What does Dreams mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἐνυπνίοις a dream. 1
חֲלֹמֹתֵ֑ינוּ dream. 1
חֲלֹמ֣וֹת to dream. / to be healthy 1
יַחֲלֹ֨ם to dream. / to be healthy 1
וַֽחֲלֹמוֹת֙ dream. 1
בַחֲלֹמ֑וֹת dream. 1
חֲלֹמֹ֣תֵיכֶ֔ם dream. 1
חֲלֹמ֥וֹת dream. 1
בַּחֲל֣וֹמֹתָ֔ם dream. 1
הַחֲלֹמ֔וֹת dream. 1
חֲל֖וֹם dream. 1
חֲל֥וֹם dream. 1
חֲלֹמ֔וֹ dream. 1
בַּחֲלֹמ֛וֹת dream. 1
חֲלֹמֹתָֽיו dream. 1
חֲלֹמֹתָ֖יו dream. 1
חֲלֹמוֹת֙ dream. 1
הַחֲל֨וֹם dream. 1
הַחֲל֖וֹם dream. 1
חֲל֑וֹם dream. 1
חֲלֹמֹתָ֑יו dream. 1
חֲלֹמ֑וֹת dream. 1
וַחֲלֹמֽוֹת dream. 1
בַּ֣חֲלֹמ֔וֹת dream. 1
חֶלְמִין֩ dream. 1

Definitions Related to Dreams

H2492


   1 to dream.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to dream (ordinary).
         1a2 to dream (prophetic).
         1a3 to dream (of false prophets).
      1b (Hiphil) to dream.
   2 to be healthy, be strong.
      2a (Qal) to be healthy.
      2b (Hiphil) to restore to health.
      

H2472


   1 dream.
      1a dream (ordinary).
      1b dream (with prophetic meaning).
      

H2493


   1 dream.
   

G1798


   1 a dream.
   

Frequency of Dreams (original languages)

Frequency of Dreams (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Dreams, Interpretation of
Though there is Scriptural warrant for preternatural origin and purpose of dreams, e.g., Jacob's ladder dream (Genesis 28) and that of Saint Joseph on the flight of the Holy Family into Egypt (Matthew 2), still dreams generally arise from merely natural causes and convey no knowledge beyond what could be obtained from other natural sources. Dreams may at times profitably be the subject of psychological investigation, but even here their value can be exaggerated or abused, as in Freudian systems.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Interpretation of Dreams
Though there is Scriptural warrant for preternatural origin and purpose of dreams, e.g., Jacob's ladder dream (Genesis 28) and that of Saint Joseph on the flight of the Holy Family into Egypt (Matthew 2), still dreams generally arise from merely natural causes and convey no knowledge beyond what could be obtained from other natural sources. Dreams may at times profitably be the subject of psychological investigation, but even here their value can be exaggerated or abused, as in Freudian systems.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Dreams
In the Ancient Near Eastern world dreams were real. They were not an extension of one's conscious or unconscious mind. Dreams were the world of the divine and the demonic. Dreams had meaning, too. They often revealed the future. They could show the dreamer the right decision to make. People even went to temples or holy places to sleep in order to have a dream which would show them the decision to make.
The dreams of common people were important to them, but the dreams of kings and of holy men or women were important on a national or international scale. One of the results was that many of the nations surrounding Israel had religious figures skilled in the interpretation of dreams. These figures could be consulted at the highest level of government for important decisions. In such nations as Egypt and Assyria, these interpreters even developed “dream books” by which they could give interpretations according to the symbols of a dream.
Dreams were important in the Old Testament, too. Israel was forbidden to use many of the divining practices of her neighbors, but over a dozen times God revealed something through a dream. When we recognize that night visions and dreams were not strictly distinguished, we can find many more times in the Old and New Testaments that God used this method to communicate. In fact, prophecy and the dreaming of dreams were to be tested in the same way according to Deuteronomy 13:1 . In Numbers 12:6 again prophecy and dreams are placed on equal footing. Saul complained that “neither by dreams, nor by Urim, nor by prophets” did God answer him ( 1 Samuel 28:6 ). Joel wrote that when the Spirit comes “your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, your young men shall see visions” (1 Samuel 2:28 ).
What Dreams Were Interpreted? Not every dream was thought to be from God. Not every dream was a significant. Some could be wishful thinking (Psalm 126:1 ; Isaiah 29:7-8 ). In times of need and especially when a person sought a word from God, dreams could be significant. In the Old Testament the interpreted dreams were most often those of prophets and rulers.
Not every dream needed to be interpreted. To note this we can distinguish three types of dreams. A simple “message dream” apparently did not need interpretation. For instance, Joseph, in Matthew 1:1 and Matthew 2:1 , understood the dreams concerning Mary and Herod even though no mention is made of interpretation. A second type, the “simple symbolic dream,” used symbols, but the symbolism was clear enough that the dreamer and others could understand it. The Old Testament Joseph had this kind of dream in Genesis 37:1 . Complex symbolic dreams, though, needed the interpretive skill of someone with experience or an unusual ability in interpretation. The dreams of Nebuchadnezzar described in Daniel 2:1 and Daniel 4:1 are good examples of this kind of dream. Even Daniel himself had dreams in which the symbolism was so complex that he had to seek divine interpretation ( Daniel 8:1 ).
How and by Whom Were Dreams Interpreted? Since several religions and cultures developed people skilled in interpretation, this skill undoubtedly was communicated to later generations both through writings and through training a new generation by apprenticeship.
In the Old Testament Joseph and Daniel are the preeminent interpreters of dreams. It is no accident that they used their skills in the courts of non-Israelite rulers. Daniel's story in Daniel 2:1 , especially, demonstrates several points about dream interpretation. First, Nebuchadnezzar believed his dream to have meaning. Second, he summoned all those with skill in interpretation of dreams, but they could not meet his demands. Apparently, even the best interpreters could be “stumped” sometimes. Third, Daniel was able to narrate the dream to the king and to explain the dream after Daniel and his friends had prayed. Here can be seen the Israelite view of the source of an interpreter's skill. The accounts of Joseph identify God as the Source of Joseph's ability when he came before Pharaoh (Genesis 41:16 ).
Were Dreams Ever Wrong or Wrongly Interpreted? Dreams were neither foolproof nor infallible. Both Jeremiah and Zechariah spoke against relying on dreams to express the revelation of God. Dreams could come without being God's word (Jeremiah 23:28 ). Jeremiah lumped dreamers together with soothsayers, sorcerers, and false prophets (Jeremiah 27:9 ). He cautioned exiles in Babylon not to listen to dreamers and false prophets who told them that the Exile would not be long (Jeremiah 29:8 ). Zechariah pointed people toward the Lord, apparently because they were relying on dreamers and others to give them the truth (Zechariah 10:1-2 ). Thus, while dreams were often used by God to reveal His will, there is a warning, too, not to rely on this method to know the will of God. See Inspiration; Oracles ; Prophets; Revelation.
Albert Bean
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Dreamer of Dreams
Such are classed with false prophets. Possibly an hypnotic state which evil spirits could use, the object being to turn the people from the Lord to idolatry. If what they prophesied came true, they must not on that account be listened to: it was a test allowed of God to prove whether Israel loved the Lord. Deuteronomy 13:1-5 . We have the same caution in the N.T. as to the gospel and the confession of Jesus Christ come in flesh. Galatians 1:8,9 ; 1 John 4:1 . In Jeremiah 27:9 the 'dreamers' are classed with 'diviners,' and in Jude 8 they are those that defile the flesh.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Dreams
The easterns, in particular the Jews, greatly regarded dreams, and applied for their interpretation to those who undertook to explain them. The ancient Greeks and Romans had the same opinion of them, as appears from their most eminent writers. We see the antiquity of this attention to dreams in the history of Pharaoh's butler and baker, Genesis 40. Pharaoh himself, and Nebuchadnezzar, are instances. God expressly condemned to death all who pretended to have prophetic dreams, and to foretel futurities, even though what they foretold came to pass, if they had any tendency to promote idolatry, Deuteronomy 13:1-3 . But the people were not forbidden, when they thought they had a significative dream, to address the prophets of the Lord, or the high priest in his ephod, to have it explained. Saul, before the battle of Gilboa, consulted a woman who had a familiar spirit, "because the Lord would not answer him by dreams, nor by prophets," 1 Samuel 28:6-7 . The Lord himself sometimes discovered his will in dreams, and enabled persons to explain them. He informed Abimelech in a dream, that Sarah was the wife of Abraham, Genesis 20:3 ; Genesis 20:6 . He showed Jacob the mysterious ladder in a dream, Genesis 28:12-13 ; and in a dream an angel suggested to him a means of multiplying his flocks, Genesis 31:11-12 , &c. Joseph was favoured very early with prophetic dreams, whose signification was easily discovered by Jacob, Genesis 37:5 . God said, that he spake to other prophets in dreams, but to Moses face to face. The Midianites gave credit to dreams, as appears from that which a Midianite related to his companion; and from whose interpretation Gideon took a happy omen, Judges 7:13 ; Judges 7:15 . The Prophet Jeremiah exclaims against impostors who pretended to have had dreams, and abused the credulity of the people: "They prophesy lies in my name, saying, I have dreamed, I have dreamed. The prophet that hath a dream, let him tell a dream; and he that hath my word, let him tell it faithfully, saith the Lord," Jeremiah 23:25 ; Jeremiah 23:28-29 . The Prophet Joel promises from God, that in the reign of the Messiah, the effusion of the Holy Spirit should be so copious, that the old men should have prophetic dreams, and the young men should receive visions, Joel 2:28 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Dreams
Though associated in some passages with trifles and vanities, Job 7:14 ; Ecclesiastes 5:7 , there is yet abundant evidence in the scriptures that God often conveyed His mind to people by means of dreams, and this not only to those who obeyed Him, but also to the heathen. Genesis 20:3,6 ; Judges 7:13 . "God speaketh once, yea twice, yet man perceiveth it not. In a dream, in a vision of the night, when deep sleep falleth upon men, in slumberings upon the bed: then he openeth the ears of men, and sealeth their instruction, that he may withdraw man from his purpose, and hide pride from man." Job 33:14-17 . God said that He would instruct His prophets in dreams. Numbers 12:6 . He also used dreams in the case of Nebuchadnezzar and of Daniel in order to reveal His will and purpose concerning, the future.
Joseph, the reputed father of the Lord, was directed several times by means of dreams; and Pilate was warned by his wife to have nothing to do with that just man because of what she had suffered in a dream. Matthew 1:20 ; Matthew 2:12-22 ; Matthew 27:19 . It is to be remarked that in the last days when God pours out His Spirit on all flesh the sons and daughters will prophesy, and the young men shall see visions, and the old men shall dream dreams. Joel 2:28 ; Acts 2:17 . This will be the way that God will make known His mind in those days.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Dreams
DREAMS . Sleep impressed primitive savages as a great mystery; and they consequently attributed a peculiar significance to the dreams of sleepers, as phenomena which they could not control by their will or explain by their reason. In the lowest stage of culture all dreams were regarded as objectively real experiences; the god or spirit actually visited the dreamer, the events dreamed actually occurred. Hence any one who was subject to frequent dreaming was looked on as a special medium of Divine energy, and many sought to produce the state by artificial means, e.g. fasting or the use of drugs. In process of time dreams came to be treated rather as Divine warnings than as actual occurrences. Such admonitions could be deliberately sought, e.g. by sleeping in a sacred spot, such as the temples of Asklepios or Serapis or the grotto of Trophonius; or they could come unsought, when the gods wished either to reveal or to deceive. (Plato, however, while allowing that the gods may send dreams, denies that they can wish to deceive men). Thus, for instance, among the Babylonians, the Assyrians, the Arabs, the Egyptians, a profound importance was attached to dreams; there were professional interpreters of them (cf. Genesis 40:5 ; Genesis 40:8 ; Genesis 41:1 , Daniel 2:5 ), and manuals were compiled to aid the work of elucidation (cf. the Oneirocritica of Artemidorus of Ephesus). Wiser theorists might discriminate between dreams, but popular superstition tended to regard them all as omens, to be explained, as far as possible, in accordance with definite rules.
1. Among the Jews . In both Testaments we find significance attached to dreams ( Genesis 37:6 ; Genesis 37:9 ; Genesis 41:25 , Judges 7:13 , Daniel 2:28 ; Daniel 7:1 ff., Matthew 1:20 ; Matthew 2:13 ; Matthew 2:20 , Acts 23:11 ; Acts 27:23 ), and in OT times it seems that a great deal of vulgar superstition existed with regard to such phenomena; similarly necromancy and sorcery, though discouraged by the higher thought of the nation (cf. Deuteronomy 18:10-11 ), were undoubtedly practised. We find hardly any traces, however, of dreams being regularly sought; 1 Samuel 28:15 may be one; and in Genesis 28:12-19 and 1 Kings 3:5 it is possible to suppose a reference to the practice of sleeping in a sacred locality in order to receive a Divine communication. On the whole, the general trend of OT teaching is as follows: Dreams may in some cases be genuine communications from God ( Job 33:15 , Jeremiah 23:28 ), and as such are reverenced ( Genesis 20:3 ; Genesis 31:10 ff.), though Numbers 12:6-8 treats them as an inferior medium; but there are false dreams and lying dreamers, against whom precautions are necessary; and the idea that habitual dreaming is a certain sign of Divine inspiration is stoutly combated (cf. Jeremiah 23:25 ; Jeremiah 23:32 ; Jeremiah 27:9 ; Jeremiah 29:8 , Zechariah 10:2 , Ecclesiastes 5:7 ), and it is definitely recognized that the interpretation of dreams belongs to God, and is not a matter of human codification (cf. Genesis 40:8 ).
2. General . The consideration of dreams is partly a subject for the sciences which treat of the general relations between body and spirit, and partly a matter of common sense. It seems clear that dreams are connected with physical states, and that their psychological origin lies mainly in the region beneath the ‘threshold of consciousness.’ But all dreams and all waking states are states of consciousness, whether it be partial or complete, and as such are subject to law; if any are to be regarded as ‘supernatural,’ it must be owing not to their methods but to their messages. Some dreams convey no message, and can be explained as valuable only by a resort to superstition. Others may be real revelations, and as such Divine; in abnormal cases the power of spiritual perception may be intensified and heightened in the dream-state, and thus an insight into Divine truth may be obtained which had been denied to the waking consciousness. Similarly Condorcet is said to have solved in a dream a mathematical problem which had baffled his waking powers, and Coleridge to have dreamt the poem of Kubla Khan . But under any circumstances the interpretation of a dream ‘belongs to God’; the question whether its message is a Divine communication or not must ultimately be answered by an appeal to the religious consciousness, or in other words to the higher reason. The awakened intelligence must be called in to criticise and appraise the deliverances received in dreams, and its verdict must decide what measure of attention is to be paid to them. Dreams, in short, may be the source of suggestions, but scarcely of authoritative directions.
A. W. F. Blunt.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Dreams
The Scripture declares that the influence of the Spirit of God upon the soul extends to its sleeping as well as its waking thoughts. But, in accordance with the principle enunciated by St. Paul in (1 Corinthians 14:15 ) dreams, in which the understanding is asleep, are placed below the visions of prophecy, in which the understanding plays its part. Under the Christian dispensation, while we read frequently of trances and vision, dreams are never referred to as vehicles of divine revelation. In exact accordance with this principle are the actual records of the dreams sent by God. The greater number of such dreams were granted, for prediction or for warning, to those who were aliens to the Jewish covenant. And where dreams are recorded as means of God's revelation to his chosen servants, they are almost always referred to the periods of their earliest and most imperfect knowledge of him. Among the Jews, "if any person dreamed a dream which was peculiarly striking and significant, he was permitted to go to the high priest in a peculiar way, and see if it had any special import. But the observance of ordinary dreams and the consulting of those who pretend to skill in their interpretation are repeatedly forbidden. (13:1-5; 18:9-14) --Schaff.

Sentence search

Dreamy - ) Abounding in Dreams or given to dreaming; appropriate to, or like, Dreams; visionary
Dreams - In the Ancient Near Eastern world Dreams were real. Dreams were the world of the divine and the demonic. Dreams had meaning, too. ...
The Dreams of common people were important to them, but the Dreams of kings and of holy men or women were important on a national or international scale. One of the results was that many of the nations surrounding Israel had religious figures skilled in the interpretation of Dreams. ...
Dreams were important in the Old Testament, too. When we recognize that night visions and Dreams were not strictly distinguished, we can find many more times in the Old and New Testaments that God used this method to communicate. In fact, prophecy and the dreaming of Dreams were to be tested in the same way according to Deuteronomy 13:1 . In Numbers 12:6 again prophecy and Dreams are placed on equal footing. Saul complained that “neither by Dreams, nor by Urim, nor by prophets” did God answer him ( 1 Samuel 28:6 ). Joel wrote that when the Spirit comes “your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream Dreams, your young men shall see visions” (1 Samuel 2:28 ). ...
What Dreams Were Interpreted? Not every dream was thought to be from God. In times of need and especially when a person sought a word from God, Dreams could be significant. In the Old Testament the interpreted Dreams were most often those of prophets and rulers. To note this we can distinguish three types of Dreams. For instance, Joseph, in Matthew 1:1 and Matthew 2:1 , understood the Dreams concerning Mary and Herod even though no mention is made of interpretation. Complex symbolic Dreams, though, needed the interpretive skill of someone with experience or an unusual ability in interpretation. The Dreams of Nebuchadnezzar described in Daniel 2:1 and Daniel 4:1 are good examples of this kind of dream. Even Daniel himself had Dreams in which the symbolism was so complex that he had to seek divine interpretation ( Daniel 8:1 ). ...
How and by Whom Were Dreams Interpreted? Since several religions and cultures developed people skilled in interpretation, this skill undoubtedly was communicated to later generations both through writings and through training a new generation by apprenticeship. ...
In the Old Testament Joseph and Daniel are the preeminent interpreters of Dreams. Second, he summoned all those with skill in interpretation of Dreams, but they could not meet his demands. ...
Were Dreams Ever Wrong or Wrongly Interpreted? Dreams were neither foolproof nor infallible. Both Jeremiah and Zechariah spoke against relying on Dreams to express the revelation of God. Dreams could come without being God's word (Jeremiah 23:28 ). Thus, while Dreams were often used by God to reveal His will, there is a warning, too, not to rely on this method to know the will of God
Dreams, Interpretation of - Though there is Scriptural warrant for preternatural origin and purpose of Dreams, e. , Jacob's ladder dream (Genesis 28) and that of Saint Joseph on the flight of the Holy Family into Egypt (Matthew 2), still Dreams generally arise from merely natural causes and convey no knowledge beyond what could be obtained from other natural sources. Dreams may at times profitably be the subject of psychological investigation, but even here their value can be exaggerated or abused, as in Freudian systems
Interpretation of Dreams - Though there is Scriptural warrant for preternatural origin and purpose of Dreams, e. , Jacob's ladder dream (Genesis 28) and that of Saint Joseph on the flight of the Holy Family into Egypt (Matthew 2), still Dreams generally arise from merely natural causes and convey no knowledge beyond what could be obtained from other natural sources. Dreams may at times profitably be the subject of psychological investigation, but even here their value can be exaggerated or abused, as in Freudian systems
Dreamful - ) Full of Dreams
Dreams - Paul in (1 Corinthians 14:15 ) Dreams, in which the understanding is asleep, are placed below the visions of prophecy, in which the understanding plays its part. Under the Christian dispensation, while we read frequently of trances and vision, Dreams are never referred to as vehicles of divine revelation. In exact accordance with this principle are the actual records of the Dreams sent by God. The greater number of such Dreams were granted, for prediction or for warning, to those who were aliens to the Jewish covenant. And where Dreams are recorded as means of God's revelation to his chosen servants, they are almost always referred to the periods of their earliest and most imperfect knowledge of him. But the observance of ordinary Dreams and the consulting of those who pretend to skill in their interpretation are repeatedly forbidden
Oneiroscopist - ) One who interprets Dreams
Oneiroscopy - ) The interpretation of Dreams
Morpheus - ) The god of Dreams
Dreamless - ) Free from, or without, Dreams
Oneiromancy - ) Divination by means of Dreams
Oneirocritics - ) The art of interpreting Dreams
Dreams - The easterns, in particular the Jews, greatly regarded Dreams, and applied for their interpretation to those who undertook to explain them. We see the antiquity of this attention to Dreams in the history of Pharaoh's butler and baker, Genesis 40. God expressly condemned to death all who pretended to have prophetic Dreams, and to foretel futurities, even though what they foretold came to pass, if they had any tendency to promote idolatry, Deuteronomy 13:1-3 . Saul, before the battle of Gilboa, consulted a woman who had a familiar spirit, "because the Lord would not answer him by Dreams, nor by prophets," 1 Samuel 28:6-7 . The Lord himself sometimes discovered his will in Dreams, and enabled persons to explain them. Joseph was favoured very early with prophetic Dreams, whose signification was easily discovered by Jacob, Genesis 37:5 . God said, that he spake to other prophets in Dreams, but to Moses face to face. The Midianites gave credit to Dreams, as appears from that which a Midianite related to his companion; and from whose interpretation Gideon took a happy omen, Judges 7:13 ; Judges 7:15 . The Prophet Jeremiah exclaims against impostors who pretended to have had Dreams, and abused the credulity of the people: "They prophesy lies in my name, saying, I have dreamed, I have dreamed. The Prophet Joel promises from God, that in the reign of the Messiah, the effusion of the Holy Spirit should be so copious, that the old men should have prophetic Dreams, and the young men should receive visions, Joel 2:28
Dream - ” It is used of the ordinary Dreams of sleep: “Then thou scarest me with Dreams, and terrifiest me through visions …” (Job 7:14). The most significant use of this word, however, is with reference to prophetic “dreams” and/or “visions. ” Both true and false prophets claimed to communicate with God by these Dreams and visions. : “If there arise among you a prophet, or a dreamer of Dreams, and giveth thee a sign or a wonder, and the sign or the wonder come to pass. The meaning, “to become healthy,” applies only to animals though “to dream” is used of human Dreams
Oneirocritical - ) Of or pertaining to the interpretation of Dreams
Oneirocritic - ) An interpreter of Dreams
Morphean - ) Of or relating to Morpheus, to Dreams, or to sleep
Dreams - Dreams . Sleep impressed primitive savages as a great mystery; and they consequently attributed a peculiar significance to the Dreams of sleepers, as phenomena which they could not control by their will or explain by their reason. In the lowest stage of culture all Dreams were regarded as objectively real experiences; the god or spirit actually visited the dreamer, the events dreamed actually occurred. In process of time Dreams came to be treated rather as Divine warnings than as actual occurrences. (Plato, however, while allowing that the gods may send Dreams, denies that they can wish to deceive men). Thus, for instance, among the Babylonians, the Assyrians, the Arabs, the Egyptians, a profound importance was attached to Dreams; there were professional interpreters of them (cf. Wiser theorists might discriminate between Dreams, but popular superstition tended to regard them all as omens, to be explained, as far as possible, in accordance with definite rules. In both Testaments we find significance attached to Dreams ( Genesis 37:6 ; Genesis 37:9 ; Genesis 41:25 , Judges 7:13 , Daniel 2:28 ; Daniel 7:1 ff. We find hardly any traces, however, of Dreams being regularly sought; 1 Samuel 28:15 may be one; and in 1618400283_39 and 1 Kings 3:5 it is possible to suppose a reference to the practice of sleeping in a sacred locality in order to receive a Divine communication. On the whole, the general trend of OT teaching is as follows: Dreams may in some cases be genuine communications from God ( Job 33:15 , Jeremiah 23:28 ), and as such are reverenced ( Genesis 20:3 ; Genesis 31:10 ff. ), though Numbers 12:6-8 treats them as an inferior medium; but there are false Dreams and lying dreamers, against whom precautions are necessary; and the idea that habitual dreaming is a certain sign of Divine inspiration is stoutly combated (cf. Jeremiah 23:25 ; Jeremiah 23:32 ; Jeremiah 27:9 ; Jeremiah 29:8 , Zechariah 10:2 , Ecclesiastes 5:7 ), and it is definitely recognized that the interpretation of Dreams belongs to God, and is not a matter of human codification (cf. The consideration of Dreams is partly a subject for the sciences which treat of the general relations between body and spirit, and partly a matter of common sense. It seems clear that Dreams are connected with physical states, and that their psychological origin lies mainly in the region beneath the ‘threshold of consciousness. ’ But all Dreams and all waking states are states of consciousness, whether it be partial or complete, and as such are subject to law; if any are to be regarded as ‘supernatural,’ it must be owing not to their methods but to their messages. Some Dreams convey no message, and can be explained as valuable only by a resort to superstition. The awakened intelligence must be called in to criticise and appraise the deliverances received in Dreams, and its verdict must decide what measure of attention is to be paid to them. Dreams, in short, may be the source of suggestions, but scarcely of authoritative directions
Dream - In the OT Dreams are described somewhat in detail, especially those of Jacob (Genesis 28:10-22), of Joseph (Genesis 37:5-10), of Nebuchadrezzar (Daniel 2, 4), and of Daniel (Daniel 7). In spite of the fact that certain Dreams are set out with considerable fullness of detail, the instances recorded are not numerous, which seems to indicate that God’s revelations by this medium are to be regarded as exceptional and providential rather than as the usual means of communication of the Divine will. The Fathers were in the habit of warning the Christians against the tendency to consider Dreams as omens in a superstitions sense. ...
The only references to Dreams or dreaming in the apostolic writings are Acts 2:17 ‘your old men shall dream Dreams’ (quoted from Joel 2:28), and Judges 1:8 ‘these also (the false teachers of v. It is generally admitted that, whilst for the most part the material of our Dreams is drawn from our waking experiences, the stimuli, external or internal, acting upon the sense organs during sleep produce the exaggerated and fantastic impressions in the mind which are woven into the fabric of our Dreams. Myers (Human Personality) regards Dreams, with certain other mental states, as being ‘uprushes’ from the subliminal self, and sleep with all its phenomena as the refreshing of the soul by the influences of the world of spirit. At any rate, there is nothing in modern psychology to preclude the possibility of Divine manifestations in Dreams. Many recent writers enjoin the cultivation of restfulness and repose of the soul in order that sleep may be beneficial and may not be disturbed by unpleasant Dreams. George Macdonald sings in his Evening Hymn:...
‘Nor let me wander all in vain...
Through Dreams that mock and flee;...
But even in visions of the brain...
Go wandering toward Thee. -Article ‘Dreams’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , ‘Dream’ In Dict. of Christ and the Gospels , and ‘Dreams and Sleep’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics ; J. translation , The Interpretation of Dreams, 1913)
Dreamland - ) An unreal, delightful country such as in sometimes pictured in Dreams; region of fancies; fairyland
Prophetical - ) Containing, or pertaining to, prophecy; foretelling events; as, prophetic writings; prophetic Dreams; - used with of before the thing foretold
Dreams - Though associated in some passages with trifles and vanities, Job 7:14 ; Ecclesiastes 5:7 , there is yet abundant evidence in the scriptures that God often conveyed His mind to people by means of Dreams, and this not only to those who obeyed Him, but also to the heathen. God said that He would instruct His prophets in Dreams. He also used Dreams in the case of Nebuchadnezzar and of Daniel in order to reveal His will and purpose concerning, the future. ...
Joseph, the reputed father of the Lord, was directed several times by means of Dreams; and Pilate was warned by his wife to have nothing to do with that just man because of what she had suffered in a dream. It is to be remarked that in the last days when God pours out His Spirit on all flesh the sons and daughters will prophesy, and the young men shall see visions, and the old men shall dream Dreams
Dream (2) - —The interest of the student of the Gospels in Dreams turns upon the occurrence in the opening chapters of Matthew of the record of no fewer than five supernatural Dreams (Matthew 1:20; Matthew 2:12-13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22). There is no reference to Dreams elsewhere in the NT except in a citation from the OT in Acts 2:17 and in an obscure verse in Jude (Judges 1:8). ...
No allusion is made in the Gospels, or indeed in the whole NT, to Dreams as phenomena forming part of the common experience of man. Barely enough exist to assure us that Dreams were thought of by the Hebrews very much as they are by men of average good sense in our own day. Men then, too, were visited with pleasant Dreams which they knew were too good to be true (Judges 7:13-15,), and afflicted with nightmares which drove rest from their beds (Job 7:14). To them, too, I Dreams were the type of the evanescent and shadowy, whatever suddenly flies away and cannot be found (Job 20:8, Psalms 73:20). The vanity and deceptiveness of Dreams were proverbial (Ecclesiastes 5:7, Isaiah 29:8). ...
The interest of the Bible in Dreams is absorbed by the rare instances in which they are made the vehicles of supernatural revelation. In this matter, too, the Son of Sirach retains the Biblical view, explicitly recognizing that Dreams may be sent by the Most High in the very passage in which he reproves the folly of looking upon Dreams in general as sources of knowledge (Sirach 34:6). The superstitions attitude characteristic of the whole heathen world, which regards all Dreams as omens, and seeks to utilize them for purposes of divination, receives no support whatever from the Biblical writers. Therefore in Israel there arose no ‘houses of Dreams,’ there was no place for a guild of ‘dream-examiners’ or ‘dream-critics. ’ When on rare occasions God did vouchsafe symbolical Dreams to men, the professed dream-interpreters of the most highly trained castes stood helpless before them (Genesis 37, 40, 41, Daniel 2, 4). The interpretation of really God-sent Dreams belonged solely to God Himself, the sender, and only His messengers could read their purport. There could be no more striking indication of the gulf that divides the Biblical and the ethnic views of Dreams. If there is a hint of an overestimate of Dreams among some Israelites (Jeremiah 23:25 f. If there are possible suggestions that there were methods by which prophetic Dreams were sought (Jeremiah 29:8, 1 Samuel 28:6; 1 Samuel 28:15), these suggestions are obscure, and involve no commendation of such usages as prevailed among the heathen. All the supernatural Dreams mentioned in the Bible were the unsought gift of Jehovah; and there is not the slightest recommendation in the Scriptural narrative of any of the superstitious practices of either seeking or interpreting Dreams which constitute the very nerve of ethnic dream-lore (cf. ...
Very exaggerated language is often met with regarding the place which supernatural Dreams occupy in Scripture. 641), for example, opens a treatment of the subject dominated by this idea with the statement that, ‘as everywhere in antiquity, Dreams play a preponderant rôle in the religion of the Hebrews. Bouché-Leclercq, who usually studies precision, remarks that ‘the Scriptures are filled with apparitions and prophetic Dreams’ (Histoire de la divination dans l’antiquté, i. Although, as we have seen, Dreams are a recognized mode of Divine communication, and dream-revelations may be presumed therefore to have occurred throughout the whole history of revelation; yet very few are actually recorded, and they oddly clustered at two or three critical points in the development of Israel. Of each of the two well-marked types of supernatural Dreams (cf. 142)—those in which direct Divine revelations are communicated (Genesis 15:12; Genesis 20:3; Genesis 20:6; Genesis 28:12; Genesis 31:10-11, 1 Kings 3:5, Matthew 1:20; Matthew 2:12-13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22; Matthew 27:19) and symbolical Dreams which receive Divine interpretations (Genesis 37:5-6; Genesis 37:10; Genesis 40:5-16; Genesis 41:1; Genesis 41:5, Psalms 126:1 Daniel 2:1; Daniel 2:3; Daniel 2:26; Daniel 4:5; Daniel 7:1)—only some half-score of clear instances are given. All the symbolical Dreams, it will be observed further, with the exception of the one recorded in Judges 7:13-15 (and this may have been only a ‘providential’ dream), occur in the histories of Joseph and Daniel; and all the Dreams of direct Divine communication, with the exception of the one to Solomon (1 Kings 3:5), in the histories of the nativity of Israel or of the nativity of Israel’s Redeemer. In effect, the patriarchal stories of the Book of Genesis, the story of Daniel at the palace of the king, and the story of the birth of Jesus, are the sole depositions of supernatural Dreams in Scripture; the apparent exceptions (Judges 7:13-15, 1 Kings 3:5, Matthew 27:19) may be reduced to the single one of 1 Kings 3:5. ...
The significance of the marked clustering of recorded supernatural Dreams at just these historical points it is not easy to be perfectly sure of. We have but to think of Abraham and Abimelech, of Jacob and Laban, of Joseph and Pharaoh, of Daniel and Nebuchadnezzar, of Joseph and the Magi, to observe how near at hand the suggestion lies that the choice of Dreams in these instances as the medium of revelation has some connexion with the relation in which the recipient stood at the moment to influences arising from the outer world, or at least to some special interaction between Israel and that world. ...
In entertaining such a conjecture we must beware, however, of imagining that there was something heathenish in the recognition of Dreams as vehicles of revelation; or even of unduly depreciating Dreams among the vehicles of revelation. It has become quite usual to speak of Dreams as the lowest of the media of revelation, with the general implication either that the revelations given through them cannot rise very high in the scale of revelations, or at least that the choice of Dreams as their vehicle implies something inferior in the qualification of the recipients for receiving revelations. And it is possible that the order in which the various methods of revelation are enumerated in such passages as Deuteronomy 13:1, 1 Samuel 28:6; 1 Samuel 28:15, Joel 2:28, Acts 2:17 may imply a gradation in which revelation through Dreams may stand at the foot. But these very passages establish Dreams among the media statedly used by God for the revelation of His will, and drop no word depreciatory of them; nor is there discoverable in Scripture any justification for conceiving the revelations made through them as less valuable than those made through other media (cf. ), that ‘the greater number’ of the recorded supernatural Dreams ‘were granted, for prediction or for warning, to those who were aliens to the Jewish covenant’; and when they were given to God’s ‘chosen servants, they were almost always referred to the periods of their earliest and most imperfect knowledge of Him’; and, ‘moreover, they belong especially to the earliest age, and became less frequent as the revelations of prophecy increase. ’ As many of these Dreams were granted to Israelites as to aliens; they do not mark any particular stage of religious development in their recipients; they do not gradually decrease with the progress of revelation; they no more characterize the patriarchal age than that of the exile or the opening of the new dispensation. If the great writing-prophets assign none of their revelations to Dreams, they yet refer to revelations by Dreams in such a way as to manifest their recognition of them as an ordinary medium of revelation (Jeremiah 23:25; Jeremiah 23:28; Jeremiah 23:32; Jeremiah 27:9; Jeremiah 29:8, Zechariah 10:2). These passages are often adduced, to be sure, as suggesting that appeal especially to Dreams was a characteristic of the false prophets of the day; and it is even sometimes represented that Jeremiah means to brand dream-revelations as such as lying revelations. Nor does Zechariah’s careful definition of his visions as received waking, though coming to him at night (Zechariah 1:8; Zec_4:1), involve a depreciation of revelations through Dreams; it merely calls our attention to the fact, otherwise copiously illustrated, that all night-visions are not Dreams (cf. ...
The citation in Acts 2:17 of the prediction of Joel 2:8 suffices to show that there rested no shadow upon the ‘dreaming of Dreams’ in the estimation of the writers of the NT. ...
In any event, this remarkable series of direct Divine revelations through Dreams (Matthew 1:20; Job 33:15; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22) forms a notable feature of this section of Matthew’s Gospel, and contributes its share to marking it off as a section apart. Of course, there is nothing’ of all this in the narrative, as there is nothing to justify it in any Scripture reference to the significance of revelation through Dreams. Any hesitancy we may experience in reading them is not suggested by them, but is imported from our own personal estimate of the fitness of Dreams to serve as media of Divine communications. ...
It is probable that the mere appearance of Dreams among the media of revelation recognized by Scripture constitutes more or less of a stumbling-block to most readers of the Bible. The disordered phantasmagoria of Dreams seems to render them peculiarly unfit for such a use. ...
We have already pointed out how little there is in common between the occasional employment of Dreams for revelations, such as meets us in Scripture, and the superstitious view of Dreams prevalent among the ancients. No special sacredness or significance is ascribed by the Scriptures to Dreams in general. No class or variety of Dreams is recommended by them to our scrutiny that we may through this or that method of interpretation seek guidance from them for our life. The question that is raised by the affirmation of such an occasional Divine employment of Dreams is obviously not whether Dreams as such possess a supernatural quality and bear a supernatural message if only we could get at it, but rather whether there is anything inherent in their very nature which renders it impossible that God should have made such occasional use of them, or derogatory to Him to suppose that He has done so. The cry of the heart which has really seen or heard God must in any case be, ‘What is man, that thou art mindful of him? or the son of man, that thou visitest him?’...
It should also be kept clearly in view that the subject of Dreams, too, is, after all, the human spirit. No doubt there are some Dreams which we should find difficulty in believing were direct inspirations of God. ...
‘The psychology of Dreams and visions,’ writes Dr. … Even in ordinary Dreams, the dreamer is still the human soul. … The possibility of even the highest forms of ethical and religions activities in Dreams cannot be denied. ...
So little, indeed, do emptiness and disorder enter into the very essence of dreaming, that common experience supplies innumerable examples of Dreams thoroughly coherent and consequent. The literature of the subject is filled with instances in which even a heightened activity of human faculty is exhibited in Dreams, and that throughout every department of mental endowment. Jurists have in their Dreams prepared briefs of which they have been only too glad to avail themselves in their waking hours; statesmen have in their Dreams obtained their best insight into policy; lecturers have elaborated their discourses; mathematicians solved their most puzzling problems; authors composed their most admired productions; artists worked out their most inspired motives. Franklin told Cabanis that the bearings and issues of political events which had baffled his inquisition when awake were not infrequently unfolded to him in his Dreams. Condorcet informs us that he often completed his imperfect calculations in his Dreams; and the same experience has been shared by many other mathematicians, as, for example, by Maignan, Göns, Wähnert. Condillac, when engaged upon his Cours d’Études, repeatedly developed and finished in his Dreams a subject which he had broken off on retiring to rest. Possibly no more instructive instance is on record, however, than the account given by Robert Louis Stevenson, in his delightful Chapter on Dreams (‘Thistle’ ed. ...
Instances of this heightened mental action in Dreams are so numerous and so striking in fact, that they have given rise to an hypothesis which provokes Wundt’s scoff at those ‘who are inclined to think that when we dream the mind has burst the fetters of the body, and that dream fancies transcend the activity of the waking consciousness, with its narrow confinement to the limitations of space and time’ (Vorlesungen über die Menschen- und Thierseele, Lect
Dreamer - ) One who Dreams
Dream - The revelation of God's will in Dreams is characteristic of the early and less perfect patriarchal times (Genesis 28:12; Genesis 31:24; Genesis 37:5-10); to Solomon, 1 Kings 3:5, in commencing his reign; the beginnings of the New Testament dispensation (Matthew 1:20; Matthew 2:13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22); and the communications from God to the rulers of the pagan world powers, Philistia, Egypt, Babylon (Genesis 20:3; Genesis 40:5; Genesis 41:1); Elihu, Job 33:15; Daniel 2; Daniel 4:5, etc. Dreams were a frequent means of imposture and idolatry Deuteronomy 13:1-3; Zechariah 10:2). "Trances" and "visions" are mentioned in the Christian church, but not Dreams. "In the multitude of Dreams are divers vanities" (Ecclesiastes 5:7), i. , God's service becomes by "dreams" (foolish fancies as to what God requires of worshippers); and random "words," positive vanity of manifold kinds; compare Matthew 6:7, "they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking
Namely - ...
For the excellency of the soul, namely, its power of divining in Dreams that several such divinations have been made, none can question
Dreamer - One who Dreams
Pethor - Interpretation of Dreams, identified with Pitru, on the west bank of the Euphrates, a few miles south of the Hittite capital of Carchemish (Numbers 22:5 , "which is by the river of the land of the children of [1] Ammo")
Oracles - God's method of communicating these oracles varied from Dreams and visions (Numbers 12:6-8), to wisdom (Proverbs 30:1), and even the Urim and Thummim (Numbers 27:21; 1 Samuel 14:337)
Divination - The Eastern people were fond of divination, magic, and the pretended art of interpreting Dreams and acquiring a knowledge of futurity. When Moses published the law, this disposition had long been common in Egypt and the neighboring countries; and to correct the Israelites inclination to consult diviners, wizards, fortune-tellers, and interpreters of Dreams, it was forbidden them under very severe penalties, and the true spirit of prophecy was promised to them as infinitely superior, Exodus 22:18 Leviticus 19:26,31 20:27 . ...
Divination was of several kinds: by water, fire, earth, air; by the fight of birds, and their singing; by lots, Dreams, arrows, clouds, entrails of sacrifices, pretended communication with spirits, etc
Dream, Dreamer - ) which means "shall be given up to dream by Dreams," translated "shall dream Dreams;" metaphorically in Jude 1:8 , of being given over to sensuous "dreamings," RV, AV, "dreamers," and so defiling the flesh
Dream - One mode of divine communication to the mind of man has been by Dreams. It was by means of Dreams that God communicated with those who were not of his covenant people. The false dreaming of a dreamer of Dreams, it may be added, was censured and to be punished
Dream - ...
Jeremiah 23:28 (a) The vagaries and mental wanderings of ungodly, religious leaders are called "dreams" and are contrasted with GOD's Word. Dreams are like the chaff, having no value whatever
Sar hamashkim - He later recommended that Joseph interpret Pharaoh's Dreams, leading to Joseph's appointment as viceroy of Egypt
Pharaoh's butler - He later recommended that Joseph interpret Pharaoh's Dreams, leading to Joseph's appointment as viceroy of Egypt
Dream - God has frequently made use of Dreams in communicating his will to men. Other significant Dreams are also recorded, such as those of Abimelech (Genesis 20:3-7 ), Pharaoh's chief butler and baker (40:5), Pharaoh (41:1-8), the Midianites (Judges 7:13 ), Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 2:1 ; 4:10,18 ), the wise men from the east (Matthew 2:12 ), and Pilate's wife (27:19)
Magic - In the Bible, all the superstitious ceremonies of magicians, sorcerers, enchanters, necromancers, spiritualists, exorcists, astrologers, soothsayers, interpreters of Dreams, fortune-tellers, casters of nativities, etc
Trance - Dreams, Vision
Interpretation - The act of expounding or unfolding what is not understood or not obvious as the interpretation of Dreams and prophecy
Business - Ecclesiastes 5:3 (a) This is typical of active, ambitious enterprises which bring Dreams of wealth and greatness
Vision - In the first ages of the world the Lord was pleased to manifest himself to the children of God by vision; sometimes by open revelations, at other times by Dreams in the night
Joseph - He landed in Egypt, where, after enduring slavery and prison, he interpreted Pharaoh’s puzzling Dreams and became viceroy of the land
Visions - In the future when the Spirit will be poured out, Israel's sons and daughters will prophesy; the old men will dream Dreams, and the young men will see visions
Amethyst - This stone had its Hebrew name,ahlâmah, from its supposed property of inducing Dreams
Advent: Looking For the - Often when, in the morning, the child of God awakes, weary and encumbered with the flesh, perhaps from troubled Dreams, perhaps with troubled thoughts, his Father's secret comes presently across him, he looks up, if not out, to feel, if not to see, the glories of that last morning when the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall arise indestructible; no weary limbs to bear the spirit down; no feverish Dreams to haunt the vision; no dark forecasting of the day's events, or returning memory of the griefs of yesterday
Amethyst - Hebrew root, "dream"; supposed to cause Dreams to those who wore it
Interpret - To explain or unfold the meaning of predictions, vision, Dreams or enigmas to expound and lay open what is concealed from the understanding as, Joseph interpreted the dream of Pharaoh
Vision - No Dreams, but visions strange
Sleep - Isaiah 65:4 , speaks of a superstitious practice among the Pagans, who went to sleep in the temples of their idols, to obtain prophetic Dreams: "They remain among the graves, and lodge in the monuments. Thus also the superstitions and idolatrous Jews, in contempt of the prophets, and of the temple of the Lord, went into the tombs and temples of idols to sleep there, and to have Dreams that might discover future events to them
Interpretation - Revealing the true meaning of supernatural Dreams, Genesis 41:1-57 Daniel 2:4 , unknown tongues, etc
Joseph - This and Dreams which showed his rule over his family inspired the envy of his brothers, who sold Joseph to a caravan of Ishmaelites (Genesis 37:1 ). On false accusations of Potiphar's wife, Joseph was thrown in the royal prison, where he interpreted the Dreams of two officials who had offended the pharaoh (Genesis 39-40 ). Eventually Joseph was brought to interpret some worrisome Dreams for the pharaoh. They did not recognize him, but Joseph saw the fulfillment of his earlier Dreams in which his brothers bowed down to him. Directed through Dreams, Joseph took his family to Egypt until it was safe to return to Nazareth (Matthew 2:13-23 )
Revelation - ...
Special revelation is that which is given to us through Prophets, the Bible, and even visions and Dreams (Numbers 12:6-8)
Joseph - His skill in interpreting Dreams brought him to the notice of Pharao who made him keeper of the royal seal and second in power in Egypt
Chaff - ...
Jeremiah 23:28 (a) This is a symbol of the worthlessness of men's Dreams and their idle reasonings
Amethyst - ) ‘amethyst’ stands for aḥlâmâh, a stone which was regarded as a charm against bad Dreams
Theophany - God has appeared in Dreams (Genesis 20:3-7; Genesis 28:12-17), visions (Genesis 15:1-21; Isaiah 6:1-13), as an angel (Genesis 16:7-13; Gen 18:1-33), etc
Night - Night is frequently a time of encounter with God, either through Dreams or visions (Genesis 20:3 ; Genesis 31:24 ; Genesis 46:2 ; 1 Kings 3:5 ; Job 33:15 ; Daniel 2:19 ; Daniel 7:2 ,Daniel 7:2,7:7 ,Daniel 7:7,7:13 ; Acts 16:9 ; Acts 18:9 ), appearances (Genesis 26:24 ; Numbers 22:20 ; 1 Chronicles 17:3 ; 2 Chronicles 1:7 ; 2 Chronicles 7:12 ; Acts 23:11 ; Acts 27:23 ), or by speech (Judges 6:25 ; Judges 7:9 ; 1 Samuel 15:16 )
Compare, Comparison - use, of interpreting Dreams, etc
Interpretation - In the earlier stages of the history of mankind Dreams were looked upon as manifestations of Divine intervention in human affairs, and it was regarded as of the first importance that their mysterious revelations should be explained for those to whom they were vouchsafed. From the story of Joseph we learn that a special class at the court of the Pharaohs discharged the function of interpreters of Dreams (cf. The idea that Dreams were a means of communication between the Deity and men was also current amongst the Hebrews from a very early date. In the NT we find that Dreams occupy the place of direct visions or revelations from God, and no difficulty seems to have been experienced by the recipients as to their precise meaning ( Matthew 1:20 ; Matthew 2:12-13 ; Matthew 2:19 ; Matthew 2:22 )
Empty - ) Destitute of reality, or real existence; unsubstantial; as, empty Dreams
Magi - (ma' gi) Eastern wise men, priests, and astrologers expert in interpreting Dreams and other “magic arts
Dream - In scripture, Dreams were sometimes impressions on the minds of sleeping persons, made by divine agency
Vision - Thus, in the earliest times, to patriarchs, prophets, and holy men God sent angels, he appeared to them himself by night in Dreams, he illuminated their minds, he made his voice to be heard by them, he sent them ecstasies, and transported them beyond themselves, and made them hear things that eye had not seen, ear had not heard, and which had not entered into the heart of man
Wheat - ...
Jeremiah 23:28 (a) The wheat in this case represents the Word of GOD, while the chaff represents the ideas, notions and Dreams of men
Impulse - There are others who are determined by visionary manifestations, or by the impressions made in Dreams, and the interpretations they put upon them
Vision(s) - The prophetic use of Dreams and visions is summarized in the Lord's dramatic defense of Moses in the face of Aaron and Miriam's revolt: "When a prophet of the Lord is among you, I reveal myself to him in visions, I speak to him in Dreams" (Numbers 12:6 ). In these books, God has revealed details of future events to a seer (human recipient), making heavy use of Dreams and visions. The first six chapters are historical narratives in which the God-given ability to interpret Dreams and visions plays an important role (Daniel 1:17 )
Divination - They are grouped into three classes: ...
Express invocation of a superhuman power, including oneiromancy (Greek: oneiros, dream; manteia, prophesying), by Dreams; necromancy (Greek: nekros, dead person), by spiritism; by other apparitions; pythonism (Greek: python, possessing demon), by possessed persons; hydromancy (Greek: hydor, water), by water; aeromancy (Greek: aer, atmosphere), by air; geomancy (Greek: ge; earth), by terrestrial substances; auspices (Latin: auspex, entrail- and bird-seer), by entrails of sacrifices, etc
Urim And Thummim - Saul sought the spirit of Samuel through a witch because God would not answer Saul through Urim or Dreams or prophets (1 Samuel 28:6-25 )
Empty - Wanting substance wanting solidity as empty Dreams
Divination - The eastern people were always fond of divination, magic, the curious arts of interpreting Dreams, and of obtaining a knowledge of future events. To prevent the Israelites from consulting diviners, fortune tellers, interpreters of Dreams, &c, he forbade them, under very severe penalties, to consult persons of this description, and promised to them the true spirit of prophecy as infinitely superior
Chrysippus, Guardian of the Holy Cross - This is a very early example of the Dreams indicating the position of valuable relics which we meet with so frequently in the middle ages, by which the failing fortunes of a religious house were revived, or the rival attractions of another establishment emulated (Cyrill
Divination - Numerous forms of divination are mentioned, such as divination by rods, ( Hosea 4:12 ) divination by arrows, (Ezekiel 21:21 ) divination by cups, (Genesis 44:5 ) consultation of teraphim, (1 Samuel 15:23 ; Ezekiel 21:21 ; Zechariah 10:2 ) [1]; divination by the liver, (Ezekiel 21:21 ) divination by Dreams, (13:2,3; Judges 7:13 ; Jeremiah 23:32 ) consultation of oracles
Song of Songs - Some poems are the private reflections of individuals, others are dialogues; some describe actual circumstances or events, others recount Dreams; some recall the past, others look to the future. Then comes a group of three poems recounting memories and Dreams
Magician - Their studies were physic, astrology, divination, foretelling of future events by the stars, interpretation of Dreams, augury, worship of the gods, &c
Needle - Thus in Baba Meẓia, 38b, in the course of a discussion on Dreams and their interpretation, R
Vision - ...
In the OT it is evident that visions, though often associated with Dreams (Joel 2:28), are to be distinguished from them. Whilst Dreams may be the medium for God’s revelations, by way of ‘special providences’ during sleep, visions may occur during waking moments and by the exaltation or perhaps the transcendence of the natural powers of sight
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - In this early period of Israelitish history we find divination by teraphim , the interpretation of Dreams, and necromancy, besides the authorized means of inquiry of God. ]'>[6] pharmakoi ], but this is not certain), and ‘ Chaldæans ’ ( kasdîm , a name which, from being a national designation, had come to mean those who were skilled in the occult lore of Babylonia and could interpret Dreams). ...
( b ) Dreams and visions . Numerous instances occur in which Divine intimations were communicated to men by Dreams and visions. Dreams are spoken of as a legitimate channel for God’s communications to His prophets and others ( Numbers 12:6 , 1 Samuel 28:6 , Job 33:15 , Joel 2:28 ). (2) But the belief in Divine warnings through Dreams came very near to divination when Interpreters were sought to make clear their meaning, as in Egypt ( Genesis 40:5 ff; Genesis 41:1 Peterharaoh calls the chartummîm a word used only in the sense of scribes possessed of occult knowledge), among the Midianites ( Judges 7:13 ), and in Babylon ( Daniel 2:2 ). (3) Dreams were sought by the prophets of a lower order in Israel, and it is known that among the Egyptians and other ancient nations special means, such as fasting or drugs, were used to induce them, from the belief that they were Divine communications. In Egypt it was a common practice for worshippers to sleep within the precincts of the temples in order to obtain intimations by Dreams, and some devotees lived by the rewards received by them for recounting the Dreams which had come to them in the temple. References to misleading divination by Dreams occur in Deuteronomy 13:1-5 (prophets were to he judged by the character of their teaching and to be put to death if they favoured idolatry), Jeremiah 23:25-28 ; Jeremiah 27:9 ; Jeremiah 29:8 , Zechariah 10:2
Inquire of God - A variety of methods were employed to seek God's counsel: Dreams (1 Samuel 28:6 ); priests with the ephod (1 Samuel 22:10 ; 1 Samuel 23:9-13 ); prophets (2 Kings 3:11 ); and direct consultation
Vision - ” This noun, which occurs 9 times, refers to a prophetic “vision” in Joel 2:28: “And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream Dreams, your young men shall see visions
Dan'Iel - (Daniel 1:8-16 ) At the close of his three years discipline, (Daniel 1:5,18 ) Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, (Daniel 1:17 ) of interpreting Dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi
Daniel - At the close of his three years' discipline, Daniel 1:5; Daniel 1:18, Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, Daniel 1:17, of interpreting Dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi
Divination - ...
...
There was divination by Dreams (Genesis 20:6 ; Deuteronomy 13:1,3 ; Judges 7:13,15 ; Matthew 1:20 ; 2:12,13,19,22 )
Sleep - Whilst the nerves are in a less excitable condition during sleep, the organic processes, which are still continued in a less active degree, make themselves felt in Dreams. Since we discriminate amongst our experiences, as to whether we are dreaming or fully awake, by the higher degree of vividness and of the sense of activity as well as by the deeper conviction of reality in the latter states, so may we be led to expect that when we see things as they are, sub specie aeternitatis, our experience will be analogous at least to awaking out of sleep, and our earthly life found to be the stuff of which Dreams are made
Sleep - Whilst the nerves are in a less excitable condition during sleep, the organic processes, which are still continued in a less active degree, make themselves felt in Dreams. Since we discriminate amongst our experiences, as to whether we are dreaming or fully awake, by the higher degree of vividness and of the sense of activity as well as by the deeper conviction of reality in the latter states, so may we be led to expect that when we see things as they are, sub specie aeternitatis, our experience will be analogous at least to awaking out of sleep, and our earthly life found to be the stuff of which Dreams are made
Vision - In its earlier form the vision is closely associated with belief in Dreams (wh
Joseph - ...
Joseph was only seventeen years old when his two so intoxicating Dreams came to him. Had Joseph been but a little older, and had he been but once or twice at Dothan, he would have hidden his Dreams in his heart like so many guilty secrets. But, innocent child that be was, he must up and out of his bed, and tell all his Dreams to all the house. And, like Joseph, till we are well past seventeen, and have been for some time away from home, we talk about nothing else but our own Dreams also. In short, be sure that you are in heaven before you keep the whole house waiting to break their fast till you have told out to the end all your Dreams of last night. Is that another subtlety of Moses? Does Moses insinuate that Joseph's brothers had never till now sat down to eat bread in entire peace since the day that Joseph began to dream? With all their faults, Joseph would have been eating bread at that moment with the patriarchs but for his spotted coat and his irrepressible Dreams
Joseph - " Their anger was increased when he told them his Dreams (37:11). At his suggestion Joseph was brought from prison to interpret the king's Dreams. Pharaoh was well pleased with Joseph's wisdom in interpreting his Dreams, and with his counsel with reference to the events then predicted; and he set him over all the land of Egypt (Genesis 41:46 ), and gave him the name of Zaphnath-paaneah
Hypocrisy - A hypocrite in classical Greek could be an interpreter of Dreams, an orator, a reciter of poetry, or an actor
Urim And Thummim - " Urim is alone in Numbers 27:21; 1 Samuel 28:6 Saul is answered neither by Dreams nor by Urim
Joel - ‘Your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your old men shall dream Dreams, and your young men shall see visions: and also upon the servants and upon the handmaids in those days will I pour out my spirit’ (Joel 2:28-29)
Oracle - ...
Secondly, Prophetical Dreams sent by God; as the Dreams which God sent to Joseph, and which foretold his future greatness, Genesis 27:5-6
jo'Seph - (Genesis 39:7-13 ) he was falsely accused and thrown into prison, where he remained at least two years, interpreting during this time the Dreams of the cupbearer and the baker. Finally Pharaoh himself dreamed two prophetic Dreams
Moon - The moon took its part with the sun in one of Joseph’s Dreams when it ‘made obeisance’ to him ( Genesis 37:9 ); and it stood still, ‘in the valley of Aijalon,’ at the command of Joshua, at the battle of Gibeon ( Joshua 10:12-13 ; cf
Divination - Intuitive types of divination in the ancient Near East involved oracles, prophecies, and Dreams
Joseph - "The story of his father's fondness, of his protest against sin among his brothers, of their jealous hostility and his prophetic Dreams, of his sale by his brethren to Midianites and by them to Potiphar in Egypt, of the divine favor on his pure and prudent life, his imprisonment for three to twelve years for virtue's sake, his wonderful exaltation to power and his wise use of it for the good of the nation, of his tender and reverent care of his father, his magnanimity to his brethren, and his faith in the future of God's chosen people, is one of the most pleasing and instructive in the Bible, and is related in language inimitably natural, simple, and touching
Mischna - It is written in a much purer style, and is not near so full of Dreams and visions as the Gemara
Hate - This “hatred” increased when Joseph reported his Dreams ( Joseph - The preeminence given him by his earthly was confirmed by his heavenly Father in two successive Dreams. ...
In his simplicity, possibly with some degree of elation, but certainly with the divine approval (for the revelation was given to be made known, Matthew 10:27), he told the Dreams to his brethren, which only aggravated their hatred: the first, their sheaves bowing to his sheaf (pointing to his coming office of lord of the Egyptian granaries); the second, the sun, moon, and 11 stars bowing to him (these heavenly bodies symbolizing authorities subject to his chief rule; compare the coming eclipse of the natural luminaries and earthly potentates before the Antitype, Matthew 24:29-30; Revelation 6:12). In the Antitype the Old Testament prophecies answer to Joseph's Dreams; the Jewish rulers rejected Him, though knowing, yet practically knowing not, the prophecies concerning Him (Acts 13:27). to inquire after their welfare and the flocks, when they saw him afar off at Dothan, they conspired to slay him, saying "we shall see what will become of his Dreams. His interpretation of their Dreams, the vine with three branches and the pressing the grape juice into Pharaoh's cup, and the three baskets of white bread (the Egyptians being noted for their fancy bread and pastry) out the uppermost of which the birds ate, came to pass; Pharaoh restored the chief cupbearer, and decapitated the chief baker. After two years Pharaoh's two Dreams of the seven fat and seven lean kine out of the river (Nile, yeowr Hebrew, aa Αur Egyptian, "great river": also Hapi, i. ) Like Daniel in the great heathen worldking's court at the close of Israel's history, so Joseph at its beginning, in like circumstances and with like abstinence from fleshly indulgences, interprets the Gentile monarch's Dreams; marking, the immeasurable superiority of the kingdom of God, even at its lowest point, to the world kingdoms
Daniel - God gave him success in his studies and the ability to interpret Dreams (Daniel 1:17; Daniel 1:20). ...
Contents of the book...
After Daniel and his friends proved their faithfulness to God during their time of testing in the Babylonian palace (1:1-21), an occasion arose where Daniel showed his remarkable ability to interpret Dreams
Daniel, Book of - ...
In Daniel 1-6 the Dreams or phenomena come to heathen kings, but in Daniel 7-12 Daniel has the visions. In Daniel 1-6 Daniel is the one who interprets the Dreams, but in 7–12 “someone” else interprets the Dreams and visions to Daniel
Necromancy - He received no communication from Urim and Thummim, Dreams, or prophets (v
Come - He “appears” and speaks to men in Dreams ( ma'gi - They appear in Herodotus' history of Astyages as interpreters of Dreams, i
Magi - These are (1) astrology , (2) oneiromancy , or divination by Dreams, aod (3) magic , which was traditionally associated with their name, but was expressly forbidden by the religion of the Persians. That Dreams guided the Magi at one point of their adventure is expressly stated ( Matthew 2:12 ); and it is fair to postulate similar direction in the initial interpretation of the star
Talmud - The Gemara is stuffed with Dreams and chimeras, with many ignorant and impertinent questions, and the style very coarse
Man - ...
And the man Dreams but what the boy believed
Baal, Master - 37:19); the KJV offers a literal translation of the Hebrew — “master of Dreams” — as an alternative
Daniel the Prophet - God also gave them knowledge and skill in learning, and to Daniel He gave understanding in all visions and Dreams
Work - Fancy wild work produces oft, and most in Dreams
False Prophet - ...
False prophets prophesied lies (Jeremiah 6:13 ; 27:14 ; Zechariah 13:3 ), deceived the people with their Dreams (Jeremiah 29:8 ), prophesied by the alleged authority of Baal (Jeremiah 2:8 ; 23:13 ), threatened the lives of the true prophets (Jeremiah 26:7 ), and dared to speak when they had not stood in the council of Yahweh and received a word directly from the Lord (Jeremiah 23:18 ). 17-22); (3) they fail to distinguish their own Dreams from a word from God (vv
Magic - There are many references scattered throughout the Old Testament to various imitative magical practices, including the use of clothing (2 Kings 2:13-14 ), magic staffs (Exodus 7:9 ), hands (2 Kings 5:11 ), mandrakes (Genesis 30:14-18 ), instruments (2 Kings 6:7 ), hair (Judges 16:17 ), whispering (2 Samuel 12:19 ), spells (Joshua 10:12 ), belomancy (1 Samuel 20:20-22 ), hydromancy (Exodus 15:25 ), and various blessings, curses, and Dreams. They were distinguished from inquiries of Yahweh (Urim and Thummin, Numbers 27:21 ; ephod, 1 Samuel 23:9 ; lots, Numbers 26:55 ; Dreams, 1 Samuel 28:6 ) on the grounds that divination was a custom of the nations
Dark, Darken, Darkly, Darkness - , "enigmas"); God's communications to Moses were not such as in the case of Dreams, etc
Daniel - He soon became known for his skill in the interpretation of Dreams (1:17; 2:14), and rose to the rank of governor of the province of Babylon, and became "chief of the governors" (Chald
Sleep - God uses our sleep on occasion to give us revelatory Dreams and guidance (Genesis 20:6-7 ; Judges 7:13-15 ; 1 Kings 3:5 ; Matthew 1:20 ; 2:12-13,22 )
Joseph - Of his life to the age of 17 ( Genesis 37:2 ) nothing is told, except that he was his father’s favourite, and rather too free in carrying complaints of his brothers and telling them of his boyish Dreams. As soon as he came within sight, their resentment perceived its opportunity, and they arranged to get rid of him and his Dreams; but the two traditions are not completely harmonized. Both were perplexed with Dreams, which Joseph interpreted to them correctly. Two years later the Pharaoh himself had his duplicated dream of the fat and lean kine and of the full and thin ears; and as much significance was attached in Egypt to Dreams, the king was distressed by his inability to find an interpreter, and ‘his spirit was troubled
Joel, Theology of - The recipients of the Spirit are said to prophesy and have Dreams or visions, words capable of a wide variety of interpretation, largely due to the fact that Joel's announcement comes rather abruptly, having no apparent conceptual connection with earlier material in the book. ...
On the assumption that Dreams and visions represent merely poetic variation, there are two phenomena said to result from the Spirit's outpouring: prophecy and Dreams/visions, the former referring to the proclamation of God's message, the latter to its reception
Theophany - The Lord appears to people in visions (Genesis 15:1 ; 46:2 ; Job 33:15 ; Psalm 89:19 ; Daniel 2:19 ; Acts 9:10 ; 18:9 ) and in Dreams (Genesis 20:3 ; 31:24 ; 1 Kings 3:5 ; Matthew 2:13 ) to reveal his plans for them or to unveil mysteries for the future
Gervasius - Ambrose, as the official custodian of the church records, might therefore have some knowledge of their resting-place, and in times of intense theological excitement men have often imputed to Dreams or supernatural assistance that for which, under calmer circumstances, they would account in a more commonplace way
Sun - ’ In one of Joseph’s Dreams there is a personification of the sun (Genesis 37:9 )
Holy Spirit - Joseph's Dreams are perceived to be divinely inspired (Genesis 41:38 ); King David, as a mouthpiece for God, proclaimed that “the Spirit of the Lord speaks” (2 Samuel 23:2 ); and Zechariah announced the word of the Lord to Zerubbabel, “Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit,' saith the Lord of Hosts” (Zechariah 4:6 )
Joseph - The Dreams of Joseph, implying his superiority over his brethren and his father's house, interpreted with an eye to Christ, are very striking circumstances of the preeminency of his character
Astrology - ...
Daniel seems to have been familiar with astrologers (2:27; 4:7) and with their inability to interpret the king's Dreams
Balaam - He conceives that the prophet had been accustomed to revelations, and that he used to receive them in visions, or in Dreams of the night
Marcus, a Gnostic - If we are sometimes tempted to be indulgent to Gnostic theories as the harmless Dreams of well-meaning thinkers perplexed by problems too hard for them the history of Marcus shews how these speculations became a degrading superstition
Daniel, Theology of - Later, God "gave" (natan [2]) the four young Jews surpassing knowledge and discernment, particularly to Daniel, a gift for understanding visions and Dreams (v. Daniel is given the ability to interpret Dreams and visions that are mysterious and impossible for the noblest and wisest of Babylon's wisemen to discern (chaps
Magi - But the Child had escaped, and the Magi, being warned of God in a dream (they were famed for interpretation of Dreams), had returned a different way, before Herod's cruel decree for the slaughter of the infants took effect at Bethlehem
Deists - These, he tells us, professed to believe in God, but shewed no regard to Jesus Christ, and considered the doctrine of the apostles and evangelists as fables and Dreams
Jacob - ...
Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other sons, which caused them to hate Joseph; they also hated him for the communications given to him through Dreams, and eventually sold him to the Ishmeelites
Chaldean Philosophy - Accordingly, Diodorus Siculus relates, that they pretended to predict future events by divination, to explain prodigies, and interpret Dreams, and to avert evils, or confer benefits, by means of augury and incantations
Jacob - ...
Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other sons, which caused them to hate Joseph; they also hated him for the communications given to him through Dreams, and eventually sold him to the Ishmeelites
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - ...
The second classical text is Numbers 12:6-8 : "When a prophet of the Lord is among you, I reveal myself to him in visions, I speak to him in Dreams. " Other prophets would receive no less a revelation from God, but in their case the means God would use to communicate his word would be the less direct, somewhat enigmatic form of Dreams and visions. ...
The fourth way that God communicated with his prophets was the extensive use of visions, Dreams, and elaborate imagery. Yet the prophet always retained the ability to distinguish between his own Dreams and those that were given by God
Daniel - Daniel, by God's mercy, possessed the truth that the Chaldeans sought after in sun and moon and stars: in Dreams and in incantations. You must pray an your very Dreams
Prophesy - The “prophet” or dreamer of Dreams might perform miracles to demonstrate that he was God’s man, but the people were to look to the message rather than the miracle before they heeded his message ( Child, Children - Zechariah Dreams of the happy time when Jerusalem shall be full of boys and girls playing in the streets ( Zechariah 8:5 )
Prophets - ...
The prophets received their messages from God, sometimes in visions, trances, and Dreams
Oracle - Mercury had oracles at Patras, upon Harmon, and in other places; Mars, in Thrace, Egypt and elsewhere; Hercules, at Cadiz, Athens, in Egypt, at Tivoli, in Mesopotamia, where he issued his oracles by Dreams, whence he was called Somnialis. Isis, Osiris, and Serapis delivered in like manner their oracles by Dreams, as we learn from Pausanias, Tacitus, Arrian, and other writers; that of Amphilochus was also delivered by Dreams; the ox Apis had also his oracle in Egypt
Lois And Eunice - I see, and hear, and share in all his holy Dreams, and high hopes, and solemn vows, and in all his protestations and resolutions. ...
And O you who are still full of promises, and vows, and fond intentions! You who cannot listen to God's severe truth tonight with patience, you are so full of ardent Dreams about what a house of love, and honour, and religion, your house is to be! Begin, I beseech you, tonight, to make yourself what you are one day to make your happy house
Sorcery - 101) uses this word to indicate the Magi, one of the six tribes of the Medes, who were probably a sacred priestly class, devoted to astrology, divination by Dreams, and the practice of magic generally
Job, Book of - He spoke of God's dealings with mankind; how He speaks to man, even in Dreams, to give him instruction; and if there be an interpreter, one among a thousand, who can show him how his soul can stand in truth before God, he may be delivered from going down to the pit; for God has found a ransom
Annunciation, the - ...
Doubt has been thrown upon the two narratives, because in the First Gospel the revelations are made by the angel of the Lord in Dreams, whereas in the Third they are made by angels to persons in their waking moments. Matthew always gives us Dreams, or that St. It is worth noting that in the New Testament we do not read of Dreams or visions in the night anywhere but in St
Fear - The fear of God comes as people experience God in a visible manifestation (Exodus 20:18 ), in Dreams (Genesis 28:17 ), invisible form (Exodus 3:6 ), and in His work of salvation (Isaiah 41:5 )
Ecclesiastes, Book of - Thus, humans are unable to achieve their Dreams and ambitions because of sin and because of their limited knowledge, power, and goodness
Appear, Appearance - ...
God makes his appearances in various forms, most typically through an angel (who can look very human [2]), in visions, and in Dreams
Learning - On the contrary, they were men of keen intelligence and ardent spirit, who had been cherishing the Messianic hope and found in Jesus the realization of their Dreams
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - He ordered all his diviners and interpreters of Dreams to be sent for; but none could tell him the dream or the interpretation: and, in wrath, he sentenced them all to death, which was about to be put in execution, when Daniel was informed of it
Philippians, Theology of - masiah [2]), meaning "the Anointed One, " held in it the hopes and Dreams of those generations before himhopes and Dreams that now at last had come to realization
Nebuchadnezzar - After we have read all that the historians and the travellers have to tell us about ancient Babylon, no wonder, we say to ourselves, that Nebuchadnezzar's Dreams were the Dreams of a magnificent imagination
Inspiration of Scripture - On other occasions, the inspiration came through Dreams
Devil - The possessed man lost the power of individual will and reason, his personal consciousness becoming strangely confused with that of the demon in him, so as to produce a twofold will, such as we have in some Dreams
Mennonites - He expressed his abhorrence of the licentious tenets which several of the Anabaptists had maintained with respect to the lawfulness of polygamy and divorce; and, finally, considered as unworthy of toleration those fanatics who were of opinion, that the holy Ghost continued to descend into the minds of many chosen believers, in as extraordinary a manner as he did at the first establishment of the Christian church, and that he testified his peculiar presence to several of the faithful, by miracles, predictions, Dreams, and visions of various kinds
Providence - ...
So in the case of Joseph; the brothers' wicked and seemingly successful plan for defeating God's will of elevating him above them, as revealed in his Dreams, was overruled to being made the very means of accomplishing it
Daniel - As at the beginning of the covenant people's history their kinsman Joseph, so toward its close Daniel, by the interpretation of Dreams (Daniel 2; Daniel 4), was promoted to high place in the court of their pagan masters
Athens - She did not beckon him like Rome; he did not see her in his Dreams, or pray that he might be prospered to come to her; he never exclaimed, with a sense of destiny, ‘I must see Athens
Essenes - This is a sufficient proof that although the Essenes might possess a certain inward religious life, and a certain practical piety, yet that these qualities with them, as well as with many other mystical sects, as for example, those of the middle ages, were connected with a theosophy, which desired to know things hidden from human reason, εμβατευειν εις α τις μη εωρακεν , and therefore lost itself in idle imaginations and Dreams, and were also mixed up with an outward asceticism, a proud spirit of separation from the rest of mankind, and superstitious observances and demeanours totally at variance with the true spirit of inward religion
Oracles - Through Jeremiah, God condemned those prophets who relied on Dreams to receive an oracle (Jeremiah 23:23-32 )
Ascension of Jesus Christ - While the Old Testament contains stories of ascension that take place in Dreams or visions ( Genesis 28:12 ), straightforward narratives like that of the angel of the Lord ascending in the flame of the altar while Manoah and his wife look on (Judges 13:20 ), and particularly of Elijah ascending to heaven in a whirlwind (2 Kings 2:11-12 ), although not related directly in the New Testament to the ascension of Jesus, are rightly seen as fundamental to the New Testament understanding that Jesus physically came down from heaven and returned there
Alexandria - The Alexandrian school of theology was made lustrous by the names of Pantænus, Clement, and especially Origen, who, while continuing the allegorical tradition, strove to show that Christian doctrine enshrined and realized the Dreams and yearnings of Greek philosophy
Nebuchadnezzar - Not to Daniel but to Nebuchadnezzar, the first representative head of the world power who overcame the theocracy, the Dreams were given announcing its doom
Israel, Israelite - It had been foreshadowed in the life story of Hosea, and was to be the fulfilment of the Dreams and longings of all the prophets
Apocalyptic - Daniel usually receives visionary Dreams in his sleep (2:19; 7:1), but he also has day-time visions (10:4-5) and is able to pass on words from God like a traditional prophet (5:25-28)
Fulfillment - ...
Visions, Dreams, and direct communications were the principal means by which God conveyed his will (Numbers 12:5-8 ) to his prophetic servants
Magi - They are also described as interpreters of Dreams (Herod. He appears, on the contrary, to use the term in the general sense of sages from the East, who busied themselves with astronomy (Matthew 2:2; Matthew 2:7; Matthew 2:9-10) and perhaps with the interpretation of Dreams (Matthew 2:12)
Daniel, the Book of - But his heavenly insight into Dreams which baffle the Chaldaeans' lore represents the covenant people's inner superiority to their pagan lords
Prophecy, Prophets - (2) Prophets received a word from God through many means—direct declarations, visions, Dreams, or an appearance of God
Angel - Sometimes angels addressed people in Dreams, as with Jacob (Genesis 28:12 ; 31:11 ), and could be recognized by animals before human beings became aware of them, as with Balaam (Numbers 22:22 )
Dominicans - To support the credit of their order, they resolved, at a chapter held at Vimpsen, in the year 1504, to have recurse to fictitious visions and Dreams, in which the people at that time had an easy faith; and they determined to make Bern the scene of their operations
Micah, Theology of - Clowney, Dreams, Visions and Oracles ; K
Proverbs, Theology of - Unlike Moses, who spoke to God face to face, and the prophets, to whom he gave visions and Dreams (Numbers 12:6-8 ), the Lord "spoke" to Solomon and other inspired sages such as Agur (Proverbs 30:1 ) and King Lemuel (31:1) through their observations of creation and humanity
the Unmerciful Servant - For one thing, you get sooner to sleep every night, and you get your sleep more unbroken with Dreams of the coming day of account
Antioch - In his Dreams Antioch was to be a metropolls, second to none for beauty, and Greek art and Greek religion were to be the uniform rule throughout all his dominions
Manichees - ...
He entirely discarded all the writings of his predecessors; rejecting the chimeras of the Valentinians and their thirty xons: the fable of Manes, with regard to the origin of rain, and other Dreams; but still retained the impurities of Basilides
Ezekiel - "His word fell like a hammer upon all the pleasant Dreams in which the captives indulged, and ground them to powder, a gigantic nature fitted to struggle against the Babylonian spirit of the age, which reveled in things gigantic and grotesque" (Hengstenberg)
Mission - In Joseph's case, aside from prescient Dreams in his youth (Genesis 37:5-11 ), there was no specific call to mission
Divination - ...
These supernatural beings communicated with men by means of ἄγγελοι (‘angels’ or ‘messengers’) or prophets, by possession, by means of the hand, tongues, Dreams, visions, trances, voices, sounds
Euchites - The things they saw in their Dreams they took for realities, and boasted that they then acquired a knowledge of future events, could see the condition of departed souls, and could read men's hearts
Paul as a Believing Man - Learn to say, and then say it continually till you say it in your very Dreams,-I am crucified with Christ! And then you will be able to work in peace, and to eat and drink in peace, and to go out and in in peace, and to lie down in peace, and rise up
the Man Who Found Treasure Hid in a Field - "...
As I was saying, a minister who would dig up the hidden treasure out of his pulpit and pastoral fields must sell all his time and all his tastes; all his thoughts by day and all his Dreams by night
Fig-Tree - Hence the saying, ‘Whoso sees a fig-tree in his Dreams, his learning shall be safe from forgetfulness’ (Berakhoth, 57)
Night (2) - Joseph and the Magi were warned in Dreams (Matthew 2:12-13; Matthew 2:19)
Solomon - Later legends, Jewish and Mohammedan, are interesting, but historically valueless; the fact that they have in no way influenced the OT narrative is an evidence of its general reliability; only two Dreams and no marvels are recorded of Solomon
Incarnation - A belief in the self-manifestation of God, through visions, Dreams, the ministry of angels, the spirit of prophecy, and in the possibility of personal converse between God and man, is apparent upon every page of the OT
Jacob - ), and his sleep was, not unnaturally, disturbed by Dreams; the cromlechs and stone terraces of the district seemed to arrange themselves into a ladder reaching from earth to heaven, with angels ascending and descending, whilst Jehovah Himself bent over him ( Genesis 28:13 RVm Will of God - At times he "spoke, " whether in Dreams, through the burning bush, or in the "still small voice" that came to Elijah
Michal, Saul's Daughter - They fall so far short of their young wife's Dreams and visions
Priscillianus And Priscillianism, Priscillian - Perplexed by the insoluble problem of the origin of sin, they indulged in most fantastic Dreams and myths
Matthew, the Gospel According to - ) Matthew 1: Joseph's Dreams
War, Holy War - Various means of determining Yahweh's stance in the coming battle were sought such as Urim, Dreams, or prophets
Hypocrisy - From this it early came to mean to answer, and to interpret, Dreams
Helena, Saint, Mother of Constantine the Great - The difficulty of discovery was caused, he says, by the Greeks having defiled them to stop the growing θρησκεία ; the site of the Sepulchre was made known, as some say, by a Hebrew living in the East, from documentary evidence, but more probably by signs and Dreams from God
Paul as a Man of Prayer - More things are wrought by prayerThan this world Dreams of
Solomon - Dreams at Gibeon, building of temples and kings' houses, largeness of heart, gifts of prophecy, a tongue of men and angels, proverbs and songs and Songs of songs-all is vanity if there is not along with it all constant repentance, daily self-denial, and a heart more and more perfect with God
Inspiration - God revealed himself to them not only by suggestion, but by Dreams, visions, voices, and the ministry of angels
David - in His Services - David had magnificent Dreams about the temple
Egypt - Inscriptions on the monuments speak of the Dreams of Pharaoh; the butler's and baker's duties are indicated in pictures; one of the oldest papyri relates the story that a foreigner was raised to the highest rank in the court of Pharaoh; and Dr
Hypocrisy - From this it early came to mean to answer, and to interpret, Dreams
Jacob - ) In the latter God states the true cause of his success; not his trickery, but "I have seen all that Laban doeth unto thee": the repetition of "in a dream" twice implies two Dreams
Ideal - He brought down the ideal out of the region of Dreams, and hopes, and words into the world of positive realities
Miracles (2) - Beneath or above the ordinary consciousness of man, and beyond the powers which at present his will controls and organizes, are other and larger powers at present uncontrolled and unorganized by the personal force, but manifest in exceptional phases of human life, such as Dreams, hypnosis, clairvoyance, clairaudience, somnambulism, or unwonted excitement and spiritual exaltation
Miracles - Joel (1618400283_8-31) apparently foretells a fuller outpouring of the Spirit accompanied with "prophesying," "dreams," and "wonders," in connection with and before "the great and terrible day of the Lord" (compare Zechariah 12:10)
Job, Theology of - He corrects Job's view of God's hiddenness by arguing that God reveals himself in mysterious ways (including Dreams, pain and illness, and angels) (33:13-23)
Prophecy - The ways by which the Deity made known his mind were various; such as by Dreams, visions, angels, symbolic representations, impulses on the mind, Numb
Inspiration - Even where tribes are too uncivilized to possess sacred writings, there exists a belief that God makes known His mind through Dreams, oracles, or inspired individuals; and the presence and influence of God is frequently spoken of as an afflatus, the blowing of a breath or wind upon the inspired person
Old Testament - 2 Peter 2:5 ff, 2 Peter 2:15 f, 2 Peter 2:22) and 1 John (1 John 3:12) are of the same character; while the numerous reminiscences in Revelation, if not distinctively ethical, are yet concrete and imaginative, the clothing of the writer’s own Dreams in the majestic symbolism of the OT poets and prophets (see article Quotations)
David - So at last, "when the Lord answered him, neither by Dreams, by Urim, nor by prophets," he filled up the measure of his guilt by repairing to the witch of Endor
God - Whereas he had spoken to the patriarchs in Dreams and visions, and to Moses directly, he spoke to Israel through the prophets
Boyhood of Jesus - It has, moreover, been suggested that on the journey up to Jerusalem, Mary for the first time told Him the story of His birth, of the messages of the angels, of the Magi, of Simeon, of Anna, of the flight into Egypt, and of the Dreams of Joseph
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - Jacob on hearing these Dreams concludes that Joseph is alive (vii
Mental Characteristics - But never was a dreamer of Dreams so intensely practical
Jesus Christ - ]'>[4] 1901); another regards Him as, above all, the spokesman of unfulfilled apocalyptic Dreams (J
Apocrypha - (2) Since these men were of the priestly line, the splendour of their achievements eclipsed for the time being the national Dreams of the house of David
Divinity of Christ - The thought of the Apostles consciously felt itself engaged not in evolving Dreams and speculations of its own, but in striving to receive and appreciate a truth which was before, above, independent of them
Possession - When, therefore, through Dreams and other experiences, he realized that his body was inhabited and animated by a spirit, he also thought that the falling rock, the running river, the waving tree, the sun moving through the sky, were each inhabited by a spirit or spirits like that within himself; every thing and every affair were animated by their own particular spirit
Poet - The request of two of them for places on His right hand and on His left (Mark 10:37) hints at gorgeous Dreams on their part
Hermas, Known as the Shepherd - In particular, if we are to set down as fools all who have believed that supernatural intimations may be given in Dreams, our list would be a long one, and would include many eminent names; and though modern science may regard visions as phenomena admitting a natural explanation, it is not reasonable to expect such a view from the science of the 2nd cent
Neology - The miracles of healing were the effect of fancy operating favourably upon the disorders; and Ananias and Sapphira died of a fright; with many other absurdities, half Dreams and half blasphemies; and of which the above are given but as a specimen
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - A modern divine would turn away from the Dreams of Valentinianism in silent contempt; but he could not refuse to discuss the question raised by Marcion, whether there is such opposition between different parts of what he regards as the word of God, that all cannot come from the same author
Perfection (of Jesus) - How can we be sure that no stain ever touched the purity of His soul during all those buried years, silent for ever now in quiet Nazareth? (2) There is also the whole story of a man’s inward life; the Dreams of the secret heart, the fancies cherished in the recesses of fond imagination, the converse which the soul holds with itself