What does Discipline mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
παιδείας the whole training and education of children (which relates to the cultivation of mind and morals 2
παιδείᾳ the whole training and education of children (which relates to the cultivation of mind and morals 1
παιδείαν the whole training and education of children (which relates to the cultivation of mind and morals 1
παιδεία the whole training and education of children (which relates to the cultivation of mind and morals 1
παιδεύω to train children. 1
מוּסָ֣ר discipline 1

Definitions Related to Discipline

G3809


   1 the whole training and education of children (which relates to the cultivation of mind and morals, and employs for this purpose now commands and admonitions, now reproof and punishment) It also includes the training and care of the body.
   2 whatever in adults also cultivates the soul, esp.
   by correcting mistakes and curbing passions.
      2a instruction which aims at increasing virtue.
      2b chastisement, chastening, (of the evils with which God visits men for their amendment).
      

H4148


   1 Discipline, chastening, correction.
      1a Discipline, correction.
      1b chastening.
      

G3811


   1 to train children.
      1a to be instructed or taught or learn.
      1b to cause one to learn.
   2 to chastise.
      2a to chastise or castigate with words, to correct.
         2a1 of those who are moulding the character of others by reproof and admonition.
      2b of God.
         2b1 to chasten by the affliction of evils and calamities.
      2c to chastise with blows, to scourge.
         2c1 of a father punishing his son.
         2c2 of a judge ordering one to be scourged.
         

Frequency of Discipline (original languages)

Frequency of Discipline (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Discipline of the Secret
A modern term describing a practise of the ancient Church, by which knowledge of the more intimate mysteries of the Christian religion, such as the Trinity and the doctrine of some of the Sacraments, were kept from the heathen and, at least in the earlier stages of their instruction, from catechumens. It was a custom intended to shield the doctrines and mysteries of Christianity from ridicule or misconception.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Discipline, Congregation of
Founded July 18, 1695, by Innocent XII as the Congregation for the Discipline and Reformation of Regulars, to replace the Congregation of the State of Regulars. Its work consisted chiefly in designating in Italy and the adjacent islands monasteries or convents of men as novitiates or houses of study, granting permission for the admission of novices, seeing to the observance of a perfect community life, and dispensing from rules in regard to the internal discipline of a religious house. Regarding the regulars in other parts of the world, its duty was to offer the pope suggestions for the promotion of regular discipline. It had its own cardinal-prefect until Pius IX, March 12, 1856, placed it under the cardinal-prefect of the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars. Pius X, May 26, 1906, suppressed it, transferring its power to the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Discipline
Systematic mental, moral, and physical training under authority; order maintained by persons under control, e.g., soldiers, pupils; an instrument of penance, such as a whip or scourge; self-flagellation, a private means of penance and mortification in use from an early date in most religious orders; punishment administered with a view to correction; the exercise by the Church of its power of spiritual punishment; the laws and directions laid down and formulated by church authority for the guidance of the faithful.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Discipline
The Old Testament Concept of Discipline . The notion of the discipline of God, and eventually the concept of the community and its leaders effecting God's discipline, derives from the notion of domestic discipline (Deuteronomy 21:18-21 ; Proverbs 22:15 ; 23:13 ). God is portrayed as a father who guides his child (i.e., the nation, more rarely an individual) to do right by the experience of physical suffering (Deuteronomy 8:5 ; Proverbs 3:11-12 ). Key ideas include "chasten/chastise" (Leviticus 26:18 ; Psalm 94:12 ; Hosea 7:12 ), "discipline" (Leviticus 17:3-95 ; Deuteronomy 4:36 ; Proverbs 12:1 ), and "reproof" (Job 5:17 ; Proverbs 6:23 ). While God generally administers discipline to the nation, the community through its leaders is charged with the responsibility to administer the legal code for individuals. This code deals almost exclusively with severe offenses that require the "cutting off" (normally, education) of the offender and gives few details concerning lesser offenses and remedial disciplinary measures. Furthermore, because Israel does not yet perceive itself in the modern (or even New Testament) sense as a religious community within a larger society, it is difficult to detect religious discipline as distinct from the Old Testament legal code. The seeds of accountability among the faithful may be seen in several strands of the tradition: removal from the assembly for ritual impurity (Exodus 12:14-20 ; 1618096034_43 ); standards for the evaluation of prophets (Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ; 18:15-22 ); and admonitions to reprove other adults (Proverbs 5:12-13 ; 9:7 ; 10:10 ; 19:25 ).
The New Testament and Personal Discipline . The notion of discipline as familial chastisement remains in the New Testament (Ephesians 6:4 ; 2 Timothy 2:25 ; Hebrews 12:5-11 ). In addition, the concept is derived from Hellenistic athletics of the Christian life as "training" for righteousness (1Col 9:24-27; 1 Timothy 4:7-8 ; Hebrews 5:14 ). Akin to these notions is the recurrent promise that instruction, submission to others, and experiences of pain will prepare the believer for greater righteousness and heavenly reward (Romans 5:3-5 ; 2Col 5:16-18; 2 Timothy 3:16 ; 1 Peter 2:18-21 ).
Community Discipline in Judaism and the Early Church . Community discipline was characteristic of Christian groups in the New Testament period. Paul, for example, probably borrowed some notions from Jewish groups like the Pharisees of whose disciplinary procedures he was himself a recipient. These systems of discipline developed during the intertestamental period as reform movements among the Jews, who developed ways to establish and regulate the boundaries between themselves and outsiders.
The Qumran sectaries developed an elaborate system of penalties intended to safeguard the purity and order of the community. This included a formal reproof procedure, short-term reduction of food allowance, exclusion from ritual meals, and permanent expulsion. Rabbinic traditions suggest that the Pharisees commonly imposed a "ban, " a temporary state of social isolation imposed for deviation from ritual purity laws or for heretical views and designed to recall the offender to full participation in the community. The right to put someone under the ban was originally limited to the Sanhedrin, but some time before the destruction of the temple it was extended to groups of scribes acting together. Rabbinic sources are not clear with respect to complete expulsion from Pharisaic communities in the New Testament era, but it is reasonable to assume that unrepentant banned persons and heretics like Christians would incur more severe judgment. Paul himself five times received a severe form of punishment administered by the synagogue for heresy, the "forty lashes minus one" (1 Thessalonians 5:14-158 ). The number of lashes was reduced from the forty prescribed in Deuteronomy 25:2-3 , presumably in order to safeguard against excessive punishment.
lu 17:3-4 may represent the seed of an originally interpersonal "reproof, apology, forgiveness" formula that occurs in expanded form for community action in Matthew 18:15-17 . The community becomes involved through its leaders when personal confrontation is ineffective; community action in the form of expulsion is a last resort. This deceptively simple formula combines redemptive purpose and caution with firm resolve in the process of community accountability, and it appears to be the basis of later New Testament practice.
Community Discipline in New Testament Churches . There is insufficient material to establish a "program" or "system" of community discipline for the New Testament period or even for the Pauline churches. It is possible, however, to gain some insights into disciplinary practice in the early Christian churches by examining key Pauline texts for evidence of procedural elements, culpable behaviors, and intended effects.
Galatians 6:1-5 suggests that the first step in correction of an erring believer is personal, private, and gentle (cf. 2Col 2:5-11; Ephesians 4:29-32 ; Colossians 3:12-13 ; 1618096034_85 ). The stress on humility and readiness to forgive on the part of the person who admonishes recalls the teaching of Jesus (Matthew 7:1-5 ; 18:21-35 ). The notions of self-searching censure and eagerness to effect heartfelt reconciliation, practically nonexistent in Qumran and rabbinic sources, are pervasive in Paul's letters. Indeed, Paul's disciplinary practices are convincing as remedial rather than punitive measures only to the extent that they are infused from start to finish with a pure desire for the good of the offender.
Some offenses, or the stubbornness of some offenders, require that the wider community of believers and its leaders become involved. The command to "take special note of" (2 Thessalonians 3:14 ) those who are disobedient may be understood as a command to "keep written records concerning" such persons (cf. "watch out for" dissenters, Romans 16:17 ). This formal element, employed at Qumran, may have been appropriate in the case of more serious offenses, especially if the accumulation of witnesses would have a bearing on further action. "Rebuke" or "refutation" is a common term in the Pastoral Epistles, which may pertain more to doctrinal correction by community leaders (1 Timothy 5:20 ; 2 Timothy 2:25-26 ; 4:2 ; Titus 1:9,13 ; 2:15 ). Either "marking" or "rebuking" on the part of community leaders may constitute "witnesses" as required in the case of divisive persons in Titus 3:10-11 and in the case of elders in 1 Timothy 5:19 . Paul equates warnings with witnesses when he writes of his impending third visit to the Corinthians (2 Corinthians 13:1-2 ). It is not clear whether warnings could be construed as witnesses ex post facto, but this may have been an intentional flexibility designed to avoid the legal elaborations of the Qumran sectaries and Pharisees. It also allowed the apostle and his delegates to "troubleshoot" freely with the immature and often contentious local communities.
A survey of the key passages does not strongly support the view that disciplinary action becomes increasingly centralized and formalized through the New Testament period. Rather, it appears that a pattern exists wherein jurisdiction rises in the community hierarchy according to the severity of the offense. Thus we observe that commonly occurring misbehavior is handled by all believers individually (Galatians 6:1-5 ; and parallels ); warnings are administered generally by the community (Romans 16:17 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:6-15 ); the factious and elders are disciplined by apostolic delegates (1 Timothy 5:19-22 ; 2 Timothy 2:25-26 ; Titus 3:10-11 ); and the most serious cases are taken up by the apostle himself (2Col 13:1-2; 1 Timothy 1:19-20 ; probably 1Col 5:3-4; cf. Acts 5:1-11 ; 8:20-24 ). Admittedly, the evidence is too sparse to insist on a rigid structure. It is equally possible that, as in the case of Qumran, the group acted through its local community leaders when problems were brought to their attention, and higher authorities like Paul or his delegates acted when they deemed it appropriate. As in the case of the witness-warning sequence, a flexible adaptation of contemporary Jewish practice fit the dynamic spirit of the movement and the occasional aberrations of its local leadership.
When an individual did not respond to warning(s) or committed a serious offense, it became necessary to effect social isolation. The expressions used in the New Testament to convey this idea do not specify what is meant. Matthew 18:17 commands the community to treat the offender "as a pagan or a tax collector." Romans 16:17 tells believers to "watch out" for wrongdoers; 1Corinthians 5:11, 2 Thessalonians 3:14 enjoin, "do not associate" with offenders; 2 Thessalonians 3:6 commands, "keep away from" the disobedient. First Corinthians 5:11 is more specific in instructing believers not to eat with those under discipline (cf. 2 John 10-11 ). This recollects the Pharisaic ban, under which the offender was cut off socially from all but his immediate family. As in the case of the ban, the individual feels ashamed (2 Thessalonians 3:14 ) and, when proven repentant (it is not clear how), is welcomed back "as a brother" (2 Thessalonians 3:15 ; cf. 2Col 2:5-11; Galatians 6:1 ).
In several instances, it appears that Paul goes beyond measures intended to recall erring individuals to a final expulsion from the community. The key text in this regard is 1 Corinthians 5:1-5 , where Paul responds to a case of incest by commanding, "hand this man over to Satan, " an expression employed similarly in 1 Timothy 1:20 . It is clear that the early church understood the realm of Satan to be everywhere outside the fellowship of believers (2Col 4:4; Galatians 1:4 ; Ephesians 2:2 ) and that Paul's expression here denotes expulsion from the community. That the sentence is reformatory is confirmed by the fact that Paul ends the pronouncement in 1 Corinthians 5:5 with the express intent that the offender's spirit may be "saved in the day of the Lord"; similarly, 1 Timothy 1:20 notes that "Hymenaeus and Alexander were handed over to Satan to be taught not to blaspheme." The phrase in 1 Corinthians 5:5 , "so the sinful nature may be destroyed, " is ambiguous. It almost certainly denotes physical suffering, but it is unclear whether the sufferer's life will be spared by repentance.
Behaviors Subject to Discipline . Doctrinal deviations that create division in the community are a problem for Paul (1Col 1:10-11; 11:18-19; cf. Hebrews 12:15 ), and the disciplinary measures in Romans 16:17,2 Corinthians 13:1-2 appear to respond to division caused by heterodoxy (cf. Galatians 5:2-12 ). The Pastoral Epistles are dominated by this concern and 1 Timothy 1:20 is a clear case in point. The danger of heresy and resultant factions to the integrity of local communities and the movement as a whole is obvious. It is not clear, however, to what extent aberrant views that did not cause splits could be tolerated. Moral deviations are in view in the two most lengthy passages, 2Thessalonians 3:6-15, 1 Corinthians 5:1-13 ( 1 Timothy 5:19-22 ; is ambiguous cf. James 5:19-20 ; 1 John 5:16-17 ). The charge that some were "idle" in Thessalonica is taken by many to denote inactivity in expectation of an imminent parousia, but it is more likely that Paul's instruction reflects a social situation typical of a large port city, where many laborers were inactive for periods of time and dependent on patrons. Within the community of believers, some appear to have begun to presume upon the Christian goodness of patrons, and the system was in danger of devolving into freeloading, resentment, and division (perhaps echoed in 1Col 11:18-19). In 1 Corinthians 5 , Paul is obviously concerned about porneia [ 2 Thessalonians 3:15 ) who is "greedy, or is an idolater, reviler, drunkard, or robber" (v. 11 NRSV). The fact that the list is expanded in 6:9-10 with special attention to sexual and property values suggests that it is not random, after the fashion of contemporary moralists, but is consciously directed at the sins of Corinth. These are of course not the only offenses subject to discipline (cf. Galatians 5:19-21 ), but they are particularly dangerous to the Corinthians. Although the list does not specify the extent of the sin, it does convey a very strict moral accountability. The reason for this ethical rigorism is implied in Paul's allusion to Deuteronomy 17:7 in 5:13, "Expel the wicked man from among you." The opposite of wickedness for Paul is not cultic purity but holiness in the sense of the Spirit-controlled life of each member of the unified community. Deviation from holiness will retard the growth of the entire body, or "leaven the lump."
Effective Community Discipline . For the individual offender, the New Testament practice is clearly intended to produce repentance in an atmosphere of support and forgiveness. For the community, to hold its members accountable through disciplinary measures will maintain the moral integrity of the group. All of these principles are present at least to some extent in the contemporary Jewish practices that were apparently adapted by the primitive church, albeit in a less systematized form. The unique and potentially potent aspect of the New Testament concept of discipline is the infusion of Christ-like love into disciplinary practice. Philippians 2:1-5 , although it does not address discipline directly, expresses concisely the principle behind the scattered references on the subject. The incentive of love, the sharing of the Spirit, the humble attitude—that is, the mind of Christis that which makes it possible to hold another person accountable. Thus the key to effective discipline is its reflexive element. The one who holds another accountable is first accountable to be a loving person. When this is true of a community of believers, isolation of an offender will be a compelling remedial force; the community's power to persuade or to punish brings a person back into obedient fellowship. It is the community's ability to demonstrate love in its Spirit-transformed living that constitutes a compellingly attractive force.
Thomas E. Schmidt
See also Church, the ; Ethics
Bibliography . W. D. Davies and D. Allen, Matthew 8-18 ; G. Fee, The First Epistle to the Corinthians ; G. Forkman, The Limits of the Religious Community ; G. W. H. Lampe, Christian History and Interpretation: Studies Presented to John Knox, pp. 337-61; C. J. Roetzel, Judgment in the Community ; C. A. Wanamaker, The Epistles to the Thessalonians .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Discipline
1: σωφρονισμός (Strong's #4995 — Noun Masculine — sophronismos — so-fron-is-mos' ) from sophron, lit., "saving the mind," from saos, "contracted to" sos, "safe" (cp. sozo, "to save"), phren, "the mind," primarily, "an admonishing or calling to soundness of mind, or to self-control," is used in 2 Timothy 1:7 , AV, "a sound mind;" RV, "discipline." Cp. sophroneo ("to be of sound mind"), sophronizo ("to admonish"), sophronos ("soberly"), and sophron, "of sound mind." See MIND. Cp. CHASTISEMENT.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Self-Discipline
Although Christians are not under the law, they are under grace (Romans 6:14). Although they are not slaves to sin, they are slaves to righteousness (Romans 6:17-18). Although they are free from the law, they are not free to do as they please; they must live to please God (Romans 7:4-6; Ephesians 5:10; Colossians 1:10). Therefore, they must exercise self-discipline, or self-control. This self-control is not opposed to control by the Holy Spirit. On the contrary it is a quality that the Holy Spirit produces (Galatians 5:22-23).
Christians must make every effort to develop self-discipline (1 Corinthians 9:25-27; 2 Peter 1:5-6), and this self-discipline applies to every area of their lives: thoughts (Titus 2:2-6), feelings (Leviticus 19:17-18; 1 Peter 2:11), speech (Psalms 39:1; James 3:7-8), eating and drinking habits (Proverbs 23:2; Proverbs 23:20; Amos 6:4-6; Ephesians 5:18), sexual behaviour (1 Corinthians 7:9; 1 Thessalonians 4:4-5) and in fact any situation in which they find themselves (1 Thessalonians 5:22-23). Such personal discipline is essential in the lives of all Christians, regardless of status, sex or age (1 Timothy 3:2; 1 Timothy 3:11; Titus 1:7-8; 2 Corinthians 10:5).
Self-discipline is necessary not only in avoiding what is wrong, but also in refraining from actions that in themselves may not be wrong at all. In certain circumstances Christians should deny themselves lawful freedoms out of consideration for others (Romans 14:15-16; Romans 14:20-22; 1 Corinthians 8:13; 1 Corinthians 10:23-24; see also DENY).
Webster's Dictionary - Self-Discipline
(n.) Correction or government of one's self for the sake of improvement.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Discipline
In the Bible, discipline has a positive and essential place in the lives of God's people. God had prescribed a way of life for His people. They had to learn how to be obedient. The process by which God's people learned obedience was the “discipline of the Lord” (Deuteronomy 11:2 NIV).
Discipline comes from a Latin word “disco” which means to learn or get to know, a direct kind of acquaintance with something or someone. Discipline refers to the process by which one learns a way of life. A disciple was like an apprentice who was learning a trade or craft from a master. Such learning required a relationship between the master who knew the way of life (discipline) and a learner (a disciple). Within this relationship, the master led a learner through a process (the discipline) until the learner could imitate or live like the master.
In the Old Testament, the covenant relationship between God and His people made Yahweh the Master. Through praise and correction, God led His people. The goal was to bring His people to a kind of maturity where obedience was the rule rather than the exception. Parents, judges, kings, prophets, and wisemen worked with God in teaching His people. Successful discipline resulted in a life pleasing to God. The earliest setting for discipline was the family (Deuteronomy 6:20-25 ).
The prophets established “schools of the prophet.” Elijah became a master to Elisha (1 Kings 19:19-21 ). Isaiah chose some Judeans who would learn his message through living with him (Isaiah 8:16 ). This pattern was followed by Jewish rabbis. The rabbi would discipline his disciples (talmidim ) through a procedure of praise and correction. This process enabled the disciples to learn the law. Correction was seldom physical in nature. Reproof or rebuke was the usual form of correction. The goal was an obedient servant of God, who knew and did what God wanted.
Jesus called twelve men to be His disciples. Through His call, He established a master-learner relation with them. As they lived and worked with Him, Jesus disciplined them in His understanding of what God wanted. Such discipline involved both praise and criticism, affirmation and rebuke. Compare Mark 8:1 ; John 21:1 . The success of His mission depended on His training this small group of followers. They would carry on His work after His death and resurrection. The twelve were His apprentices in the work which God called Jesus to do.
The Great Commission places the responsibility for discipling disciples in the hands of the church. The believers are to teach them “to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you” (Matthew 28:20 ). “To observe” is much more than simple knowledge. Observance is to live in obedience to the commands of Jesus. Learning and doing what Jesus wants requires a process, a discipline. Becoming like Christ is the result of the discipline of the Lord Jesus Christ, exercised in and through His church. Hence, churches throughout their history have sought to teach their members the way of the Lord through “church discipline.”
Apart from the Gospels, the concept of discipline appears most prominently in the ethical teachings of Paul and the Letter to the Hebrews. Paul admonished the Ephesians to bring their children up “in the discipline and instruction of the Lord” (Ephesians 6:4 NAS). Such an education was to avoid the heavy-handed, physical brutality practiced by their pagan neighbors. Discipline was not to evoke anger from the children ( Ephesians 6:4 ). The writer of Hebrews pictures God treating the faithful as sons (Hebrews 12:7 ). As a loving Father, God disciplines the believing community. Such discipline is evidence of His love because the end result of such action is blessing (Hebrews 12:10 ).
Discipline, biblically understood, results in blessing. God's people learn how to serve Him. Through praise and correction, their lives are shaped into a pattern of consistent obedience and love. Within “the discipline of the Lord,” expressed in and through the Lord Jesus Christ, one can live the kind of life which is pleasing to God and of benefit to others.
James Berryman
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Discipline (2)
Book of, in the history of the church of Scotland, is a common order drawn up by the assembly of ministers in 1650, for the reformation and uniformity to be observed in the discipline and policy of the Church. In this book the government of the church by prelates is set aside; kirk sessions are established; the superstitious observation of fast days and saint days is condemned, and other regulations for the government of the church are determined. This book was approved by the privy council, and is called the first book of discipline.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Discipline (1)
Church, consists in putting church laws in execution, and inflicting the penalties enjoined.
See CHURCH.
King James Dictionary - Discipline
DISCIPLINE, n. L., to learn.
1. Education instruction cultivation and improvement, comprehending instruction in arts, sciences, correct sentiments, morals and manners, and due subordination to authority. 2. Instruction and government, comprehending the communication of knowledge and the regulation of practice as military discipline, which includes instruction in manual exercise, evolutions and subordination. 3. Rule of government method of regulating principles and practice as the discipline prescribed for the church. 4. Subjection to laws, rules, order, precepts or regulations as, the troops are under excellent discipline the passions should be kept under strict discipline. 5. Correction chastisement punishment intended to correct crimes or errors as the discipline of the strap. 6. In ecclesiastical affairs, the execution of the laws by which the church is governed, and infliction of the penalties enjoined against offenders, who profess the religion of Jesus Christ. 7. Chastisement or bodily punishment inflicted on a delinquent in the Romish Church or that chastisement or external mortification which a religious person inflicts on himself. DISCIPLINE,
1. To instruct or educate to inform the mind to prepare by instructing in correct principles and habits as, to discipline youth for a profession, or for future usefulness. 2. To instruct and govern to teach rules and practice, and accustom to order and subordination as, to discipline troops or an army. 3. To correct to chastise to punish. 4. To execute the laws of the church on offenders, with a view to bring them to repentance and reformation of life. 5. To advance and prepare by instruction.
Webster's Dictionary - Discipline
(1):
(n.) Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc.
(2):
(v. t.) To inflict ecclesiastical censures and penalties upon.
(3):
(n.) The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge.
(4):
(n.) The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member.
(5):
(n.) The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.
(6):
(n.) Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill.
(7):
(n.) Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience.
(8):
(v. t.) To improve by corrective and penal methods; to chastise; to correct.
(9):
(n.) Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.
(10):
(v. t.) To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train.
(11):
(n.) Self-inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge.
(12):
(n.) A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline.
(13):
(v. t.) To accustom to regular and systematic action; to bring under control so as to act systematically; to train to act together under orders; to teach subordination to; to form a habit of obedience in; to drill.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Discipline (2)
DISCIPLINE.—The Gospels reveal a twofold discipline—that which Christ Himself experienced, and that to which He subjects His servants. It will be convenient to treat these separately.
1. The discipline to which Christ submitted.—The NT teaches clearly that even our Lord required to be ‘perfected’ (τελειωθῆναι) in order to ensure the consummation of the work for which He had become incarnate. Such a τελείωσις consisted in His being brought ‘to the full moral perfection of His humanity, which carries with it the complete ness of power and dignity’ (Westcott); and its necessity is recognized, not by the writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews alone (Hebrews 2:10; Hebrews 7:28 etc.), but also by Christ Himself (Luke 13:32).
It is taught with equal clearness that our Lord attained His ‘perfection’ through the discipline which He voluntarily endured. This included several elements. (1) Among the most important was the discipline of temptation (Mark 1:12-13 ||, Hebrews 2:15); and in this connexion it is important to remember that His testing was not only searching in its strength, but repeated in its assaults (note plur. Luke 22:28, and cf. Mark 14:32 ff. || Hebrews 4:15). (2) A second element in His discipline was that of delay. The incarnate Son, with His love eager for the completion of His saving work, must have exercised no ordinary self-restraint, as, amid the opposition of foes and the misconception of friends, the stages of its progress passed slowly by (Luke 12:50; cf. the probable force of the temptation in Matthew 4:8-9 and of ἐνεβριμήσατο τῷ πνεύματι in John 11:33; ef. also 2 Thessalonians 3:5). (3) The discipline of sorrow was also included in this ‘perfecting’ of Christ. His experience of sorrow was limited to no single kind. He felt the force of all the ills that vex our human life. In a most suggestive citation one sacred writer shows in how real and literal a sense He took our human sicknesses upon Him (Matthew 8:16-17, cf. Mark 5:30). He knew no less the pang of regret with which a pure man views opportunities wasted by those for whom he has cherished high ideals (Luke 19:41-44,—note ἔκλαυσεν). His, too, were the tears shed over a family bereaved and a ‘loved one lost’ (John 11:35). (4) The last aspect of Christ’s discipline of which mention must be made was that of pain and suffering. Of this there is no occasion for offering detailed illustration. The story of His sufferings is the story of His life (for a few examples see Mark 8:31 || Mark 14:32 ff. || Mark 15:16-39 ||, Hebrews 5:8; note the use of παιδεύω in Luke 23:16; Luke 23:22).
The experience of this discipline, revealing itself under different aspects and affecting His human nature at different points, was necessary to the fulfilment of our Lord’s mission. It was in virtue of His ‘perfection’ through suffering that He reached His absolute sympathy with humanity, and in consequence His complete qualification to be its Saviour (Hebrews 2:18; Hebrews 4:15-16; Hebrews 5:2). See Perfection.
2. The discipline which Christ imposes upon His followers.—Discipline is an essential part of the Christian life, and the NT points out several forms under which it is to be experienced. In some of these it is restricted to a certain number of those who call themselves by the name of Christ. (1) There is, for example, a discipline to which Christians are rendered liable by falling into error (1 Corinthians 11:29 ff., esp. note παιδευόμεθα in 1 Corinthians 11:32; see also παιδεύω in Revelation 3:19). (2) The discipline of persecution also does not of necessity come to all Christians. At the same time, as both record and exhortation prove, it is no uncommon experience. It certainly befell our Lord’s early followers (Mark 13:9, Matthew 10:22-23, John 15:21; John 16:33; cf. the Epp. passim, and see esp. Hebrews 12:4-13, where παιδεία is cited in this reference), and He Himself attributed a special blessedness to those who found a place in its honoured succession (Matthew 5:10-12). (3) In a third aspect, however, discipline falls to the lot of every Christian. No man can be a true follower of Christ who is not willing from the first to practise the discipline of self-renunciation. Such self-renunciation, indeed, is one of the conditions of entering His service (Mark 8:34 ff., Matthew 10:38). And there is to be no limit to the sacrifice required. It must be endured even to the severance of earth’s closest ties (Matthew 10:37) and the loss of life itself (Matthew 24:9, John 16:2). Few things are more impressive than the manner in which, from the very beginning of His ministry (cf. Mark 1:17-18), our Lord assumed His right to claim from His followers that utter self-repudiation, and confidently expected on their part a willing response to His demand (Matthew 9:9; Matthew 19:21).
One particular aspect of this Christian self-denial calls for separate consideration. The Gospel teaching affords little support to those who have sought to express self-renunciation in the form of morbid asceticism. Christ’s own example, in suggestive contrast with that of His forerunner, leads us to the very opposite conception of religious discipline (Matthew 11:18 f.). Along the pathway of poverty (Matthew 8:20) and persecution (John 7:19; John 8:37) to which He called His disciples, He Himself walked; yet alike in His own life and in His thought for them (Matthew 9:14, cf. 1 Timothy 5:23) ascetic discipline received no prominence. There appears to be just a hint of it in one of His sayings (Matthew 19:12, cf. 1 Corinthians 7:32 ff.), but even there it is distinctly stated less as a rule for the many than as an ideal for some few to whom a special call might come. In Christ’s view the ‘fasting’ consequent upon real sorrow was so inevitable, that any merely formal anticipation of it was to be deprecated rather than approved (Matthew 9:15). See, further, art. Asceticism.
For ecclesiastical ‘discipline’ see art. Church.
H. Bisseker.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Discipline
The root meaning of ‘discipline’ is ‘instruction,’ but in course of time it came to be used for ‘moral training,’ ‘chastening,’ ‘punishment.’ The subject naturally divides itself into two parts: (1) the spiritual discipline of the soul; (2) the ecclesiastical discipline of offenders.
1. The training necessary for the discipline of the soul.-This may be under the guidance of another or under one’s own direction.-(a) In order to develop and perfect man’s moral nature, God deals with him as a wise father with a child. The benefit of such treatment is pointed out in Hebrews 12:1-13 (cf. Matthew 5:10-12). Its final efficacy depends upon the spirit in which it is received. The motive for its endurance must be right, and the end in view must be clearly perceived. The Heavenly Father does more than simply teach His children; He disciplines them with more (cf. Proverbs 3:11, Job 5:17) or less severity (cf. Proverbs 1:2; Proverbs 1:8; Proverbs 4:1). If the Author of Salvation was made perfect through sufferings (Hebrews 2:10; cf. Hebrews 5:8 f; Hebrews 7:28, Luke 13:32), it is clear that the ‘many sons’ must pass through the same process and experience as the ‘well-beloved Son.’ In their case the need is the more urgent, for latent powers must be developed, lack of symmetry corrected, the stains of sin removed, evil tendencies eradicated. Errors in doctrine and action must be transformed into truth and righteousness (1 Corinthians 11:27 ff., 2 John 1:10 f., 2 Timothy 2:16 f.; cf. Titus 3:10, 1 Corinthians 5:9-13, 2 Thessalonians 3:6). Body and mind can move towards perfection only under the guiding hand of the Holy Father. Pain and sorrow, frustrated hopes, long delays, loneliness, changed circumstances, persecution, the death of loved ones, and other ‘dispensations of Providence,’ are designed to chasten and ennoble the soul. Character, not creed, is the final aim. Having begun a good work in His children, God will ‘perfect it until the day of Jesus Christ’ (Philippians 1:6).
(b) The Christian must also discipline himself. Through the crucifixion of his lower nature he rises into newness of life. St. Paul describes (Titus 2:12) the negative side as ‘denying ungodliness and worldly lusts,’ and the positive as to ‘live soberly, and righteously, and godly in this present world’ (‘sobrie erga nos; juste erga proximum; pie erga Deum’ [1]); see Romans 12:9, Titus 2:12; cf. 2 Timothy 2:16, 1 Peter 4:2, 1 John 2:16; also Luke 1:75, Acts 17:30; Acts 24:25. The Christian must put away anger, bitterness, clamour, covetousness, envy, evil-speaking, falsehood, fornication, guile, hypocrisy, malice, railing, shameful speaking, uncleanness, wrath (Ephesians 4:17-32, Colossians 3:8-11; cf. James 1:21, 1 Peter 2:1). Then he must acquire and mature positive virtues. This involves at every stage self-discipline (see Romans 6:19; Romans 8:13, 1 Corinthians 9:25 ff., Colossians 3:5; cf. Matthew 5:29; Matthew 18:9, Mark 9:47, Galatians 5:24).
Many elements enter into this discipline of self. Amongst others the following deserve special mention: prayer, ‘the hallowing of desire, by carrying it up to the fountain of holiness’ (J. Morison, Com. on St. Matthew5, 1885 p. 89); see Romans 12:12; cf. Acts 1:14, Ephesians 6:13, Colossians 4:2-4, 1 Peter 4:7; cf. Matthew 26:41, Luke 18:1; Luke 21:36. Fasting is frequently associated with prayer: e.g. Acts 13:3; Acts 14:23, Did. vii. 4, viii. 1, and many other passages. Ramsay (St. Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen, London, 1895, p. 122) speaks of the solemn prayer and fast which accompanied the appointment of the elders, and says that ‘this meeting and rite of fasting, which Paul celebrated in each city on his return journey, is to be taken as the form that was to be permanently observed.’ Sobriety in thought and action is commended (Romans 12:3; cf. 1 Peter 4:7 [2], 1 Thessalonians 5:6; 1 Thessalonians 5:8, 1 Timothy 2:9; 1 Timothy 2:15; cf. Sirach 18:30 [2]); watchfulness (Acts 24:15, Romans 8:19; Romans 8:23, 1 Corinthians 1:7; 1 Corinthians 16:13, 2 Corinthians 4:18, Ephesians 6:18, Colossians 4:2, Titus 2:13, Hebrews 13:17, 1 Peter 4:7, 2 Peter 3:12; cf. 2 Corinthians 9:6-7,4; Matthew 26:41, Mark 13:33, Luke 21:36); obedience (Romans 13:1-7, 2 Corinthians 2:9; 2 Corinthians 7:15; 2 Corinthians 10:6, 1 Timothy 2:1-3, Acts 5:1-10 1 Peter 2:13-14; 1 Peter 3:1, 1 John 2:3; 1 John 3:22); patience (Romans 5:3; Romans 8:25; Romans 15:4, 1 Thessalonians 1:3, 2 Thessalonians 1:3-5; 2 Thessalonians 3:5, Hebrews 10:36, James 1:3; cf. Matthew 10:22; Matthew 24:13, Luke 21:19); conflict against error and evil forces and on behalf of the truth (Ephesians 6:11-18, 1 Timothy 1:18-20; 1 Timothy 6:12, 2 Timothy 2:3; 2 Timothy 4:7 f., Philemon 1:2, Judges 1:3); work (Acts 18:3, Ephesians 4:28, 1 Thessalonians 4:11, 2 Thessalonians 3:8-12); almsgiving (Acts 24:17, Romans 12:13; Romans 15:25-26, 1 Corinthians 16:1-4, 1618096034_73 Galatians 6:10, 1 Timothy 6:17-19, Hebrews 13:16, James 2:15-16, 1 John 3:17; cf. Matthew 6:19-20, Tobit 4:7-11); temperance (Acts 24:25, 1 Corinthians 9:25, Galatians 5:23; cf. Sirach 18:30 [2], Titus 1:8, 2 Peter 1:6); chastity (Romans 13:14, Galatians 5:24, 1 Peter 2:11, 1 John 2:16; cf. Sirach 18:30); meekness (Romans 12:10, Ephesians 4:2; Ephesians 5:2, Philippians 2:3, Colossians 3:12, 1 Timothy 6:11, 1 Peter 5:5-6).
In Philippians 4:8 and 2 Peter 1:4-8 there are inspiring directions for this same self-discipline. ‘If there be any virtue, and if there be any praise,’ the brethren are to ‘think on,’ or ‘take account of,’ ‘whatsoever things are true, honourable, just, pure, lovely, of good report.’ If men are to become partakers of the Divine nature, and to escape the corruption that is in the world by lust, they must heed the injunction: ‘For this very cause adding on your part all diligence, in your faith supply virtue; and in your virtue knowledge; and in your knowledge temperance; and in your temperance patience; and in your patience godliness; and in your godliness love of the brethren; and in your love of the brethren love’ (see also 1 Corinthians 13 and 1 John 4:16). This will save from idleness and unfruitfulness. They will give the more diligence to make their calling and election sure.
No doubt the expectation in the Apostolic Age of the cataclysmic and immediate coming of Christ led to rigour and austerity of life, which were afterwards relaxed in many places. The moral necessity of discipline is always the same, even though the power of belief in the second coming of Christ in spectacular fashion wanes or departs. After the close of the 1st cent. the development of asceticism and penance became pronounced. The NT gives little or no countenance to the extreme forms that these disciplinary systems assumed.
2. Ecclesiastical discipline.-For self-protection and self-assertion the early Church had to exercise a strict discipline. Its well-being and very life depended upon the suppression of abuses and the expulsion of persistent and gross offenders. In some cases toleration would have meant unfaithfulness to Christ and degradation to the community. The duty of maintaining an adequate discipline was one of the most difficult and most important tasks that confronted the primitive Ecclesia. Jesus Himself gave to the apostles (Matthew 16:18-19, John 20:22-23) and to the Church (Matthew 18:15-18) a disciplinary charter. The Church followed the main lines of guidance therein contained. Only public sins were dealt with in the ecclesiastical courts. Private offences were to be confessed to each other (James 5:18), that prayer might be offered for forgiveness (James 5:15, 1 John 5:16), and also confessed to God (1 John 1:9). Further, Christians were discouraged from carrying disputes to the civil courts (1 Corinthians 6:1; cf. 1 Corinthians 5:12; 1 Corinthians 6:4). ‘Let not those who have disputes go to law before the civil powers, but let them by all means be reconciled by the leaders of the Church, and let them rightly yield to their decision’ (see Clem. Ep. ad Jacob., 10). The object of ecclesiastical discipline was to prevent scandal and to restore the offender. When private rebuke and remonstrance failed (Matthew 18:15; cf. 1 Thessalonians 5:14), the wrong-doer was censured by the whole community (cf. 1 Timothy 5:20, Galatians 2:11). This sentence might be pronounced by some person in authority, or by the community as community. If the accused person still remained obdurate, and in the case of heinous sin, the Church proceeded to expulsion and excommunication (Romans 16:17, 1 Corinthians 5:2; 1 Corinthians 5:11; 1 Corinthians 5:13, 2 John 1:10). The offender was thrust out from religious gatherings and debarred from social intercourse. To such excommunication might be added the further penalty of physical punishment (Titus 3:1,; Acts 8:24, 1 Corinthians 5:5, 1 Timothy 5:20) or an anathema (ἀνάθεμα, 1 Corinthians 16:22, Galatians 1:8). Knowing the great influence of the mind over the body, one can readily understand that disease, and even death, might follow such sentences. It was fully believed that the culprit was exposed, without defence, to the attacks of Satan (1 Corinthians 5:5).
The whole Church exercised this power of discipline. St. Paul addresses the community in 1 Cor., which is our earliest guide on the subject. Laymen on occasion could teach, preach, and exercise disciplinary powers. In the case of excommunication it was not necessary that there should be unanimity. A majority vote was sufficient (2 Corinthians 2:6). It was believed that Christ was actually present (Matthew 18:20) to confirm the sentence, which was pronounced in His name (1 Corinthians 5:4, 2 Corinthians 2:10).
No doubt the procedure followed in the main that of the synagogue, where expulsion was of three types-simple putting forth, excommunication with a curse, and a final anathema sentence. Discipline was designed to be reformatory and not simply punitive or retaliatory. There must be, if possible, ‘rectification’ (see 2 Timothy 3:16, where ἐπανόρθωσις is significantly joined with παιδεία). Repentance is to be followed by forgiveness (2 Corinthians 2:5-10, Galatians 6:1, Judges 1:22). The penitent was probably received into the Church again by the imposition of hands (cf. 1 Timothy 5:22).
Owing to persecution, the discipline of the Church became more and more simply moral influence. The demand for it was more urgent than aver; but, while some communities remained faithful to this duty, others grew more lax (e.g. the practice of obtaining libelli).
See also Admonition, Anathema, Chastisement, and Excommunication.
Literature.-J. H. Kurtz, Church History, Eng. translation , i.2, London, 1891; F. J. A. Hort, The Christian Ecclesia, do. 1897; C. v. Weizsäcker, Apostolic Age, Eng. translation , i.2, do. 1897, ii., 1895; P. Schaff, History of the Apostolic Age, Edinburgh, 1886; E. Hatch, Organization of the Early Christian Churches, London, 1880; A. C. McGiffert, Christianity in the Apostolic Age, Edinburgh, 1897; J. B. Lightfoot. Dissertations on the Apostolic Age, London, 1892; H. H. Henson, Apostolic Christianity, do, 1898; article ‘Discipline (Christian)’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics .
H. Cariss J. Sidnell.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Discipline
The word occurs only in Job 36:10 , but the Hebrew word, musar, is found elsewhere, and is often translated 'instruction,' and at times 'chastening' and 'correction.' In Job it is God opening men's ears for instruction or discipline. In the N.T. the word παιδεύω is translated both 'to instruct' and 'to chasten,' showing that it is God's care over His saints for blessing. See CHASTENING.There is also discipline in the church. If one be overtaken in a fault the spiritual are called upon to restore such a one. Galatians 6:1 . If there is sin, it may call for a REBUKEbefore all. 1 Timothy 5:20 . Some may need reproof, 2 Timothy 4:2 ; and in other cases, as a last resort, discipline may call for 'putting away.' See EXCOMMUNICATION. The end and purpose of all discipline is to restore the soul to communion with God and with His saints. Discipline should always be exercised in the 'spirit of meekness,' each one considering himself lest he also be tempted. Galatians 6:1 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Secret, Discipline of the
A modern term describing a practise of the ancient Church, by which knowledge of the more intimate mysteries of the Christian religion, such as the Trinity and the doctrine of some of the Sacraments, were kept from the heathen and, at least in the earlier stages of their instruction, from catechumens. It was a custom intended to shield the doctrines and mysteries of Christianity from ridicule or misconception.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Discipline
See CHASTISEMENT; SELF-DISCIPLINE.

Sentence search

Disciplinary - ) Pertaining to Discipline; intended for Discipline; corrective; belonging to a course of training
Discipline - Discipline, n. Instruction and government, comprehending the communication of knowledge and the regulation of practice as military Discipline, which includes instruction in manual exercise, evolutions and subordination. Rule of government method of regulating principles and practice as the Discipline prescribed for the church. Subjection to laws, rules, order, precepts or regulations as, the troops are under excellent Discipline the passions should be kept under strict Discipline. Correction chastisement punishment intended to correct crimes or errors as the Discipline of the strap. Discipline, ...
1. To instruct or educate to inform the mind to prepare by instructing in correct principles and habits as, to Discipline youth for a profession, or for future usefulness. To instruct and govern to teach rules and practice, and accustom to order and subordination as, to Discipline troops or an army
Disciplinarian - ) One who Disciplines; one who excels in training, especially with training, especially with regard to order and obedience; one who enforces rigid Discipline; a stickler for the observance of rules and methods of training; as, he is a better disciplinarian than scholar. ) A Puritan or Presbyterian; - because of rigid adherence to religious or church Discipline. ) Pertaining to Discipline
Rebuke - See Discipline
Discipline - In the Bible, Discipline has a positive and essential place in the lives of God's people. The process by which God's people learned obedience was the “discipline of the Lord” (Deuteronomy 11:2 NIV). ...
Discipline comes from a Latin word “disco” which means to learn or get to know, a direct kind of acquaintance with something or someone. Discipline refers to the process by which one learns a way of life. Such learning required a relationship between the master who knew the way of life (discipline) and a learner (a disciple). Within this relationship, the master led a learner through a process (the Discipline) until the learner could imitate or live like the master. Successful Discipline resulted in a life pleasing to God. The earliest setting for Discipline was the family (Deuteronomy 6:20-25 ). The rabbi would Discipline his disciples (talmidim ) through a procedure of praise and correction. As they lived and worked with Him, Jesus Disciplined them in His understanding of what God wanted. Such Discipline involved both praise and criticism, affirmation and rebuke. Learning and doing what Jesus wants requires a process, a Discipline. Becoming like Christ is the result of the Discipline of the Lord Jesus Christ, exercised in and through His church. Hence, churches throughout their history have sought to teach their members the way of the Lord through “church Discipline. ”...
Apart from the Gospels, the concept of Discipline appears most prominently in the ethical teachings of Paul and the Letter to the Hebrews. Paul admonished the Ephesians to bring their children up “in the Discipline and instruction of the Lord” (Ephesians 6:4 NAS). Discipline was not to evoke anger from the children ( Ephesians 6:4 ). As a loving Father, God Disciplines the believing community. Such Discipline is evidence of His love because the end result of such action is blessing (Hebrews 12:10 ). ...
Discipline, biblically understood, results in blessing. Within “the Discipline of the Lord,” expressed in and through the Lord Jesus Christ, one can live the kind of life which is pleasing to God and of benefit to others
Demoralization - Especially: The act of corrupting or subverting Discipline, courage, hope, etc. , or the state of being corrupted or subverted in Discipline, courage, etc
Bundobust - ) System; Discipline
Scleragogy - ) Severe Discipline
Disciplinal - ) Relating to Discipline
Title ii - Of Discipline, Thirteen Canons
Discipline - See CHASTISEMENT; SELF-DISCIPLINE
Disciplined - ) of Discipline...
Discipline - ' In Job it is God opening men's ears for instruction or Discipline. There is also Discipline in the church. Some may need reproof, 2 Timothy 4:2 ; and in other cases, as a last resort, Discipline may call for 'putting away. The end and purpose of all Discipline is to restore the soul to communion with God and with His saints. Discipline should always be exercised in the 'spirit of meekness,' each one considering himself lest he also be tempted
Disple - ) To Discipline; to correct
Disciplining - ) of Discipline...
Decretal - A letter containing an authoritative decision; a decision on a point of Discipline; more strictly, a rescript or reply of the pope when he has been appealed to on a matter of Discipline; certain collections of documents including pontifical decretals, e
Disciplinableness - ) The quality of being improvable by Discipline
Education - ) The act or process of educating; the result of educating, as determined by the knowledge skill, or Discipline of character, acquired; also, the act or process of training by a prescribed or customary course of study or Discipline; as, an education for the bar or the pulpit; he has finished his education
Abstinence - Abstinence is the reduction of food for the sake ofself-discipline, while fasting is going without food of any kindas a more severe act of Discipline
Canon (3) - In an ecclesiastical sense, is a rule either of doctrine or Discipline, enacted especially by a council, and confirmed by the authority of the sovereign. Canons are properly decisions of matters of religion, or regulations of the policy and Discipline of a church made by councils, either general, national, or provincial; such are the canons of the council of Nice, of Trent, &c
Chastisement - ) The act of chastising; pain inflicted for punishment and correction; Discipline; punishment
Martinetism - ) The principles or practices of a martinet; rigid adherence to Discipline, etc
Canons, Apostolic - An ancient collection of ecclesiastical decrees concerning the government and Discipline of the Church
Episcopalian - One who prefers the episcopal government and Discipline to all others
Apostolic Canons - An ancient collection of ecclesiastical decrees concerning the government and Discipline of the Church
Excommunication - An ancient Discipline of the Church whereby aperson for cause was cut off from all the privileges of the Church. This Discipline has practically fallen into abeyance, people forthe most part excommunicate themselves. In the English Prayer Bookis an Office called "A Commination, or Denouncing of God's Angerand Judgments against Sinners, with certain Prayers, to be usedon the First Day of Lent," which was set forth until the ancientDiscipline may be restored
Inhibit - Meaning to restrain or prohibit the exercise of the SacredMinistry; a Discipline exercised by a Bishop for cause
High Church Party - Members of the Church of England who stress the authority and claims of the episcopacy and priesthood, maintain a sacerdotal view of the Sacraments and give a high place to those points of doctrine, Discipline, and ritual which distinguish the Anglican Church from other forms of Protestantism. They cultivate orthodoxy in doctrine and rigorism in Discipline
Discipline, Congregation of - Founded July 18, 1695, by Innocent XII as the Congregation for the Discipline and Reformation of Regulars, to replace the Congregation of the State of Regulars. Its work consisted chiefly in designating in Italy and the adjacent islands monasteries or convents of men as novitiates or houses of study, granting permission for the admission of novices, seeing to the observance of a perfect community life, and dispensing from rules in regard to the internal Discipline of a religious house. Regarding the regulars in other parts of the world, its duty was to offer the pope suggestions for the promotion of regular Discipline
Doctor Illustris - Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and Discipline at Oxford
Marisco, Adam de - Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and Discipline at Oxford
Marsh, Adam - Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and Discipline at Oxford
Illustris, Doctor - Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and Discipline at Oxford
Adam de Marisco - Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and Discipline at Oxford
Adam de Marsh - Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and Discipline at Oxford
Discipline (2) - DISCIPLINE. —The Gospels reveal a twofold Discipline—that which Christ Himself experienced, and that to which He subjects His servants. The Discipline to which Christ submitted. ...
It is taught with equal clearness that our Lord attained His ‘perfection’ through the Discipline which He voluntarily endured. (1) Among the most important was the Discipline of temptation (Mark 1:12-13 ||, Hebrews 2:15); and in this connexion it is important to remember that His testing was not only searching in its strength, but repeated in its assaults (note plur. (2) A second element in His Discipline was that of delay. (3) The Discipline of sorrow was also included in this ‘perfecting’ of Christ. (4) The last aspect of Christ’s Discipline of which mention must be made was that of pain and suffering. ...
The experience of this Discipline, revealing itself under different aspects and affecting His human nature at different points, was necessary to the fulfilment of our Lord’s mission. The Discipline which Christ imposes upon His followers. —Discipline is an essential part of the Christian life, and the NT points out several forms under which it is to be experienced. (1) There is, for example, a Discipline to which Christians are rendered liable by falling into error (1 Corinthians 11:29 ff. (2) The Discipline of persecution also does not of necessity come to all Christians. (3) In a third aspect, however, Discipline falls to the lot of every Christian. No man can be a true follower of Christ who is not willing from the first to practise the Discipline of self-renunciation. Christ’s own example, in suggestive contrast with that of His forerunner, leads us to the very opposite conception of religious Discipline (Matthew 11:18 f. 1 Timothy 5:23) ascetic Discipline received no prominence. ...
For ecclesiastical ‘discipline’ see art
Discipline (2) - Book of, in the history of the church of Scotland, is a common order drawn up by the assembly of ministers in 1650, for the reformation and uniformity to be observed in the Discipline and policy of the Church. This book was approved by the privy council, and is called the first book of Discipline
Self-Discipline - Therefore, they must exercise self-discipline, or self-control. ...
Christians must make every effort to develop self-discipline (1 Corinthians 9:25-27; 2 Peter 1:5-6), and this self-discipline applies to every area of their lives: thoughts (2 Corinthians 10:5), feelings (Leviticus 19:17-18; 1 Peter 2:11), speech (Psalms 39:1; James 3:7-8), eating and drinking habits (Proverbs 23:2; Proverbs 23:20; Amos 6:4-6; Ephesians 5:18), sexual behaviour (1 Corinthians 7:9; 1 Thessalonians 4:4-5) and in fact any situation in which they find themselves (1 Thessalonians 5:22-23). Such personal Discipline is essential in the lives of all Christians, regardless of status, sex or age (1 Timothy 3:2; 1 Timothy 3:11; Titus 1:7-8; Titus 2:2-6). ...
Self-discipline is necessary not only in avoiding what is wrong, but also in refraining from actions that in themselves may not be wrong at all
Crofton System - A system of prison Discipline employing for consecutive periods cellular confinement, associated imprisonment under the mark system, restraint intermediate between imprisonment and freedom, and liberation on ticket of leave
Austerity - ) Severity of manners or life; extreme rigor or strictness; harsh Discipline
Praxis - ) Use; practice; especially, exercise or Discipline for a specific purpose or object
Rigid - ) Hence, not lax or indulgent; severe; inflexible; strict; as, a rigid father or master; rigid Discipline; rigid criticism; a rigid sentence
Tripitaka - Vinayapi/aka]'>[1] , or Basket of Discipline; Suttapitaka [2] , or Basket of Discourses; and Abhidhammapitaka [2] , or Basket of Metaphysics
Commination - It is substituted in the room of that godly Discipline in the primitive church, by which ( as the introduction to the office expresses it ) "such persons as stood convicted of notorious sins were put to open penance, and punished in this world, that their souls might be saved in the day of the Lord; and that others, admonished by their example, might be the more afraid to offend. " This Discipline, in after ages, degenerated in the church of Rome into a formal confession of sins upon Ash Wednesday, and the empty ceremony of sprinkling ashes upon the head of the people. Our reformers wisely rejected this ceremony as mere shadow and show; and substituted this office in its room, which is A denunciation of God's anger and judgment against sinners; that the people, being apprised of God's wrath and indignation against their sins, might not, through want of Discipline to the church, be encouraged to pursue them
Martinet - ) In military language, a strict disciplinarian; in general, one who lays stress on a rigid adherence to the details of Discipline, or to forms and fixed methods
Admonition - In church Discipline, public or private reproof to reclaim an offender a step preliminary to excommunication
Trainer - ) A militiaman when called out for exercise or Discipline
Chasten - ) To correct by punishment; to inflict pain upon the purpose of reclaiming; to Discipline; as, to chasten a son with a rod
Dean - An ecclesiastical official; the head of a cathedral or collegiate chapter; a vicar-forane or episcopal assistant; the representative officer of a faculty in modern Catholic universities; in English universities, the official in charge of college Discipline
Congregational Testimony - "The confession of the Name of Christis, after all, very lame, and will be so till the Discipline whichChrist ordained be restored, and the Rite of Confirmation berecovered in its full use and solemnity
Demoralize - ) To corrupt or undermine in morals; to destroy or lessen the effect of moral principles on; to render corrupt or untrustworthy in morals, in Discipline, in courage, spirit, etc
Magister Disciplinae - Or MASTER OF Discipline, the appellation of a certain ecclesiastical officer in the ancient Christian church. For this purpose they were taken into the bishop's family, and educated under him by some grave and discreet person whom the bishop deputed for that purpose, and set over them, by the name of Presbyter or Magister Disciplinae, whose chief business it was to inspect their behaviour, and instruct them in the rules and Discipline of the church
Mortify - ) To deaden by religious or other Discipline, as the carnal affections, bodily appetites, or worldly desires; to bring into subjection; to abase; to humble. ) To practice penance from religious motives; to deaden desires by religious Discipline
Treadmill - It is used principally as a means of prison Discipline
Penance - The regulations as to the length and manner of this Disciplinevaried in different times and in the several branches of the Church;the administration of it was chiefly in the hands of the Bishops. It is this "godly Discipline" to which reference is had in theCommination Office in the Prayer-book of the Church of England, andwhich is used "until the said Discipline may be restored again,which is much to be wished
Whipperin - ) Hence, one who enforces the Discipline of a party, and urges the attendance and support of the members on all necessary occasions
Adeodatus ii, Saint, Pope - A monk of the Roman cloister of Saint Erasmus, he was active in promoting monastic Discipline and in repressing the heresy of the Monothelites, who believed that there was but one will in Christ, i
Oriental Church, Congregation For the - Deals with all matters concerning persons, Discipline and rites of the Eastern Church, and questions arising from the relations with the Latin Church
Behave - ) To manage or govern in point of behavior; to Discipline; to handle; to restrain
Pliable - ) Flexible in disposition; readily yielding to influence, arguments, persuasion, or Discipline; easy to be persuaded; - sometimes in a bad sense; as, a pliable youth
Agapetus ii, Pope - Elected to the papacy, 946, he labored to restore ecclesiastical Discipline, and supported Otto the Great in evangelization of the North, urging him with other nobles to invade Italy for the purpose of restoring order
Trappist - Extreme austerity characterizes their Discipline
Florilegia - Ascetical or ethical florilegia were excerpts from Scripture and the Fathers on such topics as virtues, vices, Discipline, etc
Episcopalian - ) One who belongs to an episcopal church, or adheres to the episcopal form of church government and Discipline; a churchman; specifically, in the United States, a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church
Presbyterian - ) Of or pertaining to a presbyter, or to ecclesiastical government by presbyters; relating to those who uphold church government by presbyters; also, to the doctrine, Discipline, and worship of a communion so governed
Mulct - ) Hence, to deprive of; to withhold by way of punishment or Discipline
Nurture - ” To rear children “in the nurture and admonition of the Lord” is to Discipline and correct them as the Lord would
Schooling - ) Discipline; reproof; reprimand; as, he gave his son a good schooling
Militia - ) In the widest sense, the whole military force of a nation, including both those engaged in military service as a business, and those competent and available for such service; specifically, the body of citizens enrolled for military instruction and Discipline, but not subject to be called into actual service except in emergencies
Penitentiary - ) A house of correction, in which offenders are confined for punishment, Discipline, and reformation, and in which they are generally compelled to labor. ) Used for punishment, Discipline, and reformation
Military - ) Of or pertaining to soldiers, to arms, or to war; belonging to, engaged in, or appropriate to, the affairs of war; as, a military parade; military Discipline; military bravery; military conduct; military renown
General Council - A legally convened assembly of ecclesiastical dignitaries and theological experts representing the entire Church for the purpose of discussing, defining, and regulating matters of Church doctrine and Discipline
Blemish - Scandalous professors are blemishes to the church of God, 2 Peter 2:13 ; Judges 1:12 , and therefore ought to be put away from it, in the exercise of a godly Discipline
Letters, Pastoral - The purpose is to maintain the proper Discipline and administration in the diocese
Flagellation - In the fifth and succeeding centuries it was employed as a sanction in monastic Discipline, and in the 13th century canon law recognized it as a punishment for ecclesiastics
o Kind Creator, Bow Thine Ear - Lacey; the fourth verse reads: ...
Give us the self-control that springs...
From Discipline of outward things,...
That fasting inward secretly...
The soul may purely dwell with Thee
Audi Benigne Conditor - Lacey; the fourth verse reads: ...
Give us the self-control that springs...
From Discipline of outward things,...
That fasting inward secretly...
The soul may purely dwell with Thee
Volunteer Navy - A navy of vessels fitted out and manned by volunteers who sail under the flag of the regular navy and subject to naval Discipline
Tyranny - ) Cruel government or Discipline; as, the tyranny of a schoolmaster
Chapter - A place where delinquents receive Discipline and correction
Communion - Mutual intercourse or union in religious worship, or in doctrine and Discipline. The body of Christians who have one common faith and Discipline
Army (2) - —‘Armies’ (στρατεύματα) are mentioned by Jesus as the natural instruments of Discipline at the command of an Eastern king (Matthew 22:7). Soldier) among the crowds who came to him to be baptized (Luke 3:14); and the most remarkable bond of union between the military character and the character conformed to God, that of Discipline and orderly subordination, was suggested to our Lord by the conduct of a centurion (Luke 7:8)
Disciple - ) To punish; to Discipline
Apiarius of Sicca - 418) led to a dispute between the African Church and the popes about the regulation of local Discipline
Sicca, Apiarius of - 418) led to a dispute between the African Church and the popes about the regulation of local Discipline
Discipline - sozo, "to save"), phren, "the mind," primarily, "an admonishing or calling to soundness of mind, or to self-control," is used in 2 Timothy 1:7 , AV, "a sound mind;" RV, "discipline
Furnace - ) A place or time of punishment, affiction, or great trial; severe experience or Discipline
Ansegisus, Saint - Becoming Abbot of Fontenelle he made this monastery famous for learning, Discipline, and its library
Scourge - ) A lash; a strap or cord; especially, a lash used to inflict pain or punishment; an instrument of punishment or Discipline; a whip
Fool - In another nuance, “fool” is a morally undesirable individual who despises wisdom and Discipline ( Discipline - The Old Testament Concept of Discipline . The notion of the Discipline of God, and eventually the concept of the community and its leaders effecting God's Discipline, derives from the notion of domestic Discipline (Deuteronomy 21:18-21 ; Proverbs 22:15 ; 23:13 ). Key ideas include "chasten/chastise" (Leviticus 26:18 ; Psalm 94:12 ; Hosea 7:12 ), "discipline" (Leviticus 26:23 ; Deuteronomy 4:36 ; Proverbs 12:1 ), and "reproof" (Job 5:17 ; Proverbs 6:23 ). While God generally administers Discipline to the nation, the community through its leaders is charged with the responsibility to administer the legal code for individuals. Furthermore, because Israel does not yet perceive itself in the modern (or even New Testament) sense as a religious community within a larger society, it is difficult to detect religious Discipline as distinct from the Old Testament legal code. ...
The New Testament and Personal Discipline . The notion of Discipline as familial chastisement remains in the New Testament (1 Peter 2:18-2140 ; 2 Timothy 2:25 ; Hebrews 12:5-11 ). ...
Community Discipline in Judaism and the Early Church . Community Discipline was characteristic of Christian groups in the New Testament period. These systems of Discipline developed during the intertestamental period as reform movements among the Jews, who developed ways to establish and regulate the boundaries between themselves and outsiders. ...
Community Discipline in New Testament Churches . There is insufficient material to establish a "program" or "system" of community Discipline for the New Testament period or even for the Pauline churches. Thus we observe that commonly occurring misbehavior is handled by all believers individually (Galatians 6:1-5 ; and parallels ); warnings are administered generally by the community (Romans 16:17 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:6-15 ); the factious and elders are Disciplined by apostolic delegates (1 Timothy 5:19-22 ; 2 Timothy 2:25-26 ; Titus 3:10-11 ); and the most serious cases are taken up by the apostle himself (2Col 13:1-2; 1 Timothy 1:19-20 ; probably 1Col 5:3-4; cf. First Corinthians 5:11 is more specific in instructing believers not to eat with those under Discipline (cf. ...
Behaviors Subject to Discipline . These are of course not the only offenses subject to Discipline (cf. "...
Effective Community Discipline . The unique and potentially potent aspect of the New Testament concept of Discipline is the infusion of Christ-like love into disciplinary practice. Philippians 2:1-5 , although it does not address Discipline directly, expresses concisely the principle behind the scattered references on the subject. Thus the key to effective Discipline is its reflexive element
Communion - ) A body of Christians having one common faith and Discipline; as, the Presbyterian communion
Discreet, Discreetly - A — 1: σώφρων (Strong's #4998 — Adjective — sophron — so'-frone ) "of sound mind, self-controlled" (for the derivation, see Discipline), is translated "sober-minded," in its four occurrences in the RV, 1 Timothy 3:2 (AV, "sober"); Titus 1:8 (AV, "ditto"); Titus 2:2 (AV, "temperate"); Titus 2:5 (AV, "discreet")
Nicholas Sanders - By the Rescript of Pope Pius V he was appointed to restore ecclesiastical Discipline in England in 1567
Bastard - According to Hebrews, those who do not have the Discipline of the Lord are illegitimate children (Deuteronomy 12:8 )
Educate - ) To bring /// or guide the powers of, as a child; to develop and cultivate, whether physically, mentally, or morally, but more commonly limited to the mental activities or senses; to expand, strengthen, and Discipline, as the mind, a faculty, etc
Melchites - The Melchites, excepting some few points of little or no importance, which relate only to ceremonies, and ecclesiastical Discipline, are, in every respect, professed Greeks; but they are governed by a particular patriarch, who assumes the title of Patriarch of Antioch
Sanders, Nicholas - By the Rescript of Pope Pius V he was appointed to restore ecclesiastical Discipline in England in 1567
Exercise - ) To occupy the attention and effort of; to task; to tax, especially in a painful or vexatious manner; harass; to vex; to worry or make anxious; to affect; to Discipline; as, exercised with pain. ) That which is done for the sake of exercising, practicing, training, or promoting skill, health, mental, improvement, moral Discipline, etc. ) To exert for the sake of training or improvement; to practice in order to develop; hence, also, to improve by practice; to Discipline, and to use or to for the purpose of training; as, to exercise arms; to exercise one's self in music; to exercise troops
Discipline - The root meaning of ‘discipline’ is ‘instruction,’ but in course of time it came to be used for ‘moral training,’ ‘chastening,’ ‘punishment. ’ The subject naturally divides itself into two parts: (1) the spiritual Discipline of the soul; (2) the ecclesiastical Discipline of offenders. The training necessary for the Discipline of the soul. The Heavenly Father does more than simply teach His children; He Disciplines them with more (cf. ...
(b) The Christian must also Discipline himself. This involves at every stage self-discipline (see Romans 6:19; Romans 8:13, 1 Corinthians 9:25 ff. ...
Many elements enter into this Discipline of self. ...
In Philippians 4:8 and 2 Peter 1:4-8 there are inspiring directions for this same self-discipline. The moral necessity of Discipline is always the same, even though the power of belief in the second coming of Christ in spectacular fashion wanes or departs. Ecclesiastical Discipline. -For self-protection and self-assertion the early Church had to exercise a strict Discipline. The duty of maintaining an adequate Discipline was one of the most difficult and most important tasks that confronted the primitive Ecclesia. The object of ecclesiastical Discipline was to prevent scandal and to restore the offender. ...
The whole Church exercised this power of Discipline. Discipline was designed to be reformatory and not simply punitive or retaliatory. ...
Owing to persecution, the Discipline of the Church became more and more simply moral influence. Henson, Apostolic Christianity, do, 1898; article ‘Discipline (Christian)’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics
Chasten, Chastening, Chastise, Chastisement - ...
B — 1: παιδεία (Strong's #3809 — Noun Feminine — paideia — pahee-di'-ah ) denotes "the training of a child, including instruction;" hence, "discipline, correction," "chastening," Ephesians 6:4 , RV (AV, "nurture"), suggesting the Christian Discipline that regulates character; so in Hebrews 12:5,7,8 (in ver
Wednesday, Ash - The first day of Lent, when, in the primitive church, notorious sinners were put to open penance thus: They appeared at the church door barefooted, and clothed in sackcloth, where, being examined, their Discipline was proportioned according to their offences; after which, being brought into the church, the bishop singing the seven penitential psalms, they prostrated themselves, and with tears begged absolution; the whole congregation having ashes on their heads, to signify, that they were both mortal and deserved to be burnt to ashes for their sins
Mutiny - ) Insurrection against constituted authority, particularly military or naval authority; concerted revolt against the rules of Discipline or the lawful commands of a superior officer; hence, generally, forcible resistance to rightful authority; insubordination
Fleury, Abbo of - To restore Discipline in the monastery of La Réole, Gascony, he transferred thither several monks of Fleury
Massillon, Jean Baptiste - As bishop he maintained ecclesiastical Discipline, was a tender father to his clergy and devoted to his flock
Jean Massillon - As bishop he maintained ecclesiastical Discipline, was a tender father to his clergy and devoted to his flock
Severity - ) Gravity or austerity; extreme strictness; rigor; harshness; as, the severity of a reprimand or a reproof; severity of Discipline or government; severity of penalties
Chastening - This is in scripture mostly linked with love and sonship, and implies 'instruction' and 'discipline
Excommunication - The act of Discipline where the Church breaks fellowship with a member who has refused to repent of sins
Severe - ) Very strict in judgment, Discipline, or government; harsh; not mild or indulgent; rigorous; as, severe criticism; severe punishment
Abbo of Fleury, Saint - To restore Discipline in the monastery of La Réole, Gascony, he transferred thither several monks of Fleury
Reclaim - ) To reduce from a wild to a tamed state; to bring under Discipline; - said especially of birds trained for the chase, but also of other animals. ) Hence: To reduce to a desired state by Discipline, labor, cultivation, or the like; to rescue from being wild, desert, waste, submerged, or the like; as, to reclaim wild land, overflowed land, etc
Oswald, Saint - Administering both sees, together with Saint Ethelwold and Saint Dunstan, he restored ecclesiastical Discipline in England, and founded Ramsey monastery
Innocent i, Pope Saint - One of his letters, addressed to Victricius, Bishop of Rouen, contains 14 rules of Discipline
Leo iv, Pope Saint - In an important synod, held at Rome (835) various decrees were passed to further ecclesiastical Discipline and learning
Trent - in order to correct, illustrate, and fix with perspicuity, the doctrine of the church, to restore the vigour of its Discipline, and to reform the lives of its ministers
Penitentiary - In the ancient Christian church, a name given to certain presbyters or priests, appointed in every church to receive the private confessions of the people, in order to facilitate public Discipline, by acquainting them what sins were to the expiated by public penance, and to appoint private penance for such private crimes as were not proper to be publicly censured
Pasaginians - This denomination had the utmost aversion to the doctrine and Discipline of the church of Rome
Disciple - To punish to Discipline
Blanket - The Emperor Otho used to sally forth in dark nights, and if he found a drunken man, he administered the Discipline of the blanket
Baptistines - ...
Hermit Sisters of Saint John the Baptist, founded in Genoa by Giovanna Solimani, 1730, cloistered and very rigorous in Discipline, now maintaining several convents in Italy
Acephali - Such bishops as were exempt from the Discipline and jurisdiction of their ordinary bishop or patriarch
Baptism With the Holy Ghost And With Fire - " Many here understand "fire" in the widest sense of purification: the purification of Christ's people by the destruction of the ungodly from among them, and their purification from sin by the Discipline to which he subjects them
Eli - He was also a judge of Israel forty years, and was eminent for piety and usefulness, but criminally negligent of family Discipline
Foalan, Saint - A little later he established a monastery, under Irish Discipline, at Fosses, Belgium, near the famous convent of Nivelles
Foelan, Saint - A little later he established a monastery, under Irish Discipline, at Fosses, Belgium, near the famous convent of Nivelles
Foillan, Saint - A little later he established a monastery, under Irish Discipline, at Fosses, Belgium, near the famous convent of Nivelles
Faelan, Saint - A little later he established a monastery, under Irish Discipline, at Fosses, Belgium, near the famous convent of Nivelles
Canon Penitentiary - The office of general confessor is foreshadowed in the early history of penitential Discipline
Admonition - Admonition was a part of the Discipline much used in the ancient church: it was the first act or step towards the punishment or expulsion of delinquents
Tutor - ) An officer or member of some hall, who instructs students, and is responsible for their Discipline
Lead - This metal was employed, before the use of quicksilver was known, in purifying silver; and the process by which these metals are purged from their dross, illustrates God's Discipline of his people, Jeremiah 6:29,30 ; Ezekiel 22:17-22
School - ) Figuratively, any means of knowledge or Discipline; as, the school of experience. ) To tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove; to subject to systematic Discipline; to train
School - ) Figuratively, any means of knowledge or Discipline; as, the school of experience. ) To tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove; to subject to systematic Discipline; to train
Correction - ) The act of reproving or punishing, or that which is intended to rectify or to cure faults; punishment; Discipline; chastisement
Didascalia Apostolorum - A Greek treatise on Discipline and doctrine traditionally attributed to the Apostles, but probably written by a bishop of the 3century, in Syria
Instructions of the Apostles - A Greek treatise on Discipline and doctrine traditionally attributed to the Apostles, but probably written by a bishop of the 3century, in Syria
Severity - , "punishing, not sparing"); here it refers to ascetic Discipline; it was often used among the Greeks of courageous exposure to hardship and danger
Sound, be Sound - ...
Note: For "sound mind" in 2 Timothy 1:7 , AV, see Discipline; in 1 Peter 4:7 (AV, "sober"), see MIND , B, No
Admonish - In ecclesiastical affairs, to reprove a member of the church for a fault, either publicly or privately the first step of church Discipline
Novatians - They were distinguished merely by their Discipline; for their religious and doctrinal tenets do not appear to be at all different from those of the church
Conduct - A — 1: ἀγωγή (Strong's #72 — Noun Feminine — agoge — ag-o-gay' ) from ago, "to lead," properly denotes "a teaching;" then, figuratively, "a training, Discipline," and so, the life led, a way or course of life, conduct, 2 Timothy 3:10 , RV, "conduct;" AV, "manner of life
Severity - Rigor extreme strictness as the severity of Discipline or government
Ecclesias'Tes - The writer is a man who has sinned in giving way to selfishness and sensuality, who has paid the penalty of that sin in satiety and weariness of life, but who has through all this been under the Discipline of a divine education, and has learned from it the lesson which God meant to teach him
Dispensations - These are otherwise called "the ways of God," and denote those schemes or methods which are devised and pursued by the wisdom and goodness of God, in order to manifest his perfections and will to mankind, for the purpose of their instruction, Discipline, reformation, and advancement in rectitude of temper and conduct, in order to promote their happiness. In this sense the various revelations which God has communicated to mankind at different periods, and the means he has used, as occasion has required, for their Discipline and improvement, have been justly denominated divine dispensations
Reformatories - Strict Discipline, work at some trade, and a general schooling are the essentials of the plan. This change from a regime of strict institutional Discipline to one of kindly sympathy, which of course does not mean laxity, is sound psychology
Moses - They wrote early in the persecution, urging the claims of Discipline on the Carthaginian confessors (Ep. 51) after their release threw their influence on the side of Novatian as representing the stricter Discipline against Cornelius
Senate - ) In some American colleges, a council of elected students, presided over by the president of the college, to which are referred cases of Discipline and matters of general concern affecting the students
Egwin, Saint - He aroused resentment by his zeal for ecclesiastical Discipline and accusations having been made against him at Rome, he undertook a pilgrimage there in order to vindicate himself with the pope
Chastisement - In the OT, Apocrypha, and NT this idea of correction, Discipline, chastening, is added to that of the general cultivation of mind and morals: the education is ‘per molestias’ (Augustine, Enarr. ...
Chastisement, as part of the moral Discipline of character, is the positive duty of a father (Ephesians 6:4). In this passage, ‘chastening’ is substituted by Revised Version for Authorized Version ‘nurture,’ which is too weak a word, but ‘discipline’ might be better still. ’ The probability is that the former word refers to training by ‘act and Discipline,’ the latter to training by ‘word. ’ See also Admonition and Discipline
Marcellus, Bishop of Rome - ...
It would appear from these lines, together with those on Eusebius [1], that when persecution ceased at Rome conflicts arose in the Christian community as to the terms of readmission of the lapsi to communion; that Marcellus after his election had required a period of penance before absolution; that this stern Discipline evoked violent opposition, the subjects of it being doubtless numerous anal influential; that the church had been split into parties in consequence, and riots, anarchy, and even bloodshed, had ensued; that "the tyrant" Maxentius had interposed in the interests of peace and banished the pope as the author of the discord. the leader and instigator of the opposition, who had "denied Christ in time of peace" by condoning apostasy and subverting Discipline after persecution had ceased. But Marcellus was made the victim, and thus was a "confessor" (or, in the wider sense of the word, a "martyr"), if not strictly for the faith, at any rate for canonical Discipline and the honour of Christ
Oecumenical Councils - In normal times, when according to the Divine constitution of the Church, the pope rules in the fullness of his power, the function of councils is to support and strengthen his rule on occasion of extraordinary difficulty arising from heresies, schisms, relaxed Discipline, or external foes
Exarch - An officer in the Greek church, whose business it is to visit the provinces allotted to him, in order to inform himself of the lives and manners of the clergy; take cognizance of ecclesiastical causes; the manner of celebrating divine service; the administration of the sacraments, particularly confession; the observance of the canons; monastic Discipline; affairs of marriages, divorces, &c
Bastards - They had no claim to the paternal inheritance, or to the standing privileges and filial Discipline of children (Hebrews 12:7)
Presbytery Reformed - They profess to adhere to the solemn league and covenant agreed to by the nation before the restoration, in which they abjure popery and prelacy, and resolve to maintain and defend the doctrines, worship, Discipline, and government of the church, as approved by the parliament and assembly at Westminster, and by the general assembly of the church and parliament of Scotland, 1645-9
Avellino, Andrew, Saint - Renowned for his zeal for strict religious Discipline and for his humility and piety, he was commissioned by his superior to found houses at Milan and Piacenza, and held the post of superior at several convents
Andrew Avellino, Saint - Renowned for his zeal for strict religious Discipline and for his humility and piety, he was commissioned by his superior to found houses at Milan and Piacenza, and held the post of superior at several convents
Eliphaz - He and his companions did not understand God, nor His dealings in Discipline with a righteous man
Ecumenical Councils - In normal times, when according to the Divine constitution of the Church, the pope rules in the fullness of his power, the function of councils is to support and strengthen his rule on occasion of extraordinary difficulty arising from heresies, schisms, relaxed Discipline, or external foes
Aecumenical Councils - In normal times, when according to the Divine constitution of the Church, the pope rules in the fullness of his power, the function of councils is to support and strengthen his rule on occasion of extraordinary difficulty arising from heresies, schisms, relaxed Discipline, or external foes
Seminaries And Studies, Congregation of - This congregation supervises everything pertaining to the government, Discipline, administration, and alienation of the temporalities, and the studies of all seminaries which are not subject to the Congregation of Propaganda
Chastisement - Parents have a responsibility to Discipline their children when they do wrong, but any punishment involved must arise out of love. ...
As parents correct and train their children, so God Disciplines his children. Such Discipline is proof to believers that they are God’s children and that he loves them (Deuteronomy 8:5; Proverbs 3:11; Hebrews 12:5-11; Revelation 3:19)
Bernardo Paganelli - This however was adhered to for only a short time and Eugene was forced to flee to France, where he directed the Second Crusade and convened important synods to Discipline the clergy, propagate the faith, and encourage learning
Bernardo Pignatelli - This however was adhered to for only a short time and Eugene was forced to flee to France, where he directed the Second Crusade and convened important synods to Discipline the clergy, propagate the faith, and encourage learning
Paganelli, Bernardo - This however was adhered to for only a short time and Eugene was forced to flee to France, where he directed the Second Crusade and convened important synods to Discipline the clergy, propagate the faith, and encourage learning
Culture - ) The state of being cultivated; result of cultivation; physical improvement; enlightenment and Discipline acquired by mental and moral training; civilization; refinement in manners and taste
Consistory - Consistory is also used among the reformed for a council or assembly of ministers and elders to regulate their affairs, Discipline, &c
Tradition - ) That body of doctrine and Discipline, or any article thereof, supposed to have been put forth by Christ or his apostles, and not committed to writing
Abbot - The authority of an abbot is twofold: one, paternal, by which he administers the property of the abbey and maintains Discipline and the observance of the rule and constitutions of the order; the other, quasi-episcopal
Eugene Iii, Pope Blessed - This however was adhered to for only a short time and Eugene was forced to flee to France, where he directed the Second Crusade and convened important synods to Discipline the clergy, propagate the faith, and encourage learning
Ecclesiastes - The writer is a man who has sinned in giving way to selfishness and sensuality, who has suffered for his sin in satiety and weariness of life, but who has through all this been under the Discipline of a divine education, and has learned from it the lesson which God meant to teach him
Parish - In the articlesof association, the Parish acknowledges and accedes to theConstitution, Canons, Doctrines, Discipline and Worship of theProtestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese in which it is located
Constitution - ) An authoritative ordinance, regulation or enactment; especially, one made by a Roman emperor, or one affecting ecclesiastical doctrine or Discipline; as, the constitutions of Justinian
Filioque - The Greeks first objected to its insertion in the Nicene Creed, as though against the Discipline enjoined by the Council of Ephesus (431), and later as they drifted into schism under Photius (c
Interims - The "Interim of Augsburg," concluded June 30, 1548, comprised statements on doctrine and ecclesiastical Discipline, explained in the sense of Catholic dogma, and granted two concessions to the Protestants, viz
Council - An assemblage of the Church met together for the purposeof considering matters of faith and Discipline and legislating uponthem
Dissipation - Deceptive desires leading to a life-style without Discipline resulting in the dizzy hangovers of drunkenness
Relax - ) To make less severe or rigorous; to abate the stringency of; to remit in respect to strenuousness, earnestness, or effort; as, to relax Discipline; to relax one's attention or endeavors
Sergeant - ) In a company, battery, or troop, a noncommissioned officer next in rank above a corporal, whose duty is to instruct recruits in Discipline, to form the ranks, etc
Volunteer - ) One who enters into service voluntarily, but who, when in service, is subject to Discipline and regulations like other soldiers; - opposed to conscript; specifically, a voluntary member of the organized militia of a country as distinguished from the standing army
Scourge - To whip a lash consisting of a strap or cord an instrument of punishment or Discipline
Exercise - ...
A — 2: ἀσκέω (Strong's #778 — Verb — askeo — as-keh'-o ) signifies "to form by art, to adorn, to work up raw material with skill;" hence, in general, "to take pains, endeavor, exercise by training or Discipline," with a view to a conscience void of offense, Acts 24:16 . 1), 1 Timothy 4:8 , where the immediate reference is probably not to mere physical training for games but to Discipline of the body such as that to which the Apostle refers in 1 Corinthians 9:27 , though there may be an allusion to the practices of asceticism
Correct - ) To bring back, or attempt to bring back, to propriety in morals; to reprove or punish for faults or deviations from moral rectitude; to chastise; to Discipline; as, a child should be corrected for lying
Fulda - Its importance as a school declined in the 12th century on account of the relaxation of monastic Discipline
Custodian - The pedagogue or custodian had responsibility to Discipline or punish the boy
Ecclesiastes - "The writer is a man who has sinned in giving way to selfishness and sensuality, who has paid the penalty of that sin in satiety and weariness of life, but who has through all this been under the Discipline of a divine education, and has learned from it the lesson which God meant to teach him
Covenant - ) A solemn compact between members of a church to maintain its faith, Discipline, etc
Caprasius Presbyter at Lerins - It was under the Discipline of Caprasius and Honoratus, who are said to have made it the home of saints
Bangorian Controversy - A heavy censure was passed against it, as tending to subvert all government and Discipline in the church of Christ, to reduce his kingdom to a state of anarchy and confusion, and to impugn and impeach the royal supremacy in matters ecclesiastical, and the authority of the legislature to enforce obedience in matters of religion, by severe sanction
Ratio Studiorum - Well-regulated physical exercise and Discipline combine with the course of studies to produce a system whose efficacy has been proved by its results and endurance
Reprobate, - This appears to indicate the possibility of a man, after having preached the gospel to others, being himself disapproved; failing to reach the goal through lack of self-discipline
Testimonials - The general Canons of the Church prescribe that whenthe Standing Committee of a Diocese recommends to the Bishop acandidate for Holy Orders for ordination to the Diaconate or Priesthood, that it shall present to the Bishop a certificate ortestimonial to the effect that the candidate "hath lived piously,soberly and honestly, and hath not since his admission as acandidate for Orders, written, taught or held anything contrary tothe doctrine and Discipline of the Protestant Episcopal Church
Theodosius of Syria - Abandoning his worldly possessions, he dwelt in a hut in a forest on the mountain above the city of Rhosus, where he practised the severest self-discipline, loading his neck, loins, and wrists with heavy irons, and allowing his uncombed hair to grow to his feet
Practice - ) To exercise one's self in, for instruction or improvement, or to acquire Discipline or dexterity; as, to practice gunnery; to practice music. ) Systematic exercise for instruction or Discipline; as, the troops are called out for practice; she neglected practice in music
Excommunication - As to Discipline on earth there is a dispensational binding and loosing (cf. See Discipline
Leo the Great, Pope Saint - He reformed Church Discipline; built and restored churches; protected Rome from the Huns under Attila and the Vandals under Genseric
Leo i, Pope Saint - He reformed Church Discipline; built and restored churches; protected Rome from the Huns under Attila and the Vandals under Genseric
Canon - CANON LAW means the body of ecclesiastical laws enacted by theChurch for the rule and Discipline of its clergy and people
Chasten, Chastisement - Two basic Hebrew words express the idea—yakach , “to settle a dispute, reprove”; yasar —”to instruct, a Discipline
Elihu - Job was a righteous man, but needed God's Discipline
Emblem - If these emblems portray any mark of hostility to the faith or Discipline of the Catholic Church, they should be removed from the church or at the grave, before the exequies allowed by the Church may be performed
Roman Congregation - These are the ...
Congregation for Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs
Congregation for the Affairs of Religious
Congregation for the Oriental Church
Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith
Congregation of Sacred Rites
Congregation of Seminaries and Universities
Congregation of the Ceremonies
Congregation of the Consistory
Congregation of the Council
Congregation of the Discipline of the Sacraments
Congregation of the Holy Office
Education - The wisdom therefore and instruction, of which so much is said in the book of Proverbs, are to be understood chiefly of moral and religious Discipline, imparted, according to the direction of the law, by the teaching and under the example of parents
Patrocius, a Martyr - The prelate was suspicious, taxed him with forgery, and, according to the stern Discipline of the Gallic church, flogged him on the spot
Elder - ...
Elders in the presbyterian Discipline, are officers, who, in conjunction with the ministers and deacons, compose the kirk sessions, who formerly used to inspect and regulate matters of religion and Discipline; but whose principal business now is to take care of the poor's funds
Theology, Pastoral - During the period prior to, and attendant on, the revolt of Luther, clerical Discipline and practise were in a sorely neglected condition. How to attend the sick and dying, the use of sacramentals, vespers, church music, processions, and relics are usually treated under sacramental Discipline
Freedom - ...
Freedom in the Spirit does not mean that Christians need no self-discipline. On the contrary, self-discipline is an evidence of the Spirit’s work in them (Galatians 5:22-23; see SELF-DISCIPLINE)
Regular - ) Constituted, selected, or conducted in conformity with established usages, rules, or Discipline; duly authorized; permanently organized; as, a regular meeting; a regular physican; a regular nomination; regular troops
Correction - That which is intended to rectify, or to cure faults punishment Discipline chastisement that which corrects
Evangelical Counsels - That the Christian life demands from all a serious Discipline of natural affections, is clear
Sylvia, Sister of Flavius Rufinus - Cabrol, Les Eglises de Jerusalem; la Discipline et la liturgae au IV mé Siècle, Etude sur la Peregrinatio Salviae
Flagellants - In the northern countries they became an organized sect with severe Discipline and extreme claims, a ceremonial was developed, and a specialized doctrine, which soon degenerated into heresy, taught
Old Catholics - They set themselves up to accomplish reform in doctrine, Discipline, and theology, most of which has been in the direction of Protestantism
Catholic Encyclopedia - For two years before the formation of a Board of Editors, those who were later to compose it met to confer with its publishers, and on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, 1905, they decided to publish an "international work of reference on the constitution, doctrine, Discipline, and history of the Catholic Church
Canon - ) A law, or rule of doctrine or Discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a decision, regulation, code, or constitution made by ecclesiastical authority
Philadelphian Society - ) She was of opinion that all dissensions among Christians would cease, and the kingdom of the Redeemer become, even here below, a glorious scene of charity, concord, and felicity, if those who bear the name of Jesus, without regarding the forms of doctrine or Discipline that distinguish particular communions, would all join in committing their souls to the care of the internal guide, to be instructed, governed, and formed by his divine impulse and suggestions
Impute, to, - The sins of the man believing on Jesus are not imputed to him: Christ has atoned for them; the believer may come under Discipline for them (cf
Purpose of God - Behind all His outward acts towards His ancient people Israel, His dealings with the nations of the earth, and His Discipline of the saints who form the church, there is His purpose concerning all, and to this purpose everything is made to bend, and towards its accomplishment everything in some way or other (however hidden from the sight of man) is working
Discipline - ) A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican Discipline
Ascetical Theology - ; the external custody of the senses; the interior Discipline of the soul by recollection, the presence of God, and conformity to His will; the vows giving permanence to this life; the various modes of ordinary prayer corresponding to progress made; how to discover and frustrate the devil's snares, to recognize God operating in the soul, and to free oneself from false notions and scruples that hinder progress
Labadists - If we are to judge of the Labadists by their own account, they did not differ from the reformed church so much in their tenets and doctrines as in their manners and rules of Discipline; yet it seems that Labadie had some strange notions
Encyclopedia, Catholic - For two years before the formation of a Board of Editors, those who were later to compose it met to confer with its publishers, and on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, 1905, they decided to publish an "international work of reference on the constitution, doctrine, Discipline, and history of the Catholic Church
Theology, Ascetical - ; the external custody of the senses; the interior Discipline of the soul by recollection, the presence of God, and conformity to His will; the vows giving permanence to this life; the various modes of ordinary prayer corresponding to progress made; how to discover and frustrate the devil's snares, to recognize God operating in the soul, and to free oneself from false notions and scruples that hinder progress
Franciscans - In 1287, Matthew, of Aqua Sparta, being elected general of the order, discouraged the ancient Discipline of the Franciscans, and indulged his monks in abandoning even the appearance of poverty; and this conduct inflamed the indignation of the spiritual or austere Franciscans; so that, from the year 1290, seditions and schisms arose in an order that had been so famous for its pretended disinterestedness and humility. ...
Such was the enthusiastic frenzy of the Franciscans, that they impiously maintained that the founder of their order was a second Christ, in all respects similar to the first, and that their institution and Discipline were the true Gospel of Jesus. In the beginning of this century the whole Franciscan order was divided into two parties; the one embracing the severe Discipline and absolute poverty of St
John Calvin - Returning to Geneva in 1541, he instituted an intolerant regime of Discipline, administered despotically by the clergy
Fontevrault, Abbey of - Her successor, Anne of Orleans, reestablished Discipline in a number of priories and gained a victory over the rebellious religious at Fontevrault
Fontevrault, Order of - Her successor, Anne of Orleans, reestablished Discipline in a number of priories and gained a victory over the rebellious religious at Fontevrault
Order of Fontevrault - Her successor, Anne of Orleans, reestablished Discipline in a number of priories and gained a victory over the rebellious religious at Fontevrault
Calvin, John - Returning to Geneva in 1541, he instituted an intolerant regime of Discipline, administered despotically by the clergy
Abbey of Fontevrault - Her successor, Anne of Orleans, reestablished Discipline in a number of priories and gained a victory over the rebellious religious at Fontevrault
Correct - To bring back or attempt to bring back to propriety in morals to punish for faults or deviations from moral rectitude to chastise to Discipline as, a child should be corrected for lying
Disciples - Luke 22:28 ), but that they might aid Him in His ministry ( Matthew 9:37 ; Matthew 10:1 ; Matthew 10:5 ), and, above all, that they might be trained by dally intercourse and Discipline to carry forward the work after He was gone
Jude, Theology of - Therefore they continue to engage in spiritual Discipline and anticipate the coming of Jesus Christ, at which time God will present the faithful to himself as a holy and rejoicing people. And by an exhortation to spiritual Discipline he assures them of their stability in the faith. This appears in three primary ways: (1) the eschatological fulfillment of the types and prophecies in the Old Testament and apocryphal literature; (2) the certainty of divine judgment upon ungodly sinners; (3) the anticipation of salvation by spiritual Discipline and divine protection. 17,25), and engaging in the Disciplines of the church to keep themselves in the love of God (vv. In contrast, the unfaithful—like Israel in the wilderness—place themselves under the judgment of God by presuming on his grace, neglecting spiritual Discipline, and repudiating Jesus Christ in word and deed (v. And it is in the Spirit that the church conducts her worship and Christian Discipline (vv
Admonition - The object and reason of such admonition must be realized if it is to be a means of moral Discipline. See also Chastisement and Discipline
See, Roman - Its bishops always acted as the judges of Christian life and Discipline. In a word, for the first three centuries, the churches of the world looked to the Roman See for authoritative decisions in all matters of faith, Discipline, government, and ritual for they saw in its bishops the successors of Saint Peter, the Vicar of Christ on earth
Roman See - Its bishops always acted as the judges of Christian life and Discipline. In a word, for the first three centuries, the churches of the world looked to the Roman See for authoritative decisions in all matters of faith, Discipline, government, and ritual for they saw in its bishops the successors of Saint Peter, the Vicar of Christ on earth
School - In American usage, school more generally denotes the collective body of pupils in any place of instruction, and under the direction and Discipline of one or more teachers. His Discipline keeps the school well regulated and quiet
Body - They may be ashamed of the wrong things they do through the body, but this is all the more reason why they must exercise Discipline over it (Matthew 5:27-30; Romans 6:12-13; Romans 8:13; 1 Corinthians 9:27; 1 Thessalonians 5:23; James 3:3-5; see FLESH). Another reason to exercise such Discipline is that the body is God’s temple, God’s dwelling place within each individual believer (1 Corinthians 6:12-20)
Excommunication - Founded in the natural right which every society possesses to guard its laws and privileges from violation and abuse by the infliction of salutary Discipline, proportioned to the nature of the offences committed against them, it has found a place, in one form or another, under every system of religion, whether human or divine. In the early ages of the primitive church also, this branch of Discipline was exercised with moderation, which, however, gradually gave place to an undue severity. But it does not appear that the infliction of this Discipline was accompanied with any of those forms of excommunication, of delivering over to Satan, or of solemn execration, which were usual among the Jews, and subsequently introduced into them by the Romish church
Stoics - Stoicism therefore had a number of distinctive features: rigid self-discipline, free of both pleasure and pain; moral earnestness, free of all feelings and desires; devotion to duty, free of all emotion; and reliance upon reason, free of all superstition and irrationality
Baal - It prevailed also for a time in the kingdom of Judah (2 Kings 8:27 ; comp 11:18; 16:3; 2 Chronicles 28:2 ), till finally put an end to by the severe Discipline of the Captivity (Zephaniah 1:4-6 )
Castaway - Paul used his own example of personal Discipline to ensure that his preaching proved true in life as a call to others to do the same (1 Corinthians 9:27 )
Review - ) An inspection, as of troops under arms or of a naval force, by a high officer, for the purpose of ascertaining the state of Discipline, equipments, etc
Heal - Divine Discipline leads to repentance and “healing”: “Come, and let us return unto the Lord: for he hath torn, and he will heal us …” ( Moderate - ) One of a party in the Church of Scotland in the 18th century, and part of the 19th, professing moderation in matters of church government, in Discipline, and in doctrine
Denial - Believers, being united with Christ, deny themselves by giving up worldly attitudes and desires, and living Disciplined, godly lives (2 Corinthians 4:2; Galatians 2:20; Galatians 5:24; Colossians 3:5; Titus 2:12; see OBEDIENCE; SELF-DISCIPLINE)
Baptists - The prayers and exhortations of the brethren form a part of their church order, under the direction and control of the elders, to whom it exclusively belongs to preside in conducting the worship, to rule in cases of Discipline, and to labour in the word and doctrine, in distinction from the brethren exhorting one another. The Discipline and government of the Scottish Baptists are strictly congregational
Moravians - After its renovation in the year 1722, some of its members came to England in 1728, who being of the Moravian branch, became known by that appellation; and all those who joined them, and adopted their doctrines and Discipline, have ever since been called Moravians. By their own account, the community derive their origin from the ancient Bohemian and Moravian Brethren, who existed as a distinct people ever since the year 1457, when, separating from those who took up arms in defence of their protestations against popish errors, they formed a plan for church fellowship and Discipline, agreeable to their insight into the Scriptures, and called themselves at first, Fratres Legis Christi, or Brethren after the Law of Christ; and afterward, on being joined by others of the same persuasion in other places, Unitas Fratrum, or Fratres Unitatis. But their strict adherence to the Discipline of their own church, founded, in their view, on that of the primitive churches, and the acknowledged impossibility of its application among the mixed multitude, of which the Lutheran and Calvinist churches consisted, occasioned a cessation of cooperation, and, in the sequel, the Brethren were again left to the mercy of their persecutors, by whom their churches were destroyed, and their ministers banished, till the year 1575, when they obtained an edict from the emperor of Germany, for the public exercise of their religion. To this the Brethren objected, being unwilling to give up their ancient Discipline, and would rather proceed to seek an asylum in another place; when the count, struck with their steadfast adherence to the tenets of their forefathers, began more maturely to examine their pretensions; and being convinced of the justness of them, he procured for the Brethren the renovation of their ancient constitution, and ever after proved a most zealous promoter of their cause. They have also seniores civiles, or lay elders, in contradistinction to spiritual elders or bishops, who are appointed to watch over the constitution and Discipline of the unity of the Brethren, &c
Bentivoglio, Annetta - She found the Discipline difficult, but saw it as a way to reach God, and practiced a strict observance to the Rule
Maria Magdalena Bentivoglio - She found the Discipline difficult, but saw it as a way to reach God, and practiced a strict observance to the Rule
Moravian Church - A religious association formed near Kunwald, Bohemia, 1457, "to foster pure scriptural teaching and apostolic Discipline
Johann Von Hontheim - He is subordinate to the general council which alone, with subsequent ratification by the entire episcopate, can bind in faith and Discipline
Febronianism - He is subordinate to the general council which alone, with subsequent ratification by the entire episcopate, can bind in faith and Discipline
Girdle - When the Gentiles are gathered by God to Discipline Israel, the girdle of their loins shall not be loosed
Mary Magdalena Bentivoglio - She found the Discipline difficult, but saw it as a way to reach God, and practiced a strict observance to the Rule
Mary Magdalen of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - She found the Discipline difficult, but saw it as a way to reach God, and practiced a strict observance to the Rule
Montanists - They only held that the Holy Spirit made Montanus his organ or delivering a more perfect form of Discipline than what was delivered by his apostles
Monastic - In the eleventh century, the monastic Discipline was grown very remiss
Hontheim, Johann Nikolaus Von - He is subordinate to the general council which alone, with subsequent ratification by the entire episcopate, can bind in faith and Discipline
Annetta Bentivoglio - She found the Discipline difficult, but saw it as a way to reach God, and practiced a strict observance to the Rule
Unitas Fratrom - A religious association formed near Kunwald, Bohemia, 1457, "to foster pure scriptural teaching and apostolic Discipline
Unity of Brethren - A religious association formed near Kunwald, Bohemia, 1457, "to foster pure scriptural teaching and apostolic Discipline
Backsliding - Absence of such divine Discipline is an indication that they were never really God’s children (Hebrews 12:6-8; 2 Peter 2:9)
Libellatici - This leniency met with opposition from Novatian, who claimed to be enforcing strict Discipline, and finally formed a schismatic community
Lapsi - This leniency met with opposition from Novatian, who claimed to be enforcing strict Discipline, and finally formed a schismatic community
Maelmhaedhoc o'Morgair - After ordination he studied liturgy and theology at Lismore, and was Abbot of Bangor, Bishop of Connor (1124), and Archbishop of Armagh (1132), where he restored church Discipline, which had become relaxed through the system of lay abbots, and, on resigning the See of Armagh, he became Bishop of Down, where he established the Austin canons; returning from a visit to Rotne he introduced the monks of Clairvaux to Mellifont, 1142
Malachy, Saint - After ordination he studied liturgy and theology at Lismore, and was Abbot of Bangor, Bishop of Connor (1124), and Archbishop of Armagh (1132), where he restored church Discipline, which had become relaxed through the system of lay abbots, and, on resigning the See of Armagh, he became Bishop of Down, where he established the Austin canons; returning from a visit to Rotne he introduced the monks of Clairvaux to Mellifont, 1142
Euchites - Or EUCHITAE, a sect of ancient heretics, who were first formed into a religious body towards the end of the fourth century, though their doctrine and Discipline subsisted in Syria, Egypt, and other eastern countries, before the birth of Christ: they were thus called, because they prayed without ceasing, imagining that prayer alone was sufficient to save them
Templars - In the year 1228 this order acquired stability, by being confirmed in the council or Troyes, and subjected to a rule of Discipline drawn up by St
Hungary - In the 16th century Hungary was overrun by the Turks, Church Discipline became lax, and Protestantism gained a strong footing
Penitence - It is also used for a Discipline or punishment attending repentance, more usually called penance
Rest, Remain - The word may mean “to set one’s mind at rest,” as when a child receives the Discipline of his parent ( Thurificati - This leniency met with opposition from Novatian, who claimed to be enforcing strict Discipline, and finally formed a schismatic community
Sacrificati - This leniency met with opposition from Novatian, who claimed to be enforcing strict Discipline, and finally formed a schismatic community
Anglican Communion, the - The Episcopal Church in the United States isalso included in the Anglican Communion, being identical with theChurch of England as is set forth in the Preface to the PrayerBook, in which it is declared, "This Church is far from intendingto depart from the Church of England in any essential point ofdoctrine, Discipline and worship; or further than local circumstancesrequire
Tares - ...
This interpretation leaves unanswered those questions about Church Discipline which have made the parable an ecclesiastical battle-ground for centuries, because the parable has nothing to do with such controversies. (3) There was no background for the idea of ‘Church,’ much less of Church Discipline, in the disciples’ minds at this time. (4) If the parable refers to Church Discipline, it forbids it in toto, while the parable of the Net on a similar interpretation makes it impossible. It is idle to say that it prohibits only the exclusion of masses, and permits that of the very bad, or inculcates a general attitude of mind towards Church Discipline. (6) The Apostles did not so understand the parable, for they insisted on Church Discipline (1 Corinthians 5:2; 1 Corinthians 5:13, 2 Corinthians 2:5-11, 2 Thessalonians 3:6; 2 Thessalonians 3:13, Revelation 2:14-16; Revelation 2:20-23; cf. (2) The related parable of the Net (Matthew 13:47-50) is supposed to refer to the Discipline of the Church. (d) The parable, if it relates to Church Discipline, makes that absolutely impossible
Waldenses - They considered every Christian as, in a certain measure, qualified and authorised to instruct, exhort and confirm the brethren in their Christian course; and demanded the restoration of the ancient penitential Discipline of the church, 1:e. ...
Their rules of practice were extremely austere; for they adopted as the model of their moral Discipline, the sermon of Christ on the mount, which they interpreted and explained in the most rigorous and literal manner; and consequently prohibited and condemned in their society all wars, and suits of law, and all attempts towards the acquisition of wealth; the inflicting of capital punishments, self- defense against unjust violence, and oaths of all kinds. During the greatest part of the seventeenth century, those of them who lived in the valleys of Piedmont, and who had embraced the doctrine, Discipline, and worship of the church of Geneva, were oppressed and persecuted in the most barbarous and inhuman manner by the ministers of Rome
Christian Church, General Convention - " In 1794 they became known as "Christians," using the Bible as guide and Discipline, and accepting Christian character as test of church fellowship
Daniel o'Connell - Unfortunately his health began to fail, the generation of Young Irelanders was chafing under his prudent Discipline; then came the horrors of the Great Famine
o'Connell, Daniel - Unfortunately his health began to fail, the generation of Young Irelanders was chafing under his prudent Discipline; then came the horrors of the Great Famine
Waterlandians - The former observe, with the most religious accuracy and veneration, the ancient doctrine and Discipline of the purer sort of Anabaptists; the latter depart much more from the primitive sentiments and manners of their sect, and approach nearer to the Protestant churches
Council - An assembly of prelates and doctors, convened for regulating matters of doctrine an Discipline in the church
Mennonites - They assemble, or used to do so, twice every year from all parts of Holland, at Rynsbourg, a village two leagues from Leyden, at which time they receive the communion, sitting at a table in the manner of the Independents; but in their form of Discipline they are said more to resemble the Presbyterians. Those who adhere to their ancient Discipline are called Flemings or Flandrians
Jansenists - It was not only on account of their embracing the doctrines of Augustine, that the Jesuits were so imbittered against them; but that which offended the Jesuits, and the other creatures of the Roman pontiff, was, their strict piety, and severe moral Discipline. They reproached the clergy with an universal depravation of sentiments and manners, and an entire forgetfulness of the dignity of their character and the duties of their vocation; they censured the licentiousness of the monastic orders, and insisted upon the necessity of reforming their Discipline according to the rules of sanctity, abstinence, and self-denial, that were originally prescribed by their respective founders. Notwithstanding the above-mentioned sentiments, the Jansenists have been accused of superstition and fanaticism; and, on account of their severe Discipline and practice, have been denominated Rigourists
Church - This appears to have arisen out of the very circumstance of the increase of the church, through the zeal of the first Christians; and it was doubtless much more in the spirit of the very first Discipline exercised by the Apostles and Evangelists, (when none of the churches were independent, but remained under the government of those who had been chiefly instrumental in raising them up,) to place themselves under a common inspection, and to unite the weak with the strong, and the newly converted with those who were "in Christ before them. " There was also in this, greater security afforded both for the continuance of wholesome doctrine, and of godly Discipline. The ends of church fellowship are, the maintenance and exhibition of a system of sound doctrine; the support of the ordinances of evangelical worship in their purity and simplicity; the impartial exercise of church government and Discipline; the promotion of holiness in all manner of conversation. As to church order and Discipline, without entering into the discussion of the many questions which have been raised on this subject, and argued in so many distinct treatises, it may be sufficient generally to observe, that the church of Christ being a visible and permanent society, bound to observe certain rites, and to obey, certain rules, the existence of government in it is necessarily supposed. If baptism be the door of admission into the church, some must judge of the fitness of candidates, and administrators of the rite must be appointed; if the Lord's Supper must be partaken of, the times and the mode are to be determined, the qualifications of communicants judged of, and the administration placed in suitable hands; if worship must be social and public, here again there must be an appointment of times, an order, and an administration; if the word of God is to be read and preached, then readers and preachers are necessary; if the continuance of any one in the fellowship of Christians be conditional upon good conduct, so that the purity and credit of the church may be guarded, then the power of enforcing Discipline must be lodged some where. It cannot inflict pains and penalties upon the disobedient and refractory, like civil governments; for the only punitive Discipline authorized in the New Testament, is comprised in "admonition," "reproof," "sharp rebukes," and, finally, "excision from the society. With these relations of Christians to each other and to the world, and their correspondent duties, before our minds, we may easily interpret the nature of that extreme Discipline which is vested in the church. Nor is this extreme Discipline to be hastily inflicted before "a first and second admonition," nor before those who are "spiritual" have attempted "to restore a brother overtaken by a fault;" and when the "wicked person" is "put away," still the door is to be kept open for his reception again upon repentance. This then is the moral Discipline which is imperative upon the church of Christ, and its government is criminally defective whenever it is not enforced. It was this which created a natural and competent check upon the ministers of the church; for being only sustained by the opinion of the churches, they could not but have respect to it; and it was this which gave to the sound part of a fallen church the advantage of renouncing, upon sufficient and well-weighed grounds, their communion with it, and of kindling up the light of a pure ministry and a holy Discipline, by forming a separate association, bearing its testimony against errors in doctrine, and failures in practice
Anathema - They may have suggested lines on which a system of official Discipline in the Christian Church was afterwards constructed, but it would be an anachronism to read them into the simpler thoughts of the apostolic literature. Free association with him would be no longer possible, and to that extent the beginnings of a system of Discipline may be traced in the phrase, as in 1 Timothy 1:20 and 1 Corinthians 5:5, where the ultimate restoration of the man is distinctly in view. Execration and not official Discipline is the dominant idea, with the censure of the Church as a corollary. See also articles Discipline, Excommunication
Chivalry - (French: chevalerie, horsemanship, knighthood) ...
In its fullest sense, that aggregate of custom, Discipline, ideal, and sentiment which guided the medieval gentleman's conduct both in war and peace
Jurisdiction, Hierarchy of - By his sacred office, the Roman pontiff has supreme jurisdiction over the universal Church, in matters of faith and morals, in Discipline, and rule
Jainism - With disciples he went about preaching his doctrine, and organized his converts under austere monastic Discipline
Essenes - ...
A good aim, but to be best attained in God's way of the daily life's Discipline rather than in self imposed austerity and isolation
Benediction - 's time, and in the rituals and ceremonies of the different churches, which are found collected in father Martene's work on the rites and Discipline of the church
Mortify - Paul is far from disparaging the necessity of wholesome self-discipline (1 Corinthians 9:27), the idea, readily suggested by the associations of the word ‘mortify,’ of a gradual subjugation of the bodily appetites by the practice of bodily austerities, is here foreign to his thought
Fast - ) Voluntary abstinence from food, for a space of time, as a spiritual Discipline, or as a token of religious humiliation
Hierarchy of Jurisdiction - By his sacred office, the Roman pontiff has supreme jurisdiction over the universal Church, in matters of faith and morals, in Discipline, and rule
Methodist - Some of these polemics rested the defense of popery upon prescription; others upon the wicked lives of Protestant princes who had left the church of Rome; others, the crime of religious schism; the variety of opinions among Protestants with regard to doctrine and Discipline, and the uniformity of the tenets and worship of the church of Rome; and thus, by urging their respective arguments, they thought they should stop the mouths of their adversaries at once
Dan'Iel - (Daniel 1:8-16 ) At the close of his three years Discipline, (Daniel 1:5,18 ) Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, (Daniel 1:17 ) of interpreting dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi
Lamentations - In the lengthy third poem the writer admits that Jerusalem’s sufferings are God’s righteous judgment, and urges the people to accept God’s Discipline and seek his forgiveness
Lent, the Season of - Forty years the children ofIsrael were under Discipline in their pilgrimage in the wilderness. From these references we learn thatit is both Scriptural and helpful that this Season of Penitenceshould be prolonged for us, that bearing in mind theseincidents of "forty years" and "forty days" of devotion anddiscipline which characterized the history of God's people, andalso our Lord's example, we may be like minded in prayer, indiscipline and in turning to God
Victricius - called the Liber Regularum , treating of various heads of ecclesiastical practice and Discipline (Patr
Communion (1) - ...
It is sometimes applied to different churches united in doctrine and Discipline. The three grand communions into which the Christian church is divided is that of the church of Rome, the Greek church, and the Protestant church; but originally all Christians were in communion with each other, having one communion, faith, and Discipline
Repent - Sometimes the Lord “repented” of the Discipline He had planned to carry out concerning His people: “If that nation, against whom I have pronounced, turn from their evil, I will repent of the evil that I thought to do unto them” ( Discipline
Independents - Though the Episcopalians contend that there is not a shadow of the independent Discipline to be found either in the Bible or the primitive church, the Independents, on the contrary, believe that it is most clearly to be deduced from the practice of the apostles in planting the first churches. But as we have given an account of the general opinions and Discipline of the Brownists, we need not enumerate them here, but must beg the reader to refer to that article. He affirmed that all communion was to be broken off with those religious societies that were founded upon a different plan from his; and treated more especially the church of England as a spurious church, whose ministers were unlawfully ordained; whose Discipline was popish and anti- christian; and whose sacraments and institutions were destitute of all efficacy and virtue. this well-meaning reformer, perceiving the defects that reigned in the Discipline of Brown, and in the spirit and temper of his followers, employed his zeal and diligence in correcting them, and in new-modelling the society in such a manner, as to render it less odious to his adversaries, and less liable to the just censure of those true Christians who look upon charity as the end of the commandments. ...
The Independents were much more commendable than the Brownists; they surpassed them, both in the moderation of their sentiments, and in the order of their Discipline. At this time the Independents and Presbyterians, called from this association the United Brethren, were agreed with regard to doctrines, being generally Calvinists, and differed only with respect to ecclesiastical Discipline
Ecclesiastical Polity - Speaking of this subject, the compilers of the confession declare, "that they were most desirous to preserve the ecclesiastical polity, and those degrees in the church which had been introduced by human authority, knowing that, for wise and good purposes, the Discipline, as described in the canons, had been introduced by the fathers. " Speaking of faithful pastors, he describes them to be "those who by the doctrine of Christ lead men to true piety, who properly administer the sacred mysteries, and who preserve and exercise right Discipline. " Even after archbishops and patriarchs had arisen, he merely says, in recording their introduction, "This arrangement was calculated to preserve Discipline. Archbishop Whitgift, who distinguished himself by the zeal with which he supported the English hierarchy, frequently maintains, that the form of Discipline is not particularly, and by name, set down in Scripture; and he also plainly asserts, "that no form of church government is, by the Scriptures, prescribed or commanded to the church of God. " This principle is admirably illustrated and confirmed by the venerable Hooker, in the third book of his work on ecclesiastical polity; and another divine of the English church, who lived about the same period, has laid down what he conceives to be an unquestionable position, "that all churches have not the same form of Discipline; neither is it necessary that they should, because it cannot be proved that any particular form of church government is enjoined by the word of God. Still, however, he authorized a modification of these opinions, accommodated to the state of his native country; for although the title of bishop was not used, superintendents, with powers little inferior to those committed to prelates in England, were sanctioned by the first Book of Discipline; and these superintendents were classed, in the acts of different general assemblies, among the necessary ministers of the church
Excommunication - ...
The object of this act of Discipline was to reform the sinner (1 Corinthians 5:5), and to preserve the purity of the Church. The morals, doctrine, and government of the Church were all imperilled at times and could be preserved only by strict Discipline and severe penalties upon wrong-doers. ...
See also Anathema, Chastisement, Discipline, Restoration of Offenders. -articles ‘Discipline’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , Dict. of Christ and the Gospels , ‘Discipline (Christian)’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics , ‘Excommunication’ in Dict
Mennonites - ...
The plan of doctrine and Discipline drawn up by Menno was of a much more mild and moderate nature than that of the furious and fanatical Anabaptists (whose tumultuous proceedings have been recited under that article, ) but somewhat more severe, though more clear and consistent than the doctrine of the wiser branches of that sect, who aimed at nothing more than the restoration of the Christian church to its primitive purity. Accordingly, he condemned the plan of ecclesiastical Discipline that was founded on the prospect of a new kingdom, to be miraculously established by Jesus Christ on the ruins of civil government, and the destruction of human rulers, and which had been the fatal and pestilential source of such dreadful commotions, such execrable rebellions, and such enormous crimes. The opinions, says Mosheim, that are held in common by the Mennonites, seem to be all derived from this fundamental principle, ...
that the kingdom which Christ established upon earth is a visible church, or community, into which the holy and just alone are to be admitted; and which is consequently exempt from all those institutions and rules of Discipline that have been invented by human wisdom for the correction and reformation of the wicked. However, this austere system declines, and the rigid Mennonites are gradually approaching towards the opinions and Discipline of the more moderate, or Waterlandians
Sandemanians - Glass's expulsion, his adherents formed themselves into churches, conformable, in their institution and Discipline, to what they apprehended to be the plan of the first churches recorded in the New Testament. ...
They maintain a plurality of elders, pastors, or bishops, in each church; and the necessity of the presence of two elders in every act of Discipline, and at the administration of the Lord's supper. In their Discipline they are strict and severe, and think themselves obliged to separate from the communion and worship of all such religious societies as appear to them not to profess the simple truth for their only ground of hope, and who do not walk in obedience to it
Monk - From hence the monastic Discipline extended gradually its progress through the other provinces and countries of Europe. In the eighth century the monastic Discipline was extremely relaxed, both in the eastern and western provinces, and all efforts to restore it were ineffectual. Monks are also distinguished into reformed, whom the civil and ecclesiastical authority have made masters of ancient converts, and put in their power to retrieve the ancient Discipline, which had been relaxed; and ancient, who remain in the convent, to live in it according to its establishment at the time when they made their vows, without obliging themselves to any new reform
Monk - From hence the monastic Discipline extended its progress gradually through the other provinces and countries of Europe. ...
In the eighth century the monastic Discipline was extremely relaxed, both in the eastern and western provinces, and all efforts to restore it were ineffectual. Monks are also distinguished into reformed, whom the civil and ecclesiastical authority have made masters of ancient convents, and empowered to retrieve the ancient Discipline, which had been relaxed, and ancient, who remain in the convent, to live in it according to its establishment at the time when they made their vows, without obliging themselves to any new reform
Apostasy - Excommunication, as a final step in the process of ecclesiastical Discipline, is undertaken in the hope of restoring the wayward sinner who has fallen into grievous sin (1 Corinthians 5:1-5 )
Drill - ) To train in the military art; to exercise diligently, as soldiers, in military evolutions and exercises; hence, to instruct thoroughly in the rudiments of any art or branch of knowledge; to Discipline
Better - To improve to meliorate to increase the good qualities of as, manure betters land Discipline may better the morals
Libertines (2) - This cabal was composed of a certain number of licentious citizens, who could not bear the severe Discipline of Calvin
Lot - ...
Though rescued by Abraham he did not profitby the Discipline, but returned to dwell in the guilty city; whereas Abraham would not accept so much as a shoe latchet from its king
Daniel - At the close of his three years' Discipline, Daniel 1:5; Daniel 1:18, Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, Daniel 1:17, of interpreting dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi
Conscience - Christians must therefore train and Discipline the conscience so that it is well instructed, pure, active and sensitive (Acts 24:16; Ephesians 4:17; Ephesians 4:23; 1 Timothy 1:5; 1 Timothy 1:19; 2 Timothy 1:3)
Elder - ...
The key duties of the elders could be summarized as being the twofold task of judging and Discipline generally, and of ruling and guiding the people in an orderly way. The office of elder in the New Testament church cannot be fully understood without the background of the Old Testament local elder, an office still functioning in New Testament Judaism with duties pertaining to Discipline and leadership (cf. All elders have the task of oversight and Discipline of the congregation (Acts 20:28 ) and all have the responsibility to rule and guide the people of God with the Word in a manner that is pleasing to God (Acts 20:29-31 ). ...
The elders' task of oversight and Discipline can be described in terms of keeping watch and shepherding on behalf of the great shepherd Jesus Christ
Punishment (2) - ) would seem to forbid us to reduce it to the mere equivalent of Discipline; and He Himself, in speaking of sin that has no forgiveness (Mark 3:28 ||, cf. If, therefore, punishment is an expression of Love, it will contain the elements of Discipline and retribution in such proportion as Love demands. It seems reasonable to expect that as soon as a sinner becomes forgivable, the retributive aspect of punishment is at an end, and Discipline alone remains; and that when Discipline has utterly failed to reclaim a man, it in its turn must give place to simple retribution
Wilderness - 9), perhaps because it became the place of Discipline to God's people, as the wilderness of the Red Sea had been (Compare Ezekiel 20:35 )
Laity, Bible Reading by - Our present Discipline grows out of the decree, "Officiorum ac Munerum," of Leo XIII
Mount, Mountain - The worship at ‘ high places ’ was so deeply engrained in the Hebrews that no amount of legislation could eradicate it; the severe Discipline of the Exile was needed for its destruction
Bible Reading by Laity - Our present Discipline grows out of the decree, "Officiorum ac Munerum," of Leo XIII
Meribah - " Thirty-eight years afterward at Kadesh, bordering on the promised laud, again, untaught by the severe Discipline of the wilderness (Isaiah 9:13), Israel in want of water cried, "would God we had died when our brethren died before the Lord!"...
God's glory appeared, and the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, "take the rod, and speak unto the rock before their eyes, and it shall give forth his water
Paganism - The religious worship and Discipline of Pagans, or the adoration of idols and false gods
Children - Hence, flowed parents' responsibility to rear children in the way of the Lord (Genesis 18:19; Deuteronomy 6:7; Deuteronomy 11:19); also children's responsibility to obey parents, as a preparatory Discipline for the higher relationship to God
Exercise - To train to use to Discipline to cause to perform certain acts, as preparatory to service as, to exercise troops
Harlot - ]'>[3] was delivered from this peril only by the stern Discipline of the Exile
Train - To exercise to Discipline to teach and form by practice as, to train the militia to the manual exercise to train soldiers to the use of arms and to tactics
Decius, Emperor - It cleared off the crowd of half-hearted Christians, and left behind those who were prepared by its Discipline for the severer struggles that were to come under Valerian and Diocletian. Were the libellatici to be dealt with on the same footing as the thurificati ? Were either capable of readmission into the fold of Christ? Was that readmission to be conditional upon the church's normal Discipline, or were the confessors to be allowed to give a certificate of absolution (the libellus pacis ) to those whose weakness or repentance was sufficient reason for indulgence? Some of those who prided themselves, like many of the Roman confessors, on their constancy, looked down with scorn on the indulgence shown by Cyprian and Cornelius to the lapsi, and even taunted the latter with having been a libellaticus. The tendency to ascetic rigorism of Discipline would doubtless have shown itself sooner or later in any case, but historically the Novatianist schisms had their beginning in the Decian persecution
Vision - ]'>[1] ]), detached from the dream-state and furthered by fasting, prayer, and self-discipline ( Daniel 10:2-9 , cf
Uri'ah - The king met with an unexpected obstacle in the austere, soldier-like spirit which guided all Uriah's conduct, and which gives us a high notion of the character and Discipline of David's officers
Ascension - The ascension (1) allowed Jesus to prepare a heavenly place for His followers (John 14:2 ), (2) return to the Father (John 16:5 ), (3) send the Holy Spirit to the disciples (John 16:7 ) to bring conviction of sin, open the way to righteousness through faith, and condemn the devil, (4) comfort those suffering for Him through visions of the Ascended One (Acts 7:54-60 ), (5) call persons to fulfill His missionary task (Acts 9:1-18 ), (6) open doors of ministry for His people (2 Corinthians 2:12-14 ), (7) demonstrate God's power and His rule over all who would exercise power and authority on earth or in heaven (Ephesians 1:20-23 ), (8) give gifts for ministry to His people (Ephesians 4:7-12 ), (9) give hope to troubled followers showing they would join Him in glory (Colossians 3:1-4 ), (10) rescue His servants from persecution so they can preach His gospel (2 Timothy 4:16-18 ), (11) demonstrate that glory, not death, is God's final word for the Son and for disciples (Hebrews 2:9 ), (12) exercise a heavenly priesthood (Hebrews 4:14 ), (13) make revelation of future trials and final victory possible (Revelation 1:1 ), (14) Discipline His church so He may have fellowship with it and provide final full fellowship in ruling with Christ (Revelation 3:19-22 )
Prayer - While prayer is always to God, it is suggested that requests would naturally be made to the Father in respect of all that tends to the promotion of Christ in believers, as well as in things referring to their Discipline in the pathway here
Affliction - ...
In the New Testament the source of affliction is (1) the natural conditions of humanity (James 1:27 ); (2) persecution because of faithfulness to Christ (2 Corinthians 6:4 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:6 ); (3) Discipline for the purpose of maturing the Christian faith; and (4) the result of personal sin (Galatians 6:7 )
Armenian Church - ...
"They have among them a number of monasteries and convents, in which is maintained a severe Discipline; marriage is discountenanced, though not absolutely prohibited; a married priest cannot obtain promotion, and the higher clergy are not allowed to marry
Meekness (2) - It is, to begin with, a disposition towards God, the humble submission to the Divine will, the quiet acceptance of the Discipline of life as coming from One who in infinite wisdom and love directs the destinies of men. The attitude of humble submission to the will of God carries with it of necessity a disposition of gentleness and forbearance towards men who are harsh and provocative in their dealings, not only because they are to be regarded as the instruments of the Divine Discipline, but because only through the loving restraint of angry and vindictive feelings can the gracious will of God be done in human relationships. The soul that thus bows meekly beneath the Divine Discipline is not open to the reproach of feebleness or insensibility; it is meek, not because it is too callous to feel the pain of sorrow and misfortune or too spiritless to protest against it, but because it bends in lowly and childlike trust before the unsearchable wisdom and love of God. Meekness is the easy yoke of Jesus which enables the weary and heavy-laden to bear the Discipline laid upon them without chafing and complaining. Not only is meekness a strong and heroic quality which curbs the natural impulse to fume and rebel against God’s will, but it is the means whereby the soul is reinforced by a Divine power to endure life’s Discipline with courage. True meekness, which is worthy of all honour, is seen only in those who, with an acute sense of wrong, control the natural impulse to show anger and to retaliate, not from fear, or pride, or policy, or scorn of others, but because in obedience to the will of God they accept the provocation or wrong as Discipline, and as an opportunity for showing the Divine spirit of patience and love
Greek Church - That in these widely distant countries the professors of Christianity are agreed in every minute article of belief, it would be rash to assert; but there is certainly such an agreement among them, with respect both to faith and to Discipline, that they mutually hold communion with each other, and are, in fact, but one church. ...
We shall here present the reader with a view of its rise, tenets, and Discipline. Greek church, state and Discipline of
Lawlessness - The conscience of man finds exercise and Discipline
Soldiers - Acts 10:1) who desired to have his servant healed, speaks of the soldiers who were under his command, and, in contrast to (1) above, his remarks bring out forcibly the idea of Discipline and organization, which was to be found in a Roman legion
Independents - They admitted there were many godly men in its communion, and that it was reformed from the grossest errors of the man of sin; but thought it still wanted some things essential to a true church of Christ; in particular, a power of choosing its own ministers, and a stricter Discipline among its members
Proverbs, Theology of - The wise live securely within the limits of these teachings, but fools, who without Discipline wantonly crave what lies outside these prescribed boundaries (10:3b), die by transgressing the Lord's fixed social order (4:10-19). In other words, the inspired sage observes that within the fallen creation there is a principle of entropy that destroys life, but with Discipline one can overcome the threatening chaos. His exemplar drawn from the cosmic order functions to instruct the faithful that Discipline can overcome social chaos. For example, after the wonderful promises in 3:1-10, Solomon adds: "My son, do not despise the Lord's Discipline" (vv. Solomon's explanation, "because the Lord Disciplines those he loves, as a father the son he delights in, " shows that the father's tutelage passes into the heavenly Father's
Charlemagne - He furthered the spiritual welfare of the Church by his zeal for ecclesiastical Discipline and took keen interest in the deliberations of synods
Charles the Great - He furthered the spiritual welfare of the Church by his zeal for ecclesiastical Discipline and took keen interest in the deliberations of synods
Strong, Stronger - 14, in contrast to "the weak in faith," those who have scruples in regard to eating meat and the observance of days; 2 Corinthians 12:10 , where the strength lies in bearing sufferings in the realization that the endurance is for Christ's sake; 2 Corinthians 13:9 , where "ye are strong" implies the good spiritual condition which the Apostle desires for the church at Corinth in having nothing requiring his exercise of Discipline (contrast No
Perseverance - In addition to giving his people the promise of his power, God demands that they exercise self-discipline and effort
Suffering (2) - But by this high Discipline was His own spirit cultured (Hebrews 5:8); and through His heroic, victorious endurance of sin-imposed suffering did He become our High Priest, able to succour those who are tempted (Hebrews 2:17-18, Hebrews 4:15)
New Platonics - With regard to moral Discipline, Ammonius permitted the people to live according to the law of their country, and the dictates of nature; but a more sublime rule was laid down for the wise
Obedience - If they disobey, believers receive judgment and necessary Discipline
Hate, Hatred - ...
The Bible notes that people can hate Discipline (Psalm 50:17 ), peace (Psalm 120:6 ), and knowledge (Proverbs 1:22 )
New Self - However, although the decision to become a Christian may be instantaneously made, the transformation of a sinful human body into one that exemplifies the conduct appropriate to the mind of the new self (righteousness and holiness, Ephesians 4:24 ) requires a lifetime of determination and Discipline (Ephesians 4:22-5:21 )
Apostles - ’ The term was applied by Jesus to the twelve disciples whom He attached to Himself to aid Him in His ministry and to be trained by the Discipline of His example and precept for carrying it on after His departure ( Luke 6:13 , Matthew 10:2 )
Excommunication - Paul frequently claiming the right to exercise Discipline over his converts; comp
Joy - However, all such enjoyment must be linked with right behaviour and self-discipline (Proverbs 23:16-21; Amos 6:4-7; Romans 13:13; Romans 14:17; 1 Thessalonians 5:7-8; 1 Peter 4:3)
Excommunication - The greater excommunication consisted in absolute and entire seclusion from the church, and the participation of all its rights: notice of which was given by circular letters to the most eminent churches all over the world, that they might all confirm this act of Discipline, by refusing to admit the delinquent to their communion. The major, which falls upon those who disobey the commands of the holy see, or refuse to submit to certain points of Discipline; in consequence of which they are excluded from the church militant and triumphant, and delivered over to the devil, and his angels
Steward, Stewardship - We should therefore (a) Discipline ourselves—body, soul, and spirit, so as to realize God’s ideal for us and be most efficient for service—a duty demanding care of the body, training of the mind, culture of the affections, Discipline of the will, etc
Feed, Fed - The tending (which includes this) consists of other acts, of Discipline, authority, restoration, material assistance of individuals, but they are cidental in comparison with the "feeding
Fratricelli - However, all the persecutions which this sect endured were not sufficient to extinguish it; for it subsisted until the times of the reformation in Germany, when its remaining votaries adopted the cause and embraced the doctrine and Discipline of Luther
Excommunication - The New Testament churches apparently used excommunication as a means of redemptive Discipline
Restoration of Offenders - In the Discipline of the Apostolic Church the restoration of the offender was the main idea and that of punishment subordinate
Schoolmaster - ), ‘as well in his inferior rank, as in his recognised duty of enforcing Discipline, the paedagogus was a fit emblem of the Mosaic law
Fabianus, Bishop of Rome - There are also ten decreta assigned to him by Gratian and others, on matters of Discipline
Whip - ) A person (as a member of Parliament) appointed to enforce party Discipline, and secure the attendance of the members of a Parliament party at any important session, especially when their votes are needed
Eusebius, Bishop of Rome - It would seem that, on the cessation of Diocletian's persecution, the church there was rent into two parties on the subject of the terms of readmission of the lapsed to communion: that one Heraclius headed a party who were for readmission without the penitential Discipline insisted on by Eusebius; that the consequent tumults and bloodshed caused "the tyrant" Maxentius to interpose and banish the leaders of both factions; and that Eusebius, dying during his exile in Sicily, thus obtained the name of martyr
Burden, Burdened, Burdensome - ...
B — 2: ἐπιβαρέω (Strong's #1912 — Verb — epibareo — ep-ee-bar-eh'-o ) epi, "upon" (intensive), "to burden heavily," is said of material RV, "burden," AV, "be chargeable to;" of the effect of spiritual admonition and Discipline, 2 Corinthians 2:5 , RV, "press heavily," AV, "overcharge
Admonition, Admonish - It is thus distinguished from paideuo, "to correct by Discipline, to train by act," Hebrews 12:6 ; cp
Family - ...
Parents who love their children will fulfil their duty to instruct and Discipline them. They will not be able to do this, however, if they are ill-instructed or ill-disciplined themselves (Deuteronomy 11:18-19; 2 Samuel 7:14-15; Proverbs 1:8; Proverbs 13:1; Proverbs 13:24; Proverbs 19:18; Proverbs 29:17; Ephesians 6:4; 1 Timothy 3:2-5; 1 Timothy 5:14; Hebrews 12:7-11; see CHASTISEMENT)
Montanus, Bishop of Toledo - We are told that Montanus was the successor of Celsus in the "prima sedes" of the province of Carthaginensis; that he defended and maintained his office; that he wrote two letters on points of church Discipline, one to the inhabitants of Palencia, the other to a certain Turibius, a "religious"; and that he rebutted a scandalous accusation by the help of a miracle wrought in his favour
Nilus, an Ascetic of Sinai - Monastic Discipline seems to have been then very relaxed, as the charges are repeated in his letters and works
Grace - God’s grace continues to work in their lives, giving them the inner power to Discipline themselves, to do good, to endure suffering and to triumph over temptation (Romans 6:14-15; 2 Corinthians 12:9; 2 Timothy 2:1; Titus 2:11-14; see FREEDOM; GOOD WORKS)
Church - The impartial exercise of church government and Discipline, Hebrews 12:15 . As to church order and Discipline, it may be observed, that every Christian society formed on the congregational plan is strictly independent of all other religious societies. 4:; Fuller's Remarks on the Discipline of the Primitive Churches; and Bryson's Compendious View
Church Government - Then the Christian organization did for the Empire what the Roman organization with all its statesmanship and military Discipline had failed to do: it gave it cohesion and unity. But officials chosen to do spiritual work in a spiritual community needed spiritual gifts of some hind; and what these men received in ordination was a spirit of power and love and Discipline (2 Timothy 1:7) (see Westcott, Ephesians, 1906, p. The gift which Timothy received at his ordination was just such as was required for ruling infant churches: it was ‘a spirit of power, and love, and Discipline’ (2 Timothy 1:5; 2 Timothy 1:7). The Discipline exercised by both is similar; they deal with much the same kind of offences, and the chief penalty in both cases is excommunication
Quakers - " ...
But we shall here state a further account of their principles and Discipline, as extracted from a summary transmitted to me from one of their most respectable members. "In the practice of Discipline, we think it indispensable that the order recommended by Christ himself be invariably observed, Matthew 18:15-17 . "...
To effect the salutary purposes of Discipline, meetings were appointed at an early period of the society, which, from the times of their being held, were called quarterly meetings. Each monthly meetng is required to appoint certain persons, under the name of overseers, who are to take care that the rules of our Discipline to put in practice; and when any case of complaint, or disorderly conduct, comes to their knowledge, to see that private admonition, agreeably to the Gospel rule before-mentioned, be given, previously to its being laid before the monthly meeting. "In this place it is proper to add, that, as we believe women may be rightly called to the work of the ministry, we also think that to them belongs a share in the support of our Christian Discipline; and that some parts of it, wherein their own sex is concerned, devolve on them with peculiar propriety; accordingly they have monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings of their own sex, held at the same time and in the same place with those of the men; but separately, and without the power of making rules; and it may be remarked, that, during the persecutions which in the last century occasioned the imprisonment of so many of the men, the care of the poor often fell on the women, and was by them satisfactorily administered. The members of them unite with their brethren in the meetings for Discipline, and are equally accountable to the latter for their conduct. " ...
See a pamphlet entitled, A Summary of the History, Doctrine, and Discipline of the Quakers; Sewell's and Ruttu's Hist
Peter, Second, Theology of - 2) and to declare that God is able to preserve all who engage in the spiritual Disciplines of grace and knowledge (3:18). Because of the divine provision (1:3-4), which must be complemented by their own spiritual Discipline (1:5-11), the righteous will not fall away under the testings that arise from their evil surroundings or from the false teachers (3:17). ...
This spiritual Discipline requires the development of Christian character (1:5-7), adhering to the faith and true teaching of the apostles (1:12-21; 3:15-16), anticipating the day of the Lord (3:11-12), and keeping oneself blameless and unspotted by the world (1:4; 3:14)
Hilarius, Bishop of Rome - Peter and desires that the Discipline of the Roman church should prevail in all churches. 3, 462, to the bishops of the provinces of Vienne, Lyons, Narbonensis prima and secunda, and the Pennine Alps, which letter also contained regulations for the Discipline of the church in Gaul (Hil
Games (2) - It is clear that to Him the body was not an end in itself (Matthew 10:28), but must become the docile servant of the soul (Matthew 18:8), even at the cost of severe Discipline
Self-Suppression - In the Jesuit system the individual is completely subordinated to the community, and the suppression of each man’s self is of vital necessity for the accomplishment of perfect Discipline
Gennadius (10), Bishop of Constantinople - From the beginning of his episcopate Gennadius proved his zeal for the Catholic faith and the maintenance of Discipline
Form - ) To give a particular shape to; to shape, mold, or fashion into a certain state or condition; to arrange; to adjust; also, to model by instruction and Discipline; to mold by influence, etc
Haggai - ...
Haggai 2:10-19 are a separate message from God, reminding the people how unclean they were, and every work of their hands; and how He had been dealing with them in Discipline; yet they had not turned unto Him
Elders - a name given to certain laymen in the Presbyterian Discipline, who are ecclesiastical officers, and in conjunction with the ministers and deacons compose the kirk sessions in Scotland
Indulgences - Instead of confining them, according to their original institution, to the ordinary purposes of ecclesiastical Discipline, they extended them to the punishment of the wicked in the world to come; instead of shortening the duration of earthly penance, they pretended that they could deliver men from the pains of purgatory; instead of allowing them gratuitously, and upon just grounds, to the penitent offender, they sold them in the most open and corrupt manner to the profligate and abandoned, who still continued in their vices
Form - ) To give a particular shape to; to shape, mold, or fashion into a certain state or condition; to arrange; to adjust; also, to model by instruction and Discipline; to mold by influence, etc
Serapion, Bishop of Heraclea - Socrates records, as a characteristic speech, that Chrysostom, having vainly endeavoured to enforce his strict notions of Discipline on his worldly and luxurious clergy, Serapion exclaimed in their hearing, "You will never be able to master these men, bishop, unless you drive them all with one rod" (Socr
Novatianus And Novatianism - ...
Novatianism was the first great schism in the church on a pure question of Discipline. In Montanism questions of Discipline were involved as side issues, but did not constitute its essential difference. The Montanists rejected the lapsed, and in fact all guilty of mortal sins, Tertullian rejected second marriages, as also did the strict Discipline of the 2nd cent. Novatianism may be regarded as a conservative protest on behalf of the ancient Discipline against the prevalent liberalism of the Roman church (Baur, l. John Chrysostom's severe zeal for church Discipline led him to persecute them. the mountainous character of these countries, may not have inclined them towards its stern Discipline is a fair question
Devotion - ), with the addition of meditation, and occasionally of fasting or some form of self-discipline. Fasting, too, is associated with the Temptation (Matthew 4:2), of which one lesson is that a pure conscience and an ideal conformity with God can be attained or retained only by self-discipline and hard steadfastness under testing. Self-discipline, as removing the occasions of sin and as aiding the communion of the human spirit with God, is enjoined in such passages as Matthew 5:29-30, though in others the object becomes the avoidance of conduct that might offend or imperil the souls of the weak. ...
That self-discipline is in itself and apart from its motives meritorious, is nowhere taught by Christ, and such a notion is quite contrary to the genius of Christianity
Dionysius of Alexandria - —To Novatian, to the Roman Confessors, to Cornelius of Rome, Fabius of Antioch, Conon of Hermopolis; and to Christians in Alexandria, Egypt, Laodicaea, Armenia, on Discipline and repentance, with pictures from contemporary history (ib. ...
To these, of some of which only the titles remain, must be added an important canonical letter to Basilides, of uncertain date, discussing various questions of Discipline, and especially points connected with the Lenten fast (cf
Ordination - In the ancient Discipline there was no such thing as a vague and absolute ordination; but every one was to have a church, whereof he was to be ordained clerk or priest. The council of Trent, however, restored the ancient Discipline, and appointed that none should be ordained but those who were provided with a benefice; which practice still obtains in the church of England
Zephyrinus - He defends Callistus against the libel on his character, which, however, he allows may have had some ground, but acquits Hippolytus of wilful misrepresentation, supposing him to have been partly misled by false reports and partly by prejudice, being himself a strict maintainer of ancient Discipline, while Callistus was a liberal. ...
Zephyrinus is further accused of undue laxity in matters of Discipline
Laban (2) - )...
Unscrupulous duplicity and acquisitiveness and hypocritical craft in Laban were overruled to Discipline Jacob whose natural character had much of the same elements, but without the hypocrisy, and restrained by genuine grace
Break - ) To tame; to reduce to subjection; to make tractable; to Discipline; as, to break a horse to the harness or saddle
Element - Such a bondage to the letter had some adaptation to babes, who might need the Discipline of signs and symbols while under the care of a tutor, but it was a weak and beggarly thing in comparison with conscious living fellowship with the Lord Christ
Labour - In 1 Corinthians 9:6 he mentions Barnabas as another who lived by the same rule-a striking instance of self-discipline in view of his past history (cf
Forgiveness - This of course is different from the act of God in forgiving sins, and may be called administrative forgiveness in the church; and if the act of Discipline is led of the Spirit, it is ratified in heaven: cf
Condemnation - The man who fails to judge and Discipline himself is reminded of his duty by Divine chastening; and if that fail, he shares in the final judgment with the lost (1 Corinthians 11:31 f
Anger (Wrath) of God - In the history of Israel it appears as a terrible factor in the Discipline of the nation to righteousness: the ungrateful, the rebellious, and especially the idolatrous, are destroyed by fire and sword, pestilence and famine ( Psalms 78:1-72 , Deuteronomy 32:15-43 )
Foolishness - Their heart-culture, their spirits’ Discipline have been sleeping: and the chances of life pass them by
Pavement - In Jerusalem the garrison occupied the castle of Antonia, within which would be the tribunal used in cases of military Discipline, but probably not for the hearing of Jewish complaints and causes
Excommunication (2) - The word does not occur in Authorized and Revised Versions, but we have in the Gospels several references to the practice as it existed among the Jews in the time of Christ, while certain words of Christ Himself supply the germs of the usage of the Christian Church as it meets us in the Apostolic age and was subsequently developed in the ecclesiastical Discipline of later times. ...
For the immediate origin of the practice of excommunication as it meets us in the Gospels, we have only to go back to Ezra and the days after the Exile, when the strictest Discipline was absolutely essential to the solidarity, indeed to the very existence, of the Jewish Church and nation. In Matthew 18:17-19 He makes a similar promise to the Church generally, or to the Twelve as representing the ecclesia—not ‘qua apostles with ecclesiastical authority, but qua disciples with the ethical power of morally Disciplined men’ (Bruce, Expositor’s Gr. It is the attempt to find here the authoritative institution of excommunication as a formal act of ecclesiastical Discipline that gives a colour of justification to the contention of some critics (e
Marriage - ...
In certain circumstances it may be God’s will for a person not to marry, and this may at times require much self-discipline (Jeremiah 16:2; Matthew 19:121 Corinthians 1:7-8,17,32-35). Even among those who intend to marry, self-discipline is necessary
Punishment - However, Jesus did provide for church Discipline. One illustration of church Discipline in a case of gross immorality is found in 1 Corinthians 5:1-5
Self-Denial - There are five such kinds of Discipline recommended or countenanced by our Lord’s teaching and example: (1) fasting, (2) celibacy and sexual restraint, (3) almsgiving, (4) vigils, (5) the refusal of luxury in the surroundings of life. Paget, The Spirit of Discipline; J
Separation - ...
It would be a mistake to suppose that Christ meant to withhold from His disciples authority to exercise Discipline in the case of grave offences against the laws of the Kingdom, Discipline which they did, in point of fact, afterwards exercise (Acts 8:20-23, 1618096034_1), but which had for its object the edification, and not the destruction, of believers (2 Corinthians 10:8)
Callistus, Pope - ...
We find from Tertullian that Zephyrinus began, no doubt under Callistus's influence, the relaxation of Discipline which he himself afterwards carried further when he became bishop. ...
Hippolytus brings against him several other grave accusations of further relaxing the bonds of church Discipline (ib
Parents (2) - Domestic Discipline was exceedingly strict; the behaviour of child to parent would be marked by that courtliness of etiqnette which was once a feature of English family life; there was, perhaps, little demonstrativeness of affection in the case of the father. The strict Discipline above spoken of is implied in Luke 2:51 (καὶ ἦν ὑποτασσόμενος αὐτοῖς): the respect and obedience which Joseph and Mary claim as their due are promptly rendered by the boy, the growing youth
Levi - The Discipline made the sons, once so unfeeling towards Joseph, to become self sacrificing for Benjamin
Brownists - ...
The occasion of their separation was not, therefore, any fault they found with the faith, but only with the Discipline and form of government of the churches in England
Daniel - ...
At the close of his three years of Discipline and training in the royal schools, Daniel was distinguished for his proficiency in the "wisdom" of his day, and was brought out into public life
Temptation - This will require self-discipline as they develop better habits in their behaviour (Colossians 3:12-13; Galatians 5:16), thinking (Romans 8:5; 2 Corinthians 10:5; Philippians 4:8), talking (Ephesians 5:11-12; Titus 2:8) and praying (Matthew 6:13; Mark 14:38)
Evangelism - God's care for the first couple after they had sinned, His plan to “bless” all people through the Israelite nation, and His continuing attempts through the prophets and through Discipline to forge His people into a usable nation all speak of His concern
Diet - But the assembly drew up a list of grievances, which were reduced to an hundred articles, some whereof aimed at the destruction of the pope's authority, and the Discipline of the Romish church; however, they consented that the Lutherans should be commanded not to write against the Roman Catholics
Ministry - There was the need of government and Discipline, of pastoral counsel and comfort, of stated instruction by regular teachers as well as of occasional visits from wandering apostles and prophets
Curse - ]'>[2] (c) The ban of extermination gave place, under certain conditions, to the remedial Discipline of excommunication; that is to say, a temporary ‘cutting off from the congregation’; referred to, as a Jewish institution, in John 9:22; John 12:42; John 16:2, and, as a Christian (apparently), in Matthew 18:17
Baptists - The polity of the Baptist Church is congregational, each church being independent of control regarding Discipline and worship, appointment of pastor, and election of deacons and other officers
Shepherd - you shall be counted as Mine, and subjected to My chastening Discipline with a view to My ultimate saving of the elect, Micah 7:14), checking each sheep as it passed; to act as porter, guarding the entrance to the fold by night (John 10:3)
Jehoshaphat - Jehoshaphat repaired this fault by the good regulations, and the good order, which he established in his dominions, both as to civil and religious affairs, by appointing honest and able judges, by regulating the Discipline of the priests and Levites, and by enjoining them to perform their duty with punctuality
Order - Regular government or Discipline
Maximus, Bishop of Turin - Peter as supreme in Discipline, St
Slave, Slavery (2) - —Discipline without undue laxity was recognized as the right treatment of slaves (cf. , where the two prominent features are the severity to which the Discipline might legally be carried, viz
Temptation - Their experience is not joyous, but grievous; nevertheless, Divine wisdom enables them to ‘count it all joy’ as being a part of the Discipline which is designed to make them ‘perfect and entire, lacking in nothing
Church - "God has commanded his people to organize themselves into distinct visible ecclesiastical communities, with constitutions, laws, and officers, badges, ordinances, and Discipline, for the great purpose of giving visibility to his kingdom, of making known the gospel of that kingdom, and of gathering in all its elect subjects
Letter Form And Function - Such letters are characterized by expressions of shock ( Galatians 1:6 ), insulting address (Galatians 3:1 ), and the formulas “I have this against you” (Revelation 2:4 ,1 Corinthians 16:10-118:14 ,Revelation 2:14,2:20 NRSV) and “I reprove and Discipline” ( Revelation 3:19 NRSV)
Bonifacius i, Pope - Boniface was strenuous in enforcing the Discipline of the church
Baltimore, Maryland, City of - The Second Plenary Council (1866) declared the Catholic doctrine on Divine Revelation, the one Church of Christ, nature and necessity of faith, the Holy Scripture, the Holy Trinity, the future life, and veneration of the Blessed Virgin and the saints; adopted regulations on the hierarchy and government of the Church, ecclesiastical persons, ecclesiastical property, the sacraments, Divine worship, uniformity of Discipline, and education of youth
Per'Sia - In war they fought bravely, but without Discipline
Masona, Bishop of Merida - 28, 606, to him from Isidore in answer to an inquiry on a matter of Discipline
Perpetua, Vibia - They were attended in prison, according to the ancient Discipline of the Carthaginian church, by the deacons Tertius and Pomponius (Cypr
Biblical Theology - ...
Relation to Other Disciplines Biblical theology is related to but different from three other major branches of theological inquiry. ...
Past and Future of the Discipline The role of the Bible in Christian thought over the centuries has varied widely. Until relatively recently biblical theology as a distinct Discipline did not exist. It was at this time that biblical theology as a distinct Discipline made its appearance. Gabler inaugurated the Discipline, calling for it to rescue the Bible from the dogmatic chains of the church. Both church and world could gain transforming conviction from the fruit of a Discipline humble enough to discern, and brave enough to advocate, the ancient yet contemporary verities that biblical theology is charged to bring to light
Hosea - God's love is courageous enough to Discipline His people (Hosea 3:3-4 ). God Disciplines unfaithful leaders (Hosea 5:1-2 ). God Disciplines because He knows His people fully (Hosea 5:3 ). God seeks the return of His people through Discipline (Hosea 5:15 )
Hebrews, Theology of - Exhortation to persevere under spiritual Discipline...
Proverbs 3:11-12 ...
12:5-6...
9. Finally, from the broader perspective, God's gallery of heroes and heroines in chapter 11, culminating with Jesus as the supreme example of faith and endurance (12:1-4) is followed by a call to be Disciplined by grace in the remainder of the epistle. ...
Exhortation to Persevere under Spiritual Discipline . As he submitted to the Discipline of his Father's will, which was ultimately the cross, so must we
Confession - The case of Discipline at Corinth, when St. 8), regards the bishop with his council as in charge of the Discipline of the Church: ‘Now the Lord forgiveth all men when they repent, if repenting they return to the unity of God and to the council of the bishop. Marshall, The Penitential Discipline of the Primitive Church, new ed
Titus, Epistle to - ’ Christianity, without the Discipline of a firm organization, springing up in such soil, would naturally be weakened and corrupted by the national vices
Condemnation - The Discipline of the church is also to be carried out with this eschatological perspective in mind (1 Corinthians 5:1-13 )
Essenes (2) - ...
The order was held together by the strictest Discipline
Eusebius, Bishop of Vercellae - 63), especially commends him as the first Western bishop who joined monastic Discipline with the discharge of episcopal duties
Baal (1) - A remnant of it and an effort to combine idolatry with Jehovah worship still in part survived until the final purgation of all tendency to idols was effected by the severe Discipline of the Babylonian captivity (Zephaniah 1:4-6)
Puritans - ' Some secret attempts that had been made by them to establish a separate congregation and Discipline had been carefully repressed by the strict hand which Elizabeth held over all her subjects
Moab, Moabites - Balaam was compelled by God to bless them instead of cursing them, buthe gave to Balak the fatal advice to try to weaken them by seductive alliances (which would cause them to fall under the Lord's Discipline), and this, alas, was only too successful: cf
Mercy - So is that fondness, of a parent that withholds the hand of Discipline from a beloved child, when its frowardness and faults render seasonable and prudent correction necessary to save it from ruin
Eleusius, Bishop of Cyzicus - He is uniformly described as of high personal character, holy in life, rigid in self-discipline, untiring in his exertions for what he deemed truth, and, according to St
Satan - ” Possibly David suffered because of mistakes he made; and within the permissive will of God, He used David’s enemies to Discipline His servant. When the prophet persisted, God Disciplined him: “And God’s anger was kindled because he went: and the angel of the Lord stood in the way for an adversary against him” ( Meletius, Bishop of Lycopolis - "They neglected sound doctrine, and observed certain vain points of Discipline, upholding the same infatuated views as the Jews and Samaritans
Presbyterians - In the Scottish church, every regulation of public worship, every act of Discipline, and every ecclesiastical censure, which in other churches flows from the authority of a diocesan bishop, or from a convocation of the clergy, is the joint work of a certain number of clergymen and laymen acting together with equal authority, and deciding every question by a plurality of voices. In the church of Scotland every parish has two or three of those lay-elders, who are grave and serious persons chosen from among the heads of families, of known orthodoxy, and steady adherence to the worship, Discipline, and government of the church. Being solemnly engaged to use their utmost endeavours for the suppression of vice and the cherishing of piety and virtue, and to exercise Discipline faithfully and diligently, the minister, in the presence of the congregation, sets them apart to their office by solemn prayer; and concludes the ceremony, which is sometimes called ordination, with exhorting both elders and people to their respective duties. The presbytery treats of such matters as concern the particular churches within its limits; as the examination, admission, ordination, and censuring of ministers; the licensing of probationers, rebuking the gross or contumacious sinners, the directing the sentence of excommunication, the deciding upon references and appeals from kirk sessions, resolving cases of conscience, explaining difficulties in doctrine or Discipline; and censuring, according to the word of God, any heresy or erroneous doctrine which hath either been publicly or privately maintained within the bounds of its jurisdiction
Asceticism (2) - —Asceticism may be defined as a form of self-discipline which consists in the habitual renunciation of the things of the flesh, with a view to the cultivation of the life of the spirit. (2) Secondly, there was a class of hermit ascetics who fled away from the allurements and temptations of society, and gave themselves up to a life of rigid self-discipline in the solitude of the wilderness. ...
Further to illustrate this point of view, we may briefly allude to Jesus’ teaching on three prominent characteristics of the ascetic life—voluntary poverty, celibacy, and bodily Discipline as exercised in the practice of fasting. ...
(3) So, once more, towards the traditional Discipline of asceticism Jesus took up an attitude of indifference
Presbyterians - In the Scottish church, every regulation of public worship, every act of Discipline, and every ecclesiastical censure, which in other churches flows from the authority of a diocesan bishop, or from a convocation of the clergy, is the joint work of a certain number of clergymen and laymen acting together with equal authority, and deciding every question by a plurality of voices. In the church of Scotland every parish has two or three of those lay-elders, who are grave and serious persons chosen from among the heads of families, of known orthodoxy, and steady adherence to the worship, Discipline, and government of the church. Being solemnly engaged to use their utmost endeavours for the suppression of vice and the cherishing of piety and virtue, and to exercise Discipline faithfully and diligently, the minister, in the presence of the congregation, sets them apart to their office by solemn prayer; and concludes the ceremony, which is sometimes called ordination, with exhorting both elders and people to their respective duties. The presbytery treats of such matters as concern the particular churches within its limits; as the examination, admission, ordination, and censuring of ministers; the licensing of probationers, rebuking the gross or contumacious sinners, the directing the sentence of excommunication, the deciding upon references and appeals from kirk sessions, resolving cases of conscience, explaining difficulties in doctrine or Discipline; and censuring, according to the word of God, any heresy or erroneous doctrine which hath either been publicly or privately maintained within the bounds of its jurisdiction
Moravians - The count, who, soon after their arrival, removed from Dresden to his estate in the country, showed every mark of kindness to the poor emigrants; but being a zealous member of the church established by law, he endeavoured for some time to prevail upon them to unite themselves with it, by adopting the Lutheran faith and Discipline. This they declined; and the count, on a more minute inquiry into their ancient history and distinguishing tenets, not only desisted from his first purpose, but became himself a convert to the faith and Discipline of the United Brethren. Porter, then archbishop of Canterbury, congratulated him upon this event, and promised his assistance to a church of confessors, of whom he wrote in terms of the highest respect, for their having maintained the pure and primitive faith and Discipline in the midst of the most tedious and cruel persecutions. the Overseers' department, of which the business is to see that the constitution and Discipline of the brethren be every where maintained. ...
They have likewise seniores civiles, or lay elders, in contradistinction to spiritual elders, or bishops, who are appointed to watch over the constitution and Discipline of the Unity of the Brethren, over the observance of the laws of the country in which congregations or missions are established, and over the privileges granted to the Brethren by the governments under which they live
Divination And Magic - The practice was widely known in the ancient Middle East, especially among the Babylonians who developed it into a highly respected Discipline
Consecrate, Consecration - Paget, The Spirit of Discipline, 1903, p
Beam And Mote - He will be too much occupied with the task of self-discipline to be the quick and eager censor of others
Caecilianus, Archdeacon And Bishop of Carthage - African church lost its purely personal aspect, and became a stern religious contest on questions of Discipline
Eulalius, an Antipope - 3, 419) by ordering Boniface to be expelled from the city, and the authors of the sedition in his favour punished, Eulalius having been duly appointed according to the rule of Catholic Discipline (competens numerus ordinantium, solemnitas temporis, locique qualitas) and the rival election being deficient in these respects
Seceders - They also published what they called an Act, Declaration, and Testimony, to the doctrine, worship, government, and Discipline of the church of Scotland; and against several instances, as they said, of defection from these, both in former and in the present times. " They are fully persuaded, however, that the standards of public authority in the church of Scotland exhibit a just and consistent view of the meaning and design of the holy Scriptures with regard to doctrine, worship, government, and Discipline; and they so far differ from the dissenters in England, in that they hold these standards to be not only articles of peace and a test of orthodoxy, but as a bond of union and fellowship. ...
When any of them fall into the sin of fornication or adultery, the scandal is regularly purged according to the form of process in the established church; and those of the delinquents who do not submit to adequate censure are publicly declared to be fugitives from Discipline, and are expelled the society
Beda, Historian - venerabilis monasterii tui," to assist in the examination of some points of ecclesiastical Discipline. Cuthbert under Boisil and Eata; from these he drew the Irish knowledge of Scripture and Discipline. ...
He describes the nature of his studies, the meditation on Scripture, the observance of regular Discipline, the care of the daily singing in church, "semper aut discere, aut docere, aut scribere dulce habui
Abstinence - Paul had to prove that such fastings could not be redemptively of any value, that they were not binding, that they did not place the observer of them on a higher spiritual plane than the non-observer, that even as means of Discipline they were of doubtful value, and that they were perpetually liable to abuse (Colossians 2:20 ff. This view of fasting, grotesque as it appears to us, is akin to the truth that surfeiting of the body dulls the spiritual vision, and that the spiritual life is a rigorous Discipline (cf. has been adduced in support of self-torture of all kinds; but, while we must not minimize the reality of Christian Discipline, nothing can be legitimately deduced from this passage or any other in favour of fasting or flagellation as a general means of sanctification, nor is the Apostle’s view based on a dualism which looks on matter and the human body as inherently evil. In striking language he figures himself as in the course of his Christian race undergoing privations, abstinences, and self-discipline as great as any runner for the Isthmian prize or as any pugilist
Hosea, Theology of - But judgment, applied by a gracious Lord, is also Discipline and effective Discipline seeks restoration rather than alienation so God worked to restore his people to himself (2:12)
Jacobus Baradaeus, Bishop of Edessa - He became remarkable for the severity of his self-discipline. The speed of the zealous missionary was promoted by the fleetest dromedaries of a devout chief of the Arabs; the doctrine and Discipline of the Jacobites were secretly established in the dominions of Justinian, and each Jacobite was compelled to violate the laws and to hate the Roman legislator" (Gibbon, vol
Seed (2) - Certainly, whatever be the original nucleus, the editorial reflexions indicate a rather advanced period in the history of the early Church’s mission and Discipline
Energy - Paget, Spirit of Discipline, pp
Samuel, Second Book of - He was rebuked by Nathan: he confessed his sin, and it was put away; but he had to bear the needed Discipline
History, Church - The internal history of the Church treats of such subjects as her membership, nature, constitution, doctrine, worship, and Discipline; the external history considers the Church's relations with persons and institutions which, while not belonging to her, have nevertheless some connection with her, as schismatics, heretics, and infidels, whom she seeks to convert, and secular powers with whom she comes into contact
Elkesai, Elkesaites - Hippolytus takes credit for resisting the teaching of Alcibiades, and blames Callistus for having, by the laxity of his doctrine and practice concerning church Discipline, pre-disposed men's minds to the easy methods of forgiveness expounded in this book
Love-Feasts - Prayer again concludes our feast; and thence we depart, not to fight and quarrel; not to run about and abuse all we meet; not to give up ourselves to lascivious pastime; but to pursue the same care of modesty and chastity, as men that have fed at a supper of philosophy and Discipline, rather than a corporeal feast
Punishment - (β) In the exercise of Discipline, the members of a Christian church, acting as a judicial body, were vested with the power to inflict censure, or the severer punishment of exclusion from the fellowship of the Church, on every brother who walked disorderly (1 Corinthians 5:3-5, 1 Thessalonians 5:14, 2 Thessalonians 3:6)
Reformation - In general, an act of reforming or correcting an error or abuse in religion, Discipline, or the like. In 1529, a new diet was formed, and the power which had been granted to princes of managing ecclesiastical affairs till the meeting of a general council, was now revoked, and every change declared unlawful that should be introduced into the doctrine, Discipline, or worship of the established religion, before the determination of the approaching council was known. After various debates the following acts were passed on the twenty-fifth of September:...
That the Protestants who followed the confession of Augsburg should be for the future considered as entirely free from the jurisdiction of the Roman pontiff and from the authority and superintendence of the bishops; that they were left at perfect liberty to enact laws for themselves relating to their religious sentiments, Discipline, and worship; that all the inhabitants of the German empire should be allowed to judge for themselves in religious matters, and to join themselves to that church whose doctrine and worship they thought the most pure and consonant to the spirit of true Christianity; and that all those who should injure or prosecute any person under religious pretences, and on account of their opinions, should be declared and proceeded against as public enemies of the empire, invaders of its liberty, and disturbers of its peace. He permitted the Protestant doctors to preach publicly the sentiments of Luther, but did not venture to change the established government and Discipline of the church. This was followed by a plan of religious doctrine, worship, and Discipline, laid down by Bugenhagius, whom the king had sent for from Wittemberg for that purpose; and in 1539, an assembly of the states at Odensee gave a solemn sanction to all these transactions
Methodists, Protestant - Methodists, government and Discipline of. A considerable number both of the Calvinists and Arminian Methodists approve of the Discipline of the church of England, while many, it is said, are dissenters in principle. They did not, however, as it is well known, confine themselves to her laws in all respects as it related to Discipline. Wesley's design in calling the preachers together annually, was not merely for the regulation of the circuits, but also for the review of their doctrines and Discipline, and for the examination of their moral conduct; that those who were to administer with him in holy things might be thoroughly furnished for every good work. Wesley's death, his people have been divided; but this division, it seems, respects Discipline more than sentiment
Leo i, the Great - Leo was the man for the post: lofty and severe in life and aims, rigid and stern in insisting on the rules of ecclesiastical Discipline; gifted with an indomitable energy, courage, and perseverance, and a capacity for keeping his eye on many widely distant spheres of activity at once; inspired with an unhesitating acceptance and an admirable grasp of the dogmatic faith of the church, which he was prepared to press everywhere at all costs; finally, possessed with, and unceasingly acting upon, an overmastering sense of the indefeasible authority of the church of Rome as the divinely ordained centre of all church work and life, he stands out as the Christian representative of the imperial dignity and severity of old Rome, and is the true founder of the medieval papacy in all its magnificence of conception and uncompromising strength. The world wanted above all things unity and strength, and this was found in taking Rome for a centre and a guide both in faith and in Discipline. We see him standing as in a watch-tower, with his eye on every part of the Christian world, zealous everywhere for the interests of the faith and of Discipline, and, wherever he sees occasion, taking the opportunity of insinuating the authority of his see, not only in the West, but in the East. The "authority of the apostolic see" to regulate Discipline and depose bishops is asserted very absolutely to the bishops of Aquileia and of the home provinces in the beginning of his pontificate ; as for the heretics, "obediendo nobis, probent se esse nostros" ( Epp. Biennial provincial councils, summoned by the metropolitans, referring graver matters to a representative synod, summoned by the vicar, whence again difficult questions are to be referred to Rome, are to maintain provincial Discipline ( Epp
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - ...
(b ) Defending the Paraclete and His Discipline: de Virginibus Velandis ( c. "We are a body linked together by a common religious profession, by unity of Discipline, and by a common hope. ); and by holy words we nourish faith, raise hope, stablish confidence, and strengthen Discipline. It is highly probable that about this time a synod of African bishops met at Carthage to discuss matters affecting the organization, Discipline, and teaching of the church; and the occasion may have been used to ordain one who, as an "apologist," had proved himself so fearless a champion of the church. The flock looked to their pastors for guidance: prayer, baptism, repentance, and the Discipline connected with them; woman's dress and woman's life, married or unmarried; pleasures, amusements, how far lawful or unlawful,—all were matters upon which direction was desirable, and to all does Tertullian apply himself
Ethics - "A spirit of harlotry" thus gained religious sanction; greed and drunkenness degraded men and women; the people cast off Discipline, defiled the land, and "knew not how to blush. To watch each prophet elaborating this argument is to retrace the Discipline that ultimately made Jewish ethics the envy of the ancient world. The ninth commandment protects an individual's good name, and the tenth forbids undisciplined desire. Covenanters at Qumran sought "absolute" holiness through monastic Discipline, based on moral dualism (light/darkness, truth/falsehood)
Hebrews - Suffering functions as a Discipline that leads God's children to maturity or perfection. ...
The readers could also be qualified to stand in God's presence by means of the Discipline of suffering. God Disciplines His children for their good, that they might share his holiness (Hebrews 12:10 )
Dominicans - Upon this the impostor told him, that nothing but the most extraordinary mortifications, such as the Discipline of the whip, performed during eight days by the whole monastery, and Jetzer's lying prostrate in the form of one crucified in the chapel during mass, could contribute to his deliverance. ...
Morning was no sooner come, than Jetzer gave an account of this apparition to the rest of the convent, who all unanimously advised him to undergo the Discipline that was enjoined him, and every one consented to bear his share of the task imposed
Ordination - In the ancient Discipline there was no such thing as a vague and absolute ordination; but every one was to have a church, whereof he was to be ordained clerk or priest. The council of Trent, however, restored the ancient Discipline, and appointed that none should be ordained but those who were provided with a benefice; which practice still obtains in England
Ethics - They need to exercise constant self-discipline (1 Corinthians 9:24-27), and they will be able to do this through the work of Christ’s Spirit within them (Galatians 5:22-23; see SELF-DISCIPLINE)
Flood - A miraculous deluge of water God used to Discipline His world made evil through human sin
Hussites - He adopted the sentiments of Wickliffe and the Waldenses; and, in the year 1407, began openly to oppose and preach against divers errors in doctrine, as well as corruptions in point of Discipline, then reigning in the church
Establishments - He presided in their education and Discipline, in their religious worship, and in their general government
Jacob - ...
God used this humiliating sorrow to Discipline Jacob, and recover him to his true calling
Church - There was only one assembly, the Church of God, though expressed in different localities, in which indeed there were local office bearers, as elders and deacons, and where also Discipline was locally carried out
Deceit, Deception, Guile - Church, Discipline of the Christian Character
Faustus (11), Sometimes Called the Breton - Faustus continued as bishop the stern self-discipline which he had practised as monk and abbat
Felix Iii, Bishop of Rome - The council had also enacted canons of Discipline, the 9th and the 17th giving to the patriarchal throne of Constantinople the final determination of causes against metropolitans in the East; and the 28th assigning to the most holy throne of Constantinople, or new Rome, equal privileges with the elder Rome in ecclesiastical matters, as being the second after her, with the right of ordaining metropolitans in the Pontic and Asian and Thracian dioceses, and bishops among the barbarians therein
Wisdom - This is especially represented by the Book of Proverbs, which gives instruction on personal behavior from the Discipline of children (22:6) to the golden-rule treatment of one's neighbor (24:29)
Greek Church - In regard to Discipline and worship, the Greek church has the same division of the clergy into regular and secular, the same spiritual jurisdiction of bishops and their officials, the same distinction of ranks and offices, with the church of Rome
Jacob - ...
God used this humiliating sorrow to Discipline Jacob, and recover him to his true calling
Dualism - While Aristotle thought that reason might use sense as an artist his material, Neo-Platonism taught that only by an ascetic Discipline could reason be emancipated from the bondage of sense; and Stoicism treated sense as a usurper in man’s nature, to be crushed and cast out by reason
Right - You with strict Discipline instructed right
Mind - ...
Notes: (1) For the noun sophronismos, in 2 Timothy 1:7 , see Discipline
Unity (2) - According to the conception of the Church of the first centuries, unity was locally constituted by association in acts of communion with God (especially in the Eucharistic synaxis), and by recognition of the authority representing the Discipline of the Church; œcumenically, it was constituted by intercommunion, evidenced by reception on the part of each local community of the formatœ (commendatory letters) of the rest, by homologation of each other’s Discipline, by the encyclical letters of their respective chief pastors, and later by common Conciliar action. Churches autocephalous (externally independent of each other) might exercise large discretion in internal arrangement, yet recognize each other’s sacraments and Discipline
Organization (2) - The sea might be full of fish, but fishers were needful (Luke 5:10); the fields were ripe unto harvest, but labourers must be found for the reaping (Matthew 9:37, Luke 10:2); the broadest community will need the power of exercising Discipline, even to the extent of excommunicating if that will make the wrong-doer feel the distance between his present and his best self (Matthew 18:17); the tree must have visible form if it is to shelter men in its branches (Matthew 13:32, Luke 13:19), though its vital force may be a hidden mystery, permeating, as it does, the whole body, as the leaven does the bread (Matthew 13:33, Luke 13:21). He adopted no systematized body of teaching, or of technical Rabbinic Discipline, and no casuistic expounding of Scripture. Their equivalent title in Greek cities would seem to have been ‘overseers,’ ‘bishops’ (ἐπίσκοποι, Philippians 1:1, Titus 1:7), and their duties the same, namely, attending to the poor and the sick, helping travelling brethren, exercising Discipline towards wrong-doers, and the general administration of the community’s business
Exodus, the - ...
The ready supply of their bodily wants in Egypt (Numbers 11:5) and the rich valley of the Nile rendered this corrective Discipline the more needful, in order to rouse them to realize their high destiny and to be willing to depart. Even Moses, who had been so marvelously trained to be their leader, failed at first to awaken them; both he and they needed a further severe Discipline of 40 years
Timothy, Letters to - It gives instruction concerning behaviour towards people in different age categories (5:1-2), care for widows (5:3-16), appointment and support of church leaders (5:17-25), attitudes of slaves and masters (6:1-2), treatment of false teachers (6:3-10), self-discipline and courage in God’s servants (6:11-16) and the dangers of wealth (6:17-19)
Satan - Twice we read of persons "handed over to Satan" for spiritual Discipline by the church (1 Samuel 29:4 ; 1 Timothy 1:19-20 )
Husbandman - The human mind never fails to be arrested in religious mood by the mystic forces of nature; and in the case of the Jews there was this added Discipline, that Scripture, read statedly in their hearing, teemed with references to the tilling of the soil
Corinthians - ...
Such was the state of things as to the interior Discipline of the assemblies and edification; but the exterior deportment, which the members of this society had maintained in civil life, soon disappeared also, Formerly, when differences arose among the believers, they were adjusted by the intervention of arbitrators from their own communion, and terminated quietly
Muratorian Fragment - (b) Epistles to individuals: Philemon Titus and two to Timothy written from personal affection but hallowed by the Catholic church for the ordering of ecclesiastical Discipline
Siricius, Bishop of Rome - of Tarragona in Spain, addressed to Damasus but received by Siricius, asking the pope's advice on matters of Discipline and with regard to abuses prevalent in the Spanish church
Absolution - All the Churches, to a greater or less extent, supplement the preaching of the word by ‘discipline,’ and their admission to communion and exclusion from it tell powerfully on the individual conscience. The value, however, of this Discipline depends wholly on the measure in which those who administer it are Christian, not legal, in their spirit, and on the support which the Discipline receives from the spiritual level of the general body of the Church
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - During his renewed monastic life and in his capacity of abbat he was distinguished for the strictness of his own life and the rigour of his Discipline. He lost no time in taking measures for the restoration of Discipline, the reform of abuses, the repression of heresy, and the establishment of the authority of the Roman see, both in his own metropolitan province and wherever his influence extended. He issued the following regulations for the restoration of monastic Discipline: no monk should be received under 18 years of age, nor any husband without his wife's consent (in one case he orders a husband who had entered a monastery to be restored to his wife
In 592 began a struggle in reference to Discipline with certain bishops of Thessaly and Dalmatia, in the province of Illyricum
Corinthians, Second Epistle to - Paul insisted on Church Discipline. , in which (1) he expresses great satisfaction at the good news of Discipline exercised against evildoers, (2) justifies the collection for Jerusalem, and (3) vindicates his Apostolic authority
Pietists - One sect of these practical reformers proposed to carry on their plan without introducing any change into the doctrine, Discipline, or form of government, that were established in the Lutheran church. ...
The other maintained, on the contrary, that it was impossible to promote the progress of real piety among the Lutherans without making considerable alterations in their doctrine, and changing the whole form of their ecclesiastical Discipline and polity
Arabia - Moses' stay of 40 years in the same quarter served the same end of preparatory Discipline
Library - They included manuscripts of all of the Old Testament books except for Esther, works from the Old Testament Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, and sectarian compositions such as The Manual of Discipline, The War Scroll, and The Temple Scroll
Lie, Lying - One reason that the nation suffers the Discipline of the Lord is her insistence on lying
Grave Gravity - Paget, The Spirit of Discipline, 1891, p
Care - The forethought and work necessary to provide food and raiment for himself and for those dependent upon him, are part of the Divine Discipline of character
Forsaking All - Then there were the Twelve, whom He required to be always with Him, following Him wherever He went, sharing His lot, and entering by daily intercourse and Discipline into the myssteries of the Kingdom of Heaven, that they might be fitted for the task of carrying on His work when He was gone
Caesarius, Bishop of Arles - At the age of thirteen he betook himself to the famous monastery of Lerins ( Lerinum ), where he rapidly became master of all which the learning and Discipline of the place could impart
Paul - He had profited by the instructions of Gamaliel, and became learned in the law; yielding himself to the strictest Discipline of the sect of the Pharisees, he had become a fierce defender of Judaism and a bitter enemy of Christianity, Acts 8:3 26:9-11
Food - ...
Apart from considering others, Christians must Discipline their eating and drinking habits for their own sake
Joannes (520), Monk And Author - Dupin gives an analysis of the Pratum for illustrations of church Discipline (Eng
Stephanus i., Bishop of Rome - of Rome to influence with effect the Gallic provinces, Cyprian is far from conceding him any prerogative beyond that of the general collegium of bishops, by whose concurrent action, according to his theory, the true faith and Discipline of the Church Catholic was to be maintained
Methodists - ...
[The preceding account, so far as it respects the original history, the doctrines, and the moral Discipline of Wesleyan Methodists, is equally applicable to those in America and in Europe. ")...
For a more minute detail of the ecclesiastical economy, spiritual and temporal, of American Wesleyan Methodists, (which would lead us too far for a work of this sort,) reference may be had to the small volume published at the Conference Office, entitled ‘The Doctrines and Discipline of the Methodist Episcopal Church. ...
Beside the above, there are in the United States several smaller associations of persons bearing the name of Methodists, who hold and teach, in general, the doctrines of Wesleyan Methodists, but are not in connection with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and differ from it in various points of ecclesiastical economy and Discipline
Ethics - The Discipline of ethics deals with such questions as: “What ought I do?” “How should I act so as to do what is good and right?” “What is meant by good?” “Who is the good person?” Biblical ethics likewise addresses some of the identical questions. The closest Hebrew term in the Old Testament for “ethics,” “virtue” or “ideals” is the word musar , “discipline” or “teaching” (Proverbs 1:8 ) or even derek , “way or path” of the good and the right
Spirits in Prison - And Tertullian (de Anima, 58) explains the φυλακή of Matthew 5:25 as the Hades of Discipline for the soul
Hand - ...
A strict hand, severe Discipline rigorous government
Fulness of the Time - —Centuries of chequered Discipline had fixed in the Jewish mind the belief in one true and perfectly righteous God, and subsequently to the return from the Exile there had been no relapse into idolatry
Abraham - Still the land was given to them, and when God's set time comes they will surely be brought back to their 'fatherland' and after trial and Discipline will be blessed therein
Judah, Kingdom of - That severe Discipline purged out their craving for idols
Vigilantius - ...
The bishop of the diocese (possibly Exuperius of Toulouse, known to have had communications with pope Innocent about this time on points of Discipline) strongly favoured the views of Vigilantius, and they began to spread widely in S
Revelation (2) - Is not revelation rather a gradual disclosure than a sudden unveiling? And may it not be that what men have taken for an act of God should rather be described as an acquisition on man’s part which came to him, as all natural knowledge has come, by the gradual quickening of his spiritual faculty, in response to the Discipline of life!* Montanus - They believed that while the fundamental truths of faith remained unshaken, points both of Discipline and doctrine might receive correction. Accordingly Tertullian appeals to the new revelations on questions of Discipline, e. ...
(3) Church Discipline
Self-Control - It may be distinguished from self-denial as Discipline is from destruction, the one making the self the centre of purpose and effort, the other aiming at its extinction or suppression. John 3:34), and as thereby prepared for personal testing and Discipline as well as for His mission of mercy and redemption
Force - He did it by paying perfect loyalty to His dependence on His Father; by striving in every situation of His life freely and perfectly to identify Himself with His Father’s will and purpose for His life and His mission; by means of habits of self-discipline and prayer (1618096034_61; 1618096034_65; Luke 6:12; Luke 9:28-35; Luke 22:39-46, John 3:34; John 8:28-29). And they must also follow Him in the path of humility, self-discipline, prayer, and self-denial (Matthew 10:38; Matthew 17:19-21; Matthew 26:41, Luke 11:9-13; Luke 22:31-32; Luke 24:49, John 12:24-26; John 13:13-17; John 14:10-18; John 15:4; John 17:11-19, Acts 1:4-5)
Bereans - As to their practice and Discipline, they consider infant baptism as a divine ordinance, instituted in the room of circumcision; and think it absurd to suppose that infants, who all agree are admissible to the kingdom of God in heaven, should, nevertheless, be incapable of being admitted into his visible church on earth
Devil - The church can be commanded to hand an immoral member over to Satan for Discipline resulting in final salvation (1 Corinthians 5:5 ; compare 1 Timothy 1:20 )
Family - ...
To an Israelite, ‘family’ conveyed the notions of unity, security, order, and Discipline
Grace - The legal Discipline had taught St
Spirituality - , spiritual Disciplines) in and through the physical realm for spiritual growth. ...
Developing and keeping this single focus is accomplished by spiritual Disciplines like Bible reading, meditation, prayer, fasting, church attendance, giving things away, and serving others. )...
These Disciplines mold and shape the embodied self. ...
By these Disciplines the Christian is not simply copying Jesus Christ as a model (as in Sheldon's In His Steps ), though "putting on Christ" might mean that the Christian sometimes Acts like Christ even if he or she does not yet understand why (Romans 13:11-14 ). Foster, Celebration of Discipline ; idem, The Freedom of Simplicity ; T. Willard, The Spirit of the Disciplines
Elements - word frequently denoted the rudiments or principia of a science, art, or Discipline
Flavianus (4) i, Bishop of Antioch - Consequently church Discipline became impossible
Fruit - ’ The ‘fruit of righteousness’ is an OT phrase, and meets us again in Philippians 1:11 and Hebrews 12:11, where ‘righteousness,’ or conformity to the highest moral standard, is described as the ‘peaceful fruit’ of Discipline patiently endured
Discipleship - The second is the training needed to make the promise good; for only in the course of life’s Discipline can character be formed or resolutions realized,—it is ‘in our endurance that we must win our souls
Providence - ...
(4) Yet even so they are overruled to the moral Discipline of the saint's faith, patience, and experience (Romans 5:3-4; 1 Peter 1:6-7); David's noblest qualities were brought forth by Saul's persecutions, and even by Absalom's punitive rebellion (2 Samuel 15:25-26; 2 Samuel 16:10-12)
Idatius (3), Author of Well-Known Chronicle - from 427), he says, describing his second division, "I, undeservedly chosen to the office of the episcopate, and not ignorant of all the troubles of this miserable time, have added both the falling landmarks ('metas ruituras') of the oppressed Roman empire, and also what is more mournful still, the degenerate condition of the church order within Gallicia, which is the end of the world, the destruction of honest liberty by indiscriminate appointments (to bishoprics), and the almost universal decay of the divine Discipline of religion, evils springing from the rule of furious men and the tumults of hostile nations
Proverbs, the Book of - The disciplinary design of chastisement ("instruction," musar , Greek paideia , correction by Discipline), Proverbs 3:11-13; so Job (Job 33:17-30; Job 5:17); wisdom (Proverbs 2:4; Proverbs 3:14; Proverbs 3:8; Job 28; Proverbs 3:23; Job 5:22; Proverbs 8:25; Job 15:7-8)
Take - ...
14: ἐξαίρω (Strong's #1808 — Verb — exairo — ex-ah'ee-ro ) "to take away," is used of "putting away" a person in church Discipline, 1 Corinthians 5:13 ; for this verb as a variant reading in ver
Love - ...
This same love causes God to Discipline, correct and train his children, so that they might grow into the sorts of people that he, in his superior wisdom, wants them to be
Dead Sea Scrolls - ...
One of the foundational documents of the Qumran community is the Manual of Discipline (1QS) or the Rule of the Community . He is examined by the Master and, if pronounced fit for the Discipline, is admitted into the Covenant to begin receiving instruction in the rules of the community
Restoration - (2) The mysteriousness which everywhere surrounds our human existence is an essential part of life’s Discipline. The Discipline of mystery concerning the future world, which is so salutary for our nature, was not without its value in the perfecting of the Redeemer
Humility - This gives rise to artificial and extreme methods of Discipline, and misses the healthy objectivity of the life that forgets self in the consideration and service of others (see Herrmann’s art. Work and the school of life are the best Discipline of humility, as of the other virtues
Scripture - ); for ‘whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that through patience and through comfort of the scriptures we might have hope’ (Romans 15:4), while the very quality of their ‘inspiration’ is tested by their helpfulness for teaching, for reproof, ‘for correction, for Discipline which is in righteousness’ (2 Timothy 3:16)
Church - Common to both church and synagogue were the Discipline (Matthew 18:17), excommunication (1 Corinthians 5:4), and the collection of alms (1 Corinthians 16:2)
Freedom - In developing his theological argument against these Judaizers, Paul points out that the function of the Mosaic law was that of a temporary guardian (the Greek word used Galatians 3:24-25 ; is paidagogos, which ironically was itself used of slaves who had the responsibility to look after children and Discipline them )
Abiding - The life may be imperfectly realized, the fruitage may be disappointing, it may be nothing but leaves (Matthew 21:19); the task of Discipline, or of cleansing (καθαίρειν John 15:2 f
Columbanus, Abbat of Luxeuil And Bobbio - Columbanus laboured with his monks, and all classes of men gathered round him, notwithstanding the severe Discipline
Timotheus - After saluting him in an affectionate manner, and reminding him of the reason for which he was left at Ephesus, the Apostle takes occasion, from the frivolous disputes which some Judaizing teachers had introduced among the Ephesians, to assert the practical nature of the Gospel, and to show its superiority over the law; he returns thanks to God for his own appointment to the apostleship, and recommends to Timothy fidelity in the discharge of his sacred office; he exhorts that prayers should be made for all men, and especially for magistrates; he gives directions for the conduct of women, and forbids their teaching in public; he describes the qualifications necessary for bishops and deacons, and speaks of the mysterious nature of the Gospel dispensation; he foretels that there will be apostates from the truth, and false teachers in the latter times, and recommends to Timothy purity of manners and improvement of his spiritual gifts; he gives him particular directions for his behaviour toward persons in different situations in life, and instructs him in several points of Christian Discipline; he cautions him against false teachers, gives him several precepts, and solemnly charges him to be faithful to his trust
Education - Here life is pictured as a Discipline, the Hebrew word for which is found thirty times in this book
Philosophy - THE PHILOSOPHIC Discipline OF THE JEWS
Abiding - The life may be imperfectly realized, the fruitage may be disappointing, it may be nothing but leaves (Matthew 21:19); the task of Discipline, or of cleansing (καθαίρειν John 15:2 f
Leander (2) - 308, 277, and Thomassin, Discipline de l᾿Eglise, ii
Clement of Alexandria - 1), bringing to man in due succession conviction, Discipline, wisdom. Then follow fragmentary reflections on Discipline (9–11), on knowledge, faith, creation, the new creation (12–24), fire (25 f. Life in its fulness was coming to be apprehended as the object of Christian Discipline (3)
Donatus And Donatism - The Donatists were the first Christians who separated from the church on the ground of Discipline, though the church had already been torn by heresies, such as Gnosticism and Manicheism, which had affected doctrines. Then they reintroduced their rigorous Discipline. His work de Correctione Donatistarum is addressed to a soldier Bonifacius and is written in a style and language almost military in its stern enforcement of Discipline
Synods - Neander, speaking of the origin, use, and abuse of synods, says,—As a closer bond of union was early formed between the churches of the same province, so also the Christian catholic spirit introduced the custom that, in all pressing matters, controversies on doctrinal points, things relating to the ecclesiastical life, and very commonly in those relating to church Discipline, general deliberations should be held by deputies from these churches. The remaining, canons relate to Discipline, with the exception of the few which were at different times ordained for the suppression of heretical opinions, for the regulation of both the married and celibate clergy, and of the fees to which they should be entitled on the performance of certain duties. " From the third and fourth canons it appears that a novelty in Discipline is established, and made obligatory on the churches of both empires, but only by a handful of bishops belonging to one of them; and from the fifth, that the bishop of Rome, if he deemed a judgment erroneous, might convene a new council and send deputies to it, for the purpose of reconsidering the matter
Teaching of the Twelve Apostles - 7–15 Bryennius) deals with church ritual and Discipline, a chapter (16) being added on our Lord's Second Coming. of Barnabas, in which, after the conclusion of the doctrinal teaching, the writer proposes to pass to another doctrine and Discipline ( γνώσιν καὶ διδαχήν ), and adds an appendix of moral instructions. " The Latin fragment breaks off too soon to give any information as to the length of the original: the Church Ordinances cease to present coincidences with the Didaché after the section on the "Two Ways"; but this may be because the directions for ritual and Discipline had become out of date when the Ordinances were put together, the editor therefore designedly substituting what better agreed with the practice of his own age
Government - In other legal matters, the terminology of the royal census relating to enrollment procedures, the forms of ritual purification, and questions of Discipline exhibit parallels with Exodus 30:13-14 . For nomadic people to be compelled to live according to strict and detailed regulations, some of which were similar to Hammurabi's enactments, was a severe Discipline in itself that proved to be a sore burden, even in later sedentary times
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - Gregory praises Origen for his Socratic Discipline, and for the way in which his teacher probed his inmost soul with questions, pruned his native wildness and repressed his exuberance. The end of the entire Discipline was "nothing but this: By the pure mind make thyself like to God, that thou mayest draw near to Him and abide in Him
World - Because ‘sin entered into the world’ ( Romans 5:12 ), it is become the scene of the Incarnation and the object of Redemption ( 2 Corinthians 5:19 , 1 Timothy 1:15 , Hebrews 10:5 , John 1:9-10 ; John 1:29 ; John 3:16-17 ; John 12:47 ), the scene also, alien but inevitable, of the Christian disciple’s life and Discipline, mission and victory ( John 2:15-17 ; Matthew 13:38 ; Matthew 26:13 , John 17:16 , Romans 1:8 , 1 Corinthians 3:22 ; 1Co 4:9 ; 1 Corinthians 5:10 ; 1 Corinthians 7:31 , 2 Corinthians 1:12 , John 15:18-19 , Col 1:8 , 1 Peter 5:9 , Revelation 11:15 )
Peter - The events of that day "completed the change in Peter himself which the painful Discipline of his fall and all the lengthened process of previous training had been slowly making
Temptation - The sufferings and sorrows Jesus passed through were Divinely appointed trials that He might learn obedience, and so be made perfect (Hebrews 5:8; Hebrews 2:10); but it is not necessary here to illustrate this Discipline in detail (see Struggles of Soul)
Gnosticism - Thus they could act in any way they pleased without fear of Discipline
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - Poverty is a result of laziness (6:10-11; 10:4; 20:13; 24:33-34), lack of Discipline (13:18), idleness (14:23; 28:19), haste (21:5), excess (21:17; 23:20-21), and injustice (13:23)
Pope - And, according to the Discipline of the latter ages, though they are presented to the pope for their office from their respective countries, yet from him they must receive their bulls of consecration before they can take possession of their sees
Labour (2) - ...
The question of His Galilaean neighbours who were familiar with the circumstances of Jesus’ early life, ‘Is not this the worker in wood?’ (ὁ τέκτων, Mark 6:3), shows clearly how fully He adopted this principle as regulating the preparatory Discipline of His young manhood
Ave Maria - ...
To His first Jewish disciples the name Messiah was the unveiling of a historical mystery, the justification of the calling, preservation, and Discipline of Israel
Abram - Removing from Moreh he pitched on a mount to the east of Bethel, and journeying south he went down into Egypt (famine then afflicting Canaan), establishing there the first link of that mysterious chain which so long, through almost all their history, bound the chosen people for Discipline and for warning to the Egyptians
Temptation - The sufferings and sorrows Jesus passed through were Divinely appointed trials that He might learn obedience, and so be made perfect (Hebrews 5:8; Hebrews 2:10); but it is not necessary here to illustrate this Discipline in detail (see Struggles of Soul)
Holiness - ’ In His glorified state ‘the result of the perfection of His earthly Discipline (Hebrews 5:7 ff. A man is ἅγιος in virtue of his Divine destination (Hebrews 10:10) to which he is gradually conformed (ἁγιάζετκι, Hebrews 10:14); he is ἁγνὸς in virtue of earthly, human Discipline
Esther - The events of the times do seem to invite Christian kings to a war in respect of the great corruption and relaxation of Discipline in the empire of the enemy of Christendom. There is no circle anywhere under heaven for individual interest; for all kinds of influence, the most immediate and the most lasting; and for the ever-deepening Discipline of your own mind, and heart, and life, like the evangelical pulpit
Humility - This gives rise to artificial and extreme methods of Discipline, and misses the healthy objectivity of the life that forgets self in the consideration and service of others (see Herrmann’s art. Work and the school of life are the best Discipline of humility, as of the other virtues
Disease - Paul, too, looked upon his "thorn" as a spiritual Discipline and education (1 Corinthians 11:30 )
Jacob - His life is a long history of Discipline, chastisement, and purification by affliction
Lazarus - cf6 "one thing is needful"; "Jesus beholding loved him" (Mark) is said also of Lazarus (John 11:5); Jesus' love at last wrought out his conversion, possible to God though not to man; a sharp Palestine fever is sent to Discipline him; his death and rising through Jesus' power is accompanied by his spiritual resurrection (John 5:24-25)
Pilgrimage - A kind of religious Discipline, which consists in taking a journey to some holy place, in order to adore the relics of some deceased saint
Demon - ...
Just as the fruits of the working of the Holy Ghost in man are called the spirit ‘of power and love and Discipline’ (2 Timothy 1:7) and ‘of truth’ (1 John 4:6), so those of the demons are ‘the spirit of bondage’ (Romans 8:15), and ‘stupor’ (κατανύξεως, Romans 11:8), and ‘fearfulness’ (2 Timothy 1:7), and ‘error’ (1 John 4:6)
the Woman With the Issue of Blood - Every preacher, every author, every Discipline, every medicine of the soul
Predestination - To this everything preceding the call of Abraham, the Covenant with Israel, the Discipline and growing revelation of Law and Prophets leads up (on predestination here, cf
Peter - Jesus read his character, seeing what he was and foreseeing what the Discipline of grace would make him; and He gave him a surname prophetic of the moral and spiritual strength which would one day be his
Moses - He still needed 40 more years of Discipline, in meek self-control and humble dependence on Jehovah, in order to qualify him for his appointed work. ) In the 40 years' retirement Moses learned that self Discipline which was needed for leading a nation under such unparalleled circumstances. Not even does Moses lead them the way of Philistia which, as being near, wisdom would suggest, but knowing their unwarlike character avoids it; Moses guides them into a defile with mountains on either side and the Red Sea in front, from whence escape from the Egyptian Disciplined pursuers, who repented of letting them go, seemed hopeless, especially as Israel consisted of spiritless men, encumbered with women and with children
Innocentius, Bishop of Rome - Hence Rome appeared as the bulwark of the cause of truth, and its claim to be the unerring guardian of the apostolic faith and Discipline gained extensive credence. 1), applied to the pope soon after for information as to the practice and Discipline of the Roman church
Ordination - The nature of the charisma is referred to in 2 Timothy 1:7, which immediately follows the second passage; it is a spirit of power and love and Discipline (σωφρονισμοῦ, i. , possibly, ‘self-control,’ or better, ‘the capacity of exercising Discipline without abandoning love’ [6])
Family Life And Relations - It was the father's task to arrange marriages (Exodus 22:17 ) and to Discipline his sons (1 Samuel 3:13 )
Seventy (2) - (2) The Twelve were not only to minister, but to administer—to exercise Discipline and government (John 20:23, Acts 1:20-26)
Family - Therefore, the focus of the parent/child relationship was on love, honor, and respect as well as Discipline and instruction (Ephesians 6:1-4 )
Thessalonians, the Epistles to the - " Also instead of warning in 1 Thessalonians 5:14 stricter Discipline is substituted, now that the evil has become worse (2 Thessalonians 3:6; 2 Thessalonians 3:14, "withdraw from the company"
Wealth (2) - It is a test and Discipline of character
Poetry - The following couplet illustrates this type of parallelism: ...
Whoever loves Discipline loves knowledge, but he who hates correction is stupid
Mercy - But even in judgment and Discipline God's mercy can be seen and hoped for (2 Samuel 24:14 ; Psalm 57:1 ; Isaiah 55:7 ; 60:10 ; Jeremiah 31:20 ; Habakkuk 3:2 ; cf
Popery - ...
As for the penances imposed on the penitent by way of satisfaction, they have been commonly the repetition of certain forms of devotion, as paternosters, or ave marias, the payment of stipulated sums, pilgrimages, fasts, or various species of corporal Discipline
Glory - This is the ‘coming glory’ (Romans 8:18), ‘about to be revealed’ (1 Peter 5:1), the ‘inheritance of God in his saints’ (Ephesians 1:18) unto which they are prepared beforehand (Romans 9:23), called (1 Peter 5:10), led by Christ (Hebrews 2:10); it is their unwithering crown (1 Peter 5:11), the manifestation of their true nature (Colossians 3:4), their emancipation from all evil limitations (Romans 8:21); in the hope of it they rejoice (Romans 5:2); for it they are made meet by the indwelling of Christ (Colossians 1:27) and by the Discipline of the present (2 Corinthians 4:17)
Good - For Jesus, God alone was “nod without limitation or qualification (John 20:30-310 Luke 18:19); and while His own moral Discipline on earth was going on, He disclaimed that epithet for Himself (cf
Holy Day - No one ought to pretend that the Discipline of the Church, so far as it is expressed in the weekly day of rest and worship, or in the observance of seasons or sacraments, is without significance for the Christian life
Samuel, First Book of - Then began the flight of David from the wrath of Saul, and Saul's pursuit of him; the grace of David in twice saving the life of Saul when he had him in his power; the wickedness of Saul in slaying the priestly house of Ahimelech; the mistake of David in joining himself to the Philistines, from which the Lord delivered him; and his Discipline in the destruction of Ziklag, and the carrying away of his two wives with the inhabitants, but in mercy all were recovered
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - But it is more likely that the decline of prophecy was due less to Church organization and Discipline than to the fact that the gift was so open to abuse
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - He built a monastery two miles from the city, where 80 scholars, some of them noble, pursued a severe Discipline
Nero - The severe Discipline and hardship of these Oriental campaigns provide a contrast to the Imperial excesses at Rome
Law - Jeremiah 31:31-34 ); but it was only the hard Discipline of the law that made them realize the necessity and superiority of a more spiritual covenant between man and his God. It is a severer not a laxer ethics that Jesus introduces, a searching in place of a superficial Discipline; ‘Your righteousness,’ He says, ‘must exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees
Education - First, there was the stage of home education, extending from birth to the end of the seventh year, when the children were under parental supervision; second, the stage of school education, beginning with the eighth year and lasting to the sixteenth or eighteenth year; thirdly, there was the stage from the sixteenth or eighteenth to the twenty-first year, when the youths were ἔφηβοι, and were subjected to strict Discipline and training. ...
The mention of school punishments leads to the subject of school Discipline
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - ...
(3) Discipline is indispensable in a corporate society: provision made for this in the Mosaic Law and in the Divinely appointed ministry of the Church. 1): soldiers must be under Discipline, each in his own rank
Apocrypha - Thus we read—...
‘For her true beginning is desire of Discipline;...
And the care for Discipline is love of her’ (Wisdom of Solomon 6:17)
Millenarians - The purity of visible church communions, worship, and Discipline, will then be restored according to the primitive apostolic pattern. But when the period we are speaking of shall arrive, the sanctuary shall be cleansed, Daniel 8:14 ; the visible communion, worship, order, and Discipline of the house of God will then be restored to their primitive purity, and accord with the rule of the New Testament
High Place, Sanctuary - With the early death of Josiah the local cults revived, and it needed the Discipline of the Exile to secure the victory of the Deuteronomic demand for the centralization of the cultus
Repentance - Henson, Moral Discipline in the Christian Church, London, 1905, esp
Kenosis - That Jesus was Himself conscious of being still the subject of a moral Discipline is suggested by His refusal of the epithet ‘good’ (Mark 10:18)
Body - Paget, Spirit of Discipline, do, 1891, p
Hilarius Arelatensis, Saint, Bishop of Arles - ...
Leo's recourse to the emperor's aid has been severely censured; and Tillemont declared concerning the famous law of June 6, 445, that "in the eyes of those who have any love for the church's liberty or any knowledge of her Discipline, it will bring as little honour to him whom it praises as of injury to him whom it condemns" (Tillem
Euchites - They held the possibility in the passionless state of a perfection in which sin was impossible; such a man needed neither instruction for his soul nor fasting to Discipline his body, for delicate food and luxurious living could stir no evil desire in him
Naaman - It may lie in putting away all your present reading, and giving up much more of your time and attention to books that treat of the soul, its diseases, its Discipline, and its salvation
Ananias And Sapphira - Let us join with Augustine and Taylor in their burial-service over Ananias and Sapphira in the trembling hope that they were struck down in a sanctifying Discipline, rather than in an everlasting condemnation
Jonah - ...
God's pathetic and condescendingly touching appeal winds up the book; God's tender accents are the last that reach the ear, the abruptness of the close making them the more impressive "thou hast had pity on the gourd for the which thou hast not laboured, neither madest it grow; which came up in a night and perished in a night; and should not I spare Nineveh, that great city, wherein are more than six score thousand persons (120,000 children under four, Deuteronomy 1:39) that cannot discern between their right hand and their left hand (giving a total, if the children be a fifth, of 600,000 population), and also much cattle?" God saw the root of faith in Jonah, therefore corrected his perverse self will by an appropriate Discipline
Nation (2) - There were even some of the Pharisees who, whether because they were satisfied with the measure of religious liberty accorded under the Imperial administration, or because they shut their eyes to the facts (John 8:33), or because they saw in the foreign yoke the Discipline of God, resented any movement towards national independence; and perhaps it was some of these who associated themselves with the Herodians in Matthew 22:16
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - They lived under some kind of Discipline, with a ruling presbyter named Marcus (xvii. 1) and Discipline (cxlvii
Church (2) - Apostolicity: (a) doctrine; (b) worship; (c) Discipline. In the next place, the administration of sacraments implies Discipline, for a certain amount of organization is necessary in order to enable a society to act, and social actions cannot be performed in isolation
Archaeology And Biblical Study - ...
Biblical archaeology, a Discipline largely developing since 1800, searches for what can be learned about biblical events, characters, and teachings from sources outside the Bible. Practicing field archaeologists are often lacking in the various biblical Disciplines, while most biblical students are deficient in knowledge of archaeological technique. Archaeologists gradually learned, however, that they needed to approach their task in a more systematic and Disciplined manner in order to extract greater information from ancient civilizations. Stage Two Near the beginning of the twentieth century, significant developments in the Discipline of archaeology began to occur. Petrie and Bliss's work marks the beginning of a scientific, Disciplined approach to archaeology in Palestine
Clemens Romanus of Rome - Its main object is to restore harmony to the Corinthian church, which had been disturbed by questions apparently concerning Discipline rather than doctrine. of this letter by Rufinus, some Latin writer added a second, giving instruction as to the administration of the Eucharist and church Discipline
Cyprianus (1) Thascius Caecilius - 1–4, and the treatise on the dress of virgins, which answers to his description of his employment as "serving Discipline" during that interval. The modification of Discipline by martyrs' merits was never countenanced here (Ep
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - The strictness of the Marcionite Discipline is proved by the unfriendly testimony of Tertullian, who tries by their practice to convict of falsity the Marcionite theory, that a good God could not be the object of fear: "If so, why do you not take your fill of the enjoyments of this life? Why do you not frequent the circus, the arena, and the theatre? Why do you not boil over with every kind of lust? When the censer is handed you, and you are asked to offer a few grains of incense, why not deny your faith? 'God forbid!' you cry—'God forbid!'"...
At the end of the Diocletian persecution the Marcionites had a short interval of freedom of worship. ...
Discipline and Worship
Servant of the Lord - Gray, Divine Discipline of Israel , 79 f
Croisade, or Crusade - But amidst the abject superstition which now prevailed, that military spirit had also universally diffused itself; and, though not supported by art or Discipline, was become the general passion of the nations governed by the feudal law. For this reason they permitted an undisciplined multitude, computed at 300, 000 men, to go before them under the command of Peter the hermit, and Gautier or Walter, surnamed the moneyless, from his being a soldier of fortune. The more Disciplined armies followed after; and, passing the straits of Constantinople, were mustered in the plains of Asia, and amounted in the whole to 700, 000 men
Satan (2) - Paul accepts the current doctrine; but though in his Epistles to the Ephesians and Colossians he seems to add to the teaching of Christ in the Gospels other elements from the demonology of the Pharisaic schools and from other sources (Ephesians 2:2; Ephesians 6:11, Colossians 2:15), and in his Epistles to the Corinthians and to Timothy (1 Corinthians 5:5, 1 Timothy 1:20) ascribes to Satan a certain power of Discipline as a minister of Divine judgment, really contributes to this branch of Christian doctrine no essential element additional to that which is furnished in the Gospels
Matthew, the Gospel of - While teaching and preaching overlap, teaching emphasizes the essential principles which must be passed on to maintain the Discipline or movement at hand
Mary, the Virgin - … The time of silent Discipline and obedience is over’ (Westcott, in loc
Essenes - For a year they lived under Discipline, then they were admitted to the solemn initiatory ablution which separated them from the world, and after other two years they received full privileges of table-fellowship
Acts - All the principal characters of Luke's story demonstrated great personal devotion to God and tremendous personal Discipline in their spiritual lives. God Disciplines those who seek personal gain through false use of Jesus' name (Acts 19:9-41 )
Zechariah, Prophecy of - These nations, used as instruments of Discipline upon God's people, were to be subdued in due time by God's 'carpenters' or 'artificers
Apostolic Constitutions And Canons - , but based on more ancient materials) is divided into eight books, dealing, in rambling and hortatory fashion, with the problems of church life and Discipline
Roman Catholics - Farther: it is a matter of Discipline, not of doctrine, in the Roman church, that the laity receive the eucharist in one kind, that is, in bread only
Minucius Felix, Marcus - Nor is it to be thought that God deals ill with His worshippers because He does not give them a larger share of prosperity in this life: the Christians do not covet earthly riches; they look on trials as their Discipline, persecutions as their warfare, in which they are not deserted by their God, but combat under His eye
Judges, the Book of - ...
Extraordinary judges, following severe chastisement from those very nations whose sin they copied, were just the Discipline they needed and God raised
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Guilds of musicians, known through reference to their founders in some psalm headings (for example, “the sons of Korah”), were evidently devoted to the Discipline of liturgical music
Job, the Book of - Fourth, he then pleaded with Job to accept what had happened to him as an expression of God's Discipline and to humbly repent and seek His forgiveness (Job 36:1-37:24 )
Vine, Allegory of the - The process of cleansing in the natural vine suggests to us the chastening Discipline to which the Father subjects believers (so de Wette)
Bible, Theology of - This Discipline is closely related to church history, but it is historical study narrowly focused on theology or doctrine
Jacob - His character, as depicted, is a mixture of evil and good; and his career shows how, by Discipline and grace, the better elements came to prevail, and God was enabled to use a faulty man for a great purpose
God, Names of - The range of meanings include those of authority and Discipline, but also those of compassion, care, protection, and provision
Gifts - The absence of any reference to officials later designated as ‘bishops,’ ‘presbyters,’ ‘deacons,’ ‘pastors’ (in Ephesians 4:11), suggests a rudimentary church organization, or rather a purely democratic government in the Christian community at Corinth; and it may be that the profusion of services and functions with the accompanying perils of spiritual pride and disorder suggested to the Apostle the necessity of the more Disciplined and edifying forms of service and administration which afterwards prevailed in the apostolic churches. ...
To sum up, an examination of the passages in apostolic literature which treat of spiritual gifts inevitably brings us to the conclusion that the life of the early Church was characterized by glowing enthusiasm, simple faith, and intensity or spiritual joy and wonder, all resulting from the consciousness of the power of the Holy Spirit; also that this phase of Spirit-effected ministries and services was temporary, as such ‘tides of the Spirit’ have since often proved, and gave way to a more rigid and Disciplined Church Order, in which the official tended more and more to supersede the charismatic ministries. Thus, sooner or later, the true charismatic was sifted from the false charismatic, whose personal vanity and self-seeking nullified all usefulness, The increase of Discipline of course had its own perils
Gratianus, Emperor - His first acts were to punish with death some of the prominent instruments of the cruelties committed in the name of justice and Discipline, which had disgraced his father's later years, especially the hated Maximinus
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - Only, there will no doubt yet emerge and arise new Donatist debates, and new demands for toleration of opinion, even of erroneous opinion, and with that, new calls for the utmost caution, and faith, and patience, especially in church censures, and in church Discipline
Jesuits - As all these precautions, without military force, would have been insufficient to have rendered their empire secure and permanent, they instructed their subjects in the European art of war, and formed them into bodies completely armed, and well Disciplined. Such was the tendency of that Discipline observed by the society in forming its members, and such the fundamental maxims in its constitution, that every Jesuit was taught to regard the interest of the order as the capital object to which every consideration was to be sacrificed
Magi - Hence Cicero observes that none were admitted to the crown of Persia, but such as were well instructed in the Discipline of the magi; who taught τα βασιλικα , and showed princes how to govern
Nazirite - We may suppose that the same variety of reason as might induce a Catholic to undertake a pilgrimage-penance, Discipline, thanksgiving, or the acquisition of merit-would lead the Jew to take a Nazirite vow
Pentateuch - It requires logical Discipline and a well-balanced mind Nazirite - We may suppose that the same variety of reason as might induce a Catholic to undertake a pilgrimage-penance, Discipline, thanksgiving, or the acquisition of merit-would lead the Jew to take a Nazirite vow
Sidonius Apollinaris, Saint - Churches were overthrown, their sites overrun by animals, Christian Discipline destroyed; and writing to Basilius, Sidonius implores him, as in touch with the political negotiators, to obtain permission for the exercise of episcopal ordination ( Ep
Church, the - The second passage relates to the future organization of the church, particularly its method of Discipline, not unlike the Jewish synagogue practices of Jesus' day
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - Paul urges the church at Corinth to Discipline the immoral person so that at the day of the Lord his spirit may be saved (1 Corinthians 5:5 )
Colossians, Theology of - It requires Discipline and denial. In order to have this experience and go into God's presence, one had to prepare for the experience through prayer, fasting, and rigorous Disciplined worship
Calvinists - The name of Calvinists seems to have been given at first to those who embraced not merely the doctrine, but the church government and Discipline established at Geneva, and to distinguish them from the Lutherans
Philippians, Theology of - ...
He urges them to Discipline their minds because he knows that how people think determines how they act, that thought governs conduct
Jerusalem - The people's belief in the mere presence of the cult as a talisman against harm was not enough to save them from the Discipline of destruction
Leadership - They exercised Discipline on occasion (5:1-11) and likely led in the celebration of the Lord's Supper
Justification - The Catholic, polemical in import and comprehensive of aspect, has in view efficient Discipline of souls
Ethics - One is the exercise of Discipline
Justice (2) - They are part of His fatherly Discipline by which His children are prepared for their heavenly inheritance (2 Corinthians 4:16-17, Hebrews 5:8)
Messiah - ...
It is not surprising, amid the rapid changes of rulers and the disasters wrought by foreign invasion, that Hosea should have prophesied the Discipline of exile for his faithless countrymen, and as its final issue that they should return and seek Jahweh their God and ‘David their king
Solomon - They pare down and prune away the decalogue, and the creed, and the catechism, and the books of Discipline of their godly upbringing
Achan - And it is a splendid certificate to Joshua's Discipline, and to the morality of his army, that only one of his men gave way in the time of temptation
Angels (2) - The second is of interest to the NT student as a preparatory Discipline in the direction of Christology: and as such has no further importance for us at present
Baxterianism - He was inimical to all the existing systems of doctrine and Discipline then contended for, or ever before known in the world; while he did not present any precisely defined system as his own
Timothy And Titus Epistles to - ...
The Epistles possess common elements of language, similar features of doctrine, Discipline, and organization, and an atmosphere laden with kindred varieties of error, which constitute them a group distinct from the other Epistles of Paul, in fact so distinct that many scholars of varied schools have found difficulty in accepting them as authentic
Election - Their very position on the face of the earth, placed in the midst; of the nations, was chosen with a view to their Discipline and sanctification, for thus the Maccabaean annalist puts it: ‘Howbeit the Lord did not choose the nation for the place’s sake, but the place for the nation’s sake’ (2 Maccabees 5:19)
Oath - ), with practical experience of the law-courts, and with the possibility that even of a thing which is ‘woven into the common law’ it may be necessary to say, in Milton’s words (Of Reformation touching Church Discipline, 1641, p
Philanthropy - The words can scarcely be justified even on the supposition that it was a harsh Discipline intended to bring out the triumphant faith of the woman
Teaching - But, as the need for organization and Discipline increased pari passu with the decline of inspired utterance, teaching, at first overshadowed by prophecy, now became absorbed by leadership, although it remained a permanent function in the Church
Evil - Finally, Discipline is called evil in Proverbs 15:10 because it brings pain
Righteousness - ]'>[13] But, over and above these characteristics, it is noticeable that, probably owing to the particular argument he has in hand, he retains the classical term ‘righteousness’ for the great end which men sought by right and wrong ways of religious Discipline
Sanctification - God also used Cyrus, a pagan ruler, to Discipline Israel (Isaiah 45:1 ). When God Disciplines his children, it is for their good, that they may "share in his holiness" (Hebrews 12:10 )
Conscience - In the NT, however, as in general usage, ‘conscience’ is not restricted to the intuitive discernment of the difference between right and wrong, but is applied to the whole moral nature of man; and when understood in this way there can be no question that it shares in the general weakness of human nature, and that it is both capable of education and constantly in need of an educative Discipline
Athenagoras - It is treated as authoritative amongst Christians; its maxims being used shewing their Discipline and practice ( vid
Barnabas, Epistle of - The Apostle of the Gentiles recognized the value of Judaism and of all the institutions of the law as a great preparatory Discipline for the coming of the Messiah, as "a schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ
Judas Iscariot (2) - 227) brings out the sense of the passage in a paraphrase: ‘None of them is lost, but he whose very nature it was to be lost—he (that is to say) whose insensibility to the Divine touch, whose irresponsiveness to the heavenly Discipline, made it a certainty that he should fall away
Childhood - The whole unfolding of His life in all the religious Discipline and education of the home, the synagogue and the whole round of the Jewish year of feasts and fasts, must have been beautiful to those to whose care He was entrusted
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - Elsewhere he complains that bishops would receive persons excommunicated by other bishops to the ruin of the Discipline of souls (iii
Fire - In a later passage (1 Peter 4:12) the extremity of their sufferings, arising from the same cause, is compared to a burning or conflagration (πύρθσις) by which character is tested and purified; and the sharp Discipline they are undergoing is spoken of appropriately, considering its extreme severity, as judgment (κρίμα) already begun, from which the righteous escape with, difficulty (1 Peter 4:17 f; cf
Old Testament - The main test of its ‘inspiration’ is rather the practical one of helpfulness ‘for teaching, for judgment, for correction, for Discipline in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, furnished completely unto every good work’ (2 Timothy 3:16 f
Priest - The list begins with (3) His perfect humanity, involving oneness with the men for whom He acts, with the experience in His case as in theirs of the Discipline of suffering and temptation (Hebrews 2:9 ff; Hebrews 4:15)
Nestorian Church - The habit was, of course, destructive of all Discipline
Fire - In a later passage (1 Peter 4:12) the extremity of their sufferings, arising from the same cause, is compared to a burning or conflagration (πύρθσις) by which character is tested and purified; and the sharp Discipline they are undergoing is spoken of appropriately, considering its extreme severity, as judgment (κρίμα) already begun, from which the righteous escape with, difficulty (1 Peter 4:17 f; cf
Teaching of Jesus - ), was that as many, not as few, as possible of the average hearers addressed might, by seeking and its Discipline, come to find aright, instead of resting in imaginary possession of a knowledge that was really error
Religion (2) - With some the revelation does not pass beyond the mind, with others it calls for little more than an indulgence of feeling, with others, again, it brings out only a Discipline of obedience
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - ), and shows that the Israelites, in spite of all their privileges, fell from lack of this self-discipline
Hebrews Epistle to the - Suffering sent by God is a means of Discipline; it proves that we are really His sons (Hebrews 12:5-13)
Slave, Slavery - In penitential Discipline, wrongs done to a slave were not distinguished from wrongs done to a freeman
Sirach - , probably it is nearer in many respects to the Islâmic Discipline called Adab al-Katib, or studies necessary for a Secretary of State
Boyhood - The Discipline is of the sternest kind, corporal punishment being freely used
Calendar, the Christian - 2 Corinthians 10:4, 1 Timothy 1:18]'>[17]—certainly no gladness or sadness chancing to the camp abolishes the Stations of the soldiers; for gladness will carry out Discipline more willingly, sadness more carefully
Death of Christ - Through the Discipline of experience and through prayer He became strong enough to be obedient even unto death
Jeremiah - The Discipline of Jeremiah may be divided into four stages, following on his supernatural call: ( a ) the youthful period of fierce denunciation, b
Job - The distinctive note of his argument is the stress laid on the thought that God teaches by means of affliction; in other words, that the purpose, or at least one main purpose, of trial is Discipline (Job 33:19-28 , Job 36:10 ; Job 36:15 )
Julius (5), Bishop of Rome - It also passed 21 canons of Discipline, 3 being of special historic importance
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - He desired the sacred mysteries to be exhibited before his bed so that the sacrifice having been offered in their company he might commend his own soul to the Lord and at the same time recall to their former peace those on whom in the exercise of church Discipline he had pronounced sentence of exclusion from communion
Canon of the New Testament - The first stage is that of use in the form of Church lessons; the second that of a standard of authority to be employed as the basis of instruction, and to be appealed to in disputed cases of doctrine or Discipline
Josephus - He studied the principles of the three main sects of Judaism under professional teachers of each, and lived for three years in the society of an ascetic hermit named Banus-a Discipline then regarded as a desideratum of good breeding (we find something of the same kind in the early life of Seneca)
Jesus Christ - They had been purified by the providential Discipline of centuries from the last vestiges of idolatry
Divinity of Christ - Hand in hand with this progressive disillusionment of all that was contrary to His thought in current Messianic ideas went the progressive revelation of the true Messiah,—a revelation which became at once a testing and a Discipline of the character of the disciples, and an unfolding of undreamt of forces in His; so that at last they fell at His feet and worshipped, while others acknowledged Him as ‘Lord and God’ (John 20:28); and still others plainly felt that He was ‘ascending to the Father’ (John 20:17)
Eusebius (60), Bishop of Nicomedia - " Here were spun the webs by which the Arian conspiracy for a while prevailed over the faith and Discipline of the church
Arabia - The patient and active virtues of a soldier are insensibly nursed in the habits and Discipline of a pastoral life. During the whole of the succeeding century, their rapid career was unchecked; the Disciplined armies of the Greeks and Romans were unable to stand against them; the Christian churches of Asia and Africa were annihilated; and from India to the Atlantic, through Persia, Arabia, Syria, Palestine, Asia Minor, Egypt, with the whole of northern Africa, Spain, and part of France, the impostor was acknowledged
Incarnation (2) - Pain and sorrow, temptation and conflict, Discipline and growth,—He knows them all
Ambrosius of Milan - 390) the lamentable massacre at Thessalonica gave occasion for a very grand act of spiritual Discipline
Apostles - And the Discipline of their daily lives had rendered them alert, considerate, patient, energetic
Back to Christ - The work of Christ is interpreted by means of categories borrowed from the legal Discipline of the Roman Church
Hosius (1), a Confessor Under Maximian - The Novatianist Discipline was very rigid in other respects also, especially with reference to carnal sins, and many of the canons of Elvira relate to such offences, and their stern and austere spirit shews how deeply the Fathers at Elvira were influenced by Novatianist principles
Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons - Such a breach of Discipline in his own diocese (the actual spectacle of some Roman Christians keeping Easter with the Asiatics on Nisan 14, and in opposition to the ancestral custom of the bps
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - After four years spent in unremitting austerities, he left the society of his kind, and, dwelling in a mountain cavern, practised still more rigid self-discipline (Pallad
Eutyches And Eutychianism - Aetius, archdeacon of Constantinople, reminded these petitioners that church Discipline required monks to accept from the bishops instructions in matters of faith
Lutherans - Luther differed widely from Calvin on matters of church Discipline; and on the presence of Christ's body in the sacrament
Confession - They only urge it as entitling a person to the prayers of the congregation; and as useful for supporting the authority of wholesome Discipline, and for maintaining the purity of the Christian church
Odes of Solomon - Why should we extend the ‘secret Discipline’ to the simple practice of washing with water represented in Israelite circles by various ablutions with which the commonest pagan was familiar? How then could Tertullian have written his treatise de Baptismo? The field that this theory gives to the disciplina arcani is probably too extensive to be taken seriously into consideration
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - His days, as his friend testifies, were spent in reading, his nights in prayer; he fasted long, lay on the bare ground, and practised every form of ascetic self-discipline; he was full withal of light-hearted joy, as having found the service of Christ to be perfect freedom