What does Dog mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
כַכָּ֗לֶב dog. 2
κύων a dog. 1
הֲכֶ֣לֶב dog. 1
כֶּ֣לֶב dog. 1
הַכֶּ֔לֶב dog. 1
הַכֶּ֤לֶב dog. 1
כֶּ֥לֶב dog. 1
הַכֶּ֥לֶב dog. 1
כֶּ֗לֶב dog. 1
לְכֶ֤לֶב dog. 1
כֶּ֙לֶב֙ dog. 1
כֶּ֔לֶב dog. 1
הַכֶּ֗לֶב dog. 1
כְּ֭כֶלֶב dog. 1
כָ֑לֶב dog. 1
כֶּ֝֗לֶב dog. 1

Definitions Related to Dog

H3611


   1 Dog.
      1a Dog (literal).
      1b contempt or abasement (fig.
      ).
      1c of pagan sacrifice.
      1d of male cult prostitute (fig.
      ).
      

G2965


   1 a Dog.
   2 metaph.
   a man of impure mind, an impudent man.
   

Frequency of Dog (original languages)

Frequency of Dog (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Dog Fancier
One who has an unusual fancy for, or interest in, dogs; also, one who deals in dogs.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Dog
Representation in art associated with
Saint Hubert as part of his connection with hunters
Saint Roch, who was fed during his illness by a dog
Saint Tobias, who had a dog as a travelling companion
See also the patron saints index for patrons of dogs.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Dog
1: κύων (Strong's #2965 — Noun Masculine — kuon — koo'-ohn ) is used in two senses, (a) natural, Matthew 7:6 ; Luke 16:21 ; 2 Peter 2:22 ; (b) metaphorical, Philippians 3:2 ; Revelation 22:15 , of those whose moral impurity will exclude them from the New Jerusalem. The Jews used the term of Gentiles, under the idea of ceremonial impurity. Among the Greeks it was an epithet of impudence. Lat., canis, and Eng., "hound" are etymologically akin to it.
2: κυνάριον (Strong's #2952 — Noun Neuter — kunarion — koo-nar'-ee-on ) a diminutive of No. 1, "a little dog, a puppy," is used in Matthew 15:26,27 ; Mark 7:27,28 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Dog
Frequently mentioned both in the Old and New Testaments. Dogs were used by the Hebrews as a watch for their houses (Isaiah 56:10 ), and for guarding their flocks (Job 30:1 ). There were also then as now troops of semi-wild dogs that wandered about devouring dead bodies and the offal of the streets (1 Kings 14:11 ; 16:4 ; 21:19,23 ; 22:38 ; Psalm 59:6,14 ). As the dog was an unclean animal, the terms "dog," "dog's head," "dead dog," were used as terms of reproach or of humiliation (1 Samuel 24:14 ; 2 Samuel 3:8 ; 9:8 ; 16:9 ). Paul calls false apostles "dogs" (Philippians 3:2 ). Those who are shut out of the kingdom of heaven are also so designated (Revelation 22:15 ). Persecutors are called "dogs" (Psalm 22:16 ). Hazael's words, "Thy servant which is but a dog" (2 Kings 8:13 ), are spoken in mock humility=impossible that one so contemptible as he should attain to such power.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Dog
See Isaiah 56:10 ; Job 30:1 ) and for the dwelling (Exodus 11:7 ). Some were trained for hunting (Psalm 22:17 , Psalm 22:21 ), but some ran stray in the streets (Exodus 22:30 ; 1 Kings 14:11 ). Metaphorically, “dog” was a term of contempt (1 Samuel 17:43 ) and self-abasement (1 Samuel 24:15 ). “Dog” may refer to a male cult prostitute (Deuteronomy 23:19 ), though the exact meaning of “dog's wages” is disputed. The prophet insulted the priests by saying their sacrifices were no better than breaking a dog's neck and sacrificing the dog (Isaiah 66:3 ). This means sacrifices is not needed in the new age and that the priests had neglected their first task, that of determining God's will.
Jesus used dogs to teach people to be discriminating in whom they chose to teach (Matthew 7:6 ). Paul insulted his Judaizing opponents, calling them dogs (Philippians 3:2 ; compare 2 Peter 2:22 ; Revelation 22:15 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Dog
The watch of the house, and of the flock (Isaiah 56:10-11; Job 30:1). Sometimes domesticated, as the Syrophoenician woman's comparison and argument imply, "the household (kunaria , 'little' or 'pet') dogs eat of the crumbs (Matthew 15:26-27; Mark 7:27-28) which fall from their master's table." More commonly ownerless, and banded in troops which divide cities into so many quarters; each half-starved, ravenous troop keeps to its own quarter, and drives off any intruder; feeding on blood, dead bodies, and offal; therefore regarded as "unclean" (1 Kings 14:11; 1 Kings 16:4; 1 Kings 21:19; 1 Kings 21:23; 1 Kings 22:38; 2 Kings 9:10; 2 Kings 9:35-36). Their dismal howlings at night are alluded to in Psalms 59:6; Psalms 59:14-15; "they return at evening, they make a noise like a dog, and go round about the city"; perhaps in allusion to Saul's agents thirsting for David's blood coming to Michal's house at evening, and to the retribution on Saul in kind, when he who had made David a wanderer himself wandered about seeking vainly for help against the Philistines, and went at last by night to the witch of Endor. As unclean (Isaiah 66:3), dog, dead dog, dog's head, are terms of scorn or else self-abasement (1 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 3:8; 2 Samuel 9:8; 2 Samuel 16:9; 2 Kings 8:13). A wanton, self-prostituting man is called a "dog" (Deuteronomy 23:18). One Egyptian god had a dog form. "Beware of the (Greek) dogs," those impure persons of whom I told you often" (Philippians 3:2; Philippians 3:18-19); "the abominable" (Revelation 21:8; compare Revelation 22:15; Matthew 7:6); pagan in spirit (Titus 1:15-16); dogs in filthiness, snarling, and ferocity against the Lord and His people (Psalms 22:16; Psalms 22:20); backsliding into former carnality, as the dog "is turned to his own vomit again" (2 Peter 2:22). The Jews regarded the Gentiles as "dogs," but by unbelief they ceased to be the true Israel and themselves became dogs (Isaiah 56:10-11). "Deliver my darling from the power of the dog," i.e. my soul (literally, my unique one, unique in its preciousness) from the Jewish rabble; as "deliver My soul from the sword" is Messiah's cry for deliverance from the Roman soldiery and governor. The Assyrian hunting dog as vividly depicted on Assyrian sculptures resembled exactly our harrier or foxhound.
Webster's Dictionary - Curtail Dog
A dog with a docked tail; formerly, the dog of a person not qualified to course, which, by the forest laws, must have its tail cut short, partly as a mark, and partly from a notion that the tail is necessary to a dog in running; hence, a dog not fit for sporting.
King James Dictionary - Dog
DOG, n.
1. A species of quadrupeds, belonging to the genus Canis, of many varieties, as the mastiff, the hound, the spaniel, the shepherds dog, the terrier, the harrier, the bloodhound, &c. 2. It is used for male, when applied to several other animals as a dog-fox a dog-otter dog-ape. It is prefixed to other words, denoting what is mean, degenerate or worthless as dog-rose. 3. An andiron, so named from the figure of a dogs head on the top. 4. A term of reproach or contempt given to a man. 5. A constellation called Sirius or Canicula. See Dog-day. 6. An iron hook or bar with a sharp fang, used by seamen. 7. An iron used by sawyers to fasten a log of timber in a saw-pit. 8. A gay young man a buck. Not in use. To give or throw to the dogs, is to throw away, as useless.
To go to the dogs, is to be ruined.
DOG, To hunt to follow insidiously or indefatigably to follow close to urge to worry with importunity.
I have been pursued, dogged and way-laid.
Webster's Dictionary - Skittle-Dog
(n.) The piked dogfish.
Webster's Dictionary - Sea Dog
(1):
The dogfish.
(2):
The common seal.
(3):
An old sailor; a salt.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Dog
2 Samuel 9:8 (a) This poor man felt so desperately unworthy that he compared himself to this animal.
Psalm 22:16 (a) These were JESUS' enemies who wandered around the Cross gaping at Him and desiring to injure Him.
Isaiah 56:10 (c) These were the leaders of Israel who refused to warn and to protect them from their enemies; or it is any unsaved religious leader who fails to be a blessing to GOD's people.
Matthew 15:26 (a) This troubled woman accepted the place CHRIST gave her and compared herself to a dog waiting to be fed with the crumbs.
Philippians 3:2 (b) This is a reference to unsaved, religious leaders whose only purpose is to feed themselves and bark out their feelings which give no enlightenment or help to others.
2 Peter 2:22 (b) This refers to a religious leader who gets nothing from GOD but gives out that which he has mixed up and concocted within his own mind. He feeds on this himself and offers it to others.
Revelation 22:15 (a) GOD is informing us that false leaders, evil teachers and other similar characters who are described as "dogs" in the Old Testament and the New, will not be permitted to enter Heaven.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog Bee
A male or drone bee.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog Days
A period of from four to six weeks, in the summer, variously placed by almanac makers between the early part of July and the early part of September; canicular days; - so called in reference to the rising in ancient times of the Dog Star (Sirius) with the sun. Popularly, the sultry, close part of the summer.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog Day
Alt. of Dogday
Webster's Dictionary - Red Dog
Alt. of Red-dog flour
Webster's Dictionary - Dog Star
Sirius, a star of the constellation Canis Major, or the Greater Dog, and the brightest star in the heavens; - called also Canicula, and, in astronomical charts, / Canis Majoris. See Dog days.
Webster's Dictionary - Red-Dog Flour
The lowest grade of flour in milling. It is dark and of little expansive power, is secured largely from the germ or embryo and adjacent parts, and contains a relatively high percentage of protein. It is chiefly useful as feed for farm animals.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Weary
(a.) Extremely weary.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Faced
(a.) Having a face resembling that of a dog.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Headed
(a.) Having a head shaped like that of a dog; - said of certain baboons.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Eared
(a.) Having the corners of the leaves turned down and soiled by careless or long-continued usage; - said of a book.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Hearted
(a.) Inhuman; cruel.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Legged
(a.) Noting a flight of stairs, consisting of two or more straight portions connected by a platform (landing) or platforms, and running in opposite directions without an intervening wellhole.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Rose
(n.) A common European wild rose, with single pink or white flowers.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Brier
(n.) The dog-rose.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog-Fox
(1):
(n.) A male fox. See the Note under Dog, n., 6.
(2):
(n.) The Arctic or blue fox; - a name also applied to species of the genus Cynalopex.
Webster's Dictionary - Dog
(1):
(n.) A mean, worthless fellow; a wretch.
(2):
(n.) A fellow; - used humorously or contemptuously; as, a sly dog; a lazy dog.
(3):
(n.) One of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater Dog and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Dog Star (Sirius).
(4):
(n.) An iron for holding wood in a fireplace; a firedog; an andiron.
(5):
(n.) A grappling iron, with a claw or claws, for fastening into wood or other heavy articles, for the purpose of raising or moving them.
(6):
(n.) An iron with fangs fastening a log in a saw pit, or on the carriage of a sawmill.
(7):
(n.) A quadruped of the genus Canis, esp. the domestic dog (C. familiaris).
(8):
(n.) A piece in machinery acting as a catch or clutch; especially, the carrier of a lathe, also, an adjustable stop to change motion, as in a machine tool.
(9):
(v. t.) To hunt or track like a hound; to follow insidiously or indefatigably; to chase with a dog or dogs; to worry, as if by dogs; to hound with importunity.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Dog
DOG.—See Animals, p. 64.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Dog
Dog. This well-known animal is frequently mentioned in the Bible. But, though it was employed to watch the flocks, Job 30:1, and to guard the house, Isaiah 56:10, it was by no means regarded as we regard it, the companion and friend of man, but was an unclean animal under Jewish law and regarded with contempt. Exodus 22:31; Deuteronomy 23:18; 1 Samuel 17:43; 1 Samuel 24:14. Dogs were scavengers, half wild, prowling about the fields and the towns, devouring offal and dead bodies, and disturbing the night with their howlings. This is the case now in the east; troops of dogs abounding, recognized in a degree by food and water being occasionally given them, and, according to the instincts of their nature, guarding the place where they congregate, but deemed impure and unclean, just as among the ancient Hebrews. Hence we can understand the comparison of savage and cruel men to dogs, Psalms 22:16; Philippians 3:2, and the contempt and dislike attached to the name of a dog. 1 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 3:8; 2 Samuel 9:8. Solomon contrasts a living dog with a dead lion, Ecclesiastes 9:4, and Abner exclaims: "Am I a dog's head?" 2 Samuel 8:8, implying that a dog is the meanest thing alive. The same contempt is implied in the charge: "He that sacrifices a lamb,... as if he cut off a dog's neck." Isaiah 66:3. In the New Testament it is used to designate vile persons who are shut out of heaven, Revelation 22:15, and foolish persons devoted to their folly. 2 Peter 2:22. To the present day the word is applied by Jews to Gentiles, and by Mohammedans to Christians, as a term of reproach.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Dog
Constantly referred to in scripture as an unclean and debased animal: hence the unclean Gentiles or heathen are compared to dogs. Psalm 22:16 ; Psalm 59:6,14 . The price of a dog was forbidden to be put into the Lord's treasury, it was an abomination. Deuteronomy 23:18 . Hazael, a heathen, said, "Is thy servant a dog?" and the most offensive epithet was to call a man a dead dog. They were, and are, the scavengers of Eastern cities. All refuse is thrown into the streets and the dogs eat it. It was the dogs who ate the body of Jezebel, and licked up the blood of Naboth and of Ahab. In the N.T. it is the same: 'without are dogs,' ' beware of dogs' used symbolically of those cut off and of the unclean: they return to their vomit again. The only apparent exception to the above is when the Lord compared the Syrophenician woman to a dog, and she said, "Yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters' table." In these passages the diminutive of the word is used, implying 'little dogs or puppies,' and these are often kept in houses until they grow up. But this does not remove the contempt implied in the term. Matthew 15:27 . Wycliftranslated 'houndis' and 'litil whelpis' in Mark 7:27,28 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Dog
כלב , an animal well known. By the law of Moses, the dog was declared unclean, and was held in great contempt among the Jews, 1 Samuel 17:43 ; 1 Samuel 24:14 ; 2 Samuel 9:8 ; 2 Kings 8:13 . Yet they had them in considerable numbers in their cities. They were not, however, shut up in their houses or courts, but forced to seek their food where they could find it. The Psalmist compares violent men to dogs, who go about the city in the night, prowl about for their food, and growl, and become clamorous if they be not satisfied, Psalms 59:6 ; Psalms 59:14-15 . Mr. Harmer has illustrated this by quotations from travellers into the east. The Turks also reckon the dog a filthy creature, and therefore drive him from their houses; so that with them dogs guard rather the streets and districts, than particular houses, and live on the offals that are thrown abroad. In 1 Samuel 25:3 , Nabal is said to have been "churlish and evil in his manners; and he was of the house of Caleb;" but Caleb here is not a proper name. Literally, it is, "He was the son of a dog;" and so the Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic render it,—he was irritable, snappish, and snarling as a dog. The irritable disposition of the dog is the foundation of that saying, "He that passeth by, and meddleth with strife belonging not to him, is like one that taketh a dog by the ears," Proverbs 26:17 ; that is, he wantonly exposes himself to danger.
In 1 Kings 21:23 , it is said, "The dogs shall eat Jezebel." Mr. Bruce, when at Gondar, was witness to a scene in a great measure similar to the devouring of Jezebel by dogs. He says, "The bodies of those killed by the sword were hewn to pieces, and scattered about the streets, being denied burial. I was miserable, and almost driven to despair, at seeing my hunting dogs, twice let loose by the carelessness of my servants, bringing into the court yard the heads and arms of slaughtered men, and which I could no way prevent but by the destruction of the dogs themselves." He also adds, that upon being asked by the king the reason of his dejected and sickly appearance, among other reasons, he informed him, "it was occasioned by an execution of three men, which he had lately seen; because the hyaenas, allured into the streets by the quantity of carrion, would not let him pass by night in safety from the palace; and because the dogs fled into his house, to eat pieces of human carcasses at their leisure." This account illustrates also the readiness of the dogs to lick the blood of Ahab, 1 Kings 22:38 ; in conformity to which is the expression of the Prophet Jeremiah, Jeremiah 15:3 , "I will appoint over them the sword to slay, and the dogs to tear."
2. The dog was held sacred by the Egyptians. This fact we learn from Juvenal, who complains, in his fifteenth satire,
Oppida tota canem vencrantur, nemo Dianam. "Thousands regard the hound with holy fear, Not one, Diana."
GIFFORD.
The testimony of the Latin poet is confirmed by Diodorus, who, in his first book, assures us that the Egyptians highly venerate some animals, both during their life and after their death; and expressly mentions the dog as one object of this absurd adoration. To these witnesses may be added Herodotus, who says, that when a dog expires, all the members of the family to which he belonged worship the carcass; and that, in every part of the kingdom, the carcasses of their dogs are embalmed, and deposited in consecrated ground. The idolatrous veneration of the dog by the Egyptians is shown in the worship of their dog-god Anubis, to whom temples and priests were consecrated, and whose image was borne in all religious ceremonies. Cynopolis, the present Minieh, situated in the lower Thebais, was built in honour of Anubis. The priests celebrated his festivals there with great pomp. "Anubis," says Strabo, "is the city of dogs, the capital of the Cynopolitan prefecture. These animals are fed there on sacred aliments, and religion has decreed them a worship." An event, however, related by Plutarch, brought them into considerable discredit with the people. Cambyses, having slain the god Apis, and thrown his body into the field, all animals respected it except the dogs, which alone ate of his flesh. This impiety diminished the popular veneration. Cynopolis was not the only city where incense was burned on the altars of Anubis. He had chapels in almost all the temples. On solemnities, his image always accompanied those of Isis and Osiris. Rome, having adopted the ceremonies of Egypt, the emperor Commodus, to celebrate the Isiac feasts, shaved his head, and himself carried the dog Anubis.
3. In Matthew 7:6 , we have this direction of our Saviour: "Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they," the swine, "trample them under their feet, and," the dogs, "turn again and tear you." It was customary, not only with the writers of Greece and Rome, but also with the eastern sages, to denote certain classes of men by animals supposed to resemble them among the brutes. Our Saviour was naturally led to adopt the same concise and energetic method. By dogs, which were held in great detestation by the Jews, he intends men of odious character and violent temper; by swine, the usual emblem of moral filth, he means the sensual and profligate; and the purport of his admonition is, that as it is a maxim with the priests not to give any part of the sacrifices to dogs, so it should be a maxim with you not to impart the holy instruction with which you are favoured, to those who are likely to blaspheme and to be only excited by it to rage and persecution. It is, however, a maxim of prudence, not of cowardice; and is to be taken along with other precepts of our Lord, which enjoin the publication of truth, at the expense of ease and even life.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Dog
(1):
The menobranchus.
(2):
A small floating cloud, supposed to indicate rain.
(3):
A dog accustomed to the water, or trained to retrieve waterfowl. Retrievers, waters spaniels, and Newfoundland dogs are so trained.
(4):
A sailor, esp. an old sailor; an old salt.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Dog,
an animal frequently mentioned in Scripture. It was used by the hebrews as a watch for their houses, (Isaiah 56:10 ) and for guarding their flocks. (Job 30:1 ) Then also, as now troops of hungry and semi-wild dogs used to wander about the fields and the streets of the cities, devouring dead bodies and other offal, (1 Kings 14:11 ; 21:19,23 ; 22:38 ; Psalm 59:6 ) and thus became so savage and fierce and such objects of dislike that fierce and cruel enemies are poetically styled dogs in (Psalm 22:16,20 ) moreover the dog being an unclean animal, (Isaiah 66:3 ) the epithets dog, dead dog, dog's head, were used as terms of reproach or of humility in speaking of one's self. (1 Samuel 24:14 ; 2 Samuel 3:8 ; 9:8 ; 16:9 ; 2 Kings 8:13 )
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Dog
DOG.—See Animals, p. 64.

Sentence search

Sirius - ) The Dog Star. See Dog Star
Curtail Dog - A Dog with a docked tail; formerly, the Dog of a person not qualified to course, which, by the forest laws, must have its tail cut short, partly as a mark, and partly from a notion that the tail is necessary to a Dog in running; hence, a Dog not fit for sporting
Maikong - ) A South American wild Dog (Canis cancrivorus); the crab-eating Dog
Demiwolf - ) A half wolf; a mongrel Dog, between a Dog and a wolf
Doggish - ) Like a Dog; having the bad qualities of a Dog; churlish; growling; brutal
Knotgrass - ) The Dog grass. See under Dog
Dog - Dog, n. A species of quadrupeds, belonging to the genus Canis, of many varieties, as the mastiff, the hound, the spaniel, the shepherds Dog, the terrier, the harrier, the bloodhound, &c. It is used for male, when applied to several other animals as a Dog-fox a Dog-otter Dog-ape. It is prefixed to other words, denoting what is mean, degenerate or worthless as Dog-rose. An andiron, so named from the figure of a Dogs head on the top. See Dog-day. To give or throw to the Dogs, is to throw away, as useless. ...
To go to the Dogs, is to be ruined. ...
Dog, To hunt to follow insidiously or indefatigably to follow close to urge to worry with importunity. ...
I have been pursued, Dogged and way-laid
Nib'Haz - ( 2 Kings 17:31 ) The rabbins derived the name from a Hebrew root nabach , "to bark," and hence assigned to it the figure of a Dog, or a Dog-headed man. The Egyptians worshipped the Dog. Some indications of this worship have been found in Syria, a colossal figure of a Dog having formerly stood at a point between Berytus and Tripolis
Buansuah - ) The wild Dog of northern India (Cuon primaevus), supposed by some to be an ancestral species of the domestic Dog
Tanate - ) An Asiatic wild Dog (Canis procyonoides), native of Japan and adjacent countries. Called also raccoon Dog
Dog - ) A fellow; - used humorously or contemptuously; as, a sly Dog; a lazy Dog. ) One of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater Dog and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Dog Star (Sirius). ) An iron for holding wood in a fireplace; a firedog; an andiron. the domestic Dog (C. ) To hunt or track like a hound; to follow insidiously or indefatigably; to chase with a Dog or Dogs; to worry, as if by Dogs; to hound with importunity
Dog Star - Sirius, a star of the constellation Canis Major, or the Greater Dog, and the brightest star in the heavens; - called also Canicula, and, in astronomical charts, / Canis Majoris. See Dog days
Yowl - ) A loud, protracted, and mournful cry, as that of a Dog; a howl. ) To utter a loud, long, and mournful cry, as a Dog; to howl; to yell
Rowl - ) The deep, threatening sound made by a surly Dog; a grumbling sound. ) To utter a deep guttural sound, sa an angry Dog; to give forth an angry, grumbling sound
Hip Tree - The Dog-rose
Greyhound - See Dog
Messet - ) A Dog
Hep Tree - The wild Dog-rose
Feuterer - ) A Dog keeper
Dog-Brier - ) The Dog-rose
Wishtonwish - ) The prairie Dog
Kayko - ) The Dog salmon
Dog - Representation in art associated with ...
Saint Hubert as part of his connection with hunters
Saint Roch, who was fed during his illness by a Dog
Saint Tobias, who had a Dog as a travelling companion
See also the patron saints index for patrons of Dogs
Cannicula - ) The Dog Star; Sirius
Red Dog - of Red-dog flour...
Dogday - One of the Dog days
Dog - DOG
Dog - DOG
Canine - ) Of or pertaining to the family Canidae, or Dogs and wolves; having the nature or qualities of a Dog; like that or those of a Dog
Cynarctomachy - ) Bear baiting with a Dog
Dogging - ) of Dog...
Caleb - A Dog; a crow; a basket
Loup-Loup - ) The Pomeranian or Spitz Dog
Baboon - ) One of the Old World Quadrumana, of the genera Cynocephalus and Papio; the Dog-faced ape. Baboons have Dog-like muzzles and large canine teeth, cheek pouches, a short tail, and naked callosities on the buttocks
Latrate - ) To bark as a Dog
Towser - ) A familiar name for a Dog
Heep - ) The hip of the Dog-rose
Leamer - ) A Dog held by a leam
Dogship - ) The character, or individuality, of a Dog
Lapdog - ) A small Dog fondled in the lap
Hellhound - ) A Dog of hell; an agent of hell
Dog-Faced - ) Having a face resembling that of a Dog
Dogsick - ) Sick as a Dog sometimes is very sick
Hep - ) See Hip, the fruit of the Dog-rose
Oblatrate - ) To bark or snarl, as a Dog
Yarr - ) To growl or snarl as a Dog
Jowler - ) A Dog with large jowls, as the beagle
Tarre - ) To set on, as a Dog; to incite
Cynorexia - ) A voracious appetite, like that of a starved Dog
Fice - ) A small Dog; - written also fise, fyce, fiste, etc
Alco - ) A small South American Dog, domesticated by the aborigines
Greyhound - A tall fleet Dog, kept for the chase
Canker Bloom - The bloom or blossom of the wild rose or Dog-rose
Ululation - ) A howling, as of a Dog or wolf; a wailing
Lymhound - ) A Dog held in a leam; a bloodhound; a limehound
Limehound - ) A Dog used in hunting the wild boar; a leamer
Howl - To cry as a Dog or wolf to utter a particular kind of loud, protracted and mournful sound. We say, the Dog howls the wolf howls. The cry of a Dog or wolf, or other like sound
Dog - Dogs were used by the Hebrews as a watch for their houses (Isaiah 56:10 ), and for guarding their flocks (Job 30:1 ). There were also then as now troops of semi-wild Dogs that wandered about devouring dead bodies and the offal of the streets (1 Kings 14:11 ; 16:4 ; 21:19,23 ; 22:38 ; Psalm 59:6,14 ). As the Dog was an unclean animal, the terms "dog," "dog's head," "dead Dog," were used as terms of reproach or of humiliation (1 Samuel 24:14 ; 2 Samuel 3:8 ; 9:8 ; 16:9 ). Paul calls false apostles "dogs" (Philippians 3:2 ). Persecutors are called "dogs" (Psalm 22:16 ). Hazael's words, "Thy servant which is but a Dog" (2 Kings 8:13 ), are spoken in mock humility=impossible that one so contemptible as he should attain to such power
Canicular - ) Pertaining to, or measured, by the rising of the Dog Star
Barghest - ) A goblin, in the shape of a large Dog, portending misfortune
Dogdraw - ) The act of drawing after, or pursuing, deer with a Dog
Triple-Headed - ) Having three heads; three-headed; as, the triple-headed Dog Cerberus
Coachdog - One of a breed of Dogs trained to accompany carriages; the Dalmatian Dog
Longtail - Dog
Rache - ) A Dog that pursued his prey by scent, as distinguished from the greyhound
Dog-Headed - ) Having a head shaped like that of a Dog; - said of certain baboons
Talbot - ) A sort of Dog, noted for quick scent and eager pursuit of game
Trundletail - ) A round or curled-up tail; also, a Dog with such a tail
Bandog - ) A mastiff or other large and fierce Dog, usually kept chained or tied up
Fishskin - ) The skin of a fish (dog fish, shark, etc
Dogskin - ) The skin of a Dog, or leather made of the skin
Badgerer - ) A kind of Dog used in badger baiting
Ululate - ) To howl, as a Dog or a wolf; to wail; as, ululating jackals
Bobtail - ) An animal (as a horse or Dog) with a short tail
Cur - ) A mongrel or inferior Dog
Lapping - Of water like a Dog, i. The Dog drinks by shaping the end of his long thin tongue into the form of a spoon, thus rapidly lifting up water, which he throws into his mouth
Dog's-Ear - ) The corner of a leaf, in a book, turned down like the ear of a Dog
Obeying God: With Delight - I wish I could mind God as my little Dog minds me,' said a little boy, looking thoughtfully on his shaggy friend; 'he always looks so pleased to mind, and I don't. ' What a painful truth did this child speak! Shall the poor little Dog thus readily obey his master, and we rebel against God, who is our Creator, our Preserver, our Father, our Savior, and the bountiful Giver of everything we love?: Christian Treasury
Bobtailed - ) Having the tail cut short, or naturally short; curtailed; as, a bobtailed horse or Dog; a bobtailed coat
Unwormed - ) Not wormed; not having had the worm, or lytta, under the tongue cut out; - said of a Dog
Watchdog - ) A Dog kept to watch and guard premises or property, and to give notice of the approach of intruders
Lytta - ) A fibrous and muscular band lying within the longitudinal axis of the tongue in many mammals, as the Dog
Dog - Sometimes domesticated, as the Syrophoenician woman's comparison and argument imply, "the household (kunaria , 'little' or 'pet') Dogs eat of the crumbs (Matthew 15:26-27; Mark 7:27-28) which fall from their master's table. Their dismal howlings at night are alluded to in Psalms 59:6; Psalms 59:14-15; "they return at evening, they make a noise like a Dog, and go round about the city"; perhaps in allusion to Saul's agents thirsting for David's blood coming to Michal's house at evening, and to the retribution on Saul in kind, when he who had made David a wanderer himself wandered about seeking vainly for help against the Philistines, and went at last by night to the witch of Endor. As unclean (Isaiah 66:3), Dog, dead Dog, Dog's head, are terms of scorn or else self-abasement (1 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 3:8; 2 Samuel 9:8; 2 Samuel 16:9; 2 Kings 8:13). A wanton, self-prostituting man is called a "dog" (Deuteronomy 23:18). One Egyptian god had a Dog form. "Beware of the (Greek) Dogs," those impure persons of whom I told you often" (Philippians 3:2; Philippians 3:18-19); "the abominable" (Revelation 21:8; compare Revelation 22:15; Matthew 7:6); pagan in spirit (Titus 1:15-16); Dogs in filthiness, snarling, and ferocity against the Lord and His people (Psalms 22:16; Psalms 22:20); backsliding into former carnality, as the Dog "is turned to his own vomit again" (2 Peter 2:22). The Jews regarded the Gentiles as "dogs," but by unbelief they ceased to be the true Israel and themselves became Dogs (Isaiah 56:10-11). "Deliver my darling from the power of the Dog," i. The Assyrian hunting Dog as vividly depicted on Assyrian sculptures resembled exactly our harrier or foxhound
Slut - ) A female Dog; a bitch
Anubis - ) An Egyptian deity, the conductor of departed spirits, represented by a human figure with the head of a Dog or fox
Tike - ) A Dog; a cur
Roch, Saint - He himself was stricken with the plague, and lying in a deserted forest, was discovered by a Dog; for this reason he is generally portrayed with a Dog. Emblems: angel, Dog, bread
Dog, - (Job 30:1 ) Then also, as now troops of hungry and semi-wild Dogs used to wander about the fields and the streets of the cities, devouring dead bodies and other offal, (1 Kings 14:11 ; 21:19,23 ; 22:38 ; Psalm 59:6 ) and thus became so savage and fierce and such objects of dislike that fierce and cruel enemies are poetically styled Dogs in (Psalm 22:16,20 ) moreover the Dog being an unclean animal, (Isaiah 66:3 ) the epithets Dog, dead Dog, Dog's head, were used as terms of reproach or of humility in speaking of one's self
Tope - ) A small shark or Dogfish (Galeorhinus, / Galeus, galeus), native of Europe, but found also on the coasts of California and Tasmania; - called also toper, oil shark, miller's Dog, and penny Dog
Kennel - ) To lie or lodge; to dwell, as a Dog or a fox. ) A house for a Dog or for Dogs, or for a pack of hounds. ) A pack of hounds, or a collection of Dogs
Bowwow - ) An onomatopoetic name for a Dog or its bark
Dogged - ) Sullenly obstinate; obstinately determined or persistent; as, Dogged resolution; Dogged work. ) of Dog...
Uara - ) A large-maned wild Dog of South America (Canis jubatus) - named from its cry
Minx - ) A she puppy; a pet Dog
Expeditate - ) To deprive of the claws or the balls of the fore feet; as, to expeditate a Dog that he may not chase deer
Detent - ) That which locks or unlocks a movement; a catch, pawl, or Dog; especially, in clockwork, the catch which locks and unlocks the wheelwork in striking
Procyon - ) A star of the first magnitude in the constellation Canis Minor, or the Little Dog
Hellbender - Also called alligator, and water Dog
Bitch - ) The female of the canine kind, as of the Dog, wolf, and fox
Collie - ) The Scotch shepherd Dog
Toret - ) A ring for fastening a hawk's leash to the jesses; also, a ring affixed to the collar of a Dog, etc
Moppet - ) A long-haired pet Dog
Dog - Metaphorically, “dog” was a term of contempt (1 Samuel 17:43 ) and self-abasement (1 Samuel 24:15 ). “Dog” may refer to a male cult prostitute (Deuteronomy 23:19 ), though the exact meaning of “dog's wages” is disputed. The prophet insulted the priests by saying their sacrifices were no better than breaking a Dog's neck and sacrificing the Dog (Isaiah 66:3 ). ...
Jesus used Dogs to teach people to be discriminating in whom they chose to teach (Matthew 7:6 ). Paul insulted his Judaizing opponents, calling them Dogs (Philippians 3:2 ; compare 2 Peter 2:22 ; Revelation 22:15 )
Dog - Constantly referred to in scripture as an unclean and debased animal: hence the unclean Gentiles or heathen are compared to Dogs. The price of a Dog was forbidden to be put into the Lord's treasury, it was an abomination. Hazael, a heathen, said, "Is thy servant a Dog?" and the most offensive epithet was to call a man a dead Dog. All refuse is thrown into the streets and the Dogs eat it. It was the Dogs who ate the body of Jezebel, and licked up the blood of Naboth and of Ahab. it is the same: 'without are Dogs,' ' beware of Dogs' used symbolically of those cut off and of the unclean: they return to their vomit again. The only apparent exception to the above is when the Lord compared the Syrophenician woman to a Dog, and she said, "Yet the Dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters' table. " In these passages the diminutive of the word is used, implying 'little Dogs or puppies,' and these are often kept in houses until they grow up
Yawl - ) To cry out like a Dog or cat; to howl; to yell
Pup - ) A young Dog; a puppy
Pup - ) A young Dog; a puppy
Biter - ) One who, or that which, bites; that which bites often, or is inclined to bite, as a Dog or fish
Dhole - ) A fierce, wild Dog (Canis Dukhunensis), found in the mountains of India
Potto - Called also aposoro, and bush Dog
Dingo - ) A wild Dog found in Australia, but supposed to have introduced at a very early period
Dog-Fox - See the Note under Dog, n
Dachshund - ) One of a breed of small Dogs with short crooked legs, and long body; - called also badger Dog
Whelp - ) One of the young of a Dog or a beast of prey; a puppy; a cub; as, a lion's whelps. ) To bring forth young; - said of the female of the Dog and some beasts of prey
Colly - ) A kind of Dog
Ratter - , a Dog trained to catch rats; a rat terrier
Paw - The foot of beasts of prey having claws, as the lion, the tiger, the Dog, cat, &c
Knowing - ) Skilful; well informed; intelligent; as, a knowing man; a knowing Dog
Coyote - ) A carnivorous animal (Canis latrans), allied to the Dog, found in the western part of North America; - called also prairie wolf
Beagle - ) A small hound, or hunting Dog, twelve to fifteen inches high, used in hunting hares and other small game
Cynical - ) Pertaining to the Dog Star; as, the cynic, or Sothic, year; cynic cycle. ) Having the qualities of a surly Dog; snarling; captious; currish
Nibhaz - It was set up in Samaria by the Avites (2 Kings 17:31 ), probably in the form of a Dog
Nergal - The great Dog; that is, lion, one of the chief gods of the Assyrians and Babylonians (2 Kings 17:30 ), the god of war and hunting
Puppy - of the common Dog; a whelp
Hunter - A Dog that scents game, or is employed in the chase
Tracker - ) One who, or that which, tracks or pursues, as a man or Dog that follows game
Cerberus - ) A monster, in the shape of a three-headed Dog, guarding the entrance into the infernal regions, Hence: Any vigilant custodian or guardian, esp
Carnivorous - The term is applied: (a) to animals which naturally seek flesh for food, as the tiger, Dog, etc
Caleb - His name is somewhat singular; if it be derived, as it is supposed to be, from Keleb, Dog
Water Dog - ...
(3):...
A Dog accustomed to the water, or trained to retrieve waterfowl. Retrievers, waters spaniels, and Newfoundland Dogs are so trained
Trash - ) A collar, leash, or halter used to restrain a Dog in pursuing game. ) To hold back by a trash or leash, as a Dog in pursuing game; hence, to retard, encumber, or restrain; to clog; to hinder vexatiously
Dog - Dog. Dogs were scavengers, half wild, prowling about the fields and the towns, devouring offal and dead bodies, and disturbing the night with their howlings. This is the case now in the east; troops of Dogs abounding, recognized in a degree by food and water being occasionally given them, and, according to the instincts of their nature, guarding the place where they congregate, but deemed impure and unclean, just as among the ancient Hebrews. Hence we can understand the comparison of savage and cruel men to Dogs, Psalms 22:16; Philippians 3:2, and the contempt and dislike attached to the name of a Dog. Solomon contrasts a living Dog with a dead lion, Ecclesiastes 9:4, and Abner exclaims: "Am I a Dog's head?" 2 Samuel 8:8, implying that a Dog is the meanest thing alive. as if he cut off a Dog's neck
Cocker - ) A small Dog of the spaniel kind, used for starting up woodcocks, etc
Nibhaz - The name being derived from a word meaning "to bark," it is supposed that the god was represented by the figure of a Dog
Lap (Verb) - To drink by licking up liquid with the tongue in the manner of a Dog (Judges 7:5-7 )
Rabid - ) Affected with the distemper called rabies; mad; as, a rabid Dog or fox
Fancier - ) One who fancies or has a special liking for, or interest in, a particular object or class or objects; hence, one who breeds and keeps for sale birds and animals; as, bird fancier, Dog fancier, etc
Ratting - ) The low sport of setting a Dog upon rats confined in a pit to see how many he will kill in a given time
Cote - ) To go side by side with; hence, to pass by; to outrun and get before; as, a Dog cotes a hare
Echinococcus - It is the larval stage of the Taenia echinococcus, a small tapeworm peculiar to the Dog
Wiggle - ) To move to and fro with a quick, jerking motion; to bend rapidly, or with a wavering motion, from side to side; to wag; to squirm; to wriggle; as, the Dog wiggles his tail; the tadpole wiggles in the water
Wolf - An animal of the genus Canis, a beast of prey that kills sheep and other small domestic animals called sometimes the wild Dog
Dog - By the law of Moses, the Dog was declared unclean, and was held in great contempt among the Jews, 1 Samuel 17:43 ; 1 Samuel 24:14 ; 2 Samuel 9:8 ; 2 Kings 8:13 . The Psalmist compares violent men to Dogs, who go about the city in the night, prowl about for their food, and growl, and become clamorous if they be not satisfied, Psalms 59:6 ; Psalms 59:14-15 . The Turks also reckon the Dog a filthy creature, and therefore drive him from their houses; so that with them Dogs guard rather the streets and districts, than particular houses, and live on the offals that are thrown abroad. Literally, it is, "He was the son of a Dog;" and so the Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic render it,—he was irritable, snappish, and snarling as a Dog. The irritable disposition of the Dog is the foundation of that saying, "He that passeth by, and meddleth with strife belonging not to him, is like one that taketh a Dog by the ears," Proverbs 26:17 ; that is, he wantonly exposes himself to danger. ...
In 1 Kings 21:23 , it is said, "The Dogs shall eat Jezebel. Bruce, when at Gondar, was witness to a scene in a great measure similar to the devouring of Jezebel by Dogs. I was miserable, and almost driven to despair, at seeing my hunting Dogs, twice let loose by the carelessness of my servants, bringing into the court yard the heads and arms of slaughtered men, and which I could no way prevent but by the destruction of the Dogs themselves. " He also adds, that upon being asked by the king the reason of his dejected and sickly appearance, among other reasons, he informed him, "it was occasioned by an execution of three men, which he had lately seen; because the hyaenas, allured into the streets by the quantity of carrion, would not let him pass by night in safety from the palace; and because the Dogs fled into his house, to eat pieces of human carcasses at their leisure. " This account illustrates also the readiness of the Dogs to lick the blood of Ahab, 1 Kings 22:38 ; in conformity to which is the expression of the Prophet Jeremiah, Jeremiah 15:3 , "I will appoint over them the sword to slay, and the Dogs to tear. The Dog was held sacred by the Egyptians. ...
The testimony of the Latin poet is confirmed by Diodorus, who, in his first book, assures us that the Egyptians highly venerate some animals, both during their life and after their death; and expressly mentions the Dog as one object of this absurd adoration. To these witnesses may be added Herodotus, who says, that when a Dog expires, all the members of the family to which he belonged worship the carcass; and that, in every part of the kingdom, the carcasses of their Dogs are embalmed, and deposited in consecrated ground. The idolatrous veneration of the Dog by the Egyptians is shown in the worship of their Dog-god Anubis, to whom temples and priests were consecrated, and whose image was borne in all religious ceremonies. "Anubis," says Strabo, "is the city of Dogs, the capital of the Cynopolitan prefecture. Cambyses, having slain the god Apis, and thrown his body into the field, all animals respected it except the Dogs, which alone ate of his flesh. Rome, having adopted the ceremonies of Egypt, the emperor Commodus, to celebrate the Isiac feasts, shaved his head, and himself carried the Dog Anubis. In Matthew 7:6 , we have this direction of our Saviour: "Give not that which is holy unto the Dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they," the swine, "trample them under their feet, and," the Dogs, "turn again and tear you. By Dogs, which were held in great detestation by the Jews, he intends men of odious character and violent temper; by swine, the usual emblem of moral filth, he means the sensual and profligate; and the purport of his admonition is, that as it is a maxim with the priests not to give any part of the sacrifices to Dogs, so it should be a maxim with you not to impart the holy instruction with which you are favoured, to those who are likely to blaspheme and to be only excited by it to rage and persecution
Lucern - ) A sort of hunting Dog; - perhaps from Lucerne, in Switzerland
Whur - ) To snarl or growl, as a Dog
Ordinance - ...
A — 3: δόγμα (Strong's #1378 — Noun Neuter — Dogma — Dog'-mah ) is translated "ordinances" in Ephesians 2:15 ; Colossians 2:14 . ...
B — 1: δογματίζω (Strong's #1379 — Verb — Dogmatizo — Dog-mat-id'-zo ) akin to A, No
Louse - See Crab louse, Dog louse, Cattle louse, etc. , under Crab, Dog, etc
Lick - ) To draw or pass the tongue over; as, a Dog licks his master's hand. ) To lap; to take in with the tongue; as, a Dog or cat licks milk
Darling - Psalms 22:20 ‘Deliver my darling from the power of the Dog’; Psalms 35:17 ‘rescue my soul from their destructions, my darling from the lions
Dog Days - A period of from four to six weeks, in the summer, variously placed by almanac makers between the early part of July and the early part of September; canicular days; - so called in reference to the rising in ancient times of the Dog Star (Sirius) with the sun
Barbet - ) A variety of small Dog, having long curly hair
Howling - Uttering the cry of a Dog or wolf uttering a loud cry of distress
Lick - To pass or draw the tongue over the surface as, a Dog licks a wound. To lap to take in by the tongue as, a Dog or cat licks milk
Bulldog - ) Characteristic of, or like, a bulldog; stubborn; as, bulldog courage; bulldog tenacity. ) A variety of Dog, of remarkable ferocity, courage, and tenacity of grip; - so named, probably, from being formerly employed in baiting bulls
Nibhaz - A colossal figure of a Dog was formerly between Berytus and Tripoli. from nabach , "to bark"; a Dogheaded human figure, like the Egyptian Anubis
Pat - ) To strike gently with the fingers or hand; to stroke lightly; to tap; as, to pat a Dog
Jackal - ) Any one of several species of carnivorous animals inhabiting Africa and Asia, related to the Dog and wolf
Lurcher - ) One of a mongrel breed of Dogs said to have been a cross between the sheep Dog, greyhound, and spaniel
Paw - ) The foot of a quadruped having claws, as the lion, Dog, cat, etc
Dropper - ) A Dog which suddenly drops upon the ground when it sights game, - formerly a common, and still an occasional, habit of the setter
Marmot - ) Any one of several species of ground squirrels or gophers of the genus Spermophilus; also, the prairie Dog
Mind - ) To give attention or heed; to obey; as, the Dog minds well. ) To obey; as, to mind parents; the Dog minds his master
Decree - 1: δόγμα (Strong's #1378 — Noun Neuter — Dogma — Dog'-mah ) transliterated in English, primarily denoted "an opinion or judgment" (from dokeo, "to be of opinion"), hence, an "opinion expressed with authority, a doctrine, ordinance, decree;" "decree," Luke 2:1 ; Acts 16:4 ; 17:7 ; in the sense of ordinances, Ephesians 2:15 ; Colossians 2:14
Nebhaz - Jewish interpreters say the name means barker, and affirm that this idol had the shape of a Dog. Historical traces have also been found of the ancient worship of idols in the form of Dogs among the Syrians
Setting - The act or manner of taking birds by a setting Dog
Bite - To break or crush with the teeth, as in eating to pierce with the teeth, as a serpent to seize with the teeth, as a Dog. The seizure of any thing by the teeth of an animal, as the bite of a Dog or with the mouth, as of a fish
Bloodhound - ) A breed of large and powerful Dogs, with long, smooth, and pendulous ears, and remarkable for acuteness of smell. Other varieties of Dog are often used for the same purpose and go by the same name
Leash - ) A thong of leather, or a long cord, by which a falconer holds his hawk, or a courser his Dog
Margaret of Cortona, Saint - Represented in art, following a Dog to the corpse of her lover, holding a cross in her hand, and receiving a visit from Bon angel
Feathered - ) Having a fringe of feathers, as the legs of certian birds; or of hairs, as the legs of a setter Dog
Fawn - , as a Dog; to flatter meanly; - often followed by on or upon
Crouch - A Dog crouches to his master a lion crouches in the thicket
Unity: Among Christians to be Desired - Melancthon mourned in his day the divisions among Protestants, and sought to bring the Protestants together by the parable of the war between the wolves and the Dogs. The wolves were somewhat afraid, for the Dogs were many and strong, and therefore they sent out a spy to observe them. On his return, the scout said, 'It is true the Dogs are many, but there are not many mastiffs among them. There are Dogs of so many sorts one can hardly count them; and as for the worst of them,' said he, 'they are little Dogs, which bark loudly, but cannot bite. However, this did not cheer me so much,' said the wolf; 'as this, that as they came marching on, I observed they were all snapping right and left at one another, and I could see clearly that though they all hate the wolf, yet each Dog hates every other Dog with all his heart
Wolf - A ferocious wild animal, the Canis Lupus of Linnaeus, belonging to the Dog genus. Indeed, it closely resembles the Dog; and it is only by a few slight differences of shape that they are distinguished. ...
They are swift of foot, strong enough to carry off a sheep at full speed, and an overmatch for ordinary Dogs
Rin - ) To show the teeth, as a Dog; to snarl
Loll - ) To let the tongue hang from the mouth, as an ox, Dog, or other animal, when heated by labor; as, the ox stood lolling in the furrow
Rug - ) A rough, woolly, or shaggy Dog
Retrieve - ) To discover and bring in game that has been killed or wounded; as, a Dog naturally inclined to retrieve
Flea - David at the cave of Adullam thus addressed his persecutor Saul (1 Samuel 24:14 ): "After whom is the king of Israel come out? after whom dost thou pursue? after a dead Dog, after a flea?" He thus speaks of himself as the poor, contemptible object of the monarch's pursuit, a "worthy object truly for an expedition of the king of Israel with his picked troops!" This insect is in Eastern language the popular emblem of insignificance
Carrier - ) That which drives or carries; as: (a) A piece which communicates to an object in a lathe the motion of the face plate; a lathe Dog
Kick - KICK, To strike with the foot as, a horse kicks a servant a man kicks a Dog
Dog - 1, "a little Dog, a puppy," is used in Matthew 15:26,27 ; Mark 7:27,28
Bark - ) To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs; - said of some animals, but especially of Dogs. ) The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a Dog; a similar sound made by some other animals
Riffon - ) One of a European breed of rough-coated Dogs, somewhat taller than the setter and of a grizzly liver color. The Brussels griffon is a very small, wiry-coated, short-nosed pet Dog of Belgian origin
Worm - ) To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of, as a Dog, for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw. ) A certain muscular band in the tongue of some animals, as the Dog; the lytta
Tackle - ) To seize; to lay hold of; to grapple; as, a wrestler tackles his antagonist; a Dog tackles the game
Canker - A kind of rose, the Dog rose
Fly - 'Αrob , Septuagint translated "dog flies"; their bites severely inflame the eyelids. But the "flies," whether gnats, mosquitoes, or Dog flies, literally "devour" (Psalms 78:45), conveying the well-known ophthalmia from one to another, and by the larvae entering beneath the skin and intestines, and generating deadly disease
Fox - It is like a medium-sized Dog, with a head like the wolves, and a tail like the fox's; of a bright yellow color. To the fierceness of the wolf it joins the impudent familiarity of the Dog
Pug - ) One of a small breed of pet Dogs having a short nose and head; a pug Dog
Fly - arob, the Dog-fly
Animals in Christian Art - Saints are often represented with animals; thus, the lion is the emblem of Saint Jerome, the Dog of Saint Roch
Canker - ) A kind of wild, worthless rose; the Dog-rose
Caleb - (cay' lihb) CALEBITE Personal and clan name meaning, “dog
Hip - ) The fruit of a rosebush, especially of the English Dog-rose (Rosa canina)
Slate - ) To set a Dog upon; to bait; to slat
Mad - , having hydrophobia; rabid; as, a mad Dog
Kick - ) To strike, thrust, or hit violently with the foot; as, a horse kicks a groom; a man kicks a Dog
Once - It is found in Africa and Asia, is easily tamed and is employed like a Dog in hunting
Seize - A Dog seizes an animal by the throat
Dogs - Among the Jews, to compare a person to a Dog was the most degrading expression possible, 1 Samuel 17:43 24:14 2 Samuel 9:8 . The state of Dogs among the Jews was the same that now prevails in the East, where, having no owners, they run about the streets in troops, and are fed by charity or caprice, or live on such offal as they can pick up. In various places in Scripture the epithet "dogs" is given to certain classes of men, as expressing their insolent rapacity, Matthew 7:6 Psalm 22:16 Philippians 3:2 , and their beastly vices, Deuteronomy 23:18 2 Peter 2:22 Revelation 22:15
Charity: Spies Out the Good Points in All - It was a dead Dog with a halter round his neck, by which he appeared to have been dragged through the dirt; and a viler, a more abject ,a more unclean thing never met the eyes of man. ' Then the people turned to him with amazement, and said among themselves, 'Who is this? This must be Jesus of Nazareth, for only he could find something to pity and approve even in a dead Dog
Wolf - ) Any one of several species of wild and savage carnivores belonging to the genus Canis and closely allied to the common Dog
Original - ) The natural or wild species from which a domesticated or cultivated variety has been derived; as, the wolf is thought by some to be the original of the Dog, the blackthorn the original of the plum
Abomination - It also designates what was unfit to be presented in the service of God, such as an animal with any sort of blemish being brought as a sacrifice; the price of a Dog being put into the treasury, etc
Lime - ) A thong by which a Dog is led; a leash
Fox - It is like a medium-sized Dog, with a head like a wolf, and is of a bright-yellow color
Bite - ) The wound made by biting; as, the pain of a Dog's or snake's bite; the bite of a mosquito. ) To seize with the teeth, so that they enter or nip the thing seized; to lacerate, crush, or wound with the teeth; as, to bite an apple; to bite a crust; the Dog bit a man. ) To seize something forcibly with the teeth; to wound with the teeth; to have the habit of so doing; as, does the Dog bite?...
Fox - The Vulpes Niloticus, or Egyptian Dog-fox, and the Vulpes vulgaris, or common fox, are also found in Palestine
Wolf - (The wolf is a fierce animal of the same species as the Dog, which it resembles
Fly - render this by a word which means the "dog-fly," the cynomuia
Caleb - CALEB (‘dog,’ one of the numerous animal names in the OT which testify to early totemistic conceptions)
Fellow - A shepherd had one favorite Dog he fed him with his own hand, and took more care of him than of his fellows
Nose - We are not offended with a Dog for a better nose than his master
Dog - ...
Matthew 15:26 (a) This troubled woman accepted the place CHRIST gave her and compared herself to a Dog waiting to be fed with the crumbs. ...
...
Revelation 22:15 (a) GOD is informing us that false leaders, evil teachers and other similar characters who are described as "dogs" in the Old Testament and the New, will not be permitted to enter Heaven
Creeper - ) A small, low iron, or Dog, between the andirons
Poor - ) Wanting in fat, plumpness, or fleshiness; lean; emaciated; meager; as, a poor horse, ox, Dog, etc
Hart - The stag lolls or pants like the Dog, and is Boon exhausted by hunger
Salmone - The season was autumn, during which the Etesian (north-west) winds blow in the aegean for forty days, beginning at the rise of the Dog-star (Herodotus, vi
Pinch - ) To take hold; to grip, as a Dog does
Fly, Flies - "It is now generally supposed that the Dog-fly is meant, which at certain seasons is described as a far worse plague than mosquitos
Collar - ) Something worn round the neck, whether for use, ornament, restraint, or identification; as, the collar of a coat; a lady's collar; the collar of a Dog
Abishai - We find the consistency of character maintained throughout the history; the same spirit prompting the request at Hachilah," Let me smite Saul" (1 Samuel 26:8), as subsequently at Bahurim, when Shimei cursed David, prompted his exclamation "Why should this dead Dog curse my Lord the king? let me take off his head" (2 Samuel 16:9)
Horse - A species of quadrupeds of the genus Equus, having six erect and parallel fore-teeth in the upper jaw, and six somewhat prominent in the under jaw the Dog teeth are solitary, and the feet consist of an undivided hoof
Vow - The wages of impurity was excluded from vows (Deuteronomy 23:17-18); "dog" means "Sodomite" (Micah 1:7)
Fly - A hen flies at a Dog or cat a Dog flies at a man
Apostasy - This is, as scripture says, like the Dog returning to his vomit, and the sow to her wallowing in the mire
Tooth - The front teeth in men and quadrupeds are called incisors, or incisive or cutting teeth next to these are the pointed teeth, called canine or Dog teeth and on the sides of the jaws are the molar teeth or grinders
Bay - ) To bark, as a Dog with a deep voice does, at his game
Hare - The rule in Deuteronomy 17:27, "whatsoever goeth upon his paws" (as the Dog, cat, and beasts of prey), sufficiently excludes from the clean the hyrax and the hare
Flag - ) The bushy tail of a Dog, as of a setter
Company - ...
His faithful Dog shall bear him company
Back - ) To stand still behind another Dog which has pointed; - said of a Dog
Marriage-Feasts - Water is poured on the hands before eating; and this is repeated when the meal closes, the fingers having first been wiped on pieces of bread, which, after serving the same purpose as table-napkins with us, are thrown on the ground to be eaten by any Dog that may have stolen in from the streets through the ever-open door, or picked up by those outside when gathered and tossed out to them (Matthew 15:27 ; Mark 7:28 )
Shock - ) A Dog with long hair or shag; - called also shockdog
Pit - ) An inclosed area into which gamecocks, Dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where Dogs are trained to kill rats. ) To introduce as an antagonist; to set forward for or in a contest; as, to pit one Dog against another
Bone - ...
To make no bones, is to make no scruple a metaphor taken from a Dog who greedily swallows meat that has no bones
Pit - ) An inclosed area into which gamecocks, Dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where Dogs are trained to kill rats. ) To introduce as an antagonist; to set forward for or in a contest; as, to pit one Dog against another
Voice - We say, the voice of a man is loud or clear the voice of a woman is soft or musical the voice of a Dog is loud or harsh the voice of a bird is sweet or melodious
Slip - ) A leash or string by which a Dog is held; - so called from its being made in such a manner as to slip, or become loose, by relaxation of the hand. ) To cause to slip or slide off, or out of place; as, a horse slips his bridle; a Dog slips his collar
Raphael - Tob 5:21 ), and they start with their Dog (a favourite subject with the great painters)
Master - (i) The owner of a docile brute, - especially a Dog or horse
Purple - The famous and costly Tyrian purple, the royal color of the ancients, is said to have been discovered by the Tyrian Hercules, whose Dog having by chance eaten a shellfish called Purpura, and returning to his master with his lips tinged with a purple color, occasioned the discovery of this precious dye
Soul - , geranium, Dog, man
the Labourer With the Evil Eye - AESOP'S Dog in the manger, and our Lord's labourer with the evil eye, are two companion portraits. Æsop's Dog in the manger had his own bone, and he did not deny that it was both a big and a sweet bone. And no more did this Dog of a labourer complain that his wages were not quite enough for all the work he had done. Both Æsop's Dog, and our Lord's Dog-like labourer, were sick of that strange disease,-their neighbour's health. " And in like manner, instead of it being difficult to believe that there was ever such a Dog in the manger as this murmuring labourer, we are all such Dogs, and he who does not know and confess it-the shell is yet on his head. Why, then, do I do this and that work in the vineyard? Why do I study? Why do I preach? Why do I visit the sick and dying? Why am I an elder? Why am I a deacon? Why do I subscribe to this fund and that? Why am I a Sabbath-school teacher? And why am I a member of this church rather than of that? It is our mean and self-seeking motives that lurk so unexamined in our hearts that make us all so many Dogs in the manger, and so many envious and murmuring labourers in the vineyard
Caleb - A Dog
Plague - Dog-fly), Exodus 8:21-24
Hazael - " Hazael indignantly exclaimed, "Is thy servant a Dog, that he should do this great things?" Elisha merely answered, "The Lord hath showed me that thou shalt be king over Syria," 2 Kings 8:7-13
Indeed - g, Matthew 15:27 , RV, "for even," instead of the AV "yet;" the woman confirms that her own position as a Gentile "dog" brings privilege, "for indeed the Dogs, etc
Warp - In an enclosure near a Dog-kennel, eight heifers out of twenty warped
Power - ) A machine acted upon by an animal, and serving as a motor to drive other machinery; as, a Dog power
Flesh - To initiate a sportsman's use of the word, from the practice of training hawks and Dogs by feeding them with the first game they take or other flesh. To harden to accustom to establish in any practice, as Dogs by often feeding on any thing. The wild Dog ...
Shall flesh his tooth on every innocent
Prick - ) To make sharp; to erect into a point; to raise, as something pointed; - said especially of the ears of an animal, as a horse or Dog; and usually followed by up; - hence, to prick up the ears, to listen sharply; to have the attention and interest strongly engaged
Wolf - " The wolf is a fierce, strong, cunning, mischievous, and carnivorous quadruped; externally and internally so nearly resembling the Dog, that they seem modelled alike, yet have a perfect antipathy to each other
Proverbs - ’...
‘Give not what is holy to the Dogs, neither cast your pearls before the swine’ (Matthew 7:6). Perhaps a Dog was in the apartment begging scraps. the Greek adage: ‘You feed Dogs, and do not feed yourself’ (αὐτὸν οὐ τρέφων κύνας τρἐφεις), which Erasmus (Adag. ’...
There was another proverb: ‘Never be kind to a neighbour’s Dog’ (μήποτʼ εὖ ἔρδειν γείτονος κύνα), otherwise put: ‘One who feeds a strange Dog gets nothing but the rope to keep’ (ὃς κύνα τρέφει ξένον, τούτῳ μόνον λίνος μένει). A neighbour’s Dog, after being well fed, goes back to his former master’ (ib. He was not speaking after the heartless and insolent manner of the Rabbis, who branded the Gentiles as ‘dogs’ (cf. Exodus 12:6 : “An holy convocation to you”: to you, not to Dogs; to you, not to strangers. 29: ‘He who eats with an idolater is like one that eats with a Dog: for, as a Dog is uncircumcised, so also is an idolater’). It may be added that there is an Arabic proverb: ‘It is better to feed a Dog than a man,’ the reason alleged being that the Dog will not forget the kindness, but the man may (PEFQSt, July 1904, p
Over - ) Across; from side to side of; - implying a passing or moving, either above the substance or thing, or on the surface of it; as, a Dog leaps over a stream or a table
Hunting - The hunting Dog is not mentioned; but it is familiar to Josephus ( Ant
Name - Of course, names such as “dog” (Caleb) and “bee” (Deborah) were not indicative of the persons who bore them
Excommunication - The twenty-four offences for which it was inflicted are various, and range in heinousness from the offence of keeping a fierce Dog to that of taking God's name in vain
Animals - Another animal that the Israelites loathed was the Dog, for most Dogs in those days were savage, disease-ridden animals that roamed the streets and fed on filth (2 Samuel 16:9; 2 Kings 9:33-36; Psalms 22:16; Psalms 59:6; Matthew 7:6; Luke 16:21; 2 Peter 2:22)
Unwritten Sayings - The following are among the best specimens:...
‘Jesus one day walked with his apostles, and they passed by the carcase of a Dog. The apostles said, How foul is the smell of this Dog! But Jesus said, How white are its teeth!’...
‘Jesus said, Take not the world for your lord, lest it take you for its slaves
Point - ) The attitude assumed by a pointer Dog when he finds game; as, the Dog came to a point. ) To indicate the presence of game by fixed and steady look, as certain hunting Dogs do
Animals - Dog The Dog was a scavenger animal that often ran wild. In Mark 7:27 , Jesus probably was referring to the small Dogs that people kept as pets. Some Dogs evidently were used to herd sheep (Job 30:1 ). See below Wild Dogs . Isaiah condemned the eating of swine, Dogs, and mice (Isaiah 65:4 ; Isaiah 66:3 ,Isaiah 66:3,66:17 ). Dog The Dog was a scavenger animal that ran wild and was sometimes kept as a house pet. The Dog in Bible times was considered an unclean animal. Dogs ran wild in village streets, often in packs (Psalm 22:16-21 ; Psalm 59:6 ). The term “dog” was a designation for the wicked (Isaiah 56:10-11 ). Jews contemptuously called Gentiles, “dogs. WOLF The wolf is a large wild canine that is thought to be the primary ancestor of the domestic Dog
Over - Thus we say, a Dog leaps over a stream, or over a table a boat sails over a lake
Wind - A pack of Dog-fish had him in the wind
Set - ) To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; - said of hunting Dogs. ) To indicate the position of game; - said of a Dog; as, the Dog sets well; also, to hunt game by the aid of a setter
Charge - ) To squat on its belly and be still; - a command given by a sportsman to a Dog
Ass - Whenever the traveller journeys through the land, the braying of the ass is as familiar a sound as the barking of the village Dog
Worm - A small worm-like ligament situated beneath a Dogs tongue. To cut something, called a worm, from under the tongue of a Dog
Cry - To yelp, as a Dog. The sound or voice of irrational animals expression of joy, fright, alarm, or want as the cries of fowls, the yell or yelping of Dogs, &c. A pack of Dogs
Together - The word can be used meaning “self, my soul”: “Deliver my soul from the sword, my life [1] from the power of the Dog” ( Brahmins - " "The learned," adds Krishnu, "behold Brumhu alike in the reverend ‘branhun,' perfected in knowledge; in the ox, and in the elephant; in the Dog, and in him who eateth of the flesh of Dogs
Undressed Cloth - The raw silk was then transferred for a short time to a bath of water in which Dog or pigeon dung had been mixed, and, as in the case of the other materials, the last stage was a thorough washing in pure water
Elisha - Hazael in the common view repudiated the possibility of being capable of such atrocities, "is thy servant a Dog that he should do this great thing?" But the Hebrew requires "what" to be the predicate, and "the Dog" connected with "thy servant" the subject. "What is thy servant (the Dog as he is) that he should do this great thing?" Not the atrocity, but the greatness of it, is what startles him as something beyond his ability to accomplish, "dog (i. " "Dog" is the eastern phrase for meanness, not cruelty
Plagues of Egypt - His principal festival was at the summer solstice, when the inundation commenced; at which season, in the Dog days, by a cruel idolatrous rite, they sacrificed red-haired persons, principally foreigners, to Typhon, or the power that presided over tempests, at Busiris, Heliopolis, &c, by burning them alive, and scattering their ashes in the air, for the good of the people, as we learn from Plutarch. Egypt, we learn from Herodotus, abounded with prodigious swarms of flies, or gnats; but this was in the heat of summer, during the Dog days; whence this fly is called by the Septuagint κυνομυια , the Dog fly. But against any of the children of Israel shall not a Dog move his tongue, against man or beast; that ye may know, how that the Lord doth make a difference between the Egyptians and Israel
Mephibosheth - It is a retribution in kind that the representative of Saul's family now calls himself before David by the contemptuous title which once David in self abasement used before Saul, "dead Dog" (2 Samuel 9:8; 1 Samuel 24:14)
Maximus the Cynic, Bishop of Constantinople - Gregory Nazianzen describes him as having had no regular occupation, but loitering about in the streets, like a shameless Dog, foul and greedy (κύων, κυνίσκος, ἀμφόδων ὑπηρέτης )
Jephthah - Suppose a Dog had come out of the house of Jephthah, can any one suppose that he would have offered this unclean animal as a burnt-offering to the Lord? And why, then, should we suppose that he would offer a human sacrifice, which would have been so much more abominable? It is, moreover, argued that no mention is made of any bloody sacrifice of the young woman
Shimei - Abishai would have "taken off his head" then and there, as a "dead Dog" presuming to "curse the king
Out - It is used as an exclamation with the force of command, away begone as, out with the Dog
Elkesai, Elkesaites - A similar baptism was prescribed as a remedy for the bite of a mad Dog or a serpent or for disease
Theophilus - Moffatt, Dog, article ‘Theophilus’; T
Flies - ערב , Exodus 8:20 ; Psalms 78:45 ; Psalms 105:31 , which those interpreters who, by residing on the spot, have had the best means of identifying, have rendered the Dog-fly, κυνομυια , and it is supposed to be the same which in Abyssinia is called the zimb
Animals - To the list of domestic animals we may add Dogs and swine, which were classed together as unclean. ...
Dogs (κύνες) are mentioned twice. In the Sermon on the Mount the disciples are warned not to give that which is holy to Dogs (Matthew 7:6). The pariah Dogs that infest Eastern towns, and have to be cleared off periodically with poison, are ‘a lean, mangy, and sinister brood,’ acting as scavengers and living on offal. To call a man a Dog is throughout the Bible a customary form of abuse. These wild Dogs, says Tristram (Nat. 80), were the only Dogs known in Palestine, with the exception of the Persian greyhound; and though they could be trained enough to act as watch-dogs for the sheep-folds,* [4] they hardly became companions to man [5]. To the Jew the Dog was a very fitting symbol of the man who had depraved his moral and spiritual taste by evil living. In the Didache, ‘Give not that which is holy to Dogs’ is interpreted to mean, Do not administer the Eucharist to the unbaptized; but the principle involved in the text is capable of wider application. A Christian is not required to wear his heart on his sleeve! In the parable of Dives and Lazarus it is said that these street-dogs came and licked the beggar’s sores (Luke 16:21). It shows his destitute and defenceless condition, that he could not even keep the Dogs away! A diminutive form of κύων, viz. ‘It is not right,’ said the Master, ‘to take the children’s bread and cast it to Dogs. ’ ‘Yea, Lord,’ replied the woman, ‘yet the Dogs eat of the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table’ (Matthew 15:27 f. But it is clear from the woman’s reply that the Dogs in question are kept within the house; they are household pets. Tristram says that he found no difficulty in making a pet of a puppy taken from among the pariah Dogs (Nat. Eastern shepherds employ Dogs (if they employ them at all) not to help in herding the sheep, but to ward off wolves
Shimei - Why should that dead Dog curse the king in that way? said Abishai to David. ...
Abishai looked up and saw a dead Dog barking and biting out of his own kennel-door in Bahurim that day
Joab - ...
Better a living Dog than a dead lion. You are but a Dog beside David
Gods - ) Four-footed beasts have had their altars; as the bull, Dog, cat, wolf, baboon, lion, and crocodile, in Egypt and elsewhere; the hog in the island of Crete; rats and mice in the Troas, and at Tenedos; weasels at Thebes; and the porcupine throughout all Zoroaster's school
Lion - Solomon says, "A living Dog is better than a dead lion," Ecclesiastes 10:4 ; showing that death renders those contemptible who otherwise are the greatest, most powerful, and most terrible
Run - ; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a Dog
Clean And Unclean - It would be rash to Dogmatize about the origin of this notion; it most probably dates back to days prior to any conscious animistic beliefs, and may even be traceable ultimately to instincts which mankind shares with the higher animals. The criterion would exclude the ass, horse, Dog, and beasts of prey, which are nowhere mentioned as unclean. The horse and Dog seem to have been connected with idolatrous rites ( 2 Kings 23:11 , Isaiah 66:3 ), and so perhaps were forbidden
Nebuchadnezzar - Again, I am a Dog at home; churlish, snappish, malicious, envious; my heart hides its bone that it cannot eat, lest another Dog should get it. But when we see and feel ourselves to be oxen in our stupidity, and Dogs in our selfishness, and swine in our miryness, and vipers in our poisonousness-then we have got the key within ourselves to God's great dispensation of humiliation with Nebuchadnezzar
Devil - " Though judicially "cast down to hell" with his sinning angels, "and delivered into chains of darkness to be reserved unto judgment" (2 Peter 2:4), he is still free on earth to roam to the length of his chain, like a chained Dog, but no further
Animal - Neither did the Israelites eat animals which had been taken and touched by a devouring or impure beast, as a Dog, a wolf, a boar, &c, Exodus 22:3 ; nor of any animal that died of itself
Philanthropy - He limits the ministry of His disciples to the villages of Judaea, bidding them avoid the villages of the Samaritans (Matthew 10:5); and in His interview with the Syrophœnician woman (Mark 7:26) He not only repeats the limitation given to His disciples as binding also upon Himself, declaring that He was not sent save to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, but speaks of the woman as a Dog, and claims for the Jews that they are the children of the household. The poor man for neglect of whom Dives found himself at last in torment, was ‘full of sores,’ he was licked by the Dog, the common scavenger of offal
Bread - An Oriental seeing a scrap of bread on the road will usually lift it up and throw it to a street Dog, or place it in a crevice of the wall or on a tree branch where the birds may find it
Appreciation (of Christ) - The Syro-Phœnician woman persisted in her prayer for her sick daughter, eagerly claiming the rights, while bearing the reproach of being a Gentile ‘dog’ (Mark 7:28)
Turn - An old Dog falling from his speed, was loaded at every turn with blows and reproaches
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - For if a wolf is entering the fold, and the Dog goes not out and barks, the master beats the Dog
Genealogy - We gather that the Calebites (‘dog-tribe’) were a related but alien clan, which entered into friendly relations with Judah at the time of the conquest of Canaan, and perhaps took the lead in the invasion
Deluge - Then Ramman the storm-god thundered, and the spirits of heaven brought lightnings; the gods were terrified; they fled to heaven, and cowered in a heap like a Dog in his kennel
Name, Names - Among the earliest clan names are those of animals: Rachel (‘ewe’), Hamor (‘ass’), Caleb (‘dog’), etc
Arius, Followers of - 41) that though brass is like gold, tin like iron, and the Dog like the wolf, yet they are of different natures, and no one could call the wolf the offspring of the Dog
David - The account of David's relationship with Bathsheba not only prepares for the eventual accession of Solomon, but it also sets in motion a curse that will Dog the remainder of David's life: death and sexual outrage will follow, and "the sword will never depart from [2] house" (2 Samuel 12:10 )
Death, Mortality - A live Dog is better than a dead lion (Ecclesiastes 9:4 )
Crimes And Punishments - , where the male prostitute is to be recognized under the inexact term ‘sodomite,’ and the contemptuous ‘dog
Bible, Authority of the - Yet one implication of this wide assumption that theology should be done "according to the Scriptures" is that the tail comes to wag the Dog; because it is necessary to justify theological proposals with reference to Scripture, persons of all theological persuasions seek to find some way to connect their conclusions, on whatever ground they may have been reached, with Scripture
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - What do you think would be the thoughts of the half-dead Jew as he saw his own temple-kinsmen passing by on the other side, and then saw this Dog of a Samaritan leaping off his mule? What would he think and say all night as he saw this excommunicated Samaritan lighting the candle to pour oil and wine into his wounds and watching all night at his bedside? That Samaritan mule hobbling down the Jericho-pass with that half-dead burden on its back always reminds me of Samuel Johnson hobbling along to Bolt Court with the half-dead streetwalker on his back and laying her down on old Mrs
John the Baptist - And anything but a reed; and with anything on but the soft clothing that they put on in kings' houses!'...
And, now, from such a divinity-student as that, and after thirty years of such a curriculum and probationership as that, what kind of preaching would you go to church to look for? A dumb Dog that cannot bark? A trencher-chaplain? A soft thing of gown and bands and lawn sleeves? A candidate for a manse and a stipend? "O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? Bring forth, therefore, fruits meet for repentance
Man - …” This is the sense of the word when it is contrasted with animals: “But against any of the children of Israel shall not a Dog move his tongue, against man or beast …” ( Barzillai - Let them know from Jerusalem to Mahanaim that there is one man in Israel who is a man and is not a Dog
Ananias And Sapphira - For, then as now, a crowd of impostors would Dog the steps of the open-hearted and open-handed church
Jonah - He sank to the "bottom" of the sea first, and felt "the seaweed wrapped about his head" (Jonah 2:5-6), then the God-prepared great fish (the Dog fish, Bochart; in any view a miracle is needed, the rest is conjecture)
Name (2) - of Dog
Assur - Unable to take Damascus, Shalmaneser marched to the Mediterranean coast, where he set up a pillar at the mouth of the Dog River commemorating his victories
the Disobedient Prophet - Suppose that you were buried on the same awful principle,-in whose grave would your bones lie waiting together with his till the last trump to stand forth before God and man together? And what would your epitaph and his be? Would it be this: 'Here lie the liar and his victim'? Or would it be this: 'Here lie the seducer and the seduced'? Or would it be this: 'Here lie the hater and him he hated down to death'? Or would it be this: 'Here lie the tempting host and his too willing to be tempted guest'? Or, if you are a minister, would it be this: 'Here lies a dumb Dog, and beside him one who was a crowded preacher in the morning of his days, but a castaway before night'? Alas, my brother!...
Judgments of God - Some time after he came to the throne, he was taken prisoner by Sapor, king of Persia, and used like a slave and a Dog; for the Persian monarch, from time to time, obliged this unhappy emperor to bow himself down, and offer him his back, on which to set his foot, in order to mount his chariot or his horse
Nabal - A man will be affable, accessible, entertaining, the best of company, and the very soul of it abroad, and, then, the instant he turns the latch-key in his own door, Nabal himself was not worse, he sinks back into such an utter boorishness, and mulishness, and Doggedness. Kick, then, the Dog out of your heart
Ecclesiastes, Theology of - The book's author, who goes by the name "Qohelet" (translated in modern versions as "the Preacher" or "the Teacher"), can, on the one hand, say that he "hated life" (2:17), but, on the other, assert that a "live Dog is better off than a dead lion" (9:4)
Exodus, the Book of - The second group began with the 'arob , Dog flies (whose bite inflames severely, and particularly the eyelid), or else beetles (worshipped by the Egyptians as the symbol of creative and reproductive power; the sun god was represented as a beetle; thus their god was fittingly made the instrument of their punishment, inflicting a painful bite, and consuming various articles)
Immorality, Sexual - In Romans 1:24-32 , male cultic prostitutes, and perhaps homosexuals also, are castigated as "dogs, " which is most probably the significance of the term in Revelation 22:15 . Since the Dog was generally despised by the Hebrews as an unclean animal, serving much the same scavenging purpose as the vulture (1 Kings 22:38 ), the disparaging nature of the allusion is evident
Achan - It is better to go to heaven like a blind man led by a Dog, says our Lord; ten times better than to dance all your days down to hell with Babylonian bangles on and all ornaments
Metaphor - the comparison of a man to a lion, bear, panther, Dog or swine, serpent, eagle, raven, etc
Palestine - The Dog can scarcely be called domesticated: it is kept by shepherds for their flocks, but otherwise prowls about the streets of towns and villages seeking a living among the rubbish thrown from the houses
Egypt - We need not therefore be surprised that a nation so superstitious as the Egyptians should honour, with peculiar marks of respect, the ichneumon, the ibis, the Dog, the falcon, the wolf, and the crocodile
David - " Nothing could be more homely than his outward attire, with a staff or wand in hand used for Dogs, and a pouch around his neck for carrying a shepherd's necessaries (1 Samuel 17:40-43). His minions, "like a Dog returning at evening," thirsting for prey which they had in vain sought throughout the day, came tumultuously besieging David's house "that night" after Saul's vain attempt to destroy him in the day
Noah - The Cherokee Indians believe a Dog incited one family to build a boat wherein they were saved from the flood which destroyed all people
Sexuality, Human - The term "dog" appears to have been used in Scripture to refer to homosexual cult prostitutes (Deuteronomy 23:18 )
Sirach - 1013 A 9; the enmity between the hyaena and the Dog (13:18) from Nat
Son of God - It seems to be strangely forgotten in many quarters that ethical intimacy is, in all cases, limited by the closeness of metaphysical relationship; the limitation of the intimacy between a Dog and a man, for example, is due to the lack of metaphysical unity between them, whereas the closeness of sympathy and intimacy possible between a woman and a man is due to their metaphysical oneness. How much it implies is a problem for Dogmatic theology; but it is enough to remark here that it undoubtedly runs up into the ontological or metaphysical. This, however, is a mere piece of Dogmatism; for the uniqueness might quite as well lie in this quarter
Egypt - The "flies" were probably the Dog-fly (Septuagint) whose bite causes severe inflammation, especially in the eyelids; compare Isaiah 7:18, "the fly that is in the uttermost parts of the rivers of Egypt" Oedmann makes it the beetle, kakerlaque, Blatta orientalis, which inflicts painful bites; peculiarly appropriate, as the beetle was the Egyptian symbol of creative power. - Nature worship is the basis of the Egyptian apostasy from the primitive revelation; it degenerated into the lowest fetishism, the worship of cats, Dogs, beetles, etc
Tatianus - Some of these they placed—the Dog, the bear, the scorpion, etc
Simon Magus - When Simon refused him admittance, Peter sent a message by a Dog, whose speech brought the traitor to the Apostle’s feet
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - In character they are threefold: (a ) Apologetic; (b ) Dogmatic and polemical; (c ) Moral and ascetic. The name and the form only made us laugh, says Tertullian; and then he retorts: "But our opponents might well have worshipped such a biformed deity: for they have Dog-headed and lion-headed gods, gods with horns, gods with wings, gods goat-limbed, fish-limbed, or serpent-limbed from the loins!"...
(b ) Tertullian turns from what Christianity was not to what it was, and the main lines of the evidences of Christianity in the 2nd cent