What does Ephraim mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
אֶפְרַ֔יִם second son of Joseph 25
אֶפְרָ֑יִם second son of Joseph 23
אֶפְרַ֙יִם֙ second son of Joseph 21
אֶפְרַ֖יִם second son of Joseph 21
אֶפְרָֽיִם second son of Joseph 16
אֶפְרַ֗יִם second son of Joseph 10
אֶפְרַ֛יִם second son of Joseph 7
לְאֶפְרַ֔יִם second son of Joseph 5
אֶפְרַ֥יִם second son of Joseph 4
אֶפְרַ֜יִם second son of Joseph 4
מֵֽאֶפְרַ֔יִם second son of Joseph 3
אֶפְרָ֖יִם second son of Joseph 3
אֶפְרַ֕יִם second son of Joseph 3
אֶ֠פְרַיִם second son of Joseph 2
אֶפְרַ֣יִם second son of Joseph 2
לְאֶפְרָ֑יִם second son of Joseph 2
וְ֭אֶפְרַיִם second son of Joseph 2
וְאֶפְרָֽיִם second son of Joseph 2
וְאֶפְרַ֗יִם second son of Joseph 2
וְאֶפְרַ֙יִם֙ second son of Joseph 2
לְאֶפְרַ֗יִם second son of Joseph 1
ἐφραὶμ a city about a short day’s journey from Jerusalem. 1
לְאֶפְרַ֥יִם second son of Joseph 1
אֶפְרַיִם֒ second son of Joseph 1
לְאֶפְרַ֕יִם second son of Joseph 1
אֶ֝פְרַ֗יִם second son of Joseph 1
אֶפְרַ֨יִם ׀ second son of Joseph 1
אֶפְרַיִם֮ second son of Joseph 1
וְאֶפְרַ֜יִם second son of Joseph 1
וְאֶפְרָ֑יִם second son of Joseph 1
וְאֶפְרַ֖יִם second son of Joseph 1
וְאֶפְרַ֕יִם second son of Joseph 1
אֶפְרָ֔יִם second son of Joseph 1
؟ אֶפְרַ֗יִם second son of Joseph 1
כְּאֶפְרַ֖יִם second son of Joseph 1
אֶפְרַ֤יִם second son of Joseph 1
וְאֶפְרַ֛יִם second son of Joseph 1
וּבְאֶפְרַ֥יִם second son of Joseph 1
מֵֽאֶפְרַ֨יִם second son of Joseph 1
מֵאֶפְרַ֥יִם second son of Joseph 1
מֵאֶפְרַ֗יִם second son of Joseph 1

Definitions Related to Ephraim

H669


   1 second son of Joseph, blessed by him and given preference over first son, Manasseh.
   2 the tribe, Ephraim.
   3 the mountain country of Ephraim.
   4 sometimes used name for the northern kingdom (Hosea or Isaiah).
   5 a city near Baal-hazor.
   6 a chief gate of Jerusalem.
   Additional Information: Ephraim = “double ash-heap: I shall be doubly fruitful”.
   

G2187


   1 a city about a short day’s journey from Jerusalem.
   Additional Information: Ephraim = “double fruitfulness”.
   

Frequency of Ephraim (original languages)

Frequency of Ephraim (English)

Dictionary

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, Wood of
The battlefield where Absalom fell, the entanglement of the wood occasioning large slaughter of the Ephraimites, from whence perhaps the wood was named. From 2 Samuel 17:24; 2 Samuel 17:26; 2 Samuel 18:3, it is certain that it was E. of Jordan, not W. where the tribe Ephraim was settled. Mahanaim was the "city out of" which David's army looked for "succour" from him. Grotius thinks, less probably, that the name was derived from the slaughter of Ephraim at the Jordan fords by Jephthah (Judges 12:1-5); the city Mahanaim and wood of Ephraim were miles off from the Jordan.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Ephraim
(a) Joseph�s second son. Born in Egypt before the onset of the fateful famine. His grandfather Jacob elevated him and his brother Manasseh to the status of progenitors of tribes within the nation of Israel. Though he was the younger of the brothers, Jacob foresaw that his descendants would be the greater of the two. (b) A common Jewish name.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim in the Wilderness
(John 11 :: 54 ), a town to which our Lord retired with his disciples after he had raised Lazarus, and when the priests were conspiring against him. It lay in the wild, uncultivated hill-country to the north-east of Jerusalem, betwen the central towns and the Jordan valley.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, Wood of
A forest in which a fatal battle was fought between the army of David and that of Absalom, who was killed there (2 Samuel 18:6,8 ). It lay on the east of Jordan, not far from Mahanaim, and was some part of the great forest of Gilead.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim
Double fruitfulness ("for God had made him fruitful in the land of his affliction"). The second son of Joseph, born in Egypt (Genesis 41:52 ; 46:20 ). The first incident recorded regarding him is his being placed, along with his brother Manasseh, before their grandfather, Jacob, that he might bless them (48:10; Compare 27:1). The intention of Joseph was that the right hand of the aged patriarch should be placed on the head of the elder of the two; but Jacob set Ephraim the younger before his brother, "guiding his hands wittingly." Before Joseph's death, Ephraim's family had reached the third generation (Genesis 50:23 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, Gate of
One of the gates of Jerusalem (2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chronicles 25:23 ), on the side of the city looking toward Ephraim, the north side.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, Mount
The central mountainous district of Palestine occupied by the tribe of Ephraim (Joshua 17:15 ; 19:50 ; 20:7 ), extending from Bethel to the plain of Jezreel. In Joshua's time (Joshua 17:18 ) these hills were densely wooded. They were intersected by well-watered, fertile valleys, referred to in Jeremiah 50:19 . Joshua was buried at Timnath-heres among the mountains of Ephraim, on the north side of the hill of Gaash (Judges 2:9 ). This region is also called the "mountains of Israel" (Joshua 11:21 ) and the "mountains of Samaria" (Jeremiah 31:5,6 : Amos 3:9 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, the Tribe of
Took precedence over that of Manasseh by virtue of Jacob's blessing (Genesis 41:52 ; 48:1 ). The descendants of Joseph formed two of the tribes of Israel, whereas each of the other sons of Jacob was the founder of only one tribe. Thus there were in reality thirteen tribes; but the number twelve was preserved by excluding that of Levi when Ephraim and Manasseh are mentioned separately (Numbers 1:32-34 ; Joshua 17:14,17 ; 1 Chronicles 7:20 ). Territory of. At the time of the first census in the wilderness this tribe numbered 40,500 (Numbers 1:32,33 ); forty years later, when about to take possession of the Promised Land, it numbered only 32,500. During the march (see Numbers 2:18-24 ). When the spies were sent out to spy the land, "Oshea the son of Nun" of this tribe signalized himself.
The boundaries of the portion of the land assigned to Ephraim are given in Joshua 16:1-10 . It included most of what was afterwards called Samaria as distinguished from Judea and Galilee. It thus lay in the centre of all traffic, from north to south, and from Jordan to the sea, and was about 55 miles long and 30 broad. The tabernacle and the ark were deposited within its limits at Shiloh, where it remained for four hundred years. During the time of the judges and the first stage of the monarchy this tribe manifested a domineering and haughty and discontented spirit. "For more than five hundred years, a period equal to that which elapsed between the Norman Conquest and the War of the Roses, Ephraim, with its two dependent tribes of Manasseh and Benjamin, exercised undisputed pre-eminence. Joshua the first conqueror, Gideon the greatest of the judges, and Saul the first king, belonged to one or other of the three tribes. It was not till the close of the first period of Jewish history that God 'refused the tabernacle of Joseph, and chose not the tribe of Ephraim, but chose the tribe of Judah, the Mount Zion which he loved' (Psalm 78:67,68 ). When the ark was removed from Shiloh to Zion the power of Ephraim was humbled."
Among the causes which operated to bring about the disruption of Israel was Ephraim's jealousy of the growing power of Judah. From the settlement of Canaan till the time of David and Solomon, Ephraim had held the place of honour among the tribes. It occupied the central and fairest portions of the land, and had Shiloh and Shechem within its borders. But now when Jerusalem became the capital of the kingdom, and the centre of power and worship for the whole nation of Israel, Ephraim declined in influence. The discontent came to a crisis by Rehoboam's refusal to grant certain redresses that were demanded (1 Kings 12 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim (1)
("doubly fruitful".) Joseph's second son by Asenath, named so, "for," said Joseph, "God hath caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction." Born during the seven plenteous years; the "doubly fruitful" may refer to both the fruitfulness vouchsafed to Joseph and the plenty of the season. As regards Ephraim himself, he was doubly blessed:
(1) in being made, as well as Manasseh, a patriarchal head of a tribe, like Jacob's immediate sons (Genesis 48:5); as Judah received the primary birthright (Reuben losing it by incest, Simeon and Levi by cruelty), and became the royal tribe from whence king David and the Divine Son of David sprang, so Ephraim received a secondary birthright and became ancestor of the royal tribe among the ten tribes of Israel (Genesis 49:3-10; Genesis 49:22-26).
(2) Ephraim the younger was preferred to Manasseh the elder, just as Jacob himself was preferred before the elder Esau. Jacob wittingly guided his hands so as to lay his right on Ephraim and his left on Manasseh, notwithstanding Joseph's remonstrance; saying, "Manasseh shall be great, but his younger brother shall be greater than he, and his seed shall become a multitude of nations." Jacob called to mind God's promise at Luz, "I will make thee fruitful," a Hebrew word related to Ephraim and to Ephrath, the scene of the death of his darling wife, Ephraim's grandmother (Genesis 35:11; Genesis 35:16; Isaiah 28:1-46; Genesis 48:7; Genesis 48:13-19). Ephraim was about 21 when Jacob blessed him, for he was born before the seven years' famine, and Jacob came to Egypt toward its closing years, and lived 17 years afterward (Genesis 47:28).
Before Joseph's death Ephraim's family had reached the third generation (Genesis 50:23). The last notice we have of him is his mourning for his sons killed in the foray by the men of Gath, and naming his new-born son (See BERIAH from the calamity, unconscious that that son would be the progenitor of the most remarkable of all his descendants, Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:20-23). Psalms 78:9 is referred in Smith's Bible Dictionary to this time; but the phrase is rather figurative for spiritual apostasy; "the children of Ephraim ... carrying bows, turned back in the day of battle." Ephraim's numbers in the wilderness of Sinai census were 40,500, Manasseh's 32,200. But at the eve of entering Canaan Ephraim had decreased to 32,500, while Manasseh had increased to 52,700; and at the conquest Ephraim was fewest in numbers after Simeon (22,200).
Still in Moses' blessing Ephraim stands pre-eminent over Manasseh; and he and Manasseh are compared to the two horns of the reem (not unicorn but the gigantic wild ox, now extinct, or urus); "with them he (Joseph) shall push the people together to the ends of the earth, and they are the ten thousands of Ephraim and they are the thousands of Manasseh." Moreover Joseph's land is "blessed of the Lord for the precious things of heaven ... the dew ... the deep beneath ... the precious fruits brought forth by the sun and ... put forth by the moon ... the chief things of the ancient mountains and ... of the lasting hills ... of the earth and its fullness, and the good will of Him that dwelt in the bush": a glorious issue to the afflictions "of him that was separated from his brethren" (Deuteronomy 33:17). "His glory (is like) the firstling of his bullock," rather "the firstling of his (Joseph's) bullock (i.e. Ephraim made by Jacob in privileges the firstborn of Joseph's offspring; the singular 'bullock' being used collectively for all Joseph's offspring, and expressing their strength) is his glory."
Whereas Jacob dwelt on Joseph's trials, and prophetically the severe wars of his descendants, in which God would strengthen them as He had strengthened Joseph, Moses looks onward to their final triumph and peaceful enjoyment of all precious things in their land. The tribe Ephraim's territory. - The two great tribes of Judah and Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh) took their inheritance first. The boundaries of Ephraim are traced from W. to E. in Joshua 16:1-10. Ataroth Adar and upper Bethheron lay on the center of the southern border of Ephraim. The border on the N. side went out westward, i.e. seaward, to Michmethah, which was in front (W. or N.W.) of Shechem (Nablus), the latter being in Ephraim. From Michmethah the border went round to the E. at the back of mount Ebal, then S.E. toward Janohah (Yanun). It passed Taanath Shiloh (probably Salim).
From Janohah it touched Ataroth on the wady Fasail; then passing Naarath or Naaran (1 Chronicles 7:28) on the E. of Bethel, called Neara by Josephus, abounding in water, and so likely to be near Ras el Ain (five miles N. of Jericho), which pours a full stream into the wady Nawayimeh. From Naarath Ephraim's boundary reached Jericho, and struck into the line that forms the S. baseline of the tribe, running to the Jordan. From En Tappuah (Ain Abuz, five miles and a half S. of Shechem) Ephraim's boundary ran S.W. into the brook Kanah, which still retains its ancient name; thence the boundary ran out to the sea. The boundary between Ephraim and his brother Manasseh is not exactly defined; compare Joshua 17:14-18. Generally, Ephraim lay to the S., Manasseh to the N. But Manasseh, instead of crossing the country from E. to W. as it is often represented, occupied only half that space, and lay along the sea to the W., bounded on the E. by mount Carmel.
The territory of the twofold "house of Joseph" was 55 miles from E. to W. by 70 from N to S. The northern half of central Palestine was "mount Ephraim," hills of limestone material, intersected by wide plains with streams of running water, and therefore, clothed with vegetation. Travelers attest the increasing beauty of the country in going N. from Jerusalem. The "precious things of the earth," "flowers," "olive valleys," and "vines" are assigned to Ephraim (1618419722_86; Hosea 10:1). He is compared to a "heifer," whereas Dan, Judah, and Benjamin among their comparatively barren rocks are compared to lions and wolves. Ephraim lay near the highways from Egypt and Philistia to Galilee and from Jordan to the sea. Ephraim did not extend to the sea, but had separate cities assigned to it in Manasseh on the coast. In it were Shechem, Jacob's original settlement, "his parcel of ground" and well; Ebal and Gerizim, the mounts of cursing and blessing; and Shiloh, the seat of the sanctuary until the time of Eli.
Here too was the great Joshua's tomb, as also his patrimony. Jealous sensitiveness as to any exploit achieved without Ephraim's sharing in it betrayed at once their tribal self importance and their recognized high standing among the tribes. So toward Gideon, Jephthah and David (Judges 8:1; Judges 12:1; 2 Samuel 19:41-43). In one instance they nobly interposed to clothe, feed, and restore in freedom their captive brethren of Judah (2 Chronicles 28:9-15). Psalm 78 was designed to soothe their tribal soreness at the transference of the religious capital from Shiloh to Jerusalem (Psalms 78:60-70). They attached themselves to David after Ishbosheth's fall; 20,800 warriors of them "coming with a perfect heart to Hebron, to make David king over all Israel." Among his state officers there was more than one Ephraimite (1 Chronicles 27:10-14); and after Absalom's rebellion they were probably foremost among the men of Israel in expressing jealousy of Judah in respect to the latter's greater share in promoting David's return.
From the time of the severance of the ten tribes from Judah, brought about by Rehoboam's infatuation and Jeroboam's ("ruler over all the charge of the house of Joseph") rousing Ephraim's innate self-elation, Ephraim became the representative and main portion of the northern kingdom; for the surrounding pagan, the luxurious Phoenicians, the marauding Midianites, the Syrians and Assyrians from the N., and the Egyptians from the S., left to Israel little which was permanently, exclusively, and distinctively its own, beyond the secure territory of Ephraim with its hilly fastnesses. The plain of Esdraelon, to the N. beyond Ephraim, was the natural battlefield for Egyptian forces advancing along the seacoast plain from the S. and Syrians and Assyrians from the N. to operate in; but Ephraim could only be reached through precipitous ascents and narrow passes, where invaders could be easily repelled.
But her continually increasing moral degeneracy and religious apostasy rendered all her natural advantages unavailing. No temporary revival, as in Judah's case, relieves the gloomy picture, until the cup of her iniquity was full; and God, though His amazing love long forbore to judge her, at last swept her away permanently from her home and her abused privileges and opportunities. (Hosea 5; Hosea 6; Hosea 7; Hosea 9; Hosea 10; Hosea 11:1-8; Hosea 12; Hosea 13; Ezekiel 23; 2 Kings 17).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim (2)
Beside which was Absalom's sheep farm, where took place Amnon's murder (2 Samuel 13). Our Lord, when the chief priests plotted to kill Him, retired to "a city called Ephraim ... a country near to the wilderness" (John 11:54). "The wilderness" means the hill country N.E. of Jerusalem, between the central towns and the Jordan valley. Thus, Ophrah of Benjamin probably is identical with Ephraim (1 Samuel 13:17.) Now Et-Taiyibeh, a village on a conical hill commanding the view of the Jordan valley and the Dead Sea.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ephraim
(ee fra ihm) Personal and tribal name meaning, “two fruit land” or “two pasture lands.” The younger son of Joseph by the Egyptian Asenath, daughter of the priest of On (Genesis 41:52 ). He was adopted by his grandfather Jacob and given precedence over his brother Manasseh (Genesis 48:14 ). He was the progenitor of the tribe of Ephraim, which occupied a region slightly to the northwest of the Dead Sea (Joshua 16:1 ) and was the leading tribe of the Northern Kingdom, ever ready to assert its rights (Joshua 17:15 ; Judges 3:27 ; Judges 4:5 ; Judges 7:24-8:3 ; Judges 12:1 ).
Ephraim played an important role in Israelite history. Joshua was an Ephraimite (Joshua 19:50 ). Samuel was an Ephraimite (1 Samuel 1:1 ). Jeroboam I was an Ephraimite (1 Kings 12:25 ). The important sanctuary at Shiloh was located in the territory of Ephraim. From the eighth century B.C., Ephraim was often used as a designation for Israel (Isaiah 11:13 ; Jeremiah 7:15 ; Hosea 5:13 ). See Tribes of Israel; Patriarchs.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ephraim Gate
An entrance to Jerusalem located 400 cubits (about 200 yards) from the Corner Gate (2 Kings 14:13 ). The section of wall between these two gates was destroyed by King Jehoash of Israel in eighth century. In Nehemiah's time the city square at the Ephraim Gate was one of the sites where booths for the celebration of the feast of tabernacles were set up (Nehemiah 8:16 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, City of
Another name for Ephron. See Ephron .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, Forest of
The densely wooded site of the battle between the forces of King David and the rebel army of Absalom (2Samuel 18:6,2 Samuel 18:8 ). The location of the forest presents difficulties. The account in 2Samuel suggests a site on the east side of the Jordan near enough to the city of Mahanaim in the Jabbok valley to allow David to send reinforcements. The difficulty arises since the tribal allotment for Ephraim was west of the Jordan. Joshua 17:14-18 predicts Ephraim's expansion north into the wooded Jezreel valley and the vicinity of Beth Shan, both within Issachar's territory. It is possible that this dominant tribe also settled in the wooded hills to the east of the Jordan.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, Mount
The KJV designation for the hill country belonging to Ephraim. Modern translations use the phrase “hill country of Ephraim” since an entire region is intended rather than a particular mount. Scripture specifies that the following cities were located in the hill country of Ephraim: Bethel (Judges 4:5 ); Gibeah (Joshua 24:33 ); Ramah (Judges 4:5 ); Shamir (Judges 10:1 ); Shechem (Joshua 20:7 ); Timnath-heres or -serah (Joshua 19:50 ; Judges 2:9 ).
Webster's Dictionary - Ephraim
(n.) A hunter's name for the grizzly bear.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ephraim
EPHRAIM . A grandson of Jacob, and the brother of Manasseh, the first-born of Joseph by Asenath, the daughter of Potiphera, priest of On ( Genesis 41:50 f. [1] ], cf. Genesis 41:45 [2] ]). The ‘popular etymology’ of E [3] connects the name with the verb pârâh , ‘to be fruitful,’ and makes it refer to Joseph’s sons. In the Blessing of Jacob ( Genesis 49:22 ) there may be a play upon the name when Joseph, who there represents both Ephraim and Manasseh, is called ‘a fruitful bough.’ The word is probably descriptive, meaning ‘fertile region’ whether its root be pârâh , or ’çpher , ‘earth’(?).
Genesis 48:14 ff. (J [4] ) tells an interesting story of how Jacob adopted his Egyptian grandsons, Ephraim and Manasseh, into his own family, and at the same time, against the remonstrances of Joseph, conferred the blessing of the firstborn upon Ephraim hence Ephraim’s predestined superiority in later history.
P [5] ’s Sinai census gives 40,500 men of war (Numbers 1:33 ), but this is reduced at the Plains of Moab to 32,500 (26:37), which is less than any of the tribes except Simeon, which ‘hardly existed except in name’ (Sayce, Hist. of Heb . p. 77). Contrary to what we should have expected from the Blessing of Jacob, Ephraim, according to P [5] , lost in the meantime 20 per cent. while Manasseh gained 40 per cent.
The appearance of Joseph in the Blessing of Jacob, with no mention of his sons, who according to J [4] had been adopted as Jacob’s own, and were therefore entitled on this important occasion to like consideration with the others, points to a traditional echo of the early days in the land when Ephraim and Manasseh were still united. In the Song of Deborah (Judges 5:1-31 ) it is the ‘family’ Machir, the firstborn ( Joshua 17:1 ), the only ( Genesis 50:23 ) son of Manasseh, that is mentioned, not a Manasseh tribe. From 2 Samuel 19:20 (cf. art. Benjamin) it is plain that Shimei still regarded himself as of the house of Joseph; and, despite the traditional indications of a late formation of Benjamin (wh. see), the complete political separation of Manasseh from Ephraim appears to have been still later. At all events, Jeroboam the Ephraimite, who afterwards became the first king of Israel ( c [8] . b.c. 930), was appointed by Solomon superintendent of the forced labour of the ‘house of Joseph,’ not of Ephraim alone. Ephraim, Machir, and Benjamin were apparently closely related, and in early times formed a group of clans known as ‘Joseph.’ There are no decisive details determining the time when they became definitely separated. Nor are there any reliable memories of the way in which Ephraim came into possession of the best and central portion of the land.
The traditions in the Book of Joshua are notably uninforming. Canaanites remained in the territory until a late date, as is seen from Judges 1:29 and the history of Shechem (ch. 8 f.). Ephraim was the strongest of the tribes and foremost in leadership, but was compelled to yield the hegemony to David. From that time onwards the history is no longer tribal but national history. Eli, priest of Shiloh and judge of Israel, Samuel, and Jeroboam I. were among its great men. Shechem, Tirzah, and Samaria, the capitals of the North, were within its boundaries; and it was at Shiloh that Joshua is said to have divided the land by lot. See also Tribes of Israel.
James A. Craio.
EPHRAIM . 1 . A place near Baal-hazor ( 2 Samuel 13:23 ) It may be identical with the Ephraim which the Onomasticon places 20 Roman miles N. of Jerusalem, somewhere in the neighbourhood of Sinjil and el-Lubbân . If Baal-hazor be represented, as seems probable, by Tell ‘Asûr , the city by relation to which such a prominent feature of the landscape was indicated must have been of some importance. It probably gave its name in later times to the district of Samaria called Aphærema ( 1Ma 11:34 , Jos. [9] Ant . XIII. iv. 9). The site is at present unknown. 2 . A city ‘near the wilderness,’ to which Jesus retired after the raising of Lazarus ( John 11:54 ). ‘The wilderness’ is in Arab. [10] el-barrîyeh, i.e ., the uncultivated land, much of it affording excellent pasture, on the uplands to the N. W. of Jerusalem. The Onomasticon mentions an ‘Efralm’ 5 Roman miles E. of Bethel. This may be the modern et-Taiyibeh , about 4 miles N.E. of Beitîn , with ancient cisterns and rockhewn tombs which betoken a place of importance in old times. See also Ephron, 4.
The Forest of Ephraim (Heb. ya’ar Ephraîm .) was probably not a forest in our sense of the term, but a stretch of rough country such as the Arabs still call wa‘r , abounding in rocks and thickets of brushwood. The district is not identified, but it must have been E. of the Jordan, in the neighbourhood of Mahanaim. It was the scene of Absalom’s defeat and death ( 2 Samuel 18:6 ff). The origin of the name cannot now be discovered. Mount Ephraim , Heb, har Ephraîm , is the name given to that part of the central range of Western Palestine occupied by Ephraim, corresponding in part to the modern Jebel Nâblus the district under the governor of Nâblus . Having regard to Oriental usage, it seems a mistake to tr. [11] with RV [12] ‘the hill country of Ephraim.’ Jebel el-Quds does not mean ‘the hill country of Jerusalem,’ but that part of ‘the mountain’ which is subject to the city. We prefer to retain, with AV [13] , ‘Mount Ephraim.’
W. Ewing.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Mount Ephraim
See Ephraim, Mount .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ephraim
EPHRAIM.—John 11:54 only. After the raising of Lazarus, Jesus departed, in consequence of the plots of the chief priests against Him, ‘unto a country ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘into the country’) near to the wilderness, into a city called Ephraim, and there continued with his disciples.’
There are scarcely any textual variations. TR spells Ἐφραΐα; Lachmann, Tischendorf, Westcott-Hort spell Ἑφραὶμ; Stephanus, 1550, had on the margin the reading Ἑφρὲμ, which is supported by א L and Latin witnesses, and the name Σαμφουρείμ as to be supplied after χώραν. This is the reading of D, Sapfurim in its Latin part, for which Chase (Syro-Lat. Text of Gospels, 108) and R. Harris (A Study of Codex Bezœ, p. 184) suggested that σαμ might be the Heb. שׁם ‘the name’; but more probable is the identification with Sepphoris, which in Jos. Ant. xiv. 91 is spelt Σατφὁροις (v.ll. Σαμφὸροις and other forms); so Jerome (s.v. ‘Araba’ in OS 17. 13 f.): ‘Diocaesareae, quae olim Safforine dicehatur.’
Eusebius in his Onomasticon says (ad Ephron, Joshua 15:9) καἰ ἔστι νῦν κώμη Ἐφραὶμ μεγίστη περὶ τἀ βόρεια Αἰλίας ὠς ἀπὸ σημείων κ; in the Latin rendering of Jerome: ‘est et villa pergrandis Efrœa nomine contra septentrionem in vicesimo ab aelia miliario’ (ed. Klostermann, p. 86. 1, 90. 18). With this has been identified Afra [1]: ‘in tribu Beniamin; et est hodie vicus Efraim in quinto miliario Bethelis ad orientem respiciens’ (p. 29. 4; the Greek text [2] is here defective); further, 1 Maccabees 11:34 = Jos. Ant. xiii. 127 [3]: τοὺς τρεῖς νομοὐς Ἀφαίρεμα (v.l. Ἀφέρεμα) καὶ Αύδδα καὶ Ῥαμαθείν; finally, the notice of Josephus (BJ iv. 551), that Vespasian took Βήθηγά τε (earlier reading Βαιθήλ or Βηθήλ) καὶ Ἐφραὶμ πολίχνια. Since Robinson, the site has been sought at the modern ct-Taiyibeh, 4 miles N.E. from Bethel. Schürer (GJV3 i. 233) quotes Robinson, ii. 332–338; Guérin, Judéc, iii. 45–51; Buhl, GAP p. 177; Heidet, art. ‘Ephrem’ in Vigouroux’s Dict. ii. 1885 ff.; cf., further, art. ‘Ephraim’ by J. H. Kennedy in Hastings’ DB, and by T. K. Cheyne in Encyc. Biblica.* [4]
Origen compares, for the retirement of Jesus, Matthew 4:12 f. and then allegorizes: Ephraim, according to Genesis 41:51 f. ‘καρτοφοριαʼ; ἀτῆλθεν ἑκεϊθεν εἰς τὴν χώραν ‘τοῦ ἁλου κὀσμου,’ ἐλλὺς τῆς ἐρήμου ‘ἐκκλησια’ εἰς Ἐφραΐμ τὴν ‘καρτοφοροῦσαν’ λεγομἑνηντόλιν, etc. (new Berlin edition, pp. 420, 551). About the site he says nothing.
Eb. Nestle.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ephraim, Tribe of
Ephraim became the father of the tribe of Ephraim, distinguished for its warlike valor. By virtue of its origin, and the promises made by Jacob (Genesis 48) this tribe had an extraordinary development: in population, riches, and power, and for this reason became jealous of the spiritual supremacy of the tribe of Juda. The tribe of Ephraim precipitated the rebellion and secession from the house of David. Jeroboam (3Kings 11) became leader of the ten tribes of the north, and after the schism, the history of the tribe of Ephraim is absorbed in that of the north.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ephraim
Younger son of the patriarch Joseph (Genesis 41), born in Egypt, during the seven years of plenty. The first indication of the superiority of Ephraim over his elder brother, Manasses, is seen in the blessing given by their grandfather Jacob (Genesis 48). Using the power given to him by Divine promises, Jacob adopts as his sons, Manasses and Ephraim, in order that these might form not two branches of the same tribe, but two distinct tribes. Jacob gives the preference to the younger, by placing his right hand over the head of Ephraim.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Ephraim
Hosea 7:8 (a) This is another name for the nation of Israel, and was used about Israel when she turned her back on GOD to serve idols and live in rebellion. Israel as "Ephraim" is pictured as "a cake not turned." This refers to the fact that Israel or any individual for that matter might be splendidly related to the things of earth and to fellowmen, which would represent the lower side of the cake where it is well cooked. The upper part, however, which is raw, represents the state of Israel or an individual toward GOD, if that individual is an unsaved, self-righteous person. This is a type of the religious man of the world whose human attitudes are above reproach, but who has not a proper relationship to GOD. (See the thirty-five other times this name is mentioned in Hosea. See also Psalm 78:9).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, Gate of
A gate in Jerusalem. By its name it would evidentlyhave been on the north of the city, as is the present Damascus gate. 2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chronicles 25:23 ; Nehemiah 8:16 ; Nehemiah 12:39 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ephraim
Second son of Joseph and Asenath. The name is also given to the tribe of which he was the head, and also to the district of Palestine that fell to his lot. When Israel blessed the two sons of Joseph he set Ephraim before his elder brother, saying he should be greater, and his seed should become a multitude (or, 'fatness') of nations. Genesis 48:17-19 . Little is recorded of Ephraim personally; and of his descendants, Joshua the son of Nun is the most renowned. The tribe on the second year from the Exodus numbered in fighting men 40,500; but had decreased during the forty years to 32,500. Numbers 1:33 ; Numbers 26:37 .
The territory of the tribe was in the heart of Palestine, having Manasseh on the north, Benjamin on the south, and Dan on the west. It has beautiful valleys and noble mountains with many springs and streams. Its two principal towns were Shiloh and Shechem.
Ephraim had the place of the first-born (Jeremiah 31:9 ), the birthright being taken from Reuben and given to Joseph. 1 Chronicles 5:1,2 . Also the place of the tabernacle was in the tribe of Ephraim, hence we find in the time of the judges this tribe asserting its own importance. They were angry with Gideon for not calling them to the war sooner than he did; but a soft answer appeased their wrath. Judges 7:24 ; Judges 8:1-3 . Again they complained to Jephthah that he had gone without them to fight the Ammonites, though Jephthah declared that he had called them, and they had not responded. They also haughtily said of the Gileadites that they were fugitives of Ephraim, implying that they were not a tribe, but belonged to Ephraim, from whence they had escaped. The conflict was sharp; the Gileadites seized the ford of the Jordan, and then by putting all who wanted to pass to the test of pronouncing Shibboleth (which the Ephraimites could only call Sibboleth) they slew 42,000 of the men of Ephraim. Judges 12:1-6 . Thus was this proud and envious tribe punished for molesting their brethren, whereas they had not driven out the heathen inhabitants of the land, as they should have done. Judges 1:29 . Type of many in the church who in pride contend with their brethren, but do not fight God's battles against spiritual wickedness. Later on the Lord forsook Shiloh, and chose, not the tribe of Ephraim, but that of Judah both for the place of royalty and for the sanctuary.
In the kingdom under David and Solomon we read very little of Ephraim, but it is twice called in the Psalms 'the strength (or defence) of mine head.' Psalm 60:7 ; Psalm 108:8 . At the division of the tribes Ephraim took the most prominent place; Shechem and Samaria being in their territory naturally contributed to this, and accounts for the ten tribes being constantly called 'Ephraim' by the prophets. In the same way the two tribes are called 'Judah.' Hosea 5:3,5,13,14 , etc. Isaiah prophesied that in sixty-five years Ephraim should be broken and should not be a people. Isaiah 7:8 . This was in B.C. 742, and Samaria was taken and Israel carried into captivity in B.C. 721, so that the prophecy doubtless referred to Esarhaddon planting a colony of foreigners in Samaria in B.C. 678, which fulfils the sixty-five years. This also agrees with the prophecy saying 'the head of Ephraim ' is Samaria.
In the prophecies also that refer to the future blessing of the twelve tribes Ephraim is regarded as representing the ten tribes. Ezekiel 37:16-22 , where the twelve tribes are to become one nation in their own land, with one king over them: a prophecy which clearly has never yet been fulfilled, but which will surely be accomplished in God's own time.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ephraim, Mount
This does not refer to any particular mountain, but to the range of hill-country in Ephraim. Joshua 17:15 ; Joshua 20:7 ; Jeremiah 4:15 ; Jeremiah 31:6 ; Jeremiah 50:19 ; etc.
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Isaacus Senior, Disciple of Ephraim the Syrian
Isaacus (29) Senior, mentioned in an anonymous Life of Ephraim the Syrian among the more distinguished disciples of Ephraim who were also Syriac writers. He is cited by Joannes Maro ( Tract. ad Nest. et Eutych. ), by Bar-hebraeus (Hist. Dynast. 91), and by many other Syriac and Arabic authors, most of whom, however, confuse him with Isaac presbyter of Antioch (Assemani, B. O. i. 165). Gennadius in his de Scriptor. Eccl. c. 26, says: "Isaac wrote, concerning the Three Persons of the Holy Trinity and the Incarnation of the Lord, a book of very dark disputation and involved discourse; proving that there are three Persons in the one Godhead, each possessing a proprium peculiar to himself. The proprium of the Father is that He is the origin of the others, yet Himself without origin; that of the Son is that, though begotten, He is not later than His begetter; that of the Holy Ghost is that It is neither made nor begotten, and yet is from another. Of the Incarnation he writes that two Natures abide in the one Person of the Son of God." This chapter precedes those about Marcarius and Evagrius Pontinus, who lived ante 400. It is hence inferred that Isaac flourished about the end of the 4th cent. (Cave, i. 415, places him c. 430 (?), but some put him a century earlier.)
The work of Isaac, not unfairly described by Gennadius, is entitled Libellus Fidei SS. Trinitatis et Incarnationis Domini . It is a brief treatise, and is printed in Migne, Patr. Gk. xxxiii. In a codex Pithoeanus, teste Sirmond, the title is Fides Isaacis (or Isacis ) ex Judaeo . Hence Isaac Senior has been identified by Tillemont (viii. 409) with Isaac the converted Jew who calumniated pope Damasus. Assemani thinks that the silence of Gennadius and his epitomizer Honorius renders it doubtful that Isaac Senior, the author of the Libellus Fidei , was a Jew. Cf. also Galland. vii. Prol. p. xxv.; Ceillier, vi. 290; Mansi, iii. 504 B; Pagi, Crit. ad ann. 378, xx.
[1]
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Ephraim
One of the sons of Joseph. The name is derived from Pharah, fruitfulness. In the after ages of the church, the Lord frequently speaks of the whole church of Israel by the name of Ephraim. (See Jeremiah 31:20; Hosea 7:1; Hos 12:1; Hos 13:1) I do not presume to say the cause was, because the ten tribes had the chief city in Ephraim; but I think it probable. The Psalmist, when speaking of looking out a place for the ark, saith, we found it in Ephratah. (Psalms 132:6)
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Ephraim (4) the Syrian
Ephraim (4) the Syrian , usually called Ephrem Syrus, from the Syriac form of his name Aphrem, was born in Mesopotamia, for he describes his home as lying between the Tigris and the Euphrates (Opp. Syr. i. 23), probably at Nisibis. As Edessa became the chief scene of his labours, he is generally styled the Edessene. It is comparatively certain that he died, as stated by St. Jerome, "in extreme old age," c. a.d. 373, and therefore was probably born c. a.d. 308.
The story of his parents seeking to train him in idolatry is at variance with his own statements. In his Confession (Opp. Gr. i. 129) he says, "When I sinned, I was already a partaker of grace: I had been early taught about Christ by my parents; they who had begotten me after the flesh had trained me in the fear of the Lord. I had seen my neighbours living piously; I had heard of many suffering for Christ. My own parents were confessors before the Judge: yea, I am the kindred of martyrs." Or again, in his Syriac works ( Opp. Syr. ii. 499): "I was born in the way of truth; and though my boyhood understood not the greatness of the benefit, I knew it when trial came."
In 337 Constantine the Great died, and Sapor, king of Persia, seized the opportunity of invading Mesopotamia. He commenced the siege of Nisibis in 338, and in 70 days had brought it to the verge of surrender. But Ephrem induced the aged bishop James to mount the walls and pray for the Divine succour. Shortly afterwards swarms of mosquitoes and horse-flies made the horses and elephants unmanageable, and Sapor withdrew his forces lest he should bring upon himself heavier chastisement. Before the end of 338 St. James died, when Ephrem probably left Nisibis, and after a short stay at Amid, to which city his mother is said to have belonged, travelled towards Edessa, the chief seat both of Christianity and of learning in Mesopotamia.
Knowing no handicraft and having no means of living, Ephrem there entered the service of a bath-keeper, but devoted his spare time to teaching and reasoning with the natives. While so engaged one day his words were overheard by an aged monk who had descended from his hermitage into the city, and being rebuked by him for still mingling with the world, Ephrem withdrew into a cavern among the mountains, adopted the monastic dress, and commenced a life of extreme asceticism, giving himself up to study and to writing. His works were widely diffused, and disciples gathered round him, of whom many rose to eminence as teachers, and several of whom he commemorates in his Testament. The growing fame of Basil, bp. of Caesarea in Cappadocia, inspired Ephrem with a strong desire to visit one who had been shewn him in a dream as a column of fire reaching from earth to heaven.
His journey to Caesarea is vouched for by Basil's brother Gregory and by Ephrem himself in his Encomium on Basil. Accompanied by an interpreter he arrived on the eve of the Epiphany and spent the night in the streets. The next morning they took their place in an obscure corner of the church and Ephrem groaned in spirit as he saw Basil seated in a magnificent pulpit arrayed in shining garments with a mitre sparkling with jewels on his head and surrounded by a multitude of clergy adorned with almost equal splendour. "Alas!" he said to his interpreter "I fear our labour is in vain. For if we who have given up the world have advanced so little in holiness what spiritual gifts can we expect to find in one surrounded by so great pomp and glory?" But when Basil began to preach it seemed to Ephrem as though the Holy Ghost in shape like a dove sat upon his shoulder and suggested to him the words. From time to time the people murmured their applause and Ephrem twice repeated sentences which had fallen from the preacher's lips. Upon this Basil sent his archdeacon to invite him into his presence which offended at the saint's ragged attire he did reluctantly and only after he had been twice bidden to summon him. After embracing one another with many florid compliments Basil asked him how it was that knowing no Greek he had twice cheered the sermon and repeated sentences of it to the multitude? And Ephrem answered "It was not I who praised and repeated but the Holy Ghost by my mouth." Under pressure from St. Basil Ephrem consented to be ordained deacon. When Basil had laid his hands upon him being suddenly endowed with the knowledge of Syriac he said to Ephrem in that tongue "O Lord bid him arise," upon which Ephrem answered in Greek "Save me and raise me up O God by Thy grace." Doubtless Ephrem travelling about with an educated companion and having been an eminent teacher at Edessa a place famous for its schools had picked up some knowledge of Greek and Hebrew some evidence of which we shall later gather from his own writings. Two instances are given in the Acta of the influence of Ephrem's teaching on St. Basil. It had been usual at Caesarea in the Doxology to say Glory be to the Father and to the Son to the Holy Ghost; but after Ephrem's visit Basil inserted and before the third clause. Whereat the people in church murmured and Basil defended himself by saying that his Syrian visitor had taught him that the insertion of the conjunction was necessary for the more clear manifestation of the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. The other instance is as follows: In Gen_1:2 the LXX renders "The Spirit of God was borne upon the surface of the water." So St. Basil had understood it but the Peshitta-Syriac version renders it "The Spirit of God brooded upon the face of the waters," which Ephrem explained of the Spirit resting upon them with a warm and fostering influence as of a hen sitting upon her nest and so endowing them with the power of bringing forth the moving creature that hath life. St. Basil gives two reasons for trusting his Syrian friend. First that Ephrem led a very ascetic life; "for in proportion as a man abandons the love of the world so does he excel in that perfection which rises above the world." Secondly that "Ephrem is an acute thinker and has a thorough knowledge of the divine philosophy," i.e. of the general sense of Holy Scripture. There is nothing to suggest that any appeal was made to the Hebrew as Benedict suggests though in fact the Syriac and Hebrew words are the same; and curiously enough in his own exposition (Opp. Syr. i. 8) Ephrem says that the words simply mean that a wind was in motion; for the waters were instinct he argues with no creative energy till the fourth day. From Caesarea Ephrem was recalled to Edessa by the news that the city was assailed by numerous heresies. On his journey he rescued the people of Samosata from the influence of false teaching by a miracle and on reaching home sought to counteract heresy by teaching orthodoxy in hymns. The fatalistic tenets of Bardesan a Gnostic who flourished at the end of the 2nd cent. had been embodied in 150 psalms a number fixed upon in irreverent imitation of the Psalter of David. His son Honorius had set these hymns to music and so sweet were both the words and tunes that they were known by heart even by children and sung to the guitar. To combat their influence Ephrem composed numerous hymns himself and trained young women who were aspirants after the conventual life to sing them in chorus. These hymns have no rhyme nor do they scan but are simply arranged in parallel lines containing each as a rule seven syllables. Their poetry consists in their elevated sentiments and richness of metaphor but their regular form was an aid to the memory and rendered them capable of being set to music. The subjects of these hymns were the Life of our Lord including His Nativity Baptism Fasting and chief incidents of his ministry His Passion Resurrection and Ascension. He wrote also on Repentance on the Dead and on Martyrs. Upon the Festivals of our Lord we read on the first days of the week and on the days of martyrs Ephrem gathered round him his choirs and the whole city flocked to hear them and the poems of Bardesan lost their influence. While thus occupied Basil endeavoured to persuade him to visit Caesarea again intending to make him a bishop but the saint even feigned madness rather than consent. Meanwhile he wrote upon the devastation committed by the Persians the Maccabean martyrs the Life of Constantine and so on until the accession of Julian rudely disturbed his studies. On his expedition against the Persians Julian had advanced as far as Haran a town so famous for obstinate adherence to heathenism that Haranite in Syriac is equivalent to pagan and there determined to hold a great sacrifice to which he commanded the Edessenes to send chosen citizens to do him homage and to grace by their presence his restoration of the old cult. But this met with such fierce opposition on the part of the people and such an eager desire for martyrdom that the embassy withdrew in haste and Julian threatened Edessa with bitter vengeance upon his return. Ephrem who had exerted himself to the utmost in this crisis resumed his hermit life quitting the mountains only for controversy with heretics or for charitable services. As a controversialist Gregory of Nyssa relates of him with great approbation an act contrary to modern views of morality: The "insane and irrational Apollinaris" had written a treatise in two volumes containing much that was contrary to Scripture. These he had given in charge of a lady at Edessa from whom Ephrem borrowed them pretending that he was a disciple of Apollinaris and was preparing to defend his views. Before returning them he glued the leaves together and then challenged the heretic to a public disputation. Apollinaris accepted the challenge so far as to consent to read from these books what he had written declining more on account of his great age; but he found the leaves so firmly fastened together that he could not open them and withdrew deeply mortified by his opponent's unworthy victory.
Far more creditable is the last act recorded of Ephrem. While withdrawn in his rocky cavern he heard that Edessa had been visited by a severe famine. He came down to the city, and induced the richer citizens to bring out their secret stores of food, on condition, however, that Ephrem should himself take charge of them. He managed them with such skill, prudence, and honesty that they sufficed for the Edessenes and for numerous strangers also. The next year was one of great plenty, and Ephrem resumed his solitary life amidst the prayers and gratitude of all classes.
His death followed shortly afterwards, fully foreseen by himself, as his Testament proves. In this hymn, written in heptasyllabic metre, after playing upon his own name and professing his faith, he commands his disciples not to bury him beneath the altar, nor in a church, nor amongst the martyrs, but in the common burying-ground of strangers, in his gown and cowl, with no spices nor waxlights, but with their prayers. It ends with an account of Lamprotata, daughter of the prefect of Edessa, who earnestly sought permission to be buried in due time at Ephrem's feet.
The works of Ephrem were most voluminous. Sozomen (Eccl. Hist. iii. 16) says that he wrote three million lines, but a large proportion has perished. What remains is said by Bellarmine to be "pious rather than learned." The great edition of his works is that in six vols. fol., pub. at Rome in 1732-1743, under the editorship of the Maronite Peter Mobarek, better known by the Latin translation of his surname Benedict, and completed after his death by J. S. E. Asseman, titular bp. of Apamaea, who is answerable, however, for the translation of only vol. vi. pp. 425-687. The first three vols. consist of sermons and discourses in Greek with a Latin translation. Many of these are probably genuine, for Sozomen says that already in his lifetime works of Ephrem were translated into Greek, and as both Chrysostom and Jerome were acquainted with them, and Gregory of Nyssa quotes his Testament, it is certain that several of his writings were very soon thus made available for general use. But some pieces must be received with caution, and one ( Opp. Gr. ii. 356 seq.) is almost certainly not genuine.
The other three vols. contain his Syriac works, the most important being his Exposition of O.T. Of the commentary upon the Gospels few traces remain, but Dionysius Barsalibi, bp. of Amid, says that Ephrem had followed the order of the Diatessaron of Tatian. As copies of Dionysius's own commentary exist in the British Museum, the Bodleian Library, and elsewhere, some portions of Ephrem's work, as well as some idea of Tatian's arrangement, might be obtained from it. A collection of Armenian translations of Ephrem's works, pub. in 4 vols. 8vo by the Mechitarists at Venice in 1836, includes one (in vol. iii.) of his commentary on St. Paul's epistles.
Following upon the commentary are 12 metrical expositions of portions of Scripture, such as the creation of man in God's image, the temptation of Eve, the translation of Enoch, etc., occupying pp. 316-319. Some of these, especially that upon the mission of Jonah and the repentance of the Ninevites, have been translated into English by the Rev. H. Burgess (Lond. 1856), the author also of Select Metrical Hymns and Homilies of Ephraem Syrus (two vols. Lond. 1853). These expositions are followed by 13 metrical homilies upon the Nativity, pp. 396-436. Next come 56 homilies against false doctrines (pp. 437-560); chiefly against Bardesan, Marcion, and Manes.
In vol. iii., after the Acta S. Ephraems (i.-lxiii.), the first place is held by 87 homilies on the Faith, in answer to freethinkers. The last seven of these are called sermons upon the Pearl, which Ephrem takes as an emblem of the Christian faith, working out the idea with great beauty, though with that diffuseness which is the common fault of his writings. Three very long controversial homilies (pp. 164-208) follow, repeating many of the same thoughts.
A sermon against the Jews, preached on Palm Sunday (pp. 209-224), has been translated by the Rev. J. B. Morris into English. Then follow 85 hymns (pp. 225-359) to be used at the burial of bishops, presbyters, deacons, monks, princes, rich men, strangers, matrons, women, youths, children, in time of plague, and for general use. These are trans. into Eng. in Burgess's Select Metrical Hymns.
Next come four short homilies on Free-will (pp. 359-366), partly following the order of the Syriac alphabet; then 76 homilies on Repentance (pp. 367-561). Next, 12 sermons on the Paradise of Eden (pp. 562-598); and finally, 18 sermons on miscellaneous subjects (pp. 599-687). Considerable activity has been displayed in editing other Syriac works of Ephrem—e.g. by Dr. J. J. Overbeck, in S. Ephraemi Syri, Rabulae, Balaei, aliorumque Opera Selecta (Oxf., Clarendon Press, 1865). Almost more important is " S. Ephraemi Syri Carmina Nisibena, ed. by Dr. G. Bickell, Lipsiae, 1866." Of these hymns, the first 21 treat of the long struggle between Sapor and the Romans for the possession of Nisibis, from its siege in 350 to just before its miserable surrender by Jovian in 363. The next 5 hymns have perished; in Nos. 26-30 the scene is Edessa, and the subject the schism there in the bishopric of Barses, a.d. 361-370. Bickell thinks these were written c. 370, towards the close of Ephrem's life. Hymns 31-34 treat of Haran and the many troubles its bishop, Vitus, endured from the pagans there. The other hymns (35-77) treat of the Overthrow of Death and Satan by our Lord, of the Resurrection of the Body in refutation of Bardesan and Manes, of Dialogues between Death, Satan, and Man, and of Hymns upon the Resurrection, not of a controversial but of a consolatory character. From the directions for singing given with each hymn, and the existence in most of them of a response or refrain noted in the MS. in red, the collection was evidently for liturgical use.
Bertheau edited a Syriac homily of St. Ephrem from a MS. at Rome (Göttingen, 1837), and another from the Museum Borghianum was pub. by Zingerle and Mösinger in Monumenta Syriaca (Innsbruck, 1869), vol. i. pp. 4-12; in vol. ii. (pub. 1878) numerous fragments from MSS. at Rome are found, pp. 33-51. In most Chrestomathies specimens of Ephrem's writings are given, and that by Hahn and Sieffert consists entirely of them.
As a commentator Ephrem holds a middle place between the literal interpretation of Theodore of Mopsuestia and the allegorical method of Origen. As Basil and Gregory were both strongly influenced by Origen, Ephrem's independence is the more remarkable. In commenting on Is 25:7 (vol. ii. 61), he gives a statement of his method as follows: "Though the prophet is speaking of Sennacherib he has a covert reference to Satan. For the spiritual sense is usually the same as the ecclesiastical. The words therefore of the prophets concerning those things which have happened or were about to happen to the Jews are mystically to be referred to the future propagation of the church, and the providence of God and His judgments upon the just and upon evil-doers." Benedict, followed by Lengerke, instead of ecclesiastical translates historical ; what Ephrem really says is that there is first the literal interpretation, and secondly a spiritual one, which generally refers to the church.
The question has often been asked whether he really possessed any competent acquaintance with Hebrew and Greek. He had not had a learned education, but nevertheless displays considerable knowledge, including some of physical science, and in his discourses on fate, freewill, etc., he manifests, without parade, a sufficient mastery of Greek philosophy to refute the Gnostic errors prevalent in the East. We need not be surprised, therefore, that Sozomen says (H. E. iii. 16) that Basil wondered at his learning.
The chief places which suggest some knowledge of Hebrew are as follow. Commenting on the creation of whales in Gen_1:21 (Opp. Syr. i. 18) he says that they and leviathan inhabit the waters behemoth the land; quoting not only Job_40:15 but Psa_50:10 which he translates "And behemoth upon a thousand hills." Ephrem's rendering is perfectly possible and must have been obtained from some Jewish source.
On 1Sa_3:11 he rightly says that both the Syr. and Heb. names for cymbal resemble the verb so translated. In 1Sa_21:7 he correctly explains the word "detained" by noting that the Heb. word neasar signifies pressed or bidden away. In 2Ki_3:4 he rightly says that the Syr. nokdo is really a Heb. word and means "head shepherd."
These points might have been picked up from conversation with others, and there is a marked absence of acquaintance with the language in his commentary as a whole.
Of Greek he also shews but a very moderate knowledge, though a more real acquaintance with it than with Hebrew. His own words in Opt. Syr. ii. 317 are to the point: "Not from the rivulet of my own thought have I opened these things for thy drinking, for I am poor and destitute alike of meat and drink; but, like a bottle from the sea or drops from a caldron, I have begged these things from just men, who were lords of the fountain."
An example will shew him much more at home in Greek than in Hebrew. In 1Ki_14:3 (Opp. Syr. i. 480) the Syriac version has instead of cracknels a rare word signifying sweetmeats. Ephrem notices that the Greek has grapes and gives this as an explanation of the Syriac; but makes no reference to the Hebrew word which certainly signifies some kind of cakes such as might rightly be called sweetmeats but certainly is no kind of fruit.
From his intense devotion and piety, his hymns were largely adopted into the services of the church, and prayers also composed by him are found in most Oriental liturgies. His personal character deserves high praise. He was an extreme ascetic, passing his whole life in poverty, raggedness, humility, and gentleness. His gentleness has been denied on account of the fierce language sometimes used in controversial writings. We may, however, take his words in his Testament as literally true (Opp. Gr. ii. 396): "Throughout my whole life, neither by night nor day, have I reviled any one, nor striven with any one; but in their assemblies I have disputed with those who deny the faith. For if a wolf is entering the fold, and the dog goes not out and barks, the master beats the dog. But a wise man hates no one, or if he hates at all, he hates only a fool."
"His words reach the heart, for they treat powerfully of human joys and cares; they depict the struggles and storms of life, and sometimes its calm rest. He knows how to awaken terror and alarm, as he sets forth before the sinner his punishment, God's righteous judgment, his destined condemnation; he knows, too, how to build up and comfort, where he proclaims the hopes of the faithful and the bliss of eternal happiness. His words ring in mild, soft tones when he paints the happy rest of the pious, the peace of soul enjoyed by those who cleave to the Christian faith; they thunder and rage like a storm wind when he scourges heretics, or chastises pride and folly. Ephraim was an orator possessed of spirit and taste, and his poetical gifts were exactly those calculated to give weight and influence to his authority as a teacher among his countrymen" (Roediger). As such they venerated him, giving him especially the title of Malphono, the teacher; but one of his greatest services to the church was the marvellous variety and richness which he gave to its public worship. Ephraim's quotations from the Gospels have been collected by F. C. Burkitt (Texts and Studies , vol. vii. No. 2, Camb. Univ. Press). His Commentary on the Diatessaron was trans. into Latin by J. B. Aucher, and pub. in this form by G. Mösinger (Venice, 1876). See Also J. H. Hill, A Dissertation on the Gospel Commentary of S. Ephraim (Edinburgh, 1896). The Fragments of S. Ephraim have been ed. by J R. Harris for the (Camb. Univ. Press).
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A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Ephraim (6), Bishop of Antioch And Patriarch
Ephraim (6) ( Ephrem, Ephraemius, or, as Theophanes gives the name, Euphraimius ), bp. of Antioch and patriarch, a.d. 527-545. The title, ὁ Ἀμίδιος , given him by Theophanes, indicates that he was a native of Amida in Armenia. He devoted the early part of his life to civil employments, and became Count of the East in the reign of Justin I. The city of Antioch having been nearly destroyed in a.d. 525 and 526 by earthquake and conflagration, Ephraim was sent by Justin as commissioner to relieve the sufferers and restore the city. The high qualities manifested in the fulfilment of these duties gained the affection and respect of the people of Antioch, who unanimously chose him bishop on the death of Euphrasius (Evagr. H. E. iv. 5, 6). His consecration is placed in a.d. 357. As bishop he exhibited an unwavering firmness against the heretical tendencies of his day. Theophanes says that he shewed "a divine zeal against schismatics" ( Chronogr . p. 118). Moschus tells a story of his encounter near Hierapolis with one of the pillar ascetics, a follower of Severus and the Acephali (Prat. Spiritual. c. 36). Ephraim examined synodically the tenets of Syncleticus, metropolitan of Tarsus, who was suspected of Eutychian leanings but was acquitted (Phot. Cod. 228). In 537, at the bidding of Justinian, he repaired with Hypatius of Ephesus and Peter of Jerusalem to Gaza to hold a council in the matter of Paul the patriarch of Alexandria, who had been banished to that city and there deposed. In obedience to the emperor Justinian, Ephraim held a synod at Antioch, which repudiated the doctrines of Origen as heretical (Liberat. c. 23, apud Labbe, Concil. v. 777 seq.; Baronius, Annal. 537, 538) He was the author of a large number of theological treatises directed against Nestorius, Eutyches, Severus, and the Acephali, and in defence of the decrees of Chalcedon. In 546, yielding to severe pressure, he subscribed the edict Justinian had put forth condemning "the three chapters" (Facund. Pro Defens. Trium Capit. iv. 4). He did not survive the disgrace of this concession, and died in 547.
His copious theological works have almost entirely perished, and we have little knowledge of them save through Photius (Biblioth. Cod. 228, 229), who speaks of having read three of the volumes, but gives particulars of two only. Some few fragments of his defence of the council of Chalcedon, and of the third book against Severus, and other works, are given by Mai ( Bibl. Nov. iv. 63, vii. 204) and are printed by Migne ( Patr. Gk. lxxxvi. par. 2, pp. 2099 seq.). Theophanes, Chronogr. ad ann. 519, p. 118 d; Moschus, Prat. Spiritual. cc. 36, 37; Cave, Hist. Lit. i. 507; Fabric. Bibl. Graec. lib. v. c. 38; Le Quien, Oriens Christ. ii. 733).
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People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ephraim
Ephraim (ç'fra-ĭm), double land, two-fold increase, very fruitful. The second son of Joseph, born in Egypt before the famine, Genesis 41:50-52, and therefore upwards of 20 at Jacob's death. Joseph, when he was apprised of his father's sickness, was anxious to obtain the recognition of his sons Manasseh and Ephraim. Jacob adopted them as patriarchs, or heads of tribes, equally with his own sons. But he placed the younger, Ephraim, before the elder, Manasseh, "guiding his hands wittingly," in spite of Joseph's remonstrance, and prophetically declaring that the posterity of Ephraim should be far greater and more powerful than the posterity of Manasseh. Genesis 48:1-22. The territory of Ephraim lay in the centre of Canaan, south of Manasseh and north of Benjamin and Dan, extending from the Jordan to the Mediterranean Sea. It was about 55 miles long, and about 30 miles in its greatest breadth. It was well watered and fertile, fulfilling the blessing of Moses in Deuteronomy 33:13-16.
Ephraim, Gate of. One of the gates of ancient Jerusalem, 2 Kings 14:13; 2 Chronicles 25:23; Nehemiah 8:16; Nehemiah 12:39; probably on the north side, as the present Damascus gate is.
Ephraim, Mount. A name applied to the hill-country of Ephraim, extending from Bethel to the plain of Jezreel; called also the "mountains of Israel," R. V. "hill country of Israel," Joshua 11:21, and "mountains of Samaria." Jeremiah 31:5-6; Amos 3:9.
Ephraim, Wood of. A forest in which the great battle was fought when Absalom was killed. 2 Samuel 18:6. It lay east of the Jordan, in Gilead, near Mahanaim. Thick woods of oaks and terebinths still exist in that region.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ephraim
was the name of Joseph's second son, by Asenath, Potiphar's daughter. He was born in Egypt, A.M. 2294. Ephraim, with his brother Manasseh, was presented by his father Joseph to Jacob on his death bed, Genesis 48:8 , &c. Jacob laid his right hand on Ephraim the younger, and his left on Manasseh the older. Joseph was desirous to change his hands, but Jacob answered, "I know it, my son; Manasseh shall be multiplied, but Ephraim shall be greater." The sons of Ephraim having made an inroad into Palestine, the inhabitants of Gath killed them. Ephraim their father mourned many days for them, and his brethren came to comfort him, 1 Chronicles 7:20-21 . Afterward, he had a son named Beriah, and a daughter Sherah. He had also other sons, Rephah, Resheph, Tela, &c.
His posterity multiplied in Egypt to the number of forty thousand five hundred men capable of bearing arms. In the land of promise, Joshua, who was of this tribe, gave them their portion between the Mediterranean west, and the river Jordan east. The ark and tabernacle remained long in this tribe at Shiloh; and after the separation of the ten tribes, the seat of the kingdom was in Ephraim, and hence Ephraim is frequently used to denote the whole kingdom. The district belonging to this tribe is called Ephratah, Psalms 132:6 . Ephraim was led captive beyond the Euphrates, with all Israel, by Salmaneser, king of Assyria, A.M. 3283.
2. EPHRAIM was also the name of a city, into which Christ retired with his disciples a little before his passion, John 11:54 . It was situated in the tribe of Ephraim, near the river Jordan. There was also the wood or forest of Ephraim, situated on the other side Jordan, in which Absalom's army was routed and himself killed, 2 Samuel 18:6 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Tribe of Ephraim
Ephraim became the father of the tribe of Ephraim, distinguished for its warlike valor. By virtue of its origin, and the promises made by Jacob (Genesis 48) this tribe had an extraordinary development: in population, riches, and power, and for this reason became jealous of the spiritual supremacy of the tribe of Juda. The tribe of Ephraim precipitated the rebellion and secession from the house of David. Jeroboam (3Kings 11) became leader of the ten tribes of the north, and after the schism, the history of the tribe of Ephraim is absorbed in that of the north.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Ephraim
Fruitful; increasing
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ephraim
The second son of Joseph, born in Egypt, Genesis 41:52 . Although the youngest, he yet had the chief blessing of his grandfather Jacob, and the tribe was always more distinguished than that of Manasseh, Genesis 48:8-20 Numbers 2:18-21 . The portion of Ephraim was large and central, and embraced some of the most fertile land in all Canaan. It extended from the Mediterranean across to the Jordan, north of the portions of Dan and Benjamin and included Shiloh, Shechem, etc. A range of mountainous country, which runs through it, is called "the mountains of Ephraim," or "mount Ephraim." This extends also farther south into the portion of Judah, and is there called "the mountains of Judah." Samaria, the capital of the ten tribes, being in Ephraim, this latter name is often used for the kingdom of Israel, Isaiah 11:13 Jeremiah 31:6 50:19 .
The FOREST of Ephraim, where Absalom lost his life, was on the east side of the Jordan, near Mahanaim, 2 Samuel 18:6-8 .
The TOWN called Ephraim, to which the Savior withdrew from his enemies, John 11:54 , was probably the same place mentioned in 2 Chronicles 13:19 , and called Ophrah in Joshua 18:23 1 Samuel 13:17 . See also 2 Samuel 13:23 . It is supposed to be the present Taiyibeh, on a hill overlooking the Jordan valley, five miles northeast of Bethel.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ephraim
Second son of Joseph and Asenath. The name is also given to the tribe of which he was the head, and also to the district of Palestine that fell to his lot. When Israel blessed the two sons of Joseph he set Ephraim before his elder brother, saying he should be greater, and his seed should become a multitude (or, 'fatness') of nations. Genesis 48:17-19 . Little is recorded of Ephraim personally; and of his descendants, Joshua the son of Nun is the most renowned. The tribe on the second year from the Exodus numbered in fighting men 40,500; but had decreased during the forty years to 32,500. Numbers 1:33 ; Numbers 26:37 .
The territory of the tribe was in the heart of Palestine, having Manasseh on the north, Benjamin on the south, and Dan on the west. It has beautiful valleys and noble mountains with many springs and streams. Its two principal towns were Shiloh and Shechem.
Ephraim had the place of the first-born (Jeremiah 31:9 ), the birthright being taken from Reuben and given to Joseph. 1 Chronicles 5:1,2 . Also the place of the tabernacle was in the tribe of Ephraim, hence we find in the time of the judges this tribe asserting its own importance. They were angry with Gideon for not calling them to the war sooner than he did; but a soft answer appeased their wrath. Judges 7:24 ; Judges 8:1-3 . Again they complained to Jephthah that he had gone without them to fight the Ammonites, though Jephthah declared that he had called them, and they had not responded. They also haughtily said of the Gileadites that they were fugitives of Ephraim, implying that they were not a tribe, but belonged to Ephraim, from whence they had escaped. The conflict was sharp; the Gileadites seized the ford of the Jordan, and then by putting all who wanted to pass to the test of pronouncing Shibboleth (which the Ephraimites could only call Sibboleth) they slew 42,000 of the men of Ephraim. Judges 12:1-6 . Thus was this proud and envious tribe punished for molesting their brethren, whereas they had not driven out the heathen inhabitants of the land, as they should have done. Judges 1:29 . Type of many in the church who in pride contend with their brethren, but do not fight God's battles against spiritual wickedness. Later on the Lord forsook Shiloh, and chose, not the tribe of Ephraim, but that of Judah both for the place of royalty and for the sanctuary.
In the kingdom under David and Solomon we read very little of Ephraim, but it is twice called in the Psalms 'the strength (or defence) of mine head.' Psalm 60:7 ; Psalm 108:8 . At the division of the tribes Ephraim took the most prominent place; Shechem and Samaria being in their territory naturally contributed to this, and accounts for the ten tribes being constantly called 'Ephraim' by the prophets. In the same way the two tribes are called 'Judah.' Hosea 5:3,5,13,14 , etc. Isaiah prophesied that in sixty-five years Ephraim should be broken and should not be a people. Isaiah 7:8 . This was in B.C. 742, and Samaria was taken and Israel carried into captivity in B.C. 721, so that the prophecy doubtless referred to Esarhaddon planting a colony of foreigners in Samaria in B.C. 678, which fulfils the sixty-five years. This also agrees with the prophecy saying 'the head of Ephraim ' is Samaria.
In the prophecies also that refer to the future blessing of the twelve tribes Ephraim is regarded as representing the ten tribes. Ezekiel 37:16-22 , where the twelve tribes are to become one nation in their own land, with one king over them: a prophecy which clearly has never yet been fulfilled, but which will surely be accomplished in God's own time.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ephraim
Joseph and his Egyptian wife had two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50-52). When the aged Jacob gave his parting blessings to his family, he gave the firstborn’s blessing to Joseph instead of to Reuben (because of Reuben’s immorality with Jacob’s concubine; Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:3-4; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2). This meant that Joseph would father two tribes in Israel instead of one. Jacob therefore raised Joseph’s two sons to the same level as Jacob’s other sons, so that Joseph’s two sons would each have his own tribe (Genesis 48:5-6). The tribe of the younger son Ephraim was destined to become stronger than that of the older son Manasseh (Genesis 48:12-20).
Good territory
The tribe of Ephraim received as its inheritance possibly the best part of Canaan (cf. Genesis 49:22-26). This was the central highland region between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea (Joshua 16). (For information about its more important towns see BETHEL; JERICHO; JOPPA; SHECHEM; SHILOH.)
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Sentence search

Ephraimite - (ee' fra im ite) Member of tribe of Ephraim. See Ephraim
Ephraim - Ephraim, with his brother Manasseh, was presented by his father Joseph to Jacob on his death bed, Genesis 48:8 , &c. Jacob laid his right hand on Ephraim the younger, and his left on Manasseh the older. Joseph was desirous to change his hands, but Jacob answered, "I know it, my son; Manasseh shall be multiplied, but Ephraim shall be greater. " The sons of Ephraim having made an inroad into Palestine, the inhabitants of Gath killed them. Ephraim their father mourned many days for them, and his brethren came to comfort him, 1 Chronicles 7:20-21 . The ark and tabernacle remained long in this tribe at Shiloh; and after the separation of the ten tribes, the seat of the kingdom was in Ephraim, and hence Ephraim is frequently used to denote the whole kingdom. Ephraim was led captive beyond the Euphrates, with all Israel, by Salmaneser, king of Assyria, A. Ephraim was also the name of a city, into which Christ retired with his disciples a little before his passion, John 11:54 . It was situated in the tribe of Ephraim, near the river Jordan. There was also the wood or forest of Ephraim, situated on the other side Jordan, in which Absalom's army was routed and himself killed, 2 Samuel 18:6
Shuthelah - Son of Ephraim. Son of Zabad, a descendant of Ephraim
Jokmeam - A city of Ephraim, attached to the Kohathite Levites (1 Chronicles 6:68); in the Jordan valley, the extreme E. of Ephraim
Ephraim, Tribe of - Ephraim became the father of the tribe of Ephraim, distinguished for its warlike valor. The tribe of Ephraim precipitated the rebellion and secession from the house of David. Jeroboam (3Kings 11) became leader of the ten tribes of the north, and after the schism, the history of the tribe of Ephraim is absorbed in that of the north
Tribe of Ephraim - Ephraim became the father of the tribe of Ephraim, distinguished for its warlike valor. The tribe of Ephraim precipitated the rebellion and secession from the house of David. Jeroboam (3Kings 11) became leader of the ten tribes of the north, and after the schism, the history of the tribe of Ephraim is absorbed in that of the north
ta'Hath - ) ...
According to the present text, son of Bered, and great-grandson of Ephraim. (1 Chronicles 7:20 ) Burrington, however, identifies Tahath with Tahan, the son of Ephraim. (1 Chronicles 7:20 ) But Burrington considers him as a son of Ephraim
ta'Hath - ) ...
According to the present text, son of Bered, and great-grandson of Ephraim. (1 Chronicles 7:20 ) Burrington, however, identifies Tahath with Tahan, the son of Ephraim. (1 Chronicles 7:20 ) But Burrington considers him as a son of Ephraim
Ephraim - Ephraim (ç'fra-ĭm), double land, two-fold increase, very fruitful. Joseph, when he was apprised of his father's sickness, was anxious to obtain the recognition of his sons Manasseh and Ephraim. But he placed the younger, Ephraim, before the elder, Manasseh, "guiding his hands wittingly," in spite of Joseph's remonstrance, and prophetically declaring that the posterity of Ephraim should be far greater and more powerful than the posterity of Manasseh. The territory of Ephraim lay in the centre of Canaan, south of Manasseh and north of Benjamin and Dan, extending from the Jordan to the Mediterranean Sea. ...
Ephraim, Gate of. ...
Ephraim, Mount. A name applied to the hill-country of Ephraim, extending from Bethel to the plain of Jezreel; called also the "mountains of Israel," R. ...
Ephraim, Wood of
Ephraim, Mount - The KJV designation for the hill country belonging to Ephraim. Modern translations use the phrase “hill country of Ephraim” since an entire region is intended rather than a particular mount. Scripture specifies that the following cities were located in the hill country of Ephraim: Bethel (Judges 4:5 ); Gibeah (Joshua 24:33 ); Ramah (Judges 4:5 ); Shamir (Judges 10:1 ); Shechem (Joshua 20:7 ); Timnath-heres or -serah (Joshua 19:50 ; Judges 2:9 )
Shuthelah - Hervey, viewing 1 Chronicles 7 as corrupt, restores the line of Shuthelah thus:...
(1) Joseph;...
(2) Ephraim;...
(3) Shuthelah;...
(4) Eran or Laadan;...
(5) Ammihud;...
(6) Elishama, captain of Ephraim (Numbers 1:10);...
(7) Nun;...
(8) Joshua. The affair with the men of Gath (Joshua 7:20-27; Joshua 8:13) was probably after Israel's settlement in Canaan; and Ephraim and Shuthelah mean the individuals of their descendants who represented them as heads of the tribe or family. The Ephraimite settlements in the mountain district containing Bethhoron, Gezer, and Timnath Serah, were suited for a descent on the Philistine plain containing Gath. Benjamin helped Ephraim against the men of Gath. The Ephraim who mourned for his sons Ezer and Elead was not the patriarch son of Joseph, but a descendant who bore Ephraim's name
Ezer - Son of Ephraim and grandson of Jacob. Ephraim was born and lived in Egypt with his family (Genesis 46:20 ). It may be history of clans of Ephraim and refer to a moment of mourning in the history of families descended from Ephraim. The place in the middle of the list of descendants of Ephraim and ancestors of Joshua points to a time after that of Ephraim himself. Otherwise, a different Ephraim from the son of Jacob is meant, or Ephraim, the son of Jacob, entered Palestine, but the Bible did not preserve a story of his travels
Eran - Eran was grandson of Ephraim and a clan leader in the tribe of Ephraim (Numbers 26:36 )
Mount Ephraim - See Ephraim, Mount
Naaran - A city, the eastern limit of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:28). Probably NAARATH or Naarah, a southern landmark of Ephraim (Joshua 16:7), between Ataroth and Jericho, in one of the torrent beds leading down from the Bethel highlands to the Jordan valley
Mount Gaash - This was the memorable sepulchre of Joshua, in Tinmath Serah, in mount Ephraim. ) It should be observed, that the mountains of Ephraim were several detached portions of rising ground, here and there, dispersed through the land belonging to that tribe
Mount, Mountain - Thus in 2 Chronicles 13:4 it says "Mount Zemaraim, which is in mount Ephraim," which means that mount Zemaraim was situated in the hill-country of Ephraim. Mount Ephraim does not refer to any particular mountain; but to the range of hills, or hill country in Ephraim, extending from Bethel to the plains of Jezreel
Ephraim - The first indication of the superiority of Ephraim over his elder brother, Manasses, is seen in the blessing given by their grandfather Jacob (Genesis 48). Using the power given to him by Divine promises, Jacob adopts as his sons, Manasses and Ephraim, in order that these might form not two branches of the same tribe, but two distinct tribes. Jacob gives the preference to the younger, by placing his right hand over the head of Ephraim
Resheph - Son of Ephraim
Seirath - City in Ephraim
Shuthalhites - Descendants of Shuthelah, son of Ephraim
re'Sheph - (flame ), a son of Ephraim
e'Ran - (watchful ), the eldest son of Ephraim
Jehosh'Uah, - in the genealogy of Ephraim
Ephraim - The portion of Ephraim was large and central, and embraced some of the most fertile land in all Canaan. A range of mountainous country, which runs through it, is called "the mountains of Ephraim," or "mount Ephraim. " Samaria, the capital of the ten tribes, being in Ephraim, this latter name is often used for the kingdom of Israel, Isaiah 11:13 Jeremiah 31:6 50:19 . ...
The FOREST of Ephraim, where Absalom lost his life, was on the east side of the Jordan, near Mahanaim, 2 Samuel 18:6-8 . ...
The TOWN called Ephraim, to which the Savior withdrew from his enemies, John 11:54 , was probably the same place mentioned in 2 Chronicles 13:19 , and called Ophrah in Joshua 18:23 1 Samuel 13:17
Ephratah - Whence probably Ephraim the mother of Hur took her name, being a native and owner of the town and district; which accounts for his being called "the father of Bethlehem. " In Micah 5:2 it is called Bethlehem Ephraim. As Bethlehem means "house of bread," so Ephraim "fruitful," the region abounding in grain. In Psalms 132:6 the sense is: "we (being) in Ephraim (i
Bach'Rites, the, - the family of BECHER , son of Ephraim
Ephraim - When Israel blessed the two sons of Joseph he set Ephraim before his elder brother, saying he should be greater, and his seed should become a multitude (or, 'fatness') of nations. Little is recorded of Ephraim personally; and of his descendants, Joshua the son of Nun is the most renowned. ...
Ephraim had the place of the first-born (Jeremiah 31:9 ), the birthright being taken from Reuben and given to Joseph. Also the place of the tabernacle was in the tribe of Ephraim, hence we find in the time of the judges this tribe asserting its own importance. They also haughtily said of the Gileadites that they were fugitives of Ephraim, implying that they were not a tribe, but belonged to Ephraim, from whence they had escaped. The conflict was sharp; the Gileadites seized the ford of the Jordan, and then by putting all who wanted to pass to the test of pronouncing Shibboleth (which the Ephraimites could only call Sibboleth) they slew 42,000 of the men of Ephraim. Later on the Lord forsook Shiloh, and chose, not the tribe of Ephraim, but that of Judah both for the place of royalty and for the sanctuary. ...
In the kingdom under David and Solomon we read very little of Ephraim, but it is twice called in the Psalms 'the strength (or defence) of mine head. At the division of the tribes Ephraim took the most prominent place; Shechem and Samaria being in their territory naturally contributed to this, and accounts for the ten tribes being constantly called 'Ephraim' by the prophets. Isaiah prophesied that in sixty-five years Ephraim should be broken and should not be a people. This also agrees with the prophecy saying 'the head of Ephraim ' is Samaria. ...
In the prophecies also that refer to the future blessing of the twelve tribes Ephraim is regarded as representing the ten tribes
Ephraim - When Israel blessed the two sons of Joseph he set Ephraim before his elder brother, saying he should be greater, and his seed should become a multitude (or, 'fatness') of nations. Little is recorded of Ephraim personally; and of his descendants, Joshua the son of Nun is the most renowned. ...
Ephraim had the place of the first-born (Jeremiah 31:9 ), the birthright being taken from Reuben and given to Joseph. Also the place of the tabernacle was in the tribe of Ephraim, hence we find in the time of the judges this tribe asserting its own importance. They also haughtily said of the Gileadites that they were fugitives of Ephraim, implying that they were not a tribe, but belonged to Ephraim, from whence they had escaped. The conflict was sharp; the Gileadites seized the ford of the Jordan, and then by putting all who wanted to pass to the test of pronouncing Shibboleth (which the Ephraimites could only call Sibboleth) they slew 42,000 of the men of Ephraim. Later on the Lord forsook Shiloh, and chose, not the tribe of Ephraim, but that of Judah both for the place of royalty and for the sanctuary. ...
In the kingdom under David and Solomon we read very little of Ephraim, but it is twice called in the Psalms 'the strength (or defence) of mine head. At the division of the tribes Ephraim took the most prominent place; Shechem and Samaria being in their territory naturally contributed to this, and accounts for the ten tribes being constantly called 'Ephraim' by the prophets. Isaiah prophesied that in sixty-five years Ephraim should be broken and should not be a people. This also agrees with the prophecy saying 'the head of Ephraim ' is Samaria. ...
In the prophecies also that refer to the future blessing of the twelve tribes Ephraim is regarded as representing the ten tribes
Ataroth - Several places of this name occur in Scripture: one in the tribe of Judah, 1 Chronicles 2:54 ; one or two in Ephraim, Joshua 16:2,5,7 ; 18:13 ; and one or two in Gad, Numbers 32:3,34,35 . Robinson found traces of one of those in Ephraim, on a high hill about six miles north by west from Bethel
Nun - Sprung from Ephraim; father of Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:20-27)
Bachrites - A family descending from Becher, son of Ephraim
Ephraimite - One of the tribe of Ephraim
el'Ead - (praised by God ), a descendant of Ephraim
Had'la-i - (rest of God ), a man of Ephraim
e'Phra-Imite - Of the tribe of Ephraim; elsewhere called "Ephrathite
Eladah - Son of Tahath, a descendant of Ephraim
Elead - Son of Zabad, a descendant of Ephraim
Rephah - Son of Ephraim, and ancestor of Joshua
Ephraim, Wood of - ...
The battlefield where Absalom fell, the entanglement of the wood occasioning large slaughter of the Ephraimites, from whence perhaps the wood was named. where the tribe Ephraim was settled. Grotius thinks, less probably, that the name was derived from the slaughter of Ephraim at the Jordan fords by Jephthah (Judges 12:1-5); the city Mahanaim and wood of Ephraim were miles off from the Jordan
Naarath - A city of Ephraim
re'Phah, - a son of Ephraim, and ancestor of Joshua
Jehizkiah - Jehovah strengthens, one of the chiefs of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 28:12 )
Kibzaim - A city of Mount Ephraim (Joshua 21:22); given to the Kohathite Levites; ("two heaps". boundary of Ephraim (Joshua 16:9; Joshua 17:9-10)
Mount of the Amalekites - ), in the tribe of Ephraim (Judges 12:15 )
Japhleti - , a boundary of Ephraim
Naaran - Boyish, juvenile, a town in Ephraim between Bethel and Jericho (1 Chronicles 7:28 )
Eran - Grandson of Ephraim ( Numbers 26:36 P Baal-Shalishah - Ephraim
Hillel - Of Pirathonin mount Ephraim, father of the judge ABDON (Judges 12:13; Judges 12:15)
Pirathon - A city of Ephraim: hence the inhabitants were called Pirathonites
el'Ada - (whom God has put on ), a descendant of Ephraim through Shuthelah
Ephraim - He was the progenitor of the tribe of Ephraim, which occupied a region slightly to the northwest of the Dead Sea (Joshua 16:1 ) and was the leading tribe of the Northern Kingdom, ever ready to assert its rights (Joshua 17:15 ; Judges 3:27 ; Judges 4:5 ; Judges 7:24-8:3 ; Judges 12:1 ). ...
Ephraim played an important role in Israelite history. Joshua was an Ephraimite (Joshua 19:50 ). Samuel was an Ephraimite (1 Samuel 1:1 ). Jeroboam I was an Ephraimite (1 Kings 12:25 ). The important sanctuary at Shiloh was located in the territory of Ephraim. , Ephraim was often used as a designation for Israel (Isaiah 11:13 ; Jeremiah 7:15 ; Hosea 5:13 )
te'Lah - (vigor ), a descendant of Ephraim, and ancestor of Joshua
Janohah - Border city of Ephraim
Uzzensherah - City in Ephraim
Shiph'Tan - (judicial ), father of Kemuel, a prince of the tribe of Ephraim
Mount of the Amorites - KJV designation for the hill country of Judah and Ephraim (Deuteronomy 1:7 ,Deuteronomy 1:7,1:20 )
Zemaraim, Mount - This was situate on some part of the highlands of Ephraim
Taanathshiloh - City on the boundary of Ephraim
Kibzaim - Levitical city in Ephraim
am'Alekites, Mount of - a mountain in Ephraim, (Judges 12:15 ) probably so named because the Amalekites once held possession of it
Tappuah - ...
...
A town on the border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:8 ). The "land" of Tappuah fell to Manasseh, but the "city" to Ephraim (17:8)
Pirathon - In Ephraim "in the mount of the Amalekite" (who had an early settlement in the highlands) (Judges 12:15). David's eleventh captain for the eleventh month was of Pirathon, Benaiah of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 27:14)
Tappuah - A city on the border of Ephraim and Manasseh; the city belonged to Ephraim, the land or district named from it to Manasseh
Archi - A city on the boundary of Ephraim and Benjamin (Joshua 16:2 ), between Bethel and Beth-horon the nether
Uzzen-Sherah - It derived its name from the daughter of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:24 )
Tabbath - Famous, a town in the tribe of Ephraim (Judges 7:22 ), to the south of Bethshean, near the Jordan
Naaran - (nay' uh ran) City allotted to Ephraim, likely identical with Naarah (1 Chronicles 7:28 ; compare Joshua 16:7 )
Shiphtan - ” Father of a leader from tribe of Ephraim (Numbers 34:24 )
Shuthelah - Original ancestor of clan in tribe of Ephraim (Numbers 26:35 )
Archi - City on the border of Ephraim
ta'Han - (camp ), a descendant of Ephraim
Kanah, River - Brook between Ephraim and Manasseh
Hil'Lel - (praise ), a native of Pirathon in Mount Ephraim, father of Abdon, one of the judges of Israel
e'Phra-in - ( 2 Chronicles 13:19 ) It has been conjectured that this Ephrain or Ephron is identical with the Ephraim by which Absalom's sheep-farm of Baal-hazor was situated; with the city called Ephraim near the wilderness in which our Lord lived for some time; and with Ophrah, a city of Benjamin, apparently not far from Bethel
Sherah - Apparently the daughter of Ephraim: she built Beth-horon the nether and the upper, and Uzzen-sherah
Ephraim (1) - As regards Ephraim himself, he was doubly blessed:...
(1) in being made, as well as Manasseh, a patriarchal head of a tribe, like Jacob's immediate sons (Genesis 48:5); as Judah received the primary birthright (Reuben losing it by incest, Simeon and Levi by cruelty), and became the royal tribe from whence king David and the Divine Son of David sprang, so Ephraim received a secondary birthright and became ancestor of the royal tribe among the ten tribes of Israel (Genesis 49:3-10; Genesis 49:22-26). ...
(2) Ephraim the younger was preferred to Manasseh the elder, just as Jacob himself was preferred before the elder Esau. Jacob wittingly guided his hands so as to lay his right on Ephraim and his left on Manasseh, notwithstanding Joseph's remonstrance; saying, "Manasseh shall be great, but his younger brother shall be greater than he, and his seed shall become a multitude of nations. " Jacob called to mind God's promise at Luz, "I will make thee fruitful," a Hebrew word related to Ephraim and to Ephrath, the scene of the death of his darling wife, Ephraim's grandmother (Genesis 35:11; Genesis 35:16; Genesis 48:4; Genesis 48:7; Genesis 48:13-19). Ephraim was about 21 when Jacob blessed him, for he was born before the seven years' famine, and Jacob came to Egypt toward its closing years, and lived 17 years afterward (Genesis 47:28). ...
Before Joseph's death Ephraim's family had reached the third generation (Genesis 50:23). Psalms 78:9 is referred in Smith's Bible Dictionary to this time; but the phrase is rather figurative for spiritual apostasy; "the children of Ephraim . " Ephraim's numbers in the wilderness of Sinai census were 40,500, Manasseh's 32,200. But at the eve of entering Canaan Ephraim had decreased to 32,500, while Manasseh had increased to 52,700; and at the conquest Ephraim was fewest in numbers after Simeon (22,200). ...
Still in Moses' blessing Ephraim stands pre-eminent over Manasseh; and he and Manasseh are compared to the two horns of the reem (not unicorn but the gigantic wild ox, now extinct, or urus); "with them he (Joseph) shall push the people together to the ends of the earth, and they are the ten thousands of Ephraim and they are the thousands of Manasseh. Ephraim made by Jacob in privileges the firstborn of Joseph's offspring; the singular 'bullock' being used collectively for all Joseph's offspring, and expressing their strength) is his glory. The tribe Ephraim's territory. - The two great tribes of Judah and Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh) took their inheritance first. The boundaries of Ephraim are traced from W. Ataroth Adar and upper Bethheron lay on the center of the southern border of Ephraim. ) of Shechem (Nablus), the latter being in Ephraim. From Naarath Ephraim's boundary reached Jericho, and struck into the line that forms the S. of Shechem) Ephraim's boundary ran S. The boundary between Ephraim and his brother Manasseh is not exactly defined; compare Joshua 17:14-18. Generally, Ephraim lay to the S. The northern half of central Palestine was "mount Ephraim," hills of limestone material, intersected by wide plains with streams of running water, and therefore, clothed with vegetation. The "precious things of the earth," "flowers," "olive valleys," and "vines" are assigned to Ephraim (Isaiah 28:1-4; Hosea 10:1). Ephraim lay near the highways from Egypt and Philistia to Galilee and from Jordan to the sea. Ephraim did not extend to the sea, but had separate cities assigned to it in Manasseh on the coast. Jealous sensitiveness as to any exploit achieved without Ephraim's sharing in it betrayed at once their tribal self importance and their recognized high standing among the tribes. " Among his state officers there was more than one Ephraimite (1 Chronicles 27:10-14); and after Absalom's rebellion they were probably foremost among the men of Israel in expressing jealousy of Judah in respect to the latter's greater share in promoting David's return. ...
From the time of the severance of the ten tribes from Judah, brought about by Rehoboam's infatuation and Jeroboam's ("ruler over all the charge of the house of Joseph") rousing Ephraim's innate self-elation, Ephraim became the representative and main portion of the northern kingdom; for the surrounding pagan, the luxurious Phoenicians, the marauding Midianites, the Syrians and Assyrians from the N. , left to Israel little which was permanently, exclusively, and distinctively its own, beyond the secure territory of Ephraim with its hilly fastnesses. beyond Ephraim, was the natural battlefield for Egyptian forces advancing along the seacoast plain from the S. to operate in; but Ephraim could only be reached through precipitous ascents and narrow passes, where invaders could be easily repelled
Ephraim - Ephraim . In the Blessing of Jacob ( Genesis 49:22 ) there may be a play upon the name when Joseph, who there represents both Ephraim and Manasseh, is called ‘a fruitful bough. ]'>[4] ) tells an interesting story of how Jacob adopted his Egyptian grandsons, Ephraim and Manasseh, into his own family, and at the same time, against the remonstrances of Joseph, conferred the blessing of the firstborn upon Ephraim hence Ephraim’s predestined superiority in later history. Contrary to what we should have expected from the Blessing of Jacob, Ephraim, according to P [4] had been adopted as Jacob’s own, and were therefore entitled on this important occasion to like consideration with the others, points to a traditional echo of the early days in the land when Ephraim and Manasseh were still united. see), the complete political separation of Manasseh from Ephraim appears to have been still later. At all events, Jeroboam the Ephraimite, who afterwards became the first king of Israel ( c
Ephraim . A place near Baal-hazor ( 2 Samuel 13:23 ) It may be identical with the Ephraim which the Onomasticon places 20 Roman miles N. ...
The Forest of Ephraim (Heb. Mount Ephraim , Heb, har Ephraîm , is the name given to that part of the central range of Western Palestine occupied by Ephraim, corresponding in part to the modern Jebel Nâblus the district under the governor of Nâblus . ]'>[12] ‘the hill country of Ephraim. ]'>[13] , ‘Mount Ephraim
Japhleti - border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:3)
Asenath - Daughter of Poti-pherah, priest of On, wife of Joseph, and mother of Manasseh and Ephraim
Baal-Hazor - Where Absalom kept his flocks, 2 Samuel 13:23 , was near Ephraim, a city of Judah, some eight miles east of Jerusalem
Japh'Leli - The boundary of the "Japhletite" is one of the landmarks on the south boundary line of Ephraim
Michmethah - Hiding-place, a town in the northern border of Ephraim and Manasseh, and not far west of Jordan (Joshua 16:6 ; 17:7 )
Kli yakar - commentary to the Torah which highlights the homiletic or derush, written by Shlomo Ephraim of Luntshits (1550-1619), a student of the Maharshal...
Michmethah - Boundary of Ephraim and Manasseh
Eleadah - ” Modern translation spelling for KJV Eladah, a descendant of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:20 )
Shamir (1) - The judge Tola's home and burial place in Mount Ephraim (Judges 10:1-2). Why Tola of Issachar dwelt there is uncertain; either for security from the Canaanites, or Issachar may have possessed some towns in the Ephraim mountains
Hadlai - ” Leader in tribe of Ephraim and father of Amasa (2 Chronicles 28:12 )
Naarath - Girl, a town on the boundary between Ephraim and Benjamin (Joshua 16:7 ), not far probably from Jericho, to the north (1 Chronicles 7:28 )
Lebonah - Judges 21:19 , a town of Ephraim, near Shiloh, between Bethel and Shechem
Shalisha - A district adjoining Mount Ephraim on the west, 1 Samuel 9:4
he'Res - (the sun ), ( Judges 1:35 ) a city of Dan, in Mount Ephraim, near Ajalon; possibly identical with Mount Jearim (Ir-shemesh, city of the gun)
Ephraim, Gate of - One of the gates of Jerusalem (2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chronicles 25:23 ), on the side of the city looking toward Ephraim, the north side
She'Rah - (kinswoman ), daughter of Ephraim, ( 1 Chronicles 7:24 ) and foundress of the Beth-horons and of a town called after her Uzzen-sherah, (B
Ephraim (2) - Our Lord, when the chief priests plotted to kill Him, retired to "a city called Ephraim . Thus, Ophrah of Benjamin probably is identical with Ephraim (1 Samuel 13:17
Zuph - Levitic ancestor of Elkanah and Samuel (1 Samuel 1:1 ; 1Chronicles 6:16,1Chronicles 6:26,1 Chronicles 6:35 ) from Ephraim. Ephraim may be geographical rather than tribal
Ephraim - In the after ages of the church, the Lord frequently speaks of the whole church of Israel by the name of Ephraim. (See Jeremiah 31:20; Hosea 7:1; Hos 12:1; Hos 13:1) I do not presume to say the cause was, because the ten tribes had the chief city in Ephraim; but I think it probable
Gaash - A mountain in Ephraim ( Joshua 24:30 , Judges 2:9 )
Seirath - Woody district; shaggy, a place among the mountains of Ephraim, bordering on Benjamin, to which Ehud fled after he had assassinated Eglon at Jericho (Judges 3:26,27 )
Gaash - A shaking, a hill, on the north side of which Joshua was buried (Joshua 24:30 ; Judges 2:9 ), in the territory of Ephraim
Pirathon - Place in Ephraim where Abdon was buried 'in the mount of the Amalekites
Bethhoron - Two towns called the 'upper' and the 'nether,' though also spoken of as one, on the boundary between Benjamin and Ephraim. They were allotted to Ephraim, and given to the Kohathites. In 1 Chronicles 7:24 these towns are said to have been built by Sherah, apparently the grand-daughter of Ephraim
Manas'Seh - Both he and Ephraim were born before the commencement of the famine. He was placed after his younger brother, Ephraim, by his grandfather Jacob, when he adopted them into his own family, and made them heads of tribes. (1 Chronicles 5:25,26 ) The other half tribe settled to the west of the Jordan, north of Ephraim. For further particulars see Ephraim
Manas'Seh - Both he and Ephraim were born before the commencement of the famine. He was placed after his younger brother, Ephraim, by his grandfather Jacob, when he adopted them into his own family, and made them heads of tribes. (1 Chronicles 5:25,26 ) The other half tribe settled to the west of the Jordan, north of Ephraim. For further particulars see Ephraim
Confederate - ...
Syria is confederate with Ephraim
Kemuel - Son of Shiphtan and a prince of Ephraim
Zuph Plur. Zophim - An Ephrathite, ancestor of Amuel, and the region in mount Ephraim which he inhabited, 1 Samuel 1:1 9:5 1 Chronicles 6:35
Meshillemoth - Member of the tribe of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 28:12 )
ar'Chite, the - (as if from a place named Erech, on the frontiers of Ephraim), the usual designation of David's friend Hushai
Nun - His genealogical descent from Ephraim is recorded in (1 Chronicles 7:1 )
Joshua - Son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, Moses's successor, the commander of the army of Israel in its battle with Amalec, and one of the spies sent into Chanaan
Josue - Son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, Moses's successor, the commander of the army of Israel in its battle with Amalec, and one of the spies sent into Chanaan
Bered - An Ephraimite, apparently the grandson of Ephraim
Kibzaim - Two heaps, a city of Ephraim, assigned to the Kohathite Levites, and appointed as a city of refuge (Joshua 21 :: 22 )
Elead - ” Member of tribe of Ephraim killed by men of Gath for stealing their cattle (1 Chronicles 7:21 )
Pirathon - Prince, or summit, a place "in the land of Ephraim" (Judges 12:15 ), now Fer'on, some 10 miles south-west of Shechem
Baalhazor - Place in or near Ephraim where Absalom had pastures for sheep, and where Amnon was slain
Sichem - (Hebrew: shoulder) ...
Israelite city north of Bethel and Silo, in the tribe of Ephraim; first capital of the Kingdom of Israel, noted as the burial-place of Joseph (Josiah 24)
Jehizki'ah - (Jehovah strengthens ), son of Shallum, one of the heads of the tribe of Ephraim in the time of Ahaz
Ephraim, Mount - The central mountainous district of Palestine occupied by the tribe of Ephraim (Joshua 17:15 ; 19:50 ; 20:7 ), extending from Bethel to the plain of Jezreel. Joshua was buried at Timnath-heres among the mountains of Ephraim, on the north side of the hill of Gaash (Judges 2:9 )
Bethbarah - The point to which Ephraim took, before the Midianites, "the waters" (the streams wady Maleh, Fyadh, Jamel, Tubas, etc. side of the highlands of Ephraim toward the Jordan, and flowing through the Ghor to Bethbarah). Ephraim's intercepting of Midian was probably not so far S. ) Grove supposes Bethbarah to be the ford Jacob crossed in returning from Mesopotamia, and at which Jephthah slew the Ephraimites
Ramah - (Joshua 18:25) And there was a Ramah, called Ramathaim-Zophim, in mount Ephraim, where Elkanah and Hannah, Samuel the prophet's parents, lived. (See 1 Samuel 1:19) And yet it is very possible, that both these might be but one and the same Ramah; for the frontiers of Benjamin and Ephraim joined each other
Beth-ho'Ron - Beth-horon lay on the boundary line between Benjamin and Ephraim, (Joshua 16:3,5 ) and Joshua 18:13,14 Was counted to Ephraim, ( Joshua 21:22 ; 1 Chronicles 7:24 ) and given to the Kohathites
Bered - ...
...
A son of Shuthelah, and grandson of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:20 )
Broad Wall - A stretch of the wall of Jerusalem on the northwest corner near the Gate of Ephraim
ga'Ash - (earthquake ), a hill of Ephraim, where Joshua was buried
Naph'Tali, Mount, - the mountainous district which formed the main part of the inheritance of Naphtali, (Joshua 20:7 ) answering to "Mount Ephraim" in the centre and "Mount Judah" in the south of Palestine
Sheerah - ” Female member of tribe of Ephraim who established the two cities of Beth-horon as well as Uzzen-sherah (1 Chronicles 7:24 )
Azrikam - Governor of Ahaz's house; slain by Zichri, a mighty man of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 28:7)
Bered - Descendant of Ephraim, the same perhaps as Becher
Mount Ebal - It was situated in Ephraim, near Shechem, over against Gerizim
as'Enath - (worshipper of Neith ), daughter of Potipherah, priest, or possibly prince, of On [1], wife of Joseph, (Genesis 41:45 ) and mother of Manasseh and Ephraim
Pir'Athonite, - (Judges 12:13,15 ) ...
"Benaiah the Pirathonite of the children of Ephraim," (1 Chronicles 27:14 )
Jokmeam - Levitical city, in Ephraim
Taanath-Shiloh - Approach to Shiloh, a place on the border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:6 ), probably the modern T'ana, a ruin 7 miles south-east of Shechem, on the ridge east of the Mukhnah plain
en-Tappuah - ” A spring near the town of Tappuah which marked the border of the tribe of Manasseh and Ephraim (Joshua 17:7 )
Mount of the Amalekites - A mountainous region in the territory of Ephraim (Judges 12:15 ; compare the Hebrew “in Amalek” of Judges 5:14 )
Ephraim, Mount - This does not refer to any particular mountain, but to the range of hill-country in Ephraim
Timnathheres , Timnathserah - Identified with Kefr Haris in the Mount of Ephraim, 32 7' N, 35 9' E
be'Red - (Genesis 16:14 ) ...
A son or descendant of Ephraim, (1 Chronicles 7:20 ) possibly identical with Becher in (Numbers 26:35 )
ar'Chi - (Joshua 16:2 ) A place in the neighborhood of Bethel, on the boundary between Ephraim and Benjamin
Ephraim, the Tribe of - Thus there were in reality thirteen tribes; but the number twelve was preserved by excluding that of Levi when Ephraim and Manasseh are mentioned separately (Numbers 1:32-34 ; Joshua 17:14,17 ; 1 Chronicles 7:20 ). ...
The boundaries of the portion of the land assigned to Ephraim are given in Joshua 16:1-10 . "For more than five hundred years, a period equal to that which elapsed between the Norman Conquest and the War of the Roses, Ephraim, with its two dependent tribes of Manasseh and Benjamin, exercised undisputed pre-eminence. It was not till the close of the first period of Jewish history that God 'refused the tabernacle of Joseph, and chose not the tribe of Ephraim, but chose the tribe of Judah, the Mount Zion which he loved' (Psalm 78:67,68 ). When the ark was removed from Shiloh to Zion the power of Ephraim was humbled. " ...
Among the causes which operated to bring about the disruption of Israel was Ephraim's jealousy of the growing power of Judah. From the settlement of Canaan till the time of David and Solomon, Ephraim had held the place of honour among the tribes. But now when Jerusalem became the capital of the kingdom, and the centre of power and worship for the whole nation of Israel, Ephraim declined in influence
Corner Gate - A gate of Jerusalem in the northwest corner of the city not far from the Ephraim Gate (2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chronicles 25:23 )
Ben-Hur - ” Solomon's district supervisor over Mount Ephraim in charge of supplying the royal court one month a year (1 Kings 4:8 )
Kanah - A brook which separated Ephraim and Manasseh, and fell into the Mediterranean north of Joppa, Joshua 16:8 17:9
Ben'Jamin, the Land of - The proximity of Benjamin to Ephraim during the march to the promised land was maintained in the territory allotted to each. That given to Benjamin formed almost a parallelogram, of about 26 miles in length by 12 in breadth, lying between Ephraim, the Jordan, Judah and Dan
Taanath-Shiloh - boundary of Ephraim ( Joshua 16:6 )
Asenath - She was the mother of Manasseh and Ephraim (50-52; 46:20)
Tahath - Two descendants of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:20 )
Ezer - Son of Ephraim, slain by the ancient men of Gath in a foray on their cattle (1 Chronicles 7:21), during Israel's stay in Egypt
Janohah - On the border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:6-7)
na'Aran - (juvenile ), a city of Ephraim, which in a very ancient record, ( 1 Chronicles 7:28 ) is mentioned as the eastern limit of the tribe
ta'Anath-Shi'Loh - (approach to Shiloh ), a place named once only -- ( Joshua 16:6 ) --as one of the landmarks of the boundary of Ephraim
Baal Hazor - ) A Canaanite idol sanctuary on the borders of Ephraim and Benjamin
Tahan - Third son of Ephraim (Numbers 26:35 ). The parallel list gives Tahath as Ephraim's third son (1 Chronicles 7:20 ). Ephraimite ancestor of Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:25 )
Naaran, Naarath - City in Ephraim
Baal-Hazor - Beside Ephraim, where were Absalom’s sheep-shearers ( 2 Samuel 13:23 )
Beri'ah - (Genesis 46:17 ; Numbers 26:44,45 ) ...
A son of Ephraim
Timnath-Heres - It was "in the mount of Ephraim, in the north side of the hill Gaash," 10 miles south-west of Shechem
Sheerah - A ‘daughter’ of Ephraim, ‘who, according to the MT Tola - Son of Puah, of the tribe of Issachar: he judged Israel twenty-three years at Shamir in Mount Ephraim
Manasseh (1) - patriarchal heads of tribes, as Jacob's immediate sons were; Manasseh and Ephraim gave their names to separate tribes. When Joseph took Ephraim in his right toward Israel's left hand, and Manasseh in his left toward Israel's right hand, Israel put his right upon Ephraim the younger, and his left upon Manasseh wittingly, notwithstanding Joseph's remonstrance. Their name should be a formula of blessing, "God make thee as Ephraim and Manasseh," and they should "grow as fish do increase" (a natural image near the fish abounding Nile): Genesis 48:16; Genesis 48:20. Manasseh, Ephraim, and Benjamin, the three sprung from Rachel, marched W. Ephraim and Manasseh) the "precious things of the earth" by "the good will of Him that dwelt in the bush, "in contrast to Joseph's past "separation from his brethren," his horns like the two of the wild bull (not "unicorn"), namely, "the ten thousands of Ephraim and the thousands of Manasseh shall push," etc. At Sinai Manasseh numbered 32,200 (1 Chronicles 5:25-268; Numbers 1:35; Numbers 2:20-21; Numbers 7:54-59), Ephraim 40,500. But 40 years later, at Jordan, Manasseh 52,700, Ephraim 32,590 (Numbers 26:34-37). The town was given to Ephraim, the land N. corner of Ephraim. of Ephraim and Manasseh, along the entire line of the Jordan, from the sea of Chinneroth to the wady Kelt not far from the Salt Sea: thus it was a triangle, its apex at Jericho, its base N. In the declension of the nation Isaiah (Isaiah 9:20-21) foretells that the two sons of Joseph, once so intimately united, should be rent into factions thirsting for one another's blood, "they shall eat every man the flesh of his own arm, Manasseh Ephraim, and Ephraim Manasseh, and they together against Judah. Before Ephraim and Benjamin and Manasseh (advancing at their head, as formerly in the pillar of cloud in the wilderness)
Shuthelah - One of the three clans of the tribe of Ephraim ( Numbers 26:35 , [1] 36)
Jokmeam - Gathering of the people, a city of Ephraim, which was given with its suburbs to the Levites (1 Chronicles 6:68 )
Baal-Hamon - In Mount Ephraim, not far N
Ephrain - Possibly = Ephraim city above; also = EPHRON, MOUNT, on the northern bound of Judah (Joshua 15:9)
Tahath - Son of Bered and a son of Eladah, descendants of Ephraim
Gaash - A hill of Ephraim, north of which stood Timnath-seres, celebrated for Joshua's tomb, Joshua 24
Kibza'im - (two heaps ), a city of Mount Ephraim, given up with its "suburbs" to the Kohathite Levites
Japhleti - The clan's territory lay on border between Ephraim and Benjamin, though the clan apparently belonged to Asher
Kemuel - ...
...
Son of Shiphtan, appointed on behalf of the tribe of Ephraim to partition the land of Canaan (Numbers 34:24 )
Zereda - The fortress, a city on the north of Mount Ephraim; the birthplace of Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:26 )
uz'Zen-She'Rah - (ear (or point) of Sherah ) a town founded or rebuilt by Sherah, an Ephraimite woman the daughter either of Ephraim himself or of Beriah
Seirath - In Mount Ephraim, a continuation of the rugged, bushy ("like hair") hills which stretched to Judah's northern boundary (Joshua 15:10; Judges 3:26-27)
Baalhamon - The only clue to this name is the doubtful one of Belamon in Judith 8:3 , which was near Dothaim, not far from Samaria, in the mountains of Ephraim
Gaash - of Gaash hill or mount was Timnath Serach, the city given by Israel to Joshua at his request, in the region "mount Ephraim," where also he was buried (Joshua 19:49-50; Joshua 24:30; Judges 2:9)
Silo - (Hebrew: peace or rest) ...
City of Ephraim, north of Bethel (Judges 21)
Bered - A son of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:20 )
Beriah - Son of Ephraim
Becher - Son of Ephraim, and the head of the BACHRITES, Gaash - A hill in the district of mount Ephraim, on the side of which Joshua was buried
Kanah - A river forming the boundary between Ephraim and Manasseh
Tola - Of the tribe of Issachar, judge of Israel, at Shamir in Mount Ephraim, for twenty-three years after the death of Abimelech, Judges 10:1,2
Jano'Hah - (rest ), a place on the boundary of Ephraim ( Joshua 16:6,7 ) east of Neapolis
Manasseh - Along with Ephraim, Manasseh became one of the twelve tribes of Israel and received a landed inheritance. Jacob crossed his hands and gave that blessing to Ephraim. Jacob crossed his hands and gave that blessing to Ephraim
Timnath-Serah - A town in the mountains of Ephraim, which was assigned to Joshua; and in which he was buried
Zemaraim - Zemaraim, in the hill-country of Ephraim ( 2 Chronicles 13:4 )
Ayyah - ” In the unclear Hebrew text of 1 Chronicles 7:20 , modern translations read Ayyah as a city on the border of Ephraim
ba'Rak - (lightning ), son of Abinoam of Kedesh, a refuge city in Mount Naphtali, was incited by Deborah, a prophetess of Ephraim, to deliver Israel from the yolk of Jabin
Shal'Isha, the Land of, - It was a district near Mount Ephraim
Asenath - She was mother of Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 41:50-51 )
Ataroth-Addar - ” A border town in Ephraim (Joshua 16:5 ), bordering Benjamin (Joshua 18:13 ), probably modern Khirbet Attara at the foot of tell en-Nasbeh or possibly identical with tell en-Nasbeh and thus with biblical Mispah
Mich'Methah - (hiding-place ), a place which formed one of the landmarks of the boundary of the territories of Ephraim and Manasseh on the western side of Jordan
be'Cher - ) ...
Son of Ephraim, (Numbers 26:35 ) called 1 Chronicles 7:20 ) Same as the preceding
Timnath-Heres - Ephraim, on the N
Gibeah of Phinehas - ), a city on Mount Ephraim which had been given to Phinehas ((24:33 "hill," A
Michmethah - A landmark between Ephraim and Manasseh W. of and facing Shechem (Joshua 17:7); but Joshua 16:6 says Ephraim's border went out toward the sea to Michmethah on the N
Gaash - ” A height in the hill country of Ephraim which cannot be located any more precisely
Tappuah - A town on the line of Ephraim and Manesseh, Joshua 15:34
Oreb - The "rock of Oreb" was named after Oreb, one of the princes of Midian, whom the men of Ephraim slew
Baal-Hazor - Having a courtyard, or Baal's village, the place on the borders of Ephraim and Benjamin where Absalom held the feast of sheep-shearing when Amnon was assassinated (2 Samuel 13:23 )
Tahath (1) - Grandson of 2; but Burrington makes him son of Ephraim, and slain by the men of Gath in a raid on cattle (1 Chronicles 7:20-21)
Naarath - (nay' uh rath) KJV form of Naarah, a city in the tribal territory of Ephraim just north of Jericho (Joshua 16:7 )
Janoah - A place on the border of Ephraim ( Joshua 16:6-7 ); situated where the present Yânûn now stands, with the supposed tomb of Nun
Shamir - City in Mount Ephraim, the residence of Tola, one of the judges
Jokmeam - A town in Ephraim given to the Levites, near Beth-horon ( 1 Chronicles 6:68 )
Thebez - City in Ephraim, It was taken by Abimelech except the tower, from which he was killed by a piece of a millstone
e'Phra-im - ) The first indication we have of that ascendancy over his elder brother Manasseh which at a later period the tribe of Ephraim so unmistakably possessed is in the blessing of the children by Jacob
e'Phra-im - ) The first indication we have of that ascendancy over his elder brother Manasseh which at a later period the tribe of Ephraim so unmistakably possessed is in the blessing of the children by Jacob
e'Phra-im - ) The first indication we have of that ascendancy over his elder brother Manasseh which at a later period the tribe of Ephraim so unmistakably possessed is in the blessing of the children by Jacob
Zer'Eda - , on Mount Ephraim
Zemara'im - (double fleece of wool ), a town in the allotment of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:22 ) perhaps identical with Mount Zemaraim, mentioned in (2 Chronicles 13:4 ) only, which was "in Mount Ephraim," that is to say, within the general district of the highlands of that great tribe
e'Phra-im - ) The first indication we have of that ascendancy over his elder brother Manasseh which at a later period the tribe of Ephraim so unmistakably possessed is in the blessing of the children by Jacob
Abiezer - Gideon soothed the wounded vanity of Ephraim when upbraiding him for not having called in their aid against Midian, saying "Is not the grape of Ephraim better than the vintage of Abiezer?" (Joshua 17:2
Refuge, Cities of - On the west of Jordan were (1) Kadesh, in Naphtali; (2) Shechem, in Mount Ephraim; (3) Hebron, in Judah
Becher - Original ancestor of clan in tribe of Ephraim (Numbers 26:35 )
Zeeb - Slain at what was in consequence called "the winepress of Zeeb," at the ford of Jordan, near the passes descending from Mount Ephraim
Azaziah - Father of Hoshea, prince of Ephraim, in David's time
Amasa - A descendant of Ephraim
Pir'Athon - (princely ), "in the land of Ephraim in the mount of the Amalekite," a place in ( Judges 12:15 ) Its site, now called Fer'ata , is about one mile and a half south of the road from Jaffa, by Hableh , to Nablus
Janoah -
A town on the north-eastern border of Ephraim, in the Jordan valley (Joshua 16:6,7 )
Uzzen Sherah - enlarged and fortified, by Sherah, daughter of Ephraim or of Beriah
Tola - Judged for 23 years at Shamir in Mount Ephraim; here he died and was buried
Azaziah - Father of leader of tribe of Ephraim under David (1 Chronicles 27:20 )
Zereda(h) - Site in Ephraim of the home of Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:26 ), possibly identified as Ain Seridah iin the wadi Deir Ballut in western Samaria
Timnath-Serah - Or Timnath-Heres, Judges 2:9 , a town in Ephraim, which yielded to Joshua a home, an income, and a burial-place, Joshua 19:50 ; 24:30
Pirathon, Pirathonite - Pirathon ‘in the land of Ephraim’ was the home of Abdon ‘the Pirathonlte’ ( Judges 12:13 ; Judges 12:15 ), and of Benaiah, one of David’s heroes ( 2 Samuel 23:30 etc
Shibboleth - ” People of Gilead east of the Jordan used it to detect people of Ephraim from west of the Jordan since the Ephraimite dialect evidently did not include the sh sound, so Ephraimites always said, “sibboleth,” a word not used elsewhere in Hebrew ( Judges 12:6 )
Becher - It is probable that he married an Ephraimitish heiress, and that his descendants were consequently reckoned among the tribe of Ephraim (Numbers 26:35 ; 1 Chronicles 7:20,21 )
se'Irath - ( Judges 3:26,27 ) It was in "Mount Ephraim," ver
Kanah - A ‘brook’ or wady in the borders of Ephraim ( Joshua 16:8 ; Joshua 17:9 ) which has been identified (doubtfully) with Wady Kanah near Shechem ( Nâblus )
Kemuel - The prince of the tribe of Ephraim, one of the twelve commissioners for the dividing of the land ( Numbers 34:24 )
Manasseh - His grandfather Jacob elevated him and his brother Ephraim to the status of progenitors of tribes within the nation of Israel
Standard - Thus the standard of Judah is called the standard of the camp of Judah, which was on the east; the camp of Reuben on the south; the camp of Ephraim on the west; and the camp of Dan on the north. Genesis 49:9 ; Revelation 5:5 ); of Reuben a man; of Ephraim an ox (cf
Arimathea - It is probably the same place as Ramathaim in Ephraim, and the birth-place of Samuel (1 Samuel 1:1,19 )
ka'Nah - " (Joshua 19:28 ) ...
The river, a stream falling into the Mediterranean, which formed the division between the territories of Ephraim and Manasseh, the former on the sought, the latter on the north
Jok'me-am - (gathered by the people ), a city of Ephraim, given with its suburbs to a Kohathite Levites
Abiezer - In this last verse, "the vintage of Abiezer" means the first rout of the Midianites by the 300, mostly Abiezrites; and "the gleaning of the grapes of Ephraim," means the capture of Oreb and Zeeb, and other fruits of the victory, gathered by the Ephraimites
Beriah - ...
...
A son of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:20-23 ), born after the slaughter of his brothers, and so called by his father "because it went evil with his house" at that time
Kanah - and Ephraim on the S
Pirathon, Pirathonite - The town in the hill country of Ephraim was the home of the judge Abdon (Judges 12:13 ,Judges 12:13,12:15 ) and of Benaiah, one of David's elite warriors (2 Samuel 23:30 ; 1 Chronicles 11:31 )
Ephraim Gate - In Nehemiah's time the city square at the Ephraim Gate was one of the sites where booths for the celebration of the feast of tabernacles were set up (Nehemiah 8:16 )
Baal-Shalishah - The “land of Shalishah” was evidently in the tribal territory of Ephraim (1 Samuel 9:4 )
Becher - Son of Ephraim, Numbers 26:35 = 1 Chronicles 7:20 where the name appears as Bered
Zemaraim - Also a MOUNT on which the prophet Abijah stood in addressing Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:4); in the hilly part of Ephraim, extending into Benjamin's territory
Jehizkiah - Man of tribe of Ephraim who prevented people of Israel from bringing war prisoners from Judah into the city after Pekah of Israel defeated Ahaz of Judah about 733 B
Kem'Uel - ) ...
The son of Shiptan, and prince of the tribe of Ephraim; one of the twelve men appointed by Moses to divide the land of Canaan
Beth-Horon - The border between the tribes of Ephraim and Benjamin was at Beth-horon (Joshua 16:3 ,Joshua 16:3,16:5 ; Joshua 18:13-14 ). The city belonged to Ephraim but was set aside for the Levites (Joshua 21:22 ). The chronicler preserved an even earlier tradition of a descendant of Ephraim, a woman named Sherah, building the two cities (1 Chronicles 7:22-24 )
Ephron - The place referred to is probably the Ephraim of John 11:54 . See Ephraim (city), No
Beriah - A son of Ephraim, so-called "because it went evil with Ephraim's house" at the time, the men of Gath "born in that land" (Goshen, or else the eastern part of Lower Egypt) having slain his sons in a raid on cattle (1 Chronicles 7:20-23). if Beriah mean a "gift," he will be regarded as an extraordinary gift from God to Ephraim, now old, to stand "instead of" his sons whom he had lost; such was Seth (Genesis 4:25 margin). The incident perhaps belongs to the time, otherwise unnoticed, between Jacob's death and the Egyptian enslaving of his seed; for Ephraim's sons must, some of them, have been full grown and the Hebrew still free. " Keil thinks that" Ephraim" here is not the patriarch, but his descendant ages after bearing his name. Ezer and Elead his sons went down from mount Ephraim to Gath to carry off the Gittites' cattle and were slain in the attempt
Zemaraim - ...
...
A mount in the highlands of Ephraim, to the north of Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 13:4-20 )
Amasa - ...
...
A son of Hadlai, and chief of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 28:12 ) in the reign of Ahaz
Sha'Mir - ...
A place in Mount Ephraim, the residence and burial-place of Tola the judge
Kemuel - The son of Shiphtan and representative of Ephraim in the division of Canaan among the tribes of Israel (Numbers 34:24 )
Lean - Judges 8:2 (a) By this figure Gideon was telling the men of Ephraim that they had reaped a greater harvest by capturing Oreb and Zeeb than he had obtained in capturing or killing the rest of the army
Tappuah - City on the boundary of Ephraim
Lydda - Lydda belonged to the tribe of Ephraim
na'Arath - (juvenile ) (the Hebrew is equivalent to Naarah, which is therefore the real form of the name), a place named ( Joshua 16:7 ) only as one of the landmarks on the southern boundary of Ephraim
Lean - Judges 8:2 (a) By this figure Gideon was telling the men of Ephraim that they had reaped a greater harvest by capturing Oreb and Zeeb than he had obtained in capturing or killing the rest of the army
Tappuah (1) - On Ephraim's border, not far from the Mediterranean, "THE LAND OF Tappuah," in the territory of Ephraim but belonging to Manasseh (Joshua 16:8; Joshua 17:8)
Cakes - Ephraim (that is Israel) is compared to 'a cake not turned,' Hosea 7:8 , as unpalatable, like the lukewarm, 'neither hot nor cold,' of Revelation 3:16
Shibboleth - We meet with this word Judges 12:6; and the history connected with it concerning the men of Ephraim is not a little singular
Admah - Jehovah, when speaking of His fierce anger against Ephraim said, "How shall I make thee as Admah?" Hosea 11:8
Pel'Onite, the - ) From (1 Chronicles 27:10 ) it appears that the former was of the tribe of Ephraim, and "Pelonite" would therefore be an appellation derived from his place of birth or residence
Ezer - A son of Ephraim who, according to 1 Chronicles 7:21 , was slain by the men of Gath
Bethabara - It may be identical with Bethbarah, the ancient ford of Jordan of which the men of Ephraim took possession (Judges 7:24 )
Laadan - Member of tribe of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:26 ) and ancestor of Joshua 2:1
Shalisha - Between Mount Ephraim and Shalim
Ephra - A city of Ephraim; perhaps the same as Ophrah
Gezer - A royal city of the Canaanites, Joshua 10:33 12:12 ; between Bethhoron and the Mediterranean, Joshua 16:3 ; afterwards on the western border of Ephraim, and assigned to the Levites, Joshua 16:3 21:21
Ephrath - A name of Ephraim and Ephreimites, 1 Samuel 1:1 1 Kings 11:26 Psalm 132:6
Kibzaim - ” One of the Levitical cities in the tribal territory of Ephraim also designated as a city of refuge (Joshua 21:22 )
Ezer - Son of Zabad, a descendant of Ephraim
Gath-Rimmon - A city in Dan, near Jebud and Bene-herak ( Joshua 19:45 ), assigned to the Kohathites ( Joshua 21:24 ), and reckoned ( 1 Chronicles 6:69 ) to Ephraim
Zereda - A place in Ephraim, in the plain of Jordan
Berechi'ah - (1 Chronicles 15:23 ) ...
One of the tribe of Ephraim in the time of Ahaz
Tribes, the Twelve - After Levi was separated for the priesthood, the number twelve was maintained by Ephraim and Manasseh being mentioned instead of Joseph. In Revelation 7 , where the tribes are sealed for blessing, Dan is omitted, as being a type of Antichrist: Ephraim is also omitted, the number being made up by inserting Levi and by Joseph being mentioned as well as Manasseh. 4 Judah...
2 Simeon 2 Simeon 2 Simeon 4 Judah 7 Gad 8 Asher 1 Reuben...
3 Levi 3 Levi 4 Judah 3 Levi 11a Manasseh 6 Naphtali 7 Gad...
4 Judah 4 Judah 9 Issachar 12 Benjamin 4 Judah 11a Manasseh 8 Asher...
5 Dan 10 Zebulun 10 Zebulun 11b Ephraim 11b Ephraim 11b Ephraim 6 Naphtali...
6 Naphtali 9 Issachar 11b Ephraim 11a Manasseh 12 Benjamin 1 Reuben 11a Manasseh...
7 Gad 5 Dan 11a Manasseh 10 Zebulun 2 Simeon 4 Judah 2 Simeon...
8 Asher 7 Gad 12 Benjamin 9 Issachar 10 Zebulun 12 Benjamin 3 Levi...
9 Issachar 8 Asher 5 Dan 7 Gad 9 Issachar 2 Simeon 9 Issachar...
10 Zebulun 6 Naphtali 8 Asher 5 Dan 8 Asher 9 Issachar 10 Zebulun...
11Joseph 11 Joseph 7 Gad 6 Naphtali 6 Naphtali 10 Zebulun 11 Joseph...
12 Benjamin 12 Benjamin 6 Naphtali 8 Asher 5 Dan 7 Gad 12 Benjamin...
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Asenath - Daughter of Potipherah, prince priest of On; Joseph's wife; mother of Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 41:50; Genesis 46:20). If it be the Hebrew name assumed on her conversion (as (See BITHIAH means "daughter of Jehovah") and union with Joseph, it may be from asan , "a storehouse," in allusion to Joseph's national service, and Ephraim's name meaning "fruitfulness". The marriage into this idolatrous family seems to have borne evil fruit afterward in the idolatry of Joseph's descendants, Ephraim, and the calf worship
Ephron - The city of Ephraim (2 Samuel 13:23 ; John 11:54 ) is probably the same city. Some would locate the city of Ephraim in the lower valley at ain Samieh, on the edge of the desert
Hoshea - The alliance did him no good; it was revealed to the court of Nineveh by the Assyrian party in Ephraim, and Hoshea was immediately seized as a rebellious vassal, shut up in prison, and apparently treated with the utmost Indignity. Son of Azaziah, 1 Chronicles 27:20; like his great namesake, a man of Ephraim, ruler of his tribe in the time of king David
Hoshe'a - The alliance did him no good; it was revealed, to the court of Nineveh by the Assyrian party in Ephraim, and Hoshea was immediately seized as a rebellious vasal, shut up in prison, and apparently treated with the utmost indignity. ...
Shon of Azaziah, (1 Chronicles 27:20 ) like his great namesake, a man of Ephraim, ruler of his tribe in the time of King David
Ephraim (6), Bishop of Antioch And Patriarch - Ephraim (6) ( Ephrem, Ephraemius, or, as Theophanes gives the name, Euphraimius ), bp. 525 and 526 by earthquake and conflagration, Ephraim was sent by Justin as commissioner to relieve the sufferers and restore the city. Ephraim examined synodically the tenets of Syncleticus, metropolitan of Tarsus, who was suspected of Eutychian leanings but was acquitted (Phot. In obedience to the emperor Justinian, Ephraim held a synod at Antioch, which repudiated the doctrines of Origen as heretical (Liberat
Israel, Kingdom of - It is sometimes called the Kingdom of Ephraim or the Northern Kingdom
Kingdom of Israel - It is sometimes called the Kingdom of Ephraim or the Northern Kingdom
Perizzites - They lived mainly in the hills of central Palestine and are found in Bible narratives concerning Bethel, Shechem and the tribal territory of Ephraim (Exodus 3:8; Genesis 34:26-30; Joshua 17:15)
Kanah - The name of a brook that forms part of the boundary between Ephraim and Manasseh (Joshua 16:8 ; Joshua 17:9 )
Sharon - ' It formed part of the lots of Ephraim and of Manasseh
Ebal - A mountain in the lot of Ephraim over against mount Gerizim
Samaritan - Pertaining to Samaria, the principal city of the ten tribes of Israel, belonging to the tribe of Ephraim, and after the captivity of those tribes, repeopled by Cuthites from Assyria or Chaldea
Azazi'ah - ) ...
The father of Hoshea, prince of the tribe of Ephraim when David numbered the people
Tap'Push - (Joshua 17:7 ) ("Around the city was a district called the land of Tappuah; the city belonged to Ephraim and the land to Manasseh
Lydda - A town in the tribe of Ephraim, mentioned only in the New Testament (Acts 9:32,35,38 ) as the scene of Peter's miracle in healing the paralytic AEneas
Ataroth - A place on the boundary of Ephraim and Manasseh (Joshua 16:2; Joshua 16:5; Joshua 16:7); possibly the same as ATAROTH ADDAR, on the W
Jehizkiah - Son of Shallun, a chief of Ephraim, in Ahaz's time
Mahaneh-Dan - A site west of Kiriath-jearim where the Danites camped on the way to the hill country of Ephraim (Judges 18:12 )
Zemaraim - Mountain in the territory of Ephraim where Abijah rebuked Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:4 )
Gezer - Gezer was in Ephraim; given to Kohath, Joshua 21:21; 1 Chronicles 6:67; noticed in the wars of David, 1 Samuel 27:8; 2 Samuel 5:25; 1 Chronicles 20:4; burned by Pharaoh in Solomon's days, 1 Kings 9:15-17; given to Solomon's Egyptian wife, and rebuilt by him; was an important city in the time of the Maccabees
am'Asa - (2 Samuel 20:10 ) ...
A prince of Ephraim, son of Hadlai, in the reign of Ahaz
Forest - Unable to rescue their portion from the hands of the Canaanites, the clans of Ephraim and Manasseh cleared the forests among the hills in their territory to provide room for settlement (Joshua 17:15-18 ). Forests also provided excellent staging areas for warfare, such as the rebellion of Absalom against David which ended with a battle in the forests of Ephraim (2 Samuel 18:6-8 )
Israelites - Ephraim, the leading tribe among the ten, seems to have shown an early spirit of rivalry towards Judah; Joshua had belonged to Ephraim, the ark had long rested within its borders at Shiloh, and Jeroboam was also an Ephraimite
Manasseh - When he and his brother Ephraim were boys, and Jacob, their grandfather, was about to die, Joseph took them into the patriarch's presence to receive his blessing. — The portion of the half-tribe of Manasseh on the west of the Jordan extended from the Mediterranean to the Jordan, and lay between Asher and Issachar on the north and Ephraim on the south. The dominant position of Ephraim seems to have obscured the power of Manasseh, and this portion of their country is frequently joined with Ephraim in the biblical allusions
Hill - In Deuteronomy 1:7 , Joshua 9:1 ; 10:40 ; 11:16 , it denotes the elevated district of Judah, Benjamin, and Ephraim, which forms the watershed between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea
Dan Name - ...
(2) One of the twelve tribes of Israel; its territory lay southwest of Ephraim
Shamir - Home of Tola, the judge from the tribe of Issachar, in mount Ephraim (Judges 10:1 )
Judea - The province of Judea, as distinguished from Galilee and Samaria, included the territories of the tribes of Judah, Benjamin, Dan, Simeon, and part of Ephraim
Beriah - Son of Ephraim, begotten in the days of mourning occasioned by the death of Ephraim’s four sons, who were killed by the men of Gath whilst cattle-raiding; hence the false etymology, bera‘ah = ‘in affliction’ ( 1 Chronicles 7:23 )
Ataroth - Village on border of Benjamin and Ephraim (Joshua 16:2 ,Joshua 16:2,16:7 ) It may be modern Khirbet el-Oga in the Jordan Valley
Gathrimmon - In 1 Chronicles 6:69 there is also a Gath-rimmon given to the Levites, situate in the tribe of Ephraim; but this does not agree with Joshua, and by comparing the two lists, this appears to be the same as No
na'Ioth - (habitations ), or more fully, "Naioth in Ramah," a place of Mount Ephraim, the birthplace of Samuel and Saul, and in which Samuel and David took refuge together after the latter had made his escape from the jealous fury of Saul
Deb'Orah - ) She lived under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in Mount Ephraim, (Judges 4:5 ) which, as palm trees were rare in Palestine, "is mentioned as a well-known and solitary landmark. " She was probably a woman of Ephraim
Ephraim - EPHRAIM. After the raising of Lazarus, Jesus departed, in consequence of the plots of the chief priests against Him, ‘unto a country ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘into the country’) near to the wilderness, into a city called Ephraim, and there continued with his disciples. ‘Ephraim’ by J. and then allegorizes: Ephraim, according to Genesis 41:51 f
Zichri - A mighty man of Ephraim ( 2 Chronicles 28:7 )
Ephraim - The intention of Joseph was that the right hand of the aged patriarch should be placed on the head of the elder of the two; but Jacob set Ephraim the younger before his brother, "guiding his hands wittingly. " Before Joseph's death, Ephraim's family had reached the third generation (Genesis 50:23 )
Tappuah - City of the north border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:8 ) whose environs were allotted to Manasseh (Joshua 17:7-8 ), likely the Tappuah of Joshua 12:17 and 2 Kings 15:16
Helez - ’ The former reading is further inconsistent with 1 Chronicles 27:10 , where Helez is expressly designated as ‘of the children of Ephraim
Taanath Shiloh - On the border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:6); "the approach of Shiloh", (Gesenius), "the futurity of Shiloh" (Kurtz)
Amasa - He commanded the army of the rebel Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:25 ); but was completely routed by Joab in the forest of Ephraim ( 2 Samuel 18:6-8 ). An Ephraimite who opposed the bringing into Samaria of the Jewish prisoners, whom Pekah, king of Israel, had taken in his campaign against Ahaz ( 2 Chronicles 28:12 )
Girzites - border of Ephraim ( Joshua 10:33 ; Joshua 16:3 ; Joshua 16:10 , Judges 1:29 )
Rachel - Matthew 2:18 , have put Rachel for the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh, the children of Joseph, the son of Rachel
Asher - A place on the boundary between Ephraim and Manasseh
Samuel, Judge - He was born at Ramatha in the mountains of Ephraim, c
Ehud - On being left alone with the king, Ehud plunges his sword into the body of Eglon, and makes good his escape into the hill-country of Ephraim
Manasseh - This was divided in the promised land: one part having settled east of the Jordan, in the country of Bashan, from the river Jabbok northwards; and the other west of the Jordan, between Ephraim and Issachar, extending from the Jordan to the Mediterranean. It was far inferior to Ephraim in wealth and power, according to the prediction of Jacob, Genesis 41:50,51 48:1-22 Joshua 16:10
Isaacus Antiochenus, a Priest of Antioch in Syria - Ephraim, not (as Cave) Ephraim himself. Ephraim, and included amongst his works in the Roman edition. Ephraim (200)
Ophrah -
A city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:23 ); probably identical with Ephron (2 Chronicles 13:19 ) and Ephraim (John 11:54 )
Hosea - "His Israelitish origin is attested by the peculiar, rough, Aramaizing diction, pointing to the northern part of Palestine; by the intimate acquaintance he evinces with the localities of Ephraim (5:1; 6:8,9; 12:12; 14:6, etc
Ephraim, Forest of - The difficulty arises since the tribal allotment for Ephraim was west of the Jordan. Joshua 17:14-18 predicts Ephraim's expansion north into the wooded Jezreel valley and the vicinity of Beth Shan, both within Issachar's territory
Mountain - "Mount Ephraim" is Ephraim's hilly country (2 Chronicles 15:8)
Beriah - Son of Ephraim born after his sons Ezer and Elead died in battle against Gath
Elishama - Son of Ammihud and grandfather of Joshua: he was a chief of Ephraim
Issachar - Their portion, having the Jordan on the east, Manasseh on the west, Zebulun north, and Ephraim south, included a considerable part of the fine plain Esdraelon, the most fertile in the country
Hills - " The "country of the hills," in (1:7; Joshua 9:1 ; 10:40 ; 11:16 ) is the elevated district of Judah, Benjamin and Ephraim, which is correctly called "the mountain" in the earliest descriptions of Palestine, (Numbers 13:29 ) and in many subsequent passages
Forest - "The wood of Ephraim" clothed the sides of the hills which descend to the plain of Jezreel and the plain itself near Bethshah (Joshua 17:15-18), and extended once to Tabor which still has many forest trees. Ephraim wood, a portion of the region E. (See Ephraim WOOD
Bethhoron - On the road from Gibeon (now el Jib) to Azekah and the Philistine plain (Joshua 10:10-11; Joshua 16:3; Joshua 16:5; Joshua 18:13-14), on the boundary between Benjamin and Ephraim, but counted to the latter and given to the Kohathites (Joshua 21:22). Sherah, a granddaughter or descendant of Ephraim, built (i
Forest - The wood of Ephraim in which Absalom was slain, on the east of the Jordan. It has been suggested that the pride and defeat of Ephraim mentioned in Judges 12:1-6 caused some forest to be called after the name of that tribe
Benjamin, Tribe of - Moses pronounced a special blessing upon this tribe (Deuteronomy 33), which at the division of the territory of Chanaan under Josue, obtained its share between the frontiers of Ephraim, Dan, and Juda (Joshua 18)
Janoah - Town in tribal territory of Ephraim (Joshua 16:6-7 )
Kanah -
A stream forming the boundary between Ephraim and Manasseh, from the Mediterranean eastward to Tappuah (Joshua 16:8 )
Heart - See Jeremiah 17:9; Hosea 7:11, "Ephraim is like a silly dove without heart," i
Gibeath - ( b ) Gibeath-Phinehas , in Mount Ephraim, where Eleazar was buried ( Joshua 24:33 ); site unknown
Gerizim - (See Deuteronomy 27:1-26, throughout; Joshua 8:30-35) Both those mountains were near Shechem in Ephraim, a province of Samaria
Ajalon Aijalon - It was in the lot of Dan, Joshua 21:24 ; but being a border city it is also connected with Benjamin, 1 Chronicles 8:13 ; or with Ephraim, 1 Chronicles 6:69 ; or with Judah and Benjamin, when Rehohoam fortified the city
a'Mos - ( Amos 1:1 ; 7:14,15 ) He travelled from Judah into the northern kingdom of Israel or Ephraim, and there exercised his ministry, apparently not for any long time
Abdon - The tenth judge of Israel, Judges 12:13; Judges 12:15, probably the same as Bedan, 1 Samuel 12:11, son of Hillel, of the tribe of Ephraim
Tribe of Benjamin - Moses pronounced a special blessing upon this tribe (Deuteronomy 33), which at the division of the territory of Chanaan under Josue, obtained its share between the frontiers of Ephraim, Dan, and Juda (Joshua 18)
Elish'Ama -
The "prince" or "captain" of the tribe of Ephraim in the wilderness of Sinai
Sama'Ria, Country of - It is evident from an occurrence in Hezekiah's reign that just before the deposition and death of Hoshea, the last king of Israel, the authority of the king of Judah, or at least his influence, was recognized by portions of Asher, Issachar and Zebulun and even of Ephraim and Manasseh. Thus it comprehended the ancient territory of Ephraim and that of Manasseh west of Jordan
Amasa - Defeated in the wood of Ephraim by Joab (2 Samuel 18). A prince of Ephraim, son of Hadlai, who, at the prophet Oded's command from God, opposed the detention of the Jews taken captive by Pekah of Israel from Ahaz of Judah (2 Chronicles 28:12)
Jephthah - The men of Ephraim regarded themselves as insulted in not having been called by Jephthah to go with him to war against Ammon. This led to a war between the men of Gilead and Ephraim (12:4), in which many of the Ephraimites perished
Gezer, Gezrites - It was taken by Joshua, and allotted to Ephraim, and afterwards to the Kohathites, 1 Chronicles 6:67 ; 1 Chronicles 7:28 ; but the ancient inhabitants held possession
Ammihud - Father of Elishama, who represented the tribe of Ephraim to help Moses during the wilderness wandering (Numbers 1:10 )
Ebal, Mount - Mountain in Ephraim from which were proclaimed the curses that would fall upon Israel if they disobeyed the Lord
Amasa - A chief of Ephraim, who opposed retaining as bondsmen the men of Judah taken captive in a war with Pekah king of Israel, 2 Chronicles 28:12
Hoshea - The ruler of Ephraim in David's time
Gath-Rimmon - 1 Chronicles 6:69 lists Gath-rimmon in the tribe of Ephraim, but this is usually understood as a copyist's omission of a sentence at the beginning of 1 Chronicles 6:69
Berechiah - A leader of the tribe of Ephraim who rescued prisoners of war Pekah, king of Israel (752-732), had taken from Ahaz, king of Judah (735-715) (2 Chronicles 28:12 )
Ophrah - (See EPHRON; Ephraim
Asenath - Daughter of Poti-phera, priest of On, wife of Joseph and mother of Ephraim and Manasseh ( Genesis 41:45 ; Genesis 41:50 ; Genesis 46:20 )
Zichri - A mighty man of Ephraim who slew Maaseiah son of king Ahaz, and Azrikam, and Elkanah
Rachel - The prophecy, Jeremiah 31:15 , representing her as mourning over her posterity, the tribes of Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin, is quoted in Matthew 2:18 , in reference to the massacre at Bethlehem, in which undoubtedly many of her descendants suffered
Ger'Izim - (cutters ), a limestone mountain, 2855 feet high (800 feet above the valley at its foot), in Ephraim, near Shechem (Sychar), from which the blessings were read to the Israelites on entering Canaan
Cities of Refuge, - (1 Chronicles 6:76 ) ...
SHECHEM , in Mount Ephraim
Isaacus Senior, Disciple of Ephraim the Syrian - Isaacus (29) Senior, mentioned in an anonymous Life of Ephraim the Syrian among the more distinguished disciples of Ephraim who were also Syriac writers
Manasseh - When Jacob blessed the two sons of Joseph he crossed his hands so that Ephraim the younger son should have the chief blessing. And when Moses blessed the twelve tribes he spoke of the ten thousands of Ephraim, but the thousands of Manasseh. Those on the east of the Jordan are often called the half-tribe of Manasseh; the other half were on the west of the Jordan, about the centre of the land, between Ephraim and Issachar. In Psalm 80:2 we read, "Before Ephraim and Benjamin and Manasseh stir up thy strength, and come and save us," in allusion to these three being the tribes that immediately followed the ark of God in the wilderness
Joseph the Son of Jacob - He married an Egyptian and they produced two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:47-52). ...
Later events...
Before Jacob died, he raised the two sons of Joseph, Manasseh and Ephraim, to equal status with the brothers of Joseph. Manasseh and Ephraim would therefore become heads of tribes in Israel. His descendants buried his bones at Shechem, in the tribal area of Ephraim (Joshua 24:32)
Ophrah - Some suppose it is identical with Ephrain or Ephron, 2 Chronicles 13:19, and with the city of Ephraim, to which our Lord retired after raising Lazarus
Maaseiah - King Ahaz's son, slain by Zichri the "mighty man" of Ephraim in Pekah's invasion of Judah (2 Chronicles 28:7), connected officially with the "governor of the city" (2 Chronicles 18:25; 1 Kings 22:26)
Hill - "The hills," Deuteronomy 1:7; Joshua 9:1, is the mountain district of Judah, Benjamin, and Ephraim (Numbers 13:29)
Hur - Ben-hur, or 'son of Hur,' commissariat officer of Solomon in mount Ephraim
Ephraim - Israel as "Ephraim" is pictured as "a cake not turned
Abdon - A judge of Israel from the town of Pirathon in the tribe of Ephraim
Ophrah - This Ophrah is perhaps identical with Ephron (2 Chronicles 13:19 ) and Ephraim (2 Samuel 13:23 ; John 11:54 )
Beth-Horon - Beth-horon stood on the confines of Ephraim and Benjamin; which, according to the learned traveller, exactly answers to the situation of Bethoor
Samaria - (Hebrew: Somron, from Semer, name of the owner of the hill on which the city was built) ...
City in Ephraim, Palestine, capital of the kingdom of Israel since c
Arimathea, or Ramah - It has been supposed to be the same place as the Ramah of Mount Ephraim, the birthplace and residence of Samuel
Joseph - (Hebrew: may God add) ...
Patriarch, eleventh son of Jacob, first-born of Rachel, immediate ancestor of the tribes of Manasses and Ephraim
Micah - A shortened form of Micaiah, who is like Jehovah?
A man of Mount Ephraim, whose history so far is introduced in Judges 17 , apparently for the purpose of leading to an account of the settlement of the tribe of Dan in Northern Palestine, and for the purpose also of illustrating the lawlessness of the times in which he lived (Judges 18 ; 19:1-29 ; 21:25 )
Timnath-Serah - Remaining portion, the city of Joshua in the hill country of Ephraim, the same as Timnath-heres (Joshua 19:50 ; 24:30 )
Oreb And Zeeb - ’ Associated with the invasion put down by Gideon, these two princes were killed by the men of Ephraim, who rose at Gideon’s suggestion and intercepted the princes and their followers at the river Jordan
Tim'Nath-se'Rah - (Joshua 24:30 ) It is specified as "in Mount Ephraim on the north side of Mount Gaash
Timnath Heres - In Mount Ephraim on the N
Jareb - "Ephraim went to the Assyrian and (Judah) sent to king Jareb," "the calf shall be carried into Assyria
Micah - An idolater in Mount Ephraim
Elishama - A prince of the tribe of Ephraim at the census in the wilderness, son of Ammihud and grandfather of Joshua ( Numbers 1:10 ; Numbers 2:18 , 1 Chronicles 7:26 )
Aijalon - Fortified by Rehoboam of Judah, in his war with Israel, the northern kingdom, though sometimes, as being a border city, mentioned as in Ephraim (2 Chronicles 11:10; 2 Chronicles 28:18)
Hosea - Before the coming of the Messiah there was probably no more Christ-like teacher than the prophet of Mount Ephraim, who provided our Lord with His favourite quotation, ‘I will have mercy [1] and not sacrifice’; and it is evident that his prevision of a new covenant, linking Divine and human love in everlasting bonds, was scarcely less precious to the Apostle of the Gentiles than to the Saviour of the world
Ramah - It is said that its situation was in Mount Ephraim, 1 Samuel 1:1, a district without defined boundaries
Ebal - Deuteronomy 27:1-28:68 ; a mountain in Ephraim, over against mount Gerizim, from which it is separated by a valley about five hundred yards wide and three miles long, in which stands the town of Shechem
Luz - The most probable conclusion is that the two places were, during the times preceding the conquest, distinct, Luz being the city and Bethel the pillar and altar of Jacob that after the destruction of Luz by the tribe of Ephraim the town of Bethel arose
Allotment - Ephraim lay just north of Dan and Benjamin, bordered on the east by the Jordan and on the north by the brook Kanah. The second half of Manasseh lay north of Dan and Ephraim, extending from the Jordan to the Mediterranean
Benjamin - " So in the blessings of Psalm 68:27 Benjamin is the first named of the four tribes; and in Psalm 80:2 , where God is called upon to save them, Benjamin is mentioned with Ephraim and Manasseh, being the three tribes which followed the ark. ...
The tribe did not drive out the Jebusites, but allowed them to dwell with them in Jerusalem, Judges 1:21 ; this may have led to their idolatry, for when, with Judah and Ephraim, they were attacked by the children of Ammon, they confessed they had forsaken God and served Baalim. It was situated with Ephraim on its north, and Judah on its south, Dan on its west, and the Jordan on its east; it occupied about 28 miles east and west and 14 miles north and south at its widest parts
Benjamin - " So in the blessings of Psalm 68:27 Benjamin is the first named of the four tribes; and in Psalm 80:2 , where God is called upon to save them, Benjamin is mentioned with Ephraim and Manasseh, being the three tribes which followed the ark. ...
The tribe did not drive out the Jebusites, but allowed them to dwell with them in Jerusalem, Judges 1:21 ; this may have led to their idolatry, for when, with Judah and Ephraim, they were attacked by the children of Ammon, they confessed they had forsaken God and served Baalim. It was situated with Ephraim on its north, and Judah on its south, Dan on its west, and the Jordan on its east; it occupied about 28 miles east and west and 14 miles north and south at its widest parts
Camp - ...
WEST...
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| CAMP OF Ephraim, |...
| 108,100. |...
| MANASSEH , BENJAMIN, |...
| 32,200 35,400 |...
| Ephraim, |...
| 40,500. In Psalm 80:2 we read "Before Ephraim, and Benjamin, and Manasseh, stir upthy strength, and come and save us. ...
JUDAH, with Issachar and Zebulun, ...
The GERSHONITES and the MERARITES with the Tabernacle, ...
REUBEN, with Simeon and Gad, ...
The KOHATHITES with the 'sanctuary,' ...
Ephraim, with Manasseh and Benjamin, ...
DAN, with Asher and Naphtali
Tribes of Israel, the - Rachel's sons were Joseph (Genesis 30:22-24 ), who became the father of Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 41:50-52 ), and Benjamin (Genesis 35:16-18 ). Two of the tribes of Israel came from Joseph, namely, Ephraim and Manasseh . Ephraim and Manasseh were adopted by Jacob and therefore each became the father of a tribe in Israel (Genesis 48:8-20 ). While Manasseh was the older of the two, Jacob gave preference to Ephraim (Genesis 48:14 ; compare Deuteronomy 33:17 ). The Blessing of Jacob (Genesis 49:22-26 ) mentions only Joseph; the Blessing of Moses (Deuteronomy 33:13-17 ) begins with Joseph and notes Ephriam and Manasseh, the song of Deborah (Judges 5:14 ) speaks of Ephraim and Machir. Ephraim occupied a major portion of the central hill country with Manasseh during the tribal period. Ephraim's territory consisted of the region just north of Dan and Benjamin and ran from the Jordan River on the east to the Mediterranean Sea on the west. That Ephraim played a major leadership role among the tribes is reflected in the tribal history. Joshua, one of the twelve spies and a member of the tribe of Ephraim, became the successor of Moses ( Numbers 13:8 ,Numbers 13:8,13:16 ; Joshua 1:1-11 ). Ephraim demanded leadership in the period of the judges (Judges 3:27 ; Judges 4:5 ; Judges 7:24 ; Judges 8:1 ; Judges 10:1 ; Judges 12:1-6 ; Judges 17:1 ; Judges 18:2 ,Judges 18:2,18:13 ; Judges 19:1 ). Shiloh, located in the territory of the tribe of Ephraim, became the major center of worship during the tribal period (Joshua 18:1 ; 1 Samuel 1:1-18 ). Samuel, the leader of the tribes (1 Samuel 7:15-17 ) near the end of the period of the Judges and just prior to the beginning of the kinship, came from Ephraim (1 Samuel 1:1-20 ). ...
Ephraim's influence is seen not only during the tribal period, but in Israel's later history as well. , it was an Ephraimite named Jeroboam who led the northern tribes in their plea for leniency (1 Kings 12:1-5 ). Ephraim's influence is seen also during the time of the prophets. For instance, Hosea refers to Israel some three dozen times using the name Ephraim as being synonymous with Israel. Manasseh's territory west of the Jordan was located north of Ephraim. Therefore, the tribes of Benjamin, Ephraim, and Manasseh formed a special group. Benjamin's tribal territory was a small area west of the Jordan, sandwiched between Ephraim to the north and Judah to the south (Joshua 18:11-28 ). The tribe of Dan originally occupied the territory just west of Benjamin with Ephraim on the north and Judah and the Philistines on the south (Joshua 19:40-48 )
Heifer - Hosea 10:11 pictures obedient Ephraim as a trained heifer
Jokmeam - City of the Levites from tribe of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 6:68 ), either omitted in list in Joshua 21:22 or to be equated with Kibzaim there
Ramathaim-Zophim - One of the Levitical families descended from Kohath, that of Zuph or Zophai (1 Chronicles 6:26,35 ), had a district assigned to them in Ephraim, which from this circumstance was called "the land of Zuph," and hence the name of the town, "Zophim
Michmash - ” City in Benjamin about seven miles northeast of Jerusalem, four and a half miles northeast of Gibeah, rising 1980 feet above sea level overlooking a pass going from the Jordan River to Ephraim
Tirzah - A city in the land of Judaea, belonging to Ephraim, and from the days of Jeroboam, King of Israel, to the reign of Omri, Tirzah was the royal city and the King's residence
Birth-Right - He forfeited his birth-right for defiling his father's bed, and it was given to Joseph, who in Ephraim and Manasseh had a double portion among the tribes
Benjamin - During the march its place was along with Manasseh and Ephraim on the west of the tabernacle. ...
The inheritance of this tribe lay immediately to the south of that of Ephraim, and was about 26 miles in length and 12 in breadth
ab'Salom - He brooded over the wrong for two years, and then invited all the princes to a sheep-shearing feast at his estate in Baalhazor, on the borders of Ephraim and Benjamin. A decisive battle was fought in Gilead, in the wood of Ephraim
Josh'ua -
The son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim. Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim was assigned as Joshua's peculiar inheritance
Bethel - When Canaan was divided among Israel’s tribes, Bethel was on the border between Ephraim and Benjamin. It was allotted to Benjamin, but was occupied by Ephraim (Joshua 8:9; Joshua 16:1; Joshua 18:11-13; Joshua 18:21-22; Judges 1:23; 1 Chronicles 7:20; 1 Chronicles 7:28; for map see BENJAMIN)
Encampment - ...
Thus there were four standards, one for each "camp" of three tribes: according to tradition the four cherubic forms, the lion (Judah, Genesis 49:9; Revelation 5:5), the ox (Ephraim, Deuteronomy 33:17), the man, and the eagle (Ezekiel 1:26; Ezekiel 10:1; Revelation 4:4, etc. Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin, Rachel's descendants, formed the third camp. , represents Judah taking the lead in the march out of the wilderness of Sinai, Reuben was next, Ephraim was next, and Dan was rearward
Abdon (1) - Son of Hillel, of the tribe of Ephraim
Elishama - Leader of the tribe of Ephraim under Moses in the wilderness (Numbers 1:10 )
Oreb - Slain upon the rock Oreb in the pursuit after the battle, by the men of Ephraim, who intercepted and slew with great slaughter the Midianites after the Jordan fords
Timnath-Serah - The city in Mount Ephraim given to Joshua ( Joshua 19:50 ), where he was buried ( Joshua 24:30 ), lying on the N
Elkanah - Lived at Ramathaim Zophim, or Ramah, in mount Ephraim. King Ahaz' officer next to himself, slain by Zichri, a mighty Ephraimite, at Pekah's invasion (2 Chronicles 28:7)
Beersheba - The kingdom of the ten tribes extended from Beersheba to Mount Ephraim (2 Chronicles 19:4 )
Unicorn - In Deuteronomy 33:17, "his (Joseph's) horns are like the horns of an unicorn" (so margin rightly, not "unicorns"); "the ten thousands of Ephraim and the thousands of Manasseh," two tribes sprung from the one Joseph, are the two horns from one head
Benaiah - Ephraim ( 2 Samuel 23:30 , cf. 1 Chronicles 27:14 assigns to him the command of the course for the eleventh month, with twenty-four thousand Ephraimites under him
Hoshea - Son of Azaziah and a chief of the tribe of Ephraim
Aij'Alon - with 1 Chronicles 6:66 As in Ephraim and sometimes, ( 2 Chronicles 11:10 ; 1 Samuel 14:31 ) as in Judah and Benjamin
Gibeah - In mount Ephraim, called Gibeah of Phinehas, where Eleazar the son of Aaron was buried, Joshua 24:33
Hup'Pim - ) ...
The "son of Hur" --Ben-Hur --was commissariat officer for Solomon in Mount Ephraim
Adoption - Jacob's adoption of his two grandsons, Ephraim and Manasseh, Genesis 48:5 , was a kind of substitution, whereby he intended that these his grandson should have each his lot in Israel, as if they had been his own sons: "Ephraim and Manasseh are mine; as Reuben and Simeon, they shall be mine
Jesuits - ' And so here the Jesuits, yea, and priests too, for they are all joined in the tails, like Samson's foxes: Ephraim against Manasseh, and Manasseh against Ephraim, and both against Judah
Amasa - Leader in tribe of Ephraim who prevented Israel's soldiers from keeping captives of the army of King Ahaz of Judah, knowing this was a sin (2 Chronicles 28:12-14 )
Shiloh - Shiloh, a place of rest, a city of Ephraim, "on the north side of Bethel," from which it is distant 10 miles (Judges 21:19 ); the modern Seilun (the Arabic for Shiloh), a "mass of shapeless ruins
Kohath - Their inheritance was in Manasseh, Ephraim, and Dan (1 Chronicles 6:61-70; Joshua 21:5; Joshua 21:20-26)
Tempest - ...
Isaiah 28:2 (b) This is descriptive of the devastation that would be wrought upon Ephraim by the invasion of the enemy
Suburbs - It denotes the untilled ground outside a city or the “pasture land” belonging to the cities: “For the children of Joseph were two tribes, Manasseh and Ephraim: therefore they gave no part unto the Levites in the land, save cities to dwell in, with their suburbs for their cattle and for their substance” ( Ramah - City of Ephraim, where Samuel the prophet dwelt
Joshua - The son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim. Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim was assigned as Joshua's peculiar inheritance
Jephthah, Jephthae - ...
The men of Ephraim then gathered themselves together and complained that Jephthah had not called them to the war, beginning a quarrel, which ended with the death of 42,000 of the Ephraimites. ' Jephthah suffered severely through his rash vow, and he had not wisdom and humility to appease the anger of Ephraim
Manasseh - He and his brother Ephraim were afterwards adopted by Jacob as his own sons (48:1). The tribe of Manasseh was associated with that of Ephraim and Benjamin during the wanderings in the wilderness. ) ...
On the west of Jordan the other half of the tribe of Manasseh was associated with Ephraim, and they had their portion in the very centre of Palestine, an area of about 1,300 square miles, the most valuable part of the whole country, abounding in springs of water. Manasseh's portion was immediately to the north of that of Ephraim ( Joshua 16 )
Rachel - border of Benjamin towards Ephraim, about ten miles N
Beth-Horon - House of the hollow, or of the cavern, the name of two towns or villages (2 Chronicles 8:5 ; 1 Chronicles 7:24 ) in the territory of Ephraim, on the way from Jerusalem to Joppa
Dothan - The importance of Dothan was its placement upon the roads in the hill country of Ephraim and the resulting commercial trade
Hill, Hill-Country - The best-known har or hill-country in Palestine is the ‘hill-country of Ephraim,’ but besides this we hear of the ‘hill-country of Judah’ ( e
Giants - A valley near Jerusalem (Joshua 15:8 ; Joshua 18:16 ) and part of the wooded country in the tribal territory of Ephraim (Joshua 17:15 ) retained their name
Beth-Horon - The Beth-horons were on the frontier between Benjamin and Ephraim ( Joshua 16:3-5 ; Joshua 18:13-14 )
Gaza - City of Ephraim, 1 Chronicles 7:28 ; but here many MSS read Ayyah
Arimathaea - of Jerusalem are not ‘in the hill-country of Ephraim’ (1 Samuel 1:1)
Camp And Encamp - The tribes of Joseph's house lay to the west—Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin
Gilgal - And perhaps a third in the mountains of Ephraim, north of Bethel, Deuteronomy 11:30 2 Kings 2:1-6
Tribe - But this patriarch on his death-bed adopted Ephraim and Manasseh, the two sons of Joseph, and would have them also to constitute two tribes in Israel, Genesis 48:5
Bowels - " (Genesis 43:30) And the Lord himself is represented as expressing his tenderness for Ephraim raider the same similitude; "Is Ephraim my dear son? is he a pleasant child? for since I spake against him, I do earnestly remember him still; therefore, my bowels are troubled for him
Ramah - The principal Ramah was a city of Benjamin, near Gibeah, towards the mountains of Ephraim, six miles from Jerusalem north, and on the road from Samaria to Jerusalem, Joshua 18:25 Judges 19:13 Nehemiah 11:33 . A city in mount Ephraim, called also Ramathaim-Zophim, or Ramah of the Zuphites, the place of Samuel's birth, residence, and burial, 1 Samuel 1:1,19 7:17 8:4 25:1 28:3
Hosea - In Hosea 4:17 , as elsewhere, Israel is called Ephraim, that being the chief of the ten tribes. Ephraim, instead of turning to Jehovah in his sickness, had sought the Assyrian — a king who could not cure them. Ephraim will say, "What have I to do any more with idols?" God's answer, "I have heard him and observed him. " Again Ephraim says, "I am like a green fir tree;" and the answer is, "From me is thy fruit found
Tribes of Israel - 146) correctly remarks, several of the largest tribes Judah, Ephraim, Manasseh, Gad contained many minor tribes which surpassed in number, possessions, and political significance several of those counted in the twelve tribes. ]'>[2] ’s genealogy (Genesis 29:1-35 ; Genesis 30:1-43 ), is not 12 but 13, and in the following order:...
Leah tribes Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah 4 Bilhah (Rachel) tribes Dan, Naphtali 2 Zilpah (Leah) tribes Gad, Asher 2 Leah tribes Issachar, Zebulun 2 Rachel tribes Joseph = (Manasseh, Ephraim) 2 Benjamin (born in Palestine), Genesis 35:18 1 13 To obtain the number 12 from this scheme it is necessary to omit Levi, or to count Manasseh and Ephraim as one
Jericho - After the raising of Lazarus, Jesus and His disciples withdrew ‘into a city called Ephraim’ (John 11:54). Ephraim). ‘Jericho, ‘Ephraim,’ ‘Bethabara’; Farrar, Life of Christ, ii
Jericho - After the raising of Lazarus, Jesus and His disciples withdrew ‘into a city called Ephraim’ (John 11:54). Ephraim). ‘Jericho, ‘Ephraim,’ ‘Bethabara’; Farrar, Life of Christ, ii
Moth - The minute wasting of garments, stored up as they are in the East as wealth, by the larva which forms its own case out of the cloth material on which it feeds, is the chief point of similitude (Matthew 6:19-20; James 5:2); Hosea 5:12, "I will be unto Ephraim as a moth," gradually, silently, and surely consuming the nation's substance (Isaiah 50:9; Isaiah 51:8)
Oded - Certain chiefs of Ephraim, touched by his appeal, said, "ye shall not bring in the captives here," etc
Oil - The Prophet Hosea thus upbraids his degenerate nation with the servility and folly, of their conduct: "Ephraim feedeth on wind, and followeth after the east wind; he daily increaseth falsehood and vanity; and a league is made with Assyria, and oil carried into Egypt," Hosea 12:1
Shiloh - A famous city of Ephraim, about ten miles south of Shechem, and twenty-four north of Jerusalem
Gerizim - A mountain in Ephraim, between which and Ebal lay the city of Shechem, Judges 9:7
Judah - Judah-when named in contradistinction to Israel, Ephraim, the kingdom of the ten tribes, or Samaria-denotes the kingdom of Judah, and of David's descendants
Jephthah - ...
When Jephthah attacked the enemy, he did not invite soldiers from the tribe of Ephraim to join in the main battle. The Ephraimites were offended and threatened him with violence. He launched a furious attack and slaughtered the Ephraimites in thousands (Judges 12:1-6)
Joshua - The son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, the successor of Moses as the leader of Israel. Having thus subdued the Canaanites, Joshua divided the land among the tribes, Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim being assigned to himself as his own inheritance
Rama - Contracted from Ramathaim Zophim, in Mount Ephraim (which included under its name the northern parts of Benjamin, Bethel, and Ataroth: 2 Chronicles 13:19; 2 Chronicles 15:8; Judges 4:5; 1 Samuel 1:1). The city where Samuel anointed Saul (1 Samuel 9-10) was probably not Samuel's own city Rama, for the city of Saul's anointing was near Rachel's sepulchre adjoining Bethlehem (1 Samuel 10:2), whereas Mount Ephraim wherein was Ramathaim Zophim did not reach so far S
Abijah - His speech on mount Zemaraim in mount Ephraim, before the battle, urged on Jeroboam the justice of his cause, that God had given the kingdom to David and his sons forever "by a covenant of salt," and that Judah had the regular temple service and priesthood, whereas Israel had made golden calves their idols, and had cast out the priests; therefore "fight not ye against the Lord God of your fathers, for ye shall not prosper" (2 Chronicles 13). ...
Judah's appeal to God, in a crisis of the battle, when the enemy by an ambushment was both before and behind them, brought victory to their side; they took also Bethel, Jeshanah, and Ephraim
Benjamin - the southern portion of Ephraim. The two names may point to the union of two related tribes, and the persistence of the traditions that Benjamin was the full brother of Joseph, whereas the other Joseph tribes (Manasseh and Ephraim) are called sons, would indicate not only a close relationship to Joseph, but also a comparatively early development into an independent tribe. Within it lay Bethel (elsewhere assigned to Ephraim), Ophrah, Geba, Gibeon, Ramab, Mizpeh, Gibeah, all primitive seats of Canaanitish worship and important centres in the cultus of Israel (cf
Rama - ), a town of Mount Ephraim (1 Samuel 1:1,19 )
Banner - When the Israelites left Sinai for the land of Canaan, they marched under the banner of four major tribes: Judah, Reuben, Ephraim, and Dan (Numbers 10:1 )
Judah - The tribe of Judah was always large and prominent, vying with Ephraim for the supremacy
Bethel - House of God, the name of a city west of Hai, on the confines of the tribes of Ephraim and Benjamin, Genesis 12:8 28:10-22 , and occupying the spot where Jacob slept and had his memorable dream, the name he then gave it superseding the old name Luz, Judges 1:23 . The Ephraimites, however, expelled the Canaanites, Judges 1:22-26
Imposition of Hands - Thus Jacob blessed Ephraim and Manasses, not as a parentonly, but as a prophet
Gilgal - ...
...
A place, probably in the hill country of Ephraim, where there was a school of the prophets (2 Kings 4:38 ), and whence Elijah and Elisha, who resided here, "went down" to Bethel (2:1,2)
Zion - 178) takes Zion for a district name, like "Mount Ephraim
Shallum - Father of Jehizkiah, one of the 'heads' of Ephraim
Phin'Ehas - (Joshua 22:13-32 ) In the partition of the country he received an allotment of his own --a hill on Mount Ephraim which bore his name
Judea - On the return from Babylon the Jews, besides Judah, included large portions of Benjamin, Levi, Ephraim, and Manasseh (Ezra 1:5; Ezra 10:5-9; Nehemiah 11:4-36; 1 Chronicles 9:3; "Israel," Ezra 2:70; Ezra 2:59; Ezra 3:1; Ezra 10:5; Nehemiah 7:73), and many whose pedigree could not be found
Deborah - She held court at “the palm tree of Deborah,” in the southern part of the territory of Ephraim, between Ramah and Bethel (Judges 4:4-5 )
Abner - Among the other tribes there was a feeling of hostility to Judah; and Abner, at the head of Ephraim, fostered this hostility in the interest of the house of Saul, whose son Ish-bosheth he caused to be proclaimed king (2Samuel 2:8)
Becher - However, among the Ephraimites occur "the Bachrites of Becher" (Numbers 26:35). In a border raid on cattle (1 Chronicles 7:21) the Ephraimites had been slain by the men of Gath who invaded Goshen; thus Ephraimite heiresses, for lack of Ephraimite husbands, would marry into other tribes. ...
Becher, or his heir, would marry one, and so be reckoned among the Ephraimites instead of in Benjamin. Son of Ephraim (Numbers 26:35)
Mahanaim - ...
Here Abner fixed the seat of Ishbosheth's kingdom, being unable to wrest the towns of Ephraim or Benjamin from the Philistines (2 Samuel 2:8-9)
Reuben - This meant that Joseph received the right to have two tribes (which were descended from his sons, Ephraim and Manasseh) (Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:3-4; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2)
Galilee - ” The northern part of Palestine above the hill country of Ephraim and the hill country of Judah (Joshua 20:7 )
Unicorn, - " The two horns of the ram are "the ten thousands of Ephraim and the thousands of Manasseh
Eglon - Ehud retired to Seirath, in Mount Ephraim, and summoning by trumpet Israel from the E
Javan - God in retribution for the enslaving of Judah's children (Zechariah 9:13) declares He will fill His bow with Judah and Ephraim as His arrows, and "raise up thy sons, O Zion, against thy sons, O Greece"; fulfilled partly in His raising up the Jewish Maccabees against Antiochus Epiphanes the representative of Greece; hereafter to be exhaustively consummated in Israel being made victorious over the last antichrist, Antiochus' antitype
Gezer - A landmark of Ephraim, between lower Beth-horon and the Mediterranean (Joshua 16:3), on the S
Jeroboam (1) - Son of Nebat, of the tribe of Ephraim, and king of Israel
Samaria - It occupied about the same territory as that of Ephraim and Manasseh's portion in the west
Micah - A man of Mount Ephraim, whose history reveals the sad state of private life in Israel, as well as the mixture of idolatry with the name of Jehovah, early in the times of the Judges, Phinehas being still high priest
Shiloh - SHILOH, a celebrated city of the tribe of Ephraim, twelve miles from Shechem, Joshua 18, 19, 21
Dan - 2, The territory in Canaan allotted to Dan was on the seacoast, west of Benjamin and between Ephraim and Judah
Phinehas - The only certain occurrence of the name in a pre-exilic writing is in Joshua 24:33 ; a hill ( Gibeath Pinhas ) in Ephraim was named after him, where his father and (LXX ra'Mah - All that is directly said as to its situation is that it was in Mount Ephraim, (1 Samuel 1:1 ) a district without defined boundaries, The position of Ramah is a much-disputed question
Dan - In the original division of Canaan, Dan received its tribal portion on the Philistine coast between Judah and Ephraim (Joshua 19:40-48; Judges 5:17; Judges 13:1-2; Judges 14:1; Judges 16:23; for map see TRIBES)
Gibeah - of Jerusalem on the Shechem (Nablus) road toward mount Ephraim. " Saul first called the muster roll to discover the absentees; next he consulted the oracle of God; but when the noise in the Philistine host increased, with irreverent impatience (Isaiah 28:16) he desired the priest to stop the consultation, and put himself at the head of the people who, now that the Philistines fled, flocked to him from all their hiding places in Mount Ephraim
Joshua - ’ The son of Nun and of the tribe of Ephraim, he commanded the army in the battle with Amalek ( Exodus 17:8-16 ), attended on Moses at Mt. He was buried in Timnath-serah ( Joshua 10:15-249 ; Joshua 24:30 ) or Timnath-heres ( Judges 2:9 ), in the hill-country of Ephraim. ...
The view is widely held that Joshua has no historical reality as a person, that his name is merely the name of a clan in Ephraim, and that his leadership in Israel represents, and puts back into the period of the conquest the commanding position which Ephraim had come to hold in the Israelite confederation. Israelite or Ephraimite source. The historical foundation for making the hero of Ephraim into the conqueror of all Canaan is absent. But only on the supposition that there was something to idealize is it possible to understand why a man, who belongs to a clan in Ephraim which is otherwise unknown, came to be set up as the hero under whom they won their foothold among the nations, and passed from wandering tribes into a people. This is the more remarkable since at Joshua 8:30-35 we have a statement of how Joshua built an altar at Ebal, before the country between Gilgal and Mount Ephraim was subdued. This may represent the historical fact that the two strong clans of Judah and Ephraim were the first to be settled
Manasseh, Tribe of - Among the tribes of Israel there were two, Ephraim and Manasseh, that took their names not from Jacob’s sons but from his grandsons. Ephraim and Manasseh were the sons of Joseph. Though Manasseh was born before Ephraim, Ephraim’s tribe was senior to Manasseh’s (Genesis 48:12-20)
Ephraim - Joseph and his Egyptian wife had two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50-52). The tribe of the younger son Ephraim was destined to become stronger than that of the older son Manasseh (Genesis 48:12-20). ...
Good territory...
The tribe of Ephraim received as its inheritance possibly the best part of Canaan (cf
Manasseh - The firstborn son of Joseph, and full brother of Ephraim ( Genesis 41:51 f. Jacob’s name, we are told, was afterwards changed to Israel, and Manasseh is said to have been the elder brother of Ephraim, the name which later became almost synonymous with Israel, and, finally, in Judges 1:27-28 Manasseh and Israel appear to be used as equivalents. ...
In our oldest source bearing upon the early tribal settlement (Judges 5:1-31 ) the name of Manasseh does not appear, though that of Ephraim does. ]'>[10] , the next oldest document, includes Ephraim and Manasseh in the phrase ‘sons of Joseph’ ( Genesis 50:23 ), ‘house of Joseph’ ( Joshua 17:17 Rehoboam, - Ephraim, which had always been conscious of its own strength, was not minded to recognize the young king without some concessions on his part
Eleazar - mount Ephraim" (Joshua 24:33)
Birthright - A double portion fell to the firstborn, compare Deuteronomy 21:15-17, whence Joseph's two sons, who received the birthright forfeited by Reuben the firstborn, were counted as heads of the tribes Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 48:5-6; Genesis 48:22; Genesis 49:4; 1 Chronicles 5:1)
Ephratah - This is supported by 1 Samuel 10:2 ; Jeremiah 31:15 which place Rachel's tomb near Ramah on the border between the tribal territories of Ephraim and Benjamin
Bullock - ...
Jeremiah 31:18 (b) The speaker is Ephraim which is a name given to Israel when they were in a backslidden condition and were walking in disobedience to GOD
Before - And he set Ephraim before Manasseh
Jeroboam - This was perhaps because he was hereditary chief in Ephraim, but we must also suppose that he attracted the attention of Solomon by his ability and energy
Phinehas - Phinehas had an allotment in Mount Ephraim; here on a hill bearing his name his father Eleazar was buried (Joshua 24:33)
Gall - Oh! that the drunkards of Ephraim would seriously lay this to heart
Heart - To want heart, sometimes denotes to want understanding and prudence: "Ephraim is like a silly dove, without heart," Hosea 7:11
Judges, Book of, - (Judges 19:1 ; 18:1 ) It records -- (a) The conquest of Laish by a portion of the tribe of Dan, and the establishment there of the idolatrous worship of Jehovah already instituted by Micah in Mount Ephraim
Gideon - The Midianites were dismayed and some of them in the confusion and terror killed one another, and the others fled, pursued by the tribes before named, and by Ephraim. Ephraim proudly found fault with Gideon for not calling them to the battle at first; but a modest answer appeased their wrath
Jephthah - After the victory was won over Ammon, the tribe of Ephraim, ever jealous of any rival and claiming the supremacy, threatened Jephthah. (For "Ephraim gathered . Jephthah however answered truly that he had "called them" but they had refused, doubtless because the Gileadites had made Jephthah their commander without consulting Ephraim. ...
Besides threats of destroying Jephthah they insultingly had called the Gileadites whom Jephthah led "fugitives of Ephraim among the Ephraimites and Manassites," i. a mob of runaway Ephraimites in the midst of the two noblest tribes, Ephraim and Manasseh (compare 1 Samuel 25:10). "Shibboleth," a stream, was the test whereby the Gileadites detected the fugitive Ephraimites when trying to cross the Jordan fords, in the hands of their conquerors; 42,000 were slain who betrayed their birth by saying Sibboleth (compare on the Galilean dialect Matthew 26:73; Luke 22:59; Acts 2:7)
Pentateuch - At this time Hoshea was king of Israel, and so far disposed to countenance the worship of the true God, that he appears to have made no opposition to the pious zeal of Hezekiah; who, with the concurrence of the whole congregation which he had assembled, sent out letters and made a proclamation, not only to his own people of Judah, 2 Chronicles 30:1 , "but to Ephraim and Manasseh and all Israel, from Beersheba even unto Dan, that they should come to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, to keep the passover unto the Lord God of Israel; saying, Ye children of Israel, turn again to the Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and he will return to the remnant of you who are escaped out of the hands of the kings of Assyria; and be not ye like your fathers and your brethren, which trespassed against the Lord God of their fathers, who therefore gave them up to desolation as ye see. So the posts passed from city to city through the country of Ephraim and Manasseh even unto Zebulun," 2 Chronicles 30:6 , &c. So there was great joy in Jerusalem; for since the time of Solomon, the son of David, king of Israel, there was not the like at Jerusalem: and when all this was finished, all Israel that were present went out to the cities of Judah, and brake the images in pieces, and cut down the groves, and threw down the high places and the altars out of all Judah and Benjamin, in Ephraim also and Manasseh, until they had utterly destroyed them all,"...
2 Chronicles 30:11 ; 2 Chronicles 31
Bethel - The name Bethel was at first apparently given to the sanctuary in the neighbourhood of Luz, and was not given to the city itself till after its conquest by the tribe of Ephraim
Forest - The most extensive was the trans-Jordanic forest of Ephraim (2 Samuel 18:6,8 ; Joshua 17:15,18 ), which is probably the same as the wood of Ephratah (Psalm 132:6 ), some part of the great forest of Gilead
Ahimaaz - The battle was fought on the mount of Ephraim W
Shechem - At the distribution of the land it fell to the lot of Ephraim, and became a Levitical city and a city of refuge
Ai - In 1 Chronicles 7:28 ‘Azzah , enumerated among the cities of Ephraim, is in many MSS ‘Ayyah , which is another form of the name
Mount Nebo - We are told that he saw from thence all the land of Gilead unto Dan, and all the land of Naphtali and Ephraim and Manasseh, and all the land of Judah unto the uttermost sea, together with the south and the plain of the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees, unto Zoar
Joppa - Towards the west is extended the open sea; towards the south are spread the fertile plains of Philistia, reaching as far as Gaza; towards the north, as far as Carmel, the flowery meads of Sharon present themselves; and to the east, the hills of Ephraim and Judah raise their towering heads
Dan - On the north and east it was completely embraced by its two brother tribes Ephraim and Benjamin, while on the southeast and south it joined Judah, and was thus surrounded by the three most powerful states of the whole confederacy
Jeph'Thah - " The tribe of Ephraim challenged Jephthah's right to go to war as he had done, without their concurrence, against Ammon
Asa - After this exhortation, Asa, being animated with new courage, destroyed the idols of Judah, Benjamin, and Mount Ephraim; repaired the altar of burnt-offerings; and assembled Judah and Benjamin, with many from the tribes of Simeon, Ephraim, and Manasseh, and on the third day, in the fifteenth year of his reign, celebrated a solemn festival
Joshua the Son of Nun - ...
When Moses sent representatives from the twelve tribes to spy out Canaan, Joshua was the representative from the tribe of Ephraim. Joshua himself settled in a district that he had chosen, by God’s permission, within the territory of his own tribe, Ephraim (Joshua 19:49-50)
Jeroboam - He was made by Solomon the superintendent of the taxes exacted from the tribe of Ephraim
Kohathites - The remaining Kohathites received ten cities from the tribes of Dan, Ephraim, and Manasseh (Joshua 21:5 ,Joshua 21:5,21:20-26 ; 1Chronicles 6:61,1 Chronicles 6:66-70 )
Gehazi - " In his master's name, under pretense of charity (!), as if wanting presents for "two sons of the prophets from mount Ephraim," he obtained from Naaman two talents of silver and two changes of raiment
Azariah - One of the 'heads' of the tribe of Ephraim who objected to the bringing into Samaria the captives from Judah
Gerizim - a mount near Shechem, in Ephraim, a province of Samaria
Olives, Mount of - ...
The central summit rises two hundred feet above Jerusalem, and presents a fine view of the city, and indeed of the whole region, including the mountains of Ephraim on the north, the valley of the Jordan on the east, a part of the Dead Sea on the southeast, and beyond it Kerak in the mountains of Moab
Joshua - Son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim
Dan (1) - of Ephraim, N. Danites of Laish (named by them Dan) carried with them Micah the Ephraimite's Levitical family priest (Judges 17; 18) and graven image, which they worshipped" until the day of the captivity of the land" (Judges 18:30-31), i. Dan is omitted among the sealed in Revelation 7 as having been the first to lapse into idolatry, for which cause Ephraim also is omitted (Judges 17; Hosea 4:17) and Joseph substituted
Joseph - ...
While in Egypt, Joseph became the father of two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50-52 ), who were counted as sons of Jacob (Genesis 48:5-6 ) and whose tribes dominated the northern nation of Israel. The name Joseph is used later in the Old Testament as a reference to the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh (John 19:38-427 ; Numbers 36:1 ,Numbers 36:1,36:5 ; 1 Kings 11:28 ) or as a designation for the whole Northern Kingdom (Psalm 78:67 ; Ezekiel 37:16 ,Ezekiel 37:16,37:19 ; Amos 5:6 ,Amos 5:6,5:15 ; Amos 6:6 ; Obadiah 1:18 ; Zechariah 10:6 )
Tribes - In the lists of the tribes, as we find them in the OT, considerable variations are to be found, and frequently the tribes descended from Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh) have to be regarded as one in order to make the number twelve. The remarkable features about this list are the substitution of Joseph for Ephraim, and the omission of Dan, which seems to have fallen into disrepute at a comparatively early date
Ass - ...
The stubborn wild donkey is wiser than Ephraim, for it avoids intercourse with others through love of freedom, whereas Ephraim courts alliances fatal to his freedom
Moth - In the prophecies of Hosea, God himself says, "I will be as a moth unto Ephraim, and as a lion;" that is, I will send silent and secret judgments upon him, which shall imperceptibly waste his beauty, corrode his power, and diminish his strength, and will finish his destruction with open and irresistible calamities. It is in this sense that the Lord threatens: "I will be unto Ephraim as a moth," Hosea 5:12
Jacobus Sarugensis, Bishop of Batnae - Ephraim as "os eloquentissimum et columnam ecclesiae. Ephraim, Isaacus Magnus, and Xenaias Mabugensis, as a model writer of Syriac
Immanuel - 735 the kings of Syria and Ephraim formed an alliance against Judah, with the object of setting Tabeel, a nominee of their own, on the throne of David, and forcing the Southern Kingdom to join in a confederacy against Assyria. before he is four or five years old, Syria and Ephraim shall be ruined ( Isaiah 7:16 ). It is perfectly true that Isaiah’s view of the future was that Ephraim and Syria should be destroyed, that Judah should also suffer from Assyrian invasion, but that salvation should come through the faithful remnant. The simplest method is to follow the critics who omit Isaiah 7:16 , or at least the words ‘whose two kings thou abhorrest’; ‘the land’ will then refer naturally to Judah; if referring, as it is usually understood, to Syria and Ephraim, the singular is very strange
Jerobo'am - 975-954, was the son of an Ephraimite of the name of Nebat. He was raised by Solomon to the rank of superintendent over the taxes and labors exacted from the tribe of Ephraim
Joshua - He was a member of Ephraim, the important tribe that later formed the heart of the Northern Kingdom of Israel
Sam'Uel - was the son of Elkanah and Hannah, and was born at Ramathaim-zophim, among the hills of Ephraim
Dove (Turtle) - ...
Hosea 7:11 (a) Ephraim is a name applied to backsliding Israel
Shiloh - A city of Ephraim, (Joshua 18:10) This place was rendered memorable in the history of Israel, (Joshua 19:51; 1 Samuel 4:4; 1 Kings 14:2; Jeremiah 7:12, etc
Samuel - He was a Levite by birth, 1 Corinthians 6:20 , and the son of Elkanah and Hannah, at Ramah in Mount Ephraim, northwest of Jerusalem
Judah, Kingdom of - Joshua 19:41,42 Was recognized as belonging to Judah; and in the reigns of Abijah and Asa the southern kingdom was enlarged by some additions taken out of the territory of Ephraim
Rehoboam - In his reign Ephraim's gathering jealousy of a rival (Judges 8:1; Judges 12:1) came to a crisis, the steps to which were the severance of Israel under Ishbosheth (2 Samuel 2) from Judah under David; the removal of the political capital from Shechem, and the seat of national worship from Shiloh to Jerusalem; and finally Solomon's heavy taxation for great national and monarchical buildings, and Rehoboam's injudicious reply to the petition for lightening the burden. The maschil (Psalm 78) of Asaph is a warning to Ephraim not to incur a fresh judgment by rebelling against God's appointment which transferred Ephraim's prerogative, for its sins, to Judah; he delicately avoids wounding Ephraim's sensitiveness by not naming revolt as likely (compare 2 Samuel 20:2). Rehoboam selected Shechem as his place of coronation, probably to conciliate Ephraim. But Ephraim's reason for desiring Shechem for the place of coronation was their intention to rebel; so they made Jeroboam the spokesman of their complaints
Jephthah - " His next act was one of severity in dealing with the Ephraimites, who were not invited to war against the Ammonites, hence had a battle with the Gileadites, and were defeated; and the latter, seizing the fords of the Jordan, slew every Ephraimite who attempted to escape by crossing the river; and the method employed to ascertain whether they belonged to Ephraim was, to cause them to pronounce the word "shibboleth," which they sounded "sibboleth;" for, it seems that, by this time, a difference in the manner of pronouncing at least one Hebrew letter had arisen between the inhabitants on the different sides of the Jordan. On this occasion 42,000 men of Ephraim were slain; which was a punishment for commencing a war with so small a provocation
Samaria - (On the "glorious beauty" of Ephraim (Samaria), Isaiah 28:1, see MEALS. foretold that within 65 years Ephraim should be "broken" so as "not to be a people"; accomplished in 677 B. toward Jordan, forming the southern boundary of the plain Esdraelon (Jezreel); including Ephraim and the Manasseh W
Samuel - Son of Elkanah of Ramathaim Zophim in Mount Ephraim, and Hannah. )...
The father, though sprung from Korah the Levite, lived in Mount Ephraim, and became incorporated with Ephraim
Asher - ...
From being more numerous at mount Sinai than Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin, in David's time they had become so few that Asher's name is omitted from the chief rulers (1 Chronicles 27:16-22)
Shechem - ...
In the division of Canaan among the Israelites, Shechem fell within the tribal allotment of Ephraim, but was set apart for the Levites
Fountain - ...
Hosea 13:15 (a) The curse of GOD will cause the blessings of Ephraim to cease
Adoption - Jacob adopted as his own Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, on the same footing as Reuben and Simeon, his two elder sons (Genesis 48:5). The tribes thus were 13, only that Levi had no land division; or Ephraim and Manasseh were regarded as two halves making up but one whole tribe
Jeroboam - Son of Nebat and Zeruah of Zereda or Zarthan in the Jordan valley (1 Kings 7:46); of Ephraim (so "Ephrathite" means, 1 Kings 11:26; 1 Samuel 1:1). In this post Jereboam attempted a rebellion, the Ephraimites being impatient because of the heavy taxes and works imposed, and so having their old jealousy of Judah awakened afresh. ...
Events moved on, in God's providence, steadily toward the appointed end: Jeroboam of Ephraim over an army of Ephraimite work. Israel, having the right of making king whomsoever God chose (2 Samuel 2:4; 2 Samuel 5:3; 1 Chronicles 29:22), assembled to Shechem (Nablus now) for that purpose, the ancient place of national assembly in Ephraim (Joshua 24:1), and more suited than Jerusalem to their design of transferring the government to Jeroboam. Jeroboam, having formerly superintended Ephraim in the works of Solomon at Jerusalem in building Mille and repairing the city of David (1 Kings 11:27), could readily suggest calumnies from his own professed experience. (It was to Shechem Rehoboam had hastened to meet Israel, to secure Ephraim's allegiance, as he knew he was sure of Judah's allegiance; Shechem had been burnt down by Abimelech). ...
Rehoboam's son Abijah defeated Jeroboam, and gained for a time Bethel, Jeshanah, and Ephraim
Gideon - Gideon requested Ephraim to intercept the fleeing Midianites at the waters of Bethbarah and Jordan, namely, at the tributary streams which they would have to cross to reach the Jordan. two days' journey to Ephraim; the lower fords of Jordan at Bethbarah were taken (Bethabara of the New Testament). Here the men of Ephraim met them and executed Oreb and Zeeb, and sent their heads to Gideon "on the other side. Gideon's victory over self was still greater than that over Midian; by a soft answer he turned aside Ephraim's proud and unreasonable wrath at his not summoning them at the first: "is not the gleaning of grapes of Ephraim (their subsequent victory over the fleeing Midianites) better than the vintage of Abiezer?" than my first victory over them (Isaiah 10:26; Proverbs 15:1; Proverbs 16:32)
Armies - The light-armed troops were commonly taken from the tribes of Ephraim and Benjamin, 2 Chronicles 14:8 ; 2 Chronicles 17:17 . At some distance to the east, were the tribes of Judah, Issachar, and Zebulon; on the south were those of Reuben, Simeon, and Gad; to the west were Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin; to the north, Dan, Asher, and Naphtali. The Jewish Rabbins assert, (rounding their statement on Genesis 49:3 ; Genesis 49:9 ; Genesis 49:17 ; Genesis 49:22 , which in this case is very doubtful authority,) that the first of these standards, namely, that of Judah, bore a lion; the second, or that of Reuben, bore a man; that of Ephraim, which was the third, displayed the figure of a bull; while that of Dan, which was the fourth, exhibited the representation of cherubim
Dan - ...
The territory of Dan extended from the west of that of Ephraim and Benjamin to the sea
Rapes - ...
Judges 8:2 (a) The two princes of the Midianites are compared to the grapes which Ephraim gathered
Bear - 31:20, God states that His heart yearns for Ephraim His son (yâlad )
Ebal - a celebrated mountain in the tribe of Ephraim, near Shechem, over against Mount Gerizim
Captivities of Israel - Among those that returned with Zerubbabel are reckoned some of Ephraim and Manasseh, who settled at Jerusalem with the tribe of Judah
Tribe - But Jacob on his death bed adopted Ephraim and Manasseh, the sons of Joseph, and would have them also to constitute two tribes of Israel, Genesis 48:5
Benjamin - The blessing of Moses, Deuteronomy 33:12, was significant of the location of the tribe between Ephraim and Judah, on the hills where "the joy of the whole earth," "the city of the great King," was afterwards established, a safe and happy dwelling-place "between his shoulders
Samaria - It occupied the ancient territories of the tribes of Ephraim and western Manasseh
Israel, Kingdom of - Ephraim and all Israel raised the old cry, "Every man to his tents, O Israel" (2 Samuel 20:1 )
Josiah - These things he did not only in Judah but also in the cities of Manasseh, Ephraim, and Simeon, even unto Naphtali
Caleb - Only Joshua, the spy who went as the representative of the tribe of Ephraim, supported Caleb (Numbers 14:6-9)
Jonathan - A Levite who served as priest of Micah in Ephraim and later with tribe of Dan (Judges 17-18 )
Joseph - The elder of Jacob’s two sons by Rachel, the eleventh Patriarch, the ancestor of the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh
Crown - Compare Isaiah 28:1; Isaiah 28:5; "woe to the crown of pride, to the drunkards of Ephraim, whose glorious beauty is a fading flower"; Samaria, Ephraim's capital on the brow of a hill, is the proud crown of his drunkards; it shall perish as the flower crown on his drunkard's brow soon "fades"; but "the Lord of hosts (in striking contrast) shall be for a crown of glory and for a diadem (tsephirah ), splendid head-dress) of beauty unto the residue (the remnant left after consuming judgments) of His people
Repentance - A hypocritical repentance, as represented in Ephraim, Hosea 7:16
Gibeah - The Bible simply uses the general term “hill country of Ephraim
Absalom - ...
Absalom at length marched out against his father, whose army, under the command of Joab, he encountered on the borders of the forest of Ephraim
Envy - But the mercy of God brought about the healing of animosity between Ephraim and Judah by means of God's righteous act of salvation (Isaiah 11:13 )
Bethlehem - The concubine of the Levite of Ephraim was from the village of Bethlehem ( Judges 19:1 )
Bethel - It was finally taken by Ephraim ( Judges 1:22 , 1 Chronicles 7:28 )
Joseph - Joseph married the princess Asenath, daughter of Potipherah, priest of On; and his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, Genesis 41:50, whom Jacob adopted
Deborah - Her home was between Bethel and Ramah in the hill-country of Ephraim; here the Israelites came to her for judgment and guidance
Rams Horns - Let the reader connect with this view what Moses, in his dying moments, when the spirit of prophecy was upon him, spake of Joseph typical of the Lord Jesus Christ: "His glory (said he) is like the firstling of his bullock, and his horns are like the horns of unicorns with them he shall push the people together to the ends of the earth; and they are the ten thousands of Ephraim, and the thousands of Manasseh
Amalek, Amalekites - ...
It was formerly supposed, on the basis of Judges 5:14 ; Judges 12:15 , that there was at one time a settlement of Amalekites farther north, in the hill country of Ephraim
Pride - The noun ga’awah , which is found 19 times, also means “pride”: “And all the people shall know, even Ephraim and the inhabitant of Samaria, that say in the pride and stoutness of heart …” ( Wall - The goal was to force a breach wide enough for the troops to enter into the city; “And Jehoash king of Israel took Amaziah king of Judah, the son of Jehoash the son of Ahaziah, at Beth-shemesh, and came to Jerusalem, and brake down the wall of Jerusalem from the gate of Ephraim unto the corner gate, four hundred cubits [1]” (2 Kings 14:13)
Plain - of the Maritime Plain, which are separated from the hills of Judæa and Ephraim by a series of valleys ( Deuteronomy 1:7 , Joshua 10:40 etc
Ahaz - Isaiah and Shear-jashub his son (whose name means "the remnant shall return" was a pledge that, notwithstanding; heavy calamity, the whole nation should not perish), together met Ahaz by Jehovah's direction at the end of the conduit of the upper pool, and assured him that Rezin's and Pekah's evil counsel should not come to pass; nay, that within 65 years Ephraim (Israel) should cease to be a people. ...
Pekah slew 120,000 valiant men of Judah in one day, "because they had forsaken the Lord God of their fathers"; Zichri of Ephraim slew the king's son Maaseiah, and Azrikim the governor of his house, and Elkanah next to the king
Tree - The wood of Ephraim, where the battle was fought between the forces of Absalom and the servants of David, was probably a place of the same kind; for the sacred historian observes, that the wood devoured more people that day than the sword, 2 Samuel 18:8 . But, supposing the wood of Ephraim to have been a morass covered with trees and bushes, like the haunts of the wild boar near the banks of Jordan, the difficulty is easily removed
Jeroboam - the son of Nebat and Zeruah, was born at Zereda, in the tribe of Ephraim, 1 Kings 11:26 . He seems to have been a bold, unprincipled, and enterprising man, with much of the address of a deep politician about him; qualities which probably pointed him out to King Solomon as a proper person to be entrusted with the obnoxious commission of levying certain taxes throughout the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh
Hannah - All the more-Why is it? Is it to spare and shield them from the preoccupation and the dispersion of affection, and from the coldness and the rudeness and the neglect of one another that so many of their neighbours suffer from? And is it to teach them a far finer tenderness, and a far rarer honour, and a far sweeter solicitude for one another? Or, on the other hand, is it out of pure jealousy on God's part? Is it that He may be able to say to them, Am I not better to thee than ten sons? Or, again, is it in order to make them meet, long before His other sons and daughters around them are made meet, for that life in which they shall neither marry nor be given in marriage? Which of all these reasons, or what other reason, has their God for what He does with so many of His best saints? But all this time we have been intruding into those things of which he says to us-What is that to thee?...
Elkanah of Mount Ephraim, Hannah's husband, was, as we say, a true gentleman. But, unless God was mocked on Mount Ephraim as He has never been mocked anywhere else, it does not need a prophet to tell us, if not Peninnah's past as a maiden and a young wife, then her future as an old mother and a widow. How Hannah must often have envied, not the mothers of children so much, as those bright and merry maidens of Ephraim and Shiloh, whose souls were still their own. Elkanah and Hannah invented a sin against married life on Mount Ephraim, and, while they were forgiven for it, all the time the vengeance that was taken on it, and on them on account of it broke every bone in their body and every hard spot in their heart. And one of them is Hannah of Mount Ephraim, and the other is Teresa of Mount Carmel
Ramah - It was ‘In the hill-country of Ephraim,’ but might have been over the S. No satisfactory Identification of the Ephraimite Ramah has yet been proposed
Hand - "Laying on of hands" was usual in blessing; as the Lord Jesus blessing the infants (Mark 10:16), Jacob blessing Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 48:14); also in laying guilt and punishment upon persons accused (Deuteronomy 13:9; Deuteronomy 17:7); also in constituting magistrates, as Moses did in appointing Joshua his successor (Numbers 27:18); also setting apart the Levites (Numbers 8:10)
Beer-Sheba - This idiom also served to show the extent of the reforms of three southern kings: Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 19:4 , “Beer-sheba to mount Ephraim”), Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 30:5 , “Beer-sheba even to Dan”), and Josiah (2 Kings 23:8 , “from Geba to Beer-sheba”)
Shiloh (2) - Shiloh fell within Ephraim (Joshua 16:5-6)
Right Hand - ...
First, the word represents the bodily part called the “right hand”: “And Joseph took them both, Ephraim in his right hand toward Israel’s left hand, and Manasseh in his left hand toward Israel’s right hand …” ( Manasseh - One half tribe of Manasseh settled beyond the river Jordan, and possessed the country of Bashan, from the river Jabbok, to Mount Libanus; and the other half tribe of Manasseh settled on this side Jordan, and possessed the country between the tribe of Ephraim south, and the tribe of Issachar north, having the river Jordan east, and the Mediterranean Sea west, Joshua xvi; 17
Daniel - was a descendant of the kings of Judah, and is said to have been born at Upper Bethoron, in the territory of Ephraim
Offence - in Hosea 4:17 , "Ephraim partaking with idols hath laid stumblingblocks in his own path
Samaria - One of the three divisions of the Holy Land in the time of our Savior, having Galilee on the north and Judea on the south, the Jordan on the east and the Mediterranean on the west, and occupying parts of the territory assigned at first to Ephraim, Mahasseh, and Issachar, Luke 17:11 John 4:4
Azari'ah - ...
Son of Johanan, one of the captains of Ephraim in the reign of Ahaz
Judges, Theology of - Micah's shrine and idols were initially located in the hill country of Ephraim (presumably near Bethel — 17:1; 18:2) and were then purloined and installed in Dan. In the earlier story a Levite from the hill country of Ephraim travels to Bethlehem to retrieve his concubine from her father's house. In Gibeah (the hometown of Saul) his party is not shown any hospitality by the native citizens of the town; rather a man from Ephraim finally comes to his aid. Underlying the details of the story is a political allegory addressed to those from Ephraim and the northern tribes: Who will treat you well? [2] Who will treat you poorly? [3] Who will remove the aliens from Jebus and make it safe? Everyone reading the story knows that David and his lineage were from Bethlehem, and that David had made Jebus/Jerusalem a safe city
Joshua - " Son of Nun, of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:27). ...
Sent to spy out Canaan as representing Ephraim; Caleb represented Judah. Timnath Serah in Ephraim was assigned to Joshua himself," the city which he asked" (Joshua 19:49). ...
Joshua was buried in the border of his inheritance in Timnath Serah (probably now Kefr Haris) in Mount Ephraim, on the northern side of the hill Gaash (Joshua 24:30)
Benjamin - On march it held the post between Manasseh and Ephraim, its brother tribes, W. As on the march, so in the promised land, Benjamin's position was near that of Ephraim, between it on the N. Above all, what knit together Benjamin and Judah most was the position fixed by God for the great national temple, which deprived Ephraim of its former glory (Psalms 78:60-68); not in Judah only, or in Benjamin only, but on part of the confines of both, so that one text places it in Judah and the parallel text in Benjamin; compare Joshua 15:63 with Joshua 18:28
Ate - ...
Ephraim Gate Nehemiah 8:16 (c) Ephraim is the name applied to Israel when she was in a backslidden state
Palestine - The plain of Jezreel or Esdraelon on its northern side, separating the Ephraim mountains from those of Galilee, and stretching across from the Mediterranean to the Jordan valley, was the great battlefield of Palestine. , the only entrances to the central highlands of Judah, Benjamin, and Ephraim, from the Jordan valley; as Engedi (2 Chronicles 20:1-2; 2 Chronicles 20:16) and Adummim, the route between Jericho and Jerusalem by which Pompey advanced when he took the capital. toward Mount Ephraim especially strike the eye. Mount Ephraim (jebel Nablus) contains some of the most productive land in Palestine. The Jordan valley divides Galilee, Ephraim, and Judah from Bashan, Gilead, and Moab respectively. "The mountain of Judah," "of Ephraim," "of Naphtali," designate the three great groups of highlands
Bethel - ...
Bethel belonged by lot to Benjamin, but was falcon by Ephraim (Bethel being on his southern border) through the treachery of an inhabitant (Judges 1:22-26)
Beersheba - ...
"From Geba to Beersheba" or "from Beersheba to mount Ephraim" was the formula comprehending the southern kingdom of Judah after the severance of Israel's ten tribes (2 Kings 23:8; 2 Chronicles 19:4), and on the return from Babylon still narrower, "from Beersheba to the valley of Hinnom" (Nehemiah 11:30)
Bread - Hosea 7:8, "Ephraim is a cake not turned": burnt on one side, unbaked on the other, the fire spoiling, not penetrating it; so religious professors, outwardly warm, inwardly cold; on one side overdone, on the other not vitally influenced at all; Jehus professing great "zeal for the Lord," really zealous for themselves
Azariah - A leader of the tribe of Ephraim under Pekah, king of Israel (752-732 B
Micah, Micaiah - Micah , a dweller in the hill-country of Ephraim; he stole from his mother eleven hundred pieces of silver, which, however, he returned on hearing the curse which his mother pronounced against the thief
Abner - At Saul's death he upheld the dynasty in Ishbosheth's person, mainly owing to the paramount influence of the tribe Ephraim, which was jealous of Judah
Judah, Kingdom of - Their independence of the northern tribes, and the jealousy of Ephraim, early prepared the way for the severance of the northern and southern kingdoms under Rehoboam. ) Judah included southern Benjamin and Jerusalem the joint city of both, Simeon, and many cities of Daniel In Abijah's and Asa's reign Judah gained parts of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 13:19; 2 Chronicles 15:8; 2 Chronicles 17:2); and after Israel's deportation to Assyria the king of Judah exercised a quasi authority in the N
Joshua, Book of - Of Joseph it was said, "Thou art a great people, and hast great power:" in Ephraim and Manasseh Joseph had two portions. To Joshua was given an inheritance, Timnath-serah in mount Ephraim
Repent - In the eschatological sense, when Ephraim (as a representative of the northern branch of Israel) will “repent” ( Jehoshaphat - He had the advantage over Baasha, king of Israel; and he placed good garrisons in the cities of Judah and of Ephraim, which had been conquered by his father
Captivity - Both Judah and Israel being removed from "the lot of their inheritance" in Canaan, and dispersed among strangers, the various tribes would naturally amalgamate with each other, the envy of Judah and Ephraim would depart, and the memory of Abraham, Moses, and David would revive, Ezra 6:16,17 8:35 Ezekiel 37:26-28
Jeroboam - Solomon was so impressed with the young man that he put him in charge of the Ephraim-Manasseh workforce (1 Kings 11:28)
Israel - ) tells how Joseph was divided into two tribes, Ephraim and Manasseh. ’ The tribes of Manasseh, Ephraim, and Benjamin traced their descent from Rachel. The name Benjamin means ‘sons of the south,’ or ‘southerners’: the Benjamites are probably the ‘southerners’ of the tribe of Ephraim, and were gradually separated from that tribe after the conquest of Canaan. The original Israel, then, probably consisted of the eight tribes Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Manasseh, and Ephraim, though perhaps the Rachel tribes did not join the confederacy until they had escaped from Egypt (see § 6). 10) hold that it was the so-called Joseph tribes, Ephraim and Manasseh, that settled for a time in Egypt, and that Moses led forth. ]'>[4] document, which originated among the Ephraimites, is the first one that remembers that the name Jahweh was, until the Exodus, unknown to them (cf. ]'>[1] , there seem to have been at least three lines of attack: (1) that which Joshua led up the valley from Jericho to Ai and Bethel, from which the territories afterwards occupied by Ephraim and Benjamin were secured
Messiah - ...
The first, they say, is to proceed from the tribe of Ephraim, who is to fight against Gog, and to be slain by Annillus, Zechariah 12:10 ; the second is to be of the tribe of Judah and lineage of David, who is to conquer and kill Annillus; to bring the first Messiah to life again, to assemble all Israel, and rule over the whole world. Among whom Nehemiah Cohen, from Poland, was one, a man of great learning in the Kabbala and eastern tongues; who desired a conference with Sabatai, and at the conference maintained, that according to the Scripture, there ought to be a two-fold Messias; one the son of Ephraim, a poor and despised teacher of the law; the other the son of David, to be a conqueror. Nehemiah was content to be the former, the son of Ephraim, and to leave the glory and dignity of the latter to Sabatai. But here lay the ground of the quarrel: Nehemiah taught that the son of Ephraim ought to be the forerunner of the son of David, and to usher him in; and Nehemiah accused Sabatai of too great forwardness in appearing as the son of David, before the son of Ephraim had led him the way. Sabatai could not brook this doctrine; for he might fear that the son of Ephraim, who was to lead the way, might pretend to be the son of David, and so leave him in the lurch; and, therefore, he excluded him from any part or share in this matter; which was the occasion of the ruin of Sabatai, and all his glorious designs
Joseph - " ...
By his wife Asenath, Joseph had two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50 ). ...
The name Joseph denotes the two tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh in Deuteronomy 33:13-17 ; the kingdom of Israel in Ezekiel 37:16,19 , Amos 5:6 ; and the whole covenant people of Israel in Psalm 81:4
Issachar - of Manasseh and Ephraim, along the entire line of the Jordan from the sea of Chinneroth on the N. ...
Tola the judge was of Issachar, though his abode was at Shamir in Mount Ephraim
Micaiah - Zedekiah, one of the 400, at the gate of Samaria where the two kings sat in state, symbolically putting horns or iron spikes on his head, foretold the transfer of Ephraim's blessing (Deuteronomy 33:17) to Ahab; "with the horns of the buffalo (or wild ox, reem ) he shall push the people. " Instead of Moses' blessing on Ephraim awaiting Ahab, as Zedekiah had said, Moses' picture of what Israel would be at his death, "Jehovah's congregation as sheep having no shepherd," if no successor were appointed, would be realized (Numbers 27:17)
Meals - Hebraism for "woe to the proud crown of the drunkards of Ephraim" (Horsley)
Laying on of Hands - Jacob (“Israel”) blessed Ephraim and Manasseh by laying his hands on their heads (Genesis 48:13-20 ), and the Psalmist celebrated the Lord's protection as a blessing bestowed by God's having “laid thine hand upon me” (Psalm 139:5 )
Dan - of Ephraim, and thence attempted to spread out into the valleys of Aijalon and Sorek. On their way thither they induced the domestic priest of an Ephraimite, Micah, to accompany them with his sacred paraphernalia, an ephod, a graven and a molten image, and the teraphim
New Testament - John 11:1-44 ...
Jesus retires to Ephraim
Damascus - ...
Isaiah prophesied that Damascus should be a ruinous heap, because of its confederacy with Ephraim against God's city Jerusalem
Joshua - He was of the tribe of Ephraim, and born A
Petrus, Patriarch of Jerusalem - His predecessor in the patriarchal chair, Ephraim, had issued a synodical letter condemning Origen, and the Origenistic party clamoured to have his name removed from the diptychs
Joshua, Book of - Of the area west of Jordan, the largest and best portions went also to two and a half tribes – Judah (14:6-15:63) and the remainder of the Joseph tribes, Ephraim and the other half of Manasseh (16:1-17:18)
Immanuel - Probably under the influence of a wish to force Judah into a coalition against Assyria, an attack was made on the southern kingdom by Syria and Ephraim about 735–734 (Isaiah 7:1 ff. He made light of the danger from Syria and Ephraim, and stigmatized the allies as fag-ends of smoking firebrands, which might cause considerable annoyance, but had lost all power for serious mischief. In other words, Isaiah 7:16 interprets the sign as the desolation of Syria and Ephraim. But Isaiah certainly anticipated the overthrow of Syria and Ephraim. Just as the names of Isaiah’s two children express, the one his doctrine of the remnant, the other his certainty that Syria and Ephraim would be overthrown, so the name Immanuel expresses the mother’s conviction that God is with His people
Judea - The portion of Ephraim stretched along the northern limits of Dan and Benjamin, between the river Jordan on the east, and the Mediterranean sea on the West; containing Sichem, Joppa, Lydda, Gazara, &c. The portion of the half tribe of Manasseh was situated north of Ephraim, between the river Jordan and the Mediterranean, reaching as far north as Dora, at the foot of Mount Carmel. The principal places in the north-east quarter of the province were Jerusalem, the capital, which was entirely destroyed in the reign of Hadrian, and replaced by a new city named AElia, a little farther north, which is now the site of the modern Jerusalem; Jericho, the city of palm trees, about nineteen miles eastward of Jerusalem, and eight from the river Jordan; Phaselis, built by Herod in memory of his brother, fifteen miles north-west of Jericho; Archelais, built by Archelaus, ten miles north of Jericho; Gophna, fifteen miles north of Jerusalem, in the road to Sichem; Bethel, twelve miles north of Jerusalem, originally called Luz; Gilgal, about one mile and a half from Jericho; Engeddi, a hundred furlongs south south-east of Jericho, near the northern extremity of the Dead Sea; Masada, a strong fortress built by Judas Maccabeus, the last refuge of the Jews after the fall of Jerusalem; Ephraim, a small town westward of Jericho; Anathoth, a Levitical town, nearly four miles north of Jerusalem. ...
Samaria, lying between Judea and Galilee, in 32 15' north latitude, extended along the sea coast from Joppa to Dora, and along the river Jordan from the rivulet of Alexandrium to the southern extremity of the sea of Tiberias; comprehending the territory of the tribe of Ephraim, of the half tribe of Manasseh, and part of Issachar
Obadiah, Book of - , Ephraim to the N. ( Isaiah 1:18 , which after elimination of glosses reads, ‘And they shall possess the Negeb and the Shephçlah, and the field of Ephraim and Gilead’); in particular, the Israelites will re-occupy as far N
Jonathan - Micah afterwards found a Levite for the service, who had sojourned in Bethlehem Judah and left it to seek maintenance where he could, in Mount Ephraim. A panic ensued, the Philistines thought themselves outnumbered, and an earthquake completed the confusion; and the Israelites, with the Philistines in the camp an those hidden heretofore in Mount Ephraim and now emerging, joined in the pursuit as far W
Sanballat - The envy also of Ephraim shall depart, and the adversaries of Judah shall be cut off. Ephraim shall not envy Judah, and Judah shall not vex Ephraim
Judges, the Book of - It records:...
(1) Micah's idolatry in Mount Ephraim, and the Danite adoption of it in Laish, the conquest of which is narrated. Gideon corrupted the worship of God, Samson yielded to lust, Jephthah made a rash vow and took revenge upon Ephraim. Historical facts not subserving the Spirit's design are passed by, as Ephraim's victory over Oreb and Zeeb (Judges 8:3; Isaiah 10:26). Gideon scarcely appeased Ephraim's jealousy. Ephraim fought with Jephthah and the eastern tribes to its own sore loss
Firstborn - Ephraim ( Genesis 48:13-20 ), Solomon ( 1 Kings 1:1-53 ), Shimri ( 1 Chronicles 26:10 )
Grecians - ...
Zechariah (Zechariah 9:13) represents Judah and Ephraim as the arrows filling God's bow, "when I have raised up thy son, O Zion, against thy sons, O Greece" (Javan) thus foretelling that the Jewish Maccabees would punish Greece in the person of Antiochus Epiphanes, one of Alexander's successors, in just retribution for her purchasing from Tyre as slaves" the children of Judah and Jerusalem
Israel - The ten tribes in the prophets are often spoken of as Ephraim, which was the chief of the ten
Dry Dried Drieth - ...
Hosea 9:16 (a) The foundations of the very national existence in Israel (Ephraim), were destroyed by the enemy through the will of GOD so that they cease to be a national power
Root - ...
Judges 5:14 (b) It is evident that the men of Ephraim in the past years were enemies of Amalek, as their children became enemies of Amalek
Lord - It signifies His position as the one who has authority (like a master) over His people to reward the obedient and punish the disobedient: “Ephraim provoked him to anger most bitterly: therefore shall he leave his blood upon him, and his reproach shall his Lord return unto him” ( Israel, Kingdom of - ( 1 Kings 11:31,35 ) These were probably Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh), Issachar, Zebulun, Asher, Naphtali, Benjamin, Dan, Simeon, Gad and Reuben; Levi being intentionally omitted
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - Ephraim (4) the Syrian , usually called Ephrem Syrus, from the Syriac form of his name Aphrem, was born in Mesopotamia, for he describes his home as lying between the Tigris and the Euphrates (Opp. Ephraim was an orator possessed of spirit and taste, and his poetical gifts were exactly those calculated to give weight and influence to his authority as a teacher among his countrymen" (Roediger). Ephraim's quotations from the Gospels have been collected by F. Ephraim (Edinburgh, 1896). Ephraim have been ed
Jehoshaphat - Jehoshaphat at first fortified the cities of Judah and those of Ephraim taken by Asa (2 Chronicles 22:2-3) to secure himself against Israel. to mount Ephraim in the N
Deborah - Barak, at her call, summoned these (to whom the central tribes, Ephraim, Manasseh (Machir), and Benjamin in part sent contingents, Judges 20:14) in a long train (draw: Judges 5:6-7) toward the broad topped mount Tabor
Mizpah - Here Israel assembled to choose a leader in its "misery" when Ammon, having oppressed eastern Palestine, was threatening also to attack Judah and Ephraim W
Ebal - The conquest of the heart of the country by Joshua, mount Ephraim, Esdraelon or the Jezreel valley, is not detailed; but the narrative passes from his conquest of the S
Levi - Then the altar did not call for a consecrated servitor; but, as we see in the case of Micah, who had a private sanctuary in Ephraim, there existed apparently a preference for a Levite (Judges 17:1-13 )
Priest; Priesthood - 41:45), and she bore him two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh ( Jerusalem - The western range is the backbone of western Palestine, including the hills of Galilee, Samaria, Ephraim, Benjamin, and Judah, and passing on into the Sinaitic range ending at Ras Mohammed in the tongue of land between the two arms of the Red Sea. The gates were:...
(1) that of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 25:23), the same probably as that...
(2) of Benjamin (Jeremiah 20:2), 400 cubits from...
(3) "the corner gate" (2 Chronicles 25:23). ...
For this its situation admirably adapted it, bordering between Judah, his own tribe, and the valiant small tribe of Benjamin, which formed the connecting link with the northern tribes, especially with Ephraim the house of Joseph. Asaph wrote Psalms 78:67-71 to soothe Ephraim's jealous feeling by showing that the transference of the sanctuary from Shiloh to Zion was God's appointment; henceforth Zion is "the mountain of the Lord's house" (Isaiah 2:2). Taking Amaziah prisoner he brought him to Jerusalem and there broke down the wall from the Ephraim or Benjamin gate to the corner gate (N
Tribes - Joseph, by contrast, received two tribal allotments, one for each of his two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh
Samuel - Samuel was born into a Levite family who lived at Ramah, in the tribal territory of Ephraim (1 Samuel 1:19-20; 1 Chronicles 6:33-38)
Tabernacles, Feast of - ...
In Jerusalem the booths were built on the roofs, in house courts, in the temple court, and in the street of the water gate and of the Ephraim gate
Samaria, Samaritans - ...
While the term Samaria was first identified with the city founded by Omri, it soon became associated with the entire region surrounding the city, the tribal territory of Manasseh and Ephraim
Martha - ]'>[1] She appears in the Gospel-story on three occasions: (1) when she entertained Jesus on His way to Jerusalem at the season of the Feast of Tabernacles (Luke 10:38-42); (2) when Lazarus died and was revived by Jesus (John 11:1-46); and (3) when Jesus, on His way to the Passover from His retreat at Ephraim (John 11:54), was honoured with a public entertainment at Bethany in the house of a leading man named Simon the Leper (John 12:1-11 = Matthew 26:6-13 = Mark 14:3-9)
Hand - Jacob laid his hands on Ephraim and Manasseh, when he gave them his last blessing, Genesis 48:14
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - ...
(2) Ephraim Syrus (circa, about 360). -In his commentary Ephraim says that the apocryphal correspondence between Paul and the Corinthians was written by the followers of Bardesanes, ‘in order that under cover of the signs and wonders of the Apostle, which they described, they might ascribe to the name of the Apostle their own godlessness, against which the Apostle had striven. ’ This apocryphal correspondence was contained in the Acts of Paul, but it also circulated in some Syriac and Armenian NT Manuscripts ; no doubt it was an excerpt from the Acts, but it is not clear whether Ephraim knew the Acts or the excerpt. It is, however, much more probable that Ephraim is here referring to the Acts, as the correspondence alone does not seem ever to have been regarded by the Syriac Church as heretical
Chronicles, the Books of - ...
The sources must have been very ancient from which the compiler drew the account of the kings of Edom before Saul's reign, the slaughter of the sons of Ephraim by the Gittites (1 Chronicles 7:21; 1 Chronicles 8:13), the notice of the sons of Shelah, and their dominion in Moab (1 Chronicles 4:21-22). Jehoshaphat's garrisoning the cities of Judah and of Ephraim; removal of high places and groves; sending his princes and Levites throughout the land to teach the people in "the book of the law of the Lord" (2 Chronicles 17-18); reproval by Jehu, son of Hanani the seer, and by Eliezer, son of Dodavah of Mareshah, for his alliance with the ungodly kings of Israel; instructions to the judges; victory over the vast, allied forces of Ammon and Moeb (2 Chronicles 19-20)
Poetry - Note the following example: ...
Ephraim will not be jealous of Judah, nor Judah hostile toward Ephraim
Jacob - Shortly after this, Jacob was taken ill, and it being reported to Joseph, he hastened to the bedside of his father, taking with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim. He next blessed the infant children of Joseph; but, as he placed his hands upon their heads, he crossed them, putting his right upon Ephraim the younger, and his left upon Manasseh the elder
She'Chem - In the distribution of the land after its conquest by the Hebrews, Shechem fell to the lot of Ephraim, ( Joshua 20:7 ) but was assigned to the Levites, and became a city of refuge
Gad - When the northern tribes revolted, Jeroboam must have found the Gadites among his staunchest supporters, for it was to Penuel in Gadite territory that he moved the capital from Shechem in Ephraim (1 Kings 12:25 )
Jacob - ...
Jacob at the close of his life rose up to the height of God's thoughts, and by faith blessed the two sons of Joseph, being led of God to cross his hands, and gave the richest blessing to Ephraim
Absalom - The battle in Gilead in the wood of Ephraim (called from Ephraim's defeat, Judges 12:4) resulted in the defeat of his cumbrous undisciplined host
Giant - In addition to the Rephaim of Bashan, the Zuzim or Zamzummim, and the Emim, on the east of Jordan, the Anakim in the southwest and south for Arba, the traditional founder of Hebron, is described as the progenitor of the Anakim ( Joshua 15:13 ) we find traces of Rephaim in the well-known valley of that name near Jerusalem ( Joshua 15:8-9 ), and apparently also in the territory of Ephraim ( Joshua 17:16 )
Jacob - ...
Jacob at the close of his life rose up to the height of God's thoughts, and by faith blessed the two sons of Joseph, being led of God to cross his hands, and gave the richest blessing to Ephraim
Idolatry, - Under Hezekiah a great reform was inaugurated, that was not confined to Judah and Benjamin, but spread throughout Ephraim and Manasseh
jo'Seph - " (Genesis 50:26 ) His trust Moses kept, and laid the bones of Joseph in his inheritance in Shechem, in the territory of Ephraim his offspring
Jacob - Before he died, he raised Joseph’s two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, to the same status as his own sons (Genesis 48:1-6)
Victor, Bishop of Capua - of the Armenian version of Ephraim Syrus's Commentary on the Diatessaron (E) followed by Zahn's Forschungen zur Geschichte des Neutestamentlichen Kanons i
Hezekiah - ...
Hezekiah by letter invited not only Judah, but also Ephraim and Manasseh, to it: "Ye children of Israel, turn again unto the Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, and He will return to the remnant of you, escaped out of the hand of the king of Assyria. " The majority "laughed the messengers to scorn; nevertheless, divers of Asher, Manasseh, and Zebulun (Ephraim and Issachar also) humbled themselves and came to Jerusalem. " Next, all Israel present went out to break the images, cut down the groves, and throw down the high places and altars out of all Judah and Benjamin, in Ephraim also and Manasseh, until they had utterly destroyed them all
Micah - Of Mount Ephraim
Blood - ...
If the latter reached one of the six cities, (Kedesh in Naphtali, Shechem in mount Ephraim, Hebron in the hill country of Judah, W
Hosea - He specifies Ephraim, Mizpah, Tabor, Gilgal, Bethel or Bethaven, Jezreel, Gibeah, Ramah, Gilead, Shechem, Lebanon, Arbela
Lazarus - ...
He retired to Ephraim near the frontier of Samaria, and stayed there until the Passover drew near; then He set out for Jerusalem to keep the Feast and to die
Samaritans - At the time when they wrote to Scaliger, they reckoned one hundred and twenty-two high priests; affirmed that the Jews had no high priests of the race of Phinehas; and that the Jews belied them in calling them Cutheans; for that they are descended from the tribe of Joseph by Ephraim
Shechem - After the conquest of Canaan it became a Levitical city of refuge in Ephraim, and a gathering-place of the tribes, Joshua 20:7 21:21 24:1,25 Judges 9:1-57
Poetry of the Hebrews - Thus the parallelism is irregular when one member is shorter than the other; as Hosea 4:17 : ...
Ephraim is joined to idols; let him alone
Repentance - An especially vivid illustration of this reversal is found in Hosea 11:8-9 : "How can I give you up, Ephraim? My heart is changed within me I will not carry out my fierce anger
Alexander - For it was their practice, when they saw the affairs of the Jews in a prosperous state, to boast that they were descended from Manasseh and Ephraim; but when they thought it their interest to say the contrary, they failed not to affirm, and even to swear, that they were not related to the Jews
Violence - ...
Hosea accused Ephraim of loving to oppress, a description that is paired with a description of a merchant with false balances (Hosea 12:7 )
Justification - Even in the midst of Israel's rebellion, Hosea vividly portrayed God saying to them, “How can I give you up, Ephraim? How can I hand you over, Israel?” (Hosea 11:8 NIV)
Shechem (1) - Joshua made "Shechem in Mount Ephraim" one of the six cities of refuge (Joshua 20:7). Shechem was for a time Ephraim's civil capital. At Shechem Rehoboam was made king by Israel (1 Kings 12:1); he desired to conciliate the haughty Ephraimites by being crowned there
Jews - Under Solomon they had little war: when he died, ten of the Hebrew tribes formed a kingdom of Israel, or Ephraim, for themselves, under Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, in opposition to the kingdom of Judah and Benjamin, ruled by the family of David. The kingdom of Israel, Ephraim, or the ten tribes, had never so much as one pious king: idolatry was always their established religion. Since the prophets have predicted his mean condition and sufferings, they confidently talk of two Messiahs; one Ben-Ephraim, whom they grant to be a person of a mean and afflicted condition in this world; and the other Ben-David, who shall be a victorious and powerful prince
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - ” The Yarkon, in biblical times, formed the border between the tribes of Dan and Ephraim to the north. Farther inland, the Brook Kanah formed the boundary between Ephraim and Manasseh (Joshua 16:8 ; Joshua 17:9 )
Blessing (2) - Jacob’s blessing of Ephraim and Manasseh is esp. ** Court Systems - When a Judahite woman who was the concubine of a Levite living in the territory of Ephraim was raped and murdered in Gibeah of Benjamin, several tribes were involved (Judges 19-21 )
Cherub (1) - , an ox for Ephraim on the W
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - When Levi ceased to be counted among the tribes, the Joseph tribes, Ephraim and Manasseh, were counted separately to keep the number twelve intact
Genealogy - So Manasseh and Ephraim were numbered among Jacob's "sons," though only grandsons (Genesis 48:5)
Jacob - Faith adapted him to receive prophetic insight into the characters and destiny of Ephraim and Manasseh respectively, as also of his other representatives. ...
He anticipates the future as present, saying "I have given to thee (Joseph's descendants) above thy brethren (Ephraim was the chief tribe of the N
Descent Into Hades - 1, and Ephraim Syrus, Hymns on the Nativity, xv. ]'>[34] and Ephraim,‡‡ Jeru'Salem - --The following is a complete list of the gates named in the Bible and by Josephus, with the reference to their occurrence:-- ...
Gate of Ephraim. 9:38, the "broad place of the temple towards the east;" the "street of the house of God," (Ezra 10:9 ) the "street of the gate of Ephraim," (Nehemiah 8:16 ) and the "open place of the first gate toward the east," must have been not "streets," in our sense of the word, so much as the open spaces found in easter towns round the inside of the gates
Believe - 11:12, 'âman contrasts Judah’s actions (“faithful”) with those of Ephraim and Israel (“deceit”)
Honor - 9:11, where kâbôd represents a great crowd of people or “multitude”: “As for Ephraim, their [3] shall fly away
Jerusalem - It was anciently known as the mountains of Ephraim and Judah
Jerusalem - Gate of Ephraim. , "broad place of the gate of Ephraim," Nehemiah 8:16; and the "open place of the first gate toward the east" could not have been "streets," in our sense of the word, but rather open spaces found in eastern towns near the inside of the gates
Samuel - And after his mother was taken home to heaven and came no more to Shiloh, when Samuel the prophet needed another coat he had it always made of the same substance and of the same shape that his mother wove for him on her loom in Ephraim. And it is admitted-it is no fancy to say it-that our modern universities, divinity halls, and great public schools, have all their far-down roots in Mount Ephraim, and in Samuel's great college which he founded there
Moses - "Jehovah shewed him all the land of Gilead, unto Dan, and all Naphtali, and the land of Ephraim, and Manasseh, and all the land of Judah, unto the utmost sea, and the south, and the plain of the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees, unto Zoar" (Deuteronomy 34:2-3 ), the magnificient inheritance of the tribes of whom he had been so long the leader; and there he died, being one hundred and twenty years old, according to the word of the Lord, and was buried by the Lord "in a valley in the land of Moab, over against Beth-peor" (34:6)
Judaea - As thus defined it included the tribal possessions of Simeon, Judah, Benjamin, Dan, and, to some extent at least, of Ephraim
Adoption - "Ephraim shall say, What have I to do any more with idols?" Hosea 14:8
da'Vid - (2 Samuel 15:18 ) The final battle of Absalom's rebellion was fought in the "forest of Ephraim," and terminated in the accident which led to the young man's death; and, though nearly heartbroken at the loss of his son, David again reigned in undisturbed peace at Jerusalem
Judaea - As thus defined it included the tribal possessions of Simeon, Judah, Benjamin, Dan, and, to some extent at least, of Ephraim
Jacob - Jacob bestowed the blessing not only upon his favorite son Joseph, but also upon Joseph's two oldest sons, Ephraim and Manasseh
Saul - , "Gibeah of God"), Saul and his servant went toward the north-west over Mount Ephraim, and then turning north-east they came to "the land of Shalisha," and thence eastward to the land of Shalim, and at length came to the district of Zuph, near Samuel's home at Ramah (9:5-10)
Samaria - It was after all a quarrel between brethren, the old tribal and national feud of Judah and Ephraim being accentuated and perpetuated as a religious controversy
Head - ...
Psalm 60:7 (c) This strange passage may mean that GOD's constant acts of forgiveness toward Ephraim, and the many times He restored the nation to a place of prominence prove the character of GOD, and magnified His righteous acts and judgments
Jeremiah - from Jerusalem, perched high on the mountain-ridge and commanding an extensive view over the hills of Ephraim and the Jordan valley, towards which his memory often turned (Jeremiah 4:15 ; Jeremiah 7:14-15 ; Jeremiah 12:5 ; Jeremiah 31:4-5 ; Jeremiah 31:18 ; Jeremiah 49:19 ). He strongly recalls Hosea, whose love for ‘Ephraim’ he shares, and whose similitude of the marriage-union between Jehovah and Israel supplies the basis of his appeals
Palesti'na - This central lowland, which divides with its broad depression the mountains of Ephraim from the mountains of Galilee is the plain of Esdraelon or Jezreel the great battle-field of Palestine. The hills assume here a more varied aspect than in the southern districts, springs are more abundant and more permanent until at last, when the district of Jebel Nablus is reached--the ancient Mount Ephraim-the traveller encounters an atmosphere and an amount of vegetation and water which are greatly superior to anything he has met with in Judea and even sufficient to recall much of the scenery of the West
Levites - ...
The priests occupied the eastern side of the tabernacle, inside Judah the leading camp; the Kohathites the southern side, inside Reuben; the Gershonites the western side, inside Ephraim; the Merarites the northern, inside Daniel The aggregate of Gershonites (Numbers 3:22), Kohathites (Numbers 3:28), and Merarites (Numbers 3:34), is 22,300; but in the redemption 300 are deducted (probably the firstborn in Levi within the year that had elapsed since the command was issued, Numbers 3:40-43), and 22,000 taken as substituted for Israel's male firstborn
Census - Compare 1 Chronicles 7:20-27, where ten or eleven generations elapse between Ephraim and Joshua
Samuel, First Book of - He was the son of Hannah and Elkanah, a descendant of Korah, of Ramathaim-zophim, of mount Ephraim
Ammonites - He afterwards crossed Jordan with a design of falling upon the tribes of Judah, Benjamin, and Ephraim
Samaria, Samaritans - —Although the Samaritans claim descent from the patriarchs (John 4:12), and present us with an unbroken history, and although it is to some extent true that they represent the spirit of the tribe of Ephraim (Renan, Lang. ’...
This, according to the Samaritan division of the Decalogue, was reckoned the Tenth Commandment, and, like the others, of perpetual obligation, so that the Samaritans regarded not only the Temple at Jerusalem, but also the tabernacle at Shiloh, though in Ephraim, and the whole Jewish priesthood after the settlement of the land, as schismatical
High Place, Sanctuary - In the period of the Judges the chief sanctuary in Ephraim was that consecrated by the presence of the ark at Shiloh ( Judges 21:19 , 1 Samuel 1:3 etc
Tabernacle - ; Ephraim, Manasseh, Benjamin on the W
Jews, Judaism - The tribal contingent led by Judah was first in the line of march through the wilderness (Numbers 2:3-9 ), and Caleb of Judah joined Joshua, of the tribe of Ephraim, in bringing back a good report about the trip of the twelve spies into Canaan
Lazarus - He did not venture into the city, but retired northward to Ephraim, near the Samaritan frontier
Crucifixion - It was this form of cross that the Fathers had in view when in the crossing of Jacob’s hands as he blessed Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 48:13-14) they saw a prophecy of the Crucifixion
the Disobedient Prophet - And the decayed old creature rode down the Judean road at a pace he had not ridden since he used, as a godly youth, to be sent out on errands of life and death and mercy from Samuel's School of Mount Ephraim
Mephibosheth - A few days after that the great battle was set in the wood of Ephraim, and of Absalom's side there was a great slaughter of twenty thousand men
Canaan - The lowland especially was the country of the Canaanites; the plains between the Mediterranean on one side, and the hills of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim on the other; the shephelah , or low hills of Philistia, on the S
Number - It is suggested that the number 12 for the tribes of Israel was fixed by the Zodiac; in the lists the number 12 is obtained only by omitting Levi or Dan, or by substituting Joseph for Ephraim and Manasseh
Messiah - The swiftly passing series of short reigns terminated by violence which filled the space of 15 years in Northern Israel from the close of the dynasty of Jehu (which lasted nearly a century) to the accession of Hoshea, Assyria’s nominee, to the dismembered kingdom, deeply impressed the prophet of Ephraim, who exclaims:—...
‘They have appointed kings, but not from me (i
Zechariah, the Book of - The mention of Ephraim and Israel as distinct from Judah, in chapters 10 to 14, points to the ultimate restoration, not only of the Jews but of the northern Israelite ten tribes, who never returned as a body from their Assyrian captivity, the earnest of which was given in the numbers out of the ten tribes who returned with their brethren of Judah from the Babylonian captivity under Cyrus
Acts of the Apostles - -It is probable from the quotations in Aphraates and Ephraim that there existed originally an Old-Syriac Version of Acts, corresponding to the Evangelion da-Mepharreshe represented by the Curetonian and Sinaitic Manuscripts ; but no manuscript of this type has survived. Ephraim’s Quotations from the Gospel,’ Texts and Studies vii
David - They met in hostile array at the wood of Ephraim (1618419723_4 )
Old Testament - " But the "commandment" which Ephraim "walked after" is Jeroboam's (1 Kings 12:28-33; 2 Kings 10:28-33; Micah 6:16)
David - The decisive battle follows not long after, in the ‘forest of Ephraim’; Absalom is completely defeated, and loses his life by being caught in a tree by the head whilst fleeing
High Priest - Down to David the high priests officiated in Shiloh in Ephraim, Joshua's tribe; under David and thenceforth in Jerusalem of Judah, David's tribe: the secular power from the first influencing the ecclesiastical
Gospels - His route was through Samaria into Galilee from Ephraim (Luke 9:51; John 11:54) as the starting point, then along the border between Galilee and Samaria into Peraea (Luke 17:11; Luke 13:31), so by Jericho to Bethany and Jerusalem (Birks' Horae Evangel
Barnabas, Epistle of - But the same thing is shewn both by Scripture and by fact—by Scripture, for in the cases of the children of Rebekah, and of the blessing of Ephraim and Manasseh, we learn that the last shall be first and the first last (c
Passover - "...
Hezekiah presumes that those out of Ephraim coming to the Passover were sincere in seeking Jehovah the God of their fathers, though they had been unable to purify themselves in time for the Passover
Priests And Levites - The priest Eli seems to have had a large influence and to have exercised a jurisdiction over at least the whole tribe of Ephraim
Prophecy - ' We see 'Ephraim so broken as to be no more a people, ' while the whole nation is comprehended under the name of Judah; the Jews wonderfully preserved as a distinct people, while their great conquerors are everywhere destroyed; their land lying desolate, and themselves cut off from being the people of God, while the Gentiles are advanced in their room
Joshua - We know nothing as yet about Joshua-nothing but this, that he was not the son of Moses and Zipporah, but of a certain unknown man named Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim
John, Gospel of - As examples we may mention Bethany beyond Jordan ( John 1:28 ), Ænon ( John 3:23 ), Ephraim ( John 11:54 ), the treasury ( John 8:20 ), the pool of Siloam ( John 9:7 ), Solomon’s porch ( John 10:23 ), the Kidron ( John 18:1 )
Psalms - Of Asaph's psalms, four are composed by David's chief musician: Psalm 50; Psalm 73; Psalm 78 (warning Ephraim not to rebel against God's transfer of their prerogative to Zion and Judah), Psalm 82; a didactic and prophetic character marks them all
Barnabas, Epistle of - Of these, the Jews, the elder, are in the position of Esau and of Manasseh, who, though the first-born of their respective fathers, did not inherit the blessing; the Christians, like Jacob and Ephraim, though in each case the younger, have been made the recipients of the promise (ch
Announcements of Death - With this formal decision resting over Him, Jesus withdrew to the hills of Ephraim, near where in the beginning He had refused Satan’s offer of a compromise, and had chosen His own way and the Father’s
Canaan - This country was once adorned with woods and forests: as we read of the forest of cedars in Lebanon, the forest of oaks in Bashan, the forest or wood of Ephraim, and the forest of Hareth in the tribe of Judah
Joseph - not literally forgetting his relatives, for "his father" was uppermost in his affections; but has swallowed past sorrow in present joy; compare Psalms 90:15; Isaiah 65:16-17; Isaiah 61:7; Isaiah 62:4; Proverbs 30:20; spiritually, Psalms 45:10); and Ephraim, "doubly fruitful," Joseph again attributing all to God, "God hath caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction" (compare Genesis 49:22; John 15:2 ff)
Jerusalem - Probably the Ephraim- and Corner-gates ( 2 Kings 14:13 ) were somewhere in this neighbourhood
Prophet - If, then, the preaching of Isaiah raised the gibes of the drunkards of Ephraim, and if the unwelcome predictions of Jeremiah led to bitterest persecution, is it any wonder that the clear light of the revelation of Jesus infuriated ‘the blind Pharisee,’ and ended in His cruel mockings and death?...
III
Clementine Literature - the Homilies ), and contains also a continuation of the story, use being made therein of the martyrdom of Clement by Simeon Metaphrastes, and of a tale by Ephraim, bp
Justinianus i, Emperor - The other three, Ephraim of Antioch, Peter of Jerusalem, Zoilus of Alexandria, under real or imagined threats of deposition, obeyed and signed, and after more or less intimidation and the offer of various rewards, the great majority of bishops through Syria, Asia Minor, Greece, and Macedonia signed also