What does Deuteronomy mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Deuteronomy
(Greek: deuteros, second; nomos, law)
The fifth Book of the. Bible. The name is a misnomer, since the book does not contain any new laws, but is a partial repetition of the foregoing legislation, with an urgent exhortation to be faithful to it. It is made up principally of three discourses, the contents of which are as follows:
The first discourse, comprising chapters 1-4, is a review of the events which followed the promulgation of the Law (1-3), and an exhortation to keep it (4).
The second discourse forms the bulk of the book (5-26) and rehearses the whole Covenant in two parts:
(a) a general discourse concerning the duties of the Hebrews towards God (5-11);
(b) a special discourse in which fundamental points of the Law are rehearsed, concerning duties towards God, God's representatives, and the neighbor (12-26).
The third discourse (27-30) contains new exhortations to keep the Law; chapters 27,28 (renewal of the alliance, blessings, and curses) are extremely dramatic.
The concluding chapters (31-34) constitute an historical appendix: Moses designates Josue as his successor, recites his magnificent prophetic canticle (32), blesses the twelve tribes, views the Promised Land from the top of Mount Nebo, and dies.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Deuteronomy
the Book of: The fifth of the Five Books of Moses, records Moses' final message to the Israelites, delivered during the last weeks of his life. He admonishes them to remain faithful to G-d following their entry into the Land of Israel. The book concludes with Moses� death.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Deuteronomy, Theology of
The fifth book of the Pentateuch is not merely a recasting of the Sinai covenant text and all its derivative materials, but a new and fresh statement of Yahweh's covenant purposes to a new generation in a new place with new prospects. The nation with whom the Sinai covenant had been made had died in the wilderness and so was no longer on the scene (Numbers 14:26-35 ). Deuteronomy was addressed to their offspring who were poised to enter the land of promise, and needed reassurance of Yahweh's covenant promises in light of the challenge of impending conquest and settlement.
Critical scholarship for nearly 200 years has uprooted Deuteronomy from its traditional Mosaic setting and has located it in the seventh century b.c., identifying it as the document that gave impetus for the reformation of Josiah of Judah (2 Kings 22:8-13 ). This view not only denies the book's authorship to Moses but has given rise to modern documentary hypotheses as a whole with their source-critical theories concerning the composition of the Pentateuch. It is now fashionable to speak of Deuteronomy—2Kings as the "Deuteronomistic History, " a massive theological work redacted in the sixth century. Deuteronomy itself is thought to have originated a little earlier, being a reflection of allegedly Mosaic teaching designed to provide a covenant standard by which to assess and judge Israel's actual history (cf. 2 Kings 17 ). The negative tone of the "Deuteronomistic" account is attributed to the antimonarchic traditionists who first had created Deuteronomy as an antimonarchical tractate and then wrote their history to show how the monarchy had, indeed, violated the book's covenant mandates.
More recently, comparisons have been made between the form and content of Deuteronomy and those of ancient Near Eastern treaty texts, especially from the Hittite Empire (ca. 1400-1200 b.c.) and Neo-Assyrian (ca. 700-600) periods. While the debate continues as to which parallels are more exact, the majority of scholars are persuaded of the Old Testament-Hittite analogies and therefore of the antiquity of the structure of Deuteronomy. This is not the place to argue the matter, nor is it important from a theological standpoint to settle the issue one way or the other. What is important is to recognize that Deuteronomy itself witnesses to its Mosaic authorship (1:1,3, 5; 4:44; 31:1,9, 22) and in its canonical form bears all the hallmarks of a covenant document, specifically that of a sovereign-vassal type. In fact, it is the genre of the book as a covenant text that is the key to its proper theological purpose and understanding.
Biblical scholarship has increasingly come to understand that one cannot separate the literary genre of a text from its intended message. The form of a composition, as well as its content, is critical to its meaning. If, then, Deuteronomy is cast in the literary mold of a sovereign-vassal treaty text, its message must be understood accordingly. Moreover, inasmuch as the theology of a text is dependent on the proper exegesis, analysis, and synthesis of that text, it is safe to say that a book's theology is a function of its form.
With this in mind, it is important that Deuteronomy be analyzed as a literary composition before any attempt be made to recover its theology. The following outline represents a fairly widely held consensus of the shape of the book as a covenant document:
The preamble, which provides the setting in which the Great King presents the covenant text to the vassal (1:1-5).
The historical prologue, which recounts the past relations between the two contracting parties (1:6-4:49).
The general stipulations, which present the basic principles of expectation of behavior that underlie the relationship (5:1-11:32).
The specific stipulations, which provide interpretation or amplification of the general stipulations, usually in terms of actual cases or precise requirements (12:1-26:15).
The blessings and curses, which spell out the results of faithful adherence to or disobedience of the terms of the covenant (27:1- 28:68).
The witnesses, that is, persons or other entities to which appeal can be made as to the legality of the covenant instrument and to the commitments made by the contracting parties (30:19; 31:19; 32:1-43).
In light of the indisputable connection between form and function, it is safe to say that the concept of covenant lies at the center of the theology of Deuteronomy. Covenant, in turn, by its very definition demands at least three elementsthe two contracting parties and the document that describes the purpose, nature, and requirements of the relationship. Thus the three major rubrics of the theology of Deuteronomy are Yahweh, the Great King and covenant initiator; Israel, the vassal and covenant recipient; and the book itself, the covenant vehicle, complete with the essentials of standard treaty documents. This means, moreover, that all the revelation of the book must be seen through the prism of covenant and not abstractly removed from the peculiar historical and ideological context in which it originated.
In Deuteronomy (and, indeed, in Scripture generally) God reveals himself in Acts, theophany, and word. The Acts of God, when viewed all together and as part of a pattern, constitute the essence of history. This obviously begins with God as Creator (an aspect lacking in Deuteronomy) and continues, in its peculiar relationship to Israel, with God's self-disclosure as elector, redeemer, and benefactor of his people.
As the God who transcends history, Yahweh also reveals himself in the awe-inspiring splendor of theophany. In Deuteronomy this otherness of God finds expression typically in the brilliance of light, especially fire, and in its opposite, darkness. This polarity is suggestive of his immanence, his accessibility to his creation, but also of his transcendent remoteness. He is the Great King who desires to communicate with and to receive the homage of his people but who reminds them constantly that he is above and beyond them in unapproachable glory. It is precisely at the point of his making covenant with them that the theophanic disclosure is most emphatic.
The most intelligible and therefore least ambiguous mode of revelation is the prophetic word. That word of God in Deuteronomy is, of course, the book itself expressed in its uniquely covenant form. But Deuteronomy is a covenant text in a broader than normal sense inasmuch as it contains not only the sine qua non of standard documents of that genre but also itineraries, narratives, hymns, and homilies, all designed to provide both a covenant document as well as a historical, existential, and eschatological context in which to interpret it. Thus there are the solemn and formal pronouncements of covenant initiation (1:6b-8; 2:4b-7; 4:12-13; 5:4,6-22) as well as constant enjoinders to be faithful to its stipulations.
The subject of divine self-disclosure, that is, the content of Yahweh's revelation about himself, must also be seen in terms of the covenant purposes of the Book of Deuteronomy. It is therefore not surprising that the covenant name "Yahweh" is by far the most commonly attested to, occurring about 221 times. By this name he encountered Moses at Sinai and it is in this name that he constantly commands his people to keep the covenant made there. The rare occurrences of Elohim (23 times) and other names and epithets (about 18 times) reinforce the covenant character of the book and its almost exclusive attention to Israel, for these names, especially Elohim and its byforms, occur most regularly in contexts describing God's more cosmic or universal interests in creation and history.
The revelation of God's person in Deuteronomy follows rather typical biblical patterns. In highly anthropomorphic terms he is said to possess hands (2:15; 3:24; 4:34), an arm (4:34; 5:15), a mouth (8:3), a face (5:4; 31:18; 34:10), a finger (9:10), and eyes (11:12; 12:28); he walks (23:14), writes (10:4), and rides (33:26). He is both immanent (4:7,39; 31:8) and transcendent (4:12,35-36; 5:4,22-26), unique (3:24; 5:7; 6:4,15) and without material form (4:12,15).
In terms of his character and attributes Yahweh is gracious (5:10; 7:9,12), loving (1:31; 7:7-8,13), righteous or just (4:8; 10:17-18), merciful (4:31; 13:17), powerful (4:34,37; 6:21-22), holy (5:11), glorious (5:24-26), faithful or loyal (7:9,12), and upright (32:4). But he is also an angry God (1:37; 3:26; 9:18-20), and zealous for his own honor (4:24; 13:2-10; 29:20).
The second major theme of the theology of Deuteronomythat pertaining to the recipient of the covenant initiated by Yahwehconsists primarily of references to the single nation or people Israel. Israel serves a functional role in Deuteronomy, one in line with the formal nature of the book, which portrays her as a servant of Yahweh whose mission is one of modeling the kingdom of God on earth and pressing its claims on the alienated nations so in need of God's salvation.
There is little concern with humankind apart from their constitution as nations, particularly the nation Israel. The typical terms goy [1]] of the Lord your God." There is more to Israel, then, than a national organization of tribes. Israel is an ethnic people, a kinfolk who can trace their origins back to a common ancestor whom God promised to make a great nation.
The third rubric of the theology of Deuteronomy is that of the covenant itself, both its form and its content. As has been noted, modern scholarship has drawn attention to the remarkable correspondence between Old Testament covenant form and pattern and that of Late Bronze Age Hittite vassal treaties. But of greater theological importance than the structure of the book is its content, one so inextricably linked to its covenant context that the theology of Deuteronomy should be viewed continually as a statement of relationshipthat of Yahweh the Great King with his elect and commissioned people Israel.
More particularly, Deuteronomy is a covenant renewal document and not an initial statement of covenant establishment. This is clear from the frequent references to the original Sinai (or Horeb) covenant setting (1:6; 4:1-2,5, 10,15, 23,33-40) and the change in language in Deuteronomy vis-a-vis Exodus due to the changed circumstances (5:12-15; cf. Exodus 20:8-11 ; 7:1-5 ; cf. Exodus 23:32-33 ; 12:5 ; cf. Exodus 20:24 ; 15:12-18 ; cf. Exodus 21:2-6 ). Moreover, Deuteronomy is a greatly expanded and more detailed rendition of the covenant text, for the complexities of life and expectation in the land of promise raise issues that were of little or no consequence in the wilderness of Sinai.
After tracing the course of events from Sinai (1:6-3:29) to the present site of covenant renewal in Moab, Moses urged the people to obedience as a precondition to blessing (4:1,6, 40). He pointed out that the document of covenant was inviolable (4:2), that it must be taught to future generations (4:9-10,40), and that its infraction would result in divine chastisement (4:26-28).
Moses next introduced the general stipulations of the covenant in a passage that clearly establishes the technical nature of the relationship (4:44-49). The "law" (or, better, "instruction"), he said, would consist of "stipulations, " "decrees, " "laws, " terms associated with such treaties.
The form of the Decalogue here (5:6-21) is virtually identical to the one in Exodus although there are slight differences because of the new historical and environmental circumstances awaiting this new generation of Israel. Also like its model in Exodus, the Deuteronomic Decalogue provides a platform of principles upon which the remainder of the general stipulations must rest and, indeed, of which they are a detailed interpretation and elaboration (5:22-11:32).
These stipulations are described as commands, decrees, and laws (6:1; cf. 5:31). They are adumbrated in the Shema of 6:4-5, the confessional fulcrum of Old Testament faith that defines Yahweh as the unique Sovereign and reduces Israel's obligation to him to one of exclusive love, that is, obedience. The whole purpose of the collection of stipulations is, in fact, to set forth application of the principles of the Ten Words and the Shema (6:6; cf. 5:22) as an expression of the fundamental duty of the servant people.
The basic stipulations (7:1-11:32) require the dispossession of nonvassals who must be utterly destroyed because they will cause Israel to become disloyal. Moreover, the land belongs to Yahweh and since Israel is the vassal of Yahweh only she has legitimate claim to tenancy. They also insist that Israel recognize Yahweh as the only source of blessing and life in the land. He who supplied manna in the desert could and would provide all his people's needs in Canaan. The principles of the covenant stipulations go on, however, to emphasize that all blessings, past and future, are attributable to Yahweh's grace. Possession of the land is not just an accident of history but an outworking of Yahweh's irrefragable promises to the fathers and of his sovereign pleasure.
The specific stipulations (12:1-26:15), based squarely on the principles of the foregoing section, serve at least two major theological purposes. First, they further elucidate the fundamental covenant theme of Deuteronomy 4:40-11:32 . That is, they function in a real sense as a case-by-case commentary on that section. Second, they define precisely the terms of the covenant relative to cultic, ethical, and societal/interpersonal/interethnic relationships. That is, they make practical application of what was more or less theoretical propositions. All the themes in this section find their center in Yahweh, his people, and the covenant that binds them together.
The exclusiveness of Yahweh is underscored by the insistence that worship be centralized in one place, the place where Yahweh would choose to "put his Name" (12:5,11). There and only there could tribute offered to the Sovereignespecially that of the blood of sacrificed animalsbe presented to him. This is in opposition to the notion of the multiplicity of pagan gods and their respective shrines, all of which must be eradicated, including the prophets who promote these competing (if nonexistent) deities (13:5,9-10). Another mark of the distinction between the purity of Yahwistic faith and the corruption of paganism is the line of demarcation drawn between the clean and unclean animals (14:1-3). The arbitrary definition of a clean animal suggests the sovereign election by Yahweh of a people whom he alone declares to be holy. Finally, Yahweh's exclusiveness is celebrated by the tribute paid him by his vassal people Israel. This takes the form of the tithe (14:22-29); the release of bond-slaves who symbolize Israel as a liberated slave people; the dedication of the firstborn to Yahweh in recognition of his having spared the firstborn in the tenth plague; and annual pilgrimages to the central sanctuary, journeys whose purpose is to proclaim the lordship of Yahweh to whom his loyal subjects come in submissive presentation of tribute.
The chasm between the ineffable Lord and his theocratic citizens is bridged in part by officials appointed by him to represent him to them and them to him. Thus there are judges and "officials" (16:18), kings, levitical priests, and prophets, all of whom bear the awesome privilege and heavy responsibilities incumbent on those who would serve the King. For them to fail is to invite divine displeasure and judgment.
Israel's role as a theocratic community did not remove her from the ordinary definition of a nation. Therefore she had to know how to deal with all the exigencies of national life although, as the vassal people of Yahweh, in such a way as to draw attention to that unique role. This would influence the way the nation dealt with homicide, boundary disputes, due process, war, the just treatment of wives, children, and criminals, and moveable goods.
Purity laws, which deal directly or indirectly with forms of separation, testified to the need for Israel to maintain covenant purity and separation. They concerned such matters as clothing (22:5), mother birds (22:6-7), freedom from liability (22:8), mixed seed, animals, and cloth (22:9-11), and a variety of other cases whose significance with respect to the principle of purity is not always easy to determine. What binds them together theologically is the recognition of the fact that Yahweh himself is among his people and that his holiness demands their best efforts at holiness (23:14).
The theological importance of proper behavior of covenant members toward each other is reemphasized by another set of stipulations (23:20- 25:19), similar in some respects to those already addressed (especially 21:10-22:4), but with greater business and economic interests in view. Because all members of the theocratic community are equal before God, they must be absolutely evenhanded and scrupulously honest and fair in their dealings with one another. If the heart of covenant confession is the requirement of loving the Lord his God with all heart, soul, and strength (6:5), the corollary, loving neighbors as ourselves (Leviticus 19:18 ), is equally obligatory.
The sixth area of concern in the specific stipulation section is that of regular and consistent recognition by vassals of their indebtedness to a beneficent God for all his redemptive and restorative Acts of grace. This must find expression particularly at the time of harvest festival when worshipers, with offering in hand, recite the sacred history of their people, dedicate themselves anew to the task of covenant-keeping, and give evidence of that commitment by the presentation of a special tithe to God's dependent ministers (26:1-15). It is fitting that this pledge of covenant fidelity be made at precisely the place mentioned at the beginning of the special stipulation section, that is, at "the place the Lord your God will choose as a dwelling for his Name" (26:2; cf. 12:5).
The permanency of the covenant relationship is implied by the command that Israel, once in the land of promise, should undertake covenant renewal at Mount Ebal, a ceremony centered on the very words of the covenant text being composed by Moses (27:1-7). The solemnity of what they would do there would be apparent in the curses that would result from their disobedience to the aforementioned stipulations (27:11-26; 28:15-68) and the blessings that would ensue the pursuit of obedience (28:1-14). Such curses and blessings had already attended Israel's pilgrimage to that point, and were a guarantee that Yahweh's dealings with his people in the present and future would be no different. Therefore, Moses said, the present generation, as well as those to come, must commit and recommit themselves to covenant faithfulness (30:11-20).
Since the covenant was articulated in the Mosaic writings themselves, specifically in Deuteronomy (31:9), future commitment to its principles presupposed its preservation in a place that was both safe and accessible. The document was thus entrusted to the levitical priests and the elders of Israel who, upon stated occasions, would release it for public reading. As a reminder of the pledge the people had undertaken to keep covenant they would also regularly sing a song whose very content was a recitation of God's redemptive work on behalf of Israel (32:1-43). Finally, in affirmation of the steadfastness of Yahweh's commitment to the nation, Moses offered a promissory blessing in which the tribes are prophetically described as recipients of divine favor.
Eugene H. Merrill
See also Clean, Unclean ; Covenant ; Israel ; Law ; Moses
Bibliography . R. E. Clements, God's Chosen People: A Theological Interpretation of the Book of Deuteronomy ; J. G. McConville, Law and Theology in Deuteronomy ; Eugene H. Merrill, A Biblical Theology of the Old Testament ; Samuel J. Schultz, Deuteronomy: The Gospel of Love .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Deuteronomy, the Book of
("repetition of the law".) Containing Moses' three last discourses before his death, addressed to all Israel in the Moabite plains E. of Jordan, in the eleventh month of the last year of their wanderings, the fortieth after their departure from Egypt; with the solemn appointment of his successor Joshua, Moses' song, blessing, and the account of his death subjoined by Joshua or some prophet (Deuteronomy 1:1 - 4:40; Deuteronomy 5:1 - 26:19; Deuteronomy 27:1 - 29:29). The first is introductory, reminding Israel of God's protection and of their ungrateful rebellion, punished by the long wandering; and warning them henceforth to obey and not lose the blessing. The second discourse begins with the Ten Commandments, the basis of the law, and develops and applies the first table; next declares special statutes as to:
(1) religion,
(2) administration of justice and public officers,
(3) private and social duties.
The third discourse renews the covenant, reciting the blessings and curses. The discourses must have been all spoken in the eleventh month; for on the tenth day of the 41st year Jordan was crossed (Joshua 4:19). Joshua 1:11; Joshua 2:22, three days previous were spent in preparations and waiting for the spies; so the encampment at Shittim was on the seventh day (Joshua 2:1). Thirty days before were spent in mourning for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8); so that Moses' death would be on the seventh day of the twelfth month, and Moses began his address the first day of the eleventh month, fortieth year (Deuteronomy 1:3). Hence, the discourses, being delivered about the same time, exhibit marked unity of style, inconsistent with their being composed at distant intervals. The style throughout is hortatory, rhetorical, and impressive.
A different generation had sprung up from that to which the law at Sinai had been addressed. Parts of it had been unavoidably in abeyance in the wilderness. Circumcision itself had been omitted (Joshua 5:2). Now when Israel was to enter Canaan, their permanent abode, they needed to be reminded of much of the law which they but partially knew or applied, and to have under divine sanction, besides the religious ordinances of the previous books, supplementary enactments, civil and political, for their settled organization. Thus, Deuteronomy is not a mere summary recapitulation, for large parts of the previous code are unnoticed, but Moses' inspired elucidation of the spirit and end of the law. In it he appears as "the prophet," as in the previous books he was the historian and legislator. Two passages especially exhibit him in this character.
The first Deuteronomy 18:15-19; "the Lord thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; according to all that thou desiredst of the Lord ... in Horeb, Let me not hear again the voice of ... God ... that I die not; and the Lord said, I will raise them up a Prophet ... and I will put My words in His mouth ... And whosoever will not hearken unto My words which He shall speak in My name, I will require it of him." In the ultimate and exhaustive sense Messiah fulfills the prophecy; Deuteronomy 34:10 expressly says "there arose not a prophet since in Israel like unto Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face." So Numbers 12:6-8; Hebrews 3:2-5, state how the Antitype exceeded the type. In a lower sense the whole order of prophets, the forerunners of THE PROPHET, is included; hardly Joshua, for he was already designated as Moses' successor (Psalms 90:13-16,2; Numbers 27:23), and the prophecy contemplates a future "prophet."
Our Lord Himself must have had this prophecy in view in John 5:46, "Moses wrote of Me." The Samaritans, who received the Pentateuch alone, must have drawn their expectation of the all-revealing Messiah from it: "when He is come He will tell us all things," answering to "I will put My words in His mouth ... He shall speak in My name." In Acts 3:22, etc., Acts 7:37, Peter and Stephen both quote it as fulfilled in Jesus. The Jews, the adversaries of Christianity, are our librarians, so that we Christians cannot have altered the passage to favor our views. It at once foretells Christ's coming and their own chastisement from God ("I will requite it") for "not hearkening" to Him.
The second passage is Deuteronomy 28, where he declares more fully than in Leviticus 26 what evils should overtake Israel in the event of their disobedience, with such specific particularity that the Spirit in him must be not declaring contingencies, but foretelling the penal results of their sin which have since so literally come to pass; their becoming "a byword among all nations where the Lord has led them"; their being besieged by "a nation of a fierce countenance, until their high walls wherein they trusted came down"; their "eating the fruit of their own body, the flesh of their sons and daughters, in the straitness of the siege, and the eye of the tender and delicate woman being evil toward the husband of her bosom and toward her child which she shall eat for want of all things secretly in the siege"; their dispersion so as to "find no ease, and the sole of their foot to have no rest among the nations," but to have "a trembling heart, failing of eyes, and sorrow of mind, their life hanging in doubt, in fear day and night, and having none assurance of life"; "the whole land (Deuteronomy 29:23) not sown, nor bearing, nor having grass."
Nay, more, Moses foresaw their disobedience: "I know that after my death ye will utterly corrupt yourselves, and turn aside from the way which I have commanded you, and evil will befall you in the latter days" (Deuteronomy 31:29). So also Deuteronomy 32, Moses song. But in the distant future he intimates, not merely their continued preservation, but also a time when Israel, dispersed "among all the nations, shall call to mind how all these things, the blessing and the curse, have come upon them, and shall return unto the Lord with all their heart and soul; though they be driven unto the outmost parts of heaven, from thence will the Lord their God gather them, and He will circumcise their heart, and make them plenteous in the fruit of their land, and again rejoice over them for good" (Deuteronomy 30, also Deuteronomy 32:36; Deuteronomy 32:43).
In Deuteronomy 32:8 Moses intimates that from the beginning the distribution of races and nations had a relation to God's final purpose that Israel should be the spiritual center of the kingdom of God; "when the Most High divided to the nations their inheritance, when He separated the sons of Adam, He set the bound: of the people according to the number of the children of Israel," i.e., that their inheritance should be proportioned to their numbers. The coincidences of Moses' song with other parts of the Pentateuch and of Deuteronomy confirm its genuineness. The style is no more different than was to be expected in a lyrical, as compared with a historical, composition. Psalm 90, which is Moses' work, resembles it: Psalms 90:1; 1619165091_71 with Deuteronomy 32:4; Deuteronomy 32:7; Deuteronomy 32:36; explain Deuteronomy 32:5 "they are not His children but their spot," i.e. a disgrace to them (to God's children).
Also Deuteronomy 32:42, not "from the beginning of revenges upon the enemy," but "from the head (i.e. the chief) of the princes of the enemy." These are the germs in Hoses which the prophets expand, setting forth the coming glory of the gospel church, and especially of Israel under the final Messianic kingdom. Herein Deuteronomy, "the second law," is the preparation for the gospel law; and Moses, in the very act of founding the Sinaitic law, prepares for its giving place to the higher law which is its end and fulfillment. The falsity of the theory that Deuteronomy is of a later age is proved by the fact that the archaisms of vocabulary and grammar characterizing the Pentateuch occur in Deuteronomy. The demonstrative pronoun haeel , characteristic of the Pentateuch, occurs Deuteronomy 4:42; Deuteronomy 7:22; Deuteronomy 19:11, and nowhere else but in the Aramaic (1 Chronicles 20:8 and Ezra 5:15). The use of h local. The future ending in -un .
The passive construed with 'eth of the direct object. Κeseb for Κebes (Deuteronomy 14:4). Ζakur for Ζakar (Deuteronomy 16:16). Ancient words: 'abib , yequm , shegar , 'alaphim , methim , hermeesh for magal , teneh for sal . The Canaanite 'ashteroth hatsion , "offspring of the flocks." Υeshurun , for Israel, copied in Isaiah 44:2. Μadweh , "sickness." The resemblance of Jeremiah to Deuteronomy is accounted for by the fact that the sins denounced in Deuteronomy were those abounding in Jeremiah's time. Jeremiah, as a priest of Anathoth, familiar with the law from childhood, naturally adopts the tone of Deuteronomy (as does Huldah his contemporary; compare 2 Kings 22:16, etc., with Deuteronomy 29:2, etc.), both in denunciation and in final consolation.
Possibly also the book of the law found in the temple by Hilkiah the high priest and brought before king Josiah, after disuse for the 60 years of the two previous reigns, was Deuteronomy alone. But if it was the whole Pentateuch put by the Levites, at Moses' command, in the sides of the ark (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:26; 2 Chronicles 34:14), still Deuteronomy was the part that mainly awakened the conscience of king and people (Deuteronomy 12:2-3; Deuteronomy 12:16; Deuteronomy 12:18; Deuteronomy 29:25-27; compare 2 Kings 22:13-17; 2 Kings 22:23). Josiah's reforms are just those most insisted upon in Deuteronomy. Jeremiah was the son of Hilkiah, probably related to the high priest, and his uncle, Shallum, was apparently the husband of Huldah, the prophetess. But while having some resemblance the language and idioms of Jeremiah are of an altogether later date than Deuteronomy.
While he imitates or repeats phrases of Deuteronomy, he uses characteristic expressions never found in Deuteronomy; for instances see The Introduction to Deuteronomy, Speaker's Commentary. The writer of Deuteronomy, if a forger, would never, having the rest of the Pentateuch before him, have left apparent discrepancies between his work and it, when desiring his work to appear as if by the same author. The original writer, Moses, could alone treat his own work in such a free spirit. The different circumstances and objects in view clear the seeming discrepancies. Thus, the directions in Deuteronomy 12:6; Deuteronomy 12:17; Deuteronomy 10:8-9; Deuteronomy 14:28-29; Deuteronomy 26:12, etc., do not supersede the directions in Leviticus 27:30-34; Numbers 18:20, etc. The earlier directions refer to the general and first tithe of all produce, animal and vegetable, for the maintenance of the priests and Levites.
The later in Deuteronomy refer to the second and additional tithe on the increase of the field only, and for celebrating the sacred feasts each first and second year in the sanctuary, every third year at home with a feast to the Levites, the stranger, fatherless, and widow; like the love-feasts of New Testament (Deuteronomy 11:5.) The first tithe is taken for granted in Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 10:9; Deuteronomy 18:1-2), and no fresh injunction as to it is given, it being from the first recognized in Genesis 14:20; Genesis 28:22, as well as in Leviticus and Numbers.
The different way in which the priests and Levites respectively are regarded in Deuteronomy and in the preceding books (in these "the Levites" ministering to the priests "the sons of Aaron," as the priests minister to God (Numbers 3:5, etc.; 4; Exodus 28:1; Exodus 29:1, etc.), and not mentioned as "blessing" the people, the prerogative of the priests (Numbers 6:23-27, compare Deuteronomy 14:22); but in Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 18:7; Deuteronomy 11:6) the Levites and Aaronite priests not being mutually distinguished, and Korah not being mentioned with Dathan and Abiram in their rebellion) is accounted for by the consideration that Moses in Deuteronomy is addressing the people, and for the time takes no notice of the distinction of orders among ministers, and, similarly referring to the rebellions of the people against God, takes no notice of the minister Korah's share in the rebellion, as not suiting his present purpose. His additional enactment are just of that supplementary and explanatory kind which would come from the legislator himself, after a practical experience of the working of the law during the years of the wilderness wanderings.
In Deuteronomy 19:14, "thou shalt not remove ... landmark which they of old time have set in thine inheritance which thou shalt inherit," "they of old time" are those about first to occupy the land. Moses lays down a law for distant generations, as the land was to be a lasting inheritance; the words "shalt inherit" prove that the occupation was still future. The relaxation granted in Deuteronomy 12:15 as to killing in all their gates, whereas in Leviticus 17:3-4, the victim even for ordinary eating must be killed at the door of the tabernacle, is precisely what we might expect when Israel was on the verge of entering Canaan, which they were at the time of the delivering of Deuteronomy. Our Lord attests Deuteronomy by quoting from it alone the three passages wherewith He foiled the tempter in the wilderness (Matthew 4; Deuteronomy 8:3; Deuteronomy 6:13; Deuteronomy 6:16).
Paul (Romans 10:6; Romans 10:19; Romans 15:10 attests it Deuteronomy 30:12; Deuteronomy 30:18; Deuteronomy 32:21; Deuteronomy 32:43). Moses tells us that all the words of this law he wrote and gave to the Levites to be put in the side of the ark at the one time (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:22-26. Paul's quotations, "Rejoice, O ye nations (Gentiles), with His people," and "I will move them to jealousy with those which are not a people," prove that Moses did not understand his own law as possessing that localized narrowness to which Judaism would restrict it. Many circumstances which would naturally be noticed on the eve of Israel's entrance into Canaan occur for the first time in Moses' last address. Now first he enjoins the observance of the three great feasts (mentioned previously), at the place which the Lord shall choose (Deuteronomy 12:5).
Now first he introduces the appointment of judges in the different cities (Deuteronomy 16:18; Deuteronomy 19:11; Deuteronomy 21:18). Tents were the abodes spoken of in the previous books, now houses. In first recording the appointment of captains, he attributes it to Jethro's counsel (Exodus 18:17, etc.); in repeating the fact to the people (Deuteronomy 1:9, etc.) he notices their part in the selection. Jethro doubtless suggested the plan, and Moses, after consulting God, laid it before the people, assigning the choice to them. So in Numbers 13; 14, the Lord commands the sending of the spies; but in addressing the people (Deuteronomy 1:19, etc.) Moses reminds them of what was not noticed before, but was most to his point now, their share in sending them.
They had been told to go up at once and possess the land, but requested leave first to send spies; God in compliance with their wish gave the command. His allusion to the Lord's anger and exclusion of himself, when speaking of that of the people, accords with the character of the meekest of men (Deuteronomy 1:34-38). A forger would magnify the miracles in referring to them; Moses alludes to them as notorious, and uses them only as an incentive to enforce obedience. His notices of the children of Esau supplanting the Horims by God's help, and Moab supplanting the giant Emim (Deuteronomy 2:9-13) are made the argument why Israel need not, as their fathers, fear the giant Anakims
Holman Bible Dictionary - Deuteronomy, the Book of
English name of fifth book of Old Testament taken from Greek translation meaning, “second law.” Deuteronomy is the last of five books of Law and should not be read in isolation from the other four books (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers). Pentateuch (five books) is the familiar title associated with these five books of Law, the first and most important division of the Hebrew Bible. By longstanding tradition these books have been associated with Moses, the human instrument of God's deliverance of Israel from bondage in Egypt and the negotiator of the covenant between God and Israel.
Title The probable origin of the title “Deuteronomy” is the translation in the Septuagint (Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament) of Deuteronomy 17:18-19 . These two verses contain instructions to the king about making “a copy of this law” to be read regularly and obeyed faithfully. The Septuagint translators rendered the above phrase “this second law” instead of “a copy of this law.” The Septuagint translation implies a body of legislation different from that contained in the previous books of Law. That does not seem to be the point of the instruction in Deuteronomy 17:18-19 . This apparent Greek mistranslation is the likely source of the title “Deuteronomy.”
The title used in the Hebrew Bible, “these (are) the words” (two words in Hebrew), follows an ancient custom of using words from the first line of the text to designate a book. Sometimes the title in the Hebrew Bible was shortened to “words.” This title more accurately defines the contents of the book than our familiar English title, Deuteronomy. In the main the book consists of the words by which Moses addressed Israel prior to their entry into the Promised Land. The style is sermonic, that of a preacher addressing his congregation with words designed to move them to obedience and commitment. “Words” is an informative title, affording a window into the nature of the book.
Background Deuteronomy is not primarily a law book or a book of history. It claims to be the words of Moses addressed to Israel on the eve of their entry into Canaan. Their wanderings in the wilderness were at an end. Their early efforts at conquest of the Promised Land east of the Jordan had met with success. The events recorded in Deuteronomy took place east of the Jordan before the beginning of the conquest west of the Jordan.
The historical background to the Book of Deuteronomy is found in Moses' opening address (Deuteronomy 1-4 ). Moses recounted the events of Israel's history from the time of their departure from Sinai to the time of their arrival in the land east of the Jordan. Behind that recitation lay the covenant-making procedures at Sinai, covered by Moses in Deuteronomy 5-11 . Before that was the Exodus from Egypt, God's mighty delivering act for His people Israel. Moses used the events of the past to press home to Israel the importance of the present moment.
Israel's Exodus from Egypt and the covenant at Sinai were the stages of Israel's birth as a nation. As yet they were a nation without a homeland. God's covenant with Israel at Sinai was in part a renewal of earlier covenants made with the patriarchs. Included in those covenants were the following promises: (1) that Israel would be God's special nation, (2) that Yahweh God would be their God, (3) that they would be obedient to God, and (4) that God would give them a homeland and innumerable descendants.
Now Israel was poised on the borders of Canaan ready to enter and to possess the Land of Promise. Moses, knowing that Israel's future hung on their obedience and commitment to God, led the people in a covenant renewal ceremony. Moses' approaching death and resulting transfer of human leadership to Joshua, plus Israel's approaching battles in conquest of the land, formed the basis for renewal of the covenant.
Contents Deuteronomy contains not one, but three (or more) addresses from Moses to Israel. Most interpreters agree that the structure of the book is patterned after Near Eastern vassal treaties. More will be said about this subject in the “Date and Authorship” section of this article. The present form of Deuteronomy emphasizes the words of Moses, not the details of the covenant renewal ceremony.
Deuteronomy 1:1-5 is an introduction, giving the time and place of the addresses. The time is “the fortieth year” ( Deuteronomy 1:3 ) of wilderness wandering, “in the eleventh month, on the first day of the month.” The place is “on this side Jordan in the wilderness” (Deuteronomy 1:1 ) and, more particularly, “in the land of Moab” (Deuteronomy 1:5 ).
Deuteronomy 1:6-4:40 is Moses' first address in which he recounted Israel's journey from Horeb to Moab and urged Israel to be faithful to Yahweh. Moses used Israel's immediate past history to teach the present generation of Israelites the importance of trusting God. Israel's obedience was imperative if they were to expect to possess the land of Canaan. Moses set up cities of refuge on the east bank of the Jordan ( Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ).
Deuteronomy 4:44-28:68 contains Moses' second address to Israel. The address is introduced in Deuteronomy 4:44-49 . Then Moses proceeded to teach Israel lessons from the law. These are not laws to be used in the courts to decide legal cases, but instructions for life in the land of Canaan.
Moses' third address is found in Deuteronomy 29:1-30:20 . The focus is upon covenant renewal. Repentance and commitment would assure life and the blessings of God. Rebellion would result in their death as a nation. The choice was theirs.
Deuteronomy 31:1-29 is Moses' farewell address. The song of Moses is given in Deuteronomy 31:30-32:52 . Moses' blessing is reported in Deuteronomy 33:1 , and his death is recounted in Deuteronomy 34:1 .
Date and Authorship The date when Deuteronomy was put in its final form was relatively late. Internal evidence seems to favor a time after the Mosaic era. The author makes third person references to Moses instead of first person statements about himself as one would expect Moses to do. “Beyond the Jordan,” a common phrase used for the territory east of that river, gives the perspective of a writer within the land of Canaan.
The Near Eastern vassal treaty form of Deuteronomy has been used by scholars to argue for a date for the book in the Mosaic period or shortly thereafter. Other scholars use the same information to argue for a date closer to 600 B.C. Differences in form between early Hittite treaties and later Assyrian treaties when compared to Deuteronomy are the bases for deciding in favor of an early or a later date for Deuteronomy. Such comparisons of the structure of Deuteronomy with the structure of Near Eastern vassal treaties do not provide firm evidence for dating Deuteronomy either early or late.
The “book of the law” found during the repair of the Temple in the eighteenth year of Josiah's reign (621 B.C.) has been identified as Deuteronomy since the early church fathers shortly after 300 A.D. That identity cannot be proved, but the nature of the reforms of Josiah and the contents of Deuteronomy show an interesting similarity. For example, the call for centralization of worship (Deuteronomy 12:1 ) is matched by Josiah's destruction of all altars except the one in the Temple in Jerusalem (2 Kings 23:4-20 ).
All the basic material in Deuteronomy seems to be quite ancient, but the book seems to have been edited after the death of Moses. No doubt Moses gave such addresses to Israel as the book reflects when it became known to him that God would not permit him to lead Israel into the Promised Land.
The scribe who recorded the final form of Deuteronomy is not known. Longstanding tradition among Christians and Jews favors Moses as the author, but third person references to Moses, the location of the writer in Palestine (Deuteronomy 1:1 ), and comparison of the laws in Deuteronomy with the laws in the Book of the Covenant (Exodus 20:23-23:19 ) all indicate that the book was produced later than the Mosaic period.
Gerhard von Rad has argued convincingly for the origin of Deuteronomy among the Levitical priests (Deuteronomy 10:8-9 ; Deuteronomy 17:9 ,Deuteronomy 17:9,17:18 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-8 ; Deuteronomy 21:5 ). His investigation shows that the materials in the book have a long history preceding that writing. The book apparently preserves genuine Mosaic covenant-faith. Whoever put it in its final form was inspired just as Moses was when he addressed the Israelites on the plains of Moab.
Purpose The sermonic style of Deuteronomy suits it well to serve just as most interpreters agree that it served originally. Deuteronomy is a call to repentance, a plea for God's disobedient people to mend their ways and renew the covenant God made with them at Sinai. Moses had led Israel to the borders of Canaan nearly forty years before, but in rebellion and unbelief the people turned back into the wilderness. Now the new generation of Israelites stood on the borders of the Promised Land. Would they turn back in rebellion and unbelief?
The approaching death of Moses put urgency into his appeal for covenant renewal. He called for obedience through love to Yahweh, the loving God, who had established the covenant with Israel. Moses was convinced that only through a renewed relationship with God could the new generation of Israelites hope to succeed under Joshua's leadership in possessing the land. No doubt Joshua used the materials of Deuteronomy when he led Israel in a covenant renewal ceremony at Shechem (Joshua 8:30-35 ). Later, covenant renewal became a regular feature of Israel's cult. Deuteronomy must have been used in these ceremonies.
Teaching Deuteronomy continues to exercise strong influence on God's people. In many ways it remains a guide to life under God. It reminds of the great things God has done and wants to do for His people. It calls to faith and action in response to God's acts. It holds high the belief in the uniqueness of God as the only God without rivals. Thus it points to worship of any other god as vain, without meaning or hope. It shows the Ten Commandments as the center of the covenant relationship for believers. It holds up love of God as the basic relationship God wants with His people. It calls for total separation from pagan practices and godless life-styles. It seeks to establish a community at rest, free from internal strife and external war. It focuses on the needs of the least privileged members of society, calling on God's people to meet their needs. It teaches that the commitment of people finds reflection in action. It pronounces curses on evildoers who forsake God's covenant and blessings on those faithful to the covenant. From first to last, it calls for repentance and renewal of faith.
Outline
I. Introduction: Historical Setting (Deuteronomy 1:1-5 )
II. Moses' First Sermon: Learn from God's Saving Acts (Deuteronomy 1:6-4:43 )
A. Historical memories call for present faith action (Deuteronomy 1:6-3:29 )
B. God's Word is the foundation for His people's life (Deuteronomy 4:1-43 )
III. Second Sermon: God's Law Guides and Gives Unique Identity to God's People (Deuteronomy 4:44-28:68 )
A. Covenant faith demands total allegiance and unchanging love for God (Deuteronomy 4:44 —-Deuteronomy 4:44—-11:32 )
B. God expresses His demands in worship, leadership, daily life, business life, legal practices, family life, and care for others (Deuteronomy 12:1-28:68 ).
IV. Third Sermon: God Seeks to Renew Covenant Relationships (Deuteronomy 29:1-30:20 ).
V. Conclusion: God Seeks Continuity in Leadership for His People (Deuteronomy 31:1-34:12 ).
Billy K. Smith
Webster's Dictionary - Deuteronomy
(n.) The fifth book of the Pentateuch, containing the second giving of the law by Moses.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Deuteronomy
Repetition of the law
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Deuteronomy
Deuteronomy (deû'ter-ŏn'o-my), or the Second Law (so called from its repeating the law), is the fifth book of the Bible, and, except the last chapter, was probably written by Moses. Deuteronomy 1:5, comp. with Deuteronomy 34:1; 2 Chronicles 25:4; Daniel 9:13; Mark 12:19; Acts 3:22. This book contains three addresses of Moses to the Israelites in the plain of Moab in the 11th month of the 40th year of their journeyings. The first address. Deuteronomy 1:1 to Deu_4:40. is a brief rehearsal of the history of the "Wandering," and plea to obedience. The second address, Deuteronomy 5:1 to Deu_26:19, contains a recapitulation, with a few additions and alterations, of the law given on Sinai. The third part of Deuteronomy 27:1 to Deuteronomy 30:20, opens with the joint command of Moses and the elders to keep all the commandments, and, when they had crossed the Jordan, to write them upon the great plastered stones they were ordered to set up with appropriate ceremonies. Then follows the third address, Deuteronomy 27:11 to Deu_30:20, whose topic is, "The blessing and the curse." After these three addresses, in chapter 31 there follows the delivery of the law to Joshua and Moses' speech on the occasion, containing a command to read the law every seven years. In Deuteronomy 32:1-52 we have the song of Moses; in chapter 33 Moses' blessing of the twelve tribes. These were the last written words of Moses, and most beautifully do they set forth the majesty of God and the excellency of Israel. The final verses of the book give an account of the death of Moses, and were, of course, written by another hand.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Deuteronomy
from δευτερος , second, and νομος ; law; the last book of the Pentateuch, or five books of Moses. As its name imports, it contains a repetition of the civil and moral law, which was a second time delivered by Moses, with some additions and explanations, as well to impress it more forcibly upon the Israelites in general, as in particular for the benefit of those who, being born in the wilderness, were not present at the first promulgation of the law. It contains also a recapitulation of the several events which had befallen the Israelites since their departure from Egypt, with severe reproaches for their past misconduct, and earnest exhortations to future obedience. The Messiah is explicitly foretold in this book; and there are many remarkable predictions interspersed in it, particularly in the twenty-eighth, thirtieth, thirty-second, and thirty-third chapters, relative to the future condition of the Jews. The book of Deuteronomy finishes with an account of the death of Moses, which is supposed to have been added by his successor, Joshua.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Deuteronomy
DEUTERONOMY
1. Structure, Origin, Influence . The book consists of three speeches ( Deuteronomy 1:6 to Deuteronomy 4:40 ; Deuteronomy 4:5-26 ; Deuteronomy 4:28 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-21 to Deuteronomy 30:20 ) and two poems (chs. 32, 33), all of which are represented as having been uttered by Moses on the plains of Moab before the crossing of Jordan. The slight narrative (chs. 27, 31, 34) is concerned mainly with the last days of Moses. Chapters 1 3, however, contain an historical sketch cast into the form of a speech.
Chs. 5 26, Deuteronomy 28:1-46 are a unity with a formal opening ( Deuteronomy 4:44-49 ) and close ( Deuteronomy 29:1 ); and this section, apart from some later additions, is homogeneous. Thus chs. 5 11 elaborate those principles concerning Jahweh and His relation to His people which give a peculiar character to the Hebrew polity; chs. 12 26 develop these into a code of law; Deuteronomy 28:1-46 pronounces blessings on obedience, curses on disobedience. This section, it is now agreed, was the Law-book found in the Temple in the 18th year of Josiah (b.c. 622 621), which formed the basis of the reform described in 2 Kings 22:1-20 f. Thus Josiah abolished the high places in Judah and Jerusalem ( Deuteronomy 22:8 ; Deuteronomy 22:13 ), and confined legitimate worship to the sanctuary at Jerusalem; and this centralization of the cult is the dominating idea of Deuteronomy 5:1-33 ; Deuteronomy 6:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 7:1-26 ; Deuteronomy 8:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 9:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 10:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 11:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 12:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 13:1-18 ; Deuteronomy 14:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 16:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 17:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 29:2 ; Deuteronomy 20:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 22:1-30 ; Deuteronomy 23:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 24:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 26:1-19 . Again, Josiah purified the Jahweh-worship from baser elements, destroying the Asherah ( 2 Kings 23:6 , cf. Deuteronomy 16:21 f.) and the houses of sodomy ( Deuteronomy 20:1-209 , cf. Deuteronomy 23:17 f.). His opposition to idolatry was directed against the same forms as those denounced in Deut. (cf. the sun-worship, 2 Kings 23:5 ; 2 Kings 23:11 , Deuteronomy 17:3 ; and the worship of Milcom, Deuteronomy 23:10 ; Deuteronomy 23:13 , Deuteronomy 12:31 ). The Passover, celebrated in his day at Jerusalem, is stated to have been unique ( 2 Kings 23:21 ff.); and Deut. forbids the celebration of the Passover elsewhere than in Jerusalem ( Deuteronomy 16:5 f.). The king abolished the superstitious means of learning the Divine will ( 2 Kings 23:24 ), which Deut. forbids ( Deuteronomy 18:10 ff.). The demands of the Law-book and the performance of the king are parallel.
It is, however, a more difficult question how far the reforms which Josiah instituted in obedience to Deut. were new, and how far they were a return to older practices from which the nation had degenerated during the early monarchy. Three other codes can be distinguished in the Pentateuch, and a comparison of these with Deut. helps to determine its place in the development of Israel’s religion. An examination of the social legislation in Deut. leads to the conclusion that it is later than the Book of the Covenant (Exodus 20:1 to Exodus 23:33 ). Though we are not justified in calling Deut. a deliberate expansion of this legislation, it certainly represents a more developed state of society, as is seen, e.g. , in its numerous laws about contracts. And in one particular it controls the cult at a cardinal point which Exod. left vague: the ‘every place where Jahweh records his name’ ( Exodus 20:24 ) has become ‘the place which Jahweh shall choose to put his name there’ (Deut. passim ). When Deut. is compared with the Law of Holiness ( Leviticus 17:1-16 ; Leviticus 18:1-30 ; Leviticus 19:1-37 ; Leviticus 20:1-27 ; Leviticus 21:1-24 ; Leviticus 22:1-33 ; Leviticus 23:1-44 ; Leviticus 24:1-23 ; Leviticus 25:1-55 ; Leviticus 26:1-46 ), the codes are seen to be framed for different purposes Leviticus as a handbook for priests, Deut. as a layman’s manual. But their legislation is parallel. Compared with P [1] , Deut. is earlier, for questions left uncertain in Deut. are decided in P [1] . See further, art. Hexateuch.
The few references in Deut. to events in Israel’s history bear out the conclusion thus reached, for they are dependent on JE [3] , but show no acquaintance with P [1] ’s history. It is difficult, e.g. , to explain the absence of Korah in Deuteronomy 11:6 , if the author read Numbers 16:1-50 in its present form, where Korah from P [1] has been woven into the early story. When chs. 1 3 (see below) are included in this scrutiny, they support the inference that Deut. was an independent book, before P [1] was incorporated with JE [3] .
There are further indications of the date at which this code was introduced. Thus Deut. insists throughout on one sanctuary, at which legitimate worship can be offered to Jahweh.
The extent to which this dominates the code is not to be measured merely by the number of times the command is repeated. Older customs are recast in consequence of this change. The Passover alters its character from a family to a national festival (Deuteronomy 16:5 f.). A central tribunal is set up to replace the decisions at the local shrines ( Deuteronomy 17:8 f.). Asylums for the manslayer are needed ( Deuteronomy 19:1 ff.), since the village altars where he once found safety ( Exodus 21:14 ) are abolished, etc.
Now this was an innovation in Israel. Elijah, far from condemning the high places, is indignant at the sacrilege which has thrown down the altars of Jahweh (1 Kings 19:10 ). When he leaves the polluted land to seek Jahweh, he makes his way not to Jerusalem, but to Horeb (contrast Isaiah 2:2 f.). Hosea and Amos find much to condemn in the worship which was practised at Bethel and Dan, but never suggest that any worship offered at these shrines was ipso facto illegitimate. Yet these were the religious teachers of the nation. Deut., again, forbids the erection of pillars beside Jahweh’s altars ( Deuteronomy 12:3 f.); it is difficult to understand how Isaiah ( Isaiah 19:19 ) could have associated a pillar with Jahweh-worship, had this law been accepted in his day. The worship of the host of heaven one of the few forms of idolatry specified in Deut. is not mentioned till it receives severe blame from the prophets of the 7th cent. ( Jeremiah 8:2 ; Jeremiah 19:13 ; Jeremiah 32:29 , Zephaniah 1:3 ). But this Assyrian cult became a real danger to Israel’s religion, when Manasseh came under Eastern influences.
Hezekiah is the first king of whom we learn that he attempted to remove the high places (2 Kings 18:14 ). Evidently, however, this was an unpopular step, for the Rabshakeh was able to appeal to the conservative instincts of the nation against a king who practised such questionable innovations ( Deuteronomy 18:22 ). What impelled Hezekiah was a religious, not a political, motive. The splendid monotheistic teaching of Isaiah carried with it the Inference ‘One God, one sanctuary.’ Besides, the abuses which were associated with the local shrines compelled the religious leaders of the nation, who had been influenced by the teaching of Hosea and Amos, to go to the root and abolish such worship altogether. The one means of purifying their worship was to sever it from the high places with their Canaanite associations. Political events helped them. The fall of N. Israel (b.c. 722) carried with it the condemnation of the worship which was practised there, and swept away the worshippers who were attached to it. The deliverance of Jerusalem from Sennacherib threw a glory round the sanctuary of which Jahweh had so signally vindicated the inviolability. Probably a body of reformers framed their code in Hezekiah’s later years. They did not create a new legislation, they recast and put a new spirit into an older code. It would have been impossible to secure the acceptance of a brand-new code from a whole people.
Efforts have been made to break up Deuteronomy 5:1-33 ; Deuteronomy 6:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 7:1-26 ; Deuteronomy 8:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 9:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 10:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 11:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 12:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 13:1-18 ; Deuteronomy 14:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 16:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 17:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-21 ; 1619165091_48 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 22:1-30 ; Deuteronomy 23:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 24:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 26:1-19 into several sections, and to trace their origin. These have not been very convincing: they have relied too much on a proof of difference of origin derived from the use of the singular or the plural number in forms of address to the people. But they have proved that older elements and varied elements have been fused together into this Law-book.
Under Manasseh there followed a strong reaction, which resorted even to persecution. The reformers’ Law-book was forgotten, the reformers themselves may have been martyred. But the code itself survived to be discovered under Josiah, and to become the basis of a pregnant reform.
Opinion is divided as to whether chs. 1 3 are by the hand which wrote the main work. The fact that in Deuteronomy 11:2 ff. Moses is represented as speaking to men who had witnessed the Exodus, while in Deuteronomy 2:14 ff. that generation is represented as dead, seems decisive that they are not. The chapters may have been added as an historical introduction to a separate edition of the code. The fact that their history is based on JE [3] proves that this must have been early.
Chapters Deuteronomy 4:1-40 ; Deuteronomy 4:29 f. belong together, and are a later addition in view of new circumstances, viz., the prospect or the reality of exile.
The Song (Deuteronomy 32:1-43 ), with its double introduction ( Deuteronomy 31:16-22 ; Deuteronomy 31:30 ) and close ( Deuteronomy 32:44 ), is a didactic poem, giving an interpretation of Israel’s entire history, and bearing traces of influence from the Wisdom literature. It may date from the 7th cent. or the Exile.
The Blessing (ch. 33) dates from a time when N. Israel in the flush of its vigour could anticipate further conquests (Deuteronomy 32:17 ), since Eastern Israel had regained part of its lost territory ( Deuteronomy 32:20 ). It may belong to the reign of Jeroboam II. (b.c. 782 43), by whom the Syrians of Damascus were defeated.
Ch. 27 is difficult to assign. It evidently breaks the connexion of 26 and 28, and as evidently is composite. The Levites in Leviticus 27:14 ff. carry out what in Leviticus 27:12 ff. the tribes are commissioned to do, and there are no blessings uttered at all. There may be early elements in Leviticus 27:4 ff., but it is best to confess that the chapter is still a crux .
2. Main principles . ( a ) The fundamental principle of the book is the unity of Jahweh , who is God of the whole earth ( Deuteronomy 10:14 ), and who is more than the God of Israel, since He has relations to other nations apart from their relations to Israel ( Deuteronomy 9:5 , Deuteronomy 12:31 ). This carries with it the consequence that idolatry is the supreme sin ( Deuteronomy 6:14 ,
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Deuteronomy
Or the repetition of the law, the fifth book of the Pentateuch, so called by the Greeks, because in it Moses recapitulates what he had ordained in the preceding books, Deuteronomy 1:1-6 29:1 31:1 33:1-29 . This book contains the history of what passed in the wilderness from the beginning of the eleventh month, to the seventh day of the twelfth month, in the fortieth year after the Israelites' departure from Egypt, that is, about six weeks, B. C. 1451. That part which mentions the death of Moses was added afterwards, very probably by Joshua.
The book of Deuteronomy is the sublime and precious valedictory address of the inspired "man of God," now venerable for his age and experience, and standing almost in the gate of heaven. He gives the people of God his fatherly counsel and blessing, and then goes up into mount Pisgah alone to die. He recounts the dealings of God with them; recapitulates his laws; shows them why they should love him, and how they should serve him. It is full of tender solicitude, wise instruction, faithful warning, and the zealous love of a patriot and a prophet for the people of God, whom he had borne on his heart so long. It is often quoted by later inspired writers, and by our Lord, Matthew 4:4,7,10 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Deuteronomy
--which means "the repetition of the law" --consists chiefly of three discourses delivered by Moses shortly before his death. Subjoined to these discourses are the Song of Moses the Blessing of Moses, and the story of his death.
The first discourse. (1:1; 4:40) After a brief historical introduction the speaker recapitulates the chief events of the last forty years in the wilderness. To this discourse is appended a brief notice of the severing of the three cities of refuge on the east side of the Jordan. (4:41-43)
The second discourse is introduced like the first by an explanation of the circumstances under which it was delivered. (4:44-49) It extends from chap. (5:1-26) 19 And contains a recapitulation, with some modifications and additions of the law already given on Mount Sinai.
In the third discourse, (27:1-30) 20 The elders of Israel are associated with Moses. The people are commanded to set up stones upon Mount Ebal, and on them to write "all the words of this law." Then follow the several curses to be pronounced by the Levites on Ebal, (27:14-26) and the blessings on Gerizim. (28:1-14)
The delivery of the law as written by Moses (for its still further preservation) to the custody of the Levites, and a charge to the people to hear it read once every seven years, Deuteronomy 31 ; the Song of Moses spoken in the ears of the people, (31:30; 32:44) and the blessing of the twelve tribes. (33:5) The book closes, Deuteronomy 34 , with an account of the death of Moses, which is first announced to him ch. (32:48-52) The book bears witness to its own authorship, (31:19) and is expressly cited in the New Testament as the work of Moses. (Matthew 19:7,8 ; Mark 10:3 ; Acts 3:22 ; 7:37 ) The last chapter, containing an account of the death of Moses, was of course added by a later hand, and probably formed originally the beginning of the book of Joshua. [1]
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Deuteronomy
After receiving the law at Mt Sinai, Israel spent almost forty years in the wilderness region between Sinai and Canaan. During this time the adults died and a new generation grew up (cf. Numbers 14:28-35). Moses’ repetition of the law for this new generation is recorded in the book called Deuteronomy (from two Greek words, deuteros, meaning ‘second’, and nomos, meaning ‘law’). Concerning the authorship of the book and its relation to the previous four books see PENTATEUCH.
Characteristic style
Deuteronomy does more than simply repeat the law; it expounds the law, giving it a new emphasis. It shows that God wants more than legal correctness. He wants his people to obey him because they want to, not because they are forced to. He wants the relationship with his people to be one of warmth and love (Deuteronomy 6:3; Deuteronomy 6:5-7; Deuteronomy 7:7-8; Deuteronomy 7:11; Deuteronomy 8:5). The book’s style is that of the preacher rather than the lawgiver; its audience is the people as a whole rather than the priests and judges (Deuteronomy 6:8-9; Deuteronomy 8:6; Deuteronomy 10:12-13).
The basis of Deuteronomy is the covenant between Yahweh and his people. In his sovereign grace, God chose Israel to be his people, and promised them Canaan for a national homeland (Deuteronomy 7:7; Deuteronomy 8:1; Deuteronomy 9:4-5). Israel could do nothing but accept God’s grace and promise to serve him with loving obedience (Deuteronomy 5:6-7; Deuteronomy 6:1-3; Deuteronomy 10:12-13; see COVENANT).
In form Deuteronomy is similar to the normal covenant documents of the ancient Near East. When a sovereign overlord made a covenant with his subject peoples, he prepared a treaty document that declared his sovereignty over them and laid down the order of life he required of them. This is what God did with his people Israel, using Moses as his mediator.
Contents of the covenant document
Usually a treaty document began with an historical introduction in which the overlord, after announcing his name, recounted all he had done for his people. Deuteronomy opens with God’s recounting all he had done for Israel (1:1-3:29) and urging the people to be loyal to him in return (4:1-43).
After the introduction came a statement of the covenant’s basic requirements. For Israel the basic principles were in the form of ten commandments (4:44-5:33). Love would enable the people to do God’s will. There was to be no treachery through forming alliances with foreign powers (foreign gods) (6:1-25). God was giving his people a good land, but they had to remember that life depends on more than the food people eat. It depends on spiritual forces found only in God (7:1-8:20). The people therefore were not to be stubborn (9:1-10:11), but were to have humble purity of heart towards God and towards their fellows (10:12-11:32).
Having established the basic principles, the treaty document then set out the detailed laws. Ancient custom allowed treaties to be updated from time to time to suit changing circumstances. In the case of the Israelites, they would no longer be together as a vast crowd moving through the wilderness, but would split up, spread out and settle down in an agriculturally fertile country. Moses’ repetition of the law therefore included adjustments to fit in with the people’s new way of life (e.g. 11:10-11; 12:20-22; 14:24-27; 18:6-8).
The updated covenant document dealt with a number of matters, including faithfulness in worship (12:1-13:18), honesty in religious and social matters (14:1-16:17), justice in government (16:18-19:21), respect for human life (20:1-21:23), sexual purity (22:1-23:25), protection for the disadvantaged in society (24:1-25:4), and integrity in family relations, business dealings and religious duties (25:5-26:15). The two parties then declared their loyalty to the covenant (26:16-19).
In keeping with the form of ancient treaties, the covenant also listed the rewards and punishments (blessings and cursings) that people could expect. If they were obedient, they would enjoy increased benefits from the overlord; if they were disobedient, they would suffer severe penalties (27:1-28:68). Having stated the conditions under which the covenant operated, Moses then formally renewed it (29:1-30:20). A further feature of the covenant was the twofold provision for its maintenance. First, the people had to assemble periodically to hear it read; second, the document had to be kept in the central shrine, where it served as an absolute standard of reference (31:1-29).
Moses summarized the covenant’s contents in a song that the people were to memorize and sing (31:30-32:47). He brought the ceremony, and his leadership of Israel, to a fitting close by announcing prophetic blessings on each of Israel’s twelve tribes (32:48-33:29). After viewing the promised land, he died peacefully (34:1-12).

Sentence search

Og - Og (ŏg) long-necked? A king of Bashan, of gigantic stature, Deuteronomy 3:11, who opposed the passage of the Israelites through his territories. Deuteronomy 3:1. Deuteronomy 1:4; Numbers 21:33-34. Deuteronomy 3:8; Deuteronomy 3:4; Numbers 32:33. Joshua 13:12, and his long iron bedstead (?) (possibly sarcophagus of black basalt), was preserved as a memorial of his huge stature Deuteronomy 3:11
Pledge - An outer garment given in pledge was to be returned before night since it was the only protection the poor had from the cold (Exodus 22:26 ; Deuteronomy 24:12-13 ). One was not permitted to take as a pledge what was required for someone to earn a living (Deuteronomy 24:6 ). Creditors were prohibited from entering a house to seize a pledge (Deuteronomy 24:10 ). Job denounced abuses in the taking of pledges from family (Deuteronomy 22:6 ), from orphans and widows (Deuteronomy 24:3 ), as well as the practice of taking children as pledges (Deuteronomy 24:9 ). Amos rebuked those who coupled idolatry with holding garments in pledge (Deuteronomy 2:8 )
Deuteronomy - Deuteronomy...
1. The book consists of three speeches ( Deuteronomy 1:6 to Deuteronomy 4:40 ; Deuteronomy 4:5-26 ; Deuteronomy 4:28 ; Deuteronomy 29:2 to Deuteronomy 30:20 ) and two poems (chs. 5 26, Deuteronomy 28:1-46 are a unity with a formal opening ( Deuteronomy 4:44-49 ) and close ( Deuteronomy 29:1 ); and this section, apart from some later additions, is homogeneous. 12 26 develop these into a code of law; Deuteronomy 28:1-46 pronounces blessings on obedience, curses on disobedience. Thus Josiah abolished the high places in Judah and Jerusalem ( Deuteronomy 22:8 ; Deuteronomy 22:13 ), and confined legitimate worship to the sanctuary at Jerusalem; and this centralization of the cult is the dominating idea of Deuteronomy 5:1-33 ; Deuteronomy 6:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 7:1-26 ; Deuteronomy 8:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 9:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 10:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 11:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 12:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 13:1-18 ; Deuteronomy 14:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 16:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 17:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-21 ; Deuteronomy 20:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 22:1-30 ; Deuteronomy 23:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 24:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 26:1-19 . Deuteronomy 16:21 f. Deuteronomy 23:17 f. the sun-worship, Deuteronomy 13:1-18 ; 2 Kings 23:11 , Deuteronomy 17:3 ; and the worship of Milcom, Deuteronomy 23:10 ; Deuteronomy 23:13 , Deuteronomy 12:31 ). forbids the celebration of the Passover elsewhere than in Jerusalem ( Deuteronomy 16:5 f. forbids ( Deuteronomy 18:10 ff. , to explain the absence of Korah in Deuteronomy 11:6 , if the author read Numbers 16:1-50 in its present form, where Korah from P
Efforts have been made to break up Deuteronomy 5:1-33 ; Deuteronomy 6:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 7:1-26 ; Deuteronomy 8:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 9:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 10:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 11:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 12:1-32 ; 2 Kings 23:5 ; Deuteronomy 14:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 16:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 17:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-21 ; Deuteronomy 20:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 22:1-30 ; Deuteronomy 23:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 24:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 26:1-19 into several sections, and to trace their origin. The fact that in Deuteronomy 11:2 ff. Moses is represented as speaking to men who had witnessed the Exodus, while in Deuteronomy 2:14 ff. ...
Chapters Deuteronomy 4:1-40 ; Deuteronomy 4:29 f. ...
The Song (Deuteronomy 32:1-43 ), with its double introduction ( Deuteronomy 31:16-22 ; Deuteronomy 31:30 ) and close ( Deuteronomy 32:44 ), is a didactic poem, giving an interpretation of Israel’s entire history, and bearing traces of influence from the Wisdom literature. Israel in the flush of its vigour could anticipate further conquests (Deuteronomy 32:17 ), since Eastern Israel had regained part of its lost territory ( Deuteronomy 32:20 ). ( a ) The fundamental principle of the book is the unity of Jahweh , who is God of the whole earth ( Deuteronomy 10:14 ), and who is more than the God of Israel, since He has relations to other nations apart from their relations to Israel ( Deuteronomy 9:5 , Deuteronomy 12:31 ). This carries with it the consequence that idolatry is the supreme sin ( Deuteronomy 6:14 ,
Seir - In common usage its name sometimes referred to the nation of Edom in general (Deuteronomy 2:1; Deuteronomy 2:4; Deuteronomy 2:12)
Mount of the Amorites - KJV designation for the hill country of Judah and Ephraim (Deuteronomy 1:7 ,Deuteronomy 1:7,1:20 )
Bethpeor - One of Israel's last halting places is called "the valley over against Baal-peor" (Deuteronomy 3:29; Deuteronomy 4:46). Here Moses was buried (Deuteronomy 34:6)
Botch - An old English term used in the KJV that means boil (Deuteronomy 28:27 ,Deuteronomy 28:27,28:35 )
Occult - , astrology (Isaiah 47:13), casting spells (Deuteronomy 18:11), consulting with spirits (Deuteronomy 18:11), magic (Genesis 41:8), sorcery (Exodus 22:8), witchcraft (Deuteronomy 18:10), and spiritism (Deuteronomy 18:11)
Beyond the Jordan - Five times the phrase describes the territory on the west side of the Jordan (Genesis 50:10-11 ; Deuteronomy 3:20 ,Deuteronomy 3:20,3:25 ; Deuteronomy 11:30 )
Landmark - A stone or post usually, easily removable, from whence the charges against its removal were needed (Deuteronomy 19:14; Deuteronomy 27:16)
Loan - Because of Israel's experience of deliverance from slavery, her moral code, gave special care to marginal folk (Exodus 22:21-24 ; Deuteronomy 10:19 ; Psalm 82:3-4 ; Proverbs 31:8-9 ). Furthermore because the earth was God's (Leviticus 25:23 ; Deuteronomy 10:14 ) and human possessions were gifts from God (Deuteronomy 8:1-10 ), lending was sharing God's gifts. ...
Thus Old Testament forbade charging interest to fellow Israelites (Exodus 22:25 ; Leviticus 25:35-38 ; Deuteronomy 23:19 ), for requesting loans indicated economic hardship. One might charge interest to sojourners (Deuteronomy 23:20 ), though this arrangement was not meant to be exploitative (Exodus 22:21 ; Leviticus 19:33-34 ; Deuteronomy 10:19 ; Ezekiel 22:7 ). The pledge must not threaten the debtor's dignity (Deuteronomy 24:10-11 ), livelihood (Deuteronomy 24:6 ), family (Job 24:1-3 ,Job 24:1-3,24:9 ), or physical necessities (Exodus 22:26-27 ; Deuteronomy 24:12-13 ). ...
Years of release and the jubilee year (Exodus 23:10-11 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-15 ; Leviticus 25:1 ) provided a systematic means for addressing long-term economic hardship by returning family property, freeing slaves, and canceling debts. Deuteronomy 15:7-11 warns against scheming creditors who would refuse loans because a year of release was near; lending was to be an act of generosity ( Deuteronomy 15:10 )
Sihon - He refused to allow Israel to pass through his land, and was defeated at Jahaz ( Numbers 21:21-24 , Deuteronomy 2:26-36 , Judges 11:19-22 ). Frequent reference is made to his defeat ( Numbers 32:33 , Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Deuteronomy 3:2 ; Deuteronomy 3:6 ; Deuteronomy 4:46-47 ; Deuteronomy 29:7 ; Deuteronomy 31:4 , Joshua 2:10 ; Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 12:2 ; Joshua 13:10 ; Joshua 13:21 ; Jos 13:27 , 1 Kings 4:19 , Nehemiah 9:22 , Psalms 135:11 ; Psalms 136:19 )
Bethpeor - A city of Moab, east of the Jordan, near to which, in the valley, Israel made one of their last encampments, Deuteronomy 3:29 ; Deuteronomy 4:46 ; and near to which the Lord buried Moses. Deuteronomy 34:6 ; Joshua 13:20
Mountain of the Amorites - (Deuteronomy 1:19-20; Deuteronomy 1:44), the range that rises abruptly from the plateau et Tih, running from S
Nebo - It was the place where the aged Moses went to view the promised land and where, a short time later, he died (Deuteronomy 32:49-50; Deuteronomy 34:1; Deuteronomy 34:5-6; see ABARIM)
Shema - (sshee' mah) Transliteration of Hebrew imperative meaning, “Hear,” (Deuteronomy 6:4 ) and applied to Deuteronomy 6:4-9 , as the basic statement of the Jewish law. Later worship practice combined Deuteronomy 6:4-9 ; Deuteronomy 11:13-21 ; Numbers 15:37-41 into the larger Shema as the summary of Jewish confession
Shema - (sshee' mah) Transliteration of Hebrew imperative meaning, “Hear,” (Deuteronomy 6:4 ) and applied to Deuteronomy 6:4-9 , as the basic statement of the Jewish law. Later worship practice combined Deuteronomy 6:4-9 ; Deuteronomy 11:13-21 ; Numbers 15:37-41 into the larger Shema as the summary of Jewish confession
Arabah - In particular they used the word as a name for that deep, hot and dry valley that ran north-south from the Sea of Galilee to the Gulf of Aqabah (the north-eastern arm of the Red Sea) (Deuteronomy 1:1; Deuteronomy 2:8; Deuteronomy 4:49; Joshua 11:2; Joshua 18:18-19). The Dead Sea, which was the deepest part of this long valley, was known as the Sea of the Arabah (Deuteronomy 3:17)
Deuteronomy, the Book of - of Jordan, in the eleventh month of the last year of their wanderings, the fortieth after their departure from Egypt; with the solemn appointment of his successor Joshua, Moses' song, blessing, and the account of his death subjoined by Joshua or some prophet (Deuteronomy 1:1 - 4:40; Deuteronomy 5:1 - 26:19; Deuteronomy 27:1 - 29:29). Thirty days before were spent in mourning for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8); so that Moses' death would be on the seventh day of the twelfth month, and Moses began his address the first day of the eleventh month, fortieth year (Deuteronomy 1:3). Thus, Deuteronomy is not a mere summary recapitulation, for large parts of the previous code are unnoticed, but Moses' inspired elucidation of the spirit and end of the law. ...
The first Deuteronomy 18:15-19; "the Lord thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; according to all that thou desiredst of the Lord . " In the ultimate and exhaustive sense Messiah fulfills the prophecy; Deuteronomy 34:10 expressly says "there arose not a prophet since in Israel like unto Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face. ...
The second passage is Deuteronomy 28, where he declares more fully than in Leviticus 26 what evils should overtake Israel in the event of their disobedience, with such specific particularity that the Spirit in him must be not declaring contingencies, but foretelling the penal results of their sin which have since so literally come to pass; their becoming "a byword among all nations where the Lord has led them"; their being besieged by "a nation of a fierce countenance, until their high walls wherein they trusted came down"; their "eating the fruit of their own body, the flesh of their sons and daughters, in the straitness of the siege, and the eye of the tender and delicate woman being evil toward the husband of her bosom and toward her child which she shall eat for want of all things secretly in the siege"; their dispersion so as to "find no ease, and the sole of their foot to have no rest among the nations," but to have "a trembling heart, failing of eyes, and sorrow of mind, their life hanging in doubt, in fear day and night, and having none assurance of life"; "the whole land (Deuteronomy 29:23) not sown, nor bearing, nor having grass. "...
Nay, more, Moses foresaw their disobedience: "I know that after my death ye will utterly corrupt yourselves, and turn aside from the way which I have commanded you, and evil will befall you in the latter days" (Deuteronomy 31:29). So also Deuteronomy 32, Moses song. But in the distant future he intimates, not merely their continued preservation, but also a time when Israel, dispersed "among all the nations, shall call to mind how all these things, the blessing and the curse, have come upon them, and shall return unto the Lord with all their heart and soul; though they be driven unto the outmost parts of heaven, from thence will the Lord their God gather them, and He will circumcise their heart, and make them plenteous in the fruit of their land, and again rejoice over them for good" (Deuteronomy 30, also Deuteronomy 32:36; Deuteronomy 32:43). ...
In Deuteronomy 32:8 Moses intimates that from the beginning the distribution of races and nations had a relation to God's final purpose that Israel should be the spiritual center of the kingdom of God; "when the Most High divided to the nations their inheritance, when He separated the sons of Adam, He set the bound: of the people according to the number of the children of Israel," i. The coincidences of Moses' song with other parts of the Pentateuch and of Deuteronomy confirm its genuineness. Psalm 90, which is Moses' work, resembles it: Psalms 90:1; Psalms 90:13-16, with Deuteronomy 32:4; Deuteronomy 32:7; Deuteronomy 32:36; explain Leviticus 17:3-4,2 "they are not His children but their spot," i. ...
Also Deuteronomy 32:42, not "from the beginning of revenges upon the enemy," but "from the head (i. Herein Deuteronomy, "the second law," is the preparation for the gospel law; and Moses, in the very act of founding the Sinaitic law, prepares for its giving place to the higher law which is its end and fulfillment. The falsity of the theory that Deuteronomy is of a later age is proved by the fact that the archaisms of vocabulary and grammar characterizing the Pentateuch occur in Deuteronomy. The demonstrative pronoun haeel , characteristic of the Pentateuch, occurs Deuteronomy 4:42; Deuteronomy 7:22; Deuteronomy 19:11, and nowhere else but in the Aramaic (1 Chronicles 20:8 and Ezra 5:15). Κeseb for Κebes (Deuteronomy 14:4). Ζakur for Ζakar (Deuteronomy 16:16). " The resemblance of Jeremiah to Deuteronomy is accounted for by the fact that the sins denounced in Deuteronomy were those abounding in Jeremiah's time. Jeremiah, as a priest of Anathoth, familiar with the law from childhood, naturally adopts the tone of Deuteronomy (as does Huldah his contemporary; compare 2 Kings 22:16, etc. , with Deuteronomy 29:2, etc. ...
Possibly also the book of the law found in the temple by Hilkiah the high priest and brought before king Josiah, after disuse for the 60 years of the two previous reigns, was Deuteronomy alone. But if it was the whole Pentateuch put by the Levites, at Moses' command, in the sides of the ark (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:26; 2 Chronicles 34:14), still Deuteronomy was the part that mainly awakened the conscience of king and people (Deuteronomy 12:2-3; Deuteronomy 12:16; Deuteronomy 12:18; Deuteronomy 29:25-27; compare 1619165091_69; 2 Kings 22:23). Josiah's reforms are just those most insisted upon in Deuteronomy. But while having some resemblance the language and idioms of Jeremiah are of an altogether later date than Deuteronomy. ...
While he imitates or repeats phrases of Deuteronomy, he uses characteristic expressions never found in Deuteronomy; for instances see The Introduction to Deuteronomy, Speaker's Commentary. The writer of Deuteronomy, if a forger, would never, having the rest of the Pentateuch before him, have left apparent discrepancies between his work and it, when desiring his work to appear as if by the same author. Thus, the directions in Deuteronomy 12:6; Deuteronomy 12:17; Deuteronomy 14:22; Deuteronomy 14:28-29; Deuteronomy 26:12, etc. ...
The later in Deuteronomy refer to the second and additional tithe on the increase of the field only, and for celebrating the sacred feasts each first and second year in the sanctuary, every third year at home with a feast to the Levites, the stranger, fatherless, and widow; like the love-feasts of New Testament (Deuteronomy 11:5. ) The first tithe is taken for granted in Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 10:9; Deuteronomy 18:1-2), and no fresh injunction as to it is given, it being from the first recognized in Genesis 14:20; Genesis 28:22, as well as in Leviticus and Numbers. ...
The different way in which the priests and Levites respectively are regarded in Deuteronomy and in the preceding books (in these "the Levites" ministering to the priests "the sons of Aaron," as the priests minister to God (Numbers 3:5, etc. ), and not mentioned as "blessing" the people, the prerogative of the priests (Numbers 6:23-27, compare Deuteronomy 10:8-9); but in Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 18:7; Deuteronomy 11:6) the Levites and Aaronite priests not being mutually distinguished, and Korah not being mentioned with Dathan and Abiram in their rebellion) is accounted for by the consideration that Moses in Deuteronomy is addressing the people, and for the time takes no notice of the distinction of orders among ministers, and, similarly referring to the rebellions of the people against God, takes no notice of the minister Korah's share in the rebellion, as not suiting his present purpose. ...
In Deuteronomy 19:14, "thou shalt not remove . The relaxation granted in Deuteronomy 12:15 as to killing in all their gates, whereas in 1619165091_44 the victim even for ordinary eating must be killed at the door of the tabernacle, is precisely what we might expect when Israel was on the verge of entering Canaan, which they were at the time of the delivering of Deuteronomy. Our Lord attests Deuteronomy by quoting from it alone the three passages wherewith He foiled the tempter in the wilderness (Matthew 4; Deuteronomy 8:3; Deuteronomy 6:13; Deuteronomy 6:16). ...
Paul (Romans 10:6; Romans 10:19; Romans 15:10 attests it Deuteronomy 30:12; Deuteronomy 30:18; Deuteronomy 32:21; Deuteronomy 32:43). Moses tells us that all the words of this law he wrote and gave to the Levites to be put in the side of the ark at the one time (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:22-26. Now first he enjoins the observance of the three great feasts (mentioned previously), at the place which the Lord shall choose (Deuteronomy 12:5). ...
Now first he introduces the appointment of judges in the different cities (Deuteronomy 16:18; Deuteronomy 19:11; Deuteronomy 21:18). ); in repeating the fact to the people (Deuteronomy 1:9, etc. So in Numbers 13; 14, the Lord commands the sending of the spies; but in addressing the people (Deuteronomy 1:19, etc. His allusion to the Lord's anger and exclusion of himself, when speaking of that of the people, accords with the character of the meekest of men (Deuteronomy 1:34-38). His notices of the children of Esau supplanting the Horims by God's help, and Moab supplanting the giant Emim (Deuteronomy 2:9-13) are made the argument why Israel need not, as their fathers, fear the giant Anakims
Horeb - An alternative name for Mount Sinai (Exodus 3:1-12 ; Exodus 17:6-7 ; Deuteronomy 1:19 ; Deuteronomy 5:2 ; 1 Kings 19:8 )
Horeb - An alternative name for Mount Sinai (Exodus 3:1-12 ; Exodus 17:6-7 ; Deuteronomy 1:19 ; Deuteronomy 5:2 ; 1 Kings 19:8 )
Rebellious - Deuteronomy 9 . Deuteronomy 21
Witness - More than one witness was required in criminal cases (Deuteronomy 17:6 ; 19:15 ). They were the first to execute the sentence on the condemned (Deuteronomy 13:9 ; 17:7 ; 1 Kings 21:13 ; Matthew 27:1 ; Acts 7:57,58 ). False witnesses were liable to punishment (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 )
Kneading-Trough - ]'>[1] of Deuteronomy 28:5 ; Deuteronomy 28:17 (AV Owl - NRSV mentions two species of owl, the little and great owls ( Deuteronomy 14:16 ). KJV mentions these as well as the owl of the desert (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ) and screech owl (Isaiah 34:14 ). NIV mentions six species: the horned owl; screech owl (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ); little owl (Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ); great owl; white owl; and desert owl (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 )
Massah - Massah became a reminder of Israel's disobedience or hardness of heart (Deuteronomy 6:16 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 ; Psalm 95:8 ). Massah often appears together with Meribah (meaning “to strive with, contend, find fault with”; Exodus 17:7 ; Deuteronomy 33:8 ; Psalm 95:8 ). Deuteronomy 33:8 gives a poetic account of the origin of the Levitical priesthood at Massah
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ” Deuteronomy is the last of five books of Law and should not be read in isolation from the other four books (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers). ...
Title The probable origin of the title “Deuteronomy” is the translation in the Septuagint (Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament) of Deuteronomy 17:18-19 . That does not seem to be the point of the instruction in Deuteronomy 17:18-19 . This apparent Greek mistranslation is the likely source of the title “Deuteronomy. ” This title more accurately defines the contents of the book than our familiar English title, Deuteronomy. ...
Background Deuteronomy is not primarily a law book or a book of history. The events recorded in Deuteronomy took place east of the Jordan before the beginning of the conquest west of the Jordan. ...
The historical background to the Book of Deuteronomy is found in Moses' opening address (Deuteronomy 1-4 ). Behind that recitation lay the covenant-making procedures at Sinai, covered by Moses in Deuteronomy 5-11 . ...
Contents Deuteronomy contains not one, but three (or more) addresses from Moses to Israel. The present form of Deuteronomy emphasizes the words of Moses, not the details of the covenant renewal ceremony. ...
Deuteronomy 1:1-5 is an introduction, giving the time and place of the addresses. The time is “the fortieth year” ( Deuteronomy 1:3 ) of wilderness wandering, “in the eleventh month, on the first day of the month. ” The place is “on this side Jordan in the wilderness” (Deuteronomy 1:1 ) and, more particularly, “in the land of Moab” (Deuteronomy 1:5 ). ...
Deuteronomy 1:6-4:40 is Moses' first address in which he recounted Israel's journey from Horeb to Moab and urged Israel to be faithful to Yahweh. Moses set up cities of refuge on the east bank of the Jordan ( Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ). ...
Deuteronomy 4:44-28:68 contains Moses' second address to Israel. The address is introduced in Deuteronomy 4:44-49 . ...
Moses' third address is found in Deuteronomy 29:1-30:20 . ...
Deuteronomy 31:1-29 is Moses' farewell address. The song of Moses is given in Deuteronomy 31:30-32:52 . Moses' blessing is reported in Deuteronomy 33:1 , and his death is recounted in Deuteronomy 34:1 . ...
Date and Authorship The date when Deuteronomy was put in its final form was relatively late. ...
The Near Eastern vassal treaty form of Deuteronomy has been used by scholars to argue for a date for the book in the Mosaic period or shortly thereafter. Differences in form between early Hittite treaties and later Assyrian treaties when compared to Deuteronomy are the bases for deciding in favor of an early or a later date for Deuteronomy. Such comparisons of the structure of Deuteronomy with the structure of Near Eastern vassal treaties do not provide firm evidence for dating Deuteronomy either early or late. ) has been identified as Deuteronomy since the early church fathers shortly after 300 A. That identity cannot be proved, but the nature of the reforms of Josiah and the contents of Deuteronomy show an interesting similarity. For example, the call for centralization of worship (Deuteronomy 12:1 ) is matched by Josiah's destruction of all altars except the one in the Temple in Jerusalem (2 Kings 23:4-20 ). ...
All the basic material in Deuteronomy seems to be quite ancient, but the book seems to have been edited after the death of Moses. ...
The scribe who recorded the final form of Deuteronomy is not known. Longstanding tradition among Christians and Jews favors Moses as the author, but third person references to Moses, the location of the writer in Palestine (Deuteronomy 1:1 ), and comparison of the laws in Deuteronomy with the laws in the Book of the Covenant (Exodus 20:23-23:19 ) all indicate that the book was produced later than the Mosaic period. ...
Gerhard von Rad has argued convincingly for the origin of Deuteronomy among the Levitical priests (Deuteronomy 10:8-9 ; Deuteronomy 17:9 ,Deuteronomy 17:9,17:18 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-8 ; Deuteronomy 21:5 ). ...
Purpose The sermonic style of Deuteronomy suits it well to serve just as most interpreters agree that it served originally. Deuteronomy is a call to repentance, a plea for God's disobedient people to mend their ways and renew the covenant God made with them at Sinai. No doubt Joshua used the materials of Deuteronomy when he led Israel in a covenant renewal ceremony at Shechem (Joshua 8:30-35 ). Deuteronomy must have been used in these ceremonies. ...
Teaching Deuteronomy continues to exercise strong influence on God's people. Introduction: Historical Setting (Deuteronomy 1:1-5 )...
II. Moses' First Sermon: Learn from God's Saving Acts (Deuteronomy 1:6-4:43 )...
A. Historical memories call for present faith action (Deuteronomy 1:6-3:29 )...
B. God's Word is the foundation for His people's life (Deuteronomy 4:1-43 )...
III. Second Sermon: God's Law Guides and Gives Unique Identity to God's People (Deuteronomy 4:44-28:68 )...
A. Covenant faith demands total allegiance and unchanging love for God (Deuteronomy 4:44 —-Deuteronomy 4:44—-11:32 )...
B. God expresses His demands in worship, leadership, daily life, business life, legal practices, family life, and care for others (Deuteronomy 12:1-28:68 ). Third Sermon: God Seeks to Renew Covenant Relationships (Deuteronomy 29:1-30:20 ). Conclusion: God Seeks Continuity in Leadership for His People (Deuteronomy 31:1-34:12 )
Baal-Peor - Peor ( Deuteronomy 4:3 b, Numbers 25:6 ). In Deuteronomy 4:3 b and Hosea 9:10 it is perhaps the name of a place
Witnesses - Two at least were required to establish any charge (Numbers 35:30; Deuteronomy 17:6; Deuteronomy 19:15; Hebrews 10:28). Written evidence in the case of divorce, not as among the Bedouins and Mussulmen a mere spoken sentence (Deuteronomy 24:1; Deuteronomy 24:3). The witnesses were the first to execute sentence (Deuteronomy 13:9; Acts 7:58)
Purge - To cleanse from impurity, frequently in the figurative sense of cleansing from evil (Deuteronomy 13:5 ), guilt (Deuteronomy 19:13 ), idolatrous worship (2 Chronicles 34:3 ), and sin (Psalm 51:7 )
Rephaim - They were one of many groups who were to be destroyed when Israel took possession of Canaan (Genesis 14:5; Genesis 15:20; Deuteronomy 2:9-11; Deuteronomy 2:19-21). They were of large stature (comparable in size to the Anakim; see ANAK), and were feared by other peoples of the region (Deuteronomy 2:10-11; Deuteronomy 2:20-21; Joshua 12:4)
Kadesh-Meribah - ” (See Numbers 20:2-13 ; Deuteronomy 32:51 ; compare Exodus 17:1-7 . ) RSV has “Meribath-kadesh,” and NIV has “Meribah Kadesh” at Deuteronomy 32:51 ; Ezekiel 47:19 . NAS has “Meribah-kadesh” at Deuteronomy 32:51 and “Meribath-kadesh” at Ezekiel 47:19 . TEV has “When you were at the waters of Meribah, near the town of Kadesh” at Deuteronomy 32:51
Deuteronomy - Deuteronomy (deû'ter-ŏn'o-my), or the Second Law (so called from its repeating the law), is the fifth book of the Bible, and, except the last chapter, was probably written by Moses. Deuteronomy 1:5, comp. with Deuteronomy 34:1; 2 Chronicles 25:4; Daniel 9:13; Mark 12:19; Acts 3:22. Deuteronomy 1:1 to Deu_4:40. The second address, Deuteronomy 5:1 to Deu_26:19, contains a recapitulation, with a few additions and alterations, of the law given on Sinai. The third part of Deuteronomy 27:1 to Deuteronomy 30:20, opens with the joint command of Moses and the elders to keep all the commandments, and, when they had crossed the Jordan, to write them upon the great plastered stones they were ordered to set up with appropriate ceremonies. Then follows the third address, Deuteronomy 27:11 to Deu_30:20, whose topic is, "The blessing and the curse. In Deuteronomy 32:1-52 we have the song of Moses; in chapter 33 Moses' blessing of the twelve tribes
Sion -
Denotes Mount Hermon in Deuteronomy 4:48 ; called Sirion by the Sidonians, and by the Amorites Shenir (Deuteronomy 3:9 )
Jeshurun - ("the righteous (from yaashaar ) people"): Israel's ideal character; his high calling (Deuteronomy 32:15; Deuteronomy 33:5; Deuteronomy 33:26; Isaiah 44:2; compare Numbers 23:21)
Mezuzah - The command to write the words of the Shema (Deuteronomy 6:4-9 ; Deuteronomy 11:13-21 ) on the doorposts of one's home, like the command to write them on one's heart (Deuteronomy 6:6 ), is a challenge to always remember that love of God is central to faith. Today Mezuzah refers to small scrolls inscribed with Deuteronomy 6:4-9 ; Deuteronomy 11:13-21 placed in a container attached to the door jambs of some Jewish homes
Meonenim, Plain of - (mih ahn' ih nihm) Meonenim is the Hebrew term for diviners or soothsayers (Deuteronomy 18:10 ,Deuteronomy 18:10,18:14 ; Micah 5:12 )
Phylactery - , Exodus 13:2-16; Deuteronomy 6:4-9; Deuteronomy 11:13-21. The practice was founded upon a literal interpretation of Exodus 13:9; Exodus 13:16; Deuteronomy 6:8; Deuteronomy 11:18, and is continued to the present day
Aroer - ‘Aroer which is by the brink of the river Arnon’ ( Deuteronomy 2:36 ) is probably the ruin ‘Arâ‘ir , on the north bank of the Wady Mojib (Arnon). Deuteronomy 2:36 , 2 Kings 10:33 etc. It was captured by Sihon, king of the Amorites ( Deuteronomy 2:36 ; Deuteronomy 4:48 , Joshua 12:2 ; Joshua 13:9 , Judges 11:26 ); when conquered by Israel it was assigned to Reuben ( Deuteronomy 3:12 ); it was taken by Hazael, king of Syria ( 2 Kings 10:33 ), and apparently later on by Moab ( Jeremiah 48:19 )
Bastinado - It is referred to by "the rod of correction" (Proverbs 22:15 ), "scourging" (Leviticus 19:20 ), "chastising" (Deuteronomy 22:18 ). The number of blows could not exceed forty (Deuteronomy 25:2,3 )
Rephaim - See Deuteronomy 2:10-11 ), and the Ammonite term Zanzummim (Deuteronomy 2:20-21 ). Despite their reputation for might and height, the Rephaim were defeated by a coalition of eastern kings (Genesis 14:5 ) and were later displaced by the Israelites (Deuteronomy 3:11 ,Deuteronomy 3:11,3:13 ; compare Genesis 15:20 ) and their distant kin, the Moabites (Deuteronomy 2:10-11 ) and the Ammonites (Deuteronomy 2:20-21 ). The artificial distinction between Rephaites and descendant of Rapha apparently attempts to ease the tension between the designation of King Og of Bashan as the last of the Rephaim ( Deuteronomy 3:11 ; Joshua 12:4 ) and the mention of later descendants in 2Samuel 21:16,2Samuel 21:18,2Samuel 21:20,2 Samuel 21:22 ; 1Chronicles 20:6,1 Chronicles 20:8
Og - (ohg) The Amorite king of Bashan defeated by the Israelites before they crossed the Jordan (Numbers 21:33-35 ; Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Deuteronomy 3:1-13 ). Og is identified as the last member of the Rephaim or giants (Deuteronomy 3:11 )
Edrei - A royal city of Og, king of Bashan ( Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Deuteronomy 3:10 , Joshua 12:4 ; Joshua 13:12 ), the scene of the battle at which Og was defeated ( Numbers 21:33 , Deuteronomy 3:1 ); assigned to the eastern division of Manasseh ( Joshua 13:31 )
Crimes And Punishments - This is especially true in cases of homicide, idolatry, and sexual offenses (see, for example, Deuteronomy 19:10 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-9 ; 2 Kings 24:1-7 ). When Israel failed to purge the offender and rebellion against God's Law from their midst, God punished Israel (Leviticus 18:26-28 ; Leviticus 26:3-45 ; Deuteronomy 28:1 ). The offenses subject to capital punishment were: intentional homicide (Exodus 21:12 ; Leviticus 24:17 ; Numbers 35:16-21 ,Numbers 35:16-21,35:29-34 ), giving false testimony in capital cases (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ), idolatry (Exodus 20:3-5 ; Leviticus 20:1-5 ; Numbers 25:1-9 ; Deuteronomy 13:2-19 ; Deuteronomy 17:2-7 ; 1 Kings 15:11-13 ; 2 Kings 10:18-28 ), kidnapping an Israelite (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ), incest, homosexuality, and beastiality (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 20:11-17 ), rape (if the victim did not cry for help, she, too, should be executed; Deuteronomy 22:23-27 ), adultery (Leviticus 20:10-12 ; Deuteronomy 22:22 ), other sexual relations outside marriage (Leviticus 21:9 ; Deuteronomy 22:20-21 ,Deuteronomy 22:20-21,22:23-24 ), false prophecy (Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 18:20-22 ; 1 Kings 22:19-28 ; Jeremiah 26:9 ,Jeremiah 26:9,26:15-16 ; Jeremiah 28:5-9 ), magic, divination, and witchcraft (Exodus 22:18 ; Leviticus 19:26 ,Leviticus 19:26,19:31 ; Leviticus 20:6 ,Leviticus 20:6,20:27 ; Deuteronomy 18:10 ; 1Samuel 28:3,1 Samuel 28:9 ), violation of the Sabbath (Exodus 20:8-11 ; Exodus 23:12 Exodus 31:14-17 ; Exodus 34:21 ; Exodus 35:1 ;Exodus 35:1;2:1 ; Leviticus 23:3 ; Numbers 15:32-36 ; Nehemiah 13:15-22 ), blasphemy (Leviticus 24:14-16 ,Leviticus 24:14-16,24:23 ; 1 Kings 21:13 ), cursing or striking one's parents (Exodus 21:15 ,Exodus 21:15,21:17 ), disobeying the ruling of the court of appeals (Deuteronomy 17:8-13 ), and certain crimes against the king (1 Samuel 20:31 ; 1 Samuel 22:7-19 ; 2 Samuel 12:5 ; 2 Samuel 13:30 ; 2 Samuel 15:12 ; 2Samuel 16:5-9,2 Samuel 16:21 ; 1Kings 1:21,1 Kings 1:51 ; 1 Kings 2:22-25 ; 1 Kings 12:18-19 ; 1 Kings 21:10 ). ...
Since capital crimes were considered a blot on the community, not only did capital punishment punish the offender, it also purified Israel (Deuteronomy 13:5 ; Deuteronomy 17:7 ,Deuteronomy 17:7,17:12 ; Deuteronomy 19:19 ; Deuteronomy 21:21 ; Deuteronomy 22:21-22 ,Deuteronomy 22:21-22,22:24 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ; Judges 20:13 ; 2 Samuel 4:11 ). Israelite law held that public execution served as a deterrent (Deuteronomy 17:13 ; Deuteronomy 19:20 ; Deuteronomy 21:21 ). ...
Methods of capital punishment included stoning (Exodus 19:13 ; Leviticus 20:27 ; Leviticus 24:14 ; Deuteronomy 22:24 ; Obadiah 1:9-10 ; 1 Kings 21:13 ), burning (Genesis 38:24 ; Leviticus 20:14 ; Leviticus 21:9 ), death by the sword (Deuteronomy 13:15 ; 1 Kings 18:40 ; 2 Kings 23:20 ), beheading (2 Kings 6:31-32 ; compare 2 Samuel 16:9 ), and being shot with an arrow (Exodus 19:13 ). The bodies (or heads) of executed persons were some times impaled and exposed to public view as a warning (Deuteronomy 21:22-23 ); at times the bodies of executed persons were mutilated (2 Samuel 4:12 ). Often the phrase “cut off” is used in parallel with words or phrases or in contexts which clearly indicate death (Exodus 31:14 ; Deuteronomy 12:29 ; Deuteronomy 19:1 ; 2 Samuel 7:9 ; 1 Kings 11:16 ; Jeremiah 7:28 ; Jeremiah 11:19 ; Ezekiel 14:13 ,Ezekiel 14:13,14:17 ,Ezekiel 14:17,14:19 ,Ezekiel 14:19,14:21 ; Ezekiel 17:17 ; Ezekiel 25:7 ; Ezekiel 29:8 ; Amos 1:5 ,Amos 1:5,1:8 ; Amos 2:3 ; Joshua 7:25 ; Nahum 3:15 ; Zechariah 13:8 )
Ar - The chief city of Moab, on the east of the Salt Sea; called also Aroer, Deuteronomy 2:36; sometimes used for the whole land of Moab, Deuteronomy 2:29; burned by Sihon
Deuteronomist - ) The writer of Deuteronomy
Boil - (Rendered "botch" in Deuteronomy 28:27,35 ), an aggravated ulcer, as in the case of Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:7 ; Isaiah 38:21 ) or of the Egyptians (Exodus 9:9,10,11 ; Deuteronomy 28:27,35 )
Crimes And Punishments - ]'>[1] , the Deuteronomic Code, Deuteronomy 12:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 13:1-18 ; Deuteronomy 14:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 16:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 17:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-21 ; Deuteronomy 20:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 22:1-30 ; Deuteronomy 23:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 24:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 26:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 27:1-26 ; Deuteronomy 28:1-68 ; (3) H [1] Deuteronomy 17:3 (cf. Deuteronomy 4:19 ). The penalty is death under the ban (BC Deuteronomy 22:20 , D [1] Deuteronomy 13:12 ff. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 17:5 ). ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 27:15 ). ]'>[2] Deuteronomy 24:13 ff. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 22:22 , H [2] Deuteronomy 20:10 ). In a case of seduction the man was required to marry her whom he had wronged, if her father gave consent (BC Deuteronomy 22:16 f. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 22:29 at 50 shekels of silver. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 22:25 ff. ]'>[2] Deuteronomy 18:22 , Deuteronomy 20:13 ‘thou shalt not lie with mankind as with womankind’) and bestiality (BC Deuteronomy 22:19 , H [2] Deuteronomy 20:15 f. ]'>[2] Deuteronomy 18:6-18 under seventeen heads (see Marriage). ]'>[2] Deuteronomy 20:11 f. Deuteronomy 20:14 ). ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 22:21 ) for a priest’s daughter the punishment was even death by burning ( Deuteronomy 21:9 ) while the wide-spread heathen practice of establishing religious prostitutes, male and female, at the local sanctuaries is specially reprobated in D [1] Deuteronomy 23:17 f. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 21:18 ff. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 19:15 ff. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 22:18-21 ). ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 25:15 ff. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 24:17 ). ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 19:11 ff. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 22:19 ; Deuteronomy 22:29 appear to the modern eye as fines , but fall in reality under the head of compensation paid to the father of the women in question. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 25:1 ff. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 25:11 f. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 17:7 the witnesses in the case cast the first stone (cf. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 21:22 f. ]'>[1] Deuteronomy 13:15-17 )
Hemlock - rosh (Hosea 10:4 ; rendered "gall" in Deuteronomy 29:18 ; 32:32 ; Psalm 69:21 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; 23:15 ; "poison," Job 20:16 ; "venom," Deuteronomy 32:33 ). "Rosh is the name of some poisonous plant which grows quickly and luxuriantly; of a bitter taste, and therefore coupled with wormwood (Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Lamentations 3:19 ). ), Deuteronomy 29:18 , Text 17; Proverbs 5:4 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; 23:15
Pisgah - This was the peak from which Moses viewed the land of Canaan before he died (Deuteronomy 3:27; Deuteronomy 32:49; Deuteronomy 34:1; see ABARIM)
Fatherless - Orphans are often mentioned with widows as representatives of the most helpless members of society (Exodus 22:22 ; Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Psalm 146:9 ). God, however, has a special concern for orphans and widows (Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Psalm 10:14-18 ; Psalm 146:9 ; Hosea 14:3 ) evidenced in the title “a father of the fatherless” (Psalm 68:5 ). Old Testament law provided for the material needs of orphans and widows who were to be fed from the third year's tithe (Deuteronomy 14:28-29 ; Deuteronomy 26:12-13 ), from sheaves left forgotten in the fields (Deuteronomy 24:19 ), and from fruit God commanded to be left on the trees and vines (Deuteronomy 24:20-21 ). Orphans and widows were to be included in the celebrations of the worshiping community (Deuteronomy 16:11 ,Deuteronomy 16:11,16:14 ). God's people were repeatedly warned not to take advantage of orphans and widows (Exodus 22:22 ; Deuteronomy 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ; Psalm 82:3 ; Isaiah 1:17 )
Suph - Place helping locate where Moses delivered the speech behind the Book of Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 1:1 )
Joyfulness - Deuteronomy 28 ...
Beth-Peor - It was in the tribe of Reuben (Joshua 13:20 ; Deuteronomy 3:29 ; 4:46 ). In the "ravine" or valley over against Beth-peor Moses was probably buried (Deuteronomy 34:6 )
Beth-Peor - Town in whose valley Israel camped as Moses delivered the sermons of the Book of Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 3:29 ). It had belonged to Sihon, king of the Amorites (Deuteronomy 4:46 ). Moses died and was buried near there (Deuteronomy 34:6 )
Gerizim - A mountain near Shechem, from which the blessings were pronounced, as the curses were from Mount Ebal, Deuteronomy 11:29; Deuteronomy 27:1-13; Joshua 8:30-33. Six tribes were placed on Gerizim, and six on Ebal, Deuteronomy 27:12-13; the ark was probably in the valley between them, and Joshua read the blessings and cursings successively. Joshua 8:33-34; Deuteronomy 27:14-15
Deuteronomy - Moses’ repetition of the law for this new generation is recorded in the book called Deuteronomy (from two Greek words, deuteros, meaning ‘second’, and nomos, meaning ‘law’). ...
Characteristic style...
Deuteronomy does more than simply repeat the law; it expounds the law, giving it a new emphasis. He wants the relationship with his people to be one of warmth and love (Deuteronomy 6:3; Deuteronomy 6:5-7; Deuteronomy 7:7-8; Deuteronomy 7:11; Deuteronomy 8:5). The book’s style is that of the preacher rather than the lawgiver; its audience is the people as a whole rather than the priests and judges (Deuteronomy 6:8-9; Deuteronomy 8:6; Deuteronomy 10:12-13). ...
The basis of Deuteronomy is the covenant between Yahweh and his people. In his sovereign grace, God chose Israel to be his people, and promised them Canaan for a national homeland (Deuteronomy 7:7; Deuteronomy 8:1; Deuteronomy 9:4-5). Israel could do nothing but accept God’s grace and promise to serve him with loving obedience (Deuteronomy 5:6-7; Deuteronomy 6:1-3; Deuteronomy 10:12-13; see COVENANT). ...
In form Deuteronomy is similar to the normal covenant documents of the ancient Near East. Deuteronomy opens with God’s recounting all he had done for Israel (1:1-3:29) and urging the people to be loyal to him in return (4:1-43)
Beth-Peor - Just opposite to it, in the ravine ( Wâdy Hesbân probably), the Israelites encamped ( Deuteronomy 3:29 ; Deuteronomy 4:46 ). Moses was buried in the valley ‘over against Beth-peor’ ( Deuteronomy 34:6 )
Westward - , toward the Mediterranean (Deuteronomy 3:27 )
Nebo, Mount - A mountain of the Abarim range, east of the Jordan and the Dead Sea, from which Moses surveyed the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 32), and where he died (Deuteronomy 34)
Mount Nebo - A mountain of the Abarim range, east of the Jordan and the Dead Sea, from which Moses surveyed the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 32), and where he died (Deuteronomy 34)
Giants - Later descendants of the nephilim were called “the sons of Anak” ( Numbers 13:33 ) or Anakim ( Deuteronomy 2:11 ; Deuteronomy 9:2 ). Similar races of giants had also inhabited Moab (Deuteronomy 2:9-10 ) and Ammon (Deuteronomy 2:19-20 ). Their last survivor was Og, king of Bashan (1 Chronicles 20:4-8 ,Deuteronomy 3:11,3:13 ). A family of giants from Gath were among the Philistine enemies slain by David and his followers (2 Samuel 21:16-22 ; Deuteronomy 3:11 )
Murder - The Mosiac law prohibited any compensation for murder or the reprieve of the murderer (Exodus 21:12,14 ; Deuteronomy 19:11,13 ; 2 Samuel 17:25 ; 20:10 ). Two witnesses were required in any capital case (Numbers 35:19-30 ; Deuteronomy 17:6-12 ). If the murderer could not be discovered, the city nearest the scene of the murder was required to make expiation for the crime committed (Deuteronomy 21:1-9 ). These offences also were to be punished with death, (1) striking a parent; (2) cursing a parent; (3) kidnapping (Exodus 21:15-17 ; Deuteronomy 27:16 )
Iron - He celebrates the great hardness of it, Leviticus 26:19 ; Deuteronomy 28:23 ; Deuteronomy 28:48 ; takes notice that the bedstead of Og, king of Bashan, was of iron, Deuteronomy 3:11 ; he speaks of mines of iron, Deuteronomy 8:9 ; and he compares the severity of the servitude of the Israelites in Egypt to the heat of a furnace for melting iron, Deuteronomy 4:20 . We find, also, that swords, Numbers 35:16 , axes, Deuteronomy 19:5 , and tools for cutting stones, Deuteronomy 27:5 , were made of iron
Release, Year of - The Hebrew expression occurs only twice (Deuteronomy 15:9 ; Deuteronomy 31:10 KJV and RSV), both times in reference to the sabbatical year as a year of release from debt
Hori - The HORITES (troglodytes or inhabitants of caves, probably excavators of the remarkable ones near Petra) inhabited mount Seir (the thickly bushy, or rugged, shaggy) before Esau's invasion (Genesis 14:6; Deuteronomy 2:12; Deuteronomy 2:22; Job 30:6-7)
Venom - Venom is a translation of rosh ( Deuteronomy 32:33 ; Job 20:16 ). The same Hebrew term is used for a dangerous, poisonous plant (Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Hosea 10:4 among others)
Lime - Mixed with water, lime was used as a plaster (Deuteronomy 27:2 ,Deuteronomy 27:2,27:4 )
Helve - Deuteronomy 19:5 : a word nearly obsolete, equivalent to ‘handle
Glutton - Gluttony was associated with stubbornness, rebellion, disobedience, drunkenness, and wastefulness (Deuteronomy 21:20 ). A more general meaning for the Hebrew term as a “good-for-nothing” (Proverbs 28:7 TEV) is reflected in some translations: wastrel ( Deuteronomy 21:20 REB); profligate ( Deuteronomy 21:20 NIV; Proverbs 28:7 REB); riotous ( Proverbs 28:7 KJV)
Frontlets - Jews followed scriptural commands, literally, writing Exodus 13:1-10 ,Exodus 13:1-10,13:11-16 ; Deuteronomy 6:4-9 ; Deuteronomy 11:13-21 on small scrolls, placing these in leather containers and placing these on their forehead and left arm. See Exodus 13:9 ,Exodus 13:9,13:16 ; Deuteronomy 6:8 ; Deuteronomy 11:18
Helve - KJV term used for the handle of an ax (Deuteronomy 19:5 )
Necromancers - Evokers of the spirits of the dead (Deuteronomy 18:11)
First Rain - KJV term at Deuteronomy 11:14 for the early rain
Glede - The kite (Deuteronomy 14:13)
Delicateness - Deuteronomy 28
Field - A field may be contrasted with a tent (Numbers 19:14 ,Numbers 19:14,19:16 ), a camp (Leviticus 14:3 ,Leviticus 14:3,14:7 ), vineyards which were customarily enclosed (Exodus 22:5 ; Leviticus 25:3-4 ), or with a walled city (Leviticus 14:53 ; Deuteronomy 28:3 ,Deuteronomy 28:3,28:16 ). Fields were marked with landmarks (Deuteronomy 19:14 ). The NRSV translated the Hebrew term shedemah , one of the words generally translated field, as vineyard at Deuteronomy 32:32 . The REB rendered the term differently each place it was used (terraces, Deuteronomy 32:32 ; slope, 2 Kings 23:4 ; vineyard, Isaiah 16:8 ; field, Jeremiah 31:40 ; orchards, Habakkuk 3:17 )
Alien - Levites, priests not given inheritance, are aliens (Deuteronomy 18:6 ). The alien could worship God and was supposed to keep the Sabbath (Exodus 23:12 ; Deuteronomy 31:12 ). Special laws provided food and clothing for aliens (Deuteronomy 24:19-20 ; Deuteronomy 26:12 ). Aliens had rights in the courtroom (Deuteronomy 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ). The ritual expectations of the alien are not always clear (Deuteronomy 14:21 ; Leviticus 17:15 ). God loves aliens (Deuteronomy 10:19 )
Alien - Levites, priests not given inheritance, are aliens (Deuteronomy 18:6 ). The alien could worship God and was supposed to keep the Sabbath (Exodus 23:12 ; Deuteronomy 31:12 ). Special laws provided food and clothing for aliens (Deuteronomy 24:19-20 ; Deuteronomy 26:12 ). Aliens had rights in the courtroom (Deuteronomy 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ). The ritual expectations of the alien are not always clear (Deuteronomy 14:21 ; Leviticus 17:15 ). God loves aliens (Deuteronomy 10:19 )
Blains - The sixth Egyptian plague, which followed after Moses' sprinkling of the furnace ashes toward heaven; "the botch of Egypt" (Deuteronomy 28:27; Deuteronomy 28:35), black leprosy, a kind of elephantiasis, producing burning ulcerous pustules on the skin
Debt - The Mosaic law encouraged the practice of lending (Deuteronomy 15:7 ; Psalm 37:26 ; Matthew 5:42 ); but it forbade the exaction of interest except from foreigners. On the Sabbatical year all pecuniary obligations were cancelled (Deuteronomy 15:1-11 )
Hornet - , is perhaps figurative for I will send terror on them (Joshua 2:11; Deuteronomy 2:25), so that they will flee as if before a swarm of hornets. So "bees" (Deuteronomy 1:44; Psalms 118:12)
Taberah - An unidentified ‘station’ of the Israelites ( Numbers 11:3 , Deuteronomy 9:22 )
Rabbath - (rab' buhth) KJV variant spelling of Rabbah (Deuteronomy 3:11 ; Ezekiel 21:20 )
Sirion - (ssihr' ee ahn) Sidonian name for Mount Hermon (Deuteronomy 3:9 )
Spies - According to Numbers 13:2, Moses sent the spies into Canaan at the command of God; but according to Deuteronomy 1:22 at the suggestion of the people. In the historical book, Numbers, God's command alone is mentioned; but in Deuteronomy, which treats of the people's conduct toward God, Moses reminds them that the request which eventuated in their fathers' rebellion and death in the wilderness, emanated from themselves. The generation whom Moses addressed in Deuteronomy needed to be warned by the fate of their fathers
Jeshurun - A poetic or a pet-name for Israel which occurs four times in the OT ( Deuteronomy 32:15 ; Deuteronomy 33:5 ; Deuteronomy 33:26 , Isaiah 44:2 )
Meribah - It was also named Massah, temptation, when they tempted God there, Deuteronomy 33:8 Hebrews 3:8 . It is called "the waters of Meribah," Deuteronomy 33:8 Psalm 81:7 106:32 , and also Meribah-kadesh, Numbers 27:14 Deuteronomy 32:51 Ezekiel 47:19
Elder - , Exodus 18:12 ; Exodus 19:7 , Numbers 11:16 , Deuteronomy 5:23 ; Deuteronomy 27:1 ; Deuteronomy 31:28 ): the ‘elders’ of Exodus 24:1 are the ‘nobles’ of Exodus 24:11 . Deuteronomy brings into prominence their judicial functions ( Deuteronomy 16:18 ; Deuteronomy 19:12 ; Deuteronomy 21:2 ff; Deuteronomy 22:15 ff; Deuteronomy 25:7 ff
Grind - (Exodus 32:20 ; Deuteronomy 9:21 ; Judges 16:21 ), to crush small (Heb. It consisted of two stones, the upper (Deuteronomy 24:6 ; 2 Samuel 11:21 ) being movable and slightly concave, the lower being stationary
Ashdoth Pisgah - ("Springs of Pisgah," or "the hill") (Deuteronomy 3:17; Deuteronomy 4:49; Joshua 12:3; Joshua 13:20)
Door-Posts - The Jews were commanded to write the divine name on the posts (mezuzoth') of their doors (Deuteronomy 6:9 ). The Jews, misunderstanding this injunction, adopted the custom of writing on a slip of parchment these verses (Deuteronomy 6:4-9 , and 11:13-21), which they enclosed in a reed or cylinder and fixed on the right-hand door-post of every room in the house
Mount Hermon - This was called by the Sidonians Sirion, and the Amorites calked it Shenir, (Deuteronomy 3:9. (Deuteronomy 4:28
Hemlock - Hosea 10:4 Amos 6:12 , in Hebrew, ROSH, usually translated gall or bitterness, Deuteronomy 32:32 , and mentioned in connection with wormwood, Deuteronomy 29:18 Jeremiah 9:15 23:15 Lamentations 3:19
Massah And Meribah - There are references to the first passage in Deuteronomy 6:16 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 , Psalms 95:8 ; and to the second in Deuteronomy 32:51 , Psalms 106:32 ; in Psalms 81:7 the two are apparently confused. Deuteronomy 33:8 regards the events at Kadesh in a peculiar light: here Jahweh proves Levi at Massah and strives with (or for) him at Meribah. ...
Massah never stands alone, save at Deuteronomy 6:11 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 . It has been plausibly suggested that Meribôth-kadesh is the correct reading instead of ‘ten thousands of holy ones’ in Deuteronomy 33:2
Drawer of Water - (Deuteronomy 29:11 ; Joshua 9:21,23 ), a servile employment to which the Gibeonites were condemned
Poor -
They had the right of gleaning the fields (Leviticus 19:9,10 ; Deuteronomy 24:19,21 ). ...
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Usury was forbidden, and the pledged raiment was to be returned before the sun went down (Exodus 22:25-27 ; Deuteronomy 24:10-13 ). The rich were to be generous to the poor (Deuteronomy 15:7-11 ). ...
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In the sabbatical and jubilee years the bond-servant was to go free (Deuteronomy 15:12-15 ; Leviticus 25:39-42,47-54 ). ...
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Certain portions from the tithes were assigned to the poor (Deuteronomy 14:28,29 ; 26:12,13 ). ...
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They shared in the feasts (Deuteronomy 16:11,14 ; Nehemiah 8:10 )
Og - The whole of his kingdom was assigned to the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and half-Manasseh ( Deuteronomy 3:1-13 , Numbers 32:33 ; see also Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Deuteronomy 4:47 ; Deuteronomy 31:4 , Joshua 2:10 ; Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 13:12 ; Joshua 13:30 ). The impression of the gigantic stature of Og is corroborated by the writer of Deuteronomy 3:11 , who speaks of the huge ‘iron bedstead’ (or sarcophagus) belonging to him
Accursed - See Numbers 21:2 ); “put everyone to death” (Deuteronomy 2:34 ); “completely destroy” (Deuteronomy 20:17 ); “killed” (Joshua 6:21 ; Joshua 8:26 ); “become the Lord's permanent property” (Leviticus 27:21 ); “put a curse on destroyed” (Judges 1:17 ). REB uses “dedicated” (Leviticus 27:21 ); “devoted” (Leviticus 27:28-29 ); “utterly destroy” (Numbers 21:2 ); “put to death under solemn ban” (Deuteronomy 2:34 ); “exterminate” (Deuteronomy 7:2 ); “destroyed” (Joshua 2:10 ); “put to death” (Judges 21:11 ). In Deuteronomy 21:23 and Isaiah 65:20 KJV uses “accursed” to translate another Hebrew root, qalal , “to make light of, curse
Pisgah - Its principal distinction, however, is its being the scene of Moses’ vision of the Promised Land ( Deuteronomy 3:27 ; Deuteronomy 34:1 ) and of his death. ]'>[1] Ashdoth-pisgah , as in Joshua 12:3 and Deuteronomy 3:17 ; RV Jaakanites - (jay' uh kuh nitess) NIV translation of Bene-jaakan in Deuteronomy 10:6
Sion - Deuteronomy 4 :48; same as HERMON, q
Execution - Israelite law laid down the death penalty for certain offences, some of them religious, others civil (Leviticus 20:2; Leviticus 20:10; Leviticus 20:27; Leviticus 24:16-17; Numbers 15:32-36; Deuteronomy 13:6-10; Deuteronomy 22:20-24; Deuteronomy 24:7). Deuteronomy 13:6-10; cf. Deuteronomy 5:2; cf. Deuteronomy 5:6-7). This no doubt impressed upon people that they had to be absolutely certain in making an accusation against anyone (Leviticus 24:14; Deuteronomy 17:6-7; John 8:7; Acts 7:58). The dead body was then hung on a tree till evening as a sign that the executed person was under the curse of God (Deuteronomy 21:23)
Pentateuch - (See MOSES; LAW; GENESIS; EXODUS; LEVITICUS; NUMBERS; Deuteronomy. "The book of the law" in Deuteronomy 48:61; Deuteronomy 29:21; Deuteronomy 30:10; Deuteronomy 31:26; "the book of the law of Moses," Joshua 23:6; Nehemiah 8:1; in Ezra 7:6, "the law of Moses," "the book of Moses" (Ezra 6:18). " In Deuteronomy 17:18-19, the king is required to "write him a copy of this law in a book out of that which is before the priests, the Levites"; and Deuteronomy 31:9-11, "Moses wrote this law and delivered it unto the priests, the son of Levi," who should "at the end of every seven years read this law before all Israel in their hearing"; and Deuteronomy 31:24," Moses made an end of writing the words of this law in a book," namely, the whole Pentateuch ("the law," Matthew 22:40; Galatians 4:21), "and commanded the Levites . The book of the law thus written by Moses and handed to the priests ends at Deuteronomy 31:23; the rest of the book of Deuteronomy is an appendix added after Moses' death by another hand, excepting the song and blessing, Moses' own composition. Moses speaks of "this law" and "the book of this law" as some definite volume which he had written for his people (Deuteronomy 28:61; Deuteronomy 29:19-20; Deuteronomy 29:29). In Joshua 1:3-8; Joshua 1:13-18 the words of Deuteronomy 11:24-25; Deuteronomy 31:6-12, and Deuteronomy 3:18-20 Numbers 32:20-28, are quoted. There is the same general assembly or congregation and princes (Joshua 9:18-21; Joshua 20:6; Joshua 20:9; Deuteronomy 4:41-432; Exodus 16:22); the same elders of Israel (Joshua 7:6; Deuteronomy 31:9); elders of the city (Deuteronomy 25:8; Joshua 20:4); judges and officers (Joshua 8:33; Deuteronomy 16:18); heads of thousands (Joshua 22:21; Numbers 1:16). Bodies taken down from hanging (Joshua 8:29; Joshua 10:27; Deuteronomy 21:23). Cities of refuge (Joshua 20; Numbers 35:11-15; 1619165092_10; Deuteronomy 19:2-7). ...
So in Judges Moses' laws are referred to (Judges 2:1-3; Judges 2:11-12; Judges 18:14-179; Judges 6:8-10; Judges 20:2; Judges 20:6; Judges 20:13; Deuteronomy 13:6; Deuteronomy 13:12-14; Deuteronomy 22:21). The judge's office is as Moses defined it (Deuteronomy 17:9). Gideon recognizes the theocracy, as Moses ordained (Judges 8:22-23; Exodus 19:5-6; Deuteronomy 17:14; Deuteronomy 17:20; Deuteronomy 33:5). The tabernacle is at Shiloh (Judges 18:31); Israel goes up to the house of God and consults the high priest with Urim and Thummim (Judges 20:23; Judges 20:26-28; Exodus 28:30; Numbers 27:21; Deuteronomy 12:5). Historical rereferences to the Pentateuch abound (Judges 1:16; Judges 1:20; Judges 1:23; Judges 2:1; Judges 2:10; Judges 6:13), especially Judges 11:15-27 epitomizes Numbers 20; 21; Deuteronomy 2:1-8; Deuteronomy 2:26-34; compare the language Judges 2:1-23 with Exodus 34:13; Leviticus 26; Deuteronomy 28; Deuteronomy 7:2; Deuteronomy 7:8; Deuteronomy 12:3; Judges 5:4-5 with Deuteronomy 33:2; Deuteronomy 32:16-17. , in Leviticus 6:6-7; Deuteronomy 18:1, etc. The request for a king (1 Samuel 8:5-6) accords with Moses' words (Deuteronomy 17:14); also Deuteronomy 16:19 with 1 Samuel 8:3. ...
David's psalms allude to and even quote the Pentateuch language (Psalms 16:4-5 compare Genesis 39:3; Genesis 39:23; Psalms 4:5; Deuteronomy 33:19; Psalms 4:6; Numbers 6:26; Psalms 8:6-8; Genesis 1:26; Genesis 1:28; Psalms 9:12; Genesis 9:5; Genesis 15:5; Psalms 103:17-18; Exodus 23:8; Psalms 1:3,; Deuteronomy 16:19; Leviticus 25:36-6; Exodus 23:13; Deuteronomy 32:9; Psalms 17:8; Deuteronomy 32:10; Psalms 24:1; Deuteronomy 10:14; Exodus 19:5; Exodus 26:6; Exodus 30:19-20; Psalm 30 title; Deuteronomy 20:5; Psalms 39:12; Leviticus 25:23; Psalms 68:1; Psalms 68:4; Psalms 68:7-8; Psalms 68:17; Numbers 10:35; Deuteronomy 33:26; Exodus 13:21; Exodus 19:16; Deuteronomy 33:2; Psalms 86:8; Psalms 86:14-15; Exodus 15:11; Exodus 34:6; Numbers 10:10; Exodus 22:25; Exodus 20:6; Deuteronomy 7:9; Psalms 110:4; Genesis 14:18; Psalms 133:2; Exodus 30:25; Exodus 30:30. Proverbs 11:1; Proverbs 20:10; Proverbs 20:23; Exodus 38:8; Deuteronomy 25:13
First-Fruits - The biblical word includes the best as well as the earliest fruits or crops, both natural and prepared, drawn from such sources as the threshing-floor, the wine-vat, and the oil-press (Deuteronomy 18). They are mentioned in the Law as offerings to Jehovah (Deuteronomy 26), under the titles of gifts, tithes, sacrifices, etc
Ashdoth-Pisgah - (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 12:3 ; 13:20 ) in Authorized Version, but in Revised Version translated "slopes of Pisgah. " In Deuteronomy 4:49 it is translated in the Authorized Version "springs of Pisgah
Horites - It became part of the land of Edom, and the remaining Horites were absorbed into the Edomites (Genesis 14:6; Genesis 36:20-21; Deuteronomy 2:12; Deuteronomy 2:22; see EDOM)
Argob - Argob was probably in the center of the fertile tableland and was famous for its strong cities ( Deuteronomy 3:4 ). Moses gave this land of giants to Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:13 ). Manasseh's son Jair conquered Argob (Deuteronomy 3:14 ) and changed the name to Bashan-havoth-jair
Ar - God refused to let Israel occupy Ar, having designated it for Lot's descendants, the Moabites (Deuteronomy 2:9 ). Israel could only pass through Ar (Deuteronomy 2:18 ), evidently the region controlled by the city-state. Ar provided provisions for the Israelites as they passed through on the last legs of the wilderness wandering (Deuteronomy 2:29 )
Shenir - (sshee' nuhr) KJV alternate spelling of Senir (Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:8 )
Hazerim - Villages, probably the name of the temporary villages in which the nomad Avites resided (Deuteronomy 2:23 )
Kid - (See FOOD), on the prohibition to "seethe" or boil it in its "mother's milk": Deuteronomy 14:21)
Beeroth-Bene-Jaakan - (bee ee' ruhth-bee' nee-jay' uh kan) NAS, NRSV translation in Deuteronomy 10:6
Hazerim - An ancient abode of the Avim, apparently in the northwestern part of Arabia Petraea, Deuteronomy 2:23
Stranger - ]'>[3] ), Deuteronomy 10:19 ; Deuteronomy 23:7 etc. 620) goes much further, for, besides making more explicit and urgent the duty of defending, helping, and even loving the ‘sojourner’ ( Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:29 ; Deuteronomy 24:14 ; Deuteronomy 24:19 ), and also securing to him his rights ( Deuteronomy 24:17 , Deuteronomy 27:1-9 ), the gçr was to be allowed to participate in the three great annual feasts ( Deuteronomy 16:11 ff; cf. Deuteronomy 5:14 and Exodus 23:12 ). He is not, however, compelled, though allowed, to follow his protector’s religion ( Deuteronomy 14:29 , 1 Kings 11:7 ). That he occupies a status inferior to that of the born Israelite is indicated by the fact that he is classed with the widow and orphan as needing special consideration ( Deuteronomy 10:18 , Deuteronomy 14:29 , Deuteronomy 29:14 ; Deuteronomy 29:19 ), and that the right of intermarrying is denied him ( Deuteronomy 7:1 ff. , Deuteronomy 23:4 )
Divorcement - Deuteronomy 24
Azzah - KJV translation or spelling of Gaza (Deuteronomy 2:23 ; 1 Kings 4:24 ; Jeremiah 25:20 )
Horhagidgad - Perhaps the same as GUDGODAHin Deuteronomy 10:7
Consulter - Deuteronomy 18
Palms, City of - An alternate name for Jericho (Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 1:16 ; Judges 3:13 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 )
Poor - The considerate provisions of the law for the poor (based on principles already recognized by the patriarchs: Job 20:19; Job 24:3-4; Job 24:9-10; especially Job 29:11-16; Job 31:17) were:...
(1) The right of gleaning; the corners of the field were not to be reaped, nor all the grapes to be gathered, nor the olive trees to be beaten a second time; the stranger, fatherless, and widow might gather the leavings; the forgotten sheaf was to be left for them (Leviticus 19:9-10; Deuteronomy 24:19; Deuteronomy 24:21; Ruth 2:2). interest on loans to an Israelite, was forbidden; the pledged raiment was to be returned before sundown (Exodus 22:25-27; Deuteronomy 24:10-13); generous lending, even at the approach of Jubilee release, is enjoined: (Deuteronomy 15:7-11) "thou shalt open thy hand wide to THY poor"; God designs that we should appropriate them as our own, whereas men say "the poor. "...
(5) Lasting bondservice was forbidden, and manumission , with a liberal present, enjoined in the sabbatical and Jubilee years (Deuteronomy 15:12-15; Leviticus 25:39-42; Leviticus 25:47-54); the children were not enslaved; an Israelite might redeem an Israelite who was in bondage to a rich foreign settler. ...
(6) Portions from the tithes belonged to the poor after the Levites (Deuteronomy 14:28-29; Deuteronomy 26:12-13). ...
(7) The poor shared in the feasts at the festivals of weeks and tabernacles (Deuteronomy 16:11; Deuteronomy 16:14; Nehemiah 8:10). In Deuteronomy 15:4 the creditor must not exact a debt in the year of release, "save when there shall be no poor among you," but as Deuteronomy 15:11 says "the poor shalt never cease out of the land," translated "no poor with thee," i. Others regard the promise, Deuteronomy 15:11, conditional, Israel's disobedience frustrating its fulfillment
Abomination - Among the objects so described are heathen deities such as Ashtoreth (Astarte), Chemosh, Milcom, the ‘abominations’ of the Zidonians (Phœnicians), Moabites, and Ammonites respectively ( 2 Kings 23:13 ); images and other paraphernalia of the forbidden cults ( Deuteronomy 7:25 ; Deuteronomy 27:15 , and often in Ezk. ]'>[2] ,’ are the worship of heathen deities and of the heavenly bodies ( Deuteronomy 13:14 ; Deuteronomy 17:4 and often), the practice of witchcraft and kindred arts ( Deuteronomy 18:12 ), gross acts of immorality ( Leviticus 18:22 ff
Ar - A city on the Arnon, the border between Moab and the Amorites ( Numbers 21:15 , Deuteronomy 2:9 ), now Wâdy Môjib . It is called Ar Moab ( Numbers 21:28 , Isaiah 15:1 ),’ Î Moab ( Numbers 22:35 ), and ‘the city that is in the valley’ ( Deuteronomy 2:36 etc
Landmark - Deuteronomy 19:14 (c) This may be used as a figure whereby we are to recognize the rights of others, and not defraud our neighbors. (See Deuteronomy 27:17)
Vine of Sodom - Only in Deuteronomy 32:32. If we are to interpret Deuteronomy and Josephus literally, the colocynth seems best to answer the conditions
Shenir - =Senir, (Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 ), the name given to Mount Hermon (q
Hazerim - The villages or "enclosures" of the wandering Avvim, the ancient occupants of southwestern Palestine (Deuteronomy 2:28)
Salchah - A city belonging to Bashan beyond Jordan (Deuteronomy 3:10) If from Salah, perhaps the name means treading down
Kicked - Deuteronomy 32:15 (b) Israel refused to work for GOD and they rebelled against His restraint and His program
Rove - (See Deuteronomy 7:5; Deuteronomy 12:3; Deuteronomy 16:21; Judges 6:25; 2 Kings 13:6; 2 Kings 18:4; 2 Chronicles 34:3; Micah 5:14). The grove mentioned in Deuteronomy 16:21 and the groves planted by Abraham were normal and natural groups of ordinary trees
Ezion-Gaber - KJV variant spelling of Ezion-Geber (Numbers 33:35-36 ; Deuteronomy 2:8 ; 2 Chronicles 20:36 )
Earing - "Neither earing, nor harvest" (Genesis 45:6; Exodus 34:21; Deuteronomy 21:4; Isaiah 30:24)
Bene-Jaakan - Deuteronomy 10:6 , and see Beerothbene-Jaakan)
Beth-Peor - (Deuteronomy 4:46) The house of opening; from Pahar, to open
League - The Jews were forbidden to enter into an alliance of any kind (1) with the Canaanites (Deuteronomy 25:17-19 ; 34:12-16 ); (2) with the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8,14 ; Exodus 23:32,33 ); (3) with the Moabites and Ammonites (Deuteronomy 2:9,19 )
Emims - In the time of Abraham they occupied the country east of Jordan, afterwards the land of the Moabites (Genesis 14:5 ; Deuteronomy 2:10 ). , "terrible men" (Deuteronomy 2:11 )
Phylactery - Short portionsof the law written on strips of parchment, whichwere placed in a case made of calf skin, and wornupon the forehead and the left arm, supposed to be in obedience to Deuteronomy 6:8 ; Deuteronomy 11:18
Pethuel - ” Father of the prophet Joel (Deuteronomy 1:1 )
Senir - A name given to Mount Hermon by the Amorites, Deuteronomy 3:9 1 Chronicles 5:23 Ezekiel 27:5
Heron - This name is put in Leviticus 11:19 Deuteronomy 14:18 , for a Hebrew word of very uncertain meaning
Stranger - A foreigner settled among the covenant people, without Israelite citizenship, but subject to Israel's laws, and having a claim to kindness and justice (Exodus 12:49; Leviticus 24:22; Leviticus 19:34; Leviticus 25:6; Deuteronomy 1:16; Deuteronomy 24:17-18; Deuteronomy 24:19; Deuteronomy 10:18-19; Deuteronomy 16:11; Deuteronomy 16:14; Deuteronomy 26:11). If free he was exempt, but if not circumcised was excluded from the Passover (Exodus 12:48); he might eat foods (Deuteronomy 14:21) which the circumcised stranger might not eat (Leviticus 17:10; Leviticus 17:15). The hireling was generally taken from strangers, the law guarded his rights with tender considerateness (Deuteronomy 24:14-15)
Azzah - The right designation of the Philistine city (Deuteronomy 2:28; 1 Kings 4:24; Jeremiah 25:20)
Venom - Deuteronomy 32:33 (b) This describes the evil and wicked effect of Israel's activities as they worshiped idols and forsook the Lord
Pentateuch - The five books the books of Moses; that is, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy
Emerods - That is, hemorrhoids, the name of a painful disease occasioned by tumors, probably the piles, Deuteronomy 28:27 1 Samuel 5:12
Hemorrhoids - The KJV translators understood the affliction of Deuteronomy 28:27 ; 1Samuel 5:6,1Samuel 5:9,1 Samuel 5:12 as hemorrhoids (or emerods). Modern versions are divided in their understanding of the term in Deuteronomy
Bee - First mentioned in Deuteronomy 1:44 . Wild bees are described as laying up honey in woods and in clefts of rocks (Deuteronomy 32:13 ; Psalm 81:16 )
Jaakan - In Numbers 33:31 the order is, "from Moseroth" to Benejaakan; in Deuteronomy 10:6 it is "from the wells (beerot ) of the children of Jaakan to Mosera. " Probably Israel visited the two places twice: on the first march toward Canaan, from Mosera to Benejaakan (Numbers 33:31); the reverse order in Deuteronomy 10:6, the 40th year, when the march was differently directed
Bastard - Illegitimate children were not permitted to enter the assembly of the Lord (Deuteronomy 23:2 ). According to Hebrews, those who do not have the discipline of the Lord are illegitimate children (Deuteronomy 12:8 )
Emim - Primitive inhabitants of Moab, a gigantic people of Hebrew tradition ( Rephaim , Deuteronomy 2:10 f
Champaign - Open, unenclosed land or plain (Deuteronomy 11:30 KJV)
Pisgah - (Deuteronomy 34:1) The name means hill or mountain, from Pasag
Senir - Wrongly changed to Shenir in Deuteronomy 3:9-10; Song of Solomon 4:8
Consuming - Deuteronomy 4
Caterpillar - Some locust-like insect, now undistinguishable, Deuteronomy 28:38 1 Kings 8:37 Psalm 78:46 105:34 Isaiah 33:4
Loan - ) The merciful character of Moses' law appears in the command not to keep the poor man's outer garment, his covering by night as well as day, after sunset (Exodus 22:26-27; Deuteronomy 24:6; Deuteronomy 24:10-13; Deuteronomy 24:17; compare, however, Proverbs 22:27). Then he must be sent away with a liberal supply of provisions, the prospect of such a gift doubtless stimulating zeal in service (Deuteronomy 15:12-18; Leviticus 25:39-55); his land was to be restored
Mount of the Amorites - The range of hills which rises abruptly in the wilderness of et-Tih ("the wandering"), mentioned Deuteronomy 1:19,20 , "that great and terrible wilderness
Distill - Deuteronomy 32:2 (a) Here is shown the widespread and delightful influence of all the words of GOD upon the hearts who receive them
Champaign - The word is arabah, Deuteronomy 11:30 , and is elsewhere translated 'plain, desert, wilderness
Og - Gigantic, the king of Bashan, who was defeated by Moses in a pitched battle at Edrei, and was slain along with his sons (Deuteronomy 1:4 ), and whose kingdom was given to the tribes of Reuben and Gad and half the tribe of Manasseh (Numbers 21:32-35 ; Deuteronomy 3:1-13 )
Blasting - Reference to the hot east winds which blow across Palestine for days at a time (Deuteronomy 28:22 KJV and RSV; other versions read “blight”). This wind represents one of the great natural calamities (1 Kings 8:37 ; 2 Chronicles 6:28 ) and one of the judgments of God upon the disobedient (Deuteronomy 28:22 ; Amos 4:9 ; Haggai 2:17 )
Abarim - Deuteronomy 32:49,50 , shows that mount Nebo was connected with Abarim and that it was 'over against Jericho' and also that it was where Moses viewed the land and died. Deuteronomy 3:27 connects this with Pisgah; so that Pisgah and Nebo apparently formed part of Abarim, in the land of Moab
High Place - After the Israelites entered the Promised Land they were strictly enjoined to overthrow the high places of the Canaanites (Exodus 34:13 ; Deuteronomy 7:5 ; 12:2,3 ), and they were forbidden to worship the Lord on high places (Deuteronomy 12:11-14 ), and were enjoined to use but one altar for sacrifices (Leviticus 17:3,4 ; Deuteronomy 12 ; 16:21 )
Iron - Various instruments are mentioned as made of iron (Deuteronomy 27:5 ; 19:5 ; Joshua 17:16,18 ; 1 Samuel 17:7 ; 2 Samuel 12:31 ; 2 Kings 6:5,6 ; 1 Chronicles 22:3 ; Isaiah 10:34 ). Figuratively, a yoke of iron (Deuteronomy 28:48 ) denotes hard service; a rod of iron (Psalm 2:9 ), a stern government; a pillar of iron (Jeremiah 1:18 ), a strong support; a furnace of iron (Deuteronomy 4:20 ), severe labour; a bar of iron (Job 40:18 ), strength; fetters of iron (Psalm 107:10 ), affliction; giving silver for iron (Isaiah 60:17 ), prosperity
Botch - The name given in Deuteronomy 28:27,35 to one of the Egyptian plagues (Exodus 9:9 )
Gallows - In Genesis 40:19 and Deuteronomy 21:22 the word is rendered "tree
Tophel - Lime, a place in the wilderness of Sinai (Deuteronomy 1:1 ), now identified with Tafyleh or Tufileh, on the west side of the Edomitish mountains
Swan - Mentioned in the list of unclean birds (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ), is sometimes met with in the Jordan and the Sea of Galilee
Hazerim - ]'>[2] ( Deuteronomy 2:23 )
Unicorn - KJV translation of several related Hebrew terms which modern translations render as wild ox (as in Numbers 23:22 ; Numbers 24:8 ; Deuteronomy 33:17 )
Awl - A boring instrument, named only in connexion with the ceremony whereby a slave was bound to perpetual servitude ( Exodus 21:6 , Deuteronomy 15:17 )
Sion, Mount - ) Deuteronomy 4:48, "lofty," "upraised
Rephaim - Deuteronomy 2:11 ; Deuteronomy 2:20 calls certain peoples ‘Rephaim’ whom the Moabites and Ammonites called respectively ‘ Emim ’ and ‘ Zamzummin . ’ Deuteronomy 3:11 says that Og, king of Bashan, alone remained of the Rephaim (so also Joshua 12:4 ; Joshua 13:12 ), while Deuteronomy 3:13 says that Argob was a land of Rephaim. Because Deuteronomy 2:11 counts them with the Anakim , who were giants, and 2 Samuel 21:18-22 says that the sons of a certain Rapha (see RVm Pentateuch - Genesis is called bereshith , “in beginning”; Exodus, we'elleh shehymoth , “These are the names”; Leviticus, wayyikra , “and he called”; Numbers, bemidbar , “in the Wilderness”; and Deuteronomy, elleh haddebarim , “These are the words. Genesis means “generation” or “origin”; Exodus means “going out”; Leviticus refers to the Levitical system; Numbers refers to the numbering of the tribes, Levites, and first born (Numbers 1-4 ,Numbers 1-4,26:1 ); and Deuteronomy means “second law” (Deuteronomy 17:18 ). Numbers begins with preparation for leaving Sinai, and Deuteronomy stands out sharply from the end of Numbers in that Deuteronomy 1:1 begins the great speech of Moses which covers thirty chapters ( Deuteronomy 1-30 ). A division of the Pentateuch based on the contents may be outlined as: Genesis 1-11 , Primeval history, from Creation to Abraham; Genesis 12-36 , Patriarchal history; Genesis 37-50 , Joseph stories; Exodus 1-18 , The Exodus; Exodus 19:1Numbers 19:1—10:10 , Israel at Sinai; Numbers 10:11-21:35 , Israel in the Wilderness; Numbers 22:1Deuteronomy 22:1—34:1 , Israel in the Plains of Moab. Guidance of a rebellious people through the great and terrible wilderness marks Numbers 10-21 ; and preparations for going over Jordan and conquering Canaan are the major topics of Numbers 22:1Deuteronomy 22:1—34:1 . The Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1 : 2-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:6-21 ) are frequently called law, but they are not law in the technical sense because no penalties or sanctions are connected with them. Other groups of laws in the Pentateuch are: the Book of the Covenant (Exodus 20:22-23:19 ); the laws of sacrifice (Leviticus 1-7 ); the laws of purity (Leviticus 11-15 ); the Holiness Code (Leviticus 17-26 ); and the Deuteronomy Code (Deuteronomy 12-26 ). Four out of forty chapters in Exodus (Deuteronomy 20-23 ), most of Leviticus and a small portion of Numbers contain laws. Fourteen out of thirty-four chapters of Deuteronomy consist of legal material. See Deuteronomy 20-23 ; Deuteronomy 20-23 ; Deuteronomy 20-23 ; Deuteronomy 20-23 ; Deuteronomy 20-23 . ...
The Deuteronomic Code (Deuteronomy 12-26 ) is part of Moses' address to the twelve tribes just before they crossed the Jordan to go into Canaan. These are “preached” laws, full of admonitions and exhortations to heed and obey so that the Lord may bless them and they may live in the land (Deuteronomy 12:1 ,Deuteronomy 12:1,12:13 ,Deuteronomy 12:13,12:19 ,Deuteronomy 12:19,12:28 ; Deuteronomy 13:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:1 ; Deuteronomy 15:10 ,Deuteronomy 15:10,15:18 ; Deuteronomy 16:12 ; Deuteronomy 17:20 ,Deuteronomy 17:20,17:29 ). See Deuteronomy. ” Permission for private slaughtering and eating animals is given only in Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 12:15 ). Laws for judges, prophets, priests, and kings occur only in Deuteronomy. The laws for Hebrew slaves and the calendars of worship are different in Exodus and Deuteronomy. In Deuteronomy the Passover is to be observed only at the one legitimate place and the lamb is to be boiled (Deuteronomy 16:7 ), but in Exodus, Passover is a family affair and the lambs are to be roasted (Exodus 12:9 ). The laws for the tithes are different in Deuteronomy 14:1 from those in Numbers 18:21-32 . Laws of holy war are given only in Deuteronomy. ...
The Pentateuch contains many lists: genealogical (Genesis 5:1 ; Genesis 11:1 ; Exodus 5:1 ), geographical and ethnographical (Genesis 10:1 ; Genesis 26:1 ), tribal (Genesis 49:1 ; Deuteronomy 33:1 ); offerings (Exodus 35:1 ); census (Numbers 1-4 ; Numbers 26:1 ), and campsites in the wilderness (Numbers 33:1 ). ...
Deuteronomy is the only place in the Old Testament where long sermons are found. Even the laws in Deuteronomy are “preached” laws. They sang in times of victory (Exodus 15:1 ), at work (Numbers 21:17-18 ), in times of battle (Numbers 21:14-15 ,Numbers 21:14-15,21:27-30 ), and in worship (Numbers 6:22-26 ; Deuteronomy 32:1-43 ). ...
Although the books of the Pentateuch as a whole are anonymous, a number of passages refer to Moses writing at least certain things (compare Exodus 17:14 ; Exodus 24:4 ; Exodus 24:7 ; Numbers 33:1-2 ; Deuteronomy 31:9 ,Deuteronomy 31:9,31:22 ). One passage in the Pentateuch which contributed to the serious questioning of Mosaic authorship is Deuteronomy 34:5-8 , describing Moses' death and the following period of mourning. Other post-Mosaic references are to Dan (Genesis 14:14 ; compare Joshua 19:47 ; Judges 18:28-29 ), and the conquest of Canaan (Deuteronomy 2:12 ). D stands for Deuteronomy and was written according to this hypothesis about 621 B
Heron - Any of a family of wading birds with long necks and legs (Areidae ), which were regarded as unclean (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 )
Cormorant - Large seafowl (Phalacrocorax carbo carbo) listed among the unclean birds (Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 )
Dizahab - Region of gold, a place in the desert of Sinai, on the western shore of the Elanitic gulf (Deuteronomy 1:1 )
Mishneh torah - a) The book of Deuteronomy
Hindmost - Deuteronomy 25 ...
Bezer - Its exact site is not known, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:36
Taberah - Burning, so named on account of the fire which fell upon the Israelites for their murmings while encamped here, Numbers 11:1-3 Deuteronomy 9:22
Nether - Lower; as the lower stone of a handmill, Deuteronomy 24:6 ; the foot of Sinai, Exodus 19:17 ; the regions of the dead, Ezekiel 32:18
Divorce - Was tolerated by Moses for sufficient reasons, Deuteronomy 24:1-4 ; but our Lord has limited it to the single case of adultery, Matthew 5:31,32
Ash'Doth-Pis'Gah, - (3:17; Joshua 12:3 ; 13:20 ) and in Deuteronomy 4:49 Authorized Version, translated springs of Pisgah , i
Jeshurun - A poetical name for the people of Israel, used in token of affection, meaning, "the dear upright people" (Deuteronomy 32:15 ; 33:5,26 ; Isaiah 44:2 )
Debtor - ...
The debtor was to deliver up as a pledge to the creditor what he could most easily dispense with (Deuteronomy 24:10,11 ). ...
...
A debt could not be exacted during the Sabbatic year (Deuteronomy 15:1-15 )
Alien - Both of these classes were to enjoy, under certain conditions, the same rights as other citizens (Leviticus 19:33,34 ; Deuteronomy 10:19 ). They might be naturalized and permitted to enter into the congregation of the Lord by submitting to circumcision and abandoning idolatry (Deuteronomy 23:3-8 )
Elath - Grove; trees, (Deuteronomy 2:8 ), also in plural form Eloth (1 Kings 9:26 , etc. It is first mentioned in Deuteronomy 2:8
Wool - The first-fruit of wool was to be offered to the priests (Deuteronomy 18:4 ). The law prohibiting the wearing of a garment "of divers sorts, as of woollen and linen together" (Deuteronomy 22:11 ) may, like some other laws of a similar character, have been intended to express symbolically the separateness and simplicity of God's covenant people
Belial - It is first used in Deuteronomy 13:13 . It is translated "wicked" in Deuteronomy 15:9 ; Psalm 41:8 (RSV marg
Glede - KJV term for an unclean bird of prey (Deuteronomy 14:13 ). An easily-confused Hebrew word (daah) occurs in Leviticus 11:14 and in some manuscripts and early translations of Deuteronomy 14:13
Pygarg - KJV term for a white-rumped antelope (Deuteronomy 14:5 )
Sifri - a treatise on the derivation of Torah law from the exegesis of the verses of Numbers and Deuteronomy, written during the time of the Mishnah by Rav...
Fruit - Injunctions concerning offerings and tithes were expressed by these Hebrew terms alone (Numbers 18:12 ; Deuteronomy 14:23 ). This word "fruit" is also used of children or offspring (Genesis 30:2 ; Deuteronomy 7:13 ; Luke 1:42 ; Psalm 21:10 ; 132:11 ); also of the progeny of beasts (Deuteronomy 28:51 ; Isaiah 14:29 )
Ebal - Mountain near Shechem on which Moses set up the curse for the covenant ceremony (Deuteronomy 11:29 ; Deuteronomy 27:13 ). An altar was also on Ebal (Deuteronomy 27:4-5 )
Hart, Hind - Palestine to-day, but evidently was so once ( 1 Kings 4:23 ): it is mentioned as a clean animal in Deuteronomy 12:15 ; Deuteronomy 12:22 etc. The ‘fallow-deer’ of Deuteronomy 14:5 and 1 Kings 4:23 refers to the roe (wh
Cities of Refuge - On the east side of Jordan—Bezer, in the tribe of Reuben, in the plains of Moab, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:36. Ramoth-gilead, in the tribe of Gad, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 21:38; 1 Kings 22:3. Golan, in Bashan, in the half-tribe of Manasseh, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 21:27; 1 Chronicles 6:71
Crawling Things - The Hebrew word also appears in Deuteronomy 32:34 , where it refers to poisonous snakes
Zamzummim - They lived east of the Jordan River until the Ammonites drove them out (Deuteronomy 2:20 )
Chamois - Translated as “mountain-sheep” in modern versions (Deuteronomy 14:5 )
Claw - In Daniel 4:33 ‘claw’ means a bird’s claw; but in Deuteronomy 14:6 and Zechariah 11:16 it has the obsolete meaning of an animal’s hoof
Diligently - Deuteronomy 6
Jotbathah - , Deuteronomy 10:7 ), described as ‘a land of brooks of waters
Ague - ” The Hebrew term appears in Leviticus 26:16 and Deuteronomy 28:22 , KJV translating “fever” in the second passage
Emim - A gigantic and warlike race, who in the time of Abraham occupied the country beyond the Jordan, afterwards possessed by the Moabites, Genesis 14:5 Deuteronomy 2:10
Chamois - Not the well-known mountain goat of southern Europe, but probably a variety of wild sheep, resembling a goat, and still found in Arabia Petraea, Deuteronomy 14:5
Gier-Eagle, - an unclean bird mentioned in (Leviticus 11:18 ) and Deuteronomy 14:17 Identical in reality as in name with the racham , of the Arabs, viz
God of the Fathers - Likewise, in the Old Testament, “God of thy fathers” or “God of our fathers” functions to link the author's generation to the God of earlier generations, especially with reference to the promises to the patriarchs (Deuteronomy 1:11 , Deuteronomy 1:21 ; Deuteronomy 4:1 ; Deuteronomy 6:3 ; Deuteronomy 12:1 ; Deuteronomy 26:7 ; Deuteronomy 27:3 )
Oxen are specially valuable in Palestine for ploughing (Deuteronomy 22:19 , 1 Kings 19:19 ) and for threshing, i. ‘treading out the corn’ ( Deuteronomy 25:4 , Hosea 10:11 )
Hilkiah - ...
Still the place where it was found, the temple, and its not having been found before but only brought to light during the repairs, and that by the high priest, identify it with the original temple copy deposited by Moses' command by the side of the ark within the veil (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:26). ...
The threats and curses of the law against transgressors (Leviticus 26; Deuteronomy 28; 29) were prominent in the passages read, and so overwhelmed the king that he tore his clothes. Deuteronomy, the repetition of the law in a summary, was the leading portion read, just as at the reading in the feast of tabernacles every seventh year, the year of release, not the whole Pentateuch but lessons from it day by day were read (Nehemiah 8:18; Nehemiah 9:3-5, etc. ; Deuteronomy 1:5; Deuteronomy 31:9-13). ...
"The covenant," and the words "with all their heart and soul" (2 Kings 23:2-3), answer to the same in Deuteronomy 29:1; Deuteronomy 30:2; compare also 2 Chronicles 35:3 with Deuteronomy 33:10. Josiah's final and utter destruction of idolatrous symbols, removal of wizards, and keeping of the Passover were the fruits of his hearing Deuteronomy 16, 18. Jeremiah's frequent references to Deuteronomy are well known; compare Jeremiah 11:3-5, where he quotes Deuteronomy 27:26. ...
This correspondence is doubtless due to the prominence given to Deuteronomy in reading the book of the law just then found; the finding and the reading would naturally interest Jeremiah deeply and tinge his prophecies. The directions for the reading of the law every seventh year or year of release, also the direction (Deuteronomy 17:18-19) that a copy of the law should be made for the king distract from that of the priests and Levites, imply a paucity of readers and of copies (compare 2 Chronicles 17:9; 2 Kings 14:6; 2 Kings 18:5-6)
Paran, Mount - Probably the hilly region or upland wilderness on the north of the desert of Paran forming the southern boundary of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 33:2 ; Habakkuk 3:3 )
Salcah - Wandering, a city of Bashan assigned to the half tribe of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:10 ; Joshua 12:5 ; 13:11 ), identified with Salkhad, about 56 miles east of Jordan
Nighthawk - Unclean bird whose identity is uncertain (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 KJV, NRSV)
ho'Rem - ( Joshua 19:38 ) Van Deuteronomy Velde suggests Hurah as the site of Horem
Hazerim - (huh zee' rihm) KJV interpretation and transliteration of Hebrew word meaning, “villages” or “hamlets” in Deuteronomy 2:23
Onan - Strong, the second son of Judah (Genesis 38:4-10 ; Compare Deuteronomy 25:5 ; Matthew 22:24 )
Ague - In Deuteronomy 28:22 the word is rendered "fever
Bedstead - Used in Deuteronomy 3:11 , but elsewhere rendered "couch," "bed
Zered or Zared - A brook, or the valley through which it flows into the south-east part of the Dead sea, probably by Kir Moab, now Kerak, Numbers 21:12 Deuteronomy 2:13,14
Gaulan or Golan - From it was named the small province of Gaulonitis, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:27 1 Chronicles 6:71
Hazeroth - Deuteronomy 1:1 uses Hazeroth as one focal point to locate Moses' speech to Israel. Some Bible students try to locate all the sites in Deuteronomy 1:1 near Moab
Rephaim - RSV, Raphah; Deuteronomy 3:13 , RSV; A. , "fearful", (Deuteronomy 2:11 ), and to the Ammonites as Zamzummim
Vain - We are warned not to take God's name in vain (as though it were nothing) in the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1 : 7 ; Deuteronomy 5:11 ). Mark warned that believers are not to give God vain lip service but obedience from the heart (Deuteronomy 7:6-7 ; see Isaiah 1:13 ; Isaiah 29:13 ; James 1:26 )
Adamah - The dead return to the earth (Psalm 146:4 ), but the soil also produces harvests (Deuteronomy 7:13 ; Deuteronomy 11:7 )
Fearful - What man is there that is fearful and fainthearted? ...
Deuteronomy 20 . Deuteronomy 28
Terrible - Deuteronomy 7 ...
Let them praise thy great and terrible name, for it is holy. Deuteronomy 10 ...
3
Sion - A name of Hermon , Deuteronomy 4:48
Dathan - ) He and Abiram , sons of Reuben, conspired with Korah against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16:1-26; Numbers 16:9-11; Deuteronomy 11:6; Psalms 106:17)
Taberah - Burning, a place in the wilderness of Paran, where the "fire of the Lord" consumed the murmuring Israelites (Numbers 11:3 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 )
Hare - Hares were regarded as unclean (Leviticus 11:6 ; Deuteronomy 14:7 )
Necromancy - Deuteronomy 18
Heptateuch - (Greek: hepta, seven; teuchos, case, book) ...
The first seven books of the Bible: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Josue, and Judges
Zuzim - They are apparently called the Zamzummin in Deuteronomy 2:20
Hexateuch - (Greek: hex, six; teuchos, case, book) ...
The first six books of the Bible: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, and Josue, so caIled to mark the fact that they form a literary whole
Tophel - Place in the wilderness, mentioned only in Deuteronomy 1:1
Sion - A name given in Deuteronomy 4:48 to one of the elevations on the mountain ridge called Hermon, which see
Widow - Widows from their poverty and unprotectedness, are regarded in OT as under the special guardianship of God ( Psalms 68:6 ; Psalms 146:9 , Proverbs 15:25 , Deuteronomy 10:18 , Jeremiah 49:11 ); and consequently due regard for their wants was looked upon as a mark of true religion, ensuring a blessing on those who showed it ( Job 29:13 ; Job 31:16 , Isaiah 1:17 , Jeremiah 7:6-7 ; Jeremiah 22:3-4 ); while neglect of, cruelty or injustice towards them were considered marks of wickedness meriting punishment from God ( Job 22:9-10 ; Job 24:20-21 , Psalms 94:6 , Isaiah 1:23 ; Isaiah 10:2 , Zechariah 7:10 ; Zechariah 7:14 , Malachi 3:5 ). is especially rich in such counsels, insisting that widows be granted full justice ( Deuteronomy 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ), that they be received as guests at sacrificial meals ( Deuteronomy 14:29 , Deuteronomy 16:11 ; Deuteronomy 16:14 , Deuteronomy 26:12 f. ), and that they be suffered to glean unmolested in field, oliveyard, and vineyard ( Deuteronomy 24:19 f
Rain - The "early" or "former" rains commence in autumn in the latter part of October or beginning of November (Deuteronomy 11:14 ; Joel 2:23 ; Compare Jeremiah 3:3 ), and continue to fall heavily for two months. The "latter" or spring rains fall in March and April, and serve to swell the grain then coming to maturity (Deuteronomy 11:14 ; Hosea 6:3 ). Rain is referred to symbolically in Deuteronomy 32:2 ; Psalm 72:6 ; Isaiah 44:3,4 ; Hosea 10:12
Gall - (herb) A bitter, poisonous herb (perhaps Citrullus colocynthis ), the juice of which is thought to be the “hemlock” poison Socrates drank Gall was frequently linked with wormwood (Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 23:15 ; Lamentations 3:19 ; Amos 6:12 ) to denote bitterness and tragedy. Wormwood and gall were often associated with unfaithfulness to God, either as a picture of the unfaithful (Deuteronomy 29:18 ) or as their punishment. Modern speech translations generally translate the Hebrew word for gall in light of the context of the passage (poisonous growth, Deuteronomy 29:18 NRSV; poisonous water, Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:5 ; Jeremiah 23:15 NRSV; poison, Amos 6:12 NRSV)
Landmark - The word ( gebûl ) so rendered must not be identified off-hand, as is usually done, with the kudurru or boundary-stone of the Babylonians, for the fundamental passage, Deuteronomy 19:14 , ‘Thou shalt not remove thy neighbour’s landmark, which they of old time have set,’ should rather be rendered: ‘Thou shalt not remove (or ‘set back’) thy neighbour’s boundary , which they … have drawn. The form of land-grabbing by setting back a neighbour’s boundary-line must have been common in OT times, to judge by the frequent references to, and condemnations of, the practice ( Deuteronomy 19:14 ; Deuteronomy 27:17 , Hosea 5:10 , Proverbs 22:28 ; Proverbs 23:10 , Job 24:2 )
Divorce - The law on this subject is found in Deuteronomy 24:1-4, and the cases in which the right of a husband to divorce his wife was lost are stated in Deuteronomy 22:19; Deuteronomy 22:29
Gall - (herb) A bitter, poisonous herb (perhaps Citrullus colocynthis ), the juice of which is thought to be the “hemlock” poison Socrates drank Gall was frequently linked with wormwood (Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 23:15 ; Lamentations 3:19 ; Amos 6:12 ) to denote bitterness and tragedy. Wormwood and gall were often associated with unfaithfulness to God, either as a picture of the unfaithful (Deuteronomy 29:18 ) or as their punishment. Modern speech translations generally translate the Hebrew word for gall in light of the context of the passage (poisonous growth, Deuteronomy 29:18 NRSV; poisonous water, Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:5 ; Jeremiah 23:15 NRSV; poison, Amos 6:12 NRSV)
Ebal - On this mountain Joshua built an altar and erected a monument bearing the law of Moses ( Joshua 8:30 ); and the curses for breaches of the moral law were here proclaimed to the assembled Israelites on their formally taking possession of the Promised Land ( Deuteronomy 11:29 ; Deuteronomy 27:4 ; Deuteronomy 27:13 , Joshua 8:33 )
Issachar - After the entrance into the Promised Land, this tribe was one of the six which stood on Gerizim during the ceremony of the blessing and cursing (Deuteronomy 27:12 ). It included the plain of Esdraelon (=Jezreel), which was and still is the richest portion of Palestine (Deuteronomy 33:18,19 ; 1 Chronicles 12:40 ). ...
The prophetic blessing pronounced by Jacob on Issachar corresponds with that of Moses (Genesis 49:14,15 ; Compare Deuteronomy 33:18,19 )
Antelope - A doubtful translation of te’ô , Deuteronomy 14:5 and Isaiah 51:20
Osprey - The Hebrew word occurs in (Leviticus 11:13 ) and Deuteronomy 14:12 So the name of some unclean bird
Geber - A valiant man, (1 Kings 4:19 ), one of Solomon's purveyors, having jurisdiction over a part of Gilead, comprising all the kingdom of Sihon and part of the kingdom of Og (Deuteronomy 2 ; 31 )
Glede - The word is used in Deuteronomy 14:13
Screech Owl - NIV also used “screech owl” for Hebrew tachmas ( Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ). REB used “screech owl” for Hebrew yanshuph ( Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ; Isaiah 34:11 )
Arrows - Arrows are sometimes figuratively put for lightning (Deuteronomy 32:23,42 ; Psalm 7:13 ; 18:14 ; 144:6 ; Zechariah 9:14 ). The word is frequently employed as a symbol of calamity or disease inflicted by God (Job 6:4 ; 34:6 ; Psalm 38:2 ; Deuteronomy 32:23
Bashan - It was assigned to the tribal area of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:13 ; Joshua 13:29-31 ). It was known as a particularly fertile area (Deuteronomy 32:14 ; Ezekiel 39:18 )
Basket - Deuteronomy 28:5 (c) Moses is telling us that GOD will give abundant increase for us to take home to ourselves and enjoy for ourselves if we let the Lord GOD command us, and if we give obedient service. ...
Deuteronomy 28:17 (c) Here we find the opposite truth expressed, for if we refuse to listen to GOD, and to walk with Him, we shall find that GOD withholds the blessing, and leaves us with empty hands and desolate hearts
Flint - Deuteronomy 8:15 (b) The flint rock is probably the hardest of all the rocks. (See Deuteronomy 32:13; Psalm 114:8)
Paran - Genesis 21:21 ; Numbers 10:12 ; Numbers 12:16 ; Numbers 13:3,26 ; Deuteronomy 1:1 ; 1 Samuel 25:1 ; 1 Kings 11:18 . In Deuteronomy 33:2 ; Habakkuk 3:3 MOUNT PARAN is spoken of, which doubtless refers to some mount in the same district
Blains - It has been thought to be the black leprosy, a virulent kind of elephantiasis, "the botch of Egypt," "a sore botch that cannot be healed," Deuteronomy 28:27; Deuteronomy 28:35; that same disease which afflicted Job
Heritage - The RV is in agreement with such OT passages as Deuteronomy 4:20 , "a people of inheritance;" Deuteronomy 9:29 ; 32:9 ; Psalm 16:6
Mildew - (The rendering of a Hebrew word meaning "to be yellow," yellowness), the result of cutting east winds blighting and thus rendering the grain unproductive (Deuteronomy 28:22 ; 1 Kings 8:37 ; 2 Chronicles 6:28 )
Battlement - A parapet wall or balustrade surrounding the flat roofs of the houses, required to be built by a special law (Deuteronomy 22:8 )
Kings, 1 And 2 - The reason for this is that the reigns of the kings and many of the events in the history of Israel are evaluated according to norms set out in Deuteronomy. Many things which could have been told are not (see 1Kings 14:19,1 Kings 14:29 ; 1Kings 15:7,1Kings 15:23,1 2 Kings 17:1-415 ; 1Kings 16:5,1Kings 16:14,1Kings 16:20,1 Kings 16:27 ; 1Kings 22:39,1 Kings 22:45 ; 2 Kings 1:18 ; 2 Kings 8:23 ; 2 Kings 10:34 ; 2 Kings 12:19 ; 2Kings 13:8,2 Deuteronomy 28:15-684 ; 2Kings 14:15,2Kings 14:18,2 Kings 14:28 ; 2Kings 15:6,2Kings 15:11,2Kings 15:15,2Kings 15:21,2Kings 15:26,2Kings 15:31,2 Kings 15:36 ; 2 Kings 9:1-3 ; 2 Kings 20:20 ; 2Kings 21:17,2 Deuteronomy 28:3-6,287 ; 2 Kings 23:28 ; 2 Kings 24:5 ). ...
A study of 1,2Kings—as well as Joshua through 2Samuel—indicates that the writer's intention was to evaluate Israel's history according to the principles given in the Book of Deuteronomy and in this way explain why the nation divided after the reign of Solomon and why both nations eventually fell victim to foreign invaders. Deuteronomy 28:1 is especially important here. Deuteronomy 28:1-14 describes the blessings that will belong to Israel if they obey God's commandments. Israel would have victory over its enemies ( Deuteronomy 28:1 ,Deuteronomy 28:1,28:7 ,Deuteronomy 28:20-22:10 ) and would prosper in all its undertakings (Deuteronomy 28:3-6 ,1619165092_27:8 ,Deuteronomy 28:8,28:11-12 ). Israel would be established as a people holy to God (Deuteronomy 28:9 ) and would “always be at the top and never at the bottom” when they obeyed the command of the Lord (Deuteronomy 28:13-14 REB). They would no longer prosper ( Deuteronomy 28:15-19 ) and would be afflicted with all kinds of plagues, pestilence, and sickness (Deuteronomy 28:7,28 ,Deuteronomy 28:20-22,28:58-61 ). Rain would be withheld from their land (Deuteronomy 28:23-24 ). More significantly, they would be defeated by their enemies and suffer all the consequences of defeat (Deuteronomy 28:25-33 ,Deuteronomy 28:25-33,28:47-57 ). The most serious of those consequences would be that they would no longer be as numerous as the stars of the heavens (Deuteronomy 28:62-63 ; see Genesis 13:14-18 ; Genesis 15:1-6 ), and they would be lead into exile retracing the route of the Exodus (Deuteronomy 28:32 ,Deuteronomy 28:32,28:36-46 ,Deuteronomy 28:36-46,28:63-68 ). ...
God's promises came to the people not only in Deuteronomy. ...
Insistence on the Worship of the One True God in the Temple of Jerusalem The commandments found in Deuteronomy with which the author of 1,2Kings was especially concerned were the commands that only God be worshiped and that God be worshiped in Jerusalem alone (Deuteronomy 12-13 ). Thus, Jeroboam violated two of the most important principles of Deuteronomy: the worship of God only and only in the Temple of Jerusalem (Deuteronomy 12-13 ). The blessings of Deuteronomy 28:1-14 could still be theirs. Perhaps the writer was encouraging the exiles with the possibility that God would bless them again and raise Israel above all peoples ( Deuteronomy 28:1 ) just as Jehoiachin was given preference above other prisoners in captivity (2 Kings 25:28 )
Command, Commandment - ...
The commandments were for Israel's good (Deuteronomy 10:13 ) since God's covenant love was lasting for those who kept them (Exodus 20:6 ; Deuteronomy 7:9 ). Obedience would result in prosperity, security, God's presence, longevity, the occupation of the land, a long dynasty, and blessings of all sorts (Leviticus 26:3-13 ; Deuteronomy 5:29-6:2,17-18 ; 17:18-20 ; 28:1-14 ). Disobedience would result in terror, illness, oppression, infertility, exile, curses, and rebuke (Leviticus 26:14-20 ; Deuteronomy 28:15-68 ; Psalm 119:21 ). ...
God's commandments can be kept (Deuteronomy 30:11-14 ). Prosperity can cause one to forget them (Deuteronomy 8:11-14 ), and adversity tests willingness to obey them (Deuteronomy 8:2 ; Judges 3:4 ; cf. One must not allow even a miracle-working prophet to lead one away from them (Deuteronomy 13:4 ). Craigie, The Book of Deuteronomy
Murder - Murder is contrary to the authority of God, the sovereign disposer of life, Deuteronomy 32:39 ; to the goodness of God, who gives it, Job 10:12 ; to the law of nature, Acts 16:28 ; to the love a man owes to himself, his neighbour, and society at large. Not but that life may be taken away, as in lawful war, 1 Chronicles 5:22 ; by the hands of the civil magistrate for capital crimes, Deuteronomy 17:8 ; Deuteronomy 17:10 ; and in self-defence. According to the divine law, murder is to be punished with death, Deuteronomy 19:11-12
Bashan - It was the kingdom of Og, the Rephaite opponent of Israel, and with his name the country is almost invariably associated ( Numbers 21:33 , Deuteronomy 29:7 , Nehemiah 9:22 etc. It was noted for mountains ( Psalms 68:15 ), lions ( Deuteronomy 33:22 ), oak trees ( Isaiah 2:13 , Ezekiel 27:6 , Zechariah 11:2 ), and especially cattle, both rams ( Deuteronomy 32:14 ) and bullocks ( Ezekiel 39:18 ); the bulls and kine of Bashan are typical of cruelty and oppression ( Psalms 22:12 , Amos 4:1 ). The extent of the territory denoted by this name cannot be exactly defined till some important identifications can be established, such as the exact meaning of ‘the region of Argob’ (included in the kingdom of Og, Deuteronomy 3:4 etc
Everlasting - Eternal, applied to God (Genesis 21:33 ; Deuteronomy 33:27 ; Psalm 41:13 ; 90:2 )
Inflammation - Inflammation was one of the curses upon those disobedient to the covenant (Deuteronomy 28:22 ; compare Leviticus 13:28 )
Gudgodah - A station in the journeyings of the Israelites ( Deuteronomy 10:7 ), whence they proceeded to Jotbathah
Zamzummim - A race of giants east of the Jordan, defeated by Chedorlaomer, Genesis 14:5 , and exterminated by the Ammonites, who possessed their territory until themselves subdued by Moses, Deuteronomy 2:20-21
Hart - Or STAG, a species of deer, clean by the Levitical law, Deuteronomy 12:15 , and celebrated for its elegance, agility, and grace, Song of Song of Solomon 2:9 Isaiah 35:6
Villages - The Hebrew word thus rendered (perazon) means habitations in the open country, unwalled villages (Deuteronomy 3:5 ; 1 Samuel 6:18 )
Sodomites - Those who imitated the licentious wickedness of Sodom (Deuteronomy 23:17 ; 1 Kings 14:24 ; Romans 1:26,27 )
Pethor - Home of Balaam (Numbers 22:5 ; Deuteronomy 23:4 )
Salcah - (ssal' cuh) Territory and/or city on extreme eastern border of Bashan, possibly modern Salkhad, the defensive center of the Jebel el-Druze, 63 miles east of the Jordan (Deuteronomy 3:10 ; Joshua 12:5 )
Oshea - ) His faith, in contrast to the unbelieving spies, procured for him the addition of Jehovah's name to his own (Numbers 14:6-10; Deuteronomy 32:44), "Jah his salvation
Sihon - King of the Amorites at Heshbon, on refusing passage to the Hebrews, and coming to attack them, was himself slain, his army routed, and his dominions divided among Israel, Numbers 21:21-34 Deuteronomy 2:26-36
Swan - This bird is mentioned only in Leviticus 11:18 Deuteronomy 14:16 ; and it is there quite doubtful whether the Hebrew word means a swan
Alms - Israel's ideal was a time when no one was poor (Deuteronomy 15:4 ). Every three years, for example, the tithe of the produce of the year was to be brought to the towns and made available to the Levites, the aliens in the land, the orphans, and the widows (Deuteronomy 14:28-29 ). Every seventh year all debts were to be canceled among the Israelites (Deuteronomy 15:1-3 ), and the fields were to lie fallow so that the needy of the people might eat (Ex. Deuteronomy 23:10-11 ). In addition, the law instructed Israel to give generously to the needs of their Hebrew neighbors (Deuteronomy 15:7-11 ). Failure to comply would be sin (Deuteronomy 15:9-10 ). Israel showed concern for the needy by not harvesting the corners of fields and by leaving the gleanings so the needy and the stranger might gather what remained (Leviticus 19:9-10 ; Leviticus 23:22 ; Deuteronomy 24:19-22 )
Court Systems - The law codes limit his authority in some cases (Numbers 5:11-31 ; Deuteronomy 21:18-21 ; Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ). The elders would serve as witnesses to a transaction (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ; Ruth 4:1-12 ), decide guilt or innocence (Deuteronomy 19:1 ; Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ; Joshua 20:1-6 ), or execute the punishment due the guilty party (Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-3 ). A system in which local courts referred complex cases to the supreme judges is described in Deuteronomy 17:2-13 ; Deuteronomy 19:16-19 . The system described in Deuteronomy 17:1 ; Deuteronomy 19:1 ; 2 Chronicles 19:1 has both priests and secular officials as judges in the central court in Jerusalem. Deuteronomy 17:18-20 places the king at the same level as his subjects with respect to the requirements of God's law. The passages about the high court in Jerusalem mention priests alongside the secular judge (Deuteronomy 17:9 ; Deuteronomy 19:17 ; 2Chronicles 19:8,2 Chronicles 19:11 ). The cult and the judicial system were both concerned with removing blood-guilt from the community (Deuteronomy 21:1-9 ). Physical evidence was presented when necessary (Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ), but proving one's case depended primarily on testimony and persuasive argument. The word of at least two witnesses was required to convict (Deuteronomy 19:15 ). The system depended on the honesty of witnesses and the integrity of judges (Exodus 18:21 ; Exodus 20:16 ; Exodus 23:1-3 ,Exodus 23:1-3,23:6-9 ; Leviticus 19:15-19 ; Deuteronomy 16:19-20 ; Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ; 2 Chronicles 19:6-7 ). Cases brought by a malicious witness giving false testimony were referred to the central court (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ). In some circumstances the accused could submit to an ordeal or an oath to prove his or her innocence (Exodus 22:6-10 ; Numbers 5:11-31 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-8 ). The judges were responsible to administer punishment, often with the whole community participating (Deuteronomy 21:21 )
Moserah, Moseroth - Moserah is named in Deuteronomy 10:6 as the place where Aaron died and was buried: Moseroth in Numbers 33:30-31 as a ‘station’ on the route to Mt
Maw - The maw was among the choice cuts of meat reserved for the priests' portion (Deuteronomy 18:3 )
Admah - One of the cities of the plain, having its own king, linked with Zeboim (Genesis 10:19; Genesis 14:2; Genesis 14:8; Deuteronomy 29:23; Hosea 11:8)
Encourage - Deuteronomy 3
Giant - The king of Basban, Deuteronomy 3:11, and Goliath, 1 Samuel 17:4, were warlike and dreaded giants
Dedicate, Dedication - In the Old Testament the people who were set apart included all Israel (Exodus 19:5-6 ; Deuteronomy 7:6 ; Deuteronomy 14:2 ) and the priests (Exodus 29:1-37 ). The things that were set apart included the altar in the tabernacle (Numbers 7:10-88 ), images of pagan deities (Daniel 3:2-3 ), silver and gold (2 Samuel 8:11 ), Temple (1 Kings 8:63 ; Ezra 6:16-18 ), walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:27 ), and private dwellings (Deuteronomy 20:5 )
Chasten, Chastisement - Still, the Father must correct His children (2 Samuel 7:14 ; compare Deuteronomy 8:5 ; Deuteronomy 21:18 ; Proverbs 13:24 ; Proverbs 19:18 ). It shows God's greatness and power (Deuteronomy 11:2 )
Iram - The Horites were probably not finally destroyed immediately after Esau's settlement in their land, if we judge by the analogy of the conquest of Canaan (Deuteronomy 2:12; Deuteronomy 2:22)
Cutting - The flesh in various ways was an idolatrous practice, a part of idol-worship (Deuteronomy 14:1 ; 1 Kings 18:28 ). The Israelites were commanded not to imitate this practice (Leviticus 19:28 ; 21:5 ; Deuteronomy 14:1 )
Iim - Compare Deuteronomy 2:9-12; Deuteronomy 2:13, "rise up," implies the Israelites remained at Iim some time; they were forbidden to assail Moab
Beg - That the poor existed among the Hebrews we have abundant evidence (Exodus 23:11 ; Deuteronomy 15:11 ), but there is no mention of beggars properly so called in the Old Testament. The poor were provided for by the law of Moses (Leviticus 19:10 ; Deuteronomy 12:12 ; 14:29 )
Emerods - An archaic form of the word hemorrhoids used by the KJV for the disease(s) in Deuteronomy 28:27 and 1 Samuel 5-6 . The underlying Hebrew term is rendered tumors except for the passage in Deuteronomy where NRSV and TEV opt for ulcers or sores
Nest - Used literally of birds’ nests ( Deuteronomy 22:6 ; Deuteronomy 32:11 , Job 39:27 , Psalms 84:3 ; Psalms 104:17 , Proverbs 27:8 , Isaiah 16:2 ); metaphorically for a lofty fortress ( Numbers 24:21 , Jeremiah 49:16 , Obadiah 1:4 , Habakkuk 2:9 ); Job refers to his lost home as a nest ( Job 29:18 ); in Genesis 6:14 the ‘ rooms ’ of the ark are (see mg
Perverse - Paul urged Christians to be moral “lights” witnessing to their “crooked and perverse generation” (Philippians 2:15 ; compare Deuteronomy 32:5 ). Jesus accused His generation of both faithlessness and perversity (Matthew 17:17 ; Luke 9:41 ; compare Deuteronomy 32:20 )
Chinnereth - Lyre, the singular form of the word (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 19:35 ), which is also used in the plural form, Chinneroth, the name of a fenced city which stood near the shore of the lake of Galilee, a little to the south of Tiberias. The Sea of Chinnereth (Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 13:27 ), or of Chinneroth (Joshua 12 :: 3 ), was the "lake of Gennesaret" or "sea of Tiberias" (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 11:2 )
Spit, Spittle - The brother who refused to perform levirate marriage (have a child by his brother's wife to carry on the name of the brother, Deuteronomy 25:5-6 ) would have his face spit in by the spurned wife of the brother (Deuteronomy 25:7-9 )
Gomorrah - One of the five cities in the vale of Siddim, Genesis 14:1-11; destroyed for its wickedness, Genesis 18:20; Genesis 19:24; Genesis 19:28; made a warning by Moses, Deuteronomy 29:23; Deuteronomy 32:32; referred to by Isaiah 1:9-10; by Jeremiah 23:14; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; by Amos 4:11; by Zephaniah 2:9 : by our Saviour, Matthew 10:15; Mark 6:11, A
Hauran - When the Israelites conquered the land, the whole of this region appears to have been subject to Og, the king of Bashan, 1619165092_41; Deuteronomy 3:1-5, and a large portion of it was allotted to Manasseh. Genesis 14:5; Genesis 15:20, and Deuteronomy 3:11
Usury - The Jews might require interest of foreigners, Deuteronomy 23:19-20 , but were forbidden to receive it from each other, Exodus 22:25 Psalm 15:5 ; being instructed to lend money, etc. , in a spirit of brotherly kindness, "hoping for nothing again," Deuteronomy 15:7-11 Luke 6:33-35
Chisel - The verb pasal means to hew out or dress stone (Exodus 34:1 ; Deuteronomy 10:1 ; 1 Kings 5:18 ; Habakkuk 2:18 ). Garzen is an ax used in the stone quarries or forests ( Deuteronomy 19:5 ; 1 Kings 6:7 )
Hoof - According to Mosaic law, ritually clean animals are those which both chew the cud and have cloven (divided) hooves (Deuteronomy 14:6-7 )
Swan - SWAN ( tinshemeth , Leviticus 11:18 , Deuteronomy 14:16 )
Hatred - Altogether different is the meaning of the word in Deuteronomy 21:15 ; Matthew 6:24 ; Luke 14:26 ; Romans 9:13 , where it denotes only a less degree of love
Witch - Occurs only in Exodus 22:18 , as the rendering of Mekhashshepheh , The feminine form of the word, meaning "enchantress" (RSV, "sorceress"), and in Deuteronomy 18:10 , as the rendering of Mekhashshepheth , the masculine form of the word, meaning "enchanter
Bashan-Havoth-Jair - The Bashan of the villages of Jair, the general name given to Argob by Jair, the son of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:14 ), containing sixty cities with walls and brazen gates (Joshua 13:30 ; 1 Kings 4:13 )
Dathan - ) in his conspiracy, and with his accomplices was swallowed up by an earthquake (Numbers 16:1 ; 26:9 ; Deuteronomy 11:6 ; Psalm 106:17 )
Nether - Deuteronomy 24:6 (c) We are warned by the Lord not to destroy the usefulness of another man's life
Kedemoth - A desert lay near it, Deuteronomy 2:26
Idol - aven, "nothingness;" "vanity" (Isaiah 66:3 ; 41:29 ; Deuteronomy 32:21 ; 1 Kings 16:13 ; Psalm 31:6 ; Jeremiah 8:19 , etc. ...
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Gillulim, also a word of contempt, "dung;" "refuse" (Ezekiel 16:36 ; 20:8 ; Deuteronomy 29:17 , marg. ...
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Semel, "likeness;" "a carved image" (Deuteronomy 4:16 ). ...
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Temunah, "similitude" (Deuteronomy 4:12-19 ). It denotes also a figure cast in metal (Deuteronomy 7:25 ; 27:15 ; Isaiah 40:19 ; 44:10 ). ...
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Massekah, "a molten image" (Deuteronomy 9:12 ; Judges 17:3,4 )
Champaign - ]'>[1] has replaced champion ( Deuteronomy 11:30 , Jdt 5:1 ) and champion ( Ezekiel 37:2 marg
Host of Heaven - When the Jews fell into idolatry they worshipped these (Deuteronomy 4:19 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 21:3,5 ; 23:5 ; Jeremiah 19:13 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ; Acts 7:42 )
Massah - It is also called Meribah (Exodus 17:7 ; Deuteronomy 6:16 ; Psalm 95:8,9 ; Hebrews 3:8 )
Stoning - A form of punishment (Leviticus 20:2 ; 24:14 ; Deuteronomy 13:10 ; 17:5 ; 22:21 ) prescribed for certain offences
Rabbit - NAS, NIV, and TEV use rabbit for an unclean animal in Leviticus 11:6 ; Deuteronomy 14:7 where other English translations use hare
Diviner - Deuteronomy 18
Crooked - Deuteronomy 32
Gentile - Gentiles were used by God to punish apostate Judea (Deuteronomy 28:49; 1 Kings 8:33) and often included in blessings by God upon the Jewish people
Battlement - The Mosaic law required a battlement for each house, Deuteronomy 22:8
Raiment - Deuteronomy 8
Earing - arare ) also occurs, as Deuteronomy 21:4 ‘a rough valley, which is neither eared nor sown
Widow - The law of Moses recognized that widows needed special protection against social injustice (Exodus 2:22; Deuteronomy 24:17; Jeremiah 7:5-7; Mark 12:40-44; Luke 18:1-5). ...
Throughout the Bible God shows a special concern for widows and he expects people in general to have similar concern (Deuteronomy 10:18; Deuteronomy 14:29; Deuteronomy 24:19; Psalms 68:5; Psalms 146:9; Proverbs 15:25; Isaiah 1:17; James 1:27). If the living brother refused to do his duty, he was publicly disgraced for allowing his brother’s family name to die out (Genesis 38:8-10; Deuteronomy 25:5-10; Ruth 1:1-14; Ruth 3; Ruth 4:1-12; Matthew 22:24)
Judge - These were men chosen from the elders of the people, and as the administration of Israel developed they became a clearly recognized official body in the nation (Numbers 11:14-17; Deuteronomy 16:18; Deuteronomy 21:2; Joshua 8:33). )...
In their administration of justice, judges were to be strictly impartial, favouring neither the poor nor the rich (Exodus 23:2-3; Exodus 23:6; Deuteronomy 1:16-17; see JUSTICE). Under no circumstances were they to accept bribes (Deuteronomy 16:19-20). When cases were too difficult for them, they were to take them to the priests to decide (Deuteronomy 17:8-9; 2 Chronicles 19:8-11)
Heth - Dread, a descendant of Canaan, and the ancestor of the Hittites (Genesis 10:18 ; Deuteronomy 7:1 ), who dwelt in the vicinity of Hebron (Genesis 23:3,7 )
Ox - ); not to be muzzled when treading the corn (Deuteronomy 25:4 )
Blains - In Deuteronomy 28:27,35 , it is called "the botch of Egypt
Five books of moses - These books � Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy � chronicle events from Creation until Moses' passing and contain the 613 mitzvot
Emerods - The images made of them mean images of the part affected (1 Samuel 5:6-12; 1 Samuel 6:4-11; Deuteronomy 28:27)
Awl - An instrument only referred to in connection with the custom of boring the ear of a slave (Exodus 21:6 ; Deuteronomy 15:17 ), in token of his volunteering perpetual service when he might be free
Emim - They were ancient giants or Rephaim (Deuteronomy 2:10-11 )
Tophel - (toh' fehl) Place near the site of Moses' farewell speech o Israel (Deuteronomy 1:1 ), identified with et-Tafileh about fifteen miles southeast of the Dead Sea between Kerak and Petra
Emerods - Deuteronomy 28 ...
Pentateuch - It refers to the first five books of the Bible known as Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy
Gaulan - It was given to the half tribe of Manasseh, on the other side Jordan, Deuteronomy 4:43 ; and became a city of refuge, Joshua 21:27
Jeshurun - A poetical name of Israel, probably derived from a root meaning to be upright, and applied to the people of God as the objects of his justifying love, which does not "behold iniquity in Jacob," Deuteronomy 32:5 33:5,26 Isaiah 44:2
Stranger - The relation of the Jews to strangers was regulated by special laws (Deuteronomy 23:3 ; 24:14-21 ; 25:5 ; 26:10-13 ). The Jews were allowed to purchase strangers as slaves (Leviticus 25:44,45 ), and to take usury from them (Deuteronomy 23:20 )
Edrei - One of Bashank, two capitals (Numbers 21:33; Deuteronomy 1:4; Deuteronomy 3:10; Joshua 12:4)
Landmark - Many ancient law codes (Babylonian, Egyptian, Greek, Roman) prohibited the removal of a landmark (Deuteronomy 19:14 ; compare Deuteronomy 27:17 ; Proverbs 22:28 )
Rain - The sacred writers often speak of the rain of the former and latter season, Deuteronomy 11:14 ; Hosea 6:3 . ) The ancient Hebrews compared elocution, and even learning or doctrine, to rain: "My doctrine shall drop as the rain," Deuteronomy 32:2
Levites - The tribe of Levi was appointed because it was the only tribe that stood with Moses against the people who worshiped the golden calf (Exodus 32:25-29 ; Deuteronomy 10:6-9 ). Since the Levites were dependent on the generosity of others, families were encouraged to invite the Levites (as well as widows, strangers, and orphans) to join them in their eating and their celebration of the joyous national feast (Deuteronomy 12:12 ,Deuteronomy 12:12,12:18 ; Deuteronomy 16:11 ,Deuteronomy 16:11,16:14 ). In some passages (Deuteronomy 17:9 ,Deuteronomy 17:9,17:18 ; Deuteronomy 18:1 ; Deuteronomy 24:8 ), the terms priest and Levite (or Levitical priests) seem identical, but in Exodus 28:1 and Levitcus 8–10 it is clear that only the family of Aaron fulfilled the priestly duties of offering sacrifices in the tabernacle
Quarry - word pĕsîlîm is applied to images of gods in wood, stone, or metal ( Deuteronomy 7:5 ; Deuteronomy 7:25 ; Deuteronomy 12:3 , Isaiah 21:9 ; Isaiah 30:22 , 2 Chronicles 34:4 )
Argob - It was subdued by ‘Jair son of Manasseh,’ and became the possession of his tribe ( Deuteronomy 3:3 ; Deuteronomy 3:13 , 1 Kings 4:15 etc. It is called ‘the Argob’ ( Deuteronomy 3:13 )
Mount Gerizim - (Deuteronomy 11:29-30) There should seem to have been a special design in this appointment of the Lord by Moses; for here it was, beside the plains of Moreh, that Abraham first came, at the call of God, when he left Haran. The reader may find farther account of the blessings which the Lord appointed to be pronounced on mount Gerizim, Deuteronomy 27:11 and Deuteronomy 28:1-14 and the confirmation of the whole, as fulfilled by Joshua after Israel had passed over Jordan, taken Jericho and Ai, Joshua 8:33-35
Mouth - ‘Every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God’ (διὰ στόματος θεοῦ, Deuteronomy 8:3); ‘in the mouth of two or three witnesses’ (ἐπὶ στόματος, Deuteronomy 17:6; Deuteronomy 19:15); ‘out of the mouth of babes and sucklings’ (ἐκ στόμ
Poverty - Deuteronomy 10:17-19 ; Deuteronomy 14:28-29 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ; Deuteronomy 23:19-20 ; Deuteronomy 24:10-21 ; Deuteronomy 26:12-15 ), and in one famous sentence predicts its permanence (‘the poor shall never cease out of the land,’ Deuteronomy 15:11 ). Deuteronomy 12:12 , Deuteronomy 19:18 ), a result of the centralization of worship in the one sanctuary at Jerusalem. tithes are allotted to be given them (Deuteronomy 14:28 etc. ); they are to have the right to glean ( Deuteronomy 24:15 ; Deuteronomy 24:21 ), and in the Priestly Code there is the unrealized ideal of the Jubilee Year ( Leviticus 25:1-55 , cf. Deuteronomy 15:12-15 )
Fruit - The continuing fruitfulness of Israel's trees was dependent on faithfulness to the covenant (Deuteronomy 28:4 ,Deuteronomy 28:4,28:11 ,Deuteronomy 28:11,28:18 ). ...
Figurative uses The fruit of the womb is a common expression for descendants (Genesis 30:2 ; Deuteronomy 7:13 ; Psalm 127:3 ; Isaiah 13:18 )
Food - In the law of Moses there are special regulations as to the animals to be used for food (Leviticus 11 ; Deuteronomy 14:3-21 ). (See also for other restrictions Exodus 23:19 ; 29:13-22 ; Leviticus 3:4-9 ; 9:18,19 ; 22:8 ; Deuteronomy 14:21 . ) But beyond these restrictions they had a large grant from God (Deuteronomy 14:26 ; 32:13,14 ). The cereals were sometimes eaten without any preparation (Leviticus 23:14 ; Deuteronomy 23:25 ; 2 Kings 4:42 )
Gudgodah - A stop on the Israelites' wilderness journey (Deuteronomy 10:7 )
Hor-Haggidgad - It appears to be a variant spelling of Gudgodah (Deuteronomy 10:7 )
Ar - Called also Rabbah and Rabbath-Moab, Numbers 21:28 Deuteronomy 2:1-37 Isaiah 15:1
Cuckow - KJV translation for an unclean bird (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ); also spelled cuckoo
Astrologer - It was positively forbidden to the Jews (Deuteronomy 4:19 ; 18:10 ; Isaiah 47:13 )
Hoof - The "parting of the hoof" is one of the distinctions between clean and unclean animals (Leviticus 11:3 ; Deuteronomy 14:7 )
Bozer - of Jordan, allotted to the family of Merari (Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:36)
Widows - To be treated with kindness (Exodus 22:22 ; Deuteronomy 14:29 ; 16:11,14 ; 24:17,19-21 ; 26:12 ; 27:19 , etc
Ospray - OSPRAY ( ‘oznîyyâh , Leviticus 11:13 , Deuteronomy 14:12 )
Plough - First referred to in Genesis 45:6 , where the Authorized Version has "earing," but the Revised Version "ploughing;" next in Exodus 34:21 and Deuteronomy 21:4
Tophel - It is naturally chosen as a landmark (Deuteronomy 1:1)
Bats - Listed among the unclean birds (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 )
Manslayer - One guilty of involuntary manslaughter; one who accidentally causes another's death (Numbers 35:9-15 ,Numbers 35:9-15,35:22-28 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-10 )
Glean - The Jews were not allowed to glean their fields, but were to leave this to the poor, Leviticus 19:10 ; Leviticus 23:22 ; Deuteronomy 24:21 ; Ruth 2:3
Ospray, Osprey - (ahss' preeih) Large, flesh-eating hawk included in lists of unclean birds (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ; KJV, NRSV)
Paddle - KJV term for a digging tool (Deuteronomy 23:13 )
Hornet - The Lord drove out many of the Canaanites before Israel by means of this insect, Exodus 23:28 Deuteronomy 7:20 Joshua 24:12
Gerizim - Both mountains were closely linked with Shechem in the history of Israel, and Mt Gerizim later became a sacred mountain to the Samaritans (Deuteronomy 27:11-14; John 4:20)
Bloodguilt - Bloodguilt made a person ritually unclean (Numbers 35:33-34 ) and was incurred by killing a person who did not deserve to die (Deuteronomy 19:10 ; Jeremiah 26:15 ; Jonah 1:14 ). See Genesis 42:22 ; Deuteronomy 19:10 ; Deuteronomy 22:8 ; Joshua 2:19 ); (4) a person was under bloodguilt if those for whom he was responsible committed murder (1Kings 2:5,1 Kings 2:31-33 ); and (5) the killing of a sacrifice at an unauthorized altar imputed bloodguilt (Leviticus 17:4 ). No other penalty or sacrifice could substitute for the death of the guilty party, nor was there any need for sacrifice once the murderer had been killed (Numbers 35:33 ; Deuteronomy 21:8-9 ). If, however, the accidental killer left the boundaries of the city of refuge, the avenger of blood could kill in revenge without incurring bloodguilt (Numbers 35:31-32 ; Deuteronomy 19:13 ). The community was held to be bloodguilty if it failed to provide asylum for the accidental killer (Deuteronomy 19:10 )
Exodus - Yahweh revealed his character, showing that he was a God who redeems (Deuteronomy 15:15; 2 Samuel 7:23; Nehemiah 1:8-10; Micah 6:4; cf. The exodus was a sign to the people of this Redeemer-God’s love (Deuteronomy 4:37; Deuteronomy 7:8; Hosea 11:1), power (Deuteronomy 9:26; 2 Kings 17:36; Psalms 81:10) and justice (Deuteronomy 6:21-22; Joshua 24:5-7). At the same time it reminded them that he required them to be loyal, obedient and holy (Leviticus 11:45; Deuteronomy 4:37-40; Deuteronomy 5:6-7; Deuteronomy 7:7-11; cf
Argob - This was very fertile, and contained at one time sixty walled towns, which were taken by Jair the son of Manasseh, and called after him, Deuteronomy 1:4,13,14 1 Kings 4:13
Hoopoe - The identity of the unclean bird of Leviticus 11:19 ( Deuteronomy 14:18 ) is disputed: lapwing (KJV); hoopoe (modern English translations); waterhen (earliest Greek); woodcock (Targum)
Meonenim - , "the plain of Meonenim;" RSV, "the oak of Meonenim") means properly "soothsayers" or "sorcerers," "wizards" (Deuteronomy 18:10,14 ; 2 Kings 21:6 ; Micah 5:12 )
Solemn Meeting - It is the name given also to the convocation held on the seventh day of the Passover (Deuteronomy 16:8 )
Avim - A people dwelling in Hazerim, or "the villages" or "encampments" on the south-west corner of the sea-coast (Deuteronomy 2:23 )
Firstling - Deuteronomy 15
Charmer - In Deuteronomy 18:11 ; Isaiah 19:3 it is associated with idolatry and sorcerers: these also carry on their incantations with low mutterings
Ezion-Geber - Here also the Israelites encamped ( Numbers 33:35 , Deuteronomy 2:8 )
Bag - Deuteronomy 25:13, and Luke 12:33, where the R
Beth-Peor - In the adjacent valley Moses rehearsed the law to Israel, and was buried, Deuteronomy 4:44-46 34:6
Nature - They were to use only those trees that were not useful for anything else (Deuteronomy 20:19-20). They were to give proper food and rest to the animals that worked for them, and were not to use their animals in any way that could be considered cruel (Deuteronomy 5:14; Deuteronomy 22:10; Deuteronomy 25:4). They had to consider the animal’s instincts and feelings, and remember the need to maintain the balance of nature (Exodus 23:19 b; Leviticus 22:28; Deuteronomy 22:6-7). In particular they had to acknowledge that God was the owner of all life, and that they could take the life of an animal only by his permission (Leviticus 17:13-14; Deuteronomy 12:15-16; Deuteronomy 12:23-24; Psalms 50:10-11; see BLOOD). God allows them to take minerals from the earth, to enjoy the fruits of plant life, to cut down trees to build houses, to eat the meat of animals, and to kill insects and animals that threaten their lives (Deuteronomy 8:7-10; Deuteronomy 12:15; Joshua 6:21). God assured the Israelites that he would use nature as a means of blessing them when they obeyed him, but of punishing them when they disobeyed him (Deuteronomy 11:13-17; Deuteronomy 28:1-24; 2 Chronicles 7:14)
Ebal - On this mountain six of the tribes (Deuteronomy 27:12,13 ) were appointed to take their stand and respond according to a prescribed form to the imprecations uttered in the valley, where the law was read by the Levites (11:29; 29:4,13). This mountain was also the site of the first great altar erected to Jehovah (Deuteronomy 27:5-8 ; Joshua 8:30-35 )
Roe - ghazal), permitted for food (Deuteronomy 14:5 ; Compare Deuteronomy 12:15,22 ; 15:22 ; 1 Kings 4:23 ), noted for its swiftness and beauty and grace of form (2 Samuel 2:18 ; 1 Chronicles 12:8 ; Song of Solomon 2:9 ; 7:3 ; 8:14 )
Sun - The Bible recognizes that the sun exercises control over certain processes of life in the world, and it sees this as a sign that God created the world and continues to care for it (Genesis 1:14-18; Deuteronomy 33:13-14; Matthew 5:45). It is something God has created, and therefore it must not become an object of worship (Deuteronomy 4:19; Psalms 136:7-9; Ezekiel 8:16-18; Romans 1:18-23)
Bags - The currency in the East being mainly in silver, large sums ready counted, and sealed with a known seal in a bag; passed current (compare 2 Kings 5:23; 2 Kings 12:10; Luke 12:33; Job 14:17, "my transgression is sealed up in a bag"; Deuteronomy 32:34; Hosea 13:12, sealed securely for punishment). " Κis , bags for carrying weights (Deuteronomy 25:13) or money (Proverbs 1:14)
Pestilence - God sent pestilence as punishment for persistent unbelief (Numbers 14:12 ) and failure to fulfill covenant obligations (Deuteronomy 24:24 ; Deuteronomy 28:21 ) as well as to encourage repentence (Amos 4:10 )
Ebal, Mount - Thus the law and the curse were associated with the same mountain, Deuteronomy 11:29 ; Deuteronomy 27:4,13 ; but along with these Joshua also erected an altar unto the Lord God of Israel, before the blessings on Gerizim and the curses on Ebal were rehearsed
Ibex - The ibex is included among clean game (Deuteronomy 14:5 )
Zeboiim - One of the five cities of the Plain ( Genesis 10:18 ; Genesis 14:2 ; Genesis 14:8 , Deuteronomy 29:23 (22), Hosea 11:8 Mosera - A bond, one of the stations of the Israelites in the wilderness (Deuteronomy 10:6 ), at the foot of Mount Hor
Baal Hermon - ") The mountain had three names (Deuteronomy 3:9); Baal Hermon was probably one used among the Phoenician worshippers of Baal, whose sanctuary Baal Gad was at the base of the mountain
Kneading-Trough - The vessel in which the dough, after being mixed and leavened, was left to swell or ferment (Exodus 8:3 ; 12:34 ; Deuteronomy 28:5,7 )
Tribulation - Trouble or affiction of any kind (Deuteronomy 4:30 ; Matthew 13:21 ; 2 co 7:4 )
Taberah - The name commemorates God's “burning anger” which broke out in fire against the ever-complaining Israelites (Numbers 11:3 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 )
Mosera(h), Moseroth - The singular form of the name (Mosera or Moserah) was the site of Aaron's burial (Deuteronomy 10:6 )
Senir - ” Amorite name for Mount Hermon (Deuteronomy 3:9 )
Chameleon - A Hebrew word with the same spelling but perhaps with different historical derivation occurs in Leviticus 11:18 and Deuteronomy 14:16 , where it is apparently the barn owl, Tyto alba
Avim - They lived on the Philistine coast before the Philistines invaded about 1200 (Deuteronomy 2:23 )
Avvim - The Avvim are spoken of in Deuteronomy 2:23 (cf
Zebulun - (Genesis 30:20; Deuteronomy 33:18 compared with Genesis 49:13) Perhaps, the root of this name is Zabad, to endow, or finish
Owl - (Leviticus 11:17; Deuteronomy 14:17) The loneliness of the owl gave occasion to the Psalmist to describe thereby his solitary state of affliction
Ossifrage - The KJV included the ossifrage among the unclean birds (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 )
Peor - This name and vicinity are also associated with an idol of the Moabites, Deuteronomy 4:8
Ossifrage - Bone-breaker; in Hebrew Peries, to break; an unclean bird of the eagle family, Leviticus 11:13 Deuteronomy 14:12
Faithfulness - An infinite attribute of Jehovah; adapted to make perfect both the confidence of those who believe his word and rely on his promises, and the despair of those who doubt his word and defy his threatenings, Deuteronomy 28:26 Numbers 23:19 Psalm 89:33-34 Hebrews 10:23
Hazeroth - Here they remained a week or more, Numbers 12:1 - 16 ; and their next station recorded was near Kades-barnea, on the borders of Canaan, Numbers 12:16 13:26 Deuteronomy 1:19-21
Wanderings of the Israelites - The following tabular view of their various encampments, so far as they are recorded in Exodus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, is from Dr
Land, Ground - This contributes to their total well-being (Deuteronomy 7:13 ). ...
Ground with its produce as the sphere of living A series of blessings and curses is part of Deuteronomy 28:4 ,Deuteronomy 28:4,28:11 ,Deuteronomy 28:11,28:18 ,Deuteronomy 28:18,28:33 ,Deuteronomy 28:33,28:42 ,Deuteronomy 28:42,28:51 . The implication here is that the ground was fruitful because Job had been faithful to God and God had blessed his land (compare Deuteronomy 28:4 ,Deuteronomy 28:4,28:11 ,Deuteronomy 28:11,28:18 ,Deuteronomy 28:18,28:33 ,Deuteronomy 28:33,28:42 ,Deuteronomy 28:42,28:51 )
Senir - =Shenir, the name given to Hermon by the Amorites (Deuteronomy 3:9 )
Dart - Arrows are compared to lightning (Deuteronomy 32:23,42 ; Psalm 7:13 ; 120:4 )
Scurvy - KJV translation of Hebrew term for festering eruption (Leviticus 21:20 ; Leviticus 22:22 ), but in Deuteronomy 28:27 KJV used, “scab,” while only there did RSV use “scurvy
Beeroth-Bene-Jaakan - Probably certain wells in the territory of some nomad Horite tribe ( Genesis 36:27 , 1 Chronicles 1:42 ), the Benç Jaakan ; a halting-place in the Israelite wanderings, between Moseroth and Hor-haggidgad ( Numbers 33:31-32 , Deuteronomy 10:6 )
Froward - Deuteronomy 32
Horites or Horim - A race of early dwellers in mount Seir, whence they were expelled by the Edomites, Genesis 14:6 Deuteronomy 2:12,22
Fertility Cult - Ashtoroth, the daughter of Asherah, is used as the Hebrew word for womb or the fruit of the womb (Deuteronomy 7:13 ; Deuteronomy 28:4 ,Deuteronomy 28:4,28:18 ,Deuteronomy 28:18,28:51 ). Transvestism (prohibited in Deuteronomy 22:5 ) may have been part of a fertility rite like that practiced by the Hittites. Both skin and earth were cut as a sign of mourning (prohibited by Deuteronomy 14:1 ). The fertility of the land was ensured not by ritual reenactment of the sacred marriage but by obedience to the demands of the covenant (Deuteronomy 28:1 ,Deuteronomy 28:1,28:3-4 ,Deuteronomy 28:3-4,28:11-12 )
Meribah - The two places are mentioned together in Deuteronomy 33:8 . This took place near the close of the wanderings in the desert (Numbers 20:1-24 ; Deuteronomy 32:51 )
Gall - In the OT it is used (a) of a plant characterized by bitterness (probably wormwood), Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Hosea 10:4 ; Amos 6:12 ; (b) as the translation of the word mererah, "bitterness," Job 13:26 , e. ; (c) as the translation of rosh, "venom;" in Deuteronomy 32:32 "(grapes) of gall
Fever - Fever accompanying “consumption” or “wasting disease” (Deuteronomy 28:22 REB) could refer to any number of diseases: malaria, typhoid, typhus, dysentery, chronic diahhrea, or cholera. The “extreme burning” of Deuteronomy 28:22 is understood by most modern translations as a reference to the weather (“fiery heat” RSV, NAS; “scorching wind” TEV) rather than to a fever
Neck - The neck under yoke meant subjection and servitude ( Deuteronomy 28:48 etc. Stiff or hard of neck ( Deuteronomy 31:27 etc
Bezer - of Jordan ( Deuteronomy 4:43 , Joshua 20:8 ); a city of refuge allotted, according to P Offense - Here offense approximates crime (Deuteronomy 19:15 ; Deuteronomy 22:26 ), guilt (Hosea 5:15 ), trespass (Romans 5:15 ,Romans 5:15,5:17-18 ,Romans 5:17-18,5:20 ), or sin (2 Corinthians 11:7 )
Abomination - It refers in the OT to the feeling: of repulsion against prohibited foods (Leviticus 11:10, Deuteronomy 14:3), then to everything connected with idolatry (Deuteronomy 7:25, Romans 2:22 Jabbok - The Israelites conquered the kingdoms of Og and Sihon, but not the Ammonite country nor the upper Jabbok, which explains Deuteronomy 2:37. Compare Numbers 21:24; Deuteronomy 3:16; Joshua 12:2; Judges 11:13; Judges 11:22
Cease - Deuteronomy 15 . Deuteronomy 32
Partiality - Old Testament law contains frequent warnings to avoid partiality in rendering legal decisions (Leviticus 19:15 ; Deuteronomy 1:17 ; Deuteronomy 16:19 )
Dew - It was prized as a precious boon of Providence, Genesis 27:28 Deuteronomy 33:28 1 Kings 17:1 Job 29:19 Haggai 1:10 Zechariah 8:12 . The dew furnishes the sacred penmen with many beautiful allusions, Deuteronomy 32:2 2 Samuel 17:12 Psalm 110:3 Proverbs 19:12 Hosea 14:5 Micah 5:7
Horned Owl - The NIV reckons the horned owl an unclean bird (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 )
Kedemoth - A wilderness or uncultivated pasture adjoining was named from it; where Israel encamped when Moses asked leave of Sihon to pass through the Amorite country (Deuteronomy 2:26, etc
Dizahab - (Deuteronomy 1:1) ("where gold is abundant"): an early stage of Israel's march after Sinai
Drought - It is then the "drought of summer" (Genesis 31:40 ; Psalm 32:4 ), and the land suffers (Deuteronomy 28:23 : Psalm 102:4 ), vegetation being preserved only by the dews (Haggai 1:11 )
Sickle - There was also a sickle used for warlike purposes, more correctly, however, called a pruning-hook (Deuteronomy 16:9 ; Jeremiah 50:16 , marg
Wages - Rate of (mention only in Matthew 20:2 ); to be punctually paid (Leviticus 19:13 ; Deuteronomy 24:14,15 ); judgements threatened against the withholding of (Jeremiah 22:13 ; Malachi 3:5 ; Compare James 5:4 ); paid in money (Matthew 20:1-14 ); to Jacob in kind (Genesis 29:15,20 ; 30:28 ; 31:7,8,41 )
Zered - Zared, luxuriance; willow bush, a brook or valley communicating with the Dead Sea near its southern extremity (Numbers 21:12 ; Deuteronomy 2:14 )
Hazeroth - , and probably Deuteronomy 1:1 )
Taberah - ) A place in the wilderness of Paran where a fire from Jehovah consumed many Israelites at the outer edge of the camp, for their murmurings (Numbers 11:3; Deuteronomy 9:22)
Lapwing - The KJV included the lapwing among the unclean birds (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 )
Couch - The verb ‘to couch’ occurs in Deuteronomy 33:13 ‘the deep that coucheth beneath
Abib - (ay' bib) The month of the Exodus deliverance from Egypt (Exodus 13:4 ) and thus of the Passover festival (Exodus 23:15 ; Exodus 34:18 ; Deuteronomy 16:1 )
Pisgah - A mountain ridge, the northern part of the Abarim range, east of the Dead Sea; Nebo was one of its summits, Deuteronomy 32:49 34:1
Carefully - Deuteronomy 9
Divination - Of false prophets (Deuteronomy 18:10,14 ; Micah 3:6,7,11 ), of necromancers (1 Samuel 28:8 ), of the Philistine priests and diviners (1 Samuel 6:2 ), of Balaam (Joshua 13:22 ). Every species and degree of this superstition was strictly forbidden by the law of Moses (Exodus 22:18 ; Leviticus 19:26,31 ; 20:27 ; Deuteronomy 18:10,11 ). ...
...
There was divination by dreams (Genesis 20:6 ; Deuteronomy 13:1,3 ; Judges 7:13,15 ; Matthew 1:20 ; 2:12,13,19,22 ). ...
...
God was pleased sometimes to vouch-safe direct vocal communications to men (Deuteronomy 34:10 ; Exodus 3:4 ; 4:3 ; Deuteronomy 4:14,15 ; 1 Kings 19:12 )
Punishments - ) Death was the punishment of striking or even reviling a parent (Exodus 21:15; Exodus 21:17); blasphemy (Leviticus 24:14; Leviticus 24:16; Leviticus 24:23); Sabbath-breaking (Numbers 15:32-36); witchcraft (Exodus 22:18); adultery (Leviticus 20:10); rape (Deuteronomy 22:25); incestuous and unnatural connection (Leviticus 20:11; Leviticus 20:14; Leviticus 20:16); man stealing (Exodus 21:16); idolatry (Numbers 25:4-54). ...
The command (1619165092_65) was that the Baal-peor sinners should be slain first, then impaled or nailed to crosses; the Hebrew there (hoqa ) means dislocated, and is different from that in Deuteronomy 21:22 (thalitha toli ), Deuteronomy 21:23. Punishments not ordained by law: sawing asunder, and cutting with iron harrows(Isaiah, Hebrews 11:37; Ammon, in retaliation for their cruelties, 2 Samuel 12:31; 1 Samuel 11:2); pounding in a mortar (Proverbs 27:22); precipitation (Luke 4:29; 2 Chronicles 25:12); stripes, 40 only allowed (Deuteronomy 25:3), the Jews therefore gave only 39; the convict received the stripes from a three-thonged whip, stripped to the waist, in a bent position, tied to a pillar; if the executioner exceeded the number he was punished, a minute accuracy observed in 2 Corinthians 11:24. Slander of a wife's honour was punished by fine and stripes (Deuteronomy 22:18-19)
Akrabbim - Scorpions, A point in the frontier line of the promised land, Judges 1:36 , and in a region infested with serpents and scorpions, Deuteronomy 8:15
Earing - " It is used in the Authorized Version in Genesis 45:6 ; Exodus 34:21 ; 1 Samuel 8:12 ; Deuteronomy 21:4 ; Isaiah 30:24 ; but the Revised Version has rendered the original in these places by the ordinary word to plough or till
Kite - An unclean and keen-sighted bird of prey (Leviticus 11:14 ; Deuteronomy 14:13 )
Devarim - Deuteronomy, the fifth book of the Pentateuch ...
Devarim The fifth of the Five Books of Moses, records Moses' final message to the Israelites, delivered during the last weeks of his life
Songs - Of Moses (Exodus 15 ; Numbers 21:17 ; Deuteronomy 32 ; Revelation 15:3 ), Deborah (Judges 5 ), Hannah (1 Samuel 2 ), David (2 Samuel 22 , and Psalms), Mary (Luke 1:46-55 ), Zacharias (Luke 1:68-79 ), the angels (Luke 2:13 ), Simeon (Luke 2:29 ), the redeemed (Revelation 5:9 ; 19 ), Solomon (see SOLOMON , SONGS OF)
Tooth - One of the particulars regarding which retaliatory punishment was to be inflicted (Exodus 21:24 ; Leviticus 24:20 ; Deuteronomy 19:21 )
Plaster - Writing was easy on a surface of wet plaster (Deuteronomy 27:2-4 )
Wool - A firstfruit to the priests (Deuteronomy 18:4)
Caphtor - In Jeremiah 47:4 and in Deuteronomy 2:23 , its inhabitants are called Caphtorim (compare Genesis 10:14 )
Spoil - Holy war laws dedicated all such booty to God (Deuteronomy 20:1 )
Base - ]'>[2] , however, the word is sometimes used in the sense of morally low, mean, as Deuteronomy 13:13
Kite - Found in the Bible at Leviticus 11:14 ; Deuteronomy 14:13 ; Isaiah 34:15
Afterbirth - Disobedience to God will result in defeat in war which in turn will result in such a lack of food that women will seek nourishment from the most disgusting sources (Deuteronomy 28:57 ; compare 2 Kings 6:24-31 ; Lamentations 2:20 ; Lamentations 4:10 )
Live Long - , Exodus 20:12 ; Deuteronomy 4:40 ; 5:16 ; 17:20
Lapwing - Hoopoe, and in the parallel passage of Deuteronomy 14:18, amongst the list of those birds which were forbidden by the law of Moses to be eaten by the Israelites
Bless - ...
...
A man blesses himself when he invokes God's blessing (Isaiah 65:16 ), or rejoices in God's goodness to him (Deuteronomy 29:19 ; Psalm 49:18 ). Sometimes blessings were uttered under divine inspiration, as in the case of Noah, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses (Genesis 9:26,27 ; 27:28,29,40 ; 48:15-20 ; 49:1-28 ; Deuteronomy 33 ). The priests were divinely authorized to bless the people (Deuteronomy 10:8 ; Numbers 6:22-27 )
Hunger - God used this experience of hunger to humble the rebellious people and to teach them to hunger for His word ( Deuteronomy 8:3 ). Hunger was one penalty of disobedience of covenant obligations (Deuteronomy 28:48 ; Deuteronomy 32:24 )
Loan - The Mosaic law required that when an Israelite needed to borrow, what he asked was to be freely lent to him, and no interest was to be charged, although interest might be taken of a foreigner (Exodus 22:25 ; Deuteronomy 23:19,20 ; Leviticus 25:35-38 ). The outer garment in which a man slept at night, if taken in pledge, was to be returned before sunset (Exodus 22:26,27 ; Deuteronomy 24:12,13 ). A widow's garment (Deuteronomy 24:17 ) and a millstone (6) could not be taken
Borrow - ) In Deuteronomy God's blessings of prosperity was understood to exclude the need to borrow (Deuteronomy 15:6 ; Matthew 5:43-48 ). This passage is part of Jesus' consistent emphasis on absolute loyalty to the way of God's kingdom, which necessitates a carefree regard for one's possessions ( Matthew 6:24-34 ) and personal security (Deuteronomy 26:12 ) as one unselfishly loves the neighbor
Owl - yanshûph , Leviticus 11:17 , Deuteronomy 14:15 , ‘great owl’; [2], Isaiah 34:11 owl,’ RVm Pity - Those guilty of idolatry, murder, or false witness were to be denied pity (Deuteronomy 7:16 ; Deuteronomy 13:8 ; Deuteronomy 19:13 )
Plains - Ηam Μishor (Deuteronomy 3:10; Deuteronomy 4:43), the smooth (from yaashar , "straight") downs of Moab stretching from Jordan E. Ηa shephelah , the undulating, rolling, "low hills" between the mountainous part of Judah and the coast plain of the Mediterranean (Deuteronomy 1:7, "the vale"; 2 Chronicles 28:18, "the low country"); Seville in Spain is derived from it
Lime - שיר , Deuteronomy 27:2 ; Deuteronomy 27:4 ; Isaiah 33:12 ; Amos 2:1 ; a soft friable substance, obtained by calcining or burning stones, shells, or the like. The use of it was for plaster or cement, the first mention of which is in Deuteronomy 27, where Moses directed the elders of the people, saying, "Keep all the commandments which I command you this day
Father - A name applied (1) to any ancestor (Deuteronomy 1:11 ; 1 Kings 15:11 ; Matthew 3:9 ; 23:30 , etc. Applied to God (Exodus 4:22 ; Deuteronomy 32:6 ; 2 Samuel 7:14 ; Psalm 89:27,28 , etc
Arnon - , and afterward between Moab and Reuben (Numbers 21:13-14; Numbers 21:24; Numbers 21:26; Deuteronomy 2:24; Deuteronomy 2:36)
Bed - Another Hebrew word (er'es) so rendered denotes a canopied bed, or a bed with curtains (Deuteronomy 3:11 ; Psalm 132:3 ), for sickness (Psalm 6:6 ; 41:3 ). Sleeping in the open air was not uncommon, the sleeper wrapping himself in his outer garment (Exodus 22:26,27 ; Deuteronomy 24:12,13 )
Flint - God's miraculous provision for the Israelites in the wilderness is pictured as water ( Deuteronomy 8:15 ; Psalm 114:8 ) or oil (Deuteronomy 32:13 ) flowing from flinty rock
Girgashites - tribes ( Genesis 10:16 ; Genesis 15:21 , Deuteronomy 7:1 Prophet - God would put His words in their mouths (Deuteronomy 18:18; Jeremiah 1:9). The Law is the Pentateuch, or Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy
Scourge - This punishment was very common among the Jews, Deuteronomy 25:1-3 . For, according to the law, punishment by stripes was restricted to forty at one beating, Deuteronomy 25:3
Swan - תנשמת , Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 . " Parkhurst shows that the name is given from the creature's breathing in a strong and audible manner; and Michaelis learnedly conjectures, that in verse eighteen, and Deuteronomy 14:16 , it may mean the "goose," which every one knows is remarkable for its manner of "breathing out" or "hissing," when approached
Father - God is the Deuteronomy 32:6 Isaiah 63:16 64:8 Luke 3:38 . Under the law, certain acts of children were capital crimes, Exodus 21:15,17 Leviticus 20:9 ; and the father was required to bring his son to the public tribunal, Deuteronomy 21:18-21
Pledge - , Deuteronomy 24:12 f. It was forbidden also to take the mill or the upper millstone as a pledge ( Deuteronomy 24:6 )
Amorite (the) - Compare Numbers 13:29; Deuteronomy 1:44. Sihon, having marched against them, was killed with his sons and people (Deuteronomy 2:32-37), and his land and cattle taken by them. (Judges 11:21-22), was specially the "land of the Amorites"; but their possessions embraced all Gilead and Bashan, to Hermon (Deuteronomy 3:8; Deuteronomy 4:48-49), "the land of the two kings of the Amorites," Sihon and Og (Deuteronomy 31:4). ...
The Amorite name Senir (not Shenir) for mount Hermon (Deuteronomy 3:9) is mentioned; but this may be the Canaanite term, as distinguished from the Hebrew "Hermon" (lofty peak) and the Phoenician "Sirion" (glittering as a breast-plate; senir too means a breast-plate, from a root, "clatter," the snowy round top glittering like a breast-plate)
Ramoth - For ‘Ramoth in Gilead’ ( Deuteronomy 4:43 , Joshua 20:8 ; Jos 21:38 , 1 Chronicles 6:65 (80)) see...
Ramoth-Gilead
Hart - It is ranked among the clean animals (Deuteronomy 12:15 ; 14:5 ; 15:22 ), and was commonly killed for food (1 Kings 4:23 )
Osprey - 'ozniyyah, an unclean bird according to the Mosaic law (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ); the fish-eating eagle (Pandion haliaetus); one of the lesser eagles
Beyond - When used with reference to Jordan, signifies in the writings of Moses the west side of the river, as he wrote on the east bank (Genesis 50:10,11 ; Deuteronomy 1:1,5 ; 3:8,20 ; 4:46 ); but in the writings of Joshua, after he had crossed the river, it means the east side (Joshua 5:1 ; 12:7 ; 22:7 )
Jaakan - ” Descendant of Esau and thus tribal ancestor of Edomites (1 Chronicles 1:42 ; compare Genesis 36:27 ; Numbers 33:31-32 ; Deuteronomy 10:6 )
Gaulanitis - ), one of the cities of refuge in the territory of Manasseh (Joshua 20:8 ; 21:27 ; Deuteronomy 4:43 )
Stripes - As a punishment were not to exceed forty (Deuteronomy 25:1-3 ), and hence arose the custom of limiting them to thirty-nine (2 Corinthians 11:24 )
Admah - It was destroyed along with Sodom and Gomorrah (19:24; Deuteronomy 29:23 )
Baal-Peor - The Israelites fell into the worship of this idol (Numbers 25:3,5,18 ; Deuteronomy 4:3 ; Psalm 106:28 ; Hosea 9:10 )
Glean - The corners of fields were not to be reaped, and the sheaf accidentally left behind was not to be fetched away, according to the law of Moses (Leviticus 19:9 ; 23:22 ; Deuteronomy 24:21 )
Mezahab - If a place name, Mezahab was the home of Matred which should perhaps be identified with Dizahab (Deuteronomy 1:1 )
Maw - ]'>[1] in Deuteronomy 18:3 , and by RV Hanging - The bodies were removed before nightfall in order not to defile the land (Deuteronomy 21:22-23)
Zered - Israel crossed the Zered after wandering in the wilderness for thirty-eight years (Deuteronomy 2:13-14 )
Barn - A full barn is a sign of prosperity (Deuteronomy 28:8 ; Proverbs 3:10 ; Luke 12:18 ) while empty barns are signs of calamity of some kind (either drought, war, etc; Joel 1:17 )
Kedemoth - From the ‘wilderness of Kedemoth’ messengers were sent by Moses to Sihon ( Deuteronomy 2:26 )
Mildew - MILDEW ( yçrâqôn , Deuteronomy 28:22 , 1Ki 8:37 , 2 Chronicles 6:28 , Amos 4:9 , Haggai 2:17 ) is a disease of grain due to various fungi: it is produced by damp, and is in the above passages associated with shiddâphôn , ‘ blasting ,’ the opposite condition produced by excessive drought
Drop - Deuteronomy 32:2 (a) The word is used to illustrate the falling of GOD's Word upon the heart and the production of abundant good works as a result
Chamois - The Hebrew word is zemer, Deuteronomy 14:5 , which is held to signify 'leaper,' and would thus suit the chamois; but this animal is unknown in Palestine and is supposed never to have existed there
Asp - Word occurring ten times in the Douay Version of the Bible, standing for four Hebrew names: ...
Péthén (Deuteronomy 32), the cobra;
Akhshubh, (Psalms 13; Romans 3), a highly poisonous viper, also mentioned once in the Hebrew Bible;
Shahal, (Psalms 90), a snake;
cphoni (Isaiah 59), called "the hisser
Seethe - Deuteronomy 14:21 (b) It is probably used to describe the destructive influences by wrong use of that which should be put to good use
Just, Justice - God is merciful but He is also just (Deuteronomy 32:4 - righteous) and must punish sin
Eliashib - The same person probably was afterwards censured for profaning the temple, by giving the use of one of its chambers to a heathen and an Ammonite, his relative, Deuteronomy 23:3,4 Nehemiah 12:10 13:1-9
Necromancer - One who pretended to discover unknown and future events by summoning and interrogating the dead, Deuteronomy 18:10,11 , a crime punishable by stoning to death, Leviticus 20:27
Chinnereth - Or CINNEROTH, a town on the west shore of the sea of Galilee, Numbers 34:11 Deuteronomy 3:17 Joshua 11:2 19:35 1 Kings 15:20
Paddle - PADDLE occurs only in Deuteronomy 23:13 , where it is used of a wooden tool for digging, a spade
Pare - The paring of nails served as a sign of mourning for lost parents (Deuteronomy 21:12 KJV, REB, NRSV)
Tithes - (See Deuteronomy. In Deuteronomy 10:9; Deuteronomy 12:5-18; Deuteronomy 14:22; Deuteronomy 14:29; Deuteronomy 18:1-2; Deuteronomy 26:12-14, the general first tithe of all animal and vegetable increase for maintaining the priests and Levites is taken, for granted; what is added in this later time is the second additional tithe of the field produce alone, and for celebrating the sacred feasts each first and second year in the Shiloh or Jerusalem sanctuary, and every third year at home with a feast to the Levites, the stranger, fatherless, and widow. He solemnly professed he had done so every third and sixth year (of the septennial cycle), when instead of taking the second or vegetable tithe to the sanctuary he used it at home in charity and hospitality (Deuteronomy 26:13-14; Deuteronomy 14:28-29)
Phylacteries - They consisted of strips of parchment on which were inscribed these four texts:
Exodus 13:1-10 ; ...
11-16; ...
Deuteronomy 6:4-9 ; Deuteronomy 11:18-21 , and which were enclosed in a square leather case, on one side of which was inscribed the Hebrew letter shin, to which the rabbis attached some significance
Blessing - Aaron and the priests pronounced the benediction (Numbers 6:22-27; Deuteronomy 10:8). Jacob and Moses gave dying blessings prophetical of the character and history of the several tribes (Genesis 49; Deuteronomy 33)
Roe - Israel ate the gazelle in the wilderness, and the flesh of flocks and herds only when offered in sacrifice; but in Canaan they might eat the flesh, "even as the gazelle" (Deuteronomy 12:15; Deuteronomy 12:22); Isaac's venison was front it (Genesis 27)
Lime - In Deuteronomy 27:2 ; Deuteronomy 27:4 sîdh occurs both as vb
Citizenship - Under the Mosaic law non-Israelites, with the exception of the Moabites and the Ammonites and others mentioned in Deuteronomy 23:1-3 , were admitted to the general privileges of citizenship among the Jews (Exodus 12:19 ; Leviticus 24:22 ; Numbers 15:15 ; 35:15 ; Deuteronomy 10:18 ; 14:29 ; 16:10,14 )
Hermon - It was called by the Sidonians SIRION, Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Psalm 29:6 ; and SHENIRby the Amorites (or perhaps one of the summits was called SHENIRor SENIR. Deuteronomy 4:48
Gier Eagle - ]'>[2] of râchâm in Leviticus 11:16 and Deuteronomy 14:17 , in both of which passages RV [1] of peres in Deuteronomy 14:12 , where AV Brass - Is frequently mentioned in the English Bible, Genesis 4:22 Deuteronomy 8:9 ; but there is little doubt that copper is intended, brass being a mixed metal-two-thirds copper and one-third zinc-for the manufacture of which we are indebted to the Germans. "Brass" is used to describe drought, insensibility, baseness, and obstinacy in sin, Leviticus 26:19 Deuteronomy 28:23 Isaiah 48:4 Jeremiah 6:28 Ezekiel 22:18
Clean And Unclean - Terms often used in the Bible in a ceremonial sense; assigned to certain animals, and to men in certain cases, by the law of Moses, Leviticus 11:1-15:33 Numbers 19:1-22 Deuteronomy 14:1-29 . The Mosaic law was not merely arbitrary, but grounded on reasons connected with animal sacrifices, with health, with the separation of the Jews from other nations, and their practice of moral purity, Leviticus 11:43-45 20:24-26 Deuteronomy 14:2,3,21
Iron - He compares the bondage in Egypt to a furnace for smelting iron, and speaks of the iron ore of Canaan, Deuteronomy 3:11 4:20 8:9 . , Deuteronomy 28:48 Job 40:18 Isaiah 48:4 Jeremiah 1:18 Ezekiel 22:18,20 Daniel 2:33
Hermon - It marks the north boundary of Palestine (Deuteronomy 3:8,4:48 ;; Joshua 11:3,17 ; 13:11 ; 12:1 ), and is seen from a great distance. The Sidonians called it Sirion, and the Amorites Shenir (Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 ). It is also called Baal-hermon (Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ) and Sion (Deuteronomy 4:48 )
Testing - In like manner God tests his people, allowing them to pass through trials in order to reveal whether their faith is genuine (Deuteronomy 8:2; Psalms 66:10; Proverbs 17:3; Isaiah 48:10-11; Jeremiah 20:12; 1 Peter 4:12). Those who pass the test find they are purified and strengthened by the experience (Genesis 22:1; Deuteronomy 8:16; Deuteronomy 13:3; Judges 2:22; Hebrews 11:17; James 1:2-3; James 1:12; 1 Peter 1:6-7; see REFINE). Such a challenge is rebellion against God and may bring his punishment (Exodus 17:7; Numbers 14:22; Deuteronomy 6:16; Psalms 95:8-11; Matthew 4:7; Acts 5:9; Acts 15:10; 1 Corinthians 10:9)
Ammonite - From the very beginning (Deuteronomy 2:16-20 ) of their history till they are lost sight of (Judges 5:2 ), this tribe is closely associated with the Moabites (Judges 10:11 ; 2 Chronicles 20:1 ; Zephaniah 2:8 ). Both of these tribes hired Balaam to curse Israel (Deuteronomy 23:4 ). They inhabited the country east of the Jordan and north of Moab and the Dead Sea, from which they had expelled the Zamzummims or Zuzims (Deuteronomy 2:20 ; Genesis 14:5 ). They showed no kindness to the Israelites when passing through their territory, and therefore they were prohibited from "entering the congregation of the Lord to the tenth generation" (Deuteronomy 23:3 )
Rain - Rebibim , from rab "many," from the multitude of drops; "showers" (Deuteronomy 32:2). As compared with Egypt, Palestine was a land of rain (Deuteronomy 11:10-11), but for six months no rain falls so that "rain in harvest" and "thunder" were marvelous phenomena, and out of time and place (Proverbs 26:1; 1 Samuel 12:16-18). God claims as His peculiar prerogative the sending or withholding of rain, which He made dependent on the obedience or disobedience of Israel (Leviticus 26:3-5; Leviticus 26:19; Deuteronomy 11:13-15; Deuteronomy 28:23-24; Jeremiah 3:3; Jeremiah 5:24; Jeremiah 14:22)
Fountain - The natural bursting of waters from the ground, which drank of the rain of heaven (Deuteronomy 8:7; Deuteronomy 11:11), would on Israel's entrance into Canaan form a striking contrast to Egypt watered from below "with the foot," i. "The eyes of the Lord, Israel's God, were always upon the land from the beginning of the year even unto the end," so long as Israel was faithful (Deuteronomy 11:11-12). Deuteronomy 8:7; "a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills
Judgments of God - ...
The revelations of his will (Exodus 21:1 ; Deuteronomy 6:20 ; Psalm 119:7-175 )
Bezer - A city of refuge in tribal territory of Reuben (Deuteronomy 4:43 ; Joshua 20:8 ), set aside as a city for the Levites (Joshua 21:36 )
Butter - hemah), curdled milk (Genesis 18:8 ; Judges 5:25 ; 2 Samuel 17:29 ), or butter in the form of the skim of hot milk or cream, called by the Arabs kaimak, a semi-fluid (Job 20:17 ; 29:6 ; Deuteronomy 32:14 )
Northward - tsaphon), a "hidden" or "dark place," as opposed to the sunny south (Deuteronomy 3:27 )
Havoth-Jair - ...
...
Again, it is said that Jair "took all the tract of Argob," and called it Bashanhavoth-jair (Deuteronomy 3:14 )
Lapwing - The name of an unclean bird, mentioned only in Leviticus 11:19 and Deuteronomy 14:18
Fleece - The wool of a sheep, whether shorn off or still attached to the skin (Deuteronomy 18:4 ; Job 31:20 )
Baal-Peor - The guilty Israelites were severely punished for this transgression, and the incident became a paradigm of sin and divine judgment for later generations of Israelites (Deuteronomy 4:3 ; Psalm 106:28 ; Hosea 9:10 )
Beth-Rapha - The name could have distant relationships to the Rephaim ( Deuteronomy 3:11 ), though the Bible nowhere makes such relationships
Mildew - ” The term may refer to the yellowing of leaves as a result of drought rather than to a fungus (Deuteronomy 28:22-24 ; 1 Kings 8:37 ; 2 Chronicles 6:28 ; Amos 4:9 ; Haggai 4:9 )
me-Zahab - Holzinger suggests that it is the same name as appears in a corrupted form in Deuteronomy 1:1 as Dizahab (wh
Astray - See Deuteronomy 22
Whet - Deuteronomy 32:41 (a) In this way our Lord describes the preparations which He makes for executing judgment upon His enemies
Abarim - (abuh rihm) Mountain range including Mount Nebo from which Moses viewed the Promised Land (Numbers 27:12 ; Numbers 33:47-48 ; Deuteronomy 32:49 )
Gleaning - ]'>[1] ), Deuteronomy 24:19-21 ; cf
Lust, to - The English word 'lust' was anciently not always used in a bad sense, as it now is: see Deuteronomy 12:15 ; Galatians 5:17
Brass - The "brass" frequently spoken of in Scripture is not that compound metal to which we give the name of brass; for it Is described as dug from the mine, Deuteronomy 8:9; Job 28:2, Very frequently copper is meant; and, no doubt, also bronze, which is a composition of copper and tin, while brass is copper and zinc
Cormorant - Cormorant, the plunger, Leviticus 11:17; Deuteronomy 14:17, an unclean bird, like the cormorant—which is a water-bird about the size of a goose
Apples of Sodom - Compare "vine of Sodom" and "grapes of gall" in Deuteronomy 32:32
Salchah - A city of Bashan, conquered by the Jews and assigned to Manasseh, Deuteronomy 3:10 Joshua 12:5 13:11
Deer - The fallow deer is naturally very timorous: it was reputed clean, and good for food, Deuteronomy 14:5
Zamzum'Mim, - (Deuteronomy 2:20 ) only, the Ammonite name for the people who by others were called Rephaim
Jotbathah - one stage of Israel in the wilderness, "a land of torrents of waters" (Numbers 33:33; Deuteronomy 10:7)
Giants - Distinct from the gibbowrim , "mighty men of old, men of renown," the offspring of the intermarriage of the "sons of God" (the Sethites, Genesis 4:26, margin" then men began to call themselves by the name of the Lord"; Deuteronomy 14:1-2; Psalms 73:15; Proverbs 14:26; Hosea 1:10; Romans 8:14) and the "daughters of men. " The Sethites, the church separated from the surrounding world lying in the wicked one, had been the salt of the earth; but when even they intermarried with the corrupted races around the salt lost its savor, there was no seasoning of the universal corruption; (compare Exodus 34:16; Ezra 10:3-19; Nehemiah 13:23-28; Deuteronomy 7:3; 1 Kings 11:1-4;) a flood alone could sweep away the festering mass, out of which one godly seed alone, Noah, was saved. Moreover nephilim is applied to the giant in the report of the spies (Numbers 13:33); compare on the Anakim ("longnecked") about Hebron, Debir, Ahab, and the mountains of Judah and Israel, Deuteronomy 2:10; Deuteronomy 2:21; Deuteronomy 9:2. Og, the giant king of Bashan, was the last of them (Deuteronomy 3:11). of Jordan (Deuteronomy 2:10). The Ammonites who supplanted them called them Zamzummim (Deuteronomy 2:20; Genesis 14:5)
Agriculture - Latter rain due (Deuteronomy 11:14 ; Jeremiah 5:24 ; Hosea 6:3 ; Zechariah 10:1 ; James 5:7 ; Job 29:23 ). Figs and pomegranates were very plentiful (Numbers 13:23 ), and the vine and the olive grew luxuriantly and produced abundant fruit (Deuteronomy 33:24 ). Lest the productiveness of the soil should be exhausted, it was enjoined that the whole land should rest every seventh year, when all agricultural labour would entirely cease (Leviticus 25:1-7 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-10 ). ...
It was forbidden to sow a field with divers seeds (Deuteronomy 22:9 ). A passer-by was at liberty to eat any quantity of corn or grapes, but he was not permitted to carry away any (Deuteronomy 23:24,25 ; Matthew 12:1 ). (See Leviticus 19:9,10 ; Deuteronomy 24:19 . Ploughs of a simple construction were known in the time of Moses ( Deuteronomy 22:10 ; Compare Job 1:14 ). They were drawn by oxen (Job 1:14 ), cows (1Samuel 6:7), and asses (Isaiah 30:24 ); but an ox and an ass must not be yoked together in the same plough (Deuteronomy 22:10 ). ...
The process of threshing was performed generally by spreading the sheaves on the threshing-floor and causing oxen and cattle to tread repeatedly over them (Deuteronomy 25:4 ; Isaiah 28:28 ). Freed from impurities, the grain was then laid up in granaries till used (Deuteronomy 28:8 ; Proverbs 3:10 ; Matthew 6:26 ; 13:30 ; Luke 12:18 )
Birds - Leviticus 11:13-19 and Deuteronomy 14:12-18 list the specific birds which the Hebrews regarded as unclean and therefore not to be eaten. Like oph , tsippor may refer to birds of every kind ( Genesis 7:14 ; Deuteronomy 4:17 ), but it usually denotes game birds (Psalm 124:7 ; Proverbs 6:5 ) or the perching birds (passerines, Psalm 102:7 ; Daniel 4:12 ). Among the birds specifically named in the RSV translation of the Bible are: cock (Matthew 10:29-31 ; Matthew 26:34 ,Matthew 26:34,26:74-75 ; Mark 14:30 ,Job 39:27-28:72 ; Luke 22:34 ,Luke 22:34,22:60-61 ; John 13:38 ; John 18:27 ), carrion vulture (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ), crane (Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), dove/turtledove (Genesis 8:8-12 ; Isaiah 38:14 ; Isaiah 59:11 ; Matthew 3:16 ; Matthew 10:16 ; Luke 2:24 ; John 1:32 ), eagle (Exodus 19:4 ; Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ; Deuteronomy 32:11 ; Job 9:26 ; Job 39:27-30 ; Psalm 103:5 ; Proverbs 30:19 ; Jeremiah 4:13 ; Jeremiah 49:16 ,Jeremiah 49:16,49:22 ), falcon (Leviticus 11:14 ; Job 28:7 ), hawk (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ; Job 39:26 ), hen (Matthew 23:37 ; Luke 13:34 ), heron (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 ), kite (Leviticus 11:14 ; Deuteronomy 14:13 ), osprey (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ), ostrich (Leviticus 11:16 ; Job 39:13-18 ; Job 30:29 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ; Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Isaiah 43:20 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ; Lamentations 4:3 ; Micah 1:8 ), owl (Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ), partridge (1 Samuel 26:20 ; Jeremiah 17:11 ), peacock (1 Kings 10:22 ; 2 Chronicles 9:21 ), pelican (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ), pigeon (Genesis 15:9 ; Leviticus 1:14 ; Revelation 19:17-212 ; Leviticus 12:8 ; Leviticus 14:22 ; Luke 2:24 ; John 2:14 ), quail (Exodus 16:13 ; Numbers 11:31-32 ; Psalm 105:40 ), raven (Genesis 8:7 ; Leviticus 11:15 ; Deuteronomy 14:14 ; 1 Kings 17:4-6 ; Proverbs 30:17 ; Luke 12:24 ), sea gull (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ), sparrow (Psalm 84:3 ; Matthew 10:29 ,Matthew 10:29,10:31 ; Luke 12:6-7 ), stork (Leviticus 11:19 ; Psalm 104:17 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), swallow (Psalm 84:3 ; Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), vulture (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ), and water hen (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ). The eagle appears in the lists of unclean birds (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ). Old Testament writers noted the eagle's swift movement (Deuteronomy 28:49 ; 2 Samuel 1:23 ; Jeremiah 4:13 ), the sweep and power of its flight (Proverbs 23:5 ; Isaiah 40:31 ), and the eagle's concern for its young (Exodus 19:4 ; Deuteronomy 32:11 ). ...
In Exodus 19:4 and Deuteronomy 32:11 the eagle is used figuratively of God's protection and care. The ostrich is listed as unclean (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ), probably because of its eating habits. The raven acts as a scavenger and is listed among the unclean birds (Leviticus 11:1 ;Leviticus 11:1;15:1 ; Deuteronomy 14:14 ). ...
Vulture Both carrion vulture and vulture are listed separately in the unclean bird lists (Leviticus 11:13-19 ; Deuteronomy 14:12-18 RSV). ...
The Hebrew term nesher , sometimes translated “eagle,” is translated “vulture” in Hosea's threat to Israel (Deuteronomy 8:1 ). The curses in Deuteronomy warned the disobedient of this horrible consequence (Deuteronomy 28:26 ). In Exodus 19:4 and Deuteronomy 32:11 , God is revealed as the loving Parent who redeems and protects His people just as the parent eagle cares for its young
Slave, Slavery - the experiences of the churl Nabal ( 1 Samuel 25:10 ), of the passionate Shimei ( 1 Kings 2:39 ), and of Sarah ( Genesis 16:6 ); the implications as to the frequency of such cases in the law of Deuteronomy 23:15 ff. Here the punishment ‘for the violation of a slave-girl was almost certainly a fine to be paid to the master, if we may judge from the analogous law in Exodus 22:16 = Deuteronomy 22:28 ; i. , 1 Kings 9:20-22 = 1 Samuel 25:41 ), while captive women were especially sought as concubines or wives ( Deuteronomy 21:10-14 ). (4) From native Israelites who, through poverty and debt, had been forced to sell themselves ( Exodus 21:2 , Amos 2:6 ; Amos 8:6 , Deuteronomy 15:12 , Leviticus 25:39 , Proverbs 11:29 Consumption - A wasting or emaciating disease that would be inflicted upon those who disobeyed the law (Leviticus 26:16 ; Deuteronomy 28:22 )
Abarim - The mountains Nebe, Pisgah, and Peor were in the Abarim, Numbers 27:12 ; 33:47,48 ; Deuteronomy 32:49 ; 34:1
Zered - The torrent-valley ( nachal ) of Zered is named in the itinerary of Israel’s journeyings, Numbers 21:12 , immediately prior to their crossing of the Arnon, and in Deuteronomy 2:13 as the point that marked the close of the 38 years’ wanderings
Night-Hawk - tahmas) occurs only in the list of unclean birds (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 )
Heron - (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 ), ranked among the unclean birds
Horites - They were dispossessed by the descendants of Esau, and as a people gradually became extinct (Deuteronomy 2:12-22 )
Bezer -
A city of the Reubenites; one of the three cities of refuge on the east of Jordan (Deuteronomy 4 :: 43 ; Joshua 20:8 )
Emim - of the Dead Sea, in which the Moabites succeeded them (Genesis 14:5; Deuteronomy 2:10)
Girgashite - Dwelling in clayey soil, the descendants of the fifth son of Canaan (Genesis 10:16 ), one of the original tribes inhabiting the land of Canaan before the time of the Israelites (Genesis 15:21 ; Deuteronomy 7:1 )
Goel - " It is rendered in the Authorized Version "kinsman," Numbers 5:8 ; Ruth 3:12 ; 4:1,6,8 ; "redeemer," Job 19:25 ; "avenger," Numbers 35:12 ; Deuteronomy 19:6 , etc
Stars - The eleven stars (Genesis 37:9 ); the seven (Amos 5:8 ); wandering (Jude 1:13 ); seen in the east at the birth of Christ, probably some luminous meteors miraculously formed for this specific purpose (Matthew 2:2-10 ); stars worshipped (Deuteronomy 4:19 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 21:3 ; Jeremiah 19:13 ); spoken of symbolically (Numbers 24:17 ; Revelation 1:16,20 ; 12:1 )
Bat - The Hebrew word (atalleph') so rendered (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 ) implies "flying in the dark
Neck - Threatenings of coming judgments are represented by the prophets by their laying bands upon the people's necks (Deuteronomy 28:48 ; Isaiah 10:27 ; Jeremiah 27:2 )
Usury - The Old Testament laws prohibited a Jew from charging another Jew usury but permitted it when money was loaned to a Gentile (Deuteronomy 23:19-20 )
Hawk - Hawks were ‘unclean’ birds ( Leviticus 11:16 , Deuteronomy 14:16 )
Ears of Grain - The law permitted passersby to hand-pick heads of grain from a neighbor's field (Deuteronomy 23:25 )
Roll - Volume means so (Jeremiah 36:2; Psalms 40:7; compare Deuteronomy 31:26; Ezekiel 2:9-10, where the writing "within and without" was contrary to the usage of writing only on one side, implying the fullness of the prophecy of woe
Kine - ...
Deuteronomy 28:4 (c) By this it is indicated that the labor of the godly will be blessed and will be very fruitful
Hivites - They are also mentioned, Deuteronomy 2:23
Hate - Often denotes in Scripture only a less degree of love, Genesis 29:30,31 Deuteronomy 21:15 Proverbs 13:24 Malachi 1:2,3 Luke 14:26 Romans 9:13
Vengeance - In Deuteronomy 32:35 Romans 12:19 Hebrews 10:30 Jude 1:7 , means retributive justice- a prerogative of God with which those interfere who seek to avenge themselves
Pis'Gah - (32:49) with Deuteronomy 34:1 It lay on the east of Jordan contiguous to the field of Moab, and immediately opposite Jericho
Rem'Mon-Meth'o-ar - Van Deuteronomy Velde place Rummaneh on the south border of the plain of Buttauf , three miles north-northeast of Seffurieh
Irrigation - As streams were few in Palestine, water was generally stored up in winter in reservoirs, and distributed through gardens in numerous rills, which could easily be turned or diverted by the foot (Deuteronomy 11:10 )
Mountain of the Amorites, - Deuteronomy 1:44 It seems to be the range which rises abruptly from the plateau of et-Tih , south of Judea, running from a little south of west to north of east, and of which the extremities are the Jebel Araif en-Nakah westward and Jebel el-Mukrah eastward, and from which line the country continues mountainous all the way to Hebron
Seven - The feast of Passover (Exodus 12:15,16 ), the feast of Weeks (Deuteronomy 16:9 ), of Tabernacles (13:15), and the Jubilee (Leviticus 25:8 ), were all ordered by seven. Seven is the number of sacrifice (2 Chronicles 29:21 ; Job 42:8 ), of purification and consecration (Leviticus 42:6,17 ; 8:11,33 ; 14:9,51 ), of forgiveness (Matthew 18:21,22 ; Luke 17:4 ), of reward (Deuteronomy 28:7 ; 1 Samuel 2:5 ), and of punishment (Leviticus 26:21,24,28 ; Deuteronomy 28:25 )
Euphrates And Tigris Rivers - It formed the northern boundary of the land promised by Yahweh to Israel (Genesis 15:18 ; Deuteronomy 1:7 ). The Euphrates is mentioned in the Book of Revelation as the place where angels were bound (Deuteronomy 9:14 ) and where the sixth vial was poured out (Deuteronomy 16:12 )
Commandments, the Ten - (Exodus 34:28 ; Deuteronomy 10:4 , marg. These tables were afterwards placed in the ark of the covenant (Deuteronomy 10:5 ; 1 Kings 8:9 ). They are as a whole called "the covenant" (Deuteronomy 4:13 ), and "the tables of the covenant" (9:9,11; Hebrews 9:4 ), and "the testimony
Field - The sadeh is contrasted with what is enclosed, as a vineyard (Numbers 22:23-24) or a city (Deuteronomy 28:3; Deuteronomy 28:16). Stones marked off separate plots; to remove these landmarks entailed the curse (Deuteronomy 27:17)
Judge (Office) - At Jethro's suggestion, Moses himself served as the people's advocate before God and their instructor in the law (Exodus 18:19-20 ) and appointed subordinate judges to decide minor cases (Exodus 18:21-23 ; Numbers 11:16-17 ; Deuteronomy 1:12-17 ; Deuteronomy 16:18-20 ). Elders of a community frequently served as judges at the city gate (Deuteronomy 22:15 ; Deuteronomy 25:7 ; Ruth 4:1-9 ; Job 29:7-8 ). Difficult cases were referred to the priests or to the supreme judge (Deuteronomy 17:8-13 ; compare Numbers 5:12-31 for a case involving no witnesses)
Frontlets - (Exodus 13:16; Deuteronomy 6:8) And though we, under the glorious dispensation of the gospel, have no direction concerning them, yet it may not be improper, nor perhaps unprofitable, to notice them in a cursory way. The account is gathered from Exodus 13:1-22, and from portions of the book of Deuteronomy. (Exodus 13:11-16) The third was taken from the book of Deuteronomy, "Hear; O Israel! the Lord our God is one Lord. " (Deuteronomy 6:4-5) And the fourth was taken from Deuteronomy 11:13-21 "If thou shalt hearken diligently unto my commandments," etc
Heifer - Heifers were used for plowing (Deuteronomy 21:3 ; Judges 14:18 ) and for threshing grain (Hosea 10:11 ). Heifers (or cows) were used in three different rites: to ratify a covenant (Genesis 15:9 ); to remove the guilt associated with a murder by an unknown person (Deuteronomy 21:1-9 ); and to remove the uncleanness associated with contact with a corpse (Numbers 19:1-10 )
Ammonites - They destroyed an ancient race of giants called Zamzummim, and seized their country, which lay east of Judea, Deuteronomy 2:19-21 . Moses was forbidden to assail them, Deuteronomy 2:19
Hanging - (As a punishment), a mark of infamy inflicted on the dead bodies of criminals (Deuteronomy 21:23 ) rather than our modern mode of punishment. Criminals were first strangled and then hanged (Numbers 25:4 ; Deuteronomy 21:22 )
Moon - The great brilliance of the moon in Eastern countries led to its being early an object of idolatrous worship (Deuteronomy 4:19 ; 17:3 ; Job 31:26 ), a form of idolatry against which the Jews were warned (Deuteronomy 4:19 ; 17:3 )
Nebo (1) - Also the Mount of Moab, from which Moses viewed Canaan (Deuteronomy 32:49; Deuteronomy 34:1)
Gilead - It comprised the possessions of the tribes of Gad and Reuben and the south part of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:13 ; Numbers 32:40 ). It was bounded on the north by Bashan, and on the south by Moab and Ammon (Genesis 31:21 ; Deuteronomy 3:12-17 )
Wheat - The "fat of the kidneys of wheat" (Deuteronomy 32:14 ), and the "finest of the wheat" (Psalm 81:16 ; 147:14 ), denote the best of the kind. The disciples, under the sanction of the Mosaic law (Deuteronomy 23:25 ), plucked ears of corn, and rubbing them in their hands, ate the grain unroasted (Matthew 12:1 ; Mark 2:23 ; Luke 6:1 )
Pillar of Cloud And Fire - Visible evidence of God's presence with Israel during the Exodus and wilderness wanderings (Exodus 14:24 ; Exodus 33:9-10 ; Numbers 12:5 ; Deuteronomy 31:15 ). As a sign of God's presence, the pillar of cloud and fire was associated with divine actions: salvation (Exodus 14:19-20 ); revelation (Exodus 33:9-10 ; Psalm 99:7 ); judgment (Numbers 12:5 ); commissioning (Deuteronomy 31:15 )
Neighbour - Moses’ law laid down the principle that people were to love their neighbour as themselves (Leviticus 19:17-18; see also Exodus 20:13-17; Exodus 22:10-14; Deuteronomy 15:2; Deuteronomy 27:24)
Skirt - “To reveal a skirt” (literal reading of Deuteronomy 22:30 ; Deuteronomy 27:20 ) is a euphemism for sexual relationships, since placing the skirt over a woman of marriageable age was the same as claiming her for marriage (Ruth 3:7-14 )
Gall - —...
In LXX Septuagint χολή represents (1) רא̇שׁ (Deuteronomy 32:32, Psalms 69:21); and (2) לַעֵנָה wormwood (Proverbs 5:4, Lamentations 3:15). Deuteronomy 29:18 רא̇שׁ ולעֲנָה, LXX Septuagint ἐν χολῇ και τικρια, Vulgate fel et amaritudiaem; Lamentations 3:19 לִעֲנָה וָרא̇שׁ, LXX Septuagint τικρια καὶ χολἡ, Vulgate absynthiiet fellis
Asp - KJV translation for a dangerous, poisonous snake (Deuteronomy 32:33 ; Job 20:14 ,Job 20:14,20:16 ; Isaiah 11:8 ; Romans 3:13 ). Whatever the specific identification, they serve as symbols of dangerous poison (Deuteronomy 32:33 )
Arm - The same truth is found in Deuteronomy 4:4. (See also Deuteronomy 33:27)
Worm - That which, perforating the leaves and bark of trees, causes the little excrescences called kermes, whence is made a crimson dye, תולע , Deuteronomy 28:39 ; Job 25:6 ; Psalms 22:6 ; Isaiah 14:11 ; Isaiah 41:14 ; Isaiah 66:24 ; Exodus 16:20 ; Jonah 4:7 . The worm destructive of the vines, referred to in Deuteronomy 28:39 ; which was the pyralis vitanae, or pyralis fasciana, of Forskal, the vine weevil, a small insect extremely hurtful to the vines
Arm - ...
2: βραχίων (Strong's #1023 — Noun Masculine — brachion — brakh-ee'-own ) "the shorter part of the arm, from the shoulder to the elbow," is used metaphorically to denote strength, power, and always in the NT of the power of God, Luke 1:51 ; John 12:38 ; Acts 13:17 ; frequently so in the OT, especially in Deuteronomy, the Psalms and Isaiah; see, e. , Deuteronomy 4:34 ; 5:15 ; Psalm 44:3 ; 71:18 , where "strength" is, lit
Witch And Wizard - " Leviticus 19:31; Leviticus 20:6; Leviticus 20:27; Deuteronomy 18:11; 1 Samuel 28:3; 1 Samuel 28:9; 2 Kings 23:24; 2 Chronicles 33:6; Isaiah 8:19; Isaiah 19:3. Their unlawful arts were akin to the others forbidden in Deuteronomy 18:10-11 : "There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of times or an enchanter or a witch Poor - The gleanings of the fields, the olive trees, and the vines, were to be left for them, Leviticus 19:9 Deuteronomy 24:19 Ruth 2:2 . Compare also Leviticus 25:1-55 Deuteronomy 24:1-22
Bed - The poor had but a simple mattress or sheepskin; or a cloak or blanked, which also answered to wrap themselves in by day, Exodus 22:2 Deuteronomy 24:13 . See Deuteronomy 3:11 1 Samuel 19:15 Amos 6:4
Eagle - nesher; properly the griffon vulture or great vulture, so called from its tearing its prey with its beak), referred to for its swiftness of flight (Deuteronomy 28:49 ; 2 Samuel 1:23 ), its mounting high in the air (Job 39:27 ), its strength (Psalm 103:5 ), its setting its nest in high places (Jeremiah 49:16 ), and its power of vision (Job 39:27-30 ). This "ravenous bird" is a symbol of those nations whom God employs and sends forth to do a work of destruction, sweeping away whatever is decaying and putrescent (Matthew 24:28 ; Isaiah 46:11 ; Ezekiel 39:4 ; Deuteronomy 28:49 ; Jeremiah 4:13 ; 48:40 ). God's care over his people is likened to that of the eagle in training its young to fly (Exodus 19:4 ; Deuteronomy 32:11,12 ). The eagle was unclean by the Levitical law (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 )
Head - ’ In Deuteronomy 28:13 , Isaiah 9:14 , we find ‘head and tail’ as a proverbial expression. Similarly shaving the head , a common practice in the East ( Job 1:20 , Isaiah 15:2 ; Isaiah 22:12 , Ezekiel 7:18 , Amos 8:10 ); it was forbidden to priests ( Leviticus 21:5 ), and, in special forms, to all Israelites ( Leviticus 19:27 , Deuteronomy 14:1 ). It might also mark the close of a period of mourning ( Deuteronomy 21:12 ), or of a Nazirite’s vow ( Numbers 6:9 , Acts 18:18 ), or of a Levite’s purification ( Numbers 8:7 ). In Deuteronomy 32:42 there is a reference to the warrior’s long hair, RVm Arabah - The northern part is referred to in Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Deuteronomy 4:49 ; Joshua 3:16 ; Joshua 12:3 ; Joshua 18:18 : and the southern part in Deuteronomy 1:1 ; Deuteronomy 2:8
Moabites - At one period, however, it extended north as far as the Jabbok, and for a long time the region beyond the Jordan opposite Jericho retained the name of "the plains of Moab," Numbers 22:1 Deuteronomy 1:5 29:1 Joshua 13:32 . The Moabites had dispossessed a race of giants called Emin, Deuteronomy 2:11 , and had themselves been expelled by the Amorites from the territory north of the Arnon, Numbers 21:13,26 Judges 11:13-18 , which was again conquered by Moses, and assigned to the tribe of Reuben. On the approach of Israel from Egypt, the Moabites acted with great inhumanity, Numbers 22:1-24:25 Deuteronomy 2:8-9 ; and though God spared them from conquest, he excluded them and their seed even to the tenth generation form the peculiar privileges of his people, Deuteronomy 23:3-6
Shealtiel - This could involve the practice of Levirate marriage ( Deuteronomy 25:5-10 )
Chamois - CHAMOIS ( zemer , Deuteronomy 14:5 )
Vesture - ]'>[1] this word occurs as the rendering both of words denoting dress or raiment generally, as Genesis 41:42 , Psalms 22:18 , and of special words for the plaid-like upper garment of antiquity, as Deuteronomy 22:12 (see Fringes), Revelation 19:18 ; Revelation 19:16 (RV Asp - pethen), Deuteronomy 32:33 ; Job 20:14,16 ; Isaiah 11:8
Mine - Moses speaks of the mineral wealth of Palestine (Deuteronomy 8:9 )
Pentecost - , the "fifieth" day after the Passover, counting from the second day of the Feast, Deuteronomy 16:9-116 ; 20:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:8
Zamzummims - A race of giants; "a people great, and many, and tall, as the Anakims" (Deuteronomy 2:20,21 )
Igdaliah - a prophet, one not his own; having parted with all right in himself, to be wholly God's: Deuteronomy 33:1, Moses; Elisha, 2 Kings 4:7; Timothy, 2 Timothy 3:17)
Trachonitis - It was on the northern edge of the territory known in Old Testament times as Bashan (Numbers 32:33; Deuteronomy 32:14; see BASHAN)
Chinnereth - A city ( Deuteronomy 3:17 , Joshua 11:2 [1] Joshua 19:35 ) which gave its name to the Sea of Chinnereth ( Numbers 34:11 , Joshua 12:3 ; Joshua 13:27 ), the OT designation of the Sea of Galilee
Night-Hawk - An unclean bird ( Leviticus 11:16 , Deuteronomy 14:16 )
Hor Hagidgad - Gudgodah in Deuteronomy 10:7; "the cavern" or else "the summit" of Gidgad, according as the first letter in Hebrew is "ch" ([1]Ηet ( ח )) (as in the Received Text and Syriac) or "h" (as Septuagint and Vulgate and Samaritan text read)
Heron - An unclean bird (Leviticus 11:19; Deuteronomy 14:18)
Scorpion - In the wilderness God protected Israel from scorpions (Deuteronomy 8:15 ) and could protect His prophet from them (Ezekiel 2:6 )
Sihon - Amorite king whose capital was Heshbon (Deuteronomy 2:26 )
Botch - It occurs in reference to Deuteronomy 28:27 ‘the botch of Egypt
Cormorant - CORMORANT ( Leviticus 11:17 , Deuteronomy 14:17 , shâlâk )
Kibroth-Hattaavah - KIBROTH-HATTAAVAH (‘graves of lust,’ Numbers 11:34 ; Numbers 33:16 , Deuteronomy 9:22 )
Abundance - ...
Deuteronomy 33
Bees - Deuteronomy 1:44 (b) Here is a type of the harmful enemies who can hurt and injure GOD's people, but cannot destroy them
Moses - (See also Deuteronomy 18:15 which indicates this truth)
Cormorant - In Leviticus 11:17 and Deuteronomy 14:17 the Hebrew word is shalak, and is rightly translated Cormorant, a large bird that lives upon fish
Eunuch - They were forbidden to enter into sacred duty (Deuteronomy 23:1)
Geshur - A small district of Syria, east of the Jordan and northeast of Bashan; allotted to Manasseh, Deuteronomy 3:14; 2 Samuel 15:8; 1 Chronicles 2:23; Joshua 13:13; David married a daughter of its king, 2 Samuel 3:3; Absalom fled thither after the murder of Amnon, 2 Samuel 13:37
ab'Arim - These mountains are mentioned in ( Numbers 27:12 ; 33:47,48 ) and Deuteronomy 32:49
Burden - A weight or load, on body or soul; often used figuratively, to denote afflictions, failings, sins, Psalm 38:4 55:22 Galatians 6:2 ; services under law, Matthew 23:4 ; official responsibilities, Exodus 18:22 Deuteronomy 1:12 ; and especially prophetic messages, not always of a threatening character, Isaiah 19:1
City of Palm Trees - Probably to be identified with a site near Jericho where the Kenites lived (Judges 1:16 ; see Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 3:13 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 )
Capital Punishment - False witnessing in capital cases (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ); 3 . Idolatry (Leviticus 20:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 13:2-19 ; Deuteronomy 17:2-7 ); 4 . Abducting persons for slavery (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ); 5 . Rape (Deuteronomy 22:23-27 ) including the girl if she did not cry for help; 7. Adultery (Leviticus 20:10-12 ; Deuteronomy 22:22 ); 8 . Sex relations outside of marriage: (a) before marriage, but discovered afterward (Deuteronomy 22:20-21 ), the woman alone to be executed; (b) relations with another's betrothed (Deuteronomy 22:23-24 ), both to be executed; (c) the harlotry of a priest's daughter (Acts 5:27-334 ); 9 . Witchcraft and false claim to prophecy (Exodus 22:18 ; Leviticus 20:27 ; Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 18:20 ; 1Samuel 28:3,1 Samuel 28:9 ); 10 . Stoning was the usual method in Israel (Exodus 19:13 ; Leviticus 20:27 ; Deuteronomy 22:24 ; Joshua 7:25 ; compare Luke 20:3-6 ; Acts 7:58 ). At least two witnesses were needed to verify a charge, and they had to throw the first stones (Deuteronomy 17:6-17 ; compare John 8:7 ). Sword (Exodus 32:27 ; Deuteronomy 13:15 ), spear (Numbers 25:7
Temptation - ]'>[2] retains ‘temptation’ for ( a ) God’s testing of Pharaoh’s character and disposition ( Deuteronomy 4:34 , RVm [7] , on Deuteronomy 6:15 ) points out, in a valuable note, that ‘nissâh is a neutral word, and means to test or prove a person, to see whether he will act in a particular way ( Exodus 16:4 , Judges 2:22 ; Judges 3:4 ), or whether the character he bears is well established ( 1 Kings 10:1 ). God thus proves a person, or puts him to the test , to see if his fidelity of affection is sincere ( Genesis 22:1 , Exodus 20:20 , Deuteronomy 8:2 ; Deuteronomy 13:3 ; cf
Olive Olive-Tree - Deuteronomy 6:11; Deuteronomy 8:8. And various applications of the berries are referred to, Deuteronomy 24:20, the oil, Leviticus 24:2, which was an article of commerce, 1 Kings 5:11, and the wood, 6:31-33
Rock - Titles of God include: the “Stone of Israel” (Genesis 49:24 NAS); the Rock ( Deuteronomy 32:4 ); the Rock of salvation (Deuteronomy 32:15 ); the Rock which begat Israel (Deuteronomy 32:18 ); “the rock that is higher than I” (Psalm 61:2 )
Elder - After the settlement in Canaan they were named "elders of Israel" or "of the land" (1 Samuel 4:3; 1 Kings 20:7) or "of the tribes" (Deuteronomy 31:28) or "of the city," (Deuteronomy 19:12, compare Deuteronomy 16:18; Ruth 4:9; Ruth 4:11)
Punishment - Capital punishment was by stoning, Deuteronomy 13:10 ; burning, Leviticus 20:14 ; the sword, Exodus 32:27 ; and hanging, Deuteronomy 21:22,23 . Deuteronomy 25:3
Eye - In Deuteronomy 6:8 ; Deuteronomy 14:1 ‘between the eyes’ means ‘on the forehead. 1 Samuel 18:9 , the only use of the verb in this sense in English) or niggardliness ( Deuteronomy 15:9 , Proverbs 28:22 , and probably Matthew 6:22 , where the ‘single eye’ may mean ‘liberality’; cf
Hyperbole - Thus, things which are lofty are said to reach up to heaven, Deuteronomy 1:28 ; Deuteronomy 9:1 ; Psalms 107:26 . So things which are beyond the reach or capacity of man are said to be in "heaven," in the "deep," or "beyond the sea," Deuteronomy 30:12 ; Romans 10:6-7
Hemlock - רוש and ראש , Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Deuteronomy 32:32 ; Psalms 69:21 ; Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 23:15 ; Lamentations 3:5 ; Lamentations 3:19 ; Hosea 10:4 ; Amos 6:12 . It is evident, from Deuteronomy 29:18 , that some herb or plant is meant of a malignant or nauseous kind, being there joined with wormwood, and in the margin of our Bibles explained to be "a poisonful herb
Bashan - The battle in which the king of Bashan was defeated was fought at Edrei (Deuteronomy 3:1-3). This Bashan region included within it sixty cities, the most important of which were Edrei, Ashtaroth and Golan (Deuteronomy 3:4; Joshua 12:4-5; Joshua 21:27). It was well known for its forests, sheep, and particularly the fine cattle it produced (Deuteronomy 32:14; Psalms 22:12; Isaiah 2:13; Jeremiah 50:19; Ezekiel 27:6; Ezekiel 39:18; Amos 4:1; Micah 7:14)
Debt - To the borrower they were a misfortune ( Deuteronomy 28:12 ; 2 Kings 4:1-778 ); to the lender a form of charity. ]'>[1] ], Deuteronomy 23:19 , Leviticus 25:36 Seir - A Horite, one of the primitive rulers of the country south and southeast of the Dead Sea, Genesis 36:20 Deuteronomy 2:12
Hireling - Mosaic law required paying workers at the close of the day so that they might provide for their families (Deuteronomy 24:14-15 )
Throne - kiss'e), a royal chair or seat of dignity (Deuteronomy 17:18 ; 2 Samuel 7:13 ; Psalm 45:6 ); an elevated seat with a canopy and hangings, which cover it
Cow - A cow and her calf were not to be killed on the same day (Leviticus 22:28 ; Exodus 23:19 ; Deuteronomy 22:6,7 )
Levirate Law - From Latin levir, "a husband's brother," the name of an ancient custom ordained by Moses, by which, when an Israelite died without issue, his surviving brother was required to marry the widow, so as to continue his brother's family through the son that might be born of that marriage (Genesis 38:8 ; Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ; Compare Ruth 3 ; 4:10 )
Boar - The same Hebrew word is elsewhere rendered "swine" (Leviticus 11:7 ; Deuteronomy 14:8 ; Proverbs 11:22 ; Isaiah 65:4 ; 66:3,17 )
Lime - " The same Hebrew word is used in Deuteronomy 27:2-4 , and is there rendered "plaster
Madness - This word is used in its proper sense in Deuteronomy 28:34 , John 10:20,1 Corinthians 14:23
Betroth - From the time of betrothal the woman was regarded as the lawful wife of the man to whom she was betrothed (Deuteronomy 28:30 ; Judges 14:2,8 ; Matthew 1:18-21 )
Laban - ) ...
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A city in the Arabian desert in the route of the Israelites ( Deuteronomy 1:1 ), probably identical with Libnah (Numbers 33:20 )
Spit - , Numbers 12:14 , in some texts; Deuteronomy 25:9
Kiriathaim - "the plain of Kiriathaim," or of the two cities) whom the Moabites dispossessed before the Exodus (Deuteronomy 2:10-11)
Animal - The list of clean and unclean quadrupeds is set forth in the Levitical law (Deuteronomy 14:3-20 ; Leviticus 11 )
Fornication - In every form of it was sternly condemned by the Mosaic law (Leviticus 21:9 ; 19:29 ; Deuteronomy 22:20,21,23-29 ; 23:18 ; Exodus 22:16 )
Shoe - ) in Deuteronomy 33:25 , Min'al , "a bar," is derived from a root meaning "to bolt" or "shut fast," and hence a fastness or fortress
Freedom - The law of Moses pointed out the cases in which the servants of the Hebrews were to receive their freedom (Exodus 21:2-4,7,8 ; Leviticus 25:39-42,47-55 ; Deuteronomy 15:12-18 )
Usury - The Jews were forbidden to exact usury (Leviticus 25:36,37 ), only, however, in their dealings with each other (Deuteronomy 23:19,20 )
Swine - Israelites were forbidden to eat swine (Leviticus 11:7 ; Deuteronomy 14:8 )
Woolen Linen - Leviticus 19:19; Deuteronomy 22:11, "of divers sort," related to the Egyptian shoutnes
Similitude - Three words are translated “similitude” in the Old Testament: demuth (2 Chronicles 4:3 ; Daniel 10:16 ), tabnith (Psalm 106:20 ; Psalm 144:12 ), and temunah (Numbers 12:8 ; Deuteronomy 4:12 )
Kibroth-Hattaavah - The dead were buried there, giving the place its name (Numbers 11:34 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 ; Psalm 78:30-31 )
Divers - Deuteronomy 21
Fray - verb is found in Zechariah 1:21 and 1Ma 14:12 (‘every man sat under his vine and his fig tree, and there was none to fray them’); and ‘fray away’ occurs in Deuteronomy 28:26 , Jeremiah 7:33 , Sir 22:20 (‘whoso casteth a stone at the birds frayeth them away’)
Samaritan Pentateuch - Their scripture includes Genesis through Deuteronomy with many variant readings from the Masoretic Text or Hebrew text currently used by scholars
Amen - " It is used as an acclamation which indicates that the speaker adopts for his own what has been said by another (Deuteronomy 27), as an affirmation of the speaker's own thought, and as a formula of conclusion at the end of prayers
Ramothgilead - (Deuteronomy 4:43) It became the subject and occasion of much war in the after-days of the kings
Bedstead - Deuteronomy 3:11 (c) This is used as a symbol of the life that Og, King of Bashan, lived
Denounce - Deuteronomy 30
Thick - Deuteronomy 32:15 (b) This figures describes the healthy and wealthy condition of the nation of Israel in her prosperity
Burden - Is often used figuratively, to denote afflictions, failings, sins, Psalms 38:4; Psalms 55:22; Galatians 6:2; services under the law, Matthew 23:4; official responsibilities, Exodus 18:22; Deuteronomy 1:12; and especially prophetic massages, not always of a threatening character
Emims - The Emims were a warlike people, of a gigantic stature, great and numerous, tall as the Anakims, and were accounted giants as well as they, Deuteronomy 2:10-11
Kirjathaim - It was an ancient city of the Emim, east of the Jordan; afterwards inhabited by the Moabites, Amorites, and Israelites in turn, Genesis 14:5 Deuteronomy 2:9-11 Ezekiel 25:9
Furnaces - The word furnace is used to illustrate a state of oppression, Deuteronomy 4:20 , and of affliction, Isaiah 48:10
Milk - The Jews and their neighbors used not only the milk of cows, but also that of camels, sheep, and goats, Genesis 32:15 Deuteronomy 32:14 Proverbs 27:27
Landmark - Deuteronomy 19
Outcast - Outcast rather designates one banished from court (2 Samuel 14:14 RSV) or more often dispersed persons, exiles, or refugees ( Deuteronomy 30:4 ; Psalm 147:2 : Isaiah 11:12 ; Isaiah 56:8 ; Jeremiah 30:17 ; Micah 4:6-7 )
Hare - arnebeth ) occurs only in ( Leviticus 11:6 ) and Deuteronomy 14:7 Amongst the animals disallowed as food by the Mosaic law
Vengeance - In the context of loving one's neighbor, human revenge toward fellow Hebrews was forbidden (Leviticus 19:17-18 ; compare 2 Corinthians 10:5-6 ), but nqm may be used of legitimate punishment for a wrong ( Exodus 21:20 ; compare Exodus 21:23-25 ; Leviticus 24:19 ; Deuteronomy 19:21 ). In the song of Moses, such retribution is attributed to God alone (Deuteronomy 32:35 ,Deuteronomy 32:35,32:41 ,Deuteronomy 32:41,32:43 ). ...
Paul forbade human vengeance much in the way of Deuteronomy 32:35 (compare Leviticus 19:18 ), asserting that the Lord is the Avenger of wrong (Romans 12:19 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:6-7 ). ” The usage seems designed to bring about repentance (2 Corinthians 7:10-11 ; Deuteronomy 32:35 ). ...
The author of Hebrews also cited the Deuteronomic prohibition against human vengeance (Hebrews 10:30 ; Deuteronomy 32:35 ; compare Romans 12:19 ; Leviticus 19:18 ), and the author of 1Peter referred to human governors as persons sent by God to punish evildoers (1 Peter 2:14 ; compare Romans 13:4 )
Milk - Sheep (Deuteronomy 32:14 ) and goats (Proverbs 27:27 ) and camels (Genesis 32:15 ), as well as cows, are made to give their milk for the use of man. This Hebrew word is also sometimes used for milk in general (Deuteronomy 32:14 ; Job 20:17 )
Mosaic Legislation - The Civil Laws are mostly found in Exodus 18-23, and Deuteronomy 16-26. The Moral Laws are found in the texts already mentioned (Exodus 20-23), supplemented by Leviticus 11-20, and Deuteronomy 5
Stork - STORK ( chăs îdâh , Leviticus 11:19 , Deuteronomy 14:18 , Job 39:13 , Psalms 104:17 , Jeremiah 8:7 , Zechariah 5:9 ). No native would dream of harming it; its sacred character may have caused it to be an ‘unclean’ bird ( Leviticus 11:19 , Deuteronomy 14:18 )
Avenger of Blood - In order that this law might be guarded against abuse, Moses appointed six cities of refuge (Exodus 21:13 ; Numbers 35:13 ; Deuteronomy 19:1,9 ). He was regarded as an impure and polluted person, and was delivered up to the Goel ( Deuteronomy 19:11-13 )
Sodom - The wickedness of its inhabitants brought down upon it fire from heaven, by which it was destroyed (18:16-33; 19:1-29; Deuteronomy 23:17 ). This city and its awful destruction are frequently alluded to in Scripture (Deuteronomy 29:23 ; 32:32 ; Isaiah 1:9,10 ; 3:9 ; 13:19 ; Jeremiah 23:14 ; Ezekiel 16:46-56 ; Zephaniah 2:9 ; Matthew 10:15 ; Romans 9:29 ; 2 Peter 2:6 , etc
Jahaz - A town at which Sihon was defeated by Israel ( Numbers 21:23 , Deuteronomy 2:32 , Judges 11:20 ). After the crossing of the Arnon, messengers were sent to Sihon from the ‘wilderness of Kedemoth’ ( Deuteronomy 2:26 ), and he ‘went out against Israel into the wilderness and came to Jahaz’ ( Numbers 21:23 )
Add - Deuteronomy 19 . Deuteronomy 4
Sea - THE MEDITERRANEAN,under the names of 'the great sea,' Numbers 34:6,7 ; Ezekiel 48:28 ; 'the uttermost sea,' or 'the hinder sea,' Deuteronomy 11:24 ; Zechariah 14:8 ; 'the sea of Joppa,' Ezra 3:7 ; 'sea of the Philistines,' Exodus 23:31 . THE SALT SEA,Numbers 34:3,12 ; also called 'the east sea,' Ezekiel 47 :18; Joel 2:20 ; 'the former sea,' Zechariah 14:8 ; 'the sea of the plain,' Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 3:16 ; Joshua 12:3 ; 2 Kings 14:25
Unicorn - ' There is nothing in the scripture to intimate that the animal had but one horn, indeed Deuteronomy 33:17 speaks of 'the horns of a unicorn' (see margin ), and it must have been some animal with which the Israelites were familiar. Numbers 23:22 ; Numbers 24:8 ; Deuteronomy 33:17 ; Job 39:9,10 ; Psalm 29:6 ; Psalm 92:10 ; Isaiah 34:7
Tempt, to; Temptation - Compare Psalm 95:9 with Deuteronomy 8:2 and Deuteronomy 33:8 (where 'holy one' is Israel)
Gall - , "gall," is generally rendered "gall," Deuteronomy 29:18; Psalms 69:21, meaning most probably the poppy; and thus Jeremiah 8:14, "water of gall," would be poppy-juice. Deuteronomy 32:32
Rain - In Scripture the "early" and the "latter" rain of Palestine is spoken of, Deuteronomy 11:14 Hosea 6:3 . Nothing can more expressively represent spiritual blessings than copious showers of rain after this trying season is past, Deuteronomy 32:2 Job 29:23 Isaiah 44:3 Hosea 10:12
Thine - Deuteronomy 32 ...
But in common usage, thy is now used before a vowel in all cases. ...
If any of thine be driven out to the utmost parts of heaven-- Deuteronomy 30 ...
It is to be observed that thine, like thou, is used only in the solemn style
Birthright - Among the Hebrews, as indeed among most other nations, the firstborn enjoyed particular privileges; and wherever polygamy was tolerated, it was highly necessary to fix them, Deuteronomy 21:15-17 . Secondly, the firstborn was entitled to a share of his father's estate twice as large as any of the other brethren received, Deuteronomy 21:17
Farming - The nation was in a special sense God’s people, and its devotion to God was a basic factor that influenced seasonal conditions (Deuteronomy 11:8-17). ...
Farmers normally ploughed with oxen, urging the animals on with a sharpened stick called a goad (Deuteronomy 22:10; Judges 3:31; 1 Kings 19:19; Luke 9:62; Luke 14:19; see also YOKE). ...
The rains that marked the arrival of the rainy season were known as the early, or autumn, rains (Deuteronomy 11:14; Jeremiah 5:24; Joel 2:23) and were necessary for the sowing of the fields that followed (Genesis 26:12; Matthew 13:3). These were necessary to bring the cereal crops to full growth before the dry season arrived (Deuteronomy 11:14; Proverbs 16:15; Jeremiah 3:3; Jeremiah 5:24; Joel 2:23; Zechariah 10:1). He was to leave this for the poor (Leviticus 19:9; Deuteronomy 24:19; Ruth 2:2-7; Ruth 2:17). ...
Reapers cut the standing grain with a sickle (Deuteronomy 16:9; Mark 4:29), tied the stalks into sheaves (Genesis 37:7; Deuteronomy 24:19), and then transported the sheaves either on animals or in carts to the threshing floor (Nehemiah 13:15; Amos 2:13; Micah 4:12). The oxen were allowed to eat from the pile of straw as they trampled it (Numbers 18:27; Deuteronomy 25:4; 1 Samuel 23:1; Hosea 10:11; 1 Corinthians 9:9). It was then collected in baskets (Deuteronomy 24:20; Isaiah 17:6; Amos 8:2; see OLIVE). Abraham, Isaac and Jacob had moved around from place to place with their animals (Genesis 13:1-7; Genesis 26:14-22; Genesis 33:13), the family of Jacob had kept flocks and herds in Egypt (Genesis 47:1-6), and the people of Moses’ time had brought animals with them when they left Egypt for Canaan (Exodus 12:38; Deuteronomy 8:11-14). Some of the best regions for their animals were the grassy plains of Bashan and Gilead on the eastern side of the Jordan (Numbers 32:1; Numbers 32:26; Numbers 32:36; Deuteronomy 32:14; Psalms 22:12; Micah 7:14)
Wilderness - This word is used of the wilderness of Beersheba (Genesis 21:14 ), on the southern border of Palestine; the wilderness of the Red Sea (Exodus 13:18 ); of Shur (15:22), a portion of the Sinaitic peninsula; of Sin (17:1), Sinai (Leviticus 7:38 ), Moab (Deuteronomy 2:8 ), Judah (Judges 1:16 ), Ziph, Maon, En-gedi (1 Samuel 23:14,24 ; 24:1 ), Jeruel and Tekoa (2 Chronicles 20:16,20 ), Kadesh (Psalm 29:8 ). ...
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Jeshimon, a desert waste (Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Psalm 68:7 ). In Deuteronomy 1:1 ; 2:8 , it is rendered "plain" (RSV, "Arabah"). ...
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Tohu, a "desolate" place, a place "waste" or "unoccupied" (Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Job 12:24 ; Compare Genesis 1:2 , "without form")
Children - Hence, flowed parents' responsibility to rear children in the way of the Lord (Genesis 18:19; Deuteronomy 6:7; Deuteronomy 11:19); also children's responsibility to obey parents, as a preparatory discipline for the higher relationship to God. Smiting, or even cursing, a parent was punishable with death (Exodus 21:15; Exodus 21:17); also contumacy (Deuteronomy 21:18-21; compare Deuteronomy 27:16)
Ammon Ammonites Children of Ammon - In the earliest mention of them, Deuteronomy 2:20, they are said to have destroyed the Rephaim, whom they called the Zamzummim, and to have dwelt in their place, Jabbok being their border. Numbers 21:24; Deuteronomy 2:37; Deuteronomy 3:16. The hatred in which the Ammonites were held by Israel is stated to have arisen partly from their opposition, or, rather, their denial of assistance, Deuteronomy 23:4-5, to the Israelites on their approach to Canaan
Kithlish - (Deuteronomy 33:22; Judges 14:5), in the uplands of Judah on the E
Muzzle - Deuteronomy 25:4 is one of many laws in the Deuteronomic code concerned with humane treatment of others
Curds - They are frequently served with honey and wine and are considered a delicacy among the nomads in the ancient Near East (see Genesis 18:8 ; Deuteronomy 32:14 ; Judges 5:25 ; 2 Samuel 17:29 ; Job 20:17 ; Isaiah 7:15 ,Isaiah 7:15,7:22 )
Sheaf - Some sheaves were for gleaners (Deuteronomy 24:19 ; Ruth 2:7 )
te'Lem - The name Dhullam is found in Van Deuteronomy Velde's map, attached to a district immediately to the north of the Kubbet el-Baul , south of el Milh and Ar'arah --a position very suitable
Scourging - In no case were the stripes to exceed forty (Deuteronomy 25:3 ; Compare 2 Corinthians 11:24 )
Avim, Avites - A people who once inhabited the villages of Philistia, who were destroyed by the Caphtorims, Deuteronomy 2:23 ; a remnant being left till the days of Joshua
Wall - They were made thick and strong (Numbers 13:28 ; Deuteronomy 3:5 )
Vine of Sodom - Referred to only in Deuteronomy 32:32
Cuckoo - shachaph ; Leviticus 11:16; Deuteronomy 14:15; unclean
Fowler - The traps and snares used for this purpose are mentioned Hosea 5:1 ; Proverbs 7:23 ; 22:5 ; Amos 3:5 ; Psalm 69:22 ; Compare Deuteronomy 22:6,7
Golan - ” It was a city of refuge for people who unintentionally killed someone and was located in Bashan for the part of the tribe of Manasseh living east of the Jordan River (Deuteronomy 4:43 )
Poison - Poison served as a frequent image for wickedness, especially lying speech (Deuteronomy 32:32-33 ; Job 20:16 ; Psalm 58:4 ; Psalm 140:3 )
Shoftim - (b) A section of the Torah in Deuteronomy
Chosen - Spoken of warriors (Exodus 15:4 ; Judges 20:16 ), of the Hebrew nation (Psalm 105:43 ; Deuteronomy 7:7 ), of Jerusalem as the seat of the temple (1 Kings 11:13 )
Hazeroth - The stage after Kibroth Hattaavah in Israel's wanderings (Numbers 11:35; Numbers 12:16; Numbers 33:17; Deuteronomy 1:1)
Hashmonah - The stage of Israel's journeyings near Mount Hor, next before Moseroth (Numbers 33:29; Numbers 20:28; Deuteronomy 10:6)
Boar - Though a forbidden food to the Moslem as well as the Jew ( Leviticus 11:7 , Deuteronomy 14:8 ), the flesh is eaten by the nominally Moslem Bedouin of Palestine
Levirate Law - According to Deuteronomy 25:5-10 , the deceased's brother was to marry the widow
Gad - They were a war-like race whose valor is highly praised in the parting blessing of Moses (Deuteronomy 33), and in the prophecy of Jacob (Genesis 49)
Apple of the Eye - A figure of God’s care of His people ( Deuteronomy 32:10 , Psalms 17:8 , Zechariah 2:8 ), and of the preciousness of the Divine law ( Proverbs 7:2 )
Rephaims - (Genesis 14:5) Those were probably the same as Moses takes notice of Deuteronomy 2:10-11, there called Emims, a people great and tall, which in times past, it is said, were called giants, as the Anakims; but the Moabites called them Emims
Chamois - Only in Deuteronomy 14:5 (Heb
Cloth - Simlah occurs in Deuteronomy 22:17 ; 1 Samuel 21:9
Belial - (Deuteronomy 13:13) The same by Hannah
Cherish - 1: θάλπω (Strong's #2282 — Verb — thalpo — thal'-po ) primarily means "to heat, to soften by heat;" then, "to keep warm," as of birds covering their young with their feathers, Deuteronomy 22:6 , Sept
Zephath - It was at Zephath that the Israelites were repulsed in attempting to ascend from Kadesh, Numbers 14:40-45 21:3 Deuteronomy 1:44 Judges 1:17
Balak - His fears and his devices were both in vain, Deuteronomy 2:9
Harlot - " They were often devoted to heathen idols, and their abominations were a part of the worship, Numbers 25:1-5 Hosea 4:14 ; a custom from the defilement of which the house of God was expressly defended, Deuteronomy 23:18
Landmark - The ancient and permanent limits, therefore, of individual property in the open field, Ruth 2:3 , were marked by trees or heaps of stones at the corners; and as it was easy, by removing these, to encroach on a neighbor's ground, a peculiar form of dishonesty arose, requiring a severe punishment, Deuteronomy 19:14 Proverbs 22:28 Hosea 5:10
Cloud - By it God directed their movements, Numbers 9:15-23 14:14 Deuteronomy 1:33
Wing - 1: πτέρυξ (Strong's #4420 — Noun Feminine — pterux — pter'-oox ) is used of birds, Matthew 23:37 ; Luke 13:34 ; symbolically in Revelation 12:14 , RV, "the two wings of the great eagle" (AV, "two wings of a great eagle"), suggesting the definiteness of the action, the "wings" indicating rapidity and protection, an allusion, perhaps, to Exodus 19:4 ; Deuteronomy 32:11,12 ; of the "living creatures" in a vision, Revelation 4:8 ; 9:9
Slave - Man stealing was a capital crime (Deuteronomy 24:7); not only stealing Israelites, but people of other nations (Exodus 21:16). Masters must treat Hebrew servants as hired servants, not with rigour, but with courteous considerateness as brethren, and liberally remunerate them at the close of their service (Deuteronomy 15:12-18; Leviticus 25:39-41). Some were war captives (Numbers 31:6-7; Numbers 31:9; Deuteronomy 20:14); but Israelites must not reduce to bondage Israelites taken in war (2 Chronicles 28:8-15). until Jubilee year (Leviticus 25:10; Deuteronomy 15:17); type of the Father's willing Servant for man's sake (compare Isaiah 50:5; Psalms 40:6-8; Hebrews 10:5; Philippians 2:7). (Exodus 12:43; Deuteronomy 16:10; Deuteronomy 29:10-13; Deuteronomy 31:12), the hearing of the law, the Sabbath and Jubilee rests. The receiver of a fugitive slave was not to deliver him up (Deuteronomy 23:15-16)
Food - Their life depends for its proper function upon spiritual forces that are found only in God (Deuteronomy 8:3; Psalms 63:1; Matthew 4:3-4; Matthew 6:25; John 6:27; John 6:35). God taught Old Testament Israel that people were to make sacrifices in their business and domestic lives so that the poor would not go hungry (Leviticus 19:9-10; Deuteronomy 14:28-29; Deuteronomy 15:7-11; Psalms 132:15; Isaiah 14:30; Isaiah 58:7). People ate meals together to show friendship and hospitality (Genesis 18:6-9; Genesis 43:31-34; Mark 2:15; Luke 14:15-24), to confirm political and business agreements (Genesis 26:28-31; Genesis 31:51-54), and to demonstrate fellowship with one another and with God (Leviticus 7:13-15; Deuteronomy 14:22-27; Luke 22:30; 1 Corinthians 10:17; 1 Corinthians 10:21). They were warned also that when cutting down trees to construct siegeworks, they were to be careful not to destroy the fruit trees (Leviticus 19:23-25; Deuteronomy 20:19-20). Some of the better known fruits were figs, grapes, olives, pomegranates, apples, dates, sycamore, pistachio nuts and almonds (Genesis 43:11; Deuteronomy 8:8; Deuteronomy 34:3; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8; Song of Solomon 8:5; Amos 7:14; Matthew 7:16; see FIGS; GRAPES; OLIVES). People ate grapes fresh or dried (raisins) and crushed them to make various types of wine (Numbers 6:3; Deuteronomy 32:14; Ruth 2:14; 1 Samuel 25:18; Joel 1:5; 1 Samuel 2:13-15). ...
Cereals...
The Israelites’ chief cereals were barley and wheat (Exodus 9:31-32; Exodus 34:22; Deuteronomy 8:8). A meal made from the flesh of these animals was of special value (Genesis 27:3-4; Deuteronomy 14:4-5). Fish also was allowed as food (Deuteronomy 14:9-10; Luke 24:42-43; John 6:11; John 21:9). They also ate the honey of wild bees, which was readily found in rocks and trees (Deuteronomy 32:13; Judges 14:8; 1 Samuel 14:25)
Punishment - The sins of parents could be punished to the third and fourth generation (Exodus 20:5 ; 34:7 ; Deuteronomy 5:9-10 ). However, the Lord later revealed that individuals would bear their own guilt (Deuteronomy 24:16 ; 2 Kings 14:6 ; Jeremiah 31:29-30 ; Ezekiel 18:1-4,20 ). Worshiping gods other than Yahweh was a capital crime (Exodus 22:20 ) for which the punishment was stoning (Deuteronomy 13:6-10 ). Likewise, those who prophesied in the name of other gods, or who led the people into idolatry were to be executed (Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ; 18:20 ). Other pagan religious practices such as witchcraft, consulting of spirits, necromancy, divination, sorcery, augury, and soothsaying were proscribed (Leviticus 19:26 ; 20:6 ; Deuteronomy 18:10-11 ). Those who intended to kill were to be executed while those who slew accidentally could flee to a city of refuge (Exodus 21:12-14 ; Numbers 35:9-28 ; Deuteronomy 19:4-13 ). If someone caused bodily harm to another rather than death, lex talionis, or the law of retaliation was invoked: "an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth" (Exodus 21:23 ; Leviticus 24:19 ; Deuteronomy 19:21 ; Matthew 5:38 ). Stoning is stipulated in Leviticus 20:10 and Deuteronomy 22:22-24 . Prostitution was outlawed but no punishment is listed (Leviticus 19:29 ; Deuteronomy 23:17 ). In the case of a man raping a single woman, he could be forced to marry her (relinquishing the right to divorce) and pay her father the marriage present, but no punishment was required (Deuteronomy 22:28-29 ). Incest was proscribed (Leviticus 20:11,12 , 14,17 , 19-21 ; Deuteronomy 27:20,22-23 ) for which the penalty in certain cases was death by burning (Leviticus 20:11,14 ). Kidnappers, who stole humans, were to be put to death (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ). Whatever the false witness intended to do to the innocent party would be done to him (Deuteronomy 19:15-19 )
Deuteronomy, Theology of - Deuteronomy was addressed to their offspring who were poised to enter the land of promise, and needed reassurance of Yahweh's covenant promises in light of the challenge of impending conquest and settlement. ...
Critical scholarship for nearly 200 years has uprooted Deuteronomy from its traditional Mosaic setting and has located it in the seventh century b. It is now fashionable to speak of Deuteronomy—2Kings as the "Deuteronomistic History, " a massive theological work redacted in the sixth century. Deuteronomy itself is thought to have originated a little earlier, being a reflection of allegedly Mosaic teaching designed to provide a covenant standard by which to assess and judge Israel's actual history (cf. The negative tone of the "Deuteronomistic" account is attributed to the antimonarchic traditionists who first had created Deuteronomy as an antimonarchical tractate and then wrote their history to show how the monarchy had, indeed, violated the book's covenant mandates. ...
More recently, comparisons have been made between the form and content of Deuteronomy and those of ancient Near Eastern treaty texts, especially from the Hittite Empire (ca. While the debate continues as to which parallels are more exact, the majority of scholars are persuaded of the Old Testament-Hittite analogies and therefore of the antiquity of the structure of Deuteronomy. What is important is to recognize that Deuteronomy itself witnesses to its Mosaic authorship (1:1,3, 5; 4:44; 31:1,9, 22) and in its canonical form bears all the hallmarks of a covenant document, specifically that of a sovereign-vassal type. If, then, Deuteronomy is cast in the literary mold of a sovereign-vassal treaty text, its message must be understood accordingly. ...
With this in mind, it is important that Deuteronomy be analyzed as a literary composition before any attempt be made to recover its theology.
In light of the indisputable connection between form and function, it is safe to say that the concept of covenant lies at the center of the theology of Deuteronomy. Thus the three major rubrics of the theology of Deuteronomy are Yahweh, the Great King and covenant initiator; Israel, the vassal and covenant recipient; and the book itself, the covenant vehicle, complete with the essentials of standard treaty documents. ...
In Deuteronomy (and, indeed, in Scripture generally) God reveals himself in Acts, theophany, and word. This obviously begins with God as Creator (an aspect lacking in Deuteronomy) and continues, in its peculiar relationship to Israel, with God's self-disclosure as elector, redeemer, and benefactor of his people. In Deuteronomy this otherness of God finds expression typically in the brilliance of light, especially fire, and in its opposite, darkness. That word of God in Deuteronomy is, of course, the book itself expressed in its uniquely covenant form. But Deuteronomy is a covenant text in a broader than normal sense inasmuch as it contains not only the sine qua non of standard documents of that genre but also itineraries, narratives, hymns, and homilies, all designed to provide both a covenant document as well as a historical, existential, and eschatological context in which to interpret it. ...
The subject of divine self-disclosure, that is, the content of Yahweh's revelation about himself, must also be seen in terms of the covenant purposes of the Book of Deuteronomy. ...
The revelation of God's person in Deuteronomy follows rather typical biblical patterns. ...
The second major theme of the theology of Deuteronomythat pertaining to the recipient of the covenant initiated by Yahwehconsists primarily of references to the single nation or people Israel. Israel serves a functional role in Deuteronomy, one in line with the formal nature of the book, which portrays her as a servant of Yahweh whose mission is one of modeling the kingdom of God on earth and pressing its claims on the alienated nations so in need of God's salvation. ...
The third rubric of the theology of Deuteronomy is that of the covenant itself, both its form and its content. But of greater theological importance than the structure of the book is its content, one so inextricably linked to its covenant context that the theology of Deuteronomy should be viewed continually as a statement of relationshipthat of Yahweh the Great King with his elect and commissioned people Israel. ...
More particularly, Deuteronomy is a covenant renewal document and not an initial statement of covenant establishment. This is clear from the frequent references to the original Sinai (or Horeb) covenant setting (1:6; 4:1-2,5, 10,15, 23,33-40) and the change in language in Deuteronomy vis-a-vis Exodus due to the changed circumstances (5:12-15; cf. Moreover, Deuteronomy is a greatly expanded and more detailed rendition of the covenant text, for the complexities of life and expectation in the land of promise raise issues that were of little or no consequence in the wilderness of Sinai. First, they further elucidate the fundamental covenant theme of Deuteronomy 4:40-11:32 . ...
Since the covenant was articulated in the Mosaic writings themselves, specifically in Deuteronomy (31:9), future commitment to its principles presupposed its preservation in a place that was both safe and accessible. Clements, God's Chosen People: A Theological Interpretation of the Book of Deuteronomy ; J. McConville, Law and Theology in Deuteronomy ; Eugene H. Schultz, Deuteronomy: The Gospel of Love
Judges - At Jethro's suggestion, just before the giving of the Sinaitic law (Exodus 18; Deuteronomy 1:9, etc. ...
Regard to locality modified the genealogical principle of selection upon Israel's entrance into Canaan (Deuteronomy 16:18). The Levites, as the ultimate sources under God of jurisprudence, taught the people the law, to enable the judges and those judged to understand the right principle of decisions (Deuteronomy 17:8-13). The qualifications of a judge are given (Exodus 18:21), "able men, such as fear God, men of truth, hating covetousness"; "not wresting judgment, not respecting persons, neither taking a gift" (so universal a practice with Eastern judges), Deuteronomy 16:19; "not respecting the person of the poor, nor honouring the person of the mighty" (Leviticus 19:15); "not afraid of the face of man, for the judgment is God's" (Deuteronomy 1:17). ...
The custody, in the sanctuary, of the standard weights and measures made an appeal to the priesthood in disputes a necessity; and in final appeals the high priest, as chief legal authority, decided difficult cases before the time of the kings (Deuteronomy 17:8; Deuteronomy 17:12). ...
Afterward, the king was expected to hear causes in person, and therefore should write and read continually a copy of the law (2 Samuel 15:1-4; Deuteronomy 17:18-19). So in the case of the manslayer (Joshua 20:4-6; Deuteronomy 19:12; Numbers 35:24-25)
Gift, Giving - Human life is God's gift (Job 1:21 ), as are all things necessary for physical life: the sun for light (Jeremiah 31:25 ); plants (Genesis 1:29 ) and animals for food (Genesis 9:3 ); water (Numbers 21:16 ); clothing (Genesis 28:20 ); grass for herds (Deuteronomy 11:15 ); seasonal rains for crops (Leviticus 26:4 ); companionship of male and female (Genesis 2:18-24 ; compare Genesis 3:12 ); the ability to have children (Genesis 17:16 ); and sleep (Psalm 127:2 ). Various human abilities are likewise given by God: the ability to work (Deuteronomy 8:18 ); artistic abilities (Exodus 31:6 ); the ability to acquire learning and master communication skills (Daniel 1:17 ). In the Old Testament such gifts include: the Promised Land (Genesis 12:7 )—including its successful conquest (Deuteronomy 2:36 ), possessing its cities (Deuteronomy 6:10 ), and its spoils (Deuteronomy 20:14 ); the sabbath (Exodus 16:29 ); the promises (1 Kings 8:56 ); the covenants (2 Kings 17:15 ); the law (Exodus 24:12 ); and peace (Leviticus 26:6 )
Shaphan - During Josiah's religious reforms and refurbishment of the Temple, Shaphan delivered the newfound book of the law (probably Deuteronomy) from Hilkiah the priest to the king's palace
Avim, or Avites - Descendants of Canaan, Genesis 10:17 , who occupied a portion of the coast of Palestine from Gaza towards the river of Egypt, but were expelled and almost destroyed by invading Philistines or Caphtorim, before the time of Moses, Deuteronomy 2:23
Og - " He was a man of gigantic stature, whose bed of iron, nine cubits long and four cubits wide, was shown in Rabbath (Deuteronomy 3)
Fever - (Deuteronomy 28:22 ; Matthew 8:14 ; Mark 1:30 ; John 4:52 ; Acts 28:8 ), a burning heat, as the word so rendered denotes, which attends all febrile attacks
Suph - (Deuteronomy 1:1 , RSV; marg
Golan - Exile, a city of Bashan (Deuteronomy 4:43 ), one of the three cities of refuge east of Jordan, about 12 miles north-east of the Sea of Galilee (Joshua 20:8 )
Perjury - False witness was punishable with the sentence which would have gone to the one falsely accused of guilt (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 )
Brass - Some modern translations retain brass where hardness or persistence in sin is in view (Leviticus 26:19 ; Deuteronomy 28:23 ; Isaiah 48:4 ), but they use “bronze” as a translation elsewhere
Naked - Being without clothes (Genesis 2:25 ; Job 1:21 ; Ecclesiastes 5:15 ; Amos 2:16 ; Micah 1:8 ) or else poorly clothed (Deuteronomy 28:48 ; Matthew 25:36-44 ; James 2:15 )
Chariots of the Sun - Deuteronomy 17:3 records God's injunction to Israel not to worship the sun, but Ezekiel attested to persons in the Temple worshiping the sun ( Ezekiel 8:16 )
Levirate Law, Levirate Marriage - The legal provision requiring a dead man's brother (levirate) to marry his childless widow and father a son who would assume the dead man's name and inherit his portion of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 )
Gomorrha, Sodom And - Their names are synonymous with impenitent sin, and their fall with a manifestation of God's just wrath (Deuteronomy 29; 2 Peter 2; Jude 1:7; Ezechiel 16)
Bush - ...
Deuteronomy 33:16 (b) It refers to the unusual character of GOD's presence on the earth as contrasted with the greatness of Heaven
Sodomites - Not inhabitants of Sodom, but those "devoted" (qedeeshim ) to unnatural lust in Ashtoreth's honour, as a religious rite! (Deuteronomy 23:17; 1 Kings 14:24; 2 Kings 23:7; Job 36:14 margin) There were women similarly "desecrated" to lust as a religious rite (Genesis 38:21-22; Hosea 4:14; translated 1 Kings 22:38), "the dogs licked his blood while the 'harlots' (zonot ) were bathing in the pool" early in the morning, as their custom was
Courage - Deuteronomy 31
Abarim - ), one of its summits, Moses surveyed the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 3:27 ; 32:49 ), and there he died (34:1,5)
Bush - This word occurs in Exodus 3:2 ; Exodus 3:4 , and Deuteronomy 33:16 , as the name of the bush in which God appeared to Moses
Edrei - One of the capitals of Bashan, near which Og and his forces were destroyed, Numbers 21:33-35 Deuteronomy 1:4 3:1-3
Sodom And Gomorrha - Their names are synonymous with impenitent sin, and their fall with a manifestation of God's just wrath (Deuteronomy 29; 2 Peter 2; Jude 1:7; Ezechiel 16)
Harvest - Olives were harvested between mid-September to mid-November by beating the trees with long sticks (Deuteronomy 24:20 ; Isaiah 17:6 ). The average harvesting period was set at a period of seven weeks (Leviticus 23:15 ; Deuteronomy 16:9 ). Significant events were connected with harvest times (Exodus 34:18-20 ; Deuteronomy 16:13-16 ; Joshua 3:15 ; 1 Samuel 16:13 )
Pisgah - Nebo was a town on, or near, that ridge, lying on its western slope (Numbers 21:20; Numbers 32:3; Numbers 32:38; Deuteronomy 32:49; Deuteronomy 34:1). " The field of Zophim was on it Ashsoth-Pisgah; Deuteronomy 3:17
Murder - The Mosaic code reenacted it, Leviticus 24:17 ; and while providing for the unintentional homicide a safe retreat, declares that deliberate murder must be punished by death, from which neither the city of refuge nor the altar of God could shield the criminal, Exodus 21:12-14 Numbers 35:9-34 Deuteronomy 19:1-13 1 Kings 2:5-6,28-34 . If a corpse were found in the open fields, and the murderer could not be discovered, the town nearest to the spot was obliged to purge itself by a solemn ceremony, lest it should become liable to the judgments of God, Deuteronomy 21:1-9 . ...
In various ways God is represented as specially abhorring this crime, and securing its punishment, Deuteronomy 32:43 2 Samuel 21:1 Psalm 9:12 55:23 Hosea 1:4 Revelation 22:15
Nebo - Mount Nebo is the traditional site of Moses’ view of Canaan ( Deuteronomy 34:1 f. ) and of his death ( Deuteronomy 32:50 ). It is described as being ‘in the land of Moab over against Jericho’ and as reached from the ‘steppes of Moah’ ( Deuteronomy 34:1 ). Nebo? How does the actual view thence agree with the terms of Deuteronomy 34:1 f. It follows that the description in Deuteronomy 34:1 f. The difficulty could be in part overcome by considering Deuteronomy 34:2-3 (together with the words ‘of Gilead unto Dan’ in v
Oil - The Hebrews used olive oil as butter and as animal fat is used with us, Deuteronomy 32:13; Job 24:11; Ezekiel 16:13. Deuteronomy 28:40; Ezekiel 27:17
Imagination - At Deuteronomy 31:21 and possibly Romans 1:21 , imagination refers to the inclination to do evil. Most often, imagination means stubborness (Deuteronomy 29:19 ; Jeremiah 3:17 ; Jeremiah 7:24 ; Jeremiah 9:14 ; Jeremiah 11:8 ; Jeremiah 13:10 ; Jeremiah 16:12 ; Jeremiah 18:12 ; Jeremiah 23:17 )
Amalekite - They attempted to stop the Israelites when they marched through their territory (Deuteronomy 25:18 ), attacking them at Rephidim (Exodus 17:8-13 ; Compare Deuteronomy 25:17 ; 1 Samuel 15:2 )
Greatness of God - His greatness appears by the attributes he possesses, Deuteronomy 32:3-4 . obedience Deuteronomy 4:39-40
Baldness - A humiliation to captives (Deuteronomy 21:12; Isaiah 3:24). ...
The reason Israel was forbidden to do so was, "for thou art an holy people unto the Lord" (Deuteronomy 14:1-2)
Sihon - The Amorites were defeated; Sihon, his sons, and all his people were smitten with the sword, his walled towns were captured, and the entire country of the Amorites was taken possession of by the Israelites (Numbers 21:21-30 ; Deuteronomy 2:24-37 ). He also tried to prevent the progress of the Israelites, but was utterly routed, and all his cities and territory fell into the hands of the Israelites (Compare Numbers 21:33-35 ; Deuteronomy 3:1-14 ; Psalm 135 :: 1012-12 ; 136:17-22 )
Tithe - The Deuteronomic code stipulated that the tithe of agricultural produce be used for a family feast at the sanctuary celebrating God's provision ( Deuteronomy 14:22-27 ). The same code stipulated the third year's tithe for care of the Levites, orphans, widows, and foreigners (Deuteronomy 14:28-29 )
Unicorn - In Deuteronomy 33:17, "his (Joseph's) horns are like the horns of an unicorn" (so margin rightly, not "unicorns"); "the ten thousands of Ephraim and the thousands of Manasseh," two tribes sprung from the one Joseph, are the two horns from one head. The unicorn's characteristics are:...
(1) great strength, Numbers 23:22; Job 39:11;...
(2) two horns, Deuteronomy 33:17;...
(3) fierceness, Psalms 22:21;...
(4) untameableness, Job 39:9-11, where the unicorn, probably the wild bison, buffalo, ox, or urus (now only found in Lithuania, but then spread over northern temperate climes, Bashan, etc
Grass - (4) çseb , Deuteronomy 11:15 ; Deuteronomy 32:2 etc
Lawgiver - ]'>[1] of the OT ( Genesis 49:10 , Numbers 21:18 , Deuteronomy 33:21 , Psalms 60:7 ; Psalms 108:8 , Isaiah 33:22 ). word appears to have two meanings: (1) ‘ruler’; so in Deuteronomy 33:21 , where RVm Mouth - Organ of speech (Genesis 45:12 ; Deuteronomy 32:1 ) or laughter (Job 8:21 ; Psalm 126:2 ). The phrase “the mouth of the Lord has spoken it” serves as a frequent reminder of the reliability of a prophetic message (Isaiah 1:20 ; Isaiah 40:5 ; Jeremiah 9:12 ; compare Deuteronomy 8:3 ; Matthew 4:4 )
Sore - Something evil or bad (Deuteronomy 6:22 ; Deuteronomy 28:35 )
Zared - ZARED or ZERED (more accurately), VALLEY OF; or brook or watercourse of (Numbers 21:12; Deuteronomy 2:13-14). So the name marked an era in their progress; and the summons to cross it is noted in Deuteronomy 2:13-14
Hart - It was clean by the Levitical law, Deuteronomy 12:15; Deuteronomy 14:5, and the grace and agility of its motions are alluded to in Song of Solomon 2:9; Isaiah 35:6
Gall - ראש , something excessively bitter, and supposed to be poisonous, Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Deuteronomy 32:32 ; Psalms 69:21 ; Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 23:15 ; Lamentations 3:19 ; Hosea 10:4 ; Amos 6:12
Plough - A slight and inefficient instrument in the East, but used from the earliest times, Genesis 45:6 Deuteronomy 22:10 Job 1:14 . Ploughs were drawn by oxen asses, and heifers, Deuteronomy 22:10 Judges 14:18 ; at this day camels and cows are also used in Palestine
Eagle - (1) nesher , Deuteronomy 32:11 etc. Job 39:27 ; Job 39:30 and Jeremiah 49:16 well describe its habits; and its powerful and rapid flight is referred to in Isaiah 40:31 , Deuteronomy 28:49 , Habakkuk 1:8
Pentateuch - He wrote down the law that Israel received from God (Exodus 24:4; Exodus 34:27; Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:24), he kept records of Israel’s history (Exodus 17:14; Numbers 33:2) and he wrote songs and poems (Exodus 15:1; Deuteronomy 31:22; Genesis 12:1-30). The four documents are referred to respectively as J (because it speaks of God as Jehovah, or Yahweh), E (because it speaks of God as Elohim), D (because it bases its content on Deuteronomy) and P (because it deals mainly with matters of priestly interest). The remainder of Numbers shows how the people moved on towards the promised land, and Deuteronomy shows the life God required of them once they settled in that land. Deuteronomy 18:18-19; Acts 3:18-23)
Moab - ...
The territory of the Moabites, originally inhabited by the Emims, Deuteronomy 2:10, lay on the east of the Dead Sea and the Jordan, strictly on the highlands south of the Arnon; Numbers 21:13; Ruth 1:1-2; Ruth 2:6; but in a wider sense it included also the region anciently occupied by the Amorites over against Jericho, usually called the "Plains of Moab. " Numbers 21:13; Numbers 22:1; Numbers 26:3; Numbers 33:48; Deuteronomy 34:1. When the Hebrews advanced to Canaan, they did not enter the territory of Moab proper, Deuteronomy 2:9; Judges 11:18; but there was always a great antipathy between the two peoples, which arose from Balaam having seduced the Hebrews to sin by the daughters of Moab. Numbers 25:1-2; Deuteronomy 23:3-6
Murder - Bloodshed in any way, even in war, brought pollution (Numbers 35:33-34; Deuteronomy 21:1-9; 1 Chronicles 28:3, David; 1 Chronicles 22:8). Two witnesses were required before anyone could be put to death for murder, a check on private revenge (Numbers 35:19-30; Deuteronomy 17:6-12; Deuteronomy 19:12; Deuteronomy 19:17)
Seir, Mount - " For as Israel moved from Mount Hor by way of that plain towards the Red Sea at Elath they "compassed Mount Seir" (Numbers 21:4; Deuteronomy 2:1; Deuteronomy 2:8). toward Moab (Deuteronomy 2:3). Seir and Sinai are not in Deuteronomy 33:2 grouped together geographically, but in reference to their being both alike scenes of God's glory manifested in behalf of His people
Stranger - Both of these classes, according to the civil code of Moses, were to be treated with kindness, and were to enjoy the same rights with other citizens, Leviticus 19:33-34 ; Leviticus 24:16 ; Leviticus 24:22 ; Numbers 9:14 ; Numbers 15:14 ; Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Deuteronomy 23:7 ; Deuteronomy 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 27:19
Half Tribe - The term usually refers to that part of Manasseh dwelling to the east of the Jordan along with Reuben and Gad (Numbers 32:33 ; Deuteronomy 3:13 ; Joshua 1:12 ; Joshua 4:12 ; Joshua 22:1 )
Wormwood - WORMWOOD ( la‘ăn âh , Deuteronomy 29:18 , Proverbs 5:4 , Jeremiah 9:16 ; Jeremiah 23:16 , Lamentations 3:15-16 , Amos 5:7 ; Amos 6:12 Arnon - Swift, the southern boundary of the territory of Israel beyond Jordan, separating it from the land of Moab (Deuteronomy 3:8,16 )
Foreigner - Such as resided among the Hebrews were required by the law to be treated with kindness (Exodus 22:21 ; 23:9 ; Leviticus 19:33,34 ; 23:22 ; Deuteronomy 14:28 ; 16:10,11 ; 24:19 )
Resignation - The perfections of God, Deuteronomy 32:4
Glede - An Old English name for the common kite, mentioned only in Deuteronomy 14:13 (Heb
Bastard - " In Deuteronomy 23:2 , it occurs in the ordinary sense of illegitimate offspring
Perizzites - The Perizzites were one of many Canaanite groups that occupied Canaan before the Israelites drove them out (Genesis 13:7; Genesis 15:20; Exodus 3:8; Deuteronomy 7:1; Joshua 3:10)
Hazar - Alternately, settlements bearing the name Hazar were enclosed with walls or other defenses (compare Numbers 13:28 ; Deuteronomy 1:28 )
Hoopoe - HOOPOE ( Leviticus 11:19 , Deuteronomy 14:18 RV sa'Lim - Van Deuteronomy Velde in a position exactly in accordance with the notice of Eusebius, viz
Consumption - But in Leviticus 26:16 , Deuteronomy 28:22 it is used of a disease of the body
Doorpost - ...
Deuteronomy 11:20 (c) This is a call for the people of GOD to publicly announce to neighbors, friends and those who pass by that those in this home are believers, who accept the Word of GOD as their law of life, and express thereby their faith in GOD
Prophet, the - The Lord Jesus was emphatically 'the prophet of God,' whose coming was foretold in Deuteronomy 18:15,18
Arm - Thus God is said to have delivered his people from Egyptian bondage "with a stretched-out arm," Deuteronomy 5:15 ; and he thus threatens Eli the high priest, "I will cut off thine arm, and the arm of thy father's house,"...
1 Samuel 2:31 ; that is, I will deprive thee and thy family of power and authority
Maacah - The distribution of the half tribe of Manasseh, beyond Jordan, extended as far as this country, Deuteronomy 3:14 ; Joshua 12:5
Face - To see him "face to face," is to enjoy his presence, Genesis 32:30 Numbers 14:14 Deuteronomy 5:4 , and have a clear manifestation of his nature and grace, 1 Corinthians 13:12
Ezion-Geber - It was the port from which shipping routes went east and overland routes went north (Deuteronomy 2:8; 1 Kings 9:26)
Honey - , Deuteronomy 6:3; Deuteronomy 11:9; Deuteronomy 26:9; Deuteronomy 26:15; Deuteronomy 27:3; Deuteronomy 31:20, Joshua 5:6, Jeremiah 11:5; Jeremiah 32:22, Ezekiel 20:6; Ezekiel 20:15); or in other connexions, either literally, as a product of the soil and as food (Genesis 43:11, Deuteronomy 8:8; Deuteronomy 32:13, Judges 14:8 f. ]'>[1] , perhaps under the influence of Deuteronomy 32:13 and Psalms 81:16, has ‘honey of the mountains’]) appears to point by way of contrast to the existence of honey derived from domesticated bees
Honey - , Deuteronomy 6:3; Deuteronomy 11:9; Deuteronomy 26:9; Deuteronomy 26:15; Deuteronomy 27:3; John 21:9-13, Joshua 5:6, Jeremiah 11:5; Jeremiah 32:22, Ezekiel 20:6; Ezekiel 20:15); or in other connexions, either literally, as a product of the soil and as food (Genesis 43:11, Deuteronomy 8:8; Deuteronomy 32:13, Judges 14:8 f. ]'>[1] , perhaps under the influence of Deuteronomy 32:13 and Psalms 81:16, has ‘honey of the mountains’]) appears to point by way of contrast to the existence of honey derived from domesticated bees. With a view to this we must place the narrative of Luke 24:41-43 alongside of Deuteronomy 31:20, compare these two descriptions of a meal, and note that in many of the writings of the Fathers, and probably in various attempts to establish ‘harmonies of the Four Gospels’ (but not in the Diatessaron of Tatian), these two scenes are in fact identified (although they differ in all their essential features)
Kill, Killing - Murder was a premeditated act (Exodus 21:13 ; Numbers 35:20-22 ) punishable by death (Numbers 35:31-33 ; Deuteronomy 19:13 ). naka, [Deuteronomy 19:1-10 ). Accidental manslaughter could result from a sudden shove or unintentional throwing of an object (Numbers 35:22 ), the dropping of a stone or random missile (Numbers 35:22-23 ), a fall from a roof with no rail (Deuteronomy 22:8 ), or assault by a killer who was not lying in wait (Exodus 21:12-13 ). Capital punishment was employed for the following criminal cases: intentional homicide (Exodus 21:12 ; Leviticus 24:17 ; Numbers 35:16-21 ), kidnapping (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ), prostitution by the priest's daughter (Leviticus 21:9 ), persistent disobedience against parents (Leviticus 20:9 ; Deuteronomy 27:16 ), apostasy from the Lord (Numbers 25:5 ; Deuteronomy 13:10 ), killing the king (2 Samuel 4:10-12 ), fratricide (Genesis 4:14 ; Exodus 21:14 ; Judges 9:56 ; 2 Samuel 14:7 ), child sacrifice (Leviticus 20:4 ; Heb. mut ), and false prophecy ( Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ). It was also enforced for sexual abuses such as adultery (Leviticus 20:10 ; Deuteronomy 22:22 ), incest (Leviticus 20:11-17 ), sodomy (Leviticus 20:13 ), and bestiality (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 20:15-16 ), and for cultic abuses including idolatry (1619165092_63 ; Numbers 25:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 13:6-18 ; 17:2-7 ), blasphemy (Leviticus 24:15-16 ), profanation of the Sabbath (Exodus 31:14-15 ; Numbers 15:32-36 ), and sorcery (Exodus 22:17 ; Leviticus 20:27 )
Cattle - See Deuteronomy 7:13 ; Deuteronomy 28:4 ; Proverbs 14:4 . ...
Behemah is a general term for animals ( Exodus 9:9 ; Isaiah 30:6 ), for four-footed animals (1 Kings 4:33 ), wild animals (Deuteronomy 28:26 ; 1 Samuel 17:44 ), as well as for domestic cattle including both herds of cattle and flocks of sheep and goats (Leviticus 1:2 ) and oxen and donkeys (Deuteronomy 5:14 ). The cattle produced milk from which yogurt was made (Deuteronomy 32:14 ) and also cheese (2 Samuel 17:29 NAS). The cow was used as a yoke animal for plowing (Deuteronomy 21:3 ). Their financial value led to special laws concerning them (Exodus 21:33 , Exodus 22:1 ,Exodus 22:1,22:10 ; Deuteronomy 22:1 ). They were yoked to the plow but were not to be unequally yoked with a donkey (Deuteronomy 22:10 ). They were used to stomp on the grain to thresh out the kernels from the husks (Deuteronomy 25:4 ). The firstborn had to be sacrificed (Leviticus 22:27-28 ; Numbers 18:17 ; Deuteronomy 15:19 ). They were clean animals which God's people could eat (Deuteronomy 14:4 )
Proselytes - "The stranger" was bound by the law of the Sabbath (Exodus 20:10; Exodus 23:12; Deuteronomy 5:14) and the Passover when he was circumcised (Exodus 12:19; Exodus 12:48), the feast of weeks (Deuteronomy 16:11), tabernacles (Deuteronomy 16:14), the day of atonement (Leviticus 16:29), prohibited marriages (Leviticus 18:26), and blood (Leviticus 17:10), and Moloch worship (Numbers 10:29-32), and blasphemy (Leviticus 24:16). Kind treatment in remembrance of Israel's own position as strangers formerly in Egypt (Exodus 22:21; Exodus 23:9; Deuteronomy 10:18-19; Leviticus 19:33-34), justice (Leviticus 24:22; Deuteronomy 1:16; Deuteronomy 24:17; Deuteronomy 24:19-21), share in gleanings and tithe of the third year (Deuteronomy 14:29), were the stranger's right. But he could not hold land nor intermarry with Aaron's descendants (Leviticus 19:10; Leviticus 21:14), he is presumed to be in a subject condition (Deuteronomy 29:11); Hobab and the Kenites (Leviticus 20:2; Judges 1:16), Rahab of Jericho (Joshua 6:25), and the Gibeonites as "hewers of wood and drawers of water" (Joshua 9), are instances of strangers joined to Israel. The strangers were assembled with Israel at the feast of tabernacles at the cnd of every seven years, to hear the law (Deuteronomy 31:10-12; Joshua 8:34-35). ...
Under the kings strangers rose to influential positions: Doeg the Edomite (1 Samuel 21:7), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:3), Araunah the Jebusite (2 Samuel 24:23), Zelek the Ammonite (2 Samuel 23:37), Ithmah the Moabite (1 Chronicles 11:46, the law in Deuteronomy 23:3 forbidding an Ammonite or Moabite to enter the congregation to the tenth generation does not forbid their settlement in Israel, the law must have been written in times long before David whose great grandmother was Ruth the Moabtress), Ittai the Gittite (2 Samuel 15:19), Shebna the secretary of state under Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:37; Isaiah 22:15), Ebedmelech the Ethiopian under Zedekiah (Jeremiah 38:7), the Cherethites and Pelethites. In times of judgment on Israel for apostasy the stranger became "the head" (Deuteronomy 28:43-44); but under David and Solomon they were made to do bondservice, 70,000 bearers of burdens, 80,000 hewers, 3,600 overseers (1 Chronicles 22:2; 2 Chronicles 2:17-18)
Decalogue - The Decalogue, which is to be found in two sections (Exodus 20; Deuteronomy 5), is invested with full Divine authority, so that obedience to it is the test of holiness for the Chosen People and the individual
Kidnapping - Kidnapping freeborn Israelites either to treat them as slaves or to sell them into slavery was punishable by death (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 )
Ashtaroth - A city of Bashan, in the kingdom of Og (Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Joshua 12:4 ; 13:12 ; 9:10 )
Eunuch - The law of Moses excluded them from the congregation (Deuteronomy 23:1 )
Seraphim - ) This word, in the original, is used elsewhere only of the "fiery serpents" ( Numbers 21:6,8 ; Deuteronomy 8:15 ; Compare Isaiah 14:29 ; 30:6 ) sent by God as his instruments to inflict on the people the righteous penalty of sin
Black - " It is translated "apple" of the eye in Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Psalm 17:8 ; Proverbs 7:2
Eliab -
A Reubenite, son of Pallu (Numbers 16:1,12 ; 26:8,9 ; Deuteronomy 11:6 )
Corner - So also gleanings of fields and fruit trees (Leviticus 23:22; Deuteronomy 24:19-21)
Sabbatical Year - All debts, except those of foreigners, were to be remitted (Deuteronomy 15:1-11 )
Apple of the Eye - The promise is in Zechariah 2:8, "He that toucheth you toucheth the apple of His eye"; the prayer is Psalms 17:8 "Keep me as the apple of the eye"; the fulfillment Deuteronomy 32:10, "He kept him as the apple of His eye
Rabbah - It is known today as Amman, capital of the present-day nation of Jordan (Deuteronomy 3:11; Jeremiah 49:1-2; Ezekiel 21:20; Amos 1:13-14)
Free Will Offering - Free will offerings were traditionally given at Pentecost (Deuteronomy 16:10 )
Havvoth-Jair - ’ In Numbers 32:41 these villages are assigned to Gilead, but in Deuteronomy 3:14 and Joshua 13:30 to Bashan
Heron - word ’anâphâh designates an unclean bird ( Leviticus 11:19 , Deuteronomy 14:18 ), not otherwise mentioned in the Bible, but sufficiently well known to be taken as a type of a class
Hazezon Tamar - ) Perhaps this was "the city of palm trees" (Judges 1:16) (though Jericho is generally called so: Deuteronomy 34:3), from which the Kenites, the tribe of Moses' father-in-law, went into the wilderness of Judah with the children of Judah
Hen (2) - As "the eagle stirring up her nest, fluttering over her young, spreading abroad her wings, taking, bearing them on her wings," represents the Old Testament aspect of Jehovah in relation to Israel under the law (Deuteronomy 32:11), so the "hen," Christ the lowly loving Son of God gathering God's children under His overshadowing wing, in the gospel (Ruth 2:12; Psalms 17:8; Psalms 91:4)
Chamois - Allowed as clean food (Deuteronomy 14:5)
Bush - BUSH ( seneh , Exodus 3:2-4 , Deuteronomy 33:16 )
Drunk - Deuteronomy 32
Follow - Tindale translates Leviticus 26:17 ‘ye shal flee when no man foloweth you,’ and Deuteronomy 28:22 ‘they [1] shall folowe the, intyll thou perishe
Vanity - The term is likewise applied to this world, as unsatisfactory, Ecclesiastes 1:2 ; to lying, Psalms 4:2 ; to idols, Deuteronomy 32:21 ; to whatever disappoints our hopes, Psalms 60:11
Asp - Its 'cruel venom' is used symbolically to describe the wine of the wicked (Deuteronomy 32:33 : cf
Hearken - Deuteronomy 4 ...
3
Vine of Sodom - May not the term be symbolical of that which leads to destruction, which was the doom of Sodom? Deuteronomy 32:32
Abarim - Hence Abarim is joined with ‘mount’ ( Numbers 27:12 , Deuteronomy 32:49 ) and ‘mountains’ ( Numbers 33:47 ); also with ‘Iyye , ‘heaps of’ ( Numbers 21:11 )
Argob - In the region of Argob there were sixty cities, called Bashan- havoth-Jair, which had very high walls and strong gates, without reckoning many villages and hamlets, which were not inclosed, Deuteronomy 3:4-14 ; 1 Kings 4:13
Deep, the - In Romans 10:7 'the deep' probably refers to the deep sea, for in Deuteronomy 30:13 (from whence the quotation is made) it is "Who shall go over the sea for us?" and the sea is called 'the deep' elsewhere, as Isaiah 51:10 ; Isaiah 63:13 , etc
Lust - Originally meant any longing desire, however innocent, Deuteronomy 12:15 14:26
Pelican - The Hebrew term translated pelican in Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 , however, suggests a bird which regurgitates its food to feed its young
Elath - It is mentioned as one of the places passed by the Israelites during their wanderings ( Deuteronomy 2:8 )
Caphtorim - These last two people are both named as ancestors of the Philistines, Genesis 10:14 Deuteronomy 2:23 Amos 9:7 ; and it is probable that a colony made up from both drove out the Avim from the country on the south-east coast of the Mediterranean, and occupied it under the name of Philistines, which it is generally agreed means strangers
Pethor - Mentioned in Numbers 22:5 and Deuteronomy 23:4 as the home of Balaam, in N
Og - (Deuteronomy 3:11) We have an account of this wonderful man; and his size must have been enormous, if we judge of it by his bedstead of iron
Hermon - The ancient Amorites called it Mt Senir (Deuteronomy 3:9; see also LEBANON)
Basket - A third type basket is the common household utensil used in harvesting grain (Deuteronomy 26:2 ; Deuteronomy 28:5 )
Hearing the Word of God - Under the former dispensation there was a public hearing of the law at stated seasons, Deuteronomy 31:10 ; Deuteronomy 31:13
Frontlets - Occurs only in Exodus 13:16 ; Deuteronomy 6:8 , and 11:18. " The passages so written out on strips of parchment were these, Exodus 12:2-10 ; 13:11-21 ; Deuteronomy 6:4-9 ; 11:18-21
Brass - With us a mixed metal, consisting of copper and zinc; but the brass of the Bible is one dug simple out of the earth (Deuteronomy 8:9; Job 28:2), probably copper. In Deuteronomy 33:25, "thy shoes shall be iron and brass," it is implied Asher should have a mine abounding territory
Baldness - Shaving the head for appearance or in grieving for the dead was prohibited by law (Leviticus 21:5 ; Deuteronomy 14:1 ), and especially for priests (Ezekiel 44:20 ). Deuteronomy 21:11 may refer to a practice of making captives bald, to baldness in mourning, or to a symbol of a change in life-style
Gall - Deuteronomy 29:18 (to which Hebrews 12:15, "root of bitterness," refers; a root whose essence is bitterness), Deuteronomy 32:32
Suck - Deuteronomy 32:13 (b) The sweetness of CHRIST is obtained by GOD's people in very difficult circumstances, and under impossible situations. ...
Deuteronomy 33:19 (b) This prophecy tells how the Jews will obtain their riches from the Gentiles (the sea), and will find riches in strange places, and in strange ways
Appeal - It is not probable, when the kingdom was established, that all causes were tried at Jerusalem; but only cases of appeal from the tribal judges; and it was such that Absalom alludes to in 2 Samuel 15:2,3 : see also Deuteronomy 16:18 . It is evident from Deuteronomy 17:8-12 that the mind of God was to be sought where He put His name, if the matter was too hard for the judges
Widow - A custom was prevalent in patriarchal times, Genesis 38:1-30 , and was afterwards confirmed by the Mosaic law, Deuteronomy 25:5-10 , that a widow without children, in order to preserve the family name and inheritance, should marry the brother of her deceased husband; or he failing his nearest kinsman, Ruth 3:12,13 4:1-11 Matthew 22:23-30 . The humanity and justice of true religion are shown in the Bible, as might be expected, by numerous indications that God and the friends of God sympathize with the sorrows, supply the wants, and defend the rights of the widow, Exodus 22:22-24 Deuteronomy 16:11 24:17,19 Psalm 68:5 Isaiah 1:17 10:2 Jeremiah 22:3 Matthew 23:14
Birds - ...
There is great difficulty in accurately determining the different species of birds prohibited in Leviticus 11:13-19 Deuteronomy 14:11-20 , and the proper version of the Hebrew names. ...
Moses, to inculcate humanity on the Israelites, ordered them, if they found a bird's nest, not to take the dam with the young, but to suffer the old one to fly away, and to take the young only, Deuteronomy 22:6,7
Deuteronomy - Or the repetition of the law, the fifth book of the Pentateuch, so called by the Greeks, because in it Moses recapitulates what he had ordained in the preceding books, Deuteronomy 1:1-6 29:1 31:1 33:1-29 . ...
The book of Deuteronomy is the sublime and precious valedictory address of the inspired "man of God," now venerable for his age and experience, and standing almost in the gate of heaven
Bashan - It is celebrated in Scripture for its rich pasturage: "Rams, of the breed of Bashan," Deuteronomy 32:14 ; "Rams, bulls, goats, all of them fatlings of Bashan," Ezekiel 39:18 . In the time of Joshua, Argob, one of its chief districts, contained sixty walled towns, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:27
Giants - After the flood, mention is made of a race called Rephaim, Genesis 14:5 Joshua 17:15 ; kindred with whom were the Emim, early occupants of the land of Moab, and the Zamzummim in Ammon, Deuteronomy 2:10,20 . Og was one of the last of this race, Deuteronomy 3:11,13
Perdition - It is the penalty for disobedience (Deuteronomy 22:24 ; Deuteronomy 28:20 )
Moses - The Israelites finally reached the banks of the Jordan, after defeating the Amorrhites and Moabites, and Moses died on Mount Nebo after pronouncing the three memorable discourses preserved in Deuteronomy. He was buried in the valley of Moab, but "no man knows his sepulchre" (Deuteronomy 34), and "there arose no more a prophet in Israel like unto Moses" (ib. See also, Exodus, Numbers and Deuteronomy
Mourn - Abraham mourned for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 ); Jacob for Joseph (37:34,35); the Egyptians for Jacob (50:3-10); Israel for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ), for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ), and for Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1 ); David for Abner (2 Samuel 3:31,35 ); Mary and Martha for Lazarus (John 11 ); devout men for Stephen (Acts 8:2 ), etc. ); (2) by loud lamentation (Ruth 1:9 ; 1 Samuel 6:19 ; 2 Samuel 3:31 ); (3) by the disfigurement of the person, as rending the clothes (Genesis 37:29,34 ; Matthew 26:65 ), wearing sackcloth (Genesis 37:34 ; Psalm 35:13 ), sprinkling dust or ashes on the person (2 Samuel 13:19 ; Jeremiah 6:26 ; Job 2:12 ), shaving the head and plucking out the hair of the head or beard (Leviticus 10:6 ; Job 1:20 ), neglect of the person or the removal of ornaments (Exodus 33:4 ; Deuteronomy 21:12,13 ; 2 Samuel 14:2 ; 19:24 ; Matthew 6:16,17 ), fasting (2 Samuel 1:12 ), covering the upper lip (Leviticus 13:45 ; Micah 3:7 ), cutting the flesh (Jeremiah 16:6,7 ), and sitting in silence (Judges 20:26 ; 2 Samuel 12:16 ; 13:31 ; Job 1:20 ). For Jacob it was seventy days (Genesis 50:3 ); for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ) and Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ) thirty days; and for Saul only seven days (1 Samuel 31:13 )
Sinai - Through that covenant God formally made them his people and gave them this law (Exodus 19; Exodus 24:16; Exodus 34:1-4; Exodus 34:29; Leviticus 7:37-38; Leviticus 27:34; Deuteronomy 1:6; Deuteronomy 1:19; Deuteronomy 5:1-2; 1 Kings 8:9; Acts 7:38)
Plagues - ...
The primary reference to the plagues in the Bible is in Exodus 7:1-13:15 (compare Deuteronomy 4:34 ; Deuteronomy 7:19 ; Deuteronomy 11:3 ; Jeremiah 32:20 )
Jabbok - of this the territory had been wrested from Ammon by the Amorites (Joshua 13:25), and was still claimed by Ammon after Israel had in turn wrested it from Sihon, whence the Jabbok is still called "the border of the children of Ammon" (Deuteronomy 3:16; Joshua 12:2; Judges 11:13; Judges 11:21-22). Israel was restricted by God's prohibition from touching the Ammonite land, which He had given to the children of Lot (Deuteronomy 2:19; Deuteronomy 2:37)
Weather - The rain came in the cooler season, beginning with early rains about October and concluding with later rains about March (Deuteronomy 11:14; Jeremiah 3:3; Jeremiah 5:24; Joel 2:23; see FARMING). Deuteronomy 3:9). If they obeyed him, he would bless them with good weather and agricultural prosperity; if they turned away from him and followed other gods, he would send them droughts and other disasters (Deuteronomy 28:1-24; see NATURE)
Heaven - The place from which rain comes ( Deuteronomy 11:11; 1 Kings 8:35; 2 Chronicles 6:26; Jeremiah 10:13). The place which describes Israel's dispersion ( Deuteronomy 30:4; Nehemiah 1:9). ( Deuteronomy 33:13)
Almighty - ‘Rock’ as a title of God in Deuteronomy 32:4 ; Deuteronomy 32:18 ; Deuteronomy 32:30-31 ), or ‘Lord
Gate - The gates of eastern walled towns were usually of wood, Judges 16:3 , often covered with thick plates of iron or copper, Psalm 107:16 Isaiah 45:2 Acts 12:10 , secured by bolts and bars, Deuteronomy 3:5 1 Kings 4:13 , and flanked by towers, 2 Samuel 18:24,33 . A city was usually regarded as taken when its gates were won, Deuteronomy 28:52 Judges 5:8 . ...
In oriental cities there was always an open space or place adjacent to each gate, and these were at the same time the market places, and the place of justice, Genesis 23:10-18 Ruth 4:1-12 Deuteronomy 16:18 21:19 25:6,7 Proverbs 22:22 Amos 5:10,12,15
Fear - Their fear of God is mixed with love for him (Deuteronomy 6:2; Deuteronomy 6:5; 1 Peter 1:8; 1 Peter 3:15). They should obey God because they love him (Deuteronomy 10:12; Romans 8:15; 1 John 4:17-18; 1 John 5:3)
Olive - It is the characteristic tree of Judea on Roman coins, Deuteronomy 8:8. Asher "dipped his foot in oil" (Deuteronomy 33:24). The tree was shaken to get the remnant left after the general gathering (by "beating," Deuteronomy 24:20), Isaiah 24:13; image of Israel's "remnant according to the election of grace. A rocky calcareous subsoil suits it; compare "oil out of the flinty rock" (Deuteronomy 32:13)
Pity - Exodus 15:13 , Numbers 14:19 , Deuteronomy 13:17 ; Deu 30:3 , 2 Kings 13:23 , 2 Chronicles 36:15 ). They were not required, however, to look beyond the limits of their own race ( Deuteronomy 7:16 , See Deuteronomy 7:9 ) except in the case of individual aliens who might at any time be living within their borders (see Exodus 22:21 ; Exodus 23:9 , Deuteronomy 10:18 f
Foreigner - ...
God has a special concern for those who are resident foreigners or who belong to other minority groups that are liable to unfair treatment by the majority (Deuteronomy 10:17-19; Psalms 146:9). He instructed Israelites to treat foreigners with tolerance and kindness, and to remember how they themselves felt when they were foreigners in Egypt (Exodus 23:9; Deuteronomy 24:19-22; see HOSPITALITY). They were under the law of Israel (Exodus 12:19; Leviticus 17:10; Leviticus 18:26; Leviticus 20:2; Leviticus 24:16), but they also shared the national blessings of Israel (Deuteronomy 29:10-13; Joshua 8:33; Joshua 20:9). They could join in some of Israel’s ceremonies (Numbers 15:14; Deuteronomy 26:11), but they could not join in the Passover unless they had formally become members of the covenant people (Exodus 12:48-50; see CIRCUMCISION; PROSELYTE)
Hermon, Mount - The name Hermon was called Sarion (Sirion) by the Sidonians (Phoenicians) (Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Psalm 29:6 ) and Sanir (Senir) by the Amorites (Deuteronomy 3:9 ). It is also called Sion (Deuteronomy 4:48 ), probably on account of its height. (1) It was the northern border of the Amorite kingdom (Deuteronomy 3:8 ; Deuteronomy 4:48 )
Bashan - ) The tract beyond Jordan (Deuteronomy 3:3; Deuteronomy 3:10; Deuteronomy 3:14; Joshua 12:5; 1 Chronicles 5:23), between mount Hermon on the N. Og, the giant king of Bashan, "came out" from the rugged strongholds of Argob to encounter them, and perished with all his people (Numbers 21:33-35; Deuteronomy 3:1-5; Deuteronomy 3:12-13)
Ammon - Ammon and Moab appear continually together; both are said to have hired Balaam (Deuteronomy 13:4), though Moab alone is mentioned in the detailed account (Numbers 22; 23). Ammon destroyed the aboriginal Rephaim or giants, named Zamzummim, and occupied their land, Jabbok being their boundary (Deuteronomy 2:20-21; Deuteronomy 2:37). Their unwillingness to help Israel, and their joining Moab in hiring Balaam (Deuteronomy 23:2; Deuteronomy 23:46; Nehemiah 13:2), caused their exclusion (like that of a bastard) from the Lord's congregation for ten generations; whereas Edom, who had not hired him, was only excluded for three
Ashtaroth - ” This word, “ashtaroth,” appears in Deuteronomy 7:13 and Deuteronomy 28:4 ,Deuteronomy 28:4,28:18 ,Deuteronomy 28:18,28:51 to describe the young of the flock. Og, king of Bashan, reigned in the city of Ashtaroth (Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 12:4 , Joshua 13:12 , Joshua 13:31 ; 1 Chronicles 6:17 )
Frontlets - Thrice mentioned in Old Testament: totaphot (Exodus 13:16; Deuteronomy 6:8; Deuteronomy 11:18). prayers, for they were worn at prayer to typify sincerity, but others explain ligaments) were parchment strips, inscribed with Exodus 13:2-17; Deuteronomy 6:4-9; Deuteronomy 6:13-22 (by no means the most important passages in the Pentateuch, which fact is against the Jewish literalism), in prepared ink, rolled in a case of black PHYLACTERY. Rabbis quoted Isaiah 49:16; Isaiah 62:8; Deuteronomy 33:2, to prove that even God wore them! and Isaiah 38:16 to show that the wearer thereby prolonged his days, but he who did not wear them should go to perdition
Cattle - To the rearing and management of them the inhabitants chiefly devoted themselves (Deuteronomy 8:13 ; 12:21 ; 1 Samuel 11:5 ; 12:3 ; Psalm 144:14 ; Jeremiah 3:24 ). According to the Mosaic law, the mouths of cattle employed for the threshing-floor were not to be muzzled, so as to prevent them from eating of the provender over which they trampled (Deuteronomy 25:4 ). If an ox went astray, whoever found it was required to bring it back to its owner (23:4; Deuteronomy 22:1,4 ). An ox and an ass could not be yoked together in the plough (Deuteronomy 22:10 ). They were used both for sacrifice and for food (Deuteronomy 14:4 ), especially the young males (Genesis 27:9,14,17 ; Judges 6:19 ; 13:15 ; 1 Samuel 16:20 )
Stone - John 2:6 ), a mill ( Deuteronomy 24:8 ). At first an expression of popular fury ( Joshua 7:25 ), it was afterwards regulated by law as an appointed means of capital punishment ( Deuteronomy 17:5-7 ; cf. Stones would be the ordinary landmarks between the fields of one person and another, the removal of which was strictly forbidden ( Deuteronomy 19:14 etc. ), but afterwards was built of several stones, which must be unhewn ( Exodus 20:25 , Deuteronomy 27:5-6 ). Ebal ( Deuteronomy 27:2 ff. Stones = testicles ( Leviticus 21:20 , Deuteronomy 23:1 , Job 40:17 )
Servant - The Hebrews servant was not to be made to serve with rigor, nor transferred to any harder bondage; he had an appeal to the tribunals, a right to all religious privileges, the power of demanding release on providing a pecuniary equivalent, and a donation from his master at his release, Leviticus 25:47-55 Deuteronomy 15:12-18 . These were protected by law, Deuteronomy 1:16,17 27:19 , and might become proselytes, attend the festivals, enjoy religious instruction and privileges, Exodus 12:44 Deuteronomy 12:18 29:10-13 31:10-13 . The servant who was mutilated by his master was to be set free, Exodus 21:26,27 ; the refugee from foreign oppression was to be welcomed, 1 Corinthians 7:20-24 ; and kidnapping or man stealing was forbidden on pain of death, Exodus 21:16 Deuteronomy 24:7 1 Timothy 1:10 . ...
The allusion of the Bible to involuntary servitude, imply that it is an evil and undesirable condition of life; yet the bondman who cannot obtain his freedom is divinely exhorted to contentment, Deuteronomy 23:15,16 . Meanwhile the Bible give directions as to the mutual duties of masters and servants, Ephesians 6:5-9 Colossians 3:22 4:1 Titus 2:9 Philippians 1:1-25 1 Peter 2:18 ; and proclaims the great truths of the common origin of all men, the immorality of every human soul, and its right to the Bible and to all necessary means of knowing and serving the Saviorthe application of which to all the relations of master and servant, superior and inferior, employer and employed, would prevent all oppression, which God abhors, Deuteronomy 24:14 Psalm 103:6 Isaiah 10:1-3 Amos 4:1 Malachi 3:5 James 5:4
Torah - The Torah was given to Moses (Exodus 24:12 ) and commanded to be kept (Exodus 16:28 ; Deuteronomy 17:19 ; Ezekiel 44:24 ). ...
Within the Book of Deuteronomy, torah is used to represent the body of the Deuteronomic code (Deuteronomy 4:8 ; Deuteronomy 30:10 ; Deuteronomy 32:46 ), that is, the essence of Israel's responsibilities under the covenant. The “book of the law” found in the Temple which fueled Josiah's reforms (2 Kings 22:8-13 ) is often regarded to be roughly equivalent to the Book of Deuteronomy. Eventually the name Torah came to be applied to the entire Pentateuch, the five books traditionally ascribed to Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy
Ban - The war ban of the first degree, as it may be termed, Involved the destruction not only of every man, woman, and child of the enemy, but also of their entire property of every description (see Deuteronomy 13:16 ). Deuteronomy 7:26 ). In this case only the men, women, and children of the doomed city were devoted, while the cattle and the rest of the spoil became the property of the victors ( Deuteronomy 2:34 f. , Deuteronomy 3:6 f. , Deuteronomy 7:2 , Joshua 11:14 ). A still further relaxation, a ban of the third degree, is contemplated by the law of Deuteronomy 20:10 ff. It appears in the oldest legislation as the punishment of the apostate Israelite ( Exodus 22:20 ), and is extended in the Deuteronomic code to the idolatrous city ( Deuteronomy 13:12 ff. Nevertheless the enactment of Deuteronomy 13:12 ff
Herb - ...
...
Yarak , Green; any green thing; foliage of trees ( 2 Kings 19:26 ; Psalm 37:2 ); a plant; herb (Deuteronomy 11:10 )
Hill - In Deuteronomy 1:7 , Joshua 9:1 ; 10:40 ; 11:16 , it denotes the elevated district of Judah, Benjamin, and Ephraim, which forms the watershed between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea
Eshcol - The small and well-watered valley from which the Hebrew spies obtained the specimen of grapes, which they suspended from a staff borne by two men for safe carriage to Moses, Numbers 13:22-27 32:9 Deuteronomy 1:24
Abomination - Idols and their worship were so named, because they robbed God of his honor, while the rites themselves were impure and cruel, Deuteronomy 7:25,26 12:31
Eshcol - A wady, with vineyards and pomegranates, apparently near Hebron ( Numbers 13:23-24 ; Numbers 32:9 , Deuteronomy 1:24 )
Dead Sea - In the Old Testament it is called "sea of the wilderness" (Joshua 1:3); "east sea" (Joel 2; Zachariah 14); "salt sea" (Genesis 14); and "sea of the desert" (Deuteronomy 3)
Countenance - The face as an indication of mood, emotion, or character (see Genesis 4:5-6 ; Deuteronomy 28:50 ; Job 9:27 ; Psalm 10:4 ; Proverbs 15:13 ; Ecclesiastes 7:3 ; Mark 10:22 )
Zamzummim - A name given by the conquering Ammonites to the Rephaim , the original inhabitants of the land ( Deuteronomy 2:20 )
Booty - In Canaan all that breathed were to be destroyed (Deuteronomy 20 :: 16 )
Law of Moses - Torah, Deuteronomy 1:5 ; 4:8,44 ; 17:18,19 ; 27:3,8 )
Olive - The best oil was from olives that were plucked before being fully ripe, and then beaten or squeezed (Deuteronomy 24:20 ; Isaiah 17:6 ; 24:13 )
Proselyte - , in Exodus 22:21 ; 23:9 ; Deuteronomy 10:19 , of the "stranger" living among the children of Israel
Finger of God - The finger of God writing the Ten Commandments illustrated God's giving the law without any mediation (Exodus 31:18 ; Deuteronomy 9:10 )
Bamah - " Your sacrifices even to ME on a "high place" instead of My "altar" in the temple, were therefore a "provocation," Ezekiel 20:28 (Deuteronomy 12:1-5)
Sword - It is a symbol of divine chastisement (Deuteronomy 32:25 ; Psalm 7:12 ; 78:62 ), and of a slanderous tongue (Psalm 57:4 ; 64:3 ; Proverbs 12:18 )
Awl - The boring of a slave's ear with it was the token of his volunteering perpetual service, when he might be free at the year of release (Exodus 21:6; Deuteronomy 15:17)
Divorce - The dissolution of the marriage tie was regulated by the Mosaic law (Deuteronomy 24:1-4 )
Horeb - But, in Deuteronomy, where Israel appears no longer in that region, "Horeb" is used
Evil Speaking - Warnings against it are frequent; it is forbidden in the legislation of the OT (Ninth Commandment; Deuteronomy 19:16-19 ) and of the NT ( Matthew 5:22 ; Matthew 12:32 ; Matthew 15:19 )
Neck - A yoke placed on the neck is a frequent emblem of servitude (Genesis 27:40 ; Deuteronomy 28:48 ; Isaiah 10:27 )
Cinnereth - A harp, one of the "fenced cities" of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ; Compare Deuteronomy 3:17 )
Omorrah - ...
Deuteronomy 32:32 (a) The Lord applies this terrible name to the nation of Israel when they turned away from His love and grace to worship idols, and to live in sin
Altaschith - The title of Psalm 57; 58; 59; 75: The maxim of David amidst persecutions, embodying the spirit of his psalm (Kimchi); drawn from Deuteronomy 9:26, Moses' prayer, "Destroy not Thy people and Thine inheritance, whom Thou hast redeemed
Battlement - Deuteronomy 22:8 (c) The thought of the passage is that we are to seek to establish preventive measures or ample protection around the church, the people of GOD, and the testimony of our Lord
High - A place of leadership ( Deuteronomy 26:19)
Admah - God destroyed Admah, one of “the cities of the plains” (Genesis 19:29 ), along with Sodom and Gomorrah (Deuteronomy 29:23 )
Adoni-Zedek - Joshua carefully obeyed the law by taking them from the trees before nightfall (Deuteronomy 21:23 )
Zebulun - The tribe hosted the other tribes with religious festivals at Mount Tabor (Deuteronomy 33:18-19 )
Hallow - Thus Wyclif translates John 17:17 ‘Halwe thou hem in treuthe,’ and Deuteronomy 32:51 ‘Ye halwide not me amonge the sones of Yreal’ (1388
Caphtor - A chaplet, the original seat of the Philistines (Deuteronomy 2:23 ; Jeremiah 47:4 ; Amos 9:7 )
Tail - Deuteronomy 28:13 (a) The Lord uses this figure to describe the very low and degraded condition into which Israel would descend when she turned away from the Lord as her leader to follow idols
Firstborn - The firstborn male of the family carried certain familial rites and privileges (Genesis 27:1-29; Gen 48:13-14) and was given a double portion of the inheritance (Deuteronomy 21:17)
Adama - one of the five cities which were destroyed by fire from heaven, and buried under the waters of the Dead Sea, Genesis 14:2 ; Deuteronomy 29:23
Anakim - They were nearly extirpated by the Hebrews so that only a few remained afterwards in the cities of the Philistines, Numbers 13:22; Deuteronomy 9:2; Joshua 11:21-22; Joshua 14:15; and Jeremiah 47:5, which in the Septuagint reads: "O remnant of the Anakim" that is cut off
Wormwood - Lamentations 3:15 , an intensely bitter and poisonous plant, a symbol for whatever is nauseous and destructive, Deuteronomy 29:18 Jeremiah 9:15
Wheat - Is the principal and most valuable kind of grain for the service of man, and is produced in almost every part of the world, Genesis 30:14 Deuteronomy 8:8 Judges 6:11 Matthew 13:25 1 Corinthians 15:37
Dragon - Thus in Deuteronomy 32:33 Jeremiah 51:34 Revelation 12:1-17 , it evidently implies a huge serpent; in Isaiah 27:1 51:9 Ezekiel 29:3 , it may mean the crocodile, or any large sea-monster; while in Job 30:29 Lamentations 4:3 Micah 1:8 , it seems to refer to some wild animal of the desert, most probably the jackal
Kick - Deuteronomy 32 ...
It is hard for thee to kick against the goads
Pledge - The creditor could not enter a house and take what he pleased; and the millstone being a necessary of life, could not be taken, Deuteronomy 24:6,10,11
Respect of Persons - The judges of the Hebrews were directed to give sentence strictly according to truth and justice, without regard to the comparative wealth, influence or other advantage of one party over the other, Leviticus 19:15 Deuteronomy 16:17 Proverbs 24:23
Miriam - Her jealous murmurs against Moses and his Cushite wife were punished by a temporary leprosy, Numbers 12:1-16 Deuteronomy 24:9 ; but she was forgiven and restored, and near the close of the wandering of Israel, died at Kadwshbarnea, Numbers 20:1
Fear - People are afraid of wars (Exodus 14:10 ), of their enemies (Deuteronomy 2:4 ), and of subjugation (Deuteronomy 7:18 ; Deuteronomy 28:10 ). Yahweh is a “great and terrible God” (Nehemiah 1:15 ); He is “fearful in praises, doing wonders” (Exodus 15:11 ); His name is “fearful” (Deuteronomy 28:58 ) and “terrible” (Psalm 99:3 ). ...
Fear as obedience Deuteronomy sets out a relationship between the fear of God and the observance of the demands of the covenant. To fear the Lord is one of the ways by which Israel expresses its obedience and loyalty to Yahweh and to His divine requirements: “And now, Israel, what doth the Lord thy God require of thee, but to fear the Lord thy God, to walk in all his ways, and to love him, and to serve the Lord thy God with all thy heart and with all thy soul, to keep the commandments of the Lord and his statutes, which I command thee this day for thy good?” (Deuteronomy 10:12-13 ; compare Deuteronomy 6:24-25 ; Deuteronomy 10:20 ; Deuteronomy 13:4 ). Fear becomes a demand that can be learned (Deuteronomy 17:19 ). God invites His people not to be afraid of Him (Genesis 15:1 ; Genesis 26:24 ); the angel of the Lord seeks to calm an individual before a divine message is communicated (Daniel 10:12 ,Daniel 10:12,10:19 ; Luke 1:13 ,Luke 1:13,1:30 ); a person acting as a mediator of God invites the people to trust in God (Moses, Deuteronomy 31:6 ; Joshua, Joshua 10:25 )
Sickle - The Hebrew sickles ( Deuteronomy 16:9 ; Deuteronomy 23:25 etc
Feast - Feasting was a part of the observances connected with the offering up of sacrifices (Deuteronomy 12:6,7 ; 1 Samuel 9:19 ; 16:3,5 ), and with the annual festivals (Deuteronomy 16:11 )
Milk - "A land flowing with milk" symbolizes abundance (Exodus 3:8; Deuteronomy 6:3). The milk of sheep, camels, goats, and cows was used (Deuteronomy 32:14; Genesis 32:15; Proverbs 27:27); "butter" in our sense occurs Proverbs 30:33
Interest - Mosaic law prohibited the charging of interest to fellow Israelites (Exodus 22:25 ; Leviticus 25:36-37 ; Deuteronomy 23:19 ). Interest could be charged to foreigners (Deuteronomy 23:20 )
Hill, Hill-Country - in Joshua 11:21 ), the ‘hill-country of Naphtali’ ( Joshua 20:7 ), the ‘hill-country of Ammon’ ( Deuteronomy 2:37 ), and of Gilead ( Deuteronomy 3:12 )
Kir - When Tiglath-pileser III conquered the area during the reign of Ahaz (2 Kings 16:9 ), the descendants of the original immigrants to Syria were sent back to Kir (compare the aversion of the ancient Hebrews to being sent back to Egypt in Deuteronomy 17:16 ; Deuteronomy 28:68 )
Hart - איל , Deuteronomy 12:15 ; Deuteronomy 14:5 ; Psalms 42:1 ; Isaiah 35:6 , the stag, or male deer
Kadesh - It was "eleven days," or about 165 miles, distant from Horeb, Deuteronomy 1:2 : on the border of Edom, Numbers 20:16; not far from Gerar, Genesis 20:1; to the east of Bered, Genesis 16:14; in the desert of Zin, Numbers 20:1; Numbers 27:14; Numbers 33:36; Deuteronomy 32:51; and the point to which Chedorlaomer returned, having driven the Horites over the Arabah into the Et Tih region, and then going northward
Scourge - Moses limits the number of stripes to forty, which might never be exceeded, Deuteronomy 25:1-3 . The offender was stripped from his shoulders to his middle, and tied by his arms to a low pillar, that he might lean forward, and the executioner the more easily strike his back; or, according to the modern custom in inflicting the bastinado, was made to lie down with his face to the ground, Deuteronomy 25:2
Refuge, Cities of - Cities of refuge, situated at convenient distances, were set apart for the manslayer ( Deuteronomy 19:2-7 ), and it may even be that the roads thither were specially kept and marked to make escape easy ( Deuteronomy 19:3 ; but cf. Practically, then, the community administered justice, but when the death penalty was to be exacted, it was exacted not by the community, but by the avenger of blood in accordance with primitive usage ( Deuteronomy 19:12-13 ). The statements bearing on the number of the cities of refuge are conflicting ( Numbers 35:11 ; Numbers 35:13-15 , Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ; Deuteronomy 19:7-10 , Joshua 20:2 ; Joshua 20:7-8 ; cf. Ultimately there were six, but at first there appear to have been only three ( Deuteronomy 19:2 ; Deuteronomy 19:7 ). But when in post-exilic times the Jews covered a wider area, there would naturally be need for more cities; and so we find the number in Numbers and Joshua stated at six, and additions made to the text in Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ; Deuteronomy 19:3 to suggest that the number six had been contemplated from the beginning
Host of Heaven - Second, “heaven” can be used to refer to the dwelling place of God (Deuteronomy 26:15 ; 1 Kings 8:30 ). The term can refer to an act of war, as in Numbers 1:3 ,Numbers 1:3,1:20 ; Deuteronomy 24:5 , and Joshua 22:12 . ...
Old Testament writers warned Israel about the danger of worshiping the heavenly bodies (Deuteronomy 4:19 ) and prescribed the death penalty for the crime of worshiping the sun, or the moon, or any of the “host of heaven” (Deuteronomy 17:2-7 )
Hate, Hatred - Some Hebrew laws explicitly deal with hatred or favoritism (Deuteronomy 19:11-13 ; Deuteronomy 21:15-17 ; Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ). God hates pagan idolatry (Deuteronomy 12:31 ) as well as hypocritical Hebrew worship (Isaiah 1:14 ; Amos 5:21 )
Hunting - ...
Among the animals hunted for food were the gazelle, the hart, the roebuck, and the wild goat (Deuteronomy 12:15 ; Deuteronomy 12:22 ; Deuteronomy 14:5 etc. Neither beast nor bird might be eaten unless the blood had been ‘poured out’ ( Leviticus 17:13 , Deuteronomy 12:16 etc
Avenger - Cities of refuge offered people who killed without intention or hatred a place of escape from the avenger of blood (Exodus 21:12-14 ; Numbers 35:6-34 ; Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-13 ; Joshua 20:1-9 ). The avenger or go'el is responsible to take the life of one who killed a family member ( Numbers 35:12 ), to receive restitution for crimes against a deceased relative (Numbers 5:7-8 ), buy back property lost to the family (Leviticus 25:25 ), redeem a relative who sold himself into slavery (Leviticus 25:48-49 ), or marry the widow of a relative without sons and perpetuate the family (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ). The law of the avenger thus prevented the shedding of innocent blood while also purging the guilt of murdering the innocent (Deuteronomy 19:11-13 )
Animals - They were to treat their working animals kindly and give them proper food and rest (Deuteronomy 5:14; Deuteronomy 22:10; Deuteronomy 25:4). The Israelites hunted some of these for food, but there were others that they were forbidden to eat (Leviticus 11:1-8; Deuteronomy 14:3-8; Isaiah 14:23; Isaiah 34:11; see UNCLEANNESS)
Slave - ...
Israelite slaves could be held captive no more than six years (Exodus 21:1-2; Deuteronomy 15:12). When they went out free, the master had to give them sufficient goods to enable them to begin a new life satisfactorily (Deuteronomy 15:13-14). Kidnapping for slavery was an offence that carried the death penalty (Deuteronomy 24:7), and the practice of returning runaway slaves to their masters was prohibited (Deuteronomy 23:15-16). Yet these slaves also had rights (Deuteronomy 21:10-14). They could even join in the full religious life of Israel, provided they had formally become part of the covenant people through the rite of circumcision (Exodus 12:44; Deuteronomy 16:14). ...
Although such a relationship indicated the submissive place of God’s people (Deuteronomy 6:13-14; Deuteronomy 10:12-13), it did not indicate shame or humiliation in their status
Justice - ...
God, the sovereign ruler of the universe, is perfect in justice (Genesis 18:25; Deuteronomy 32:4; Romans 12:19-214). But God wants justice in the operations of all earthly governments, and likewise in private dealings between individuals (Deuteronomy 16:18-20; Deuteronomy 25:13-16). Moses’ law, given by God himself, sets out the sort of justice that God requires (Deuteronomy 16:18; Deuteronomy 32:44-47). ...
Justice must be the same for all, rich and poor alike (Exodus 23:3; Exodus 23:6-7; Deuteronomy 1:15-17). Laws must not be designed to suit the people of power and influence, but must protect the rights of those who can be easily exploited, such as foreigners, widows, orphans, debtors, labourers and the poor in general (Exodus 21:1-11; Exodus 22:21-27; Exodus 23:6-12; Deuteronomy 14:28-29; Deuteronomy 15:11)
Ebal - The hill upon which the curses of the law were to be read; as on the opposite hill GERIZIM the blessings (Deuteronomy 11:29-30; Deuteronomy 27:12-13; Joshua 8:30-35). On Ebal the great altar of unhewn stones was erected, plastered with lime and inscribed with the law (Deuteronomy 27:2-8) immediately after entering the Holy Land, when Joshua had the first leisure after destroying Ai. ...
Translated in Deuteronomy 11:30, "are they not on the other side Jordan, beyond ('achiree ) the way (road) of the W. ...
"The Canaanites" are mentioned in Deuteronomy 11:30, as in Genesis 12:6, as then already in the land, which originally was held by a Semitic race, but was afterward taken by the Hamitic Canaanites whose original seat was near the Red Sea, from whence they migrated northwards. The Samaritan Pentateuch reads "Gerizim "for Ebal (Deuteronomy 27:4) as the site of the altar and the plastered and law-inscribed stones; but all the Hebrew authorities are against it, and the site of the cursing is fitly the site of the altar where the penalty of the curse is borne by the typical victim. ...
Moreover, the cursings alone are specified in the context (Deuteronomy 27:14-26), an ominous presage at the beginning of Israel's disobedience and consequent chastisement
Man - It is also the generic name of the human race (Genesis 1:26,27 ; 5:2 ; 8:21 ; Deuteronomy 8:3 ). geber, man with reference to his strength, as distinguished from women (Deuteronomy 22:5 ) and from children (Exodus 12:37 ); a husband (Proverbs 6:34 ). methim, men as mortal (Isaiah 41:14 ), and as opposed to women and children (Deuteronomy 3:6 ; Job 11:3 ; Isaiah 3:25 )
Owl - " In the list of unclean birds (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ); also mentioned in Job 30:29 ; Isaiah 13:21 ; 34:13 ; 43:20 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ; Micah 1:8 . yanshuph, rendered "great owl" in Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 , and "owl" in Isaiah 34:11 . kos, rendered "little owl" in Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 , and "owl" in Psalm 102:6
Gluttonous - Deuteronomy 21:20, Ezekiel 23:42, Hosea 4:18 for use of the Heb. But it is possible that the real force of the insult to our Lord is shown by Deuteronomy 21:20. NT uses the words found in Deuteronomy 21:20
Fenced Cities - of Jordan, had "three-score cities fenced with high walls, gates and bars, beside unwalled towns a great many" (Deuteronomy 3:4-5); all which Israel took. Canaan's "cities fenced up to heaven" were leading causes of the spies' and Israel's unbelieving panic (Numbers 13:28; Deuteronomy 1:28; Deuteronomy 9:1-2)
Concubine - However, laws could control them and so start a movement that would lead to their eventual removal (Exodus 21:7-11; Deuteronomy 21:15-17; see also SLAVERY). Through bearing him children, concubines helped strengthen his household and increase his social influence (Genesis 16:1-2; Genesis 25:1; Genesis 29:24; Genesis 29:29; Genesis 30:4-13; Genesis 36:12; Deuteronomy 21:10-11; 2 Samuel 5:13-14; 2 Chronicles 11:21). ...
God warned Israelite kings against glorifying themselves through building large harems, but most kings ignored his warnings (Deuteronomy 17:15-17; 2 Samuel 12:7-880; 1 Kings 11:3; 2 Chronicles 11:21; cf
Oil, Olive - , coronation of kings, consecration of the high priest, and ordination of the Levites, and was prominent in Mosaic ordinances (Exodus 30; Leviticus 8; Deuteronomy 28)
Olive Oil - , coronation of kings, consecration of the high priest, and ordination of the Levites, and was prominent in Mosaic ordinances (Exodus 30; Leviticus 8; Deuteronomy 28)
Raven - An ‘unclean’ bird ( Leviticus 11:15 , Deuteronomy 14:14 ), numbers of which may always be seen gathered, together with the dogs, around the carrion thrown out into the valley of Hinnom (cf
Senir - The name of Hermon among the Amorites, according to Deuteronomy 3:9 , but in Song of Solomon 4:8 and 1 Chronicles 5:23 distinguished from Hermon
Sin, Wilderness of - Sinai must be located somewhere in the Negeb, the wilderness of Sin was on the more direct route from Egypt to Kadesh, near to if not identical with the desert of Zin ( Numbers 13:21 ; Numbers 20:1 ; Numbers 27:14 ; Numbers 33:36 ; Numbers 34:3 , Deuteronomy 32:51 , Joshua 15:1-3 )
Suph - A place-name in Deuteronomy 1:1 ‘In the Arabah over against Suph’; AV Hew - The references to “hewers of wood” together with drawers of water (Joshua 9:21 ,Joshua 9:21,9:23 ,Joshua 9:23,9:27 ; Deuteronomy 29:11 ) probably refer to those who gathered firewood
Mint - The paying of tithes of mint was in accordance with the Mosiac law (Deuteronomy 14:22 ), but the error of the Pharisees lay in their being more careful about this little matter of the mint than about weightier matters
Hawk - It is an unclean bird (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 )
Cuckoo - " This bird is mentioned only in Leviticus 11:16 and Deuteronomy 14:15 (RSV, "seamew")
Manna - Deuteronomy 8:3 (a) This bread is a type of CHRIST, the living Bread
Caterpillar - Used in the Old Testament (1 Kings 8:37 ; 2 Chronicles 6:28 ; Psalm 78:46 ; Isaiah 33:4 ) as the translation of a word (hasil) the root of which means "to devour" or "consume," and which is used also with reference to the locust in Deuteronomy 28:38
Borrow - " The Hebrew had another word which is properly translated "borrow" in Deuteronomy 28:12 ; Psalm 37:21
Shield - Used figuratively of God and of earthly princes as the defenders of their people (Genesis 15:1 ; Deuteronomy 33:29 ; Psalm 33:20 ; 84:11 )
Disposition - Angels are mentioned in connection with the giving of the Law of Moses in Deuteronomy 33:2
Figured Stone - ” The same Hebrew term is used in Ezekiel 8:12 for idolatrous shrines decorated with base reliefs of gods in the form of animals ( Ezekiel 8:10 ; prohibited in Deuteronomy 4:17-18 )
Appeal - Deuteronomy 17:8-9 implies a court of appeal in hard cases; compare Judges 4:5
Brimstone - An image of every visitation of God's vengeance on the ungodly, especially of the final one (Deuteronomy 29:23; Job 18:15; Psalms 11:6; Isaiah 34:9; Ezekiel 38:22; Revelation 19:20; Revelation 20:10; Revelation 21:8)
Zeboim -
One of the "five cities of the plain" of Sodom, generally coupled with Admah (Genesis 10:19 ; 14:2 ; Deuteronomy 29:23 ; Hosea 11:8 )
Gier Eagle - raham = "parental affection," Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ; RSV, "vulture"), a species of vulture living entirely on carrion
Bribery - Bribery, because it perverted justice, is prohibited in the Bible ( Exodus 23:8 ; Deuteronomy 16:19 )
Ossifrage - OSSIFRAGE ( peres = ‘the breaker,’ Leviticus 11:13 , Deuteronomy 14:12 , RV Reverence - The failure to revere God (Deuteronomy 32:51 ) and the act of revering other gods (Judges 6:10 ) have dire consequences
Gleaning - Mosaic law required leaving this portion so that the poor and aliens might have a means of earning a living (Leviticus 19:9-10 ; Leviticus 23:22 ; Deuteronomy 24:19-21 ; compare Ruth 2:1 )
Belial - ” It is a term of derision (Deuteronomy 13:13 )
Aaron - He caused the casting of the golden calf which the Israelites worshiped in the wilderness (Exodus 32), but at the prayer of Moses he was spared the fate of the three thousand worshipers (Deuteronomy 9)
Muzzle - Deuteronomy 25:4 (a) This word has two meanings
Bush, Burning - " Deuteronomy 33:16 : and it is three times mentioned in the N
Zeboim, Valley of - Ζeboim (without the Hebrew 'Αyin ( ע ) means "gazelles"; one of the four cities of the plain; destroyed with Sodom, Gomorrha, and Admah (Genesis 10:19; Genesis 14:2; Deuteronomy 29:23; Hosea 11:8)
Pethor - Balaam's abode (Numbers 22:5; Deuteronomy 23:4)
Aram-Naharaim - Transliterated from Hebrew also in Genesis 24:10 ; Deuteronomy 23:4 ; Judges 3:8 ; and 1 Chronicles 19:6 by NIV
Hate - "If a man have two wives, one beloved and another hated," Deuteronomy 21:15 ; that is, less beloved
Nebo - (Deuteronomy 34:1; Deu 34:5) One of the idols of Babylon bore the name of Nebo
Zoar - It was one of the landmarks which Moses saw from Pisgah, Deuteronomy 34:3, and it appears to have been known in the time of Isaiah, Isaiah 15:5, and Jeremiah
Region - Deuteronomy 3
Barrenness - The strength of this feeling is evinced by the extraordinary and often unjustifiable measures it led them to adopt, Genesis 16:2 19:31 38:14 Deuteronomy 25:5-10
Og - It was assigned by Moses to the half-tribe of Manasseh, Numbers 21:33 32:33 Deuteronomy 1:4 3:1-13 4:47 31:4 Joshua 2:10 12:4 13:30
Enchantments - All these are expressly forbidden and denounced in Scripture, Exodus 22:18 Leviticus 19:26 20:27 Deuteronomy 18:10,11
Vanity - It often denotes wickedness, particularly falsehood, Deuteronomy 32:21 Psalm 4:2 24:4 119:37 , and sometimes idols and idol-worship, 2 Kings 17:15 Jeremiah 2:5 18:15 Jonah 2:8
Drought - A drought therefore is threatened as one of God's sorest judgments, Job 24:19 Jeremiah 50:38 Joel 1:10-20 Haggai 1:11 ; and there are many allusions to its horrors in Scripture, Deuteronomy 28:23 Psalm 32:4 102:4
Jahaz - Trodden down (called also Jahaza, Joshua 13:18 ; Jahazah, 21:36; Jahzah, 1 Chronicles 6:78 ), a town where Sihon was defeated, in the borders of Moab and in the land of the Ammonites beyond Jordan, and north of the river Arnon (Numbers 21:23 ; Deuteronomy 2:32 )
Brethren - Matthew 5:22-24 Deuteronomy 3:20), even when one of them is separated off (Deuteronomy 10:9; Deuteronomy 18:2; Deuteronomy 18:7); (3) membership of other groups lying between the family and the nation, i. clans and single tribes (see Deuteronomy 18:7, where the Levite’s ‘brethren’ are his fellow-Levites); (4) metaphorical applications which are too general and too various for exact delimitation
Queen of Heaven - The Massoretes evidently took the first word as m e le’kheth (‘work,’ ‘creation’) supposing that the silent aleph (’) had been omitted and considered the expression a synonym for ‘Host of Heaven’ ( ts e bhâ’ hash-shâmayîm , Jeremiah 8:2 ; Jeremiah 19:13 , Zephaniah 1:5 , Deuteronomy 4:19 ; Deuteronomy 17:3 etc
Gall - In Deuteronomy 32:33 and Job 20:16 it denotes the poison of serpents. " The original probably denotes some bitter, poisonous plant, most probably the poppy, which grows up quickly, and is therefore coupled with wormwood ( Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Lamentations 3:19 )
Gaza - Called also Azzah, which is its Hebrew name (Deuteronomy 2:23 ; 1 Kings 4:24 ; Jeremiah 25:20 ), strong, a city on the Mediterranean shore, remarkable for its early importance as the chief centre of a great commercial traffic with Egypt. Its earliest inhabitants were the Avims, who were conquered and displaced by the Caphtorims (Deuteronomy 2:23 ; Joshua 13:2,3 ), a Philistine tribe
Beast - Animals of different kinds were to be always kept separate (Leviticus 19:19 ; Deuteronomy 22:10 ). Oxen when used in threshing were not to be prevented from eating what was within their reach (Deuteronomy 25:4 ; Rape - The forcible rape of an engaged woman was a capital offense (Deuteronomy 22:25-27 ). In other cases of forcible rape, the offender was required to marry his victim and was not permitted to divorce her (Deuteronomy 22:28-29 )
Robbery - The basic biblical law concerning robbery is the prohibition of the Ten Commandments, “Thou shall not steal” (Exodus 20:15 ; Deuteronomy 5:19 ). Such an absolute statement makes it irrelevant whether the robber acquires property by force, duplicity or oppression (see Genesis 31:31 ; Leviticus 19:13 ; Deuteronomy 24:14-15 ; Malachi 3:5 ; John 10:1 )
Vow - To be taken voluntarily; but when taken to be conscientiously fulfilled (Deuteronomy 23:21-23; Ecclesiastes 5:5; Nehemiah 1:15; Psalm 1. The wages of impurity was excluded from vows (Deuteronomy 23:17-18); "dog" means "Sodomite" (Micah 1:7)
Betrothal - Old Testament-Genesis 19:14 ; Exodus 22:16 ; Deuteronomy 22:23-30 ; 2 Samuel 3:14 ; Hosea 2:19-20 . The penalty under the law of Moses for disrupting this principle by adultery, rape, fornication, or incest was death by stoning (Deuteronomy 22:23-30 )
Commandments, the Ten - Deuteronomy 10:4 margin reads 'the ten words,' and they are often referred to as the DECALOGUE. " Deuteronomy 5:27
Concubines - Deuteronomy 21:11 gives the root of it: a man saw a beautiful woman and lusted after her. Deuteronomy 17:17
Euphrates - In Scripture the Euphrates is named as one of the rivers of Eden, Genesis 2:14; called "the great river," Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; noted as the eastern boundary of the Promised Land, Deuteronomy 11:24; Joshua 1:4; 1 Chronicles 5:9; and of David's conquests, 2 Samuel 8:3; 1 Chronicles 18:3; of those of Babylon from Egypt, 2 Kings 24:7; is referred to in prophecy, Jeremiah 13:4-7; Jeremiah 46:2-10; Jeremiah 51:63; and in Revelation 9:14; Revelation 16:12
Brimstone - נפרית , Genesis 19:24 ; Deuteronomy 29:23 ; Job 18:15 ; Psalms 11:6 ; Isaiah 30:33 ; Isaiah 34:9 ; Ezekiel 38:22 . " Moses, among other calamities which he sets forth in case of the people's disobedience, threatens them with the fall of brimstone, salt, and burning like the overthrow of Sodom, &c, Deuteronomy 29:23
Bat - עחלפּ? , Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 ; Isaiah 2:20 ; Bar_6:22 . The bat is therefore well described in Deuteronomy 14:18-19 , as the passage should be read, "Moreover the othelaph, and every creeping thing that flieth, is unclean to you; they shall not be eaten
Punishments - ...
The mode of capital punishment usual among the Hebrew was stoning, Deuteronomy 13:9-10 Joshua 17:18 John 8:7 ; but various other modes became known to them by intercourse with other nations: as decapitation, 2 Kings 10:6-8 Matthew 14:8-12 ; precipitation from rocks, 2 Chronicles 25:12 Luke 4:29 ; hanging, Joshua 8:29 Esther 7:10 ; burning, Daniel 3:1-30 ; cutting asunder, Daniel 2:5 3:29 Hebrews 11:27 ; beating, on a wheel-like frame, Hebrews 11:35 ; exposure to wild beasts, Daniel 6:1-28 1 Corinthians 15:32 ; drowning, Matthew 18:6 ; bruising in a mortar, Proverbs 27:22 ; and crucifixion, John 19:18 . Minor punishments were scourging, Leviticus 19:20 2 Corinthians 11:24 ; retaliation in kind for an injury done, Exodus 21:23-25 Deuteronomy 19:19 ; imprisonment, 2 Chronicles 16:10 Matthew 4:12 ; the stocks, Acts 16:24 ; banishment, Revelation 1:9 ; and personal torture, 2 Chronicles 18:26 Isaiah 50:6 Matthew 18:30 Hebrews 11:37
Ten Commandments - Deuteronomy 5:22 ; Deuteronomy 9:10-11 ). When these were broken by Moses on his descent from the mount ( Exodus 32:19 , Deuteronomy 9:17 ), he was commanded to prepare two fresh stones like the first, on which God re-wrote the ‘ten words’ ( Exodus 34:4 ; Exodus 34:28 , Deuteronomy 10:2 ; Deuteronomy 10:4 ). The two stones were immediately placed in the ark, which had been prepared by Moses specially for that purpose ( Deuteronomy 10:1-5 Divorce - Because of sin divorce arose, and Moses sought to regulate it (Deuteronomy 24:1-4 ; Matthew 19:8 ). Leviticus 21:14 ; Deuteronomy 22:13-19,28-29 ), but it was already occurring in Israel. Deuteronomy 24:1-4 prohibited remarriage of a woman to her first husband after the death or divorce of her second husband. Divorce is not commended, commanded, or approved by God in these passages, but failure to forbid divorce, especially in Deuteronomy 24 , de facto means that God's law tolerated divorce to the extent that no civil or ecclesiastical penalty was imposed. ...
The basis for divorce in Deuteronomy 24:1 is "some indecency" ( ervat dabar ). Although adultery was punishable by death (Deuteronomy 22:22-24 ), it could still be included in the broad concept of ervat dabar . It is likewise possible that Jesus employed the general term porneia [ Matthew 5:32 ; 19:9 ) to refer to ervat dabar in Deuteronomy 24:1 . ...
Deuteronomy 24:1-4 , therefore, is a concession made by God to the fallen condition of humankind. Although Deuteronomy 7:1-4 commands Israelites not to make covenants or to intermarry with the people in Canaan when they enter that land, this principle is not normative since the Old Testament permits marriage to believing foreigners (cf. Divorce is wrong because it produces adultery in the remarriage, except in the case of fornication ( porneia [ Matthew 19:9 ) is the meaning of "fornication" (porneia [ Deuteronomy 24:1 ). Some argue that porneia [ Leviticus 20:10 ; Deuteronomy 22:22-24 ). Unsatisfied with his answer, the Pharisees raise the issue of the divorce statement in Deuteronomy 24:1-4 . Jesus states that Deuteronomy 24:1-4 permitted divorce solely because of man's hard (sinful) heart, but this was not God's original plan for marriage ( Matthew 19:8 )
Famine And Drought - Occasionally oppressors destroyed or confiscated food (Deuteronomy 28:33 ,Deuteronomy 28:33,28:51 ; Isaiah 1:7 ). When the people obeyed God, the land was productive (Deuteronomy 11:11-14 ). However, when they disobeyed, judgment came on the land by drought and famine (Leviticus 26:23-26 ; Deuteronomy 11:16-17 ; 1 Kings 8:35 )
Poor - One reality of life is that society will always contain people who are poor and disadvantaged (Deuteronomy 15:11; Matthew 26:11). In addition, people were to give money, food and goods to help the poor (Exodus 22:25; Leviticus 25:35-38; Deuteronomy 15:7-8; Deuteronomy 16:9-12; Deuteronomy 26:12; Esther 9:22; Job 29:16)
Temptation - ” In Deuteronomy 8:2 Moses said: “God led thee these forty years in the wilderness, to humble thee, and to prove ( nsh ) thee, to know what was in thine heart, whether thou wouldest keep his commandments, or no. Jesus quoted Deuteronomy 6:16 when He said: “Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God” ( Matthew 4:7 ). (Compare Exodus 17:2 ,Exodus 17:2,17:7 ; Deuteronomy 6:16 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 ; Numbers 14:22 ; Acts 5:9 ; Acts 15:10 ; 1 Corinthians 10:9 ; Hebrews 3:8-9
Nation - In biblical usage, a ‘nation’ was primarily a ‘people group’ defined by the sorts of unifying characteristics outlined above (Genesis 10:32; Deuteronomy 32:8; Acts 17:26). This was not because Israel was better than other nations (Deuteronomy 7:6-7; Deuteronomy 9:9), but because God wanted a channel of communication through which he could send his blessings to all the people of the world (Genesis 12:3; Genesis 22:17-18; see ELECTION). ...
Israelites of Old Testament times made such a clear distinction between themselves and others that their usual word for ‘nations’ (plural) developed the special sense of ‘other nations’ (often translated ‘Gentiles’ or ‘heathen’) (Deuteronomy 18:9; Psalms 2:1; Isaiah 11:10; Isaiah 30:28; Isaiah 36:18; Isaiah 49:22; Jeremiah 10:1-5; Jeremiah 10:10; see GENTILE)
Alliances - Forbidden with the doomed Canaanites (Deuteronomy 7:2; Judges 2:2). But peaceable relations with other nations as distinguished from copying their idolatries, were encouraged (Deuteronomy 2:25; Deuteronomy 15:6; Genesis 27:29). But alliances by marriage with idolaters are reprobated as incentives to latitudinarianism first and at last, to conformity with paganism (Deuteronomy 7:3-6)
Idolatry - His nearest relatives were not only bound to denounce him and deliver him up to punishment (Deuteronomy 13:20-10 ), but their hands were to strike the first blow when, on the evidence of two witnesses at least, he was stoned (Deuteronomy 17:2-7 ). No facts are more strongly declared in the Old Testament than that the extermination of the Canaanites was the punishment of their idolatry (Exodus 34:15,16 ; Deuteronomy 7 ; 12:29-31 ; 20:17 ), and that the calamities of the Israelites were due to the same cause (Jeremiah 2:17 ). On taking possession of the land, the Jews were commanded to destroy all traces of every kind of the existing idolatry of the Canaanites (Exodus 23:24,32 ; 34:13 ; Deuteronomy 7:5,25 ; 12:1-3 )
Blessing - Often it contrasts God’s blessings with his cursings or punishments (Deuteronomy 11:26-28; Deuteronomy 27:12-13; Deuteronomy 30:19). ...
The blessing that people in Israelite families wanted most was the prophetic announcement by which the head of the family passed on favours to his children (Genesis 27:36-41; Genesis 48:8-22; Genesis 49:1-28; Deuteronomy 33; Hebrews 11:20-21; Hebrews 12:17)
Inheritance - It was a gift that came from God (Genesis 12:7; Deuteronomy 4:37-38; Deuteronomy 12:10). A childless widow could, however, ask the brother of her dead husband to act as a sort of temporary husband to her, so that she might produce a son who would inherit the dead husband’s property and carry on his name (Deuteronomy 25:5-10; see WIDOW). This special inheritance was known as the birthright (Genesis 49:3; Deuteronomy 21:17)
Land (of Israel) - The reason the Lord gave this land to the children of Israel was because he was faithful to his covenant to Abraham (Deuteronomy 9:4-5 ), his love for Abraham (Deuteronomy 4:37 ), and his love for Israel (Deuteronomy 7:8 ). Just before the children of Israel entered the land of Canaan, Moses reiterated the Law as recorded in the Book of Deuteronomy. A number of laws in the Book of Deuteronomy are rooted in the land: the year of release from debt (15:1-11), appointing just judges (16:18-20), selection of a king (17:14-20), abominations of the nations (18:9-14), the cities of refuge (19:1-13), removing landmarks (19:14), unknown murder (21:1-9), leaving a hanged man on a tree (21:22-23), divorce (24:1-4), and just weights and measurements (25:13-16). ...
The eastern border is marked out from Hazan Enan to Shepham, and then goes down from Shapham to Riblah on the east side of Ain; it goes down and reaches to the eastern side of the Sea of Chinnereth; the border goes down along the Jordan, and ends at the Salt Sea (Numbers 34:10-12 ; Deuteronomy 3:17 ). Moses and Joshua allowed them to settle there even though it was not part of the promised land (Deuteronomy 3:12-17,20 ; Joshua 12:6 ; 13:8-33 ; 22:4,19 , 27 ). ...
Three cities of refuge—Kedesh in Galilee, Shechem, and Kirjath Arba (Hebron)were located "in the land" (Deuteronomy 19:1-3 ), but provision was made for three more, two of which were outside the land when the territory was enlarged (Joshua 20:1-9 ). The Bible describes the land of Israel at least nineteen times as "a land flowing with milk and honey" (Leviticus 26:3-12 ; Numbers 13:23,28 ; 14:7 ; 24:3 ; Deuteronomy 6:3 ; 11:9 ; 26:9,15 ; 27:3 ; 28:2-7,11-12 ; 31:20 ). But the land you are crossing over to take possession of is a land of mountains and valleys that drinks water rain from heaven" (Deuteronomy 11:10-11 ). Nonetheless, the people were reminded to diligently obey God's commandments and to love the Lord (Deuteronomy 11:12-15 ). This would enhance their wealth, and in so doing, violate a commandment the Lord had laid down for the king: "Nor shall he greatly multiply silver and gold for himself" (Deuteronomy 17:17 )
Sin - Deuteronomy and the Historical Books . Love, of God and of their fellow-men, is more explicitly dwelt on as the motive power of human life ( Deuteronomy 6:5 ; Deuteronomy 10:12 etc. ), and the heart is again and again referred to as the seat of that love, both passively and actively ( Deuteronomy 11:18 , Deuteronomy 6:6 , Deuteronomy 10:16 ). The basis upon which it is rested is the fact of God’s love for them and their fathers evidenced in many vicissitudes and in spite of much to hinder its activity ( Deuteronomy 4:37 , Deuteronomy 7:7 f. , Deuteronomy 10:15 ). Though there are numerous echoes of the older conception that the keeping of God’s commandments is one side of a bargain which conditions men’s happiness and prosperity ( Deuteronomy 4:24 ; Deuteronomy 4:40 , Deuteronomy 6:15 ), yet we observe a lofty range of thought bringing in its train truer ideas of sin and guilt. The sternness of God is insisted on, but as having for its objective the good of His people ( Deuteronomy 10:13 , Deuteronomy 6:24 ). Deuteronomy 10:18 f. Deuteronomy 14:1 f. , Deuteronomy 7:6 , Deuteronomy 26:18 f. , Deuteronomy 27:9 , Deuteronomy 28:9 etc
War - Finally, their sin reached the extent where God could postpone judgment no longer (Genesis 15:16; Deuteronomy 9:5). It helped to protect Israel from the corrupt religion, moral filth and physical disease that characterized life throughout Canaan (Deuteronomy 7:1-2; Deuteronomy 7:16; Deuteronomy 7:25-26; Deuteronomy 20:16-18). Even then they were to attack only the soldiers, not the women and children (Deuteronomy 20:10-15; cf. Judges 11:12-28), and they were not to destroy the natural environment (Deuteronomy 20:19-20). They were to treat prisoners of war well, and if they took any of the captive women as wives, they had to treat them with consideration and respect (Deuteronomy 21:10-14; cf. Those excused from military service included any who had recently committed themselves to some undertaking that could be ruined if they suddenly abandoned it (Deuteronomy 20:1-7). If any went out to battle but then became afraid, they were to be sent home (Deuteronomy 20:8; cf
Leaven - In the great solemnity of the Passover the Jews were bidden to eat unleavened bread (Exodus 12,13, 34; Numbers 12; Deuteronomy 16)
Habitation - God's habitation is designated as heaven (Deuteronomy 26:15 ; 2 Chronicles 30:27 ), the Temple (2 Chronicles 29:6 ), or Jerusalem (Psalm 46:4 )
Astrologers - These superstitions were prevalent among the Chaldeans, Assyrians, Egyptians, Phoenicians, and Arabians, and were closely connected with the worship of the sun, moon, and stars, Deuteronomy 4:19 17:3 2 Kings 23:5,12 Jeremiah 19:13 Ezekiel 8:16 Zephaniah 1:5
Mole - ]'>[1] ‘chameleon’; but same word is in Leviticus 11:18 and Deuteronomy 14:18 tr
Horse - For a long period after their settlement in Canaan the Israelites made no use of horses, according to the prohibition, Deuteronomy 17:16
Blind - The blind are to be treated with compassion (Leviticus 19:14 ; Deuteronomy 27:18 )
Belial - "A man of Belial" is a worthless, lawless fellow (Deuteronomy 13:13; Judges 19:22; 1 Samuel 2:12)
Bat - Unclean in the eye of the law (Deuteronomy 14:18-19; Leviticus 11:19-20)
Maacah - A small kingdom outside Argob (Deuteronomy 3:14), and Bashan (Joshua 12:5)
Ashtaroth - of Jordan, called so from being a seat of Ashtoreth's worship, "Og dwelt in Ashtaroth, in Edrei" (Deuteronomy 1:4; Joshua 12:4; Joshua 13:12-31; Joshua 9:10)
Saint - The "saints" spoken of in Jude 1:14 are probably not the disciples of Christ, but the "innumerable company of angels" ( Hebrews 12:22 ; Psalm 68:17 ), with reference to Deuteronomy 33:2
Gomorrah - Their wickedness became proverbial (Deuteronomy 32:32 ; Isaiah 1:9,10 ; Jeremiah 23:14 )
Aram - In Genesis 25:20 ; 31:20,24 ; Deuteronomy 26:5 , the word "Syrian" is properly "Aramean" (RSV, marg
Muzzle - Deuteronomy 25 ...
1
Pomegranate - Common in Egypt (Numbers 20:5 ) and Palestine (13:23; Deuteronomy 8:8 )
Wormwood - Metaphorical for bitter sorrow (Jeremiah 9:15, fulfilled in Lamentations 3:15; Lamentations 3:19); and evil with its bitter produce, or an apostate lurking in Israel and tainting others (Deuteronomy 29:18; Proverbs 5:4; Amos 5:7, rendered "hemlock"; Greek apsinthos ; Revelation 8:11, the star which at the third trumpet fell upon the rivers and made them wormwood)
Omen - The Israelites were prohibited from interpreting omens (Deuteronomy 18:10 NAS, NIV)
Brook of Zered - ” The Israelites crossed this book marking an end to their wilderness wandering and entrance into the Promised Land (Numbers 21:12 ; Deuteronomy 2:13-14 )
Forehead - Shaving the forehead in sign of mourning is forbidden ( Deuteronomy 14:1 )
Arm - God's outstretched arm does (Exodus 6:6 ; Exodus 15:16 ; Deuteronomy 5:15 )
Bald - Deuteronomy 14:1 (a) Baldness in this Scripture would indicate that the people were opposed to GOD's judgments and GOD's dealings and would prove it to others by making themselves bald
Street - A broad open space, as the courtyard, the space near the gate devoted to public business (Deuteronomy 13:16), or before t he temple (Ezra 10:9; Esther 4:6)
Zeboiim - Zeboiim was destroyed when God sent fire and brimstone on Sodom and Gomorrah (Deuteronomy 29:23 ; compare Hosea 11:8 )
Antelope - It had a divided hoof and chewed the cud and so qualified as a clean animal to be eaten (Deuteronomy 14:5 )
Asp - Hence Moses describes it, (Deuteronomy 32:33) and Job, (Job 20:14) and Paul
Tongue - For the tongue or language that is spoken in any country, Deuteronomy 28:49
Ramoth - It belonged to Gad, was assigned to the Levites, and became one of the cities of refuge beyond Jordan, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:38
Pygarg - A ‘clean’ animal, Deuteronomy 14:5 only
Issachar - The character of his posterity was foretold by Jacob and by Moses, Genesis 49:14,15 Deuteronomy 33:18,19
Paddle - Deuteronomy 23 ...
Baldness (Natural or Artificial) - This was forbidden to the Israelites, in consequence of its being a heathen custom, Deuteronomy 14:1
Peg - Pegs were used: to secure tents (Judges 4:21-22 ; Judges 5:26 ); to hang articles (Isaiah 22:23 ,Isaiah 22:23,22:25 ; Ezekiel 15:3 ); to weave cloth (Judges 16:14 ); even to dig latrines (Deuteronomy 23:13 )
Desert - Other deserts particularly mentioned, are "that great and terrible wilderness" in Arabia Petraea, south of Canaan, Numbers 21:20 ; also the region between Canaan and the Euphrates, Exodus 23:31 Deuteronomy 11:24
Saint - Deuteronomy 33
Terror - Deuteronomy 32 ...
The terrors of God do set themselves in array against me
Tithe - Deuteronomy 26
Hivites - Among the many tribal groups that occupied Canaan before the Israelites dispossessed them were the people known as Hivites (Genesis 10:15-17; Exodus 3:8; Exodus 23:28; Deuteronomy 7:1; Joshua 3:10)
Obedience - Since God is the Creator and Lord of the universe, people should obey him (Deuteronomy 4:35-40). To those who obey him, he promises blessing; to those who disobey him, cursing (Deuteronomy 11:27-28; Deuteronomy 27:10; Joshua 5:6)
Harlot - In Proverbs 5:17-20 "strange" seemingly contrasts with one's own rightful wife; another term, qudeeshaah , "consecrated woman" (in Genesis 38:21-22; Deuteronomy 23:17; Hosea 4:14), refers to the abominable worship of the Syrian Astarte or Venus by prostitution. The masculine qadesh , "Sodomites," implies male prostitution in the same vile worship (Deuteronomy 23:17; 1 Kings 14:24; 1 Kings 15:12; 1 Kings 22:46; 2 Kings 23:7; Job 36:14). The children of a harlot could not inherit with legitimate children (John 8:41; Deuteronomy 23:2), but "bastard" means probably one born of incest or adultery; so the rabbis explain Judges 11:1-2
Earrings - The "phylacteries," headbands, totapkot (Matthew 23:5) in the Talmudists' opinion were the sanctioned antidote to the idolatrous amulets and "earrings" (Deuteronomy 6:7-8; Deuteronomy 11:18-19; contrast Hosea 2:13; Isaiah 3:21, lechashim . But the language in Deuteronomy and in Exodus 13:9; Exodus 13:16 is rightly taken by the Karaite Jews as proverbial, not literal; as is apparent from the reason added, "that the law of Jehovah may be in thy mouth"; for it is by receiving the law into the heart, and by keeping it, that it would be naturally on the tongue continually
Kadesh - ), and for a long time it was the centre of the tribal encampments ( Numbers 20:1 , Deuteronomy 1:46 ). The spies were sent hence ( Numbers 32:8 , Deuteronomy 1:20 ff. ...
Kadesh-barnea lay on the south boundary of the Amorite highlands (Deuteronomy 1:18 ), ‘in the uttermost border’ of Edom ( Numbers 20:6 )
Requirement - God's general requirement for his people is to fear and love him, to walk in all his ways, to serve him wholeheartedly, and to keep his instructions (Deuteronomy 10:12-13 ). God will require an accounting from those who do not heed his prophet (Deuteronomy 18:19 ), or who violate their vows (Deuteronomy 23:21 )
Father - Still the parent was not to inflict death, but to bring the refractory child before the city elders in the gate or place of justice (Deuteronomy 21:18-21). "Father" is used also for protector, patron (Job 29:16; Psalms 68:5; Deuteronomy 32:6). as the days of heaven upon the earth" (Deuteronomy 11:18-21)
Harlot - Apart from breaches of the marriage vows, immoral relations between the sexes were deemed venial ( Deuteronomy 22:28 ff. Children of harlots were practical outlaws ( Deuteronomy 23:2 , Judges 11:1 ff. Religious prostitution was prohibited in Israel ( Deuteronomy 23:17 ), and all gain from the unholy calling as Temple revenue was spurned (see Driver, Deut
Rock - ...
The name of rock is also given to God, by way of metaphor, because God is the strength, the refuge, and defence of Israel, as those places were to the people who resided among them, Psalms 18:2 ; Psalms 18:31 ; Psalms 31:2-3 ; Deuteronomy 32:15 ; Deuteronomy 32:18 ; Deuteronomy 32:30-31 ; Psalms 61:2 , &c
Firstborn - ]'>[3] ( Deuteronomy 15:19-23 ), P Justice - God does not take bribes (Deuteronomy 10:17 ) or pervert justice in any way (Genesis 18:25 ; 2 Chronicles 19:7 ). Just law is law that reflects God's standards (Genesis 9:5-6 ; Deuteronomy 1:17 ), and not mere human reasoning (Habakkuk 1:7 ). A breach of justice consists of a verdict that runs contrary to the law or that does not accord with the known facts (Exodus 23:1-9 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-3 ). ...
In a culture where judges, not juries, render a verdict, false accusations, bribery, and influence peddling are the favored devices of injustice (Deuteronomy 16:18-20 ; 1 Samuel 8:3 ; Proverbs 17:23 ; 19:28 ; Isaiah 5:23 ; Jeremiah 5:28 ; Ezekiel 22:29 ; Amos 2:6-7 ; Zechariah 7:9-10 ). The victims are disproportionately from the poor, among whom are the fatherless, the widow, and the resident alien (Deuteronomy 27:19 ; Psalm 82 ). The righteous judge must never show partiality to the rich (Deuteronomy 24:17 ), nor for that matter to the poor (Leviticus 19:15 ); he must render true judgment at all times
Justice - God “executes justice for the orphan and the widow, and loves the strangers, providing them food and clothing” (Deuteronomy 10:18 , NRSV; compare Hosea 10:12 ; Isaiah 30:18 ). The needs which are met include land (Ezekiel 45:6-9 ; compare Micah 2:2 ; Micah 4:4 ) and the means to produce from the land, such as draft animals and millstones (Deuteronomy 22:1-4 ; Deuteronomy 24:6 ). These productive concerns are basic to securing other essential needs and thus avoiding dependency; thus the millstone is called the “life” of the person (Deuteronomy 24:6 ). Other needs are those essential for mere physical existence and well being: food (Romans 13:1-2,13 ; Psalm 146:7 ), clothing (Deuteronomy 24:13 ), and shelter (Psalm 68:6 ; Job 8:6 ). The equal protection of each person in civil and judicial procedures is represented in the demand for due process ( Deuteronomy 16:18-20 ). Freedom from bondage is comparable to not being “in hunger and thirst, in nakedness and lack of everything” (Deuteronomy 28:48 NRSV). ...
The source of justice As the sovereign Creator of the universe, God is just (Psalm 99:1-4 ; Genesis 18:25 ; Deuteronomy 32:4 ; Jeremiah 9:24 ), particularly as the defender of all the oppressed of the earth (Psalm 76:9 ; Psalm 103:6 ; Jeremiah 49:11 ). The king receives God's justice and is a channel for it (Psalm 72:1 ; compare Romans 13:1-2 ,Deuteronomy 10:18:4 )
Sign - Three settings predominate: the created order (Ezekiel 4:1-336 ; Genesis 9:12-17 ; Isaiah 37:30 ; Isaiah 55:13 ); human history (Exodus 7:3 ; Deuteronomy 4:34 ; Deuteronomy 6:22 ); and religious ritual (Genesis 17:11 ; Exodus 12:13 ; Exodus 13:9 ,Exodus 13:9,13:16 ; Exodus 31:13 ). The goal of the Exodus signs is the knowledge that “I am the LORD (in the midst of the earth)” (Exodus 7:5 ; Exodus 8:22 ; Exodus 10:2 ) and that “the LORD is God; there is no other besides him” (Deuteronomy 4:34-35 NRSV). Israel's unbelief in spite of signs is often condemned (Numbers 14:11 ,Numbers 14:11,14:22 ; Deuteronomy 1:29-33 ). The signs fulfill their goal when they inspire obedience (Deuteronomy 11:3 ,Deuteronomy 11:3,11:8 ), worship (Deuteronomy 26:8 ,Deuteronomy 26:8,26:10 ), and loyalty to the Lord (Joshua 24:16-17 ). The signs of pagan prophets similarly serve as a challenge to trust in Yahweh (Deuteronomy 13:1-4 )
Prophet, Christ as - The largest Old Testament passage on the coming Messiah in the role of a prophet is Deuteronomy 18:15-19 . Joshua was indeed a man full of wisdom, but Deuteronomy 34:9-12 , almost as if it had anticipated this identification of Joshua with that prophet who was to arise and be like Moses, effectively closed the door on that equation by saying, "Now Joshua son of Nun was filled with the spirit of wisdom, because Moses had laid his hands on him But no prophet arose in Israel like unto Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face For no one had ever known the mighty power or performed the awesome deeds that Moses did in the sight of all Israel" (author's translation). But since you do not believe what he wrote, how are you going to believe what I say?" Of all the places that Jesus could have been referring to in Moses' writings, none would be a more obvious candidate for a messianic reference than Deuteronomy 18:15-19 , where the Messiah would function as the prophetic teacher. ...
The characteristics of the prophet that Moses announced in Deuteronomy 18:15-19 are: (1) that he would be an Israelite; (2) that he would be like Moses; and (3) that he would be authorized to declare the word of God with authority. Does it refer to the institution of the prophetic order, or to an individual prophet? Jewish and most recent commentators regard the term "prophet" in Deuteronomy 18:15-19 as a collective and generic term. This, of course, must be admitted, for the context of Deuteronomy 17-18 speaks of classes or groups of leaders such as the priests and Levites. The first is teacher ( Deuteronomy 4:5 ; 31:22 ; 2 Kings 4:22-23 ). Deuteronomy 28-29 and Deuteronomy 31:19-21 ; with Matthew 21:28-45 ; 23:37-39 ; 24:4-31 )
Sheep - After settling down in Canaan, the Israelites, on the whole, belonged to this latter category (Deuteronomy 7:13; 1 Samuel 17:15; 1 Samuel 25:2). Apart from those ceremonial sacrifices where worshippers ate the meat of the sheep in a ritual meal, Israelites killed sheep for meat only on special occasions (Leviticus 7:15; Deuteronomy 12:21; 1 Samuel 25:18; Amos 6:4; see also LAMB)
Olive - Olive trees, both wild and cultivated, were among the most common trees of Palestine (Deuteronomy 8:8; Judges 15:5; 1 Chronicles 27:28; Luke 22:39). They then collected the fruit in baskets (Deuteronomy 24:20; Isaiah 17:6; Isaiah 24:13; Amos 8:2)
Booty - Within Canaan no captives were to be made; all that breathed were to be destroyed (Deuteronomy 20:14; Deuteronomy 20:16); but outside, if resistance were offered, the women and children were to be made captives, the men slain
Sodom And Gomorrah - Together, Sodom and Gomorrah provided a point of comparison for the sinfulness of Israel and other nations (Deuteronomy 32:32 ; Isaiah 1:10 ; Jeremiah 23:14 ). The memory of their destruction provided a picture of God's judgment (Isaiah 13:19 ; Jeremiah 49:18 ; Matthew 10:14-15 ; Matthew 11:23-24 ) and made them an example to be avoided (Deuteronomy 29:23-25 ; 2 Peter 2:6 )
Aroer - Compare Deuteronomy 3:12 . Sihon, king of the Amorites, ruled it prior to Israel's conquest (Deuteronomy 4:48 ; Joshua 12:2 )
Honey - (See Deuteronomy 8:8). ...
Deuteronomy 32:13 (a) The rock represents the Lord JESUS, and the honey represents the sweetness, the loveliness and all those precious graces which one receives from CHRIST by faith
Amen - ]'>[1] by an equivalent Greek expression ( Numbers 5:22 , Deuteronomy 27:15 ‘so be it,’ Jeremiah 28:6 ( Jeremiah 36:6 ) ‘truly’), but sometimes transliterated ( 1 Chronicles 16:36 ) as in English. It is an indication of solemn assent, chiefly in prayer, to the words of another, on the part either of an individual ( Numbers 5:22 ) or of an assembly ( Deuteronomy 27:15 ); sometimes reduplicated ( Psalms 41:13 ), sometimes accompanied by a rubrical direction ( Psalms 106:48 )
Hear - This seems to be an allusion to Deuteronomy 18:15 ; Deuteronomy 18:18-19 : "The Lord shall raise up unto you a prophet; him shall ye hear;"...
which is also expressly applied in Acts 3:22
Paran - Perhaps in this region should be sought ‘Paran’ of Deuteronomy 33:2 , Habakkuk 3:3 (Driver, ‘Deut. If Deuteronomy 2:8 refers to a place in Moab, no trace of it has yet been found
Gate - is often used in Scripture to denote a place of public assembly, where justice was administered, Deuteronomy 17:5 ; Deuteronomy 17:8 ; Deuteronomy 21:19 ; Deuteronomy 22:15 ; Deuteronomy 25:6-7 , &c
Border - To them it was the chief of three ‘sensible signs,’ or material reminders, of their obligations under the Law, the other two being the Phylacteries (tĕphillîn) and mĕzûzôth, oblong boxes fixed above the door-posts, on which Deuteronomy 6:4-9; Deuteronomy 11:12-21 were written, according to the directions there given. The Law first required (Deuteronomy 22:12) that ‘twisted cords’ (Heb. ’ This thing termed gĕdhîlîm acquired later the special name zîzîth,—it is so rendered by the Targum in Deuteronomy 22:12. ...
The ‘twisted cords’ of Deuteronomy 22:12 were clearly intended to be fastened to the four corners of the outer garment (usually called simlâh)
Desert - It can describe the southern boundary of the Promised Land ( Exodus 23:31 ; Deuteronomy 11:24 ). It serves as the eastern boundary of the Promised Land and is often translated, “plain,” if it is not transliterated as “Arabah” ( Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 12:1 ). It could be described like the original chaos prior to creation (Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Jeremiah 4:23-26 ). Israel was able to go through the desert because God led them (Deuteronomy 1:19 ). Its animal inhabitants caused even more fear—1snakes and scorpions (Deuteronomy 8:15 ); wild donkeys (Jeremiah 2:24 )
Levirate Law - ]'>[1] Among the Jews the law was laid down that ‘if brethren dwell together, and one of them die, and have no child (son), the wife of the dead shall not marry without unto a stranger: her husband’s brother … shall take her to him to wife’ (Deuteronomy 25:5). It almost seems, however, that the Levirate custom was not permitted by later legislation (Leviticus 18:16; Leviticus 20:21); but it has been suggested (1) that the forbidden marriage of that legislation was one between a man and the wife of his living brother;* [3] The object of the Levirate marriage (Deuteronomy 25:6) was to secure that the firstborn of the new union should succeed in the name of the dead brother, whose name thereby might not be blotted out from Israel. In none of the three statements are the ipsissima verba of Deuteronomy 25:5 used, and Mt
Justice - Justice in magistrates, rulers, and judges, must be fearless and impartial, and all its decisions such as will bear revision before the court of heaven, Deuteronomy 1:16,17 2 Samuel 23:3 2 Chronicles 19:6-10 . ...
THE JUSTICE OF GOD is that essential and infinite attribute which makes his nature and his ways the perfect embodiment of equity, and constitutes him the model and the guardian of equity throughout the universe, Deuteronomy 32:4 Psalm 89:14 . In the land of Canaan, local magistrates were appointed for every city and village; and these were instructed to cooperate with the priests, as being all together under the theocracy, the actual government of Jehovah, the supreme Judge of Israel, Deuteronomy 16:18 17:8-10 19:17 21:16 . Their informal courts were held in the gate of the city, as the most public and convenient place, Deuteronomy 21:9 22:15 25:7 ; and in the same place contracts were ratified, Ruth 4:1,9 Jeremiah 32:7-15 . The sentence of the judge was instantly executed; and in certain cases the witnesses cast the first stone, Deuteronomy 17:5,7 25:2 Joshua 7:24 1 Samuel 22:18 1 Kings 2:24 Proverbs 16:14
Lending - If they took clothing as a guarantee, they had to return it by evening, so that the person would not have to sleep in the cold (Exodus 22:26-27; Deuteronomy 24:6; Deuteronomy 24:10-13). God promised to reward those who were generous to their fellows (Deuteronomy 15:1-11). In those cases normal business procedures applied (Deuteronomy 15:3; cf. Deuteronomy 23:20)
Enchantments - " All kinds of enchantments were condemned by the Mosaic law (Leviticus 19:26 ; Deuteronomy 18:10-12 )
Fallow-Deer - Deuteronomy 14:5 (RSV, "Wild goat"); 1 Kings 4:23 (RSV, "roebucks")
Frontlet - They contained the following passages written on parcament: Exodus 13:1-10; 11-16, and Deuteronomy 6:4-9; 11:13-21
Aroer - An ancient city on the north side of the Arnon, in the southern border of the tribe of Reuben, Deuteronomy 2:36 4:48 Joshua 13:9
Apple of the Eye - Three different Hebrew words or phrases are rendered as the apple of the eye: (1) the word in Deuteronomy 32:10 and Proverbs 7:2 literally means “little man” and evidently refers to the reflection of a person in the eye of another; (2) the word in Psalm 17:8 and Lamentations 2:18 (KJV) literally means “the daughter of the eye” with possibly the same significance as (1); and (3) the word in Zechariah 2:8 literally means “gate
Benjamin, Tribe of - Moses pronounced a special blessing upon this tribe (Deuteronomy 33), which at the division of the territory of Chanaan under Josue, obtained its share between the frontiers of Ephraim, Dan, and Juda (Joshua 18)
Shittah Tree - ]'>[1] ‘ acacia tree’; shittim wood [2] Exodus 25:5 ; Exodus 25:10 ; Exodus 25:13 ; Exodus 26:15 ; Exodus 26:26 ; Exodus 27:1 ; Exodus 27:6 , Deuteronomy 10:3 , RV Malediction - The announcement of a temporal loss or of eternal loss as a punishment for sin made by God Himself or by one speaking in the name of God; as in Genesis 3, and Deuteronomy 11
Hare - 'arnebeth) was prohibited as food according to the Mosaic law (Leviticus 11:6 ; Deuteronomy 14:7 ), "because he cheweth the cud, but divideth not the hoof
Meat-Offering - It was a recognition of the sovereignty of God and of his bounty in giving all earthly blessings (1 Chronicles 29:10-14 ; Deuteronomy 26:5-11 )
Flax - It was much used in forming articles of clothing such as girdles, also cords and bands ( Leviticus 13:48,52,59 ; Deuteronomy 22:11 )
Field - Unwalled villages or scattered houses are spoken of as "in the fields" (Deuteronomy 28:3,16 ; Leviticus 25:31 ; Mark 6:36,56 )
Peor - ...
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A Moabite divinity, called also "Baal-peor" (Numbers 25:3,5,18 ; Compare Deuteronomy 3:29 )
Seir - It was allotted to the descendants of Esau (Deuteronomy 2:4,22 ; Joshua 24:4 ; 2 Chronicles 20:10 ; Isaiah 21:11 ; Exek 25:8)
Heir - The Mosaic law made specific regulations regarding the transmission of real property, which are given in detail in Deuteronomy 21:17 ; Numbers 27:8 ; 36:6 ; 27:9-11
Lakum - of Jordan; for Deuteronomy 33:23, "possess thou "the sea" (yam ) and the sunny district" (Speaker's Commentary Darom, E
Ships - Moses (Deuteronomy 28:68 ) and (Job 9:26 ) make reference to them, and Balaam speaks of the "ships of Chittim" (Numbers 24:24 )
Baldness - The Jews were forbidden to follow the customs of surrounding nations in making themselves bald (Deuteronomy 14:1 )
Wormwood - It is noted for its intense bitterness (Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Proverbs 5:4 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Amos 5:7 )
Axe - " The head was fastened to the handle by thongs, and so was liable to slip off (Deuteronomy 19:5; 2 Kings 6:5)
Degrees, Song of - The probable origin of this name is the circumstance that these psalms came to be sung by the people on the ascents or goings up to Jerusalem to attend the three great festivals (Deuteronomy 16:16 )
Pisgah - God allowed Moses to view the Promised Land from the heights of Pisgah (Deuteronomy 34:1 ) but would not let him cross into Canaan
Asher - It was fruitful in grain, wine, oil, and minerals, Genesis 49:20 Deuteronomy 33:24,25
Money - ...
Poverty is not desirable either, and people should use their money to help those who are in need (Deuteronomy 15:7-10; James 2:15-16; see POOR)
Scourge - The number of blows was set in Deuteronomy 25:3 at forty, but later reduced to thirty-nine
Bat - They are counted as unclean ‘fowl,’ though a little separate from the birds, in Leviticus 11:19 , Deuteronomy 14:18
Fallow-Deer - ]'>[1] among the clean animals ( Deuteronomy 14:5 ), and in the list of game furnished for Solomon’s daily table ( 1 Kings 4:23 )
Gall - (1) rôsh , some very bitter plant, Deuteronomy 29:18 , Lamentations 3:19 ; ‘water of gall,’ Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:16 ; tr
Siegeworks - Israel's law did not allow fruit trees to be cut down to build such platforms (Deuteronomy 20:19-20 )
Cluster - Deuteronomy 32:32 (b) Here is described the terrible amount and character of GOD's wrath against His people when they turn from Him
Benjamin - ...
Deuteronomy 33:12 (a) Here is a beautiful picture of the trusting and confident Christian who dwells in the presence of his Lord, is covered by GOD's gracious, protecting care, and like the Indian's papoose, rests securely and happily between the shoulders of his wonderful Lord
Furnace - Deuteronomy 4
Shoe - Deuteronomy 33:25 (b) This is a type of the blessed preparation given by GOD to enable His children to traverse difficult roads without discomfort
Gerizim - (See Deuteronomy 27:1-26, throughout; Joshua 8:30-35) Both those mountains were near Shechem in Ephraim, a province of Samaria
Paran - DESERT OF, a "great and terrible wilderness" which the children of Israel entered after leaving Mount Sinai, Numbers 10:12 ; Deuteronomy 1:19 ; and in which thirty-eight of their forty years of wandering were spent
Bezer - or Bozra, or Bostra, a city beyond Jordan, given by Moses to Reuben: this town was designed by Joshua to be a city of refuge; it was given to the Levites of Gershom's family, Deuteronomy 4:43
Cormorant - שלכּ? , Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ; a large sea bird
Tephillim - They contained the following passages written on parcament: Exodus 13:1-10; 11-16, and Deuteronomy 6:4-9; 11:13-21
Tribe of Benjamin - Moses pronounced a special blessing upon this tribe (Deuteronomy 33), which at the division of the territory of Chanaan under Josue, obtained its share between the frontiers of Ephraim, Dan, and Juda (Joshua 18)
Witness - Under the Mosaic law, two witnesses under oath were necessary to convict a person charged with a capital crime, Numbers 35:30 ; and if the criminal was stoned, the witnesses were bound to cast the first stones, Deuteronomy 17:6-7 Acts 7:58
Cubit - ...
The cubit became the basic unit for estimating length, depth and height (Genesis 7:20; Deuteronomy 3:11; 1 Chronicles 11:23)
Asher - This was a fertile area whose olive orchards produced the best oil in Palestine (Genesis 49:20; Deuteronomy 33:24)
Valley - bik'ah, a "cleft" of the mountains (Deuteronomy 8:7 ; 11:11 ; Psalm 104:8 ; Isaiah 41:18 ); also a low plain bounded by mountains, as the plain of Lebanon at the foot of Hermon around the sources of the Jordan (Joshua 11:17 ; 12:7 ), and the valley of Megiddo (2 Chronicles 35:22 ). ...
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Ge, "a bursting," a "flowing together," a narrow glen or ravine, such as the valley of the children of Hinnom (2 Kings 23:10 ); of Eshcol (Deuteronomy 1:24 ); of Sorek (Judges 16:4 ), etc
Honey - ...
Old Testament During Bible times, honey appeared in three forms: (1) honey deposited from wild bees (Deuteronomy 32:13 ), (2) honey from domesticated bees (one of the products “of the field” 2 Chronicles 31:5 ), and (3) a syrup made from dates and grape juice (2 Kings 18:32 ). Bees made their honeycombs and deposited their honey in holes in the ground (1 Samuel 14:25 ); under rocks or in crevices between rocks (Deuteronomy 32:13 ); or in the carcasses of animals (Judges 14:8 )
Virgin - Deuteronomy 22:23 ff. has laws for the protection of virgins; Deuteronomy 22:13 insists on the importance of virginity in a bride
Signs - They reveal something of the power and purposes of God (Exodus 7:3; Deuteronomy 4:34; Deuteronomy 7:19; Joshua 24:17; John 2:11; Acts 2:22; Acts 2:43; Hebrews 2:4)
Mourning - ; removal of ornaments or neglect of person, Deuteronomy 21:12-13, etc. In the case of Jacob it was seventy days, Genesis 50:3; of Aaron, Numbers 20:29, and Moses, Deuteronomy 34:8, thirty
Golden Calf - All other references to this subject in the Bible (Deuteronomy 9:16 ,Deuteronomy 9:16,9:21 ; 2 Kings 10:29 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 2 Chronicles 11:15 ; 2 Chronicles 13:8 ; Nehemiah 9:18 ; Psalm 106:19 ; Acts 7:41 ) have in view either the incident involving Aaron or the one involving Jeroboam I
Zin - ZIN ( Numbers 13:21 ; Numbers 20:1 ; Numbers 27:14 ; Numbers 33:36 ; Numbers 34:3 ; Numbers 34:6 , Deuteronomy 32:51 , Joshua 15:1 ; Joshua 15:3 ). The remaining two passages, Numbers 27:1-23 and Deuteronomy 32:1-52 , which are duplicates, refer to the punishment of Moses for his offence at ‘the waters of Meribah of Kadesh in the wilderness of Zin
Hare - arnebeth Reckoned unclean on the ground that it "chews the cud, but divideth not the hoof" (Leviticus 11:6; Deuteronomy 14:7). The rule in Deuteronomy 17:27, "whatsoever goeth upon his paws" (as the dog, cat, and beasts of prey), sufficiently excludes from the clean the hyrax and the hare
Dew - A leading source of fertility (Genesis 27:28; Deuteronomy 33:13; Job 29:19; Hosea 14:5; Isaiah 18:4; Zechariah 8:12). ...
On the other hand its gentle, silent, benignant influence, diffusing itself over the parched ground, represents the blessed effect of God's word and God's grace (Deuteronomy 32:2); also brotherly love (Psalms 133:3), the "dew of Hermon (i
Might - Deuteronomy 28 ...
2. Deuteronomy 6 ...
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Lift - In ancient times as now, an oath required raising one's hand (Genesis 14:22 ; Exodus 6:8 , NAS margin; Deuteronomy 32:40 ). To lift up one's eyes or heart is to be haughty or prideful (Deuteronomy 8:14 ; 2 Kings 14:10 ; 2 Kings 19:22 ; 2 Chronicles 25:19 ; Proverbs 30:13 ; Isaiah 37:23 )
Bless - Deuteronomy 15 . Genesis 27; Deuteronomy 33
Maker - " (Psalms 95:6) So again the prophet Isaiah, (Isaiah 52:12-13) "Who art thou that thou shouldest be afraid of a man that shall die and of the son of man which shall be made as grass; and forgettest the Lord thy Maker, that hath stretched forth the heavens, and laid the foundations of the earth!" It is not a little interesting, but highly important to be kept in view, that the act itself is connected with the glorious and fearful name of JEHOVAH-ALEHIM, (see Deuteronomy 28:58) to intimate the plurality of persons in the GODHEAD. (Ecclesiastes 12:1) So again in Job, (Job 35:10) the word is plural, where is God my Makers? And yet that the church night never lose sight of the unity of the divine Essence, while thus believing in the existence of a threefold character of person in the GODHEAD, the Lord, by Moses, delivered this glorious fundamental truth in the plainest and strongest terms; "Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is one Lord!" (Deuteronomy 6:4) Oh! that these sacred, hallowed truths, were both duly and reverently considered and pondered over, agreeably to their immense sublimity, in these days of Arian and Socinian blasphemy!...
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Queen of Heaven - I beg the reader to turn to the fourth chapter of Deuteronomy, and observe, from beginning to end, with what tenderness and affection the man of God admonished Israel on this point. " (Deuteronomy 33:14; Deu 33:16)...
Heaven - Deuteronomy 26 The sanctified heart loves heaven for its purity, and God for his goodness. Deuteronomy 1 ...
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Aramean - (ar uh mee' an) consisted of the loose confederation of towns and settlements spread over what is now called Syria as well as in some parts of Babylon from which Jacob and Abraham came (Deuteronomy 26:5 ). Deuteronomy 26:5 contains what has become an important confession for Jews—”A wandering Aramean was my father” (RSV)—which claims Aramean lineage for Jacob and by extension for Abraham
Gilead or Galeed - Thus, in Deuteronomy 34:1 , God is said to have showed Moses, from mount Nebo, "all the land of Gilead unto Dan. " Compare Numbers 32:26,29 Deuteronomy 3:12
Jealousy - God is jealous for His people Israel in sense 1, that is, God is intolerant of rival gods (Exodus 20:5 ; Exodus 34:14 ; Deuteronomy 4:24 ; Deuteronomy 5:9 ) One expression of God's jealousy for Israel is God's protection of His people from enemies
Image - All use of images in religious worship was clearly and peremptorily prohibited, Exodus 20:4,5 Deuteronomy 16:22 Acts 17:16 Romans 1:23 . Now, however, they are universally used by Papists: by most in a gross breach of the second commandment, and by the best in opposition to both the letter and the spirit of the Bible, Exodus 20:4,5 32:4,5 Deuteronomy 4:15 Isaiah 40:18-31 John 4:23,24 Revelation 22:8,9
Dew - Dew is a favourite emblem in Scripture: (a) richness and fertility ( Genesis 27:28 , Deuteronomy 33:13 ); (b) refreshing and vivifying effects ( Deuteronomy 32:2 , Isaiah 18:4 ); (c) stealth ( 2 Samuel 17:12 ); (d) inconstancy ( Hosea 6:4 ; Hosea 13:3 ); (e) the young warriors of the Messianic king ( Psalms 110:3 )
Dizahab - The writer of Deuteronomy 1:1 thought of this as a town on the further side of the Jordan, in the ‘Arabah, on the border of Moab, ‘over against Suph,’ and as belonging to a group of places which he names. At Numbers 21:14 we find Suphah ( Deuteronomy 1:1 Samuph) in conjunction with Vaheb (see RV Reward - Deuteronomy 32 . Deuteronomy 27
Concubine - Deuteronomy 17:17 forbid kings to take so many wives. ...
A concubine, whether purchased (Exodus 21:7-11 ; Leviticus 25:44-46 ) or won in battle (Numbers 31:18 ), was entitled to some legal protection (Exodus 21:7-12 ; Deuteronomy 21:10-14 ), but was her husband's property
Hospitality - The custom was to welcome both friends and strangers and to give them food, water and other provisions to make them comfortable (Genesis 18:1-8; Genesis 24:32; Exodus 2:20; Deuteronomy 10:18-19; Deuteronomy 23:4; Judges 13:15; Judges 19:16-21; 2 Kings 4:8; Job 31:32; Luke 7:44-45; Acts 9:43; Acts 16:15)
Jealousy - He desires their faithfulness and has a deep concern for their well-being (Exodus 20:4-5; Deuteronomy 6:15; Joshua 24:19; Psalms 78:58; Zechariah 1:14; 1 Corinthians 10:21-22; James 4:5). Jealousy may therefore include the idea of zeal for all that is right and opposition to all that is wrong (Numbers 25:11-13; Deuteronomy 4:24; Nahum 1:2; John 2:17; 2 Corinthians 7:11)
Leviticus - Canon Tristram, speaking of the remarkable discoveries regarding the flora and fauna of the Holy Land by the Palestine Exploration officers, makes the following statement:, "Take these two catalogues of the clean and unclean animals in the books of Leviticus [1] and Deuteronomy [2]. There are eleven in Deuteronomy which do not occur in Leviticus, and these are nearly all animals and birds which are not found in Egypt or the Holy Land, but which are numerous in the Arabian desert. They are not named in Leviticus a few weeks after the departure from Egypt; but after the people were thirty-nine years in the desert they are named, a strong proof that the list in Deuteronomy was written at the end of the journey, and the list in Leviticus at the beginning
Joshua - ...
The Lord selected Joshua to be Moses' successor long before Moses' death (Numbers 27:15-23 ; Deuteronomy 31:14-15 ,Deuteronomy 31:14-15,31:23 ; Deuteronomy 34:9 )
Sabbatical Year - However, in the case of foreigners who owed Israelites debts, normal business procedures applied (Deuteronomy 15:1-11). Foreigners who were slaves of Israelites apparently did not enjoy this privilege (Deuteronomy 15:12-18; Leviticus 25:44-46; see SLAVE). This reading was to take place at the central place of worship when the people assembled to celebrate the Feast of Tabernacles (Deuteronomy 31:9-13)
Infant Baptism - Those favoring infant baptism raise the following arguments: (1) household baptisms likely included some infants (Acts 16:5 ,Acts 16:5,16:33 ; Acts 18:8 ; 1 Corinthians 1:16 ); (2) Jesus' welcome and blessing of children is a mandate to baptize infants (Mark 10:13-16 ); “hinder” is a technical term associated with baptism (Acts 8:36 ); (3) circumcision which prefigured baptism (Colossians 2:11 ) included children (Genesis 17:12 ); (4) in the Old Testament children participated in ceremonies of covenant renewal (Deuteronomy 29:10-13 ; Joshua 8:35 ; Joel 2:16 ). ...
Baptists and other adherents of believer's baptism raise the following arguments and counter-arguments: (1) The New Testament prerequisite of baptism is faith (Acts 18:8 ) which is evidenced by confession (Romans 10:9-10 ) and repentance (Acts 2:38 ); (2) infant baptism rests ultimately on the fear that infants are held accountable for organic sin; Baptists counter with a doctrine of an age of accountability at which conscious sin occurs (Genesis 8:21 ; Psalm 25:7 ; Jeremiah 3:25 ) and at which a conscious response to God is possible (1 Kings 18:12 ; Psalm 71:5 ,Psalms 71:5,71:17 ); (3) household baptisms need not have included children; baptism is prefigured in the salvation of Noah and his exclusively adult household in the ark (1 Peter 3:20-21 ); (4) Jesus' blessing of the children demonstrates Christ's love for children; children are presented as an example to disciples rather than as disciples themselves (Matthew 18:2-4 ); (5) circumcision is an imperfect analogy to baptism; only males participated in circumcision, whereas in baptism there is “neither male nor female” (Galatians 3:28 ); the witness of the New Testament is that “what is born of the flesh is flesh” and that a spiritual birth is necessary to enter God's kingdom (John 3:5-6 ); it is not the Israel of the flesh that inherits the promises of God but those who are spiritual Israel by a faith commitment (Romans 6-8 ; Galatians 6:16 ); (6) the responsibility of the faith community to its children is instruction in the way of the Lord (Deuteronomy 4:9-10 ; Deuteronomy 11:19 ; Proverbs 22:6 ); participation in covenant renewal is educational for children
Nature - 74) finds in the Law ‘the general rule that nothing is to be permitted contrary to the delicate sense of the inviolable proprieties of nature,’ and gives a number of instances ( Exodus 23:19 ; Exodus 34:26 , Leviticus 22:28 ; Leviticus 19:19 , Deuteronomy 22:9-11 , Leviticus 10:9 ; Leviticus 19:28 ; Leviticus 21:5 ; Leviticus 22:24 , Deuteronomy 14:1 ; Deuteronomy 23:2 )
Esau - He displaced the Horites from the hilly land of Seir, and settled there with his followers ( Genesis 32:3 ; Genesis 36:8 , Deuteronomy 2:12 ). ) carried with it the loss of precedence after the father’s death ( Genesis 27:29 ), and probably loss of the domestic priesthood ( Numbers 3:12-13 ), and of the double portion of the patrimony ( Deuteronomy 21:17 ). Twenty years later the brothers were reconciled ( Genesis 33:4 ); after which Esau made Seir his principal abode, and on the death of Isaac settled there permanently ( Genesis 35:29 , Genesis 36:6 , Deuteronomy 2:4-5 , Joshua 24:4 )
Milk - Most often milk came from sheep and goats (Proverbs 27:27 ; Deuteronomy 32:14 ); cow's milk was also known (Isaiah 7:21-22 ), as was milk from humans (Isaiah 28:9 ). ...
The Old Testament's most extensive use of milk is in conjunction with honey to symbolize abundance and blessing (Exodus 3:17 ; Exodus 13:5 ; Exodus 33:3 ; Leviticus 20:24 , Numbers 13:27 ; Deuteronomy 6:3 ; Joshua 5:6 ). ...
One of the more perplexing sayings of Scripture is the repeated rule (Exodus 23:19 ; Exodus 34:26 ; Deuteronomy 14:21 ) not to boil a kid in its mother's milk
City - In the kingdom of Og in Bashan there were sixty "great cities with walls," and twenty-three cities in Gilead partly rebuilt by the tribes on the east of Jordan (Numbers 21:21,32,33,35 ; 32:1-3,34-42 ; Deuteronomy 3:4,5,14 ; 1 Kings 4:13 ). A fenced city was a city surrounded by fortifications and high walls, with watch-towers upon them (2 Chronicles 11:11 ; Deuteronomy 3:5 ). The regulations concerning these cities are given in Numbers 35:9-34 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-13 ; Exodus 21:12-14
Arm - Zerôa‛ means "arm," a part of the body: "Blessed be he that enlargeth Gad: he dwelleth as a lion, and teareth the arm with the crown of the head" (Deuteronomy 33:20). ...
God's strength is figured by anthropomorphisms (attributing to Him human bodily parts), such as His "stretched out arm" (Deuteronomy 4:34) or His "strong arm" (Jeremiah 21:5). Deuteronomy 18:3)
Olive - It is always classed among the most valuable trees of Palestine, which is described as a land of oil olive, and honey, Deuteronomy 6:11 8:8 Habakkuk 3:17 . It is gathered by shaking the boughs and by beating them with poles, Deuteronomy 24:20 Isaiah 17:6 , and is sometimes plucked in an unripe state, put into some preserving liquid, and exported. , Deuteronomy 32:13 Job 29:6
Hand - The hand of God is His eternal purpose and executive power (Acts 4:28; Acts 4:30); His providential bounty (Psalms 104:28); His firm hold preserving His saints (John 10:28-29; Deuteronomy 33:8). "Laying on of hands" was usual in blessing; as the Lord Jesus blessing the infants (Mark 10:16), Jacob blessing Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 48:14); also in laying guilt and punishment upon persons accused (Deuteronomy 13:9; Deuteronomy 17:7); also in constituting magistrates, as Moses did in appointing Joshua his successor (Numbers 27:18); also setting apart the Levites (Numbers 8:10). The impartation of the Spirit was connected with the symbolical laying on of hands; "Joshua was full of the spirit of wisdom, FOR Moses had laid his hands upon him" (Deuteronomy 34:9)
Greatness - The Bible describes God as the greatest of gods (Deuteronomy 10:17 ); his greatness is unsearchable (Psalm 145:3 ). The "greatness of majesty" becomes the worshiper's cry for who God is (Exodus 15:7 ; Deuteronomy 5:24 ). God's care of the children of Israel in the wilderness demonstrated his greatness (Deuteronomy 3:24 ; 11:2 ). ...
God also exhibits greatness in love toward humanity by forgiving (Numbers 14:19 ) and by redeeming (Deuteronomy 9:26 )
Arise - Also see Deuteronomy 19:15, which states that a matter may be "confirmed" only by the testimony of two or more witnesses. ...
Another special use of qûm is "rise up again," as when a childless widow complains to the elders, "My husband's brother refuseth to raise up unto his brother a name in Israel …" ( Deuteronomy 25:7). With 'êl "against," it often means "to fight against or attack": "A man riseth against his neighbor, and slayeth him …" ( Deuteronomy 22:26). With the particle ("against"), qûm means "make a formal charge against": "One witness shall not rise up against a man …" ( Deuteronomy 19:15)
Sanctification - These fall into three groupings: those whose sanctity was inherent (for example, firstborn males of female animals and human beings, Exodus 13:2 ,Exodus 13:2,13:11-13 ; Leviticus 27:26 ); objects whose sanctification was required (for example, tithes of crops and pure animals, Leviticus 27:30-33 ; Deuteronomy 26:13 ); and gifts whose sanctification was voluntary (see partial list in Leviticus 27:1 ). Finally, the nation of Israel was sanctified to the Lord as a holy people (Exodus 19:6 ; Deuteronomy 7:1 ;Deuteronomy 7:1;6:1 ; Deuteronomy 14:2 ,Deuteronomy 14:2,14:21 ; Deuteronomy 26:19 )
Ark - Samuel and the prophetical narratives of the Hexateuch; ( b ) of Deuteronomy and the writers influenced by Dt. a contraction for ‘the ark or chest containing the tables of the covenant’ ( Deuteronomy 9:9 ff. ]'>[5] ) are now silent as to the origin of the ark, but since the author of Deuteronomy 10:1-6 had one or both of these before him, it may be assumed that its construction was there also assigned to Moses in obedience to a Divine command. In these the ark a simple chest of acacia wood, according to Deuteronomy 10:3 is associated chiefly with the operations of war, in which it is the representative of J″ Salecah - SALECAH ( Deuteronomy 3:10 , Joshua 13:11 ; Joshua 12:5 , 1 Chronicles 5:11 ) was the most easterly of the towns claimed by Israel
Egg - Eggs deserted (Isaiah 10:14 ), of a bird (Deuteronomy 22:6 ), an ostrich (Job 39:14 ), the cockatrice (Isaiah 59:5 )
Ephah - , "an ephah and an ephah"), Deuteronomy 25:14 , means two ephahs, the one false and the other just
Hornet - tsir'ah, "stinging", (Exodus 23:28 ; Deuteronomy 7:20 ; Joshua 24:12 )
Machir - They settled in land taken from the Amorites (Numbers 32:39,40 ; Deuteronomy 3:15 ) by a special enactment (Numbers 36:1-3 ; Joshua 17:3,4 )
Familiar Spirit - Sorcerers or necormancers, who professed to call up the dead to answer questions, were said to have a "familiar spirit" (Deuteronomy 18:11 ; 2 Kings 21:6 ; 2 Chronicles 33:6 ; Leviticus 19:31 ; 20:6 ; Isaiah 8:19 ; 29:4 )
Divorce - Moses had suffered a man to put away his wife for any cause, as we see in Deuteronomy 24:1,3 ; but the Lord maintained God's original ordinance that what God had joined together, man had no right to put asunder, therefore a man must not put away his wife except for fornication, when she herself had broken the bond
Machir - of Jordan was subdued by his powerful family (Numbers 32:39; Deuteronomy 3:15)
Kid - The Mosaic law forbade to dress a kid in the milk of its dam, a law which is thrice repeated (Exodus 23:19 ; 34:26 ; Deuteronomy 14:21 )
Mulberry Tree - Of this valley Celsius remarks, that it was "rugged and embarrassed with bushes and stones, which could not be passed through without labour and tears;" referring to Psalms 84:7 ; and the "rough valley," Deuteronomy 21:4 ; and he quotes from a manuscript of Abu'l Fideli a description of the tree which grew there, and mentions it as bearing a fruit of an acrid taste
Messenger - Messenger is often used in the literal sense (Genesis 32:3 ,Genesis 32:3,32:6 ; Numbers 20:14 ; Numbers 24:12 ; Deuteronomy 2:26 )
Wages - They should be paid every night (Leviticus 19:13; Deuteronomy 24:14-15; compare Job 24:11; James 5:4; Jeremiah 22:13; Malachi 3:5); spiritually, John 4:36; Romans 6:28
Barley - A grain for which Palestine was known (Deuteronomy 8:8 )
Bit, Bridle - the corresponding verb in Deuteronomy 25:4 )
Midst - Deuteronomy 18 ...
MIDST, adv
Unity of God - The unity of God is argued from his necessary existence, self-sufficiency; perfection, independence, and omnipotence; from the unity of design in the works of nature; and from there being no necessity of having more gods than one: but the Scriptures set it beyond all doubt, Deuteronomy 6:4
Blessing - Deuteronomy 33 ...
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Accursed - Deuteronomy 21:23 (c) This word represents GOD's wrath against the sinner
Asp - Deuteronomy 32:33 (a) The effect of liquor on the soul is compared to the poison that comes from the bite of the serpent
End - ...
Deuteronomy 32:29 (a) This refers to the outcome of Israel's disobedience and path of rebellion
Charmer - In Deuteronomy 18:11 the word "charmer" means a dealer in spells, especially one who, by binding certain knots, was supposed thereby to bind a curse or a blessing on its object
Shittim Wood, Shittah Tree - Exodus 25 — Exodus 38 ; Deuteronomy 10:3
Controversy - Deuteronomy 21
Soul - ...
Below is a list of some of the things which are covered by this word:...
Genesis 2:7 The human life...
Genesis 34:8 Human feelings...
Genesis 35:18 The human spirit...
Leviticus 5:2 The person's body...
Leviticus 17:11 The whole person...
Leviticus 17:12 The person's body...
2 Chronicles 6:38 Purpose of heart...
1 Samuel 18:1 Human affections...
1 Kings 17:21 The spirit of life...
Deuteronomy 11:13 The human mind or will...
Hebrews 10:39 The whole person...
Hebrews 13:17 The human life...
The above types cover practically all of the places where the word "soul" is used throughout the Scriptures
Garden - Gardens of herbs, or kitchen gardens, are mentioned in Deuteronomy 11:10 and 1 Kings 21:2
Hermon - The highest mountain in Palestine, Deuteronomy 3:8; Joshua 12:1; Joshua 11:17; 1 Chronicles 5:23
Ramoth - The city belonged to the tribe of Gad, Deuteronomy 4:43
Housetop - The housetop was flat, and guarded by a low parapet wall (see Deuteronomy 22:8 )
Fringes - The Israelites were commanded to put fringes upon their garments, Numbers 15:38-39; Deuteronomy 22:12, a kind of edging which would prevent the ends of the cloth from unravelling; also in the corners possibly of the outer garment, which was quadrangular, there was to be a narrow blue ribbon
Paran - Mount Paran appears as a poetic parallel to Mount Sinai (Deuteronomy 33:2 ; compare Habakkuk 3:3 ) as the place of revelation
Ear - The perforated ear was a sign of slavery or dependence, indicating the obligation to attend ( Exodus 21:6 , Deuteronomy 15:16 f
Dung - Directions for personal cleanliness are given in Deuteronomy 23:10-14 ; and in the case of sacrifices the dung of the animals was burnt outside the camp ( Exodus 29:14 , Leviticus 4:11-12 ; Leviticus 8:17 , Numbers 19:5 )
Anak - Only Joshua and Caleb believed Israel could conquer them (Numbers 13:22-33; Deuteronomy 9:2)
King - Moses (Deuteronomy 17:14-17) contemplated the contingency of a king being set up in Israel as in all the adjoining nations. Other allusions to kings to come occur (Deuteronomy 7:3-40; Numbers 24:17; Deuteronomy 28:36). ), "make us a king to judge us like all the nations," evidently is molded after Deuteronomy 17:14; so Samuel's language in presenting Saul to the people (Isaiah 30:1-2) as "him whom the Lord hath chosen" alludes to Moses' direction (Deuteronomy 17:15), "thou shalt in any wise set him king over thee whom the Lord thy God shall choose. " The sacred record of Solomon's multiplying horses and chariots from Egypt, and foreign wives who turned away his heart, alludes to the prohibition (Deuteronomy 17:16-17; compare 1619165092_47; Exodus 34:16), and proceeds to verify the prediction of the results of disobedience to it. ...
Solomon's multiplication of horses and chariots from Egypt entailed constant traffic with that idolatrous nation, which the prohibition, Deuteronomy 17:16, was designed to prevent. have written for him) a copy of the law out of that before the priests and Levites; he should read therein all his life, to keep all the words, that his heart might not be lifted up above his brethren, to the end that he might prolong his days in his kingdom" (Deuteronomy 17:18-20). The rule ("one from among thy brethren shalt thou set king over thee," Deuteronomy 17:15) that no stronger should reign gives point to the question (See JESUS CHRIST), Matthew 22:17, "is it lawful to give tribute unto Caesar?" (Jeremiah 30:21)
Tithes - ...
People presented their tithes by taking them to the central place of worship, where, with their households and the Levites, they joined in a joyous ceremonial meal (Deuteronomy 12:5-7; Deuteronomy 12:17-19). If the offerers lived so far from the tabernacle (or later the temple) that transporting their goods was a problem, they could sell their tithes locally and take the money instead (Deuteronomy 14:22-27). In this case the offerers, after distributing their tithes, had to go to the central place of worship and declare before God that they had done according to the divine command (Deuteronomy 14:28-29; Deuteronomy 26:12-15)
Blessing - The record of Israel's past is best understood as an outworking of blessing and cursing (Deuteronomy 27:1-28:68 ). The tribe of Levi was set apart "to pronounce blessings in his [1] name" (Deuteronomy 10:8 ; 21:5 ). Second, the blessing is a sign of special favor that is intended to result in prosperity and success (Deuteronomy 28:3-7 ). Those who are obedient to God's commands are blessed with affluence and victory (Deuteronomy 28:1-14 ). On the other hand, those who are disobedient are cursed (Deuteronomy 28:15-68 ) and suffer the consequences of drought, disease, and deprivation
Joshua the Son of Nun - ...
Conqueror of Canaan...
Forty years later, when the new generation was ready to enter Canaan, Moses appointed Joshua as his divinely chosen successor (Numbers 27:18-22; Deuteronomy 31:14; Deuteronomy 34:9). Joshua would direct the conquest of Canaan and, with Eleazar the high priest, oversee the division of the land among Israel’s tribes (Numbers 34:17; Deuteronomy 1:38; Deuteronomy 3:28; Deuteronomy 31:23)
Righteousness - ( a ) It is perhaps safest to begin with the forensic or juristic application, The plaintiff or defendant in a legal case who was in the right was ‘righteous’ ( Deuteronomy 25:1 , Isaiah 5:23 ); and his claim resting on his good behaviour was ‘righteousness’ ( 1 Kings 8:32 ). ‘judgment of righteousness’ ( Deuteronomy 16:18 ), judged ‘righteously’ ( Deuteronomy 1:16 ). ( b ) As the Divine will was revealed in the Law, ‘righteousness’ was thought of as obedience to its rules ( Deuteronomy 6:25 ). Restoring a pledge at sun-down was ‘righteousness’ ( Deuteronomy 24:13 ). ), God Himself is naturally thought of as essentially righteous ( Deuteronomy 32:4 where ‘just’ = ‘righteous’; Jeremiah 12:1 , Isaiah 42:21 , Psalms 7:9 (10) 11 (12), His throne is founded on righteousness and judgment ( Psalms 89:14 , (15)), and all His ways exhibit righteousness ( Psalms 145:17 ). ]'>[8] ( Deuteronomy 6:25 ; Deuteronomy 6:8 other passages) and the Heb
Teach, Teacher - God intended the promises of the Mosaic covenant for parents and their children (Deuteronomy 6:1-2 ). Deuteronomy 5:16 ). Cursing one's parents was a capital offense (Exodus 21:15,17 ; Deuteronomy 21:18-21 ; 27:16 ). In anticipation of entering the promised land, Israel is reminded of God's activity for them and their consequent obligation to obey him and to teach their children to do the same (Deuteronomy 4:1-14,40 ; 5:29 ; 6:1-7,20-25 ; 11:19-21 ). Moses commands parents to teach their children (Exodus 13:9 ), teaches Israel's elders how to adjudicate civic matters (Exodus 18:20 ), and assigns responsibility for teaching the law to Aaron and his descendants, the priests and Levites (Leviticus 10:11 ; Deuteronomy 33:10 ; cf. Upon entering the land, Israel was not to intermarry with its inhabitants because this would result in apostasy (Deuteronomy 7:3-6 ). Instead, the land's inhabitants were to be eliminated in order to do away with false teaching (Deuteronomy 20:18 ). As the archetypical prophet, Moses taught Israel and spoke of a future prophet like himself to whose teaching Israel must give heed (Deuteronomy 18:15-19 )
Hospitality - This practice was extended to every sojourner, even a runaway slave (Deuteronomy 23:16-17 ) or one's arch enemy. ...
The Pentateuch contains specific commands for the Israelites to love the strangers as themselves (Leviticus 19:33-34 ; Deuteronomy 10:18-19 ), and to look after their welfare (Deuteronomy 24:17-22 )
Leaven - The Israelites on pain of death were to have none in their houses or in the land during Passover for seven days, from 14th Nisan (Exodus 12:15; Exodus 12:19; Exodus 12:39; Exodus 13:7; Exodus 23:18; Deuteronomy 16:3-4). Leaven was allowed to be offered in the firstfruits and tithes (Deuteronomy 26:2; Deuteronomy 26:12; 2 Chronicles 31:5), the Pentecostal loaves (Leviticus 23:15; Leviticus 23:17), and the peace offering (Leviticus 7:13)
Firstfruits - The land is also viewed as a gift from God and the best of it, its "firstfruits, " is to be given to him—crops (Exodus 23:16,19 ), the wheat harvest (Exodus 34:22 ; Leviticus 2:14 ; 23:20 ), olive oil (Numbers 18:12 ; Deuteronomy 18:4 ), the finest new wine (Numbers 18:12 ; Deuteronomy 18:4 ), honey (2 Chronicles 31:5 ), sheep wool (Deuteronomy 18:4 ), and fruit (Nehemiah 10:35 )
Wealth - In some cases it may be (Deuteronomy 28:1-6; Psalms 112:1-3; 2 Corinthians 9:10-11), but in others it may have resulted from greed or injustice (Isaiah 3:14-15; James 5:1-6; Revelation 3:17). ...
One danger of wealth is that it gives such a feeling of independence that people may not trust God as they should (Deuteronomy 8:17-18; Psalms 10:3; Psalms 52:7; Proverbs 18:11; Proverbs 28:11; Mark 10:23; Philippians 2:4-84). ...
The Bible does not always condemn wealth, for the wealthy can help others by their generous giving (Deuteronomy 15:1-11; Matthew 27:57-60; Luke 12:33; Luke 16:9-13; Acts 4:36-37; Acts 20:35; 2 Corinthians 8:14; 2 Corinthians 9:6-7; 1 Timothy 6:17-19; see GIVING)
Fear - The purpose of the giving of the Law is the implanting of this fear in the hearts of men ( Deuteronomy 4:10 ); it is the sum of religious duty ( Deuteronomy 6:13 ) and prompts to obedient and loving service ( Deuteronomy 10:12 )
House - Deuteronomy 7:8 (a) This is a reference to the nation of Egypt. (See also Deuteronomy 8:14). ...
Deuteronomy 25:10 (a) The type here is used to describe a family or the line of generation
Canaanites - The "Girgashites" are mentioned in addition to the foregoing in Deuteronomy 7:1 ; Joshua 3:10 . ...
The Israelites, when they were led to the Promised Land, were commanded utterly to destroy the descendants of Canaan then possessing it (Exodus 23:23 ; Numbers 33:52,53 ; Deuteronomy 20:16,17 ). This was to be done "by little and little," lest the beasts of the field should increase (Exodus 23:29 ; Deuteronomy 7:22,23 )
Curse - That is why the judgments upon those who disobey God’s commands are called curses, and the rewards to those who obey his commands are called blessings (Deuteronomy 27:11-26; Deuteronomy 30:19; Joshua 8:33-34; Zechariah 5:3; see BLESSING). That is, they were devoted to God for destruction (Deuteronomy 7:25-26; Joshua 6:17-18; Joshua 7:1; Joshua 7:11-12; 1 Kings 20:42; Malachi 4:6) and could not under any circumstances be spared
Gilead - )...
Geographically, Gilead was the region between the Yarmuk River (southern boundary of the land once known as Bashan) and the northern tip of the Dead Sea (Deuteronomy 3:10). The eastern part of the tribe of Manasseh lived in the northern half, and the tribe of Gad in the southern half (Deuteronomy 3:12-13). It mentions the two halves together in Deuteronomy 3:12-13
Devote, Devoted - This same benefit was extended to the sons of Zadok (Deuteronomy 20:16-184 ). The Old Testament set rules for treatment of war prisoners (Deuteronomy 21:10-14 ). Even trees were protected (Deuteronomy 20:19-20 ). Individuals or villages promoting paganism were to be destroyed (Deuteronomy 7:26 ; 13:16-18 ). Disloyalty would mean defeat and death (Deuteronomy 28:25-26 ). ...
Amalekites fell under the ban because of atrocities committed during the wilderness wanderings (Deuteronomy 25:17-19 )
Tithe, Tithing - Sometimes firstfruits and tithing appear to be identical (Deuteronomy 26:1-14 ), other times separate (Nehemiah 12:44 ). ...
Deuteronomy instructed households to bring their tithes to the sanctuary for a joyous sacrificial meal. If it was too far, the offerer was told that the goods could be sold locally and the money used near the sanctuary to buy "anything you wish" including oxen, sheep, wine, or strong drink (Deuteronomy 14:22-26 ). ...
The difference between instructions in Deuteronomy and Numbers led some rabbis to believe that there were two tithes each year, one for the Levite and one to be eaten before the Lord. Deuteronomy, written as Israel entered the land and began a more settled existence, required that tithes be eaten in the sanctuary (where the remaining portion was no doubt left). Driver, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Deuteronomy; D
Worm - Tola'im in some places denotes the caterpillar (Deuteronomy 28:39 ; Jonah 4:7 ), and rimmah, the larvae, as bred from putridity (Job 17:14 ; 21:26 ; 24:20 )
Roe, Roebuck - ‘red’), Deuteronomy 14:5 , 1 Kings 4:23 , AV Bird - They are mentioned also as an article of food (Deuteronomy 14:11 )
Aroer -
A town on the north bank of the Arnon (Deuteronomy 4:48 ; Judges 11:26 ; 2 Kings 10:33 ), the southern boundary of the kingdom of Sihon (Joshua 12:2 )
Hoshea -
The original name of the son of Nun, afterwards called Joshua (Numbers 13:8,16 ; Deuteronomy 32:44 )
Merchant - After the Hebrews became settled in Palestine they began to engage in commercial pursuits, which gradually expanded (49:13; Deuteronomy 33:18 ; Judges 5:17 ), till in the time of Solomon they are found in the chief marts of the world (1 Kings 9:26 ; 10:11,26,28 ; 22:48 ; 2 Chronicles 1:16 ; 9:10,21 )
Neck - Contrast the yoke men must wear who reject Christ's easy yoke (Deuteronomy 28:48)
Jeshimon - The Hebrew word also appears as a common noun meaning desert (Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Psalm 68:7 ; Psalm 78:40 ; Psalm 106:14 ; Psalm 107:4 ; Isaiah 43:19-20 )
Itch - The itch included among the curses on those unfaithful to the covenant (Deuteronomy 28:27 ) was possibly eczema or prurigo
Trinity - That God is one, and that there is but one God (Deuteronomy 6:4 ; 1 Kings 8:60 ; Isaiah 44:6 ; Mark 12:29,32 ; John 10:30 )
Flour - Most often cereal offerings were of fine flour (Leviticus 2:1-2 ,Leviticus 2:1-2,2:4-5 ,Leviticus 2:4-5,2:7 ), ground from the inner kernels of wheat only, the best part of the grain (Deuteronomy 32:14 )
Raven - "Every raven after his kind" was forbidden as food (Leviticus 11:15 ; Deuteronomy 14:14 )
Ramoth-Gilead - Heights of Gilead, a city of refuge on the east of Jordan; called "Ramoth in Gilead" (Deuteronomy 4:43 ; Joshua 20:8 ; 21:38 )
Drunk - To "add drunkenness to thirst" (Deuteronomy 29:19 , A
Election - It signifies God's taking a whole nation, community, or body of men, into external covenant with himself, by giving them the advantage of revelation as the rule of their belief and practice, when other nations are without it, Deuteronomy 7:6
Nehiloth - She is the church, possessing the Lord as her "inheritance" (Psalms 16:5), or possessed by Him as "His inheritance" (Deuteronomy 32:9)
Simeon, the Tribe of - It is passed by in silence (Deuteronomy 33 )
Ramoth-Gilead - ” One of the cities of refuge Moses appointed for unintentional killers (Deuteronomy 4:43 ; compare Joshua 20:8 ) and Levitical cities (Joshua 21:38 )
Portion - God's chosen people are termed God's portion (Deuteronomy 32:9 ; Jeremiah 21:10 )
Siege - Deuteronomy 28:53-57 described the horrible actions to which siege leads (compare Jeremiah 19:9 )
Golan - of the Jordan ( Deuteronomy 4:43 , Joshua 20:8 ), assigned to the sons of Gershon ( Joshua 21:27 , 1 Chronicles 6:71 ), in the territory belonging to the half-tribe of Manasseh in Bashan
Able - Deuteronomy 16
Swallow - Balaam could not curse Israel whom God had blessed (Deuteronomy 23:5), nor Shimei David, nay God requited David good instead (2 Samuel 16:5-12; Psalms 109:28)
Man - ...
Some of the places in which these types are used will be found in the following list:...
Man of War Exodus 15:3...
Man of the Heart1Pe3:4...
Man of the Earth Psalm 10:18...
Man of GOD Deuteronomy 33:1...
Man of Peace Psalm 120:7
Gazelle - ]'>[2] ‘roe’; in Deuteronomy 14:5 etc
Perizzite - The Hebrew perezot , "unwalled country villages" or "towns," were inhabited by peasants engaged in agriculture like the Arab fellahs (Deuteronomy 3:5; 1 Samuel 6:18; Ezekiel 38:11; Zechariah 2:4)
Moseroth - Deuteronomy 10:6, it is called by the former name; and Numbers 33:30, by the latter
Coney - ; Deuteronomy 14:7; for it has a peculiar movement of the jaw as if chewing
Zamzummim - or ZUZIM, a gigantic race of people, who, together with the Rephaim and Emim, men of like stature, occupied, in the time of Abraham, the country east of Jordan and the Dead Sea, where they were routed by Chedorlaomer, and from which they were afterward expelled by the Ammonites, Deuteronomy 2:20-21
Wheat - הטה , Genesis 30:14 ; Deuteronomy 8:8 ; σιτος , Matthew 13:25 ; Luke 16:7 ; 1 Corinthians 15:37 ; the principal and the most valuable kind of grain for the service of man
Saint - A holy person, a friend of God, either on earth or in heaven, Deuteronomy 33:2
Chance - Deuteronomy 22
Demon - Twice it stands in the text ( Deuteronomy 32:17 , Psalms 106:37 ), representing a root found in both Assyr
Moon - The Hebrews were specially cautioned against this form of idolatry, Deuteronomy 4:19 17:3 ; and yet fell into it; 2 Kings 21:3 Isaiah 65:11 Jeremiah 7:18 8:2 19:13 44:17-25
Ossifrage - The Hebrew word occurs, as the name of an unclean bird, in ( Leviticus 11:13 ) and Deuteronomy 14:12 It is probably the lammergeyer , or bearded vulture as it is sometimes called, one of the largest of the birds of prey
Heaven - The clouds serve a similar rain-producing function, so that KJV often translates the Hebrew word for “clouds” as “sky” (Deuteronomy 33:26 ; Psalm 57:10 ; Isaiah 45:8 ; Jeremiah 51:9 ; compare Psalm 36:6 ; Psalm 108:4 ). Thus the Bible speaks of “birds of the heavens,” though English translations often use “air” or “sky” (Deuteronomy 4:17 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ; Lamentations 4:19 ). The heaven is the source for rain (Deuteronomy 11:11 ; Psalm 148:4 ), dew (Genesis 27:28 ), frost (Job 38:29 ), snow (Isaiah 55:10 ), fiery lightning (Genesis 19:24 ), dust (Deuteronomy 28:24 ), and hail (Joshua 10:11 ). Heaven is God's treasure chest, storing treasures such as the rain (Deuteronomy 28:12 ), wind and lightning (Jeremiah 10:13 ), and snow and hail (Job 38:22 ). It is the divine workplace, where He sends blessings to His people (Deuteronomy 26:15 ; Isaiah 63:15 ) and punishment on His enemies (Psalm 2:4 ; Psalm 11:4-7 ). It belonged to God (Deuteronomy 10:14 )
Blessing And Cursing - The word means “to kneel” (2 Chronicles 6:13 ; Psalm 95:6 ) and thus “to bless” (Genesis 27:33 ; Exodus 18:10 ; Deuteronomy 28:4 ). Persons might also bless one another (Genesis 27:33 ; Deuteronomy 7:14 ; 1 Samuel 25:33 ), or they might bless things (Deuteronomy 28:4 ; 1 Samuel 25:33 ; Proverbs 5:18 ). An extended curse formula appears in Deuteronomy, where blessing and cursing are contrasted (Deuteronomy 27:15-26 ; cf. Deuteronomy 28:16-19 ). Central to the covenant renewal ceremony was the blessing (Deuteronomy 28:3-6 )
Idol, Idolatry - They dishonour God through hiding his glory, and mislead people through giving them wrong ideas of God (Deuteronomy 4:15-18; Romans 1:21-23). ...
The penalty that Israelite law laid down for idol worship was death (Exodus 22:20; Deuteronomy 13:2-5; Deuteronomy 17:2-5). Because they did not know what Yahweh looked like, they copied the forms of the gods of other religions (Exodus 32:4; Deuteronomy 4:12; 1 Kings 12:28; Romans 1:23-3203). Idols were enemies of God and were disgusting and hateful in his sight (Deuteronomy 7:25; Deuteronomy 29:17; Deuteronomy 32:16-17; Ezekiel 36:17-18; 1 Corinthians 8:4; 1 Corinthians 10:19-20)
Moreh, - The same spot may be indicated by the terebinths of Moreh ( Deuteronomy 11:30 ), mentioned as indicating the position of Ebal and Gerizim. Gilgal ( Deuteronomy 11:30 ) may be Khirbet Juleijel , fully 1 1 / 2 mile E
Kadesh - They took their journey from Kadesh into the deserts of Paran, "by way of the Red Sea" (Deuteronomy 2:1 ). Here the people murmured for want of water, as their forefathers had done formerly at Rephidim; and Moses, irritated by their chidings, "with his rod smote the rock twice," instead of "speaking to the rock before their eyes," as the Lord had commanded him (Compare Numbers 27:14 ; Deuteronomy 9:23 ; Psalm 106:32,33 )
Kadesh - They took their journey from Kadesh into the deserts of Paran, "by way of the Red Sea" (Deuteronomy 2:1 ). Here the people murmured for want of water, as their forefathers had done formerly at Rephidim; and Moses, irritated by their chidings, "with his rod smote the rock twice," instead of "speaking to the rock before their eyes," as the Lord had commanded him (Compare Numbers 27:14 ; Deuteronomy 9:23 ; Psalm 106:32,33 )
Faithfulness of God - Deuteronomy 11:14-15 . He declared that the Israelites should be subject to his awful displeasure, if they walked not in his ways; it was accordingly fulfilled, Deuteronomy 28:1-68 : ...
6
Firstfruits - In accordance with Mosaic law, individual Israelites brought to the house of the Lord “the first (that is, “the best”) of the firstfruits of thy land” (Exodus 23:19 ; Exodus 34:26 ), including grain, wine, and oil, which were used—except for the grain (Leviticus 2:14-16 )—for the support of the priests (Numbers 18:12 ; Deuteronomy 18:4 ). According to Deuteronomy 26:1-11 , the offering was brought in a basket to the sanctuary for presentation
Hanging - The Israelites, after putting an enemy or criminal to death, might hang them on a gibbet or tree for public scorn as added degradation and warning (Genesis 40:19 ; Deuteronomy 21:22 ; Joshua 8:29 ; 2 Samuel 4:12 ), but biblical law demanded that the corpses be taken down and buried the same day (Deuteronomy 21:22-23 )
Mesopotamia - It was called by the Hebrews Aram-naharaim, or "Aram (or Syria) of the two rivers;" Genesis 24:10; Deuteronomy 23:4; Judges 3:8; Judges 3:10; 1 Chronicles 19:6; and Padan-aram or "Plain of Syria," Genesis 25:20; Genesis 28:2-7; Genesis 46:15; also Aram or "Syria," Numbers 23:7; Genesis 31:20; Genesis 31:24. Deuteronomy 23:4
Messiah - As in ancient times not only the king, but also the priest and the prophet, was consecrated to his calling by being anointed, the word "Messiah" often occurs in the Old Testament in its literal sense, signifying one who has been anointed, 1 Samuel 24:6; Lamentations 4:1-22 :' 20; Ezekiel 28:14; Psalms 105:15; hut generally it has a more specific application, signifying the One who was anointed, the supreme Deliverer who was promised from the beginning, Genesis 3:15, and about whom a long series of prophecies runs through the whole history of Israel from Abram, Genesis 12:3; Genesis 22:18; Jacob, Genesis 49:10; Balaam, Numbers 24:17; Moses, Deuteronomy 18:15; Deuteronomy 18:18; and Nathan, 2 Samuel 7:16; through the psalmists and prophets, Psalms 2:1-12; Psalms 16:1-11; Psalms 22:1-31; Psalms 40:1-17; Psalms 45:1-17; Psalms 110:1-7; Isaiah 7:10-16; Isaiah 9:1-7; Isaiah 11:1-16; Isaiah 13:1-22; Isaiah 53:1-12; Isaiah 61:1-11; Jeremiah 23:5-6; Micah 5:2; Malachi 3:1-4, to his immediate precursor, John the Baptist
Gilead - Genesis 31:21; Deuteronomy 3:12-17; 1 Samuel 13:7; 2 Kings 10:33. Jacob fled toward Gilead, Genesis 31:21; it was conquered by Israel, Numbers 21:24; Judges 10:18; Joshua 12:2; Deuteronomy 2:36; was given to Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, Joshua 17:6; under Jephthah it defeated the Ammonites, Judges 10:18; was a refuge for Saul's son and for David, 2 Samuel 2:9; 2 Samuel 17:22; 2 Samuel 17:24; the home of Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1; taken in part by Syria, 2 Kings 10:33; by Assyria, 2 Kings 15:25-29; referred to in the minor prophets, Hosea 6:8; Hosea 12:11; Amos 1:3; Amos 1:13; Obadiah 1:19; Micah 7:14; Zechariah 10:10
Eternal - " (Deuteronomy 32:40) "The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms. " (Deuteronomy 33:27) And JEHOVAH, in a threefold character of persons, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, is thus described in the eternity of his nature and essence, so Christ the Mediator, by virtue of the union of the manhood with the GODHEAD, is declared by JEHOVAH to be eternal
Concubine - Exodus 21:7-9; Deuteronomy 21:10-17. Concubines were often servants or captives, Exodus 21:7-11; Deuteronomy 21:10-14; but this was not always the case
Weeks - In addition to the week of days, the Jews had three other seasons, denominated weeks, Leviticus 25:1-17 ; Deuteronomy 16:9-10 :...
1. It was a period of seven weeks or forty-nine days, which was succeeded on the fiftieth day by the feast of pentecost, πεντηκοστη , "fifty," Deuteronomy 16:9-10
City - The "fenced cities" of the Jews, Deuteronomy 3:5 , were of various sizes and degrees of strength; some being surrounded by high and thick stone walls, and others by feebler ramparts, often of clay or sun-dried bricks, and sometimes combustible, Isaiah 9:10 Amos 1:7-14 . ...
CITY OF GOD, Deuteronomy 12:5 Psalm 46:4 , and the HOLY, HOLINESS CITY, Nehemiah 11:1 , names of Jerusalem
Blindness - Blindness was sometimes inflicted as a punishment, Genesis 19:11 Acts 13:6 ; and it was often threatened as a penalty, Deuteronomy 28:28 . The Jews were enjoined by the humane laws of Moses to show all kindness and consideration to the blind, Leviticus 19:14 Deuteronomy 27:18
Banquets - At the three great religious feasts, when all the males appeared before Jehovah, the family had its feast, of which the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow had their share (Deuteronomy 16:11). The tithes and firstlings were to be eaten at the sanctuary, if not too far off (Deuteronomy 12:17-18; Deuteronomy 14:22-23). So the cup is not expressly mentioned in the Passover supper in the Old Testament but Deuteronomy 14:26; Isaiah 25:6 imply the use of wine at it
Burial - Partly because of the warm climate of Palestine and partly because the corpse was considered ritually impure, the Hebrews buried their dead as soon as possible and usually within twenty-four hours of death (Deuteronomy 21:23 ). The Canaanite practices of laceration and mutilation are forbidden in the Torah (Leviticus 19:27-28 ; Leviticus 21:5 ; Deuteronomy 14:1 ). Mourning for Jacob lasted seventy days (Genesis 50:3 ), while for Aaron and Moses it lasted thirty days (Numbers 20:29 ; Deuteronomy 34:5-8 ). Women captured in war were allowed to mourn the deaths of their parents one month before having to marry their captors (Deuteronomy 21:11-13 )
Ear - (See also Deuteronomy 15:17). ...
Deuteronomy 32:1 (a) The people of the earth are evidently indicated by this passage, and the Lord wants all people of every kind, everywhere, to listen to His voice, and hear His message. (See also Deuteronomy 1:45). It is a fulfillment of Deuteronomy 15:17
Agriculture - The recurrence of famines and intercourse with Egypt taught the Canaanites subsequently to attend more to tillage, so that by the time of the spies who brought samples of the land's produce from Eshcol much progress had been made (Deuteronomy 8:8; Numbers 13:23). But there they unlearned the exclusively pastoral life and learned husbandry (Deuteronomy 11:10), while the deserts beyond supplied pasture for their cattle (1 Chronicles 7:21). The condition of military service was attached to the land, but with merciful qualifications (Deuteronomy 20); thus a national yeomanry of infantry, officered by its own hereditary chiefs, was secured. Horses were forbidden to be multiplied (Deuteronomy 17:16). The seed was trodden in by cattle in irrigated lands (Deuteronomy 11:10; Isaiah 32:20). Sowing divers seed in a field was forbidden (Deuteronomy 22:9), to mark God is not the author of confusion, there is no transmutation of species, such as modern skeptical naturalists imagine. Oxen unmuzzled (Deuteronomy 25:4) five abreast trod out the grain on the floor, to separate the grain from chaff and straw; flails were used for small quantities and lighter grain (Isaiah 28:27). The gleanings, the grainers of the field, and the forgotten sheaf and remaining grapes and olives, were also the poor man's right; and perhaps a second tithe every third year (Leviticus 19:9-10; Deuteronomy 14:28; Deuteronomy 26:12; Amos 4:4)
Agriculture - The plough was usually drawn by two or more oxen ( Amos 6:12 ), or by asses ( Isaiah 30:24 ), but the employment of one of each kind was forbidden ( Deuteronomy 22:10 ). Deuteronomy 28:22 , Amos 4:9 and worst of all a visitation of locusts. The average harvest period, reckoned by the Hebrew legislation ( Leviticus 23:15 , Deuteronomy 16:9 ) to cover seven weeks, may be set down as from the middle of April to the beginning of June, the barley ripening about a fortnight sooner than the wheat. ...
The standing corn was reaped with the sickle ( Deuteronomy 16:9 RV Asherah - It was made of wood ( Judges 6:26 ), and could be planted in the ground ( Deuteronomy 16:21 ), plucked up or cut down ( Micah 5:14 , Exodus 34:13 ), and burned with fire ( Deuteronomy 12:3 ). Deuteronomy 7:5 ; Deuteronomy 12:2 ff; Deuteronomy 16:21 ), and to their ultimate abolition ( 2 Kings 18:4 ; 2 Kings 23:4 ff
Hebrew (Descendent of Eber) - Given the ethnic identity, special laws protected Hebrew slaves (Exodus 21:2 ; Deuteronomy 15:12 ; compare Leviticus 25:40-41 ; Jeremiah 34:8-22 )
Hivites - Most frequently the name appears in the list of nations God would drive out of the land during the Israelite conquest (for example, Deuteronomy 7:1 )
Oath - A solemn appeal to God, permitted on fitting occasions (Deuteronomy 6:13 ; Jeremiah 4:2 ), in various forms (Genesis 16:5 ; 2 Samuel 12:5 ; Ruth 1:17 ; Hosea 4:15 ; Romans 1:9 ), and taken in different ways (Genesis 14:22 ; 24:2 ; 2 Chronicles 6:22 )
Curse - Prophetical curses were sometimes pronounced by holy men (Genesis 9:25 ; 49:7 ; Deuteronomy 27:15 ; Joshua 6:26 )
Laish (2) - ) Laish being near its haunt, the wooded slopes of Bashan, Hermon, and Lebanon, and the jungles of Lake Merom (see Deuteronomy 33:22, "Dan
Moreh - Here Joshua set up a great stone by the sanctuary of Jehovah (Joshua 24:26, compare Deuteronomy 11:30)
Unicorn - The word thus rendered has been found in an Assyrian inscription written over the wild ox or bison, which some also suppose to be the animal intended (Compare Deuteronomy 33:17 ; Psalm 22:21 ; 29:6 ; 92:10 )
Lapwing - Rather the hoopoe (Leviticus 11:19; Deuteronomy 14:18)
Elath - ” See Deuteronomy 2:8 )
Rabbah - Capital of Ammon that Moses apparently did not conquer (Deuteronomy 3:11 ; Joshua 13:25 ), located about twenty-three miles east of the Jordan River
Tabor - It served as a boundary point for the tribes of Naphtali,...
Issachar, and Zebulun (Joshua 19:12 ,Joshua 19:12,19:22 ), where the tribes worshiped early (Deuteronomy 33:18-19 )
Furnace - Biblical references to furnaces are mostly figurative for experiences of testing (of the Egyptian bondage, Deuteronomy 4:20 ; 1 Kings 8:51 ; Jeremiah 11:4 ; of adversity, Isaiah 48:10 )
Dew - ...
Dew is used in the Bible as a symbol of refreshment (Deuteronomy 32:2 ; Psalm 133:3 ); a symbol of the loving power of God which revives and invigorates (Proverbs 19:12 ); a symbol of the sudden onset of an enemy (2 Samuel 17:12 ); a symbol of brotherly love and harmony (Psalm 133:3 ); a symbol of God's revelation (Judges 6:36-40 ); and a symbol of God's blessing (Genesis 27:28 )
Fringe - Tassels of twisted cords fastened to the four corners of the outer garment, worn by observant Jews as a reminder of covenant obligations (Numbers 15:38-39 ; Deuteronomy 22:12 ; compare Zechariah 8:23 )
Queen of Heaven - God makes fools' present prosperity their doom (Proverbs 1:32) and does good to His people in their latter end (Deuteronomy 8:16)
Hill - "The hills," Deuteronomy 1:7; Joshua 9:1, is the mountain district of Judah, Benjamin, and Ephraim (Numbers 13:29)
Drink, Strong - The Speaker's Commentary explains the proverbial phrase, Deuteronomy 29:19, "so that the soul that is drunken with sin carry away that which thirsts for sin
Omnipotence - God's power is revealed in God's creating and sustaining the universe (Psalm 65:6 ; Jeremiah 32:17 ; Hebrews 1:3 ), in God's deliverance of Israel from Pharaoh's forces (Exodus 15:1-18 ), in the conquest of Canaan (Deuteronomy 3:21-24 ), in the incarnation (Luke 1:35 ), in Christ's death on the cross (1 Corinthians 1:17-18 , 1 Corinthians 1:23-24 ), and in the ongoing ministry of the church (1 Corinthians 2:5 ; Ephesians 3:20 )
Shittim - While at Shittim, they were blessed by Balaam (whom Balak had hired to curse Israel; Numbers 22-24 ; compare Micah 6:5 ), committed sin with the Moabite and Midianite women (Numbers 25:1 ), and Joshua was announced as Moses' successor (Deuteronomy 34:9 )
Cruelty - Such passages as Deuteronomy 20:17 , Joshua 6:21 , 2 Samuel 12:31 no longer trouble the devout student of the Bible as they once did
Forest - ya‘ar (root meaning a ‘rugged’ place), Deuteronomy 19:5 , 2 Kings 2:24 , Jeremiah 46:23 , Micah 3:12 etc
Golan - A city of Bashan (Deuteronomy 4:43), allotted out of Manasseh to the Levites; one of the three cities of refuge E
Birds, Clean And Unclean - A list of the unclean birds is given in Leviticus 11:13-20 ; Deuteronomy 14:12-18
Earth - ...
Deuteronomy 32:1 (a) The word refers to the peoples of the earth in every nation, for it is the desire of our Lord that all shall hear His Word
Fallow Deer - " A clean animal (Deuteronomy 14:5)
Eternal - Deuteronomy 33 ...
2
Exceed - Deuteronomy 25 ...
1
Gift - Deuteronomy 16 ...
6
Anathema - Greek translation of Hebrew cherem, the holy war ban imposing destruction of war booty (Leviticus 27:28 ; Deuteronomy 20:10-18 )
Dragon - " In Deuteronomy 32:33 it refers to some poisonous reptile, being used in connection with the asp, a poisonous snake
Nest - , in Deuteronomy 22:6 ; 32:11 , signifies the actual receptacle built by birds in which to lay their eggs (having special reference to the prospective brood); but the word kataskenosis, used by the Lord, denotes "a resting or roosting place
Birthright - Another right was that of the double portion, Deuteronomy 21:17 ; 1 Chronicles 5:1,2
Hare - ארנבת , Arabic arneb, Leviticus 11:6 ; Deuteronomy 14:7
Schoolmaster - ...
Little is known respecting the schools of the Jews, nor when and how far they took the place of domestic instruction, Deuteronomy 6:7-9 11:18-20
Levi - For his share in the treacherous massacre of the Shechemites, Genesis 34:1-31 , his father at death foreboded evil to his posterity, Genesis 49:5-7 ; but as they afterwards stood forth on the Lord's side, Moses was charged to bless them, Exodus 32:26-29 Deuteronomy 33:8-11
Jair - , "Jair's villages" (Numbers 32:41 ; Deuteronomy 3:14 ; Joshua 13:30 )
Heshbon - The Amorites in turn lost it to the Israelites just before their attack on Canaan (Numbers 21:25-26; Deuteronomy 3:2)