What does Evil mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הָרַ֖ע bad 35
רָ֑ע bad 18
רָעָ֑ה to cut in 14
κακὸν of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 13
רָֽע bad 12
πονηροῦ full of labours 12
הָרָ֖ע bad 12
רָעָ֔ה bad 10
הָרַ֛ע bad 9
הָרַע֙ bad 8
רָעָ֖ה bad 8
πονηρὰ full of labours 8
κακοῦ of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 8
πονηρὸς full of labours 6
הָֽרָעָה֙ bad 6
רָעָֽה bad 6
רָעָ֣ה bad 6
הָרָעָ֖ה bad 6
הָרָעָ֑ה bad 5
πονηρόν full of labours 5
πονηρὸν full of labours 5
רָ֗ע bad 5
מֵרָֽע bad 5
רֹ֥עַ badness 5
רָ֭עָה bad 5
κακόν of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 5
הָרָ֔ע bad 4
רָ֖ע bad 4
רָ֔ע bad 4
φαῦλον easy 4
πονηρῶν full of labours 4
πονηροὶ full of labours 4
πονηρά full of labours 4
הָרָ֑ע bad 3
רַ֣ע bad 3
הָרָעִ֔ים bad 3
רָעִ֑ים bad 3
רַ֖ע bad 3
πονηροῖς full of labours 3
מֵרָ֑ע bad 3
רָעָ֗ה bad 2
הָרָֽע bad 2
מֵ֭רָע bad 2
רָ֝֗ע bad 2
הָרַע֮ bad 2
רָעָ֤ה bad 2
הָרַ֔ע bad 2
הָֽרָעָ֔ה bad 2
רָ֥ע bad 2
הָרָעָ֜ה bad 2
רָ֣ע bad 2
וָרָ֔ע bad 2
רָ֭ע bad 2
לְרָעָ֔ה bad 2
πονηραί full of labours 2
הָרָעָ֤ה bad 2
וָרָֽע bad 2
רָעַ֨ת bad 2
בָּרָ֖ע bad 2
κακολογῶν to speak evil of 2
לָרַ֣ע bad 2
κακοποιῆσαι to do harm. / to do evil 2
הָרֵֽעַ to be bad 2
κακά of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 2
κακῶν of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 2
κακὰ of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 2
רָעַת֙ bad 2
רֹ֣עַ badness 2
πονηρότερα full of labours 2
κακῶς miserable 2
רָעִֽים bad 2
πονηρᾷ full of labours 2
πονηροὺς full of labours 2
πονηρῷ full of labours 2
؟ רָ֑ע bad 2
πονηρούς full of labours 2
φαῦλα easy 2
הָרָ֤ע bad 1
רָעָ֥ה bad 1
הָרָע֖וֹת bad 1
הָרַ֤ע bad 1
רָ֭עִים bad 1
הָרָעָ֔ה bad 1
רָעָה֙ bad 1
רָעָתָ֛ם bad 1
בָרָעָ֗ה bad 1
רַ֨ע bad 1
הָרָעָ֛ה bad 1
הָֽרָעָ֖ה bad 1
מֵרָ֣ע bad 1
מֵרָעָ֨ה bad 1
רָעָ֧ה ׀ bad 1
؟ מֵרָֽע bad 1
؟ מֵרָ֑ע bad 1
(רָ֑ע) bad 1
βλασφημείσθω to speak reproachfully 1
רָעִ֥ים bad 1
הֲרֵעֹתֶ֖ם to be bad 1
רָ֜ע bad 1
וּמֵרֹ֖עַ badness 1
וּמֵרֹ֣עַ badness 1
הֲרֵע֔וֹתִי to be bad 1
וַתָּ֣רַע to be bad 1
וְרָעָ֣ה to be bad 1
הֵרַ֖ע to be bad 1
וְתָרֵ֔עוּ to be bad 1
רָעַ֣ת bad 1
יָרֵ֔עוּ to be bad 1
הֵרֵ֜עוּ to be bad 1
לְהָרַ֔ע to be bad 1
לְהָרַ֣ע ׀ to be bad 1
הֵרֵ֖עוּ to be bad 1
לְהָרֵ֑עַ to be bad 1
יָרֵ֑עוּ to be bad 1
؟ רָ֔ע bad 1
וְרָעַת֙ bad 1
רָעֽוֹת bad 1
וְ֝רָעָ֗ה bad 1
רָ֝עָ֗ה bad 1
בְּרָעָֽה bad 1
בְּרָ֑ע bad 1
לָרָ֑ע bad 1
לָֽרָעָה‪‬ bad 1
רָע֣וֹת bad 1
רָ֡ע bad 1
רָעָתִֽי bad 1
לְרָעָֽה bad 1
בְרָעָ֑ה bad 1
וְהָרַ֥ע bad 1
בְּ֭רָעָה bad 1
רָּ֣ע bad 1
(הָ֭רַע) bad 1
לָרָֽע bad 1
הָֽרָעִ֑ים bad 1
וָ֝רָ֗ע bad 1
וְרָעָ֥ה bad 1
(הָרַע֙) bad 1
[ובאישתא] evil 1
πονηρός full of labours 1
πονηροί full of labours 1
πονηρέ full of labours 1
πονηρᾶς full of labours 1
מְרֹדַךְ֩ son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar 1
אוֹנֵֽךְ trouble 1
בְּ֭לִיַּעַל worthlessness. 1
πονηροῦ⧽ full of labours 1
וְדֹרֵ֖שׁ to resort to 1
הַוַּ֥ת desire. 1
זִמָּ֑ה plan 1
זַ֝מּ֗וֹתָ to have a thought 1
לְמֵרָ֔ע (Hiphil) mischief. 1
עָמָ֖ל 1
πονηρὲ full of labours 1
πονηρίας depravity 1
עָמָ֣ל 1
κακολογῆσαί to speak evil of 1
βλασφημοῦντες to speak reproachfully 1
βλασφημοῦσιν to speak reproachfully 1
ἐπιθυμίας desire 1
κακίᾳ malignity 1
κακίας malignity 1
κακολογοῦντες to speak evil of 1
κακοποιῶν to do harm. / to do evil 1
καταλαλιάς defamation 1
κακοποιοῦντας to do harm. / to do evil 1
κακήν of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 1
κακοὶ of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 1
κακὸς of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 1
κακούς of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 1
κακῷ of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 1
κακοὺς of a bad nature. / of a mode of thinking 1
עֲמַ֖ל 1
מֵּרָעָ֖ה bad 1
מֵרָ֣עָת֔וֹ bad 1
וְרָעִ֗ים bad 1
לְרָעֹ֑ת bad 1
בְרָ֖ע bad 1
הָרָעִ֛ים bad 1
רָע֖וֹת bad 1
וָרָ֑ע bad 1
בָרָ֔ע bad 1
הָ֣רָעָ֔ה bad 1
רָ֨ע bad 1
בְּרָֽע bad 1
לָרַ֛ע bad 1
מֵרָ֖ע bad 1
רָעָתֵ֖כִי bad 1
הָֽרָעִ֔ים bad 1
הָרָ֜ע bad 1
בָּרָעָ֖ה bad 1
רָ֛ע bad 1
הָרָעָ֣ה ׀ bad 1
מֵֽרָעָ֔ה bad 1
؟ רָֽע bad 1
לְרָ֑ע bad 1
רָעִ֔ים bad 1
הָרָעָֽה bad 1
וְרַ֥ע bad 1
וְרָעָ֛ה bad 1
؟ רָעָֽה bad 1
βλασφημεῖν to speak reproachfully 1
؟ לְרָֽע bad 1
הָֽרָעִים֙ bad 1
וְהָרָ֔ע bad 1
בְּרָ֣עָתֶ֔ךָ bad 1
הָרָעָה֙ bad 1
רָע֙ bad 1
הָרָ֛ע bad 1
יָרֵֽעַ to be bad 1

Definitions Related to Evil

H7451


   1 bad, Evil.
      1a bad, disagreeable, malignant.
      1b bad, unpleasant, Evil (giving pain, unhappiness, misery).
      1c Evil, displeasing.
      1d bad (of its kind—land, water, etc).
      1e bad (of value).
      1f worse than, worst (comparison).
      1g sad, unhappy.
      1h Evil (hurtful).
      1i bad, unkind (vicious in disposition).
      1j bad, Evil, wicked (ethically).
         1j1 in general, of persons, of thoughts.
         1j2 deeds, actions.
   2 Evil, distress, misery, injury, calamity.
      2a Evil, distress, adversity.
      2b Evil, injury, wrong.
      2c Evil (ethical).
   3 Evil, misery, distress, injury.
      3a Evil, misery, distress.
      3b Evil, injury, wrong.
      3c Evil (ethical).
      

G4190


   1 full of labours, annoyances, hardships.
      1a pressed and harassed by labours.
      1b bringing toils, annoyances, perils; of a time full of peril to Christian faith and steadfastness; causing pain and trouble.
   2 bad, of a bad nature or condition.
      2a in a physical sense: diseased or blind.
      2b in an ethical sense: Evil wicked, bad.
      Additional Information: The word is used in the nominative case in Mt. 6:13.
               This usually denotes a title in the Greek.
               Hence Christ is saying, deliver us from “The Evil”, and is probably referring to Satan.
               

G2556


   1 of a bad nature.
      1a not such as it ought to be.
   2 of a mode of thinking, feeling, acting.
      2a base, wrong, wicked.
   3 troublesome, injurious, pernicious, destructive, baneful.
   

H7455


   1 badness, Evil.
      1a badness, bad quality.
      1b wilfulness.
      1c Evil, badness (ethical).
      1d sadness.
      

H7489


   1 to be bad, be Evil.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to be displeasing.
         1a2 to be sad.
         1a3 to be injurious, be Evil.
         1a4 to be wicked, be Evil (ethically).
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to do an injury or hurt.
         1b2 to do Evil or wickedly.
         1b3 mischief (participle).
   2 to break, shatter.
      2a (Qal).
         2a1 to break.
         2a2 broken (participle).
         2a3 to be broken.
      2b (Hithpolel) to be broken, be broken in pieces, be broken asunder.
      

G2560


   1 miserable, to be ill.
   2 improperly, wrongly.
   3 to speak ill of, revile, one.
   

G2554


   1 to do harm.
   2 to do Evil, do wrong.
   

G5337


   1 easy, slight, ordinary, mean, worthless, of no account.
   2 ethically, bad, base, wicked.
   

G2551


   1 to speak Evil of, revile, abuse, one.
   2 to curse.
   

G987


   1 to speak reproachfully, rail at, revile, calumniate, blaspheme.
   2 to be Evil spoken of, reviled, railed at.
   

H1100


   1 worthlessness.
      1a worthless, good for nothing, unprofitable, base fellow.
      1b wicked.
      1c ruin, destruction (construct).
      

G2549


   1 malignity, malice, ill-will, desire to injure.
   2 wickedness, depravity.
      2a wickedness that is not ashamed to break laws.
   3 Evil, trouble.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 4189, poneria.
   See entry 5855 for comparison of synonyms.
   

H5999


G2636


   1 defamation, Evil speaking.
   

G4189


   1 depravity, iniquity, wickedness.
   2 malice.
   3 Evil purposes and desires.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 2549, kakia.
   See entry 5855 for comparison of synonyms.
   

H873


   1 Evil, bad, be Evil.
   

H4827


   1 (Hiphil) mischief.
   2 (TWOT) confidential friend.
   

H192


   1 son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Neo-Babylonian empire, 562–560 BC.
   Additional Information: Evil Merodach = “man of Merodach”.
   

H1875


   1 to resort to, seek, seek with care, enquire, require.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to resort to, frequent (a place), (tread a place).
         1a2 to consult, enquire of, seek.
            1a2a of God.
            1a2b of heathen gods, necromancers.
         1a3 to seek deity in prayer and worship.
            1a3a God.
            1a3b heathen deities.
         1a4 to seek (with a demand), demand, require.
         1a5 to investigate, enquire.
         1a6 to ask for, require, demand.
         1a7 to practice, study, follow, seek with application.
         1a8 to seek with care, care for.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to allow oneself to be enquired of, consulted (only of God).
         1b2 to be sought, be sought out.
         1b3 to be required (of blood).
         

H1942


   1 desire.
      1a desire (in bad sense).
   2 chasm (fig.
   of destruction).
      2a engulfing ruin, destruction, calamity.
      

H2154


   1 plan, device, wickedness, Evil plan, mischievous purpose.
      1a plan, purpose.
      1b Evil device, wickedness.
      1c not chaste, incest, licentiousness, adultery, idolatry, harlotry.
      

H2161


   1 to have a thought, devise, plan, consider, purpose.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to consider, fix thought upon.
         1a2 to purpose, devise.
         1a3 to plot (of Evil intent).
         

H205


   1 trouble, wickedness, sorrow.
      1a trouble, sorrow.
      1b idolatry.
      1c trouble of iniquity, wickedness.
      

G1939


   1 desire, craving, longing, desire for what is forbidden, lust.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 3806, pathos.
   See entry 5845 for comparison of synonyms.
   

Frequency of Evil (original languages)

Frequency of Evil (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Hill of Evil Counsel
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Deliver us From Evil
Closing petition in the Lord's Prayer, the Our Father; the very words of Our Lord, instead of the Greek substitution adopted in later editions of the Anglican Book of Common Prayer: "For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever."
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Evil
EVIL is an older form of the word ‘ill’; used, both as substantive and adjective, to tr. [1] various synonyms and ranging in meaning from physical unfitness to moral wickedness. The former is archaic, but occurs in Genesis 28:8 (AVm [2] ), Exodus 21:8 (AVm [2] ), Jeremiah 24:3 (AV [4] ), and Matthew 7:18 , though the two last passages are not without an ethical tinge. But the word almost invariably connotes what is either morally corrupt (see Sin) or injurious to life and happiness.
1 . In the OT the two meanings are at first scarcely differentiated. Whatever comes to man from without is, to begin with, attributed simply to God ( Amos 3:6 , Lamentations 3:38 , Ezekiel 14:9 , Isaiah 45:7 ). Destruction is wrought by His angels ( Exodus 12:23 , 2 Samuel 24:16 , Psalms 78:49 ). Moral temptations come from Him ( 2 Samuel 24:1 , 1 Kings 22:23 ), though there is a tendency to embody them in beings which, though belonging to the host of heaven, are spoken of as evil or lying spirits ( 1 Samuel 16:14 , Judges 9:23 , 1 Kings 22:22 ). The serpent of the Fall narrative cannot be pressed to mean more than a symbol of temptation, though the form which the temptation takes suggests hostility to the will of God external to the spirit of the woman ( 2 Corinthians 11:3 , cf. Genesis 3:1-3 ). Then later we have the figure of the Adversary or Satan, who, though still dependent on the will of God, is nevertheless so identified with evil that he is represented as taking the initiative in seduction ( Zechariah 3:1 , 1 Chronicles 21:1 , but cf. 2 Samuel 24:1 ). This marks the growth of the sense of God’s holiness ( Deuteronomy 32:4 etc.), the purity which cannot behold evil ( Habakkuk 1:13 ); and correspondingly sharpens the problem. Heathen gods are now identified with demons opposed to the God of Israel ( Deuteronomy 32:17 , Psalms 106:37 ; cf. 1 Corinthians 10:20 ). This tendency, increased perhaps by Persian influence, becomes dominant in apocryphal literature ( 2 Peter 2:4 and Judges 1:6 are based on the Book of Enoch), where the fallen angels are a kingdom at war with the Kingdom of God.
2 . In the NT moral evil is never ascribed to God ( James 1:13 ), being essentially hostile to His mind and will ( Romans 1:18-21 ; Rom 5:10 , 1 John 1:5-7 ; 1 John 2:16 ; 1Jn 2:29 ; 1 John 3:4 ; 1 John 3:9 ); but to the Evil One ( Matthew 6:13 ; Matthew 13:19 , 1 John 5:19 ), an active and personal being identical with the Devil ( Matthew 13:39 , John 8:44 ) or Satan ( Matthew 4:10 , Mark 4:15 , Luke 22:31 , John 13:27 ), who with his angels ( Matthew 25:41 ) is cast down from heaven ( Revelation 12:9 , cf. Luke 10:18 ), goes to and fro in the earth as the universal adversary ( 1 Peter 5:8 , Ephesians 4:27 ; Ephesians 6:11 , James 4:7 ), and will be finally imprisoned with his ministering spirits ( Revelation 20:2 ; Revelation 20:10 , cf. Matthew 25:41 ). Pain and suffering are ascribed sometimes to God ( Revelation 3:19 , 1 Thessalonians 3:3 , Hebrews 12:5-11 ), inasmuch as all things work together for good to those that love Him ( Romans 8:28 ); sometimes to Satan ( Luke 13:16 , 2 Corinthians 12:7 ) and the demons ( Matthew 8:28 etc.), who are suffered to hurt the earth for a season ( Revelation 9:1-11 ; Revelation 12:12 ).
The speculative question of the origin of evil is not resolved in Holy Scripture, being one of those things of which we are not competent judges (see Butler’s Analogy , i. 7, cf. 1 Corinthians 13:12 ). Pain is justified by the redemption of the body ( Romans 8:18-25 , 1 Peter 4:13 ), punishment by the peaceable fruits of righteousness ( Hebrews 12:7-11 ), and the permission of moral evil by the victory of the Cross ( John 12:31 , Romans 8:37-39 , Colossians 2:15 , 1 Corinthians 15:24-28 ). Accept the facts and look to the end is the teaching of the Bible as a guide to practical religion ( James 5:11 ). Beyond this we enter the region of that high theology which comprehensive thinkers like Aquinas or Calvin have not shrunk from formulating, but which, so far as it is dealt with in the NT, appears rather as a by-product of evangelical thought, than as the direct purpose of revelation (as, e.g ., in Romans 9:1-33 , where God’s elective choice is stated only as the logical presupposition of grace). St. Paul is content to throw the responsibility for the moral facts of the universe upon God ( Romans 9:19-24 ; cf. Job 33:12 , Ecclesiastes 5:2 , Isaiah 29:16 ), who, however, is not defined as capricious and arbitrary power, but revealed as the Father, who loves the creatures of His hand, and has foreordained all things to a perfect consummation in Christ the Beloved ( Ephesians 1:3-14 etc.).
J. G. Simpson.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Evil-Merodach,
EVIL-MERODACH , the Amel-Marduk of the Babylonians, son and successor of Nebuchadrezzar on the throne of Babylon ( 2 Kings 25:27-30 ), promoted Jehoiachin in the 37th year of his captivity. He reigned b.c. 562 560. Berosus describes him as reigning lawlessly and without restraint, and he was put to death by his brother-in-law Neriglissar, who succeeded him.
C. H. W. Johns.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mount of Evil Counsel
One of the high hills to the south of Jerusalem, forms the eastern boundary of the plain of Raphaim. Tradition of the 12th century says that Caiphas here owned a house in which the Jews held their first meeting to take counsel against Jesus and "prophesied that Jesus should die for the nation" (John 11).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - King's Evil
So called from the legend according to which the power of healing this disease was bestowed by Saint Remigius upon the French Kings. Edward the Confessor was the first King of England to cure by his touch this affliction. It is tuberculosis of the lymphatic glands and sometimes of bones and joint surfaces, with slowly suppurating abscesses and fistulous passages, the inflamed structures being subject to a cheesy degeneration.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Speaking, Evil
SPEAKING, EVIL . See Evil Speaking.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Evil Eye
(Proverbs 23:6 ), figuratively, the envious or covetous. (Compare Deuteronomy 15:9 ; Matthew 20:15 .)
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Evil-Speaking
Is expressly forbidden (Titus 3:2 ; James 4:11 ), and severe punishments are denounced against it (1 Corinthians 5:11 ; 6:10 ). It is spoken of also with abhorrence (Psalm 15:3 ; Proverbs 18:6,7 ), and is foreign to the whole Christian character and the example of Christ.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Evil-Merodach
Merodach's man, the son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon (2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31,34 ). He seems to have reigned but two years (B.C. 562-560). Influenced probably by Daniel, he showed kindness to Jehoiachin, who had been a prisoner in Babylon for thirty-seven years. He released him, and "spoke kindly to him." He was murdered by Nergal-sharezer=Neriglissar, his brother-in-law, who succeeded him (Jeremiah 39:3,13 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Evil-Merodach
(ee' vihl-mih roh' dach) Babylonian royal name meaning, “worshiper of Marduk.” Babylonian king (562-560 B.C.) who treated Jehoiachin, king of Judah, with kindness (2 Kings 25:27 ). The Babylonian form of the name is Amel-Marduk. He was the son of Nebuchadrezzar. See Babylon .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Evil Speaking
1: βλασφημία (Strong's #988 — Noun Feminine — blasphemia — blas-fay-me'-ah ) is translated "evil speaking" in Ephesians 4:31 , AV (RV, "railing"). See BLASPHEMY.
2: καταλαλιά (Strong's #2636 — Noun Feminine — katalalia — kat-al-al-ee'-ah ) "evil speaking," 1 Peter 2:1 ; see BACKBITING.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Evil, Evil-Doer
A — 1: κακός (Strong's #2556 — Adjective — kakos — kak-os' ) stands for "whatever is evil in character, base," in distinction (wherever the distinction is observable) from poneros (see No. 2), which indicates "what is evil in influence and effect, malignant." Kakos is the wider term and often covers the meaning of poneros. Kakos is antithetic to kalos, "fair, advisable, good in character," and to agathos, "beneficial, useful, good in act;" hence it denotes what is useless, incapable, bad; poneros is essentially antithetic to chrestos, "kind, gracious, serviceable;" hence it denotes what is destructive, injurious, evil. As evidence that poneros and kakos have much in common, though still not interchangeable, each is used of thoughts, cp. Matthew 15:19 with Mark 7:21 ; of speech, Matthew 5:11 with 1 Peter 3:10 ; of actions, 2 Timothy 4:18 with 1 Thessalonians 5:15 ; of man, Matthew 18:32 with Matthew 24:48 .
The use of kakos may be broadly divided as follows: (a) of what is morally or ethically "evil," whether of persons, e.g., Matthew 21:41 ; 24:48 ; Philippians 3:2 ; Revelation 2:2 , or qualities, emotions, passions, deeds, e.g., Mark 7:21 ; John 18:23,30 ; Romans 1:30 ; 3:8 ; 7:19,21 ; 13:4 ; 14:20 ; 16:19 ; 1 Corinthians 13:5 ; 2 Corinthians 13:7 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:15 ; 1 Timothy 6:10 ; 2 Timothy 4:14 ; 1 Peter 3:9,12 ; (b) of what is injurious, destructive, baneful, pernicious, e.g., Luke 16:25 ; Acts 16:28 ; 28:5 ; Titus 1:12 ; James 3:8 ; Revelation 16:2 , where kakos and poneros come in that order, "noisome and grievous." See B, No. 3. For compounds of kakos, see below.
A — 2: πονηρός (Strong's #4190 — Adjective — poneros — pon-ay-ros' ) akin to ponos, "labor, toil," denotes "evil that causes labor, pain, sorrow, malignant evil" (see No. 1); it is used (a) with the meaning bad, worthless, in the physical sense, Matthew 7:17,18 ; in the moral or ethical sense, "evil," wicked; of persons, e.g., Matthew 7:11 ; Luke 6:45 ; Acts 17:5 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:2 ; 2 Timothy 3:13 ; of "evil" spirits, e.g., Matthew 12:45 ; Luke 7:21 ; Acts 19:12,13,15,16 ; of a generation, Matthew 12:39,45 ; 16:4 ; Luke 11:29 ; of things, e.g., Matthew 5:11 ; 6:23 ; 20:15 ; Mark 7:22 ; Luke 11:34 ; John 3:19 ; 7:7 ; Acts 18:14 ; Galatians 1:4 ; Colossians 1:21 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; 2 Timothy 4:18 ; Hebrews 3:12 ; 10:22 ; James 2:4 ; 4:16 ; 1 John 3:12 ; 2 John 1:11 ; 3 John 1:10 ; (b) with the meaning toilsome, painful, Ephesians 5:16 ; 6:13 ; Revelation 16:2 . Cp. poneria, "iniquity, wickedness." For its use as a noun see B, No. 2.
A — 3: φαῦλος (Strong's #5337 — Adjective — phaulos — fow'-los ) primarily denotes "slight, trivial, blown about by every wind;" then, "mean, common, bad," in the sense of being worthless, paltry or contemptible, belonging to a low order of things; in John 5:29 , those who have practiced "evil" things, RV, "ill" (phaula), are set in contrast to those who have done good things (agatha); the same contrast is presented in Romans 9:11 ; 2 Corinthians 5:10 , in each of which the most authentic mss. have phaulos for kakos; he who practices "evil" things (RV, "ill") hates the light, John 3:20 ; jealousy and strife are accompanied by "every vile deed," James 3:16 . It is used as a noun in Titus 2:8 (see B, No. 4). See BAD , ILL , VILE.
B — 1: κακία (Strong's #2549 — Noun Feminine — kakia — kak-ee'-ah ) primarily, "badness" in quality (akin to A, No. 1), denotes (a) "wickedness, depravity, malignity," e.g., Acts 8:22 , "wickedness;" Romans 1:29 , "maliciousness;" in James 1:21 , AV, "naughtiness;" (b) "the evil of trouble, affliction," Matthew 6:34 , only, and here alone translated "evil." See MALICE , MALICIOUSNESS , NAUGHTINESS , WICKEDNESS.
B — 2: πονηρός (Strong's #4190 — Adjective — poneros — pon-ay-ros' ) the adjective (A, No. 2), is used as a noun, (a) of Satan as the "evil" one, Matthew 5:37 ; 6:13 ; 13:19,38 ; Luke 11:4 (in some texts); John 17:15 ; Ephesians 6:16 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:3 ; 1 John 2:13,14 ; 3:12 ; 5:18,19 ; (b) of human beings, Matthew 5:45 ; (probably ver. 39); 13:49; 22:10; Luke 6:35 ; 1 Corinthians 5:13 ; (c) neuter, "evil (things)," Matthew 9:4 ; 12:35 ; Mark 7:23 ; Luke 3:19 ; "that which is evil," Luke 6:45 ; Romans 12:9 ; Acts 28:21 , "harm."
B — 3: κακός (Strong's #2556 — Adjective — kakon — kak-os' ) the neuter of A, No. 1, is used with the article, as a noun, e.g., Acts 23:9 ; Romans 7:21 ; Hebrews 5:14 ; in the plural, "evil things," e.g., 1 Corinthians 10:6 ; 1 Timothy 6:10 , "all kinds of evil," RV.
B — 4: φαῦλος (Strong's #5337 — Adjective — phaulon — fow'-los ) the neuter of A, No. 3, is used as a noun in Titus 2:8 .
B — 5: κακοποιός (Strong's #2555 — Adjective — kakopois — kak-op-oy-os' ) properly the masculine gender of the adjective, denotes an "evil-doer" (kakon, "evil," poieo, "to do"), 1 Peter 2:12,14 ; 4:15 ; in some mss. in 1 Peter 3:16 ; John 18:30 (so the AV). For a synonymous word see Note (1). Cp. the verb below. In the Sept., Proverbs 12:4 ; 24:19 . See MALEFACTOR.
Notes: (1) Kakourgos, "an evil-worker" (kakon, "evil," ergon, "a work"), is translated "evil-doer" in 2 Timothy 2:9 , AV (RV, "malefactor"). Cp. Luke 23:32,33,39 .
(2) Adikema, "an injustice" (a, negative, dikaios, "just"), is translated "evil-doing," in Acts 24:20 , AV, RV, "wrong-doing." See INIQUITY , WRONG.
C — 1: κακόω (Strong's #2559 — Verb — kakoo — kak-o'-o ) "to ill-treat" (akin to A, No. 1), is rendered "to entreat evil" in Acts 7:6,19 ; "made (them) evil affected," Acts 14:2 . See AFFECT , AFFLICT , HARM , HURT , VEX.
C — 2: κακοποιέω (Strong's #2554 — Verb — kakopoieo — kak-op-oy-eh'-o ) signifies "to do evil" (cp. B, No. 5), Mark 3:4 (RV, "to do harm"); so, Luke 6:9 ; in 3 John 1:11 , "doeth evil," in 1 Peter 3:17 , "evil doing." See HARM.
Note: Cp. kakologeo, "to speak evil" (see CURSE , SPEAK); kakopatheo, "to endure evil" (see ENDURE , SUFFER); kakopatheia, "suffering affliction" (see SUFFER); kakoucheo, "to suffer adversity" (see SUFFER).
D — 1: κακῶς (Strong's #2560 — Adverb — kakos — kak-oce' ) "badly, evilly," akin to A, No. 1, is used in the physical sense, "to be sick," e.g., Matthew 4:24 ; Mark 1:32,34 ; Luke 5:31 (see DISEASE). In Matthew 21:41 this adverb is used with the adjective, "He will miserably destroy those miserable men," more lit., "He will evilly destroy those men (evil as they are)," with stress on the adjective; (b) in the moral sense, "to speak evilly," John 18:23 ; Acts 23:5 ; "to ask evilly," James 4:3 . See AMISS , GRIEVOUSLY , SICK , SORE.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Evil
Is distinguished into natural and moral. Natural evil is whatever destroys or any way disturbs the perfection of natural beings; such as blindness, diseases, death, &c. Moral evil is the disagreement between the actions of a moral agent, and the rule of those actions, whatever it is. Applied to a choice, or acting contrary to the moral or revealed laws of the Deity, it is termed wickedness or sin. Applied to acting contrary to the mere rule of fitness, a fault.
See article SIN.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Evil Merodach
Son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar. During the latter's exclusion from men among beasts, Evil Merodach administered the government. On Nebuchadnezzar's resuming it at the end of seven years, he heard of his son's misconduct and that Evil Merodach had exulted in his father's calamity. He therefore cast Evil Merodach into prison, where the prince met Jehoiachin or Jeconiah, and became his friend. When Evil Merodach mounted the throne therefore he brought him out of prison, changed his prison garments, and set his throne above the throne of the kings with him in Babylon, and "Jehoiachin did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life" (Jeremiah 52:31-34). After a two-year reign, 561-559 B.C., he was murdered by Neriglissar (Nergal Sharezer), a Babylonian noble (married to his sister), who seized the crown. Evil Merodach was guilty of lawless government, according to Berosus, possibly because of his showing greater lenity than his father.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Tree of the Knowledge of Good And Evil
Stood in the midst of the garden of Eden, beside the tree of life (Genesis 23,3 ). Adam and Eve were forbidden to take of the fruit which grew upon it. But they disobeyed the divine injunction, and so sin and death by sin entered our world and became the heritage of Adam's posterity. (See ADAM .)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Evil
That which is opposed to God and His purposes or that which, defined from human perspectives, is harmful and non-productive. The Problem of Evil Evil is a major theoretical and practical problem for a Christian. Evil is of two types. First, there is natural evil. There are destructive forces in nature, ranging from earthquakes and tidal waves to cancer. Second, there is moral evil which has its source in the choice and action of humans. This type of evil includes war, crime, cruelty, and slavery.
If God is all-powerful and good, as the Bible affirms, why does He allow evil? There are statements and emphases in the Bible which help to explain and reduce the problem of natural and moral evil.
Natural Evil Concerning natural evil, several emphases should be noted. First, moral evil accounts for much of natural evil. In Genesis, evil and suffering appeared only after the Fall (Genesis 3:16-19 ). By contrast, the original creation is very good (Genesis 1:31 ). The new heavens and the new earth will have no more suffering (Revelation 21:4 ). This means that evil and suffering are not eternally inevitable. Rather they are bound up with the actions of sinful humans. Physical suffering and pain and finally death have been introduced as a consequence of the Fall (Genesis 3:16-19 ).
Second, God disciplines His people collectively and individually, even through natural evil and pain, to bring them closer to His purposes (Proverbs 3:11-12 ; Jeremiah 18:1-10 ). This emphasis is also found in the New Testament (Hebrews 2:10 ; Hebrews 5:8-9 ; Hebrews 12:5-11 ).
Third, personal life cannot develop except in a stable environment. God limited Himself by the establishment of regularity and law. This regularity of nature is an important factor in developing human personality. The earthquake, volcano, and storm, which cause human suffering, all belong to nature's regularity. Some so-called natural evil, therefore, can be attributed to the necessary operation of natural uniformities.
Fourth, natural evils may be used for judgment upon sin. It is deeply ingrained in the Bible that physical evils have been used by God for the punishment of individual and national wickedness. Noah's flood, the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, and the fall of Jerusalem are examples. This does not mean that all physical evils are the punishment of physical sins.
Moral Evil There are also some biblical teachings which help us to understand moral evil from the Christian perspective.
First, God limited Himself in giving people and angels freedom. To be truly human, a person must have the power of choice. Apparently God felt that, for reasons which were evident to Him but which we can only partly understand, it was better to make human beings than robots.
Robots might respond in an automatically correct way in every situation, but they would be machines, not persons. Not even God can love machines in the sense that persons can be loved.
Second, humans used freedom in such a way as to bring in evil. The Bible tells us that with the Fall, humanity's first sin, a radical change took place in the universe. Death came upon mankind (Genesis 2:17 ; Genesis 3:2-3 , Genesis 3:19 ). God pronounced a curse upon mankind which is represented by certain specifics: anguish in childbearing (Genesis 3:16 ), male domination over the wife (Genesis 3:16 ), toilsome labor (Genesis 3:17 ), and thorns and thistles (Genesis 3:18 ). These are probably only a sample of the actual effects upon the creation. Paul in Romans 8:22 said that the whole creation has been affected by human sin and is now in bondage to decay.
Third, back of human revolt stood Satan. In Genesis 3:1 we read that the serpent tempted Eve. Thus, an evil force was present within the creation. It was Satan's appeal which stirred within Adam and Eve the desire which led them to sin. Compare Revelation 12:9 .
It is clear, then, that God did not create evil and sin. He merely provided the options necessary for human freedom. People sinned, and before that, the fallen angels, not God.
Fourth, even though evil is because of human revolt and failure, God continues to be active in redeeming people from their self-imposed evil.
Fifth, God deals with evil through judgment and wrath. This judgment can be seen in the Old Testament (Deuteronomy 28:20-21 ; Isaiah 3:11 ). The wrath of God is not divine vindictiveness, but is dynamic, persistent opposition to sin (Romans 1:18 ). Thus, a principle of judgment upon, and annulment of, evil can be discerned at work in history and even in individual lives.
Sixth, God deals with evil through the incarnation, the cross, and the resurrection. The Bible teaches that God Himself in Jesus Christ became the victim of evil so that there might be victory over evil. It is also indicated in such passages as Colossians 1:24 ; Philippians 3:10 ; and 2 Corinthians 12:7 that the Christian can bear suffering for others and assist in God's redemptive purpose.
After all the solutions are considered, we still realize that the problem of evil is not completely solved on an intellectual level from our limited human perspective. However, on the practical and experiential level we can say with the apostle Paul that “in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us” (Romans 8:37 ).
John P. Newport
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Evil Speaking
The using language either reproachful or untrue respecting others, and thereby injuring them. It is an express command of Scripture, "To speak evil of no man." Titus 3:2 . James 4:11 . By which, however, we are not to understand that there are no occasions on which we are at liberty to speak of others that which may be considered as evil.
1. Persons in the administration of justice may speak words which in private intercourse would be reproachful.
2. God's ministers may inveigh against vice with sharpness and severity, both privately and publicly, Is. 58: 1. Titus 1:13 .
3. Private persons may reprove others when they commit sin, Leviticus 19:17 .
4. Some vehemence of speech may be used in defense of truth, and impugning errors of bad consequence, Judges 1:3 .
5. It may be necessary, upon some emergent occasions, with some heat of language, to express disapprobation of notorious wickedness, Acts 8:23 . Yet in all these the greatest equity, moderation, and candour, should be used; and we should take care,
1. Never to speak in severe terms without reasonable warrant or apparent just cause;
2. Nor beyond measure;
3. Nor out of bad principles or wrong ends; for ill will, contempt, revenge, envy, to compass our own ends; from wantonness, or negligence, but from pure charity for the good of those to whom or of whom we speak. This is an evil, however, which greatly abounds, and which is not sufficiently watched against; for it is not when we openly speak evil of others only that we are guilty, but even in speaking what is true we are in danger of speaking evil of others. There is sometimes a malignant pleasure manifested; a studious recollection of every thing that can be brought forward; a delight in hearing any thing spoken against others; a secret rejoicing in knowing that another's fall will be an occasion of our rise. All this is base to an extreme. The impropriety and sinfulness of evil speaking will appear, if we consider,
1. That it is entirely opposite to the whole tenor of the Christian religion.
2. Expressly condemned and prohibited as evil, Psalms 64:3 . James 4:11 .
3. No practice hath more severe punishments denounced against it, 1 Corinthians 5:11 . 1 Corinthians 6:10 .
4. It is an evidence of a weak and distempered mind.
5. It is even indicative of ill-breeding and bad manners.
6. It is the abhorrence of all wise and good men, Psalms 15:3 .
7. It is exceedingly injurious to society, and inconsistent with the relation we bear to each other as Christians, James 3:6 .
8. It is branded with the epithet of folly, Proverbs 18:6 ; Proverbs 7:1-27 :
9. It is perverting the design of speech.
10. It is opposite to the example of Christ, whom we profess to follow.
See SLANDER, Barrow's Works, vol. 1: ser. 16. Tillotson's Ser. ser. 42. Jack's Ser. on Evil Speaking.
Holman Bible Dictionary - DEvil, Satan, Evil, Demonic
The personal dimension of that which opposes God's purposes in His world. For some people, belief in a personal Satan is part of mankind's nursery furniture. The concept of a personal Satan, however, has remained a part of evangelical thought. The present-day Christian who accepts the biblical teaching concerning Satan is not committed to all of the crude imagery that has sprung up around belief in Satan. In the light of medieval and modern distortions, a careful consideration of the biblical teaching concerning Satan is especially needed.
Old Testament Teaching A fully defined doctrine of Satan is not fund in the Bible until New Testament times. A number of reasons have been suggested for the relatively limited material on Satan in the Old Testament.
God began His self-revelation in the ancient world of polytheism (belief in many gods). God wanted to lead His people to a dynamic practical monotheism (the belief in and worship of one God). In the Old Testament a primary emphasis is placed on the supremacy of and the power of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, who delivered the Hebrews from the slavery of Egypt.
Satan, the chief of the fallen angels, is mentioned in a number of places in the Old Testament. It is clear that from the very moment of the creation of this world that Satan and fallen angels were on the scene, rebels against God. Satan was evidently perfect in his original state. Pride seems to have been the cause of his fall. Disguised as a serpent, he was the agent of temptation for the first man and woman (Genesis 3:10 ; Revelation 12:9 ; Revelation 20:2 ). When Satan does appear in the Old Testament he is always the adversary of God's people. He seeks to lead God's people into presumption (1 Chronicles 21:1 ) or slanders them to God's face (Zechariah 3:1 ).
The most extensive Old Testament discussion of Satan is in Job. Here he is seen as God's agent and minister, who tested human fidelity. He makes a wager with God using Job as the stake. He acts, however, with the express permission of God and keeps within the limits which God has fixed for him (Job 1:12 ; Job 2:6 ).
New Testament Teaching By the time the New Testament book were written, God had led their authors to a clear-cut doctrine of Satan. This doctrine located an origin of evil in Satan. This recognizes the reality of evil outside and beyond the scope of human will. The New Testament avoids identifying evil with the direct will of God and keeps it always and finally subordinate to God.
Matthew, Mark, and Luke clearly accept and teach a doctrine of a personal Satan and his agents called fallen angels or demons (Mark 3:22 ). Matthew 4:1 tells of Jesus being tempted by the devil in the wilderness. In Matthew 25:41 even hell is described as being prepared for the devil and his angels. Satan and demons are seen as able to inflict disease ( Matthew 17:5-18 ; Luke 13:16 ). Satan possessed Judas (Luke 22:3 ). John saw Satan as the prince of this world (John 12:31 ; John 14:30 ; John 16:11 ) with the whole world in his power (1 John 5:19 ).
The apostle Paul's world view teaches that Satan is the god of this age. The cosmos or unredeemed world is at present under Satan's power. Satan is now the “commander of the spiritual powers of the air” (Ephesians 2:2 REB) and leads “the superhuman forces of evil in the heavenly realms” ( Ephesians 6:12 REB).
The general New Testament Epistles describe Satan's activities graphically. 2 Peter 2:4 speaks of the “angels that sinned” and Jude 1:6 of the “angels which kept not their first estate.” The constant use of violence and deceit by Satan requires that believers manifest courage and extreme vigilance ( James 4:7 ; 1 Peter 5:8-9 ).
The book of Revelation sees Satan's activities as involving not only individuals but communities. Political forces can become servants of the devil (Revelation 12:1 ; Revelation 13:1 ). Revelation 2:13 even speaks of a throne of Satan.
It should be remembered that the New Testament teaches that Satan and his demonic allies are not coequal with God. He is a created being who has rebelled and can tempt—but not force. The main concern of the Bible is not with the devil but with God and the gospel of His grace. Satan and the demonic forces have been overcome by the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The New Testament never allows complete pessimism. In the end Satan and his angels will be completely overcome. In fact, Jesus came into the world to “destroy the works of the devil” (1 John 3:8 ). The cross was a decisive victory over Satan and Satan's host (Colossians 2:15 ). This victory insured that countless numbers would be delivered from the dominion of darkness and transferred to the kingdom of Christ (Colossians 1:13 ).
Limitations of Satan Today, people continue to concretize their fears. They want a scapegoat to deliver them from responsibility. Satan is a created, rebellious and tempting evil power active in the universe, but his powerful existence does not exclude a person from responsibility. Satan and the demonic forces cannot dominate or possess us except by our own consent. Believers will not be tempted beyond our power of resistance (1 Corinthians 10:13 ). The power of Satan is limited. He acts within the limits set by divine sovereignty. The believer has God's armor—the biblical gospel, integrity, peace through Christ, faith in Christ, prayer—as spiritual security (Ephesians 6:11-18 ).
The recent fascination with Satan and demons is in reaction to an earlier disbelief. Christians should beware of excessive gullibility as well as extreme oversimplification. Knowledge about Satan and evil angels alerts Christians to the danger and subtlety of satanic temptation. We should not become too absorbed in satanic forces. Satan and demonic forces are active, but they are limited. We must remember that the main thrust of Christianity is on the availability of God's power and love in Jesus Christ and the Spirit.
John P. Newport
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Evil
As a prerequisite for any discussion of evil, moral evil must be distinguished from physical or natural evil. This essay uses the term "moral evil" to include both social offenses (ethics—murder, theft) and cultic sins (those offenses aimed directly against the deityblasphemy, idolatry). Moral evil, therefore, whether its setting be cultic or social, when carried out may be considered a sin. That cultic and ethical values were one and the same in the Hebraic mind may be illustrated by the similar penalties exacted for the severest offenses in either category (death, being cut off). Cultic values are addressed in the first four of the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:3-11 ; Deuteronomy 5:7-15 ) and by the first of Jesus' "Great Commandments" (Matthew 22:37-40 ; Mark 12:30 ; Luke 10:27 ; cf. Deuteronomy 6:5 ); ethics are considered in the last six of the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:12-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:16-21 ) and by the second "Great Commandment" (Leviticus 19:18 ).
Accordingly, what is morally good is not what human society decides is in its best interest, but what the revealed will of God declares. There can be no biblical ethics that stand apart from cult nor a biblical morality apart from theology. Instead, morality is defined by theology, which carries within it certain cultic affirmations and prohibitions together with the ethical. For example, the same Decalogue that declares that stealing and murder are wrong likewise forbids idolatry and blasphemy. What makes these things wrong is not some abstract quality called "the good" as sought by philosophers in time past. Instead, what constitutes social evil is what is so defined by God, and in that respect (i.e., as to why a given act is good or bad), differs little from cultic evil. There are, therefore, no grounds for the oft-repeated error wherein the "moral law" (the ethical) is in some way distinguished from the "ceremonial law" (the cultic) in Israel's values system. There can be no such distinction! That which is ethical is right because God has declared it so; the cultic portions of the Law likewise determine what is right for the same reason. Because of this, cult and ethics often appear fused in the Bible, as in Cain's admission of guilt for a faulty sacrifice and the murder of his brother (Genesis 4:13 ); a similar fusion of the cultic and the ethical occurs in Genesis 15:16 ("the sin of the Amorites"), where idolatry and unethical activity are considered as one.
If God is the definer of what is good (2 Samuel 10:12 ; Mark 10:18 ; Luke 18:19 ), right (Genesis 18:25 ), and just (Job 34:12 ), it is not surprising that the Bible never attributes moral or cultic evil to him (Job 34:10 ). Indeed, he hates evil (Psalm 5:6 ) and is the avenging judge who punishes those who practice it (Isaiah 31:2 ; Micah 2:1 ).
On the other hand, what ethicists term physical evil (or, natural evil) is often connected with the activities of God, and thus demonstrates the importance of defining these categories before discussing the subject further. An ethicist may distinguish these two types of evil thus: (1) moral evil, which is real if any intellectual being knowingly does anything he or she ought not to have done without being compelled to do it; and (2) physical evil, which is real if some beings have suffered in situations caused by nonrational beings, or through actions of rational beings acting nonrationally.
Moral Evil and Sin . Distinguishing moral evil from sin is no simple task, yet it must be attempted before any discussion may proceed further. First, it is important to differentiate a sin (an individual expression of sin) from generic sin, the condition that gives rise to its expression. An individual sin, as mentioned earlier, is an acting out of cultic or social evil. But generic sin) is the condition that gives rise to the evil expressed in the individual sin.
However sin and evil may be considered by a secularist, the theological perspective held by the Bible that presupposes an involvement by God in his creation and an active will of God governing that creation requires that evil assume a theological dimension. Accordingly, moral evil finds its roots in disobedience, whether deliberate or accidental, premeditated or unpremeditated, cultic or ethical, to the revealed will of God, and as such, becomes associated with generic sin and virtually synonymous with wickedness. The stress in the Old Testament lies not on the conceptual, but in the practical outworking of a state of disharmony with God and one's fellow humans. It may be expected, therefore, that there will be an extensive overlap between terms for sin and terms expressing moral evil, whether the expression of this sin/evil be cultic or social. The origins for sin and evil in both Old and New Testaments are traced to the activities of an evil creature, Satan (1 John 3:8 : "the devil has been sinning from the beginning" ) and to human sin that led to a fall (Romans 5:12-14 ) and banishment form Eden and the tree of life (Genesis 3 ).
Cultic and Social Evil . In biblical theology, natural revelation ties humanity in general to a responsibility before God which, when ignored, leads to human relationships that are immoral (Romans 1:18-25 ). In both Testaments, proper worship and social ethics are subsumed in a common covenant that ties the people of God to him and to one another. Since what God ordains is good, what is ethical is not clearly differentiated from what is cultic. Both belong to that aspect of sin that sets itself against the divinely instituted order, whether social or cultic, and thus inexorable finds itself in incessant conflict with God. Like Gollum's ring in The Hobbit or the addict's first "fix, " evil does not always seem immediately repulsive, but may even be seen as attractive on superficial examination (Genesis 3:6 ), while profoundly destructive at a deeper level (Isaiah 59:7 ).
Because what is right was what was ordained by God, and what is wrong was what was proscribed by him, deviation from this paradigm constitutes what is evil. The most common term for cultic evil in the Old Testament (used over 200 times) is awon [1], Leviticus 5:17 ; 17:16 ); and (3) the punishment for the act (e.g., Genesis 4:13 ; Job 19:29 ). It may be used to describe idolatry (Exodus 20:5 ; Joshua 22:17 ; cf. Jeremiah 11:10 ; Ezekiel 7:19 ; 14:3,4 , 7 ), trivializing the deity (2 Samuel 3:13-14 ), apostasy (Jeremiah 13:22 ), breach of the covenant (Jeremiah 5:25 ), or other activities that would in some way demean God's character or name (1 Samuel 3:13-14 ). It may refer to doing away with the fear of God (Job 15:4-5 ) or a lack of steadfastness toward him (Psalm 78:37-38 ) and it functions to alienate the individual from God (Leviticus 26:40 ; Isaiah 59:4 ). Prohibitions sometimes list words for "sin" together with awon [ Deuteronomy 19:15 ; Isaiah 1:4 ).
A frequently used word to convey the wrongness of idolatry is awen [ Genesis 35:18 ). The word is often used along with "toil" or "labor, " and in such cases may designate the sin that brings the trouble (Psalm 7:14 ; Isaiah 10:1 ). It may also be used to emphasize the absence of any theological value to a religious exercise (Isaiah 1:13 ). Taking on the nuance of power used in a harmful manner, in Psalm 36:4 awen [ Job 31:3 ; Psalm 5:6 ; 6:9 ; Proverbs 10:29 ; 21:15 ).
Other common words for evil include the nouns awel, awla, derived from a root meaning "to deviate." The two words have virtually no detectable difference in meaning and denote what is contrary to the character of God; thus they bring at their heels a divine response. They are used to describe what is not right (Leviticus 19:15,35 ) and dishonest business practices (Deuteronomy 25:14-16 ). Although Ezekiel generally seems to stress a need for cultic correctness, he uses awel to denote moral lapse, dishonesty (3:20; 18:24,26; 33:18) such as taking usury and showing partiality in judgment (18:8), dishonest trade that desecrates the sanctuaries (28:18), and taking pledges for loans, stealing, and so on (33:15). Moreover, awel is sometimes found in one's hand (18:8). Both words are clearly seen as denoting actions by their frequent use as objects of verbs of doing. They are frequently seen as antonyms for words denoting justice, faithfulness, honesty, proper (just) administration, and rightness. They are frequently paired with synonyms with other words denoting persecution, wickedness, rebellion, violence, and evil.
Many Hebrew words are used for both cultic and social evil. For example, awon [2], resa [3] are the most important antonyms for "what is right, just."
The words ra [4] in Psalm 10:15 as the "evildoer."
In the New Testament the words poneros [ Deuteronomy 31:17 ; Amos 3:6 b). The word appears in the New Testament without the attendant problems of theodicy that appear in its Old Testament setting. As such the adjective kakos [ Matthew 24:48 ), what is harmful (e.g., the tongue, James 3:8 ; cf. Romans 14:20 ), or, when used as a substantive, what is contrary to law (i.e., a sin, crime, John 18:23 ; Romans 7:21 ). Most of its occurrences in the New Testament are found in Paul's writings, where it can depict the evil one does unwillingly (Romans 7:15,17-20 ) and which becomes a law that rules him (7:21,23) and which can only be overcome by the grace of God through Christ (7:25).
The compounds and derivatives of the word poneros [ Matthew 7:11 ), the hardened Pharisees (Matthew 12:34 ), and the Jews as the evil generation (Matthew 12:39 ). In Matthew 7:17-18 , an "evil" tree bears "evil" fruit, whereas in 7:11 poneros [ Matthew 22:10 ) who will be judged in the final judgment (Matthew 13:49-50 ). Anyone who decides against Jesus is evil (2 Thessalonians 3:2 ; 2 Timothy 3:13 ). Particularly when used with the definite article it may serve as a sobriquet for Satan (Matthew 13:19 ; Mark 4:15 ; Luke 8:12 ).
Although its literal meaning is "lawlessness, " anomia [ Matthew 7:23 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:7 ).
Physical Evil . The denominative Hebrew root r with its derivatives ra [5], roa , and raa [6], is frequently used in the Old Testament to designate the physical aspect of the action, situation, or state as it appears to the one experiencing its effects.
What Is Harmful . This distinctive nuance of the root r may be clearly seen where one of the words listed above is used to designate something physically harmful and where no moral reference is clearly intended as primary. Examples of this are found in its use to describe poisonous herbs in Elisha's pot ( 2 Kings 4:41 ) and the bad water he heals (2 Kings 2:19 ). Closely allied to the latter are the "evil diseases" of Egypt (Deuteronomy 7:15 ) and the "evil diseases" of Ecclesiastes 6:2 . Similarly seen as harmful are the deadly sword of Psalm 144:10 and God's arrows in Ezekiel 5:16 . Dangerous animals capable of destroying human life are called "evil" (Genesis 37:20,33 ). God will remove them from Canaan (Leviticus 26:6 ), but will send them again to destroy rebellious Jerusalem (Ezekiel 5:17 ; cf. also Ezekiel 14:15 ), only to banish them again when Judah is restored from captivity (Ezekiel 34:25 ). Edomites are chided for gloating over the disaster of the destruction of Jerusalem, called "his [7] evil" (Obadiah 1:13 ).
What Is Subjectively Perceived . Jacob's assertion that "my years have been few and difficult [8]" (Genesis 47:9 ) may be interpreted as either subjective, wherein the "evil" indicates suffering, or objective, as a hyperbole of humility. However, in 1 Kings 22:8 and its parallel ( 2 Chronicles 18:12 ) the king of Israel (Ahab) answers Jehoshaphat of Judah, declaring that there is indeed a prophet of Yahweh about, adding peevishly, "But I hate him because he never prophesies anything good about me, but always bad [8]." That neither moral nor objective evil is intended is clear when the prophecy unfolds as a prediction of Ahab's death. The prophecy is evil to Ahab, for whom it bodes personal harm and by whom it must be subjectively received. Ahab recognizes this, and confirms this as what he intended when he had predicted an evil prophecy (22:18).
Almost as obvious as the preceding is the phrase an "evil name" found frequently throughout the Old Testament to designate an unsavory reputation. For example, the husband's charge of nonvirginity in his bride "gives her a bad [8] name" (Deuteronomy 22:14,19 ). Nehemiah denounces the hireling of Tobiah and Sanballat as one who wished to intimidate him and thus "give me a bad [8] name" (Nehemiah 6:13 ). The evil name does not indicate moral, objective evil (as, for instance, a blasphemous or lewd epithet or title), but a subjectively perceived harm. Similar is the "evil" report (NIV, "distressing words") of Exodus 33:4 , in which Moses reports to the people God's displeasure at calf-worship. An objective moral evil would require a foul, malevolent report. Instead, it describes the evaluation of God's reaction to Israel's idolatry and his decision not to go with them any longer. Nor is Joseph's evil report of his brothers objective, moral evil (Genesis 37:2 ), but a tale of their behavior that cast them in an unfavorable light. In Jeremiah 49:23 , Hamath and Arpad hear evil tidings about the fall of Damascusevil to them because Damascus was their ally and her fall portends their own fates.
The Teacher in Ecclesiastes calls the disappointing pursuit of wisdom a "heavy burden" (1:13) and repeats the words in 4:8 to describe the unfruitfulness of materialism. In 5:13 he calls selfishness a "grievous evil" (RSV). Finally, discipline is called evil in Proverbs 15:10 because it brings pain. A net is evil to the fish it catches (Eccel 9:12); misfortune is an evil to Solomon as its recipient ( 1 Kings 5:4 ; NIV "disaster" ).
To "be evil in someone's eyes, " or "to displease someone" can describe a woman slave who does not please her master (Exodus 21:8 ) and Esau's Canaanite (Hittite) wives who displeased Isaac (Genesis 28:8 ). In 1 Samuel 29:7 , Achish warns David against displeasing the lords of the Philistines. God's mercy to Nineveh displeased Jonah (4:1) because it embarrassed him; he felt its effects in losing face.
Appearance is another way in which a subjective notion is expressed by the words in question. Ecclesiastes 7:3 speaks of an "evil of countenance" to indicate a sad expression, as the context demonstrates. The Persian king asks Nehemiah, "Why are your faces evil, when you are not sick?" ( Nehemiah 2:2 ), or, "Why does your face look so sad when you are not ill?" (NIV ). Evil appearance denotes the poor quality of the cattle in Pharaoh's dream (Genesis 41:3,4,19,20,21,27 ); land (Numbers 13:19 ); and a bargaining session (Proverbs 20:14 ; [12] ). The figs in Jeremiah's vision were so "evil" they could not be eaten (24:2,3, 8; 29:17; they were of such poor quality that they were already in a state of decomposition that rendered them inedible).
Prosperity and adversity are also seen in terms of good and evil. When the people say to Jeremiah, "Whether it is good or evil, we will obey the voice of the Lord our God" (42:6 RSV), they are really saying, "For success or failure, we will obey."
Evil as the Responsibility of God . While moral evil is never imputed to God, there is often a connection made between Yahweh and ra [13], roa , and raa [14]. The classical reference, Isaiah 45:7 , wherein God is called creator of evil would then refer to physical destruction, rather than moral evil, as the parallel term "maker of peace" would seem to render conclusive. God's judgments are not moral evil, else they would hardly be called judgments, but are physical, and called evil because of the adverse effects.
When God is pictured as "bringing evil, " it is nearly always an invasion of Judah by a foreign power as exemplified in Jeremiah 4:6 , where the term clearly refers to the impending invasion of Judah by the Babylonians (similar are 1 Kings 9:9 ; 21:29 ; 2 Kings 21:12 ; 2 Chronicles 7:22 ; Jeremiah 6:19 ; 19:3,15 ; 36:31 ). Especially clear is Exodus 32:12 a, which says, referring to the exodus from Egypt, "it was with evil intent that he [15] brought them [13]9 out." Isaiah 31:2 predicts the failure of the alliance between Judah and Egypt, proclaiming God as the one who is wise and "brings evil, " that is, brings defeat to his enemies. Similarly, Amos 3:6 asks, assuming a negative answer, if evil befalls a city, unless the Lord has done it. The meaning is clear. If a city is captured by an enemy, God has ordained it. In each of the preceding cases, the context verifies the interpretation as physical evil, in these cases as experienced subjectively by the victim of the military action. Lamentations 3:38 declares that it is the decree of God that brings good and evil.
The "Evil Day" may likewise be resolved as a day on which something harmful occurs rather than a day evil in and of itself. For example, Jeremiah 17:16-18 indicates that the "day of evil" (RSV) is a day on which Yahweh judges those who are his enemies, in this case, those who persecute the prophet. The "evil day" of Amos 6:3 refers to the fall of Samaria and destruction of Israel as a judgment by God (for similar language for Judah, see Jeremiah 16:10 ). Similarly, the psalmist declares that God's chastening is designed to keep him from days of trouble (Psalm 94:13 ; 27:5 ; 49:5 ). In Ecclesiastes 12:1 , however, the phrase "evil days" alludes simply to old age, as the context shows.
For God to speak evil concerning someone (1 Kings 22:23 ) may mean passing sentence on him. Similar is Naomi's complaint that God has brought evil upon her (Ruth 1:21 ). Yahweh "brings evil" upon Absalom by defeating the counsel of Ahithophel (2 Samuel 17:14 ). The "evil" of which God repents in Jonah 3:9-10 is evil only to the Ninevites, for they would have felt its effects physically and subjectively. But objectively, the act would have been justice executed because of the immoral conduct of the Assyrians.
Saul's Evil Spirit . The evil spirit from Yahweh that plagued Saul (1 Samuel 16:14-16,23 ; 18:10 ; 19:9 ) may be considered as a spirit (disposition) sent by God that eventually destroyed Saul. The spirit, then, was God's instrument of judgment on Saul because of his rebellious attitude. Morally, the issue is justice, not evil. Similar is the evil spirit sent between Abimelech and the inhabitants of Shechem, which turns the Shechemites against him (Judges 9:23 ).
While the above cited evidence might lead one to conclude that all natural evil (disaster) is a judgment of God for some sort of evil committed by the afflicted party, the Bible will not bear this conclusion. Job and Ecclesiastes issue a sharp challenge to the doctrine of retribution in this life and John 9:1-3 repudiates it as a means of explaining all suffering.
Why Evil? The Bible does not answer the oft-posed problem of how a just, omnipotent, and loving God could permit evil to exist in a universe he had created. A detailed examination to this question lies outside the scope of this article. Some suggestions, however, that have been offered about moral evil are: (1) while God is perfect, creation is only pronounced "very good" (Genesis 1:31 ); it is impossible for a created universe to rival God in perfection and the existence of moral evil is one example of its imperfection; (2) to compel all beings to act morally is to override their free will; likewise, to grant them free moral agency is to concede the possibility that someone at some time will act in an evil manner; and (3) God in his infinite wisdom created the best of all possible worlds; one can only consider that, were the world created any other way it would have been less than the best of all possibilities. The latter consideration also holds true as a possible explanation for natural evil.
William C. Williams
See also Demon ; Sin
Bibliography . E. Achilles, NIDNTT, 1:561-67; M. Barker, Heythrop Journal 19 (1978): 12-27; K. H. Bernhardt, TDOT, 1:140-47; R. H. Bube, JASA 27:4 (1975): 171-80; G. R. Castellino, CBQ 30 (1968): 15-28; W. M. Clark, JBL (1989): 266-78; M. Dahood, Biblica 53 (1972): 386-403; G. I. Davies, VT 27 (1977): 105-10; J. E. Davison, JBL 104 (1985): 617-35; M. Ferg
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Evil Spirit
See Demon
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Origin of Evil
See Sin.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Evil Speaking
EVIL SPEAKING in the Bible covers sins of untruthfulness as well as of malice. It includes abuse, thoughtless talebearing, imputing of bad motives, slander, and deliberate false witness. Warnings against it are frequent; it is forbidden in the legislation of the OT (Ninth Commandment; Deuteronomy 19:16-19 ) and of the NT ( Matthew 5:22 ; Matthew 12:32 ; Matthew 15:19 ). Christians must expect this form of persecution ( Matthew 5:11 ), but must be careful to give no handle to it ( Romans 14:16 , Titus 2:8 , 1 Peter 2:12 ; 1 Peter 3:16 ).
C. W. Emmet.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Spirit, Evil
See Demon
Webster's Dictionary - Evil Eye
See Evil eye under Evil, a.
Webster's Dictionary - Evil-Favored
(a.) Having a bad countenance or appearance; ill-favored; blemished; deformed.
Webster's Dictionary - Evil-Minded
(a.) Having evil dispositions or intentions; disposed to mischief or sin; malicious; malignant; wicked.
Webster's Dictionary - Evil-Eyed
(a.) Possessed of the supposed evil eye; also, looking with envy, jealousy, or bad design; malicious.
Webster's Dictionary - Evil
(1):
(n.) Moral badness, or the deviation of a moral being from the principles of virtue imposed by conscience, or by the will of the Supreme Being, or by the principles of a lawful human authority; disposition to do wrong; moral offence; wickedness; depravity.
(2):
(a.) Having qualities tending to injury and mischief; having a nature or properties which tend to badness; mischievous; not good; worthless or deleterious; poor; as, an evil beast; and evil plant; an evil crop.
(3):
(a.) Having or exhibiting bad moral qualities; morally corrupt; wicked; wrong; vicious; as, evil conduct, thoughts, heart, words, and the like.
(4):
(a.) Producing or threatening sorrow, distress, injury, or calamity; unpropitious; calamitous; as, evil tidings; evil arrows; evil days.
(5):
(n.) Anything which impairs the happiness of a being or deprives a being of any good; anything which causes suffering of any kind to sentient beings; injury; mischief; harm; - opposed to good.
(6):
(n.) malady or disease; especially in the phrase king's evil, the scrofula.
(7):
(adv.) In an evil manner; not well; ill; badly; unhappily; injuriously; unkindly.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Labourer With the Evil Eye
AESOP'S dog in the manger, and our Lord's labourer with the evil eye, are two companion portraits. Æsop's famous fable taught the very same lesson in ancient Greece that our Lord's present parable taught to Israel in His own day, and still teaches to Christendom in our day.
But before we come to that, there are one or two preliminary lessons that we are intended to learn from the very framework, so to call it, of this parable. And to begin with, let us look well at this unheard-of husbandman. For the like of this husbandman has never been seen before nor since in Galilee, nor in Jewry, nor in Samaria, nor anywhere else. This singular husbandman plants and reaps his vineyard less for the sake of his vines, than for the sake of his vinedressers. This so altruistic husbandman, as we would call him, occupies his vineyard not at all for his own advantage, but for the sole advantage of his labourers. Their well-being is better to him than all the wine they will ever produce. Indeed, and to let out the whole truth at once, this husbandman is a perfect portrait of God the Father, drawn by the skilful and loving hand of God the Son. My Father is the husbandman, says our Lord in another parable. And it must be so here also. For no other husbandman in all the world ever went out at all hours of the day to hire his labourers, and at the same wages. No other husbandman could afford to pay for one hour's work in the evening of the day as much as he pays for the burden and heat of the whole day. No; this husbandman's portrait is no pure invention of our Lord's sanctified genius, as some of His other portraits are. This is no original stroke of our Lord's holy and fruitful imagination. This is as real and as genuine a likeness as is the likeness of the snarling labourer himself. Only, the snarling and snapping labourer is a likeness taken from this envious and spiteful earth. Whereas this husbandman is the speaking likeness of Heavenly Love. My Father is the husbandman.
"Which went out early in the morning to hire labourers into his vineyard." Ah, me! With what a sharp stroke does that incidental-looking statement come home to those of us the morning of whose days is now long past! For we remember well how God came to us early in our life, and before we had as yet hired ourselves out to other masters. O young people, if you would only believe it! If we could only put our old hearts into your young bosoms! How fast you would fall in with the husbandman's earliest offer! And what a life of blows, and starvation, and all kinds of cruel usage, would you thus escape! Satisfy our children, O Lord, early with Thy mercy, that they may rejoice and be glad in Thee all their days.
But of all the hours of this husbandman's labourer-hiring days it is His eleventh hour that comes most home to my own heart. It is His eleventh hour that makes all us old men to exclaim-Who is a God like unto Thee! Whether any young people will be won to God through this scripture tonight, I do not know. But I will answer for some of the old. For He came to us also at the first hour of the day, and at the third hour of the day, and at the sixth hour, and at the ninth hour. But if He will still take us at the eleventh hour, we are His on the spot. The holy child Samuel, and many more early-called, and early-employed, children of God have had their own long and happy lives of highly rewarded labour. But the thought of all such holy and happy labourers is a positive hindrance and stumbling-block to us. All such wise and good men are a rebuke to us rather than an encouragement. It is the thief on the cross who, of all saved men, is our especial example. The thief on the cross was the great eleventh-hour labourer of our Lord's day, and we come into the vineyard with him. At the end of our evil life we come with him. When the sins of our youth, and all our sins, have found us out we come with him. When the wages of our life-long service of sin has become death to us also we come with him. When this mocking taunt is thrown in our teeth,-What fruit have ye now of those things of which ye are now ashamed? we come with him. Those who are still in the early morning of their days have never heard of the thief on the cross. They have never once read his so heart-encouraging history. It is not yet written for their learning. Not till they are as old as we are will they be able to read the thief's so heartening history as we read it. But it is now the eleventh hour with us as it was with him, and we come with him. Since God takes the bitterest dregs of our sinful lives, and, like this husbandman, pays so altruistically for them, we come. Take us, O God; O do Thou take us. And where our sin has abounded, let Thy grace much more abound.
Is thine eye evil? said the good husbandman to the murmuring labourer. Now, an "evil eye" is just our old Bible English for the Latin word "invidia." Is thine heart so selfish and so envious as that? was what our Lord said to this man who could not enjoy his own wages for grudging and growling at his neighbour's wages. Æsop's dog in the manger had his own bone, and he did not deny that it was both a big and a sweet bone. But he was such a hound at heart that he could not see his master's ox beginning to munch his bottle of straw in his manger without snarling and snapping at him. And no more did this dog of a labourer complain that his wages were not quite enough for all the work he had done. All his unhappiness lay in this that his neighbour had so much wages to take home with him that night to his happy wife and children. He did not complain that he was underpaid himself. All his misery came from this, that his fellow-servant was so much overpaid. Both Æsop's dog, and our Lord's dog-like labourer, were sick of that strange disease,-their neighbour's health. This wretched creature was so full of an evil eye that every one must have seen it. Even if he hadheld his peace every one must have seen his evil heart running out of his eye. Even if you were a perfect stranger to me; even if I had never seen you before, I would undertake to tell to all men the name of the man you both envy and hate, if I were near enough to see your eye when your rival is being praised and rewarded in your presence. Nay, I would know it from the very tone of your voice; aye, from the very cough in your throat. For envy, like love, will out. And, as our Lord is always saying to us, it will out at the eye. "As to the motive of those attacks on Goethe," says Heine, "I know at least what it was in my own case. It was my evil eye." Now, who is your Goethe? Who is your fellow-labourer in your special line of life? "Potter envies potter," says Aristotle. Who is your companion-potter? And do you have the self-knowledge that even poor Heine had, to say to yourself every day-'As for these dislikes, and aversions, and antipathies, that I feel in my heart; as well as for these depreciations and contempts that pass continually through my tongue and my pen; I know what their motive is in my own case at least, it is in my own evil eye.'
Envy so parched my blood, that had I seenA fellow man made joyous, thou hadst mark'dA livid paleness overspread my cheek.Such harvest reap I of the seed I sow'd.O man, why place thy heart where there doth needExclusion of participants in good?If he is rightly reported, a Greek commentator who bears a great name makes a very shallow remark at this point. He says that it is difficult for him to believe that any man who is really within the kingdom of heaven himself, and is in its service, and is receiving its rewards, could have an evil eye at another man for his work and for his wages in that kingdom. A more stupid remark never fell from an able man's pen. A more senseless and self-exposing annotation was never made. A young friend of Mr. George Meredith's once came to him in an agony of pain and shame. "This is too bad of you!" he cried. "Willoughby is me!" "No, my dear fellow," said the great writer, "Willoughby is all of us." And in like manner, instead of it being difficult to believe that there was ever such a dog in the manger as this murmuring labourer, we are all such dogs, and he who does not know and confess it-the shell is yet on his head. Yes, Willoughby is all of us. The truth is, an evil eye, like this labourer's evil eye, is not only in all our hearts, but it is the agony of every truly good man's heart that it is so: it is very hell itself to every truly good man's heart that it is so: to every man's heart who is so much as even beginning to know what true goodness really is. Instead of there being no envy among the disciples of Jesus Christ, and among those who labour in His Father's vineyard, as this stupid old annotator would have us believe; instead of that, the true hellishness of envy is never tasted by any man till he is far up in the kingdom of heaven, and is full of its mind and spirit. Dante was far up on his way to Paradise when the fine dialogue on envy and on love took place. Dante sounds his deepest depths in his heart-searching cantos on envy, even as his most seraphic flights are taken in his cantos on love.
"Behold we have forsaken all, and followed Thee; what shall we have therefore?" That miserable speech of Peter's, which gave occasion to this parable, utterly vitiated all Peter's previous work for his Master, however hard he had worked, and however much he had forsaken for his Master's cause. For it is yet another of the absolute principles of this noble vineyard that it is motive in its labourers that counts with its Master. It is motive alone that counts with Him, far more than strength, or skill, or early morning promptitude and punctuality, in His labourers. Unless all these admirable qualities are informed and animated by the right motives, they all go for next to nothing in this so singular and so spiritual vineyard. "An unexamined life is no true life at all," Socrates kept saying continually, as he both examined his own motives every day and set all other men on the daily examination of their own motives. We know from Peter's own mouth what his motives had been in his discipleship up till now. And Peter's shame is told us here that we may see our own shame in our own motives also and up till now. Why, then, do I do this and that work in the vineyard? Why do I study? Why do I preach? Why do I visit the sick and dying? Why am I an elder? Why am I a deacon? Why do I subscribe to this fund and that? Why am I a Sabbath-school teacher? And why am I a member of this church rather than of that? It is our mean and self-seeking motives that lurk so unexamined in our hearts that make us all so many dogs in the manger, and so many envious and murmuring labourers in the vineyard. And as it was at Peter and his miserable motives that his Master levelled this parable, so it is at us and at our miserable motives, and at the miserable envies and jealousies that spring out of our miserable motives, that He levels this same parable in this house tonight.
And now in summing up our Lord adds this noble lesson to all His other noble lessons in this noble and ennobling scripture. Many are called, He adds, but few are chosen. Take them all together, He says; take those called at the first hour of the day, and those called at the third hour, and those called at the sixth hour, and those called at the ninth hour, and those called at the eleventh hour-when they are all counted up-many are called. But, with all that, the chosen men; the truly choice spirits even among the men who are called; the men who are sincere and single in their motives; the men who are full of humility about themselves, and about their work, and about their wages; the men who are so full of brotherly love that they have no evil eye left at their brother's good work or good wages, but who rather rejoice in all the good things that fall to their brother-labourer's lot-such men are not many even in the vineyard of heaven itself. There are many in that vineyard who say with Peter-What shall we have, therefore? But they are few who work at all hours of the day, and still receive their wages at night with pain and shame, and say to themselves that they are the most unprofitable of all their fellow-servants. They are the few, even among God's true servants, who continually look on all they receive and possess as so many proofs of His singular and unparalleled grace and goodness to themselves. They are the few who so think and so feel and so speak; but, then, they are the very finest and the very choicest of all His saints. They are the elect of His elect. Their true place on earth is in such a noble vineyard as this, and they are the true servants of such a noble Master as this. My brethren, at whatever hour you enter this vineyard, early or late, work all your days in this fine and noble spirit. So work for your Master, and so love your neighbour as yourself, that you may be found at last, not only among the many called, but among the few chosen.
King James Dictionary - Evil
E'VIL, a. e'vl. Heb. to be unjust or injurious, to defraud.
1. Having bad qualities of a natural kind mischievous having qualities which tend to injury, or to produce mischief. Some evil beast hath devoured him. Genesis 37
2. Having bad qualities of a moral kind wicked corrupt perverse wrong as evil thoughts evil deeds evil speaking an evil generation. 3. Unfortunate unhappy producing sorrow, distress, injury or calamity as evil tidings evil arrows evil days. E'VIL, n. Evil is natural or moral. Natural evil is any thing which produces pain, distress, loss or calamity, or which in any way disturbs the peace, impairs the happiness, or destroys the perfection of natural beings.
Moral evil is any deviation of a moral agent from the rules of conduct prescribed to him by God, or by legitimate human authority or it is any violation of the plain principles of justice and rectitude.
There are also evils called which affect injuriously the peace or prosperity of a city or state and political evils, which injure a nation, in its public capacity.
All wickedness, all crimes, all violations of law and right are moral evils. Diseases are natural evils, but they often proceed from moral evils.
2. Misfortune mischief injury. There shall no evil befall thee. Psalms 91
A prudent man foreseeth the evil, and hideth himself. Proverbs 22
3. Depravity corruption of heart, or disposition to commit wickedness malignity. The heart of the sons of men is full of evil. Ecclesiastes 9
4. Malady as the king's evil or scrophula. E'VIL, adv. generally contracted to
1. Not well not with justice or propriety unsuitable. Evil it beseems thee.
2. Not virtuously not innocently. 3. Not happily unfortunately. It went evil with his house.
4. Injuriously not kindly. The Egyptians evil entreated us, and afflicted us.
In composition, evil, denoting something bad or wrong, is often contracted to
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Evil Spirits
EVIL SPIRITS . As a natural synonym for demons or devils, this phrase is used in the NT only by St. Luke ( Luke 7:21 ; Luke 8:2 , Acts 19:12-13 ; Acts 19:15-16 ), and presents no difficulty. But in the OT, especially the historical books, reference is made to an evil spirit as coming from or sent by God; and the context invests this spirit with personality. The treachery of the men of Shechem is so explained ( Judges 9:23 ), though in this case the spirit may not be personal but merely a temper or purpose of ill-will. Elsewhere there is not the same ground for doubt: ‘an evil spirit from the Lord’ is the alleged cause of Saul’s moodiness ( 1 Samuel 16:14 , where notice the antithetical ‘the spirit of the Lord’), and of his raving against David ( 1 Samuel 18:10 ; 1 Samuel 19:9 ). Similarly Micaiah speaks of ‘a lying spirit’ from God ( 1 Kings 22:21-23 , 2 Chronicles 18:20-23 ). It has been suggested that in all these cases the reference is to God Himself as exerting power, and effecting good or evil in men according to the character of each. The nearest approach to this is perhaps in Exodus 12:13 ; Exodus 12:23 , where Jehovah and the destroyer are apparently identified, though the language admits equally of the view that the destroyer is the agent of Jehovah’s will (cf. 2 Samuel 24:16 ). But the theory is inconsistent with what is known to have been the current demonology of the day (see Devil), as well as with the natural suggestion of the phrases. These spirits are not represented as constituting the personal energy of God, but as under His control, which was direct and active according to some of the writers, but only permissive according to others. The fact of God’s control is acknowledged by all, and is even a postulate of Scripture; and in using or permitting the activity of these spirits God is assumed or asserted to be punishing people for their sins. In this sense He has ‘a band of angels of evil’ ( Psalms 78:49 ), who may yet he called ‘angels of the Lord’ ( 2 Kings 19:35 , Isaiah 37:36 ), as carrying out His purposes. Micaiah evidently considered Zedekiah as used by God in order to entice Ahab to his merited doom. Ezekiel propounds a similar view ( Isaiah 14:9 ), that a prophet may be deceived by God, and so made the means of his own destruction and of that of his dupes, much as David was moved to number Israel through the anger of the Lord against the people ( 2 Samuel 24:1 ). As the conception of God developed and was purified, the permitted action of some evil spirit is substituted for the Divine activity, whether direct or through the agency of messengers, considered as themselves ethically good but capable of employment on any kind of service. Accordingly the Chronicler represents Satan as the instigator of David ( 1 Chronicles 21:1 ). Jeremiah denies the inspiration of lying prophets, and makes them entirely responsible for their own words and influence ( 1 Chronicles 23:16 ; 1 Chronicles 23:21 ; 1 Chronicles 23:25 f.); they are not used by God, and will be called to account. They speak out of their own heart, and are so far from executing God’s justice or anger upon the wicked that He interposes to check them, and to protect men from being misled.
An evil spirit, therefore, wherever the phrase occurs in a personal sense in the earlier historical books of the OT, must be thought of simply as an angel or messenger of God, sent for the punishment of evil (cf. 1 Samuel 19:9 RVm [1] ). His coming to a man was a sign that God’s patience with him was approaching exhaustion, and a prelude of doom. Gradually the phrase was diverted from this use to denote a personal spirit, the ‘demon’ of the NT margin, essentially evil and working against God, though powerless to withdraw entirely from His rule.
R. W. Moss.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Evil
Moral rebellion against God. It is contrary to the will of God. There is natural evil (floods, storms, famines, etc.) and moral evil (adultery, murder, idolatry, etc.). Natural evil is a result of moral evil. Adam's sin resulted in sin entering the world allowing floods, storms, famines, etc. Evil originated with Satan (Isaiah 14:12-15) and is carried on by man (Matthew 15:18-19). (See Theodicy.)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Evil One
EVIL ONE.—See preced. art. and Lord’s Prayer and Satan.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Evil Spirit
EVIL SPIRIT.—See Demon.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Evil (2)
EVIL.—It is customary to distinguish three kinds of evil: (1) what Leibnitz called metaphysical evil, i.e. the incompleteness and imperfection which belong more or less to all created things; (2) physical evil, i.e. pain, suffering, and death; and (3) moral evil, which is a vicious choice of a morally responsible being.
1. Metaphysical evil.—The writers of the OT were, for the most part, deeply impressed with the doctrine of God’s transcendence; i.e. His unique and unapproachable majesty, power, and holiness. Hence the nothingness and transitoriness of all earthly and visible things are a constant theme with them: ‘Behold, heaven and the heaven of heavens cannot contain thee,’ etc. (1 Kings 8:27); ‘What is man that thou art mindful of him?’ etc. (Psalms 8:4); ‘All flesh is grass,’ etc. (Isaiah 40:6); ‘The inhabitants of the earth are as grasshoppers’ (Isaiah 40:22). Compared with God’s ineffable holiness, the holiest of created beings are, as it were, unclean. In heaven the holy angels veil their faces in God’s presence (Isaiah 6:2). The holy sanctuary of Israel required to be purged every year from its pollutions by the blood of sacrifices (Leviticus 16:16). All human righteousnesses are as a polluted garment (Isaiah 64:6).
In the NT there is naturally less stress laid upon the Divine transcendence. The theme of the NT writers is the love of God shown in the Incarnation. The eternal Son of God has taken upon Him human nature, to raise it into fellowship with God, to clothe it with the garment of the Divine righteousness, and to cause it to partake of the Divine immortality. Yet the awful and unapproachable character of God, and the infinite abyss which separates the Creator from the highest creature, are never lost sight of. He alone is the Absolute Good (Mark 10:18); He alone may lawfully be worshipped (Mark 12:29; Mark 12:32, Revelation 19:10).
2. Physical evil.
(1) Optimism and pessimism.—Christianity may be classed philosophically as a moderate optimism. It is not an extravagant optimism, like that of Leibnitz, who maintained that this is the best of all possible worlds, or of Malebranche, who regarded it as the best conceivable. Christ would certainly not have endorsed the hyperboles of Pope, that all discord is harmony not understood, and all partial evil universal good; yet He must certainly be classed among the most pronounced teachers of optimism. As against all forms of Gnosticism and Dualism, He maintained that the Universe, in all its parts, is the work of a perfectly good Creator, and that, in spite of all appearances to the contrary, it is under the guidance of His fatherly Providence: ‘Behold the fowls of the air,’ etc. (Matthew 6:26); ‘Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing?’ etc. (Matthew 10:29); ‘He maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good,’ etc. (Matthew 5:45). The optimism of Jesus is particularly evident in His eschatology. He taught that in the end good will triumph over evil, and evil be absolutely excluded from the Universe: ‘In the end of the world the Son of man shall send forth his angels,’ etc. (Matthew 13:41, cf. Matthew 24:31; Matthew 25:30; Matthew 25:41). He believed that there is a glorious goal to which the whole creation is moving. In one passage He calls it Creation’s new birth (παλινγενεσία, Matthew 19:28); but His usual term for it is the ‘Kingdom of God’ (or of Heaven): ‘Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father’ (Matthew 13:43). For the coming of this Kingdom every Christian is directed to pray (Matthew 6:10) and to watch (Matthew 24:42, Matthew 25:13). That the material Universe will be glorified along with the spiritual is not distinctly stated by Jesus, but is a necessary inference from the doctrine of the resurrection of the body, which was undoubtedly held by Him (Matthew 5:29; Matthew 10:28 etc.), though in a more spiritual form than was generally current (Matthew 22:30).
(2) Pain, sorrow, disease, and death.—The Gospels lend no countenance to the view that moral evil is the only genuine evil, and that physical evil is not evil in the strict and proper sense. Pain, sorrow, disease, and death were regarded by Jesus as things which ought not to be, and He spent much of the time of His public ministry in combating them: ‘He went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed with the devil: for God was with him’ (Acts 10:38). He committed the ministry of healing to the Apostles and other believers: ‘Preach, saying, The kingdom of heaven is at hand. Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out devils; freely ye have received, freely give’ (Matthew 10:7). Death was regarded by Jesus as in an especial sense ‘the enemy.’ Its ravages affected Him with acute distress (ἐνεβριμήσατο τῷ πνεύματι καὶ ἐτάραξεν ἑαυτόν … ἑδάκρυσεν, John 11:33 ff., where consult the commentators). Three of His most striking recorded miracles were victories over death (Mark 5:41, Luke 7:14, John 11:43); and His own resurrection, according to the energetie expression of the Apostle, ‘abolished death, and brought life and incorruption to light’ (2 Timothy 1:10).
As to the causation of physical evil, there is a great difference of point of view between the OT and the NT. The OT upon the whole (Job 1:2. is an exception) regards physical evil as inflicted directly by God. According to the NT, however, physical evil is mainly the work of the devil. God tolerates, permits, and overrules, rather than directly inflicts it. Pain and disease and death belong to the devil’s kingdom, not to God’s; and their universal prevalence is a sign of the usurped authority over the human race of ‘the prince of this world.’ The preaching of the Kingdom of God and the emancipation of mankind from the devil’s thraldom were consequently accompanied by an extensive ministry of healing, and Christ appealed to His miracles as evidence that ‘the kingdom of God is come upon you’ (Luke 11:20). The NT does not, however, deny that physical evil is often inflicted by God for disciplinary or retributive purposes. Hebrews 12:6 lays especial stress upon the wholesome chastening of affliction which all the sons of God receive. Examples of penal or retributive affliction are Matthew 9:2 (palsy), Matthew 23:35 (war and massacre), John 5:14 (constitutional infirmity), Acts 5:5 (death), Acts 13:11 (blindness). Jesus, however, strongly protested against the idea that every calamity is to be regarded as a punishment for individual sin. This specially Jewish idea, which Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar develop at length in the Book of Job, is definitely condemned (Luke 13:4, John 9:3).
3. Moral evil.
(1) Its nature and origin.—The only possible way of accounting for moral evil without making God the author of it, is to attribute it to the abuse of free will on the part of created beings, angelic, or human, or both. The doctrine of free will has been severely criticised in all ages by the advocates of philosophical and theological necessity; but it has, notwithstanding, held its ground, and is at the present time the faith of all the most progressive races of mankind. That it was held by Jesus does not admit of reasonable doubt. Thus He habitually spoke of the power which men possess to resist God and to frustrate His benevolent intentions: ‘O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, … how often would I (ἠθέλησα) … and ye would not’ (καὶ οὐκ ἠθελήσατε, Luke 13:34; cf. John 5:40, Matthew 11:20 ff.). His general invitations to all men to be saved imply the same doctrine: ‘Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest’ (Matthew 11:28); ‘And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto myself’ (John 12:32).
The reality of Christ’s Libertarianism is not disproved by certain passages in the Gospels which seem at first sight to speak the language of Predestination, or even of Determinism (John 6:37; John 6:39, Matthew 26:24 etc.). Predestination was not so held in Christ’s time as to exclude free will. Josephus says of the Pharisees: ‘When they say that all things happen by fate, they do not take away from men the freedom of acting as they think fit; since their notion is that it hath pleased God to mix up the decrees of fate and man’s will, so that man can act virtuously and viciously’ (Ant. xviii. i. 3).
Jesus accordingly attributed the origin of evil not to the will of God, but to the perversity of God’s creatures. Mankind, according to Him, is in rebellion against God; but the whole guilt of rebellion is not his. Before man existed, there were myriads of finite spirits, higher in the order of creation than he, and of these some fell from their original innocence and became devils. The chief of these, Satan, is ever seeking to seduce the human race from its allegiance to its Creator, and is therefore emphatically called ‘the tempter’ (ὁ πειράζων, Matthew 4:3, 1 Thessalonians 3:5), and the slayer of men (ἀνθρωποκτόνος, John 8:44). This last is the one certain allusion to the fall of Satan to be found in the Gospels (Luke 10:18 is doubtful). From it we learn that he once existed in a state of innocence (ἐν τῇ ἀληθείᾳ), but did not persist in it (reading οὐκ ἔστηκεν with WH [1] ).
The position of Satan in the Universe is so exalted, and the power ascribed to him in the NT so great (cf. esp. Matthew 4:8, John 14:30), that some have regarded Jesus as a Dualist. But the authority attributed to Satan in the NT, though great, is subordinate. The devils recognize the power of Jesus, and come out at His word (Mark 1:24; Mark 1:34; Mark 3:11 etc.). If Satan is ‘the strong man,’ there is a Stronger, who can bind him and spoil his goods (Matthew 12:29). At the Temptation the devil acknowledged that his power is a delegated one (ἑμοὶ παραδεδοται, Luke 4:8). His kingdom will surely come to an end; in fact its fall has already been virtually secured by the Passion and Resurrection of Jesus (John 12:31). His final punishment has been determined, and it will be fully adequate to his delinquency (Matthew 25:41).
(2) Original sin.—There is no recorded teaching of Jesus about original sin. He recognized the fall of man (John 8:44), and the general sinfulness of the human race (Matthew 7:11); but how He connected these two facts does not appear. It may, perhaps, be argued from John 9:1-3, that He would not have approved of any theory of original sin which regarded men as obnoxious to punishment from God merely because of an ancestral taint that they could not help inheriting. See, further, artt. Sin and Eternal Punishment.
Literature.—Athanasius, contra Gentes; Augustine, Antipelagian Treatises, etc.; Origen, de Principiis (esp. i. 5, 6); J. Muller, The Christian Doctrine of Sin (translation); Momerie, The Origin of Evil; Naville, The Problem of Evil (translation); Butler, Analogy; Le Conte, Evolution, ix.; Fairbairn, The Philosophy of the Christian Religion, i. 3, 4: Tennant, The Origin and Propagation of Sin; and The Fall and Original Sin; Bull, The State of Man before the Fall; Paley, Natural Theology, xxvi.; Harris, pro Fide, xiv; A. Moore, Science and the Faith, and Essays, i., iii., and Oxford House Papers, vol. ii.; artt. ‘Sin’ and ‘Fall’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; Dixie, ‘The Necessity of Pain’ in Oxford House Papers; E. A. Abbott, The Kernel and the Husk, ix.; S. Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian. The subject is discussed in most systematic treatises on theology, ethics, and metaphysics.
C. Harris.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Evil-Speaking
In Greek, as in English, there is a rich vocabulary expressive of different shades of this prevalent sin.
(1) καταλαλεῖν is ‘to speak down,’ ‘to detract.’ κατάλαλοι is translated ‘backbiters’ (Romans 1:30), and καταλαλίαι ‘backbitings’ (2 Corinthians 12:20), but evil-speaking does not necessarily take place behind the back, or in the absence of the person hated. κατάλαλοι form one of the many types which are the outcome of the reprobate mind (Romans 1:30), and Christian converts, as new-born babes, must put away all καταλαλίαι (1 Peter 2:1-2; cf. James 4:11). The best people in the world cannot escape the breath of detraction, and in the Apostolic Age the Christians were regarded as ‘genus hominum superstitionis novae et maleficae’ (Suet. Nero, 16), accused of ‘odium generis humani’ (Tac. Ann. xv. 44), and suspected of committing the most infamous crimes in their secret assemblies. In such an atmosphere of calumny they made it their endeavour to live in such a manner that their detractors should not only be put to shame (1 Peter 3:16), but even constrained by their good works to glorify God (1 Peter 2:12; cf. Matthew 5:16).
(2) βλασφημεῖν (βλάσφημος, βλασφημία) is a stronger term, including all kinds of evil-speaking against men as well as against God. In a number of passages it is difficult to decide whether ‘blaspheme’ or ‘rail’ is the precise meaning of the word (Acts 13:45; Acts 18:6; Acts 26:11 etc.). St. Paul has a full share of βλασφημία; he is ‘evil spoken of’ (1 Corinthians 10:30) and ‘slanderously reported’ (Romans 3:8). While the Gentiles speak evil of the followers of Christ (1 Peter 4:4), the latter must calumniate no man (Titus 3:2); railing (βλασφημία) is one of the sins of temper and tongue which they are repeatedly enjoined to put away (Ephesians 4:31, Colossians 3:8). At the same time they must strive to prevent their ‘good,’ or ‘the word of God,’ or ‘the way of truth,’ or ‘the name of God and the doctrine,’ from being blasphemed, or evil spoken of (Romans 14:16, Titus 2:5, 2 Peter 2:2, 1 Timothy 6:1), St. Paul affirms that the name of God is blasphemed among the Gentiles because of the Jews (Romans 2:24). The false teachers and libertines of the sub-Apostolic Age spoke evil of the powers of the unseen world (2 Peter 2:10, Judges 1:10); and their empty logomachies gave rise to mutual railings (βλασφημίαι, 1 Timothy 6:4). See, further, article Blasphemy.
(3) διἀβολος (from διαβάλλω, Luke 16:1), which denotes, κατʼ ἐξοχήν, the ‘chief slanderer,’ or ‘devil,’ is applied also to any ordinary calumniator. Women who are called to the office of the diaconate must not be slanderers (1 Timothy 3:11), and the same applies to aged women who are to influence the younger by their words and example (Titus 2:3). In grievous post-apostolic times, which seemed the last, many bad types of character became prominent, including διάβολοι (2 Timothy 3:3).
(4) λοιδορεῖν (a word of uncertain derivation) is invariably translated ‘revile’ in the Revised Version , whereas the Authorized Version has ‘rail’ and ‘speak reproachfully’ as variations. St. Paul says of the apostles that being reviled they bless (1 Corinthians 4:12); that the so-called brother who is a reviler (λοίδορος) is to be shunned (1 Corinthians 5:11); and that revilers shall not inherit the Kingdom of God (1 Corinthians 6:10). For seeming to revile the high priest Ananias in a moment of just anger, St. Paul was quick to make apology (Acts 24:4). In a time of persecution St. Peter turns the minds of his readers to the perfect example of Christ, who, being reviled, reviled not again (1 Peter 2:23), and bids them render, as He did, ‘contrariwise blessing’ (1 Peter 3:9).
(5) Analagous terms are κακολογεῖν, ‘to speak evil of’ (Acts 19:9), ἀντιλέγειν, ‘to speak against’ (Acts 28:22), and δυσφημία, ‘evil report,’ which the servant of Christ learns to accept, equally with εὐφημία, as part of his lot (2 Corinthians 6:8). ‘Being defamed (δυσφημούμενοι), we bless’ (1 Corinthians 4:13).
James Strahan.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Evil
This article is not a study of the word ‘evil’ as substantive, adjective, or adverb in the two senses of ‘bad’ and ‘hurtful,’ for which the use of a concordance may suffice; but of the conception of evil in the apostolic writings. Three senses of the term have been distinguished by Leibniz: metaphysical-the necessary imperfection of the creature as compared with the Creator; physical-pain, suffering, sorrow, death; and moral-sin. Although the NT does assert the difference between God and the world and man, and the inferiority of the made to the Maker, it does not conceive creatureliness as itself evil, but expresses its limitation and impotence in the term ‘flesh,’ For this aspect see article Flesh. The article Sin deals with the third sense of the word ‘evil.’ It is thus with physical evil alone that we are here concerned. Its existence in manifold forms is assumed by all the apostolic writers; but generally it is with the sufferings of Christian believers, including persecution, that they are concerned, in order to encourage patience, offer comfort, or assure deliverance.
What these sorrows were, Paul’s account of his own experience shows (Acts 20:18-35, 2 Corinthians 1:3-11; 2 Corinthians 6:4-10; 2 Corinthians 11:23-33; cf. Romans 8:35-36). This experience is regarded as a sharing of Christ’s sufferings (2 Corinthians 1:5, 1 Corinthians 15:24-28,20), and even as a completion of that suffering for the good of the Church (Colossians 1:24). ‘Paul does not claim to fill up the defects in Christ’s earthly suffering or in the sufferings of the Church, but in the sufferings which he has to endure in his flesh, which are Christ’s sufferings, because he and Christ are one’ (Peake, Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘Col.,’ 1903, p. 515). Suffering is a means of entering into closer fellowship with Christ (Philippians 3:10). As suffering was a condition of perfecting Christ Himself for His work (Hebrews 2:10; Hebrews 2:14-15; Hebrews 4:15; Hebrews 5:8-9; Hebrews 7:28), so also it perfects Christian character if properly endured (Romans 5:3, 1 Thessalonians 1:3, Hebrews 10:36, 1 Peter 5:10). It is to be regarded not as penal, but as chastening (Hebrews 12:7-11, James 1:2-4; James 5:11). It cannot separate from the love of God (Romans 8:35-39), and it prepares for, and secures, the glory hereafter (Ephesians 3:13, Revelation 7:14), with which it is not worthy to be compared (Romans 8:18), since the companions of Christ’s sufferings will also be the partners of His reign (Romans 8:17, 2 Corinthians 1:5, Philippians 3:10, 2 Timothy 2:11-13, 1 Peter 4:13). Of all evils death is regarded as the greatest, and in Paul we find a painful shrinking from it (2 Corinthians 5:1-8); accordingly, it is evident how precious a comfort was the Christian hope of immortality and resurrection (Romans 8:23-25). Since death is regarded as the penalty of sin (Romans 5:12-21; Romans 6:21-23, 1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:56), the salvation in Christ includes deliverance from death for the believer, and finally the abolition of death (1618170215_4 2 Timothy 1:10) and all other evils (Revelation 21:4). Behind death, sin, and all evil, the Apostolic Church saw the devil and other powers of wickedness (Ephesians 4:27, 1 Thessalonians 3:5, Hebrews 2:14, James 4:7, 1 Peter 5:8, 1 John 5:19, Revelation 12:9), and accordingly Christ’s work, especially His death (Colossians 2:15), was regarded as a victory over all evil powers (1 John 3:8).
This teaching is for the most part experimental and practical, and can still minister comfort and encouragement to the Christian believer. There are two speculative elements in it which modern Christian faith cannot unquestioningly accept-the connexion of death with sin as its penalty, and the existence of the devil and other evil powers. As regards the first point, the writer ventures to repeat a few sentences he has written elsewhere. ‘It is generally admitted that death is a natural necessity for animal organisms such as man’s, and that before man was in the world death prevailed. It seems vain to justify Paul by speculations such as these: that God anticipating sin introduced death into the natural order as a. penalty already prepared for sin, or that, had man preserved his innocence, he might have risen above this natural necessity. Paul’s interest is primarily in the moral character and the religious consciousness. What he was concerned with was man’s sense of the mystery and dread of the desolation of death, man’s looking for judgment after death. In such totality, including what man thinks of, and feels about, death, surely Paul’s view of the connexion between sin and death is not altogether false. It is man’s sense of guilt that invests death with its terror (1 Corinthians 15:56). Nor are we warranted in saying that conscience here is playing tricks on man, frightening him with illusions. If there he indeed a moral order in the world, an antagonism of God to sin, and if, as there is reason to believe, there is a moral continuity between this life and the next, such a change as death is may he conceived as fraught with moral significance, as introducing the soul into such conditions as have been determined by the judgment of God on the moral character of this life’ (Studies of Paul and his Gospel, 1911, pp. 146-7). As regards the second point, one sentence regarding Paul will suffice. ‘In his cosmology, angelology, and demonology, as well as his eschatology, he remains essentially Jewish’ (op. cit. p. 17); and this is equally true of the whole Apostolic Church. Christian faith need not burden itself with this load of Jewish beliefs.
There are two passages in which Paul attempts a theodicy (Romans 8:18-25; Romans 8:9-11), the first dealing with Nature and the second with human history. In the first passage he attributes to Nature consciousness of, and a dissatisfaction with, its present imperfection-a desire for, and an expectation of, its completion. He includes Nature in man’s grievous disaster, but also in his glorious destiny. As by the sin he has committed he has brought misery, so by the grace he will receive he will impart blessing. We are unable to accept ‘Paul’s account of the origin of physical evil as altogether due to man’s sin. There can, however, be no doubt that man has a vital, organic relation to his environment. The evolution of the world and the development of humanity are not independent but connected processes. If we are warranted in believing in the progress of the race, we are justified in hoping for a correspondent and consequent transformation of the universe, For the perfect man we may expect the perfect home’ (Romans [1], p. 193). In the second passage we are not here concerned with the argument as a whole, but only with Paul’s conclusion, that, as the unbelief of the Jews has opened the door for the faith of the Gentiles, so the gathering in of the Gentiles will lead to the restoration of the Jews. ‘For God hath shut up all unto disobedience, that he might have mercy upon all’ (Romans 11:32). Without ascribing to Paul on the ground of this and similar passages a dogmatic universalism, against which there is contrary evidence throughout the NT, we may assign to the Apostolic Church the hope of the final victory of Christ over all evil. The apostolic attitude towards the problem of evil cannot be described as optimism, for the reality of sin and pain is too seriously and sympathetically recognized, nor as pessimism, for the possibility of redemption is too confidently and persuasively urged, but it may be spoken of as meliorism, for it has the faith which claims a present salvation for every believer, and the hope of a final fulfilment of God’s purpose of grace, and both are linked with a love that sees in human need and pain an opportunity for service and sacrifice, in which man can regard himself as a fellow-worker with God in the solution of the problem of evil. To revert to the distinctions made in the beginning of this article, the apostolic view recognizes no metaphysical evil, for to be the creature, subject, and child of God, is for man only good; it links physical with moral evil, and makes deliverance from pain dependent on salvation from sin; and it throws all the emphasis on moral evil; for it is concerned not with the speculative intellect, but only with the moral conscience and religions consciousness of man.
Literature.-W. Beyschlag, NT Theology, Eng. translation , 1895, i. 228, ii. 107; G. B. Stevens, Theology of the NT, 1899, pp. 187, 375; T. v. Haering, The Christian Faith, Eng. translation , 1913, ii. 562-577; J. Martineau, A Study of Religion2, 1889, ii. 49-132; A. B. Bruce, Apologetics, 1892, p. 63; A. M. Fairbairn, The Philosophy of the Christian Religion, 1902, pp. 94-168; G. W. Leibniz, Essais de Théodicée sur la Bonté de Dieu, la Liberté de l’homme et l’Origins du mal, 1710.
Alfred E. Garvie.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evil
A condition resulting from some imperfection, which may be structural (constitutional) or functional. Structural looks to the possession and integrity of being; functional to fitting and well-ordered action. To possess beingln imperfection is the lot of all created natures; in this sense all created natures are evil, when considered in relation to God, Who is absolute perfection of being. Integrity of being looks chiefly to the absence of any substantive or accidental defect of constitution. Such integrity is wanting in congenital feeble-mindedness, in traumatic insanity, in the deformed, the malformed and the maimed. Functional imperfection is found in non-traumatic insanity, in ignorance and error, in the diseased, the perverted, and in those who are anti-socially disposed. It will be seen from this analysis of what is admittedly evil in fact, that evil is of its nature a negative entity-an absence, a want, a defect, a perversion-a denial of good. Moral evil is properly a functional defect, a free and deliberate defection from a known standard of moral goodness. In this proper sense it applies only to action, and is called sin. In a wider sense it means any condition that tends to evoke sinful action.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evil Counsel, Mount of
One of the high hills to the south of Jerusalem, forms the eastern boundary of the plain of Raphaim. Tradition of the 12th century says that Caiphas here owned a house in which the Jews held their first meeting to take counsel against Jesus and "prophesied that Jesus should die for the nation" (John 11).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evil, Powers of
Since original sin is ascribed to the instigation of the devil: "By the envy of the devil, death came into the world" (Wisdom of Solomon 2), and according to Saint Paul (Ephesians 6), the evil spirits are the most dangerous enemies of our souls, the real powers of evil in the world are the fallen angels. Hence evil men, living in sin, are said to be slaves of, or in the power of Satan; and other evils so-called, such as calamities, sickness, and the like, are often due to the same powers of evil.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evil, King's
So called from the legend according to which the power of healing this disease was bestowed by Saint Remigius upon the French Kings. Edward the Confessor was the first King of England to cure by his touch this affliction. It is tuberculosis of the lymphatic glands and sometimes of bones and joint surfaces, with slowly suppurating abscesses and fistulous passages, the inflamed structures being subject to a cheesy degeneration.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evil, Principalities of
The rebellious angels, cast out of heaven, were in Saint Paul's day believed to dwell "in the high places" or "in regions above" (Ephesians 6,2). Like the faithful angels (Ephesians 1; Colossians 1), they preserved their respective ranks in the fallen state. Of the evil spirits three classes at least are expressly mentioned in the New Testament (1 Corinthians 15; Ephesians 6; Colossians 2). In Jude 1:1, "principalities" denotes rather the dominion or province or their former power before the fall.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Evil
is distinguished into natural and moral. Natural evil is whatever destroys or any way disturbs the perfection of natural beings, such as blindness, diseases, death, &c. Moral evil is the disagreement between the actions of a moral agent, and the rule of those actions, whatever it be. Applied to choice, or acting contrary to the moral or revealed laws of the Deity, it is termed wickedness, or sin. Applied to an act contrary to a mere rule of fitness, it is called a fault. The question concerning the origin of evil has very much perplexed philosophers and divines, both ancient and modern. Plato, for the solution of this question, maintained, that matter, from its nature, possesses a blind and refractory force, from which arises in it a propensity to disorder and deformity; and that this is the cause of all the imperfection which appears in the works of God, and the origin of evil. Matter, he conceives, resists the will of the supreme Artificer, so that he cannot possibly execute his designs; and this is the cause of the mixture of good and evil, which is found in the material world. "It cannot be," says he, "that evil should be destroyed, for there must always be something contrary to good;" and again, "God wills, as far as it is possible, every thing good, and nothing evil." What that property of matter is which opposes the wise and benevolent intentions of the first Intelligence, Plato has not clearly explained; but he speaks of it as ξυμφυτος επιθυμια , an intimate propensity to disorder, and says, that before nature was adorned with its present beautiful forms, it was inclined to confusion and deformity, and that from this habitude arises all the evil which happens in the world. Plutarch supposes the Platonic notion to be, that there is in matter an unconscious, irrational soul; and this supposition has been adopted by several modern writers. But the writings of Plato afford no evidence that he conceived the imperfection of matter to arise from any cause distinct from its nature. Such a notion is incongruous with Plato's general system, and is contrary to the doctrine of the Pythagorean school, to which he was probably indebted for his notions on this subject; for the philosophers of that sect held that motion is the effect of a power essential to matter. Some of the Stoics adopted the notion of the Platonists concerning the origin of evil and ascribed it to the defective nature of matter, which it is not in the power of the great Artificer to change; asserting, that imperfections appear in the world, not through any defect of skill in its author, but because matter will not admit of the accomplishment of his designs. But it was perceived by others, that this hypothesis was inconsistent with the fundamental doctrine of the Stoics concerning nature. For since, according to their system, matter itself receives all its qualities from God, if its defects be the cause of evil, these defects must be ultimately ascribed to him. No other way of relieving this difficulty remained, than to have recourse to fate, and say, that evil was the necessary consequence of that eternal necessity to which the great whole, comprehending both God and matter, is subject. Thus, when Chrysippus was asked whether diseases were to be ascribed to Divine providence, he replied that it was not the intention of nature that these things should happen; nor were they conformable to the will of the Author of nature and Parent of all good things; but that, in framing the world, some inconveniences had adhered by necessary consequence, to his wise and useful plan. To others the question concerning the origin of evil appeared so intricate and difficult, that, finding themselves unequal to the solution of it, they denied either that there is any God at all, or, at least, any author or governor of the world. The Epicureans belonged to this class; nor does Lucretius allege any other reason for denying the system of the world to be the production of a Deity beside its being so very faulty. Others again judged it to be more rational to assign a double cause of visible effects, than to assign no cause at all; as nothing, indeed, can be more absurd than to admit actions and effects without any agent and cause. These persons perceiving a mixture of good and evil, and being persuaded that so many inconsistencies and disorders could not proceed from a good being, supposed the existence of a malevolent principle, or god, directly contrary to the good one; hence they derived corruption and death, diseases, griefs, mischiefs, frauds, and villanies, while from the good being they deduced nothing but good. This opinion was held by many of the ancients; by the Persian magi, Manicheans, Paulicians, &c.
2. Dr. Samuel Clarke, in his "Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God," deduces from the possibility and real existence of human liberty an answer to the question, What is the cause and original of evil? For liberty, he says, implying a natural power of doing evil, as well as good; and the imperfect nature of finite beings making it possible for them to abuse this their liberty to an actual commission of evil; and it being necessary to the order and beauty of the whole, and for displaying the infinite wisdom of the Creator, that there should be different and various degrees of creatures, whereof, consequently, some must be less perfect than others; hence there necessarily arises a possibility of evil, notwithstanding that the Creator is infinitely good. In short thus: all that we call evil is either an evil of imperfection, as the want of certain faculties and excellencies which other creatures have; or natural evil, as pain, death, and the like; or moral evil, as all kinds of vice. The first of these is not properly an evil: for every power, faculty, or perfection, which any creature enjoys, being the free gift of God, which he was no more obliged to bestow, than he was to confer being or existence itself, it is plain the want of any certain faculty or perfection in any kind of creatures which never belonged to their nature, is no more an evil to them than their never having been created, or brought into being at all, could properly have been called an evil. The second kind of evil, which we call natural evil, is either a necessary consequence of the former; as death, to a creature on whose nature immortality was never conferred; and then it is no more properly an evil than the former; or else it is counterpoised, in the whole, with as great or greater good, as the afflictions and sufferings of good men, and then also it is not properly an evil; or else, lastly, it is a punishment; and then it is a necessary consequent of the third and last sort of evil, namely, moral evil. And this arises wholly from the abuse of liberty, which God gave to his creatures for other purposes, and which it was reasonable and fit to give them for the perfection and order of the whole creation; only they, contrary to God's intention and command, have abused what was necessary for the perfection of the whole, to the corruption and depravation of themselves. And thus all sorts of evils have entered into the world, without any diminution to the infinite goodness of its Creator and Governor.
3. This is obviously all the answer which the question respecting the origin of evil is capable of receiving. It brings us to the point to which the Scriptures themselves lead us. And though many questions may yet be asked, respecting a subject so mysterious as the permission of evil by the Supreme Being, this is a part of his counsels of which we can have no cognizance, unless he is pleased to reveal them; and as revelation is silent upon this subject, except generally, that all his acts, his permissive ones as well as others, are "wise, and just and good" we may rest assured, that beyond what is revealed, human wisdom in the present state can never penetrate.
Webster's Dictionary - Evil
(1):
(n.) Moral badness, or the deviation of a moral being from the principles of virtue imposed by conscience, or by the will of the Supreme Being, or by the principles of a lawful human authority; disposition to do wrong; moral offence; wickedness; depravity.
(2):
(a.) Having qualities tending to injury and mischief; having a nature or properties which tend to badness; mischievous; not good; worthless or deleterious; poor; as, an evil beast; and evil plant; an evil crop.
(3):
(a.) Having or exhibiting bad moral qualities; morally corrupt; wicked; wrong; vicious; as, evil conduct, thoughts, heart, words, and the like.
(4):
(a.) Producing or threatening sorrow, distress, injury, or calamity; unpropitious; calamitous; as, evil tidings; evil arrows; evil days.
(5):
(n.) Anything which impairs the happiness of a being or deprives a being of any good; anything which causes suffering of any kind to sentient beings; injury; mischief; harm; - opposed to good.
(6):
(n.) malady or disease; especially in the phrase king's evil, the scrofula.
(7):
(adv.) In an evil manner; not well; ill; badly; unhappily; injuriously; unkindly.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - World is Very Evil, the
Hymn not found in the Breviary. Written about 1140 by Bernard of Morlaix, it was translated by J. Neale.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Evil-Merodach
The fool of Merodach; the fool grinds bitterly
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Evil-Merodach
The son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, B. C. 561. His friendly treatment of Jehoiachin the captive king of Judah, in releasing him from prison and variously distinguishing him above other captives, is mentioned to his praise, 2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31 - 34 . His reign and life were cut short by a conspiracy, headed by Neriglissar his sister's husband, who succeeded him.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Evil
If Christians believe in a God of love and power who created and controls the world, how can they explain the presence and power of evil in the world? This question commonly puzzles people, but the Bible gives no direct answer to it. As usual the Bible’s response to the problem is practical rather than theoretical. It is more concerned with helping people develop character than with satisfying intellectual curiosity. And as people accept that help, they receive answers to some of the problems (cf. John 7:17). (Concerning the superior knowledge that Gnostics claimed to have regarding good and evil see KNOWLEDGE.)
Human nature
God created the world good and he wanted the people of his creation to enjoy it with him (Genesis 1:31; 1 Timothy 4:4; Hebrews 4:4; Hebrews 4:10). But since he created them as morally responsible beings with a freedom to make their own decisions, the possibility existed that they might misuse their freedom. They might choose to do what they knew they should not do (Genesis 2:15-17). Maturity would come through making correct moral choices. The self-denial involved in rejecting tempting alternatives would strengthen character (cf. Hebrews 5:8; Hebrews 5:14).
God wanted people to live in a relationship of love with him and with their fellow human beings; but they could not love if they were not free. If they were robots, they could do what their maker programmed them to do, but they could not love or enjoy anything. However, as freedom produced the possibility of devotion and goodness, so also it produced the possibility of rebellion and evil. Evil was not a product of the creative activity of God, but a product of the wrong use of freedom by morally responsible beings (Genesis 3:1-7; James 1:12-13).
Life in a spoiled world
The Bible commonly speaks of evil in two different but related ways. Firstly, it speaks of evil in a moral sense similar to that considered above, where evil is the opposite of moral goodness (Proverbs 8:13; Jeremiah 7:24; Micah 2:1; Matthew 5:45; Matthew 15:19; Romans 7:19; Romans 7:21; 2 Thessalonians 3:2; for details see SIN). Satan, through whom this evil entered the human race, is fittingly called ‘the evil one’ (Genesis 3:1; Matthew 13:19; 1 John 2:13; 1 John 5:19; see SATAN).
Secondly, the Bible speaks of evil in a more general sense, where it refers to calamities, conflicts, sufferings, misfortunes and even to things such as bad health and bad fruit. The word again means the opposite of good, but with a non-moral meaning (Deuteronomy 7:15; 2 Samuel 15:14; Matthew 7:17; Luke 16:25). Yet there is a connection between these two uses of ‘evil’. Because the evil of sin has infected the world, calamities and misfortunes have become part of life in the world.
When the Old Testament says that God sends both good and evil, it is referring not to moral good and moral evil, but to life’s blessings and troubles. Israelites in Old Testament times acknowledged God’s overall control in all the affairs of life, both good and bad (Job 2:10; Isaiah 45:7). They saw that the evils of conflict, disaster and destruction were often God’s means of punishing the wicked (1 Samuel 16:14; Jeremiah 35:17; Amos 3:6).
No cause for despair
Although the entrance of sin into the world has spoiled God’s purposes for the human race, it has not overthrown them. God can bring good out of evil (Genesis 50:20; Romans 8:28). The troubles of life are not always God’s judgments for specific wrongdoings. God usually does not explain why particular evils occur or why people suffer from them. Nevertheless, he consistently uses those evils to bring positive benefits (Habakkuk 1:13; Habakkuk 3:17-19; Luke 13:1-5; John 9:2-3; 2 Corinthians 12:7-9; see SUFFERING). This, however, does not excuse the people who cause the evils (Isaiah 10:5-11; Jeremiah 51:5-10; Jeremiah 51:34-36; Matthew 26:24; Acts 2:23; Romans 3:8).
Probably the most feared of all evils is death, but God uses even death to fulfil his purposes for good. Through death he has conquered death and delivered people from the power of evil (Hebrews 2:14; see DEATH). Through Christ’s death, believers can enjoy victory over evil while still living in the present evil world (Romans 6:7-11; Romans 6:14; Galatians 1:4; see SALVATION). They will enjoy final victory when Christ returns to remove all evil, even to its last trace, and bring in God’s new heaven and new earth (1 Corinthians 15:25-28; Revelation 21:4; Revelation 21:27; Revelation 22:1-3).

Sentence search

Kein ayin hara - "An Evil eye should not be cast upon him. " ...
Kein Ayin Hara ("no Evil eye"): (Yiddish) �No Evil eye!" Customarily added after praising another; expressing the wish that the Evil eye should not affect the individual discussed
Evil - Some Evil beast hath devoured him. Having bad qualities of a moral kind wicked corrupt perverse wrong as Evil thoughts Evil deeds Evil speaking an Evil generation. Unfortunate unhappy producing sorrow, distress, injury or calamity as Evil tidings Evil arrows Evil days. Evil is natural or moral. Natural Evil is any thing which produces pain, distress, loss or calamity, or which in any way disturbs the peace, impairs the happiness, or destroys the perfection of natural beings. ...
Moral Evil is any deviation of a moral agent from the rules of conduct prescribed to him by God, or by legitimate human authority or it is any violation of the plain principles of justice and rectitude. ...
There are also Evils called which affect injuriously the peace or prosperity of a city or state and political Evils, which injure a nation, in its public capacity. ...
All wickedness, all crimes, all violations of law and right are moral Evils. Diseases are natural Evils, but they often proceed from moral Evils. There shall no Evil befall thee. Psalms 91 ...
A prudent man foreseeth the Evil, and hideth himself. The heart of the sons of men is full of Evil. Malady as the king's Evil or scrophula. Evil it beseems thee. It went Evil with his house. The Egyptians Evil entreated us, and afflicted us. ...
In composition, Evil, denoting something bad or wrong, is often contracted to ...
Malefactor - , "evil-working" (kakos, "evil," ergon, "work"), is used as a noun, translated "malefactor(-s)" in Luke 23:32,33,39 , and in the RV in 2 Timothy 2:9 (AV, "evil doer"). See Evil , B, Note (1). , "doing Evil," is used in 1 Peter 2:12,14 ; 3:16 (in some mss. See Evil , B, No
Speaking, Evil - SPEAKING, Evil . See Evil Speaking
Evil Eye - See Evil eye under Evil, a
Evil - There is natural Evil (floods, storms, famines, etc. ) and moral Evil (adultery, murder, idolatry, etc. Natural Evil is a result of moral Evil. Evil originated with Satan (Isaiah 14:12-15) and is carried on by man (Matthew 15:18-19)
Cursing - Execrating imprecating Evil on denouncing Evil dooming to Evil, misery, or vexation
Evildoer - EvilDO'ER, n. Evil and doer, from do. One who does Evil one who commits sin, crime, or any moral wrong. ...
They speak Evil against you as Evildoers
Retaliate - ) To return like for like; specifically, to return Evil for Evil; as, to retaliate upon an enemy. ) To return the like for; to repay or requite by an act of the same kind; to return Evil for (evil)
Evil - ) Having qualities tending to injury and mischief; having a nature or properties which tend to badness; mischievous; not good; worthless or deleterious; poor; as, an Evil beast; and Evil plant; an Evil crop. ) Having or exhibiting bad moral qualities; morally corrupt; wicked; wrong; vicious; as, Evil conduct, thoughts, heart, words, and the like. ) Producing or threatening sorrow, distress, injury, or calamity; unpropitious; calamitous; as, Evil tidings; Evil arrows; Evil days. ) malady or disease; especially in the phrase king's Evil, the scrofula. ) In an Evil manner; not well; ill; badly; unhappily; injuriously; unkindly
Evil - ) Having qualities tending to injury and mischief; having a nature or properties which tend to badness; mischievous; not good; worthless or deleterious; poor; as, an Evil beast; and Evil plant; an Evil crop. ) Having or exhibiting bad moral qualities; morally corrupt; wicked; wrong; vicious; as, Evil conduct, thoughts, heart, words, and the like. ) Producing or threatening sorrow, distress, injury, or calamity; unpropitious; calamitous; as, Evil tidings; Evil arrows; Evil days. ) malady or disease; especially in the phrase king's Evil, the scrofula. ) In an Evil manner; not well; ill; badly; unhappily; injuriously; unkindly
All-Possessed - ) Controlled by an Evil spirit or by Evil passions; wild
Temptation - ) The act of tempting, or enticing to Evil; seduction. ) The state of being tempted, or enticed to Evil. ) That which tempts; an inducement; an allurement, especially to something Evil
Requite - To repay either good or Evil in a good sense, to recompense to return an equivalent in good to reward. ...
In a bad sense, to retaliate to return Evil for Evil to punish. ...
Joseph will certainly requite us all the Evil which we did to him. He hath requited me Evil for good
Belial - ) An Evil spirit; a wicked and unprincipled person; the personification of Evil
Malice - (Latin: malum; malitium, Evil, Evil intent) ...
The Evil of a conscious and deliberate transgression of the law of God; contempt of the Divine Author of the law; a denying God the reverence and service due Him; the real essence of sin
Yetzer hara - �the Evil inclination�); the human inclination to do Evil, rooted in the physical nature of man
Harm - A — 1: κακός (Strong's #2556 — Adjective — kakos — kak-os' ) "evil," is rendered "harm" in Acts 16:28 ; 28:5 . See Evil. ...
A — 2: πονηρός (Strong's #4190 — Adjective — poneros — pon-ay-ros' ) "evil," generally of a more malignant sort than No. See Evil. ...
B — 1: κακόω (Strong's #2559 — Verb — kakoo — kak-o'-o ) "to do Evil to a person" (akin to A, No. See AFFECT , Evil. 1, and poieo, "to do"), is so rendered in the RV of Mark 3:4 ; Luke 6:9 (AV, "to do Evil"), with reference to the moral character of what is done; in 1 Peter 3:17 , "evil doing;" 3 John 1:11 , "doeth Evil
Sheitan - ) An Evil spirit; the Evil one; the devil
Menace - ) The show of an intention to inflict Evil; a threat or threatening; indication of a probable Evil or catastrophe to come. ) To threaten, as an Evil to be inflicted. ) To express or show an intention to inflict, or to hold out a prospect of inflicting, Evil or injury upon; to threaten; - usually followed by with before the harm threatened; as, to menace a country with war
Repression - ) The act of repressing, or state of being repressed; as, the repression of Evil and Evil doers
Evil, Powers of - Since original sin is ascribed to the instigation of the devil: "By the envy of the devil, death came into the world" (Wisdom of Solomon 2), and according to Saint Paul (Ephesians 6), the Evil spirits are the most dangerous enemies of our souls, the real powers of Evil in the world are the fallen angels. Hence Evil men, living in sin, are said to be slaves of, or in the power of Satan; and other Evils so-called, such as calamities, sickness, and the like, are often due to the same powers of Evil
Evil - The Problem of Evil Evil is a major theoretical and practical problem for a Christian. Evil is of two types. First, there is natural Evil. Second, there is moral Evil which has its source in the choice and action of humans. This type of Evil includes war, crime, cruelty, and slavery. ...
If God is all-powerful and good, as the Bible affirms, why does He allow Evil? There are statements and emphases in the Bible which help to explain and reduce the problem of natural and moral Evil. ...
Natural Evil Concerning natural Evil, several emphases should be noted. First, moral Evil accounts for much of natural Evil. In Genesis, Evil and suffering appeared only after the Fall (Genesis 3:16-19 ). This means that Evil and suffering are not eternally inevitable. ...
Second, God disciplines His people collectively and individually, even through natural Evil and pain, to bring them closer to His purposes (Proverbs 3:11-12 ; Jeremiah 18:1-10 ). Some so-called natural Evil, therefore, can be attributed to the necessary operation of natural uniformities. ...
Fourth, natural Evils may be used for judgment upon sin. It is deeply ingrained in the Bible that physical Evils have been used by God for the punishment of individual and national wickedness. This does not mean that all physical Evils are the punishment of physical sins. ...
Moral Evil There are also some biblical teachings which help us to understand moral Evil from the Christian perspective. ...
Second, humans used freedom in such a way as to bring in Evil. Thus, an Evil force was present within the creation. ...
It is clear, then, that God did not create Evil and sin. ...
Fourth, even though Evil is because of human revolt and failure, God continues to be active in redeeming people from their self-imposed Evil. ...
Fifth, God deals with Evil through judgment and wrath. Thus, a principle of judgment upon, and annulment of, Evil can be discerned at work in history and even in individual lives. ...
Sixth, God deals with Evil through the incarnation, the cross, and the resurrection. The Bible teaches that God Himself in Jesus Christ became the victim of Evil so that there might be victory over Evil. ...
After all the solutions are considered, we still realize that the problem of Evil is not completely solved on an intellectual level from our limited human perspective
Curse - ) Evil pronounced or invoked upon another, solemnly, or in passion; subjection to, or sentence of, divine condemnation. ) The cause of great harm, Evil, or misfortune; that which brings Evil or severe affliction; torment. ) To bring great Evil upon; to be the cause of serious harm or unhappiness to; to furnish with that which will be a cause of deep trouble; to afflict or injure grievously; to harass or torment. ) To call upon divine or supernatural power to send injury upon; to imprecate Evil upon; to execrate
Contrariwise - ...
Not rendering Evil for Evil, nor railing for railing but contrariwise, blessing
Requite - ) To repay; in a good sense, to recompense; to return (an equivalent) in good; to reward; in a bad sense, to retaliate; to return (evil) for Evil; to punish
Threat - ) The expression of an intention to inflict Evil or injury on another; the declaration of an Evil, loss, or pain to come; menace; threatening; denunciation
Curse - To utter a wish of Evil against one to imprecate Evil upon to call for mischief or injury to fall upon to execrate. To injure to subject to Evil to vex, harass or torment with great calamities. To devote to Evil. Malediction the expression of a wish of Evil to another. Imprecation of Evil. Denunciation of Evil
Dignities - The people 2Peter condemned willingly blasphemed the dignities, who are Evil good angels or Evil angels
Evil - As a prerequisite for any discussion of Evil, moral Evil must be distinguished from physical or natural Evil. This essay uses the term "moral Evil" to include both social offenses (ethics—murder, theft) and cultic sins (those offenses aimed directly against the deityblasphemy, idolatry). Moral Evil, therefore, whether its setting be cultic or social, when carried out may be considered a sin. Instead, what constitutes social Evil is what is so defined by God, and in that respect (i. , as to why a given act is good or bad), differs little from cultic Evil. ...
If God is the definer of what is good (2 Samuel 10:12 ; Mark 10:18 ; Luke 18:19 ), right (Genesis 18:25 ), and just (Job 34:12 ), it is not surprising that the Bible never attributes moral or cultic Evil to him (Job 34:10 ). Indeed, he hates Evil (Psalm 5:6 ) and is the avenging judge who punishes those who practice it (Isaiah 31:2 ; Micah 2:1 ). ...
On the other hand, what ethicists term physical Evil (or, natural Evil) is often connected with the activities of God, and thus demonstrates the importance of defining these categories before discussing the subject further. An ethicist may distinguish these two types of Evil thus: (1) moral Evil, which is real if any intellectual being knowingly does anything he or she ought not to have done without being compelled to do it; and (2) physical Evil, which is real if some beings have suffered in situations caused by nonrational beings, or through actions of rational beings acting nonrationally. ...
Moral Evil and Sin . Distinguishing moral Evil from sin is no simple task, yet it must be attempted before any discussion may proceed further. An individual sin, as mentioned earlier, is an acting out of cultic or social Evil. But generic sin) is the condition that gives rise to the Evil expressed in the individual sin. ...
However sin and Evil may be considered by a secularist, the theological perspective held by the Bible that presupposes an involvement by God in his creation and an active will of God governing that creation requires that Evil assume a theological dimension. Accordingly, moral Evil finds its roots in disobedience, whether deliberate or accidental, premeditated or unpremeditated, cultic or ethical, to the revealed will of God, and as such, becomes associated with generic sin and virtually synonymous with wickedness. It may be expected, therefore, that there will be an extensive overlap between terms for sin and terms expressing moral Evil, whether the expression of this sin/evil be cultic or social. The origins for sin and Evil in both Old and New Testaments are traced to the activities of an Evil creature, Satan (1 John 3:8 : "the devil has been sinning from the beginning" ) and to human sin that led to a fall (Romans 5:12-14 ) and banishment form Eden and the tree of life (Genesis 3 ). ...
Cultic and Social Evil . Like Gollum's ring in The Hobbit or the addict's first "fix, " Evil does not always seem immediately repulsive, but may even be seen as attractive on superficial examination (Genesis 3:6 ), while profoundly destructive at a deeper level (Isaiah 59:7 ). ...
Because what is right was what was ordained by God, and what is wrong was what was proscribed by him, deviation from this paradigm constitutes what is Evil. The most common term for cultic Evil in the Old Testament (used over 200 times) is awon [1], Leviticus 5:17 ; 17:16 ); and (3) the punishment for the act (e. ...
Other common words for Evil include the nouns awel, awla, derived from a root meaning "to deviate. They are frequently paired with synonyms with other words denoting persecution, wickedness, rebellion, violence, and Evil. ...
Many Hebrew words are used for both cultic and social Evil. The words rasa [ רָשַׁע ]'>[2] in Psalm 10:15 as the "evildoer. Most of its occurrences in the New Testament are found in Paul's writings, where it can depict the Evil one does unwillingly (Romans 7:15,17-20 ) and which becomes a law that rules him (7:21,23) and which can only be overcome by the grace of God through Christ (7:25). ...
The compounds and derivatives of the word poneros [ Matthew 7:11 ), the hardened Pharisees (Matthew 12:34 ), and the Jews as the Evil generation (Matthew 12:39 ). In Matthew 7:17-18 , an "evil" tree bears "evil" fruit, whereas in 7:11 poneros [ Matthew 22:10 ) who will be judged in the final judgment (Matthew 13:49-50 ). Anyone who decides against Jesus is Evil (2 Thessalonians 3:2 ; 2 Timothy 3:13 ). ...
Physical Evil . Closely allied to the latter are the "evil diseases" of Egypt (Deuteronomy 7:15 ) and the "evil diseases" of Ecclesiastes 6:2 . Dangerous animals capable of destroying human life are called "evil" (Genesis 37:20,33 ). Edomites are chided for gloating over the disaster of the destruction of Jerusalem, called "his [7] Evil" (Obadiah 1:13 ). Jacob's assertion that "my years have been few and difficult [8]" (Genesis 47:9 ) may be interpreted as either subjective, wherein the "evil" indicates suffering, or objective, as a hyperbole of humility. However, in 1 Kings 22:8 and its parallel ( 2 Chronicles 18:12 ) the king of Israel (Ahab) answers Jehoshaphat of Judah, declaring that there is indeed a prophet of Yahweh about, adding peevishly, "But I hate him because he never prophesies anything good about me, but always bad [8]. " That neither moral nor objective Evil is intended is clear when the prophecy unfolds as a prediction of Ahab's death. The prophecy is Evil to Ahab, for whom it bodes personal harm and by whom it must be subjectively received. Ahab recognizes this, and confirms this as what he intended when he had predicted an Evil prophecy (22:18). ...
Almost as obvious as the preceding is the phrase an "evil name" found frequently throughout the Old Testament to designate an unsavory reputation. For example, the husband's charge of nonvirginity in his bride "gives her a bad [8] name" (Deuteronomy 22:14,19 ). Nehemiah denounces the hireling of Tobiah and Sanballat as one who wished to intimidate him and thus "give me a bad [8] name" (Nehemiah 6:13 ). The Evil name does not indicate moral, objective Evil (as, for instance, a blasphemous or lewd epithet or title), but a subjectively perceived harm. Similar is the "evil" report (NIV, "distressing words") of Exodus 33:4 , in which Moses reports to the people God's displeasure at calf-worship. An objective moral Evil would require a foul, malevolent report. Nor is Joseph's Evil report of his brothers objective, moral Evil (Genesis 37:2 ), but a tale of their behavior that cast them in an unfavorable light. In Jeremiah 49:23 , Hamath and Arpad hear Evil tidings about the fall of Damascusevil to them because Damascus was their ally and her fall portends their own fates. In 5:13 he calls selfishness a "grievous Evil" (RSV). Finally, discipline is called Evil in Proverbs 15:10 because it brings pain. A net is Evil to the fish it catches (Eccel 9:12); misfortune is an Evil to Solomon as its recipient ( 1 Kings 5:4 ; NIV "disaster" ). ...
To "be Evil in someone's eyes, " or "to displease someone" can describe a woman slave who does not please her master (Exodus 21:8 ) and Esau's Canaanite (Hittite) wives who displeased Isaac (Genesis 28:8 ). Ecclesiastes 7:3 speaks of an "evil of countenance" to indicate a sad expression, as the context demonstrates. The Persian king asks Nehemiah, "Why are your faces Evil, when you are not sick?" ( Nehemiah 2:2 ), or, "Why does your face look so sad when you are not ill?" (NIV ). Evil appearance denotes the poor quality of the cattle in Pharaoh's dream (Genesis 41:3,4,19,20,21,27 ); land (Numbers 13:19 ); and a bargaining session (Proverbs 20:14 ; [12] ). The figs in Jeremiah's vision were so "evil" they could not be eaten (24:2,3, 8; 29:17; they were of such poor quality that they were already in a state of decomposition that rendered them inedible). ...
Prosperity and adversity are also seen in terms of good and Evil. When the people say to Jeremiah, "Whether it is good or Evil, we will obey the voice of the Lord our God" (42:6 RSV), they are really saying, "For success or failure, we will obey. "...
Evil as the Responsibility of God . While moral Evil is never imputed to God, there is often a connection made between Yahweh and ra [13], roa , and raa [14]. The classical reference, Isaiah 45:7 , wherein God is called creator of Evil would then refer to physical destruction, rather than moral Evil, as the parallel term "maker of peace" would seem to render conclusive. God's judgments are not moral Evil, else they would hardly be called judgments, but are physical, and called Evil because of the adverse effects. ...
When God is pictured as "bringing Evil, " it is nearly always an invasion of Judah by a foreign power as exemplified in Jeremiah 4:6 , where the term clearly refers to the impending invasion of Judah by the Babylonians (similar are 1 Kings 9:9 ; 21:29 ; 2 Kings 21:12 ; 2 Chronicles 7:22 ; Jeremiah 6:19 ; 19:3,15 ; 36:31 ). Especially clear is Exodus 32:12 a, which says, referring to the exodus from Egypt, "it was with Evil intent that he [15] brought them [16] out. " Isaiah 31:2 predicts the failure of the alliance between Judah and Egypt, proclaiming God as the one who is wise and "brings Evil, " that is, brings defeat to his enemies. Similarly, Amos 3:6 asks, assuming a negative answer, if Evil befalls a city, unless the Lord has done it. In each of the preceding cases, the context verifies the interpretation as physical Evil, in these cases as experienced subjectively by the victim of the military action. Lamentations 3:38 declares that it is the decree of God that brings good and Evil. ...
The "Evil Day" may likewise be resolved as a day on which something harmful occurs rather than a day Evil in and of itself. For example, Jeremiah 17:16-18 indicates that the "day of Evil" (RSV) is a day on which Yahweh judges those who are his enemies, in this case, those who persecute the prophet. The "evil day" of Amos 6:3 refers to the fall of Samaria and destruction of Israel as a judgment by God (for similar language for Judah, see Jeremiah 16:10 ). In Ecclesiastes 12:1 , however, the phrase "evil days" alludes simply to old age, as the context shows. ...
For God to speak Evil concerning someone (1 Kings 22:23 ) may mean passing sentence on him. Similar is Naomi's complaint that God has brought Evil upon her (Ruth 1:21 ). Yahweh "brings Evil" upon Absalom by defeating the counsel of Ahithophel (2 Samuel 17:14 ). The "evil" of which God repents in Jonah 3:9-10 is Evil only to the Ninevites, for they would have felt its effects physically and subjectively. ...
Saul's Evil Spirit . The Evil spirit from Yahweh that plagued Saul (1 Samuel 16:14-16,23 ; 18:10 ; 19:9 ) may be considered as a spirit (disposition) sent by God that eventually destroyed Saul. Morally, the issue is justice, not Evil. Similar is the Evil spirit sent between Abimelech and the inhabitants of Shechem, which turns the Shechemites against him (Judges 9:23 ). ...
While the above cited evidence might lead one to conclude that all natural Evil (disaster) is a judgment of God for some sort of Evil committed by the afflicted party, the Bible will not bear this conclusion. ...
Why Evil? The Bible does not answer the oft-posed problem of how a just, omnipotent, and loving God could permit Evil to exist in a universe he had created. Some suggestions, however, that have been offered about moral Evil are: (1) while God is perfect, creation is only pronounced "very good" (Genesis 1:31 ); it is impossible for a created universe to rival God in perfection and the existence of moral Evil is one example of its imperfection; (2) to compel all beings to act morally is to override their free will; likewise, to grant them free moral agency is to concede the possibility that someone at some time will act in an Evil manner; and (3) God in his infinite wisdom created the best of all possible worlds; one can only consider that, were the world created any other way it would have been less than the best of all possibilities. The latter consideration also holds true as a possible explanation for natural Evil
Deprecation - ) The act of deprecating; a praying against Evil; prayer that an Evil may be removed or prevented; strong expression of disapprobation
Enticement - ) The act or practice of alluring or tempting; as, the enticements of Evil companions. ) That which entices, or incites to Evil; means of allurement; alluring object; as, an enticement to sin
Demoniacal - ) Influenced or produced by a demon or Evil spirit; as, demoniac or demoniacal power. ) Pertaining to, or characteristic of, a demon or Evil spirit; devilish; as, a demoniac being; demoniacal practices
Evil, Evil-Doer - A — 1: κακός (Strong's #2556 — Adjective — kakos — kak-os' ) stands for "whatever is Evil in character, base," in distinction (wherever the distinction is observable) from poneros (see No. 2), which indicates "what is Evil in influence and effect, malignant. Kakos is antithetic to kalos, "fair, advisable, good in character," and to agathos, "beneficial, useful, good in act;" hence it denotes what is useless, incapable, bad; poneros is essentially antithetic to chrestos, "kind, gracious, serviceable;" hence it denotes what is destructive, injurious, Evil. ...
The use of kakos may be broadly divided as follows: (a) of what is morally or ethically "evil," whether of persons, e. ...
A — 2: πονηρός (Strong's #4190 — Adjective — poneros — pon-ay-ros' ) akin to ponos, "labor, toil," denotes "evil that causes labor, pain, sorrow, malignant Evil" (see No. 1); it is used (a) with the meaning bad, worthless, in the physical sense, Matthew 7:17,18 ; in the moral or ethical sense, "evil," wicked; of persons, e. , Matthew 7:11 ; Luke 6:45 ; Acts 17:5 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:2 ; 2 Timothy 3:13 ; of "evil" spirits, e. ...
A — 3: φαῦλος (Strong's #5337 — Adjective — phaulos — fow'-los ) primarily denotes "slight, trivial, blown about by every wind;" then, "mean, common, bad," in the sense of being worthless, paltry or contemptible, belonging to a low order of things; in John 5:29 , those who have practiced "evil" things, RV, "ill" (phaula), are set in contrast to those who have done good things (agatha); the same contrast is presented in Romans 9:11 ; 2 Corinthians 5:10 , in each of which the most authentic mss. have phaulos for kakos; he who practices "evil" things (RV, "ill") hates the light, John 3:20 ; jealousy and strife are accompanied by "every vile deed," James 3:16 . , Acts 8:22 , "wickedness;" Romans 1:29 , "maliciousness;" in James 1:21 , AV, "naughtiness;" (b) "the Evil of trouble, affliction," Matthew 6:34 , only, and here alone translated "evil. 2), is used as a noun, (a) of Satan as the "evil" one, Matthew 5:37 ; 6:13 ; 13:19,38 ; Luke 11:4 (in some texts); John 17:15 ; Ephesians 6:16 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:3 ; 1 John 2:13,14 ; 3:12 ; 5:18,19 ; (b) of human beings, Matthew 5:45 ; (probably ver. 39); 13:49; 22:10; Luke 6:35 ; 1 Corinthians 5:13 ; (c) neuter, "evil (things)," Matthew 9:4 ; 12:35 ; Mark 7:23 ; Luke 3:19 ; "that which is Evil," Luke 6:45 ; Romans 12:9 ; Acts 28:21 , "harm. , Acts 23:9 ; Romans 7:21 ; Hebrews 5:14 ; in the plural, "evil things," e. , 1 Corinthians 10:6 ; 1 Timothy 6:10 , "all kinds of Evil," RV. ...
B — 5: κακοποιός (Strong's #2555 — Adjective — kakopois — kak-op-oy-os' ) properly the masculine gender of the adjective, denotes an "evil-doer" (kakon, "evil," poieo, "to do"), 1 Peter 2:12,14 ; 4:15 ; in some mss. ...
Notes: (1) Kakourgos, "an Evil-worker" (kakon, "evil," ergon, "a work"), is translated "evil-doer" in 2 Timothy 2:9 , AV (RV, "malefactor"). ...
(2) Adikema, "an injustice" (a, negative, dikaios, "just"), is translated "evil-doing," in Acts 24:20 , AV, RV, "wrong-doing. 1), is rendered "to entreat Evil" in Acts 7:6,19 ; "made (them) Evil affected," Acts 14:2 . ...
C — 2: κακοποιέω (Strong's #2554 — Verb — kakopoieo — kak-op-oy-eh'-o ) signifies "to do Evil" (cp. 5), Mark 3:4 (RV, "to do harm"); so, Luke 6:9 ; in 3 John 1:11 , "doeth Evil," in 1 Peter 3:17 , "evil doing. kakologeo, "to speak Evil" (see CURSE , SPEAK); kakopatheo, "to endure Evil" (see ENDURE , SUFFER); kakopatheia, "suffering affliction" (see SUFFER); kakoucheo, "to suffer adversity" (see SUFFER). ...
D — 1: κακῶς (Strong's #2560 — Adverb — kakos — kak-oce' ) "badly, Evilly," akin to A, No. , "He will Evilly destroy those men (evil as they are)," with stress on the adjective; (b) in the moral sense, "to speak Evilly," John 18:23 ; Acts 23:5 ; "to ask Evilly," James 4:3
Malignant - ) Characterized or caused by Evil intentions; pernicious. ) A man of extrems enmity or Evil intentions. ) Disposed to do harm, inflict suffering, or cause distress; actuated by extreme malevolence or enmity; virulently inimical; bent on Evil; malicious
Albigensianism - They believed in a good spirit who created the spiritual, and in an Evil spirit who created the material world, including the human body, which is therefore under his control. The good spirit created the soul but the Evil one imprisoned it in the body, which is Evil from its source. To deliver souls from this Evil and punishment, the good spirit, God, sent Jesus Christ who is only a creature. Since the body is Evil He could assume only a celestial one. They commended suicide especially by starvation, their endura, and in general, the extinction of human life, and advocated abstention from marriage, preferring concubinage as less Evil
Albigenses - They believed in a good spirit who created the spiritual, and in an Evil spirit who created the material world, including the human body, which is therefore under his control. The good spirit created the soul but the Evil one imprisoned it in the body, which is Evil from its source. To deliver souls from this Evil and punishment, the good spirit, God, sent Jesus Christ who is only a creature. Since the body is Evil He could assume only a celestial one. They commended suicide especially by starvation, their endura, and in general, the extinction of human life, and advocated abstention from marriage, preferring concubinage as less Evil
Ayin hara - Evil Eye
Threatening - Menacing denouncing Evil. The act of menacing a menace a denunciation of Evil, or declaration of a purpose to inflict Evil on a person or country, usually for sins and offenses
Evil Merodach - During the latter's exclusion from men among beasts, Evil Merodach administered the government. On Nebuchadnezzar's resuming it at the end of seven years, he heard of his son's misconduct and that Evil Merodach had exulted in his father's calamity. He therefore cast Evil Merodach into prison, where the prince met Jehoiachin or Jeconiah, and became his friend. When Evil Merodach mounted the throne therefore he brought him out of prison, changed his prison garments, and set his throne above the throne of the kings with him in Babylon, and "Jehoiachin did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life" (Jeremiah 52:31-34). Evil Merodach was guilty of lawless government, according to Berosus, possibly because of his showing greater lenity than his father
Anti-Tactae - A branch of Gnostics, who held that God was good and just, but that a creature had created Evil; and, consequently, that it is our duty to oppose this author of Evil, in order to avenge God of his adversary
Railing - See Evil-speaking
Tarea - Howling; doing Evil
Iniquity - See Evil ; Sin ...
...
Slander - See Evil-speaking
Aleppo Boil - of Evil...
Backbiting - See Evil-speaking
Maledicency - ) Evil speaking
Evil Spirit - EVIL SPIRIT
Yvel - ) Evil; ill
Scelestic - ) Evil; wicked; atrocious
Misdread - ) Dread of Evil
Evil Speaking - 1: βλασφημία (Strong's #988 — Noun Feminine — blasphemia — blas-fay-me'-ah ) is translated "evil speaking" in Ephesians 4:31 , AV (RV, "railing"). ...
2: καταλαλιά (Strong's #2636 — Noun Feminine — katalalia — kat-al-al-ee'-ah ) "evil speaking," 1 Peter 2:1 ; see BACKBITING
Filthy - Colossians 3:8 (a) The word here describes lewd language, contaminating conversation, "racy" stories, and all Evil communications. This refers to money used for wrong purposes, or to obtain Evil ends. ...
Judges 1:8 (a) This is a figure of men who imagine Evil things about GOD's people to further their own lustful desires
Worse - ) Bad, ill, Evil, or corrupt, in a greater degree; more bad or Evil; less good; specifically, in poorer health; more sick; - used both in a physical and moral sense. ) In a worse degree; in a manner more Evil or bad
Malum - ) An Evil
Malengine - ) Evil machination; guile; deceit
Missuggestion - ) Wrong or Evil suggestion
Leaven - (b) In every place where leaven is mentioned, it is a type of Evil teachings, Evil doctrines and Evil practices. ...
Matthew 13:33 (a) The leaven in this case is a type of Evil doctrines, taught by the apostate church. The woman is the apostate church, the meal is the Word of GOD, the leaven is wrong and Evil teachings concerning the Word of GOD
Temptation - The act of tempting enticement to Evil by arguments, by flattery, or by the offer of some real or apparent good. ...
When the devil had ended all the temptation, he departed from him for a season. Solicitation of the passions enticements to Evil proceeding from the prospect of pleasure or advantage. The state of being tempted or enticed to Evil. That which is presented to the mind as an inducement to Evil
Birsha - An Evil; a son who beholds
Raamah - Greatness; thunder; some sort of Evil
Diffame - ) Evil name; bad reputation; defamation
Oety - ) Invocation of Evil spirits; witchcraft
Maleficient - ) Doing Evil, harm, or mischief
Threatened - Menaced with Evil
Loshon horo - �the Evil tongue�); gossip and slander ...
Wrongdoing - ) Evil or wicked behavior or action
Maleficent - ) Doing Evil to others; harmful; mischievous
Misdeed - ) An Evil deed; a wicked action
Tempted - Enticed to Evil provoked tried
Evil - Natural Evil is whatever destroys or any way disturbs the perfection of natural beings, such as blindness, diseases, death, &c. Moral Evil is the disagreement between the actions of a moral agent, and the rule of those actions, whatever it be. The question concerning the origin of Evil has very much perplexed philosophers and divines, both ancient and modern. Plato, for the solution of this question, maintained, that matter, from its nature, possesses a blind and refractory force, from which arises in it a propensity to disorder and deformity; and that this is the cause of all the imperfection which appears in the works of God, and the origin of Evil. Matter, he conceives, resists the will of the supreme Artificer, so that he cannot possibly execute his designs; and this is the cause of the mixture of good and Evil, which is found in the material world. "It cannot be," says he, "that Evil should be destroyed, for there must always be something contrary to good;" and again, "God wills, as far as it is possible, every thing good, and nothing Evil. " What that property of matter is which opposes the wise and benevolent intentions of the first Intelligence, Plato has not clearly explained; but he speaks of it as ξυμφυτος επιθυμια , an intimate propensity to disorder, and says, that before nature was adorned with its present beautiful forms, it was inclined to confusion and deformity, and that from this habitude arises all the Evil which happens in the world. Some of the Stoics adopted the notion of the Platonists concerning the origin of Evil and ascribed it to the defective nature of matter, which it is not in the power of the great Artificer to change; asserting, that imperfections appear in the world, not through any defect of skill in its author, but because matter will not admit of the accomplishment of his designs. For since, according to their system, matter itself receives all its qualities from God, if its defects be the cause of Evil, these defects must be ultimately ascribed to him. No other way of relieving this difficulty remained, than to have recourse to fate, and say, that Evil was the necessary consequence of that eternal necessity to which the great whole, comprehending both God and matter, is subject. To others the question concerning the origin of Evil appeared so intricate and difficult, that, finding themselves unequal to the solution of it, they denied either that there is any God at all, or, at least, any author or governor of the world. These persons perceiving a mixture of good and Evil, and being persuaded that so many inconsistencies and disorders could not proceed from a good being, supposed the existence of a malevolent principle, or god, directly contrary to the good one; hence they derived corruption and death, diseases, griefs, mischiefs, frauds, and villanies, while from the good being they deduced nothing but good. Samuel Clarke, in his "Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God," deduces from the possibility and real existence of human liberty an answer to the question, What is the cause and original of Evil? For liberty, he says, implying a natural power of doing Evil, as well as good; and the imperfect nature of finite beings making it possible for them to abuse this their liberty to an actual commission of Evil; and it being necessary to the order and beauty of the whole, and for displaying the infinite wisdom of the Creator, that there should be different and various degrees of creatures, whereof, consequently, some must be less perfect than others; hence there necessarily arises a possibility of Evil, notwithstanding that the Creator is infinitely good. In short thus: all that we call Evil is either an Evil of imperfection, as the want of certain faculties and excellencies which other creatures have; or natural Evil, as pain, death, and the like; or moral Evil, as all kinds of vice. The first of these is not properly an Evil: for every power, faculty, or perfection, which any creature enjoys, being the free gift of God, which he was no more obliged to bestow, than he was to confer being or existence itself, it is plain the want of any certain faculty or perfection in any kind of creatures which never belonged to their nature, is no more an Evil to them than their never having been created, or brought into being at all, could properly have been called an Evil. The second kind of Evil, which we call natural Evil, is either a necessary consequence of the former; as death, to a creature on whose nature immortality was never conferred; and then it is no more properly an Evil than the former; or else it is counterpoised, in the whole, with as great or greater good, as the afflictions and sufferings of good men, and then also it is not properly an Evil; or else, lastly, it is a punishment; and then it is a necessary consequent of the third and last sort of Evil, namely, moral Evil. And thus all sorts of Evils have entered into the world, without any diminution to the infinite goodness of its Creator and Governor. This is obviously all the answer which the question respecting the origin of Evil is capable of receiving. And though many questions may yet be asked, respecting a subject so mysterious as the permission of Evil by the Supreme Being, this is a part of his counsels of which we can have no cognizance, unless he is pleased to reveal them; and as revelation is silent upon this subject, except generally, that all his acts, his permissive ones as well as others, are "wise, and just and good" we may rest assured, that beyond what is revealed, human wisdom in the present state can never penetrate
Destructive - ) Causing destruction; tending to bring about ruin, death, or devastation; ruinous; fatal; productive of serious Evil; mischievous; pernicious; - often with of or to; as, intemperance is destructive of health; Evil examples are destructive to the morals of youth
Quade - ) Evil; bad; baffling; as, a quade wind
Evilly - ) In an Evil manner; not well; ill
Eblis - ) The prince of the Evil spirits; Satan
Pejorative - ) Implying or imputing Evil; depreciatory; disparaging; unfavorable
Malefaction - ) A crime; an offense; an Evil deed
Maleficience - ) The doing of Evil, harm, or mischief
Misfeign - ) To feign with an Evil design
Unclean Spirits - Elsewhere in the Bible Evil spirits are called demons (see DEMONS). Jesus’ victory over Evil spirits was a sign that the kingdom of God had come and Satan was being conquered (Matthew 4:23-24; Matthew 12:28; see KINGDOM OF GOD; SATAN). ...
When people were possessed by Evil spirits, their speech and behaviour changed. Evil spirits could enable them to have supernatural knowledge or strength, which could be used in an orderly way, but could also produce behaviour similar to hysteria or epilepsy. ...
Jesus and his disciples healed many who were possessed by Evil spirits, but the Bible usually makes a distinction between such people and those who suffered from normal sicknesses and diseases (Matthew 10:8; Mark 1:34; Mark 6:13; Acts 5:16; Acts 8:7; Acts 16:16-18; see DISEASE). Those possessed by unclean spirits were not necessarily morally Evil, and were not excluded from the synagogue. In fact, they were usually so tormented by the Evil spirits that they showed great relief and gratitude when freed from them (Mark 1:21-26; Mark 5:18-20; Luke 8:1-2). ...
Those whom Jesus cleansed from Evil spirits had to beware of becoming self-satisfied
Bad - , Mark 7:21 , "thoughts;" 1 Corinthians 15:33 , "company;" Colossians 3:5 , "desire;" 1 Timothy 6:10 , "all kinds of Evil;" 1 Peter 3:9 , "evil for Evil;" (b) in the sense of what is injurious or baneful, e. , the tongue as "a restless Evil," James 3:8 ; "evil beasts," Titus 1:12 ; "harm," Acts 16:28 ; once it is translated "bad," 2 Corinthians 5:10 . " See Evil , HARM , ILL , NOISOME , WICKED. ...
2: πονηρός (Strong's #4190 — Adjective — poneros — pon-ay-ros' ) connected with ponos, "labor," expresses especially the "active form of Evil," and is practically the same in meaning as (b), under No. See Evil , GRIEVOUS , HARM , LEWD , MALICIOUS , WICKED
Evil - If Christians believe in a God of love and power who created and controls the world, how can they explain the presence and power of Evil in the world? This question commonly puzzles people, but the Bible gives no direct answer to it. (Concerning the superior knowledge that Gnostics claimed to have regarding good and Evil see KNOWLEDGE. However, as freedom produced the possibility of devotion and goodness, so also it produced the possibility of rebellion and Evil. Evil was not a product of the creative activity of God, but a product of the wrong use of freedom by morally responsible beings (Genesis 3:1-7; James 1:12-13). ...
Life in a spoiled world...
The Bible commonly speaks of Evil in two different but related ways. Firstly, it speaks of Evil in a moral sense similar to that considered above, where Evil is the opposite of moral goodness (Proverbs 8:13; Jeremiah 7:24; Micah 2:1; Matthew 5:45; Matthew 15:19; Romans 7:19; Romans 7:21; 2 Thessalonians 3:2; for details see SIN). Satan, through whom this Evil entered the human race, is fittingly called ‘the Evil one’ (Genesis 3:1; Matthew 13:19; 1 John 2:13; 1 John 5:19; see SATAN). ...
Secondly, the Bible speaks of Evil in a more general sense, where it refers to calamities, conflicts, sufferings, misfortunes and even to things such as bad health and bad fruit. Yet there is a connection between these two uses of ‘evil’. Because the Evil of sin has infected the world, calamities and misfortunes have become part of life in the world. ...
When the Old Testament says that God sends both good and Evil, it is referring not to moral good and moral Evil, but to life’s blessings and troubles. They saw that the Evils of conflict, disaster and destruction were often God’s means of punishing the wicked (1 Samuel 16:14; Jeremiah 35:17; Amos 3:6). God can bring good out of Evil (Genesis 50:20; Romans 8:28). God usually does not explain why particular Evils occur or why people suffer from them. Nevertheless, he consistently uses those Evils to bring positive benefits (Habakkuk 1:13; Habakkuk 3:17-19; Luke 13:1-5; John 9:2-3; 2 Corinthians 12:7-9; see SUFFERING). This, however, does not excuse the people who cause the Evils (Isaiah 10:5-11; Jeremiah 51:5-10; Jeremiah 51:34-36; Matthew 26:24; Acts 2:23; Romans 3:8). ...
Probably the most feared of all Evils is death, but God uses even death to fulfil his purposes for good. Through death he has conquered death and delivered people from the power of Evil (Hebrews 2:14; see DEATH). Through Christ’s death, believers can enjoy victory over Evil while still living in the present Evil world (Romans 6:7-11; Romans 6:14; Galatians 1:4; see SALVATION). They will enjoy final victory when Christ returns to remove all Evil, even to its last trace, and bring in God’s new heaven and new earth (1 Corinthians 15:25-28; Revelation 21:4; Revelation 21:27; Revelation 22:1-3)
Discernment of Spirits - A judgment whereby to discern whether an impulse in the soul comes from the good spirit (God or angel), or from the Evil one; a free gift of God and infallibly certain, when resting on a special supernatural illumination; an act of prudence, more or less perfect, when based on reflection and experience. In well disposed souls the action of the good spirit is recognized by the effect of tranquillity and a consistent tendency toward good, that of the Evil one by disturbance, and a more or less hidden tendency towards Evil
Anger - (Latin: ango, distress) ...
A strongly exciting emotion aroused by an Evil that is present but not acquiesced in. Anger is not purely painful as it includes the agreeable consciousness of energetic reaction against Evil, and is not of itself morally Evil, but may be at times a high moral force in the form of virtuous indignation, called "just" anger
Albigenses - This error taught that there were two gods: the good god of light usually referred to as Jesus in the New Testament and the god of darkness and Evil usually associated with Satan and the "God of the Old Testament. " Anything material was considered Evil including the body which was created by Satan. The soul, created by the good god, was imprisoned in the Evil flesh and salvation was possible only through holy living and doing good works
Belial - In later times the name Belial denoted the devil: "What concord hath Christ with Belial?" ...
2 Corinthians 6:15 ; for as the word literally imports "one who will do no one good," the positive sense of a doer of Evil was applied to Satan, who is the author of Evil, and, eminently, "the Evil One
Bewitch - 1: βασκαίνω (Strong's #940 — Verb — baskaino — bas-kah'ee-no ) primarily, "to slander, to prate about anyone;" then "to bring Evil on a person by feigned praise, or mislead by an Evil eye, and so to charm, bewitch" (Eng. , "fascinate" is connected), is used figuratively in Galatians 3:1 , of leading into Evil doctrine
Rassation - ) A wandering about with Evil intentions; a rioting
Energumen - ) One possessed by an Evil spirit; a demoniac
Defamed - Slandered dishonored or injured by Evil reports
Deeds - Evil deeds are distinct from Evil words or thoughts
Dolus - ) Evil intent, embracing both malice and fraud
Circumspectness - ) Vigilance in guarding against Evil from every quarter; caution
Evil One - EVIL ONE
Warned - Cautioned against danger admonished of approaching Evil notified
Exorcise - ) To cast out, as a devil, Evil spirits, etc. ) To deliver or purify from the influence of an Evil spirit or demon
Welfare - Exemption from misfortune, sickness, calamity or Evil the enjoyment of health and the common blessings of life prosperity happiness applied to persons. Exemption from any unusual Evil or calamity the enjoyment of peace and prosperity, or the ordinary blessings of society and government applied to states
Abusion - ) Evil or corrupt usage; abuse; wrong; reproach; deception; cheat
Faitour - ) A doer or actor; particularly, an Evil doer; a scoundrel
Enticer - ) One who entices; one who incites or allures to Evil
Safely - ) In a safe manner; danger, injury, loss, or Evil consequences
Malevolent - ) Wishing Evil; disposed to injure others; rejoicing in another's misfortune
Malversation - ) Evil conduct; fraudulent practices; misbehavior, corruption, or extortion in office
Satanism - ) The Evil and malicious disposition of Satan; a diabolical spirit
Devil - ) To make like a devil; to invest with the character of a devil. ) A very wicked person; hence, any great Evil. ) An Evil spirit; a demon. ) The Evil One; Satan, represented as the tempter and spiritual of mankind
Malice, Maliciousness, Malicious - See Evil , B, No. ...
Note: In 2 John 1:10 , AV, poneros, "evil, wicked" (see Evil , A
Mahound - ) A contemptuous name for Mohammed; hence, an Evil spirit; a devil
Misaffection - ) An Evil or wrong affection; the state of being ill affected
Imagination - KJV term for thought as the prelude to action, frequently in the sense of plotting or devising Evil; can also refer to stubbornness from the Hebrew words meaning formed or twisted. Imagination means Evil plans (Proverbs 6:18 ; Lamentations 3:60-61 ). At Deuteronomy 31:21 and possibly Romans 1:21 , imagination refers to the inclination to do Evil. For example, the RSV used imagination only four times: for the inclination to do Evil (Genesis 6:5 ; Genesis 8:21 NRSV reads, “inclination”); for the plans of the proud ( Luke 1:51 NSRV reads “thoughts”); and in connection with the making of idols ( Acts 17:29 ) where imagination may mean creativity or more likely a depraved mind. The NIV also used imagination four times: in reference to fabricating prophecy (Ezekiel 13:2 ,Ezekiel 13:2,13:17 ); and for Evil plans (Isaiah 65:2 ; Isaiah 66:18 )
Malefactor - ‘evil-doer’), John 18:30, 1 Peter 2:12; 1 Peter 2:14; 1 Peter 4:15; (2) κακοῦργος (lit. ‘evil-worker’), Luke 23:32-33; Luke 23:39, 2 Timothy 2:9. Authorized Version renders κακοποιός ‘malefactor’ in John 18:30, ‘evil-doer’ elsewhere; but Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 gives ‘evil-doer’ throughout. Again Authorized Version renders κακοῦργος ‘malefactor’ in Luke 23:32-33; Luke 23:39, ‘evil-doer’ in 2 Timothy 2:9, while Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 makes it always ‘malefactor
Mischief - Harm hurt injury damage Evil, whether intended or not. Ill consequence Evil vexatious affair
Wickedness - Departure from the rules of the divine law Evil disposition or practices immorality crime sin sinfulness corrupt manners Wickedness generally signifies Evil practices
Cacodemon - ) An Evil spirit; a devil or demon
Ahriman - Modern Persian form of Anro Mainyus, Evil spirit of Zoroastrian Iranians and Parsees
Deprecatory - ) Serving to deprecate; tending to remove or avert Evil by prayer; apologetic
Enticed - Incited instigated to Evil seduced by promises or persuasions persuaded allured
Misgiving - ) Evil premonition; doubt; distrust
be'ra - (son of Evil ) king of Sodom
Rasha - a wicked individual; according to Chassidut, anyone who still succumbs to his Evil inclination...
Evil-Minded - ) Having Evil dispositions or intentions; disposed to mischief or sin; malicious; malignant; wicked
Mistide - ) To happen or come to pass unfortunately; also, to suffer Evil fortune
Undevil - ) To free from possession by a devil or Evil spirit; to exorcise
Revenge - ) The act of revenging; vengeance; retaliation; a returning of Evil for Evil. ) The disposition to revenge; a malignant wishing of Evil to one who has done us an injury
Affect - 1: κακόω (Strong's #2559 — Verb — kakoo — kak-o'-o ) from kakos, "evil, to treat badly, to hurt," also means "to make Evil affected, to embitter," Acts 14:2 . See Evil , HARM , HURT
Worst - Most bad most Evil in a moral sense as the worst man the worst sinner. Most afflictive, pernicious or calamitous as the worst Evil that can befall a state or an individual. The most Evil state in a moral sense
Beriah - A gift, or in Evil. ...
...
A son of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:20-23 ), born after the slaughter of his brothers, and so called by his father "because it went Evil with his house" at that time
Bale - ) Evil; an Evil, pernicious influence; something causing great injury
Worst - ) Bad, Evil, or pernicious, in the highest degree, whether in a physical or moral sense. ) That which is most bad or Evil; the most severe, pernicious, calamitous, or wicked state or degree
Sceva - His seven sons pretended to practice exorcism, and presumed to call on Evil spirits to come out from persons possessed, in the name of Jesus. Their ignominious discomfiture by a man possessed by and Evil spirit, promoted the cause of the gospel at Ephesus, Acts 19:14-16
Quitch - ) Figuratively: A vice; a taint; an Evil
Misdemeanor - ) Ill behavior; Evil conduct; fault
Afreet - ) A powerful Evil jinnee, demon, or monstrous giant
al'Vah - (evil ), a duke of Edom, ( Genesis 36:40 ) written ALIAH in (1 Chronicles 1:51 )
Saved - Preserved from Evil injury or destruction kept frugally prevented spared taken in time
Transgression - See Evil ; Forgiveness ; Repentance ; Salvation; Sin
Evil-Eyed - ) Possessed of the supposed Evil eye; also, looking with envy, jealousy, or bad design; malicious
Defending - Denying opposing resisiting forbidding maintaining uninjured by force or by reason securing from Evil
Taranis - ) A Celtic divinity, regarded as the Evil principle, but confounded by the Romans with Jupiter
Oblin - ) An Evil or mischievous spirit; a playful or malicious elf; a frightful phantom; a gnome
Wariness - ) The quality or state of being wary; care to foresee and guard against Evil; cautiousness
Machinator - ) One who machinates, or forms a scheme with Evil designs; a plotter or artful schemer
Mishap - ) Evil accident; ill luck; misfortune; mischance
Revenging - Inflicting pain or Evil spitefully for injury or affront received
Sinister - ) Indicative of lurking Evil or harm; boding covert danger; as, a sinister countenance. ) Unlucky; inauspicious; disastrous; injurious; Evil; - the left being usually regarded as the unlucky side; as, sinister influences
Publican - Matthew 11:19 (b) This name is applied to any Evil person as an epithet of contempt. ...
Luke 18:10 (b) The word here is used to represent any Evil person who comes to CHRIST in repentance and accepts the Saviour to be his Lord and Master
Provoke - ‘To provoke’ is now ‘to try to call forth Evil passions,’ but in AV [1] it is used in the sense of inciting to any action, good or Evil, as 2 Corinthians 9:2 ‘Your zeal hath provoked very many
Abyss - The abode of the dead and the place where Evil spirits are imprisoned (Revelation 9:1-11)
Hatred - ) Strong aversion; intense dislike; hate; an affection of the mind awakened by something regarded as Evil
Tempting - Enticing to Evil trying
Collogue - ) To talk or confer secretly and confidentially; to converse, especially with Evil intentions; to plot mischief
Accurse - ) To devote to destruction; to imprecate misery or Evil upon; to curse; to execrate; to anathematize
Devilry - ) The whole body of Evil spirits. ) Conduct suitable to the devil; extreme wickedness; deviltry
Tempter - ) One who tempts or entices; especially, Satan, or the Devil, regarded as the great enticer to Evil
Malediction - ) A proclaiming of Evil against some one; a cursing; imprecation; a curse or execration; - opposed to benediction
Malfeasance - ) The doing of an act which a person ought not to do; Evil conduct; an illegal deed
Noisome - 1: κακός (Strong's #2556 — Adjective — kakos — kak-os' ) "evil," is translated "noisome" in Revelation 16:2
Loki - ) The Evil deity, the author of all calamities and mischief, answering to the African of the Persians
Sain - ) To sanctify; to bless so as to protect from Evil influence
Wittingly - ...
He knowingly and wittingly brought Evil into the world
Threaten - ) To utter threats against; to menace; to inspire with apprehension; to alarm, or attempt to alarm, as with the promise of something Evil or disagreeable; to warn. ) To exhibit the appearance of (something Evil or unpleasant) as approaching; to indicate as impending; to announce the conditional infliction of; as, to threaten war; to threaten death
Propensity - ) The quality or state of being propense; natural inclination; disposition to do good or Evil; bias; bent; tendency
Dire - ) Evil in great degree; dreadful; dismal; horrible; terrible; lamentable
Double Tongue - 1 Timothy 3:8 (a) This describes a tongue that speaks both good and Evil about the same person
Morose - ) Lascivious; brooding over Evil thoughts
Fallow-Ground - , break off all your Evil habits; clear your hearts of weeds, in order that they may be prepared for the seed of righteousness. So says the prophet, "Break off your Evil ways, repent of your sins, cease to do Evil, and then the good seed of the word will have room to grow and bear fruit
Threaten - To declare the purpose of inflicting punishment, pain or other Evil on another, for some sin or offense to menace. To menace by action to present the appearance of coming Evil as, rolling billows threaten to overwhelm us. To exhibit the appearance of something Evil or unpleasant approaching as, the clouds threaten us with rain or a storm
Crying - ) Calling for notice; compelling attention; notorious; heinous; as, a crying Evil
Frame-up - for a malicious or Evil purpose, as to incriminate a person on false evidence
Portent - , that which portends Evil; a sign of coming calamity; an omen; a sign
Evilness - ) The condition or quality of being Evil; badness; viciousness; malignity; vileness; as, Evilness of heart; the Evilness of sin
Execration - The act of cursing a curse pronounced imprecation of Evil utter detestation expressed
Remedial - ) Affording a remedy; intended for a remedy, or for the removal or abatement of an Evil; as, remedial treatment
Ahi'ra - (brother of Evil , i
Malign - ) Having an Evil disposition toward others; harboring violent enmity; malevolent; malicious; spiteful; - opposed to benign. ) To speak great Evil of; to traduce; to defame; to slander; to vilify; to asperse
Scapegoat - The one of the two buck goats presented before the Lord on the Day of Atonement, chosen by lot to be the emissary goat, not sacrificed for sin, as his companion, but let go into the wilderness, symbolic of carrying the iniquities of the Chosen People into an uninhabited land; or, as some interpret the emissary goat to mean the Evil spirit, symbolic of turning back on the Evil spirit the sins which he instigated (Leviticus 8)
Concupiscible - ) Exciting desire, good or Evil
Mischievous - ) Causing mischief; harmful; hurtful; - now often applied where the Evil is done carelessly or in sport; as, a mischievous child
Missay - ) To speak Evil of; to slander
Idle - The "idle word" which Christ condemns, is a word morally useless and Evil
Clandestine - ) Conducted with secrecy; withdrawn from public notice, usually for an Evil purpose; kept secret; hidden; private; underhand; as, a clandestine marriage
Ahriman - ) The Evil Principle or Being of the ancient Persians; the Prince of Darkness as opposer to Ormuzd, the King of Light
Prognosticate - ) To indicate as future; to foretell from signs or symptoms; to prophesy; to foreshow; to predict; as, to prognosticate Evil
Pandemonium - ) The great hall or council chamber of demons or Evil spirits
Venom - Deuteronomy 32:33 (b) This describes the Evil and wicked effect of Israel's activities as they worshiped idols and forsook the Lord
Enticing - Inciting to Evil urging to sin by motives, flattery or persuasion alluring
Eschew - ...
Job--feared God and eschewed Evil
Witchcraft - ) The practices or art of witches; sorcery; enchantments; intercourse with Evil spirits
Malevolence - ) The quality or state of being malevolent; Evil disposition toward another; inclination to injure others; ill will
Heart - ...
"A good man, (saith the Lord Jesus) out of the good treasure of his heart, bringeth forth that which is good; and an Evil man, out of the Evil treasure of his heart, bringeth forth that which is Evil; for out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh
Eschew - ]'>[1] it occurs only in Job 1:1 ; Job 1:8 ; Job 2:3 of Job himself, as Job 1:1 ‘one that feared God, and eschewed Evil,’ and in 1 Peter 3:11 ‘Let him eschew Evil, and do good
Bera - Gift, or son of Evil, king of Sodom at the time of the invasion of the four kings under Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:2,8,17,21 )
Ahira - Brother of Evil = unlucky, or my brother is friend, chief of the tribe of Naphtali at the Exodus (Numbers 1:15 ; 2:29 )
Avengement - Vengeance punishment the act of taking satisfaction for an injury in inflicting pain or Evil on the offender satisfaction taken revenge
Manitu - ) A name given by tribes of American Indians to a great spirit, whether good or Evil, or to any object of worship
Ill - Bad or Evil, in a general sense contrary to good, physical or moral applied to things Evil wicked wrong iniquitous as, his ways are : he sets an example. Producing Evil or misfortune as an star or planet. Bad Evil unfortunate as an end an fate. Wickedness depravity Evil. Misfortune calamity Evil disease pain whatever annoys or impairs happiness, or prevents success. ...
ILL, prefixed to participles of the present tense, and denoting Evil or wrong, may be considered as a noun governed by the participle, or as making a part of a compound word as an meaning man, an designing man, an boding hour that is, a man meaning an hour boding It is more consonant, however, to the genius of our language, to treat these and similar words as compounds
Evil - To possess beingln imperfection is the lot of all created natures; in this sense all created natures are Evil, when considered in relation to God, Who is absolute perfection of being. It will be seen from this analysis of what is admittedly Evil in fact, that Evil is of its nature a negative entity-an absence, a want, a defect, a perversion-a denial of good. Moral Evil is properly a functional defect, a free and deliberate defection from a known standard of moral goodness
Pull - Psalm 31:4 (b) This action indicates the way that GOD delivers His child from the Evil plans and wicked ways of the ungodly
Rope - Isaiah 5:18 (b) This is emblematic of schemes and plans which are made to Evil purposes and to assist one in committing sins
Unthankful - ...
For he is kind to the unthankful and to the Evil
Plague - ) That which smites, wounds, or troubles; a blow; a calamity; any afflictive Evil or torment; a great trail or vexation. ) To infest or afflict with disease, calamity, or natural Evil of any kind
Demon - ...
 ...
In the New Testament the word is synonymous with the Evil spirit, and in English versions of the Bible is rendered "devil" and consequently designates a maleficent being, a meaning not necessarily implied in the original yord "demon. " One possessed or controlled by an Evil spirit is a demoniac, or energumen
Evil - Natural Evil is whatever destroys or any way disturbs the perfection of natural beings; such as blindness, diseases, death, &c. Moral Evil is the disagreement between the actions of a moral agent, and the rule of those actions, whatever it is
Backbiter, Backbiting - Katalalia is translated "evil speaking" in 1 Peter 2:1 , "backbiting" in 2 Corinthians 12:20 . ...
Note: The corresponding verb katalaleo the RV translates "speak against," in its five occurrences, James 4:11 (three times); 1 Peter 2:12 , and 3:16; AV, "speak Evil," in all the passages except 1 Peter 2:12
Theodicy - The study of the problem of Evil in the world. How could a holy and loving God who is in control of all things allow Evil to exist? The answer has been debated for as long as the church has existed. ...
It is clear that God is sovereign, and that He has willed the existence of both good and Evil, and that all of this is for His own glory
Unrighteous - ) Not righteous; Evil; wicked; sinful; as, an unrighteous man
Perpetration - ) The thing perpetrated; an Evil action
Misfortune - ) Bad fortune or luck; calamity; an Evil accident; disaster; mishap; mischance
Relieved - Freed from pain or other Evil eased or cured aided succored dismissed from watching
Poison - Deuteronomy 32:33 (a) The terrible story in this verse is to reveal to us that the vine planted by our Lord, which should have produced lovely grapes, was really bringing forth poisonous liquor, such as the wickedness and Evil of Sodom. ...
Psalm 58:4 (a) This figure represents the Evil words and teachings of the ungodly hypocrite. That which the hypocrite says and does influences for Evil those who listen to him. ...
Romans 3:13 (a) By this we understand that the messages that issued from the lips of ungodly teachers who are leaders of false religions are Evil poison. He is also telling us that Evil speaking of any kind only hurts, damages and injures those who hear such messages
Satan - Among the angelic spirits of the unseen world there are those that are Evil, though the Bible nowhere records how they fell into such a condition. The chief of these Evil angelic spirits is one known as the adversary – the adversary of God, his people, and all that is good. The Hebrew word for ‘adversary’ is satan, which later became the name used in the Bible for this leader of Evil (Job 1:6). He is also called the devil (Matthew 4:1-12; 1 John 3:8; Revelation 12:9), the prince of demons (Matthew 13:24-26; Matthew 12:24; see also BEELZEBUL), the prince of this world (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11), the god of this world (2 Corinthians 4:4), the prince of the power of the air (Ephesians 2:2), the Evil one (Matthew 13:19; Ephesians 6:16; 1 John 2:13; 1 John 3:12) and the accuser of the brethren (Revelation 12:10; cf. ...
God’s rebellious servant...
We should not think that Satan is in some way the equal of God, one being a good God and the other an Evil God. There are good angels and Evil angels, Satan being chief of the Evil ones (Matthew 25:31; Hebrews 2:14-150; Ephesians 6:12; Judges 1:9; Revelation 12:7-9; see ANGELS; DEMONS). ...
Also there are not, as it were, two kingdoms, a kingdom of good where God is absolute ruler and a kingdom of Evil where Satan is absolute ruler. Like all created beings, he is under the rule and authority of God and he can do his Evil work only within the limits God allows (Job 1:12; Job 2:6; cf. In spite of the Evil he loves to do, he is still fulfilling God’s purposes, even though unwillingly (Job 1:9-12; 1 Kings 22:19-23; cf. ...
This does not mean that God tempts people to do Evil. God desires rather to save people from Evil (Matthew 6:13; 1 Corinthians 10:13). God allows Evil angels to continue to exist just as he allows Evil people. He opposes all that is good and encourages all that is Evil. He works not only through people who are obviously Evil (Acts 13:8-10; Ephesians 2:1-3; 1 John 3:10; 1 John 3:12; Revelation 2:13), but also through those who appear to be good (Mark 8:33; John 8:44; Acts 5:3; Revelation 2:9; Revelation 3:9). ...
Satan causes people physical suffering through disease (Luke 13:16; 2 Corinthians 12:7; see DISEASE), and Evil spirits (Mark 3:20-27; Mark 7:25; Acts 10:38; see MAGIC; UNCLEAN SPIRITS)
Cursedness - ) The state of being under a curse or of being doomed to execration or to Evil
Beelzebub - ) The title of a heathen deity to whom the Jews ascribed the sovereignty of the Evil spirits; hence, the Devil or a devil
Eradicative - ) Tending or serving to eradicate; curing or destroying thoroughly, as a disease or any Evil
Hatred - Is the aversion of the will to any object considered by us as Evil, or to any person or thing we suppose can do us harm. Yet he is said to hate the wicked, Psalms 5:5 ; and indignation and wrath, tribulation and anguish, will be upon every soul of man that does Evil
Devil - DEVIL, n. In the Christian theology, an Evil spirit or being a fallen angel, expelled from heaven for rebellion against God the chief of the apostate angels the implacable enemy and tempter of the human race. A very wicked person, and in ludicrous language, an great Evil
Privilege - ) A peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor; a right or immunity not enjoyed by others or by all; special enjoyment of a good, or exemption from an Evil or burden; a prerogative; advantage; franchise. ) To bring or put into a condition of privilege or exemption from Evil or danger; to exempt; to deliver
Meal - Both CHRIST and His Word are able to dispel all poisonous thoughts in the life, and to deliver safely from the Evil doctrines and teachings of false religions. Since the meal offering represents the life of CHRIST offered to the Father instead of our own, we are rather inclined to believe that this meal may represent the blessed Person of our Lord JESUS who delivers from all Evil doctrines, and every poisonous faith
Transparent - It covers many sins, and Evil motives. The gold of Heaven hides no hypocrisy, no sham, no Evil
Sodom - This city was filled with wickedness, lust and Evil of every sort. Israel and the city of Jerusalem took on the sins of Sodom and practiced their Evil ways so that GOD used that name as a description of the places where His people lived, and of the people themselves
Exorcist, - one who pretends to expel Evil spirits by conjuration, prayers and ceremonies. (Matthew 12:27 ; Acts 19:13 ) David, by playing skillfully on a harp, procured the temporary departure of the Evil spirit which troubled Saul. (1 Samuel 16:23 ) The power of casting out devils was bestowed by Christ while on earth upon the apostles, (Matthew 10:8 ) and the seventy disciples (Luke 10:17-19 ) and was, according to his promise, (Mark 16:17 ) exercised by believers after his ascension
Palindrome - ) A word, verse, or sentence, that is the same when read backward or forward; as, madam; Hannah; or Lewd did I live, & Evil I did dwel
Presentiment - ) Previous sentiment, conception, or opinion; previous apprehension; especially, an antecedent impression or conviction of something unpleasant, distressing, or calamitous, about to happen; anticipation of Evil; foreboding
Broth - Isaiah 65:4 (b) This term is used to describe the Evil mixture of lust and pleasure which Israel was enjoying in her rebellion against the Lord
Welfare - ) Well-doing or well-being in any respect; the enjoyment of health and the common blessings of life; exemption from any Evil or calamity; prosperity; happiness
Carefulness - Heedfulness caution vigilance, in guarding against Evil, and providing for safety
Longer - This Evil can be endured no longer
Foul - Revelation 18:2 (a) In this way GOD reveals His utter hatred for the wicked practices and the Evil beliefs which prevail in those great world systems of religion which are described as Babylon. In these religious systems every Evil known to man prospers and is promoted. Luther and others were blessed of GOD in breaking open many of these prison cells, and setting great multitudes free from the tyranny, the wickedness, the Evil of the monster that held them captives
End Justifies the Means - A maxim which is true if the end and means be good, not if either be Evil. This maxim, or practise, was attributed to the early Christians in the sense that they were doing Evil in order to obtain something good. "And not rather (as we are slandered, and as some affirm that we say) let us do Evil, that there may come good 1" (Rom. The Jesuits were accused of approving any Evil means, in order to attsain their end
Rectitude - or UPRIGHTNESS, is the choosing and pursuing those things which the mind, upon due inquiry and attention, clearly perceives to be good, and avoiding those that are Evil
Concupiscence - The "lust of concupiscence" ( 1 Thessalonians 4:5 ; RSV, "passion of lust") denotes Evil desire, indwelling sin
Abominate - abomino, supposed to be formed by ab and omen to deprecate as ominous may the Gods avert the Evil
Lasting - Durable of long continuance that may continue or endure as a lasting good or Evil a lasting color
Reward - ...
To give in return, either good or Evil. ...
Thou hast rewarded me good, whereas I have rewarded thee Evil. When Evil or suffering is return for injury or wickedness, reward signifies to punish with just retribution, to take vengeance on, according to the nature of the case. ...
In the latter passage, reward signifies to render with good and Evil. Punishment a just return of Evil or suffering for wickedness
Evil Speaking - It is an express command of Scripture, "To speak Evil of no man. By which, however, we are not to understand that there are no occasions on which we are at liberty to speak of others that which may be considered as Evil. This is an Evil, however, which greatly abounds, and which is not sufficiently watched against; for it is not when we openly speak Evil of others only that we are guilty, but even in speaking what is true we are in danger of speaking Evil of others. The impropriety and sinfulness of Evil speaking will appear, if we consider, ...
1. Expressly condemned and prohibited as Evil, Psalms 64:3 . on Evil Speaking
Good, Goodness - For human beings goodness involves right behavior, expresses itself in kindness and other praiseworthy qualities, includes avoiding Evil, and springs from the inner person. ...
Goodness involves not only right behavior but also avoiding its opposite, Evil. The choice between good and Evil has lain before people since the garden of Eden when Adam and Eve ate fruit from the "tree of the knowledge of good and Evil" (Genesis 2:9 ). Since then God's curse has fallen on "those who call Evil good and good Evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter" (Isaiah 5:20 ). A wise ruler like Solomon, or indeed anyone who wants to obey God, needs the wisdom to tell good from Evil (1 Kings 3:9 ; Hebrews 5:14 ). Those who serve God will "seek good, not Evil, hate Evil, love good" (Amos 5:14-15 ). An Evil person is Evil within (Genesis 6:5 ; Mark 7:14-23 ; and parallels)
Wicked - In eight of these RV has substituted some other reading: ‘evil’ in Matthew 12:45, Luke 11:26, Ephesians 6:16, Colossians 1:21, 1 John 5:19, ‘lawless’ in Acts 2:23 (on the basis of a different reading: διὰ χειρὸς ἀνόμων instead of TR διὰ χειρῶν ἀνόμων), 2 Thessalonians 2:8, ‘amiss’ in Acts 25:5. In four of these instances the change from ‘wicked’ to ‘evil’ is due to the fact that Evil spirits are referred to; in Acts 2:23, where, with the changed text, ἄνομος ceases to be an attribute of hands and becomes a characterization of persons, it naturally resumes its literal meaning of ‘lawless’; in 2 Thessalonians 2:8 ‘the lawless one’ is preferable, because ἄνομος probably rests on pre-Pauline Jewish tradition which represented the Antichrist as an enemy to the Law, so that ‘wicked’ would be too vague a translation; in Acts 25:5 ‘amiss’ reproduces ἄτοπον more closely than ‘wicked. ’ The change in Colossians 1:21 from ‘wicked works’ to ‘evil works’ has nothing in the context to recommend it. In Matthew 7:18 ‘evil fruits’ = ‘unwholesome, injurious fruits’; Acts 28:21, ‘evil words’ are ‘harmful words’; 1 Corinthians 5:13, ‘the wicked’ fornicator is so called because his uncleanness infects the whole Church (1 Corinthians 5:6). ‘Evil times’ are dangerous times (Galatians 1:4, Ephesians 5:16; Ephesians 6:13). Especially of Satan and other Evil spirits the word πονηρός is appropriately used, because they are intent upon doing Evil and working harm (Ephesians 6:16), but for the same reason it applies to men who seek to injure others (Acts 17:5; Acts 18:14; Acts 25:18). In Colossians 1:21 the works of paganism are called ἔργα πονηρά because they establish enmity between God and men: the rendering ‘wicked works’ of AV expresses this better than ‘evil works’ of RV . From the connotation of Evil intent it is to be explained that τὸ πονηρόν‚ τὰ πονηρά are never used of the physical Evil of Divine retribution. κακόν and κακά are the words for this, because, even when God finds it necessary to punish, no Evil intent can be predicated of Him. It is no exception when occasionally the adjective is used with such things as ἕλκος, νόσος in the sense of ‘malignant,’ for here the Evil intent is metaphorically attributed to the disease (Deuteronomy 6:22). Only in regard to the last-mentioned passage is the personal reference to Satan placed beyond doubt by 1 John 5:18; hence the rendering of RV , ‘in the Evil one,’ is to be preferred to the ‘in wickedness’ of AV
Cockatrice - Isaiah 14:29 (b) This represents the cruel and Evil result of plans which are promoted by Satan and carried out by wicked men
Armageddon - It is the location of the final great battle between good and Evil called the Great Day of God Almighty
Mal - A prefix in composition denoting ill,or Evil, F
Complot - ) A plotting together; a confederacy in some Evil design; a conspiracy
Detest - ) To hate intensely; to abhor; to abominate; to loathe; as, we detest what is contemptible or Evil
Jinnee - ) A genius or demon; one of the fabled genii, good and Evil spirits, supposed to be the children of fire, and to have the power of assuming various forms
Justice - The justice of God is in this, that He loves good and hates Evil, and hence He rewards the good and punishes the Evil
Hate - ) Strong aversion coupled with desire that Evil should befall the person toward whom the feeling is directed; as exercised toward things, intense dislike; hatred; detestation; - opposed to love. ) To have a great aversion to, with a strong desire that Evil should befall the person toward whom the feeling is directed; to dislike intensely; to detest; as, to hate one's enemies; to hate hypocrisy
Habit - It is a very great aid in the performance of virtuous actions and a fatal influence in Evil-doing, though there is no Evil habit that, with divine grace, cannot be resisted and corrected
Vile - ...
3: πονηρός (Strong's #4190 — Adjective — poneros — pon-ay-ros' ) "evil," is translated "vile" in Acts 17:5 , RV (AV, "lewd"). See BAD , Evil
Rescue - ) To free or deliver from any confinement, violence, danger, or Evil; to liberate from actual restraint; to remove or withdraw from a state of exposure to Evil; as, to rescue a prisoner from the enemy; to rescue seamen from destruction
Abaddon - 1) Hebrew word meaning ruin, place of destruction, realm of the dead (Job 31) ...
2) A prince of Hell, Evil angel of death and disaster (Apocalypse 9); same as Apollyon, Destroyer
Badness - The state of being bad, Evil, vicious or depraved want of good qualities, natural or moral as the badness of the heart, of the season, of the roads, & 100...
Alas - ) An exclamation expressive of sorrow, pity, or apprehension of Evil; - in old writers, sometimes followed by day or white; alas the day, like alack a day, or alas the white
Discreet - ) Possessed of discernment, especially in avoiding error or Evil, and in the adaptation of means to ends; prudent; sagacious; judicious; not rash or heedless; cautious
Abominable - ) Worthy of, or causing, abhorrence, as a thing of Evil omen; odious in the utmost degree; very hateful; detestable; loathsome; execrable
Bechirah chofshit - The principle according to which every individual is empowered to make unconstrained moral decisions and hence be held accountable for his or her conduct, be it good or Evil
Bedevil - ) To throw into utter disorder and confusion, as if by the agency of Evil spirits; to bring under diabolical influence; to torment
Concupiscence - Concupiscence is intense desire, always in a bad sense, so that it is unnecessary to say ‘evil concupiscence’ as in Colossians 3:5
Preeminent - ) Eminent above others; prominent among those who are eminent; superior in excellence; surpassing, or taking precedence of, others; rarely, surpassing others in Evil, or in bad qualities; as, preeminent in guilt
Flee - ) To run away, as from danger or Evil; to avoid in an alarmed or cowardly manner; to hasten off; - usually with from
Deprecate - ) To pray against, as an Evil; to seek to avert by prayer; to desire the removal of; to seek deliverance from; to express deep regret for; to disapprove of strongly
Malefactor - ) An Evil doer; one who commits a crime; one subject to public prosecution and punishment; a criminal
Beinoni - �intermediate one�); an individual whose spiritual labors have brought him to a level of perfection in thought, word and deed, despite his still-active Evil inclination; see Tanya, ch
Fear - A painful emotion or passion excited by an expectation of Evil, or the apprehension of impending danger. Fear is accompanied with a desire to avoid or ward off the expected Evil. Fear is an uneasiness of mind, upon the thought of future Evil likely to befall us. Fear is the passion of our nature which excites us to provide for our security, on the approach of Evil. To feel a painful apprehension of some impending Evil to be afraid of to consider or expect with emotions of alarm or solicitude. I will fear no Evil, for thou art with me. ...
FEAR, To be in apprehension of Evil to be afraid to feel anxiety on account of some expected Evil
Snare - 1: παγίς (Strong's #3803 — Noun Feminine — pagis — pag-ece' ) "a trap, a snare" (akin to pegnumi, "to fix," and pagideuo, "to ensnare," which see), is used metaphorically of (a) the allurements to Evil by which the Devil "ensnares" one, 1 Timothy 3:7 ; 2 Timothy 2:26 ; (b) seductions to Evil, which "ensnare" those who "desire to be rich," 1 Timothy 6:9 ; (c) the Evil brought by Israel upon themselves by which the special privileges Divinely granted them and centering in Christ, became a "snare" to them, their rejection of Christ and the Gospel being the retributive effect of their apostasy, Romans 11:9 ; (d) of the sudden judgments of God to come upon those whose hearts are "overcharged with sufeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life," Luke 21:35 (ver
Dread - Great fear, or apprehension of Evil or danger. It is an uneasiness or alarm excited by expected pain, loss or other Evil. We speak of the dread of Evil the dread of suffering the dread of the divine displeasure
Fear - ) To be in apprehension of Evil; to be afraid; to feel anxiety on account of some expected Evil. ) A painful emotion or passion excited by the expectation of Evil, or the apprehension of impending danger; apprehension; anxiety; solicitude; alarm; dread
Worse - More Evil more bad or : more depraved and corrupt in a moral sense. Evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse. In a manner more Evil or bad
Backbite - ) To censure or revile the absent. ) To wound by clandestine detraction; to censure meanly or spitefully (an absent person); to slander or speak Evil of (one absent)
Dangerous - Creating danger causing risk of Evil as a dangerous man a dangerous conspiracy
Escaping - Fleeing from and avoiding danger or Evil being passed unobserved or unhurt shunning evading securing safety quitting the custody of the law, without warrant
Unawares - The Evil came upon us unawares
Purge - To cleanse from impurity, frequently in the figurative sense of cleansing from Evil (Deuteronomy 13:5 ), guilt (Deuteronomy 19:13 ), idolatrous worship (2 Chronicles 34:3 ), and sin (Psalm 51:7 )
Bera - (bee' ruh) Personal name perhaps meaning, “with Evil” or “victory
Evidently - The Evil of sin may be evidently proved by its mischievous effect
Imprecate - ...
To invoke, as an Evil on any one to pray that a curse or calamity may fall on one's self or on another person
Demogorgon - ) A mysterious, terrible, and Evil divinity, regarded by some as the author of creation, by others as a great magician who was supposed to command the spirits of the lower world
Tempter - One that solicits or entices to Evil. The great adversary of man the devil
Repent - 6:6); “And the Lord repented [1] of the Evil which he thought to do unto his people” ( Evil, I will repent of the Evil that I thought to do unto them” ( Evil in my sight, that it obey not my voice, then I will repent of the good …” ( Evil” (Joel 2:13). In other instances, the Lord changed His mind; obviously, He changed when man changed to make the right choices, but He could not change His attitude toward Evil when man continued on the wrong course. ...
God usually changed His mind and “repented” of His actions because of man’s intercession and repentance of his Evil deeds. Moses pleaded with God as the intercessor for Israel: “Turn from thy fierce wrath, and repent of this Evil against thy people” ( Evil which he thought to do unto his people” ( Evil way; and God repented of the Evil, that he had said that he would do unto them …” (Jonah 3:10)
Moral Good - While the goodness or badness of many acts is determined by positive law, yet ultimately, the distinction between good and Evil is a natural one, right rational nature constituting the proximate norm of morality and the Divine Nature or Reason the ultimate norm. ,when in conformity with right rational nature; otherwise it is Evil. Hence there exists a distinction between moral good and Evil, which has its origin in the nature of things; acts such as blasphemy, idolatry, lying, etc. , being intrinsically Evil, others such as the worship of God, pursuit of truth, etc. To be morally good all three elements of the act must be in conformity with the standards of morality, while if one of these determinants be Evil the act itself will be morally bad
Good, Moral - While the goodness or badness of many acts is determined by positive law, yet ultimately, the distinction between good and Evil is a natural one, right rational nature constituting the proximate norm of morality and the Divine Nature or Reason the ultimate norm. ,when in conformity with right rational nature; otherwise it is Evil. Hence there exists a distinction between moral good and Evil, which has its origin in the nature of things; acts such as blasphemy, idolatry, lying, etc. , being intrinsically Evil, others such as the worship of God, pursuit of truth, etc. To be morally good all three elements of the act must be in conformity with the standards of morality, while if one of these determinants be Evil the act itself will be morally bad
Demoniacs - This word is frequently used in the New Testament, and applied to persons suffering under the possession of a demon or Evil spirit, such possession generally showing itself visibly in bodily disease or mental derangement. All these things speak of a personal power of Evil. Twice our Lord distinctly connects demoniacal possession with the power of the Evil one. We are led, therefore, to the ordinary and literal interpretation of these passages, that there are Evil spirits, subjects of the Evil one, who, in the days of the Lord himself and his apostles especially, were permitted by (God to exercise a direct influence over the souls and bodies of certain men
Guile - Paul encouraged Christians to be “guileless as to what is Evil” ( Romans 16:19 NRSV; compare 1 Peter 2:1 ), that is, innocent or naive when it comes to Evil
Trap - Joshua 23:13 (a) These Evil people who should have been exterminated would by their charms, attractions and reasonings catch the people of GOD, and make them idolaters, living in wickedness. ...
Psalm 69:22 (a) In this Messianic prophecy our Lord is telling us that His presence should have been a blessing to them, but instead of that it excited their Evil hearts and they became murderers of the One who loved them, and would have saved them
Reward - ) To give in return, whether good or Evil; - commonly in a good sense; to requite; to recompense; to repay; to compensate. ) That which is given in return for good or Evil done or received; esp
Rescue - ...
To free or deliver from any confinement, violence, danger or Evil to liberate from actual restraint, or to remove or withdraw from a state of exposure to Evil as, to rescue a prisoner from an officer to rescue seamen from destruction by shipwreck
Nibhaz - Barker, the name of an idol, supposed to be an Evil demon of the Zabians
Curse - The action of wishing any tremendous Evil to another
Preeminence - ; rarely, in a bad sense, superiority or notoriety in Evil; as, preeminence in honor
Alas - ...
An exclamation expressive of sorrow, grief, pity, concern, or apprehension of Evil sometimes followed by day or while alas the day, like alack a day or alas the while, expressing an unhappy time
Conflict - Philippians 1:30 (b) Describes the battle that was constantly going on in Paul's heart and life because of the Evil forces and persecutions which came upon him from both Jewish religious leaders and Gentiles
Ebed - Father of Gaal who rebelled against Abimelech, when God had sent an Evil spirit between Abimelech and the men of Shechem
Beri'ah - (in Evil, or a gift )
Extirpation - ) The act of extirpating or rooting out, or the state of being extirpated; eradication; excision; total destruction; as, the extirpation of weeds from land, of Evil from the heart, of a race of men, of heresy
Manichee - , who taught a dualism in which Light is regarded as the source of Good, and Darkness as the source of Evil
Malpractice - ) Evil practice; illegal or immoral conduct; practice contrary to established rules; specifically, the treatment of a case by a surgeon or physician in a manner which is contrary to accepted rules and productive of unfavorable results
Mara - ) The principal or ruling Evil spirit
Machinate - ) To contrive, as a plot; to plot; as, to machinate Evil
Wickedness - ) The quality or state of being wicked; departure from the rules of the divine or the moral law; Evil disposition or practices; immorality; depravity; sinfulness
Maroth - Maroth waited carefully for good ("is grieved for her gods," Gesenius), but "evil (answering to bitterness, which Maroth means) came
Scum - Ezekiel 24:6 (a) This describes the Evil character of the leaders of Jerusalem (the "top" ones)
Dread - It keeps the mind in a perpetual alarm, in an eager watchfulness of every circumstance that bears any relation to the Evil apprehended
Ate - Ate is a personification of Evil, mischief or malice
Flour - Exodus 29:2 (c) This is no doubt a type of the beautiful white, smooth life of CHRIST in which there was no sin, nor Evil
Dreamers - Judges 1:8 (a) The reference is to wicked men who imagine Evil devices and arrange wicked programs for GOD's people
Feng-Shui - ) A system of spirit influences for good and Evil believed by the Chinese to attend the natural features of landscape; also, a kind of geomancy dealing with these influences, used in determining sites for graves, houses, etc
Warning - ) Caution against danger, or against faults or Evil practices which incur danger; admonition; monition
Malignity - ) Extreme Evilness of nature or influence; perniciousness; heinousness; as, the malignity of fraud. ) The state or quality of being malignant; disposition to do Evil; virulent enmity; malignancy; malice; spite
Ill - ...
Note: For phaulos, John 5:29 , RV, see Evil , A, No
Fishing Net, Parable of the - It thus forewarns the disciples against scandal resulting from the presence of Evil in the Kingdom, and reminds them that the establishment of the Kingdom of God will not result in the disappearance of Evil from the world. The disciples, therefore, must not expect a sudden, miraculous transformation of the world, which would make it resemble heaven, and must not be scandalized when persecution comes, as it is bound to, from the coexistence of the Kingdom and of Evil
Avenge - To take satisfaction for an injury by punishing the injuring party to vindicate by inflicting pain or Evil on the wrong doer. ...
In these examples, avenge implies that the Evil inflicted on the injuring party is a satisfaction or justice done to the injured, and the party vindicated is the object of the verb. But modern usage inclines to make a valuable distinction in the use of these words, restricting avenge to the taking of just punishment, and revenge to the infliction of pain or Evil, maliciously, in an illegal manner
Miserable, Miserably, Misery - ...
A — 2: κακός (Strong's #2556 — Adjective — kakos — kak-os' ) "bad, Evil," is translated "miserable" in Matthew 21:41 , RV (AV, "wicked"). Adhereing to the meaning "evil," and giving the designed stress, the sentence may be rendered, "evil (as they are) he will Evilly destroy them
Duties of Parents - Hence they, too, must counteract in the child the twofold Evil which clings to it, i. ,ignorance and propensity to Evil
Devil Worshippers - Those who practise the worship or cult of the devil, an aspect of heathen worship in its worst and most degraded form. Among many barbarous peoples, offerings were made to Evil and malignant gods, in order to placate them and avert their anger. As each nation had its own gods, racial rivalry led them to consider the protecting divinities of an enemy as Evil demons, hence those who worshipped what they considered good beings were devil-worshippers to other nations. Such worship was not confined to heathens, for accounts of magical practises and occultation appear in the history of heretical sects in medieval Europe, and under the guise of various esoteric cults of today there are numerous devil-worshippers
Agony - Anguish is the reflection on Evil that is already past, while agony is a struggle with Evil at the time present
Huldah - Tell the man that sent you, thus saith the Lord, "Behold, I will bring Evil upon this place; but because thine heart was tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the Lord, thine eyes shall not see all the Evil which I will bring upon this place
Worshippers, Devil - Those who practise the worship or cult of the devil, an aspect of heathen worship in its worst and most degraded form. Among many barbarous peoples, offerings were made to Evil and malignant gods, in order to placate them and avert their anger. As each nation had its own gods, racial rivalry led them to consider the protecting divinities of an enemy as Evil demons, hence those who worshipped what they considered good beings were devil-worshippers to other nations. Such worship was not confined to heathens, for accounts of magical practises and occultation appear in the history of heretical sects in medieval Europe, and under the guise of various esoteric cults of today there are numerous devil-worshippers
Terror - Rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the Evil. The threatenings of wicked men, or Evil apprehended from them
Serenus, a Solitary - In the former he treats mostly of the nature of the soul, the rapid movement of the thoughts, the influence of Evil spirits upon them, and the duty of fixing the desire on God. In the latter he declares the nature of Evil spirits, their fall, subordination, and occupation
Sorcerer - , mutterers, men who professed to have power with Evil spirits
Backbite - In Psalm 15:3 , the rendering of a word which means to run about tattling, calumniating; in Proverbs 25:23 , secret talebearing or slandering; in Romans 1:30 and 2 Corinthians 12:20 , Evil-speaking, maliciously defaming the absent
Principalities - Supernatural spiritual powers, whether good or Evil
Hermogenian - He held matter to be the fountain of all Evil, and that souls and spirits are formed of corrupt matter
Theodicy - ) A vindication of the justice of God in ordaining or permitting natural and moral Evil
Philetus - Their Evil doctrine would eat as a canker, or gangrene
Leaven - As a symbol it is always used in scripture for the working of the human element, whether mind or flesh, in the things of God, and hence Evil. Its presence here might seem to suggest an exception to the statement that leaven always signifies that form of Evil; but it is not, for the peace offering typifies worship, and there, alas, the worshipper is not entirely free from indwelling sin. In the parable of 'the leaven hid in the meal,' it also represents the same Evil, which in an insidiousway permeates the mass with which it is mixed. It is only a too true similitude of the kingdom of God, for everywhere Evil is spreading therein
Requital - ) The act of requiting; also, that which requites; return, good or bad, for anything done; in a good sense, compensation; recompense; as, the requital of services; in a bad sense, retaliation, or punishment; as, the requital of Evil deeds
Entrap - ) To catch in a trap; to insnare; hence, to catch, as in a trap, by artifices; to involve in difficulties or distresses; to catch or involve in contradictions; as, to be entrapped by the devices of Evil men
Pander - ) Hence, one who ministers to the Evil designs and passions of another
Exemption - ) The act of exempting; the state of being exempt; freedom from any charge, burden, Evil, etc
Entice - Often in a bad sense: To lead astray; to induce to Evil; to tempt; as, the sirens enticed them to listen
Demon - ) An Evil spirit; a devil
Ominous - ) Of or pertaining to an omen or to omens; being or exhibiting an omen; significant; portentous; - formerly used both in a favorable and unfavorable sense; now chiefly in the latter; foreboding or foreshowing Evil; inauspicious; as, an ominous dread
Chiun - It was most probably the planet Saturn, worshipped by eastern nations as an Evil spirit to be propitiated by sacrifices
Secundians - light and darkness, whence arose the good and Evil that are observable in the universe
Government of God - His moral government is his rendering to every man according to his actions, considered as good or Evil
Malefactor - ” The Latin means “evil-doer
Danger - ) Exposure to injury, loss, pain, or other Evil; peril; risk; insecurity
Denunciation - ) That by which anything is denounced; threat of Evil; public menace or accusation; arraignment
Fearfulness - Terror alarm apprehension of Evil
Zoroastrianism - The system presupposes a good spirit (Ormuzd) and an opposing Evil spirit (Ahriman)
Caiaphas - A name and person, memorable in Scripture from being overruled by God the Ho1y Ghost to deliver a prophecy the very reverse of his own wishes, and like another Balaam, to pronounce good when he intended Evil
Safely - In a safe manner without incurring danger or hazard of Evil consequences
Demonology - (Greek: daimon, inferior or Evil spirit; logos, teaching) ...
The science or doctrine concerning demons. Belief in Evil spirits and consequent magic is of remotest antiquity, among both savage and cultured races, varying from crude to the elaborate systems of the ancient Assyrians, Chal4eans, and Persians
Deserve - To merit to be worthy of applied to good or Evil. To be worthy of, in a bad sense to merit by an Evil act as, to deserve blame or punishment
Amiss - ...
B — 1: κακῶς (Strong's #2560 — Adverb — kakos — kak-oce' ) akin to kakos, "evil," is translated "amiss" in James 4:3 ; elsewhere in various ways. See Evil , GRIEVOUS , MISERABLE , SORE
Evil Spirits - Evil SPIRITS . As a natural synonym for demons or devils, this phrase is used in the NT only by St. But in the OT, especially the historical books, reference is made to an Evil spirit as coming from or sent by God; and the context invests this spirit with personality. Elsewhere there is not the same ground for doubt: ‘an Evil spirit from the Lord’ is the alleged cause of Saul’s moodiness ( 1 Samuel 16:14 , where notice the antithetical ‘the spirit of the Lord’), and of his raving against David ( 1 Samuel 18:10 ; 1 Samuel 19:9 ). It has been suggested that in all these cases the reference is to God Himself as exerting power, and effecting good or Evil in men according to the character of each. But the theory is inconsistent with what is known to have been the current demonology of the day (see Devil), as well as with the natural suggestion of the phrases. In this sense He has ‘a band of angels of Evil’ ( Psalms 78:49 ), who may yet he called ‘angels of the Lord’ ( 2 Kings 19:35 , Isaiah 37:36 ), as carrying out His purposes. As the conception of God developed and was purified, the permitted action of some Evil spirit is substituted for the Divine activity, whether direct or through the agency of messengers, considered as themselves ethically good but capable of employment on any kind of service. ...
An Evil spirit, therefore, wherever the phrase occurs in a personal sense in the earlier historical books of the OT, must be thought of simply as an angel or messenger of God, sent for the punishment of Evil (cf. Gradually the phrase was diverted from this use to denote a personal spirit, the ‘demon’ of the NT margin, essentially Evil and working against God, though powerless to withdraw entirely from His rule
Lodge - The birds represent Evil spirits. So the present religious institutions filled with all sorts of Evil doctrines, worldly practices and unsaved persons is not according to the will of GOD. The devil has his throne in the apostate church, as we read in Revelation 2:13. He and his Evil angels are represented by the birds that lodge, make their nests and feel at home in the various branches of this huge, religious institution
Harmless - , with the simplicity of a single eye, discerning what is Evil, and choosing only what glorifies God; Romans 16:19 , "simple (unto that which is Evil)," AV marg. 1), "void of Evil," is rendered "harmless" in Hebrews 7:26 (RV, "guileless"), of the character of Christ as a High Priest; in Romans 16:18 , RV, "innocent," AV, "simple
Loose Conduct - ...
Mezimmâh (מְזִמָּה, Strong's #4209), “purpose; Evil device; Evil thoughts; discretion. Mezimmâh refers to “evil device” in Job 21:27 the word is used to mean “evil thoughts,” and in Devilish - DEVILISH, a. Partaking of the qualities of the devil diabolical very Evil and mischievous malicious as a devilish scheme devilish wickedness. Having communication with the devil pertaining to the devil. Excessive enormous in a vulgar and ludicrous sense as a devilish cheat
Serpent - Jesus accused the Pharisees of being as Evil and deadly as serpents (Matthew 23:33 )
Play - Exodus 32:6 (c) We may consider that this act represents the carelessness and the heedlessness of the unsaved, who while living in their sins, and enjoying Evil pleasures, have no fear of GOD, no regard for His Word, and no care about their destiny
Pliant - Also used figuratively: Easily influenced for good or Evil; tractable; as, a pliant heart
Blot - Proverbs 9:7 (b) The Lord is telling us that when an outsider interferes with the Evil actions of another, he is quite apt to receive an injury to himself, which may be seen also by others
Joanna - The wife of Chuza, the steward of Herod Antipas, one of ‘certain women which had been healed of Evil spirits and infirmities,’ She ministered to Jesus of her substance, and after the crucifixion helped to anoint His body ( Luke 8:3 ; Luke 24:10 )
Jasper - Revelation 4:3 (c) Probably a very valuable stone, translucent or transparent, typical of the preciousness of our GOD in whom there is no flaw, defilement, Evil, nor spot of any kind
Demoniac - ) One of a sect of Anabaptists who maintain that the demons or devils will finally be saved. ) A human being possessed by a demon or Evil spirit; one whose faculties are directly controlled by a demon
Merodach - The names of Babylonish kings were also sometimes compounded with this name, as Evil-Merodach and Merodach-Baladan, Isaiah 39:1 , who is also called Berodach-Baladan in 2 Kings 20:12
Croaker - ) One who croaks, murmurs, grumbles, or complains unreasonably; one who habitually forebodes Evil
Calumniate - ) To propagate Evil reports with a design to injure the reputation of another; to make purposely false charges of some offense or crime
Sembiani - So called from Sembianus their leader, who condemned all use of wine as Evil of itself
Avenge - ) To take vengeance for; to exact satisfaction for by punishing the injuring party; to vindicate by inflicting pain or Evil on a wrongdoer
Naughtiness - Modern translations thus replace naughtiness with terms such as Evil, greed, or wickedness to reflect the seriousness of the sin
Malice - malitia, from malus, Evil
Seduce - ) To draw aside from the path of rectitude and duty in any manner; to entice to Evil; to lead astray; to tempt and lead to iniquity; to corrupt
Demon - Demons are Evil (Luke 10:17-18), powerful (Luke 8:29), and under the power of Satan (Matthew 12:24-30)
Retribution - ) That which is given in repayment or compensation; return suitable to the merits or deserts of, as an action; commonly, condign punishment for Evil or wrong
Daemoniac - One "possessed with a devil. " In the days of our Lord and his apostles, Evil spirits, "daemons," were mysteriously permitted by God to exercise an influence both over the souls and bodies of men, inflicting dumbness (Matthew 9:32 ), blindness (12:22), epilepsy (Mark 9:17-27 ), insanity (Matthew 8:28 ; Mark 5:1-5 ). In the daemoniac his personality seems to be destroyed, and his actions, words, and even thoughts to be overborne by the Evil spirit (Mark, l
Blasphemy - In scripture this does not always refer to speaking Evil of God, to which the word is now restricted. The same Greek word is translated 'railing' in 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Jude 9 ; and 'evil speaking' in Ephesians 4:31 , as it might well be rendered elsewhere
Warn - To give notice of approaching or probable danger or Evil, that it may be avoided to caution against any thing that may prove injurious. To caution against Evil practices
Conscience - The conscious knowledge of good and Evil. He could have had no knowledge of good and Evil before any Evil was there. ' This agrees with what God said of Adam after the fall, "Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and Evil. " This knowledge of good and Evil is universal: some of the most benighted heathen, for instance, have owned that they knew such things as stealing were wrong. a 'good conscience,' enabling one when accused of Evil, to know that the charge is untrue. a 'pure conscience,' which is characterised by the separation from Evil
Everlasting Punishment - “Punishment” introduces the ideas of wrongdoing and Evil. Thus, to wrestle with the idea of “everlasting punishment” is to grapple with notions of time, justice, Evil, and the end of time. Such end-of-time trauma befalls the Evil, angelic powers which oppose God (Matthew 24:41 ; Jude 1:6 ; Revelation 19:3 ) and those human beings who willfully continue in “sin”—a decision which demonstrates solidarity with the Evil powers (Matthew 25:46 ; Mark 3:29 ; Jude 1:13 ; Revelation 14:11 ). At the time of Jesus' appearance, all Evil will be destroyed and all humans who continued in opposition to God will receive their eternal sentencing (2 Thessalonians 1:9 )
Everlasting Punishment - “Punishment” introduces the ideas of wrongdoing and Evil. Thus, to wrestle with the idea of “everlasting punishment” is to grapple with notions of time, justice, Evil, and the end of time. Such end-of-time trauma befalls the Evil, angelic powers which oppose God (Matthew 24:41 ; Jude 1:6 ; Revelation 19:3 ) and those human beings who willfully continue in “sin”—a decision which demonstrates solidarity with the Evil powers (Matthew 25:46 ; Mark 3:29 ; Jude 1:13 ; Revelation 14:11 ). At the time of Jesus' appearance, all Evil will be destroyed and all humans who continued in opposition to God will receive their eternal sentencing (2 Thessalonians 1:9 )
Evil (2) - EVIL. —It is customary to distinguish three kinds of Evil: (1) what Leibnitz called metaphysical Evil, i. the incompleteness and imperfection which belong more or less to all created things; (2) physical Evil, i. pain, suffering, and death; and (3) moral Evil, which is a vicious choice of a morally responsible being. Metaphysical Evil. Physical Evil. Christ would certainly not have endorsed the hyperboles of Pope, that all discord is harmony not understood, and all partial Evil universal good; yet He must certainly be classed among the most pronounced teachers of optimism. (Matthew 10:29); ‘He maketh his sun to rise on the Evil and on the good,’ etc. He taught that in the end good will triumph over Evil, and Evil be absolutely excluded from the Universe: ‘In the end of the world the Son of man shall send forth his angels,’ etc. —The Gospels lend no countenance to the view that moral Evil is the only genuine Evil, and that physical Evil is not Evil in the strict and proper sense. Pain, sorrow, disease, and death were regarded by Jesus as things which ought not to be, and He spent much of the time of His public ministry in combating them: ‘He went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed with the devil: for God was with him’ (Acts 10:38). Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out devils; freely ye have received, freely give’ (Matthew 10:7). ...
As to the causation of physical Evil, there is a great difference of point of view between the OT and the NT. is an exception) regards physical Evil as inflicted directly by God. According to the NT, however, physical Evil is mainly the work of the devil. Pain and disease and death belong to the devil’s kingdom, not to God’s; and their universal prevalence is a sign of the usurped authority over the human race of ‘the prince of this world. ’ The preaching of the Kingdom of God and the emancipation of mankind from the devil’s thraldom were consequently accompanied by an extensive ministry of healing, and Christ appealed to His miracles as evidence that ‘the kingdom of God is come upon you’ (Luke 11:20). The NT does not, however, deny that physical Evil is often inflicted by God for disciplinary or retributive purposes. Moral Evil. —The only possible way of accounting for moral Evil without making God the author of it, is to attribute it to the abuse of free will on the part of created beings, angelic, or human, or both. ...
Jesus accordingly attributed the origin of Evil not to the will of God, but to the perversity of God’s creatures. Before man existed, there were myriads of finite spirits, higher in the order of creation than he, and of these some fell from their original innocence and became devils. The devils recognize the power of Jesus, and come out at His word (Mark 1:24; Mark 1:34; Mark 3:11 etc. At the Temptation the devil acknowledged that his power is a delegated one (ἑμοὶ παραδεδοται, Luke 4:8). Muller, The Christian Doctrine of Sin (translation); Momerie, The Origin of Evil; Naville, The Problem of Evil (translation); Butler, Analogy; Le Conte, Evolution, ix
Shamanism - The Shaman, or wizard priest, deals with good as well as with Evil spirits, especially the good spirits of ancestors
Bode - BODE, To portend to foreshow to presage to indicate something future by signs to be the omen of most generally applied to things as, our vices bode Evil to the country
Danger - Peril risk hazard exposure to injury, loss, pain or other Evil
Abyss - (Greek: abyssos, bottomless) ...
Primarily an adjective signifying very deep (Wisdom of Solomon 10); as a substantive it means a great cavity, primeval waters, or primal chaos, and as used in the New Testament the abode of the dead, or limbo, and the abode of Evil spirits, or hell
Mischief - , disarrangement of order; trouble or vexation caused by human agency or by some living being, intentionally or not; often, calamity, mishap; trivial Evil caused by thoughtlessness, or in sport
Malignancy - ) Unfavorableness; Evil nature
be-el'Zebul - (lord of the house ), the title of a heathen deity, to whom the Jews ascribed the sovereignty of the Evil spirits; Satan, the prince of the devils
Malignity - , "bad manner or character" (kakos, "bad," ethos, "manner"), hence, "an Evil disposition" that tends to put the worst construction on everything, "malice, malevolence, craftiness," occurs in Romans 1:29 , as the accompaniment of dolos, "guile
sa'Tan - The personal existence of a spirit of Evil is clearly revealed in Scripture; but the revelation is made gradually, in accordance with the progressiveness of God's method. In the first entrance of Evil into the world, the temptation is referred only to the serpent. The captivity brought the Israelites face to face with the great dualism of the Persian mythology, the conflict of Ormuzd with Ahriman, the co-ordinate spirit of Evil; but it is confessed by all that the Satan of Scripture bears no resemblance to the Persian Ahriman. We cannot, of course, conceive that anything essentially and originally Evil was created by God. As to the time cause and manner of his fall Scripture tells us scarcely anything; but it describes to us distinctly the moral nature of the Evil one. We find, accordingly, opposites of qualities are dwelt upon as the characteristics of the devil. His direct influence over the soul is simply that of a powerful and Evil nature on those in whom lurks the germ of the same Evil. Besides this direct influence, we learn from Scripture that Satan is the leader of a host of Evil spirits or angels who share his Evil work, and for whom the "everlasting fire is prepared. But one passage (1 Kings 6:4 ) --identifies them distinctly with the "demons" (Authorized Version "devils") who had power to possess the souls of men. But the Evil one is not merely the "prince of the demons;" he is called also the "prince of this world" in (John 12:31 ; 14:30 ; 16:11 ) and even the. He is called emphatically ho diabolos , "the devil. "trial," is essential to man, and is accordingly ordained for him and sent to him by God, as in (Genesis 22:1 ) It is this tentability of man, even in his original nature, which is represented in Scripture as giving scope to the Evil action of Satan. Every sin committed makes a man the "servant of sin" for the future, (John 8:34 ; Romans 6:16 ) it therefore creates in the spirit of man a positive tendency to Evil which sympathizes with, and aids, the temptation of the Evil one
Rail, Railer, Railing - A — 1: βλασφημέω (Strong's #987 — Verb — blasphemeo — blas-fay-meh'-o ) "to blaspheme, rail, revile" (for the meanings of which see BLASPHEME), is translated "to rail at, or on," in Matthew 27:39 , RV (AV, "reviled"); Mark 15:29 ; Luke 23:39 ; 2 Peter 2:10 , RV (AV, "to speak Evil of"); Luke 2:12 , RV (AV, "speak Evil of"). loidoreo, "to revile" (see REVILE), and B, No. , "judgment of railing;" in Ephesians 4:31 , RV (AV, "evil speaking"). ...
B — 2: λοιδορία (Strong's #3059 — Noun Feminine — loidoria — loy-dor-ee'-ah ) "abuse, railing, reviling," is rendered "reviling" in the RV, 1 Peter 3:9 (twice); in 1 Timothy 5:14 , AV marg. , "for their reviling. " See REVILE , C. ...
C — 2: λοίδορος (Strong's #3060 — Noun Masculine — loidoros — loy'-dor-os ) an adjective denoting "reviling, railing" (akin to B, No. See REVILE
Tree of Knowledge - Reference to “the tree of the knowledge of good and Evil” is in a context concerned with the fall. ” Eating from the tree brought the knowledge of good and Evil ( Genesis 3:5 ,Genesis 3:5,3:22 ). ...
The tree of knowledge was Adam and Eve's opportunity to demonstrate obedience and loyalty to God, but the serpent used it to tempt Eve to eat and to become like God “knowing good and Evil” (Genesis 3:5 )
Bowls - Babylonian bowls are to be seen in the British Museum, with Chaldean inscriptions, probably designed as charms against Evil and sickness (compare Joseph's "divining cup," Genesis 44:5)
Canker Worm - ...
...
Nahum 3:15 (c) It represents any Evil calamity that may be sent by GOD to punish His people as individuals or as a company
Apprehensive - ) Anticipative of something unfavorable' fearful of what may be coming; in dread of possible harm; in expectation of Evil
Bad - ) Wanting good qualities, whether physical or moral; injurious, hurtful, inconvenient, offensive, painful, unfavorable, or defective, either physically or morally; Evil; vicious; wicked; - the opposite of good; as, a bad man; bad conduct; bad habits; bad soil; bad health; bad crop; bad news
Unhappy - ) Marked by infelicity; Evil; calamitous; as, an unhappy day
Defame - ) To harm or destroy the good fame or reputation of; to disgrace; especially, to speak Evil of maliciously; to dishonor by slanderous reports; to calumniate; to asperse
Marcionite - ) A follower of Marcion, a Gnostic of the second century, who adopted the Oriental notion of the two conflicting principles, and imagined that between them there existed a third power, neither wholly good nor Evil, the Creator of the world and of man, and the God of the Jewish dispensation
Fiery - 1: πυρόω (Strong's #4448 — Verb — puroo — poo-ro'-o ) "to set on fire, burn up" (from pur, "fire"), always used in the Passive Voice in the NT, is translated "fiery" in Ephesians 6:16 , metaphorically of the darts of the Evil one; "fire-tipped" would perhaps bring out the verbal force of the word. , "the darts of the Evil one, the fiery (darts)," marking them as particularly destructive
Isaiah, Martyrdom of - The narrative concerns Isaiah who makes predictions concerning the Evil deeds of Manasseh. An Evil priest offers Isaiah freedom if he will retract his prophecies of judgment
Hatred - The only hatred it can express is hatred of Evil ( Hebrews 1:9 , Judges 1:23 , Revelation 2:6 ; Revelation 17:15 ). It would seem fairer to suppose that He meant what He said and said what He meant; but that the hatred He enjoined applied to the objects mentioned only so far as they became identified with the spirit of Evil and so antagonistic to the cause of Christ
Demon - ]'>[2] it is substituted for ‘devil’ in the margin of many passages, and the American Committee was in favour of its adoption in the text. ]'>[4] , and denoting a species of genli or demi-gods, who were conceived as invested with power for good or Evil, and to whom even human sacrifices were offered. So in Bar 4:7 ; and in the same sense probably ‘devils’ is used in 1 Corinthians 10:20 and Revelation 9:20 . For the conception of demon as an influence or spirit, exclusively Evil, see Devil; and for the phenomena, see Possession and Exorcism
Shrewd - ) Inclining to shrew; disposing to curse or scold; hence, vicious; malicious; Evil; wicked; mischievous; vexatious; rough; unfair; shrewish
Desolation - of the will, caused by the Evil spirit in order to withdraw the soul from God's service
Deliver us - First words of the prayer in the Mass following the Our Father (Pater Noster), it emphasizes the petition for deliverance from all Evil, and leads up to a further petition far the peace of the Lord; to be invoked just after in the Pax Domini
Libera Nos - First words of the prayer in the Mass following the Our Father (Pater Noster), it emphasizes the petition for deliverance from all Evil, and leads up to a further petition far the peace of the Lord; to be invoked just after in the Pax Domini
Sin, Original - Man has derived an Evil nature from Adam, but his sins are his own
Blasphemy - ) An indignity offered to God in words, writing, or signs; impiously irreverent words or signs addressed to, or used in reference to, God; speaking Evil of God; also, the act of claiming the attributes or prerogatives of deity
Flies - Ecclesiastes 10:1 (b) This is a type which represents an Evil deed done by a godly man
Traitor - 1: προδότης (Strong's #4273 — Noun Masculine — prodotes — prod-ot'-ace ) denotes "a betrayer, traitor;" the latter term is assigned to Judas, virtually as a title, in Luke 6:16 ; in 2 Timothy 3:4 it occurs in a list of Evil characters, foretold as abounding in the last days
Evil-Speaking - ’ κατάλαλοι is translated ‘backbiters’ (Romans 1:30), and καταλαλίαι ‘backbitings’ (2 Corinthians 12:20), but Evil-speaking does not necessarily take place behind the back, or in the absence of the person hated. ...
(2) βλασφημεῖν (βλάσφημος, βλασφημία) is a stronger term, including all kinds of Evil-speaking against men as well as against God. Paul has a full share of βλασφημία; he is ‘evil spoken of’ (1 Corinthians 10:30) and ‘slanderously reported’ (Romans 3:8). While the Gentiles speak Evil of the followers of Christ (1 Peter 4:4), the latter must calumniate no man (Titus 3:2); railing (βλασφημία) is one of the sins of temper and tongue which they are repeatedly enjoined to put away (Ephesians 4:31, Colossians 3:8). At the same time they must strive to prevent their ‘good,’ or ‘the word of God,’ or ‘the way of truth,’ or ‘the name of God and the doctrine,’ from being blasphemed, or Evil spoken of (Romans 14:16, Titus 2:5, 2 Peter 2:2, 1 Timothy 6:1), St. The false teachers and libertines of the sub-Apostolic Age spoke Evil of the powers of the unseen world (2 Peter 2:10, Judges 1:10); and their empty logomachies gave rise to mutual railings (βλασφημίαι, 1 Timothy 6:4). ...
(3) διἀβολος (from διαβάλλω, Luke 16:1), which denotes, κατʼ ἐξοχήν, the ‘chief slanderer,’ or ‘devil,’ is applied also to any ordinary calumniator. ...
(4) λοιδορεῖν (a word of uncertain derivation) is invariably translated ‘revile’ in the Revised Version , whereas the Authorized Version has ‘rail’ and ‘speak reproachfully’ as variations. Paul says of the apostles that being reviled they bless (1 Corinthians 4:12); that the so-called brother who is a reviler (λοίδορος) is to be shunned (1 Corinthians 5:11); and that revilers shall not inherit the Kingdom of God (1 Corinthians 6:10). For seeming to revile the high priest Ananias in a moment of just anger, St. Peter turns the minds of his readers to the perfect example of Christ, who, being reviled, reviled not again (1 Peter 2:23), and bids them render, as He did, ‘contrariwise blessing’ (1 Peter 3:9). ...
(5) Analagous terms are κακολογεῖν, ‘to speak Evil of’ (Acts 19:9), ἀντιλέγειν, ‘to speak against’ (Acts 28:22), and δυσφημία, ‘evil report,’ which the servant of Christ learns to accept, equally with εὐφημία, as part of his lot (2 Corinthians 6:8)
False Ropes: Danger of - If men had eyes might they not clearly see Evil spirits gathering around the sinking hulks of Romanism and self-righteousness, watching for their expected victims? ...
...
Bottomless Pit - It represented the home of Evil, death, and destruction stored up until the sovereign God allowed them temporary power on earth
Motive - Some call it a faculty of the mind, by which we pursue good and avoid Evil
Refine (And Forms) - Zechariah 13:9 (a) This beautiful type represents the living GOD dealing with His people and cleansing them from Evil ways
Viper - (Job 20:16; Isaiah 30:6) And the Lord Jesus in the gospel called the children of the Evil one a generation of vipers
Malevolence - It discovers itself in frowns and a lowering countenance; in uncharitableness, in Evil sentiments; hard speeches to or of its object; in cursing and reviling; and doing mischief either with open violence or secret spite, as far as there is power
Venom - ) Spite; malice; malignity; Evil quality
Securely - ...
Devise not Evil against thy neighbor, seeing he dwelleth securely by thee
Optimism - The fact of Evil is explained as a necessary product of metaphysical finiteness and moral freedom. Physical Evil is a punishment for abuse of the latter
Ebionites - They also held that the universe is divided into two realms, that of good and that of Evil. The Son of God rules over the former, and the Prince of Evil over the latter
Suspicion - Consists in imagining Evil of others without proof. It is sometimes opposed to charity, which thinketh no Evil
Repentance: Must be Real - and crying out against the Evil which their follies have wrought them, yet these very people have continued in their transgressions, and have even gone from bad to worse. Their enmity to Evil was mere feigning; like the sword-play of the stage, which looks like earnest fight, but no wounds are given or received
Deal Out, Deal With - 31:12: “She will do him good and not Evil. 24:17: “… Thou hast rewarded me good, whereas I have rewarded thee Evil
Recompense - Recompense to no man Evil for Evil
Maximus, an Ecclesiastical Writer - Eusebius says the subject of his work was the origin of Evil and whether matter had been created, and elsewhere ( Praep. He propounds the difficulty concerning the origin of Evil; if Evil was at any time created, then something came out of nothing, since Evil did not exist before; and God Who created it must take pleasure in Evil, which we cannot admit. He then offers the solution that, co-eternally with God, there existed matter, destitute of form or qualities, and borne about in a disorderly manner; that God took pity on it, separated the best parts from the worst, reduced the former to order, and left the latter behind as being of no use to Him for His work, and that from these lees of matter Evil sprang. The most successful part of the orthodox speaker's reply is where he shews that this hypothesis does not relieve God of the charge of being the author of Evil
Affections - (Latin: ad; to; facere, to make) ...
Term used by writers on spiritual matters to denote emotions, dispositions, movements of the passions of love, desire, enjoyment of what is good, and of hatred, aversion, and disgust for what is Evil
Impetration - Impetration accompanied by right dispositions and certain conditions will infallibly gain us every gift and avert every Evil
Darkness, Prince of - Saint John and Saint Paul picture the conflict between good and Evil under the contrast of light and darkness (John 3; Ephesians 5)
Poison - 1: ἰός (Strong's #2447 — Noun Masculine — ios — ee-os' ) denotes "something active" as (a) "rust," as acting on metals, affecting their nature, James 5:3 ; (b) "poison," as of asps, acting destructively on living tissues, figuratively of the Evil use of the lips as the organs of speech, Romans 3:13 ; so of the tongue, James 3:8
Speaking - ...
Note: For "evil speaking(s)," in Ephesians 4:31 , see RAILING; in 1 Peter 2:1 , see BACKBITING
Genius - A good or Evil spirit or daemon, who the ancients supposed was set over each person to direct his birth, accompany him in his life, and to be his guard
Folly - ...
See Evil, SIN
Redeemer - He redeems us from all Evil by the payment of a ransom (q
Petition - Watts, is the fourth part of prayer, and includes a desire of deliverance from Evil, and a request of good things to be bestowed
Sensual - It is part of the Evil of the human heart (Mark 7:22 ; compare Romans 13:13 ), calling for repentance (2 Corinthians 12:21 )
Malignity - Extreme enmity, or Evil dispositions of heart towards another malice without provocation, or malevolence with baseness of heart deep rooted spite. Extreme Evilness of nature as the malignity of fraud
Persecution: Not to be Feared - So you may say of the poor woridlings when they speak Evil of Christians: they are blind
Deserve - ) To earn by service; to be worthy of (something due, either good or Evil); to merit; to be entitled to; as, the laborer deserves his wages; a work of value deserves praise
Buildest - Ezekiel 16:31 (a) These Evil men definitely planned and constructed places for sinning throughout the city
Achbor - Father of king Jehoiakim's ready tool in Evil, Elnathan (Jeremiah 26:22-23); Achbor was, on the contrary, an instrument of good Josiah, to inquire the Lord's will from the prophetess Huldah
Corruptible - Manners are corruptible by Evil example
Harm - Moral wrong Evil mischief wickedness a popular sense of the word
Fall, the - The fall is that event in the Garden of Eden where Adam and Eve disobeyed the command of God and ate of The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (Genesis 2:1-25; Gen 3:1-24)
Virgin, Virginity, - Used symbolically for those in separation from Evil
Gergesenes - A place rendered memorable by our Lord's having visited it, and working a miracle there upon a poor creature under possession of an Evil spirit
Rulers of the World of This Darkness - One of the several terms Saint Paul (Ephesians 6) applies to the Evil spirits, whose leader is the "prince of darkness"
Belial - In later writings, Belial is put for the power or lord of Evil, Satan, 2 Corinthians 6:15
Diabolism - (Latin: diabolus, the devil) ...
The term includes all kinds of intercourse or attempts to deal with the Evil spirit by witchcraft, incantations, magic, spiritism, and other occult practises. The possibility of consulting and securing the help of the devil is sufficiently attested by Scripture: God forbids consultation of soothsayers (Deuteronomy 18); to "go aside after wizards" is unlawful (Leviticus 19). The Church as well as the Bible warrants the belief in Evil spirits, or devils, and in their power, as far as God will permit, to do harm, but forbids dealing with them, since, by reason of the perversion of their wills, they endeavor to turn men from God
Advance - , to make progress, is translated "advanced" in Luke 2:52 , RV, of the Lord Jesus (AV, "increased"); in Galatians 1:14 "advanced," of Paul's former progress in the Jews' religion (AV, "profited"); in Romans 13:12 , "is far spent," of the "advanced" state of the "night" of the world's spiritual darkness; in 2 Timothy 2:16 , "will proceed further," of profane babblings; in 2 Timothy 3:9 , "shall proceed no further," of the limit Divinely to be put to the doings of Evil men; in 2 Timothy 3:13 , of the progress of Evil men and impostors, "shall wax," lit
Lust - Evil propensity depraved affections and desires. ...
Lust not after Evil things as they also lusted
Stink - Ointment or perfume is spoiled by any dead animal being in it, so Evil actions injure the hearts of those who hold the actor in honor. ...
Isaiah 3:24 (c) This term is given to the bad living and the Evil actions which are a stench in GOD's nostrils, and which He despises
Shiggaion - Psalm 7 refers to David's being accused by Saul (the Benjamite, Cush the Ethiopian unchangeably black at heart toward David: Jeremiah 13:23; Amos 9:7; Cush similar to Kish, Saul's father) of plotting Evil against him, whereas he returned good for Evil in sparing Saul his deadly foe, when in his power (1 Samuel 24:7); "concerning the words" i
Satan - The adversary of God and man, the foe to goodness, and the tempter to Evil. The proper name appears five times in the Old Testament, 1 Chronicles 21:1; Job 1:6; Job 1:12; Job 2:1; Zechariah 3:1; in the New Testament 25 times; the word "devil" occurs 25 times; "the prince of this world," three times; "the wicked one," six times; "the tempter," twice. In one remarkable verse several epithets are combined—the old serpent, the devil, and Satan, who deceiveth the whole world. The most striking mention of Satan is in Job, where he appears among "the sons of God," This is in itself sufficient to prove the subordination of the powers of Evil unto God and the permissive nature of sin, and that Satan has no authority to vex save as God grants it. See Devil
Tempt - To incite or solicit to an Evil act to entice to something wrong by presenting arguments that are plausible or convincing, or by the offer of some pleasure or apparent advantage as the inducement. To solicit to draw without the notion of Evil
Imagination - 1: λογισμός (Strong's #3053 — Noun Masculine — logismos — log-is-mos' ) "a reasoning, a thought" (akin to logizomai, "to count, reckon"), is translated "thoughts" in Romans 2:15 , suggestive of Evil intent, not of mere reasonings; "imaginations" in 2 Corinthians 10:5 (RV, marg. 1, is rendered "imaginations" in Romans 1:21 , carrying with it the idea of Evil purposes, RV, "reasonings;" it is most frequently translated "thoughts
Eye - , Matthew 20:33 ; of God's power of vision, Hebrews 4:13 ; 1 Peter 3:12 ; of Christ in vision, Revelation 1:14 ; 2:18 ; 19:12 ; of the Holy Spirit in the unity of Godhood with Christ, Revelation 5:6 ; (b) metaphorically, of ethical qualities, Evil, Matthew 6:23 ; Mark 7:22 (by metonymy, for envy); singleness of motive, Matthew 6:22 ; Luke 11:34 ; as the instrument of Evil desire, "the principal avenue of temptation," 1 John 2:16 ; of adultery, 2 Peter 2:14 ; (c) metaphorically, of mental vision, Matthew 13:15 ; John 12:40 ; Romans 11:8 ; Galatians 3:1 , where the metaphor of the "evil eye" is altered to a different sense from that of bewitching (the posting up or placarding of an "eye" was used as a charm, to prevent mischief); by Gospel-preaching Christ had been, so to speak, placarded before their "eyes;" the question may be paraphrased, "What Evil teachers have been malignly fascinating you?;" Ephesians 1:18 , of the "eyes of the heart," as a means of knowledge
Snare - ...
...
Judges 8:27 (a) This is symbolical of the Evil effect of idolatrous worship on the people of Israel. ...
2 Samuel 22:6 (b) The plans and schemes of Evil men to destroy David are called a snare. ...
Psalm 69:22 (a) The Lord JESUS is speaking here and asking His Father to change the plans of the enemies in such a way that their Evil deeds against Him would be the very evidence that would curse them. Certainly their Evil plans of that day and night turned to their curse and damnation. These devices of the Devil are compared to snares and traps of Satan
Eye - , Matthew 20:33 ; of God's power of vision, Hebrews 4:13 ; 1 Peter 3:12 ; of Christ in vision, Revelation 1:14 ; 2:18 ; 19:12 ; of the Holy Spirit in the unity of Godhood with Christ, Revelation 5:6 ; (b) metaphorically, of ethical qualities, Evil, Matthew 6:23 ; Mark 7:22 (by metonymy, for envy); singleness of motive, Matthew 6:22 ; Luke 11:34 ; as the instrument of Evil desire, "the principal avenue of temptation," 1 John 2:16 ; of adultery, 2 Peter 2:14 ; (c) metaphorically, of mental vision, Matthew 13:15 ; John 12:40 ; Romans 11:8 ; Galatians 3:1 , where the metaphor of the "evil eye" is altered to a different sense from that of bewitching (the posting up or placarding of an "eye" was used as a charm, to prevent mischief); by Gospel-preaching Christ had been, so to speak, placarded before their "eyes;" the question may be paraphrased, "What Evil teachers have been malignly fascinating you?;" Ephesians 1:18 , of the "eyes of the heart," as a means of knowledge
Epidemical - ) Spreading widely, or generally prevailing; affecting great numbers, as an epidemic does; as, epidemic rage; an epidemic Evil
Pekahiah - He "did that which was Evil in the sight of the Lord
Catharists - ) They supposed that matter was the source of Evil; that Christ was not clothed with a real body; that baptism and the Lord's supper were useless institutions; with a variety of other strange notions
Salvation - This word is used of the deliverance of the Israelites from the Egyptians (Exodus 14:13 ), and of deliverance generally from Evil or danger
Denounce - ) To make known in a solemn or official manner; to declare; to proclaim (especially an Evil)
Whet - ...
Psalm 64:3 (a) Evil men prepare cutting words and lying statements by which they intend to injure others
Hole - Isaiah 51:1 (a) Evidently this picture represents the depths of sin, Evil and wickedness into which a human being may descend
Happen - There shall no Evil happen to the just
Obstinacy - ) The quality or state of being difficult to remedy, relieve, or subdue; as, the obstinacy of a disease or Evil
Tempt - ) To lead, or endeavor to lead, into Evil; to entice to what is wrong; to seduce
Precaution - ) A measure taken beforehand to ward off Evil or secure good or success; a precautionary act; as, to take precautions against accident
Lust, to - The word ἐπιθυμέω signifies 'to desire earnestly,' and is often translated 'desire,' without the thought of the desire being an Evil one, as in Matthew 13:17 ; 1 Timothy 3:1 ; 1 Peter 1:12 , etc
Lasting - ) Existing or continuing a long while; enduring; as, a lasting good or Evil; a lasting color
Curious - , the arts of those who pry into forbidden things, with the aid of Evil spirits
Demons - These rebellious, or fallen, angels are variously known as demons, Evil spirits, spiritual hosts of wickedness, principalities, powers, rulers, authorities, Evil spiritual forces, cosmic powers of Evil, and angels of the devil. But God forbids magic and sorcery, for these things themselves involve cooperating with supernatural Evil powers (Leviticus 19:26; Leviticus 20:6; Galatians 5:20; Revelation 9:20-21; Revelation 21:8; see MAGIC). Christians should be aware of their Evil purposes, but should not fear them
Sin - Original sin is that whereby our whole nature is corrupted, and rendered contrary to the law of God; or, according to the 9th article of the church of England, "It is that whereby man is very far gone from original righteousness, and is, of his own nature, inclined to Evil. Actual sin is a direct violation of God's law, and generally applied to those who are capable of committing moral Evil; as opposed to idiots, or children, who have not the right use of their powers. Secret sins are those committed in secret, or those which we, through blindness or prejudice, do not see the Evil of, Psalms 19:12 . While we contemplate, therefore, the nature, the Evil, the guilt, the consequence of sin, it is our happiness to reflect, that he who permitted it hath provided a remedy for it; and that he "so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on him should not perish, but have everlasting life. article Sin; King's and Jenyns's Origin of Evil; Burroughs' Exceeding Sinfulness of Sin; Dr. Smith's Sermon on the Permission of Evil
Antichrist - It is part of a complex of images and figures that represent the activity and power of Evil—of those forces that are hostile to God. The Old Testament uses the figure of a dragon to symbolize Evil's conflict with God existing from the time of creation to God's final triumph (Isaiah 27:1 ; cf. The dragon is used twelve times in Revelation and designates the devil and Satan and the enemy of God's Messiah. The cosmic struggle with Evil is now chiefly localized in the church. ...
In both Testaments these figures function not only to describe the magnitude and threat of Evil but to affirm God's control over creation. In the Old Testament and New Testament the image of the beast is used to describe both the power and intensity of Evil and to declare God's ultimate victory. In the New Testament these figures function in line with the Old Testament conviction that God will ultimately defeat the forces of Evil. The eschaton is recognizable because of the unleashing of Evil and will be characterized by a particularly vivid and horrific confrontation between God and his enemy (2 Thessalonians 2 ; 1 John 2:18 )
Afflict, Affliction - ...
A — 2: κακουχέω (Strong's #2558 — Verb — kakoucheo — kak-oo-kheh'-o ) from kakos, "evil," and echo, "to have," signifies, in the Passive Voice, "to suffer ill, to be maltreated, tormented," Hebrews 11:37 (AV, "tormented," RV, "afflicted"); Hebrews 13:3 , AV, "suffer adversity," RV, "evil entreated. 1), "to be Evil entreated with," is used in Hebrews 11:25 . ...
A — 3: κακοπαθέω (Strong's #2553 — Verb — kakopatheo — kak-op-ath-eh'-o ) from kakos, "evil," pathos, "suffering," signifies "to suffer hardship. ...
B — 1: κακοπάθεια (Strong's #2552 — Noun Feminine — kakopatheia — kak-op-ath'-i-ah ) from kakos, "evil," and pascho, "to suffer" is rendered "suffering" in James 5:10 , RV (AV, "suffering affliction"). ; of Christ's "sufferings," 1 Peter 1:11 ; 5:1 ; Hebrews 2:9 ; of those as shared by believers, 2 Corinthians 1:5 ; Philippians 3:10 ; 1 Peter 4:13 ; 5:1 ; (b) of "an Evil emotion, passion," Romans 7:5 ; Galatians 5:24 . The connection between the two meanings is that the emotions, whether good or Evil, were regarded as consequent upon external influences exerted on the mind (cp. 1, and expresses in sense (b) the uncontrolled nature of Evil desires, in contrast to epithumia, the general and comprehensive term, lit
Evil-Merodach, - Evil-MERODACH , the Amel-Marduk of the Babylonians, son and successor of Nebuchadrezzar on the throne of Babylon ( 2 Kings 25:27-30 ), promoted Jehoiachin in the 37th year of his captivity
East Wind - It was the cause and also the emblem of Evil (Ezekiel 17:10 ; 19:12 ; Hosea 13:15 )
Conversion - Turning from Evil to God
Doer - ...
(2) In 2 Timothy 2:9 , kakourgos is rendered "evil doer" (RV, "malefactor")
Elnathan - Jehoiakim's ready tool for Evil, in fetching the prophet Urijah out of Egypt to be killed (Jeremiah 26:22-23); one of the king's council when Jeremiah's roll was burned (Jeremiah 36:12; Jeremiah 36:25); he interceded with the king not to burn it
Onan - The device by which he evaded the object of this marriage ‘was Evil in the sight of the Lord, and he slew him’ ( Genesis 38:8-10 )
Platter - It may be said that the house has been beautifully repaired, painted and ornamented, but the tenant inside is Evil, wicked and unclean
Cheek - The admonition (Luke 6:29 ), "Unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other," means simply, "Resist not Evil" (Matthew 5:39 ; 1 Peter 2:19-23 )
Poison - The tongue is "an unruly Evil, full of deadly poison
Ingratitude - It is sometimes applied to the act of returning Evil for good
Salvation - (Latin: salvare, to save) ...
In scriptural language, the transference from straitened circumstances and other Evils into a state of freedom and security. As sin is the greatest Evil, Scripture uses the word mainly in the sense of redemption and liberation from sin and its consequences
Simple And Simplicity - Sometimes used in the Bible in a good sense, denoting sincerity, candor, and an artless ignorance of Evil, Romans 16:19 2 Corinthians 1:12 11:3 ; sometimes in a bad sense, denoting heedless foolishness both mental and moral, Proverbs 1:22 9:4 14:15 22:3 ; and sometimes in the sense of mere ignorance or inexperience, 2 Samuel 15:11 Proverbs 1:4 21:11
Unworthy - One great Evil of government is that unworthy men are elected or appointed to fill important offices
Warning - Caution against danger, or against faults or Evil practices which incur danger
o'Nan - " ( Genesis 38:4 ; 1 Chronicles 2:3 ) "What he did was Evil in the eyes of Jehovah and he slew him also, as he had slain his elder brother
Revenge - Far from returning Evil for Evil, they must positively do good to those who do Evil to them (Exodus 23:4-5; Leviticus 19:17-18; Matthew 5:44-48; Matthew 18:35; see FORGIVENESS)
Michael - An Evil spirit was behind the rulers of Persia and had prevented a messenger of God from reaching Daniel, but the good spirit Michael overpowered the Evil spirit and freed the heavenly messenger (Daniel 10:12-14). ...
The messenger knew that later he would be opposed by an Evil spirit working on behalf of Greece (the nation that would succeed Persia as the Jews’ ruler), but he was confident that Michael’s help would again bring him victory (Daniel 10:20-21). The context concerns conflict in the spirit world, with Michael and his angels fighting on behalf of God’s people against the devil and his angels
Blasphemy - In the sense of speaking Evil of God this word is found in Psalm 74:18 ; Isaiah 52:5 ; Romans 2:24 ; Revelation 13:1,6 ; 16:9,11,21 . It denotes also any kind of calumny, or Evil-speaking, or abuse (1 Kings 21:10 ; Acts 13:45 ; 18:6 , etc
Nergal-Sharezer - 1:20) who murdered his brother-in-law, Evil Merodach, Nebuchadnezzar's son, and succeeded to the throne as having married Nebuchadnezzar's daughter. ...
Intemperance, lawlessness, and his elevation of Jehoiachin above the other kings at Babylon, disgusted the Babylonians, so that they deposed Evil Merodach
Flee, Fled - ), besides its literal significance, is used metaphorically, (a) transitively, of "fleeing" fornication, 1 Corinthians 6:18 ; idolatry, 1 Corinthians 10:14 ; Evil doctrine, questionings, disputes of words, envy, strife, railings, Evil surmisings, wranglings, and the love of money, 1 Timothy 6:11 ; youthful lusts, 2 Timothy 2:22 ; (b) intransitively, of the "flight" of physical matter, Revelation 16:20 ; 20:11 ; of death, Revelation 9:6
Salutation - ...
When Evil doctrine had spread in the professing church, the question of salutation became serious. The 'lady' to whom the apostle John wrote was strictly enjoined not to receive into her house any one who brought not good doctrine, nor was she even to salute such a one; for to do so, would be to become morally a partaker of his Evil deeds
Sin: Aroused by the Law - ' Evil often sleeps in the soul, until the holy command of God is discovered, and then the enmity of the carnal mind rouses itself to oppose in every way the will of God. ' How vain to hope for salvation from the law, when through the perversity of sin, it provokes our Evil hearts to rebellion, and works in us neither repentance nor love
Mammon - ” In general use it was a personification of riches as an Evil spirit or deity. From about 1500 it has been current in English as indicating the Evil influence of wealth
Captive - Isaiah 51:14 (b) This is typical of any Christian who is a slave to any form of Evil or uncleanness. ...
Luke 4:18 (b) Here is a type of those who are bound by Satan in false doctrines, false beliefs and Evil practices
Arnish - He gets rid of the Evil things in his life and takes on some of the lovely things of the church. The Evil spirit comes back to such a man because he is empty - CHRIST has not entered; the Holy Spirit has not come into his life
Draw - John 12:32 (a) This word is used throughout the Scripture to indicate an unseen power which pulls men by an irresistible force either to do good or to do Evil. The context will always indicate whether the power is from GOD, or from some Evil source
Sanction - Such complete and final sanction is not to be found in this world of struggle between good and Evil, where the forces of Evil at times seem victorious, but in the future life with its eternal rewards or happiness and the eternal punishments or misery through which goodness and virtue as well as Divine Justice are finally triumphant
Blaspheme, Blasphemy, Blasphemer, Blasphemous - See Evil SPEAKING , RAILING. ...
B — 1: βλασφημέω (Strong's #987 — Verb — blasphemeo — blas-fay-meh'-o ) "to blaspheme, rail at or revile," is used (a) in a general way, of any contumelious speech, reviling, calumniating, railing at, etc. , Matthew 27:39 ; Mark 15:29 ; Luke 22:65 (RV, "reviling"); Luke 23:39 ; (b) of those who speak contemptuously of God or of sacred things, e. , Matthew 9:3 ; Mark 3:28 ; Romans 2:24 ; 1 Timothy 1:20 ; 6:1 ; Revelation 13:6 ; 16:9,11,21 ; "hath spoken blasphemy," Matthew 26:65 ; "rail at," 2 Peter 2:10 ; Jude 1:8,10 ; "railing," 2 Peter 2:12 ; "slanderously reported," Romans 3:8 ; "be Evil spoken of," Romans 14:16 ; 1 Corinthians 10:30 ; 2 Peter 2:2 ; "speak Evil of," Titus 3:2 ; 1 Peter 4:4 ; "being defamed," 1 Corinthians 4:13 . See DEFAME , RAIL , REPORT , REVILE. ...
C — 1: βλάσφημος (Strong's #989 — Adjective — blasphemos — blas'-fay-mos ) "abusive, speaking Evil," is translated "blasphemous," in Acts 6:11,13 ; "a blasphemer," 1 Timothy 1:13 ; "railers," 2 Timothy 3:2 , RV; "railing," 2 Peter 2:11
Knell - ) To sound as a knell; especially, to toll at a death or funeral; hence, to sound as a warning or Evil omen
Cushan-Rishathaim - (cyoo' sshan- rihssh uh thay' ihm) Personal name meaning, “dark one of double Evil
Flight Into Egypt - After the departure of the wise men, the angel of the Lord told Joseph to fiy into Egypt with the Infant Jesus and His mother, as Herod had Evil designs against them; there they remained until the death of Herod (Matthew 2)
Untoward - ‘untoward to all good … forward to Evil’ Judgement of the Synode at Dort , p
Merodach - Merodach is an element in the names of the Babylonian kings Merodach-baladan (2 Kings 20:12 ; Isaiah 39:1 ) and Evil-Merodach (2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31 )
Naturally - We are naturally prone to Evil
Mary of Egypt, Saint - After living an Evil life for seventeen years at Alexandria, she was miraculously converted at Jerusalem
Reap - Reaping is used as a symbol of recompense for good (Hosea 10:12 ; Galatians 6:7-10 ) and Evil (Job 4:8 ; Proverbs 22:8 ; Hosea 8:7 ; Hosea 10:13 ), of evangelism (Matthew 9:37-38 ; Luke 10:2 ; John 4:35-38 ), and of final judgment (Matthew 13:30 ,Matthew 13:30,13:39 ; Revelation 14:14-16 )
Fairy - ) An imaginary supernatural being or spirit, supposed to assume a human form (usually diminutive), either male or female, and to meddle for good or Evil in the affairs of mankind; a fay
Manners - ...
Evil communications corrupt good manners
Nineveh - Jonah was sent there to prophetically foretell the city's imminent destruction, due to its inhabitants’ Evil ways
Rieve - ) To feel grief; to be in pain of mind on account of an Evil; to sorrow; to mourn; - often followed by at, for, or over
Allure - Sometimes used in a bad sense, to allure to Evil but in this sense entice is more common
Distrust - ) Suspicion of Evil designs
Unleavened - 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a) Since the word is used to describe the bread in which there is no fermenting yeast, so now it is used to describe the church in which there are no ungodly sinners, none of the Devil's children, but only those who have been washed in the Blood of the Lamb, made pure and beautiful in CHRIST. No Evil doctrines would be permitted in such a church
Docetism - This error developed out of the dualistic philosophy which viewed matter as inherently Evil, that God could not be associated with matter, and that God, being perfect and infinite, could not suffer
Unstable - They do not stand their ground under pressure, or under the cunning schemes of Evil men
Zachariah - He did Evil in the sight of the Lord, and Shallum son of Jabesh conspired against him, killed him in public, and reigned in his stead
Egypt, Flight Into - After the departure of the wise men, the angel of the Lord told Joseph to fiy into Egypt with the Infant Jesus and His mother, as Herod had Evil designs against them; there they remained until the death of Herod (Matthew 2)
Egypt, Mary of, Saint - After living an Evil life for seventeen years at Alexandria, she was miraculously converted at Jerusalem
Unruly - The tongue can no man tame it is an unruly Evil
am'mi-el - ) He perished by the plague for his Evil report
Conscience - It may be defined to be the judgment which a man passes on the morality of his actions as to their purity or turpitude; or the secret testimony of the soul, whereby it approves things that are good, and condemns those that are Evil. Of an Evil conscience there are several kinds. Conscience, in regard to actions in general, is Evil when it has lost more or less the sense it ought to have of the natural distinctions of moral good and Evil: this is a polluted or defiled conscience. Conscience is Evil in itself when it gives either none or a false testimony as to past actions; when reflecting upon wickedness it feels no pains, it is Evil, and said to be seared or hardened, 1 Timothy 4:2 . It is also Evil when during the commission of sin it lies quiet. ...
In regard to future actions, conscience is Evil if it does not startle at the proposal of sin, or connives at the commission of it
Euchites - They were a sort of mystics, who imagined, according to the oriental notion, that two souls resided in man, the one good, and the other Evil; and who were zealous in expelling the Evil soul or demon, and hastening the return of the good Spirit of God, by contemplation, prayer, and singing of hymns. The same denomination was used in the twelfth century to denote certain fanatics who infested the Greek and Eastern churches, and who were charged with believing a double trinity, rejecting wedlock, abstaining from flesh, treating with contempt the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's supper, and the various branches of external worship, and placing the essence of religion solely in external prayer; and maintaining the efficacy of perpetual supplications to the Supreme Being for expelling an Evil being or genius, which dwelt in the breast of every mortal
Wash - Jeremiah 4:14 (a) The cleansing of the soul and heart from Evil sin is compared to a washing. It is the thought of taking advantage of the blood of the sacrifices, or of the Word of GOD, or of the Spirit of GOD, to put away things that are wrong in the sight of GOD in order that the person may be cleansed from the Evil. ...
2 Peter 2:22 (b) This represents the moral cleansing brought about in the lives of those who seek by their own efforts to get rid of their Evil ways and habits, thinking that thereby they will be Christians
Slander - Aspersing a man's actions with foul names, importing that they proceed from Evil principles, or tend to bad ends, when it doth not or cannot appear. Imputing to our neighbour's practice, judgment, or profession, Evil consequences which have no foundation in truth. It is a restless Evil, which disturbs society; spreads dissention through cities and countries; disunites the strictest friendship; is the source of hatred and revenge; fills wherever it enters with disturbances and confusion; and every where is an enemy to peace, comfort, and Christian good breeding. ...
Lastly, it is an Evil full of deadly poison: whatever flows from it is infected, and poisons whatever it approaches; even its praises are empoisoned; its applauses malicious; its silence criminal; its gestures, motions, and looks, have alltheir venom, and spread it each in their way. Still more dreadful is this Evil when it is found among those who are the professed disciples of Jesus Christ. and article Evil SPEAKING
Think, Devise - The word may deal with Evil, as when Haman “devised” an Evil plot against the Jewish people ( Evil toward him as a servant of the Lord ( Evil concerning the judgment he “thought” to bring upon Israel ( Evil He “purposed” to do concerning Israel ( Evil God has “purposed” against the nation ( Evil against the land of the Chaldeans in His judgment after using them for the purification of His people, Israel ( Evil connotation. 21:11); and Nahum complained of those who “imagine” Evil against the Lord ( Devil - ; SATAN A personal spiritual power who leads the forces of Evil and opposition to God. It speaks of an opposing, personal power of Evil in only a few places and uses diverse language to refer to this Evil power. ...
As a figure of Evil the word satan appears in Job 1:1;b12 and Zechariah 3:1-2 . ...
The Old Testament uses other language to talk about Evil influencing human actions. Judges 9:23 refers to God sending an “evil spirit between Abimelech and the men of Shechem. ” The “Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and an Evil spirit from the Lord troubled him” ( 1 Samuel 16:14 ). This Evil spirit came and went from Saul (1 Samuel 16:23 ; compare 1 Samuel 18:10 ; 1 Samuel 19:9 ). Satan is a major factor in causing Evil situations and in tempting people to Evil actions. The New Testament avoids identifying Evil with the direct will of God, but Evil is always subordinate to God. Thus the devil rules on earth only as people let him. People can escape his power through prayer for deliverance from Evil (Matthew 6:13 ; compare John 17:15 ). In that case, Satan is limited to being the “prince of the devils” (Matthew 9:34 ). The main concern of the Bible is not with the devil but with God and the gospel of His grace. In the end Satan and his angels will be completely overcome, for Jesus came into the world to “destroy the works of the devil” (1 John 3:8 ). But even though Satan is a created, rebellious, and tempting Evil power active in the universe, this fact does not exclude a person from responsibility. Knowledge about Satan and Evil angels alerts Christians to the danger and sublety of satanic temptation
Evil - This article is not a study of the word ‘evil’ as substantive, adjective, or adverb in the two senses of ‘bad’ and ‘hurtful,’ for which the use of a concordance may suffice; but of the conception of Evil in the apostolic writings. Although the NT does assert the difference between God and the world and man, and the inferiority of the made to the Maker, it does not conceive creatureliness as itself Evil, but expresses its limitation and impotence in the term ‘flesh,’ For this aspect see article Flesh. The article Sin deals with the third sense of the word ‘evil. ’ It is thus with physical Evil alone that we are here concerned. Of all Evils death is regarded as the greatest, and in Paul we find a painful shrinking from it (2 Corinthians 5:1-8); accordingly, it is evident how precious a comfort was the Christian hope of immortality and resurrection (Romans 8:23-25). Since death is regarded as the penalty of sin (Romans 5:12-21; Romans 6:21-23, 1 Peter 4:13; 1 Corinthians 15:56), the salvation in Christ includes deliverance from death for the believer, and finally the abolition of death (1 Corinthians 15:24-28, 2 Timothy 1:10) and all other Evils (Revelation 21:4). Behind death, sin, and all Evil, the Apostolic Church saw the devil and other powers of wickedness (Ephesians 4:27, 1 Thessalonians 3:5, Hebrews 2:14, James 4:7, 1 Peter 5:8, 1 John 5:19, Revelation 12:9), and accordingly Christ’s work, especially His death (Colossians 2:15), was regarded as a victory over all Evil powers (1 John 3:8). There are two speculative elements in it which modern Christian faith cannot unquestioningly accept-the connexion of death with sin as its penalty, and the existence of the devil and other Evil powers. We are unable to accept ‘Paul’s account of the origin of physical Evil as altogether due to man’s sin. Without ascribing to Paul on the ground of this and similar passages a dogmatic universalism, against which there is contrary evidence throughout the NT, we may assign to the Apostolic Church the hope of the final victory of Christ over all Evil. The apostolic attitude towards the problem of Evil cannot be described as optimism, for the reality of sin and pain is too seriously and sympathetically recognized, nor as pessimism, for the possibility of redemption is too confidently and persuasively urged, but it may be spoken of as meliorism, for it has the faith which claims a present salvation for every believer, and the hope of a final fulfilment of God’s purpose of grace, and both are linked with a love that sees in human need and pain an opportunity for service and sacrifice, in which man can regard himself as a fellow-worker with God in the solution of the problem of Evil. To revert to the distinctions made in the beginning of this article, the apostolic view recognizes no metaphysical Evil, for to be the creature, subject, and child of God, is for man only good; it links physical with moral Evil, and makes deliverance from pain dependent on salvation from sin; and it throws all the emphasis on moral Evil; for it is concerned not with the speculative intellect, but only with the moral conscience and religions consciousness of man
Protector - ) One who, or that which, defends or shields from injury, Evil, oppression, etc
Smooth - 1: λεῖος (Strong's #3006 — Adjective — leois — li'-os ) "smooth," occurs in Luke 3:5 , figurative of the change in Israel from self-righteousness, pride and other forms of Evil, to repentance, humility and submission
Anger - The emotion of instant displeasure on account of something Evil that presents itself to our view
Mamre - It apparently was named after an Amorite (Mamre) who helped Abraham defeat the Evil king, Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:1-24 )
Sceva - The Evil spirit jumped on them instead
Bewitch - The Greek word used here has a history in magical Evil and the casting of spells
Discern - ) To see or understand the difference; to make distinction; as, to discern between good and Evil, truth and falsehood
Augment - To increase or swell the degree, amount or magnitude as, impatience augments an Evil
Creep - ...
Judges 1:4 (a) The writer describes the subtle, clever, insidious ways of the enemies of GOD who get in among GOD's people to make known their Evil doctrines and to turn away the people from the true faith in GOD
Ditch - ...
Proverbs 23:27 (a) This is a terrible description and indictment of an Evil woman
Antidote - ) Whatever tends to prevent mischievous effects, or to counteract Evil which something else might produce
Sour - Jeremiah 31:29 (b) By this peculiar type the Lord is telling us that the Evil practices of the father are frequently transmitted to the children
Warn - ) To give notice to, of approaching or probable danger or Evil; to caution against anything that may prove injurious
Nergalsharezer - He killed his brother-in-law Evil-merodach, and succeeded to the throne, B
Wicked - ) Evil in principle or practice; deviating from morality; contrary to the moral or divine law; addicted to vice or sin; sinful; immoral; profligate; - said of persons and things; as, a wicked king; a wicked woman; a wicked deed; wicked designs
Scandal - (LL: scandalum, stumbling block) ...
Any word or action which has at least the appearance of Evil, and which is the occasion of sin to another
Nebhaz - In the Zabian books, Nibhaz occurs as the "lord of darkness;" which, according to the character of Assyrian- Chaldean mythology, would point to an Evil planetary demon
Satan - 64, ‘the fallen watchers’ (and their descendants) are carefully distinguished from the Satans, who apparently belong to ‘a counter kingdom of Evil’ which existed before the fall of the watchers recorded in Genesis 6:1 , the latter, in consequence of their fall, becoming subject to the former. ‘Their functions were threefold: they tempted to Evil (69. of Wisdom ( Wis 2:24 : ‘by the envy of the devil death entered into the world’) we already meet with the identification of the Serpent of Genesis 3:1-24 with Satan, which afterwards became a fixed element in belief, and an allusion to the same idea may be detected in the Psalms of Song of Solomon 4:11 , where the prosperous wicked man is said to be ‘like a serpent, to pervert wisdom, speaking with the words of transgressors. It is interesting to note that in the later Midrash one of the works of Messiah ben-Joseph is the slaying of Sammael, who is ‘the Satan, the prime mover of all Evil. The Rabbinic doctrine of the ‘evil impulse’ ( yetser ra ’), which works within man like a leaven ( Berak . 17a), looks like a theological refinement, which has sometimes been combined with the popular view of Satan (Satan works his Evil purpose by the instrumentality of the ‘evil impulse’). our word ‘diabolical’), which is translated ‘devil,’ and which means ‘accuser’ or ‘calumniator. Matthew 10:25 ) Satan is apparently identified with Beelzebub (or Beelzebul), and is occasionally designated ‘the Evil one’ ( Matthew 13:19 ; Matthew 13:38 etc. ; so, perhaps, also in the Lord’s Prayer: ‘deliver us from the Evil one ’). He is called the ‘prince of the devils (or demons)’ in Matthew 12:24 , just as Sammael, ‘the great prince in heaven,’ is designated the ‘chief of Satans’ in the Midrash. In Enoch the demons, who are represented as the Evil spirits which went forth from the souls of the giant offspring of the fallen watchers, exercise an Evil activity, working moral ruin on the earth till the final judgment. As in the Book of Enoch, Satan is represented in the NT as the ruler of a counter-kingdom of Evil (cf. Opposition is concentrated in the persons of Christ and the devil. The Son of God is manifested for the express purpose of destroying the devil’s works ( 1 John 3:8 ). Devil. Our Lord, as is clearly apparent in the Synoptic tradition, recognized the existence and power of a kingdom of Evil, with organized demonic agencies under the control of a supreme personality, Satan or Beelzebub. These demonic agencies are the source of every variety of physical and moral Evil. Maladies traced to demonic possession play a large part in the Synoptic narratives (see Devil, Possession). The Evil effected by Satanic agency is intellectual and moral as well as physical ( Mark 4:15 , Matthew 13:19 ; Matthew 13:33 ; cf. That our Lord accepted the reality of such personal agencies of Evil cannot seriously be questioned; nor is it necessary to endeavour to explain this fact away. Under certain conditions and in certain localities the sense of the presence and potency of Evil personalities has been painfully and oppressively felt by more than one modern European, who was not prone to superstition
ad'am - [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and Evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. By it Adam could know good and Evil int he divine way, through obedience; thus knowing good by experience in resisting temptation and forming a strong and holy character, while he knew Evil only by observation and inference. Or he could "know good and Evil," in Satan's way, be experiencing the Evil and knowing good only by contrast
ad'am - [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and Evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. By it Adam could know good and Evil int he divine way, through obedience; thus knowing good by experience in resisting temptation and forming a strong and holy character, while he knew Evil only by observation and inference. Or he could "know good and Evil," in Satan's way, be experiencing the Evil and knowing good only by contrast
ad'am - [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and Evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. By it Adam could know good and Evil int he divine way, through obedience; thus knowing good by experience in resisting temptation and forming a strong and holy character, while he knew Evil only by observation and inference. Or he could "know good and Evil," in Satan's way, be experiencing the Evil and knowing good only by contrast
Root - A — 1: ῥίζα (Strong's #4491 — Noun Feminine — rhiza — hrid'-zah ) is used (a) in the natural sense, Matthew 3:10 ; 13:6,21 ; Mark 4:6,17 ; 11:20 ; Luke 3:9 ; 8:13 ; (b) metaphorically (1) of "cause, origin, source," said of persons, ancestors, Romans 11:16-18 (twice); of things, Evils, 1 Timothy 6:10 , RV, of the love of money as a "root" of all "kinds of Evil" (marg. , "evils;" AV, "evil"); bitterness, Hebrews 12:15 ; (2) of that which springs from a "root," a shoot, said of offspring, Romans 15:12 ; Revelation 5:5 ; 22:16
Arrow - ...
Psalm 11:2 (a) Here the arrow represents wicked devices and Evil words which the wicked use against the righteous. ...
Jeremiah 9:8 (a) The tongue that speaks deceitfully and makes Evil statements about another is described as a sharp arrow that wounds and hurts
Heart - But before the deluge God's verdict of man was that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only Evil continually. And the Lord said, Out of the heart of man proceed Evil thoughts and every form of wickedness
Jehoahaz - He did that which was Evil in the sight of the Lord, and was oppressed by Hazael king of Syria, who compelled him to reduce his army to fifty horsemen, ten chariots, and ten thousand foot soldiers. He did that which was Evil in the sight of the Lord, and was deposed by Pharaoh-Necho, who sent him in chains to Egypt, where he died
Ahaz - The Evil king of Judah (735-715). The Bible characterizes Ahaz as an Evil man who participated in the most monstrous of idolatrous practices (2 Kings 16:3 )
Wickedness - 20:13, where the sons of belı̂ya‛al are perpetrators of wickedness (they raped and murdered a man’s concubine): “Now therefore deliver us the men, the children of Belial [1] which are in Gibeah, that we may put them to death, and put away Evil from Israel. 1:11 the wicked counselor plots Evil against God
Bands - ...
Psalm 2:3 (a) This is typical of the restraining laws and commandments of GOD wherein He curbs and retards the Evil passions and cruel powers of wicked men. ...
Ecclesiastes 7:26 (b) This is a figure of the tremendous, attractive power of the Evil woman who holds in the chains of sin those who yield to her Evil attractions. ...
Isaiah 28:22 (a) This solemn warning is to inform us that the Evil habits of life will be made permanent if the Evildoer persists in his path instead of coming to the Lord for salvation
Conspiracy - ) A combination of men for an Evil purpose; an agreement, between two or more persons, to commit a crime in concert, as treason; a plot
Detraction - For just reasons one may lawfully divulge another's offenses, but only to prudent persons and for the purpose of preventing Evil to the guilty party or others
Dart - The use of flaming arrows (Psalm 7:13 ; Psalm 120:4 ) becomes in Ephesians 6:16 a picture of the assault of the Evil one on believers
Refrain - 1: παύω (Strong's #3973 — Verb — pauo — pow'-o ) "to stop," is used in the Active Voice in the sense of "making to cease, restraining" in 1 Peter 3:10 , of causing the tongue to refrain from Evil; elsewhere in the Middle Voice, see CEASE , No
Satan - See Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic
Owl - As the owl was surrounded by the barren, hot sands with only reptiles for company, so the Saviour was surrounded by wicked influences and Evil enemies
Ahura-Mazda - He is the opponent of Ahriman, the spirit of Evil, both being sprung from Eternity, or, according to another version, Ahriman being the offspring of a moment of doubt on the part of Ormazd
Corruption - ...
Romans 8:21 (b) The bondage of living in this world of sin and death is compared to vile, rotten, Evil things
Crete, Cretians - It was the inhabitants of this island who had the Evil report of being alway liars and lazy gluttons, according to one of their own poets (Epimenides)
Mast - He is blown about easily by the winds of lust, and is carried away by his own Evil mind
Satyrs - sacrifices unto devils" (seirim ) i. to the Evil spirits of the desert, literally, "shaggy goats," hence applied to an object of pagan worship or a demon dwelling in the desert (2 Chronicles 11:15; Isaiah 13:21; Isaiah 34:14)
Blasphemy - Speaking Evil of God or denying Him some good which we should attribute to Him. Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit is stating that Jesus did his miracles by the power of the devil (Matthew 12:22-32) and is an unforgivable sin (Mark 3:28-30)
Belial - This is an Hebrew word, signifying somewhat Evil
Melancholy - ) Producing great Evil and grief; causing dejection; calamitous; afflictive; as, a melancholy event
Jehoiakim - He reigned eleven years in Jerusalem, and did Evil in the sight of the Lord
Wickedness, Spirits of - See also principalities of Evil
Evil - Evil is an older form of the word ‘ill’; used, both as substantive and adjective, to tr. Moral temptations come from Him ( 2 Samuel 24:1 , 1 Kings 22:23 ), though there is a tendency to embody them in beings which, though belonging to the host of heaven, are spoken of as Evil or lying spirits ( 1 Samuel 16:14 , Judges 9:23 , 1 Kings 22:22 ). Then later we have the figure of the Adversary or Satan, who, though still dependent on the will of God, is nevertheless so identified with Evil that he is represented as taking the initiative in seduction ( Zechariah 3:1 , 1 Chronicles 21:1 , but cf. ), the purity which cannot behold Evil ( Habakkuk 1:13 ); and correspondingly sharpens the problem. In the NT moral Evil is never ascribed to God ( James 1:13 ), being essentially hostile to His mind and will ( Romans 1:18-21 ; Rom 5:10 , 1 John 1:5-7 ; 1 John 2:16 ; 1Jn 2:29 ; 1 John 3:4 ; 1 John 3:9 ); but to the Evil One ( Matthew 6:13 ; Matthew 13:19 , 1 John 5:19 ), an active and personal being identical with the Devil ( Matthew 13:39 , 1 Corinthians 15:24-287 ) or Satan ( Matthew 4:10 , Mark 4:15 , Luke 22:31 , John 13:27 ), who with his angels ( Matthew 25:41 ) is cast down from heaven ( Revelation 12:9 , cf. ...
The speculative question of the origin of Evil is not resolved in Holy Scripture, being one of those things of which we are not competent judges (see Butler’s Analogy , i. Pain is justified by the redemption of the body ( Romans 8:18-25 , 1 Peter 4:13 ), punishment by the peaceable fruits of righteousness ( Hebrews 12:7-11 ), and the permission of moral Evil by the victory of the Cross ( John 12:31 , Romans 8:37-39 , Colossians 2:15 , 1618170215_84 )
Vine - Sometimes it is spoken of as a good vine, and in other passages as a vine that was unprofitable and that brought forth Evil fruit. Instead of doing so, it brought forth Evil fruit in most of the cases where it refers to Israel. GOD is telling us that Israel had become so corrupt that they were more like those two wicked cities than like His city, and their works were as Evil as those of Sodom. ...
Jeremiah 2:21 (a) Here we read the sad lament of the Lord because of the Evil conduct of His people. They did not act like a good vine bearing grapes, but as an Evil vine, bearing useless fruit, or poisonous fruit
Raven - Hence the Evil omen attached to the bird
Naughtiness - Badness wickedness Evil principle or purpose
Mordecai - Esther's cousin and the mastermind behind her rise to power and subsequent victory over the Evil Haman
Viper - Jesus spoke of the wicked religious leaders as vipers (Matthew 3:7 ) because of their venomous attacks on Him and their Evil character in leading the people astray
Pious Frauds - The terms pious and fraud form a solecism; and the practice of doing Evil that good may come, is directly opposite to the injunction of the sacred Scriptures, Romans 3:8
Croak - ) To complain; especially, to grumble; to forebode Evil; to utter complaints or forebodings habitually
Dainties - ...
Psalm 141:4 (b) David indicates that the pleasures of sin which are offered by Evil men are the Devil's delicious and delightful foods
Dung Ate - Nehemiah 3:13 (c) Probably this figure is used to describe the care we should exercise in ridding ourselves of those unhappy things in our lives, bad habits, Evil ways, harmful practices, that should not be permitted either in our words or actions
Zachariah - Did Evil in the sight of Jehovah as his fathers, worshipping Jeroboam's calves
Emancipate - ) To free from any controlling influence, especially from anything which exerts undue or Evil influence; as, to emancipate one from prejudices or error
Sickle - GOD permits sinners to run their course, produce their Evil fruit, and then He cuts them off, and the day of grace is ended
Evil, Principalities of - Of the Evil spirits three classes at least are expressly mentioned in the New Testament (1 Corinthians 15; Ephesians 6; Colossians 2)
Achan, Achar - All Israel were punished until the sin was discovered and avenged; showing in type that there cannot be Evil in an assembly of Christians without all being involved
Talisman - in averting or repelling Evil; an amulet; a charm; as, a talisman to avert diseases
Belial - In the New Testament, "Belial" is used as an appellation of Satan, the power or lord of Evil: "What concord hath Christ with Belial," the prince of licentiousness and corruption? 2 Corinthians 6:15
Redound - The Evil, soon driven back, redounded as a flood on those from whom it sprung
Direction, Spiritual - Saint Ignatius says that the devil attacks those in the way of perfection, not by solicitations to Evil, but by snares and deceits, presenting Evil under the guise of good. " (1 John 4) He should accept unreservedly as the foundation of his ministry the fact of the good spirit working in the soul for its perfection, the Evil spirit plotting against the soul for its destruction
Full - A — 1: πλήρης (Strong's #4134 — Adjective — pleres — play'-race ) denotes "full," (a) in the sense of "being filled," materially, Matthew 14:20 ; 15:37 ; Mark 8:19 (said of baskets "full" of bread crumbs); of leprosy, Luke 5:12 ; spiritually, of the Holy Spirit, Luke 4:1 ; Acts 6:3 ; 7:55 ; 11:24 ; grace and truth, John 1:14 ; faith, Acts 6:5 ; grace and power, Acts 6:8 ; of the effects of spiritual life and qualities, seen in good works, Acts 9:36 ; in an Evil sense, of guile and villany, Acts 13:10 ; wrath, Acts 19:28 ; (b) in the sense of "being complete," "full corn in the ear," Mark 4:28 ; of a reward hereafter, 2 John 1:8 . ...
A — 2: μεστός (Strong's #3324 — Adjective — mestos — mes-tos' ) probably akin to a root signifying "to measure," hence conveys the sense of "having full measure," (a) of material things, a vessel, John 19:29 ; a net, John 21:11 ; (b) metaphorically, of thoughts and feelings, exercised (1) in Evil things, hypocrisy, Matthew 23:28 ; envy, murder, strife, deceit, malignity, Romans 1:29 ; the utterances of the tongue, James 3:8 ; adultery, 2 Peter 2:14 ; (2) in virtues, goodness, Romans 15:14 ; mercy, etc. ...
B — 1: γέμω (Strong's #1073 — Verb — gemo — ghem'-o ) "to be full, to be heavily laden with," was primarily used of a ship; it is chiefly used in the NT of Evil contents, such as extortion and excess, Matthew 23:25 ; dead men's bones, Matthew 23:27 ; extortion and wickedness, Luke 11:39 ; cursing, Romans 3:14 ; blasphemy, Revelation 17:3 ; abominations, Revelation 17:4 ; of Divine judgments, Revelation 15:17 ; 21:9 ; (RV, "laden," AV, "full"); of good things, Revelation 4:6,8 ; 5:8
Armageddon - (ahr muh gehd' dahn) A Middle East site of the final battle between the forces of good and Evil (Revelation 16:16 ). The reality that God will bring defeat on the forces of Evil at Armageddon should lead all people to examine themselves, their plans, and their actions to see if they might be part of the Evil forces rather than part of the work of God's kingdom
Spiritual Direction - Saint Ignatius says that the devil attacks those in the way of perfection, not by solicitations to Evil, but by snares and deceits, presenting Evil under the guise of good. " (1 John 4) He should accept unreservedly as the foundation of his ministry the fact of the good spirit working in the soul for its perfection, the Evil spirit plotting against the soul for its destruction
Restoration - In a variety of phrases ‘regeneration’ ( palingenesia , Matthew 19:28 ), ‘restitution of all things’ ( Acts 3:21 ), ‘summing up all things in Christ, the things in the heavens, and the things upon the earth’ ( Ephesians 1:10 ), ‘new heavens and a new earth’ ( 2 Peter 3:13 , Revelation 21:1 ), ‘make all things new’ ( Revelation 21:6 ) the NT points forward to a perfected condition which shall supervene upon the present imperfect condition of mingled good and Evil (cf. Matthew 13:39-40 ; Matthew 13:49-50 ), including a renewal of nature, the quelling of all Evil ( Philippians 2:10-11 ), and restoration of order and harmony in the universe, with Christ as Head. ( Eph 1:10 , 1 Corinthians 15:24-28 , Philippians 2:10-11 ); but unbiassed study of the passages and their context shows that it is far from the Apostle’s view to teach an ultimate conversion or annihilation of the kingdom of Evil
Curse, Cursing, Cursed, Accursed - 2, primarily signifies "to pray against, to wish Evil against a person or thing," hence "to curse," Matthew 25:41 ; Mark 11:21 ; Luke 6:28 ; Romans 12:14 ; James 3:9 . ...
B — 4: κακολογέω (Strong's #2551 — Verb — kakologeo — kak-ol-og-eh'-o ) "to speak Evil" (kakos, "evil," lego, "to speak"), is translated by the verb "to curse" in Matthew 15:4 ; Mark 7:10 , "to speak Evil of father and mother," not necessarily "to curse," is what the Lord intended (RV). AV and RV have the verb "to speak Evil" in Mark 9:39 ; Acts 19:9 . See Evil
Methodist Episcopal Church - " The doctrine of sanctification implies "freedom from sin, from Evil desires and Evil tempers, and from pride
Eli - The next time he is mentioned it is only as the father of Hophni and Phinehas, the whole passage being occupied with an account of their Evil doings ( 1 Samuel 2:12 ff. , Eli is mentioned only as the listener to ‘a man of God’ who utters his prophecy of Evil
Har-Magedon - Another explanation finds in the word a survival of the name of the place in which the gods of Babylonia were believed to have defeated the dragon Tiâmat and the other Evil spirits. While the reference is apocalyptic, it seems probable on the whole that the word perpetuates Megiddo as the synonym of the battle-field whether above the earth or in the under world on which the final victory over Evil was to be won
Relief - ) That which removes or lessens Evil, pain, discomfort, uneasiness, etc. ) The act of relieving, or the state of being relieved; the removal, or partial removal, of any Evil, or of anything oppressive or burdensome, by which some ease is obtained; succor; alleviation; comfort; ease; redress
Magic - ...
Such magic often has an Evil intent, being directed at enemies by means of curses, spells and ritualistic actions. Sometimes it may have a partly good intent in trying to reverse Evil spells and curses (Numbers 24:1; Numbers 24:10; 1 Samuel 6:2; 2 Kings 17:17; 2 Kings 21:6; Daniel 2:2; Revelation 9:21). ...
Divination, witchcraft and all these associated practices are contrary to the ways of God, not only because they depend on Evil spiritual powers for their operation, but also because they are a denial of faith. ...
Jesus Christ has triumphed over all the unseen powers of Evil, and through him believers too can triumph (Ephesians 1:19-21; Ephesians 2:6; Colossians 2:8-10; Colossians 3:1-3)
Spirits in Prison - Verses 19-21 declare his triumphant declaration to the Evil spirits, and contrasts them with Noah, who was saved through water—a type of Christian baptism. ...
That these spirits are the Evil angels of Genesis 6:1-4 (or their offspring) is indicated by their being in prison, their disobedience in the time of Noah, their mention in 2 Peter 2:4 and Jude 6 , and the New Testament use of the plural noun ("spirits, " pneumasin ) as a reference to Evil spirits unless otherwise qualified. This is further supported by contemporary Jewish literature (1Enoch 6:1-8; 12:1-16:4; 19:1; 2Baruch 56:12), which describes these Evil angels in the same way as the passage in 1Peter
Pekah - His conduct was Evil; he maintained the sinful worship set up by Jeroboam I
Agagite - ]'>[1] reads Bugaios , Esther 3:1 , Esther 8:5 , omits at Esther 3:10 , and at Esther 9:24 , EST 16:10 has Macedonian , a word of Evil connotation after Antiochus Epiphanes
Catechism of Saint Peter Canisius - ,the shunning of Evil and the doing of good
Heart: Must be Renewed - A man may beat down the bitter fruit from an Evil tree until he is weary; whilst the root abides in strength and vigor, the beating down of the present fruit will not hinder it from bringing forth more
News - Evil news rides fast, while good news baits
Augment - ) To enlarge or increase in size, amount, or degree; to swell; to make bigger; as, to augment an army by reeforcements; rain augments a stream; impatience augments an Evil
Marrow - To fear the Lord and shun Evil is marrow (KJV) or refreshment (NAS, RSV) or nourishment (NIV) to the bones (Proverbs 3:8 )
Gaels - There were also the two assemblies, the druids who charmed the Evil spirits, the ollamhs (professors of law), and bards who had charge of the genealogies and reduced them to writing
Brute - ...
Judges 1:10 (a) This is an assertion that these Evil leaders knew nothing of spiritual things but only the things of this earth
Consolation - Comfort alleviation of misery, or distress of mind refreshment of mind or spirits a comparative degree of happiness in distress or misfortune, springing from any circumstance that abates the Evil, or supports and strengthens the mind, as hope, joy, courage and the like
Entice - To incite or instigate, by exciting hope or desire usually in a bad sense as, to entice one to Evil
Frail - Man is frail, and prone to Evil
Rooted - This understanding of the Scriptures will keep us from being blown about by every wind of doctrine, and the Evil schemes of false teachers
Thicket - ...
Jeremiah 4:7 (b) The word is used to illustrate the Evil surroundings and the wicked society of the countries of Assyria, Babylonia and other foreign nations which were to invade Israel and lay it waste
Malice - ) Enmity of heart; malevolence; ill will; a spirit delighting in harm or misfortune to another; a disposition to injure another; a malignant design of Evil
Sadness - A kind of pain caused by an interior apprehension, through our sensitive appetite, of some Evil that affects us
Saint Peter Canisius, Catechism of - ,the shunning of Evil and the doing of good
Origin - The apostasy is believed to have been the origin of moral Evil
Thou - ...
Art thou he that should come? Matthew 11 ...
I will fear no Evil, for thou art with me
Whisperer, Whispering - 1: ψιθυριστής (Strong's #5588 — Noun Masculine — psithuristes — psith-oo-ris-tace' ) "a whisperer," occurs in an Evil sense in Romans 1:29
Antinomianism - If good works, argued Agricola, do not help to salvation so Evil ones do not hinder it and therefore justified Christians are not bound to observe the law
Mortification - (Latin: mortificare, to cause death) ...
A practise of Christian asceticism the purpose of which is twofold: negatively, to cause death to sin, to overcome the desires of the flesh, to conquer Evil habits; positively, through penances, hardships, austerities and continued good actions, so to strengthen the will that a man may pursue a desired object despite difficulties
Monica, Saint - Moreover, her son Augustine fell into Evil ways during his youth
Amon - He did Evil in the sight of the Lord, as his father Manasseh had done, by forsaking Jehovah and worshipping idols
Corruptions: Hard to Die - Often and often have I vowed death to some Evil propensity, and have fondly dreamed that the sentence was fulfilled, but alas! in weaker moments I have had sad cause to know that the sinful tendency still survived
Hermogenians - Hermogenes established matter as his first principle; and regarding matter as the fountain of all Evil, he maintained, that the world, and every thing contained in it, as also the souls of men and other spirits, were formed by the Deity from an uncreated and eternal mass of corrupt matter
Christ: to be Followed Above All - ' Unlettered ignorance is a great Evil, but learned ignorance is worse, and such is all learning which decoys the heart from Jesus
Dancing - The caperings and wantonings of the ball-room are death to the solemn influences of our ministry, and many an ill-ended life first received its bent for Evil amid the flippancies of gay assemblies met to trip away the hours
Belial - In the New Testament it is found only in 2 Corinthians 6:15 , where it is used as a name of Satan, the personification of all that is Evil
Non-Residence - Nothing can reflect greater disgrace on a clergyman if a parish, than to receive the emolument without ever visiting his parishioners, and being unconcerned for the welfare of their souls; yet this has been a reigning Evil in our land, and proves that there are too many who care little about the flock, so that they may but live at ease
Sinners: Their Company to be Avoided - There is little need to warn them off, they are all too alarmed to come near, Why is it men are not as much afraid of the contagion of vice? How dare they run risks for themselves and children by allowing Evil companions to frequent their house? Sin is as infectious and far more deadly than the small-pox or fever
Lucifer - A later tradition associated the word with Evil, although the Bible does not use it as such
Discreet - Prudent wise in avoiding errors or Evil, and in selecting the best means to accomplish a purpose circumspect cautious wary not rash
Antinomianism - If good works, argued Agricola, do not help to salvation so Evil ones do not hinder it and therefore justified Christians are not bound to observe the law
Possession - ) The state of being possessed or controlled, as by an Evil spirit, or violent passions; madness; frenzy; as, demoniacal possession
Devote - ) To appropriate by vow; to set apart or dedicate by a solemn act; to consecrate; also, to consign over; to doom; to Evil; to devote one to destruction; the city was devoted to the flames
Arrow - The word is used also for slanderous words and malicious purposes of Evil men
Agag - 1 Samuel 15:9 (c) This King of Amalek is a type of some wicked habit or Evil way which is promoted and cultivated in the life of one who knows better
Marsh - They live in the lowlands of life where the stinging, crawling, Evil varmints of sin make their habitation, and where dirt abounds in the life, the soul and the words of those who live there
Coal - Psalm 120:4 (b) The Evil words of hostile enemies are compared to coals that burn and hurt when they strike
Dregs - GOD punished Israel in great wrath because they turned against Him in such a wicked and Evil way
Herodians - Their Evil principles may well come under the term 'the leaven of Herod
Expect - ) To look for (mentally); to look forward to, as to something that is believed to be about to happen or come; to have a previous apprehension of, whether of good or Evil; to look for with some confidence; to anticipate; - often followed by an infinitive, sometimes by a clause (with, or without, that); as, I expect to receive wages; I expect that the troops will be defeated
Antinomy - If good works, argued Agricola, do not help to salvation so Evil ones do not hinder it and therefore justified Christians are not bound to observe the law
Departure - A forsaking abandonment as a departure from Evil
Sow (Animal) - Matthew 12:43-455 (b) We see in this type a picture of an unsaved sinner who has cleansed himself from bad habits and the Evil ways in which he has lived
Wind - The wind is also used as a symbol of the unseen influence of Satan, Jude 12 ; and where permitted he carries out his Evil designs by the wind
Retrieve - ) To remedy the Evil consequence of, to repair, as a loss or damadge
Remedy - ) That which corrects or counteracts an Evil of any kind; a corrective; a counteractive; reparation; cure; - followed by for or against, formerly by to
Exorcism - (Greek: ex, out; horkizo, solemnly command ) ...
The act or ceremony of driving out demons from possessed persons, places, or things, or of protecting them from the influence of Evil spirits. In the prayer used in blessing holy water, God is besought to protect those who use it against the influence of the devil
Abstinence - The Holy Ghost, by his servants the apostles, hath given them very blessed directions of "abstaining from fleshly lusts which war against the soul: and from the very appearance of Evil
Air - "The prince of the power of the air" is the head and chief of the Evil spirits, with which both Jews and Heathens thought the air was filled
Deep, the - In Luke 8:31 'the deep' refers to the abyss where Evil spirits are confined
Abstain, Abstinence - , to keep oneself from), in the NT, invariably refers to Evil practices, moral and ceremonial, Acts 15:20,29 ; Reparation - (Latin: reparare, to repair) ...
Term used in canon law in reference to the reparation of churches; in asceticism, to express the prayers, actions, or sufferings offered to God to make good the Evil done by men, particularly on certain occasions of excess, e
Nadab - Nadab did Evil in the sight of the Lord; and with him perished his children and the race of Jeroboam, as God had foretold, 1 Kings 15:25-30
Lust - In Galatians 5:17 , we see that the aspirations of the heart renewed by the Holy Spirit, oppose and will subdue the native Evil desires, 1 Corinthians 15:57 ; but in the unrenewed heart these reign uncontrolled, lead to greater and greater outwards sin, and secure eternal death, James 1:14,15
Lunatic - Lunatics are expressly mentioned in distinction from men possessed by Evil spirits, Matthew 4:24 17:15 . See DEVILS
Restraint - The commands of God should be effectual restraints upon our Evil passions
Trees - The "tree of knowledge of good and Evil" bore the forbidden fruit, by eating of which Adam fatally increased his knowledgeof good by its loss, of sin and woe by actual experience, Genesis 2:9,17
Devil - The former work is of course, a part of his great work of temptation to Evil and is not only exemplified but illustrated as to its general nature and tendency by the narrative of Genesis 3
Haughty - 1: ὑπερήφανος (Strong's #5244 — Adjective — huperephanos — hoop-er-ay'-fan-os ) "showing oneself above others" (huper, "over," phainomai, "to appear"), though often denoting preeminent, is always used in the NT in the Evil sense of "arrogant, disdainful, haughty;" it is rendered "haughty" in Romans 1:30 ; 2 Timothy 3:2 , RV, AV, "proud," but "proud" in both versions in Luke 1:51 ; James 4:6 ; 1 Peter 5:5 ; in the last two it is set in opposition to tapeinos, "humble, lowly
Escape - ) To get clear from danger or Evil of any form; to be passed without harm. ) The act of fleeing from danger, of evading harm, or of avoiding notice; deliverance from injury or any Evil; flight; as, an escape in battle; a narrow escape; also, the means of escape; as, a fire escape
Suck - ...
Job 20:16 (b) Zophar is making the statement that the hypocrite and the wicked live on lies and flourish on wicked sayings and Evil conversation. They were delighting in Evil things
Jael - The praise, therefore, accorded to Jael and her deed in the Song of Deborah ( Judges 5:24-27 ) must be accounted for on the questionable moral principle that an Evil deed, if productive of advantage, may be rejoiced over and commended by those who have not taken part in it. This is one degree worse than ‘doing Evil that good may come,’ for the Evil itself is extolled; whereas, in the other case, it is deplored, and unwillingly acquiesced in because it is ‘necessary
Eli - Eli spoke to his sons of their Evil doings, but he did not with energy prevent the dishonour to the Lord. ...
As Eli allowed his sons to continue in their Evil ways, God sent a message to him by Samuel, reminding him of the judgements of which the man of God had warned him, and repeating that it was because "his sons made themselves vile and he restrained them not. " A pious remark, but which did not correct the Evil
Eli - Eli spoke to his sons of their Evil doings, but he did not with energy prevent the dishonour to the Lord. ...
As Eli allowed his sons to continue in their Evil ways, God sent a message to him by Samuel, reminding him of the judgements of which the man of God had warned him, and repeating that it was because "his sons made themselves vile and he restrained them not. " A pious remark, but which did not correct the Evil
Breast - ...
Ezekiel 23:3 (a) This is a terrible accusation against Israel because they had permitted the wicked people around them to take liberties with them to satisfy all their Evil desires. GOD would not ignore these Evil associations. We find this same sin presented in all of its Evil in the church of Rome today. They have partaken of the idolatrous practices of almost every known Evil religion. They nourish every form of Evil and sin and promote every kind of wicked association with the world
Suffering - Clearly an understanding of suffering introduces the problem of Evil. Suffering follows the entrance of Evil into the universe. The Bible does not attempt to explain the origin of Evil. It accepts Evil and suffering as givens in a fallen and sinful world. The wicked would surely suffer for their Evil ways (Psalm 7:15-16 ; Psalm 37:1-3 ; Psalm 73:12-20 ; Psalm 139:19 ), even though they might prosper for a time (Job 21:28-33 ). ...
New Testament Into an Evil world God sent His only Son
Lust - But Rendall is probably right in saying that the word ἐπιθυμεῖ here is neutral and equally applicable to the good desires of the Spirit and the Evil lusts of the flesh (Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘Galatians,’ 1903, in loc. To them it was the Evil, envious spirit of man. ...
(b) When the word is used without an object it generally refers to Evil longings (cf. We find such expressions as ‘the corruption that is in the world through lust’ spoken of (2 Peter 1:4)-where corruption is the consequence of Evil desire. The NT has no meticulous fear in passing judgment on Evil desires and on their consequences. It does not take up the immaculate, fastidious attitude of ‘virtue for virtue’s sake,’ but its point of view is the whole personality, and on this is moral judgment for good or Evil passed. To Augustine and the Reformers, however, this concupiscence was prior to the individual’s Evil volition and in a sense caused it. The Reformers did not regard ‘desire’ viewed as a part of man’s ideal nature as ‘evil’; but, as a matter of fact, in actual experience the desires are found to be Evil. ...
‘All the desires of men we teach to be Evil, … not in so far as they are natural, but because they are inordinate, and they are inordinate because they flow from a corrupt nature’ (Calvin, Institutes, bk. It is usually maintained that the difference between the two is that πάθος refers to Evil on its passive and ἐπιθυία on its more active side. In John 8:44 the lusts of murder and deceit are traced back to the devil. The idea is the Jewish one that the devil tempted Cain to murder his brother Abel, and that the serpent deceived Eve (cf. This view that the devil is the originator of lust took various forms in Jewish thought (Sirach 25:23 ff. The existence of an Evil tendency (yezer hara) in human nature was a problem for Judaism. ), sometimes it was ascribed to the devil, and sometimes to God. The good tendency (yezer hatob) was without difficulty ascribed to God, but the Evil tendency could not be so treated. Paul (1618170215_11) simply states these two tendencies and connects the Evil with the fall of Adam. John mentions the devil (1 John 3:8) as the originator of Evil desires, he is opposing the Gnostic view that the ‘spiritual’ man is not responsible for sensual sins. Yet it is certain that the problem of Evil is not solved on NT principles by any atomistic view of human personality, and that the redemption of Christ has its cosmic as well as its personal aspects. ’ It is the kingdom of Evil as organized in customs and tendencies in human society and human hearts, including also Evil spirits. It is true that the body (σῶμα) with its desires (Romans 6:12) was a sort of armoury where sin got its weapons, but the body as such is not the originative seat of Evil; otherwise St. 1 Corinthians 9:27), but Rothe is scarcely warranted in making the sensuous nature the primary root of Evil (Theol. ...
Again, the heart is viewed as the origin of Evil desires (Romans 1:24; cf. Evil desires originating in their impious state. Evil tendencies develop pari passi, with God’s judicial withdrawal. What the NT is concerned with is not the origin-an insoluble problem-but the abolition of Evil desires. ) gives a long list of Evil desires leading to death, but to him strife and envy are characteristically causative of this result, as in the case of Cain (iv. But it does say that Evil desires leave the soul unsatisfied and produce disorder (James 4:2). Redemption is necessary to cope with Evil desires. ...
The desiring of Evil things St. This desiring does not work in vacuo; it is active in an atmosphere already tainted with idolatry, sensuality, and devilry (1 Corinthians 10:15 ff. Here again the ‘flesh’ is the origin of Evil desire-not the body as such, but the sinful personality (Law
To the NT, then, Evil desires contaminate, corrupt, and destroy the soul itself and bring upon it God’s punishment
Deliverance - Rescue from danger or any Evil
Kingdom of Satan - More definitely the kingdom of Satan means the organized forces of the Evil spirits under the leadership of Satan, the "Adversary," the devil
Jannes And Jambres - The Damascus Document from the Qumran Sect describes the two as brothers raised up by Belial, the Evil one
Eschew - 1: ἐκκλίνω (Strong's #1578 — Verb — ekklino — ek-klee'-no ) "to turn aside" (ek, "from," klino, "to turn, bend"), is used metaphorically (a) of leaving the right path, Romans 3:12 , RV, "turned aside," for AV, "gone out of the way;" (b) of turning away from division-makers and errorists, Romans 16:17 , RV, "turn away from;" (c) of turning away from Evil, 1 Peter 3:11 , RV, "turn away from," AV, "eschew
Merodach - It forms part of some kings' names, as Merodach Baladan, Evil Merodach; it is so used as early as 1650 B
Zachariah - "He did that which was Evil in the sight of the Lord, as his fathers had done" (2 Kings 14:29 ; 15:8-12 )
Caution - ) Precept or warning against Evil of any kind; exhortation to wariness; advice; injunction
Sins: How Men Treat Them - Sins are natural to all men, but it makes all the difference whether they are fostered or kept under; the carnal mind makes itself a warren for Evil, but a gracious spirit wages constant war with every transgression
Bewray - ’ Sometimes, however, hewray is used in an Evil sense, and is scarcely distinguishable from hetray
Evil Speaking - Evil SPEAKING in the Bible covers sins of untruthfulness as well as of malice
Dualism - ) A system which accepts two gods, or two original principles, one good and the other Evil
Aid - ) To support, either by furnishing strength or means in cooperation to effect a purpose, or to prevent or to remove Evil; to help; to assist
Abomination - Hence, defilement, pollution, in a physical sense, or Evil doctrines and practices, which are moral defilements, idols and idolatry, are called abominations
Viper - Isaiah 59:5 (b) This indicates the product of the works and the plans of wicked Israel in producing Evil and harmful results
Jabez - He prayed to the God of Israel that He would bless him, and enlarge his border; that God's hand might be with him, and keep him from Evil that it might not grieve him
Familiar - ) An attendant demon or Evil spirit
Dread - ) Great fear in view of impending Evil; fearful apprehension of danger; anticipatory terror
Apprehension - ) Anticipation, mostly of things unfavorable; distrust or fear at the prospect of future Evil
Fearful - Affected by fear feeling pain in expectation of Evil apprehensive with solicitude afraid
Tail - By his Evil sayings he becomes the object of contempt instead of the object of praise and honor
Cain - (Genesis 4:1) Alas! how little did our poor mistaken mother know, what miseries among thousands and millions of her children would be induced, before He should arise to do away the Evil of her transgression, by the sacrifice of himself!...
See Abel
Amon - He did Evil in the sight of the Lord, and served the idols which his father had set up
Aholibah - They both prostituted themselves to the Egyptians and Assyrians, in imitating their abominations and idolatries; for which reason the Lord abandoned them to those very people for whose Evil practices they had shown so passionate an affection
Chaste - hagios, "holy, as being free from admixture of Evil;" hosios, "holy, as being free from defilement;" eilikrines, "pure, as being tested," lit
Beelzebub - A name of contempt applied to Satan, the prince of the Evil angels. , the chief abomination, was used as an appellation of the prince of devils
Raven - Our natures do pursue, like rats that raven down their proper bane, a thirsty Evil, and when we drink, we die
Hatred - It is justifiable to hate or loathe the Evil deeds or habits of another, as this can be done without hating the person
Satan, Kingdom of - More definitely the kingdom of Satan means the organized forces of the Evil spirits under the leadership of Satan, the "Adversary," the devil
lu'Cifer - Jerome downward, to Satan in his fall from heaven arises probably from the fact that the Babylonian empire is in Scripture represented as the type of tyrannical and self idolizing power, and especially connected with the empire of the Evil One in the Apocalypse
Armaged'Don - ( Revelation 16:16 ) The scene of the struggle of good and Evil is suggested by that battle-field, the plain of Esdraelon, which was famous for two great victories, of Barak over the Canaanites and of Gideon over the Midianites; and for two great disasters, the deaths of Saul and Josiah
Wander - , "planet"), is used metaphorically in Jude 1:13 , of the Evil teachers there mentioned as "wandering (stars)
Demon - in Matthew 8:31, though some Manuscripts have it in Mark 5:12, Luke 8:29, and some inferior ones in Revelation 16:14; Revelation 18:2) is almost always rendered ‘devil’ in English Version , though Revised Version margin usually gives ‘demon. ‘a Divine thing’); and both had a neutral sense: a spirit inferior to the supreme gods, superior to man, but not necessarily Evil. But ordinarily in the NT δαιμόνιον has a bad sense, and signifies ‘an Evil spirit. ’ The expression ‘to have a demon’ (or ‘demons’), which occurs several times in the Gospels (ἔχειν δαιμόνιον [2], equivalent to δαιμονίζεσθαι, which is also frequent there), is the same as the paraphrases found elsewhere in the NT which avoid the word ‘demon’ (Acts 8:7 ‘had unclean spirits,’ Acts 19:12 ‘had Evil spirits,’ Acts 10:38, etc. In Christian writings the word ‘demon’ always means an Evil being, though it is curious that, in the NT and (as far as the present writer has observed) in the Fathers, Satan himself is never called δαίμων or δαιμόνιον (‘demon’). Conversely his angels are never in the NT called ‘devils’ (διάβολοι), though in John 6:70 Judas is called διάβολος. The Fathers emphatically assert that all demons are Evil: see e. -Demons are regarded as the ministers of Satan-a host of Evil angels over whom he has command. That these angels are the same as the demons appears from the fact that Satan is the prince of the demons (Mark 3:22), and that demoniacs are said to be ‘oppressed of the devil’ (τοῦ διαβόλου, i. Satan [3], Acts 10:38; cf. Thus there are good spirits and Evil spirits which must be distinguished and proved: the spirit of the Antichrist must be distinguished from the Spirit of God (1 John 4:1). 2 Corinthians 11:4) and of Evil angels as being ‘principalities’ (ἀρχαί), ‘powers,’ ‘world-rulers (κοσμοκράτορες) of this darkness,’ ‘spiritual beings (πνευματικά) of wickedness in the heavenly [4]’ (Ephesians 6:12; the last phrase may be roughly rendered ‘in the sphere of spiritual activities’; cf. The demons accordingly instigate Evil men against the good; they are ‘unclean spirits, as it were frogs’ coming ‘out of the mouth of the dragon … for they are spirits of demons,’ instigating the ‘kings of the whole world’ to the ‘war of the great day of God’ (Revelation 16:13 f. See also Devil. The evangelistic records depict a much stronger activity of Evil in Palestine during the earthly life of our Lord than that which, as the rest of NT would lead us to suppose, existed elsewhere and at a later time. Yet in four passages of Acts we read of possession by unclean or Evil spirits: at Jerusalem (Acts 5:16); in Samaria, where they were expelled at the preaching of Philip (Acts 8:7); at Philippi, where the ventriloquist maiden is said to have a spirit, a Python (Acts 16:16 : πνεῦμα πύθωνα is the best reading); and at Ephesus, where by St. Paul’s miracles the Evil spirits were expelled (Acts 19:12). In this last passage we read of the Evil spirit speaking out of the possessed man’s month, and of the man’s actions being those of the Evil spirit (Acts 19:15); also of Jewish exorcists who endeavoured to expel him (the seven of Acts 19:14 become in all the best Manuscripts two at Acts 19:16; probably there were seven brothers, but only two took part in this incident). Here, then, we have the conception of something other than ordinary madness being a possession by Evil spirits; and this incident may be considered as a stepping-stone to the conception found in some NT writers of physical disease as being, at least in some cases, also a possession. Whitehouse in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , article ‘Demon, Devil’; W. Dictionary of the Bible , articles ‘Devil,’ ‘Possession
Charm - Human grace and attractiveness; magic objects intended to ward off Evil; and a method used to prevent poisonous snakes from biting. Magic charms sewn as wristbands (Ezekiel 13:18 NIV) to ward off Evil spirits and diseases receive prophetic condemnation
Throne - Psalm 94:20 (a) No doubt this refers to the power of Evil purposes and desires, as well as the tragic influence of it. ...
Isaiah 14:9 (a) This seems to teach that in hell thrones are erected for Evil and wicked monarchs who have fallen, and who in mockery are given a place on a throne in hell among the people he cursed
Torment - 2, is translated "to torment," (a) of sickness, Matthew 8:6 ; (b) of the doom of Evil spirits, Mark 5:7 ; Luke 8:28 ; (c) of retributive judgments upon impenitent mankind at the close of this age, Revelation 9:5 ; 11:10 ; (d) upon those who worship the Beast and his image and receive the mark of his name, Revelation 14:10 ; (e) of the doom of Satan and his agents, Revelation 20:10 . ...
B — 2: κακουχέω (Strong's #2558 — Verb — kakoucheo — kak-oo-kheh'-o ) "to treat Evilly," in the Passive Voice is translated "tormented" in Hebrews 11:37 , AV (RV, "evil entreated")
Hate, Hatred - They are viewed as "evil. ...
The response by God's people needs to mirror God's attitude toward Evil. We are to hate Evildoers (Psalm 26:5 ), idolaters (Psalm 31:6 ), the false way (Psalm 119:104 ), falsehood (Psalm 119:163 ), and anything that is Evil (Psalm 97:10 ; Proverbs 8:13 ; Amos 5:15 ). Hatred proves to be a tangible measurement of Evil in the world
Lust (2) - , these words properly denote strong desire whether good or bad, then Evil desire in particular, and finally sexual desire specifically. When He speaks of the seed of the word being choked by the lusts (ἐπιθυμίαι) of other things (Mark 4:19), these lusts are desires not necessarily Evil, though the taint of Evil is beginning to enter, because, while in themselves they may be harmless, these desires are allowed to hinder the operation of the word. When He says to the Jewish leaders, ‘Ye are of your father the devil, and the lusts (ἐπιθνμίας) of your father it is your will to do,’ both ‘lust’ and ἐπιθυμία have passed into a distinctly bad meaning. There is no limit to the iniquity and abandonment to which such Evil possession or corruption may drag the blinded, besotted soul intent upon brutish delights never realized
Armour (2) - (1) It points to the power of Christ as able to dislodge Evil passions and habits from the heart (cf. (2) Eschatologically it points to the final victory of good over Evil. The ‘stronger’ had already come into the ‘strong one’s’ house and had delivered many; the conflict was continued by Him and against Him till His death, when He overcame him that had the power of death; the same conflict of Evil against good is still continued, His ‘spoiling’ is going on, He is still taking from His adversary one and another of his possessions, till in the end He shall bind him in the abyss and utterly destroy him (cf
Plow - The word is used to express the plotting of Evil against a friend in Evil against thy neighbor, seeing he dwelleth securely by thee [1]
Consent - , "to think well with" (sun, "with," eu, "well," dokeo, "to think"), to take pleasure with others in anything, to approve of, to assent, is used in Luke 11:48 , of "consenting" to the Evil deeds of predecessors (AV, "allow"); in Romans 1:32 , of "consenting" in doing Evil; in Acts 8:1 ; 22:20 , of "consenting" to the death of another. All these are cases of "consenting" to Evil things
Manichaeans - Lardner, believed in an eternal self-existent Being, completely happy and perfect in goodness, whom alone he called God, in a strict and proper sense; but he believed, also, in an Evil principle or being, which he called hyle, or the devil, whom he considered as the god of this world, blinding the eyes of them that believe not, 2 Corinthians 4:4 . Their belief in the Evil principle was, no doubt, adopted to solve the mysterious question of the origin of Evil, which, says Dr. As to the hyle, or the devil, though they dared not to consider him as the creature of God, neither did they believe in his eternity; for they contended, from the Greek text of John 8:44 , that he had a father. In this commotion darkness became mingled with light, and thus they account for good and Evil being so mixed together in the world. Every thing, therefore, which they conceived unworthy of the fountain of goodness, they attributed to the Evil being; particularly the material world, the Mosaic dispensation, and the Scriptures on which it was founded. Another absurd consequence of believing the moral Evil of matter was, that they denied the real existence of Christ's human nature, and supposed him to suffer and die in appearance only
Angels - As a result there are good angels and Evil angels. ...
Both good and bad angels are under God’s sovereign rule, the difference between them being that the good angels are obedient and the Evil angels rebellious. Even the chief of the Evil angels, Satan, is no more than a created being under the authority of God. Satan and the Evil angels who follow him can do their Evil work only within the limits that God allows (Job 1:12; Job 2:6; see SATAN). For further discussion on Evil angels see DEMONS
Arrow - The word is applied symbolically to children, Psalm 127:4,5 ; to the lightning, Psalm 18:14 Habakkuk 3:11 ; to sudden calamities, Job 6:4 Psalm 38:2 91:5 Ezekiel 5:15 ; and to the deceitful and bitter words of an Evil tongue, Psalm 64:3 120:4
Witchcraft - The damsel with "a spirit of divination" (Acts 16:16 ) was possessed by an Evil spirit, or, as the words are literally rendered, "having a spirit, a pithon
Discerning of Spirits - Discerning between the operation of God's Spirit and that of the Evil spirit, or unaided human spirit claiming to utter the dictates of God's Spirit
Spare, Sparingly - , "to forego" the infliction of that Evil or retribution which was designed, is used with a negative in Acts 20:29 ; Romans 8:32 ; 11:21 (twice); 2 Corinthians 13:2 ; 2 Peter 2:4,5 ; positively, in 1 Corinthians 7:28 ; 2 Corinthians 1:3 ; rendered "forbear" in 2 Corinthians 12:6
Minstrel - Music was often so used to prepare the frame for spiritual influences (1 Samuel 10:5-11) and to soothe an Evil spirit of excitement, as when David played to calm Saul
Frugality - the Evil effects of inattention to it, Luke 11:1 ; Luke 11:13
Corruptions: Vitality of - If we are cured of some one fault, we grow proud of the amendment; or if we perceive ourselves to be in the wrong and strive against the Evil, we are too apt to despond and become unbelieving. So pride and unbelief, two master Evils, grow out of the decay of other sins
Angel - ) One of a class of "fallen angels;" an Evil spirit; as, the devil and his angels
Nirvana - To obtain deliverance from rebirth, all forms of desire, whether Evil or innocent, must be absolutely suppressed, even the desire to preserve one's conscious existence
Simplicity, Simple - Simplicity is associated with ideas like integrity (2 Samuel 15:11 ), without Evil (Romans 16:18 ), generosity (Romans 12:8 ), a life of devotion to God (2 Corinthians 1:12 ), and simply believing the gospel truth (2 Corinthians 11:3 )
Onion - It may consist of pleasures, business, sports, education, music, religion or Evil practices
Jehoiachin - For 37 years he was a captive, but Evil-merodach liberated him and made him share the royal bounty and be head of all the captive kings in Babylon
Acquit - ...
To set free to release or discharge from an obligation, accusation, guilt, censure, suspicion, or whatever lies upon a person as a charge or duty as, the jury acquitted the prisoner we acquit a man of Evil intentions
Blaspheme - To speak of the Supreme Being in terms of impious irreverence to revile or speak reproachfully of God, or the Holy Spirit. To speak Evil of to utter abuse or calumny against to speak reproachfully of
Air - The Spirit of GOD must take our prayers through the opposition of Evil spirits up to the Throne of GOD and the Lord JESUS
Wages - It describes the satisfaction that is received by the sinner from yielding to Evil desires
Birds - These are employed as symbols of Evil agents: as, in the dream of Pharaoh's baker, the birds ate the bakemeats he was carrying on his head, Genesis 40:17 ; and in the parable of the Sower the fowls or birds which devoured the seed by the wayside are interpreted by Christ to signify 'the wicked one
Anger, Burning - 32:12: “Turn from thy fierce wrath [1], and repent of this Evil against thy people
Harp - It was used by David to drive away the Evil spirit from Saul, 1 Samuel 16:23 and it is the only musical instrument referred to symbolically as being in heaven
Alexander - Paul ‘much Evil,’ and who was probably an Ephesian Jew; possibly the same as the Alexander of 1 Timothy 1:20 (see Hymenæus), in which case we may regard him as an apostate Christian who had relapsed into Judaism
Conspiracy - A combination of men for an Evil purpose an agreement between two or more persons, to commit some crime in concert particularly, a combination to commit treason, or excite sedition or insurrection against the government of a state a plot as a conspiracy against the life of a king a conspiracy against the government
Fain - but the appropriate sense of the word is, glad or pleased to do something under some kind of necessity that is, glad to evade Evil or secure good
Repent - ) To be sorry for sin as morally Evil, and to seek forgiveness; to cease to love and practice sin
Alexander - The coppersmith who did Paul much Evil, and of whom Timothy was warned
Achor, Valley of - It will be a door of hope to Israel — putting away Evil from among themselves, national self-judgement — in the future when they call to mind that it was there that God's judgement began to fall on them, followed by blessing: so the tribulation of the latter day will usher in blessing
Dreamer of Dreams - Possibly an hypnotic state which Evil spirits could use, the object being to turn the people from the Lord to idolatry
Sacred - ) Solemnly devoted, in a bad sense, as to Evil, vengeance, curse, or the like; accursed; baleful
Seleucians - Their teaching, based on the crudest form of dualism, held that matter is coeternal with God, that Evil is to be attributed to God as well as to matter, that the human spul is formed from earthly elements by angels
Drought - Was an Evil to which Palestine was naturally subject, as no rain fell from May to September
Seleucians - Their teaching, based on the crudest form of dualism, held that matter is coeternal with God, that Evil is to be attributed to God as well as to matter, that the human spul is formed from earthly elements by angels
Worker, Workfellow, Fellow Workers, Workman - 1: ἐργάτης (Strong's #2040 — Noun Masculine — ergates — er-gat'-ace ) is translated "workers" in Luke 13:27 ("of iniquity"); 2 Corinthians 11:13 ("deceitful"); Philippians 3:2 ("evil"); "work man," Matthew 10:10 , AV (RV, "laborer"); "workman," 2 Timothy 2:15 ; "workmen," Acts 19:25
Gnostics - We find in it evident traces of that mystical and cabalistic jargon which, after their return from captivity, deformed the religion of the Jews; and many Gnostics adopted the oriental notion of two independent coeternal principles, the one the author of good, the other of Evil. We have a key to many parts of their system, when we know that they held matter to be intrinsically Evil, of which, consequently, God could not be the author. Those who embraced the doctrine of two principles supposed the world to have been produced by the Evil principle; and, in most systems, the creator, though not the father of Christ, was looked upon as the God of the Jews, and the author of the Mosaic law. These successive aeons or emanations appear to have been inferior each to the preceding; and their existence was indispensable to the Gnostic scheme, that they might account for the creation of the world without making God the author of Evil. Here, again, we find a strong resemblance to the oriental doctrine of two principles, good and Evil, or light and darkness. God must have been conceived to be more powerful than matter, or an emanation from God could not have shaped and moulded it into form: yet God was not able to reduce matter into its primeval chaos, nor to destroy the Evil which the Demiurgus had produced. Christ was sent into the world to remedy the Evil which the creative aeon or Demiurgus had caused. He was to emancipate men from the tyranny of matter, or of the Evil principle; and, by revealing to them the true God, who was hitherto unknown, to fit them, by a perfection and sublimity of knowledge, to enter the divine pleroma. In all their notions concerning Christ, we still find them struggling with the same difficulty of reconciling the author of good with the existence of Evil. This notion was supported by the same argument which infidels have often urged, that the God of the Jews is represented as a God of vengeance and of cruelty; but it was also a natural consequence of their fundamental principle, that the author of good cannot in any manner be the author of Evil. They believed the prophets to have been inspired by the same creative aeon, or the same principle of Evil, which acted originally upon matter; and if their writings had come down to us, we should perhaps find them arguing, that, though the prophets were not inspired by the supreme God, they still could not help giving utterance to truth. Both parties were actuated by the same common notion, that matter is inherently Evil. The one thought that the body, which is compounded of matter, ought to be kept in subjection; and hence they inculcated self-denial, and the practice of moral virtue: while others, who had persuaded themselves that knowledge was every thing, despised the distinctions of the moral law, which was given, as they said, not by the supreme God, but by an inferior aeon, or a principle of Evil, who had allied himself with matter. Thus, some have deduced it from the eastern notion of a good and Evil principle, some from the Jewish Cabbala, and others from the doctrines of the later Platonists
Mani - Briefly these teachings are a dual principle of creation, the one good and from God, the other Evil and from an antagonistic power, namely Satan and the bad angels who seek to destroy the work of God. Man's spirit is from God and therefore good, his body from Satan and therefore Evil
Manichaeism - Briefly these teachings are a dual principle of creation, the one good and from God, the other Evil and from an antagonistic power, namely Satan and the bad angels who seek to destroy the work of God. Man's spirit is from God and therefore good, his body from Satan and therefore Evil
Manichaeus - Briefly these teachings are a dual principle of creation, the one good and from God, the other Evil and from an antagonistic power, namely Satan and the bad angels who seek to destroy the work of God. Man's spirit is from God and therefore good, his body from Satan and therefore Evil
Cathari - The essential characteristic of the Catharist faith was dualism, and as differences of opinion concerning this belief arose among the Cathari they became divided into various factions: the Bogomili in the East, and the Bagnolenses and Concorrezenses in Italy, professed a mitigated form of dualism, believing the Evil principle inferior to the supreme beneficent principle; while the Albanenses in Italy, and almost all the non-Italian Cathari, among them the Albigenses, were rigid dualists, believing in the perfect equality of the good and Evil principles
Birth Control - While the Catholic Church does not urge married persons to beget the largest possible number of children, and does not sanction the intemperate use of marriage, she does condemn each deliberate act of birth control as intrinsically Evil (S. The essential Evil of birth control, however, consists in frustrating the primary purpose of marriage, the propagation of the species
Serpent - 1: ὄφις (Strong's #3789 — Noun Masculine — ophis — of'-is ) the characteristics of the "serpent" as alluded to in Scripture are mostly Evil (though Matthew 10:16 refers to its caution in avoiding danger); its treachery, Genesis 49:17 ; 2 Corinthians 11:3 ; its venom, Psalm 58:4 ; 1 Corinthians 10:9 ; Revelation 9:19 ; its skulking, Job 26:13 ; its murderous proclivities, e. The general aspects of its Evil character are intimated in the Lord's rhetorical question in Matthew 7:10 ; Luke 11:11 . Its characteristics are concentrated in the archadversary of God and man, the Devil, metaphorically described as the serpent, 2 Corinthians 11:3 ; Revelation 12:9,14,15 ; 20:2
Castaway - ...
Paul warned Timothy of Evil persons in Evil times with people resisting the truth, having corrupt minds, and being unqualified in the faith (2 Timothy 3:8 )
Corrupt - Evil communications corrupt good manners. To entice from good and allure to Evil
Anger - a resentful emotion of the mind, arising upon the receipt, or supposed receipt, of an affront or injury; and also simple feeling of strong displacency at that which is in itself Evil, or base, or injurious to others. Strong displeasure against Evil doers, provided it be free from hatred and malice, and interferes not with a just placableness, is also blameless, Ephesians 4:26
Rather - ...
Light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were Evil. Good is rather to be chosen than Evil
Manichaeism - Briefly these teachings are a dual principle of creation, the one good and from God, the other Evil and from an antagonistic power, namely Satan and the bad angels who seek to destroy the work of God. Man's spirit is from God and therefore good, his body from Satan and therefore Evil
Worse - A — 1: χείρων (Strong's #5501 — Adjective — cheiron — khi'-rone ) used as the comparative degree of kakos, "evil," describes (a) the condition of certain men, Matthew 12:45 ; Luke 11:26 ; 2 Peter 2:20 ; (b) Evil men themselves and seducers, 2 Timothy 3:13 ; (c) indolent men who refuse to provide for their own households, and are worse than unbelievers, 1 Timothy 5:8 , RV; (d) a rent in a garment, Matthew 9:16 ; Mark 2:21 ; (e) an error, Matthew 27:64 ; (f) a person suffering from a malady, Mark 5:26 ; (g) a possible physical affiction, John 5:14 ; (h) a punishment, Hebrews 10:29 , "sorer
Flesh And Spirit - Bible readers often suppose that any mention of the word “flesh” is automatically in contrast with the concept of “spirit” and is, therefore, intrinsically Evil. ” Therefore, it may be safely concluded that the concept of “flesh” as such is not an Evil concept but a part of the artistry and design of God. Once our first parents had sinned, all subsequent offspring were born with a tendency toward Evil that manifests itself particularly in the flesh. Essentially, the emphasis that Paul provides is not intended to suggest that the Spirit is good and the flesh is Evil, but rather that the flesh should never rule the spiritual life of a man
Demon Possession - The control of an individual's personality so that actions are influenced by an Evil demonic spirit. Most of those described as demon-possessed in the New Testament are adult men, but certain women were also delivered from the influence of Evil spirits (Luke 8:2 ; Luke 13:11 ,Luke 13:11,13:16 ). In His discussions with the Jews He assumed the reality of demon possession when He affirmed that His casting out of devils showed that the kingdom of God had come to His hearers (Matthew 12:23-27 ). The most useful solution to the problem will assume that the Evil of human nature renders the mind especially susceptible to the influence of personal agents of Evil
Amulets And Charms - ]'>[1] root = ‘to carry’) as charms to protect the wearer against the malign influence of Evil spirits, and in particular against ‘the Evil eye,’ is almost as wide-spread as the human race itself. Children and domestic animals are supposed to be specially subject to such influence, and to-day ‘in the Arabic border lands there is hardly a child, or almost an animal, which is not defended from the Evil eye by a charm’ (Doughty). The Jews were in this respect like the rest of the world, and in the Talmud it is said that ninety-nine deaths occur from the Evil eye to one from natural causes (see Magic Divination and Sorcery)
Dominion - κυριότης) says that in Peter Evil angels are implied from the context, though not in Jude. Evil angels, although the good are the more powerful, they do not abuse their opponents; how absurd and wicked for Evil men to abuse good angels, or perhaps even the legitimate Church authorities. 395) combines (b) and (c) above: ‘the railing at dignities, though its first exhibition might be made against the Apostles and those set in authority in the Church, yet went further and resulted in the denial of our only Master, God Himself, whose dominion these sinners were disregarding, and our Lord Jesus Christ, whose glory these men speak Evil of or rail at
Air - The apostles, like other Jews of their time, regarded the air as a region between earth and the higher heavens, inhabited by spirits, especially Evil spirits. tyranny of Evil). 25) speaking of the devil having fallen from heaven and wandering about ‘our lower atmosphere,’ ‘there bearing rule over his fellow-spirits …,’ ‘while the Lord came to cast down the devil, and clear the air and prepare the way for us up into heaven. That he had authority over the Evil spirits whose abode is in the air was the general Jewish belief, except among the Sadducees. Evil spirits, but the ‘air-power’ or ‘air-tyranny’ (for this meaning of ἐξουσία see Lightfoot’s note on Colossians 1:13)
Demiurge - According to Marcion, he was the personification of Evil who caused the crucifixion of Christ
Integrity - It was a special prerogative of our first parents in Paradise by which the Evil impulses of sensuality were kept under perfect control
New Thought - Its fundamental ideas are: ...
that God is omnipresent and immanent in all created things
that man is a divine soul "a microcosm of God"
that he is under the domination of universal law
New Thought denies all idea of atonement, regarding Evil "as only misdirected energy
Blunt - To repress or weaken any appetite, desire or power of the mind to impair the force of any passion which affects the mind, or of any Evil or good which affects the body as, to blunt the edge of love, of pain, or of suffering
Astrologers - It was fancied that the stars and planets had an influence, for good or for Evil, on human affairs, and that certain aspects and relative positions of the heavenly bodies were full of meaning to those who had skill to interpret them, Daniel 2:2
Johann Gassner - Convinced that certain maladies were caused by the Evil spirit, he utilized the procedure on others with wonderful success
Crete - " The character of the people is described in Paul's quotation from "one of their own poets" (Epimenides) in his epistle to Titus: "The Cretans are alway liars, Evil beasts, slow bellies" (Titus 1:12 )
John, Second Epistle of - It is an important principle that one bidding 'God speed' to a false teacher, is partaker of his Evil deeds
Soothsaying - The word is allied to mainomai, "to rave," and mania, "fury" displayed by those who were possessed by the Evil spirit (represented by the pagan god or goddess) while delivering their oracular messages
Wormwood - Metaphorical for bitter sorrow (Jeremiah 9:15, fulfilled in Lamentations 3:15; Lamentations 3:19); and Evil with its bitter produce, or an apostate lurking in Israel and tainting others (Deuteronomy 29:18; Proverbs 5:4; Amos 5:7, rendered "hemlock"; Greek apsinthos ; Revelation 8:11, the star which at the third trumpet fell upon the rivers and made them wormwood)
Contrite - Deep conviction of the Evil of sin
Repentance: (Thorough): Searches Out Sin - May the Lord search us and try us, and see if there be any Evil way in us, and
Holiness - Applied to God it sets forth His separation from, and opposition to all Evil
Beriah - Beraiah's name is explained here not as a compound of (Yahweh created ) but as a compound of (with Evil )
Oven - GOD describes it as a heat that so destroys the virtues of the soul that only Evil remains
Zachariah - He did that which was Evil before the Lord
Light: Detested by the Wicked - ' Thus do men revile the gospel because it reveals their own sin. Thus all agitations for reforms in Church and State are opposed, and all manner of mischief attributed to them as if they created the Evils which they bring to light. The lover of the right courts anything which may manifest the wrong, but those who love Evil have never a good word for those disturbing beams of truth which show up the filthy corners of their hearts and lives
Acquit - ) To set free, release or discharge from an obligation, duty, liability, burden, or from an accusation or charge; - now followed by of before the charge, formerly by from; as, the jury acquitted the prisoner; we acquit a man of Evil intentions
Intend - For they intended Evil against thee
Shelomith - Alas! what can such events produce but Evil? "Lust (saith the Holy Ghost by the apostle) when it hath conceived bringeth forth sin, and sin when it is finished bringeth forth death
Gabriel - As Michael represents the angels in their might in conflict with Evil, so Gabriel in ministering comfort and sympathy to man in dark times
Heed - Take heed of Evil company
Devil - He opposes God and is completely Evil. He is often called Lucifer which is a Latin translation of "light bearer" found in Isaiah 14:12, and also the accuser of the brethren in (Revelation 12:10), dragon (Revelation 12:9), the devil (Matthew 4:1), the tempter (Matthew 4:3), the accuser (Revelation 12:10), the prince of demons (Luke 11:15), the ruler of this world (John 12:31), See Isaiah 14:12-15 for a description of the fall of the devil. Upon Jesus' return, the Devil will be vanquished -- depending on the eschatological position
Gassner, Johann Joseph - Convinced that certain maladies were caused by the Evil spirit, he utilized the procedure on others with wonderful success
Diseases - God promised to Israel that if they would be obedient He would take away from them all sickness, and would put upon them none of the Evil diseases of Egypt which they had known
Caesarea Philippi - Our Saviour visited and taught in this place, and healed one who was possessed of an Evil spirit:...
here also he gave the memorable rebuke to Peter, Mark 8
Vex - 1: ὀχλέω (Strong's #3791 — Verb — ochleo — okh-leh'-o ) "to disturb, trouble," is used in the Passive Voice, of being "troubled" by Evil spirits, Acts 5:16
Thought, New - Its fundamental ideas are: ...
that God is omnipresent and immanent in all created things
that man is a divine soul "a microcosm of God"
that he is under the domination of universal law
New Thought denies all idea of atonement, regarding Evil "as only misdirected energy
Cherish - To harbor to indulge and encourage in the mind as, to cherish will, or any Evil passion
Sentences, Book of the - The first book treats of God and the Trinity, Providence, predestination, and Evil; the second, or creation, the angels, the fall, grace, and sin; the third, of the Incarnation, Redemption, the virtues, and commandments; the fourth, of the Sacraments and the four last things
Sensual - In theology, carnal pertaining to the flesh or body, in opposition to the spirit not spiritual or holy Evil
New Thought - Its fundamental ideas are: ...
that God is omnipresent and immanent in all created things ...
that man is a divine soul "a microcosm of God" ...
that he is under the domination of universal law ...
New Thought denies all idea of atonement, regarding Evil "as only misdirected energy
Blasphemy - In fact, the Jews themselves were the ones guilty of blasphemy; for in speaking Evil of Jesus they were speaking Evil of God (1 Timothy 1:13). When people called God’s Spirit Satan and called good Evil, they put themselves in a position where they had no way of acknowledging God’s goodness
Habakkuk - ...
The prophet has had his question answered, but he goes on to announce God’s judgment on Evil, particularly the Evil of the Babylonians (2:6-20). The book concludes with a psalm that pictures, by a series of dramatic illustrations, the work of God in judgment upon Evil (3:1-15)
Messalians - Prayer, they said, drives out the Evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the Evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Filthy, the - Prayer, they said, drives out the Evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the Evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Natural Law - It is that universal, unchangeable, eternal law which Saint Paul says is indelibly written by the Creator in our hearts or in our very nature, urging us to observe the moral order, to do good, and avoid Evil. The expression or participation of this eternal law in free rational creatures is the natural law which may be summed up in the general prescription to do good and avoid Evil, to live in conformity with right rational nature, or to observe the moral order as Divinely constituted and sanctioned
Law, Natural - It is that universal, unchangeable, eternal law which Saint Paul says is indelibly written by the Creator in our hearts or in our very nature, urging us to observe the moral order, to do good, and avoid Evil. The expression or participation of this eternal law in free rational creatures is the natural law which may be summed up in the general prescription to do good and avoid Evil, to live in conformity with right rational nature, or to observe the moral order as Divinely constituted and sanctioned
Teraphim - "Perhaps," says Bishop Wordsworth, "Saul, forsaken by God and possessed by the Evil spirit, had resorted to teraphim (as he afterwards resorted to witchcraft); and God overruled Evil for good, and made his very teraphim (by the hand of his own daughter) to be an instrument for David's escape
Thought - As the thoughts are the prime movers of the conduct; as in the sight of the Divine Being, they bear the character of good or Evil; and as they are therefore cognizable at his tribunal; the moral regulation of them is of the greatest importance. Those of an Evil nature, which ought to be banished, are, ...
1
Nicolaitans - 46) explain, followers of Nicolas one of the seven (Judges 1:7-8; Acts 6:5) as there was a Judas among the twelve; confounding the later Gnostic Nicolaitans with those of Michaelis explains Nicolas (conqueror of the people) is the Greek for the Hebrew Balsam ("destroyer of the people," bela' 'am ); as we find both the Hebrew and Greek names, Abaddon, Apollyon; Satan, devil. The Nicolaitans combined Evil "deeds" which Jesus "hates" with Evil "doctrine
Preaching: Need of Prayer And Unction - In the afternoon he arrived, or rather an Evil spirit who personated him, arrived, to see what mischief he could do. So they asked this devil to preach on hell, which he did; and, as may be supposed from his experience, a most wonderful sermon was. However, on the arrival of the real preacher, the Evil one was discovered, and was obliged to disclose himself, and his malicious designs
Victory - ...
The New Testament uses the illustration of warfare in giving teaching about the Christian’s conflict with Evil, a conflict in which God again is the one who brings victory (2 Corinthians 10:3-4; Ephesians 6:10-18; see also ARMOUR; WEAPONS). Because of Satan’s power in the world, Christians have a conflict with the world and its Evil ways, but again through faith in Christ they are guaranteed victory (Romans 8:35-37; James 4:4; 1 John 2:15; 1 John 5:19; see WORLD)
Adelphians - Prayer, they said, drives out the Evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the Evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Job - ‘And remember Job; when he cried unto the Lord, saying, Verily Evil hath afflicted me: but thou art the most merciful of all those who show mercy. Wherefore we [1] heard him and relieved him from the Evil which was upon him, and we restored unto him his family,’ etc
Euchites - Prayer, they said, drives out the Evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the Evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Adelphians - Prayer, they said, drives out the Evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the Evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Messalians - Prayer, they said, drives out the Evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the Evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Proverbs, Book of - In this book God has furnished, through the wisest of men, principles and precepts for the guidance and security of the believer in passing through the temptations to which he is exposed in an Evil world. Under symbolic terms, such as 'the Evil man' and 'the strange woman,' the great forms of Evil in the world, violent self-will, and corrupting folly, are laid bare in their course and end. " Others are synthetical, the second sentence enforcing the first, as "The Lord hath made all things for himself, yea, even the wicked for the day of Evil. ...
Proverbs 3 shows that it is the fear of God, and subjection to Hisword, that is the only true path in an Evil world. Evil must be avoided and be kept at a distance. There are six sets of four things:...
Four generations that are Evil. ...
Christians should study the Book of Proverbs, for (even when properly occupied with heavenly things, and the interests of Christ on earth) they are apt to overlook the need of wisdom from heaven to pass through this Evil world, and to manage their affairs on earth in the fear of God
Lust - In Romans 6:12 the injunction against letting sin reign in our mortal body to obey the "lust" thereof, refers to those Evil desires which are ready to express themselves in bodily activity. They are equally the "lusts" of the flesh, Romans 13:14 ; Galatians 5:16,24 ; Ephesians 2:3 ; 2 Peter 2:18 ; 1 John 2:16 , a phrase which describes the emotions of the soul, the natural tendency towards things Evil. Such "lusts" are not necessarily base and immoral, they may be refined in character, but are Evil if inconsistent with the will of God. ...
Other descriptions besides those already mentioned are: "of the mind," Ephesians 2:3 ; "evil (desire)," Colossians 3:5 ; "the passion of," 1 Thessalonians 4:5 , RV; "foolish and hurtful," 1 Timothy 6:9 ; "youthful," 2 Timothy 2:22 ; "divers," 2 Timothy 3:6 ; Titus 3:3 ; "their own," 2 Timothy 4:3 ; 2 Peter 3:3 ; Jude 1:16 ; "worldly," Titus 2:12 ; "his own," James 1:14 ; "your former," 1 Peter 1:14 , RV; "fleshly," 1 Peter 2:11 ; "of men," 1 Peter 4:2 ; "of defilement," 2 Peter 2:10 ; "of the eyes," 1 John 2:16 ; of the world ("thereof"), 1 John 2:17 ; "their own ungodly," Jude 1:18 . 1, has the same twofold meaning as the noun, namely (a) "to desire," used of the Holy Spirit against the flesh, Galatians 5:17 (see below); of the Lord Jesus, Luke 22:15 , "I have desired;" of the holy angels, 1 Peter 1:12 ; of good men, for good things, Matthew 13:17 ; 1 Timothy 3:1 ; Hebrews 6:11 ; of men, for things without moral quality, Luke 15:16 ; 16:21 ; 17:22 ; Revelation 9:6 ; (b) of "evil desires," in respect of which it is translated "to lust" in Matthew 5:28 ; 1 Corinthians 10:6 ; Galatians 5:17 (1st part; see below); James 4:2 ; to covet, Acts 20:23 ; Romans 7:7 ; 13:9
Colossians, Letter to the - ...
A chief concern of the false teachers was with things they considered to be in conflict, such as good and Evil, spirit and matter, deity and humanity. Believing matter to be Evil, they claimed that a God who was holy could not come in contact with human beings. People had to worship them and win their favour if they wanted protection against the Evil forces at work in the world (Colossians 2:8; Colossians 2:18). Indeed, he is the creator of all things, the Saviour of sinful people and the conqueror of the powers of Evil (Colossians 1:20-22; Colossians 2:15). It means that they too have victory over Evil, and as a result are able to produce Christlike qualities in their lives (Colossians 3:3-5; Colossians 3:10)
Devil - DEVIL . Used with the definite article, its original meaning was that of the accuser or traducer of men (see Satan), whence it soon came to denote the supreme spirit of Evil, the personal tempter of man and enemy of God. That certain animals were believed to be endowed with demonic power appears from Genesis 3:1-15 , though here the serpent itself is represented as demonic, and not yet as possessed by an Evil spirit ( Wis 2:24 , Romans 16:20 ). The conception of demon or devil was used to embrace three species of existences. The devils of later Judaism accordingly are thought of as invisible spirits, to whom every ill, physical or moral, was attributed. At times they do His bidding and are the ministers of His wrath, but in this sense are not classed in Scripture as devils; e. In the period of the NT the belief in devils as spirits, Evil and innumerable, was general amongst the nations, whether Jewish or Gentile; but in Jesus and His disciples the cruder features of the belief, such as the grotesqueness of the functions assigned to these spirits in the literature of the second century, do not appear. Possession is thrice alluded to ( John 7:20 ; John 8:40 ; John 10:28 ) as a suggested explanation of Christ’s work and influence; but Evil generally is traced back rather to the activity of the devil ( John 6:70 , where ‘a devil’ is not a demon, but the word is used metaphorically much as ‘Satan’ in Matthew 16:23 , John 13:2 ; John 13:27 ), whose subordinates fall into the background. , abound in references to demons, who are conceived, not as Evil influences resting upon or working within a man, but as personal spirits besetting or even possessing him. Possession so called is a familiar phenomenon to them, as it continued to be in the early years of the Church, though there is a marked disposition towards the Johannine view of a central source of Evil. Paul speaks of doctrines emanating from devils ( 1 Timothy 4:1 , where the word should not be taken metaphorically). The devils of 1 Corinthians 10:20 were demigods or deposed idols. James recognizes the existence of a number of devils ( James 2:19 ), whose independence fit God is not complete. In all these books the conception of devils seems to be giving way to that of the devil; the former gradually lose any power of initiative or free action, and become the agents of a great spirit of Evil behind them. But in the NT the process is complete, and in every part the devil appears as a personal and almost sovereign spirit of Evil, capable of such actions as cannot be explained away by the application of any theory of poetic or dramatic personification. ‘the Evil one’ of Matthew 13:19 ); and for him and his angels an appropriate destiny is prepared ( Matthew 25:41 ). , the devil prompted the treason of Judas ( John 13:2 ), and is vicious in his lusts, a liar and a murderer ( John 8:44 ), a sinner in both nature and act ( 1 John 3:8 ; 1 John 3:10 ). Peter represents the devil as prowling about in search of prey ( 1 Peter 5:8 ), the standing adversary of man, baffled by Jesus ( Acts 10:38 ). James ( James 4:7 ) the devil is an antagonist who upon resistance takes to flight. If ‘son of the devil’ ( Acts 13:10 ) is metaphorical, St. To give opportunity to the devil ( Ephesians 4:27 ) may lead to a share in his condemnation ( 1 Timothy 3:6 ). Such language, common to all the writers, and pervading the whole NT, allows no other conclusion than that the forces and spirits of Evil were conceived as gathered up into a personal bead and centre, whose authority they recognized and at whose bidding they moved. ...
This opinion is confirmed by the representation of the devil’s relation to men and to God, and by many phrases in which he is referred to under other names. In hindering and harming men he stands in antithesis to Christ ( 2 Corinthians 6:15 ), and hence is fittingly termed the Evil and injurious one ( Matthew 6:13 ; Matthew 13:18 , John 17:15 , Ephesians 6:16 , 2 Thessalonians 3:3 , 1 John 2:13 f. Bent upon maintaining and spreading Evil, he begins with the seduction of Eve ( 2 Corinthians 11:3 ) and the luring of men to doom ( John 8:44 ). ...
In regard to the devil’s relation to God, the degree of independence and personal initiative is less in the OT than in the NT, but nowhere is there anything like the exact co-ordination of the two. In Job 1:6 the devil associates himself with ‘the sons of God,’ and yet is represented as not strictly classed with them; he has the right of access to heaven, but his activity is subject to Divine consent. Another stage is marked in 1 Chronicles 21:1 , where the statement of 2 Samuel 24:1 is modified as though the devil worked in complete and unshackled opposition to God. In the Book of Enoch he is the ruler of a kingdom of Evil, over which kingdom, however, the Divine sovereignty, or at least suzerainty, stands. God and the devil are placed in antithesis ( James 4:7 ); so ‘the power of darkness’ and ‘the kingdom of the Son of his love’ ( Colossians 1:13 ), as though the two were entirely distinct. The devil is the prince and personal head of the demons ( Mark 3:22 ). Paul expresses similar views; the devil is ‘the god of this world’ or age ( 2 Corinthians 4:4 ), ‘the prince of the power of the air’ ( Ephesians 2:2 ), ruling over the Evil spirits who are located in the sky or air ( Luke 10:18 , Revelation 12:9 ; cf. He is the stronger ( Luke 11:22 ), and can even now, under the limitations of the moral probation of men, frustrate the devil’s designs ( Luke 22:32 ), and destroy his works ( 1 John 3:8 ), and will eventually bring him to nought ( Hebrews 2:14 ). ...
The personality of the devil must consequently be regarded as taught by Scripture. He is not conceived as the original or only source of Evil, but as its supreme personal representative. His existence, like that of Evil itself, may be ascribed to the permissive will of God, with analogous limitations in each case. And the tradition of a revolt and fall of angels has this in its favour, that it fits in with the belief in devils and the devil, and provides a partially intelligible account of circumstances under which such a belief might take shape. The devil thus becomes a type of every confirmed Evil-doer: and the patience and the righteousness of God are alike exemplified
Flood - A miraculous deluge of water God used to discipline His world made Evil through human sin. ...
Theological Proclamation of the Flood God took account of earth's wickedness, the persistent human bent toward Evil, the corruption that filled the earth with injustice. The destruction of all people existing before the Flood indicated the abhorrence of Evil. Accordingly, He vowed never to doom the world again despite the enormous, continuing Evil of the human creatures, an Evil inconsistent with all God made and intended. The human mind was ever bent on nothing but Evil. ...
If God saw the Evil in the earth, He saw also the righteous Noah—blameless in his generation, one who walked with God
Frontlet - Both are called phylacteries, meaning conservatories (of God's commandments) or safeguards (against Evil influences)
Duel - As governments became more civilized and as the Evil grew they too had to do their utmost to suppress it
Dualism - (Latin: duo, two) ...
(1) The system accounting for the universe as caused by two conflicting principles, good and Evil
Malediction - It may mean also the wishing of Evil to a person from a sentiment of hatred or the like, against that person, or from a natural resentment on account of some offense deserving punishment
Christ: Our Only Rest - Some Evil temper now begins to boil, or some care would fain perplex me, or some idol wants to please me, or some deadness or some lightness creeps upon my spirit, and communion with my Saviour is withdrawn
Imagination - The Greek words have in these passages the same Evil intent as the AV Possess - ) To enter into and influence; to control the will of; to fill; to affect; - said especially of Evil spirits, passions, etc
Innocent - Free from the guilt of a particular crime or Evil action as, a man is innocent of the crime charged in the indictment
Decay - " The plan failed because of the Evil hearts of men
Dispensation - ) The act of dispensing or dealing out; distribution; often used of the distribution of good and Evil by God to man, or more generically, of the acts and modes of his administration
Asmodaeus - ASMODÆUS , the ‘evil demon’ of Tob 3:1-17 ; Tob 6:1-17 ; Tob 8:1-21 , appears freely in the Talmud as Ashmĕdai , which popular etymology connected with shâmad , ‘to destroy
Sick - They were only Evil and wicked continually
Viper, - as symbolical of Evil ones
Result - ) To come out, or have an issue; to terminate; to have consequences; - followed by in; as, this measure will result in good or in Evil
Armageddon - A symbolical name for the place where a final struggle between the hosts of good and Evil must take place
Tephillim - Both are called phylacteries, meaning conservatories (of God's commandments) or safeguards (against Evil influences)
Obstinacy - Fixedness that will not yield to application, or that yields with difficulty as the obstinacy of a disease or Evil
Remedy - That which counteracts an Evil of any kind with for, to or against usually with for. Civil government is the remedy for the Evils of natural liberty
Loss - we cannot regret the loss of bad company or of Evil habits
Saving - Preserving from Evil or destruction hindering from waste or loss sparing taking or using in time
Patient - Having the quality of enduring Evils without murmuring or fretfulness sustaining afflictions of body or mind with fortitude, calmness or christian submission to the divine will as a patient person, or a person of patient temper. It is followed by of before the Evil endured as patient of labor or pain patient of heat or cold
Wide - With great extent used chiefly in composition as wide-skirted meads wide-waving swords wide-wasting pestilence wide-spreading Evil
Hardship - 1: κακοπαθέω (Strong's #2553 — Verb — kakopatheo — kak-op-ath-eh'-o ) "to suffer Evil," is translated "suffer hardship" in three places in the RV, 2 Timothy 2:3 (in some mss
Wrong - ) To impute Evil to unjustly; as, if you suppose me capable of a base act, you wrong me. ) Whatever deviates from moral rectitude; usually, an act that involves Evil consequences, as one which inflicts injury on a person; any injury done to, or received from; another; a trespass; a violation of right
Sceva - ]'>[1] ‘strolling’ perhaps conveys too much the idea of ‘vagabond’) endeavoured to exorcise Evil spirits by naming over them the name of Jesus. The Apostolic age firmly believed in possession by Evil spirits; and there is really nothing in this chapter unlike what we read elsewhere in NT
Christ: His Eye Our Stimulus - ...
And is there not a charm to thee, O believer, in the fact that you contend in the battle-field of life under the eye of your Savior? Wherever you are, however you are oppressed by foes, however exhausted by the stem strife with Evil, the eye of Christ is fixed most lovingly upon thee. ' Human and angelic minds, animated, the good by love, and the Evil by hate, are the spectators of your deeds
Job (2) - Its theme is the problem of Evil, why the righteous suffer and the wicked prosper in this world. " But it is no less estimable for its religious and ethical worth, setting forth as it does the being and perfections of Jehovah, the apostasy and guilt of Evil spirits and of mankind, the sovereignty of divine providence, the mercy of God on the basis of sacrifice and penitence, the disciplinary nature of his people's sorrows, the wisdom of submission to his will, and the assurance, in view of his infinite power and wisdom, that all shall be well with his followers in the end
Avenger, Avenger of Blood - the magistrate bears not the sword in vain, for he is the minister of God for the punishment of Evil-doers. The duty of a Christian in not avenging himself in no way clashes with the exercise of the government of God by magistrates, who derive their authority from Him, in repressing and punishing Evil
Lunatic - The lunatics we read of in the gospel, certainly were those which were possessed by the Evil spirit. And in the days of our Lord, those maladies were more than ordinarily common; for as the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil, so the possession by the Evil spirit was then permitted, for the purpose of the display of Christ's power
Saviour - Salvation from all kinds of danger and Evil, bodily, spiritual, temporal, and eternal (Matthew 1:21; Ephesians 5:23; Philippians 3:20-21), including also the idea restorer and preserver, giver of positive life and blessedness, as well as saviour from Evil (Isaiah 26:1; 2 Samuel 8:6; Isaiah 60:18; Isaiah 61:10; Psalms 118:25), deliverer, as the judges were saviours (margin Judges 3:9; Judges 3:15; Nehemiah 9:27; Jeroboam II, 2 Kings 13:5; Obadiah 1:21)
Ood - ; - opposed to Evil. ) Possessing desirable qualities; adapted to answer the end designed; promoting success, welfare, or happiness; serviceable; useful; fit; excellent; admirable; commendable; not bad, corrupt, Evil, noxious, offensive, or troublesome, etc
Pain - We suffer pain when we fear or expect Evil we feel pain at the loss of friends or property. Penalty punishment suffered or denounced suffering or Evil inflicted as a punishment for a crime, or annexed to the commission of a crime
Dominion - ’ There is no necessary reference in either of these texts to Evil angels, but a comparison of what is written in Ephesians 2:2 ; Ephesians 6:12 shows that ‘the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places’ need not be excluded. Others believe that the reference is to angels, either good or Evil, as representing some form of supernatural power and dominion, and the reference in the context to Michael, the archangel, not bringing a railing judgment even against the devil, may be thought to favour this view
Nicola'Itans - (2 Peter 2:15 ; Jude 1:11 ) They, like the false prophet of Pethor, united brave words with Evil deeds. (Revelation 2:13,14 ) This was bad enough, but there was a yet worse Evil
Jezebel - She was a bold, wicked idolatress, and stirred up her husband to do Evil against the Lord. she is mentioned as symbolical of an Evil seducing system in the professing church that leads others into idolatrous associations
Pride - The Evil effects of pride are beyond computation. In fact, there is hardly an Evil perpetrated but what pride is connected with it in a proximate or remote sense. To suppress this Evil, we should consider what we are
Hedge - ...
Ezekiel 22:30 (a) This unusual passage teaches us that while GOD gives divine interference in order to protect and guard His people, He also needs godly men who will stand with Him and on His side to prevent the entrance of Evil doctrines, Evil programs, and Evil teachings among the people of GOD
Devil - As a mighty commander-in-chief of all Evil forces Satan was and is permitted to come before GOD to accuse the believers. Under this name the devil seeks to get his followers to put away Evil habits and wicked ways and became a clean, upright, moral person. This person remains a lost sinner, although the devil has enabled him to put away many Evil characteristics. Here the Lord JESUS refers to the devil as one who has mighty power and is able to hold his followers firmly a prisoner in his grasp. The devil is very clever at presenting various and sundry religions to deceive human hearts. The devil seems to be a heavenly person in this role. As a prince the devil seeks to obtain the throne of the heart and become a king. Under this title the devil is presented as one who is fierce, strong, malicious and cruel. This word and the Hebrew word Abaddan describe the devil as being the sovereign ruler over sin, and able to deceive the world, whereby many are sent down to hell. The devil is presented in this horrible character as one who has no regard whatever for the lives nor the property of those with whom he comes in contact. This characteristic of the devil is perfectly exhibited in the history of the Roman Catholic Church. The cunning of the devil and his clever subtlety is compared to the snake
Florinus, Presbyter at Rome - The title of the letter to Florinus was On Monarchy, or that God is not the Author of Evil , and Eusebius remarks that Florinus seems to have maintained the opposite opinion. Philaster (79) refers to an unnamed heretic, who taught that things which God made were in their own nature Evil. If Florinus ever in a heretical sense made God the author of Evil, his errors afterwards took the opposite direction, and he became a Valentinian
Star - Sometimes these are Evil persons, sometimes they are good persons. Sometimes they are used to represent good, and sometimes Evil. The great star that fell in verse10 is another angelic dignitary who has power to bring bitterness, hatred and Evil upon men
Sin - This relationship would imply that 'âven means the absence of all that has true worth; hence, it would denote “moral worthlessness,” as in the actions of wrongdoing, Evil devising, or false speaking. ” Cognates appear in Arabic as ‘ithmun (“sin; offense; misdeed; crime”), ‘athima (“to sin, err, slip”), and ‘athimun (“sinful; criminal; Evil; wicked”); but the Arabic usage does not include the idea of restitution. ...
'Âmâl (עָמָל, Strong's #5999), “evil; trouble; misfortune; mischief; grievance; wickedness; labor. His atonement may cover over “iniquity”: “By mercy and truth iniquity is purged; and by the fear of the Lord men depart from Evil” ( Evil ways … and shall loathe yourselves in your own sight for your iniquities and for your abominations” (cf. ...
Ra‛ (רַע, Strong's #7451), “bad; Evil; wicked; sore. Some scholars believe that the Akkadian term raggu (“evil; bad”) may be a cognate. ...
Ra’ refers to that which is “bad” or “evil,” in a wide variety of applications. A greater number of the word’s occurrences signify something morally Evil or hurtful, often referring to man or men: “Then answered all the wicked men and men of Belial, of those that went with David …” (
Evil men” (Job 35:12; cf. Ra’ is also used to denote Evil words ( Evil thoughts ( Evil actions ( Evil abominations of the house of Israel! For they shall fall by the sword, by the famine, and by the pestilence. ”...
Ra’ may mean “bad” or unpleasant in the sense of giving pain or caming unhappiness: “And Jacob said unto Pharaoh, … Few and Evil have the days of the years of my life been …” (
Evil tidings, they mourned …” ( Evil [23] angels among them” ( Evil beast hath devoured him …” ( Evil diseases of Egypt … upon thee …” ( Evil arrows of famine, which shall be for their destruction …” ( Evil [23] …”; moral “evil” is not intended in this context, but rather the antithesis of shalom (“peace; welfare; well-being”). Another effect is seen in the word of the prophet to Evil Babylon: “You have forfeited your life” ( Occasion of Sin - It is absolute if of itself it leads us to sin, relative if only on account of weakness it becomes an occasion of Evil-doing
Jakob Behmen - He taught a sort of dualism in the nature of God as an explanation of good and Evil, one of his basic theories being the apprehension of a principle by its opposite
Jakob Boehme - He taught a sort of dualism in the nature of God as an explanation of good and Evil, one of his basic theories being the apprehension of a principle by its opposite
Canonical Admonitions - A preliminary means used by the Church towards a suspected person as a preventive of harm or a remedy of Evil
Sceva - He had seven sons, who "took upon them to call over them which had Evil spirits the name of the Lord Jesus," in imitation of Paul
Bond - Used figuratively to speak of the bonds of wickedness or sin (Isaiah 58:6 ; Luke 13:16 ; Acts 8:23 ), of affliction and judgment (Isaiah 28:22 ; Isaiah 52:2 ; Jeremiah 30:8 ; Nahum 1:13 ), the authority of kings (Job 12:18 ; Psalm 2:3 ), the obligation to keep the covenant (Jeremiah 2:20 ; Jeremiah 5:5 ; see Colossians 2:14 ), the bonds of peace and love (Ephesians 4:3 ; Colossians 3:14 ), and the bonds of an Evil woman (Ecclesiastes 7:26 )
Hermas - Each man, according to it, has a bad and a good angel, who endeavour to influence him for Evil and good respectively
Behmen, Jakob - He taught a sort of dualism in the nature of God as an explanation of good and Evil, one of his basic theories being the apprehension of a principle by its opposite
Behminists - He taught a sort of dualism in the nature of God as an explanation of good and Evil, one of his basic theories being the apprehension of a principle by its opposite
Nergal-Sharezer - He was a son-in-law of Nebuchadnezzar who usurped the Babylonian throne following the death of Evil-merodach
Devote - To execrate to doom to Evil
Mar - Isaiah 52 ...
Moral Evil alone mars the intellectual works of God
Preserve - ) To keep or save from injury or destruction; to guard or defend from Evil, harm, danger, etc
Angel - In a bad sense, an Evil spirit as, the angel of the bottomless pit
Asp - Job was considering and meditating in his heart the things that were bitter, harsh and Evil in his life. ...
Romans 3:13 (b) This refers to the teaching and the ministry of false religious teachers whose doctrines are of the Devil
Bent - ...
Hosea 11:7 (a) The hearts of the people of Israel were inclined toward Evil practices and were always ready and alert to go into things that displeased GOD
Perilous Times - Evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse, deceiving and being deceived
Grieve - Ephesians 4 ...
GRIEVE, To feel pain of mind or heart to be in pain on account of an Evil to sorrow to mourn
Leucopetrians - The name of a fanatical sect which sprang up in the Greek and eastern churches towards the close of the twelfth century: they professed to believe in a double trinity, rejected wedlock, abstained from flesh, treated with the utmost contempt the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's supper, and all the various branches of external worship: placed the essence of religion in internal prayer alone; and maintained, as it is said, that an Evil being or genius dwelt in the breast of every mortal, and could be expelled from thence by no other method than by perpetual supplication to the Supreme Being
Witch - ) One who practices the black art, or magic; one regarded as possessing supernatural or magical power by compact with an Evil spirit, esp. with the Devil; a sorcerer or sorceress; - now applied chiefly or only to women, but formerly used of men as well
Admonitions, Canonical - A preliminary means used by the Church towards a suspected person as a preventive of harm or a remedy of Evil
Love Feasts - The Evil dealt with at Corinth (l
Tares - The Lord describes the tares as "the sons of the Evil one;" false teachings are indissociable from their propagandists
Sin, Occasion of - It is absolute if of itself it leads us to sin, relative if only on account of weakness it becomes an occasion of Evil-doing
Exorcists - From a Greek word signifying to conjure, to use the name of God or certain magical ceremonies with design to expel devils from places or bodies which they possess. The apostles were enabled to cast out Evil spirits in Christ's name, Matthew 10:1 Mark 16:17 Luke 10:17 ; and designing men, both before and after the Savior's death, pretended to exercise the same power, Matthew 12:27 Mark 9:38 Luke 9:49,50 Acts 19:13-17
Paulicianism - Originally they held the following: ...
the God of the material universe and the God of the spirItual world are distinct ...
all matter is Evil ...
the Old Testament is to be rejected ...
Christ was not incarnate but was an angel whose mother was the heavenly Jerusalem ...
Baptism and the Eucharist consist in hearing the Word of God ...
there are no other sacraments ...
They were also Iconoclasts
Repentance - ...
Two requisites of repentance included in sub are "to turn from Evil, and to turn to the good. " Most critical theologically is the idea of returning to God, or turning away from Evil. Three times Ezekiel included God's call to the people of Israel: "Repent! Turn from your idols and renounce all your detestable practices!" (14:6); "Repent! Turn away from all your offenses" (18:30); "Turn! Turn from your Evil ways" (33:11). To be abandoned are both Evil intentions and Evil deeds, and both motive and conduct are to be radically changed. A striking example is found in Isaiah 1:16-17 : "Take your Evil deeds out of my sight! Stop doing wrong, learn to do right! Seek justice, encourage the oppressed. ...
To repent and to convert involved obedience to God's revealed will, placing trust in him, turning away from all Evil and ungodliness. Each person was to "turn from his wicked Evil way" (Jeremiah 26:3 ; 36:3 )
Divine Retribution - Process of God's meting out merited requital—punishment for Evil or reward for good. These questions, in turn, call to mind other issues such as suffering, Evil, and God's justness. ...
Though the exact phrase “divine retribution” does not occur in the Old Testament, the idea is quite prevalent: people will be repaid in this life for what they do—blessing for good, punishment for Evil
Discern, Discerner, Discernment - 31, the RV has "discerned," for the AV, "would judge," of trying oneself, "discerning" one's condition, and so judging any Evil before the Lord; in 1 Corinthians 14:29 , regarding oral testimony in a gathering of believers, it is used of "discerning" what is of the Holy Spirit, RV, "discern" (AV, "judge"). 2, "a distinguishing, a clear discrimination, discerning, judging," is translated "discernings" in 1 Corinthians 12:10 , of "discerning" spirits, judging by evidence whether they are Evil or of God. , "towards a discerning," is translated "to discern," said of those who are capable of discriminating between good and Evil
Spirits in Prison - The disobedient “spirits,” accordingly, are not the people who died in the flood, but the Evil spirits, or demons, whose influence brought divine judgment on the world. Peter probably viewed these Evil spirits as the offspring of the strange union mentioned in 1Peter 3:18,1 between the “sons of God” (that is, angelic or superhuman beings of some kind) and the “daughters of men. 8-10: “But now the giants who are born from (the union of) spirits and the flesh shall be called Evil spirits upon the earth
Iniquity - 2, and translated "a matter of wrong," in Acts 18:14 ; "wrong-doing," Acts 24:20 (AV, "evil-doing"); "iniquities," Revelation 18:5 . See Evil , WRONG. kakia, "evil
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - This doctrine located an origin of Evil in Satan. This recognizes the reality of Evil outside and beyond the scope of human will. The New Testament avoids identifying Evil with the direct will of God and keeps it always and finally subordinate to God. Matthew 4:1 tells of Jesus being tempted by the devil in the wilderness. In Matthew 25:41 even hell is described as being prepared for the devil and his angels. Satan is now the “commander of the spiritual powers of the air” (Ephesians 2:2 REB) and leads “the superhuman forces of Evil in the heavenly realms” ( Ephesians 6:12 REB). Political forces can become servants of the devil (Revelation 12:1 ; Revelation 13:1 ). The main concern of the Bible is not with the devil but with God and the gospel of His grace. In fact, Jesus came into the world to “destroy the works of the devil” (1 John 3:8 ). Satan is a created, rebellious and tempting Evil power active in the universe, but his powerful existence does not exclude a person from responsibility. Knowledge about Satan and Evil angels alerts Christians to the danger and subtlety of satanic temptation
Fear - From a moral standpoint, slight fear must be ignored; grave fear must not be allowed to deter us from duty, yet there is lessened responsibility for Evil done out of fear
Aceldama - Tradition points out this field on the steep side of the hill of Evil Counsel overhanging the valley of Hinnom on the south
Office, Abuse of - Is taken in canon law in the very wide sense of the Evil and unlawful use of ecclesiastical power or office and the term is not restricted to tyrannical use
Revive - , it sprang into activity, manifesting the Evil inherent in it; here sin is personified, by way of contrast to the man himself
Gall - Psalm 69:21 ); some regard the word here as referring to myrrh, on account of Mark 15:23 ; (b) metaphorical, Acts 8:23 , where "gall of bitterness" stands for extreme wickedness, productive of Evil fruit
Age: no Care For Sin - Age cures not the Evil heart, but exhibits in a ridiculous but deeply painful light the indelible perversity of human nature
Naaman - The king of Israel suspected in this some Evil design against him, and rent his clothes
Damnation - condemnaion, "from the rulers, who are not a terror to good works, but to the Evil
Church - ; as, to array the power of the church against some moral Evil
Apprehend - To fear to entertain suspicion or fear of future Evil as, we apprehend calamities from a feeble or wicked administration
Mother - A mother has naturally great influence over her children, whether for good or Evil, as Jochebed the mother of Moses, and Jezebel the mother of Athaliah
Flight - ) The act of fleeing; the act of running away, to escape or expected Evil; hasty departure
Default - A failing, or failure an omission of that which ought to be done neglect to do what duty or law requires as, this Evil has happened through the governors default
Flee - To run with rapidity, as from danger to attempt to escape to hasten from danger or expected Evil. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you
Eliphaz - They therefore condemned Job as an Evil doer, considering that this was proved by what God had brought upon him
Inclination - Acquired inclinations are such as are superinduced by custom, which are called habits; and these are either good or Evil
Mirth - When men rejoice in that which is Evil
Symbols - This principle is altogether violated by taking leaven to signify 'evil' in the offerings in Leviticus, and what is 'good' in the parable of 'the leaven hid in the meal' in Matthew and Luke, as is often done
Overlook - ) To look upon with an Evil eye; to bewitch by looking upon; to fascinate
Abuse of Office - Is taken in canon law in the very wide sense of the Evil and unlawful use of ecclesiastical power or office and the term is not restricted to tyrannical use
Abuse of Power - Is taken in canon law in the very wide sense of the Evil and unlawful use of ecclesiastical power or office and the term is not restricted to tyrannical use
Devise - 3:16), châshab also is used in the sense of “devising Evil plans” ( Baasha - Baasha's Evil conduct provoked the denunciation of God's judgments upon his house, as predicted by Jehu the prophet
Viper - Hence the viper is a symbol of whatever is most Evil and destructive, Job 20:16 Isaiah 30:6
Chance - An event, good or Evil success or misfortune luck
Partial - All partial Evil, universal good
Jehoiachin - 509, reigned three months, and was then carried away to Babylon, where he was imprisoned for thirty-six years, and then released and favored by Evil-merodach, 2 Kings 24:6-16 25:27 2 Chronicles 3:9,10
Patience - The suffering of afflictions, pain, toil, calamity, provocation or other Evil, with a calm, unruffled temper endurance without murmuring or fretfulness. A calm temper which bears Evils without murmuring or discontent
Upbraid - ...
The use of to and of, after upbraid, as to upbraid a man of his gain by iniquity, to upbraid to a man his Evil practices, has been long discontinued
Wicked - Evil in principle or practice deviating from the divine law addicted to vice sinful immoral
Mar'Tha - In the supper at Bethany (John 12:2 ) the old character shows itself still, but it has been freed from Evil
Avail - 1: ἰσχύω (Strong's #2480 — Verb — ischuo — is-khoo'-o ) signifies (a) "to be strong in body, to be robust, in sound health," Matthew 9:12 ; Mark 2:17 ; (b) "to have power," as of the Gospel, Acts 19:20 ; to prevail against, said of spiritual enemies, Revelation 12:8 ; of an Evil spirit against exorcists, Acts 19:16 ; (c) "to be of force, to be effective, capable of producing results," Matthew 5:13 ("it is good for nothing;" lit
Simplicity - ’ Openness of mind is praiseworthy when it implies willingness to receive instruction; it becomes blameworthy when it connotes a disposition equally receptive of good and of Evil, or an incapacity to distinguish between right and wrong. Christ Jesus being made unto them ‘wisdom from God’ ( 1 Corinthians 1:30 ), they are no longer beguiled like Eve, but are ‘wise unto that which is good, and simple unto that which is Evil’ ( Romans 16:19 )
Satan - , 1 Samuel 29:4 ; Psalm 38:20 ; 71:13 ; four in Psalm 109 ; (c) of "Satan," the Devil, some seventeen or eighteen times in the OT; in Zechariah 3:1 , where the name receives its interpretation, "to be (his) adversary," RV (see marg. ...
"Satan" is not simply the personification of Evil influences in the heart, for he tempted Christ, in whose heart no Evil thought could ever have arisen (John 14:30,2 Corinthians 5:21 ; Hebrews 4:15 ); moreover his personality is asserted in both the OT and the NT, and especially in the latter, whereas if the OT language was intended to be figurative, the NT would have made this evident. See DEVIL
Provocation, Provoke - ...
B — 3: ἐρεθίζω (Strong's #2042 — Verb — erethizo — er-eth-id'-zo ) "to excite, stir up, provoke," is used (a) in a good sense in 2 Corinthians 9:2 , AV, "hath provoked," RV, "hath stirred up;" (b) in an Evil sense in Colossians 3:21 , "provoke. " ...
B — 7: προκαλέω (Strong's #4292 — Verb — prokaleo — prok-al-eh'-om-ahee ) "to call forth," as to a contest, hence "to stir up what is Evil in another," occurs in the Middle Voice in Galatians 5:26
Quench, Unquenchable - in Mark 9:44,46 ); (b) metaphorically, of "quenching" the fire-tipped darts of the Evil one, Ephesians 6:16 ; of "quenching" the Spirit, by hindering His operations in oral testimony in the church gatherings of believers, 1 Thessalonians 5:19 . For there was always the danger that the impulses of the flesh might usurp the place of the energy of the Spirit in the assembly, and the endeavor to restrain this Evil by natural means would have the effect of hindering His ministry also
Saturnians - He held the doctrine of two principles, whence proceeded all things; the one, a wise and benevolent Deity, and the other, matter, a principle essentially Evil, and which he supposed acted under the superintendence of a certain intelligence of a malignant nature. ...
To these creatures, whom the benevolent principle had endowed with reasonable souls, and with dispositions that led to goodness and virtue, and Evil being, to maintain his empire, added another kind, whom he formed of a wicked and malignant character: and hence the differences we see among men
Malice - It may be ‘wickedness,’ as Acts 8:22 , James 1:21 ; or ‘evil’ = ‘trouble,’ Matthew 6:34 . It indicated Evil of any sort (cf
Age - There is the patriarchal age; the Mosaic age or dispensation; the Christian age, in which "the kingdom of God cometh without observation" (and Evil predominates outwardly); and the future manifested millennial kingdom: the two latter together forming "the world (Greek: "age") to come," in contrast to "this present Evil world" (age) (Ephesians 1:21; Galatians 1:4)
Fowl - ...
Matthew 13:4 (a) Here is a type of Evil spirits who pounce upon the Word of GOD when the sinner hears it in order to take it out of his heart and mind. ...
Mark 4:32 (b) These birds represent Evil spirits who make their home and perform their activities in religious systems
Kings - The two books of Kings deal especially with the theocratic promise of 2 Samuel 7:12 : see 1 Kings 14:7-11; 1 Kings 15:29; 1 Kings 16:1-7; and treat the history from the kingly side, and show the Evil of schism and the worship of idols set up for political reasons, as by Solomon, 1 Kings 11:1-43, and Jeroboam, 1 Kings 12:26. The story of the revolt of the larger part of the land to form the kingdom of Israel follows, and of the frequent changes of dynasty, no less than seven, which furnished 19 kings, every one Evil, during the 253 years of its existence
Darius - DARIUS THE MEDE ...
Daniel 5:31 9:1 11:1 , was son of Astyages king of the Medes, and brother of Mandane mother of Cyrus, and of Amyit the mother of Evil-merodach and grandmother of Belshazzar: thus he was uncle, by the mother's side, to Evil-merodach and to Cyrus
Exorcism - The word may be defined as denoting the action of expelling an Evil spirit by the performance of certain rites, including almost always the invocation of a reputedly holy name. The vital part of the procedure was the invocation of a name (or a series of names, of a deity or an angel, at the mention of which the Evil spirit was supposed to recognize the presence of a superior power and to decline a combat, as though a spell had been put upon him. Christ, on the other hand, uses no spell, but in virtue of His own authority bids the Evil spirits retire, and they render His slightest word unquestioning obedience. His own personality, His mere presence on the scene, are enough to alarm the Evil spirits and to put an end to their mischief
Fall - In Genesis 2:9 the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and Evil grow together in the midst of the garden; in Genesis 2:17 the second alone is made the test of man’s obedience. These Evils, it is taught, are inconsistent with the ideal of human life, and contrary to the intention of a good God. The process by which these Evil thoughts are insinuated into the mind of the woman is described with a masterly insight into the psychology of temptation which is unsurpassed in literature. To eat of the tree would make man like God, knowing good and Evil; and God does not wish man to be like Himself. ...
(3) What, then, is meant by the ‘knowledge of good and Evil,’ which was acquired by eating of the tree? Does it mean simply an enlargement of experience such as the transition from childhood to maturity naturally brings with it, and of which the feeling of shame (Genesis 3:7 ) is the significant index? Or is it, as has generally been held, the experimental knowledge of moral distinctions, the awaking of the conscience, the faculty of discerning between right and wrong? It is very difficult to say which of these interpretations expresses the thought in the mind of the writer. It is in accordance with Hebrew idiom to hold that knowledge of good and Evil is equivalent to knowledge in general; though it is of course not certain that that is the sense in which the phrase is here used. The identification of the serpent with the devil appears first in the Apocryphal literature ( Wis 2:24 ); in the narrative itself he is simply the most subtle of the creatures that God has made ( Genesis 3:1 ), and there is not the slightest reason to suppose that he is there regarded as the mouthpiece of the Evil spirit. There is thus a certain ambiguity in the representation of the serpent, which may have its source in some more primitive phase of the legend; but which also points the way, under the influence of a deeper apprehension of the nature of moral Evil than had been attained in the time of the writer, to that identification of the serpent with the Evil One which we find in the NT ( Romans 16:20 , Revelation 12:9 ; Revelation 20:2 ). In the same way, and with the same justification, the reflexion of later ages read into the curse on the serpent ( Genesis 3:15 ) the promise of ultimate redemption from the power of Evil through the coming of Christ. It is only the general scope of the passage that can be thought to warrant the inference that the victory is to be on the side of humanity; and it is a still higher flight of religious inspiration to conceive of that victory as culminating in the triumph of Him whose mission it was to destroy the works of the devil
Necromancy - During the Middle Ages it was condemned by the Church; theologians held that necromancy is due to the agency of Evil spirits, because the means taken are inadequate to produce the expected results
Hophni And Phinehas - The two sons of Eli; they were priests in the sanctuary at Shiloh, where, in spite of the presence of their father, they carried on their Evil practices
Earrings - These may have been magical apparel with engraving of words supposed to ward off Evil
Slander, Talebearing - ]'>[2] has ‘an Evil report against the land
Oath - But if the words are taken as referring to oaths, then their intention may have been to show "that the proper state of Christians is to require no oaths; that when Evil is expelled from among them every yea and nay will be as decisive as an oath, every promise as binding as a vow
Principality - 1: ἀρχή (Strong's #746 — Noun Feminine — arche — ar-khay' ) "beginning, government, rule," is used of supramundane beings who exercise rule, called "principalities;" (a) of holy angels, Ephesians 3:10 , the Church in its formation being to them the great expression of "the manifold (or "much-varied") wisdom of God;" Colossians 1:16 ; (b) of Evil angels, Romans 8:38 ; Colossians 2:15 , some would put this under (a), but see SPOIL , B
Device - 1: ἐνθύμησις (Strong's #1761 — Noun Feminine — enthumesis — en-thoo'-may-sis ) "a cogitation, an inward reasoning" (generally, Evil surmising or supposition), is formed from en, "in," and thumos, "strong feeling, passion" (cp
Feelings Religious - For instance; religion consists in contrition, repentance, and devotion: now, what is contrition but a feeling of sorrow for sin? what is devotion but a feeling of love to God and his ways? Who can separate the idea of feeling from any of these acts? The fact is this; religious feelings, like every thing else, have run into the opposite Evil of lukewarmness, and been content with a system without feeling its energy
Christ: Sympathy With His People - If,' says Augustine, 'a man should come up to embrace thee, to kiss and honour thee upward, and beneath with a pair of shoes beaten full of nails, tread upon thy bare foot; the head shall despise the honor done unto it, and for the foot that smarteth, say, Why treadest thou upon me? So when feigned gospellers honor Christ our Head, sitting in heaven, and oppress his members on earth, the Head shall speak for the feet that smart, and say, Why treadest thou on me?' Paul had a zeal toward God, but he did tread upon Christ's feet on earth, for whom the Head crieth forth of heaven, 'Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?' Although Christ sitteth on the right hand of his Father, yet lieth he on earth; he suffereth all calamities here on earth, he is many times Evil entreated here on earth
Breastplate - They have done that which is just and they are not afraid of Evil consequences
Cain - ...
1 John 3:12 (a) He indicates any person, who, in order to sustain and maintain his own Evil ways, desires by hook or crook to get rid of his righteous and Godly associates
Corrupt - ...
2 Corinthians 2:17 (a) The Word itself cannot be changed, but the use of it may be a misuse whereby Scriptures are made to teach Evil doctrines or practices
Word of od - Below are given some of the types which are used to describe the Word of GOD, which is the Bible:...
Bow Habakkuk 3:9 (a)...
Judge John 12:48 (a)...
Buckler Psalm 18:30 (a)...
Lamp, Psalm 119:105 (a)...
Fire, Jeremiah 23:29 (a)...
Laver, Exodus 30:18 (c)...
Hammer, Jeremiah 23:29 (a)...
Light, Psalm 119:105 (a)...
Meat, 1 Corinthians 3:2 (b)...
Milk, 1 Peter 2:2 (a)...
Rain, Isaiah 55:10-11 (a)...
Seed, Luke 8:11 (a)...
Shield, Psalm 91:4 (a)...
Snow, Isaiah 55:10-11 (a)...
Spoil Psalm 119:162 (a)...
Sword Ephesians 6:17 (a)...
Truth John 17:17 (a)...
Water Ephesians 5:26 (a)...
Micah 7:3 (b) Here we see the care with which wicked men seek to cover up their Evil actions, and to prevent the public from seeing what they are doing
Alarm - ) To surprise with apprehension of danger; to fill with anxiety in regard to threatening Evil; to excite with sudden fear
Bitter - Is is an Evil and bitter thing
Contain - The Kings person contains the unruly people from Evil occasions
Scorpion - ...
Ezekiel 2:6 (a) The word is used to describe the terrible wickedness and the Evil scourge of Israel at this time
Scepter - GOD promised that He would destroy all these Evil princes and sovereigns
Savour - ...
2 Corinthians 2:14 (b) This is symbolic of that peculiar influence given out by a person either for good or for Evil
Albanenses - They held with the Gnostics and Manicheans, two principles, the one of good and the other of Evil. They rejected the doctrine of the resurrection, affirmed that the general judgment was past, and that hell torments were no other than the Evils we feel and suffer in this life
Mount Amana - ) meaning from the fellowship of the Evil, which is like the ferocity of beasts, to the sweet communion of Jesus, in his love, and grace, and favour
Enchanter - In either case, the ashipu offered incantations to deliver a person from Evil magical forces (demons)
Recompense, Reward - ...
In its first occurrence in the Old Testament, the word has the sense of “repaying” or “restoring”: “Why have you returned Evil for good?” ( Levi - For his share in the treacherous massacre of the Shechemites, Genesis 34:1-31 , his father at death foreboded Evil to his posterity, Genesis 49:5-7 ; but as they afterwards stood forth on the Lord's side, Moses was charged to bless them, Exodus 32:26-29 Deuteronomy 33:8-11
Pekah - In the latter part of his Evil reign he formed an alliance with the Syrians of Damascus, and they attacked Ahaz king of Judah, who in turn sought the aid of Assyria
Rid - I will rid Evil beasts out of the land
Wipe - To cleanse from Evil practices or abuses to overturn and destroy what is foul and hateful
Jehoahaz - He reigned seventeen years, and followed the Evil ways of the house of Jeroboam
Onan - Who shall say the numbers which since his days have fallen into it? And who shall calculate the army which by Onanism have hastened the termination of a life of sin, and hurried themselves into eternity! Into how many streams of Evil, diffusing themselves into all the parts of our poor fallen nature, hath that one deadly poison the old serpent put into Adam manifested itself through all our passions! Blessed Lord Jesus! what, but for thy gracious recovery of our nature, could have saved the wretched race of Adam from the wrath to come
Jehoiachin - After an imprisonment of thirty-seven years (Jeremiah 52:31,33 ), he was liberated by Evil-merodach, and permitted to occupy a place in the king's household and sit at his table, receiving "every day a portion until the day of his death, all the days of his life" (52:32-34)
Watchfulness - Believers must resist Evil so as not to be taken by surprise at the Lord's coming. ...
Both Paul and Peter issue the command to be watchful, to stand against the Evil one (see Ephesians 6:10-17 ; 1 Peter 5:8 ). The church must watch unless savage wolves, influenced by the Evil one, overtake the community and lead it astray. The picture of Jesus' stand against the devil's temptation is all the more powerful because of the disciples' failure to do the same
Rapes - Their Evil actions are compared to wild grapes. ...
Matthew 7:16 (b) We learn from this figure that Evil lives cannot produce good fruit for GOD. Those who belong to the Devil are not bearing fruit for the GOD of Heaven. ...
Revelation 14:18 (b) This figure represents the people of the earth who are the product of wicked leaders, Evil teachers and false faiths
Repentance - When Israel turned from their Evil ways and sought God, He often repented of the punishment He had meditated. On the other hand, the promises to bless Israel when in the land were made conditionally on their obedience, so that God would, if they did Evil, turn from or repent of the good that He had said He would do, either to Israel or in fact to any nation. ...
Repentance is also spoken of as a change of thought and action where there is no Evil to repent of
Temptation, Test - While the number of terms denoting temptation and testing is small, their range of meaning is wide, extending from a secular sense of trying something out to a religious sense of luring toward Evil. When they experience enticement to Evil, he is able to deliver them (1 Corinthians 10:13 ; 2 Peter 2:9 ; Luke 4:1-11 ). Negatively, it is denied that God tempts anyone to Evil (James 1:13 ). ...
In Jesus' ministry Satan stands out as the great choreographer of temptation, so that he is referred to as the tempter (Matthew 4:3 ) and the devil (Mark 1:13 ). The language of the "evil inclination" is not prominent in the New Testament in connection with temptation, although the idea is not absent (1 Corinthians 5:5 ; 1 Timothy 1:20 ; 1618170215_6 ). Both trials (as revealing and stimulating character and progress) and temptations (understood as allurements to Evil) may minister to the divine purpose, provided the outcome is positive (James 1:12 ). But there is this important distinction: since temptation embodies incitement to Evil, it cannot be God's doing (James 1:13 )
Dualism - the Evil serpent, Psalms 89:10 , cf. Paul, starting from the common Hebraic notion of flesh ( sarx ), ‘according to which it signifies material substance, which is void indeed of the spirit, but not contrary to it, which is certainly weak and perishable, and so far unclean, but not positively Evil,’ advances to the conception of the flesh as ‘an agency opposed to the spirit,’ having ‘an active tendency towards death. In Persian thought there are opposed to one another, as in conflict with one another, Ormuzd and Ahriman , the personal principles of good and Evil. In post-exilic Judaism, however, there was a twofold tendency so to assert the transcendence of God that angels must be recognized as mediating between Him and the world, and to preserve His moral perfection by assigning the Evil in the world to the agency of Evil spirits under the leadership of Satan , the adversary. In the NT generally the doctrine of the devil current in Judaism is taken over, but the Divine supremacy is never denied, and the Divine victory over all Evil is always confidently anticipated. Apocalyptic Literature, Devil, Eschatology
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - The prophets could speak of a "day" when the Lord would act, sometimes in punishment of Evil, sometimes in bringing blessing. So with Moses' prophecy that after his death Israel would turn away from the right with the result that Evil would befall them "in the latter days" (Deuteronomy 31:29 ). " So also is the opposition of Evil to all that is good. A very different picture is given in Ezekiel's prophecy that in "the latter days" Gog, the chief prince of the forces of Evil, will come against Israel and be defeated (chaps. There are other references both to final bliss and to the final rebellion of the forces of Evil. It means that in the end all Evil will be decisively overthrown and God's kingdom established forever. ...
That there will be an upsurge of Evil in the last days is made clear by a number of passages. But Evil will be more widespread than that, for "There will be terrible times in the last days. "In the last days scoffers will come, scoffing and following their own Evil desires" (2 Peter 3:3 ). ...
That Evil will continue to the end is clear, as many passages testify. Again and again the New Testament brings out the truth that when Jesus returns all Evil will be defeated and the redeemed will know the fullness of everlasting life. This did not mean that all Evil would immediately disappear; both the New Testament writings and Christian experience make it plain that Evil continues
Abijah - In war with Jeroboam he gained a signal victory, 2 Chronicles 13:1-22 ; yet he followed the Evil example of his father
Lanfranc - Lanfranc probably advised the king to name William Rufus his successor, and he subsequently made constant efforts to check the Evil deeds of the latter
Incantations - Chants used by magicians to control Evil spirits and thus heal the sick or afflict enemies
Obligation - Obligation or moral duty implies the practical imperative necessity of doing freely what is morally good and avoiding what is morally Evil
Moral Duty - Obligation or moral duty implies the practical imperative necessity of doing freely what is morally good and avoiding what is morally Evil
Inner Man - According to Paul's understanding (Romans 7:22-23 ), human personality has three components: (1) the inmost self where the law dwells; Paul equated this with reason (nous , Romans 7:23 ); the inmost self approximates the rabbinic yeser hatob (inclination to good); (2) the members or the flesh that is responsive to desire; the flesh approximates the rabbinic yeser harah (inclination to Evil); and (3) the conscious I which is aware of both reason and desire
Fable - Typically, the characters are portrayed as having human personality traits that are good or Evil
Soldier - Christians are often likened to soldiers who have to clothe themselves with armour to fight against the Evil forces of Satan (2 Corinthians 10:3-4; Ephesians 6:10-18; see ARMOUR; WEAPONS)
Manasseh, King of Judah - Even the sweeping reforms of Josiah a few years later were not able to rid Judah of Manasseh’s Evil (2 Kings 23:24-27)
Corruptions: Overcome Gradually - If our prayers and repentances do not appear to overcome our corruptions, we must continue still to use these gracious battering-rams, for in due time by faith in Jesus Christ the power of Evil shall be overthrown
Murmur - To grumble to complain to utter complaints in a low,half articulated voice to utter sullen discontent with at, before the thing which is the cause of discontent as, murmur not at sickness or with at or against, before the active agent which produces the Evil
Bones - “Rottenness of bones” signified one whose wife caused shame and confusion (Proverbs 12:4 ; Proverbs 14:30 ) or could refer to dejectedness and anticipation of approaching Evil (Habakkuk 3:16 )
Rehoboth (1) - ) Third of Isaac's wells, called so because after that the wells Esek ("contention") and Sitnah ("hatred"), which his men had dug, the Gerar herdsmen would not let him keep peaceably, now at last his good has overcome their Evil, and God makes room for him
Robbery - In Israel's disorganized state in the northern kingdom this Evil was very prevalent (Hosea 4:2; Hosea 6:9; Micah 2:8)
Discern - To see or understand the difference to make distinction as, to discern between good and Evil, truth and falsehood
Merodach - The name occurs in many Babylonian proper names, and appears in the Bible in Merodach-baladan and Evil-merodach , and probably in Mordecai
Mixture - In this life there is a mixture of good and Evil
Slander - Diabolos can mean “slanderous” or “the slanderer” (the devil). See Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic ; Ethics
Rend - ...
Joel 2:13 (a) By this word we are called upon to feel a deep grief over sin and Evil
Enius - ) A good or Evil spirit, or demon, supposed by the ancients to preside over a man's destiny in life; a tutelary deity; a supernatural being; a spirit, good or bad
Dark - ) Foreboding Evil; gloomy; jealous; suspicious
Pain - ) Punishment suffered or denounced; suffering or Evil inflicted as a punishment for crime, or connected with the commission of a crime; penalty
Bad - Ill Evil opposed to good a word of general use, denoting physical defects and moral faults, in men and things as a bad man, a bad heart, a bad design, bad air, bad water, bad books
Innocency - Freedom from guilt or Evil intentions simplicity of heart as the innocence of a child
Beast - Daniel 7:3 (a) These beasts represent four great kingdoms, all of them cruel, Evil and Satanic in their power and influence
Baker - In Hosea 7:4,6 , the heating of the oven by the baker is used figuratively for those who, as it were, prepared their lusts for Evil, and then waited till the moment when they could satisfy them more greedily
All - They keep these Evil things alive in the heart
Mustard (Tree) - Its members include atheists, idolators and Evildoers of every kind. The birds in this church tree represent Evil spirits ruling in church councils
Provide - ) To procure supplies or means in advance; to take measures beforehand in view of an expected or a possible future need, especially a danger or an Evil; - followed by against or for; as, to provide against the inclemency of the weather; to provide for the education of a child
Pelagianism - He taught that man's will was and still is free to choose good or Evil and there is no inherited sin (through Adam)
Imputation - Is the attributing any matter, quality, or character, whether good or Evil, to any person as his own
Attrition - It might, however, be easily shown that the mere sorrow for sin because of its consequences, and not on account of its Evil nature, is no more acceptable to God than hypocrisy itself can be
Save - ) To make safe; to procure the safety of; to preserve from injury, destruction, or Evil of any kind; to rescue from impending danger; as, to save a house from the flames
Fruit - ) That which is produced; the effect or consequence of any action; advantageous or desirable product or result; disadvantageous or Evil consequence or effect; as, the fruits of labor, of self-denial, of intemperance
Male - ) Evil; wicked; bad
Male - ) Evil; wicked; bad
Astyages - He had two daughters, Mandane and Amyit: Mandane married Cambyses, the Persian, and was the mother of Cyrus; Amyit married Nebuchadnezzar, the son of Nabopolassar, and was the mother of Evil-merodach
Narrow - , hemmed in, like a mountain gorge; the way is rendered "narrow" by the Divine conditions, which make it impossible for any to enter who think the entrance depends upon self-merit, or who still incline towards sin, or desire to continue in Evil
Knock - ) To practice Evil speaking or fault-finding; to criticize habitually or captiously
Jehoiachin - Nevertheless, he was ultimately released from prison by Evil-merodach of Babylon and accorded some honor in the land of his captivity (2 Kings 25:27-30 )
Retreat - Under a competent director the retreatants follow certain spiritual exercises, like those of Saint Ignatius, which enable one to grasp more clearly the simple truths of religion about God and man's relations with Him, sin and its penalties, the following of Christ, and a rule of life, in order to rise above the thought of doing Evil and to aim at a higher standard of life
Scourge - He or that which greatly afflicts, harasses or destroys particularly, any continued Evil or calamity
Ner'Gal-Share'Zer - He is the same as the monarch called Neriglissar or Neriglissor, who murdered Evil-merodach, the son of Nebuchadnezzar and succeeded him upon the throne
Blasphemy - in its technical English sense, signifies the speaking Evil of God and in this sense it is found (Psalm 74:18 ; Isaiah 52:5 ; Romans 2:24 ) etc
Overtake - ...
2: προλαμβάνω (Strong's #4301 — Verb — prolambano — prol-am-ban'-o ) "to anticipate" (pro, "before," lambano, "to take"), is used of the act of Mary, in Mark 14:8 [1]; of forestalling the less favored at a social meal, 1 Corinthians 11:21 ; of being "overtaken" in any trespass, Galatians 6:1 , where the meaning is not that of detecting a person in the act, but of his being caught by the trespass, through his being off his guard (see Galatians 5:21 and contrast the premediated practice of Evil in Galatians 5:26 )
Enemy - ...
The Bible speaks of enemies other than one’s fellow human beings; for example, Satan, death and Evil spiritual forces
Exercise - , "gymnastic"), 1 Timothy 4:7 , with a view to godliness; Hebrews 5:14 , of the senses, so as to discern good and Evil; Hebrews 12:11 , of the effect of chastening, the spiritual "exercise" producing the fruit of righteousness; 2 Peter 2:14 , of certain Evil teachers with hearts "exercised in covetousness," RV
Armageddon - It will coincide with the second coming of Christ (Revelation 16:15 ) and there all of the hosts of Evil will be defeated (Revelation 19:11-21 ). ...
In any case, John sees the final triumph of God at Armageddon and offers that to the persecuted Christians as a word of comfort and hope that Evil will not win, but is doomed to ultimate destruction
Dragon - ...
Job 30:29 (a) Job compares his companions to Evil, ugly, horrible animals who brought only dismay to his heart. ...
Revelation 12:3 (a) This is a picture of Satan, in his cruelty, wickedness and Evil actions. ...
Revelation 13:2 (a) This reveals the antichrist who exercises tremendous power over the people of the world, and he receives this power from the Devil
Wine - ...
Revelation 17:2 (a) The wine in this case represents the Evil practices of the apostate church. The nations receive the false teachings of this Evil church which makes it easy to live in every kind of sinfulness, and yet be comforted by the assurance that the church can forgive, and has the power to send the soul to Heaven
Measure - ...
Matthew 23:32 (a) By this figure we learn that the Evil deeds of the fathers are brought to full completion in the lives of their children. The Evil that the fathers failed to do were committed by the children
Lip - The compression of the “lips” was an indication of Evil thoughts or motivation: “He shutteth his eyes to devise froward things: moving his lips he bringeth Evil to pass” ( Heart - We read of a broken heart, a clean heart, an Evil heart, a liberal heart. ...
The heart of man is naturally depraved and inclined to Evil, Jeremiah 17:9
Fall of Man - They surely throw some light on that great question, the origin of Evil. God has thought fit to allow Evil to exist in order that he may have a platform for showing his mercy, grace, and compassion. But by permitting Evil, mysterious as it seems, God's works of grace, mercy, and wisdom in saving sinners have been wonderfully manifested to all his creatures
Darkness - The absolute, sovereign God rules over the darkness and the powers of Evil. Third, God uses the darkness for his own purposes: to hide himself from the sight of men (Psalm 18:11 ; 1 Kings 8:12 ) and to bring his judgment on Evildoers (Deuteronomy 28:28-29 ; Matthew 8:12 ; 22:13 ), Evil nations (Ezekiel 30:18-19 ), and false prophets (Jeremiah 23:12 ; Micah 3:6 ; Revelation 16:10 ). It also indicates God's judgment on Evil
Temptation - Used in KJV to refer to testing, trying, and enticing to Evil. James 1:13 says, “Let no man say when he is tempted ( peirazo ), I am tempted by God: for God cannot be tempted with Evil, neither tempteth he any man. ) These passages refer to the temptation as coming from the “tempter,” “devil,” or “Satan. Jesus taught His disciples to pray: “Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from Evil” ( Matthew 6:13 ). See Devil, Satan, Eve, Demonic; Temptation of Jesus
Wind - ...
Proverbs 11:29 (b) No doubt the writer referred to the transient character of that which falls to the lot of the Evil man. ...
Ephesians 4:14 (a) This indicates the strange power of Evil teachings, which, in their sophistry and clever logic, lead away from the truth of the Scriptures into error, and a false faith. ...
Judges 1:12 (b) By this type we understand the many false religions and Evil teachings which abound, which easily deceive the ungodly, and carry them off into false religions
Darkness (2) - This darkness the presence of Jesus dispels, except in the case of those who love the darkness and who therefore shrink back into the recesses of gloom, when the light shines, because their deeds are Evil. This state results from long continuance in Evil (John 3:19). This is the darkness of sin, chosen and loved as sin, the instinctive hatred, inwrought with what is radically Evil, of the Divine purity and light
World - Therefore, the Bible frequently speaks of the present world, or present age, as something that is Evil and that is opposed to God (John 7:7; John 17:25; James 4:4; 1 John 2:15). This is worldliness, and it is an Evil that the Bible warns Christians against. ...
Meanwhile Christians have to live in an Evil world, while not joining in the sins of the world. But they must remain faithful to Christ and keep themselves from being corrupted by the world’s Evil
Reap - Job 4:8 (a) We shall receive back Evil for Evil, and trouble for trouble. ...
Proverbs 22:8 (a) Evil works are not permanently fruitful. ...
Hosea 8:7 (a) This figure is used to inform us that a little bit of sin may produce a tremendous lot of Evil and harm
Apocalyptic Literature - He wanted to encourage God’s people to endure their sufferings, in the assurance that God would soon overthrow Evil and bring in the golden age. ...
Some features of the literature...
Throughout the apocalyptic literature there is a sharp contrast between Evil and good, between the present world and the age to come. In the present world God’s people suffer because of the Evil that hostile governments and ungodly people direct against them. In the age to come, by contrast, God’s people will enjoy unending contentment, whereas those who are Evil will be destroyed (cf
Suffer - , Matthew 16:21 ; 17:12 ; 1 Peter 2:23 ; (b) in His expiatory and vicarious sacrifice for sin, Hebrews 9:26 ; 13:12 ; 1 Peter 2:21 ; 3:18 ; 4:1 ; (c) including both (a) and (b), Luke 22:15 ; 24:26,46 ; Acts 1:3 , "passion;" 3:18; 17:3; Hebrews 5:8 ; (d) by the antagonism of the Evil one, Hebrews 2:18 ; (II) of human "suffering "(a) of followers of Christ, Acts 9:16 ; 2 Corinthians 1:6 ; Galatians 3:4 ; Philippians 1:29 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:14 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:5 ; 2 Timothy 1:12 ; 1 Peter 3:14,17 ; 5:10 ; Revelation 2:10 ; in identification with Christ in His crucifixion, as the spiritual ideal to be realized, 1 Peter 4:1 ; in a wrong way, 1 Peter 4:15 ; (b) of others, physically, as the result of demoniacal power, Matthew 17:15 , RV, "suffereth (grievously)," AV, "is (sore) vexed;" cp. ...
A — 10: κακουχέω (Strong's #2558 — Verb — kakoucheo — kak-oo-kheh'-o ) "to ill-treat" (kakos, "evil," and echo, "to have"), is used in the Passive Voice in Hebrews 11:37 , RV, "evil entreated" (AV, "tormented"); in Hebrews 13:3 , RV, "are Evil entreated" (AV, "suffer adversity"). 6), RV, "to be Evil entreated with," AV, "to suffer affliction with
Magi - The Magi believed that there were two principles, one the cause of all good, and the other the cause of all Evil; in which opinion they were followed by the sect of the Manichees. They called the good principle Jazden, and Ormuzd, and the Evil principle Ahraman or Aherman. The reason of their worshipping fire was, because they looked upon it as the truest symbol of Oromasdes, or the good god; as darkness was of Arimanius, or the Evil god. Prideaux is of opinion that Zoroaster took the hint of this alteration in their theology from the prophet Isaiah, who brings in God, saying to Cyrus king of Persia, I am the Lord, and there is none else: I form the light, and create darkness; I make peace and create Evil, ch. In short, Zoroaster held that there was one supreme independent Being, and under him two principles, or angels; one the angel of light or good, and the other the angel of Evil or darkness; that there is a perpetual struggle between them, which shall last to the end of the world; that then the angel of darkness and his disciples shall go into a world of their own, where they shall be punished in everlasting darkness; and the angel of light and his disciples shall also go into a world of their own, where they shall be rewarded in everlasting light
Possession - In Scripture the idea is associated with both phases of moral character; and a man may be possessed by Christ or the Holy Spirit, or by a or the devil. Later usage has confined the word mainly, though not exclusively, to possession by an Evil spirit. the frequent ‘the hand of the Lord was upon’ him, 1 Kings 18:46 : so of an Evil spirit, 1 Samuel 18:10 ). Elsewhere such complaints are referred to as merely disease, and no suggestion is made that they were caused or complicated by the action of an Evil spirit ( Matthew 15:30 , Mark 7:32 , Luke 18:25 ). Mark 9:25 , where the sufferer was not consulted, and any humouring followed the cure; so elsewhere), and the Evil spirits are represented after expulsion as actual and still capable of mischief ( Mark 5:13 ). ), attributes the power to cast out devils to the disciples of the Pharisees, and implicitly asserts it for Himself ( Mark 12:27 f. At a later date there was a disposition to ascribe all diseases to possession, to multiply Evil spirits beyond calculation, and to invest them with functions and activities of the most grotesque kind. Christ’s attitude was altogether different, though He consistently talks and acts upon the assumption that Evil spirits were no creatures of the fancy, and that possession was a real phenomenon. ...
That such an assumption was wrong it is outside the province of the real sciences to assert or to deny; and there are some considerations that make the conclusion at least probable, that personal spirits of Evil exist, and cause by their activity some woeful sufferings amongst men. In the asylums and hospitals, moreover, are cases of mental or nervous disease, not entirely explicable by physical law, but looking exceedingly like what cases of possession may be supposed to be; just as in social and civil life men are sometimes met with whose viciousness defies any other interpretation than that an, or the, Evil spirit has secured the mastery over them. Seven Evil spirits are grouped in Babylonian mythology ( Matthew 12:45 , Mark 16:9 , Luke 8:2 ; Luke 11:26 ), and these with their subordinate genii kept men in continual fear, and were thought able to occupy the body and produce any kind of sickness
the Labourer With the Evil Eye - AESOP'S dog in the manger, and our Lord's labourer with the Evil eye, are two companion portraits. At the end of our Evil life we come with him. ...
Is thine eye Evil? said the good husbandman to the murmuring labourer. Now, an "evil eye" is just our old Bible English for the Latin word "invidia. This wretched creature was so full of an Evil eye that every one must have seen it. Even if he hadheld his peace every one must have seen his Evil heart running out of his eye. It was my Evil eye. Who is your companion-potter? And do you have the self-knowledge that even poor Heine had, to say to yourself every day-'As for these dislikes, and aversions, and antipathies, that I feel in my heart; as well as for these depreciations and contempts that pass continually through my tongue and my pen; I know what their motive is in my own case at least, it is in my own Evil eye. He says that it is difficult for him to believe that any man who is really within the kingdom of heaven himself, and is in its service, and is receiving its rewards, could have an Evil eye at another man for his work and for his wages in that kingdom. The truth is, an Evil eye, like this labourer's Evil eye, is not only in all our hearts, but it is the agony of every truly good man's heart that it is so: it is very hell itself to every truly good man's heart that it is so: to every man's heart who is so much as even beginning to know what true goodness really is. But, with all that, the chosen men; the truly choice spirits even among the men who are called; the men who are sincere and single in their motives; the men who are full of humility about themselves, and about their work, and about their wages; the men who are so full of brotherly love that they have no Evil eye left at their brother's good work or good wages, but who rather rejoice in all the good things that fall to their brother-labourer's lot-such men are not many even in the vineyard of heaven itself
Gnostics - They corrupted the doctrine of the Gospel by a profane mixture of the tenets of the origin of Evil and the creation of the world, with its divine truths. These last were peculiarly serviceable to them, on account of the allegories and allusions with which they abound, which are capable of different interpretations; though their doctrine concerning the creation of the world by one or more inferior beings of an Evil or imperfect nature, led them to deny the divine authority of the books of the Old Testament, which contradicted this idle fiction, and filled them with an abhorrence of Moses and the religion he taught; alleging, that he was actuated by the malignant author of this world, who consulted his own glory and authority, and not the real advantage of men. ...
Their persuasion that Evil resided in matter, as its centre and source, made them treat the body with contempt, discourage marriage, and reject the doctrine of the resurrection of the body, and its re-union with the immortal spirit. The Gnostics considered Jesus Christ as the Son of God, and inferior to the Father, who came into the world for the rescue and happiness of miserable mortals, oppressed by matter and Evil beings; but they rejected our Lord's humanity, on the principle that every thing corporeal is essentially and intrinsically Evil; and therefore the greatest part of them denied the reality of his sufferings. The first, who were material, and incapable of knowledge, inevitably perished, both soul and body; the third, such as the Gnostics themselves pretended to be, were all certainly saved; the psychic, or animal, who were the middle between the other two, were capable either of being saved or damned, according to their good or Evil actions
Peter, Second, Theology of - In conformity to the Evil influences of their pagan culture, they distorted the apostolic teachings about freedom from the law (1:20-21; 2:21; 3:15-16; cf. Jesus Christ will certainly appear, and those who have fallen from the faith will be judged along with this Evil world. This is proven by the destruction of the ancient world in its ungodliness, the continuing detention of insubordinate angels, and the catastrophic destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah for their Evil and immorality (2:4-10). All Evil will be brought under the scrutiny of God and will be punished by him (3:5-7,10-12). ...
Salvation is God's ability to protect the righteous and deliver them from their Evil environment, like Noah and Lot (2:5,7-8), which will be completed at the appearing of Jesus Christ. Because of the divine provision (1:3-4), which must be complemented by their own spiritual discipline (1:5-11), the righteous will not fall away under the testings that arise from their Evil surroundings or from the false teachers (3:17)
Kindness - In 1 Corinthians 15:33 the proverbial saying φθείρουσιν ἤθη χρηστὰ ὁμιλίαι κακαί, ‘evil companionships corrupt good morals’ (or ‘characters’), has χρηστός in the same general sense, the opposite here being κακός. 141) as consisting in the trait of beneficence towards those who are Evil and ungrateful: ‘χρηστός bene cupit, neque bonis tantum sed etiam malis. In Luke 6:35 God is said to be χρηστός towards the unthankful and Evil, and the statement serves to urge the preceding exhortation: ‘love your enemies, do them good, and lend, never despairing. In Luke 2:4 the χρηστότης is associated with ‘forbearance’ and ‘longsuffering’; it is that attitude of God by which doing good in the face of Evil He leads men to repentance. The χρηστότης of Titus 3:4 is shown by the context to be God’s kindness towards sinful, undeserving man, and held up as an example for the Christian of abstention from Evil-speaking, contentiousness, and pride. ’ Finally, in 1 Peter 2:8 (a quotation from Psalms 34:9) the general meaning ‘gracious’ seems to be indicated by the fact that the Divine χρηστότης is set in contrast to the wickedness and guile and hypocrisies and envies and Evil-speakings, which the readers must put aside as new-born men (cf
Sin (2) - To the consciousness of Jesus, Satan was present, not as a convenient personification of Evil that became actual only in the individual wills of men, but as the author of sin, the person in whom Evil has its spring, even as God is the fount of life. John, the whole world lay in the Evil One (1 John 5:19, cf. To be delivered from the Evil One was the converse of being brought into temptation (Matthew 6:13 : the insertion of ἀλλά in Mt. The Jews were of their father the devil, so that the works wrought by them were antithetic to the works of God manifested in Jesus (John 8:44). For the true unification between the normal and universal purpose of the gospel—the forgiveness of sins—and the occasional and particular accessories of it—exorcism and healing—lay not so much in the analogy between bodily disease and spiritual wickedness, as in the fact that both are the exercise of the one Satanic power within the usurped kingdom of Evil. Salvation is therefore not the restoration of spiritual health, but the liberation of God’s people from an Evil service. He was the shepherd bringing home the lost sheep dispersed upon the mountains (John 10:16); or, somewhat to vary the idea, the Redeemer coming into the world, not to judge it along with its prince, but to save it from the Evil One (John 3:17-18, John 12:31; John 12:47, John 17:15), and casting out the indwelling Satan by the finger or Spirit of God (1 Timothy 2:64). The Christian is armed in order to ward off the fiery darts of the Evil One (Ephesians 6:16). A remarkable parallel to the conception of ‘the Evil One,’ which appears both in the Synoptics and in the Fourth Gospel, is found in ‘the prince of the power of the air’ (Ephesians 2:2). The same passage describes those who become sons of God as by nature children of wrath (Ephesians 2:3), dead not in sin but through trespasses (Ephesians 2:5), sons of disobedience because inwrought by this Evil spirit (Ephesians 2:2). He is describing the common experience of an inward struggle, when neither good nor Evil is finally in the ascendant. Compliance with Evil involves an obedience (Romans 6:16), a slavery (Romans 6:17). This is more clearly brought out by the assertion that lust, not God, is the tempter (James 1:13-14), which suggests the presence of an Evil will, the source of that friendship of the world which is enmity against God (James 4:4), taking occasion of the natural passions and desires of men to influence spiritually the human personality. The wisdom which cometh down from above is set over against a wisdom which is devilish (James 3:15; James 3:18; James 3:17). James in his recognition of the personality of Evil. The Fourth Gospel has recorded the prayer of Christ for His disciples, not that they should be taken from the world, but that they might be kept from the Evil One (John 17:15); and also His condemnation of the Jews because, continuing in the bondage of sin, it was their will to do the lusts not of their body, but of their father the devil (John 8:44). The old serpent the devil (Revelation 12:9; Revelation 20:2) deceives the whole world (Revelation 12:9, Revelation 20:2; Revelation 20:10), having power (δύναμις, Revelation 13:2) and even authority (ἐξουσία, Revelation 13:4; cf. Behind human history is the devil, ‘who sinneth from the beginning’ (1 John 3:8). ‘The whole world lieth in the Evil one’ (1 John 5:19). To be begotten of God (1 John 3:9), who is light (1 John 1:5), truth (1 John 5:20), and love (1 John 4:8), is a reversal of those relations described as being ‘of the devil’ (1 John 3:8), who is a murderer and liar (John 8:44), and the power of darkness (1 John 2:11; cf. Though Evil is antithetic to good, it is not in a Platonic sense as non-being (τὸ μὴ ὄν). Though God is indeed the beginning and the end (Revelation 1:8; Revelation 21:6; Revelation 22:13), yet a similar phrase is used in speaking of the author of Evil as in describing the Word (1 John 3:8; 1 John 1:1): both are ‘from the beginning
Devil - (Greek: diabolos, slanderer, accuser, or traducer) ...
The word is used as a name for a fallen angel or Evil spirit, especially for the chief of the rebellious angels, Lucifer or Satan (Matthew 25). Christ drove out devils, and empowered the Apostles to do so. In the Church the institution of the order of exorcists testifies to belief in a personal devil
Deafness - Mark 9:25 attributes deafness to an Evil spirit
Breach - ...
Proverbs 15:4 (b) An Evil tongue opens the way for the human spirit to get in trouble
Reward - A — 1: μισθός (Strong's #3408 — Noun Masculine — misthos — mis-thos' ) primarily "wages, hire," and then, generally, "reward," (a) received in this life, Matthew 5:46 ; 6:2,5,16 ; Romans 4:4 ; 1 Corinthians 9:17,18 ; of Evil "rewards," Acts 1:18 ; see also HIRE; (b) to be received hereafter, Matthew 5:12 ; 10:41 (twice),42; Mark 9:41 ; Luke 6:23,35 ; 1 Corinthians 3:8,14 ; 2 John 1:8 ; Revelation 11:18 ; 22:12
Self-Examination - Is the calling ourselves to a strict account for all the actions of our lives, comparing them with the word of God, the rule of duty; considering how much Evil we have committed, and good we have omitted
Serpentinians - Or OPHITES, heretics in the second century, so called from the veneration they had for the serpent that tempted Eve, and the worship paid to a real serpent: they pretended that the serpent was Jesus Christ, and that he taught men the knowledge of good and Evil
Inactivity: the Evils of - All sorts of mischief happen to unoccupied professors of religion; there is no Evil from which they are secure; better would it be for them to accept the lowest occupation for the Lord Jesus, than remain the victims of inaction
Gog And Magog - In Ezekiel 38-39 , Gog of the land of Magog is the leader of the forces of Evil in an apocalyptic conflict against Yahweh
Lucy, Saint - Condemned to suffer the shame of prostitution, she stood immovable and could not be dragged to the place of Evil
Hinnom, Valley of - ) The valley where it runs between the "hill of Evil counsel" and the S
Ban - ) To curse; to invoke Evil upon
Devise - ...
In a bad sense: ...
Devise not Evil against thy neighbor
Priscillianists - For they denied the reality of Christ's birth and incarnation; maintained that the visible universe was not the production of the Supreme Deity, but of some daemon or malignant principle; adopted the doctrines of aeons, or emanations from the divine nature; considered human bodies as prisons formed by the author of Evil to enslave celestial minds; condemned marriage, and disbelieved the resurrection of the body
Trial - ) That which tries or afflicts; that which harasses; that which tries the character or principles; that which tempts to Evil; as, his child's conduct was a sore trial
Sensible - ) Having moral perception; capable of being affected by moral good or Evil
Deliver - ) To set free from restraint; to set at liberty; to release; to liberate, as from control; to give up; to free; to save; to rescue from Evil actual or feared; - often with from or out of; as, to deliver one from captivity, or from fear of death
Virgin - ...
Jeremiah 46:11 (a) Again our Lord speaks in derision of the Evil nation of Egypt which was living in wickedness and sin, and was held up to ridicule by the GOD of Israel
Archer - These enemies speak Evil of GOD's servants and seek to damage GOD's children. The true Christian should never lose an opportunity to expose the Evils of the false religious sects who deceive the people and hold them in darkness and superstition
Wormwood - ...
Amos 5:7 (a) The judgments of GOD were so severe, and Israel was so Evil in their minds, that they were made bitter by GOD's decisions against them
Jehoiachin - Jehoiachin was carried to Babylon and kept in prison thirty-six years; on the accession of Evil-merodach, B
Babylonians - Many magical and incantation tablets show that they were in great fear of Evil spirits: they called upon 'the spirit of heaven' and 'the spirit of earth' to deliver them
Eyes - If the eye is single — there being but one object (the glory of God) before the soul — the whole body is full of light; but if the eye be Evil, having divers objects (as when an eye sees double), the whole body is full of darkness
Beelzebub, - The Lord shows the folly of supposing that the same Evil one who was seeking to build up a kingdom should be at the same time the means of pulling it down
Athaliah - She may be said to have introduced the worship of Baal into Judah, and she brought up her son to follow in her Evil ways
Endure - How can I endure to see the Evil that shall come to my people? Esther 8
Jehoiachin - At the accession of Evil-merodach he was freed from durance, and received a daily allowance from the palace ( 2 Kings 25:27 f
Lebanon - GOD is telling us by this wonderful figure that man's best and greatest efforts are not sufficient, and do not avail for the putting away of any Evil or any sin in a human life
Stumble - It revealed their hatred and exposed their Evil hearts
Heart - The heart is declared to be corrupt and full of Evil, Ecclesiastes 9:3, and deceit, Jeremiah 17:9, the seat of sin and crime, Matthew 15:19, as also of faith
Belteshazzar - (Daniel 1:7) And no doubt, the design was Evil; that he might in it lose sight both of his own name, and with it the remembrance of the Lord God of his fathers
Michael the Archangel - These are illustrations of the conflict of good and Evil spirits in the unseen universe
Drive Out - Evil “shepherds” or leaders did not lead but rather “drove away” and scattered Israel ( Cloud - ...
2: νεφέλη (Strong's #3507 — Noun Feminine — nephele — nef-el'-ay ) "a definitely shaped cloud, or masses of clouds possessing definite form," is used, besides the physical element, (a) of the "cloud" on the mount of transfiguration, Matthew 17:5 ; (b) of the "cloud" which covered Israel in the Red Sea, 1 Corinthians 10:1,2 ; (c), of "clouds" seen in the Apocalyptic visions, Revelation 1:7 ; 10:1 ; 11:12 ; 14:14-16 ; (d) metaphorically in 2 Peter 2:17 , of the Evil workers there mentioned; but RV, "and mists" (homichle), according to the most authentic mss
Semipelagianism - According to Cassian and his followers ...
God's grace sometimes awaits man's free cooperation
the beginning of faith is in one's power
salvation, always supposing the assistance of grace, depends finally upon one's own will
there is no such thing as predestination ante proevisa merita
grace is given to all, or when denied is withheld because God foresees one's Evil use of it
These opinions became popular in southern Gaul and were defended by Vincent of Lerins and others
Diseases - Besides the natural causes of diseases, Evil spirits were charged with producing them among the Hebrews, Job 2:7 Mark 9:17 Luke 13:16 2 Corinthians 12:7
Ungodliness, Ungodly - 1: ἀσέβεια (Strong's #763 — Noun Feminine — asebeia — as-eb'-i-ah ) "impiety, ungodliness," is used of (a) general impiety, Romans 1:18 ; 11:26 ; 2 Timothy 2:16 ; Titus 2:12 ; (b) "ungodly" deeds, Jude 1:15 , RV, "works of ungodliness;" (c) of lusts or desires after Evil things, Jude 1:18
Rewards - At the same time the Lord will reward the doer of Evil with its fitting recompense
Sabinus, Bishop of Heraclea - Socrates shews how Sabinus tries to disparage the fathers of Nicaea in the face of the contrary evidence of Eusebius, and makes no mention whatever of Macedonius, lest he should have to describe his Evil deeds
Meekness (2) - But this gentle and peaceable disposition is not inconsistent with a burning indignation at the injustice and Evil conduct of men, when wider interests are concerned. When the interests of the Divine Kingdom are at stake, in the face of flagrant and defiant wrongdoing, the duty of the meek is not silence and self-repression, but indignant and active opposition to Evil. It will not requite Evil with Evil. According to the Russian moralist, who has preached with great power the Quaker doctrine of non-resistance to Evil, the old right of requital was abolished by Christ; not only should there be no private retaliation against wrong, but there should be no recourse to any legal tribunal when one has suffered injury or injustice. The law of non-resistance in Tolstoi’s view is absolute; when we are wronged, we should suffer meekly in the hope that through our meekness Evil will be overcome of good. When Jesus, in inculcating meekness and love to our enemies, said, ‘Resist not Evil’ (Matthew 5:39), the context shows that He was not laying down a law which should be rigidly interpreted according to the letter, but that He was requiring a new spirit—the spirit of forbearance and love in dealing with those who wrong us. Christ’s aim in requiring meekness of His followers was a moral aim—the furtherance of the Divine Kingdom, the lessening of the amount of Evil in the world—a result which the meek endurance of wrong often brings with it in the disarming of enmity and in the quenching of the fires of ill-will, whereas retaliation adds to the Evil and inflames the bitterness that already exists; but when it has become clear that forbearance and patience with a wrong-doer only confirm him in his Evil courses, Christian love not only does not forbid but actually requires, in the interest both of public righteousness and of the wrongdoer himself, recourse to a civil tribunal that requital may be given. So long as there is any reasonable hope that meek endurance of wrong will turn the wrongdoer to a better frame of mind, we should be willing to suffer injustice; but when that hope has proved itself vain, there is nothing inconsistent with the spirit of meekness and Christian love in securing that justice shall be done and Evil defeated by the procedure of civil law. God’s Kingdom on earth grows not by requiting Evil with Evil, but by overcoming Evil with good
Mithraism - Pluto, or Incarnate Evil, was also begotten of Infinite Time, but warred against Heaven with his army of darkness. These Evil spirits wandered over the world afflicting man, who roust worship the four simple elements, fire, air, earth, and water
Crown - Later, a seven-headed dragon appeared wearing a crown on each head (Matthew 12:3 ), but opposing all the Evil forces was the “Son of man” wearing “a golden crown” (Matthew 14:14 ). In each case the crown symbolized power, either good or Evil
Inquisition, the - The ordinary episcopal powers were unable to cope with the Evil, while the populace took the matter into their own hands and put many of the heretics to death. The remedy for these Evils on both sides was the establishment of a special tribunal, the Papal, or Roman Inquisition (1230, final form). In Spain the Evil was in large measure due to the great influence which the civilpower had in the administration of the Inquisition
Beriah - ("in Evil" or "a gift". A son of Ephraim, so-called "because it went Evil with Ephraim's house" at the time, the men of Gath "born in that land" (Goshen, or else the eastern part of Lower Egypt) having slain his sons in a raid on cattle (1 Chronicles 7:20-23)
Regeneration - That the worldwide subjection to the authority of Christ will not mean the entire banishment of Evil, is clear from Revelation 20:7,8 . Only in the new heavens and earth, "wherein dwelleth righteousness," will sin and Evil be entirely absent
Deliverance, Deliverer - Scripture also speaks to deliverance from sin ( Psalm 39:8 ; Psalm 79:9 ); the way of Evil (Proverbs 2:12 ); the power of Evil (Matthew 6:13 ; Galatians 1:4 ; Colossians 1:13 ); the body of death (Romans 7:24 ); the law (Romans 7:6 ); and the coming wrath of God (1 Thessalonians 1:10 )
Nebuchadnezzar - Babylon proved to be an arrogant nation, and God’s prophet saw all its pride and Evil embodied in its king (Isaiah 14:4-11). He was succeeded by his son Evil-merodach (Jeremiah 52:31)
Net - ...
Psalm 141:10 (b) These nets may be the wicked designs and Evil traps prepared by David's enemies to catch him. The case was reversed and they fell victims to their own Evil plans. We are to be diligent, vigilant and alert of these devices of the Devil
Habitation - Psalm 74:20 (a) This expression describes the dens of iniquity, both religious and irreligious, in which Evil people live their wicked lives. They set their thrones in these Evil churches. They promote cruelty, wickedness, sin and all the Evils that accompany idolatry and liquor
Excommunication - The necessity of putting away an Evil person is apparent; the presence of God, who is holy, demands it, and believers are called to holiness: "the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are. Matthew 18:18 ), to which the saints are called where it is needful to put away Evil from the assembly, but always with the hope that restoration may follow
Help - The Evil approached, and who can help it? 6. The Evil is done there is no help for it
Spot - Numbers 19:2 (c) By this type we understand the spotless character of our Lord JESUS CHRIST on whom there was no sin nor fault, and in Him no Evil of any kind. ...
Hebrews 9:14 (a) By this figure we understand that the Lord JESUS offered Himself to GOD, with no sin connected with His offering, no pride, no selfishness, no ulterior motives, no Evil of any kind
Three - ...
Sometimes it is a triad of good, and sometimes of Evil. ...
- the trinity of Evil is the devil, the antichrist and the false prophet. ...
- the trinity of wickedness is the world, the flesh and the devil
Libertines (2) - A religious sect which arose in the year 1525, whose principal tenets were, that the Deity was the sole operating cause in the mind of man, and the immediate author of all human actions; that, consequently, the distinctions of good and Evil, which had been established with regard to those actions, were false and groundless, and that men could not, properly speaking, commit sin; that religion consisted in the union of the spirit, or rational soul, with the Supreme Being; that all those who had attained this happy union, by sublime contemplation and elevation of mind, were then allowed to indulge, without exception or restraint, their appetites or passions; that all their actions and pursuits were then perfectly innocent; and that, after the death of the body, they were to be united to the Deity. To this odious class belonged one Gruet, who denied the divinity of the Christian religion, the immortality of the soul, the difference between moral good and Evil, and rejected with disdain the doctrines that are held most sacred among Christians; for which impieties he was at last brought before the civil tribunal in the year 1550, and condemned to death
Openly - The Apostle carries on his metaphor of the 'evil eye;' as a preventive of such mischief it was common to post up charms on the walls of houses, a glance at which was supposed to counteract any Evil influence to which a person may have been subjected
Relief - The removal, in whole or in part, of any Evil that afflicts the body of mind the removal or alleviation of pain, grief, want, care, anxiety, toil or distress, or of any thing oppressive or burdensome, by which some ease is obtained. That which mitigates or removes pain, grief or other Evil
Concupiscence - ” The Greeks used the term to mean excitement about something in a neutral sense and then in an Evil sense of wrongly valuing earthly things. Either sin brings death, or believers in Christ murder Evil lusts (Colossians 3:5 )
Jehoash - While the high priest lived, Jehoash favoured the worship of God and observed the law; but on his death he fell away into Evil courses, and the land was defiled with idolatry. These Evil deeds brought down on the land the judgement of God, and it was oppressed by the Syrian invaders
Hypocrisy - From the root idea of smoothness it came to be employed for flattery, and so for all kinds of Evil deception. They cease to hate Evil and take to planning it (Psalms 36:1-4). The classical passage for a hypocrisy that practises the ceremonies and knows none of the duties of religion is Isaiah 1, but nearly every prophet has occasion to speak against the Evil. ...
Then the Evil of hypocrisy is more than negative. Just because hypocrisy is thus an enemy in the camp poisoning the wells, our Lord deals with it openly, directly, negatively, by the method of denunciation, as with no other form of Evil. ...
The supreme Evil of hypocrisy, as the negation of the life of faith, appears still more clearly in what our Lord says about the eternal sin. Yet, from the context, it is apparent that the abiding Evil is not the act of unbelief, but the absence of all love of the truth, of which the unbelief is the evidence. Christ came that the thoughts of many hearts should be revealed (Luke 2:35), and those who had cherished Evil were as conspicuously displayed as those who had cherished good. Thus he showed himself of his father the devil, who from the beginning was a murderer as well as the father of lies. Here in John then we have juggling with truth, hypocrisies before God and the world and one’s own soul, set forth as the cardinal sin which relates us as certainly to the spirit of Evil as faith does to the spirit of good, and which works in hate, as surely as goodness works in love, and which leaves men to die in their sins, because it is hostile to all that could lead to penitence and pardon. Though unable to deny either the power or the beneficence of Christ’s work, being resolved not to accept the practical consequences of belief, they call light darkness and good Evil. Nothing, it is said, can be covered, and the hypocrite has power to do only one great Evil—to associate others in his spiritual destruction. On the other hand, to follow hypocrisy is to go the road that leads to the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost—the state of mind that has so juggled with good and Evil that good has no power over it, the sin which no change of dispensation, or perhaps nothing in eternity any more than in time, can modify. ...
In every form of Evil, as Martensen rightly affirms, hypocrisy is present in a partial form. Thus it is, more even than habit, the cumulative element in devotion to Evil. Long his difficulties seemed to him intellectual perplexity about the origin of Evil
Hypocrisy - From the root idea of smoothness it came to be employed for flattery, and so for all kinds of Evil deception. They cease to hate Evil and take to planning it (Psalms 36:1-4). The classical passage for a hypocrisy that practises the ceremonies and knows none of the duties of religion is Isaiah 1, but nearly every prophet has occasion to speak against the Evil. ...
Then the Evil of hypocrisy is more than negative. Just because hypocrisy is thus an enemy in the camp poisoning the wells, our Lord deals with it openly, directly, negatively, by the method of denunciation, as with no other form of Evil. ...
The supreme Evil of hypocrisy, as the negation of the life of faith, appears still more clearly in what our Lord says about the eternal sin. Yet, from the context, it is apparent that the abiding Evil is not the act of unbelief, but the absence of all love of the truth, of which the unbelief is the evidence. Christ came that the thoughts of many hearts should be revealed (Luke 2:35), and those who had cherished Evil were as conspicuously displayed as those who had cherished good. Thus he showed himself of his father the devil, who from the beginning was a murderer as well as the father of lies. Here in John then we have juggling with truth, hypocrisies before God and the world and one’s own soul, set forth as the cardinal sin which relates us as certainly to the spirit of Evil as faith does to the spirit of good, and which works in hate, as surely as goodness works in love, and which leaves men to die in their sins, because it is hostile to all that could lead to penitence and pardon. Though unable to deny either the power or the beneficence of Christ’s work, being resolved not to accept the practical consequences of belief, they call light darkness and good Evil. Nothing, it is said, can be covered, and the hypocrite has power to do only one great Evil—to associate others in his spiritual destruction. On the other hand, to follow hypocrisy is to go the road that leads to the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost—the state of mind that has so juggled with good and Evil that good has no power over it, the sin which no change of dispensation, or perhaps nothing in eternity any more than in time, can modify. ...
In every form of Evil, as Martensen rightly affirms, hypocrisy is present in a partial form. Thus it is, more even than habit, the cumulative element in devotion to Evil. Long his difficulties seemed to him intellectual perplexity about the origin of Evil
Separation - In opposition to prevailing ideas on the subject, Christ plainly indicated that the Kingdom of God, throughout the course of its earthly development, must contain conflicting elements of good and Evil, and gravely deprecated any premature attempt at separating them. But the Evil element referred to in the parables is not that which has always existed in the world, and must be expected to continue, but that which has entered the Kingdom in the course of, and as the result of, its own operations, which tend to gather within its pale spurious adherents as well as genuine (Matthew 13:47). , that the Evil element is in the world, the good element in the Kingdom, and the blending of the two merely contiguity or co-existence in space. It is hard to see why our Lord should have been at such pains to point out what must be perfectly obvious to everybody, that the world is Evil, and why He should recommend a tolerant attitude toward the Evil, instead of making it a reason for earnest evangelistic effort. Having regard to the imperfections that cleave to human nature while still in a state of probation, it is evidently His intention that lenity rather than severity should characterize the treatment of offenders, lest good and Evil be rashly included in one common condemnation, and the remedy prove so violent as to be worse than the disease (Matthew 13:29). ...
While the disciples are enjoined to preserve an attitude of patient endurance toward Evil within the Kingdom, Christ held out to them the prospect of a day of final sifting in which it would be completely eliminated (Matthew 13:30; Matthew Mat_13:48). The burning of the tares does not refer so much to the fate which ultimately overtakes Evildoers, as to the fact that they can no longer exert a depressing effect on the fortunes of the Kingdom
Hermogenes (1), a Teacher of Heretical Doctrine - ...
With regard to the doctrines of Hermogenes, the language of Hippolytus suggests that he denied the physical possibility of creation from nothing; but in the representation of Tertullian no stress is laid on the philosophic maxim, "Nihil ex nihilo," and the eternal existence of matter seems only assumed to account for the origin of Evil. The second is disproved by the existence of Evil, for if God made all things out of nothing unrestrained by any condition, His work would have been all good and perfect like Himself. It remained, therefore, that God must have formed the world out of previously existent matter, through the fault of which Evil was possible. With regard to the general argument, Tertullian shews that the hypothesis of the eternity of matter relieves none of the difficulties of reconciling the existence of Evil with the attributes of God. If God exercised lordship over matter, why did He not clear it of Evil before He employed it in the work of creation? Or why did He employ in His work that which He knew to be Evil? It would really, he says, be more honourable to God to make Him the free and voluntary author of Evil than to make him the slave of matter, compelled to use it in His work, though knowing it to be Evil. By this approach part of matter was reduced to order and became the κόσμος , but part remains unsubdued; and this, it is to be supposed, was in the theory of Hermogenes the source of Evil. " (Theodoret adds that Hermogenes taught that the devil and the demons would be resolved into hyle. Philaster, however, attributes to his heretics other doctrines which we have no reason to think were held by Hermogenes: that Evil proceeded sometimes from God, sometimes from matter; that there was no visible Paradise; that water-baptism was not to be used, seeing that souls had been formed from wind and fire, and that the Baptist had said that Christ should baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire; that angels, not Christ, had created men's souls; that this world was the only "infernum," and that the only resurrection is that of the human race occurring daily in the procreation of children
Devil - Diabolus, an Evil angel. Thus we say, indifferently, the devil, or Satan; only the latter has more the appearance of a proper name, as it is not attended with the article. That there are angels and spirits, good and bad, says an eminent writer; that at the head of these last, there is one more considerable and malignant than the rest, who, in the form, or under the name, of a serpent, was deeply, concerned in the fall of man, and whose head, in the language of prophecy, the Son of Man was one day to bruise; that this Evil spirit, though that prophecy be in part fulfilled, has not yet received his death's wound, but is still permitted, for ends to us unsearchable, and in ways which we cannot particularly explain, to have a certain degree of power in this world hostile to its virtue and happiness,—all this is so clear from Scripture, that no believer, unless he be previously "spoiled by philosophy and vain deceit," can possibly entertain a doubt of it. Certainly, among the numerous refinements of modern times, there is scarcely any thing more extraordinary than the attempt that has been made, and is still making, to persuade us that there really exists no such being in the world as the devil; and that when the inspired writers speak of such a being, all that they mean is, to personify the Evil principle! A bold effort unquestionably; and could its advocates succeed in persuading men into the universal belief of it, they would do more to promote his cause and interest in the world than he himself has been able to effect since the seduction of our first parents. In the old Testament, particularly in the first two chapters of Job, this Evil spirit is called Satan; and in the New Testament, he is spoken of under various titles, which are also descriptive of his power and malignity; as for example, he is called, "the prince of this world," John 12:31 ; "the prince of the power of the air," Ephesians 2:2 ; "the god of this world," 2 Corinthians 4:4 ; "the dragon, that old serpent, the devil," Revelation 20:2 ; "the wicked one,"...
1 John 5:19 . We are also taught that this grand adversary of God and man has a numerous band of fallen spirits under his control; and that both he and they are reserved under a sentence of condemnation unto the judgment of the great day, Judges 1:6 ; and that "everlasting fire," or perpetual torment, "is prepared for the devil and his angels," Matthew 25:41 . In these various passages of Scripture, and many others which might be added, the existence of the devil is expressly stated; but if, as our modern Sadducees affirm, nothing more is intended in them than a personification of the abstract quality of Evil, the Bible, and especially the New Testament, must be eminently calculated to mislead us in matters which intimately concern our eternal interests. If, in inferring from them the existence of Evil spirits in this world, we can be mistaken, it will not, be an easy matter to show what inference deduced from Scripture premises may safely be relied on. To the notion, that the Jews derived their opinions on this subject from the oriental philosophy, and that like the Persians they set up a rival god; it may be replied, that the Jewish notion of the devil had no resemblance to what the Persians first, and the Manicheans afterward, called the Evil principle; which they made in some sort coordinate with God, and the first source of all Evil, as the other is of good. For the devil, in the Jewish system, is a creature as much as any other being in the universe, and is liable to be controlled by omnipotence,—an attribute which they ascribed to God alone. The arguments from philosophy against the existence of Evil spirits are as frail as that which is pretended to be grounded upon criticism. If we see men sometimes so bad as to delight in tempting others to sin and ruin, there may exist a whole order of fallen beings who may have the same business and the same malignant pleasure; and if we see some men furiously bent upon destroying truth and piety, this is precisely what is ascribed to these Evil spirits. The establishment of the worship of devils so general in some form throughout a great part of the Heathen world, is at once a painful and a curious subject, and deserves a more careful investigation than it has received. In modern times, devil-worship is seen systematized in Ceylon, Burmah, and many parts of the East Indies; and an order of devil-priests exists, though contrary to the Budhist religion, against the temples of which it sets up rival altars. Ives, in his travels through Persia, gives the following curious account of devil-worship: "These people (the Sanjacks, a nation inhabiting the country about Mosul, the ancient Nineveh) once professed Christianity, then Mohammedanism, and last of all devilism. They say it is true that the devil has at present a quarrel with God; but the time will come when, the pride of his heart being subdued, he will make his submission to the Almighty; and, as the Deity cannot be implacable, the devil will receive a full pardon for all his transgressions, and both he, and all those who paid him attention during his disgrace, will be admitted into the blessed mansions. The person of the devil they look on as sacred; and when they affirm any thing solemnly, they do it by his name. " The worshippers of the devil mentioned by Ives were also found by Niebuhr in the same country, in a village between Bagdad and Mosul, called Abd-el-asis, on the great Zab, a river which empties itself into the Tigris. Some accuse them of worshipping the devil under the name of Tschellebi; that is, Lord. I have also been assured that the Dauasins do not worship the devil; but adore God alone as the Creator and Benefactor of all mankind. They say that it is just as improper for men to take a part in the dispute between God and a fallen angel, as for a peasant to ridicule and curse a servant of the pacha who has fallen into disgrace; that God did not require our assistance to punish Satan for his disobedience; it might happen that he might receive him into favour again; and then we must be ashamed before the judgment seat of God, if we had, uncalled for, abused one of his angels: it was therefore the best not to trouble one's self about the devil; but endeavour not to incur God's displeasure ourselves. When they offer eggs or butter to them for sale, they endeavour first to get the articles into their hands, and then dispute about the price, or for this or other reasons to abuse Satan with all their might; on which the Dauasin is often polite enough to leave every thing behind, rather than hear the devil abused
Heart - Every imagination of the thoughts of the heart is Evil continually. We read of an honest and good heart, and an Evil heart of unbelief, a willing heart, a heavy heart, sorrow of heart, a hard heart, a proud heart, a pure heart. ...
The heart of the sons of men is fully set in them to do Evil
Blasphemy - He had been casting out devils, and the Scribes and Pharisees, with their usaul malignity, ascribed those gracious acts to the agency of the Evil Spirit. They had charged Christ with having an Evil spirit, by whose influence he wrought miracles, and hence Jesus declared the sin, and shewed, at the same time, that it was totally unpardonable. Your sorrow and apprehension most decidedly manifest that you have not so sinned, neither can have committed such an Evil
Cerdo, Gnostic Teacher - He describes him as more than once coming to the church and making public confession, and so going on, now teaching his doctrine in secret, now again making public confession, now convicted in respect of his Evil teaching, and removed, or, as some think, voluntarily withdrawing himself, from the communion of the brethren (ἀφιστάμενος τῆς τῶν ἀδελφῶν συνοδίας ). Thus we learn that Cerdo introduced two first principles ( ἀρχαί ) and two gods, the one good, the other Evil, the latter the creator of the world. It is an important difference that to the good god is opposed in the account of Irenaeus a just one; in that of Hippolytus, an Evil one
Mouth Lips - The same idea underlies the demand that the mouths of Evil speakers be stopped (Titus 1:11, ἐπιστομίζειν; cf. 2 Thessalonians 2:8), or of the frog-vomiting mouths of the three Evil powers in the Apocalypse (Revelation 16:13), the latent psychology helps to explain the harshness of the metaphor. ‘The mouth as the organ of speech, the chief source of human influence, is frequently in the Apocalypse the instrument of good or Evil’ (H
Exorcism - The entrance of a bad spirit-a dumb, unclean, or Evil spirit-caused disease of body or disorder of mind. 3 He could compel a spirit to come out of a person or thing into which it had entered; with the result, if the spirit was an Evil one, that the baneful consequences of possession immediately ceased. -As the cause of disease was the incoming of an Evil spirit, so the cure of the disease consisted in its expulsion. David by music expelled the Evil spirit from Saul (1 Samuel 16:14-23), though, when the spirit came mightily, he failed (1 Samuel 19:9; Jos. His words and deeds show us the Evil spirits going out of a patient (Matthew 17:18, Mark 5:8, Luke 8:29, Mark 9:25-26); entering into lower animals (Matthew 8:32, Mark 5:13, Luke 8:33); wandering through waterless places (Matthew 12:43, Luke 11:24); cooperating with other spirits (Matthew 12:45, Luke 11:26); and re-entering the patients from whom they had been expelled (Matthew 12:45, Luke 11:26). In contrast to the exorcists of His time (Matthew 12:27, Luke 11:19), our Lord exhibited exceptional skill and unbroken success in the expulsion of Evil spirits. He healed ‘all who were tyrannized over by the devil’ (Acts 10:38). It is especially noteworthy that our Lord in expelling Evil spirits employed no outward means (except once, the spittle [8]); He simply commanded and it was done. Paul being applied to those afflicted, the Evil spirits came out of them (Acts 19:11 f. Over a man afflicted with an Evil spirit they pronounced this formula: ὁρκίζω ὑμᾶς τὸν Ἰησοῦν ὅν Παῦλος κηρύσσει. The effort proved more than futile, for the recitation of the formula, instead of bringing Jesus into such effective touch with the man that the Evil spirit had to yield possession to Him, roused the spirit to stir into activity that abnormal muscular strength often possessed by those mentally deranged (cf. The words which shed light on the struggle from the higher Christian standpoint are those in James 4:7 : ‘resist the devil, and he will flee from you’-words which were an exhortation to the Christians not to resort to exorcism, but to rely on the successful resistance which sprang from a strong exertion of their sanctified wills aided by the power of God. This is possibly to be accounted for by the fact that the work of these writers forced them to think more of evangelism and apologetic than of combating the Evils of the heathen world. The ordinary Christian practised it, Gregory Thaumaturgus even casting out devils by sending letters to the person possessed. Thompson, The Devils and Evil Spirits of Babylonia, 1903-04, vol
Vengeance (2) - It was the exorcizing of an Evil spirit, and the opening of the doors of the heart to a new spirit. It is true that there is much denunciation of Evil (e. Revenge is Evil. Love is a heaping of coals of fire on an enemy’s head (Romans 12:20), the kindling of a burning shame in his heart, the overcoming of Evil with good, the triumph of God. The moral order of the world will be vindicated by Him whose right alone it is to mete out vengeance to Evildoers, who alone has adequate knowledge and wisdom to do justice to sin. It would be the old Evil spirit of vengeance in a new form, a more subtle and therefore a worse form. It would be the conquest of ourselves by Evil, not of the Evil in others by good. But, on the other hand, the moral sense which God has implanted in us, and which He has strengthened by His revelation of Himself, could not rest satisfied unless it were assured that Evil shall not go unpunished, that unrepented wrong shall receive its due reward from an all-wise and, let us add, an all-loving God
Eve - 2:17: "but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and Evil") and weakening the statement about the consequences of disobedience (3:3: "or you will die"; Evil and to anticipate the eventual vanquishment of Evil. From the perspective of the New Testament the ultimate realization of that hope is to be found in the triumph of God and his kingdom over Evil and the Evil one (Luke 10:17-19 ; Romans 16:20 ; Hebrews 2:14 ; Revelation 12 )
Satan (2) - But notwithstanding such suggestions that an Evil spirit, a malicious accuser, is described (like the Satan, the accuser of the brethren, διάβολος, κατήγορος of the NT), there is no explicit indication that this is the case. Of a malignant enemy of God and His cause, a personal spirit of Evil called Satan, there is no express mention in the OT. Again, though in one passage in Chronicles (1 Chronicles 21:1) we read that Satan tempted David to number the people—a presumptuous offence for which the king was severely punished—the parallel passage (2 Samuel 24:1), much the older narrative, attributes David’s conduct to trial at the hands of God, not to the temptation of the Evil One. The complete revelation of such a being as the malignant author of Evil was reserved for the time when, with the advent of Christ’s Kingdom, the minds of God’s people were prepared, without risk of idolatry, or of the mischievous dualism of such a religion as that of Zoroaster, to recognize in the serpent of Eden and in the Satan who appeared as the adversary of Job and of Joshua, the great Adversary of God and man, whose power is to be feared and his temptations resolutely resisted, but from whose dark dominion the Son of God had come to deliver mankind. Jesus and His disciples distinctly assume the reality of Satan and his kingdom as a mighty power for Evil, opposed to the Kingdom of God in the world and in the hearts of men. They describe the Tempter as ὁ διάβολος, ‘the devil,’ using the recognized word for betrayer or malicious accuser. Luke concludes the narrative with the significant words, ‘When the devil had ended all the temptation, he departed from him for a season,’ as if to indicate that the conflict with Satan was renewed and continued throughout our Lord’s ministry. Matthew tells us that when the devil left Him, angels came and ministered unto Him. Thus the Synoptic Gospels distinctly describe the source of the temptation as the direct suggestions of a person, and that one who is variously called Satan and ‘the devil. ’...
Again, these same Gospels, as also the Acts of the Apostles, take notice of Christ’s works of healing, and especially of those wrought upon persons possessed with demons, as illustrating the nature of His mission, which was to heal ‘all that were oppressed of the devil’ (Acts 10:38). Then He proceeds to say, ‘But if I cast out devils by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you’ (Matthew 12:28, cf. Passing over such passages as those in the Sermon on the Mount, ‘Whatsoever is more than these cometh of Evil’ or ‘the Evil one’ (Matthew 5:37); ‘Deliver us from Evil’ or ‘the Evil one’ (Matthew 6:13), which have been explained, and even, as in the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , translated as referring to the personal Author of Evil, we find Jesus in His discourses and in warnings addressed to His disciples making distinct allusion to Satan as the great adversary whom they have cause to fear. In the parables of the Sower and the Tares, the Evil One, variously termed ‘the devil,’ ‘Satan,’ ‘the enemy,’ ‘the wicked one,’ is described as seeking to frustrate the work of Christ by catching away the good seed sown in the heart (Matthew 13:19, Mark 4:15, Luke 8:12); or by sowing tares among the wheat (Matthew 13:38-39), the tares denoting the children of ‘the wicked one’ as the enemy that sowed them is ‘the devil. ...
Once more, in Christ’s discourse on the Last Judgment, it is expressly stated that the everlasting punishment to which the unfaithful are condemned was ‘prepared for the devil and his angels’ (Matthew 25:41), a passage which well illustrates the manner in which, in the Synoptic Gospels, Jesus is consistently represented as alluding to Satan and his power and kingdom. Jesus directly attributes the opposition of His antagonists to the malice of the devil. So He says to the Jews, ‘Ye are of your father the devil, and the lusts of your father ye will do’ (John 8:44). The other portions of the NT confirm but do not materially add to the testimony of the Gospels on the subject of the personality and the power of the Evil One. James (James 4:7) merely counsels his readers to resist the devil, assuring them that he will flee from them; while in another passage (James 2:19) he speaks of ‘the demons’ (τὰ δαιμόνια), evidently meaning by the term the subordinate agents of Satanic power, as believing that there is one God—a belief which fills them with terror
Judaizers - Some of the Judaizers were men of Evil principles infected with the foul Gnostic heresies, but many of them were of good faith, who labored under the difficulty of divesting their minds of traditionalism
Mortal Sin - It tarnishes the soul, and causes remorse of conscience, an inclination to Evil, darkening of the intellect, weakening of the will
Reign - ...
Romans 5:17 (a) The word is used to describe that one who is a conqueror over passion, lust and all Evil things. ...
Romans 6:12 (a) By this figure we are admonished to let no Evils prevail in the life, so that they direct the life in wrong paths
Nadab - Jeroboam's son, who walked in his father's Evil way; reigned two years, 954-952 B
Apple - There is nothing to show that it was the "tree of the knowledge of good and Evil
Decide, Decision - , "unto a discerning of good and Evil" (translated "to discern"); in Romans 14:1 , "not to (doubtful) disputations" is more literally rendered in the margin "not for decisions (of doubts)
Sadducees - It is said also, that they rejected the Bible, except the Pentateuch; denied predestination; and taught, thet God had made man absolute master of all his actions, without assistance to good, or restraint from Evil
Davidists - He is likewise said to have denied the existence of angels good and Evil, and to have disbelieved the doctrine of a future judgment
Spinosism - Thus is the Deity made the sole agent as well as patient, in all Evil, both physical and moral
Breastplate - Breastplates were also strong symbols of Evil (Revelation 9:9 ,Revelation 9:9,9:17 )
Hymenaeus - These false teachers ‘made shipwreck concerning the faith’; their heresy consisted in denying the bodily resurrection, saying that the resurrection was already past apparently an early form of Gnosticism which, starting with the idea of matter being Evil, made the body an unessential part of our nature, to be discarded as soon as possible
Discover - We often discover our mistakes, when too late to prevent their Evil effects
Dispensation - The dealing of God to his creatures the distribution of good and Evil, natural or moral, in the divine government
Coal - "Heaping coals of fire on the head" symbolizes overcoming Evil with good
Enemies - Of the devil and the powers of Evil, in the parable of the Wheat and the Tares, Matthew 13:25; Matthew 13:39
Hireling - Ben Sira was acquainted with devoted hirelings: ‘Entreat not Evil thy servant that worketh, nor a hireling that giveth thee his life’ (Sirach 7:20)
Jehoahaz - He was an Evil-doer, 2 Kings 23:32, and referred to as a young lion by Ezekiel 19:3
Fly - ...
Ezekiel 13:20 (c) This may represent the wiles of Evil women who would and did lure men from GOD's path of righteousness
Cherub, Cherubim - In the Accadian language they were termed kirubu, and were thought to preserve the places from the entrance of Evil spirits
Coals - Pieces of charcoal in process of combustion were called ‘coals of fire’ (ἄνθρακες πυρός = גַּחֲלֵי אֵשׁ), and glowing coals heaped upon the head became a figure for the burning sense of shame which an enemy feels when he receives a return of good for the Evil he has done (Romans 12:20 || Proverbs 25:21-22)
Defend - To secure against attacks or Evil to fortify against danger or violence to set obstacles to the approach of any thing that can annoy
Angel - The fallen angels rebelled and became Evil angels
Elihu - The purport of Elihu's address is that God acts in grace and blessing to deliver man from Evil, and to chastise and break him down
Legalist - We may farther consider a legalist as one who has no proper conviction of the Evil of sin; who, although he pretends to abide by the law, yet has not a just idea of its spirituality and demands
Tempt, to; Temptation - Temptation to Evil, either by Satan, or by our own lusts
Default - ) A failing or failure; omission of that which ought to be done; neglect to do what duty or law requires; as, this Evil has happened through the governor's default
Despise - At the same time, man may “reject” Evil ( Demons - Devils, Demons. Although there is only one being known as the devil, the English version of the Scriptures often uses the words devil and devils, where it should read demon and demons. The words in the original Greek are different from the word used when the devil is referred to. They are Evil spirits plainly distinguished from the persons whom they possess, sometimes a number of them entering into a person. As frequent accounts are given, in the Old Testament and in the New, of the devil and of demons entering into persons, there is no reason to doubt that they do so now
Devils - Devils, Demons. Although there is only one being known as the devil, the English version of the Scriptures often uses the words devil and devils, where it should read demon and demons. The words in the original Greek are different from the word used when the devil is referred to. They are Evil spirits plainly distinguished from the persons whom they possess, sometimes a number of them entering into a person. As frequent accounts are given, in the Old Testament and in the New, of the devil and of demons entering into persons, there is no reason to doubt that they do so now
Epicureans - He made good and Evil depend on the increasing of pleasure and diminishing of pain, or the reverse; esteeming the pleasures and pains of the mind superior to those of the body, so that a happy life must be a virtuous life
Hurt, Hurtful - ...
B — 3: κακόω (Strong's #2559 — Verb — kakoo — kak-o'-o ) "to do Evil to anyone:" see HARM
Beetle - For nothing can be supposed more natural than to imagine a nation, addicted to polytheism, as the Egyptians were, in a country frequently suffering great mischief and scarcity from swarms of devouring insects, should, from a strange sense and fear of Evil to come, (the common principle of superstition and idolatry,) give sacred worship to the visible authors of these their sufferings, in hopes to render them more propitious for the future
Blasphemy Against the Holy Ghost - Matthew 12:31,32 Mark 3:28 Luke 12:10 This sin was committed by the Pharisees when they, in violation of their own convictions, willfully and maliciously ascribed the miracles of the Son of God and the work of the Holy Spirit to the Evil one
Sin, Mortal - It tarnishes the soul, and causes remorse of conscience, an inclination to Evil, darkening of the intellect, weakening of the will
Redemption - Deliverance from bondage, distress, or from liability to any Evil or forfeiture, either by money, labor or other means
Kind - God is kind to the unthankful, and to the Evil
Swine - The herd of swine destroyed by Evil spirits in the Sea of Gennesaret, Matthew 8:32 , are supposed to have been kept by Jews for sale to the Gentiles around them, in defiance of the law
Fulfilled - There are in the New Testament many instances of such an accomplishment, where the purposes of men were very different, and those who figured in the transaction did not dream of any thing but some Evil project of their own
Understanding - By understanding I mean that faculty whereby we are enabled to apprehend the objects of knowledge, generals or particulars, absent or present, and to judge of their truth or falsehood, good or Evil
Cup - Psalm 116:18 , "cup of salvation"); in the NT it is used most frequently of the sufferings of Christ, Matthew 20:22,23 ; 26:39 ; Mark 10:38,39 ; 14:36 ; Luke 22:42 ; John 18:11 ; also of the Evil deeds of Babylon, Revelation 17:4 ; 18:6 ; of Divine punishments to be inflicted, Revelation 14:10 ; 16:19
Enoch - Death is one of the Evil consequences of human sin, and the genealogical record of the generations from Adam to Noah is characterized by repetition of the word ‘death’ (Genesis 5:5; Genesis 5:8; Genesis 5:11; Genesis 5:14; Genesis 5:17; Genesis 5:20)
Recompence, Recompense - of Psalm 116:12 ); elsewhere it is used of "recompense," "whether between men (but in that case only of good, not of Evil, see No. the corresponding noun in Luke 14:12 ; or between God and Evil-doers, Romans 12:19 , RV (AV, "repay"); Hebrews 10:30 , cp
Raiment - ...
Zechariah 3:4 (a) The soiled garments represent the Evil and wicked life of the ordinary person. ...
Revelation 3:5 (b) This is typical of the beautiful, sinless character of those who are saved by grace, walk with GOD, and are overcomers of sin and Evil
Marcionites - He laid down two principles, the one good, the other Evil; between these he imagined an intermediate kind of Deity, of a mixed nature, who was the Creator of this inferior world, and the god and legislator of the Jewish nation: the other nations who worshipped a variety of gods, were supposed to be under the empire of the Evil principle
Sleep (And Forms) - ...
Matthew 13:25 (b) Generally speaking, men are not alert to the dangers of the invasion of their rights by the Devil. Satan very cleverly gets into schools with Evil doctrines, because the authorities are not on the alert to catch destructive teachings. Children learn Evil habits and wicked ways because the parents are not alert and watchful over that which their children learn
Ahab - He has the miserable character given him of doing "evil in the sight of the Lord above all that were before him. " He not only maintained the worship of the calves set up by Jeroboam, but, having married Jezebel, daughter of Eth-baal, king of the Zidonians, he yielded himself to her Evil influence, and introduced the worship of Baal into Samaria
Justinus - The second principle is called Elohim, the Father of the creation, deficient in knowledge, but not represented as subject to Evil passion. The principal part is played by the third paternal angel, Baruch, the chief minister of good, and the third maternal, Naas, or the serpent, the chief author of Evil
Draw-Net - It points, like that parable, to the intermixture of good and Evil in the Church in its present stage, and it is implicit in the figure used that no absolute separation is possible or to be thought of now. A time of deliberate (καθίσαντες) and final severance is announced as a warning to the Evil, as an assurance to the good. But the separation of the good and the Evil at the end of the world will be effected not by the men through whom the Kingdom was extended, but by the angels, to whom this ministry is always assigned (Matthew 13:41; Matthew 24:31; Matthew 25:31, Revelation 14:18-19). Augustine showed that such attempted separation was forbidden by our Lord, apart from the case of open Evildoers, and that He had not contemplated a community in its present stage free from admixture of Evil
Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs - Much weight cannot be laid on the (not frequent) occurrence of δαίμων and δαιμόνιον in the LXX Septuagint, as they stand for varying words in the original; but there are a number of Hebrew expressions which must be connected with demons, it all events as far as the popular imagination was concerned; these are: רוּחַ רָעָה ‘evil spirit, Judges 9:23, 1 Samuel 16:14; רוּחַ עָוְעָים ‘spirit of perverseness,’ Isaiah 19:14 : שִׁדים ‘demons’, Deuteronomy 32:17, Psalms 106:37; שְׂעירִים ‘satyrs,’ Leviticus 17:7, Isaiah 13:21; Isaiah 34:14; קָמָב ‘destruction,’ conceived of as due to demoniac power, see the whole verse, Psalms 91:6; עֳליקָה ‘female blood-sucker,’ Proverbs 30:15; לִילִית ‘night-hag,’ Isaiah 34:13-14; עֳוָאוִל, Leviticus 16:8 ff. This last instance clearly shows how firmly embedded in popular imagination was this belief in Evil powers of the solitude. According to OT conceptions, the Evil spirits are not the subjects of some supreme ruler; in the earlier books they are represented as fulfilling the commands of Jehovah in doing harm to men, but later on they seem to enjoy complete independence, though even here the conceptions are not consistent (cf. ’** [30] The head of them is Satan (הַשָטַן = ‘the adversary’); it is his aim to mislead men into Evil, and then to accuse them before God, hence the further name מקטנר (κατήγορος) = ‘accuser’ (cf. šidu = ‘good, or Evil genius. Mark 16:18), and change them into animals; they could also endow men with the faculty of exercising the ‘evil eye’ (cf. Sirach 14:8; Sirach 14:10, Tobit 4:16), by means of which the good fortune of others could be turned to Evil; there is a special formula for use against the ‘evil eye. § World - The ‘world’ is to be judged in righteousness ( Psalms 9:8 ; Psalms 96:13 ; Psalms 98:9 ), and punished for its Evil ( 1 Corinthians 5:12-135 ). This world is Evil ( Galatians 1:4 ), its wisdom is naught ( John 5:4-5 ; 1 Corinthians 2:6 ; 1 Corinthians 3:18 ), its rulers crucified the Lord of glory ( 1 Corinthians 2:8 ); finally, it is the ‘god of this world’ that has blinded the minds of the unhelieving ( 2 Corinthians 4:4 ). Paul condemns, then, is hardly the world as essentially Evil, but the world-spirit which leads to Evil by its neglect of the unseen and eternal, and by its blindness to the true scale of values revealed in the gospel of Christ crucified. It is true that Jesus is the Light of the world ( John 1:9 ; John 3:19 ; John 8:12 ; John 9:5 ; John 12:46 ), its Life-giver ( John 6:33 ; John 6:51 ), its Saviour ( John 3:17 , John 4:42 , John 12:47 ); yet ‘the world knew him not’ ( John 1:10 ), and