What does Euphrates mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
פְּרָֽת the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 5
פְּרָ֑ת the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 3
פְּרָ֔תָה the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 3
פְּרָ֔ת the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 2
פְּרָ֗ת the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 2
εὐφράτην a large 1
εὐφράτῃ a large 1
(פְּרָֽת‪‬) the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 1
פְרָֽת the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 1
בִּפְרָ֑ת the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 1
פְּרָ֖ת the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf. 1

Definitions Related to Euphrates

H6578


   1 the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf.
   Additional Information: Euphrates = “fruitfulness”.
   

G2166


   1 a large, famous river which rises in the mountains of Armenia Major, flows through Assyria, Syria, Mesopotamia and the city of Babylon, and empties into the Gulf of Persia.
   Additional Information: Euphrates = “the good and abounding river”.
   

Frequency of Euphrates (original languages)

Frequency of Euphrates (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Euphrates
Hebrew, Perath; Assyrian, Purat; Persian cuneiform, Ufratush, whence Greek Euphrates, meaning "sweet water." The Assyrian name means "the stream," or "the great stream." It is generally called in the Bible simply "the river" (Exodus 23:31 ), or "the great river" (Deuteronomy 1:7 ). The Euphrates is first mentioned in Genesis 2:14 as one of the rivers of Paradise. It is next mentioned in connection with the covenant which God entered into with Abraham (15:18), when he promised to his descendants the land from the river of Egypt to the river Euphrates (Compare Deuteronomy 11:24 ; Joshua 1:4 ), a covenant promise afterwards fulfilled in the extended conquests of David (2 Samuel 8:2-14 ; 1 Chronicles 18:3 ; 1 Kings 4:24 ). It was then the boundary of the kingdom to the north-east. In the ancient history of Assyria, and Babylon, and Egypt many events are recorded in which mention is made of the "great river." Just as the Nile represented in prophecy the power of Egypt, so the Euphrates represented the Assyrian power (Isaiah 8:7 ; Jeremiah 2:18 ).
It is by far the largest and most important of all the rivers of Western Asia. From its source in the Armenian mountains to the Persian Gulf, into which it empties itself, it has a course of about 1,700 miles. It has two sources, (1) the Frat or Kara-su (i.e., "the black river"), which rises 25 miles north-east of Erzeroum; and (2) the Muradchai (i.e., "the river of desire"), which rises near Ararat, on the northern slope of Ala-tagh. At Kebban Maden, 400 miles from the source of the former, and 270 from that of the latter, they meet and form the majestic stream, which is at length joined by the Tigris at Koornah, after which it is called Shat-el-Arab, which runs in a deep and broad stream for above 140 miles to the sea. It is estimated that the alluvium brought down by these rivers encroaches on the sea at the rate of about one mile in thirty years.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Euphrates And Tigris Rivers
(eeu fray' teess uhnd ti grihss) Two of the greatest rivers of Western Asia. They originate in the Armenian mountains and unite about ninety miles from the Persian Gulf to form what is now called the Shatt-al-Arab which flows into the gulf. In ancient times the Tigris flowed through its own mouth into the gulf. The Euphrates and Tigris were included among the four rivers of Paradise (Genesis 2:14 ). The Euphrates was known as “the great river” (Genesis 15:18 ; Joshua 1:4 ) or “the river” (Numbers 22:5 ) to the Hebrews. It formed the northern boundary of the land promised by Yahweh to Israel (Genesis 15:18 ; Deuteronomy 1:7 ). The Euphrates is mentioned in the Book of Revelation as the place where angels were bound (Deuteronomy 9:14 ) and where the sixth vial was poured out (Deuteronomy 16:12 ).
The Euphrates is the longest, largest, and most important river in Western Asia. Many significant cities were located on the Euphrates, Babylon being the most important. Others located on its banks were Mari and Carchemish, the latter being the site of a famous battle between Babylon and Egypt in 605 B.C. (Jeremiah 46:2 ).
The Tigris is not as prominent in the Bible as is the Euphrates, but it is the site of the major vision of the prophet Daniel (Daniel 10:4 ). Like the Euphrates, some significant cities were located on its banks. Nineveh, the ancient capital of the Assyrian Empire, was located on its east bank. Farther south was the site of Asshur, religious center and original capital of Assyria. See Babylon ; Nineve h.
M. Stephen Davis
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Euphrates
Εu , Sanskrit su , denotes "good"; the second syllable denotes "abundant." Hebrew Ρrath , now Frat. Eden, wherein it is mentioned as one of the four, rivers. (See EDEN.) The bound to which God promised the land given to Abraham's seed should extend. Called "the river," "the great river," as being the largest with which Israel was acquainted, in contrast to the soon drying up torrents of Palestine (Isaiah 8:7; Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7). The largest and longest of the rivers of western Asia. It has two sources in the Armenian mountains, one at Domli, 25 miles N.E. of Erzeroum, the other N. of the mountain range Ala Tagh, not far from Ararat; the two branches meet at Kebban Maden, the one having run 400 the other 270 miles. The united river runs S.W. and S. through the Taurus and Antitaurus ranges toward the Mediterranean; but the ranges N. of Lebanon preventing its reaching that sea, it turns S.E. 1,000 miles to the Persian gulf. N. of Sumeisat (Samosata) the stream runs in a narrow valley between mountains.
From Sumeisat to Hit it runs amidst a more open but hilly country. From Hit downwards it runs through a low, flat, alluvial plain. The whole course is 1,750 miles, 650 more than the Tigris and only 200 short of the Indus; for 1,200 it is navigable for boats and small steamers. Its greatest width is 700 or 800 miles from the mouth, namely, 400 yards across, from its junction with the Khabour (Chebar) at Carchemish, to Werai, a village. Below the Khabour it has no tributaries, and so its depth and width decrease. At Babylon its width has decreased to 200 yards, with a depth of 15 ft. Farther down 120 wide, 12 deep. Moreover, its water here and lower down is much employed in irrigation; and it has a tendency to expend itself in vast marshes. But 40 miles below Lamlum it increases to 200 yards wide, and when joined by the Tigris it is half a mile wide The yearly inundation in May is clue to the melting of the snows in the Armenian mountains.
Nebuchadnezzar (Abyden., Fr. 8) controlled the inundation by turning the water through sluices into channels for distribution over the whole country. Boats of wicker work, coated with bitumen and covered with skins, are still to be seen on the river, as more than two thousand years ago in Herodotus' time. By this river the East and West carried on mutual commerce during the successive periods of Babylonian and Persian rule. As Babylon represents mystically the apostate church, so the waters of Euphrates, "where the whore sitteth" (in impious parody of Jehovah who "sitteth upon the flood"), represent the "peoples, multitudes, nations, and tongues," which were her main support (Revelation 17:15-16). The drying up of Babylon's waters answers to the ten kings' stripping, eating, and burning the whore, which is now being enacted in many European countries (Revelation 16:12).
"The kings of the Euphrates" (compare Revelation 1:6) are the saints of Israel and the Gentiles accompanying the king of Israel in "glory returning from the way of the East" (Ezekiel 43:2; Matthew 24:27). The obstacles which stood in the way of Israel and her king returning, namely, the apostate church (both Rome and the Greek apostasy) and her multitudinous peoples, shall be dried up, her resources being drained off, just as Cyrus marched into Babylon through the dry channel of the Euphrates.
The promise to Abraham that his seed's inheritance should reach the Euphrates (Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; Joshua 1:4) received a very partial fulfillment in Reuben's pastoral possessions (1 Chronicles 5:9-10) (the Hagarites here encountered them, the inscriptions confirming scripture as to their appearance upon the middle Euphrates in the later empire); a fuller accomplishment under David and Solomon, when an annual tribute was paid from subject petty kingdoms in that quarter, as Hadadezer king of Zobah, etc. (1 Chronicles 18:3; 2 Samuel 8:3-8; 1 Kings 4:21; 2 Chronicles 9:26.) The full accomplishment awaits Messiah's coming again. (See CANAAN.) The Euphrates was the boundary between Assyria and the Hittite country, after Solomon's times, according to inscriptions. But Assyria at last drove back the Hittites from the right bank. (See CARCHEMISH.)
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Euphrates
EUPHRATES , one of the rivers of Eden ( Genesis 2:14 ), derives its name from the Assyr. [1] Purat , which is itself taken from the Sumerian Pura , ‘water,’ or Pura-nun , ‘the great water.’ Purat became Ufrâtu in Persian, where the prosthetic vowel was supposed by the Greeks to be the word u , ‘good.’ In the OT the Euphrates is generally known as ‘ the river .’ It rises in the Armenian mountains from two sources, the northern branch being called the Frat or Kara-su, and the southern and larger branch the Murad-su (the Arsanias of ancient geography). The present length of the river is 1780 miles, but in ancient times it fell into the sea many miles to the north of its existing outlet, and through a separate mouth from that of the Tigris. The salt marshes through which it passed before entering the sea were called Marratu ( Merathaim in Jeremiah 50:21 ), where the Aramæan Kalda or Chaldæans lived. The alluvial plain between the Euphrates and the Tigris constituted Babylonia, the water of the annual inundation (which took place in May, and was caused by the melting of the snows in Armenia) being regulated by means of canals and barrages. The Hittite city of Carchemish stood at the point where the Euphrates touched Northern Syria, and commanded one of the chief fords over the river; south of it came the Belikh and Khabur, the last affluents of the Euphrates. The promise made to the Israelites that their territory should extend to ‘the great river’ ( Genesis 15:18 etc.) was fulfilled through the conquests of David ( 2Sa 8:3 ; 2 Samuel 10:16-19 , 1 Kings 4:24 ).
A. H. Sayce.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Euphrates
The Euphrates was a famous river of Mesopotamia. Its chief interest for us in the Apostolic Age is its adoption as a term in the allegorical apparatus of Christian polemic and apologetic. In Revelation 9:14 the sixth angel is ordered to release the four angels who were bound at the river Euphrates, and in Revelation 16:12 the sixth angel dries up the Euphrates for the coming of the kings of the East. We have here an allusion to the Nero-legend which told that Nero had fled to the East, to the Medes and Persians, beyond the river Euphrates, and would again cross the river accompanied by myriads of soldiers and make war on Rome (Sib. Or. iv. 119-122, 137-139). In accordance with this legend, a second pseudo-Nero appeared on the Euphrates under Titus in a.d. 80 (cf. R. H. Charles, The Ascension, of Isaiah, 1900, pp. lviii-lxi). In both the Apocalyptic verses, however, we have more than an allusion to a Parthian incursion. In the allegorical language of the period, as Egypt was the type of bodily life, so was Mesopotamia of spiritual (cf. Hippol. Ref. v. 3: ‘Mesopotamia is the current of the great ocean flowing from the midst of the Perfect Man’). On the other hand, by another symbol the Euphrates stood for the power of the earthly kingdom and the waves of persecutors (e.g. in Bede, Explan. Apoc. ii. 9 [1]), or for the human as opposing the Divine.
Thus, interpreting the wind of the apostolic period by its legacy to subsequent ages, Rupertus understands the waters of Euphrates in the Apocalypse as the foolish reasonings of men dried up by the judgment of God in order that the saints of Him who is the ‘East’ may destroy ‘the deceits of the magi, the vain inventions of philosophers and the fictions of the poets’ (Com. in. Apoc. ix. 16 [2]). Also, as the Euphrates was the boundary of Paradise and of the realm of Solomon, it came to signify the reason of man as the boundary to be passed by the spiritual man before he could see the light of the eternal day. In this way the evil condition of Euphrates passed easily into the conception of it as the water of baptism. Philo has yet another interpretation (de Somn. ii. 255). Referring to Genesis 15:18 he says that the river of Egypt represents the body and the river Euphrates the soul, and that the spiritual man’s jurisdiction extends from the world of change and destruction to the world of interruption, the two terms ‘river of Egypt’ and ‘river Euphrates’ being thus opposed as blame and praise are opposed, so that man may choose the one and eschew the other.
W. F. Cobb.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Euphrates
This river is first mentioned in connection with the garden of Eden, but cannot be thereby traced. Genesis 2:14 . It was the N.E. boundary of the land promised to Abraham, as the river of Egypt was the S.W. Genesis 15:18 . It is called the great river, the river Euphrates, Deuteronomy 1:7 , and at times is merely called 'the river.' Genesis 31:21 . David was able to possess the land to the Euphrates, 2 Samuel 8:3 , which also Solomon maintained. 1 Kings 4:24 .
In one of Jeremiah's typical actions he hid his girdle by the Euphrates then found it spoiled and useless; so should the pride of Judah and Jerusalem be marred (Jeremiah 13:4-11 ) — a figure of the carrying away to Babylon of those who should have cleaved to the Lord for His praise, as a girdle to the loins of a man. The prophecy against Babylon was written by Jeremiah in a book, and given to Seraiah, who was to read the same when he arrived at Babylon, then tie a stone to the book and cast it into the Euphrates, and. say "Thus shall Babylon sink." Jeremiah 51:59-64 . The book was thus placed in the river in which the Babylonians trusted for safety, but which was the channel of their destruction. Isaiah 45:1 .
The Euphrates is mentioned in the Revelation as the place where four angels are or will be bound, who will be loosed at the sixth trumpet, letting loose the Eastern forms of Satanic wickedness hitherto held in check. Revelation 9:14 . Viewing Palestine as the centre of God's dealings with the earth, the Euphrates was the barrier between East and West. The sixth vial will be poured upon the great river Euphrates, that it may be dried up and a way be made for the kings from the East to come unto the great battle of Armageddon. Revelation 16:12 .
There are two sources of the river; one in the Armenian mountains, about 40 N, 41 30' E, and the other in the mountain range of Ararat, about 39 30' N, 43 E. When the streams join they run nearly south and then south east for 1000 miles. After being joined by the Tigris it falls into the Persian Gulf. It is generally supposed that the river has not always in all parts run in the same channel; that after overflowing its banks it has not always returned to its former course, though it ran into it again farther south. A glance at a map will show that the possessions of David could have embraced but a very small part of the Euphrates, about Lat. 35 to 36 N. The great Syrian desert of Arabia separated the southern part of the river from Palestine.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Euphrates
Euphrates (eû-frâ'tçz), the abounding. A noted river, the largest in western Asia; rises in Armenia in two sources. Its whole length is 1780 miles. It is navigable for large ships to Bassora, 70 miles above its mouth; a steamer drawing four feet of water has ascended to Bir, 1197 miles. It flows in a broad, deep current, filled to the level of its banks, and at Babylon is considerably less than a mile in width. For the last 800 miles of its course it does not receive a single tributary. The Tigris flows in a narrower channel, with deeper banks and a less rapid current. The country between the two rivers slopes toward the Tigris, and thus greatly favors the draining off of the superfluous waters of the Euphrates. In Scripture the Euphrates is named as one of the rivers of Eden, Genesis 2:14; called "the great river," Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; noted as the eastern boundary of the Promised Land, Deuteronomy 11:24; Joshua 1:4; 1 Chronicles 5:9; and of David's conquests, 2 Samuel 8:3; 1 Chronicles 18:3; of those of Babylon from Egypt, 2 Kings 24:7; is referred to in prophecy, Jeremiah 13:4-7; Jeremiah 46:2-10; Jeremiah 51:63; and in Revelation 9:14; Revelation 16:12. In upward of 26 other passages it is spoken of as "the river." By this stream the captive Jews wept. Psalms 137:1. It is now called the Frat by the natives.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Euphrates
A famous river of Asia, which has its source in the mountains of America, runs along the frontiers of Cappadocia, Syria, Arabia Deserta, Chaldea, and Mesopotamia, and falls into the Persian Gulf. According to the recent researches of Chesney, it receives the Tigris at a place called Shat-el-Arab. Five miles below the junction of these two mighty rivers, the Shat-el-Arab receives from the northeast the Kerkhah, which has a course of upwards of five hundred miles. Sixty-two miles below the mouth of the Kerkhah, another large river, the Kuran, comes in from the east. At present it enters the Shat-el-Arab forty miles above its mouth; but formerly it flowed channel, east of the main stream. According to that view which places the Garden of Eden near the junction of the Tigris with the Euphrates, these might be regarded as the four rivers of Paradise. We might well suppose that the Kuran, in very ancient times, as now, entered the Shat-el-Arab; and perhaps still farther from its mouth. Scripture often calls the Euphrates simply "the river," Exodus 23:31 Isaiah 7:20 8:7 Jeremiah 2:18 ; or "the great river," and assigns it for the eastern boundary of that land which God promised to the Hebrews, Deuteronomy 1:7 Joshua 1:4 . It overflows in summer like the Nile, when the snow on the mountains of Armenia, the nearest springs of both are but a few miles apart.
The Euphrates is a river of consequence in Scripture geography, being the utmost limit, east, of the territory of the Israelites. It was indeed only occasionally that the dominion of the Hebrews extended so far; but it would appear that even Egypt, under Pharaoh Necho, made conquests to the western bank of the Euphrates. The river is about eighteen hundred miles long. Its general direction is southeast; but in a part of its course it runs westerly, and approaches the Mediterranean near Cilicia. It is accompanied in its general course by the Tigris. There are many towns on its banks, which are in general rather level than mountainous. The river does not appear to be of very great breadth, varying, however, from sixty to six hundred yards. Its current, after reaching the plains of Mesopotamia, is somewhat sluggish, and in this part of its course many canals, etc., were dug, to prevent injury and secure benefit from the yearly overflows. At Seleucia, and Hilleh the ancient Babylon, it approaches near the Tigris, and some of its waters are drawn off by canals to the latter river. Again, however, they diverge, and only unite in the same channel about one hundred and twenty miles from the Persian Gulf. It is not well adapted for navigation, yet light vessels go up about one thousand miles, and the modern steam-boat which now ascends from the ocean, meets the same kind of goat-skin floats on which produce was rafted down the river thousands of years ago.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Euphrates
That makes fruitful
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Euphrates
Among the rivers of west Asia, the Euphrates was the largest. It was often referred to as ‘the great river’ or simply ‘the River’ (Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; Ezra 8:36; Nehemiah 2:9; Nehemiah 3:7; Isaiah 7:20). The territory of the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers was known as Mesopotamia, and formed part of the ancient land of Babylon. This was the region where the garden of Eden was located (Genesis 2:10-14). The ancient city of Ur was on the Euphrates (Genesis 11:28; see UR).
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Sentence search

Tiph'Sah - (ford ) is mentioned in ( 1 Kings 4:24 ) as the limit of Solomon's empire toward the Euphrates and in (2 Kings 15:16 ) it is said to have been attacked by Menahemi. It was known to the Greeks and Romans under the name of Thapsacus, and was the point where it was usual to cross the Euphrates. Thapsacus has been generally placed at the modern Deir ; but the Euphrates expedition proved that there is no ford at Deir , and that the only ford in this part of the course of the Euphrates is at Suriyeh , 45 miles below Balis, and 165 above Deir
Tigris River - See Euphrates River; Rivers
Erech - A recent explorer finds its probable site in the mounds of primeval ruins now called Irka or Irak, a few miles east of the Euphrates, midway between Babylon and the junction of the Euphrates and Tigris
Euphrates And Tigris Rivers - The Euphrates and Tigris were included among the four rivers of Paradise (Genesis 2:14 ). The Euphrates was known as “the great river” (Genesis 15:18 ; Joshua 1:4 ) or “the river” (Numbers 22:5 ) to the Hebrews. The Euphrates is mentioned in the Book of Revelation as the place where angels were bound (Deuteronomy 9:14 ) and where the sixth vial was poured out (Deuteronomy 16:12 ). ...
The Euphrates is the longest, largest, and most important river in Western Asia. Many significant cities were located on the Euphrates, Babylon being the most important. ...
The Tigris is not as prominent in the Bible as is the Euphrates, but it is the site of the major vision of the prophet Daniel (Daniel 10:4 ). Like the Euphrates, some significant cities were located on its banks
Carchemish - Fortress of Chemosh, a city on the west bank of the Euphrates (Jeremiah 46:2 ; 2 Chronicles 35:20 ), not, as was once supposed, the Circesium at the confluence of the Chebar and the Euphrates, but a city considerably higher up the river, and commanding the ordinary passage of the Euphrates; probably identical with Hierapolis
Euphrates - The Euphrates was a famous river of Mesopotamia. In Revelation 9:14 the sixth angel is ordered to release the four angels who were bound at the river Euphrates, and in Revelation 16:12 the sixth angel dries up the Euphrates for the coming of the kings of the East. We have here an allusion to the Nero-legend which told that Nero had fled to the East, to the Medes and Persians, beyond the river Euphrates, and would again cross the river accompanied by myriads of soldiers and make war on Rome (Sib. In accordance with this legend, a second pseudo-Nero appeared on the Euphrates under Titus in a. On the other hand, by another symbol the Euphrates stood for the power of the earthly kingdom and the waves of persecutors (e. ...
Thus, interpreting the wind of the apostolic period by its legacy to subsequent ages, Rupertus understands the waters of Euphrates in the Apocalypse as the foolish reasonings of men dried up by the judgment of God in order that the saints of Him who is the ‘East’ may destroy ‘the deceits of the magi, the vain inventions of philosophers and the fictions of the poets’ (Com. Also, as the Euphrates was the boundary of Paradise and of the realm of Solomon, it came to signify the reason of man as the boundary to be passed by the spiritual man before he could see the light of the eternal day. In this way the evil condition of Euphrates passed easily into the conception of it as the water of baptism. Referring to Genesis 15:18 he says that the river of Egypt represents the body and the river Euphrates the soul, and that the spiritual man’s jurisdiction extends from the world of change and destruction to the world of interruption, the two terms ‘river of Egypt’ and ‘river Euphrates’ being thus opposed as blame and praise are opposed, so that man may choose the one and eschew the other
Aram-Zobah - (Psalm 60 , title), probably the region between the Euphrates and the Orontes
Garden of Eden - (Genesis 2) Home of Adam and Eve, located by tradition in the valley of the Euphrates
Eden, Garden of - (Genesis 2) Home of Adam and Eve, located by tradition in the valley of the Euphrates
Terrestrial Paradise - (Genesis 2) Home of Adam and Eve, located by tradition in the valley of the Euphrates
Carchemish - ) from Damascus to the Euphrates at Bir; 200 miles higher up on the Euphrates than the classical Circesium. Important in position as commanding a passage of the Euphrates, from whence its possession was a matter of contest between Babylon and Egypt (2 Chronicles 35:20)
Tiphsah - The boundary of Solomon's dominions on the Euphrates. This is doubtless the city known to the Greeks and Romans as Thapsacus, situated at the ford of the Euphrates, which well agrees with the signification of Tiphsah, 'passing over. A traveller in the winter of 1841-2 found but twenty inches of water in the Euphrates at this spot
Ahava - In all probability this was one of the streams of Mesopotamia which flowed into the Euphrates somewhere in the north-west of Babylonia. It has, however, been supposed to be the name of a place (Ezra 8:15 ) now called Hit, on the Euphrates, east of Damascus
Hebrew - Hebrew (hç'brew), a name given to Abram by the Canaanites, Genesis 14:13, because he had crossed the Euphrates. The name some derive from ʾêber, "beyond, on the other side," Abraham and his posterity being called Hebrews in order to express a distinction between the races east and west of the Euphrates
Rivers of Babylon - , the Tigris, Euphrates, Chalonas, the Ulai, and the numerous canals
Helam - of Euphrates, where Hadarezer and the Syrians were defeated by David (2 Samuel 10:16-17)
Rezeph - Solid; a stone, (2 Kings 19:12 ; Isaiah 37:12 ), a fortress near Haran, probably on the west of the Euphrates, conquered by Sennacherib
Euphrates - It is called the great river, the river Euphrates, Deuteronomy 1:7 , and at times is merely called 'the river. David was able to possess the land to the Euphrates, 2 Samuel 8:3 , which also Solomon maintained. ...
In one of Jeremiah's typical actions he hid his girdle by the Euphrates then found it spoiled and useless; so should the pride of Judah and Jerusalem be marred (Jeremiah 13:4-11 ) — a figure of the carrying away to Babylon of those who should have cleaved to the Lord for His praise, as a girdle to the loins of a man. The prophecy against Babylon was written by Jeremiah in a book, and given to Seraiah, who was to read the same when he arrived at Babylon, then tie a stone to the book and cast it into the Euphrates, and. ...
The Euphrates is mentioned in the Revelation as the place where four angels are or will be bound, who will be loosed at the sixth trumpet, letting loose the Eastern forms of Satanic wickedness hitherto held in check. Viewing Palestine as the centre of God's dealings with the earth, the Euphrates was the barrier between East and West. The sixth vial will be poured upon the great river Euphrates, that it may be dried up and a way be made for the kings from the East to come unto the great battle of Armageddon. A glance at a map will show that the possessions of David could have embraced but a very small part of the Euphrates, about Lat
Tatnai - the Jewish side, of the Euphrates (Ezra 3:5-6; Ezra 6:6; Ezra 6:13)
Helam - Place situate between the Jordan and the Euphrates, where David defeated the Syrians under Hadarezer
Hena - Supposed to have been a city of Mesopotamia afterwards called Ana, at a ford of the Euphrates, 2 Kings 18:34 ; 19:13 ; Isaiah 37:13
pe'Thor - (soothsayer ), a town of Mesopotamia, where Balaam resided, and situated "upon the river," possibly the Euphrates
Pethor - of Assyria regarding a certain city which he calls Pitru , that it lay on the river Sâgûr (modern Sâjûr ), near its junction with the Euphrates. Thus Pethor would seem to have lain a little south of Carchemish, on the west of the Euphrates
Tiphsah - The ancient Thapsacus, an important city on the western bank of the Euphrates, which constituted the northeastern extremity of Solomon's dominions, 1 Kings 4:24 . The ford at this place being the last one on the Euphrates towards the south, its possession was important to Solomon in his design to attract the trade of the East to Palestine
Beyond the River - A phrase that refers to the Euphrates River in Mesopotamia. From the perspective of those living in Palestine, “beyond the river” meant on the east side of the Euphrates River. From the perspective of those living in Persia, “beyond the river” meant on the west side of the Euphrates River
Salah - ("extension"); implying the spread of the Shemites from their original seat toward the Euphrates
Euphrates - Euphrates , one of the rivers of Eden ( Genesis 2:14 ), derives its name from the Assyr. ’ In the OT the Euphrates is generally known as ‘ the river . The alluvial plain between the Euphrates and the Tigris constituted Babylonia, the water of the annual inundation (which took place in May, and was caused by the melting of the snows in Armenia) being regulated by means of canals and barrages. The Hittite city of Carchemish stood at the point where the Euphrates touched Northern Syria, and commanded one of the chief fords over the river; south of it came the Belikh and Khabur, the last affluents of the Euphrates
Euphra'Tes - " The Euphrates is the largest, the longest and by far the most important of the rivers of western Asia. The annual inundation of the Euphrates is caused by the melting of the snows in the Armenian highlands. The Euphrates is first mentioned in Scripture as one of the four rivers of Eden. (11:24; Joshua 1:4 ) Prophetical reference to the Euphrates is found in (Jeremiah 13:4-7 ; 46:2-10 ; 51:63 ; Revelation 9:14 ; 16:12 ) "The Euphrates is linked with the most important events in ancient history
Tat'na-i - (gift ), satrap of the province west of the Euphrates in the time of Darius Hystaspes
Hena - Associated with Sepharvaim or Sippara (now Mosaib), probably therefore in Babylonia or on the Euphrates. The Assyrian inscriptions mention Anat, a town on an island in the Euphrates, some distance below its union with the Chabour
he'Lam - (stronghold ), a place east of the Jordan but west of the Euphrates at which the Syrians were collected by Hadarezer, and where David met and defeated them
Flood - ) In Joshua 24:2,3,14,15 , the word "flood" (RSV, "river") means the river Euphrates
Tattenai - (tat' teh nehi) Contemporary of Zerubbabel, governor of the Persian province “across the (Euphrates) River,” which included Palestine (Ezra 5:3 ,Ezra 5:3,5:6 ; Ezra 6:6 ,Ezra 6:6,6:13 )
Shobach - Poured out, the "captain of the host of Hadarezer" when he mustered his vassals and tributaries from beyond "the river Euphrates" (2 Samuel 10:15-18 ); called also Shophach (1 Chronicles 19:16 )
Rezeph - ) A fortress conquered by Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:12), probably on the western side of Euphrates; joined with Haran
Chilmad - The Chaldee version has "Media," others "Carmanda," a large city beyond the Euphrates (Xenophon)
Tel-Abib - The place of Ezekiel's residence among the Jewish captives in Babylonia, on the Chebar, a branch of the Euphrates (Ezekiel 3:15); the nahr Μalcha , Nebuchadnezzar's royal canal
Hena - It is identified with the modern Anah, lying on the right bank of the Euphrates, not far from Sepharvaim
Dehavites - A people beyond the Euphrates, who furnished colonists for Samaria, 2 Kings 17:24 ; Ezra 4:9 ; supposed to be the Dahae, on the east of the Caspian sea, and under the Persian government
Armenia - A large country of Asia, having Media on the east, Cappadocia on the west, Colchis and Iberia on the north, Mesopotamia on the south, and the Euphrates and Syria on the southwest. Lying between the Caucasus and the Taurus range, with Mount Ararat towering in its central province, it gives rise to three notable rivers, the Euphrates, Tigris, and Araxes
Reu - ” Descendant of Shem (Genesis 11:18-21 ; 1 Chronicles 1:25 ), possibly the ancestor of a Semitic tribe associated with Ra'ilu, an island in the Euphrates below Anat
Tiphsah - A city on the western bank of the Euphrates, supposed to be the Thapsacus of the Greeks and Romans
Chebar - It is thought to have risen near the head of the Tigris, and to have run through Mesopotamia, to the south-west, and emptied itself into the Euphrates
e'Den - The Hiddekel, one of its rivers, is the modern Tigris; the Euphrates is the same as the modern Euphrates. With regard to the Pison and Gihon a great variety of opinion exists, but the best authorities are divided between (1) Eden as in northeast Arabia, at the junction of the Euphrates and Tigris, and their separation again, making the four rivers of the different channels of these two, or (2), and most probably, Eden as situated in Armenia, near the origin of the rivers Tigris and Euphrates, and in which same region rise the Araxes (Pison of Genesis) and the Oxus ( Gihon )
e'Den - The Hiddekel, one of its rivers, is the modern Tigris; the Euphrates is the same as the modern Euphrates. With regard to the Pison and Gihon a great variety of opinion exists, but the best authorities are divided between (1) Eden as in northeast Arabia, at the junction of the Euphrates and Tigris, and their separation again, making the four rivers of the different channels of these two, or (2), and most probably, Eden as situated in Armenia, near the origin of the rivers Tigris and Euphrates, and in which same region rise the Araxes (Pison of Genesis) and the Oxus ( Gihon )
Rezeph - It is thought to have been afterwards called Rasapha, and to have stood some twenty-five miles west of the Euphrates towards Palmyra
Habor - A major tributary of the Euphrates River
Pethor - ” City in upper Mesopotamia identified with tell Ahmar, twelve miles south of Carchemish near the confluence of the Sajur and Euphrates rivers
Habor - A river of Gozan, 2 Kings 17:6; 1 Chronicles 5:26; probably identical with the modern Khabour, the Aborrhas and Chaboras of ancient writers, and a branch of the Euphrates
Shinar - A level region of indefinite extent around Babylon and the junction of the Euphrates and Tigris, Genesis 10:10 11:2 14:1 Joshua 7:21 Isaiah 11:11 Daniel 1:2 Zechariah 5:11
Ava - It has been identified with Hit on the Euphrates
Chebar - :cannot be the same as Ilabor, but may be one of the canals which connected the Tigris with the Euphrates, near Babylon
Chebar - It has been supposed to be identical with the river Habor, the Chaboras, or modern Khabour, which falls into the Euphrates at Circesium. An opinion that has much to support it is that the "Chebar" was the royal canal of Nebuchadnezzar, the Nahr Malcha, the greatest in Mesopotamia, which connected the Tigris with the Euphrates, in the excavation of which the Jewish captives were probably employed
Shinar - A region in Mesopotamia, the plain between the Tigris and Euphrates
ha'Bor - (beautiful banks ), the "river of Gozan," ( 2 Kings 17:6 ) and 2 Kings 18:11 Is identified beyond all reasonable doubt with the famous affluent of the Euphrates, which is called Aborrhas and Chaboras by ancient writers, and now Khabour
Ivah - It lay on the Euphrates, between Sepharvaim and Henah, and is supposed by some to have been the Ahava of (Ezra 8:15 )
Pethor - Interpretation of dreams, identified with Pitru, on the west bank of the Euphrates, a few miles south of the Hittite capital of Carchemish (Numbers 22:5 , "which is by the river of the land of the children of [1] Ammo")
Kadmonites - Probably they were identical with the "children of the east," who inhabited the country between Palestine and the Euphrates
Sepharvaim - Identified with Sippara , on the Euphrates, 33 5' N, 44 15' E
Shobach - Commanded the army brought from beyond Euphrates after Syria's and Ammon's defeat before Rabbah
Aha'va - Perhaps it is the modern Hit, on the Euphrates due east of Damascus
Chushan Rishathaim - he was king of the Syrian country about Haran, the region between the Euphrates and the Khabour, held by the Nairi, divided into petty tribes, as Assyria had not at this time extended her dominion to the Euphrates
Hadarezer - Helped by the Damascus Syrians (See HADAD); driven by David beyond the river Euphrates (2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Samuel 8:5; 2 Samuel 10:6-9; 1 Chronicles 18:3; 1 Chronicles 19:7-19). )...
Rezonof Hadarezer's retainers escaped, and with "bands" marauded the thinly-peopled district between the Jordan and the Euphrates (2 Kings 5:2; 1 Chronicles 5:18-22), then became master of Damascus, and as an "adversary" did "mischief" to Israel in Solomon's days (1 Kings 11:28-25). ) Edom invaded Israel during David's absence at the Euphrates; Psalm 44 by the sons of Korah alludes to this. Psalm 60 by David was composed after victory in part had been gained over Aram Naharaim (Syria of the two floods) and Aram (Syria) of Zobah the kingdom of Hadarezer, who had come to help his vassals of Mesopotamia, the region of the two rivers Tigris and Euphrates; after having conquered the two Syrias, Joab returned and smote Edom in the valley of Salt; Psalm 60 refers to the expedition subsequently undertaken to occupy Edom in revenge for Edom's invasion of Israel
Eber - is usually explained as denoting those who have come from ‘çber han-nâhâr (see Joshua 24:2-3 ), or ‘ the other side of the River’ (the Euphrates), i. ]'>[2] origin, and denoted originally the ‘traders’ who went to and fro across the Euphrates. Why Eber is not the immediate, but the sixth ancestor of Abraham, and why many other tribes besides the Hebrews are reckoned as his descendants, is perhaps to be explained (König) by the fact that, though the Israelites were in a special sense ‘Hebrews,’ it was remembered that their ancestors had long made the region ‘across’ the Euphrates their resting-place, and many other tribes (Peleg, Joktan, etc. What Eber means in Numbers 24:24 is uncertain: most probably perhaps, the country across the Euphrates (|| with Asshur, i
Ahava - It may be the modern Hib on the Euphrates, in the latitude of Bagdad
Helam - Place of abundance, a place on the east of Jordan and west of the Euphrates where David gained a great victory over the Syrian army (2 Samuel 10:16 ), which was under the command of Shobach
Ellasar - The Chaldeaan Larsa, Greek Larissa, a town of lower Babylon, half way between Ur (Mugheir) and Erech (Warka) on the left bank of the Euphrates
Pishon - Some suggest the “river” was a canal connecting the Tigris and Euphrates or another body of water, such as the Persian Gulf
Bethrehob - Some judge that the Syrians came from a different place near the Euphrates
Carchemish - A chief city of northern Syria, on the Euphrates, where a great and decisive battle was fought, in which Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh-necho
Ahava - It has been thought to be the same as AVA and IVAH, and to be identified with Hit on the Euphrates, 33 35' N, 42 50' E
Apharsachites - a people sent by the kings of Assyria to inhabit the country of Samaria, in the room of those Israelites who had been removed beyond the Euphrates, Ezra 5:6
Hadadezer or Hadarezer - A powerful king of Syria, reigning in Zobah and the surrounding country, even to the Euphrates, 1 Kings 11:23
Rehoboth - NAS, NRSV, and REB identify the river as the Euphrates. Edomite dominion reaching the Euphrates is improbable
he'Brew - This word first occurs as given to Abram by the Canaanites, (Genesis 4:13 ) because he had crossed the Euphrates. The name is also derived from Eber, "beyond, on the other side," Abraham and his posterity being called Hebrews in order to express a distinction between the races east and west of the Euphrates
Chebar - This is probably to be identified with the nar Kabari, a channel of the Euphrates River southeast of Babylon
Minni - (mihn' ni) People inhabiting the mountainous area south of Lake Urmia northeast of the Tigris-Euphrates valley (Jeremiah 51:27 )
Babylonish - The city stood on the river Frat, or Euphrates, and it is supposed, on the spot where the tower of Babel was founded
Cappadocia - The district extended as far eastward as the Euphrates
Rehoboth - A city on the Euphrates, Genesis 36:37, supposed to be represented by the modern Rahabah
Pison - It has, of course, been placed as variously as the Garden of Eden, to which article and Euphrates the reader is referred
Mash - The name Mash is probably represented by the Mons Masius of classical writers, a range which forms the northern boundary of Mesopotamia, between the Tigris and Euphrates
Mesopotamia - (Greek: mesas, middle; potamos, river; country between rivers) ...
A great plain between the Euphrates and the Tigris; the upper part covered ancient Assyria; the lower comprised ancient Chaldea and Babylonia
Chaldea - or Babylonia, the country lying on both sides of the Euphrates, of which Babylon was the capital; and extending southward to the Persian Gulf, and northward into Mesopotamia, at least as far as Ur, which is called Ur of the Chaldees
Tigris - " Rising in the Armenian mountains, not far from the sources of Euphrates, it flows N. For the last two hundred, miles before its confluence with the Euphrates the country was intersected with artificial watercourses and adapted river beds, such as the Shat-el-Hie, or river of Hie; and in this district are the ruins of old towns; some scarcely known, as Zirgul, "the city of the brilliant light"; others better known, as Ur (Mugheir)
Asnapper - The Assyrian king or satrap, under whose direction the territory of the ten tribes was peopled by emigrants from beyond the Euphrates, 2 Kings 17:24 ; Ezra 4:10
Habor - It is a tributary of the Euphrates, the Chaboras of the Greeks, the modern Khâbûr
i'Vah - Isai 37:13 In connection with Hena and Sepharvaim, and once, (2 Kings 17:24 ) in connection with Babylon and Cuthah, must be sought in Babylonia, and is probably identical with the modern Hit, on the Euphrates
he'na - It Isaiah 20 miles from Babylon on the Euphrates
Aram - The elevated region northeast of Palestine, toward the Euphrates river. Aram-naharaim of Genesis 24:10 is translated Mesopotamia in the English Version, and refers to the region between the Euphrates and Tigris rivers
River - The three principal rivers referred to in scripture are the Nile, the Jordan, and the Euphrates. The word employed for the Nile is yeor, 'a fosse or channel'; for the Jordan and the Euphrates the word used is nahar, 'a river' always supplied with water
Calneh - It is possibly the modern Niffer, about 60 miles south-southeast of Babylon, on the eastern bank of the Euphrates
Accad - It was in the land of Shinar, and George Smith locates it at Agadi, on the Euphrates, north of Babylon
Zobah - It seems to have lain near Damascus, and to have included the city Hamath conquered by Solomon, 2 Chronicles 8:3 , but also to have extended towards the Euphrates, 2 Samuel 8:3
Cuthites - A people who dwelt beyond the Euphrates, and were thence transplanted into Samaria, in place of the Israelites who had before inhabited it
el'Lasar - Larsa was a town of lower Babylonia or Chaldea, situated nearly halfway between Ur ( Mugheir ) and Erech ( Warka ), on the left bank of the Euphrates
Rezeph - There is one west of the Euphrates, on the road from Racca to Hums, and another on the east of the river, near Bagdad; both have been suggested as probable identifications
Hara - Probably HARAN, the Mesopotamian city whither Abram came from Ur, where he received his second call from God, and where his brother Nahor's children settled (Genesis 11:31; Genesis 24:10; Genesis 27:43; Genesis 25:20) in Padan Aram or the low and beautiful region at the foot of the hills below mount Masius, between the Khabour and the Euphrates. ) Here still is a town bearing the old name Harran, whose people retained until lately the Chaldean language and idols; upon the Belilk (in ancient times, Bilichus), an affluent of the Euphrates
Flood - Sometimes a particular river is meant, the Euphrates, the Nile, or the Jordan. (1) The Euphrates is referred to in Joshua 24:2 (‘your fathers dwelt on the other side of the flood,’ RV Eden - Two of its rivers are identified, the Euphrates, and the Hiddekel or Tigris; the others are disputed. The best authorities agree that the "garden of Eden eastward" was somewhere in the highlands of Armenia, or in the valley of the Euphrates, but its precise location cannot be determined
Heber - But others have suggested, with greater probability, that Abraham and his family were thus called, because they came from the other side of the Euphrates into Canaan; Heber signifying in the Hebrew language one that passes, or, a passage, that is, of the river Euphrates
Euphrates - Euphrates (eû-frâ'tçz), the abounding. The country between the two rivers slopes toward the Tigris, and thus greatly favors the draining off of the superfluous waters of the Euphrates. In Scripture the Euphrates is named as one of the rivers of Eden, Genesis 2:14; called "the great river," Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; noted as the eastern boundary of the Promised Land, Deuteronomy 11:24; Joshua 1:4; 1 Chronicles 5:9; and of David's conquests, 2 Samuel 8:3; 1 Chronicles 18:3; of those of Babylon from Egypt, 2 Kings 24:7; is referred to in prophecy, Jeremiah 13:4-7; Jeremiah 46:2-10; Jeremiah 51:63; and in Revelation 9:14; Revelation 16:12
Euphrates - Hebrew, Perath; Assyrian, Purat; Persian cuneiform, Ufratush, whence Greek Euphrates, meaning "sweet water. The Euphrates is first mentioned in Genesis 2:14 as one of the rivers of Paradise. It is next mentioned in connection with the covenant which God entered into with Abraham (15:18), when he promised to his descendants the land from the river of Egypt to the river Euphrates (Compare Deuteronomy 11:24 ; Joshua 1:4 ), a covenant promise afterwards fulfilled in the extended conquests of David (2 Samuel 8:2-14 ; 1 Chronicles 18:3 ; 1 Kings 4:24 ). " Just as the Nile represented in prophecy the power of Egypt, so the Euphrates represented the Assyrian power (Isaiah 8:7 ; Jeremiah 2:18 )
Zoba - It adjoined the Damascus territory, and stretched toward the Euphrates(See HADADEZER
Tiphsah - City on the west bank of the Euphrates about 75 miles south of Carchemish, representing the northeastern limit of Solomon's kingdom (1 Kings 4:24 )
Chilmad - ]'>[1] form of Charmande , a town on the Euphrates mentioned by Xenophon ( Anab
Hebrew - Eber, either a proper name, or a name denoting passage, pilgrimage, or coming from beyond the Euphrates
Parah - The Hebrew parath , often translated Euphrates (so KJV, NAS, NRSV), may refer to the spring Ain Farah at Jeremiah 13:4-7
Rehoboth - A city on the Euphrates, thought to be the modern Er-rahabeh, south of Carchemish, Genesis 36:37 ; 1 Chronicles 1:48 ; 17:3 ...
Chebar - A river which rises in the northern part of Mesopotamia, and flows first southeast, then south and southwest, into the Euphrates
Car'Chemish - It seems to have commanded the ordinary passage of the Euphrates at Bir or Birekjik
Padan-Aram - It is the region between the two great rivers Euphrates and Tigris
Hena - Hena may be the same as Ana or Anat at the middle of the course of the Euphrates River
Shuah - The tribe represented by this name may perhaps be the Suchu of the cuneiform inscriptions, on the right bank of the Euphrates
Ellasar - It is supposed that the old Chaldean town of Larsa was the metropolis of this kingdom, situated nearly half-way between Ur (now Mugheir) and Erech, on the left bank of the Euphrates
Aram-Naharaim - Aram of the two rivers, is Mesopotamia (as it is rendered in Genesis 24:10 ), the country enclosed between the Tigris on the east and the Euphrates on the west (Psalm 60 , title); called also the "field of Aram" (Hosea 12:12 , RSV) i
Erech - Its ruins at Warka lie half-way between Hillah and Korna, on the left bank of the Euphrates, and W
Mesopotamia - (mihss uh puh tay' mih uh) Strictly speaking, Mesopotamia (from the Greek “between the rivers”) is the designation of the area between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. Mesopotamia applies more generally to the entire Tigris-Euphrates valley
Brook - However, this distinction is not always observed in the Scripture; and one is not unfrequently taken for the other,—the great rivers, such as the Euphrates, the Nile, the Jordan, and others being called brooks. Thus the Euphrates, Isaiah 15:7 , is called the brook of willows
Chamites - The Chusites inhabited Arabia, Africa, and the valleys of the Euphrates and Tigris; Mesram occupied Egypt; Phuth, probably the region west of Egypt, particularly Libya; and Chanaan, the country later occupied by Israel
Habor - An affluent of the Euphrates, joining that river about 35 N
Hadadezer - He was defeated by David with great loss, and driven across the Euphrates
Shuah - Son of Abraham (Genesis 25:2 ) and possibly thought of as original ancestor of the Suhu mentioned in Assyrian sources as living on the Euphrates River below the mouth of the Chabur
Merodach-Baladan - Merodach has given a son, (Isaiah 39:1 ), "the hereditary chief of the Chaldeans, a small tribe at that time settled in the marshes at the mouth of the Euphrates, but in consequence of his conquest of Babylon afterwards, they became the dominant caste in Babylonia itself
Gozan - It was situated in Mesopotamia, on the river Habor (2 Kings 17:6 ; 18:11 ), the Khabur, a tributary of the Euphrates
Kirjath-Huzoth - Balak here received and entertained Balaam, whom he had invited from Pethor, among the "mountains of the east," beyond the Euphrates, to lay his ban upon the Israelites, whose progress he had no hope otherwise of arresting
Shu'Hite - This ethnic appellative "Shuhite" is frequent in the book of Job, but only as the apithet of one person, Bildad The local indications of this book point to a region on the western side of Chaldea, bordering on Arabia; and exactly in this locality, above Hit and on both sides of the Euphrates, are found, in the Assyrian inscriptions, the Tsahi , a powerful people
Ellasar - ’ Larsa, modern Senkereh in Lower Babylonia on the east bank of the Euphrates, was celebrated for its temple and worship of the sun-god Shamash
Haran - (Authorized Version ‘Charaan,’ Acts 7:2; Acts 7:4)...
Haran was a city of some importance, on a tributary of the Euphrates
Ahava - " The modern Hit, on the Euphrates, E
Ahava - AHAVA was a settlement in Babylonia lying along a stream of the same name, probably a large canal near the Euphrates
Israelites - the descendants of Israel, who were first called Hebrews by reason of Abraham, who came from the other side of the Euphrates; and afterward Israelites, from Israel, the father of the twelve tribes; and, lastly, Jews, particularly after their return from the captivity of Babylon; because the tribe of Judah was then much stronger and more numerous than the other tribes, and foreigners had scarcely any knowledge but of this tribe
Paradise - The learned Huetius places it upon the river that is produced by the conjunction of the Tigris and Euphrates, now called the river of the Arabs, between this conjunction, and the division made by the same river before it falls into the Persian sea. Other geographers have placed it in Armenia, between the sources of the Tigris, the Euphrates, the Araxes, and the Phasis, which they suppose to be the four rivers described by Moses
Sabtah - The Cushites here form the middle connecting link between Ethiopia their original home, and the Cushite settlement on the Euphrates, the original basis of the Babylonian population
Amaw - It was located west of Euphrates River south of Carchemish and included Pethor, the home town of Balaam, the prophet
Arabia - On the north it is bounded by part of Syria, on the east by the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates, on the south by the Arabian Sea and the straits of Babelmandel, and on the west by the Red sea, Egypt, and Palestine
Tiphsah - The classical Thapsacus , the chief crossing-place on the middle Euphrates for caravans and armies, after the decline of Carchemish in the Persian period
Armenia - ) The name in Hebrew, translated Armenia from (Ηar-Μini ), "the mountains of Minni" equatzs to Minyas, in the upper valley of the Murad-su branch of the Euphrates
Padan Aram - The land between Tigris and Euphrates is a vast flat, except where the Sinjar range intersects it
ur of the Chaldees - City or district somewhere near the Euphrates, from whence Abraham was called of God
Alexander, Saint - He also founded a monastery on the Euphrates
Carchemish - Probably the same with Circesium or Circusium, a fortified city on the west of the Euphrates, where the river Chaboras enters it
Euphrates - As Babylon represents mystically the apostate church, so the waters of Euphrates, "where the whore sitteth" (in impious parody of Jehovah who "sitteth upon the flood"), represent the "peoples, multitudes, nations, and tongues," which were her main support (Revelation 17:15-16). ...
"The kings of the Euphrates" (compare Revelation 1:6) are the saints of Israel and the Gentiles accompanying the king of Israel in "glory returning from the way of the East" (Ezekiel 43:2; Matthew 24:27). The obstacles which stood in the way of Israel and her king returning, namely, the apostate church (both Rome and the Greek apostasy) and her multitudinous peoples, shall be dried up, her resources being drained off, just as Cyrus marched into Babylon through the dry channel of the Euphrates. ...
The promise to Abraham that his seed's inheritance should reach the Euphrates (Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; Joshua 1:4) received a very partial fulfillment in Reuben's pastoral possessions (1 Chronicles 5:9-10) (the Hagarites here encountered them, the inscriptions confirming scripture as to their appearance upon the middle Euphrates in the later empire); a fuller accomplishment under David and Solomon, when an annual tribute was paid from subject petty kingdoms in that quarter, as Hadadezer king of Zobah, etc. ) The Euphrates was the boundary between Assyria and the Hittite country, after Solomon's times, according to inscriptions
ti'Gris - The Tigris, like the Euphrates, rises from two principal sources in the Armenian mountains, and flows into the Euphrates
Tiphsah - A town on the western bank of the Euphrates, the limit of Solomon's empire in that direction (1 Kings 4:24). Thapsacus, in northern Syria, where the Euphrates was usually crossed (Strabo xvi
Habor - It joins the Euphrates at Circesium; the country adjoining abounds in mounds, the remains of Assyrian cities
Rehoboth - ...
...
An ancient city on the Euphrates (Genesis 36:37 ; 1 Chronicles 1:48 ), "Rehoboth by the river
Beth-Togarmah - It may be related to modern Gurun between the Halys and Euphrates Rivers
Eden, House of - Its most formidable competitor, Bit-Adini , a district on either bank of the Middle Euphrates, frequently mentioned in the cuneiform inscriptions, is too far 200 miles from Damascus, and in the days of Amos had long been subject to Assyria
Severus, Septimius - Legate of the fourth legion on the Euphrates and later governor of Upper Pannonia
Septimius Severus - Legate of the fourth legion on the Euphrates and later governor of Upper Pannonia
Chaldaea - part of Babylonia, chiefly on the right bank of the Euphrates, but used to designate the whole country. Ur or Umqueir, more toward the mouth of the Euphrates, was the original chief city of Chaldaea; here inscriptions of the 22nd century B. , deciphered lately, prove that the early seat of the Babylonian empire was there rather than higher up the Euphrates. , toward the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates; this is the Chaldaean period (from 2340 to 1500 B. ) Chaldaea lies between the Tigris and Euphrates, and comprises also an average of 30 miles along the W. of the Euphrates; a vast alluvial plain, running N. , and a line from Hit on the Euphrates to Tekrit on the Tigris forming its N. Borsippa is Birs-Nimrud now; Sepharvaim or Sippara, Mosaib; Cutha, Ibrahim; Chilmad, Calwadha; Larancha, Senkereh; Is, Hit, where the canal leaving the Euphrates at the point where the alluvial plain begins passed along the whole edge of the plain, and fell into the Persian gulf. ...
There is one large inland fresh water sea, Nedjef, 40 miles long by 35 wide, surrounded by red sandstone cliffs; about 20 miles from the right bank of the Euphrates
Tatnai - , of the whole tract on the west of the Euphrates
Rehum - Persian official with oversight of the Trans-Euphrates territory, including Judah
Terah - Along with a migration of people from Ur of the Chaldees, Terah moved his family, following the Euphrates River to Haran (Genesis 11:31 )
Hena - Büsching has identified Hena with the modern Ana on the Euphrates; and Sachau supposes that Ivvah is ‘Imm between Aleppo and Antioch
Rehoboth by the River - As Edom never extended to the Euphrates' "river," probably an Assyrian invasion put Shaul from Rehoboth on the Edomite throne
Sepharvaim - The name may represent the two Sippars on the Euphrates River or Shabarain in Syria
Cushan-Rishathaim - It has been conjectured that he was a king of the Mitanni, whose territory once covered the district between the Euphrates and Habor, or that ‘Aram River - The Hebrews give the name of "the river," without any addition, sometimes to the Nile, sometimes to the Euphrates, and sometimes to Jordan
Gihon - ) Reland, Calmet, &c, think that Gihon is the Araxes, which has its source, as well as the Tigris and Euphrates, in the mountains of Armenia, and, running with almost incredible rapidity, falls into the Caspian Sea
re'Hob -
The father of Hadadezer king of Zobah, whom David smote at the Euphrates
Uz - It appears to have been a region in Arabia Deserta, between Palestine, Idumaea, and the Euphrates, and most probably not far from the borders of Idumaea
Sepharvaim - When Shalmaneser king of Assyria carried away Israel from Samaria to beyond the Euphrates, he sent people in their stead into Palestine, among whom were the Sepharvaim, 2 Kings 17:24,31
Hebrew - , the Euphrates; or to the Hebrew word meaning "the region" or "country beyond," viz. It is the more probable origin of the designation given to Abraham coming among the Canaanites as a man from beyond the Euphrates (Genesis 14:13 )
Aram - of Palestine to the Euphrates and Tigris. Syria, stretching from the Jordan and lake Gennesareth to the Euphrates, rising 2000 feet above the level of the sea
Arme'Nia - --Armenia is that lofty plateau whence the rivers Euphrates, Tigris, Araxes and Acampsis pour down their waters in different directions; the first two to the Persian Gulf, the last two respectively to the Caspian and Euxine seas. (2) MINNI only occurs in (Jeremiah 51:27 ) It is probably identical with the district Minyas, in the upper valley of the Murad-su branch of the Euphrates
Mesopotamia - by the Euphrates. part between the bend of the Euphrates and the upper Tigris is what Scripture names Mesopotamia. side of the Sinjar range, empties itself into the Euphrates
Euphrates - According to that view which places the Garden of Eden near the junction of the Tigris with the Euphrates, these might be regarded as the four rivers of Paradise. Scripture often calls the Euphrates simply "the river," Exodus 23:31 Isaiah 7:20 8:7 Jeremiah 2:18 ; or "the great river," and assigns it for the eastern boundary of that land which God promised to the Hebrews, Deuteronomy 1:7 Joshua 1:4 . ...
The Euphrates is a river of consequence in Scripture geography, being the utmost limit, east, of the territory of the Israelites. It was indeed only occasionally that the dominion of the Hebrews extended so far; but it would appear that even Egypt, under Pharaoh Necho, made conquests to the western bank of the Euphrates
Mesopotamia - an extensive province of Asia, the Greek name of which denotes "between the rivers," and on this account Strabo says, οτι κειται μεταξυ του Ευφρατου και του Τιγρος , that "it was situated between the Euphrates and the Tigris. Toward the north, it comprehended part of Taurus and the Mesius, which lay between the Euphrates and the Tigris. The principal rivers were Chaboras, (Al Kabour,) which commenced at Charrae, (Harran,) east of the mountains, and discharged itself into the Euphrates at Circesium (Kirkisieh;) the Mygdonius, (Hanali,) the source of which was near Nisibis, and its termination in the Chaboras. At some distance to the south, upon the Tigris and on the borders of Mesopotamia, was the town of Antiochia, near which commenced the wall that passed from the Tigris to the Euphrates, under the name of Murus Mediae, or Semiramidis. In the western part were Edessa, called also Callin-Rhae, (Orfa,) Charrae, (Harran,) Nicephorium, (Racca,) Circesium at the mouth of the Chaboras, Anatho, (Anah,) Neharda, (Hadith Unnour,) upon the right of the Euphrates. According to Ptolemy, Mesopotamia had on the north a part of Armenia, on the west the Euphrates on the side of Syria, on the east the Tigris on the borders of Assyria, and on the south the Euphrates which joined the Tigris. About four hundred years after Cushan-Rishathaim, we find the northern parts of Mesopotamia in the hands of the Syrians of Zobah; as we are told, in 2 Samuel x, that Hadarezer, king of Zobah, after his defeat by Joab, "sent and brought out the Syrians that were beyond the river" Euphrates
Tubal - This nation was probably the Tiberini of the Greek historian Herodotus, a people of the Asiatic highland west of the Upper Euphrates, the southern range of the Caucasus, on the east of the Black Sea
Ellasar - Other scholars suggest Ellasar is an abbreviation for Til-Asurri on the Euphrates River
Rehoboth - ’ ‘The River’ here may not be, as usually, the Euphrates, but the ‘River of Egypt’ (see Egypt [1])
Armenia - It is for the most part high table-land, and is watered by the Aras, the Kur, the Euphrates, and the Tigris
Beth-Eden - Assyrian records refer to Bit-adini, a city-state between the Euphrates and Balik rivers, somewhat north of Syria proper
Willows - This tree grows abundantly on the banks of the Euphrates, in other parts of Asia as in Palestine
Carchemish - City on the river Euphrates, about 36 50' N, 38 5' E
Chedorlaomer - He had subdued the five kings near the Dead Sea, some 700 miles across the desert, or 1000 by the Euphrates and traversing the land of Canaan
Shinar - Ancient name of the plain lying in the south between the Euphrates and the Tigris
Salcah - above the surrounding ground, an offshoot from the Bashan mountains, is a strong castle on the edge of the Euphrates desert, commanding a view of any foe who might approach, almost a day's journey off
Calneh - , the east, bank of the Euphrates, but 30 miles distant from its present course, and about 60 miles south-south-east from Babylon
Ulai - The two channels emptied their waters through the river now called the Karun into the Shat-el-Arab, the united stream of the Euphrates and Tigris, twenty miles below their junction at Korna
Dura, Plain of - 238) found a small river so named, falling into the Euphrates 6 or 7 miles S
Reho'Both - (Genesis 36:37 ; 1 Chronicles 1:48 ) The affix "by the river" fixes the situation of Rehoboth as on the Euphrates
go'Zan - It was the tract watered by the Habor, the modern Khabour , the great Mesopotamian affluent of the Euphrates
Diaspora - They may be divided into two classes: those who lived east of the Euphrates, in Babylonia, Persia, etc
Rezeph - It is the Ratsappa or Ratsapi of the Assyrian inscriptions, the modern Rasafa , between Palmyra and the Euphrates
Arabia Deserta - It has the mountains of Gilead on the west, and the river Euphrates on the east, and extends far to the south
Habor - There is another river of the same name (the Chaboras) which, after a course of about 200 miles, flows into the Euphrates at Karkesia, the ancient Circesium
Calneh - of Babylon, in the marshes on the left bank of the Euphrates, towards the Tigris
Shi'Nar - (country of two rivers ), the ancient name of the great alluvial tract through which the Tigris and Euphrates pass before reaching the sea --the tract known in later times as Chaldaea or Babylonia
Iconium - It was on the great Roman highway from Ephesus to Tarsus, Antioch, and the Euphrates, and at the foot of Mount Taurus, in a beautiful and fertile country, about 300 miles southeast of Constantinople and about 120 miles inland from the Mediterranean
Pethor - 24:1, 6); on an island in the river Euphrates, and partly also extending both sides of the river; for ages the seat of an ancient pagan worship; a good center for influencing the Arabs on the E
Aram-Naharaim - It refers to the land between the Tigris and Euphrates River
Rachel - This prophecy was completed when these two tribes were carried into captivity beyond the Euphrates; and St
Adrammelech (1) - was also one of the gods adored by the inhabitants of Sepharvaim, who were settled in the country of Samaria, in the room of the Israelites, who were carried beyond the Euphrates
na'Hor - He married Milcah, the daughter of his brother Haran; and when Abraham and Lot migrated to Canaan, Nahor remained behind in the land of his birth, on the eastern side of the Euphrates
Necho ii - Four years after this conquest Necho again marched to the Euphrates; but here he was met and his army routed by the Chaldeans (B. 606) under Nebuchadnezzar, who drove the Egyptians back, and took from them all the territory they had conquered, from the Euphrates unto the "river of Egypt" (Jeremiah 46:2 ; 2 Kings 24:7,8 )
Mesopotamia - Mesopotamia is referred to in Acts 2:9, where it is evidently the well-known district between the rivers Euphrates and Tigris with which the name is generally associated, and also in Acts 7:2, where it is roughly parallel with ‘the land of the Chaldaeans’ in v. To the south its limits were about where Babylonia begins, at the so-called Median Wall, which runs from a little below Is (Hit), on the Euphrates, to a point just above Opis (Kadisiya), on the Tigris. ...
The river Chaboras (Khabur), entering the Euphrates from the east near Circesium, marks off the three divisions of Mesopotamia-(a) the northern tracts on its west side, (b) the similar tracts to east of it, and (c) the steppe-land stretching away south to the Median Wall. Among these may be mentioned Corsothe, Anatho, and Is (on the Euphrates), and Atrae and Caenae (on the Tigris)
Babylonia - This celebrated province included the track of country lying on the river Euphrates, bounded north by Mesopotamia and Assyria and south by the Persian Gulf. Bot in ancient and modern times, Important tracts on the eastern bank of the Tigris, and on the western ban of the Euphrates, and still more on both banks of their united streams, were reckoned to Babylonia, or Irak el-Arab. ...
Babylonia is an extensive plain, interrupted by no hill or mountain, consisting of a fatty, brownish soil, and subject to the annual inundations of the Tigris and Euphrates, more especially of the latter, whose banks are lower than those of the Tigris. The Euphrates commonly rises about twelve feet above its ordinary level, and continues at this height from the end of April tell June
Eden - But the opinion which has been most generally received on this subject is that which places the garden on the Lower Euphrates; between the junction of that river with the Tigris and the gulf of Persia. To this it is replied, that, according to this scheme, the garden was intersected by a great branch of the Euphrates, in the lower and broadest part of its course; which will give it an extent absolutely irreconcilable with the idea of Adam's "dressing" it by his own manual labour, or even of overlooking it: beside that all communication would be cut off between its different parts by a stream half a mile in width. Wells, in order to support his hypothesis of the situation of Eden on the lower parts of the Euphrates and Tigris, after giving these rivers a distribution which has now no existence, makes the Pison and Gihon to be parts of the Tigris and Euphrates themselves: an arrangement at perfect disagreement with the particular description of Moses; beside, that the Gihon thus called, instead of compassing the whole land of Cush, can only be said to skirt an extreme corner of it. It appears, indeed, that in the time of Alexander, the Euphrates pursued a separate course to the sea; or, at least, that a navigable branch of it was carried in that direction: in the mouth of which, at Diridotis, Nearchus anchored with his fleet. But it is only the lower parts of the Euphrates and Tigris, as they creep through the plains of Babylonia, which are thus inconstant: higher up in their courses, they flow over more solid strata, and in deeper valleys, unchanged by time. It is true, that the heads of the four rivers, above described, cannot now be found sufficiently near, to recognize thence the exact situation of paradise; but they all arise from the same mountainous region; and the springs of the Euphrates and Tigris, as already mentioned, are even now nearly interwoven
Adrammelech - One of the gods adored by the inhabitants of Sepharvaim, who settled in Samaria, in the stead of those Israelites who were carried beyond the Euphrates
Sepharva'im - , on the Euphrates above Babylon, which was near the site of the modern Mosaib
Aram - The word means high, or highlands, and as the name of a country denotes that elevated region extending from the northeast of Palestine to the Euphrates
Sea - [2] ...
Any great collection of waters, as the river Nile (Isaiah 19:5 ) and the Euphrates
Shiloah, Waters of - Isaiah (Isaiah 8:6) makes it represent the quiet confidence in Jehovah's benignant sway, exercised through David's line, to which he urged the Jews, in contrast to the overwhelming force of Assyria (like the flood of the Euphrates) which they sought as an ally
Mesopotamia - ' It is the district lying between the rivers Euphrates and the Upper Tigris, especially in the N
Jehoiakim - A year after, his allied the Egyptians were defeated on the Euphrates; yet he despised the warnings of Jeremiah, and cast his book into the fire
Babylonia - Ancient empire in Asia in the region of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers
Cappadocia - The largest ancient province of Asia Minor; having Pontus on the north, mount Taurus, separating it from Cilicia and Syria, on the south, Galatia on the west, and the Euphrates and Armenia on the east
Desert - Other deserts particularly mentioned, are "that great and terrible wilderness" in Arabia Petraea, south of Canaan, Numbers 21:20 ; also the region between Canaan and the Euphrates, Exodus 23:31 Deuteronomy 11:24
pa'Dan-a'Ram - " (Hosea 12:13 ) The term was perhaps more especially applied to that portion which bordered on the Euphrates, to distinguish if from the mountainous districts in the north and northeast of Mesopotamia
Rehoboth - There are two places named Rahabeh, near the Euphrates, which may be these cities
Salamenes of Capersana - Salamanes (2), a solitary of Capersana, a village on the right bank of the Euphrates, who shut himself up in a cell on the opposite bank, having neither door nor window
River - ...
(1) Νahar , "a continuous and full river", as Jordan, and especially "the river" Euphrates. " Zechariah 10:11, "all the deeps of the river shall dry up," namely, the Nile or else the Euphrates. Thus the Red "sea" and the Euphrates "river" in the former part of the verse answer to "Assyria
Bela - It is noteworthy that this Bela, like the Edomite king mentioned above, seems to have been traditionally connected with the Euphrates
Tiphsah - Passing over; ford, one of the boundaries of Solomon's dominions (1 Kings 4:24 ), probably "Thapsacus, a great and wealthy town on the western bank of the Euphrates," about 100 miles north-east of Tadmor
Sea, the - yam), signifies (1) "the gathering together of the waters," the ocean (Genesis 1:10 ); (2) a river, as the Nile (Isaiah 19:5 ), the Euphrates (Isaiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 51:36 ); (3) the Red Sea (Exodus 14:16,27 ; 15:4 , etc
Riblah - It was on the great caravan road from Palestine to Carchemish, on the Euphrates
Colossae - It was about 12 miles above Laodicea, and near the great road from Ephesus to the Euphrates, and was consequently of some mercantile importance
Nahor - He married Milcah, the daughter of his brother Haran, and remained in the land of his nativity on the east of the river Euphrates at Haran (Genesis 11:27-32 )
Chebar - It flows into the Euphrates at Circesium
Slime - 179) mentions that hot bitumen and burned bricks were used for building the walls of Babylon; the bitumen from the river Is falling into Euphrates not far from Babylon
Arabia - Northern Arabia, which joins Western Arabia and extends northward to the Euphrates
Hadare'Zer - 2 Samuel 10:8 Under the command of Shophach or Shobach, the captain of the host, they crossed the Euphrates, joined the other Syrians, and encamped at a place called Helam
Menahem - He then, proceeding "from Tirzah" (2 Kings 15:16) where Israel's main army was posted, smote Tiphsach (Thapsacus on the Euphrates), Israel's northeastern border city under Solomon (1 Kings 4:24), restored by Jeroboam II (2 Kings 14:25; 2 Kings 14:28), but having probably revolted again during the anarchy at his death. Situated on the western bank of the Euphrates on the great trade road from Egypt, Syria, and Phoenicia to Mesopotamia, it was important for Menahem to secure it
Eden - Ezekiel 27:23 mentions a region named Eden located on the Euphrates. The Euphrates and the Tigris can be identified, but there is no agreement on the location of the Pishon and the Gihon
Eden - Here, within a circle but a few miles in diameter, four large rivers rise: the Euphrates, and Tigris, or Hiddekel, flowing south into the Persian Gulf; the Araxes, flowing northeast into the Caspian Sea; and the Phasis, or the Halys, flowing northwest into the Black Sea. ...
Another location of Eden is now preferred by many interpreters-near the spot where the Euphrates and Tigris from a junction after their long wanderings, a hundred and twenty miles north of the Persian gulf, and where the river Ulai flows in from the northeast. As two of the rivers of Eden bear the familiar names of the Euphrates and Tigris, it seems probable that it was in one or the other of the regions above named
Sepharvaim - " The Sippara on the east bank of the Euphrates is now called Abu-Habba; that on the other bank was Accad, the old capital of Sargon I
Kadmonite - They probably inhabited the Syro-Arabian desert between Palestine-Syria and the Euphrates—which is to say, areas to the east of Canaan
Ico'Nium - It was a large and rich city, 120 miles north from the Mediterranean Sea, at the foot of the Taurus mountains, and on the great line of communication between Ephesus and the western coast of the peninsula on one side, and Tarsus, Antioch and the Euphrates on the other
Gihon - See EDEN , and Euphrates
Chaldea - The southern portion of Babylonia, Lower Mesopotamia, lying chiefly on the right bank of the Euphrates, but commonly used of the whole of the Mesopotamian plain. The country so named is a vast plain formed by the deposits of the Euphrates and the Tigris, extending to about 400 miles along the course of these rivers, and about 100 miles in average breadth. Its site is now called Mugheir, or Mugayyar, on the western bank of the Euphrates, in Southern Babylonia
te'Rah - We learn from it simply that he was an idolater, (Joshua 24:2 ) that he dwelt beyond the Euphrates in Ur of the Chaldees, (Genesis 11:28 ) and that in the southwesterly migration, which from some unexplained cause he undertook in his old age, he went with his son Abram, his daughter-in-law Sarai, and his grandson Lot, "to go into the land of Canaan, and they came unto Haran, and dwelt there
Hoshea - A second revolt brought back the Assyrian king Sargon, who besieged Samaria, and carried the ten tribes away beyond the Euphrates, B
Bittern - Gesenius translates "the hedgehog" (from its rolling itself together; qaapad , "to contract oneself"), and Strabo says that enormous hedgehogs were found in the islands of the Euphrates
Ivah - Now Hit, on the Euphrates, between Sippara (Sepharvaim) and Anah (Hena), with which it was apparently united politically
Carchemish - CARCHEMISH was the northern capital of the Hittite empire, but was probably also of consequence before the era of the Hittites, as it commanded the principal ford of the Euphrates on the right bank, and was therefore indispensable to travel and commerce in Northern Syria
Vials - There are seven direct judgements of the wrath of God (they are no longer mere providential actings) upon the settled sphere of God's dealings, whereby those who have received the mark of the beast are grievously affected; and upon masses of people outside that sphere, and upon the sources of national life and prosperity; also on those in authority in the world; also on the Euphrates, that it may be dried up to make way for the kings from the sun rising; followed by a general break up of human governments introductory to the reign of Christ
Sea - The Arabians and orientals in general frequently gave the name of sea to great rivers, as the Nile, the Euphrates, the Tigris, and others, which, by their magnitude, and by the extent of their overflowings, seemed as little seas, or great lakes
Syria - Aram), the name in the Old Testament given to the whole country which lay to the north-east of Phoenicia, extending to beyond the Euphrates and the Tigris. could claim dominion and levy tribute from the nations from the banks of the Euphrates to the borders of the Libyan desert
Hittites - In Joshua (Joshua 1:4; Joshua 9:1; Joshua 11:3-4; Joshua 12:8) they appear as the principal power occupying upper Syria, between Palestine and the Euphrates. Smith has just discovered their capital lying about half way between the mighty cities of the Euphrates valley and those of the Nile
Ur - Now Mugheir (a ruined temple of large bitumen bricks, which also "mugheir" means, namely, Um Mugheir "mother of bitumen"), on the right bank of the Euphrates, near its junction with the Shat el Hie from the Tigris; in Chaldaea proper. ...
Ur lies six miles distant from the present coarse of the Euphrates, and 125 from the sea; though it is thought it was anciently a maritime town, and that its present inland site is due to the accumulation of alluvium (?)
Chald a - An ancient country on both sides of the river Euphrates, and bordering on the Persian Gulf. Among the four great kingdoms or empires on the Euphrates, secular historians usually place the Chaldæan as the first in order or earliest, lasting for about ten centuries, from b
Captivity, Babylonian - After each of these a large portion of the population of Jerusalem and of other Judean cities was carried away to the banks of the Euphrates
Deputy - , in the region west of the Euphrates
Nachor - " El Naura is a town on Euphrates above Hit
Province - of Euphrates
Haran - It is generally identified with the modern Haran, the Roman Carræ, situated on the river Belik—the ancient Bilichus—about 60 miles above its entrance into the Euphrates
Babylon - (Assyrian: bab-ili, gate of the god) ...
Ancient city on the Euphrates River, about 60 miles south of Baghdad
Magi or Wise Men - The captivity of the Jews beyond the Euphrates had dispersed throughout the East much knowledge of the true God; and these philosophers and astronomers, in their search after wisdom, had found and believed the prophecies respecting the Messiah, and were divinely guided to his presence at Bethlehem
Babylonian Captivity - After each of these a large portion of the population of Jerusalem and of other Judean cities was carried away to the banks of the Euphrates
Peter, Epistles of - It was written probably at Babylon on the Euphrates, 1 Peter 5:13
Peter, First Epistle of - ...
It was written from Babylon, on the Euphrates, which was at this time one of the chief seats of Jewish learning, and a fitting centre for labour among the Jews
Erech - It lay on the left bank of the Euphrates, about 120 miles south-east of Babylon, and is now represented by the mounds and ruins of Warka
Tahpanhes - then crown prince Nebuchadrezzar defeated the Egyptian forces at Carchemish on the northern Euphrates and pursued them to the border of Egypt
Willows, Brook of the - of the Euphrates
Parthians - Mithridates I ruled from the Indian Koosh to the Euphrates
Sea - To any great collection of waters, as the Nile or the Euphrates in time of a flood or high water
Haran - Here also Crassus the Roman general was defeated and killed by the Parthiuated on a branch of the Euphrates, in 36 degrees 52' north latitude, and 39 degrees 5' east longitude, in a flat and sandy plain, and is only peopled by a few wandering Arabs, who select it for the delicious water it furnishes
Dragon - Large whales do not often frequent the Mediterranean, which was the sea that the Israelites knew; they apply "sea" to the Nile and Euphrates, and so apply "tannin " to the crocodile, their horror in Egypt, as also to the large serpents which they saw in the desert. "The dragon in the sea," which Jehovah shall punish in the day of Israel's deliverance, is Antichrist, the antitype to Babylon on the Euphrates' waters (Isaiah 27:1)
Eden - The primitive Eden was somewhere in the locality containing the conjoined Euphrates and the Tigris (or Hiddekel) which branch off northward into those two rivers, and southward branch into two channels again below Bassera, before failing into the sea, Gihon the E. The four took their rise in it, as their center, which is not true of the present Tigris ("arrow") and Euphrates ("the good and fertile". ) Armenia's highlands are the traditional cradle of the race; thence probably, from Eden as their source, flowed the two eastern rivers, Tigris and Euphrates, and the two western ones through the regions answering to Arabia and Egypt
Iraq - Country of southwestern Asia in the region of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, between Persia and northern Arabia, comprising the former Turkish vilayets of Baghdad, Basra, and Mosul
Mesopotamia - , "Syria of the two rivers"), the name given by the Greeks and Romans to the region between the Euphrates and the Tigris (Genesis 24:10 ; Deuteronomy 23:4 ; Judges 3:8,10 )
Havilah - It may perhaps be identified with the sandy tract which skirts Babylonia along the whole of its western border, stretching from the lower Euphrates to the mountains of Edom
Nergal-Sharezer - The palace of Nergal-sharezer is the only large building discovered on the Euphrates' right bank
Mash - the inhabitants of Mesene near Bassera where the Tigris and Euphrates fall into the Persian gulf; this however seems too far from the other Aramaic settlements
Necho - On Necho's return from the Euphrates, where he had taken and garrisoned the city of Carchemish, b
Ut - (Job 1:1 ) As far as we can gather, "the land of Uz" lay either east or southeast of Palestine, (Job 1:3 ) adjacent to the Sabaeans and the Chaldaeans, (Job 1:15,17 ) consequently north of the southern Arabians and west of the Euphrates; and, lastly, adjacent to the Edomites of Mount Seir, who at one period occupied Uz, probably as conquerors, (Lamentations 4:21 ) and whose troglodyte habits are described in (Job 30:6,7 ) From the above data we infer that the land of Uz corresponds to the Arabia Deserta of classical geography, at all events to so much of it as lies north of the 30th parallel of latitude
Insignificant Subjects: Not Fit For the Pulpit - When trivial subjects are descanted upon from the pulpit, while souls are perishing for lack of knowledge, the same comparison may be used; as for instance, when a congregation is collected, and the preacher talks about the drying up of the Euphrates, or ventilates his pet theory for reconciling Moses and geology
Magi - Whence these Magi came we do not certainly know, but probably from the lands of the Jewish captivity on the Euphrates
Distill - The Euphrates distilleth out of the mountains of Armenia
Tadmor - Palmyra was situated about midway between Damascus and Tiphsah or Thapsacus on the Euphrates
Nod - But, be it on the higher or lower Euphrates, ( see EDEN, ) the land of Nod which stood before it with respect to the place where Moses wrote, may still preserve the curse of barrenness passed on it for Cain's sake, namely, in the deserts of Syria or Arabia
Haran - Haran was situated in the north-western part of Mesopotamia on a river of the same name running into the Euphrates
Armenia - Minni and Ashchenaz, Jeremiah 51:27, districts in the upper valley of a branch of the Euphrates
Roman Empire - It reached to the Atlantic on the west, the Euphrates on the east, the African desert, the Nile cataracts, and the Arabian deserts on the south, the Rhine, the Danube, and the Black Sea on the north
Ur - It is situated on the right bank of the Euphrates near the marshes, and in periods of inundation the ruins are surrounded by water
Ur - It has been identified by the most ancient traditions with the city of Orfah in the highlands of Mesopotamia, which unite the table-land of Armenia to the valley of the Euphrates. p 7 A second tradition, which appears in the Talmud, finds Ur in Warka, 120 miles southeast from Babylon and four east of the Euphrates
Eden, Garden of - It has been almost universally agreed that one of the four rivers is the Euphrates and another the Tigris . One is that the Gihon is the Nile, and the Pishon the Persian and Arabian Gulfs, conceived of as a great river, with its source and that of the Nile not far from those of the Euphrates and the Tigris. near the mouths of the Euphrates, the Tigris
Coele-Syria - , Cœle-Syria and Phœnicia denote the whole Persian province, stretching from the Euphrates to the borders of Egypt
Meshech - ), the former lying to the north-east of Cilicia and the latter eastward between them and the Euphrates
Governor - Several of these governors presided over districts on the western side of the Euphrates, Nehemiah 2:7; Nehemiah 2:9; and they were inferior to the satraps, or king's lieutenants
Sumer - Its principal cities were Nippur, Adab, Lagash, Umma, Larsa, Erech, Ur, and Eridu, most of which were on or near the Euphrates. The area consists primarily of the fertile plain between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers and is now the southern part of modern Iraq
Armenia - a considerable country of Asia, having Colchis and Iberia on the north, Media on the east, Mesopotamia on the south, Pontus and Cappadocia on the west, and the Euphrates and Syria on the south-west. In the flourishing times of Tyre, the Armenians, according to Ezekiel 27:14 , brought horses and mules to the markets of that city; and, according to Herodotus, they had a considerable trade in wine, which they sent down the Euphrates to Babylon, &c
Babylon - A celebrated city situated on the Euphrates, the original foundation of which is described under the word Babel. ...
Babylon lay in a vast and fertile plain watered by the Euphrates, with flowed through the city. Her location gave her to a great extent the control of the traffic, by the Euphrates and by caravans, between Central Asia and Arabia and Egypt. Cyrus had previously caused a canal, which ran west of the city, and carried off the superfluous water of the Euphrates into the lake of Nitocris, to be cleared out, in order to turn the river into it; which, by this means, was rendered so shallow, that his soldiers were able to penetrate along its bed into the city, Daniel 5:1-31
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - Thus the early river civilizations of the Nile, the Tigris, and Euphrates starting about 3000 B. Euphrates First mentioned in Genesis 2:14 as one of the four branches of the river that watered the Garden of Eden, the Euphrates flows 1,700 miles to become the longest river in Western Asia. On the Middle Euphrates, Carchemish, originally the center of a small city-state, became the important provincial capital of the Mitanni kingdom, later of the Hittite and Assyrian Empires. Two important tributaries, the Belikh and Khabur, flow into the Euphrates from the north before it continues on to the ancient trade center at Mari. The Lower Euphrates generally formed the western limits of the city-states that made up the early Sumerian civilization. From the river plain to the delta, both the Tigris and Euphrates rivers regularly have formed new branches and changed their courses. Lost as well in this region are the vast amounts of sediment that the Tigris and Euphrates bring from the mountainous regions. See Euphrates and Tigris Rivers . ...
The course of the Upper Euphrates was described as the northern border of the Promised Land (Genesis 15:18 ; Deuteronomy 1:7 ; Deuteronomy 11:24 ; Joshua 1:4 ). The terms “the river,” “the flood,” “the great river,” and “beyond the river” (Genesis 41:1 ; Ezra 4:10-13 ; Jeremiah 46:8 ) refer to the Euphrates, historically a significant political and geographical boundary. Tigris From its source in a small lake (Hazar Golu), about 100 miles west of Lake Van, in Armenia, the Tigris flows in a southeasterly direction for about 1,150 miles before joining the Euphrates and emptying into the Persian Gulf. The Euphrates, flowing at a level nine meters higher than the Tigris, permitted the construction of a sequence of irrigation canals between the two rivers that resulted in unusual productivity. ...
Apart from the significant roles played by the Nile in Egypt and the Tigris and Euphrates in Mesopotamia, the rivers of the biblical world were small and mostly unnavigable
Babylon - ...
Location Traditionally, a mound called Babil, near the Euphrates River and some six miles northeast of Hillah (southwest of Iraq's capital city Baghdad), has been identified as the location of ancient Babylon. However, the city's location proved to be represented by a number of mounds downstream on the Euphrates 1 1/2-2 1/2 miles south of Babil, the main ones being Qasr, Amran ibn Ali, Merkes, and Homera. ...
Ancient Babylon was divided in two by the Euphrates river. The eastern section with the “Summer Palace” to the north was enclosed by a triangular defensive system of walls running over eight miles from the Euphrates about one and one half miles north of the city southeast to turn southwest to rejoin the river about 750 feet south of the city. ”...
Just inside the outer wall system at the north and along the Euphrates was the mound Babil, some 1 1/2-2 1/2 miles north of the other mounds. Ancient Babylon's most famous street was the Processional Way, Aibur-shabu (“the enemy shall never pass”) along which the images of the gods were transported from the Euphrates into Babylon during the New Year Festival. From the Euphrates along this street the distance was about 2000 feet to the northern side of the rectangular wall system. Inside the gate the Processional Way, sloping downward, extends some 4000 feet southward to turn west between the ziggurat enclosure and the Marduk temple toward the Euphrates bridge built by either Nabopolassar or his son Nebuchadnezzar
Haran - It stood on the river Belik, an affluent of the Euphrates, about 70 miles above where it joins that river in Upper Mesopotamia or Padan-aram, and about 600 miles northwest of Ur in a direct line
Mesha - " The western port of Arabia; Muss (Bothart), Mesene ("a fluviatile island") at the mouth of the Tigris and Euphrates, near Bassora (Gesenius) (Genesis 10:30); Beishe in the N
Canaanites, the - In Genesis 15:18-21 , where the land promised to Abram extends to the river Euphrates, there are ten nations mentioned: the Kenites, the Kenizzites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaims, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites
Chaldea - The whole district was situate between the rivers Tigris and the Euphrates, but extended west of the latter
Esdras - The Persian king had given Esdras a letter ordering the satraps beyond the Euphrates to aid him to enforce observance of the Mosaic Law in Judea
Cush - The Cushites appear to have spread along extensive tracts, stretching from the Upper Nile to the Euphrates and Tigris. One branch, called the Cossaeans, settled in the mountainous district on the east of the Tigris, known afterwards as Susiana; another occupied the lower regions of the Euphrates and the Tigris; while a third colonized the southern shores and islands of the gulf, whence they afterwards emigrated to the Mediterranean and settled on the coast of Palestine as the Phoenicians
Bela - A king of Edom, son of Beor, a Chaldean probably by birth (like Balaam also descended from Beor, and originally residing in Pethor of Aram by the Euphrates: Numbers 22:5; Numbers 23:7), and reigning in Edom by conquest (Genesis 36:31-39; 1 Chronicles 1:43-51). He too "in Aroer, even unto Nebo and Baal Meon, eastward unto the entering in of the wilderness from the river Euphrates" (1 Chronicles 5:8-9)
Hebrew - The sense of Genesis 10:21 is: as in Genesis 10:6-20 the three Hamite settlements are mentioned, Babylon, Egypt, Canaan, so next the Shemite races are spoken of as commencing at the most easterly point of the Hamites, namely, Babylon and the Euphrates. of the nations settled eastward, starting from beyond the Euphrates
Mesopotamia - Originally the name ‘Mesopotamia’ was given to the fertile land around the upper reaches of the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers (Genesis 24:10; Deuteronomy 23:4; Judges 3:8-10; 1 Chronicles 19:6). By New Testament times it applied to the whole of the Euphrates-Tigris valley, so that even the city of Ur, which was near the mouth of the Euphrates, was considered to be in Mesopotamia (Acts 2:9; Acts 7:2). (For details see ARAM; ASSYRIA; BABYLON; Euphrates; SYRIA; TIGRIS
Willows - The Jewish captives in Babylon hung their harps on the weeping willow along the Euphrates
Ur - The site is an oval shape and had harbor facilities on the Euphrates River, until its course shifted twelve miles east from the city's western limit
Uz - Ptolemy mentions the Aesitae (related to "Uz") as in the northern part of Arabia Deserta, near Babylon and the Euphrates
a'Ram -
The name by which the Hebrews designated, generally, the country lying to the northeast of Palestine; the great mass of that high tableland which, rising with sudden abruptness from the Jordan and the very margin of the Lake of Gennesaret, stretched at an elevation of no less than 2000 feet above the level of the sea, to the banks of the Euphrates itself
Sanaballat - He may have received from the Persian government some authority over the Samaritans of imported Cuthites, as one of the governors west of the Euphrates
ha'Ran - (Genesis 25:20 ) the cultivated district at the foot of the hills, a name well applying to the beautiful stretch of country which lies below Mount Masius between the Khabour and the Euphrates
ba'Laam - Numb 31:16 He seems to have lived at Pethor, (23:4; Numbers 22:5 ) on the river Euphrates, in Mesopotamia
Nebaioth - 1:12, section 4) regards "Nabateans" as synonymous with "Arabs," and says that "Ishmael's twelve sons inhabit all the regions from the Euphrates to the Red Sea" (compare Genesis 25:18). Quatremere from them shows that these Nabateans inhabited Mesopotamia between the Euphrates and Tigris; they were Syro Chaldaeans, and were celebrated among the Arabs for agriculture, magic, medicine, and astronomy
Tadmor or Tamar - A palm-tree, 1 Kings 9:18 , a city founded by Solomon in the desert of Syria, on the borders of Arabia Dessert, towards the Euphrates, 2 Chronicles 8:4 . It was about one hundred and twenty miles northeast of Damascus, more than half the distance to the Euphrates
Hadadezer - Thus the power of the Ammonites and the Syrians was finally broken, and David's empire extended to the Euphrates (2 Samuel 10:15-19 ; 1 Chronicles 19:15-19 )
Midian - The territory of Midian extended, according to some scholars, from the Elanitic Gulf to Moab and Mount Sinai; or, according to others, from the Sinaitic peninsula to the desert and the banks of the Euphrates
Seraiah - Son of Neriah: to him was committed by Jeremiah a roll 'written against Babylon,' to be read at Babylon, and then with a stone tied to it, he was to cast it into the Euphrates; and to declare, "Thus shall Babylon sink
Babel - The Birs Nimrûd is one of the most striking ruins on the plain, and is six miles southwest of Hillah, on the Euphrates
Shalmaneser - Shalmaneser brought an army against him, ravaged Samaria, besieged Hoshea in his capital, and notwithstanding his long resistance of three years, 2 Kings 17:1-40 ; 18:9-12 , he took the city and dismantled it, put Hoshea into bonds, and dismantled it, put Hoshea into bonds, and carried away most of the people beyond the Euphrates
Syria - In the New Testament, Syria may be considered as bounded west and north-west by the Mediterranean and by Mount Taurus, which separates it from Cilicia and Cataonia in Asia Minor, east by the Euphrates, and south by Arabia Deserta and Palestine, or rather Judea, for the name Syria included also the northern part of Palestine
River - Nahar, applied, like our word river, to constantly flowing streams, such as the Euphrates
River - With the definite article, "the river," it signifies invariably the Euphrates
Hadad - 2), confirms 2 Samuel 8:3 as to David's defeating Hadadezer or Hadarezer, king of Zobah, "when he went to recover his border at the river Euphrates"; Nicolaus says, "a certain Hadad, a native Syrian, had great power, ruling over Damascus and all Syria except. Phoenicia (this accords with 2 Samuel 8:5, 'the Syrians of Damascus came to support Hadadezer,' being his vassals); he contended against David king of Judea in many battles; in the last, which was by the Euphrates, he suffered defeat (making his third defeat: 2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Samuel 8:5; 2 Samuel 10:18), showing himself a prince of the greatest prowess
Tribe - Tiglath-Pileser first took away captive the tribes of Reuben, Gad, Naphtali, and the half tribe of Manasseh, which were beyond Jordan, and carried them beyond the Euphrates, 2 Kings 15:29 ; 1 Chronicles 5:26 ; A. Some years after, Shalmaneser king of Assyria took the city of Samaria, destroyed it, took away the rest of the inhabitants of Israel, carried them beyond the Euphrates, and sent other inhabitants into the country to cultivate and possess 2 Kings 17:6 ; 2 Kings 18:10-11
River - Among the other streams and mountain torrents in Palestine there are the Kishon, which drains Galilee westward; the Yarmuk and the Jabbok, which carry the waters of Bashan and Gilead into the Jordan; the Leontes and Orontes, which rise in CCEle-Syria and drain the great basin between Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon, and the Euphrates, greatest of All, forming the boundary of Palestine on the N. In the first (Revelation 9:14), the sixth angel with the trumpet is bidden to loose the four angels that are bound at ‘the great river Euphrates,’ that they may lead forth a mighty army to the sad disaster of Rome. The Euphrates, which in the olden time had been the ideal eastern boundary of Israel’s territory, is here conceived of as the frontier between Rome and her enemies the Parthians. In a parallel passage (Revelation 16:12) the sixth angel pours out his bowl on the Euphrates, and its waters are dried up that the way may be ready for the kings (of Parthia) to cross over (cf
Babylon - bank of the Euphrates, part of its site being now occupied by Hillah, about 50 miles S. 689, the chief palaces, temples, and city walls levelled with the ground, and the waters of the Euphrates turned over it. The reference to Babylon in 1 Peter 5:13 has had three interpretations: ( a ) Babylon in Egypt, mentioned by Strabo and Epiphanius; ( b ) Babylon on the Euphrates; and ( c ) Rome
Seraiah - The roll containing this message (Jeremiah 50:1-8 ) Seraiah was to read to the exiles, and then, after fixing a stone to it, was to throw it into the Euphrates, uttering, as it sank, the prayer recorded in Jeremiah 51:59-64
Babel, Tower of - ...
The Birs Nimrud, at ancient Borsippa, about 7 miles south-west of Hillah, the modern town which occupies a part of the site of ancient Babylon, and 6 miles from the Euphrates, is an immense mass of broken and fire-blasted fragments, of about 2,300 feet in circumference, rising suddenly to the height of 235 feet above the desert-plain, and is with probability regarded as the ruins of the tower of Babel
Hittites - This was near or at Hebron in the south of Palestine, whereas other passages speak of them in the north, between the Lebanon and the Euphrates, which was probably where they originally settled, Joshua 1:4 ; and there are intimations that they continued a powerful and warlike race after Palestine was possessed by Israel
Balaam - The son of Beor or Bosor, and a native of Pethor, on the Euphrates
Mesopotamia - Between the rivers, the Greek name of the country between the Euphrates and the Tigris, called in Arabic, Al Jezira, the island
Chalde'a, - Chaldea proper was the southern part of Babylonia, and is used in Scripture to signify that vast alluvial plain which has been formed by the deposits of the Euphrates and the Tigris
Hittites - They inhabited the whole region between the Euphrates and Damascus, their chief cities being Carchemish on the Euphrates, and Kadesh, now Tell Neby Mendeh, in the Orontes valley, about six miles south of the Lake of Homs
Ur - It stood near the mouth of the Euphrates, on its western bank, and is represented by the mounds (of bricks cemented by bitumen) of el-Mugheir, i. , "the bitumined," or "the town of bitumen," now 150 miles from the sea and some 6 miles from the Euphrates, a little above the point where it receives the Shat el-Hie, an affluent from the Tigris
Hittites - Assuming that this is correct, the principal habitat of the Hittites was Asia Minor, for these monuments are found from Karabel, a pass near Smyrna, to Erzerum, and from the so-called Niobe (originally a Hittite goddess), near Magnesia, to Jerabis, the ancient Carchemish, on the Euphrates. It is probable that their civilization was developed in Asia Minor, and that they afterwards pushed southward into northern Syria, invading a region as far eastward as the Euphrates. 1400) they attempted unsuccessfully to invade the land of Mittani on the Euphrates, and successfully planted themselves on the Orontes valley in Syria (cf
Babylon - The noted capital of the Chaldæan and Babylonian empires, situated on both sides of the Euphrates river, about 200 miles above its junction with the Tigris, 300 miles from the Persian Gulf. The valley is broad, and the river Euphrates is now about 600 feet wide and 18 feet deep at this place. Babylon, according to Herodotus, was a vast square on both sides of the Euphrates, enclosed by a double line of walls, about 56 miles in circuit and including about 200 square miles
Nimrod - The combination of warlike prowess with a passion for the chase is illustrated by the numerous hunting scenes sculptured on the monuments; and it may well be imagined that to the Hebrew mind Nimrod became an ideal personation of the proud monarchs who ruled the mighty empires on the Euphrates and the Tigris
Pool - " The "pools" spoken of in Isaiah 14:23 are the marshes caused by the ruin of the canals of the Euphrates in the neighbourhood of Babylon
zo'ba, - It probably was eastward of Coele-Syria, and extended thence northeast and east toward, if not even to, the Euphrates
Eden - Only two of these can be identified, the Euphrates, and the Hiddekel denoting the Tigris
Eden - Only two of these can be identified, the Euphrates, and the Hiddekel denoting the Tigris
Chaldea - The most important of the smaller groups were the Chaldeans, who lived in the south of Babylon around the lower reaches of the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers
Haran - of Mesopotamia, marked by the modern village of Harran , situated on the Bçlikh, a tributary of the Euphrates, and about nine hours’ ride S
Eden - The site must undoubtedly be sought for somewhere along the course of the great streams the Tigris and the Euphrates of Western Asia, in "the land of Shinar" or Babylonia
Nergal-Sharezer - The ruins of a palace, the only one on the right bank of the Euphrates, bear inscriptions denoting that it was built by this king
Accad - It stood close to the Euphrates, opposite Sippara
Chaldea - , the land between the lower stretches of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers
Seraiah - Though Seraiah was to cast it into the Euphrates, a symbol of Babylon's fate, he retained the substance in memory, to communicate orally to his countrymen
Ezra - Josephus says he died at an advanced age at Jerusalem: but an early writer said there was a tomb near the junction of the Tigris and the Euphrates which was reported to be the tomb of Ezra
Pul (2) - of the Euphrates
Ephraim - Ephraim was led captive beyond the Euphrates, with all Israel, by Salmaneser, king of Assyria, A
Canaan, Land of - The whole of it was promised to Abraham, and a further territory was also promised 'from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates. ; the Mediterranean being the western limit, the eastern being undefined; but the 'river Euphrates' boundary must be on the north part of that river, which indeed was reached by Solomon at Tiphsah (about 35 50' N, 39 E). In Deuteronomy 1:7 the borders are named as between 'the mount of the Amorites,' near the Dead Sea on the south, to 'Lebanon and the river Euphrates' on the north
Euphrates - Among the rivers of west Asia, the Euphrates was the largest. The territory of the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers was known as Mesopotamia, and formed part of the ancient land of Babylon. The ancient city of Ur was on the Euphrates (Genesis 11:28; see UR)
ba'Bel - The city was situated on both sides of the river Euphrates, and the two parts were connected together by a stone bridge five stades (above 1000 yards) long and 30 feet broad. About five miles above Hillah, on the opposite or left bank of the Euphrates occurs a series of artificial mounds of enormous size. Scattered over the country on both sides of the Euphrates are a number of remarkable mounds, usually standing single, which are plainly of the same date with the great mass of ruins upon the river bank
Assyria - A great empire of western Asia, founded at a very early date probably the oldest on the Euphrates, and is traced to Asshur, Genesis 10:10-11, who built Nineveh, Rehoboth (?), Calah, and Resen. " The Persian Gulf formerly extended about 130 miles further to the northwest than it does now, the gulf having been filled up by mud borne down by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. ), its capital, and Media (Mada), with Ecbatana (Agamtanu = Achmetha, Ezra 6:2), its capital, and Armenia (Urartu = Ararat, 2 Kings 19:37), and the land of the Hittites (Chatti), who, we thus learn, as well as from the Egyptian inscriptions, had their chief seat far to the north of Damascus—Carchemish (Gargamish), their capital, being on the Euphrates, not far from the latitude of Nineveh (modern Jerabis). The river Habor (Chabur), of 2 Kings 17:6, is a river often named that flows into the middle Euphrates from the northeast, and Gozan (Guzanu) (ib. "The only known Ur situated in the territory of the Chaldeans is the city of Uru, lying on the right bank of the Euphrates, far below Babylon, whose site now bears the name Muqayyar (Mugheir)
Tad'Mor - It lay between the Euphrates and Hamath, to the southeast of that city, in a fertile tract or oasis of the desert
Iconium - On the route between western Asia and Ephesus on one side, and Tarsus, Antioch, and Euphrates on the other
Thutmose - His military exploits expanded Egypt to include Nubia to the south and Syria, north to the Euphrates River
Table of Nations - The descendants of Shem were located generally in north Syria, that is, the region of the upper part of the Euphrates River, and Mesopotamia, especially the eastern part
Mesopotamia - The name given by the Greeks and Romans to that tract of fertile country lying between the rivers Euphrates and Tigris
Gourd - So Habor was a region and a river (the Khabour, the affluent of the Euphrates)
Sepharvaim - of Babylon, built on both banks of Euphrates (or of the canal nahr Αgane ), from whence arises its dual form, -aim , "the two Sipparas
Pitch - Bitumen pits are still found at Hit on the western bank of Euphrates; so tenacious is it "that it is almost impossible to detach one brick from another" (Layard, Nin
Balaam - A celebrated diviner, of the city Pethor, on the Euphrates, Numbers 22:5
Necho or Pharaoh-Necho - On his return from the Euphrates, where he had taken and garrisoned the city of Carchemish, B
Babylon, Kingdom of - Among its chief cities may be mentioned Ur (now Mugheir or Mugayyar), on the western bank of the Euphrates; Uruk, or Erech (Genesis 10:10 ) (now Warka), between Ur and Babylon; Larsa (now Senkereh), the Ellasar of Genesis 14:1 , a little to the east of Erech; Nipur (now Niffer), south-east of Babylon; Sepharvaim (2 Kings 17:24 ), "the two Sipparas" (now Abu-Habba), considerably to the north of Babylon; and Eridu, "the good city" (now Abu-Shahrein), which lay originally on the shore of the Persian Gulf, but is now, owing to the silting up of the sand, about 100 miles distant from it. The salt-marshes at the mouths of the Euphrates and Tigris were called Marratu, "the bitter" or "salt", the Merathaim of Jeremiah 50:21
Tadmor - a city built by Solomon, 1 Kings 9:18 , afterward called Palmyra; situated in a wilderness of Syria, upon the borders of Arabia Deserta, inclining toward the Euphrates. Josephus places it two days' journey from the Euphrates, and six days' journey from Babylon
Babel - Arabia, and the cities on the lower Euphrates near its mouth. Thence they went higher up the river, and finally fixed at Babylon, 300 miles above the Persian gulf, and 200 above the junction of the Tigris with the Euphrates. The streets crossed at right a angles, the cross streets to the Euphrates being closed at the river end by brazen gates. " The largest, the royal canal, navigable to merchant vessels, connected the Euphrates and Tigris. Five miles above Hillah, on the left bank of the Euphrates, enormous mounds mark the site of the capital of S. of Hillah, and six from the Euphrates, is the most remarkable, 153 1/2 ft. of the river Sippara, the ancient course of the Euphrates, and that of Neriglissar on the W. Nimrod the son of Cash carne over in ships to lower Mesopotamia, and built Ur on the right of the Euphrates near the mouth. The cuneiform inscriptions often designate the people of the lower Euphrates region Kiriath Arbol, "the four nations;" such a confederacy appears in Genesis 14, of which the king of Shinar was one. So the Babylonian empire was extended over the whole Euphrates valley to the Taurus range, over Syria, Phoenicia, Palestine, Idumaea; and the Jews passed as tributaries under Babylon, as they had been under Assyria. ) in the later years of Nabopolassar conquered the whole region between Egypt and the Euphrates. Nabopolassar sent Nebuchadnezzar; and the latter at the battle of Carchemish, on the Euphrates, regained all the lost territory for Babylon (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2-12. " He built the palace on the right bank of the ancient bed of the Euphrates
Pharaoh - Thothmes III broke the confederacy of the allied kings of all the regions between Euphrates and the Mediterranean, just 17 years before Israel's invasion of Canaan, thus providentially preparing the way for an easy conquest of Canaan; this accounts for the terror of Midian and Moab at Israel's approach (Numbers 22:3-4), and the "sorrow and trembling which took hold on the inhabitants of Palestina and Canaan" (Exodus 15:14-16). Necho designed to acquire all Syria as far as Carchemish on the Euphrates (2 Chronicles 35:20-24). So Necho for a time ruled all Syria, "from the Euphrates to the river of Egypt," deposed Jehoahaz for Eliakim = Jehoiakim, and levied tribute (2 Kings 24:7; 2 Kings 23:31-35)
Balaam - Balaam was a soothsayer of Pethor on the Euphrates, called by Balak, king of Moab, to curse the Israelites, who were lying encamped in the Jordan valley. According to it, Balaam was a prophet of Pethor on the river Euphrates. It is also extremely unlikely that so long a journey as that from the Euphrates to Moab would be attempted upon an ass
Assur - , the Mesopotamian desert (between Tigris and Euphrates), or else the Euphrates, on the W. of the Euphrates was Arabia, higher up Syria, and the country of the Hittites. of the Sinyar (a limestone range extending from Iwan in Luristan nearly to Rakkah on the Euphrates), and eastward beyond the Khabour, northward to Mardie, and southward to near Bagdad. Rehoboth answers to ruins still so named on the right of the Euphrates, N. He records that his mother placed him at his birth in an ark of rushes and set it afloat on the Euphrates; seemingly copied from the account of Moses. ("Be worship given to Nin" or "Hercules") claims to have conquered in the first five years of his reign "42 countries from the Lower Zab to the Upper Sea of the setting sun," the region from Assyria proper to the Euphrates, from Babylon's borders to mount Taurus, and to have fought the Hittites in northern Syria, and invaded Armenia and Cappadocia
Daniel, Book of - Daniel is "the historian of the Captivity, the writer who alone furnishes any series of events for that dark and dismal period during which the harp of Israel hung on the trees that grew by the Euphrates
Laban - Jacob removed his property across the Euphrates, while Rachel took with her the teraphim or household gods of the family
Sabeans - " They are thought to have inhabited beyond the Euphrates; whence they are connected with Asshur and Chilmad, Genesis 10:28 ; 1 Chronicles 1:22
Syria - by the middle Euphrates and the Hamâd or desert steppe, and on the S. Separated from one another by great mountain barriers, they have never formed a political unity, but during the centuries in which their freedom was undisturbed by the military powers on the Nile and Euphrates valleys they developed types of civilization and culture which, through the commerce of Phcenicia and the religion of Judaea , have powerfully influenced mankind
Sea - The Great Sea is the Mediterranean: “From the wilderness and this Lebanon even unto the great river, the river Euphrates, all the land of the Hittites, and unto the Great Sea toward the going down of the sun, shall be your coast” ( Euphrates River ( Medes, me'Dia - From north to south it was certainly confined between the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates on the one side, the Black and Caspian Seas on the other. It was separated from Babylonia either by the Tigris or more probably by a line running about halfway between that river and the Euphrates
Nebuchadnezzar - ) and wrested from him all the territory from Euphrates to Egypt (Jeremiah 46:2; Jeremiah 46:12; 2 Kings 24:7) which he had held for three years, so that "he came not again any more out of his land. " Abydenus states Nebuchadnezzar made the nahr malcha , "royal river," a branch from the Euphrates, and the Acracanus; also the reservoir above the city Sippara, 90 miles round and 120 ft. The network of irrigation by canals between the Tigris and Euphrates, and on the right bank of the Euphrates to the stony desert, was his work; also the canal still traceable from Hit at the Euphrates, framing 400 miles S
Jordan - Pococke has made on the river Euphrates: The bed of the Euphrates, says that writer, was measured by some English gentlemen at Beer, and found to be six hundred and thirty yards broad; but the river only two hundred and fourteen yards over; then they thought it to be nine or ten feet deep in the middle; and were informed that it sometimes rises twelve feet perpendicularly. Harmer argues: "Might not the over-flowings of the Jordan be like those of the Euphrates, not annual, but much more rare?" The difficulty, therefore, will be completely removed by supposing, that it does not, like the Nile, overflow every year, as some authors, by mistake, had supposed, but, like the Euphrates, only in some particular years; but when it does it is in the time of harvest
River - ) ...
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Nahar, a "river" continuous and full, a perennial stream, as the Jordan, the Euphrates (Genesis 2:10 ; 15:18 ; Deuteronomy 1:7 ; Psalm 66:6 ; Ezekiel 10:15 )
Merodach Baladan - Inscriptions say that Merodach Baladan, having been conquered in battle by Sargon, and Babylonia having been ravaged, fled to "the islands at the mouth of the Euphrates
Bitumen - The springs at Kit, on the Euphrates, 150 miles above Babylon, are mentioned by Herodotus (i
Gihon - ) The Septuagint, Jeremiah 2:18, identify it with the Nile; but the writer of Genesis, so well acquainted with Egypt, would never have connected the Nile with the Euphrates
Ararat - The country was southeast of the Black Sea and southwest of the Caspian, where the head waters of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers were found
Zebulun - It is thought these tribes were the first carried into captivity beyond the Euphrates by Pul and Tiglath Pileser, kings of Assyria, 1 Chronicles 5:26
Ishmael - He had twelve sons, who became the founders of so many Arab tribes or colonies, the Ishmaelites, who spread over the wide desert spaces of Northern Arabia from the Red Sea to the Euphrates (Genesis 37:25,27,28 ; 39:1 ), "their hand against every man, and every man's hand against them
Gihon - But as, according to the sacred narrative, all these rivers of Eden took their origin from the head-waters of the Euphrates and the Trigris, it is probable that the Gihon is the ancient Araxes, which, under the modern name of the Arras, discharges itself into the Caspian Sea
Syria, Syrian - If from Dan to Beersheba be taken as the boundaries of Palestine, it leaves for Syria a district quite as large on its north, besides extending also to the Euphrates on the east
Irrigation - During the Exile of Judah in Babylon, canals as large as twenty-five yards wide and several miles long carried the waters of the Tigris and Euphrates to field and city
Riblah - From Riblah the roads were open by the Euphrates to Nineveh, or by Palmyra to Babylon, by the S
Deluge - ...
If the waters had only overflowed the neighbourhood of the Euphrates and the Tigris, they could not be fifteen cubits above the highest mountains; there was no rising that height but they must spread themselves, by the laws of gravity, over the rest of the earth; unless perhaps they had been retained there by a miracle; in that case, Moses, no doubt, would have related the miracle, as he did that of the waters of the Red Sea, &c. It may also be observed, that in regions far remote from the Euphrates and Tigris, viz
Arabia - by the Euphrates and the Persian Gulf, S. by the Euphrates, W. They spread their colonies from the Senegal to the indus, and from Madagascar to the Euphrates
Sennacherib - Building a fleet on the Tigris and Euphrates, he pursued the Chald¿an to the mouth of the Eul¿us, and there captured and destroyed the Chald¿an stronghold, thus invading Lower Elam
Babylon - ...
On the west bank of the Euphrates, about 50 miles south of Bagdad, there is found a series of artificial mounds of vast extent
Well - See Numbers 24:7, "he shall stream with water out of his two buckets," namely, suspended from the two ends of a pole, the usual way of fetching water from the Euphrates in Balaam's neighbourhood
Hosea - The king of Assyria removed the Israelites of the ten tribes to countries beyond the Euphrates, and thus terminated the kingdom of the ten tribes
Ishmaelites - " From this brief statement, we may conjecture how far their territory extended; for Havilah, according to the generality of writers, was situated near the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates, and Shur, on the isthmus which separates Arabia from Egypt, now called the isthmus of Suez
Solomon - His unquestioned dominion extended from the Euphrates to the "river of Egypt;" Palmyra in the desert and Eziongeber on the Red Sea were in his possession
Last - When applied elsewhere, the word means “western”: “Every place whereon the soles of your feet shall tread shall be yours: from the wilderness and Lebanon, from the river, the river Euphrates, even unto the uttermost [1] sea shall your coast be” ( Carchemish - (cahr' cehm ihssh; fort of Chemosh ) (modern Jerablus) was an important city on the great bend of the Euphrates River
Hierocles (1), Neoplatonic Philosopher - Coming from a man in his position, it would carry great weight in the region of the Euphrates
Abaddon - ...
Elliott identifies the locusts with the Muslims; their turbans being the "crowns" (but how are these "like gold"?); they come from the Euphrates River; their cavalry were countless; their "breast-plates of fire" being their rich-colored attire; the fire and smoke out of the horses' mouths being the Turkish artillery; their standard "horse tails"; the period, an hour, day, month, and year, 396 years 118 days between Thogrul Beg going forth Jan
Isaacus i, Catholicos of the Church of Greater Armenia, Saint - , and the general Anatolius, who was commissioned by the emperor to build the city of Theodosiopolis (called Garin by the Armenians, Erzeroum by the Turks), near the sources of the Euphrates, as a place of refuge for Isaac
Babylon (2) - It was chiefly between the Euphrates and Tigris rivers
Salt - The governors of the provinces beyond the Euphrates, writing to the king Artaxerxes, tell him, "Because we have maintenance from the king's palace," Ezra 4:14
Hebrews - Some of them are names of places near the upper reaches of the Euphrates and the Tigris, and the whole genealogy may be regarded rather as a geographical account of the wanderings of the Hebrews than as a statement of racial affinities. of the Euphrates
Uz - 23 it is located on the borders of the Euphrates
Judah - All these reported to the Satrap of the Persian satrapy of Abarnaharah which encompassed the land west of the Euphrates River with its center in Damascus (Ezra 5:3 ,Ezra 5:3,5:6 ; Ezra 6:6 ,Ezra 6:6,6:13 )
Hiram - 18), apparently on the authority of Dius and Menunder of Ephesus in file time of Alexander the Great, states, "David reduced the Syrians near the Euphrates, and Commagene, the Assy
Banking - among the Babylonians in the valleys of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers
Cappadocia - Cappadocia was traversed by the great road of commerce from Ephesus to the Euphrates, by the pilgrims’ route from Constantinople to Jerusalem, and by roads from the Cilician Gates to the cities of the Euxine
Captivities of Israel - In the year of the world 3283, Shalmaneser took and destroyed Samaria, after a siege of three years, and transplanted the tribes that had been spared by Tiglath-pileser, to provinces beyond the Euphrates, 2 Kings 18:10-11
Banking - among the Babylonians in the valleys of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers
Assyria - Most generally, Assyria means the Kingdom of Assyria, including Babylonia and Mesopotamia, and extending to the Euphrates, which is therefore used by Isaiah as an image of this empire, Isaiah 7:20 ; 8:7
Ararat - The Acampsis, the Araxes, the Euphrates, and the Tigris connect it respectively with the four great seas
Josiah - In the thirty-second year of Josiah's reign, Pharaoh-Necho, king of Egypt, advanced with his army against Carchemish, a city situated on the river Euphrates
Hittites And Hivites - He intended to gain control over the trade route along the Euphrates by capturing Aleppo, the route's northern terminus. He soon claimed all territories west of the Euphrates. Assyria continued its westward move and, in spite of the Egypt-Hittite treaty, reached the Euphrates and cut off Hittite copper supplies
Nebuchadnezzar - The whole was watered from the Euphrates, which flowed at its base, by machinery within the mound. The ruins of the hanging gardens are believed to be found in the vast irregular mound called Kasr, on the East Side of the Euphrates, eight hundred yards by six hundred at its base
Tadmor - ...
Tadmor, of whose origin and earlier history we know nothing, lay upon a great natural road through the desert, not far from the Euphrates, and not very far from Damascus
Ahijah - ...
Though blind with age he detected her, and announced that as Jeroboam had utterly failed in the one condition of continuance in the kingdom rent from David's house, which his former prophecy had laid down, namely, to keep God's commandments heartily as David did, Jeroboam's house should be taken away "as dung"; but that in reward for the good there was found in Abijah toward God, he alone should have an honorable burial (compare Isaiah 57:1-2), but that "Jehovah would smite Israel as a reed shaken in the water, and root up and scatter Israel beyond the river," Euphrates
Belshazzar - Cyrus diverted the Euphrates into a channel, and guided by Gobryas and Gadatas, deserters, marched by the dry channel into Babylon, while the citizens were carousing at an annual feast to the idols (Isaiah 21:5; Isaiah 44:27; Jeremiah 50:29-35; Jeremiah 50:38-39; Jeremiah 51:36; Jeremiah 51:57)
Cilicia - It was comparatively easy to cross the Amanus range, either by the Syrian Gates (Beilan Pass) to Antioch and Syria, or by the Amanan Gates (Baghche Pass) to North Syria and the Euphrates
Arise - When Scripture says that "[1] rose up, and passed over the [2] river" ( Sennacherib - , crushed the revolt of Babylon, and drove away Merodach Baladan, made Belibus his officer viceroy, ravaged the Aramaean lands on the Tigris and Euphrates, and carried off 200,000 captives
Peter, First Epistle of - It was apparently sent from Babylon on the Euphrates, where many Jews were located
ma'gi - As to the country from which they came, opinions vary greatly; but their following the guidance of a star seems to point to the banks of the Tigris and Euphrates, where astronomy was Cultivated by the Chaldeans
Joshua, the Book of - Euphrates . " The limit, the Euphrates, was not actually reached until Solomon's reign (1 Kings 4:21), and the full realization awaits Christ's millennial reign (Genesis 15:18; Psalms 72:8); but the main step toward its fulfillment was taken
Ships, Sailors, And Navigation - The early development of the two major centers of civilization along the major river systems of the Near Eastern world, the Tigris/Euphrates and the Nile, surely was not coincidental. Along the marshy stretches of the Nile, Tigris, and Euphrates, rafts of reed bundles were refined into the reed canoe. The special requirements of rapids and swift waters of the Upper Tigris and Euphrates prompted the development of the buoyed raft, a wooden platform supported on inflated skins that continued in use until very recent times. Mesopotamian Shipping Mesopotamian kings and merchants also operated long-distance maritime routes in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean from several inland cities that were accessible along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. A prevailing north wind and rapids in the Upper Tigris and Euphrates Rivers diminished the development of commercial shipping and the need for larger vessels
Peter - It was addressed to Christian churches in Asia Minor, and written probably at Babylon on the Euphrates
Temple, the Second - The body of pilgrims, forming a band of 42,360, including children, having completed the long and dreary journey of some four months, from the banks of the Euphrates to Jerusalem, were animated in all their proceeding by a strong religious impulse, and therefore one of their first cares was to restore their ancient worship by rebuilding the temple
Laban (2) - Jacob, during the absence of Laban, sheep-shearing, stole away with his family and flocks, crossing the Euphrates for the W
Nebuchadnezzar - " Nebuchadnezzar was intrusted by his father with repelling Pharaoh-necho, and succeeded in defeating him at Carchemish, on the Euphrates, b
Directions (Geographical) - At times a Babylonian/Assyrian viewpoint describes Palestine as the land of the Amorites, that is the wild west, or the land beyond the river with reference to the Euphrates
Greece - When, about three centuries after Alexander’s death, practically all his former dominions had become Roman provinces, Greek was the one language which could carry the traveller from the Euphrates to Spain
Siloam, the Pool of - Messiah "the sent One" (Luke 4:18; John 10:36) answers to the type Siloam the sent water (Job 5:10; Ezekiel 31:4) that healed; He flows gently, softly, and healing, like Siloam fertilising and beautifying, not turbid as the winter torrent Kedron, nor sweeping destructively all before it as Euphrates (symbol of Αssyria) , but gliding on in its silent mission of beneficence (Isaiah 8:6; 1618452146_7; Isaiah 40:11; 2 Corinthians 10:1)
Idolatry - Abraham's father's family served other gods beyond the river Euphrates; and Laban had idols which Rachel brought along with her
Throne - We read of the throne of the governor of this side the river; the throne, in other words, of the governor for the king of Persia of the provinces belonging to that empire on the west of the Euphrates
Bashan - The expression of ‘the fat bulls of Bashan,' which occurs more than once in the Scriptures, seemed to us equally inconsistent, as applied to the beasts of a country generally thought to be a desert, in common with the whole tract which is laid down in our modern maps as such between the Jordan and the Euphrates; but we could now fully comprehend, not only that the bulls of this luxuriant country might be proverbially fat, but that its possessors, too, might be a race renowned for strength and comeliness of person
Roman Empire - The boundaries of the empire were now the Atlantic on the west, the Euphrates on the east, the deserts of Africa, the cataracts of the Nile and the Arabian deserts on the south, the British Channel, the Rhine, the Danube and the Black Sea on the north
Josiah - His only fault was his supposition that by frustrating Necho's expedition to the Euphrates against Assyria he might avert God's predicted judgment on Judah. The Syrian princes, those independent as Josiah as well as Assyria's vassals, hoped now to be free from every foreign yoke; it was therefore necessary now to check the Egyptian, for though Necho was not marching against Judah but against Carchemish by Euphrates, Josiah knew that if once the Egyptians gained Coelosyria his independence would be gone
Wages - A still better reflexion of the actual conditions of labour in the valley of the Euphrates is found in the numerous written contracts that have been deciphered in recent years, a specimen of which will be given below (see esp
Phenicia - " "The trade routes from all Asia converged on the Phoenician coast; the centres of commerce on the Euphrates and Tigris forwarding their goods by way of Tyre to the Nile, to Arabia, and to the west; and, on the other hand, the productions of the vast regions bordering the Mediterranean passing through the Canaanite capital to the eastern world
Hypostatical Union - The Monophysites, or Jacobites, are found chiefly near the Euphrates and Tigris; they are much less numerous than the Nestorians; and, although they profess to have corrected the errors which were supposed to adhere to the Eutychian heresy, they may be considered as having formed their peculiar opinions upon the general principles of that system
Levites - After the captivity, numbers of them returned from beyond the Euphrates to Judea, Nehemiah 11:15-19 12:24-31
Canaan - ...
God's promise to Abraham was, "Unto thy seed have I given this land from the river of Egypt unto the great river the river Euphrates, the Kenites, the Kenezites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaims, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites" (Genesis 15:18-21). "The river (nahar ) of Egypt" is the Nile, or Sihor, here representing (according to Grove) Egypt in general, as "Euphrates" represents Assyria (compare Isaiah 8:7-8). In Exodus 23:31, "I will set thy bounds from the Red Sea even unto the sea of the Philistines (the Mediterranean), and from the desert (Paran and Shur) to the river" (Euphrates), the immediate territory of Israel in the Old Testament is assigned. ...
Solomon accordingly possessed Tiphsah, the old ford of Euphrates on the N
Assyria - , the greatest of the Assyrian kings, "crossed the Euphrates, defeated the kings of the Hittites, captured the city of Carchemish, and advanced as far as the shores of the Mediterranean
Pentateuch - ...
These particulars, observed with such curiosity, seem to prove that the author of the Pentateuch lived beyond the Euphrates
Roads - The most northerly, and in some respects the most important, was that connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Euphrates Valley
Mari - Today known as tell el-Hariri, the site is comprised of about 135 acres (after erosion on its northeast sector), is located adjacent to the right (west) bank of the Euphrates river, roughly fifteen miles north of the modern Syrian-Iraqi border
Gregorius, Saint., the Illuminator - the priests and supporters of the old religion—and baptized the king and his court in the Euphrates
Palmtree - For TADMOR (2 Chronicles 8:4) in 1 Kings 9:18 the best reading is Tamar, "the palm city," Roman "Palmyra," on an oasis of the Syrian desert, in the caravan route between Damascus and the Euphrates
Pass Over - ” This basic meaning can be used of “going over or through” a particular location to get to the other side, as when Jacob “crossed over” the Euphrates to escape Laban ( Ara'Bia - Northern Arabia , or the Arabian Desert, is a high, undulating, parched plain, of which the Euphrates forms the natural boundary from the Persian Gulf to the frontier of Syria, whence it is bounded by the latter country and the desert of Petra on the northwest and west, the peninsula of Arabia forming its southern limit
Land (of Israel) - The Lord "cut" an unconditional covenant with Abraham in which he stated, "To your descendants I give this land, from the river of Egypt to the great river, the Euphrates" (Genesis 15:18 ). He said, "To your descendants I give this land, from the river of Egypt to the great river, the Euphrates" (Genesis 15:18 )
Canaan - These included the bordering nations on the east, far into Arabia Deserta; thence north to Tipsah on the Euphrates, with all Syria between Lebanon and the Euphrates
Games - Another game commonly referred to as “hounds and jackals” was played throughout the Fertile Crescent (Tigris-Euphrates and Nile valleys with intervening land)
Iconium - So central and prosperous a city, traversed by a trade-route leading direct to the Cilician Gates, and connected by a cross-road with the great high-way to the Euphrates, naturally attracted many traders and settlers from the outside world
Israel - ...
Israel when carried away were placed in Halah and in Habor by the river of Gozan (in the neighbourhood of the river Khabour, an affluent of the river Euphrates), and in the cities of the Medes
Hand - ...
In several passages, yâd is used in the sense of “power” or “rule”: “And David smote Hadarezer king of Zobah unto Hamath, as he went to stablish his dominion by the river Euphrates” ( Amalekites - It is remarkable, that most authors make Saul's pursuit of the Amalekites to commence from the lower Euphrates, instead of from the southern border of the land of Canaan
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - Eastward its boundary was the high range of Zagros, or mountains of Kurdistan; westward it was, according to the views of some, bounded by the Mesopotamian desert, while according to others it reached the Euphrates
Jacobus Sarugensis, Bishop of Batnae - According to them, Jacobus was born at Kurtom on the Euphrates, A
Babylon - This direction agrees well with the locality of Babylon on the river Euphrates. The river Euphrates ran through the city; but on the banks of the river strong walls were built with gates of brass; there was also a bridge from side to side near the centre of the city
David - He was chosen to accomplish to their full extent the promises made to Abraham, to give to his seed the whole country from the river of Egypt to the great river Euphrates. He left a compact and united state, stretching from the frontier of Egypt to the foot of Lebanon, from the Euphrates to the sea
Arabia - The near approach of the Euphrates to the Mediterranean constitutes it a peninsula, the largest in the world. By these Cushites, whose first plantations were on both sides of the Euphrates and Gulf of Persia, and who were the first that traversed the desert of Arabia, the earliest commercial communications were established between the east and the west. ...
The second region, or Arabia Deserta, is bounded on the north and north- east by the Euphrates, on the east by a ridge of mountains which separates it from Chaldea, on the south by Arabia Felix, and on the west by Syria, Judea, and Arabia Petraea. Here, with a few dates, the milk of his faithful camel, and perhaps a little corn, brought by painful journeys from distant regions, or plundered from a passing caravan, the Arab supports a hard existence, until the failure of his resources impels him to seek another ...
oasis, or the scanty herbage furnished on a patch of soil by transient rains; or else, which is frequently the case, to resort, by more distant migration, to the banks of the Euphrates; or, by hostile inroads on the neighbouring countries, to supply those wants which the recesses of the desert have denied. Porter, in the person and tribe of an Arab sheik, whom he encountered in the neighbourhood of the Euphrates
Jehoahaz - " After his victory at Megiddo, Necho intended to march forward to the Euphrates, but hearing that Jehoahaz had ascended the throne as the people's favorite, whose leanings would be on the side of Babylon against Egypt, like Josiah's, he sent a division of his army, which took Jerusalem and dethroned Jehoahaz, and laid a heavy tribute on the land
Reuben - ) Seeking pastures for their flocks they dissipated their strength in guerrilla marauding expeditions toward Euphrates against the Bedouin tribes Hagar, Jetur, Nephish (1 Chronicles 5:9-10; 1 Chronicles 5:18, etc
Aretas - It was probably this successful reign that Josephus had in view when he wrote of the extension of the Nabataean kingdom from the Euphrates to the Red Sea (Ant
Phrygia - ...
Phrygia was traversed by the great route of traffic and intercourse which joined the aegean with Syria and the Euphrates
Babylon - Although its boundaries varied from one era to the next, the land of Babylon was always centred on Mesopotamia, the region of the rivers Euphrates and Tigris
Tigris - Two great rivers, the Tigris and the Euphrates, flowed through Mesopotamia, a fertile region that in biblical times was part of the lands of Aram, Assyria, Babylon and Persia (Genesis 2:14-15; Daniel 10:4)
Balaam - a prophet of the city of Pethor, or Bosor, upon the Euphrates, whose intercourse with Balak, king of the Moabites, who sent for him to curse the Israelites, is recorded at large by Moses, Numbers 22-24
Balaam - The same name (omitting the last part, -am, of Balaam), Bela, (and he also "son of Beor," front baar , to "burn up,) occurs among the Edomites connected with Midian by a victory recorded in Genesis 36:32-37; also with the "river" Euphrates through Saul of Rehoboth which was on it, king of Edom. Hence, while owning Jehovah for his God and following patriarchal tradition (Job 42:8, who is thought by the decipherers of the Assyrian and Babylonian monuments to have lived in the region about the mouth of the Euphrates, Uz, the early seat of the first Babylonian empire) in offering victims by sevens
Ishmael - Assyria, in fact traversing the whole Arabian desert from the Euphrates to the Red Sea. The Arab conquerors have won a hundred thrones and established their Mohamedanism from the Senegal to the Indus, from the Euphrates to the Indian Ocean
Babylon, History And Religion of - ...
History The city of Babylon was founded in unknown antiquity on the river Euphrates, about 50 miles south of modern Baghdad. The city spanned the Euphrates and was surrounded by an eleven-mile long outer wall which enclosed suburbs and Nebuchadnezzar's summer palace
Magi - , the region toward the Euphrates from whence Balaam came (Numbers 23:7; Numbers 22:5)
Flood - Its Structural Background The literary theme of a flood was a natural motif for the Sumerian and Akkadian peoples who resided between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in a plain prone to flood
Colosse - ...
Probably during Paul's "two years" stay at Ephesus, when "all which dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord Jesus" (Acts 19:10; Acts 19:26), Epaphras, Philemon (Philemon 1:2; Philemon 1:13; Philemon 1:19), Archippus, Apphia, and other natives of Colosse (which was on the high road from Ephesus to the Euphrates), becoming converted at Ephesus, were subsequently the first preachers in their own city
Damascus - Nicholaus of Damascus says Hadad (so he named him) reigned over "all Syria except Phoenicia," and began the war by attacking David, and was defeated in a last engagement at the Euphrates River
Water - The waters of the Euphrates are to be dried up, like the Jordan before Joshua, that the powers of the East-Parthia and her confederates-may come to the invasion of the Roman Empire (Revelation 16:12)
Colossae - Commanding the approaches to a pass in this range, and traversed by the great trade-route between Ephesus and the Euphrates, Colossae was at one time a place of much importance
Army - Distributing the legions in the frontier provinces of the Empire-which had the Atlantic as its boundary on the west, the Rhine and the Danube on the north, the Euphrates on the east, and the deserts of Arabia and Africa on the south-he charged them to guard the borders which were exposed to the attacks of restless barbarians
a'Braham - ) His family, a branch of the descendants of Shem, was settled in Ur of the Chaldees, beyond the Euphrates, where Abraham was born
Babel - An hour's walk, indulged in intense reflection, brought me to the grandest and most gigantic northern mass, on the eastern bank of the Euphrates, and distant about four miles and a half from the eastern suburb of Hillah
David - His wisdom and energy consolidated the Jewish kingdom; and his warlike skill enabled him not only to resist with success the assaults of invaders, but to extend the bounds of the kingdom over the whole territory promised in prophecy-from the Red sea and Egypt to the Euphrates, Genesis 15:18 Joshua 1:3
Idol, Idolatry - The impious Jezebel endeavored to extinguish the worship of the Lord, by persecuting his prophets, (who, as a barrier, still retained some of the people in the true religion,) till God, incensed at their idolatry, abandoned Israel to the kings of Assyria and Chaldea, who transplanted them beyond the Euphrates
Nile - ...
The Hebrews sometimes gave both to the Euphrates and the Nile the name of "sea," Isaiah 19:5 Nahum 3:8
Solomon - The Nile, Mediterranean, and Euphrates, were then Israel's bounds (1 Kings 4:21; 2 Chronicles 9:26) as promised in Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 11:24. ) Tiphsah ("Thapsacus") on the Euphrates (1 Kings 4:24) was his limit in that direction. The sudden rise of the empire under David and Solomon, extending 450 miles from Egypt to the Euphrates, and its sudden collapse under Rehoboam, is a feature not uncommon in the East
Abraham - From Joshua 24:2; Joshua 24:14-15, it appears Terah and his family served other gods beyond the Euphrates. river Euphrates," a promise only in part fulfilled under David and Solomon (2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Kings 4:21; 2 Chronicles 9:26)
Medes - ) The Median empire then was separated from Babylonia either by the Tigris or by a line half way between the Tigris and Euphrates; Syria, Phoenicia, and Judaea falling to Babylon
Roman Empire - ; the Euphrates on the E
Apollonius of Tyana - The account of his opposition to the Stoic Euphrates may perhaps also be taken as authentic
Arabia - In the time of Josephus this people ‘inhabited all the country from the Euphrates to the Red Sea’ (Ant
Messiah - Not long after this, a Jew who dwelt beyond the Euphrates, called himself the messiah, and drew vast multitudes of people after him
bi'Ble - Some Jewish scholars living at Tiberias, and at Sora by the Euphrates, from the sixth to the twelfth century, punctuated the Hebrew text, and wrote is the vowel points and other tone-marks to aid in the reading of the Hebrew; and these, together with notes of various kinds, they called Masora (tradition), hence the name Masoretic text
Babylon - Babylonia was one vast plain, adorned and enriched by the Euphrates and the Tigris, from which, and from the numerous canals that intersected the country from the one river to the other, water was distributed over the fields by manual labour and by hydraulic machines, giving rise, in that warm climate and rich exhaustless soil, to an exuberance of produce without a known parallel, over so extensive a region, either in ancient or modern times. —Much time having been lost, and no progress being made in the siege, the anxiety of Cyrus was strongly excited, and he was reduced to great perplexity, when at last it was suggested and immediately determined to divert the course of the Euphrates. But while the building of the temple of Belus, and the reparation of the embankments of the Euphrates, were actually carrying on, the conqueror of the world died, at the commencement of this his last undertaking, in the height of his power, and in the flower of his age. " While the workmen "cast her up as heaps" while excavating for bricks, that they may "take" them "from thence," and that "nothing may be left;" they labour more than trebly in the fulfilment of prophecy: for the numerous and deep excavations form pools of water, on the overflowing of the Euphrates, and, annually filled, they are not dried up throughout the year
Jews - They were elected by God in the person of Abraham, who left Ur, a city of the Chaldees on the Euphrates River, to settle in southern Chanaan
Tarsus - ...
The great trade-route from the Euphrates by the Amanus Pass joined the one from Antioch by the Syrian Gates about 50 miles E
Jehoiakim - In Jehoiakim's fourth year Necho suffered his great defeat from Babylon at Carehemish, wherein he lost his possessions between Euphrates and the Nile, and returned no more to Judaea; so that Josiah's death was not unavenged (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2)
Abercius, Bishop of Hierapolis - And I saw the plain of Syria and all its cities, even Nisibis, having crossed the Euphrates, and everywhere I had fellow-worshippers (συνομήθεις, so Lightfoot and Ramsay; συνοδίτην , Zahn, referring to Paul)
Manes, Called Also Mani - One day his father heard in a temple a voice saying, "Eat no flesh, drink no wine, and abstain from women," whereupon he founded the sect of the Mugtasila or the Washers, identical with the Sabians of the Marshes between the Tigris and Euphrates, still found near Bassora
Canaan - In a north-eastern direction, it was bounded only by the river Euphrates, and included a considerable part of Syria. It is stated that Solomon had dominion over all the region on the western side of the Euphrates, from Thiphsah, or Thapsacus, on that river, in latitude 25 20', to Azzah, or Gaza. "Tadmore in the wilderness," (Palmyra,) which the Jewish monarch is stated to have built, (that is, either founded or fortified,) is considerably to the north-east of Damascus, being only a day's journey from the Euphrates; and Hamath, the Epiphania of the Greeks, (still called Hamah,) in the territory belonging, to which city Solomon had several "store cities," is seated on the Orontes, in latitude 34...
45' N
Palestine - ...
The territory promised as an inheritance to the seed of Abraham (Genesis 15:18-21 ; Numbers 34:1-12 ) was bounded on the east by the river Euphrates, on the west by the Mediterranean, on the north by the "entrance of Hamath," and on the south by the "river of Egypt
Solomon - An empire is established which extends from the Euphrates to the borders of Egypt, a distance of 450 miles; and this empire, rapidly constructed, enters almost immediately on a period of peace which lasts for half a century
Arabia, Arabs - He too gives this name to the desert to the east of the Euphrates, the desert which separates Babylonia from Mesopotamia proper ( Anab
Abgar - 13) relates, without any suggestion of scepticism, that ‘king Abgar, who ruled with great glory the nations beyond the Euphrates, being afflicted with a terrible disease which it was beyond the power of human skill to cure, when he heard of the name of Jesus and His miracles, … sent a message to Him by a courier and begged Him to heal the disease
Fulness of the Time - The whole world was but one country; and from the Euphrates to the Atlantic there was settled government, order, and the rule of law under one sovereign sceptre
Abraham - The same day God made a covenant with Abraham that to his seed should the land be given from the river of Egypt to the great river Euphrates : cf
Commerce - They carried some of the articles which they brought from India through the straits of Babelmandel into Abyssinia and Egypt; some they transported to Babylon through the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates; and some by the way of the Red Sea to the port of Eziongeber
Language of Christ - It was, however, only very gradually effected, and was chiefly due to the predominance to which Aramaic attained in Western Asia during the Persian period, coming, as it did, to be, with dialectical differences, the lingua communis from the Euphrates to the Mediterranean. to the Aramaic-speaking peoples, whom he describes in the following paragraph as ‘the Parthians, Babylonians, the remotest Arabians, and those of our nation beyond Euphrates, with the Adiabeni
Assyria - He is said to have reigned from the Euphrates to the Nile
Hadrianus, Publius Aelius, Emperor - His external policy was marked by the abandonment of any idea of extending the eastern frontier of the empire beyond the Euphrates
Solomon - He enjoyed a profound peace throughout his dominions; Judah and Israel lived in security; and his neighbours either paid him tribute, or were his allies; he ruled over all the countries and kingdoms from the Euphrates to the Nile, and his dominions extended even beyond the former; he had abundance of horses and chariots of war; he exceeded the orientals, and all the Egyptians, in wisdom and prudence; he was the wisest of mankind, and his reputation was spread through all nations
Theophilus, Bishop of Antioch - We gather from his writings that he was born a heathen, not far from the Tigris and Euphrates, and was led to embrace Christianity by studying the Holy Scriptures, especially the prophetical books (ad Autol
David - In a few years the whole territory from the Euphrates to the river of Egypt, and from Gaza on the west to Thapsacus on the east, was under his sway (2 Samuel 8:3-13 ; 10 ). The sceptre of Solomon was already, before his father's death, owned from the Mediterranean to the Euphrates, and from the Orontes to the Red Sea
Egypt - Necho carrying all before him proceeded as far as Carchemish on the Euphrates, and on returning to Jerusalem he deposed Jehoahaz and carried him to Egypt (where he died), and set up his brother Eliakim in his stead, calling him Jehoiakim. By Necho being able to attack the king of Assyria, in so distant a place as Carchemish shows the strength of Egypt at that time, but the power of Babylon was increasing, and after three years Nebuchadnezzar defeated the army of Necho at Carchemish, and recovered every place from the river of Egypt to the Euphrates; and "the king of Egypt came not again any more out of his land
Egypt - Canaan and Syria were subdued, as well as Cyprus, and the boundaries of the Egyptian Empire were fixed at the Euphrates
Titus (Emperor) - By Syrian Antioch he went to Zeugma on the Euphrates, where he received an embassy from the Parthian king
Ebla - At stake had been the control over the Euphrates River (and possibly even the Tigris) and the trade routes along which the wood, metals, and raw materials flowed to Mesopotamia from Syria and Anatolia
Ebla - At stake had been the control over the Euphrates River (and possibly even the Tigris) and the trade routes along which the wood, metals, and raw materials flowed to Mesopotamia from Syria and Anatolia
Joab - David gave the final blow to the rallying Syrians with their brethren from beyond Euphrates under Shobach, Hadarezer's captain
Egypt - , the second successor of Ahmosi, reached the Euphrates. This Pharaoh, however, was a great strategist, as well as a valiant soldier: as the result of many annual campaigns, he not only placed his tablet on the bank of the Euphrates, by the side of that of Thetmosi I. His son Neko, profiting by the long weakness of Assyria, swept through Syria as far as Carchemish on the Euphrates, and put the land to tribute, until the Babylonian army commanded by Nebuchadrezzar hurled him back (b
Jeremiah - ...
In this reign Jeremiah gave the symbolical prophecy of the girdle on his loins taken to the Euphrates, and hidden in a hole of the rock (Jeremiah 2:18). A journey twice of 200 miles to the Euphrates may have been taken only in the spiritual world wherein the seer moved (compare Jeremiah 19:1; Jeremiah 19:10; Jeremiah 27:2-3; Isaiah 20:2)
Sol'Omon - The absence of any reference to Babylon and Assyria, and the fact that the Euphrates was recognized as the boundary of Solomon's kingdom, (2 Chronicles 9:26 ) suggests the inference that the Mesopotamian monarchies were at this time comparatively feeble
Peter - " ...
After this he appears to have carried the gospel to the east, and to have laboured for a while at Babylon, on the Euphrates (1 Peter 5:13 )
Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata - Notwithstanding the apparently non-canonical character of the proceeding, Eusebius ordained numerous bishops on his way from Thrace to the Euphrates, including Acacius at Beroea, Theodotus at Hierapolis, Isidore at Cyrus, and Eulogius at Edessa
Edom - ...
Psalm 44 was written by the sons of Korah in the midst of Edom's invasion of Israel, taking advantage of David's absence at the Euphrates
Nineveh - In the second century, Lucian, a native of a city on the banks of the Euphrates, testified that Nineveh was utterly perished, that there was no vestige of it remaining, and that none could tell where once it was situated
Abram - And then there was a symbol vouchsafed him, and larger promise that his posterity should possess the whole extent of country between the river of Egypt and the Euphrates
Deluge - When Bel and three other gods determined to destroy Shurippak, a city ‘lying on the Euphrates,’ Ea warned him to build a ship
da'Vid - (Genesis 15:18-21 ) During the succeeding ten years the nations bordering on his kingdom caused David more or less trouble, but during this time he reduced to a state of permanent subjection the Philistines on the west, (2 Samuel 8:1 ) the Moabites on the east, (2 Samuel 8:2 ) by the exploits of Benaiah, (2 Samuel 23:20 ) the Syrians on the northeast as far as the Euphrates, (2 Samuel 8:3 ) the Edomites, (2 Samuel 8:14 ) on the south; and finally the Ammonites, who had broken their ancient alliance, and made one grand resistance to the advance of his empire
Hammurabi - In the latter years he built walls along the Tigris and Euphrates and in year 43 fortified Sippar with an earthen wall
Government - Under the Persians Judah was a subdistrict of the great province west of the Euphrates and subject to its governor ( Ezra 5:3 )
Diognetus, Epistle to - The writer To Greeks and To Diognetus may have been this bringer of Greek Pauline Christianity to the regions beyond Euphrates conquered by Trajan and abandoned by Hadrian, and have been ancestor of the friend of Origen and of the great Milanese archbp
Phoenicia, phNicians - Scholars now suppose that this refers really to the Persian Gulf, and that the Canaanites , of whom the Phœnicians were a part, came from North Arabia by way of the shore of the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates valley
Lucianus, a Famous Satirist - 120) at Samosata on the Euphrates, the son of poor parents, he gradually betook himself to the composing and reciting of rhetorical exercises, which he did with continually increasing success as he journeyed westwards, visiting Greece, Italy, and Gaul, where his success reached the highest pitch
Bible - The OT was nearly all written in the Holy Land; the only exceptions being in the case of books composed in the valley of the Euphrates during the Exile (Ezekiel, possibly Lamentations, Deutero-Isaiah, or part of it, perhaps some of the Psalms, a revision of the Law). This may have been done by the Euphrates during the Exile, so that the Law-book brought up to Jerusalem would be the Pentateuch (or the Hexateuch), or it may have been after the Return, in which case the Law-book would be only P Abram - The family of Abraham was idolatrous, for his "fathers served other gods beyond the flood," that is, the great river Euphrates; but whether he himself was in the early period of his life an idolater, we are not informed by Moses. The territories of the kings of the cities of the plain were a few years afterward invaded by a confederacy of the petty kings of the Euphrates and the neighbouring countries, and Lot and his family were taken prisoners
Trade And Commerce - In addition to the Indian route mentioned in the last paragraph, goods from India could be brought by the port of Charax at the mouth of the Persian Gulf, by the Euphrates, and then by the caravan route passing through Palmyra to Damascus. Four trade-routes brought the silk products of China to Rome: (a) the overland route from Northern China through Chinese Turkestan to Bactria, by the Caspian gates to Media and the Euphrates; (b) a branch of this, crossing the Pamirs from Kashgar and descending the valley of the Indus to Karachi, thence by sea to the Persian Gulf; (c) from Central China through Tibet and Nepal to Palibothra on the Ganges, down the Ganges, and then by sea to Egypt; (d) from Cattigara (Tonkin) (Jones, A Companion to Roman History, p
Revelation, the - The mention of the Euphrates shows that the judgements of this chapter arise from the East. Poured upon the great river Euphrates, opening up the way for the eastern hordes
Pottery in Bible Times - The pottery reflects the arrival of a highly developed culture that results in a prosperous, urbanized, sedentary population with rich cultural ties to the upper Euphrates region from which Abraham migrated, according to the biblical text
Creation - Looking, however, to the vastly higher antiquity of the Babylonian narrative, to its conformity (even in points which affect the Biblical record) to the climatic conditions of the Euphrates Valley, and to the general indebtedness of Israel to the civilization of Babylon, it cannot reasonably be doubted that the Hebrew narrative is dependent on Babylonian models; though it is of course not certain that the particular version preserved in the tablets referred to is the exact original by which the Biblical writers were influenced
Antioch - It was politically of advantage that the seat of empire should be removed from the Euphrates valley to a locality nearer the Mediterranean
God - , west of the river Euphrates) spoke to king Darius of the “house of the great God” (Ezra 5:8)
Idolatry - God, therefore, incensed at the sins and idolatry of the ten tribes, abandoned those tribes to the kings of Assyria and Chaldea, who transplanted them beyond the Euphrates, from whence they never returned
David - He followed on to smite Moab; then extended his border to the river Euphrates, and put garrisons in Syria of Damascus; he smote of the Syrians in the valley of Salt 18,000
Sea - The Hebrews give the name of sea to any large collection of water, Job 14:11 ; as to the lakes of Tiberias and Asphaltites, and also to the rivers Nile and Euphrates, Isaiah 11:15 18:2 21:1 Jeremiah 51:36,42
Israel - We can now trace in the cuneiform literature the appearance and westward migration of the Aramæans, and we know that they begin to be mentioned in the Euphrates valley about b. These tribes, along with the other Abrahamidæ the Edomites, Ammonites, and Moabites moved westward from the Euphrates along the eastern border of Palestine
Ezekiel - He lived in his own house at Tel-Abib near the river Chebar, an irrigation canal that channeled the waters of the Euphrates River into the surrounding arid region
Egypt - Successive Eighteenth Dynasty pharaohs made military campaigns into Canaan and against the Mitannian kingdom of Mesopotamia, creating an empire which reached the Euphrates River
Nineveh - Lucian of Samosara near the Euphrates asserts none in his day even knew where Nineveh stood
Numbers, the Book of - ...
Their defeat caused Balak to summon Balaam to curse Israel from "Pethor, which was on the river (Euphrates) in his native land" (so, Numbers 22:5), at least 350 miles distant
Adam (1) - Rawlinson identified with Babylonia; the Babylonian documents giving an exact geographical account of the garden of Eden, and the rivers bearing the same names: the Hiddekel is certainly the Tigris, and the Phrath the Euphrates; the other two seem tributary branches, though some make Gihon the Nile and Pison the Indus (?)
Assyria - And in the end of his reign, Pharaoh-Necho, king of Egypt, the successor of Psammitichus, went up against the king of Assyria to the river Euphrates, to fight against Carchemish, or Circutium; and in his way thither slew Josiah, 2 Kings 23:29 ; 2 Chronicles 35:20 ; and therefore the last king of Assyria was not yet slain
John, the Epistles of - the Christians beyond the Euphrates, outside the Roman empire, "the church at Babylon elected together with" (1 Peter 5:13) the churches in the Ephesian region, where Peter sent his epistles (1 Peter 1:1; Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, Bithynia)
Ships And Boats - With the Assyrians navigation seems to have been confined to the Tigris and Euphrates, where small timber boats, supported by inflated skins ( keleks ), and coracles of plaited willow ( kufas ), were largely in use (see EBi Nehemiah - Artaxerxes, "according to the good hand of Nehemiah's God upon him," granted him leave to go to Jerusalem for a time, and letters to the provincial governors beyond the Euphrates to convey him forward, and to Asaph to supply timber for the palace gates, etc
Job - Allowing this chirography to be correct, (and such, upon a fair review of facts, we may conclude it to be,) there is no difficulty in conceiving that hordes of nomadic Chaldeans as well as Sabeans, a people addicted to rapine, and roving about at immense distances for the sake of plunder, should have occasionally infested the defenceless country of Idumea, and roved from the Euphrates even to Egypt
Moab - This prince carried them captive beyond the Euphrates, as the prophets had threatened, Jeremiah 9:26 ; Jeremiah 12:14-15 ; Jeremiah 25:11-12 ; Jeremiah 48:47 , &c; Jeremiah 49:3 ; Jeremiah 49:6 ; Jeremiah 49:39 ; Jeremiah 50:16 ; and Cyrus sent them home again, as he did the rest of the captives
Greece, Religion And Society of - Returning from Egypt, he continued his campaign eastward through the Tigris-Euphrates valley and conquered lands as far east as India
Solomon - Solomon was able to control, and no doubt profited by, the caravan trade between the Euphrates and the Nile
Jacob - At length he took flight whilst Laban was engaged in sheep-shearing, and, re-crossing the Euphrates on his way home, reached Gilead
Scripture - The Massoretic text of today is the work of a body of scholars living at Tiberias, in Galilee, and at Sora in the Euphrates valley, who added the vowel points
Palestine - To the east of Bashan lies only desert that begins to slope toward the Euphrates
Canaan, History And Religion of - The territory between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River reaching from the brook of Egypt to the area around Ugarit in Syria or to the Euphrates
Messiah - The last kings of Judah became mere puppets in the hands of foreign princes, who pulled the strings from the banks of the Nile or of the Euphrates
Jeremiah - He is away at the Euphrates learning how to illustrate and enforce his next sermon, and he preaches it over and over to himself as he sees in the sand the footprints of his captive people
Acts of the Apostles - This was based on an earlier Syriac text, made in 506 by Polycarp for Philoxenus, Bishop of Mabug (Hierapolis, the modern Membij on the Euphrates), which is no longer extant for Acts
Division of the Earth - ) The children of Aram planted the fertile country north of Babylonia, called Aram Naharaim, "Aram between the two rivers," the Euphrates and the Tigris, thence called by the Greeks, Mesopotamia, Genesis 24:10 , and Padan Aram, the level country of Aram, Genesis 25:20
Revelation of John, the - Again, the loosing of the four winds by the four angels standing on the four corners of the earth, under the sixth seal (Revelation 7:1), answers to the loosing of the four angels at the Euphrates under the sixth trumpet (Revelati
Old Testament - The twofold Gemara, or commentary, completed the Talmud; the Jerusalem Gemara of the Jews of Tiberias was written at the end of the fourth century; the Babylonian emanated from the schools on the Euphrates at the end of the fifth century
David - David was victorious over all these peoples, the result being a great extension of his kingdom, which reached right up to the Euphrates (cf
Deluge - "...
Still more coincident even than this with the Mosaic account, is the Grecian history of the deluge, as preserved by Lucian, a native of Samosata on the Euphrates; and its authority is the more incontrovertible, on account of his being an avowed derider of all religions
Government - Mari on the Euphrates
Baruch, Apocalypse of - Edessa Itself is situated on ‘the other side’ of the Euphrates, and those Edessenes who read the Epistle may have fancied that the Epistle of Baruch was addressed to their own ancestors
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - Ephraim (4) the Syrian , usually called Ephrem Syrus, from the Syriac form of his name Aphrem, was born in Mesopotamia, for he describes his home as lying between the Tigris and the Euphrates (Opp
Roman Empire - There was now a chain of Roman provinces from the Black Sea to the Euphrates, but client States were retained along the frontier
Manuscripts - This Church had its centre at Edessa near the Euphrates, and its language must not be identified with the Aramaic our Lord spoke
Terah - His childhood spent in ancient Chaldea; his very crossing of the flood Euphrates on such an errand; the snows of Lebanon; the oaks of Bashan; Damascus; Salem; the Nile; the pyramids; the great temples; the famous schools and schoolmasters of Egypt, at whose feet Moses was to sit in after days,-all that, and much more that we neither know nor can imagine
Jeremiah - The great battle of Carchemish (605), on the Euphrates, decided the fate of Syria and Palestine; the empire of Western Asia, quickly snatched from Egypt, passed into the strong hands of the Chaldæan king Nebuchadrezzar, the destined destroyer of Jerusalem
Palestine - The rival empires, Egypt and Babylon-Assyria, could march against one another only along the maritime western plain of Palestine and the Lebanon plain leading toward and from the Euphrates
Palesti'na - The rivals road by which the two great rivals of the ancient world could approach one another --by which alone Egypt could get to Assyria and Assyria to lay along the broad hat strip of coast which formed the maritime portion of the holy land, and thence by the plain of the Lebanon to the Euphrates
Joram - ...
From the point of view of etymology, it is most natural to connect this word with the verb יָרַד ‘to descend,’ and this is how it is treated by the prevalent opinion, found, however, more frequently among geographers than among philologists, according to which the Jordan is ‘the descending,’ ‘the flowing,’ a name which might, of course, be applicable to any stream of water, and which, in a single particular case, would have become a proper name, just as the Hebrews called the Euphrates הַנֶּהָד, ‘river
Jews - ...
Under him they subdued their neighbours, the Philistines, Edomites, and others; and took possession of the whole dominion which had been promised them, from the border of Egypt to the banks of the Euphrates
Apocrypha - Then in addition to the saved remnant of the Jews already referred to, the lost ten tribes will be brought back from their exile beyond the Euphrates, whither they had gone by a miraculous passage through the river, and whence they will return by a similar miraculous staying of ‘the springs of the river’ again
Messiah - Not long after this, a Jew who dwelt beyond Euphrates, called himself the Messiah, and drew vast multitudes of people after him
John, Gospel of (Critical) - Theodoret, bishop of Cyrrhus, near the Euphrates, in 453, tells how he found more than 200 copies of the work in the churches of his district
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - The see was that of Cyrus, or more properly Cyrrhus, the chief city of a district of the province of Euphratensis, called after it Cyrrhestica, an extensive fertile plain between the spurs of the Amanus and the river Euphrates, intersected by mountain ranges