What does Drunkenness mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
μέθῃ intoxication. 1
οἰνοφλυγίαις drunkenness. 1
רַ֛עַל reeling. 1
שִׁכָּר֥וֹן drunkenness. 1
שִׁכָּרֽוֹן drunkenness. 1
! בַשְּׁתִֽי a drinking 1

Definitions Related to Drunkenness

H8358


   1 a drinking, drinking bout Ecc 10:17.
   

H7943


   1 Drunkenness.
   

H7478


   1 reeling.
   

G3178


   1 intoxication.
   2 Drunkenness.
   

G3632


   1 Drunkenness.
   

Frequency of Drunkenness (original languages)

Frequency of Drunkenness (English)

Dictionary

Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Drunk,, Drunkard, Drunkenness
A — 1: μεθύω (Strong's #3184 — Verb — methuo — meth-oo'-o ) signifies "to be drunk with wine" (from methu, "mulled wine;" hence Eng., "mead, honey-wine"); originally it denoted simply "a pleasant drink." For John 2:10 see under DRINK. The verb is used of "being intoxicated" in Matthew 24:49 ; Acts 2:15 ; 1 Corinthians 11:21 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:7 b; metaphorically, of the effect upon men of partaking of the abominations of the Babylonish system, Revelation 17:2 ; of being in a state of mental "intoxication," through the shedding of men's blood profusely, ver. 6.
A — 2: μεθύσκω (Strong's #3182 — Verb — methusko — meth-oos'-ko ) signifies "to make drunk, or to grow drunk" (an inceptive verb, marking the process or the state expressed in No. 1), "to become intoxicated," Luke 12:45 ; Ephesians 5:18 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:7 .
B — 1: μέθυσος (Strong's #3183 — Noun Masculine — methusos — meth'-oo-sos ) "drunken" (cp. No. 2), is used as noun, in the singular, in 1 Corinthians 5:11 , and in the plural, in 1 Corinthians 6:10 , "drunkard," "drunkards."
C — 1: μέθη (Strong's #3178 — Noun Feminine — methe — meth'-ay ) "strong drink" (akin to methu, "wine," see under A. 1, above), denotes "drunkenness, habitual intoxication," Luke 21:34 ; Romans 13:13 ; Galatians 5:21 .
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Drunkenness
Intoxication with strong liquor. It is either actual or habitual; just as it is one thing to be drunk, and another to be a drunkard. The evil of drunkenness appears in the following bad effects:
1. It betrays most constitutions either to extravagance of anger, or sins of lewdness.
2. It disqualifies men for the duties of their station, both by the temporary disorder of their faculties, and at length by a constant incapacity and stupefaction.
3. It is attended with expense, which can often be ill spared.
4. It is sure to occasion uneasiness to the family of the drunkard.
5. It shortens life.
6. It is a most pernicious awful example to others.
7. It is hardly ever cured.
8. It is a violation of God's word, Proverbs 20:1 . Ephesians 5:18 . Is. 5: 11. Romans 13:13 . "The appetite for intoxicating liquor appears to me, " says Paley, "to be almost always acquired. One proof of which is, that it is apt to return only at particular times and places; as after dinner, in the evening, on the market-day, in such a company, at such a tavern." How careful, then, should we be, lest we form habits of this kind, or choose company who are addicted to it; how cautious and circumspect should we act, that we be not found guilty of a sin which degrades human nature, banishes reason, insults God, and exposes us to the greatest evils! Paley's Mor. Phil. vol. 2: ch. 2. Flavel's Works, vol. 2: p. 349; Buck's anecdotes, vol. 1: p. 82, 4rth edition; Lamont's Ser., vol. 1: ser. 15, 16.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Drunkenness
A state of dizziness, headaches, and vomiting resulting from drinking alcoholic beverages. From Genesis 9:21 on, the Bible describes the shameful state of the drunken person and the shameful actions resulting from the state. Too much partying led to drunkenness and failure of communication between husband and wife ( 1 Samuel 25:36 ). It left a person defenseless against enemies (1 Kings 16:9-10 ; 1 Kings 20:16 ). They sang loud songs ridiculing other people (Psalm 69:12 ) and could not walk straight (Job 12:25 ; Psalm 107:27 ). They vomited (Jeremiah 25:27 ) and were in a daze, unaware of events around them (Joel 1:5 ). They ruined their future (Proverbs 23:20-21 ). They could not protect themselves against unnecessary injuries such as avoiding a thornbush (Proverbs 26:9 ). Drunken leaders ruin a nation (Isaiah 28:1-9 ). Being drunk became a figure of speech for having to drink the disaster God was sending (Isaiah 49:26 ; Isaiah 51:21-22 ; Jeremiah 25:27-29 ; Ezekiel 39:17-20 .
The Jewish leaders tried to discredit Jesus, saying He was a drunkard (Matthew 11:19 ). Jesus warned that the cares of life may lead to anxiety and drunkenness (Luke 21:34 ). Paul repeatedly warned against the dangers of drunkenness (Romans 13:13 ; 1 Corinthians 5:11 ; Galatians 5:21 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:7 ). Timothy 1 Thessalonians 3:3 and Titus 1:7 warn church leaders they must not be drunkards. Drunkenness is a pagan custom, not a Christian one ( 1 Peter 4:3 ). Drunkards are among these who will not “inherit the kingdom of God” (1 Corinthians 6:10 ).
King James Dictionary - Drunkenness
DRUNKENNESS, n.
1. Intoxication inebriation a state in which a person is overwhelmed or overpowered with spirituous liquors, so that his reason is disordered, and he reels or staggers in walking. Drunkenness renders some persons stupid, others gay, others sullen, others furious. Let us walk honestly as in the day not in rioting and drunkenness.
2. Habitually ebriety or intoxication. 3. Disorder of the faculties resembling intoxication by liquors inflammation frenzy rage. Passion is the drunkenness of the mind.
Webster's Dictionary - Drunkenness
(1):
(n.) Disorder of the faculties, resembling intoxication by liquors; inflammation; frenzy; rage.
(2):
(n.) The state of being drunken with, or as with, alcoholic liquor; intoxication; inebriety; - used of the casual state or the habit.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Drunkenness (2)
DRUNKENNESS.—Only one explicit utterance of our Lord relating to drunkenness is recorded (Luke 21:34). Elsewhere He warns against it indirectly, as in the parables where He holds up drunken servants to reprobation (Matthew 24:49 = Luke 12:45). But His references to the vice are surprisingly meagre. That must not be regarded as a measure of the contemporary extent of the evil, nor as indicating any lack of concern on His part. Our Lord’s attitude to the matter must be estimated in view of the sentiments and practices of His times.
The habit of drinking to excess was widespread. Hebrew literature provides ample proof of familiarity with its unvarying moral and social consequences. The scandals associated with the early Christian love-feasts (1 Corinthians 11:21, Judges 1:12) were doubtless partly a recrudescence of pre-Christian practices. While excess was unsparingly condemned by moralists, moderation was uniformly commended. Occasional maxims hint at the expediency of abstinence in the interests of moral integrity and personal security. But where that is actually practised, it is invariably the outcome of purely religious impulse. It would seem that the Nazirites, the Rechabites, and other ascetics realized that indulgence in wine was inimical to spiritual life (cf. Luke 1:15), or inexpedient in situations demanding the highest possible personal purity, or inappropriate to persons of singular and abnormal holiness (cf. John the Baptist, with whom some seem to have compared Jesus unfavourably, Luke 7:34). To the ordinary Jew, however, habitual indulgence was a matter of course. Abstinence required strong reasons to justify it. The Babylonian Gemara would even seem to suggest that abstinence might be a positive sin. ‘The Nazirite has sinned by denying himself wine.’ It bases this opinion on an arbitrary and erroneous interpretation of Numbers 6:20 (see Jewish Encyc. art. ‘Drunkenness’).
Jesus seems to have adopted the prevailing popular attitude. He instituted no campaign against the use of strong drink. He made it no part of His mission to denounce indulgence. He Himself followed the ordinary practices of His day, both using wine and giving His countenance to festivities in which wine played an important part (cf. John 2:10). His various references to the beverage indicate that He regarded it as a source of innocent enjoyment (cf. Luke 5:30; Luke 5:38-39; Luke 7:34; Luke 17:8). Nevertheless, that He did not overlook the fact that excess was common, and that He had an open eye for the obtrusive evils of over-indulgence, is abundantly evident from other references, as in the parables. That He did not feel called upon to command or commend abstinence in spite of this is partly to be explained, perhaps, by the fact that drunkenness was the vice chiefly of the wealthy. That seems to be implicitly recognized in Luke 21:34, where it is bracketed with surfeiting and subjection to the cares of this life, faults peculiarly associated with the rich or well-to-do. In the parable of the Householder (Matthew 24:45-51 = Luke 12:42-46), the drunken characters whom He holds up to contempt are servants of one in high position, forming the ménage of a luxurious household in which creature comforts would be plentiful. In the circles in which Jesus Himself principally moved, and to which He chiefly appealed, excess does not seem to have been so common as to call for urgent protest or the starting of a crusade against the use of alcoholic liquors.
Christ’s attitude to the whole matter was determined by the fundamental purpose of His mission. Drunkenness in general He regards as the accompaniment and symptom of a carnal unregenerate state of heart, the outcome of wickedness that defies restraint. He implicitly recognizes it also as strongly contributory to spiritual demoralization, as inducing such blunting of the spiritual sensibilities and disabling of spiritual faculty as incapacitate the soul for the proper exercises of the devout life, and endanger its future by reducing it to a state of unpreparedness for the last Divine catastrophe (Luke 21:34 ff.).
A. M. Hunter.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Drunkenness
It may be taken for granted that the wine of the Bible was fermented, and therefore, when taken in excess, intoxicating. Unfermented wine is a modern concept. The ancients had not that knowledge of antiseptic precautions which would have enabled them to preserve the juice of the grape in an unfermented state. It was the inebriating property of wine that constituted the sting of the calumny with which the sanctimonious tried to injure our Lord Ἰδοὺ ἄνθρωπος, οἰνοπότης (Matthew 11:19, Luke 7:34). There would have been no scandal in His habitually partaking of a beverage which was never harmful. Christ bade men take heed lest their hearts should be overcharged with surfeiting and drunkenness (κραιπάλῃ καὶ μέθῃ Luke 21:34), but He evidently regarded it as possible to draw the line between the use and the abuse of wine. He was not a Nazirite, Rechabite, or Essene. A Palestinian movement against wine and strong drink might conceivably have been begun by the Baptist (Luke 1:15), but not by Christ. His religion was not in its essence a system of ascetic negations; it was much more than one of the ‘creeds which deny and restrain.’ In His time and country, drunkenness, however pernicious in individual cases, could not be regarded as one of the deadly national sins.
‘Orientals are not inclined to intemperance. The warm climate very quickly makes it a cause of discomfort and disease’ (Mackie, Bible Manners and Customs, 1898, p. 46). Moreover, ‘the wines of Palestine may be assumed on the whole not to have exceeded the strength of an ordinary claret’ (A. R. S. Kennedy, Encyclopaedia Biblica iv. 5319).
It was Gentile rather than Jewish wine-drinking habits that Apostolic Christianity had to combat, and Bacchus (Dionysus) was notoriously one of the most powerful of the gods of Greece and Home. The apostles did not fight against the social customs of pagan nations with a new legalism. It was not the Christian but the Judaizer or the Gnostic who repeated the parrot-cry, ‘Handle not, taste not, touch not.’ Christianity goes to work in a wholly different manner. It relies on the power of great positive truths. It creates a passion for high things which deadens the taste for low things. Its distinction is that it makes every man a legislator to himself. The inordinate use of wine and strong drink becomes morally impossible for a Christian, not because there is an external law which forbids it, but because his own enlightened conscience condemns it. St. Paul does not say to the Roman Christians, ‘Let us walk lawfully, not in revelling and drunkenness,’ but ‘Let us walk becomingly’ (εὐσχημόνως, Romans 13:13). This means that there is a beautiful new σχῆμα, or ideal of conduct, of which every man becomes enamoured when he accepts the Christ in whom it is embodied. Thereafter he feels, with a shuddering repulsion, how ill it would become him to walk in ‘revelling and drunkenness, chambering and wantonness.’ He abjures the thought of being at once spiritual and sensual. Having put on the Lord Jesus Christ, he cannot continue to make provision for the flesh, to fulfil its lusts.
It is true that the moral verdicts of the Christian are not always immediate and sure. ‘Manifest are the works of the flesh,’ wrote St. Paul, naming among them ‘drunkenness’ (μέθαι, Galatians 5:19; Galatians 5:21), but they were far from being so manifest to all his converts. The Christian conscience needed to be educated, the spiritual taste to be cultivated. At Corinth the ἀγάπη, or love-feast, which ended in the Lord’s Supper, all too readily degenerated into something not very unlike the banquets in the idol-temples. ‘One is hungry, and another is drunken’ (μεθύει, 1 Corinthians 11:21). ‘Paul paints the scene in strong colours; but who would be warranted in saying that the reality fell at all short of the description?’ (Meyer, Com. in loc.). It has always been one of the enchantments of Bacchus and Comus to make their devotees glory in their shame, so that they
‘Not once perceive their foul disfigurement,
Bat boast themselves more comely than before’
(Milton, Comus, 74f.).
That this is true of the vulgar and of the educated alike, both in pagan and in Christian times, is attested not only by a thousand drinking-songs but by the orgies of the ‘Symposium’ and the ‘Noctes Ambrosiamae.’ Yet even Omar Khayyam, after all his praise of the Vine, is obliged to confess that he has ‘drowned his glory in a shallow cup’; and, in the light of Christianity, drunkenness stands condemned as a sin against the body which is a ‘member of Christ.’
Christianity is a religion of principles, not of rules, and in Romans 14:21 St. Paul states a principle which justifies any kind and thoughtful man, apart from considerations of personal safety and happiness, in becoming an abstainer. In doing this the Apostle is far from imposing a new yoke of bondage. He does not categorically say to the Christian, ‘Thou shalt not drink wine,’ but he reasons that it is good (καλόν)-it is a beautiful morale-in certain conditions and from certain motives, to abstain. There was evidently a tendency among Christian liberals, who rightly gloried in their free evangelical position, to say, ‘If men will pervert and abuse our example, we cannot help it; the fault is their own, and they must bear the consequences.’ St. Paul, the freest of all, sees a more excellent way, and chooses to walk in it, though he does not exercise his apostolic authority to command others to follow him. What is his own liberty to drink a little wine in comparison with the temporal safety and eternal salvation of thousands who are unable to use the same freedom without stumbling? He cannot-no man can-live merely unto himself, and he would sooner be so far a Nazirite or an Essene than do anything to hurt a brother.
It is noticeable that there was never any organized movement in the Apostolic or post-Apostolic Church against the use of strong drink. Many of the Fathers, following the example of Philo-who wrote a book περὶ μέθης on Genesis 9:21 -dealt with the subject at length. Clement, Cyprian, Chrysostom, Jerome, and Augustine all preached moderation to every one and abstinence to some. But neither the apostles nor the Fathers ever dreamed of seeking legislation for the prohibition or even the restriction of the sale and use of intoxicating liquors. Since their time two things-the discovery or distilled liquors in the 13th cent., and the trend of civilization northward-have greatly altered the conditions of the problem.
‘Extremists now place all alcohol-containing drinks under the same ban, but fermented liquors are still generally held to be comparatively innocuous; nor can any one deny that there is a difference. It is safe to say that if spirits had never been discovered the history of the question would have been entirely different’ (A. Shadwell, Encyclopaedia Britannica 11 xxvi. 578). ‘The evils which it is desired to check are mach greater in some countries than in others.… The inhabitants of south Europe are much less given to alcoholic excess than those of central Europe, who again are more temperate than those of the north’ (ib. xvi. 759).
Just where the temptations to drunkenness are greatest, the Apostle’s principle of self-denial for the sake of others is evidently the highest ethic. No drunkard can ‘inherit the Kingdom of God’ (1 Corinthians 6:10), and the task of Christian churches and governments is ‘to make it easy for men to do good and difficult for them to do evil.’
Since, however, it is notoriously impossible to make men sober merely by legislation, the main factors in the problem must always be moral and religions. The Apostolic Church found the true solution. The Christians who were filled with the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost were mockingly said to be filled with wine (γλεῦκος, Acts 2:13, perhaps ‘sweet wine’; not ‘new wine,’ as Pentecost took place eight months after the vintage). St. Peter tried to convince the multitude that it was not a sensual but a spiritual intoxication, and St. Paul gives to all Christians the remarkable counsel, ‘Be not drunken with wine, wherein is dissoluteness (ἀσωτία; cf. ἀσώτως in Luke 15:13), but be filled with the Spirit’ (Ephesians 5:18). It is presupposed that every man naturally craves some form of exhilaration, loving to have his feelings excited, his imagination fired, his spirit thrilled. And drunkenness is the perversion of a true instinct. It is the fool’s way of drowning care and rising victorious over the ills of life. Intoxication is the tragic parody of inspiration. What every man needs is a spiritual enthusiasm which completely diverts his thoughts from the pursuit of sensuous excitement, on the psychological principle that two conflicting passions cannot dominate the mind at the same time. That enthusiasm is the gift of the Divine Spirit.
The injunction to Timothy to be no longer a water-drinker (μηκέτι ὑδροπότει) but to use a little wine (1 Timothy 5:23) is now generally regarded as post-Pauline. It is ‘evidently, in the context in which it stands, not merely a sanitary but quite as much a moral precept, and thus implies that Timothy had himself begun to abjure wine on grounds of personal sanctity’ (F. J. A. Hort, Judaistic Christianity, 1894, p. 144). The words were probably written about the time of the first appearance of the Encratites (Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics v. 301), who made abstinence from flesh, wine, and marriage the chief part of their religion, seeking salvation not by faith but by asceticism. Water-drinking thus for a time became associated with a dcadly error. This was a situation in which Christians felt it to be their duty to assert their right to use what they regarded as the creature and gift of God (1 Timothy 4:4-5). See, further, article Abstinence.
James Strahan.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Drunkenness
One of the common sins of mankind. We read of it as early as Noah. Genesis 9:21 . Its grave character is shown in the N.T. by the drunkard being classed along with fornicators, thieves, idolaters, etc., and the declaration that no drunkard shall inherit the kingdom of God. 1 Corinthians 5:11 ; 1 Corinthians 6:10 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Drunkenness
DRUNKENNESS . See Wine and Strong Drink.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Drunkenness
Is referred to in the Bible both in single instances and as a habit. Its folly is often illustrated, Psalm 107:27 Isaiah 19:14 24:20 28:7,8 , its guilt denounced, Isaiah 5:22 , its ill results traced, 1 Samuel 25:36 1 Kings 16:9 20:16 , and its doom shown, 1 Corinthians 6:9,10 . It is produced by wine, Genesis 9:21 21:33 Jeremiah 23:9 Ephesians 5:18 , as well as by "strong drink," 1 Samuel 1:13-15 Isaiah 5:11 . Hence the use of these was forbidden to the priests at the altar, Leviticus 10:9 ; and all are cautioned to avoid them, Proverbs 20:1 23:20 . To tempt others to drunkenness is a sin accursed of God, 2 Samuel 11:13 Habakkuk 2:15,16 . Its prevalence in a community is inseparable from the habitual use of any inebriating liquor. Hence the efforts made by the wise and good to secure abstinence from all intoxicating drinks, 1 Corinthians 8:13 . See WINE .

Sentence search

Drunkenness - Drunkenness, n. Drunkenness renders some persons stupid, others gay, others sullen, others furious. Let us walk honestly as in the day not in rioting and Drunkenness. Passion is the Drunkenness of the mind
Drunkenhead - ) Drunkenness
Temulency - ) Intoxication; inebriation; Drunkenness
Wine - See Abstinence, Drunkenness, Eucharist, Temperance
Shicron - Drunkenness; his gift; his wages
Wine - See Abstinence, Drunkenness, Eucharist, Temperance
Ebriosity - ) Addiction to drink; habitual Drunkenness
Drunkenness - Drunkenness
Drunkship - ) The state of being drunk; Drunkenness
Ebriety - ) Drunkenness; intoxication by spirituous liquors; inebriety
Drunken - Given to Drunkenness as a drunken butler. Proceeding from intoxication done in a state of Drunkenness as a drunken quarrel
Sacar - (1 Chronicles 11:35) If his name be derived from Shakar, it should seem to mean somewhat alluding to Drunkenness
Shi'Cron - (drunkenness ), one of the landmarks at the western end of the north boundary of Judah
Maudlin - ) Drunk, or somewhat drunk; fuddled; given to Drunkenness
Strong Drink - The Bible warns against Drunkenness. See Drunkenness ; Wine
Drunkenness - Too much partying led to Drunkenness and failure of communication between husband and wife ( 1 Samuel 25:36 ). Jesus warned that the cares of life may lead to anxiety and Drunkenness (Luke 21:34 ). Paul repeatedly warned against the dangers of Drunkenness (Romans 13:13 ; 1 Corinthians 5:11 ; Galatians 5:21 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:7 ). Drunkenness is a pagan custom, not a Christian one ( 1 Peter 4:3 )
Drunk - The sin of Drunkenness is frequently and strongly condemned (Romans 13:13 ; 1 Corinthians 6:9,10 ; Ephesians 5:18 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:7,8 ). To "add Drunkenness to thirst" (Deuteronomy 29:19 , A
Debauch - ) Excess in eating or drinking; intemperance; Drunkenness; lewdness; debauchery
Amethyst - 1: ἀμέθυστος (Strong's #271 — Noun Feminine — amethustos — am-eth'-oos_tos ) primarily meaning "not drunken" (a, negative, and methu, "wine"), became used as a noun, being regarded as possessing a remedial virtue against Drunkenness
Temperance - Temperance in eating and drinking is opposed to gluttony and Drunkenness, and in other indulgences, to excess
Sin: Its Hardening Effects - Preston says that the man yielded to the temptation, and from that time he never did feel the slightest regret at his Drunkenness, and lived and died a confirmed sot, though formerly he had been a very high professor
Amethyst - Its Greek name, from which the English word comes, implied that it was a charm against Drunkenness
Revelling - Paul urges the Romans to ‘walk becomingly (εὐσχημόνως), as in the day; not in revelling and Drunkenness’ (Romans 13:13). Trench, Synonyms of the NT8, London, 1876, 61:, and article Drunkenness
Glutton - Gluttony was associated with stubbornness, rebellion, disobedience, Drunkenness, and wastefulness (Deuteronomy 21:20 )
Revel, Reveling - ...
2: κῶμος (Strong's #2970 — Noun Masculine — komos — ko'-mos ) "a revel, carousal," the concomitant and consequence of Drunkenness, is used in the plural, Romans 13:13 , translated by the singular, RV, "reveling" (AV, "rioting"); Galatians 5:21 ; 1 Peter 4:3 , "revelings
Wine - Scripture condemns Drunkenness and overindulgence, but pictured wine as a part of the typical ancient meal
Amethyst - Greek, "protecting against Drunkenness" Pliny says, because it approaches the color of wine without reaching it
Drunkenness (2) - DRUNKENNESS. —Only one explicit utterance of our Lord relating to Drunkenness is recorded (Luke 21:34). ‘Drunkenness’). That He did not feel called upon to command or commend abstinence in spite of this is partly to be explained, perhaps, by the fact that Drunkenness was the vice chiefly of the wealthy. Drunkenness in general He regards as the accompaniment and symptom of a carnal unregenerate state of heart, the outcome of wickedness that defies restraint
Mathew, Theobald - In 1838, in order to combat the widespread Drunkenness in Ireland, he inaugurated the temperance movement which has become historic
Amethyst - The ancients thought that this stone had the power of dispelling Drunkenness in all who wore or touched it, and hence its Greek name formed from A_, "privative," and _methuo , "To get drunk
Theobald Mathew - In 1838, in order to combat the widespread Drunkenness in Ireland, he inaugurated the temperance movement which has become historic
Lethargy of Soul - Comparatively few of our hearers are destroyed by outrageous and flaming vices, such as blasphemy, theft, Drunkenness, or uncleanness; but crowds of them are perishing by that deadly smoke of indifference which casts its stifling clouds of carelessness around them, and sends them asleep into everlasting destruction
Dissipation - Deceptive desires leading to a life-style without discipline resulting in the dizzy hangovers of Drunkenness
Drunkenness - Christ bade men take heed lest their hearts should be overcharged with surfeiting and Drunkenness (κραιπάλῃ καὶ μέθῃ Luke 21:34), but He evidently regarded it as possible to draw the line between the use and the abuse of wine. ’ In His time and country, Drunkenness, however pernicious in individual cases, could not be regarded as one of the deadly national sins. Paul does not say to the Roman Christians, ‘Let us walk lawfully, not in revelling and Drunkenness,’ but ‘Let us walk becomingly’ (εὐσχημόνως, Romans 13:13). Thereafter he feels, with a shuddering repulsion, how ill it would become him to walk in ‘revelling and Drunkenness, chambering and wantonness. Paul, naming among them ‘drunkenness’ (μέθαι, Galatians 5:19; Galatians 5:21), but they were far from being so manifest to all his converts. ’ Yet even Omar Khayyam, after all his praise of the Vine, is obliged to confess that he has ‘drowned his glory in a shallow cup’; and, in the light of Christianity, Drunkenness stands condemned as a sin against the body which is a ‘member of Christ. ...
Just where the temptations to Drunkenness are greatest, the Apostle’s principle of self-denial for the sake of others is evidently the highest ethic. And Drunkenness is the perversion of a true instinct
Excess - " ...
(2) In 1 Peter 4:3 , oinophlugia, "drunkenness, debauchery" (oinos, "wine," phluo, "to bubble up, overflow"), is rendered "excess of wine," AV (RV, "winebibbings")
Snare - 1: παγίς (Strong's #3803 — Noun Feminine — pagis — pag-ece' ) "a trap, a snare" (akin to pegnumi, "to fix," and pagideuo, "to ensnare," which see), is used metaphorically of (a) the allurements to evil by which the Devil "ensnares" one, 1 Timothy 3:7 ; 2 Timothy 2:26 ; (b) seductions to evil, which "ensnare" those who "desire to be rich," 1 Timothy 6:9 ; (c) the evil brought by Israel upon themselves by which the special privileges Divinely granted them and centering in Christ, became a "snare" to them, their rejection of Christ and the Gospel being the retributive effect of their apostasy, Romans 11:9 ; (d) of the sudden judgments of God to come upon those whose hearts are "overcharged with sufeiting, and Drunkenness, and cares of this life," Luke 21:35 (ver
Recover - ...
2: ἀνανήφω (Strong's #366 — Verb — ananepho — an-an-ay'-fo ) "to return to soberness," as from a state of delirium or Drunkenness (ana, "back," or "again," nepho, "to be sober, to be wary"), is used in 2 Timothy 2:26 , "may recover themselves" (RV marg
Drunkenness - To tempt others to Drunkenness is a sin accursed of God, 2 Samuel 11:13 Habakkuk 2:15,16
Hannah - ’ Eli, the high priest, mistakes the silent movement of her lips as she prays, and accuses her of Drunkenness; but when he finds out the mistake he has made, he gives her his blessing, and prays that her petition may be granted
Drunk,, Drunkard, Drunkenness - 1, above), denotes "drunkenness, habitual intoxication," Luke 21:34 ; Romans 13:13 ; Galatians 5:21
Chemosh - There can be little doubt that part of the religious services performed to Chemosh, as to Baal- Peor, consisted in revelling and Drunkenness, obscenities and impurities of the grossest kinds
Nabal - " On her return she found her husband incapable from Drunkenness of understanding the state of matters, and not till the following day did she explain to him what had happened
Sobriety - " ...
See Drunkenness, MODERATION
Drunkenness - The evil of Drunkenness appears in the following bad effects: ...
1
Flesh - Thus among the works of the flesh, Galatians 5:19-21 , are numbered not only adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, Drunkenness, and revellings, which all relate to criminal indulgence of appetite, but idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, envyings, and murders, which are manifestly vices of a different kind, and partake more of the diabolical nature than of the beastly
Awake - ...
3: ἐκνήφω (Strong's #1594 — Verb — eknepho — ek-nay'-fo ) primarily, "to return to one's sense from Drunkenness to become sober," is so used in the Sept
Temperance - word ( nçphalios ) ‘temperate’ in 1 Timothy 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 3:11 , Titus 2:2 ; its root-meaning points to the avoidance of intemperance in the form of Drunkenness, but in actual usage it condemns all forms of self-indulgence. In Galatians 5:23 , ‘self-control’ closes the list of the graces which are all ‘the fruit of the Spirit,’ just as ‘drunkenness and revellings’ close the list of ‘the works of the flesh’ ( Galatians 5:21 )
Nazirite - First, they refused wine and anything that was likely to produce it, to demonstrate their refusal of life’s enjoyments and to avoid any possibility of Drunkenness
Concupiscence - Such desire can be for sex (Matthew 5:28 ), material goods (Mark 4:19 ), riches (1 Timothy 6:9 ), and Drunkenness (1 Peter 4:3 )
Swallow - They drink iniquity, they live on their sins, they revel in rioting and Drunkenness, and all of this serves to destroy the people
Bishop - In 1 Timothy 3:1-7 qualifications were given for a “bishop”: reputation, marital status, character traits, hospitality, teaching ability, non-drunkenness, attitude toward money, responsible parenthood, and length of time as a Christian
Wine - 9:24 yayin means Drunkenness: “And Noah awoke from his wine
Sabbath - Indeed, the fear was that the day would be "wasted by idleness and degraded by sensuality and Drunkenness," because it was so joyous
Cup - The nations drinking from the "cup of his wrath" are often depicted as lost in Drunkenness
Wine - Drunkenness is condemned as a sin
Walk - ...
To the contrary, the members of the faith should continue walking decently and properly, as in the daylight (Romans 13:13 ), not in carousing, Drunkenness, sexual promiscuity, sensuality, strife, or jealousy
Law - ...
Thus it allows of fornication, adultery, Drunkenness, prodigality, duelling, and of revenge in the extreme, and lays no stress upon the virtues opposite to these
Ethics - At their shrines they were "worshiped" with orgies of Drunkenness and sexual license (male and female cult prostitution, incest). "A spirit of harlotry" thus gained religious sanction; greed and Drunkenness degraded men and women; the people cast off discipline, defiled the land, and "knew not how to blush. No one who joined in Psalm 8,19 , 29,65 , 89,96 , 104 could imagine that God would take pleasure in sexual promiscuity, Drunkenness, infant sacrifice or emotional frenzy
Habakkuk - Fourth taunt song: Woe because of Drunkenness (Habakkuk 2:15-17 )...
5
Wealth - If in the times of Isaiah the land was ‘full of silver and gold,’ it was also ‘full of idols’ ( Isaiah 2:7-8 ): the ruling classes oppressed the poor ( Isaiah 5:3 , Micah 2:2 ), Drunkenness ( Isaiah 5:11 , Micah 2:11 ) and audacity of sin ( Isaiah 5:13 ) were rampant
Abstain, Abstinence - The Bible consistently condemns Drunkenness, but it cannot be viewed as teaching total abstinence from fermented wine
Care - So serious indeed may be the consequences of this distress of soul, that Jesus, in His warning against the evil things which may overcharge the heart, and make men utterly unprepared for the coming of the Son of Man, combined with surfeiting and Drunkenness ‘the cares of this life’ (Luke 21:34)
Ordination - In case any crime, as Drunkenness, perjury, forgery, &c, is alleged against any one that is to be ordained, either priest or deacon, the bishop ought to desist from ordaining him
Food - The Bible links gluttony and Drunkenness as sins equally to be avoided (Proverbs 23:2; Proverbs 23:21; Luke 6:25; 1 Corinthians 11:20-22)
Herod - Yet marital unfaithfulness and Drunkenness did not seem to be among his vices
Fornication - The connexion between Drunkenness and vice is also recognized (Ephesians 5:18; cf
Feasting - ’ The Corinthians, doubting the resurrection-life, must wake up from Drunkenness in a righteous fashion
Babylon - A night was chosen when the inhabitants were about to hold a festival, when the whole city would be given up to Drunkenness and debauchery
Nineveh - He relates that the king of Assyria, elated with his former victories, and ignorant of the revolt of the Bactrians, had abandoned himself to scandalous inaction; had appointed a time of festivity, and supplied his soldiers with abundance of wine; and that the general of the enemy, apprised by deserters, of their negligence and Drunkenness, attacked the Assyrian army while the whole of them were fearlessly giving way to indulgence, destroyed great part of them, and drove the rest into the city
Ordination - ...
In case any crime, as Drunkenness, perjury, forgery, &c
Impotence - ‘Sins of the flesh,’ as commonly understood, are notoriously responsible for many of mankind’s worst diseases and infirmities; and the Apostolie catalogue of these sins includes not only adultery, uncleanness, murder, Drunkenness, and revellings, but also hatred, variance, wrath, strife, envyings, and covetousness (Galatians 5:19-21, Colossians 3:5, Ephesians 5:3)
Night (2) - Nicodemus for fear of his colleagues came to Jesus by night at the Passover season; the interview may have been on the roof of some friendly house, or in one of the tents used by the pilgrims (John 3:2; John 19:39); night was also the time for theft, and Drunkenness, and revelling (Luke 12:39, cf
Ham - One will have it that, admitting the Drunkenness, still Noah was all the time innocent; it was the unusually strong wine that did it
Timothy And Titus Epistles to - ) Such sins as Drunkenness and open vice will be evident at once, but secret sins will come out in time
Teaching - Negatively, the Christian ethic prohibited open vice, such as fornication and Drunkenness; it exposed the sinfulness of spiritual errors, such as pride and co
Abstinence - -While Drunkenness as well as gluttony is sternly condemned, nowhere is total abstinence, in our sense, enforced
Proverbs - If they see him enjoying a somewhat plenteous meal, they fall to bitter accusing, though themselves indulging daily in Drunkenness and excess
Methodists - By doing no harm; by avoiding evil in every kind, especially that which is most generally practised, such as taking the name of God in vain; profaning the day of the Lord, either by doing ordinary work thereon, or by buying or selling; Drunkenness; buying and selling spirituous liquors, or drinking them, unless in cases of extreme necessity; fighting, quarrelling, brawling; brother going to law with brother: returning evil for evil, or railing for railing; the using many words in buying or selling; the buying or selling uncustomed goods; the giving or taking things on usury, that is, unlawful interest; uncharitable or unprofitable conversation, particularly speaking evil of magistrates or of ministers; doing to others as we would not they should do unto us; doing what we know is not for the glory of God, as the putting on of gold or costly apparel; the taking such diversions as cannot be used in the name of the Lord Jesus; singing those songs, or reading those books, which do not term to the knowledge or love of God; softness, or needless self-indulgence; laying up treasure upon earth; borrowing without a probability of paying; or taking up goods, without a probability of paying for them
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - The diocese of Paulinus was a small one and appears at any rate formerly to have been notorious for Drunkenness and immorality (Ep
Eucharist - There were even eases of Drunkenness
Augustine - It was Romans 13:13-14 ; a passage peculiarly applicable to him, in reference to his former habits and present state of mind: "Not in rioting and Drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying: but put ye on THE LORD JESUS CHRIST, and make not provision for the flesh to fulfil the lusts thereof
Augustinus, Aurelius - He ran back to Alypius and opened "the Apostle" at Rom_12:13-14 "Not in rioting and Drunkenness not in chambering and wantonness not in strife and envying; but put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ and make not provision for the flesh to fulfil the lusts thereof
Art - Clement describes a number of subjects commonly engraved upon seals to which Christians could give a Christian meaning (see Christ in Art), whilst he forbids the use of seals which bear idols, swords, bows, and drinking cups—condemning thus, not art, but idolatry, war, and Drunkenness (Paed
Methodists, Protestant - ...
"First, by doing no harm; by avoiding evil in every kind; especially that which is most generally practised, such as the taking the name of God in vain; the profaning the day of the Lord, either by doing ordinary work thereon, or by buying or selling; Drunkenness; buying or selling spirituous liquors, or drinking them, unless in cases of extreme necessity; fighting, quarrelling, brawling; brother going to law with brother; returning evil for evil, or railing for railing; the using many words in buying or selling; the buying or selling uncustomed goods; the giving or taking things on usury, 1:e
Babylon - And they were denounced against the Babylonians, and the inhabitants of Chaldea, expressly because of their idolatry, tyranny, oppression, pride, covetousness, Drunkenness, falsehood, and other wickedness