What does Envy mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
φθόνον envy. / for envy 4
יְקַנֵּ֣א to envy 2
קִנְאָֽה ardour 2
φθόνου envy. / for envy 1
φθόνῳ envy. / for envy 1
φθόνος envy. / for envy 1
תְּ֭קַנֵּא to envy 1
קִנְאָתָ֖ם ardour 1
וּכְקִנְאָ֣תְךָ֔ ardour 1
קִנְאַ֣ת ardour 1
קִנְאַת־ ardour 1
תְּֽרַצְּדוּן֮ (Piel) to watch stealthily or with envious hostility 1

Definitions Related to Envy

G5355


   1 Envy.
   2 for Envy, i.e. prompted by Envy.
   

H7065


   1 to Envy, be jealous, be envious, be zealous.
      1a (Piel).
         1a1 to be jealous of.
         1a2 to be envious of.
         1a3 to be zealous for.
         1a4 to excite to jealous anger.
      1b (Hiphil) to provoke to jealous anger, cause jealousy.
      

H7068


   1 ardour, zeal, jealousy.
      1a ardour, jealousy, jealous disposition (of husband).
         1a1 sexual passion.
      1b ardour of zeal (of religious zeal).
         1b1 of men for God.
         1b2 of men for the house of God.
         1b3 of God for his people.
      1c ardour of anger.
         1c1 of men against adversaries.
         1c2 of God against men.
      1d Envy (of man).
      1e jealousy (resulting in the wrath of God).
      

H7520


   1 (Piel) to watch stealthily or with envious hostility, watch with enmity, watch with Envy.
   

Frequency of Envy (original languages)

Frequency of Envy (English)

Dictionary

Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Envy, Envying
A — 1: φθόνος (Strong's #5355 — Noun Masculine — phthonos — fthon'-os ) "envy," is the feeling of displeasure produced by witnessing or hearing of the advantage or prosperity of others; this evil sense always attaches to this word, Matthew 27:18 ; Mark 15:10 ; Romans 1:29 ; Galatians 5:21 ; Philippians 1:15 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Titus 3:3 ; 1 Peter 2:1 ; so in James 4:5 , where the question is rhetorical and strongly remonstrative, signifying that the Spirit (or spirit) which God made to dwell in us was certainly not so bestowed that we should be guilty of "envy."
Note: Zelos, "zeal or jealousy," translated "envy" in the AV, in Acts 13:45 ; Romans 13:13 ; 1 Corinthians 3:3 ; 2 Corinthians 12:20 ; James 3:14,16 , is to be distinguished from phthonos, and, apart from the meanings "zeal" and "indignation," is always translated "jealousy" in the RV. The distinction lies in this, that "envy" desires to deprive another of what he has, "jealousy" desires to have the same or the same sort of thing for itself. See FERVENT , INDIGNATION , JEALOUSY , ZEAL.
B — 1: φθονέω (Strong's #5354 — Verb — phthoneo — fthon-eh'-o ) "to envy" (akin to A.), is used in Galatians 5:26 .
B — 2: ζηλόω (Strong's #2206 — Verb — zeloo — dzay-lo'-o ) denotes "to be zealous, moved with jealousy," Acts 7:9 ; 17:5 , RV, "moved with jealousy" (AV, "moved with envy"); both have "envieth" in 1 Corinthians 13:4 . See the Note under A. See AFFECT , COVET , DESIRE , JEALOUS , ZEALOUS.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Envy
A sensation of uneasiness and disquiet, arising from the advantages which others are supposed to possess above us, accompanied with malignity towards those who possess them. "This, " says a good writer, "is universally admitted to be one of the blackest passions in the human heart. No one, indeed, is to be condemned for defending his rights, and showing displeasure against a malicious enemy; but to conceive ill will at one who has attacked none of our rights, nor done us any injury, solely because he is more prosperous than we are, is a disposition altogether unnatural. Hence the character of an envious man is universally odious. All disclaim it; and they who feel themselves under the influence of this passion, carefully conceal it. The chief grounds of envy may be reduced to three: accomplishments of mind; advantages of birth, rank, and fortune; and superior success in worldly pursuits. To subdue this odious disposition, let us consider its sinful and criminal nature; the mischiefs it occasions to the world; the unhappiness it produces to him who possesses it; the evil causes that nourish it, such as pride and indolence: let us, moreover, bring often into view those religious considerations which regard us as Christians: how unworthy we are in the sight of God, how much the blessings we enjoy are above what we deserve. Let us learn reverence and submission to that divine government which has appointed to every one such a condition as is fittest for him to possess; let us consider how opposite the Christian spirit is to envy; above all, let us offer up our prayers to the Almighty, that he would purify our hearts from a passion which is so base and so criminal."
Holman Bible Dictionary - Envy
A painful or resentful awareness of another's advantage joined with the desire to possess the same advantage. The advantage may concern material goods (Genesis 26:14 ) or social status (Genesis 30:1 ). Old Testament wisdom frequently warns against envying the arrogant (Psalm 73:3 ), the violent (Proverbs 3:31 ), or the wicked (Psalm 37:1 ; Proverbs 24:1 ,Proverbs 24:1,24:19 ). In the New Testament envy is a common member of vice lists as that which comes out of the person and defiles (Mark 7:22 ), as a characteristic of humanity in rebellion to God (Romans 1:29 ), as a fruit of the flesh (Galatians 5:21 ), as a characteristic of unregenerate life (Titus 3:3 ) and as a trait of false teachers (1 Timothy 6:4 ). Envy (sometimes translated jealousy by modern translations) was the motive leading to the arrest of Jesus (Matthew 27:18 ; Mark 15:10 ) and to opposition to the gospel in Acts (Acts 5:17 , Acts 13:45 ; Acts 17:5 ). Christians are called to avoid envy (Galatians 5:26 ; 1 Peter 2:1 ).
Envy is sometimes a motive for doing good. The Preacher was disillusioned that hard work and skill were the result of envying another (Ecclesiastes 4:4 ). Paul was, however, able to rejoice that the gospel was preached even if the motive were envy (Philippians 1:15 ).
The KJV rightly understood the difficult text in James 4:5 , recognizing that it is a characteristic of the human spirit that it “lusteth to envy”. Contrary to modern translations, the Greek word used for envy here (phthonos ) is always used in a negative sense, never in the positive sense of God's jealousy (Greek zealos ). God's response to the sinful longings of the human heart is to give more grace (James 4:6 ). See Jealousy .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Envy
Sin of jealousy over the blessings and achievements of others, especially the spiritual enjoyment and advance of the kingdom of Christ freely and graciously bestowed upon the people of God. Old Testament examples of the sin of jealousy include the rivalry of Joseph's brothers over the favor that Joseph received at the hand of God (Genesis 37:12-36 ; Acts 7:9 ), and Saul's animosity toward David for his physical and spiritual prowess (1 Samuel 18 ). Envy inevitably leads to personal harm and debilitation, affecting one's physical, spiritual, and emotional well-being (Job 5:2 ; Proverbs 14:30 ). Unchecked, it gradually leads to a destructive and remorseful way of life (Proverbs 27:4 ), and ultimately, to estrangement from God (Romans 1:28-32 ).
Envy manifests the insidiousness of sin and human depravity apart from the intervention of God's redeeming grace. As a sin of the flesh, envy characterizes the lives of the unregenerate. Envy is one of the traits of the Christian's former way of life (Romans 13:8-14 ; Titus 3:3 ). Those who practice envy and strife are barred from the kingdom of heaven (Galatians 5:19-26 ). Indeed, the unregenerate nature ever tends toward envy, manifesting the unbeliever's rejection of God, his truth, and his will for human conduct (James 3:14,16 ).
The way of true wisdom counsels the faithful to avoid the company of such godless people (Proverbs 24:1 ). Envy is listed among the sins of the flesh that must be conquered through the power of the Holy Spirit (1Col 3:3; 2Col 12:20; 1 Peter 2:1 ). "Do not let your heart envy sinners, but always be zealous for the fear of the Lord" (Proverbs 23:17 ). Love is to have majesty over envy (1 Corinthians 13:4 ).
As an example from former days, the righteous judgment of Yahweh against Edom was measured out in accordance with the measure of Edom's jealousy toward the people of God (Ezekiel 35:11 ). But the mercy of God brought about the healing of animosity between Ephraim and Judah by means of God's righteous act of salvation (Isaiah 11:13 ). In the time of Messiah's earthly ministry it was the envy of the Jews that led to the rejection and betrayal of Jesus into the hands of Pilate for crucifixion (Matthew 27:18 ). Nevertheless, in the providence and foreordination of God, what the wicked intended for evil was destined to be the instrument of God's redemption of his elect through the shed blood of Jesus Christ.
Paul points out how the good news of the gospel was preached at times out of envy and strife (Philippians 1:15 ). Yet in spite of the envious motives of the false apostles, Paul rejoiced that Christ was being proclaimed. Like Christ, the apostle in his ministry of the gospel experienced the hatred and jealousy of the Jews (Acts 13:45 ). This did not deter him from his divinely ordained mission. There were other times, however, that false teaching led to controversy and envy among the people of God (1 Timothy 6:4 ). Genuine, unfeigned love for God and his word prompts the disciples of Christ to proclaim and defend the full counsel of God's truth. Loving and consecrated devotion to Christ and his kingdom dissipates the sins of envy and jealousy.
Mark W. Karlberg
See also Covetousness
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Envy
ENVY . Envy leads to strife, and division, and railing, and hatred, and sometimes to murder. The Bible classes it with these things ( Romans 1:29 ; Rom 13:13 , 1 Corinthians 3:3 , 2 Corinthians 12:20 , Gal 5:21 , 1 Timothy 6:4 , Titus 3:3 , James 3:14 ; James 3:16 ). It is the antipode of Christian love. Envy loveth not, and love envieth not ( 1 Corinthians 13:4 ). Bacon closes his essay on ‘Envy’ with this sentence: ‘Envy is the vilest affection and the most depraved; for which cause it is the proper attribute of the Devil, who is called, The envious man, that soweth tares amongst the wheat by night; as it always cometh to pass, that Envy worketh subtilly and in the dark, and to the prejudice of good things, such as is the wheat.’ Chrysostom said: ‘As a moth gnaws a garment, so doth envy consume a man, to be a living anatomy, a skeleton, to be a lean and pale carcass, quickened with a fiend.’ These are Scriptural estimates. Envy is devilish, and absolutely inconsistent with the highest life. Examples abound in the Bible, such as are suggested by the relations between Cain and Abel, Jacob and Esau, Rachel and Leah, Joseph and his brothers, Saul and David, Haman and Mordecai, the elder brother and the prodigal son, the Roman evangelists of Philippians 1:15 and the Apostle Paul, and many others.
D. A. Hayes.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Envy
Envy is the feeling of mortification or ill-will occasioned by the contemplation of the superior advantages of others.
‘Base envy withers at another’s joy,
And hates that excellence it cannot reach’
(Thomson, Seasons, ‘Spring,’ 283).
In the NT the word is used to translate two Gr. terms, φθόνος and ζῆλος, the former of which is invariably (with the possible exception of James 4:5) taken in malam partem, while the latter is frequently used in a good sense.
(1) Those who are given up to a reprobate mind are ‘full of envy’ (μεστοὺς φθόνου Romans 1:29), and the character of the word is strikingly indicated by the company it keeps, φθόνος and φόνος (‘murder’) going together. Among the works of the flesh are ‘envyings’ (Galatians 5:21), such as are occasioned by quarrels about words (1 Timothy 6:4). Christians can recall the time when they were ‘living in malice and envy’ (Titus 3:3); and even now they need the injunction to ‘put away all envies’ (1 Peter 2:1); it ill becomes them to be seen ‘provoking one another, envying one another’ (Galatians 5:26). In Rome St. Paul found, with mingled feelings, some men actually preaching Christ from envy, moved to evangelical activity by the strange and sinister inspiration of uneasiness and displeasure at his own success as an apostle (Philippians 1:15) (see Faction). If the Revised Version of James 4:5 is correct, φθονέω has its usual evil sense, and this difficult passage means, ‘Do you think that God will implant in us a spirit of envy, the parent of strife and hate?’ But it may be better to translate, either, ‘For even unto jealous envy (‘bis zur Eifersucht’ [1]) he longeth for the spirit which he made to dwell in us,’ or ‘That spirit which he made to dwell in us yearneth for us even unto jealous envy.’ If either of the last two renderings is right, φθόνος is for once ascribed to God, or to a spirit which proceeds from Him, and the word has no appreciable difference of meaning from the ζῆλος (‘jealousy’) which is so often attributed to Him in the OT (θεὸς ζηλωτής, Exodus 20:5, etc.). He longs for the devotion of His people with an intensity which is often present in, as well as with a purity which is mostly absent from, our human envy. Very different from this passion of holy desire was the φθόνος of the pagan gods (τὸ θεῖον πᾶν ἐστι φθονερόν, says Solon, Herod. i. 32; cf. iii. 40)-that begrudging of uninterrupted human happiness which Crœsus and Polycrates had so much reason to fear.
(2) In the Revised Version of Acts 7:9; Acts 13:45; Acts 17:5, Romans 13:13, 1 Corinthians 3:3, James 3:14; James 3:16 ‘jealousy’ is substituted for Authorized Version ‘envy,’ in Acts 5:17 for ‘indignation,’ and in 2 Corinthians 12:20 for ‘emulation.’ In all these instances the word is ζῆλος (vb. ζηλόω), used in a bad sense, though in many other cases it has a good meaning and is translated ‘zeal’ (Romans 10:2, 2 Corinthians 7:7; 2 Corinthians 7:11; 2 Corinthians 9:2, Philippians 3:6). In 2 Corinthians 11:2 ζήλῳ θεοῦ means a zeal or jealousy like that which is an attribute of God, most pure in its quality, and making its possessor intensely solicitous for the salvation of men.
In 2 Corinthians 9:2 the Revised Version margin suggests ‘emulation of you’ as the translation of ὁ ὑμῶν ζῆλος., William Law, who calls envy ‘the most ungenerous, base, and wicked passion that can enter the heart of man’ (A. Whyte, Characters and Characteristics of William Law4, 1907, p. 77), denies that any real distinction can be drawn between envy and emulation.
‘If this were to be attempted, the fineness of the distinction would show that it is easier to divide them in words than to separate them in action. For emulation, when it is defined in its best manner, is nothing else but a refinement upon envy, or rather the most plausible part of that black and poisonous passion. And though it is easy to separate them in the notion, yet the most acute philosopher, that understands the art of distinguishing ever so well, if he gives himself up to emulation, will certainly find himself deep in envy.’
If this were the case, there would be an end of all generous rivalry and fair competition. But it is contrary to the natural feeling of mankind. Plato says, ‘Let every man contend in the race without envy’ (Jowett2, 1875, v. 75), and St. Paul frequently stimulates his readers with the language of the arena. The distinction between φθόνος and ζῆλος (in the good sense) is broad and deep. The one is a moral disease-‘rottenness in the bones’ (Proverbs 14:30), ‘aegritudo suscepta propter alterius res secundas’ (Cicero, Tusc. iv. 8); the other is the health and vigour of a spirit that covets earnestly the best gifts. Nothing but good can come of the strenuous endeavour to equal and even excel the virtues, graces, and high achievements of another. Ben Jonson has the line, ‘This faire aemulation, and no envy is,’ and Dryden ‘a noble emulation heats your breast.’ ζῆλος (from ζέω, ‘boil’) is, in fact, like its Hebrew equivalent קִנְאָה (‘heat,’ ‘ardour’), an ethically neutral energy, which may become either good or bad, according to the quality of the objects to which it is directed and the spirit in which they are pursued. It instigated the patriarchs (ζηλώσαντες, Acts 7:9) to sell their brother into Egypt, and the Judaizers (ζηλοῦσιν, Galatians 4:17) to seek the perversion of St. Paul’s spiritual children. Love (ἀγάπη) has no affinity with this base passion (οὐ ζηλοῖ, 1 Corinthians 13:4). Love generates a rarer, purer zeal of its own, and ‘it is good to be zealously sought in a good matter at all times’ (καλὸν δὲ ζηλοῦσθαι ἐν καλῷ πάντοτε, Galatians 4:18).
James Strahan.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Envy (2)
ENVY—.The word φθόνος occurs in the Gospels only in the two parallel passages Matthew 27:18 and Mark 15:10 in connexion with the trial of Jesus. When the members of the Jewish hierarchy sought the death of Jesus at the hands of Pilate, they attempted to veil their motives under the pretence of loyalty to Caesar. Pilate was too astute a man to credit these professions for a single instant. He perceived (ἐγίνωσκε, Mark 15:10) the underlying feeling to be envy. If the word ἤδει (‘he knew,’ Matthew 27:18) is significant, it supports the opinion that Pilate had previously become acquainted with the attitude of the chief priests toward Jesus. The message that Pilate later received from his wife (Matthew 27:19) somewhat favours this opinion. In fact it was the business of Pilate to know of the person of Jesus and His relations to the leaders of the Jews, and nothing but the contemptuous indifference of a Gallio would have hindered him from the inquiries necessary for gaining this knowledge.
Perhaps it might seem at first as though the feeling which prompted the priests might more properly be termed jealousy. A comparison of the two feelings, jealousy and envy, readily shows the distinctive character of each: ‘Jealousy is the malign feeling which is often had toward a rival, or possible rival, for the possession of that which we greatly desire, as in love or ambition. Envy is a similar feeling toward one, whether rival or not, who already possesses that which we greatly desire. Jealousy is enmity prompted by fear; envy is enmity prompted by covetousness’ (Century Dictionary, s.v. ‘Envy’). ‘Envy is only a malignant, selfish hunger, casting its evil eye on the elevation or supposed happiness of others’ (Bushnell, ib.). In Trench, Synonyms of the New Testament, xxvi., the comparison is less happily stated. Apparently jealousy (ζῆλος) ‘may assume two shapes; either that of a desire to make war upon the good which it beholds in another, and thus to trouble that good, and make it less; or, where it has not vigour and energy enough to attempt the making of it less, there may be at least the wishing of it less. And here is the point of contact which ζῆλος has with φθονος: thus Plato, Menex. 242 A, τρῶτον μὲν ζῆλος, ἁτὸ ζήλου δὲ φθονος: the latter being essentially passive, the former is active and energetic’. This citation from Plato shows that there may be a genetic relation between jealousy and envy, but it does not show that envy is passive. Trench quotes from Aristotle, Rhetoric, ii. 11, omitting ὁ δἑ τὸν πλησιον [1] μὴ ἑχειν διὰ τον φθόνον [2]: ‘One that is moved by envy contrives that his neighbour shall not have the good that he has or seems to have.’ A careful examination of the use of φθονος in classic Greek authors justifies this statement of Aristotle, and reveals that it means the same active malignant feeling as is expressed in modern English by the word ‘envy.’ It was φθονος which moved the gods to prevent men from attaining a great or uninterrupted experience of prosperity. Pindar, the tragic writers, and orators also are found using the word to designate the active impulse to destroy another’s prosperity so far as one has the power to do it.
The Septuagint, according to Hatch’s Concordance, uses φθόνος only in the Apocryphal books. The most noteworthy instance is in Wisdom of Solomon 2:24 ‘on account of the envy of the devil, death entered into the world.’
Since envy is an ill-will or malice aroused by the success or good gifts of another, it is the fitting word to designate the motive of the priests who protested their loyalty to Caesar. Envy is not a primary emotion. Other feelings prepare the way for, and may enter into, it. It is the result of a development in the life of selfishness (Jul. Müller, Lehre von der Sünde, i. 233 f. [3]). In the Gospels this development is not difficult to trace. The deeds and words of Jesus were from the outset attended by suspicion on the part of scribes and Pharisees. His growing popularity aroused their jealousy. When they could charge Him with a compact with Beelzebub (Matthew 12:22 ff., Mark 3:20 ff., Luke 11:14 ff.), they had begun to hate Him because of the popular confidence in Him, and especially because this confidence was of a degree and a quality which they never had received, and which they could not hope to receive. This occurrence was an attempt to discredit Him with the people, and it showed that envy had obtained full lodgment in their hearts. From that time onwards it had so large a share in their lives, that when they appeared before Pilate they were so mastered by this feeling to which they had given free rein for months, that they were unable to conceal it. See also artt. Covetousness and Jealousy.
F. B. Denio.
Webster's Dictionary - Envy
(1):
(n.) Emulation; rivalry.
(2):
(n.) Public odium; ill repute.
(3):
(n.) An object of envious notice or feeling.
(4):
(n.) Malice; ill will; spite.
(5):
(n.) Chagrin, mortification, discontent, or uneasiness at the sight of another's excellence or good fortune, accompanied with some degree of hatred and a desire to possess equal advantages; malicious grudging; - usually followed by of; as, they did this in envy of Caesar.
(6):
(v. i.) To be filled with envious feelings; to regard anything with grudging and longing eyes; - used especially with at.
(7):
(v. t.) To feel envy at or towards; to be envious of; to have a feeling of uneasiness or mortification in regard to (any one), arising from the sight of another's excellence or good fortune and a longing to possess it.
(8):
(v. t.) To feel envy on account of; to have a feeling of grief or repining, with a longing to possess (some excellence or good fortune of another, or an equal good fortune, etc.); to look with grudging upon; to begrudge.
(9):
(v. t.) To long after; to desire strongly; to covet.
(10):
(v. t.) To do harm to; to injure; to disparage.
(11):
(v. t.) To hate.
(12):
(v. t.) To emulate.
(13):
(v. i.) To show malice or ill will; to rail.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Envy
Sadness on account of another's good, inasmuch as the latter is, or at least is regarded as, lessening one's own excellence; one of the seven deadly vices.
King James Dictionary - Envy
EN'VY, L. invideo, in and video, to see against, that is, to look with enmity.
1. To feel uneasiness, mortification or discontent, at the sight of superior excellence, reputation or happiness enjoyed by another to repine at another's prosperity to fret or grieve one's self at the real or supposed superiority of another, and to hate him on that account. Envy not thou the oppressor. Proverbs 3
Whoever envies another, confesses his superiority.
2. To grudge to withhold maliciously. To envy at, used by authors formerly, is now obsolete.
Who would envy at the prosperity of the wicked?
EN'VY, n. Pain, uneasiness, mortification or discontent excited by the sight of another's superiority or success, accompanied with some degree of hatred or malignity, and often or usually with a desire or an effort to depreciate the person, and with pleasure in seeing him depressed. Envy springs from pride, ambition or love, mortified that another has obtained what one has a strong desire to possess.
Envy and admiration are the Scylla and Charybdis of authors.
All human virtue, to its latest breath,
Finds envy never conquered, but by death.
Emulation differs from envy, in not being accompanied with hatred and a desire to depress a more fortunate person.
Envy, to which th' ignoble mind's a slave,
Is emulation in the learn'd or brave.
It is followed by of or to. They did this in envy of Caesar, or in envy to his genius. The former seems to be preferable.
1. Rivalry competition. Little used. 2. Malice malignity. You turn the good we offer into envy.
3. Public odium repute invidiousness. To discharge the king of the envy of that opinion.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Envy
See JEALOUSY.

Sentence search

Envied - See Envy, the verb. Subjected to Envy
Envy - Envy not thou the oppressor. To Envy at, used by authors formerly, is now obsolete. ...
Who would Envy at the prosperity of the wicked? ...
EN'VY, n. Envy springs from pride, ambition or love, mortified that another has obtained what one has a strong desire to possess. ...
Envy and admiration are the Scylla and Charybdis of authors. ...
All human virtue, to its latest breath, ...
Finds Envy never conquered, but by death. ...
Emulation differs from Envy, in not being accompanied with hatred and a desire to depress a more fortunate person. ...
Envy, to which th' ignoble mind's a slave, ...
Is emulation in the learn'd or brave. They did this in Envy of Caesar, or in Envy to his genius. You turn the good we offer into Envy. To discharge the king of the Envy of that opinion
Envious - ) Inspiring Envy. ) Feeling or exhibiting Envy; actuated or directed by, or proceeding from, Envy; - said of a person, disposition, feeling, act, etc
Envy - Envy . Envy leads to strife, and division, and railing, and hatred, and sometimes to murder. Envy loveth not, and love envieth not ( 1 Corinthians 13:4 ). Bacon closes his essay on ‘Envy’ with this sentence: ‘Envy is the vilest affection and the most depraved; for which cause it is the proper attribute of the Devil, who is called, The envious man, that soweth tares amongst the wheat by night; as it always cometh to pass, that Envy worketh subtilly and in the dark, and to the prejudice of good things, such as is the wheat. ’ Chrysostom said: ‘As a moth gnaws a garment, so doth Envy consume a man, to be a living anatomy, a skeleton, to be a lean and pale carcass, quickened with a fiend. Envy is devilish, and absolutely inconsistent with the highest life
Beriah - In fellowship; in Envy
Onde - ) Hatred; fury; Envy
Envying - ) of Envy...
Envious - Feeling or harboring Envy repining or feeling uneasiness, at a view of the excellence, prosperity or happiness of another pained by the desire of possessing some superior good which another possesses, and usually disposed to deprive him of that good, to lessen it or to depreciate it in common estimation. Tinctured with Envy as an envious disposition. Excited or directed by Envy as an envious attack
Begrudge - ) To grudge; to Envy the possession of
Envy - Envy inevitably leads to personal harm and debilitation, affecting one's physical, spiritual, and emotional well-being (Job 5:2 ; Proverbs 14:30 ). ...
Envy manifests the insidiousness of sin and human depravity apart from the intervention of God's redeeming grace. As a sin of the flesh, Envy characterizes the lives of the unregenerate. Envy is one of the traits of the Christian's former way of life (Romans 13:8-14 ; Titus 3:3 ). Those who practice Envy and strife are barred from the kingdom of heaven (Galatians 5:19-26 ). Indeed, the unregenerate nature ever tends toward Envy, manifesting the unbeliever's rejection of God, his truth, and his will for human conduct (James 3:14,16 ). Envy is listed among the sins of the flesh that must be conquered through the power of the Holy Spirit (1Col 3:3; 2Col 12:20; 1 Peter 2:1 ). "Do not let your heart Envy sinners, but always be zealous for the fear of the Lord" (Proverbs 23:17 ). Love is to have majesty over Envy (1 Corinthians 13:4 ). In the time of Messiah's earthly ministry it was the Envy of the Jews that led to the rejection and betrayal of Jesus into the hands of Pilate for crucifixion (Matthew 27:18 ). ...
Paul points out how the good news of the gospel was preached at times out of Envy and strife (Philippians 1:15 ). There were other times, however, that false teaching led to controversy and Envy among the people of God (1 Timothy 6:4 ). Loving and consecrated devotion to Christ and his kingdom dissipates the sins of Envy and jealousy
Envy - Old Testament wisdom frequently warns against Envying the arrogant (Psalm 73:3 ), the violent (Proverbs 3:31 ), or the wicked (Psalm 37:1 ; Proverbs 24:1 ,Proverbs 24:1,24:19 ). In the New Testament Envy is a common member of vice lists as that which comes out of the person and defiles (Mark 7:22 ), as a characteristic of humanity in rebellion to God (Romans 1:29 ), as a fruit of the flesh (Galatians 5:21 ), as a characteristic of unregenerate life (Titus 3:3 ) and as a trait of false teachers (1 Timothy 6:4 ). Envy (sometimes translated jealousy by modern translations) was the motive leading to the arrest of Jesus (Matthew 27:18 ; Mark 15:10 ) and to opposition to the gospel in Acts (Acts 5:17 , Acts 13:45 ; Acts 17:5 ). Christians are called to avoid Envy (Galatians 5:26 ; 1 Peter 2:1 ). ...
Envy is sometimes a motive for doing good. The Preacher was disillusioned that hard work and skill were the result of Envying another (Ecclesiastes 4:4 ). Paul was, however, able to rejoice that the gospel was preached even if the motive were Envy (Philippians 1:15 ). ...
The KJV rightly understood the difficult text in James 4:5 , recognizing that it is a characteristic of the human spirit that it “lusteth to Envy”. Contrary to modern translations, the Greek word used for Envy here (phthonos ) is always used in a negative sense, never in the positive sense of God's jealousy (Greek zealos )
Askant - ) Sideways; obliquely; with a side glance; with disdain, Envy, or suspicion
Envy, Envying - A — 1: φθόνος (Strong's #5355 — Noun Masculine — phthonos — fthon'-os ) "envy," is the feeling of displeasure produced by witnessing or hearing of the advantage or prosperity of others; this evil sense always attaches to this word, Matthew 27:18 ; Mark 15:10 ; Romans 1:29 ; Galatians 5:21 ; Philippians 1:15 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Titus 3:3 ; 1 Peter 2:1 ; so in James 4:5 , where the question is rhetorical and strongly remonstrative, signifying that the Spirit (or spirit) which God made to dwell in us was certainly not so bestowed that we should be guilty of "envy. " ...
Note: Zelos, "zeal or jealousy," translated "envy" in the AV, in Acts 13:45 ; Romans 13:13 ; 1 Corinthians 3:3 ; 2 Corinthians 12:20 ; James 3:14,16 , is to be distinguished from phthonos, and, apart from the meanings "zeal" and "indignation," is always translated "jealousy" in the RV. The distinction lies in this, that "envy" desires to deprive another of what he has, "jealousy" desires to have the same or the same sort of thing for itself. ...
B — 1: φθονέω (Strong's #5354 — Verb — phthoneo — fthon-eh'-o ) "to Envy" (akin to A. ...
B — 2: ζηλόω (Strong's #2206 — Verb — zeloo — dzay-lo'-o ) denotes "to be zealous, moved with jealousy," Acts 7:9 ; 17:5 , RV, "moved with jealousy" (AV, "moved with Envy"); both have "envieth" in 1 Corinthians 13:4
Capital Sins - In Catholicism, the seven causes of all sin: pride, covetousness, lust, anger, gluttony, Envy, sloth...
Enviable - ) Fitted to excite Envy; capable of awakening an ardent desire to posses or to resemble
Evil-Eyed - ) Possessed of the supposed evil eye; also, looking with Envy, jealousy, or bad design; malicious
Envy (2) - ENVY—. He perceived (ἐγίνωσκε, Mark 15:10) the underlying feeling to be Envy. A comparison of the two feelings, jealousy and Envy, readily shows the distinctive character of each: ‘Jealousy is the malign feeling which is often had toward a rival, or possible rival, for the possession of that which we greatly desire, as in love or ambition. Envy is a similar feeling toward one, whether rival or not, who already possesses that which we greatly desire. Jealousy is enmity prompted by fear; Envy is enmity prompted by covetousness’ (Century Dictionary, s. ‘Envy’). ‘Envy is only a malignant, selfish hunger, casting its evil eye on the elevation or supposed happiness of others’ (Bushnell, ib. This citation from Plato shows that there may be a genetic relation between jealousy and Envy, but it does not show that Envy is passive. 11, omitting ὁ δἑ τὸν πλησιον [1] μὴ ἑχειν διὰ τον φθόνον [2]: ‘One that is moved by Envy contrives that his neighbour shall not have the good that he has or seems to have. ’ A careful examination of the use of φθονος in classic Greek authors justifies this statement of Aristotle, and reveals that it means the same active malignant feeling as is expressed in modern English by the word ‘envy. The most noteworthy instance is in Wisdom of Solomon 2:24 ‘on account of the Envy of the devil, death entered into the world. ’...
Since Envy is an ill-will or malice aroused by the success or good gifts of another, it is the fitting word to designate the motive of the priests who protested their loyalty to Caesar. Envy is not a primary emotion. This occurrence was an attempt to discredit Him with the people, and it showed that Envy had obtained full lodgment in their hearts
Enviously - With Envy with malignity excited by the excellence or prosperity of another
Envy - Envy is the feeling of mortification or ill-will occasioned by the contemplation of the superior advantages of others. ...
‘Base Envy withers at another’s joy,...
And hates that excellence it cannot reach’...
(Thomson, Seasons, ‘Spring,’ 283). ...
(1) Those who are given up to a reprobate mind are ‘full of Envy’ (μεστοὺς φθόνου Romans 1:29), and the character of the word is strikingly indicated by the company it keeps, φθόνος and φόνος (‘murder’) going together. Among the works of the flesh are ‘envyings’ (Galatians 5:21), such as are occasioned by quarrels about words (1 Timothy 6:4). Christians can recall the time when they were ‘living in malice and Envy’ (Titus 3:3); and even now they need the injunction to ‘put away all envies’ (1 Peter 2:1); it ill becomes them to be seen ‘provoking one another, Envying one another’ (Galatians 5:26). Paul found, with mingled feelings, some men actually preaching Christ from Envy, moved to evangelical activity by the strange and sinister inspiration of uneasiness and displeasure at his own success as an apostle (Philippians 1:15) (see Faction). If the Revised Version of James 4:5 is correct, φθονέω has its usual evil sense, and this difficult passage means, ‘Do you think that God will implant in us a spirit of Envy, the parent of strife and hate?’ But it may be better to translate, either, ‘For even unto jealous Envy (‘bis zur Eifersucht’ [1]) he longeth for the spirit which he made to dwell in us,’ or ‘That spirit which he made to dwell in us yearneth for us even unto jealous Envy. He longs for the devotion of His people with an intensity which is often present in, as well as with a purity which is mostly absent from, our human Envy. ...
(2) In the Revised Version of Acts 7:9; Acts 13:45; Acts 17:5, Romans 13:13, 1 Corinthians 3:3, James 3:14; James 3:16 ‘jealousy’ is substituted for Authorized Version ‘envy,’ in Acts 5:17 for ‘indignation,’ and in 2 Corinthians 12:20 for ‘emulation. , William Law, who calls Envy ‘the most ungenerous, base, and wicked passion that can enter the heart of man’ (A. 77), denies that any real distinction can be drawn between Envy and emulation. For emulation, when it is defined in its best manner, is nothing else but a refinement upon Envy, or rather the most plausible part of that black and poisonous passion. And though it is easy to separate them in the notion, yet the most acute philosopher, that understands the art of distinguishing ever so well, if he gives himself up to emulation, will certainly find himself deep in Envy. Plato says, ‘Let every man contend in the race without Envy’ (Jowett2, 1875, v. Ben Jonson has the line, ‘This faire aemulation, and no Envy is,’ and Dryden ‘a noble emulation heats your breast
Emulation - ) Jea/ous rivalry; Envy; envious contention
Emulation - Plato makes emulation the daughter of Envy: if so, there is a great difference between the mother and the offspring; the one being a virtue and the other a vice. Emulation admires great actions, and strives to imitate them; Envy refuses them the praises that are their due; emulation is generous, and only thinks of equalling or surpassing a rival; Envy is low, and only seeks to lessen him
Repine - ) To continue pining; to feel inward discontent which preys on the spirits; to indulge in Envy or complaint; to murmur
Affect - , "zeal"), means (a) "to be jealous," Acts 7:9 ; 17:5 ; "to Envy," 1 Corinthians 13:4 ; "to covet," James 4:2 ; in a good sense ("jealous over"), in 2 Corinthians 11:2 ; (b) "to desire earnestly," 1 Corinthians 12:31 ; 14:1,39 ; "to take a warm interest in, to seek zealously," Galatians 4:17,18 , AV, "zealously affect," "to be zealously affected. See COVET , DESIRE , Envy , JEALOUS , ZEALOUS
Diffidence - Johnson, may check resolution and obstruct performance, but compensates its embarrassment by more important advantages; it conciliates the proud, and softens the severe; averts Envy from excellence, and censure from miscarriage
Detraction - ) The act of taking away from the reputation or good name of another; a lessening or cheapening in the estimation of others; the act of depreciating another, from Envy or malice; calumny
Jealousy - Sense 3 approximates Envy. Jealousy, like Envy, is common in vice lists ( Romans 13:13 ; 2 Corinthians 12:20 ; Galatians 5:20-21 ). James regarded jealousy (or bitter Envy) as characteristic of earthy, demonic wisdom (Proverbs 3:14 ) and as the source of all disorder and wickedness (Proverbs 3:16 ). See Envy
Capital Sins - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Capital Vices - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Sins, Capital - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Sins, Seven Deadly - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Seven Deadly Sins - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Vices, Capital - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Envy - ) Chagrin, mortification, discontent, or uneasiness at the sight of another's excellence or good fortune, accompanied with some degree of hatred and a desire to possess equal advantages; malicious grudging; - usually followed by of; as, they did this in Envy of Caesar. ) To feel Envy at or towards; to be envious of; to have a feeling of uneasiness or mortification in regard to (any one), arising from the sight of another's excellence or good fortune and a longing to possess it. ) To feel Envy on account of; to have a feeling of grief or repining, with a longing to possess (some excellence or good fortune of another, or an equal good fortune, etc
Carefully - Envy, how carefully does it look
Jealous, Jealousy - A — 1: ζῆλος (Strong's #2205 — Noun — zelos — dzay'-los ) "zeal, jealousy," is rendered "jealousy" in the RV (AV, "envying") in Romans 13:13 ; 1 Corinthians 3:3 ; James 3:14,16 ; in 2 Corinthians 12:20 (AV, "envyings"); in Galatians 5:20 , RV "jealousies" (AV, "emulations"); in Acts 5:17 (AV, "indignation"); in Acts 13:45 (AV, "envy"); in 2 Corinthians 11:2 it is used in the phrase "with a godly jealousy," lit. See Envy. ...
B — 1: ζηλόω (Strong's #2206 — Verb — zeloo — dzay-lo'-o ) akin to A, "to be jealous, to burn with jealousy" (otherwise, to seek or desire eagerly), is rendered "moved with jealousy," in Acts 7:9 ; 17:5 , RV (AV, "moved with Envy"); in 1 Corinthians 13:4 , "envieth (not)," AV and RV; in James 4:2 , RV marg
Disturb - ) To agitate the mind of; to deprive of tranquillity; to disquiet; to render uneasy; as, a person is disturbed by receiving an insult, or his mind is disturbed by Envy
Jaundice - ) To affect with jaundice; to color by prejudice or Envy; to prejudice
Sins Against the Holy Spirit - They are ...
despair of one's salvation
presumption of God's mercy
impugning the known truths of faith
envy of another's spiritual good
obstinacy in sin
final impenitence
Although no sin is absolutely unpardonable, those who sin against the Holy Ghost stubbornly resist the influence of grace and do not wish to repent
Wickedness, Spirits of - The Envy of Satan and his fallen hosts conspires against God and His reign over the souls of men
Cruelty - Inhumanity a savage or barbarous disposition or temper, which is gratified in giving unnecessary pain or distress to others barbarity applied to persons as the cruelty of savages the cruelty and Envy of the people
Sadness - The proper object of sadness is one's own pain or loss, as distinct from that of pity which is sorrow for another's pain or loss, and from that of Envy which is sorrow at another's good
Evil, Powers of - Since original sin is ascribed to the instigation of the devil: "By the Envy of the devil, death came into the world" (Wisdom of Solomon 2), and according to Saint Paul (Ephesians 6), the evil spirits are the most dangerous enemies of our souls, the real powers of evil in the world are the fallen angels
Brag - ) To talk about one's self, or things pertaining to one's self, in a manner intended to excite admiration, Envy, or wonder; to talk boastfully; to boast; - often followed by of; as, to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money, or of the great things one intends to do
Grudge - To be discontented at another's enjoyments or advantages to Envy one the possession or happiness which we desire for ourselves
Joseph - As the oldest son of his favored wife, Jacob loved him dearly and gave him preferential treatment, causing Joseph's brothers to Envy him and sell him into slavery
Jealousy - Jealousy is nearly allied to Envy, for jealousy, before a good is lost by ourselves, is converted into Envy, after it is obtained by others
Contentment - It is opposed to Envy (James 3:16 ), avarice (Hebrews 13:5 ), ambition (Proverbs 13:10 ), anxiety (Matthew 6:25,34 ), and repining (1 Corinthians 10:10 )
Rudge - ) To look upon with desire to possess or to appropriate; to Envy (one) the possession of; to begrudge; to covet; to give with reluctance; to desire to get back again; - followed by the direct object only, or by both the direct and indirect objects
Abel - ...
In Envy and anger, Cain killed Abel (Genesis 4:8)
Envy - The chief grounds of Envy may be reduced to three: accomplishments of mind; advantages of birth, rank, and fortune; and superior success in worldly pursuits. Let us learn reverence and submission to that divine government which has appointed to every one such a condition as is fittest for him to possess; let us consider how opposite the Christian spirit is to Envy; above all, let us offer up our prayers to the Almighty, that he would purify our hearts from a passion which is so base and so criminal
Mar - Ire, Envy and despair ...
Marr'd all his borrow'd visage
Affection - ; the malevolent affections, hatred, Envy, etc
Lust - The spirit that dwelleth in us lusteth to Envy
Flee, Fled - ), besides its literal significance, is used metaphorically, (a) transitively, of "fleeing" fornication, 1 Corinthians 6:18 ; idolatry, 1 Corinthians 10:14 ; evil doctrine, questionings, disputes of words, Envy, strife, railings, evil surmisings, wranglings, and the love of money, 1 Timothy 6:11 ; youthful lusts, 2 Timothy 2:22 ; (b) intransitively, of the "flight" of physical matter, Revelation 16:20 ; 20:11 ; of death, Revelation 9:6
Appetite - Appetites are passions directed to general objects, as the appetite for fame, glory or riches in distinction from passions directed to some particular objects, which retain their proper name, as the passion of love, Envy or gratitude
Choose - Envy not the oppressor, and choose none of his ways
Zeal - Sometimes it is taken for Envy: so we render it, Acts 5:17 , where we read, "The high priest, and all that were with him, were filled with Envy," επλησθησαν ζηλου : although it might as well be rendered, "were filled with zeal
Eli - Frederick Robertson, in his able apology for Eli, makes a great deal of the total absence of Envy in Eli. My tongue may be cleaving to the roof of my mouth with Envy; I may be as blind with Envy as Eli was blind with old age; the hair may have fallen off my head till I am bald with Envy-and yet no man about me may so much as guess it. What Eli is to be praised for is this-not that he felt no Envy of Samuel; but that, feeling Envy every day, as he could not fail to feel it, he kept his Envy down, and did not let it come out in his treatment of Samuel. Of course Eli had Envy of Samuel; all men have Envy in their hearts who are placed by God in Eli's circumstances, and it is misleading and mischievous in the last degree in any preacher to say anything else. God alone could say whether Eli had Envy or not. The point with God is not whether I have Envy or not; but it is this, how I deal with the Envy that He knows I have. All that my fellow-men can see in me is not the Envy of my heart, but that of my life. If the Baptist had no Envy and no jealousy of his fast-rising Cousin, then he has all that the less praise for his noble reply to his envious and jealous disciples. But if John had no such Envy and no such jealousy himself as his disciples had on his account, then he was not a man of like passions as we are. ...
Not only had Eli, with all his Envy, a very real and a very deep love for little Samuel; but along with that, and kept alive by that, he had a real, a living, and a deep faith in God, and in God's voices and visions and answers to men
Candour - Is a disposition to form a fair and impartial judgment on the opinions and actions of others; or a temper of mind unsoured by Envy, unruffled by malice, and unseduced by prejudice; sweet without weakness, and impartial without rigour
Judging Rash - It often evidences our pride, Envy, and bigotry
Satan - By collecting the passages where Satan, or the devil, is mentioned, it may be concluded, that he fell from heaven with his company; that God cast him down from thence for the punishment of his pride; that by his Envy and malice, sin, death, and all other evils came into the world; that, by the permission of God, he exercises a sort of government in the world over subordinate apostate angels like himself; that God makes use of him to prove good men, and chastise bad ones; that he is a lying spirit in the mouth of false prophets and seducers; that it is he, or his agents, that torment or possess men, and inspire them with evil designs, as when he suggested to David, the numbering of the people, to Judas to betray his Lord and Master, and to Ananias and Sapphira to conceal the price of their field; that he is full of rage like a roaring lion, and of subtlety like a serpent, to tempt, to betray, to destroy, and involve us in guilt and wickedness; that his power and malice are restrained within certain limits, and controlled by the will of God; in a word, that he is an enemy to God and man, and uses his utmost endeavours to rob God of his glory, and men of their souls
Zeal - Zeal is always in the NT the translation of the same word, ζῆλος, ζηλωτής, and always in a good sense; the bad sense is translated by ‘envy’. Its contemporary use was chiefly in a bad sense; it stood for Envy, and as a proper noun it furnished the party name that covered a very pernicious patriotism (Ζηλωταί). ) come spiritual conceit, the idea that we have ‘whereof to glory’ (Romans 4:2) even toward God; the showy religionism of the Pharisees (Matthew 23:5); the love ‘to have the pre-eminence’ (3 John 1:9), and that Envy which is ‘the rottenness of the bones’ (Proverbs 14:30)
Covetousness - Woodruff...
See also Envy ...
...
Contentment - It stands opposed to Envy, James 3:16
World - When we Envy those who are more fortunate and more favoured by the world than we are
Eye - An evil eye implies Envy ( Mark 7:22 ; cf
Shade - Envy will merit, as its shade, pursue
Reserve - Is knowledge so despis'd? or Envy, or what reserve forbids to taste? ...
4
Jealousy - Jealousy in the bad sense is Envy – the feeling of resentment or hate that people have towards those who have more influence, power, ability, status, fame or possessions than they (Genesis 30:1; Genesis 37:11; 1 Samuel 18:8-9; Job 5:2; Psalms 106:16; Matthew 27:18; Acts 5:17; 1 John 3:12)
Bashan - "Why leap ye, ye high hills?" namely, with Envy. Or translate, "Why do ye look with suspicion and Envy?" namely, at God's hill, Zion, which He hath raised to so high a spiritual elevation above you
the Labourer With the Evil Eye - Even if you were a perfect stranger to me; even if I had never seen you before, I would undertake to tell to all men the name of the man you both Envy and hate, if I were near enough to see your eye when your rival is being praised and rewarded in your presence. For Envy, like love, will out. '...
Envy so parched my blood, that had I seenA fellow man made joyous, thou hadst mark'dA livid paleness overspread my cheek. Instead of there being no Envy among the disciples of Jesus Christ, and among those who labour in His Father's vineyard, as this stupid old annotator would have us believe; instead of that, the true hellishness of Envy is never tasted by any man till he is far up in the kingdom of heaven, and is full of its mind and spirit. Dante was far up on his way to Paradise when the fine dialogue on Envy and on love took place. Dante sounds his deepest depths in his heart-searching cantos on Envy, even as his most seraphic flights are taken in his cantos on love
Full - ...
A — 2: μεστός (Strong's #3324 — Adjective — mestos — mes-tos' ) probably akin to a root signifying "to measure," hence conveys the sense of "having full measure," (a) of material things, a vessel, John 19:29 ; a net, John 21:11 ; (b) metaphorically, of thoughts and feelings, exercised (1) in evil things, hypocrisy, Matthew 23:28 ; Envy, murder, strife, deceit, malignity, Romans 1:29 ; the utterances of the tongue, James 3:8 ; adultery, 2 Peter 2:14 ; (2) in virtues, goodness, Romans 15:14 ; mercy, etc
Exorcism - Then follow the litanies, psalms, and prayer; after which the exorcist asks the devil his name, and adjures him by the mysteries of the Christian religion not to afflict the person any more; then, laying his right hand on the daemoniac's head, he repeats the form of exorcism, which is this: "I exorcise thee, unclean spirit, in the name of Jesus Christ: tremble, O Satan, thou enemy of the faith, thou foe of mankind, who hast brought death into the world; who hast deprived men of life, and hast rebelled against justice, thou seducer of mankind, thou root of all evil, thou source of avarice, discord, and Envy
Malice - Christians recall the time, before ‘the washing of regeneration,’ when they were ‘living in malice (ἐν κακίᾳ) and Envy’ (Titus 3:3)
Abel - Cain was angry, and filled with Envy, and when he and his brother were in the field together, he took his brother's life
Eye - , Matthew 20:33 ; of God's power of vision, Hebrews 4:13 ; 1 Peter 3:12 ; of Christ in vision, Revelation 1:14 ; 2:18 ; 19:12 ; of the Holy Spirit in the unity of Godhood with Christ, Revelation 5:6 ; (b) metaphorically, of ethical qualities, evil, Matthew 6:23 ; Mark 7:22 (by metonymy, for Envy); singleness of motive, Matthew 6:22 ; Luke 11:34 ; as the instrument of evil desire, "the principal avenue of temptation," 1 John 2:16 ; of adultery, 2 Peter 2:14 ; (c) metaphorically, of mental vision, Matthew 13:15 ; John 12:40 ; Romans 11:8 ; Galatians 3:1 , where the metaphor of the "evil eye" is altered to a different sense from that of bewitching (the posting up or placarding of an "eye" was used as a charm, to prevent mischief); by Gospel-preaching Christ had been, so to speak, placarded before their "eyes;" the question may be paraphrased, "What evil teachers have been malignly fascinating you?;" Ephesians 1:18 , of the "eyes of the heart," as a means of knowledge
Eve - The identification of the serpent with the devil, which was far from the thoughts of the writer of Genesis 3, first appears in Wisdom of Solomon 2:24, ‘But by the Envy of the devil death entered into the world’ (cf
Faction - His presence moved the preachers of the city; it quickened the evangelical pulse; but, while some began to preach Christ in good-will to him (διʼ εὐδοκίαν), others did it through Envy and strife (διὰ φθόνον καί ἔριν), out of faction (έξ ἐριθείας), not purely or sincerely (ἁγνῶς)
Hypatia, Lady in Alexandria - This then was the woman upon whom malicious Envy now made its attack
Eye - , Matthew 20:33 ; of God's power of vision, Hebrews 4:13 ; 1 Peter 3:12 ; of Christ in vision, Revelation 1:14 ; 2:18 ; 19:12 ; of the Holy Spirit in the unity of Godhood with Christ, Revelation 5:6 ; (b) metaphorically, of ethical qualities, evil, Matthew 6:23 ; Mark 7:22 (by metonymy, for Envy); singleness of motive, Matthew 6:22 ; Luke 11:34 ; as the instrument of evil desire, "the principal avenue of temptation," 1 John 2:16 ; of adultery, 2 Peter 2:14 ; (c) metaphorically, of mental vision, Matthew 13:15 ; John 12:40 ; Romans 11:8 ; Galatians 3:1 , where the metaphor of the "evil eye" is altered to a different sense from that of bewitching (the posting up or placarding of an "eye" was used as a charm, to prevent mischief); by Gospel-preaching Christ had been, so to speak, placarded before their "eyes;" the question may be paraphrased, "What evil teachers have been malignly fascinating you?;" Ephesians 1:18 , of the "eyes of the heart," as a means of knowledge
Mary Magdalene - ...
Pride, Envy, anger, intemperance, lasciviousness, covetousness, spiritual sloth-these were Dante's seven scars on his sanctified forehead. He contended against me with great learning and great eloquence that Dante's besetting sin was pride-a towering, satanic, scornful pride, to the contemptuous and complete exclusion of all possible Envy. And I confess it seemed to me that Dante and he together had established the doctrine that any Envy at all is absolutely, and in the nature of things, quite incompatible with such a lofty pride as that was which wholly possessed Dante's heart. But when I came to myself; when I left all books, the very best, about pride and Envy, and when I was led again of God's Holy Spirit into the pandemonium that is in my own heart, I recovered courage, till, tonight, I have my harness on again to fight the battle of divine truth against any man, and all men, and even Dante himself. And the divine truth to me in this matter is this: That in my heart, if not in Dante's, both pride and Envy have their full scope together; and that they never, in the very least, either exclude, or drink up, or narrow down, the dreadful dominion of one another. You must surely know what pride is, and you must all know, still better perhaps, what Envy is, and at whose payments and praises and successes and positions your heart cramps and strangles and excruciates itself
Miriam - Till her wild jealousy kindled her wild pride, and her wild pride her wild, insane, and impious Envy, and then her insane and impious Envy soon led her into her fatal trespass against Moses and against God. There are days, and nights, and weeks, and years of insinustion, and suspicion, and wounded pride, and gnawing Envy all gathered up into a few words, as the manner of Scripture is. 'Hath He not also spoken by us?' And Aaron had pride enough and ambition enough and Envy enough smouldering in his own heart, that when Miriam blew long enough upon it, Aaron's heart also burned up into an answering flame. That is the fruit of all her Envy, and insinuation, and detraction, and slander against her brother and her brother's wife. Look, O Envy-filled men and women, look at your mother with her flesh half consumed upon her as if she had been seven days dead. I can well believe that was the best week for the whole house of Israel till that week came when a Greater than Moses and Aaron and Miriam all put together suffered without the gate for their Envy and for all their other trespasses
Equal - ...
Those who were once his equals, Envy and defame him
Opposition - Though the Roman governor fully realized that this opposition was dictated by Envy, and that Christ was innocent of any thought of treason against the Roman government, yet he was afraid, from motives of personal interest, to give a decision in accordance with his convictions
Satan - "By collecting the passages, " says Cruden, "where Satan, or the devil, is mentioned, it may be observed, that he fell from heaven with all his company; that God cast him down from thence for the punishment of his pride; that, by his Envy and malice, sin, death, and all other evils, came into the world; that, by the permission of God, he exercises a sort of government in the world over his subordinates, over apostate angels like himself; that God makes use of him to prove good men and chastise bad ones; that he is a lying spirit in the mouth of false prophets, seducers, and heretics; that it is he, or some of his, that torment or possess men; that inspire them with evil designs, as he did David, when he suggested to him to number his people; to Judas, to betray his Lord and Master; and to Ananias and Sapphira, to conceal the price of their field
Pride - Pride manifests itself by praising ourselves, adorning our persons, attempting to appear before others in a superior light to what we are; contempt and slander of others; Envy at the excellencies others possess; anxiety to gain applause; distress and rage when slighted; impatience of contradiction, and opposition to God himself
Evil Speaking - Nor out of bad principles or wrong ends; for ill will, contempt, revenge, Envy, to compass our own ends; from wantonness, or negligence, but from pure charity for the good of those to whom or of whom we speak
Great - The poor Envy the great, and the great despise the poor
Injury - By doing him a mischief, without any advantage to ourselves, through Envy and malice
Bone - ...
Proverbs 14:30 (a) Envy is compared to a disease which destroys the very foundations of faith and leaves the person spiritually sick and weak. Envy has the same effect on the soul
Hate, Hatred - Conflict, jealousy, and Envy often result in animosity, separation, revenge, and even murder (Genesis 26:27 ; Matthew 5:43-44 ; Judges 11:7 ; 2Samuel 13:15,2 Samuel 13:22 )
Anthropomorphitae - Anthropomorphism is always connected with anthropopathism (from ἄνθρωπος and πάθος passion) which ascribes to God human passions and affections such as wrath anger Envy jealousy pity repentance
Sheol - ...
Unlike this world, Sheol is devoid of love, hate, Envy, work, thought, knowledge, and wisdom (Ecclesiastes 9:6,10 )
Daniel - ...
After the capture of Babylon by the Medes and Persians, under Cyaxares and Cyrus, Daniel was continued in all his high employments, and enjoyed the favor of these princes until his death, except at one short interval, when the Envy of the other officers prevailed on the king of the other officers prevailed on the king to cast him into the lion's den, an act which recoiled on his foes to their own destruction
Covet, Covetous, Covetousness - See AFFECT , DESIRE , Envy , JEALOUS , ZEALOUS
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - And they will feel toward me and toward my sons just the same suspicion, and jealousy, and Envy, and hatred, and ill-will, that I feel toward them. Even if Christ had asked it of her, she would have shrunk from exposing her two sons to the Envy and the anger and the detraction of all the ten, and of many more besides. But instead of that, this cruel woman to her own flesh and blood was for exposing her two sons to every possible shaft and spear of Envy, and anger, and ill-will, and injury. 'How great they will be, if I can help it,' the heartless creature talked to herself and said: 'What titles they will wear! What power they will exercise! And how all Galilee will hear of it, and how they will all Envy Salome!' Till she said: 'Leave it to me, my sons; leave it to me
Slander - ...
It is an assemblage of an iniquity, a secret pride, which discovers to us the mote in our brother's eye, but hides the beam which is in our own; a mean Envy, which, hurt at the talents or prosperity of others, makes them the subjects of its censures, and studies to dim the splendour of whatever outshines itself; a disguised hatred, which sheds in its speeches the hidden venom of the heart; an unworthy duplicity which praises to the face, and tears in pieces behind the back; a shameful levity, which has no command over itself or words, and often sacrifices both fortune and comfort to the imprudence of an amusing conversation; a deliberate barbarity, which goes to pierce an absent brother; a scandal, where we become a subject of shame and sin to those who listen to us; an injustice, where we ravish from our brother what is dearest to him
Cheerfulness - Are there those who preach Christ out of Envy and contentiousness? No matter, Christ is being preached (Philippians 1:15-18)
Fool, Foolishness, And Folly - The characteristics of folly include thoughtlessness, the pursuit of unbridled aspirations, and a life-style characterized by Envy, greed, and pride
Humility - His spirit may be full of Envy instead of humility
Abel - Envy of the godly was "the way of Cain" (Judges 1:11)
Arbitration - This truth finds full expression in the Epistles, where peace, the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22), and the concomitant of righteousness, is contrasted with the strife and Envy of sin, and is noted as a mark of the kingdom of God, who is the God of peace
Nestorians - The great Nestorian pontiffs who form the opposite party, and who have, since 1559, been distinguished by the general denomination of Elias, and reside constantly at Mousul, look with a hostile eye on this little patriarch; but since 1617 the bishops of Ormus have been in so low and declining a state, both in opulence and credit, that they are no longer in a condition to excite the Envy of their brethren at Mousul, whose spiritual dominion is very extensive, taking in great part of Asia, and comprehending within its circuit the Arabian Nestorians, as also the Christians of St
Salvation - It is to dwell for ever in a place, where no objects of pity or compassion, of anger or Envy, of hatred or distrust, are to be found; but where all will increase the happiness of each other, by mutual love and kindness
Captivity - Both Judah and Israel being removed from "the lot of their inheritance" in Canaan, and dispersed among strangers, the various tribes would naturally amalgamate with each other, the Envy of Judah and Ephraim would depart, and the memory of Abraham, Moses, and David would revive, Ezra 6:16,17 8:35 Ezekiel 37:26-28
Move, Moved, Mover, Moving, Unmovable - (5) See also COMPASSION , Envy , FEAR , INDIGNATION
Isaac - Isaac’s prosperity aroused the Envy of the Philistine herdsmen ( Genesis 26:20 f
Godly, Godliness - He has an unhealthy interest in controversies and quarrels about words that result in Envy, strife, malicious talk, evil suspicions, and constant friction between men of corrupt mind, who have been robbed of the truth and who think that godliness is a means to financial gain" (1 Timothy 6:3-5 )
Ear - Its actual co-operation with the eye is therefore a more effective rebuke to the Envy springing from Corinthian individualism
Lie - Envy lies between beings equal in nature, though unequal in circumstances
Joseph - He was the beloved one of his father: this with the intimations given to him of his future position, destined for him by God in the midst of his family, stirred up the Envy of his brethren and resulted in his being sold to the Gentiles: as the Lord was hated by His brethren the Jews, and sold by one of them
Worldliness - Successful achievement, the possession of external wealth, or still more of personal gifts and qualities which are an object of desire and Envy to others, produce a feeling and attitude of arrogant superiority towards one’s fellows, and of self-idolatry in relation to God. And here also, the self-satisfaction which is produced by the sense of possession has its negative counterpart in the no less egotistical discontent and Envy which are excited by the consciousness of defect (1 Timothy 6:4, Titus 3:3, 1 John 3:15)
Joseph - This and dreams which showed his rule over his family inspired the Envy of his brothers, who sold Joseph to a caravan of Ishmaelites (Genesis 37:1 )
Helena, Companion of Simon Magus - But after she had produced them, she was detained by them through Envy
Live - ...
7: διάγω (Strong's #1236 — Verb — diago — dee-ag'-o ) is used of time in the sense of passing a life, 1 Timothy 2:2 , "(that) we may lead (a tranquil and quiet, RV) life;" Titus 3:3 , "living (in malice and Envy)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - ...
The Testament of Simeon (‘concerning Envy,’ β). He warns against the spirit of deceit and Envy; it wears away the envier and prompts to murder. After two years’ fasting he learnt the remedy-to flee to the Lord; then the evil spirit flees, the envier’s mind is lightened, and he sympathizes with the object of his Envy (iii. ’ Love expels Envy with all its distracting power (iv. Still, if they forswear Envy and stiff-neckedness, Simeon shall flourish and spread far in the persons of his posterity (vi
Joseph - ...
As Joseph was the beloved son of Jacob, and distinguished by his father with special tokens, of his affection, and which excited the Envy of his brethren; so Christ, the beloved and only begotten son of God, by means of that distinguishing token of JEHOVAH, in setting him up, the Head of his body the church, and giving him a kingdom, in his glorious character of Mediator, called forth, as is most generally believed, that war we read of in heaven in the original rebellion of angels
Ambition - , as Trench points out, the use of ὀφθαλμὸς πονηρός [2] for ‘envy’)
Out - ...
So we say, a thing is done out of Envy, spite or ambition
Joseph - ...
Joseph's coat of many colours was like to have been his winding-sheet, such was the Envy and the hatred of his half-brothers at Rachel's well-favoured, richly-talented, and over-ornamented son. The patriarchs, moved with Envy, says Stephen in the Acts, sold Joseph into Egypt And Jacob, on his death-bed, when he was blessing Joseph, said of him that the archers had hated him, and had shot their arrows at him, and had sorely wounded him. It is usual for mankind, says Josephus on the text, to Envy their nearest relatives and their best friends for their eminence and for their prosperity
Joshua - The mystical interpretation here tells us that pride was the sin of the Amorite, and Envy the sin of the Hittite, and wrath of the Perizzite, and gluttony and lechery of the Girgashite and the Hivite, while covetousness and sloth were the corruptions of the Canaanite and the Jebusite. And then that same method of interpretation passes on to this, that many young men when they first enter on their inexperience of sanctification are cheated into sparing some of their pride under this disguise, and some of their Envy under that. Still, just as Joshua put the Gibeonites to hew wood and draw water for the altar of the Lord when he could not root them out, so we may turn the remnants of our pride, and Envy, and ill-will, and gluttony, and sloth to this same good use. Are you yourselves to be, and are you to bring up your children after you to be, Amorites, and Hittites, and Hivites, and Canaanites, and Jebusites in the land? Are you to let ambition, and Envy, and pride, and anger, and self-will rule in your hearts and be your household gods? No! Never, never! Not so long as you have still this day in your choice for yourselves and for your households the Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, and abundant in goodness and truth
Angel - ...
Some think Envy, others unbelief; but most suppose it was pride
Job, Book of - --
One question could be raised by Envy: may not the goodness which secures such direct and tangible rewards be a refined form of selfishness? Satan, the accusing angel, suggests the doubt, "Doth Job fear God for nought ?" and asserts boldly that if those external blessings were withdrawn, Job would cast off his allegiance" he will curse thee to thy face
Abraham - O!-you start up and exclaim: O! if my lot had only been cast in Galilee, or in Samaria, or in Judea, or in Jerusalem! O! you cry, how you Envy the men and the women to whom the Father will say, Inasmuch as ye did it to Him, ye did it to Me! But, as you still cry that, this scripture comes up into my mind. Abraham believed the word of the Lord in his day; and if we believe in our day through the word of the disciples, then are we Abraham's seed, and need Envy neither Abraham our father nor any of our brethren. Did it ever come to this terrible pass with you, your life or His? And how did that terrible pass end? When was it? Where was it? How long ago was it? When did it take place last? Has it taken place today? Is it taking place every day? Then you need Envy neither Abraham nor any other man
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - Excellence has given way to jealousy and Envy (iii. Envy and ill-will always result in suffering. These examples ought to warn us who have to face the same expression of the world’s Envy to be free from Envy ourselves
John the Baptist - The most envious-minded man in all the world does not Envy a lion, or an eagle, or an angel. A beggar does not Envy a king
Fill, Fill up - have this verb in John 19:29 ); a city, with confusion, Acts 19:29 ; a wedding, with guests, Matthew 22:10 ; (2) of persons (only in Luke's writings: (a) with the Holy Spirit, Luke 1:15,41,67 ; Acts 2:4 ; 4:8,31 ; 9:17 ; 13:9 ; (b) with emotions: wrath, Luke 4:28 ; fear, Luke 5:26 ; madness, Luke 6:11 ; wonder, amazement, Acts 3:10 ; jealousy, Acts 5:17 , RV, for AV, "indignation," and Acts 13:45 (AV, "envy")
Child, Children - Thus, Sarah was despised by her more fortunate handmaid Hagar ( Genesis 16:4 ); Rachel, in Envy of Leah, cried, ‘Give me children or else I die’ ( Genesis 30:1 ); Hannah’s rival taunted her to make her fret, because the Lord had shut up her womb ( 1 Samuel 1:6 ); Elisabeth rejoiced when the Lord took away her ‘reproach among men’ ( Luke 1:25 )
Kindness - It came to such as were ‘foolish, disobedient, deceived, serving divers lusts and pleasures, living in malice and Envy, hateful and hating one another
Jealousy (2) - קִנְאָה being at least once rendered θυμός in LXX Septuagint; often it is Envy (Acts 13:45 : so the verb Acts 7:9, Acts 17:5); in this sense, too, it is frequently combined with ἔρις (Romans 13:13, 1 Corinthians 3:3, 2 Corinthians 12:20, Galatians 5:20); only rarely does it denote a keen and affectionate interest (2 Corinthians 7:7; 2 Corinthians 7:11)
Liberality of Sentiment - I set one Paul against a whole army of uninspired men: 'Some preach Christ of good will, and some of Envy and strife
Waldenses - That the Scriptures teach that there is one God, almighty, all-wise, and all-good, who made all things by his goodness; for he formed Adam in his own image and likeness; but that by the Envy of the devil sin entered into the world, and that we are sinners in and by Adam
the Queen of Sheba - ...
...
No; there was neither captiousness nor frivolity in the Queen of Sheba when she came out of her own country, and neither was there detraction, nor depreciation, nor Envy when she returned home. Bishop Lancelot Andrewes has no more private devotion than that is where we come upon him praying to God to be delivered from his Envy of another man's grace
Sanballat - But if ye have bitter Envyings and strife in your hearts, glory not, and lie not against the truth. This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish; for where Envying and strife is, there is confusion and every evil work. The Envy also of Ephraim shall depart, and the adversaries of Judah shall be cut off. Ephraim shall not Envy Judah, and Judah shall not vex Ephraim
Jews - They grew in numbers and wealth, excited the Envy and hatred of the native population, and were persecuted and driven out of the country
Stephanus i., Bishop of Rome - Paul rejoiced at the preaching of the gospel, and recognized it, though preached out of Envy and strife
Saul - As time went on, and as trials and temptations beset Saul, a hard and stony heart, a spirit of rebellion, and pride, and Envy, and jealousy, and despair took possession of Saul, and held possession of Saul to his terrible end. Saul's mad and murderous Envy of David is as clear as day to every man who puts its proper name on what goes on every day in his own evil heart
Samson - But, then, as it always comes into my heart when I read of Samson's total abstinence-...
What boots it at one gate to make defence,And at another to let in the foe?You are making a gallant defence at one gate, but what about all the other gates; and, especially, what about the gates on the other side of the city? You keep, with all diligence, this and that gate of the body, but what about the more deadly gates of the soul? Plutarch tells us of a great Roman who was very brave; but, then, he was very envious of other brave men, and his Envy did himself and them and the state more mischief than if he had been a coward. You do not touch wine, but how do you stand to all Samson's other sins? Death and hell will come still more surely into your hearts through the gates of Envy, and ill-will, and hatred, and pride, and revenge, and malice, and unbelief, and neglect of God in prayer, than at those more yawning gates that all decently living men make a defence at
Titus, Theology of - We lived in malice and Envy, being hated, hateful and hating one another
Satan - Satan had already fallen, and his fall perhaps affected this earth and its creatures, over which he may originally in innocence have been God's vicegerent, hence his Envy of man his successor in the vicegerency (James 1:2-4; Genesis 3:1-14)
Simeon - Some, again, were poisoned against Him by what other people, and people of power, said against Him; some through Envy, and some just because they had once begun to speak against Him, and could never give over what they had once begun to do
Commerce - In the age of Ezekiel, the commerce of Jerusalem was so great, that it gave an occasion of Envy even to the Tyrians themselves, Ezekiel 26:2
Truth - James, as might be expected, associated knowledge of truth with moral qualities such as the grace of meekness, and the absence of bitter Envy and rivalry (James 3:13-14)
Proverbs, the Book of - ...
Warning against Envy at the sinner's seeming prosperity appears (Proverbs 3:31; Proverbs 23:17; Proverbs 24:1; Proverbs 24:19) as in Job
Caracalla, the Nickname of m. Aurelius Severus Antoninus Bassianus - ...
We cannot tell whether he had any higher motives than a mean malice and uneasy Envy in his murder of his brother, and whether the mother, for whose sake he claimed to have done it and whom he would not allow to utter or even listen to a complaint, ever forgave him
Satan - of Wisdom ( Wis 2:24 : ‘by the Envy of the devil death entered into the world’) we already meet with the identification of the Serpent of Genesis 3:1-24 with Satan, which afterwards became a fixed element in belief, and an allusion to the same idea may be detected in the Psalms of Song of Solomon 4:11 , where the prosperous wicked man is said to be ‘like a serpent, to pervert wisdom, speaking with the words of transgressors
Daniel - Envy often follows high office which men so covet; so, by a law cunningly extorted by his enemies from the weak Darius, that none should offer petition to man or god except to the king for 30 days, as though it were a test of loyalty, on pain of being cast into a lions' den, Daniel was cast in and was delivered by God, who thus rewarded his pious faithfulness (Daniel 6)
Fall, the - Cain, with Envy and hatred in his heart, murdered his brother (Genesis 4:1-8 )
Adam - As we go on speaking about this and that man of science, and this and that book of science and of the philosophy of science, the unlettered people who hear us are tempted to Envy us our time and our talents and our books. For, as long as they have Moses and Paul, the Book of Genesis and the Epistle to the Romans, they need Envy no man
Hopkinsians - Self-love produces all the violent passions; Envy, wrath, clamour, and evil speaking: and every thing contrary to the divine law is briefly comprehended in this fruitful source of all iniquity, self-love
Hopkinsians - Self-love produces all the violent passions, Envy, wrath, clamour, and evil speaking; and every thing contrary to the divine law is briefly comprehended in this fruitful source of iniquity, self-love
Eye - By an "evil eye" is meant, Envy, jealousy, grudging, ill- judged parsimony; to turn the eyes on any one, is to regard him and his interests; to find grace in any one's eyes, Ruth 2:10 , is to win his friendship and good will
Lust - ...
It is true also that the passage in James 4:5 -‘the Spirit that dwelleth in us lusteth to Envy’-is now generally understood of the Indwelling Spirit of God, but it was not so understood by the Authorized Version translators. ) gives a long list of evil desires leading to death, but to him strife and Envy are characteristically causative of this result, as in the case of Cain (iv
Esther - What a magnificent and unparalleled opportunity-you dare not deny it-is yours, for your self-control, for the reducing of your pride, for the extermination of your temper, for your humility and your patience, for the forgiving of your injuries, and for hiding your hungry, broken, bleeding heart with God I And what more would you have? Yours is a circle with opportunities in it that an elect angel might well Envy. What an ever-gnawing Envy at that other man
Disease - Somewhat unexpectedly, Job blames unhealthy attitudes of mind for destroying those who know no better, "vexation" ("resentment" NIV), "jealousy" ("envy" NIV, Job 5:2 ; cf
Conscience - This appraisement is ultimately occupied with the incentives that present themselves to the will, in regard to some of which (envy and malice, for instance) there is an Immediate verdict of badness, and in regard to others a verdict of better or worse
Endurance - , Mark 10:22, Luke 16:14), Envy (Matthew 21:38; Matthew 27:18, John 12:10), and hate (Luke 19:14, John 7:7; John 15:18; John 15:24); a rejection characterized in its display by indifference (Luke 14:18 ff
the Woman With the Issue of Blood - And when again your evil heart runs with Envy, and anger, and pride, and ill-will, and unkindness, and all the rest of the bad blood of hell,-all that the more grasp you at Him and at His garment
Discipline - The Christian must put away anger, bitterness, clamour, covetousness, Envy, evil-speaking, falsehood, fornication, guile, hypocrisy, malice, railing, shameful speaking, uncleanness, wrath (Ephesians 4:17-32, 1618090179_1; cf
Abel - ...
...
The blood of Christ! O my brethren, what blood the blood of Christ must be! What wonderful, what wonder-working blood! What amazing blood! How can even the blood of Christ atone for, and make amends to God and man for, all our Envy, and malice, and murder of men's bodies, souls, and reputations? The more I think of that-I do not know, I cannot tell, I cannot imagine
Medicine - It might also be caused by human Envy ( Job 5:2 ), or by bodily excess ( Sir 37:30-31 ), but even so its vera causa was God’s direct authorization
Ishmael - Ishmael's royal descent fired his Envy and ambition; hence, he lent a ready ear to the plot proposed by the ancient foe of Judah
Person, Personhood - The whole spectrum of emotions is attributed to the heartpositive emotions like love, loyalty, joy, comfort and negative ones like grief, Envy, anger
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - And who would blame you for all that solicitude? Who would say that you were anxious over much? We would all Envy you for your high honour, but we would all be thankful that we had not to go through your ordeal
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - Suppose all your malicious thoughts about us told, and all your secret hatred of us, and all your Envy of this man and that man, naming him, and for what
Samuel, First Book of - ...
Saul set David over the men of war, but the praises of the women, "Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands," raised his Envy, and he eyed him from that day and attempted to kill him
Aaron - "...
After the tabernacle was built, Moses consecrated Aaron to the high priesthood with the holy oil, and invested him with his priestly robes,—his garments "of glory and beauty;" but Aaron's weakness was again manifested in concurring with Miriam, his sister, to censure and oppose Moses, through Envy
Fall - 2 Samuel 24:1, where it is the Lord who moves David to number the people), yet it is not till we come to Wisdom of Solomon 2:24 that he is identified with the serpent who tempted Eve: ‘But by the Envy of the devil death entered into the world, and they that are of his portion mate trial thereof. ’ The connexion between death and the woman’s sin stated in 25:24 and between death and the devil’s Envy affirmed in Wisdom of Solomon 2:24 has already been referred to
the Blind Leaders of the Blind - The Scribes and the Pharisees had eyes enough to preach against adultery and murder when these things once came out of the hearts of the people; but they were as blind as moles to the real roots of these things, as well as to the kindred roots of pride, and covetousness, and Envy, and deceit, of which their own hearts, and the hearts of all their blinded hearers, were full
the Angel of the Church of Ephesus - And he who has been elected of God to such an office as that in Ephesus, or in Edinburgh, or anywhere else, has no need to Envy the most shining angel in all the seven heavens
Lazarus - "...
"This last and greatest of His miracles was to raise our Lord much estimation," says the distinguished John Donne, "but (for they always accompany one another) it was to raise both Him and Lazarus much Envy also
Naaman - And her firstborn is your pride, and your anger, and your Envy, and your ill-will, and your hatred of so many men around you
Aaron - His high dignity as interpreter of Moses, and worker of the appointed "signs in the sight of the people," and his investiture with the hereditary high priesthood, a dignity which Moses did not share, account naturally for his having once harbored Envy, and joined with Miriam in her jealousy of Moses' Ethiopian wife, when they said: "Hath the Lord spoken only by Moses? Hath He not spoken also by us?" (Compare Numbers 12:1-2 with Exodus 15:20
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - A little of the leaven of suspicion, and of jealousy, and of Envy-with illustrations and instances taken from yourself
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - It is when I take my own heart, with all its wickedness-working self-love, and with all its self-seeking in everything, and self-serving out of everything and every one: with all its deceitfulness, and disingenuousness, and Envy, and jealousy, and grudging, and malevolence, and lay it alongside of the holy heart of my Lord,-it is that that does it
the Disobedient Prophet - '...
What is it that makes the decrepit old prophet of Bethel post at such a pace after the man of God who is on his way home to Judah? Has his conscience at last been awakened? Have the tidings of his delighted sons filled the poor old time-server with bitter remorse for his fat table and for his dumb pulpit? Or, is it deadly Envy and revenge at the man who has so stolen his sons' hearts that day till they are about to set off to Judah to go to school to this man of God? It is too late now for him to command his sons' reverence and love
Enoch - Every step you take out of an angry heart and into a meek heart; out of Envy and into admiration and honour; out of ill-will and into good-will;-on the spot your heavenly Father seeth you and loveth you, and sayeth to His angels, Hast thou considered My new servant? Enoch, on the day his first child was born, just began to lay aside all malice, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil-speakings, and as a new-born babe desired the sincere milk of the word that he might grow thereby
Barnabas - And still more instruction and example in his noble absence of all Envy and all jealousy of a man far more gifted, far more successful, and soon to be far more famous than himself
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - The most weighty charges were that he had anathematized Cyril and charged him with heresy; that he was a Nestorian; and especially that at Easter 445, in the presence of his clergy, he had spoken the blasphemous words, "I do not Envy Christ His becoming God, for I can become God no less than He
Ecclesiastes, Theology of - Further, the motivation to work hard itself is evil because it springs from Envy (4:4)
Ten Commandments - To love one's neighbor is to refuse to surrender to the sin of Envy
Nehemiah - ...
And let it not be overlooked, to their praise, that all the builders builded every man with his sword by his side because of the deadly Envy and ill-will of their enemies round about
Games - Hence the surprising ardour which animated all the states of Greece to imitate the ancient heroes, and encircle their brows with wreaths, which rendered them still more the objects of admiration or Envy to succeeding times, than the victories they had gained, or the laws they had enacted. In the exercise of faith and self-denial he must "cast off the works of darkness," lay aside all malice and guile, hypocrisies, and Envyings, and evil speakings, inordinate affections, and worldly cares, and whatever else might obstruct his holy profession, damp his spirits, and hinder his progress in the paths of righteousness
Temple - ...
This splendid building, which rose like a mount of gold and of snow, and was once the admiration and Envy of the world, has forever passed away
Ethics - To watch each prophet elaborating this argument is to retrace the discipline that ultimately made Jewish ethics the Envy of the ancient world
Angels (2) - 24), ‘without sensuous requirements’ (Yoma, 74b), ‘without hatred, Envy, or jealousy’ (Chag
David - in His Services - And they said one to another, did not our heart burn within us while He talked with us by the way, and while He opened to us the Scriptures?...
O two disciples, on your way that same day to Emmaus, how I Envy you your travelling Companion that day! My heart burns to think of your Divine Companion opening up to you David's Messianic Psalms that memorable day
Election - When Jews in numbers come to seek as their own the righteousness and goodness which they see thus manifested in the lives of Christians, and are stirred up to Envy and emulation by the contemplation of them, the time will be at hand when all Israel-Israel as a nation-shall be saved
Guilt (2) - But the Book of Wisdom (Wisdom of Solomon 2:24) represents death as entering the world through the Envy of the devil, and Sirach (Sirach 25:24) declares that sin originated from a woman, and ‘because of her we all die
David - But secondly, it had the effect of arousing Saul’s Envy; a not wholly unnatural feeling, considering the estimation in which David was held by the people in consequence of his victory; the adage assuredly one of the most ancient authentic fragments of the history of the time ...
‘Saul hath slain his thousands,...
And David his ten thousands’...
was not flattering to one who had, in days gone by, been Israel’s foremost warrior
Aaron - Yes; and who knows what our Master may graciously say to us after He has rewarded Moses for his magnificent talents and for his magnificent services? One thing is sure: we shall be satisfied with what He shall say to us, and we shall have no room left in our hearts wherewith any more to Envy Moses for his god-like gifts and for his god-like services
Righteousness - The quality of incorruption (ἀφθαρσία) and eternity (τὸ ἀΐδιον) they Envy and felicitate God an possessing; the quality of power (τὸ κύριον καὶ τὸ δυνατόν) they dread and fear; they love and honour and revere the deity for his δικαιοσύνη and yet, Plutarch sadly reflects, the first of these three emotions the passion for immortality (‘of which our nature is not capable’), is the strongest, while the divine ἀρέτη, i
Sin - From the selfish heart comes rebellion, godlessness, cursing, lies, slander, Envy, greed, sensuality, and pride (Matthew 12:34-37 ; Romans 1:18-32 )
Government of the Hebrews - Being thus called upon to sustain very different and yet very important offices, they became the subjects of that Envy which would naturally be excited by the honour and the advantages attached to their situation
Hell - ...
‘They showed me there a very terrible place … and all manner of tortures in that place … and there is no light there, but murky fire constantly flameth aloft, and there is a fiery river coming forth, and that whole place is everywhere fire … and those men said to me: This place is prepared for those who dishonour God, who on earth practise … magic-making, enchantments, and devilish witchcrafts, and who boast of their wicked deeds, stealing, lies, calumnies, Envy, rancour, fornication, murder … for all these is prepared this place amongst these, for eternal inheritance’ (cf
Paul - " But when almost the whole city came together the next Sabbath to hear the word of God, Envy of the admission of Gentiles to gospel privileges without being first proselytized to Judaism incited the Jews to blaspheme and to contradict Paul
Hell - ...
‘They showed me there a very terrible place … and all manner of tortures in that place … and there is no light there, but murky fire constantly flameth aloft, and there is a fiery river coming forth, and that whole place is everywhere fire … and those men said to me: This place is prepared for those who dishonour God, who on earth practise … magic-making, enchantments, and devilish witchcrafts, and who boast of their wicked deeds, stealing, lies, calumnies, Envy, rancour, fornication, murder … for all these is prepared this place amongst these, for eternal inheritance’ (cf
Liberius, Bishop of Rome - Baronius, however, condemns him so far as to say that his Envy of Felix and his longing for the adulation to which he had been used at Rome led to his weakness
David - Envy moved Saul under the evil spirit to cast his javelin at him, but twice he eluded it
Terah - And, almost to a certainty, we, today, would have been called the children of faithful and acceptable Abel but for his brother's Envy, and but for that foul and fatal blow in the field
Work - It is also observed that Envy and greed supply the motivation for the work of many (4:4; 6:7)
Peter Epistles of - Clement says that ‘envy’ was the cause of the trouble, and his language doubtless reflects the same popular animosity of which Tacitus speaks
Joseph - Unbelief, along with a secret misgiving that it might prove true after all, and bitter Envy, wrought upon the brothers
Mental Characteristics - Amidst men whose eyes were sharpened by Envy to detect the least fault, and who tried many times to ensnare Him in His words because they despaired of tripping Him in wrong conduct, He threw down the challenge without misgiving: ‘Which of you convicteth me of sin?’ And none dared take it up, either then or later (Mark 14:55): nor in the sixty generations that have passed since then have any such ethical advances been made that, looking back from our present vantage ground, we can point to anything as sin in Him
Paul - Some of the Jews, and many of the Gentiles of both sexes, embraced the Gospel; but the unbelieving Jews, moved with Envy and indignation at the success of St
Paul - Here again, as in Pisidian Antioch, the Envy of the Jews was excited, and the mob assaulted the house of Jason with whom Paul and Silas were staying as guests, and, not finding them, dragged Jason himself and some other brethren before the magistrates
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - Athanasius, the veteran champion of the faith, congratulated Cappadocia on possessing a bishop whom every province might Envy (Ath
Art - The ‘love of beauty,’ he proceeds, ‘is an essential part of all healthy human nature, and though it can long coexist with states of life in many other respects unvirtuous, it is itself wholly good,—the direct adversary of Envy, avarice, mean worldly care, and especially of cruelty
Confession - ) The books above-said teach this, that there is one God, almighty, all- wise, and all-good, who has made all things by his goodness; for he formed Adam in his own image and likeness, but that by the Envy of the devil, and the disobedience of the said Adam, sin has entered into the world, and that we are sinners in Adam and by Adam