What does Elisha mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
אֱלִישָׁ֔ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 11
אֱלִישָֽׁע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 7
אֱלִישָׁ֤ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 5
אֱלִישָׁ֖ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 4
אֱלִישָׁ֑ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 4
אֱלִישָׁע֙ the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 4
אֱלִישָׁ֣ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 4
אֱלִישָׁ֗ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 3
אֱלִישָׁ֜ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 3
וֶאֱלִישָׁע֙ the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 2
אֱלִישָׁע֒ the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 2
ἐλισαίου a distinguished OT prophet 1
וֶאֱלִישָׁ֡ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
אֱלִישָׁ֧ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
לֶאֱלִישָֽׁע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
אֱלִישָׁ֣ע ׀ the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
וֶאֱלִישָׁ֞ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
וֶאֱלִישָׁ֣ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
וֶאֱלִישָׁ֖ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
אֱלִישָׁ֛ע the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
וֶֽאֱלִישָׁע֙ the great prophet who succeeded Elijah. 1
וַיָּ֨שָׁב to return 1

Definitions Related to Elisha

H477


   1 the great prophet who succeeded Elijah.
   Additional Information: Elisha = “God is salvation”.
   

H7725


   1 to return, turn back.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to turn back, return.
            1a1a to turn back.
            1a1b to return, come or go back.
            1a1c to return unto, go back, come back.
            1a1d of dying.
            1a1e of human relations (fig).
            1a1f of spiritual relations (fig).
               1a1f1 to turn back (from God), apostatise.
               1a1f2 to turn away (of God).
               1a1f3 to turn back (to God), repent.
               1a1f4 turn back (from evil).
            1a1g of inanimate things.
            1a1h in repetition.
      1b (Polel).
         1b1 to bring back.
         1b2 to restore, refresh, repair (fig).
         1b3 to lead away (enticingly).
         1b4 to show turning, apostatise.
      1c (Pual) restored (participle).
      1d (Hiphil) to cause to return, bring back.
         1d1 to bring back, allow to return, put back, draw back, give back, restore, relinquish, give in payment.
         1d2 to bring back, refresh, restore.
         1d3 to bring back, report to, answer.
         1d4 to bring back, make requital, pay (as recompense).
         1d5 to turn back or backward, repel, defeat, repulse, hinder, reject, refuse.
         1d6 to turn away (face), turn toward.
         1d7 to turn against.
         1d8 to bring back to mind.
         1d9 to show a turning away.
            1d10 to reverse, revoke.
      1e (Hophal) to be returned, be restored, be brought back.
      1f (Pulal) brought back.
      

G1666


   1 a distinguished OT prophet, the disciple, companion, and successor of Elijah.
   Additional Information: Eliseus or Elisha = “God his salvation”.
   

Frequency of Elisha (original languages)

Frequency of Elisha (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Durbin, Elisha John
Apostle of Western Kentucky, born Madison County, Kentucky, February 1, 1800; died Shelbyville, Kentucky, 1887. He was ordained in 1822, and his missionary career lasted for over 60 years during which he erected churches, established stations, formed congregations, and visited isolated families.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Elisha
(a) (d. 663 BCE) Elijah's student and successor. Before ascending to heaven, Elijah granted him double the prophetic powers that he himself possessed. The Tanach records many of the miracles he preformed. Among them: purification of Jericho's drinking water, transformation of a single cruse of oil into many vessels' worth, resurrecting a dead child, and curing a Gentile general of leprosy. (b) A common Jewish name.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Elisha
God his salvation, the son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah, who became the attendant and disciple of Elijah (1 Kings 19:16-19 ). His name first occurs in the command given to Elijah to anoint him as his successor (1 Kings 19:16 ). This was the only one of the three commands then given to Elijah which he accomplished. On his way from Sinai to Damascus he found Elisha at his native place engaged in the labours of the field, ploughing with twelve yoke of oxen. He went over to him, threw over his shoulders his rough mantle, and at once adopted him as a son, and invested him with the prophetical office (Compare Luke 9:61,62 ). Elisha accepted the call thus given (about four years before the death of Ahab), and for some seven or eight years became the close attendant on Elijah till he was parted from him and taken up into heaven. During all these years we hear nothing of Elisha except in connection with the closing scenes of Elijah's life. After Elijah, Elisha was accepted as the leader of the sons of the prophets, and became noted in Israel. He possessed, according to his own request, "a double portion" of Elijah's spirit (2 Kings 2:9 ); and for the long period of about sixty years (B.C. 892-832) held the office of "prophet in Israel" (2 Kings 5:8 ). After Elijah's departure, Elisha returned to Jericho, and there healed the spring of water by casting salt into it (2 Kings 2:21 ). We next find him at Bethel (2:23), where, with the sternness of his master, he cursed the youths who came out and scoffed at him as a prophet of God: "Go up, thou bald head." The judgment at once took effect, and God terribly visited the dishonour done to his prophet as dishonour done to himself. We next read of his predicting a fall of rain when the army of Jehoram was faint from thirst (2 Kings 3:9-20 ); of the multiplying of the poor widow's cruse of oil (4:1-7); the miracle of restoring to life the son of the woman of Shunem (4:18-37); the multiplication of the twenty loaves of new barley into a sufficient supply for an hundred men (4:42-44); of the cure of Naaman the Syrian of his leprosy (5:1-27); of the punishment of Gehazi for his falsehood and his covetousness; of the recovery of the axe lost in the waters of the Jordan (6:1-7); of the miracle at Dothan, half-way on the road between Samaria and Jezreel; of the siege of Samaria by the king of Syria, and of the terrible sufferings of the people in connection with it, and Elisha's prophecy as to the relief that would come (2 Kings 6:24-7:2 ).).
We then find Elisha at Damascus, to carry out the command given to his master to anoint Hazael king over Syria (2 Kings 8:7-15 ); thereafter he directs one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, king of Israel, instead of Ahab. Thus the three commands given to Elijah (9:1-10) were at length carried out.
We do not again read of him till we find him on his death-bed in his own house (2 Kings 13:14-19 ). Joash, the grandson of Jehu, comes to mourn over his approaching departure, and utters the same words as those of Elisha when Elijah was taken away: "My father, my father! the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof."
Afterwards when a dead body is laid in Elisha's grave a year after his burial, no sooner does it touch the hallowed remains than the man "revived, and stood up on his feet" (2 Kings 13:20-21 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Elisha
("God for salvation".) ELISEUS in New Testament. Shaphat's son, of Abel Meholah ("meadow of the dance"), in the Jordan valley. See his call: ELIJAH. He was engaged at field work, 12 yoke before him, i.e. himself with the 12th while the other 11 were in other parts of the field; or, as land was measured by "yokes of oxen," he had plowed land to the extent of nearly 12 yokes, and was finishing the 12th: either view marks his being a man of substance. Hengstenberg regards the twelve as marking him the prophet of the whole covenant nation, not merely of the ten tribes. Whether formally "anointed" with oil or not, he was really anointed with the Spirit, and duly called by his predecessor to the prophetic office by Elijah's crossing over, and hastily throwing upon him the rough mantle, the token of investiture, and then going as quickly as he came. Elisha was one to act at once on God's first call, at all costs.
So bidding farewell to father and mother (contrast Matthew 8:21-22; "suffer me first to go and (tend my father until his death, and then) bury my father"; and Luke 9:61-62, where the "bidding farewell" involved in that particular case a division of heart between home relations and Christ, Luke 14:26; Matthew 10:37; Philippians 3:13), and slaying a yoke of oxen and boiling the flesh with the wooden instruments (compare 2 Samuel 24:22), a token of giving up all for the Lord's sake, he ministered to Elijah henceforth as Joshua did to Moses. His ministry is once described, "Elisha who poured water on the hands of Elijah." He was subordinate; so the sons of the prophets represent it: "Jehovah will take away thy master (Elijah) from thy head" (2 Kings 2:3). Yet his ministry made an advance upon that of his master.
The mission of Elijah, as his name implied, was to bring Israel to confess that Jehovah alone is God ('Εel ); Elisha further taught them, as his name implies, that Jehovah if so confessed would prove the salvation of His people. Hence, Elisha's work is that of quiet beneficence; Elijah's that of judicial sternness upon all rebels against Jehovah. Contrast 1 Kings 18:40 with 2 Kings 5:18-19. Elisha, the healer, fitly comes after Elijah, the destroyer. The latter presents himself with the announcement, "as Jehovah God of Israel liveth ... there shall not be dew nor rain these years": the first miracle of the former is, "thus saith Jehovah, I have healed these waters (by casting in salt, the symbol of grace and incorruption), there shall not be from thence any more death or barren land." The large spring N.W. of the present town of Jericho is the traditional object of the cure (Ain-es-Sultan).
Elijah, like a Bedouin, delighted in the desert, the heights of Carmel, and the caves of Horeb, and avoided cities. Elisha on the contrary frequented the haunts of civilization, Jericho (2 Kings 2:18), Samaria (2 Kings 2:25), and Dothan (2 Kings 6:13), where he had a house with "doors" and "windows" 2 Kings 4:3; 1 Kings 19:15-160; 2 Kings 4:24; 2 Kings 6:32; 2 Kings 13:17). He wore the ordinary Israelite garment, and instead of being shunned by kings for sternness, he possessed considerable influence with the king and the "captain of the host" (2 Kings 4:13).
At times he could be as fiery in indignation against the apostate kings of Israel as was his predecessor (2 Kings 3:13-14), but even then he yields himself to the soothing strains of a minstrel for the godly Jehoshaphat's sake, and foretells that the ditches which he directs to be made should be filled with water (the want of which was then being sorely felt), coming by the way of Edom; this took place at the S.E. end of the Dead Sea; the route of the confederates Judah. Israel, and Edom, in order to invade the rebelling Moabite king Mesha from the eastern side, since he was (according to the Moabite stone) carrying all before him in the N.W.
Like Elijah, he conquered the idols on their own ground, performing without fee the cures for which Beelzebub of Ekron was sought in vain. At Bethel, on his way from Jericho to Carmel (2 Kings 2:23), where he had been with Elijah (2 Kings 2:2), he was met by "young men" (narim , not "little children"), idolaters or infidels, who, probably at the prompting of Baal's prophets in that stronghold of his worship sneered at the report of Elijah's ascension: "Go up" like thy master, said they, "thou bald head" (qereach , i.e., with hair short at the back of the head, in contrast with Elijah's shaggy locks flowing over his shoulders; gibeach is the term for bald in front). Keil understands, however, "small boys" to have mocked his natural baldness at the back of his head (not with old age, for he lived until 50 years later, 2 Kings 13:14).
The God-hating spirit which prevailed at calf-worshipping Bethel betrayed itself in these boys, who insulted the prophet of Jehovah knowingly. The profanity of the parents, whose guilt the profane children filled the measure of, was punished in the latter, that the death of the sons might constrain the fathers to fear the Lord since they would not love Him, and to feel the fatal effects recoiling on themselves of instigating their children to blaspheme (Exodus 20:5). Elisha, not in personal revenge but as Jehovah's minister, by God's inspiration, pronounced their doom. Two Syrian she-bears (corresponding to the Arctic bear of northern Europe) "tare forty-two of them" (compare and contrast Luke 9:54-55). A widow (Obadiah's widow, according to Josephus), when the creditor threatened to take her sons as bondmen, cried to Elisha for help on the ground of her deceased husband's piety.
Elisha directed her to borrow empty vessels, and from her one remaining pot of oil to fill them all, shutting the door upon herself and her sons who brought her the vessels. Only when there was no vessel left to fill was the miraculous supply of oil stayed. A type of prayer, with "shut doors" (Matthew 6:6), which brings down supplies of grace so long as we and ours have hearts open to receive it (Psalms 81:10; Ephesians 3:20). Only when Abraham ceased to ask did God cease to grant (Genesis 18). On his way from Gilgal (not the one which was near Jericho, but N. of Lydda, now Jiljilieh) to Carmel, Elisha stayed at Shunem in Issachar, now Solam, three miles N. of Jezreel, on the southern slopes of Jebel ed Duhy, the little Hermon. "A great woman" (in every sense: means, largeness of heart, humility, contentment) was his hostess, and with her husband's consent provided for him a little chamber with bed, table, stool, and candlestick, so that he might in passing always "turn in there."
In reward he offered to use his interest for her with the king or the captain of the host; with true magnanimity which seeks not great things for self (Jeremiah 45:5), she replied, "I dwell among mine own people." At Gehazi's suggestion without her solicitation, Elisha promises from God that she should have what was the greatest joy to an Israelite wife, a son. When he was old enough to go out with his father, a sunstroke in the harvest field caused his death. The mother, inferring from God's extraordinary and unsought gift of the child to her, that it could not be God's design to snatch him from her for ever, and remembering that Elijah had restored the widow's son at Zarephath, mounted her she-ass (hathon , esteemed swifter than the he-ass), and having left her son on the bed of the man of God, without telling her husband of the death, rode 15 miles, four hours ride, to Carmel.
There Elisha was wont to see her regularly at his services on the "new moon and sabbath." Seeing her now approaching from a distance, Elisha sent Gehazi to meet her and ask, "Is it well with thee? ... with thy husband? ... with the child?" Her faith, hope, and resignation prompted the reply, "It is well." Gehazi, like Jesus' disciples (Matthew 15:23; Matthew 19:13), would have thrust her away when she clasped Elisha's feet (compare Matthew 28:9; Luke 7:38), but Elisha with sympathetic insight said, "Let her alone, for her soul is vexed within her, and Jehovah hath hid it from me." A word from her was enough to reveal the child's death, which with natural absence of mind amidst her grief she did not explicitly men. lion, "Did I desire a son from my lord?" Elisha sends on Gehazi with his staff; Gehazi is to salute none on the way, 'like Jesus' 70 sent before His face, but lays Elisha's staff on the child's face without effect.
(So the law could not raise the dead in sins (Romans 8:3; Galatians 3:21); Jesus Himself must come to do that.) Elisha, entering the room, shuts to the door (Matthew 6:6), and there stretching himself twice on the child, mouth to mouth, eyes to eyes, and hands to hands (compare Acts 20:10; antitypically the dead stoner must come into contact with the living Jesus, 1 John 1), after Elijah's pattern, and praying to Jehovah, proved the omnipotence of prayer to quicken the dead; then he delivered the resuscitated son to the happy mother. In a time of dearth (2 Kings 4:38), perhaps the same as that in 2 Kings 8:1-2, one of the sons of the prophets brought in a lap full of gourds or wild cucumbers, off a plant like a wild vine, the only food to be had; the effect in eating was such that one exclaimed, "There is death in the pot." Elisha counteracted the effect by casting in meal.
Next, a man of Baal Shalisha brings firstfruits (paid to the prophets in the absence of the lawful priests: Numbers 18:8; Numbers 18:12; Deuteronomy 18:3-4), namely, 20 small loaves of new barley, and full green ears of grain roasted, esteemed a delicacy (Leviticus 2:14; Leviticus 23:14), in his garment (margin) or bag. In reply to his servitor's unbelieving objection," What, should I set this before an hundred men?" Elisha replied, "Give the people ... for thus saith Jehovah, They shall eat, and leave thereof": a forerunner of Christ's miracle of feeding more men with fewer loaves, preceded by like want of faith on the disciples' part (Luke 9:18-17; John 6:9-13), and followed by a like leaving of abundance, after the multitude were fed. Naaman's cure follows. His leprosy was of the white kind, the most malignant (2 Kings 5:27).
In Syria it did not, as in Israel, exclude from intercourse; and Naaman was "great" in the presence of his master, and honored as "a mighty man in valor," because of being Jehovah's instrument in giving Syria victory. But withal (as all human greatness has some drawback) he was a leper. A "little maid" of Israel, carried captive to Syria in a foray, and brought to wait on Naaman's wife (so marvelously does God's providence overrule evil to good, and make humble and small agents effect great good) was the honored instrument of informing Naaman of the prophet of God. A lesson to us that none should plead (Matthew 25:24-30) inability to serve God and man in some form or another. Benhadad, with oriental absolutism, wrote as though the Israelite king could at will (compare Matthew 8:9) command Elisha's services. At the same time he sent much gold, silver, and the rich raiments (lebush , robe of ceremony) of Damascus; as though "God's gift may be purchased with money" (Acts 8:20).
Joram showed no less want of faith, than Benhadad showed want of religious knowledge. Had he believed as did the little maid his former subject, he would have felt that, though he was "not God to, kill and to make alive," yet there was in the midst of the people one by whom God had both killed and made alive (Deuteronomy 32:39). Elisha rectifies his error, sending a dignified message of reproof to the king, and desiring him to let Naaman come, and he should know "there is a prophet in Israel." Naaman came with horses and chariots, not yet perceiving that true greatness lies not in earthly pomp and, wealth (2 Kings 5:1; 2 Kings 5:9; 2 Kings 5:11). Elisha, to teach him humility as the first step to any favor from God, sent a messenger, instead of coming in person to the door: "Go, wash in Jordan seven times." But, like men offended at the simplicity of the gospel message of salvation, Naaman having expected a more ceremonial mode of cure, and despising Jordan in comparison with the magnificent waters of his own Damascus, went off in a rage.
His slaves, however, suggested the reasonableness of obeying so easy a command, since had it been a "great" one he would have complied. The mode of cure was wisely designed to teach him to unlearn his false ideas of greatness. He dipped seven times as he was told, "and his flesh came again like unto the flesh of a little child"; typifying the spiritual new birth through washing in the "fountain opened for uncleanness" (Job 33:25; Zechariah 13:1; John 3:5). Elisha by refusing his presents shows that the minister of God is not influenced by filthy lucre (1 Timothy 3:3), as Naaman's master had supposed (2 Kings 5:5, compare Genesis 14:28). Naaman desires to take away two mules burden of earth, wherewith to make an altar to Jehovah of the holy land, a sensible memorial to remind him perpetually in his pagan country of Jehovah' s past favor bestowed on him in Israel (compare Joshua 4:20-21, and the mediaeval campo santos).
He further asked God's pardon if, when in attendance on the Syrian king, he bowed in Rimmon's temple as a mark of respect to his master's religious feeling, not to the idol. Elisha, without sanctioning this compromise, but tacitly leaving his religious convictions to expand gradually, and in due time to east off the remains of idolatry still cleaving to him, bade him farewell with the customary "Go in peace." So the Lord Jesus "spoke the word as they were able to hear it" (Mark 4:33, compare Mark 8:23-25; John 16:12). Nothing is precipitately forced; principles planted in germ are left to their own silent development in due course. Gehazi's covetousness stands in sad contrast to Elisha's disinterestedness. The man of God's servant is as faithless as the pagan Naaman's servants were faithful; the highly privileged often fall far below the practice of those with scarcely any spiritual privileges whatever.
He even makes it a merit not to "spare" a pagan, "this Syrian," and dares to invoke God: "my master hath spared this Syrian ... but, as Jehovah liveth, I will take somewhat of him." By lying he gains two talents and two changes of raiment from Naaman; but lying is of no avail before Elisha: "went not my heart with thee, when the man turned again from his chariot to meet thee? is it a time to receive money?" etc.; compare 1 Peter 4:3. If Gehazi must have Naaman's money he shall have also Naaman's leprosy, and that for ever. In this miracle too Elisha foreran the Lord Jesus, the cure of leprosy being exclusively God's work. This must have been at least seven years after raising the Shunammite's son (2 Kings 8:1-4). During Elisha's residence at Jericho, the numbers of the sons of the prophets increasing, the place became "too strait" for them. So they removed to the Jordan, and there felled the trees densely growing on its banks.
The iron axe-head, a borrowed one, fell into the water. By a stick cast in, Elisha raised the iron to swim. God teaches His children to trust Him in small as in greater difficulties. He who numbers our very hairs regards nothing as too small to be brought under His notice; "God can as easily make our hard, heavy hearts, sunk down in the world's mud, to float upon life's stream and see heaven again" (Trapp). Benhadad, while Elisha resided at Dothan, half-way between Samaria and Jezreel, tried to surprise Israel from different points, but was foiled by Elisha warning the Israelite king, "beware that thou pass not such a place." Benhadad suspecting treachery was informed (probably by one who had witnessed Elisha's cure of Naaman)," the prophet in Israel telleth the king of Israel the words that thou speakest in thy bedchamber" (2 Kings 6:12); compare Christ's ministers, Luke 12:3.
The Syrian king therefore sent horses and chariots to compass Dothan by night. Elisha's ministering servant (not Gehazi) rising early was terrified at the sight; "alas, my master! how shall we do?" Elisha replies, "they that be with us are more than they with him" (2 Chronicles 32:7; Psalms 55:18; Romans 8:31), and prays, "Lord, open his eyes"; then he saw "the mountain full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha" (Psalms 34:7; Zechariah 9:8.) Thus the same heavenly retinue attended Elisha as his master (2 Kings 2:11). At Elisha's prayer the investing host was smitten with blindness (mental, Keil, Genesis 19:11), and Elisha went out to meet them as they came down from their encampment on the hill E. of Dothan, and led them into Samaria.
There Jehovah opened their eyes; and when the king of Israel would have smitten them, Elisha on the contrary caused him to "prepare great provision for them, and send them away." Compare Romans 12:2.). Untaught by this lesson, Benhadad, in disregard of gratitude and prudence, tried, instead of the previous marauding forays, a regular siege of Samaria. Israel was reduced to the last extremities of famine, unparalleled until the Roman siege of Jerusalem, a woman eating her own son, fulfilling the curse (Leviticus 26:29; Deuteronomy 28:53-57).
Joram, in language identical with his mother Jezebel's threat against Elijah (1 Kings 19:2; 2 Kings 6:31), makes Elisha the scape-goat of the national calamity, as though his late act in leading the blinded Syrians to Samaria and glorifying Jehovah above Baal were the cause, or suspecting it was by Elisha's word of prayer, as it was by Elijah's formerly (1 Kings 17), that the famine came (See JEHORAM); "God do so and more also to me, if the head of Elisha shall stand on him this day." Seeing the executioner's approach Elisha said to the elders sitting with him to receive consolation and counsel, "this son of a murderer (i.e. of Ahab and Jezebel, 1 Kings 18:4; 1 Kings 18:21) hath sent to take away my head"; "hold the messenger fast at the door," "his master's feet (are) behind him," namely, hastening to revoke his hasty order for Elisha's execution.
"Behold," said the king, "this evil is of Jehovah; what, should I wait for Jehovah any longer?" (as thou exhortest me, Psalms 27:14.) Compare Malachi 3:14; Proverbs 19:3. Elisha replies that as "this evil (the famine) is of Jehovah," so the suddenness of its removal by the morrow at "the word of Jehovah" would prove it not to be futile, as Joram said, to "wait for Jehovah." The Lord will not allow Joram's perversity to stop the current of divine mercy. A lord on whose hand the king leaned answered that this could only be "if Jehovah would make windows in heaven." His sentence was according to his unbelief; "thou shalt see it ... but shalt not eat thereof." Tantalus like, his seeing should only aggravate the bitterness of his exclusion from the blessing. A panic at a fancied sound of Hittite and Egyptian foes, by God's appointment, caused the Syrians to leave theft' camp and all its contents, and flee for their life.
Four lepers discovered the fact, and at first hid their spoil (Matthew 13:44; Matthew 25:25); afterward fearing mischief from selfishness (Proverbs 11:24), they held their peace no longer, but, feeling it a day of good tidings, told it to the king's household. Compare spiritually as to the gospel Isaiah 52:7; Isaiah 62:6-7; Matthew 28:19; Romans 13:12. The thronging crowd trode down the unbelieving lord who had charge of the gate. By Elisha's advice the Shunammite woman had gone to sojourn in the grain-growing seacoast plain of the Philistines during the seven years famine already alluded to (2 Kings 4:38).
In her absence her house and field had been appropriated, and she on her return appealed with loud cry to the king. He at the very time, by God's providence, had been inquiring from Gehazi (long before his leprosy, 2 Kings 5; 2 Kings 8, a proof that the incidents of Elisha's life are not recorded in chronological sequence, but in their spiritual connection) concerning Elisha's miracles, and was hearing of her son's resuscitation when she herself appeared. Her land, and all she had lost, were restored. Elisha, when Joram and Israel failed to be reformed by God's mercies, proceeded to Damascus to execute Elijah's commission (2 Corinthians 2:14). Benhadad respectfully inquired by Hazael, who brought a kingly present, 40 camels laden with every good thing of Damascus, "thy son (regarding Elisha as a father and lord) saith, Shall I recover of this disease?" "Then mayest certainly (i.e. in the natural course): howbeit Jehovah showed me he shall surely die."
Elisha, intensely gazing at Hazael's countenance, discerned his unscrupulous cruelty, and wept at the thought of the evil he would do to Israel. Hazael in the common view repudiated the possibility of being capable of such atrocities, "is thy servant a dog that he should do this great thing?" But the Hebrew requires "what" to be the predicate, and "the dog" connected with "thy servant" the subject. "What is thy servant (the dog as he is) that he should do this great thing?" Not the atrocity, but the greatness of it, is what startles him as something beyond his ability to accomplish, "dog (i.e. low, not cruel) as he is." "Dog" is the eastern phrase for meanness, not cruelty. Hazael, in the common view, murdered Benhadad with a wet cloth, whether "the bath mattress" (Ewald) or the thick woolen quilt or mosquito net. Others, from "Hazael" being named at the end of 2 Kings 8:15 as if distinct from the previous "he," think Benhadad placed it wet on himself to cool the fever, and died of the sudden chill.
Elisha next proceeded to Ramoth Gilead in the hills east of Jordan, which Hazael had tried to occupy (2 Kings 8:28). Joram was wounded, but the fortress still resisted Syria. There Elisha anointed Jehu, by the hand of one of the children of the prophets, to take vengeance on Ahab's guilty seed, having been witness of that monarch's wicked seizure of Naboth's vineyard and of Elijah's awful sentence on him (2 Kings 9:26). Elisha's last recorded act was when Jehu's grandson, Joash, wept over his deathbed in the words which Elisha had used of the departing Elijah: "my father, the chariot of Israel and the horsemen thereof," i.e., in losing thee Israel loses its main defense. Elisha, putting his hands on the king's (for God's hand must strengthen ours if we are to prosper, Genesis 49:24), bade Joash shoot toward the hostile land, saying, "the arrow of Jehovah's deliverance ... thou shalt smite the Syrians in Aphek."
Joash's half heartedness deprived him of complete triumph; for when told to smite the ground, he smote but thrice, instead of five or six times. Spiritually, if we fainted not in shooting the arrow of prayer (Psalms 5:3), we should smite down our spiritual foes more completely (Isaiah 43:22). Even when dead and buried, Elisha's body was made by God the means of revivifying a dead body cast hastily sideways into his sepulchral cell, upon a sudden inroad of the Moabite bands; a type of the vivifying power of Christ's dead body (Isaiah 26:19). Other antitypical resemblances are
(1) Christ's solemn inauguration at the Jordan.
(2) His dividing death's flood for us: Isaiah 51:15.
(3) By his "covenant of salt" healing the "naught water" and "barren ground" of the condemning law and of afflictive chastisements: Isaiah 35:1; Isaiah 35:6.
(4) His making the barren church mother of spiritual children: Isaiah 55:1.
(5) Multiplying the oil of grace: Isaiah 61:3.
(6) Reviving the spiritually and the naturally dead: John 5:25-29.
(7) Curing those bodily and those spiritually lepers.
(8) Feeding multitudes with bread for the body, and the bread of life for the soul.
(9) Being the church's "chariots and horsemen," "always causing us to triumph": 1618451895_73.
(10) Setting the captives free: Isaiah 61:1.
(11) Inflicting judgments on mockers. Acts 13:41; and on lucre-loving Gehazi-like ministers, as Judas; giving up to judicial blindness the willfully blind, John 9:39-41; and to seeing without tasting bliss those who disbelieve the gospel promise of the heavenly feast; so the rich man in hell saw Lazarus afar off in Abraham's bosom, an impassable gulf excluding himself (Luke 16:23-26). The gentle features of his character attracted the poor and the simple to him in their troubles, whereas sternness characterized Elijah. In Herod and Herodias Ahab and Jezebel are reproduced, as in John the Baptist Elijah is reproduced; as Elijah, the representative of the law, foreruns the gentler Elisha, so John the greatest prophet of the law foreruns Jesus the gracious Savior.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Ishmael ben Elisha, rabbi
(d. 100:140) Mishnaic sage, pupil of Rabbi Nechunia ben Hakaneh. As a child, he was rescued from Roman captors by Rabbi Joshua ben Gamla and brought to Judea, where excelled in Torah learning. He is famous for his enumeration of the thirteen principles of halachah hermeneutics. He authored the Halachic Midrash, the Mechilta. He is one of the Ten Martyrs brutally killed by the Romans
Holman Bible Dictionary - Elisha
(e li' sshuh) Personal name meaning, “my God is salvation.” A ninth century B.C. Israelite prophet, son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah (1 Kings 19:16 ).
His Name and Call Experience Elisha was plowing one day when “Elijah passed by him, and cast his mantle upon him.” (1 Kings 19:19 ). This action symbolically manifested God's plan to bestow the prophetic powers of Elijah upon Elisha. The chosen one understood the call of God for, “he left the oxen, and ran after Elijah” (1 Kings 19:20 ). That Elisha felt the call of prophetic succession is again clear following Elijah's dramatic ascent into heaven. There Elisha “took up also the mantle of Elijah that fell from him” (2 Kings 2:13 ).
The beginning of Elisha's ministry should be dated to the last years of King Ahab's rule (1 Kings 19:1 ) or approximately 850 B.C. The prophet then served faithfully during the reigns of Ahaziah (about 853 B.C.), Jehoram or Joram (852 B.C.), Jehu (c. 841 B.C.), Jehoahaz (c. 814 B.C.), and Jehoash or Joash (798 B.C.). 2 Kings 1-13 preserves the details of Elisha's ministry which ranged from about 850-800 B.C.
His Miracles After Elijah insisted to his chosen successor that he, “Ask what I shall do for you, before I am taken from you,” Elisha answered, “Let me inherit a double portion of spirit” (2 Kings 2:9 NIV). Taking up the mantle of the departed prophet, he parted the Jordan River. Following this miracle the prophetic order or “sons of the prophets” declared, “The spirit of Elijah is resting on Elisha” ( 2 Kings 2:15 ).
Soon thereafter, Elisha made bad water wholesome (2 Kings 2:19-22 ). His reputation soon assumed so sacred an aura that harassment of the prophet merited severe punishment. For mocking the bald prophet, 42 boys were attacked by two she-bears (2 Kings 2:23-24 ).
The prophet used his power to provide a widow with an abundance of valuable oil to save her children from slavery (2 Kings 4:1-7 ). He made a poisonous pottage edible (2 Kings 4:38-41 ), fed a hundred men by multiplying limited resources (2 Kings 4:42-44 ), and miraculously provided water for thirsting armies (2 Kings 3:13-22 ). Once he made an iron ax head float (2 Kings 6:5-7 ).
Some of the miracles of Elisha are quite well known and loved. Who has not been moved by the story of the Shunammite woman and her son? This barren woman and her husband who had graciously opened their home to the prophet had in turn been given a son by the Lord. One day while the boy worked in the field with his father, he suffered an apparent heartstroke and died. The compassion and tenacious hope of the mother met its reward when she sought and found the man of God and pleaded for help. God's power through Elisha raised the boy from the dead (2 Kings 4:8-37 ).
Yet another well-known story is the healing of Naaman the leper and the subsequent affliction of Gehazi the dishonest servant of Elisha (2 Kings 5:1-27 ). The miraculous powers of the prophet were prominently displayed still further in the war between Syria and Israel. The Syrian soldiers were blinded, then made to see. Then, at last, divine intervention totally foiled the Syrian siege of Samaria (2 Kings 6:8-7:20 ).
Elisha's power did not end at death. For when a dead man was thrown into Elisha's grave and touched his bones, “he revived, and stood up on his feet” (2 Kings 13:21 ).
In carrying out the second and third commands of the “still small voice” to Elijah (1 Kings 19:11-16 ), Elisha enhanced his legacy beyond the realm of miracle worker. He played a major role in Hazael becoming king of Syria (2 Kings 8:7-15 ) and also in the anointing of Jehu as king of Israel (2 Kings 9:1-13 ).
Powerful enough to perform miracles and appoint kings, yet sensitive enough to weep over the fate of Israel (2 Kings 8:11-12 ), Elisha, disciple and successor to Elijah, proved to be both prophet and statesman. Chosen by God and hand-picked by Elijah in the latter half of the ninth century B.C., Elisha directed the historical drama of Israel. See Miracles; Prophet-Prophecy; History of Israel; Baal Worship.
J. Randall O'Brien
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Elisha
ELISHA . Elisha was a native of Abel-meholah, which was situated in the Jordan valley 10 Roman miles from Scythopolis, probably on the site of the modern ‘Ain Helweh . His father was a well-to-do farmer, and so Elisha is a representative of the newer form of Hebrew society. On his return from Horeb, Elijah cast his mantle upon the youth, as he was directing his father’s servants at their ploughing. The young man at once recognized the call from God, and, after a hastily-devised farewell feast, he left the parental abode ( 1 Kings 19:16 ; 1 Kings 19:19 ), and ever after he was known as the man ‘who poured water on the hands of Elijah’ ( 2 Kings 3:11 ). His devotion to, and his admiration for, his great master are apparent in the closing scenes of the latter’s life. A double portion of Elijah’s spirit (cf. the right of the firstborn to a double portion of the patrimony) is the summum bonum which he craved. In order to receive this boon he must be a witness of the translation of the mighty hero of Jehovah; and as Elijah is whirled away in the chariot of fire, his mantle falls upon his disciple, who immediately makes use of it in parting the waters of the Jordan. After Elisha has recrossed the river, he is greeted by the sons of the prophets as their leader ( 2 Kings 13:20-2157 ).
After this event it is impossible to reduce the incidents of Elisha’s life to any chronological sequence. His ministry covered half a century (b.c. 855 798), and during this period four monarchs, Jehoram, Jehu, Jehoahaz, and Joash, sat on the throne of Israel (2 Kings 3:1 ff; cf. 2 Kings 13:14 ff.). The story of Elisha was borrowed by the author of the Book of Kings from some prophetic work of the Northern Kingdom; and, without any regard for sequence in time, he has arranged his material according to subject-matter. In our canonical Book of Kings, the larger part of Elisha’s activities is placed within the reign of Jehoram ( 2 Kings 3:1 ff; cf. 2 Kings 9:1 ff.). He may have reached the zenith of his career in these twelve years, but all the recorded events of his life cannot be crowded into this short period.
His name, Elisha (= ‘God is salvation’), like that of his master, tersely describes his character and expresses his mission. Elijah’s was a flint-like nature, which crushed its opponents and won its victories by hard blows. Elisha is a gentler and more gracious man, and gains his ends by diplomacy. He loves the haunts of men, and resides in cities like Dothan and Samaria. His miracles are deeds of mercy, and, like that of the Prophet of Nazareth, his ministry breathes a spirit ‘of gracious, soothing, holy beneficence.’ We find him at the headquarters of the sons of the prophets, making his benign presence felt. He sweetens a spring of brackish water at Jericho ( 2 Kings 2:19 ff.) at a time of drought; he renders a poisonous mess of pottage harmless for the members of the prophetic guild ( 2 Kings 4:38 ff.); he multiplies the oil for the prophet’s widow, who finds herself in dire extremity ( 2 Kings 4:1 ff). At the prophet’s command, as at the bidding of a greater than Elisha, the loaves are multiplied ( 2 Kings 4:42 ). His sympathy goes out in a practical way for the man who has lost his axe ( 2 Kings 6:1 ff.). One of the most beautiful stories in the whole range of Scripture is that of the entertainment of Elisha in the home of the Shunammite. Her hospitality and the practical manifestation of gratitude on the part of the prophet form a charming picture. In the restoration of her son to life, Elisha performs one of his greatest miracles ( 2 Kings 4:8 ff., 2 Kings 8:1 ff.). In his treatment of the Syrian troops which had been despatched to capture him, he anticipated the spirit of the Saviour ( 2 Kings 6:14 ff.). The familiar incident of the healing of the leprosy of Naaman not only gives an idea of the influence and power of the man of God, but the story is suggestive of the pro-foundest spiritual truths ( 2 Kings 5:6-17 ).
The contrast between the spirit of master and disciple may be over-emphasized. Elisha could be as stern as Elijah: at Bethel he treats the mocking youth in the spirit of Sinai (2 Kings 2:23 ), and no touch of pity can be detected in the sentence that falls on Gehazi ( 2 Kings 5:27 ). The estimate of Sirach ( Sir 48:12 ) is according to all the facts of the OT narrative:
‘Elijah it was who was wrapped in a tempest:
And Elisha was filled with his spirit:
And in all his days he was not moved by the fear of any ruler,
And no one brought him into subjection.’
This severer side of the prophet’s character appears in his public rather than in his private life. In the Moabitish campaign, the allied kings seek his counsel. His address to Jehoram of Israel. ‘What have I to do with thee? Get thee to the prophets of thy father and the prophets of thy mother,’ indicates that Elisha had not forgotten the past and the conflicts of his master (2 Kings 3:13 ff.). Later, the relations between the reigning monarch and the prophet seem more cordial, for the man of God reveals the plans of the Syrians to Israel’s king ( 2 Kings 6:8 ff.). This change of attitude on the part of the prophet may be due to the fact that Jehoram attempted to do away with Baal worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ); but Elisha has not forgotten the doom pronounced upon the house of Ahab by Elijah. While Jehu is commanding the forces besieging Ramoth-gilead, Elisha sends one of the sons of the prophets to anoint the general as king, and thus he executes the commission which Elijah received from Jehovah at Horeb ( 1 Kings 19:16 ).
Elisha’s relations with the Syrians are exceedingly interesting. On one occasion he appears to be as much at home in Damascus as in Samaria. Ben-hadad, suffering from a severe ailment, hears of his presence in his capital, and sends Hazael to the man of God to inquire concerning the issue. The prophet reads the heart of the messenger, and predicts both the king’s recovery and his assassination by Hazael (2 Kings 8:7 ff.). Nothing is said of a formal anointing, but in this connexion Elisha seems to have carried out the commission of Elijah ( 1 Kings 19:17 ). The blockade of Samaria ( 2 Kings 6:24 to 2 Kings 7:20 ) probably falls in the reign of Jehoahaz. That the prophet is held by king and statesmen responsible for the straits to which the city has been reduced, is an eloquent tribute to his political influence. In this connexion Elisha’s prediction of deliverance is speedily fulfilled. Under Joash, Israel was hard pressed, and her might had dwindled to insignificance ( 2 Kings 13:7 ), but Elisha was still the saviour of his country. Joash weeps over him as he lies on his deathbed: ‘My father, my father, the chariots of Israel and the horsemen thereof.’ Directing the monarch to perform a symbolical act, the prophet gives him assurance of victory ( 2 Kings 13:15 ff.). Even after his burial his bones had the power to perform a beneficent miracle ( 1618451895_3 ).
An incident in the life of Elisha throws light on the prophetic state. Before declaring the final result of the campaign to the three kings, he asks for a minstrel. The music induces the ecstatic state, and then he prophesies (2 Kings 3:15 ). The supernatural abounds in his life; in many instances he manifests the power of prediction ( 2 Kings 4:16 , 2Ki 5:26 , 2 Kings 6:8 ff., 2 Kings 7:1 ff., 2Ki 8:10 ; 2 Kings 8:12 ff., 2 Kings 9:6 f., 2 Kings 13:15 ff.). But some of his deeds are not miracles in the modern sense ( 2 Kings 2:19 ff., 2 Kings 4:38 ff., 2 Kings 6:6 ff.).
James A. Kelso.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Yishmael ben Elisha
(d. 100:140) Mishnaic sage, pupil of Rabbi Nechunia ben Hakaneh. As a child, he was rescued from Roman captors by Rabbi Joshua ben Gamla and brought to Judea, where excelled in Torah learning. He is famous for his enumeration of the thirteen principles of halachah hermeneutics. He authored the Halachic Midrash, the Mechilta. He is one of the Ten Martyrs brutally killed by the Romans
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Elisha
ELISHA (Authorized Version Eliseus).—The famous disciple, companion, and successor of Elijah. In NT he is only once referred to, viz. in Luke 4:27. Jesus, preaching in the synagogue at Nazareth, reminds His fellow-townsmen, who were unwilling to receive His teaching because He was one of themselves, that Elisha, who was an Israelite, healed but one leper, and he was a Syrian. He leaves them to draw the obvious inference as to the probable consequence of their rejection of Him. It is clear, however, that in this warning our Lord was looking far beyond Nazareth, and that He had in view the casting away of the Jews through unbelief, and the call of the Gentiles.
J. Cromarty Smith.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Elisha
1 Kings 19:16 (c) He is a type of CHRIST as the Saviour. The word means, "GOD is the Saviour."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Elisha
Son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah. Elijah was instructed by God to anoint Elisha to be prophet in his stead. Elijah cast his mantle over him, but we do not read of the anointing: doubtless it was realised in receiving a double portion of Elijah's spirit. Elisha was not prepared then to take up Elijah's mantle, but first he made a feast for his people, and then he followed Elijah and ministered unto him. When God was about to take Elijah to Himself, it became known to the sons of the prophets, and they told Elisha, but he knew it already; and when Elijah suggested to him to remain behind he refused and followed him from place to place, until he had traversed Jordan (figuratively death) with Elijah. Being thus proved to be knit together in spirit, Elijah asked Elisha what he should do for him before he was taken. Elisha said, "Let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me." Elijah replied that, though he had asked a hard thing, it should be so if he saw him when he was taken up. A chariot and horses of fire separated them, and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven; and Elisha saw it. Elisha took up the mantle that fell from Elijah, which before he had failed to do, and went to the Jordan and smote it with the mantle, and the waters divided, and he passed over into the land, with the spirit of the ascended Elijah resting on him.
Elisha's first miracle was healing the waters at Jericho, the cursed city, by means of salt in a new cruse: type of the purifying power of grace. His mission was grace as from an ascended one; the waters were permanently healed, and the ground was no longer barren. But as he went to Bethel some boys out of the city mocked him, saying, "Go up, thou bald head." He cursed them in the name of the Lord, and two she bears tore forty-two of them. God vindicated the authority of His servant. Elisha had come as it were from heaven, into which Elijah had entered, and he came in grace, and if this was despised, judgement must follow, as it will be with Israel by-and-by. Elisha went to Carmel, where the priests of Baal had been destroyed, and thence to Samaria, the seat of the apostasy, and where his testimony was most needed. Jehoshaphat king of Judah joined with Jehoram king of Israel, and the king of Edom, to attack Moab; but they had no water. Elisha was sought for, and he boldly told Jehoram to go to the gods of his father and mother: if Jehoshaphat had not been there he would not have helped them, nevertheless there was grace for them. Ditches, or pits were made, and in the morning the valley was full of water; victory over Moab followed. 2 Kings 2,3 .
A widow ofone of the prophets appealed to Elishato save her two sonsfrom the grasp of a creditor. She had nothing but a pot of oil. She was told to borrow vessels 'not a few,' and fill them with oil. On her doing this the oil was increased until there was not a vessel more to fill. Thus according to her faith in borrowing was her supply from God. The creditor was paid, and she and her sons lived on the remainder, showing how God far exceeded her request.
A great woman at Shunem bestowed hospitality on Elisha, and provided a chamber for his use whenever he passed that way. For this she was rewarded with a son; but when grown old enough to go into the fields he died. The woman laid him on Elisha's bed, and hastened to inform him of what had happened, but piously added 'It is well.' Elisha returned with the woman, and the child was raised to life and restored to his mother. Thus was manifested the power of God over death and a broken heart was bound up.
Two more miracles followed. In gathering herbs for a meal because of the dearth, a poisonous weed was included and there was 'death in the pot.' Elisha cast in some meal, and the pottage was cured. The other miracle was the increase of the bread so that a hundred men were supplied from twenty loaves, or cakes, and there was some left: similar to the Lord feeding the multitudes when He was on earth. 2 Kings 4 .
The next miracle was healing Naaman the Syrian of leprosy. This was grace extending beyond the land, even to their enemies. Naaman had to be humbled as well as blessed, and to learn that there was "no God in all the earth but in Israel," as he himself confessed. Gehazi, Elisha's servant, was, alas, tempted with a lie in his mouth to take of the Syrian some of the presents which he had brought for Elisha, but which had been refused. This was revealed to Elisha, and the leprosy of Naaman cleaved to Gehazi and to his seed. The one nearest to the means of blessing, if he turns from it, suffers most. Elisha next made the iron head of the axe to swim, thus reversing the laws of nature: the axe was borrowed, and the trust must not be violated. 2Kings 5,2 Kings 6:1-7 .
The Syrians had now to learn a lesson of the power of the God of Israel, but still in grace. They laid traps for the king of Israel, but Elisha warned him again and again of the danger, and he escaped. On this being made known to the king of Syria he sent an army to seize Elisha. He was at Dothan, and they compassed the city. Elisha prayed that his servant's eyes might be opened to see that they were surrounded with horses and chariots of fire which were otherwise invisible: cf. Hebrews 1:13,14 . The army was then smitten with blindness, led to Samaria, fed with bread and water, and dismissed to their master with the wonderful tale. It was no use laying plots against people whose God protected them like this. "The bands of Syria came no more into the land of Israel;" that is, the marauding bands that laid plots to seize the king; for immediately we read that Ben-hadad king of Syria came with a great army and besieged Samaria. The famine became so severe that a woman's child was boiled and eaten. The king was greatly moved at this and threatened to take the life of Elisha, apparently linking the famine with God's servant. This was revealed to Elisha as he sat in the house. The king followed the messenger and he said, "This evil is of the Lord; what should I wait for the Lord any longer?" Elisha had a message of deliverance: by the next day a measure of fine flour should be sold for a shekel, and two measures of barley for the same. An unbelieving lord scoffed at this; but he saw it, though he did not eat of it, for he was trampled to death in the crowd. Thus judgement followed unbelief in the gracious provision of God. 2 Kings 6:8 - 2 Kings 7 .
Elisha prophesied that there wouldbe a seven years' famine, and he told the Shunammite woman to sojourn where she could during the time. She dwelt among the Philistines seven years, and on her return she cried to the king for the restoration of her house and land. God so ordered it that just at that time Gehazi was relating to the king the great things that Elisha had done. He recognised the woman as the one whose son Elisha had raised, and the king ordered the restoration of her property.
The prophet went to Damascus, and Ben-hadad, being sick, sent Hazael to inquire if he should recover. The answer was that he might certainly recover, yet he should die: an apparent enigma; but it was fully explained by Hazael causing his death when he would otherwise have recovered. Elisha prophesied that Hazael would be king over Syria, and he wept as he told the dreadful things he would do to Israel. Elisha sent one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu to be king over Israel: he was to execute God's judgement on the house of Ahab and on Jezebel, which had been prophesied by Elijah. 1 Kings 21:23,24 . What had been foretold Jehu fulfilled. 2Kings 8,2 Kings 9 .
The time now approached for Elisha's death. He was sick and Joash king of Israel went to visit him. Elisha prophesied that Joash should smite the Syrians till they were consumed, but he was angry with the king's want of energy and said he should smite them but three times. Elisha's work was now done and he died and was buried. When a corpse was let down into the same tomb, as soon as it touched the bones of Elisha life was restored. Type that though Israel is now dead towards God (cf. Daniel 12:2 ), when they are brought into connection with God's true Prophet they will be restored to life as unexpectedly and as powerfully. As we have seen, Elisha's mission was grace, and his history to the end is stamped with the power of life. 2 Kings 13:14-21 . He is called ELISEUS in Luke 4:27 .
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Elisha
The successor, in the prophetical office, of Elijah. His name is also highly significant, meaning the salvation of my God. I must pass over many interesting circumstances in the history of this man of God, for the same reasons as in the former. But I beg to notice one event in Elisha's ministry, because it is not so generally regarded, and yet seems to lead to a profitable subject of meditation. The event I refer to, is that of his healing the waters of Jericho. (See 2 Kings 2:19-22) The reader will not forget, that Jericho is the city Joshua cursed before the Lord. (See Joshua 6:26 with 1 Kings 16:34) There evidently appears from this history, the tokens of divine displeasure upon Jericho in the days of Elisha. For we read, that the men of the city said unto the prophet, "Behold, I pray thee, the situation of this city is pleasant, as my lord seeth, but the water is naught, and the ground barren." In the margin of our Bibles the barren ground is explained, in causing to miscarry. Hence it should seem that the divine displeasure was manifested in this way, in the rendering the climate unfavourable to the increase of children. I do not presume to decide upon the subject, neither do I say as much, when I ask in order to determine the point, as to enquire. But I humbly conceive, if by the naughtiness of the water of Jericho, barrenness was induced among the females, there was somewhat in this analogous to the Lord's appointment in Israel concerning the waters of Jealousy. In both cases, the matter is the same in relation to the cause. (See Numbers 5:23-31) That the barrenness mentioned of Jericho referred to the sterility of the women, or their miscarriages, which is the same thing in effect, I have no doubt. The same word Sheceleh, is made use of in this place, as in the instance of Jacob's expostulating with Laban: "Thy she-goats" (Genesis 31:38) "have not cast their young." And the Lord, when speaking in promises to his people, saith, "He" (Exodus 23:25-26) "shall bless thy bread and thy water, and I will take sickness away from the midst of thee. There shall nothing cast their young, nor be barren, in thy land." It appears then, that amidst all the pleasantness of Jericho, which abounded with palm trees (and, indeed, on that account was called the city of palm trees,) (See 2 Chronicles 28:15) there was still a certain somewhat, unfavourable to that which to the children of Israel (looking forward to the types that the promised seed would be in their lot), was among the most distressing of all calamities, the want of children. This was the state of Jericho. The prophet's cruse of salt cast into the waters, under the Lord's blessing, healed the land. Elisha cast the cruse into the spring, saying,"Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters; there shall not be from thence any more, death, or barren land. So the waters were healed unto this day, according to the saying of Elisha." I have thought it worthwhile to enter into the particulars of this interesting account, concerning the barrenness at Jericho healed by the cruse of salt cast into the spring of the waters, by way of introducing an infinitely more interesting observation on the subject itself. The cruse of salt, like the tree at Marah (Exodus 15:25) were both beautiful types of Jesus and his salvation. Both the cruse and the barrenness are effectually cured when Jesus takes them away. The waters of Marah lose their bitterness when his cross is put in them to sweeten and sanctify. The barrenness of Jericho is healed, and children are born, even in Jericho, when Christ's cruse of grace is applied. A Rahab and harlot is found in Jericho; and Æthiopia, and Seba, and the multitude of isles, shall stretch forth their hands unto God. Jesus hath taken out the curse when he was made a curse for us, that we might be made the righteousness of God in him. (Galatians 3:13; 2 Corinthians 5:21) Hallelujah!
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Elisha
ELISHA, the servant and the successor of Elijah, was the son of a prosperous farmer in Israel. Shaphat, the father of Elisha, was a man of substance, but, like all true Israelites, rich and poor, he had brought up his son Elisha to a life of hard work. And thus it is that we come upon Elisha standing in the office of superior over his father's ploughmen, while he is, at the same time, one of those same ploughmen himself. One spring day, when all Shaphat's ploughs were at work in the spring-time meadow, and Elisha's plough the foremost among them, Elijah, the old prophet, came up suddenly behind Elisha and cast his rough mantle over Elisha's shoulder. In a moment the young ploughman saw and understood what it was that had happened to him. Elijah had not spoken a single word to Elisha. But Elijah's solemn silent act was sufficiently clear and eloquent to Elisha. 'When a great teacher dies,' says Sir John Malcolm in his History of Persia, 'he bequeaths his patched mantle to the disciple that he most esteems. And the moment the elect disciple puts on the holy mantle he is vested with the whole power and sanctity of his predecessor. The mantles which were used by ascetics and saints have always been the objects of religious veneration in the East. The holy man's power is founded upon his sacred character, and that rests upon his poverty and contempt of worldly goods. His mantle is his all, and its transfer marks out his heir. Some of these sacred mantles can be traced for several centuries, and their value increases with their age.' This is an old and superstitious tradition now; but in the ploughed field of Abel. Meholah we are back at its very beginning and first performance, when Elijah comes up behind Elisha and casts his cloak of camel's hair over the shoulders of Shaphat's son. And, as if to make it impossible for himself ever to turn back from following Elijah, Elisha made a fire of the wood of his familiar plough, and slew his favourite oxen and made a feast of the flesh, and thereby proclaimed openly to all men that he had put his hand to another plough than that plough of wood, from which he would never draw back. Elisha burned his ships that day, as the Romans would have said. Shaphat, Elisha's father, was growing old, and Elisha would soon have inherited the rich meadow he was then working in; but, in a moment, all that was for ever changed; and Shaphat may now cast his husbandman's mantle over what young farmer he will; his son Elisha is henceforth dead to all that Abel-Meholah has to hold out to him. For the next fifty years Elisha is to be a spiritual ploughman in the Lord's meadows, which are the hearts and lives of the men of Israel.
Elijah's mantle is one of our most expressive proverbs, and so is Elisha's request for a double portion of his departing master's spirit. 'Ask what I shall do for thee,' said Elijah, 'before I be taken away from thee.' And Elisha said, 'I pray thee, let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me.' Not the double of all the gifts and all the graces that Elijah had possessed and had so well employed. That is an impossible explanation of Elisha's petition. I can easily imagine Elijah feeling now that life was over with him, that he had been an unprofitable servant. All true men so feel. I can easily imagine Elijah seeking of God in prayer that his successor should be twofold, should be tenfold, more gifted and more successful than he had been. But I cannot imagine a humble and loyal soul like Elisha so insulting his master on his deathbed as to say to him: 'I hope to have double thy success to show when I come to die.' No; the thing is inconceivable. What Elisha really asked for was simply the fulfilment of what had been already promised him when Elijah's mantle fell on his shoulders. That act of Elijah was the sign and the seal of Elisha's adoption. And the adopted son had always allotted to him the double portion that belonged to the first-born. Not the double of what the adopting father possessed himself; for no man can put into his testament the double of what he has of his own. But he can double the portion that would properly have belonged to one of his younger children. And thus it is that, when it is put to him, Elisha simply, and dutifully, and humbly asks that the divine law of adoption and primogeniture may immediately begin to hold and to take effect in his spiritual sonship to the departing prophet.
The world and the church live and thrive and grow from generation to generation under the guiding and upholding hand of God. All the time that Elijah was repining and meditating death under the juniper tree, God was preparing the young ploughman of Abel-Meholah to wear Elijah's mantle, and to carry forward Elijah's work. And when we are prognosticating the headlessness and the collapse of the church when this man and that man shall have fallen asleep, all the time God has His hidden servants, quite well known to Him, and quite ready to take up this man's and that man's great office when they shall demit it. There may be to be seen following the spring plough in Strathmore or in the Lothians at this moment, some young man who shall be as well known and as great in a few years in Scotland as Elisha was in Israel. There are certainly at school, at college, in the shop, in the office, on the hills, in the mine, young men who, five-and-twenty years after this, shall be as great preachers, as great writers, as great statesmen, as great administrators, and as great discoverers as any of those who are now in such fame, and far better suited for the time to come. Elisha was not Elijah. But he was the gift of the living God to the living Israel of his day. And I would have you all keep your dejected hearts in perfect peace, sure of this, that God will look after both the church and the world far better than the most anxious-minded and censorious-minded of His people.
And let all our prophets, and all the sons of our prophets, go to school in manners and in morals to those fifty sons of the prophets in that day in Israel. Look at them as they hail and bow down before a better man than themselves, though he is as young as themselves, and withal, has not had their schooling for his office. There is blessing in store for Israel, from such young ministers. Elisha had been a ploughman till he became Elijah's servant. And, yet, in a moment, and without a murmur, the fifty sons of the prophets at once accept Elisha as the true successor of Elijah, and as their young master. The old men who had not had great success themselves did not cast up Elisha's youth to him when his success began, nor did the sons of the prophets keep up against him his humble origin, or his lack of letters. There must have been good Divinity Halls in those days when there were fifty probationers just come out of them of such humility, and admiration, and belief in better men than themselves. These prophetical graces are beautiful to us to read about at a distance, but they are far more beautiful to God when they are seen in everyday men like ourselves. Those fifty students must have had good tutors and governors in ministerial morals and in pastoral theology.
About dead men's mantles. Elisha's first instinct was to bury and blot himself out under Elijah's coat of camel's hair and his leathern girdle. And he did actually begin his public life wearing those ancient coverings and austere accoutrements. But Elisha was far too simple and far too sincere a man to continue long wound up in such cerements. He set out, and I do not wonder at it, in Elijah's mantle, and he did his first prophetical work in it; but he wore it awkwardly, and he soon laid it aside. Elisha was an altogether smaller and more homely man than Elijah, and he wisely preferred before long to put on much less startling and outstanding clothes. Elisha was a gentle, homely, kindly lowland minister; as unlike Elijah as the green meadows of Abel-Meholah were unlike the savage solitudes of mountainous Gilead. And we must not demand of our young preachers that they shall all stride out with the same step, and pronounce just with the same accent as the Elijah of our youth. We had Elijah, and he fulfilled his day, and did his work. And no men among us need more to be men of today, and not of yesterday, than they who preach the Word of God to us and to our children. Even the Elijah you so often go back upon, were he here again, he would not be exactly the same man, with exactly the same mantle, the hem and the hair of which you were so wont to kiss.
Every ill-brought-up boy who calls names at old people and at odd people must he reminded of those miserable boys and girls of Bethel who called bad names at Elisha till two she-bears came out of the wood, and tore forty and two children of them. The Areopagus on one occasion sentenced a Greek boy to death only for plucking out a quail's eyes, because, they said, if that boy was let live, he would do widespread cruelty and mischief when he grew up, and he had better die at once; and so they sent him to the executioner. On December the 21st, 1719, Thomas Boston writes this in his journal: A poor boy came into the house begging, having such a defect in his speech that he pronounced the words father and mother fao and moa, at which my wife and others smiling, desired him to speak over again what he had said. In the meantime my little daughter stood looking on with tears in her eyes and in great distress, and at length she came up to her mother, and said, 'Mother, did God make that laddie?' 'Yes, my dear, He did.' 'Will He not then be angry at us all for laughing at the laddie, for my lesson says, "He that mocketh at the poor, reproacheth his Maker"?' She was in mighty concern also to let the boy have some old clothes.
With all that the sacred writer has given us about Elisha, I am not satisfied. I would have liked some more about Elisha's father and mother. I always regret hearing Elisha calling Elijah his father, and no more word of honest Shaphat. Fathers, come with me, and let no man run away with our best name from us! Let no man, no, not Elijah himself, take our crown. Let us determine to be the fathers of our children in the spirit also. Let us be specially jealous of our best ministers, lest our children pass us by, and claim any other man whatsoever as their spiritual father. Let our children be able all their days to say-it was my father; it was my mother. We feed them, we clothe them, we send them to school, and we work and lay up for them. O let no other man, the very best, cast the mantle of the Christian calling and the Christian spirit on the shoulders of our children. Let us do that ourselves; let us do it early; let us do it now. Here am I and the children which Thou hast given me!
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elisha
Elisha (e-lî'shah), God his salvation. A distinguished prophet of Israel and successor of Elijah. The acts of his earlier ministry are related at considerable length. He is first mentioned as the son of Shaphat, the agriculturist of Abel-meholah in the valley of the Jordan. While occupied in guiding the plow he received the call of Elijah, and appears ever after to have attended on him. 1 Kings 19:16; 1 Kings 19:19-21; 2 Kings 3:11. How deep the affection was with which he regarded his master, the narrative of Elijah's last days on earth sufficiently testifies. At his translation Elisha asked a double portion of the departing prophet's spirit, secured his falling mantle, and had speedily full proof that the Lord God of Elijah was with him. 2 Kings 2:1-15. Elisha, though a young man, was bald. The young persons mocked at the great miracle just performed. Why should not the bald head go up after his master? the world would be well rid of both. Such profanity must have an instant significant punishment. And at the word of the prophet, speaking in God's name, she-bears destroyed a number of these mockers. 2 Kings 2:23-25. Many would hear and fear, and learn to reverence God's ambassador. He was the counsellor and friend of successive kings. He was the opposite to Elijah in most things. He lived in the city or with his students, honored and sought for, a welcome guest in the homes he graced by his presence. And yet he was filled with a "double"—i.e.. an elder brother's—portion of Elijah's spirit, both to work miracles and to give counsel for present and future emergencies. He multiplied the widow's oil, 2 Kings 4:5-8, and when the son of the good Shunammite—God's reward to her for her kindness to his prophet—died, he raised him to life. 2 Kings 4:8-37. He cured Naaman, smote Gehazi with leprosy, misled the Syrians, foretold abundant food, and when dying gave the king the promise of victory. 2 Kings 5:1-27; 2 Kings 6:1-33; 2 Kings 7:1-20; 2 Kings 8:1-29. But God would still put honor on his servant. He was buried, and afterwards, when Moabite bands were ravaging the country, and some one was to be carried to the tomb, the attendants, surprised by the spoilers, hastily thrust the corpse into Elisha's sepulchre. But no sooner had it touched the great prophet's bones than the dead man lived again. 2 Kings 13:20-21. Truly, by all these wondrous works it was abundantly proved that there was a God in Israel.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Elisha
the son of Shaphat, Elijah's disciple and successor in the prophetic office, was of the city of Abelmeholah, 1 Kings 19:16 , &c. Elijah having received God's command to anoint Elisha as a prophet, came to Abelmeholah; and finding him ploughing with oxen, he threw his mantle over the shoulders of Elisha, who left the oxen, and accompanied him. Under the article Elijah, it has been observed that Elisha was following his master, when he was taken up to heaven; and that he inherited Elijah's mantle, with a double portion of his spirit. Elisha smote the waters of Jordan, and divided them; and he rendered wholesome the waters of a rivulet near Jericho. The kings of Israel, Judah, and Edom, having taken the field against the king of Moab, who had revolted from Israel, were in danger of perishing for want of water. Elisha was at that time in the camp; and seeing Jehoram, the king of Israel, he said, "What have I to do with thee? get thee to the prophets of thy father, and to the prophets of thy mother. As the Lord liveth, were it not out of respect to Jehoshaphat, the king of Judah, who is here present, I would not so much as look on thee. But now send for a minstrel; and while this man played, the Spirit of the Lord fell upon Elisha, and he said, Thus saith the Lord, Make several ditches along this valley; for ye shall see neither wind nor rain, yet this valley shall be filled with water, and you and your cattle shall drink of it." The widow of one of the prophets having told Elisha, that her husband's creditor was determined to take her two sons and sell them for slaves, Elisha multiplied the oil in the widow's house, in such quantity that she was enabled to sell it and to discharge the debt. Elisha went frequently to Shunem, a city of Manasseh, on this side Jordan, and was entertained by a certain matron at her house. As she had no children, Elisha promised her a son; and his prediction was accomplished. Some years after, the child died. Elisha, who was then at Mount Carmel, was solicited by the mother to come to her house. The prophet went, and restored the child. At Gilgal, during a great famine, one of the sons of the prophets gathered wild gourds, which he put into the pot, and they were served up to Elisha and the other prophets. It was soon found that they were mortal poison; but Elisha ordering meal to be thrown into the pot, corrected the quality of the pottage. Naaman, general of the king of Syria's forces, having a leprosy, was advised to visit Elisha in order to be cured. Elisha appointed him to wash himself seven times in the Jordan; and by this means Naaman was perfectly healed. He returned to Elisha, and offered him large presents, which the man of God resolutely refused. But Gehazi, Elisha's servant, did not imitate the disinterestedness of his master. He ran after Naaman, and in Elisha's name begged a talent of silver, and two changes of garments. Naaman gave him two talents. Elisha, to whom God had discovered Gehazi's action, reproached him with it, and declared, that the leprosy of Naaman should cleave to him and his family for ever. This is a striking instance of the disinterestedness of the Jewish prophets. Elisha, like his master Elijah, had learned to contemn the world. The king of Syria being at war with the king of Israel, could not imagine how all his designs were discovered by the enemy. He was told, that Elisha revealed them to the king of Israel. He therefore sent troops to seize the prophet at Dothan; but Elisha struck them with blindness, and led them in that condition into Samaria. When they were in the city, he prayed to God to open their eyes; and after he had made them eat and drink, he sent them back unhurt to their master. Some time after, Benhadad, king of Syria, having besieged Samaria, the famine became so extreme, that a certain woman ate her own child. Jehoram, king of Israel, imputing to Elisha these calamities, sent a messenger to cut off his head. Elisha, who was informed of this design against his life, ordered the door to be shut. The messenger was scarcely arrived, when the king himself followed, and made great complaints of the condition to which the town was reduced. Elisha answered, "To-morrow about this time shall a measure of fine flour be sold for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a shekel, in the gate of Samaria." Upon this, one of the king's officers said, "Were the Lord to open windows in heaven, might this thing be." This unbelief was punished; for the prophet answered, "Thou shalt see it with thine eyes, but shalt not eat thereof," which happened according to Elisha's prediction, for he was trodden to death by the crowd in the gate. At the end of the seven years' famine, which the prophet had foretold, he went to Damascus, to execute the command which God had given to Elijah many years before, of declaring Hazael king of Syria. Benhadad being at that time indisposed, and hearing that Elisha was come into his territories, sent Hazael, one of his principal officers, to the prophet to consult him, and inquire of him whether it were possible for him to recover. The prophet told Hazael, that he might recover, but that he was very well assured that he should not; and then looking steadfastly upon him, he broke out into tears upon the prospect, as he told him, of the many barbarous calamities which he would bring upon Israel, when once he was advanced to power, as he would soon be, because he was assured by divine revelation that he was to be king of Syria. Hazael, though offended at the time at being thought capable of such atrocities, did but too clearly verify these predictions; for at his return, having murdered Benhadad, and procured himself to be declared king, he inflicted the greatest miseries upon the Israelites.
2. Elisha sent one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, and grandson of Nimshi, to be king, in pursuance of an order given to Elijah some years before; and Jehu having received the royal unction, executed every thing that had been foretold by Elijah against Ahab's family, and against Jezebel. Elisha falling sick, Joash, king of Israel, came to visit him, and said, "O my father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof." Elisha desired the king to bring him a bow and arrows. Joash having brought them, Elisha requested him to put his hands on the bow, and at the same time the prophet put his own hand upon the king's, and said, Open the window which looks east, and let fly an arrow.
The king having done this, Elisha said, This is the arrow of the Lord's deliverance: thou shalt be successful against Syria at Aphek. Elisha desired him again to shoot, which he did three times, and then stopped. But Elisha with vehemence said, "If thou hadst smitten five or six times, then thou hadst smitten Syria until thou hadst consumed it; whereas now thou shalt smite Syria only thrice." This is the last prediction of Elisha of which we read in Scripture, for soon after he died; but it was not his last miracle: for, some time after his interment, a company of Israelites, as they were going to bury a dead person, perceiving a band of Moabites making toward them, put the corpse for haste into Elisha's tomb, and, as soon as it had touched the prophet's body, it immediately revived; so that the man stood upon his feet: a striking emblem of the life-giving effect of the labours of the servants of God, after they themselves are gathered to their fathers.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Elisha
A prophet of Israel. In obedience to Divine command Elias designated him as his successor by casting his mantle over his shoulders. He accompanied Elias until the latter was translated and his prophetical power was confirmed by many miracles, among them the raising of a child to life and the cure of the Syrian general Naaman of leprosy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Elisha John Durbin
Apostle of Western Kentucky, born Madison County, Kentucky, February 1, 1800; died Shelbyville, Kentucky, 1887. He was ordained in 1822, and his missionary career lasted for over 60 years during which he erected churches, established stations, formed congregations, and visited isolated families.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Elisha
Salvation of God
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Elisha
The pupil and successor of Elijah, a prophet of Israel during the reign of Jehoram, Jehu, Jehoahaz, and Joash, B. C. 903-838. He was a native of Abel-meholah, where he was at work ploughing when Elijah called him to become a prophet, 1 Kings 19:16 . Some years afterwards he witnessed the miraculous ascension of Elijah, divided the Jordan with his mantle, and took his place at the head of the schools of the prophets. During his long ministry he acted an important part in the public affairs of Israel. Many miracles also were wrought at his word; some of these were, healing the waters of Jericho; supplying the widow's cruse with oil, and the allied armies of Judah, Israel, and Edom with water; gaining a son for the woman of Shunem, and restoring him to life; healing the leprosy of Naaman; detecting and punishing Ghazi. His history is recorded in 2 Kings 2:1-9:37 13:14-21 . He died lamented by king Joash and the people; and a year afterwards, a corpse deposited in the same sepulchre was at once restored to life.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Elisha
At the time of the ministry of Elijah and Elisha, Israel’s ancient religion was threatened by the Baalism that Jezebel had brought with her from Phoenicia. Through her husband, King Ahab of Israel, Jezebel had tried to establish Phoenician Baalism as the official religion of Israel (1 Kings 16:30-33). The man who began the long and difficult job of removing this Baalism from Israel was the prophet Elijah (see ELIJAH). By God’s direction Elijah passed on the unfinished task to Elisha (1 Kings 19:16; 1 Kings 19:19), whose ministry lasted through the reigns of six Israelite kings. The extent of his ministry was about fifty years. The period was the latter half of the ninth century BC.
Successor to Elijah
From the beginning Elisha showed a willingness to succeed Elijah, in spite of the obvious difficulties ahead. Originally a farmer, he gave up his former way of life for the unpopular task of being God’s messenger to the hardened and idolatrous people of Israel (1 Kings 19:19-21). Like Elijah, Elisha would have to move around the country, strengthening the believers and opposing the idolaters. Elijah tested him to see if he would try to avoid some of the difficulties by remaining at one of the schools for young prophets. But Elisha was determined to carry on Elijah’s work. He was Elijah’s spiritual heir, and he remained with Elijah to the end to receive the spiritual inheritance (2 Kings 2:1-12).
A miracle at the Jordan River quickly proved that God’s power had now passed from Elijah to Elisha (2 Kings 2:13-14). Many more miracles would follow, showing what a serious threat Jezebel’s Baalism was to Israel’s national life.
Elisha’s ministry was to be twofold. It was to be concerned on the one hand with preserving the faithful minority in Israel (the remnant), and on the other with preparing judgment for the unfaithful nation (1 Kings 19:15-18). His first two miracles symbolized these characteristics of blessing and cursing. To those who were in need he brought healing, but to those who rejected his message he brought judgment (2 Kings 2:19-25).
A combined Israelite-Judean attack on Moab gave Elisha the opportunity to demonstrate to the two kings his opposition to Baal. He refused to help the Baal-worshipping Israelite king, though he passed on advice to the godly Judean king (2 Kings 3:9-15).
Caring for the faithful minority
Faithful believers were rare in Israel, and Elisha had to help preserve them, lest the true worship of Yahweh vanish from the nation. He helped the poor widow of one of the godly prophets by giving her a miraculous supply of oil that saved her entire family (2 Kings 4:1-7). He also secured the future for a wealthy believer by giving her a son. When, years later, the son died, Elisha brought him back to life (2 Kings 4:8-37).
Many of the faithful were to be found in the schools where young men trained to be prophets. Like Elijah before him, Elisha moved around these schools, with the aim of strengthening those who could later help rebuild the religious life of the nation (2 Kings 2:1-7; 2 Kings 2:15; 2 Kings 4:38; 2 Kings 6:1).
These communities were very poor. They had difficulty getting enough food to eat each day, and they lacked even the basic tools to rebuild their inadequate housing. In one place Elisha worked a miracle to save the day’s food from being lost, and in another he miraculously recovered a borrowed tool that had fallen into the river (2 Kings 4:38-41; 2 Kings 6:1-7). On one occasion he miraculously multiplied a gift of food to feed a large group of his followers (2 Kings 4:42-44).
By the healing of Naaman, Elisha showed God’s power to the commander of the army (Syria) that God was going to use to punish Israel (2 Kings 5:1-14; cf. 1 Kings 19:15-17). Naaman’s knowledge of the one true God was still imperfect, but at least he had a more sincere faith in Yahweh than did many Israelites (2 Kings 5:15-19).
Preparing Israel for judgment
God’s intention to use Syria to punish his people did not mean that Elisha had to desert Israel and join the Syrians. In fact, the Syrians saw him as an enemy and tried to capture him. Instead Elisha captured the Syrian soldiers and led them to the Israelite capital, Samaria. When the Israelite king wanted to kill them, Elisha directed him to feed them. The incident brought a temporary peace, and should have taught both nations that God controlled their destinies (2 Kings 6:8-23).
Neither king learnt much from the incident. The Syrian king attacked Jerusalem afresh, and the Israelite king blamed Elisha for the suffering that resulted (2 Kings 6:24-31). Elisha assured Israel’s king that the siege would be broken and there would be plenty of food the next day. But when Elisha’s prediction proved to be true, the king was slow to believe (2 Kings 7:1-15).
Syria’s partly successful attacks on Israel were only the beginning. The attacks would become increasingly successful and violent. When Hazael of Syria murdered his king and seized the throne, a new era of terror began. Elisha wept when he saw the trouble that Hazael’s cruelty would bring upon Israel (2 Kings 8:7-15; cf. 1 Kings 19:15). With Hazael now king of Syria, the time had arrived for Elisha to carry out his last major responsibility, the anointing of Jehu to be king of Israel. Jehu’s job was to remove Jezebel’s Baalism from Israel’s leadership by destroying Ahab, Jezebel and all their Baal-worshipping family (2 Kings 9:1-10; cf. 1 Kings 19:16-17; see JEHU).
Elisha lived to see the divine judgment carried out, first on Ahab’s family and then on Israel as a whole. After that, he saw the beginnings of Israel’s recovery, and might have seen Israel overthrow Syrian power completely had not the Israelite king been lacking in faith (2 Kings 13:14-19). Even after Elisha’s death, dramatic events at his burial place showed that the God he served was still alive and powerful (2 Kings 13:20-21).

Sentence search

Gehazi - (8th century BCE) Elisha’s servant. After Elisha cured Naaman of tzaraat, Gehazi, falsely claiming to speak for Elisha, asked Naaman for an imbursement—which he appropriated for himself. For his dishonesty and greed, Elisha cursed Gehazi that he permanently “inherit” Naaman's tzaraat
The shunamite woman - Childless woman who regularly hosted Elisha when he traveled through Shunam. In appreciation, Elisha blessed her with a son. When he died several years later, Elisha miraculously resurrected him
Eliseus - (ehl ih ssee' uhss) KJV spelling of Elisha, following the Greek transliteration of the Hebrew, in Luke 4:27 . See Elisha
Mantle - Elijah, who was the master of Elisha, left this garment for Elisha, so that all would know that Elisha now was the successor to Elijah, and could and would exercise all the powers of Elijah
Eliseus - Greek form of Elisha, q
Gehazi - ” Servant of the prophet Elisha (2 Kings 4:12 ). Later he tried to secure for himself the reward Elisha had refused from Naaman the Syrian and then lied to Elisha (2 Kings 5:20-25 ). Gehazi did testify to the king of Elisha's good deeds and helped the widow get her lands restored (2 Kings 8:1-6 ). See Elisha
Elise'us, - the Greek form of the name Elisha
Elisha - Elijah having received God's command to anoint Elisha as a prophet, came to Abelmeholah; and finding him ploughing with oxen, he threw his mantle over the shoulders of Elisha, who left the oxen, and accompanied him. Under the article Elijah, it has been observed that Elisha was following his master, when he was taken up to heaven; and that he inherited Elijah's mantle, with a double portion of his spirit. Elisha smote the waters of Jordan, and divided them; and he rendered wholesome the waters of a rivulet near Jericho. Elisha was at that time in the camp; and seeing Jehoram, the king of Israel, he said, "What have I to do with thee? get thee to the prophets of thy father, and to the prophets of thy mother. But now send for a minstrel; and while this man played, the Spirit of the Lord fell upon Elisha, and he said, Thus saith the Lord, Make several ditches along this valley; for ye shall see neither wind nor rain, yet this valley shall be filled with water, and you and your cattle shall drink of it. " The widow of one of the prophets having told Elisha, that her husband's creditor was determined to take her two sons and sell them for slaves, Elisha multiplied the oil in the widow's house, in such quantity that she was enabled to sell it and to discharge the debt. Elisha went frequently to Shunem, a city of Manasseh, on this side Jordan, and was entertained by a certain matron at her house. As she had no children, Elisha promised her a son; and his prediction was accomplished. Elisha, who was then at Mount Carmel, was solicited by the mother to come to her house. At Gilgal, during a great famine, one of the sons of the prophets gathered wild gourds, which he put into the pot, and they were served up to Elisha and the other prophets. It was soon found that they were mortal poison; but Elisha ordering meal to be thrown into the pot, corrected the quality of the pottage. Naaman, general of the king of Syria's forces, having a leprosy, was advised to visit Elisha in order to be cured. Elisha appointed him to wash himself seven times in the Jordan; and by this means Naaman was perfectly healed. He returned to Elisha, and offered him large presents, which the man of God resolutely refused. But Gehazi, Elisha's servant, did not imitate the disinterestedness of his master. He ran after Naaman, and in Elisha's name begged a talent of silver, and two changes of garments. Elisha, to whom God had discovered Gehazi's action, reproached him with it, and declared, that the leprosy of Naaman should cleave to him and his family for ever. Elisha, like his master Elijah, had learned to contemn the world. He was told, that Elisha revealed them to the king of Israel. He therefore sent troops to seize the prophet at Dothan; but Elisha struck them with blindness, and led them in that condition into Samaria. Jehoram, king of Israel, imputing to Elisha these calamities, sent a messenger to cut off his head. Elisha, who was informed of this design against his life, ordered the door to be shut. Elisha answered, "To-morrow about this time shall a measure of fine flour be sold for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a shekel, in the gate of Samaria. " This unbelief was punished; for the prophet answered, "Thou shalt see it with thine eyes, but shalt not eat thereof," which happened according to Elisha's prediction, for he was trodden to death by the crowd in the gate. Benhadad being at that time indisposed, and hearing that Elisha was come into his territories, sent Hazael, one of his principal officers, to the prophet to consult him, and inquire of him whether it were possible for him to recover. Elisha sent one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, and grandson of Nimshi, to be king, in pursuance of an order given to Elijah some years before; and Jehu having received the royal unction, executed every thing that had been foretold by Elijah against Ahab's family, and against Jezebel. Elisha falling sick, Joash, king of Israel, came to visit him, and said, "O my father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof. " Elisha desired the king to bring him a bow and arrows. Joash having brought them, Elisha requested him to put his hands on the bow, and at the same time the prophet put his own hand upon the king's, and said, Open the window which looks east, and let fly an arrow. ...
The king having done this, Elisha said, This is the arrow of the Lord's deliverance: thou shalt be successful against Syria at Aphek. Elisha desired him again to shoot, which he did three times, and then stopped. But Elisha with vehemence said, "If thou hadst smitten five or six times, then thou hadst smitten Syria until thou hadst consumed it; whereas now thou shalt smite Syria only thrice. " This is the last prediction of Elisha of which we read in Scripture, for soon after he died; but it was not his last miracle: for, some time after his interment, a company of Israelites, as they were going to bury a dead person, perceiving a band of Moabites making toward them, put the corpse for haste into Elisha's tomb, and, as soon as it had touched the prophet's body, it immediately revived; so that the man stood upon his feet: a striking emblem of the life-giving effect of the labours of the servants of God, after they themselves are gathered to their fathers
Eliseus - ]'>[1] form of Elisha (wh
Gehazi - The servant of Elisha. Later he related to king Joram all the things which Elisha had done
Elisha - At the time of the ministry of Elijah and Elisha, Israel’s ancient religion was threatened by the Baalism that Jezebel had brought with her from Phoenicia. By God’s direction Elijah passed on the unfinished task to Elisha (1 Kings 19:16; 1 Kings 19:19), whose ministry lasted through the reigns of six Israelite kings. ...
Successor to Elijah...
From the beginning Elisha showed a willingness to succeed Elijah, in spite of the obvious difficulties ahead. Like Elijah, Elisha would have to move around the country, strengthening the believers and opposing the idolaters. But Elisha was determined to carry on Elijah’s work. ...
A miracle at the Jordan River quickly proved that God’s power had now passed from Elijah to Elisha (2 Kings 2:13-14). ...
Elisha’s ministry was to be twofold. ...
A combined Israelite-Judean attack on Moab gave Elisha the opportunity to demonstrate to the two kings his opposition to Baal. ...
Caring for the faithful minority...
Faithful believers were rare in Israel, and Elisha had to help preserve them, lest the true worship of Yahweh vanish from the nation. When, years later, the son died, Elisha brought him back to life (2 Kings 4:8-37). Like Elijah before him, Elisha moved around these schools, with the aim of strengthening those who could later help rebuild the religious life of the nation (2 Kings 2:1-7; 2 Kings 2:15; 2 Kings 4:38; 2 Kings 6:1). In one place Elisha worked a miracle to save the day’s food from being lost, and in another he miraculously recovered a borrowed tool that had fallen into the river (2 Kings 4:38-41; 2 Kings 6:1-7). ...
By the healing of Naaman, Elisha showed God’s power to the commander of the army (Syria) that God was going to use to punish Israel (2 Kings 5:1-14; cf. ...
Preparing Israel for judgment...
God’s intention to use Syria to punish his people did not mean that Elisha had to desert Israel and join the Syrians. Instead Elisha captured the Syrian soldiers and led them to the Israelite capital, Samaria. When the Israelite king wanted to kill them, Elisha directed him to feed them. The Syrian king attacked Jerusalem afresh, and the Israelite king blamed Elisha for the suffering that resulted (2 Kings 6:24-31). Elisha assured Israel’s king that the siege would be broken and there would be plenty of food the next day. But when Elisha’s prediction proved to be true, the king was slow to believe (2 Kings 7:1-15). Elisha wept when he saw the trouble that Hazael’s cruelty would bring upon Israel (2 Kings 8:7-15; cf. With Hazael now king of Syria, the time had arrived for Elisha to carry out his last major responsibility, the anointing of Jehu to be king of Israel. ...
Elisha lived to see the divine judgment carried out, first on Ahab’s family and then on Israel as a whole. Even after Elisha’s death, dramatic events at his burial place showed that the God he served was still alive and powerful (2 Kings 13:20-21)
Elisha - Elijah was instructed by God to anoint Elisha to be prophet in his stead. Elisha was not prepared then to take up Elijah's mantle, but first he made a feast for his people, and then he followed Elijah and ministered unto him. When God was about to take Elijah to Himself, it became known to the sons of the prophets, and they told Elisha, but he knew it already; and when Elijah suggested to him to remain behind he refused and followed him from place to place, until he had traversed Jordan (figuratively death) with Elijah. Being thus proved to be knit together in spirit, Elijah asked Elisha what he should do for him before he was taken. Elisha said, "Let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me. A chariot and horses of fire separated them, and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven; and Elisha saw it. Elisha took up the mantle that fell from Elijah, which before he had failed to do, and went to the Jordan and smote it with the mantle, and the waters divided, and he passed over into the land, with the spirit of the ascended Elijah resting on him. ...
Elisha's first miracle was healing the waters at Jericho, the cursed city, by means of salt in a new cruse: type of the purifying power of grace. Elisha had come as it were from heaven, into which Elijah had entered, and he came in grace, and if this was despised, judgement must follow, as it will be with Israel by-and-by. Elisha went to Carmel, where the priests of Baal had been destroyed, and thence to Samaria, the seat of the apostasy, and where his testimony was most needed. Elisha was sought for, and he boldly told Jehoram to go to the gods of his father and mother: if Jehoshaphat had not been there he would not have helped them, nevertheless there was grace for them. ...
A widow ofone of the prophets appealed to Elishato save her two sonsfrom the grasp of a creditor. ...
A great woman at Shunem bestowed hospitality on Elisha, and provided a chamber for his use whenever he passed that way. The woman laid him on Elisha's bed, and hastened to inform him of what had happened, but piously added 'It is well. ' Elisha returned with the woman, and the child was raised to life and restored to his mother. ' Elisha cast in some meal, and the pottage was cured. Gehazi, Elisha's servant, was, alas, tempted with a lie in his mouth to take of the Syrian some of the presents which he had brought for Elisha, but which had been refused. This was revealed to Elisha, and the leprosy of Naaman cleaved to Gehazi and to his seed. Elisha next made the iron head of the axe to swim, thus reversing the laws of nature: the axe was borrowed, and the trust must not be violated. They laid traps for the king of Israel, but Elisha warned him again and again of the danger, and he escaped. On this being made known to the king of Syria he sent an army to seize Elisha. Elisha prayed that his servant's eyes might be opened to see that they were surrounded with horses and chariots of fire which were otherwise invisible: cf. The king was greatly moved at this and threatened to take the life of Elisha, apparently linking the famine with God's servant. This was revealed to Elisha as he sat in the house. The king followed the messenger and he said, "This evil is of the Lord; what should I wait for the Lord any longer?" Elisha had a message of deliverance: by the next day a measure of fine flour should be sold for a shekel, and two measures of barley for the same. ...
Elisha prophesied that there wouldbe a seven years' famine, and he told the Shunammite woman to sojourn where she could during the time. God so ordered it that just at that time Gehazi was relating to the king the great things that Elisha had done. He recognised the woman as the one whose son Elisha had raised, and the king ordered the restoration of her property. Elisha prophesied that Hazael would be king over Syria, and he wept as he told the dreadful things he would do to Israel. Elisha sent one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu to be king over Israel: he was to execute God's judgement on the house of Ahab and on Jezebel, which had been prophesied by Elijah. ...
The time now approached for Elisha's death. Elisha prophesied that Joash should smite the Syrians till they were consumed, but he was angry with the king's want of energy and said he should smite them but three times. Elisha's work was now done and he died and was buried. When a corpse was let down into the same tomb, as soon as it touched the bones of Elisha life was restored. As we have seen, Elisha's mission was grace, and his history to the end is stamped with the power of life
Geha'zi - (valley of vision ), the servant or boy of Elisha. Later in the history he is mentioned as being engaged in relating to King Joram all the great things which Elisha had done
Elisha - ...
His Name and Call Experience Elisha was plowing one day when “Elijah passed by him, and cast his mantle upon him. This action symbolically manifested God's plan to bestow the prophetic powers of Elijah upon Elisha. That Elisha felt the call of prophetic succession is again clear following Elijah's dramatic ascent into heaven. There Elisha “took up also the mantle of Elijah that fell from him” (2 Kings 2:13 ). ...
The beginning of Elisha's ministry should be dated to the last years of King Ahab's rule (1 Kings 19:1 ) or approximately 850 B. 2 Kings 1-13 preserves the details of Elisha's ministry which ranged from about 850-800 B. ...
His Miracles After Elijah insisted to his chosen successor that he, “Ask what I shall do for you, before I am taken from you,” Elisha answered, “Let me inherit a double portion of spirit” (2 Kings 2:9 NIV). Following this miracle the prophetic order or “sons of the prophets” declared, “The spirit of Elijah is resting on Elisha” ( 2 Kings 2:15 ). ...
Soon thereafter, Elisha made bad water wholesome (2 Kings 2:19-22 ). ...
Some of the miracles of Elisha are quite well known and loved. God's power through Elisha raised the boy from the dead (2 Kings 4:8-37 ). ...
Yet another well-known story is the healing of Naaman the leper and the subsequent affliction of Gehazi the dishonest servant of Elisha (2 Kings 5:1-27 ). ...
Elisha's power did not end at death. For when a dead man was thrown into Elisha's grave and touched his bones, “he revived, and stood up on his feet” (2 Kings 13:21 ). ...
In carrying out the second and third commands of the “still small voice” to Elijah (1 Kings 19:11-16 ), Elisha enhanced his legacy beyond the realm of miracle worker. ...
Powerful enough to perform miracles and appoint kings, yet sensitive enough to weep over the fate of Israel (2 Kings 8:11-12 ), Elisha, disciple and successor to Elijah, proved to be both prophet and statesman. , Elisha directed the historical drama of Israel
Abel-Meholah - Meadow of dancing, or the dancing-meadow, the birth-place and residence of the prophet Elisha, not far from Beth-shean (1 Kings 4:12 ), in the tribe of Issachar, near where the Wady el-Maleh emerges into the valley of the Jordan, "the rich meadow-land which extends about 4 miles south of Beth-shean; moist and luxuriant. " Here Elisha was found at his plough by Elijah on his return up the Jordan valley from Horeb (1 Kings 19:16 )
Baalshalisha - Unknown place from which a man brought to Elisha bread of the firstfruits, when there was a dearth in the land
Shunem - Two resting-places, a little village in the tribe of Issachar, to the north of Jezreel and south of Mount Gilboa (Joshua 19:18 ), where the Philistines encamped when they came against Saul (1 Samuel 28:4 ), and where Elisha was hospitably entertained by a rich woman of the place. On the sudden death of this woman's son she hastened to Carmel, 20 miles distant across the plain, to tell Elisha, and to bring him with her to Shunem. There, in the "prophet's chamber," the dead child lay; and Elisha entering it, shut the door and prayed earnestly: and the boy was restored to life (2 Kings 4:8-37 )
Shaphat - The father of Elisha, 1 Kings 19:16
Gehazi - A confidential attendant of Elisha. We afterwards find him recounting to king Jehoram the wonderful deeds of Elisha, at the moment when the providence of god brought the woman of Shunem before the king, to claim the restoration of her lands, 2 Kings 8:1-6
Shaphat - ...
...
The father of Elisha (1 Kings 19:16-19 )
Shu'Nammite, the, - the native of Shunem , is applied to two persons: Abishag, the nurse of King David, ( 1 Kings 1:3,15 ; 2:17,21,22 ) and the nameless hostess of Elisha
Perkinism - Elisha Perkins of Norwich, Conn
Abel-Meholah - A town in the plain of Jordan, distinguished as the home of Elisha
Baal-Shalisha - Lord of Shalisha, a place from which a man came with provisions for Elisha, apparently not far from Gilgal (2 Kings 4:42 )
Abelmeholah - Near this place Gideon defeated the Midianites, Judges 7:22 ; and here Elisha was born, 1 Kings 19:16
Meholathite - The name signifies 'a man of Meholah,' which may refer to Abel-meholah, the birth-place of Elisha
Servitor - Probably Gehazi, the personal attendant on Elisha, is here meant
Naaman - Elisha advised him to immerse seven times in the Jordan River
Elisha - ELISHA, the servant and the successor of Elijah, was the son of a prosperous farmer in Israel. Shaphat, the father of Elisha, was a man of substance, but, like all true Israelites, rich and poor, he had brought up his son Elisha to a life of hard work. And thus it is that we come upon Elisha standing in the office of superior over his father's ploughmen, while he is, at the same time, one of those same ploughmen himself. One spring day, when all Shaphat's ploughs were at work in the spring-time meadow, and Elisha's plough the foremost among them, Elijah, the old prophet, came up suddenly behind Elisha and cast his rough mantle over Elisha's shoulder. Elijah had not spoken a single word to Elisha. But Elijah's solemn silent act was sufficiently clear and eloquent to Elisha. Meholah we are back at its very beginning and first performance, when Elijah comes up behind Elisha and casts his cloak of camel's hair over the shoulders of Shaphat's son. And, as if to make it impossible for himself ever to turn back from following Elijah, Elisha made a fire of the wood of his familiar plough, and slew his favourite oxen and made a feast of the flesh, and thereby proclaimed openly to all men that he had put his hand to another plough than that plough of wood, from which he would never draw back. Elisha burned his ships that day, as the Romans would have said. Shaphat, Elisha's father, was growing old, and Elisha would soon have inherited the rich meadow he was then working in; but, in a moment, all that was for ever changed; and Shaphat may now cast his husbandman's mantle over what young farmer he will; his son Elisha is henceforth dead to all that Abel-Meholah has to hold out to him. For the next fifty years Elisha is to be a spiritual ploughman in the Lord's meadows, which are the hearts and lives of the men of Israel. ...
Elijah's mantle is one of our most expressive proverbs, and so is Elisha's request for a double portion of his departing master's spirit. ' And Elisha said, 'I pray thee, let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me. That is an impossible explanation of Elisha's petition. But I cannot imagine a humble and loyal soul like Elisha so insulting his master on his deathbed as to say to him: 'I hope to have double thy success to show when I come to die. What Elisha really asked for was simply the fulfilment of what had been already promised him when Elijah's mantle fell on his shoulders. That act of Elijah was the sign and the seal of Elisha's adoption. And thus it is that, when it is put to him, Elisha simply, and dutifully, and humbly asks that the divine law of adoption and primogeniture may immediately begin to hold and to take effect in his spiritual sonship to the departing prophet. There may be to be seen following the spring plough in Strathmore or in the Lothians at this moment, some young man who shall be as well known and as great in a few years in Scotland as Elisha was in Israel. Elisha was not Elijah. Elisha had been a ploughman till he became Elijah's servant. And, yet, in a moment, and without a murmur, the fifty sons of the prophets at once accept Elisha as the true successor of Elijah, and as their young master. The old men who had not had great success themselves did not cast up Elisha's youth to him when his success began, nor did the sons of the prophets keep up against him his humble origin, or his lack of letters. Elisha's first instinct was to bury and blot himself out under Elijah's coat of camel's hair and his leathern girdle. But Elisha was far too simple and far too sincere a man to continue long wound up in such cerements. Elisha was an altogether smaller and more homely man than Elijah, and he wisely preferred before long to put on much less startling and outstanding clothes. Elisha was a gentle, homely, kindly lowland minister; as unlike Elijah as the green meadows of Abel-Meholah were unlike the savage solitudes of mountainous Gilead. ...
Every ill-brought-up boy who calls names at old people and at odd people must he reminded of those miserable boys and girls of Bethel who called bad names at Elisha till two she-bears came out of the wood, and tore forty and two children of them. ...
...
With all that the sacred writer has given us about Elisha, I am not satisfied. I would have liked some more about Elisha's father and mother. I always regret hearing Elisha calling Elijah his father, and no more word of honest Shaphat
Elisha - Elisha . Elisha was a native of Abel-meholah, which was situated in the Jordan valley 10 Roman miles from Scythopolis, probably on the site of the modern ‘Ain Helweh . His father was a well-to-do farmer, and so Elisha is a representative of the newer form of Hebrew society. After Elisha has recrossed the river, he is greeted by the sons of the prophets as their leader ( 2 Kings 2:15 ). ...
After this event it is impossible to reduce the incidents of Elisha’s life to any chronological sequence. The story of Elisha was borrowed by the author of the Book of Kings from some prophetic work of the Northern Kingdom; and, without any regard for sequence in time, he has arranged his material according to subject-matter. In our canonical Book of Kings, the larger part of Elisha’s activities is placed within the reign of Jehoram ( 2 Kings 3:1 ff; cf. ...
His name, Elisha (= ‘God is salvation’), like that of his master, tersely describes his character and expresses his mission. Elisha is a gentler and more gracious man, and gains his ends by diplomacy. At the prophet’s command, as at the bidding of a greater than Elisha, the loaves are multiplied ( 2 Kings 4:42 ). One of the most beautiful stories in the whole range of Scripture is that of the entertainment of Elisha in the home of the Shunammite. In the restoration of her son to life, Elisha performs one of his greatest miracles ( 2 Kings 4:8 ff. Elisha could be as stern as Elijah: at Bethel he treats the mocking youth in the spirit of Sinai (2 Kings 2:23 ), and no touch of pity can be detected in the sentence that falls on Gehazi ( 2 Kings 5:27 ). The estimate of Sirach ( Sir 48:12 ) is according to all the facts of the OT narrative:...
‘Elijah it was who was wrapped in a tempest:...
And Elisha was filled with his spirit:...
And in all his days he was not moved by the fear of any ruler,...
And no one brought him into subjection. ‘What have I to do with thee? Get thee to the prophets of thy father and the prophets of thy mother,’ indicates that Elisha had not forgotten the past and the conflicts of his master (2 Kings 3:13 ff. This change of attitude on the part of the prophet may be due to the fact that Jehoram attempted to do away with Baal worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ); but Elisha has not forgotten the doom pronounced upon the house of Ahab by Elijah. While Jehu is commanding the forces besieging Ramoth-gilead, Elisha sends one of the sons of the prophets to anoint the general as king, and thus he executes the commission which Elijah received from Jehovah at Horeb ( 1 Kings 19:16 ). ...
Elisha’s relations with the Syrians are exceedingly interesting. Nothing is said of a formal anointing, but in this connexion Elisha seems to have carried out the commission of Elijah ( 1 Kings 19:17 ). In this connexion Elisha’s prediction of deliverance is speedily fulfilled. Under Joash, Israel was hard pressed, and her might had dwindled to insignificance ( 2 Kings 13:7 ), but Elisha was still the saviour of his country. ...
An incident in the life of Elisha throws light on the prophetic state
Shunem - Also where a Shunammite showed hospitality to Elisha
Elisha - ELISHA (Authorized Version Eliseus). Jesus, preaching in the synagogue at Nazareth, reminds His fellow-townsmen, who were unwilling to receive His teaching because He was one of themselves, that Elisha, who was an Israelite, healed but one leper, and he was a Syrian
Gehazi - Servant to the prophet Elisha. He had seen Elisha's miracles, even to the raising of the dead, and yet was tempted to deceive him and fraudulently gain a present from Naaman. In after years he was entertaining the king of Israel with the great works of the prophet, when the Shunammite whose son Elisha had raised to life came to petition the king for her land, and she confirmed the servant's narration
Hazael - Jehu was to extirpate the authors of idolatry, Hazael to chastise the whole nation of Israel, and Elisha to slay with the quick and powerful sword of the divine word. When Elisha visited Damascus, and Ben-hadad, who was sick, had sent Hazael, a trusted servant, to inquire whether he should recover, Elisha intimated his approaching sovereignty
Shunem - One of David's wives, and the generous woman to the prophet Elisha, were each called by this name
a'Bel-Meho'Lah - (meadow of the dance ), in the northern pat of the Jordan valley, ( 1 Kings 4:12 ) to which the routed Bedouin host fled from Gideon, (Judges 7:22 ) Here Elisha was found at his plough by Elijah returning up the valley from Horeb
Baal-Meon - It is supposed to have been the birth-place of Elisha
Pottage - Elisha added meal to a tainted recipe of pottage at Gilgal (2 Kings 4:38-41 )
Naaman - ” Syrian general cured of leprosy under the direction of the prophet Elisha (2 Kings 5:1 )
Naaman - Elisha the prophet hearing of this, sent for Naaman, and the strange interview which took place is recorded in 2 Kings 5 . He was cured of his leprosy by dipping himself seven times in the Jordan, according to the word of Elisha
Gehazi - Elisha's servant. Trusted by Elisha with his staff to lay on the face of the lifeless youth. But reanimation was not effected until Elisha himself came: typifying that Moses the messenger, with his rod and the law, could not quicken dead souls, that is reserved for Jesus with His gospel. ...
Then God's detection: Elisha said, "Whence comest thou?" The liar was at no loss for a reply: "Thy servant went no where. " Elisha sternly answered, "Went not mine heart with thee, when the man turned again, (compare Psalm 139)? Is it a time to receive money," etc. "...
Still in 2 Kings 8:4 Gehazi appears as "servant of the man of God," narrating to king Joram the great acts of Elisha and the restoration to life of the Shunammite's son, when lo! she herself appeared
Eutychus - A youth who sat in a window and, falling asleep during Paul's long and late discourse, fell from the third story, and was restored to life by the apostle, who fell on the dead body and embraced it, as Elijah of old (1 Kings 17:21), and Elisha (2 Kings 4:34)
Abelmeholah - From here Elisha, was called to be a prophet
Dothan - Dothan was the place Elisha stayed (2 Kings 6:13 ). The king of Syria sought to capture Elisha by laying siege to the city. Elisha then led the Syrian army away from Dothan to Samaria and defeat
Elisha - On his way from Sinai to Damascus he found Elisha at his native place engaged in the labours of the field, ploughing with twelve yoke of oxen. Elisha accepted the call thus given (about four years before the death of Ahab), and for some seven or eight years became the close attendant on Elijah till he was parted from him and taken up into heaven. During all these years we hear nothing of Elisha except in connection with the closing scenes of Elijah's life. After Elijah, Elisha was accepted as the leader of the sons of the prophets, and became noted in Israel. After Elijah's departure, Elisha returned to Jericho, and there healed the spring of water by casting salt into it (2 Kings 2:21 ). We next read of his predicting a fall of rain when the army of Jehoram was faint from thirst (2 Kings 3:9-20 ); of the multiplying of the poor widow's cruse of oil (4:1-7); the miracle of restoring to life the son of the woman of Shunem (4:18-37); the multiplication of the twenty loaves of new barley into a sufficient supply for an hundred men (4:42-44); of the cure of Naaman the Syrian of his leprosy (5:1-27); of the punishment of Gehazi for his falsehood and his covetousness; of the recovery of the axe lost in the waters of the Jordan (6:1-7); of the miracle at Dothan, half-way on the road between Samaria and Jezreel; of the siege of Samaria by the king of Syria, and of the terrible sufferings of the people in connection with it, and Elisha's prophecy as to the relief that would come (2 Kings 6:24-7:2 ). ...
We then find Elisha at Damascus, to carry out the command given to his master to anoint Hazael king over Syria (2 Kings 8:7-15 ); thereafter he directs one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, king of Israel, instead of Ahab. Joash, the grandson of Jehu, comes to mourn over his approaching departure, and utters the same words as those of Elisha when Elijah was taken away: "My father, my father! the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof. " ...
Afterwards when a dead body is laid in Elisha's grave a year after his burial, no sooner does it touch the hallowed remains than the man "revived, and stood up on his feet" (2 Kings 13:20-21 )
Shaphat - Father of Elisha (2 Kings 6:31 )
Shaphat - The father of Elisha ( 1Ki 19:16 ; 1 Kings 19:18 , 2 Kings 3:11 ; 2 Kings 6:31 )
Tishbite - Designation of Elisha
Abel-Meholah - ) The birthplace of Elisha, where he was found at his plow by Elijah returning up the Jordan valley from Horeb (1 Kings 19:16)
Gehazi - Of the antecedents of Gehazi, and of his call to be the attendant of Elisha, the sacred historian gives us no information. He appears to stand in the same intimate relation to his master that Elisha had done to Elijah, and was probably regarded as the successor of the former. Gebazi bears Elisha’s message to her: ‘Behold, thou hast been careful for us with all this care; what is to be done for thee? Wouldst thou be spoken for to the king, or to the captain of the host?’ On her refusal to be a candidate for such honours, Gehazi reminds his master that the woman is childless. Taking up his attendant’s suggestion, Elisha promises a son to their benefactress ( 2 Kings 4:8 ff. He follows the cavalcade of Naaman, and, fabricating a message from his master, begs a talent of silver and two changes of raiment for two young men of the sons of the prophets, who are supposed to be on a visit to Elisha. Having received and hidden his ill-gotten possessions, he stands before his master to do his bidding as if nothing had occurred, quite unaware that Elisha with prophetic eye has watched him on his foul mission of deception
Elisha - Elisha was one to act at once on God's first call, at all costs. His ministry is once described, "Elisha who poured water on the hands of Elijah. ...
The mission of Elijah, as his name implied, was to bring Israel to confess that Jehovah alone is God ('Εel ); Elisha further taught them, as his name implies, that Jehovah if so confessed would prove the salvation of His people. Hence, Elisha's work is that of quiet beneficence; Elijah's that of judicial sternness upon all rebels against Jehovah. Elisha, the healer, fitly comes after Elijah, the destroyer. Elisha on the contrary frequented the haunts of civilization, Jericho (2 Kings 2:18), Samaria (2 Kings 2:25), and Dothan (2 Kings 6:13), where he had a house with "doors" and "windows" 2 Kings 4:3; 2 Kings 4:9; 2 Kings 4:24; 2 Kings 6:32; 2 Kings 13:17). Elisha, not in personal revenge but as Jehovah's minister, by God's inspiration, pronounced their doom. A widow (Obadiah's widow, according to Josephus), when the creditor threatened to take her sons as bondmen, cried to Elisha for help on the ground of her deceased husband's piety. ...
Elisha directed her to borrow empty vessels, and from her one remaining pot of oil to fill them all, shutting the door upon herself and her sons who brought her the vessels. of Lydda, now Jiljilieh) to Carmel, Elisha stayed at Shunem in Issachar, now Solam, three miles N. " At Gehazi's suggestion without her solicitation, Elisha promises from God that she should have what was the greatest joy to an Israelite wife, a son. ...
There Elisha was wont to see her regularly at his services on the "new moon and sabbath. " Seeing her now approaching from a distance, Elisha sent Gehazi to meet her and ask, "Is it well with thee? . " Gehazi, like Jesus' disciples (Matthew 15:23; Matthew 19:13), would have thrust her away when she clasped Elisha's feet (compare Matthew 28:9; Luke 7:38), but Elisha with sympathetic insight said, "Let her alone, for her soul is vexed within her, and Jehovah hath hid it from me. lion, "Did I desire a son from my lord?" Elisha sends on Gehazi with his staff; Gehazi is to salute none on the way, 'like Jesus' 70 sent before His face, but lays Elisha's staff on the child's face without effect. ) Elisha, entering the room, shuts to the door (Matthew 6:6), and there stretching himself twice on the child, mouth to mouth, eyes to eyes, and hands to hands (compare Acts 20:10; antitypically the dead stoner must come into contact with the living Jesus, 1 John 1), after Elijah's pattern, and praying to Jehovah, proved the omnipotence of prayer to quicken the dead; then he delivered the resuscitated son to the happy mother. " Elisha counteracted the effect by casting in meal. In reply to his servitor's unbelieving objection," What, should I set this before an hundred men?" Elisha replied, "Give the people . Benhadad, with oriental absolutism, wrote as though the Israelite king could at will (compare Matthew 8:9) command Elisha's services. Elisha rectifies his error, sending a dignified message of reproof to the king, and desiring him to let Naaman come, and he should know "there is a prophet in Israel. Elisha, to teach him humility as the first step to any favor from God, sent a messenger, instead of coming in person to the door: "Go, wash in Jordan seven times. Elisha by refusing his presents shows that the minister of God is not influenced by filthy lucre (1 Timothy 3:3), as Naaman's master had supposed (2 Kings 5:5, compare Genesis 14:28). Elisha, without sanctioning this compromise, but tacitly leaving his religious convictions to expand gradually, and in due time to east off the remains of idolatry still cleaving to him, bade him farewell with the customary "Go in peace. Gehazi's covetousness stands in sad contrast to Elisha's disinterestedness. " By lying he gains two talents and two changes of raiment from Naaman; but lying is of no avail before Elisha: "went not my heart with thee, when the man turned again from his chariot to meet thee? is it a time to receive money?" etc. In this miracle too Elisha foreran the Lord Jesus, the cure of leprosy being exclusively God's work. During Elisha's residence at Jericho, the numbers of the sons of the prophets increasing, the place became "too strait" for them. By a stick cast in, Elisha raised the iron to swim. Benhadad, while Elisha resided at Dothan, half-way between Samaria and Jezreel, tried to surprise Israel from different points, but was foiled by Elisha warning the Israelite king, "beware that thou pass not such a place. " Benhadad suspecting treachery was informed (probably by one who had witnessed Elisha's cure of Naaman)," the prophet in Israel telleth the king of Israel the words that thou speakest in thy bedchamber" (2 Kings 6:12); compare Christ's ministers, Luke 12:3. Elisha's ministering servant (not Gehazi) rising early was terrified at the sight; "alas, my master! how shall we do?" Elisha replies, "they that be with us are more than they with him" (2 Chronicles 32:7; Psalms 55:18; Romans 8:31), and prays, "Lord, open his eyes"; then he saw "the mountain full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha" (Psalms 34:7; Zechariah 9:8. ) Thus the same heavenly retinue attended Elisha as his master (2 Kings 2:11). At Elisha's prayer the investing host was smitten with blindness (mental, Keil, Genesis 19:11), and Elisha went out to meet them as they came down from their encampment on the hill E. ...
There Jehovah opened their eyes; and when the king of Israel would have smitten them, Elisha on the contrary caused him to "prepare great provision for them, and send them away. ...
Joram, in language identical with his mother Jezebel's threat against Elijah (1 Kings 19:2; 2 Kings 6:31), makes Elisha the scape-goat of the national calamity, as though his late act in leading the blinded Syrians to Samaria and glorifying Jehovah above Baal were the cause, or suspecting it was by Elisha's word of prayer, as it was by Elijah's formerly (1 Kings 17), that the famine came (See JEHORAM); "God do so and more also to me, if the head of Elisha shall stand on him this day. " Seeing the executioner's approach Elisha said to the elders sitting with him to receive consolation and counsel, "this son of a murderer (i. of Ahab and Jezebel, 1 Kings 18:4; 1 Kings 18:21) hath sent to take away my head"; "hold the messenger fast at the door," "his master's feet (are) behind him," namely, hastening to revoke his hasty order for Elisha's execution. Elisha replies that as "this evil (the famine) is of Jehovah," so the suddenness of its removal by the morrow at "the word of Jehovah" would prove it not to be futile, as Joram said, to "wait for Jehovah. By Elisha's advice the Shunammite woman had gone to sojourn in the grain-growing seacoast plain of the Philistines during the seven years famine already alluded to (2 Kings 4:38). He at the very time, by God's providence, had been inquiring from Gehazi (long before his leprosy, 2 Kings 5; 2 Kings 8, a proof that the incidents of Elisha's life are not recorded in chronological sequence, but in their spiritual connection) concerning Elisha's miracles, and was hearing of her son's resuscitation when she herself appeared. Elisha, when Joram and Israel failed to be reformed by God's mercies, proceeded to Damascus to execute Elijah's commission (1 Kings 19:15-16). Benhadad respectfully inquired by Hazael, who brought a kingly present, 40 camels laden with every good thing of Damascus, "thy son (regarding Elisha as a father and lord) saith, Shall I recover of this disease?" "Then mayest certainly (i. "...
Elisha, intensely gazing at Hazael's countenance, discerned his unscrupulous cruelty, and wept at the thought of the evil he would do to Israel. ...
Elisha next proceeded to Ramoth Gilead in the hills east of Jordan, which Hazael had tried to occupy (2 Kings 8:28). There Elisha anointed Jehu, by the hand of one of the children of the prophets, to take vengeance on Ahab's guilty seed, having been witness of that monarch's wicked seizure of Naboth's vineyard and of Elijah's awful sentence on him (2 Kings 9:26). Elisha's last recorded act was when Jehu's grandson, Joash, wept over his deathbed in the words which Elisha had used of the departing Elijah: "my father, the chariot of Israel and the horsemen thereof," i. Elisha, putting his hands on the king's (for God's hand must strengthen ours if we are to prosper, Genesis 49:24), bade Joash shoot toward the hostile land, saying, "the arrow of Jehovah's deliverance . Even when dead and buried, Elisha's body was made by God the means of revivifying a dead body cast hastily sideways into his sepulchral cell, upon a sudden inroad of the Moabite bands; a type of the vivifying power of Christ's dead body (Isaiah 26:19). In Herod and Herodias Ahab and Jezebel are reproduced, as in John the Baptist Elijah is reproduced; as Elijah, the representative of the law, foreruns the gentler Elisha, so John the greatest prophet of the law foreruns Jesus the gracious Savior
Baal-Shalishah - ” Home of unnamed man who brought firstfruits to Elisha, who used them to feed a hundred men (2 Kings 4:42-44 )
Shaphat - Father of Elisha the prophet
Sons of the Prophets - The most extensive use of the expression occurs in the Elisha stories where the prophet is portrayed as the leader of the prophetic guild. In that capacity, Elisha cared for the needs of a prophet's widow (2 Kings 4:1-7 ), agreed to the building of a common dwelling (2 Kings 6:1-7 ), and presided at a common meal (2 Kings 4:38-44 ). The sons of the prophets functioned either as witnesses (1 Kings 20:35-42Kings 2:5,2Kings 2:7,2 Kings 2:15 ) or as agents of Elisha's ministry (2 Kings 9:1-3 ). ...
The single reference outside the Elisha cycle to the sons of the prophets is to someone identified as “a certain man of the sons of the prophets” who condemned Ahab's release of Ben-Hadad (2Kings 2:3,2 )
Carmelites - One of the four tribes of Mendicants, or begging friars; so named from Mount Carmel, formerly inhabited by Elias, Elisha, and the children of the prophets; from whom this order pretends to descend in uninterrupted succession
Igdaliah - a prophet, one not his own; having parted with all right in himself, to be wholly God's: Deuteronomy 33:1, Moses; Elisha, 2 Kings 4:7; Timothy, 2 Timothy 3:17)
Minstrel - Elisha once when solicited to give advice asked for a minstrel to be brought, and 'when the minstrel played, the hand of the Lord came upon him
do'Than - It next appears as the residence of Elisha
Hazael - When an officer of Ben-hadad, he was sent to Elisha (who was visiting Damascus) to know whether Ben-hadad should recover of his sickness. Elisha's answer was indefinite: "Go, say unto him, Thou mayest certainly recover: howbeit the Lord hath showed me that he shall surely die. " Elisha then wept and explained it was in view of the cruelty that Hazael would do to Israel. Hazael repudiated this imputation, whereupon Elisha told him that he would be king over Syria. Elijah had been bidden to anoint Hazael as king of Syria, but we do not read that he ever anointed him, neither is there any word of Elisha's doing this on the above occasion
Benhadad - Afterwards when Ben-hadad was sick he sent Hazael to Elisha, who had come to Damascus, to know whether he would recover. Elisha said Hazael could tell the king he might surely recover, though Elisha knew he would die
Jehoash - He tells us that when Elisha was about to die Jehoash came to visit him, and wept over him as a great power about to be lost to Israel. Elisha bade him take bow and arrows and shoot the arrow of victory towards Damascus, then to strike the ground with the arrows. The three blows which he struck represent the three victories obtained by Jehoash, and the blame expressed by Elisha indicates that his contemporaries thought the king slack in following up his advantage
Jeho'Ram - The piety of Jehoshaphat suggested an inquiry of Jehovah, thorough Elisha. After reproving Jehoram, Elisha, for Jehoshaphat's sake, inquired of Jehovah, and received the promise of an abundant supply of water, and of a great victory over the Moabites; a promise which was immediately fulfilled. A little later, when war broke out between Syria and Israel, we find Elisha befriending Jehoram; but when the terrible famine in Samaria arose, the king immediately attributed the evil to Elisha, and determined to take away his life. The providential interposition by which both Elisha's life was saved the city delivered is narrated (2 Kings 7:1 ) . and Jehoram appears to have returned to friendly feeling toward Elisha. (2 Kings 8:4 ) It was soon after these vents that the revolution in Syria predicted by Elisha took place, giving Jehoram a good opportunity of recovering Ramoth-gilead from the Syrians
Abel-Meholah - A place in the Jordan valley, the limit of Gideon’s pursuit of the Midianites ( Judges 7:22 ); in the administrative district of Taanach and Megiddo under Solomon ( 1 Kings 4:12 ); the native place of Adriel, husband of Merab, Saul’s daughter ( 1 Samuel 18:19 ), and of Elisha ( 1 Kings 19:16 )
Shunem - David's nurse, Abishag, was of Shunem, 1 Kings 1:3, and it was the residence of the Shunammite woman who entertained Elisha
Baldness - ...
The insult offered to Elisha by the young people of Bethel, improperly rendered "little children," who cried out after him, "Go up thou bald head," may here be noticed. The town of Bethel was one of the principal nurseries of Ahab's idolatry, and the contempt was offered to Elisha in his public character as a prophet of the Lord
Hazael - Elisha coming to Damascus, the capital of Syria, Benhadad, the reigning monarch, being then indisposed, sent Hazael, who was one of his principal officers, to wait upon the prophet, and consult him as to the issue of his disorder, 2 Kings 8:7-13 . The prophet told Hazael that certainly his master might recover, because his complaint was not mortal; yet he was very well assured that he would not recover; and, looking him steadfastly in the face, Elisha burst into tears. " Hazael indignantly exclaimed, "Is thy servant a dog, that he should do this great things?" Elisha merely answered, "The Lord hath showed me that thou shalt be king over Syria," 2 Kings 8:7-13 . Hazael soon inflicted upon Israel all the cruelties which Elisha had foretold
Mantle - The transference of the mantle from Elijah to Elisha signified the passing of prophetic responsibility and God's accompanying power
Benhadad - 3115, Benhadad declared war against Jehoram, the son and successor of Ahab, 2 Kings 6:8 ; but his designs were made known to Jehoram by the Prophet Elisha, and they were accordingly frustrated. Suspecting some treachery in this affair, Benhadad was informed that all his projects were revealed to his enemy by Elisha, and getting intelligence that the latter was at Dothan, he sent a detachment of his best troops to invest the city and apprehend the prophet; but they were struck with blindness at Elisha's prayer, so that they were unable to distinguish him, when he was in the midst of them and held a conversation with them. Jehoram, hearing of these calamities, attributed them to Elisha, and sent orders to have him put to death; but before his messengers could reach the prophet's house, he came thither himself. Elisha predicted that the next day, about the same hour, a measure of fine flour would be sold at the gate of Samaria for a shekel, which, however incredible at the moment, proved to be the case; for in the night, a general panic, supernaturally induced, pervaded the Syrian camp; they imagined that Jehoram had procured an army of Egyptians to come to his assistance, and, abandoning their horses, tents, and provisions, they all took to flight. As soon as the news was confirmed, the Samaritans went out, pillaged the Syrian camp, and brought in such quantities of provisions, that a measure of fine flour was, at the time specified by Elisha, sold at the gate of Samaria for a shekel, 2 Kings 7. 3120, Benhadad fell sick, and sent Hazael, one of his officers, with forty camels, loaded with valuable presents, to the Prophet Elisha, to interrogate him, whether or not he should recover of his indisposition. Elisha fixed his eyes steadfastly on Hazael, and then burst into tears: "Go," said he, "and tell Benhadad, Thou mayest certainly recover; though the Lord hath showed me that he shall assuredly die. He then took possession of the kingdom of Syria, according to the prediction of Elisha, 2 Kings 8
Meir, rabbi - Student of Rabbi Akiba, Rabbi Ishmael, as well as Elisha ben Abuyah
Dothan - Where Joseph found his brethren, Genesis 37:17, and Elisha resided
Hazael - We have his history, and the effect wrought upon the mind of the prophet Elisha in beholding him with his prophetic spirit, foreseeing the cruelties of Hazael on the children of Israel. All that the prophet Elisha foretold literally came to pass; and he, that, while the servant of the king his master, stood astonished at the bare mention only of the cruelties Elisha admonished him of, actually perpetrated the very murders which he had shuddered at, when he became clothed with the royal purple
Haz'a-el - He appears to have been previously a person in a high position at the court of Ben-hadad, and was sent by his master to Elisha to inquire if he would recover from the malady under which he was suffering. Elisha's answer led to the murder of Ben-hadad by his ambitious servant, who forthwith mounted the throne. 860), whom he "smote in all their coasts," (2 Kings 10:32 ) thus accomplishing the prophecy of Elisha
Shunammite - The 'great woman' who provided Elisha with a lodging
Hiel - (See Joshua 6:26 with 1 Kings 16:34)...
See also Elisha...
Ben-Hadad - Sought to capture Elisha for telling his plans to king of Israel, but through God's miracle had his troops blinded and led captive to Samaria (2 Kings 6:8-23 ). When this Ben-hadad besieged Samaria again, God through Elisha caused him to think Hittites and Egyptians were attacking him. As Elisha predicted, Hazael, a Syrian officer, killed Ben-hadad (2 Kings 8:7-15 )
Joash - He did that which was evil in the sight of the Lord, even as Jeroboam; but when Elisha was dying Joash visited him, and wept over him, uttering the same words which Elisha had uttered as he beheld Elijah taken to heaven. Joash had the sense that the powerwhich translated Elijah had been with Elisha, who was now departing. Elisha then prophesied that he should smite Syria. Elisha said that if he had smitten more times he would have consumed Syria; but now he should defeat them only three times
Gehazi - Valley of vision, Elisha's trusted servant (2 Kings 4:31 ; 5:25 ; 8:4,5 ). On this latter occasion he was guilty of duplicity and dishonesty of conduct, causing Elisha to denounce his crime with righteous sternness, and pass on him the terrible doom that the leprosy of Naaman would cleave to him and his for ever (5:20-27)
na'Ioth - In its corrected from the name signifies "habitations," and probably means the huts or dwellings of a school or college of prophets over which Samuel presided as Elisha did over those at Gilgal and Jericho
Hazael - While an officer of Ben-hadad, king of Syria, Hazael was sent to Elisha the prophet to inquire about the king's health (2 Kings 8:7-15 ). Elisha prophesied Hazael's future kingship and his cruel treatment of Israel
Javan - Javan had four sons, by whom the different portions of Greece Proper were peopled: Elisha, Tharsis, Chittim, and Dodanim. Elisha, Eliza, or Ellas, as it is written in the Chaldee, and from whom the Greeks took the name of ‘Ελληνες , settled in the Peloponnesus; where, in the Elysian fields and the river Ilissus, his name is still preserved
Bear - Bears came out of the wood and destroyed the children who mocked the prophet Elisha (2 Kings 2:24 )
Minstrel - Elisha called for a minstrel to withdraw his mind from the outer world, so that his spirit might be in a state to receive the divine revelation (2 Kings 3:15)
Gourd, Wild, - In a time of dearth a lap-full of gourds from a wild vine was gathered to provide a meal for Elisha and the sons of the prophets
Hazael - Having usurped the throne, he reigned forty years; and by his successful and cruel wars against Judah and Israel justified the forebodings of Elisha, 2 Kings 8:28 10:32 12:17 13:3,7 2 Chronicles 22:5
Servant - Thus Joshua was the servant of Moses, Elisha of Elijah, Gehazi of Elisha; St
Baal Meon - " The reputed birthplace of Elisha
Dothan - It was the residence of Elisha (2 Kings 6:13 ), and the scene of a remarkable vision of chariots and horses of fire surrounding the mountain on which the city stood
Example - ...
Elisha, the model helper
Moth, - In the East garments were kept in larger quantities, as property and for presents, as when Naaman the Syrian brought 'changes of garments' as a present to Elisha, of which Gehazi obtained two
Man of od - ...
We shall see this in the list that follows:...
Moses, the Model of Intercession Jeremiah 15:1...
The Angel of the Lord, Model of Sufficiency Judges 13:6...
The Pre-existent CHRIST, Model of Justice1Sa2:27...
Samuel, Model of Understanding1Sa9:6...
Shemaiah, Model of Counsel1Ki12:22...
Elijah, Model of Faithfulness1Ki17:18...
Elisha, Model of Kindness2Ki4:7...
Ahijah, Model of Severity2Ki23:16...
David, Model of Praise2Ch8:14...
Isaiah, Model of Spirituality2Ch25:7...
Igdaliah, Model of Consecration Jeremiah 35:4...
Timothy, Model of Holiness1Ti6:11...
You, the Saint of GOD, Model of Godliness2Ti3:17...
Martyrs - They are: Rabban Simeon ben Gamaliel II, Rabbi Ishmael ben Elisha, Rabbi Akiba, Rabbi Hananiah ben Teradion, Rabbi Hutzpit the Interpreter, Rabbi Eleazar ben Samua, Rabbi Hananiah ben Hakinai, Rabbi Yeshevav the Scribe, Rabbi Judah ben Damah, and Rabbi Judah ben Bava
Ten martyrs - They are: Rabban Simeon ben Gamaliel II, Rabbi Ishmael ben Elisha, Rabbi Akiba, Rabbi Hananiah ben Teradion, Rabbi Hutzpit the Interpreter, Rabbi Eleazar ben Samua, Rabbi Hananiah ben Hakinai, Rabbi Yeshevav the Scribe, Rabbi Judah ben Damah, and Rabbi Judah ben Bava
Baldness (Natural or Artificial) - The children at Bethel cried after Elisha, "Go up, thou bald head," 2 Kings 2:23
Ben-Hadad - These do not seem to have been fulfilled, for three years after, Ahab renewed the war and was slain, 1 Kings 22:1-53 After about nine years, Ben-hadad again invaded Israel, and the prophet Elisha was instrumental in frustrating his plans, 2 Kings 6:8-23 . Shortly before his death, Ben-hadad, being sick, sent Hazael to ask the prophet Elisha, then at Damascus, what the issue would be
Chamber - "On the wall," which the Shunammite prepared for the prophet Elisha (2 Kings 4:10 ), was an upper chamber over the porch through the hall toward the street
Elisha - Elisha (e-lî'shah), God his salvation. At his translation Elisha asked a double portion of the departing prophet's spirit, secured his falling mantle, and had speedily full proof that the Lord God of Elijah was with him. Elisha, though a young man, was bald. He was buried, and afterwards, when Moabite bands were ravaging the country, and some one was to be carried to the tomb, the attendants, surprised by the spoilers, hastily thrust the corpse into Elisha's sepulchre
Ben-Hadad - ) After Ahab's death, Moab having revolted from Ahaziah and Jehoram, successive kings of Israel (2 Kings 1:1; 2 Kings 1:6-7), Ben-Hadad took advantage of Israel's consequent weakness, and after having been baffled several times by Elisha besieged Samaria a second time so straitly that mothers gave their own sons to be eaten, a horror similar to what occurred in later times in Titus' siege of Jerusalem. The consequent plenty had been foretold by Elisha. ...
Shortly after Ben-Hadad fell sick, and sent Hazael with large presents to consult Elisha who was in Damascus (2 Kings 8:7-15). " Hazael's latent cruelty and ambition were awakened by what ought to have awakened remorse, Elisha's tears at the horrors which the prophet foresaw he would perpetrate. Joash, visiting Elisha on his deathbed, by his direction shot arrows eastward, the pledge of the Lord's deliverance from Syria
Ramoth-Gilead - In Ramoth-gilead Elisha anointed Jehu as king over Israel (2 Kings 9:1-6 )
Shunem, Shunammites - The prophet Elisha stayed often at the home of a Shunammite couple, prophesied that a son would be born to them, and raised the boy from the dead after an accident in the field (2 Kings 4:1 )
Chariot - When the king of Syria sought to take Elisha at Dothan he was protected by invisible chariots of fire
Father - The king of Israel said to Elisha, my father shall I smite them? 2 Kings 6
Hazael - The next mention of him describes how Ben-hadad, Hazael’s predecessor, who is ill, sends Hazael to Elisha, to inquire whether he will recover ( 2 Kings 8:7 ff. ); at the interview which Hazael has with the Israelite prophet, the murder of the Syrian king is arranged, and Elisha designates Hazael as his successor on the throne
Naaman - A Syrian captain, who, in the days of Joram king of Israel, was cured of his leprosy through Elisha the prophet. Elisha simply answered, "Go in peace
Famine - The most severe famines recorded in scripture are the two of seven years' duration, one in the time of Joseph, and the other in the days of Elisha
Minister - One who attends or waits on another, Matthew 20:28 ; so Elisha was the minister of Elijah, 1 Kings 19:21 2 Kings 3:11
Carmel - That which has made Carmel most familiar to us is its intimate connection with the history of the two great prophets of Israel—Elijah and Elisha
Hazael - Elijah’s successor, Elisha, wept when he saw the suffering that the cruel Hazael would bring upon Israel (2 Kings 8:12-15)
Gilgal - Elijah and Elisha were associated closely with Gilgal. At one time Elisha made his headquarters there (2 Kings 4:38 ), where Elijah was taken up into heaven (2 Kings 2:1 ). See Beth-gilgal ; Elisha ; Joshua ; Samuel ; Saul
Hazael - Sent by his master Benhadad originally to Elisha to ask if he would recover from his sickness. " Then Elisha gazing at Hazael burst into tears (typifying Him who wept over Jerusalem, Luke 19:41), and said his weeping was "because I know the evil thou wilt do unto Israel . Herein Elisha fulfilled Elijah's commission, that he should appoint Hazael king of Syria to be the Lord's scourge of fits guilty people (1 Kings 19:15). El was also in the name of Elisha, who appointed him in the name of El; probably he assumed this name because of this call
Joram - He led a coalition with Judah and Edom, advised by Elisha, to defeat Moab
Dothan - Elisha's place of sojourn, when the Syrian king invested the city with horses and chariots, to Gehazi's dismay; but "the mountain" whereon it stood he saw, when the Lord opened his eyes, to be "full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha" (2 Kings 6:13-18)
Prophets, Sons of the - We read of them only in the days of Samuel, Elijah, and Elisha, who were held in repute by them
Naaman - He was afflicted with the leprosy; but was miraculously cured, on washing seven times in the Jordam, Leviticus 14:7 , according to the direction of Elisha, 2 Kings 5:1 - 27 ; Luke 4:27
Jericho - It contained a school of the prophets, and as the residence of Elisha, 2 Kings 2:4,18 . The city destroyed by Joshua may have been nearer to the fountain of Elisha, supposed to be the present Ain es-Sultan, two miles northwest of Rihah
Jehoash - He held the prophet Elisha in honour, and wept by his bedside when he was dying, addressing him in the words Elisha himself had used when Elijah was carried up into heaven: "O my father, my father, the chariot of Israel and the horsemen thereof
Leontius, Priest And Martyr of Armenia - He acted a conspicuous part in the stand of the Armenian church against the court of Persia, as related chiefly in the History of Varian by Elisha Vartabed and in the historical work of Lazarus of Barb. 296, 297; Elisha, u
Jehoram - of the Dead Sea, then northwards through Edom and the rocky valley Ahsy which separates Edom from Moab, but for Elisha who had a regard for Jehoshaphat, and brought water to fill the wady Ahsy miraculously from God; the water was collected for use in (Jeremiah 14:3) the ditches made by his direction. (See DIBON; Elisha. However, Jehoram's removal of Baal's statue seems to have drawn Elisha to him, so that the prophet was able to offer the Shunammite woman to speak to the king in her behalf (2 Kings 4:13). As Elisha spoke so sternly to him in 2 Kings 3:14, the removal of the Baal statue may have been subsequent to, and the consequence of, Jehoram's witnessing the deliverance of himself and his two allies, wrought through Jehovah's prophet in chapter 3. The miraculous cure deepened his respect for Elisha. The tale of a mother who had slain her child for food, and complained of another mother having hidden hers contrary to agreement, roused Jehoram to rend his clothes; then appeared the hair sackcloth of mourning penitence "within" (mibaait ), a bore sign without the real repentance of heart, as his threat of murdering Elisha proves, Romans 12:31. Jehoram thought that by his sackcloth he had done his part; when God's help did not yet come, Jehoram vented his impatience on the prophet, as if Elisha's zeal for Jehovah against Baal was the cause of the calamity. (See Elisha. )...
Elisha, by deferring the entrance of the executioner, gave time for Jehoram's better feelings to work. " Elisha's prophecy of immediate plenty, and its fulfillment to the letter (2 Kings 7), restored the friendly relations between Jehoram and him (2 Kings 8:4). Jehoram's conversation with Gehazi about Elisha's great works and his raising the dead lad, and the Shunammite woman's return at that very time, occurred probably while the prophet was at Damascus prophesying to Hazael his coming kingship (2 Kings 8). But Jehu, with characteristic haste, immediately after Elisha had anointed him, set out for Jezreel and with an arrow slew Jehoram and threw his body on the very plot of ground which by falsehood and murder Ahab had dispossessed Naboth of, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy (1 Kings 21:19; 1 Kings 21:22). As the Shunammite's child must have been at least three years old when raised again, Elisha's acquaintance with her must have been four or five years sooner, bringing us to Jehoram's second year; so that Elisha's presence with the three allied kings (2 Kings 3) must have been in Jehoram's first year. ...
Lord Hervey thinks Elijah was not translated until the sixth year of Jehoram, whereas Elisha began ministering in the first year of Jehoram. Elisha's prophetic writing threatened him with great plagues to his people, children, wives, and goods, and disease of the bowels so that they should fall out, because of his apostasy and murder of his brethren who were "better than himself" (2 Chronicles 12-15, 18-19)
Josephus, Catholicos of Armenia - For a full contemporary account of this see Elisha Vartabed's Hist. The reply is given in full by Elisha; for the spirit of it see ISDIGERD II. Thus much Elisha relates of Joseph in his 7th chap
Car'Mel - That which has made the name of Carmel most familiar to the modern world is its intimate connection with the history of the two great prophets of Israel, Elijah and Elisha
Naaman - A Syrian general who came to Elisha to be healed of leprosy. Through an Israelite slave-girl Naaman hears of the man of God who works miracles, and in the hope of being cured of his leprosy he comes to Elisha; it is, however, noteworthy that he comes at Elisha’s request ( 2 Kings 2:8 ) in order that he may learn that ‘there is a prophet in Israel. ’ On Elisha’s refusing the gift offered to him, Naaman asks for two mules’ burden of Israelitish soil upon which to worship the God of Israel; this is in entire accordance with the ideas of the time that a god of a country cannot be worshipped properly excepting upon his own soil (cf
Carmel - It was the scene of Elijah’s sacrifice ( 1 Kings 18:1-46 ), and hither after Elijah’s translation Elisha came on the way to Samaria ( 2 Kings 2:25 ). Elisha was for a time established here ( 2 Kings 4:25 )
Elijah - In a small voice the Lord commanded him to go anoint Hazael king of Syria, Jehu king of Israel, and Elisha as his own successor (1 Kings 19:1-17 ). ...
Relationship to Messiah Elijah and Elisha were involved in the schools of the prophets when Elijah struck the waters of the Jordan and they parted to allow their crossing (2 Kings 2:1-12 ). There, immediately after conferring a double portion of his spirit on Elisha (2 Kings 2:9 ), the two were separated by a chariot and horses of fire which carried Elijah away in a whirlwind as Elisha watched shouting, “My father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof
Elisha - But I beg to notice one event in Elisha's ministry, because it is not so generally regarded, and yet seems to lead to a profitable subject of meditation. (See Joshua 6:26 with 1 Kings 16:34) There evidently appears from this history, the tokens of divine displeasure upon Jericho in the days of Elisha. Elisha cast the cruse into the spring, saying,"Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters; there shall not be from thence any more, death, or barren land. So the waters were healed unto this day, according to the saying of Elisha
Elijah - In contrast to the detailed genealogy of Samuel, Elisha, and other prophets, Elijah abruptly appears, like Melchizedek in the patriarchal dispensation, without father or mother named, his exact locality unknown; in order that attention should be wholly fixed on his errand from heaven to overthrow Baal and Asherah (the licentious Venus) worship in Israel. ...
His "mantle," 'adereth , of sheepskin, was assumed by Elisha his successor, and gave the pattern for the "hairy" cloak which afterwards became a prophet's conventional garb (Zechariah 13:4, "rough garment". over Israel, and Elisha . Elisha he first sought out and found in Abel Meholah in the valley of the Jordan on his way northward, for spiritual companionship was his first object of yearning. Casting his mantle on him as the sign of a call, he was followed by Elisha, who thenceforth became his minister, and who executed subsequently the former two commands. (See Elisha. Therefore, as Elijah had committed to Elisha the duty laid on himself by God of foretelling to Hazael his elevation to the Syrian throne (Elisha being Elijah revived in spirit), so Elijah committed to him the writing which would come after Elijah's translation to Joram with all the solemnity of a message from Elijah in the unseen world to condemn the murder when perpetrated which Elijah foresaw he would perpetrate. Fairbairn makes it be called "a letter from Elijah" because he was ideal head of the school of prophecy from which it emanated, and his spirit still rested upon Elisha. But the language, 2 Chronicles 21:12, implies in some stricter sense it was Elijah's writing delivered by Elisha, his successor, to Joram. ...
To these sons of the prophets, as well as to Elisha, it was revealed that their master Elijah was about to be caught up front them. Elijah sought that privacy which he felt most suitable to the coming solemn scene; but Elisha would not leave him. Finally, after parting asunder the Jordan with his mantle, he gave Elisha leave to ask what he would, and having promised that he should have a double portion of Elijah's spirit, a chariot and horses of fire parted the two, and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven. The "hardness" of Elisha's request, and its granting being dependent on his seeing Elijah ascend, imply that it is to be got from God not (Matthew 19:26) man; that therefore he must look up to Him who was about to translate Elijah, not to Elijah himself. ...
The "double portion" is not "double" what Elijah had, for Elisha had not tidal; but, as the firstborn son and heir received two portions, and the other children but one, of the father's goods (Deuteronomy 21:17), so Elisha, as Elijah's adopted son, begs a preeminent portion of Elijah's spirit, of which all the other "sons of the prophets" should have their share (Grotius); compare Deuteronomy 21:15. Elisha performed double as many miracles, namely, 16 as compared with Elijah's eight; and the miracles of a like kind to Elijah's; compare 2 Kings 9:26, with 2 Kings 4:29-37; 1 Kings 17:16 with 2 Kings 4:1-7. Elisha, when getting his choice, asked not for gains, honors, or pleasures, but for spiritual gifts, with a view, not to his own glory, but to the glory of God and the edification of the church. As Elijah's ascension was the forerunner of Elisha's possessing an influence such as Elijah had not, Elisha becoming the honored adviser of kings whereas Elijah had been their terror, Elisha on his deathbed being recognized as "the chariot of Israel and the horsemen thereof" by king Joash just as Elijah had been by Elisha, so Christ's ascension was the means of obtaining for the church the Holy Spirit in full measure, whereby more souls were gathered in than by Jesus' bodily presence (John 16:6-15; Ephesians 4:8-14)
Hazael - His interview with Elisha is mentioned in 2 Kings 8
Mesha - " (See JEHORAM, JEHOSHAPHAT, Elisha, ENGEDI, CHEMOSH, on the confederacy against Mesha and the superstitions indignation raised against Israel because of their reducing him to such desperation that he sacrificed his own son (Micah 6:7), so that the allies departed to their own land
Jehu - The leader of the opposition was Elijah, and after him Elisha. Elisha saw this to be the favourable moment to start the long-planned revolt. ...
Elisha’s activity extended through the reign of Jehu, but the narrative of the prophet’s life tells us little of the king
Jericho - A college of prophets was shortly afterwards founded here ( 2 Kings 2:4 ), for whose benefit Elisha healed its bitter waters ( 2 Kings 2:18 ). ...
The modern er-Rîha is not exactly on the site of ancient Jericho, which is a collection of mounds beside the spring traditionally associated with Elisha
Carmel - Here were consumed the "fifties" of the royal guard; and here also Elisha received the visit of the bereaved mother whose son was restored by him to life (2 Kings 4:25-37 ). To them Elijah and Elisha often resorted (1 Kings 18:19,42 ; 2 Kings 2:25 )
Baldness - Elisha was ridiculed for being bald, but he may have shaved his head to mourn Elijah's departure (2 Kings 2:23 )
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
898...
Ahaziah,...
Elisha
Jehu - He was a commander of the army when Elisha the prophet sent one of the sons of the prophets to Ramoth-gilead to anoint him as king (2 Kings 9:1-10 )
Ben-ha'Dad - Soon after Ben-hadad fell sick, and sent Hazael to consult Elisha as to the issue of his malady
Jehoram - Elisha went forth with the confederated army (2 Kings 3:1-19 ), and at the solicitation of Jehoshaphat encouraged the army with the assurance from the Lord of a speedy victory. Elisha afterwards again befriended Jehoram when a war broke out between the Syrians and Israel, and in a remarkable way brought that war to a bloodless close (2 Kings 6:23 )
Joram, Jehoram - They then appealed to Elisha for help, but he said that except Jehoshaphat had been there he would not have looked upon Joram. In the meantime a prophet, sent by Elisha, visited the camp and anointed Jehu to be king of Israel, with instructions to smite the house of Ahab totally
Elijah - Here he had visions of the glory and majesty of God, and conversed with him; and was commanded to return to the wilderness of Damascus, to anoint Hazael king over Syria, and Jehu king over Israel, and to appoint Elisha his successor in the prophetic office. Elijah, understanding by revelation that God would soon translate him out of this world, was desirous of concealing this fact from Elisha, his inseparable companion. He therefore said to Elisha, "Tarry thou here, for the Lord hath sent me to Bethel. " But Elisha answered, "I will not leave thee. " At Bethel, Elijah said, "Tarry thou here, the Lord hath sent me to Jericho;" but Elisha replied, he would not forsake him. At Jericho Elijah desired him to stay; but Elisha would not leave him. Elijah then said to Elisha, "Ask what I shall do for thee before I be taken away from thee. " "I pray thee," said Elisha, "let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me;" that is, obtain the gift of prophecy from God for me, in the same measure that thou possessest it. " As they journeyed, a fiery chariot, with horses of fire, suddenly separated them, and Elijah was carried in a whirlwind to heaven; while Elisha exclaimed, "My father, my father, the chariots of Israel and the horsemen thereof!"...
5
Naaman - A little Israelitish captive maiden tells him of the fame and skill of Elisha, and he is cured by him by following his simple directions to bathe in the Jordan seven times
Jezebel - Elisha anointed Jehu to replace Joram
Naaman - (For the rest, see Elisha
Aphek - Also Elisha promised Joash victory over the Syrians in Aphek (2 Kings 13:17 )
Aphek - Also Elisha promised Joash victory over the Syrians in Aphek (2 Kings 13:17 )
Elijah - Jehu also he anoints to be king of Israel, and Elisha he summons to become a prophet. Being now forewarned of the approach of his removal from earth, he gives his last instructions to the school of the prophets, crosses the Jordan miraculously, and is borne to heaven in a fiery chariot without tasting death, leaving his mantle and office to Elisha, 1 Kings 17:1-19:21 21:29 2 Kings 1:1-2:18
Jer'Icho - In its immediate vicinity the sons of the prophets sought retirement from the world; Elisha "healed the spring of the waters;" and over against it, beyond Jordan, Elijah "went up by a whirlwind into heaven. Robinson in the immediate neighborhood of the fountain of Elisha; and that of the second (the city of the New Testament and of Josephus) at the opening of the Wady Kelt (Cherith), half an hour from the fountain
Elijah - God’s instruments of judgment against Israel would be an enemy king Hazael, an Israelite king Jehu, and Elijah’s successor Elisha (1 Kings 19:15-21). ...
The time had now come for Elijah to pass on to Elisha the responsibility for preserving the faithful and preparing judgment for the Baalists. Elisha stayed with Elijah to the end, and in due course received Elijah’s spiritual inheritance (2 Kings 2:9)
Shunem - A Shunem is also the scene of Elisha’s miracle in 2 Kings 4:8 ff. Shunammite is applied (1) to Abishag ( 1 Kings 1:2 ), who is perhaps the original of the Shulammite of Song of Solomon 6:13 , the interchange of t and n being exemplified in the modern Solam = Shunem; (2) to the unnamed friend of Elisha in 2 Kings 4:8 ff; 2 Kings 8:1-6
Covetousness - Gehazi, the servant of Elisha, coveted the property of Naaman so much that he lied to get what he wanted from Naaman the leper (2 Kings 5:19-25 ) and was struck with leprosy
Minister - one who attends or waits on another; so we find Elisha was the minister of Elijah, and did him services of various kinds, 2 Kings 3:11
Benbadad - fell sick, and sent Hazael to consult Elisha as to the issue of his malady
Tarshish - That Tarshish was situated in the west is evident from Genesis 10:4 , where it is joined with Elisha, Kittim, and Dodanim
Elijah - Here the Lord appeared unto him and said, "What dost thou here, Elijah?" In answer to his despondent words God manifests to him his glory, and then directs him to return to Damascus and anoint Hazael king over Syria, and Jehu king over Israel, and Elisha to be prophet in his room (1 Kings 19:13-21 ; Compare 2 Kings 8:7-15 ; 9:1-10 ). He went down to Gilgal, where was a school of the prophets, and where his successor Elisha, whom he had anointed some years before, resided. Elisha was solemnized by the thought of his master's leaving him, and refused to be parted from him. Arrived at the borders of Gilead, which Elijah had left many years before, it "came to pass as they still went on and talked" they were suddenly separated by a chariot and horses of fire; and "Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven, "Elisha receiving his mantle, which fell from him as he ascended
Jehoram - The prophet Elisha was active during the reign of Jehoram, and it is probable that the siege of Samaria, of which we have so graphic an account in 2 Kings 6:1-33 ; 2 Kings 7:1-20 , also belongs to this period
Bashan - The cities of Bashan were taken by Hazael (2 Kings 10:33 ), but were soon after reconquered by Jehoash (2 Kings 13:25 ), who overcame the Syrians in three battles, according to the word of Elisha (19)
Gilgal - ...
...
A place, probably in the hill country of Ephraim, where there was a school of the prophets (2 Kings 4:38 ), and whence Elijah and Elisha, who resided here, "went down" to Bethel (2:1,2)
Bear - The instrument of punishing the 42 youths who mocked Elisha, in a wood between Jericho and Bethel, probably in winter when bears descend from the mountains to the lowlands (2 Kings 2:24)
Zarephath - The choice, among all others, of the widow of pagan Phœnician Zarephath, and of Naaman the leper of heathen Syrian Damascus, to receive the favours of the prophets Elijah and Elisha, filled the crabbed synagogue hearers of Nazareth with wrath and murder (Luke 4:25 ff
Jericho - The more ancient city was probably in the neighborhood of the beautiful fountain, which is apparently the same whose waters Elisha healed
Abba - Elisha used it toward Elijah; servants applied it to their masters, etc
Jericho - (See Deuteronomy 34:3) But we find, in the after days of Israel's history, the barrenness of Jericho spoken of, (2 Kings 2:18-22) See Elisha
Rest, Remain - ...
“To rest” sometimes indicates a complete envelopment and thus permeation, as in the spirit of Elijah “resting” on Elisha (2 Kings 2:15), the hand of God “resting” on the mountain ( Joram or Jehoram - Not long after he was involved in war with Ben-hadad king of Syria, and Hazael his successor; and in this time occurred the miraculous deliverance of Samaria from siege and famine, and also various miracles of Elisha, including the healing of Naaman
Jehoram - Though not as devoted to Baal as his parents, he remained in conflict with Elisha, the prophet who led God’s opposition to Baal (2 Kings 3:1-3; 2 Kings 3:13; 2 Kings 6:30-31)
Naaman - And Naaman, the Syrian, well known from the history of his leprosy, and the cure of it by Elisha the prophet, 2 Kings 5:1, etc. ...
The subject of Naaman's leprosy, and the wonderful cure by the prophet Elisha, in the name of the Lord, hath afforded large scope for the most improving meditation
Carmel - ...
The mountain was afterwards the residence of Elisha, where he was visited by the Shunammite woman on the death of her child
Prophecy, Prophet - Elijah and Elisha prophesied in the midst of apostate Israel
Minister, Serve - ...
Elisha “ministered” to Elijah (1 Kings 19:21)
Ahazi'ah - The revolution carried out in Israel by Jehu under the guidance of Elisha broke out while Ahaziah was visiting his uncle at Jezreel
First-Fruits - (Nehemiah 10:35,37 ; 12:44 ) An offering of first-fruits is mentioned as an acceptable one to the prophet Elisha
Gil'Gal - ...
In (2 Kings 2:1,2 ; 4:38 ) is named a Gilgal visited by Elijah and Elisha
Hand, Right Hand - The hand of the Lord comes upon Elisha through the playing of a harp and leads him to prophesy (2 Kings 3:15 ). Naaman expects Elisha to cure him through the waving of his hand (2 Kings 5:11 )
Jericho - However, modern research places it a quarter of a mile from the mountain Quarantana (the traditional scene of Christ's temptation), at the fountain of Elisha. Elisha "healed the waters" of the fountain, called also Ain es Sultan (2 Kings 2:18-22), half an hour N. Under Elisha a school of prophets resided at Jericho
Joash - His visit to the dying prophet Elisha is described in 2 Kings 13:14-19
Joash or Jehoash - He had a great regard for the prophet Elisha, and visited him on his deathbed, where by a divine oracle he was assured of three victories over the Syrians
na'Aman - A little Israelitish captive maiden tells him of the fame and skill of Elisha, and he is cured by him by following his simple directions to bathe in the Jordan seven times
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - It is enough for us to know that in many cases there was such a definite call from God, as the testimonies of Elisha, Isaiah, Amos, Hosea, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel demonstrate. ...
Elisha is one of the earliest individuals in Scripture to receive a specific call from God to be a prophet. In 1 Kings 19:15-16 , God directed the disheartened Elijah to "Go back the way you came and anoint Elisha the son of Shaphat from Abel Meholah to succeed you as prophet. " While the text does not indicate whether the oil of anointing was poured over the head of Elisha, it does note that Elijah found Elisha plowing in the field, whereupon Elijah "threw his cloak [18] around [19]" (v. 19) and as a result Elisha immediately left his oxen and ran after Elijah. Indeed, as Elisha later requested, a double portion of the Spirit that rested on Elijah fell on him (2 Kings 2:9-14 ). Nearly half of these references (36) are used of Elisha, fifteen of the unnamed prophet in 1 Kings 13 , and the other twenty-five are scattered: five refer to Moses, four to Samuel, seven to Elijah, three to David, two to Shemaiah, and five to unnamed individuals. ...
So accurate was this type of communication by a man of God that "Time and again Elisha warned the [10]7 king so that he was on his guard in such places" (2 Kings 6:10 ). When the enraged Syrian king demanded to know where the leak was in his organization, the answer was, "None of us [6]7 , but Elisha, the prophet who is in Israel, tells the king of Israel the very words you speak in your bedroom" (v. Thus, just as the Lord opened the eyes of Balaam's donkey so that she saw what Balaam at first could not see (Numbers 22:31 ), so God opened the eyes of the prophet Elisha's servant so that he could see the angelic armies of the Lord that surrounded Samaria were indeed greater in number than the Syrian armies (2 Kings 6:15-17 ). ...
At other times, the prophets were available to answer direct questions, such as the time when the kings of Israel, Judah, and Edom came to Elisha as an embarrassed delegation to ask how they could extricate themselves out of the military mess that they had managed to get themselves into (2 Kings 3:11-19 )
Miracle - The next major cluster of miracles involves the prophets Elijah and Elisha. Elisha purifies poisoned water and causes an axhead sunk in the river to float (2 Kings 2:19-22 ; 6:1-7 ). In addition to those already noted, Elisha provides unfailing oil for a needy widow (2 Kings 4:1-7 ), purifies a pot of food, feeds a hundred men with twenty small loaves, and again demonstrates God's concern for foreigners in healing Naaman's leprosy (4:38- 5:27). Indeed Jesus himself will liken parts of his ministry to God's choice in the days of Elijah and Elisha to favor those outside Israel (Luke 4:25-27 ). Although Elisha dies a normal death, even his bones cause a corpse thrown into his grave to be resuscitated (2 Kings 13:20-21 ). Raising the son of the Nain widow closely resembles the reanimations by Elijah and Elisha (Luke 7:11-17 ) and occurs on virtually the identical site as one of them (Old Testament Shunem). Luke highlights Jesus' compassion for the outcasts of society (4:18; 17:11-19) and his role as a new Moses (9:28-36) and Elijah/Elisha (7:1-28). Bronner, The Stories of Elijah and Elisha ; C
Chariot - This vision would be to Elisha a source of strength and encouragement, for now he could say, "They that be with us are more than they that be with them
Jericho - A school for young prophets was located at Jericho in the time of Elijah and Elisha (2 Kings 2:4-5; 2 Kings 2:15-22)
Bethel - The school was still functioning in the time of Elijah and Elisha (1 Samuel 7:16; 1 Samuel 10:3; 2 Kings 2:3; 2 Kings 2:23)
Father - The word is also applied to teachers: “And Elisha saw it, and he cried, My father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof …” (2 Kings 2:12). In 2 Kings 6:21, the word is applied to the prophet Elisha and in Syria, Syrian - The only reference to the name in the New Testament is in Luke 4:27 , where it is stated that there were many lepers in Israel in the days of Elisha, but none were cured but Naaman the Syrian
Hair - Baldness was disliked, as sometimes symptomatic of leprosy, Leviticus 13:40-44 : hence the reproach uttered against Elisha, 2 Kings 2:23
Camp - Naaman stood before Elisha “with all his company” (2 Kings 5:15 NASB, NEB, “retinue”)
Jehoash - Though unfaithful to God, he respected God’s prophet Elisha (2 Kings 13:11; 2 Kings 13:14)
Naaman - , whose cure by the instrumentality of Elisha is related in 2 Kings 5, and who was referred to by our Lord as ‘Naaman the Syrian’ in His discourse in the synagogue at Nazareth
Elijah - ...
The translation of Elijah into heaven occurs in an anecdotal section concerned mainly with Elisha (2 Kings 2:1-12 ). He did not bequeath his staff to Elisha, but his cloak, which had a spiritual not a magical power. Elisha desired a double portion of Elijah's spirit, a stipulation in Hebrew law whereby the eldest son received his share and was equipped as the true successor to his father. Wallace, Elijah and Elisha
Anoint - Thus, Elisha was “anointed” to be a prophet (1 Kings 19:16)
Apostles Other Than the Twelve - Central America...
Saint Ceadda Mercia, Saxon England...
Saint Christian Portugal ...
Saint Columba The Highlanders...
Scotland...
the Picts...
Cyril and Methodius, Saints The Slavs...
Saint Denis The French...
Father Elisha John Durbin Western Kentucky...
Saint Eloi Tournai, Belgium...
Saint Ephesus Sardinia...
Saint Euphrasius Spain...
Saint Felix East Anglia...
Valencia, Spain...
Edward Fenwick, O
There is - Used with the infinitive and the preposition le, yêsh signifies possibility—Elisha told the Shunammite woman: “… Behold, thou hast been careful for us with all this care; what is to be done for thee? Wouldest thou be spoken for to the king, or to the captain of the host [3]?” (2 Kings 4:13)
Elijah - But Elijah was to anoint Hazael to be king over Syria, Jehu to be king over Israel, and Elisha to be prophet in his room. Elijah thereupon departed, and finding Elisha threw upon him his mantle. Traversing in the close company of Elisha the spots which, however now perverted, told of certain great truths — Gilgal, of the necessity of the judgement of self, the place of circumcision — Bethel, of the faithfulness of God and the resources which are His for His own, the place where God had appeared to Jacob — Jericho, of the power of God as against all that of the enemy — they reached the Jordan through which they passed dry shod, the waters being separated hither and thither by Elijah smiting them with his mantle. " Figuratively he had passed through death, and ascended to heaven: this forms the basis of Elisha's ministry. Elisha's ministry differed from this, and was more of grace
Elijah - But Elijah was to anoint Hazael to be king over Syria, Jehu to be king over Israel, and Elisha to be prophet in his room. Elijah thereupon departed, and finding Elisha threw upon him his mantle. Traversing in the close company of Elisha the spots which, however now perverted, told of certain great truths — Gilgal, of the necessity of the judgement of self, the place of circumcision — Bethel, of the faithfulness of God and the resources which are His for His own, the place where God had appeared to Jacob — Jericho, of the power of God as against all that of the enemy — they reached the Jordan through which they passed dry shod, the waters being separated hither and thither by Elijah smiting them with his mantle. " Figuratively he had passed through death, and ascended to heaven: this forms the basis of Elisha's ministry. Elisha's ministry differed from this, and was more of grace
Elijah - After hearing his complaint, Jehovah gives His faithful servant a threefold commission: Hazael is to be anointed king of Syria, Jehu of Israel; and Elisha is to be his successor in the prophetic order. As far as we know, only the last of these three commissions was executed by the prophet himself, who, after this sublime incident, made his headquarters in the wilderness of Damascus ( Ki 19: 15); the other two were carried out either by Elisha or by members of the prophetic guilds ( 2 Kings 8:7 ff; 2 Kings 9:2 ). Accompanied by his faithful follower Elisha, he passes from Bethel to Jericho, and from thence they cross the Jordan, after Elijah has parted the waters by striking them with his mantle. Elisha)
Head - ...
2 Kings 2:3 (c) The type is used in this place to describe the leadership of Elijah over Elisha. Elisha was subservient to Elijah. Now the master of Elisha was to be taken away from him. It was on this peak that Elijah and Elisha saw the mighty power of GOD, and the enemies of GOD saw the wrath of GOD, as well as His wonderful display of vengeance
Hospitality - The word is not used in the Old Testament, but its elements are recognizable: Abraham and the three visitors (Genesis 18:1-8 ), Lot and the two angels (Genesis 19:1-8 ), Abraham's servant at Nahor (Genesis 24:17-33 ), Reuel and Moses (Exodus 2:20 ), Manoah and the angel (Judges 13:15 ), Elijah and the widow of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:10-11 ), and Elisha and the Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4:8-11 )
Carmel - ) Elisha repaired there, after Elijah's ascension (2 Kings 2:25). Here too Elisha was visited by the bereaved mother, with a view to his restoring to life her deceased son (2 Kings 4:25)
Jericho - It was Elisha's first miracle, he cast in salt and the water was healed. ...
The Ain es Sultan, 31 52' N, 35 27' E , is held to be the fountain healed by Elisha, and the ruins around mark the site of the ancient city, five miles from the Jordan; but this is not the site of the Jericho of N
Father - "My father," said Naaman's attendants to him, "if the prophet had bid thee do some great thing," 2 Kings 5:13 ; and so the king of Israel addresses the prophet Elisha, 2 Kings 6:21
Neomenia - The Shunamite, who entertained Elisha, proposing to visit that prophet, her husband said to her, "Why do you go to-day, since it is neither Sabbath nor new moon?" 2 Kings 4:23
jo'Ash - On occasion of a friendly visit paid by Joash to Elisha on his death-bed, the prophet promised him deliverance from the Syrian yoke in Aphek, ( 1 Kings 20:26-30 ) He then bade him smite upon the ground, and the king smote thrice and then stayed
Damascus - ...
Naaman, a Syrian officer, sought Elisha's help in curing his skin disease but decided Abana and Pharphar, the great rivers of Damascus, offered greater help than did the Jordan (2 Kings 5:12 ). Elisha helped deliver Samaria when Ben-hadad besieged it (2 Kings 6-7 ). Elisha also prophesied a change of dynasty in Damascus, naming Hazael its king (2 Kings 8:7-15 )
Famine And Drought - Drought and famine also plagued the Israelites in the days of David (2 Samuel 21:1 ), Elijah (1 Kings 18:2 ), Elisha (2 Kings 4:38 ), Haggai (Haggai 1:11 ), and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 5:3 )
Sama'Ria - He also makes it the burial-place of the prophets Elisha and Obadiah
Baal - The prophets Elijah and Elisha delivered the condemnation of God concerning Baal worship and tried to rid the land of the idolatry (1 Kings 18:17-40 ; 2 Kings 1:9-16 )
Lamp - " (1 Samuel 3:3-4) Was not this emblematical of the Spirit of prophecy, that before one lamp of the Lord went out another should be lighted, before Eli was quite extinguished Samuel should be kindred? Do we not find it so through the church's history in all ages? Did not the spirit of Elijah rest on Elisha? Did not all the prophets succeed one another in their ministry, as might best promote and carry on the Lord's cause in the earth? I do not presume to speak decidely upon the subject, but if the thought be right, is there not great sweetness in that Scripture explained in reference to this view, and with an eye to the Lord Jesus? "I have ordained a lamp for mine anointed
Camel - Benhadad of Damascus also sent a present to Elisha, "forty camels' burden" (2 Kings 8:9 )
Elijah - He anointed Elisha to be prophet in his room
Carmel - It is memorable for frequent visits of the prophets Elijah and Elisha, 2 Kings 2:25 4:25 , and especially for the destruction of the priests of Baal upon it, Jeremiah 50:19
Jehu - The commanders, being left in charge of the conduct of the war, met in council; and while engaged in their deliberations, a messenger from Elisha appeared in the camp, and taking Jehu from the council, led him into a secret chamber, and there anointed him king over Israel, and immediately retired and disappeared (2 Kings 9:5,6 )
Ahab - The Baalism promoted by Ahab and Jezebel was a threat to Israel’s existence as God’s people, and for this reason God sent the prophets Elijah and Elisha to oppose it
Earth, Land - ...
Naaman, the commander of the army of Syria, came to Elisha to be healed of leprosy. The maid of Naaman's wife told her mistress that Elisha could cure Naaman of leprosy. Naaman, however, said of Elisha's God, “I know that there is no God in all the earth (erets ), but in Israel” (2 Kings 5:15 )
Jericho - The valley of Jericho was watered by a rivulet which had been formerly salt and bitter, but was sweetened by the Prophet Elisha, 2 Kings 2:19 . The fountain of Elisha he states to be a soft water, rather warm; he found in it some small shell fish of the turbinated kind
Jericho - It is mentioned in the Bible usually in association with some movement from one side of the Jordan to another—the Israelite invasion, when Ehud takes tribute to the Moabite king, when David sends envoys to the king of Ammon, when Elijah and Elisha cross the Jordan, or when Zedekiah attempts to escape the Babylonians
Rechab - , 3:10) infers from 2 Kings 2:12; 2 Kings 13:14, that Elijah and Elisha were "the chariot (recheb ) of Israel," i. "...
John of Jerusalem says Jehonadab was Elisha's disciple (Instit
Widow - The people who witnessed the miracle exclaimed that a great prophet had risen up among them, probably with reference to Elijah or Elisha, the former of whom, like Christ, had raised a widow’s son
Debt - Isaiah 50:1 , Matthew 18:23 ), and Elisha helps her not by invoking the law, but by a miracle
Jehu - A young man of the prophets, who had been sent by Elisha, arrived at the camp and said he had a message for Jehu
Gilgal - A place connected with the closing scene of Elijah's life and where Elisha wrought one of his miracles
Dorcas - Peter, who was present at the raising of Jairus’ daughter, should follow the method of his Master, while we see how, with the humility of Elijah or Elisha (1 Kings 17:20, 2 Kings 4:33), he does not at first speak the word of power but kneels down in prayer
Complete - After providing the widow with the amount needed, Elisha directed her: “Go sell the oil, and pay [3] thy debt …” (2 Kings 4:7)
Carmel - Mount Carmel is celebrated in the Old Testament, as the usual place of residence of the Prophets Elijah and Elisha
Prophets - The prophet Elisha had the present conduct of his servant Gehazi revealed to him, 2 Kings 5:26 . That it was usual for some of these schools, or at least for their tutors, to be endued with a prophetic spirit, appears from the relation of the prophecies concerning the ascent of Elijah, delivered to Elisha by the sons of the prophets both at Jericho and at Bethel, 2 Kings 2:3 ; 2 Kings 2:5 . Riches were no temptation to them; therefore Elisha not only refused Naaman's presents, but punished his servant Gehazi very severely for clandestinely obtaining a small share of them, 2 Kings 5:15 , &c
Jordan River - The Jordan River is also featured in the miracles of Elijah and Elisha
Samaria - The famishing inhabitants of the city were soon relieved with the abundance of the spoil of the Syrian camp; and it came to pass, according to the word of Elisha, that "a measure of fine flour was sold for a shekel, and two measures of barely for a shekel, in the gates of Samaria" (2 Kings 7:1-20 )
Discipline - ” Elijah became a master to Elisha (1 Kings 19:19-21 )
Salt - Salt as expressing purity was the outward sign Elisha used in healing the waters (2 Kings 2:20-21)
Naaman - He appears to have been a Gentile idolater; but being miraculously cured of his leprosy by the power of the God of Israel, and the direction of his Prophet Elisha, he renounced his idolatry, and acknowledged this God to be the only true God: "Behold, now I know that there is no God in all the earth, but in Israel," 2 Kings 5:15 , and promised, for the time to come, that he would worship none other but Jehovah, 2 Kings 5:17
Camel - Rebekah came to Isaac riding upon a camel, Genesis 24:64 ; the queen of Sheba brought them to Solomon, and Hazael to Elisha, laden with the choicest gifts, 1 Kings 10:2 ; 2 Kings 8:9 ; and they were even made serviceable in war, 1 Samuel 30:17
Beelzebub or Beelzebul - 8); Elisha was recognized as a prophet by the woman of Shunem, because no fly crept over his place at the table (Berakh
Servant - Thus Joshua was the servant of Moses; Elisha of Elijah; and Peter, Andrew, Philip, and Paul were servants of Jesus Christ
Rest - They said, the spirit of Elijah doth rest on Elisha
Laying on of Hands - Elisha laid his hands on King Joash's hands as a prophetic act signifying God's promise to provide Israel victory over Syria (2 Kings 13:16 )
Foreknowledge - Elisha knew that the Syrian siege of Samaria would be lifted the next day (Romans 8:29-305 ), and Isaiah anticipated the coming of the Persian king Cyrus, who would rescue Israel from exile (41:2; 44:28; 45:1)
Jericho - A school of prophets was established at Jericho (2 Kings 2:5), and it was from Jericho that Elijah and Elisha went down to Jordan
Ass - The Shunamite's ass ( 2 Kings 4:24-37), "a time to heal," when she rode to Elisha, who restored her son
Fathers - ...
The fathers praised are Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Israel, Moses, Aaron, Phinehas, Joshua, Caleb, the Judges, Samuel, Nathan, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Hezekiah, Isaiah, Josiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Job, the Twelve, Zerubbabel, Joshua the priest, Nehemiah
Famine - Who can doubt but that the plenty in Egypt, which was succeeded by seven years famine, was to bring about the gracious purposes of the Lord concerning Joseph and his family, that Israel might be led out of Egypt? Who can question that the famine in the days of Elisha was the same, when we are told, that the Lord called for it seven years
Medicine - The case of the widow's son restored by Elisha, (2 Kings 4:19 ) was probably one of sunstroke
Child - The poor woman, whose oil Elisha increased so much as enabled her to pay her husband's debts, complained to the prophet, that, her husband being dead, the creditor was come to take away her two sons to be bondmen, 2 Kings 4:1
Damascus - his son continued to exercise dominion over Israel, 2 Kings 13:3-7,22 ; but Jehovah had compassion on Israel, and Joash, according to the dying prophecy of Elisha, overcame the king of Syria three times and recovered the cities of Israel
Vine - Some of the other sorts were of a poisonous quality, as appears from the story related among the miraculous acts of Elisha, 2 Kings 4:39 ; 2 Kings 4:41
Jericho - A school of prophets was established at Jericho (2 Kings 2:5), and it was from Jericho that Elijah and Elisha went down to Jordan
Serve - Elisha “ministered” to Elijah (1 Kings 19:21). 24:13), and Elisha had a “servitor” (2 Kings 4:43; NASB, “attendant”)
Jordan - Twice afterwards its waters were miraculously divided at the same spot by Elijah and Elisha (2 Kings 2:8,14 )
Prayer - , of Abraham (Genesis 17:18,20 ; 18:23-32 ; 20:7,17,18 ), of Moses for Pharaoh (Exodus 8:12,13,30,31 ; Exodus 9:33 ), for the Israelites (Exodus 17:11,13 ; 32:11-14,31-34 ; Numbers 21:7,8 ; Deuteronomy 9:18,19,25 ), for Miriam (Numbers 12:13 ), for Aaron (Deuteronomy 9:20 ), of Samuel (1 Samuel 7:5-12 ), of Solomon (1 Kings 8 ; 2 Chronicles 6 ), Elijah (1 Kings 17:20-23 ), Elisha (2 Kings 4:33-36 ), Isaiah (2 Kings 19 ), (Jeremiah 42:2-10 ), Peter (Acts 9:40 ), the church (12:5-12), Paul (28:8)
Zeal - The despair of Elijah is replaced by the calmer zeal of Elisha, ever mindful of the invisible forces at work for good (2 Kings 6:16)
Build - Ben-hadad’s servant Hazael took gifts to Elisha, saying, “Thy son Benhadad king of Syria hath sent me to thee” (2 Kings 8:9)
Lie - ” Elisha “came thither, and he turned into the chamber [2], and lay there” (2 Kings 4:11)
Salutations - This precept is not inconsistent with the charge which the Prophet Elisha gave to his servant Gehazi, not to salute any man he met, nor return his salutation; for he wished him to make all the haste in his power to restore the child of the Shunamite, who had laid him under so many obligations. The manners of the country rendered Elisha's precautions particularly proper and necessary, as the salutations of the east often take up a long time
Israel, Kingdom of - The adoption of Baal-worship led to a reaction in the nation, to the moral triumph of the prophets in the person of Elijah, and to extinction of the house of Ahab in obedience to the bidding of Elisha
Gourd - We read of the wild gourd in 2 Kings 4:39 ; that Elisha, being at Gilgal during a great famine, bade one of his servants prepare something for the entertainment of the prophets who were in that place
Galilee - ‘Out of Galilee ariseth no prophet’ ( John 7:52 ) was another, in the face of the fact that Galilee was the home of Deborah, Barak, Ibzan, Tola, Elon, with the prophets Jonah, Elisha, and possibly Hosea
Gilgal - Gilgal from which Elijah and Elisha went down to Bethel (2 Kings 2:1-2)
Jordan - Twice afterwards the Jordan was miraculously crossed, by Elijah and Elisha, 2 Kings 5:14 6:6
Prophecy, Prophet - Nevertheless, when Israel’s religion was under threat from the Baal worship introduced by Jezebel, the prophets Elijah and Elisha found many faithful followers of God in these schools. ...
The language of prophecy...
Early prophets such as Deborah, Samuel, Nathan, Ahijah, Elijah and Elisha have left little or no record of their prophecies
Samaria, Samaritans - Naaman, a Syrian leper, had come to Samaria to be healed by Elisha a short time prior to Ben hadad's attack (2 Kings 5:1 )
Kings, Books of - But it is quite certain that the extended life of Elijah and the equally diffuse life of Elisha never had a place in the history of the kings. There must have been a Life of Elijah circulated by some of his disciples or admirers after his death, and the probability is strong that there was also a separate Life of Elisha. ...
The narratives which deal with Isaiah suggest reflexions similar to those which come to us in looking at Elijah and Elisha
Spirit; Breath - Elisha asked Elijah for a double portion of his “spirit” (2 Kings 2:9) and received it
Urim And Thummim - The oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c
Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - ...
Jordan divided by Elijah and Elisha
Miracles - The miracles are almost entirely connected either with the Exodus from Egypt, or with the ministry of Elijah and of Elisha. While the miracles ascribed to Elijah and Elisha might be considered as their credentials, yet they cannot be regarded as essential to their prophetic ministry; and the variations with which they are recorded represent popular traditions which the compiler of the Books of Kings has incorporated without any substantial alteration. Some of the miracles ascribed to Elisha are not of a character congruous with the function of prophecy; but it may be that we should very cautiously apply our sense of fitness as a test of truth to these ancient narratives
Naaman - ' And, then, how Naaman came to Samaria with his horses and his chariot; how Elisha sent out and told him to go and wash seven times in Jordan; how Naaman was wroth and would not wash in Jordan, but went away home in a rage: how his excellent servants reasoned with their angry master and how he repented and went and washed in Jordan till his flesh came again like the flesh of a little child-all that is told in fourteen as solid and as eloquent verses as ever were written. When Naaman was told how he could be made clean, because the prophet's counsel did not fit in with Naaman's prejudices and his sense of his own importance, he was wroth at Elisha, and went home, leprosy and all, in a rage
Prophesy - Followers of Elijah and Elisha formed into groups to assist and/or to learn from these masters
Jehu - The Prophet Elisha received a commission to anoint him; but the order does not appear to have been executed until more than twenty years afterward, and then it was done by one of the sons of the prophets, 2 Kings 9:1-3
Kings, Books of - ...
Contents of 2 Kings...
Elijah was succeeded as prophet by Elisha (1:1-2:14), who soon proved that the miraculous power of God worked through him as it had through Elijah (2:15-3:27)
Furniture - Because of her special concern for the prophet Elisha, she and her husband built “a small room on the roof” (2 Kings 4:10 NIV) of their house for him to use when he was passing through their vicinity
Prayer - God worked miracles through the prayers of Elijah and Elisha (1 Kings 17:19-22 ; 1 Kings 18:20-40 )
Feeding the Multitudes - (1) The question of Jesus, ‘How many loaves have ye?’ reminds one of the question of Elisha (2 Kings 4:2), ‘What hast thou in the house?’ and so suggests an imitation of Elisha’s miracle, as in fact the whole process of multiplication suggests the miracle of the meal in the jar and the cruse of oil of 1 Kings 17:11-16
Gentiles - The native chiefs of Canaan treat Abraham with respect; the Pharaoh who makes Joseph lord of his house calls him ‘a man in whom the spirit of God is’; the daughter of the Pharaoh of the oppression is moved with compassion at the sight of the child Moses, and brings him up as her son; Jethro receives Moses when an exile into his family, guides him in the desert, and instructs him in the art of governing; Rahab and Ruth ‘take refuge under the wings of the God of Israel,’ and their names are in the regal genealogy; Ittai the Gittite cleaves to David, when almost all have forsaken him; the Queen of Sheba comes to hear the wisdom of Solomon; the Tyrian Hiram supplies him with materials when building the Temple, having been ‘ever a lover of David’; the widow of Zarephath, nearly destitute herself, feeds the famishing Elijah; and Naaman, the Syrian general, confesses his faith in the God of Elisha as the one true God; Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian slave, rescues Jeremiah from death, and is rewarded with a promise of personal immunity from danger; Job, an Arabian shaikh, is the lofty teacher of how ‘to suffer and be strong’; Cyrus the Persian Is the Lord’s anointed, and the deliverer of His people. Luke’s account of our Lord’s discourse at Nazareth it is clear that His hearers understood the references to the ministries of Elijah and Elisha as pointing to the admission of Gentiles into the Kingdom (Luke 4:28)
Prophet - God as King of the theocracy did not give up His sovereignty when kings were appointed; but as occasion required, through the prophets His legates, superseded, reproved, encouraged, set up, or put down kings (as Elisha in Jehu's case); and in times of apostasy strengthened in the faith the scattered remnant of believers. Official prophets seem to have continued to the close of the Old Testament, though the direct mention of "the sons of the prophets" occurs only in Samuel's, Elijah's, and Elisha's time. Elisha and the elders were sitting in his house, officially engaged, when the king of Israel sent to slay him (2 Kings 6:32)
Messiah - Prophets such as Elisha were set apart in this way (1 Kings 19:16 )
Miracles - The second period was that of Elijah and Elisha, when Israel’s religion was threatened with destruction
Samaria - Here those holy men of God, Elijah and Elisha, spoke their tremendous warnings in the ears of their incorrigible rulers, and wrought their miracles in the sight of all the people
Kings, the Books of - The prophets are prominent in Kings, as Nathan, Abijah, Elijah, Elisha, the prophet against the Bethel altar, Jonah, etc. The composition of the annals by prophets accounts for the prominence given to Elijah and Elisha. Elisha's charge to Gehazi (2 Kings 4:29) is repeated in our Lord's charge (Luke 10:4); the raising of the Shunammite's son is referred to, Hebrews 11:35; Jezebel is referred to, Revelation 2:20
Bason - 2 Kings 3:11 ‘Elisha the son of Shaphat, which poured water on the hands of Elijah
Oracles - Other examples, although the word oracle is not used, include Elijah's word to Ahab ( 1 Kings 21:17-19 ) and Elisha's word to Jehoram (2 Kings 3:13-20 ). Prophets did sometimes use music as a means of receiving a decision oracle as did Elisha (2 Kings 3:15 )
Wilderness (2) - Since the time of the Crusades, ecclesiastical tradition has contrived to localize that event in a particular, well-defined spot, and has chosen for it the wild and desolate mountain which arises almost vertically above the Fountain of Elisha, west from the oasis of Jericho
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - God's provisions through Elisha is but one example of his "listening" to the cry of the poor in the Bible (2 Kings 4:1-7 )
Angels - When Elisha was in Dothan, surrounded by Syrian hosts, and his servant cried, "Alas! how shall we do?" the Lord opened his eyes to see the mount full of chariots and horses of fire round about (2 Kings 6:15; 2 Kings 6:17, compare Psalms 94:7)
Jordan - Lot, for example, is said to have chosen ‘all the circle of the Jordan’ because ‘it was well watered everywhere’ ( Genesis 13:10 ); Joshua and all Israel crossed over the Jordan on dry ground ( Joshua 3:17 ); Ehud seized the fords of the Jordan against the Moabites, cutting off their retreat ( Judges 3:28 ); Gideon, Jephthah, David, Elijah, and Elisha were all well acquainted with the Jordan; Naaman the Syrian was directed to go wash in the Jordan seven times, that his leprosy might depart from him ( 2 Kings 5:10 )
Moab - (See JEHOSHAPHAT; JEHORAM; Elisha; EDOM
House - ...
Such "a little chamber" the Shunammite woman made (built) "on the wall" of the house for Elisha (2 Kings 4:10, compare 1 Kings 17:19)
Government - A more important check was found in the religious control, democratic in its best sense, exercised by the prophets (Samuel, Nathan, Elijah, Elisha, Jeremiah, etc
Salt - " So again when the prophet Elisha sweetened the waters of Jericho, he did it by casting a cruse of salt into them; and this was done by commission from the Lord, for the prophet added, "Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters; there shall not be from thence any more death or barren and
Miracles - 10-12 ...
Dividing of Jordan by Elijah 2 Kings 2:7-8 ...
Elijah carried to heaven 2 Kings 2:11 ...
Dividing of Jordan by Elisha 2 Kings 2:14 ...
Cure of the waters of Jericho 2 Kings 2:19-22 ...
Supply of water to the army 2 Kings 3:16-20 ...
Increase of the widow's oil 2 Kings 4:2-7 ...
Raising the Shunammite's son 2 Kings 4:32-37 ...
Healing of the deadly pottage 2 Kings 4:38-41 ...
Feeding the 100 with 20 loaves 2 Kings 4:42-44 ...
Cure of Naaman's leprosy 2 Kings 5:10-14 ...
Swimming of the iron axe-head 2 Kings 6:5-7 ...
Resurrection of the dead man on touching Elisha's bones Mark 2:3-12 ...
Return of the shadow on the dial 2 Kings 20:9-11 ...
Among the Gentiles ...
Deliverance of the three in the fiery furnace Daniel 3:19-27 ...
Deliverance of Daniel from the lions Daniel 6:16-23 ...
Jonah saved by the great fish Jonah 2:1-10 ...
In the N
Jordan - Here Elijah and Elisha divided the waters with the prophet's mantle (2 Kings 2:4; 2 Kings 2:8; 2 Kings 2:14)
Nathanael - what we read of Elisha in 2 Kings 5:26; 2 Kings 6:12)
Prophecy, Prophets - Elijah and Elisha offered critique and advice for the kings
Kings, 1 And 2 - God's prophets continually proclaimed them to the people: Elijah (1 Kings 17-19 ; 1 Kings 21:1 ; 2 Kings 1:1 ), Elisha (2 Kings 2:1-25 ; 2 Kings 3:9-20 ; 2 Kings 4:1-8:15 ; 2 Kings 9:1-3 ; 2 Kings 13:14-21 ), Isaiah (2 Kings 19:1-20:19 ) and others
Heal, Health - ...
One extraordinary means of healing is recorded in 2 Kings 4:25-37 : Elisha first ordered that his staff be laid on the inert body of a child, and when that failed, he lay face to face upon the child until warmth and life returned
Elijah - And when Elisha saw it he cried, My father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof! And he saw him no more
Dwelling - The chamber on the wall designed for Elisha, 2 Kings 4:10, was probably the room over the gate, with the projecting window
Banquet - This was a part of the service which Elisha performed for his master Elijah; and in every instance under the law where water was applied to the body by another, it was done, not by plunging, but by pouring or sprinkling
House - Such was the "little chamber upon the wall," which the Shunammite had built for Elisha, 2 Kings 4:10 ; the "summer parlor" of Eglon, Judges 3:20 ; and the "chamber over the gate," where David retired to weep, 2 Samuel 18:33 ; and perhaps in the New Testament the "upper chamber" where Tabitha was laid out, Acts 9:37 , and whence Eutychus fell from the window of the third loft into the court, Acts 20:9
Transportation And Travel - Ben-hadad, the king of Syria, sent “forty camel-loads” of goods to Elisha in an attempt to learn if he would recover from an illness
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - Despite the reference in Luke 4:25-27 to Elijah and Elisha and their ministry to foreigners, Jesus explicitly denied that He was sent to Gentiles or Samaritans ( Matthew 15:24 ; see Matthew 10:5-6 )
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - Jehu's revolt is sanctioned by the prophets Elijah and Elisha (2 Kings 9:7-10,26,30-37 )
Prayer - ...
So in Old Testament Moses (Exodus 8:12-30; Exodus 15:25), Elijah (1 Kings 17:20; John 14:13), Elisha (2 Kings 4:33; 2 Kings 6:17-18), Isaiah (2 Kings 20:11)
Jonah - ) Thus, Jonah was among the earliest of the prophets who wrote, and close upon Elisha who died in Joash's reign, having just before death foretold Syria's defeat thrice (2 Kings 13:14-21)
Lazarus - Elijah and Elisha had wrought miracles of resuscitation (1 Kings 17:17 ff
Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus - Elisha, John of Ephesus was imprisoned in the patriarch's palace
Man (2) - Elisha also was sent to heal Naaman the Syrian, although there were many lepers nearer home (Luke 4:25-27)
Prayer - ]'>[2]8 1 Kings 8:63 ) sacrifice is not mentioned! The Temple is a house of prayer); (4) Elijah’s intercession ( 1618451895_87 ), colloquy ( 1 Kings 19:9-11 ), prayer before miracle ( 1 Kings 17:20-21 ), so also Elisha ( 2 Kings 4:33 ; 2 Kings 6:17 ); (5) Hezekiah prays in national crisis ( 2 Kings 19:15 ) and in illness ( 2 Kings 20:3 ); note his assertion of righteousness
Leadership - Elisha took God's message to Syria (2 Kings 8 ), Jonah to Nineveh, and Ezekiel preached among the exiles in Babylon
Angels (2) - ]'>[1]7 to Exodus 12:12 tells of 90,000 myriads of destroying angels; and in Deuteronomy 34:5 the same Targum speaks of the glory of the Shekinah being revealed to the dying Moses, with 2000 myriads of angels and 42,000 chariots; as 2 Kings 6:17 tells of a ‘mountain full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha
Preaching - At Naioth, in the suburbs of Ramah, there was one where Samuel dwelt; and there was one at Jericho, and a third at Bethel, to which Elijah and Elisha often resorted
Christ, Christology - To Elijah God gives the command, "and anoint Elisha
Prayer - The role of mediator in prayer was prevalent in the Old Testament (as in Abraham, Moses, David, Samuel, Amos, Solomon, Hezekiah, Elijah, Elisha, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Israel)
Education in Bible Times - Hints of these organized schools for particular training are scattered throughout the Old Testament, especially in the company of the prophets associated with Elisha (2 Kings 2:3,5 ; 6:1-2 ; cf
Herod - ...
Herod "feared" John at first (compare Ahab's fear of Elisha, 1 Kings 21:20), "knowing that he was a just man and an holy, and observed him (preserved him from Herodias, or else respected, regarded him); and when he heard him he did many things and heard him gladly
Preaching - At Naioth, in the suburbs of Ramah, there was one, where Samuel dwelt; there was another at Jericho, and a third at Bethel, to which Elijah and Elisha often resorted
Animals - A narrative about Elisha recorded in the Bible pictures the ferocity of the bear (2 Kings 2:23-24 )
David - in the "habitations" of the prophets there, connected together by a wall or hedge round; a school over which Samuel presided, as Elisha did over those at Gilgal and Jericho; schools not for monastic separation from life's duties, but for mental and spiritual training with a view to greater usefulness in the world
House - ]'>[5] ) erected for Elisha, the ‘summer parlour ’ ( Judges 3:20 , lit
Biblical Theology - Nathan rebukes David; Ahijah and Iddo speak to Solomon's times; Elijah and Elisha minister to the northern kingdom of Israel after its split from Judah to the south following Solomon's reign
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - If thou see the ass of him that hateth thee lying under his burden, and wouldest forbear to help him, thou shalt surely help with him’; 1 Samuel 24:4-8 the example of David in sparing the life of Saul when he had him in his power; also the similar instance of Elisha in sparing the Syrians (2 Kings 6:22); Psalms 7:5 b (4b) ‘Yea, I have delivered him that without cause was mine adversary
Israel - In the synchronous history ( 1 Kings 12:1-33 - 2 Kings 17:1-41 ) the principal sources are the ‘Book of the Chronicle of the Kings of Israel’ and the ‘Book of the Chronicle of the Kings of Judah,’ though various other writings have been drawn upon for the narratives of Elijah and Elisha
Messiah - In the case of prophets like Elijah and Elisha the hope is hardly more distinct than a belief that the nation which worshipped Jehovah would he triumphant over its enemies
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - ) and by the saints of old-Elijah, Elisha, Ezekiel, Abraham, Job, Moses (xvii
Prophet - It may have been insight into character that enabled Micaiah to predict the coming cowardice of Zedekiah (1 Kings 22:25), and it certainly seems to have been this that gave Elisha power to read the future of Hazael (2 Kings 8:12)
Palestine - The heroes of the past were much in His thought, and His journeys from place to place reminded Him of them continually, Elijah and Elisha, Solomon, David, and Isaiah, were figures not merely remembered from reading in the sacred books