What does Deluge mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Deluge, the
Catastrophe described in the Bible (Genesis 6; 7; 8). The deluge is referred to in several passages of Scripture as a historical fact; the writings of the Fathers consider the event in the same light; and this view is confirmed by the tradition existing in all places and at all times as to occurrence of a similar catastrophe. Early geologists considered the biblical deluge identical with the diluvium at the beginning of the quaternary period, but recent authors distinguish the two. Till about the 17th century it was commonly held that the entire globe was submerged in the deluge, but this opinion is now rarely held for the following reasons:
The sources of the water mentioned in the Bible are not sufficient to cover the entire globe.
Aquatic animals would have been killed by the mixture of sea and fresh water.
The collecting, housing in the ark, and feeding of such an enormous number of animals seems impossible.
The text does not necessarily imply such a flood, since the words arez and adamah may just as well be translated by "region" and "land." Universal expressions in the Bible are frequently taken in a relatively universal sense.
The biblical narrative was written by an eyewitness, or by some one writing not long after the event, and must be understood, not according to our ideas, but according to his, who wrote of things in as far as known to him.
Hence, while most modern expositors deny the geographical universality of the flood, many defend at least its ethnographical universality; others hold that the flood did not extend to the entire human race but is limited by the Bible itself (Genesis 4,5) to the descendants of Cain and Seth. To corroborate this opinion they adduce arguments from ethnology, languages, and ancient traditions. It is impossible to fix the time of the deluge, since the dates mentioned in the three available texts of Scripture disagree both as to the year from Adam and as to the year before Christ that it occurred. The earliest year before Christ mentioned in the texts and ancient traditions Isaiah 3100, but scientists demand for many reasons that the deluge be placed at a much earlier time.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Deluge
The name given to Noah's flood, the history of which is recorded in Genesis 7,8 . It began in the year 2516 B.C., and continued twelve lunar months and ten days, or exactly one solar year.
The cause of this judgment was the corruption and violence that filled the earth in the ninth generation from Adam. God in righteous indignation determined to purge the earth of the ungodly race. Amid a world of crime and guilt there was one household that continued faithful and true to God, the household of Noah. "Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations."
At the command of God, Noah made an ark 300 cubits long, 50 broad, and 30 high. He slowly proceeded with this work during a period of one hundred and twenty years (Genesis 6:3 ). At length the purpose of God began to be carried into effect. The following table exhibits the order of events as they occurred:
In the six hundredth year of his life Noah is commanded by God to enter the ark, taking with him his wife, and his three sons with their wives (Genesis 7:1-10 ).
The rain begins on the seventeenth day of the second month (Genesis 7:11-17 ).
The rain ceases, the waters prevail, fifteen cubits upward (Genesis 7:18-24 ).
The ark grounds on one of the mountains of Ararat on the seventeenth day of the seventh month, or one hundred and fifty days after the Deluge began (Genesis 8:1-4 ).
Tops of the mountains visible on the first day of the tenth month (Genesis 8:5 ).
Raven and dove sent out forty days after this (Genesis 8:6-9 ).
Dove again sent out seven days afterwards; and in the evening she returns with an olive leaf in her mouth (Genesis 8:10,11 ).
Dove sent out the third time after an interval of other seven days, and returns no more (Genesis 8:12 ).
The ground becomes dry on the first day of the first month of the new year (Genesis 8:13 ).
Noah leaves the ark on the twenty-seventh day of the second month (Genesis 8:14-19 ).
The historical truth of the narrative of the Flood is established by the references made to it by our Lord (Matthew 24:37 ; Compare Luke 17:26 ). Peter speaks of it also (1 Peter 3:20 ; 2 Peter 2:5 ). In Isaiah 54:9 the Flood is referred to as "the waters of Noah." The Biblical narrative clearly shows that so far as the human race was concerned the Deluge was universal; that it swept away all men living except Noah and his family, who were preserved in the ark; and that the present human race is descended from those who were thus preserved.
Traditions of the Deluge are found among all the great divisions of the human family; and these traditions, taken as a whole, wonderfully agree with the Biblical narrative, and agree with it in such a way as to lead to the conclusion that the Biblical is the authentic narrative, of which all these traditions are more or less corrupted versions. The most remarkable of these traditions is that recorded on tablets prepared by order of Assur-bani-pal, the king of Assyria. These were, however, copies of older records which belonged to somewhere about B.C. 2000, and which formed part of the priestly library at Erech (q.v.), "the ineradicable remembrance of a real and terrible event." (See NOAH; CHALDEA .)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Deluge
See Flood .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Deluge
See NOAH.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Deluge
The flood which overflowed and destroyed the earth. This flood makes one of the most considerable epochas in chronology. Its history is given by Moses, Genesis 6:7 : Its time is fixed by the best chronologers to the year from the creation 1656, answering to the year before Christ 2293. From this flood, the state of the world is divided into diluvian and ante-diluvian. Men who have not paid that regard to sacred history as it deserves, have cavilled at the account given of an universal deluge. Their objections principally turn upon three points:
1. The want of any direct history of that event by the profane writers of antiquity.
2. The apparent impossibility of accounting for the quantity of water necessary to overflow the whole earth to such a depth as it is said to have been.
And,
3. There appearing no necessity for an universal deluge, as the same end might have been accomplished by a partial one. To the above arguments we oppose the plain declarations of Scripture. God declared to Noah that he was resolved to destroy every thing that had breath under heaven, or had life on the earth, by a flood of waters; such was the threatening, such was the execution. the waters, Moses assures us, covered the whole earth, buried all the mountains; every thing perished therein that had life, excepting Noah and those with him in the ark. Can an universal deluge be more clearly expressed? If the deluge had only been partial, there had been no necessity to spend an hundred years in the building of an ark, and shutting up all sorts of animals therein, in order to re-stock the world: they had been easily and readily brought from those parts of the world not overflowed into those that were; at least, all the birds never would have been destroyed, as Moses says they were, so long as they had wings to bear them to those parts where the flood did not reach.
If the waters had only overflowed the neighbourhood of the Euphrates and the Tigris, they could not be fifteen cubits above the highest mountains; there was no rising that height but they must spread themselves, by the laws of gravity, over the rest of the earth; unless perhaps they had been retained there by a miracle; in that case, Moses, no doubt, would have related the miracle, as he did that of the waters of the Red Sea, &c. It may also be observed, that in regions far remote from the Euphrates and Tigris, viz. Italy, France, Switzerland, Germany, England, &c. there are frequently found in places many scores of leagues from the sea, and even in the tops of high mountains, whole trees sunk deep under ground, as also teeth and bones of animals, fishes entire, sea-shells, ears of corn, &c. petrified; which the best naturalists are agreed could never have come there but by the deluge. That the Greeks and western nations had some knowledge of the flood, has never been denied; and the Mussulmen, Chinese, and Americans, have traditions of the deluge.
The ingenious Mr. Bryant, in his Mythology, has pretty clearly proved that the deluge, so far from being unknown to the heathen world at large, is in reality conspicuous throughout every one of their acts of religious worship. In India, also, Sir William Jones has discovered, that in the oldest mythological books of that country, there is such an account of the deluge, as corresponds sufficiently with that of Moses. Various have been the conjectures of learned men as to the natural causes of the deluge. Some have supposed that a quantity of water was created on purpose, and at a proper time annihilated by Divine power. Dr. Burnet supposes the primitive earth to have been no more than a crust investing the water contained in the ocean; and in the central abyss which he and others suppose to exist in the bowels of the earth at the time of the flood, this outward crust broke in a thousand pieces, and sunk down among the water, which thus spouted up in vast cataracts, and overflowed the whole surface.
Others, supposing a sufficient fund of water in the sea or abyss, think that the shifting of the earth's centre of gravity drew after it the water out of the channel, and overwhelmed the several parts of the earth successively. Others ascribe it to the shock of a comet, and Mr. King supposes it to arise from subterraneous fires bursting forth with great violence under the sea. But are not most, if not all these hypotheses quite arbitrary, and without foundation from the words of Moses? It is, perhaps, in vain to attempt accounting for this event by natural causes, it being altogether miraculous and supernatural, as a punishment to men for the corruption then in the world. Let us be satisfied with the sources which Moses gives us, namely, the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the waters rushed out from the hidden abyss of the bowels of the earth, and the clouds poured down their rain incessantly. Let it suffice us to know, that all the elements are under God's power; that he can do with them as he pleases, and frequently in ways we are ignorant of, in order to accomplish his own purposes. The principal writers on this subject have been Woodyard, Cockburn, Bryant, Burnett, Whiston, Stillingfleet, King, Calcott and Tytler.
Webster's Dictionary - Deluge
(1):
(n.) Fig.: Anything which overwhelms, or causes great destruction.
(2):
(n.) A washing away; an overflowing of the land by water; an inundation; a flood; specifically, The Deluge, the great flood in the days of Noah (Gen. vii.).
(3):
(v. t.) To overwhelm, as with a deluge; to cover; to overspread; to overpower; to submerge; to destroy; as, the northern nations deluged the Roman empire with their armies; the land is deluged with woe.
(4):
(v. t.) To overflow with water; to inundate; to overwhelm.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Deluge
See Flood.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Deluge
See FLOOD.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Deluge
signifies, in general, any great inundation; but more particularly that universal flood by which the whole inhabitants of this globe were destroyed, except Noah and his family. According to the most approved systems of chronology, this remarkable event happened in the year 1656 after the creation, or about 2348 before the Christian aera. Of so general a calamity, from which only a single family of all who lived then on the face of the earth was preserved, we might naturally expect to find some memorials in the traditionary records of Pagan history, as well as in the sacred volume, where its peculiar cause, and the circumstances which attended it, are so distinctly and so fully related. Its magnitude and singularity could scarcely fail to make an indelible impression on the minds of the survivors, which would be communicated from them to their children, and would not be easily effaced from the traditions even of their latest posterity. A deficiency in such traces of this awful event, though perhaps it might not serve entirely to invalidate our belief of its reality, would certainly tend considerably to weaken its claim to credibility; it being scarcely probable that the knowledge of it should be utterly lost to the rest of the world, and confined to the documents of the Jewish nation alone. What we might reasonably expect has, accordingly, been actually and completely realized. The evidence which has been brought from almost every quarter of the world to bear upon the reality of this event, is of the most conclusive and irresistible kind; and every investigation, whether etymological or historical, which has been made concerning Heathen rites and traditions, has constantly added to its force, no less than to its extent.
And here, it were injustice to the memory of ingenuity and erudition almost unexampled in modern times, were we not to mention the labours of Bryant, the learned analysist of ancient mythology, whose patience and profoundness of research have thrown such new and convincing light on this subject. Nor must we forget his ardent and successful disciple, Mr. Faber, who, in his "Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri," has in travelling over similar ground with his illustrious master at once corrected some of his statements, and greatly strengthened his general conclusions. As the basis of their system, however, rests on a most extensive etymological examination of the names of the deities and other mythological personages worshipped and celebrated by the Heathen, compared with the varied traditions respecting their histories, and the nature of the rites and names of the places that were sacred to them, we cannot do more, in the present article, than shortly state the result of their investigations, referring for the particular details, to the highly original treatises already mentioned. According to them, the memory of the deluge was incorporated with almost every part of the Gentile mythology and worship; Noah, under a vast multitude of characters, being one of their first deities, to whom all the nations of the Heathen world looked up as their founder; and to some circumstance or other in whose history, and that of his sons and the first patriarchs, most, if not all, of their religious ceremonies may be considered as not indistinctly referring. Traces of these, neither vague nor obscure, they conceive to be found in the history and character, not only of Deucalion, but of Atlas, Cronus, or Saturn, Dionusos, Inachus, Janus, Minos, Zeus, and others among the Greeks; of Isis, Osiris, Sesostris, Oannes, Typhon, &c, among the Egyptians; of Dagon, Agruerus Sydyk, &c, among the Phenicians; of Astarte, Derceto, &c, among the Assyrians; of Buddha, Menu, Vishnu, &c, among the Hindus; of Fohi, and a deity represented as sitting upon the lotos in the midst of waters, among the Chinese; of Budo and Iakusi among the Japanese, &c. They discover allusions to the ark, in many of the ancient mysteries, and traditions with respect to the dove and the rainbow, by which several of these allegorical personages were attended, which are not easily explicable, unless they be supposed to relate to the history of the deluge. By the celebrated Ogdoas of the Egyptians, consisting of eight persons sailing together in the sacred baris or ark, they imagine the family of Noah, which was precisely eight in number, to have been designated; and in the rites of Adonis or Thammuz, in particular, they point out many circumstances which seem to possess a distinct reference to the events recorded in the sixth and seventh chapters of Genesis. With regard to this system, we shall only farther observe, that, after every reasonable deduction is made from it, which the exuberant indulgence of fancy occasionally exhibited by its authors appears to render necessary, it contains so much that is relevant and conclusive, that it induces the conviction that it has a solid foundation in truth and fact; it being scarcely possible to conceive, that a mere hypothesis could be supported by evidence so varied, so extensive, and in many particulars so demonstrative, as that which its framers have produced.
Beside, however, the allusions to the deluge in the mythology and religious ceremonies of the Heathen, to which we have thus concisely adverted, there is a variety of traditions concerning it still more direct and circumstantial, the coincidence of which, with the narrative of Moses, it will require no common degree of skeptical hardihood to deny. We are informed by one of the circumnavigators of the world, who visited the remote island of Otaheite, that some of the inhabitants being asked concerning their origin, answered, that their supreme God having, a long time ago, been angry, dragged the earth through the sea, when their island was broken off and preserved. In the island of Cuba, the people are said to believe that the world was once destroyed by water by three persons, evidently alluding to the three sons of Noah. It is even related, that they have a tradition among them, that an old man, knowing that the deluge was approaching, built a large ship, and went into it with a great number of animals; and that he sent out from the ship a crow, which did not immediately come back, staying to feed on the carcasses of dead animals, but afterward returned with a green branch in its mouth. The author who gives the above account likewise affirms that it was reported by the inhabitants of Castells del Oro, in Terra Firma, that during a universal deluge, one man, and his children, were the only persons who escaped, by means of a canoe, and that from them the world was afterward peopled. According to the Peruvians, in consequence of a general inundation, occasioned by violent and continued rains, a universal destruction of the human species took place, a few persons only excepted, who escaped into caves on the tops of the mountains, into which they had previously conveyed a stock of provisions, and a number of live animals, lest when the waters abated, the whole race should have become extinct. Others of them affirm, that only six persons were saved, by means of a float or raft, and that from them all the inhabitants of the country are descended. They farther believe, that this event took place before there were any incas or kings among them, and when the country was extremely populous. The Brazilians not only preserve the tradition of a deluge, but believe that the whole race of mankind perished in it, except one man and his sister; or, according to others, two brothers with their wives, who were preserved by climbing the highest trees on their loftiest mountains; and who afterward became the heads of two different nations. The memory of this event they are even said to celebrate in some of their religious anthems or songs. Acosta, in his history of the Indies, says, that the Mexicans speak of a deluge in their country, by which all men were drowned; and that it was afterward peopled by viracocha, who came out of the lake Titicaca; and, according to Herrera, the Machoachans, a people comparatively in the neighbourhood of Mexico, had a tradition, that a single family was formerly preserved in an ark amid a deluge of waters; and that along with them, a sufficient number of animals were saved to stock the new world. During the time that they were shut up in the ark, several ravens were sent out, one of which brought back the branch of a tree. Among the Iroquois it is reported that a certain spirit, called by them Otkon, was the creator of the world; and that another being, called Messou, repaired it after a deluge, which happened in consequence of Otkon's dogs having one day while he was hunting with them lost themselves in a great lake, which, in consequence of this, overflowed its banks, and in a short time covered the whole earth.
Passing from the more remote western to the eastern continent, nearer to the region where Noah is generally supposed to have lived, we find the traditions respecting the deluge still more particular and minute. According to Josephus, there were a multitude of ancient authors who concurred in asserting that the world had once been destroyed by a flood; "This deluge," says he, "and the ark are mentioned by all who have written barbaric histories, one of whom is Berosus the Chaldean." Eusebius informs us, that Melo, a bitter enemy of the Jews, and whose testimony is on this account peculiarly valuable, takes notice of the person who was saved along with his sons from the flood, having been, after his preservation, driven away from Armenia, whence he retired to the mountainous parts of Syria. Abydenus, after giving an account of the deluge from which Xisuthrus, the Chaldean Noah, was saved, concludes with asserting, in exact concurrence with Berosus, that the ark first rested on the mountains of Armenia, and that its remains were used by the natives as a talisman; and Plutarch mentions the Noachic dove being sent out of the ark, and returning to it again, as an intimation to Deucalion that the storm had not yet ceased.
This, however, is by no means all; Sir W, Jones, speaking of one of the Chinese fables says, "Although I cannot insist with confidence, that the rainbow mentioned in it alludes to the Mosaic narrative of the flood, nor build any solid argument on the divine person Niuva, of whose character, and even of whose sex the historians of China speak very doubtfully; I may nevertheless assure you, after full inquiry and consideration, that the Chinese believe the earth to have been wholly covered with water, which, in works of undisputed authenticity, they describe as flowing abundantly, then subsiding, and separating the higher from the lower age of mankind."
Still more coincident even than this with the Mosaic account, is the Grecian history of the deluge, as preserved by Lucian, a native of Samosata on the Euphrates; and its authority is the more incontrovertible, on account of his being an avowed derider of all religions. The antediluvians, according to him, had gradually become so hardened and profligate, as to be guilty of every species of injustice. They paid no regard to the obligation of oaths; were insolent, inhospitable, and unmerciful. For this reason they were visited with an awful calamity. Suddenly the earth poured forth a vast quantity of water, the rain descended in torrents, the rivers overflowed their banks, and the sea rose to a prodigious height, so that "all things became water," and all men were destroyed except Deucalion. He alone, for the sake of his prudence and piety, was reserved to a second generation. In obedience to a divine nomination, he entered, with his sons and their wives, into a large ark, which they had built for their preservation; and immediately swine, and horses, and lions, and serpents, and all other animals which live on earth, came to him by pairs, and were admitted by him into the ark. There they became perfectly mild and innoxious, their natures being changed by the gods, who created such a friendship between them, that they all sailed peaceably together, so long as the waters prevailed over the surface of the globe.
Scarcely less remarkable is the Hindoo tradition. It is contained in the ancient poem of the Bhavagat; and forms the subject of the first Purana, entitled Matsya, or "The Fish." The following is Sir William Jones's abridgment of it; and the identity of the event which it describes, with that of the Hebrew historian, is too obvious to require any particular illustration: "The demon Hayagriva, having purloined the Vedas from the custody of Brahma, while he was reposing at the close of the sixth Manwantara, the whole race of men became corrupt, except the seven Rishis, and Satyavrata, who then reigned in Dravira, a maritime region to the south of Carnata. This prince was performing his ablutions in the river Critimala, when Vishnu appeared to him in the shape of a small fish, and after several augmentations of bulk in different waters, was placed by Satyavrata in the ocean, where he thus addressed his amazed votary: ‘In seven days all creatures who have offended me shall be destroyed by a deluge, but thou shalt be secured in a capacious vessel miraculously formed; take therefore all kinds of medicinal herbs, and esculent grain for food, and, together with the seven holy men, your respective wives, and pairs of all animals, enter the ark without fear: then shalt thou know God face to face, and all thy questions shall be answered.' Saying this, he disappeared; and after seven days the ocean began to overflow the coasts, and the earth to be flooded by constant showers, when Satyavrata, meditating on the deity, saw a large vessel moving on the waters. He entered it, having in all respects conformed to the instructions of Vishnu; who in the form of a vast fish, suffered the vessel to be tied with a great sea serpent, as with a cable, to his measureless horn. When the deluge had ceased, Vishnu slew the demon, and recovered the Vedas, instructed Satyavrata in divine knowledge, and appointed him the seventh Menu, by the name of Vaivaswata."
When we thus meet with some traditions of a deluge in almost every country, though the persons saved from it are said, in those various accounts to have resided in different districts widely separated from each other, we are constrained to allow that such a general concurrence of belief could never have originated merely from accident. While the mind is in this situation, Scripture comes forward, and, presenting a narrative more simple, better connected, and bearing an infinitely greater resemblance to authentic history, than any of those mythological accounts which occur in the traditions of Paganism, immediately flashes the conviction upon the understanding, that this must be the true history of those remarkable facts which other nations have handed down to us, only through the medium of allegory and fable. By the evidence adduced in this article, indeed, the moral certainty of the Mosaic history of the flood appears to be established on a basis sufficiently firm to bid defiance to the cavils of skepticism. "Let the ingenuity of unbelief first account satisfactorily for this universal agreement of the Pagan world; and she may then, with a greater degree of plausibility, impeach the truth of the Scriptural narrative of the deluge."
The fact, however, is not only preserved in the traditions of all nations, as we have already seen; but after all the philosophical arguments which were formerly urged against it, philosophy has at length acknowledged that the present surface of the earth must have been submerged under water. "Not only," says Kirwan, "in every region of Europe, but also of both the old and new continents, immense quantities of marine shells, either dispersed or collected, have been discovered." This and several other facts seem to prove, that at least a great part of the present earth was, before the last general convulsion to which it has been subjected, the bed of an ocean which, at that time, was withdrawn from it. Other facts seem also to prove with sufficient evidence, that this was not a gradual retirement of the waters which once covered the parts now inhabited by men; but a violent one, such as may be supposed from the brief but emphatic relation of Moses. The violent action of water has left its traces in various undisputed phenomena. Stratified mountains of various heights exist in different parts of Europe, and of both continents; in and between whose strata, various substances of marine, and some vegetables of terrestrial, origin, repose either in their natural state, or petrified. To overspread the plains of the arctic circle with the shells of Indian seas, and with the bodies of elephants and rhinoceri, surrounded by masses of submarine vegetation; to accumulate on a single spot, as at La Bolca, in promiscuous confusion, the marine productions of the four quarters of the globe; what conceivable instrument would be efficacious but the rush of mighty waters? These facts, about which there is no dispute, and which are acknowledged by the advocates of each of the prevailing geological theories, give a sufficient attestation to the deluge of Noah, in which "the fountains of the great deep were broken up," and from which precisely such phenomena might be expected to follow. To this may be added, though less decisive in proof, yet certainly strong as presumptive evidence, that the very aspect of the earth's surface exhibits interesting marks both of the violent action, and the rapid subsidence, of waters; as well as affords a most interesting instance of the divine goodness in converting what was ruin itself into utility and beauty. The great frame-work of the varied surface of the habitable earth was probably laid by a more powerful agency than that of water; either when on the third day the waters under the heavens were gathered into one place, and the crust of the primitive earth was broken down to receive them, so that "the dry land might appear;" or by those mighty convulsions which appear to have accompanied the general deluge; but the rounding, so to speak, of what was rugged, where the substance was yielding, and the graceful undulations of hill and dale which so frequently present themselves, were probably effected by the retiring waters. The flood has passed away; but the soils which it deposited remain; and the valleys through which its last streams were drawn off to the ocean, with many an eddy and sinuous course, still exist, exhibiting visible proofs of its agency, and impressed with forms so adapted to the benefit of man, and often so gratifying to the finest taste, that, when the flood "turned," it may be said to have "left a blessing behind it."
The objections once made to the fact of a general deluge have, indeed, been greatly weakened by the progress of philosophical knowledge; and may be regarded as nearly given up, like the former notion of the high antiquity of the race of men, founded on the Chinese and Egyptian chronologies and pretended histories. Philosophy has even at last found out that there is sufficient water in the ocean, if called forth, to overflow the highest mountains to the height given by Moses,—a conclusion which it once stoutly denied. Keill formerly computed that twenty-eight oceans would be necessary for that purpose; but we are now informed "that a farther progress in mathematical and physical knowledge has shown the different seas and oceans to contain, at least, forty-eight times more water than they were then supposed to do; and that the mere raising of the temperature of the whole body of the ocean to a degree no greater than marine animals live in, in the shallow seas between the tropics, would so expand it as more than to produce the height above the mountains stated in the Mosaic account." As to the deluge of Noah, therefore, infidelity has almost entirely lost the aid of philosophy in framing objections to the Scriptures.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Deluge
DELUGE
1. The Biblical story , Genesis 6:5 to Genesis 9:17 [1]. The two narratives of J [2] and P [3] have been combined; the verses are assigned by Driver as follows: J [2] Genesis 6:5-8 , Genesis 7:1-5 ; Genesis 7:7-10 ; Genesis 7:12 ; Genesis 7:16 b, Genesis 7:17 b, Genesis 7:22-23 , Genesis 8:2-3 a, Genesis 8:6-13 b, Genesis 8:20-22 ; P [3] Genesis 6:9-22 , Genesis 7:6 ; Genesis 7:11 ; Genesis 7:13-16 a, Genesis 7:17 a, Genesis 7:18-21 ; Genesis 7:24 , Genesis 8:1-2 a, Genesis 8:3-5 , Genesis 8:13 a, Genesis 8:14-19 , Genesis 9:1-17 . J [2] alone relates the sending out of the birds, and the sacrifice with which J″ [7] is so pleased that He determines never again to curse the ground. P [3] alone gives the directions with regard to the size and construction of the ark, the blessing of Noah, the commands against murder and the eating of blood, and the covenant with the sign of the rainbow. In the portions in which the two narratives overlap, they are at variance in the following points. ( a ) In P [3] one pair of every kind of animal ( Genesis 6:18-20 ) in J [2] one pair of the unclean and seven of the clean ( Genesis 7:2-3 ), are to be taken into the ark. (In Genesis 7:9 a redactor has added the words ‘two and two’ to make J [2] ’s representation conform to that of P [3] .) The reason for the difference is that, according to P [3] , animals were not eaten at all till after the Deluge ( Genesis 9:3 ), so that there was no distinction required between clean and unclean. ( b ) In P [3] the cause of the Deluge is not only rain, but also the bursting forth of the subterranean abyss ( Genesis 6:11 ); J [2] mentions rain only ( Genesis 6:12 ). ( c ) In P [3] the water begins to abate after 150 days ( Genesis 8:3 ), the mountain tops are visible after 8 months and 13 days ( Genesis 7:11 , Genesis 8:5 ), and the earth is dry after a year and 10 days ( Genesis 8:14 ); in J [2] the Flood lasts only 40 days ( Genesis 7:12 , Genesis 8:6 ), and the water had begun to abate before that.
2. The Historicity of the story. The modern study of geology and comparative mythology has made it impossible to see in the story of the Deluge the literal record of an historical event. (The fact that marine fossils are found on the tops of hills cannot be used as an argument, for (i.) the same argument could be used and is actually used by native tribes to prove other flood-stories in various parts of the globe; and (ii.) though it proves that some spots which are now at the tops of hills were at one time submerged, that is not equivalent to asserting that a flood ever occurred which covered the whole planet apart from the extreme improbability that the submergence of mountains was within the period of man’s existence.) The difficulties in the story as it stands are immense. ( a ) All the water in the world, together with all the vapour if reduced to water, would not cover the whole earth to the height of Mt. Ararat. And if it had, it is impossible to imagine how it could have dried up in a year and 10 days (not to speak of 40 days), or whither it could have flowed away. ( b ) If only a single family survived, it is impossible to account for the wide variety of races and languages. ( c ) The means of safety is not a ship, but simply a huge chest, which would instantly capsize in a storm. It is popularly assumed that it had a hull, shaped like that of a ship; but of this nothing is said in the Heb. narrative. ( d ) The collection by Noah of a pair of every kind of animal, bird, and creeping thing, which would include species peculiar to different countries from the arctic regions to the tropics, is inconceivable. And no less so the housing of them all in a single chest, the feeding and care of them by eight persons, the arrangements to prevent their devouring one another, and the provision of the widely diverse conditions of life necessary for creatures from different countries and climates. From every point of view it is clear that the story is legendary, and similar in character to the legends which are found in the folk-lore of all peoples.
3. The Cause of the Deluge . This is stated to be rain ( Genesis 7:11 b, Genesis 7:12 ), and the bursting forth of the subterranean abyss. It must be studied in connexion with other flood-stories. Such stories are found principally in America, but also in India, Cashmir, Tibet, China, Kamschatka, Australia, some of the Polynesian Islands, Lithuania, and Greece. In the great majority of cases the flood is caused by some startling natural phenomenon, which often has a special connexion with the locality to which it belongs; e.g. the melting of the ice or snow, in the extreme N. of America; earthquakes, on the American coastlands where they frequently occur; the submergence or emergence of islands, in districts liable to volcanic eruptions; among inland peoples the cause is frequently the bursting of the banks of rivers which have been swollen by rains. Sometimes the stories have grown up to account for various facts of observation; e.g. the dispersion of peoples, and differences of language; the red colour, or the pale colour, of certain tribes; the discovery of marine fossils inland, and so on. In some cases these stories have been coloured by the Bible story, owing to the teaching of Christian missionaries in modern times, and often mixed up with other Bible stories, and reproduced with grotesque details by local adaptation. But there are very many which are quite unconnected with the story of Noah. (For a much fuller discussion of the various flood-stories see the valuable art. ‘Flood’ in Hastings’ DB [18] ii.) It is reasonable, therefore, to treat the Hebrew story as one of these old-world legends, and to look for the cause of it in the natural features of the land which gave it birth. And we are fortunate in the possession of an earlier form of the legend, which belongs to Babylonia, and makes it probable that its origin is to be ascribed to the inundation of the large Babylonian plain by the bursting forth of one of the rivers by which it is intersected, and perhaps also, as some think, to the incursion of a tidal wave due to an earthquake somewhere in the South. This, among a people whose world was bounded by very narrow limits, would easily be magnified in oral tradition into a universal Deluge.
4. The Babylonian story . ( a ) One form of the story has long been known from the fragments of Berosus, an Egyptian priest of the 3rd cent. b.c. It differs in certain details from the other form known to us; e.g. when the birds return the second time, clay is seen to be attaching to their legs (a point which finds parallels in some N. American flood-legends); and not only the hero of the story, Xisuthros, and his wife, but also his daughter and the pilot of the ship are carried away by the gods.
( b ) The other and more important form is contained in Akkadian cuneiform tablets m the British Museum, first deciphered in 1872. It is part of an epic in 12 parts, each connected with a sign of the Zodiac; the Flood story is the 11th, and is connected with Aquarius, the ‘water-bearer.’ Gilgamesh of Uruk (Erech, Genesis 10:10 ), the hero of the epic, contrived to visit his ancestor Ut-napishtim, who had received the gift of immortality. The latter is in one passage called Adra-hasis, which being inverted as Hasis-adra appears in Greek as Xisuthros. He relates to Gilgamesh how, for his piety, he had been preserved from a great flood. When Bel and three other gods determined to destroy Shurippak, a city ‘lying on the Euphrates,’ Ea warned him to build a ship. He built it 120 cubits in height and breadth, with six decks, divided into 7 storeys, each with 9 compartments; it had a mast, and was smeared with bitumen. He took on board all his possessions, ‘the seed of life of every kind that I possessed,’ cattle and beasts of the field, his family, servants, and craftsmen. He entered the ship and shut the door. Then Ramman the storm-god thundered, and the spirits of heaven brought lightnings; the gods were terrified; they fled to heaven, and cowered in a heap like a dog in his kennel. On the 7th day the rain ceased, and all mankind were turned to clay. The ship grounded on Mt. Nisir, E. of the Tigris, where it remained 6 days. Then Ut-napishtim sent forth a dove, a swallow, and a raven, and the last did not return. He then sent the animals to the four winds, and offered sacrifice on an altar at the top of the mountain. The gods smelled the savour and gathered like flies. The great goddess Ishtar lighted up the rainbow. She reproached Bel for destroying all mankind instead of one city only. Bel, on the other hand, was angry at the escape of Ut-napishtim, and refused to come to the sacrifice. But he was pacified by Ea, and at length entered the ship, and made a covenant with Ut-napishtim, and translated him and his wife to ‘the mouth of the rivers,’ and made them immortal.
The similarities to the Heb. story, and the differences from it, are alike obvious. It dates from at least b.c. 3000, and it would pass through a long course of oral repetition before it reached the Hebrew form. And herein is seen the religious value of the latter. The genius of the Hebrew race under Divine inspiration gradually stripped it of all its crude polytheism, and made it the vehicle of spiritual truth. It teaches the unity and omnipotence of J″ [7] ; His hatred of sin and His punishment of sinners; but at the same time His merciful kindness to them that obey Him, which is shown in rescuing them from destruction, and in entering into a covenant with them.
5. It is strange that, apart from Genesis 9:28 ; Genesis 10:1 ; Genesis 10:32 ; Genesis 11:10 , there are only two allusions in the OT to the Flood, Isaiah 54:9 and Psalms 29:10 (the latter uncertain; see commentaries). In the Apocr. [20] : Esther 3:9 Esther 3:9 f., Wis 10:4 , Sir 44:17 f. ( Sir 40:10 in LXX [21] , but not in Heb.). In the NT: Matthew 24:38 f., Luke 17:27 , Hebrews 11:7 , 1Pe 3:20 , 2 Peter 2:5 .
A. H. M‘Neile.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Deluge
That universal flood which was sent upon the earth in the time of Noah, and from which there were but eight persons saved. Moses' account of this event is recorded in Genesis 6:1-8:22 . See ARK OF NOAH . The sins of mankind were the cause of the deluge; and most commentators agree to place it B. C. 2348. After the door of the ark had been closed upon those that were to be saved, the deluge commenced: it rained forty days; "the fountains of the great deep were broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened." All men and creatures living on the land perished, except Noah and those with him. For five months the waters continued to rise, and reached fifteen cubits above the highest summits to which any could fly for refuge; "a shoreless ocean tumble round the world." At length the waters began to abate; the highest land appeared, and the ark touched ground upon Mount Ararat. In three months more the hills began to appear. Forty days after, Noah tested the state of the earth's surface by sending out a raven; and then thrice, at intervals of a week, a dove. At length he removed the covering of the ark, and found the flood had disappeared; he came forth from the ark, reared an altar, and offered sacrifices to God, who appointed the rainbow as a pledge that he would no more destroy mankind with a fool.
Since all nations have descended from the family then preserved in the ark, it is natural that the memory of such an event should be perpetuated in various national traditions. Such is indeed the fact. These traditions have been found among the Egyptians, Chaldeans, Phoenicians, Greeks, Hindoos, Chinese, Japanese, Scythians, and Celts, and in the western hemisphere among the Mexicans, Peruvians, and South sea islanders. Much labor has been expanded in searching for natural causes adequate to the production of a deluge; but we should beware of endeavoring to account on natural principles for that which the Bible represents as miraculous.
In the New Testament, the deluge is spoken of as a stupendous exhibition of divine power, like the creation and the final burning of the world. It is applied to illustrate the long suffering of God, and assure us of his judgment on sin, 2 Peter 3:5-7 , and of the second coming of Christ, Matthew 24:38 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Deluge
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Sentence search

Antediluvians - A general name for all mankind who lived before the flood, including the whole human race from the creation to the Deluge. Whiston's Josephus, Cockburn's Treatise on the Deluge, and article Deluge
Diluvian - ) Of or pertaining to a Deluge, esp. to the Noachian Deluge; diluvial; as, of diluvian origin
Antediluvian - ) Of or relating to the period before the Deluge in Noah's time; hence, antiquated; as, an antediluvian vehicle. ) One who lived before the Deluge
Diluvial - ) Of or pertaining to a flood or Deluge, esp. to the great Deluge in the days of Noah; diluvian. ) Effected or produced by a flood or Deluge of water; - said of coarse and imperfectly stratified deposits along ancient or existing water courses
Flood - See Deluge
Deluged - ) of Deluge...
Deluging - ) of Deluge...
Antediluvial - ) Before the flood, or Deluge, in Noah's time
Diluvialist - ) One who explains geological phenomena by the Noachian Deluge
Clysmian - ) Connected with, or related to, the Deluge, or to a cataclysm; as, clysmian changes
Deluge - ) A washing away; an overflowing of the land by water; an inundation; a flood; specifically, The Deluge, the great flood in the days of Noah (Gen. ) To overwhelm, as with a Deluge; to cover; to overspread; to overpower; to submerge; to destroy; as, the northern nations Deluged the Roman empire with their armies; the land is Deluged with woe
Cataclysm - ) An extensive overflow or sweeping flood of water; a Deluge
Ogygian - ) Of or pertaining to Ogyges, a mythical king of ancient Attica, or to a great Deluge in Attica in his days; hence, primeval; of obscure antiquity
Mesopotamia - A province rendered remarkable for the first peopling of the earth after the Deluge
Methuselah - He lived 969 years, a longer life than any other on record, and died within the year before the Deluge, Genesis 5:21,22
Universality - ) The quality or state of being universal; unlimited extension or application; generality; - distinguished from particularity; as, the unversality of a proposition; the unversality of sin; the unversality of the Deluge
Overspread - The Deluge overspread the earth
Flood - (See Deluge
Deluge, the - The Deluge is referred to in several passages of Scripture as a historical fact; the writings of the Fathers consider the event in the same light; and this view is confirmed by the tradition existing in all places and at all times as to occurrence of a similar catastrophe. Early geologists considered the biblical Deluge identical with the diluvium at the beginning of the quaternary period, but recent authors distinguish the two. Till about the 17th century it was commonly held that the entire globe was submerged in the Deluge, but this opinion is now rarely held for the following reasons: ...
The sources of the water mentioned in the Bible are not sufficient to cover the entire globe. It is impossible to fix the time of the Deluge, since the dates mentioned in the three available texts of Scripture disagree both as to the year from Adam and as to the year before Christ that it occurred. The earliest year before Christ mentioned in the texts and ancient traditions Isaiah 3100, but scientists demand for many reasons that the Deluge be placed at a much earlier time
Flood, the - The Deluge is referred to in several passages of Scripture as a historical fact; the writings of the Fathers consider the event in the same light; and this view is confirmed by the tradition existing in all places and at all times as to occurrence of a similar catastrophe. Early geologists considered the biblical Deluge identical with the diluvium at the beginning of the quaternary period, but recent authors distinguish the two. Till about the 17th century it was commonly held that the entire globe was submerged in the Deluge, but this opinion is now rarely held for the following reasons: ...
The sources of the water mentioned in the Bible are not sufficient to cover the entire globe. It is impossible to fix the time of the Deluge, since the dates mentioned in the three available texts of Scripture disagree both as to the year from Adam and as to the year before Christ that it occurred. The earliest year before Christ mentioned in the texts and ancient traditions Isaiah 3100, but scientists demand for many reasons that the Deluge be placed at a much earlier time
Methuselah - 1656, being the very year of the Deluge, at the age of nine hundred and sixty-nine, the greatest age to which any mortal man ever attained
World, Ages of - The first extends from the beginning of the world to the Deluge, and comprehends one thousand six hundred and fifty-six years. The second, from the Deluge to Abraham's entering the Land of Promise in 2082, comprehends four hundred and twenty-six years
Ark - (Latin: arca, chest) ...
The vessel of timber daubed with pitch, 300 cubits long, 50 broad, and 30 high, which Noe constructed at the command of God for the preservation of him and his family and two of all living creatures during the Deluge; also the chest in Which were kept the tables of the Law, called the Ark of the Covenant
Overflow - To Deluge to overwhelm to cover, as with numbers
Noah - (Hebrew: rest) ...
Son of Lamech, and ninth patriarch of the Sethite line, who, with his family, was saved in the Ark, from the Deluge, dying 350 years later at the age of 950
Noe - (Hebrew: rest) ...
Son of Lamech, and ninth patriarch of the Sethite line, who, with his family, was saved in the Ark, from the Deluge, dying 350 years later at the age of 950
Deluge - Men who have not paid that regard to sacred history as it deserves, have cavilled at the account given of an universal Deluge. There appearing no necessity for an universal Deluge, as the same end might have been accomplished by a partial one. Can an universal Deluge be more clearly expressed? If the Deluge had only been partial, there had been no necessity to spend an hundred years in the building of an ark, and shutting up all sorts of animals therein, in order to re-stock the world: they had been easily and readily brought from those parts of the world not overflowed into those that were; at least, all the birds never would have been destroyed, as Moses says they were, so long as they had wings to bear them to those parts where the flood did not reach. petrified; which the best naturalists are agreed could never have come there but by the Deluge. That the Greeks and western nations had some knowledge of the flood, has never been denied; and the Mussulmen, Chinese, and Americans, have traditions of the Deluge. Bryant, in his Mythology, has pretty clearly proved that the Deluge, so far from being unknown to the heathen world at large, is in reality conspicuous throughout every one of their acts of religious worship. In India, also, Sir William Jones has discovered, that in the oldest mythological books of that country, there is such an account of the Deluge, as corresponds sufficiently with that of Moses. Various have been the conjectures of learned men as to the natural causes of the Deluge
Deluge - The sins of mankind were the cause of the Deluge; and most commentators agree to place it B. After the door of the ark had been closed upon those that were to be saved, the Deluge commenced: it rained forty days; "the fountains of the great deep were broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened. Much labor has been expanded in searching for natural causes adequate to the production of a Deluge; but we should beware of endeavoring to account on natural principles for that which the Bible represents as miraculous. ...
In the New Testament, the Deluge is spoken of as a stupendous exhibition of divine power, like the creation and the final burning of the world
Avitus, Saint - He is the author of a poem dealing with the scriptural narrative of original sin, expulsion from paradise, the Deluge, and crossing of the Red Sea; Milton made use of this in preparing Paradise Lost
Alcimus Ecdicius, Saint - He is the author of a poem dealing with the scriptural narrative of original sin, expulsion from paradise, the Deluge, and crossing of the Red Sea; Milton made use of this in preparing Paradise Lost
Flood - The flood, by way of eminence, the Deluge the great body of water which inundated the earth in the days of Noah. FLOOD, To overflow to inundate to Deluge as, to flood a meadow
Sethians - Heretics who paid divine worship to Seth, whom they looked upon to be Jesus Christ, the Son of God, but who was made by a third divinity, and substituted in the room of the two families of Abel and Cain, which had been destroyed by the Deluge
Arphaxad - Son of Shem, born the year after the Deluge
Genesis - The first book of the sacred scriptures of the Old Testament, containing the history of the creation, of the apostasy of man, of the Deluge, and of the first patriarchs, to the death of Joseph
Ark - ) The large, chestlike vessel in which Noah and his family were preserved during the Deluge
Noah - Rest, comfort, the name of celebrated patriarch who was preserved by Jehovah with his family, by means of the ark, through the Deluge, and thus became the second founder of the human race. The history of Noah and the Deluge is contained in Genesis 5:1-9:29 . He was the son of Lamech, and grandson of Methuselah lived six hundred years before the Deluge, and three hundred and fifty after it, dying two years before Abram was born
Armenia - Here the ark of Noah rested after the Deluge (Genesis 8:4 )
Drown - To overflow to Deluge to inundate as, to drown land
Silver - It does not appear to have been in use before the Deluge; at least Moses says nothing of it; he speaks only of the metals brass and iron, Genesis 4:22
Wrinkle - A keen north wind, blowing dry, wrinkled the face of Deluge, as decayd
Age - The Romans distinguished the time that preceded them into three ages: the obscure or uncertain age, which reached down as low as Ogyges king of Attica, in whose reign the Deluge happened in Greece; the fabulous or heroic age, which ended at the first olympiad; and the historical age, which commenced at the building of Rome. The first extends from the creation to the Deluge, and comprehends 1656 years. The second age, from the Deluge to Abraham's entering the land of promise, A. From the creation to the Deluge, 2262 years. From the Deluge to the confusion of tongues, 738 years
Babel, Tower of - The name given to the tower which the primitive fathers of our race built in the land of Shinar after the Deluge (Genesis 11:1-9 ). " In the Babylonian tablets there is an account of this event, and also of the creation and the Deluge
Noah - ( See Deluge. After the Deluge Noah lived three hundred and fifty years; and the whole time of his life having been nine hundred and fifty years, he died, A. Peter calls Noah a preacher of righteousness, because before the Deluge he was incessantly preaching and declaring to men, not only by his discourses, but by the building of the ark, in which he was employed a hundred and twenty years, that the cloud of divine vengeance was about to burst upon them. But his faithful ministry produced no effect, since, when the Deluge came, it found mankind practising their usual enormities, Matthew 24:37
Ark - The large floating vessel, in which Noah and his family were preserved, during the Deluge
Genesis - The general divisions of the book are as follows: ...
the creation of the world and early history of mankind (1-11), including the Fall, the promise of a Redeemer, and the Deluge; ...
the early history of the Jews (12-50), including Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph
Overflow, Overflowing - ...
A — 2: κατακλύζω (Strong's #2626 — Verb — katakluzo — kat-ak-lood'-zo ) "to inundate, Deluge" (kata, "down," kluzo, "to wash" or "dash over," said, e
Ark of Noah - The vessel in which the family of Noah was preserved during the Deluge, when all the rest of our race perished for their sins. It was by miracle that he was forewarned, and directed to prepare for the flood; and the same miraculous power accomplished all that Noah was unable to so in designing, building, and filling the ark, and preserving and guiding it through the Deluge. See Deluge
Hilarianus (1) Quintus Julius, Latin Chiliast Writer - ...
The following is a sketch of his chronology:...
From the Creation to the Deluge . ...
"; "; Deluge to the Call of Abraham
Deluge - According to them, the memory of the Deluge was incorporated with almost every part of the Gentile mythology and worship; Noah, under a vast multitude of characters, being one of their first deities, to whom all the nations of the Heathen world looked up as their founder; and to some circumstance or other in whose history, and that of his sons and the first patriarchs, most, if not all, of their religious ceremonies may be considered as not indistinctly referring. They discover allusions to the ark, in many of the ancient mysteries, and traditions with respect to the dove and the rainbow, by which several of these allegorical personages were attended, which are not easily explicable, unless they be supposed to relate to the history of the Deluge. ...
Beside, however, the allusions to the Deluge in the mythology and religious ceremonies of the Heathen, to which we have thus concisely adverted, there is a variety of traditions concerning it still more direct and circumstantial, the coincidence of which, with the narrative of Moses, it will require no common degree of skeptical hardihood to deny. It is even related, that they have a tradition among them, that an old man, knowing that the Deluge was approaching, built a large ship, and went into it with a great number of animals; and that he sent out from the ship a crow, which did not immediately come back, staying to feed on the carcasses of dead animals, but afterward returned with a green branch in its mouth. The author who gives the above account likewise affirms that it was reported by the inhabitants of Castells del Oro, in Terra Firma, that during a universal Deluge, one man, and his children, were the only persons who escaped, by means of a canoe, and that from them the world was afterward peopled. The Brazilians not only preserve the tradition of a Deluge, but believe that the whole race of mankind perished in it, except one man and his sister; or, according to others, two brothers with their wives, who were preserved by climbing the highest trees on their loftiest mountains; and who afterward became the heads of two different nations. Acosta, in his history of the Indies, says, that the Mexicans speak of a Deluge in their country, by which all men were drowned; and that it was afterward peopled by viracocha, who came out of the lake Titicaca; and, according to Herrera, the Machoachans, a people comparatively in the neighbourhood of Mexico, had a tradition, that a single family was formerly preserved in an ark amid a Deluge of waters; and that along with them, a sufficient number of animals were saved to stock the new world. Among the Iroquois it is reported that a certain spirit, called by them Otkon, was the creator of the world; and that another being, called Messou, repaired it after a Deluge, which happened in consequence of Otkon's dogs having one day while he was hunting with them lost themselves in a great lake, which, in consequence of this, overflowed its banks, and in a short time covered the whole earth. ...
Passing from the more remote western to the eastern continent, nearer to the region where Noah is generally supposed to have lived, we find the traditions respecting the Deluge still more particular and minute. According to Josephus, there were a multitude of ancient authors who concurred in asserting that the world had once been destroyed by a flood; "This Deluge," says he, "and the ark are mentioned by all who have written barbaric histories, one of whom is Berosus the Chaldean. Abydenus, after giving an account of the Deluge from which Xisuthrus, the Chaldean Noah, was saved, concludes with asserting, in exact concurrence with Berosus, that the ark first rested on the mountains of Armenia, and that its remains were used by the natives as a talisman; and Plutarch mentions the Noachic dove being sent out of the ark, and returning to it again, as an intimation to Deucalion that the storm had not yet ceased. "...
Still more coincident even than this with the Mosaic account, is the Grecian history of the Deluge, as preserved by Lucian, a native of Samosata on the Euphrates; and its authority is the more incontrovertible, on account of his being an avowed derider of all religions. This prince was performing his ablutions in the river Critimala, when Vishnu appeared to him in the shape of a small fish, and after several augmentations of bulk in different waters, was placed by Satyavrata in the ocean, where he thus addressed his amazed votary: ‘In seven days all creatures who have offended me shall be destroyed by a Deluge, but thou shalt be secured in a capacious vessel miraculously formed; take therefore all kinds of medicinal herbs, and esculent grain for food, and, together with the seven holy men, your respective wives, and pairs of all animals, enter the ark without fear: then shalt thou know God face to face, and all thy questions shall be answered. When the Deluge had ceased, Vishnu slew the demon, and recovered the Vedas, instructed Satyavrata in divine knowledge, and appointed him the seventh Menu, by the name of Vaivaswata. "...
When we thus meet with some traditions of a Deluge in almost every country, though the persons saved from it are said, in those various accounts to have resided in different districts widely separated from each other, we are constrained to allow that such a general concurrence of belief could never have originated merely from accident. "Let the ingenuity of unbelief first account satisfactorily for this universal agreement of the Pagan world; and she may then, with a greater degree of plausibility, impeach the truth of the Scriptural narrative of the Deluge. To overspread the plains of the arctic circle with the shells of Indian seas, and with the bodies of elephants and rhinoceri, surrounded by masses of submarine vegetation; to accumulate on a single spot, as at La Bolca, in promiscuous confusion, the marine productions of the four quarters of the globe; what conceivable instrument would be efficacious but the rush of mighty waters? These facts, about which there is no dispute, and which are acknowledged by the advocates of each of the prevailing geological theories, give a sufficient attestation to the Deluge of Noah, in which "the fountains of the great deep were broken up," and from which precisely such phenomena might be expected to follow. The great frame-work of the varied surface of the habitable earth was probably laid by a more powerful agency than that of water; either when on the third day the waters under the heavens were gathered into one place, and the crust of the primitive earth was broken down to receive them, so that "the dry land might appear;" or by those mighty convulsions which appear to have accompanied the general Deluge; but the rounding, so to speak, of what was rugged, where the substance was yielding, and the graceful undulations of hill and dale which so frequently present themselves, were probably effected by the retiring waters. "...
The objections once made to the fact of a general Deluge have, indeed, been greatly weakened by the progress of philosophical knowledge; and may be regarded as nearly given up, like the former notion of the high antiquity of the race of men, founded on the Chinese and Egyptian chronologies and pretended histories. " As to the Deluge of Noah, therefore, infidelity has almost entirely lost the aid of philosophy in framing objections to the Scriptures
Partial - It has been much disputed whether the Deluge was partial or total
Genesis - It contains an account of the creation; the primeval state and fall of man; the history of Adam and his descendants, with the progress of religion and the origin of the arts; the genealogies age, and death of the patriarchs until Noah; the general defection and corruption of mankind, the general Deluge, and the preservation of Noah and his family in the ark; the history of Noah and his family subsequent to the time of the Deluge; the repeopling and division of the earth among the sons of Noah; the building of Babel, the confusion of tongues, and the dispersion of mankind; the lives of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph
Abyss - ...
See Deluge
Antecedent - ) Going before in time; prior; anterior; preceding; as, an event antecedent to the Deluge; an antecedent cause
Flood - See Deluge
Rainbow - Others judge it to be more probable that the rainbow had not been seen prior to the flood, the state of the atmosphere being different from what it became after the Deluge
Septuagint - The chronology of the Septuagint differs materially from that of the Hebrew text, adding, for example, 606 years between the creation and the Deluge
Clean And Unclean - A distinction between clean and unclean animals existed before the Deluge, Genesis 7:2
Deluge - ...
The ark grounds on one of the mountains of Ararat on the seventeenth day of the seventh month, or one hundred and fifty days after the Deluge began (Genesis 8:1-4 ). " The Biblical narrative clearly shows that so far as the human race was concerned the Deluge was universal; that it swept away all men living except Noah and his family, who were preserved in the ark; and that the present human race is descended from those who were thus preserved. ...
Traditions of the Deluge are found among all the great divisions of the human family; and these traditions, taken as a whole, wonderfully agree with the Biblical narrative, and agree with it in such a way as to lead to the conclusion that the Biblical is the authentic narrative, of which all these traditions are more or less corrupted versions
Bow - Though the divine righteousness requires a Deluge of wrath on the faithless, God's faithfulness will only shine forth on the elect remnant the brighter for the tribulation that necessarily precedes (compare Isaiah 54:8-10). ...
As the rainbow was reflected on the waters of the world's ruin, and is seen only when a cloud is over the earth, so another Deluge of fire shall precede the new heavens and earth" granted to redeemed man, as the earth after the flood was restored to Noah
Noah - See Deluge
Heart - But before the Deluge God's verdict of man was that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually
Ark - Or NOAH'S ARK, a floating vessel built by Noah for the preservation of his family, and the several species of animals, during the Deluge
Odd - Sixteen hundred and odd years after the earth was made, it was destroyed by a Deluge
Flood - The Gospel use, then, of the Flood is, like the meaning of the word used (κατακλυσμός), neutral as to the important questions raised by the OT story of the Deluge
Flood - This word is particularly and perhaps especially applicable only to the Deluge, when the Lord by a flood of waters destroyed every thing that lived upon the earth of his creatures
Flood - The Gospel use, then, of the Flood is, like the meaning of the word used (κατακλυσμός), neutral as to the important questions raised by the OT story of the Deluge
Rainbow - I know not how it is, but so it is, as if by natural instinct, as often as I see that beautiful arch in the heavens called the rainbow, I call to mind what JEHOVAH once said after the Deluge: "I do set my bow in the cloud, and it shall be for a token of a covenant between me and the earth and it shall come to pass, when I bring a cloud over the earth, that the bow shall be seen in the cloud. For I cannot but conclude, that the bow JEHOVAH set in the cloud after the Deluge, and the rainbow John saw in heaven round about the throne, and encircling or covering the head of the mighty angel, were all to the same purport, and all representing Christ
Music - After the Deluge, the first mention of music is in the account of Laban's interview with Jacob (Genesis 31:27 )
Epoch - The second is the Deluge, which, according to the Hebrew text, happened in the year of the world 1656
Sodom - —The overthrow of the ‘cities of the plain’ was, according to Hebrew traditions, a Divinely-sent catastrophe, second only to that of the Deluge. )—of the Son of Man to the Deluge in the days of Noah. ’ The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah is also coupled with the Deluge in 2 Peter 2:5-7 as an example of punishment
Deluge - Deluge...
1. The Biblical story , Genesis 6:5 to Genesis 9:17 [3] , animals were not eaten at all till after the Deluge ( Genesis 9:3 ), so that there was no distinction required between clean and unclean. ]'>[3] the cause of the Deluge is not only rain, but also the bursting forth of the subterranean abyss ( Genesis 6:11 ); J Ark - As the ark was under the Deluge of the downpouring rain, so the Lord JESUS suffered under the rolling billows of GOD's terrible wrath
Birds in Symbolism - ...
The dove was an early type of purity, as in Canticle of Canticles, 5,6; of peace, as in the story of the Deluge; of simplicity and innocence, as in Matthew 10
Melchizedek - One Jewish tradition considers him to be a survivor of the Deluge, the patriarch Shem, and thus entitled by his very age to bless the father of the faithful, and by his position as ruler of Canaan to confer his rights to Abram
Shem - Some have thought Shem the same as Melchisedec, and that he himself had been at the school of Methuselah before the Deluge: that he gave to Abraham the whole tradition, the ceremonies of the sacrifices of religion, according to which this patriarch afterward offered his sacrifices
Symbolism, Birds in - ...
The dove was an early type of purity, as in Canticle of Canticles, 5,6; of peace, as in the story of the Deluge; of simplicity and innocence, as in Matthew 10
Punishments - It was reenacted, with reasons, after the Deluge, Genesis 9:5-6 , and in the wilderness, Numbers 35:9-34 ; and was early and widely recognized among mankind
Noah - But with Noah God entered into a covenant, with a promise of deliverance from the threatened Deluge (18). (See Deluge)
Nimrod - The nearest Babylonian parallel to the figure of Nimrod as yet discovered is Gilgamesh , the tyrant of Erech, whose adventures are recorded in the famous series of tablets to which the Deluge-story belongs, and who is supposed to be the hero so often represented on seals and palace-reliefs in victorious combat with a lion
Genesis - The first eleven chapters describe the creation of things, the history of Adam, the Deluge, and the confusion of tongues at Babel
Food - There is, however, a distinct law on the subject given to Noah after the Deluge (Genesis 9:2-5 )
Second - ) Being of the same kind as another that has preceded; another, like a protype; as, a second Cato; a second Troy; a second Deluge
Accad - Among other notable records, they contain an account of the Creation which closely resembles that given in the book of Genesis, of the Sabbath as a day of rest, and of the Deluge and its cause
Ark - arca, denotes a kind of floating vessel built by Noah, for the preservation of himself and family, with several species of animals during the Deluge. It appears to have had neither helm, nor mast, nor oars; but was merely a bulky capacious vessel, light enough to be raised aloft with all its contents, by the gradual rise of the Deluge. It is, in truth, the only solution of a difficulty which has no other explanation; for as a universal Deluge is confirmed by the general history of the world, and by a variety of existing facts and monuments, such a structure as the ark, for the preservation and sustenance of various animals, seems to have been absolutely necessary; for as we can trace up the first imperfect rudiments of the art of ship building among the Greeks, there could be no ships before the flood; and, consequently, no animals could have been saved. See Deluge
Flood, the - Words cannot be plainer than the above to signify a universal Deluge: the world that then was is distinguished from the earththat now is, and it is easy for faith to accept God's statement. This is a prophecy as little believed by many, as was the Deluge that was proclaimed by Noah; but which will as certainly come to pass. The details of the Deluge are given in full in Genesis 6 - 8
Babel - It were unnecessary for me to add, that Babel was the name given to the tower which the impiety of men began to build after the Deluge
Melchiz'Edek - Jewish tradition pronounces Melchizedek to be a survivor of the Deluge, the patriarch Shem
Weeks - A period of seven days, under the usual name of a week, שבעת , is mentioned as far back as the time of the Deluge, Genesis 7:4 ; Genesis 7:10 ; Genesis 8:10 ; Genesis 8:12 ; Genesis 29:27-28
Music - Jubal, before the Deluge, is said to have been "the father of all that play on the (kinnor) harp, and (hugab) organ
Dragon - They were made types of the Deluge and all destructive agencies; hence the dragon temples are placed near water in Asia, Africa, and Britain, e
Cain - This corruption prevailed, and at length the Deluge was sent by God to prevent the final triumph of evil
Aera - ...
The ancient Jews made use of several aeras in their computation; sometimes they reckoned from the Deluge, sometimes from the division of tongues; sometimes from their departure out of Egypt; and at other times from the building of the temple; and sometimes from the restoration after the Babylonish captivity: but their vulgar aera was from the creation of the world, which falls in with the year of the Julian period 953; and consequently they supposed the world created 294 years sooner than according to our computation
Silver - The only one of the four metals, gold, silver, brass, and iron, not mentioned until after the Deluge
Ark - It was intended to preserve certain persons and animals from the Deluge which God was about to bring over the earth. Traditions of the Deluge, by which the race of man was swept from the earth, and of the ark of Noah have been found existing among all nations
Vine - "...
Noah planted the vine after the Deluge, and is supposed to have been the first who cultivated it, Genesis 9:20 . Many are of opinion that wine was not unknown before the Deluge; and that this patriarch only continued to cultivate the vine after that event, as he had done before it: but the fathers think that he knew not the force of wine, having never used it before, nor having ever seen any one use it
Incest - In the beginning of the world, and again, long after the Deluge, marriages between near relations were allowed
Noah - Smith's Bible Dictionary observes, if they were descendants of the Nephilim in Genesis 6:4 (?) the Deluge was not universal. A transparent substance may have been used, for many arts discovered by the Cainites (Genesis 4:21-22) and their descendants in the 2,262 years between Adam and the flood (Septuagint; Hebrew 1656 years) were probably lost at the Deluge. The Deluge began on the 17th day of the second month, i. At the third sending she returned no more (the emblem of the new heavens and earth which shall be after the fiery Deluge, Genesis 6:11; Romans 8:21, when the ark of the church to separate us from the world shall be needed no more, Revelation 21:1-22); contrast Isaiah 57:20 with Matthew 3:16; Matthew 11:29. ...
Hindu tradition says Manu was ordered by a great fish to build a ship secured to the horn of Brahma in a fish form to escape the Deluge, and was at last landed on a northern mountain. The Phrygian Annakos who lived more than 300 years in Iconium (Enoch, whose years were 365) foretold the Deluge. ) believe in a Deluge from which eight were saved in a canoe (Hardwick, 3:185). ...
No record of the flood appears in the Egyptian monuments, but Plato (Timaeus, 21) testifies that the Egyptians believed that catastrophes from time to time by God's anger had visited all lands but Egypt; the last was a Deluge submerging all lands but Egypt, 8,000 years before Solon's visit to Amosis, no rain falling in Egypt. ...
Psalms 29:10 translated "Jehovah sat (so sit, Psalms 9:4; Psalms 9:7-8; Joel 3:12) at the flood"; mabbul , Noah's Deluge; as King and Judge vindicating His people and destroying their ungodly foe, "and therefore Jehovah will sit King for ever. ...
Yet the earth was Deluged by that water out of which it had originally risen; (2 Peter 3:6) "by which (plural Greek) heavens and earth, in respect to the waters which flowed together from both, the then world perished, in respect to its occupants, men and animals, and its existing order" (kosmos ); for "the fountains of the great deep were broken up" from the earth below, and "the windows of heaven above were opened
Olive - This is one of the earliest trees mentioned in Scripture, and has furnished, perhaps ever since he Deluge the most universal emblem of peace, Genesis 8:11
no'ah - The language of the book of Genesis does not compel us to suppose that the whole surface of the globe was actually covered with water, if the evidence of geology requires us to adopt the hypothesis of a partial Deluge. There is a medal of Apamea in Phrygia, struck as late as the time of Septimius Severus, in which the Phrygian Deluge is commemorated. Nearly all commentators now agree on the partial extent of the Deluge. ) ( The scene of the Deluge --Hugh Miller, in his "Testimony of the Rocks," argues that there is a remarkable portion of the globe, chiefly on the Asiatic continent, though it extends into Europe, and which is nearly equal to all Europe in extent, whose rivers (some of them the Volga, Oural, Sihon, Kour and the Amoo, of great size) do not fall into the ocean, but, on the contrary are all turned inward, losing themselves in the eastern part of the tract, in the lakes of a rainless district in the western parts into such seas as the Caspian and the Aral
no'ah - The language of the book of Genesis does not compel us to suppose that the whole surface of the globe was actually covered with water, if the evidence of geology requires us to adopt the hypothesis of a partial Deluge. There is a medal of Apamea in Phrygia, struck as late as the time of Septimius Severus, in which the Phrygian Deluge is commemorated. Nearly all commentators now agree on the partial extent of the Deluge. ) ( The scene of the Deluge --Hugh Miller, in his "Testimony of the Rocks," argues that there is a remarkable portion of the globe, chiefly on the Asiatic continent, though it extends into Europe, and which is nearly equal to all Europe in extent, whose rivers (some of them the Volga, Oural, Sihon, Kour and the Amoo, of great size) do not fall into the ocean, but, on the contrary are all turned inward, losing themselves in the eastern part of the tract, in the lakes of a rainless district in the western parts into such seas as the Caspian and the Aral
Antediluvians - meaning, “before the Deluge,” refers to those who lived before the Flood described in Genesis 6-8
a'Arat - (high or holy ground ), a mountainous district of Asia mentioned in the Bible in connection with the following events:-- (1) As the resting-place of the ark after the Deluge
Eden - It is here that their conformity with the Mosaic account is to be sought; and it is here that they may be found, in the exact condition in which they were left by the Deluge, and, indeed, according to Moses, in which they existed before that event. Faber supposes the lake Arsissa to cover the site of Eden; and that the change which carried the heads of the rivers to a greater distance from it, was occasioned by the Deluge
Ark of Noah - ...
Various questions have been raised as to the veracity of the Bible account of the Deluge, for which see FLOOD
Flood - A miraculous Deluge of water God used to discipline His world made evil through human sin. In every geological or archaeological endeavor to use sedimentary deposits to develop a time frame for such a catastrophic Deluge and all efforts to recover an ark have failed
Conflagration - But the word is more ordinarily restrained to that grand period, or catastrophe of our world, wherein the face of nature is expected to be changed by a Deluge of fire, as it was anciently by that of water. The astrologers account for it from a conjunction of all the planets in the sign Cancer; "as the Deluge," say they, "was occasioned by their conjunction in Capricorn
Idol, Idolatry - No mentioned is made of such worship before the Deluge; though from the silence of Scripture we cannot argue that it did not exist. Josephus and many of the fathers were of opinion, that soon after the Deluge idolatry became prevalent; and certainly, whenever we turn our eyes after the time of Abraham, we see only a false worship
Ararat - ) A mountainous district in Armenia; the resting place of the ark after the Deluge (Genesis 8:4)
Matter - He grants the Deluge to have come so very near the matter, that few escaped
Rain - ...
Isaiah 4:6 (b) This is descriptive of the storms of trouble, and the Deluge of sorrow which would overwhelm the soul were it not for the refuge offered by our Lord in Himself
Bottle - These skin bottles were not confined to the countries of Asia; the roving tribes, which passed the Hellespont soon after the Deluge, and settled in Greece and Italy, probably introduced them into those countries
Dove - "...
The first mention of the dove in the Scripture is Genesis 8:8 ; Genesis 8:10-12 , where Noah sent one from the ark to ascertain if the waters of the Deluge had assuaged
Witness - ...
God having for fifteen hundred years manifested His patience towards the guilty antediluvian world, He, after warning the people by the preaching of Noah, bore witness to His righteousness and His power by the Deluge, and at the same time manifested His grace in saving Noah and his family in the ark
Dispensation, - ...
About 360 years after the Deluge the Patriarchal Age was begun by the call of Abraham, a new and sovereign dealing of God; but this was confined to Abraham and his descendants
French Prophets - Their message was (and they were to proclaim it as heralds to the Jews, and every nation under heaven, beginning at England, ) that the grand jubilee, the acceptable year of the Lord, the accomplishment of those numerous Scriptures concerning the new heaven and the new earth, the kingdom of the Messiah, the marriage of the Lamb, the first resurrection, or the new Jerusalem descending from above, were now even at the door; that this great operation was to be wrought on the part of man by spiritual arms only, proceeding from the mouths of those who should by inspiration, or the mighty gift of the Spirit, be sent forth in great numbers to labour in the vineyard; that this mission of his servants should be witnessed to by signs and wonders from heaven, by a Deluge of judgments on the wicked universally throughout the world, as famine, pestilence, earthquakes, &c
Noah - " Men lived to a much greater age than this till long after the flood, so that this seems to refer to the period from the warning to the Deluge
Noah - " Men lived to a much greater age than this till long after the flood, so that this seems to refer to the period from the warning to the Deluge
Baptism - He is the ark of safety into which we enter for protection from the Deluge of GOD's anger against sin
Ark - It was by miracle that he was forewarned and directed to prepare for the flood; and the same miraculous power accomplished all that Noah was unable to do in designing, building, and filling the ark, and preserving and guiding it through the Deluge
Africanus, Julius - He thinks a connexion between the Ogygian Deluge and the plagues of Egypt likely; and confirms his conclusions by deducing from Polemo, Apion, and Ptolemaeus Mendesius, that Moses was a contemporary of Inachus, whose son, Phoroneus, reigned at Argos in the time of Ogyges. Africanus follows the LXX: he counts 2262 years to the Deluge; he does not recognize the second Cainan; he places the Exodus A
Animal - The foundation of it was therefore clearly sacrificial; for before the Deluge it could not have reference to health, since animal food was not allowed to men prior to the Deluge; and as no other ground for the distinction appears, except that of sacrifice, it must therefore have had reference to the selection of victims to be solemnly offered to God, as a part of worship, and as the means of drawing near to him by expiatory rites for the forgiveness of sins
Beast - " Next to fear of a Deluge was their fear of the beasts of the earth; but God assures men "the fear of you and the dread of you shall be upon every beast of the earth" (Genesis 9:2)
Child - ...
"Children or sons of men," is a name given to Cain's family before the Deluge, and, in particular, to the giants who were violent men, and had corrupted their ways
Music - The first mentioned of music in the times after the Deluge is in the narrative of Laban's interview with Jacob, (Genesis 32:27 ) so that, whatever way it was preserved, the practice of music existed in the upland country of Syria, and of the three possible kinds of musical instruments two were known and employed to accompany the song
Mountains - Thus Mount Ararat is a standing memorial of the Deluge of man's sin, God's justice, and God's mercy
Ark - arca , ‘a chest,’ is the rendering of two Hebrew words, of which one ( tçbhâh , probably a loan-word) is applied both to the basket of bulrushes in which the infant Moses was exposed, and to the ark built by Noah (see Deluge)
Type - THE Deluge
Nineveh - The principal museums of Europe are stored with the relics, and many tablets have been discovered, one of which gives a remarkable account of the Deluge
Atheist - That Atheism existed in some sense before the flood, may be suspected from what we read in Scripture, as well as from Heathen tradition; and it is not very unreasonable to suppose, that the Deluge was partly intended to evince to the world a heavenly power, as Lord of the universe, and superior to the visible system of nature. This was at least a happy consequence of that fatal catastrophe; for, as it is observed by Dean Sherlock, "The universal Deluge, and the confusion of languages, had so abundantly convinced mankind of a divine power and providence, that there was no such creature as an Atheist, till their ridiculous idolatries had tempted some men of wit and thought, rather to own no God than such as the Heathens worshipped
Division of the Earth - Hales, was uttered long after the Deluge. 2614, or five hundred and forty-one years after the Deluge, and one hundred and ninety-one years after the death of Noah, in the following order:—"To the sons of Shem was allotted the middle of the earth, namely, Palestine, Syria, Assyria, Samaria, Singar, [4] Babel, [2]1 Persia, and Hegiaz; [2]0 to the sons of Ham, Teimen, [7] Africa, Nigritia, Egypt, Nubia, Ethiopia, Scindia, and India; [8] to the sons of Japheth, also, Garbia, [9] Spain, France, the countries of the Greeks, Sclavonians, Bulgarians, Turks, and Armenians. 2614, or about five hundred and forty-one years after the Deluge, it was a length of time before they all reached their respective destinations
Idolatry - It is generally allowed, however, that it had not its beginning till after the Deluge; and many are of opinion, that Belus, who is supposed to be the same with Nimrod, was the first man that was deified. 2247, about a hundred and one years after the Deluge, according to the Hebrew chronology; four hundred and one years according to the Samaritan; and five hundred and thirty-one years according to the Septuagint; though most of the fathers place it no higher than that of Serug; which seems to be the more probable opinion, considering that for the first hundred and thirty-four years of Eber's life all mankind dwelt in a body together; during which time it is not reasonable to suppose that idolatry broke in upon them; then some time must be allowed after the dispersion of the several nations, which were but small at the beginning, to increase and settle themselves; so that if idolatry was introduced in Eber's time, it must have been toward the end of his life, and could not well have prevailed so universally, and with that obstinacy which some authors have imagined
Music - The first mention of stringed instruments, however, precedes the Deluge. " About five hundred and fifty years after the Deluge, or B
River - In the remaining passage (Revelation 12:15) the dragon casts water out of his mouth ‘as a river’ that the Imperial mistress (Rome) may be carried away as by a Deluge
Break - To burst as, a storm or Deluge breaks
Attila, King And General of the Huns - The rapid series of events between the Hunnish attack on the Eastern empire in 441 and the battle of Châlons in 451 has been compared to a Deluge of rain which sweeps a district and leaves no further trace than the débris which the torrent has washed down
Ravels - " He found, perhaps, in the higher grounds, some of the carcasses of those who had perished in the Deluge
Flood, the - Three major positions are taken: (1) the traditional, which asserts the universal, worldwide, nature of the Deluge; (2) limited flood theories, which narrow the scope of the flood story to a particular geographical location in Mesopotamia; and (3) nonliteral (symbolic) interpretation, which suggests that the flood story is a nonhistorical account written to teach theological truth. Nelson, The Deluge in Stone: A History of the Flood Theology of Genesis ; A
Conflagration - where from the connection of the words, the opposition between the conflagration and the Deluge, as well as the most literal and apparent import of the phrases themselves, it is plain they cannot, as Dr
Miracle - ...
The Deluge, comprising many miracles, Genesis 6:1-22
Music - Jubal, who lived before the Deluge, was the "father" of those who played on the harp and the organ, Genesis 4:21 31:26-27
Enoch Book of - God sends Uriel to Noah to warn him of approaching Deluge (x. In symbolism Enoch sees the history of Noah and the Deluge; Israel at the Exodus, crossing the Jordan, under the Judges; the building of the Temple; the two kingdoms; the Fall of Jerusalem (lxxxix. -Lamech has a wondrous son; Methuselah inquires of Enoch at the ends of the earth about him; Enoch replies that a Deluge is to come because of sin introduced by the fallen angels; this son shall alone be saved-sin will arise again after him till the final annihilation of evil. 1, 2a)-which generally refer to Noah and the Deluge
For - ...
Thus much for the beginning and progress of the Deluge
Ararat - a mountain of Asia, in Armenia, on which the ark of Noah rested after the cessation of the Deluge
Spirits in Prison - … And those who dwelt on the earth perished … through the waters of the Deluge
Dead Sea - " These cliffs then were probably swept by the lightnings, and their flaming masses poured in a Deluge of fire upon the plain
Persia - In his work traces appear of Adam and Eve's history, creation, the Deluge, David's psalms
Serpent - The serpent typhon of the Egyptians, who is sometimes identified with the ocean, because the Deluge was esteemed the work of the evil principle; and the serpent python of the Greeks, who is evidently the same as the monster typhon; appear to have similarly originated, in the first instance, from some remembrance of the form which Satan assumed when in paradise. From Syria and the east the legend passed into Greece, mingled, however, with allusions to the Deluge
Genesis, the Book of - The universality of the Deluge over the area, then occupied by man is attested by the traditions of widely scattered nations, preserved from the times when as yet the forefathers of mankind were undispersed
Judgment - The circumstance of the present heavens and earth being treasured up and kept, ever since the first Deluge, from all after Deluges, in order to their being destroyed by fire at the day of judgment, shows, we think, that the Apostle is speaking of a real, and not of a metaphorical, destruction of the heavens and earth
Nin'Eveh - Some of the most interesting of these give accounts of the creation and of the Deluge and all agree with or confirm the Bible
Cosmas (3), Indian Navigator - Here men lived till the Deluge, when Noah and his family crossed the intervening flood in the Ark, and peopled the present world
Houses - I never saw any picture that could give a more correct idea of a Deluge than the valley of the Nile in this season
Wages - After humanity's rebellion against God and the consequent catastrophic judgments of the fall, the Deluge, and Babel, God calls Abram to be the bearer of salvation for the world
Abraham - ...
The Deluge, the revelation to Noah, and the Babel dispersion had failed to counteract the universal tendency to idolatrous apostasy, obliterating every trace of primitive piety
Creation - ...
Here we see all the principal objects of creation mentioned exactly in the same order which Moses had assigned to them in his writings; and when we consider what follows;—the war of the giants; the general corruption of the world; the universal Deluge; the preservation of Deucalion and Pyrrha; their sacrifices to the gods on leaving the vessel in which they had been preserved;—there can scarcely remain a doubt that Ovid borrowed, either directly or at second hand, from Moses
Job - ...
But the fathers of the former age, or grandfathers of the present, were the contemporaries of Peleg and Joktan, in the fifth generation after the Deluge; and they might easily have learned wisdom from the fountain head by conversing with Shem, or perhaps with Noah himself; whereas, in the seventh generation, the standard of human life was reduced to about two hundred years, which was a shadow compared with the longevity of Noah and his sons
Peter, the Epistles of - The Deluge and Noah, the "eighth," saved are referred to in both epistles
Food - According to the author of the Priests’ Code, indeed, the food of men and beasts alike was exclusively herbaceous in the period before the Deluge ( Genesis 1:29 f
Thecla - A Deluge of hail and rain quenched the fire the people fled and Thecla escaped
Fire - Once temporarily destroyed by the waters of the Deluge, the earth and the heavens have been ‘stored up for fire’ (2 Peter 3:7) and now at the Coming of the Lord ‘the heavens being on fire shall be dissolved, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat’ (v
Egypt - Egypt was first peopled after the Deluge by Mizraim, or Mizr, the son of Ham, who is supposed to be the same with Menes, recorded in Egyptian history as the first king
Fire - Once temporarily destroyed by the waters of the Deluge, the earth and the heavens have been ‘stored up for fire’ (2 Peter 3:7) and now at the Coming of the Lord ‘the heavens being on fire shall be dissolved, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat’ (v
Jeremiah - The territory of Judah seems, after all, to have escaped the Scythian Deluge, which swept to the borders of Egypt
Apocalyptic Literature - It placed before his eyes the picture of the Deluge
Mahometanism - In the Koran are advanced the following assertions, among others already noticed: That both Jews and Christians are idolaters; that the patriarchs and Apostles were Mohammedans; that the angels worshipped Adam, and that the fallen angels were driven from heaven for not doing so; that our blessed Saviour was neither God, nor the Son of God; and that he assured Mohammed of this in a conference with the Almighty and him; yet that he was both the word and Spirit of God: not to mention numberless absurdities concerning the creation, the Deluge, the end of the world, the resurrection, the day of judgment, too gross to be received by any except the most debased understandings
Abram - During the three hundred and fifty years which elapsed between the Deluge and the birth of Abraham, this and other idolatrous superstitions had greatly corrupted the human race, perverted the simple forms of the patriarchal religion, and beclouded the import of its typical rites
Paul the Apostle - And such a Deluge of forgery or ‘pseudepigraphy’ in the 2nd cent
Israel - This is clearly the case with the Creation and Deluge narratives, parallels to which have been found in Babylonian and Assyrian literature
Apocrypha - Undoubtedly this is a Jewish conception, and its mournful character, so unlike the triumphant tone of Enoch, is in keeping with the gloomy character of the book, and a reflection of the deep melancholy that took possession of the minds of earnest, patriotic Jews after the fearful scenes of the siege of Jerusalem and the overwhelming of their hopes in a Deluge of blood