifies "to fall asleep," Matthew 27:52 , RV, "had fallen asleep," for AV, "slept." See ASLEEP. (5) In Acts 27:34 , apollumi, "to perish," is translated "shall ... perish," RV, for AV, "shall ... fall." (6) In Jude 1:24 the adjective aptaistos, "without stumbling, sure footed" (a, negative, and ptaio, "to stumble"), is translated "from stumbling," RV, for AV, "from falling." (7) In Acts 1:18 the phrase prenes, headlong, with the aorist participle of ginomai, "to become," "falling headlong." lit., "having become headlong," is used of the suicide of Judas Iscariot. Some would render the word (it is a medical term) "swollen," (as connected with a form of the verb pimpremi, "to burn"), indicating the condition of the body of certain suicides. (8) In Acts 20:9 , AV, kataphero, "to bear down," is translated "being fallen into" (RV, "borne down"), and then "he sunk down" (RV, ditto), the first of gradual oppression, the second (the aorist tense) of momentary effect. (9) In Acts 19:35 diopetes, from dios, "heaven," pipto, "to fall," i.e., "fallen" from the sky, is rendered "image which fell down from Jupiter" (RV marg., "heaven").
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Fall of Man
The loss of those perfections and that happiness which his Maker bestowed on him at his creation, through transgression of a positive command, given for the trial of man's obedience, and as a token of his holding every thing of God, as lord paramount of the creation, with the use of every thing in it, exclusive of the fruit of one tree. This positive law he broke by eating the forbidden fruit; first the woman, then the man: and thus the condition or law of the covenant being broken, the covenant itself was broken. The woman was enticed by an evil genius, under the semblance of a serpent, as appears from its reasoning the woman into the transgression of the law, of which a brute beast is incapable. Hence the evil genius is called a murderer and a liar from the beginning, John 8:44 . Romans 5:12 , the old serpent, Revelation 12:9 ; Revelation 20:2 . Moses relates this history, from what appeared externally to sense; both, therefore, are to be conjoined, the serpent as the instrument, and the devil as the primary cause.
Man suffered himself to be seduced by perverse and confused notions of good and evil, prompted by a desire of a greater degree of perfection, and swayed by his sensual appetite, in contradiction to his reason, Genesis 3:6 . And thus it appears possible, how, notwithstanding the divine image with which man is adorned, he might fall; for though included in it knowledge, it did not exclude from it confused notions, which are those arising from sense and imagination, especially when off our guard and inattentive, blindly following the present impression. From this one sin arose another, and then another, from the connection of causes and effects, till this repetition brought on a habit of sin, consequently a state of moral slavery; called by divines a death in sin, a spiritual death, a defect of power to act according to the law, and from the motive of the divine perfections, as death in general is such a defect of power of action; and this defect or inability, with all its consequences, man entailed on his posterity, remaining upon them, till one greater man remove this, and reinstate them in all they forfeited in Adam. In the fall of man we may observe,
1. The greatest infidelity.
2. Prodigious pride.
3. Horrid ingratitude.
4. Visible contempt of God's majesty and justice.
5. Unaccountable folly.
6. A cruelty to himself and to all his posterity. Infidels, however, have treated the account of the fall and its effects, with contempt, and considered the whole as absurd; but their objections to the manner have been ably answered by a variety of authors; and as to the effects, one would hardly think any body could deny. For, that man is a fallen creature, is evident, if we consider his misery as an inhabitant of the natural world; the disorders of the globe we inhabit, and the dreadful scourges with which it is visited; the deplorable and shocking circumstances of our birth; the painful and dangerous travail of women; our natural uncleanliness, helplessness, ignorance, and nakedness; the gross darkness in which we naturally are, both with respect to God and a future state; the general rebellion of the brute creation against us; the various poisons that lurk in the animal, vegetable, and mineral world, ready to destroy us: the heavy curse of toil and sweat to which we are liable; the innumerable calamities of life, and the pangs of death.
Again, it is evident, if we consider him as a citizen of the moral world; his commission of sin; his omission of duty; the triumph of sensual appetites over his intellectual faculties; the corruption of the powers that constitute a good head, the understanding, imagination, memory, and reason; the depravity of the powers which form a good heart, the will, conscience, and affections; his manifest alienation from God; his amazing disregard even of his nearest relatives; his unaccountable unconcern about himself; his detestable tempers; the general our-breaking of human corruption in all individuals; the universal overflowing of it in all nations. Some striking proofs of this depravity may be seen in the general propensity of mankind to vain, irrational, or cruel diversions; in the universality of the most ridiculous, impious, inhuman, and diabolical sins; in the aggravating circumstances attending the display of this corruption; in the many ineffectual endeavours to stem its torrent, in the obstinate resistance it makes to divine grace in the unconverted; the amazing struggles of good men with it; the testimony of the heathens concerning it; and the preposterous conceit which the unconverted have of their own goodness. Dict. of the Bible; Fletcher's Appeal to Matters of Fact; Berry Street Lectures, vol. 1:180, 189; South's Sermons, vol. 1: 124, 150; Bates's Harmony of Div. Att. P. 98; Boston's Four-fold State, part 1:
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Hypocrisy: a Fall Fatal
The meteor, if it once fall, cannot be rekindled.' When those who once flashed before the eyes of the religious public with the blaze of a vain profession, fall into open and scandalous sin, it is impossible to renew their glory. Once break the egg of hypocrisy, and who can repair the damage?
Holman Bible Dictionary - Fall
The traditional name for the first sin of Adam and Eve which brought judgment upon both nature and mankind. In Genesis people are the dominion-havers created in the image of God (Genesis 1:26-28 ). Man and woman are placed on earth with a commandment to obey (Genesis 1:28 ). The biblical understanding of dominion suggests a serving stewardship rather than mere power (Matthew 20:25-28 ).
Sin in the Garden Genesis pictures humans as the special creation of God (Matthew 2:7 ) placed in the special garden created by God (Matthew 2:8-15 ). Three features are crucial for understanding the human role in the garden: (1) Adam was put in the garden to “dress it and to keep it” (Matthew 2:15 ). God provided this vocation for man's fulfillment. (2) The first people were granted great freedom and discretion in the garden. This freedom permitted them to take from the goodness of God's creation (Matthew 2:16 ). (3) Yet their freedom and discretion were limited. God prohibited the taking of the fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil (Matthew 2:17 ). Scholars have pointed out that these three features belong uniquely to humans. Each person faces (1) vocation, (2) freedom, and yet (3) prohibition. Full humanity is experienced only when all three of these are maintained. God also met man's only apparent need—the need for community (Genesis 3:12-136 ). No partner could be found for him from the parade of animals. This prompted the special creation of woman from man (Genesis 2:19-22 ). Man immediately saw that she was made of human stuff, unlike the animals. Together they made a one-flesh union with perfect intimacy (Genesis 2:23-25 ).
The “knowledge of good and evil” would make humans godlike in some way (Genesis 3:5 ,Genesis 3:5,3:22 ). Some Bible students understand the tree to hold (1) all knowledge—that is the complete range of experience. Others claim the tree provides (2) knowledge of a moral nature. Some claim the acquired knowledge was simply (3) sexual experience.
The tree's purpose within the narrative provides a clue toward a more satisfactory explanation. The tree was the object and symbol of God's authority. The tree reminded Adam and Eve that their freedom was not absolute but had to be exercised in dependence upon God. In prideful rebellion the couple grasped for the capacity to be completely self-legislating—establishing an absolute self-directing independence. Such absolute dominion belongs only to God. Their ambition affected every dimension of human experience; for example, they claimed the right to decide what is good and evil.
The Serpent. The serpent made a sudden intrusion into the story. The serpent is identified in Genesis only as a creature. Theological reflection has identified him as an instrument of Satan and, thus, legitimately cursed and pictured as the enemy of woman's seed (Genesis 3:14-15 ). Later Scripture also declares that Satan is the ultimate tempter (1 John 3:8 ; Revelation 12:9 ). His presence, however, does not diminish mankind's responsibility. Scripture stipulates that man cannot blame his sin on demonic temptation (James 1:12-15 ).
The serpent began the conversation with a question that obviously distorted or at least extended God's order not to eat of the tree (Genesis 3:1 ). The questioner invited the woman to enter into a conversation about God and to treat Him and His word as objects to be considered and evaluated. Moreover, the serpent painted God as one who sadistically and arbitrarily placed a prohibition before the couple to stifle their enjoyment of the garden.
The woman apparently felt inclined to defend God's instruction. In her response to the serpent she included a citation of God's command. The text does not tell us how she or the snake came to know God's command. Adam may have passed on this information that he initially received prior to woman's creation (Genesis 2:17-18 ). She may thus represent all who receive the word of God through “human” instrumentality but who are nevertheless called to believe (compare John 20:29 ). She responded with a restatement of God's permission to eat freely of the garden provision (Genesis 3:2 ). She then told of God's prohibition of that one tree in the middle of the garden. Perhaps anxiety over doubting God's character moved her then to add to God's own words; she extended the instruction to include touching the tree, thereby making her own law. It is interesting that the first challenge to God's word did not involve deletion, but addition by both the serpent and the woman. Mankind's first surrender to temptation began with doubting God's instruction and His loving character. Today sinners still ask if God for “no good reason” keeps us from enjoying something He made.
The woman's willingness to judge and her addition to God's instruction, though seemingly harmless, permitted the serpent boldly to continue with a direct attack on God's character. He declared that the couple would not really die. Instead, he argued that God's motive was to keep the couple from being like God. The serpent claimed that the phrases “your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil” (Genesis 3:5 ) are God's reasons for giving the prohibitive command; in reality, these phrases express the human reasons for breaking the command. The couple was unhappy with their freedom as long as they thought more could be had. They sought unrestricted freedom—to be responsible to no one, not even God. The serpent seemed sure that eating would produce equality not death.
The woman stood before the tree. Crudely, she saw the fruit was good for food. In a more refined manner she judged it to be pleasant to the eye. More appealing to her vanity still was the newfound faith that it would bring knowledge (Genesis 3:6 ; compare 1 John 2:16 ). She ate of the fruit and gave it to Adam who ate as well. The story of sin is simply told without hearing from the couple. They would now know experientially the results of their broken trust.
Results of Sin Sin had immediate results in the couple's relationship; the self-first and self-only attitude displayed toward God affected the way they looked at one another. The mutual trust and intimacy of the one-flesh bond (Genesis 2:24 ) was ravaged by distrust. This does not suggest that the knowledge of good and evil was sexual awareness. Intercourse was the command and blessing of God prior to the fall (Genesis 1:28 ). In the absence of mutual trust, complete intimacy implies complete vulnerability (Genesis 3:7 ).
The couple also felt compelled to hide from God when they heard Him walking in the garden. When loving trust characterized the couple's attitude, they were apparently comfortable in God's presence. After their sin, shame appropriately marked their relationships—both human and divine (Genesis 3:8 ). The sinners could not remain hidden. God pursued, asking, “where art thou” (Genesis 3:9 ). This may be a normal question, but some see it as God's sorrowful anticipation of what follows. Sinners finally must speak to God. Adam admitted that God's presence now provoked fear, and human shame provoked hiding (Genesis 3:10 ).
God's next question drew the man's attention away from his plight to his sin (Genesis 3:11 ). The couple had to face their maker. The man admitted his sin, but only after emphatically reminding God that the woman was instrumental in his partaking. Woman shared equally in the deed, but she quickly blamed the deceiving serpent (1618389629_63 ). Along with shame, blame comes quite naturally to humankind.
God moved immediately to punish. The serpent was not interviewed because he was not an image-bearer in whom God sought a representation and relationship. The snake's behavior foreshadowed the reversal of created order and mankind's dominion. Once appealing and crafty, the cursed snake became lower than other animals. The judgment included the strife between snakes and humans. Some believe a fuller meaning of the verse promises Christ's ultimate victory over Satan (Genesis 3:14-15 ).
The woman's punishment was linked to her distinctive role in the fulfillment of God's command (Genesis 1:28 ). Her privilege to share in God's creative work was frustrated by intense pain. Despite this pain she would nevertheless desire intimacy with her husband, but her desire would be frustrated by sin. Their mutuality and oneness were displaced by male domination (Genesis 3:16 ). Even today the mark of sin is seen in the degrading domination of women—for example, rape, polygamy, and pornography.
Adam's punishment also involved the frustration of his service. He was guilty of following the woman's sinful advice and eating of the forbidden tree (Genesis 3:17 ). The fruitful efficiency known prior to the Fall was lost. Now even his extreme toil would be frustrated by the cursed earth. The
earth was apparently cursed because it was within Adam's domain. This corporate mentality is strange to us, but biblical writers recognize nature's need for redemption (Isaiah 24:1 ; Romans 8:19-23 ; Colossians 1:15-20 ). Contemporary environmental crises remind us today of human dependence upon sin-injured nature.
Results—Epilogue Man's prerogative to name woman (Genesis 3:20 ) was a sign of the fallen order, but hope persists. Mankind can carry on because the woman has the capacity to bear children. Hope ultimately emerged from divine determination to preserve His creation. Some may expect God to retreat and leave the sinful people alone to taste the misery that would follow, but grace-giving Yahweh provided clothing for fallen mankind (Genesis 3:20-21 ).
Yahweh acknowledged the partial truth of the serpent's claim: Adam's and Eve's autonomy had made them like the divine (Genesis 3:5 ,Genesis 3:5,3:22 ). In these circumstances, access to the tree of life is inappropriate. Numerous questions regarding the conditional nature of the tree of life are left unanswered here (Ezekiel 47:12 ; Revelation 2:7 ; Revelation 22:2 ,Revelation 22:2,22:14 ,Revelation 22:14,22:19 ). As a tragic judgment, the sinful pair was driven out of the garden, intended by God as His dwelling place. Guardian cherubim protected the garden and the tree (Genesis 3:22-24 ) and, thus, graciously protected people from entering into an infinite period of struggle. The serpent's lie concerning death (Genesis 3:4 ) became visible. Human sin brought death (Genesis 3:19 ,Genesis 3:19,3:22 ). Some readers question why death did not come “on that day” as God had apparently promised (Genesis 2:17 ), but the Hebrew expression may mean simply “when” (NIV; compare REB). One should also be reminded of God's grace to allow life to continue and the Hebrew understanding that death involves separation from God as much as physical death (Job 7:21 ; Psalm 88:5 ,Psalms 88:5,88:10-12 ; Isaiah 38:18-19 ).
New Testament The New Testament writers assumed the fallen state of both humans and nature. Both groan for redemption (Romans 8:19-23 ). When comparing Adam and Christ, Paul declared that sin and death gained entrance into the world through Adam and that sin and death are now common to all people (Romans 5:12 ; Romans 6:23 ). Adam may be pictured as a representative of mankind, all of whom share in his penalty (Romans 5:19 ).
Randy Hatchett
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Fall, the
The word "fall" is widely used to refer to what is recorded in Genesis 3 , particularly to what is written of the temptation of Adam and Eve, their being overcome by it, and their immediate reactions after they became aware of the consequences (3:1-8).
Since the account includes the role of a speaking serpent in an environment of perfect peace, beauty, and well-being for Adam and Eve, critical scholars have proposed that the account is a myth. For them it does not portray a scene that really existed or an event that actually happened in the earliest history of humanity. The New Testament does not give any credence to that view. Passages such as Romans 5:12-19,1 Corinthians 15:21-22 , and 1 Timothy 2:12-13 definitely refer to the fall as having actually happened as recorded. Many biblical scholars have correctly pointed out that the entire biblical teaching of Jesus Christ's redeeming and restoring work is based on the veracity of the historical account. Christ came and actually undid what Adam and Eve had done.
Adam and Eve had been created as image-bearers of God. They were placed in the cosmic kingdom created by God in intimate relationship with him. They were to mirror and represent their Creator as they carried out the spiritual, social, and cultural mandates. They were called to serve as mediators of the creation covenant—specifically as royal representatives and as priests representing creation before God and God before creation. To so serve they were created as unblemished persons, having intellect, volition, emotions, physical potentialities, drives, and abilities. They were created as the crown of creation and given Eden, the garden palace, as their home in which they were to carry out their roles and mandates. This they could do for they were in a trusting, obeying, honoring relationship with God who, as the sovereignly present, good, truly reliable One, communicated with them daily.
In communicating with them God had given his command not to eat of one specific tree (2:17). He did not explain why they should not. He warned them of the consequences if they did: they would die. Adam and Eve did not question God; they accepted the prohibition.
Satan and evil were also present in the cosmos but neither had influence in it. Satan, having been a powerful and influential administrative archangel, had rebelled against God. He was cast out but not destroyed by God. Satan, undoubtedly very envious of Adam and Eve whom God had given the role of vicegerents in the cosmic kingdom, sought to become the sovereign ruler. To do this, he had to gain the submission and service of Adam and Eve.
Satan, with his wisdom and abilities, confronted Eve using a serpent whose cunning ways Satan was able to use to his advantage. Satan led Eve to doubt God's goodness, truthfulness, reliability, and honor. He had but to ask the question: Did God really say you must not eat from any tree in the garden? The question, as framed, led Eve to respond in such a way that she began to doubt God's goodness and reliability; she added, "you must not touch it." The added comment revealed Eve's uncertainty about herselfwhat would she do if she came near it and touched it?
Satan attacked God directly by contradicting him, saying Adam and Eve would not die and that God knew they would become as he was (3:4-5). Satan transformed human honor, desire, and dignity, all God-given qualities, into dishonor, greed, and pride. Eve led Adam to join her, acting with hearts deviated from God's stipulated way of life, service, and peace. It was a willfully chosen path. Sin, evil, and death became influential forces and realities throughout the cosmic kingdom.
The effects of Adam and Eve's unbelief, disobedience, and rejection of God's command not to eat is stated in a seeming euphemistic manner: "Their eyes were opened" and "they realized they were naked." The first phrase indicates that they were still persons who could know, understand, and evaluate themselves in relation to God. This is not to say they were perfect in exercising these human capacities. They were still image-bearers but their attitudes and dispositions were radically affected. They were no longer in fellowship with God; when he came to commune with them they hid. They turned from seeking him; they rejected his fellowship. The love-life bond was broken from their side. They had become and realized they were covenant breakers. The phrase regarding their nakedness revealed that they realized they stood guilty before God. They could not appear before him as they were; they were exposed as persons who needed covering, protection, and defense. They were now no longer at peace in a wholesome, well-functioning relationship with God, nor with each other, for they were quick to shift blame. The relationship of harmony and trust between God and them, between man and woman, between them and the cosmos, as represented by the serpent, was ruptured. Self-defense and accusation of others, motivated by pride arising from their perverted hearts, became a tragic reality, adding to the deepening and widening gulf separating them from God, intimate relationship with others, and the natural world. Shame and fear gripped them; they realized that a tragic separation had suddenly taken place. They experienced the horrible reality of death, which basically means to have torn apart what belongs together for the exercise and enjoyment of love, peace, goodness, contentment, and joy. With opened eyes they saw themselves dead to God, to each other, and to the created natural order. They saw and understood they were immobilized, incapable to stand and serve, ready, able productive, and blessed before their covenant God.
The consequences of Adam and Eve's disobedience, rejection, deviation, and transgression had far-reaching effects. God had ordained and placed them as progenitors of the human race and as mediatorial vicegerents in the cosmos. By God's ordinance human offspring would inherit a deceitful heart, inclined to all manner of evil and incurably corrupt (Jeremiah 17:9 ). All would be conceived in sin and be born with the guilt of sin (Psalm 51:5 ). No one would come into life with a pure heart and conscience. All would be, have been, and will be born with inherited sin and guilt. This sin has been properly referred to as original sin and it is the root, source, and motivating factor for all the actual sins committed in thought, word, and deed. Scripture teaches us that the human race increased in disobedience and wickedness since the initial fateful deviation. Cain, with envy and hatred in his heart, murdered his brother (Genesis 4:1-8 ). The wickedness of humanity became great and violence filled the earth; polygamy became a way of life (Genesis 4:19 ; 6:2,5 ). Paul, under the Spirit's inspiration, wrote that through the one man's disobedience the many were made sinners (Romans 5:19 ) and therefore all suffer the consequence of sin: all died in Adam (1 Corinthians 15:22 ).
The natural world also was deeply affected. The harmony among forces in the cosmos was disturbed and disrupted. God informed Adam that creation would not respond to his efforts as before. Adam would labor and sweat; thorns would grow. The biblical references to droughts, famines, floods, earthquakes, and destructive burning are well known. These are all reasons for the frustrations and groanings of all creation which, by the ordinance of God and as a result of humanity's sin, will continue until the end of time (Romans 8:18-22 ).
Adam, Eve, and all their posterity's disobedience, rejection, and deviation had a direct consequence on God also. His relation to humanity was altered. No longer did Adam and Eve hear only words of love and encouragement; they heard reproof, condemnation, and retribution. God himself did not change; humanity broke the covenant relationship and true to himself and his Word, God in righteousness and justice, dealt accordingly. By his decree death entered the world, and God had to deal with the cosmos in the throes of despair and death. But he demonstrated his love also.
God made six pronouncements, all of which revealed his mercy and grace. Mercy is love extended to those experiencing brokenness, pain, misery, and grief because of human depravity, corruption, sin, and guilt. Grace is love extended to those who do not deserve love; grace is love for the guilty.
First, God declared that enmity was to exist between Satan and the seed of the woman. This enmity would divide humanity into disobedient despisers and rejectors of God and his covenant and submitting, believing, and obedient recipients of mercy and love. This enmity would be expressed in an abiding antithesis between Satan's dominion and the cosmic kingdom of God.
Second, God pronounced victory, redemption, and restoration. The satanic dominion and its participants would be crushed. A mortal blow would be struck by the seed of the woman, who would suffer in delivering it. This was the first promise of what later became clearly enunciated as salvation wrought by Jesus Christ.
Third, while an absolute curse was pronounced upon Satan and his dominion, a mitigated curse was pronounced on Eve. She would have greatly increased pain in childbearing; pain would accompany her as she experienced motherhood; undoubtedly she had greatly increased pain when she lost Abel at her son Cain's hand.
Fourth, a mitigated curse was pronounced on Adam and the ground. Adam would experience painful toil and sweat as food was cultivated in a thorn- and thistle-infested ground.
Fifth, Adam and Eve were also informed that although they could be spiritually restored (delivered from spiritual death), they would experience physical death. They would be returned to the dust of the earth.
Sixth, while the mitigated curse was surely executed, an absolute curse on Adam and Eve and on the natural world would not be. God's covenant with creation would continue. Adam and Eve would continue as covenantal vicegerentsalthough in a weakened condition.
God revealed that although his wisdom, love, goodness, integrity, sovereignty, and majesty had been assaulted by Satan and violated by Adam and Eve, in his infinite compassion and with his unsurpassing power and authority he would destroy Satan and his dominion. He would undo the fall by providing full redemption and restoration through the mediatorial work of the seed of the woman, his incarnate Son, Jesus Christ, who would serve as the second Adam.
Gerard Van Groningen
See also Adam ; Eve ; Genesis, Theology of
Bibliography . H. Bavinck, Our Reasonable Faith ; W. Broomall, The Encyclopedia of Christianity, 4:170-74; A. A. Hoekema, Created in God's Image ; P. E. Hughes, The True Image ; J. Murray, ZPEB, 2:492-94; N. Shepherd, BEB, 2:765-67; G. Vos, Biblical Theology .
Webster's Dictionary - Fall
(1):
(v. t.) To cease to be erect; to take suddenly a recumbent posture; to become prostrate; to drop; as, a child totters and falls; a tree falls; a worshiper falls on his knees.
(2):
(v. t.) To cease to be active or strong; to die away; to lose strength; to subside; to become less intense; as, the wind falls.
(3):
(v. t.) To find a final outlet; to discharge its waters; to empty; - with into; as, the river Rhone falls into the Mediterranean.
(4):
(v. t.) To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin; to depart from the faith; to apostatize; to sin.
(5):
(v. t.) To become insnared or embarrassed; to be entrapped; to be worse off than before; asm to fall into error; to fall into difficulties.
(6):
(v. t.) To become prostrate and dead; to die; especially, to die by violence, as in battle.
(7):
(v. t.) To decline in power, glory, wealth, or importance; to become insignificant; to lose rank or position; to decline in weight, value, price etc.; to become less; as, the falls; stocks fell two points.
(8):
(v. t.) To Descend, either suddenly or gradually; particularly, to descend by the force of gravity; to drop; to sink; as, the apple falls; the tide falls; the mercury falls in the barometer.
(9):
(v. t.) To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; - said of the countenance.
(10):
(v. t.) To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; - said of the young of certain animals.
(11):
(v. t.) To be overthrown or captured; to be destroyed.
(12):
(n.) The act of felling or cutting down.
(13):
(v. t.) To happen; to to come to pass; to light; to befall; to issue; to terminate.
(14):
(v. t.) To come; to occur; to arrive.
(15):
(v. t.) To pass somewhat suddenly, and passively, into a new state of body or mind; to become; as, to fall asleep; to fall into a passion; to fall in love; to fall into temptation.
(16):
(v. t.) To begin with haste, ardor, or vehemence; to rush or hurry; as, they fell to blows.
(17):
(v. t.) To pass or be transferred by chance, lot, distribution, inheritance, or otherwise; as, the estate fell to his brother; the kingdom fell into the hands of his rivals.
(18):
(v. t.) To belong or appertain.
(19):
(v. t.) To be dropped or uttered carelessly; as, an unguarded expression fell from his lips; not a murmur fell from him.
(20):
(v. t.) To let fall; to drop.
(21):
(v. t.) To sink; to depress; as, to fall the voice.
(22):
(v. t.) To diminish; to lessen or lower.
(23):
(v. t.) To bring forth; as, to fall lambs.
(24):
(v. t.) To fell; to cut down; as, to fall a tree.
(25):
(n.) The act of falling; a dropping or descending be the force of gravity; descent; as, a fall from a horse, or from the yard of ship.
(26):
(n.) The act of dropping or tumbling from an erect posture; as, he was walking on ice, and had a fall.
(27):
(n.) Death; destruction; overthrow; ruin.
(28):
(n.) Downfall; degradation; loss of greatness or office; termination of greatness, power, or dominion; ruin; overthrow; as, the fall of the Roman empire.
(29):
(n.) The surrender of a besieged fortress or town ; as, the fall of Sebastopol.
(30):
(n.) Diminution or decrease in price or value; depreciation; as, the fall of prices; the fall of rents.
(31):
(n.) A sinking of tone; cadence; as, the fall of the voice at the close of a sentence.
(32):
(n.) Declivity; the descent of land or a hill; a slope.
(33):
(n.) Descent of water; a cascade; a cataract; a rush of water down a precipice or steep; - usually in the plural, sometimes in the singular; as, the falls of Niagara.
(34):
(n.) The discharge of a river or current of water into the ocean, or into a lake or pond; as, the fall of the Po into the Gulf of Venice.
(35):
(n.) Extent of descent; the distance which anything falls; as, the water of a stream has a fall of five feet.
(36):
(n.) The season when leaves fall from trees; autumn.
(37):
(n.) That which falls; a falling; as, a fall of rain; a heavy fall of snow.
(38):
(n.) Lapse or declension from innocence or goodness. Specifically: The first apostasy; the act of our first parents in eating the forbidden fruit; also, the apostasy of the rebellious angels.
(39):
(n.) Formerly, a kind of ruff or band for the neck; a falling band; a faule.
(40):
(n.) That part (as one of the ropes) of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting.
(41):
(v. t.) To sink; to languish; to become feeble or faint; as, our spirits rise and fall with our fortunes.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Fall
FALL . The story of the Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 is the immediate sequel to the account of man’s creation with which the Jahwistic document opens (see Creation). It tells how the first man and woman, living in childlike innocence and happiness in the Garden of Eden, were tempted by the subtle serpent to doubt the goodness of their Creator, and aim at the possession of forbidden knowledge by tasting the fruit of the one tree of which they had been expressly charged not to eat. Their transgression was speedily followed by detection and punishment; on the serpent was laid the curse of perpetual enmity between it and mankind; the woman was doomed to the pains of child-bearing: and the man to unremitting toil in the cultivation of the ground, which was cursed on account of his sin. Finally, lest the man should use his newly-acquired insight to secure the boon of immortality by partaking of the tree of life, he was expelled from the garden, which appears to be conceived as still existing, though barred to human approach by the cherubim and the flaming sword.
It is right to point out that certain incongruities of representation suggest that two slightly varying narratives have been combined in the source from which the passage is taken (J [1] ). The chief difficulty arises in connexion with the two trees on which the destiny of mankind is made to turn. In Genesis 2:9 the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil grow together in the midst of the garden; in Genesis 2:17 the second alone is made the test of man’s obedience. But ch. 3 (down to Genesis 2:22 ) knows of only one central tree, and that obviously (though it is never so named) the tree of knowledge. The tree of life plays no real part in the story except in Genesis 3:22 ; Genesis 3:24 ; and its introduction there creates embarrassment; for if this tree also was forbidden, the writer’s silence regarding the prohibition is inexplicable, and if it was not forbidden, can we suppose that the Divine prerogative of immortality was placed within man’s reach during the period of his probation? The hypothesis of a twofold recension of the Paradise story, while relieving this difficulty, would be of interest as showing that the narrative had undergone a development in Hebrew literature; but it does not materially aid the exegesis of the passage. The main narrative, which is complete, is that which speaks of the tree of knowledge; the other, if it be present at all, is too fragmentary to throw light on the fundamental ideas embodied in the story.
That this profoundly suggestive narrative is a literal record of a historic occurrence is an opinion now generally abandoned even by conservative theologians; and the view which tends to prevail amongst modern expositors is that the imagery is derived from the store of mythological traditions common to the Semitic peoples. It is true that no complete Babylonian parallel has yet been discovered; the utmost that can be claimed is that particular elements or motives of the Biblical story seem to be reflected in some of the Babylonian legends, and still more in the religious symbolism displayed on the monuments (tree of life, serpent, cherubim, etc.). These coincidences are sufficiently striking to suggest the inference that a mythical account of man’s original condition and his fall existed in Babylonia, and had obtained wide currency in the East. It is a reasonable conjecture that such a legend, ‘stripped of its primitive polytheism, and retaining only faint traces of what was probably its original mythological character, formed the material setting which was adapted by the [2] narrator for the purpose of exhibiting, under a striking and vivid imaginative form, the deep spiritual truths which he was inspired to discern’ (Driver). These spiritual truths, in which the real significance of the narrative lies, we must endeavour very briefly to indicate.
(1) The story offers, on the face of it, an explanation of the outstanding ills that flesh is heir to: the hard, toilsome lot of the husbandman, the travail of the woman and her subjection to man, the universal fate of death. These evils, it is taught, are inconsistent with the ideal of human life, and contrary to the intention of a good God. Man, as originally created, was exempt from them; and to the question, Whence came they? the answer is that they are the effect of a Divine curse to which the race is subject; though it is to be noted that no curse is pronounced on the first pair, but only on the serpent as the organ of temptation, and the ground which is cursed for man’s sake .
(2) The consequences of the curse are the penalty of a single sin, by which man incurred the just anger of God. The author’s conception of sin may be considered from two points of view. Formally, it is the transgression of a Divine commandment, involving distrust of the wisdom and goodness of the Almighty, and breaking the harmony which had subsisted between man and his Maker. The process by which these evil thoughts are insinuated into the mind of the woman is described with a masterly insight into the psychology of temptation which is unsurpassed in literature. But it is a mistake to suppose that the essence of the sin consists in the merely formal disobedience to a command arbitrarily imposed as a test of fidelity. There was a reason for the Divine injunction, and a reason for man’s transgression of it; and the reasons are unambiguously indicated. To eat of the tree would make man like God, knowing good and evil; and God does not wish man to be like Himself. The essence of the sin is therefore presumption, an overstepping of the limits of creaturehood, and an encroachment on the prerogatives of Deity.
(3) What, then, is meant by the ‘knowledge of good and evil,’ which was acquired by eating of the tree? Does it mean simply an enlargement of experience such as the transition from childhood to maturity naturally brings with it, and of which the feeling of shame (Genesis 3:7 ) is the significant index? Or is it, as has generally been held, the experimental knowledge of moral distinctions, the awaking of the conscience, the faculty of discerning between right and wrong? It is very difficult to say which of these interpretations expresses the thought in the mind of the writer. It is in accordance with Hebrew idiom to hold that knowledge of good and evil is equivalent to knowledge in general; though it is of course not certain that that is the sense in which the phrase is here used. On the other hand, there is nothing to show that it refers to the moral sense; and the fact that neither of the ways in which the newly acquired faculty manifests itself (the perception of sex, and insight into the mystic virtue of the tree of life, Genesis 3:22 ) is a distinctively ethical cognition, rather favours the opinion that the knowledge referred to is the power to discern the secret meanings of things and utilize them for human ends, regardless of the will and purpose of God the knowledge, in short, which is the principle of a godless civilization. The idea may be that succinctly expressed by the writer of Ecclesiastes: ‘God made man upright; but they have sought out many inventions’ ( Ecclesiastes 7:29 ).
(4) One specific feature of the story remains to be considered, namely, the rôle assigned to the serpent, and his character. The identification of the serpent with the devil appears first in the Apocryphal literature ( Wis 2:24 ); in the narrative itself he is simply the most subtle of the creatures that God has made ( Genesis 3:1 ), and there is not the slightest reason to suppose that he is there regarded as the mouthpiece of the evil spirit. At the same time it is impossible to escape the impression that the serpent is conceived as a malevolent being, designedly insinuating suspicion of God into the minds of our first parents, and inciting them to an act which will frustrate the Divine purpose regarding mankind. There is thus a certain ambiguity in the representation of the serpent, which may have its source in some more primitive phase of the legend; but which also points the way, under the influence of a deeper apprehension of the nature of moral evil than had been attained in the time of the writer, to that identification of the serpent with the Evil One which we find in the NT ( Romans 16:20 , Revelation 12:9 ; Revelation 20:2 ). In the same way, and with the same justification, the reflexion of later ages read into the curse on the serpent ( Genesis 3:15 ) the promise of ultimate redemption from the power of evil through the coming of Christ. Strictly interpreted, the words imply nothing more than a perpetual antagonism between the human race and the repulsive reptiles which excite its instinctive antipathy. It is only the general scope of the passage that can be thought to warrant the inference that the victory is to be on the side of humanity; and it is a still higher flight of religious inspiration to conceive of that victory as culminating in the triumph of Him whose mission it was to destroy the works of the devil.
J. Skinner.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Fall
Esther 6:13 (a) This expression is used to describe the defeat of Haman at the hands of the Jews. He would be deposed from his high and exalted position in the kingdom. This of course took place soon. (See Psalm 5:10; Psalm 141:10).
Esther 9:3 (a) The word is used to describe the great fear and apprehension that fell upon the people because of the power given to Mordecai, the Jew.
Proverbs 26:27 (a) This act is used to describe the conditions of that one who is caught in his own evil schemes and is injured by the plot which he intended for others.
Hebrews 6:6 (a) The action referred to in this passage has no reference whatever to a Christian. It refers to one who has attached himself to Christianity as glasses are attached to the face, or as earrings are attached to the ears. The ears never fall away, nor does the nose, for they are a part of the body. The Christian is a part of the body of JESUS CHRIST, as is described fully in Ephesians. Professing Christians are attached to the church, or the people of GOD, as Judas was, but they are not a part of that living group known as the Church of JESUS CHRIST, or the body of the Lord JESUS. There are those who profess to be saved but have never really been born again. They pretend to adhere to the doctrines of CHRIST, but under pressure and persecution they turn their backs on CHRIST and repudiate that which they pretended at one time to believe.
King James Dictionary - Fall
FALL, pret. fell pp. fallen. L. fallo, to fail, to deceive, Gr. Heb. to fall. Fail agrees better with Heb., but these words may have had one primitive root, the sense of which was to move, to recede, to pass. See Foul.
1. To drop from a higher place to descend by the power of gravity alone. Rain falls from the clouds a man falls from his horse ripe fruits fall from trees an ox falls into a pit. I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven. Luke 10 .
2. To drop from an erect posture. I fell at his feet to worship him. Revelation 19 .
3. To disembogue to pass at the outlet to flow out of its channel into a pond, lake or sea, as a river. The Rhone falls into the Mediterranean sea. The Danube falls into the Euxine. The Mississippi falls into the gulf of Mexico. 4. To depart from the faith, or from rectitude to apostatize. Adam fell by eating the forbidden fruit. Labor to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief. Hebrews 4 .
5. To die particularly by violence. Ye shall chase your enemies, and they shall fall before you by the sword. Leviticus 26 .
A thousand shall fall at thy side. Psalms 91 .
6. To come to an end suddenly to vanish to perish. The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished.
7. To be degraded to sink into disrepute or disgrace to be plunged into misery as, to fall from an elevated station, or from a prosperous state. 8. To decline in power, wealth or glory to sink into weakness to be overthrown or ruined. This is the renowned Tyre but oh, how fallen. Heaven and earth will witness, if Rome must fall, that we are innocent.
9. To pass into a worse state than the former to come as, to fall into difficulties to fall under censure of imputation to fall into error or absurdity to fall into a snare. In these and similar phrases, the sense of suddenness, accident or ignorance is often implied but not always. 10. To sink to be lowered. The mercury in a thermometer rises and falls with the increase and diminution of heat. The water of a river rises and falls. The tide falls. 11. To decrease to be diminished in weight or value. The price of goods falls with plenty and rises with scarcity. Pliny tells us, the as fell from a pound to two ounces in the first Punic war. 12. To sink not to amount to the full. The greatness of finances and revenue doth fall under computation.
13. To be rejected to sink into disrepute. This book must stand or fall with thee.
14. To decline from violence to calmness from intensity to remission. The wind falls and a calm succeeds. At length her fury fell.
15. To pass into a new state of body or mind to become as, to fall asleep to fall distracted to fall sick to fall into rage or passion to fall in love to fall into temptation. 16. To sink into an air of dejection, discontent, anger, sorrow or shame applied to the countenance or look. Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell. Genesis 4 .
I have observed of late thy looks are fallen.
17. To happen to befall to come. Since this fortune falls to you.
18. To light on to come by chance. The Romans fell on this model by chance.
19. To come to rush on to assail. Fear and dread shall fall on them. Exodus 15 .
And fear fell on them all. Acts 19 .
20. To come to arrive. The vernal equinox, which at the Nicene council fell on the 21st of March, falls now about ten days sooner.
21. To come unexpectedly. It happened this evening that we fell into a pleasing walk.
22. To begin with haste, ardor or vehemence to rush or hurry to. They fell to blows. The mixt multitude fell to lusting. Numbers 11 .
23. To pass or be transferred by chance, lot, distribution, inheritance or otherwise, as possession or property. The estate or the province fell to his brother. The kingdom fell into the hands of his rival. A large estate fell to his heirs. 24. To become the property of to belong or appertain to. If to her share some female errors fall.
Look in her face and you'll forget them all.
25. To be dropped or uttered carelessly. Some expressions fell from him. An unguarded expression fell from his lips. Not a word fell from him on the subject. 26. To sink to languish to become feeble or faint. Our hopes and fears rise and fall with good or success. 27. To be brought forth. Take care of lambs when they first fall. 28. To issue to terminate. Sit still, my daughter, till thou knowest how the matter will fall. Ruth 3 .
To fall aboard of, to strike against another ship.
To fall astern, to move or be driven backward or to remain behind. A ship falls astern by the force of a current, or when outsailed by another.
1. To fall away, to lose flesh to become lean or emaciated to pine. 2. To renounce or desert allegiance to revolt or rebel. 3. To renounce or desert the faith to apostatize to sink into wickedness. These for awhile believe, and in time of temptation fall away. Luke 8 .
4. To perish to be ruined to be lost. How can the soul - fall away into nothing.
5. To decline gradually to fade to languish, or become faint. One color falls away by just degrees, and another rises insensibly.
1. To fall back, to recede to give way. 2. To fail of performing a promise or purpose not to fulfill. To fall calm, to cease to blow to become calm.
1. To fall down, to prostrate one's self in worship. All nations shall fall down before him. Psalms 72 .
2. To sink to come to the ground. Down fell the beauteous youth.
3. To bend or bow as a suppliant. Isaiah 14 . 4. To sail or pass towards the mouth of a river, or other outlet. To fall foul, to attack to make an assault.
1. To fall from, to recede from to depart not to adhere as, to fall from an agreement or engagement. 2. To depart from allegiance or duty to revolt. 1. To fall in, to concur to agree with. The measure falls in with popular opinion. 2. To comply to yield to. You will find it difficult to persuade learned men to fall in with your projects.
3. To come in to join to enter. Fall into the ranks fall in on the right. To fall in with, to meet, as a ship also, to discover or come near, as land.
1. To fall off, to withdraw to separate to be broken or detached. friends fall off in adversity. Love cools, friendship falls off, brothers divide.
2. To perish to die away. Words fall off by disuse. 3. To apostatize to forsake to withdraw from the faith, or from allegiance or duty. Those captive tribes fell off from God to worship calves.
4. To forsake to abandon. His subscribers fell off. 5. To drop. Fruits fall off when ripe. 6. To depreciate to depart from former excellence to become less valuable or interesting. The magazine or the review falls off it has fallen off. 7. To deviate or depart from the course directed, or to which the head of the ship was before directed to fall to leeward. 1. To fall on, to begin suddenly and eagerly. Fall on, and try thy appetite to eat.
2. To begin an attack to assault to assail. Fall on, fall on and hear him not.
3. To drop on to descend on. 1. To fall out, to quarrel to begin to contend. A soul exasperated in ills, falls out with every thing, its friend, itself -
2. To happen to befall to chance. There fell out a bloody quarrel betwixt the frogs and the mice.
1. To fall over, to revolt to desert from one side to another. 2. To fall beyond. To fall short, to be deficient. The corn falls short. We all fall short in duty.
1. To fall to, to begin hastily and eagerly. Fall to, with eager joy, on homely food.
2. To apply one's self to. He will never after fall to labor. They fell to raising money, under pretense of the relief of Ireland.
1. To fall under, to come under, or within the limits of to be subjected to. They fell under the jurisdiction of the emperor. 2. To come under to become the subject of. This point did not fall under the cognizance or deliberations of the court. These things do not fall under human sight or observation. 3. To come within to be ranged or reckoned with. These substances fall under a different class or order. 1. To upon, to attack. See to fall on. 2. To rush against. Fall primarily denotes descending motion, either in a perpendicular or inclined direction, and in most of its applications, implies literally or figuratively velocity, haste, suddenness or violence. Its use is so various and so much diversified by modifying words, that it is not easy to enumerate its senses in all its applications.
FALL,
1. To let fall to drop. And fall thy edgeless sword. I am willing to fall this argument. This application is obsolete.
2. To sink to depress as, to raise or fall the voice. 3. To diminish to lessen or lower as, to fall the price of commodities. Little used. 4. To bring forth as, to fall lambs. Little used. 5. To fell to cut down as, to fall a tree. This use is now common in America, and fell and fall are probably from a common root. FALL, n.
1. The act of dropping or descending from a higher to a lower place by gravity descent as a fall from a horse or from the yard of a ship. 2. The act of dropping or tumbling from an erect posture. he was walking on ice and had a fall. 3. Death destruction overthrow. Our fathers had a great fall before our enemies.
4. Ruin destruction. They conspire thy fall.
5. Downfall degradation loss of greatness or office as the fall of Cardinal Wolsey. Behold thee glorious only in thy fall.
6. Declension of greatness, power or dominion ruin as the fall of the Roman empire. 7. Diminution decrease of price or value depreciation as the fall of prices the fall of rents the fall of interest. 8. Declination of sound a sinking of tone cadence as the fall of the voice at the close of a sentence. 9. Declivity the descent of land or a hill a slope. 10. Descent of water a cascade a cataract a rush of water down a steep place usually in the plural sometimes in the singular as the falls of Niagara, or the Mohawk the fall of the Hoosatonuc at Canaan. Fall is applied to a perpendicular descent, or to one that is very steep. When the descent is moderate, we name it rapids. Custom, however, sometimes deviates from this rule, and the rapids of rivers are called falls. 11. The outlet or discharge of a river or current of water into the ocean, or into a lake or pond as the fall of the Po into the gulf of Venice. 12. Extent of descent the distance which any thing falls as, the water of a pond has a fall of five feet. 13. The fall of the leaf the season when leaves fall from trees autumn. 14. That which falls a falling as a fall of rain or snow. 15. The act of felling or cutting down as the fall of timber. 16. Fall, or the fall, by way of distinction, the apostasy the act of our first parents in eating the forbidden fruit also, the apostasy of the rebellious angels. 17. Formerly, a kind of vail. 18. In seamen's language, the loose end of a tackle. 19. In Great Britain, a term applied to several measures, linear, superficial and solid.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Fall, the
The fall is that event in the Garden of Eden where Adam and Eve disobeyed the command of God and ate of The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (Genesis 2:1-25; Gen 3:1-24). Since Adam represented all of mankind, when He sinned, all of mankind fell with Him (Romans 5:12).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Fall (2)
FALL.—The various questions suggested in regard to the relation of the Fall to Jesus Christ may be treated under the following heads:
i.The Messianic element in the story of the Fall.
ii.The Fall in its bearing on the work of Christ in (1) the Incarnation, (2) its redemptive aspects.
iii.The Fall in its bearing on the Person of Christ.
iv.Our Lord’s own teaching (or that of the Gospels) on the Fall.
i. The Messianic element in the story of the fall.—It is not within the scope of this Dictionary to discuss the general character of the OT narrative of the Fall. We may here simply assume as accepted the view that in Genesis 3 we have an account, cast in the pictorial form characteristic of the period to which it belongs, of the beginning of human sin, with its attendant evils of suffering and death. Whatever opinion may be held as to the literary materials and composition of the narrative, it commends itself as in all essential features a unique and authoritative record of great fundamental facts of human life and history; and its Divine inspiration is sufficiently attested by the profound truthfulness and significance of its moral and religious teaching.
In the midst of this story of sin and judgment we find the first promise of restoration, and thus the Divine purpose of redemption is brought into association with the very beginnings of human evil. ‘I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed: it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel’ (Genesis 3:15). That this utterance contains the germ of Messianic prophecy cannot be doubted; but care must be taken to make neither too much nor too little of this element in it, and to interpret the passage in accordance with sound principles of historical exegesis, with due reference to the context, and to the general characteristics of OT prophecy. The embodiment of this Protevangelium in the primitive religious tradition, and in the inspired record of it, is a testimony to the fact that the Divine purpose of redemption is coeval with the existence of human sin. From the time when the consciousness of guilt and corruption first dawned in the human heart, there was also present the hope of restoration, and of man’s ultimate triumph over those powers of evil by which he had been temporarily vanquished. This is the germ of which all the redemptive promise and prophecy of the OT are the development. Three progressive ideas may be traced in the teaching of the passage. (1) Under the symbolism of the repulsion with which the serpent species is regarded, there is conveyed the truth that there would be continual and deadly conflict between the human race and the powers of evil, each seeking to destroy the other. (2) The hopeful element in the struggle is indicated, and man’s final victory suggested, by the specific way in which the conflict is described—‘It shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.’ (3) There underlies the statement with regard to mankind in general the remoter and deeper significance applicable to the representative Man, in and through whom the warfare was to be brought to a crisis and a victorious issue.
The order of these points may also be taken as indicating the line along which the full meaning of the saying would unfold itself. It is one of those pregnant utterances of revelation whose content is gradually realized and defined by the progress of events. The Messianic ideas contained in it are as yet vague and general, yet real; rudimentary, but fundamental; implicit rather than explicit; yet enough to keep a spark of hope alive, and to inspire faith and effort till clearer light came in the providential unfolding of God’s redemptive plan.
ii. The Fall in relation to the work of Christ.—The fact of man’s fallen condition, of which the narrative of Genesis 3 is the historical explanation, is the raison d’être of redemption, and thus the Fall is very closely related to the whole work of Christ at every point. But it is with the effects rather than with the manner or history of the Fall that the gospel is supremely concerned, and after the story has once for all been given at the beginning of revelation, it is thereafter but little referred to in Scripture, and is scarcely ever brought into direct relation with redemption, except in two classical passages in the writings of St. Paul, viz. in Romans 5 and 1 Corinthians 15. Our attention will here be confined to those points in which the Fall comes into more direct relation with the work of Christ, or in which the fall of man in Adam and his restoration in Christ serve to illuminate each other.
1. The relation of the Fall to the Incarnation.—The question here raised is between the two views expressed respectively by the words of Augustine, ‘Si homo non pecasset, filius Dei non esset incarnatus,’ and of Andreas Osiander, ‘Etiamsi homo non pecasset, Deus tamen incarnatus esset licet non crucifixus.’ The common belief has hitherto been that the whole mission and work of Christ were solely conditioned by the Fall. But the other view with regard to the Incarnation, maintained by the Scotists in the Middle Ages and by other distinguished thinkers, has of late gained fresh currency, especially in connexion with modern evolutionary philosophy. The relation of the Fall to the Incarnation determines the place of the latter in the plan of redemption, and opens up the question whether the Incarnation was subsidiary to the Atonement, or the Atonement a development and modification of the Incarnation.
(i.) The view that an Incarnation was, independently of sin, the consummation of God’s purpose in relation to mankind, has been supported by arguments which can here only be briefly mentioned.
(a) The metaphysical argument that a possibility of becoming man must have existed eternally in the being of God, otherwise no incarnation could have taken place. In other words, there was in God a ‘self-disposition’ for incarnation, a necessity (ethical, not metaphysical) for God, who is love, to make a perfect self-communication to His moral and spiritual creatures.
(b) The very conception of the Mediator in redemption implies a necessary and eternal relation both to God and to man, which, even apart from sin, would have found its issue in incarnation. The Mediator is necessary for the perfecting of the world no less than for its redemption, and has a cosmical significance wider and deeper than His work as Redeemer.
(c) As Christ is necessary for the world’s perfection, the incarnation may be held to be involved in the ‘eternal idea of the world.’ This is the counterpart of the preceding arguments, and is as old as Irenaeus. It means that man has in his very nature a need and a capacity for Christ, corresponding to God’s self-communicating love, and this quite apart from sin.
(d) To base the incarnation solely on the need of redemption, is to make Christ a means and not an end in Himself, or, in more modern language, to reduce the most glorious manifestation of God for the perfecting of humanity to an expedient contingent upon the untoward incident of sin. In Christ alone, as the centre and end, is the highest possible for man realized; if this were dependent on the Fall, then sin would be a ‘felix culpa’ in the most emphatic sense.
(e) These somewhat speculative lines of reasoning are not without Scripture warrant. In such passages as Colossians 1:15 ff. and Ephesians 1:9-10 f. we have at least a suggestion of a grand Christo-centric plan for the universe, antecedent to, and occupying a plane quite above, the contingency of human sin. Christ is here presented in relation to the Universe as ‘the firstborn of all creation,’ in whom and unto whom all things were created, in whom all things hold together, and who becomes also the ‘head of the body, the Church,’ and ‘the firstborn from the dead.’ It was God’s eternal purpose ‘to sum up all things in Christ,’ ‘in whom also we were made a heritage’ (cf. also John 1:3, Hebrews 1:2, 1 Corinthians 8:6, Revelation 3:14 etc.). Redemption is here presented as something which forms a harmonious part of a larger plan. Christ is at once the Alpha and the Omega, the medium and the end of creation, the beginning and the consummation of God’s eternal purpose.
(ii.) The commonly received view that the Incarnation is simply a necessary part of the work of redemption, is supported by the prima facie teaching of Scripture. ‘The Son of man came to seek and to save’ (Luke 19:10); ‘God sent forth his Son … that he might redeem’ (Galatians 4:4 f.). These are examples of innumerable passages which represent the mission of Christ in this light. But to this it may be answered that, though historically and actually the Incarnation has taken this redemptive aspect, and is naturally and properly so presented in the Gospel, another view of it, under different conditions, is not excluded, of which, as we have seen, we are in fact permitted brief glimpses in a wider field of vision.
(iii.) Both the foregoing views may be united and harmonized in what is really the truest and deepest conception, viz. that God’s purpose is an eternal and unchangeable unity, and every part of it, as wrought out in history, must be regarded as having its proper place in relation to the whole. It is by a misunderstanding of the absolute being and counsels of God that we discuss at all questions as to what might have been done under other conditions. The view of the question before us which is most worthy of a true conception of God, and which at the same time agrees with the broad teaching of Scripture, is that in the infinite counsels of Him who sees the end from the beginning, Redemption is wrought into the very fabric of God’s eternal purpose, all parts of which—Creation, Redemption, Incarnation, Atonement, the Final Consummation,—hang together harmoniously as integral and correlated elements in one homogeneous, perfect, and unchangeable unity. The question as to the relation of the Fall to the Incarnation thus resolves itself into that of the place of the Fall in God’s plan of the world; and we need not hold with hyper-Calvinists that sin was foreordained, in order to believe that the Fall, foreseen and permitted, enters into an intimate and essential relation to the whole of the Divine plan. In this plan Incarnation holds a central place, and its redemptive significance is one aspect of a wider relation to the world, as the means for perfecting as well as for redeeming the human race. This view preserves the place of Redemption in the foreground of God’s revealed plan, avoids the necessity of conceiving any change in the Divine purpose contingent upon sin, and at the same time gives the Incarnation that cosmical significance worthy of its transcendent character. Thus Christ is central and supreme, and the whole scheme of Redemption is presented in a true perspective, more in harmony with the requirements of modern thought.
2. The relation of the Fall to the redemptive work of Christ.—In the distinctively soteriological aspects of Christ’s work, we are brought at once into close relation to the Fall. We have here to consider (i.) the reality and general nature of the Fall, as seen in the light of Redemption; and (ii.) the main points of detail in which the Fall and the redeeming work of Christ explain and illustrate each other.
(i.) The doctrine of the Fall is vital to the Christian system; the reality and general nature of the Fall, as a great downward and retrograde step in the history of mankind, are confirmed and illustrated by the redemptive work of Christ. This aspect of Christ’s work, which occupies in Scripture the foremost place, is everywhere represented as rendered necessary by something grievously abnormal in the condition of the human race. The Scripture doctrine of sin as absolute evil; man’s universal sinfulness, helplessness, and state of spiritual death, which form the very basis of Redemption; the representation of mankind as ‘lost,’ ‘alienated’ from God, and yet capable and worthy of being redeemed and restored;—all this, as so abundantly presented and emphasized in connexion with the atoning work of Christ, affords the strongest confirmation of the doctrine that man has fallen from a higher condition. Whatever may be said as to the Incarnation (see 1, above), it is clear that the great outstanding fact of the Atonement, with all the suffering and sacrifice which it involved, can only be accounted for at once by the dignity and the degradation of man,—in other words, by the Fall.
(ii.) This is borne out by the more specific teaching in regard to the Fall in its relation to the work of Christ in Romans 5:12-21 and 1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49. The general and clear line of argument in the former passage brings out the following points:
Adam’s act of disobedience involved all men in (a) Sin, and (b) Death. By sin is here meant both actual sinfulness (‘for that all sinned,’ Romans 5:12), and a condition of liability to penalty even apart from personal transgression (Romans 5:14). This latter, however, is not to be held in any sense as personal participation in or responsibility for Adam’s offence, though it is the transmitted effect of it (see below). Death here apparently means physical death in the first place (as in Romans 5:14), but most probably includes also spiritual death. On the other hand, though the analogy is not fully expressed, it is clearly implied that in the same way Christ’s act of obedience brings (a) Justification and (b) Life; and in view of the emphatic reiteration, in various forms, of the surpassing fulness of Redemption in Romans 5:15-17, we may include under these terms: negatively, deliverance from guilt, from sin itself, and from death; and positively, the bestowment of judicial and actual righteousness, and of spiritual and eternal life.
Another question raised in this connexion is concerned with the precise moral relationship between Adam and his posterity on the one hand, and between Christ and His people on the other. Adam and Christ (‘the second Adam’) are represented as standing in an analogous relation to mankind, forming the basis in the one case of universal sin and death, and in the other of restoration for believers. In regard to Adam it has been variously held (1) that the relation between him and his posterity was virtually one of identity; mankind sinned in him and therefore share his guilt; (2) that the relation is representative or federal, Adam acting on behalf of his descendants; and (3) that the relation is natural, the evil effects of Adam’s fall being communicated to the race through the ordinary channels of heredity. The third view preserves any elements of truth in the other two, while it best explains the facts in harmony with true ethical principles. The transmitted effect of Adam’s sin consists mainly of the loss of moral balance, an inborn tendency of heart and will towards evil, a disability, though not a total inability, for goodness. Though men are not personally implicated in the guilt of Adam’s transgression, their condition involves demerit and necessitates redemption.* [1] Turning to the other side, though we are not warranted in carrying the analogy too far, we find on the part of Christ (1) a relation of identity with the race through the Incarnation; (2) a representative or covenant relation with His people (see 2 Corinthians 5:21 etc.), based on the one side on God’s free grace, and on the other on believers’ voluntary acceptance of it (Romans 5:17); and (3) a vital union between Christ and believers by which new life is imparted and the evil effects of the Fall counteracted (John 15:1-6 etc.).
Christ is thus a new beginning for the fallen race, a fountain of life and righteousness, as Adam was of death and sin. Adam was a true ‘figure of him that was to come,’ a type based not on mere analogy, but on deep and real correspondences between his relation as ‘psychical’ parent to his natural descendants, and Christ’s relation to His people as the ‘second Adam,’ the ‘spiritual’ originator of a regenerated race.† [2]
iii. The Fall in relation to the Person of Christ.—The Fall of Adam, as we have seen, introduced into the nature of all descended from him a fatal taint of sin, an insuperable moral disability. The question now before us is, How did Jesus Christ, the new Adam, as a true member of the fallen race, escape this evil influence? That Christ in His nature and Person was absolutely free from sin, is one of the clearest and most generally admitted as well as most vital facts of the gospel. Born into the world in the line of human descent, sharing human nature otherwise in its fulness, how was Jesus alone unaffected by the common heritage of sin?
The full answer to this question lies hidden in the mystery of the Incarnation; but an indication of the line in which the solution lies is given in the great fact of the Virgin Birth of our lord. The historical reality of this part of the Gospel narrative has been assailed by modern criticism, but the doctrine still retains its place in the best philosophy of the Incarnation, and the truth has been rather confirmed than otherwise by impartial study of the records. As a fact, the birth of Jesus in a supernatural manner commends itself as peculiarly in keeping with the whole scheme of redemption. (1) It indicates a new departure, a fresh beginning, the introduction into the human race of a new element, and marks a break in the normal and fatal continuity of spiritual helplessness and decay. (2) It suggests, though it does not fully explain, means by which Christ could become true man and yet be preserved from the hereditary effects of the Fall. ‘The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Most High shall overshadow thee: wherefore also that which is to be born shall be called holy, the Son of God’ (Luke 1:35). Those who deny the Virgin Birth have still to explain the equally miraculous fact of the appearance of this single exception to the universal sinfulness of mankind. The manner of Christ’s birth, as recorded in the Gospels of Mt. and Lk., is so fully in harmony with His unique personality and character, that, though we cannot fully understand, we may at least be satisfied that all form parts of one Divine plan, and thus the moral miracle and the physical mutually support one another. See art. Virgin Birth.
iv. The Teaching of Christ and of the Gospels on the Fall.—Our Lord makes no reference to the story of the Fall in all His recorded teaching, His only allusion to our first parents at all being the general statement in connexion with marriage (Matthew 19:4, Mark 10:6). But the doctrine of the Fall underlies the whole teaching of Christ on sin and redemption, and is particularly confirmed and illustrated in the following points:
(1) The universal sinfulness of man. This is taken for granted. ‘If ye then, being evil, know,’ etc. (Matthew 7:11, Luke 11:13). This truth is involved in the whole character of our Lord’s mission and teaching. See also John 1:29; John 8:7. (2) The inwardness of sin. ‘Out of the heart come forth evil thoughts,’ etc. ‘… These are the things which defile the man’ (Matthew 15:19-20 and ||). Cf. also Matthew 5:21-28, Mark 10:5, Luke 6:45. (3) The deep radical character of human evil. ‘Ye must be born anew’ (John 3:7 and John 3:3). (4) The hereditary disability of human nature. ‘That which is born of the flesh is flesh,’ etc. (John 3:6; cf. John 1:13). (5) Jesus everywhere indicates clearly His view as to the original dignity and value of man. ‘What shall a man be profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and forfeit his life?’ (Matthew 16:26). Cf. Luke 15:10, Matthew 12:12, etc.; and the general teaching of Jesus as to the Fatherhood of God. (6) The Fall may be said to be pictured for us more specifically in the parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11 ff.), and the corresponding parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Piece of Money in the same chapter. (7) Generally the whole mission of Christ to ransom men (Mark 10:45), to save (Matthew 1:21, Luke 19:10 etc.), and to restore to Divine Sonship (John 1:12), is founded upon the doctrine of the Fall and the state of ruin resulting from it, combined with splendid possibilities of restoration through grace.
Literature.—On OT narrative and Messianic elements: Ryle’s Early Narratives of Genesis; all good Commentaries, such as those of Dillmann, Gunkel, and Driver.
On Fall and Incarnation: Dorner, Person of Christ, vol. iii. pp. 361–369, vol. v. pp. 236–248, also the same author’s Christian Doctrine, vol. iii. pp. 283–299; Martensen, Christian Dogmatics, pp. 258–263; Orr, Christian View of God, etc., pp. 319–327; Westcott, The Gospel of Creation.
On Adam and Christ: Relative sections of treatises on Systematic Theology, such as Dorner, Hodge; Orr’s Christian View; Fairbairn, Christ in Modern Theology; also Sanday-Headlam, Romans (on 5:12–21), and other good Commentaries; Beyschlag, NT Theology, vol. ii.
On Virgin Birth and Sinlessness of Christ: Sanday, Bampton Lectures; Gore, Bampton Lectures: all critical Lives of Christ: Griffith-Jones, Ascent through Christ; and for trustworthiness of Luke’s narrative, Ramsay, Was Christ born at Bethlehem?
On Christ’s teaching: all good treatises, such as Wendt’s; and works on NT Theology, as those of Weiss and Beyschlag.
J. E. M‘Ouat.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Fall
It is now generally recognized by scholars that the story of the Fall in Genesis is to be regarded neither as literal history, as Irenaeus, Tertullian, and Augustine taught, nor as allegory, as Clement and Origen, following Philo, held; but as a myth, common to the Semitic group of religions, in which an attempt is made to explain the origin of the evils from which mankind suffers. This myth has, however, been transformed to bring it into accord with the ‘ethical monotheism’ or the Hebrew religion. For the present purpose, the exposition of the apostolic (in this case exclusively the Pauline) doctrine, it is not necessary to examine any alleged similar myth in other religions, to cite any of the supposed Babylonian parallels, to enter into the details of the narrative in Genesis, or to exhibit the truth under the mythological form, which expositors have found in the story (For all these particulars the articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i. 839, Hastings’ Single-vol. Dictionary of the Bible p. 257, and Dict. of Christ and the Gospels i. 571 may be consulted).
There is no evidence that the teaching of the OT as a whole on the subject of sin was in the slightest degree affected by the narrative in fin 3, as the instances cited to the contrary disappear on closer scrutiny; but the universality of man’s sinfulness is asserted as a fact, although no reason for it is offered. It is only when we come to the apocryphal Jewish literature that the story is given the significance of doctrine. Although, as the evidence from this source shows, Jewish theology in the time of Jesus had taken up the question of the origin of sin and death, yet in the teaching of Jesus there is not the faintest echo of Jewish thought upon the subject. His standpoint is that of the OT, although His revelation of God’s Father-hood and man’s sonship gives to the sin which separates God and man a more tragic import. St. Paul, however, has given a place in his theology to this contemporary Jewish doctrine, and, on account of the light it throws upon his teaching, it will be necessary to examine it more closely.
1. The connexion of St. Paul’s doctrine with Jewish teaching.-(a) While in the OT we have the beginnings, but only the beginnings, of the later doctrine of Satan (Job 1:9-12; Job 2:1-6, the unbeliever in, and slanderer of, man’s goodness and godliness Zechariah 3:1, the adversary of man to hinder God’s grace; 1 Chronicles 21:1, the tempter; cf. 2 Samuel 24:1, where it is the Lord who moves David to number the people), yet it is not till we come to Wisdom of Solomon 2:24 that he is identified with the serpent who tempted Eve: ‘But by the envy of the devil death entered into the world, and they that are of his portion mate trial thereof. This identification is assumed in Romans 16:20 and Revelation 12:9; Revelation 20:2 and is also implied in John 8:44 (cf. 1 John 3:8; 1 John 3:12).
(b) Woman’s share in this tragedy for the race is mentioned in Sirach 25:24 : ‘From a woman was the beginning of sin; and because of her we all die.’ Of this detail of the narrative St. Paul also makes use by way of warning: ‘But I fear, leer by any means, as the serpent beguiled Eve in his craftiness, your minds should be corrupted from the simplicity and the purity that is toward Christ’ (2 Corinthians 11:3). It is not impossible that in this allusion St. Paul has in view the opinion of apocalyptic and Rabbinic writers that the temptation was to unchastity.
‘The thought which pervades this passage is that of conjugal loyalty and fidelity to one husband, and it is difficult to resist the conclusion to which Everling (Die Paulinische Angelologie u. Dämonologie, 51-57) comes in his able discussion of the passage, that the mention of Eve in this connexion in a clause introduced by ὡς, makes it necessary to understand the sin into which she was betrayed as similar to that into which the Corinthian Church is, figuratively speaking, in danger of falling, namely, unchastity and infidelity to her husband’ (H. St. J. Thackeray, The Relation of St. Paul to Contemporary Jewish Thought, 1900, p. 52; cf. Tennant, The Fall and Original Sin, 1903, p. 251).
If this was St. Paul’s belief, it adds force to his argument for woman’s subordination in 1 Timothy 2:14 ‘Adam was not beguiled, but the woman being beguiled hath fallen into transgression.’ Here again St. Paul is either echoing, or in accord with, Jewish thought, for in the Slavonic Secrets of Enoch, xxxi. 6, we read: ‘And on this account he [1] conceived designs against Adam; in such a manner he entered [2] and deceived Eve. But he did not touch Adam’ (cf. Thackeray, op. cit. pp. 51, 52). Such an opinion would explain the harshness of his tone and the hardness of his dealing with women.
(c) These are, however, subordinate features of the narrative; but St. Paul is, in his assertion of human depravity, not only in accord with some of the sayings in the OT, but with such explicit teaching as is found in 2Ezr 4:11 ‘How can he that is already worn out with the corrupted world understand incorruption,’ and 2Ezr 7:68 ‘For all that are born are defiled with iniquities, and are full of sins and laden with offences.’ But such a view does not seem to have been universal, for Edersheim says expressly of the teaching of the Talmud: ‘So far as their opinions can be gathered from their writings, the great doctrines of Original Sin, and of the sinfulness of our whole nature, were not held by the ancient Rabbis’ (LT [3] 4, 1887, i. 165; cf. Sanday-Headlam, Romans 5 [4], p. 137).
(d) Man’s present racial condition is traced back to Adam’s fall (παράπτωμα; Wisdom of Solomon 10:1 ‘Wisdom guarded to the end the first formed father of the world, that was created alone, and delivered him out of his own transgression’). The teaching in Romans 5:12-21 is very fully anticipated in 2 Esdras 3:21-22 : ‘For the first Adam bearing a wicked heart transgressed, and was overcome; and not he only, but all they also that are born of him. Thus disease was made permanent; and the law was in the heart of the people along with the wickedness of the root; so the good departed away, and that which was wicked abode still’; 2 Esdras 4:30 ‘For a grain of evil seed was sown in the heart of Adam from the beginning, and how much wickedness hath it brought forth unto this time! and how much shall it yet bring forth until the time of threshing come!’; 7:118 ‘O thou Adam, what hast thou done? for though it was thou that sinned, the evil is not fallen on thee alone, but upon all of us that come of thee.’ While it is generally assumed that in these passages man’s moral corruption in the sense of inherited depravity is traced to Adam’s transgression as its cause, yet Tennant maintains that the available evidence does not support the view.
‘The only parallels adduced by Sanday and Headlam from approximately contemporary literature are the passages of 4 Ezra [5] relating to the cor malignum. But the cor malignum is certainly the yezer hara of the Rabbis, regarded by Pseudo-Ezra, as well as by talmudic writers, as inherent in Adam from the first, and as the cause, not the consequence, of his fall. St. Paul, curiously enough, nowhere appears to make use of the current doctrine of the evil yezer; certainly not in connexion with the Fall. There would seem to be no evidence that St. Paul held, even in germ, the doctrine of an inherited corruption derived from Adam’ (op. cit. p. 264f.).
To the explicit challenge of a common understanding of St. Paul’s doctrine we must return when dealing with it in detail in the next section; but meanwhile it may be made clear that it is not the assertion of a connexion between Adam’s fall and man’s sinfulness which is denied in these passages, but the inference from them that Adam’s fall is regarded as the cause of moral depravity, and not merely as its first instance.
Support is given to this interpretation of the evidence by Weber’s summary of the teaching of the Talmud (Altsyn. Theol. p. 216, quoted by Sanday-Headlam, op. cit. p. 137): ‘By the Fall man came under a curse, is guilty of death, and his right relation to God is rendered difficult. More than this cannot be said. Sin, to which the bent and leaning had already been planted in man by creation, had become a fact; the “evil impulse” (= cor malignum) gained the mastery over mankind, who can only resist it by the greatest efforts; before the Fall it had had power over him, but no such ascendancy (Uebermacht).’ After this quotation Sanday-Headlam continue the discussion in the words: ‘Hence when the writer says a little further on that according to the Rabbis “there is such a thing as transmission of guilt, but not such a thing as transmission of sin (Es gibt eine Erbschuld, aber keine Erbsünde),” the negative proposition is due chiefly to the clearness with which the Rabbis (like Apoc. Baruch) insist upon free-will and direct individual responsibility’ (op. cit. p. 137f.).
The conclusion to which one is led is that a common doctrine cannot be confidently affirmed; and that if St. Paul does teach that man’s moral nature was changed for the worse by the Fall, he is not following a clearly expressed and generally accepted Jewish doctrine on the subject. The bearing of his distinctive doctrine of the flesh on, and the meaning of, 1 Corinthians 15:47-48 in relation to the Jewish doctrine of the cor malignum must be reserved for subsequent discussion, while the feature referred to in the above quotation may here be illustrated.
(e) There can be no doubt of the distinctness and emphasis with which Jewish thought insists on man’s individual responsibility, sometimes even, it would seem, in opposition to the view of a moral solidarity of the race, as the following passages show: 2 Esdras 3:26 ‘In all things doing even as Adam and all his generation had done: for they also bare a wicked heart’; 8:59, 60 ‘The Most High willed not that man should come to nought: but they which be created have themselves defiled the name of him that made them, and were unthankful unto him which prepared life for them’; 9:11, 12 ‘As many as have scorned my law, while they had yet liberty, and, when as yet place of repentance was open unto them, understood not, but despised it; the same must know it after death by torment.’ The strongest assertion of the exclusion of the derivation of any guilt from Adam is found, however, in Apoc. Bar. liv. 15, 19: ‘For though Adam first sinned and brought untimely death upon all, yet of those who were born from him each one of them has prepared for his own soul torment to come, and again each of them has chosen for himself glories to come.… Adam is therefore not the cause, save only of his own soul, but each one of us has been the Adam of his own soul’ (Charles’s translation in Apoc. and Pseudepig. of the OT, 1913, ii. 511f.). While St. Paul is constant in his assertion of individual liberty, yet he does not think of opposing it to, or trying to harmonize it with, the common sin of the race, sprung from Adam. Either he was not conscious of any contradiction, or regarded it as a problem insoluble by man’s wisdom.
(f) On the connexion between Adam’s sin and the introduction of death there is no such uncertainty in the evidence. The curse that rests on man since the Fall is mentioned in Sirach 40:1 : ‘Great travail is created for many men, and a heavy yoke is upon the sons of Adam.’ The connexion between death and the woman’s sin stated in 25:24 and between death and the devil’s envy affirmed in Wisdom of Solomon 2:24 has already been referred to. More explicit is the reference to the narrative of Genesis in 2 Ezra 3:7 : ‘And unto him thou gavest thy one commandment: which he transgressed, and immediately thou appointedst death for him and in his generation.’ So also the Apoc. Bar. xvii. 3: ‘Adam … brought death and cut off the years of those who were born from him’ (cf. xxiii. 4). There are two passages, however, that seem to teach that man was by nature mortal, and that the Fall only hastened the process; ‘Adam first sinned and brought untimely death (mortem immaturam) upon all’ (liv. 15); and ‘Owing to his transgression untimely death (mors quae non erat tempore eius) came into being’ (lvi. 6). Apart from the two classical passages in St. Paul’s letter on the relation of Christ and Adam in Romans 5 and 1 Corinthians 15, which must be discussed in detail, death is connected with sin as its penalty in Romans 6:23 ‘The wages of sin is death,’ and in James 1:15 ‘Sin, when it is fullgrown, bringeth forth death.’ We must now pass to the discussion of St. Paul’s doctrine of the Fall.
2. St. Paul’s doctrine of the Fall.-Although the classical passage on the subject is Romans 5:12-21, yet there are references to Adam in 1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Corinthians 15:49 which may be briefly examined in so far as they present doctrine supplementary to that in Romans 5.
(a) 1 Corinthians 15:21-22 states the same doctrine. The contrast is emphasized in 1 Corinthians 15:45 by the description of the first Adam, in accordance with the account of his creation in Genesis 2:7, as living soul, while Christ, the last Adam, is a life-giving spirit. Adam was given life by the breath or spirit of God, but could not impart any; Christ not only has life, but gives it. The psychic order of the first Adam necessarily preceded the pneumatic order of the last (1 Corinthians 15:46): so far there is no moral censure of the first Adam implied, and the Apostle’s statement corrects an error into which theological speculation on man’s primitive condition often fell. ‘The Apostle,’ says Godet (ad loc.), ‘does not share the notion, long regarded as orthodox, that humanity was created in a state of moral and physical perfection.… Independently of the Fall, there must have been progress from an inferior state, the psychic, which he posits as man’s point of departure, to a superior state, the spiritual, foreseen and determined as man’s goal from the first’ (quoted by Findlay, Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘1 Cor.,’ 1900, p. 938). This inferior state did not include for St. Paul the cor malignum, which Jewish thought assigned to Adam. It is not so certain that the next statement, ‘The first man is of the earth, earthy: the second man is of heaven’ (Hebrews 7:9-106), refers only to physical origin, and does not indicate moral character.
χοϊκός, as Philippians 3:19, Colossians 3:2 suggest, seems to have a moral connotation. But even if this be so, it does not make certain that St. Paul assigned the yezer hara to the unfallen Adam, as, since the reference in the ‘second man from heaven’ is not to the pre-existent Word, but to the Risen Lord, the contrast is between Adam fallen as the source of death to mankind and Christ risen as the fountain of its eternal life. If v. 49 be not merely a prediction, but an exhortation, as many ancient authorities attest (see Revised Version margin), this moral reference becomes certain. This whole passage, accordingly, does disprove the view that man’s primitive condition was one of such perfection that there was no need of progress; but it offers no support to the assumption that St. Paul regarded Adam’s position as so inferior morally that the Fall would to him appear as inevitable. As Romans 5:14 shows, he assigns to Adam a greater moral culpability than to his descendants before the Law was given, for he transgressed a definite commandment of God. Nor does St. Paul’s doctrine of the flesh (q.v. [6] ) justify any such assumption about the moral defect of man’s state before the Fall, as it is not a physical, but an ethical, conception, and relates to mankind as it is for man’s present experience, not to any previous state of man. If we cannot, therefore, identify the flesh with the yezer hara of unfallen man, unless we leave in St. Paul’s system the antinomy of a two-fold origin of sinfulness, one individual, the other racial, we are forced to conclude that in some way he did connect the presence of the flesh in sinful mankind with the entrance of sin at the Fall.
(b) The further discussion of this topic brings us to the closer consideration of Romans 5:12-21. (α) The purpose of the passage must be clearly kept in view. St. Paul is not proving man’s universal sinfulness-he has done that by an empirical proof, a historical induction, in chs. 1-3; nor is he concerned to explain the origin of sin. He assumes as not needing any proof that man’s sinfulness is the result of Adam’s fall. From that fact he deduces the conclusion that one person can be so related to the race as to be the author to it of both sin and death. If that be so in the case of Adam, it can be and is so in the case of Christ as the Author of righteousness and life, and even so much more as Christ is superior to Adam. The purpose of the passage is to show that Christ can and does bring more blessing to man than Adam has brought curse. We go beyond what St. Paul’s own intention warrants in asserting that his doctrine of salvation in Christ rests on, and falls to the ground without, his teaching on the Fall. As his proof of the sinfulness of mankind is empirical, so his certainty of salvation in Christ is rooted in his experience, and not in tins opinions he shared with his contemporaries regarding the origin of sin. It is important at the outset of this discussion to assert this consideration, as it will relieve us of the painful anxiety, which many exponents of this passage hitherto have felt and shown, to justify in some sense or another this story of the fall, in spite of the origin criticism now assigns to it, as an essential constituent of Christian theology.
(β) In Romans 5:12 St. Paul affirms the entrance of sin into the world, and death as its penalty, as the result of Adam’s transgression, and the diffusion of death among mankind in consequence either of Adam’s sin alone, or of the spread of sin among all his descendants. There is this ambiguity about the meaning in the clause ‘for that all sinned,’ which is not only grammatically irregular, but seems even to be logically inconsistent. To fix his meaning we must examine his language very closely. The connective phrase ἐφʼ ᾧ has been variously interpreted. It is improbable that ᾧ is masculine and the antecedent either Adam or death; taking it as neuter, the rendering ‘because’ is more probable than ‘in like manner as’ or ‘in so far as.’ In what sense did ‘all sin’ (πάντες ἤμαρτον)?
(1) The Greek commentators take the obvious sense of the words, regarded apart from the context: ‘all as a matter of fact by their own choice committed sin.’ To this interpretation two objections from the context may be urged. Firstly, if individual death is the penalty of individual sin, Adam is not responsible for the sin or the death, and so there is no parallelism with Christ as the source of righteousness and life to all; but the purpose of the whole argument is to prove a connexion between Adam and the race similar to that between Christ and redeemed humanity. Secondly, in the next verse St. Paul goes on to show that till the time of Moses, in the absence of law, the descendants of Adam could not be held as blameworthy as Adam himself was; while sin was in the world it could not be imputed as personal guilt, incurring of itself, apart from the connexion with Adam, the penalty of death.
(2) Some connexion with Adam must be asserted; but of what kind? An explanation accepted by many commentators, while on grammatical grounds not rendering ἐφʼ ᾧ ‘in whom’ but ‘because,’ yet treats the sentence as convening the equivalent meaning. Bengel presents this view in its classical expression: omnes peccarunt, Adamo peccante. If St. Paul had meant this, why did he not supply the words? it is often asked. But when we observe the irregularity of the structure of the very sentence, introducing such ambiguity into St. Paul’s meaning, we do not seem entitled to expect him to express himself with such logical precision. On this ground alone we must not set aside the explanation. But even if we accept it, what sense are we to attach to the statement that in Adam’s sin all sinned?
(i.) Firstly, there is the realistic explanation: that as Adam was the ancestor of the race, so all his descendants were physically included in him, even as Levi is represented to have paid tithes to Melchizedek ‘in the loins’ of Abraham (1618389629_42). But such a physical explanation only increases the difficulty of understanding the connexion.
(ii.) Secondly, there is the legal explanation, so prominent in the federal theology of the Reformed Church. Adam acted, not for himself alone, but as representative of the race, and so the race shares the responsibility of his act. But to this explanation there is the obvious objection that a representative must be chosen by those for whom he acts, if they are to be in any sense responsible for his acts; and the race had no voice in the choice of its first ancestor. If the objection is met by appealing to a Divine appointment, the plea of injustice is not answered, but the will of God is represented as overriding the rights of man. In a Calvinistic theology alone could such an explanation carry conviction.
(iii.) Thirdly, the explanation more generally accepted is that from Adam all mankind has inherited a tendency to evil, which, while not abolishing individual liberty and responsibility so as to make individual transgression inevitable, yet as a fact of experience has resulted in the universal sinfulness of the race. This is the view of Sanday-Headlam (op. cit. p. 134), and they support it with the references to Jewish literature already noted. The writer of this article in his Commentary on Romans (Century Bible, 1901) accepted this conclusion. ‘Without expressly stating it, Paul assumes the doctrine of original sin in the sense of an inherited tendency to sin, for what he affirms beyond all doubt here is that both the sin and the death of the human race are the effects of Adam’s transgression’ (p. 154). A further study of the problem has led him, however, to recognize at least the possibility of another explanation. Tennant, who of modern writers has made this subject specially his own, in his three books, The Origin and Propagation of Sin (1902), The Sources of the Doctrines of the Fall and Original Sin (1903), and The Concept of Sin (1912), has not only contended against the doctrine of such an inherited tendency, but has also maintained that this idea is not present in St. Paul’s mind in this passage. Referring to Sanday-Headlam’s objection to Bengal’s explanation that the words ‘in Adam’ would have been given had St. Paul intended that meaning, he presses a similar objection to their view.
‘That suggested by Dr. Sanday and Mr. Headlam, from whose weighty opinion it is here ventured to diverge, is an equally important element to be “supplied.” Indeed, it may be asked whether the idea of inherited sinfulness, as the cause of death to all who come between Adam and Moses, does not call at least as loudly for explicit mention, if St. Paul’s full meaning be expressible in terms of it, as that signified by Bengel’s addition of “in Adam”? Would it not be equally novel to the reader, so far as our knowledge of the thought of that age goes, and more remote from the actual language of the verse and its context?’ (The Fall and Original Sin, p. 261).
Reserving for subsequent treatment the wider issue of whether this is or is not an inherited tendency to evil, we must meanwhile look at the explanation Tennant himself alters of this verse.
(iv.) Though he rejects the realistic explanation in any form, either as already mentioned or as presented in Augustine’s theory ‘which makes human nature a certain quantum of being and treats descent from Adam as a division of this mass of human nature into parts’ (Stevens, The Pauline Theology, 1892, p. 136f.), he accepts the following explanation:
‘Much more probable, in the opinion or the present writer, is the suggestion that, in his identification of the race and Adam, St. Paul was using a form of thought occurring by no means exclusively in the particular verse of his writings with which we are here concerned. Stevens has appropriately named it “mystical realism.” “It is characteristic at Paul’s mind,” says this writer, “to conceive religious truth under forms which are determined by personal relationship. These relations, especially the two just specified (that of unregenerate humanity to Adam, and of spiritual humanity to Christ), may be termed mystical in the sense of being unique, vital, and inscrutable; they are real in the sense that sinful humanity is conceived as being actually present and participant in Adam’s sin …” (op. cit. p. 32f., and elsewhere). This mystical realism is a style of thought, a rhetorical mode; it is not a philosophy; the realism is only figurative. St. Paul identifies the race, as sinners, with Adam in the same sense that he identifies the believer with Christ. “The moral defilement of man is represented as contracted in and with the sin of Adam” (op. cit. p. 37).… This attractive interpretation of St. Paul’s meaning has the great virtue of explaining his words, which involve so many difficulties when taken, as they generally have been, with too much literalness, as only a particular case of a mode of speech which is characteristic of the apostle. And so long as it is not so far pressed as to lose sight of the undeniable connexion between the apostle’s teaching and the somewhat indefinite belief which he inherited from Jewish doctors as to the connexion between the Fall and human sin and death, it would seem to supply the best key to the thought of this difficult passage’ (The Fall and original Sin, pp. 262-3).
If it be the case that, as Tennant maintains, Jewish thought assigned the cor malignum or the yezer hara to Adam even before his Fall as well as to his descendants, and so did not teach a moral corruption of man’s action of a result of the Fall (see op. cit. pp. 264-5), it does appear more likely that St. Paul did not hold the doctrine, and that accordingly it cannot be here introduced to explain his meaning. If this alternative must be excluded, although the writer is not finally convinced that it must, the explanation Tennant accepts does appear the most probable among all the others already mentioned. It must be frankly admitted that we cannot reach certainty on this matter, and it does not seem at all necessary for a modern reconstruction of Christian doctrine that we should. Whatever St. Paul’s view of the Fall and its consequences may have been, seeing that it rests ultimately on a narrative which modern scholarship compels us to regard as a myth, however purified and elevated in the new context given to it in the record of the Divine revelation, and is influenced directly by contemporary Jewish thought, it cannot be regarded as authoritative for our Christian faith, however great may be its historical interest as an instance of the endeavour of a great mind to find a solution for a great problem.
3. The doctrine of the Fall and modern Christian thought.-Although the writer holds the conviction that it is not necessary for the Christian theologian to try and save as much as he dare of the wreckage of the doctrine of the Fall, after the storm of literary and historical criticism has passed over it, a few sentences may be added in closing this article as to the relation of modern Christian thought to the doctrine.
(a) What has already been urged must be repeated: that the teaching of the OT regarding sin and salvation does not rest at all on the narrative in Genesis 3, but on the reality of human experience and the testimony of human conscience; that the teach
Webster's Dictionary - to-Fall
(n.) A lean-to. See Lean-to.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Adam, Fall of
Since by the grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his fall.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fall
The fall of man is among the first of the portraits in the Bible on the great subject of redemption. When Adam came out of the hands of his gracious Creator, we are told, that he was created in the image of God. By which I apprehend, that he was formed in similitude to him who is "the image of the invisible God, the first born of every creature." "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness." (Genesis 1:26) What image? Not the image of JEHOVAH as JEHOVAH, for JEHOVAH is invisible; but, according to what the apostle Paul hath delivered to the church, by the authority and instruction of the Holy Ghost, in the image of him who before all worlds stood up, at the call of God, as the glorious Head of his body the church secretly, though not openly, the "first-born of every creature." Let the reader read the whole passage. (Colossians 1:15, etc.) "Who is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of every creature. For by him were all things created that are in heaven and that are in earth, visible and invisible; whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers, all things were created by him and for him: and he is before all things, and by him all things consist. And he is the Head of the body, the church; who is the beginning, the first-born from the dead, that in all things he might have the pre-eminence." Now from hence it plainly appears that Christ as Christ, that is, God and man in one person, had a priority of existence to every other, and was, and is, he image of the invisible JEHOVAH, in whose likeness Adam, the first man, was made. It appears also, that by him, that is, God and man in one person, all things were created. God created all things, we are told, by Jesus Christ. (Ephesians 3:9)
And it farther appears, that all things were not only created by him, but for him. The whole cause for which JEHOVAH went forth in acts of creation, as relating to our world, was for the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. Yea, more than this; for the same Scripture saith, that he is not only before all things, but by him all things consist. As if this image of the invisible God became the only foundation for creation to rest upon, and the only power to preserve and keep the whole together. This image then of the invisible God was the Person in whose likeness, it should seem, Adam, the first man of the earth, was formed. And, therefore, in the holiness of that similitude, as well in mind as in body, our first parent came forth from the hands of his infinite and kind Creator.
By the fall he lost this resemblance, and all his faculties became ruined and defiled; yea, his whole nature virtually all sin. Hence the Scriptures, under the strongest expressions, speak of the mighty ruin. His understanding became darkened, so as to lose the knowledge of God. (Ephesians 4:18-19) His affections became carnal, sensual, and devilish. (Ephesians 2:1-3; James 3:15) His will stubborn, rebellious, proud, and disobedient. (1 Peter 4:3) Yea, his whole mind enmity against God. (Romans 8:7) The Psalmist, and after him the apostle Paul, hath given some of the more striking features of fallen man, when he saith, "The Lord looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand and seek after God." But the result of the divine enquiry was, that "they were all gone aside, they were altogether become filthy, there was none that did good, no not one." (Psalms 14:2-3 with Romans 3:10-19) Such is the Scripture account of the fall.
Blessed be He that, by his great undertaking, hath restored our poor nature from the ruins of the fall, and by uniting his church, which is his body, to himself, hath given to us a better righteousness than man had before. The holiness of Adam was but the holiness of the creature, peaceable, capable of being lost; and was lost. The holiness of the Lord Jesus, in which all his redeemed are beheld and accepted before God, is the holiness of God-man, perfect, and incapable of being ever lost or lessened. How precious the thought! So then, our present fallen state is not the original state of man, neither is it the final state. In Jesus and his righteousness the injury sustained by the fall is more than repaired, and the everlasting welfare of the church, which is his body, eternally secured from all the possibility of loss from an union and oneness with him. Hail! thou glorious, gracious, holy one of God, "the Lord our righteousness." (Jeremiah 23:6)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Fall of Man
In addition to what is stated on this subject under the article Adam, it may be necessary to establish the literal sense of the account given of man's fall in the book of Genesis. This account is, that a garden having been planted by the Creator, for the use of man, he was placed in it, "to dress it, and to keep it;"—that in this garden two trees were specially distinguished, one as "the tree of life," the other as: "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil;"—that from eating of the latter Adam was restrained by positive interdict, and by the penalty, "In the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die;"—that the serpent, who was more subtle that any beast of the field, tempted the woman to eat, by denying that death would be the consequence, and by assuring her, that her eyes and her husband's eyes "would be opened," and that they would "be as gods, knowing good and evil;"—that the woman took of the fruit, gave of it to her husband, who also ate;—that for this act of disobedience they were expelled from the garden, made subject to death, and laid under other maledictions.
2. That this history should be the subject of much criticism, not only by infidels, but by those who told false and perverted views of the Christian system, was to be expected. Taken in its natural and obvious sense, along with the comments of the subsequent Scriptures, it teaches the doctrines of the existence of an evil, tempting, invisible spirit, going about seeking whom he may deceive and devour; of the introduction of moral corruptness into human nature, which has been transmitted to all men; and is connected also with the doctrine of a vicarious atonement for sin; and wherever the fundamental truths of the Christian system are denied, attempts will be made so to interpret this part of the Mosaic history as to obscure the testimony which it gives to them, either explicitly, or by just induction. Interpreters have adopted various and often strange theories; but those whose opinions it seems necessary to notice may be divided into such as deny the literal sense of the relation entirely; such as take the account to be in part literal and in part allegorical; and those who, while they contend earnestly for the literal interpretation of every part of the history, consider some of the terms used, and some of the persons introduced, as conveying a meaning more extensive than the letter, and as constituting several symbols of spiritual things and of spiritual beings.
3. Those who have denied the literal sense entirely, and regarded the whole relation as an instructive mythos, or fable, have, as might be expected, when all restraint of authority was thus thrown off from the imagination, themselves adopted very different theories. Thus we have been taught, that this account was intended to teach the evil of yielding to the violence of appetite and to its control over reason; or the introduction of vice in conjunction with knowledge and the artificial refinements of society; or the necessity of keeping the great mass of mankind from acquiring too great a degree of knowledge, as being hurtful to society; or to consider it as another version of the story of the golden age, and its being succeeded by times more vicious and miserable; or as designed, enigmatically, to account for the origin of evil, or of mankind. This catalogue of opinions might be much enlarged: some of them have been held by mere visionaries; others by men of learning, especially by several of the semi-infidel theologians and Biblical critics of Germany; nor has our own country been exempt from this class of bold expositors. How to fix upon the moral of "the fable" is, however, the difficulty; and the great variety of opinion is a sufficient refutation of the general notion assumed by the whole class, since scarcely can two of them be found who adopt the same views, after they have discarded the literal acceptation.
4. But that the account of Moses is to be taken as a matter of real history, and according to its literal import, is established by two considerations, against which, as being facts, nothing can successfully be urged. The first is, that the account of the fall of the first pair is a part of a continuous history. The creation of the world, of man, of woman; the planting of the garden of Eden, and the placing of man there; the duties and prohibitions laid upon him; his disobedience; his expulsion from the garden; the subsequent birth of his children, their lives, and actions, and those of their posterity, down to the flood; and, from that event, to the life of Abraham, are given in the same plain and unadorned narrative; brief, but yet simple; and with no intimation at all, either from the elevation of the style or otherwise, that a fable or allegory is in any part introduced. As this, then, is the case, and the evidence of it lies upon the very face of the history, it is, clear, that if the account of the fall be excerpted from the whole narrative as allegorical, any subsequent part, from Abel to Noah, from Noah to Abraham, from Abraham to Moses, may be excerpted for the same reason, which reason is merely this, that it does not agree with the theological opinions of the interpreter; and thus the whole of the Pentateuch may be rejected history, and converted into fable. Either then the account of the fall must be taken as history, or the historical character of the whole five books of Moses must be unsettled; and if none but infidels will go to the latter consequence, then no one who admits the Pentateuch to be a true history generally, can consistently refuse to admit the story of the fall of the first pair to be a narrative of real events, because it is written in the same style, and presents the same character of a continuous record of events. So conclusive has this argument been felt, that the anti-literal interpreters have endeavoured to evade it, by asserting that the part of the history of Moses in question bears marks of being a separate fragment, more ancient than the Pentateuch itself, and transcribed into it by Moses, the author and compiler of the whole. This point is examined and satisfactorily refuted in Holden's learned and excellent work, entitled, "Dissertation on the Fall of Man;" but it is easy to show, that it would amount to nothing, if granted, in the mind of any who is satisfied on the previous question of the inspiration of the Holy Scriptures. For let it be admitted that Moses, in writing the pentateuchal history, availed himself of the traditions of the patriarchal ages, a supposition not in the least inconsistent with his inspiration or with the absolute truth of his history, since the traditions so introduced have been authenticated by the Holy Spirit; or let it be supposed, which is wholly gratuitous, that he made use of previously existing documents; and that some differences of style in his books may be traced which serve to point out his quotations, which in a position that some of the best Hebraists have denied; yet two things are to be noted: first, that the inspired character of the books of Moses is authenticated by our Lord and his Apostles, so that they must necessarily be wholly true, and free from real contradictions; and, secondly, that to make it any thing to their purpose who contend that the account of the fall in an older document, introduced by Moses, it ought to be shown that it is not written as truly in the narrative style, even if it could be proved to be, in some respects, a different style, as that which precedes and follows it. Now the very literal character of our translation will enable even the unlearned reader to discover this. Whether it be an embodied tradition, or the insertion of a more ancient document, (though there is no foundation at all for the latter supposition,) it is obviously a narrative, and a narrative as simple as any which precedes or follows it.
5. The other indisputable fact to which I just now adverted, as establishing the literal sense of the history, is that, as such, it is referred to and reasoned upon in various parts of Scripture: "Knowest thou not this of old, since man (Adam) was placed upon earth, that the triumphing of the wicked is short, and the joy of the hypocrite but for a moment?" Job 20:4-5 . There is no reason to doubt but that this passage refers to the fall and the first sin of man. The date agrees; for the knowledge here taught is said to arise from facts as old as the first placing of man upon earth, and the sudden punishment of the iniquity corresponds to the Mosaic account: "The triumphing of the wicked is short, his joy but for a moment." "If I
covered my transgressions as Adam, by hiding mine iniquity in my bosom,"
Job 31:33 . Magee renders the verse,
"Did I cover, like Adam, my transgression, By hiding in a lurking place mine iniquity?"
and adds, "I agree with Peters, that this contains a reference to the history of the first man and his endeavours to hide himself after his transgression." Our margin reads, "after the manner of men;" and also the old versions; but the Chaldee paraphrase agrees with our translation, which is also satisfactorily defended by numerous critics. "What is man, that he should be clean? and he which is born of a woman, that he should be righteous?"
Job 15:14 . Why not clean? Did God make woman or man unclean at the beginning? If he did, the expostulation would have been more apposite, and much stronger, had the true cause been assigned, and Job had said, "How canst thou expect cleanness in man, whom thou createdst unclean?" But, as the case now stands, the expostulation has a plain reference to the introduction of vanity and corruption by the sin of the woman, and is an evidence that this ancient writer was sensible of the evil consequences of the fall upon the whole race of man. "Eden" and "the garden of the Lord" are also frequently referred to in the prophets. We have the "tree of life" mentioned several times in the Proverbs and in the Revelation. "God," says Solomon, "made man upright." The enemies of Christ and his church are spoken of, both in the Old and New Testaments, under the names of "the serpent," and "the dragon;" and the habit of the serpent to lick the dust is also referred to by Isaiah.
6. If the history of the fall, as recorded by Moses, were an allegory, or any thing but a literal history, several of the above allusions would have no meaning; but the matter is put beyond all possible doubt in the New Testament, unless the same culpable liberties be taken with the interpretation of the words of our Lord and of St. Paul as with those of the Jewish lawgiver. Our Lord says, "Have ye not read, that he which made them at the beginning, made them male and female; and said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife; and they twain shall be one flesh?" Matthew 19:4-5 . This is an argument on the subject of divorces, and its foundation rests upon two of the facts recorded by Moses:
(1.) That God made at first but two human beings, from whom all the rest have sprung.
(2.) That the intimacy and indissolubility of the marriage relation rests upon the formation of the woman from the man; for our Lord quotes the words in Genesis, where the obligation of man to cleave to his wife is immediately connected with that circumstance: "And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man. Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife; and they shall be one flesh." This is sufficiently in proof that both our Lord and the Pharisees considered this early part of the history of Moses as a narrative; for, otherwise, it would neither have been a reason, on his part, for the doctrine which he was inculcating, nor have had any force of conviction as to them. "In Adam," says the Apostle Paul, "all die;" "by one man sin entered into the world." "But I fear lest by any means, as the serpent beguiled Eve through his subtlety, so your minds should be corrupted from the simplicity that is in Christ." In the last passage, the instrument of the temptation is said to be a serpent, οφις , which is a sufficient answer to those who would make it any other animal; and Eve is represented as being first seduced, according to the account in Genesis. This St. Paul repeats in 1 Timothy 2:13-14 : "Adam was first formed, then Eve. And Adam was not deceived," first or immediately, "but the woman being deceived was in the transgression." And he offers this as the reason of an injunction, "Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection." When, therefore, it is considered, that these passages are introduced, not for rhetorical illustration, or in the way of classical quotation, but are made the basis of grave and important reasonings, which embody some of the most important doctrines of the Christian revelation, and of important social duties and points of Christian order and decorum; it would be to charge the writers of the New Testament with the grossest absurdity, nay, with even culpable and unworthy trifling, to suppose them to argue from the history of the fall as a narrative, when they knew it to be an allegory. And if we are, therefore, compelled to allow that it was understood as a real history by our Lord and his inspired Apostles, those speculations of modern critics, which convert it into a parable, stand branded with their true character of infidel and semi- infidel temerity.
7. The effect of the sin or lapse of Adam was to bring him under the wrath of God; to render him liable to pain, disease, and death; to deprive him of primeval holiness; to separate him from communion with God, and that spiritual life which was before imparted by God, and on which his holiness alone depended, from the loss of which a total moral disorder and depravation of his soul resulted; and finally to render him liable to everlasting misery. See ORIGINAL SIN . For the effect of the fall of Adam upon his posterity, See JUSTIFICATION .
Webster's Dictionary - Law-Fall
(n.) Depression of the jaw; hence, depression of spirits.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of le Puy (Fall River)
Established in 1902 by nine sisters from the mother-house at Le Puy, France, who took charge of schools in French parishes of the Diocese of Fall River, where the congregation has now manages schools. The provincial house and novitiate are in the city of Fall River.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Fall
See SIN.

Sentence search

Fall - Fall, pret. Fallen. Fallo, to fail, to deceive, Gr. to Fall. Rain Falls from the clouds a man Falls from his horse ripe fruits Fall from trees an ox Falls into a pit. I beheld Satan as lightning Fall from heaven. The Rhone Falls into the Mediterranean sea. The Danube Falls into the Euxine. The Mississippi Falls into the gulf of Mexico. Labor to enter into that rest, lest any man Fall after the same example of unbelief. Ye shall chase your enemies, and they shall Fall before you by the sword. ...
A thousand shall Fall at thy side. To be degraded to sink into disrepute or disgrace to be plunged into misery as, to Fall from an elevated station, or from a prosperous state. This is the renowned Tyre but oh, how Fallen. Heaven and earth will witness, if Rome must Fall, that we are innocent. To pass into a worse state than the former to come as, to Fall into difficulties to Fall under censure of imputation to Fall into error or absurdity to Fall into a snare. The mercury in a thermometer rises and Falls with the increase and diminution of heat. The water of a river rises and Falls. The tide Falls. The price of goods Falls with plenty and rises with scarcity. The greatness of finances and revenue doth Fall under computation. This book must stand or Fall with thee. The wind Falls and a calm succeeds. To pass into a new state of body or mind to become as, to Fall asleep to Fall distracted to Fall sick to Fall into rage or passion to Fall in love to Fall into temptation. ...
I have observed of late thy looks are Fallen. To happen to befall to come. Since this fortune Falls to you. Fear and dread shall Fall on them. The vernal equinox, which at the Nicene council fell on the 21st of March, Falls now about ten days sooner. If to her share some female errors Fall. Our hopes and fears rise and Fall with good or success. Take care of lambs when they first Fall. Sit still, my daughter, till thou knowest how the matter will Fall. ...
To Fall aboard of, to strike against another ship. ...
To Fall astern, to move or be driven backward or to remain behind. A ship Falls astern by the force of a current, or when outsailed by another. To Fall away, to lose flesh to become lean or emaciated to pine. These for awhile believe, and in time of temptation Fall away. How can the soul - Fall away into nothing. One color Falls away by just degrees, and another rises insensibly. To Fall back, to recede to give way. To Fall calm, to cease to blow to become calm. To Fall down, to prostrate one's self in worship. All nations shall Fall down before him. To Fall foul, to attack to make an assault. To Fall from, to recede from to depart not to adhere as, to Fall from an agreement or engagement. To Fall in, to concur to agree with. The measure Falls in with popular opinion. You will find it difficult to persuade learned men to Fall in with your projects. Fall into the ranks Fall in on the right. To Fall in with, to meet, as a ship also, to discover or come near, as land. To Fall off, to withdraw to separate to be broken or detached. friends Fall off in adversity. Love cools, friendship Falls off, brothers divide. Words Fall off by disuse. Fruits Fall off when ripe. The magazine or the review Falls off it has Fallen off. To deviate or depart from the course directed, or to which the head of the ship was before directed to Fall to leeward. To Fall on, to begin suddenly and eagerly. Fall on, and try thy appetite to eat. Fall on, Fall on and hear him not. To Fall out, to quarrel to begin to contend. A soul exasperated in ills, Falls out with every thing, its friend, itself - ...
2. To happen to befall to chance. To Fall over, to revolt to desert from one side to another. To Fall beyond. To Fall short, to be deficient. The corn Falls short. We all Fall short in duty. To Fall to, to begin hastily and eagerly. Fall to, with eager joy, on homely food. He will never after Fall to labor. To Fall under, to come under, or within the limits of to be subjected to. This point did not Fall under the cognizance or deliberations of the court. These things do not Fall under human sight or observation. These substances Fall under a different class or order. See to Fall on. Fall primarily denotes descending motion, either in a perpendicular or inclined direction, and in most of its applications, implies literally or figuratively velocity, haste, suddenness or violence. ...
Fall, ...
1. To let Fall to drop. And Fall thy edgeless sword. I am willing to Fall this argument. To sink to depress as, to raise or Fall the voice. To diminish to lessen or lower as, to Fall the price of commodities. To bring forth as, to Fall lambs. To fell to cut down as, to Fall a tree. This use is now common in America, and fell and Fall are probably from a common root. Fall, n. The act of dropping or descending from a higher to a lower place by gravity descent as a Fall from a horse or from the yard of a ship. he was walking on ice and had a Fall. Our fathers had a great Fall before our enemies. They conspire thy Fall. Downfall degradation loss of greatness or office as the Fall of Cardinal Wolsey. Behold thee glorious only in thy Fall. Declension of greatness, power or dominion ruin as the Fall of the Roman empire. Diminution decrease of price or value depreciation as the Fall of prices the Fall of rents the Fall of interest. Declination of sound a sinking of tone cadence as the Fall of the voice at the close of a sentence. Descent of water a cascade a cataract a rush of water down a steep place usually in the plural sometimes in the singular as the Falls of Niagara, or the Mohawk the Fall of the Hoosatonuc at Canaan. Fall is applied to a perpendicular descent, or to one that is very steep. Custom, however, sometimes deviates from this rule, and the rapids of rivers are called Falls. The outlet or discharge of a river or current of water into the ocean, or into a lake or pond as the Fall of the Po into the gulf of Venice. Extent of descent the distance which any thing Falls as, the water of a pond has a Fall of five feet. The Fall of the leaf the season when leaves Fall from trees autumn. That which Falls a Falling as a Fall of rain or snow. The act of felling or cutting down as the Fall of timber. Fall, or the Fall, by way of distinction, the apostasy the act of our first parents in eating the forbidden fruit also, the apostasy of the rebellious angels
Falling - ) from Fall, v. ) of Fall...
Crumble - ) To break into small pieces; to cause to Fall in pieces. ) To Fall into small pieces; to break or part into small fragments; hence, to Fall to decay or ruin; to become disintegrated; to perish
Hanch - (1):...
A sudden Fall or break, as the Fall of the fife rail down to the gangway
Drip - ) To let Fall in drops. ) A Falling or letting Fall in drops; a dripping; that which drips, or Falls in drops. ) To Fall in drops; as, water drips from the eaves. ) To let Fall drops of moisture or liquid; as, a wet garment drips
Avale - ) To descend; to Fall; to dismount. ) To cause to descend; to lower; to let Fall; to doff
Cascade - ) To Fall in a cascade. ) A Fall of water over a precipice, as in a river or brook; a waterfall less than a cataract
Fall - ) To cease to be erect; to take suddenly a recumbent posture; to become prostrate; to drop; as, a child totters and Falls; a tree Falls; a worshiper Falls on his knees. ) To cease to be active or strong; to die away; to lose strength; to subside; to become less intense; as, the wind Falls. ) To find a final outlet; to discharge its waters; to empty; - with into; as, the river Rhone Falls into the Mediterranean. ) To become insnared or embarrassed; to be entrapped; to be worse off than before; asm to Fall into error; to Fall into difficulties. ; to become less; as, the Falls; stocks fell two points. ) To Descend, either suddenly or gradually; particularly, to descend by the force of gravity; to drop; to sink; as, the apple Falls; the tide Falls; the mercury Falls in the barometer. ) To happen; to to come to pass; to light; to befall; to issue; to terminate. ) To pass somewhat suddenly, and passively, into a new state of body or mind; to become; as, to Fall asleep; to Fall into a passion; to Fall in love; to Fall into temptation. ) To let Fall; to drop. ) To sink; to depress; as, to Fall the voice. ) To bring forth; as, to Fall lambs. ) To fell; to cut down; as, to Fall a tree. ) The act of Falling; a dropping or descending be the force of gravity; descent; as, a Fall from a horse, or from the yard of ship. ) The act of dropping or tumbling from an erect posture; as, he was walking on ice, and had a Fall. ) Downfall; degradation; loss of greatness or office; termination of greatness, power, or dominion; ruin; overthrow; as, the Fall of the Roman empire. ) The surrender of a besieged fortress or town ; as, the Fall of Sebastopol. ) Diminution or decrease in price or value; depreciation; as, the Fall of prices; the Fall of rents. ) A sinking of tone; cadence; as, the Fall of the voice at the close of a sentence. ) Descent of water; a cascade; a cataract; a rush of water down a precipice or steep; - usually in the plural, sometimes in the singular; as, the Falls of Niagara. ) The discharge of a river or current of water into the ocean, or into a lake or pond; as, the Fall of the Po into the Gulf of Venice. ) Extent of descent; the distance which anything Falls; as, the water of a stream has a Fall of five feet. ) The season when leaves Fall from trees; autumn. ) That which Falls; a Falling; as, a Fall of rain; a heavy Fall of snow. ) Formerly, a kind of ruff or band for the neck; a Falling band; a faule. ) To sink; to languish; to become feeble or faint; as, our spirits rise and Fall with our fortunes
Ruinate - ) To cause to Fall; to cast down. ) To Fall; to tumble
Thump - ) The sound made by the sudden Fall or blow of a heavy body, as of a hammer, or the like. ) A blow or knock, as with something blunt or heavy; a heavy Fall. ) To give a thump or thumps; to strike or Fall with a heavy blow; to pound
Original Sin - See Fall, SIN
Fell - * For FELL see Fall ...
Tuefall - ) See To-fall
Light - " (2) In Revelation 7:16 , AV, pipto, "to Fall," is translated "shall . (3) For Acts 27:41 , RV, see Fall , B, No
Sisters of Saint Joseph of le Puy (Fall River) - Established in 1902 by nine sisters from the mother-house at Le Puy, France, who took charge of schools in French parishes of the Diocese of Fall River, where the congregation has now manages schools. The provincial house and novitiate are in the city of Fall River
Fil - of Fall, v
Faule - ) A Fall or Falling band
Drop - ) Whatever is arranged to drop, hang, or Fall from an elevated position; also, a contrivance for lowering something...
(2):...
(n. ) Act of dropping; sudden Fall or descent. ) To bestow or communicate by a suggestion; to let Fall in an indirect, cautious, or gentle manner; as, to drop hint, a word of counsel, etc. ) To cause to Fall in one portion, or by one motion, like a drop; to let Fall; as, to drop a line in fishing; to drop a courtesy. ) To Fall in drops. ) To Fall, in general, literally or figuratively; as, ripe fruit drops from a tree; wise words drop from the lips. ) To let drops Fall; to discharge itself in drops. ) To Fall dead, or to Fall in death. ) To Fall or be depressed; to lower; as, the point of the spear dropped a little. ) To Fall short of a mark. ) The quantity of fluid which Falls in one small spherical mass; a liquid globule; a minim; hence, also, the smallest easily measured portion of a fluid; a small quantity; as, a drop of water. ) To pour or let Fall in drops; to pour in small globules; to distill. ) A curtain which drops or Falls in front of the stage of a theater, etc
Recidivate - ) To backslide; to Fall again
Fall, Fallen, Falling, Fell - A — 1: πτῶσις (Strong's #4431 — Noun Feminine — ptosis — pto'-sis ) "a Fall" (akin to B, No. 1), is used (a) literally, of the "overthrow of a building," Matthew 7:27 ; (b) metaphorically, Luke 2:34 , of the spiritual "fall" of those in Israel who would reject Christ; the word "again" in the AV of the next clause is misleading; the "rising up" (RV) refers to those who would acknowledge and receive Him, a distinct class from those to whom the "fall" applies. The "fall" would be irretrievable, cp. ...
A — 2: παράπτωμα (Strong's #3900 — Noun Neuter — paraptoma — par-ap'-to-mah ) primarily "a false step, a blunder" (para, "aside," pipto, "to Fall"), then "a lapse from uprightness, a sin, a moral trespass, misdeed," is translated "fall" in Romans 11:11,12 , of the sin and "downfall" of Israel in their refusal to acknowledge God's claims and His Christ; by reason of this the offer of salvation was made to Gentiles; cp. " In 2 Thessalonians 2:3 "the Falling away" signifies apostasy from the faith. Note: For "mighty Fall," Revelation 18:21 , RV, see VIOLENCE. ...
B — 1: πίπτω (Strong's #4098 — Verb — pipto — pip'-to, pet'-o ) "to Fall," is used (a) of descent, to "fall" down from, e. , Matthew 10:29 ; 13:4 ; (b) of a lot, Acts 1:26 ; (c) of "falling" under judgment, James 5:12 (cp. , Matthew 2:11 ; Mark 5:22 ; Revelation 5:14 ; 19:4 ; (e) of things, "falling" into ruin, or failing, e. , Matthew 7:25 ; Luke 16:17 , RV, "fall," for AV, "fail;" Hebrews 11:30 ; (f) of "falling" in judgement upon persons, as of the sun's heat, Revelation 7:16 , RV, "strike," AV, "light;" of a mist and darkness, Acts 13:11 (some mss. have epipipto); (g) of persons, in "falling" morally or spiritually, Romans 14:4 ; 1 Corinthians 10:8,12 ; Revelation 2:5 (some mss. ...
B — 2: ἀποπίπτω (Strong's #634 — Verb — apopipto — ap-op-ip'-to ) "to Fall from" (apo, "from"), is used in Acts 9:18 , of the scales which "fell" from the eyes of Saul of Tarsus. ...
B — 3: ἐκπίπτω (Strong's #1601 — Verb — ekpipto — ek-pip'-to ) "to Fall out of" (ek, "out," and No. 1), "is used in the NT, literally, of flowers that wither in the course of nature, James 1:11 ; 1 Peter 1:24 ; of a ship not under control, Acts 27:17,26,29,32 ; of shackles loosed from a prisoner's wrist, Acts 12:7 ; figuratively, of the Word of God (the expression of His purpose), which cannot "fall" away from the end to which it is set, Romans 9:6 ; of the believer who is warned lest he "fall" away from the course in which he has been confirmed by the Word of God, 2 Peter 3:17 . ]'>[1] So of those who seek to be justified by law, Galatians 5:4 , "ye are Fallen away from grace. ...
B — 4: ἐμπίπτω (Strong's #1706 — Verb — empipto — em-pip'-to ) "to Fall into, or among" (en, "in," and No. ...
B — 5: ἐπιπίπτω (Strong's #1968 — Verb — epipipto — ep-ee-pip'-to ) "to Fall upon" (epi, "upon," and No. ...
B — 6: καταπίπτω (Strong's #2667 — Verb — katapipto — kat-ap-ip'-to ) "to Fall down" (kata, "down," and No. 2, properly, "to Fall in one's way" (para, "by"), signifies "to Fall away" (from adherence to the realities and facts of the faith), Hebrews 6:6 . ...
B — 8: περιπίπτω (Strong's #4045 — Verb — peripipto — per-ee-pip'-to ) "to Fall around" (peri, "around"), hence signifies to "fall" in with, or among, to light upon, come across, Luke 10:30 , "among (robbers);" Acts 27:41 , AV, "falling into," RV, "lighting upon," a part of a shore; James 1:2 , into temptation (i. ...
B — 9: προσπίπτω (Strong's #4363 — Verb — prospipto — pros-pip'-to ) "to Fall towards anything" (pros, "towards"), "to strike against," is said of "wind," Matthew 7:25 ; it also signifies to "fall" down at one's feet, "fall" prostrate before, Mark 3:11 ; 5:33 ; 7:25 ; Luke 5:8 ; 8:28,47 ; Acts 16:29 . ...
B — 10: ὑστερέω (Strong's #5302 — Verb — hustereo — hoos-ter-eh'-o ) "to come late, to be last, behind, inferior," is translated "falleth short" in Hebrews 12:15 , RV, for AV, "fail," and "fall short" in Romans 3:23 , for AV, "come short," which, in view of the preceding "have," is ambiguous, and might be taken as a past tense. ...
B — 11: ἐπιβάλλω (Strong's #1911 — Verb — epiballo — ep-ee-bal'-lo ) "to cast upon" (epi, "on," ballo, "to throw"), also signifies to "fall" to one's share, Luke 15:12 , "that Falleth. ...
B — 12: ἔρχομαι (Strong's #2064 — Verb — erchomai — er'-khom-ahee ) "to come," is translated "have Fallen out," in Philippians 1:12 , of the issue of circumstances. ...
B — 13: γίνομαι (Strong's #1096 — Verb — ginomai — ghin'-om-ahee ) "to become," is translated "falling" (headlong) in Acts 1:18 . ...
B — 14: ἀφίστημι (Strong's #868 — Verb — aphistemi — af-is'-tay-mee ) when used intransitively, signifies "to stand off" (apo, "from," histemi, "to stand"), "to withdraw from;" hence, "to Fall away, to apostatize," 1 Timothy 4:1 , RV, "shall Fall away," for AV, "shall depart;" Hebrews 3:12 , RV, "falling away. ...
B — 15: παραβαίνω (Strong's #3845 — Verb — parabaino — par-ab-ah'ee-no ) "to transgress, Fall" (para, "away, across," baino, "to go"), is translated "fell away" in Acts 1:25 , RV, for AV, "by transgression fell. ...
B — 16: καταβαίνω (Strong's #2597 — Verb — katabaino — kat-ab-ah'ee-no ) denotes "to come (or Fall) down," Luke 22:44 ; in Revelation 16:21 , "cometh down," RV. " (2) In 2 Peter 1:10 , ptaio, "to stumble," is translated "stumble," RV, for AV, "fall. " (3) In Romans 14:13 , skandalon, "a snare, a means of doing wrong," is rendered "an occasion of Falling," RV, for AV "an occasion to Fall. " (4) Koimao, in the Middle Voice, signifies "to Fall asleep," Matthew 27:52 , RV, "had Fallen asleep," for AV, "slept. Fall. " (6) In Jude 1:24 the adjective aptaistos, "without stumbling, sure footed" (a, negative, and ptaio, "to stumble"), is translated "from stumbling," RV, for AV, "from Falling. " (7) In Acts 1:18 the phrase prenes, headlong, with the aorist participle of ginomai, "to become," "falling headlong. (8) In Acts 20:9 , AV, kataphero, "to bear down," is translated "being Fallen into" (RV, "borne down"), and then "he sunk down" (RV, ditto), the first of gradual oppression, the second (the aorist tense) of momentary effect. (9) In Acts 19:35 diopetes, from dios, "heaven," pipto, "to Fall," i. , "fallen" from the sky, is rendered "image which fell down from Jupiter" (RV marg
Labile - ) Liable to slip, err, Fall, or apostatize
Hypocrisy: a Fall Fatal - The meteor, if it once Fall, cannot be rekindled. ' When those who once flashed before the eyes of the religious public with the blaze of a vain profession, Fall into open and scandalous sin, it is impossible to renew their glory
Ingratitude: to God - The Staubach is a Fall of remarkable magnificence, seeming to leap from heaven; its glorious stream reminds one of the abounding mercy which in a mighty torrent descends from above. In the winter, when the cold is severe, the water freezes at the foot of the Fall, and rises up in huge icicles like stalagmites, until it reaches the Fall itself as though it sought to bind it in the same icy fetters
Shower - ) To rain in showers; to Fall, as in a hower or showers. ) A Fall or rain or hail of short duration; sometimes, but rarely, a like Fall of snow. ) That which resembles a shower in Falling or passing through the air copiously and rapidly
Defoliated - ) Deprived of leaves, as by their natural Fall
Depravity - ...
See Fall, SIN
Backfall - ) A Fall or throw on the back in wrestling
Caducity - ) Tendency to Fall; the feebleness of old age; senility
Mistle - ) To Fall in very fine drops, as rain
Tottering - Shaking, as threatening a Fall vacillating reeling inclining
Tumble-Down - ) Ready to Fall; dilapidated; ruinous; as, a tumble-down house
Tottlish - ) Trembling or tottering, as if about to Fall; un steady
Tottery - ) Trembling or vaccilating, as if about to Fall; unsteady; shaking
Calvinism - A system of religion, introduced by John Calvin, the French reformer, in opposition to Catholic teaching, the distinctive doctrines of which, in addition to his Presbyterian idea of the church, are as follows: ...
Man, as a result of Adam's Fall, has no freedom of will, but is an absolute slave of God;
God has predestined each one of us, some to hell, and some to heaven from eternity absolutely independently of our own efforts;
the elect cannot be lost. " His followers split into two sects: the Supralapsarians (Latin: supra lapsum, before the Fall) who together with Calvin regarded God's decree of reprobation as absolute, and unconditioned by the Fall; the Infralapsarians, or Sublapsarians (Latin: infra, or sub, after), regarded God's positive condemnation as consequent to and conditioned by the Fall
Dewfall - ) The Falling of dew; the time when dew begins to Fall
Decay - de and cado, to Fall, or decedo
Sublapsarians - Those who hold that God permitted the first man to Fall into transgression without absolutely predetermining his Fall; or that the decree of predestination regards man as Fallen, by an abuse of that freedom which Adam had, into a state in which all were to be left to necessary and unavoidable ruin, who were not exempted from it by predestination
Happen - To come by chance to come without one's previous expectation to Fall out. To come to befall. To light to Fall or come unexpectedly
Fallen - ) of Fall...
(2):...
(a
Loaming - ) Twilight; dusk; the Fall of the evening
Loaming - ) Twilight; dusk; the Fall of the evening
Butter-Fingered - ) Apt to let things Fall, or to let them slip away; slippery; careless
Moth - 'ash, from a root meaning "to Fall away," as moth-eaten garments Fall to pieces (Job 4:19 ; 13:28 ; Isaiah 50:9 ; 51:8 ; Hosea 5:12 )
Fluviograph - ) An instrument for measuring and recording automatically the rise and Fall of a river
Tossed - Thrown upward suddenly or with a jerk made to rise and Fall suddenly
Dropped - Let Fall distilled laid aside dismissed let go suffered to subside sprinkled or variegated
Kneel - ) To bend the knee; to Fall or rest on the knees; - sometimes with down
Eve - Her Fall illustrates the ease with which all persons Fall into sin (2 Corinthians 11:3 )
Pruner - ) Any one of several species of beetles whose larvae gnaw the branches of trees so as to cause them to Fall, especially the American oak pruner (Asemum moestum), whose larva eats the pith of oak branches, and when mature gnaws a circular furrow on the inside nearly to the bark. When the branches Fall each contains a pupa
Dribble - ) To Fall weakly and slowly. ) A drizzling shower; a Falling or leaking in drops. ) To Fall in drops or small drops, or in a quick succession of drops; as, water dribbles from the eaves. ) To let Fall in drops
Omphiasis - ) A disease of the teeth, which causes them to loosen and Fall out of their sockets
Hip Lock - A lock in which a close grip is obtained and a Fall attempted by a heave over the hip
Oose-Rumped - ) Having the tail set low and buttocks that Fall away sharply from the croup; - said of certain horses
Topple - ) To Fall forward; to pitch or tumble down
Ravenstein - ) A kind of Fall apple, marked with streaks of deep red and orange, and of excellent flavor and quality
Water Clock - An instrument or machine serving to measure time by the Fall, or flow, of a certain quantity of water; a clepsydra
Thermoneurosis - ) A neurosis causing rise or Fall of a body's temperature
Overboard - ) Over the side of a ship; hence, from on board of a ship, into the water; as, to Fall overboard
Mantrap - ) A dangerous place, as an open hatch, into which one may Fall
Matthias - A disciple chosen by lot to fill up the number of the apostles after the Fall of Judas Iseariot
Leontodon - ) A genus of liguliflorous composite plants, including the Fall dandelion (L
Fell - of Fall. ...
FELL, To cause to Fall to prostrate to bring to the ground, either by cutting, as to fell trees, or by striking, as to fell an ox
Fall of Adam - Since by the grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his Fall
Backslide - ) To slide back; to Fall away; esp
Happen - ) To come by chance; to come without previous expectation; to Fall out
Adam, Fall of - Since by the grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his Fall
Lapse - ) A Fall or apostasy. ) A gliding, slipping, or gradual Falling; an unobserved or imperceptible progress or passing away,; - restricted usually to immaterial things, or to figurative uses. ) To slide or slip in moral conduct; to fail in duty; to Fall from virtue; to deviate from rectitude; to commit a fault by inadvertence or mistake. ) To Fall or pass from one proprietor to another, or from the original destination, by the omission, negligence, or failure of some one, as a patron, a legatee, etc. ) To become ineffectual or void; to Fall
Ampere Foot - A unit, employed in calculating Fall of pressure in distributing mains, equivalent to a current of one ampere flowing through one foot of conductor
Precipice - ) A sudden or headlong Fall
Flop - ) To strike about with something broad abd flat, as a fish with its tail, or a bird with its wings; to rise and Fall; as, the brim of a hat flops. ) To Fall, sink, or throw one's self, heavily, clumsily, and unexpectedly on the ground
Clinographic - ) Pertaining to that mode of projection in drawing in which the rays of light are supposed to Fall obliquely on the plane of projection
Rainfall - ) A Fall or descent of rain; the water, or amount of water, that Falls in rain; as, the average annual rainfall of a region
Anticlimax - ) A sentence in which the ideas Fall, or become less important and striking, at the close; - the opposite of climax
Orthocenter - ) That point in which the three perpendiculars let Fall from the angles of a triangle upon the opposite sides, or the sides produced, mutually intersect
Foal - The primary sense of the verb is to shoot, to cast or throw, to Fall. Fall and foul with a different prefix. Foal is literally a shoot, issue, or that which is cast, or which Falls
Breakneck - ) A Fall that breaks the neck
Three weeks - the Three Weeks of mourning from the Seventeenth of Tammuz through Tishah B'Av, commemorating the period between the Fall of Jerusalem and the Destruction of the Temple ...
Kneel - To bend the knee to Fall on the knees sometimes with down
Unloose - To Fall in pieces to lose all connection or union
Precipitous - ) Headlong; as, precipitous Fall
Paradise - The name is also applied to thehappy abode of Adam and Eve before the Fall
Winter - The season between Fall and spring, usually short and mild in Palestine
Crushed - Pressed or squeezed so as to break or bruise overwhelmed or subdued by power broken or bruised by a Fall grievously oppressed broken or bruised to powder comminuted
Supralapsarianism - The word means "before the Fall. By contrast, the infralapsarian ("after the Fall") position is the reverse in that it holds that God first decided he would allow sin into the world and second that he would then save people from it
lu'Cifer - In this passage it is a symbolical representation of the king of Babylon in his splendor and in his Fall. Jerome downward, to Satan in his Fall from heaven arises probably from the fact that the Babylonian empire is in Scripture represented as the type of tyrannical and self idolizing power, and especially connected with the empire of the Evil One in the Apocalypse
Nebushasban - ” High official of Nebuchadrezzar involved in the Fall of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:13 )
Water Power - (1):...
A Fall of water which may be used to drive machinery; a site for a water mill; a water privilege
Rain - The "early" or "former" rains commence in autumn in the latter part of October or beginning of November (Deuteronomy 11:14 ; Joel 2:23 ; Compare Jeremiah 3:3 ), and continue to Fall heavily for two months. Then the heavy "winter rains" Fall from the middle of December to March. The "latter" or spring rains Fall in March and April, and serve to swell the grain then coming to maturity (Deuteronomy 11:14 ; Hosea 6:3 )
Ruin - ) The act of Falling or tumbling down; Fall. ) That which is Fallen down and become worthless from injury or decay; as, his mind is a ruin; especially, in the plural, the remains of a destroyed, dilapidated, or desolate house, fortress, city, or the like. ) To bring to ruin; to cause to Fall to pieces and decay; to make to perish; to bring to destruction; to bring to poverty or bankruptcy; to impair seriously; to damage essentially; to overthrow. ) To Fall to ruins; to go to ruin; to become decayed or dilapidated; to perish
Stumble, Be Weak - 26:37: “And they shall Fall one upon another. ...
This word is often used figuratively to describe the consequences of divine judgment on sin: “Behold, I will lay stumbling blocks before this people, and the fathers and the sons together shall Fall upon them …” ( Fall …” ( Crackaloo - A kind of gambling game consisting in pitching coins to or towards the ceiling of a room so that they shall Fall as near as possible to a certain crack in the floor
Mattowacca - ) An American clupeoid fish (Clupea mediocris), similar to the shad in habits and appearance, but smaller and less esteemed for food; - called also hickory shad, tailor shad, Fall herring, and shad herring
Align - ) To form in line; to Fall into line
Tremendous - ) Fitted to excite fear or terror; such as may astonish or terrify by its magnitude, force, or violence; terrible; dreadful; as, a tremendous wind; a tremendous shower; a tremendous shock or Fall
Plop - ) To Fall, drop, or move in any way, with a sudden splash or slap, as on the surface of water
Downcome - ) Sudden Fall; downfall; overthrow
Prolapse - ) To Fall down or out; to protrude. ) The Falling down of a part through the orifice with which it is naturally connected, especially of the uterus or the rectum
Imprecate - ...
To invoke, as an evil on any one to pray that a curse or calamity may Fall on one's self or on another person
Nahum, Book of - , when Assurbanipal took Thebes, and the Fall of Ninive (606). To console his people he foretells the Fall of Ninive, hence the title, "Burden of Ninive," a book of vision
Circumflex - ) A wave of the voice embracing both a rise and Fall or a Fall and a rise on the same a syllable
Wadi - These creekbeds can become raging torrents when especially heavy rains Fall
Sile - ) To drop; to flow; to Fall
Oubliette - ) A dungeon with an opening only at the top, found in some old castles and other strongholds, into which persons condemned to perpetual imprisonment, or to perish secretly, were thrust, or lured to Fall
Undulatory - ) Moving in the manner of undulations, or waves; resembling the motion of waves, which successively rise or swell rise or swell and Fall; pertaining to a propagated alternating motion, similar to that of waves
Pash - ) A heavy Fall of rain or snow
Totter - ) To shake so as to threaten a Fall; to vacillate; to be unsteady; to stagger; as,an old man totters with age
Mediterranean Fruit Fly - Its larva lives in ripening oranges, peaches, and other fruits, causing them to decay and Fall
Cold Wave - In the terminology of the United States Weather Bureau, an unusual Fall in temperature, to or below the freezing point, exceeding 16� in twenty-four hours or 20� in thirty-six hours, independent of the diurnal range
Needy - ...
To relieve the needy and comfort the afflicted, are duties that Fall in our way every day
Pippin - ) A name given to apples of several different kinds, as Newtown pippin, summer pippin, Fall pippin, golden pippin
Headlong - ) With the head foremost; as, to Fall headlong
Fall River, Massachusetts, Diocese of - Org
diocese of Fall River
patron saints index
Eighth Crusade - (1267-1270) Caused by the merciless destruction of the Sultan Bibars and having Saint Louis and Charles of Anjou as commanders, it terminated in the death of the former and the Fall of the last Christian towns, 1291
Vail - To let Fall. To let Fall to lower as, to vail the topsail. To let Fall to sink
Distill - ) To let Fall or send down in drops. & v) To drop; to Fall in drops; to trickle
Liable - Proudly secure, yet liable to Fall. We never say, a man is liable to happiness or prosperity, but he is liable to disease, calamities, censure he is liable to err, to sin, to Fall
Headlong - With the head foremost as, to Fall headlong
Lean-to - ) A shed or slight building placed against the wall of a larger structure and having a single-pitched roof; - called also penthouse, and to-fall
Heteroscian - ) One who lives either north or south of the tropics, as contrasted with one who lives on the other side of them; - so called because at noon the shadows always Fall in opposite directions (the one northward, the other southward)
Herod Agrippa ii - He opposed the Jewish rebellion against Rome, and after the Fall of Jerusalem went to Rome
Hail - 1: χάλαζα (Strong's #5464 — Noun Feminine — chalaza — khal'-ad-zah ) akin to chalao, "to let loose, let Fall," is always used as an instrument of Divine judgment, and is found in the NT in Revelation 8:7 ; 11:19 ; 16:21
Hail - 1: χάλαζα (Strong's #5464 — Noun Feminine — chalaza — khal'-ad-zah ) akin to chalao, "to let loose, let Fall," is always used as an instrument of Divine judgment, and is found in the NT in Revelation 8:7 ; 11:19 ; 16:21
Epact, the - The Epact is used in the calculations forfinding on what day Easter will Fall
Picea - These trees have pendent cones, which do not readily Fall to pieces, in this and other respects differing from the firs
d'Avenant, William - After the Fall of Charles I he went to France, later becoming a Catholic
Caesar - The name of all the Roman emperors from the time of Julius Caesar to the Fall of the Roman empire
Abash - ...
To make the spirits to Fall to cast down the countenance to make ashamed to confuse or confound, as by exciting suddenly a consciousness of guilt, error, inferiority, &e
Persistent - ) Remaining beyond the period when parts of the same kind sometimes Fall off or are absorbed; permanent; as, persistent teeth or gills; a persistent calyx; - opposed to deciduous, and caducous
William d'Avenant - After the Fall of Charles I he went to France, later becoming a Catholic
Douse - ) To Fall suddenly into water
Novice - They were not to be appointed as bishops or overseers, lest, being lifted up with pride, they should Fall into the condemnation of the devil
Drizzle - ) To rain slightly in very small drops; to Fall, as water from the clouds, slowly and in fine particles; as, it drizzles; drizzling drops or rain
Dwindle - ) To diminish; to become less; to shrink; to waste or consume away; to become degenerate; to Fall away
Uncertain - ) Not sure; liable to Fall or err; Fallible
Lin - ) A waterfall, or cataract; as, a roaring lin. ) A pool or collection of water, particularly one above or below a Fall of water
Tumble - ) To roll down; to Fall suddenly and violently; to be precipitated; as, to tumble from a scaffold. ) Act of tumbling, or rolling over; a Fall
Lop - The primary sense is evidently to Fall or fell, or to strike down, and I think it connected with flap. To let Fall to flap as, a horse lops his ears
Ethanim - Ethanim means, “always flowing with water” and refers to the flooding streams fed by heavy Fall rains
Aboard - ...
To Fall aboard, to strike a ship's side
Asometer - ) An apparatus for holding and measuring of gas; in gas works, a huge iron cylinder closed at one end and having the other end immersed in water, in which it is made to rise or Fall, according to the volume of gas it contains, or the pressure required
Disunite - ) To part; to Fall asunder; to become separated
Grinder - 37, says, ‘The great grinders which stand beyond the eye-teeth, in no creature whatsoever do Fall out of themselves
Washout - , especially of a portion of the bed of a road or railroad by a Fall of rain or a freshet; also, a place, especially in the bed of a road or railroad, where the earth has been washed away
Tautochrone - ) A curved line, such that a heavy body, descending along it by the action of gravity, will always arrive at the lowest point in the same time, wherever in the curve it may begin to Fall; as, an inverted cycloid with its base horizontal is a tautochrone
Descend - ) To Fall in pitch; to pass from a higher to a lower tone. ) To pass from a higher to a lower place; to move downwards; to come or go down in any way, as by Falling, flowing, walking, etc. ; to plunge; to Fall; to incline downward; - the opposite of ascend. ) To come down, as from a source, original, or stock; to be derived; to proceed by generation or by transmission; to Fall or pass by inheritance; as, the beggar may descend from a prince; a crown descends to the heir
Bellows - ) An instrument, utensil, or machine, which, by alternate expansion and contraction, or by rise and Fall of the top, draws in air through a valve and expels it through a tube for various purposes, as blowing fires, ventilating mines, or filling the pipes of an organ with wind
Collapse - ) To Fall together suddenly, as the sides of a hollow vessel; to close by Falling or shrinking together; to have the sides or parts of (a thing) Fall in together, or be crushed in together; as, a flue in the boiler of a steam engine sometimes collapses. ) A Falling together suddenly, as of the sides of a hollow vessel
Jeremias, Lamentations of - In the Vulgate and the Septuagint, four elegiac poems and one prayer, bewailing the Fall of Jerusalem, written by Jeremias. They are all the work of Jeremias after the Fall of Jerusalem (588)
Lamentations of Jeremias - In the Vulgate and the Septuagint, four elegiac poems and one prayer, bewailing the Fall of Jerusalem, written by Jeremias. They are all the work of Jeremias after the Fall of Jerusalem (588)
Cadence - ) The close or Fall of a strain; the point of rest, commonly reached by the immediate succession of the tonic to the dominant chord. ) A Fall of the voice in reading or speaking, especially at the end of a sentence
Relapse - ) A sliding or Falling back, especially into a former bad state, either of body or morals; backsliding; the state of having Fallen back. ) To Fall from Christian faith into paganism, heresy, or unbelief; to backslide. ) To slide or turn back into a former state or practice; to Fall back from some condition attained; - generally in a bad sense, as from a state of convalescence or amended condition; as, to relapse into a stupor, into vice, or into barbarism; - sometimes in a good sense; as, to relapse into slumber after being disturbed. ) One who has relapsed, or Fallen back, into error; a backslider; specifically, one who, after recanting error, returns to it again
Lean - , "to Fall back" (ana, "back," pipto, "to Fall"), is used of reclining at a repast and translated "leaning back, (as he was, on Jesus' breast)" in John 13:25 , RV (the AV follows the mss
Fail - ...
A — 3: πίπτω (Strong's #4098 — Verb — pipto — pip'-to, pet'-o ) "to Fall," is used of the Law of God in its smallest detail, in the sense of losing its authority or ceasing to have force, Luke 16:17 . have ekpipto, "to Fall off"). See Fall. (2) In Hebrews 12:15 , hustereo, "to come behind, Fall short, miss," is rendered "fail" in the AV, RV, "falleth short
Avalanche - ) A Fall of earth, rocks, etc. ) A large mass or body of snow and ice sliding swiftly down a mountain side, or Falling down a precipice
Curtate - ) Shortened or reduced; - said of the distance of a planet from the sun or earth, as measured in the plane of the ecliptic, or the distance from the sun or earth to that point where a perpendicular, let Fall from the planet upon the plane of the ecliptic, meets the ecliptic
Dizzy - ) Having in the head a sensation of whirling, with a tendency to Fall; vertiginous; giddy; hence, confused; indistinct
Disintegrate - ) To separate into integrant parts; to reduce to fragments or to powder; to break up, or cause to Fall to pieces, as a rock, by blows of a hammer, frost, rain, and other mechanical or atmospheric influences
Sprout - Job 14:7 (b) This is a word of encouragement to those who Fall or fail in life
Waterfall - ) A Fall, or perpendicular descent, of the water of a river or stream, or a descent nearly perpendicular; a cascade; a cataract. ) An arrangement of a woman's back hair over a cushion or frame in some resemblance to a waterfall
Flacians - He taught that original sin is the very substance of human nature; and that the Fall of man was an event which extinguished in the human mind every virtuous tendency, every noble faculty, and left nothing behind it but universal darkness and corruption
Coincide - ) To occur at the same time; to be contemporaneous; as, the Fall of Granada coincided with the discovery of America
Pulverize - ) To become reduced to powder; to Fall to dust; as, the stone pulverizes easily
Dilapidation - ) The pulling down of a building, or suffering it to Fall or be in a state of decay
Depreciate - ) To Fall in value; to become of less worth; to sink in estimation; as, a paper currency will depreciate, unless it is convertible into specie
Ticklish - ) Standing so as to be liable to totter and Fall at the slightest touch; unfixed; easily affected; unstable
Headstrong, Heady - means "falling forwards" (from pro, "forwards," and pipto, "to Fall"); it is used metaphorically to signify "precipitate, rash, reckless," and is said (a) of persons, 2 Timothy 3:4 ; "headstrong" is the appropriate rendering; (b) of things, Acts 19:36 , RV, "(nothing) rash" (AV, "rashly")
Stumble - 1; with moral significance in James 2:10 ; 3:2 (twice), RV, "stumble" (AV, "offend"); in 2 Peter 1:10 , RV, "stumble" (AV, "fall"). ...
Note: For aptaistos, "from stumbling," Jude 1:24 , RV, see Fall , B, Note (6)
Flap - ) To move, as something broad and flaplike; as, to flap the wings; to let Fall, as the brim of a hat. ) To Fall and hang like a flap, as the brim of a hat, or other broad thing
Tribulation - These verses refer to a great tribulation that shall Fall upon the Jews in a future day: cf. In Revelation 7:14 a great multitude is referred to that have come out of the great tribulation, but these are from the nations, hence this tribulation is not the same as that which will Fall specially on the Jews, though both may take place at the same time
Nibhaz - (nihb' haz) Deity worshiped by the residents of Avva whom the Assyrians used to resettle the area about Samaria after the Fall of that city in 722 B
Beset - To Fall upon
Augustinism - Term used sometimes to designate the entire group of philosophical doctrines of Saint Augustine, but often used exclusively to designate his explanation reconciling the theories of the Fall, grace, and free will in the solution of the problem of freedom and grace, i
Just, Justice - In the grace of God, justice fell upon His Son so that mercy would Fall upon us
Fall, the - The Fall is that event in the Garden of Eden where Adam and Eve disobeyed the command of God and ate of The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (Genesis 2:1-25; Gen 3:1-24)
Pre-Adamites - The teaching that there was a race of people before Adam and Eve lived in the Garden and that the Fall of Satan caused a widespread destruction of the world
Deciduous - ) Falling off, or subject to Fall or be shed, at a certain season, or a certain stage or interval of growth, as leaves (except of evergreens) in autumn, or as parts of animals, such as hair, teeth, antlers, etc
Second Crusade - (1145-1147) The Fall of the principality of Edessa into the hands of the Moslems, 1144, produced the second expedition which was preached by Saint Bernard, Abbot of Clairvaux, and supported by Louis VII of France, his wife Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine, and Emperor Conrad III of Germany
Thank - Weigh the danger with the doubtful bliss, ...
And thank yourself, if aught should Fall amiss
Fall (2) - FALL. —The various questions suggested in regard to the relation of the Fall to Jesus Christ may be treated under the following heads:...
i. The Messianic element in the story of the Fall. The Fall in its bearing on the work of Christ in (1) the Incarnation, (2) its redemptive aspects. The Fall in its bearing on the Person of Christ. Our Lord’s own teaching (or that of the Gospels) on the Fall. The Messianic element in the story of the Fall. —It is not within the scope of this Dictionary to discuss the general character of the OT narrative of the Fall. The Fall in relation to the work of Christ. —The fact of man’s Fallen condition, of which the narrative of Genesis 3 is the historical explanation, is the raison d’être of redemption, and thus the Fall is very closely related to the whole work of Christ at every point. But it is with the effects rather than with the manner or history of the Fall that the gospel is supremely concerned, and after the story has once for all been given at the beginning of revelation, it is thereafter but little referred to in Scripture, and is scarcely ever brought into direct relation with redemption, except in two classical passages in the writings of St. Our attention will here be confined to those points in which the Fall comes into more direct relation with the work of Christ, or in which the Fall of man in Adam and his restoration in Christ serve to illuminate each other. The relation of the Fall to the Incarnation. ’ The common belief has hitherto been that the whole mission and work of Christ were solely conditioned by the Fall. The relation of the Fall to the Incarnation determines the place of the latter in the plan of redemption, and opens up the question whether the Incarnation was subsidiary to the Atonement, or the Atonement a development and modification of the Incarnation. In Christ alone, as the centre and end, is the highest possible for man realized; if this were dependent on the Fall, then sin would be a ‘felix culpa’ in the most emphatic sense. The question as to the relation of the Fall to the Incarnation thus resolves itself into that of the place of the Fall in God’s plan of the world; and we need not hold with hyper-Calvinists that sin was foreordained, in order to believe that the Fall, foreseen and permitted, enters into an intimate and essential relation to the whole of the Divine plan. The relation of the Fall to the redemptive work of Christ. —In the distinctively soteriological aspects of Christ’s work, we are brought at once into close relation to the Fall. ) the reality and general nature of the Fall, as seen in the light of Redemption; and (ii. ) the main points of detail in which the Fall and the redeeming work of Christ explain and illustrate each other. ) The doctrine of the Fall is vital to the Christian system; the reality and general nature of the Fall, as a great downward and retrograde step in the history of mankind, are confirmed and illustrated by the redemptive work of Christ. The Scripture doctrine of sin as absolute evil; man’s universal sinfulness, helplessness, and state of spiritual death, which form the very basis of Redemption; the representation of mankind as ‘lost,’ ‘alienated’ from God, and yet capable and worthy of being redeemed and restored;—all this, as so abundantly presented and emphasized in connexion with the atoning work of Christ, affords the strongest confirmation of the doctrine that man has Fallen from a higher condition. Whatever may be said as to the Incarnation (see 1, above), it is clear that the great outstanding fact of the Atonement, with all the suffering and sacrifice which it involved, can only be accounted for at once by the dignity and the degradation of man,—in other words, by the Fall. ) This is borne out by the more specific teaching in regard to the Fall in its relation to the work of Christ in Romans 5:12-21 and 1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49. In regard to Adam it has been variously held (1) that the relation between him and his posterity was virtually one of identity; mankind sinned in him and therefore share his guilt; (2) that the relation is representative or federal, Adam acting on behalf of his descendants; and (3) that the relation is natural, the evil effects of Adam’s Fall being communicated to the race through the ordinary channels of heredity. ), based on the one side on God’s free grace, and on the other on believers’ voluntary acceptance of it (Romans 5:17); and (3) a vital union between Christ and believers by which new life is imparted and the evil effects of the Fall counteracted (John 15:1-6 etc. ...
Christ is thus a new beginning for the Fallen race, a fountain of life and righteousness, as Adam was of death and sin. The Fall in relation to the Person of Christ. —The Fall of Adam, as we have seen, introduced into the nature of all descended from him a fatal taint of sin, an insuperable moral disability. The question now before us is, How did Jesus Christ, the new Adam, as a true member of the Fallen race, escape this evil influence? That Christ in His nature and Person was absolutely free from sin, is one of the clearest and most generally admitted as well as most vital facts of the gospel. (2) It suggests, though it does not fully explain, means by which Christ could become true man and yet be preserved from the hereditary effects of the Fall. The Teaching of Christ and of the Gospels on the Fall. —Our Lord makes no reference to the story of the Fall in all His recorded teaching, His only allusion to our first parents at all being the general statement in connexion with marriage (Matthew 19:4, Mark 10:6). But the doctrine of the Fall underlies the whole teaching of Christ on sin and redemption, and is particularly confirmed and illustrated in the following points:...
(1) The universal sinfulness of man. (6) The Fall may be said to be pictured for us more specifically in the parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11 ff. ), and to restore to Divine Sonship (John 1:12), is founded upon the doctrine of the Fall and the state of ruin resulting from it, combined with splendid possibilities of restoration through grace. ...
On Fall and Incarnation: Dorner, Person of Christ, vol
Cataract - ) A great Fall of water over a precipice; a large waterfall
Samurai - Their special rights and privileges were abolished with the Fall of feudalism in 1871
Premature - ) Happening, arriving, existing, or performed before the proper or usual time; adopted too soon; too early; untimely; as, a premature Fall of snow; a premature birth; a premature opinion; premature decay
Uillotine - ) A machine for beheading a person by one stroke of a heavy ax or blade, which slides in vertical guides, is raised by a cord, and let Fall upon the neck of the victim
Concussion - ) A condition of lowered functional activity, without visible structural change, produced in an organ by a shock, as by Fall or blow; as, a concussion of the brain
Lob - ) To let Fall heavily or lazily
Pekahiah - PEKAHIAH , son of Menahem, was king of Israel for a short time in the troubled period which preceded the Fall of Samaria
Siloam, Tower, in - In connection with Ophel, there is mention made of "a tower that lieth out ," ( Nehemiah 3:26 ) and there is no unlikelihood in connecting this projecting tower with the tower in Siloam, while one may be almost excused for the conjecture that its projection was the cause of its ultimate Fall
Kinah - A Kenite settlement made directly after the Fall of Jericho (Judges 1:16)
Baal-Berith - " The name denotes the god of the covenant into which the Israelites entered with the Canaanites, contrary to the command of Jehovah (Exodus 34:12 ), when they began to Fall away to the worship of idols
Succoth Benoth - ” A pagan deity which people from Babylon brought with them to Israel when it was resettled by the Assyrians after the Fall of Samaria in 722 B
Asleep - To a state of sleep as to Fall asleep
Dilapidate - ) To get out of repair; to Fall into partial ruin; to become decayed; as, the church was suffered to dilapidate
Permissive Decree - An example of a permissive decree would be the Fall of Adam into sin
Trebucket - It acted by means of a great weight fastened to the short arm of a lever, which, being let Fall, raised the end of the long arm with great velocity, hurling stones with much force
Undermine - ) To excavate the earth beneath, or the part of, especially for the purpose of causing to Fall or be overthrown; to form a mine under; to sap; as, to undermine a wall
Overtake - To come upon to Fall on afterwards
Shed - ) To let Fall; to throw off, as a natural covering of hair, feathers, shell; to cast; as, fowls shed their feathers; serpents shed their skins; trees shed leaves. ) To Fall in drops; to pour. ) To let Fall the parts, as seeds or fruit; to throw off a covering or envelope
Distill - To drop to Fall in drops. To let Fall in drops to throw down in drops
Backsliding - a Falling off, or defection in matters of religion; an apostasy, Acts 21:21 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:3 ; 1 Timothy 4:1 . On the latter passage Chrysostom observes, "When a house has a strong foundation, suppose an arch Fall, some of the beams break, or a wall decline, while the foundation is good, these breaches may be repaired; so in religion, whilst a person maintains the true doctrines, and remains on the firm rock, though he Fall, true repentance may restore him to the favour and image of God: but as in a house, when the foundation is bad, nothing can save the building from ruin; so when heretical doctrines are admitted for a foundation, nothing can save the professor from destruction
Istanbul, Turkey, Vicariate Apostolic - It was suppressed after the Fall of Constantinople to the Muslim Turks in 1453
Fence - From various causes they were apt to bulge out and Fall ( Psalm 62:3 )
Carcass - Jeremiah 19:7 (a) A term of derision used against the people of Jerusalem who, because of their wickedness, were to Fall under the sword of their enemies
Temptations (2) - Knowing how likely he was to Fall into sin, he ran away with all his might, and she ran after him, crying, 'Wherefore runnest thou away? It is I
Winnowing - The stalks are thrown into the air, and the wind blows away the chaff and the straw, letting the heavier pure grain Fall back to the ground (Isaiah 30:24 )
Alimentation - Under it would Fall the obligation of parents towards children, of children towards parents, husbands towards wives, of a religious order or congregation towards its members
Daphne - (See Gibbon, Decline and Fall , c
Infinite - There was 'no end' to the strength of Ethiopia and Egypt in supporting the city No; yet it was carried away: so would God's judgements Fall upon Nineveh
Zeresh - Haman's wife, who instigated him to erect a high gallows and to prevail on the king to hang on it Mordecai, then to go in merrily with the king unto the banquet, but predicted Haman's own Fall when she heard Mordecai was a Jew (Esther 5:10; Esther 5:14; Esther 6:13)
Sick - ) To Fall sick; to sicken
Barsabas - He was one of the candidates for the vacancy in the apostleship, occasioned by the Fall of Judas Iscariot
Vale - to Fall
Wrestle - Another, by a Fall in wrestling, started the end of the clavicle from the sternum
Irha-Heres - The prophecy here points to a time when the Jews would so increase in number there as that the city would Fall under their influence
Descend - To move or pass from a higher to a lower place to move, come or go downwards to Fall to sink to run or flow down applicable to any kind of motion or of body. We descend on the feet, on wheels, or by Falling. To come suddenly to Fall violently. In music, to Fall in sound to pass from any note to another less acute or shrill, or from sharp to flat
Trumpets - ...
In the judgements that are to Fall upon the earth, as foretold in the Revelation, the Seven Seals introduce the Seven Trumpets: the first four Fall upon the Roman earth, and refer to the state and circumstances of men; the latter three trumpets refer to the East, and Fall upon the persons themselves
Sebam - The ‘vine of Sibmah’ is mentioned by Isaiah and Jeremiah as one of the possessions of Moab on which destruction was to Fall
Autumn - ) The third season of the year, or the season between summer and winter, often called "the Fall
Pawl - ) A pivoted tongue, or sliding bolt, on one part of a machine, adapted to Fall into notches, or interdental spaces, on another part, as a ratchet wheel, in such a manner as to permit motion in one direction and prevent it in the reverse, as in a windlass; a catch, click, or detent
Ditch - ...
Psalm 7:15 (a) Here is a figure of speech to describe the trap made by the enemies of GOD's children into which they themselves Fall
Pibeseth - Place whose young men were to Fall by the sword and others be carried into captivity, mentioned in the judgement of God upon Egypt, Ezekiel 30:17
Redhead - American poachard, grayback, and Fall duck
Err - ) To miss intellectual truth; to Fall into error; to mistake in judgment or opinion; to be mistaken
Offend - ) To oppose or obstruct in duty; to cause to stumble; to cause to sin or to Fall
Adder - " (Psalms 91:13) Hence also, as sin is of the devil, the infusion of it into our nature, at the Fall, is called in Scripture, adder's poison
Trespass - A — 1: παράπτωμα (Strong's #3900 — Noun Neuter — paraptoma — par-ap'-to-mah ) primarily "a false step, a blunder" (akin to parapipto, "to Fall away," Hebrews 6:6 ), lit. , "a Fall beside," used ethically, denotes "a trespass," a deviation, from uprightness and truth, Matthew 6:14,15 (twice); 18:35, in some mss. ...
In Romans 11:11,12 , the word is used of Israel's "fall," i. , their deviation from obedience to God and from the fulfillment of His will (to be distinguished from the verb ptaio, "fall," in the 1st part of ver. See Fall , A, No
Cain - Ignoring the Fall, he approached God in his own person, and with the fruit of his own toil from the ground that had been cursed. Cain's act of worship is a notable type of mere human religion — presuming to approach God as if there had been no Fall and no sin
Cain - Ignoring the Fall, he approached God in his own person, and with the fruit of his own toil from the ground that had been cursed. Cain's act of worship is a notable type of mere human religion — presuming to approach God as if there had been no Fall and no sin
Send - To cause to come or Fall to bestow. To cause to come or Fall to inflict
Window - In the United Sates, the sashes are made to rise and Fall, for the admission or exclusion of air. Ere I let Fall the windows of mine eyes
Sheminith - It may mean on an eight-stringed instrument; on the eighth string of an instrument; on a deeper octave than the Alamoth (1 Chronicles 15:20 ); for the eighth and concluding rite of the Fall new year festival; or refer to the tuning of the instrument or the scale of the melody
Jesu Dulcis Memoria - Caswall; the third verse reads ...
O Hope of every contrite heart,...
O Joy of all the meek,...
To those who Fall, how kind Thou art...
How good to those who seek! ...
Jesu, the Very Thought of Thee - Caswall; the third verse reads ...
O Hope of every contrite heart,...
O Joy of all the meek,...
To those who Fall, how kind Thou art...
How good to those who seek! ...
Assort - ) To agree; to be in accordance; to be adapted; to suit; to Fall into a class or place
Skelp - ) A squall; also, a heavy Fall of rain
Slabber - ) To let saliva or some liquid Fall from the mouth carelessly, like a child or an idiot; to drivel; to drool
Inhabiters of the Earth - A designation of those mentioned in the Revelation, who, notwithstanding the successive judgements that Fall upon them, cling to the earth as settlers there, and against whom 'woe, woe, woe' is pronounced
Siloam, Tower of - Jotham "built much on the wall of Ophel" (2 Chronicles 27:3); "Manasseh compassed about Ophel" (2 Chronicles 33:14); a "tower lay (projecting) out" in Ophel (Nehemiah 3:26); such a projection might easily Fall
Libration Point - A solid object moving in the same velocity and direction as such a libration point will remain in gravitational equilibrium with the two bodies of the system and not Fall toward either body
Lower - LOWER, To Fall to sink to grow less
Fall of Man - The history of the Fall is recorded in Genesis 2,3 . The record of Adam's temptation and Fall must be taken as a true historical account, if we are to understand the Bible at all as a revelation of God's purpose of mercy. The state therefore to which Adam was reduced by his disobedience, so far as his subjective condition is concerned, was analogous to that of the Fallen angels. If man had never Fallen there would have been no opportunity of showing divine mercy. Without the Fall we should have known nothing of the Cross and the Gospel. This is regarded as an illustration of the wide dissemination of the tradition of the Fall. The story of the "golden age," which gives place to the "iron age", the age of purity and innocence, which is followed by a time when man becomes a prey to sin and misery, as represented in the mythology of Greece and Rome, has also been regarded as a tradition of the Fall
Beat - See CAST , No 7, Fall , No. " ...
7: προσπίπτω (Strong's #4363 — Verb — prospipto — pros-pip'-to ) "to Fall upon" (pros, "to," pipto, "to Fall"), is translated "beat" in Matthew 7:25 ; elsewhere, "to Fall down at or before. " See Fall
Justice, Original - This primitive state before the Fall included the gift of sanctifying grace, exemption from concupiscence, bodily immortality, habitual infused science, and the non-necessity of suffering
Original Justice - This primitive state before the Fall included the gift of sanctifying grace, exemption from concupiscence, bodily immortality, habitual infused science, and the non-necessity of suffering
Stupor - It is suggested that this meaning arose from the influence of the verb katanustazo, "to nod" or "fall asleep" (Field, Notes on the Translation of the NT)
Geruth - ” Fugitives stopped there near Bethlehem on their way to Egypt fleeing from Ishmael, who had killed Gedaliah, whom Babylon had appointed governor of Judah after the Fall of Jerusalem in 586 B
Shack - ) The grain left after harvest or gleaning; also, nuts which have Fallen to the ground. ) To shed or Fall, as corn or grain at harvest
Overthrow - ) To cause to Fall or to fail; to subvert; to defeat; to make a ruin of; to destroy
Gomorrha, Sodom And - Their names are synonymous with impenitent sin, and their Fall with a manifestation of God's just wrath (Deuteronomy 29; 2 Peter 2; Jude 1:7; Ezechiel 16)
Aven - On, or Heliopolis, 'House of the Sun,' in northern Egypt, a seat of idolatry: its young men should Fall by the sword
Haughty - ...
A haughty spirit goeth before a Fall
Lick - ...
Psalm 72:9 (a) By this we understand the complete defeat which GOD would bring upon His enemies causing them to Fall prostrate in the dirt
Fugitive - ) Not fixed; not durable; liable to disappear or Fall away; volatile; uncertain; evanescent; liable to fade; - applied to material and immaterial things; as, fugitive colors; a fugitive idea
Sicken - ) To become sick; to Fall into disease
Tickle - ) Wavering, or liable to waver and Fall at the slightest touch; unstable; easily overthrown
Evil, Principalities of - Like the faithful angels (Ephesians 1; Colossians 1), they preserved their respective ranks in the Fallen state. In Jude 1:1, "principalities" denotes rather the dominion or province or their former power before the Fall
Achan, Achar - Son of Carmi, of the tribe of Judah, who on the Fall of Jericho kept some of its spoil, against the express command of Jehovah, hence called 'the accursed thing,' and was stoned to death with his family, and with his possessions burned with fire
Degenerate - ) To Fall off from the normal quality or the healthy structure of its kind; to become of a lower type
Delay - ) To retard; to stop, detain, or hinder, for a time; to retard the motion, or time of arrival, of; as, the mail is delayed by a heavy Fall of snow
Eve - The first mother of our race, and the cause of our Fall
Sodom And Gomorrha - Their names are synonymous with impenitent sin, and their Fall with a manifestation of God's just wrath (Deuteronomy 29; 2 Peter 2; Jude 1:7; Ezechiel 16)
Jabneel - After the Fall of Jerusalem (A
Sink - ) To be overwhelmed or depressed; to Fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease. ) To Fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west. ) To enter deeply; to Fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate
Assault - To attack or Fall upon by violence, or with a hostile intention as, to assault a man, a house or town. To invade or Fall on with force as, the cry of war assaults our ears
Precipitate - ) To dash or Fall headlong. ) Falling, flowing, or rushing, with steep descent; headlong. The precipitate may Fall to the bottom (whence the name), may be diffused through the solution, or may float at or near the surface
Fourteenth Century Crusade - The second, also a fruitless effort, 1443, after the Turkish Murad II had defeated the Greek emperor at Constantinople, 1422, and the Council of Florence had proclaimed a religious union of East and West, 1439, was brought to a close by the Fall of Constantinople, 1453
Fifteenth Century Crusde - The second, also a fruitless effort, 1443, after the Turkish Murad II had defeated the Greek emperor at Constantinople, 1422, and the Council of Florence had proclaimed a religious union of East and West, 1439, was brought to a close by the Fall of Constantinople, 1453
Dram - , which was first struck by Darius, the son of Hystaspes, and was current in Western Asia long after the Fall of the Persian empire
Fend - The primary sense is to Fall on, or to strike, to repel
Flatten - ) To lower the pitch of; to cause to sound less sharp; to let Fall from the pitch
Iddy - ) Having in the head a sensation of whirling or reeling about; having lost the power of preserving the balance of the body, and therefore wavering and inclined to Fall; lightheaded; dizzy
Depose - ) To let Fall; to deposit
Woe - The Revelation shows that God's 'woes' will Fall with mighty power on those denounced
Wiper - ) A piece generally projecting from a rotating or swinging piece, as an axle or rock shaft, for the purpose of raising stampers, lifting rods, or the like, and leaving them to Fall by their own weight; a kind of cam
Mutiny - ) To Fall into strife; to quarrel
Thousand - ...
A thousand shall Fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand
Shearjashub - Isaiah apparently named him (and his brother, Mahershalalhashbaz) as an embodiment of prophecy, that Judah would Fall, but a remnant would survive
John the Almsgiver, Saint - At the Fall of Alexandria, he fled to his native land, where he died
Joannes Eleemosynasius, Saint - At the Fall of Alexandria, he fled to his native land, where he died
Joannes Misebicors, Saint - At the Fall of Alexandria, he fled to his native land, where he died
Misebicors, Joannes, Saint - At the Fall of Alexandria, he fled to his native land, where he died
Cento - The Byzantine empress Eudoxia is credited with having formed a history of the Fall and redemption of man with lines from the works of Homer, while the works of Vergil supplied the material for the notable "Cento nuptialis" compiled by the Roman poet Ausonius, and for a life of Christ, compiled in 1634 by Alexander Ross
Methuselah - The history of the Fall and of the world before the flood was carried thus through only one person to Noah
Nergal - Following the Fall of the Northern Kingdom of Israel, the Assyrians resettled Samaria with Mesopotamian peoples who brought their gods, including Nergal, with them (2 Kings 17:30 )
Sieve - God warned Israel He would place them in a sieve of judgment and none would Fall through, for none of them were good grain (Amos 9:9 )
Conscience - Like all our other faculties, it has been perverted by the Fall (John 16:2 ; Acts 26:9 ; Romans 2:15 )
Frail - ...
(6):...
(superl) Liable to Fall from virtue or be led into sin; not strong against temptation; weak in resolution; also, unchaste; - often applied to Fallen women
Rase - ) To be leveled with the ground; to Fall; to suffer overthrow
Assail - To leap or Fall upon by violence to assault to attack suddenly, as when one person Falls upon another to beat him
Almsgiver, John the Saint - At the Fall of Alexandria, he fled to his native land, where he died
Sclaff - ) A slight blow; a slap; a soft Fall; also, the accompanying noise
Time-Table - ) A tabular statement of the time at which, or within which, several things are to take place, as the recitations in a school, the departure and arrival of railroad trains or other public conveyances, the rise and Fall of the tides, etc
Demit - ) To let Fall; to depress
Freedom - FREE, FREEDOM...
The Scriptures considering our whole nature by the Fall under the vassalage of sin and Satan, represent our deliverance from both by grace under the character of spiritual freedom
Baal-Berith - But what covenant? Was Israel so far gone in idolatry, as not only to set up an idol, but to insult JEHOVAH in his gracious covenant? To what an awful state is our nature reduced by the Fall! Into what an awful apostacy may, and will, every man sink, void of grace! Reader, turn to that sweet covenant promine, Jeremiah 32:40
Eleemosynasius, Joannes, Saint - At the Fall of Alexandria, he fled to his native land, where he died
Drops - To pour or let Fall in small portions or globules, as a fluid to distill. To let Fall as any substance as, to drop the anchor to drop a stone
Crush - To overwhelm by pressure to beat or force down, by an incumbent weight, with breaking or bruising as, the man was crushed by the Fall of a tree. A violent collision, or rushing together, which breaks or bruises the bodies or a Fall that breaks or bruises into a confused mass as the crush of a large tree, or of a building
Retire - ) A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or Fall back. ) To recede; to Fall or bend back; as, the shore of the sea retires in bays and gulfs
Rain - To Fall in drops from the clouds, as water used mostly with it for a nominative as, it rains it will rain it rained, or it has rained. To Fall or drop like rain as, tears rained at their eyes. The descent of water in drops from the clouds or the water thus Falling. When water Falls in very small drops or particles, we call it mist, and fog is composed of particles so fine as to be not only indistinguishable, but to float or be suspended in the air
Adrian vi, Pope - He appealed in vain to Christian rulers to oppose the advancing Turks, and his death was hastened by the Fall of Rhodes into their hands
Dedel, Adrian - He appealed in vain to Christian rulers to oppose the advancing Turks, and his death was hastened by the Fall of Rhodes into their hands
Temptation - Many horses Fall at the bottom of a hill because the driver thinks the danger past and the need to hold the reins with firm grip less pressing
Diadem - It was made of silk, linen or wool, and tied round the temples and forehead, the ends being tied behind and let Fall on the neck
Neck - To Fall upon someone's neck with weeping or kissing is a special sign of tenderness (Genesis 33:4 ; Genesis 45:14 ; compare Luke 15:20 )
Armageddon - The word itself is translated 'the mountain of slaughter,' and may be used symbolically for the destruction that will surely Fall upon the enemies of the Lord Jesus
Sardine, Sardius, - It was one of the stones that covered the king of Tyrus (doubtless portraying Satan before his Fall)
Aulneau, Jean Pierre - Arriving at Lake of the Woods, in the Fall of 1735, he wintered in Fort Charles, Minnesota, and in June, 1736, set out with a party to procure provisions and ammunition
Fearful - It is a fearful thing to Fall into the hands of the living God
Heavily - When calamities Fall heavily on the christian, he finds consolation in Christ
Welter - ) A rising or Falling, as of waves; as, the welter of the billows; the welter of a tempest. ) To rise and Fall, as waves; to tumble over, as billows
Adrian Dedel - He appealed in vain to Christian rulers to oppose the advancing Turks, and his death was hastened by the Fall of Rhodes into their hands
Anxiety - We should make God's kingdom our first priority; everything else will Fall in line after we do that (Matthew 6:33 )
Kneel - 1: γονυπετέω (Strong's #1120 — Verb — gonupeteo — gon-oo-pet-eh'-o ) denotes "to bow the knees, kneel," from gonu (see above) and pipto, "to Fall prostrate," the act of one imploring aid, Matthew 17:14 ; Mark 1:40 ; of one expressing reverence and honor, Mark 10:17 ; in mockery, Matthew 27:29
Wormwood - " In Revelation 8:10-11 , the star called wormwood seems to denote a mighty prince, or power of the air, the instrument, in its Fall, of sore judgments on large numbers of the wicked
Occupation - Men not engaged in some useful occupation commonly Fall into vicious courses
Simplicius, Pope Saint - His pontificate, which saw the Western Empire Fall under barbarian control, was disturbed by the Monophysite controversy in the East
Consist - ...
2: συνίστημι (Strong's #4921 — Verb — sunistemi — soon-is-tah'-o, soon-is-tah'-an'-o, soon-is-tah'-ay-mee ) sun, "with," histemi, "to stand," denotes, in its intransitive sense, "to stand with or Fall together, to be constituted, to be compact;" it is said of the universe as upheld by the Lord, Colossians 1:17 , lit
Short, Shorten - ...
Note: For hustereo, "to come short, Fall short," see Fall , No
Violence, Violent, Violently - ...
A — 2: ὅρμημα (Strong's #3731 — Noun Neuter — hormema — hor'-may-mah ) "a rush" (akin to hormao, "to urge on, to rush"), is used of the Fall of Babylon, Revelation 18:21 , AV, "violence," RV, "mighty Fall
Toss - To cause to rise and Fall as, to be tossed on the waves. To toss up, is to throw a coin into the air and wager on what side it will Fall
Flat - Not elevated or erect Fallen. Cease t'admire, and beauty's plumes Fall flat. Level with the ground totally Fallen. A flat denotes a Fall or depression of half a tone. To grow flat to Fall to an even surface
Bruise - ) To injure, as by a blow or collision, without laceration; to contuse; as, to bruise one's finger with a hammer; to bruise the bark of a tree with a stone; to bruise an apple by letting it Fall
Flavius Josephus - Jewish historian; born Jerusalem, 37; died c101He went to Rome, 64, and on his return joined the Jewish revolt, holding out against Vespasian in Jotapata until the Fall of the city, 61
Josephus, Flavius - Jewish historian; born Jerusalem, 37; died c101He went to Rome, 64, and on his return joined the Jewish revolt, holding out against Vespasian in Jotapata until the Fall of the city, 61
Gin - pah, a plate or thin layer; and hence a net, a snare, trap, especially of a fowler (Psalm 69 :: 22 , "Let their table before them become a net;" Amos 3:5 , "Doth a bird Fall into a net [1] upon the ground where there is no trap-stick [2] for her? doth the net [1] spring up from the ground and take nothing at all?", Gesenius
Cave - ) To Fall in or down; as, the sand bank caved
Drop - A small portion of any fluid in a spherical form, which Falls at once from any body, or a globule of any fluid which is pendent, as if about to Fall a small portion of water Falling in rain as a drop of water a drop of blood a drop of laudanum
Flag - ...
FLAG, To let Fall into feebleness to suffer to drop as, to flag the wings
Resort - ) To Fall back; to revert
Stoning - If the stones were aimed at the head a person would soon be stunned and Fall
Disjoint - ) To Fall in pieces
Header - ) A Fall or plunge headforemost, as while riding a bicycle, or in bathing; as, to take a header
Depress - ) To press down; to cause to sink; to let Fall; to lower; as, to depress the muzzle of a gun; to depress the eyes
Gnat - These and such small insects are very apt to Fall into food or liquid, and require to be ‘strained out ’ (RV Lightning - This passage does not refer to Satan's Fall from Heaven, but rather to his daily attacks on the people on earth
Recoil - ) To start, roll, bound, spring, or Fall back; to take a reverse motion; to be driven or forced backward; to return. ) A starting or Falling back; a rebound; a shrinking; as, the recoil of nature, or of the blood
Punt - ) To kick (the ball) before it touches the ground, when let Fall from the hands
Overset - ) To cause to Fall, or to tail; to subvert; to overthrow; as, to overset a government or a plot
Achor, Valley of - It will be a door of hope to Israel — putting away evil from among themselves, national self-judgement — in the future when they call to mind that it was there that God's judgement began to Fall on them, followed by blessing: so the tribulation of the latter day will usher in blessing
All Souls Day - If the feast should Fall on Sunday it is kept on November 3,
Invade - To Fall on to attack to seize as a disease
Invent - invenio, inventum in and venio, to come literally, to come to, to Fall on, to meet, Eng
Fail - ) To be wanting; to Fall short; to be or become deficient in any measure or degree up to total absence; to cease to be furnished in the usual or expected manner, or to be altogether cut off from supply; to be lacking; as, streams fail; crops fail. ) To Fall away; to become diminished; to decline; to decay; to sink
Habitation - ” Revelation 18:2 announces the Fall of “Babylon,” which “is become the habitation of devils
Balak - It is difficult to resist the conclusion that, if Balaam is the teacher of Gnosticism, Balak is the Roman power which has adopted syncretism and seeks to compel the Christians to adopt its ways also, and so makes them Fall into the corruptions attendant on pagan worship
Nahshon - Salmon his son married Rahab after the Fall of Jericho
Boomerang - When thrown from the hand with a quick rotary motion, it describes very remarkable curves, according to the shape of the instrument and the manner of throwing it, often moving nearly horizontally a long distance, then curving upward to a considerable height, and finally taking a retrograde direction, so as to Fall near the place from which it was thrown, or even far in the rear of it
Shatter - ) To be broken into fragments; to Fall or crumble to pieces by any force applied
Nephilim - (nehf' ih lihm) Transliteration of Hebrew word related to verb, “to Fall,” and often interpreted as “aborted ones
Moment - This word is contracted from motamentum, or some other word,the radical verb of which signified to move, rush, drive or Fall suddenly, which sense gives that of force. The sense of an instant of time is from Falling or rushing, which accords well with that of meet
Allowance - That which is allowed a portion appointed a stated quantity, as of food or drink hence, in seamen's language, a limited quantity of meat and drink, when provisions Fall short
Ebb - ) The state or time of passing away; a Falling from a better to a worse state; low state or condition; decline; decay. ) Receding; going out; Falling; shallow; low. ) To return or Fall back from a better to a worse state; to decline; to decay; to recede
Slip - He will Fall at any moment under the right conditions and circumstances
Devil - The greatest of all the Fallen angels. He is often called Lucifer which is a Latin translation of "light bearer" found in Isaiah 14:12, and also the accuser of the brethren in (Revelation 12:10), dragon (Revelation 12:9), the devil (Matthew 4:1), the tempter (Matthew 4:3), the accuser (Revelation 12:10), the prince of demons (Luke 11:15), the ruler of this world (John 12:31), See Isaiah 14:12-15 for a description of the Fall of the devil
Genesis - The general divisions of the book are as follows: ...
the creation of the world and early history of mankind (1-11), including the Fall, the promise of a Redeemer, and the Deluge; ...
the early history of the Jews (12-50), including Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph
Nephilim - (nehf' ih lihm) Transliteration of Hebrew word related to verb, “to Fall,” and often interpreted as “aborted ones
Rash - Corn so dry as to Fall out with handling
Sentences, Book of the - The first book treats of God and the Trinity, Providence, predestination, and evil; the second, or creation, the angels, the Fall, grace, and sin; the third, of the Incarnation, Redemption, the virtues, and commandments; the fourth, of the Sacraments and the four last things
Serenus, a Solitary - In the latter he declares the nature of evil spirits, their Fall, subordination, and occupation
Law of Abstinence - The obligation is suspended on Holy Saturday at noon and on all feasts of precept, except those Falling on week-days in Lent; and on vigils which Fall on a Sunday, there is no abstinence on the Sunday or on the preceding Saturday. ...
England and Wales: Fridays, except holy days of obligation and December 26,; Wednesdays in Lent; ember Saturday in Lent; ember Wednesdays; vigils of Assumption, All Saints, and Christmas, except when these feasts Fall on a Sunday or Monday. ...
Scotland: Fridays; ember Wednesdays; vigils of Assumption, All Saints, and Christmas, except when they Fall on a Saturday or Sunday; Ash Wednesday; ember Saturday in Lent; up to noon on Holy Saturday. If a holy day of obligation Falls on a day of abstinence, outside of Lent, the obligation of abstinence is removed
Abstinence, Law of - The obligation is suspended on Holy Saturday at noon and on all feasts of precept, except those Falling on week-days in Lent; and on vigils which Fall on a Sunday, there is no abstinence on the Sunday or on the preceding Saturday. ...
England and Wales: Fridays, except holy days of obligation and December 26,; Wednesdays in Lent; ember Saturday in Lent; ember Wednesdays; vigils of Assumption, All Saints, and Christmas, except when these feasts Fall on a Sunday or Monday. ...
Scotland: Fridays; ember Wednesdays; vigils of Assumption, All Saints, and Christmas, except when they Fall on a Saturday or Sunday; Ash Wednesday; ember Saturday in Lent; up to noon on Holy Saturday. If a holy day of obligation Falls on a day of abstinence, outside of Lent, the obligation of abstinence is removed
Giant - The signification of this word is uncertain: some trace it to a root 'to Fall,' but then it is not clear whether it signifies 'fallen ones,' or 'those who Fall upon
Eden - The Fall of Pharaoh, under the figure of an exalted tree, is said to comfort the trees of Eden, which is called the 'garden of God,' etc. Adam was put in the garden to dress and to keep it; but on his Fall he was driven out and cherubim were placed to keep the way of the tree of life
Eden - The Fall of Pharaoh, under the figure of an exalted tree, is said to comfort the trees of Eden, which is called the 'garden of God,' etc. Adam was put in the garden to dress and to keep it; but on his Fall he was driven out and cherubim were placed to keep the way of the tree of life
Nahum - , probably close to the time of the Fall of Nineveh. ...
The second chapter graphically portrays the future Fall of Assyria's capital, Nineveh. Yet, Nahum, poetically affirmed the city's Fall. , so the same fate would befall Nineveh (Nahum 3:8-11 ). In the Enemy's Fall, God Offers Hope for His Oppressed People (Nahum 1:12-15 ). The enemy will Fall, but God's people will be restored (Nahum 2:1-2 )
Sepharvaim - Probably it answers to the Shabara’in named in the Babylonian Chronicle as taken just before the Fall of Samaria
Zalmon - 143, when he attempted to relieve the Syrian garrison in Jerusalem and was prevented by a heavy Fall of snow ( 1Ma 13:22 )
Ramoth-Gilead - It was among the first places to Fall when Assyria conquered Israel and carried the people into captivity (2 Kings 15:29)
Seize - ) To Fall or rush upon suddenly and lay hold of; to gripe or grasp suddenly; to reach and grasp
Strike - * Notes: (1) In Revelation 7:16 , pipto, "to Fall," is rendered "strike" in the RV, AV, "light (on)
Dancers - It was their custom all of a sudden to Fall a dancing, and, holding each other's hands, to continue thereat, till, being suffocated with the extraordinary violence, they fell down breathless together
Snare - The animal would Fall into the pit and be captured
Scar - ) A mark left upon a stem or branch by the Fall of a leaf, leaflet, or frond, or upon a seed by the separation of its support
Apple - ...
In religious symbolism and ecclesiastical art, the apple is used as a decoration on a church; the Infant Christ is represented holding an apple, the fruit of Paradise that became the cause of Adam's Fall; it is also (rare) the apple of obedience and of life; Sodom's apple symbolizes sin, or sinful lust
Ossifrage - It does this by carrying them up to a height and letting them Fall upon a stone or rock till they break
Ossifrage - He pushes kids, lambs, hares, calves, and even men off the rocks, and takes the bones of animals high up in the air, and lets them Fall on stones to crack them and render them more digestible
Jumpers - to put themselves in violent agitations: and, finally, to jump until they were quite exhausted, so as often to be obliged to Fall down on the floor or the field, where this kind of worship was held
Rain - By recent statistics the seasons appear to have somewhat altered, and most rain now Falls from November to March inclusive. It is also judged that the cutting down of trees to make charcoal has affected the Fall of rain in some districts
Parthians - The Parthians adopted Greek culture following their Fall to Alexander the Great
Mesha - Unable to force his way through the besieging host, King Mesha sought the aid of his gods by sacrificing his own son on the city wall; and the besiegers, horrorstruck at this atrocious act, withdrew in terror, lest some curse should Fall on them
Dagon - In that at Ashdod, Dagon twice miraculously fell down before the ark of God; and in the second Fall his head and hands were broken off, leaving only the body, which was in the form of a large fish, 1 Samuel 5:1-9
Fountain - The springs of Palestine, though short-lived, are remarkable for their abundance and beauty, especially those which Fall into the Jordan and into its lakes, of which there are hundreds throughout its whole course
Fall - It is now generally recognized by scholars that the story of the Fall in Genesis is to be regarded neither as literal history, as Irenaeus, Tertullian, and Augustine taught, nor as allegory, as Clement and Origen, following Philo, held; but as a myth, common to the Semitic group of religions, in which an attempt is made to explain the origin of the evils from which mankind suffers. Dämonologie, 51-57) comes in his able discussion of the passage, that the mention of Eve in this connexion in a clause introduced by ὡς, makes it necessary to understand the sin into which she was betrayed as similar to that into which the Corinthian Church is, figuratively speaking, in danger of Falling, namely, unchastity and infidelity to her husband’ (H. Tennant, The Fall and Original Sin, 1903, p. Paul’s belief, it adds force to his argument for woman’s subordination in 1 Corinthians 15:21-220 ‘Adam was not beguiled, but the woman being beguiled hath Fallen into transgression. ...
(d) Man’s present racial condition is traced back to Adam’s Fall (παράπτωμα; Wisdom of Solomon 10:1 ‘Wisdom guarded to the end the first formed father of the world, that was created alone, and delivered him out of his own transgression’). Thus disease was made permanent; and the law was in the heart of the people along with the wickedness of the root; so the good departed away, and that which was wicked abode still’; 2 Esdras 4:30 ‘For a grain of evil seed was sown in the heart of Adam from the beginning, and how much wickedness hath it brought forth unto this time! and how much shall it yet bring forth until the time of threshing come!’; 7:118 ‘O thou Adam, what hast thou done? for though it was thou that sinned, the evil is not Fallen on thee alone, but upon all of us that come of thee. But the cor malignum is certainly the yezer hara of the Rabbis, regarded by Pseudo-Ezra, as well as by talmudic writers, as inherent in Adam from the first, and as the cause, not the consequence, of his Fall. Paul, curiously enough, nowhere appears to make use of the current doctrine of the evil yezer; certainly not in connexion with the Fall. Paul’s doctrine we must return when dealing with it in detail in the next section; but meanwhile it may be made clear that it is not the assertion of a connexion between Adam’s Fall and man’s sinfulness which is denied in these passages, but the inference from them that Adam’s Fall is regarded as the cause of moral depravity, and not merely as its first instance. 137): ‘By the Fall man came under a curse, is guilty of death, and his right relation to God is rendered difficult. Sin, to which the bent and leaning had already been planted in man by creation, had become a fact; the “evil impulse” (= cor malignum) gained the mastery over mankind, who can only resist it by the greatest efforts; before the Fall it had had power over him, but no such ascendancy (Uebermacht). Paul does teach that man’s moral nature was changed for the worse by the Fall, he is not following a clearly expressed and generally accepted Jewish doctrine on the subject. The curse that rests on man since the Fall is mentioned in Sirach 40:1 : ‘Great travail is created for many men, and a heavy yoke is upon the sons of Adam. There are two passages, however, that seem to teach that man was by nature mortal, and that the Fall only hastened the process; ‘Adam first sinned and brought untimely death (mortem immaturam) upon all’ (liv. Paul’s doctrine of the Fall. Paul’s doctrine of the Fall. … Independently of the Fall, there must have been progress from an inferior state, the psychic, which he posits as man’s point of departure, to a superior state, the spiritual, foreseen and determined as man’s goal from the first’ (quoted by Findlay, Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘1 Cor. Paul assigned the yezer hara to the unfallen Adam, as, since the reference in the ‘second man from heaven’ is not to the pre-existent Word, but to the Risen Lord, the contrast is between Adam Fallen as the source of death to mankind and Christ risen as the fountain of its eternal life. Paul regarded Adam’s position as so inferior morally that the Fall would to him appear as inevitable. ]'>[6] ) justify any such assumption about the moral defect of man’s state before the Fall, as it is not a physical, but an ethical, conception, and relates to mankind as it is for man’s present experience, not to any previous state of man. If we cannot, therefore, identify the flesh with the yezer hara of unfallen man, unless we leave in St. Paul’s system the antinomy of a two-fold origin of sinfulness, one individual, the other racial, we are forced to conclude that in some way he did connect the presence of the flesh in sinful mankind with the entrance of sin at the Fall. He assumes as not needing any proof that man’s sinfulness is the result of Adam’s Fall. Paul’s own intention warrants in asserting that his doctrine of salvation in Christ rests on, and Falls to the ground without, his teaching on the Fall. It is important at the outset of this discussion to assert this consideration, as it will relieve us of the painful anxiety, which many exponents of this passage hitherto have felt and shown, to justify in some sense or another this story of the Fall, in spite of the origin criticism now assigns to it, as an essential constituent of Christian theology. Tennant, who of modern writers has made this subject specially his own, in his three books, The Origin and Propagation of Sin (1902), The Sources of the Doctrines of the Fall and Original Sin (1903), and The Concept of Sin (1912), has not only contended against the doctrine of such an inherited tendency, but has also maintained that this idea is not present in St. Paul’s full meaning be expressible in terms of it, as that signified by Bengel’s addition of “in Adam”? Would it not be equally novel to the reader, so far as our knowledge of the thought of that age goes, and more remote from the actual language of the verse and its context?’ (The Fall and Original Sin, p. And so long as it is not so far pressed as to lose sight of the undeniable connexion between the apostle’s teaching and the somewhat indefinite belief which he inherited from Jewish doctors as to the connexion between the Fall and human sin and death, it would seem to supply the best key to the thought of this difficult passage’ (The Fall and original Sin, pp. ...
If it be the case that, as Tennant maintains, Jewish thought assigned the cor malignum or the yezer hara to Adam even before his Fall as well as to his descendants, and so did not teach a moral corruption of man’s action of a result of the Fall (see op. Paul’s view of the Fall and its consequences may have been, seeing that it rests ultimately on a narrative which modern scholarship compels us to regard as a myth, however purified and elevated in the new context given to it in the record of the Divine revelation, and is influenced directly by contemporary Jewish thought, it cannot be regarded as authoritative for our Christian faith, however great may be its historical interest as an instance of the endeavour of a great mind to find a solution for a great problem. The doctrine of the Fall and modern Christian thought. -Although the writer holds the conviction that it is not necessary for the Christian theologian to try and save as much as he dare of the wreckage of the doctrine of the Fall, after the storm of literary and historical criticism has passed over it, a few sentences may be added in closing this article as to the relation of modern Christian thought to the doctrine
Resist - , and primarily, "to Fall against or upon" (anti, "against," pipto, "to Fall"), then, "to strive against, resist," is used in Acts 7:51 of "resisting" the Holy Spirit
Flag - ) To let droop; to suffer to Fall, or let Fall, into feebleness; as, to flag the wings
Temple - The primary sense of the root of this word is to Fall. Literally, the Fall of the head the part where the head slopes from the top
Jeremi'ah, Book of - 46-49, has been placed here as a kind of completion to the prophecy of the seventy years and the subsequent Fall of Babylon. The two great prophecies of the Fall of Jerusalem, and the history connected with them
Malta, Knights of - The Fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Knights of Malta - The Fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Knights of Rhodes - The Fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Providence: the Guardian of Our Weakness - Winds wander and dews drip earthward, - Rains Fall, suns rise and set, Earth whirls, and all but to prosper A poor little violet
Soul: Needing Something to Cling to - And just as in a neglected garden you may see the poor creepers making shift to sustain themselves as best they can; one convolvulus twisting round another, and both draggling on the ground; a clematis leaning on the door, which will by-and-by open and let the whole mass Fall down; a vine or a passion-flower wreathing round a prop which all the while chafes and cuts it; so in this Fallen world it is mournful to see the efforts which human souls are making to get some sufficient object to lean upon and twine around
Stumbling Block - Anything that causes a person to stumble or to Fall
Calah - The Kalach of the inscriptions, one of the great fortresses which after the Fall of Nineveh (cf
Hospitallers of Saint John of Jerusalem - The Fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Founder - ) To Fall; to stumble and go lame, as a horse
Ditch - The metaphor has been interpreted as referring to Gehenna: more probably it refers simply to danger of hurt, or even ruin, from wilful or careless perversion of the truth leading to moral wandering and Fall
Rhodes, Knights of - The Fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Ebal, Mount - Mountain in Ephraim from which were proclaimed the curses that would Fall upon Israel if they disobeyed the Lord
Serpent - 2 Corinthians 11:3 Hence, as a fruit of the tradition of the Fall, the serpent all through the East became the emblem of the spirit of evil, and is so pictured even on the monuments of Egypt. It has been supposed by many commentators that the serpent, prior to the Fall, moved along in an erect attitude. It is quite clear that an erect mode of progression is utterly incompatible with the structure of a serpent; consequently, had the snakes before the Fall moved in an erect attitude they must have been formed on a different plan altogether. The typical form of the serpent and its mode of progression were in all probability the same before: the Fall as after it; but subsequent to the Fall its form and progression were to be regarded with hatred and disgust by all mankind, and thus the animal was cursed above all cattle," and a mark of condemnation was forever stamped upon it
Fall - The Fall of man is among the first of the portraits in the Bible on the great subject of redemption. ...
By the Fall he lost this resemblance, and all his faculties became ruined and defiled; yea, his whole nature virtually all sin. (Romans 8:7) The Psalmist, and after him the apostle Paul, hath given some of the more striking features of Fallen man, when he saith, "The Lord looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand and seek after God. " (Psalms 14:2-3 with Romans 3:10-19) Such is the Scripture account of the Fall. ...
Blessed be He that, by his great undertaking, hath restored our poor nature from the ruins of the Fall, and by uniting his church, which is his body, to himself, hath given to us a better righteousness than man had before. How precious the thought! So then, our present Fallen state is not the original state of man, neither is it the final state. In Jesus and his righteousness the injury sustained by the Fall is more than repaired, and the everlasting welfare of the church, which is his body, eternally secured from all the possibility of loss from an union and oneness with him
Fit - competo, whence compatible, signifies properly to meet or to Fall on, hence to suit or be fit, from peto. The primary sense is to come to, to Fall on, hence to meet, to extend to, to be close, to suit. To come or Fall, is the primary sense of time or season
Pitch - ) A descent; a Fall; a thrusting down. ) To plunge or Fall; esp. , to Fall forward; to decline or slope; as, to pitch from a precipice; the vessel pitches in a heavy sea; the field pitches toward the east
Slump - ) A Falling or declining, esp. suddenly and markedly; a Falling off; as, a slump in trade, in prices, etc. ) To undergo a slump, or sudden decline or Falling off; as, the stock slumped ten points. ) To Fall or sink suddenly through or in, when walking on a surface, as on thawing snow or ice, partly frozen ground, a bog, etc. ) The noise made by anything Falling into a hole, or into a soft, miry place
Magus, Simon - By magic he rose into the air, but the prayers of the Apostles Peter and Paul caused him to Fall, a scene depicted in the attached image
Injury - These injuries may be received by a Fall or by other violence
Perseverance of the Saints - ...
This doctrine is not inconsistent with the truth that the believer may nevertheless Fall into grievous sin, and continue therein for some time
Infinite - God is regarded as infinite in many other qualities: God's steadfast love endures forever (Psalm 100:5 ); God's knowledge extends to the Fall of a single sparrow and the number of hairs on our heads (Matthew 10:29-30 ; compare Psalm 139:1-6 ); God is “the Almighty” (Genesis 17:1 ; Exodus 6:3 )
Neck - To Fall upon one another’s neck has from old time been an affectionate form of greeting in the East ( Genesis 33:4 etc
Achan - On the occasion of the Fall of Jericho, he seized, contrary to the divine command, an ingot of gold, a quantity of silver, and a costly Babylonish garment, which he hid in his tent
Teman - ); they shall Fall by the sword," i
Clutch - ) The hands, claws, or talons, in the act of grasping firmly; - often figuratively, for power, rapacity, or cruelty; as, to Fall into the clutches of an adversary
Plump - ) To drop or Fall suddenly or heavily, all at once
Pour - ) To flow, pass, or issue in a stream, or as a stream; to Fall continuously and abundantly; as, the rain pours; the people poured out of the theater
Pounce - ) To Fall suddenly and seize with the claws; - with on or upon; as, a hawk pounces upon a chicken
Rash - ) So dry as to Fall out of the ear with handling, as corn
Amsterdam - Passing to the Counts of Holland, it was raised to the rank of a city, 1301; after the Fall of Antwerp in 1585 it became the center of the world's trade
Sparrow - one of them shall not Fall on the ground without your Father
Baruch - He lived during the days of the decline and Fall of the Kingdom of Juda, and, like Jeremias, was desolated at the prospect of the subjugation of Juda by Babylon. He warned them against provoking a foe whom they could not withstand; and, when they had Fallen into captivity with the best of their people, he warned the remnant to cease arousing Babylon and place their trust in God
Wheat - In Palestine this most important of all grains was sown after barley—late in the Fall
Chance - An event that happens, Falls out or takes place, without being contrived, intended, expected or foreseen the effect of an unknown cause, or the unusual or unexpected effect of a known cause accident casualty fortuitous event as, time and chance happen to all. ...
CHANCE, To happen to Fall out to come or arrive without design, or expectation
Canker - A disease incident to trees, which causes the bark to rot and Fall
Simonans - By magic he rose into the air, but the prayers of the Apostles Peter and Paul caused him to Fall, a scene depicted in the attached image
Simon Magus - By magic he rose into the air, but the prayers of the Apostles Peter and Paul caused him to Fall, a scene depicted in the attached image
Darkness - The absence of natural light, Genesis 1:2 , and hence figuratively a state of misery and adversity, Job 18:6 Psalm 107:10 Isaiah 8:22 9:1 ; also the absence of the sun and stars, and hence the Fall of chief men and national convulsions, Isaiah 13:10 Acts 2:20
Wicked - The primary sense is to wind and turn, or to depart, to Fall away
Ossifrage - It well deserves its name ossifrage, bone breaker , for "not only does he push kids and lambs and even men off the rocks, but he takes the bones of animals that other birds of prey have denuded of the flesh high up into the air and lets them Fall upon a stone in order to crack them and render them more digestible even for his enormous powers of deglutition
Supralapsarians - Persons who hold that God, without any regard to the good or evil works of men, has resolved, by an eternal decree, supra lapsum, antecedently to any knowledge of the Fall of Adam, and independently of it, to save some and reject others: or, in other words, that God intended to glorify his justice in the condemnation of some, as well as his mercy in the salvation of others; and, for that purpose, decreed that Adam, should necessarily Fall. ...
The question which he proposes to discuss, is, "Whether men were considered in the mind of God in the decree of election as Fallen or unfallen, as in the corrupt mass through the Fall, or in the pure mass of creatureship, previous to it, and as to be created?" There are some who think that the latter, so considered, were the objects of election in the divine mind. These are called Supralapsarians, though of these, some are of opinion that man was considered as to be created or creatable, and others as created but not Fallen. ...
The decree of the means includes the decree to create men to permit them to Fall, to recover them out of it through redemption by Christ, to sanctify them by the grace of the Spirit, and completely save them; and which are not to be reckoned as materially many decrees, but as making one formed decree; or they are not to be considered as subordinate, but as co-ordinate means, and as making up one entire complete medium; for it is not to be supposed that God decreed to create man, that he might permit him to Fall, in order to redeem, sanctify, and save him; but he decreed all this that he might glorify his grace, mercy, and justice. Now, as the glory of God is last in execution, it must be first in intention, wherefore men must be considered in the decree of the end as not yet created and Fallen; since the creation and permission of sin belong to the decree of the means, which in order of nature is after the decree of the end. And they add to this, that if God first decreed to create man, and suffered him to Fall, and then out of the Fall chose some to grace and glory, he must decree to create man without an end, which is to make God to do what no wise man would; for when a man is about to do any thing, he proposes an end, and then contrives and fixes on ways and means to bring about that end
Danger, Dangerous - , "prone to Fall" (epi, "upon," i. , near upon, sphallo, "to Fall"), hence, "insecure, dangerous," is used in Acts 27:9
Lots, Casting - God overruled among His people how the lot should Fall, as stated in Proverbs 16:33 ; "The lot is cast into the lap; but the whole disposing thereof is of the Lord. In order to fill up the vacancy caused by the Fall of Judas, the lot was resorted to; but was on that occasion accompanied by prayer that the Lord would show which of the two He had chosen
Lamentations, Book of - (lay mehn tay' shuhnss) Twenty-fifth book of Bible preserving mourning over the Fall of Jerusalem in 587 B. Factors which favor authorship by Jeremiah are the antiquity of the tradition associating him with the book, the similarity in tone between Lamentations and portions of Jeremiah's book (Jeremiah 8-9 ;Jeremiah 8-9;14-15 ), and a similar perspective in Lamentations and Jeremiah as to the cause of the Fall of Jerusalem (for example, Lamentations 1:2-18 ; Lamentations 2:14 ; Lamentations 4:13-17 ; Jeremiah 2:18 ; Jeremiah 14:7 ; Jeremiah 16:10-12 ; Jeremiah 23:11-40 ; Jeremiah 37:5-10 ). In either case the author was surely an eyewitness of the Fall of Jerusalem. Lamentations 4:1 vividly pictures the horrors of the siege and Fall of Jerusalem and places part of the blame for the judgment on the immoral prophets and priests of the city
Apostasy - (a pahss' tuh ssee) is the act of rebelling against, forsaking, abandoning, or Falling away from what one has believed. ...
Old Testament The Old Testament speaks of “falling away” in terms of a person's deserting to a foreign king (2 Kings 25:11 ; Jeremiah 37:13-14 ; Jeremiah 39:9 ; Jeremiah 52:15 ). Still God's Fallen people had hope. The Spirit had explicitly revealed this Falling away from the faith ( 1 Timothy 4:1 ). ...
Associated New Testament concepts include the parable of the soils, in which Jesus spoke of those who believe for a while but “fall away” in time of temptation (Luke 8:13 ). Hebrews speaks of Falling away from the living God because of “an evil heart of unbelief” (1 Timothy 3:12 ). Those who Fall away cannot be renewed again to repentance (Hebrews 6:6 ). Yet God is able to keep the believer from Falling (Jude 1:24 ). Based on the concept of God's sovereign grace, some hold that, though true believers may stray, they will never totally Fall away. Others affirm that any who Fall away were never really saved. ...
Persons worried about apostasy should recognize that conviction of sin in itself is evidence that one has not Fallen away
Communion With God: Power of - In driving piles, a machine is used by which a huge weight is lifted up and then made to Fall upon the head of the pile
Jabneel - " it had a school of learned doctors at the time of the Fall of Jerusalem
Repentance: Must be Real - They barked too much at sin to Fall to and destroy it
Suretiship - It may be difficult to refuse, but it is unrighteousness unless the one who is surety can bear the loss if it should Fall upon him
Atonement - ...
When a man has been guilty of any vice, the best atonement he can make for it is, to warn others not to Fall into the like
Grace, Controversies on - For the infallibility of the connection of grace with the consent of the free will, both Fall back upon God's foreknowledge through the scientia media
Evening - Ecclesiastes 11:6 (b) The evening time in the life is the time when the shadows Fall, the day's work is ended, sorrows and weakness have come, and hope has faded
Bear - ...
Daniel 7:5 (b) This animal is used as a type of the Medo-Persian empire which was the second great world kingdom to appear following the Fall of Babylon
Pashur - The Lord would make him a terror to himself and all his friends; and they should Fall by the sword
Allowance - ) That which is allowed; a share or portion allotted or granted; a sum granted as a reimbursement, a bounty, or as appropriate for any purpose; a stated quantity, as of food or drink; hence, a limited quantity of meat and drink, when provisions Fall short
Johanan - 2 Kings 25:23 , Jeremiah 40:8 to Jeremiah 43:5 , the son of Kareah, chief of ‘the captains of the forces,’ who after the Fall of Jerusalem joined Gedaliah at Mizpah
Prostrate - ) To throw down, or cause to Fall in humility or adoration; to cause to bow in humble reverence; used reflexively; as, he prostrated himself
Kirharaseth - Such was our nature originally, like the garden of Eden; and who but must lament to behold the ruin by the Fall
Offend - ...
Notes: (1) In James 2:10 ; 3:2 (twice), AV, ptaio, "to stumble," is translated "offend;" see Fall , STUMBLE
Owe - O deem thy Fall not ow'd to man's decree
Cistern, - a receptacle for water, either conducted from an external spring or proceeding from rain-fall
Heshbon - But the city was doomed to destruction in the divine judgment that was to Fall upon Moab (Isaiah 15:1; Isaiah 15:4; Isaiah 16:8; Jeremiah 48:1-2; Jeremiah 48:45; Jeremiah 49:3)
Adam - It was the name given to the first man, whose creation, Fall, and subsequent history and that of his descendants are detailed in the first book of Moses (Gen (Genesis 5 ). Thereafter the Lord caused a deep sleep to Fall upon him, and while in an unconscious state took one of his ribs, and closed up his flesh again; and of this rib he made a woman, whom he presented to him when he awoke. The narrative of the Fall comprehends in it the great promise of a Deliverer (Genesis 3:15 ), the "first gospel" message to man
Innocence - ...
Innocence in a comparative sense may be attributed to men who, though Fallen, are yet, in respect of particular sins, innocent, or who from circumstances of upbringing, or by the special grace of God, are shielded from that knowledge of sin by personal experience which is the common lot of men. If John the Baptist, in whose life no Fall is recorded, the essence of whose career is one unbroken record of devotion to the service of God, be taken as a type of innocence, he is pre-eminently the stern masculine type of character, and he displays great knowledge of men and power of dealing with the varied temptations of soldiers, publicans, and professors of religion. Innocence possesses an intuitive perception of right and wrong, observable in the child, which becomes blunted by the indulgence of sin; it also implies a strength which is lost by a Fall. Each successive lapse from innocence makes the soul weaker in that particular direction in which the Fall has taken place
Chime - ) To be in harmony; to agree; to suit; to harmonize; to correspond; to Fall in with
Canker - ) A disease incident to trees, causing the bark to rot and Fall off
Joel, Book of - ...
Finally, the prophet foretells portents and judgments as destined to Fall on the enemies of God (ch
Corruptions: Overcome Gradually - Lord, enable me to give hearty blows by the power of thy Holy Spirit until the gates of hell in my soul shall be made to totter and Fall
Baal-Zebub - ” In 2 Kings 1:2 , a Philistine deity from which the Israelite King Ahaziah sought help after injuring himself in a Fall
Neco - Neco began to reign three years after the Fall of Nineveh, the Assyrian capital
Fortune - ) To Fall out; to happen. ) That which befalls or is to befall one; lot in life, or event in any particular undertaking; fate; destiny; as, to tell one's fortune
Corinth - The city visited by Paul was founded by Julius Caesar about a century after the Fall of a former Corinth on the same site
Shame - " (Genesis 2:25) But after the Fall, instantly a conscious sense of sin made them attempt to hide themselves from the presence of the Lord, amidst the trees of the garden
Escheat - ) The Falling back or reversion of lands, by some casualty or accident, to the lord of the fee, in consequence of the extinction of the blood of the tenant, which may happen by his dying without heirs, and formerly might happen by corruption of blood, that is, by reason of a felony or attainder. ) That which Falls to one; a reversion or return...
(7):...
(n. ) Lands which Fall to the lord or the State by escheat
Dissolve - ) To fade away; to Fall to nothing; to lose power
Austria - Austria was included in the Roman provinces of Rhaetia, Noricum, and Pannonia, and received Christianity with Roman civilization, but after the Fall of the Empire was overrun by wild Slavonic tribes
Slide - ...
Psalm 26:1 (b) David knew that he was in the hands of his loving Lord, and therefore would stand firm and would not Fall by the wayside
Pelagianism - Every infant born into the world is in the same condition as Adam before the Fall and becomes a sinner because he sins
Sheba (1) - The tribe of Benjamin through Sheba sought to regain the ascendancy which it lost at Saul's Fall
Window - ...
In the East windows were usually made to open horizontally, which explains how a person sitting in a window could Fall out
Toss - ) To cause to rise and Fall; as, a ship tossed on the waves in a storm
Abate - ) To be defeated, or come to naught; to Fall through; to fail; as, a writ abates
Curse - CURSE and CURSES...
We cannot be too attentive to those terms, as they refer to the original curse pronounced on the Fall of our first parents, and those curses again proclaimed at the giving of the law on mount Sinai, as the penalty of disobedience
Ahijah - God revealed to him that the wife of Jeroboam was coming in disguise to know if their son Abijah would live, and Ahijah had to tell her the dire judgements that should Fall upon Jeroboam and his house
Mow - ) To cut down; to cause to Fall in rows or masses, as in mowing grass; - with down; as, a discharge of grapeshot mows down whole ranks of men
Jab'ne-el - At the time of the Fall of Jerusalem, Jabneh was one of the most populous places of Judea
Cave - ...
To cave in, to Fall in and leave a hollow, as earth on the side of a well or pit. When in digging into the earth, the side is excavated by a Falling of a quantity of earth, it is said to cave in
Snow - The expression in Proverbs 25:13 , "as the cold of snow in the time of harvest," alludes to its use in preparing cool drinks for the reapers; while on the other hand, in Proverbs 26:1 , "snow in summer," that is, a Fall of snow, being unseasonable and unnatural, is compared to honors inappropriately lavished on a fool
Famine - Famine is sometimes a natural effect, as when the Nile does not overflow in Egypt, or rains do not Fall in Judea, at the customary season; or when caterpillars, locusts, or other insects, destroy the fruits
Seize - To Fall or rush upon suddenly and lay hold on or to gripe or grasp suddenly
Tempt - Still his strength conceal'd, ...
Which tempted our attempt, and wrought our Fall
Tip - ...
TIP, In the phrase, to tip off, that is, to Fall headlong hence, to die
e'Bal, Mount, - a mount in the promised land, on which the Israelites were to "put" the curse which should Fall upon them if they disobeyed the commandments of Jehovah
Overtake - The modern Greek version is "even if a man, through lack of circumspection, should Fall into any sin
Grace - All grace comes indeed from God, but since the Fall every grace bestowed upon human beings is based on the merits of Christ. Before the Fall Adam received grace directly from God, without reference to the Saviour of mankind; and so did the angels whilst they were oh probation. But now we, the children of the Fallen Adam, receive grace only through Christ Our Lord
Eve - Paul recalls the story of her Fall as a warning to his young and attractive, but weak and unstable, Corinthian Church, As God presented Eve, a pure virgin, to Adam, so St. (1 Timothy 2:13-14) uses the story of the Fall for the purpose of proving woman’s natural inferiority to man
Trip - ) To cause to stumble, or take a false step; to cause to lose the footing, by striking the feet from under; to cause to Fall; to throw off the balance; to supplant; - often followed by up; as, to trip up a man in wrestling. ) To release, let Fall, or see free, as a weight or compressed spring, as by removing a latch or detent
Nature, Natural - ...
The Fall disrupted God's intended order for creation and for humankind (Genesis 3:16-19 ). As a result of the Fall, humankind has become absolutely sinful. That creation order was disrupted by the Fall, but it was not destroyed. Although the Fall corrupted human nature and predisposed people to turn away from God, Christ's work on the cross has made it possible for redeemed humankind to turn toward God and partake of his divine nature once again. Similarly, although creation suffers under the curse of the Fall, it too looks forward to the restoration of the original creation order
Fall of Man - In addition to what is stated on this subject under the article Adam, it may be necessary to establish the literal sense of the account given of man's Fall in the book of Genesis. The first is, that the account of the Fall of the first pair is a part of a continuous history. As this, then, is the case, and the evidence of it lies upon the very face of the history, it is, clear, that if the account of the Fall be excerpted from the whole narrative as allegorical, any subsequent part, from Abel to Noah, from Noah to Abraham, from Abraham to Moses, may be excerpted for the same reason, which reason is merely this, that it does not agree with the theological opinions of the interpreter; and thus the whole of the Pentateuch may be rejected history, and converted into fable. Either then the account of the Fall must be taken as history, or the historical character of the whole five books of Moses must be unsettled; and if none but infidels will go to the latter consequence, then no one who admits the Pentateuch to be a true history generally, can consistently refuse to admit the story of the Fall of the first pair to be a narrative of real events, because it is written in the same style, and presents the same character of a continuous record of events. This point is examined and satisfactorily refuted in Holden's learned and excellent work, entitled, "Dissertation on the Fall of Man;" but it is easy to show, that it would amount to nothing, if granted, in the mind of any who is satisfied on the previous question of the inspiration of the Holy Scriptures. For let it be admitted that Moses, in writing the pentateuchal history, availed himself of the traditions of the patriarchal ages, a supposition not in the least inconsistent with his inspiration or with the absolute truth of his history, since the traditions so introduced have been authenticated by the Holy Spirit; or let it be supposed, which is wholly gratuitous, that he made use of previously existing documents; and that some differences of style in his books may be traced which serve to point out his quotations, which in a position that some of the best Hebraists have denied; yet two things are to be noted: first, that the inspired character of the books of Moses is authenticated by our Lord and his Apostles, so that they must necessarily be wholly true, and free from real contradictions; and, secondly, that to make it any thing to their purpose who contend that the account of the Fall in an older document, introduced by Moses, it ought to be shown that it is not written as truly in the narrative style, even if it could be proved to be, in some respects, a different style, as that which precedes and follows it. There is no reason to doubt but that this passage refers to the Fall and the first sin of man. Why not clean? Did God make woman or man unclean at the beginning? If he did, the expostulation would have been more apposite, and much stronger, had the true cause been assigned, and Job had said, "How canst thou expect cleanness in man, whom thou createdst unclean?" But, as the case now stands, the expostulation has a plain reference to the introduction of vanity and corruption by the sin of the woman, and is an evidence that this ancient writer was sensible of the evil consequences of the Fall upon the whole race of man. If the history of the Fall, as recorded by Moses, were an allegory, or any thing but a literal history, several of the above allusions would have no meaning; but the matter is put beyond all possible doubt in the New Testament, unless the same culpable liberties be taken with the interpretation of the words of our Lord and of St. " When, therefore, it is considered, that these passages are introduced, not for rhetorical illustration, or in the way of classical quotation, but are made the basis of grave and important reasonings, which embody some of the most important doctrines of the Christian revelation, and of important social duties and points of Christian order and decorum; it would be to charge the writers of the New Testament with the grossest absurdity, nay, with even culpable and unworthy trifling, to suppose them to argue from the history of the Fall as a narrative, when they knew it to be an allegory. For the effect of the Fall of Adam upon his posterity, See JUSTIFICATION
Johannes Bessarion - After the Fall of Constantinople, he labored unceasingly to save the Oriental Christians, and was rewarded for his efforts with the commendatory abbacy of the Greek Basilians at Grottaferrata; subsequently he was named Patriarch of Constantinople
Bessarion, Johannes - After the Fall of Constantinople, he labored unceasingly to save the Oriental Christians, and was rewarded for his efforts with the commendatory abbacy of the Greek Basilians at Grottaferrata; subsequently he was named Patriarch of Constantinople
Devil - (Greek: diabolos, slanderer, accuser, or traducer) ...
The word is used as a name for a Fallen angel or evil spirit, especially for the chief of the rebellious angels, Lucifer or Satan (Matthew 25). Yet he remains a rational spirit, possessed of the knowledge he had before the Fall, and in the administration of the universe is permitted, for God's own purposes, to exercise some influence upon animate and inanimate creatures
Orphans - Their rearing will generally be undertaken by relatives, but among the poor the responsibility may Fall upon public or private agencies
So - Assyrian annals, however, inform us that in 722, shortly after the Fall of Samaria, a certain Sib’i , ‘tartan’ (commander-in-chief) of Musri, was sent by Pir’u, king of Musri ( i
Titans - ...
Similarly in the song of victory in Jdt 16:7 we read:...
‘For the mighty one did not Fall by the young men,...
Neither did the sons of Titans smite him,...
Nor did tall giants set upon him,...
But Judith, the daughter of Merari …’...
In this late work Greek mythology has been absorbed by Jewish thought
Mount - The mountains of Western and Middle Palestine do not extend to the sea, but gently slope into plains, and toward the Jordan Fall down into the Ghor
Snow - This historical books of the Bible contain only two notices of snow actually Falling -- (2 Samuel 23:20 ) 1 Maccabees 13:22 ; but the allusions in the poetical books are so numerous that there can be no doubt as to its being an ordinary occurrence in the winter months. At Jerusalem snow often Falls to the depth of a foot or more in january or February, but it seldom lies. At Nazareth it Falls more frequently and deeply,a nd it has been observed to Fall even in the maritime plain of Joppa and about Carmel
Recover - , "awake"), said of those who, opposing the truth through accepting perversions of it, Fall into the snare of the Devil, becoming intoxicated with error; for these "recovery" is possible only by "repentance unto the knowledge of the truth
Mash - the inhabitants of Mesene near Bassera where the Tigris and Euphrates Fall into the Persian gulf; this however seems too far from the other Aramaic settlements
Ancient - ) Old; that happened or existed in former times, usually at a great distance of time; belonging to times long past; specifically applied to the times before the Fall of the Roman empire; - opposed to modern; as, ancient authors, literature, history; ancient days
Attack - ) To Fall upon with force; to assail, as with force and arms; to assault. ) The act of attacking, or Falling on with force or violence; an onset; an assault; - opposed to defense
Egyptian, the - Later the Egyptian gathered 30,000 in the wilderness, leading the multitude to the Mount of Olives from which, so he promised, they would see the walls of Jerusalem Fall at his command
Jedidiah - Jedid-Jah, ("darling of Jehovah"), name given by God through Nathan the prophet to Solomon (2 Samuel 12:25) combining David's own name (Jedid akin to David "beloved") and Jehovah's; a pledge of David's restoration to God's favor after his Fall in the matter of Bathsheba, implying the union of the earthly and the heavenly king
Belshazzar - From the standpoint of Babylonian history, Belshazzar was not a particularly important personage except that he participated in the decisions and events leading to the Fall of the Babylonian empire
Dread - Shall not his dread Fall on you
Mercy: Its Effect on the Soul - What think you, will he not entreat the gracious monarch to extend his clemency to his fellow rebels? Will not the tears stand in his eyes as he admires the difference which his sovereign's free mercy has made? Will he not be moved with emotions impossible to describe, of mingled joy and grief; pity and gratitude, wonder and compassion? Christian, see your likeness here drawn to the life, you must surely feel ready to Fall down on your knees, and cry,' Lord, why dost thou reveal thy mercy to me and not to these? Save them also, O Lord, for thy name's sake
Asleep - Acts 7:60 (b) Christians who die are said to "fall asleep
Sabeans - It is a blessed thought however, what is said, Psalms 72:1-20 throughout, concerning the ultimate extension and prosperity of the Redeemer's kingdom "when the kings of Sheba and of Seba shall offer gifts; yea, when all kings shall Fall down before him, all nations shall serve him
Ahaziah - He reigned two years and died after suffering a Fall in his palace at Samaria (2 Kings 1:2-17 )
Evening - The latter part and close of the day, and the beginning of darkness or night properly the decline or Fall of the day, or of the sun
Ashes (2) - These, being beneath the feet, suggest humiliation, and when thrown into the air they were allowed to Fall upon the person of the mourner, that he might carry the evidences of his grief with him
Magdalen - settled a revenue on them; and farther appointed, that the effects of all public prostitutes dying interstate should Fall to them; and that the testaments of the rest should be invalid, unless they bequeathed a portion of their effects, which was to be at least a fifth part of them
Eugenics - Eugenists Fall into two classes: extreme eugenists, who advocate the compulsory breeding of the select, birth control among the poor, and sterilization and euthanasia of the unfit; moderate eugenists, who advocate little more than the segregation of the feeble-minded in order to prevent their increase
Dan - Dan shall be a serpent by the way, an adder in the path, that biteth the horse's heels, so that his rider shall Fall backward
Affliction - In Fallen humanity man is born to trouble as the sparks fly upward. Besides the afflictions incident on Fallen humanity, there are afflictions that Fall specially upon the Christian
Mephibosheth - See 2 Samuel 4:4 , and his nurse was in such consternation at the news, that she let the child Fall; and from this accident he was lame all his life
Retire - To recede to Fall back
Man - He was created with holy dispositions, prompting him to holy actions; but he was Fallible, and did Fall from his integrity (3:1-6). (See Fall
Stumbling Block - In the figurative language of the Bible, a stumbling block is some kind of obstacle that either causes people to Fall or hinders them in doing what they should. Through joining in idol feasts, these Christians were tempted to Fall into idolatry and immorality (Revelation 2:14)
Hit - To meet or Fall on by good luck to succeed by accident not to miss. ...
To hit on or upon, to light on to come to or Fall on by chance to meet or find, as by accident
Philadelphia - To Smyrna the promise is, "the synagogue of Satan" should not prevail against her faithful ones; to Philadelphia, she should even win over some of "the synagogue of Satan," (the Jews who might have been the church of God, but by opposition had become "the synagogue of Satan") to "fall on their faces and confess God is in her of a truth" (1 Corinthians 14:25). Her converts Fall low before those whom once they persecuted (Psalms 84:10; Acts 16:29-33)
Want - To Fall short not to contain or have. To Fall short to be lacking
Nail - cut down and Fall, and the burden that was upon it shall be cut off," i. all Shebna's offspring and dependants and all his emoluments and honours shall Fall with himself, as the ornaments hanging upon a peg Fall when it Falls
Man - This article will deal only with the religious estimate of man, as other matters which might have been included will be found in other articles (Creation, Eschatology, Fall, Sin, Psychology). Man’s dignity, as made by special resolve and distinct act of God in God’s image and likeness (synonymous terms), with dominion over the other creatures, and for communion with God, as asserted in the double account of his Creation in Genesis 1:1-31 ; Genesis 2:1-25 , and man’s degradation by his own choice of evil, as presented figuratively in the story of his Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 , are the two aspects of man that are everywhere met with. Psalms 51:1-19 ), and is still more emphasized in the NT, with distinct allusion to the Fall and its consequences (see esp
Offence - ...
"In NT skandalon is always used metaphorically, and ordinarily of anything that arouses prejudice, or becomes a hindrance to others, or causes them to Fall by the way. , "all stumblingblocks;" Matthew 18:7 , RV, "occasions of stumbling" and "occasion;" Luke 17:1 (ditto); Romans 14:13 , RV, "an occasion of Falling" (AV, "an occasion to Fall"), said of such a use of Christian liberty as proves a hindrance to another; Romans 16:17 , RV, "occasions of stumbling," said of the teaching of things contrary to sound doctrine; 1 John 2:10 , "occasion of stumbling," of the absence of this in the case of one who loves his brother and thereby abides in the light. See Fall , B, Note (3)
Jezrael - With the Fall of the house of Achab, the glory of Jezrael disappeared; only once more is the name mentioned, when the prophet Osee names the judgment of God, chastising and saving Israel, as the "great day of Jezrael" (Osee 1)
Jezrahel - With the Fall of the house of Achab, the glory of Jezrael disappeared; only once more is the name mentioned, when the prophet Osee names the judgment of God, chastising and saving Israel, as the "great day of Jezrael" (Osee 1)
Jezreel - With the Fall of the house of Achab, the glory of Jezrael disappeared; only once more is the name mentioned, when the prophet Osee names the judgment of God, chastising and saving Israel, as the "great day of Jezrael" (Osee 1)
Damascus, Syria - Mentioned in Genesis and on the pylons of Karnak, with the Fall of the Kingdom of Syria it seems to have lost its autonomy, and appears only occasionally in the history of the Jews, Greeks, and Romans
Terebinth - The dark overhanging foliage affords a grateful shade in summer, but in autumn the leaves change colour and Fall off
Tiberius - The successive deaths of his nominees compelled him to Fall back upon Tiberius, who in a
Ossifrage - , "bone-breaker"]'>[1] by letting them Fall on a rock from a great height
Club - ) To throw, or allow to Fall, into confusion
Ignorance: of Oneìs Own Heart - A crowd were watching it, in momentary expectation of seeing it Fall, while the owner, standing in the midst of them, was cursing God to his face, and pouring out the most horrid oaths
Rizpah - Her famous act was (2 Samuel 21:8-11) her watching against bird and beast of prey the hung up corpses of her two sons and five kinsmen on the sacred hill of Gibeah, with which Saul had been so closely connected (1 Samuel 11:4), from the beginning of barley harvest, the sacred Passover season, until the Fall of the early rain in October, without tent to screen her from the scorching sun all day and the saturating dews at night, and with only her black widow's sackcloth to rest upon, keeping her from the rocky ground
Lightning - Lightning serves as an illustration for Christ's clearly visible coming (Matthew 24:26-27 ) and of Satan's (sudden, catastrophic, visible?) Fall (Luke 10:18 )
Mortal - mortalis, from mors, death, or morior, to die, that is, to Fall
Pit - It is so easy to Fall in, and so hard to get out
Gabriel Garcia Moreno - Graduated in law at Quito, 1844, he entered political life, and after the Fall of Roca, whom he had helped defeat the Flores administration, he was exiled
Garcia Moreno, Gabriel - Graduated in law at Quito, 1844, he entered political life, and after the Fall of Roca, whom he had helped defeat the Flores administration, he was exiled
Cherub, Cherubim - They were placed at Eden to keep the tree of life after the Fall of man
Conversion - The Lord, knowing that he would Fall under the sifting of Satan, said, "When thou art converted strengthen thy brethren;" that is, when he had returned in contrition, or been restored
Coals - ), that the ‘coals of fire’ are Divine judgments which will Fall on the sinner’s head if he hardens his heart against persevering love, is impossible
Snare - So the Christian, taught of God, and led by the Holy Spirit, will not be ignorant of Satan's devices, and will not Fall thereby
Rade - ) The rate of ascent or descent; gradient; deviation from a level surface to an inclined plane; - usually stated as so many feet per mile, or as one foot rise or Fall in so many of horizontal distance; as, a heavy grade; a grade of twenty feet per mile, or of 1 in 264
Scour - ) A place scoured out by running water, as in the bed of a stream below a Fall
Ambassador - 2 Corinthians 5:20 ; Ephesians 6:20 ; and judgement will Fall on those who obey not the gospel
Rade - ) The rate of ascent or descent; gradient; deviation from a level surface to an inclined plane; - usually stated as so many feet per mile, or as one foot rise or Fall in so many of horizontal distance; as, a heavy grade; a grade of twenty feet per mile, or of 1 in 264
Rap - To rap and rend, to seize and tear or strip to Fall on and plunder to snatch by violence
Lighten - To Fall to light
Rain - The former Falls in the latter part of October, the seed-time of Palestine; and the weather then continues variable, with more or less rain the whole winter, until after the latter or spring rain in April. ...
It appears from meteorological records kept at Jerusalem, that the average annual Fall of rain is fifty-five inches
Scald - Here the blue flames of scalding brimstone Fall
Revolt - To Fall off or turn from one to another
Venus - venio, which signifies to rush, to Fall, to happen venor, to hunt, &c
Who - There thou tellst of kings, and who aspire who Fall, who rise, who triumph, who do moan
Eagle, - No sooner does an animal Fall than these birds congregate in numbers on its carcase, according to Job 9:26 ; Matthew 24:28
Psalms - But they Fall short of the canticles of the NT in spiritual insight
Nought - ...
C — 4: ἐκπίπτω (Strong's #1601 — Verb — ekpipto — ek-pip'-to ) "to Fall out," is used in Romans 9:6 in the sense of Falling from its place, Falling, of the word of God, RV, "hath come to nought" (AV, "hath taken none effect"). See Fall
Evil - In Genesis, evil and suffering appeared only after the Fall (Genesis 3:16-19 ). Physical suffering and pain and finally death have been introduced as a consequence of the Fall (Genesis 3:16-19 ). Noah's flood, the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, and the Fall of Jerusalem are examples. The Bible tells us that with the Fall, humanity's first sin, a radical change took place in the universe. People sinned, and before that, the Fallen angels, not God
Offence - nouns, in the sense of an injury, a trespass or a Fall, or as an occasion of unbelief, doubt, or apostasy. The former is used with respect to a moral Fall, ‘a Falling beside,’ and thus completes the conception of sin (ἁμαρτία, ‘missing the mark’) by that of Falling short or Falling aside. It signifies a bait or stick in a trap and generally anything which causes a person to be entrapped or to Fall. To cause Christ’s little ones to stumble or to Fall is severely condemned (Matthew 18:6)
Break - ) To diminish the force of; to lessen the shock of, as a Fall or blow. ) To Fall in business; to become bankrupt. ) To Fall out; to terminate friendship
Man - But Revelation also adds the fact of man's Fall, which reason only dimly suspects, of man's redemption through the Incarnation and Death of the Second Person of the Trinity, of the institution of the Church, which is commanded to carry on the work of redemption till the end of time
Ahaziah - After a Fall from the gallery of his house, he sent to consult a god of the Philistines as to his recovery
Methodist Episcopal Church - " The latter emphasize "belief in the Trinity, the Fall of man and his need of repentance, freedom of the will, sanctification, future rewards and punishments, and the sufficiency of the Scriptures for salvation
Rain - The first rains after the summer begin to Fall in November, though showers in October are not unknown; and the weather continues intermittently wet until the following March, or sometimes till April. As a rule the first rainfalls, which are accompanied by heavy thunderstorms, are followed by comparatively fine weather, broken by occasional wet days, after which, towards the end of the rainy season, there are again heavy successions of rain-storms. The average annual rainfall in Jerusalem is about 28 inches, though this is subject to much variation
Ahaziah - His messengers, sent to consult the god of Ekron regarding his recovery from the effects of a Fall from the roof-gallery of his palace, were met on the way by Elijah, who sent them back to tell the king that he would never rise from his bed (1Kings 22:51; 2 Kings 1:18 )
Obadiah, Book of - Neither, however, would save it from the divine judgment that would Fall upon it because of its active cooperation in the destruction of Jerusalem (Obadiah 1:1-16)
Nicholas v, Pope - This, together with the Fall of Constantinople and the discovery of republican conspiracies in Rome, dealt him a fatal blow
Seraiah - Army officer who reported to Gedaliah when he was named governor immediately after the Fall of Jerusalem in 586 B
Distinction - Maids, women, wives, without distinction Fall
Knee, Kneel - To Fall upon the knees before a superior is an act at once of reverence and of entreaty ( 2 Kings 1:13 , Matthew 17:14 , Luke 5:8 etc
Ahaziah - By a Fall from a window of his palace he was seriously injured, and, after lingering awhile, died from the accident
Tammuz - Oh, what an awful state is our nature reduced to by the Fall! (See Moloch
Morsel - Moth - He is the One who will direct the way when the shadows Fall across the path
Curse - To utter a wish of evil against one to imprecate evil upon to call for mischief or injury to Fall upon to execrate
Fold - The primary sense is to Fall, or to lay, to set, throw or press together
Tilt - ) To lean; to Fall partly over; to tip
Abel - In process of time the great difference in the two brothers was manifested by Abel offering to God a slain animal, whilst Cain brought the fruit of own labour from the cursed ground, ignoring the facts that in the Fall of Adam life had been forfeited and the ground cursed
Herodians - But as the general expectation of the Jewish nation, at that time, was on the tiptoe for their king the Messiah to appear, to deliver them from the Roman yoke, and to raise an empire that should conquer the world, Herod was glad to Fall in with this popular idea, not doubting but that they would regard him as the person
Rebecca, Rebekah - The latter whom God said should be the first, was her favourite son; but she lacked faith, and did not wait for the promised blessing to Fall upon Jacob in God's time, but sought it in her own cunning way
Abel - In process of time the great difference in the two brothers was manifested by Abel offering to God a slain animal, whilst Cain brought the fruit of own labour from the cursed ground, ignoring the facts that in the Fall of Adam life had been forfeited and the ground cursed
Babbler, Babblings - Then it seems to have been used of a man accustomed to hang about the streets and markets, picking up scraps which Fall from loads; hence a parasite, who lives at the expense of others, a hanger on
Providence - Not a sparrow, nor a hair of the head, Falls to the ground without his knowledge, Isaiah 14:26-27 ; Matthew 10:29-30 ; Acts 17:24 - 29 . The history of each man, the rise and Fall of nations, and the progress of the church of Christ, reveal at every step the hand of Him who "worketh all things after the counsel of his own will
Sparrow - A sparrow is of course of comparatively little value; and it is therefore a striking exemplification of God's providence to say that he watches even over the sparrow's Fall, Matthew 10:29
Tommaso Parentucelli - This, together with the Fall of Constantinople and the discovery of republican conspiracies in Rome, dealt him a fatal blow
Pashhur - The son of Immer, a Temple official and priest, who caused Jeremiah to be beaten and put in the stocks after he had predicted the Fall of Jerusalem
Novice - A bishop is to be ‘not a novice, lest being puffed up he Fall into the condemnation of the devil
Body, Bodily - , "a Fall" (akin to pipto, "to Fall"); hence, "that which is Fallen, a corpse," Matthew 14:12 ; 24:28 , "carcase;" Mark 6:29 ; 15:45 , "corpse;" Revelation 11:8,9 , "dead bodies" (Gk
Antichrist - Now, it is generally agreed that the reign of Antichrist is 1260 years; consequently, if his rise is not to be reckoned till he was possessed of secular authority, then his Fall must be when this power is taken away. If this rise began, according to Mede, in 456, then he must have Fallen in 1716. As these hypotheses, therefore, must Fall to the ground, it remains for us to consider why the last mentioned is the more probable. In this we have to rejoice, that, however various, the opinions of the learned may be as to the time when Antichrist rose, it is evident to all that he is fast declining, and will certainly Fall, Revelation 18:1 ; Revelation 18:5 . on Fall of Babylon; Ward's Three Discourses of Prophecy and books under that article
Calendars - The vernal and autumnal equinoxes (the day in the spring and Fall, respectively, when days and nights are of equal lengths) were commonly designated as the beginning of a new year. In Phoenicia, Canaan, and Israel, however, the Fall date was chosen, probably for the reason that harvesting marked the end of one agricultural cycle and prepared for the next. In the exilic and postexilic periods, the Jews shifted to the spring new year, but since rabbinic times the Fall new year has been observed. Albright, Ancient Near Eastern Texts)...
Two things are important to observe: (1) the list commences in the Fall and ends with the following summer; (2) because it alternates between two-month and one-month periods and does not name or number the months, we can see that the succession of agricultural activities determines the order of items, and that the year is conceived on the succession of agricultural events rather than on astronomical observation. ...
The month In addition to knowing that the length of months varied and that a new-year date in the spring or Fall determined which of them was first, we are able to observe through Israel's history an interesting development in the naming of the months
Nativity of Christ, Feast of the - The feast is a holy day of obligation, preceded by the preparatory season of Advent and by a special vigil; should it Fall on a Friday it abrogates the law of abstinence
Christmas - The feast is a holy day of obligation, preceded by the preparatory season of Advent and by a special vigil; should it Fall on a Friday it abrogates the law of abstinence
Serpent - ...
The serpent is first mentioned in connection with the history of the temptation and Fall of our first parents (Genesis 3 )
Quick - ...
Numbers 16:30 (a) This word is used to describe the matter of time in regard to the Fall of these rebels
Scapegoat - At this place the Judean desert was supposed to commence; and the man in whose charge the goat was sent out, while setting him free, was instructed to push the unhappy beast down the slope of the mountain side, which was so steep as to insure the death of the goat, whose bones were broken by the Fall
Zadok - In him the line of Phinehas resumed the dignity, and held it till the Fall of Jerusalem
Rain - Rarely did rain of any significance Fall outside these two periods. Westerly winds from the Mediterranean Sea brought wet storms during the winter, most of the rain Falling along the coastal plain, in the north, and in the central hills
Tree of Knowledge - Reference to “the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” is in a context concerned with the Fall
Gamaliel - "...
Son of rabbi Simeon, and grandson of Hillel; president of the Sanhedrin under Tiberius, Caligula, and Claudius; he died 18 years before the Fall of Jerusalem
Machaerus - After the Fall of Jerusalem it was recaptured, and finally destroyed by the Roman general Lucilius Bassus (ib
Cord - The Lord loosened the bands and permitted Job to Fall into affliction and poverty
Tip - ) To Fall on, or incline to, one side
Antinomians - One has but to read carefully the epistle to the Galatians to see that for Gentile believers to place themselves under the law is to Fall from grace; and Paulexhorted them to be as he was, for he was (though a Jew by birth) as free from the law by the death of Christ as they were as Gentiles
Lag - ) To walk or more slowly; to stay or Fall behind; to linger or loiter
Dog - The only apparent exception to the above is when the Lord compared the Syrophenician woman to a dog, and she said, "Yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which Fall from their masters' table
Rain - For six months in the year, from May to October, no rain Falls, the whole land becomes dry, parched, and brown. Rain continues to Fall more or less during the month of March; it is very rare in April
Occasion - occasio, from oceido, to Fall ob and cado. Properly, a Falling, happening or coming to an occurrence, casualty, incident something distinct from the ordinary course or regular orders of things
Rear - To lift after a Fall
Lion - he croucheth, and humbleth himself, that the poor may Fall by his strong ones
Tempest - The primary sense of tempus, time, is a Falling, or that which Falls, comes or happens, from some verb which signifies to Fall or come suddenly, or rather to drive, to rush
Frontlets - This square is put on the middle of the forehead, and the strings being girt about the head, are then brought before, and Fall on the breast
Regeneration - A baptizedChristian may repeatedly Fall from Grace, and by repentance, byamendment of life and by forgiveness he may be again restored,(this is Conversion), but he cannot be said to be again regeneratewithout a grievous misapprehension of the language of the Bible anda total departure from the Doctrine of the Primitive Church
Shell - ) To Fall off, as a shell, crust, etc. ) To cast the shell, or exterior covering; to Fall out of the pod or husk; as, nuts shell in Falling
Fear - Since the Fall of man, the whole race of Adam have known the effects both of natural and sinful fear; none but the regenerated are acquainted with what is known in Scripture by a religious, or holy fear. ...
Natural and slavish fear, arising from a conscious sense of sin, manifested itself immediately upon the Fall, when Adam sought to hide himself from the presence of the Lord amidst the trees of the garden
Sleep - ...
First, Jesus is never said to have Fallen asleep. Second, unbelievers are never said to Fall asleep. Third, believers are said to Fall asleep at death (1 Corinthians 15:6,18 , 20 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:13,15 ), and in one instance "to Fall asleep in Jesus" (1 Thessalonians 4:14 ). So the metaphor of sleep is used to emphasize that we have no more to fear from death than we do from Falling asleep. Fourth, believers are never said to have Fallen asleep in the death of Jesus; rather, we died with him (Colossians 2:20 ; 2 Timothy 2:11 ) or were crucified with him (Galatians 2:20 ). Fifth, even when believers are punished by the Lord with temporal death, it is still no longer death but a Falling asleep (1 Corinthians 11:30 )
Exile - The eventual Fall of Samaria occurred at the hands of Sargon II (722-705 B. ...
The prophets Hosea and Amos had prophesied the Fall of Israel. These two prophets proclaimed that Israel's Fall was due to moral and spiritual degeneration rather than to the superior military might of the Assyrian nation. ...
History of the Exile of Judah More than a hundred years before the Babylon Exile, Isaiah, the prophet, had predicted Judah's Fall (Isaiah 6:11-12 ; Isaiah 8:14 ; Isaiah 10:11 ). In addition, the prophets Micah, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, Habakkuk, and Ezekiel agreed that Judah would Fall. ) until the Fall of Jerusalem when he was blinded and taken into Exile into Babylon (2 Kings 24:17-25:7 ; 2 Chronicles 36:10-21 ; Jeremiah 39:1-7 ; Jeremiah 52:1-11 ; Ezekiel 12:12-13 ; Ezekiel 17:5-21 )
Kingly Office of Christ - ...
Christ sustained and exercised the function of mediatorial King as well as of Prophet and Priest, from the time of the Fall of man, when he entered on his mediatorial work; yet it may be said that he was publicly and formally enthroned when he ascended up on high and sat down at the Father's right hand (Psalm 2:6 ; Jeremiah 23:5 ; Isaiah 9:6 ), after his work of humiliation and suffering on earth was "finished
Elam - On the Fall of the Assyrian Empire, Elam passed into the hands of the Persians" (A
Baal-Zebub - And this was the ridiculous idol worshipped at Ekron, to whom Ahaziah, king of Israel, sent to enquire concerning his recovery from a Fall he had from his terrace
Nebuchadrezzar - The Fall of Nineveh gave Egypt a chance to reclaim Syria, and Pharaoh-Necho made an attempt to regain it
Tadmor - 11 of Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Safety of Believers - The man with a deceitful heart and a darkened mind, a feeble frame and a slippery way, a fainting heart and a daring foe: the man would stumble and Fall: but the member of Christ's body cannot drop off; the portion of the Redeemer cannot be wrenched from his grasp
Descent - The act of descending the act of passing from a higher to a lower place, by any form of motion, as by walking, riding, rolling, sliding, sinking or Falling. Fall from a higher to a lower state or station
Flake - A small collection of snow, as it Falls from the clouds or from the air a little bunch or cluster of snowy crystals, such as Fall in still moderate weather
Belgium - After passing through the hands of Lorraine, Burgundy, Austria, Spain, Austria again, France, and, after the Fall of Napoleon, Holland, the Belgian provinces revolted in 1830, proclaimed their independence, and were recognized as a constitutional monarchy in 1831
Prisoners - ...
Isaiah 10:4 (b) This difficult passage may mean that the unrighteous rulers shall eventually be punished by making such wicked devices that they themselves shall Fall, and those who have been their prisoners will become their masters, and they themselves will become the prisoners
Silk - Gibbon, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, iv
Quarrel - ) To violate concord or agreement; to have a difference; to Fall out; to be or become antagonistic. ) A breach of concord, amity, or obligation; a Falling out; a difference; a disagreement; an antagonism in opinion, feeling, or conduct; esp
Find - ) To meet with, or light upon, accidentally; to gain the first sight or knowledge of, as of something new, or unknown; hence, to Fall in with, as a person
Heavy - ) Heaved or lifted with labor; not light; weighty; ponderous; as, a heavy stone; hence, sometimes, large in extent, quantity, or effects; as, a heavy Fall of rain or snow; a heavy failure; heavy business transactions, etc
Decrees, of God - It also follows that God has eternally known all events that have occurred, are occurring, and will occur in this creation including the Fall, redemption, glorification, etc
Infants - On these principles, the death of Christ saves more than the Fall of Adam lost
Shank - ) To Fall off, as a leaf, flower, or capsule, on account of disease affecting the supporting footstalk; - usually followed by off
Bastard - To restrain the licentious desires of the heart, Jehovah by an express law fixed a stigma upon the bastard, which was not to be removed till the tenth generation; and to show that the precept was on no account to be violated, or suffered to Fall into disuse, it is emphatically repeated, "A bastard shall not enter into the congregation of the Lord; even to his tenth generation shall he not enter into the congregation of the Lord,"...
Deuteronomy 23:2
Intercessions - ...
B — 1: ἐντυγχάνω (Strong's #1793 — Verb — entunchano — en-toong-khan'-o ) primarily "to Fall in with, meet with in order to converse;" then, "to make petition," especially "to make intercession, plead with a person," either for or against others; (a) against, Acts 25:24 , "made suit to (me)," RV [1], i
Observation - We apply the word to simple vision, as when one says, a spot on the sun's disk did not Fall under his observation or to the notice or cognizance of the mind, as when one says, the distinction made by the orator escaped his observation
Remembrance - Titan among the heav'ns th' immortal fact display'd, lest the remembrance of his grief should Fall
Bethesda - Its waters rise and Fall at irregular intervals, and flow down by a subterraneous channel to the pool of Siloam
Plague - The Seer beholds successive Divine judgments Fall upon the earth, the sea, the rivers, the sun, moon, and stars
Harvest - The Festival of Booths fell at the end of harvest in the Fall. If a person brought them, then the Lord might accept them (Leviticus 23:10-11 ), an acceptance perhaps reflected in the successful completion of the harvest in the Fall, a "blessing" (Deuteronomy 24:19 ; Psalm 107:37-38 )
Fail - Fallo Gr. It seems to be allied to Fall, Fallow, pale, and many other words. To be neglected to Fall short not to be executed
Zephaniah, Prophecy of - The prophet proclaims the judgements that must Fall upon the land, and upon Judah and Jerusalem, though with grace to the faithful remnant at the end. God had from time to time used some of them as the means whereby He punished His chosen people; but they had been filled with pride and had abused their power, therefore His judgements should surely Fall upon them: the prophecy however looks on to the future great day of God's wrath
Perseverance - God, as a Being possessed of infinite love, faithfulness, wisdom, and power, can hardly be supposed to suffer any of his people finally to Fall into perdition. Now if there be a possibility of their finally Falling, then this choice, this union, his death and intercession, may all be in vain, and rendered abortive; an idea as derogatory to the divine glory, and as dishonourable to Jesus Christ, as possibly can be. To this it is answered, that some of these texts do not so much as suppose the Falling away of a truly good man; and to all of them, it is said, that they only show what would be the consequence if such should Fall away; but cannot prove that it ever in fact happens. It is foretold as a future event that some should Fall away, Matthew 24:12-13 . It is objected that many have in fact Fallen away, as David, Solomon, Peter, Alexander, Hymeneus, &c. to which it is answered, that David, Solomon, and Peter's Fall, were not total; and as to the others, there is no proof of their ever being true Christians
Fall of Man - And thus it appears possible, how, notwithstanding the divine image with which man is adorned, he might Fall; for though included in it knowledge, it did not exclude from it confused notions, which are those arising from sense and imagination, especially when off our guard and inattentive, blindly following the present impression. In the Fall of man we may observe, ...
1. Infidels, however, have treated the account of the Fall and its effects, with contempt, and considered the whole as absurd; but their objections to the manner have been ably answered by a variety of authors; and as to the effects, one would hardly think any body could deny. For, that man is a Fallen creature, is evident, if we consider his misery as an inhabitant of the natural world; the disorders of the globe we inhabit, and the dreadful scourges with which it is visited; the deplorable and shocking circumstances of our birth; the painful and dangerous travail of women; our natural uncleanliness, helplessness, ignorance, and nakedness; the gross darkness in which we naturally are, both with respect to God and a future state; the general rebellion of the brute creation against us; the various poisons that lurk in the animal, vegetable, and mineral world, ready to destroy us: the heavy curse of toil and sweat to which we are liable; the innumerable calamities of life, and the pangs of death
Medium - The transformation of Saul from one who expelled mediums (1 Samuel 28:3 ) to one who consulted a medium at En-dor (1 Samuel 28:8-19 ) graphically illustrates his Fall
Fog: a Figure of Our Partial Knowledge - ...
Into such blunders do we Fall in our life-pilgrimage; a little trouble in the distance is, through our mistiness, magnified into a crushing adversity
Rape - Rape was one horror associated with the Fall of Jerusalem (Lamentations 5:11 ; Zechariah 14:2 )
Offence - All these may be compared to the stumbling-blocks which cause a man to Fall
to'Bit, Book of, - It is represented and completed shortly after the Fall of Nineveh (B
Manna - And in the Encyclopedia, the translators are charged with making Moses Fall into a plain contradiction
Pit - In the New Testament "pit" is used literally of a place into which an animal (Matthew 12:11 ; Luke 14:5 ) or the blind (Matthew 15:14 ; Luke 6:39 ) might Fall (the latter is also a figure for the spiritually blind Pharisees). In addition, it is used metaphorically for an underworld dungeon: a gloomy prison for the Fallen angels (2 Peter 2:4 ) or a bottomless abyss for Satan during the millennium (Revelation 20:1-3 )
Preacher: to Avoid a Lofty Style - Both the jets, and the basin into which they Fall, are above the reach of any man of ordinary stature; yet the fountain was intended to supply the public with water, and it fulfils its design by a method which we never saw in use before; every person brings a spout or trough with him long enough to reach the top of the fountain and bring the water down into his pitcher
Concubines - This alas, was the very Fall ofSolomon, who had 700 wives and 300 concubines, and they did turn away his heart
Deposit - ) To lay down; to place; to put; to let Fall or throw down (as sediment); as, a crocodile deposits her eggs in the sand; the waters deposited a rich alluvium
pi-Hahiroth - The name, however, sufficiently explains the situation of the children of Israel; who were hemmed in at this place, between the sea in front, and a narrow mountain pass behind; which no doubt encouraged Pharaoh to make his attack upon them in so disadvantageous a position; thinking that they must inevitably Fall an easy prey into his hands, or be cut to pieces: when their deliverance, and his own destruction, were unexpectedly wrought by the parting of the waters of the sea
Certain, Certainty, Certainly, Certify - A — 1: ἀσφάλεια (Strong's #803 — Noun Feminine — asphaleia — as-fal'-i-ah ) primarily, "not liable to Fall, steadfast, firm," hence denoting "safety," Acts 5:23 , and 1 Thessalonians 5:3 , has the further meaning, "certainty," Luke 1:4
Brimstone - " Moses, among other calamities which he sets forth in case of the people's disobedience, threatens them with the Fall of brimstone, salt, and burning like the overthrow of Sodom, &c, Deuteronomy 29:23
Pekah - The Fall of Damascus was followed by the ravaging of the districts of Israel north and east of Samaria, and the transportation of their inhabitants to remote portions of the empire
Rain - (Proverbs 16:1,5 ) For six months in the year, from May to October, no rain Falls, the whole land becomes dry, parched and brown. January and February are the coldest months, and snow Falls, sometimes to the depth of a foot or more, at Jerusalem, but it does not lie long; it is very seldom seen along the coast and in the low plains. Rain continues to Fall more or less during the month of March it is very rare in April
Fig - It produced no spiritual fruit and would Fall under God’s judgment (Mark 11:12-14; cf
Rejection - ‘did they stumble that they might Fall?’ asks the Apostle. ‘God forbid: but by their Fall salvation is come unto the Gentiles
Zedekiah - He advised the people to submit to Babylon, and so at least soften the judgment that was to Fall upon them (2 Kings 24:18-20; 2 Chronicles 36:11-14; Jeremiah 27:1; Jeremiah 27:12-15). He also warned Zedekiah of the judgment to Fall on him personally (Jeremiah 34:1-7)
Nation - ...
Nevertheless, nations may Fall under God’s judgment, and God may use other nations to punish them. If they do wrong, they too may Fall under God’s judgment (Isaiah 10:5-19; Isaiah 37:23-26; Habakkuk 1:6-7; Habakkuk 2:15-17)
Lydda - After the Fall of the holy city it became one of the refuges of Rabbinical learning. His relics were taken to Lydda, and round his name was gradually woven a tissue of legend, in which the Greek myth of Perseus and Andromeda (see Joppa), the Moslem idea of Elijah (or alternatively of Jesus) as the destined destroyer of the Impostor (al-dajjâl) or Antichrist, and the old Hebrew story of the Fall of Dagon before the ark, were all inextricably intertwined, till Lydda became the shrine of St
Conscience - This resulted from the Fall of Adam. ' This agrees with what God said of Adam after the Fall, "Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil
Flat - ) To Fall form the pitch. ) To become flat, or flattened; to sink or Fall to an even surface. ) Lying at full length, or spread out, upon the ground; level with the ground or earth; prostrate; as, to lie flat on the ground; hence, Fallen; laid low; ruined; destroyed
Hang - ...
To hang down, to let Fall below the proper situation to bend down to decline as, to hand down the head, and elliptically, to hang the head. And Fall those sayings from that gentle tongue, ...
Where speech and soft persuasion hung
Enoch - 622, and being contemporary with Adam, he had every opportunity of learning from him the story of the creation, the circumstance of the Fall, the terms of the promise, and other important truths. The intent of the Apostle, in the discourse containing this passage, is, to show that there has been but one way of obtaining the divine favour ever since the Fall, and that is, by faith, or a firm persuasion and confidence in the atonement to be made for human transgressions by the obedience, sufferings, death, and resurrection of the promised Messiah
Satan - 180, the origin of the demons is traced to the Fall of the angelic watchers, the ‘sons of God’ who corrupted themselves with the ‘daughters of men’ ( Genesis 3:1-24 f. 64, ‘the Fallen watchers’ (and their descendants) are carefully distinguished from the Satans, who apparently belong to ‘a counter kingdom of evil’ which existed before the Fall of the watchers recorded in Genesis 6:1 , the latter, in consequence of their Fall, becoming subject to the former. ), where, moreover, satanology shows a rich development (the pride, revolt, and Fall of Satan are dwelt upon). Fall. The ‘angels which kept not their first estate’ (Judges 1:6 , 2 Peter 2:4 ) are the angelic watchers whose Fall through lust is described in Enoch 6 16. In Enoch the demons, who are represented as the evil spirits which went forth from the souls of the giant offspring of the Fallen watchers, exercise an evil activity, working moral ruin on the earth till the final judgment. also Ephesians 6:12 and Luke 10:13 ‘I beheld Satan Fallen as lightning from heaven ’)
Sexuality, Human - Foundations This essay is based on the following premises: (1) Those functions founded in the unfallen created order that God proclaimed good ( Genesis 1:31 ) may be seen as normative for matters touching theological ethics. (2) Sin came as a result of the Fall, introducing a distortion of the created order and fostering enmity and alienation where none had previously existed. (5) Redemption attempts to remove or rectify the alienation introduced by the Fall, restoring humankind to fellowship with God (Romans 5:12-21 ; Ephesians 2:1-22 ) and with itself (Isaiah 2:1-5 ; Micah 4:1-7 ). ...
Accordingly, since narratives of Eden before the Fall picture the unsullied created order as God ordained it, they become normative and prescriptive; hence the way that unfallen man interfaced with woman should provide a working model for male/female relationships in the community of the redeemed. Narratives of Fallen humanity (such as the stories of Samson's womanizing or Solomon's polygyny) are descriptive and provide information about what was, but not always about what ought to have been. Jesus, untainted by the Fall ( Hebrews 4:15 ), lived the only unfallen life since humanity's banishment from Eden. The way that Jesus, the "second Adam, " related to women should, like that of unfallen Adam, provide a model for intersexual relationships. As can be demonstrated by the overt parallels between Eden and the New Jerusalem portrayed in Revelation 21-22 , the world to come (the eschaton) will be established as a postfallen order with the effects of the Fall fully negated. Commands, teachings, laws, and institutions that are designed to move one from a Fallen to a postfallen (redeemed) state or community are redemptive and therefore prescriptive, although care must be taken to distinguish the spirit from the letter in their application ( Mark 9:47 ). Further, since Adam transmits it to his progeny (Genesis 5:1-3 ), it is likewise clear that the image of God (imago Dei ) was not lost in the Fall. ...
Those who see women as inherently inferior to men often appeal to the specific account of the creation of woman (Genesis 2:18,20-22 ) as shedding further light on the relationship that existed between the sexes in their unfallen state: woman, they maintain, is a secondary creation, a mere "helpmeet" to the man. Such distinctions are not a product of the Fall to be redeemed, therefore, but a part of the created order to be nurtured. ...
Male/female relationships before the Fall are described in Genesis 2:25 : although they were naked, they felt no shame. But when sin entered with the Fall, resulting in banishment from Eden (Genesis 3:24 ), shame came with it also; a barrier was erected to the sort of naive innocence that had characterized the relationship previously. It was only after the Fall that God said to the woman, "Your desire will be for your husband, and he will rule over you" ( Matthew 15:22-289 ). Likewise, it was after the Fall that Adam named his wife Eve, using the same naming formula (Genesis 3:20 ) as he used in naming the animals (2:20), and by its use implying the same authority of a superior over an inferior. ...
To summarize: the creation texts make it clear that any pattern of absolute male dominance and female inferiority found in the Bible must result from the Fall, not from a theology of the created order. The process of redemption taught by the Bible is clear: it seeks to restore humanity, and with it creation (Romans 8:19-22 ), from the effects of the Fall. If, therefore, man's dominion over woman is a consequence of the Fall (Genesis 3:16 ), one of the ramifications of the gospel would be to abolish institutions such as concubinage that reduce her to a chattel
Affliction: Effects of in Different People - Such, too, is the difference when the storms of affliction Fall on hearts unrenewed by Christian faith, and on those who abide in Christ
Lazarus - Poor Lazarus sat outside the mansion of the nameless rich man to receive whatever food might Fall from the banquet table (Luke 16:19-31 )
Plague - ...
God in his mercy gave advance notice of the plagues and consistently gave Pharaoh the chance to repent; but the longer Pharaoh delayed, the more he increased the judgment that was to Fall on him (Exodus 9:15-19)
Boaz - The pillars, which were hollow, were broken up and carried to Babylon at the Fall of Jerusalem before Nebuchadnezzar
Commerce - Jerusalem appears in Ezekiel 26:2 as the rival of Tyre, who exulted at the thought of her Fall; "she is broken that was the gates (the mart) of the people, she (i
Micaiah - ...
Then he relates that he had seen, probably in a vision, Jehovah sitting on His throne, and asking who would persuade Ahab to go to Ramoth-gilead and Fall there
Hearing: For Others - The want of a self-applying conscience causes much of the best of preaching to Fall like rain upon a rock, from which it soon runs off; or if a little is caught in a hollow, it only stagnates, and then dries away, leaving no blessing behind
Noah - "Let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he Fall
Nineveh - The Fall of Nineveh (b
Dung - The word is used also in Scripture to indicate symbolically the degradation to which a person or a nation might Fall (2 Kings 9:37 ; Jeremiah 8:2 )
Divided Kingdom - The two political states of Judah and Israel that came into existence shortly after the death of Solomon and survived together until the Fall of Israel in 722 B
Novatians - Novatian first separated from the communion of pope Cornelius, on pretence of his being too easy in admitting to repentance those who had Fallen off in times of persecution. He indulged his inclination to severity so far, as to deny that such as had Fallen into gross sins, especially those who had apostatized from the faith under the persecution set on foot by Decius, were to be again received into the bosom of the church; grounding his opinion on that of St. if they shall Fall away, to renew them again unto repentance, " Hebrews 6:4-6 . The Novatians did not deny but a person Falling into any sin, how grievous soever, might obtain pardon by repentance; for they themselves recommended repentance in the strongest terms; but their doctrine was, that the church had it not in its power to receive sinners into its communion, as having no way of remitting sins but by baptism: which once received could not be repeated
Azekah - The tribe of Judah occupied it in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:30 ), after it had been one of the last cities to Fall to Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon in 588 B
Molten Sea - After the Fall of Jerusalem in 587 B
Hail - Impinging hailstones are often frozen together, and sometimes great ragged masses of ice Fall with disastrous results to life and property
Divide - ) To break friendship; to Fall out
Jezreel - After the Fall of the house of Ahab, Jezreel also fell into a decline
Fall - The ears never Fall away, nor does the nose, for they are a part of the body
Barak - Deborah consented to go, but told Barak that it would not be to his honour; Sisera would Fall by the hand of a woman
Architecture, Byzantine - After the Fall of Constantinople in 1453 the style continued in countries of the Greek Rite, becoming identified with the national church of Russia
Ear - To be by the ears,------------------ ...
To Fall together by the ears,------- to fight or scuffle to ...
To go together by the ears,--------- quarrel
Example - Lest any man Fall after the same example of unbelief
Haman - Thus God watched over His people in their captivity and made the device of their enemy to Fall upon his own head, as it will be with Satan
Burst - To come or Fall upon suddenly or with violence to rush upon unexpectedly as, a sound bursts upon our ears
Hen - The Roman eagle was about to Fall upon the Jewish state; our Lord invited them to himself in order to guard them from threatened calamities: they disregarded his invitations and warnings, and fell a prey to their adversaries
Molten Sea - After the Fall of Jerusalem in 587 B
Holy, Holiness - Mankind lost all holiness in the Fall; but God makes his people gradually "partakers of his holiness" here, and in heaven they will be found perfectly and for ever sanctified; as an earnest of which, he look upon them as already in Christ, holy and beloved
Beasts - Beasts suffer with man under the penalties of the Fall, Genesis 3:14 Exodus 9:6 3:15 Ezekiel 38:20 Hosea 4:3
Without - It has no property of a connective or conjunction, and does not Fall within the definition
Passing Through the Fire - ...
Oh, thou blessed Jesus! what unspeakable mercies hast thou bestowed upon thy people in bringing life and immortality to light by thy gospel! To what a deplorable state is our nature universally reduced by the Fall; and how great are our privileges in the Lord in having raised up our poor nature from such gross ignorance and sin! See Moloch...
Hermetic Literature - In the Fall, this man united with nature to produce the seven androgynous persons who were the source of the human race
Order of Reformed Cistercians of Our Lady of la tr - Despoiled by the French Revolution, a number of the monks with their superior, Dom Augustin de Lestrange, took refuge in Switzerland and elsewhere until restored by the Fall of Napoleon, 1815
Massachusetts - The same Fall a congregation of about 100 was gathered together in Boston and the building of a brick church, under the patronage of the Holy Cross, was undertaken on the site of a former Huguenot church on School Street, by Reverend Claude de la Poterie, who had come from France
Cornerstone - There then comes a warning: those who believe consider the stone to be something precious; but those who do not believe are warned that the stone which they have rejected has become the head of the corner (Psalm 118:22 ) and, further, this stone will make them stumble and Fall (Isaiah 8:14 ; compare Romans 9:33 )
Nergal-Sharezer - But it is known from the inscriptions that Nabonadius had a son called Belshazzar, who may have been his father's associate on the throne at the time of the Fall of Babylon, and who therefore would be the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar
Sto'Ics - The Stoics and Epicureans, who are mentioned together in (Acts 17:18 ) represent the two opposite schools of practical philosophy which survived the Fall of higher speculation in Greece
Effect - , "to Fall out of, as of a ship Falling out of its course" (cp
Almond - "The almond tree bears its blossoms in the midst of winter, on a naked, leafless stem, and these blossoms (reddish or flesh-coloured in the beginning) seem at the time of their Fall exactly like white snow-flakes
False Christs - Jesus associated the appearance of messianic pretenders with the Fall of Jerusalem (Matthew 24:23-26 ; Mark 13:21-22 )
Sword (2) - ...
Metaphorically the sword stands as a symbol for war (to ‘fall by the edge of the sword’ means to die in war), or for a divided state of society (Matthew 10:34 ‘I came not to send peace, but a sword’ [2])
Bourignonists - She held many extravagant notions, among which, it is said, she asserted that Adam, before the Fall, possessed the principles of both sexes; that in an ecstacy, God represented Adam to her mind in his original state; as also the beauty of the first world, and how he had drawn from it the chaos; and that every thing was bright, transparent, and darted forth life and ineffable glory with a number of other wild ideas
Christ: His Eye Our Stimulus - Seeing their chief Fall, the clan wavered, and gave the enemy an advantage
Idumaea - ...
After the Fall of Babylon the pressure of the desert Arabs forced the Edomites across the Jordan-Arabah valley, and the people and name were extended westward
Hungary - The country remained part of Austria-Hungary until the Fall of that empire in 1918, when it was reestablished as an independent monarchy
Rock - Other texts apply to Christ the Isaiah image of a rock which causes persons to Fall (Romans 9:33 ; 1 Peter 2:8 )
Sandal, Shoe - As socks are not usually worn in the East, dust is effectively removed either by taking off the shoe and beating it on a stone, or by projecting the foot with the toes bent upwards so that the dust may Fall out from the open heel of the shoe (Matthew 10:14)
Brook - For the most part the brooks, fed only by the rain, dry up in the summertime, and the mills along their banks Fall silent, waking to fresh activity again only with the music of the rushing storm
Dig - ...
To dig down, is to undermine and cause to Fall by digging as, to dig down a wall
Josiah - The Assyrian empire was tottering to its Fall, and Pharaoh-necho thought to seize the provinces nearest him and attach them to Egypt
Seventy Weeks - A historical approach relates these years to the period of history between the Fall of Jerusalem and the restoration of the Temple in 164 B
Foot - To "cover the feet" was the delicate expression for easing oneself, preparatory to which the loose garment was let Fall to cover the person (1 Samuel 24:3; compare margin 2 Kings 18:27)
Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary - ...
Name Meaning; ad, to; sumere, to take (latin) ...
Patronage Acadians...
Alezio, Italy...
archdiocese of Seattle, Washington, USA...
Arquata Scrivia, Piedmont, Italy...
Bard, Aosta, Italy...
Bolzano, Italy...
Cajuns...
Carentino, Piedmont, Italy...
Casal Cermelli, Piedmont, Italy...
Cerreto d'Esi, Ancona, Italy...
Cistercian Order...
Coniolo, Piedmont, Italy...
Decollatura, Italy...
diocese of Bathurst, Canada...
diocese of Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA...
diocese of Fall River, Massachusetts, USA...
diocese of Fargo, North Dakota, USA...
diocese of Galway and Kilmacduagh, Ireland...
diocese of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, USA...
diocese of San Fernando, Pampanga, Philippines...
diocese of Trenton, New Jersey, USA...
Etroubles, Aosta, Italy...
Fabbrica Curone, Piedmont, Italy...
fish dealers...
fishmongers...
France...
French air crews...
Ghaxaq, Malta...
Guatemala...
Guazzora, Piedmont, Italy...
Gudja, Malta...
Hal Ghaxaq, Malta...
harness makers...
Il-Gudja, Malta...
Il-Mosta, Malta...
India...
Issogne, Aosta, Italy...
Jamaica...
Loro Ciuffenna, Arezzo, Italy...
Maryland, USA...
Moncestino, Piedmont, Italy...
Montecastello, Piedmont, Italy...
Montegioco, Piedmont, Italy...
Morlupo, Italy...
Mosta, Malta...
Paraguay...
Pian di Sco, Arezzo, Italy...
Slovakia...
South Africa...
Stia, Arezzo, Italy...
Trapani, Sicily, Italy...
Trisobbio, Piedmont, Italy...
Villeneuve, Aosta, Italy...
Zia Indian Pueblo...
Storefront Commercial Links related to Our Lady of the Assumption ...
Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions...
Of the Assumption of Mary, by Saint Alphonsus Maria de Liguori ...
Foul - To Fall foul, is to rush on with haste, rough force and unseasonable violence
Uzziah - His history evinces the truth that "it is a fearful thing to Fall into the hands of the living God
Jericho - This is the famous city before whose walls the Lord manifested such a miracle of grace to Israel, in causing them to Fall to the ground at the blasting of the rams' horns
Use - " A rendering close to the meaning of the Greek is "for neither at any time did we Fall into the use of flattering speech;" cp. 1 Timothy 2:14 , "fallen into transgression
Lodge - ) To Fall or lie down, as grass or grain, when overgrown or beaten down by the wind
Lodge - To Fall flat, as grain
Saint Bartholomew's Day - As early as 1560 Michaelis Suriano, the Venetian ambassador, wrote that Francis II wanted to Fall upon the Protestant leaders and punish them without mercy; in 1569 Parliament offered a reward to whomever would apprehend the Admiral Coligny, leader of the Calvinist party
Talk - The natural histories of Switzerland talk much of the Fall of these rocks, and the great damage done
Star - In times of disgrace and public calamity, it is said the stars withhold their light; they Fall from heaven, and disappear
West - , a decline or Fall, departure
Lot - Lot was so much at home in Sodom that even when God’s judgment was about to Fall on the city, he did not want to leave (Genesis 19:15-20)
Beat - ) To come or act with violence; to dash or Fall with force; to strike anything, as, rain, wind, and waves do. ) The rise or Fall of the hand or foot, marking the divisions of time; a division of the measure so marked
Backsliding - , one who is regenerated by God and justified by grace through faith) Fall again under the dominion of sin? Reformed theologians have maintained that the sinner redeemed by grace has been delivered once-for-all from bondage to sin. For such (elect) individuals, consequently, backsliding does not entail a Fall from grace, whereby one is placed once more under sin's dominion. In the teachings of Christ and his apostles the people of God are exhorted to persevere in righteousness and holiness, so as not to Fall under divine condemnation. Accordingly, the angel of the church in Ephesus warns those who have forsaken their first love: "Remember the height from which you have Fallen! Repent and do the things you did at first" (Revelation 2:5 )
Reproach - ...
In 1 Timothy 3:7 the Apostle, enumerating the characteristics requisite for a bishop, says that ‘he must have good testimony from them that are without; lest he Fall into reproach and the snare of the devil. Some, perhaps feeling that ‘reproach of the devil’ is an impossible expression, διαβόλου here in the general sense of ‘slanderer,’ and translate, ‘lest he Fall into the reproaches and snares prepared by slanderers. Should he fail to secure this general approval, there is the probability that his life is open to adverse criticism and that he may thus Fall a prey to the wiles of the tempter
Evil (2) - This last is the one certain allusion to the Fall of Satan to be found in the Gospels (Luke 10:18 is doubtful). His kingdom will surely come to an end; in fact its Fall has already been virtually secured by the Passion and Resurrection of Jesus (John 12:31). He recognized the Fall of man (John 8:44), and the general sinfulness of the human race (Matthew 7:11); but how He connected these two facts does not appear. 3, 4: Tennant, The Origin and Propagation of Sin; and The Fall and Original Sin; Bull, The State of Man before the Fall; Paley, Natural Theology, xxvi. ‘Sin’ and ‘Fall’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; Dixie, ‘The Necessity of Pain’ in Oxford House Papers; E
Chronology of the Biblical Period - The divided monarchy of Israel and Judah began with the ascension of Rehoboam following Solomon's death, and lasted until the Fall of Samaria in 722 B. These external synchronisms can be used to fix the date of the Fall of Jerusalem at ca. ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Genesis, the Book of - It is a religious history, therefore it omits accounts in detail of other nations, and concentrates attention on the origin of that one from whom the promised Redeemer of man from the deadly consequences of the Fall (which is detailed at the beginning) sprang. While a bare catalogue is given of whole genealogies of nations, minute details are given of the godly patriarchs in the line of the promised Savior, for these details are of more everlasting moment to us than the rise and Fall of the mightiest empires. ...
Thus Adam's history before and in the Fall is minutely given, as affecting the whole race whom he represented; but after the Fall only a few brief notices, but these of important bearing on mankind's spiritual prospects (Genesis 3:20-24; Genesis 4:1; Genesis 5:1-5). Traditions of widely separated nations over the earth retain fragments of the account of the Fall, the tree, the serpent, the first pair, the flood
Magna Carta - Article XXII provided that fineB imposed on the clergy should not Fall upon their revenue from ecclesiastical benefices
Michelangelo Buonarroti - From 1508-1512 he was occupied, at the command of Pope Julius II, with painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel the history of the Creation and Fall, with numberless additional figures, including the heroic prophets and sibyls
Carta, Magna - Article XXII provided that fineB imposed on the clergy should not Fall upon their revenue from ecclesiastical benefices
Numbering of the People - In his "strait" David said, "Let me Fall into the hands of the Lord
No - "As I wandered day after day with ever-growing amazement amongst these relics of ancient magnificence, I felt that if all the ruins in Europe, classical, Celtic, and medieval, were brought together into one centre, they would Fall far short both in extent and grandeur of those of this single Egyptian city
Bochim - The Angel Prince of Jehovah's host announced to Joshua at Gilgal the Fall of Jericho, directly after their rolling away the reproach of Egypt by circumcision, whence the place got its name (Gilgal "rolling") (Joshua 5:2-15)
Reveal - " "The NT occurrences of this word Fall under two heads, subjective and objective
Perish - , Matthew 5:29,30 ; Luke 5:37 ; Acts 27:34 , RV, "perish" (in some texts pipto, "to Fall," as AV); Hebrews 1:11 ; 2 Peter 3:6 ; Revelation 18:14 (2nd part), RV, "perished" (in some texts aperchomai, "to depart," as AV); (b) of persons, e
Deal With, Have Dealings With - ...
Notes: (1) In Acts 25:24 , entunchano, "to Fall in with, meet and talk with," and hence "to make suit to a person" by way of pleading with him, is translated "have dealt with" in the AV; correctly in the RV, "have made suit to," of the Jews in appealing to Festus against Paul
Sycomore - It is deciduous, but the old leaves do not Fall off till the new ones come out
See - ) To Fall in with; to have intercourse or communication with; hence, to have knowledge or experience of; as, to see military service
Money - The study of ancient coined money is interesting, showing the rise of the arts and their Fall during the dark ages of priestcraft, from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries; the coins of 400 years before Christ being superb, while those a thousand years after Christ are hardly discernible
Galilee - After the Fall of Jerusalem in A
Tibe'Rias, - The Sanhedrin, subsequent to the Fall of Jerusalem, after a temporary sojourn at Jamnia and Sepphoris, became fixed there about the middle of the second century
Tirhakah - Isaiah (Isaiah 17:12-18;Isaiah 17:7) announces Sennacherib's overthrow, and desires the Ethiopian ambassadors, now in Jerusalem, having arrived from Meroe, the island between "the river of Ethiopia," the Nile, and the Astaboras, in "vessels of bulrushes"' or pitchcovered papyrus canoes, to bring word to their own nation (not "woe," but "ho!" calling the Ethiopians' attention to his prophetic announcement of the Fall of Judah's and their common foe; Vulgate translated "the land of the clanging sound of wings," i
Dispensation - From the Fall of Adam to the flood
Headdress - In Leviticus 10:6 the sense of "uncover (literally, "let loose") not your heads" is "let not your hair Fall loosely from your head" as in mourning
Likeness - The divine likeness is sometimes thought to have been lost in the Fall, though its passing to Seth (Genesis 5:3 ) argues against the popular form of this argument
Eutychus - Eutychus, who was sealed at the window, fell asleep, and, Falling down from the third story, was ‘taken up dead ‘(ἤρθη νεκρός). Some suppose that the youth was only stunned by his Fall, and appeared to the spectators to be dead; others that the whole story is unhistorical, and merely intended as a parallel to the narrative of St
Life: Power of the Inner - His genial inhabitation thaws that soul and its favourite sins asunder, and makes the indolence and self-indulgence and indevotion Fall off from their old resting-place on that dissolving heart
Will - When man was created, he had liberty and power to do what was pleasing in the sight of God; but by the Fall, he lost all ability of will to any spiritual good; nor has he any will to that which is good until divine grace enlightens the understanding and changes the heart. "This being understood, it is easy to perceive that man in his Fallen state can only will according to his Fallen capacities, and that, however freely his volitions may flow within their extent, he cannot possibly overpass them
Calf - It could not and did not deliver them from their enemies, but caused GOD's wrath to Fall upon them
Fade - Other leaves Fall and are more beautiful than when they were on the trees
Babylon the Great - Heaven, the apostles and prophets are called on to rejoice over the Fall of that seductive and soul-destroying system: cf
Mordecai - The Fall of Haman rapidly followed, and the raising of Mordecai into power
Stumbling Block, - Anything placed in the way of another over which he might stumble and Fall
Stones - The Jews "fell" on Messiah "the rock of offense and were broken"; the rock shall Fall on antichrist who "burdens himself with it" by his assault on the restored Jews, and "grind him to powder" (Zechariah 13; 14)
Power - Satan offered to give to the Lord 'authority' over the kingdoms of the world which had been delivered to him, if the Lord would Fall down and worship him
FALSE - falsus, from Fallo, to deceive. See Fall and Fail
Decline - ) A Falling off; a tendency to a worse state; diminution or decay; deterioration; also, the period when a thing is tending toward extinction or a less perfect state; as, the decline of life; the decline of strength; the decline of virtue and religion. ) To bend downward; to bring down; to depress; to cause to bend, or Fall
Galilee - After the Fall of Jerusalem, Galilee became the residence of celebrated rabbis and the centre of Jewish schools of learning
Jezebel - They say that at Gordar, it is usual to hew in pieces the unhappy prisoners, which Fall into their hands; and that when this is done, their scattered fragments are suffered to lie in the streets, being denied burial
Ahazi'ah - (Isaiah 16:1 ) Before Ahaziah could take measures for enforcing his claim, he was seriously injured by a Fall through a lattice in his palace at Samaria
Feasts - The religious feasts mentioned in Scripture Fall under three heads:(A) Those properly connected with the institution of the Sabbath; (B) the historical or great festivals; (C) the day of atonement
Quarrel - To Fall into variance
Genesis - It contains an account of the creation; the primeval state and Fall of man; the history of Adam and his descendants, with the progress of religion and the origin of the arts; the genealogies age, and death of the patriarchs until Noah; the general defection and corruption of mankind, the general deluge, and the preservation of Noah and his family in the ark; the history of Noah and his family subsequent to the time of the deluge; the repeopling and division of the earth among the sons of Noah; the building of Babel, the confusion of tongues, and the dispersion of mankind; the lives of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph
Wealth: Involves Danger - It is so much the easier for men to Fall when walking on wealth's sea of glass, because all men aid them to do so
Marcus, Surnamed Eremita - ...
(4) ἀπόκρισις πρὸς τοὺς ἀποροῦντας περὶ τοῦ θείου βαπτίσματος , an important treatise on the doctrine of baptism, states distinctly that by the grace of baptism original sin is put away and the baptized are in exactly the condition Adam was before the Fall
Dan - It was one of the first parts of Israel to Fall when Assyria conquered the land and took the people into captivity (2 Kings 15:29)
Adder - ' It lies in holes or ruts and darts upon an animal passing: and this well agrees with the above text, where Dan is compared to "an adder in the path that biteth the horse heels, so that his rider shall Fall backward:" typical of apostasy and the power of Satan
Church: Her Glory in Tribulation - One will at a certain hour of a bright day be surprised to see a rainbow making an entire circle, surrounding the Fall like a coronet of gems, or a ring set with all the brilliants of the jeweller. ...
We lingered long watching the flashing crystal, dashed and broken upon a hundred craggy rocks, and tossed into the air in sheets of foam, to Fall in wreaths of spray; we should not have tired for hours if we could have tarried to admire the harmonious hues of that wheel within a wheel,...
'Of colours changing from the splendid rose, ...
To the pale violet's dejected hue;' ...
but we were on a journey, and were summoned to advance. When, at any time, our forebodings foretell the coming of evil times for the church, let us remember that before the Spirit revealed to the beloved disciple the terrible beasts, the thundering trumpets, the Falling stars, and the dreadful vials, he bade him mark with attention that the covenant rainbow was round about the throne
Obadiah, Book of - Its central section, Obadiah 1:10-14 , deals with the Fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians in 586 B. The Fall of Edom was to trigger this eschatological event in which order would be restored to an unruly world. ...
The Meaning Like the Book of Revelation, which proclaims the downfall of the persecuting Roman Empire, the aim of Obadiah is to sustain faith in God's moral government and hope in the eventual triumph of His just will
Amos, Book of - Hosea's prophecy is confined to the sins of Judah and Israel, whereas Amos tells of the judgements that should Fall upon some of the surroundingnations that had molested Israel, especially upon those that retained any part of the land that had been promised to Abraham; and then he recounts the sins, not only of Judah to which he himself belonged, but also of Israel, indeed there is more concerning the latter than the former. Judgements should Fall upon Amaziah and Israel shouldgo into captivity
Mennonites - Gan, of Ryswick, they believe that in the Fall man lost his innocence, and that all his posterity are born with a natural propensity to evil, and with fleshly inclinations, and are exposed to sickness and death. The posterity of Adam derive no moral guilt from his Fall: sin is personal, and the desert of punishment cannot be inherited
Throne - John, we find the twenty-four elders sitting upon as many thrones in the presence of the Lord; "and they Fall down before him that sat on the throne, &c, and cast their crowns before the throne. This is not only kneeling, but absolute prostration; you first Fall upon your knees, then upon the palms of your hands, then incline your head and body till your forehead touches the ground; and, in case you have an answer to expect, you lie in that posture till the king, or somebody from him, desires you to rise
Simeon Stylites - Some such structure must have been there, not only to prevent his Fall, but also for him to write the epistles he sent broadcast to emperors, bishops, and councils on all pressing questions. The people of Antioch piteously reminded Leo, "Forasmuch as our city is without walls, for we have been visited in wrath by their Fall, we brought hither the sacred body to be our wall and bulwark," and were permitted to retain it; but this did not avail to protect the city against capture by the Persians
Eve - Some detect evidence of male headship in the prefall narrative (e. Others suggest the idea of man's subjugation of woman is introduced only after the Fall when God describes the various forms of humiliation, enmity, pain, and drudgery that result from human rebellion against him (3:14-19). ...
The woman's role in the narrative about the Fall is significant, not least because it is she who has the exchange with the serpent, the agent of temptation. ...
The only positive prospect mentioned by God as he spells out the Fall's consequences is that, in the context of the ongoing enmity between the woman and her offspring, on the one hand, and the serpent and his offspring, on the other, the woman's offspring will dominate the serpent's (3:15). Hiebert...
See also Adam ; Fall, the ; Head, Headship ; Woman ...
Bibliography
Antichrist - A late writer, after collecting the principal prophecies relating to antichrist, infers from them that a power, sometimes represented as the little horn, the man of sin, the antichrist, the beast, the harlot, the star Falling from heaven, the false prophet, the dragon, or as the operation of false teachers, was to be expected to arise in the Christian world to persecute and oppress, and delude the disciples of Christ, corrupt the doctrine of the primitive church, enact new laws, and establish its dominion over the minds of mankind. This was likewise the opinion of the first reformers; and it was the prevalent opinion of Christians, in the earliest ages, that antichrist would appear soon after the Fall of the Roman empire. The Papists imagine they view in the prophetical picture of antichrist, imperial Rome, elated by her victories, exulting in her sensuality and her spoils, polluted by idolatry, persecuting the people of God, and finally Falling like the first Babylon; whilst a new and holy city, represented by their own communion, filled with the spotless votaries of the Christian faith, rises out of its ruins, and the victory of the cross is completed over the temples of Paganism. If the rise of antichrist be not reckoned till he was possessed of secular authority, his Fall will happen when this power shall be taken away. If his rise began, according to Mede in 456, he must have Fallen in 1716; if in 606, it must be in 1866; if in 755, in 2015. If, however, we use prophetical years, consisting of three hundred and sixty days, and date the rise of antichrist in the year 755, his Fall will happen in the year of Christ 2000
Cast - , "to Fall out," is translated "be cast ashore," in Acts 27:29 , RV, AV, "have Fallen upon. " See EFFECT , FAIL , Fall , NOUGHT. 5), Fall, No
Josiah - Nineveh was Falling, if not already Fallen. Hence Josiah was permitted, not without culpability on his part, to meddle in the ungodly world's wars, and so to Fall, and with himself to withdraw the last godly ruler from the people henceforth given over to punishment (2 Kings 23:25-30). He was buried with every honour, and Jeremiah composed a dirge, annually chanted at Hadadrimmon (not the "Lamentations" over Jerusalem after its Fall). ...
Antichrist superseding spiritual Babylon appropriately Falls at Armageddon, i. the hill of Megiddo, the scene of godly Josiah's Fall through descending to the world's carnal strifes as Babylon's ally (Revelation 16:14-18); the Jews' future mourning for Him whom they pierced, before God's interposition against all nations confederate against Jerusalem, answers to their mourning for Josiah at Megiddo (Zechariah 12:10-11). Josiah's greatness harmonizes with the parallel decline and Fall of Assyria
Hamath - Following the Fall of Samaria in 722-721 B
Magisterium - The Church exercises this teaching power infallibly in matters of faith and morals, in virtue of the promise of Divine assistance given her by Christ, "And behold I am with you all days even to the consummation of the world" (Matthew 28). The individual bishop as such (the Bishop of Rome, successor of Saint Peter, excepted) is not infallible. When all the bishops in the world agree in their teaching on a particular doctrine of faith or morals, which is not solemnly defined, this constitutes an infallible teaching of the Ecclesia Docens, because the Church as a whole cannot Fall into error in these matters. The pope enjoys the prerogative of infallibility in his official capacity as successor of Saint Peter, and hence Supreme Pastor of the Church. The faithful are obliged in virtue of the infallible teaching power (magisterium) of the Church Teaching, whether this power is exercised ordinarily or solemnly, to submit their understanding to the teaching of the Church
Tiberias - After the Fall of Jerusalem many of the Jews took up their abode in Tiberias, and by a strange reversal of fate this unclean city became a most important centre of Rabbinic teaching
Tiberias - ...
After the Fall of Jerusalem (A
Zedekiah - After the Fall of Jerusalem, Nebuzaraddan was sent to carry out its complete destruction
Rain - As compared with Egypt, Palestine was a land of rain (Deuteronomy 11:10-11), but for six months no rain Falls so that "rain in harvest" and "thunder" were marvelous phenomena, and out of time and place (Proverbs 26:1; 1 Samuel 12:16-18). In January and February snow Falls, but lies only a short time. Showers Fall occasionally in April and May
Nahum - Nahum, who had been deeply stirred over Assyria’s injustice and cruelty, had a feeling of satisfaction that at last a fitting divine judgment was to Fall upon the ruthless oppressor (Nahum 2:10; Nahum 2:13; Nahum 3:5-7; Nahum 3:19)
Kadesh-Barnea - ...
Excavations of Ein el-Qudeirat have shown major fortresses dating from the period of Solomon to the Fall of the monarchy (tenth century B
Dissolve - To Fall asunder to crumble to be broken
Board - ...
To Fall over board, that is, over the side the mast went by the board
Apion - His literary triumphs and critical labours on Homer do not Fall within our scope, but his conflict with Jews and Jewish Christians entitles him to a place here
Zephaniah, the Book of - On whom they shall Fall (Zephaniah 1:8-11)
Peter, Second Epistle of - Saints, knowing these things before, were not to Fall from their stedfastness, but to grow in grace and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ
Crack - To Fall to ruin, or to be impaired. A burst of sound a sharp or loud sound, uttered suddenly or with vehemence the sound of any thing suddenly rent a violent report as the crack of a Falling house the crack of a whip
Deep - The Lord God caused a deep sleep to Fall on Adam
Apocalypse - It was written either during the persecution of Nero (54-68) or of Domitian (90-94), during Saint John's exile at Patmos, to encourage the persecuted Christians by foretelling the Fall of Rome as an anti-Christian power and the trials but complete victory of the Church
Spring - ...
Proverbs 25:26 (a) The righteous man is not supposed to be influenced by the wicked, nor Fall down in obedience to the wicked desires
Lessons - ...
Upon Septuagesima Sunday, Genesis is begun; because that book, which treats of the Fall of man, and the severe judgment of God inflicted on the world for sin, best suits with a time of repentance and mortification
Interim - The controverted points were, the state of Adam before and after his Fall; the redemption of mankind by Jesus Christ; the justification of sinners; charity and good works; the confidence we ought to have in God; that our sins are remitted; the church and its true marks, its power, its authority, and ministers; the pope and bishops; the sacraments; the mass; the commemoration of saints; their intercession; and prayers for the dead
Abomination of Desolation - It would seem to follow, therefore, that the reference is to some event, portending the Fall of Jerusalem, which might also be interpreted by the Christians as a premonition of the Parousia ( 2 Thessalonians 2:1-12 )
Dew - " (Isaiah 26:19) meaning that as from the rich dews which Fall upon the earth, the dry, withered, and apparently dead plants of the winter shall again bud, and break forth in the spring, so the dead and dying state of Christ's redeemed shall, from the dew of his birth, "revive as the corn, and grow as the vine
Coelestius, Heretic of Hibernian Scots - Coelestius had for some time studied law, and then become a monk, when his speculations upon the conditions of grace and nature attracted attention, as he affirmed the leading points of what were afterwards known as the Pelagian heresy upon the Fall of man and the need of supernatural assistance, in effect denying both
Siloam - ...
Nothing is known respecting the "tower" near Siloam, the Fall of which killed eighteen men
Paper, Papyrus - Aged papyrus became brittle, literally causing words to Fall off the page
Offend - To disturb, annoy, or cause to Fall or stumble
Cause - ...
I will cause him to Fall by the sword
Children - The apostle Paul speaks of them as fruits and evidences of the Fall; but assures those who abide in faith, that, amid all the suffering that reminds them that woman was first in the transgression, Genesis 3:16 , they may yet look trustfully to God for acceptance and salvation, 1 Timothy 2:15
Pay - ...
PAY, To pay off,in seamen's language, is to Fall to leeward, as the head of a ship
Fear - ...
Sinners have good reason to fear God; because God’s punishment will one day Fall upon them (Micah 7:16-17; Matthew 10:28)
Protevangelium - Fall in vol
Lamentations - (For events surrounding the Fall of Jerusalem see JEREMIAH
Fig - These little figs develop along with the leaves up to a certain point, to about the size of a small cherry, and then the great majority of them Fall to the ground, carried down with every gust of wind. These immature figs are known as the taksh , and are eaten by the fellahîn as they Fall; they may indeed sometimes be seen exposed for sale in the market in Jerusalem
Roll - ) To Fall or tumble; - with over; as, a stream rolls over a precipice. ) The oscillating movement of a vessel from side to side, in sea way, as distinguished from the alternate rise and Fall of bow and stern called pitching
Pentecost, Feast of - On this computation Pentecost would Fall on 6th Sivan (June). But some theorists maintained that the Sabbath referred to was the ordinary Sabbath during the days of Unleavened Bread, whenever it chanced to Fall
Devil - For any subordinate agent of this kingdom, man or demon, to oppose another agent would be, reasons Christ, a division of Satan against Satan (involving the Fall of his kingdom), which division Satan would never sanction (Ephesians 6:12-13). Our Lord speaks of the disciples' casting out of demons as an installment or earnest of the final "fall" of Satan before the kingdom of Christ (Luke 10:18). There are four gradations in Satan's ever-deepening Fall. All we know of his original state as an archangel of light is that he lost it through pride and restless ambition, and that he had some special connection, possibly as God's vicegerent over this earth and the animal kingdom; thereby we can understand his connection and that of his subordinate Fallen angels with this earth throughout Scripture, commencing with his temptation of man to his characteristic sin, ambition to be "as gods knowing good and evil;" only his ambition seems to have been that of power, man's that of knowledge. "...
(4) At its close, being loosed for a while, in person Satan shall head the last conspiracy against Christ (permitted in order to show the security of believers who cannot Fall as Adam fell by Satan's wiles), and shall be finally cast into the lake of life forever (Revelation 20:7-10)
Man - ...
The state of man has been divided into fourfold: his primitive state; Fallen state; gracious state; and future state. His Fall. ...
See Fall. ...
Although man has Fallen by his iniquity, yet he is not left finally to perish. The divine Being, foreseeing the Fall, in infinite love and mercy made provision for his relief
Devil, Devlish - 7, seeking to devour them as a roaring lion, 1 Peter 5:8 ; those who Fall into his snare may be recovered therefrom unto the will of God, 2 Timothy 2:26 , "having been taken captive by him (i
Regeneration - This restitution will not in the coming millennial age be universally a return to the pristine condition of Edenic innocence previous to the Fall, but it will fulfill the establishment of God's covenant with Abraham concerning his descendants, a veritable rebirth of the nation, involving the peace and prosperity of the Gentiles
Hope - These went forth to their labor, and they took with them, to cheer their toils, their well-beloved sister Hope; and well it was they did, for they needed the music of her consolation ere the work was done, for the forest trees were huge and demanded many sturdy blows of the axe ere they would Fall prone upon the ground
No - : the passage rather indicates the completeness of Egypt’s Fall by the punishment of the remote Thebes, which could not be accomplished till Lower Egypt was prostrate
Apostasy - Those who Fall out of fellowship with the saints are restored to full communion through confession of sin and reaffirmation of faith in Jesus Christ. Excommunication, as a final step in the process of ecclesiastical discipline, is undertaken in the hope of restoring the wayward sinner who has Fallen into grievous sin (1 Corinthians 5:1-5 )
Abomination - ...
(Daniel 11:31 ), in that section of his prophecies which is generally interpreted as referring to the fearful calamities that were to Fall on the Jews in the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, says, "And they shall place the abomination that maketh desolate
Robbery - ...
Emphatic statements respecting the prevalence of robbers during the stormy period preceding the Fall of Jerusalem, and an account of the measures adopted by Felix in consequence, may be found in Josephus-‘as to the number of the robbers he caused to be crucified, and of those who were caught among them, and whom he brought to punishment, they were a multitude not to be enumerated’ (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) II
Meet - To suffer unexpectedly as, to meet with a Fall to meet with a loss
Mephibosheth - Gilboa, and in the flight of the royal household after the battle he was so seriously injured by a Fall as to become lame in both his feet ( 2 Samuel 4:4 )
Reed - Never was there any but Jesus crowned with thorns; for though all his people feel the briars and the thorns, yet it was he, and he only, on whom and in whom the sentence at the Fall was to be completely fulfilled
Quails - It is a blessed thing to let God choose forms, and this will be always right, but if we will ride restive, like Jeshurun, a Fall must be the consequences
Gilgal - A tradition evidently suggested by the Biblical story of the Fall of Jericho is recorded by Conder as having been related to him here
Fowl - In the parable of the Sower they devour the seed that Falls by the wayside (Matthew 13:4); in that of the Mustard Seed they lodge under the shadow of the huge plant which grew out of such a tiny germ (Mark 4:32). How foolish of man, who can do all these things, to Fall so far beneath the ‘fowls,’ and worry over food and drink, when his first duty is to seek the kingdom of God and His righteousness!...
D
a'Hab - Being told by the prophet Micaiah that he would Fall, he disguised himself, but was slain by "a certain man who drew a bow at a venture
Leper - In the worst form the bones and the marrow are pervaded with the disease, so that the joints of the hands and feet lose their power, the limbs of the body Fall together, and the whole system assumes a most deformed and loathsome appearance
Daniel, Book of - The precise time of Christ's coming is told; the rise and the Fall of antichrist, and the duration of his power, are accurately determined; the victory of Christ over his enemies, and the universal prevalence of his religion are clearly pointed out
Josh'ua - A miracle made the Fall of Jericho more terrible to the Canaanites
Flood - It is a reminder that, at the return of Jesus Christ, sudden judgment will again Fall on an ungodly world, though again God will preserve the righteous (Matthew 24:36-39; 2 Peter 2:5; 2 Peter 2:9; cf
Get - ...
To get behind, to Fall in the rear to lag. ...
To get asleep, to Fall asleep
Light - ) To come down suddenly and forcibly; to Fall; - with on or upon. ) The manner in which the light strikes upon a picture; that part of a picture which represents those objects upon which the light is supposed to Fall; the more illuminated part of a landscape or other scene; - opposed to shade
Behmenists - How some angels, and all men, are Fallen from God, and their first state of a divine triune life in him; what they are in their Fallen state, and the difference between the Fall of angels and that of man. How the earth, stars, and elements were created in consequence of the Fall of angels. How and why sin and misery shall only reign for a time, until God shall, in a supernatural way, make Fallen man rise to the glory of angels, and this material system shake off its curse, and enter into an everlasting union with that heaven from whence it fell
Light - ) To come down suddenly and forcibly; to Fall; - with on or upon. ) The manner in which the light strikes upon a picture; that part of a picture which represents those objects upon which the light is supposed to Fall; the more illuminated part of a landscape or other scene; - opposed to shade
Adam - Adam committed a ταράττωμα, a lapse, a false step—commonly termed the Fall. ’ Adam’s Fall involved all men in sin, and therefore in death; but this was because all men (in full exercise of their free will) sinned. Adam’s Fall ushered in a reign of death; Christ’s work ensures that all who have received His kindness and His gift of righteousness shall themselves reign in life. In John 8:44 ἀνθρωποκτόνος may refer to the introduction of death into the world by the Fall of Adam. ; Tennant, The Sources of the Doctrine of the Fall and Original Sin; Sadler, The Second Adam and the New Birth; Thackeray, The Relation of St
Adam - Adam committed a ταράττωμα, a lapse, a false step—commonly termed the Fall. ’ Adam’s Fall involved all men in sin, and therefore in death; but this was because all men (in full exercise of their free will) sinned. Adam’s Fall ushered in a reign of death; Christ’s work ensures that all who have received His kindness and His gift of righteousness shall themselves reign in life. In John 8:44 ἀνθρωποκτόνος may refer to the introduction of death into the world by the Fall of Adam. ; Tennant, The Sources of the Doctrine of the Fall and Original Sin; Sadler, The Second Adam and the New Birth; Thackeray, The Relation of St
Patience - Those who respond to his patience in faith and repentance receive his forgiveness; those who despise or ignore it Fall under his punishment (Exodus 34:6-7; Romans 2:3-4; Romans 9:22; 1 Timothy 1:16; 2 Peter 3:9)
Gallienus p. Licinius, Emperor - On his father's Fall, he was legally bound to put every clergyman to death wherever found, and to deal in almost as summary a fashion with all other Christians
Emperor Worship - King Nebuchadnezzar made an image of gold, presumably of himself, and commanded everyone to Fall down and worship the image or be killed (Daniel 3:5-6 )
Uzzah - We must not in presumptuous haste try to sustain God's cause, as if it must Fall unless it have our support; God can guard His own ark
Dog - Sometimes domesticated, as the Syrophoenician woman's comparison and argument imply, "the household (kunaria , 'little' or 'pet') dogs eat of the crumbs (Matthew 15:26-27; Mark 7:27-28) which Fall from their master's table
Lots - We do know that people of the Old and New Testaments believed God (or gods in the case of non-Israelites or non-Christians) influenced the Fall or outcome of the lots (Proverbs 16:33 )
Conversion - of individuals, but sometimes in a sense that Falls short of ‘conversion’ as the conscious change implied in becoming a Christian. Luke 22:32 was addressed to the leader of the Apostles, and his ‘conversion’ was his return to his Master’s service after his Fall
Groaning - For the sympathy of Nature with man’s Fall and restoration see Weber, pp
Sacrifice - Doubtless in some way God had instructed man that, the penalty of the Fall and of his own sin being that his life was forfeited, he could only appropriately approach God by the death of a substitute not chargeable with his offence; for it was by faith that Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain
Crown of Thorns - The thorns with which a hostile world pierced the Saviour’s brows are an emblem of the sin of man, the curse of thistles and thorns having been threatened after the Fall (see Dr
Seasons - After the flood, God declared that while the earth remained the seasons should continue, Genesis 8:22 these Fall approximately thus:...
1. Cold } Falling in October to March. Heat } Falling in April to September
Heavy - Large abundant as a heavy Fall of snow or rain
Affliction - The afflictions of a good man, says an elegant writer, never befall without a cause, nor are sent but upon a proper errand. Now the rains must Fall, and the winds must roar around us; but, sheltering ourselves under him who is the "covert from the tempest, " let us wait with patience till the storms of life shall terminate in an everlasting calm
Tail - ) The side of a coin opposite to that which bears the head, effigy, or date; the reverse; - rarely used except in the expression "heads or tails," employed when a coin is thrown up for the purpose of deciding some point by its Fall
Tone - ) A whining style of speaking; a kind of mournful or artificial strain of voice; an affected speaking with a measured rhythm ahd a regular rise and Fall of the voice; as, children often read with a tone
Amalek, Amalekites - ...
When the Israelites, who, alas, disbelievingly agreed with the spies who had brought up the evil report of the land, were told they should all Fall in the wilderness, they then said they would go up and possess it; but they were smitten by the Amalekites and the Canaanites
Case - Literally, that which Falls, comes, or happens an event. Hence, the particular state, condition, or circumstances that befall a person, or in which he is placed as, make the case your own this is the case with my friend this is his present case. The variation of nouns and adjectives is called declension both case and declension signifying, Falling or leaning from the first state of the word. In case, is a phrase denoting condition or supposition literally, in the event or contingency if it should so Fall out or happen
Hazael - For when Jehu broke up the siege of Ramoth-Gilead, and came with his army to Samaria, Hazael took advantage of his absence to Fall upon his territories beyond Jordan, destroying all the land of Gilead, Gad, Reuben, and Manasseh, from Aroer to Bashan, 2 Kings 10:32
Dan - Dan shall be a serpent by the way, an adder in the path, that biteth the horse heels, so that his rider shall Fall backward
Lamp - At present there are so many occasions where 'candle' would manifestly be inappropriate, and where, therefore, they are obliged to Fall back on 'light,' that the distinction between phos and luchnos nearly, if not quite, disappears in our Version
Clean, Cleanness, Cleanse, Cleansing - , Matthew 23:26 ; 27:59 ; John 13:10 (where the Lord, speaking figuratively, teaches that one who has been entirely "cleansed," needs not radical renewal, but only to be "cleansed" from every sin into which he may Fall); John 15:3 ; Hebrews 10:22 ; Revelation 15:6 ; 19:8,14 ; 21:18,21 ; (b) in a Levitical sense, Romans 14:20 ; Titus 1:15 , "pure;" (c) ethically, with the significance free from corrupt desire, from guilt, Matthew 5:8 ; John 13:10,11 ; Acts 20:26 ; 1 Timothy 1:5 ; 3:9 ; 2 Timothy 1:3 ; 2:22 ; Titus 1:15 ; James 1:27 ; blameless, innocent (a rare meaning for this word), Acts 18:6 ; (d) in a combined Levitical and ethical sense ceremonially, Luke 11:41 , "all things are clean unto you
Think - ...
Let him that thinketh he standeth, take heed lest he Fall
Festivals - The religious times ordained int he law Fall under three heads:
Those formally connected with the institution of the Sabbath; ...
This historical or great festivals; ...
The day of atonement
Election, - ...
The reason Christians feel a difficulty as to the doctrine of election to eternal life, is because they do not see the extent of the Fall of man, and his utterly lost condition
Woman - They declare the method of His Incarnation and "suggest the means whereby that humanity was made free from the taint of sin consequent upon the Fall, viz
Dan (1) - that biteth the horse heels, so that his rider shall Fall backward," alludes primarily to Dan's local position in front of the royal Judah; so ready to meet the horse, forbidden in Israelite warfare, with the watchword "I have waited for Thy salvation," and to Fall unawares on the advancing enemy by the way Dan's mode of warfare is illustrated in its attack on the men of Laish," careless, quiet, and secure," as also in their great judge Samson's mode of attack, watching for an opportunity and striking an unlooked for, stealthy, sudden blow
Sit - ...
12: ἀναπίπτω (Strong's #377 — Verb — anapipto — an-ap-ip'-to ) "to Fall back" (ana, "back," pipto, "to Fall"), denotes in the NT, "to recline for a repast," Matthew 15:35 ; Mark 6:40 ; 8:6 ; Luke 11:37 ; 14:10 ; 17:7 ; 22:14 ; John 6:10 (twice); 13:12; in John 13:25 ; 21:20 it is used of leaning on the bosom of Christ
Mephibosheth - His nurse at the sad tidings took him up and fled; in her haste she let him Fall from her shoulders (Josephus Ant. ...
Mephibosheth typifies man once son of the King; then having lost his right by the Fall, as Mephibosheth did by Saul's and Jonathan's death at Gilboa
Sin - His probation was their probation, and his Fall their Fall
Consecration - Then, after reading many prayers, he came near the bread, and, gently lifting up the corner of the napkin, beheld it; and immediately letting Fall the napkin, he retreated hastily a step or two, and made three low obeisances: his lordship then advanced, and, having uncovered the bread, bowed three times as before. Then he laid his hand on the cup, which was full of wine, with a cover upon it; which having let go, he stepped back, and bowed three times towards it; then he came near again, and lifting up the cover of the cup, looked in it; and seeing the wine, let Fall the cover again, retired back, and bowed as before
Reverence - In several places certain physical acts are significant of reverence, such as προσπίπτειν, ‘to Fall down before’ (Mark 3:11; Mark 5:33, Luke 8:28); γονυπετεῖν, ‘to bend the knee’ (Matthew 17:14, Mark 1:40); πίπτειν ἐπὶ πρόσωπον, ‘to Fall upon the face
Greetings - He will bear lightly an exposure that would cover us with perpetual shame; treat him with less formal respect than he desires, and he will Fall into a paroxysm of rage over his ‘broken honour. One interceding for another (Mark 7:25), or begging a favour (Matthew 18:26; Matthew 18:29), will Fall down flat; while in token of utter submission one may kiss a benefactor’s feet (Luke 7:38; Luke 7:45)
Atheist - Was ever any considerable work, in which there was required a great variety of parts, and a regular and orderly disposition of those parts, done by chance! Will chance fit means to ends, and that in ten thousand instances, and not fail in any one? How often might a man, after he had jumbled a set of letters in a bag, fling them out upon the ground, before they would Fall into an exact poem; yea, or so much as make a good discourse in prose? And may not a little book be as easily made by chance as the great volume of the world? How long might a man be in sprinkling colours upon canvass with a careless hand, before they would happen to make the exact picture of a man? And is a man easier made by chance than his picture? How long might twenty thousand blind men, who should be sent out from several remote parts of England, wander up and down before they would all meet upon Salisbury plain, and Fall into rank and file in the exact order of an army? And, yet, this is much more easy to be imagined than how the innumerable blind parts of matter should rendezvous themselves into a world
Petrus, Surnamed Fullo - The Fall of Basiliscus, a. Peter was one of the first to Fall
Jew - More than three thousand years ago, while on a conquering march, with visions of glory before them, they were warned of their future apostacy, and were told of the judgments that would Fall upon them and upon their land. Paul tells us, "Through their Fall salvation is come unto the Gentiles. And he informs us that the world is again to be indebted to the Jews; he says: "Now if the Fall of them be the riches of the world and the diminishing of them the riches of the Gentiles; how much more their fulness?" Romans 11:11-12
Judgement - God's four sore judgements on the living were threatened against Jerusalem, and have often Fallen upon mankind generally, and will Fall upon them in the future, as shown in the Revelation. They should warn men; as a slight shower often Falls before a storm, so these frequent judgements are but the forerunners of the great storm of the wrath of God that will surely Fall upon this guilty world, when the vials of His fury are poured out: cf. His judgement Falls on the living nations; also before Israel is restored to blessing, judgement from God will Fall upon them. The Fallen angels are reserved unto judgement, 2 Peter 2:4 ; and everlasting fire is prepared for the devil and his angels
Leovigild, Arian King of the Visigoths - Its Fall (early in 572?) was a heavy blow to the imperial cause in Spain (Joannes Bicl. to the siege of Seville, which lasted through 583 into 584, and after the Fall of Seville up the Guadalquivir valley to Cordova. The Catholic church was the natural foe of her Arian rulers, and when her attempts to shake them off failed, it was inevitable that the penalty should Fall heavily on her and on her bishops
Pharisees - Effects of the Fall of Jerusalem. In two particulars the Fall of the city seemed to harden Pharisaic tendencies. Probably a short time before the Fall of the city eighteen points of difference between the schools of Hillel and Shammai, all dealing with relations with Gentiles, were decided in favour of the Shammaists, the more rigid school. We may take it that this ended all missionary enterprise, and that after the Fall of the city the exclusive tendency reigned supreme
Ordeals - Among the ordeals were: ...
the duel, the outcome of which was looked upon as the judgment of God
the cross, before which the accuser and the accused stood with outstretched arms, and the first to let Fall his arms was defeated
the hot iron, in which ordeal the accused must walk a certain distance carrying a red-hot iron in his hands, or he must walk barefooted over red-hot ploughshares, and if he remained uninjured his innocence was established
cold water, into which the accused with arms and legs bound was cast, and if he floated upon the water, he was declared not guilty
the blessed morsel, consisting of a piece of cheese and bread which the accused must swallow, if he was to have his innocence established
the suspended loaf, a loaf of bread, through which a stick of wood was passed and placed in an opening made in another piece of wood, so that it could turn, and a person was considered guilty if it turned from west to east
the examen in mensuris (Latin: trial by ballot), seldom practised, an ordeal probably decided by lot or by the measuring of the accused by a stick of determined length
bleeding, in which ordeal, a person suspected of murder was forced to look upon the wounds of the victim, and if these began to bleed afresh, his guilt was supposed to have been proven
The Christian missionaries and Churchmen generally were somewhat tolerant of the ordeals, excepting the duel
Lamentations, Book of - ' There, in that fixed attitude of grief which Michael Angelo has immortalized, the prophet may well be supposed to have mourned the Fall of his country" (Stanley, Jewish Church). ) of the Jews" at Jerusalem, a portion of the old wall of the temple of Solomon, Schaff says: "There the Jews assemble every Friday afternoon to bewail the downfall of the holy city, kissing the stone wall and watering it with their tears
Thorns Thistles - It is equally unnatural for those in whom the spirit of truth has been planted, and who have received similar care and attention, to Fall away and abandon the faith thus planted. They cover Fallow ground, and must be burnt before the ground can be ploughed
Easter Day - By this rule Easter will alwaysfall between the 22d of March, the earliest date, and the 25th ofApril, the latest day on which it can possibly Fall. "...
Easter was always accounted the Queen of Festivals the highest ofall Holy Days, and celebrated with the greatest solemnity, and thePrayer Book provisions are in keeping with this fact
Foot - “To Fall at someone's feet” showed humble submission, often when one had a request (1 Samuel 25:24 ; Luke 17:16 )
Perdition - The contrast, however, is sharply drawn in Philippians 1:28 and Hebrews 10:39 between those who are saved and those who Fall into perdition; cf
Well - deep, seven feet six inches in diameter, and lined with rough masonry; a pitcher unbroken at the bottom evidenced that there was water at some seasons, otherwise the Fall would have broken the pitcher
Magic - ...
Among the methods of divination and sorcery mentioned in the Bible are throwing arrows into the air and observing the pattern formed when they Fall (Ezekiel 21:21), consulting idolatrous figures or images (Ezekiel 21:21), looking into the liver of a sacrificed animal (Ezekiel 21:21), consulting the spirits of the dead (1 Samuel 28:8-9), studying the movements of the stars (Isaiah 47:13), gazing into a bowl or large cup of water (Genesis 44:5; Genesis 44:15) and using wristbands and veils in weird rituals to cast deadly spells over people (Ezekiel 13:17-19)
Orthodoxy - the Fall of man, regeneration, atonement, repentance, justification by free grace, &c
Scripture - Jesus Christ is the center to which everything in Scripture is united and bound together—beginning and end, creation and redemption, humanity, the world, the Fall, history, and future
Star - In Revelation 9:1 the Seer sees a star already Fallen (πεπτωκότα) and lying on the ground, representing the Fall of some person, perhaps Satan
Aphthartodocetae, a Sect of the Monophysites - This whole question is rather one of scholastic subtlety, though not wholly idle, and may be solved in this way: that the body of Christ, before the Resurrection, was similar in its constitution to the body of Adam before the Fall, containing the germ or possibility of immortality and incorruptibility, but subject to the influence of the elements, and was actually put to death by external violence, but through the indwelling power of the sinless Spirit was preserved from corruption and raised again to an imperishable life, when—to use an ingenious distinction of St
Day of Christ - There is no reference in the NT to an identification of the Fall of Jerusalem with this day, and all such interpretations must be read into it
Gallus (11), Abbat, the Apostle of Switzerland - The sermon he preached at John's consecration is extant in Latin—a wonderful specimen of Irish erudition, simple yet full of vigour, learned and devout, giving an abstract of the history of God's dealings from the creation, of the Fall and redemption, of the mission of the apostles and calling of the Gentiles, and ending with a powerful appeal to Christian faith and life, which gives some idea of the state of the corrupt and barbarous society he was seeking to leaven
Bolt - ) To strike or Fall suddenly like a bolt
Condition - These senses however Fall within the first definition
Flesh - " (Ephesians 5:30) But the term flesh hath also another sense, when by of opposition to the spirit, it is taken as a comprehensive expression of our whole corrupt and carnal nature by the Fall
Alphaeus - ...
Nothing is known of either Alphaeus beyond the name; for such details as that (2) was the brother of Joseph, the reputed father of the Lord, stand or Fall with his identification with Clopas to whom they really belong
Devil - The Fall and punishment of the devil is recorded
Abyss - John, "a star Fall from heaven unto the earth, and to him was given the key of the bottomless pit
Bee - The passage in Isaiah 7:8 , which mentions the "hissing for the bee," is supposed to involve an allusion to the practice of calling out the bees from their hives, by a hissing or whistling sound, to their labour in the fields, and summoning them again to return when the heavens begin to lower, or the shadows of evening to Fall
Eden - Wherever it was, it is there no more since the Fall and the curse
Woman - If woman was first in the Fall, she was honored in the exclusive parentage of the Savior of mankind; and women were the truest friends of Christ while on earth. The primal curse Falls with heaviest weight on woman; but the larger proportion of women in our churches may indicate that it was the purpose of God to make his grace to man "yet more abound" to her who was the first in sinning and suffering
Temper - ...
To Fall with dignity, with temper rise
Messi'ah - " The earliest gleam of the gospel is found in the account of the Fall
Meet, Meet With, Met - ); 22:10; Acts 10:25 ; Hebrews 7:1,10 ; metaphorically in Acts 20:22 ("shall befall"). See BEFALL. " ...
A — 5: συμβάλλω (Strong's #4820 — Verb — sumballo — soom-bal'-lo ) "to confer, to Fall in with, meet with," is translated "met" in Acts 20:14 , RV (AV, "met with"), of the Apostle Paul's "meeting" his companions at Assos
Angel - As finite creatures they may Fall under temptation; and accordingly we read of "fallen angels. " Of the cause and manner of their "fall" we are wholly ignorant
Body - Prior to the Fall, Adam and Eve enjoyed perfect fellowship with God, and that fellowship was experienced in the body (Genesis 1:27-31 ). Just as the Fall of Adam brought a curse on the earth, the resurrection of the body has consequences of cosmic proportions
Type - ...
CAIN as ignoring the Fall of man and approaching God by an offering which was the fruit of the ground which He had cursed and afterwards slaying his brother, became a type of the natural man's evil in offering to the holy God that which He could not righteously accept, and of his rejection of Christ. Genesis 7:11-24 — type of the sudden destruction that will Fall upon the guilty world
Nineveh - Diodorus asserts that there was an ancient prophecy that Nineveh should not Fall till the river became an enemy to the city; which happened in the third year of the siege, when the river partially overflowed the city. 606, by the Medes and Babylonians, and the Fall of this city was the end of the kingdom of Assyria
House - From such a position Eutychus could easily Fall. The circumstance of Samson's pulling down the house by means of the pillars may be explained by the fact of the company being assembled on tiers of balconies above each other, supported by central pillars on the basement; when these were pulled down the whole of the upper floors would Fall also
Marriage - Although the Fall has marred the divine purpose and function of marriage, this definition reflects the God-ordained ideal for marriage from the beginning. This open intimate relational aspect of God's image, reflected in marriage, was marred by the Fall (cf. Without the Fall, probably no one would have ever been single. He leads his wife toward dependence upon Christ, not upon himself, for all human leaders are Fallible. ...
Effect of the Fall on Marriage . The Fall made human hearts hard toward God and toward each other. The Fall severely damaged the marriage relationship
Satan - Satan had already Fallen, and his Fall perhaps affected this earth and its creatures, over which he may originally in innocence have been God's vicegerent, hence his envy of man his successor in the vicegerency (Genesis 1:26; Genesis 3:1-14). They are free now to tempt and hurt only to the length of their chain; Revelation 12:7-9 describes not their original expulsion, but a further step in their Fall, owing to Christ's ascension, namely, exclusion from access to accuse the saints before God (Job 1:11; Zechariah 3). Dei, 22:1) opinion was that the redeemed were elected by God to fill up the lapsed places in the heavenly hierarchy, occasioned by the Fall of Satan and his demons
Simeon - ...
And, being full of the Holy Ghost, Simeon went on to say: "Behold, this child is set for the Fall and rising again of many in Israel. They rise, and they stand, and they Fall, just as they receive or reject Immanuel. Has Mary's Son, then; has God's Son, been a stumbling stone to me? Or, has He been the one foundation laid in Zion for me? Has He, to my everlasting salvation, and to His everlasting praise, lifted me up from all my Falls and made me to stand upon His righteousness as upon a rock? Simeon himself had at one time stumbled and been broken on this child, and on His too great name. Though he Fall he shall not be utterly cast down, for the Lord upholdeth him with His hand, Now, unto Him that is able to keep you from Falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of His glory with exceeding joy: to the only wise God, our Saviour
Bear - ) A person who sells stocks or securities for future delivery in expectation of a Fall in the market
Fig Tree - As early as the end of February, little figs grow at the junction of the old wood and the leaves, but they develop only to the size of a cherry, are inedible, and soon Fall for the most part
Locust - The invasions of locusts are the heaviest calamites that can befall a country. Woe to the countries beneath them if the wind Fall and let them alight! They descend unnumbered as flakes of snow and hide the ground
Divorce - What marriage is to the Christian, it was, in the view of Scripture, to man before and since the Fall and God's promise of redemption
Olive - " The least breeze makes the flowers Fall; compare Job 15:33, "he shall cast off his flower as the olive," i
Evil Speaking - There is sometimes a malignant pleasure manifested; a studious recollection of every thing that can be brought forward; a delight in hearing any thing spoken against others; a secret rejoicing in knowing that another's Fall will be an occasion of our rise
Nature - A stone by nature Falls, or inclines to Fall
Manna - He did not need to make food Fall from heaven, for he himself was the true bread from heaven (John 6:31-35)
Mizpah, Mizpeh - One of the most interesting chapters in the history of Mizpah took place after the Fall of Jerusalem
Die - Men die of disease of a fever of sickness of a Fall of grief
Down - Along a descent from a higher to a lower place as, to run down a hill to Fall down a precipice to go down the stairs
Gibeonites - The three years' famine, the Lord's answer when consulted as to the cause, that it was "for Saul and his bloody house because he slew the Gibeonites," and after the execution of Saul's seven (seven, the sacred number, denotes the performance of a work of God) sons "the Lord being entreated for the hind," prove that David did not contrive or eagerly Fall in with this device for ridding himself of the remainder of Saul's royal line
Joshua - The miraculous Fall of Jericho terrified the Canaanites
Bow - To stoop to Fall upon the knees
Image - ...
It might naturally have been thought that man at his Fall would have ceased to be in the image and likeness of God, but it is not so represented in scripture
Asterius, Bishop of Amasea - 76) he mentions the consulate and Fall of Eutropius as an event of the preceding year
Desolation - ’ There is not necessarily in this passage any prediction of the Fall of Jerusalem, though the context may seem to suggest this
Abaddon - In Revelation 9:11 personified as the destroyer, Greek, apolluon , "the angel of the bottomless pit," Satan is meant; for he is described in Revelation 9:1 as "a star Fallen from heaven unto earth, to whom was given the key of the bottomless pit"; and Revelation 12:8-9,12: "Woe to the inhabiters of the earth, for the devil is come down. , and the Fall of Constantinople, May 29, 1453 A
Countenance - ...
To put out of countenance, to cause the countenance to Fall to abash to intimidate to disconcert
Albion - The death of Alboin followed the Fall of Pavia
Slide - ) To slip when walking or standing; to Fall
Adam - They were transgressors, had Fallen from their state of innocence, and acquired a conscience, and with it the sense of their own evil and guilt. Adam did not beget a son until after his Fall: hence all mankind are alike Fallen creatures. We have no details of the life of Adam as a Fallen man
Throw - ) A cast of dice; the manner in which dice Fall when cast; as, a good throw
Adam - They were transgressors, had Fallen from their state of innocence, and acquired a conscience, and with it the sense of their own evil and guilt. Adam did not beget a son until after his Fall: hence all mankind are alike Fallen creatures. We have no details of the life of Adam as a Fallen man
Babylon (2) - At the Fall of Nineveh, b
Salt (2) - The Jordan flows through a sunken valley, the Fall along its course being rapid and considerable, till it reaches its lowest point in this lake
Baal (1) - ...
So great a predilection for cults of such a nature was shown by the Israelites, from the time of their entrance into Canaan until the Fall of the monarchy, that Jabweh was given this title
Covenant - ...
Theologians use the phrase "covenant of works" to denote the constitution established by God with man before the Fall, the promise of which was eternal life on condition of obedience, Hosea 6:7 Romans 3:27 Galatians 2:19
Joram, Jehoram - He was warned as to his course by 'a writing' from the prophet Elijah (which was doubtless written some time before, 2 Chronicles 21:12 ), foretelling that God would smite His people with a great plague; the king's disease should be such that his bowels should Fall out; and it was thus that he miserably died
Jehu - He ordered the execution of seventy other descendants of Ahab, and displayed their heads as a warning that the wrath of God would Fall on any who opposed him (2 Kings 10:1-11)
Curse - Those who disobey the law Fall under God’s curse; but Jesus bore this curse when he himself became a curse in place of the sinner (Galatians 3:10; Galatians 3:13; see CROSS)
Dan - Many Danites were deported to Assyria, Babylon, and Media following the Fall of Samaria in 722 or 721 B. The writer of Kings ascribed the Fall of the kingdom to the worship of gods other than Yahweh (2 Kings 17:7-20 ), and Dan was one of the key centers of this idolatry
Come - To happen or Fall out as, how comes that? Let come what will. Hence when followed by an object or person, with to or on, to befall to light on. ...
To come about, to happen to Fall out to come to pass to arrive
Law - Genesis 3:1-24 : ...
See Fall. Laws, remedial, a fancied law, which some believe in, who hold that God, in mercy to mankind, has abolished that rigorous constitution or law that they were under originally, and instead of it has introduced a more mild constitution, and put us under a new law, which requires no more than imperfect sincere obedience, in compliance with our poor, infirm, impotent circumstances since the Fall
Cherubim - At the entrance of the garden of Eden, after the Fall, we find the cherubim and a flaming sword placed. ...
The question is then, What, or whom, did they represent? I would very humbly say in answer, that I am inclined to think, with several who have gone before me in the study of this solemn and mysterious subject, that the cherubim were emblematical of the glorious persons of the GODHEAD, in their covenant engagements to redeem our Fallen nature, as represented in those characters united with the manhood of Christ. By which I apprehend, the sense of the expression is, not to keep from, but to keep to, the way of the tree of life; meaning, that poor Fallen man now had no access but by this way. " (John 14:6) Hence it should seem, that by these cherubic figures, among which the face of a man formed a part, immediately at the Fall, redemption through Christ was set up by those emblems, as manifested to the church. This objection, therefore, Falls to the ground
Eagle - Now, when the Lord Jesus useth this similitude, it teacheth us that it is impossible they can Fall whom he bears; for they are on the wings and above, and not beneath, and like those birds, who catch up their young in their talons, and in their flight may drop them. Even the youths shall faint and be weary, and the young men shall utterly Fall; but they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run and not be weary, and they shall walk and not faint
Chronology of the Old Testament - The next period, however, from Athaliah to Hezekiah, and from Jehu to the Fall of Samaria, gives us greater difficulty. In general the picture it gives of the sequence of events from the time of the Judges down to the Fall of Jerusalem is correct. The amount of error is less as we come down to later times, and disappears at the Fall of Samaria
Fall - Fall . The story of the Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 is the immediate sequel to the account of man’s creation with which the Jahwistic document opens (see Creation). These coincidences are sufficiently striking to suggest the inference that a mythical account of man’s original condition and his Fall existed in Babylonia, and had obtained wide currency in the East
Casuistry - Special cases, of course, are not to be decided by sentiment or what is popularly called common sense, but according to the principles under which they happen to Fall
ad'am - After this the Lord God caused a deep sleep to Fall upon him, and took one of his ribs from him, which he fashioned into a woman and brought her to the man
Watchfulness - They fail to hear and obey their master's warning to watch and pray so as not to Fall into temptation (Matthew 26:41 )
Sycamine - The law of gravitation is as clearly manifested in the Fall of the leaf as in the majestic order of the planets, and the power of faith is as vividly illustrated in the figure of uprooting a mulberry tree by the word of command, as in that of uprooting a sycomore, or even of moving a mountain
Dispensations - ...
(2) The Adamic dispensation of promise (Genesis 3:15) after the Fall, down to the flood; the remembrance of the promise being kept alive by sacrifice
Vinegar - ‘The vigilant humanity of Julian,’ says Gibbon,‡ Register - , register when the corresponding parts Fall in the same line, or when line Falls exactly upon line in reverse pages, or (as in chromatic printing) where the various colors of the design are printed consecutively, and perfect adjustment of parts is necessary
Peter - As a faithful servant of Jesus how very eminent Peter stands forth to observation; for who among the apostles so zealous, so attached to his Lord, as Peter? And that such an one should Fall from his integrity, even to the denial of his Lord, what caution doth it teach to the highest servants of Jesus! But when we have paid all due attention to those striking particularities in the life of Peter, the most blessed and most important instruction the life of this apostle exhibits, is in the display of that sovereign grace of Jesus manifested in Peter's recovery
Zephaniah - In Zephaniah 2:13-15 he foretells Nineveh's Fall (625 B
Hold - ) Not to Fall away, desert, or prove recreant; to remain attached; to cleave;-often with with, to, or for. ) To cause to remain in a given situation, position, or relation, within certain limits, or the like; to prevent from Falling or escaping; to sustain; to restrain; to keep in the grasp; to retain
Arm - The importance attached to the functions discharged by this organ are incidentally referred to by Job in his solemn repudiation of conscious wrong-doing (‘Let my shoulder Fall from the shoulder-blade, and mine arm be broken from the bone’ Job 31:22 )
Compassion, Merciful - 24:14: “Let us Fall now into the hand of the Lord; for his mercies are great
ad'am - After this the Lord God caused a deep sleep to Fall upon him, and took one of his ribs from him, which he fashioned into a woman and brought her to the man
ad'am - After this the Lord God caused a deep sleep to Fall upon him, and took one of his ribs from him, which he fashioned into a woman and brought her to the man
Frontlets - This square is put on the middle of the forehead, and the strings being girt about the head, make a knot in the form of the letter ד ; they then are brought before, and Fall on the breast
Seir - In the summer it produces most of the European fruits, namely, apricots, figs, pomegranates, olives, apples, and peaches; while in winter deep snows occasionally Fall, with frosts, to the middle of March
Father - Job entitles God "the Father of rain," Job 38:28 ; he produces it, and causes it to Fall
Adam - Adam's lamentable Fall is next related
Let - ...
To let down, to permit to sink or Fall to lower
People of the Land - 2 Kings 25:18-21 records that Nebuchadrezzar put to death at Riblah “sixty men of the people of the land,” along with others held responsible for the revolt against Babylon resulting in the Fall of Jersualem in 587 B
Wash - To wet to Fall on and moisten as, the rain washes the flowers or plants
Josiah - The answer was that the evil and the curses found in the book should Fall upon the people; but, because Josiah's heart was tender, and he had humbled himself, the judgement should not be executed in his days
Confession - In the Bible’s usage of the word, these meanings Fall into two groups, those concerned with confession of sins, and those concerned with confession of faith
Pinnacle - On the other hand, the battlement of the Royal Portico would afford the deepest and sheerest Fall, and, on the whole, it is most probable that ‘the pinnacle’ was situated here
Purse - The passage, says Wendt, is to be explained from foresight of an impending period of persecution for the disciples: Jesus sets the necessity of buying a sword in contrast to the freedom from all want hitherto enjoyed by His disciples in their work as His messengers, and bases His exhortation on a reference to the doom about to Fall on Himself; a period would begin when the disciples would no longer be unharmed, but would be in the midst of conflicts and persecutions (see Wendt, Teaching of Jesus, ii
Murder - An Egyptian Jew gave himself out as a prophet and held out to a crowd in the wilderness the alluring promise that the walls of Jerusalem would Fall down at his word and so make the city theirs once more
Give - To fail to yield or force to break or Fall. ...
To give on, to rush to Fall on
Oracle - Balaam, at the instigation of his own spirit, and urged on by his avarice, fearing to lose thy recompence that he was promised by Balak, king of the Moabites, suggests a diabolical expedient to this prince of making the Israelites Fall into idolatry and fornication, (Numb. ) that he saw the Almighty, sitting upon his throne, and all the host of heaven round about him; and the Lord said, Who shall tempt Ahab, king of Israel, that he may go to war with Ramoth Gilead, and Fall in the battle? One answered after one manner, and another in another
Nehemiah, Book of - If this is accepted, Ezra’s visit and work of reform Fall in the year 398. ...
‘According to him, a return of exiles in the second year of Cyrus did not take place at all; the building of the Temple and the walls was rather the work of the population that had remained behind in the land (2 Kings 25:12 ), of whom Zerubbabel and Nehemiah were governors; Ezra’s visit and work of reform Fall in the second governorship of Nehemiah, after the events narrated in Nehemiah 13:4-31
sa'Tan - We can only conjecture, therefore, that Satan is a Fallen angel, who once had a time of probation, but whose condemnation is now irrevocably fixed. As to the time cause and manner of his Fall Scripture tells us scarcely anything; but it describes to us distinctly the moral nature of the evil one. " ( Matthew 25:41 ) Of their origin and Fall we know no more than of his. But in the temptation of a Fallen nature Satan has a greater power
Sex, Biblical Teaching on - A double standard in relationships may be described throughout the Scriptures; yet before the Fall and after the coming of Christ, man and woman are set forth as equals before God. ...
Yet the Fall ruptured God's plan for male/female equality
Song of Solomon, Theology of - The pervasive garden theme in the Song evokes memories of the garden before the Fall. ...
This perfect harmony between the male and female tragically ended at the Fall
Hosea - Judah had trusted to her fenced cities: judgement should Fall upon both. " The prophecy ends with the declaration that the wise and the prudent will grasp the things revealed; "for the ways of the Lord are right, and the just shall walk in them; but the transgressors shall Fall therein
Break - To intercept to check to lessen the force of as, to break a Fall, or a blow. To suffer an interruption of friendship to Fall out
Angel - As to the time of their Fall, we are certain it could not be before the sixth day of the creation, because on that day it is said, "God saw every thing that he had mad, and behold it was very good;" but that it was not long after, is very probable, as it must have preceded the Fall of our first parents. The number of the Fallen angels seems to be great, and, like the holy angels, perhaps have various orders among them, Matthew 12:24
Osee, Book of - " (Matthew 9,12; Osee 6), and in the Gospel of Saint Luke He repeats: "Then shall they begin to say to the mountains: 'Fall upon us!' and to the hills: 'Cover us!'" (Luke 23; Osee 10; Apocalypse 6)
Adam - His happiness was farther imbittered by witnessing the fruits of his Fall in his posterity. Cain his first born son, and Abel the second, born in the likeness of their Fallen parents, were ere long last to them-the one slain, and the other a fugitive. " In that very day he should lose the moral image of his Maker, and become subject not only to physical death, but also to God's eternal wrath and curse, which is death in the highest sense of the word, and is the doom which has Fallen upon all his race
Work, Theology of - The notion that labor came into being as a result of humanity's Fall does not reflect biblical truth
Easter Controversy - The dispute originated between the West and East, about the middle of the 2century, over the practise followed in the Eastern Church of terminating the Lenten Fast and beginning the Easter celebration on the 14th day of the Jewish month, Nisan, regardless of the day on which this date might Fall
Quartodeciman Controversy - The dispute originated between the West and East, about the middle of the 2century, over the practise followed in the Eastern Church of terminating the Lenten Fast and beginning the Easter celebration on the 14th day of the Jewish month, Nisan, regardless of the day on which this date might Fall
Sheshbazzar - Then, further, it is not unlikely that the younger man, Zerubbabel, took the leading part in the work of restoration, and as a result his uncle’s memory would Fall into the background
Human Free Will - Sin became an inherited part of the inner nature of mankind at the Fall in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 3:6 )
Sin Offering - Josephus declares that the sin offering is presented by those "who Fall into sin in ignorance
Galilee, Sea of - In this distance of 26 1/2 miles there is a Fall in the river of 1,682 feet, or of more than 60 feet to the mile
Tiberias - Jerusalem, Hebron, Safed, and Tiberias are the four holy places in which the Jews say if prayer without ceasing were not offered the world would Fall into chaos
Scribe - After the Fall of Jerusalem, they became more important than ever
Hosea, Book of - " (Matthew 9,12; Osee 6), and in the Gospel of Saint Luke He repeats: "Then shall they begin to say to the mountains: 'Fall upon us!' and to the hills: 'Cover us!'" (Luke 23; Osee 10; Apocalypse 6)
Locust - ’ When locusts are blown seaward, they Fall into the water in vast numbers ( Exodus 10:19 )
Earth Earthen Earthy Earthly - Earth (γῆ) is used in a variety of meanings, which may be distinguished as follows: (1) the dust or matter of which the first man was made (1 Corinthians 15:47); (2) the fertile soil which yields grass and herbs and fruit (Hebrews 6:7, James 5:7, Revelation 9:4); (3) the solid ground upon which men stand or Fall (Acts 9:4; Acts 9:8); (4) the land in contrast with the sea (2 Peter 3:5, Revelation 10:5); (3) the whole world as the abode of men (Acts 1:8, etc
Wind - ...
Proverbs 11:29 (b) No doubt the writer referred to the transient character of that which Falls to the lot of the evil man. ...
Proverbs 25:14 (a) There are those who claim to have great gifts, but when they stand before the audience, they Fall flat. A meeting is advertised largely, the speaker is extolled for his ability, the proper music is arranged, the crowd has arrived, and then the whole meeting Falls "flat
Pithom - But what an awful character must this mother of Sisera have been, to take pleasure in the lusts of her son! Forgetting the chastity of her sex, she seemed to rest in the very thought that the daughters of Israel would serve for the savage sports of her son and his army, and a damsel or two Fall to the lot of every man
Saints - The holy angels are said by JEHOVAH (Job 4:18) to have no trust put in them, yea,"he chargeth them with folly, or weakness—that is, with a possibility of Falling. Angels have Fallen, and therefore angels may Fall
Linen - We might be prompted humbly to ask, why is it that the Lord hath so prohibited the wearing of linen and woollen together? Can it be an object of moment in itself? Since the Fall our poor sinful bodies requires: covering, which in innocency, it should seem, was unnecessary either for warmth or decency; and as the fleecy garment is for warmth, and, the linen for cleanliness can it be offensive to our God, that his poor creatures should use both? Nay, it is, well known that we do use both, and do not consider it as any breach of this command
Book (2) - ’ The Scriptures used in the synagogues up to the Fall of Jerusalem were probably leather rolls, or at least rolls of skins tanned in some way; but papyrus rolls were in very general use
Condemnation (2) - Condemnation at the last may indeed Fall like a thunderbolt upon the rejected (Matthew 21:19)
Considerateness - Among the many rays of ‘his own glory’ (John 2:11) manifested forth in His first miracle, we must not omit His considerateness for the mortification which the Falling short of their wine would cause to His peasant hosts, and His taking care that none save His mother and the servants knew whence the new and better supply was drawn (John 2:9). Peter, who, as he had thrice denied his Lord, is thrice restored with delicate allusion to, but not mention of, his threefold Fall (John 21:15; John 21:17), are examples no less shining and illustrative
Day (That) - The expression ‘in that day’ is used, for instance, to refer quite plainly to the Fall of Jerusalem (Luke 17:31; in Mk
Habibus, Deacon, Martyr at Edessa - His dying prayer was, "O king Christ, for Thine is this world and Thine is the world to come, behold and see that while I might have been able to flee from these afflictions I did not flee, in order that I might not Fall into the hands of Thy justice
Hand - The terrible wrath of an angry GOD will Fall upon him in judgment
Fly - To fly at, to spring towards to rush on to Fall on suddenly
Isaacus Antiochenus, a Priest of Antioch in Syria - Here Isaacus seems to Fall into the opposite heresies, failing to distinguish Nature from Person; but elsewhere he uses language unmistakably orthodox. 59 is a hymn asserting, against the Cathari or Novatianists, that Fallen man recovers innocence not only by baptism, but also by penitence
Settle - ) To sink to the bottom; to Fall to the bottom, as dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reserveir
Flies - ...
Having said thus much, by way of shewing to what a degraded state our whole nature is reduced by the Fall, I hope the reader will indulge me with making another observation, to point out the blessedness to which we are brought, in the recovery from such gross ignorance, by the glorious gospel of the ever-blessed God
Man - enosh, 'subject to corruption, mortal;' not used for man till after the Fall
Ear-Rings - " Some writers contend, that by the nose-jewel, we are to understand rings, which women attached to their forehead, and let them Fall down upon their nose; but Chardin, who certainly was a diligent observer of eastern customs, no where saw this frontal ring in the east, but every where the ring in the nose
Antinomians - Some of their teachers expressly maintained, that as the elect cannot Fall from grace nor forfeit the divine favour, the wicked actions they commit are not really sinful, nor are to be considered as instances of their violation of the divine law; and that consequently they have no occasion either to confess their sins, or to break them off by repentance
Bottle - They enclose these leathern bottles in woollen sacks, because their beasts of carriage often Fall down under their load, or cast it down on the sandy desert
Upper Room - "The house in which I am at present living," says Jowett, "gives what seems to be a correct idea of the scene of Eutychus' Falling from the upper loft while St. Eutychus, thus sitting, would be on a level with the open window; and, being overcome with sleep, he would easily Fall out from the third loft of the house into the street, and be almost certain, from such a height, to lose his life
Keep - ) To continue in, as a course or mode of action; not to intermit or Fall from; to hold to; to maintain; as, to keep silence; to keep one's word; to keep possession
Acts of the Apostles - Keeping this idea steadily in view, we shall see that all the events recorded Fall naturally into their places, and that any seeming abruptness is sufficiently accounted for
Throw - A cast of dice and the manner in which dice Fall when cast as a good throw
Time - tempus tempora, the Falls of the head, also tempest, &c. wpa in its original sense, opportunity, occasion, a Fall, an event, that which comes
Refuge, Cities of - If in the contest a man of the murdered person's family happens to Fall, there can be no peace until two others of the murderer's family have been slain
Ptolemais - The destruction of the city ‘produced terror all over Europe; for, with its Fall in 1291, the power of the Christian nations of the West lost its last hold upon the East’ (C
Nets - ἀμφιβάλλω, which verb stands, without a noun, for the action of the fisherman in using the net, Mark 1:16), bell- or pear-shaped, thrown by hand from the shore or from a boat, which was skilfully wielded so as to Fall upon the water with its circular mouth fully extended
Olive - The wind was dreaded by the cultivator of the olive for the least ruffling of a breeze is apt to cause the flowers to Fall
Fall, the - The word "fall" is widely used to refer to what is recorded in Genesis 3 , particularly to what is written of the temptation of Adam and Eve, their being overcome by it, and their immediate reactions after they became aware of the consequences (3:1-8). Passages such as Romans 5:12-19,1 Corinthians 15:21-22 , and 1 Timothy 2:12-13 definitely refer to the Fall as having actually happened as recorded. He would undo the Fall by providing full redemption and restoration through the mediatorial work of the seed of the woman, his incarnate Son, Jesus Christ, who would serve as the second Adam
Euric, King of Toulouse - " Thus the pretence of the foedus was finally set aside, and in the interval between the Fall of the western empire and the rise of the Ostrogoths and Franks, Euric appears as the most powerful sovereign of the West (Dahn, v. In 475 came the Fall of Nepos and Augustulus, and the suspension of the empire of the West. By 478 the whole peninsula had Fallen to the Goths, except a mountainous strip in the N. destined in the following generation to Fall back before the young and all-subduing power of the Franks, called to a greater work than they" (Dahn, Könige der Germanen , v
Punishment (2) - So serious may this punishment be, that death would be a preferable alternative (Mark 9:42); and, unrestricted to individual transgressors, it may Fall also both upon cities (Matthew 10:15; Matthew 11:21; Matthew 23:38) and upon nations (Matthew 21:43-44; Matthew 23:35; Matthew 23:38). A discussion of the punishment resulting from that judgment does not Fall within the scope of the present article, and the reader is therefore referred to the separate study on Eternal Punishment. Instead of seeking to dogmatize on what does not at present Fall within the sphere of our understanding, it would seem wise to confine our conclusions to two broad principles:...
(i
Ezekiel - The Fall of Jerusalem is the central point. ...
(2) Symbolical prophecies of Jerusalem's Fall: Ezekiel 3:16-17. ...
(6) Two years and five months later, the very day on which Ezekiel speaks, is announced as that of beginning the siege; Jerusalem shall Fall: Ezekiel 24. ...
(7) Predictions against foreign nations during Ezekiel's silence regarding his own people; since judgment begins at the house of God it will visit the pagan world: Ezekiel 25-32; some of these were uttered later than others, but all began to be given (Havernick) after the Fall of Jerusalem
Genesis, Theology of - Theological reflection on Genesis occurs in the Book of Ecclesiastes, which includes meditations on the human condition after the Fall. Genesis tells of the Fall into sin but also immediately begins the story of redemption through the promised son. ...
Paul also extracts theological lessons from the story of the Fall. Garrett...
See also Abraham ; Adam ; Create, Creation ; Eve ; Fall, the ; Flood, the ...
Bibliography
Revelation, the - The loss of the true spring and power of devotedness and service characterises the first declension in the church: no one may have observed it but the Lord, yet it is spoken of as a Fall , and repentance is called for, or its candlestick would be removed from its place. The four living creatures and the elders Fall down, and the new song of redemption is sung. Jeremiah 51:25 ; it may correspond to the Fall of Babylon in Revelation 17 , Revelation 18 . A great star Falls — some great power from above — and corrupts the moral sources. A star — one in power — Falls from heaven: moral darkness and Satanic influence follow. Another announces the Fall of Babylon. There is an unprecedented break up of communities, and Fall of imperial centres; and great Babylon is remembered before God for wrath. Direct final judgements Fall from God out of heaven, but produce only blasphemy on the part of men. Seven kings, heads or forms of government, are spoken of, of which five were Fallen, one existed, and one was still to come, remaining but a little while. Revelation 18 gives the lamentations of various classes and orders over the Fall of the great and splendid city, under the form of which the harlot is portrayed
Lamentations, Book of - It forms a curious contrast to the consolation offered to Athens in her decline and Fall through the comedies of Aristophanes. ’ This statement is 300 years later than the Fall of Jerusalem; and Lam
Satan - ...
Jesus spoke of seeing Satan "fall like lightning from heaven" (Luke 10:18 ), a Fall not identified but spoken of within the context of demons being cast out—a sign of Satan's loss of authority
Coming Again - In the solemn discourse on the future recorded in Matthew 24 and Mark 13, there are certain passages which, as usually interpreted, convey the impression that the destruction of Jerusalem and the Fall of the Jewish State was one such momentous crisis that Jesus had particularly in view (Matthew 24:15-22; Matthew 24:32-34, Mark 13:14-23; Mark 13:29-30; cf. This view makes His several comings Fall into line as phases or stages of a continuous process, in which, sometimes through the quickened vitality of His Church, sometimes through the catastrophic action of the moral laws and forces which lie behind the movements of human society, His invincible operation should be revealed, until the final consummation is reached in the sovereign manifestation of His authority and glory at the end of the age
Cast - To throw or let Fall as, to cast anchor. In seamens language, to Fall off, or incline, so as to bring the side of a ship to the wind applied particularly to a ship riding with her head to the wind, when her anchor is first loosened
Antioch - The slaughter of seventeen thousand, and the captivity of one hundred thousand of its inhabitants, mark the final siege and Fall of Antioch; which, while they close the long catalogue of its public woes, attest its extent and population. But the period now referred to, namely, the age of Chrysostom, toward the close of the fourth century, may be considered as the brightest of its history subsequent to the Apostolic age, and that from which the church at Antioch may date its Fall
Light - To Fall on to come to by chance to happen to find with on. To Fall on to strike
pe'Ter - Then too it was that he made those repeated protestations of unalterable fidelity, so soon to be falsified by his miserable Fall. On the morning of the resurrection we have proof that Peter, though humbled, was not crushed by his Fall
Kings, Books of - The books record the division of the Israelite kingdom into two parts, and the history, decline and Fall of the separate kingdoms (see ISRAEL; JUDAH, TRIBE AND KINGDOM). ...
Rehoboam, Solomon’s son, saw the judgment of God Fall when the kingdom split into two
Daniel - ...
Daniel’s trust in God showed itself also in the fearless way he told Nebuchadnezzar of the judgment that would Fall upon him because of his pride (Daniel 4:19; Daniel 4:25). The kingdoms of the world may fight against God, but in the end they must Fall beneath the all-conquering power of his kingdom
Sanctification - The Fall plunged the human race and the universe into a state of dysfunction (Genesis 3:14-19 ). Neither was so distorted by the Fall so as to obliterate God's original purpose and design completely. Fallen human beings still bear God's image (James 3:9-10 ). Fallen creation still witnesses to God's existence and attributes (Psalm 19:1-6 ; Romans 1:20 ). Yet both, depending on the analogy employed, are skewed, broken, Fallen, dysfunctional, "unsanctified. ...
The unsanctified state of Fallen humanity is not caused merely by lack of effort or poor motivation. Adam and Eve's prefallen sanctification was not a result of their inherent capabilities. ...
Human beings "fall short of God's glory" (Romans 3:23 ) because they lack God's presence, which produces glory. God's presence was the essential missing factor in Adam and Eve's postfall state. Functioning moral likeness to God, lost in the Fall, is restored through God's redemption in Christ (Ephesians 4:23-24 ; Colossians 3:9-10 ). First, Jesus Christ was the only human being since the Fall to live a continuously, perfectly sanctified life. God promises the "overcomers" in Revelation 2,3 to restore all that was lost in the Fall (2:7,11, 17,26; 3:5,12)
Baruch, Apocalypse of - It does not readily Fall into sections, but may be analyzed as follows:...
i-xx. 5-12); the Fall of Jerusalem is a step towards the final judgment (xx. All history is divided into 12 parts: the black waters are the six bad periods, beginning with the Fall (‘O Adam, what hast thou done to all those who are born from thee?’ xlviii. Yet the catastrophe is too recent to allow him calmly to contemplate the Fall of Zion, and his lament over the ruins (x. ...
While, however, absolute consistency is not to be expected, it is necessary to show that the Fall of Jerusalem is assumed all through the book. is an address by Baruch to the Jews left in the land after the Fall of Jerusalem. ‘The Most High … alone knows what will befall’ (lxix. When the author thinks for a moment about the fate of apostate Israelites, he Falls into intentional obscurity (xlii
Adam - Nor does Moses delay long, even upon that, but, after one great and fruitful word upon that, he passes on to take up at more length, in his own wonderful way, and in answerable style, the temptation and the Fall of Adam and of all Adam's offspring. And thus it is that he dips his pen in such an inkhorn of tears, and describes to us with such sympathy, and in such sad words, that aboriginal mystery of iniquity-the temptation, the Fall, and the expulsion of Adam from Eden. '...
In one of William Law's finest dialogues Theophilus asks his pupil Humanus how he would set about convincing a man of his Fallen estate. This is the sure and infallible proof of the Fall of man. The Fall of man is not a thing to be learnt from any history whatsoever, but shows itself everywhere and every day and in every man with as much clearness as we see the sun. My first attempt, therefore, upon any man, to convince him of Adam's Fall as the ground of Christ's redemption, should be an attempt to do that for him which affliction, disappointment, sickness, pain, and the approach of death have a natural tendency to do; that is, to convince him of the vanity, poverty, and misery of his life and condition in this world. I would appeal at first to nothing but his own nature and condition in this world to demonstrate this capital truth of Holy Scripture that all mankind lie in a Fallen state. Death comes to us with overwhelming proofs of our Fall in his hands. ...
And then, just as the full truth about the atonement led the apostle back from Christ to Adam, so in another epistle of his, the resurrection of Christ, and the resurrection of all those who have Fallen asleep in Christ, leads Paul back again to Adam in this way
Divorce - With the Fall of humankind the divine purpose and function of marriage were damaged by sin, and the marriage relationship often destroyed. ...
Effect of the Fall on Marriage . The Fall of humankind (Genesis 3 ) caused human hearts to become hard toward God and toward each other. ...
Deuteronomy 24:1-4 , therefore, is a concession made by God to the Fallen condition of humankind
Stone - So far from that, He went on to say, ‘Every one that Falleth on that stone shall be broken to pieces; but on whomsoever it shall Fall, it will scatter him as dust’ (Luke 20:18 = Matthew 21:44). ’ And it seems clear that his reminiscence of the latter passage has been inspired by his recollection of the Lord’s own words as to those who Fall upon the Stone which is Himself, and those upon whom that Stone shall Fall (cf
Calvinists - They maintain that God hath chosen a certain number of the Fallen race of Adam in Christ, before the foundation of the world, unto eternal glory, according to his immutable purpose, and of his free grace and love, without at least foresight of faith, good works, or any conditions performed by the creature; and that the rest of mankind he was pleased to pass by, and ordain to dishonour and wrath, for their sins, to the praise of his vindictive justice. ...
For it was the most free counsel, and gracious will and intention of God the Father, that the quickening and saving efficacy of the most precious death of his Son should exert itself in all the elect, to give unto them only justifying faith, and by it to conduct them infallibly to salvation; that is, it was the will of God that Christ, by the blood of the cross, whereby he confirmed the new covenant, should efficaciously redeem out of every people, tribe, nation, and language, all those, and those only, who were from eternity elected to salvation, and given to him by the Father. They maintain that mankind are totally depraved, in consequence of the Fall of the first man, who, being their public head, his sin involved the corruption of all his posterity, and which corruption extends over the whole soul, and renders it unable to turn to God, or to do any thing truly good, and exposes it to his righteous displeasure, both in this world and that which is to come. "Such as man was after the Fall, such children did he beget...
corruption by the righteous judgment of God being derived from Adam to his posterity...
not by imitation, but by the propagation of a vicious nature. Lastly: They maintain that those whom God has effectually called, and sanctified by his Spirit, shall never finally Fall from a state of grace. They admit that true believers may Fall partially, and would Fall totally and finally but for the mercy and faithfulness of God, who keepeth the feet of his saints; also, that he who bestoweth the grace of perseverance, bestoweth it by means of reading and hearing the word, meditation, exhortations, threatenings, and promises; but that none of these things imply the possibility of a believer's Falling from a state of justification. ...
Now unto him that is able to keep you from Falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy, to the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever, Amen
Cast - ) To cause to Fall; to shed; to reflect; to throw; as, to cast a ray upon a screen; to cast light upon a subject
Rebekah - ‘Upon me be thy curse, my son’ (Genesis 27:13 ), is her answer to Jacob when he fears that a curse will Fall on his deception
Day of the Lord - Lamentations 2:2 can speak of the “day of the Lord's anger” in past tense, describing the Fall of Jerusalem
Chicago, Illinois - Incidental to the World's Congress Auxiliary of the Columbian Exposition and World's Fair in Chicago, the sessions of the Second Catholic Congress of the United States were held in the Fall of 1893, presided over by Archbishop Feehan and William J
Elisha - We next read of his predicting a Fall of rain when the army of Jehoram was faint from thirst (2 Kings 3:9-20 ); of the multiplying of the poor widow's cruse of oil (4:1-7); the miracle of restoring to life the son of the woman of Shunem (4:18-37); the multiplication of the twenty loaves of new barley into a sufficient supply for an hundred men (4:42-44); of the cure of Naaman the Syrian of his leprosy (5:1-27); of the punishment of Gehazi for his falsehood and his covetousness; of the recovery of the axe lost in the waters of the Jordan (6:1-7); of the miracle at Dothan, half-way on the road between Samaria and Jezreel; of the siege of Samaria by the king of Syria, and of the terrible sufferings of the people in connection with it, and Elisha's prophecy as to the relief that would come (2 Kings 6:24-7:2 )
Jericho - The spring, ain es-Sultan, issues some 30,000 cubit feet of water daily which Falls about 160 feet in the first mile of its course down many channels to the Jordan River six miles away, irrigating about 2,500 acres. 4 inches of rain Fall there per year (mostly between November and February), and the average temperature for January Isaiah 59 F, while it Isaiah 88 F for August
Huguenots - God grant the fatal bandage that hides the truth from thine eyes may Fall off! May God forget the rivers of blood with which thou hast deluged the earth, and which thy reign hath caused to be shed!...
May God blot out of his book the injuries which thou hast done us; and while he rewards the sufferers, may he pardon those who exposed us to suffer! O, may God, who hath made thee to us, and to the whole church, a minister of his judgments, make thee a dispenser of his favours an administrator of his mercy!"...
Metals - Races that have degenerated into barbarism Fall back upon flint; then advance to bronze, an alloy of copper and tin, harder than either: and then brass; and lastly iron
Song of Songs - The first sees two main characters, Solomon and a Shulammite girl who Fall in love and marry
Cut - ) To sever and cause to Fall for the purpose of gathering; to hew; to mow or reap
Blasphemy - Edom was guilty of blasphemy when it rejoiced over the Fall of Jerusalem (Ezekiel 35:12 )
Rabbah - Jerusalem's Fall should be followed by that of Rabbah (compare Josephus, Hermon - " But a Hermon dew was a dew such as Falls there, the snow on the summit condensing the summer vapors which float in the higher air, and causing light clouds to hover round and abundant dew to Fall on it, while the air is elsewhere without a cloud and the whole country parched
Micah, Book of - ...
Summary of the book...
From his prophetic viewpoint, Micah gives a picture of the judgment about to Fall on Israel and Judah (1:1-16)
Find - The primary sense is to come to, to rush, to Fall on, to meet, to set on
Heir - ‘The heirship of the Son was realised in the Incarnation, and in its essence is independent of the Fall (Westcott on Hebrews 1:2), though conditioned by it as to its circumstances
Serpent - Full consideration of this passage, and of its relation to 2 Kings 18:4, does not Fall within the scope of this article (see art
on (2) - Josephus (Ant 10:9, section 7) says Nebuchadnezzar, the fifth year after Jerusalem's Fall, left the siege of Tyre to march against Egypt
Adam - The Fall , Genesis 2:16 f
Manna - It was altogether miraculous: for this food began to Fall from heaven from the time the Israelites arrived in the wilderness of Zin, which was the sixteenth day of the second month after their departure from Egypt, until that they came to Canaan, during the pilgrimage of forty years
Avenge - ...
In the covenant, God warned that His vengeance may Fall on His own people: “And I will bring a sword upon you, that shall avenge the quarrel of my covenant …” ( Aphraat (Aphrahat, Farhad - Any one who doubts his own capacity for the keeping of a vow of virginity, which apparently was often taken at the time of baptism, is advised to marry before that rite, a Fall subsequent to it being a heinous sin (vii
Corn - ’ It is rendered ‘corn’ only in John 12:24 (Authorized Version): ‘Except a corn of wheat [1] Fall into the ground and die …’ (cf
Solomon - His Fall, alas, followed, for he loved many strange women, which turned his heart away, and he went after their gods, and built high places for them
Care, Careful - Matthew 10:28-29, God cares for the sparrows that Fall to the ground)
Cross - Cross and pile, a play with money, at which it is put to chance whether a coin shall Fall with that side up, which bears the cross, or the other which is called pile or reverse. Transverse oblique passing from side to side Falling athwart as a cross beam
Sidon - ...
Justin Martyr makes (Judges 18:3) Tyre a colony planted by Sidon when the king of Ascalon took Sidon the year before the Fall of Troy
Festus - ’ More particularly it is added that he ‘sent forces, both horsemen and footmen, to Fall upon those that had been seduced by a certain impostor, who promised them deliverance and freedom from the miseries they were under, if they would but follow him as far as the wilderness
Infidelity - ...
Its inconsistency with reason; its incongruity with the nature of man; its cloudy and obscure prospects; its unsatisfying nature; its opposition to the dictates of conscience; its pernicious tendency to eradicate every just principle from the breast of man, and to lead the way for every species of vice and immorality, show us that it cannot flourish, but must finally Fall
Mordecai - Precious Jesus! what everlasting blessedness hast thou introduced into the circumstances of our Fallen state, when by thy visit to our world, and redemption of our nature in it, thou hast raised thy people from the ruins of the Fall, and cleansed our hearts by thy blood from all those evil passions of our Fallen nature
Beloved - He calls him his elect, his chosen, his only beloved, his dear Son; as if he would have every individual member of his church, (and which is indeed the case) to Fall in love with him
Tree - The end product of wood already processed and fashioned into something may be indicated by ‛êts: “And upon whatsoever any of them, when they are dead, doth Fall, it shall be unclean; whether it be any vessel of wood …” ( Light - ...
In the metaphorical use 'ôr signifies life over against death: “For thou hast delivered my soul from death: wilt not thou deliver my feet from Falling, that I may walk before God in the light of the living?” ( Fall, I shall arise; when I sit in darkness, the Lord shall be a light unto me” ( Flesh - ...
The word means the “meaty part plus the skin” of men: “And the Lord God caused a deep sleep to Fall upon Adam, and he slept: and he took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof” ( Remonstrants - They believe that God, having an equal regard for all his creatures, sent his Son to die for the sins not of the elect only, but of the whole world; that no mortal is rendered finally unhappy by an eternal and invincible decree, but that the misery of those who perish arises from themselves; and that, in this present imperfect state, believers, if not vigilant, may, through the force of temptation, and the influence of Satan, Fall from grace, and sink into final perdition
Nile - Having crossed several kingdoms and provinces, it Falls into Egypt at the cataracts, which are waterfalls over steep rocks of the length of two hundred feet. ...
Very little rain ever Falls in Egypt, never sufficient to fertilize the land; and but for the provision of this bountiful river, the country would be condemned to perpetual sterility. It is now known, that the sources, or permanent springs, of the Nile are situated in the mountains of Abyssinia, and the unexplored regions to the west and south-west of that country; and that the occasional supplies, or causes of the inundation, are the periodical rains which Fall in those districts. Although the Nile, by way of eminence, has been called "the river of Egypt," it must not be confounded with another stream so denominated in Scripture, an insignificant rivulet in comparison, which Falls into the Mediterranean below Gaza
Daniel - The Assyrian, the Persian, the Grecian, and the Roman empires, are all particularly described under appropriate characters; and it is expressly declared that the last of them was to be divided into ten lesser kingdoms; the time at which Christ was to appear is precisely fixed; the rise and Fall of antichrist, and the duration of his power, are exactly determined; and the future restoration of the Jews, the victory of Christ over all his enemies, and the universal prevalence of true religion, are distinctly foretold, as being to precede the consummation of that stupendous plan of God, which "was laid before the foundation of the world," and reaches to its dissolution
Nazareth - The traditionary "Mount of the Precipitation" is nearly two miles from the town, too remote to have answered the purpose of the enraged Nazarenes; while there were several precipitous spots close at hand, where the Fall is still from thirty to fifty feet
Pipe Flute - 219), where he cites the Jewish lamentation at the Fall of Jotapata as recorded in Josephus, BJ_ III
Leontius, Bishop of Antioch - Leontius foresaw that on his death the conduct of affairs was likely to Fall into less cautious hands, and, touching his white hairs predicted, "When this snow melts there will be much mud
Serpent - Full consideration of this passage, and of its relation to 2 Kings 18:4, does not Fall within the scope of this article (see art
Calvinism - How the passage may be proved from its context to have no respect to the eternal state of men at all; but, if that were less obvious, it gives no answer to the objection; and we are brought round again, as indeed he confesses, to his former, and indeed only, argument, that the whole matter as he states it, is to be referred back to the divine will; which will, though perfectly arbitrary, is, as he contends, the highest rule of justice: "I say, with Augustine, that the Lord created those whom he certainly foreknew would Fall into destruction; and that this was actually so, because he willed it; but of his will, it belongs not to us to demand the reason, which we are incapable of comprehending; nor is it reasonable, that the divine will should be made the subject of controversy with us, which is only another name for the highest rule of justice. —Man, therefore, Falls according to the appointment of divine providence; but he Falls by his own fault. By his own wickedness, therefore, man corrupted the nature he had received pure from the Lord, and by his Fall he drew all his posterity with him to destruction. That he might not Fall, he stood in need of that strength and constancy with which God armeth all the elect, as long as he will keep them blameless. " This last writer, partly by several of the same passages we have given above from Calvin's Institutes, and by extracts from his other writings, proves that Calvin did by no means consider man, as Fallen, to be the object of reprobation; but man not yet created; man as to be created, and so reprobated, under no consideration in the divine mind of his Fall or actual guilt, except as consequences of an eternal preterition of the persons of the reprobate, resolvable only into the sovereign pleasure of God. But election is the immutable purpose of God; by which, before the foundations of the world were laid, he chose, out of the whole human race, Fallen by their own fault from their primeval, integrity into sin and destruction, according to the most free good pleasure of his own will, and of mere grace, a certain number of men, neither better nor worthier than others, but lying in the same misery with the rest, to salvation in Christ; whom he had, even from eternity, constituted Mediator and head of all the elect, and the foundation of salvation; and therefore he decreed to give them unto him to be saved, and effectually to call and draw them into communion with him, by his word and Spirit; or he decreed himself to give unto them true faith, to justify, to sanctify, and at length powerfully to glorify them, &c, Ephesians 1:4-6 ; Romans 8:30 . But in like manner as, by the Fall, man does not cease to be man, endowed with intellect and will; neither hath sin, which hath pervaded the whole human race, taken away the nature of the human species, but it hath depraved and spiritually stained it; so that even this divine grace of regeneration does not act upon men like stocks and trees, nor take away the properties of his will; or violently compel it, while unwilling; but it spiritually quickens, heals, corrects, and sweetly, and at the same time powerfully, inclines it; so that whereas before it was wholly governed by the rebellion and resistance of the flesh, now prompt and sincere obedience of the Spirit may begin to reign; in which the renewal of our spiritual will, and our liberty, truly consist; in which manner, (or for which reason,) unless the admirable Author of all good should work in us, there could be no hope to man of rising from the Fall by that free will, by which, when standing, he fell into ruin. God, who is rich in mercy, from his immutable purpose of election, does not wholly take away his Holy Spirit from his own, even in lamentable Falls; nor does he so permit them to glide down, ( prolabi, ) that they should Fall from the grace of adoption, and the state of justification; or commit the ‘sin unto death,' or against the Holy Spirit; that, being deserted by him, they should cast themselves headlong into eternal destruction. So that not by their own merits or strength, but by the gratuitous mercy of God, they obtain it, that they neither totally Fall from faith and grace, nor finally continue in their Falls and perish
Nahum - Her outposts and defences are already Falling before the invader, just as the first-ripe figs Fall at the mere shaking of a fig-tree; and her people have become women ( Nahum 3:12 f. 664 663, but before the Fall of Nineveh in b. About 623 or 624 Nahum would need no great discernment to see the approaching Fall of Assyria, and in the equipment and quick movements of the Medes and Scythians he would find the imagery which he uses to such good effect in his oracles
Jude, Theology of - The date of this letter then must Fall within Jude's lifetime, that is, in the middle or latter half of the first century. 1) and guards them lest they Fall (v
Denial - His Fall is the more surprising by reason of Christ’s clear announcement of it beforehand, and Peter’s strong protestations of fidelity (Matthew 26:34 f. Deep as the Fall was, however, care must be taken not to exaggerate its criminality
Agriculture - Hence it would be normal for some of the scattered seed to Fall on a path of compacted soil where it would not be covered and lie vulnerable to birds. Similarly, some seeds would Fall at the margins of the fields where thorny thickets and rapidly growing thistles easily suffocated the germinating wheat. ...
How did the agriculture of Egypt differ from that of Canaan? The essential difference between Egyptian and Canaanite agriculture was that Canaan depended on rainfall (Deuteronomy 11:11 ), while Egypt depended on the River Nile and its annual flood (Amos 8:8 ). In July the Nile rose following rainfall in Ethiopia and flooded the land on both sides. In Isaiah 5:1-7 and Genesis 27:28 we read how the hillside was fenced and terraced to provide deep stone-free soil where the rainfall could water the vines' roots in winter
Come, Came - See BRING , B, Note (1), Fall , GO , GROW , LIGHT , PASS , RESORT. See DESCEND , Fall , GET , GO , STEP (down)
Ezekiel, Theology of - They could not imagine that God would allow his house to Fall. Second, if the city should Fall, it meant that Yahweh was weak and small. On the other hand, if a righteous person Falls away and behaves corruptly, the former Acts of righteousness will not protect that one from punishment (vv. Here, too, the Fall of the temple is before him, since it is the gravity of Israel's sin that explains how God could have allowed the temple to Fall. Against Ammon, for example (25:1-7), Ezekiel makes the point that because they gloated over the Fall of the Jerusalem sanctuary, God would hand them and all their possessions over to foreigners from the east
Apocalypse - ...
(A) Under this head Fall: (a) The cycle known as Enoch, which includes: (a) The Ethiopic Enoch, so called because it survives chiefly in an Ethiopic Version. ...
(B) Under this head would Fall not be much apocalypses written independently by Jews who were Christians-for, if we except the Apocalypse of John, such books are hardly known to have existed-as (a) Selections from Jewish apocalypses of matter embodying beliefs common to Jews and Christians; and (b) Christian interpolations of Jewish apocalypses. It is, indeed, a fact worthy of special notice that at an early period, which we may date roughly from the Fall of the Jewish State in a. Within this period Fall the comparative victory (Maccabaean triumph), varying fortunes (political importance, accompanied with decline of religious fervour; dissensions between the lax hellenizing and the puritanical patriotic party), and the ultimate seeming extinction (capture of Jerusalem by Titus a. In Daniel, which belongs to the period of the Maccabaean struggle, we may see the high-water mark of spiritual faith reached by this ideal; in the fact that after the Fall of the Jewish State, the kernel† [12]0 of the nation, the Jews of the stricter synagogue, ceased to cherish the apocalypses and perhaps even suppressed‡ Temperance - 1 Timothy 3:8 ), and from this chapter it is plain that the Apostle regards violent quarrelling ( 1 Timothy 3:3 ), false and reckless speech ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), self-conceit ( 1 Timothy 3:6 ), greed of filthy lucre ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), as well as fondness for much wine ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), as manifold forms of Intemperance by whose means men ‘fall into reproach and the snare of the devil’ ( 1 Timothy 3:7 )
Biblical Commission - , universal creation by God, the special creation of man, the formation of the first woman from man, the unity of the human race, the original happiness and subsequent Fall of Adam and Eve, and the promise of a Redeemer
Zebulun - Some of this tribe accepted Hezekiah's touching invitation to the Passover after the Fall of the northern kingdom (2 Chronicles 30:10-11; 2 Chronicles 30:18)
Die, Dead, Dying - ...
5: κοιμάω (Strong's #2837 — Verb — koimao — koy-mah'-o ) in the Middle and Passive Voices, its only use in the NT, signifies "to Fall asleep
Hospitality - His sun shines and his rain Fall on the evil as well as the good
Face - When angry or sad, one's countenance (face) will Fall (Genesis 4:5 )
French Prophets - The burden of their prophecies was, Amend your lives; repent ye: the end of all things draws nigh! The hills rebounded with their loud cries for mercy, and imprecations against the priests, the church, the pope, and against the anti-christian dominion, with predictions of the approaching Fall of popery
Thorn - Science regards thorns as undeveloped branches (as in the hawthorn; but prickles as in the bramble and rose are only hardened hairs); a specimen of the arrest which the Fall put on the development of what otherwise would have been good; powers for good turned to hurt through sin
Tyre - Deserted by the Christians after the Fall of Acre, it was destroyed by the Muslims
Pelagians - That new-born infants are in the same situation with Adam before the Fall
Samuel - God “was with him and let none of his words Fall to the ground” ( 1 Samuel 3:19 ; also 1 Samuel 9:6 )
Face - To Fall on the face is the customary Eastern obeisance, whether to man or to God. The ‘fallen face’ ( Genesis 4:5 ) is used of displeasure; ‘hardening the face’ of obstinate sin ( Proverbs 21:29 , Jeremiah 5:3 )
Gain - These passages Fall into three groups: (1) The parallel records of a saying repeated by all the Synoptists (Matthew 16:26, Luke 9:25, Mark 8:36); (2) the parables of the Talents and the Pounds (Matthew 25:17; Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22, Luke 19:15-16; Luke 19:18); (3) the single record of the saying in Matthew 18:13
Sennacherib - A thousand shall Fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand, but it shall not come nigh thee
Fortunatus, Bishop of Poictiers - that on the marriage of Galesuintha, sister of Brunehaut, with Chilperic, and his Elegy upon the Fall of Thuringia
Condemnation - ‘The condemnation of the devil’ (1 Timothy 3:6) is a comparison of his Fall with that of any vainglorious member of the hierarchy
Nahum - Nahum 3:8-10 show that as 'populous No' (the renowned Thebes, with its hundred gates), had been brought to nought (probably by Sargon, king of Assyria), so should Nineveh Fall
Beat - The rise or Fall of the hand or foot, in regulating the divisions of time in music
Leaf - As many leaves grow more beautiful, waxen, and tinted when they are ready to Fall, so some lives are more glorious in their closing days. The individual grows sour, fault-finding, critical, demanding, and there is no grief when he Falls and is swept away into eternity
Fig, Fig-Tree - ...
The meaning of James 3:12 is clear: a tree is known by its fruits; a fig-tree cannot bring forth olives, neither can an olive-tree bring forth figs; a man’s ‘works’ are, in short, an infallible index to his ‘faith’ (James 2:18). The Seer beholds the stars of heaven Falling to the earth ‘as a fig-tree casteth her unripe figs, when she is shaken of a great gale,’ In the ordinary way these winter figs (ὄλυνθοι) did not ripen, so here the judgment predicted is not about to cut off prematurely those who if spared would develop into matured and useful fruit, but those who are ‘without hope and without God in the world’-in short, the ‘cumberers of the ground. These tiny figs Continue to grow with the leaves until they reach about the size of a cherry, then the majority of them Fall to the ground or are blown down by the wind
Slip - ) To err; to Fall into error or fault
Unperfect - Though we meet with this word but once in the whole Bible, namely, Psalms 139:16, yet, as in the two translations we have of the Psalms, the word in the one is rendered imperfect, which in the other is rendered unperfect, and as the difference is very striking when properly considered, I think it an object of no small moment in a work of this kind, to guard the reader against an error into which he may be apt to Fall for want of due attention in this particular
Mother - ” Hosea calls the priests (probably) the “mother” of Israel: “… And the prophet also shall Fall with thee in the night, and I will destroy thy mother” ( Death - ” Lamentations describes the situation of Jerusalem before its Fall: “… Abroad the sword bereaveth, at home there is as death” ( Tadmor - It may be said to consist at present of a forest of Corinthian pillars, erect and Fallen. Here stand groups of columns, whose symmetry is destroyed by the Fall of many of them; there we see them ranged in rows, of such length, that, similar to rows of trees, they deceive the sight, and assume the appearance of continued walls
On - Coming or Falling to the surface of any thing as, rain Falls on the earth. Whosoever shall Fall on this stone, shall be broken. Noting imprecation or invocation, or coming to, Falling or resting on
Waste - Waste is voluntary, as by pulling down buildings or permissive, as by suffering them to Fall for want of necessary repairs
Nehemi'ah - They made a great conspiracy to Fall upon the builders with an armed force and put a stop to the undertaking
Petronilla, Saint And Virgin - Her great beauty led count Flaccus to Fall in love with her and come with soldiers to take her by force as his wife
Freedom - They have been saved by God’s grace so that they might be free from sin, not so that they might Fall under sin’s power again (Romans 6:6-14; 1 Corinthians 10:23-245; 1 Peter 2:16; 2 Peter 2:19)
History - Creation and Fall Asserting that God is the Creator of the earth suggests that He is ultimately responsible for all of history and nature. ...
The Fall is the story of humans' first prideful misuse of freedom (Genesis 1-3 ). Human freedom and sin are crucial to history's telling, for the Fall means that human freedom will often be used in ways which oppose the Creator's will
Religion - ...
The arenas of such divine intersection extend from individual lives to the rise and Fall of empires. Hence, in the rise and Fall of kingdoms and empires the peoples of ancient Israel's world assumed that they experienced the workings of the gods. In that environment, Yahweh's sovereign control over the fortunes of nations, kings, and peoples (especially their downfall) humbled human arrogance (Genesis 11:1-9 ; Psalm 9:20 ; Isaiah 31:3 ; Ezekiel 28:2 ), exposed the powerlessness of the gods that humans made to fill the void left by their "forgetting" the Creator (Psalm 96:5 ; 115:4-7 ; 135:15-18 ; Isaiah 44:9-20 ; 46:1-7 ), and testified to the sole rule of Yahweh (Exodus 9:16 ; 14:17-18 ; Psalm 106:8 ; Ezekiel 25:11,17 ; 26:6 ; 28:22-24 ; 29:6,9 , 21 ; 30:8,19 , 25-26 ; 32:15 ; 35:15 ). ...
Third, certain activities or life expressions Fall within its sphere: worship, prayer, and praise, both private and communal, and proclamationtelling the story of what the one true God has done (Isaiah 43:10,12 ; 44:8 ; Matthew 28:18-20 ; Acts 1:8 )
Hell - Since death is not a natural occurrence but issues from the Fall, the Old Testament confidently awaits God's demonstration of his lordship over Sheol by raising the righteous to life (Genesis 2-3 ; Psalm 16:10 ; 49:15 ; Isaiah 25:8 ; Hosea 13:14 ). While God created us for a loving relation with himself, at the Fall humankind rebelled. God's judgment Falls on all sinners, unless they have faith in Jesus. ...
Since hell is not a natural fixture of creation but results from the Fall and is destiny of the wicked, the New Testament occasionally personifies hell as the demonic forces behind sin
History - Creation and Fall Asserting that God is the Creator of the earth suggests that He is ultimately responsible for all of history and nature. ...
The Fall is the story of humans' first prideful misuse of freedom (Genesis 1-3 ). Human freedom and sin are crucial to history's telling, for the Fall means that human freedom will often be used in ways which oppose the Creator's will
Mephibosheth - Mephibosheth, the future king of Israel, was only five years old when Jonathan his father, and Saul his grandfather, both fell in the same battle on Mount Gilboa, and with their Fall their family fell from the throne. But in her haste she let the little prince Fall, and from that Fall Mephibosheth was lame in his feet all his days. I looked for thee, I was afraid that in the overthrow some evil had befallen thee. Shall I forbear to hear that honest minister, James Urquhart, for a time, seeing the stone is like to Fall on me if I do so?' And then our modern Mephibosheth has the grace to add in his diary, 'A grain of sound faith would easily answer all these questions
Palestine - The eastern slopes form the barren and rugged “wilderness of Judea,” then Fall abruptly to the floor of the Jordan Valley. It receives abundant rainfall, an average of 28 to 32 inches per year, and consequently is rather densely covered with vegetation, including some woodland. ...
(1) Across from Galilee and north of the Yarmuk River is Bashan (Hauron), an area of rich volcanic soil with rainfall in excess of sixteen inches per year. From June through August no rain Falls except in the extreme north. ...
With late October, the “early rain” so often mentioned in Scripture begins to Fall. In Jerusalem snow may Fall twice during the course of the winter months. On occasion the temperature may rise 30F and the humidity Fall to less than 10 percent
Leper - The tuberculated form is the common one, inflaming the skin, distorting the face and joints, causing the hair of the head or eyebrows to Fall off or else turn white (Leviticus 13:3-6), and encrusting the person with ulcerous tubercles with livid patches of surface between. Leprosy in the house, a fungous growth on the walls, symbolized the corruption which taints all creation and which is the effect of the Fall
Solomon - The provision required for one day was "thirty measures of fine flour, and threescore measures of meal, ten fat oxen, and twenty oxen out of the pastures, and an hundred sheep, beside harts, and roebucks, and Fallow-deer, and fatted fowl" (1 Kings 4:22,23 ). His decline and Fall from his high estate is a sad record. The ruling nation is split in twain, the subject-races Fall off, the pre-eminence lately gained being wholly lost, the scene of struggle, strife, oppression, recovery, inglorious submission, and desperate effort, re-commences
Retaliation - The Code of Hammurabi prescribes (§§ 196, 200): ‘If a man has caused the loss of a gentleman’s eye, his eye shall one cause to be lost’; ‘if a man has made the tooth of a man that is his equal to Fall out, one shall make his tooth Fall out
Nahum, Theology of - After all, the prophet exults in the violent downfall of the city of Nineveh and the death of its inhabitants. because it mentions the Fall of Thebes (3:8), which took place at that time. ...
The interweaving judgment- and salvation-oracles are followed by a prophetic vision in which Nahum describes the future downfall of the city as if he were there. ...
This representation of the Fall of the city evokes a series of taunts and woes directed toward Nineveh
Heathen - This derivation seems to have been first suggested by Gibbon (Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, ed. Gibbon, Decline and Fall of Roman Empire, ed
Samuel - to Beersheba, recognized Samuel as prophet of Jehovah, "for the Lord revealed Himself to Samuel in Shiloh by the word of the Lord, and the Lord let none of his words Fall to the ground. " Twenty years elapse after the Fall of church and state at the fatal battle of Ebenezer, and the destruction of Shiloh the seat of Jehovah's worship (1 Samuel 7:2-3, etc
Feast of the Immaculate Conception - She had at least the graces of the first Eve before the Fall and more
Enoch - ...
It vindicates God's government of the world, spiritual and natural, recognizes the Trinity, also Messiah "the Son of man" (the name "Jesus" never occurs), "the Elect One" from eternity, before whom "all kings shall Fall down, and on whom they shall fix their hopes," the supreme Judge, who shall punish eternally the wicked and reward the just
Ahaziah - Ahaziah was prevented by a Fall through a lattice in his palace at Samaria from enforcing it; but Jehoram his brother subsequently attempted it
Southcotters - One night she heard a noise as if a ball of iron was rolling down the stairs three steps; and the Spirit afterwards, she says, told her this was a sign of three great evils which were to Fall upon this land, the sword, the plague, and the famine. After this she gives us a long communication on Genesis 49:1-33 : wherein Jacob warns his sons of what should befall them in the last days, and which she applies to our present times
Immaculate Conception - She had at least the graces of the first Eve before the Fall and more
Immaculate Conception, Feast of the - She had at least the graces of the first Eve before the Fall and more
Adam - ...
Paul Ferguson...
See also Eve ; Fall, the ; Genesis, Theology of ...
Bibliography
Sam'Son - After a time he began to Fall into the temptations which addressed themselves to his strong animal nature; but he broke through every snare in which he was caught so long as he kept his Nazarite vow
Uriah - The greatest saint will Fall into the deadliest sin, once that he ceases to lean on God and God withdraws His grace. So he fell the victim of adulterous passion which was reckless of all honour, gratitude, and the fear of God; the once faithful man of God had now Fallen so low as treacherously to murder his true hearted and loyal soldier and servant, whose high sense of honour so contrasts with David's baseness
Hebrew Language - Mental qualities are represented by physical members: strength by the "hand" or "arm"; anger by the "nostril" (aph ); favor by the "shining face"; displeasure by the "falling of the countenance. The Fall has among its evil effects caused a severance between names and things
Respect of Persons - ...
The NT instances of the compound word Fall into three main groups
Cain - But in its present form, the connexion of Cain with Adam and Eve suggests the thought of the terrible effects of the Fall: the next generation reaches a deeper degree of guilt; Cain is more hardened than Adam, in that he feels no shame but boldly tries to conceal his guilt; and the punishment is worse Adam was to till the ground with labour, but Cain would not henceforth receive from the earth her strength
Flesh - The explanation usually given of this use of the term ‘flesh’ is that, man having Fallen, sin comes by natural inheritance (flesh), whereas goodness is given by supernatural grace (spirit). 61), ‘in the writings of Paul to a change in the moral nature of man, or of his bodily constitution in consequence of the Fall, i
James - Matthew 4:5 , Luke 4:9 ), and as the Fall did not kill him, they stoned him, and he was finally despatched with a fuller’s club
Giants - Νephilim ; Hebrew "those who Fall on" men; men of violence, robbers, tyrants; compare Genesis 6:13, "the earth is filled with violence through them
Chaff - The threshing-floor was so placed, usually in an elevated and breezy position, that the wind could be utilized to separate the lighter, heavier, and heaviest materials from one another, and the method of winnowing secured that the grain should Fall in the centre, the heavier straw at a small distance from the grain heap, while the broken straw and chaff (ἄχυρον) were carried away by the wind, either out of the threshing-floor, or so that it could be swept together for burning
Wash - ) To cover with water or any liquid; to wet; to Fall on and moisten; hence, to overflow or dash against; as, waves wash the shore
Nose - This word may be used of the structure protruding from one’s face: “… They shall take away thy nose and thine ears; and thy remnant shall Fall by the sword …” ( Millennium - Other important events will also have occurred previously, namely, the judgements that must Fall upon Judah and Israel before they can under God occupy the first place of earthly blessing in their own land, the nations being blessed through them
Nail - " Sweet thought to the humble timid believer!...
But the prophet, in the close of this relation, saith, "that in that day, saith the Lord of hosts, shall the nail that is fastened in a sure place be removed, and be cut down and Fall
Lot - Pity must therefore draw a friendly veil over the closing scene of this man of affliction; and let him that thinketh he standeth, take heed lest he Fall into deeds more reprehensible than those of Lot, without having equal trials and sufferings to plead in his favour
Universalists - Those who believe that Christ so died for all, that, before he shall have delivered up his mediatorial kingdom, all Fallen creatures shall be brought to a participation of the benefits of his death, in their restoration to holiness and happiness. ]'>[1] They have likewise a just claim to this title on other grounds; for their doctrine, which includes the restoration, or "restitution of all the intelligent offspring of God," or of all "lapsed intelligences," seems to embrace even the Fallen angels. But these prejudices must now Fall; we must destroy them, or they will destroy us
Apocalypse - An attempt to explain these prophecies does not Fall within the design of this work; and therefore those who are disposed to study this sublime and mysterious book are referred to Mede, Daubuz, Sir Isaac Newton, Lowman, Bishop Newton, Bishop Hurd, and many other excellent commentators
Asleep, Sleep - ...
A — 2: κοιμάω (Strong's #2837 — Verb — koimaomai — koy-mah'-o ) is used of natural "sleep," Matthew 28:13 ; Luke 22:45 ; John 11:12 ; Acts 12:6 ; of the death of the body, but only of such as are Christ's; yet never of Christ Himself, though He is "the firstfruits of them that have Fallen asleep," 1 Corinthians 15:20 ; of saints who departed before Christ came, Matthew 27:52 ; Acts 13:36 ; of Lazarus, while Christ was yet upon the earth, John 11:11 ; of believers since the Ascension, 1 Thessalonians 4:13-15 ; Acts 7:60 ; 1 Corinthians 7:39 ; 11:30 ; 15:6,18,51 ; 2 Peter 3:4 . has 'fallen asleep;' (b) from the fact that in the NT the word resurrection is used of the body alone; (c) from Daniel 12:2 , where the physically dead are described as 'them that sleep (Sept. ...
A — 4: ἀφυπνόω (Strong's #879 — Verb — aphupnoo — af-oop-no'-o ) "to Fall asleep" (apo, "away"), is used of natural "sleep," Luke 8:23 , of the Lord's Falling "asleep" in the boat on the lake of Galilee
Lucianus, Priest of Antioch, Martyr - During the controversies after the deposition of Paulus, Lucian seems to have Fallen under suspicion. Christians a martyrdom like his would more than atone for his early Fall
Petilianus, a Donatist Bishop - Those who Fall away after baptism must return, not by rebaptism, but by repentance
Valerianus, Emperor - Gallienus, immediately after his father's captivity, stopped the persecution, but it probably lasted in the East till the Fall of Macrianus, who had assumed the purple in 262
Millenarians - It is, I conceive, to these great events, the Fall of antichrist, the reestablishment of the Jews, and the beginning of the glorious millennium, that the three different dates in Daniel, of twelve hundred and sixty years, twelve hundred and ninety years, and thirteen hundred and thirty-five years, are to be referred. " Psalms 22:27 ; yea, all kings shall Fall down before him, "all nations shall serve him," Psalms 72:11 . He is speaking of Israel in a literal sense, the natural posterity of Abraham; for he distinguishes them both from the believing Gentiles and the Jewish converts of his time, and describes them as the rest who were blinded, had stumbled and Fallen, and so had not obtained, but were broken off and cast away, Romans 11:7 ; Romans 11:11-12 ; Romans 11:15 ; Romans 11:17 . Yet he denies that they have stumbled that they should Fall, that is, irrecoverably, so as in no future period to be restored; but shows that God's design in permitting this was, that through their Fall salvation might come unto the Gentiles, and that this again might provoke them to jealousy or emulation, Romans 11:11 . He argues that if their Fall and diminishing was the riches of the Gentiles, and the casting away of them was the reconciling of the world, their fulness will be much more so, and the receiving of them be life from the dead, Romans 11:12 ; Romans 11:15 . It is intimated that there will be such visible tokens of the divine presence and residence among them as will Fall under the notice of the world, and produce conviction and awe, as was in some measure the case in the first churches, Acts 2:47 ; Acts 5:11 ; Acts 5:13 ; 1 Corinthians
Sarah - Chaldea, and Canaan, and Egypt; Hagar and Ishmael; the promise of Isaac, and then the birth, the circumcision, the sacrifice, and the deliverance of Isaac; all the trials and all the triumphs of his father's and his mother's faith; all their Falls; all their victories; all God's promises, and all His wonderful and adorable providences in their so exercised lives; all their attainments in truth and in obedience; and then, to crown all, the complete fulfilment of God's so long delayed promise-all that, and much more that has not been told-it all arose out of this, that Sarah had no child. Like Sarah, I Fall into sore temptations between the Divine promise on the one hand, and my own evil heart on the other hand. Not Adam before his Fall; not Enoch, who so pleased God; not Abraham at his call, or after offering his son; not Jacob at Bethel, nor Israel at the Jabbok; not Moses on the mount and in the cleft rock; not Isaiah in the temple, and not John in the spirit-not the best and the most blessed of them all was more blessed or better blessed than was Hagar the polluted outcast on her weeping way to Shur. Fall down and weep. When thou didst Fall His hand held thee up
Achan - Nothing demoralises an army like sacking a Fallen city. And the swift and heavy Fall of Joshua's hand on that one man must have still more consolidated Joshua's authority, and transformed his wilderness hosts into true soldiers, where other soldiers would have been thieves and robbers. For, what is the Fall of Jericho to them in that tent when it has cost them the life of their husband, their father, and their master? When the door of that tent is suddenly lifted, and the face of a corpse comes in, takes a spade, and buries a strange burden in the earth in the midst of the astounded tent. Had God seen it to be good to make men and women in some way without eyes, the Fall itself would have been escaped. ' Yes, it is as certain as God's truth and righteousness are certain, that the mortified man who goes about with his eyes out; the man who steals along the street seeing neither smile nor frown; he who keeps his eyes down wherever men and women congregate,-in the church, in the market-place, at a railway-station, on a ship's deck, at an inn table,-where you will; that man escapes multitudes of temptations that more open and more full-eyed men and women continually Fall before
Ebionism - After the Fall of Jerusalem, just as Judaism became more intolerant and more exclusive, so we may suppose this judaizing sect followed suit, and, retiring more and more from fellowship with the Church at large, and seeking to strengthen their own position, they by degrees formulated the system we have described. ...
The siege and Fall of Jerusalem were events of the greatest importance for Judaism (see article Pharisees) and Jewish Christianity alike. If, as seems probable, the Order of Essenes was broken up after the Fall of Jerusalem, it is very likely that many of them would associate with the Ebionites, who held the Law in such esteem, and would be able to impress their own customs on their associates. ...
Gnostic tendencies are still more pronounced in the Ebionism of the Clementine Literature, which, however, Falls outside the period we are concerned with
Assyria - With this victory commenced the great successes of Nebuchadnezzar and Cyaxares, and it laid the foundation of the two collateral empires of the Babylonians and Medes, which were branches of the Assyrian empire; and hence the time of the Fall of the Assyrian empire is determined, the conquerors being then in their youth. In the reign of Josiah, when Zephaniah prophesied, Nineveh and the kingdom of Assyria were standing; and their Fall was predicted by that Prophet, Zephaniah 1:3 ; Zephaniah 2:13 . But in the third and fourth years of Jehoiakim, the successor of Josiah, the two conquerors having taken Nineveh, and finished their war in Assyria, prosecuted their conquests westward; and, leading their forces against the king of Egypt, as an invader of their right of conquest, they beat him at Carchemish, and took from him whatever he had recently taken from the Assyrians, 2 Kings 24:7 ; Jeremiah 46:2 ; "and therefore we cannot err," says Sir Isaac Newton, "above a year or two, if we refer the destruction of Nineveh, and Fall of the Assyrian empire, to the third year of Jehoiakim," or the hundred and fortieth, or according to Blair, the hundred and forty-first year of Nabonassar; that is, the year B
Church Government - The general development seems fairly clear, though its later stages Fall beyond NT times. His point is not that the Galatians are mistaken, but that they are altogether Falling away from Christ; not that the Corinthian is a bad offender, but that the church sees no great harm in the matter. Yet even in the Apostolic age prophecy ( 1 Thessalonians 5:20 ) is beginning to Fall into discredit, and false prophets are flourishing (1 John, 2 Peter, Jude)
Cherub (1) - of Eden (after Adam's Fall) God placed (yashkeen , 'set as the dwelling place of His Shekinah glory') the Cherubim, and a flaming sword which turned every way to keep the way of life" (Genesis 3:24). The placing of the man-like Cherub on the inheritance once man's suggested the truth that man and the creatures involved in his Fall have still by some gracious mystery, of which the Cherubim are the pledge, an interest in Eden
Inheritance - Originally wives, too, as part of the property of the deceased, would Fall to the possession of the heir-in-chief (cf. ( d ) For the order of succession the rule is laid down in Numbers 27:8-11 that if a man die without male issue the right of inheritance shall Fall successively to his daughter, his brothers, his father’s brothers, his next kinsman thereafter
Judge Judging (Ethical) - Paul writes (Romans 14:4), ‘Who art thou that judgest another man’s servant? To his own master he standeth or Falleth. The meaning is that the saints will be associated with their Lord in the act of judging the world at the Last Day, and their judgment will be exercised not only on the world, but on ‘angels’ (1 Corinthians 6:3), meaning the hierarchy of evil or Fallen spirits. Experience deepens the sense of the ignorance and Fallibility attaching to man’s judgments. The epigram tout connaître c’est tout pardonner is in effect an expression of human helplessness; and the aspiration of David, ‘Let me Fall now into the hand of the Lord … and let me not Fall into the hand of man’ (1 Chronicles 21:13), is really the cry of humanity for ever conscious of the limitations of its own judgments
Agriculture - During the period of growth the crops were exposed to a variety of risks, such as the delay or scanty Fall of the spring rains (the ‘latter rain’ of the OT, Amos 4:9 ), blasting by the hot sirocco wind, mildew, hail these three are named together in Haggai 2:17 ; cf. The corners of the field were left to be reaped, and the Fallen ears to be gleaned, by the poor and the stranger ( Leviticus 19:9 f. The chaff is carried farthest away ( Psalms 1:4 , the light morsels of straw to a shorter distance, while the heavy grains of wheat or barley Fall at the winnower’s feet. ), the law that every field must lie Fallow for one year in seven ( Exodus 23:10 f
Bible, - ...
It is 'the word of God,' an unfolding of unseen things — a revelation of the nature of God morally, and the history, divinely penned, of man His creature, first as innocent, and then as Fallen, with its consequences. ...
The Bible also reveals the character of Satan since his Fall, as being a liar and murderer; he is the great enemy of the Lord Jesus and of man, and he deceived our mother Eve. This is followed by the many and varied judgements that will Fall upon Christendom and the world, reaching to the eternal state of the new heavens and the new earth
Assyria - An inscription also mentions the Fall of the city. (Sarakos) ?...
Fall of Nineveh ? 606...
The Assyrians were idolaters: from the inscriptions the names of hundreds of gods can be gathered
Hold - It rarely or never signifies the first act of seizing or Falling on, but the act of retaining a thing when seized or confined. To sustain to keep from Falling. To hold one's own, to keep good one's present condition not to Fall off, or to lose ground. To cease raining to cease, as Falling weather used impersonally. If a man be upon a high place, without a good hold, he is ready to Fall
Providence - God's providence is concerned in a sparrow's Fall; His children are of more value than many sparrows, and therefore are assured of His providential care in all their concerns. If no Fallible beings had been created there could have been no virtue, for virtue implies probation, and probation implies liability to temptation and sin. ) The plagues, earthquakes, drought, flood, frost, and famine subserve ends of providence which we only in part see; and they also suggest to us the need of a providence to control them within appointed bounds, and that without such a providence all nature would Fall into disorder (Jeremiah 5:22; Job 26:7-11; Job 38:4-14)
Nero, Claudius Caesar - According to his view, as many of the shops near the circus where the fire originated were occupied by Jews, suspicion would Fall upon them, which would be strengthened by the fact that the Transtiberine, the Ghetto of that time, was one of the few quarters that had escaped the fire. In the days of his prosperity diviners had predicted his Fall and that he would gain a new dominion in the East and Jerusalem and at last regain the empire ( ib
Serpent - For the serpent of Genesis 3:1-24 See Fall (4), and Satan, p
Shekinah - Of this we Fall short ( Romans 3:23 ), but it is in process of being recovered by the Christian ( Romans 5:2 ; Romans 8:18 ; Romans 8:30 , 2 Corinthians 3:18 ; 2 Corinthians 4:6 ; cf
Doubt - Tragically Eve and Adam bought into his deceptive plan and plunged humankind into the Fall (vv
Religion - As it respects natural religion, some doubt whether, properly speaking, there can be any such thing; since, through the Fall, reason is so depraved, that man without revelation is under the greatest darkness and misery, as may be easily seen by considering the history of those nations who are destitute of it, and who are given up to barbarism, ignorance, cruelty, and evils of every kind. It does not tell us how man became a Fallen sinful creature, as he is, nor how he can be recovered
Micaiah - as sheep that have no shepherd (quoted by the Lord Jesus Himself, Matthew 9:36, as it is previously the basis of Ezekiel 34:5; Zechariah 10:2), and Jehovah said, these have no master (Ahab Falling), let them return every man to his house. ...
Micaiah therefore revealed the source unseen of the 400 prophets' falsehood; Jehovah, seen in real vision on His throne amidst His hosts, asked, who shall persuade Ahab to go up and Fall at Ramoth Gilead? A lying spirit undertook to influence the 400 to Ahab's ruin (Zechariah 13:2; 1 John 4:6)
Blessedness - While some like Abel, Seth, Noah, and the patriarchs regain blessedness, others like Cain (Genesis 4:11 ) and Canaan (Genesis 9:25 ) Fall under God's disfavor
Roads - The foundations were of stone, and when allowed to Fall into disrepair were rough and slippery, and very trying to the nerves of travellers
Foreknowledge - "Before the creation of the world" Christ was "chosen" or "foreknown" to be the Redeemer (1 Peter 1:20 ), a clear indication that God knew from the beginning that humankind would Fall into sin
Powers - The uses of this biblical term Fall into two major divisions: referring to "miraculous powers" and to angelic beings belonging to the hierarchy of heaven
Solitude - ...
The literature of early Western monasticism and much of the teaching of the later Mystics on the subject of solitude Fall into line with the recorded experience of the Egyptians, and form a further commentary on the recorded facts of our Lord’s solitude
A - ...
A has in English, three sounds the long or slender, as in place, fate the broad, as in wall, Fall, which is shortened in salt, what and the open, as in father, glass, which is shortened in rather, fancy
Basilius of Ancyra, Bishop of Ancyra - Basil was one of the first to Fall
Act of Faith - They usually contrive the Auto to Fall on some great festival, that the execution may pass with the more awe; and it is always on a Sunday
Mediator - Colossians 1:21 ; and in the fulness of time he came into this world, obeyed the law, satisfied justice, and brought his people into a state of grace and favour; yea, into a more exalted state of friendship with God than was lost by the Fall, Ephesians 2:18 . He is a suitable, constant, willing, and prevalent Mediator; his mediation always succeeds, and is infallible
Fig Tree - And so much did the Lord Jesus, in his divine teaching, Fall in with this popular way of conveying knowledge, that at one time we are told "without a parable spake he not unto them
Wicked - 32:10), Fall by their devices ( Send - ” God was concerned lest after the Fall Adam “put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life” ( Cassianus, Julius, a Heretical Teacher - Cassian also taught that man had not been originally created with a body like ours, but that these fleshly bodies were the "coats of skin" in which the Lord clothed our first parents after the Fall
Catharine, Martyr of Alexandria - The order became extinct after the Fall of Constantinople; but in the 17th cent
Micah, Book of - Judgements should Fall upon Samaria, her wound was incurable; but they should also approach Judah and Jerusalem
Floor - After this, with the fork just described, they cast the whole some yards from thence, and against the wind; which driving back the straw, the corn and the ears not threshed out Fall apart from it, and make another heap
Adoration - , by kneeling, Falling prostrate, kissing the feet, hands, garments, &c. ...
The Persian manner of adoration, introduced by Cyrus, was by bending the knee, and Falling on the face at the prince's feet, striking the earth with the forehead, and kissing the ground. These prelates finding a vehement disposition in the people to Fall down before them, and kiss their feet, procured crucifixes to be fastened on their slippers; by which stratagem, the adoration intended for the pope's person is supposed to be transferred to Christ
Eating - As there were several sorts of meats, the use of which was prohibited, they could not conveniently eat with those who partook of them, fearing to receive pollution by touching such food, or if by accident any particles of it should Fall on them
Vine - Jacob, in the blessing which he gave Judah, "Binding his foal unto the vine, and his ass's colt unto the choice vine, he washed his garments in wine, and his clothes in the blood of grapes," Genesis 49:11 ; he showed the abundance of vines that should Fall to his lot
Giant - Aquila translates nephilim, επιπιπτοντες , men who attack, who Fall with impetuosity on their enemies, which renders very well the force of the term
Sacrament - Some sacraments are more necessary for salvation than others, thus Baptism is necessary for all; Penance for those who Fall into grave post-Baptismal sin; Holy Orders to give sacred ministers to the Church
War - One of the evil fruits of the Fall, and an appalling manifestation of the depravity of mankind, Genesis 6:11-13 Isaiah 9:5 James 4:1-2 , often rendered apparently inevitable by the assaults of enemies, or commanded by God for their punishment
Charge - To rush on to Fall on to attack, especially with fixed bayonets as, an army charges the enemy
Germany - As a result of the World War there has been a tendency to return to the Catholic Church, for the Fall of the empire left Protestantism with no official head; many religious orders and congregations evicted under the imperial regime are returning, some to their original property
High Priest - The theological view of the high priesthood does not Fall within the scope of this work
Masona, Bishop of Merida - 583, after the Fall of Merida, and restored, not during the lifetime of Leovigild, as his enthusiastic biographer declares, but upon the accession of Reccared, who sought to reverse his father's policy
Noah - The parallel 2 Peter 2:4 refers to the first Fall of the apostate angels, not to Genesis 6:2. "There were giants in the earth in those days": nephilim , from a root to Fall, "fallers on others," "fellers," tyrants; applied in Numbers 13:33 to Canaanites of great stature. Death existed in the animal world before man's creation, for man's Fall foreseen and the world reflected the sad image of the Fall that was to be; moreover, the pre-existing death and physical evil had probably a connection with Satan's Fall. ...
No record of the flood appears in the Egyptian monuments, but Plato (Timaeus, 21) testifies that the Egyptians believed that catastrophes from time to time by God's anger had visited all lands but Egypt; the last was a deluge submerging all lands but Egypt, 8,000 years before Solon's visit to Amosis, no rain Falling in Egypt
Day of Judgment - ...
Whether Jesus Himself regarded the Judgment-day as involving the Fall of Jerusalem, or whether He regarded the inevitable destruction of the Jewish State as one of the foreruoners of the Judgment, will remain a matter of dispute until the critical composition of Mark 13 is more precisely fixed. On the whole, however, in view of Jesus’ forecast of the punishment to come upon the Jewish people both to Galilee and in Jerusalem, it seems probable that He did in some precise way correlate the Fall of Jerusalem with the eschatological Judgment. Had the disciples regarded the Fall of Jerusalem as in any true sense the Judgment of the Parousia, it is inconceivable that the Fourth Gospel and the other portions of the NT written subsequent to a. The truth of Christianity in this, as in others of its phases, does not rise and Fall with the finality of its expository and pedagogical concepts. And, further, it must be added that the early Church believed that it was possible even for those who, so far as could be judged by ordinary standards, had accepted Jesus as Christ, to Fall away and be ultimately lost
Jeremiah - He prophesied under Josiah and his sons from the year 626 to the Fall of Jerusalem in b. see) had already celebrated Nineveh’s downfall in his splendid verses. ...
The Fall of Josiah in battle concluded the interval of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by Judah under his vigorous rule. Jeremiah denounces him vehemently; the wonder is that he did not Fall a victim to the king’s anger, like his disciple Uriah ( Jeremiah 26:20-24 ; Jeremiah 36:26-30 ; Jeremiah 22:13-19 ). The revived national faith in Jehovah, which had rested on Josiah’s political success, was shaken by his Fall; the character of the new king, and the events of his reign, furthered the reaction. 626 621; ( b ) the time of disillusion and silence, subsequent to Josiah’s reforms, 621 608; ( c ) the critical epoch, 608 604, opened by the Fall of Josiah at Megiddo and closing in the fourth year of Jehoiakim after the battle of Carchemish and the advent of Nebuchadrezzar, when the paroxysm of the prophet’s soul was past and his vision of the future grew clear; ( d ) the stage of full illumination, attained during the calamities of the last days of Jerusalem. It effected no ‘circumcision of the heart,’ no inward turning to Jehovah, no such ‘breaking up of the Fallow ground’ as Jeremiah had called for; the good seed of the Deuteronomic teaching was ‘sown among thorns’ ( Jeremiah 4:3-4 ), which sprang up and choked it. Like the Christian prophet who wrote the Epistle to the Hebrews, Jeremiah fled to the ideal and eternal from the horrors of the national downfall; as the earthly Zion sinks, the image of God’s true city rises on his soul
Israel, History of - Having united the north and the south, he established Jerusalem as the capital of the kingdom, contained the Philistines, expanded Israel's borders and her trade, and established a monarchical line that ruled in uninterrupted fashion, save one exception (Athaliah, 842-837), until the Fall of Judah to Babylonia in 587. Her involvement in the larger world of nations meant that Israel was destined to Fall politically more quickly than Judah. ” The Fall of Samaria in 721 marked the end of Israel as a part of the United Monarchy. ...
Israel having Fallen in the eighth century, Judah continued into the seventh and early sixth centuries. His revolt against Babylon in 588 led to the ultimate Fall of Jerusalem, including the razing of the Jerusalem Temple by Nebuchadrezzar in 587
Temptation, Trial - James exhorts his readers to count it all joy when they Fall into manifold ‘temptations’ (Revelation 1:2). There are not a few instances in which ‘temptation’ means seduction to sin or exposure to the danger of Falling before it. ‘They that desire to be rich Fall into a temptation and a snare’ (1 Timothy 6:9)
Lamentations - His appeal in both is to Jehovah for judgment (Lamentations 3:64-66; Jeremiah 11:20); Edom, exulting in Zion's Fall, is warned that God's winecup of wrath shall pass away from Zion and be drunk by Edom (Lamentations 4:21; Jeremiah 25:15-21; Jeremiah 49:12). ...
But now that the stroke has Fallen, so far from exulting at the fulfillment of his predictions on the Jewish rulers who had persecuted him, all other feelings are swallowed up in intense sorrow. But Edom, now exulting in her Fall, shall soon be visited in wrath, while Zion's captivity shall cease. ...
The fifth elegy (Lamentations 5) is prayer to Jehovah to consider "our reproach," slaves ruling His people, women ravished, young men grinding, children sinking under burdens of wood, "the crown" of the kingdom and priesthood "fallen," and Zion desolate
Obadiah, Book of - ...
The book contains two themes: (1) a prophetic Interpretation of an overwhelming disaster which has already befallen Edom ( Obadiah 1:1-7 ; Obadiah 1:10-14 ; Obadiah 1:16 b); (2) a prediction of a universal judgment and specifically of judgment on Edom which is now imminent ( Obadiah 1:8-9 ; Obadiah 1:16 a, Obadiah 1:16-21 ). The prophetic interpretation of Edom’s Fall . In this calamity the writer sees Jahweh’s judgment on Edom for gloating over the Fall of the Jews described as Edom’s brother ( Obadiah 1:12 ) and participating with foreign and alien enemies ( Obadiah 1:11 ) in the infliction of injuries on them. The section closes with the effective assertion of the retributive character of the disasters that had befallen Edom and still affect it ‘As thou hast done, is it done unto thee; thy dealing returns upon thine own head’ ( Obadiah 1:15 b)
Unbelief - ‘By their Fall salvation is come unto the Gentiles’ (Romans 11:11). But there is not in this Epistle the forecast of the glorious future yet in store when Israel would turn again, only an insistence upon the need of giving diligence to enter into that rest, ‘that no man Fall after the same example of disobedience’ (Hebrews 4:11)
Sadducees (2) - ’ It is always used to designate the political party of the Jewish aristocratic priesthood from the time of the Maccabees to the final Fall of the Jewish State. The high priests at the head of the Sanhedrin were Sadducees, but they were always in a minority; though essentially a political party, they had apparently no independent existence apart from Jerusalem and its Temple, and with the Fall of the Jewish State they disappear entirely from history
Assyria - Samaria would Fall; and her Fall might well admonish Judah. Accordingly, in the prophecies of Nahum and Zephaniah, we find denunciations predicting the entire downfall of this haughty power
Jonathan - Dutifully devoted to his father, whose constant companion he was (1 Samuel 20:2; 1 Samuel 20:25), yet true to his bosom friend David, whose modest:, youthful beauty, and heroic bravery won his whole heart at their first meeting after Goliath's Fall, against whom nevertheless Saul cherished such deadly spite. Jonathan's pious and filial self devotion appears in his readiness (like Isaac) to die at his father's command because of the rash adjuration of the latter; type of the Son of God, volunteering to die for us because Adam by eating the forbidden fruit had his "eyes opened" (Genesis 3; 1 Samuel 14:27; 1 Samuel 14:43); again in his continuing to the last faithful to Saul, though his father had attempted his life, and though he knew that his father's kingdom was doomed to Fall and David to succeed
Paul Apprehended of Christ Jesus - Thine arrows are sharp in the hearts of the King's enemies, whereby the people Fall under Thee!...
And thus it was that, as Saul journeyed, and came near Damascus, suddenly there shone down upon him a great light from heaven. But you will go over for yourselves all the cases of conversion you have ever heard about, or read about, and you will see for yourselves how full of all kinds of individuality, and variety, and intensity of interest, the work of conversion is, till like Mercy in The Pilgrim's Progress, you will Fall in love with your own. Saul got his conversion out of that overthrow on the way to Damascus, while all his companions only got some bodily bruises from their Fall, and the complete upsetting of their errand out of it
Shimei - David had nothing to do with the Fall of Saul on Mount Gilboa; but the Fall of Uriah in the front of the battle before Rabbah was ever before David, and never more so than it was that day as he crossed the Kedron, and passed through Gethsemane, and descended upon Bahurim. And when we awake to all that, we Fall in with it all with unceasing wonder and with unceasing thanksgiving. And he will soon come to see God in everything that befalls him; and not God only, but God his Sanctifier and his Saviour. And all so secretly, so exquisitely, so intricately, so surely, and so infallibly working together of God
Barnabas - ...
But, as if to chasten our too great pride in Barnabas, even Barnabas, this so pentecostal and so apostolic man; even Barnabas, so full hitherto of the Holy Ghost and of faith-even he must Fall at last, and that too all but fatally. For, what two chosen and fast friends in all the New Testament circle of friends, would you have wagered would be the last to Fall out fiercely, and to turn their backs on one another for ever? Not Paul and Barnabas, at any rate, you would confidently and proudly have said. Whoever will quarrel, and Fall out, and forget what they owe to one an other, that can never, by any possibility, happen to Paul and his old patron Barnabas-so you would have said
Devil - (1) It included the national deities, conceived as Fallen, but not always as stripped of all power ( Exodus 12:12 , Isaiah 19:1 ; Isaiah 24:21 ; cf. (2) It covered such of the angels as were thought to have been once attendants upon the true God, but to have Fallen ( 2 Peter 2:4 , Judges 1:6 , Ethiop. Possession is thrice alluded to ( John 7:20 ; John 8:40 ; John 10:28 ) as a suggested explanation of Christ’s work and influence; but evil generally is traced back rather to the activity of the devil ( John 6:70 , where ‘a devil’ is not a demon, but the word is used metaphorically much as ‘Satan’ in Matthew 16:23 , John 13:2 ; John 13:27 ), whose subordinates Fall into the background. He prolongs the tribulation of the faithful who do not yield to him ( Revelation 2:18 ); after his great Fall ( Revelation 12:9 ) he is goaded by defeat into more venomous activity ( Revelation 12:12 ), but eventually meets his doom ( Revelation 20:10 ). And the tradition of a revolt and Fall of angels has this in its favour, that it fits in with the belief in devils and the devil, and provides a partially intelligible account of circumstances under which such a belief might take shape
Image of God - They maintain that humankind in the Fall retained the image but lost the likeness
Evil - The serpent of the Fall narrative cannot be pressed to mean more than a symbol of temptation, though the form which the temptation takes suggests hostility to the will of God external to the spirit of the woman ( 2 Corinthians 11:3 , cf. This tendency, increased perhaps by Persian influence, becomes dominant in apocryphal literature ( 2 Peter 2:4 and Judges 1:6 are based on the Book of Enoch), where the Fallen angels are a kingdom at war with the Kingdom of God
Essenes (2) - 150 to the Fall of Jerusalem. On the other hand, they were rigid beyond all others in their observance of the Sabbath; and they went beyond the Pharisees in their absolute determinism, affirming ‘that fate governs all things, and that nothing befalls men but what is according to its determination’ (Josephus Ant
Games - The knucklebones of sheep were specially suited to deciding lots since they could Fall in only four positions
Reprobate - It is in these solemn words that the writer sums up his urgent message to the Hebrew Christians to press on unto perfection and to be on their guard against spiritual sloth, which may issue in Falling away. He speaks as if a Fall from grace were possible even on the part of those who have experienced spiritual enlightenment and renewal, as if there were a point even in the spiritual life where backsliding becomes apostasy, and the man who crucifies the Son of God afresh and puts Him to an open shame is beyond repentance rejected, reprobate
Heaven - It is used of the surrounding air wherein "the fowls of heaven" fly (Genesis 1:26, compare Genesis 1:20); from whence the rain and hail Fall (Deuteronomy 11:11)
Torah - Some of the precepts of the law, according to Jesus, were provided because of humanity's nature and Fall short of God's perfect will ( Matthew 5:33-37 ; Matthew 19:8-9 )
Judah - Genesis 35:22 ), and Simeon and Levi, because of their barbarous conduct towards the Shechemites, Fall before their enemies and into disfavour with their brethren, and Judah succeeds to the primogenitureship
Obadiah, Theology of - Obadiah, the shortest Old Testament book with only twenty-one verses, was probably written shortly after the Fall of Judah and Jerusalem to the Babylonians in 587 b
Sleep - In the NT the noun ὕπνος means sleep proper, whilst the verbs καθεύδειν, ‘to lie down to rest,’ and κοιμᾶσθαι, ‘to Fall asleep,’ are in most common use. Stephen is said to have Fallen asleep when he died as the effects of stoning (Acts 7:60). Paul, true believers live and die unto the Lord, under the symbolism of waking and sleeping respectively (1 Thessalonians 5:10); hence the beautiful phrases occur, ‘fallen asleep in Christ’ (1 Corinthians 15:18) and ‘those who sleep (or are Fallen asleep) in Jesus’ (1 Thessalonians 4:14). All the activities are lowered, the pulse Falls about one-fifth, the circulation is slower, the process of nutrition is retarded and the excitation of the nerves diminished. It is not surprising, therefore, that sleep should appear to the onlooker as ‘Death’s twin-brother’ and that the old Hebrews should have committed their dead to the tomb with the reflexion that they had Fallen asleep and were laid to rest with their fathers
Adam in the nt - Paul intervenes with a parenthesis dealing with those who lived before any specific commands were given in the Mosaic law, and yet who sinned, owing to the transmitted effects of Adam’s Fall, and therefore died
Regeneration - ...
The holy Scriptures, with one voice, declare, that man by the Fall of Adam lost all apprehension of the divine nature; he became virtually dead in trespasses and sins: so that the recovery from hence could only be effected by the quickening influences of the Holy Ghost
Moab, Moabites - Balaam was compelled by God to bless them instead of cursing them, buthe gave to Balak the fatal advice to try to weaken them by seductive alliances (which would cause them to Fall under the Lord's discipline), and this, alas, was only too successful: cf
Geology of Palestine - The Western Table-land has streams rising in copious springs of water stored in the limestone strata; these streams on the Eastern side have a very rapid Fall, owing to the great depth of the Ghôr. At that time the temperature was colder, and the rainfall higher; hence the valleys, now dry, were channels of running water
Acacius, Bishop of Caesarea - 98), his influence with the emperor Constantius was considerable enough to nominate Felix (the antipope) to the see of Rome at the Fall of Liberius, A
Mercy - It is distinguished from love, thus: The object of love is the creature simply; the object of mercy is the creature Fallen into misery. Parents love their children simply as they are their children; but if they Fall into misery, love works in a way of pity and compassion: love is turned into mercy
Offer - 6:12: “He that is far off shall die of the pestilence; and he that is near shall Fall by the sword
Salutations - All the forms of salutation now observed appear to have been in general use in the days of our Lord; for he represents a servant as Falling down at the feet of his master, when he had a favour to ask; and an inferior servant, as paying the same compliment to the first, who belonged, it would seem, to a higher class; "The servant, therefore, fell down and worshipped him, saying, Lord, have patience with me, and I will pay thee all. When Jairus solicited the Saviour to go and heal his daughter, he fell down at his feet: the Apostle Peter, on another occasion, seems to have Fallen down at his knees, in the same manner as the modern Arabs Fall down at the knees of a superior. Morier thinks is most likely the Falling upon the neck and kissing, so frequently mentioned in Scripture, Genesis 33:4 ; Genesis 45:14 ; Luke 15:20
Manna - Salmasius thinks this of the same kind which fed the children of Israel; and that the miracle lay, not in creating any new substance, but in making it Fall duly at a set time every day throughout the whole year, and that in such plenty as to suffice so great a multitude
Babylon - After the Fall of Nineveh, b
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - In Scripture it is remarkable that we hear nothing of Assyria after the reign of Esarhaddon, and profane history is equally silent until the attacks began which brought about her downfall. The Fall of Assyria, long previously prophesied by Isaiah, (Isaiah 10:5-19 ) was effected by the growing strength and boldness of the Medes, about 625 B
Image - , not the essential and substantial form of them; the contrast has been likened to the difference between a statue and the shadow cast by it; (3) of the relations between God the Father, Christ, and man, (a) of man as he was created as being a visible representation of God, 1 Corinthians 11:7 , a being corresponding to the original; the condition of man as a Fallen creature has not entirely effaced the "image;" he is still suitable to bear responsibility, he still has Godlike qualities, such as love of goodness and beauty, none of which are found in a mere animal; in the Fall man ceased to be a perfect vehicle for the representation of God; God's grace in Christ will yet accomplish more than what Adam lost; (b) of regenerate persons, in being moral representations of what God is, Colossians 3:10 ; cp
Jude, the Epistle of - If the time were after the Fall of Jerusalem (A
Symmachus q. Aurelius - He probably took part in the missions for the same purpose sent by the senate by Theodosius after the Fall of Maximus, and to Valentinian II
Sleep - In the NT the noun ὕπνος means sleep proper, whilst the verbs καθεύδειν, ‘to lie down to rest,’ and κοιμᾶσθαι, ‘to Fall asleep,’ are in most common use. Stephen is said to have Fallen asleep when he died as the effects of stoning (Acts 7:60). Paul, true believers live and die unto the Lord, under the symbolism of waking and sleeping respectively (1 Thessalonians 5:10); hence the beautiful phrases occur, ‘fallen asleep in Christ’ (1 Corinthians 15:18) and ‘those who sleep (or are Fallen asleep) in Jesus’ (1 Thessalonians 4:14). All the activities are lowered, the pulse Falls about one-fifth, the circulation is slower, the process of nutrition is retarded and the excitation of the nerves diminished. It is not surprising, therefore, that sleep should appear to the onlooker as ‘Death’s twin-brother’ and that the old Hebrews should have committed their dead to the tomb with the reflexion that they had Fallen asleep and were laid to rest with their fathers
Evil - The origins for sin and evil in both Old and New Testaments are traced to the activities of an evil creature, Satan (1 John 3:8 : "the devil has been sinning from the beginning" ) and to human sin that led to a Fall (Romans 5:12-14 ) and banishment form Eden and the tree of life (Genesis 3 ). In Jeremiah 49:23 , Hamath and Arpad hear evil tidings about the Fall of Damascusevil to them because Damascus was their ally and her Fall portends their own fates. Similarly, Amos 3:6 asks, assuming a negative answer, if evil befalls a city, unless the Lord has done it. The "evil day" of Amos 6:3 refers to the Fall of Samaria and destruction of Israel as a judgment by God (for similar language for Judah, see Jeremiah 16:10 )
Fall - Intercourse was the command and blessing of God prior to the Fall (Colossians 1:15-200 ). The fruitful efficiency known prior to the Fall was lost. ...
Results—Epilogue Man's prerogative to name woman (Genesis 3:20 ) was a sign of the Fallen order, but hope persists. Some may expect God to retreat and leave the sinful people alone to taste the misery that would follow, but grace-giving Yahweh provided clothing for Fallen mankind (Genesis 3:20-21 ). ...
New Testament The New Testament writers assumed the Fallen state of both humans and nature
Jeremiah, Book of - ...
Jeremiah 2 — Jeremiah 6 This section is an appeal to Jerusalem, with exhortations to repentance, and warnings as to what had befallen Israel. Zedekiah gave him some relief; but on foretelling the Fall of the city he was put into a dungeon, where he sank in the mire. Judgements were to Fall upon Egypt, the Philistines, Moab, the Ammonites, Edom, Damascus, Kedar, Elam, and Babylon
Nin'Eveh - Although only the general plan of the ground-floor can now be traced, it is evident that the palaces had several stories built of wood and sun-dried bricks, which, when the building was deserted and allowed to Fall to decay, gradually buried the lower chambers with their ruins, and protected the sculptured slabs from the effects of the weather. (Nahum 3:18 ) The fullest and the most vivid and poetical picture of Nineveh's ruined and deserted condition is that given by Zephaniah, who probably lived to see its Fall
Jeremiah - ...
A unit of eight chapters then traces events in chronological sequence from the final siege of Jerusalem to the settlement of the Jews in Egypt: Jeremiah’s imprisonment and rescue (37:1-38:28); the Fall of Jerusalem (39:1-18); the appointment of Gedaliah and his brutal assassination (40:1-41:18); the migration to Egypt (42:1-43:7); and Jeremiah’s message to the Jews in Egypt (43:8-44:30). An historical appendix details matters relating to the Fall of Jerusalem (52:1-34)
Pride (2) - To it certain natures Fall victims who would consider family pretensions or religious assumptions of superiority vulgar and discreditable. No one who then was present was likely to Fall into the sin of presuming on privileges of position, or treating subordinates with selfish, slighting inconsiderateness
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - 8-11), how women tempt; he cites the Fall of the Watchers; he deprecates the meeting of men and women (v. He recounts his own Fall (xii. Tiglath-Pileser - After the Fall of the capital, Damascus became an Assyrian province
Urim And Thummim - Were they contained within the hollow ephod-image, which was provided with a narrow aperture, so that it was possible to shake the image and yet neither lot ‘come out’? (The lot is technically said ‘to Fall or come out,’ the latter Joshua 16:1 RV Deliver - The key words nasal [1] ("draw out, snatch away"), palat [2] ("make an escape"), malat [3] ("to cause to escape"), halas [3] (to "draw out"), and yasa [5] ("to save") Fall within the field of meaning describing God's redemptive activity on the part of his people
Altar - In an oracle against Israel (Amos 3:14 ), God declared that "the horns of the altar will be cut off and Fall to the ground
Esther, Theology of - ...
Although Falling down before a superior in Israel was common, it is easier in this context to understand why Mordecai did not Fall prostrate before Haman
Sardis - But centuries of material prosperity made the Lydian character soft and voluptuous, and the Fall of CrCEsus, whom Solon warned in vain of the fickleness of fortune, became to the Greeks the supreme illustration of the danger of careless security
Jehovah - Εlohim (the plural expressing the fullness of God's powers) is appropriate to creation (Genesis 1 - 2:3); JEHOVAH ELOHIM to paradise and to the covenant of grace at the Fall; the combination identifies the Jehovah of the moral government with the Elohim of creation
Galilee - After the Fall of Jerusalem, Galilee became the centre of Rabhinic life. Owing to moisture derived from the Lehanon mountains, Galilee is the best-watered district of Palestine, and abounds in streams and springs, though the actual rainfall is little greater than that of Judæa
Inspiration - Although the doctrine of the inspiration of the Bible does not properly Fall within the scope of a Bible Dictionary, a brief summary of views held in the Christian Church may be added: ( a ) The Theory of verbal inspiration affirms that each human author was but the mouthpiece of God, and that in every word, therefore, God speaks
Sanctification - These Fall into three groupings: those whose sanctity was inherent (for example, firstborn males of female animals and human beings, Exodus 13:2 ,Exodus 13:2,13:11-13 ; Leviticus 27:26 ); objects whose sanctification was required (for example, tithes of crops and pure animals, Leviticus 27:30-33 ; Deuteronomy 26:13 ); and gifts whose sanctification was voluntary (see partial list in Leviticus 27:1 )
Glory - While humans may not have entirely lost this God-given glory through their Fall into sin, their pursuit of folly shows that they do not live up to their glorious calling ( Proverbs 26:1 )
Ass - They could easily get loose and Fall into a pit (Luke 14:5 )
Fig (Tree) - Their riches and their treasures would Fall an easy prey to the invader
James, Epistle of - ...
Referring to the various temptations into which saints Fall, the apostle bids them count it all joy, inasmuch as the proving of faith works endurance
Ark - literature, the names of the ark, more than twenty in number, Fall into three groups, which are characteristic ( a ) of the oldest literary sources, viz
Head - Hence the head is the chief or more important part, and is used for the whole person, in the phrase, let the evil Fall on my head
Fear - So soon as their eyes are opened, and their consciences quickened, they discover that it is a fearful thing (φοβερόν) to Fall into the hands of the living God (Hebrews 10:31)
Irenaeus, Bishop of Tyre - Domnus turned for counsel to Theodoret, who replied that "it was better to Fall under the ill-will of man than to offend God and wound one's own conscience
Bezer - All the days his High Priest liveth no condemnation can Fall upon him; and that is for ever!...
That the appointment of those cities (which were six in number), had an eye to Christ cannot be doubted, because a provision for the manslayer, if referring only to temporal things, might have been made in a much easier and more simple way. And it was a law in Israel we are told, that one day in every year there were persons sent to repair the roads leading to them, and to remove all stumblingblocks or stones, which might by time have Fallen in the way; and to see also, that the posts of direction, which were set up at every corner leading to the city, were carefully preserved, and the name Miklat, (that is, refuge) legible upon them
Judas Iscariot - Stung to the quick at their refusal to take back the money, while they condemned himself, he went to the temple, cast down the whole sum in the treasury, or place for receiving the offerings of the people; and, after he had thus returned the wages of iniquity, he retired to some lonely place, not far, perhaps, from the scene of Peter's repentance; and, in the frenzy of despair, and at the instigation of the devil, hanged himself; crowning with suicide the murder of his master and his friend; rejecting his compassionate Saviour, and plunging his own soul into perdition! In another place it is said that, ‘falling headlong, he burst asunder, and all his bowels gushed out,' Acts 1:18 . Both these accounts might be true: he might first have hanged himself from some tree on the edge of a precipice; and, the rope or branch breaking, he might be dashed to pieces by the Fall
Captives - The barbarous custom long survived the decline and Fall of the Babylonian empire; for by the testimony of Mr
Nineveh - Their timely repentance delayed for a time the Fall of the city; but about 753 B
Jordan - The current is usually swift and strong; and there are numerous rapids and Falls, of which no less than twenty-seven are specified by Lieutenant Lynch as dangerous even to his metallic boats. The sea of Tiberias lies 312 (according to Lynch, 653) feet below the level of the Mediterranean, and the Dead Sea 1,316 feet; hence the Fall of the Jordan between the two seas Isaiah 1,000 feet
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - Immediately upon the Fall, hopes of recovery and salvation are held out, but the manner in which this salvation is to be effected is left altogether indefinite
Fear - So soon as their eyes are opened, and their consciences quickened, they discover that it is a fearful thing (φοβερόν) to Fall into the hands of the living God (Hebrews 10:31)
Punishments - " Viewed historically, the first case of punishment for crime mentioned in Scripture, next to the Fall itself, is that of Cain, the first murderer
Image - They Fall into sin when they yield to the temptation to rebel against God and set themselves up as the ones who will decide what is right and what is wrong
Samson - Wherefore let him that thinketh be standeth take heed lest he Fall. ...
But it often happens with our promised deliverers also that they Fall far short of far weaker men in the after-work they do for themselves and for us. Prison within prison,Inseparably dark!Nothing of all these evils hath befall'n meBut justly; I myself have brought them on,Sole author I, sole cause. Turn my mourning into dancing, my dreaming into earnestness, my Falls into clearings of myself, my guilt into indignation, my sin into fear, my transgression into vehement desire, and my pollution into revenge. Rejoice not against me, O mine enemy; when I Fall, I shall arise; when I sit in darkness, the Lord shall be a light unto me
Sea - Later they cast the cargo of wheat into the sea (Acts 27:38); and again they loosened the cables of the anchors and let them Fall off into the sea (Acts 27:40). Thus, no hurt is to befall the earth or the sea until the servants of God are sealed in their foreheads; no physical convulsions are to take place until the saints of God are secured (Revelation 7:1-3). At the Fall of Babylon (i
Mary - For we road that at the creation, the Lord God caused a deep sleep to Fall upon Adam, and he slept; and he took one of his ribs and closed up the flesh instead thereof: and the rib, which the Lord God had taken from the man, made he a woman. The original promise at the Fall was, that Christ should be of the "seed of the woman;" and accordingly we find the prophet, in the after-ages, commissioned by the Holy Ghost to tell the church that "a virgin should conceive, and bear a son. " (Isaiah 7:14) Now observe the expression conceive: not a conception, as in the ordinary way of generation, in our Fallen race; for this is by corrupt and sinful creatures; and therefore David very properly saith, "in sin did my mother conceive me
Angel - What the evil angels possessed before their Fall the like powers, which they are still occasionally permitted to exercise for the punishment of wicked nations, seems also evident. " Speculations on the cause and occasion of their Fall are all vain and trifling
Parousia (2) - It is at least clear that certain passages in the discourse point to the judgment on Israel as a nation and the impending Fall of Jerusalem and its Temple-worship, whilst it is equally clear that other passages refer to a crisis, certainly to be looked for, but still lying in the distance (Matthew 24:43-50, Mark 13:34-37). Manifestly Jesus took into account the gradual evolution of human affairs in contemplating the triumph of His Kingdom, while at the same time His faith in that triumph was so real and assured, and His vision of it so intensely clear, that it seemed to Him imminent, on the eve of fulfilment; and when He spoke under this feeling His disciples gathered the impression that it was close at hand, and they naturally understood the supreme event to be synchronous with the Fall of Jerusalem, though in tins, as it proved, they were mistaken. On the other hand, there are passages in the Eschatological Discourse in Matthew 24 and Mark 13 which seem to represent the final coming as preceded by certain manifest signs which shall give evidence of its nearness—the appearance of false Christs (Matthew 24:5, Mark 13:6; Mark 13:22), wars, earthquakes, and famines (Mark 13:11-136 Mark 13:7-10), persecutions and tribulations (Matthew 24:9, 1618389629_73), the darkened sun and Falling stars (Matthew 24:29, Mark 13:24-25)
Greek Language - Later, the Fall of Constantinople ushered in the Modern Greek Period. As should be expected, the literary style of the writers of the New Testament Falls somewhere between these two extremes
Devote, Devoted - In fact Hosea prophesied the Fall of the house of Jehu for his wholesale shedding of blood in the Valley of Jezreel (1:4)
Behmenists - How some angels, and all men, are Fallen from God, and their first state of a divine triune life in him; what they are in their Fallen state, and the difference between the Fall of angels and that of Man. How the earth, stars, and elements, were created in consequence of the Fallen angels. How and why sin and misery, wrath, and death, shall only reign for a time, till the love, the wisdom, and the power of God shall in a supernatural way (the mystery of God made man) triumph over sin, misery, and death; and make Fallen man rise to the glory of angels, and this material system shake off its curse, and enter into an everlasting union with that heaven from whence it fell
Akeldama - In Acts, on the other hand, (a) nothing is said of a refunding of the money by Judas; (b) his death was not self-inflicted, nor was it caused by hanging; it is described as due to a Fall and a consequent rupture of the abdomen; (c) the held was bought by Judas himself, and not by the priests; (d) nothing is said of its former use as a ‘potter’s field,’ nor (e) of the purpose for which it was used after the death of Judas; (f) the blood which gave its name to the field was that of Judas, by which it was defiled, for (g) the field Akeldama is identified with the place of his death, a fact of which there is no mention in Matthew
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - ...
Satan, the chief of the Fallen angels, is mentioned in a number of places in the Old Testament. It is clear that from the very moment of the creation of this world that Satan and Fallen angels were on the scene, rebels against God. Pride seems to have been the cause of his Fall. ...
Matthew, Mark, and Luke clearly accept and teach a doctrine of a personal Satan and his agents called Fallen angels or demons (Mark 3:22 )
Astrology - Consequently, it is only to be expected that when people Fall away from the faith once delivered to the saints they will place increasing trust in such astrological devices as horoscopes
Witness - The solitary eagle flying across the sky cries with a great voice, ‘Woe, woe, woe, for them that dwell on the earth’ (the three-fold woe possibly corresponding to the three plagues yet to Fall upon the earth). ’ οὐαί introduces each section of the three-fold dirge of lamentation uttered by the mourners of Fallen Babylon (Revelation 18:10; Revelation 18:16; Revelation 18:19) and is followed by the nominative-the broken construction suggesting the emotion of the mourners
Seed (2) - The latter is compared to the vital germ or grain of the plant, which, through no fault of its own or of the sower, may fail to germinate, owing to the unpromising nature of the ground on which it chances to Fall
Samaria, Samaritans - Following the Northern Kingdom's Fall to Assyria (721 B
Wisdom And Wise Men - Thus, clearly by the Fall of Judah, the sage had taken his place as one of the key leaders in Israelite society
Foreigner - With the Fall, humanity is exiled from God's immediate presence into a "foreign" land
Samson - ...
Still even Samson's Falls, as Israel's, are in God's wonderful providence overruled to Satan's and his agents' confusion and the good of God's elect. (See DELILAH for his Fall
Samuel, Second Book of - ...
2 Samuel 23 gives "the last words of David," wherein he exults in the infallibility of God's covenant, notwithstanding the failure in his house. Three punishments were offered to David by the mouth of the prophet, and he chose to Fall "into the hand of the Lord, for his mercies are great
Cut - ...
To cut down, to fell to cause to Fall by severing
Minister - Nor has God Almighty ever sanctified ignorance, or consecrated it to his service; since it is the effect of the Fall, and the consequence of our departure from the Fountain of intelligence
Shem - Methuselah and Shem were the two links between Adam and Isaac, so that the record of creation and man's Fall came to Isaac on the testimony of the original chief actor, transmitted by only two intervening links
Arminians - The first Arminians, indeed, had some doubt with respect to the closing part of this article; but their followers uniformly maintain "that the regenerate may lose true justifying faith, Fall from a state of grace, and die in their sins
Tree - ...
Job 14:7 (c) The teaching of this passage is that though a man may fail in business, or Fall as a sinner, it is quite possible for him to be restored and to recover and to end his days in blessing, and with GOD's approval
Save - Yeshû‛âh is used in a few instances of a human act: “Where no counsel is, the people Fall: but in the multitude of counselors there is safety” ( Land - 8:16), and rain and dew Fall on it ( ba'Bel - On the Fall of Nineveh, B
Akeldama - In Acts, on the other hand, (a) nothing is said of a refunding of the money by Judas; (b) his death was not self-inflicted, nor was it caused by hanging; it is described as due to a Fall and a consequent rupture of the abdomen; (c) the held was bought by Judas himself, and not by the priests; (d) nothing is said of its former use as a ‘potter’s field,’ nor (e) of the purpose for which it was used after the death of Judas; (f) the blood which gave its name to the field was that of Judas, by which it was defiled, for (g) the field Akeldama is identified with the place of his death, a fact of which there is no mention in Matthew
Marcus, a Gnostic - Thus his system tells of 30 Aeons divided into an Ogdoad a Decad and a Dodecad; of the Fall and recovery of Sophia; of the future union of the spirits of the chosen seed with angels as their heavenly bridegrooms
Job - God allowed disasters to Fall upon Job to prove the genuineness of Job’s faith and at the same time enrich Job’s experience of God
Pillar - In 1 Timothy 6:9 we have the covetous Falling into a snare and hurtful lusts such as drown men’ (A. Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, vii
Enoch Book of - -Fall of certain angels, through union with women (vi. Knowledge of arts, magic, and astronomy imparted by Fallen angels (viii. 1) and is sent to the Fallen angels (‘Watchers’) with the message: ‘no peace nor forgiveness’ (xii. 4-6); as he reads it he Falls asleep and sees visions of chastisement, which he recounts to them (xiii. Here stand the Fallen angels, whose spirits seduce men to idolatry (xix. 1-7), which is the final prison of the Fallen angels (xxi. ); vision of Fallen angels in Prison (lxiv. Michael and Raphael are astonished at the sternness of the judgment upon the Fallen angels (lxviii. 2-5); the names of the Fallen angels and Satans who led them astray and taught men knowledge and writing (lxix. ); stars (= angels) Fall from heaven, and unite with cattle (lxxxvi. In symbolism Enoch sees the history of Noah and the Deluge; Israel at the Exodus, crossing the Jordan, under the Judges; the building of the Temple; the two kingdoms; the Fall of Jerusalem (lxxxix. Fallen angels); the righteous and holy receive guardians till an end is made of sin; though the righteous sleep long, they have nothing to fear; angels, sun, moon, and stars will witness to the sins of sinners (c. -Lamech has a wondrous son; Methuselah inquires of Enoch at the ends of the earth about him; Enoch replies that a Deluge is to come because of sin introduced by the Fallen angels; this son shall alone be saved-sin will arise again after him till the final annihilation of evil. The work as we have it Falls naturally into five quite distinct main sections as shown in 1 above:...
Section i. They Fall into subsections: xii-xvi. The problem in this section is the origin of evil, which is traced to the Fall of the Watchers
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - In the final chapter, when Gad, the prophet, gives David three options for punishment after his sin in the matter of the census taking, David says, "Let us Fall into the hands of the Lord, for his mercy is great; but do not let me Fall into the hands of men" (2 Samuel 24:14 ). What have they done? Let your hand Fall upon me and my family" (2 Samuel 24:17 ). , the role it played at the crossing of the Jordan [7]) it is not surprising that when the Israelites were defeated by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4 ) the elders requested that the ark be brought to the battlefield. ...
When the Philistines placed the ark in the temple of their god, Dagon, at Ashdod, the next day they found that the image of their deity had Fallen to the floor and broken in pieces before the ark of the Lord (1 Samuel 5 )
God - The reconciling work God had engaged in since the Fall (Genesis 3 ) assumed institutional status in the Torah. Israel's history concludes with the Fall of Samaria in 722 b. , and Judah's history dips into a hiatus called the exile with the Fall of Jerusalem in 586 b. The Book of Lamentations stands as an assessment of Judah's Fall and a witness to Yahweh's mercy, which is renewed every morning (1618389629_74 )
Gospels - Harnack thinks that it must have been written neat the Fall of Jerusalem, but not necessarily before it. His Gospel must be prior to that date, and Fall between 30 and 50. * Matthew, Gospel According to - Matthew emphasizes the close connexion between the Fall of Jerusalem and the Coming of the Son of Man (Matthew 24:29), thus limiting the period during which the gospel could be preached to the Gentiles, St. ...
Of several of these parables it will rightly be felt that, as originally spoken, they had a wider meaning and scope than that here given, and one which is inconsistent with the narrow limits of the Kingdom to be inaugurated immediately after the Fall of Jerusalem. It must have been written by a Jewish-Christian, probably by a Jewish-Christian of Palestine, and it cannot date from long after the Fall of Jerusalem. For it is inconceivable that any one should so arrange the words of Christ as to convey the impression that He had taught that He would return as Son of Man immediately after the Fall of Jerusalem, if many years had elapsed since that event
Evolution (Christ And) - This conception of the Person and work of Christ, while it Falls into line with the Evolutionary idea in one direction, appears to Fall foul of it in another, because of the claim it makes that there was in the nature of Christ an incommensurable factor, incapable of being explained by the laws of organic life, or by human psychology,—manifesting itself in a life of unique goodness and power, begun by a free special act of God in the Virgin-birth, and consummated by the objective Resurrection of our Lord from the dead. The first makes the Christ the consummation and crown of the process of cosmic Evolution, and postulates the Incarnation as its necessary climax; the second occupies the old standpoint of Christian theology from the beginning, that, whether the Incarnation lay implicit or not in the process, it was historically conditioned by the fact of the sinful and ‘fallen’ state of humanity. It presupposes that a lapse, or at least a fatal halt, had occurred in the upward spiritual development of the race, and that all further progress was barred by the poisoning of the wells of progress by sin (see Fall). The future of the world lies with Christ, unless it is to Fall back on a lower stage of ethical and spiritual development on its way to utter disintegration and decadence
Micah, Theology of - Micah concludes these oracles with the climactic prediction that Jerusalem will Fall (3:12; cf. 1-4), and so the nation Falls into anarchy (vv. Under the heat of the Lord's glowing wrath and under his heavy tread, the eternal and majestic mountains melt and flow like hot wax, and the arable plains where humankind finds its immediate source of life split apart like waterfalls roaring down a rocky gorge (v. When this majestic God suddenly erupts with awesome power, puny human walls and fortifications crumble and Fall into ravines (vv
Epicureans - Every sensuous impression received by the mind is produced by something other than itself, and is infallibly true. But Epicurus claimed that the only movement of which we are aware is that of the Fall of bodies to the earth-downward movement. This theory also accounts not only for our visions of the ghosts of departed friends, whose secondary particles may float about long after their death, but also for our perceptions of the gods; for, though they are composed of much finer particles than mortals, their ‘films’ may Fall with impact upon the human organism
Games - The difference remarked by Gibbon (Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, ch. Gibbon, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, ch
Death - If the belief enshrined in the story of the Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 regarded death in the ordinary sense as the penalty of Adam and Eve’s transgression, they at any rate did not die ‘in the day’ of their transgression; v. It is a Falling asleep after life’s day and ‘we sleep to wake’: but there is nothing here to shed light on such questions as to whether that sleep is a prolonged period of unconsciousness or no. We may notice the following points: ( a ) The Pauline doctrine that natural death is the primitive consequence of sin , already referred to, is to be explained as the common Jewish interpretation of the OT account of the Fall, and finds no direct support in the Gospels
Samuel, First Book of - Because Eli did not restrain his sons, judgement should Fall upon his house. 5,1 Samuel 6 rehearse the judgements of God on the Philistines while the ark was in their possession, and the Fall of their god Dagon
Cosmas (3), Indian Navigator - ...
The chief design of the Christian Topography is "to confute the impious heresy of those who maintain that the earth is a globe, and not a flat oblong table, as is represented in the Scriptures" (Gibbon, Decline and Fall, c. g the absurdity of the supposition of the existence of antipodean regions inasmuch as the beings on the other side of the world must drop off and the rain would Fall upwards instead of downwards; while the supposed rotatory motion of the universe is disproved by the disturbance that would be caused to the repose of the blessed in heaven by their being perpetually whirled through space
Dwelling - The outer circle in an audience in such a room sat upon a dais, or upon cushions elevated so as to be as high as the window-sill, From such