What does Eclipse mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Eclipse
Of the sun alluded to in Amos 8:9 ; Micah 3:6 ; Zechariah 14:6 ; Joel 2:10 . Eclipses were regarded as tokens of God's anger (Joel 3:15 ; Job 9:7 ). The darkness at the crucifixion has been ascribed to an eclipse (Matthew 27:45 ); but on the other hand it is argued that the great intensity of darkness caused by an eclipse never lasts for more than six minutes, and this darkness lasted for three hours. Moreover, at the time of the Passover the moon was full, and therefore there could not be an eclipse of the sun, which is caused by an interposition of the moon between the sun and the earth.
Webster's Dictionary - Eclipse
(1):
(n.) The loss, usually temporary or partial, of light, brilliancy, luster, honor, consciousness, etc.; obscuration; gloom; darkness.
(2):
(v. t.) To obscure, darken, or extinguish the beauty, luster, honor, etc., of; to sully; to cloud; to throw into the shade by surpassing.
(3):
(n.) An interception or obscuration of the light of the sun, moon, or other luminous body, by the intervention of some other body, either between it and the eye, or between the luminous body and that illuminated by it. A lunar eclipse is caused by the moon passing through the earth's shadow; a solar eclipse, by the moon coming between the sun and the observer. A satellite is eclipsed by entering the shadow of its primary. The obscuration of a planet or star by the moon or a planet, though of the nature of an eclipse, is called an occultation. The eclipse of a small portion of the sun by Mercury or Venus is called a transit of the planet.
(4):
(v. t.) To cause the obscuration of; to darken or hide; - said of a heavenly body; as, the moon eclipses the sun.
(5):
(v. i.) To suffer an eclipse.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Eclipse
The word eclipse, εκλειψις , signifies failure, namely, of light. An eclipse of the sun is caused by the intervention of the moon, at new, or in conjunction with the sun, intercepting his light from the earth, either totally or partially. An eclipse of the moon is caused by the intervention of the earth, intercepting the sun's light from the moon, when full, or in opposition to the sun, either totally or partially. The reason why the sun is not eclipsed every new moon, nor the moon at every full, is owing to the inclination of the moon's orbit to the plane of the ecliptic, or earth's orbit, is an angle of about five degrees and a half: in consequence of which, the moon is generally too much elevated above the plane of the ecliptic, or too much depressed below it, for her disk to touch the earth's shadow at full, or for her shadow, or her penumbra, to touch the earth's disk at new. An eclipse, therefore, of either luminary can only take place when they are within their proper limits, or distances, from the nodes or intersections of both orbits. And because the limits of solar eclipses are wider than those of lunar, in general there will be more eclipses of the sun than of the moon. In any year, the number of eclipses of both luminaries cannot be less than two, and these will both be of the sun, nor more than seven: the usual number is four; and it is very rare to have more than six. But though solar eclipses happen oftener, lunar are more frequently observed in any particular place. For an eclipse of the moon is visible to the inhabitants of half the globe at the same instant; whereas, an eclipse of the sun is visible only within that part of the earth's surface, traversed by the moon's total shadow, and by her penumbra, or partial shadow. But her total shadow, when she is nearest to the earth, cannot cover a space of more than a hundred and fifty-eight geographical miles in diameter, nor at her mean distance more than seventy-nine, and at her greatest distance may not touch the earth at all. In the two former cases, the sun will be eclipsed in the places covered by the shadow totally, or by the penumbra partially: in the last it may be annular, but not total. Without the reach of the shadow, and within the limits of the penumbra, which cannot cover more than four thousand five hundred and fifty-two miles of the earth's surface, there will be a partial eclipse of the sun, and without these limits no eclipse at all. Hence lunar eclipses are more frequently noticed by historians than solar; and Diogenes Laertius may be credited when he relates, that, during the period in which the Egyptians had observed eight hundred and thirty-two eclipses of the moon, they had only observed three hundred and seventy-three of the sun. In the midst of a total lunar eclipse, the moon's disk is frequently visible, and of a deep red or copperish colour. This, in the poetic language of sacred prophecy, is expressed by "the moon's being turned into blood," Joel 2:31 . This remarkable phenomenon is caused by the sun's lateral rays in their passage through the dense atmosphere of the earth, being inflected into the shadow by refraction, and falling pretty copiously upon the moon's disk, are reflected from thence to the eye of the spectator. If the earth had no atmosphere, the moon's disk would then be as black as in a solar eclipse. A total eclipse of the moon may occasion a privation of her light for an hour and a half, during her total immersion in the shadow; whereas, a total eclipse of the sun can never last in any particular place above four minutes, when the moon is nearest to the earth, and her shadow thickest. Hence it appears, that the darkness which "overspread the whole land of Judea," at the time of our Lord's crucifixion, was preternatural, "from the sixth until the ninth hour," or from noon till three in the afternoon, in its duration, and also in its time, about full moon, when the moon could not possibly eclipse the sun. It was accompanied by an earthquake, which altogether struck the spectators, and among them the centurion and Roman guard, with great fear, and a conviction, that Jesus was the Son of God, Matthew 27:51-54 .
Eclipses, says Dr. Hales, are justly reckoned among the surest and most unerring characters of chronology; for they can be calculated with great exactness backward as well as forward; and there is such a variety of distinct circumstances of the time when, and the place where, they were seen; of the duration, or beginning, middle, or end of every eclipse, and of the quantity, or number of digits eclipsed; that there is no danger of confounding any two eclipses together, when the circumstances attending each are noticed with any tolerable degree of precision. Thus, to an eclipse of the moon incidentally noticed by the great Jewish chronologer, Josephus, shortly before the death of Herod the Great, we owe the determination of the true year of our Saviour's nativity. During Herod's last illness, and not many days before his death, there happened an eclipse of the moon on the very night that he burned alive Matthias, and the ringleaders of a sedition, in which the golden eagle, which he had consecrated and set up over the gate of the temple, was pulled down and broken to pieces by these zealots. This eclipse happened, by calculation, March 13, U.C. 750, B.C. 4. But it is certain from Scripture, that Christ was born during Herod's reign; and from the visit of the magi to Jerusalem "from the east," απο ανατολων , from the Parthian empire, to inquire for the true "born King of the Jews," whose star they had seen "at its rising," εν τη ανατολη , and also from the age of the infants massacred at Bethlehem, "from two years old and under," Matthew 2:1-16 . It is no less certain, that Jesus could not have been born later than B.C. 5, which is the year assigned to the nativity by Chrysostom, Petavius and Prideaux.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Eclipse
ECLIPSE . See Sun.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Eclipse of the Sun
No historical notice of an eclipse occurs in the Bible, but there are passages in the prophets which contain manifest allusion to this phenomenon. (Joel 2:10,31 ; 3:15 ; Amos 8:9 ; Micah 3:6 ; Zechariah 14:6 ) Some of these notices probably refer to eclipses that occurred about the time of the respective compositions: thus the date of Amos coincides with a total eclipse which occurred Feb. 9, B.C. 784, and was visible at Jerusalem shortly after noon; that of Micah with the eclipse of June 5, B.C. 716. A passing notice in (Jeremiah 15:9 ) coincides in date with the eclipse of Sept. 30, B.C. 610, so well known from Herodotus' account (i. 74,103). The darkness that overspread the world at the crucifixion cannot with reason be attributed to an eclipse, as the moon was at the full at the time of the passover.

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Eclipse of the Sun - No historical notice of an Eclipse occurs in the Bible, but there are passages in the prophets which contain manifest allusion to this phenomenon. (Joel 2:10,31 ; 3:15 ; Amos 8:9 ; Micah 3:6 ; Zechariah 14:6 ) Some of these notices probably refer to Eclipses that occurred about the time of the respective compositions: thus the date of Amos coincides with a total Eclipse which occurred Feb. 784, and was visible at Jerusalem shortly after noon; that of Micah with the Eclipse of June 5, B. A passing notice in (Jeremiah 15:9 ) coincides in date with the Eclipse of Sept. The darkness that overspread the world at the crucifixion cannot with reason be attributed to an Eclipse, as the moon was at the full at the time of the passover
Eclipse - Eclipse
Eclipsed - ) of Eclipse...
Eclipsing - ) of Eclipse...
Eclipse - A lunar Eclipse is caused by the moon passing through the earth's shadow; a solar Eclipse, by the moon coming between the sun and the observer. A satellite is Eclipsed by entering the shadow of its primary. The obscuration of a planet or star by the moon or a planet, though of the nature of an Eclipse, is called an occultation. The Eclipse of a small portion of the sun by Mercury or Venus is called a transit of the planet. ) To cause the obscuration of; to darken or hide; - said of a heavenly body; as, the moon Eclipses the sun. ) To suffer an Eclipse
Eclipse - Eclipses were regarded as tokens of God's anger (Joel 3:15 ; Job 9:7 ). The darkness at the crucifixion has been ascribed to an Eclipse (Matthew 27:45 ); but on the other hand it is argued that the great intensity of darkness caused by an Eclipse never lasts for more than six minutes, and this darkness lasted for three hours. Moreover, at the time of the Passover the moon was full, and therefore there could not be an Eclipse of the sun, which is caused by an interposition of the moon between the sun and the earth
Obscuration - ) The act or operation of obscuring; the state of being obscured; as, the obscuration of the moon in an Eclipse
Occult - ) To Eclipse; to hide from sight
Eclipse - The word Eclipse, εκλειψις , signifies failure, namely, of light. An Eclipse of the sun is caused by the intervention of the moon, at new, or in conjunction with the sun, intercepting his light from the earth, either totally or partially. An Eclipse of the moon is caused by the intervention of the earth, intercepting the sun's light from the moon, when full, or in opposition to the sun, either totally or partially. The reason why the sun is not Eclipsed every new moon, nor the moon at every full, is owing to the inclination of the moon's orbit to the plane of the ecliptic, or earth's orbit, is an angle of about five degrees and a half: in consequence of which, the moon is generally too much elevated above the plane of the ecliptic, or too much depressed below it, for her disk to touch the earth's shadow at full, or for her shadow, or her penumbra, to touch the earth's disk at new. An Eclipse, therefore, of either luminary can only take place when they are within their proper limits, or distances, from the nodes or intersections of both orbits. And because the limits of solar Eclipses are wider than those of lunar, in general there will be more Eclipses of the sun than of the moon. In any year, the number of Eclipses of both luminaries cannot be less than two, and these will both be of the sun, nor more than seven: the usual number is four; and it is very rare to have more than six. But though solar Eclipses happen oftener, lunar are more frequently observed in any particular place. For an Eclipse of the moon is visible to the inhabitants of half the globe at the same instant; whereas, an Eclipse of the sun is visible only within that part of the earth's surface, traversed by the moon's total shadow, and by her penumbra, or partial shadow. In the two former cases, the sun will be Eclipsed in the places covered by the shadow totally, or by the penumbra partially: in the last it may be annular, but not total. Without the reach of the shadow, and within the limits of the penumbra, which cannot cover more than four thousand five hundred and fifty-two miles of the earth's surface, there will be a partial Eclipse of the sun, and without these limits no Eclipse at all. Hence lunar Eclipses are more frequently noticed by historians than solar; and Diogenes Laertius may be credited when he relates, that, during the period in which the Egyptians had observed eight hundred and thirty-two Eclipses of the moon, they had only observed three hundred and seventy-three of the sun. In the midst of a total lunar Eclipse, the moon's disk is frequently visible, and of a deep red or copperish colour. If the earth had no atmosphere, the moon's disk would then be as black as in a solar Eclipse. A total Eclipse of the moon may occasion a privation of her light for an hour and a half, during her total immersion in the shadow; whereas, a total Eclipse of the sun can never last in any particular place above four minutes, when the moon is nearest to the earth, and her shadow thickest. Hence it appears, that the darkness which "overspread the whole land of Judea," at the time of our Lord's crucifixion, was preternatural, "from the sixth until the ninth hour," or from noon till three in the afternoon, in its duration, and also in its time, about full moon, when the moon could not possibly Eclipse the sun. ...
Eclipses, says Dr. Hales, are justly reckoned among the surest and most unerring characters of chronology; for they can be calculated with great exactness backward as well as forward; and there is such a variety of distinct circumstances of the time when, and the place where, they were seen; of the duration, or beginning, middle, or end of every Eclipse, and of the quantity, or number of digits Eclipsed; that there is no danger of confounding any two Eclipses together, when the circumstances attending each are noticed with any tolerable degree of precision. Thus, to an Eclipse of the moon incidentally noticed by the great Jewish chronologer, Josephus, shortly before the death of Herod the Great, we owe the determination of the true year of our Saviour's nativity. During Herod's last illness, and not many days before his death, there happened an Eclipse of the moon on the very night that he burned alive Matthias, and the ringleaders of a sedition, in which the golden eagle, which he had consecrated and set up over the gate of the temple, was pulled down and broken to pieces by these zealots. This Eclipse happened, by calculation, March 13, U
Totality - ) The quality or state of being total; as, the totality of an Eclipse
Digit - ) One twelfth part of the diameter of the sun or moon; - a term used to express the quantity of an Eclipse; as, an Eclipse of eight digits is one which hides two thirds of the diameter of the disk
Darkness - The darkness "over all the land," (Matthew 27:45 ) attending the crucifixion has been attributed to an Eclipse, but was undoubtedly miraculous, as no Eclipse of the sun could have taken place at that time, the moon being at the full at the time of the passover
Darkness - "...
The date of Amos 8:9 coincides with a total Eclipse visible at Jerusalem shortly after noon, Feb. ; the date of Micah 3:6 with the Eclipse June 5th, 716 B. , 2:56); the date of Jeremiah 15:9 with the Eclipse of Sept. ) The darkness over all the land (Juaea) from the sixth to the ninth hour during Christ's crucifixion (Matthew 27:45) cannot have been an Eclipse, for it would not last three hours, seldom intensely more than six minutes. The Eclipse, darkness and earthquake in Bithynia, noted by Phlegon of Tralles, was probably in the year before. By the paschal reckoning the moon must then have been at its full phase, when the sun could not be Eclipsed
Emerge - ) To rise out of a fluid; to come forth from that in which anything has been plunged, enveloped, or concealed; to issue and appear; as, to emerge from the water or the ocean; the sun emerges from behind the moon in an Eclipse; to emerge from poverty or obscurity
Extinguish - ) To obscure; to Eclipse, as by superior splendor
Emersion - ) The reappearance of a heavenly body after an Eclipse or occultation; as, the emersion of the moon from the shadow of the earth; the emersion of a star from behind the moon
Penumbra - ) The shadow cast, in an Eclipse, where the light is partly, but not wholly, cut off by the intervening body; the space of partial illumination between the umbra, or perfect shadow, on all sides, and the full light
Baily's Beads - A row of bright spots observed in connection with total Eclipses of the sun. Just before and after a total Eclipse, the slender, unobscured crescent of the sun's disk appears momentarily like a row of bright spots resembling a string of beads
Lantern - All of man's intellectual lightness falls into an Eclipse in the light of the Son of GOD
Stephen Perry - He was sent by the British Government on numerous scientific expeditions, observing the transits of Venus at Kerguelen (1874) and Madagascar (1882), and the solar Eclipse at the Isles de Salut (1889), dying a few weeks later at sea
Ecliptic - ) Pertaining to an Eclipse or to Eclipses
Dungal - He addressed a letter to Charlemagne explaining an Eclipse of the sun in which he displays a knowledge of astronomy far beyond his time
Partial - ) Of, pertaining to, or affecting, a part only; not general or universal; not total or entire; as, a partial Eclipse of the moon
Sun - By ‘signs in the sun’ (Luke 21:25) we are to understand the phenomena of Eclipse, as described more clearly in the parallel passages, Matthew 24:29, Mark 13:24. The statement in Luke 23:45 as to ‘the sun being darkened’ (Authorized Version ) or ‘the sun’s light failing’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ) at the time of the Crucifixion, cannot be explained in this way, since an Eclipse of the sun can happen only at new moon, whereas the Crucifixion took place at a Passover, when the moon was full
Dim - ) To render dim, obscure, or dark; to make less bright or distinct; to take away the luster of; to darken; to dull; to obscure; to Eclipse
Darkness - This could not have been caused by an Eclipse of the sun; for at Passover the moon was full, and on the opposite side of the earth from the sun
Wink - I could Eclipse and cloud them with a wink
Sun - The darkening or Eclipse of the sun was often interpreted as a sign of God's displeasure with humans
Blot - ) To obscure; to Eclipse; to shadow
Moon (2) - Also, the darkness which lasted for three hours during the crucifixion could not be due to an ordinary Eclipse of the sun by the moon
Septuagesima - " The reasonfor thus numbering these Sundays has been beautifully set forthin "Thoughts on the Services" as follows: "The Church now(Septuagesima Sunday) enters the penumbra of her Lenten Eclipse,and all her services are shadowed with the sombre hue of herapproaching Season of humiliation
Shadow - The shadow of the earth in in an Eclipse of the moon is proof of its sphericity
Blind - To Eclipse
Obscure - The shadow of the earth obscures the moon, and the body of the moon obscures the sun, in an Eclipse
Earthquake - Phlegon, Adrian's freedman, relates that, together with the Eclipse, which happened at noon day, in the fourth year of the two hundred and second Olympiad, or A
Darkness - The darkness which now covered Judea, and the neighbouring countries, beginning about noon, and continuing till Jesus expired, was not the effect of an ordinary Eclipse of the sun, for that can never happen but at the new moon, whereas now it was full moon; not to mention that the total darkness occasioned by Eclipses of the sun never continues above twelve or fifteen minutes; wherefore it must have been produced by the divine power, in a manner we are not able to explain. Farther, the Christian writers, in their most ancient apologies to the heathens, affirm that as it was full moon, at the passover when Christ was crucified, no such Eclipse could happen by the course of nature
Darkness - That it was preternatural is certain, for, the moon being at full, a natural Eclipse of the sun was impossible
Moon - And as the moon is subject to an Eclipse, and hath her waxing and waning times, so the church knows how to be abased and how to abound. When Jesus, the Sun of righteousness, causeth his rays of light to act upon the church, by their kind influences, the church then like the moon from the sun, ministers according to the divine appointment of her Lord; but if the earth comes between, that is, if earthly affections intervene between Christ and the soul, then, like the interposition in the planetary world, there will be an Eclipse
Amos - Furthermore, the earthquake mentioned in 1:1, and the Eclipse in 8:1, suggests proximity with the year 763 B
Can - An astronomer can calculate an Eclipse, though he can not make a coat
Grasshopper - Bochart supposes that this species of the locust has its name from the Arabic verb hajaba, "to veil," because, when they fly, as they often do, in great swarms, they Eclipse even the light of the sun
Darkness (2) - ’ It may suffice to remark that, the Passover falling at full moon, there can be no question here of a solar Eclipse
Darkness - Hence, when the whole was passed, and this Eclipse gone by; and day-light brake in again upon Jesus, he cried with a loud voice, "It is finished
Miracles - Tyndall says that "science does assert that without a disturbance of natural law quite as serious as the stoppage of an Eclipse, or the rolling of the St
Maximus, Bishop of Turin - (16), their tumults during an Eclipse (100), the idolatry still lurking among the lower orders (Serm
Sun - Though there is no actual mention of an Eclipse in the Bible, part of the language used in describing the terrors of the day of the Lord both in OT and NT is derived from such an event: ‘the sun shall be turned into darkness’ ( Joel 2:31 ), ‘the sun became black as sackcloth of hair’ ( Revelation 6:12 )
Habakkuk, Theology of - His glory and brilliance Eclipse all the forces of nature
Separation - Hitherto they have existed as an obscuring medium, but with the removal of the scandals and their authors (Matthew 13:41) the character of the righteous at last appears, without shadow of Eclipse, in all its unsullied purity and splendour (Matthew 13:43)
Vigilantius - He was an inmate of Jerome's monastery on the occasion of a tremendous storm with earthquake and Eclipse ( cont
Africanus, Julius - ...
Another interesting passage in the χρονικά is one in which he treats of the darkness at the Crucifixion and shews in opposition to the Syrian historian Thallus that it was miraculous and that an Eclipse of the sun could not have taken place at the full moon
Esther - " A young "secondary wife" might for a time Eclipse the queen consort in the favor of the king; but the latter would ultimately maintain her due position
Nebuchadnezzar - 74) who led the Babylonian force under Cyaxares in his Lydian war and whose interposition at the Eclipse (610 B
Light And Darkness - ’ And here also the idea of this light without shadow or Eclipse is used to emphasize the fact, previously referred to, of the essential holiness of One who cannot be tempted with evil and who Himself tempteth no man (James 1:13)
Amos - Much of his imagery is drawn from nature: earthquakes and the Eclipse of the sun, the cedars and the oaks, the roaring of the lion, the snaring of birds, the bite of the viper; once only does he draw a comparison from shepherd life ( Amos 3:12 )
Dates (2) - ...
There are two move data to help us to fix the year of Herod’s death: the Eclipse of the moon which preceded his last illness (Ant. The lunar Eclipses visible in Palestine during b. As it is quite possible that the final scene of Herod’s life and his obsequies did not cover more than one month, we might, with Ideler and Wurm, fix on the Eclipse of March 12 b
Heaven - ...
The arguments against degrees are, that all the people of God are loved by him with the same love, all chosen together in Christ, equally interested in the same covenant of grace, equally redeemed with the same price, and all predestinated to the same adoption of children; to suppose the contrary, it is said, is to Eclipse the glory of divine grace, and carries with it the legal idea of being rewarded for our works
Paul Apprehended of Christ Jesus - There is one other conversion long since Paul's, that will, to you and to me to all eternity, quite Eclipse Paul's conversion, and will for ever completely cast, even it, quite into the shade
Devotion - In the parables the joy is occasionally festal and general, but sometimes becomes that of personal and assured possession (Matthew 13:44; Matthew 13:46), or is even lifted up into likeness to the Saviour’s own joy, incapable of dimness or of Eclipse (John 15:11, Matthew 25:21)
Barnabas - Paul so Eclipses every one of his contemporaries, that it is with the utmost difficulty we can get a glimpse of any one but Paul. Everlastingly well done, thou true son of consolation!...
The scene now shifts to Antioch, which is soon to Eclipse Jerusalem herself, and to become the true mother-church of evangelical Christianity
Messiah - gave expression, there followed a time of reaction when these high hopes suffered temporary Eclipse
Joseph - In strength of right purpose he was second to none, whilst in the graces of reverence and kindness, of insight and assurance, he became the type of a faith that is at once personal and national (Hebrews 11:22 ), and allows neither misery nor a career of triumph to Eclipse the sense of Divine destiny
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - Isidore discourses of the days, the night, the seasons, the solstice and equinox, the world and its five zones, heaven and its name, the planets, the waters, the heavens, the nature, size, and course of the sun, the light and course of the moon, the Eclipse of sun and moon, the course of the stars, the position of the seven planets, the light of the stars, falling stars, the names of the stars and whether they have any soul, thunder, lightning, the rainbow, clouds, showers, snow, hail, the nature and names of the winds, the signs of storms, pestilence, the heat, size, and saltness of the ocean, the river Nile, the names of sea and rivers, the position and motion of the earth, mount Etna, and the parts of the earth
Hebrews Epistle to the - As the glories of the heavenly Sion Eclipse the terrors of Sinai, so is our responsibility greater than that of Israel of old
Prophecy - But to foretel such events would not be to prophesy, any more than to say that it will be light to-morrow at noon, or that on a certain day and hour next year there will occur an Eclipse of the sun or moon, when that event had been previously ascertained by astronomical calculation
Joseph - ...
In his simplicity, possibly with some degree of elation, but certainly with the divine approval (for the revelation was given to be made known, Matthew 10:27), he told the dreams to his brethren, which only aggravated their hatred: the first, their sheaves bowing to his sheaf (pointing to his coming office of lord of the Egyptian granaries); the second, the sun, moon, and 11 stars bowing to him (these heavenly bodies symbolizing authorities subject to his chief rule; compare the coming Eclipse of the natural luminaries and earthly potentates before the Antitype, Matthew 24:29-30; Revelation 6:12)
Babel - The first Eclipse on record, a lunar one, was accurately observed at Babylon, March 19th, 721 B. Ptolemy has preserved an account of lunar Eclipses as far back as this date