What does Enoch mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἑνὼχ the son of Jared and father of Methuselah. 3
חֲנ֑וֹךְ eldest son of Cain. / son of Jared and father of Methuselah whom God took home to heaven without dying. / the city which Cain built and named after himself. / a son of Midian 2
חֲנֽוֹךְ eldest son of Cain. / son of Jared and father of Methuselah whom God took home to heaven without dying. / the city which Cain built and named after himself. / a son of Midian 2
חֲנ֔וֹךְ eldest son of Cain. / son of Jared and father of Methuselah whom God took home to heaven without dying. / the city which Cain built and named after himself. / a son of Midian 2
חֲנ֥וֹךְ eldest son of Cain. / son of Jared and father of Methuselah whom God took home to heaven without dying. / the city which Cain built and named after himself. / a son of Midian 1
לַֽחֲנוֹךְ֙ eldest son of Cain. / son of Jared and father of Methuselah whom God took home to heaven without dying. / the city which Cain built and named after himself. / a son of Midian 1
חֲנ֜וֹךְ eldest son of Cain. / son of Jared and father of Methuselah whom God took home to heaven without dying. / the city which Cain built and named after himself. / a son of Midian 1
חֲנ֖וֹךְ eldest son of Cain. / son of Jared and father of Methuselah whom God took home to heaven without dying. / the city which Cain built and named after himself. / a son of Midian 1

Definitions Related to Enoch

H2585


   1 eldest son of Cain.
   2 son of Jared and father of Methuselah whom God took home to heaven without dying.
   3 the city which Cain built and named after himself.
   4 a son of Midian, the third child.
   5 the eldest son of Reuben.
   Additional Information: n pr m Enoch = “dedicated”Hanoch = “dedicated”.
   

G1802


   1 the son of Jared and father of Methuselah.
   Additional Information: Enoch = “dedicated”.
   

Frequency of Enoch (original languages)

Frequency of Enoch (English)

Dictionary

Chabad Knowledge Base - Enoch
(3138-2773 BCE) Son of Jared. A righteous man who �walked with G-d.� He ascended to heaven alive.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Enoch
Initiated.
The eldest son of Cain (Genesis 4:17 ), who built a city east of Eden in the land of Nod, and called it "after the name of his son Enoch." This is the first "city" mentioned in Scripture.
The son of Jared, and father of Methuselah (Genesis 5:21 ; Luke 3:37 ). His father was one hundred and sixty-two years old when he was born. After the birth of Methuselah, Enoch "walked with God three hundred years" (Genesis 5:22-24 ), when he was translated without tasting death. His whole life on earth was three hundred and sixty-five years. He was the "seventh from Adam" (Jude 1:14 ), as distinguished from the son of Cain, the third from Adam. He is spoken of in the catalogue of Old Testament worthies in the Epistle to the (Hebrews 11:5 ). When he was translated, only Adam, so far as recorded, had as yet died a natural death, and Noah was not yet born. Mention is made of Enoch's prophesying only in Jude 1:14 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Enoch
("consecrated".)
1. Cain's oldest son; and the city (probably a village of rude huts) which he built and named after him (Genesis 4:17-18). The similarity of names in Cain's line and Seth's line is no proof of the persons being identical, for many of the seemingly like names are from distract roots. Moreover, the fewness of names at that early time, and the relationship and occasional intercourse between the families, account for the similarity or identity of the other names. Details are given especially as to Lamech and Enoch, marking the utter distinctness of those so named in the two lines.
2. Son of Jared; father of Methuselah. Seventh from Adam (seven indicating divine completeness, Enoch typifying perfected humanity). As angels fell to the earth by transgression, so this man was raised to heaven by pleasing God (Irenaeus, 4:15, sec. 2). Of Noah and Enoch alone it is written that they "walked with God" (Genesis 5:24; Genesis 6:9); others "walked before God" (Genesis 17:1). But walking with God is a relic of the first paradise when man talked and walked with God in holy familiarity, and an anticipation of the second (Revelation 21:3; Revelation 22:3-4). The secret spring of his walk with God was "faith"; faith was the ground of his" pleasing God" (which answers to "walking with God" in Genesis 5, compare Amos 3:3); his "pleasing God" was the ground of his being "translated that he should not see death" (Hebrews 11:5-6).
"Translation" implies a sudden removal from mortality to immortality without death, such as shall pass over the living saints at Christ's coming (1 Corinthians 15:51-52), of whom Enoch is a type. After the monotonous repetition of the same record of patriarchs, "lived" so many years, "begat sons and daughters, ... and he died," the account of Enoch's walk with God and translation without death stands forth in brighter relief. His years, 365 (the number of days in one year), were fewer, than his predecessors'; but in his fewer years there was that to record which was not in their immensely lengthened years, he moreover begat sons and daughters, and yet found family ties no hindrance to his walking with God as a family man. Nay, it was not until "after he begat Methuselah" that it is written "Enoch walked with God." God's gift of children awakened in him a new love to God and a deeper sense of responsibility.
Enoch in the antediluvian generation, and Elijah in the postdiluvian, witnessed before Christ in their own persons to the truth of the resurrection of the body and its existence in heaven. The fathers mostly made them the two witnesses slain by the beast, but afterward raised to heaven (Revelation 11). This view, if true, would be one answer to the objection against their translation, that "it is appointed unto men once to die" (Hebrews 9:27), and that "death passed upon all men for that all have sinned" (Romans 5:12). Enoch's translation was an appropriate testimony to the truth he announced, "Behold the Lord cometh ... to execute judgment" in the face of a mocking, infidel world. Judges 1:14 stamps with inspired sanction the current TRADITION of the Jews as to Enoch's prophecies. The language "Enoch prophesied, saying," favors tradition rather than the Book of Enoch being the source from whence Jude drew.
So Paul mentions Jannes and Jambres the Egyptian magicians, names drawn from tradition, not from Scripture (2 Timothy 3:8). Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, and others allude to the Book of Enoch Bruce the Abyssinian traveler brought home three Ethiopic copies from Alexandria, which Lawrence translated in 1821. The Ethiopic was translated from the Greek, the Greek from the Hebrew. The Apostolic Constitutions, Origen (contra Celsus), Jerome, and Augustine deny its canonicity.
It vindicates God's government of the world, spiritual and natural, recognizes the Trinity, also Messiah "the Son of man" (the name "Jesus" never occurs), "the Elect One" from eternity, before whom "all kings shall fall down, and on whom they shall fix their hopes," the supreme Judge, who shall punish eternally the wicked and reward the just. If the book belong to the period just before our Lord's coming, it gives an interesting view of believing Jews' opinions concerning Messiah at that time. No sure proof establishes its existence before the Christian era.
3. Third son of Midian, Abraham's son by Keturah (Genesis 25:4).
4. Reuben's oldest son, head of the family of Hanochites (Genesis 46:9; Numbers 26:5). See HANOCH for a fourth Enoch, so the KJV has it.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Enoch
(ee' nawch) Personal name meaning, “dedicated.” 1. The son of Jared taken up to God without dying (Genesis 5:18 ). He became the father of Methuselah. Enoch lived in such close fellowship with God that he was translated into the presence of God without dying. Hebrews 11:5 attributes his translation to faith. According to Jude 1:14 , he prophesied. The name of Enoch is associated with a large body of ancient extra-biblical literature. See Genesis ; Resurrection ; Apocalyptic ; Apocrypha ; Pseudepigrapha .
2. Son of Cain for whom Cain built a city and named it (Genesis 4:17-18 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Enoch
ENOCH (Heb. Chăn ôk ) is the ‘seventh from Adam’ ( Judges 1:14 ) in the Sethite genealogy of Genesis 5:1-32 (see Genesis 5:18-24 ). In the Cainite genealogy of Genesis 4:17 ff. he is the son of Cain, and therefore the third from Adam. The resemblances between the two lists seem to show that they rest on a common tradition, preserved in different forms by J [1] (ch. 4) and P [2] (ch. 5)., though it is not possible to say which version is the more original. The notice which invests the figure of Enoch with its peculiar significance is found in Genesis 5:24 ‘Enoch walked with God; and he was not, for God took him.’ The idea here suggested that because of his perfect fellowship with God this patriarch was ‘translated’ to heaven without tasting death (cf. Sir 44:16 ; Sir 49:14 , Hebrews 11:5 ) appears to have exerted a certain influence on the OT doctrine of immortality (see Psalms 49:15 ; Psalms 73:24 ). A much fuller tradition is presupposed by the remarkable development of the Enoch legend in the Apocalyptic literature, where Enoch appears as a preacher of repentance, a prophet of future events, and the recipient of supernatural knowledge of the secrets of heaven and earth, etc. The origin of this tradition has probably been discovered in a striking Babylonian parallel. The seventh name in the list of ten antediluvian kings given by Berosus is Evedoranchus, which (it seems certain) is a corruption of Enmeduranki, a king of Sippar who was received into the fellowship of Shamash (the sun-god) and Ramman, was initiated into the mysteries of heaven and earth, and became the founder of a guild of priestly diviners. When or how this myth became known to the Jews we cannot tell. A trace of an original connexion with the sun-god has been suspected in the 365 years of Enoch’s life (the number of days in the solar year). At all events it is highly probable that the Babylonian legend contains the germ of the later conception of Enoch as embodied in the apocalyptic Book of Enoch ( c [3] . b.c. 105 64), and the later Book of the Secrets of Enoch, on which see Hastings’ DB [4] i. 705ff. A citation from the Book of Enoch occurs in Judges 1:14 f. (= Ephesians 1:9 , Ephesians 5:4 , 27:2).
J. Skinner.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Enoch
ENOCH.—There is no mention of the patriarch Enoch in the Gospels except as a link in our Lord’s genealogy, Luke 3:37.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Enoch Book of
Introductory.-The Ethiopic Book of Enoch (or 1 Enoch, as it is now more conveniently denominated) is the largest, and, after the canonical Book of Daniel, the most important of the Jewish apocalyptic works which have so recently come to be recognized as supplying most important data for the critical study of NT ideas and phraseology. The Book-or rather the Books-of Enoch the reader will find to be a work of curious complexity and unevenness. It is a wonderful mass of heterogeneous elements; in fact, it is quite a cycle of works in itself-geographical, astronomical, prophetic, moral, and historical. In this medley we find certain recurring notes. The temporary success and triumph of the wicked, idolaters, luxurious, rich, oppressors, rulers, kings, and mighty ones, and the present sufferings of the righteous, are continually contrasted with their future destiny-after death or after judgment, according to the views of the particular author as to the moment at which moral discrimination will begin. Another recurring note is the subservience of natural phenomena to spiritual and quasi-personal forces, which in turn are responsible and as a rule obedient to God. Repeatedly and with dramatic force the unfailing order of Nature is contrasted with the disobedience of man. Yet another recurring feature, and one common to this apocalyptic literature, is the reserving of the visions and the books of Enoch for the last days, for the elect to read and understand. On the other hand, there is ever and anon a baffling change in the presentation of ideas about the Kingdom, the Messiah, the form of the future judgment and life after death. The pictures of the Messianic Kingdom take on a shifting, ever-changing form, in accordance with the views of the author and the particular tribulations under which each individual writer was labouring. Judgment is mediated now by angels of punishment, now by the archangels, or the sword of the righteous or internecine strife, or by the Son of Man, or exercised immediately by God Himself. Darkness and chains and burning fire, valleys and the abyss, loom large in all descriptions of the place and mode of punishment. There is a highly developed angelology, in keeping with the general conception of God’s transcendence, and an equally developed demonology, which is connected with the interest of the various authors in the problem of the seat and origin of evil. The power of prayer-whether that of the angels, the departed holy ones, or the righteous on earth-is recognized, especially in the bringing in of judgment. The space devoted to the calendar, however, and the movements of the heavenly bodies, and the secrets of natural forces, stands in sheer contrast to the NT silence on those subjects.
We cannot close without quoting Charles’s words in his introduction (Book of Enoch, 1912, p. x):
‘In the age to which the Enoch literature belongs there is movement everywhere, and nowhere dogmatic fixity and finality. And though at times the movement may be reactionary, yet the general trend is onward and upward.’ This work is the most important historical memorial ‘of the religious development of Judaism from 200 b.c. to 100 a.d., and particularly of the development of that side or Judaism, to which historically Christendom in large measure owes its existence.’
We have only to take the single example of the unique portrait of the ‘Son of Man’ in the Parables-eternally pre-existent with God, recognized now by the righteous, and hereafter to be owned and adored by all, even His foes-to be assured of the truth of this verdict.
1. Contents.
Section i.: chs. i.-xxxvi.
i-v.-Enoch takes up his parable: God’s coming to judgment to help and bless the righteous and destroy the ungodly (i. 1-9); Nature’s unfailing order (ii. 1-v. 3) contrasted with sinners’ disobedience; a curse on them, but forgiveness, peace, and joy for the elect (v. 4-9).
vi.-xi. (Noachic fragment).-Fall of certain angels, through union with women (vi. 1-vii. 1); birth of giants who devour mankind and drink blood (vii. 2-6). Knowledge of arts, magic, and astronomy imparted by fallen angels (viii. 1-4). Cry of souls of dead for vengeance (viii. 4, ix. 3, 10) heard by the four archangels, who bring their cause before God (ix. 1-11). God sends Uriel to Noah to warn him of approaching Deluge (x. 1-3). Raphael is to bind Azazel in desert in Dudael till judgment day, and heal the earth (x. 4-7); Gabriel to destroy giants by internecine strife (x. 9-10, 15), Michael to bind Semjaza and his associates for seventy generations in valleys of the earth (x. 11-14). All evil is to cease, and the plant of righteousness (i.e. Israel) to appear (x. 16). All the righteous are to escape and live till they beget thousands of children (x. 17), the earth is to yield a thousandfold, all men are to become righteous and adore God (x. 21). Sin and punishment will cease for ever (x. 22), Store-chambers of blessing in heaven will be opened (xi.).
xii-xvi.
A Dream Vision of Enoch.-Enoch is hidden from men (xii. 1) and is sent to the fallen angels (‘Watchers’) with the message: ‘no peace nor forgiveness’ (xii. 4-6), which he delivers to Azazel (xiii. 1, 2) and the others (xiii. 3); they beseech Enoch to write a petition for them (xiii. 4-6); as he reads it he falls asleep and sees visions of chastisement, which he recounts to them (xiii. 7-10). The message of the vision is given in xiv. 1-7; the manner of it in xiv. 8-xvi. 4. He ascends in the vision to heaven, post crystal walls into a crystal house and a greater house beyond, to the blazing throne of the Great Glory (xiv. 20), whom no angel can behold. He entrusts Enoch with the message to the Watchers; they had sinned in taking wives (xv. 3-7); from the dead giants’ bodies proceed evil spirits which, remaining on earth, do all harm with impunity till the Great Judgment (xv. 8-xvi. 1); the Watchers’ doom is repeated (xvi. 2-4).
xvii-xxxvi.
Enoch’s two journeys: through the earth and to Sheol.
(a) xvii.-xix.-Enoch is brought to the ends of the earth and views treasuries of stars, and the winds that uphold heaven (xvii. 1-xviii. 3), and seven mountains of precious stones (xviii. 6), and beyond, a deep abyss of fire (xviii. 11), and further, an utter waste (xviii. 12) with seven stars like burning mountains, bound for ten thousand years for not observing their appointed times (xviii. 13-16). Here stand the fallen angels, whose spirits seduce men to idolatry (xix. 1) and their wives, turned into sirens (xix. 2).-(b) xx-xxxvi.-The seven archangels-Uriel, Raphael, Raguel, Michael, Saraqael, Gabriel, Remiel-and their functions (xx.). Enoch proceeds to chaos and the seven stars and the abyss of xviii. 12-16 (xxi. 1-7), which is the final prison of the fallen angels (xxi. 8-10). Elsewhere in the west he sees a great mountain with three (‘four’ in text) hollow places (=Sheol), to contain men’s souls till the Great Judgment-one for martyrs like Abel and other righteous men, with a bright spring of water (xxii. 5-9), one for unpunished sinners (xxii. 10, 11), one for sinners (who suffered in life), who never rise (xxii. 12-13). Thereafter, still in the west, he sees the fire of the heavenly luminaries (xxiii.), and elsewhere again, beyond a mountain range of fire, seven mountains of precious stones, the central one to be God’s throne on earth, with the tree of life (xxiv. 1-xxv. 3) to be transplanted after the judgment to the holy place, where the righteous shall eat of it and live a long life on earth (xxv. 4-6). In the middle of the earth Enoch sees a holy mountain (Zion) with its surrounding summits and ravines (xxvi.), and the accursed valley (of Hinnom) which is to be the scene of the Last Judgment (xxvii.). Thence he goes east (xxviii-xxxiii.), past fragrant trees and mountains, over the Erythraean Sea and the angel Zotiel (xxxii. 2), to the garden of the righteous, and the Tree of Wisdom, which is fully described (xxxii. 3-6). Thence to the earth’s ends whereon heaven rests, with three portals for the stars in east and west (xxxiii. 3, xxxvi. 2, 3) and three in north and south for the winds (xxxiv. 1-3, xxxvi. 1).
Section ii.: chs. xxxvii.-lxxi.
-The Parables.
xxxvii. 1 commences ‘the second vision … of wisdom’; till the present day such wisdom has never been given as is embodied in these three Parables recounted to those that dwell on the earth (xxxvii. 4, 5).
xxxviii-xliv.
The First Parable.-When the Righteous One appears, where will the sinners’ dwelling be? Then shall the kings and mighty perish and be given into the hands of the righteous and holy (xxxviii.). [1] A whirlwind carries off Enoch to the end of the heavens; he views the dwelling-places of the holy who pray for mankind, and the Righteous One’s abode under the wings of the Lord of Spirits (xxxix. 3-14); an innumerable multitude, and four presences (=archangels)-Michael, Raphael, Gabriel, and Phanuel-and their functions (xl.); heaven’s secrets and weighing of men’s actions (xli. 1, 2); secrets of natural phenomena and sun and moon; their chambers and weighing of the stars (xli. 3-9, xliii. 1, 2, xliv.); the stars stand for the holy who dwell on the earth (xliii. 4). A fragment.-Wisdom goes forth, and finds no dwelling-place among men, so returns to heaven; while unrighteousness is welcomed and remains with men (xlii.).
xlv.-lvii.
-The Second Parable.-The lot of the apostates: the new heaven and earth. Those who deny the name of Lord of Spirits are preserved for judgment (xlv. 1, 2). ‘Mine Elect One’ on throne of glory shall try men’s works; heaven and earth transformed (xlv. 3-6). The Head of Days and Son of Man (xlvi. 1-4) shall put down the kings and the mighty; they have no hope of rising from their graves (xlvi. 5-8). ‘In those days’ the prayer of the righteous united with angelic intercession was heard (xlvii. 1, 2); the Head of Days on the throne of His glory, books of the living opened, vengeance of righteous at hand (xlvii. 3, 4). Enoch sees the inexhaustible fountain of righteousness: ‘at that hour’ the Son of Man was ‘named’ in the presence of the Lord of Spirits; he is a staff to the righteous, the light of the Gentiles: in His name the righteous are saved; kings and mighty are to bum like straw (xlviii.); infinite wisdom and power of the Elect One (xlix.). [2] In those days earth, Sheol, and Abaddon give up what they hold. The Elect One arises, sits on God’s throne, and chooses out the righteous amid universal rejoicing (li.). Enoch sees seven metal mountains (symbols of world-powers): they will serve the Anointed’s dominion (lii. 4), and melt before the Elect One (lii. 6). Next he sees a deep valley with open months, and angels of punishment preparing instruments of Satan to destroy the kings and the mighty (liii. 1-5); after this the Righteous and Elect One shall cause the house of His congregation to appear (liii. 6). In another part he sees a deep valley with burning fire; here the kings and the mighty are cast in (liv. 1, 2), and iron chains made for Azazel’s hosts, whom four archangels will cast into the burning furnace on that great day (liv. 3-6), after judgment by the Elect One (Leviticus 3, 4); angels of punishment with scourged are seen proceeding to cast the Watchers’ children into the abyss (lvi. 1-4). [3]
lviii.-lxxi.
-The Third Parable.-Endless light and life for righteous (lviii.). [4] [5]
Third Parable resumed.-The angels are seen with long cords; they go to measure Paradise (lxx. 3) and recover all the righteous dead from sea or desert (lxi. 1-5); the Lord of Spirits places the Elect One on the throne of glory to judge (lxi 6-9); all the heavenly hosts, Cherubim, Seraphim, and Ophannim, angels of power and of principalities, the Elect One, the powers on earth and over water, the elect who dwell in the garden of life, and all flesh shall join in praising God (lxi. 10-13). The kings and the mighty are called upon to recognize the Elect One, now seated on the throne; pained and terrified, they glorify God (lxii. 1-6) and adore the Son of Man; but are delivered to the angels for punishment (lxii. 9-12); the righteous had previously known the Son of Man, though hidden from the beginning, and shall eat and lie down and rise up for ever with Him, and be clothed with garments of glory and of life (lxii. 7, 8, 13-16); unavailing repentance and confession of the kings and the mighty (lxiii.); vision of fallen angels in Prison (lxiv.). [6]
Close of Third Parable.-Universal joy at the revealing of the Son of Man, who receives ‘the sum of judgment’ (lxix. 26-29). [7]
Section iii.: chs. lxxii.-lxxxii.-The Book of the Courses of the Heavenly Luminaries.
The sun (lxxii.), the moon and its phases (lxxiii.), the lunar year (lxxiv.), the stars, the twelve winds and their portals (lxxvi.), the four quarters of the world, the seven great mountains, rivers, islands (lxxvii.), the moon’s waxing and waning (lxxviii.), recapitulation (lxxix., lxxx. 1), perversion of Nature and the heavenly bodies owing to man’s sin (lxxx. 2-8). Enoch sees the heavenly tablets containing men’s deeds to all eternity, and is given one year to teach them to Methuselah (lxxxi.); his charge to Methuselah to hand on the books to the generations of the world; blessing on the observers of the true system of reckoning-year of 364 days (lxxxii. 1-9); stars which lead the seasons and the months (lxxxii. 10-20).
Section iv.: chs. lxxxiii.-xc.-Two Dream Visions: (a) lxxxiii., lxxxiv.; (b) lxxxv.-xc.
(a) Vision of earth’s destruction: Mahalalel bids Enoch pray that a remnant may remain (lxxxiii. 1-9); prayer of Enoch for survival of plant of eternal seed (= Israel) (lxxxiii. 10-lxxxiv. 6). (b) Second dream, in which Enoch sees Adam and other patriarchs under symbolism of bulls, etc. (lxxxv.); stars (= angels) fall from heaven, and unite with cattle (lxxxvi., lxxxvii.); the first star is cast into the abyss; evil beasts slay one another (lxxxviii.). In symbolism Enoch sees the history of Noah and the Deluge; Israel at the Exodus, crossing the Jordan, under the Judges; the building of the Temple; the two kingdoms; the Fall of Jerusalem (lxxxix. 1-67). Israel is entrusted to the Seventy Shepherds (=angelic rulers) from the Captivity to the Maccabaean revolt (lxxxix. 68-xc. 12); the enlightened lambs (= Chasids) and the great horn (= Judas Maccabaeus) (xc. 6-12). The final assault of the heathen; a great sword is given to the sheep (= Jews); the Lord of the sheep intervenes (xc. 13-19); a throne is erected in the pleasant land for Him; the sealed books are opened; the sinning stars are cast into the abyss of fire, also the Seventy Shepherds; the blinded sheep into the abyss in the midst of the earth (= Gehenna) (xc. 20-27); the old house (= Temple) is removed; the Lord of the sheep brings a new house, greater and loftier; the sword is sealed up; all the sheep ‘see’ (i.e. are enlightened); a white bull (= Messiah) is born, and is adored by all; the others are all transformed into white bulls, and the Lord of the sheep rejoices over them all alike; Enoch awakes and weeps [xc. 28-42).
Section v.: chs. xci.-civ.
(a) Enoch’s Book for his Children, (xcii. 1).-God has appointed days for all things; the righteous are to arise from sleep and walk in eternal light, and sin is to disappear (xcii.). Methuselah and his family are summoned and exhorted to love righteousness; violence must increase, but judgment will follow; idols will fail, and the heathen be judged in fire for ever; the righteous are to rise again (xci. 1-11).
(b) Apocalypse of Weeks.-1st week: Enoch born. 2nd: the first end; Noah saved. 3rd: Abraham elected as the plant of righteous judgment. 4th: the law for all generations made. 5th: house of glory … built. 6th: all Israel blinded; Elijah ascends to heaven; the Dispersion. 7th: general apostasy; the elect righteous elected to receive seven-fold instruction concerning all creation (= Enoch’s revelations). 8th: week of righteousness and of sword; Temple rebuilt for ever; all mankind converted. 9th: righteous judgment revealed to the whole world; sin abolished. 10th: great eternal judgment on angels; new heaven; thereafter weeks without number for ever (xciii., xci. 12-17).
(c) Warnings and woes.-Warnings against paths of unrighteousness (xciv. 1-5); woes against oppressors and rich (xciv. 6-11) and sinners (xcv. 2-7); hope for righteous (xcvi. 1-3); their prayer heard (xcvii. 5); woes against the luxurious and the rich (xcvi. 4-8, xcvii. 1-10). Warnings against indulgence; sin is of man’s own devising, and every sin is every day recorded in heaven (xcviii. 1-8); sinners are prepared for the day of destruction; they will be given into hands of righteous (xcviii. 9-16). Woes on godless and law-breakers (xcix.); the righteous are to raise prayers and place them before the angels, who are to place the sin of sinners for a memorial before the Most High (xcix. 3). Sinners are to destroy one another (c. 1-3); angels descend into secret places and gather all who brought down sin (i.e. fallen angels); the righteous and holy receive guardians till an end is made of sin; though the righteous sleep long, they have nothing to fear; angels, sun, moon, and stars will witness to the sins of sinners (c. 4-13); God is obeyed by all Nature, therefore His law should be observed by men (ci.). Terrors of the judgment-day; the righteous who died in misery are not to grieve but await judgment (cii. 1-5). Taunts of sinners-after death we and the righteous are equal (cii. 6-11). Enoch knows a mystery from the heavenly tablets-the spirits of the righteous dead shall live and rejoice (ciii. 1-4); woes of sinners who died in honour-their spirits descend into darkness, chains, and burning flame (ciii. 5-8); woes of the righteous (ciii. 9-15); yet in heaven the angels remember them for good, and their names are written; they shall shine as lights of heaven (civ. 1, 2); ‘cry for judgment, and it shall appear’ (civ. 3). The writings of Enoch are to be given to the righteous-they give joy, uprightness, and wisdom (civ. 9-13).
[8] [9] An independent addition (cviii.).-Another book written by Enoch ‘for his son and those who keep the law in the last days’; the righteous are to wait for the destruction of the ungodly, whose spirits suffer in fire (cviii. 1-6); the spirits of the humble who lived ascetic lives and belonged to the generation of light shall God bring forth in shining light and seat each on the throne of his honour in never-ending splendour (cviii. 7-15).
2. Title.-The work is referred to under several titles. Of these the oldest are (a) the Books of Enoch (Test. Jud. xviii. 1, Test. Lev. x. 5 [10]; Origen, c. Celsum, v. 54, in Num. Hom. 28:2-this title is implied in the division of the work into books; 1 En xiv. 1, lxxii. 1, lxxxii. 1, xcii. 1, cviii. 1; Syncellus, Chronographia [11]); (b) the Words of Enoch (Jub. xxi. 10; Test. Benj. ix. 1; cf. 1 En. i. 1, xiv. 1). Other titles are (c) the Book of Enoch (Test. Lev. x. 5 [12]; Origen, de Princ. i. iii. 3, etc.); (d) the Writing of Enoch (Test. Lev. xiv. 1; Tertullian, de Cultu Fem. i. 3); (e) Enoch (Judges 1:14; Ep. Barn. iv. 3; Clem. Alex., Eclog. Proph. [12]; Origen, in Ioannem, vi. 25, c. Celsum, v. 54; Tertullian, de Cultu Fem. ii. 10, de Idol. iv., xv.).
3. Canonicity.-That the work was recognized as inspired in certain Jewish circles appears from the above references in Jubilees and the Test. XII. Patriarchs. St. Jude quotes a passage from it as an authentic prophecy of Enoch. The Epistle of Barnabas (xvi. 5) refers to it in the words λέγει γὰρ ἡ γραφή; Athenagoras (Leg. pro Christianis, 24) as ἀ τοῖς προφήταις ἐκπεφώνηται; Tert. (de Idol. xv.), ‘Spiritus … prececinit per … Enoch’; (de Cultu Fem. i. 3), ‘scio seripturam Enoch … non recipi a quibusdam, quia nec in armarium Judaicum admittitur … cum Enoch eadem scriptura etiam de Domino praedicarit, a nobis quidem nihil omnino rejiciendum est, quod pertineat ad nos.… A Judaeis potest jam videri propterea reiecta, sicut et cetera quae Christum sonant.’ Origen, however, in c. Celsum, v. 54, says: ἐν ταῖς ἐκκλησίαις οὐ πάνυ φέρεται ὡς θεῖα τὰ ἐπιγεγραμμένα τοῦ Ἐνὼχ βιβλία. Chrysostom (Hom. in Genesis 6:1), Jerome (Com. in Psalms 132:3), and Augustine (de Civ. Dei, XV. xxiii. 4) denounce the work as apocryphal, and this opinion henceforward prevails.
4. Critical structure and dates.-That the work was composite might be inferred from the external evidence of the titles, ‘Books’ or ‘Words of Enoch,’ under which the work is quoted in other writings. But internal evidence is more decisive. The frequent headings, such as ‘the book written by Enoch’ (xcii. 1), ‘another book which Enoch wrote’ (cviii. 1), and the divergence of historical outlook, of method of treatment, of ideas and phrases, in the various parts, point even more clearly to the fact that the work in its present form is a redaction of several of the more prominent writings belonging to a diffuse and varied cycle of literature passing under the name of Enoch. The work as we have it falls naturally into five quite distinct main sections as shown in 1 above:
Section i.: Visions and journeys (for contents see above).
-xii.-xxxvi. belong to the earliest Enochic portion of this section; they are pre-Maccabaean, as, unlike lxxxiii-xc, they make no reference to Antiochus’ persecution. They fall into subsections: xii-xvi. (out of their original order), xvii-xix., xx-xxxvi. Chs. vi-xi. belong to the earlier Book of Noah (see below). Chs. i-v. appear to be an introduction written by the final editor of the entire work. The problem in this section is the origin of evil, which is traced to the fall of the Watchers. There is no Messiah; God Himself is to abide with men (xxv. 3); all the Gentiles will become righteous and worship God (x. 21); the righteous are admitted to the tree of life and live patriarchal lives with very material joys and blessings.
Section ii.: The Parables (formerly known as ‘the Similitudes’)
There are three Parables (xxxviii.-xliv., xlv.-lvii., lviii.-lxix.), while xxxvii. forms an introduction, and lxx. a conclusion to them. Ch. lxxi. belongs to the Third Parable. There are many interpolations. Some are from the Book of Noah-lx., lxv-lxix. 25 confessedly, and probably xxxix. 1-2, liv. 7-Leviticus 2 as well. Behind the Parables proper lie two sources, as Beer (Kautzsch’s Apok. and Pseud. ii. 227) has shown: one deals with the ‘Son of Man’-xl. 3-7, xlvi-xlviii. 7, lii. 3-4, lxi. 3-4, lxii. 2-lxiii., lxix. 26-29, lxx-lxxi., and has ‘the angel who went with me’ as Enoch’s interpreter; the other deals with ‘the Elect One’-xxxviii-xxxix., xl. 1-2, 8-10, xli. 1-2, 9, xlv., xlviii. 8-10, l-lii. 1-2, 5-9, liii-liv. 6, Leviticus 3 -lvii., lxi. 1-2, 5-13, lxii. l, and has the ‘angel of peace’ as interpreter of the vision (so Charles, Enoch, p. 65). Only the former source attributes pre-existence to the Son of Man (xlviii. 2). This section is full of peculiar features, e.g. ‘Lord of Spirits’ as a Divine title; Phanuel replaces Uriel as the fourth archangel. The angelology is more developed: besides Cherubim, we have Seraphim, Ophannim, angels of power and of principalities. And so is the demonology: the origin of evil is traced back to the Satans and an original evil spirit-world. The Messiah is eternally pre-existent, and all judgment is committed to Him. The date of this section appears to lie between 95 and 64 b.c. and probably between 95 and 79. ‘The kings and the mighty’ are evidently the later Maccabaean princes and their Sadducaean supporters. The mighty cannot refer to the Romans; it must refer to the Sadducaean nobles, who did not support the Herods. The problem is the oppression of the righteous by the kings and mighty, and the solution consists in a vision of the coming liberator and vindicator, the Messiah of supernatural power and privilege.
Section iii.: The Book of the Heavenly Luminaries
Chs. lxxii-lxxviii., lxxxii., lxxxix. are original to this section; lxxx. and lxxxi. are interpolations. The conceptions at times approach those of i-xxxvi., but the points of divergence are very numerous. The date is not ascertainable. The object is to establish the solar year of 364 days as a Divine law revealed as early as the time of Enoch (lxxiv. 12 as emended. Cf. Jub. vi, 32-36).
Section iv.: The Dream Visions
There is only one interpolation-xc. 14b, xc. 13-15 and xc. 16-18 are doublets. There is close agreement with and evident knowledge of vi-xi., but no dependence on them. The conceptions are more spiritual and developed. The date would be before 161 b.c., as Judas Maccabaeus is still warring (xc. 13); the end is expected to be about 140 b.c., as the fourth period of twelve shepherds would end then. The problem is the continued depression of Israel after the Return, which is attributed to the neglect of its seventy angelic guardians.
Section v.-This section really commences with xcii. 1 (see heading), and the original order of the first four chapters was xcii., xci. 1-10, 18-19, xciii. 1-10, xci. 12-17, xciv.; of these xciii. 1-10, xci. 12-17 form the short ‘Apocalypse of Weeks.’ There is a close resemblance throughout xci-civ. to i-xxxvi., in phrases, references, and ideas, but the divergences are not less numerous (see Charles, p. 219ff.). The righteous alone rise, and in spirit only, not in body, to walk in eternal light in heaven. Contrast the crude materialism of i-xxxvi. The date is determined by the interpretation we put on ciii. 14, 15-‘the rulers … did not remove from us the yoke of those that devonred us and dispersed us and murdered us.’ If the massacre of the Pharisees by John Hyrcanus is meant, the date must be later than that year-94 b.c., (cf. Parables). Otherwise, 104-95 b.c. (so Charles). The problem is ethical (the seeming impunity of the prosperous wicked-who, however, at death descend to Sheol and the name for ever), not national, as in lxxxiii-xc.
cv.-An independent Messianic fragment; cvi-cvii.-part of the earlier Book of Noah; cviii. presupposes i-xxxvi. and xci-civ., and is later in date, and strongly ascetic, if not Essene, in tone.
Book of Noah.-Scattered through the work we find a series of more or less fragmentary passages-vi-xi., liv. 7-Leviticus 2, lx., lxv-lxix. 25, cvi-cvii., and probably xxix. 1, 2a)-which generally refer to Noah and the Deluge. Their inclusion appears to be due to the final editor, who forced into what are often awkward contexts fragments of this earlier work, or series of works, which we also know from Jub. vii. 20-39, x. 1-15, xxi, 10.
5. The text.-The text is not extant in the original Semitic form, but we possess a Greek translation of a part, and an Ethiopic version of the whole.
(1) The Greek version exists in duplicate to some extent. (a) The superior in point of text is to be found in Syncellus (Chronographia, ed. Dind. i. 20-23, etc.), who quotes vi-x. 14, xv. 8-xvi. 1, and also gives viii. 4-ix. 4 in variant form. He also gives a quotation ‘from the first book of Enoch concerning the watchers’ (ed. Dind. i.-47) which does not occur in our present text. (b) The longer but less accurate text for i-xxxii. (and xix. 3-xxi. 9 in duplicate) was discovered in 1886-7 at Akhmîm, and published by Bouriant in 1892. Another fragment, in tachygraphic characters, exists in a Vatican Greek manuscript -no. 1809 (see at end of this article ).
(2) The Ethiopic version, which is a translation from the Greek, is known in 29 Manuscripts , of which 15 are in England. The best are numbered gg1 mqtu in Charles’s Ethiopic text (q.v. [1] ). This text is inferior to that of the Syncellus Greek and is much nearer to that of the Akhmîm Fragment (known generally as the ‘Gizeh Greek’).
(3) The Latin version
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Enoch
1. Eldest son of Cain. Genesis 4:17,18 .
2. City built by Cain, and named after his son: it is the first city that we read of. Genesis 4:17 .
3. Son of Jared, and father of Methuselah. Of him it is said he "walked with God: and he was not; for God took him;" and also that by faithhe was translated, and that before his translation he had this testimonythat he pleased God. A bright example in those early days of how by grace a man can have communion with God, and so please God, and be made sensible of it, thus enjoying the light of His countenance in walking with Him in a sinful world. Enoch was taken to heaven without dying, as the living saints will be at the coming of the Lord Jesus. Genesis 5:18-24 ; Luke 3:37 ; Hebrews 11:5 ; Jude 14 . Called HENOCH in 1 Chronicles 1:3 .
In Jude a prophesy of Enoch is quoted which is not found in the O.T. As Jude wrote under the inspiration of God this could have been revealed to him, as many other things in scripture have been, and which could have beenknown in no other way; or he may have been inspired to record whathad been handed down orally. There is an apocryphal book called THE BOOK OF ENOCH, from which some believe that Jude quoted, though it is not inspired. But there is no evidence that the book was then in existence. It refers to the Messiah as 'Son of God,' which has been judged to proveconclusively that it was written in the Christian era. The passage in the book of Enoch, speaking of Christ executing judgement, is worded thus: "Behold he cometh with ten thousand of his saints, to execute judgement upon them, and destroy the wicked, and reprove all the carnal, for everything which the sinful and ungodly have done and committed against him." The traveller Bruce, on his return from Egypt in A.D. 1773 brought three MSS of the entire book in Æthiopic. In 1821 it was translated into English. The book purports to be a series of revelations made to Enoch and Noah.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Enoch, Saint
(died c.580)Popularized in the name of an Established Presbyterian church, public square, and important railroad terminal in Glasgow, Scotland, is rightly Thenog or Thenew, the mother of Saint Kentigern; she was baptized by Saint Serf. Feast, July 18,.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Enoch
The seventh from Adam. His name signifies dedicated, from Chanach. The Holy Ghost: hath given a blessed testimony to this man. (Hebrews 11:5) Oh! for grace thus to walk, and thus to have communion with God in Christ!
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Enoch
AND ENOCH WALKED WITH GOD: AND HE WAS NOT; FOR GOD TOOK HIM
WHEN a reader of the Bible first steps across the borders of the Bible, and, for love of the Bible, begins to read the ancient books that lie around and beneath the Bible, he comes sometimes upon a real treasure, but more often upon a heap of rubbish. When a reader of the Bible first hears of The Book of Enoch, taking Coleridge's excellent advice, he sells his bed to buy that book. Enoch walked with God, he says to himself. I have the whole Bible in my hands, all written, he says to himself, by men all of whom so walked, but let me get all the books of all such men, before I have either time or money for any other manner of man or any other kind of book. But when, after long looking for it, he at last holds The Book of Enoch in his hand, it is with what a disappointment! For one thing, he soon sees that he has been deceived and imposed upon. Enoch! He has not read the first chapter of the book till it is as clear as day to him that Enoch never saw the book that goes under his ancient name; and besides, it is simply impossible that any man who had ever walked with God as Enoch walked could have written a single chapter of such an inflated and fantastic book. In four verses of his own Bible-in two verses in the Old Testament, and in two verses in the New Testament-there is more truth and more beauty and more guidance how he is to walk with God, than there is in all the hundred and eight chapters of the so-called Book of Enoch taken together. Still, our Bible scholars must work on in rubbish-heaps like The Book of Enoch, if only for the sake of the chips and the filings of the Bible that are sometimes to be found there. But unless you are a Bible scholar, and are able to get good out of a book that returns but a far-off echo of your Bible, you will spend your time and your money far better than by spending either on The Book of Enoch. 'And Enoch walked with God; and he was not, for God took him.' There is substance there for him who knows what substance is, and there is style there for him who knows what style is. And that is but one single verse out of a whole Bible full of such substance and such style.
This, then, is the book of the generations of Adam. 'Adam begat a son in his likeness, after his image, and called his name Seth. And Adam lived after he had begotten Seth, he begat sons and daughters, and he died. And Seth lived, and died. And Enos lived, and died. And Cainan lived, and died. And Mahalaleel lived, and died. And Jared lived, and begat Enoch. And Jared lived after he begat and begat sons and daughters, and he died. And Enoch begat Methuselah. And Enoch walked with God after he begat Methuselah, and begat sons and daughters. And Enoch walked with God; and he was not, for God took him.' What is that? Let us go back upon that. Let us ponder all that passage over again. Adam and all his sons, after they had begotten sons and daughters, died. But of Enoch, the seventh from Adam, we read very differently. Adam, and Seth, and Enos, and Cainan, and Mahalaleel, and Jared all lived, they simply lived on, after they had had children born to them, and then died. But Enoch walked with God after his first child was born. As much surely as to say-could anything be said with more plainness?-that it was only after his first child was born to him that Enoch really and truly began to walk with God. Fathers and mothers, young fathers and young mothers, fathers and mothers whose first child has just been born, and no more-seize your opportunity. Let not another day pass. Begin today. Begin tonight. It is late, if not yet too late, with the most of us; but it is not yet too late with you. Take Enoch for your father. Take him for your patron patriarch. Take him for your example. Follow him in his blessed footsteps in his family life. It was his first son that made Enoch a saint. As soon as he saw his first child in his image, and in his arms, Enoch became from that day a new man. All men begin to walk for a short season with God when their first child is born; only Enoch, alone almost of all men, held on as he had begun. Enoch's heart ran over to God when his first child was born; and his tender, noble, princely heart never went back from that day from God, never grew cold again, never grew hard again, and never again forgot or neglected God. And as child followed child, Enoch, their father, grew more and more in grace with the growth of his house, till at the last he was not, for God took him. What an inheritance of blessed memories Enoch's children must have had! We all have fathers and mothers with God, for God has taken them; but, unless it was Elijah's children, no man's children ever looked up to heaven with such wondering and worshipping eyes as Enoch's children looked. My father! my father! The chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof!
Enoch, the wisest and the happiest of men, began his religious life where most men have not yet come to at the end of their religious life. He began by believing that God Is. With us, with all that we can do, we but attain to occasional hopes and confused convictions that perhaps God Is. We do not, indeed, even at our worst, in as many words deny that God Is. But scarce one in a thousand of our actions is performed, scarce one in a thousand of our words is spoken, on the pure and clear and sure ground that God Is. At our best we believe in a languor and in a dream that God is away out somewhere in the universe. We call Him 'infinite' in our catechisms and in our creeds, in our psalms and in our prayers, not thinking what we are saying, and then we go away and live as if He were infinitely far away from us and from this whole world. Only, after death, when at last death comes, we fear that, somewhere and somehow, we shall see God. But Enoch never saw death, because he ever saw God. Enoch never died. Enoch did not need to die. Death could do nothing for Enoch. Death was neither friend nor enemy, first nor last, to Enoch. Death was not appointed for men like Enoch. As Dr. Herrick has it in his Heretics of Yesterday, Enoch was the first recorded mystic. 'The first mystic of whom we have any record was Enoch, and the four words which furnish us with his whole biography is the best definition we have of true spiritual mysticism,-Enoch walked with God.' You are an orthodox theologian when you take pen and ink and subscribe with your hand that God is. But you become a mystical theologian and a spiritual man when you begin to believe with your whole heart that God is beside you, and within you, and is nowhere else for you but in your own heart. Commonplace men see now and then a skirt of God, and catch now and then a broken ray, a scintilla, as a mystic would say, of God's glory; but Enoch walked with God up and down the land of Eden, as a man walketh with his friend. God was in Enoch's heart. 'He looked within and saw God mirrored there.' Enoch, from the day that his little child was born, felt God shed abroad in his heart. He entered every new morning into his own heart to walk there with God. He walked abroad every morning with his child in his arms, and with his God in his heart. Enoch so entered and so dwelt with God in his own heart, that God could not endure to loan him to this world any longer. When I first heard tell that there was a Book of Enoch, did I not promise myself a great treat! What an autobiography that must be! I wonder, will Enoch enter into particulars, I said to myself, and will he give instances, and tell in plain pedestrian words, giving chapter and verse, and step after step, just as I can understand it and imitate it, how he, Enoch, walked with God: really, and on his own solid feet, and on this solid earth, how he walked with God? But when I made an effort and got the book, what was I in every chapter introduced to and made to walk with, but cherubim and seraphim, principalities and powers, angels and devils, seven holy ones, and four holy ones, and three holy ones; behemoth and leviathan; wild camels, wild boars, wild dogs; eagles and elephants and foxes; giant men and siren women-till I rose up and put Enoch in my shelf and took down William Law. Took William Law to my heart and read in him for the thousandth time his two golden chapters showing, How all orders and all ranks of men and women of all ages are obliged to devote themselves to God; as, also, How great devotion to God fills our lives with the greatest peace and happiness that can be enjoyed in this world. Till, like everybody who takes up William Law, I could not lay him down till I had come to his concluding chapter, 'Of the excellency and greatness of a devout spirit.' And then, when I turned the last page, and came to the printer's name, I felt like that member of my young men's class who told me that he read Law slowly and grudgingly, counting the pages every now and then, lest he should come too soon to the end. Yes, Dr. Herriek, you are right; Enoch was the first mystic, and his biography is written in as few words as would have pleased the arch-mystics themselves. Enoch, the true and genuine Enoch, never wrote a book, far less The Book of Enoch. But he did for us what very few books know anything about, he walked with God, and so sets us on thinking what walking with God might mean. My brethren, I am not making play with solemn words, nor am I practising upon you when I say it-walking with God is both the most difficult thing and the most easy thing in all the world. It is so difficult as to be found positively an impossibility by most men; while to one man here and there among men it is as easy to him as breathing is, as easy as eating is when he is hungry, and as drinking is when he is thirsty. Suppose you had exhorted Cain to begin to walk with God from the day that he murdered Abel-it would have taken nothing short of a miracle to make the murderer do it. A miracle could have made him do it, but it would have been a miracle. But suppose, on the other hand, that Enoch had for any cause fallen out of step with God for a single day, what a weary and heavy-laden man you would have had in Enoch that night! But, not to wander so far from home, how few of us ourselves ever enter into our own hearts, where alone God walks with men. God dwelleth not in temples made with hands, nor walketh on the pavement that leads up to such temples. Your first step in the direction of God is not taken when you put on your Sabbath clothes and walk demurely into your pew. No; but it is taken when you put on humility upon your proud heart, and fill your hot heart full of meekness, and resignation, and quietness, and contrition, and a broken, heavenly, holy heart. To hold your peace when you are reproved is a direct and sure step toward God. To be silent when you suffer wrong-God takes at that great moment a great step of His toward you. To let a slight, an insult, a blow, a scoff, a sneer fall on your head like an excellent oil, and on your heart like your true desert-with that man will I dwell, says the God of Israel in His prophet. Every step you take out of an angry heart and into a meek heart; out of envy and into admiration and honour; out of ill-will and into good-will;-on the spot your heavenly Father seeth you and loveth you, and sayeth to His angels, Hast thou considered My new servant? Enoch, on the day his first child was born, just began to lay aside all malice, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil-speakings, and as a new-born babe desired the sincere milk of the word that he might grow thereby. He just began to live in the Spirit before the dispensation of the Spirit, and walked in the Spirit even before the Spirit was as yet given. And though his family, and his friends, and his enemies did not know so much as the very name of the fruit of the Spirit, they all ate and drank that fruit in Enoch's walk and conversation; for the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance, and such like.
Are any of you, my brethren, in your secret heart, in continual fear of death? Are you, though no one knows it, all your lifetime subject to that terrible bondage? Well, Enoch of all the Bible characters is the best of them all for you. For Enoch was translated that he should not see death. Begin then tonight, and as long as you are left on the earth a living man walk with Enoch. Walk with God. Walk with Him into whose presence death never comes, and in whose whole kingdom no grave is ever dug. You have neglected God until tonight. But you are not yet dead. Your body is still warm and free and your own. Your soul is still in this church this Sabbath night. You are not yet in hell. God has not yet in anger said, Cut that cumberer down! Instead of that, He is still waiting to be gracious to you. Begin, then, to walk all the rest of your life un earth with God. And, if you are not to have your name added to the names of Enoch and Elijah; if you are not to be translated; if you are not to remain and to be alive when Christ comes; even so, your death, if it must be, will only be a circumstance in your walk with God. It will only be a striking and a never-to-be-forgotten incident and experience to you. It will only be a new departure, the opening up of a new prospect, and your first entrance on that which God hath prepared for them that love Him. If you will only walk close enough with Enoch and with Enoch's God you will never really taste death. You will not know where you are. Is it past? you will ask in astonishment. Am I really gone over Jordan? And it will all be because you importuned so often on earth, and said, and would not be kept quiet from saying, O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death? Behold, now, thy Deliverer for whom thou didst so often cry; behold, He has come at thy cry, and has come for thee out of Zion. O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law. But thanks be to God which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Enoch
Enoch (ç'nok), initiating or initiated, i.e., dedicated. 1. A son of Cain. Genesis 4:17; Genesis 18:2. One of the most eminent of the antediluvian patriarchs, the son of Jared and father of Methuselah. He has this remarkable testimony, "that he walked with God;" an expression denoting near communion with the Lord, and conformity to his will. And "he was not; for God took him," that is, like Elijah in subsequent times, "he was translated that he should not see death." His life was, for the period in which he lived, a short one upon earth, 365 years; but it was a life of faith, pleasing in the eye of his Maker. Genesis 4:18-24; Luke 3:37; Hebrews 11:5. Jude cites a prophecy of Enoch. In 1 Chronicles 1:3, Enoch is called Hanoch.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Enoch
the son of Cain, Genesis 4:17 , in honour of whom the first city noticed in Scripture was called Enoch, by his father Cain, who was the builder. It was situated on the east of the province of Eden.
2. ENOCH, the son of Jared, and father of Methuselah. He was born A.M. 622, and being contemporary with Adam, he had every opportunity of learning from him the story of the creation, the circumstance of the fall, the terms of the promise, and other important truths. An ancient author affirms, that he was the father of astronomy; and Eusebius hence infers, that he is the same with the Atlas of the Grecian mythology. Enoch's fame rests upon a better basis than his skill in science. The encomium of Enoch is, that he "walked with God." While mankind were living in open rebellion against Heaven, and provoking the divine vengeance daily by their ungodly deeds, he obtained the exalted testimony, "that he pleased God." This he did, not only by the exemplary tenor of his life, and by the attention which he paid to the outward duties of religion, but by the soundness of his faith, and the purity of his heart and life: see Hebrews 11:5-6 . The intent of the Apostle, in the discourse containing this passage, is, to show that there has been but one way of obtaining the divine favour ever since the fall, and that is, by faith, or a firm persuasion and confidence in the atonement to be made for human transgressions by the obedience, sufferings, death, and resurrection of the promised Messiah. The cloud of witnesses which the Apostle has produced of Old Testament worthies, all bore, in their respective generations, their testimony to this great doctrine, in opposition to the atheism or theism, and gross idolatry, which prevailed around them. All the patriarchs are celebrated for their faith in this great truth, and for preserving this principle of religion in the midst of a corrupt generation. Enoch, therefore, is said, by another evangelical writer, to have spoken of the coming of Christ to judgment unto the antediluvian sinners. See Judges 1:14-15 . This prophecy is a clear, and it is also an awful, description of the day of judgment, when the Messiah shall sit upon his throne of justice, to determine the final condition of mankind, according to their works; and it indicates that the different offices of Messiah both to save and to judge, or as Prophet, Priest, and King, were known to the holy patriarchs. On what the Apostle founded this prediction has been matter of much speculation and inquiry. Some, indeed, have produced a treatise, called "The Book of Enoch," which, as they pretend, contains the cited passage; but its authority is not proved, and internal evidence sufficiently marks its spurious origin. It is, therefore, reasonable to suppose that the prophecy cited by St. Jude was either traditionally handed down, or had been specially communicated to that Apostle. In the departure of Enoch from this world of sin and sorrow, the Almighty altered the ordinary course of things, and gave him a dismissal as glorious to himself, as it was instructive to mankind. To convince them how acceptable holiness is to him, and to show that he had prepared for those that love him a heavenly inheritance, he caused Enoch to be taken from the earth without passing through death. See ELIJAH .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Enoch
1. A son of Cain, in honor of whom the first city named in the Bible was called Enoch, Genesis 4:17 .
2. "The seventh from Adam," and the father of Methuselah; eminent as a patriarch who lived near to God, through faith in a Redeemer to come, Hebrews 11:5,13 . It was a testimony to his rare piety in an ungodly age that he was translated without seeing death, like Elijah. He had lived only three hundred and sixty years, Genesis 5:18-24 Jude 1:14,15 , quotes a traditionary prophecy of Enoch, showing his belief in a judgment to come. There is an apocryphal book bearing the name of Enoch, in which similar language occurs. It was probably written by some devout Christian of the first century, and is only valuable for the light it throws on the belief of the early church. It was never received as canonical.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Enoch
Dedicated; disciplined
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Enoch
Death is one of the evil consequences of human sin, and the genealogical record of the generations from Adam to Noah is characterized by repetition of the word ‘death’ (Genesis 5:5; Genesis 5:8; Genesis 5:11; Genesis 5:14; Genesis 5:17; Genesis 5:20). The case of Enoch, however, was different. He was a man who lived his life in such close fellowship with God that God took him to be with himself without Enoch’s having to die first (Genesis 5:22-24; Hebrews 11:5). In this way God gave hope to the righteous that death’s apparent conquest is not permanent. God has power over it.
Thousands of years later, when Jews were becoming increasingly interested in heaven and the afterlife, there was much interest in Enoch. During the last centuries of the era before Christ, people wrote books in his name, and the New Testament quotes one of these as containing a prophecy from Enoch (Judges 1:14-15).
The only other person named Enoch in the Bible also belonged to the earliest period of biblical history. He was a son of Cain, but the Bible says little about him (Genesis 4:17-18).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Enoch
ENOCH.—There is no mention of the patriarch Enoch in the Gospels except as a link in our Lord’s genealogy, Luke 3:37.

Sentence search

Enoch - ENOCH. —There is no mention of the patriarch Enoch in the Gospels except as a link in our Lord’s genealogy, Luke 3:37
Enoch - ENOCH. —There is no mention of the patriarch Enoch in the Gospels except as a link in our Lord’s genealogy, Luke 3:37
Henoch - Same as Enoch
Mathu'Sala - = METHUSELAH , the son of Enoch
Irad - Son of Enoch and grandson of Cain
Irad - Son of Enoch, grandson of Cain, father of Mehujael (Genesis 4:18). The similarity of the names to those in Seth's line, Enoch, Cainan, Jared, Mahalaleel, arose from the paucity of names at first, the relationship of Seth's and Cain's families, and their occasional intercourse
Irad - Son of Enoch and grandson of Cain ( Genesis 4:18 )
Henoch - (hee' nahch) KJV spelling for Enoch (1Chronicles 1:3,1 Chronicles 1:33 )
Jared - —Father of Enoch, named in our Lord’s genealogy (Luke 3:37)
he'Noch -
Enoch, 2
Irad - Son of Enoch (Genesis 4:18 )
Took - ...
Enoch was not, for God took him
i'Rad - (fleet ), son of Enoch; grandson of Cain, and father of Mehujael
Enoch - Enoch (Heb. The notice which invests the figure of Enoch with its peculiar significance is found in Genesis 5:24 ‘Enoch walked with God; and he was not, for God took him. A much fuller tradition is presupposed by the remarkable development of the Enoch legend in the Apocalyptic literature, where Enoch appears as a preacher of repentance, a prophet of future events, and the recipient of supernatural knowledge of the secrets of heaven and earth, etc. A trace of an original connexion with the sun-god has been suspected in the 365 years of Enoch’s life (the number of days in the solar year). At all events it is highly probable that the Babylonian legend contains the germ of the later conception of Enoch as embodied in the apocalyptic Book of Enoch ( c Enoch - AND Enoch WALKED WITH GOD: AND HE WAS NOT; FOR GOD TOOK HIM...
WHEN a reader of the Bible first steps across the borders of the Bible, and, for love of the Bible, begins to read the ancient books that lie around and beneath the Bible, he comes sometimes upon a real treasure, but more often upon a heap of rubbish. When a reader of the Bible first hears of The Book of Enoch, taking Coleridge's excellent advice, he sells his bed to buy that book. Enoch walked with God, he says to himself. But when, after long looking for it, he at last holds The Book of Enoch in his hand, it is with what a disappointment! For one thing, he soon sees that he has been deceived and imposed upon. Enoch! He has not read the first chapter of the book till it is as clear as day to him that Enoch never saw the book that goes under his ancient name; and besides, it is simply impossible that any man who had ever walked with God as Enoch walked could have written a single chapter of such an inflated and fantastic book. In four verses of his own Bible-in two verses in the Old Testament, and in two verses in the New Testament-there is more truth and more beauty and more guidance how he is to walk with God, than there is in all the hundred and eight chapters of the so-called Book of Enoch taken together. Still, our Bible scholars must work on in rubbish-heaps like The Book of Enoch, if only for the sake of the chips and the filings of the Bible that are sometimes to be found there. But unless you are a Bible scholar, and are able to get good out of a book that returns but a far-off echo of your Bible, you will spend your time and your money far better than by spending either on The Book of Enoch. 'And Enoch walked with God; and he was not, for God took him. And Jared lived, and begat Enoch. And Enoch begat Methuselah. And Enoch walked with God after he begat Methuselah, and begat sons and daughters. And Enoch walked with God; and he was not, for God took him. But of Enoch, the seventh from Adam, we read very differently. But Enoch walked with God after his first child was born. As much surely as to say-could anything be said with more plainness?-that it was only after his first child was born to him that Enoch really and truly began to walk with God. Take Enoch for your father. It was his first son that made Enoch a saint. As soon as he saw his first child in his image, and in his arms, Enoch became from that day a new man. All men begin to walk for a short season with God when their first child is born; only Enoch, alone almost of all men, held on as he had begun. Enoch's heart ran over to God when his first child was born; and his tender, noble, princely heart never went back from that day from God, never grew cold again, never grew hard again, and never again forgot or neglected God. And as child followed child, Enoch, their father, grew more and more in grace with the growth of his house, till at the last he was not, for God took him. What an inheritance of blessed memories Enoch's children must have had! We all have fathers and mothers with God, for God has taken them; but, unless it was Elijah's children, no man's children ever looked up to heaven with such wondering and worshipping eyes as Enoch's children looked. My father! my father! The chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof!...
Enoch, the wisest and the happiest of men, began his religious life where most men have not yet come to at the end of their religious life. But Enoch never saw death, because he ever saw God. Enoch never died. Enoch did not need to die. Death could do nothing for Enoch. Death was neither friend nor enemy, first nor last, to Enoch. Death was not appointed for men like Enoch. Herrick has it in his Heretics of Yesterday, Enoch was the first recorded mystic. 'The first mystic of whom we have any record was Enoch, and the four words which furnish us with his whole biography is the best definition we have of true spiritual mysticism,-Enoch walked with God. Commonplace men see now and then a skirt of God, and catch now and then a broken ray, a scintilla, as a mystic would say, of God's glory; but Enoch walked with God up and down the land of Eden, as a man walketh with his friend. God was in Enoch's heart. ' Enoch, from the day that his little child was born, felt God shed abroad in his heart. Enoch so entered and so dwelt with God in his own heart, that God could not endure to loan him to this world any longer. When I first heard tell that there was a Book of Enoch, did I not promise myself a great treat! What an autobiography that must be! I wonder, will Enoch enter into particulars, I said to myself, and will he give instances, and tell in plain pedestrian words, giving chapter and verse, and step after step, just as I can understand it and imitate it, how he, Enoch, walked with God: really, and on his own solid feet, and on this solid earth, how he walked with God? But when I made an effort and got the book, what was I in every chapter introduced to and made to walk with, but cherubim and seraphim, principalities and powers, angels and devils, seven holy ones, and four holy ones, and three holy ones; behemoth and leviathan; wild camels, wild boars, wild dogs; eagles and elephants and foxes; giant men and siren women-till I rose up and put Enoch in my shelf and took down William Law. Herriek, you are right; Enoch was the first mystic, and his biography is written in as few words as would have pleased the arch-mystics themselves. Enoch, the true and genuine Enoch, never wrote a book, far less The Book of Enoch. But suppose, on the other hand, that Enoch had for any cause fallen out of step with God for a single day, what a weary and heavy-laden man you would have had in Enoch that night! But, not to wander so far from home, how few of us ourselves ever enter into our own hearts, where alone God walks with men. Every step you take out of an angry heart and into a meek heart; out of envy and into admiration and honour; out of ill-will and into good-will;-on the spot your heavenly Father seeth you and loveth you, and sayeth to His angels, Hast thou considered My new servant? Enoch, on the day his first child was born, just began to lay aside all malice, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil-speakings, and as a new-born babe desired the sincere milk of the word that he might grow thereby. And though his family, and his friends, and his enemies did not know so much as the very name of the fruit of the Spirit, they all ate and drank that fruit in Enoch's walk and conversation; for the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance, and such like. ...
Are any of you, my brethren, in your secret heart, in continual fear of death? Are you, though no one knows it, all your lifetime subject to that terrible bondage? Well, Enoch of all the Bible characters is the best of them all for you. For Enoch was translated that he should not see death. Begin then tonight, and as long as you are left on the earth a living man walk with Enoch. And, if you are not to have your name added to the names of Enoch and Elijah; if you are not to be translated; if you are not to remain and to be alive when Christ comes; even so, your death, if it must be, will only be a circumstance in your walk with God. If you will only walk close enough with Enoch and with Enoch's God you will never really taste death
e'Noch, the Book of - The first trance of the existence of this work is found in the Epistle of (Jude 1:14,15 ) An apocryphal book called Enoch was known at a very early date, but was lost sight of until 1773, when Bruce brought with him on his return from Egypt three MSS. In its present shape the book consists of a series of revelations supposed to have been given to Enoch and Noah, which extend to the most varied aspects of nature and life. Notwithstanding the quotation in Jude, and the wide circulation of the book itself, the apocalypse of Enoch was uniformly and distinctly separated from the canonical Scriptures
Enoch - The case of Enoch, however, was different. He was a man who lived his life in such close fellowship with God that God took him to be with himself without Enoch’s having to die first (Genesis 5:22-24; Hebrews 11:5). ...
Thousands of years later, when Jews were becoming increasingly interested in heaven and the afterlife, there was much interest in Enoch. During the last centuries of the era before Christ, people wrote books in his name, and the New Testament quotes one of these as containing a prophecy from Enoch (Judges 1:14-15). ...
The only other person named Enoch in the Bible also belonged to the earliest period of biblical history
Methu'Selah - (man of the dart ), the son of Enoch, sixth in descent from Seth, and father of Lamech
Enoch - Enoch (ç'nok), initiating or initiated, i. Jude cites a prophecy of Enoch. In 1 Chronicles 1:3, Enoch is called Hanoch
Enoch - A son of Cain, in honor of whom the first city named in the Bible was called Enoch, Genesis 4:17 . He had lived only three hundred and sixty years, Genesis 5:18-24 Jude 1:14,15 , quotes a traditionary prophecy of Enoch, showing his belief in a judgment to come. There is an apocryphal book bearing the name of Enoch, in which similar language occurs
Methuselah - Son of Enoch, and father of Lamech
Enoch - Enoch lived in such close fellowship with God that he was translated into the presence of God without dying. The name of Enoch is associated with a large body of ancient extra-biblical literature
ja'Red - (descent ), one of the antediluvian patriarchs, and further of Enoch ( Genesis 5:15,16,18-20 ; Luke 3:37 ) In the lists of Chronicles the name is given in the Authorized Version JERED
je'Red -
Son of Mahalaleel and father of Enoch
Methuselah - (3074-2105 BCE) Son of Enoch and grandfather of Noah; a wise and righteous man
Translation - (μετάθεσις)...
The word ‘translation’ is used of Enoch (q. The ‘translation’ of Enoch is mentioned in Sirach 44:18 (cf. need not necessarily mean anything but a holy death; but it was undoubtedly the common belief that Enoch did not die
Bartlett - Enoch Bartlett, of Dorchester, Massachusetts
Jared -
The fourth antediluvian patriarch in descent from Seth (Genesis 5:15-20 ; Luke 3:37 ), the father of Enoch; called Jered in 1 Chronicles 1:2
Jared - Father of Enoch (Genesis 5:15-20 )
James Robertson - Translated Schlegel's Philosophy of History and Mohler's Symbolism; wrote Lectures on Edmund Burke and a poem, The Prophet Enoch
Methuselah - Son of Enoch, and the seventh from Adam: he lived 969 years, longer than any other person, and died in the year of the flood
Robertson, James Burton - Translated Schlegel's Philosophy of History and Mohler's Symbolism; wrote Lectures on Edmund Burke and a poem, The Prophet Enoch
Enoch - Enoch was taken to heaven without dying, as the living saints will be at the coming of the Lord Jesus. Called HENOCH in 1 Chronicles 1:3 . ...
In Jude a prophesy of Enoch is quoted which is not found in the O. There is an apocryphal book called THE BOOK OF Enoch, from which some believe that Jude quoted, though it is not inspired. The passage in the book of Enoch, speaking of Christ executing judgement, is worded thus: "Behold he cometh with ten thousand of his saints, to execute judgement upon them, and destroy the wicked, and reprove all the carnal, for everything which the sinful and ungodly have done and committed against him. The book purports to be a series of revelations made to Enoch and Noah
Enoch - Details are given especially as to Lamech and Enoch, marking the utter distinctness of those so named in the two lines. Seventh from Adam (seven indicating divine completeness, Enoch typifying perfected humanity). Of Noah and Enoch alone it is written that they "walked with God" (Genesis 5:24; Genesis 6:9); others "walked before God" (Genesis 17:1). ...
"Translation" implies a sudden removal from mortality to immortality without death, such as shall pass over the living saints at Christ's coming (1 Corinthians 15:51-52), of whom Enoch is a type. and he died," the account of Enoch's walk with God and translation without death stands forth in brighter relief. Nay, it was not until "after he begat Methuselah" that it is written "Enoch walked with God. ...
Enoch in the antediluvian generation, and Elijah in the postdiluvian, witnessed before Christ in their own persons to the truth of the resurrection of the body and its existence in heaven. Enoch's translation was an appropriate testimony to the truth he announced, "Behold the Lord cometh . Judges 1:14 stamps with inspired sanction the current TRADITION of the Jews as to Enoch's prophecies. The language "Enoch prophesied, saying," favors tradition rather than the Book of Enoch being the source from whence Jude drew. Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, and others allude to the Book of Enoch Bruce the Abyssinian traveler brought home three Ethiopic copies from Alexandria, which Lawrence translated in 1821. See HANOCH for a fourth Enoch, so the KJV has it
e'Noch - ) In the Epistle of Jude ( Jude 1:14 ) he described as "the seventh from Adam;" and the number is probably noticed as conveying the idea of divine completion and rest, while Enoch was himself a type of perfected humanity. After the birth of Methuselah it is said, ( Genesis 5:22-24 ) that Enoch "walked with God three hundred years. In the Epistle to the Hebrews the spring and issue of Enoch's life are clearly marked. Both the Latin and Greek fathers commonly coupled Enoch and Elijah as historic witnesses of the possibility of a resurrection of the body and of a true human existence in glory
Kenan - Son of Enoch and father of Mahalalel ( Genesis 5:9 ; Genesis 5:12 Methuselah - the son of Enoch, and father of Lamech, Genesis 5:21
Enoch - the son of Cain, Genesis 4:17 , in honour of whom the first city noticed in Scripture was called Enoch, by his father Cain, who was the builder. Enoch, the son of Jared, and father of Methuselah. Enoch's fame rests upon a better basis than his skill in science. The encomium of Enoch is, that he "walked with God. Enoch, therefore, is said, by another evangelical writer, to have spoken of the coming of Christ to judgment unto the antediluvian sinners. Some, indeed, have produced a treatise, called "The Book of Enoch," which, as they pretend, contains the cited passage; but its authority is not proved, and internal evidence sufficiently marks its spurious origin. In the departure of Enoch from this world of sin and sorrow, the Almighty altered the ordinary course of things, and gave him a dismissal as glorious to himself, as it was instructive to mankind. To convince them how acceptable holiness is to him, and to show that he had prepared for those that love him a heavenly inheritance, he caused Enoch to be taken from the earth without passing through death
Methuselah - Man of the dart, the son of Enoch, and grandfather of Noah
Hanoch - (hay' nahch) Personal name with same Hebrew spelling as Enoch meaning, “dedicated” or “vassal
Archangel - Hierarchies emerge in the literature that stressed particular groupings headed by archangels [1] who were counted among number designations such as seven (Tobit 12:15 ; 4 Ezra 5:20 ), four (Enoch 4; 87:2-3; 88:1), three (Enoch 90:31). The archangels Michael (Daniel 10:13 ; Daniel 12:1 ; Enoch 9:1; 10:11), Gabriel (Daniel 8:16 ; Enoch 9:1; 20:7; 40:9), Raphael (Tobit 3:17 ; Tobit 12:15 ; Enoch 10:4; 40:9) and Uriel (Enoch 9:1; 19:1; 20:2) gain particular hero status. The Book of Revelation appears to reflect tradition of archangels found in Enoch (although the term archangelos is found only in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and Jude 1:9 ) that have holy creatures waiting on the throne of God, presiding over the corners of the earth, and are part of the cosmic reordering at the end of time (Revelation 1:4 ; Revelation 4:5 ; Revelation 7:1 ; Revelation 12:7 ; Enoch 9:1; 10:1; 40:2; 90:21)
Methuselah - ” A son of Enoch (who walked with God) and grandfather of Noah (Genesis 5:21 ,Genesis 5:21,5:26-29 )
Hanoch, Henoch - The same as Enoch in Genesis 5:19-24
Jude - As to the quotation in Jude 1:14,15 , see Enoch 2
Raphael - (1) He is one of the seven ‘angels of the presence’ ( Luke 1:13 , Revelation 8:2 [2], Enoch 90). So in Enoch 20. Enoch 10. ’ (5) In Enoch 22 he is a guide in Sheol; in 32, in Paradise
Translation - Enoch was translated without dying
Methusaleh - Son of Enoch
Enoch -
The eldest son of Cain (Genesis 4:17 ), who built a city east of Eden in the land of Nod, and called it "after the name of his son Enoch. After the birth of Methuselah, Enoch "walked with God three hundred years" (Genesis 5:22-24 ), when he was translated without tasting death. Mention is made of Enoch's prophesying only in Jude 1:14
Enoch Book of - -The Ethiopic Book of Enoch (or 1 Enoch, as it is now more conveniently denominated) is the largest, and, after the canonical Book of Daniel, the most important of the Jewish apocalyptic works which have so recently come to be recognized as supplying most important data for the critical study of NT ideas and phraseology. The Book-or rather the Books-of Enoch the reader will find to be a work of curious complexity and unevenness. Yet another recurring feature, and one common to this apocalyptic literature, is the reserving of the visions and the books of Enoch for the last days, for the elect to read and understand. ...
We cannot close without quoting Charles’s words in his introduction (Book of Enoch, 1912, p. x):...
‘In the age to which the Enoch literature belongs there is movement everywhere, and nowhere dogmatic fixity and finality. -Enoch takes up his parable: God’s coming to judgment to help and bless the righteous and destroy the ungodly (i. ...
A Dream Vision of Enoch. -Enoch is hidden from men (xii. 3); they beseech Enoch to write a petition for them (xiii. He entrusts Enoch with the message to the Watchers; they had sinned in taking wives (xv. ...
Enoch’s two journeys: through the earth and to Sheol. -Enoch is brought to the ends of the earth and views treasuries of stars, and the winds that uphold heaven (xvii. Enoch proceeds to chaos and the seven stars and the abyss of xviii. In the middle of the earth Enoch sees a holy mountain (Zion) with its surrounding summits and ravines (xxvi. ]'>[1] A whirlwind carries off Enoch to the end of the heavens; he views the dwelling-places of the holy who pray for mankind, and the Righteous One’s abode under the wings of the Lord of Spirits (xxxix. Enoch sees the inexhaustible fountain of righteousness: ‘at that hour’ the Son of Man was ‘named’ in the presence of the Lord of Spirits; he is a staff to the righteous, the light of the Gentiles: in His name the righteous are saved; kings and mighty are to bum like straw (xlviii. Enoch sees seven metal mountains (symbols of world-powers): they will serve the Anointed’s dominion (lii. ]'>[4]
(a) Vision of earth’s destruction: Mahalalel bids Enoch pray that a remnant may remain (lxxxiii. 1-9); prayer of Enoch for survival of plant of eternal seed (= Israel) (lxxxiii. (b) Second dream, in which Enoch sees Adam and other patriarchs under symbolism of bulls, etc. In symbolism Enoch sees the history of Noah and the Deluge; Israel at the Exodus, crossing the Jordan, under the Judges; the building of the Temple; the two kingdoms; the Fall of Jerusalem (lxxxix. are enlightened); a white bull (= Messiah) is born, and is adored by all; the others are all transformed into white bulls, and the Lord of the sheep rejoices over them all alike; Enoch awakes and weeps [xc. ...
(a) Enoch’s Book for his Children, (xcii. -1st week: Enoch born. 7th: general apostasy; the elect righteous elected to receive seven-fold instruction concerning all creation (= Enoch’s revelations). Enoch knows a mystery from the heavenly tablets-the spirits of the righteous dead shall live and rejoice (ciii. The writings of Enoch are to be given to the righteous-they give joy, uprightness, and wisdom (civ. -Lamech has a wondrous son; Methuselah inquires of Enoch at the ends of the earth about him; Enoch replies that a Deluge is to come because of sin introduced by the fallen angels; this son shall alone be saved-sin will arise again after him till the final annihilation of evil. -Another book written by Enoch ‘for his son and those who keep the law in the last days’; the righteous are to wait for the destruction of the ungodly, whose spirits suffer in fire (cviii. Of these the oldest are (a) the Books of Enoch (Test. ]'>[11]
); (b) the Words of Enoch (Jub. Other titles are (c) the Book of Enoch (Test. ); (d) the Writing of Enoch (Test. 3); (e) Enoch (Judges 1:14; Ep. Jude quotes a passage from it as an authentic prophecy of Enoch. ), ‘Spiritus … prececinit per … Enoch’; (de Cultu Fem. 3), ‘scio seripturam Enoch … non recipi a quibusdam, quia nec in armarium Judaicum admittitur … cum Enoch eadem scriptura etiam de Domino praedicarit, a nobis quidem nihil omnino rejiciendum est, quod pertineat ad nos. -That the work was composite might be inferred from the external evidence of the titles, ‘Books’ or ‘Words of Enoch,’ under which the work is quoted in other writings. The frequent headings, such as ‘the book written by Enoch’ (xcii. 1), ‘another book which Enoch wrote’ (cviii. 1), and the divergence of historical outlook, of method of treatment, of ideas and phrases, in the various parts, point even more clearly to the fact that the work in its present form is a redaction of several of the more prominent writings belonging to a diffuse and varied cycle of literature passing under the name of Enoch. belong to the earliest Enochic portion of this section; they are pre-Maccabaean, as, unlike lxxxiii-xc, they make no reference to Antiochus’ persecution. , and has ‘the angel who went with me’ as Enoch’s interpreter; the other deals with ‘the Elect One’-xxxviii-xxxix. l, and has the ‘angel of peace’ as interpreter of the vision (so Charles, Enoch, p. The object is to establish the solar year of 364 days as a Divine law revealed as early as the time of Enoch (lxxiv. He also gives a quotation ‘from the first book of Enoch concerning the watchers’ (ed
Uriel - ’ In Enoch 9. Uriel, ‘whom the eternal Lord of glory sets over all the luminaries of heaven,’ shows Enoch the celestial phenomena; In 33
Be - ’ This primary meaning is found in Genesis 5:24 ‘Enoch walked with God; and he was not’; Hebrews 11:6 ‘he that cometh to God must believe that he is
Methuselah - ) A name given prophetically by Enoch, or given after the event. No record of godliness is given, as in his father Enoch's case (Genesis 5:21-27); faith is not always hereditary
Enos - Adam, Seth, and Enoch died before him; and Noah was contemporary with him eighty-four years, Genesis 4:26 ; 5:6-11 ; Luke 3:38
Methuselah - The son of Enoch, and, according to Hebrew chronology, 969 years old when he died, in the first year of the flood
Cain - He settled in the land of Nod, and built a city, which he named after his son Enoch
Cain - He settled in the land of Nod, and built a city, which he named after his son Enoch
Apocalyptic Literature - The Ethiopic Enoch. The Slavonic Enoch. Our list will begin with the Books of Enoch. The Ethiopic Enoch. —The adjective ‘Ethiopic’ has been attached to the title of this work because of another Book of Enoch discovered in a Slavonic version. —As it stands to-day, the Book of Enoch can be subdivided into five main parts with an introduction and a conclusion, as follows: Introductory Discourse, in which the author announces his parable, and formally asks attention to the important matters which he is about to divulge (1–5). The sentence upon the fallen angels is communicated to Enoch (12), and he reveals it to them; but, at their urgent request, he composes a petition on their behalf, that they might obtain forgiveness; while rehearsing this, preparatory to presenting it, he falls asleep and is informed in a dream that their request for forgiveness will not be granted, and once more makes known to the angels their impending doom (13–16). Enoch tells of a journey in which he learned of the places where thunders and lightnings originate, and saw the stream of Hades, the corner-stone and the pillars of the world, the seven mountains of precious stones, and the places of punishment of the disobedient angels, i. Enoch is carried by storm-clouds to the end of heaven, and there beholds the pre-existing Kingdom of God, the dwellings of the righteous and the elect, and of angels and archangels (39, 40). Enoch sees the Son of Man beside the Head of Days (46). Enoch’s translation to Paradise, his ascension to heaven, and his acceptance by the Son of Man, are then given in the appendix (70, 71). The course of the sun is first described (72), next the course of the moon (73, 74); untoward days (75); the winds (76); the four quarters of heaven (77); further details regarding the rising and setting of the sun (78, 79), changes in the order of things to come in the last Jays (80), and the return of Enoch to the earth; and the committal of these matters to Methusaleh (81, 82). Enoch narrates to his son Methusaleh two visions which he saw before he had taken a wife to himself. Enoch commands his son Methusaleh to summon to his side all his other sons, and when they have come he delivers to them an address on righteousness, which is especially designed to instruct the righteous of all ages (91:1–11). ...
The conclusion of the whole Book of Enoch (106–108) contains an account of the marvels destined to accompany the birth of Noah (106, 107), and a new description of the fiery tribulations reserved for the wicked and of the blessings that await those who ‘loved eternal heaven better than their own lives’ (108). —Thus far the Book of Enoch has been treated as it is extant. Clemen finds in it seven separate Enoch traditions or legends worked together by a redactor. The weight of probability, however, is rather in favour of three primitive documents: (1) A Book of Enoch, consisting of chs. The fragment of the Greek version recently discovered shows clear evidences of being the translation of a Semitic original (the case is argued conclusively by Charles, Book of Enoch, pp. —(See Charles, Book of Enoch, pp. Henoch (1855); Hoffmann, ‘Ub. Henoch’ in ZDMG Cain - He settled in the land of Nod, and built a city, which he named after his son Enoch
Cain - He withdrew into the land of Nod, east of Eden, and built a city that he named Enoch, after one of his sons
Example - ...
Enoch, the model walker
Translation - ) The act of translating, removing, or transferring; removal; also, the state of being translated or removed; as, the translation of Enoch; the translation of a bishop
la'Mech - (Genesis 4:18-24 ) He is the only one except Enoch, of the posterity of Cain, whose history is related with some detail
Majesty - Book of Enoch, v. Book of Enoch, v
Walk - The same is true of Enoch as in Genesis 5:22
Meditation: to be Practiced - It is said that Enoch walked with God: here is not an idle but an active communion
Jude, the Epistle of - The doubts about it arose probably from the reference to the mysterious conflict of Michael the archangel with Satan concerning Moses' body, nowhere else mentioned in Scripture, but found in the apocryphal Book of Enoch. If Jude indeed quotes the passage from the Book of Enoch he thereby stamps with inspired approval that passage, not the whole book, just as Paul sanctions particular sentiments from Aratus, Epimenides, and Menander (Acts 17:28; Titus 1:12; 1 Corinthians 15:33). But as Jude differs a little from the Book of Enoch, written probably by a Jew thoroughly imbued with Daniel's sacred writings, it is likely he rather sanctions the current tradition of the Jews as to Enoch's prophecies, just as Paul names the Egyptian magicians "Jannes and Jambres," though the Old Testament does not. (See Enoch. " These evils, combined with mocking scepticism, shall characterize the days immediately before the Lord's coming to judgment, as when Enoch warned the ungodly just on the eve of the flood
Cities - The earliest notice in Scripture of city-building is of Enoch by Cain, in the land of his exile
Jude, Epistle of - ...
Enoch prophesied of the judgement on the ungodly when the Lord comes with His holy myriads. See Enoch
Jude, Epistle of Saint - ,The Assumption of Moses (verse 9) and the Book of Enoch (verse 14)
Epistle of Saint Jude - ,The Assumption of Moses (verse 9) and the Book of Enoch (verse 14)
Cities - The earliest notice of city building is of Enoch by Cain, in the land of his exile
Preaching - Enoch prophesied, Judges 1:14-15 ; and Noah was a preacher of righteousness, 2 Peter 2:5
Translate - By faith Enoch was translated, that he should not see death
Book With the Seven Seals - ...
To touch on some of the details-the conception of a book containing the future history of the world is found in Enoch, lxxxi. 1, 2: ‘And be said unto me: O Enoch, observe the writing of the heavenly tablets and read what is written thereon … and I read the book of all the deeds of men, and of all the children of flesh that will be upon the earth to the remotest generations’; and more especially xciii. the seven weeks of Israel’s history in Enoch)
Satan - of Enoch (chs. of Enoch, however, the so-called ‘Similitudes’ (chs. Apparently these ‘Satans’ are ruled by a single chief, who is styled ‘Satan’ in one passage (Enoch 54. ’ The same identification also meets us in the Book of the Secrets of Enoch (? 1st cent. The chief of the Satans is Sammael, who is often referred to as ‘the angel of death’: and in the Secrets of Enoch he is prince of the demons and a magician. ...
The demonology that confronts us in the NT has striking points of contact with that which is developed in the Enochic literature. The ‘angels which kept not their first estate’ (Judges 1:6 , 2 Peter 2:4 ) are the angelic watchers whose fall through lust is described in Enoch 6 16. In Enoch the demons, who are represented as the evil spirits which went forth from the souls of the giant offspring of the fallen watchers, exercise an evil activity, working moral ruin on the earth till the final judgment. As in the Book of Enoch, Satan is represented in the NT as the ruler of a counter-kingdom of evil (cf
Tree of Life - Its first appearance is in Enoch, xxiv. Slavonic Enoch, viii. They picture the future as a garden (Enoch, xxiv. Charles, The Book of the Secrets of Enoch, Oxford, 1912, p. Revelation 21:24-27, Isaiah 60:3; Enoch, xxv
Noah - Genesis 5:24 and see Enoch)
Sodom And Gomorrah - The reason is possibly to be found in the belief (Enoch, lxvii
Cain - Cain went out from the presence of God — significant sentence — and in the land of Nod built a city and named it after his son Enoch
Cain - Cain went out from the presence of God — significant sentence — and in the land of Nod built a city and named it after his son Enoch
Millennium - In Slavonic Enoch (chs. 15) we have a view very similar to that of the Slavonic Enoch, while Justin Martyr ( Dial
Cud - Enoch walked with GOD
Observe - In the days of Enoch, the people observed not circumcision or the sabbath
Melchizedek - He has been variously supposed to be the Holy Spirit, the Son of God, an angel, Enoch and Shem
Paradise - Enoch (chs. Enoch, Apoc
Apocalyptic Literature - The Enoch Literature . The Enoch literature has reached us in two forms: ( a ) The Ethiopic Enoch; ( b ) The Slavonic Book of the Secrets of Enoch. ...
( a ) The Ethiopic Book of Enoch is a collection of apocalypses and other material written during the last two centuries before Christ. As it now exists, the collection is a survival of a wide-spread Enoch literature, and its constituent sections have been to a considerable extent edited by both Jews and Christians. ...
The importance of Enoch is great for the understanding of the eschatology of the NT and the methods of apocalyptic. ...
( b ) The (Slavonic) Secrets of Enoch probably had a pre-Christian original, and further, presupposes the existence of the Ethiopic Enoch. The Secrets of Enoch is a highly developed picture of the coming age and of the structure of the heaven, which, it holds, is seven-fold. ’ These two Psalms are not of a kin with the ordinary apocalyptic literature like the Enoch literature, and probably represent a tendency more religious than apocalyptic
Immortality - Those who did escape death—Enoch (Genesis 5:24 ) and Elijah (2 Kings 2:10-11 )—did so only by the power of God and not by some inherent power they had to live forever
Jude - Jude, because the apocryphal books of Enoch, and the ascension of Moses, are quoted in it. Jude quoted a book called Enoch or Enoch's prophecies; and even allowing that he did quote it, he gives it no authority; it was no canonical book of the Jews; and if such a book existed among the Jews, it was apocryphal, and yet there might be in it some right things
Fathers - ...
The fathers praised are Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Israel, Moses, Aaron, Phinehas, Joshua, Caleb, the Judges, Samuel, Nathan, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Hezekiah, Isaiah, Josiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Job, the Twelve, Zerubbabel, Joshua the priest, Nehemiah. In a sort of appendix (Sirach 49:14-16) are given Enoch (again), Joseph, Shem, Seth, Enos, Adam. Charles, Book of the Secrets of Enoch, pp
Pseudepigrapha - ” This is based on those books claiming to be written by Adam, Enoch, Moses, and other famous Old Testament people. ...
First Enoch has been preserved in the Ethiopic language. 1–36) tells how Enoch was taken up into heaven and shown its secrets. ...
Second Enoch is also an apocalypse preserved primarily in the Slavonic language. In it Enoch was taken up into heaven and commanded to write 366 books
Spirits in Prison - Enoch, x. Enoch, xxi. Enoch, vii. Enoch, xii. 8, the ‘watchers of the heaven’ who have fallen from their high estate are reproved and condemned by Enoch
Noah - , among his contemporaries—and that he, like Enoch, walked with God
Scapegoat - ...
In the Book of Enoch, Azazel is identified as the leader of the fallen angels who lies bound beneath rocks in the desert awaiting judgment
No - ...
With a suffixed pronoun 'ayin negates the existence of the one or thing so represented; with the suffixed pronoun “he,” the word means “he was no longer”: “And Enoch walked with God: and he was [1]; for God took him” ( Judgment - Enoch 48)
Azazel - In the Book of Enoch ( c Please, Pleasing, Well-Pleasing, Pleasure - , Christian manner of life, as "pleasing" God; in Genesis 5:22 , where the Hebrew has "Enoch walked with God," the Sept. has "Enoch pleased God;" cp
Eden, Garden of - , but has a stronger mythological colouring: the ‘garden of God’ ( Ezekiel 28:13 ) is apparently identified with the well-known mythical mountain of the gods ( Ezekiel 28:14 ); the cherub and the king of Tyre are assimilated to each other; the stones of fire may be compared with the flame of a sword ( Genesis 3:24 : see also Enoch 24. In later literature we find much expansion and embellishment of the theme: see Jubilees 3:9, 4:26, Enoch 24f
Judgment Day - ...
Intertestamental Period This orientation became more prominent in Jewish writings in the interbiblical period (Enoch 47:3; 90:2-27; 4Ezra 7:33; 12; Baruch 24 ; Testament of Benjamin 10:6-8; Judith 16:17 ). Also angels will be judged as well as humans (1618420063_9; Enoch 10:6; 16:1; 19:1; 90:20-27). God is usually pictured as the Judge although sometimes the Messiah is charged with this responsibility (Enoch 45:3; 69:27-29)
Canon of Scripture, the, - The Old Testament Canon is ratified by the fact that the present Old Testament books were those accepted in the time of Christ and endorsed by him, and that of 275 quotations of the Old Testament in the New, no book out of the Canon is quoted from except perhaps the word of Enoch in Jude
Smoke - The smoke of the torment of Caesar-worshippers goes up for ever in sight of the holy angels and the Lamb (Revelation 14:11), a weird conception suggested by Enoch, xxvii
Cain - , the land of "exile", which is said to have been in the "east of Eden," and there he built a city, the first we read of, and called it after his son's name, Enoch
Cain - While he dwelt in this country, which is generally understood to be Susiana, or Chusistan, he had a son, whom he named Enoch, in memory of whom he built a city of the same name
Levirate Law - This doctrine, taught clearly in Daniel 12, was made popular in Jewish theological discussions by the Book of Enoch,‡ Ark - ), supplementing a tradition which is found in the Book of Enoch (6-16; cf. Peter (himself like a spirit in prison during those three days), unhappy children of the unlawful union between angels and the daughters of men, condemned rebels who in vain sought the intervention of Enoch on their behalf in that time of Divine long-suffering when Noah was preparing the ark in which he saved himself and his family (see R
Angels - The limitation of the angels’ knowledge is also stated in Ethiopic Enoch, xvi. In the Secrets of Enoch. Enoch, lxi. 7); in the Secrets of Enoch (20) we read of archangels, incorporeal powers, lordships, principalities, powers, cherubim, seraphim, ‘ten troops. Enoch, 20 (Uriel, Rafael, Raguel, Michael, Saraqael, Gabriel; the Gr. Enoch, 40). ...
They will attend on the Son at the Last Judgment (1 Thessalonians 4:16, 2 Thessalonians 1:7, Revelation 3:5); and this seems to be the most probable reference in 1 Thessalonians 3:13 ‘with all his saints’ (or ‘holy ones’-τῶν ἁγίων αὐτοῦ) and in Judges 1:14 ‘with ten thousands of his holy ones’ (or ‘with his holy myriads,’ ἐν ἁγίαις μυριάσιν αὐτοῦ), where the words are quoted from Enoch, i
Genesis, Book of - Though sin and death reigned, God had His witnesses in Enoch and Noah: the former yields a type of the rapture of the heavenly saints, and the latter of the deliverance of the earthly saints through judgement. See ABEL, CAIN, Enoch, NOAH
Descent Into Hades - ...
We may pass by fanciful theories such as that the passage refers to the preaching of Enoch regarded as an incarnation of the Messiah. The apocryphal Book of Enoch records preaching of punishment to fallen angels, but says nothing of a preaching of salvation to the souls of men
Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - ...
3382...
4289...
" " Enoch
City - The earliest mention of city-building is that of Enoch, which was built by Cain (Genesis 4:17 )
Ascension - Experienced by Enoch (Genesis 5:24 ) and Elijah (2 Kings 2:1-2 ) but supremely by Jesus Christ (Acts 1:9 )
Names - the city Enoch ( Genesis 4:17 ) etc
Anointing - We may compare a passage in the Secrets of Enoch (22:8), where Enoch, when carried into the presence of God, is anointed with holy oil, with the result (56:2) that he needs no food, and is purged from earthly passions
Nebaioth - ...
But the mention of names resembling Adam, Seth, Enoch, Noah, Shem, Abraham, and of Hermes, Agathodaemon, Tammuz, and the Ionians, and the anachronisms geographical, linguistic, historical, and religious, point to a modern date even as late as the first century A
Dragon - Enoch, xx
Antediluvians - The names of Enoch and Lamech occur on both genealogies, and other names (such as Cain and Kenan, Irad and Jared) are similar enough in Hebrew to be variations of the same name
Go Down - This meaning is further established because Enoch was rewarded by being taken off the earth: “And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him” ( Angels (2) - Not only do we read in Slavonic Enoch 19:5 of ‘angels who are over the souls of men, and who write down all their works and their lives before the face of the Lord’; and in the Apocalypse of John, where symbolism abounds, of ‘books’ being ‘opened,’ and of the ‘dead’ being ‘judged according to what was written in the books’: but even in an Epistle of St. In extra-Biblical literature the veil is often mentioned, concealing the abode of God in the Most Holy Place, within which the archangels are permitted to enter (Tobit 12:12; Tob_12:15, Enoch 40:2). It is true that Judges 1:6 and Enoch 15:3–7 both speak of the angels as having first ‘left their habitation’ in heaven; but the fact that they were deemed capable of sexual intercourse implies a much coarser conception of the angelic nature than is taught in the words of our Lord, of Philo, and of the Talmud. In Enoch 8:1 Azazel is said to have taught men metallurgy and other sciences; as Prometheus was said to have taught the Greeks. Enoch 24:3, 40:2, Enoch tells his children that not even the angels know the secrets which he discloses to them
World - 6:9, 7:12, 13, 8:1, 52) and the Slavonic Enoch. The idea, however, is vouched for by earlier documents, Enoch, Jubilees, Assumption of Moses (see on the whole subject Bousset’s Religion des Judentums2, p. In classical Greek, while it is sometime used with reference to the firmament above, and its sense is not anywhere restricted to the earth, so also in the lxx it translates öÈáÈà, the ‘host’ of heaven (in Enoch also, κόσμος τῶν φωστήρων, xx. ) Hence also it easily comes to mean (as already in Enoch [2]) mankind in general (1 Corinthians 4:13, Hebrews 11:33); and, by further natural transitions, worldly possessions (Song of Solomon 11:203
World - 6:9, 7:12, 13, 8:1, 52) and the Slavonic Enoch. The idea, however, is vouched for by earlier documents, Enoch, Jubilees, Assumption of Moses (see on the whole subject Bousset’s Religion des Judentums2, p. In classical Greek, while it is sometime used with reference to the firmament above, and its sense is not anywhere restricted to the earth, so also in the lxx it translates öÈáÈà, the ‘host’ of heaven (in Enoch also, κόσμος τῶν φωστήρων, xx. ) Hence also it easily comes to mean (as already in Enoch [2]) mankind in general (1 Corinthians 4:13, Hebrews 11:33); and, by further natural transitions, worldly possessions (1 John 3:17
Seraphim - The later Jewish tradition, according to which they are serpents, points in the same direction (Enoch 20
Son of God - 2Samuel 2:16,2 Samuel 2:18 ; 4 Ezra 7:28-29 ; 13:32,37,52 ; 14:9 ; Book of Enoch 105:2)
Sheol - Enoch 22
Hades - Enoch, 22), it is represented now as a scene of moral issues and contrasted experiences-the selfish rich man is ‘tormented in this flame’; the humble beggar is ‘comforted’ in Abraham’s bosom
Air - In the Slavonic Secrets of Enoch the apostate angels are suspended in the second heaven awaiting the Last Judgment (§ 7; see Thackeray, Relation of St
Abyss - The Ethiopian Book of Enoch is especially suggestive for the development of the eschatological conceptions that appear in pre-Christian Judaism; und in the earliest part of that book the fallen angels and demons are represented as cast after the final judgment into a gulf (χάος) of fire (10:13, 14), while in 21:7 the chasm (διακοπή) filled with fire (cf
Abyss - The Ethiopian Book of Enoch is especially suggestive for the development of the eschatological conceptions that appear in pre-Christian Judaism; und in the earliest part of that book the fallen angels and demons are represented as cast after the final judgment into a gulf (χάος) of fire (10:13, 14), while in 21:7 the chasm (διακοπή) filled with fire (cf
Terah - Enoch, in the lack of Abel, would have made a model Abraham. How Enoch would have walked with God in Ur of the Chaldees, and in Haran, and in Canaan, and in Egypt, and back again in Canaan, confessing, all the time, that he was a stranger and a pilgrim with God on the earth! How Enoch would have told and would have taught his children after him that without faith it is impossible to please God! How he would have gone before them and shown them the way to come to God, believing that He is, and that He is a rewarder of them that diligently seek Him! But the divine will was in a strait betwixt two in Enoch's case. Enoch was sorely needed on earth, indeed; but his own desire to depart, taken together with God's desire to have Enoch with Him, carried the day; which carriage, for Enoch, at any rate, was far better. ...
As it turned out, then, it was neither Adam, nor Abel, nor Enoch, nor Noah, nor Terah, but it was Abram, Terah's choicest son, who was installed of God into the fatherhood of all foreknown, predestinated, called, justified, and glorified men
Hermon, Mount - Enoch 6:6 (a book of the apocrypha) mentions that Hermon is the place where wicked angels alighted in the days of Jared
Metals - Instruments before Tubalcain (born according to Hebrew chronology 500 years after Adam and contemporary with Enoch from Seth; 1,000 according to Septuagint chronology) were apparently of flint, bone, and hard wood, such as uncivilized nations now use
Gehenna (2) - Enoch xxvii
Apocrypha - Maccabees, book of Enoch, etc
Philosophy - Book of Enoch) and the Oriental speculations which were at that time very prevalent in Asia Minor
Advent (2) - ) the supernatural Son of Man, who was hidden with God before the world was created, and who, clothed with Divine attributes, will suddenly appear along with the Head of Days to execute judgment on men and angels (Similitudes of Enoch 46:1, 2, 48:2, 3). The dispersed of Israel will be restored, and the Gentiles drawn into submission (Enoch 90:30); sin and wrong will be banished (Enoch 51:1, 90:37) In the Psalter of Solomon, written under the pressure of the Roman domination (b. For the Apocalyptic writings, see Charles’ editions the Book of Enoch, etc
Devil - Enoch chs. Enoch 54:6, Matthew 12:24-27 ); though the kingdom is not entirely outside the sovereign rule of Jehovah, who is the Lord of all spirits and of the abyss in which they dwell (Enoch 40, Deuteronomy 32:22 , Job 11:8 , Psalms 139:8 , Luke 16:24 ). In the Book of Enoch he is the ruler of a kingdom of evil, over which kingdom, however, the Divine sovereignty, or at least suzerainty, stands
Apocalyptic - The best known of the extra-biblical apocalyptic books are 1Enoch (often called “Ethiopic Enoch,” since it survives in that language), 2Enoch, 4Ezra, and 2Baruch. The end therefore is good !...
Most apocalyptic works are ascribed to an ancient saint, as their names imply (for example, the books of Enoch , the Apocalypse of Abraham , of Noah , of Ezra , of Baruch )
Prophet - Thus Enoch, Abraham, and the patriarchs, as bearers of God's message (Genesis 20:7 ; Exodus 7:1 ; Psalm 105:15 ), as also Moses (Deuteronomy 18:15 ; 34:10 ; Hosea 12:13 ), are ranked among the prophets
Condemnation - John 3:19, 2 Peter 2:1-3) as well as in Enoch, i
Eternal Fire (2) - The Book of Enoch is the great storehouse of teaching on this subject. Thus it appears that the NT ‘eternal fire’ of Gehenna is anticipated in this book: the only difference being that, while in the NT the fire prepared for the devil and his angels is identified with that into which wicked men are cast, in the Book of Enoch they are always distinguished. Charles, The Book of Enoch, also Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life; J
Shepherd - In Enoch lxxxix
Chosen One - But in the Book of Enoch ‘the Elect one’ is a common title of the Messiah ( Abomination, Abomination of Desolation - ...
The historical situation of Daniel is clarified in 1 Maccabees 1:54 ; 1 Maccabees 6:7 ; 2 Maccabees 6:2 ; 2 Maccabees 1:1 Enoch 89:68-90:27; and Testament of Levi 16-17
Take Away - 12:11) and the kingdom (1 Kings 11:34)...
Of special interest is the use of the verb in the absolute sense: God “took away” Enoch so that he was not found on earth ( Messiah - Enoch literature the hope of a personal Messiah is presented in somewhat different degrees of distinctness. It is obvious, however, that in this early Enoch literature the thought is poetic rather than precise, and in a way it marks the transition from the political religious hope of the prophets to the transcendental expectations of the later apocalypses. ’...
In the other group of Enoch visions (chs. ...
In Slavonic Enoch , likewise, there is no mention of the Messiah or of the resurrection, although the latter is doubtless involved in the doctrine of the millennium, which this book sets forth. It would appear that both in the Assumption of Moses and in Slavonic Enoch the central figure is God, the deliverer of His people and judge of His enemies, rather than the Messiah. In Second Esdras the Christ is conceived of as pre-existent, raised from the sea in company with Enoch, Moses, and Elijah; and is addressed by God as ‘my Son
Pharisees (2) - Enoch 89:58, 73, 90:28, Ps-Sol 10:8; 17:18). The God who tabernacled in Israel was succeeded by ‘the God of heaven’ (1 Maccabees 3:60, Enoch 13:4; 106:11, 2 Esdras 8:20, Ps-Sol 2:34, To 7:17). ‘God’ and ‘heaven’ became interchangeable terms; and in place of words about the personal care of Jehovah, we meet cosmological and meteorological discussions of the stars and rain and snow, with suggestions of sun-worship (Enoch 72:35, Ps-Sol 2:13–14; 4:21). The Messiah, as Son of Man, appeared sharing the majesty, glory, and heavenly nature of Jehovah (Enoch 47:3 and often). He appropriated to Himself the lofty Messianic conception of the Pharisees; He was ‘Son of God’ (Enoch 105:2 f. , Matthew 17:12); ‘son of woman’ (Enoch 62); and Κύριος (Ps-Sol 17:23)
Jude, Epistle of - Would-be shepherds, they sacrilegiously pollute the love-feasts; delusive prophets, hopelessly dead in sin, shameless in their apostasy, theirs is the doom foretold by Enoch on the godless. ’ Jude is also unique in the NT in his use of apocryphal writings the Assumption of Moses in 2 Timothy 4:9 , and the Book of Enoch in v
Elements - 34) and in the Book of Enoch (xli, xliii. The Book of Enoch (lxxxii
Shekinah - Enoch ‘Lord of glory,’ and ‘the Great Glory,’ as titles of God)
Resurrection - The traditions embodied in the stories of the translations of Enoch and Elijah (Genesis 5:24 , 2 Kings 2:11 ) receive their explanation on the assumption that in this way alone would they be enabled to enjoy the continuance of a full and complete life beyond the grave. ...
Book of Enoch . ...
The most important and best known section of the Book of Enoch (chs. (For discussions of this question see the admirable critical edition of the Book of Enoch by R. We know that materialistic views of this doctrine were held side by side with the more spiritual ideas so prominent in the Book of Enoch (cf
Day of Judgment - It is difficult to know just when this idea of hell as a place of punishment, as over against Sheol as the abode of the disembodied dead, was first brought into relation with the Day of Judgment, but by the time of the apocalyptists we find the correlation complete (Ethiopic Enoch 27:2, 3, 48:9, 54:1, 2, 62:12, 13, 90:26, 27). In fact the punishment inflicted upon men is distinctly recognized as adjusted to the conditions of their life in Ethiopic Enoch 22:1–14. More or less literally, books were believed to be kept in heaven, generally by one of the seven angels, in which the deeds of men were recorded (Ethiopic Enoch 89:61, 90:14–22, Ascens. In the final assize these books were opened and balanced, and the future of the individual was determined according to the preponderance of his good or evil deeds (Ethiopic Enoch 51:52, 15, 89:61ff. Instead of a balancing of good deeds and bad, it is evident from both the Synoptics and the Fourth Gospel that He recognized in eternal life the summum bonum, which is quite other than the sensuous joys of Enoch and some of the Rabbis
Scripture - In addition to OT texts there are numerous allusions to apocryphal literature, such as the Wisdom of Ben Sira, the Wisdom of Solomon, 1 and 2 Maccabees, the Book of Enoch, the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, and the Assumption of Moses (see article Quotations). It is remarkable, however, that the usual formula of Scriptural quotation is nowhere attached to apocryphal texts, the only approach to such canonical recognition being found in the ‘prophesying’ of Enoch in Judges 1:14
New Creation - First Enoch 91:16 speaks of the passing away of the old order and the appearance of the new ("And in it [1] the first heaven shall pass away, and a new heaven shall appear"). First Enoch 72:1 classifies this as a "new work" of God ("until the creation will be made anew to last forever" cf
Evil - This tendency, increased perhaps by Persian influence, becomes dominant in apocryphal literature ( 2 Peter 2:4 and Judges 1:6 are based on the Book of Enoch), where the fallen angels are a kingdom at war with the Kingdom of God
Adam in the nt - see Eve; and on Judges 1:14 see Enoch
Build - 4:17, bânâh means not only that Enoch built a city, but that he “founded” or “established” it
Resurrection - In addition, God took from the earth two Old Testament figures before their deaths: Enoch (Genesis 5:24 ) and Elijah (2 Kings 2:9-11 )
Type - ...
(Consider also Enoch, Melchizedek, Joseph, Moses, Aaron, Joshua, Boaz, David, Solomon, Zerubbabel, Cyrus, Hagar, Ahithophel, and others
Eschatology - Enoch 37 60, cf. Enoch 91:18, 92:3, 103:3f. Enoch 32, 33) in which Satan is bound; by a great period of conflict in which Satan and his hosts are finally defeated and cast into the lake of fire; and by a general resurrection including the wicked for the purpose of judgment
Peter, Second Epistle of - with 2 Peter 3:7 ; 2 Peter 3:10 ); and the use of Proverbs may perhaps he seen in 2 Peter 2:17 ( Proverbs 10:11 ; Proverbs 21:6 ; Proverbs 25:14 ) and in 2 Peter 2:21 ( Proverbs 12:28 ; Proverbs 16:17 ; Proverbs 16:31 )...
( b ) Book of Enoch . It cannot be doubted that Enoch 9. Both Epistles are influenced greatly by Isaiah and in some measure by Proverbs and Enoch
Witness - ...
WOE...
The word οὐαί occurs freely in the LXX , in the Book of Enoch (esp
Jude Epistle of - Indeed, it had been announced by Enoch, who in that far-off age had prophesied directly of the Divine judgment that would overtake them (Judges 1:14 f. ) to Jewish Apocalypses (The Assumption of Moses and The Book of Enoch), would explain its rejection by those to whom Eusebius and Jerome refer
New Jerusalem - First Enoch 90:28-29 relates a vision of a transformation of the "old house" into a new one, representing a transformed Jerusalem
Antichrist - Under the inspiration of the two Witnesses (Elijah and Enoch) the Messianic revolt against the Antichrist was to begin, the Book of Revelation being interpreted literally at this point
Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - ...
MIRACLES IN OLD TESTAMENT...
Enoch translated
Parousia - Enoch 48) now seen to be impossible of realization
Paradise - ...
There are several important passages in 2 Enoch: viii and ix
Prison - ’ The allusion in all these passages appears to be to the Book of Enoch, which represents the fallen angels as undergoing temporary punishment (in Tartarus, xix
Sibylline Oracles - The apostles ask who these four persons are, and the Lord replies, ‘They are Enoch, Elijah, Schila, and Tabitha. [4] 352), she is ranked with Enoch and Elijah as having entered heaven in the body. Crum further solves the problem of ‘Schila’ by noting that when the Arabic noun is pointed differently it becomes equivalent to ‘Sibylla,’ who is elsewhere associated with Enoch
New Jerusalem - (Slavonic Enoch) lxv. Charles, The Book of Enoch, Oxford, 1912, Introd. It is to be noted that this portion of the Book of Enoch is dated very shortly after the Book of Daniel and not long after 1 Enoch vi-xxxvi, in neither of which does the New Jerusalem yet appear
Esdras, the Second Book of - By a similar process of inference Slavonic Enoch had determined the duration of the temporary Messianic kingdom as 1000 years, or a millennium. On this matter the Book of Revelation follows Enoch
Principality Principalities - The Slavonic Enoch (xx. 1) says that in the seventh heaven ‘Enoch saw … all the fiery hosts of great archangels, and incorporeal powers, and lordships, and principalities, and powers; cherubim and seraphim, thrones and the watchfulness of many eyes’ (quoted in Peake, Colossians)
Eternity - In the Book of Enoch, however, ‘Time’ is followed by ‘Eternity’ in the עוֹלָם הַכָא
Zabii - They greatly respect the temple of Mecca and the pyramids of Egypt, fancying these last to be the sepulchres of Seth, and of Enoch and Sabi, his two sons, whom they look on as the first propagators of their religion
Hell - The passage in 2 Peter shows evident traces of the effect upon it of the Book of Enoch, so it is not necessary to go further a field in order to discover the source of the word. A passage in the Book of the Secrets of Enoch, x. ’...
Very similar passages are found in the Book of the Secrets of Enoch, chs
Immortality - ) and the conception of the transformation of the righteous into the likeness of Messiah occurs first in Enoch xc. 208) has proposed the emendation ἐν ᾦ καὶ Ἐνώχ on the supposition that Ἐνώχ has dropped out by haplography, and would refer the passage to a reminiscence of the visit of Enoch to the condemned watchers and his intercession for them (see Enoch xii
Fire - Further confirmation of the idea is sought in the Book of Enoch (lxvii. ’ The expression does not occur in the apocalyptic writings, but in the Book of Enoch ‘the abyss or fire’ is the doom in store for the fallen angels in the Day of Judgment (x. 7-10), and in the Secrets of Enoch (x
Hell - The passage in 2 Peter shows evident traces of the effect upon it of the Book of Enoch, so it is not necessary to go further a field in order to discover the source of the word. A passage in the Book of the Secrets of Enoch, x. ’...
Very similar passages are found in the Book of the Secrets of Enoch, chs
Fire - Further confirmation of the idea is sought in the Book of Enoch (lxvii. ’ The expression does not occur in the apocalyptic writings, but in the Book of Enoch ‘the abyss or fire’ is the doom in store for the fallen angels in the Day of Judgment (x. 7-10), and in the Secrets of Enoch (x
Heir Heritage Inheritance - Daniel 7:27 and the Slavonic Secrets of Enoch, § 9 [7]). With the NT idea of an ethical inheritance or portion we may compare Wisdom of Solomon 5:5, Sirach 4:13 (glory) Sirach 37:26 (confidence among his people), the Ethiopic Book of Enoch, lviii
Canon of the Old Testament - ...
Some quotations in the New Testament are not directly found in the canonical books; thus Judges 1:17 takes a portion of the uninspired book of Enoch, and by inspiration stamps that portion as true; Paul also refers to facts unrecorded in Old Testament (2 Timothy 3:8; Ephesians 5:14; Hebrews 11:24); see also John 7:38; James 4:5-6; 2 Timothy 3:8
Son of Man - This is true of the later apocalyptic writings such as Enoch and 2Esdras as well as the rabbinic writings
Book of Life - ...
All three conceptions appear in the Book of Enoch. Charles, The Boot of Enoch2, Oxford
Pharisees - It was they who wrote the great Apocalypses (Daniel and Enoch)
Noah - The book of Enoch takes the carnal cohabitation view; but because Judges 1:1 accords with it in sonic particulars it does not follow he accords with it in all. Noah alone found grace in His sight; of him and Enoch alone it is written, "they walked with God. The Phrygian Annakos who lived more than 300 years in Iconium (Enoch, whose years were 365) foretold the deluge
Apocalypse - ...
(A) Under this head fall: (a) The cycle known as Enoch, which includes: (a) The Ethiopic Enoch, so called because it survives chiefly in an Ethiopic Version. (β) The Slavonic Secrets of Enoch, before a
Winter - Rejected by men, she ascends again to her seat in heaven (Enoch xlii. Charles on this passage of Enoch is too significant to be omitted: ‘The praise of wisdom was a favourite theme
Cain (1) - In Nod ("exile") he built a city and named it from his son Enoch (high dedication); the first step in the founding of the spiritual world city upon which the carnal fix their affections as their lasting home, instead of seeking the heavenly city and continuing pilgrims on earth (Psalms 49:11; Hebrews 11:10-16), To make up for his loss of unity in the fellowship of God and His people, Cain creates for himself and his an earthly center of unity
Restitution - Jesus is referring to that hope of a renovation of heaven and earth which formed part of the Jewish Messianic expectation (Enoch xlv
Elect, Election - ...
The only other writing of a late date in which ‘the Elect One appears as a Messianic title is the Book of Enoch, which seems to have been the chief means of popularizing its use. , 49:2, 4, 51:3, 5, 52:6, 9, 55:4, 61:5, 8, 10, 62:1), and on a couple of occasions this is joined with another word or words which are equivalent to a characterization of the conditions upon which His election to the Messiahship rests (‘the righteous and elect one,’ 53:6; ‘the elect one of righteousness and faith,’ 39:6 Preaching - From the sacred records, says Robert Robinson, we learn that when men began to associate for the purpose of worshipping the Deity, Enoch prophesied, Judges 1:14-15 . From the days of Enoch to the time of Moses, each patriarch worshipped God with his family: probably several assembled at new moons, and alternately instructed the whole company
Voice (2) - of Enoch lxv
Synagogue - Lceb, La Littérature des pauvres dans la Bible, Paris, 1892); hence the abundance of prayers in the post-Exilic literature (1 Chronicles 17:16-27; 1 Chronicles 29:10-19, 2 Chronicles 6:14-42; 2 Chronicles 14:11; 2 Chronicles 20:6-12, Ezra 9:6-15, Nehemiah 9:6-38, Daniel 2:20-23; Daniel 9:4-19, also Isaiah 36:15-20), not to mention the apocryphal books such as the Maccabees, Enoch, Judith, etc. Enoch lxxxiii
Peter, First Epistle of - ...
( b ) Book of Enoch . Enoch 9
Daniel, Book of - Generally, apocalyptic writings bear the name of ancient heroes such as Adam, Enoch, or Baruch, who demonstrated in their time the type of character needed in the current situation of the writer
Blasphemy (2) - Yet the claim was not for more than the Book of Enoch assigned to the Messiah
Amen - Here it is perhaps a conscious archaic form, brought in to add to the mysterious language of the vision, which may originally, like the Book of Enoch or Noah, have been ascribed to some earlier seer
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - The concept was dear to Jewish apocalyptic writers, believing as they did that this age could be remedied only by the kingdom of God or the age to come (see Isaiah 40-66 ; Daniel 2:44 ; 1 Enoch 6-36,83-90 ; Sib Oracles 3:652-56; 2Baruch 39-40; 4Ezra 7; etc. " That disclosure of truth was itself a proleptic experience of the age to come (Daniel 9:20-12:13 ; 1 Enoch 63:2,32 ; 48:1,49 ; 4 ; Ezra 14:25,38-40 ; 2 Baruch 54:13 ; Revelation 4-22 ). Such an identification was relegated to the anticipated age to come (Isaiah 28:16 ; Ezekiel 40-48 ; Jub 1:18; 4Qflor; 1Enoch 91:13; etc
Preaching - From the sacred records we learn, that, when men began to associate for the purpose of worshipping the Deity, Enoch prophesied, Judges 1:14-15 . From the days of Enoch to the time of Moses, each patriarch worshipped God with his family; probably several assembled at new moons, and alternately instructed the whole company
Apocalyptic - Extrabiblical apocalyptic works like 1Enoch (first century b. Charles, The Book of Enoch ; idem, Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs ; S
Walk (2) - ...
περιπατεῖν is used of the conduct of life; Aquila, Genesis 5:22 (Enoch) περιεπάτει σὺν τῷ θεῷ, where LXX Septuagint has εὐηρεστησε (cf
Benediction - * Excommunication - 827, 2466) says it was part of a Jewish cursing formula from the Prophecy of Enoch (Judges 1:14)
no'ah - among his contemporaries), and that he, like Enoch, walked with God
no'ah - among his contemporaries), and that he, like Enoch, walked with God
Benediction - * Resurrection - -The principal literary sources for Alexandrian Judaism are Philo, the Book of Wisdom , 2 Enoch, and 4 Maccabees. ...
In 2 Enoch we have the conception of the millennial Messianic kingdom, at the end of which occurs the Final Judgment
Ascension of Isaiah - There he sees all the righteous from the time of Adam, including Abel, Seth, and Enoch, stript of the garments of the flesh, not sitting on their thrones nor as yet wearing their crowns of glory, until the Beloved has descended to earth (9:12, 13) and ascended again (9:18). in the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs and in Slavonic Enoch is not to be found in the Asc
Annunciation, the - Matthew’s Jewish readers, if they compared his story with their own national ideas, as illustrated in the Book of Enoch (6, 15, 69, 86, 106), would find a similar contrast. Both in the Book of Enoch and frequently in 4 Ezra the Almighty speaks of the Messiah as His Son
Jerusalem - We read of a preexistent heavenly Jerusalem (Syriac Baruch 4:2 ) that will descend to earth at the end of the age (2 Esdras 10:27,2 Esdras 10:27,10:54 ; 2 Esdras 13:4-6 ), or, according to another conception, is the place in heaven where the righteous will eventually dwell (Slahyvonic Enoch 55:2)
Angel - Uriel explained to Enoch many of his visions (1Enoch 21:5-10; 27:2-4), interpreted Ezra's vision of the celestial Jerusalem ( 2 Esdras 10:28-57 ), and explained the fate of the fallen angels who supposedly married human women (1Enoch 19:1-9; cf. Gabriel, Michael, Raphael, and Uriel (1Enoch 40:3,6) reported to God about the depraved state of humanity, and received appropriate instructions. According to contemporary thought, Gabriel sat on God's left, while Michael sat on the right side (2Enoch 24:1)
Hell - 11-14 ) and endless torment (Jub 36:11; 1Enoch 27:1-3; 103:8; T Gad 7:5). Sheol frequently became an interim location for the dead, distinguished from the place of final punishment (1Enoch 18:9-16; 51:1). While some intertestamental writings equate hell with the "lake of fire" in this "accursed valley" of Hinnom (1Enoch 90:26,27; 54:1,2), others use it to denote a place in the underworld (Sib Or 4:1184-86). For instance, at times fire consumes the wicked (1Enoch 99:12); in other texts fire and worms torment their victim to a useless existence (Judith 16:17 )
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - Samuel was not the first person to prophesy, however, for "Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied" ( Jude 14 ). Enoch was well before Abraham's day, much less Samuel's
Apocrypha - ...
Apocalyptic literature lends itself more readily to Messianic ideas, and these find full expression in the Book of Enoch, where—in the ‘Similitudes’—the descriptions of the Messiah who appears in clouds as the Son of Man are assigned by Dr. Undoubtedly this is a Jewish conception, and its mournful character, so unlike the triumphant tone of Enoch, is in keeping with the gloomy character of the book, and a reflection of the deep melancholy that took possession of the minds of earnest, patriotic Jews after the fearful scenes of the siege of Jerusalem and the overwhelming of their hopes in a deluge of blood
Prophet - They regarded Him as one of the προφῆται ἀληθείας, and as superior to προφῆται συνέσεως οὐκ ἀληθείας; and, as such, placed Him in line with Adam, Enoch, Noah, etc. But in the Book of Enoch ( Heaven - 2 Kings 2:1-25 : Heaven is to be considered as a place as well as a state: it is expressly so termed in Scripture, John 14:2-3 : and the existence of the body of Christ, and those of Enoch and Elijah, is a further proof of it
Retribution (2) - * Life - Enoch, Ps
Genesis, Theology of - On a less complex level, Hebrews also refers to Abel, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph as examples of persevering faith (11:4-22)
Star (2) - of Enoch (lxxxvi
Sepulchre - Unlike Enoch and Elijah, Christ had died and been actually buried; hence His death was a reality, and because He had risen from the tomb His resurrection was an indisputable fact
Angel - The angelology of the Apocrypha is expanded to an almost unlimited extent in later Jewish writings, more especially in the Book of Enoch , in the Targums , and in the Talmud ; but with these we are not concerned here
Elijah - In conclusion, we may observe, that to assure the world of the future existence of good men in a state of glory and felicity, and that in bodies changed from mortality to immortality, each of the three grand dispensations of religion had its instance of translation into heaven; the patriarchal in the person of Enoch, the Jewish in the person of ELIJAH, and the Christian in the person of CHRIST
Person of Christ - Later Jewish thought, however, read the passage in a Messianic sense; and in the Similitudes of the Book of Enoch (probably b. What we judge to have really happened is this: taking the title freely as given in Daniel 7:1-28 , and possibly influenced by the Similitudes of Enoch or kindred ideas, Jesus began by using it to mean special or representative humanity as appointed to transcendent glory and dominion; but later He defined and enriched this meaning in a singular way by introducing the idea of suffering
Salvation - Sirach 51:12 (ἐξ ἀτωλείας), Wisdom of Solomon 16:7, Judith 9:11, Enoch 48:7 (of ‘the Son of Man’; ‘in his name are they being saved, and he is the God of their life’) 50:3 (eschatological-negative, mere salvation without glory) 63:8, 4 Ezr 6:25, 7:131, 9:8, 12:34, 13:26, 8:39 (the righteous shall he satisfied with salvation in connexion with the Messiah), Ps-Sol 6:2, 10:8, 12:6, 18:6, Baruch 4:22; Baruch 4:24; Matthew 9:21-228 Test
Eschatology - -Most early Christians doubtless conceived of this in the traditional dramatic form, in accordance with the teaching of Enoch and other Jewish apocalypses. On the other hand, it should be remembered that (a) the ‘unearthly’ conception of the Messiah set forth in the Enochic ‘Son of Man’ would be modified by the recollection of the historical human personality of Jesus the Messiah; and (b) the apocalyptic idea of Messiahship, though one-sided, and therefore inadequate for a satisfactory Christology, was yet a high and transcendent ideal-one which needed to be supplemented and enlarged, rather than corrected
Apocrypha - Of apocalyptical and prophetical works, there are the Book of Enoch , quoted in Jude, the Assumption of Moses , the Apocalypse of Baruch , the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Abel - When, therefore, it is said that "by faith Enoch was translated that he should not see death," it must be supposed that he had some promise or intimation to this effect, on which, improbable as the event was, he nobly relied; and in the result God honoured his faith in the sight of all men
Resurrection - , Eth Enoch) was commonplace, but none were permitted passage to "the right hand of God
Soul - ); others in its premundane creation (Slavonic Enoch 23:5); others (perhaps the majority) in its concreation with the body, which is apparently the doctrine of the OT (Isaiah 44:2; Isaiah 44:24; Isaiah 49:1; Isaiah 49:5, Job 31:15)
Soul - ); others in its premundane creation (Slavonic Enoch 23:5); others (perhaps the majority) in its concreation with the body, which is apparently the doctrine of the OT (Isaiah 44:2; Isaiah 44:24; Isaiah 49:1; Isaiah 49:5, Job 31:15)
Church, the - Both the Old Testament and Judaism anticipated the rebuilding of the temple in the future kingdom of God (ez 40-48 Haggai 2:1-9 ; 1 Enoch 90:29 ; 91:3 ; Jub 1:17,29; etc
Time - The author of Ethiopic Enoch, xvi
Miracle - Enoch in Genesis 5:24 )
Light - The gradual evolution of the religious idea slowly purified the symbolism, especially in the deeper reaches of faith within the later Judaism (notably in the Book of Enoch)
Sarah - Not Adam before his fall; not Enoch, who so pleased God; not Abraham at his call, or after offering his son; not Jacob at Bethel, nor Israel at the Jabbok; not Moses on the mount and in the cleft rock; not Isaiah in the temple, and not John in the spirit-not the best and the most blessed of them all was more blessed or better blessed than was Hagar the polluted outcast on her weeping way to Shur
Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs - as regards other late literature the Book of Enoch 15
Election - And the destiny of the elect people was to culminate in the Elect Servant of the Lord: ‘Behold my servant whom I uphold; my chosen (בְּחָירִי, ὁ ἐκλεκτός μον) in whom my soul delighteth: I have put my spirit upon him; he shall bring forth judgement to the Gentiles’ (Isaiah 42:1 Revised Version ; ‘the Elect one’ appears as a Messianic designation in the Book of Enoch; xl
Ascension - The same verb is used of Elijah (2 Kings 2:11 Septuagint , Sirach 48:9) and of Enoch (Sirach 49:14), and also of the vessel received up into heaven in St
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - ...
Following upon the commentary are 12 metrical expositions of portions of Scripture, such as the creation of man in God's image, the temptation of Eve, the translation of Enoch, etc
Acts of the Apostles - These critics see in the book traces of four strata, and assert that it is a compilation of the same nature as the Pentateuch, the Book of Enoch , and the Apostolic Constitutions
God - Enoch (19:1) Uriel speaks of the evil angels leading men astray into sacrificing to demons as to gods (see Charles’s note; and also xcix
God - God began this work when he created the world, and continued it in his work of grace executed in the lives of the heroes and heroines of faith, like Enoch who walked with God (Genesis 5:22,24 ), Noah who found favor in the eyes of the Lord (Genesis 6:8 ), Abraham whose faith God counted as righteousness (Genesis 15:6 ), and Joseph whom God sustained in Egypt through adversity and success (Genesis 39:23 )
Eschatology (2) - the part dealing with the Book of Enoch)
Sirach - The only trace that has been found of Alexandrian exegesis is in Sirach 44:16, where Enoch is said to have been a pattern of repentance to the generations
Ascension (2) - Comparison with the assumption of Enoch and of Moses or the translation of Elijah, or with the deification of the Imperial representative, or with the Buddha-legend, only serves to demonstrate its striking originality, It has a character, place, and use that cannot be assigned to these
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - They have as a common feature the frequent citation of the Book of Enoch
Bible - ...
The apocryphal books of the Old Testament, according to the Romanists, are the book of Enoch (see Judges 1:14 , ) the third and fourth books of Esdras, the third and fourth books of Maccabees, the prayer of Manasseh, the Testament of the twelve Patriarchs, the Psalter of Solomon, and some other pieces of this nature
Josephus - Berendts propounded the theory that this really represented the original form of the Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) , and had therefore preserved authentic utterances of Josephus regarding Christ (the Slavonic Enoch, which in part goes back to a Judaeo-Aramaic original, would furnish a parallel case)
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - Let us be obedient to His call, following the example of Enoch and Noah (ix
Fall - Paul is either echoing, or in accord with, Jewish thought, for in the Slavonic Secrets of Enoch, xxxi
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - as wicked received Christ's preaching and were taken up by Him into His kingdom; but that Abel Enoch Noah Abraham the prophets and other righteous men imagined that the Demiurge was tempting them as on other occasions and so being afraid to join themselves to Christ and accept deliverance from Him were left in the underworld