What does Demetrius mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
δημήτριος a heathen silversmith at Ephesus. / a certain Christian 2
δημητρίῳ a heathen silversmith at Ephesus. / a certain Christian 1

Definitions Related to Demetrius

G1216


   1 a heathen silversmith at Ephesus.
   2 a certain Christian, 3Jo 12.
   Additional Information: Demetrius = “belonging to Ceres”.
   

Frequency of Demetrius (original languages)

Frequency of Demetrius (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Demetrius
A silversmith at Ephesus, whose chief occupation was to make "silver shrines for Diana" (q.v.), Acts 19:24 ,i.e., models either of the temple of Diana or of the statue of the goddess. This trade brought to him and his fellow-craftsmen "no small gain," for these shrines found a ready sale among the countless thousands who came to this temple from all parts of Asia Minor. This traffic was greatly endangered by the progress of the gospel, and hence Demetrius excited the tradesmen employed in the manufacture of these shrines, and caused so great a tumult that "the whole city was filled with confusion."
A Christian who is spoken of as having "a good report of all men, and of the truth itself" (3 John 1:12 ).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Demetrius (2)
A friend of Saint John, and possibly the bearer of his third epistle.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Demetrius
A pagan silversmith who made shrines for Diana at Ephesus, and opposed Saint Paul (Acts 19).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Demetrius
DEMETRIUS . 1. Soter , the son of Seleucus Philopator . In his boyhood he was sent (b.c. 175) to Rome as a hostage, but made his escape after the death of his uncie, Antiochus Epiphanes. Landing at Tripolis, he was joined by large bodies of the people, and even by the bodyguard of his cousin, Antiochus Eupator. Eupator was soon defeated and put to death, and in b.c. 162, Demetrius was proclaimed king ( 1Ma 7:1-4 , 2Ma 14:1-2 ; Jos. [1] Ant . XII. x. 1). After seven years, Alexander Balas (wh. see) was set up as a claimant to the crown of Syria (b.c. 153); and he and Demetrius competed for the support of Jonathan ( 1Ma 10:1-21 ; Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. ii. 1 3). Balas prevailed in spite of the attempts of his rival to outbid him ( 1Ma 10:25-45 ). In b.c. 150 a decisive engagement took place, in which Demetrius was defeated and slain ( 1Ma 10:48-50 ; Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. ii. 4).
2. Nikator , sent by his father, D. Soter , for safety to Chidus after the success of Balas seemed probable. After several years of exile he landed (b.c. 147) with an army of Cretan mercenaries on the Cilician coast, and finally inflicted a fatal defeat upon Balas (b.c. 145) on the banks of the Œnoparas, from which event Demetrius derived his surname ( 1Ma 11:14-19 ; Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. iv. 8). He bought off the opposition of Jonathan by the addition of three Samaritan provinces to Judæa, and the exemption from tribute of the country thus enlarged ( 1Ma 11:20-37 ; Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. iv. 9). After varying fortunes in the war with Tryphon (wh. see), Demetrius invaded the dominions of the king of Parthia, by whom, in b.c. 138, he was taken prisoner ( 1Ma 14:1-3 ). Upon regaining his liberty at the end of ten years, he undertook a war against Ptolemy Physkon of Egypt. Having been defeated by Zabinas at Damascus, he fled to Ptolemais, and thence to Tyre, where in b.c. 125 he was murdered (Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. ix. 3), possibly at the instigation of his wife Cleopatra (App. Syr . 68; Liv. Epit . lx.).
3. Eukairos , grandson of D. Nikator . On the death of his father he established himself in Cœle-Syria, with Damascus as his capital (Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. xiii. 4). When civil war broke out between Alexander Jannæus and his Pharisee subjects, the latter invited the assistance of Demetrius (Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. xiii. 5, BJ I. iv. 4), who defeated Jannæus in a pitched battle near Shecbem (Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. xiv. 1, BJ I. iv. 5). After a chequered career, Demetrius fell into the hands of the Parthians, by whom he was detained in captivity until his death (Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. xiv. 3).
4, 5. Two persons of the name are mentioned in NT the ringleader in the riot at Ephesus ( Acts 19:24 ), and a disciple commended by St. John ( 3 John 1:12 ). Probably the same name occurs in a contracted form as Demas .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Demetrius Soter
King of the Seleucidæ, who made war against Judas Machabeus and defeated him in a third campaign, 161 B.C. Demetrius was later defeated and slain by the Syrian pretender, Alexander, and his Jewish allies. Father of Demetrius Nikator.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gallitzin, Demetrius Augustine
Missionary, born The Hague, 1770; died Loretto, Pennsylvania, 1840. He was baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church, but became a Catholic, c.1787,came to Baltimore, 1792, and entered Saint Mary's Seminary and was ordained, 1795. In 1799 he went to McGuire's Settlement in the Alleghenies, erecting a small log church where Loretto, named by him, now stands; there he remained 41 years. Receiving no salary, he spent what he received of his inheritance developing the colony spiritually and industrially. He was one of the first in the United States to defend the Church by writing. Made Vicar-General of Western Pennsylvania, 1827, he refused to allow the proposal of his name for the sees of Cincinnati and Detroit. On the centenary of the Loretto mission, a bronze statue, donated by Charles M. Schwab, was erected over the rough-hewn monument marking his grave.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin
Missionary, born The Hague, 1770; died Loretto, Pennsylvania, 1840. He was baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church, but became a Catholic, c.1787,came to Baltimore, 1792, and entered Saint Mary's Seminary and was ordained, 1795. In 1799 he went to McGuire's Settlement in the Alleghenies, erecting a small log church where Loretto, named by him, now stands; there he remained 41 years. Receiving no salary, he spent what he received of his inheritance developing the colony spiritually and industrially. He was one of the first in the United States to defend the Church by writing. Made Vicar-General of Western Pennsylvania, 1827, he refused to allow the proposal of his name for the sees of Cincinnati and Detroit. On the centenary of the Loretto mission, a bronze statue, donated by Charles M. Schwab, was erected over the rough-hewn monument marking his grave.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Demetrius Nikator
Son of Demetrius Soter, who regained the throne about 146 B.C., but was forced by Jonathan Machabeus to release the Jews from taxation and to increase their territory. He was later captured by the Parthians; on his release, after attacking Egypt he was defeated by Alexander Zabinas, a pretender, and assassinated at Tyre, 128 B.C.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Demetrius
(dih mee' trih uhss) Personal name meaning, “belonging to Demeter, the Greek goddess of crops.” 1. A silversmith in Ephesus. He incited a riot directed against Paul because he feared that the apostle's preaching would threaten the sale of silver shrines of Diana, the patron goddess of Ephesus (Acts 19:24-41 ). Demetrius may have been a guild master in charge of producing small silver copies of Diana's temple with a figure of the goddess inside. 2. Apparently a convert from the worship of Demeter, the god worshiped in the mystery religion at Eleusis near Athens. John commended him, saying, he “hath good report of all men, and of the truth itself” (3 John 1:12 ). He may have carried 3John from John to its original readers.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Nikator, Demetrius
Son of Demetrius Soter, who regained the throne about 146 B.C., but was forced by Jonathan Machabeus to release the Jews from taxation and to increase their territory. He was later captured by the Parthians; on his release, after attacking Egypt he was defeated by Alexander Zabinas, a pretender, and assassinated at Tyre, 128 B.C.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Demetrius
1. A maker of silver portable models of the great temple and statue of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesus (Acts 19:24). They were kept as amulets against danger. Demetrius and his fellow craftsmen, in fear for their gains, raised a tumult against Paul as saying "they be no gods which are made with hands." Like many men he made regard for religion his plea, while really having an eye to self; "not only this our craft is in danger to be set at nought, but also that the temple of the great goddess Diana should be despised and her magnificence destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worshippeth." A religious party cry is sure to rouse many who care little at heart about piety. It shows how soon Christianity, notwithstanding its seeming weakness, was felt as a mighty power threatening pagandom with all its then greatness.
2. A Christian "having good report of all men, and of the truth itself," and of John (3 John 1:12). The gospel standard of truth witnessed his conformity to it in love and good works; a transparently real Christian.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Demetrius
There are two, if not three, persons of this name mentioned in the NT-a fact which is not surprising, considering how very common the name was in the Greek world.
1. Demetrius, the silversmith of Ephesus (Acts 19). A business man, profoundly interested in the success of his business, Demetrius was a manufacturer of various objects in silver, of which the most profitable were small silver models of the shrine of the Ephesian goddess Artemis (see Diana). These models were purchased by the rich, dedicated to the goddess, and hung up within her temple. The preaching of St. Paul was so powerful that devotion to the goddess became less prevalent, the demand for such offerings was reduced, and Demetrius felt his livelihood in danger. He called a meeting of the gild of his handicraft to decide on a means for coping with the new situation. The meeting ended in a public disturbance. Nothing is known of the later life of Demetrius.
2. Demetrius, an important member of the church referred to in the Second and Third Epistles of St. John. It is impossible to identify the church with certainty, but there can be little doubt that it was in the province of Asia. The presbyter-overseer of the church is absent, and in his absence Gaius and Demetrius act in the truest interest of the members. Demetrius’ good conduct (3 John 1:12) is attested by all.
3. The full name of Demas (Colossians 4:14, 2 Timothy 4:10, Philemon 1:24) may very well have been Demetrius (possibly Demodorus, Demodotus); see Demas.
Literature.-See W. M. Ramsay’s lifelike picture of the scene at Ephesus in his St. Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen, London, 1895, p. 277ff. The best list of pet-names is found in A. N. Jannaris, An Historical Greek Grammar, do. 1897, § 287.
A. Souter.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Demetrius
Belonging to corn
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Demetrius
Demetrius (2) succeeded Julianus A.D. 189, as 11th bp. of Alexandria (Eus. H. E. v. 22). He presided over the see for 43 years, and died a.d. 231-232 ( ib. vi. 26). He appears to have been of an energetic and imperious nature. He took an active interest in the Catechetical School, and is said to have sent one of its early chiefs, Pantaenus, on a [1] mission "to the Indians" on their own request (Hieron. de Vir. Ill. 36). After Clement had left Alexandria, he placed Origen at its head, c. 203 (Eus. H. E. vi. 5), and strenuously encouraged him to continue his work, when his indiscreet zeal had exposed him to misrepresentation ( ib. vi. 8). Later (a.d. 217), he sent Origen to the Roman governor of Arabia, at the governor's earnest invitation ( ib. vi. 19). Origen fulfilled his mission satisfactorily, but not long afterwards Demetrius's friendship for him was interrupted. [2] According to a late, and not very trustworthy, authority, Demetrius is reported to have written letters on the keeping of Easter, maintaining the view adopted at Nicaea (Eutychius, Ann. pp. 363 ff.; Migne, Patrol. vol. cxi.). Other legendary stories of his life are given in the Chronicon Orientale (pp. 72 f. ed 1685), and more briefly by Tillemont ( Mémoires , Origène, art. vii. tom. iii. p. 225, ed. Bruxelles).
The statement that Demetrius first changed the singular ecclesiastical arrangement of Egypt, by appointing three bishops in addition to the bp. of Alexandria, who had formerly governed the whole province, is probably correct, though the only direct authority for it is that of Eutychius, patriarch of Alexandria, in the 10th cent. (cf. Lightfoot, Philippians , p. 230). Possibly this change was due to special views on church government, which may have influenced Demetrius in his harsh judgment on the ordination of Origen beyond the limits of his jurisdiction.
[3]
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Demetrius
Demetrius (de-mç'tri-ŭs), belonging to Demeter or Geres. 1. A maker of silver shrines—models of the great temple—of Diana or Artemis at Ephesus. Acts 19:24. 2. A Christian mentioned with' commendation by John. 3 John 1:12.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Demetrius
1. Silversmith of Ephesus, who made silver shrines of the temple. Fearing that the preaching of Paul against idolatry would lessen the gains of himself and others, he raised an uproar. Acts 19:24,38 .
2. A convert who was borne witness to by all, and by the truth itself. 3 John 12 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Demetrius
1. A goldsmith of Ephesus, who made models of the famous temple of Diana at Ephesus, which he sold to foreigners, Acts 19:24-4 . Observing the progress of the gospel, not in Ephesus only, but in the regions around, he assembled his fellow-craftsmen, and represented that, by this new doctrine, not only their trade would suffer, but the worship of the great Diana of Ephesus was in danger of being entirely forsaken. This produced an uproar and riot in the city, which the town clerk with difficulty appeased by firmness and persuasion.
2. A disciple, and probably a minister, of high repute, 3 John 1:12 . He may have been formerly the silversmith of Ephesus; but this can be neither proved nor disproved.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Soter, Demetrius
King of the Seleucidæ, who made war against Judas Machabeus and defeated him in a third campaign, 161 B.C. Demetrius was later defeated and slain by the Syrian pretender, Alexander, and his Jewish allies. Father of Demetrius Nikator.

Sentence search

Demetrius Soter - Demetrius was later defeated and slain by the Syrian pretender, Alexander, and his Jewish allies. Father of Demetrius Nikator
Soter, Demetrius - Demetrius was later defeated and slain by the Syrian pretender, Alexander, and his Jewish allies. Father of Demetrius Nikator
Lasthenes - An officer of high rank, ‘kinsman’ ( 1Ma 11:31 ) and ‘father’ ( 1Ma 11:32 ) of Demetrius ii. He raised a body of Cretan mercenaries, and enabled Demetrius to land in Cilicia, and wrest the throne of Syria from Alexander Balas (Jos. When Demetrius was endeavouring to make terms with Jonathan the Maccabæan, he wrote to Lasthenes in favour of the Jews, and forwarded a copy of his letter to the Jewish prince ( 1Ma 11:29-37 )
Demetrius - Demetrius, the silversmith of Ephesus (Acts 19). A business man, profoundly interested in the success of his business, Demetrius was a manufacturer of various objects in silver, of which the most profitable were small silver models of the shrine of the Ephesian goddess Artemis (see Diana). Paul was so powerful that devotion to the goddess became less prevalent, the demand for such offerings was reduced, and Demetrius felt his livelihood in danger. Nothing is known of the later life of Demetrius. Demetrius, an important member of the church referred to in the Second and Third Epistles of St. The presbyter-overseer of the church is absent, and in his absence Gaius and Demetrius act in the truest interest of the members. Demetrius’ good conduct (3 John 1:12) is attested by all. The full name of Demas (Colossians 4:14, 2 Timothy 4:10, Philemon 1:24) may very well have been Demetrius (possibly Demodorus, Demodotus); see Demas
Arsaces - When opposed by Demetrius Nikator, who thought the people would rise in his favour and afterwards assist him against Tryphon, he deceived Demetrius by a pretence of negotiations, and in b
Aphaerema - A district taken from Samaria and added to Judæa by Demetrius Soter ( Ant
Tryphon - An officer of Alexander Balas, who, after the death of the latter, took advantage of the unpopularity of Demetrius to put forward Antiochus, the son of Balas, as a claimant to the throne ( 1Ma 11:39 ). His rapacity led Simon to appeal to Demetrius ( 1Ma 13:34 ). In the end, Antiochus Sidetes, the brother of Demetrius, attacked Tryphon, besieged him in Dor, and pursued him when he escaped thence to Orthesia ( 1Ma 15:10-14 ; 1Ma 15:37-39 )
Demetrius - Demetrius . 162, Demetrius was proclaimed king ( 1Ma 7:1-4 , 2Ma 14:1-2 ; Jos. 153); and he and Demetrius competed for the support of Jonathan ( 1Ma 10:1-21 ; Jos. 150 a decisive engagement took place, in which Demetrius was defeated and slain ( 1Ma 10:48-50 ; Jos. 145) on the banks of the Œnoparas, from which event Demetrius derived his surname ( 1Ma 11:14-19 ; Jos. see), Demetrius invaded the dominions of the king of Parthia, by whom, in b. When civil war broke out between Alexander Jannæus and his Pharisee subjects, the latter invited the assistance of Demetrius (Jos. After a chequered career, Demetrius fell into the hands of the Parthians, by whom he was detained in captivity until his death (Jos
Alexander Balas - A low-born youth called Balas, living in Smyrna, was put forward by the enemies of Demetrius I. Jonathan defeated Apollonius, one of the generals of Demetrius, and received still further honours ( 1Ma 10:1-89 )
Demetrius - Demetrius (de-mç'tri-ŭs), belonging to Demeter or Geres
Nica'Nor -
Son of Patroclus, 2 Maccabees 8:9 , a general who was engaged in the Jewish wars under Antiochus Epiphanes and Demetrius 1:1 Zabade'Ans, - an Arab tribe who were attacked and spoiled by Jonathan, on his way back to Damascus from his fruitless pursuit of the army of Demetrius
Pontianus, Bishop of Rome - ...
His only episcopal act of which anything needs to be said is his probable assent to the condemnation of Origen by Demetrius of Alexandria. Demetrius. " The condemnation of Origen by Demetrius being supposed (though not with certainty) to have been c
Imalcue - in opposition to Demetrius ii
Demas - Probably contracted from Demetrius
Demetrius - Demetrius (2) succeeded Julianus A. Origen fulfilled his mission satisfactorily, but not long afterwards Demetrius's friendship for him was interrupted. ]'>[2] According to a late, and not very trustworthy, authority, Demetrius is reported to have written letters on the keeping of Easter, maintaining the view adopted at Nicaea (Eutychius, Ann. ...
The statement that Demetrius first changed the singular ecclesiastical arrangement of Egypt, by appointing three bishops in addition to the bp. Possibly this change was due to special views on church government, which may have influenced Demetrius in his harsh judgment on the ordination of Origen beyond the limits of his jurisdiction
Demetrius Nikator - Son of Demetrius Soter, who regained the throne about 146 B
Nikator, Demetrius - Son of Demetrius Soter, who regained the throne about 146 B
Town Clerk, - the title ascribed in our version to the magistrate at Ephesus who appeased the mob in the theatre at the time of the tumult excited by Demetrius and his fellow craftsmen
Altoona, Pennsylvania, Diocese of - Father Demetrius Gallitzin, Russian missionary, labored there
Bacchides - Governor of Mesopotamia under Demetrius Soter; sent to establish Alcimus (wh
Tripolis - An important town in northern Phœnicla, where Demetrius Soter landed when he made his successful attack against Antiochus v
Demas - DEMAS (= Demetrius?)
de'Mas - (governor of the people ), most probably a contraction from Demetrius or perhaps from Demarchus, a companion of St
Heraclas, Patriarch of Alexandria - Heraclas retained the school but a short time, for on the death of Demetrius he was elected to the archiepiscopal throne. Heraclas did not adopt any of his teacher's peculiar views, but voted for his deprivation both from his office as teacher and from his orders and for his excommunication at the two synods held by Demetrius, nor when elected bishop did he attempt to rescind these sentences
Deme'Trius - Possibly the first Demetrius,converted; but this is very doubtful
Aristarchus - He was nearly killed in the tumult which Demetrius excited in Ephesus, Acts 19:29, and it is said that he was finally beheaded in Rome
Lysias - ); after the death of Epiphanes he championed the cause of Eupator, and finally suffered death along with the latter at the hands of Demetrius (6:14ff
Demas - Contracted from Demetrius, or Demarchus
Lys'Ias - 164 he, together with his ward, fell into the hands of Demetrius Soter, who put them both to death
Gaius - Along with Aristarchus, he was seized during the riot in Ephesus incited by Demetrius the silversmith
John, Third Epistle of - Demetrius is commended, and greetings sent to Gaius and to 'the friends
Holofernes - ...
Holofernes has been variously identified with Ashurbanipal, Cambyses, Orophernes of Cappadocia (a friend of Demetrius Soter, the enemy of the Jews), Nicanor (the Syrian general conquered by Judas Maccahæus), Scaurus (Pompey’s lieutenant in Syria), and Severus (Hadrian’s general)
Demas - (Δημᾶς, perhaps a short form of Demetrius, as Silas was of Silvanus)...
Demas was a Christian believer who was with St. The name ‘Demetrius’ occurs twice in the list of politarchs of Thessalonica; and, while we cannot say with certainty that the Demas of 2 Timothy 4:10 is identical with either of these, the possibility is not excluded. It is impossible to identify Demas with any Demetrius mentioned in the NT
Demetrius - Demetrius may have been a guild master in charge of producing small silver copies of Diana's temple with a figure of the goddess inside
Demetrius - This traffic was greatly endangered by the progress of the gospel, and hence Demetrius excited the tradesmen employed in the manufacture of these shrines, and caused so great a tumult that "the whole city was filled with confusion
Cleopatra - 146), at her father’s bidding, the wife of his rival, Demetrius Nikator ( 1Ma 11:12 ; Jos
Nicanor - Five years later he was sent on the same errand by Demetrius; this time he endeavoured to win by strategy what he had failed to gain by force
Alcimus - Demetrius Soter, cousin and successor to Antiochus, in response to Alcimus’s solicitations, reinstated him by the means of Nicanor, the Syrian general
Sele-u'Cus iv - (Daniel 11:20 ) His son Demetrius I
Theatre - Besides the performance of dramas, public meetings were often in the theater, as being large enough almost to receive "the whole city" (Acts 19:29); so at Ephesus the theater was the scene of the tumultuous meeting excited by Demetrius
Kedesh - It was taken by Tiglath-pileser in the reign of Pekah, 2 Kings 15:29, and here the battle took place between Jonathan Maccabæus and Demetrius
Alexander, Bishop of Jerusalem - His chief claim to celebrity rests on the library he formed at Jerusalem, and on the boldness with which he supported Origen against his bishop, Demetrius of Alexandria. 14, and to Demetrius, H
Antiochus - ANTIOCHUS EPIPHANES, the son of Antiochus the Great, having continued a hostage at Rome fourteen years, his brother Seleucus resolved to procure his return to Syria, and sent his own son Demetrius to Rome in the place of Antiochus. ...
In the meantime, Demetrius Soter, son of Seleucus Philopator, and nephew to Antiochus Epiphanes, to whom by right the kingdom belonged, having escaped from Rome, came into Syria. Finding the people disposed for revolt, Demetrius headed an army, and marched directly to Antioch, against Antiochus and Lysias. However, the inhabitants did not wait till he besieged the city; but opened the gates, and delivered to him Lysias and the young king Antiochus Eupator, whom Demetrius caused to be put to death, without suffering them to appear in his presence. Demetrius Nicanor, king of Syria, having rendered himself odious to his troops, one Diodotus, otherwise called Tryphon, came to Zabdiel, a king in Arabia, and desired him to entrust him with young Antiochus, whom he promised to place on the throne of Syria, which was then possessed by Demetrius Nicanor. The troops dismissed by Demetrius, came and joined Tryphon, who, having formed a powerful army, defeated Demetrius, and forced him to retreat to Seleucia. Jonathan, engaged by so many favours, declared resolutely for Antiochus, or rather for Tryphon, who reigned under the name of this young prince; and on several occasions he attacked the generals of Demetrius, who still, possessed many places beyond Jordan and in Galilee, 1Ma_11:63 , &c; 1Ma_12:24 ; 1Ma_12:34 . ANTIOCHUS SIDETES, or Soter the Saviour, or Eusebes the pious, was the son of Demetrius Soter, and brother to Demetrius Nicanor. Tryphon, the usurper of the kingdom of Syria, having rendered himself odious to his troops, they deserted him, and offered their services to Cleopatra, the wife of Demetrius Nicanor. She lived in the city of Seleucia, shut up with her children, while her husband Demetrius was a prisoner in Persia, where he had married Rodeguna, the daughter of Arsaces, king of Persia. This prince was then at Cnidus, where his father, Demetrius Soter had placed him with one of his friends. Three years after, Antiochus marched against the Persians, or Parthians, and demanded the liberty of his brother Demetrius Nicanor, who had been made prisoner long before by Arsaces, and was detained for the purpose of being employed in exciting a war against Antiochus. After the death of Sidetes, Demetrius Nicanor, or Nicetor, reascended the throne of Syria
Demetrius - Demetrius and his fellow craftsmen, in fear for their gains, raised a tumult against Paul as saying "they be no gods which are made with hands
Apollonius - 147) on the side of Demetrius ( 1Ma 10:69-85 ; Jos
Town Clerk - The town clerk at, Ephesus appeased the mob gathered by Demetrius the silversmith against the gospel preachers (Acts 19:35-41)
Aquila And Priscilla - The circumstances of this incident are unknown, although it may have occurred during Paul's trouble with Demetrius the silversmith (Acts 20:23-41 )
Theatre - So at Ephesus (Acts 19), when the disturbance aroused by Demetrius took place, it was the most natural thing in the world that a rush should be made to the theatre (v
Maccabees - Demetrius r. He sent ambassadors to Rome asking for assistance, which was granted to the extent that the Senate sent word to Demetrius i. This international policy of Judas displeased ‘the Pious,’ however, and they deserted him; and before the message of the Senate could reach Demetrius, Judas had been defeated by the Syrian general Bacchides , at Elasa, and killed ( 1M Malachi 3:1 to 1Ma 9:22 ). As a sort of licensed revolutionist, Jonathan was sought as an ally by the two rivals for the Syrian throne, Alexander Balas and Demetrius i. When Alexander Balas was conquered by Demetrius ii. Demetrius did not find himself strong enough to punish the Jews, but apparently bought off the siege by adding to Judæa three sections of Samaria, and granting remission of tribute. Jonathan thereupon became a supporter of Demetrius ii. Simon’s first step was to make the recognition of the independence of Judæa a condition of an alliance with Demetrius ii. Antiochus was presently killed in a campaign against the Parthians, and was succeeded by the weak Demetrius ii. The Pharisees asked aid from Demetrius iii
Imitate - The command of 3 John 1:11 is general, though specific examples of good (Demetrius) and bad (Diotrephes) are in view
Majesty - μεγαλειότης, ‘magnificence,’ is applied to Solomon (1 Ezra 1:5), and in the NT (by Demetrius, the silversmith) to the Ephesian Artemis (Acts 19:27)
Diana - The "silver shrines for Diana," made by Demetrius and others, were probably little models of the temple sold for amulets and household use
Diotrephes - ...
Demetrius is praised as of the opposite spirit to Diotrephes; as the former was to be followed, so the latter to be shunned (3 John 1:11-12)
Beasts - Paul, 1 Corinthians 15:32 , speaks of fighting with beasts, &c: by which he does not mean his having been exposed in the amphitheatre to fight as a gladiator, as some have conjectured, but that he had to contend at Ephesus with the fierce uproar of Demetrius and his associates
Diana - The "silver shrines for Diana," made by Demetrius and others, were probably small models of the same for domestic use, and for sale to travellers and visitors
Diana - This illustrates the Scripture mention of Demetrius the silversmith as the maker of silver portable models of Diana's shrine. (See Demetrius
Machabees, the - Jonathan defeated Bacchides, revenged the death of his brother, and made peace with Alexander who had usurped the throne of Demetrius, the successor to Antiochus
Artemis - In Acts, a silversmith named Demetrius rallied support against Paul's preaching of the gospel for fear that it might damage his business selling statues
Septuagint - , 1705) describes the origin of Septuagint; King Ptolemy (Philadelphus), by the advice of his librarian Demetrius Phalereus, obtained from the high priest at Jerusalem 72 interpreters, six from each tribe; by conference and comparison in 72 days they completed the work. ) says that, before Demetrius, others had made a translation of the Pentateuch and Joshua (the history of the going forth from Egypt, etc
Merom, the Waters of - 18), but probably they descended, as did Demetrius at a later date ( Ant
Oration, Orator - Examples include the Sanhedrin's debate over Jesus' growing following which culminated in Caiaphas' suggestion that the expedient course was to seek Jesus' death (John 11:47-50 ) and Demetrius' discourse on what action was necessary to save the business of the silversmiths in Ephesus (Acts 19:23-27 )
Origen - Later while journeying to Greece he was ordained at Cresarea; Demetrius, Bishop of Alexandria, was displeased at this and Origen, forced to quit the catechetical school, 231, settled at Caesarea in Palestine and resumed his teaching
Assembly - In Acts 19:32; Acts 19:39; Acts 19:41 ‘assembly’ (ἐκκλησία) stands for the tumultuary mob gathered by Demetrius and his fellow-gildsmen in Ephesus to protest against the teaching of St. If Demetrius and his gildsmen had just ground of complaint, they should have earned their case before the proper court, over which the proconsul presided, for the present gathering was outside the law, and had ‘no power to transact business
Antiochus - In the midst of their success, both young Antiochus and Lysias were assassinated by Demetrius I. 138 128), the last of the energetic Syrian monarchs, came to the throne during the imprisonment of Demetrius II
Septuagint - Aristobulus, who was a tutor to Ptolemy Physcon; Philo, who lived in our Saviour's time, and was contemporary with the apostles; and Josephus, speak of this translation as made by seventy-two interpreters, by the care of Demetrius Phalereus, in the reign of Ptolemy Philadelphus
Salamis - The same waters witnessed the greatest sea-fight of ancient times, in which Demetrius the son of Antigonus achieved in 306 b
Lydda - Re-occupied by the Jews after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:35), it was nevertheless governed by the Samaritans till the time of Jonathan Maccabaeus, when the Syrian king Demetrius II
Edom, Edomites - , for by 312 they were in this region, and Antigonus and Demetrius came in, contact with them (cf
Pantaenus, of Alexandria - But Jerome raises a difficulty when he names Demetrius as the bishop by whom he was sent. For Eusebius places the accession of Demetrius to the patriarchate in the 10th year of Commodus ( H
Moloch - The portable model "tabernacle" (compare Demetrius' silver shrines of Diana, Acts 19:24) was small enough to escape Moses' notice
Septuagint - According to one account, Ptolemy Philadelphus, king of Egypt, caused this translation to be made for the use of the library which he had founded at Alexandria at the request and with the advice of the celebrated Demetrius Phalereus, his principal librarian. These learned men were accordingly shut up in the island of Pharos; where, having agreed in a translation of each period after a mutual conference, Demetrius wrote down their version as they dictated it to him; and thus, in the space of seventy-two days, the whole was accomplished. Farther, this version was neither made by the command of Ptolemy, nor at the request nor under the superintendence of Demetrius Phalereus; but was voluntarily undertaken by the Jews for the use of their countrymen
Septuagint - Philadelphus was advised by his librarian Demetrius Phalereus to procure from Jerusalem copies of the Hebrew Scriptures, and men learned in the Hebrew and Greek languages to translate them. An army of apologists was raised up, of whom Josephus and Philo are, for us, the chief, because so much of their work is extant; but they must have been well-nigh equalled in weight and influence by such writers as the historians Alexander Cornelius (‘Polyhistor’), Demetrius, Eupolemus, Artapanus, and Aristeas, the poets Philo, Theodotus, and Ezekiel, the philosopher Aristobulus, and Cleodemus or Malchas, small fragments of whose writings are preserved in Clem
Sep'Tuagint - This letter which is dressed by Aristeas to his brother Philocrates, gives a glowing account of the origin of the Septuagint; of the embassy and presents sent by King Ptolemy to the high priest at Jerusalem, by the advice of Demetrius Phalereus, his librarian, 30 talents of gold and 70 talents of silver, etc
Georgius (43), Patron Saint of England - 559) tells us that, when the Crusaders were hard pressed by the Saracens at the battle of Antioch, June 28, 1089, the soldiers were encouraged by seeing "the martyrs George and Demetrius hastily approaching from the mountainous districts, hurling darts against the enemy, but assisting the Franks" (cf. Demetrius see Böckh, Corp
Name - Demetrius is another instance of the same thing. -A number of these occur in the apostolic writings; thus Apollonius is shortened into Apollos (Acts 18:24); Ampliatus into Amplias (Romans 16:8); Demetrius into Demas (Acts 19:24, 3 John 1:12, 2 Timothy 4:10, etc
Impostors - 744
Benedict Levita (Benedict the Deacon), author of a forged collection of documents (848-850)
Leotardus and Wilgardus, in the 11th century
the Anabaptist John of Leyden (John Bokelzoon), who flourished in 1533 and who was possibly insane
the Pseudo-Isidore (Isidore Mercator), author of a whole series of apocrypha, including the False Decretals
Paulua Tigrinus, pretended Patriarch of Constantinople, who deceived Pope Clement VII
the Franciscan friar, James of Jülich, who performed all the functions of a bishop without having received consecration
several individuals contemporary with and imitative of Saint Joan of Arc
Sir John Oldcastle, the Wycliffite, possibly deluded
those connected with the veneration of the ashes of Richard Wyche (burned 1440)
Johann Bohm, the Hussite, possibly a mere tool
Jack Cade, whose rebellion, however, was of no religious significance any more than that of Wat Tyler
Lambert Simnel (1487)
Perkin Warbeck (1497)
Numerous other secular pretenders to royal thrones include ...
Alexis Comnenus
the false Baldwin
the impersonator of Frederick II
after the death of Sebastian of Portugal, a whole series of pretenders to the throne
The "false Demetrius," however, was never proved to be an impostor; the six impersonators of Louis XVII were unquestionably such
Antiochus - Eupator succeeded to the throne; and...
in 162 Demetrius SOTER; but they were not powerful against Judaea, and in B
Maccabees - The two last chapters contain events under the reign of Demetrius Soter, the successor of Antiochus Eupator, and contain such varieties in their style, as render it doubtful whether they had the same author as the rest of the work
Alexander - A Jew whom the Jews put forward during Demetrius' riot at Ephesus to plead their cause before the mob who suspected that the Jews were joined with the Christians in seeking to overthrow Diana's worship (Acts 19:33)
Damascus - His successor, Demetrius Eucærus, invaded Palestine in 88 b
Library - ...
The first corporate Hellenistic library was conceived by Ptolemy I at Alexandria in Egypt, and then established by Demetrius of Phalerum (Athens) under Ptolemy II (285-247 B
Games - ...
In 1 Corinthians 15:32 Paul alludes to "fights with beasts" (though his fights were with beast-like men, Demetrius and his craftsmen, not with beasts, from which his Roman citizenship exempted him), at Ephesus
Paul - After the tumult raised by Demetrius he went to Macedonia, and there wrote the SECOND EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS
Macedonia - In Thessalonica, his role was later assumed by the Christian martyr Demetrius
John, the Letters of - The elder praised Gaius and commended Demetrius (who may have carried the letter) as a faithful witness
High Priest - Simon Maccabee was, likewise, confirmed in his high priesthood and made a “friend” of the Seleucid King Demetrius II (1 Maccabees 14:38 )
Antiochus - Hence, and because of his craftily supplanting Demetrius, the rightful heir, he is called in Daniel 11: "a vile person
Greek Versions of ot - 285 247), describes how the king, at the suggestion of his librarian, Demetrius of Phalerum, resolved to obtain a Greek translation of the laws of the Jews for the library of Alexandria; how, at the instigation of Aristeas, he released the Jewish captives in his kingdom, to the number of some 100,000, paying the (absurdly small) sum of 20 drachmas apiece for them to their masters; how he then sent presents to Eleazar, the high priest at Jerusalem, and begged him to send six elders out of each tribe to translate the Law; how the 72 elders were sent, and magnificently entertained by Ptolemy, and were then set down to their work in the island of Pharos; and how in 72 days they completed the task assigned to them. Demetrius of Phalerum was librarian to Ptolemy i
John, Epistles of - The evil example of Diotrephes is held up for condemnation, whilst in contrast to him, a certain Demetrius is praised, whose reputation in the Church was excellent, who had won the confidence of the Apostle, and higher commendation still had ‘the witness of the truth itself. ’ Tried by the strictest and most searching test of all, the sterling metal of Demetrius’ character rang true
Ephesus - The gild of silversmiths, led by their indignant president Demetrius (q
Epicureans - ’ And during the severe famine which afflicted Athens, Plutarch informs us that the Epicureans lived on beans which they shared out from day to day (Demetrius, 34)
Theophilus, Bishop of Alexandria - Theophilus affirmed that Origen had been condemned (not only by Demetrius, but) by Heraclas
Paul - Previous to the disturbance raised by Demetrius, Paul had intended to continue at Ephesus till Titus should return, whom he had sent to inquire into the state of the church at Corinth, 2 Corinthians 12:18
Babylon - The Persians, the Macedonians, the Parthians, the Romans, the Saracens, and the Turks, are the chief of the many nations who have unscrupulously and unsparingly "served themselves" of the land of the Chaldeans: and Cyrus and Darius, kings of Persia; Alexander the Great; and Seleucus, king of Assyria; Demetrius and Antiochus the Great; Trajan, Severus, Julian, and Heraclius, emperors of Rome; the victorious Omar, the successor of Mohammed; Holagou, and Tamerlane, are "great kings" who successively subdued or desolated Chaldea, or exacted from it tribute to such an extent, as scarcely any other country ever paid to a single conqueror