What does Esau mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
עֵשָׂ֖ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 15
עֵשָׂ֔ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 13
עֵשָֽׂו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 8
עֵשָׂו֙ eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 7
עֵשָׂ֗ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 6
עֵשָׂ֑ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 5
עֵשָׂ֣ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 5
עֵשָׂ֛ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 5
עֵשָׂ֜ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 4
עֵשָׂ֥ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 4
עֵשָׂ֤ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 3
: עֵשָׂ֔ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 3
ἠσαῦ was the eldest son of Isaac and twin brother of Jacob. 3
לְעֵשָׂ֗ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 2
לְעֵשָׂ֑ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 2
לְעֵשָׂ֔ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 2
: עֵשָׂ֑ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 2
--עֵשָׂ֛ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
לְעֵשָׂ֜ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
עֵשָׂ֡ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
לְעֵשָׂ֖ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
עֵשָׂ֣ו ׀ eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
לְעֵשָׂ֥ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
וְעֵשָֽׂו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
וְעֵשָׂ֣ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
؟ עֵשָׂ֑ו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1
וַיֹּ֡אמֶר to say 1
וַיֹּ֖אמֶר to say 1
וַיֹּ֕אמֶר to say 1
؟ עֵשָֽׂו eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples. 1

Definitions Related to Esau

H6215


   1 eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin brother of Jacob; sold the birthright for food when he was hungry and the divine blessing went to Jacob; progenitor of the Arab peoples.
   Additional Information: Esau = “hairy”.
   

G2269


   1 was the eldest son of Isaac and twin brother of Jacob.
   Additional Information: Esau = “hairy”.
   

H559


   1 to say, speak, utter.
      1a (Qal) to say, to answer, to say in one’s heart, to think, to command, to promise, to intend.
      1b (Niphal) to be told, to be said, to be called.
      1c (Hithpael) to boast, to act proudly.
      1d (Hiphil) to avow, to avouch.
      

Frequency of Esau (original languages)

Frequency of Esau (English)

Dictionary

Chabad Knowledge Base - Esau
(1653-1506 BCE) Also known as Edom. Son of Rebecca and Isaac. He sold his birthright to his younger twin Jacob. A hunter, he led an immoral lifestyle, though he excelled in honoring his father. He eventually settled in Seir, and is the progenitor of Edom.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Esau
("hairy, rough"); for at birth he "came out red (from whence his name EDOM), all over like an hairy garment" (Genesis 25:25). The animal appearance marked his sensual, self willed, untamed nature, in which the moral, spiritual elements were low. Secar , "hairy," may have also originated the designation of his territory, mount Sier, i.e." thickly wooded," as he was in person "hairy." Jacob took hold of his twin brother in the womb when the latter was coming out first, from whence he got his name = supplanter (Hosea 12:3). Esau like Nimrod was "a cunning (skillful) hunter," "a man of the field" or "desert," wild, restless, and selfindulgent, instead of following his fathers' peaceful pastoral life, "dwelling in tents." Isaac, with the caprice of affection whereby the quiet, parent loves the opposite to his own character, "loved Esau because he did eat of his venison," his selfishness herein bringing its own punishment.
"Rebekah loved Jacob" as "a plain man," i.e. upright, steady, and domestic; but her love too was wanting in regard to high principle. Reckless of the lawfulness of the means, provided she gained her end, she brought sorrow on both. From before the birth of both it was foretold her, "the elder shall serve the younger." Esau's recklessness of spiritual and future privileges, and care only for the indulgence of the moment, caused him to sell his birthright for Jacob's red pottage, made of lentils or small beans, still esteemed a delicacy in the East. The color was what most took his fancy; "feed me with that red, that red." "The lust of the flesh and the lust of the eye" were his snare. He can hardly have been "at the point, to die" with hunger; rather his impatience to gratify his appetite made his headstrong will feel as if his life depended on it; I shall die if I don't get it, then "what profit shall this birthright do to me!" Nay, but "what is a man profiled if he shall gain the whole world and lose his own soul, or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?" (Matthew 16:26.)
Jacob took an ungenerous and selfish advantage, which the Scripture does not sanction, and distrusting Esau's levity required of him art oath. Yet his characteristic faith appears in his looking on to the unseen future privileges attached to, the birthright (the priesthood of the family (Numbers 8:17-19) and the progenitorship of Messiah independently of temporal advantages. Genesis 48:22; Genesis 49:3-4) as heir of the everlasting promises to Abraham's seed (Romans 9:5; Romans 9:8). "Profane Esau for one morsel sold," and so "despised, his birthright." The smallness of the inducement aggravates the guilt of casting away eternity for a morsel. Unbelieving levity must have all its good things now (1 Corinthians 15:32); faith says with Jacob "I have waited for Thy salvation, O Lord" (Genesis 49:18; compare Luke 16:25).
The nickname Edom," red," was consequently given Esau as the reproach of his sensual folly, a name mostly confined to his land and his posterity. By feigning to be Esau, Jacob, at his mother's suggestion, stole the father's blessing which God would have secured to him without guile and its retributive punishment, had he waited in simple faith. Isaac too erred through carnal partiality, which he sought to stimulate by eating his favorite's venison, determining to give to Esau the blessing in spite of the original divine intimation, "the elder shall serve the younger," and in spite of Esau's actual sale of the birthright to Jacob, and though Esau had shown his unworthiness of it by taking when he was forty years of age two Hittite wives from among the corrupt Canaanites, to his father's and mother's grief. Too late, when "afterward Esau would have inherited the blessing, he was rejected, for he found no place for repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears" (Hebrews 12:16-17).
There is an "afterward" coming when the unbeliever shall look back on his past joys and the believer on his past griefs, in a very different light from now. Contrast Hebrews 12:11 with Hebrews 12:17; so Genesis 3:6; Genesis 3:8, "the cool of the day "; Matthew 25:11-12, "the foolish virgins." Esau found the truth of the homely proverb, "he that will not when he may, when he will shall have nay" (Proverbs 1:24-30; Luke 13:28; Luke 13:34-35; Luke 19:42; Luke 19:44). What Esau found not was "place for repentance" of the kind which he sought, namely, such as would regain the lost blessing. Had Esau sought rear repentance he would have found it (Matthew 7:7). He did not find it because this was not what he sought. His "tears" were no proof of true repentance, for immediately after being foiled in his desire he resolved to murder Jacob! He wept not for his sin, but for its penalty.
"Before, he might have had the blessing without tears; afterward, however many he shed, he was rejected" (Bengel). Tears are shed at times by the most hardened; failing to repent when so softened for the moment, they hardly ever do so afterward (1 Samuel 24:16-17, Saul: contrast David, Psalms 56:8). Rebekah, hearing of the vengeful design of Esau against her favorite son, by recalling to Isaac's remembrance Esau's ill judged marriage secured the father's consent to Jacob's departure from the neighborhood of the daughters of Heth to that of his own kindred, and at the same time the confirmation of the blessing (Genesis 27:46; Genesis 28:1). Esau then tried by marrying his cousin Mahalath, Ishmael's daughter, to conciliate his parents (Genesis 28:8-9). Thus he became connected with the Ishmaelite tribes beyond the Arabah valley.
Soon after he began to drive the Horites out of mount Seir; and by the return of Jacob 29 years after, Esau was there with armed retainers and abundant wealth. It was not however until after his father's death that he permanently left Canaan, according to Isaac's blessing, to Jacob, his wives and family then first accompanying him (Genesis 35:29; Genesis 36:6). Esau was moved by God in answer to Jacob's wrestling prayer to lay aside revenge and meet his brother with embraces, kisses, and tears (Proverbs 16:7). Love, and gifts in token of it, drove after drove, melted the violent but impulsive spirit of Esau. Jacob however, wisely fearing any collision which might revive the old grudge, declined accompanying Esau, but expressed a hope one day to visit mount Seir; his words," I will lead on softly ... until I come unto my lord unto Seir," cannot mean he then intended going there, for he was avowedly going toward Succoth and Shechem (Genesis 32-33).
The death of their father Isaac more than 20 years afterward was probably the next and last occasion of the brothers meeting. They united in paying him the last sad offices (Genesis 35:29). Then Esau, by this time seeing that Jacob's was the birthright blessing and the promised land, withdrew permanently to his appointed lot, mount Seir (Genesis 32:3; Deuteronomy 2:5-12). He carried away all his substance from Canaan there, to take full possession of Seir and drive out its original inhabitants. "Living by his sword" too, he felt Edom's rocky fastnesses better suited for his purpose than S. Palestine with its open plains. (See EDOM, (See AHOLIBAMAH, (See BASHEMATH.)
The prophecy of Isaac," Thou shalt serve thy brother, and ... when thou shalt have the dominion thou shalt break his yoke from off thy neck," was fulfilled to the letter. At first Esau prospered more, dukes being in Edom before any king reigned in Israel (Genesis 36:31), and while Israel was in bondage in Egypt Edom was independent. But Saul and David conquered the Edomites (1 Samuel 14:47; 2 Samuel 8:14), and they were, excepting revolts, subject to Judah until Ahaz' reign; then they threw off the yoke (2 Kings 16:6; 2 Chronicles 28:7). Judas Maccabeus defeated, and his nephew Hyrcanus conquered, and compelled them to be circumcised and incorporated with the Jews; but an Idamean dynasty, Antipater and the Herod's, ruled down to the final destruction of Jerusalem.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Esau
(ee' ssayyoo) Personal name whose meaning is not known. Son of Isaac and Rebecca; elder twin brother of Jacob (Genesis 25:24-26 ; Genesis 27:1 ,Genesis 27:1,27:32 ,Genesis 27:32,27:42 ; 1 Chronicles 1:34 ); father of the Edomite nation (Genesis 26:1 ; Deuteronomy 2:4-29 ; Malachi 1:2-3 ). At birth his body was hairy and red “and they called his name Esau” (Genesis 25:25 ,Genesis 25:25,25:30 ; Genesis 27:11 ,Genesis 27:11,27:21-23 ). The second born twin, Jacob, father of the nation Israel, held Esau's heel at birth (Genesis 25:22-26 ); thus depicting the struggle between the descendants of the two which ended when David lead Israel in the conquest of Edom (2 Samuel 8:12-14 ; 1 Chronicles 18:13 ; compare Numbers 24:18 ). From the first Jacob sought to gain advantage over Esau (Hosea 12:3 ). Esau, the extrovert, was a favorite of his father and as a hunter provided him with his favorite meats. Jacob was the favorite of his mother Rebecca.
As a famished returning hunter, Esau, lacking self-control, sold his birthright to Jacob for food (Genesis 25:30-34 ). Birthright involved the right as head of the family (Genesis 27:29 ) and a double share of the inheritance (Deuteronomy 21:15-17 ). This stripped Esau of the headship of the people through which Messiah would come. Thus, the lineage became Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.
Having lost his birthright, he was still eligible to receive from Isaac the blessing of the eldest son. Rebecca devised a deception whereby Jacob received this blessing (Genesis 27:1-30 ).
Esau blamed Jacob for all his problems failing to realize that the character flaw revealed in his selling of his birthright followed him all of his life. Esau received a blessing, but neither he nor his descendants were to occupy the fertile land of Palestine (Genesis 27:39 ). At age 40 he married two Hittite wives (Genesis 26:34-35 ).
Years later the two brothers were reconciled when Jacob returned from Mesopotamia. Esau had lived in the land of Seir. As Jacob neared Palestine, he made plans for confronting his wronged brother and allaying his anger. Esau, with an army of 400, surprised Jacob, his guilty brother, and received him without bitterness (Genesis 33:4-16 ).
The two reconciled brothers met again for the final time at the death of their father (Genesis 35:29 ). Though their hostility was personally resolved, their descendants continue to this day to struggle against one another.
Nelson Price
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Esau
ESAU . 1 . The name is best explained as meaning ‘tawny’ or ‘shaggy’ ( Genesis 25:25 ); Edom or ‘ruddy’ was sometimes substituted for it ( Genesis 25:30 ), and Esau is represented as the progenitor of the Edomites ( Genesis 36:9 ; Genesis 28:8-9 , Jeremiah 49:8 ff., Obadiah 1:8 ). He displaced the Horites from the hilly land of Seir, and settled there with his followers ( Genesis 32:3 ; Genesis 36:8 , Deuteronomy 2:12 ). His career is sketched briefly but finely by weaving incidents collected from two sources (J [1] and E [2] ; in the early part, chiefly the former), whilst the Priestly writer is supposed to have contributed a few particulars ( Genesis 26:34 f., Genesis 26:28 :9, 36). The standing feature of Esau’s history is rivalry with Jacob, which is represented as even preceding the birth of the twins ( Genesis 25:22 , Hosea 12:3 ). The facts may be collected into four groups. The sale of the birthright ( Genesis 25:29 ff.) carried with it the loss of precedence after the father’s death ( Genesis 27:29 ), and probably loss of the domestic priesthood ( Numbers 3:12-13 ), and of the double portion of the patrimony ( Deuteronomy 21:17 ). For this act the NT calls Esau’ profane’ ( Hebrews 12:16 ), thus revealing the secret of his character; the word (Gr. bebçlos ) suggests the quality of a man to whom nothing is sacred, whose heart and thought range over only what is material and sensibly present. To propitiate his parents, Esau sought a wife of his own kin ( Genesis 36:43 ), though already married to two Hittite women ( Genesis 26:34-35 ). His father’s proposed blessing was diverted by Jacob’s artifice; and, doomed to live by war and the chase ( Genesis 27:40 ), Esau resolved to recover his lost honours by killing his brother. Twenty years later the brothers were reconciled ( Genesis 33:4 ); after which Esau made Seir his principal abode, and on the death of Isaac settled there permanently ( Genesis 35:29 , Genesis 36:6 , Deuteronomy 2:4-5 , Joshua 24:4 ).
By a few writers Esau has been regarded as a mythical personage, the personification of the roughness of Idumæa. It is at least as likely that a man of Esau’s character and habits would himself choose to live in a country of such a kind (Malachi 1:3 ); and mere legends about the brothers, as the early Targums are a witness, would not have made Esau the more attractive man, and the venerated Jacob, in comparison, timid, tricky, and full of deceits. Against the historicity of the record there is really no substantial evidence.
2 . The head of one of the families of Nethinim, or Temple servants, who accompanied Nehemiah to Jerusalem ( 1Es 5:29 ); see Ziha.
R. W. Moss.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Esau
(Ἠσαῦ)
(1) St. Paul (Romans 9:10-13) uses the pre-natal oracle regarding Esau and his brother (Genesis 25:22-23) as an illustration of the principle of Divine election. Before they were born, when neither had any merit or demerit, the elder was destined to serve the younger. As the prophet Malachi (Malachi 1:2-3) has it, ‘Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated.’ In both of the OT passages quoted there was a reference not merely to the children but to their descendants. The first part of the oracle runs, ‘Two nations are in thy womb, and two peoples shall be separated from thy bowels’ (Genesis 25:23); and the Prophet’s words are, ‘Was (or ‘is,’ Revised Version margin) not Esau Jacob’s brother? saith the Lord: yet I (have) loved Jacob; but Esau (have) I hated, and made his mountains a desolation, and gave (given) his heritage to the jackals of the wilderness. Whereas Edom saith,’ etc. (Malachi 1:3-4).
St. Paul is engaged in proving that the Divine promise has not failed though the majority of the children of Abraham have been excluded (or have excluded themselves by unbelief) from a share in its fulfilment in Christ. His purpose is to sweep away a narrow, particularistic doctrine of election, according to which God’s action ends in Israel, and to replace it by a grand universalistic conception, according to which the world, or all humanity, is the end of the Divine action, and election itself is controlled by an all-embracing purpose of love. He accomplishes his purpose partly by a very effective argumentum ad hominem. The Jews so little understood the humbling principle of election, which ascribes all the merit of salvation to God, that they prided themselves on having been chosen, while their neighbours, Ishmael and Edom, had been rejected. Since Jacob-in the prophetic words which were so dear to them-had been loved and Esau hated, it was clear to them that they were the objects of a peculiar Divine favour. To turn the edge of this argument, St. Paul had only to remind them that many of the rejected-e.g. Esau and all his descendants-were children of Abraham. If God could make a distinction in the chosen family in former times, without being untrue to His covenant, He might do so again. A whole nation might lose its birthright like Esau.
(2) The writer of Hebrews (Hebrews 12:16) instances Esau as a profane person, who for a single meal (ἀντὶ βρώσεως μιᾶς) sold his birthright. ‘Profane’ (βέβηλος), when applied to things, means ‘unconsecrated,’ ‘secular. The word occurs in the Septuagint of Leviticus 10:10, ‘ye shall put difference between the holy and the common (τῶν βεβήλων).’ It was the fault of Esau, who was not without admirable qualities, that he made no such distinction. To him the most sacred things were common, because he had no spiritual discernment. He despised ‘this birthright’ (Genesis 25:32) as a thing of no worth. He did not despise the blessing which had material advantages attached to it, and he imagined he could retain it even after he had sold the birthright. But the poignant moment of disillusionment came, when he realized that the blessing was gone beyond recall. His regrets were vain: ‘he found no place for repentance.’ This signifies that there was no means of undoing what he had done; the past was irreparable.
James Strahan.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Esau
Genesis 25:25 (c) This is a type of the flesh and the life of selfishness in contrast with Jacob and the life of faith. ( Hebrews 12:16).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Esau
A twin son with Jacob of Isaac and Rebekah, though Esau was actually the first-born. He is described as "red, all over like a hairy garment;" with this his name corresponds, which signifies 'hairy.' Genesis 25:25 . The first thing we read of him is the selling of his birthright to his over-reaching brother Jacob, for a mess of pottage. Concerning this he is called in the N.T. a profane person, because he valued not that which was the gift of God. He afterwards sought the blessing carefully with tears, but found no place of repentance. Genesis 25:29-34 ; Hebrews 12:16,17 .
Jacob, through want of faith in God, surreptitiously obtained the blessing of his father (who, contrary to God's election, intended it for Esau), in which Isaac said that he had made Jacob Esau's lord, and given all his brethren to be his servants. The blessing of Esau was "Thy dwelling shall be the fatness of the earth, and of the dew of heaven from above; and by thy sword shalt thou live, and shalt serve thy brother; and it shall come to pass, when thou shalt have the dominion, that thou shalt break his yoke from off thy neck." Genesis 27:37-40 . Esau hated his brother, and intended, when the days of mourning for his father were ended, to kill him. The words of Isaac were fulfilled. David put garrisons throughout all Edom (where the descendants of Esau dwelt, Genesis 36:8 ) and all they of Edom became his servants, 2 Samuel 8:14 ; but later on in the days of Joram, Edom revolted from under the hand of Judah; and though Joram wasable to punish them, yet Judah was growing weaker, and 'Edom revolted from under the hand of Judah, unto this day.' 2 Kings 8:20-22 . Obadiah announces Edom's final judgement: no remnant is restored. See EDOM.
Esau had three wives (see BASHEMATH)and a numerous posterity, which increasedto a powerful tribe. When he went to meet Jacob he was accompaniedby four hundred men. It may be God had warned Esau, as He did Laban, not to hurt Jacob; or possibly his anger may have abated: forwhen they approached, "Esau ran to meet him, and embracedhim, and fell on his neck and kissed him, and they wept." They were thushappily reconciled, and at the death of Isaac his two sons buriedhim. Genesis 33:4 ; Genesis 35:29 .
In Malachi 1:2,3 Esau is referred to as having been hated by Jehovah, whereas Jacob had been loved. This is quoted by Paul in Romans 9:13 , where God's sovereignty is being enforced. It was foretold that the elder shouldserve the younger before they were born, and before they could have done either good or bad: this was God's sovereignty. But it was not foretold that God would hate Esau; it is not mentioned till the close of the Old Testament, after Esau in his descendants had displayed his unrelenting enmity to Israel, and Esau personally had long before that despised the gift of God in his birthright. The passage in Malachi is thought by some to refer to the nations which descended from the two brothers.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Esau
(Hebrew: hairy)
The eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin-brother of Jacob. The life-long opposition between the two brothers was foreshadowed by their struggle when still in their mother's womb. Esau became a skilful hunter, beloved of his father. In a moment of hunger he exchanged his birthright for a mess of pottage which Jacob had prepared. His choice of Chanaanite wives was grievously offensive to Rebecca. Preparatory to giving his parting blessing to his son, Isaac bade him procure with his hunting the meat for a savory dish; during Esau's absence Jacob, on the advice of his mother, impersonated his brother by covering his neck and hands with the hide of kids. In this manner he obtained the blessing intended for the first-born, after which he fled from his brother's wrath and they met only after 20 years. Esau settled in the land of Seir and his descendants were called Edomites.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Esau
The elder brother of Jacob, who despised the blessing, and was rejected. In the history of those two brothers, we have enough to answer and silence all cavils respecting distinguishing grace from God's own testimony. (See Genesis 25:21-23; Malachi 1:3; Romans 9:1-33 throughout.) But while this doctrine concerning distinguishing grace is fully displayed in the history of Jacob and Esau from those Scriptures, there is one point more relating to Esau which deserves to be particularly considered, and the more so, from the misapprehension of many respecting it. I mean what is said by the apostle of the rejection of Esau's repentance. (Hebrews 12:16-17) By a mistake both of the cause which gave birth to this man's repentance, and of the nature of that repentance itself, many erroneous opinions have been formed upon it. A short attention to the passage as given by the apostle, under the Holy Ghost's teaching, will put this subject in a clear light, and explain this seeming difficulty. The passage is as follows: "Lest there be any fornicator or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright. For ye know how that afterward when he would have inherited the blessing, he was rejected, for he found no place of repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears." Now, if the reader will compare what is here said with the account given by the Holy Ghost, how he sold his birthright. (Genesis 25:29-34) he will discover the contempt which he put upon his birthright, and the consequent resentment of God. This is the first thing to be observed in this transaction. The covenant blessing he still despised. This he wholly disregarded, and never repented that he had so done. And if the reader looks attentively to what the Apostle hath said concerning his repentance, he will next discover, that Esau's repentance was not in respect to the promised blessing, in spiritual things conveyed to Jacob, but mere temporal possessions. Jacob was made Esau's lord, and Esau himself, by selling his birthright, had consented to it; of this he repented, and sought it carefully with tears, to prevail upon his father Isaac to call it back, hoping the known partiality of the father to him would prevail over his natural feelings. "And hence he cried with an exceeding bitter cry, and said, Hast thou but one blessing, my father, bless me, even me, also, O my father!" (Genesis 27:34-38) The reader will perceive, that in this whole account here nothing but the natural feelings at work. The repentance of Esau is wholly concerning earthly possessions, and not a word spoken about the covenant blessing given to Abraham concerning the rejection of Esau's repentance is the rejection of his earthly father Isaac, and hath nothing to do with the rejection of the Lord. Esau offered no repentance to God. The blessing in Christ he regarded no more then, than he did when he sold his birthright. This was not in Esau's concern. Esau was still the same profane person as ever. So that, if men who read their Bibles would read them attentively on this point, and beg the great Author of his written word, even God the Holy Ghost, to instruct them, they would learn to make a proper distinction between what Paul calls the sorrow of the world, which worketh death, and that godly sorrow which worketh repentance to salvation not to be repented of. (2 Corinthians 7:10) The former, like Esau's, is wholly from nature the latter, Paul describes, is from grace. The one is man's own creating, and wholly concerning, earthly things; the other is the Lord's creating, and wholly refers to heavenly things. The repentance that begins in a man's own heart from his own disappointments in worldly pursuits, ends as it began, and produceth death. The repentance which is from above and leads to true sorrow of soul, riseth to the source from whence it first came, and bringeth forth life. And this is confirmed by what the apostle declared; "Christ is exalted as a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins." (Acts 5:31)
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Esau
OR PROFANE PERSON
ESAU lost his birthright with all its blessings largely through his lack of imagination. The things that are unseen and eternal had neither substance nor evidence to Esau compared with the things that are seen and temporal. Jacob, his brother, had many faults, but Jacob inherited the blessing because after all is said he had eyes and a heart for the unseen and the spiritual. But Esau had no such speculation in his eyes. The covenant promises made to his fathers had no interest, they had no existence even, to Esau. They can take the promises who care for them; as for Esau, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. At the same time, Esau had many not wholly ignoble things about him. Esau was full of the manliest interests and occupations and pursuits. He was a very proverb of courage and endurance and success in the chase. He was the ruggedest, the brawniest, and the shaggiest of all the rugged, brawny, and shaggy creatures of the field and of the forest, among whom he lived and died. Esau had an eye like an eagle. His ear never slept. His foot took the firmest hold of the ground. And his hand was always full both of skill, and strength, and success. Esau's arrow never missed its mark. He was the pride of all the encampment as he came home at night with his traps, and his snares, and his bows, and his arrows, and laden to the earth with venison for his father's supper. Burned black with the sun; beaten hard and dry with the wind; a prince of men; a prime favourite both with men, and women, and children, and with a good word and a good gift from the field for them all. But, all the time, a heathen. All the time, an animal more than a man. All the time, all body and no soul. All the time a profane person, who failed of the grace of God.
In that extraordinary solidity of style, in which Moses sometimes surpasses Dante himself, we have Isaac and Esau and Jacob set before us to the life in six or seven verses. 'And Jacob sod pottage; and Esau came from the field, and he was faint. And Esau said to Jacob, Feed me, I pray thee, with that same red pottage; for I am faint. And Jacob said, Sell me this day thy birthright. And Esau said, Behold, I am at the point to die; and what profit shall this birthright do to me? And Jacob said, Swear to me this day; and he sware unto him; and he sold his birthright unto Jacob. Then Jacob gave Esau bread and pottage of lentils, and he did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way. Thus Esau despised his birthright.' This was not the first time that Esau and Jacob had exchanged words about that birthright. No man sells his birthright on the spot. He who sells his birthright, sells it many times in his heart before he takes it so openly as that to the market. He belittles it, and despises it, and cheapens it, at any rate to himself, long before he sells it so cheaply to another. No man, and no woman, falls in that fatal way without having prepared their fall for themselves in their hearts. Esau had showed his contempt for his birthright a thousand times, and in a thousand ways, before now. Everybody knew that Esau's birthright was for sale, if anybody cared to bid for it. Isaac knew, Rebekah knew, and Jacob knew; and Jacob had for long been eyeing his brother for a fit opportunity. It had for a long time back been marrow to Jacob's bones to hear Esau jesting so openly about his birthright over his venison and his wine; jesting and being jested about the covenant blessing. 'As much as you are able to eat, Esau! and anything else you like to name, to boot; only, say that you toss me today your worthless birthright,' said Jacob. 'Take it, and welcome!' said Esau. 'And much good may it do you! It has never been worth a haunch of good venison to me. You may have it, and my oath on it on the spot, for a good dish at once, and be quick, of your smoking pottage. Take it, and let me be done with it. Take it, and let me hear no more about it.' And Esau did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way.
Esau's roving habits of life; his increasing distaste for the life and the religion of his father's house; and, now that he had cut himself so completely adrift by openly selling his birthright, with all its privileges, and obligations, and responsibilities-all that combined to throw Esau more and more into the company of the old Canaanite communities that lay all around the patriarchal settlements. Esau, alas! was all the time himself a true Canaanite at heart. Son of Isaac and Rebekah, and grandson of Abraham and Sarah, as he was, Esau had nothing of his forefathers or his foremothers in him, unless it was some of the dregs of their remaining vices; and, as the apostle has it, some of their springing up roots of bitterness. All that Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah, had passed through; all their trials, and all their triumphs, and all their attainments of faith and of obedience, had left no mark at all on Esau, their so profane descendant. And everything that Esau did, every step that he took in life, every choice that he made in life, and every bargain that he struck, only made that more and more manifest. A man's choice in his marriage, more than anything else in this life, makes it manifest what that man is, and where his heart is. Now, Esau's marriage, fatal step as it also was, was not the passionate impulse of a moment, any more than his sale of his birthright had been. Esau had hunted for years with the brothers of Judith and Bashemath. He had eaten and drunken and danced with the Hittite inhabitants of the land. He had sacrificed and sworn and vowed to their false gods of the fields, and of the streams, and of the unclean groves. Like every reprobate from a better life, Esau had far outdone the sons of Beeri and Elon in their impieties and debaucheries. Till, at last, and in open defiance of all decency and religion, he brought home two Canaanite wives to his father's covenanted camp. 'Now, all these things happened unto them for examples, and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come.' And thus it is that we see the same things in the end of the world that has come upon ourselves. A child is born and baptized in a God-fearing house; and yet, by some fatality, or what shall we call it, he grows up as much outside the best life of his father's house as Esau all his days was outside the best life of Isaac's house. He is a little heathen among his brothers and sisters and school-fellows. His birthright is the Sabbath-day, and the Lord's table, and the society of the best people in the city, and, first a youthhood, and then a manhood, of purity and piety and the service of Christ in His church. But his first act of free and independent life is to sell all that, sometimes for a better salary; sometimes for the smile and the patronage of the open enemies of his father's faith; and sometimes for a coarser mess than even that. Years pass on till Esau sets up an openly heathen household in defiance of father and mother and all, which is ever after a grief of mind to Isaac and Rebekah. The tragedy is not so patent to us because we do not have Moses to write out our household histories, and Paul to comment on the writing, as in Esau's case; but to those who train themselves and accustom themselves to look on the world around them in this one single view as God's world, there is plenty of such profanity and self-reprobation going on among us everyday.
What with the purpose of God according to election, and that purpose communicated to Rebekah when she went to inquire of the Lord; what with Isaac's love for Esau because he did eat of his venison; what with Rebekah's retaliatory love for Jacob; what with Esau's increasing levity and profanity, and Jacob's increasing subtlety; what with Esau's defiant Canaanite marriage; and now, to crown all, Isaac's old age, blindness, and fast-approaching end-what with all that, that was as unhappy a house as was at that moment on the face of this unhappy earth. So full is that house, covenant promises and all, of guilty secrets, guilty memories, guilty wrongs, guilty remorses, guilty intentions, and guilty hopes and fears. It has often been pointed out what a mercy it is that God keeps our own future, and the future of our families, to Himself; and does not burden, and entangle, and tempt us with a knowledge that we are not able to bear. Rebekah would have children; and then she would know the secret things that belonged to Him who was forming her children in her womb; and, then, not able to wade into, and to keep her feet in the deep places of God, she fell into a life-long snare and sea of trouble, and laboured all her days under a life-long cross. It would take a Shakespeare, as deep in grace as in nature, to put upon the stage that hell upon earth that opened its mouth day and night in Isaac's covenant tent. A more powerful and a more fruitful chapter for the sacred ends of tragedy was never written than the tragical chapter of Isaac's deathbed. The decayed life, and the still more decayed faith, of Abraham's only son Isaac; the cunning and treachery of Rebekah, the bride he had brought into his mother Sarah's tent in love; Jacob, the too willing tool of his cunning mother's chicanery and lies; the pitiful imposition perpetrated upon the blind old epicure; and, then, reprobate Esau's unavailing cry of remorse and revenge. Yes, verily. The ways of transgressors are hard! The wages of sin is death!
On the principle, then, that all these things about Esau are written for our admonition, how shall we be best admonished against Esau's profane and disastrous mind? To know the truth about him, and about ourselves, is the first thing for us all to set about tonight. Well, to begin with, we are all more or less like Esau in our birth, and in our birthright, and in our profane and brutish mind about our birthright. Like Esau, we have all been born inside the covenant. We have all been sealed with the seal of the covenant. We have all been baptized for a future far greater, and far more full of blessing, than that future which fell either to Esau or to Jacob. But we have all Esau's profane mind and hard heart in us also. And, if any one would but teach us; if any great writer or great preacher, if any wise father or loving mother could and would but take us early in hand, and tell us, and let us see, that all this life is not to make what is called money, or to attain what is called success, or to fill our belly with what is called pleasure, but that God Himself has set us here so to live, and so to choose, and so to act as to put off every day this profane mind, and to put on a sacred, a spiritual, a divine, a heavenly mind-if any one with authority and with influence would but tell and teach us that! For, like Esau, to begin with, we have no imagination. We have no eyes, neither of body nor of mind, for God, or for Jesus Christ, or for heaven, or for hell, or for holiness, or for eternal life. Before we are out of our boyhood we are become vain in our imaginations, and our foolish hearts are darkened, and we worship and serve the creature more than the Creator. And for this cause God gives us over to vile affections, and to a reprobate mind. That was Esau's early history; and that is the early and life-long history of multitudes among ourselves. There is an intellectual, and with it a spiritual stupidity-there is no other name for it-that has already taken possession of one out of every two children that are born in our most covenanted households. They soon declare and show themselves to be utterly insensible to everything intellectual, spiritual, moral, noble, and above the world that knows not God. If they are rich and idle, they spend their days, like Esau, hunting down creatures of God that have more of God's image in them than their hunters have. They eat, and drink, and dress, and dance like Esau, with any Canaanite household which has sons and daughters like themselves. But they never read a good book. They never attend a good teacher. They have neither time nor taste for anything that pertains to the mind or the heart. Philo calls Esau a 'wooden' man; and the number of wooden men and women who sit at our dinner tables eating venison and drinking wine, and who are then driven all the noisy night after to our city assemblies, for outnumber those people who are made of any finer or more spiritual material. Put off the wood and the earth, put off the insensibility and the profanity that are still in you all, my brethren. And put on mind, and heart, and understanding, and consideration, and imagination. Choose your reading. Choose your company. Choose your husband and your wife. Choose your birthright. Choose life, and not death; blessing, and not cursing; heaven, and not hell. You can, if you choose. You can, if you like. Only, lay this to heart with all holy fear, that there is insensibility, and stupidity, and profanity enough in you by nature, and up to this day, to make you, amid all your covenant surroundings, a reprobate of a far worse kind than ever Esau was, unless, with tears, you seek a place of repentance. And it will take all your tears, and all your time, and all the repentance, and all the remission of sins, that Christ can give you out of His place of exaltation, to enable you to escape his end at last who ate and drank, and despised his birthright.
Young men! come, come, and I will tell you! All of you who have not up to this night quite sold the whole of your birthright. Oh! never, never do it. Die, and we shall bury you with honour, and with assurance; but, oh! my son, my brother, never, never, till the day of your death, sell to man or woman or devil your divine birthright. Your birthright of truth, and honesty, and honour, and, especially, of chastity. Sell everything but that! There must be some men here tonight just at the crisis, and just in the temper, in which Esau came home so hungry from the hunt. There are men in this house who are saying this to themselves: 'I am alone. I have nobody to care for me. If I had, it would be different, and I would be a better man. But in all this big city, in all broad Scotland, there is no one for whose sake I need keep my head above water. Though I go out of this house, and sell myself to hell tonight, no one will lament me. What profit shall it do to me to make any more stand against the gambling-table, or the dram-shop, or anything else!' My own son! ring my bell tonight, and I will talk with you and will tell you the rest. I have not lived to grey hairs in a city, and been a minister of city families, and city young men, without learning things about birthrights and their sale and their redemption too-things that cannot be told on the housetop. No minister in Edinburgh knows more or can speak better about these things than I can do. If you have no minister who can and will tell you about Esau, and about himself, and about yourself, and about Jesus Christ, ring my bell! It will be late that I do not open the door! I will be busy that we do not have another hour over Esau-you and I.
But what is to be said to those who are long past all that? What is to be said to those whose birthright has been sold past all redemption long ago? To those who have sold, not their birthright only, but their very selves, soul and body, so long ago, and so often since then? All this about Esau is agony to them. They are beside themselves with remorse and with misery. They are tired to death seeking for a place of repentance. They are beginning to seek for a field of blood, and some Sabbath night, unless God himself prevent them, they will go out like Judas. But God will prevent. He will come, and He will prevent all that from this time henceforth. 'Save from going down to the pit, I have found a ransom. O Esau, thou hast destroyed thyself; but in Me is thine help. Ye have sold yourselves for nought, but ye shall be redeemed without money. What fruit had ye then in those things of which ye are now ashamed? For the end of those things is death. For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life. Who is a God like unto Thee, that pardoneth iniquity, and passeth by the transgression of the remnant of His heritage? He retaineth not His anger for ever, because He delighteth in mercy. He will turn again, He will have compassion upon us, He will subdue our iniquities; and Thou wilt cast all our sins into the depths of the sea. Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who, according to His abundant mercy, hath begotten us again to a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead; to an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you, who are kept by the power of God through faith unto salvation, ready to be revealed in the last time.'
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Esau
Esau (ç'saw), or Edom (ç'dom). Son of Isaac and Rebecca, and twin brother of Jacob. Genesis 25:25; Genesis 36:1. The most important events of his life are intimately connected with the life of Jacob. See Jacob. His family settled on Mount Seir, east of Jordan, which was hence called Edom, and bis descendants were the Edomites, one of the most powerful and formidable nations of that age. The prophecies concerning Esau and Edom have been literally fulfilled. His family has become extinct, "cut off forever," so that there is none "remaining of the house of Esau," Obadiah 1:18; Jeremiah 49:17; Ezekiel 25:13, and "the things of Esau" have been "so searched out and his hidden things sought up," Obadiah 1:6, "that not a relic can be found in their ancient dwellings." See Edom.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Esau
son of Isaac and Rebekah, born A.M. 2168, B.C. 1836. When the time of Rebekah's delivery came, she had twins, Genesis 25:24-26 : the first-born was hairy, therefore called Esau; that is, a man full grown or of perfect age; but some derive Esau from the Arabic gescha or gencheva, which signifies a hair cloth. Esau delighted in hunting, and his father Isaac had a particular affection for him. On one occasion, Esau, returning from the fields greatly fatigued, desired Jacob to give him some red pottage, which he was then preparing. Jacob consented, provided Esau would sell him his birthright. Esau complied, and by oath resigned it to him, Genesis 25:29-34 . Esau, when aged forty, married two Canaanitish women, Judith, daughter of Beeri, the Hittite; and Bashemath, daughter of Elon, Genesis 26:34 . These marriages were very displeasing to Isaac and Rebekah, because they intermingled the blood of Abraham with that of Canaanite aliens. Isaac being old, and his sight decayed, directed Esau to procure him delicate venison by hunting, that he might give him his chief blessing, Genesis 27. The artifice of his mother, however, counteracted his purpose; and she contrived to impose upon Isaac, and to obtain the father's principal blessing for her son Jacob. Esau was indignant on account of this treachery, and determined to kill Jacob as soon as their father should die. Rebekah again interposed, and sent Jacob away to her brother Laban, with whom he might be secure. During the period of separation, which lasted several years, Esau married a wife of the family of Ishmael; and, removing to Mount Seir, acquired great power and wealth. When Jacob returned, after a long absence, to his father's country, with a numerous family, and large flocks and herds, he dreaded his brother's displeasure; but they had an amicable and affectionate interview. After their father's death, they lived in peace and amity; but, as their possessions enlarged, and there was not sufficient room for them in the land in which they were strangers, Esau returned to Mount Seir, where his posterity multiplied under the denomination of Edomites. ( See EDOM. ) The time of his death is not mentioned; but Bishop Cumberland thinks it is probable that he died about the same time with his brother Jacob, at the age of about one hundred and forty-seven years, Genesis 25-36.
2. On the most important part of this history, the selling of the birthright, we may observe, (1.) That although it was always the design of God that the blessing connected with primogeniture in the family of Abraham should be enjoyed by Jacob, and to exercise his sovereignty in changing the succession in which the promises of the Abrahamic covenant might descend; yet the conduct of Rebekah and Jacob was reprehensible in endeavouring to bring about the divine design by the unworthy means of contrivance and deceit; and they were punished for their presumption by their sufferings.
(2.) That the conduct of Esau in selling his birthright was both wanton and profane. It was wanton, because he, though faint, could be in no danger of not obtaining a supply of food in his father's house; and was therefore wholly influenced by his appetite, excited by the delicacy of Jacob's pottage. It was profane, because the blessings of the birthright were spiritual as well as civil. The church of God was to be established in the line of the first-born; and in that line the Messiah was to appear. These high privileges were despised by Esau, who is therefore made by St. Paul a type of all apostates from Christ, who, like him, profanely despise their birthright as the sons of God. See BIRTHRIGHT .
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Esau
He that acts or finishes
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Esau
The son of Isaac, and twin brother of Jacob, Genesis 25:1-34 . He was the elder of the two, and was therefore legally the heir, but sold his birthright to Jacob. We have an account of his ill-advised marriages, Genesis 26:34 ; of his loss of his father's chief blessing, and his consequent anger against Jacob, Genesis 27:1-46 ; of their subsequent reconciliation, Genesis 32:1-33:20 ; and of his posterity, Genesis 36:1-43 . He is also called Edom; and settled in the mountains south of the Dead Sea, extending to the gulf of Akaba, where he became very powerful. This country was called from him the land of Edom, and afterwards IDUMAEA, which see.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Esau
As the firstborn of Isaac’s twin sons, Esau was entitled to the family birthright. This meant that, upon his father’s death, he would receive twice the inheritance of any other sons and become family head. Moreover, in the case of Isaac’s firstborn, it included headship of God’s chosen people and the right to possess the land of Canaan. But Esau was an unspiritual and irresponsible person, preferring temporary benefits to lasting blessings. Foolishly he sold his birthright to his ruthless twin, Jacob (Genesis 25:29-34; Genesis 26:34-3557).
The custom was for the father to confirm the birthright by giving his special blessing before he died. Esau tried to gain this blessing ahead of Jacob, but again Jacob’s cunning defeated him (Genesis 27:1-29). Overcome with misery and anger, Esau tried to kill Jacob, but Jacob found out and escaped (Genesis 27:30-38; Genesis 27:41-45; Hebrews 12:17).
Although God’s purpose was that his promises to Abraham and Isaac be fulfilled through Jacob and not Esau, that did not excuse either of them for their disgraceful behaviour (Genesis 25:23; Romans 9:10-13). Nevertheless, God had a blessing for Esau. Esau would not father the nation that God would make his own, but he would father a nation that would establish a name for itself in the region. This was the nation Edom, which occupied the barren regions south and east of the Dead Sea (Genesis 27:39-40; see EDOM).
Esau confirmed his position as being outside God’s covenant blessings by marrying firstly two local Hittite women, and later a daughter of Ishmael (1618542641_1; Genesis 28:8-9). When Jacob returned to Canaan after twenty years, Esau went to meet him. Fearful of what might happen, Jacob begged Esau’s mercy, but Esau responded with such generous forgiveness that the dreaded meeting turned into a happy reunion (Genesis 32:1-21; Genesis 33:1-16). The two brothers met again when together they buried their father Isaac (Genesis 35:27-29).

Sentence search

Esau - As the firstborn of Isaac’s twin sons, Esau was entitled to the family birthright. But Esau was an unspiritual and irresponsible person, preferring temporary benefits to lasting blessings. Esau tried to gain this blessing ahead of Jacob, but again Jacob’s cunning defeated him (Genesis 27:1-29). Overcome with misery and anger, Esau tried to kill Jacob, but Jacob found out and escaped (Genesis 27:30-38; Genesis 27:41-45; Hebrews 12:17). ...
Although God’s purpose was that his promises to Abraham and Isaac be fulfilled through Jacob and not Esau, that did not excuse either of them for their disgraceful behaviour (Genesis 25:23; Romans 9:10-13). Nevertheless, God had a blessing for Esau. Esau would not father the nation that God would make his own, but he would father a nation that would establish a name for itself in the region. ...
Esau confirmed his position as being outside God’s covenant blessings by marrying firstly two local Hittite women, and later a daughter of Ishmael (Genesis 26:34-35; Genesis 28:8-9). When Jacob returned to Canaan after twenty years, Esau went to meet him. Fearful of what might happen, Jacob begged Esau’s mercy, but Esau responded with such generous forgiveness that the dreaded meeting turned into a happy reunion (Genesis 32:1-21; Genesis 33:1-16)
Edom - red) Another name for Esau, called so because he sold his birthright in exchange for a red stew. (b) The nation which descended from Esau
Timna - Concubine of Eliphaz, son of Esau, and mother of Amalek. Son of Eliphaz, a son of Esau
Oholibamah - The Hivite daughter of Anah and wife of Esau (Genesis 36:2 ). Edomite leader descended from Esau (Genesis 36:41 )
Amalek - Dweller in a valley, the son of Eliphaz and grandson of Esau (Genesis 36:12 ; 1 Chronicles 1:36 ); the chief of an Idumean tribe (Genesis 36:16 ). His mother was a Horite, a tribe whose territory the descendants of Esau had seized
Edom - Red, a name of Esau, Isaac's eldest son, appropriate on account of his natural complexion, but given, it would seem, from the current name of food for which he sold his birthright-"that same red," Genesis 25:25,30 . See Esau and IDUMEA
Aholibamah - One of thewives of Esau: she was the daughter of Anah, daughter of Zibeon the Hivite. She bare to Esau "duke Jeush, duke Jaalam, duke Korah
Esau - Esau (ç'saw), or Edom (ç'dom). The prophecies concerning Esau and Edom have been literally fulfilled. His family has become extinct, "cut off forever," so that there is none "remaining of the house of Esau," Obadiah 1:18; Jeremiah 49:17; Ezekiel 25:13, and "the things of Esau" have been "so searched out and his hidden things sought up," Obadiah 1:6, "that not a relic can be found in their ancient dwellings
Timna - A concubine of Eliphaz, son of Esau ( Genesis 36:12 ). A woman of the Esau clan of Horites ( Genesis 36:22 , 1 Chronicles 1:39 )
Jaalam - Son of Esau
Esau - A twin son with Jacob of Isaac and Rebekah, though Esau was actually the first-born. ...
Jacob, through want of faith in God, surreptitiously obtained the blessing of his father (who, contrary to God's election, intended it for Esau), in which Isaac said that he had made Jacob Esau's lord, and given all his brethren to be his servants. The blessing of Esau was "Thy dwelling shall be the fatness of the earth, and of the dew of heaven from above; and by thy sword shalt thou live, and shalt serve thy brother; and it shall come to pass, when thou shalt have the dominion, that thou shalt break his yoke from off thy neck. Esau hated his brother, and intended, when the days of mourning for his father were ended, to kill him. David put garrisons throughout all Edom (where the descendants of Esau dwelt, Genesis 36:8 ) and all they of Edom became his servants, 2 Samuel 8:14 ; but later on in the days of Joram, Edom revolted from under the hand of Judah; and though Joram wasable to punish them, yet Judah was growing weaker, and 'Edom revolted from under the hand of Judah, unto this day. ...
Esau had three wives (see BASHEMATH)and a numerous posterity, which increasedto a powerful tribe. It may be God had warned Esau, as He did Laban, not to hurt Jacob; or possibly his anger may have abated: forwhen they approached, "Esau ran to meet him, and embracedhim, and fell on his neck and kissed him, and they wept. ...
In Malachi 1:2,3 Esau is referred to as having been hated by Jehovah, whereas Jacob had been loved. But it was not foretold that God would hate Esau; it is not mentioned till the close of the Old Testament, after Esau in his descendants had displayed his unrelenting enmity to Israel, and Esau personally had long before that despised the gift of God in his birthright
Adah - One of the wives of Esau, daughter of Elon the Hittite and thus 'a daughter of Canaan:' she bare to Esau his first-born son Eliphaz, who became the father of seven of the dukes of Edom
Jetheth - Duke of Edom, a descendant of Esau
Mibzar - Descendant of Esau and duke of Edom
Judith - Daughter of Beeri a Hittite, and wife of Esau
Esau - When the time of Rebekah's delivery came, she had twins, Genesis 25:24-26 : the first-born was hairy, therefore called Esau; that is, a man full grown or of perfect age; but some derive Esau from the Arabic gescha or gencheva, which signifies a hair cloth. Esau delighted in hunting, and his father Isaac had a particular affection for him. On one occasion, Esau, returning from the fields greatly fatigued, desired Jacob to give him some red pottage, which he was then preparing. Jacob consented, provided Esau would sell him his birthright. Esau complied, and by oath resigned it to him, Genesis 25:29-34 . Esau, when aged forty, married two Canaanitish women, Judith, daughter of Beeri, the Hittite; and Bashemath, daughter of Elon, Genesis 26:34 . Isaac being old, and his sight decayed, directed Esau to procure him delicate venison by hunting, that he might give him his chief blessing, Genesis 27. Esau was indignant on account of this treachery, and determined to kill Jacob as soon as their father should die. During the period of separation, which lasted several years, Esau married a wife of the family of Ishmael; and, removing to Mount Seir, acquired great power and wealth. After their father's death, they lived in peace and amity; but, as their possessions enlarged, and there was not sufficient room for them in the land in which they were strangers, Esau returned to Mount Seir, where his posterity multiplied under the denomination of Edomites. ) That the conduct of Esau in selling his birthright was both wanton and profane. These high privileges were despised by Esau, who is therefore made by St
Esau - At birth his body was hairy and red “and they called his name Esau” (Genesis 25:25 ,Genesis 25:25,25:30 ; Genesis 27:11 ,Deuteronomy 21:15-17:21-23 ). The second born twin, Jacob, father of the nation Israel, held Esau's heel at birth (Genesis 25:22-26 ); thus depicting the struggle between the descendants of the two which ended when David lead Israel in the conquest of Edom (2 Samuel 8:12-14 ; 1 Chronicles 18:13 ; compare Numbers 24:18 ). From the first Jacob sought to gain advantage over Esau (Hosea 12:3 ). Esau, the extrovert, was a favorite of his father and as a hunter provided him with his favorite meats. ...
As a famished returning hunter, Esau, lacking self-control, sold his birthright to Jacob for food (Genesis 25:30-34 ). This stripped Esau of the headship of the people through which Messiah would come. ...
Esau blamed Jacob for all his problems failing to realize that the character flaw revealed in his selling of his birthright followed him all of his life. Esau received a blessing, but neither he nor his descendants were to occupy the fertile land of Palestine (Genesis 27:39 ). Esau had lived in the land of Seir. Esau, with an army of 400, surprised Jacob, his guilty brother, and received him without bitterness (Genesis 33:4-16 )
Mizzah - Despair, one of the four sons of Reuel, the son of Esau (Genesis 36:13,17 )
Edomite - ) One of the descendants of Esau or Edom, the brother of Jacob; an Idumean
Reuel - Son of Esau, (Genesis 36:4) The name is from Reuah, friend—and El, God
Pinon - Descendant of Esau and a duke of Edom
Akan - A descendant of Esau ( Genesis 36:27 ); called in 1 Chronicles 1:42 Jakan
Alian - A descendant of Esau ( 1 Chronicles 1:40 ); called in Genesis 36:23 Alvan
Miz'Zah - (fear ), son of Reuel and grandson of Esau
Mibzar - Fortress, one of the Edomitish "dukes" descended from Esau (Genesis 36:42 ; 1 Chronicles 1:53 )
Magdiel - A descendant of Esau, and a duke of Edom
ma'Halath - (stringed instrument ), the daughter of Ishmael, and one of the wives of Esau
ma'Halath - (stringed instrument ), the daughter of Ishmael, and one of the wives of Esau
Omar - A grandson of Esau ( Genesis 36:11 ; Genesis 36:15 , 1 Chronicles 1:36 )
je'Theth - (a nail ), one of the "dukes" who came of Esau
Judith - ) Esau's wife, daughter of Beeri the Hittite (Genesis 26:34). (See AHOLIBAMAH; Esau; BEERI
Zephi, Zepho - Son of Eliphaz, a son of Esau, and a duke of Edom
o'Mar - (eloquent, talkative ), son of Eliphaz the first-born of Esau
Mag'di-el - (prince of God ), one of the "dukes" of Edom, descended from Esau
Ziha - A family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:43 = Nehemiah 7:46 ; Nehemiah 11:21 ); called in 1Es 5:29 Esau
Adah - Daughter of Elon, a Hittite, and one of the wives of Esau ( Genesis 36:2 ). ]'>[2] ) the daughter of Elon the Hittite, whom Esau takes to wife, is named Basemath (wh
Zephi - Son of Eliphaz, son of Esau; "duke," i
Beeri - A Hittite, father of Judith, wife of Esau
Esau - Esau . The name is best explained as meaning ‘tawny’ or ‘shaggy’ ( Genesis 25:25 ); Edom or ‘ruddy’ was sometimes substituted for it ( Genesis 25:30 ), and Esau is represented as the progenitor of the Edomites ( Genesis 36:9 ; Genesis 36:43 , Jeremiah 49:8 ff. The standing feature of Esau’s history is rivalry with Jacob, which is represented as even preceding the birth of the twins ( Genesis 25:22 , Hosea 12:3 ). For this act the NT calls Esau’ profane’ ( Hebrews 12:16 ), thus revealing the secret of his character; the word (Gr. To propitiate his parents, Esau sought a wife of his own kin ( Genesis 28:8-9 ), though already married to two Hittite women ( Genesis 26:34-35 ). His father’s proposed blessing was diverted by Jacob’s artifice; and, doomed to live by war and the chase ( Genesis 27:40 ), Esau resolved to recover his lost honours by killing his brother. Twenty years later the brothers were reconciled ( Genesis 33:4 ); after which Esau made Seir his principal abode, and on the death of Isaac settled there permanently ( Genesis 35:29 , Genesis 36:6 , Deuteronomy 2:4-5 , Joshua 24:4 ). ...
By a few writers Esau has been regarded as a mythical personage, the personification of the roughness of Idumæa. It is at least as likely that a man of Esau’s character and habits would himself choose to live in a country of such a kind (Malachi 1:3 ); and mere legends about the brothers, as the early Targums are a witness, would not have made Esau the more attractive man, and the venerated Jacob, in comparison, timid, tricky, and full of deceits
Birthright - 1: πρωτοτόκια (Strong's #4415 — Noun Neuter — protokia — pro-tot-ok'-ee-ah ) "a birthright" (from protos, "first," tikto, "to beget"), is found in Hebrews 12:16 , with reference to Esau (cp. Esau transferred his "birthright" to Jacob for a paltry mess of pottage, profanely despising this last spirtual privilge, Genesis 25 ; 27 . Thus Isaac was preferred to Ishmael, Jacob to Esau, Joseph to Reuben, David to his elder brethren, Solomon to Adonijah
ja-a'Lam - (whom God hides ), a son of Esau, ( Genesis 36:5,14,18 ) comp
Gatam - Son of Eliphaz and grandson of Esau Genesis 36:11 )
Omar - Son of Eliphaz, a son of Esau
Timna - A secondary wife of Eliphaz the son Esau, a name which recurs in the records of the Idumaena tribes, Genesis 36:12,22,40 ; 1 Chronicles 1:36,51
Alian - ” A descendant of Esau and thus an Edomite (1 Chronicles 1:40 )
be-e'ri -
The father of Judith, one of the wives of Esau
Rebecca - (Ῥεβέκκα)...
Rebecca, the wife of Isaac, received a Divine oracle before the birth of her twin sons, Esau and Jacob, foretelling her that she would be the mother of two nations or peoples, of whom the elder would serve the younger (Romans 9:10-12, from Genesis 25:24-26). Even within the family of Abraham, to whom the promises were given, God more than once made choice, rejecting Ishmael and accepting Isaac, loving Jacob and hating Esau (Romans 9:7; Romans 9:13). See Jacob and Esau
Mibzar - Duke or tribe prince of Edom of Esau (Genesis 36:42) at Hadar's death, ("fortress")
Esau - Paul (Romans 9:10-13) uses the pre-natal oracle regarding Esau and his brother (Genesis 25:22-23) as an illustration of the principle of Divine election. As the prophet Malachi (Malachi 1:2-3) has it, ‘Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated. The first part of the oracle runs, ‘Two nations are in thy womb, and two peoples shall be separated from thy bowels’ (Genesis 25:23); and the Prophet’s words are, ‘Was (or ‘is,’ Revised Version margin) not Esau Jacob’s brother? saith the Lord: yet I (have) loved Jacob; but Esau (have) I hated, and made his mountains a desolation, and gave (given) his heritage to the jackals of the wilderness. Since Jacob-in the prophetic words which were so dear to them-had been loved and Esau hated, it was clear to them that they were the objects of a peculiar Divine favour. Esau and all his descendants-were children of Abraham. A whole nation might lose its birthright like Esau. ...
(2) The writer of Hebrews (Hebrews 12:16) instances Esau as a profane person, who for a single meal (ἀντὶ βρώσεως μιᾶς) sold his birthright. ’ It was the fault of Esau, who was not without admirable qualities, that he made no such distinction
Bash'Emath - (fragrant, pleasing ), daughter of Ishmael, the last married of the three wives of Esau
el-Beth'el - (the God of Bethel ), the name which Jacob is said to have bestowed on the place at which God appeared to him when he was flying from Esau
Zephi - ” Descendant of Esau (1 Chronicles 1:36 ) called Zepho in the parallel passage (Genesis 36:11 ,Genesis 36:11,36:15 )
ga'Tam - (a burnt valley ), the fourth son of Eliphaz the son of Esau, ( Genesis 36:11 ; 1 Chronicles 1:36 ) and one of the "dukes" of Eliphaz
am'Alek - (dweller in a valley ), a son of Eliphaz by his concubine Timnah grandson of Esau, and chieftain ("duke," Authorized Version) of Edom
Mount Seir - But in process of time the descendants of Esau. Moses relates that the children of Esau destroyed the Horims, and took possession of Seir. And here, soon after, we find those gracious manifestations which the Lord vouchsafed to him, to strengthen his faith, and to prepare him for the interview with his brother Esau
Beeri -
The father of Judith, one of the wives of Esau (Genesis 26:34 ), the same as Adah (Genesis 36:2 )
Adah - Wife of Esau and mother of Edomite officials (Genesis 36:2-16 )
Horites - (Genesis 14:6) Perhaps, in latter days, they were mingled with, and lost their name in the Edomites, or children of Esau
Obadiah, Book of - Edom (Esau) is characterised in scripture by his deadly hatred to his 'brother Jacob,' Obadiah 10 . Obadiah depicts the Jews themselves as God's instruments for the destruction of Esau; which agrees with Isaiah 11:14 ; Daniel 11:41 . the house of Jacob shall be a fire, and the house of Joseph a flame, and the house of Esau for stubble. The destruction shall be complete: "every one of the mount of Esau" shall be cut off by slaughter; "there shall not be any remaining of the house of Esau
Eliphaz - A son of Esau by his wife Adah the daughter of Elon the Hittite (Genesis 36:4 ). He may have been a descendant of Eliphaz the son of Esau
Esau - Esau like Nimrod was "a cunning (skillful) hunter," "a man of the field" or "desert," wild, restless, and selfindulgent, instead of following his fathers' peaceful pastoral life, "dwelling in tents. " Isaac, with the caprice of affection whereby the quiet, parent loves the opposite to his own character, "loved Esau because he did eat of his venison," his selfishness herein bringing its own punishment. " Esau's recklessness of spiritual and future privileges, and care only for the indulgence of the moment, caused him to sell his birthright for Jacob's red pottage, made of lentils or small beans, still esteemed a delicacy in the East. )...
Jacob took an ungenerous and selfish advantage, which the Scripture does not sanction, and distrusting Esau's levity required of him art oath. "Profane Esau for one morsel sold," and so "despised, his birthright. ...
The nickname Edom," red," was consequently given Esau as the reproach of his sensual folly, a name mostly confined to his land and his posterity. By feigning to be Esau, Jacob, at his mother's suggestion, stole the father's blessing which God would have secured to him without guile and its retributive punishment, had he waited in simple faith. Isaac too erred through carnal partiality, which he sought to stimulate by eating his favorite's venison, determining to give to Esau the blessing in spite of the original divine intimation, "the elder shall serve the younger," and in spite of Esau's actual sale of the birthright to Jacob, and though Esau had shown his unworthiness of it by taking when he was forty years of age two Hittite wives from among the corrupt Canaanites, to his father's and mother's grief. Too late, when "afterward Esau would have inherited the blessing, he was rejected, for he found no place for repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears" (Hebrews 12:16-17). " Esau found the truth of the homely proverb, "he that will not when he may, when he will shall have nay" (Proverbs 1:24-30; Luke 13:28; Luke 13:34-35; Luke 19:42; Luke 19:44). What Esau found not was "place for repentance" of the kind which he sought, namely, such as would regain the lost blessing. Had Esau sought rear repentance he would have found it (Matthew 7:7). Rebekah, hearing of the vengeful design of Esau against her favorite son, by recalling to Isaac's remembrance Esau's ill judged marriage secured the father's consent to Jacob's departure from the neighborhood of the daughters of Heth to that of his own kindred, and at the same time the confirmation of the blessing (Genesis 27:46; Genesis 28:1). Esau then tried by marrying his cousin Mahalath, Ishmael's daughter, to conciliate his parents (Genesis 28:8-9). ...
Soon after he began to drive the Horites out of mount Seir; and by the return of Jacob 29 years after, Esau was there with armed retainers and abundant wealth. Esau was moved by God in answer to Jacob's wrestling prayer to lay aside revenge and meet his brother with embraces, kisses, and tears (Proverbs 16:7). Love, and gifts in token of it, drove after drove, melted the violent but impulsive spirit of Esau. Jacob however, wisely fearing any collision which might revive the old grudge, declined accompanying Esau, but expressed a hope one day to visit mount Seir; his words," I will lead on softly . Then Esau, by this time seeing that Jacob's was the birthright blessing and the promised land, withdrew permanently to his appointed lot, mount Seir (Genesis 32:3; Deuteronomy 2:5-12). At first Esau prospered more, dukes being in Edom before any king reigned in Israel (Genesis 36:31), and while Israel was in bondage in Egypt Edom was independent
Beeri - Hittite father of girl Esau married, grieving his parents Isaac and Rebekah (Genesis 26:34-35 ; Genesis 27:46 )
Rehoboth - We read of a river of this name Genesis 36:37; where one Saul, a descendant of Esau, resided on the borders of it
Esau - OR PROFANE PERSON...
ESAU lost his birthright with all its blessings largely through his lack of imagination. The things that are unseen and eternal had neither substance nor evidence to Esau compared with the things that are seen and temporal. But Esau had no such speculation in his eyes. The covenant promises made to his fathers had no interest, they had no existence even, to Esau. They can take the promises who care for them; as for Esau, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. At the same time, Esau had many not wholly ignoble things about him. Esau was full of the manliest interests and occupations and pursuits. Esau had an eye like an eagle. Esau's arrow never missed its mark. ...
In that extraordinary solidity of style, in which Moses sometimes surpasses Dante himself, we have Isaac and Esau and Jacob set before us to the life in six or seven verses. 'And Jacob sod pottage; and Esau came from the field, and he was faint. And Esau said to Jacob, Feed me, I pray thee, with that same red pottage; for I am faint. And Esau said, Behold, I am at the point to die; and what profit shall this birthright do to me? And Jacob said, Swear to me this day; and he sware unto him; and he sold his birthright unto Jacob. Then Jacob gave Esau bread and pottage of lentils, and he did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way. Thus Esau despised his birthright. ' This was not the first time that Esau and Jacob had exchanged words about that birthright. Esau had showed his contempt for his birthright a thousand times, and in a thousand ways, before now. Everybody knew that Esau's birthright was for sale, if anybody cared to bid for it. It had for a long time back been marrow to Jacob's bones to hear Esau jesting so openly about his birthright over his venison and his wine; jesting and being jested about the covenant blessing. 'As much as you are able to eat, Esau! and anything else you like to name, to boot; only, say that you toss me today your worthless birthright,' said Jacob. 'Take it, and welcome!' said Esau. ' And Esau did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way. ...
Esau's roving habits of life; his increasing distaste for the life and the religion of his father's house; and, now that he had cut himself so completely adrift by openly selling his birthright, with all its privileges, and obligations, and responsibilities-all that combined to throw Esau more and more into the company of the old Canaanite communities that lay all around the patriarchal settlements. Esau, alas! was all the time himself a true Canaanite at heart. Son of Isaac and Rebekah, and grandson of Abraham and Sarah, as he was, Esau had nothing of his forefathers or his foremothers in him, unless it was some of the dregs of their remaining vices; and, as the apostle has it, some of their springing up roots of bitterness. All that Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah, had passed through; all their trials, and all their triumphs, and all their attainments of faith and of obedience, had left no mark at all on Esau, their so profane descendant. And everything that Esau did, every step that he took in life, every choice that he made in life, and every bargain that he struck, only made that more and more manifest. Now, Esau's marriage, fatal step as it also was, was not the passionate impulse of a moment, any more than his sale of his birthright had been. Esau had hunted for years with the brothers of Judith and Bashemath. Like every reprobate from a better life, Esau had far outdone the sons of Beeri and Elon in their impieties and debaucheries. A child is born and baptized in a God-fearing house; and yet, by some fatality, or what shall we call it, he grows up as much outside the best life of his father's house as Esau all his days was outside the best life of Isaac's house. Years pass on till Esau sets up an openly heathen household in defiance of father and mother and all, which is ever after a grief of mind to Isaac and Rebekah. The tragedy is not so patent to us because we do not have Moses to write out our household histories, and Paul to comment on the writing, as in Esau's case; but to those who train themselves and accustom themselves to look on the world around them in this one single view as God's world, there is plenty of such profanity and self-reprobation going on among us everyday. ...
What with the purpose of God according to election, and that purpose communicated to Rebekah when she went to inquire of the Lord; what with Isaac's love for Esau because he did eat of his venison; what with Rebekah's retaliatory love for Jacob; what with Esau's increasing levity and profanity, and Jacob's increasing subtlety; what with Esau's defiant Canaanite marriage; and now, to crown all, Isaac's old age, blindness, and fast-approaching end-what with all that, that was as unhappy a house as was at that moment on the face of this unhappy earth. The decayed life, and the still more decayed faith, of Abraham's only son Isaac; the cunning and treachery of Rebekah, the bride he had brought into his mother Sarah's tent in love; Jacob, the too willing tool of his cunning mother's chicanery and lies; the pitiful imposition perpetrated upon the blind old epicure; and, then, reprobate Esau's unavailing cry of remorse and revenge. The ways of transgressors are hard! The wages of sin is death!...
On the principle, then, that all these things about Esau are written for our admonition, how shall we be best admonished against Esau's profane and disastrous mind? To know the truth about him, and about ourselves, is the first thing for us all to set about tonight. Well, to begin with, we are all more or less like Esau in our birth, and in our birthright, and in our profane and brutish mind about our birthright. Like Esau, we have all been born inside the covenant. We have all been baptized for a future far greater, and far more full of blessing, than that future which fell either to Esau or to Jacob. But we have all Esau's profane mind and hard heart in us also. And, if any one would but teach us; if any great writer or great preacher, if any wise father or loving mother could and would but take us early in hand, and tell us, and let us see, that all this life is not to make what is called money, or to attain what is called success, or to fill our belly with what is called pleasure, but that God Himself has set us here so to live, and so to choose, and so to act as to put off every day this profane mind, and to put on a sacred, a spiritual, a divine, a heavenly mind-if any one with authority and with influence would but tell and teach us that! For, like Esau, to begin with, we have no imagination. That was Esau's early history; and that is the early and life-long history of multitudes among ourselves. If they are rich and idle, they spend their days, like Esau, hunting down creatures of God that have more of God's image in them than their hunters have. They eat, and drink, and dress, and dance like Esau, with any Canaanite household which has sons and daughters like themselves. Philo calls Esau a 'wooden' man; and the number of wooden men and women who sit at our dinner tables eating venison and drinking wine, and who are then driven all the noisy night after to our city assemblies, for outnumber those people who are made of any finer or more spiritual material. Only, lay this to heart with all holy fear, that there is insensibility, and stupidity, and profanity enough in you by nature, and up to this day, to make you, amid all your covenant surroundings, a reprobate of a far worse kind than ever Esau was, unless, with tears, you seek a place of repentance. Sell everything but that! There must be some men here tonight just at the crisis, and just in the temper, in which Esau came home so hungry from the hunt. If you have no minister who can and will tell you about Esau, and about himself, and about yourself, and about Jesus Christ, ring my bell! It will be late that I do not open the door! I will be busy that we do not have another hour over Esau-you and I. ...
But what is to be said to those who are long past all that? What is to be said to those whose birthright has been sold past all redemption long ago? To those who have sold, not their birthright only, but their very selves, soul and body, so long ago, and so often since then? All this about Esau is agony to them. O Esau, thou hast destroyed thyself; but in Me is thine help
Nahath - Son of Reuel, a son of Esau
Aran - Son of Dishan the Horite ( Genesis 36:28 , 1 Chronicles 1:42 ), a descendant of Esau
Hairy - ...
Esau, my brother, is a hairy man
ze'Pho - (watch-tower ), son of Eliphaz, son of Esau, ( Genesis 36:11 ) and one of the "dukes" or phylarchs of the Edomites
Elon - A Hittite, whose daughter Esau married (Genesis 26:34; Genesis 36:2)
Nahath -
One of the four sons of Reuel, the son of Esau (Genesis 36:13,17 )
Amalek - Son of Eliphaz, and grandson of Esau, Genesis 36:12
Mahalath -
The daughter of Ishmael, and third wife of Esau (Genesis 28:9 ); called also Bashemath (Genesis 36:3 )
Venison - The word is only used in the narrative of Jacob's stealing Esau's birthright. Isaac preferred Esau because of his love of wild game
Aholiba'Mah - (my tabernacle is exulted ), One of the three wives of Esau
ke'Naz -
Son of Eliphaz the son of Esau
Elimelech - ...
Eliphaz: Son of Esau, father of Amalek
Rebecca - 1554 BCE) Second of the four Matriarchs, wife of Isaac, mother of Jacob and Esau
na'Hath -
One of the "dukes" of Edom, eldest son of Reuel the son of Esau
Isaac - A few years later he married Bathuel's daughter, Rebecca, whom one of his father's servants had brought from Mesopotamia and who, at an advanced age, bore him twin sons, Jacob and Esau. During his last years occurred the incident of his conferring upon Jacob the blessing which he had always intended for Esau
Basemath - One of the wives of Esau. ]'>[1] ) Esau is said to have taken Mahalath , the daughter of Ishmael, the sister of Nebaioth, to be his wife; and in Genesis 36:2 the first mentioned of Esau’s wives is Adah , the daughter of Elon the Hittite
Pottage - Jacob served pottage and bread to the famished Esau in return for the birthright (Genesis 25:29-34 )
Amalek - Son of Eliphaz, by his concubine Timnah, of the Horites; grandson of Esau; duke of Edom (Genesis 36:12; Genesis 36:16)
Aiah - A son of Zibeon among the clans of Edom descended from Esau (Genesis 36:24 )
Zibeon - A Hivite, father of Anah and grandfather of Aholibamah, a wife of Esau
a'Dah - ...
A Hittitess, one of the three wives of Esau, mother of Eliphaz
ju'Dith -
The daughter of Beeri the Hittite, and wife of Esau
Isaac - (a) (1713-1533 BCE) Second of the three Patriarchs, son of Abraham and Sarah, husband of Rebecca, father of Jacob and Esau
Hamran - ” Member of family of Esau and Seir (1 Chronicles 1:41 )
Basemath - A Hittite woman whom Esau married, grieving his parents, Isaac and Rebekah (Genesis 26:1 : 34-35 ; Genesis 27:46 ). In Genesis 28:9 , Esau married Mahalath, daughter of Ishmael and sister of Nebajoth
Edom - It was given to Esau, and called the field or land of Edom. See Esau and Idumæa
Jaakan - ” Descendant of Esau and thus tribal ancestor of Edomites (1 Chronicles 1:42 ; compare Genesis 36:27 ; Numbers 33:31-32 ; Deuteronomy 10:6 )
Eliphaz - ) as son of Esau by Adah ( 1 Chronicles 1:4 ; 1 Chronicles 1:10 ), and father of Amalek by his Horite concubine Timnah ( 1 Chronicles 1:12 ; 1 Chronicles 1:22 )
Judith - A wife of Esau, daughter of Beeri the Hittite ( Genesis 26:34 ; cf
a-i'ah -
Son of Zibeon, a descendant of Seir and ancestor of one of the wives of Esau, (1 Chronicles 1:40 ) called in (Genesis 36:24 ) AJAH
Esau - Esau became a skilful hunter, beloved of his father. Preparatory to giving his parting blessing to his son, Isaac bade him procure with his hunting the meat for a savory dish; during Esau's absence Jacob, on the advice of his mother, impersonated his brother by covering his neck and hands with the hide of kids. Esau settled in the land of Seir and his descendants were called Edomites
Jacob - He was born with Esau probably at the well of Lahairoi, about b. He bought the birthright from his brother Esau, and afterward acquired the blessing intended for Esau by practicing a well-known deceit on Isaac. He escaped from the angry pursuit of Laban, from a meeting with Esau, and from the vengeance of the Canaanites provoked by the murder of Shechem; and in each of these three emergencies he was aided and strengthened by the interposition of God, and in sign of the grace won by a night of wrestling with God his name was changed at Jabbok into Israel
je'Ush -
Son of Esau by Aholiabamah the daughter of Anah, the son of Zebeon the Hivite
Cainites - They honoured those who carry in Scripture the most visible marks of reprobation; as the inhabitants of Sodom, Esau, Korah, Dathan, and Abram
Heth - The wives of Esau are called in Genesis 27:46 (R Horims, Horites - They were destroyed by the children of Esau
Teman - South, a city and region in Eastern Idumaea, settled by Teman the grandson of Esau, Genesis 36:11,15,42 Amos 1:12 Habakkuk 3:3
Judith - One of Esau's Hittite wives who caused grief for his parents because they feared the women would lead Esau away from his culture and his God (Genesis 26:33-34 )
Horites - They were dispossessed by the descendants of Esau, and as a people gradually became extinct (Deuteronomy 2:12-22 )
Judith - One of Esau's Hittite wives who caused grief for his parents because they feared the women would lead Esau away from his culture and his God (Genesis 26:33-34 )
Reuel -
A son of Esau and Bashemath (Genesis 36:4,10 ; 1 Chronicles 1:35 )
Aholibamah - Tent of the height, the name given to Judith, the daughter of Beeri = Anah (Genesis 26:34 ; 36:2 ), when she became the wife of Esau
Mahalath - Daughterof Ishmael and wife of Esau
Jeush - A son of Esau by Oholibamah; also the eponym of a Horite clan ( Genesis 36:5 ; Genesis 36:14 ; Genesis 36:18 = 1 Chronicles 1:35 )
Elon - A Hittite, father of Bashemath, and Adah, wife, (or wives) of Esau
Timnah - Duke descended from Esau
Rebecca - She became the mother of Esau and Jacob, the latter being her favorite (Genesis 25)
Idumaeans - The inhabitants of Idumæa or Edom, descendants of Esau, Genesis 36:1; Genesis 36:8, and dwellers in the clefts of the rocks in the Sinaitic peninsula. They perpetuated the enmity between Esau and Jacob. The prophets foretold the desolation of the descendants of Esau and their country
Esau - ) But while this doctrine concerning distinguishing grace is fully displayed in the history of Jacob and Esau from those Scriptures, there is one point more relating to Esau which deserves to be particularly considered, and the more so, from the misapprehension of many respecting it. I mean what is said by the apostle of the rejection of Esau's repentance. The passage is as follows: "Lest there be any fornicator or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright. And if the reader looks attentively to what the Apostle hath said concerning his repentance, he will next discover, that Esau's repentance was not in respect to the promised blessing, in spiritual things conveyed to Jacob, but mere temporal possessions. Jacob was made Esau's lord, and Esau himself, by selling his birthright, had consented to it; of this he repented, and sought it carefully with tears, to prevail upon his father Isaac to call it back, hoping the known partiality of the father to him would prevail over his natural feelings. The repentance of Esau is wholly concerning earthly possessions, and not a word spoken about the covenant blessing given to Abraham concerning the rejection of Esau's repentance is the rejection of his earthly father Isaac, and hath nothing to do with the rejection of the Lord. Esau offered no repentance to God. This was not in Esau's concern. Esau was still the same profane person as ever. (2 Corinthians 7:10) The former, like Esau's, is wholly from nature the latter, Paul describes, is from grace
ja'Cob - He was born with Esau, probably at the well of Lahai-roi, about B. He bought the birthright from his brother Esau, and afterward acquired the blessing intended for Esau, by practicing a well-known deceit on Isaac. He escaped from the angry pursuit of Laban, from a meeting with Esau, and from the vengeance of the Canaanites provoked by the murder of Shechem; and in each of these three emergencies he was aided and strengthened by the interposition of God, and in sign of the grace won by a night of wrestling with God his name was changed at Jabbok into Israel
Birthright - ...
Esau, for a morsel, sold his birthright
Teman -
A grandson of Esau, one of the "dukes of Edom" (Genesis 36:11,15,42 )
Kenaz -
One of the sons of Eliphaz, the son of Esau
Reuel - Son of Esau by his wife Bashemath
Horites - When Esau and his descendants moved into the region, they overpowered the Horites and took possession of the land for themselves
Jalam - ” Son of Esau and grandson of Isaac (Genesis 36:5 ), a clan leader among the Edomites (Genesis 36:18 )
Tim'na, -
A concubine of Eliphaz son of Esau, and mother of Amalek (Genesis 36:12 ) it may be presumed that she was the same as Timna sister of Lotan
Reu'el - (friend of God ) One of the sons of Esau, by his wife Bashemath, sister of Ishmael
ko'Rah -
Third son of Esau by Aholibamah. (Genesis 36:5,14,18 ; 1 Chronicles 1:35 ) He was born in Canaan before Esau migrated to Mount Seir, (Genesis 36:5-9 ) and was one of the "dukes" of Edom. ) ...
Another Edomitish "duke" of this name, sprung from Eliphaz, Esau's son of Adah
e'Sau - ( Genesis 25:25 ) Esau's robust frame and "rough" aspect were the types of a wild and daring nature. Mention of his unhappy marriages may be found in (Genesis 26:34 ) The next episode in the life of Esau is the loss of his father's covenant blessing, which Jacob secured through the craft of his mother, and the anger of Esau, who vows vengeance. Of Esau's subsequent history nothing is known; for that of his descendants see EDOM
Jacob - Son of Isaac and Rebekah, and twin-brother to Esau. Esau was more turbulent and fierce, and passionately fond of hunting. Isaac was partial to Esau, Rebekah to Jacob. On his solitary journey of six hundred miles into Mesopotamia, and during the toils and injuries of this twenty years' service with Laban, God still prospered him, and on his return to the land of promise inclined the hostile spirits of Laban and of Esau to peace
Uz - Descendant of Esau (Genesis 36:28 ) and member of the Horite branch of Edomites
Shammah - Son of Reuel, a son of Esau
Teman - A country named from the oldest son of Eliphaz, the son of Esau
Elbethel - Name given by Jacob to the place of the altar which he built at Beth-el to God who appeared to him when he fled from Esau
Very - ...
Whether thou be my very son Esau or not
Rebekah - Isaac and Rebekah were without children for twenty years, but then Rebekah gave birth to twin sons, Esau and Jacob (Genesis 25:20-26). ...
When Esau plotted to kill Jacob, Rebekah thought out another scheme, this time to protect Jacob
Kenizzites - ]'>[3] in Genesis 36:42 enrols Kenaz among the ‘dukes’ of Edom, while a Priestly supplementer counts him both as a ‘duke’ and as a grandson of Esau ( Genesis 36:11 ; Genesis 36:16 ). The Chronicler names Kenaz as a grandson of Esau ( 1 Chronicles 1:36 ), and also as a descendant of Judah ( 1 Chronicles 4:13-15 )
Bowing - Abraham "bowed himself to the people of the land" (Genesis 23:7 ); so Jacob to Esau (Genesis 33:3 ); and the brethren of Joseph before him as the governor of the land (Genesis 43:28 )
Jacob - A studious man, he incurred his twin brother Esau’s wrath when he deceptively received Isaac’s blessings
el-Elohe-Israel - "The mighty God of Israel," who had just shown His infinite might in saving Jacob (whose name was by God changed to Israel, because by prayer he had might with this mighty God and had prevailed) from Esau his deadly foe
Mahalath - Granddaughter of Abraham and daughter of Ishmael who married Esau (Genesis 28:9 )
Teman, Temani, Temanites - Son of Eliphaz, a son of Esau, and a duke of Edom; also his descendants and the district inhabited by them
Lentile - We find Esau longing for a mess of pottage made of lentils, Genesis 25:34
Hardeneth - Jacob and Esau had lived their lives, and2000 years had passed by before GOD said, "Jacob have I loved, and Esau have I hated
Edom, Edomites - Edom or Esau was their reputed ancestor. The Israelites were conscious that the Edomites were their near kinsmen, hence the tradition that Esau and Jacob were twin brothers ( Genesis 25:24 ). That the Edomites were an older nation they showed by making Esau the firstborn twin. The tradition that Jacob tricked Esau out of his birthright ( Genesis 27:1-46 ), and that enmity arose between the brothers, is an actual reflexion of the hostile relations of the Edomites and Israelites for which the Israelites were to a considerable degree responsible. Possibly Edomites settled here and were incorporated in Judah, for Kenaz is said in Genesis 36:11 to be a son of Esau, while in Judges 3:9 he is counted a Judahite
Isaac - In answer to their prayers, God gave them twin sons, Esau and Jacob. God declared that his covenant people would come through Jacob, though Esau also would father a nation (Genesis 25:21-26). ...
Esau, the more outgoing of the two sons, was Isaac’s favourite. Isaac determined to pass on the divine blessing to Esau, even though God had said it was to go to Jacob (Genesis 27:4). ...
Because of the deceit over Isaac’s blessing, Esau tried to kill Jacob
Isaac - ...
Rebekah was barren, but on Isaac beseeching the Lord, she conceived, and was told that she should be the mother of two nations, and the twinbrothers Esau and Jacob were born, Esau being the firstborn. ...
God does not hide the failings and weaknesses of His people, hence it is related how that Isaac loved Esau because he ate of his venison; and that when he was old he directed him to make savoury meat such as he loved, that he might eat and bless him, his eldest son, before he died. God had said that the elder should serve the younger, but Rebekah, instead of leaving the matter in God's hands, contrived by a deceitful stratagem to get the blessing for Jacob instead of Esau the firstborn. Notwithstanding this failure we read in Hebrews 11:20 , "By faith Isaac blessed Jacob and Esau concerning things to come. ...
The days of Isaac were 180 years: when he died his sons Esau and Jacob buried him
Eliphaz - ...
...
The son of Esau by his wife Adah, and father of several Edomitish tribes (Genesis 36:4,10,11,16 )
Kenaz - Son of Eliphaz and grandson of Esau, he was a clan chieftain of the Edomites (Genesis 35:11 ,Genesis 35:11,35:15 )
Keturah - Abraham, Esau, Hagar)
Jab'Bok - (Numbers 21:24 ; 2:37; 3:16) It was on the south bank of the Jabbok that the interview took place between Jacob and Esau, (Genesis 32:22 ) and this river afterward became, toward its western part, the boundary between the kingdoms of Sihon and Og
Lentiles - Such was that for which Esau sold his birthright Genesis 25:29-34
el'Iphaz -
The son of Esau and Adah, and the father of Teman
Amalek - " Originally Amalek was a grandson of Esau. Esau is a type of the flesh, and Amalek is also a type of the flesh which has no place in the economy of GOD
Hunting - Esau was "a cunning hunter" ( Genesis 25:27 )
Rachel - ...
In flight from his brother, Esau, Jacob met her when Rachel brought the sheep to water
Bashemath - One of the wives of Esau, the daughter of Ishmael and the mother of Reuel. In the earlier narrative, Genesis 26:34 ; Genesis 28:9 , the names of Esau's wives differ from those given in Genesis 36:2,3
Fords - Jacob passed over the ford of Jabbok when he came to meet Esau
Lentils - The red pottage which Jacob prepared and for which Esau sold his birthright was made from them
Hate - "Jacob have I loved, and Esau have I hated;" that is, have deprived of the privileges of his primogeniture, through his own profanity; and visited him with severe judgment on account of his sins
Zerah - The son of Reuel, and grandson of Esau, Genesis 36:13,17
Heman - In Genesis 36:22 , one of the sons of Lotan mentioned among the descendants of Esau
Shammah - Edomite tribe descended from Esau (Genesis 36:13 )
Jacob - He secured through a ruse the blessing which Isaac intended for Esau, and thus was confirmed Jacob's possession of the birthright, his struggle for which had begun before his birth
Lentiles - Small beans, common in Syria and Egypt, called 'adas , very palatable; the ingredient of the red pottage ('edom ), for which Esau sold his birthright. The Arabs make Hebron the scene of Esau's selling his birthright, and therefore daily supply the needy with lentil soup from the kitchen of a mosque there
Teman - Edomite clan descended from Esau (Genesis 36:11 , Genesis 36:15 ; 1 Chronicles 1:36 )
Sham'Mah -
The son of Reuel the son of Esau
Seir - The region was home to Esau and his descendants (Genesis 32:3 ; Joshua 24:4 )
Elon - A Hittite, the father-in-law of Esau ( Genesis 26:34 ; Genesis 36:2 )
Lentils - It is of a reddish-brown colour, and is certainly the original ‘ red pottage ’ of Esau ( Genesis 25:30 )
Anah - Mother of Oholibamah, a wife of Esau (Genesis 36:2 ), and grandmother of Jeush, Jalam, and Korah (Genesis 36:14 )
Rebekah - She was a woman of personal attractions and became the wife of Isaac, to whom late in life she bore Esau and Jacob
Election, - When Jacob and Esau were born, Jacob was elected for blessing, and his descendants as the only nation chosen by God for His special favour. It was not before Esau was born, nor until long after he was dead, that it was said he was hated of God. Some even judge that it refers, not to Esau personally, but to his descendants after their deeds had been fully manifested
Jacob - Like his father, he was of a quiet and gentle disposition, and when he grew up followed the life of a shepherd, while his brother Esau became an enterprising hunter. His dealing with Esau, however, showed much mean selfishness and cunning (Genesis 25:29-34 ). ...
Soon after his acquisition of his father's blessing (Genesis 27 ), Jacob became conscious of his guilt; and afraid of the anger of Esau, at the suggestion of Rebekah Isaac sent him away to Haran, 400 miles or more, to find a wife among his cousins, the family of Laban, the Syrian (28). ...
He now hears with dismay of the approach of his brother Esau with a band of 400 men to meet him. He feels that he must now depend only on God, and he betakes himself to him in earnest prayer, and sends on before him a munificent present to Esau, "a present to my lord Esau from thy servant Jacob. Esau came forth and met him; but his spirit of revenge was appeased, and the brothers met as friends, and during the remainder of their lives they maintained friendly relations. The complete reconciliation between Esau and Jacob was shown by their uniting in the burial of the patriarch (35:27-29)
Patriarchs, the - Esau grew up to be a hunter, while Jacob followed the more sedentary life-style of his father by supervising the family's flocks and herds, moving with them when it was necessary to find fresh pasture (Genesis 33:18-20 ). Isaac unfortunately provoked sibling rivalry by favoring Esau above Jacob. In a moment of desperate hunger, Esau traded his birthright for some of Jacob's soup, thereby transferring to his brother a double portion of Isaac's estate as well as other rights. ...
In old age, Isaac's sight failed; and, when it became apparent that Esau might inherit the extra birthright provision after all, Rebekah conspired with her favorite son Jacob to deceive Isaac into blessing him rather than Esau. The success of the scheme made Esau extremely angry. After some years absence Jacob finally returned to Mamre, where his father was living, and along with Esau buried him when he died aged 180 years. ...
Jacob's title as supplanter was fulfilled most noticeably in his dealings with his twin brother Esau. Yet in other respects he was described commendably by comparison with Esau, the semi-nomadic skilled hunter, as being a “quiet” (RSV) man. ...
The deception which Jacob perpetrated upon his father and Esau made Jacob afraid of his brother for many years. ...
Perhaps the greatest crisis in Jacob's adult life was that of his reconciliation with Esau (Genesis 32:1 ). When Jacob finally met his brother, he observed all the traditional courtesies and was reunited with Esau in a tearful greeting. Esau accepted Jacob's gift after the usual denial of need and offered to escort Jacob home
Jacob - Isaac and Rebekah gave the second of their twin sons the name Jacob (meaning ‘to hold the heel’) because at the birth the baby Jacob’s hand took hold of the heel of the first twin, Esau (Genesis 25:24-26). ...
From the beginning God made it clear that he had chosen Jacob, not Esau, as the one through whom he would fulfil his promises to Abraham. By ruthless bargaining he took from Esau the right of the firstborn to become family head and receive a double portion of the inheritance (Genesis 25:27-34; see FIRSTBORN). (Concerning the lesser blessings given to the elder brother see Esau. ...
A changed man...
As he headed for Canaan, Jacob knew that if he was to live in safety he would have to put things right with Esau. Esau by this time had established a powerful clan (Edom) in neighbouring regions to the south-east. He humbled himself before Esau and begged his forgiveness, with the result that instead of further tension and conflict between the two brothers there was friendship and cooperation (Genesis 33:1-17)
Teman - A tribe (and district) of Edom, whose importance is indicated by its eponym being the eldest son of the eldest son (Eliphaz) of Esau ( Genesis 36:11 ; Genesis 36:15 ; cf
Seir - It was allotted to the descendants of Esau (Deuteronomy 2:4,22 ; Joshua 24:4 ; 2 Chronicles 20:10 ; Isaiah 21:11 ; Exek 25:8)
Bashemath - The Hittite Elon's daughter; wife of Esau (Genesis 26:34). Ishmael's daughter; the last of Esau's three wives according to the Edomite genealogy inserted by Moses (Genesis 36:3-4; Genesis 36:13). Esau's Seirite wife, called Judith daughter of Beeri in the narrative (Genesis 26:34), is called Arolibamah (the name of a district in Idumaea) the genealogy (Genesis 36:41)
Bare - I have made Esau bare
Seir, Mount - ' It was occupied at first by the Horites, and afterwards by the descendants of Esau, and acquired the name of EDOM, q
Zerah - Son of Reuel, a son of Esau, and one of the dukes of Edom
Rebekah - A daughter of Bethuel, and sister of Laban in Mesopotamia, who became the wife of Isaac, and twenty years afterwards the mother of Jacob and Esau
Jacob - He was the younger brother of Esau, and a twin. It was observed, that at his birth he held his brother Esau's heel, and for this reason was called Jacob, Genesis 25:26 , which signifies "he supplanted. " Jacob was of a meek and peaceable temper, and loved a quiet pastoral life; whereas Esau was of a fierce and turbulent nature, and was fond of hunting. Isaac had a particular fondness for Esau; but Rebekah was more attached to Jacob. The manner in which Jacob purchased his brother's birthright for a mess of pottage, and supplanted him by obtaining Isaac's blessing, is already referred to in the article Esau. As to the purchase of the birthright, Jacob appears to have been innocent so far as any guile on his part, or real necessity from hunger on the part of Esau, is involved in the question; but his obtaining the ratification of this by the blessing of Isaac though agreeable, indeed, to the purpose of God, that the elder should serve the younger, was blamable as to the means employed. Hales on this transaction implicate Isaac also:—Thirty-seven years after, when Jacob was seventy-seven years old, according to Abulfaragi, and Isaac a hundred and thirty-seven, when he was old, and his sight had failed, and he expected soon to die, his partiality for Esau led him to attempt to set aside the oracle, and the cession of Esau's birthright to Jacob, by conferring on him the blessing of Abraham, in reward for bringing him savoury venison to eat, before his death. In this design, however, he was disappointed by the artifice of Rebekah, who dressed her favourite Jacob in his brother's clothes, and made him personate Esau, and thereby surreptitiously obtained for him the blessing: "Let people serve thee, and nations bow down to thee: be lord over thy brethren, and let thy mother's sons bow down to thee: cursed be every one that curseth thee, and blessed be he that blesseth thee," Genesis 27:1-29 . It is remarkable that, notwithstanding the agitation of Isaac, when "he trembled very exceedingly," at the detection of the fraud, he did not attempt to rescind the blessing, nor transfer it to Esau; but, on the contrary, confirmed it on Jacob: "Yea, and he shall be blessed. " His wishes were overruled and controlled by that higher power which he vainly endeavoured to counteract; and that he spoke as the Spirit gave him utterance, appears from his prediction respecting Esau's family: "And it shall come to pass, when thou shalt have the dominion, that thou shalt break thy brother's yoke from off thy neck," Genesis 27:40 ; which was fulfilled in the days of Jehoram, king of Judah, when "the Edomites revolted from under the dominion of Judah, and made themselves a king unto this day," 2 Chronicles 21:8-10 . ...
According to this view, all the parties were more or less culpable; Isaac, for endeavouring to set aside the oracle which had been pronounced in favour of his younger son; but of which he might have an obscure conception; Esau, for wishing to deprive his brother of the blessing which he had himself relinquished; and Rebekah and Jacob, for securing it by fraudulent means, not trusting wholly in the Lord. For Jacob afterward reverenced Esau as his elder brother, and insisted on Esau's accepting a present from his hand in token of submission Genesis 33:3-15 . Esau also appears to have possessed himself of his father's property during Jacob's long exile. And they were both severely punished in this life for their fraud, which destroyed the peace of the family, and planted a mortal enmity in the breast of Esau against his brother: "Is he not rightly named Jacob?" a supplanter; "for he hath supplanted me these two times: he took away my birthright, and lo, now he hath taken away my blessing. And there can be little doubt of his intention of executing his threat, when he came to meet him on his return, with such an armed force as strongly alarmed Jacob's fears, had not God changed the spirit of Esau into mildness, so that "he ran to meet Jacob, and fell on his neck, and they wept," Genesis 33:4 . And though he was supported with the assurance of the divine protection, and the renewal of the blessing of Abraham by God himself, in his remarkable vision at Bethel, and solemnly devoted himself to his service, wishing only for food and raiment, and vowing to profess the worship of God, and pay tithe unto him should he return back in peace, Genesis 28:10-22 ; yet he was forced to engage in a tedious and thankless servitude of seven years, at first for Rachel, with Laban, who retaliated upon him the imposition he had practised on his own father; and substituted Leah, whom he hated, for Rachel, whom he loved; and thereby compelled him to serve seven years more; and changed his wages several times during the remainder of his whole servitude of twenty years; in the course of which, as he pathetically complained, "the drought consumed him by day, and the frost by night, and the sleep departed from his eyes," in watching Laban's flocks, Genesis 31:40 ; and at last he was forced to steal away, and was only protected from Laban's vengeance, as afterward from Esau's, by divine interposition
te'Man -
A son of Eliphaz, son of Esau by Adah
Zerah - Descendant of Esau and thus clan leader of Edomites (Genesis 36:13 ,Genesis 36:13,36:17 )
Lentil - This, we find, was the "red pottage" which Esau, from thence called Edom, exchanged for his birthright
Obadiah - ...
Prophecy of, contains a general accusation of Edom, and an account of the prosperity of Zion when Jacob should return from his captivity and Esau be discomfited
Kenizzite - They probably derived their name from Kenaz—a descendant of Esau (Genesis 36:11 ,Genesis 36:11,36:15 )—who is listed among the Edomite chieftains (Genesis 36:42 )
Eliphaz - Son of Esau and Adah, and father of Teman, etc
Rebek'ah - ) For nineteen years she was childless: then Esau and Jacob were born, the younger being the mother's companion and favorite. She directed and aided him in carrying it out, foresaw the probable consequence of Esau's anger, and prevented it by moving Isaac to send Jacob away to Padan-aram, (Genesis 27:1 )
Korah - Son of Esau and Aholibamah. Son of Eliphaz, a son of Esau
Laban - Later, Jacob fled to his uncle Laban's house after stealing the blessing from Esau
Leah - When Jacob returned to Palestine from Padan-aram, Leah and her children were placed in front of Rachel and Joseph, evidently to absorb any violence from Esau, Jacob's brother
Laban - Later, Jacob fled to his uncle Laban's house after stealing the blessing from Esau
Field - In many passages the term implies what is remote from a house, ( Genesis 4:8 ; 24:63 ; 22:25) or settled habitation, as in the case of Esau
Seir - The posterity of Esau afterward were in possession of the mountains of Seir, and Esau himself dwelt there when Jacob returned from Mesopotamia, Genesis 33:3 ; Genesis 33:14 ; Genesis 36:8-9 . These people were driven out from their country by the Edomites, or the children of Esau, who dwelt there in their stead, and were in possession of this region when the Israelites passed by in their passage from Egypt to the land of Canaan
Jacob - He was the son of Isaac and Rebekah, younger twin brother of Esau, and husband of Leah and Rachel (Genesis 25:21-26 ; Genesis 29:21-30 ). Living up to his name, Jacob bargained for Esau's birthright. Parental partiality fostered continuing hostility between Esau, the hunter beloved of his father, and Jacob, the quiet, settled, integrated person...
favored by his mother. ...
Esau's thoughtlessness lost him his birthright and allowed Jacob to have material superiority. Nevertheless, Isaac intended to bestow the blessing of the firstborn upon Esau. Esau, too, received a blessing, but a lesser one. Rebekah had to arrange for Jacob to flee to her home in Paddan-aram to escape Esau's wrath (Genesis 27:46-28:1 ). They probably symbolized God's protection and encouragement as he headed southward to meet Esau for the first time in twenty years. Esau's seemingly hostile advance prompted a call for clear evidence of God's guarding. ...
Jacob's fear of meeting Esau proved groundless. Seemingly, Esau was content to forget the wrongs of the past and to share his life. Esau headed to Seir to become the father of the Edomites. Finally, the death of Jacob's father, who had been robbed of companionship with both sons, brought Jacob and Esau together again at the family burial site in Hebron. He always seemed to be running from someone or something—from Esau, from Laban, or from famine in Canaan. It was a new Jacob—Israel—who hobbled off to meet Esau
Jacob - Though a twin, he is called 'the younger,' being born after Esau. When they grew up, Esau became a hunter, whereas Jacob was a peaceful man, dwelling in tents. Isaac loved Esau, and Rebekah loved Jacob. ' Then he had to meet Esau, and doubtless conscience smote him, for he was greatly alarmed. ...
God protected him from Esau, as He had from Laban: they kissed each other and wept. He then feigned that he would follow Esau to Seir, but turned aside to Shechem, where he bought the portion of a field, thus settling down for his own ease in the midst of the Canaanites, instead of going to Beth-el, God's house, from whence he had started
Jacob - Though a twin, he is called 'the younger,' being born after Esau. When they grew up, Esau became a hunter, whereas Jacob was a peaceful man, dwelling in tents. Isaac loved Esau, and Rebekah loved Jacob. ' Then he had to meet Esau, and doubtless conscience smote him, for he was greatly alarmed. ...
God protected him from Esau, as He had from Laban: they kissed each other and wept. He then feigned that he would follow Esau to Seir, but turned aside to Shechem, where he bought the portion of a field, thus settling down for his own ease in the midst of the Canaanites, instead of going to Beth-el, God's house, from whence he had started
Amalekite - Descendants of Amalek, the grandson of Esau (Genesis 36:12 ), they inhabited the desolate wasteland of the northeast Sinai peninsula and the Negeb
Forget - 27:45, when Rebekah urges Jacob to flee his home until Esau “forget that which thou hast done to him
Profane - The Scripture calls Esau profane, because he sold his birthright, which was considered a holy thing, not only because the priesthood was annexed to it, but also because it was a privilege relating to Christ, and a type of the title of believers to the heavenly inheritance, Hebrews 12:16
Haran - Here, after leaving Ur, Abraham dwelt till is father Terah died; and to this old homestead Isaac sent for a wife, and Jacob fled from the wrath of Esau, Genesis 11:31,32 ; 12:5 ; 24:1-67 ; 27:43 ; 28:10 ; 29:4
Isaac - ...
Isaac married Rebekah (Genesis 24:1 ), who bore him twin sons, Esau and Jacob (Genesis 25:21-28 ). Isaac was deceived into giving Jacob his blessing and priority over Esau (Genesis 27:1 )
Birthright - Esau transferred his birthright to Jacob for a paltry mess of pottage, profanely setting at nought what was the spiritual privilege connected with it, the being progenitor of the promised Messiah (Genesis 25:33; Hebrews 12:16-17). Thus Isaac is preferred to Ishmael, Jacob to Esau, Joseph to Reuben, David to his elder brothers
Korah - A son of Esau (Genesis 36:5 ,Genesis 36:5,36:14 ; 1 Chronicles 1:35 ) who became chief of a clan of Edom (Genesis 36:18 ). A grandson of Esau, son of Eliphaz, and chief of a clan of Edom (Genesis 36:16 ; 1 Chronicles 1:36 )
Birthright - Esau forfeited his birthright to his brother Jacob for the sake of a meal of lentil stew and bread (Genesis 25:29-34 )
Birth-Right - Esau is called a profane person for selling his birth-right: it was a privilege God had given him, and which he should have valued as such
Reprobate - ...
It should seem that the word is equivalent to that of rejection; such as in the case of Cain, Genesis 4:5; such as Esau, Hebrews 12:16-17
Bullock - 32:15), which tells us that among the gifts Jacob sent to placate Esau were “ten bulls
Haran - Thither it was likewise that Jacob repaired to Laban, when he fled from Esau, Genesis 27:43 ; Genesis 28:10
Amalek - The son of Eliphaz, and grandson of Esau
e'Dom, Idumae'a - The name Edom was given to Esau, the first-born son of Isaac and twin brother of Jacob, when he sold his birthright to the latter for a meal of lentil pottage. The country which the Lord subsequently gave to Esau was hence called "the country of Edom," ( Genesis 32:3 ) and his descendants were called Edomites. --Esau's bitter hatred to his brother Jacob for fraudulently obtaining his blessing appears to have been inherited by his latest posterity
Rebekah - Sarah, Rachel, Hannah), was at first barren, but in answer to Isaac’s prayer Jacob and Esau were born ( Genesis 25:24-26 ). She was the author of the treacherous plan by which Jacob deprived Esau of his father’s blessing (Genesis 27:1-46 ). , however, the motive of the journey is that he might take a wife from the family of his mother, in contrast to Esau, who had grieved his parents by taking a wife from among the Canaanites ( Genesis 26:34-35 ). Esau’s wives vex her beyond measure
Birthright - Esau transferred his birth-right to Jacob (Genesis 25:33 )
Succoth - Here Jacob (Genesis 32:17,30 ; 33:17 ), on his return from Padan-aram after his interview with Esau, built a house for himself and made booths for his cattle
Amalek, Amalekites - There is a difficulty connected with these names, seeing that we read of Amalekites in Genesis 14:7 , some hundred years before Amalek, the son of Eliphaz and grandson of Esau, was born, Genesis 36:12 . Whether all we read of the tribe after this refers to the descendants of Esau, or whether the more ancient people were amalgamated with them, is not known
Jacob - It is part of Moses' subtlety, as Philo calls it, to tell us how much more Rebekah loved Jacob than she loved Esau, whom Isaac loved; and then, to go on to give us two examples, and two examples only, of that love. The first example of Rebekah's motherly love is seen when she dresses up Jacob in Esau's clothes, and drills him into the very tones of Esau's voice, as also into all Esau's hearty huntsman's ways in the house, till she has rehearsed her favourite son Jacob into a finished and perfect supplanter. And then, her second love is seen in the terror and in the haste with which she ships off Jacob to Haran lest Esau in his revenge should send one of his shafts through the supplanter's heart. ...
Esau had been all up and down the whole country round about a hundred times. But as long as Esau lives, as long as that man or that woman lives whom our son supplanted so long ago, he will build his house over a volcano, and will travel home to it with a trembling heart. ' But, to Jacob's consternation, Esau never looked at those lowing, snow-white herds, but put on his armour in silence, and came posting north at the head of four hundred men. But, with all these women and children, and with all these cattle and other encumbrances, was there ever a man taken in such a cruel trap! But he had still one whole night to count on before Esau could be at the Jabbok. Deliver me, I pray Thee, from the hand of my brother Esau, lest he smite me, and the women with. That staff at the first had been a birthday gift from his twin-brother Esau. When he saw that Jacob envied it, Esau smoothed the stout branch better, and straightened it out, and carved E. But now, who can tell how near Esau may be by this time! That cunning, cruel, revengeful man! Till, as the darkness fell so obscure, every plunge of the Jabbok, and every roar of the storm, made Jacob feel the smell of Esau's coat and the blow of his hairy hand. It was Esau, and it was not Esau. It was both God and Esau; till Jacob to the day of his death could never tell Who the terrible Wrestler really was Just before the morning broke, with one last wrench Jacob was left halt and lame for life. There are many other names and titles and epithets we would have given to this overtaken son of Isaac and Rebekah; this broken brother of Esau, whose sins have so found him out
Idumea - The true Idumaeans, or Edomites, were, as their name implies, descendants of Edom, or Esau, elder brother of Jacob, Genesis 36:6-9 . They were divinely charged, however, to preserve friendly relations with their "brother" Esau, Numbers 20:14-21 Deuteronomy 2:4-7 23:7 . Saul was involved in war with them, 1 Samuel 14:47 ; but they continued independent till the time of David, who subdued them, in completion of Isaac's prophecy, that Jacob should rule Esau, Genesis 27:29 2 Samuel 8:14 1 Kings 11:15 1 Chronicles 18:11-13
Obadiah, Book of - Edom, being descended from Esau, was a brother nation to Israel-Judah, and therefore should have helped Jerusalem in its final hour (cf
Mount Amalek - It is probable that this mountain took its name from Amalek, the grandson of Esau. )...
Behold, reader, in the history of Esau's race, and their bitter enmity against the seed of Jacob, the type of that unceasing and everlasting war which takes place between nature and grace, between the children of the bondwoman and the children of the free
Rebecca, Rebekah - ...
Twenty years after her marriage Rebecca became the mother of twin-sons, Esau and Jacob
Repentance - Such was the repentance of Juda, Matthew 27:3 ; and so it is said that Esau found "no place of repentance" in his father Isaac, although he sought it with tears, Hebrews 12:17 ; that is, Isaac would not change what he had done, and revoke the blessing given to Jacob, Genesis 27:1-46
Sell - "Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for a mess of pottage
Horites - ]'>[2] 3) counts them among the descendants of Esau
Shammah - Son of Reuel, son of Esau, a tribal chief ( Genesis 36:13 )
Cunning - Esau was a cunning hunter
Arabians - There were also the descendants of Ishmael and those of Esau
Edomites - Isaac said of Esau, "Thy dwelling shall be the fatness of the earth, and of the dew of heaven from above
Amalekites - Although the descendants of Esau were, on the whole, known as Edomites, one group of Esau’s descendants developed separately and were known as the Amalekites (Genesis 36:1; Genesis 36:9; Genesis 36:12; Exodus 17:8; Judges 3:13; 1 Samuel 15:2; 1 Samuel 15:15)
Hebrew - In scripture the name is not applied to any except to Abraham and his descendants, and only to those who descended through Isaac and Jacob, to the exclusion of the children of Ishmael and Esau. The descendants of Ishmael and Esau were not sojourners in the promised land, but wandered whither they would
Edom - Name given to Esau because he craved the red pottage of Jacob, Edom signifying red, Genesis 25:30 ; Genesis 36:1,8,19 ; but the name is more usually given to his tribe and the territory they possessed. Of Jerusalem they said, "Rase it, rase it, even to the foundation thereof," Psalm 137:7 , evincing, as also do other passages, the hatred and jealousy of the descendants of Esau
Jacob - (See Esau; ISAAC. ) Esau's twin brother, but second in point of priority. staying at home, minding the flocks and household duties; not, like Esau, wandering abroad in keen quest of game, "a man of the field," wild, restless, self indulgent, and seldom at home in the tent. ...
Having bought the birthright from Esau, he afterward, at Rebekah's instigation, stole the blessing which his father intended for Esau, but which God had appointed to him even when the two sons were yet unborn; "the elder shall serve the younger" (Genesis 25:23; Genesis 27:29; Malachi 1:3; Romans 9:12). ...
The fear of man, precautions cunning, habitual timidity as to danger, characterize him, as we might have expected in one quiet and shrewd to begin with, then schooled in a life exposed to danger from Esau, to grasping selfishness from Laban, and to undutifulness from most of his sons (Genesis 31:15; Genesis 31:42; Genesis 34:5; Genesis 34:30; Genesis 43:6; Genesis 43:11-12). Faith made him "covet earnestly the best gift," though his mode of getting it (first by purchase from the reckless, profane Esau, at the cost of red pottage, taking ungenerous advantage of his brother's hunger; next by deceit) was most unworthy. ...
When sent forth by his parents to escape Esau, and to get a wife in Padan Aram, he for the first time is presented before us as enjoying God's manifestations at Bethel in his vision of the ladder set up on earth, and the top reaching heaven, with "Jehovah standing above, and the angels of God ascending and descending (not descending and ascending, for the earth is presupposed as already the scene of their activity) on it," typifying God's providence and grace arranging all things for His people's good through the ministry of "angels" (Genesis 28; Hebrews 1:14). from Esau," appealing to God's, known pity for the helpless, "I fear him lest he . a present unto my lord Esau," was calculated by successive appeals to impress the impulsive elder brother (Matthew 5:25). Jacob is made to know he has more to fear from God's displeasure than from Esau's enmity Once that he stands right with God he need not fear Esau. at Beersheba may have been to avoid collision with Esau and to make an independent settlement in the promised land. It seems to have been in a time of his temporary religious declension after his escape from Esau through God's interposition. The catalog of ills includes his sufferings:...
(1) from Esau,...
(2) Laban,...
(3) maiming by the Angel,...
(4) Dinah's violation and Simeon and Levi's cruelty,...
(5) loss of Joseph,...
(6) Simeon's imprisonment,...
(7) Benjamin's departure,...
(8) Rachel's death,...
(9) Reuben's incest
Isaac - At 40 Isaac married his cousin, Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel, Nahor's son, by whom at 60 he had twin sons, Esau and Jacob. Weakness and partiality for Esau, probably owing to the contrast which Esau's bold spirit presented to his own gentle unadventurous character, were his failings; his partaking of his favorite dish, venison, the produce of his son's hunting, confirmed his selfish partiality. " Esau invited him to: "arise and sit" to eat of his venison; implying that he was laid in his bed. Moreover "he trembled exceedingly" when Esau came in. Esau's words imply his thinking Isaac near death, "the days of mourning for my father are at hand. " Isaac's unexpected prolongation of life probably deterred Esau from his murderous purpose against Jacob for having stolen his blessing. Isaac's carnal partiality and Rebekah's tortuous policy eventuated in their being left in their old age by both children, Esau disappointed and disinherited, Jacob banished to a long and distant servitude; the idols of God's children becoming their scourges, in order to bring them back to Himself (1 Corinthians 11:32; Jeremiah 2:19). His blessing Jacob and Esau "even (Greek) concerning things to come," as if they were actually present, and not merely concerning things present, is quoted (Hebrews 11:20) as evidencing his faith; as similar dying charges evidenced Jacob's and Joseph's faith
Envy - Examples abound in the Bible, such as are suggested by the relations between Cain and Abel, Jacob and Esau, Rachel and Leah, Joseph and his brothers, Saul and David, Haman and Mordecai, the elder brother and the prodigal son, the Roman evangelists of Philippians 1:15 and the Apostle Paul, and many others
Isaac - For many years the couple were childless; but at length Isaac’s prayers were heard, and Rebekah gave birth to the twins, Esau and Jacob. He appears next as a decrepit and dying man ( Genesis 27:1 ; Genesis 27:41 ), whose blessing, intended for Esau ( Genesis 25:28 , Genesis 27:4 ), was diverted by Rebekah upon Jacob. When the old man discovered the mistake, he was agitated at the deception practised upon him, but was unable to do more than predict for Esau a wild and independent career
Idumaea - Although the Idumaeans were ‘sons of Esau,’ their interests from this time were entirely merged with those of the Jews, and their country was reckoned to Judaea, Idumaea being counted one of the eleven toparchies of Judaea in Roman times (Josephus BJ iii
Flame - ...
Obadiah 1:18 (a) GOD will make His people a powerful scourge to defeat the people of Esau
Cattle - 36:15: “These were [3] of the sons of Esau
Amalekites - They are generally supposed to have been the descendants of Amalek, the son of Eliphaz, and grandson of Esau. The Arabians have a tradition that this Amalek was a son of Ham; and when we consider that so early as the march from Egypt the Amalekites were a people powerful enough to attack the Israelites, it is far more probable that they should derive their ancestry from Ham, than from the then recent stock of the grandson of Esau. These considerations would be sufficient, had we no other reasons for believing them not to be of the stock of Esau
Ezer - ” Ezer was a leader in Edom and a descendant of Esau (Genesis 36:21 ,Genesis 36:21,36:27 ,Genesis 36:27,36:30 )
se'ir - The Horites appear to have been the chief of the aboriginal inhabitants, (Genesis 36:20 ) but it was ever afterward the possession of the Edomites, the descendants of Esau
Heel - ...
Genesis 25:26 (c) Probably this may be taken as a type of the power that Jacob was to have over Esau because of the blessing which his father gave
Enough - ...
And Esau said, I have enough, my brother
Korah -
The third son of Esau, by Aholibamah (Genesis 36:14 ; 1 Chronicles 1:35 )
Preexistence of Souls - The debate in John 9:2 likely concerned the possibility of sins committed in the womb (compare God's choice of Jacob over Esau while they were still in the womb Genesis 25:23 ; Romans 9:11-13 )
Idumaea - They were partly destroyed, partly absorbed, by the Bedouin tribes who claimed descent through Esau from Abraham, and who were acknowledged by the Israelites as late as the date of the Deuteronomic codes as brethren ( Deuteronomy 23:7 )
First-Begotten, First-Born, - Esau was called a profane person for selling his birthright: it was despising the gift of God
i'Saac - When forty years old he married Rebekah his cousin, by whom, when he was sixty, he had two sons, Esau and Jacob
Repentance - Esau found no place for repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears; he could not move his father Isaac to repent of what he had done, or to recall the blessing from Jacob and confer it on himself, Hebrews 12:17 ; Matthew 3:2 ; Matthew 4:17
Isaac - The partiality of the mother for Jacob, and of the father for Esau, led to unhappy jealousies, discord, sin, and long separations between the brothers, though all were overruled to accomplish the purposed of God
Names - Compare the cases of Ishmael, Esau, and Jacob, Moses, Ichabod, etc
Genesis - ...
Isaac married and produced two sons, Esau and Jacob (24:1-25:26). In accordance with God’s will, the blessing of Abraham passed to Jacob instead of to Esau. But first he had to be reconciled to his brother Esau, who by this time had developed a prosperous settlement in neighbouring territory to the south-east (32:1-36:43)
Arabia - ), but in later times by the descendants of Esau, and known as the Land of Edom or Idumea, also as the Desert of Seir or Mount Seir
Mahanaim - Jacob's two companies answer to the two heavenly ones, the face of God and the face of Esau; seeing that first prepares Jacob for seeing this; the messengers of God and those of Jacob; and the name Jabbok, i
Hittites - They then occupied the southern part of the land, as Hebron, Genesis 23:3-18, extending towards Beersheba; since Esau married Hittite wives, and Isaac and Rebekah feared that Jacob might follow his example
ze'Rah -
A son of Reuel, son of Esau, (Genesis 36:13 ; 1 Chronicles 1:37 ) and one of the "dukes" or phylarchs of the Edomites
Edom - Specifically, they identified the Ammonites and Moabites as descendants of Lot, Abraham's nephew, but the Edomites as descendants of Esau, Jacob's brother (Genesis 19:30-36 ; Genesis 36:1 ). According to the biblical writers, enmity between Israel and Edom began already with Jacob and Esau (when the former stole the latter's birthright) and was exacerbated at the time of the Israelite Exodus from Egypt (when the Edomites refused the Israelites passage through their land). See Transjordan ; Esau ; Bozrah ; Nabateans ; Petra ; Sela
Isaac - He sent Jacob into Mesopotamia, there to take a wife of his own family, Genesis 28:1-2 , and to prevent his marrying among the Canaanites as his brother Esau had done. He then died at the age of a hundred and eighty years, and was buried with Abraham by his sons Esau and Jacob, Genesis 35. See Esau and See JACOB
Jabbok - On the southern bank of the Jabbok Jacob met Esau (Genesis 32:22)
Laban - We meet him next at Haran entertaining Jacob ( Genesis 29:13-14 ), who had escaped from his brother Esau
Field - Thus, “Esau was a cunning hunter, a man of the field; and Jacob was a plain man, dwelling in tents” ( Salutation - See Jacob's salutation of Esau, Genesis 43:1-34 ; and compare Genesis 19:1 23:7 42:6 1 Samuel 25:44 2 Samuel 1:2 John 20:26
Profane - ’ Esau was ‘profane’ (Hebrews 12:16) because he despised his spiritual birthright
Ishmael - He married an Egyptian (Genesis 21:21), and one of his daughters married Isaac’s son, Esau (Genesis 28:9)
Edom - The name Edom meant ‘red’ and was given to Esau, his descendants, and the land they later occupied (Genesis 36:1; Genesis 36:8-9). Esau was red haired, he exchanged his birthright for red bean soup, and Edom was a land of red soil (Genesis 25:25; Genesis 25:30; Matthew 2:1-193; 2 Kings 3:22)
Obadiah - ) "Saviours shall come up on Mount Zion to judge the Mount of Esau, and the kingdom shall be the Lord's"; no longer under the usurping prince of this world. "To judge Esau" means to punish, as 1 Samuel 3:13. The Mount of Esau shall be abased before Mount Zion
Jacob - Whilst still at home, he succeeded in overreaching Esau in two ways. He took advantage of Esau’s hunger and heedlessness to secure the birthright, which gave him precedence even during the father’s lifetime ( Genesis 43:33 ), and afterwards a double portion of the patrimony ( Deuteronomy 21:17 ), with probably the domestic priesthood. Isaac was dismayed, but instead of revoking the blessing confirmed it ( Genesis 27:33-37 ), and was not able to remove Esau’s bitterness. Esau is consigned to the dry and rocky districts of Idumæa, with a life of war and plunder; but his subjection to Jacob is limited in duration ( 2 Kings 8:22 ), if not also in completeness ( Genesis 27:40 f. ...
Of this successful craft on Jacob’s part the natural result on Esau’s was hatred and resentment, to avoid which Jacob left his home to spend a few days (Genesis 27:44 ) with his uncle in Haran. ]'>[6] represents Rebekah as pleading with her son his danger from Esau; but P Edom - a province of Arabia, which derives its name from Edom, or Esau, who there settled in the mountains of Seir, in the land of the Horites, south-east of the Dead Sea. The Edomites, or Idumeans, the posterity of Esau, had kings long before the Jews. They continued independent till the time of David, who subdued them, in completion of Isaac's prophecy, that Jacob should rule Esau, Genesis 27:29-30 . " "I laid the mountains of Esau and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness. The territory of the descendants of Esau affords as miraculous a demonstration of the inspiration of the Scriptures as the fate of the children of Israel. Its fertility and early cultivation are implied not only in the blessings of Esau, whose dwelling was to be the fatness of the earth, and of the dew of heaven from above; but also in the condition proposed by Moses to the Edomites, when he solicited a passage for the Israelites through their borders, that "they would not pass through the fields nor through the vine-yards;" and also in the great wealth, especially in the multitudes of flocks and herds, recorded as possessed by an individual inhabitant of that country, at a period, in all probability even more remote, Genesis 27:39 ; Numbers 20:17 ; Job 42:12 . " "If grape gatherers come to thee, would not they leave some gleaning grapes? If thieves by night, they will destroy till they have enough; but I have made Esau bare
Arabia Felix - Ishmael, Genesis 25:13-15 , and the six sons of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:2 , together with the seed of Esau and of Lot, occupied the parts of Arabia nearer Judea
Hunt - Genesis mentions several hunters by name, none of whom are Israelite ancestors (Nimrod, Genesis 10:9 ; Ishmael, Genesis 21:20 ; Esau, Genesis 25:27 ), perhaps suggesting that hunting was more characteristic of Israel's neighbors than of Israel
Birthright - The paternal blessing was also in a peculiar sense the right of the first-born, though the right itself and all the blessings of it might be forfeited or transferred, as in the case of Jacob and Esau, Genesis 25:33; Reuben and Joseph, 1 Chronicles 5:1
Ara'Bia - It was mostly peopled by descendants of Esau, and was generally known as the land of Edom or Idumea [2], as well as by its older appellation, the desert of Seir or Mount Seir. ...
In northern and western Arabia are other peoples, which, from their geographical position and mode of life are sometimes classed with the Arabs, of these are AMALEK , the descendants of Esau , etc
Predestination - ...
In a discussion of election and predestination, questions about Jacob and Esau (Romans 9:13 ) arise, as do questions about God “hardening Pharaoh's heart” (Romans 9:17-18 ). Romans 9:13 could mean that God really hated Esau and played favorites among His children. A better interpretation of these passages is to say that God used what Esau and Pharaoh had become. Esau, a compulsive man who sought instant gratification of his desires, would not be the kind of person who becomes a patriarch
Mount, Mountain - (1) They were dwelling-places , for which the numerous caves, natural and artificial, excavated in their soft limestone sides, well fitted them: thus Esau dwelt in Mount Seir ( Genesis 36:8 )
Brothers - In fact, the book of Genesis addresses the difficulties of sibling rivalry, or the “brother problem”: Cain and Abel (Genesis 4:1 ); Jacob and Esau (Genesis 25-28 ); Joseph and his brothers (Genesis 37-50 )
Lord - Jacob instructed his slaves to speak to “my lord Esau” ( Esau “lord
Reject - A — 1: ἀποδοκιμάζω (Strong's #593 — Verb — apodokimazo — ap-od-ok-ee-mad'-zo ) "to reject" as the result of examination and disapproval (apo, "away from," dokimazo, "to approve"), is used (a) of the "rejection" of Christ by the elders and chief priests of the Jews, Matthew 21:42 ; Mark 8:31 ; 12:10 ; Luke 9:22 ; 20:17 ; 1 Peter 2:4,7 (AV, "disallowed"); by the Jewish people, Luke 17:25 ; (b) of the "rejection" of Esau from inheriting "the blessing," Hebrews 12:17
Rebekah - " (See JACOB; Esau. Esau's Hittite wives "were a grief to Isaac and Rebekah" (Genesis 26:34-35. ...
She saved Jacob from Esau's murderous fury by inducing Isaac to send him away to Padan Aram (Genesis 28:1-5); thus she brought on herself by the one great sin the loss of her favorite's presence for the rest of her life, for she was not alive when he returned, Isaac alone survived (Genesis 35:27)
Jacob - He names the sanctuary the house of God (Genesis 28:22), and, in contrast to Abraham the father of Ishmael, and Isaac the father of Esau, Jacob inherits the promise in his children (49)
Seir, Mount - " Esau and the Edomite supplanted the previous occupants the Horites
Die - ” Jacob explains to Esau that, were his livestock to be driven too hard (fast), the young among them would “die” ( Command - 32:4, Jacob “commissioned” his servants to deliver a particular message to his brother Esau
There is - Possession is sometimes indicated by yêsh plus the preposition le: “And Esau said, I have enough, my brother …” ( Jacob - He names the sanctuary the house of God (Genesis 28:22), and, in contrast to Abraham the father of Ishmael, and Isaac the father of Esau, Jacob inherits the promise in his children (49)
Profane - ...
The sense of the name given to Esau is upon this ground plain and intelligible. (Hebrews 12:16) The expression of profane person doth not simply mean a defiled person, for in this sense all the Jacobs of God are unclean and defiled as well as the Esaus; but the profaneness means, the low esteem which Esau had to the birthright of the promise in Christ, which he despised, and to shew his contempt of it sold it for a morsel of present food
Edom -
The name of Esau (q
Elder, Eldest - ...
A — 3: μείζων (Strong's #3187 — Adjective — meizon — mide'-zone ) "greater," the comparative degree of megas, "great," is used of age, and translated "elder" in Romans 9:12 , with reference to Esau and Jacob
Ram - Consequently, as highly valuable animals, such “rams” were selected by Jacob to be part of a peace present sent to Esau ( Hate, Hatred - God hates Esau (Malachi 1:2-5 ; Romans 9:13 ) stresses divine freedom in election, not an emotional reaction
Hunting - Esau, skilful in the chase , is depicted as somewhat uncouth and simple ( Genesis 25:27 etc
Possess - ...
When people are the object, yârash sometimes means “to dispossess” in the sense of taking away their inheritable goods and putting them in such a social position that they cannot hold possessions or inherit permanent possessions: “The Horim also dwelt in Seir beforetime; but the children of Esau succeeded them, when they had destroyed them from before them, and dwelt in their stead …” ( Appearance - , "thy face"), where it is said by God of Lot, and Genesis 33:10 , where it is said by Jacob of Esau; see also Deuteronomy 10:17 ("persons"), Leviticus 19:15 ("person")
Isaac - After the death and burial of his father he took up his residence at Beer-lahai-roi (25:7-11), where his two sons, Esau and Jacob, were born (21-26), the former of whom seems to have been his favourite son (27,28)
Goel - The same custom exists in Arabia, and it appears to have been alluded to by Rebecca: when she learned that Esau was threatening to kill his brother Jacob, she endeavoured to send the latter out of the country, saying, "Why should I be bereft of you both in one day?" Genesis 27:15 . She could not be afraid of the magistrate for punishing the murderer, for the patriarchs were subject to no superior in Palestine; and Isaac was much too partial to Esau for her to entertain any expectation that he would condemn him to death for it
Hittites - From this tribe Esau took his first two wives (26:34; 36:2)
Dispersion - The following table shows how the different families were dispersed: ...
| - Japheth | - Gomer | Cimmerians, Armenians | - Magog | Caucasians, Scythians | - Madal | Medes and Persian tribes | - Javan | - Elishah | Greeks | - Tarshish | Etruscans, Romans | - Chittim | Cyprians, Macedonians | - Dodanim | Rhodians | - Tubal | Tibareni, Tartars | - Mechech | Moschi, Muscovites | - Tiras | Thracians | | - Shem | - Elam | Persian tribes | - Asshur | Assyrian | - Arphaxad | - Abraham | - Isaac | - Jacob | Hebrews | - Esau | Edomites | - Ishmael | Mingled with Arab tribes | - Lud | Lydians | - Aram | Syrians | | - Ham | - Cush | Ethiopans | - Mizrain | Egyptians | - Phut | Lybians, Mauritanians | - Canaan | Canaanites, Phoenicians ...
Elect, Elected, Election - " It is used four times in Romans; in Acts 9:11 , of Esau and Jacob, where the phrase "the purpose
Inheritance - Reuben lost preeminence because of incest with Bilhah (Genesis 35:22 ; Genesis 49:4 ; 1 Chronicles 5:1 ), and Esau surrendered his birthright to Jacob (Genesis 25:29-34 )
Firstborn - The firstborn might sell his rights as Esau did (Genesis 25:29-34 ) or forfeit them for misconduct as Reuben did because of incest (Genesis 35:22 ; Genesis 49:3-4 )
Rejection - Peter’s words in Acts 4:11, uses of the rejected stone ἐξονθενηθείς) and of Esau (Hebrews 12:17); (2) ἀποβάλλειν (in the forms ἀπόβλητον, 1 Timothy 4:4, and ἀποβολὴ, Acts 27:22, Romans 11:15) and (3) ἀπωθεῖσθαι (Acts 7:27; Acts 7:39; Acts 13:46, Romans 11:1-2, 1 Timothy 1:19) are used in a general sense in most of the references
Naming - Jacob was named “the supplanter” for “he took hold on Esau's heel” (Genesis 25:26 ). ...
Personal characteristics, Esau means “hairy”; Careah means “bald,” (Genesis 25:25 ; 2 Kings 25:23 ); and the use of animal names in early times, Deborah means “bee”; Jonah means “dove”; Rachel means “ewe,” are attested
Amalek, Amalekites - Perhaps this accounts for the priestly genealogies which make Amalek a descendant of Esau and a subordinate Edomite
Camel - He sent a present of thirty milch camels to his brother Esau (32:15)
Return - ...
Used in this emphasis, shûb can be applied specifically of returning along a path already traversed: “So Esau returned that day on his way unto Seir” ( Fear - Jacob prayed: “Deliver me, I pray thee, from the hand of my brother, from the hand of Esau: for I fear him, lest he will come and smite me, and the mother with the children” ( Genealogy - The Edomites, as most nearly related, are derived from Esau (36). In the earliest tradition ( Numbers 32:12 , Joshua 14:6 ; Joshua 14:14 ) he is descended from Kenaz, a tribe of Edom, and ‘grandson’ of Esau ( Genesis 36:11 ; Genesis 36:42 ); in 1 Samuel 25:3 ; 1 Samuel 30:14 the Calebite territory is still distinct from Judah. The patriarchs and more prominent figures, such as Ishmael and Esau and Caleb, were no doubt individuals, and their history is not entirely figurative
Arabah - According to Isaac's promise to Esau, the dwelling of his descendants is "the fatness of the earth, with grain and wine" (Genesis 27:37-39)
Hardness of the Heart - Hebrew can describe thinking as, “Esau said in his heart” (Genesis 27:41 )
Dinah - "...
God made this tragedy the occasion of reviving Jacob's earnestness, which had declined into worldliness for a time through his settlement near Shechem (Genesis 33:17-20); reminding him of his vow to make an altar at Bethel to God, who had appeared to him there in the day of his distress when fleeing from Esau
Cry - ...
Esau cried with a great and bitter cry
Tell - A note of this emotionally charged situation is seen in Jacob’s message to Esau: “… I have sent to tell my lord, that I may find grace in thy sight” ( Malachi, Theology of - In a passage made famous by its quotation in Romans 9:13 , the Book of Malachi begins with the statement, "I have loved Jacob, but Esau I have hated" (1:2-3). Esau, though Jacob's twin brother, was the founder of Edom, a nation that God turned into a wasteland as he poured his wrath upon it (1:3-4)
Tribes of Israel - The number 12 is an artificial one, as is seen from its application to the descendants of Ishmael ( Genesis 17:20 ; Genesis 25:13-15 ), of Nahor ( Genesis 22:20-24 ), and of Esau ( Genesis 36:15-19 ; Genesis 36:40-43 )
Mind - It speaks of the “grief of mind” (spirit) which Isaac and Rebekah experienced because Esau married heathen wives
Genesis, Book of - From Isaac spring Jacob and Esau: Jacob obtains his two wives Rachel and Leah, and with them and their maids he begets the heads of the twelve tribes, who are to possess the land as promised to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Send - 32:18 the second emphasis is in view—these animals are “a present sent unto my lord Esau
Vessel - ” Isaac told Esau to take his gear, his quiver, and his bow, “and go out to the field, and take me some venison” ( Generation - Thus creation, Adam, Noah, Noah's sons, Shem, Terah, Ishmael, the sons of Ishmael, Isaac, Esau, and Jacob each provide a generation and a structural unit in the Genesis narrative
Firstborn - But Ishmael was allowed no share at all in the father’s property ( Genesis 21:10 ); and the superiority of Jacob over Esau (symbolizing the superiority of Israel over Edom) is described as having been foretold before their birth ( Genesis 25:23 ), and as brought about by Esau’s voluntary surrender of the birthright ( Genesis 25:29-34 )
Responsibility - Esau complained that Jacob "deceived" him and got the birthright, when in fact he had sold it to his brother (compare Genesis 27:36 ; with Genesis 25:27-34 )
Obadiah, Theology of - These people are portrayed in the Bible as related to the Israelites, being descendants of Esau (Genesis 36 , especially vv
Offer - The word is also used of the imminence of foreboding events: “… Esau said in his heart, The days of mourning for my father are at hand [1] …” ( ju'Das Iscar'Iot - " (5) Judas' repentance may be compared to that of Esau
Edom - ) Esau's surname, the firstborn of Isaac; Jacob's twin brother, who sold his birthright for the red pottage (of yellow brown lentils, dashim ; the cooking of which is still seen in Egyptian representations), from whence came his surname (Genesis 25:29-34). Seir means rugged, applicable alike to Seir the hirsute (like Esau) progenitor of the Horites, Edom's predecessors, and to their rugged forest covered territory (Genesis 14:6; Genesis 32:3; Genesis 36:1-8; Genesis 36:20-22). Esau, with his 400 armed men (Genesis 32:6), commenced driving out the Horites, and permanently settled in mount Seir after his father's death, yielding Canaan to Jacob, in accordance with his father's blessing. Naturally then he notices that eight kings had reigned of Esau's family up to his own time, "before the reigning of any king to the children of Israel. ...
Meanwhile mount Stir or Edom proper, was occupied by the Nabathaeans (descended from Nebaioth, Ishmael's oldest son and Esau's brother in law), a powerful people of S
Jehovah - The last 19 chapters of Genesis, from Jacob's meeting the angels and Esau, have Elohim alone (except in the history of Judah and Pharez, Genesis 38; and Joseph's first entrance into Egypt, Genesis 39; and Jacob's dying exclamation, Genesis 49:18; the beginning and close of the long period of sorrow and patient waiting) to prepare by contrast for the fuller revelation to Moses, when Jehovah is made known in its full and experimental preciousness
First-Born First-Begotten - The privilege of the first-born: the birthright (τὰ πρωτοτόκια, Vulgate primitiva) is spoken of once in the NT, in Hebrews 12:16, which refers to Esau’s act in selling it (Genesis 25:33); the act was profanity, for the sacred privilege was despised. The firstborn was the heir to the headship of the family, and received a double portion of his father’s property (Deuteronomy 21:17); this was always the case unless for some special cause the birthright was taken from him, as in the cases of Esau, Reuben (1 Chronicles 5:1), and Manasseh (Genesis 48:14-19)
Martha - They were, like the brothers Jacob and Esau, utterly diverse in disposition and temperament
Arabia - ...
Many of the people descended from Noah (Genesis 10), Abraham (through his concubine Keturah; Genesis 25:1-6), and Esau (Genesis 36) settled as tribal groups in Arabia
Ishmael - Esau married his daughter Mahalath before Ishmael's death, for it is written "Esau went unto Ishmael" (Genesis 28:9)
Elijah - Esau, also, often halted upon his thigh. Esau wrestled with wild beasts with all his passions, but Jacob wrestled with the angel
Hatred - ) attributes to Jahweh: ‘Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated
Cainites - They claimed fellowship with Esau, Korah, the men of Sodom, and all such people, and regarded themselves as on that account persecuted by the Creator
Separate - A reciprocal separation seems to be implied in the birth of Jacob and Esau: “Two nations are in thy womb, and two manner of people shall be separated from thy bowels …” ( a'Braham - Abraham lived to see the gradual accomplishment of the promise in the birth of his grandchildren Jacob and Esau, and witnessed their growth to manhood
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - The statement in Romans 9:13 , "Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated, " is best understood in terms of an established covenant with Jacob and not with Esau
Election - Further elections narrow down this line of promise Isaac, not Ishmael; Jacob, not Esau (cf. ...
Here, however, it will naturally be asked Is there not, after all, a reason for these and similar elections in the greater congruity of the object with the purpose for which it was designed? If God chose Abraham, was it not because Abraham was the best fitted among existing men for such a vocation? Was Isaac not better fitted than Ishmael, and Jacob than Esau, to be the transmitters of the promise? This leads to a remark which carries us much deeper into the nature of election
Korah - Esau's son, by Aholibamah (Genesis 36:5; Genesis 36:14; Genesis 36:18). A duke of Edom, born in Canaan before Esau migrated to Mount Seir
Blessing And Cursing - When Isaac mistakenly blessed Jacob rather than Esau, he could not recall the blessing, for it existed in history (Genesis 27:18-41 ); it had acquired an identity of its own
Predestination - " In Genesis 25:23 a statement is made concerning the destinies of Jacob and Esau before they were born
Kill, Killing - Harag [1] for the intended killing of Joseph 37:20; mut was used in Genesis 37:18 ; also see 1 Samuel 19:1 ; 1 Kings 11:40 ] Jacob versus Esau [2] and Cain versus Abel [3])
Arabia - Then Ishmael's, then Esau's descendants, for Esau identified himself with Ishmael by his marrying Ishmael's daughter (Genesis 28:9)
Herod - Jewish people refused to support him because he was not a full-blooded Jew, but a descendant of Esau
Ephraim (1) - ...
(2) Ephraim the younger was preferred to Manasseh the elder, just as Jacob himself was preferred before the elder Esau
Tears - In no case was the lamentation vain remorse, like that of Esau, who found no place of repentance, though he sought the blessing of his father diligently with tears (Hebrews 12:17)
Freedom of the Will - Paul himself was involved in this) to the Law, Second, the apparent inability of an individual or groups of individuals (Esau, Pharaoh, Israel) to will what is right because of some dealing of God with them. Is then God’s promise to them broken by the rejection of His people? No: to suppose this would be to limit God’s power; for He was supreme enough to put conditions on that promise (Isaac was chosen, and not lshmael; Jacob, and not Esau). But we must remember that he is arguing about Isaac, not Ishmael; Jacob, not Esau
Abortion - Nowhere is this more clearly shown than in the prebirth rivalry between Jacob and Esau, and in the encounter between John and Jesus recorded in Luke's birth narrative. Jacob's struggle with Esau in the womb prophetically anticipated events later in life (Genesis 25:21-26 ), and when John the Baptist, as a fetus of six months, leapt in the presence of the newly conceived Jesus, he inaugurated his witness to the One who is to come (Luke 1:39-45 )
Exodus - They reckon thus: ...
| Years | | From Abraham's arrival in Canaan to Isaac's | birth 25 | | From Isaac's birth to that of his twin sons | Esau and Jacob 60 | | From Jacob's birth to the going down into | Egypt 130 | | (215) | | From Jacob's going down into Egypt to the | death of Joseph 71 | | From death of Joseph to the birth of Moses 64 | | From birth of Moses to the Exodus 80 | | In all
Inheritance - That a father had power to transfer the birthright from the firstborn to another is implied in the cases of Ishmael and Isaac ( Genesis 21:10 ), Esau and Jacob ( Genesis 27:37 ), Reuben and Joseph ( 1 Chronicles 5:1 ), Adonijah and Solomon ( 1 Kings 1:11 ff
Remnant - Obadiah, whose book targets Edom, asserts, "There will be no survivors from the house of Esau" (v
Genealogy - ...
So Genesis 5:1, "the book of the generations of Adam," wherein his descendants are traced down to Noah; Genesis 6:9, "the generations of Noah," the history of Noah and his sons; Genesis 10:1, "the generations of the sons of Noah," Shem, Ham, and Japhet, the oldest and most precious existing ethnological record; Genesis 11:10-26 "the generations of Shem," Genesis 11:27 "the generations of Terah," Abram's father; Genesis 25:12 "the generations of Ishmael," Genesis 25:19 "the generations of Isaac"; Genesis 36:1, "the generations of Esau"; Genesis 37:2, "the generations of Jacob"; Genesis 35:22-26, "the sons of Jacob," etc
Marriage (i.) - The impulsive self-will of Esau which showed itself in the contempt of his birthright, led him to set aside the above tradition by marrying two of the daughters of Heth (Genesis 26:34; Genesis 26:33; Genesis 27:46)
Eagle - Jeremiah predicted a similar calamity: "Thus saith the Lord, Behold, he shall fly as an eagle, and spread his wings over Moab," Jeremiah 48:40 ; and the same figure was employed to denote the destruction that overtook the house of Esau: "Behold, he shall come up and fly as the eagle, and spread his wings over Bozrah," Jeremiah 49:22
Obadiah, Book of - Among these verses are now interspersed others, Obadiah 1:6 , which speaks of Esau (=Edom) in the 3rd person (pl
Genesis - Reconciliation with his brother Esau is followed by deception on the part of his sons
Arms - Thus Isaac said to Esau, "Take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow," Genesis 27:3 ; though, it is true, these are not spoken of as used in war, but in hunting; and so they are supposed and implied before this, where it is said of Ishmael that he became an archer, he used bows and arrows in shooting of wild beasts, Genesis 21:20
Shepherds - " From the present which Jacob made to his brother Esau, consisting of five hundred and eighty head of different sorts, we may form some idea of the countless numbers of great and small cattle which he had acquired in the service of Laban
Romans, Theology of - Whether it is Jacob over Esau, Moses over Pharaoh, or now the Gentiles over Paul's own kind, it is by God's sovereign grace that even a remnant is saved. ...
Yet there is an added ingredient in the formula of election, for God does not choose capriciously but through valid secondary agents, and in each case the nonelect are seen to be lacking in faith: Esau, Pharaoh, and now Israel who have not pursued righteousness through faith, but as it were based on works (9:30-33)
Atonement - Jacob uses the same verb (Genesis 32:20), "I will appease Esau with the present," i
Cooking And Heating - The pottage which Jacob gave to Esau was a lentil soup (Genesis 25:30 )
Family Life And Relations - ...
Though every effort was expended to preserve the stability of the family, tensions existed, and the Bible makes no effort to conceal them (Abraham's quarrel with his nephew Lot, Genesis 13:5-8 ; Esau's hatred of Jacob, Genesis 27:41 ; and the favoritism shown Jacob by Rebekah, Genesis 25:28 ; 27:15-17 ). Likewise, the stories of the successes of Joseph and David and the failures of Reuben and Esau show that age was not inviolably superior to youth
Covenant - When fleeing from Esau, Jacob was assured of these; the reassurance of Yahweh's presence was captured by the phrases "I am with you"; "I will watch over you"; "I will bring you back to the land"; "I will not leave you"; and "I will accomplish all I promise you. When the time came to confront Esau, Jacob depended on Yahweh's covenantal relationship with his forbears and the promises made to them and him (32:9-12)
Marriage - Esau was a hunter, but Jacob liked to cook (Genesis 25:27-29 )
Judas - In the family of Adam there was a Cain; in Noah's house there was a Ham; Isaac had his Esau as well as Jacob; and, above all, the Lord Jesus had Judas
Reprobation - But, if the doctrine of absolute election and reprobation be true; if we are to understand that men like Jacob and Esau, in the Calvinistic construction of the passage, while in the womb of their mother, nay, from eternity, are loved and hated, elected or reprobated, before they have done "good or evil," then it necessarily follows, that there is precisely this kind of respect of persons with God; for his acceptance or rejection of men stands on some ground of aversion or dislike, which cannot be resolved into any moral rule, and has no respect to the merits of the case itself; and if the Scripture affirms that there is no such respect of persons with God, then the doctrine which implies it is contradicted by inspired authority
Deuteronomy, the Book of - His notices of the children of Esau supplanting the Horims by God's help, and Moab supplanting the giant Emim (Deuteronomy 2:9-13) are made the argument why Israel need not, as their fathers, fear the giant Anakims
Unpardonable Sin - * Heir Heritage Inheritance - , where Isaac and Jacob are fellow-heirs (συγκληρονόμοι) with Abraham; and Hebrews 12:17, where Esau failed to inherit the blessing
Canaanites - But we learn from the Scripture history, that the Hittites in particular were become degenerate in the time of Isaac and Rebekah; for they could not endure the thoughts of Jacob's marrying one of the daughters of Heth, as Esau had done
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - * Sacrifice And Offering - 587), such as Jacob’s ‘present’ to Esau ( Genesis 32:13 ; Genesis 32:18 ), and the ‘presents’ which subjects were expected to offer to their sovereigns ( 1 Samuel 10:27 )
Sin - At the same time, the history of Esau furnishes us with proof that already glimmerings of a more profound ethical basis upon which to build human character, than that recognized elsewhere, had begun to obtrude themselves. If in the case of Abraham ‘faith was reckoned for righteousness’ ( Romans 4:9 ), and belief in the fidelity of God’s promises, in the face of the most untoward conditions, constituted the foundation-stone of the patriarch’s noble character, so in Esau’s case it was the lack of this belief, with the consequent inability to appreciate the dignity to which he was born, that lay at the root of his great and pathetic failure
Saul - But he has gone away and left us to deal with such characters as Esau, and Balaam, and Saul, and Judas for ourselves
Samson - …'I am weary of my life!' said Rebekah to Isaac over the marriage of Esau, and in terror of a like marriage of Jacob
Joseph - Can Jacob have forgotten the sea of trouble into which his father's favouritism, and his mother's indulgence, cast both themselves and their children? The woful harvest of all that long past folly is still making both Jacob's life and many other lives as bitter as death to this day; and vet here is Jacob poisoning the whole of his family life also, and spoiling Joseph, just as Isaac and Rebekah had spoiled and poisoned their own and their children's lives when Jacob and Esau were still their children
Number - , Isaac and Esau marry at the age of 40; there are 40 years of the wandering; Ezekiel’s 40 years’ captivity ( Ezekiel 29:11 ); 40 days was the period Moses spent in the Mount, Elijah and Christ fasted in the wilderness, etc
Fire - ...
Obadiah 1:18 (a) By this is represented the wrath of Israel against the people of Esau, their enemies
Circumcision - The spiritual promises of the covenant continued unrestricted to all the descendants of Abraham, whether by Isaac or by Ishmael; and still lower down, to the descendants of Esau as well as to those of Jacob
Israel, History of - To Isaac and Rebekah were born Jacob and Esau
Election - Ishmael was rejected, Isaac chosen: Esau was rejected and Jacob chosen, antecedently to all moral conduct, though both were of the same father and mother
Red Sea - ...
The Red Sea derived its name from Edom, signifying "red," a title of Esau, to whom the bordering country of Edom, or Idumaea, belonged, Genesis 25:30 ; Genesis 36:31-40
Food - One or more of these, doubtless supplied the venison from which Esau was wont to make the ‘savoury meat’ which his father loved ( Genesis 25:28 ; Genesis 27:5 f
Amos, Theology of - Isaiah 9:1-7 ; 11:10-16 ), the singling out of a presumably chastened remnant of Edom in Amos 9:12 calls to mind a number of biblical invectives against the descendants of Esau for their gleeful complicity with the Babylonian conquerors of Judah in 586 b
Herod - ...
Thus a descendant of Esau tried still to get from Jacob the forfeited blessing (Genesis 27:29; Genesis 27:40), in vain setting up an earthly kingdom on a professed Jewish basis, to rival Messiah's spiritual kingdom, as it was then being fore-announced by John Baptist
Marriage - the story of Esau and Jacob’s presents, Genesis 33); in the parable no excuse is offered
Prophecy - We see the family of Esau totally extinct, and that of Jacob subsisting at this day; 'the septre departed from Judah, ' and the people living no where in authority, every where in subjection; the Jews still dwelling alone among the nations, while 'the remembrance of Amalek is utterly put out from under heaven
Animals - They were among the cattle gift that Jacob offered to Esau (Genesis 32:15 )
Moses - " Contrast Esau (Hebrews 12:16-17)
Man - Paul would have joined heartily; but his recognition of the individual relation of men to God does not prevent him from accepting the fact that the Ishmaelites were cast out in Hagar’s son (Galatians 4:30), and that the Edomites were ‘hated’ in Esau (Romans 9:13)
Barnabas, Epistle of - Of these, the Jews, the elder, are in the position of Esau and of Manasseh, who, though the first-born of their respective fathers, did not inherit the blessing; the Christians, like Jacob and Ephraim, though in each case the younger, have been made the recipients of the promise (ch
Offering - For example, when Jacob was on his way back home after twenty years, his long-standing guilt and fear of Esau prompted him to send a rather large “present” (bribe) of goats, camels, and other animals ( Romans, Epistle to the - It was to Isaac and not to Ishmael, to Jacob and not to Esau (Romans 9:1-13 )
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - 1-3), the war with Esau, who is slain by Jacob, the capture of the Edomite stronghold (ix
Israel - If countries and peoples are here personified as men, the same may be the case elsewhere: and in Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Esau, and the twelve sons of Jacob, we may be dealing not with individuals but with tribes
Calvinism - " He proceeds to quote the example of Jacob and Esau, as loved and hated before they had done good or evil, to show that the only reason of election and reprobation is to be placed in God's "secret counsel