What does Ephesus mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἔφεσον a maritime city of Asia Minor 8
ἐφέσῳ a maritime city of Asia Minor 6
ἐφέσου a maritime city of Asia Minor 2

Definitions Related to Ephesus

G2181


   1 a maritime city of Asia Minor, capital of Ionia and under the Romans, of proconsular Asia, situated on the Icarian Sea between Smyrna and Miletus.
   Additional Information: Ephesus = “permitted”.
   

Frequency of Ephesus (original languages)

Frequency of Ephesus (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ephesus
The capital of proconsular Asia, which was the western part of Asia Minor. It was colonized principally from Athens. In the time of the Romans it bore the title of "the first and greatest metropolis of Asia." It was distinguished for the Temple of Diana (q.v.), who there had her chief shrine; and for its theatre, which was the largest in the world, capable of containing 50,000 spectators. It was, like all ancient theatres, open to the sky. Here were exhibited the fights of wild beasts and of men with beasts. (Compare 1 Corinthians 4:9 ; 9:24,25 ; 15:32 .) Many Jews took up their residence in this city, and here the seeds of the gospel were sown immediately after Pentecost (Acts 2:9 ; 6:9 ). At the close of his second missionary journey (about A.D. 51), when Paul was returning from Greece to Syria (18:18-21), he first visited this city. He remained, however, for only a short time, as he was hastening to keep the feast, probably of Pentecost, at Jerusalem; but he left Aquila and Priscilla behind him to carry on the work of spreading the gospel.
During his third missionary journey Paul reached Ephesus from the "upper coasts" (Acts 19:1 ), i.e., from the inland parts of Asia Minor, and tarried here for about three years; and so successful and abundant were his labours that "all they which dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord Jesus, both Jews and Greeks" (19:10). Probably during this period the seven churches of the Apocalypse were founded, not by Paul's personal labours, but by missionaries whom he may have sent out from Ephesus, and by the influence of converts returning to their homes.
On his return from his journey, Paul touched at Miletus, some 30 miles south of Ephesus (Acts 20:15 ), and sending for the presbyters of Ephesus to meet him there, he delivered to them that touching farewell charge which is recorded in Acts 20:18-35 . Ephesus is not again mentioned till near the close of Paul's life, when he writes to Timothy exhorting him to "abide still at Ephesus" (1 Timothy 1:3 ).
Two of Paul's companions, Trophimus and Tychicus, were probably natives of Ephesus (Acts 20:4 ; 21:29 ; 2 Timothy 4:12 ). In his second epistle to Timothy, Paul speaks of Onesiphorus as having served him in many things at Ephesus (2 Timothy 1:18 ). He also "sent Tychicus to Ephesus" (4:12), probably to attend to the interests of the church there. Ephesus is twice mentioned in the Apocalypse (1:11; 2:1).
The apostle John, according to tradition, spent many years in Ephesus, where he died and was buried.
A part of the site of this once famous city is now occupied by a small Turkish village, Ayasaluk, which is regarded as a corruption of the two Greek words, hagios theologos; i.e., "the holy divine."
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Apollonius of Ephesus
Apollonius of Ephesus, so called on the doubtful authority of the writer of Praedestinatus, ed. by Sirmond, who styles him bp. of Ephesus, but the silence of Eusebius and all other earlier testimony makes it difficult to lay much stress on this statement. He wrote a work in five books against the Cataphrygian or Montanist heresy. Fragments of the first three books are extant in Eusebius ( H. E. v. 18), and contain much that is curious and valuable with regard to the lives and characters of Montanus, the prophetesses Priscilla and Maximilla, and their followers. Jerome also devotes an article to Apollonius. Vir. Illust. c. 50, in which he calls him ἀνὴρ ἐλλογιμώτατος , the author of a μέγα καὶ ἐπίσημον τεῦχος , and quotes him as stating that Montanus and his prophetesses hanged themselves. The book professes to be written 40 years after the commencement of Montanus's pretensions to prophesy. Taking for the rise of Montanism the date given in the Chronicon of Eusebius (A.D. 172), this would give about A.D. 210 for the date of this work. Eusebius mentions also that Apollonius cites the Revelation of St. John, that he relates the raising to life of a dead man at Ephesus by the same John, and that he makes mention of the tradition quoted also by Clement of Alexandria ( Strom. vi. 5 sub finem ) from the Apocryphal "Preaching of Peter" that our Lord commanded His apostles not to leave Jerusalem for twelve years after His ascension. This work of Apollonius was thought sufficiently important by Tertullian to demand an answer; bk. vii. of his lost work, de Ecstasi, was devoted to a refutation of his assertions (Hieron. de Vir. Ill . c. 50). Tillemont, Hist. Eccl. ii. 426; Bonwetsch. Gesch. des Montanismus (Erlanger, 1881).
[1]
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ephesus
(ehf' uh ssuhss) One of the largest and most impressive cities in the ancient world, a political, religious, and commercial center in Asia Minor. Associated with the ministries of Paul, Timothy, and the apostle John, the city played a significant role in the spread of early Christianity. Ephesus and its inhabitants are mentioned more than twenty times in the New Testament.
Location The ancient city of Ephesus, located in western Asia Minor at the mouth of the Cayster River, was an important seaport. Situated between the Maeander River to the south and the Hermus River to the north, Ephesus had excellent access to both river valleys which allowed it to flourish as a commercial center. Due to the accumulation of silt deposited by the river, the present site of the city is approximately five to six miles inland.
Historical Background The earliest inhabitants of Ephesus were a group of peoples called Leleges and Carians who were driven out around 1000 B.C. by Ionian Greek settlers led by Androclus of Athens. The new inhabitants of Ephesus assimilated the native religion of the area, the worship of a goddess of fertility whom they identified with the Greek goddess Artemis, the virgin huntress. (Later the Romans identified Artemis with their goddess Diana.)
Around 560 B.C. Croesus of Lydia conquered Ephesus and most of western Asia Minor. Under Croesus' rule, the city was moved farther south and a magnificent temple, the Artemision, was constructed for the worship of Artemis. In 547 B.C., following the defeat of Croesus by Cyrus of Persia, Ephesus came under Persian control. Disaster struck the city in 356 when fire destroyed the Artemision.
Alexander the Great, who was reportedly born on the same day as the Artemision fire, took over the area in 334 B.C. His offer to finance the ongoing reconstruction of the temple was diplomatically declined. The rebuilt temple, completed about 250 B.C., became known as one of the Seven Wonders of the World.
Lysimachus, one of Alexander's generals, ruled over Ephesus from about 301 to 281 B.C., when he was killed by Seleucus I. Under Lysimachus the city was moved again, this time to higher ground to escape the danger of flooding. City walls were built; a new harbor was constructed; and new streets were laid out. After the death of Lysimachus, Ephesus fell under the control of the Seleucids until their defeat by the Romans in 189 B.C. Rome gave the city to the king of Pergamum as a reward for his military assistance. In 133 B.C., at the death of the last Pergamum ruler, the city came under direct Roman control.
Under the Romans, Ephesus thrived, reaching the pinnacle of its greatness during the first and second centuries of the Christian era. At the time of Paul, Ephesus was probably the fourth largest city in the world, with a population estimated at 250,000. During the reign of the emperor Hadrian, Ephesus was designated the capital of the Roman province of Asia. The grandeur of the ancient city is evident in the remains uncovered by archaeologists, including the ruins of the Artemision, the civic agora, the temple of Domitian, gymnasiums, public baths, a theater with seating for 24,000, a library, and the commercial agora, as well as several streets and private residences. Also discovered were the head and forearm of a colossal statue of the emperor Domitian. Today the Turkish town of Seljuk occupies the site of ancient Ephesus.
Ephesus in the New Testament Paul stopped at Ephesus at the end of his second missionary journey, left Priscilla and Aquila there, and returned to Antioch (Acts 18:18-21 ). Apollos preached in Ephesus soon thereafter and met Priscilla and Aquila who “expounded unto him the way of God more perfectly” (Acts 18:26 ). Paul, on his third journey, spent more than two years in Ephesus teaching and preaching in the synagogue and in the hall of Tyrannus. The success of his preaching at Ephesus triggered a riot headed by the silversmiths who feared that their business of selling miniature replicas of Artemis (Diana) or her temple would suffer severely (Acts 19:24-41 ). After the town clerk quelled the disturbance, Paul left Ephesus for Macedonia. At the conclusion of this missionary endeavor, on his way back to Palestine, Paul stopped at Miletus and sent for the elders of the church in Ephesus so that he might speak with them (Acts 20:17 ).
Ephesus is also mentioned in 1 Corinthians 15:32 . Paul noted that he had fought with beasts at Ephesus. Many commentators understand this statement to be only a figurative reference to strong and dangerous opposition. At the close of 1Corinthians, Paul wrote that he would remain at Ephesus until Pentecost “for a great door and effectual is opened unto me, and there are many adversaries” (1 Corinthians 16:8-9 ).
Elsewhere in the New Testament Ephesus appears as the location of one of the seven churches addressed in Revelation (Revelation 1:11 ; Revelation 2:1 ). Ephesus, the leading city of Asia Minor, is appropriately the first of the seven churches. In the opening verse of the letter to the Ephesians some manuscripts describe the recipients of the letter as the saints who are “at Ephesus.” The earliest and most reliable manuscripts, however, do not include the reference to Ephesus. In 1,2Timothy, Ephesus is mentioned three times. Timothy was urged to remain at Ephesus (1 Timothy 1:3 ); reference is made to Onesiphorus and “in how many things he ministered unto me at Ephesus” (2 Timothy 1:16-18 ); and the writer stated that Tychicus had been sent to Ephesus (2 Timothy 4:12 ).
Christian tradition from the second century and later claimed that the apostle John moved to Ephesus, and after living to an old age, died a natural death there. Another, more dubious tradition states that Mary the mother of Jesus also died in Ephesus. See Asia Minor; Ephesians; Revelation, Book of; Timothy .
Mitchell G. Reddish
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ephesus
EPHESUS . The capital of the Roman province Asia; a large and ancient city at the mouth of the river Cayster, and about 3 miles from the open sea. The origin of the name, which is native and not Greek, is unknown. It stood at the entrance to one of the four clefts in the surrounding hills. It is along these valleys that the roads through the central plateau of Asia Minor pass. The chief of these was the route up the Mæander as far as the Lycus, its tributary, then along the Lycus towards Apamea. It was the most important avenue of civilization in Asia Minor under the Roman Empire. Miletus had been in earlier times a more important harbour than Ephesus, but the track across from this main road to Ephesus was much shorter than the road to Miletus, and was over a pass only 600 ft. high. Consequently Ephesus replaced Miletus before and during the Roman Empire, especially as the Mæander had silted up so much as to spoil the harbour at the latter place. It became the great emporium for all the trade N. of Mt. Taurus.
Ephesus was on the main route from Rome to the East, and many side roads and sea-routes converged at it (Acts 19:21 ; Acts 20:1 ; Act 20:17 , 1 Timothy 1:3 , 2 Timothy 4:12 ). The governors of the provinces in Asia Minor had always to land at Ephesus. It was an obvious centre for the work of St. Paul, as influences from there spread over the whole province ( Acts 19:10 ). Corinth was the next great station on the way to Rome, and communication between the two places was constant. The ship in Acts 18:19 , bound from Corinth for the Syrian coast, touched first at Ephesus.
Besides Paul, Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21 f.) and Timothy (according to 1 Timothy 1:3 , 2 Timothy 4:9 ), John Mark ( Colossians 4:10 , 1 Peter 5:13 ), and the writer of the Apocalypse ( Revelation 1:11 ; Revelation 2:1 ) were acquainted with Asia or Ephesus.
The harbour of Ephesus was kept large enough and deep enough only by constant attention. The alluvial deposits were (and are) so great that, when once the Roman Empire had ceased to hold sway, the harbour became gradually smaller and smaller, so that now Ephesus is far away from the sea. Even in St. Paul’s time there appear to have been difficulties about navigating the channel, and ships avoided Ephesus except when loading or unloading was necessary (cf. Acts 20:16 ). The route by the high lands, from Ephesus to the East, was suitable for foot passengers and light traffic, and was used by St. Paul ( Acts 19:1 ; probably also Acts 16:6 ). The alternative was the main road through Colossæ and Laodicea neither of which St. Paul ever visited ( Colossians 2:1 ).
In the open plain, about 5 miles from the sea, S. of the river, stands a little hill which has always been a religious centre. Below its S. W. slope was the temple sacred to Artemis (see Diana of the Ephesians). The Greek city Ephesus was built at a distance of 1 2 miles S. W. of this hill. The history of the town turns very much on the opposition between the free Greek spirit of progress and the slavish submission of the Oriental population to the goddess. Crœsus the Lydian represented the predominance of the latter over the former, but Lysimachus (b.c. 295) revived the Greek influence. Ephesus, however, was always proud of the position of ‘Warden of the Temple of Artemis’ (Acts 19:35 ). The festivals were thronged by crowds from the whole of the province of Asia. St. Paul, whose residence in Ephesus lasted 2 years and 3 months ( Acts 19:8 ; Acts 19:10 ), or roughly expressed, 3 years ( Acts 20:31 ). at first incurred no opposition from the devotees of the goddess, because new foreign religions did not lessen the influence of the native goddess; but when his teaching proved prejudicial to the money interests of the people who made a living out of the worship, he was at once bitterly attacked. Prior to this occurrence, his influence had caused many of the famous magicians of the place to burn their books ( Acts 19:13-19 ). The riot of 19:32 was no mere passing fury of a section of the populace. The references to Ephesus in the Epistles show that the opposition to Christianity there was as long-continued as it was virulent ( 1 Corinthians 15:32 ; 1Co 16:9 , 2 Corinthians 1:8 ; 2 Corinthians 1:10 ).
The scene in Acts 19:23 ff. derives some Illustration from an account of the topography and the government of the city. The ruins of the theatre are large, and it has been calculated that it could hold 24,000 people. It was on the western slope of Mt. Pion, and overlooked the harbour. The Asiarchs (see Asiarch), who were friendly to St. Paul, may have been present in Ephesus at that time on account of a meeting of their body ( Acts 19:31 ). The town-clerk or secretary of the city appears as a person of importance, and this is exactly in accordance with what is known of municipal affairs in such cities. The Empire brought decay of the influence of popular assemblies, which tended more and more to come into the hands of the officials, though the assembly at Ephesus was really the highest municipal authority ( Acts 19:39 ), and the Roman courts and the proconsuls ( Acts 19:38 ) were the final judicial authority in processes against individuals. The meeting of the assembly described in Acts was not a legal meeting. Legal meetings could be summoned only by the Roman officials, who had the power to call together the people when they pleased. The secretary tried to act as intermediary between the people and these officials, and save the people from trouble at their hands. The temple of Artemis which existed in St. Paul’s day was of enormous size. Apart from religious purposes, it was used as a treasure-house: as to the precise arrangements for the charge of this treasure we are in ignorance.
There is evidence outside the NT also for the presence of Jews in Ephesus. The twelve who had been baptized with the baptism of John (Acts 19:3 ) may have been persons who had emigrated to Ephesus before the mission of Jesus began. When St. Paul turned from the Jews to the population in general, he appeared, as earlier in Athens, as a lecturer in philosophy, and occupied the school of Tyrannus out of school hours. The earlier part of the day, beginning before dawn, he spent in manual labour. The actual foundation of Christianity in Ephesus may have been due to Priscilla and Aquila ( Acts 18:19 ).
‘Ephesian’ occurs as a variant reading in the ‘Western’ text of Acts 20:4 for the words ‘of Asia,’ as applied to Tychicus and Trophimus. Trophimus was an inhabitant of Ephesus ( Acts 21:29 ), capital of Asia; but Tychicus was probably merely an Inhabitant of the province Asia; hence they are coupled under the only adjective applicable to both. It is hardly safe to infer from the fact that Tychicus bore the letter to the Colossians that he belonged to Colossæ (province Asia); but it is possible that he did.
A. Souter.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ephesus
(Ἔφεσος, a graecized form of a native Anatolian name)
The town of Ephesus was a little south of latitude 38°N., at the head of a gulf situated about the middle of the western coast of Asia Minor. It lay on the left bank of the river Cayster, at the foot of hills which slope towards the river. In ancient times the river reached to the city pates, but its mouth has gradually silted up so that the city is now some four to six miles from the sea. The effect of the river’s action has been to raise the level of the land all over. The ruins, the most extensive in Asia Minor, give an idea of how large the ancient city was. The extent of the area covered by it cannot now be exactly estimated; but, as the population in St. Paul’s time was probably about a third of a million, and in ancient times open spaces were frequent and ‘sky-scrapers’ unknown, the city must have been large, even according to our standards. The temple of Artemis (see Diana), the ruins of which were discovered by Wood, lies now about five miles from the coast, and was the most imposing feature of the city. Its site must have been sacred from very early times, and successive temples were built on it. Other notable features of the city were the fine harbour along the banks of the Cayster, the aqueducts, and the great road following the line of the Cayster to Sardis, with a branch to Smyrna. The heat in summer is very great, and fever is prevalent. The harvest rain storms are violent. The site was nevertheless so attractive that it must have been very early occupied. The ancients dated the settlement of Ionian Greeks there early in the 11th cent. b.c., and the city long before St. Paul’s time had become thoroughly Greek, maintaining constant intercourse with Corinth and the rest of Greece proper.
The history of the city, with its changing government, need not be traced here. It fell under Roman sway, with the rest of the district, which the Romans called ‘Asia’ (q.v. [1] ) by the will of Attalus iii. (Philometor), the Pergamenian king, in 133 b.c. In 88 b.c. the inhabitants sided with Mithridates, king of Pontus, and slaughtered all resident Romans. They were punished in 84 by Sulla, who ravaged the city. During the rule of Augustus the city was embellished by a number of new buildings.
When Ephesus came into contact with Christianity, it still retained all its ancient glory. With its Oriental religion, its Greek culture, its Roman government, and its world-wide commerce, it stood midway between two continents, being on the one hand the gateway of Asia to crowds of Western officials and travellers, as Bombay is the portal of India to-day, and on the other hand the rendezvous of multitudes of Eastern pilgrims coming to worship at Artemis’ shrine. Traversed by the great Imperial highway of intercourse and commerce, it had all nationalities meeting and mingling in its streets. No wonder if it felt its ecumenical importance, and believed that what was said and done by its citizens was quickly heard and imitated by ‘all Asia and the world’ (ἡ οἰκουμένη, Acts 19:27).
In Ephesus a noble freedom of thought and a vulgar superstition lived side by side. The city of Thales and Heraclitus contained many men of rich culture and deep philosophy, who were earnest seekers after truth. Prominent citizens like the Asiarchs (q.v. [1] ), who were officially bound to foster the cultus of Rome and the Emperor, yet regarded St. Paul and his message with marked friendliness (Acts 19:31). Nothing but a wide-spread receptivity to fresh ideas can account for the wonderful success of the first Christian mission in the city, and for the reverberation of the truth ‘almost throughout all Asia’ (Acts 19:26). The best mind of the age was wistfully awaiting a new order of things. Having tried eclecticism and syncretism in vain, it was ‘standing between two worlds, one dead, the other powerless to be born.’ When, therefore, the startling news came from Syria to Ephesus that the Son of God had lived, died, and risen again, it ran like wildfire; its first announcement created another Pentecost (Acts 19:6); and in two years ‘all they who dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord, both Jews and Greeks’ (Acts 19:10).
Every spiritual revival has ethical issues, and Ephesus quickly recognized that the new truth was a new ‘Way’ (Acts 19:23). The doctrine now taught in the School or Tyrannus, formerly the home of one knows not what subtle and futile theories, had a direct bearing upon human lives. That was why it made ‘no small stir’ (Acts 19:23). The message which St. Paul delivered ‘publicly and from house to house’ (Acts 20:20), admonishing men ‘night and day with tears’ (Acts 20:31), was morally revolutionary. It was a call to repentance and faith (Acts 20:21); and, though no frontal attack was made upon the established religion of Ephesus, and no language used which could fairly be construed as offensive (Acts 19:37), yet it soon became apparent that the old order and the new could not thrive peacefully side by side. The gospel of mercy to all was a gage of battle to many. St. Paul, therefore, found that, while Ephesus opened ‘a door wide and effectual’ (ἐνεργής) there were ‘many adversaries’ (1 Corinthians 16:9). This did not surprise or disappoint him. The fanatical hatred of Ephesus was better than the polite scorn of Athens. As the city of Artemis lived largely upon the superstition of the multitude, not only the priests who enjoyed the rich revenues of the Temple, but also the artisans who made ‘shrines’ for pilgrims, felt that if Christianity triumphed their occupation would be gone. Religion was for Ephesus a lucrative ‘business’ (ἐργασία, Acts 19:24-25), and the ‘craft’ (τὸ μέρος, this branch of trade) of many was in danger. Indeed, the dispute which arose affected the whole city, being regarded as nothing less than a duel between Artemis and Christ. If He were enthroned in the Ephesian heart, she would be deposed from her magnificence, and the greatest temple in the world ‘made of no account’ (Acts 19:27). The situation created a drama of real life which was enacted in and around the famous theatre of Ephesus. The gild of silversmiths, led by their indignant president Demetrius (q.v. [1] ); the ignorant mob, excited to fanatical frenzy; the crafty Jews, quick to dissociate themselves from their Christian compatriots; the brave Apostle, eager to appear before ‘the people’ (τὸν δῆμον) of a free city; the friendly Asiarchs, constraining him to temper valour with discretion; the calm, dignified, eloquent Secretary (γραμματεύς), stilling the angry passions of the multitude; and behind all, as unseen presences, the majesty of Imperial Rome, the sensuous charm of Artemis, the spiritual power of Christ-these all combined to give a sudden revelation of the soul of a city. The practical result was that a vindication of the liberty of prophesying was drawn from the highest municipal authority, who evidently felt that in this matter he was interpreting the mind of Rome herself. To represent Christianity as a religio licita was clearly one of the leading aims of St. Luke as a historian.
The fidelity of St. Luke’s narrative in its political allusions and local colour has received confirmation from many sources. As the virtual capital of a senatorial province, Ephesus had its proconsuls (ἀνθύπατοι, Acts 19:38), but here the plural is merely used colloquially, without implying that there could ever be more than one at a time. As the head of a conventus iuridicus, Ephesus was an assize town, in which the judges were apparently sitting at the very time of the riot (Acts 19:38). Latin was the language of the courts, and ἀγοραῖοι ἄγονται is the translation of conventus aguntur. As a free city of the Empire, Ephesus had still a semblance of ancient Ionic autonomy; her affairs were ‘settled in a regular assembly’ (v, 39), i.e. either at an ordinary meeting of the Demos held in the theatre on a fixed day, or at an extraordinary meeting called by authority of the proconsul. Irregular meetings of the populace were sternly prohibited (Acts 19:40) and, indeed, the powers of the lawful assembly were more and more curtailed, till at last it practically had to content itself with registering the decrees of the Roman Senate. The proud claim of Ephesus to be the temple-warden (νεωκόρον, lit. [4] ‘temple-sweeper’) of Artemis (Acts 19:35) is attested by inscriptions and coins (W. M. Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, 1895, i. 58; Letters to the Seven Churches, 232). The Asiarchs who befriended St. Paul had no official connexion with the cult of Artemis; they were members of the Commune whose function it was to unite the Empire in a religious devotion to Rome.
St. Paul’s pathetic address at Miletus to the elders of Ephesus (Acts 20:16-35), in which he recalls the leading features of his strenuous mission in the city-his tears and trials (Acts 20:19), his public and private teaching (Acts 20:20), his incessant spiritual and manual toil (Acts 20:31-34)-and declares himself pure from the blood of all men (Acts 20:26), presents as high an ideal of the ministerial vocation as has ever been conceived and recorded. There is no reason to doubt that it gives an approximate summary of his original words (cf. J. Moffatt, Introd. to Literature of the New Testament (Moffatt)., p. 306).
With the religious history of Ephesus are also associated the names of Priscilla and Aquila (Acts 18:18), Apollos (Acts 18:24, 1 Corinthians 16:12), Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21), Timothy (1 Timothy 1:3, 2 Timothy 4:9), and especially John the Apostle and John the Presbyter. After the departure of St. Paul the Ephesian Church was injured by the activity of false teachers (Acts 20:29-30; Revelation 2:4), but the Fall of Jerusalem greatly enhanced its importance, and the influence of the Johannine school made it the centre of Eastern Christianity. In the time of Domitian it had the primacy among the Seven Churches of Asia (Revelation 2:1). The Letter to the Church of Ephesus is on the whole laudatory. The Christian community commanded the writer’s respect by its keen scrutiny of soi-disant apostles, by its intolerance of evil, and its hatred of the libertinism which is the antithesis of legalism. But it had declined in the fervent love which alone made a Church truly lovable to the Apostle. A generation later, however, Ignatius in his Ep. to the Ephesians uses the language of profound admiration:
‘I ought to be trained for the contest by you in faith, in admonition, in endurance in long-suffering (§ 3); ‘for ye all live according to the truth and no heresy hath a home among you; nay, ye do not so much as listen to any one if he speak of aught else save concerning Jesus Christ in truth’ (§ 6); ‘you were ever of one mind with the Apostles in the power of Jesus Christ’ (§ 11).
Ephesus had a long line of bishops, and was the seat of the council which condemned the doctrine of Nestorius in a.d. 431. The ruins of the ancient city, on Coressus and Prion, are extensive and impressive. The theatre in which the riot (Acts 19) Look place is remarkably well preserved, and in 1870 the foundation of the Temple of Artemis was discovered by J. T. Wood. The modern village lying beside the temple bears the name of Ayasoluk, which is a corruption of ἄγιος θεολόγος, the title of St. John the Divine which was given to the Church of Justinian.
Literature.-W. M. Ramsay, Letters to the Seven Churches, 1904; Murray’s Handbook to Asia Minor, 1895; G. A. Zimmermann, Ephesos im ersten christl. Jahrhundert, 1874; article ‘Ephesus’ in Pauly-Wissowa [5] , v. [6]; J. T. Wood, Discoveries at Ephesus, 1876; E. L. Hicks, Ancient Greek Inscriptions in the Brit. Museum, iii. 2 [7]; D. G. Hogarth, Excavations in Ephesus: the Archaic Artemisia, 2 vols., 1908.
Alexander Souter and James Strahan.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ephesus, Third Council of
Æcumenical Council, 431. Presided over by Saint Cyril, Patriarch of Alexandria, it condemned Nestorius, the Bishop of Constantinople, who taught that Mary did not bring forth the Word of God, but the Man who became the temple of the Godhead, "the animated purple of the King." The decision of the council was received with wide acclaim.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ephesus
City, Lydia, Asia Minor, capital of Proconsular Asia; one of the seven churches to whose bishop Saint John was commanded to write (Apocalypse 1). To the faithful chiefly in this city Paul addressed his letter "to the Ephesians." It became an archbishopric and is now a titular see. There was held the Third General Council and also the "Robber Council of Ephesus."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ephesus, Robber Council of
Held at Ephesus in 449, it was not really a council but a synod called to vindicate the heresiarch Eutyches from the condemnation of Saint Flavian, Patriarch of Constantinople. Disgraceful scenes of violence occurred during one of the flrst sessions; Eutyches was vindicated, and Saint Flavian, and Theodoret, Bishop of Cyprus, were condemned without hearings. Both appealed to Rome. Pope Saint Leo excommunicated all who had taken part in the assembly and declared all its acts null.
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Heraclides Cyprius, Bishop of Ephesus
Heraclides (5) Cyprius, bp. of Ephesus; a native of Cyprus, who had received a liberal education, was versed in the Scriptures, and had passed some years in ascetic training in the desert of Scetis under Evagrius. He then became deacon to Chrysostom, and was in immediate attendance on him. On the deprivation of Antoninus, bp. of Ephesus, a.d. 401, there being a deadlock in the election through the number of rival candidates and the violence of the opposing factions, Chrysostom brought Heraclides forward, and he was elected by the votes of seventy bishops to the vacant see. The election at first only increased the disturbance, and loud complaints were made of the unfitness of Heraclides for the office, which detained Chrysostom in Asia (Socr. H. E. vi. ii; Soz. H. E. viii. 6; Pallad. p. 139). At the assembling of the synod of the Oak, a.d. 403, Heraclides was summoned to answer certain specified charges brought against him by Macarius, bp. of Magnesia, a bishop named Isaac, and a monk named John Among these charges was one of holding Origenizing views. The urgency with which the condemnation of Chrysostom was pressed forward retarded the suit against Heraclides which had come to no issue when his great master was deposed and banished. After Chrysostom's second and final exile in 404, Heraclides was his fellow-sufferer. He was deposed by the party in power, and put in prison at Nicomedia, where, when Palladius wrote, he had been already languishing for years. A eunuch who, according to Palladius, was stained with the grossest vices, was consecrated bp. of Ephesus in his room (Pallad. Dial. ed. Bigot. p. 139). On the ascription to this Heraclides of the Lausiac History of Palladius, under the name of Paradisus Heraclidis, see PALLADIUS (7); also Fabricius, Bibl. Graec. x. 117; Ceillier, vii. 487.
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Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Angel of the Church of Ephesus
YOU are not to think of an angel with six wings. This is neither a Michael nor a Gabriel. I cannot give you this man's name, but you may safely take it that he was simply one of the oldest of the office-bearers of Ephesus. No, he was no angel. He was just a chosen and faithful elder who had begun by being a deacon and who had purchased to himself a good degree, like any one of yourselves. Only, by reason of his great age and his spotless character and his outstanding services, he had by this time risen till he was now at the head of what we would call the kirk-session of Ephesus. By universal acclamation he was now the "president of their company, and the moderator of their actions," as Dr. John Rainoldes has it. This angel, so to call him, had grown grey in his eldership and he was beginning to feel that the day could not now be very far distant when he would be able to lay down his office for ever. At the same time, it looked to him but like yesterday when he had heard the prince of the apostles saying to him those never-to-be-forgotten words-"Take heed to thyself, and to all the flock over which the Holy Ghost hath made thee an overseer, to feed the flock of God, which He hath purchased with His own blood." And, with many mistakes, and with many shortcomings, this ruling and teaching elder of Ephesus has not been wholly unmindful of his ordination vows. In short, this so-called angel of the Church of Ephesus was no more an actual angel than I am. A real angel is an angel. And we cannot attain to a real angel's nature, or to his office, so as to describe such an angel aright. But we understand this Ephesus elder's nature and office quite well. We see his very same office every day among ourselves. For his office was just to feed the flock of God, as Paul has it. And again, as James has it, his office was just to visit the widows and orphans of Ephesus in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world of Ephesus. And he who has been elected of God to such an office as that in Ephesus, or in Edinburgh, or anywhere else, has no need to envy the most shining angel in all the seven heavens. For the most far-shining angel in the seventh heaven itself desires to look down into the pulpit and the pastorate of the humblest and obscurest minister in the Church of Christ. And that because he knows quite well that there is nothing for him to do in the whole of heaven for one moment to be compared with the daily round on this earth of a minister, or an elder, or a deacon, or a collector, or a Sabbath-school teacher.
Now, there is nothing so sweet, either among angels or among men, as to be appreciated and praised. To be appreciated and praised is the wine that maketh glad the heart of God and man. And the heart of the old minister of Ephesus was made so glad when he began to read this Epistle that he almost died with delight. And then as His all-seeing and all-rewarding way always is, His Lord descended to instances and particulars in His appreciation and praise of His servant. 'I know thy works. I chose thee. I gave thee all thy talents. I elected thee to thy charge in Ephesus. I ordained thee to that charge, and my right hand hath held thee up in it. Thou hast never been out of my mind or out of my eye or out of my hand for a moment. I have seen all thy work as thou wentest about doing it for me. It is all written before me in my book. All thy tears also are in my bottle.'
We have an old-fashioned English word that exactly sets forth what our Lord says next to the angel of Ephesus. 'I know all thy painfulness also,' He says. It is a most excellent expression for our Master's purpose. No other language has produced so many painful ministers as the English language, and no other language can so well describe them. For just what does this painfulness mean? It means all that is left behind for us to fill up of His own painful sufferings. It means all that tribulation through which every true minister of His goes up. It means cutting off now a right hand and plucking out now a right eye. It means taking up some ministerial cross every day. It means drinking every day the cup of the sinfulness of sin. It means to me old Thomas Shepard more than any other minister that I know. "Labour," as our bloodless version has it is a far too dry, a far too wooden, and a far too tearless, word, for our Lord to employ toward such servants of His. Depend upon it He will not content Himself with saying "labour" only. He will select and will distinguish His words on that day. And to all who among ourselves have preached and prayed and have examined themselves in and after their preaching and praying, as it would seem that this angel at one time did, and as Thomas Shepard always did, their Master will signalise and appreciate and praise their "painfulness" in their own so expressive old English, and they will appreciate and appropriate His so suitable word and will appreciate and praise Him back again for it.
His patience is another of the praises that his Master gives to this once happy minister. I do not suppose that the angel of Ephesus counted himself a specially happy man when, all unthought of to himself, he was laying up in heaven all this eulogium upon himself and upon his patience. But all the more, with such a suffering servant, his Master held Himself bound to take special knowledge of all that went on in the Church of Ephesus. And to this day and among all our so altered circumstances, patience continues to take a foremost place in the heart and in all the ministry of every successor of the true apostleship. Nay, patience was not only an apostolic grace, it was much more a Messianic grace. Patience was one of the most outstanding and far-shining graces of our Lord Himself as long as He was by far the most sorely tried of all His ministers. And He has all men and all things in His hands to this day that He may so order all men and all things as that all His ministers shall be put to this school all their days, as He was put all His days by His Father. The whole of every minister's lot and life is divinely ordained him so as to win for him his crown of patience, if he will only listen and believe it. "I know all thy patience," said our Lord to the angel of Ephesus.
I do not the least know who or what the Nicolaitans of Ephesus were, and no one that I have consulted is any wiser than I am, unless it is Pascal. And Pascal says that their name is equivocal. When that great genius and great saint comes upon the Nicolaitans in these Epistles, he has an original way of interpretation all his own. He always interprets this name, so he tells us, of his own bad passions. And not the Nicolaitans of Ephesus only; but the Egyptians, and the Babylonians, and as often as the name of any "enemy" occurs in the Old Testament, and it occurs in the Psalms continually, that so great and so original man interprets and translates them all into his own sinful thoughts and sinful feelings and sinful words and sinful actions. That is I fear a far too mystical and equivocal interpretation for the most of us as yet. To call the Nicolaitans of Ephesus our own wicked hearts, is far too Port-Royal and puritan for such literalists as we are. Only, as one can see, the minister of Ephesus would be swept into the deepest places, and into the most spiritual experiences, both of mysticism and of puritanism before their time, as often as he set himself, as he must surely have henceforth set himself every day of his life, to hate the deeds of the Nicolaitans, whoever they were, and at the same time to love the Nicolaitans themselves. To a neighbour minister in the same Synod our Lord sends a special message about the sharp sword with the two edges. And it would need all the sharpness of that sword and all its edges to divide asunder the deeds of the Nicolaitans from the Nicolaitans themselves in their minister's heart. To divide them, that is, so as to hate their evil deeds with a perfect hatred, and at the same time to love the doers of those deeds with a perfect love. The name Nicolaitan is equivocal, says Pascal.
A litotes is a rhetorical device by means of which far less is said than is intended to be understood. A true litotes has this intention and this result that while, in words, it diminishes what is actually said, in reality, it greatly increases the effect of what is said. What could be a more condemning charge against any minister of Christ than to tell him in plain words that he had left his first love to his Master and to his Master's work? And yet, just by the peculiar way in which that charge is here worded, a far more sudden blow is dealt to this minister's heart than if the charge had been made in the plainest and sternest terms. To say "nevertheless I have somewhat against thee" to say "somewhat," as if it were some very small matter, and scarcely worth mentioning, and then suddenly to say what it is, that, you may depend upon it, gave a shock of horror to that minister's heart that he did not soon get over. You would have thought such a minister impossible. Had you heard his praise so generously spread abroad at first both by God and man you would have felt absolutely sure of that minister's spiritual prosperity and praise to the very end. You would have felt as sure as sure could be that behind all that so immense activity and popularity there must lie hidden a heart as full as it could hold of the deepest and solidest peace with God; a peace, you would have felt sure, without a speck upon it, and with no controversy on Christ's part within a thousand miles of it. But the ministerial heart is deceitful above all other men's hearts. And these shocking revelations about this much-lauded minister have been recorded and preserved in order that all ministers may see themselves in them as in a glass. Now, there is not one moment's doubt about when and where all this terrible declension and decay began to set in. His Master does not say in as many words just when and where matters began to go wrong between them two. But that silence of His is just another of His rhetorical devices. He does not tell it from the housetops of Ephesus, as yet. But the minister of Ephesus knew quite well, both when and where his first love began to fail and he to fall away. He knew quite well without his Master's message about it, that all this declension and collapse began in the time and at the place of secret prayer. For, not this Ephesus minister only, but every minister everywhere continues to love his Master and his Master's work, ay, and his Master's enemies, exactly in the measure of his secret reading of Holy Scripture and his secret prayerfulness. Yes, without being told it in as many words I am as sure of it as if I had been that metropolitan minister myself. You may depend upon it; nay, you know it yourselves quite well, that it was his habitual and long-continued neglect of secret prayer. It was from that declension and decay that his ministry became so undermined and had come now so near a great catastrophe. 'With all my past praise of thee, I give thee this warning,' said that Voice which is as the sound of many waters, 'that unless thou returnest to thy first life of closet communion with Me, I will come to thee quickly and will remove thy candlestick out of its place. I gave thee that congregation when I might have given it to another. And I have upheld thee in it, and have delivered thee out of a thousand distresses of thine. But thou hast wearied of me. Thou hast given thy night watches to other things than a true minister's meditation and prayer for himself and for his people. And I will suffer it at thy hands no longer. Remember from whence thou hast fallen, and repent, and do the first works.'
And now with all that in closing take this as the secret prayer of the angel of Ephesus the very first night after this severe message was delivered to him. 'O Thou that holdest the stars in Thy right hand, and walkest in the midst of the seven golden candlesticks. Thou hast spoken in Thy mercy to me. And thou hast given me an ear to hear Thy merciful words toward me. Lord, I repent. At Thy call I repent. I repent of many things in my ministry in Ephesus. But of nothing so much as of my restraint of secret prayer. This has been my besetting sin. This has been the worm at the root of all my mistakes and misfortunes in my ministry. This has been my blame. O spare me according to Thy word. O suffer me a little longer that I may yet serve Thee. What profit is there in my blood? Shall the dead hold communion with Thee? Shall the grave of a castaway minister redound honour to Thee? Restore Thou my soul. Restore once more to me the joy of Thy salvation, then will I teach transgressors Thy ways, and sinners shall be converted to Thee. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and a contrite heart, O God, Thou wilt not despise. Do good in Thy good pleasure unto Zion; build Thou the walls of Jerusalem.'
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ephesus
A renowned city of Ionia, and in the time of the Romans the capital of the part called 'the province of Asia,' being the west portion of Asia Minor. Being near the sea it was a place of great commerce, and as the capital of the province it had constant intercourse with the surrounding towns.The celebrated temple of Diana also brought multitudes of heathen. Its inhabitants are supposed to have been of Greek origin, with also a large number of Jews engaged in commerce. Acts 18:19-24 ; Acts 19:1,17,26,35 ; Acts 20:16,17 ; 1 Corinthians 15:32 ; 1 Corinthians 16:8 ; Ephesians 1:1 ; 1 Timothy 1:3 ; 2 Timothy 1:18 ; 2 Timothy 4:12 ; Revelation 1:11 ; Revelation 2:1 . It is now named Ayasolook. The ruins are extensive: the sea has retired, leaving a pestilential morass of mud and rushes.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Ephesus
The celebrated city to which Paul sent his Epistle. And one of the seven churches to whom the Lord Jesus sent his message. (See Acts 19:1; Ephesians 1:1; Revelation 2:1)
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ephesus
Ephesus (ef'e-sŭs). The commercial city of Asia Minor, "one of the eyes of Asia." It stood upon the south side of a plain, with mountains on three sides, and the sea on the west. The river Caÿster ran across the plain. Paul visited Ephesus on his second tour, Acts 18:19-21; Apollos was instructed there by Aquila and Priscilla, Acts 18:24-26; Paul dwelt there three years, Acts 19:1-41; charged the elders of the church. Acts 20:16-28; the angel of the church of Ephesus is named in Revelation 2:1-7. The city is now desolate: the ruins of the stadium and theatre remain.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ephesus
a much celebrated city of Ionia, in Asia Minor, situated upon the river Cayster, and on the side of a hill. It was the metropolis of the Proconsular Asia, and formerly in great renown among Heathen authors on account of its famous temple of Diana. This temple was seven times set on fire: one of the principal conflagrations happened on the very day that Socrates was poisoned, four hundred years before Christ; the other, on the same night in which Alexander the Great was born, when a person of the name of Erostratus set it on fire, according to his own confession, to get himself a name! It was, however, rebuilt and beautified by the Ephesians, toward which the female inhabitants of the city contributed liberally. In the times of the Apostles it retained much of its former grandeur; but, so addicted were the inhabitants of the city to idolatry and the arts of magic, that the prince of darkness would seem to have, at that time, fixed his throne in it. Ephesus is supposed to have first invented those obscure mystical spells and charms by means of which the people pretended to heal diseases and drive away evil spirits; whence originated the ‘Εφεσια γραμματα , or Ephesian letters, so often mentioned by the ancients.
2. The Apostle Paul first visited this city, A.D. 54; but being then on his way to Jerusalem, he abode there only a few weeks,
Acts 18:19-21 . During his short stay, he found a synagogue of the Jews, into which he went, and reasoned with them upon the interesting topics of his ministry, with which they were so pleased that they wished him to prolong his visit. He however declined that, for he had determined, God willing, to be at Jerusalem at an approaching festival; but he promised to return, which he did a few months afterward, and continued there three years, Acts 19:10 ; Acts 20:31 . While the Apostle abode in Ephesus and its neighbourhood, he gathered a numerous Christian church, to which, at a subsequent period, he wrote that epistle, which forms so important a part of the Apostolic writings. He was then a prisoner at Rome, and the year in which he wrote it must have been 60 or 61 of the Christian aera. It appears to have been transmitted to them by the hands of Tychicus, one of his companions in travel, Ephesians 6:21 . The critics have remarked that the style of the Epistle to the Ephesians is exceedingly elevated; and that it corresponds to the state of the Apostle's mind at the time of writing. Overjoyed with the account which their messenger brought him of the steadfastness of their faith, and the ardency of their love to all the saints, Ephesians 1:15 ; and, transported with the consideration of the unsearchable wisdom of God displayed in the work of man's redemption, and of his amazing love toward the Gentiles, in introducing them, as fellow-heirs with the Jews, into the kingdom of Christ, he soars into the most exalted contemplation of those sublime topics, and gives utterance to his thoughts in language at once rich and varied. The epistle, says Macknight, is written as it were in a rapture. Grotius remarks that it expresses the sublime matters contained in it in terms more sublime than are to be found in any human language; to which Macknight subjoins this singular but striking observation, that no real Christian can read the doctrinal part of the Epistle to the Ephesians, without being impressed and roused by it, as by the sound of a trumpet.
3. Ephesus was one of the seven churches to which special messages were addressed in the book of Revelation. After a commendation of their first works, to which they were commanded to return, they were accused of having left their first love, and threatened with the removal of their candlestick out of its place, except they should repent, Revelation 2:5 . The contrast which its present state presents to its former glory, is a striking fulfilment of this prophecy. Ephesus was the metropolis of Lydia, a great and opulent city, and, according to Strabo, the greatest emporium of Asia Minor. Its temple of Diana, "whom all Asia worshipped," was adorned with one hundred and twenty-seven columns of Parian marble, each of a single shaft, and sixty feet high, and which formed one of the seven wonders of the world. The remains of its magnificent theatre, in which it is said that twenty thousand people could easily have been seated, are yet to be seen. But a few heaps of stones, and some miserable mud cottages, occasionally tenanted by Turks, without one Christian residing there, are all the remains of ancient Ephesus. It is, as described by different travellers, a solemn and most forlorn spot. The Epistle to the Ephesians is read throughout the world; but there is none in Ephesus to read it now. They left their first love, they returned not to their first works. Their "candlestick has been removed out of its place;" and the great city of Ephesus is no more. Dr. Chandler says, "The inhabitants are a few Greek peasants, living in extreme wretchedness, dependence, and insensibility; the representatives of an illustrious people, and inhabiting the wreck of their greatness: some, in the substructions of the glorious edifices which they raised; some, beneath the vaults of the stadium, once the crowded scene of their diversions; and some, by the abrupt precipice, in the sepulchres which received their ashes. Its streets are obscured and overgrown. A herd of goats was driven to it for shelter from the sun at noon; and a noisy flight of crows from the quarries seemed to insult its silence. We heard the partridge call in the area of the theatre and the stadium. The glorious pomp of its Heathen worship is no longer remembered; and Christianity, which was here nursed by Apostles, and fostered by general councils, until it increased to fulness of stature, barely lingers on in an existence hardly visible." "I
was at Ephesus, says Mr. Arundell, "in January, 1824; the desolation was then complete: a Turk, whose shed we occupied, his Arab servant, and a single Greek, composed the entire population; some Turcomans excepted, whose black tents were pitched among the ruins. The Greek revolution, and the predatory excursions of the Samiotcs, in great measure accounted for this total desertion. There is still, however, a village near, probably the same which Chisull and Van Egmont mention, having four hundred Greek houses."
St. John passed the latter part of his life in Asia Minor, and principally at Ephesus, where he died.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Ephesus
Desirable
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Robber Council of Ephesus
Held at Ephesus in 449, it was not really a council but a synod called to vindicate the heresiarch Eutyches from the condemnation of Saint Flavian, Patriarch of Constantinople. Disgraceful scenes of violence occurred during one of the flrst sessions; Eutyches was vindicated, and Saint Flavian, and Theodoret, Bishop of Cyprus, were condemned without hearings. Both appealed to Rome. Pope Saint Leo excommunicated all who had taken part in the assembly and declared all its acts null.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ephesus
The capital of Ionia, a celebrated city of Asia Minor, situated near the mouth of the Cayster, about forty miles southeast of Smyrna. It was chiefly celebrated for the worship and temple of Diana, which last was, accounted one of the seven wonders of the world. See Acts 18:19,21 . This first brief visit was followed by a longer one towards the close of the same year, and continuing through the two following years, Acts 19:10 20:31 . The church thus early established, enjoyed the laborers of Aquila and Priscilla, of Tychicus and Timothy. It was favored with one of the best of Paul's epistles; its elders held an interview with him at Miletus, before he saw Rome, and he is supposed to have visited them after his first imprisonment. Here the apostle John is said to have spent the latter part of his life, and written his gospel and epistles; and having penned Christ's message to them in the isle of Patmos, to have returned and died among them. Christ gives the church at Ephesus a high degree of praise, coupled with a solemn warning, Revelation 2:1-5 , which seems not to have prevented its final extinction, though it remained in existence six hundred years. But now its candlestick is indeed removed out of its place. The site of that great and opulent city is desolate. Its harbor has become a pestilential marsh; the lovely and fertile level ground south of the Cayster now languishes under Turkish misrule; and the heights upon its border bear only shapeless ruins. The outlines of the immense theatre, Acts 19:29 , yet remain in the solid rock; but no vestige of the temple of Diana can be traced.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ephesus
Ephesus was the chief city of the Roman province of Asia (part of present-day Turkey). The church in Ephesus probably began through the work of Priscilla and Aquila, whom Paul left in Ephesus after visiting the city briefly at the end of his second missionary journey (Acts 18:18-21). (For map of the region see ASIA.)
Early developments
An important visitor during the early days of the Ephesian church was Apollos, a Jewish teacher from Alexandria in Egypt. Though eloquent, Apollos was lacking in the knowledge of certain Christian teachings, till Priscilla and Aquila taught him more accurately (Acts 18:24-28). The time of the church’s greatest growth came when Paul returned at the beginning of his third missionary journey and spent three years in the city (Acts 20:31). During this time the zealous Ephesian converts evangelized most of the province of Asia (Acts 19:8-10).
The people of Ephesus were well known for their superstition and magic, and some dramatic events accompanied the people’s response to Paul’s preaching (Acts 19:11-20). The city was considered to be the home of the goddess Artemis (or Diana) and contained a magnificent temple built in her honour (Acts 19:27-28; Acts 19:35). As the people of Ephesus turned in increasing numbers from the worship of Artemis to faith in Jesus, tensions arose in the city. The silversmiths who made small household shrines of the goddess found themselves going out of business and stirred up a riot. It took the city authorities several hours to restore order (Acts 19:23-41).
Some time during his three years in Ephesus, Paul wrote the letter we know as First Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:8-9; 1 Corinthians 16:19). While in Ephesus Paul met violent opposition and suffered physical harm. On one occasion he almost lost his life (1 Corinthians 15:32; 1 Corinthians 16:8-9; cf. 2 Corinthians 1:8-9). Ephesus was no doubt the scene of some of the sufferings that Paul later records in 2 Corinthians 11:23-29, and possibly he suffered one of his imprisonments there.
Later difficulties
Before leaving Ephesus at the end of his third missionary journey, Paul warned that false teachers would trouble the church (Acts 20:17; Acts 20:28-31). This proved to be so, and Paul’s letter to the Ephesians, which he wrote during his first imprisonment in Rome, deals with some of the wrong ideas that had become widespread in and around Ephesus (see EPHESIANS, LETTER TO THE).
After his release from Rome, Paul revisited the church in Ephesus to try to correct the wrong teaching. When he moved on, he left Timothy behind to continue corrective teaching. He also wrote Timothy two letters to help him in this task (1 Timothy 1:3-7; 1 Timothy 6:3-5; 2 Timothy 1:18; 2 Timothy 2:14-16). The false teaching that the apostle John condemned in his letters (written towards the end of the first century) was also centred in Ephesus (1 John 2:18-22; 1 John 4:1; 2 John 1:9-11).
Later the Ephesian church was troubled by another group of false teachers, the Nicolaitans. These people encouraged Christians to demonstrate their freedom by eating food that had been offered to idols and by engaging in sexual immorality (Revelation 2:2; Revelation 2:6; cf. Revelation 2:14-15).
Unfortunately, the Ephesian Christians had become so concerned with opposing false teaching year after year, that in the process their love for Christ had lost its original warmth. They had become harsh, critical and self-satisfied. God warned them that if they did not change and regain their original spirit of love, he would act against them in judgment and bring their church to an end. But those who triumphed over these attitudes would enjoy the fulness of eternal life (Revelation 2:1-7).
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus
Joannes (160) (called of Asia and of Ephesus ), Monophysite bp. of Ephesus, born c. 516, and living in 585, a Syriac writer whose chief work was his History of the Church , in the extant portion of which he describes himself once as "John, who is called superintendent of the heathen and Breaker of Idols" (ii. 4), and twice as "John who is over the heathen, who was bp. of Ephesus" (ii. 41; iii. 15). Elsewhere he styles himself, "John bp. of Ephesus" (iv. 45), or simply, "John of Ephesus" (v. 1); and, lastly, "John of Asia, that is, John of Ephesus" (v. 7). Hence John of Ephesus is clearly the historian so often mentioned by Syriac writers as John bp. of Asia, "Asia" meaning the district of which Ephesus was the capital.
Dr. Land (Johann von Ephesus der erste syrische Kirchenhistoriker ) discusses his identification with one or other of his numerous namesakes who wrote during the same period; and has pronounced in the negative.
What we know of the personal history of John of Ephesus is gathered from the meagre extracts from pt. ii. of his great work, preserved in the Chronicon of Dionysius; and from the extant pt. iii., which is to some extent an autobiography. Dionysius ( ap. Assemani, Bibl. Or. 83–90) tells us that John's birthplace was Amid in N. Mesopotamia. He stood high in the confidence of the emperor Justinian, by whom he was commissioned in 542 as "Teacher of the heathen" in the four provinces of Asia, Caria, Phrygia, and Lydia. His success was such that in four years 70,000 persons adopted Christianity. In the third part of his history (ii. 44) John mentions that Deuterius was 35 years his fellow-labourer, and his successor in Caria. Together they had built 99 churches and 12 monasteries. John tells (iii. 36–37) how the work began among the mountains round Tralles. His chief monastery, Darira, rose upon the site of a famous temple which he had demolished.
In 546 he was entrusted with an inquiry into the secret practice of pagan rites by professing Christians. Members of all ranks were inculpated: Phocas, prefect of the capital, being informed against, poisoned himself. John was appointed to instruct the accused in Christian doctrine; and an imperial edict prescribed conversion within three months! Theophanes tells us that heathens and heretics were to be excluded from public office.
From pt. iii. of John's history we learn that in the 2nd year of Tiberius (A.D. 579), upon the rumour of a heathen plot to destroy the Christians of Baalbec, the emperor ordered an officer named Theophilus to suppress paganism in the East. Torture, crucifixion, the sword, wild beasts, were among the means employed. Numbers were accused; the prisons teemed with victims of every rank; and a permanent inquisition was established for their trial.
As bp. of Ephesus or "Asia," John appears to have supervised all the Monophysite congregations of Asia Minor. His 30 years of influence at the court of Justinian and his high personal qualities gave him very considerable authority among his own party. He tells us (v. 1) that in the reign of Justin II. he "was dwelling in the royal city and controlling all the revenues of all the congregations of the Faithful there and in every place." In a chapter written A.D. 581 he mentions his old intimacy with Tiberius at the court of Justin: "He and I were often together, and stood with the other courtiers before the serene Justin " (iii. 22).
John suffered grievously in the persecution instigated first by John Scholasticus, whom he calls John of Sirmin, and afterwards by Eutychius. Together with Paul of Aphrodisias (subsequently patriarch of Antioch), Stephen, bp. of Cyprus, and the bp. Elisha, John of Ephesus was imprisoned in the patriarch's palace. In the heated debates which followed, the four Monophysite bishops stoutly charged John of Sirmin with breach of the canons in annulling the orders of their clergy, and, when the patriarch demanded of them "a union such as that between Cyril of Alexandria and John of Antioch," declared their willingness provided they might drive out the council of Chalcedon from the church, as Cyril had driven out Nestarius. The vacillating emperor, of whom John testifies that for six years he had been friendly to the "orthodox," attempted to secure peace by drawing up a dogmatic formula, in the shape of an imperial edict, which he sent to the four captive bishops for revision. Their changes were admitted, but the "Nestorians and semi-Nestorians" of the court—so John puts it—scared the timid emperor into further alterations, of which the chief was an inserted clause, " that the customs of the church were to be maintained," which meant that the obnoxious council was still to be proclaimed from the diptychs. Weary of the dispute, and probably not understanding its grounds, Justin now signed the document, and required the subscription of John of Ephesus and his companions. They declined, and 33 days passed in constant wrangling between them and the patriarch. Meanwhile they were kept under close guard; the patriarch's creatures stripped them of everything; friends were denied admittance to their prison; and their personal followers were also confined in the dungeons of the palace. The misery of the four bishops was aggravated by the reproaches of the leading Monophysite laymen, who supposed that their obstinacy alone hindered a compromise which would stop the persecution. The cunning patriarch was careful to encourage this belief. At last his victims gave way, the patriarch promising upon oath that the council of Chalcedon should be sacrificed. The four bishops twice communicated with him; but when they reminded him of his promise, he referred them to the pope; he could not, for their sakes, risk a schism from Rome. Our historian touchingly describes the sorrow of himself and his companions over this fraud; even their opponents pitied them, until they once more faced them with galling taunts, which led to a second imprisonment (i. 17–25). The emperor made further fruitless attempts at conciliation. The upshot of a discussion before the senate was that the four bishops boldly uttered their anathema "upon the whole heresy of the two natures," and renounced communion with their deceivers for ever. Thereupon they were sentenced to "banishment." The sentence was at once carried out. They never saw each other again. John of Ephesus was confined in the hospital of Eubulus at Constantinople. Though helpless from gout and exposed to swarms of vermin, he was denied all assistance. As he lay in his filthy prison, it seemed to him that his feverish thirst was slaked and his misery comforted by a heavenly visitant, whose coming he describes with much pathos and simplicity. After a year he was removed to an island, where he remained 18 months, when the Caesar Tiberius ordered his release. For three years, however, he was under surveillance, until the patriarch died (A.D. 578). Before the outbreak of this persecution, John of Ephesus and Paul of Aphrodisias had argued publicly with Conon and Eugenius, the founders of the Cononites, nicknamed Tritheites, in the presence of the patriarch and his synod, by command of Justin (v. 3). Conon had vainly tried to win the support of John, who proved to him that he was a heretic and afterwards wrote him a letter of warning (v. 1–12). Eutychius, who, upon the death of John of Sirmin, was restored to the patriarchal throne, was hardly more tolerant of Monophysites than its late occupant. Persecution was renewed, and John of Ephesus again met with disgraceful injustice. By another imprisonment Eutychius wrung from him the resignation of a property which Callinicus, a chief officer of the court, had bestowed, and which John had largely improved and converted into a monastery. After being further deprived of his right of receiving five loaves at the public distributions, for which he had paid 300 darics, John was released.
Tiberius, Justin's successor, though unwilling to persecute, was overcome by popular clamour. The mob of the capital groundlessly suspected their new emperor of Arian leanings (iii. 13, 26). An edict was therefore published ordering the arrest of Arians, Manicheans, etc. Under cover of this, the "orthodox" were once more harried and plundered. The first victim was John of Ephesus (iii. 15), who had now lived many years and suffered much in Constantinople. He and his friends were incarcerated at Christmas in a miserable prison called the Cancellum (A.D. 578?); and after much fruitless argument were finally ordered to leave the city.
It is greatly to our historian's credit that, during the bitter strife which raged long among the Monophysites themselves, in the matter of the double election of Theodore and Peter to succeed Theodosius as their patriarch of Alexandria, he maintained an honourable neutrality, standing equally aloof from Paulites and Jacobites, although his sympathies were with Theodore, the injured patriarch (iv. 9–48). John wrote his account of this pernicious quarrel in 583, the 2nd year of Maurice; for he says that it had already lasted 8 years (iv. 11), and that he is writing an outline of events from the year of Alexander 886 (A.D. 575) onwards (iv. 13). In his anxiety to heal the schism, John sent 10 epistles to "the blessed Jacob" [1], protesting his own neutrality, and urging reconciliation between the two factions (iv. 46); and after Jacob's death (A.D. 581) his party made overtures to John of Ephesus, then living at the capital, to induce him to recognize Peter of Callinicus as patriarch of Antioch in place of Paul (iv. 45). In reply the historian rebuked them for violating the canons. John accuses both sides of an utter want of mutual charity, and an entire aversion to calm examination of the grounds of their quarrel. He adds that he has briefly recorded the main facts from the outset to the current year, 896 (A.D. 585)—the latest date observable in his work.
The Ecclesiastical History. —John states (pt. iii. bk. i. c. 3) that he has already written a history of the church, "beginning from the times of Julius Caesar, as far as to the sixth year of the reign of Justin II., son of the sister of Justinian." If, as Dr. Payne Smith assumes, pt. i. was a mere abridgment of Eusebius, its loss is not a great one. The disappearance of pt. ii. is more unfortunate, as it would probably have furnished much important matter for the reign of Justinian. It brought the history down to 571. Pt. iii. continues it to c. 585, thus covering the period between the 6th year of Justin II. and the 4th of Maurice. It was called forth by the persecution above mentioned, which broke out in the 6th or 7th year of Justin, and the writer often apologizes for want of chronological order, occasional repetitions, and even inconsistencies of statement (see esp. i. 3; ii. 50), as defects due to the stress of untoward circumstances: "This should be known to critics: many of these stories were penned in time of persecution . . . people conveyed away the papers inscribed with these chapters, and the other papers and writings, into divers places, and in some instances they remained hidden so long as two or three years in one place or another" (ii. 50). John had no memoranda of what he had already written, and never found opportunity for revision. With these drawbacks, the work possesses special interest as an original account. John was contemporary with most of the characters described; he writes of what he himself saw and heard and of doings in which he was personally concerned. For 30 years he was a trusted servant of Justinian; and Gibbon would probably have recognized in the second part of his history a valuable gauge of the servility and the malice of Procopius. Had Gibbon possessed the third part of John's work, he would hardly have surmised that "the sentiments of Justin II. were pure and benevolent," or believed that the four last years of that emperor "were passed in tranquil obscurity" (cf. iii. 1–6); had he read what John has to say of the worthless stepson of Belisarius he might have rated "the gallant Photius" less highly; and he would have learned that it was the thoughtless improvidence of Tiberius which forced the unhappy Maurice to appear a grasping niggard (cf. iii. 11; v. 20). As regards chronology, Assemani, who did not love a Monophysite, accuses John of inaccuracy, asserting that he used a peculiar Greek era, making almost all Justinian's acts and his death ten years later than the dates assigned by Evagrius, Theophanes, and Cedrenus. But in pt. iii. (v. 13) John gives the usual date for Justinian's death—Nov. 14, 876 [2]. Of Theophanes Gibbon has said that he is "full of strange blunders" and "his chronology is loose and inaccurate"; his verdict in regard to John of Ephesus would have been very different.
His attitude to the great controversy of his day is that of one thoroughly convinced that his own party holds exclusive possession of the truth. The Monophysites are "the orthodox," "the faithful"; their opponents "Synodites," "Nestorians," or at least "half-Nestorians"; the synod of Chalcedon is "the stumbling-block and source of confusion of the whole church"; "it sunders Christ our God into two natures after the Union, and teaches a Quaternity instead of the holy Trinity" (i. 10, 18); the four bishops taunt the patriarch with "the heresy of the two natures, and the blasphemies of the synod, and of the tome of Leo" (i. 18). Yet John does not labour to blacken the memory of his adversaries; the strong terms in which he speaks of the pride of power and savage tyranny of John Scholasticus are warranted or at least excused by facts (i. 5, 12, 37); and Baronius denounces John of Sirmin in language equally decided (H. E. ad ann. 564). In regard to Eutychius, John protests his adherence to truth: "Although we declare ourselves opposed to the excellent patriarch Eutychius, yet from the truth we have not swerved in one thing out of a hundred; nor was it from eagerness to revile and ridicule that we committed these things to writing" (iii. 22). His impartiality is manifest in his description of the great schism which rent asunder his own communion; unsparing in his censure of both factions, he refers their wicked and worse than heathenish rancour to the instigation of devils (iv. 19, 22, 39). Credulous John was, but credulity was a common attribute of his age. More serious objection might be taken to his approval of the cruelties connected with the suppression of heathenism (iii. 34) and his intolerance of "heresy" other than his own. In 550 he dug up and burnt the bones of Montanus, Maximilla, and Priscilla, the false prophets of Montanism (Extr. ap. Dionys.). Herein also he shared the temper of his contemporaries. The spirit of persecution is not the peculiar mark of any age, church, or sect. Apart from these blemishes we may recognize in him an historian who sincerely loved truth; a bishop who was upright and devoted; and a man whose piety rested upon a thorough knowledge of Scripture.
His style, like that of most Syriac writers, is verbose and somewhat unwieldy, but has the eloquence of simple truth and homely pathos.
The Third Part of the Ecclesiastical History of John of Ephesus was first edited from the unique MS. in the Brit. Mus. by Dr. Cureton (Oxf. 1853)—a splendid reproduction of the original—and translated into English by Dr. Payne Smith (Oxf. 1860) and into German by Schönfelder (München, 1862). These versions are of great assistance, many chapters being defective in the original.
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A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Maximus of Ephesus
Maximus (25) of Ephesus. A "master of theurgic science," commonly reckoned among the neo-Platonic philosophers, the interest of whose life consists merely in the fact that he supplied an essential link in the transit of the emperor Julian from Christianity to paganism. The account given by Eunapius, in his Life of Maximus, shews exactly how this was. Julian, while still under tutelage and in early youth, with the natural self-will of a vigorous mind, had rebelled in secret against his Christian instructors and betaken himself to Greek philosophy as a liberal and congenial study. This bent was not disallowed by the emperor Constantius, who thought it safe when compared with political ambitions But philosophy at that era indicated much more than quiet intellectual research. It was a name of power, to which all whose sentiments flowed with a strong current towards the traditionary heathenism had recourse for self-justification; and it was natural that Julian, once he had attached himself to this study, should instinctively seek for more practical advantages from it than the mere increase of theoretical wisdom. Maximus, though flashy and meagre as a philosopher, was better supplied with an ostentatious show of practical power than any of his philosophic rivals. The amiable rhetorician Libanius, the aged sage Aedesius, could please Julian, but evidently were lacking in the force which could move the world. But when Aedesius, compelled by increasing infirmity, resigned Julian to the tuition of his two followers, Chrysanthius and Eusebius, Julian began to be struck with the terms in which these two spoke of their old fellow-pupil Maximus. Chrysanthius, indeed, alone seemed to admire him; Eusebius affected to depreciate him; but this feigned depreciation was calculated to excite the interest of Julian. For what Eusebius spoke of in this slighting manner was a certain miraculous power possessed by Maximus, of which he gave one or two casual instances. Julian had never seen miracles like those with which Maximus was credited; so he bade Eusebius stick to his learning and hurried off to Maximus. That skilful adept, after a solemn preparation of his imperial pupil, in which he was aided by Chrysanthius, described to Julian the revered religious authority of the hierophant of Eleusis, whose sacred rites were among the most famous in Greece, and urged him to go thither. He went, and was imbued with a teaching which combined a mysterious exaltation of the power of the Greek deities with hints of his own personal aggrandizement. By such acts as these, and by his initiation into the Eleusinian mysteries, he passed over to paganism, though his having done so was still unknown to the world. When, Constantius being dead, he became sole master of the Roman empire, he did not forget his instructors. He sent for Chrysanthius and Maximus; they consulted the sacrificial omens; the signs were unfavourable, and dissuaded them from accepting the invitation. Chrysanthius trembled, and refused to go; the more ambitious Maximus declared it unworthy of a wise man to yield to the first adverse sign, and went. He was received by Julian with extraordinary honours, but by his haughtiness and effeminate demeanour earned the censure even of the heathen, among whom was the partial panegyrist Eunapius. After the death of Julian he was severely and even cruelly treated by Valentinian and Valens, and though released for a time, was beheaded by order of Valens in 371, on a charge of having conspired against him. His personal appearance is described by Eunapius as impressive. The four extant letters of Julian to him (Nos. 15, 16, 38, 39) consist of such indiscriminate panegyric that they tell little of his real character or views. For other authorities see D. of G. and R. Biogr.
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A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Polycrates, Bishop of Ephesus
Polycrates (1) , bp. of Ephesus in the last decade of 2nd cent. When Victor of Rome sought to unify the practice of the whole Christian world in the matter of Easter celebration, he first asked for meetings of bishops in different places to report on the practice of their localities. This request was made in the name of his church, as we learn from the use of the plural in the reply of Polycrates. From every other place, as far as we can learn, the answer was that they celebrated the feast of our Lord's Resurrection on no other day than Sunday; but Polycrates, writing in the name of the bishops of Asia, declared that they had preserved untampered the tradition to celebrate only on the 14th day of the month, the day when the Jewish people put away their leaven. He appeals to the authority of the great luminaries which the Asian church could boast, and whose bodies lay among them, Philip, one of the twelve apostles, and his three daughters, John, who lay on our Lord's breast, a priest who wore the πέταλον , Polycarp of Smyrna, Thraseas of Eumenia, Sagaris, Papirius, Melito, all of whom had observed the 14th day, according to the Gospel, walking according to the rule of faith. Polycrates himself had followed the traditions of his kindred, seven of whom had been bishops before him, and had been confirmed in his view by his own study of the whole Scripture and by conference with brethren from all the world. Although his letter bore no signature but his own, he claims that it had received the assent of a great number of bishops (Eus. H. E. v. 24). For the sequel see IRENAEUS.
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A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Stephanus, Bishop of Ephesus
Stephanus (12), bp. of Ephesus at the time of the "Robber Synod" and the 4th council of Chalcedon. The 11th session of that council (Oct. 29, 451) was wholly occupied with investigating a complaint brought by Bassianus, formerly bp. of Ephesus, against Stephen, who was in advanced age, having been then 50 years one of the clergy of Ephesus. Bassianus had been expelled by violence from the see c. 448, and succeeded by Stephen. Both were deprived of the see by decree of the synod, but allowed a pension of 200 gold pieces (Mansi, t. vii. 271–294; Hefele's Councils , t. iii. p. 371, Clark's trans.). The name of Stephen of Ephesus is attached to a MS. collection of sermons in the Vienna imperial library (Lambecii, Comment. iii. 66; Fabric. Bib. Graec. xii. 183, ed. Harles).
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Sentence search

Ephesian - Pertaining to Ephesus, in Asia Minor. As a noun, a native of Ephesus
Ephesus - Ephesus and its inhabitants are mentioned more than twenty times in the New Testament. ...
Location The ancient city of Ephesus, located in western Asia Minor at the mouth of the Cayster River, was an important seaport. Situated between the Maeander River to the south and the Hermus River to the north, Ephesus had excellent access to both river valleys which allowed it to flourish as a commercial center. ...
Historical Background The earliest inhabitants of Ephesus were a group of peoples called Leleges and Carians who were driven out around 1000 B. The new inhabitants of Ephesus assimilated the native religion of the area, the worship of a goddess of fertility whom they identified with the Greek goddess Artemis, the virgin huntress. Croesus of Lydia conquered Ephesus and most of western Asia Minor. , following the defeat of Croesus by Cyrus of Persia, Ephesus came under Persian control. ...
Lysimachus, one of Alexander's generals, ruled over Ephesus from about 301 to 281 B. After the death of Lysimachus, Ephesus fell under the control of the Seleucids until their defeat by the Romans in 189 B. ...
Under the Romans, Ephesus thrived, reaching the pinnacle of its greatness during the first and second centuries of the Christian era. At the time of Paul, Ephesus was probably the fourth largest city in the world, with a population estimated at 250,000. During the reign of the emperor Hadrian, Ephesus was designated the capital of the Roman province of Asia. Today the Turkish town of Seljuk occupies the site of ancient Ephesus. ...
Ephesus in the New Testament Paul stopped at Ephesus at the end of his second missionary journey, left Priscilla and Aquila there, and returned to Antioch (Acts 18:18-21 ). Apollos preached in Ephesus soon thereafter and met Priscilla and Aquila who “expounded unto him the way of God more perfectly” (Acts 18:26 ). Paul, on his third journey, spent more than two years in Ephesus teaching and preaching in the synagogue and in the hall of Tyrannus. The success of his preaching at Ephesus triggered a riot headed by the silversmiths who feared that their business of selling miniature replicas of Artemis (Diana) or her temple would suffer severely (Acts 19:24-41 ). After the town clerk quelled the disturbance, Paul left Ephesus for Macedonia. At the conclusion of this missionary endeavor, on his way back to Palestine, Paul stopped at Miletus and sent for the elders of the church in Ephesus so that he might speak with them (Acts 20:17 ). ...
Ephesus is also mentioned in 1 Corinthians 15:32 . Paul noted that he had fought with beasts at Ephesus. At the close of 1Corinthians, Paul wrote that he would remain at Ephesus until Pentecost “for a great door and effectual is opened unto me, and there are many adversaries” (1 Corinthians 16:8-9 ). ...
Elsewhere in the New Testament Ephesus appears as the location of one of the seven churches addressed in Revelation (Revelation 1:11 ; Revelation 2:1 ). Ephesus, the leading city of Asia Minor, is appropriately the first of the seven churches. In the opening verse of the letter to the Ephesians some manuscripts describe the recipients of the letter as the saints who are “at Ephesus. ” The earliest and most reliable manuscripts, however, do not include the reference to Ephesus. In 1,2Timothy, Ephesus is mentioned three times. Timothy was urged to remain at Ephesus (1 Timothy 1:3 ); reference is made to Onesiphorus and “in how many things he ministered unto me at Ephesus” (2 Timothy 1:16-18 ); and the writer stated that Tychicus had been sent to Ephesus (2 Timothy 4:12 ). ...
Christian tradition from the second century and later claimed that the apostle John moved to Ephesus, and after living to an old age, died a natural death there. Another, more dubious tradition states that Mary the mother of Jesus also died in Ephesus
Demetrius - A goldsmith of Ephesus, who made models of the famous temple of Diana at Ephesus, which he sold to foreigners, Acts 19:24-4 . Observing the progress of the gospel, not in Ephesus only, but in the regions around, he assembled his fellow-craftsmen, and represented that, by this new doctrine, not only their trade would suffer, but the worship of the great Diana of Ephesus was in danger of being entirely forsaken. He may have been formerly the silversmith of Ephesus; but this can be neither proved nor disproved
Ephesian - ) A native of Ephesus. ) Of or pertaining to Ephesus, an ancient city of Ionia, in Asia Minor
Sceva - (sscee' vuh) Jewish “high priest” in Ephesus with seven sons who tried unsuccessfully to exorcise demons in Jesus' name as Paul had done (Acts 19:14 ). No such Jewish high priest is known from other sources, particularly not one living in Ephesus. The title may be the result of a copyist or a title Sceva took upon himself to impress leaders of other religions in Ephesus
Stephanus, Bishop of Ephesus - of Ephesus at the time of the "Robber Synod" and the 4th council of Chalcedon. of Ephesus, against Stephen, who was in advanced age, having been then 50 years one of the clergy of Ephesus. The name of Stephen of Ephesus is attached to a MS
Aquila - )...
When Paul left Corinth for Ephesus eighteen months later, Aquila and Priscilla went with him, and remained in Ephesus when Paul moved on (Acts 18:11; Acts 18:18-19). They probably helped to establish the church in Ephesus. In particular they helped Apollos, a newly converted Jewish teacher who had come to Ephesus from Egypt (Acts 18:24-26; see APOLLOS). They remained in Ephesus to help Paul when he returned to the city for a three-year stay (Acts 19:1; cf. At this time the church in Ephesus used the house of Aquila and Priscilla as a meeting place (1 Corinthians 16:19). They continued to serve God wholeheartedly, and their house in Rome, like their house in Ephesus, became a church meeting place (Romans 16:3-5). ...
Many years later Aquila and Priscilla were living back in Ephesus, no doubt helping Timothy in the difficult work Paul had given him to do there
Ephesians - The inhabitants of Ephesus
Ephesus - ...
During his third missionary journey Paul reached Ephesus from the "upper coasts" (Acts 19:1 ), i. Probably during this period the seven churches of the Apocalypse were founded, not by Paul's personal labours, but by missionaries whom he may have sent out from Ephesus, and by the influence of converts returning to their homes. ...
On his return from his journey, Paul touched at Miletus, some 30 miles south of Ephesus (Acts 20:15 ), and sending for the presbyters of Ephesus to meet him there, he delivered to them that touching farewell charge which is recorded in Acts 20:18-35 . Ephesus is not again mentioned till near the close of Paul's life, when he writes to Timothy exhorting him to "abide still at Ephesus" (1 Timothy 1:3 ). ...
Two of Paul's companions, Trophimus and Tychicus, were probably natives of Ephesus (Acts 20:4 ; 21:29 ; 2 Timothy 4:12 ). In his second epistle to Timothy, Paul speaks of Onesiphorus as having served him in many things at Ephesus (2 Timothy 1:18 ). He also "sent Tychicus to Ephesus" (4:12), probably to attend to the interests of the church there. Ephesus is twice mentioned in the Apocalypse (1:11; 2:1). ...
The apostle John, according to tradition, spent many years in Ephesus, where he died and was buried
Ephesus - Ephesus (ef'e-sŭs). Paul visited Ephesus on his second tour, Acts 18:19-21; Apollos was instructed there by Aquila and Priscilla, Acts 18:24-26; Paul dwelt there three years, Acts 19:1-41; charged the elders of the church. Acts 20:16-28; the angel of the church of Ephesus is named in Revelation 2:1-7
Sceva - A Jew at Ephesus, a leader among the priests, perhaps the head of one of the twenty-four courses. Their ignominious discomfiture by a man possessed by and evil spirit, promoted the cause of the gospel at Ephesus, Acts 19:14-16
Demetrius - A pagan silversmith who made shrines for Diana at Ephesus, and opposed Saint Paul (Acts 19)
Miletus - (Miletum, 2 Timothy 4:20 ), a seaport town and the ancient capital of Ionia, about 36 miles south of Ephesus. 28) of Ephesus recorded in Acts 20:15-35
Churches, Seven - on Ephesus, Smyrna, etc
Ephesus - Ephesus was the chief city of the Roman province of Asia (part of present-day Turkey). The church in Ephesus probably began through the work of Priscilla and Aquila, whom Paul left in Ephesus after visiting the city briefly at the end of his second missionary journey (Acts 18:18-21). ...
The people of Ephesus were well known for their superstition and magic, and some dramatic events accompanied the people’s response to Paul’s preaching (Acts 19:11-20). As the people of Ephesus turned in increasing numbers from the worship of Artemis to faith in Jesus, tensions arose in the city. ...
...
Some time during his three years in Ephesus, Paul wrote the letter we know as First Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:8-9; 1 Timothy 6:3-5). While in Ephesus Paul met violent opposition and suffered physical harm. Ephesus was no doubt the scene of some of the sufferings that Paul later records in 2 Corinthians 11:23-29, and possibly he suffered one of his imprisonments there. ...
Later difficulties...
Before leaving Ephesus at the end of his third missionary journey, Paul warned that false teachers would trouble the church (Acts 20:17; Acts 20:28-31). This proved to be so, and Paul’s letter to the Ephesians, which he wrote during his first imprisonment in Rome, deals with some of the wrong ideas that had become widespread in and around Ephesus (see EPHESIANS, LETTER TO THE). ...
After his release from Rome, Paul revisited the church in Ephesus to try to correct the wrong teaching. The false teaching that the apostle John condemned in his letters (written towards the end of the first century) was also centred in Ephesus (1 John 2:18-22; 1 John 4:1; 2 John 1:9-11)
Silversmith - Only referred to in scripture as those who formed the silver representations of the temple at Ephesus
Shrine - Small representations of heathen temples, as at Ephesus or elsewhere
Ephesus - Ephesus . Miletus had been in earlier times a more important harbour than Ephesus, but the track across from this main road to Ephesus was much shorter than the road to Miletus, and was over a pass only 600 ft. Consequently Ephesus replaced Miletus before and during the Roman Empire, especially as the Mæander had silted up so much as to spoil the harbour at the latter place. ...
Ephesus was on the main route from Rome to the East, and many side roads and sea-routes converged at it (Acts 19:21 ; Acts 20:1 ; Act 20:17 , 1 Timothy 1:3 , 2 Timothy 4:12 ). The governors of the provinces in Asia Minor had always to land at Ephesus. The ship in Acts 18:19 , bound from Corinth for the Syrian coast, touched first at Ephesus. ) and Timothy (according to 1 Timothy 1:3 , 2 Timothy 4:9 ), John Mark ( Colossians 4:10 , 1 Peter 5:13 ), and the writer of the Apocalypse ( Revelation 1:11 ; Revelation 2:1 ) were acquainted with Asia or Ephesus. ...
The harbour of Ephesus was kept large enough and deep enough only by constant attention. The alluvial deposits were (and are) so great that, when once the Roman Empire had ceased to hold sway, the harbour became gradually smaller and smaller, so that now Ephesus is far away from the sea. Paul’s time there appear to have been difficulties about navigating the channel, and ships avoided Ephesus except when loading or unloading was necessary (cf. The route by the high lands, from Ephesus to the East, was suitable for foot passengers and light traffic, and was used by St. The Greek city Ephesus was built at a distance of 1 2 miles S. Ephesus, however, was always proud of the position of ‘Warden of the Temple of Artemis’ (Acts 19:35 ). Paul, whose residence in Ephesus lasted 2 years and 3 months ( Acts 19:8 ; Acts 19:10 ), or roughly expressed, 3 years ( Acts 20:31 ). The references to Ephesus in the Epistles show that the opposition to Christianity there was as long-continued as it was virulent ( 1 Corinthians 15:32 ; 1Co 16:9 , 2 Corinthians 1:8 ; 2 Corinthians 1:10 ). Paul, may have been present in Ephesus at that time on account of a meeting of their body ( Acts 19:31 ). The Empire brought decay of the influence of popular assemblies, which tended more and more to come into the hands of the officials, though the assembly at Ephesus was really the highest municipal authority ( Acts 19:39 ), and the Roman courts and the proconsuls ( Acts 19:38 ) were the final judicial authority in processes against individuals. ...
There is evidence outside the NT also for the presence of Jews in Ephesus. The twelve who had been baptized with the baptism of John (Acts 19:3 ) may have been persons who had emigrated to Ephesus before the mission of Jesus began. The actual foundation of Christianity in Ephesus may have been due to Priscilla and Aquila ( Acts 18:19 ). Trophimus was an inhabitant of Ephesus ( Acts 21:29 ), capital of Asia; but Tychicus was probably merely an Inhabitant of the province Asia; hence they are coupled under the only adjective applicable to both
Sce'va, - a Jew residing at Ephesus at the time of St
Asia - (ayshuh) in the New Testament refers to a Roman province on the west of Asia Minor whose capital was Ephesus. Its first capital was Pergamum, but the capital was later changed to Ephesus. Paul the apostle traveled and preached extensively in Asia (Acts 19:10 ,Acts 19:10,19:22 ) especially in the neighborhood of Ephesus; but God forbade him to preach there prior to his Macedonian call (Acts 16:6 )
Town-Clerk - A man in authority at Ephesus, perhaps what would now be called 'recorder,' but he evidently possessed considerable influence
Onesiphorus - ” Ephesian Christian praised for his effort to seek out the place of Paul's arrest, his disregard of the shame connected with befriending one in chains, and his past service in Ephesus (2 Timothy 1:16-18 ). All that can be assumed is that Onesiphorus was not at Ephesus
Temple Keeper - " Coin inscriptions show that it was an honorary title given to certain cities, especially in Asia Minor, where the cult of some god or of a deified human potentate had been established, here to Ephesus in respect of the goddess Artemis. Apparently the imperial cult also existed at Ephesus
Ephe'Sians, the Epistle to the, - This epistle was addressed to the Christian church at Ephesus. [2] Its contents may be divided into two portions, the first mainly doctrinal , ch
Shrines, Silver - Little models and medallions of the temple and image of Diana of Ephesus (Acts 19:24 )
Fortunatus - At Ephesus with Stephanas and Achaicus when Paul wrote 1 Corinthians
Sceva - He was probably a person of authority in the synagogue at Ephesus, and had seven sons
Aquila - On Paul's departure from Corinth after eighteen months, Aquila and his wife accompanied him to Ephesus, where they remained, while he proceeded to Syria (Acts 18:18,26 ). When they became Christians we are not informed, but in Ephesus they were (1 Corinthians 16:19 ) Paul's "helpers in Christ Jesus. They are referred to some years after this as being at Ephesus (2 Timothy 4:19 )
Philetus - Amiable, with Hymenaeus, at Ephesus, said that the "resurrection was past already" (2 Timothy 2:17,18 )
Miletus - (2 Timothy 4:20) It should seem that there was another place of this name near Ephesus
Diana - The Diana of Ephesus was a different deity from the chaste huntress of the Greeks. The temple of this goddess was the pride and glory of Ephesus, and one of the seven wonders of the world. Compare 1 Corinthians 3:9-17, written in Ephesus; and Ephesians 2:19-22. Ancient coins of Ephesus represent the shrine and statue of Diana, with a Greek inscription, "of the Ephesians. In her temple at Ephesus were stored immense treasures, and any preaching that tended to lower the shrine in the minds of the people, as Paul's did, would naturally arouse a great tumult
Fortunatus - Fortunate, a disciple of Corinth who visited Paul at Ephesus, and returned with Stephanas and Achaicus, the bearers of the apostle's first letter to the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:17 )
Dei Genetrix - (Latin: Deipara or Dei Genetrix, Mother of God; Greek: Theotokos, bearing God) ...
Title of Our Lady officially sanctioned at the Council of Ephesus (431) upon the condemnation of the Nestorian heresy
Deipara - (Latin: Deipara or Dei Genetrix, Mother of God; Greek: Theotokos, bearing God) ...
Title of Our Lady officially sanctioned at the Council of Ephesus (431) upon the condemnation of the Nestorian heresy
Theotokos - (Latin: Deipara or Dei Genetrix, Mother of God; Greek: Theotokos, bearing God) ...
Title of Our Lady officially sanctioned at the Council of Ephesus (431) upon the condemnation of the Nestorian heresy
Samos - An island in the AEgean Sea, a few miles south-west of Ephesus, only incidently mentioned in the return of Paul's third missionary journey
Trogyllium - The name of a town and promontory of Ionia, in Asia Minor, between Ephesus and the mouth of the Meander, opposite to Samos
Miletus - On the west coast of southern Asia Minor were the important towns of Miletus and Ephesus. )...
When Paul visited Miletus towards the end of his third missionary journey, he invited the elders of the church at Ephesus to come and meet him at Miletus
Aquila And Priscilla - Converted to Christianity, they entertained Saint Paul in Corinth and later at Ephesus
Trophimus - Convert of Ephesus who accompanied Paul to Jerusalem, and whom the Jews thought Paul had taken into the temple
Sosthenes - One whom Paul (when at Ephesus) unites with himself in the First Epistle to the Corinthians
Diana - Her temple was at Ephesus, built of choice marble. Though Ephesus was otherwise an enlightened city, it was dark as to religion, the excited people could shout for two hours "Great is Diana of the Ephesians
Aristarchus - Paul to Ephesus, and there continued with him during the two years of his abode in that place, sharing with him in all the dangers and labours of the ministry, Acts 19:29 ; Acts 20:4 ; Acts 27:2 . He left Ephesus with the Apostle, and went with him into Greece
Onesiphorus - A primitive Christian who ministered to the wants of Paul at Ephesus, and afterward sought him out at Rome and openly sympathized with him
Eph'Esus - --Conspicuous at the head of the harbor of Ephesus was the great temple of Diana or Artemis, the tutelary divinity of the city. In consequence of this devotion the city of Ephesus was called neo'koros, ( Acts 19:35 ) or "warden" of Diana. Another consequence of the celebrity of Diana's worship at Ephesus was that a large manufactory grew up there of portable shrines, which strangers purchased, and devotees carried with them on journeys or set up in the houses. The stadium or circus, 685 feet long by 200 wide, where the Ephesians held their shows, is probably referred to by Paul as the place where he "fought with beasts at Ephesus. " ( 1 Corinthians 15:32 ) Connection with Christianity --The Jews were established at Ephesus in considerable numbers. Paul's other companions, two, Trophimus and Tychicus, were natives of Asia, (Acts 20:4 ) and the latter was probably, (2 Timothy 4:12 ) the former certainly, (Acts 21:29 ) a native of Ephesus
Aristarchus of Thessalonica, Saint - (1century) Disciple of Saint Paul whom he accompanied in his Apostolic missions (Acts 20; 27) to Ephesus, Corinth, Jerusalem, and finally Rome
Achaicus - A Christian who, with Stephanas and Fortunatus, visited Paul at Ephesus, by whom the apostle was refreshed in spirit
Demetrius - A maker of silver shrines—models of the great temple—of Diana or Artemis at Ephesus
Artemis - In Ephesus and western Asia Minor she was portrayed as a more mature woman. ...
The most famous statue was located in the city of Ephesus, the official “temple keeper” for Artemis. Artemis was the chief deity of Ephesus, and her temple was one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. See Ephesus . They conducted the daily ceremonies caring for the deity and for the gifts brought by worshipers, as well as an annual festival on May 25, when numerous statues of the goddess were carried in procession to the amphitheater in Ephesus for a celebration of music, dancing, and drama
Tyrannus - Prince, a Greek rhetorician, in whose "school" at Ephesus Paul disputed daily for the space of two years with those who came to him (Acts 19:9 )
Trophimus - A native of Ephesus, Acts 21:29, and a convert to the gospel, probably under Paul's ministry
Fortunatus - 1 Corinthians 16:17 , came from Corinth to Ephesus, to visit Paul
Stephanas - He was forward in the service of the church, and came to Paul at Ephesus, 1 Corinthians 16:15,17
Smyrna - The port of Smyrna was in the Roman province of Asia, not far north of Ephesus. ) The church there was probably formed during Paul’s three-year stay in Ephesus, when the Ephesian converts took the gospel to the surrounding area (Acts 19:8-10; Revelation 2:8)
Demetrius - A silversmith in Ephesus. He incited a riot directed against Paul because he feared that the apostle's preaching would threaten the sale of silver shrines of Diana, the patron goddess of Ephesus (Acts 19:24-41 )
Miletum, Miletus - It was here that Paul called for the elders of Ephesus (some thirty miles distant), and had his parting interview with them. By comparing the last named passage with Acts 20:4 ; Acts 21:29 it appears that Paul visited Miletus between his first and second imprisonments, but he may not have again seen the elders of Ephesus
Aquila And Priscilla - It is not clear whether they became Christians before or after meeting Paul; but, they became workers in the gospel, and accompanied Paul to Ephesus (Acts 18:19 ). Some scholars think the church at Ephesus received a copy of the last chapter of Romans. The reference to the couple in 2 Timothy 4:19 may indicate the couple was in Ephesus
Hermogenes - ” Follower who deserted Paul, apparently while he was in prison in Ephesus (2 Timothy 1:15 )
Epaenetus - He was probably a native of Ephesus
Timothy, First Epistle to - Paul in this epistle speaks of himself as having left Ephesus for Macedonia (1:3), and hence not Laodicea, as mentioned in the subscription; but probably Philippi, or some other city in that region, was the place where this epistle was written. During the interval between his first and second imprisonments he probably visited the scenes of his former labours in Greece and Asia, and then found his way into Macedonia, whence he wrote this letter to Timothy, whom he had left behind in Ephesus
Tychicus - Paul then sent him as his special representative to the churches of Ephesus and Colossae, to tell the Christians how he was faring in Rome. Paul considered sending him to relieve Titus in Crete (Titus 3:12), and later he sent him to relieve Timothy in Ephesus (2 Timothy 4:12)
Aquila - They travelled with Paul to Ephesus, where they were able to help Apollos spiritually. They were still at Ephesus when Paul wrote 1Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:19 ); and were at Rome when the epistle to the saints there was written, in which Paul said they had laid down their necks for his life, and that to them all the churches, with Paul, gave thanks
Tyran'Nus - (sovereign ), the name of a man in whose school or place of audience Paul taught the gospel for two years, during his sojourn at Ephesus
Alexander - (al ehx an' dehr) names five New Testament men including the son of Simon of Cyrene (Mark 15:21 ), a relative of Annas (Acts 4:6 ), a Jew of Ephesus (Acts 19:33 ), a false teacher (1 Timothy 1:19-20 ), and a coppersmith (2 Timothy 4:14 )
Adventure - 1: δίδωμι (Strong's #1325 — Verb — didomi — did'-o-mee ) "to give," is once used of giving oneself to go into a place, "to adventure" into, Acts 19:31 , of Paul's thought of going into the midst of the mob in the theater at Ephesus
Asiar'Chae - (chief of Asia ) (Authorized Version; ( Acts 19:31 ) ), officers chosen annually by the cities of that part of the province of Asia of which Ephesus was, under Roman government, the metropolis
Fortuna'Tus - (fortunate ) ( 1 Corinthians 16:17 ) one of the three Corinthians the others being Stephanas and Achaicus, who were at Ephesus when St
Jupiter, - At Lystra the heathen inhabitants supposed Jupiter was impersonated by Barnabas, and at Ephesus they professed that the image of Diana had fallen from Jupiter, or heaven
Theatre - The ruins of this theatre at Ephesus still exist, and they show that it was a magnificent structure, capable of accommodating some 56,700 persons
Miletus - It was about thirty-six miles south of Ephesus, and the capital of both Caria and Ionia. Paul called the elders of the church of Ephesus, to deliver his last charge to them, Acts 20:15 , &c
Apol'Los - (given by Apollo ) a Jew from Alexandria, eloquent (which may also mean learned ) and mighty in the Scriptures; one instructed in the way of the Lord, according to the imperfect view of the disciples of John the Baptist, ( Acts 18:24 ) but on his coming to Ephesus during a temporary absence of St. (Acts 18:27 ; 19:1 ) When the apostle wrote his First Epistle to the Corinthians, Apollos was with or near him, (1 Corinthians 16:12 ) probably at Ephesus in A
Aristarchus - His life was endangered in the riot at Ephesus, excited by the silversmiths, Acts 19:29 ; but having escaped, he continued with Paul, and was a prisoner with him at Rome, Colossians 4:10
Stephanas - Stephanas himself had joined the Apostle at Ephesus when he wrote, and was of great assistance to him there
Titus, Epistle to - , from Ephesus, in the autumn of 67 in the interval between Paul's two Roman imprisonments
Apollo - Although imperfectly instructed in Christian doctrine, he was teaching at Ephesus, when Aquila and Priscilla brought about his complete conversion and baptism
Theatre - At the uproar at Ephesus they rushed into the theatre
Demetrius - Silversmith of Ephesus, who made silver shrines of the temple
Alexander - A Jew of Ephesus
Hymeneus - A member of the church, probably at Ephesus, who fell into the heresy of denying the true doctrine of the resurrection, and saying it had already taken place
Colossae - Although Colossae was on the main highway from Syria to Ephesus, Paul apparently did not visit the church there during his missionary travels recorded in Acts (Colossians 1:4; Colossians 2:1). ...
The church in Colossae was probably founded during Paul’s stay in Ephesus on his third missionary journey, when the Ephesian converts took the gospel to the towns of the surrounding countryside (Acts 19:8-10)
Nicephorus Blemmida - Ordained at Nicaea about 1223, he subsequently entered a monastery which he had founded at Ephesus
Achaichus - (1Corinthians 16:17), one of the members of the church of Corinth who, with Fortunatus and Stephanas, visited Paul while he was at Ephesus, for the purpose of consulting him on the affairs of the church
Town Clerk, - the title ascribed in our version to the magistrate at Ephesus who appeased the mob in the theatre at the time of the tumult excited by Demetrius and his fellow craftsmen
Apollos - He came to Ephesus (about A. He was with Paul at Ephesus when he wrote the First Epistle to the Corinthians; and Paul makes kindly reference to him in his letter to (Titus 3:13 )
Trophimus - He came from Ephesus to Corinth with the Apostle, and kept him company in his whole journey from Corinth to Jerusalem, A. And this they said, because certain Jews of Ephesus having seen Trophimus with St
Ephesus - There was held the Third General Council and also the "Robber Council of Ephesus
Cenchrea - A port of Corinth, now called Kikries, whence Paul sailed for Ephesus, Acts 18:18
Seven Churches in Asia - They are Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamus, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea, mentioned in Apocalypse, 1-3, where Saint John, on the island of Patmos, was commanded to send to their bishops instructions and admonitions, in which the Church is praised or blamed with reference to past trials and told of a greater one to come in connection with the coming of Christ
Celestine i, Saint, Pope - He excommunicated Nestorius, strengthened the Faith in outlying provinces, brought about the testimonial of devotion shown to Our Lady of Ephesus, and sent Saint Palladius and Saint Patrick to preach the Gospel to Ireland
Erastus - Paul from Ephesus to Macedonia ( Acts 19:22 ), and who later remained in Corinth ( 2 Timothy 4:20 ), is perhaps the same
Achaicus - Paul at Ephesus and ‘refreshed his spirit
Prisca, Priscilla - " Paul met them at Corinth, and they travelled with him to Ephesus, where they were enabled to expound unto Apollos the way of God more perfectly
Diana - a celebrated goddess of the Heathens, who was honoured principally at Ephesus, Acts 19
Erastus - He followed Paul to Ephesus, and attended Timothy in a mission to Macedonia, Acts 19:22
Ephesus - (Ἔφεσος, a graecized form of a native Anatolian name)...
The town of Ephesus was a little south of latitude 38°N. ...
When Ephesus came into contact with Christianity, it still retained all its ancient glory. ...
In Ephesus a noble freedom of thought and a vulgar superstition lived side by side. ’ When, therefore, the startling news came from Syria to Ephesus that the Son of God had lived, died, and risen again, it ran like wildfire; its first announcement created another Pentecost (Acts 19:6); and in two years ‘all they who dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord, both Jews and Greeks’ (Acts 19:10). ...
Every spiritual revival has ethical issues, and Ephesus quickly recognized that the new truth was a new ‘Way’ (Acts 19:23). It was a call to repentance and faith (Acts 20:21); and, though no frontal attack was made upon the established religion of Ephesus, and no language used which could fairly be construed as offensive (Acts 19:37), yet it soon became apparent that the old order and the new could not thrive peacefully side by side. Paul, therefore, found that, while Ephesus opened ‘a door wide and effectual’ (ἐνεργής) there were ‘many adversaries’ (1 Corinthians 16:9). The fanatical hatred of Ephesus was better than the polite scorn of Athens. Religion was for Ephesus a lucrative ‘business’ (ἐργασία, Acts 19:24-25), and the ‘craft’ (τὸ μέρος, this branch of trade) of many was in danger. The situation created a drama of real life which was enacted in and around the famous theatre of Ephesus. As the virtual capital of a senatorial province, Ephesus had its proconsuls (ἀνθύπατοι, Acts 19:38), but here the plural is merely used colloquially, without implying that there could ever be more than one at a time. As the head of a conventus iuridicus, Ephesus was an assize town, in which the judges were apparently sitting at the very time of the riot (Acts 19:38). As a free city of the Empire, Ephesus had still a semblance of ancient Ionic autonomy; her affairs were ‘settled in a regular assembly’ (v, 39), i. The proud claim of Ephesus to be the temple-warden (νεωκόρον, lit. Paul’s pathetic address at Miletus to the elders of Ephesus (Acts 20:16-35), in which he recalls the leading features of his strenuous mission in the city-his tears and trials (Acts 20:19), his public and private teaching (Acts 20:20), his incessant spiritual and manual toil (Acts 20:31-34)-and declares himself pure from the blood of all men (Acts 20:26), presents as high an ideal of the ministerial vocation as has ever been conceived and recorded. ...
With the religious history of Ephesus are also associated the names of Priscilla and Aquila (Acts 18:18), Apollos (Acts 18:24, 1 Corinthians 16:12), Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21), Timothy (1 Timothy 1:3, 2 Timothy 4:9), and especially John the Apostle and John the Presbyter. The Letter to the Church of Ephesus is on the whole laudatory. ...
Ephesus had a long line of bishops, and was the seat of the council which condemned the doctrine of Nestorius in a. Jahrhundert, 1874; article ‘Ephesus’ in Pauly-Wissowa Dalmatius, Monk And Abbat - Dalmatius (4) , monk and abbat, near Constantinople at the time of the council of Ephesus (a. of Cyzicus; because the latter was present at the council of Ephesus in that capacity. ...
During the supremacy of the Nestorian party at Ephesus, letters were conveyed by a beggar in the hollow of a cane from Cyril and the Athanasian or Catholic bishops to the emperor Theodosius II. of Ephesus, and that they were all in the greatest distress. The emperor then wrote to Ephesus, ordering a deputation of each party to arrive at Constantinople
Trophimus - Paul's companion, a Gentile of Ephesus (Acts 21:29). Trophimus was probably the brother sent before with Titus (2 Corinthians 12:18), and therefore must have been sent from Ephesus; he was moreover an Ephesian
Theatre - Besides the performance of dramas, public meetings were often in the theater, as being large enough almost to receive "the whole city" (Acts 19:29); so at Ephesus the theater was the scene of the tumultuous meeting excited by Demetrius. (See Ephesus; DIANA
Asia - The province, with Ephesus as its capital, included Caria, Lydia, and Mysia, which were anciently called Doris, Ionia, and AEolis. As Paul laboured in other parts of Asia Minor, and there being frequent intercourse between the various places and Ephesus, it may be that a wider area is in some passages referred to as 'Asia,' as in Acts 19:10,26,27
Aquila And Priscilla - A year and a half after Priscilla and Aquila accompanied Paul from Corinth to Ephesus on his way to Syria. ) In 1 Corinthians 16:19 we find them still at Ephesus, and having "a church (assembling) in their house. "...
Afterward we find them near Timothy, in or about Ephesus (2 Timothy 4:19). She and he together, as true yokefellows in the Lord, to all within their reach; to Apollos, who became the mighty champion of Christianity, convincing the Jews from the Scriptures at Corinth; setting up "a church in their house" wherever they were: in Ephesus; then at Rome, risking their lives for Paul, and earning thanks of "all the churches of the Gentiles
Tychicus - Thence he accompanied him to Jerusalem on the Apostle’s last visit there, acting along with Trophimus as a delegate of the church of Ephesus and conveying the offerings of the church to the poor brethren at Jerusalem. He was a companion of the Apostle during his first captivity, and was sent to Ephesus from Rome probably with the Epistle to the Ephesians. In 2 Timothy 4:12 the writer tells Timothy that he has sent Tychicus to Ephesus, from which we may conclude that he was with the Apostle in his second captivity in Rome. It is possible that the reference in 2 Corinthians 8:18 to ‘the brother whose praise in the gospel is spread through all the churches,’ and who was deputed along with Titus and another unnamed Christian to carry the Second Epistle to the Corinthians from Ephesus to Corinth, may be Tychicus, and the other unnamed deputy may be Trophimus
the Angel of the Church of Ephesus - I cannot give you this man's name, but you may safely take it that he was simply one of the oldest of the office-bearers of Ephesus. Only, by reason of his great age and his spotless character and his outstanding services, he had by this time risen till he was now at the head of what we would call the kirk-session of Ephesus. " And, with many mistakes, and with many shortcomings, this ruling and teaching elder of Ephesus has not been wholly unmindful of his ordination vows. In short, this so-called angel of the Church of Ephesus was no more an actual angel than I am. But we understand this Ephesus elder's nature and office quite well. And again, as James has it, his office was just to visit the widows and orphans of Ephesus in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world of Ephesus. And he who has been elected of God to such an office as that in Ephesus, or in Edinburgh, or anywhere else, has no need to envy the most shining angel in all the seven heavens. And the heart of the old minister of Ephesus was made so glad when he began to read this Epistle that he almost died with delight. I elected thee to thy charge in Ephesus. '...
We have an old-fashioned English word that exactly sets forth what our Lord says next to the angel of Ephesus. I do not suppose that the angel of Ephesus counted himself a specially happy man when, all unthought of to himself, he was laying up in heaven all this eulogium upon himself and upon his patience. But all the more, with such a suffering servant, his Master held Himself bound to take special knowledge of all that went on in the Church of Ephesus. "I know all thy patience," said our Lord to the angel of Ephesus. ...
I do not the least know who or what the Nicolaitans of Ephesus were, and no one that I have consulted is any wiser than I am, unless it is Pascal. And not the Nicolaitans of Ephesus only; but the Egyptians, and the Babylonians, and as often as the name of any "enemy" occurs in the Old Testament, and it occurs in the Psalms continually, that so great and so original man interprets and translates them all into his own sinful thoughts and sinful feelings and sinful words and sinful actions. To call the Nicolaitans of Ephesus our own wicked hearts, is far too Port-Royal and puritan for such literalists as we are. Only, as one can see, the minister of Ephesus would be swept into the deepest places, and into the most spiritual experiences, both of mysticism and of puritanism before their time, as often as he set himself, as he must surely have henceforth set himself every day of his life, to hate the deeds of the Nicolaitans, whoever they were, and at the same time to love the Nicolaitans themselves. He does not tell it from the housetops of Ephesus, as yet. But the minister of Ephesus knew quite well, both when and where his first love began to fail and he to fall away. For, not this Ephesus minister only, but every minister everywhere continues to love his Master and his Master's work, ay, and his Master's enemies, exactly in the measure of his secret reading of Holy Scripture and his secret prayerfulness. '...
And now with all that in closing take this as the secret prayer of the angel of Ephesus the very first night after this severe message was delivered to him. I repent of many things in my ministry in Ephesus
Curious Arts - Ephesus was noted for its wizard and the "Ephesian spells;" i
Deme'Trius -
A maker of silver shrines of Artemis at Ephesus
Sceva - once having been high priest, or else chief of the priests at Ephesus, or of one of the 24 courses
Aristarchus - He was nearly killed in the tumult which Demetrius excited in Ephesus, Acts 19:29, and it is said that he was finally beheaded in Rome
Apollonius of Ephesus - Apollonius of Ephesus, so called on the doubtful authority of the writer of Praedestinatus, ed. of Ephesus, but the silence of Eusebius and all other earlier testimony makes it difficult to lay much stress on this statement. John, that he relates the raising to life of a dead man at Ephesus by the same John, and that he makes mention of the tradition quoted also by Clement of Alexandria ( Strom
Heraclides Cyprius, Bishop of Ephesus - of Ephesus; a native of Cyprus, who had received a liberal education, was versed in the Scriptures, and had passed some years in ascetic training in the desert of Scetis under Evagrius. of Ephesus, a. of Ephesus in his room (Pallad
Town Clerk - At Ephesus ( Acts 19:35 ) the clerk feared that he would have to account to the Roman governor for the irregularly constituted assembly
Tychicus - He is alluded to also in Colossians 4:7 , Titus 3:12 , and 2 Timothy 4:12 as having been with Paul at Rome, whence he sent him to Ephesus, probably for the purpose of building up and encouraging the church there
Chloe - Chloe herself may have been either a Christian or a beathen, and may have lived either at Corinth or at Ephesus
Worshipper, - The first occurrence of the term in connection with Ephesus is on coins of the age of Nero, A
Stephanas - Stephanas may have delivered a letter from the Corinthian church to Paul while the apostle was in Ephesus (1 Corinthians 16:17 )
Hilarius, Pope - He attended the "Robber Synod" of Ephesus, 449, as a legate and upheld the rights of the papacy until Dioscurus of Alexandria forced him to flee
Hilarus, Pope - He attended the "Robber Synod" of Ephesus, 449, as a legate and upheld the rights of the papacy until Dioscurus of Alexandria forced him to flee
Hilary, Pope - He attended the "Robber Synod" of Ephesus, 449, as a legate and upheld the rights of the papacy until Dioscurus of Alexandria forced him to flee
Priscilla - Timothy at Ephesus would find her counsel invaluable in dealing with the female part of his flock, his position as a young man needing delicacy and discretion in relation to them (2 Timothy 4:19; Romans 16:3; 1 Corinthians 16:19; Acts 18:2; Acts 18:26)
Town-Clerk - The town-clerk of Ephesus (Acts 19:35-41), who displays tact and also points out the illegality of the whole proceedings of the crowd, with the proper means of redress if there be a real grievance, was a typical official of a Greek city with the Athenian type of constitution. In cities like Ephesus, which were the headquarters of a Roman governor, the town-clerk appears to have acted also as a kind of intermediary between the proconsul (with his staff) and the municipal authorities. An inscription of Branchidae in the same province of Asia as Ephesus (Greek Inscriptions in the British Museum, no. 921) provides the best illustration of the import of this riotous assembly in Ephesus (C. So in Ephesus and elsewhere the local officials were most careful to avoid punishment from the Roman authorities on account of assemblies illegally summoned
Asia - Ephesus, Pergamum, and Smyrna were its principal cities. Paul’s preaching in Ephesus was the most powerful cause of the spread of the gospel in this province, and the Epistle ‘to the Ephesians’ is probably a circular letter to all the churches in it
Onesiphorus - The Lord grant unto him that he may find mercy (as he found me) of the Lord in that day; and in how many things he ministered unto me at Ephesus thou knowest very well. ...
Absence from Ephesus probably is the cause of the expression; he had not yet returned from his visit to Rome
Athanasius, Bishop of Perrha - of Perrha, a see dependent on the Syrian Hierapolis; present at the council of Ephesus, 431, supporting Cyril of Alexandria. After "the Robber Synod" of Ephesus, A
Timothy - He was left in charge of the church at Ephesus. A post-apostolic tradition makes him bishop of Ephesus
Mother of God - 373) and finally sanctioned at the Council of Ephesus (431)
Nicolaitanes - The church at Ephesus (Revelation 2:6 ) is commended for hating the "deeds" of the Nicolaitanes, and the church of Pergamos is blamed for having them who hold their "doctrines" (15)
Ephesus, Robber Council of - Held at Ephesus in 449, it was not really a council but a synod called to vindicate the heresiarch Eutyches from the condemnation of Saint Flavian, Patriarch of Constantinople
God, Mother of - 373) and finally sanctioned at the Council of Ephesus (431)
Robber Council of Ephesus - Held at Ephesus in 449, it was not really a council but a synod called to vindicate the heresiarch Eutyches from the condemnation of Saint Flavian, Patriarch of Constantinople
Timothy, the Second Epistle to - Timothy was possibly still at Ephesus, for Priscilla and Aquila whom Paul salutes generally resided there (2 Timothy 4:19); also Onesiphorus, who ministered to Paul at Ephesus and therefore it is presumable resided there (2 Timothy 1:16-18). The Hymenaeus of 2 Timothy 2:17 is probably the Hymenaeus at Ephesus (1 Timothy 4:1-59); also "Alexander the coppersmith" (Ephesians 6:21-226) seems to be the Alexander put forward by the Jews to clear themselves, not to befriend Paul, in the riot at Ephesus (Acts 19:33-34). Still, if Timothy was at Ephesus, why did he need to be told that Paul had sent Tychicus to Ephesus, or that Paul had left Trophimus, himself an Ephesian (Acts 21:29), sick at Miletus which was only 30 miles from Ephesus?...
Probably Timothy's overseership extended beyond Ephesus to all the Pauline churches in Asia Minor; he combined with it the office of "evangelist," or itinerant missionary Ephesus was only his head quarters; and 2 Timothy 4:13 will accord with the theory of Ephesus or any other place in the N. Onesiphorus, undeterred by danger, sought out and visited him; Linus also, the future bishop of Rome, Pudens a senator's son and Claudia the British princess, and Tychicus before he was sent to Ephesus. (See LINUS; PUDENS; CLAUDIA Possibly Tychicus was bearer of the epistle as of epistles to Ephesians (1618527528_80) and Colossians (Colossians 4:7-8), since "to thee" in 2 Timothy 4:12 is not needed for this view if Timothy was at the time not at Ephesus itself. ) Shortly before his second imprisonment Paul visited Ephesus, where new elders governed the church (Acts 20:25, most of the old ones had passed away), say in the latter end of 66 or 67 A
Dies Mariae Deiparae - The old Armenian calendar (5th century) carried it for the date corresponding to August 15, under the title of the "Annunciation of the Mother of God" referring to the decree of the Council of Ephesus (c
Day, Lady - The old Armenian calendar (5th century) carried it for the date corresponding to August 15, under the title of the "Annunciation of the Mother of God" referring to the decree of the Council of Ephesus (c
Day of Mary Mother of God - The old Armenian calendar (5th century) carried it for the date corresponding to August 15, under the title of the "Annunciation of the Mother of God" referring to the decree of the Council of Ephesus (c
Lady Day - The old Armenian calendar (5th century) carried it for the date corresponding to August 15, under the title of the "Annunciation of the Mother of God" referring to the decree of the Council of Ephesus (c
John, Third Epistle of - The Second and Third Epistles were probably written soon after the First, and from Ephesus
Noetians - Christian heretics in the third century, followers of Noetius, a philosopher of Ephesus, who pretended that he was another Moses sent by God, and that his brother was a new Aaron
Nicolaitans - They are condemned in Revelation 2:6 ,Revelation 2:6,2:15 for their practices in Ephesus and Pergamon
Sceva - A Jew at Ephesus, a chief of the priests, whose seven sons sought by the name of Jesus to cast out a demon
Priscilla - From Ephesus this pious pair went to Rome, where they were when St
Miletus - He stayed long enough to send for the elders of Ephesus, and give them the farewell charge recorded in Acts 20:1-38 . Miletus was already unimportant by comparison with Ephesus, which now received the trade of the Mæander valley, and shared with Smyrna the trade that came along the great road through the centre of Asia Minor. Ephesus was recognized by the Romans as the southern capital of the province of Asia
Apollos - (ay pahl' lahss), meaning “destroyer,” names an Alexandrian Jew who came to Ephesus following Paul's first visit and was taught Christian doctrine by Priscilla and Aquila. He went from Ephesus to Greece with the encouragement of the Asian believers and a letter of introduction (Acts 18:27 ). See Aquila and Priscilla ; Ephesus ; Corinth ; 1Corinthians ; 2Corinthians
Diana - The Diana of Ephesus was like the Syrian goddess Ashtoreth, and appears to have been worshipped with impure rites and magical mysteries, Acts 19:19 . ...
The temple of this goddess was the pride and glory of Ephesus. Ancient coins of Ephesus represent the shrine and statue of Diana, with a Greek inscription, meaning "of the Ephesians," Acts 19:28,34,35
Town Clerk - The town clerk at, Ephesus appeased the mob gathered by Demetrius the silversmith against the gospel preachers (Acts 19:35-41). Such excitement, he reasons, is undignified in Ephesians, seeing that their devotion to Diana of Ephesus is beyond question
Ephesians - The citizens of Ephesus. The Epistle to the Ephesians was written by Paul to the Christians at Ephesus
Julianus, Missionary Priest to the Nubians - John of Ephesus (R. John of Ephesus describes fully the rival missions and the triumph of the empress's schemes
Tychicus - Paul also sent Tychicus to Ephesus on one occasion (2 Timothy 4:12 ) and possibly to Crete on another (Titus 3:12 )
Churches, Robbers of - The word ought to be translated simply ‘sacrilegious persons,’ that is, persons acting disrespectfully to the goddess of Ephesus
a'Sia - The passages in the New Testament where this word occurs are the following; ( Acts 2:9 ; 6:9 ; 16:6 ; 19:10,22,26,27 ; 20:4,16,18 ; 21:27 ; 27:2 ; Romans 16:5 ; 1 Corinthians 16:19 ; 2 Corinthians 1:8 ; 2 Timothy 1:15 ; 1 Peter 1:1 ; Revelation 1:4,11 ) In all these it may be confidently stated that the word is used for a Roman province which embraced the western part of the peninsula of Asia Minor and of which Ephesus was the capital
Cenchrea - Paul sailed from, thence to Ephesus
Sixtus Iii, Pope Saint - He ...
approved of the Acts of the Council of Ephesus
defended the supremacy of the pope over Illyricum, against the local bishops and Proclus of Constantinople
restored the Basilica of Liberius
beautified Saint Peter's, and the Lateran Basilica
Feast, March 28,
Eras'Tus - Paul at Ephesus, who with Timothy was sent forward into Macedonia
Ephesus - Ephesus is supposed to have first invented those obscure mystical spells and charms by means of which the people pretended to heal diseases and drive away evil spirits; whence originated the ‘Εφεσια γραμματα , or Ephesian letters, so often mentioned by the ancients. While the Apostle abode in Ephesus and its neighbourhood, he gathered a numerous Christian church, to which, at a subsequent period, he wrote that epistle, which forms so important a part of the Apostolic writings. Ephesus was one of the seven churches to which special messages were addressed in the book of Revelation. Ephesus was the metropolis of Lydia, a great and opulent city, and, according to Strabo, the greatest emporium of Asia Minor. But a few heaps of stones, and some miserable mud cottages, occasionally tenanted by Turks, without one Christian residing there, are all the remains of ancient Ephesus. The Epistle to the Ephesians is read throughout the world; but there is none in Ephesus to read it now. Their "candlestick has been removed out of its place;" and the great city of Ephesus is no more. " "I...
was at Ephesus, says Mr. John passed the latter part of his life in Asia Minor, and principally at Ephesus, where he died
Timothy, the First Epistle to - The apostle naturally directs Timothy, the church president for the time being at Ephesus, and Titus at Crete, concerning "bishop-elders and deacons," in order to secure due administration of the church at a time when heresies were springing up and when he must soon depart this life. He shows the same anxiety in his address to the elders of the same city Ephesus earlier (Acts 20:21-30). Timothy and Titus exercised the same power in ordaining elders in Ephesus and Crete as Paul had in the Gentile churches in general (2 Corinthians 11:28). Soon after Paul's leaving Ephesus for Macedon (1 Timothy 1:3). The object of leaving Timothy at Ephesus was primarily to restrain the false teachers (1 Timothy 1:3), not to organize the church for the first time. ...
As to Acts 20:25, "all" the Ephesian elders called to Miletus "never saw Paul's face" afterward; Paul "knew" this by inspiration; but this assertion of his is compatible with his visiting Ephesus again (1 Timothy 1:3; 2 Timothy 1:18; 2 Timothy 4:20). Being at Miletum, so near Ephesus, after his first Roman imprisonment, he would be sure to visit Ephesus. In 1 Timothy 3:14 Paul says "I write, hoping to come unto thee shortly"; but on the earlier occasion of his passing from Ephesus to Macedon he had planned to spend the summer in Macedon and the winter in Corinth (1 Corinthians 16:6). Nor did Paul leave Timothy then as now (1 Timothy 1:3) at Ephesus, but sent him to Macedon (Acts 19:22). Wherever he was he was uncertain how long he might be detained from coming to Ephesus to Timothy (1 Timothy 3:14-15). Between it and Ephesus communication was easy; his course on former occasions was from Macedon to Corinth (Acts 17-18). ...
(3) To warn against covetousness, a sin prevalent at Ephesus, and to stimulate to good works (1 Timothy 6:3-19)
Tychicus - In later years either he or Artemas was to have been sent to Crete, apparently to take Titus’ place ( Titus 3:12 ); but he was sent to Ephesus, probably instead of to Crete ( 2 Timothy 4:12 )
Erastus - ...
...
A companion of Paul at Ephesus, who was sent by him along with Timothy into Macedonia (Acts 19:22 )
Smyrna - Myrrh, an ancient city of Ionia, on the western coast of Asia Minor, about 40 miles to the north of Ephesus
Trophimus - ” Gentile Christian from Ephesus who accompanied Paul to Jerusalem for the presentation of the collection (Acts 20:4-5 ; Acts 21:29 )
Miletus - It was on the coast, 36 miles to the south of Ephesus
Aristarchus - ” Paul's companion caught by the followers of Artemis in Ephesus (Acts 19:29 )
Gaius - He with Aristarchus was seized and carried into the theatre during the uproar at Ephesus
Tychicus - He was sent by the apostle from Rome to the Ephesians and to the Colossians; and after Paul's release, Tychicus was again sent to Ephesus
Gaius - He accompanied Paul to Ephesus, and was seized by the mob
Onesiphorus - A Christian friend of Paul at Ephesus, who came to Rome while the apostle was imprisoned there for the faith, and at a time when almost every one had forsaken him
Patriarch - In the christian church, a dignitary superior to the order of archbishops as the patriarch of Constantinople, of Alexandria, or of Ephesus
Onesiph'Orus - (2 Timothy 4:19 ) It is evident from (2 Timothy 1:18 ) that Onesiphorus had his home at Ephesus
Olympas - Paul in Romans 16:15, probably as forming an ἐκκλησία or household or district church in Rome or Ephesus
Phlegon - Paul in Romans 16:14, probably as forming a household church at Rome or Ephesus under the leadership of Asyncritus, the first mentioned (cf
Titus, Letter to - He therefore left Titus behind in Crete to help correct the problems (Titus 1:5), while he himself sailed on to Ephesus. There were problems in Ephesus also, but Paul could stay there for only a limited time. )...
From Macedonia Paul wrote two letters, one to Titus in Crete, the other to Timothy in Ephesus
Tiberius ii., Emperor of Constantinople - We shall confine ourselves to the religious history of the period, for which the church history of the Monophysite John of Ephesus (Dr. John of Ephesus, H. John of Ephesus, p
Ephesians, Letter to the - ...
At the time Paul wrote this letter, a particular kind of false teaching had affected the churches in and around Ephesus. If so, that would explain why some ancient manuscripts include the word ‘Ephesus’ in Paul’s opening greeting, but others omit it. ...
Background to the letter...
Regardless of how many copies of the letter may have been distributed, there seems no doubt that one of those copies went to the church in Ephesus. Ephesus was a town on the west coast of Asia Minor and was famous for its heathen religions (Acts 19:35). Paul saw that the church in Ephesus would be troubled by false teaching (Acts 20:29-30), and such teaching seems to have arisen by the time Paul was first imprisoned in Rome (Acts 28:16; Acts 28:30; cf. ...
The false teaching that affected the Ephesus area also affected neighbouring towns such as Laodicea and Colossae. All this is good reason for the Christians in and around Ephesus not to allow themselves to be persuaded by the clever, but false, teaching of the Gnostics (Ephesians 5:6)
Gaius - During a heathen outbreak against Paul at Ephesus the mob seized Gaius and Aristarchus because they could not find Paul, and rushed with them into the theatre
Asia - Is used to denote Proconsular Asia, a Roman province which embraced the western parts of Asia Minor, and of which Ephesus was the capital, in Acts 2:9 ; 6:9 ; 16:6 ; 19:10,22 ; 20:4,16,18 , etc
Asiarchs - Officers, like the Roman aediles and Greek leitourgoi , yearly chosen by the cities in that part of Asia of which Ephesus was metropolis, to defray the cost and to undertake all the arrangements of the national games and theatrical sacred spectacles
Asia - of Asia Minor, with Ephesus as its capital, including Mysia, Lydia, Caria
Gaius - Along with Aristarchus, he was seized during the riot in Ephesus incited by Demetrius the silversmith
Tyrannus - After Paul withdrew from the synagogue in Ephesus, he preached for two years at the lecture hall of Tyrannus (Acts 19:9 )
Fortunatus - Paul at Ephesus ( 1 Corinthians 16:17 ); he had probably been baptized by the Apostle himself ( 1 Corinthians 1:16 )
Gaius - Paul’s ‘companion in travel’ who was seized in the riot at Ephesus ( Acts 19:29 ), and the Gaius addressed by St
Adramyttium - Its gulf is opposite the isle Lesbos, on the Roman route between Troas and the Hellespont, and Pergames, Ephesus and Miletus
Asiarchs - Paul won friends among this elite class (Acts 19:31 ), and they helped protect him from a religious riot in Ephesus
Colosse, or Colassae - Colossians 1:7 ; Colossians 2:1 ; but he may have done so in his journeys or have gone thither from Ephesus
Seven Churches - The assemblies were at Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamos, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea, places comparatively near together in the west of Asia Minor
Hypatia, Writer - In the synodical book of the council of Ephesus is given a letter, from its style evidently the work of a female writer (unnamed), which is falsely attributed to Hypatia (1) the philosopher of Alexandria
Acephali - of those who, in the affair of the council of Ephesus, refused to follow either St
Simplicius, Pope Saint - He defended the independence of the Church against the encroachments of the Emperor Zeno, who sought to have his Henotikon recognized by Rome in 482; upheld the authority of the pope in matters of faith, in opposition to the future schismatic patriarch, Acacius; condemned Peter Mongus, Fullo, Paul of Ephesus, and John of Apamea; and built four churches in Rome
Gai'us - or Cai'us ( lord )--
A Macedonian who accompanied Paul in his travels, and whose life was in danger from the mob at Ephesus
Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus - Joannes (160) (called of Asia and of Ephesus ), Monophysite bp. of Ephesus, born c. of Ephesus" (ii. of Ephesus" (iv. 45), or simply, "John of Ephesus" (v. 1); and, lastly, "John of Asia, that is, John of Ephesus" (v. Hence John of Ephesus is clearly the historian so often mentioned by Syriac writers as John bp. of Asia, "Asia" meaning the district of which Ephesus was the capital. Land (Johann von Ephesus der erste syrische Kirchenhistoriker ) discusses his identification with one or other of his numerous namesakes who wrote during the same period; and has pronounced in the negative. ...
What we know of the personal history of John of Ephesus is gathered from the meagre extracts from pt. of Ephesus or "Asia," John appears to have supervised all the Monophysite congregations of Asia Minor. Elisha, John of Ephesus was imprisoned in the patriarch's palace. Weary of the dispute, and probably not understanding its grounds, Justin now signed the document, and required the subscription of John of Ephesus and his companions. John of Ephesus was confined in the hospital of Eubulus at Constantinople. Before the outbreak of this persecution, John of Ephesus and Paul of Aphrodisias had argued publicly with Conon and Eugenius, the founders of the Cononites, nicknamed Tritheites, in the presence of the patriarch and his synod, by command of Justin (v. Persecution was renewed, and John of Ephesus again met with disgraceful injustice. The first victim was John of Ephesus (iii. 581) his party made overtures to John of Ephesus, then living at the capital, to induce him to recognize Peter of Callinicus as patriarch of Antioch in place of Paul (iv. Of Theophanes Gibbon has said that he is "full of strange blunders" and "his chronology is loose and inaccurate"; his verdict in regard to John of Ephesus would have been very different. ...
The Third Part of the Ecclesiastical History of John of Ephesus was first edited from the unique MS
Lydia (1) - The chief interest of Lydia for us is that it contained several very ancient and important great cities (of the Ionian branch), Smyrna, Ephesus, Sardis, Colophon, etc. Paul’s long residence in Ephesus ( Acts 19:1 ff
Church Chronology - John at Ephesus 97...
The Ten great Persecutions of Christians 64-313...
I. General Council, at Ephesus 431...
IV
Aquila - When the Apostle left Corinth, Aquila and Priscilla accompanied him as far as Ephesus, where he left them with that church while he pursued his journey to Jerusalem. Lastly, they were come back to Ephesus again, when St
Tychicus - ...
In Titus 3:12 Paul proposes to send Artonus or Tychicus (from Corinth or else Ephesus, where Tychicus was with Paul) to take Titus' place (which his past services to Paul in the neighbouring Asia qualified him for) at Crete, and so to set Titus free to join Paul at Nicopolis. In 2 Timothy 4:12, in his second Roman imprisonment, Paul says "Tychicus I have sent to Ephesus," implying "I need one profitable for the ministry; I had one in Tychicus, but he is gone" (Ellicott). Others make Paul send Tychicus ("I am herewith sending Tychicus to Ephesus") to take Timothy's place there as president of the church
Prochorus, a Deacon - In punishment for a first refusal to go by sea John suffers shipwreck, but arrives safely at Ephesus, accompanied by Prochoros his disciple. Receiving permission to return to Ephesus, he first retires to a solitary place in the island (κατάπαυσις ) and there dictates his gospel to Prochoros, and when finished leaves it behind as a memorial of his work in Patmos. He then goes by ship to Ephesus, and dwells there in the house of Domnus, whom he had formerly in his youth raised to life. After residing 26 years more at Ephesus he buries himself alive. With this, moreover; agrees the fact that the author can assume a universal diffusion of Christianity in Ephesus and the Aegean Archipelago. He is better acquainted with the topography of those parts than with the neighbourhood of Ephesus
Trophimus - A Gentile Christian, a native of Ephesus ( Acts 21:29 ), who, with Tychicus, also of the province Asia ( Acts 20:4 ), and others, accompanied St
Laodicea - The city of this name mentioned in Scripture lay on the confines of Phrygia and Lydia, about 40 miles east of Ephesus (Revelation 3:14 ), on the banks of the Lycus
Fortunatus - Paul in Ephesus, perhaps bearing letters, and to whom he refers in 1 Corinthians 16:17-18
Iconium - It was on the great Roman highway from Ephesus to Tarsus, Antioch, and the Euphrates, and at the foot of Mount Taurus, in a beautiful and fertile country, about 300 miles southeast of Constantinople and about 120 miles inland from the Mediterranean
Alexander - The would-he spokesman of the Jews in the riot at Ephesus, which endangered them as well as the Christians ( Acts 19:33 ); not improbably the same as the coppersmith ( 2 Timothy 4:14 ) who did St
Alexander - A Jew at Ephesus who sought to address the crowd in the theatre
aq'Uila - On the departure of the apostle from Corinth, a year and eight months after, Priscilla and Aquila accompanied him to Ephesus
Aristarchus - Though attacked during a riot in Ephesus (Acts 19:28-29), Aristarchus stuck firmly with Paul throughout the remaining journeys recorded in Acts
Diana - As Ephesus was the capital of Asia in the limited sense, Diana of Ephesus was naturally the idol "whom all Asia and the world worshipped. ) Games were celebrated at Ephesus in her honor, and her worship was the He uniting politically Ephesus and other cities. In the great theater at Ephesus, on one of the walls of the entrance lobby, Mr
Julius, Bishop of Puteoli - Leo in June 449, and acted as his legate in the "Robber" council of Ephesus (Leo Mag. That it was our Julius who was the papal legate at Ephesus is proved by Leo's letter to the latter (xxxiv. On Quesnel's hypothesis, that Julius and not Renatus died on the road to Ephesus, and that Julian took his place, cf. On their arrival at Ephesus the legates lodged with Flavian; on the ground that they had lived with him and been tampered with by him ( συνεκροτήθησαν , Lat
Aquila And Priscilla - They seem always to have been able to maintain a fair position, for their house was a meeting-place for the Church both in Ephesus and in Rome. Paul went to Ephesus, Aquila and Priscilla went with him and remained there to do pioneer work whilst he visited Jerusalem. So the initial work in Ephesus was done by Aquila and Priscilla. ]'>[2] ) came to Ephesus, with his imperfect apprehension of Christianity. Would not his presence overshadow Aquila and Priscilla, tending to make their work more difficult? The elementary and even chaotic state of things in Ephesus at this period is shown by the incident of the twelve men ‘knowing only the baptism of John’ whom St. As nothing is said about the baptism of Apollos, and as the twelve men ‘had not heard whether the Holy Spirit was given,’ it seems unlikely that there had been any Christian baptism in Ephesus before St. Paul left them in Ephesus to do pioneering work, so he seems to have sent them to Rome to prepare the way for his coming there. The decree of expulsion was not enforced permanently; their connexion with a leading Roman family made it more possible for them to return to Rome than for Jews with no influence; whilst their knowledge of the city, their social standing, as well as their experience in Corinth and in Ephesus, with their devotion to himself, fitted them pre-eminently for such work as St. Paul’s missionary labours, and whom he selected to do pioneering work in Ephesus and in Rome. In particular their return to Ephesus at a later period (2 Timothy 4:19) is quite comprehensible
Flavian, Saint - Later the emperor called the Robber Council at Ephesus, under Dioscurus, Flavian's rival
Aristarchus - Paul's companion on his third missionary tour, and dragged into the theater with Gains by the mob at Ephesus; he accompanied Paul to Asia, afterward to Rome (Acts 19:29; Acts 20:4; Acts 27:2)
Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary - The feast probably originated about the time of the Council of Ephesus, c
Alexandria, Cyril of, Saint - He presided over the General Council at Ephesus, at which Nestorius was condemned
Laodicea - A Christian church was early established here, probably from Ephesus, and to this church Paul sent a salutation when writing to the Colossians, Colossians 4:15; it is also mentioned in Revelation 1:11; Revelation 3:14
Gaius or Caius - A Macedonian, who accompanied Paul in his travels, and whose life was in danger at Ephesus, Acts 19:29
Phygelus - The pseudo-Dorotheus of Tyre makes both Phygelus and Hermogenes to belong to the seventy disciples, and the former to be a follower of Simon Magus and afterwards bishop of Ephesus, and the latter bishop of Megara
Smyrna - A celebrated Ionian city situated at the head of a deep gulf on the western coast of Asia Minor, forty miles north by west of Ephesus. On these hills lie the scanty remains of the ancient city; among which is the ground-plot of the stadium, where is said to have occurred the martyrdom of Polycarp-the pupil of the apostle John, and very probably "the angel of the church in Ephesus," Revelation 2:8
Ephesians, Epistle to - ...
Planting of the church at Ephesus. Paul's first and hurried visit for the space of three months to Ephesus is recorded in Acts 18:19-21 . On his second visit, early in the following year, he remained at Ephesus "three years," for he found it was the key to the western provinces of Asia Minor. From Ephesus as a centre the gospel spread abroad "almost throughout all Asia" (19:26). ...
On his last journey to Jerusalem the apostle landed at Miletus, and summoning together the elders of the church from Ephesus, delivered to them his remarkable farewell charge (Acts 20:18-35 ), expecting to see them no more. " It is a book "which sounds the lowest depths of Christian doctrine, and scales the loftiest heights of Christian experience;" and the fact that the apostle evidently expected the Ephesians to understand it is an evidence of the "proficiency which Paul's converts had attained under his preaching at Ephesus. " "Is it then any matter of amazement that one letter should resemble another, or that two written about the same time should have so much in common and so much that is peculiar? The close relation as to style and subject between the epistles to Colosse and Ephesus must strike every reader
Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary - Also known as Nativité di Maria Vergine ...
Memorial September 8, ...
About the Feast Probably originated after the Council of Ephesus in 431, which established her right to the title of "Mother of God
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Feast of the - Also known as Nativité di Maria Vergine ...
Memorial September 8, ...
About the Feast Probably originated after the Council of Ephesus in 431, which established her right to the title of "Mother of God
Apollos - He visited Ephesus about A
Nestorianism - He was condemned by the aecumenical councils of Ephesus (431) and Chalcedon (451)
Nestorius - He was condemned by the aecumenical councils of Ephesus (431) and Chalcedon (451)
Henoticon - The sting of this edict lies here; that it repeats and confirms all that has been enacted in the councils of Nice, Constantinople, Ephesus, and Chalcedon, against the Arians, Nestorians, and Eutychians, without making any particular mention of the council of Chalcedon
Colossae - It was about 12 miles above Laodicea, and near the great road from Ephesus to the Euphrates, and was consequently of some mercantile importance
Smyrna - Ancient city in the west of Asia Minor, about forty miles north of Ephesus
Nestorianism - He was condemned by the aecumenical councils of Ephesus (431) and Chalcedon (451)
Sergius, a Monophysite Priest - Sergius (12), the name of the two Monophysite priests persecuted with John of Ephesus at Constantinople
Trophimus - (Τρόφιμος)...
Trophimus was a Christian convert belonging to Ephesus (Acts 21:29) and a companion of the apostle Paul on his third missionary journey (Acts 20:4). In 2 Corinthians 8:18-24 reference is made to two companions of the Apostle who accompanied Titus from Ephesus to Corinth with the Second Epistle to the Corinthians
Robbers of Churches - This is the Authorized Version rendering of the word ἰερόσυλοι used by the town-clerk of Ephesus on the occasion of the riot described in Acts 19. Wood, Discoveries at Ephesus, do
Apollos - was a Jew of Alexandria, who came to Ephesus in the year of our Lord 54, during the absence of St. At Ephesus, therefore, he began to speak boldly in the synagogue, and demonstrated by the Scriptures that Jesus was the Christ. Apollos, hearing that the Apostle was at Ephesus, went to meet him, and was there when St
John the Apostle - Tradition represents him as closing his career at Ephesus. The fourth Gospel is ascribed to John, and was probably composed, or at least put in its present shape, at Ephesus, between a. They were written in Ephesus, between a. Those who adopt the latter opinion apply the term to the church at Jerusalem, and the term "elect sister," 2 John 1:13, to the church at Ephesus
Alexander - A leading member of the Jewish community at Ephesus (Acts 19:33), who was put forward by the Jews at the time of the Ephesian riot to clear themselves of any complicity with St. The omission of τις, ‘a certain,’ before his name has been regarded as an indication that Alexander was a well-known man in Ephesus at the time. -(1) His trade was that of a smith (see Coppersmith), a worker in metal, originally brass, but subsequently any other metal, which might associate him with the craftsmen of Ephesus. (2) The statement regarding him was addressed to Timothy, who was settled in Ephesus
Miletus - The trade of the Maeander Valley was diverted to Ephesus, and, before the coming of the Romans, Miletus, though still called a ‘metropolis’ of Ionia, had become a second-rate commercial town, which the conquerors did not think it necessary to link up to any important city by one of their great roads. At the end of his third journey, when he was hastening to Jerusalem to attend the Feast of Pentecost, he deliberately chose at Troas a ship which was not to touch at Ephesus, where it was probably still unsafe for him to appear, and where in any case his time would have been very short (Acts 20:16). But when the coaster in which he was sailing, and whose movements he naturally could not control, came to Miletus, he unexpectedly found that he would be detained there for some days, and it occurred to him that in the interval he might send a messenger to Ephesus-30 miles distant in a straight line, and somewhat further by boat and road-and summon its elders to meet him. Mycale, and speeding along the coast road, the messenger might reach Ephesus by midnight. Paul was leaving Ephesus, intending to return by Macedonia to Corinth (1 Corinthians 16:5), he may have had reasons for first visiting Miletus, and been obliged to leave Trophimus, who became sick there; or, though he did not personally visit Miletus, he might use a condensed expression, which meant that his friend, having been sent to Miletus and detained there by sickness, was unable to return to Ephesus before the time of sailing, and so was left behind
Demetrius -
A silversmith at Ephesus, whose chief occupation was to make "silver shrines for Diana" (q
John, First Epistle of - It was evidently written by John the evangelist, and probably also at Ephesus, and when the writer was in advanced age
Sceva - An implement, a Jew, chief of the priests at Ephesus (Acts 19:13-16 ); i
Onesiphorus - From the first reference we learn that he showed special kindness to the Apostle during his imprisonment at Rome, when others, from whom he might have expected sympathy and help, held aloof from him; from the second we infer that he and his family lived at Ephesus
Ico'Nium - It was a large and rich city, 120 miles north from the Mediterranean Sea, at the foot of the Taurus mountains, and on the great line of communication between Ephesus and the western coast of the peninsula on one side, and Tarsus, Antioch and the Euphrates on the other
Aquila - On the departure of the apostle from Corinth, a year and six months after, Priscilla and Aquila accompanied him to Ephesus
Colos'Sians, the Epistle to the, - ) The epistle was addressed to Christians of the city of Colosse, and was delivered to them by Tychicus, whom the apostle had sent both to them, (Colossians 4:7,8 ) and to the church of Ephesus, (Ephesians 6:21 ) to inquire into their state and to administer exhortation and comfort
Paul - His third missionary tour (autumn)...
Paul at Ephesus (three years); Epistle to the Galatians (56 or 57). Return to Ephesus. First Epistle to the...
54-57...
Paul's departure from Ephesus (summer) to Macedonia. 56-57, from Ephesus. 57, from Ephesus
Capreolus, Bishop of Carthage - of Carthage, known in connexion with the council of Ephesus, a. ]'>[1]...
Tillemont supposes Capreolus to have succeeded to the see of Carthage shortly before the death of Augustine (430), as the letter convoking the council of Ephesus seems to have been addressed to him and to Augustine (xii. Another object of his letter to Ephesus was to implore the council not to re-open the question of the Pelagian heresy
Onesiphorus - (Ὀνεσίφορος, ‘profit-bringer’)...
This is the name of a Christian convert belonging to Ephesus who had visited Rome during the apostle Paul’s imprisonment and had sought out the prisoner and ministered to his wants: ‘He off refreshed me, and was not ashamed of my chain’ (2 Timothy 1:16). He had also performed outstanding services for the Church at Ephesus, to which the Apostle refers, mentioning that Timothy, to whom he writes, knew better (βέλτιον) about them than he did himself (2 Timothy 1:18). διακονέω) has been supposed to indicate that Onesiphorus acted as a deacon of the Church in Ephesus, but this is by no means certain
Theatre - Ephesus)
Town Clerk - In the circumstances at Ephesus the town clerk feared that he might himself be held responsible for the irregular gathering
Timothy, Letters to - ...
When Paul came to Ephesus he found similar problems. ...
In due course Paul left Ephesus for Macedonia, but he left Timothy behind to help restore order and stability in the church. He contrasts the wrong kind of teaching given at Ephesus with the gospel that he preaches (1:1-11), and then shows from his experiences that the truth of this gospel is sufficient for even the greatest of sinners (1:12-20). He also visited Miletus, a town near Ephesus in western Asia Minor (2 Timothy 4:20), and Troas, a town farther north (2 Timothy 4:13). (Mark was probably working in Colossae, a town not far from Ephesus; cf. He had been visited by Onesiphorus of Ephesus (2 Timothy 1:16-18) and by some of the local Roman Christians (2 Timothy 4:21), but only Luke was able to stay with him (2 Timothy 4:11). ...
Apart from giving Timothy details concerning his circumstances in Rome, Paul wanted to give him added encouragement concerning the church in Ephesus
Ephesians, Epistle to the - The explicit statement of 1:1 would seem to indicate that the letter was written to the Christians who dwelt at Ephesus, but the absence of any allusion to time or place or definite persons, together with the omission of the words "at Ephesus" from some manuscripts, have led many even conservative scholars to regard the work as a circular letter rather than a message to a particular church
Timothy - He passes now out of sight for a few years, and is again noticed as with the apostle at Ephesus (Acts 19:22 ), whence he is sent on a mission into Macedonia. According to tradition, after the apostle's death he settled in Ephesus as his sphere of labour, and there found a martyr's grave
Erastus - Paul in Ephesus, and who were sent by him on some errand into Macedonia. It is easier to believe that the members of the Church at Corinth had friends at Ephesus than at Rome; but, as Lightfoot reminds us, personal acquaintance was not necessary in the Apostolic Church to create Christian sympathy
Demetrius - Demetrius, the silversmith of Ephesus (Acts 19). Ramsay’s lifelike picture of the scene at Ephesus in his St
Epistle to the Ephesians - The explicit statement of 1:1 would seem to indicate that the letter was written to the Christians who dwelt at Ephesus, but the absence of any allusion to time or place or definite persons, together with the omission of the words "at Ephesus" from some manuscripts, have led many even conservative scholars to regard the work as a circular letter rather than a message to a particular church
Laodicea - Like Colossae and Hierapolis, Laodicea was situated in a fertile valley east of Ephesus in the Roman province of Asia. The church was probably founded at the time of Paul’s lengthy stay in Ephesus during his third missionary journey, when the zealous Ephesian converts took the gospel throughout the surrounding countryside (Acts 19:8-10; Colossians 4:12-13)
Alexander - ...
...
A Jew of Ephesus who took a prominent part in the uproar raised there by the preaching of Paul (Acts 19:33 )
Hermas - It is conjectured that together they formed a separate ἐκκλησία or ‘church,’ the locality of which we shall suppose to have been Rome or Ephesus, according to our view of the destination of these salutations
Stephanas - By joining Paul at Ephesus they with Stephanas supplied means of communion between Paul and the Corinthians, taking his letter back with them
Abyssinian Church - They claim there is but one nature in Christ, reject all the aecumenical councils since Ephesus, have some minor heresies of their own, and practise probably the lowest type of Christianity in the world
Tyrannus - Paul’s sojourn at Ephesus we are told that after he had spent three months in arguing with the Jews in the synagogue he succeeded in rousing the hostility of their rulers to such an extent that he was compelled to withdraw from the synagogue altogether, and that he remained in the city for a period of two years, ‘reasoning daily in the school of Tyrannus’ (Acts 19:9). The question here arises, Is Tyrannus to be conceived of as a lecturer in philosophy in Ephesus at the date of the Apostle’s visit, who gave his lecture-room for the use of the Christians? Two explanations are possible. , be correct, the most probable theory is that Tyrannus was a private teacher in Ephesus who granted the use of his building to St. But may not the words have been inserted by one who did not understand the reference to the school of Tyrannus and who desired to make it more intelligible?...
It is impossible to settle the question whether this Tyrannus supposed to be teaching at Ephesus at the date of the Apostle’s visit was a Jew or a Gentile. ...
(2) The only other possible explanation is that the ‘school of Tyrannus’ was the name of some public building in Ephesus which had either belonged to or been used by a person named Tyrannus some time before, and been gifted to the city as a place of public instruction. But the whole matter remains in uncertainty, and there is perhaps more to be said for the view implied in the Western text, that Tyrannus was a teacher lecturing in Ephesus at the date of the Apostle’s visit
Filioque - The Greeks first objected to its insertion in the Nicene Creed, as though against the discipline enjoined by the Council of Ephesus (431), and later as they drifted into schism under Photius (c
Proconsul - To the former belonged the "proconsuls" at Ephesus, Acts 19:38 (AV, "deputies"); to the latter, Sergius Paulus in Cyprus, Acts 13:7,8,12 , and Gallio at Corinth, Acts 18:12
Council - Council of Ephesus, held A
Diana - Her most noted temple was that at Ephesus
Deputy - A coin of Ephesus, in the senate's province of Asia, illustrates the use of "deputies" in Acts 19:38
Beast - ...
1 Corinthians 15:32 (a) The word is used here by the servant of GOD to indicate the character of the men who opposed Paul and persecuted him in Ephesus
Chloe - It is not said that she was a Christian, nor is it clear whether she lived in Corinth or in Ephesus
Paradise - The name is also given to 'the third heaven,' to which Paul was caught up, 2 Corinthians 12:4 ; and to the paradise of God, where there is the tree of life (type of Christ), of which the overcomer in the church at Ephesus would have authority to eat
Kiss - When Paul said farewell to the elders of Ephesus, they wept sore, and fell on his neck and kissed him
Miletus - ...
The apostle Paul, on his voyage from Macedonia toward Jerusalem, spent a day or two here, and held an affecting interview with the Christian elders of Ephesus, who at his summons came nearly thirty miles from the north to meet him, Acts 20:15-38
Ephesians, Epistle to the - The ablest modern critics are not agreed as to the church to whom it was addressed, whether to that in Ephesus, that in Laodicea, or to both of these in connection with the other churches in that region
Church - A particular church or body of professing believers, who meet and worship together in one place; as the churches of Rome, Corinth, Ephesus, Philippi, etc
Gala'Tians, the Epistle to the, - Paul not long after his journey through Galatia and Phrygia, (Acts 18:23 ) and probably in the early portion of his two-and-a-half-years stay at Ephesus, which terminated with the Pentecost of A
Titus, Epistle to - " Thence he went to Ephesus, where he left Timothy, and from Ephesus to Macedonia, where he wrote First Timothy, and thence to Nicopolis in Epirus, from which place he wrote to Titus, about A
Ampliatus - If the view be held that the salutations in Romans 16 were part of a letter to the Church of Ephesus, Ampliatus must have been a Roman, resident in Ephesus, with whom St
Coelestius, Heretic of Hibernian Scots - He soon after retired to Ephesus, where he obtained the priesthood which he had sought in vain at Carthage. After the condemnation of the doctrines of Pelagius by the oecumenical council at Ephesus, Coelestius passed from sight
John - He appears to have retired to Ephesus, but at what time is unknown. He suffered under persecution, and was banished to Patmos (1:9); whence he again returned to Ephesus, where he died, probably about A. There are many interesting traditions regarding John during his residence at Ephesus, but these cannot claim the character of historical truth
Presbyterians - "There is nothing in Scripture upon which the Episcopalian is more ready to rest his cause than the alleged episcopacy of Timothy and Titus, of whom the former is said to have been bishop of Ephesus, and the latter bishop of Crete; yet the Presbyterian thinks it is clear as the noon-day sun, that the presbyters of Ephesus were supreme governors, under Christ, of the Ephesian churches, at the very time that Timothy is pretended to have been their proper diocesan. we read, that 'from Miletus Paul sent to Ephesus, and called the elders (presbyters) of the church. "From this passage it is evident that there was in the city of Ephesus a plurality of pastors of equal authority, without any superior pastor or bishop over them; for the apostle directs his discourse to them all in common, and gives them equal power over the whole flock. Hammond, indeed, imagines, that the elders whom Paul called to Miletus, were the bishops of Asia, and that he sent for them to Ephesus, because that city was the metropolis of this province. ...
But, were this opinion well founded, it is not conceivable that the sacred writer would have called them the elders of the church of Ephesus, but the elders of the church in general, or the elders of the churches in Asia. Besides, it is to be remembered, that the apostle was in such haste to be at Jerusalem, that the sacred historian measures his time by days; whereas it must have required several months to call together the bishops or elders of all the cities of Asia; and he might certainly have gone to meet them at Ephesus in less time than would be requisite for their meeting in that city, and proceeding thence to him at Miletus. They must therefore have been either the joint pastors of one congregation, or the pastors of different congregations in one city; and as it was thus in Ephesus, so it was in Philippi; for we find the apostle addressing his epistle 'to all the saints in Jesus Christ which are at Philippi, with the bishops and deacons. ' From the passage before us it is likewise plain, that the presbyters of Ephesus had not only the name, but the whole power of bishops given to them by the Holy Ghost; for they are enjoined to do the whole work of bishops which signifies to rule as well as feed the church of God. "It appears, therefore, that the apostle Paul, left in the church of Ephesus, which he had planted, no other successors to himself than presbyter-bishops, or Presbyterian ministers, and that he did not devolve his power upon any prelate. Timothy, whom the Episcopalians allege to have been the first bishop of Ephesus, was present when this settlement was made, Acts 20:5 ; and it is surely not to be supposed that, had he been their bishop, the apostle would have desolved the whole episcopal power upon the presbyters before his face. ' But with what truth could this have been said, if obedience to a diocesan bishop had been any part of their duty, either at the time of the apostle's speaking, or at any future period? He foresaw that ravenous wolves would enter in among them, and that even some of themselves should arise speaking perverse things; and if, as the Episcopalians allege, diocesan episcopacy was the remedy provided for these evils, is it not strange, passing strange, that the inspired preacher did not foresee that Timothy, who was then standing beside him, was destined to fill that important office: or, if he did foresee it, that he ommitted to recommend him to his future charge, and to give him proper instructions for the discharge of his duty? "But if Timothy was not bishop of Ephesus, what, it may be asked, was his office in that city? for that he resided there for some time, and was by the apostle invested with authority to obtain and rebuke presbyters, are facts about which all parties are agreed, and which, indeed, cannot be controverted by any reader of Paul's epistles. To this the Prebyterian replies, with confidence, that the power which Timothy exercised in the church of Ephesus was that of an evangelist, Tim 2: 4, 5. ) as well as Ephesus, and that he had as much authority over those churches as over that of which he is said to have been the fixed bishop. ' This text might lead us to suppose that Timothy was bishop of Corinth as well as of Ephesus; for it is stronger than that upon which his episcopacy of the latter church is chiefly built. 'I besought thee to abide still at Ephesus, when I went into Macedonia, that thou mightest charge some that they teach no other doctrine. It is to be observed, too, that the first epistle to Timothy, which alone was written to him during his residence at Ephesus, was of a date prior to Paul's meeting with the elders of that church at Miletus; for in the epistle he hopes to come to him shortly; whereas he tells the elders at Miletus that they should see his face no more. This being the case, it is evident that Timothy was left by the apostle at Ephesus only to supply his place during his temporary absence at Macedona; and that he could not possibly have been constituted fixed bishop of that church, since the episcopal powers were afterwards committed to the presbyters by the Holy Ghost in his presence
Presbyterians - "There is nothing in Scripture upon which the Episcopalian is more ready to rest his cause than the alleged episcopacy of Timothy and Titus, of whom the former is said to have been bishop of Ephesus, and the latter bishop of Crete; yet the Presbyterian thinks it is clear as the noon-day sun, that the presbyters of Ephesus were supreme governors, under Christ, of the Ephesian churches, at the very time that Timothy is pretended to have been their proper diocesan. we read, that 'from Miletus Paul sent to Ephesus, and called the elders (presbyters) of the church. "From this passage it is evident that there was in the city of Ephesus a plurality of pastors of equal authority, without any superior pastor or bishop over them; for the apostle directs his discourse to them all in common, and gives them equal power over the whole flock. Hammond, indeed, imagines, that the elders whom Paul called to Miletus, were the bishops of Asia, and that he sent for them to Ephesus, because that city was the metropolis of this province. ...
But, were this opinion well founded, it is not conceivable that the sacred writer would have called them the elders of the church of Ephesus, but the elders of the church in general, or the elders of the churches in Asia. Besides, it is to be remembered, that the apostle was in such haste to be at Jerusalem, that the sacred historian measures his time by days; whereas it must have required several months to call together the bishops or elders of all the cities of Asia; and he might certainly have gone to meet them at Ephesus in less time than would be requisite for their meeting in that city, and proceeding thence to him at Miletus. They must therefore have been either the joint pastors of one congregation, or the pastors of different congregations in one city; and as it was thus in Ephesus, so it was in Philippi; for we find the apostle addressing his epistle 'to all the saints in Jesus Christ which are at Philippi, with the bishops and deacons. ' From the passage before us it is likewise plain, that the presbyters of Ephesus had not only the name, but the whole power of bishops given to them by the Holy Ghost; for they are enjoined to do the whole work of bishops which signifies to rule as well as feed the church of God. "It appears, therefore, that the apostle Paul, left in the church of Ephesus, which he had planted, no other successors to himself than presbyter-bishops, or Presbyterian ministers, and that he did not devolve his power upon any prelate. Timothy, whom the Episcopalians allege to have been the first bishop of Ephesus, was present when this settlement was made, Acts 20:5 ; and it is surely not to be supposed that, had he been their bishop, the apostle would have desolved the whole episcopal power upon the presbyters before his face. ' But with what truth could this have been said, if obedience to a diocesan bishop had been any part of their duty, either at the time of the apostle's speaking, or at any future period? He foresaw that ravenous wolves would enter in among them, and that even some of themselves should arise speaking perverse things; and if, as the Episcopalians allege, diocesan episcopacy was the remedy provided for these evils, is it not strange, passing strange, that the inspired preacher did not foresee that Timothy, who was then standing beside him, was destined to fill that important office: or, if he did foresee it, that he ommitted to recommend him to his future charge, and to give him proper instructions for the discharge of his duty? "But if Timothy was not bishop of Ephesus, what, it may be asked, was his office in that city? for that he resided there for some time, and was by the apostle invested with authority to obtain and rebuke presbyters, are facts about which all parties are agreed, and which, indeed, cannot be controverted by any reader of Paul's epistles. To this the Prebyterian replies, with confidence, that the power which Timothy exercised in the church of Ephesus was that of an evangelist, Tim 2: 4, 5. ) as well as Ephesus, and that he had as much authority over those churches as over that of which he is said to have been the fixed bishop. ' This text might lead us to suppose that Timothy was bishop of Corinth as well as of Ephesus; for it is stronger than that upon which his episcopacy of the latter church is chiefly built. 'I besought thee to abide still at Ephesus, when I went into Macedonia, that thou mightest charge some that they teach no other doctrine. It is to be observed, too, that the first epistle to Timothy, which alone was written to him during his residence at Ephesus, was of a date prior to Paul's meeting with the elders of that church at Miletus; for in the epistle he hopes to come to him shortly; whereas he tells the elders at Miletus that they should see his face no more. This being the case, it is evident that Timothy was left by the apostle at Ephesus only to supply his place during his temporary absence at Macedona; and that he could not possibly have been constituted fixed bishop of that church, since the episcopal powers were afterwards committed to the presbyters by the Holy Ghost in his presence
John the Evangelist, Saint - Exiled to Patmos, he wrote the Apocalypse or Revelation there; after his return to Ephesus he wrote his Gospel and Epistles
Asia - Many Jews were scattered over these regions, as appears from the history in Acts, and from Josephus, the writers of the New Testament comprehend, under the name of Asia, either (1) the whole of Asia Minor, Acts 19:26,27 ; 20:4,16,18 ; or (2) only proconsular Asia, that is, the region of Ionia, of which Ephesus was the capital, and which Strabo also calls Asia, Acts 2:9 ; 6:9 ; 16:6 ; 19:10,22
Robbery - " In the temple at Ephesus there was a great treasure-chamber, and as all that was laid up there was under the guardianship of the goddess Diana, to steal from such a place would be sacrilege (Acts 19:37 )
Flock - In Paul's address to the elders of Ephesus he exhorts them to take heed unto all the flock: the wolves would not spare them
Shalman - Menander of Ephesus spoke of his warring in southern Syria and besieging Tyre five years (Josephus, Evangelist, John the, Saint - Exiled to Patmos, he wrote the Apocalypse or Revelation there; after his return to Ephesus he wrote his Gospel and Epistles
Apollos - At Ephesus he was taught more perfectly by Priscilla and Aquila
Patmos - In this cave, over-looking the sea and its islands towards his beloved Ephesus, tradition says that John saw and recorded his prophetic visions
Philemon - 18), possibly during the long ministry in Ephesus ( Acts 19:10 ), for the Apostle had not himself visited Colossæ ( Colossians 2:1 )
John, the Second And Third Epistles of - (3 John 1:5 ) in some city near Ephesus
John, the First Epistle General of - It was probably written from Ephesus, and most likely at the close of the first century
Apollos - He came to Ephesus before St. In Ephesus, Apollos may have preached only John’s baptism of repentance
Timothy - During Paul's long stay at Ephesus Timothy "ministered to him" (Acts 19:22), and was sent before him to Macedonia and to Corinth "to bring the Corinthians into remembrance of the apostle's ways in Christ" (1 Corinthians 4:17; 1 Corinthians 16:10). They were together at Ephesus, after his departing eastward from Italy (1 Timothy 1:3). The office at Ephesus and Crete (Titus 1:5) became permanent on the removal of the apostles by death; "angel" (Revelation 1:20) was the transition stage between "apostle" and our "bishop. 43) makes him first bishop of Ephesus, if so John's residence and death must have been later. ...
Possibly (Calmet) Timothy was "the angel of the church at Ephesus" (Revelation 2). " His training under females, his constitutional infirmity, susceptible soft temperament, amativeness, and sensitiveness even to "tears" (2 Timothy 1:4, probably at parting from Paul at Ephesus, where Paul had to "beseech" him to stay: 1 Timothy 1:3), required such charges as "endure hardness (hardship) as a good soldier of Jesus Christ" (2 Timothy 2:3-18; 2 Timothy 2:22), "flee youthful lusts," (1 Timothy 5:2) "the younger entreat as sisters, with all purity. ) Timothy "professed a good profession before many witnesses" at his baptism and his ordination, whether generally or as overseer at Ephesus (1 Timothy 1:18; 1 Timothy 4:14; 1 Timothy 6:12; 2 Timothy 1:6)
Aquila And Priscilla - Paul’s eighteen months’ residence in Corinth, Aquila and Priscilla accompanied him to Ephesus . At Ephesus they remained whilst St. The last NT reference to this devoted pair shows that they returned to Ephesus ( 2 Timothy 4:19 ); their fellowship with Timothy would, doubtless, tend to his strengthening ‘in the grace that is in Christ Jesus’ (21)
Ephesians, Book of - ”...
Paul and the Ephesians Precise information on the introduction of Christianity to Ephesus is not available. The newly-established religion moved inevitably westward to the coast and to the flourishing city of Ephesus, a city of multiple religions, gods, and goddesses. They stopped at Ephesus and surveyed the situation in that city where religions flourished. He returned to Ephesus during a third missionary journey and experienced the triumph over the challenge of Jewish religious leaders as well as that of the Greco-Roman religions represented in the worship of the Greek goddess Artemis (Roman name—Diana; Acts 19:24 ). ...
His ministry in Ephesus lasted three years (Acts 20:31 ). The case for Caesarea has been posited on speculative questions such as: (1) Would it be easier for Paul to get letters to the three places involved (Ephesus, Colosse, and Philippi) from Caesarea or from Rome? (2) Would it be easier for the runaway slave, Onesimus, to meet Paul in a prison in faraway Rome or the much closer Caesarea?...
A third opinion has grown out of Colossians 4:16 in which Paul urged the church at Colosse to exchange letters with the church at neighboring Laodicea so both might get the benefit of both letters. This opinion, which was never widely held, took the position that Paul was writing from an imprisonment in Ephesus and that the “Laodicean” letter was what we have as “Ephesians. ” This view requires an imprisonment in Ephesus for which we have no solid evidence. Some interpreters holding this viewpoint to 1 Corinthians 15:32 in which Paul wrote of his having “fought with beasts at Ephesus. ...
Introduction to the Epistle Paul's experiences in Ephesus combined with the work of his associates qualified him for writing to that church the Queen of the Epistles. He addressed himself “to the saints which are at Ephesus” (Ephesians 1:1 ). ”...
The expression “at Ephesus” is not in the oldest manuscripts of Ephesians, but it is in many of the best ones
Silver - Images for idolatrous worship were made of silver or overlaid with it, (Exodus 20:23 ; Hosea 13:2 ); Habb 2:19 Baruch 6:39 , and the manufacture of silver shrines for Diana was a trade in Ephesus
Lycaonia - through Lycaonia to Troas (Acts 16:1-8); on the third, in the same direction, to Ephesus (Acts 18:23; Acts 19:1)
Miletus - 51) assembled and addressed the elders of Ephesus, 25 miles distant to the N
Eutychians - This heresy was first condemned in a synod held at Constantinople, by Flavian, in 448; approved by the council of Ephesus, called convenitus latronum, in 449; and re-examined and fulminated in the general council of Chalcedon, in 451
Demetrius - A maker of silver portable models of the great temple and statue of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesus (Acts 19:24)
Asyncritus - If the Ephesian destination be preferred, there is evidence of similar house-churches at Ephesus in 1 Corinthians 16:19, and perhaps in Acts 20:20 (see article Patrobas)
Henoticon - This decree repeated and confirmed all that had been enacted in the councils of Nice, Constantinople, Ephesus, and Chalcedon, against the Arians, Nestorians, and Eutychians, without particularly mentioning the council of Chalcedon
Patrobas - It is suggested that together they formed an ἐκκλησία or household church, the locality of which we shall suppose to have been Rome or Ephesus, according to our view of the destination of these salutations
Jacobus Baradaeus, Bishop of Edessa - of Ephesus ordained by him, printed by Land ( Anecdota Syriaca , vol. ...
James Baradaeus is stated by John of Ephesus to have been born at Tela Mauzalat, otherwise called Constantina, a city of Osrhoëne, 55 miles due E. The period spent by him at Constantinople—15 years, according to John of Ephesus—was a disastrous one for the Monophysite body. John of Ephesus says 100,000 (Land, Anecdot. The longer of the two Lives of James, by John of Ephesus (Land, u. The simplicity and innocence of his character, as described by his contemporary John of Ephesus (H. The internecine strife between the different sections of the Monophysite party is fully detailed by John of Ephesus, who records with bitter lamentation the blows, fighting, murders, and other deeds "so insensate and unrestrained that Satan and his herds of demons alone could rejoice in them, wrought on both sides by the two factions with which the believers—so unworthy of the name—were rent," provoking "the contempt and ridicule of heathens, Jews, and heretics" ( H. For a full account see John of Ephesus, op. Conon and Eugenius, whom he had ordained at Alexandria—the former for the Isaurian Seleucia, the latter for Tarsus—who became the founders of the obscure and short-lived sect of the "Cononites," or, from the monastery at Constantinople to which a section of them belonged, "Condobandites" (John of Ephesus, H
Corinthians, Second Epistle to the - Shortly after writing his first letter to the Corinthians, Paul left Ephesus, where intense excitement had been aroused against him, the evidence of his great success, and proceeded to Macedonia. Here he expected to meet with Titus, whom he had sent from Ephesus to Corinth, with tidings of the effects produced on the church there by the first epistle; but was disappointed (1 Corinthians 16:9 ; 2 co 1:8 ; 2:12,13 )
Senuti, an Anchorite - He attached himself to the monastery of Panopolis near Athrebi in Upper Egypt, where he soon attained such fame for sanctity and orthodoxy that Cyril would only set out for the council of Ephesus if he had the company of Senuti and Victor, archimandrite of Tabenna. Senuti's conduct at the council of Ephesus, as described by his disciple and successor Besa fully justifies the charges of outrageous violence brought by the Nestorian party against their opponents
Basilius, Bishop of Seleucia - of Seleucia, in Isauria, and metropolitan, succeeded Dexianus, who attended the council at Ephesus, and therefore after 431. But at the "Robbers' Synod" held at Ephesus a few months later his courage gave way, and he acquiesced in the rehabilitation of Eutyches, and retracted his obnoxious language
Timotheus, Timothy - ...
During Paul's stay at Ephesus Timothy was with him, and was sent to Corinth, but was again with Paul in Macedonia when the Second Epistle to the Corinthians was written. Paul besought him to remain at Ephesus to warn the brethren against false teachers, 1 Timothy 1:3 ; and in the Second Epistle he begs him to use diligence to come to him, to bring with him Mark, and the cloak he had left at Troas, the books and the parchments
Fathers of the Church - The Council of Ephesus (431) declared in its first session that it would define nothing save what had been held unanimously by the ancient and holy Fathers. Lastly, the highest degree of ecclesiastical approbation is reached when the Church takes the very doctrine of a Father and embodies it in her own official pronouncements, as, in the case of Saint Cyril of Alexandria, whose twelve anathematisms against Nestorius were adopted by the Council of Ephesus (431). Le Consilio de Ephesus (431) declarava dum su prime session que illo non facerea definitiones si non assecurava unanimemente per le Patros ancian e sancte. Ultimemente, le grandissime mesura de approbation ecclesiastic es attingete quando le Ecclesio incarna le doctrina de un Patro in su pronunciamentos official, como in le caso de Sancte Cyril de Alexandria, de qui dece-duo anathemas contra Nestorius era adoptate per le Consilio de Ephesus (431)
Onesimus - Paul had not yet visited Colossae (Colossians 2:1); but Onesimus may have seen and heard the Apostle at Ephesus during the latter’s three years’ abode in that city, which was only 100 miles distant from Colossae. 46); in Ephesus, according to another tradition which identifies him with Onesimus, ‘bishop’ of Ephesus in the time of Ignatius (Ign
John (the Apostle) - Regarding John’s residence in Ephesus. —From the time of his meeting with Paul in Jerusalem until his activity in later life at Ephesus, we have no certain knowledge of the Apostle. It is of more moment to inquire why he should go to Ephesus, and in answer two reasons may be given: (a) the importance of this city as a centre for missionary activity; and (b) the necessity of carrying on and developing the work of Paul. ‘the Church’s centre of gravity was no longer at Jerusalem; it was not yet at Rome; it was at Ephesus’ (Thiersch, quoted by Godet, Com. The main witnesses for the common tradition are Irenaeus, Polycrates (Bishop of Ephesus), and Clement of Alexandria. after the first three) ‘John the disciple of the Lord, who also lay on His breast, likewise published a Gospel while dwelling at Ephesus’ (adv. ’ Also the Church at Ephesus, founded by Paul, and with which John lived till Trajan’s time (98–117), ‘is a truthful witness to the tradition of the Apostles’ (ib. They link together in such a manner the experiences of personal associations and reverent memories that the evidence for John’s presence in Ephesus seems well-nigh conclusive. It is apparently the similarity of their fortunes which leads him to speak of this Apostle at all, for just as Paul had sent for the elders of the Ephesian Church to meet him at Miletus on his way to imprisonment in Rome, so Ignatius at Smyrna received a delegation from Ephesus (Ephes. This reference is, ‘May I be found in the lot of the Christians of Ephesus, who have always been of the same mind with the Apostles through the power of Jesus Christ’ (Ephes. Indeed, it does not require us to think that he was living at the time the words of Papias were written, or that he was even ever in Ephesus at all. The only support we have for this last supposition is Dionysius of Alexandria, who in the interests of the authorship of the Apocalypse by some other John than the Apostle cites the tradition that ‘there are two monuments in Ephesus, each bearing the name of John. Certainly it is equally improbable that, at the early time of Polycarp, John the Presbyter should have become such a figure in Ephesus that Polycarp could speak of him exactly as if he were John the Apostle. ...
(b) In turning to the witness of Polycrates, it is well to note that he was Bishop of Ephesus, had seven relatives who were bishops, and was at the time of his letter to Victor, Bishop of Rome, an old enough man to have been living at the time of Polycarp. He fell asleep at Ephesus. Polycrates now follows with his testimony that among those who had died in Asia was ‘Philip, one of the Twelve Apostles, who sleeps in Hierapolis, and his two virgin daughters and another daughter who lived in the Holy Spirit and now rests at Ephesus’ (Historia Ecclesiastica iii. ’ The clearness, positiveness, and fulness of the witness of these three, taken together with the personal relations involved, affords adequate basis for the general belief of the Church that in the latter part of his life John made his home in Ephesus. 22), it has been generally believed that the Apostle lived to a ripe old age, and died quietly at Ephesus. Of course, if John the Apostle died in this way, there is nothing left but to take some other John as the John of Ephesus; and all the testimony of Irenaeus, Polycrates, and Clement of Alexandria has a confusion of names underlying it; also the John of the Apostolic council (Galatians 2:9) was not the son of Zebedee. It will surprise no one to know that the life of one so eminent as John was embellished with all manner of legends, such as his meeting with Cerinthus in the bath-house at Ephesus (adv
Alexander - A Jew of Ephesus, who sought in vain to quiet the popular commotion respecting Paul, Acts 4:6 ...
5
Copper - ), a "coppersmith" of Ephesus ( 2 Timothy 4:14 )
Mary Magdalen, Saint - The Greek tradition holds that Mary Magdalen retired to Ephesus with the Blessed Virgin, and died there, her relics being transferred to Constantinople
Mile'Tus, - (Acts 20:15,17 ) less correctly called MILETUM in (2 Timothy 4:20 ) It lay on the coast, 36 miles to the south of Ephesus, a day's sail from Trogyllium
Philippians, Letter to the - Ephesus has also been suggested as a possibility. There is no doubt that Paul met severe opposition in Ephesus (1 Corinthians 15:32), but there is no certainty that he was imprisoned there
Baptism - Baptism of the Holy Spirit was bestowed at Jerusalem, Samaria, Cesarea and Ephesus, Acts 2:1-4; Acts 10:44; Acts 19:6. At Ephesus twelve who had received John's baptism only were again baptized "in the name of the Lord Jesus," Acts 19:2-5
Timothy - Indeed, he was selected by Paul as his chosen companion in his journeys, shared for a time his imprisonment at Rome, Hebrews 13:23 , and was afterwards left by him at Ephesus, to continue and perfect the work which Paul had begun in that city, 1 Timothy 1:3 3:14 . The first of these Paul seems to have written subsequently to his first imprisonment at Rome, and while he was in Macedonia, having left Timothy at Ephesus, 1 Timothy 1:2 , A
Ephesians, Epistle to the - Paul first visited Ephesus on his way from Corinth to Syria: he did not stay then, but left Priscilla and Aquila there, who were afterwards joined by Apollos. ...
In 1 Corinthians 15:32 Paul speaks of having fought with beasts at Ephesus, doubtless alluding to the strong opposition manifested towards him there by the Jews. , Paul exhorts the elders of Ephesus, as overseers, to feed the church of God. ...
In 1 Timothy 1:3 Paul says he had besought Timothy to abide at Ephesus, and to exhort them to teach no other doctrine, and not to give heed to fables and endless genealogies. In 2 Timothy 1:15 there is the sad intelligence that 'all they which are in Asia' (which must have included Ephesus) had 'turned away from' Paul, doubtless signifying that they had given up the truth as taught by Paul, and settled down with a lower standard. In 2 Timothy 4:12 Tychicus had been sent to Ephesus
Italy - see), and from there sailed to Ephesus or Antioch or Alexandria, as he desired
Titus - We find him, at a later period, with Paul and Timothy at Ephesus, whence he was sent by Paul to Corinth for the purpose of getting the contributions of the church there in behalf of the poor saints at Jerusalem sent forward (2 Corinthians 8:6 ; 12:18 )
Theater - Those in small towns held approximately 4,000 persons, while larger theaters, such as that in Ephesus where Paul was denounced (Acts 19:29 ), were capable of holding 25,000 or more
Barsumas, Syrian Archimandrite - The next year, 449, at the "Robbers' Synod" of Ephesus, Theodosius II
Acephali - Acephali (from ἀ and κεφαλή , those without a head or leader) is a term applied:—(1) To the bishops of the oecumenical council of Ephesus in 431, who refused to follow either St
Euprepius, Bishop of Bizya - of Bizya in Thrace; one of 68 bishops who demanded that the opening of the council of Ephesus should be postponed until the arrival of John of Antioch
Craft Workers - This was well demonstrated on one occasion in Ephesus
John Evangelist, Saint - John issaid to have spent the later years of his life at Ephesus, and is theonly one of the Apostles who died a natural death
Tyrannus - Paul in Ephesus preached before the Jews and proselytes in the synagogue for three months. All the probabilities are in favour of this having been the name of a noted public building in Ephesus
Gaius - Now it is perhaps easier to believe that this Corinthian would have friends, whom he would wish to salute, at Ephesus rather than at Rome, and these salutations in Romans 16:23 are thought by some scholars to point to an Ephesian destination of the passage. Paul, who with Aristarchus was seized at Ephesus
Bishop - Paul called for the elders of the church at Ephesus, Acts 20:17 , and called them 'overseers. ' The bishops of Ephesus were exhorted to take heed to all the flock, and to feed the church of God
Beast - Paul writes that he fought with ‘beasts’ at Ephesus (1 Corinthians 15:32). Paul referred to some extreme danger from men through which he had passed in Ephesus, of which the Corinthians had heard (P
John, Letters of - Towards the end of the first century, the churches in and around Ephesus suffered much tension and conflict because of false teaching (e. Early records indicate that the apostle John lived in Ephesus at this time, and that he wrote his Gospel and three letters partly to counter some of the false views. ...
Background to 1 John...
The chief trouble-maker in Ephesus was a man named Cerinthus
Paul as a Pastor - ...
IN his painstaking industry for Theophilus and for us, Luke has provided us with an extract-minute, so to call it, copied out of the session-books of Ephesus. Paul had been the minister and the moderator of the kirk-session of Ephesus for three never-to-be-forgotten years. He knows that, and he has a great longing, and a most natural longing it is, to see his old colleagues in Ephesus once more before he goes to be with Christ. Paul had given three of the best years of his life to Ephesus, and it was only natural that he should take occasion to go over those three years and look at some of the lessons that those three years had left behind them, both for himself and for his successors in the eldership of Ephesus. In no other single passage in all Paul's Life by Luke, or in all his own Epistles even, do we see the finished friend and the perfect pastor as in this sederunt, so to call it, of the kirk-session of Ephesus. No: the elders of Ephesus did not need to be reminded that Paul had not spent those three years serving and satisfying them. With all humility of mind, says Paul to the assembled elders of Ephesus. " The whole of Ephesus was Paul's parish. Above all his discoveries, when Professor Ramsay goes east to dig for Paul in Ephesus, I would like him to be able to disinter Paul's pastoral-visitation book. Did Paul make it a rule to read, and expound, and pray, in every house, and on every visit? Did he send word by the deacon of the district that he was coming? Or did he just, in our disorderly way, start off and drop in here and there as this case and that came up into his overcrowded mine? Till the learned Professor comes upon Paul's private note-book, for myself I will continue to interpret Paul's farewell address to the kirk-session of Ephesus with some liberality. Paul does not really mean me to understand that he was always weeping, and always catechising, and always expounding, and always on his knees in the houses of Ephesus
Church Government - His work was not to serve tables, but to preach and to make disciples of all nations, so that he led a wandering life, settling down only in his old age, or in the sense of making, say, Ephesus or Corinth his centre for a while. We have (1) the appointment of the Seven at Jerusalem ( Acts 6:1-15 ); (2) elders at Jerusalem in the years 44, 50, 58 ( Acts 11:30 ; Acts 15:8 ; Acts 15:22 ; Acts 21:18 ), appointed by Paul and Barnabas in every church about 48 ( Acts 14:23 ), mentioned James 5:14 ; at Ephesus in 58 ( Acts 20:17 ), mentioned 1 Peter 5:1 ; (3) Phœhe a deaconess at Cenchreæ in 58 ( Romans 16:1 ), bishops and deacons at Philippi in 63 ( Philippians 1:1 ). Also in the Pastoral Epistles, Timothy at Ephesus about 66 is ( 1 Timothy 3:1-16 ; 1 Timothy 4:1-16 ) in charge of four orders: (1) bishops (or elders) ( 1 Timothy 5:1 ); (2) deacons; (3) deaconesses ( 1 Timothy 3:11 ) (‘women’ Apollos - In Acts 18:24-25 Apollos is described as ‘a Jew, an Alexandrian by race, a learned man, mighty in the Scriptures, instructed in the way of the Lord, fervent in spirit,’ who came to Ephesus when Aquila and Priscilla had been left there by St. If the twelve men found in Ephesus by St. It seems unlikely that Apollos was baptized at Ephesus, for the twelve disciples are still ignorant of baptism, nor was there a Christian Church in Ephesus until after St. Perhaps they recognized the need of fuller instruction than could be given in Ephesus for such a promising disciple, who was likely to become a powerful Christian teacher. Apollos when he arrived in Ephesus did not know of the giving of the Holy Spirit
Eusebius, Bishop of Dorylaeum - Proclus against Nestorius, and before the orthodox had separated from the communion of Nestorius, in consequence of the council of Ephesus, there appeared, fixed in a public place, a document exposing the identity of Nestorius's doctrine with that of Paul of Samosata. When Eusebius arrived in Ephesus early in Aug. 449 to attend the council, he apparently lodged with Stephen of Ephesus ( ib. He complains more than once of the conduct of Dioscorus in excluding him from the council of Ephesus (Labbe, iv. He urges the iniquities of Dioscorus at Ephesus, and begs for complete exculpation for himself and condemnation for Dioscorus (ib. 699 A) voted for the deposition of both claimants to the see of Ephesus, Bassian and Stephen, as being both alike irregularly consecrated
Colossians - The epistle was addressed to the Christians of the city of Colossae, and was delivered to them by Tychicus, whom the apostle had sent both to them, Colossians 4:7-8, and to the church of Ephesus, Ephesians 6:21, to inquire into their state and to give exhortation and comfort
Smyr'na - (myrrh ), a city of Asia Minor, situated on the AEgean Sea, 40 miles north of Ephesus
Magic - At Ephesus there was a great destruction of magical books (Acts 19:18,19 )
Teacher, Teaching - Paul left Timothy at Ephesus to charge some not to teach other doctrine than what the apostles taught; and those that did teach otherwise are said to be "puffed up, knowing nothing," etc
Dorotheus (7), Bishop of Martianopolis - Preaching in Constantinople not long before the council of Ephesus, he declared that "if any one asserted that Mary was the mother of God he was anathema" (Ep
Titus - Here he received the Epistle to Titus from Paul, then at Ephesus, inviting him to Nicopolis, Titus 3:12 ; whence he went into the neighboring Dalmatia, before Paul was finally imprisoned at Rome, 2 Timothy 4:10
Wonder - The seven wonders of the world were the Egyptian pyramids, the Mausoleum erected by Artemisia, the temple of Diana at Ephesus, the walls and hanging gardens of Babylon, the colossus at Rhodes, the statue of Jupiter Olympius, and the Pharos or watch-tower of Alexandria
Baptism - The distinction between John's baptism and Christian baptism appears in the case of Apollos, (Acts 18:26,27 ) and of the disciples at Ephesus mentioned (Acts 19:1-6 ) We cannot but draw from this history the inference that in Christian baptism there was a deeper spiritual significance
Philologus - The locality to which we shall suppose these churches belonged will depend upon whether we think the destination of these salutations was Rome or Ephesus
Timothy - He seems to have soon won his way into the trust and affection of the Corinthians, for when, after the departure of the Apostle to Ephesus, troubles break out in Corinth, Paul first sends Timothy to compose the disorder, giving him authority to speak in his name (1 Corinthians 4:17). ...
The two chief centres of Timothy’s subsequent activity were Macedonia and Ephesus (Acts 19:21-22, Philippians 2:19-20, 2 Timothy 1:15; 2 Timothy 1:18; 2 Timothy 4:13). He is addressed as having charge of churches in the neighbourhood of Ephesus, and as being exposed to serious dangers and temptations. -Timothy is called the first bishop of Ephesus (Eus. he is said to have been made bishop of Ephesus by Paul in the reign of Nero, to have become an intimate friend of the apostle John, and to have suffered martyrdom under Nerva on 22nd January, when Peregrinus was proconsul of Asia
Diana - ) But the Artemis of Ephesus is a divinity entirely different in character from the ordinary Greek Artemis; and that such a goddess should come to be represented in English by the name Diana is almost ridiculous. ...
The goddess of Ephesus, called Artemis by the Greeks, was a divinity of a type wide-spread throughout Anatolia and the East generally (cf. The Artemis of Ephesus was represented in art as multimammia, covered with breasts. ...
The Ephesian cult of Artemis was by no means confined to Ephesus. ...
It was in Ephesus (q
Epaenetus - 3), who appear in 1 Corinthians 16:19 and again in 2 Timothy 4:19 as living in Ephesus, has given rise to the suggestion that this section of Romans was originally addressed to the Church of Ephesus
Tim'Othy - 63, revisited proconsular Asia; that the apostle then continued his Journey to Macedonia, while the disciple remained, half reluctantly, even weeping at the separation, (2 Timothy 1:4 ) at Ephesus, to check, if possible, the outgrowth of heresy and licentiousness which had sprung up there. He continued, according to the old traditions, to act as bishop of Ephesus, and died a martyr's death under Domitian or Nerva. If he continued, according to the received tradition, to be bishop of Ephesus, then he, and no other, must have been the "angel" of the church of Ephesus to whom the message of (Revelation 2:1-7 ) was addressed
Colossae - Commanding the approaches to a pass in this range, and traversed by the great trade-route between Ephesus and the Euphrates, Colossae was at one time a place of much importance. In his second journey he was debarred from speaking in Asia (Acts 16:6), the province to which Colossae politically belonged, and in his third tour ‘he went through the Galatic region and Phrygia [1] in order, confirming the disciples,’ and ‘having passed through the upper country (τὰ ἀνωτερικὰ μέρη) he came to Ephesus’ (Acts 18:23; Acts 19:1). During his three years’ residence in Ephesus, ‘all they that dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord, both Jews and Greeks’ (Acts 19:10; cf. Epaphras and Philemon, citizens of Colossae, were probably converted in Ephesus, and the former was speedily sent, as St
Timothy - He is next mentioned at Ephesus with Paul on his third missionary journey, and thence is sent with Erastus to Macedonia in advance of the Apostle ( Acts 19:22 ). probably those who had borne the Epistle) to Ephesus ( 1 Corinthians 16:10-11 ; 1 Corinthians 16:8 ). From the Pastoral Epistles we learn that when Paul, after his release, came into Asia, he left Timothy as his delegate in Ephesus, giving him full instructions as to how he was to rule the Church during his absence, which he realized might be longer than he anticipated ( 1 Timothy 1:3 ; 1 Timothy 3:14-15 )
Games - The most important of these, from the Biblical student’s point of view, were the games of Ephesus. Paul was certainly familiar, and, as will be seen below, allusions to games are remarkably frequent in writings connected with Ephesus. ...
There is a very interesting allusion to the games of Ephesus in 2 Timothy 4:7 ‘I have contended the good contest, I have completed the race … henceforth is laid up for me the crown of righteousness,’ etc. The last passage, it should be remembered, is addressed to the elders at Ephesus. In connexion with Ephesus we may notice also the allusion in Acts 19:31 to the Asiarchs the officers who superintended the games. The reference to fighting ‘with wild beasts at Ephesus’ in 1 Corinthians 15:32 is probably a metaphorical allusion to such contests as were common afterwards in the Colosseum at Rome, and were, according to Schmitz (see ‘Isthmia’ in Smith’s Dict. Here, again, it should be borne in mind that it was to Ephesus and the surrounding towns, the district of the great Ephesian games, that St
Antioch - It has been identified with the modern Yalobatch, lying to the east of Ephesus
Tryphaena - We shall picture their activity at Rome or Ephesus according to our view of the destination of the salutations in Romans 16
Galatia - Paul founded several "churches" in the Galatian region, not residing for long in one place and forming a central church, as at Ephesus and Corinth (Galatians 1:2; 1 Corinthians 16:1; Acts 16:6)
Adramyttium - Though it passed the coast-road which connected Ephesus with Troy and the Hellespont, while an inland highway linked it with Pergamos
Corinthians - The first epistle was written by Paul at Ephesus, about a
Nereus - If so, Nereus and his sister and Olympas may have been their family, which formed the nucleus of a church which met under their leadership at their house in Rome or Ephesus
Pastor - Paul’s charge at Miletus to the elders of the Church at Ephesus (Acts 20:28)
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - Was written from Ephesus (1 Corinthians 16:8 ) about the time of the Passover in the third year of the apostle's sojourn there (Acts 19:10 ; 20:31 ), and when he had formed the purpose to visit Macedonia, and then return to Corinth (probably A. " In 16:8 he declares his intention of remaining some time longer in Ephesus
Pergamum - But Ephesus was now the centre of trade, and it was at Ephesus that West and East met together, creating a medley of all philosophies and all religions
Corinth - Here, after his departure, Apollos came from Ephesus. ...
Before this former letter, he paid a second visit (probably during his three years' sojourn at Ephesus, from which he could pass readily by sea to Corinth Acts 19:10; Acts 20:31); for in 2 Corinthians 12:14; 2 Corinthians 13:1, he declares his intention to pay a third visit. The place of writing was Ephesus (1 Corinthians 16:8). The English subscription "from Philippi" arose from mistranslating 1 Corinthians 16:5, "I am passing through Macedonia;" he intended (1 Corinthians 16:8) leaving Ephesus after Pentecost that year. ...
Just before his conflict with the beastlike mob of Ephesus, 1 Corinthians 15:32 implies that already he had premonitory symptoms; the storm was gathering, his "adversaries many" (1 Corinthians 16:9; Romans 16:4). The tumult (Acts 19:29-30) had not yet taken place, for immediately after it he left Ephesus for Macedon. 57, when Paul left Ephesus for Troas. In "ASIA" (see) he had been in great peril (2 Corinthians 1:8-9), whether from the tumult at Ephesus (Acts 19:23-41) or a dangerous illness (Alford)
Helladius, Bishop of Tarsus - His episcopate illustrates the stormy period of the council of Ephesus. Helladius with Eutherius of Tyana next drew up a long letter to pope Sixtus, giving their account of the council of Ephesus and begging him as a new Moses to save the true Israel from the persecution of the Egyptians. 164), but the latter convoked the bishops of his province, whose synodical letters to Theodosius declared their complete acceptance of all required of them: admission of the decrees of the council of Ephesus, communion with Cyril, the ratification of Nestorius's sentence of deposition, and the anathematization of him and his adherents ( ib
Messalians - They were condemned in 376 by Flavian, Bishop of Antioch; in 388 by the Synod of Side; in 426 by a Council of Constantinople; and in 431 by the Third General Council of Ephesus
Filthy, the - They were condemned in 376 by Flavian, Bishop of Antioch; in 388 by the Synod of Side; in 426 by a Council of Constantinople; and in 431 by the Third General Council of Ephesus
Effectual - It is translated "effectual" in 1 Corinthians 16:9 , of the door opened for the Gospel in Ephesus, and made "effectual" in the results of entering it; and in Philemon 1:6 , of the fellowship of Philemon's faith "in the knowledge of every good thing" (RV)
Theatre - So at Ephesus (Acts 19), when the disturbance aroused by Demetrius took place, it was the most natural thing in the world that a rush should be made to the theatre (v
Adelphians - They were condemned in 376 by Flavian, Bishop of Antioch; in 388 by the Synod of Side; in 426 by a Council of Constantinople; and in 431 by the Third General Council of Ephesus
Gomer - Originally dwelling in what is now southern Russia, the Ukraine (the Crimea betrays their name, the Cimmerian Bosphorus); then being dispossessed by the Scythians, they fled across the Caucasus into Armenia and Asia Minor; they warred with Lydia, and burnt the temple of Diana of Ephesus...
They are the stock of the Cymry (as the Welsh call themselves; the English gave them the name "Welsh," i
Assembly - the word is also used for any gathering of people, as at the tumult in Ephesus
Euchites - They were condemned in 376 by Flavian, Bishop of Antioch; in 388 by the Synod of Side; in 426 by a Council of Constantinople; and in 431 by the Third General Council of Ephesus
Adelphians - They were condemned in 376 by Flavian, Bishop of Antioch; in 388 by the Synod of Side; in 426 by a Council of Constantinople; and in 431 by the Third General Council of Ephesus
Messalians - They were condemned in 376 by Flavian, Bishop of Antioch; in 388 by the Synod of Side; in 426 by a Council of Constantinople; and in 431 by the Third General Council of Ephesus
Corinth'Ians, First Epistle to the, - Paul toward the close of his nearly three-years stay at Ephesus, (Acts 19:10 ; 20:31 ) which, we learn from (1 Corinthians 16:8 ) probably terminated with the Pentecost of A
Timothy, Epistles to - Paul, having to go into Macedonia, left Timothy in charge of the Church at Ephesus ( 1 Timothy 1:3 ); and, fearing he might be detained longer than he anticipated, he wrote telling him how to act during his absence ( 1 Timothy 3:14-15 ). From other allusions in the Epistles we gather that the Apostle visited not only Ephesus and Macedonia, but also Troas ( 2 Timothy 4:13 ), Corinth and Miletus ( 2 Timothy 4:20 ), and Crete ( Titus 1:5 ), and that he purposed wintering in Nicopolis ( Titus 3:12 ). No doubt in Acts we find the Apostle remaining two years in Ephesus (Acts 19:10 ), but on that occasion he did not leave Timothy behind when he went into Macedonia; on the contrary, he sent him into that country while he remained at Ephesus ( Acts 19:22 ); nor was there time during his two years in that city for such lengthened journeys as the above visits require. 61), we must conclude, if we accept the Pastorals as genuine, that the Apostle visited Ephesus, Macedonia, and Crete after a release from imprisonment. In a city like Ephesus, Oriental mysticism, Greek thought, Judaism, and Christianity would meet; and the Church there, if lapsing from truth, would show signs of heresy derived from all these sources. 64, ample time would have passed since he first evangelized Ephesus in a
Hilarius, Bishop of Rome - He had been sent, when a deacon, as one of the legates of pope Leo to the council at Ephesus called Latrocinium (449), and is especially mentioned in the Acts of the council as having protested against the deposition of Flavian. After the council, Flavian having died from the violent treatment he had undergone, Hilarius, fearing with reason the like usage, escaped from Ephesus and travelled by by-roads to Italy. In remembrance of his deliverance at Ephesus from the trials that procured him the title of confessor, he built, after he became pope, in the baptistery of Constantine near the Lateran, two chapels dedicated to St. Anastasius Bibliothecarius mentions his decreta sent to various parts, confirming the synods of Nice, Ephesus, and Chalcedon, condemning Eutyches, Nestorius, and all heretics, and confirming the domination and primacy of the holy Catholic and apostolic see (Concil
Sceva - At Ephesus, where St
Corinth - Here he first became aquainted with Aquila and Priscilla, and soon after his departure Apollos came to it from Ephesus
Mark - At a later period he was with Peter in Babylon (1 Peter 5:13 ), then, and for some centuries afterwards, one of the chief seats of Jewish learning; and he was with Timothy in Ephesus when Paul wrote him during his second imprisonment (2 Timothy 4:11 )
John, Gospel of Saint - Its author is the Apostle Saint John, who wrote the Gospel at Ephesus shortly before his death, about the year 100
Troas - ...
During his next missionary tour Paul rested a while in his northward journey from Ephesus, hoping to meet Titus (2 Corinthians 2:12-13)
Philemon - This conversion took place during Paul's extended ministry in Ephesus (Acts 19:10 )
Trogyllium - Mycale, on the coast of Asia Minor, about equidistant from Ephesus and Miletus
Determine - ...
Paul had determined to sail by Ephesus
Sosipater - It is perhaps easier to believe that their salutations were meant for fellow-Christians at Ephesus than at Rome, but we must remember that in the Apostolic Church sympathy and even affection were possible between converts who were not personally acquainted
Felix (1) i, Bishop of Rome - Felix, who had in the meantime succeeded Dionysius, addressed a letter on the subject to Maximus and to the clergy of Antioch, fragments of which are preserved in the Apologeticus of Cyril of Alexandria, and in the Acts of the council of Ephesus, and which is also alluded to by Marius Mercator, and by Vincent of Lerins in his Commonitorium ; cf
Church - The followers of Christ in a particular city or province as the church of Ephesus, or of Antioch
Gospel of Saint John - Its author is the Apostle Saint John, who wrote the Gospel at Ephesus shortly before his death, about the year 100
Philemon - He calls Philemon "brother," and says "thou owest unto me even thine own self," namely, as being the instrument of thy conversion (Philemon 1:19); probably during Paul's long stay at the neighboring Ephesus (Acts 19:10), when "all they which dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord Jesus
Epistles to the Corinthians - Two epistles written by Saint Paul in the year 57, the first from Ephesus and the second from Macedonia
Temple - The most celebrated of the ancient pagan temples were that of Belus in Babylon, that of Vulcan at Memphis, that of Jupiter at Thebes, that of Diana at Ephesus, that of Apollo in Miletus,that of Jupiter Olympius in Athens, and that of Apollo at Delphi
Ephesus - Christ gives the church at Ephesus a high degree of praise, coupled with a solemn warning, Revelation 2:1-5 , which seems not to have prevented its final extinction, though it remained in existence six hundred years
Divination - , as well as the notorious dealers in magical books at Ephesus
Apollos - ...
When Apollos visited the newly established Christian community in Ephesus, it became clear that he lacked an understanding of some important Christian teachings
Polycrates, Bishop of Ephesus - of Ephesus in the last decade of 2nd cent
Evagrius - Evagrius (17) , an ecclesiastical historian, who wrote six books, embracing a period of 163 years, from the council of Ephesus a. The work is chiefly valuable in relation to the Nestorian and Eutychian heresies, and the councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon
Paulus, Bishop of Emesa - of Emesa one of the most deservedly respected prelates of the period of the Nestorian controversy the contemporary of Cyril and John of Antioch the peacemaker between the patriarchs of Alexandria and Antioch after the disastrous close of the council of Ephesus a. He reached Ephesus together with John of Antioch and the other Oriental bishops and joined in the deposition of Cyril and Memnon (Labbe iii
Liturgy - Paul, or Ephesus            | | or Rome |     ——————- | | |     | | Present Liturgy | Liturgy of Lyons  Liturgy of Syriac of Egypt | |  St. John, for the Church in Ephesus
John the Apostle - According to these, John lived to a very old age (as Jesus had foretold; John 21:20-23) and spent most of his later years in Ephesus. It seems also that he was imprisoned on Patmos, an island off the coast from Ephesus, from where the book of Revelation was written (Revelation 1:9)
Corinth - being Ephesus, with which it was in close and continual connexion. They also left for Ephesus with him. Apollos had crossed from Ephesus to Corinth (Acts 18:27 , 2 Corinthians 3:1 ) and done valuable work there ( Acts 18:27-28 , 1 Corinthians 1:12 )
James And John, the Sons of Zebedee - Clemen, whose discussion of the whole evidence should be consulted (Die Entstehung des Johannesevangeliums), says, this does not prove the historical accuracy of the statement, but it is important evidence of a different tradition from that which represents the son of Zebedee as living on in Ephesus to an advanced old age, and dying a peaceful death. The real difficulty is to account for the growth of a different tradition at Ephesus, if the tradition of John’s martyrdom was known at Hierapolis in Papias’ time. John’s residence in Ephesus. -Even if the story of John’s death at the hand of the Jews is historical, it does not exclude the possibility of his residence at Ephesus, though it certainly overthrows the traditional account of his long residence there till the reign of Trajan and his wonderful activity in extreme old age as the last surviving apostle and ‘over-bishop’ of Asia. ...
In the question of the Apostle’s residence in Ephesus we are confronted with another problem of which our present knowledge offers no certain solution. ad Romans 12:2), while there is no mention of John in the Ephesian Epistle? The immediate occasion of the reference to Paul-the passing through Ephesus of martyrs ‘on their way to God’-precluded the mention of John. But the reference in the preceding chapter to the presence of apostles at Ephesus (xi. But this does not preclude an earlier residence at Ephesus. ...
It is probable that Polycrates of Ephesus, in his list of the μεγάλα στοιχεῖα of Asia which he gives in his letter to Victor of Rome (a. ’ But his account of the ἐπιστήθιος is clearly legendary, and sufficient time had elapsed since the death of the John of Ephesus (? 110), to whom he refers, for the growth of confusion, whether ‘deliberate’ or unconscious. It is too wide-spread to be derived from any one single source, and is difficult to reconcile with the view that the son of Zebedee had no connexion at all with Asia and Ephesus. ...
On the whole, the least unsatisfactory explanation of the evidence, with all its difficulties and complexities, is the hypothesis that the Apostle did spend some years of his later life in Ephesus, where he became the hero of many traditions which belonged of right to another or to others
Asia Minor, Cities of - Cities of Asia Minor important to the New Testament accounts included Alexandria Troas, Assos, Ephesus, Miletus, Patara, Smyrna, Pergamum, Sardis, Thyatira, Philadelphia, Laodicea, Colassae, Attalia, Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, Derbe, and Tarsus. ...
Ephesus served as the primary trading center of all Asia Minor. A well-laid road linked the post facilities at Ephesus with Tarsus to the east. As the chief port and city of Asia, Paul's choice of Ephesus as a center of ministry provided the perfect base from which the Gospel could be spread throughout the Roman world. Wagons bearing Anatolian marble passed through Antioch on their way to ships at Ephesus to be used in the decoration of the empire. ...
The boyhood home of the Apostle Paul, Tarsus of Cilicia lay on the eastern end of the east-west trade route beginning at Ephesus
Games - The "chiefs of Asia" (Asiarchs) superintended the games in honor of Diana at Ephesus (Acts 19:31). ...
In Hebrews 12:1-254 Paul alludes to "fights with beasts" (though his fights were with beast-like men, Demetrius and his craftsmen, not with beasts, from which his Roman citizenship exempted him), at Ephesus. The Asiarchs' friendliness was probably due to their having been interested in his teaching during his long stay at Ephesus. Paul wrote 1 Corinthians at Ephesus, and in addressing the Ephesian elders he uses naturally the same image, an undesigned coincidence (Acts 20:24)
Alexander, Bishop of Hierapolis Euphratensis - of Hierapolis Euphratensis and metropolitan in the patriarchate of Antioch; the uncompromising opponent of Cyril of Alexandria, and the resolute advocate of Nestorius in the controversies that followed the council of Ephesus, A. ...
Alexander arrived at the council of Ephesus in company with his brother metropolitan Alexander of Apamea on or about June 20, 431. of Ephesus, and declaring Cyril's anathemas heretical
Victor, Bishop of Rome - of Ephesus, as head of the Asian churches, who, at Victor's desire, had convened an assembly of bishops which concurred with Polycrates in his rejoinder. He resolutely upholds the Asian tradition, supporting it by the authority of Philip the apostle, who, with his two aged virgin daughters, was buried at Hierapolis; of another saintly daughter of his who lay at Ephesus; of St. John, also at rest at Ephesus; of Polycarp of Smyrna, bishop and martyr; of Thraseas of Eumenia, also bishop and martyr, who slept at Smyrna
Timotheus - He is sometimes called bishop of Ephesus, and it has been said that he suffered martyrdom in that city, some years after the death of St. Paul's First Epistle to Timothy was to give him instructions concerning the management of the church of Ephesus; and it was probably intended that it should be read publicly to the Ephesians, that they might know upon what authority Timothy acted. After saluting him in an affectionate manner, and reminding him of the reason for which he was left at Ephesus, the Apostle takes occasion, from the frivolous disputes which some Judaizing teachers had introduced among the Ephesians, to assert the practical nature of the Gospel, and to show its superiority over the law; he returns thanks to God for his own appointment to the apostleship, and recommends to Timothy fidelity in the discharge of his sacred office; he exhorts that prayers should be made for all men, and especially for magistrates; he gives directions for the conduct of women, and forbids their teaching in public; he describes the qualifications necessary for bishops and deacons, and speaks of the mysterious nature of the Gospel dispensation; he foretels that there will be apostates from the truth, and false teachers in the latter times, and recommends to Timothy purity of manners and improvement of his spiritual gifts; he gives him particular directions for his behaviour toward persons in different situations in life, and instructs him in several points of Christian discipline; he cautions him against false teachers, gives him several precepts, and solemnly charges him to be faithful to his trust. Many have thought that he was at Ephesus; but others have rejected that opinion, because Troas does not lie in the way from Ephesus to Rome, whither he was directed to go as quickly as he could
John, Gospel of - ...
It was probably written at Ephesus, which, after the destruction of Jerusalem (A
Scribe - ...
Note: The word grammateus is used of the town "clerk" in Ephesus, Acts 19:35
False Apostles - They should perhaps be identified with the Nicolaitans active at Ephesus ( Revelation 2:6 ) and Pergamos (Revelation 2:15 ), and with the followers of the “false prophetess” at Thyatira (Revelation 2:20 )
Iconium - On the route between western Asia and Ephesus on one side, and Tarsus, Antioch, and Euphrates on the other
Island - Samos is an island located off the Ionian coast twelve miles southwest of Ephesus (Acts 20:15 )
Hymenaeus - ...
His sentence pronounced at Rome took effect on Hymenaeus at Ephesus, in the form of some bodily sickness (so Acts 5:5; Acts 5:10; Acts 13:11; 1 Corinthians 11:30), that he should learn not to blaspheme
Urbanus - We shall suppose him to have been resident at the time of writing in Rome or in Ephesus, according to our view of the destination of Romans 16
Sepharvaim - " The Lord Jesus said this to the once flourishing church of Ephesus; and the Lord fulfilled the awful threatening
Council - ...
Ecumenical Council, in church history, a general council or assembly of prelates and doctors, representing the whole church as the council of Nice, of Ephesus, and of Chalcedon
Beasts - Paul, 1 Corinthians 15:32 , speaks of fighting with beasts, &c: by which he does not mean his having been exposed in the amphitheatre to fight as a gladiator, as some have conjectured, but that he had to contend at Ephesus with the fierce uproar of Demetrius and his associates
Cedar - The ark of the covenant, and much of the temple of Solomon, and that of Diana at Ephesus, were built of cedar
Laodice'a - But the preaching of the gospel at Ephesus, ( Acts 18:19 ; Acts 19:41 ) must inevitably have resulted in the formation of churches in the neighboring cities, especially where Jews were settled; and there were Jews in Laodicea
Paulus of Asia - We owe our knowledge of him to the Ecclesiastical History of John of Ephesus (Dr
Photius, Bishop of Tyre - Under the powerful influence of Uranius of Himera, he and his fellow-judges first acquitted Ibas at Tyre and Berytus, and the next year at the "Robber Synod" of Ephesus zealously joined in his condemnation (Martin, Le Brigandage d’Ephèse , pp 118–120, 181)
Titus - When affairs had reached a dangerous climax in the church of Corinth during Paul’s sojourn in Ephesus, Timothy was first dispatched by the Apostle to restore peace; but he failed, and Titus was then sent. His position in Crete is similar to that of Timothy in the churches of Ephesus-a representative of the Apostle holding a local commission
Hierapolis - Paul’s prolonged mission in Ephesus, the city from which the light radiated over the whole province of Asia (Acts 19:10; Acts 19:26). Polycrates, bishop of Ephesus towards the end of the 2nd cent
Asiarch - Artemis-worship, moreover, hulked so largely in Ephesus as perhaps to dwarf the Imperial worship. ...
See also articles Diana and Ephesus
Colosse - ...
Probably during Paul's "two years" stay at Ephesus, when "all which dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord Jesus" (Acts 19:10; Acts 19:26), Epaphras, Philemon (Philemon 1:2; Philemon 1:13; Philemon 1:19), Archippus, Apphia, and other natives of Colosse (which was on the high road from Ephesus to the Euphrates), becoming converted at Ephesus, were subsequently the first preachers in their own city
Ephesians, Epistle to - To whom was it addressed? That it was specifically written to the Ephesian Church is improbable, for two reasons (1) The words ‘at Ephesus’ in Ephesians 1:1 are absent from two of the earliest MSS, and apparently from the Epistle as known to Marcion (a. Paul’s long stay at Ephesus, greetings to friends, etc. On the other hand, early tradition, as shown in the title, associated the Epistle with Ephesus, and, except Marcion, no early writer associated it with any other Church. Possibly the space where ‘at Ephesus’ now appears was left blank for Tychicus to fill in as he left copies of the letter at the various churches on his line of route
Paul - When he visited Ephesus he separated the disciples from the synagogue, and they met in the school of Tyrannus. At Ephesus he wrote theFIRST EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS, and probably the EPISTLE TO THE GALATIANS. At Miletus he gave a solemn parting address to the elders of Ephesus, and took his leave of the disciples at Tyre, where he was cautioned not to go to Jerusalem. His movements from that time are not definitely recorded; apparently he visited Ephesus and Macedonia, 1 Timothy 1:3 ; wrote the FIRST EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY; visited Crete, Titus 1:5 ; and Nicopolis, Titus 3:12 ; wrote the EPISTLE TO TITUS (the early writers say that he went to Spain, which we know he desired to do, Romans 15:24,28 ); visited Troas and Miletus, 2 Timothy 4:13,20 ; wrote the EPISTLE TO THE HEBREWS; and when a prisoner at Rome the second time, wrote the SECOND EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY, when expecting his death
John the Apostle - After an indefinite interval he is understood to have settled in Ephesus. 96) he returned from the island and took up his abode in Ephesus, according to ‘an ancient Christian tradition’ (lit. The former says that ‘all the elders associated with John the disciple of the Lord in Asia bear witness,’ and that he remained in Ephesus until the time of Trajan. John and the young disciple who fell into evil ways and became the chief of a band of robbers, as having occurred when ‘after the tyrant’s death he returned from the isle of Patmos to Ephesus. ’ Tertullian confirms the tradition of a residence in Ephesus by quoting the evidence of the Church of Smyrna that their bishop Polycarp was appointed by John ( de Pr. Polycrates, bishop of Ephesus towards the end of the 2nd cent. , in a letter to Victor, bishop of Rome, speaks of one among the ‘great lights’ in Asia ‘John, who was both a witness and a teacher, who reclined upon the bosom of the Lord, and, being a priest, wore the sacerdotal plate,’ as having fallen asleep at Ephesus. Ephesus is said to have been the scene of this incident. John maintained a prolonged ministry in Ephesus has never been challenged till recent years
John the Baptist - Of this number was Apollos, a learned and zealous man, who was of Alexandria, and came to Ephesus twenty years after the resurrection of our Saviour, Acts 18:25 . It is certain that he lived in Asia Minor the latter part of his life, and principally at Ephesus. " On the succession of Nerva to the empire in the year 96, John returned to Ephesus, where he died at an advanced age in the third year of Trajan's reign, A. It went consequently to Ephesus. The church at Ephesus he there describes by the following traits: It was thronged with men who arrogated to themselves the ministry and apostolical authority, and were impostors, ψευδεις . If we may judge from local circumstances, she also lived at Ephesus. The whole of this is applicable to a considerable place, where the Apostle had resided for a long time; and in the second epoch of his life, it is particularly applicable to Ephesus. If this is to be referred to the first epistle, (for we are not aware of any other to a community,) then certainly Ephesus is the place to which the third epistle was also directed, and was the place where Caius resided. Who was better qualified to promulgate the Gospel among the believers than Caius, especially if it was to be published at Ephesus?...
The above view is ingenious, and in its leading parts satisfactory; but the argument from the Apostle's supposed want of "writing materials," is founded upon a very forced construction of the texts
Amphilochius, Bishop of Sida - He brought forward the subject at the council of Ephesus (A
Copts - They admit only three oecumenical councils; those of Nice, Constantinople, and Ephesus
Accompany - " In regard to the parting of Paul from the elders of Ephesus at Miletus, personal "accompaniment" is especially in view, perhaps not without the suggestion of assistance, Acts 20:38 , RV "brought him on his way;" "accompaniment" is also indicated in Acts 21:5 ; "they all with wives and children brought us on our way, till we were out of the city
Bishop - Paul came to Miletus, he sent to Ephesus for the presbyters of the church, and thus addressed them: "Take heed unto yourselves, and to all the flock over which the Holy Ghost hath made you" (the presbyters) " επισκοπους , bishops," or overseers, Acts 20:17
Games - At Ephesus an annual contest was held in honor of Diana
Philemon - His conversion took place not at Colossae (Colossians 2:1), but presumably during the Apostle’s three years’ abode at Ephesus, between which town and the cities of the Lycus (of which Colossae was one) the relations were intimate (see Lightfoot, Colossians3, 1879, p
Petrus, First Bishop of Parembolae - Peter attended the council of Ephesus in 431
Deacon - Acts 11:29 ; Acts 12:25 , Romans 15:25 ; Romans 15:31 , 2Co 8:4 ; 2 Corinthians 9:1 ; 2 Corinthians 9:12-13 ), makes it natural to find in their appointment the germ of the institution of the diaconate as it meets us at Philippi and Ephesus, in two Epp. We can only infer that the diakonia of the deacons in Philippi and Ephesus, like the diakonia of the Seven in Jerusalem, was in the first place a ministry to the poor
Hypostatical Union - His zeal provoked opposition; in the eagerness of controversy he was led to use unguarded expressions; and he was condemned by the third of the general councils, the council of Ephesus, in the year 431. It is a matter of doubt whether the opinions of Nestorius, if he had been allowed by his adversaries fairly to explain them, would have appeared inconsistent with the doctrine established by the council of Ephesus, that Christ is one person, in whom two natures were most closely united
Apocalypse - John was banished to Patmos in the latter part of the reign of Domitian, and he returned to Ephesus immediately after the death of that emperor, which happened in the year 96; and as the Apostle states, that these visions appeared to him while he was in that island, we may consider this book as written in the year 95 or 96. The second and third chapters contain seven epistles to the seven churches in Asia; namely, of Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamus, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea, which relate chiefly to their then respective circumstances and situation
Romans, Epistle to the -
The date of this epistle is fixed at the time of the visit recorded in Acts 20:3 during the winter and spring following the apostle's long residence at Ephesus A. (Acts 8:4 ; 11:10 ) At first we may suppose that the gospel had preached there in a confused and imperfect form, scarcely more than a phase of Judaism, as in the case of Apollos at Corinth, (Acts 18:25 ) or the disciples at Ephesus
Phrygia - The journey was continued ‘through the upper country to Ephesus,’ i. along the direct route which passed through the higher country from Metropolis to Ephesus, instead of the high road which followed the valley of the Lycus
Julianus, Bishop of Cos - It was JULIUS of Puteoli, however, not this Julian, who was papal legate at the council of Ephesus. In the matter of the claims of BASSIAN and Stephen to the see of Ephesus, he gives his voice first for setting both aside, then for allowing a local council to choose (701 D, 703 D)
John, the Gospel According to - Written at Ephesus at the request of the Asiatic bishops to set forth more profoundly Christ's Divinity (Jerome, Prolegomena in Matthew). Ephesus, after Jerusalem's fall, A. His allusions in the peculiar terms of his prologue to the theosophic notions prevalent at Ephesus accord with that city being the place of his writing the Gospel. Acts 18:24 implies the connection between Alexandria, the headquarters of Gnosticism, and Ephesus. The Gospel cannot have been written at the same time and place as Revelation, the styles are so different, His mode of counting the hours as we do was Asiatic (see Townson, Harmony, 8:1, section 3), and accords with Ephesus being the place of writing. Considering the intercourse between the Christian churches it is incredible that his Gospel should have been unknown at Ephesus, John's and previously Paul's scene of labours, and this to John a "pillar" of the church
John the Apostle - In the Acts, epistles to Ephesians, and Timothy, recording Paul's ministry in connection with Ephesus, no mention occurs of John being there. Probably he left Jerusalem long before settling at Ephesus, and only moved there after Paul's martyrdom, A. His tone is meditative and serene, as contrasted with Paul's logical and at the same time ardent style, His sharp reproof of Diotrephes accords with the story of his zeal against error, reported as from Polycarp, that entering the public baths of Ephesus he heard that Cerinthus was there; instantly he left the building lest it should fall while that enemy of the truth was within. Clement of Alexandria (Quis Dives Salvus? ) reports of John as a careful pastor, that he commended a noble looking youth in a city near Ephesus to the bishop. 2:39, Eusebius 3:23), states that John settled at Ephesus and lived to the time of Trajan
Philippians - If Philippians was written from Caesarea, we would assign a date in the late 50s; if from Ephesus, the mid-50s. Some evidence indicates that Paul was also in prison in Ephesus (Acts 19:1 ; 2 Corinthians 11:23 ; 1 Corinthians 15:30-32 ). Ephesus was the capitol of Asia. A trip from Rome to Philippi took several weeks; from Ephesus to Philippi required only several days
Oration, Orator - Examples include the Sanhedrin's debate over Jesus' growing following which culminated in Caiaphas' suggestion that the expedient course was to seek Jesus' death (John 11:47-50 ) and Demetrius' discourse on what action was necessary to save the business of the silversmiths in Ephesus (Acts 19:23-27 )
Diana of the Ephesians - The rude idol preserved in her chief temple at Ephesus was said to have fallen from heaven (this is the real meaning of Acts 19:35 ), a not uncommon idea in ancient times, which suggests that such images were sometimes meteoric stones
Bishop - That they are not now called Apostles will appear from the followingstatement: "When the Apostles, in anticipation of their approachingdeath, appointed their successors in the superintendence of theseveral churches which they had founded, as Timothy at Ephesus andTitus at Crete, the title of Apostolos was reserved by way ofreverence to those who had been personally sent by Christ Himself;Episcopos was assigned to those who succeeded them in the highestoffice of the Church, as overseers of Pastors as well as offlocks; and Presbuteros became the distinctive appellation ofthe second order, so that after the first century, no writer hasdesignated the office of one of this second order by the termEpiscope
Romans Epistle to the - Ephesus best satisfies the conditions at this period, and indeed two features point to it directly. Paul first preached at Ephesus. Paul; thence they accompanied him to Ephesus (Acts 18) and remained there. Paul sends a greeting from them and from the church in their house; similarly in 2 Timothy 4:19 he sends greetings to them, again at Ephesus. Hence Ephesus evidently became their home. It is of course possible that at the time when Romans was written they might have returned temporarily to Rome to settle their business affairs; their expulsion perhaps left them but little time to put them in order; but the strange thing is that when they were in Rome only for a short visit their house should there, as well as at Ephesus, be the meeting-place of the local church. ...
These facts, then, suggest that the verses are really a fragment of a letter addressed to Ephesus. Paul had visited, and that the indications point to Ephesus. ” ’ He suggests that the short letter to Ephesus followed that to Romans in the letter-book (a book containing copies or letters sent or received) of Tertlus, St. to Ephesus (Renan, etc
Colossians - The letter itself does not name the place where Paul was imprisoned, and Caesarea and Ephesus have been suggested as alternatives to Rome. If written from Ephesus, the time of writing would be in the mid-50's; if from Caesarea the late 50's. A main road from Ephesus to the east ran through the region. His influence was felt, however, during his ministry in Ephesus
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - Theodosius, influenced by his wife and his chamberlain, issued letters (Mar 30, 449), ordering the chief prelates (patriarchs, as we may call them, and exarchs) to repair, with some of their bishops, to Ephesus by Aug. Mary's church at Ephesus, the scene of the third general council's meeting in 431; 150 bishops being present. Eusebius on the one hand, those of Eutyches on the other—were accordant with the decisions of the councils of Nicaea and Ephesus—"two councils in name," said he, "but one in faith" ( ib. " It was read by Beronicianus, the secretary of the imperial consistory, and stated that "at the recent council at Ephesus, this good ( χρηστός ) Dioscorus, disregarding justice, and supporting Eutyches in heresy—having also gained power by bribes, and assembled a disorderly multitude—did all he could to ruin the Catholic faith, and to establish the heresy of Eutyches, and condemned us: I desire, therefore, that he be called to account, and that the records of his proceedings against us be examined. Forthwith, a cry arose from the bishops whom he had intimidated at Ephesus. At another point the "Orientals," the opponents of Dioscorus, objected that the acts of Ephesus misrepresented their words. " Stephen of Ephesus then narrated the violence done to his secretaries: Acacias of Arianathia described the coercion scene. Why was not a like course taken at Ephesus?" No one answered ( ib. Cyril's letter to John of Antioch, "Laetentur coeli," was read as part of the acts of Ephesus. Some time later the Easterns denied that the whole council at Ephesus had assented to Eutyches's language; it was the language of "that Pharaoh, Dioscorus the homicide. The apostolic see excuses those who were coerced by Dioscorus at Ephesus, but who are obedient to archbp. He prevented Leo's letter to Flavian" (the acts of Ephesus say the letter to the council, v
Thessaloni'ca - In fact it was nearly if not quite on a level with Corinth and Ephesus in its share of the commerce of the Levant
Samos - 60), and disputed with Smyrna and Ephesus the title ‘first city of Ionia
Andreas Samosatensis of Samosata - of Samosata at the time of the council of Ephesus, A
Cenchreae - 219), but there is strong reason to believe that Romans 16 is a letter meant for Ephesus (see Romans)
Aristarchus - He is first mentioned on the occasion of the riot in Ephesus, where along with another companion of the Apostle named Gaius (q
Eutherius, Bishop of Tyana - of Tyana, a leader of the Nestorians at the council of Ephesus, a
Corinthians - This was written by Paul at Ephesus, about A
John, Gospel of - This Gospel was probably written at Ephesus about A
Paulus, the Black - In 578 a new patriarch of Antioch, Peter of Callinicus, was appointed, and Paul withdrew into concealment at Constantinople, where he died in 582, as detailed by John of Ephesus
Titus, Epistle to - ...
It has been thought possible that the visit alluded to in our Epistle might have taken place during the Apostle’s lengthened sojourn at Corinth (Acts 18:11 ) or at Ephesus ( Acts 19:10 ). ...
These dangers to the Christian faith are very similar to those opposed in 1 Timothy; with, however, this difference, that none of those mentioned here seems to have its origin in the incipient Gnosticism which in a measure affected the Church in Ephesus, where Timothy was in charge
Blasphemy - The town-clerk of Ephesus reminds his fellow-citizens, roused to fury at the bare suspicion of dishonour to Artemis, that St. To the prophet of Ephesus all this seemed rank blasphemy, and he delivered his soul by denouncing it
Philadelphia - Paul’s residence in Ephesus (Acts 19:10), had firmly established itself by the time of Domitian, and is praised by St. Great minds run parallel, and the words of the prophet of Ephesus are in spirit identical with those uttered long afterwards by the prophet of Florence
Palladius, Bishop of Helenopolis - Palladius was at the synod at Constantinople, May 400, at which Antoninus of Ephesus was accused by Eusebius, and he was one of three bishops deputed by Chrysostom to visit Asia and make a personal investigation into the charges (Pallad. When Chrysostom, at the opening of 401, resolved to go to Ephesus himself, Palladius was one of the bishops to accompany him ( ib. of Aspuna in 431, when Eusebius attended the council of Ephesus as bp
Eutyches And Eutychianism - He was a staunch upholder of the views and conduct of Cyril of Alexandria, who had even sent him, as a special mark of favour, a copy of the Acts of the council of Ephesus, a. Eusebius asked first for the recital of (a ) Cyril's first letter to Nestorius, (b ) the approbation of that letter by the council of Ephesus, and (c ) Cyril's letter to John of Antioch; secondly, that all present should express acceptance of these documents as true expositions of the Nicene Creed. 15, the deputies announced that Eutyches refused to appear before the synod, alleging that Eusebius had long been his enemy, and had grossly slandered him, for he (Eutyches) was ready to assent to and subscribe the statements of the holy Fathers at Nicaea and Ephesus. "I wish," it said, "for the peace of the church, and steadfast adherence to the orthodox doctrines of the Fathers at Nicaea and Ephesus. He repeats that he could not accede to the demands of the synod, acknowledge two natures in Christ, and anathematize all who opposed this doctrine, because Athanasius, Gregory, Julius, and Felix had rejected the expression "two natures," he himself having no wish to add to the creed of Nicaea and Ephesus, nor to define too particularly the nature of God the Word. ...
A council had already been summoned by the emperor to meet at Ephesus. It stated the cause of the summons to be the doubts and disputes which had arisen concerning the faith; it invited Dioscorus to present himself with ten metropolitans and ten bishops at Ephesus on Aug. During the first session the secretaries read the documents descriptive of the introduction of Eutyches at the synod of Ephesus (the Latrocinium) and the reading of his paper. At words attributing to Eutyches the statement, "The third general council (that of Ephesus, 431) hath directly forbidden any addition to the Nicene Creed," Eusebius of Dorylaeum exclaimed, "That is untrue. I only care to preserve the Catholic faith, not that of any individual man"; and then he turned upon Basil for having said one thing at Constantinople and another at Ephesus. "Yes, we all sinned (at Ephesus); we all implore forgiveness
Joannes Presbyter - Now, there were many Johns, and it is said that there were two tombs in Ephesus, each called John's. We find thus, remarks Eusebius, that "the account of those is true who have stated that two persons in Asia had the same name, and that there were two tombs in Ephesus, each of which, even to the present time, bears the name of John. 24), names John, who leaned on our Lord's breast, who sleeps at Ephesus, but says nothing about any second John buried there or elsewhere. Neither, though he mentions the two monuments at Ephesus, both bearing the name of John, does he say what would have been very much to his purpose, that he had heard that they were supposed to commemorate different persons; and in fact Jerome, who in his "catalogue" repeats the story, tells us that some held that the same John was commemorated by both. of Ephesus in succession to Timothy
Flavianus (8), Bishop of Constantinople - 8, 449 the Latrocinium assembled at Ephesus, Eutyches violently attacked the archbishop
Titus - From Ephesus Paul had written at least one letter to the Corinthians, and had made a rushed visit to Corinth in an effort to deal with serious problems in the Corinthian church
Mediterranean Sea, the - Paul's work involved such Mediterranean cities as Caesarea, Antioch, Troas, Corinth, Tyre, Sidon, Syracuse, Rome, and Ephesus
Thyatira - Thyatira's "last works were more than the first," realizing 1 Thessalonians 4:1, instead of retrograding from "first love and first works" as Ephesus (Revelation 2:4-5); the converse of Matthew 12:45; 2 Peter 2:20
Galla Placidia, Daughter of Theodosius i - The legates of Leo had just returned from the Robber Council of Ephesus
Apostles Other Than the Twelve - Central America...
Saint Ceadda Mercia, Saxon England...
Saint Christian Portugal ...
Saint Columba The Highlanders...
Scotland...
the Picts...
Cyril and Methodius, Saints The Slavs...
Saint Denis The French...
Father Elisha John Durbin Western Kentucky...
Saint Eloi Tournai, Belgium...
Saint Ephesus Sardinia...
Saint Euphrasius Spain...
Saint Felix East Anglia...
Valencia, Spain...
Edward Fenwick, O
Ephraim (6), Bishop of Antioch And Patriarch - In 537, at the bidding of Justinian, he repaired with Hypatius of Ephesus and Peter of Jerusalem to Gaza to hold a council in the matter of Paul the patriarch of Alexandria, who had been banished to that city and there deposed
Wolf - And the Apostle Paul, in his address to the elders of Ephesus, gives the name of this insidious and cruel animal to the false teachers who disturbed the peace and perverted the faith of their people: "I know this, that after my departing shall grievous wolves enter in among you, not sparing the flock," Acts 20:29
Philippians, Epistle to the, - After the lapse of five years, spent chiefly at Corinth and Ephesus, St
Narcissus - Some scholars think that the mention of this household is conclusive in favour of the Roman destination of Romans 16, but to others, in view of the strong probability that the chapter belong to a letter to the Church at Ephesus, it seems quite reasonable to suppose that there was a ‘household of Narcissus’ known to St
Nicolaitans - ’ They are mentioned twice in the NT (Revelation 2:6; Revelation 2:15) as a party at Ephesus and also at Pergamum, whose tenets were similar, it seems, in the judgment of the writer, to those of Balaam (q
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - He attended the council of Ephesus in 431 as a presbyter, was cognizant of Cyril's autocratic conduct ( Ep. He engaged to publicly anathematize Nestorius and all who thought with him on his return, and declared the identity of his doctrine with that agreed upon by John and Cyril, and that he accepted the decrees of Ephesus equally with those of Nicaea as due to the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. All-powerful at Constantinople through the intrigues of Chrysaphius, Dioscorus and his partisans easily obtained from the feeble emperor, indignant at the condemnation of Eutyches, an edict summoning a general council at Ephesus for Aug. Chaereas, as had been predetermined, addressed a report to the imperial government, declaring the charges proved; and on June 27 the emperor, acknowledging the receipt of the document, ordered that a bishop who would command the confidence of the faithful should be substituted for Ibas (Perry, The Second Synod of Ephesus; Martin, u. The council of Ephesus, so notorious for its scandalous violence, which gained for it, from Leo the Great ( Ep. 307–311; Perry, Acts of the Second Council of Ephesus; Abbé Martin, Actes du Brigandage d’Ephèse; Le Pseudo-synode d’Ephèse
Bishop - Paul reminds the elders of Ephesus that the Holy Ghost has made them bishops over the flock; in Philippians 1:1 he sends a greeting to the saints at Philippi ‘with bishops and deacons’; in 1 Timothy 3:2 he tells Timothy that ‘the bishop must be blameless,’ etc. So 1 Timothy 3:1-16 ignores the elders, though ( 1 Timothy 5:17 ) there were elders at Ephesus, and had been ( Acts 20:17 ) for some time. Similarly the elders in Crete ( Titus 1:6 ) are ‘appointed’ by Titus, and apparently the bishops at Ephesus by Timothy
Nicolaitans - John says in his Revelation, to the angel of the church of Ephesus, "But this thou hast, that thou hatest the deeds of the Nicolaitans, which I also hate," Revelation 2:6 ; and again, to the angel of the church of Pergamos: "So hast thou also them that hold the doctrine of the Nicolaitans, which thing I hate," Revelation 2:15 . Thus to the church at Ephesus he writes: "Thou hast tried them which say they are Apostles and are not, and hast found them liars," Revelation 2:2 . It appears from this and other passages, that they had distinguished themselves at Ephesus; and it is when writing to that church, that St
John, Gospel of - ...
The apostle at Ephesus...
John was very old at the time he wrote his Gospel, and was probably the last survivor of the original apostolic group. Records from the period immediately after the New Testament era indicate that he lived his later years in Ephesus in Asia Minor, where he fought against false teachers. John was already dealing with early stages of these errors at Ephesus
Bishop - In addressing the elders of the church of Ephesus the Apostle Paul stated, “the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers (episcopous ), to feed the church of God” (Acts 20:28 )
Laodicea - (lay ahd ih cee' uh) A city in southwest Asia Minor on an ancient highway running from Ephesus to Syria ten miles west of Colossae and six miles south of Hierapolis
Market, Market-Place - Such was the agora of Ephesus (Acts 16:19; Acts 17:17), leading in a direct line, with branching side streets of the ordinary kind, from the canal quay to the amphitheatre at the other end
Isaacus i, Catholicos of the Church of Greater Armenia, Saint - Isaac did not attend the general council of Ephesus
Paphos - Paul remained longer at Paphos, he would inevitably have come into conflict with this worship-which Athanasius branded as the deification of lust (τὴν ἐπιθυμίαν θεοποιήσαντες προσκυνοῦσιν [1])-as he did later with that of Artemis at Ephesus
Joannes, the Faster, Bishop of Constantinople - In the case of a presbyter named Athanasius, accused of being to some extent a Manichee, and condemned as such, Gregory shews that the accuser was himself a Pelagian, and that by the carelessness, ignorance, or fault of John the Faster the Nestorian council of Ephesus had actually been mistaken for the Catholic, so that heretics would be taken for orthodox, and orthodox condemned as heretics!...
His Writings
Maximianus, Archbaptist of Constantinople - The action of the council of Ephesus had thrown the churches of Constantinople into direst confusion
Maximus, Patriarch of Antioch - , patriarch of Antioch, by the "Latrocinium" of Ephesus, a
Noetus, a Native of Smyrna Noetus - Noetus, a native of Smyrna according to Hippolytus; of Ephesus according to Epiphanius ( Haer
Valens, Emperor - In 374 Valens raised a persecution against the neo-Platonic philosophers, and put to death several of their leaders, among them Maximus (25) of Ephesus, the tutor and friend of the emperor Julian, Hilarius, Simonides, and Andronicus
Assembly - In Acts 19:32; Acts 19:39; Acts 19:41 ‘assembly’ (ἐκκλησία) stands for the tumultuary mob gathered by Demetrius and his fellow-gildsmen in Ephesus to protest against the teaching of St. ’) In Ephesus the man revered for his piety and worth was the Secretary of the City (γραμματεύς [1]), who calls the gathering a riot (στάσις), and a concourse (συστροφή)
Joannes, Bishop of Antioch - A larger arena was supplied by the general council summoned by Theodosius to meet at Ephesus at Pentecost, 431. John's arrival having been delayed more than a fortnight beyond the time fixed for the opening of the council, he wrote that Antioch was 42 days' journey from Ephesus, at the fastest. He had been travelling without interruption for 30 days; he was now within five or six stages of Ephesus. of Ephesus, and of excommunication on all the other prelates of the council, until they should have condemned Cyril's "capitula," which they declared tainted not only with Apollinarian, but with Arian and Eunomian heresy ( ib. The letter reached Ephesus June 29. Memnon and Cyril were reinstated: the former to remain at Ephesus as bishop; Cyril and the other bishops to return home. 432, declared that John might be received again into the Catholic church, provided he repudiated all whom the council of Ephesus had deposed and proved by his acts that he really deserved the name of a Catholic bishop (Coteler
Corinthians, Second Epistle to - After leaving, he kept up communications ( 2 Corinthians 12:17 ), though it was only at Ephesus on the Third Missionary Journey in 56 ( Acts 19:1 ) that he could resume personal intercourse. 56) he possibly paid a second visit from Ephesus to Corinth, which caused him great pain and grief ( 2 Corinthians 2:1 ; 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 2 Corinthians 12:21 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1 ). Paul leaves Ephesus owing to riot ( Acts 19:1-41 ), expects to see Titus in Troas, but does not meet him until they reach Macedonia in the summer or autumn of 57 ( 2 Corinthians 2:12-13 ). Paul at Ephesus ( Acts 19:1 ). Paul at Ephesus ( 1 Corinthians 16:17-18 ), asking for advice on certain matters ( 1 Corinthians 7:1 ; 1 Corinthians 8:1 )
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - 430 when Theodosius had summoned an oecumenical council to meet at Ephesus at the coming Whitsuntide and before the Roman and Alexandrian resolutions had been communicated to Nestorius the latter wrote to Celestine that the best solution would be the adoption of the word "Christotokos," although he did not object to "Theotokos," if it were used so as not to imply "a confusion of natures. The substance was "When you reach Ephesus consult Cyril in everything and do what he thinks best. " On the same day Celestine wrote the most remarkable of his letters that addressed to the council of Ephesus (Ep. Paul to the "episcopi" of Ephesus Act_20:28. " ...
Nestorius, though sent away from Ephesus, had been allowed to live at his old home near Antioch
John - Its author claims to be “John,” it is associated with Patmos and Ephesus, and in tone it fits the character of the apostle who was called “Boanerges. According to tradition, John lived to an old age in Ephesus, where he preached love and fought heresy, especially the teachings of Cerinthus. The ruins of this basilica are still visible in Ephesus today. Years later, a group of John's followers were found around Ephesus, among them the eloquent Apollos (Acts 18:24-19:7 ); and for centuries John's influence survived among the Mandeans, who claimed to perpetuate his teachings
Demetrius - Two persons of the name are mentioned in NT the ringleader in the riot at Ephesus ( Acts 19:24 ), and a disciple commended by St
Apollos - Apollos was "fervent in spirit;" and so when he came to Ephesus, "he spoke and taught diligently the things of Jesus" (so the three oldest manuscripts read), as John had pointed to Jesus as the Messiah
Palace - ...
Note: Some scholars, believing that this Epistle was written during an Ephesian imprisonment, take the "Praetorium" here to be the residence in Ephesus of the proconsul of the province of Asia, and "Caesar's household" to be the local imperial civil service (Deissmann etc
Evangelist - Timothy was such a missionary bishop or vicar apostolic at Ephesus (1 Timothy 1:3; 2 Timothy 4:5)
Hiram - 18), apparently on the authority of Dius and Menunder of Ephesus in file time of Alexander the Great, states, "David reduced the Syrians near the Euphrates, and Commagene, the Assy
Quartus - It is, however, easier to believe that members of the Church at Corinth had friends in Ephesus, to which city some scholars think that the greetings were directed
Cappadocia - Cappadocia was traversed by the great road of commerce from Ephesus to the Euphrates, by the pilgrims’ route from Constantinople to Jerusalem, and by roads from the Cilician Gates to the cities of the Euxine
Joannes Scholasticus, Bishop of Constantinople - To the canons of the councils of Nicaea, Ancyra, Neocaesarea, Gangra, Antioch, Ephesus, and Constantinople, already collected and received in the Greek church, John added 89 "Apostolical Canons," the 21 of Sardica, and the 68 of the canonical letter of Basil
Proclus, Saint Patriarch of Constantinople - On the death of Sisinnius, the famous NESTORIUS succeeded, and early in 429, on a festival of the Virgin, Proclus preached the celebrated sermon on the Incarnation inserted in the beginning of the Acts of the council of Ephesus
Titus - ) He was with Paul at Ephesus (Acts 19), and was sent thence to Corinth to commence the collection for the Jerusalem saints, and to ascertain the effect of the first epistle on the Corinthians (2 Corinthians 7:6-9; 2 Corinthians 8:6; 2 Corinthians 12:18); and there showed an unmercenary spirit. " The history (Acts 20) does not record Paul's passing through Troas in going from Ephesus to Macedon, but it does in coming from that country; also that he had disciples there (1618527529_50) which accords with the epistle (2 Corinthians 2:12): an undesigned coincidence confirming genuineness
Revelation of John, the - Justin held his controversy with the learned Jew Trypho at Ephesus, John's residence 35 years previously; he says "the Revelation was given to John, one of the twelve apostles of Christ. 6:13), refers to the 24 elders' seats mentioned in Revelation (Revelation 4:5) by John, also (Quis Dives Salvus? section 42) John's return to Ephesus from Patmos on the Roman emperor's death. The writer's addresses to the seven churches of proconsular Asia accord with the tradition that after John's return from Patmos at Domitian's death he lived for long in Nerva's reign, and died at Ephesus in Trajan's time (Eusebius, H. Also he commends Ephesus for trying and convicting "them which say they are apostles, and are not"; implying his own claim to prophetic inspiration (Revelation 2:2) as declaring in the seven epistles Christ's will revealed through him. 100) came to John at Ephesus, bringing him copies of the Gospels, Matthew, Mark, and Luke, and requested his apostolic judgment concerning them; he pronounced them genuine, authentic, and inspired, and at their request added his Gospel to complete the fourfold aspect of Christ (Muratori Canon; Eusebius iii. 95) he returned to Ephesus under Nerva
Exorcism - In another vein, Acts 19:13-16 tells of wandering Jewish exorcists in Ephesus who attempted to exorcise demons in the name of the Jesus preached by Paul but without success
Epaphras - ; but if the reading ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν (‘on our behalf,’ ‘as our delegate’) be accepted in Colossians 1:7 (as by Revised Version on the authority of the three oldest Manuscripts ), the Apostle, during his long residence at Ephesus, when ‘all who dwelt in Asia heard the Word’ (Acts 19:10), must have specially commissioned Epaphras to evangelize Colossae in his (St
Lying - The Church of Ephesus was praised because she had tried soi disant apostles and found them false (ψευδεῖς, Revelation 2:2)
Smyrna - of Ephesus; beautified by Alexander the Great and Antigonus, and designated "the beautiful
Business - ), and at Ephesus showed no tenderness for the profits of idolatrous silversmiths (Acts 19:24-27)
Archippus - Paul’s three years’ abode at Ephesus, where the Apostle had severe conflicts with assailants (1 Corinthians 15:32)
Eusebius, Bishop of Pelusium - He was present at the council of Ephesus in 431 (Mansi, iv
Monophysitism - Flavian wished the matter to remain as it had been settled at Constantinople, but he was overruled, and a synod called together at Ephesus in 449. Leo, who had sent four representatives to Ephesus, had by this time learned from them the true history of the proceedings there. Hilary had also taken with him from Ephesus the appeal of Flavian for a rehearing of the case in Italy. And even before the assembling of that synod he had written his celebrated letter to Flavian which, though suppressed at Ephesus, was afterwards read at Chalcedon, and accepted as an accurate statement of the doctrine handed down from the first in the church. " There can be no doubt that the decision thus promulgated was a sound one, and that, as Leo did not fail to remark pertinently more than once, the doctrines condemned at the two councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon pointed out two rocks on which the doctrine of Christ might be shipwrecked. ...
The resistance against the decrees of the council of Chalcedon has nevertheless been even more formidable than against those of Ephesus, and the communities still in existence which are separated from the church at large on the question of the decrees of Chalcedon are more numerous, less scattered, and more thoroughly organized than those called into existence by the decrees of Ephesus. He accepts implicitly the decisions of Ephesus and Chalcedon, and of the latter he gives a detailed and careful summary
Euchites - Theodoret may possibly also have used a Messalian book called Asceticus , the doctrines of which, Photius tells us, had been exposed and anathematized at the council of Ephesus in 431. ...
Between the accession of Sisinnius and the council of Ephesus in 431, John of Antioch wrote to Nestorius about the Messalians, and Theodosius legislated against them (xvi. At Ephesus Valerian of Iconium, and Amphilochius of Side, in the name of the bps. These proceedings at Ephesus were unknown to Gregory the Great (Ep
Roman Empire - The free cities were governed by their own magistrates, and were exempt from Roman garrisoning; as Tarsus, Antioch in Syria, Athens, Ephesus, Thessalonica. Politarchs ("rulers of the city") and the demos ("people") are mentioned at Thessalonica (Acts 17:5-8); the "town clerk" (grammateus ) and "assembly" at Ephesus ( Alexander - A Jew whom the Jews put forward during Demetrius' riot at Ephesus to plead their cause before the mob who suspected that the Jews were joined with the Christians in seeking to overthrow Diana's worship (Acts 19:33). The coppersmith at Ephesus who did Paul much evil
Galatians, the Epistle to the - Galatians 4:13, "ye know how I preached at the first" (Greek at rite former time), implies that Paul at the time of writing had been twice in Galatia; and Galatians 1:6, "I marvel that ye are so soon removed," implies that he wrote not long after having left Galatia the second time, possibly (Alford) soon after he began his residence at Ephesus (Acts 18:23; Acts 19:1), which lasted from autumn A. A sudden exigency (tidings of Galatian Judaizing having reached him at Corinth from Ephesus) apparently called forth this epistle, for it maintains Christian liberty from carnal ceremonialism, and justification by faith only, in an admonitory and controversial tone
Julianus, Bishop of Halicarnassus - ...
Four scholastici from Alexandria visited Ephesus c. They then united with the Theodosians under Dorotheus, who, Theophanes says, was one of that party, but who both Sophronius of Jerusalem and John of Ephesus, the latter of whom especially was likely to be much better informed than the Chronographer, say was a Julianist (Sophron
Rabbulas, Bishop of Edessa - ) His separation from Theodore's school of doctrine was strongly exhibited in the winter preceding the council of Ephesus, 430–431, in a letter to Andrew of Samosata, upbraiding him for having attacked Cyril, a fragment of which is printed by Overbeck among the Syriac documents in his ed. After this it is surprising to find Rabbûlas at the council of Ephesus, joining the Orientals in their opposition to Cyril
Episcopacy - That Timothy and Titus were bishops of Ephesus and Crete, whose business it was to exercise such extraordinary acts of jurisdiction as are now claimed by diocesan bishops, 1 Timothy 1:3 . as they understand it, of diocesan bishops, in the seven churches of Asia, particularly the angel of Ephesus, though there were many ministers employed in it long before the date of that epistle, Acts 20:17 ; Acts 18:1-28 :...
4. And though Timothy was with Paul when he took his leave of the elders of Ephesus (Acts 20:1-38 :) the apostle gives not the least hint of any extraordinary power with which he was invested, nor says one word to engage their obedience to him; which is a very strong presumption that no such relation did subsist, or was to take place
Paul - He was accompanied by Aquila and Priscilla, whom he left at Ephesus, at which he touched, after a voyage of thirteen or fifteen days. He journeyed by land in the "upper coasts" (the more eastern parts) of Asia Minor, and at length made his way to Ephesus, where he tarried for no less than three years, engaged in ceaseless Christian labour. It possessed a splendid harbour, in which was concentrated the traffic of the sea which was then the highway of the nations; and as Liverpool has behind her the great towns of Lancashire, so had Ephesus behind and around her such cities as those mentioned along with her in the epistles to the churches in the book of Revelation, Smyrna, Pergamos, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea. ...
Very shortly before his departure from Ephesus, the apostle wrote his First Epistle to the Corinthians (q. There we can imagine him pacing the ramparts on the edge of the Mediterranean, and gazing wistfully across the blue waters in the direction of Macedonia, Achaia, and Ephesus, where his spiritual children were pining for him, or perhaps encountering dangers in which they sorely needed his presence
Laodicea - He endured a sore conflict, striving in anxious prayer in behalf of the churches of Ephesus and Laodicea that they might be delivered from Judaizing teachers, who blended Eastern theosophy and angel worship with Jewish asceticism and observance of new moons and sabbaths, professing a deeper insight into the world of spirits and a nearer approach to heavenly purity and intelligence than the simple gospel afforded (Colossians 2:8-9; Colossians 2:16-23)
Account - ]'>[1] ) of Ephesus warns his fellow-citizens of the difficulty of giving ‘account (λόγος) of this concourse’; and in Philippians 4:17 ‘the fruit that increaseth to your account
Blasphemy - It is interesting also to notice that this is the word put by the author of the Acts into the mouth of the town-clerk of Ephesus when he was appeasing the riotous mob who were persuaded that St
Fable - , with a more definite reference to a type of false teaching actually in vogue at Ephesus and in Crete
Sosthenes - Paul in Ephesus is explicable on two grounds: (a) his presence in Corinth as a Christian might irritate the Jews and make Christian work harder; (b) his social position and ability would probably mark him out as a suitable fellow-worker with St
Galatians, Epistle to the - The epistle was probably written, either from Ephesus or Corinth, between A
Caesarea - Paul landed on his way from Ephesus (Acts 18:22), being later escorted hither on his return from Jerusalem (Acts 23:23; Acts 23:33), and here he was imprisoned for two years, and tried before Festus (Acts 25:1; Acts 25:4; Acts 25:6; Acts 25:13)
Epistle to the Galatians - The epistle was probably written, either from Ephesus or Corinth, between A
Domnus ii, Bishop of Antioch - At the Latrocinium, held at Ephesus, Aug
Eustathius (22), Bishop of Berytus - At the second council of Ephesus, the disgraceful "Robbers' Synod," Aug
Maximus of Ephesus - Maximus (25) of Ephesus
Romans, the Epistle to the - The time was during his visit in the winter and spring following his long stay at Ephesus (Romans 20:3); for he was just about to carry the contributions of Macedonia and Achaia to Jerusalem (Romans 15:25-27; compare Acts 20:22), just after his stay at Corinth at this time (Acts 24:17; 1 Corinthians 16:4; 2 Corinthians 8:1-2; 2 Corinthians 9:1, etc. He wrote 1 Corinthians before leaving Ephesus; 2 Corinthians on his way to Corinth; and Galatians at Corinth, where also he wrote Romans. Compare the omission of "in Ephesus" (Ephesians 1:1) to generalize the epistle to the Ephesians
Paul - (Acts 18:18 ) Paul paid a visit to the synagogue at Ephesus, but would not stay. Leaving Ephesus, he sailed to Caesarea, and from thence went up to Jerusalem, spring, A. Third missionary journey, including the stay at Ephesus . This letter was in all probability sent from Ephesus. He came down to Ephesus from the upper districts of Phrygia. Before leaving Ephesus Paul went into Macedonia, where he met Titus, who brought him news of the state of the Corinthian church. At Miletus, however there was time to send to Ephesus, and the elders of the church were invited to come down to him there
Bishop - " In the larger churches, as Ephesus and Smyrna, there were many presbyters, but only one angel under the one "chief Shepherd and Bishop of Souls," the term "bishop" thus being applicable to the highest pastoral superintendence (1 Peter 2:25; 1 Peter 5:4). Timothy either at his ordination as presbyter, or else consecration as temporary overseer or bishop over Ephesus, received a spiritual gift "by prophecy," i
Laodicea - In his third missionary tour he did not go to Ephesus by the ordinary route of commerce, which would have brought him to the Lycus cities, but passed through ‘the upper country’ (τὰ ἀνωτερικὰ μέρη, Acts 19:1), probably by Seiblia and the Cayster valley. During his three years’ residence in Ephesus ‘all they who dwell in Asia heard the word’ (19:10)
Joannes Cappadox, Bishop of Constantinople - The patriarch John, having meanwhile gained time for thought and consultation, came out and mounted the pulpit, saying, "There is no need of disturbance or tumult; nothing has been done against the faith; we recognize for orthodox all the councils which have confirmed the decrees of Nicaea, and principally these three—Constantinople, Ephesus, and the great council of Chalcedon. The patriarch was at last obliged to have inserted in the diptychs the four councils of Nicaea, Constantinople, Ephesus, and Chalcedon, and the names of Euphemius and Macedonius, patriarchs of Constantinople, and Leo, bp
Philip - And it was there, according to Polycrates (bishop of Ephesus c. The same authority adds that another daughter who ‘lived in fellowship with the Holy Spirit’ was huried at Ephesus—a circumstance that may perhaps point to Philip’s own residence there for a time, and consequently to a renewed intercourse with his old friend the Apostle John
Derbe - Derbe lay on the great trade-route between Ephesus and Syrian Antioch
Atticus, Archbaptist of Constantinople - His writings were quoted as those of an orthodox teacher by the councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon (Labbe, iii
Deliverer - Paul in 2 Corinthians 1:10 uses it of his rescue from death in Ephesus (ἐρύσατο ἡμᾶς καὶ ῥύσεται-καὶ ἕτι ῥύσεται)
Fable - ’...
The Pastoral Epistles give a vivid picture of the state of religious feeling in Ephesus, and the Roman Province of Asia generally, in the years a
Apostasy - Paul “withdrew” from the synagogue in Ephesus (Acts 19:9 ) because of the opposition he found there, and he counseled Timothy to “withdraw” from those who advocate a different doctrine (1 Timothy 6:3-5 )
Euthymius (4), Abbat in Palestine - of the Saracens, on his way to the council at Ephesus, a
Philippi - Other explanations are that it means ‘the first city we arrived at’ (which the Greek could scarcely mean), or that Philippi claimed a pre-eminence in much the same way that Pergamus, Smyrna, Ephesus all claimed to be the ‘first city’ of Asia
Paradise - What the Lord Jesus said to the dying thief upon the cross, (Luke 23:43) and to the church of Ephesus, (Revelation 2:7) have tended much to establish this opinion
Incarnation - 381), Ephesus (A. ...
The Council of Ephesus considered the marriage christology of Nestorius, Bishop of Constantinople
ti'Tus - , (Acts 18:23 ) and spending a long time at Ephesus, (Acts 19:1 ; 20:1 ) the apostle proceeded to Macedonia by way of Troas
Mark - He was probably still there when Paul later wrote to Timothy (who was in Ephesus, not far away), asking him to get Mark and bring him to Rome
Ministry - Paul summons the presbyter-bishops of the Church in Ephesus to meet him at Miletus, and addresses them in a tone of high spiritual authority ( Acts 20:17-35 )
Saints - " The same distinction is made in Ephesians 1:1 : "to the saints [4] in Ephesus and the faithful [3] in Christ Jesus
Epiphanius, Patriarch of Constantinople - Epiphanius adopts the symbol of Nicaea, the decrees of Ephesus, Constantinople, and Chalcedon, and the letters of pope Leo in defence of the faith
Elders - In Titus 1:7 they are called bishops, or overseers; so in Acts 20 Paul called for the elders of Ephesus, to whom he said that the Holy Ghost had made them bishops, or overseers, showing that those appointed as elders and bishops were the same persons
Patmos - While the authorities of Ephesus, moved perhaps by some mysterious impulse to spare the saint’s life, transported him to the lonely island in order that the city might be freed from his too insistent word and testimony, he was providentially taken into a retreat where he was beside ‘the deep sea and the mighty things
Joannes Philoponus, Distinguished Philosopher - of John of Ephesus, 269, 274, 297), while their opponents were called Cononitae, after Conon of Tarsus who wrote a reply to the Περὶ ἀναστάσεως
Roads And Travel - Luke sketches the sea-journeys that followed, Cenchreae to Ephesus, Ephesus to Caesarea, with great rapidity (Acts 18:19-22). Acts 18:23 has brought him as far as Pisidian Antioch, and then be is said to have crossed τὰ ἀνωτερικὰ μέρη and thus reached Ephesus (Acts 19:1). ’ There was a well-recognized, important, and ancient route to Ephesus by Apollonia, Apamea-Celaenae, the Lyeus valley, Colossae, Laodicea, the Maeander valley, Antioch, and Tralles. What route was taken by him from Ephesus to Macedonia (Acts 20:1-2) must remain uncertain, but it is probable that he coasted northwards to Troas and then repeated the journey of Acts 16:11 ff. We next hear of him at Athens (arrived 25th June, left 6th July), On 6th July he sailed from the Piraeus, the harbour of Athens, to Zoster, from there on 8th July to Ceos, on 9th July to Gyaros, on the 10th to Syros, on the 11th to Delos, He then went by Samos to Ephesus (arrived 22nd July, departed 26th July)
Paul - Paul sailed into Syria, and thence he went to Ephesus: thence to Caesarea; and is supposed to have arrived at Jerusalem just before the feast of pentecost. 54, confirming the Christians of those countries; and thence, according to his promise, he went to Ephesus, Acts 19. " He also performed many miracles at Ephesus; and not only great numbers of people were converted to Christianity, but many also of those who in this superstitious city used incantations and magical arts, professed their belief in the Gospel, and renounced their former practices by publicly burning their books. Previous to the disturbance raised by Demetrius, Paul had intended to continue at Ephesus till Titus should return, whom he had sent to inquire into the state of the church at Corinth, 2 Corinthians 12:18 . He now thought it prudent to go from Ephesus immediately, Acts 20, A. Being desirous of reaching Jerusalem before the feast of pentecost, he would not allow time to go to Ephesus, and therefore he sent for the elders of the Ephesian church to Miletus, and gave them instructions, and prayed with them
John, the Epistles of - " The region of Ephesus, where Gnostic heresy sprang up, was probably the place, and the latter part of the apostolic age the time, of writing. 9) mentions them as John's, whose sepulchre was shown at Ephesus in his day. 25) relates that John, after Domitian's death, returned from Patmos to Ephesus, and went on missionary tours into the pagan regions around, and visited the churches, ordaining bishops and clergy (compare 2 John 1:12; 3 John 1:9-10; 3 John 1:14)
Beast - So persecutors of Christians, as Paul's opponents at Ephesus (1 Corinthians 15:32)
Mark, John - 67, Mark was near Ephesus, from whence he was about to be taken by Timothy to Rome
Troas - To Troas he came again, after his flight from Ephesus (Acts 20:1-6), ‘for the gospel of Christ,’ eager to preach to willing hearers, yet restlessly preoccupied by thoughts of Corinth, and soon compelled to turn his back upon ‘an open door’ (2 Corinthians 2:12-13)
Patriarchs - Thus the patriarch of Constantinople grew to be a patriarch over the patriarchs of Ephesus and Caesarea, and was called the (Ecumenical and Universal Patriarch; and the patriarch of Alexandria had some prerogatives which no other patriarch but himself enjoyed; such as the right of consecrating and approving of every single bishop under his jurisdiction
Laying on of Hands - Paul did the same for some disciples at Ephesus who had been baptized into John the Baptist's baptism (Acts 19:6 )
Church - Thus all the disciples in Antioch, forming several congregations, were one church (Acts 13:1 ); so also we read of the "church of God at Corinth" (1 Corinthians 1:2 ), "the church at Jerusalem" (Acts 8:1 ), "the church of Ephesus" (Revelation 2:1 ), etc
Boldness - Paul and Barnabas at Antioch of Pisidia (Acts 13:46), of Apollos at Ephesus (Acts 18:26), of St
Apolinaris, or Apolinarius Claudius - of Ephesus, in his letter to Victor of Rome
Asia - ; but long before that time Ephesus (q
Philippi - Paul visited Philippi again on his way from Ephesus into Macedon (Acts 20:1), and a third time on his return from Greece (Corinth) to Syria by way of Macedon (Acts 20:3; Acts 20:6)
Titus - Paul sent him from Ephesus with his First Epistle to the Corinthians, and with a commission to inquire into the state of the church at Corinth; and he sent him thither again from Macedonia with his Second Epistle, and to forward the collections for the saints in Judea
Dreams - the Oneirocritica of Artemidorus of Ephesus)
Marcianus, Flavius, Emperor of the East - Theodosius had taken the part of Eutyches and upheld the decision of the "Latrocinium" of Ephesus
Polychronius, Bishop of Apamea - But within the next three years he had died or otherwise vacated the see, for in the records of the council of Ephesus Alexander is bp
Ephesians Epistle to the - Paul is a prisoner at the time (Ephesians 3:1; Ephesians 4:1; Ephesians 6:20), and writes from prison to ‘the saints which are in Ephesus. He was very well known in Ephesus. If the letter was actually sent to Ephesus (so Schmidt in Meyer5; Alford), this is incredible. The evidence of Ignatius raises a further difficulty, since he definitely writes to Ephesus about ‘all the letters’ of St
Timothy And Titus Epistles to - -The Epistles to Timothy and Titus are conveniently, if inaccurately, called the Pastoral Epistles, because, in contrast to Paul’s other letters, their object has been thought to be primarily that of equipping his two lieutenants, Timothy and Titus, for pastoral work in two particular regions-Ephesus, with its circle of churches, and Crete. and Titus, to impress upon the recipients the necessity of taking measures to preserve in its purity and strength the gospel which they had learnt from Paul, in view of special false teaching already present in Ephesus and Crete and threatening to increase. -Formal reminder of warning once given at Ephesus in person against false teaching, which substitutes idle speculation for Christian love, springing out of a pure heart and unfeigned faith, which it is the aim of preaching to produce. After an interjected reference to the possibility of delay in coming to Ephesus, the Apostle states that the purpose of the letter is to instruct Timothy as to his right ordering of the Church, which, as the dwelling-place of the God of Israel, supports and is the foundation of the truth
Gods, Pagan - The great mother goddess of Asia Minor worshiped at Ephesus was identified with Artemis, the Roman Diana. Her temple at Ephesus was one of the seven wonders of the aancient world and an object of pilgrimages. Artemis of the Ephesians was depicted in statues at Ephesus with many breasts, perhaps inspired by a sacred stone (a meteorite?; Acts 19:35 ) kept in the temple. Paul's work in Ephesus resulted in an uproar incited by the silversmiths who sold souvenirs to the pilgrims (Acts 19:23-41 )
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch - Thus in Smyrna, the city of Polycarp, he wrote to Ephesus, Magnesia, and Tralles. ), and Ephesus (xii. The ordinary way from Antioch to Ephesus was by land, and Ignatius calls the messenger to be sent by the Smyrnaeans to Antioch θεοδρόμος ( Pol. Ignatius did not, as was usual, pass through Magnesia and Ephesus, but left the great road at Sardis and came by Laodicea, Hierapolis, Philadelphia, and perhaps Colossae, as he had certainly visited Philadelphia and met there the false teachers from Ephesus (Zahn, 258 seq. That of Ephesus he treats with special respect, and anticipates writing a second letter (ad Eph
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - The documents were prior to the council of Ephesus and to the formal condemnation of Nestorius then passed. Theodoret's name appears in the letters and other documents passing between the Oriental party at Ephesus and their representatives in Chalcedon, in which much was said and written in a bitter spirit (Labbe, vol. On their way home from Ephesus the Orientals, Theodoret among them, held a synod at Tarsus and renewed the sentence of deposition on Cyril in conjunction with the seven orthodox deputies to Theodosius II. The declaration of faith presented to Cyril by Paul of Emesa, as representing the belief of John, and accepted by Cyril, had been originally drawn up by Theodoret at Ephesus. ...
From the "Latrocinium" or "Robbers' Synod," at Ephesus (449) [1], Theodoret was excluded by an imperial edict of Mark 4, unless summoned unanimously by the council itself (Labbe, iv. " Theodosius continued to pay no heed to the remonstrances of Leo, asserting that everything had been decided at Ephesus with complete freedom and in accordance with the truth, and that the prelates there deposed merited their fate for innovations in the faith
Mary, the Virgin - John to Ephesus, cannot be known. Another tradition, found in the Synodical Letter of the Council of Ephesus (a. John to Ephesus, and speaks of her as having been buried in that city
Episcopalians - Over the persons to whom he thus conveyed the office of teaching, he exercised jurisdiction; for he sent to Ephesus, to the elders of the church to meet him at Miletus; and there, in a long discourse, gave them a solemn charge, Acts 20:17-35 ; and to Timothy and Titus he writes epistles in the style of a superior. He not only directs Timothy, whom he had besought to abide at Ephesus, how to behave himself in the house of God as a minister, but he sets him over other ministers. He gives him directions about the ordination of bishops and deacons; he places both these kinds of office-bearers in Ephesus under his inspection, instructing him in what manner to receive an accusation against an elder who laboured in word and doctrine; and he commands him to charge some that they teach no other doctrine but the form of sound words
Hittites - The Lydian Cyhele and Artemis of Ephesus were probably originally Hittite divinities
Council - The council of Ephesus, convened by Theodosius the Younger, and the suit of Nestorius
Domitianus, the Emperor - The apostle, as the chosen friend of the Son of David, may have been pointed out by the delatores of Ephesus as the descendants of Judas were in Judea
Chief, Chiefest, Chiefly - and were probably assembled at Ephesus for such a purpose when they sent advice to St
Petrus, Surnamed Fullo - After long debate the council of Ephesus in 431 had declared the church of Cyprus autocephalous
Romans, Epistle to the - After the riots in Ephesus ( Acts 19:23-40 ) St. The missionary statesmanship which led him to seize on the great trade-centres like Ephesus and Corinth found its highest expression in his passionate desire to see Rome. 16 at least may be part of a letter to Ephesus. The reference to Epænetus in Romans 16:5 would be more natural in a letter to Ephesus than in a letter to Rome. In view of Acts 18:2 it is difficult to suppose that Aquila and Priscilla had returned from Ephesus to Rome
Backsliding - Accordingly, the angel of the church in Ephesus warns those who have forsaken their first love: "Remember the height from which you have fallen! Repent and do the things you did at first" (Revelation 2:5 )
Acacius, Bishop of Beroea - In the general council which followed at Ephesus, A
Irenaeus, Bishop of Tyre - In 431 Irenaeus unofficially accompanied Nestorius to the council of Ephesus (Labbe, Concil
Nonnus of Panopolis - of Edessa, elected at the synod of Ephesus, a
Gospels - ...
Many people in the region where John lived (probably Ephesus) were troubled by false teachers
Walk (2) - ’ This use of περιπατεῖν is also found in Revelation 2:1 of our Lord’s life of activity in His exalted state: ‘walketh in the midst of the seven golden candlesticks,’ as if journeying forth by the circular route which, after traversing all the Churches mentioned, returns to Ephesus (Ramsay, Letters to the Seven Churches, ‘Letter to the Church in Ephesus,’ Introduction)
Timothy, Epistles to - ...
After the benediction Paul states that Timothy had been besought to remain at Ephesus to enjoin some not to teach strange doctrine, nor give heed to fables and useless genealogies, which ministered questions rather than the dispensation of God, which was in faith. He reviews his service, and has to lament that all in Asia (that is, Asia Minor including Ephesus) had turned away from him
Smyrna - Its claim to be the chief city of Asia was contested by Ephesus and Pergamum, but in beauty it was easily first
Forgiveness - Paul reminded the church at Ephesus of both the grounds of their forgiveness and the basis on which they must forgive one another (Ephesians 4:32 )
Evangelist - He is in charge of the Church at Ephesus in place of St
Judging (by Men) - Paul had determined (κεκρικει) to sail past Ephesus (Acts 20:16); he determined (ἕκρινα) not to know anything among the Corinthians save Jesus Christ and Him crucified (1 Corinthians 2:2); not to come to them in sorrow (2 Corinthians 2:1)
Evangelist - He is in charge of the Church at Ephesus in place of St
Petrus, Surnamed Mongus - This was addressed to the bishops, clergy, monks, and laymen of the Alexandrian patriarchate; it recognized the creed of "the 318" at Nicaea as "confirmed by the 150" at Constantinople, the decisions of the council of Ephesus, together with the 12 articles of Cyril; it employed language as to Christ's consubstantiality with man which Cyril had adopted in his "reunion with the Easterns"; it rejected the opposite theories of a "division" and a "confusion" in the person of Christ, and included Eutyches as well as Nestorius in its anathema
Pillar - The reference would then be to the local Church of Ephesus
Theodotion, Otherwise Theodotus - 215), referring to the word "virgin " παρθένος ) in Is 7:14, affirms that the passage is to be read "not as certain of those who now venture to misinterpret the Scripture, 'Behold, the damsel ( νεᾶνις ) shall be with child and shall bear a son'; as Theodotion of Ephesus interpreted it and Aquila of Pontus, both Jewish proselytes; following whom the Ebionites pretend that he was begotten of Joseph
Nestorius And Nestorianism - Ephesus was chosen as the place of meeting (probably because of the excitement prevalent at Constantinople), and the meeting was fixed for Whitsuntide 431. of Ephesus, opened the synod, which consisted of some 200 metropolitans, and proceeded to condemn and depose Nestorius in the absence of the Syrian contingent. John of Antioch signed a condemnation of Nestorius, while Cyril consented in 432 to sign an Antiochene formulary which had been submitted by Theodoret to the Syrian bishops at Ephesus and was afterwards transmitted to the emperor. He is painstaking and accurate, and a devout believer in the decisions both of Ephesus and Chalcedon. Of later authorities Mansi, Hardouin, and Hefele have handed down the proceedings of the council of Ephesus, and commented upon them
Vincentius Lirinensis - 42) after the council of Ephesus, i. The author then, to shew that his view is no offspring of private presumption, adduces the example of the council of Ephesus, held nearly 3 years before the time of writing, in the consulship of Bassus and Antiochus
Corinth - One of four prominent centers in the New Testament account of the early church, the other three being Jerusalem, Antioch of Syria, and Ephesus
Magi - stood Paul and Barnabas at Paphos (Acts 13:6-12); also the exorcists and those who used "curious arts" and who "brought their books together, and burned them before all men" to the value of "50,000 pieces of silver," at Ephesus (Acts 19:13-19)
Eve - This injunction must be seen against the backdrop of the situation in Ephesus, Timothy's location (1:3), where certain women in the church were creating problems (see 5:11-15)
Virtue - from merely human motives, ‘I fought with beasts at Ephesus, what doth it profit me? If the dead are not raised, let us eat and drink; for to-morrow we die’ Idolatry - After the death of Julius Caesar a temple in his honour was erected at Ephesus (29 b
Smyrna - Her standard of comparison will no longer be Ephesus or Sardis or Pergamos or even Rome, but the City of God, in which the last is first
Hatred - ’ The capacity for hatred is set down by Christ to the credit of the Church of Ephesus: ‘Thou hatest the works of the Nicolaitans, which I also hate’ (Revelation 2:6)
Friends Friendship - Paul in an hour of peril at Ephesus, Acts 27:3 friends of the same Apostle at Sidon; Acts 12:20 reveals Blastus in the character of ‘a friend at court
Acts of the Apostles - ) It may be noted that while at Ephesus, because of the opposition of the Jews in the synagogues, Paul separated the disciples and they met in a building distinct from the synagogue, commencing a further development of the church's history
Philip the Evangelist - Yet there can be no doubt that the author of the Acts distinguishes the two, and the tradition does not really confound them, but distinguishes the three daughters of Philip the Apostle (one of whom was married and settled at Ephesus) from the four daughters of Philip the Evangelist, who were all virgins (see Polycrates, quoted in Eusebius, HE_ iii
Timotheus, Called Aelurus - On his way home he visited Ephesus, and gratified its clergy and laity by declaring their church (the fifth in Christendom in point of dignity) to be free from that subjection to Constantinople which had been imposed on it by the 28th canon of Chalcedon ( ib
Papias - Paul, with Ephesus as base of influence; and hither were attracted not a few of the leading personal disciples of Jesus, including, perhaps, several of the original Apostles. Chief of all, we must reckon John, the son of Zebedee, whose presence at Ephesus for a period of years cannot be explained away by any confusion with another John. ...
Hierapolis, Papias’ home in South Phrygia, was well within the province of Asia and near the main road to Ephesus from the East, while it actually lay on another road running N. Yet even at that date two of His personal disciples, Aristion and the Elder John, were still living, most likely in Ephesus or its neighbourhood, somewhere about a
Chronology of the New Testament - Second Missionary Journey, from Antioch through Syria-Cilicia to Derbe and Lystra, Acts 15:41 ; Acts 16:1 ; through the ‘Phrygo-Galatic’ region of the province Galatia to Troas, 1618527529_64 ; to Macedonia, Acts 16:11 ; Athens, Acts 17:15 ; and Corinth, Acts 18:1 , where 18 months are spent; thence by sea to Ephesus, Acts 18:19 ; Jerusalem (fourth visit), Acts 18:22 ; and Antioch, where ‘some time’ is spent, Acts 18:23 . Third Missionary Journey, from Antioch by the ‘Galatic region’ and the ‘Phrygian region,’ Acts 18:23 , to Ephesus, Acts 19:1 , where two years and three months are spent, Acts 19:8 ; Acts 19:10 ; by Troas 2 Corinthians 2:12 , to Macedonia, Acts 20:1 ; and Corinth, Rome And the Roman Empire - Eusebius also claimed that in Nerva's reign the senate took away Domitian's honors and freed exiles to return home, thus letting John return to Ephesus. Irenaeus wrote in the second century that John died in Ephesus in the reign of Trajan
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - Diana) of fertility worshiped at Ephesus and elsewhere during the New Testament era. In Ephesus a temple was built in the third century b
Alexander the Coppersmith - THERE are some most interesting and most important questions of New Testament scholarship, and New Testament sanctification, connected with Alexander the coppersmith of Ephesus. But, taking the text just as it has been put into our hands tonight, what are we able to make of it? What shall we succeed in taking out of it tonight for our own guidance tomorrow, and for every day we live on the earth?...
The first time we come on Alexander he is a Jew of Ephesus, and a clever speaker to an excitable crowd
Tongues, Gift of - Peter expressly says that it was the same as at Pentecost ( Acts 11:15 ) and at Ephesus ( Acts 19:8 ); and probably the same is intended in the story of the Samaritan converts ( Acts 8:17 f
Versions, Ancient, of the Old And New Testaments, - --In the year 431, Joseph and Eznak returned from the Council of Ephesus bringing with them a Greek copy of the Scriptures
Tribulation - He told the elders of Ephesus that ‘bonds and tribulations’ awaited him (Acts 20:23)
Philosophy - Paul argued in the Hall of Tyrannus in Ephesus for two years
Apostolic Fathers - At Smyrna he composed letters thanking the churches of Ephesus, Magnesia, and Tralles for sending messengers to greet him
Corinthians - From Ephesus he wrote his First Epistle to the Corinthians, in the beginning of A
Cerinthians - John, who resided at Ephesus
Man - , to speak evil of men with whom he had contended at Ephesus as 'beasts' (cp
John, Gospel of (Critical) - Paul had completed his mission to the Gentiles; and in Ephesus, where the Gospel was written, his doctrine had already an assured place in the Christian Church. If such claims were rife in Ephesus, perhaps St. He says that ‘John, the disciple of the Lord, who leaned upon His breast,’ wrote it ‘while dwelling in Ephesus, the city of Asia’ (adv. Among these he mentions Ephesus, evidently in connexion with the name of St
Mediation Mediator - At Ephesus he interpreted the preaching of John the Baptist as urging faith in Jesus as the hope of salvation (Acts 19:4). The elders of Ephesus he urged ‘to feed the church of God’ (correct text), ‘which he purchased with his own blood’ (Acts 20:28), where at once the deity of Jesus is asserted and also the atoning nature of His death
Antioch - It was intended as a garrison town and a centre of Hellenic influence in the heart of Asia Minor, commanding the great trade route between Ephesus and the Cilician Gates. In no other Asian city, except Ephesus, was the influence of his preaching so far-reaching
Mining And Metals - In NT there is special mention of the guild of silversmiths at Ephesus, and of the ‘shrines’ or models of the temple of Diana which were their most profitable article of trade ( Acts 19:24 )
Thyatira - Paul’s prolonged mission in Ephesus (Acts 19:10; Acts 19:26)
Revelation, Book of - ...
Patmos, the place of John’s imprisonment, was an island off the coast from Ephesus in the west of Asia Minor
Money - A coin of Ephesus mentions its "town clerk"; also another its temple and statue of Diana
Library - Many of the first librarians were outstanding scholars and literary critics, such as Zenodotus of Ephesus, Apollonius of Rhodes, Callimachus the poet, and Eratosthenes the geographer
Perseverance - They refer to perseverance on the part of Paul (2 Corinthians 12:12 ), his converts (2 Thessalonians 1:4 ), Job (James 5:11 ), Moses (Hebrews 11:27 ), and the believers in Ephesus and Thyatira (Revelation 2:2-3,19 )
Jew, Jewess - In the Acts of the Apostles we see how the Roman proconsul Gallio (Acts 18:12-17) simply regards Christianity as an insignificant variation of Judaism, and the same view is taken by King Agrippa (Acts 26:32), as well as by the town-clerk of Ephesus (Acts 19:37)
Decius, Emperor - To this reign belongs the well-known legend of the Seven Sleepers of Ephesus, told for the first time by Gregory of Tours (de Glor
Appoint, Appointed - The verb is used by Paul of his service in the ministry of the Gospel, 1 Timothy 1:12 (RV, "appointing" for "putting"); 1 Timothy 2:7 (RV, "appointed" for "ordained"); and 2 Timothy 1:11 (RV, "appointing" for "putting"); of the overseers, or bishops, in the local church at Ephesus, as those "appointed" by the Holy Ghost, to tend the church of God, Acts 20:28 ("hath made"); of the Son of God, as appointed Heir of all things, Hebrews 1:2
Phoebe - If, on the other hand, Romans 16:1-21 (or 1-23) was addressed to the Church at Ephesus, Phoebe’s destination was that city
Petrus, Saint, Archbaptist of Alexandria - Paul was constrained to leave Gaius and Aristarchus in the hands of the mob of Ephesus (Act_19:29-30); Peter escaped from prison and his guards died for it; the Innocents died in place of the Holy Child
Reccared - He then anathematized Arius and his doctrine, and declared his acceptance of Nice, Constantinople, Ephesus, Chalcedon, and all other councils that agreed with these, and pronounced an anathema on all who returned to Arianism after being received into the church by the chrism, or the laying on of hands; then followed the creeds of Nicaea and Constantinople and the definition of Chalcedon, and the tomus concluded with the signatures of Reccared and Baddo his queen
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - No doubt there had been frequent communications, especially during the Apostle’s stay in Asia, for the journey between Corinth and Ephesus was a very easy one; but the communications were probably by letter only. She therefore not improbably belonged to Asia Minor the reference to her seems to imply that she was not a Corinthian, and ‘they of Chloe’ would be her agents who passed to and fro between Ephesus and Corinth. would have been written from Ephesus in the spring of the year before St
Colossians, Epistle to the - On his third missionary journey he took another route (Acts 19:1), and that he did not visit that district during his two years’ stay at Ephesus is sufficiently proved by the allusions in his letter to the Church at Colossae (Colossians 1:4; Colossians 1:7; Colossians 1:9; Colossians 2:1). Paul, probably at Ephesus, and had become a disciple. the house of Aquila and Priscilla at Rome, Romans 16:5 (if, indeed, Romans 16 was not addressed to Ephesus), that of Philemon (Philemon 1:2) in Colossae, that of Nymphas, or Nympha, in Laodicea (Colossians 4:15)
John, Epistles of - Whilst very little evidence is forthcoming to enable us to fix exactly either of these, the general consensus of testimony points very decidedly to Ephesus during the last few years of the 1st century. Jerome among the Fathers, Erasmus at the time of the Reformation, and many modern critics have ascribed the Epistle to ‘John the Presbyter’ of Ephesus, but there is no early reference to such a person except the statement of Papias quoted by Eusebius and referred to in a previous article. The two leading opinions are (1) that the words ‘elect lady and her children are to be understood literally of a Christian matron in Ephesus and her family; and (2) that a church personified, with its constituent members, was intended
Ordination - It is also probable that election existed at Ephesus and in Crete, though we nowhere read of it in the Pastoral Epistles. It is possible, though perhaps not probable, that the words in Acts 20:28 (see below, 6) mean that the Holy Ghost had by a prophet pointed out the presbyters at Ephesus as being worthy of ordination. Paul tells the presbyters of Ephesus that the Holy Ghost has made them ‘bishops
Colossians, Epistle to the - (1) Epaphras, who had been the first evangelist of the Colossians, and who seems to have held at Colossæ a position somewhat similar to that which Timothy is represented in the Pastoral Epistles as holding in Ephesus, had come to Rome bringing information as to the special needs and dangers of the Colossian Church
John the Baptist - Similarly, upon arriving in Ephesus, Paul encountered about a dozen disciples of John
Mark (John) - Later still he is stationed somewhere between Ephesus and Rome (2 Timothy 4:11)
John - "Little children, love one another," was the aged apostle's whole benediction as the young men carried him into the church of Ephesus every Lord's Day
Pelagians - The council of Ephesus likewise condemned the opinions of Pelagius and Celestius; and the Emperor Honorius, in 418, published an edict, which ordained that the leaders of the sect should be expelled from Rome, and their followers exiled
Severus, Patriarch of Antioch - According to John of Ephesus, he died in the Egyptian desert (ed
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - To the south at Ephesus, the original town site on the disease-ridden marshlands was abandoned about A. During the days of Ephesus' prosperity, the constant dredging was adequately maintained
Peter, the Epistles of - In Lydia was the Philadelphian church favorably noticed Revelation 3:7; that of Sardis the capital; Thyatira; and Ephesus, founded by Paul, laboured in by Aquila, Priscilla, Apollos, and Paul for three years, censured for leaving its first love (Revelation 2:4). It was either when he went to Colosse that he proceeded to Peter, thence to Ephesus, from whence (2 Timothy 4:11) Paul tells Timothy to bring him to Rome (A
Paul - 52-57) centered in the city of Ephesus from which the gospel probably spread into the surrounding cities such as the seven churches in Revelation (Acts 18:23-20:6 ; Revelation 2-3 ). From Ephesus he carried on a correspondence with the Corinthian church and possibly other churches
Tongues, Gift of - Ephesus, and Colosse
Luke (2) - An instance in Asia Minor was that between Smyrna, Ephesus, and Pergamum
Mark - Paul wrote to Timothy to bring Mark with him (2 Timothy 4:11), Timothy was to pick him up at Colossae on his way from Ephesus
Fruit - Thus the Apostle hopes, as he looks forward to his visit to Rome, that he may ‘have some fruit among’ the people of that city as he had in Corinth and Ephesus (Romans 1:13)
Dositheus (1), Leader of Jewish Sect - 42) we read that Theophilus of Persia who was later than the council of Ephesus wrote against Dositheus
Council - 325; the second general council was held at Constantinople, in the year 381, by order of Theodosius the Great; the third, at Ephesus, by order of Theodosius, Junior, A
Galatians, Epistle to the - Galatian theory, understanding Acts 16:6 ; Acts 18:23 to represent the two visits to the Galatians implied in Galatians 4:13 , usually fix on Ephesus as the place of writing, and suppose that the Epistle dates from the long stay there recorded in Acts 19:8 ff. It is certainly strange, on the Ephesus or Macedonia hypothesis, that Paul neither took any steps to visit the erring Galatians, nor, if he could not go to them, explained the reason of his inability
Ebionism (2) - to the 19th, the Fourth Gospel has been associated in two quite different ways with Ebionism, and specifically with Cerinthus, an Ebionite of the Gnosticizing type who taught in Ephesus towards the close of the Apostolic age. John and Cerinthus in the baths of Ephesus (Iren
Temptation, Trial - The angel of the church in Ephesus ‘tried’ or ‘tempted’ them which called themselves apostles and were not, and found them false (Revelation 2:2)
John, the Gospel of - According to tradition the fourth Gospel was written by John the apostle in Ephesus, toward the end of his life
Church - )...
The steps were apostle; then vicar apostolic or apostolic delegate, as Timothy in Ephesus and Titus in Crete, temporarily (1 Timothy 1:3; 2 Timothy 4:21; Titus 3:12; Titus 1:5), then angel, then bishop in the present sense
Cerinthus, Opponent of Saint John - On one of his journeys he arrived at Ephesus, and met St
Temple - But the temple at Babylon is alluded to, 2 Chronicles 36:7; Ezra 5:14; the temple of Diana at Ephesus, Acts 19:27; the temple of God, 2 Corinthians 6:16, meaning the saints, and the temple in the Holy City—the New Jerusalem
Education - Only once, indeed, is the word ‘school’ to be found even in NT ( Acts 19:9 ), and then only of the lecture-room of a Greek teacher in Ephesus
Maxentius, Joannes, Presbyter And Archimandrite - At the close of the fifth they solemnly protest their acceptance of the councils of Nicaea, Constantinople, Ephesus, and Chalcedon, the letters of Leo anathematizing the writings of Theodore of Mopsuestia and Nestorius his disciple, and all writings opposed to the Twelve Chapters of the blessed Cyril against Nestorius; anathematizing in addition, Eutyches and Dioscorus (Petr
Leo i, the Great - In 431, during the council of Ephesus, St. It was the emperor who summoned the council of Ephesus in 449 ( Epp. He praises the conduct of his legates and confirms their wish that the names of those bishops, Dioscorus Juvenal, and Eustathius, who had taken a chief part in the crimes of the council of Ephesus should not be recited at the altar (lxxx
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - The council of Ephesus, however, while it condemned Nestorius by name, contented itself with condemning Theodore's creed without mentioning Theodore; and the Nestorian party consequently fell back upon the words of Theodore, and began to circulate them in several languages as affording the best available exposition of their views (Liberat. of Edessa, who at Ephesus had sided with John of Antioch, now publicly anathematized Theodore (Ibas, Ep. The West, Africa especially, rebelled against a decree which seemed to set at nought the authority of the councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon, and also violated the sanctity of the dead
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - Such books and charms were burnt at Ephesus when their owners became Christians ( Acts 19:19 ). So celebrated was Ephesus for its magic, that ‘Ephesian letters’ was a common name for amulets made of leather, wood, or metal on which a magic spell was written (Farrar, St
Revelation, the Book of - ...
Letters to the Seven Churches (2:1–3:22) The letters to the churches of Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea have a fairly consistent format. ...
The church at Ephesus (Revelation 2:1-7 ) is told to return to her first love; the church at Smyrna (Revelation 2:8-11 ), to be faithful unto death; the churches of Pergamum (Revelation 2:12-17 ) and Thyatira (Revelation 2:18-29 ) must beware of false teaching and the immoral deeds that so often accompany erroneous theology
Roman Law in the nt - In Acts 19:38 the plural ἀνθύπατοι is used; the meaning is not that there were more than one proconsul at Ephesus at a time, or that the proconsul’s counsellors were called by this name (a conjecture for which there is no evidence), but that ‘there are such things as proconsuls. Thus at Ephesus, a ‘free’ city, we find, in addition to the Roman proconsulship, a Greek constitution
Apostles - ...
In Revelation John commended the church at Ephesus for proving some who claimed to be apostles to be liars (Revelation 2:2 )
Intercession - The farewell prayers with the elders of Ephesus (Ephesians 3:14-194), and the whole congregation of Tyre (Acts 21:5-6), are typical in all probability of many similar services
Corinthians, Epistles to the - He had been in great danger (probably referring to the uproar at Ephesus, Acts 19 ), but the God of resurrection had delivered him
Ave Maria - Like the title Theotokos, sanctioned by the Third Œcumenical Council (Ephesus 431), they were intended to safeguard and emphasize the true humanity of Christ
Bishop, Elder, Presbyter - Paul at Ephesus or in Crete; they were forerunners of the monarchical bishops, not the first examples of them
Law - , "in law" (en, "in," and nomos), or, strictly, "what is within the range of law," is translated "lawful" in Acts 19:39 , AV (RV, "regular"), of the legal tribunals in Ephesus; (b) "under law" (RV), in relation to Christ, 1 Corinthians 9:21 , where it is contrasted with anomos (see No
Philemon Epistle to - Paul at Ephesus, Acts 19:22) is appropriately associated with the Apostle, the letter begins with a cordial recognition of Philemon’s faith and love towards Christ and towards brethren whose hearts he had refreshed by Christian fellowship and generous charity
Julianus Eclanensis, Bishop of Eclana - Whither he went from Constantinople does not appear, but he with other Pelagians seem to have accompanied Nestorius to the convent of Ephesus, A
Intercession - The farewell prayers with the elders of Ephesus (Acts 20:36), and the whole congregation of Tyre (Acts 21:5-6), are typical in all probability of many similar services
Luke - There is no critical agreement as to whether the so-called Epistles of the Imprisonment were written from Caesarea, from Rome, or (according to a more recent hypothesis) from Ephesus. -Very little is added by tradition to the information in the Pauline Epistles except (a) the constant attribution to Luke of the Third Gospel and Acts; (b) the statement that he was an Antiochene Greek; (c) somewhat less frequently, statements that he died in Bœotia, Bithynia, or Ephesus; (d) the statement, found only in late Manuscripts , that the Gospel was written in Alexandria
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - When Cyril was at the council of Ephesus endeavouring to crush Nestorianism, Isidore wrote to him: "Prejudice does not see clearly; antipathy does not see at all. For many of those at Ephesus accuse you of pursuing a personal feud, instead of seeking the things of Jesus Christ in an orthodox way
Nestorian Church - Whether her doctrine, then or at any time, was what the word "Nestorian" means to us, and what is the theological status of a church which accepts Nicaea, Constantinople, and Chalcedon, but rejects Ephesus, are separate and difficult questions. ; John of Ephesus, Eccl
Physician - Rufus of Ephesus, who also practised medicine in the reign of Trajan, was educated at Alexandria. Soranos of Ephesus, who received his medical and anatomical training in Alexandria, was the most famous obstetrician of antiquity
Disease - Disease had a religious dimension for all ancient peoples, partly from the natural recourse to superhuman help in danger or distress; idol shrines at Corinth, Ephesus, and Rome were as beset with sufferers as was the Jerusalem temple
Idol, Idolatry - As the gospel message spread it encountered various forms of idolatry in the pagan world as attested in Acts, especially Paul's encounters at Athens (17:16-31) and Ephesus (19:23-34)
Demon - Yet in four passages of Acts we read of possession by unclean or evil spirits: at Jerusalem (Acts 5:16); in Samaria, where they were expelled at the preaching of Philip (Acts 8:7); at Philippi, where the ventriloquist maiden is said to have a spirit, a Python (Acts 16:16 : πνεῦμα πύθωνα is the best reading); and at Ephesus, where by St
the Angel of the Church in Thyatira - The minister of Ephesus had left his first love to God and to God's work because he was so happy in the love of his wife and children
Abel - That name, that name, that name, that family of names! Where are the owners of all these names? What account can I give of them? If they are not here tonight, where are they? Why are they not here, and why are they where they are? What a preacher Paul must have been, and what a pastor, and supported and seconded by what a staff of elders, since he was able to say to his assembled kirk-session in Ephesus that he was clear of the blood of all his people! What mornings to his tent-making, and to his sermons, and to his epistles; and what afternoons and evenings to humility, and to tears, and to temptations, both publicly and from house to house! Like Samuel Rutherford, and long before his day, always at his books, always among his people, always at their sick-beds, always catechising their children, always preaching and always praying
Peter - John at Ephesus, our Second Gospel is based upon information derived from Peter
the Unprofitable Servant - " The best fight Paul ever fought was not with wild beasts at Ephesus, but it was with his own self-righteous heart
Thessalonians, the Epistles to the - Aristarchus was his "companion in travel," and shared his perils at Ephesus and his shipwreck, and was his "fellow prisoner" and "fellow labourer" at Rome (Acts 27:2; Colossians 4:10; Philemon 1:24)
Salutations - David Schulz sought the solution in Ephesus, to which Church these words were directed
Heal, Health - We read of "extraordinary miracles" at Ephesus (19:11), the restoration of Eutychus at Troas (20:9-12), and the healing of Publius's father on Malta
Minister Ministry - ’ But the Seven are not called διάκονοι, and there is no evidence in the NT which can connect them with the ‘deacons’ at Philippi or Ephesus
Games - Paul’s experience at Ephesus may be taken as typical
the Angel of the Church in Pergamos - For to be told, and that on such absolute authority, that while Satan had his colonies and his dependencies and his outposts in Ephesus, and in Smyrna, and in Thyatira, yet that his very citadel and stronghold was in Pergamos,-that must have been an awful revelation to the responsible pastor of Pergamos
Arts - The silversmiths of Ephesus (Acts 19:24) were a powerful gild, working at a particular craft, viz
Calling - The invitation, "the calling," of the first preachers was to all who heard them in Rome, in Ephesus, in Corinth, and other places; and those who embraced it, and joined themselves to the church by faith, baptism, and continued public profession, were named, especially and eminently, "the called," because of their obedience to the invitation
Macarius Magnus, Magnes, a Writer - 521), that at the Synod of the Oak in 403, one of the accusers of Heracleidas of Ephesus was a Macarius, bp
Montanus - —For the history of Montanism in the East after its definite separation from the church, our chief authorities are fragments preserved by Eusebius of two writers, the anonymous writer already mentioned and Apollonius of Ephesus. In connexion with this may be taken what is told of John of Ephesus in the same reign of Justinian (Assemani, Bibl
Polycarpus, Bishop of Smyrna - In so behaving he claimed to act in the spirit of his master John, concerning whom he told that once when he went to take a bath in Ephesus and saw Cerinthus within, he rushed away without bathing, crying out, "Let us flee, lest the bath should fall in, for Cerinthus, the enemy of the truth, is within"; and when Marcion meeting Polycarp asked him, "Do you recognize us?" he answered, "I recognize thee as the firstborn of Satan. The proconsul came from Ephesus the ordinary seat of government to preside
Widows - ...
When 1 Timothy 5:3-16 was written the question of the Church’s relation to widows-in Ephesus at any rate-had become a serious problem
Sacrifice And Offering - Paul's preaching of the gospel at Ephesus disrupted the business and worship of the goddess Artemis (Acts 19:1 )
Church Government - There are similar leaders at Ephesus
Exorcism - Again, at Ephesus, a city in which exorcism flourished, St
Apocrypha, New Testament - After many other travels, John finally dies in Ephesus
Synagogue - Paul's hiring the school of one Tyrannus at Ephesus, and teaching in it daily, is a peculiar instance, Acts 19:9-10
Philippi - 3702) thinks that Philippi was a ‘first’ city in the same sense in which Ephesus, Pergamus, and Smyrna bore that distinction-a ‘first-class’ city; but it does not appear that this phraseology was used outside the Commune of Asia
Christ in the Early Church - 107, and are addressed to the Churches of Ephesus, Magnesia, Tralles, Rome, Philadelphia, Smyrna, and to Polycarp of Smyrna. ...
(c) The Council of Ephesus (431) dealt with a further problem, the ‘Hypostatic Union,’ i
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - 400, Eusebius of Valentinopolis accused his brother bishop, Antoninus of Ephesus, of selling ordination to bishoprics, melting down the church plate for his own benefit, and other grave offences (Pallad. 401), and he in very feeble health, proceeded to Ephesus
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - The chief agent in effecting it was the neo-Platonist Maximus of Ephesus, a philosopher, magician, and political schemer. The young prince hurried off to Ephesus, and there threw himself with eagerness into the teaching of his new master, which seems exactly to have suited his fantastic temperament
Justinianus i, Emperor - to Maris was a violent assault on the council of Ephesus. His control of the fifth council was much more direct and considerable than his predecessors exercised at Ephesus and Chalcedon
Pelagianism And Pelagius - He shortly afterwards sailed to Ephesus. Coelestius left Ephesus, whither he had gone on his expulsion from Africa and obtained ordination as presbyter, and proceeded to Constantinople, whence, as he began disseminating his peculiar opinions, he was driven by its bishop, Atticus
Demon - God performed extraordinary miracles through Paul in Ephesus, including the expulsion of demons (19:11-12)
Baptism - Apollos' and John's disciples at Ephesus knew not of the Holy Spirit's baptism, which is the distinctive feature of Christ's (Acts 18:25; Acts 19:2-6; compare Acts 1:5; Acts 11:16)
Confession - Paul is represented as receiving many confessions publicly at Ephesus (Acts 19:18), when many ‘came, confessing, and declaring their deeds,’ and there was a bonfire of books of magic
Henoticon, the - " On this account, and knowing also that the strength and shield of the empire rested in the one true faith declared by the holy Fathers gathered at Nicaea, confirmed by those who met at Constantinople and followed by those who had condemned Nestorius at the council of Ephesus, the emperor declares that "the creed so made and confirmed is the one only symbol of faith, and that he has held, holds, and will hold no other, and will regard all who hold another as aliens, and that in this alone those who desire saving baptism must be baptized
the Angel of the Church in Sardis - When he went to the communion-seasons at Ephesus and Smyrna and Pergamos and Thyatira, for years after the captivated people could tell you his texts and at every mention of his name they would break out about his preaching
Wealth - Still, his preaching has an impact on how people use their wealth, particularly in Ephesus; believers who no longer buy idols cause such a downturn in the silver business that the merchants riot (19:23-27)
Dionysius, Pseudo-Areopagita - The emperor Justinian invited Hypatius of Ephesus, and other bishops of the orthodox side, to meet in his palace the leaders of the Severians
Apostle - Eusebius gives the following account: "Thomas, as we learn by tradition, had Parthia for his lot; Andrew, Scythia; John, Asia, who having lived there a long time, died at Ephesus
Romans, Book of - This information from the Roman letter corresponds precisely with what Luke reported in the Acts of the Apostles about Paul's deciding to leave Ephesus, travel through Macedonia and Achaia, go to Jerusalem, and then visit Rome ( Acts 19:21 )
Paul the Apostle - 53 to 57 and centered on a long stay in Ephesus, from where he wrote 1Corinthians
Resurrection - Paul articulates the persecution he received at Ephesus in verse 32, which only has meaning if the dead are raised
Confession (of Christ) - In 1 Timothy he commends the young minister of the Church in Ephesus because be had ‘confessed the good confession in the sight of many witnesses’ (1 Timothy 6:12), and finds in this matter the perfect example for Christian imitation in the ‘good confession’ which Christ Jesus Himself witnessed before Pontius Pilate (1 Timothy 6:13); while in 2 Timothy we have an evident re-echo of the Lord’s own language in the warning, ‘If we shall deny him, he also will deny us’ (2 Timothy 2:12)
Paul's Blamelessness as a Minister - Instead of saying to us Here is Philippi, and here is Ephesus, and here is Corinth, and so on: Paul says to us Here were afflictions, and here were necessities, and here were troubles on every side
Expediency - Paul reminds the elders of Ephesus that he had kept back nothing that was profitable (τῶν συμφερόντων) unto them
Dispersion - Jews of Ephesus, Sardis, Delos, etc
Heresy - Paul had preached at Ephesus, a quantity of magical and theurgical books were brought forward by their possessors and burned before his eyes, Acts 19:19
Word - John, who lived to a great age, and who resided at Ephesus, in Proconsular Asia, was moved by the growth of the Gnostic heresies, and by the solicitations of the Christian teachers, to bear his testimony to the truth in writing, and particularly to recollect those discourses and actions of our Lord, which might furnish the clearest refutation of the persons who denied his preexistence
Predestination - It is ‘the saints which are at Ephesus and the faithful in Christ Jesus’ who are the objects of this Divine choice and blessing, persons who are believing men and women (τοῖς πιστοῖς) and Christians indeed (τοῖς ἁγίοις)
Dispersion - Jews of Ephesus, Sardis, Delos, etc
Church - It is the Church of God that suffers persecution in the persons of those who are of ‘the Way’ ( 1 Corinthians 15:9 , Acts 8:3 ; Acts 9:1 ); is profaned by misuse of sacred ordinances at Corinth ( 1 Corinthians 11:22 ); becomes at Ephesus the pillar and ground of the truth ( 1 Timothy 3:16 )
Revelation, Theology of - When a temple was dedicated to Domitian on the western side of the marketplace in Ephesus, the leading city of Asia Minor and the first to be mentioned in John's letters to the churches, other cities of the province followed suit in a wave of popular fervor
Paul as a Man of Prayer - How happy to have been his fellow-elder in Ephesus, his physician, his son in the Gospel
Paul as a Student - Athens was a great city, Corinth was a great city, and Ephesus was a great city
Family - A similar case is perhaps that of Chloe; she seems to have been a widow whose household (‘they of Chloe,’ 1 Corinthians 1:11) traded between Ephesus and Corinth
Idol - ...
The Phoenicians anointed stones (often aerolites, as that "which fell down from Jupiter," sacred to Diana of Ephesus, Acts 19:35) to various gods, like the stone anointed by Jacob (Genesis 28:18; Genesis 28:22) at Bethel, called therefore Baetylia (compare also Genesis 31:45)
Emperor-Worship - The Asiarch held office for a limited period, but retained the honorary title, hence there might be several Asiarchs in Ephesus (see Expositor’s Greek Testament in loc
Woman - Again, egalitarians have regularly proposed some historical background (most notably the presence of heresy in Ephesus 1 Corinthians 1:11 ) as the rationale for Paul's mandate, which is then seen as culturally limited in application
Church - The first opinion is manifestly contradicted by the language of the Apostles, who, while they teach that there is but one church, composed of believers throughout the world, think it not at all inconsistent with this to speak of "the churches of Judea," "of Achaia," "the seven churches of Asia," "the church at Ephesus," &c
Synagogue - Throughout Asia Minor, Macedonia, Greece and its islands, in cities such as Ephesus, Philippi, Thessalonica, Athens, and Corinth, the synagogues, being the gathering-places for Jews and ‘God-fearing’ half-proselytes (Acts 13:16; Deuteronomy 11:13-21; Acts 13:43; Acts 17:17), offered a sphere of activity to St
Trade And Commerce - 103]'>[2]), was able to acquire about £18,000, which he deposited at Ephesus on his return journey (Correspondence of M
Holy Spirit - In 19:1-7 Paul encounters in Ephesus followers of John the Baptist whom Luke calls "disciples" (v
Anger - Similarly, the Church at Ephesus is congratulated on its hatred of the Nicolaitans (Revelation 2:6)
Papyri And Ostraca - The more we realize the missionary character of Primitive Christianity, the more clearly we grasp the greatness of the Apostle Paul working among the proletariat of the great centres of the world’s commerce Ephesus, Corinth, etc
Thecla - The author, being of Asia—that is, of the Roman province supposed a proconsul to be found at Iconium and at Antioch, because he had himself been accustomed to see a proconsul at Ephesus or Smyrna; and thus Tertullian's statement that he was of Asia (taken in that limited sense) is borne out, not by his exact knowledge, as Schlau supposed, but by his mistake
Acts of the Apostles - ( g ) The ‘Asiarchs’ at Ephesus ( Acts 19:31 RVm Paul - ) The leading facts of his life which appear in that history, subsidiary to its design of sketching the great epochs in the commencement and development of Christ's kingdom, are: his conversion (Acts 9), his labours at Antioch (Acts 11), his first missionary journey (Acts 13; 14), the visit to Jerusalem at the council on circumcision (Acts 15), introduction of the gospel to Europe at Philippi (Acts 16),: visit to Athens (Acts 17), to Corinth (Acts 18), stay at Ephesus (Acts 19), parting address to the Ephesian elders at Miletus (Acts 20), apprehension at Jerusalem, imprisonment at Casesarea, and voyage to Rome (Acts 21-27)
Oracle - Diana, the sister of Apollo, had several oracles in Egypt, Cilicia, Ephesus, &c
Novatianus And Novatianism - When visiting Ephesus to consecrate a bishop a
Bible - John probably come from Ephesus or its neighbourhood; but the sites of the origin of all the other books are doubtful
Galatia - In these cities, planted in the moat civilized and progressive part of central Asia Minor-the region traversed by the great route of traffic and inter-course between Ephesus and Syrian Antioch-many Greeks, Romans, and Jews swelled the native Phrygian and Lycaonian populace
Gospels - Irenaeus is wrong again when he said that John the Apostle lived to a good age and spent the last part of his life at Ephesus
John, Gospel of - He expressly states that after the publication of the other three Gospels, ‘John the disciple of the Lord, who also leaned upon His breast, himself also published the Gospel, while he was dwelling at Ephesus in Asia
Paul the Apostle - Paul never re-visited Ephesus. Paul never re-visited Ephesus
Trade And Commerce - 103]'>[2]), was able to acquire about £18,000, which he deposited at Ephesus on his return journey (Correspondence of M
Revelation, the - Ephesus
New Testament - " The Armenian, by Mesrobus, early in the fifth century, made from Greek manuscripts; brought from Alexandria and from Ephesus
Trial-at-Law - At Ephesus, again, the Apostle was saved from the fanatical violence of the mob by the sanity of the town-clerk (ὁ γραμματεύς, the city scribe or secretary), who reminded them that the courts were open and the proconsuls (ἀνθύπατοι, plur
Canon of the New Testament - He notes that 2 and 3 John have been attributed to a presbyter whose tomb at Ephesus is still pointed out
Jesus Christ - It is true that there is a powerful body of Patristic testimony in support of the tradition that the Fourth Gospel was composed by the Apostle Johnin Ephesus in his old age about a
Eusebius (60), Bishop of Nicomedia - 20) who at first refused their signatures among them both the Eusebii Theognis of Nicaea Menophantus of Ephesus Secundus of Ptolemais Theonas Patrophilus Narcissus Maris and others
Christianity - The first triumphs of Christianity were in the heart of Greece itself, the nursery of learning and the polite arts; for churches were planted at a very early period at Corinth, Ephesus, Beraea, Thessalonica, and Philippi
Paul - was written from Ephesus during the author’s prolonged sojourn in that city in the third missionary journey
Christ in the Middle Ages - The cause of the Hesychasts was ably defended by Nicolaus Cabasilas, bishop of Thessalonica, and by Marcus Eugenicus, archbishop of Ephesus
Hosius (1), a Confessor Under Maximian - 362), the name of a robber synod even more than did the false council of Ephesus
Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons - of Ephesus, he had cut them off from his communion
Confession - ...
Before leaving the ancient formulas of Christian doctrine, it may be stated, that both in the council of Ephesus against the Nestorians, held A