What does Decapolis mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
δεκαπόλεως a track of land so called from the ten cities that were in it. 2
δεκαπόλει a track of land so called from the ten cities that were in it. 1

Definitions Related to Decapolis

G1179


   1 a track of land so called from the ten cities that were in it.
      1a according to Pliny, these cities were: Damascus, Opoton, Philadelphia, Raphana, Scythopolis, Gadara, Hippondion, Pella, Galasa, and Canatha (Gill).
      Additional Information: Decapolis = “ten cities”.
      

Frequency of Decapolis (original languages)

Frequency of Decapolis (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Decapolis
(dih cap' oh lihss) Place name meaning, “ten cities.” A group of Greek cities referred to in Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 ; Mark 7:31 , originally ten in number but including more cities at a later time. The second century A.D. writer Pliny named the ten cities as Damascus, Philadelphia (modern Amman), Canatha, Scythopolis, Pella, Hippos, Gadara, Dion, Raphana, and Gerasa (modern Jerash). Ptolemy, another second century writer, names eighteen cities in the Decapolis, omitting Raphana but adding nine others. A later source mentioned fourteen cities in the group. Thus the number varied from time to time. They were established after the time of Alexander the Great and were predominantly Greek in culture and influence. These cities were scattered south and east of the Sea of Galilee. Only Scythopolis was west of the Jordan River. Josephus named it as the greatest of the group.
The “Decapolis” is mentioned only in Matthew and Mark in the Bible. In Mark 5:20 , Jesus healed a demoniac after which the man “began to publish in Decapolis how great things Jesus had done for him.” Mark 7:31 states that after Jesus went to the region of Tyre and Sidon he went “through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis.” Matthew 4:25 adds no more to our knowledge of these cities.
Traditionally the Decapolis is assumed to be a league of cities which preserved the stronghold of Greek thought and life in Palestine and resisted the Semitic influences of the Jews. According to Pliny, however, it was not a very solid political alliance. A recent view is that it was not even a league, but a geographical region. These cities do seem to have much in common; they were centers for the spread of Greco-Roman culture and had no great love for the Jews. They were associated with one another closely enough that in some ways they were considered as a group, if not as a league. See Palestine .
W. Thomas Sawyer
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Decapolis
(Greek: ten cities)
A district in Palestine east and south of the Sea of Galilee which took its name from the confederation of ten cities of which it was composed; those of interest are Damascus, Gadara, and Pella.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Decapolis
Ten cities=deka, ten, and polis, a city, a district on the east and south-east of the Sea of Galilee containing "ten cities," which were chiefly inhabited by Greeks. It included a portion of Bashan and Gilead, and is mentioned three times in the New Testament (Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 ; 7:31 ). These cities were Scythopolis, i.e., "city of the Scythians", (ancient Bethshean, the only one of the ten cities on the west of Jordan), Hippos, Gadara, Pella (to which the Christians fled just before the destruction of Jerusalem), Philadelphia (ancient Rabbath-ammon), Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Raphana, and Damascus. When the Romans conquered Syria (B.C. 65) they rebuilt, and endowed with certain privileges, these "ten cities," and the province connected with them they called "Decapolis."
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Decapolis
Thrice mentioned in Scripture: Mark 5:20, which shows that it was around Gadara (Mark 7:31; Matthew 4:25). A district containing ten cities, rebuilt, colonized, and granted special privileges by Rome 65 B.C. Other cities afterward receiving similar privileges cause confusion as to which are the original ten; probably Scythopolis (W. of Jordan), Hippos, Gadara, Philadelphia, Pella, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Damascus, Raphana (all E. of Jordan). The region once so populous is now almost without inhabitants, except a few living in savagery amidst the ruins and cavern tombs of Scythopolis, Gadara, and Canatha.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Decapolis
DECAPOLIS . Originally a league of ten cities, Greek in population and constitution, for mutual defence against the Semitic tribes around them. It must have come into existence about the beginning of the Christian era. The original ten cities, as enumerated by Pliny, were Scythopolis, Pella, Dion, Gerasa, Philadelphia, Gadara, Raphana, Kanatha, Hippos, and Damascus. Other cities joined the league from time to time. The region of Decapolis ( Matthew 4:25 , Mark 5:20 ; Mark 7:31 ) was the territory in which these cities were situated; that is (excluding Damascus), roughly speaking, the country S.E. of the Sea of Galilee.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Decapolis
DECAPOLIS.—A league of ten Greek cities (ἡ Δεκάπολις) in eastern Palestine, which was probably formed at the time of Pompey’s invasion of Palestine, 64–63 b.c. By the Greek cities Pompey was hailed as a deliverer from the Jewish yoke, and many towns elevated Pompey’s campaign to the dignity of an era. The coins of Gadara, Canatha, Pella, Dion, and Philadelphia use the Pompeian era. At first the league must have comprised just ten cities. According to Pliny (HN v. 18), these were Scythopolis (Beisân), Hippos (Susieh), Gadara (Umm Keis), Pella (Fahil), Philadelphia (’Amman), Gerasa (Jerâsh), Dion, Canatha (Kanawât), Damascus, and Raphana. The formation of a confederation of Greek cities in the midst of a Semitic population was necessary for the preservation of Hellenic civilization and culture. From the days of Alexander the Great, who sought to Hellenize the Orient by founding Greek cities throughout the conquered lands, there were Greek cities in Palestine. The Seleucid kings of Antioch and the Ptolemies encouraged the immigration of Greeks into this region. Among the cities occupied before 198 b.c. by the incoming Greeks were Pella, Dion, Philadelphia, Gadara, and Abila in the region east of the Jordan. Hippos and Gerasa are first named in the early part of the 1st cent. b.c. (Josephus BJ i. iv. 8). Among the cities liberated by Pompey from the Jewish yoke, Hippos, Scythopolis, and Pella are expressly named; and Gadara, which had been destroyed by the Jews, was rebuilt (BJ i. vii. 7). Pompey annexed these cities to the province of Syria, but conferred upon them municipal freedom. All the cities of the Decapolis had in the Roman period the rights of coinage and asylum, and were allowed to maintain a league for defence against their common foes.
The first references in literature to the Decapolis are found in the Gospels. On our Lord’s first journey through all Galilee, He was attended by crowds from all parts of Palestine, among whom were persons from Decapolis (Matthew 4:25). Most likely these were Jews, who formed a considerable part of the population even in Greek cities. The fierce Gerasene demoniac, whom our Lord healed, published in the Decapolis what things Jesus had done for him (Mark 5:20). The presence of two thousand swine on the eastern shores of the Lake of Galilee would of itself suggest the presence of a Gentile population in that vicinity. When our Lord returned from Tyre and Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, He crossed the upper Jordan and passed south through the district governed by the tetrarch Philip to the eastern shore of the Lake. In order to reach the Sea of Galilee, He went ‘through the midst of the borders of Decapolis’ (Mark 7:31). Hippos lay just east of the Lake, Gadara a few miles to the south-east, and in full view from the southern end; Pella and Scythopolis were not far to the south; while the other cities of the Decapolis lay to the north-east, east, and south-east of the Lake. Our Lord visited the Jewish population of Peraea in His later ministry, but He seems never to have made a tour to the great cities of the Decapolis. His rebuff in connexion with the destruction of the herd of swine was rather discouraging (Mark 5:17).
Two famous writers of the latter part of the 1st cent. a.d. speak of the Decapolis. Pliny not only preserves the names of the ten cities (HN v. 18), but also praises the small olives of the region (Mark 15:4). Josephus refers to Decapolis repeatedly. In the 2nd cent. a.d. Ptolemy (v. xv. 22) names eighteen towns as belonging to the league of Decapolis. He omits Raphana from Pliny’s list, and adds nine, most of the new members of the confederation belonging to the district just south of Damascus. In his day Hellenic civilization and commerce in the region beyond the Jordan were at their zenith. The modern traveller, wandering over the ruins of temples, theatres, and baths at Gerasa, Philadelphia, and Gadara, is impressed with the glories of the Grecian life in Palestine during the period of our Lord’s earthly ministry and for some centuries afterwards.
Literature.—Schurer, HJP [1] ii. i. 94 ff.: G. A. Smith, HGHL [2] 593 ff.; G. Holscher, Palastina in der pers. u. hellen. Zeit; Schumacher, Across the Jordan; Merrill, East of the Jordan.
John R. Sampey.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Decapolis
Containing ten cities
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Decapolis
a country in Palestine, so called, because it contained ten principal cities; some situated on the west, and some on the east side of Jordan, Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Decapolis
A district embracing ten cities (as its name implies). Afterthe conquest of Palestine by the Romans these cities were rebuilt and partly colonised, having peculiar privileges. Historians are not quite agreed as to which were the ten cities, but they are now generally held to have been Hippos, Gadara, Pella, Philadelphia, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Damascus, Raphana, and Scythopolis. All were on the east of the Jordan exceptScythopolis: but the name Decapolis seems to have been used for a district on the west ofthe Jordan as well as on the east. Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 ; Mark 7:31 . It was to Pella that the Christians fled just before the destruction of Jerusalem.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Decapolis
Decapolis (de-kăp'o-lĭs), ten cities. A region noticed three times in the Bible. Matthew 4:25; Mark 5:20; Mark 7:31. It lay near the Sea of Galilee, probably on both sides of the Jordan. The cities were rebuilt by the Romans about b.c. 65; but as other cities grew up, writers are not agreed as to the names of the ten cities. Pliny gives them as follows: Scythopolis, Hippos, Gadara, Pella, Philadelphia, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Raphana, Damascus. Six are deserted, and none have many inhabitants except Damascus.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Decapolis
(From the Greek words, deka, ten, and polis, a city,) a country in Palestine, which contained ten principal cities, on both of the Jordan, chiefly east, Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 ; 7:31 . According to Pliny, they were, Scythopolis, Philadelphia, Raphanae, Gadara, Hippos, Dios, Pella, Gerasa, Canatha, and Damascus. Josephus inserts Otopos instead of Canatha. Though within the limits of Israel, the Decapolis was inhabited by many foreigners, and hence it retained a foreign appellation. This may also account for the numerous herds of swine kept in the district, Matthew 8:30 ; a practice which was forbidden by the Mosaic Law.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Decapolis
The Romans gave the name Decapolis (meaning ‘ten cities’) to an extensive region situated largely south and east of the Sea of Galilee. Its inhabitants were mainly Gentiles. The New Testament mentions two of its localities, Gadara and Gerasa, and certain occasions on which Jesus visited the region. On one of these occasions Jesus healed a demon possessed man, though the incident brought him into conflict with local pig farmers (Matthew 8:28; Mark 5:1; Mark 5:11-14; Mark 7:31). Many of the people from the area joined the crowds that at one time followed Jesus (Matthew 4:25).
All Dictionary (12) 1910 New Catholic Dictionary (1) American Tract Society Bible Dictionary (1) Bridgeway Bible Dictionary (1) Easton's Bible Dictionary (1) Fausset's Bible Dictionary (1) Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible (1) Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament (1) Hitchcock's Bible Names (1) Holman Bible Dictionary (1) Morrish Bible Dictionary (1) People's Dictionary of the Bible (1) Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary (1)

Sentence search

Gerasa - Gerasa was a town in Decapolis, south-east of the Sea of Galilee. (For map and other details see Decapolis; GADARA
Kenath - Kenath was the easternmost city of the Decapolis. See Decapolis
Gadara - The district of Gadara bordered the Lake of Galilee on its eastern side and extended south into the territory known as Decapolis. (For map and other details see Decapolis
ra'Phon, - a city of Gilead, 1 Maccabees 15:37 perhaps identical with Raphana, which is mentioned by Pliny as one of the cities of the Decapolis
Decapolis - Decapolis . The region of Decapolis ( Matthew 4:25 , Mark 5:20 ; Mark 7:31 ) was the territory in which these cities were situated; that is (excluding Damascus), roughly speaking, the country S
Decapolis - DECAPOLIS. All the cities of the Decapolis had in the Roman period the rights of coinage and asylum, and were allowed to maintain a league for defence against their common foes. ...
The first references in literature to the Decapolis are found in the Gospels. On our Lord’s first journey through all Galilee, He was attended by crowds from all parts of Palestine, among whom were persons from Decapolis (Matthew 4:25). The fierce Gerasene demoniac, whom our Lord healed, published in the Decapolis what things Jesus had done for him (Mark 5:20). In order to reach the Sea of Galilee, He went ‘through the midst of the borders of Decapolis’ (Mark 7:31). Hippos lay just east of the Lake, Gadara a few miles to the south-east, and in full view from the southern end; Pella and Scythopolis were not far to the south; while the other cities of the Decapolis lay to the north-east, east, and south-east of the Lake. Our Lord visited the Jewish population of Peraea in His later ministry, but He seems never to have made a tour to the great cities of the Decapolis. speak of the Decapolis. Josephus refers to Decapolis repeatedly. 22) names eighteen towns as belonging to the league of Decapolis
Decapolis - Ptolemy, another second century writer, names eighteen cities in the Decapolis, omitting Raphana but adding nine others. ...
The “Decapolis” is mentioned only in Matthew and Mark in the Bible. In Mark 5:20 , Jesus healed a demoniac after which the man “began to publish in Decapolis how great things Jesus had done for him. ” Mark 7:31 states that after Jesus went to the region of Tyre and Sidon he went “through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis. ...
Traditionally the Decapolis is assumed to be a league of cities which preserved the stronghold of Greek thought and life in Palestine and resisted the Semitic influences of the Jews
Perea - He also visited neighbouring Decapolis, the other region that bordered Jordan’s east bank (Matthew 4:25). (For a map showing the two regions see Decapolis
Swine - 1618877719_88 speaks of a large herd of swine in the Decapolis area where Jesus saw them as fit bearers of demons
Beth-Shean - Saul's body was fastened to its walls, 1 Samuel 31:10; 1 Samuel 31:12; after the captivity it was called Scythopolis, and was a chief city of Decapolis; now Beisan, having ruins of temples, colonnades, hippodrome, theatre, and city walls
Decapolis - Decapolis (de-kăp'o-lĭs), ten cities
Decapolis - Though within the limits of Israel, the Decapolis was inhabited by many foreigners, and hence it retained a foreign appellation
Decapolis - All were on the east of the Jordan exceptScythopolis: but the name Decapolis seems to have been used for a district on the west ofthe Jordan as well as on the east
Decapolis - 65) they rebuilt, and endowed with certain privileges, these "ten cities," and the province connected with them they called "Decapolis
Gadara - Now Um-keis, a fortified chief city of Decapolis, of considerable importance in the time of Christ, and having many Greek inhabitants
Ramoth-Gilead - It has with probability been identified with Reimun, on the northern slope of the Jabbok, about 5 miles west of Jerash or Gerasa, one of the cities of Decapolis
Bethshan, Bethshean - It is doubtless on the same spot as SCYTHOPOLIS, mentioned in 2 Maccabees 12:29 , and which was one of the ten cities of Decapolis
Beth-Shean, Beth-Shan - After changes of fortune in the Maccabæn struggle, and in the time immediately succeeding, it attained considerable prosperity as a member of the Decapolis ( 1Ma 12:40 , Jos
Coele-Syria - ), including in it Scythopolis, the only member of the Decapolis west of the river
Gadara - It was a town of the Decapolis, probably Greek in origin, and was the chief city of Peræa
Gadarene - (gad' uh reene) A resident of Gadara, one of the cities of Decapolis (Mark 5:1 )
Gilead - ...
In New Testament times the former land of Gilead fell partly within the Decapolis and partly within Perea. Towns of the region that feature in the New Testament story are Gadara, Gerasa and Bethany-beyond-Jordan (Matthew 4:25; Matthew 8:28; Mark 5:1; Mark 7:31; John 1:28; see Decapolis; PEREA)
Sidon (2) - ...
Mark 7:31 And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis. ...
And again he went out from the borders of Tyre, and came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the borders of Decapolis. Thus the primary Gospel of Mark, the more ancient Sinaitic and Vatican Manuscripts , Professor Weiss, and the Revisers do not hesitate to depict Jesus as entering Gentile territory (twice), entering a (probably) heathen house, and dispensing blessings upon a pagan woman, going then yet farther ‘through Sidon’ and Decapolis. Sidon on the far north was for this reason included, as was the hog-herding Decapolis
Gerasa - A city of the Decapolis of unknown origin, the first known event in its history being its capture by Alexander Jannæus, about b
Spitting, Spittle - Three occasions are recorded on which Christ made use of His spittle in the work of healing: with a deaf and dumb man in the Decapolis (Mark 7:33), when He touched the tongue of the afflicted with moisture from His own mouth; with a blind man at Bethsaida (Mark 8:23), when He ‘spat upon his eyes’; and with one born blind, at Jerusalem (John 9:6-7), when He made clay of the spittle and anointed the eyes of the blind
Rab'Bah - It was one of the cities of the Decapolis, and became the seat of a Christian bishop
Peraea - ’ His usage may depend on whether he happened at the moment to be referring to the district which was more completely Jewish, or to the whole region, which was governed as one, and which included the Hellenistic towns of the Decapolis (Ant. The northern parts of Peraea mingled with the region of the Decapolis, where in the towns there was a vigorous Hellenistic civilization, and apparently north of the Yarmuk the Jewish element of the population was inconsiderable. It was probably he who organized the Decapolis (the term ἡ Δεκάπολις is found first in the Roman period). See Decapolis. ‘Peraea,’ ‘Gadara,’ ‘Decapolis,’ ‘Machaerus’; Thomson, Land and Book
Ammonites - Philadelphia came to be regarded as one of the Decapolis cities, a federation of ten Greek cities in Palestine (Matthew 4:25 ), and was annexed with the whole Decapolis region to the Roman empire in A. See Transjordan ; Decapolis
Peraea - When Josephus says that it stretches from Machærus to Pella, and from Philadelphia ( ’Ammân ) to the Jordan, he probably gives political boundaries, excluding Decapolis ( BJ III
Gerasenes, Gergesenes - In the same way the reading Γερασηνῶν might be explained—being derived from the large and important city of the Decapolis, Gerasa—the modern Jerash. ’ But this reading he objected to, inasmuch as he knew of only one Gerasa, the town of the Decapolis, which he rightly conceived could not have been the scene of the miracle
Beth-Shean - ” Scythopolis was the largest city of the Decapolis (Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 ), and the only city of the league west of the Jordan River
Transjordan - ...
By New Testament times, a cluster of Greco-Roman-oriented cities with primarily Gentile populations (the so-called “Decapolis” cities) had emerged in the northern Transjordan (earlier Bashan, Gilead, and Ammon). See Ammon; Arnon ; Bashan ; Decapolis ; Edom ; Gilead ; Jabbok ; Moab; Tribes of Israel
Sidon - ...
No details are given of our Lord’s visit to Sidon, though it is definitely stated that He came through it, or at least its surrounding territory (reading διά not καί in Mark 7:31, with the best Manuscripts ), on His way to Decapolis, which He probably reached by the highway over the Lebanon to Damascus (see H
Cosmopolitanism - Decapolis was almost entirely Greek; in Galilee there had for long been a large Gentile population; and foreigners as well as proselytes from all parts of the empire found their way to Jerusalem (Acts 2:7; see Schürer, HJP Rabbah - ...
For a time the city (one of the Decapolis group) bore the name Philadelphia , given to it by Ptolemy Philadelphia (b
Rabbah - 3:3, section 3) includes Rabbah in Decapolis
Bashan - The mountains here are called the land of Gilead in the Scriptures, and in Josephus; and, according to the Roman division, this was the country of the Decapolis, so often spoken of in the New Testament, or the province of Gaulonitis, from the city of Gaulon, its early capital
Population - Villages were more widely scattered, and, apart from the southern federation of cities known as the Decapolis, there was a comparative lack of important towns
Mark, Gospel by - After returning through Decapolis, and ( Mark 8 ) feeding the four thousand at Gennesaret, He went to the north-east, and ( Mark 9 ) was transfigured before His three disciples; it was probably on Mount Hermon
Philadelphia - Northward and eastward from the city stretched a great volcanic plateau, the Katakekaumene or ‘Burnt Region’-called also the Decapolis-whose famous vintages were one of Philadelphia’s chief sources of revenue
City - The Decapolis (Matthew 4:25) consisted of a group of ten or more cities east of the Jordan, united in a league for purposes of defence. The cities constituting the Decapolis are variously named
Lasciviousness - 154): ‘Here the reference is probably to the dissolute life of the Herodian court, and of the Greek cities of Galilee and the Decapolis; if δόλος characterized the Jew, his Greek neighbour was yet more terribly branded by ἀσέλγεια
Decapolis - The Romans gave the name Decapolis (meaning ‘ten cities’) to an extensive region situated largely south and east of the Sea of Galilee
Ravels - A writer, indeed, in the Memoirs of Literature, for April, 1710, endeavours to show, from many authors, that there was in the country of Bethschan, in Decapolis, by the brook Cherith or Carith, a little town called Aorabi or Orbo, Judges 7:25 : Isaiah 10:6 ; and he therefore explains the word orebim, which, in 1 Kings 17:4 , we translate "ravens," of the inhabitants of that village, some of whom, he contends, daily carried bread and flesh to Elijah, who had retired to and lay in a cave in the neighbourhood
Magdala - Caspari and Edersheim would place Magadan within the limits of the Decapolis, but do not assign it to any definite location
Damascus - It was a city of the Decapolis
pe'Ter - Some time was passed afterward in attendance upon our Lord's public ministrations in Galilee, Decapolis, Peraea and Judea
Galilee - Upper Galilee had Mount Lebanon and the countries of Tyre and Sidon on the north; the Mediterranean Sea on the west; Abilene, Ituraea, and the country of the Decapolis, on the east; and Lower Galilee on the south
Herod - He built Caesarea Philippi and was governor of the Northeastern districts of Iturea, Gaulinitis, Trachonitis, and Decapolis
Palestine - This province was subdivided into these districts, (1) Peraea proper, lying between the rivers Arnon and Jabbok; (2) Galaaditis (Gilead); (3) Batanaea; (4) Gaulonitis (Jaulan); (5) Ituraea or Auranitis, the ancient Bashan; (6) Trachonitis; (7) Abilene; (8) Decapolis, i
Gentiles (2) - Moreover, it was in the same Gentile-infected Galilee that the most important part of His ministry was carried on, and He even went into the borders of Tyre and Sidon (Mark 7:24), and also taught and healed those who came to Him from thence, together with those who sought Him from Decapolis (Matthew 4:25), and from Idumaea, and from beyond Jordan (Mark 3:8); nor did He disdain to remain on one occasion for two days among the Samaritans at their request (John 4:40)
Ministry - (e) Several visits to districts contiguous to Galilee, to the east and north, are mentioned, namely, the visit to Gerasa or Gadara during His Galilaean ministry (Matthew 8:28, Mark 5:1, Luke 8:26), to Decapolis (Mark 7:31), to the unknown Magadan (Matthew 15:39) or Dalmanutha (Mark 8:10), and Caesarea-Philippi (Matthew 16:13, Mark 6:30-32,). Decapolis
Jesus Christ - Early in the third year of his ministry, Jesus disputed with the Pharisees about eating with unwashed hands, and went toward the northwest, healed the daughter of the Syrophœnician woman, and then passed around to Decapolis, where he wrought many miracles and fed 4000
Canaan - Peraea was again divided into seven cantons; Abilene, Trachonitis, Iturea, Gaulonitis, Batanaea, Peraea, and Decapolis
Games - In the cities of the Decapolis there were in some instances two amphitheatres, while some possessed a ναυμαχία; and annual Παγκράτια or games of all kinds were held (G
Ammonites - Ammon was, however, a highly productive and populous country when the Romans became masters of all the provinces of Syria; and several of the ten allied cities, which gave name to the celebrated Decapolis, were included within its boundaries
Palestine - ...
In this border region stood the cities of the Decapolis, in which a wealthy and strongly defended Greek life held its own, by force of Roman garrisons, against the desert and the south. The fact that Jesus visited the Decapolis (Mark 7:31; cf
Palestine - In New Testament times, Decapolis and Perea were located there
Political Conditions - —The title of tetrarch was granted also to Antipas, whose dominions included the two districts of Galilee and Peraea, separated by the confederation of free Greek cities known as the Decapolis
Judea - There remains to be noticed the Decapolis, or confederation of ten cities in the last mentioned districts, which having been occupied during the Babylonish captivity by Heathen inhabitants, refused to adopt the Mosaic ritual after the restoration of the Jews, and found it necessary to unite their strength against the enterprises of the Asmonean princes