What does Debt mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
δάνειον a loan. 1
ὀφειλὴν that which is owed. 1
ὀφείλημα that which is owed. 1
יָֽד hand. 1
נֹשֶׁא֙ to lend on interest or usury 1
(נִשְׁיֵ֑ךְ) debt. 1

Definitions Related to Debt

H5378


   1 to lend on interest or usury, be a creditor.
      1a (Qal) creditor (participle).
      1b (Hiphil) to act as a creditor.
      

H5386


   1 Debt.
   

H3027


   1 hand.
      1a hand (of man).
      1b strength, power (fig.
      ).
      1c side (of land), part, portion (metaph.
      ) (fig.
      ).
      1d (various special, technical senses).
         1d1 sign, monument.
         1d2 part, fractional part, share.
         1d3 time, repetition.
         1d4 axle-trees, axle.
         1d5 stays, support (for laver).
         1d6 tenons (in tabernacle).
         1d7 a phallus, a hand (meaning unsure).
         1d8 wrists.
         

G1156


   1 a loan.
   

G3782


   1 that which is owed.
   2 a Debt.
   3 metaph. dues: specifically of conjugal duty.
   

G3783


   1 that which is owed.
      1a that which is justly or legally due, a Debt.
   2 metaph.
   offence, sin.
   

Frequency of Debt (original languages)

Frequency of Debt (English)

Dictionary

King James Dictionary - Debt
DEBT, n. det. L. debitum, contracted.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Debt, Debtor
See loan .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Debt
1: ὀφειλή (Strong's #3782 — Noun Feminine — opheile — of-i-lay' ) "that which is owned" (see Note, below), is translated "debt" in Matthew 18:32 ; in the plural, "dues," Romans 13:7 ; "(her) due," 1 Corinthians 7:3 , of conjugal duty: some texts here have opheilomenen (eunoian) "due (benevolence)," AV; the context confirms the RV. See DUE.
2: ὀφείλημα (Strong's #3783 — Noun Neuter — opheilema — of-i'-lay-mah ) a longer form of No. 1, expressing a "debt" more concretely, is used (a) literally, of that which is legally due, Romans 4:4 ; (b) metaphorically, of sin as a "debt," because it demands expiation, and thus payment by way of punishment, Matthew 6:12 .
3: δάνειον (Strong's #1156 — Noun Neuter — daneion — dan'-i-on ) "a loan" (akin to danos, "a gift"), is translated "debt" in Matthew 18:27 (RV, marg., "loan"), of the ten thousand talents debtor. Cp. daneizo, "to lend," and daneistes, "a money-lender, a creditor."
Note: In Matthew 18:30 , opheilo, "to owe," is translated "debt" in the AV (RV, "that which was due."). See DUE.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Debt
Because debts place a person under obligation to his creditors, Paul sometimes used the word ‘debt’ to refer to a person’s spiritual obligations. Paul considered that his obligation to preach the gospel was a debt he owed to people everywhere (Romans 1:14; 1 Corinthians 9:16). He believed also that Gentile Christians, having received the gospel by way of the Jews, owed a debt to their Jewish brothers. The Gentiles had an obligation to help the Jews in their poverty (Romans 15:27).
More frequently, however, the Bible uses the illustration of debt to refer to something bad, such as sin in general (Matthew 6:12; Matthew 18:32-35) or bondage to the sinful human nature (Romans 8:12). Debt in this sense is a reminder of the difficulties of life in the everyday world, where debts can easily bring a person to ruin. The poor can easily be exploited, and for this reason Israelite law aimed at protecting them from greedy money-lenders. (For details see LENDING.)
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Debt
The Mosaic law encouraged the practice of lending (Deuteronomy 15:7 ; Psalm 37:26 ; Matthew 5:42 ); but it forbade the exaction of interest except from foreigners. Usury was strongly condemned (Proverbs 28:8 ; Ezekiel 18:8,13,17 ; 22:12 ; Psalm 15:5 ). On the Sabbatical year all pecuniary obligations were cancelled (Deuteronomy 15:1-11 ). These regulations prevented the accumulation of debt.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Debt
DEBT
1. In OT. Loans in the OT period were not of a commercial nature. They were not granted to enable a man to start or extend his business, but to meet the pressure of poverty. To the borrower they were a misfortune ( Deuteronomy 28:12 ; Deuteronomy 28:44 ); to the lender a form of charity. Hence the tone of legislation on the subject.
Usury is forbidden in all three codes (Exodus 22:25 [1] ], Deuteronomy 23:19 , Leviticus 25:36 [2] ]); it was making a profit out of a brother’s distress. In Dt. it may be taken from a foreigner. Pledges were allowed, but under strict limitations ( Deuteronomy 24:10 , Job 24:3 ). In Deuteronomy 15:1-23 is a remarkable law providing for the ‘letting drop’ of loans every seventh year (see Driver, ad loc. ). Its relation to the law of the Sabbatical year in Exodus 23:10 (JE [3] ), Leviticus 25:1 (H [4] ) is not clear, but the cessation of agriculture would obviously lead to serious financial difficulties, and debtors might reasonably look for some relief. This consideration makes for the modern view, that the passage implies only the suspension for a year of the creditor’s right to demand payment. It must be admitted, however, that apart from a priori considerations the obvious interpretation is a total remission of debts (so the older, and Jewish commentators). Foreigners do not come under the law. The other codes have no parallel, except where the debt may have led to the bondage of the debtor’s person.
Historically the legislation seems to have been largely ignored. In 2 Kings 4:1-7 a small debt involves the bondage of a widow’s two sons (cf. Isaiah 50:1 , Matthew 18:23 ), and Elisha helps her not by invoking the law, but by a miracle. In Nehemiah 5:1-19 mortgaged lands and interest are restored under the pressure of an economic crisis. Nehemiah himself has been a creditor and taken usury. There is an apparent reference to Deuteronomy 15:1-23 in Nehemiah 10:31 . In later times the strictness of the law was evaded by various legal fictions: Hillel introduced a system of ‘contracting out.’ That loans played a large part in social life is shown by frequent references in the Prophets, Psalms, and Proverbs ( Isaiah 24:2 , Psalms 15:5 ; Psalms 37:21 , Proverbs 19:17 ; Proverbs 28:8 ). Jeremiah 15:10 shows that the relation between debtor and creditor was proverbially an unpleasant one. In Psalms 37:21 it is part of the misfortune of the wicked that he shall be unable to pay his debts; there is no reference to dishonesty. Proverbs 22:7 , Sir 18:33 warn against borrowing, and Sir 29:1-28 has some delightful common-sense advice on the whole subject.
2. In NT. Loans are assumed by our Lord as a normal factor in social life ( Matthew 25:27 , Luke 16:5 ; Luke 19:23 ). Luke 6:34-35 suggests that the Christian will not always stand on his rights in this respect. Debt is used as a synonym for sin in Matthew 6:12 (cf. the two parables Matthew 18:23 , Luke 7:41 ; and Colossians 2:14 ). The context of these passages is a sufficient warning against the external and legalistic view of sin which might be suggested by the word itself. Christ does not imply that it is a debt which can be paid by any amount of good deeds or retributive suffering. The word is chosen to emphasize our duty of forgiveness, and it has a wide meaning, including all we owe to God. The metaphor of the money payment has ceased to be prominent, except where it is implied by the context.
C. W. Emmet.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Debt, Debtor (2)
DEBT, DEBTOR.—The Jews, being an inland people, and not directly interested in the world’s trade, were slow to gain touch with the credit-systems of more commercial communities. But by Christ’s day their business ideas, modified already in part by the Phœnicians, are seen overlaid and radically affected by Roman domination. The people, on the one hand, as they listened to the reading of the Law in public, had the OT ideal before them, which was one of notable mildness, backed by humanitarian ordinances. Debt in their old national life had been regarded as a passing misfortune, rather than a basal element in trading conditions. In the popular mind it was associated with poverty (Exodus 22:25), a thing that came upon the husbandman, for instance, in bad seasons (Nehemiah 5:3). Being thus exceptional, and a subject for pity, little or no interest was to be exacted (Exodus 22:25), and a strict tariff excluded many things from the list of articles to be taken in pledge (Deuteronomy 24:6; Deuteronomy 24:17, Job 24:3, Amos 2:8, etc.), while in the Seventh or Fallow year (Exodus 23:10-11 ff., Leviticus 25:1-7), and again amid the joys of Jubilee (Leviticus 25:30 ff.), the poor debtor had ample reason to rejoice. There was harshness in the tone, on the other hand, of the Roman methods, which were developed more on the lines of modern commerce. Often the more impoverished the debtor, the greater the exaction, as Horace expressly puts it (Sat. 1, 2, 14), 5 per cent. a month (60 per cent. per annum) being cited by him as a rate of interest not unknown.
In the Gospels we have suggestions of the money-customs of the day at Matthew 21:12-13, Mark 11:15-18, Luke 19:45-48, and John 2:13-17. There are pictures of indebtedness in the parables of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:41-42), the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), and the Pounds (Luke 19:11-27). Lending and repaying are seen in practice at Luke 6:34; also a credit system at Luke 16:6-7, if the reference there be to merchants, and not simply to those who paid rents in kind. Imprisonment for debt appears in Matthew 5:25-26; and in unmitigated form in the story of the Two Creditors (Matthew 18:21-35), with selling into slavery, accompanied by the horror of ‘tormentors’ (Matthew 18:34), although the whole passage is to be interpreted with caution, because Jesus in the fancied features of His tale may be reflecting, not the manners of His own land, but the doings of some distant and barbaric potentate. Enough that in the time of Christ there was seizure of the debtor’s person, and the general treatment of him was cruel.
But whatever the law and custom, it was not the manner of Jesus to attack it. The civil code was left to change to higher forms in days to come. The exhibition of a certain spirit in face of it was what His heart craved, a spirit which should do justice to the best instincts of a true humanity. We can transcend in loving ways the nether aims even of bad laws; and it was the evasion of clear duty in this respect, by those in the high places of the religious world, which moved Jesus most. He was the champion of the merciful essence of the old enactments (Matthew 5:17), while others around Him, prating of orthodoxy the while, were harsh to those unfortunately in their power (Matthew 23:14), all in the name of an ancient law whose real inwardness they missed. The Sadducees, whose love of money was whetted by enjoyment of the Temple dues, were not the men to show mercy to a debtor, nor were the Pharisees behind them, more Puritanic in zeal, and rigidly enforcing the letter of their writs. ‘An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth’ (Matthew 5:38), as an old catchword, would infect the spirit in which, in the name of ‘righteousness,’ they complacently sued. Jesus lays down no outward rules such as might bear upon the modern business world. There fair and square dealing must be a first postulate; but, in the light of His gospel, men should be keener than they are to note hardships, and their hearts warmer towards cases of distress. In the spirit of the Golden Rule (Matthew 7:12, Luke 6:31-36) merciful dealings will show themselves in undefined ways; and the love of brothermen should counteract the love of money which prompts to stem exactions in every case alike. The soul saved by Christian feeling from sordid views of life adds to its true treasure by making the circumstances of unfortunate ones an exercise-ground for tender, pitying grace. The metaphors of Jesus in Matthew 5:39-42 are exceeding bold, and the generous treatment there inculcated may sound almost incredible, not to say subversive of social order; but the enlightened heart will recognize at once the kindly and sacrificing spirit meant to be strongly emphasized. The dynamic in the whole matter, with Jesus, is the remembrance of the pitiful nature of our own plight before God, to whom on the strict requirements of law we are indebted in countless ways. The more this inward situation is brought home to us, the more we shall outwardly be compassionate in turn. Here comes in the moral grandeur of the Beatitude on mercy (Matthew 5:7), a principle which melts into prayer when we connect it with the tender breathing of the Petition on forgiveness (Matthew 6:12). The humble and the contrite heart holds the key to magnanimity. See, further, art. ‘Debt’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible.
Debtor.—There remains the question of debt as the emblem of moral short-coming (ὁφείλημα, Matthew 6:12. See Lord’s Prayer), and the Supreme Creditor’s way with men in this regard, especially as depicted in certain well-known parables. The image is natural which pictures the Deity sitting like a civil judge, to try men for defaults; and while some think more of the majesty of the law, and what must be exacted to satisfy the interests of order, others love to dwell on the prerogative of mercy, and favour judgments which are ameliorative as well as punitive. No reader of the Gospels can fail to see the latter characteristic strong in the teaching of the Master. Pardon befits the royal clemency, and God is known in the kingdom for sovereign displays of grace. Yet due weight is given to the other aspect of the image also—the satisfaction of the law; for Jesus teaches that it is only the pure in heart who see God (Matthew 5:8); the holiness that avails must be inward, not that of the legalist (Matthew 5:20), and only they who are merciful obtain mercy (Matthew 5:7). But what is characteristic in the Gospel treatment of the subject is not any dwelling upon absolute judgments—these are left to the Searcher of Hearts; rather we are taken by Jesus to the sphere of proximate evidence, and shown that in the individual life the presence or absence of the forgiving spirit is sure token of the presence or absence of the Divine condescension as regards the person himself. In other words, principles discovered in the relations of men with each other are a fortiori valid for their relationship to God (Matthew 6:14-15).
The elder brother of the Prodigal (Luke 15:25-32) illustrates the point; representing as he does the Pharisaic type of mind—common in all ages and pronouncedly so in the time of Jesus—which complacently fancies itself well within the Kingdom, but shows by its harsh attitude to fellow-mortals that it is inwardly not right with God. The elder brother is pictured, not without point, as remaining outside the banquet-hall, so long as he continued in his implacable mood.
The story of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:36-50) shows the vital contrast of the matter in the persons of the Woman who was a Sinner—truly gracious in her doings, because full now of penitence and faith and love—and Simon, hide-bound and censorious like his class, with no disciplined sense of having been humbled like her before God. The latter, like the debtor of the trivial fifty pence, had little reaction of wholesome feeling in his mind; the former had manifestly much, like the man over-joyed to find himself relieved from a financial peril ten times greater. This is a concrete instance of the method of the Master. Certain visible acts of the woman at the banquet bespoke the inward action of God’s Spirit, and argued a state of reconciliation with Him. From the scanty graciousness of Simon, on the other hand, one inferred just as truly a heart imperfectly attuned to goodness, and knowing little of the joy of pardon. ‘To whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little’ (Luke 7:47). As to which is the root and which the fruit, rival systems of theology may battle; but the fact is, the two graces are eternal co-relatives, and either may be first in the order of thought when neither is entitled to absolute precedence in fact. See Forgiveness.
The parable of the Two Creditors (Matthew 18:23-35) shows the other side of the shield from the Woman’s case, in a person of downright inhumanity concerning whom it is equally clear that he had no saving experience of God’s mercy himself. The story, as a story, is remarkable for simple force; we feel the horror of the implacable attitude of the servant forgiven for a great indebtedness, who failed to show goodwill in turn to a subordinate for a default infinitely less. Nemesis descends (Matthew 18:34) when he finds he is not forgiven after all—he loses that which he had seemed to have (Matthew 18:27). ‘So likewise shall my Heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their trespasses’ (Matthew 18:35).
Jesus saw many around Him glorying in fancied privilege and very zealous for the Law, yet omitting its essential matters—justice, mercy, faith. To such especially this Gospel message was addressed; broadening out in what for Him was the supreme truth, that love to God is seen and tested in love to man. To be sympathetic, sacrificing, generous, is not only the pier from which the heavenward arch springs, but the pier to which it returns. The forgiving God cannot possibly be seen in those who hide themselves from their own flesh (Luke 6:36).
Literature.—Besides art. ‘Debt’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, the Comm. on the passages referred to, and the standard works on the Parables, the following may be consulted:—Edersheim, Life and Times, ii. p. 268 ff.; Schurer, HJP [1] ii. 1. 362f.; Expositor, i. vi. (1877) p. 214 ff.; Ker, Serm. 1st ser. p. 16 ff.
George Murray.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Debt, Debtor
The Acts and the Epistles give few glimpses of the trade of the time (cf. James 4:13 ff., 1 Thessalonians 2:9; 1 Thessalonians 4:11, 2 Thessalonians 3:8 ff., Acts 19:24 ff., 1 Corinthians 7:30, Romans 13:7 ff., Revelation 18:4-20). This may seem all the more remarkable since Christianity touched the commerce of the Roman world at so many points and used the fine Roman roads (see article Trade And Commerce). The allusions to debt are quite incidental, and come in generally in the metaphorical use of words.
1. Literal use.-The word ‘debt’ signifying a business transaction is found in Philemon 1:18 (ὀφείλει), where St. Paul delicately refers to money or valuables stolen from Philemon by Onesimus. St. Paul here uses the technical language of business-τοῦτο ἑμοὶ ἐλλόγα. We meet ἐλλογέω in pagan inscriptions and in an Imperial papyrus letter of the time of Hadrian (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East2, 79f.). Dibelius (‘Kol.’ in Handbuch zum NT, 1912, p. 129) quotes various examples, as ὑπὲρ ἀρραβῶνος [1]ιμῇ ἐλλογουμέν[2]υ (Grenfell and Hunt, ii. 67, 16ff.). In the rest of St. Paul’s half-humorous sally with Philemon (ἔγραψα τῇ ἐμῇ χειρί) he probably has in mind τὸ χειρόγραφον (Colossians 2:14). The debtor could have another to write for him if unable to write himself (cf. specimen of such a note by an ἀγράμματος from the Fayyûm papyri [3]). The common word for ‘repay’ is ἀποδίδωμι (cf. Romans 13:7), but St. Paul here uses ἀποτίσω, ‘which is much stronger than ἀποδώσω’ (Deissmann, p. 335 n. [4] ; cf. also Moulton and Milligan, in Expositor, 7th ser., vi. [5] 191f.). St. Paul thus gives Philemon his note of hand to pay the debt of Onesimus. In Philippians 4:18 St. Paul uses, perhaps in playful vein again, the technical word for a receipt, ἀπέχω, in expressing his appreciation of the liberal contribution sent to him by the Philippians (cf. ἀπέχω for a tax-receipt on an ostracon from Thebes [6]). The term εἰς λόγον ὑμῶν (Philippians 4:17) has the atmosphere of book-keeping (cf. also εἰς λόγον δόσεως καὶ λήμψεως in Philippians 4:15). In Romans 4:4 we find the figure of credit for actual work as a debt-κατὰ ὀφείλημα. This is simply pay for work done (wages). The word ὁ μισθός, hire for pay, is the common expression (cf. the proverb in 1 Timothy 5:18 and μίσθωμα (hired house) in Acts 28:30).
In James 5:4 the curtain is raised upon the social wrong done to labour by grinding employers who kept back (ἀφυστερέω) the wages of the men who tilled the fields. James rather implies that there was little recourse to law in such cases, but consoles the wronged workers in that God has heard their cries. There was imprisonment for debt, as was the case in England and America till some 50 years ago, but it was only with difficulty that the workman could bring such a law to bear on his employer. In Romans 13:6-8 St. Paul expressly urges the Roman Christiana to pay taxes, a form of debt paid with poor grace in all the ages. Christianity is on the side of law and order, and recognizes the debt of the citizens to government for the maintenance of order. ‘For this cause ye pay tribute also’ (Romans 13:6), φόρους τελεῖτε. In Romans 13:7 he urges the duty of paying (ἀπόδοτε) back in full (perfective use of ἀπό as in ἀπέχω above) one’s taxes. φόρος is the tribute paid by the subject nation (Luke 20:22, 1 Maccabees 10:33), while τέλος represents the customs and dues which would in any case be paid for the support of the civil government (Matthew 17:25, 1 Maccabees 10:31). So Sanday-Headlam, Romans, in loco.
In Romans 13:8 St. Paul covers the whole field by μηδενὶ μηδὲν ὀφείλετε. We are not to imagine that he is opposed to debt as the basis of business. The early Jewish prohibitions against debt and interest (usury) contemplated a world where only the poor and unfortunate had to borrow. But already, long before St. Paul’s time, borrowing and lending was a regular business custom at the basis of trade. Extortionate rates of interest were often charged (cf. Horace [7], who expressly states that interest at the rate of 5 per cent a month or 60 per cent a year was sometimes exacted). Jesus draws a picture of imprisonment, and even slavery, for debt in the Parable of the Two Creditors (Matthew 18:23-35; cf. also Matthew 5:25 f.). But the point of view of St. Paul here is the moral obligation of the debtor to pay his debt. In few things do Christians show greater moral laxity than in the matter of debt. Evidently St. Paul had already noticed this laxity. He makes this exhortation the occasion of a strong argument for love, but the context shows that liberal financial obligations (ὀφειλή, common in the papyri in this sense) are in mind as well as the metaphorical applications of ὀφείλω.
2. Metaphorical uses.-The examples in the apostolic period chiefly come under this heading. The debt of love in Romans 13:8 is a case in point. It may be noted that ἀγάπη can no longer be claimed as a purely biblical word (cf. Deissmann, op. cit. p. 70). None the less Christianity glorifies the word. The debt of love is the only one that must not be paid in full, but the interest must be paid. For other instances of ὀφείλω see Romans 15:1-27, 1 Corinthians 5:10. In Romans 13:7 ὀφείλω covers all kinds of obligations, financial and moral (cf. also 1 Corinthians 7:3 [8]). The metaphorical me of ὀφειλέτης appears in Romans 1:14, Galatians 5:3 etc. The metaphor of debt is found in various other words. Thus, when St. Paul speaks of Christians being ‘slaves of Christ,’ he is thinking of the obligation due to the new Master who has set us free from the bondage of sin at the price of His own blood. The figure need not be overworked, but this is the heart of it (cf. Romans 6:18-22, Galatians 2:4; Galatians 5:1, 1 Corinthians 6:20; 1 Corinthians 7:23, Romans 3:24, 1 Timothy 2:6, Titus 2:14; cf. also 1 Peter 1:18, Hebrews 9:12). (See Deissmann, op. cit. pp. 324-44 for a luminous discussion of the whole subject of manumission of slaves in the inscriptions and papyri, as illustrating the NT use of words like ἀπολύτρωσις, λυτρόω, λύτρον, ἀντίλυτρον, ἀγοράζω, τιμή, ἐλευθερόω, ἐλεύθερος, ἐλευθερία, δοῦλος, δουλεύω, καταδουλόω, etc.) The use of ἀποδίδωμι with the figure of paying off a debt is common (cf. Romans 2:6; Romans 12:17, etc.). ἀρραβών (Ephesians 1:14) presents the idea of pledge (mortgage), earnest money to guarantee the full payment (Deissmann, op. cit. p. 340). In Hebrews 7:22 in the same way ἔγγυος is surety or guarantor. It seems clear that διαθήκη in Hebrews 9:16 f. has the notion of a will (testament) which is paid at death. Deissmann (op. cit. p. 341) argues that ‘no one in the Mediterranean world in the first century a.d. would have thought of finding in the word διαθήκη the idea of “covenant” St. Paul would not, and in fact did not,’ That sweeping statement overlooks the Septuagint , however. Cf. article Covenant. The figurative use of ἐλλογάω occurs in Romans 5:13.
Literature.-articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , Dict. of Christ and the Gospels , Jewish Encyclopedia , and Catholic Encyclopedia , and Commentaries on the passages cited; A. Deissmann, Bible Studies, Eng. translation , 1901, and Light from the Ancient East2, 1911; A. Edersheim, LT [9] ii. p. 268ff.; E. Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. tr. of GJV).] ii. i. 362f.
A. T. Robertson.
Webster's Dictionary - Debt
(1):
(n.) An action at law to recover a certain specified sum of money alleged to be due.
(2):
(n.) That which is due from one person to another, whether money, goods, or services; that which one person is bound to pay to another, or to perform for his benefit; thing owed; obligation; liability.
(3):
(n.) A duty neglected or violated; a fault; a sin; a trespass.

Sentence search

Repudiation - ) One who favors repudiation, especially of a public Debt. ) The act of repudiating, or the state of being repuddiated; as, the repudiation of a doctrine, a wife, a Debt, etc
Surety - A person who is legally responsible for the Debt of another or the money or thing of value put down to guarantee the Debt. Should there be a default, the surety would have to pay the Debt or even be enslaved until the Debt was paid
Satisfaction - (Latin: satis, enough; facere, to make) ...
(1) In general, reparation made to another to pay a Debt or to atone for an injury. ...
(2) In particular, compensation made to God for the Debt of temporal punishment. That such a Debt of punishment may reamin after the sin itself has been forgiven, and that man can make satisfaction for it, is evident from Scripture (2 Kings 12; Jonah 3), and from Christian tradition. The penance given after sacramental confession is intended principally to make satisfactoin for the Debt of tempoal punishment
Dette - ) Debt
Borrowing - See Debt
Creditor - See Debt
Loan - See Debt
Acquittance - ) The clearing off of Debt or obligation; a release or discharge from Debt or other liability
Detteles - ) Free from Debt
Debtless - ) Free from Debt
Trespass Offering - 'asham, "debt"), the law concerning, given in Leviticus 5:14-6:7 ;; also in Numbers 5:5-8 . The idea of sin as a "debt" pervades this legislation
Debt - 1: ὀφειλή (Strong's #3782 — Noun Feminine — opheile — of-i-lay' ) "that which is owned" (see Note, below), is translated "debt" in Matthew 18:32 ; in the plural, "dues," Romans 13:7 ; "(her) due," 1 Corinthians 7:3 , of conjugal duty: some texts here have opheilomenen (eunoian) "due (benevolence)," AV; the context confirms the RV. 1, expressing a "debt" more concretely, is used (a) literally, of that which is legally due, Romans 4:4 ; (b) metaphorically, of sin as a "debt," because it demands expiation, and thus payment by way of punishment, Matthew 6:12 . ...
3: δάνειον (Strong's #1156 — Noun Neuter — daneion — dan'-i-on ) "a loan" (akin to danos, "a gift"), is translated "debt" in Matthew 18:27 (RV, marg. , "loan"), of the ten thousand talents Debtor. " ...
Note: In Matthew 18:30 , opheilo, "to owe," is translated "debt" in the AV (RV, "that which was due
Debt - Because Debts place a person under obligation to his creditors, Paul sometimes used the word ‘debt’ to refer to a person’s spiritual obligations. Paul considered that his obligation to preach the gospel was a Debt he owed to people everywhere (Romans 1:14; 1 Corinthians 9:16). He believed also that Gentile Christians, having received the gospel by way of the Jews, owed a Debt to their Jewish brothers. ...
More frequently, however, the Bible uses the illustration of Debt to refer to something bad, such as sin in general (Matthew 6:12; Matthew 18:32-35) or bondage to the sinful human nature (Romans 8:12). Debt in this sense is a reminder of the difficulties of life in the everyday world, where Debts can easily bring a person to ruin
Debt - Debt, n
Payment - ) That which is paid; the thing given in discharge of a Debt, or an obligation, or in fulfillment of a promise; reward; recompense; requital; return. ) The act of paying, or giving compensation; the discharge of a Debt or an obligation
Elegit - ) A judicial writ of execution, by which a defendant's goods are appraised and delivered to the plaintiff, and, if not sufficient to satisfy the Debt, all of his lands are delivered, to be held till the Debt is paid by the rents and profits, or until the defendant's interest has expired
Amortizable - ) Capable of being cleared off, as a Debt
Pruzbul - document allowing a Debt to be collected in the Sabbatical year...
Dueness - ) Quality of being due; Debt; what is due or becoming
Debenture Stock - The Debt or series of Debts, collectively, represented by a series of debentures; a Debt secured by a trust deed of property for the benefit of the holders of shares in the Debt or of a series of debentures. By the terms of much debenture stock the holders are not entitled to demand payment until the winding up of the company or default in payment; in the winding up of the company or default in payment; in the case of railway debentures, they cannot demand payment of the principal, and the Debtor company cannot redeem the stock, except by authority of an act of Parliament
Debtee - ) One to whom a Debt is due; creditor; - correlative to Debtor
Debtor - ) One who owes a Debt; one who is indebted; - correlative to creditor
Acceptilation - ) Gratuitous discharge; a release from Debt or obligation without payment; free remission
Charged - Loaded burdened attacked laid on instructed imputed accused placed to the Debt ordered commanded
Death - Paid the Debt of nature. ' No; it is not paying a Debt; it is rather like bringing a note to the bank to obtain solid gold in exchange for it
Debit - ) To charge with Debt; - the opposite of, and correlative to, credit; as, to debit a purchaser for the goods sold. ) A Debt; an entry on the Debtor (Dr. ) To enter on the Debtor (Dr
Quietus - ) Final discharge or acquittance, as from Debt or obligation; that which silences claims; (Fig
Duebill - ) A brief written acknowledgment of a Debt, not made payable to order, like a promissory note
Retention - ) The right of withholding a Debt, or of retaining property until a Debt due to the person claiming the right be duly paid; a lien
Pawnor - ) One who pawns or pledges anything as security for the payment of borrowed money or of a Debt
Assignor - ) An assigner; a person who assigns or transfers an interest; as, the assignor of a Debt or other chose in action
Discharged - Unloaded let off shot thrown out dismissed from service paid released acquitted freed from Debt or penalty liberated performed executed
Quittance - ) Discharge from a Debt or an obligation; acquittance
Trifling - ) Being of small value or importance; trivial; paltry; as, a trifling Debt; a trifling affair
Indebted - INDEBT'ED, a. Being in Debt having incurred a Debt held or obliged to pay. A is indebted to B he is indebted in a large sum, or to a large amount. We are indebted in our parents for their care of us in infancy and youth. We are indebted to God for life. We are indebted to the christian religion for many of the advantages, and much of the refinement of modern times
Funded - ) Existing in the form of bonds bearing regular interest; as, funded Debt
Unincumbered - ) Free from any temporary estate or interest, or from mortgage, or other charge or Debt; as, an estate unincumbered with dower
Funding - ) Providing a fund for the payment of the interest or principal of a Debt
Tot - ) To mark with the word "tot"; as, a totted Debt. , so much; - a term used in the English exchequer to indicate that a Debt was good or collectible for the amount specified, and often written opposite the item
Payment - The thing given in discharge of a Debt or fulfillment of a promise
Ransom - CHRIST is the only one who could pay the Debt and set us free. ...
Job 36:18 (b) This represents the great price which GOD accepted from the Lord JESUS CHRIST at Calvary where the Saviour paid the Debt for the sinner. JESUS CHRIST only can pay the Debt and set us free
Mortgage - But in this case, courts of equity interpose,and if the estate is of more value than the Debt, they will on application grant a reasonable time for the mortgager to redeem the estate. A pledge of goods or chattels by a Debtor to a creditor, as security for the Debt. To grant an estate in fee as security for money lent or contracted to be paid at a certain time, on condition that if the Debt shall be discharged according to the contract, the grant shall be void, otherwise to remain in full force. It is customary to give a mortgage for securing the repayment of money lent, or the payment of the purchase money of an estate, or for any other Debt. To pledge to make liable to the payment of any Debt or expenditure
Acquittal - ) The act of acquitting; discharge from Debt or obligation; acquittance
Fieri Facias - A judicial writ that lies for one who has recovered in Debt or damages, commanding the sheriff that he cause to be made of the goods, chattels, or real estate of the defendant, the sum claimed
Redemptioner - ) One who redeems himself, as from Debt or servitude
Readjuster - ) One who, or that which, readjusts; in some of the States of the United States, one who advocates a refunding, and sometimes a partial repudiation, of the State Debt without the consent of the State's creditors
Relinquish - ) To give up; to renounce a claim to; resign; as, to relinquish a Debt
Security - ) Something given, deposited, or pledged, to make certain the fulfillment of an obligation, the performance of a contract, the payment of a Debt, or the like; surety; pledge. ) An evidence of Debt or of property, as a bond, a certificate of stock, etc
Uaranty - ) In law and common usage: An undertaking to answer for the payment of some Debt, or the performance of some contract or duty, of another, in case of the failure of such other to pay or perform; a guarantee; a warranty; a security. ) In law and common usage: To undertake or engage that another person shall perform (what he has stipulated); to undertake to be answerable for (the Debt or default of another); to engage to answer for the performance of (some promise or duty by another) in case of a failure by the latter to perform; to undertake to secure (something) to another, as in the case of a contingency
Liable - The surety is liable for the Debt of his principal. The parent is not liable for Debts contracted by a son who is a minor, except for necessaries. The surety is liable, that is, bound to pay the Debt of his principal
Extricate - ) To free, as from difficulties or perplexities; to disentangle; to disembarrass; as, to extricate a person from Debt, peril, etc
i o u - A paper having on it these letters, with a sum named, and duly signed; - in use in England as an acknowledgment of a Debt, and taken as evidence thereof, but not amounting to a promissory note; a due bill
Defray - ) To pay or discharge; to serve in payment of; to provide for, as a charge, Debt, expenses, costs, etc
Recoverable - ; obtainable from a Debtor or possessor; as, the Debt is recoverable; goods lost or sunk in the ocean are not recoverable
Responsibility - ) The state of being responsible, accountable, or answerable, as for a trust, Debt, or obligation
Confession - The acknowledgment of a crime, fault or something to one's disadvantage open declaration of guilt, failure, Debt, accusation, &c. The acknowledgment of a Debt by a Debtor before a justice of the peace, &c
Debenture - by corporations, as evidences of Debt. ) A writing acknowledging a Debt; a writing or certificate signed by a public officer, as evidence of a Debt due to some person; the sum thus due
Amortization - ) The extinction of a Debt, usually by means of a sinking fund; also, the money thus paid
Amortize - ) To clear off or extinguish, as a Debt, usually by means of a sinking fund
Chevisance - ) A bargain or contract; an agreement about a matter in dispute, such as a Debt; a business compact
Hebrew servant - Law of: If a Jew stole and could not afford to make restitution, the courts would sell him into servitude for a six year term and payment from his "sale" would go towards paying his Debt
Eved ivri - ("the Hebrew servant") If a Jew stole and could not afford to make restitution, the courts would sell him into servitude for a six-year term and payment from his "sale" would go towards paying his Debt
Release - To free from obligation or penalty as, to release one from Debt, from a promise or covenant. To quit to let go, as a legal claim as, to release a Debt or forfeiture. Discharge from obligation or responsibility, as from Debt, penalty or claim of any kind acquittance
Score - Debt, or account of Debt. To set down as a Debt
Debt, Debtor - The allusions to Debt are quite incidental, and come in generally in the metaphorical use of words. -The word ‘debt’ signifying a business transaction is found in Philemon 1:18 (ὀφείλει), where St. The Debtor could have another to write for him if unable to write himself (cf. Paul thus gives Philemon his note of hand to pay the Debt of Onesimus. In Romans 4:4 we find the figure of credit for actual work as a Debt-κατὰ ὀφείλημα. There was imprisonment for Debt, as was the case in England and America till some 50 years ago, but it was only with difficulty that the workman could bring such a law to bear on his employer. Paul expressly urges the Roman Christiana to pay taxes, a form of Debt paid with poor grace in all the ages. Christianity is on the side of law and order, and recognizes the Debt of the citizens to government for the maintenance of order. We are not to imagine that he is opposed to Debt as the basis of business. The early Jewish prohibitions against Debt and interest (usury) contemplated a world where only the poor and unfortunate had to borrow. Jesus draws a picture of imprisonment, and even slavery, for Debt in the Parable of the Two Creditors (Matthew 18:23-35; cf. Paul here is the moral obligation of the Debtor to pay his Debt. In few things do Christians show greater moral laxity than in the matter of Debt. The Debt of love in Romans 13:8 is a case in point. The Debt of love is the only one that must not be paid in full, but the interest must be paid. The metaphor of Debt is found in various other words. ) The use of ἀποδίδωμι with the figure of paying off a Debt is common (cf
Liable - ) Bound or obliged in law or equity; responsible; answerable; as, the surety is liable for the Debt of his principal
Peon - ) A day laborer; a servant; especially, in some of the Spanish American countries, Debtor held by his creditor in a form of qualified servitude, to work out a Debt
Repay - ) To pay anew, or a second time, as a Debt
Residue - The balance or remainder of a Debt or account
Chitty - ) A signed voucher or memorandum of a small Debt, as for food and drinks at a club
Oblige - ) To bind by some favor rendered; to place under a Debt; hence, to do a favor to; to please; to gratify; to accommodate
Lien - ) A legal claim; a charge upon real or personal property for the satisfaction of some Debt or duty; a right in one to control or hold and retain the property of another until some claim of the former is paid or satisfied
Lien - ) A legal claim; a charge upon real or personal property for the satisfaction of some Debt or duty; a right in one to control or hold and retain the property of another until some claim of the former is paid or satisfied
Due - ) Owed, as a Debt; that ought to be paid or done to or for another; payable; owing and demandable. ) That which is owed; Debt; that which one contracts to pay, or do, to or for another; that which belongs or may be claimed as a right; whatever custom, law, or morality requires to be done; a fee; a toll
Release, Year of - The Hebrew expression occurs only twice (Deuteronomy 15:9 ; Deuteronomy 31:10 KJV and RSV), both times in reference to the sabbatical year as a year of release from Debt
Adjudication - ) The decision upon the question whether the Debtor is a bankrupt. ) A process by which land is attached security or in satisfaction of a Debt
Penny, - Higher sums were reckoned by this coin, as the Debt of 500 pence in Luke 7:41
Unbalanced - ) Not adjusted; not settled; not brought to an equality of Debt and credit; as, an unbalanced account; unbalanced books
Outlaw - ) To remove from legal jurisdiction or enforcement; as, to outlaw a Debt or claim; to deprive of legal force
Borrow - dan(e)ion, "a Debt," Matthew 18:27 , and dan(e)istes, "a creditor," Luke 7:41
Undue - ) Not due; not yet owing; as, an undue Debt, note, or bond
Caption - In Scots law, a writ issued at the instance of a creditor, commanding an officer to take and imprison the Debtor, till he pays the Debt
Forgive - To pardon to remit, as an offense or Debt to overlook an offense, and treat the offender as not guilty. Forgive us our Debts. To remit as a Debt, fine or penalty
Uarantee - ) In law and common usage: A promise to answer for the payment of some Debt, or the performance of some duty, in case of the failure of another person, who is, in the first instance, liable to such payment or performance; an engagement which secures or insures another against a contingency; a warranty; a security. ) In law and common usage: to undertake or engage for the payment of (a Debt) or the performance of (a duty) by another person; to undertake to secure (a possession, right, claim, etc
Tender - In law, an offer, either of money to pay a Debt, or of service to be performed, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture which would be incurred by non-payment or non-performance as the tender of rent due, or of the amount of a note or bond with interest. So also the tender must be at the time and place where the rent or Debt ought to be paid, and it must be to the full amount due. To offer in payment or satisfaction of a demand, for saving a penalty or forfeiture as, to tender the amount of rent or Debt
Debt - These regulations prevented the accumulation of Debt
Set-Off - ) A counterclaim; a cross Debt or demand; a distinct claim filed or set up by the defendant against the plaintiff's demand
Shophar - The shophar was to be blown on the Day of Atonement in the jubilee year to signal the release of slaves and Debt
Diligence - ) Process by which persons, lands, or effects are seized for Debt; process for enforcing the attendance of witnesses or the production of writings
Del Credere - An agreement by which an agent or factor, in consideration of an additional premium or commission (called a del credere commission), engages, when he sells goods on credit, to insure, warrant, or guarantee to his principal the solvency of the purchaser, the engagement of the factor being to pay the Debt himself if it is not punctually discharged by the buyer when it becomes due
Pay - ) To give a recompense; to make payment, requital, or satisfaction; to discharge a Debt. ) To discharge, as a Debt, demand, or obligation, by giving or doing what is due or required; to deliver the amount or value of to the person to whom it is owing; to discharge a Debt by delivering (money owed)
Discount - ) A counting off or deduction made from a gross sum on any account whatever; an allowance upon an account, Debt, demand, price asked, and the like; something taken or deducted. ) To deduct from an account, Debt, charge, and the like; to make an abatement of; as, merchants sometimes discount five or six per cent for prompt payment of bills
Owe - A — 1: ὀφείλω (Strong's #3784 — — opheilo — of-i'-lo, of-i-leh'-o ) "to owe, to be a Debtor" (in the Passive Voice, "to be owed, to be due"), is translated by the verb "to owe" in Matthew 18:28 (twice); Luke 7:41 ; 16:5,7 ; Romans 13:8 ; in 15:27, RV, "they (gentile converts) owe it" (AV, "it is their duty"); Philemon 1:18 . See BEHOVE , Debt , DUE , DUTY , GUILTY , INDEBTED , MUST , NEED , OUGHT. , "thou owest me already as much as Onesimus' Debt, and in addition even thyself" (not "thou owest me much more"). ...
B — 1: ὀφειλέτης (Strong's #3781 — Noun Masculine — opheiletes — of-i-let'-ace ) "a Debtor" (akin to A, No. , "a Debtor (of ten thousand talents). " See DebtOR
Flattery - ...
Just praise is only a Debt, but flattery is a present
Advocate - He shows by the wounds that He paid the Debt for the believer whom He represents
Enhance - ) To be raised up; to grow larger; as, a Debt enhances rapidly by compound interest
Discharge - ) To send away (a creditor) satisfied by payment; to pay one's Debt or obligation to. ) The state of being discharged or relieved of a Debt, obligation, office, and the like; acquittal. ) To throw off the obligation of, as a duty or Debt; to relieve one's self of, by fulfilling conditions, performing duty, trust, and the like; hence, to perform or execute, as an office, or part. ) To of something weighing upon or impeding over one, as a Debt, claim, obligation, responsibility, accusation, etc. ; fulfillment, as by the payment of a Debt, or the performance of a trust or duty. ) Act of relieving of something which oppresses or weighs upon one, as an obligation, liability, Debt, accusation, etc. ; acquittance; as, the discharge of a Debtor
Debts - In nothing, perhaps, do the Israelitish laws deviate so far from our own, as in regard to matters of Debt. Imprisonment was unknown among the Hebrews, who were equally free from those long and expensive modes of procedure with which we are acquainted, for the recovery of Debts. Where pledges were lodged with a creditor for the payment of a Debt, which was not discharged, the creditor was allowed to appropriate the pledge to his own benefit, without any interposition of a magistrate, and to keep it as rightfully as if it had been bought with the sum which had been lent for it. But, beside the pledge, every Israelite had various pieces of property, on which execution for Debt might readily be made; as...
(1. From...
Deuteronomy 15:1-11 , we see that no Debt could be exacted from a poor man in the seventh year; because the land lying fallow, he had no income whence to pay it:...
(4. ) The person of the Debtor, who might be sold, along with his wife and children, if he had any. ...
We have no intimation, in the writings of Moses, that suretyship was practised among the Hebrews in cases of Debt. Where this warranty was given, the surety was treated with the same severity as if he had been the actual Debtor; and if he could not pay, his very bed might be taken from under him, Proverbs 22:27 . It is to be observed that the hand was given, not to the creditor, but to the Debtor, in the creditor's presence. By this act the surety intimated that he became in a legal sense one with the Debtor, and rendered himself liable to pay the Debt. ) The creditor was not allowed to enter the house of the Debtor to fetch the pledge, but was obliged to stand without the door, and wait till it was brought to him, Deuteronomy 24:10-11 . Such a restoration was no loss to the creditor; for he had it in his power at last, by the aid of summary justice, to lay hold of the whole property of the Debtor; and if he had none, of his person: and, in the event of non-payment, as before stated, to take him for a bond slave
Bulk - ) The main mass or body; the largest or principal portion; the majority; as, the bulk of a Debt
Answerable - ) Obliged to answer; liable to be called to account; liable to pay, indemnify, or make good; accountable; amenable; responsible; as, an agent is answerable to his principal; to be answerable for a Debt, or for damages
Forgiveness - Remission of a Debt, fine or penalty
Guilt - It would seem to be easy to distinguish between this subjective sense of Debt, which may be fed by groundless fears, and the objective guilt of sinners before God, with which the Bible is concerned. A deep feeling of guilt, even if caused by oppressive parenting, can yet have a positive effect in deepening our appreciation of our failures before God and the Debt of obedience that we owe. And then, in addition, a "guilt offering" must be made to the Lord, because when we sin against others and incur "indebtedness" to them, we violate the order that God prescribes for his world and his people, and have thus incurred a Debt toward him also. In the parable of the unmerciful servant Jesus shows that we owe God an enormous Debt, far greater than we could possibly repay (Matthew 18:21-35 ). By the smallest words of hostility we make ourselves "liable for" the fires of hell (Matthew 5:21-22 ), a Debt we can never pay and remain alive (cf. ...
The New Testament has no need for a word equivalent to asam [ Mark 10:45 ), paying our indebtedness for us
Debtor - , "one was brought, a Debtor to him of ten thousand talents"). The slave could own property, and so become a "debtor" to his master, who might seize him for payment. ...
It is used metaphorically, (a) of a person who is under an obligation, Romans 1:14 , of Paul, in the matter of preaching the Gospel; in Romans 8:12 , of believers, to mortify the deeds of the body; in Romans 15:27 , of gentile believers, to assist afflicted Jewish believers; in Galatians 5:3 , of those who would be justified by circumcision, to do the whole Law: (b) of those who have not yet made amends to those whom they have injured, Matthew 6:12 , "our Debtors;" of some whose disaster was liable to be regarded as a due punishment, Luke 13:4 (RV, "offenders;" AV, sinners;" marg. , "debtors"). , "a Debt-ower" (chreos, "a loan, a Debt," and No. 1), is found in Luke 7:41 , of the two "debtors" mentioned in the Lord's parable addressed to Simon the Pharisee, and in Luke 16:5 , of the "debtors" in the parable of the unrighteous steward. , Job 31:37 , "having taken nothing from the Debtor;" Proverbs 29:13 , "when the creditor and the Debtor meet together. ...
Note: In Matthew 23:16 opheilo, "to owe" (see Debt), is translated "he is a Debtor
Claim - To call for to ask or seek to obtain, by virtue of authority, right or supposed right to challenge as a right to demand as due as, to claim a Debt to claim obedience, or respect. A right to claim or demand a title to any Debt, privilege or other thing in possession of another as, a prince has a claim to the throne
Incur - To bring on as, to incur a Debt to incur guilt to incur the displeasure of God to incur blame or censure
Earnest - A pledge of the performance of a promise; or part of a Debt, paid in assurance of the payment of the whole; or part of the price, paid down to confirm a bargain; or part of a servant's wages, paid at the time of hiring, to ratify the engagement
Debtor - If the house, cattle, or goods of a Hebrew would not meet his Debts, his land might be appropriated for this purpose until the year of Jubilee, or his person might be reduced into servitude till he had paid his Debt by his labor, or till the year of Jubilee, which terminated Hebrew bondage in all cases, Leviticus 25:29-41 2 Kings 4:1 Nehemiah 5:3-5
Debtor - ...
The Debtor was to deliver up as a pledge to the creditor what he could most easily dispense with (Deuteronomy 24:10,11 ). ...
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A Debt could not be exacted during the Sabbatic year (Deuteronomy 15:1-15 ). ...
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A surety was liable in the same way as the original Debtor (Proverbs 11:15 ; 17:18 )
Corner - In David's time only 500 or 600 in Debt or distress joined him out of all Judaea (1 Samuel 21:11)
Bill - ‘writing’), an acknowledgment of goods or money received written and signed by the Debtor himself ( Baba bathra X. See, further, Debt
Compounder - ) One who compounds a Debt, obligation, or crime
Recognizance - ) An obligation of record entered into before some court of record or magistrate duly authorized, with condition to do some particular act, as to appear at the same or some other court, to keep the peace, or pay a Debt
Remission - ) Discharge from that which is due; relinquishment of a claim, right, or obligation; pardon of transgression; release from forfeiture, penalty, Debt, etc
Absolve - ) To set free, or release, as from some obligation, Debt, or responsibility, or from the consequences of guilt or such ties as it would be sin or guilt to violate; to pronounce free; as, to absolve a subject from his allegiance; to absolve an offender, which amounts to an acquittal and remission of his punishment
Indebted - 1: ὀφείλω (Strong's #3784 — — opheilo — of-i'-lo, of-i-leh'-o ) "to owe, to be a Debtor," is translated "is indebted" in Luke 11:4 . Luke does not draw a parallel between our forgiving and God's; he speaks of God's forgiving sins, of our forgiving "debt," moral Debts, probably not excluding material Debts. Matthew speaks of our sins as opheilemata, "debts," and uses parallel terms
Pay - To discharge a Debt to deliver to a creditor the value of the Debt, either in money or goods, to his acceptance or satisfaction, by which the obligation of the Debtor is discharged. To discharge a duty created by promise or by custom or by the moral law as, to pay a Debt of honor or of kindness
Debt - Debt...
1. ]'>[4] ) is not clear, but the cessation of agriculture would obviously lead to serious financial difficulties, and Debtors might reasonably look for some relief. It must be admitted, however, that apart from a priori considerations the obvious interpretation is a total remission of Debts (so the older, and Jewish commentators). The other codes have no parallel, except where the Debt may have led to the bondage of the Debtor’s person. In 2 Kings 4:1-7 a small Debt involves the bondage of a widow’s two sons (cf. Jeremiah 15:10 shows that the relation between Debtor and creditor was proverbially an unpleasant one. In Psalms 37:21 it is part of the misfortune of the wicked that he shall be unable to pay his Debts; there is no reference to dishonesty. Debt is used as a synonym for sin in Matthew 6:12 (cf. Christ does not imply that it is a Debt which can be paid by any amount of good deeds or retributive suffering
Peace of Pardon: Not a Mere Forgetfulness - I have spilled the ink over a bill and so have blotted it till it can hardly be read, but this is quite another thing from having the Debt blotted out, for that cannot be till payment is made
Floating - ) Not funded; not fixed, invested, or determined; as, floating capital; a floating Debt
Hate - ) To be very unwilling; followed by an infinitive, or a substantive clause with that; as, to hate to get into Debt; to hate that anything should be wasted
Embarrass - ) To involve in difficulties concerning money matters; to incumber with Debt; to beset with urgent claims or demands; - said of a person or his affairs; as, a man or his business is embarrassed when he can not meet his pecuniary engagements
Chargeable - Imputable that may be laid or attributed as a crime, fault or Debt as a fault chargeable on a man
Pawn - ) Anything delivered or deposited as security, as for the payment of money borrowed, or of a Debt; a pledge
Year Sabbatical - There was, moreover, a general release; no Debt to a Jew was allowed to stand, but must be forgiven
Recover - ) To gain as a compensation; to obtain in return for injury or Debt; as, to recover damages in trespass; to recover Debt and costs in a suit at law; to obtain title to by judgement in a court of law; as, to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery; to gain by legal process; as, to recover judgement against a defendant
Fund - ) To put into the form of bonds or stocks bearing regular interest; as, to fund the floating Debt. ) The stock of a national Debt; public securities; evidences (stocks or bonds) of money lent to government, for which interest is paid at prescribed intervals; - called also public funds
Bill - A bond (so Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885) or written acknowledgment of Debt, Luke 16:5; Luke 16:7 : Gr. Was the bond merely an acknowledgment of a Debt, or was it an undertaking to pay a fixed annual rental from the produce of a farm? Edersheim decides, though without giving his reasons, for the former alternative; Lightfoot inclines to the latter. Against the theory of a simple Debt is the fact that the amount of the obligation is stated in kind—wheat and oil—and not in money; and the probability of the story is heightened if we are to understand that the remissions authorized by the steward—amounting in money value, according to Edersheim, to the not very considerable sums of £5 and £25 respectively—affected not a single but an annual payment. But, on the other hand, as van Koetsfeld, who argues strongly for the view that the document was of the nature of a lease, admits, there is no precedent for the word (χρεοφιλέται) rendered ‘debtors’ being used for tenants. Acknowledgments of Debt were usually written on wax-covered tablets, and could easily be altered, the stylus in use being provided, not only with a sharp-pointed kôthçbh or writer, but with a flat thick môhçk or eraser. Hence, should the steward conspire with the Debtors against his master’s interests, the latter had no check upon the fraud
Confession - ) Acknowledgment; avowal, especially in a matter pertaining to one's self; the admission of a Debt, obligation, or crime
Binding And Loosing - Whatever be the primary signification of this metaphor in the Aramaic language, these words as used by Christ, as is evident from the context and from Christian tradition, meant that He was to confer upon the rulers of His Church the power to bind the faithful to the observance of laws and to loose them from impediments to eternal happiness, especially from sin and its consequent Debt of punishment
Loosing, Binding And - Whatever be the primary signification of this metaphor in the Aramaic language, these words as used by Christ, as is evident from the context and from Christian tradition, meant that He was to confer upon the rulers of His Church the power to bind the faithful to the observance of laws and to loose them from impediments to eternal happiness, especially from sin and its consequent Debt of punishment
Chimham - Taken by David to court, instead of Barzillai the Gileadite, his father, to whom the king owed a Debt of gratitude for help in his flight from Absalom
Extension - ) A written engagement on the part of a creditor, allowing a Debtor further time to pay a Debt
Acquit - ) To discharge, as a claim or Debt; to clear off; to pay off; to requite
Answerable - Obliged or liable to pay, indemnify or make good; as, to be answerable for a Debt or for damages
Adversary - Since the prisoner can never pay the Debt he must remain there forever
Suretiship - The hand was given in token of undertaking the office or becoming responsible for a Debt (Job 17:13; Proverbs 6:1; Psalms 119:122; Isaiah 38:14): "undertake (harbeeni ) for me," Hebrew "be surety for me
Atonement - Following Anselm, it is now usually held that Satan had no rights over man, but that Christ suffered because man by sin had incurred a Debt to Divine justice and that this required a satisfaction that could be paid only by a God-Man Redeemer
Compensation - ) The extinction of Debts of which two persons are reciprocally Debtors by the credits of which they are reciprocally creditors; the payment of a Debt by a credit of equal amount; a set-off
Decrease - John 3 ...
DECREASE, To lessen to make smaller in dimensions, amount, quality or excellence, &c to diminish gradually or by small deductions as, extravagance decreases the means of charity every payment decreases a Debt intemperance decreases the strength and powers of life
Saving - By reducing the interest of the Debt, the nation makes a saving
Recover - To gain as a compensation to obtain in return for injury or Debt as, to recover damages in trespass to recover Debt and cost in a suit at law
Pledge - Something given as downpayment on a Debt
Adullam - Those who were in distress, despondent and in Debt came there to David for relief
re-Demption - ) Performance of the obligation stated in a note, bill, bond, or other evidence of Debt, by making payment to the holder
Behove - See BOUND , Debt , DUE , DUTY , GUILTY , INDEBTED , MUST , NEED , OUGHT , OWE
Voucher - ) A book, paper, or document which serves to vouch the truth of accounts, or to confirm and establish facts of any kind; also, any acquittance or receipt showing the payment of a Debt; as, the merchant's books are his vouchers for the correctness of his accounts; notes, bonds, receipts, and other writings, are used as vouchers in proving facts
Liquid - Dissolved not obtainable by law as a liquid Debt
Confess - ) To make acknowledgment or avowal in a matter pertaining to one's self; to acknowledge, own, or admit, as a crime, a fault, a Debt
Entry - Make an entry of every sale, of every Debt and credit
Revival - ) Restoration of force, validity, or effect; renewal; as, the revival of a Debt barred by limitation; the revival of a revoked will, etc
Reckon - ) To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of Debt and credit; to adjust relations of desert or penalty
Satisfaction - Payment discharge as, to receive a sum in full satisfaction of a Debt to enter satisfaction on record
Claim - ) A right to claim or demand something; a title to any Debt, privilege, or other thing in possession of another; also, a title to anything which another should give or concede to, or confer on, the claimant
Dowry - , to put up a building or to payoff a Debt, but it must be carefully invested, the income to be used for the support of the religious in question
Impute, Imputation - To reckon to someone the blessing, curse, Debt, etc
Ransom - The Debt is represented not as cancelled but as fully paid
Arrest - ) To take, seize, or apprehend by authority of law; as, to arrest one for Debt, or for a crime
Satisfy - ) To answer or discharge, as a claim, Debt, legal demand, or the like; to give compensation for; to pay off; to requite; as, to satisfy a claim or an execution
Exact - ) Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect; true; correct; precise; as, the clock keeps exact time; he paid the exact Debt; an exact copy of a letter; exact accounts
Distress - ) To seize for Debt; to distrain
Compound - To pay by agreement to discharge, as a Debt, by paying a part, or giving an equivalent different from that stipulated or required as, to compound Debts
Corban - The Pharisees, and the Talmudists their successors, permitted even Debtors to defraud their creditors by consecrating their Debt to God; as if the property were their own, and not rather the right of their creditor
Tender - ) To offer in payment or satisfaction of a demand, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture; as, to tender the amount of rent or Debt. ) An offer, either of money to pay a Debt, or of service to be performed, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture, which would be incurred by nonpayment or nonperformance; as, the tender of rent due, or of the amount of a note, with interest
Discharge - To pay as, to discharge a Debt, a bond, a note. To free from claim or demand to give an acquittance to, or a receipt in full, as to a Debtor. The creditor discharged his Debtor. Release from obligation, Debt or penalty or the writing which is evidence of it an acquittance as, the Debtor has a discharge. Payment, as of a Debt
Lending - ...
Repayment of loans...
Though not allowed to take interest from the poor, creditors could, if they wished, ask for temporary possession of some article belonging to a Debtor, as a guarantee that the Debtor would repay the loan. Creditors could give employment to Debtors who wished to repay Debts by working for them, but he could not make the Debtors their permanent slaves (Leviticus 25:39-40). ...
Disorders arose when creditors took advantage of Debtors, and Debtors took advantage of friends whom they had asked to guarantee them. Also, Debtors could get themselves so far into Debt that guarantors could be ruined. Wise advisers therefore warned guarantors against making rash promises, and even suggested they withdraw their guarantees from dishonest Debtors before it was too late (Proverbs 6:1-5; Proverbs 11:15; Proverbs 17:18; Proverbs 22:26). ...
Although dishonest Debtors were a problem, dishonest creditors were a much greater problem. They seized Debtors’ food and clothing (Amos 2:6-8; Amos 5:11; Amos 8:6), farm animals (Job 24:3), and houses and land (Micah 2:2; Micah 2:9). Some even took members of the Debtors’ families and made them slaves (2 Kings 4:1; Nehemiah 5:1-5). ...
Release from Debt...
These disorders existed in spite of the law which laid down that, at the end of every seven years, Israelites were to forgive Debts owed them by fellow Israelites. They were to consider themselves one big family, where no one would be driven into poverty or refused a loan in a time of need, even if the year for releasing Debtors was approaching. (Concerning the year for releasing Debtors see SABBATICAL YEAR. )...
As with the law concerning interest on loans, the law concerning release from Debt did not apply to cases involving foreign Debtors. The New Testament encourages Christians to give to those in need (Luke 6:30-31; Romans 12:13), and discourages them from getting into Debt (Romans 13:8). ...
The generosity of creditors in helping the needy and forgiving Debtors is frequently used in the New Testament to picture truly godly attitudes. By contrast, the bondage that binds Debtors to their creditors is an illustration of that bondage to the old nature from which Christians have been freed by Christ (Romans 8:12-13)
Forgiveness - Hence it is used of remitting a Debt (Matthew 18:27; Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:14), equivalent to οὐ λογἱζεσθαι (2 Corinthians 5:19; see also Sanday-Headlam, Romans 5 [3], 100); the creditor tears up the bill, so to speak, or never enters the Debt in his ledger. Here, the figure of the cancelling of a Debt is joined to another-rescue from some usurping power; and this (in the passage in Eph. Paul takes up the suggestion implied in the word ἄφεσις, ‘a cancelled Debt,’ already familiar to Pharisaic thought, and develops it into his doctrine of justification: there is a Debt-all men owe it-caused by the nonperformance of the necessary works; judgment must therefore be given against us; but with the Judge who would pronounce the sentence there is also grace. Christ the Son of God dies for our sin; and this same death we also die, by faith, to sin; hence, we are justified before God-that is, we are like men who have never contracted a Debt; and there is nothing for us but acquittal
Divorce - It is of three kinds: from the bond of matrimony, which is called an absolute divorce; from the bed, which makes lawful the denial of the marriage Debt; from bed and board, which denies the rights of cohabitation
Adullam - At this place is a hill some 500 feet high pierced with numerous caverns, in one of which David gathered together "every one that was in distress, and every one that was in Debt, and every one that was discontented" (1 Samuel 22:2 )
Quit - ) To discharge, as an obligation or duty; to meet and satisfy, as a claim or Debt; to make payment for or of; to requite; to repay
Extend - ) To value, as lands taken by a writ of extent in satisfaction of a Debt; to assign by writ of extent
Requisition - ) A notarial demand of a Debt
Security - Anything given or deposited to secure the payment of a Debt, or the performance of a contract as a bond with surety, a mortgage, the indorsement of a responsible man, a pledge, &c
Bond - Its technical use is for ‘a note of hand, a bond or obligation, as having the “sign manual” of the Debtor or contractor’ (Lightfoot, Col. These three metaphors all accentuate the main idea of the cancellation of the Debt. Christ has paid the Debt and destroyed the note against us. Paul’s offer to pay Philemon for the Debt of Onesimus (Philemon 1:18 f
Debtors, the Two - Answering the thought of the Pharisee, Jesus proposes the parable of the two Debtors, who owed to a money lender, the one 500 denarii (approximately $100), the other 50, but to whom the creditor graciously remits the amount; the former, receiving a greater favor, is naturally bound to greater gratitude. Thus what the woman has done to Him has been done to God, and Jesus is the Divine creditor who may remit the sinner's Debt, as indeed the woman, whose faith Jesus praises, had believed that Jesus could do
Death - As to the Debt (debitum mortis) it extends to all defiled by sin, therefore to all except the God-man and the Immacmate Virgin; as to the fact (factum mortis), it certainly extends to all except those who will be living at the second coming of Christ
Apply - To use or employ for a particular purpose, or in a particular case as, to apply a sum of money to the payment of a Debt
Redeem - ) To regain by performing the obligation or condition stated; to discharge the obligation mentioned in, as a promissory note, bond, or other evidence of Debt; as, to redeem bank notes with coin
Secure - ) To put beyond hazard of losing or of not receiving; to make certain; to assure; to insure; - frequently with against or from, rarely with of; as, to secure a creditor against loss; to secure a Debt by a mortgage
Two Debtors, the - Answering the thought of the Pharisee, Jesus proposes the parable of the two Debtors, who owed to a money lender, the one 500 denarii (approximately $100), the other 50, but to whom the creditor graciously remits the amount; the former, receiving a greater favor, is naturally bound to greater gratitude. Thus what the woman has done to Him has been done to God, and Jesus is the Divine creditor who may remit the sinner's Debt, as indeed the woman, whose faith Jesus praises, had believed that Jesus could do
Redemption - Repurchase of notes, bills or other evidence of Debt by paying their value in specie to their holders
Retain - An executor may retain a Debt due to him from the testator
Loans - There is thus full justification for the numerous Gospel intimations of hardship and Debt, and impoverishment generally. See Debt. ...
But the relation of Debtor and creditor is so obviously adaptable to moral obligations, that under any social condition the use of this figure is to be expected. verb (ὀφείλω) is variously rendered in the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘owed,’ ‘owest,’ ‘that was due’ (Matthew 18:28; Matthew 18:30; Matthew 18:34, Luke 7:41; Luke 16:5; Luke 16:7 of financial obligation); ‘debtor’ (Matthew 23:16; Matthew 23:18 [1]), ‘duty’ (Luke 17:10), ‘ought’ (John 13:14; John 19:7), ‘indebted’ (Luke 11:4; all of moral obligation); and the noun (ὀφειλέτης) is translated ‘owed’ (Matthew 18:24 of money Debt), ‘debtors’ (Matthew 6:12 of moral Debts), ‘offenders’ (Luke 13:4 [2] of guilt before God). Financial obligations afford also a ready measure of moral indebtedness; our sins against one another are as Debts of £50 or £5 (Luke 7:41), but our sin against God runs into ‘millions sterling’ (Matthew 18:24). Because then, in the Gospel narratives, Debtors and creditors, borrowers and lenders figure largely, we are not able to say that the teaching of Jesus either supports or condemns modern commercial arrangements
Clear - Free from Debt, or obligation not liable to prosecution as, to be clear of Debt or responsibility. To remove any incumbrance, or embarrassment often followed by off or away as, to clear off Debts to clear away rubbish. To free to liberate, or disengage to exonerate as, to clear a man from Debt, obligation, or duty
Seguestration - ) The seizure of the property of an individual for the use of the state; particularly applied to the seizure, by a belligerent power, of Debts due from its subjects to the enemy. ) A kind of execution for a rent, as in the case of a beneficed clerk, of the profits of a benefice, till he shall have satisfied some Debt established by decree; the gathering up of the fruits of a benefice during a vacancy, for the use of the next incumbent; the disposing of the goods, by the ordinary, of one who is dead, whose estate no man will meddle with
Execution - In law, the carrying into effect a sentence or judgment of court the last act of the law in completing the process by which justice is to be done, by which the possession of land or Debt, damages or cost, is obtained, or by which judicial punishment is inflicted. An execution issues from the clerk of a court, and is levied by a sheriff, his deputy or a constable, on the estate, goods or body of the Debtor
Jurisdiction - Inferior courts have jurisdiction of Debt and trespass, or of smaller offenses the supreme courts have jurisdiction of treason, murder, and other high crimes
Yard - Hence liberty of the yard, is a liberty granted to persons imprisoned for Debt, of walking in the yard, or within any other limits prescribed by the law, on his giving bond not to go beyond those limits
Plunge - Also used figuratively; as, to plunge into Debt
Apply - ) To put to use; to use or employ for a particular purpose, or in a particular case; to appropriate; to devote; as, to apply money to the payment of a Debt
Receive - ) To take, as something that is offered, given, committed, sent, paid, or the like; to accept; as, to receive money offered in payment of a Debt; to receive a gift, a message, or a letter
Attach - ) To take by legal authority: (a) To arrest by writ, and bring before a court, as to answer for a Debt, or a contempt; - applied to a taking of the person by a civil process; being now rarely used for the arrest of a criminal
Composition - ) The adjustment of a Debt, or avoidance of an obligation, by some form of compensation agreed on between the parties; also, the sum or amount of compensation agreed upon in the adjustment
Compound - ) To settle amicably; to adjust by agreement; to compromise; to discharge from obligation upon terms different from those which were stipulated; as, to compound a Debt
Demand - ) To ask or call for with authority; to claim or seek from, as by authority or right; to claim, as something due; to call for urgently or peremptorily; as, to demand a Debt; to demand obedience
Extend - In law, to value lands taken by a writ of extent in satisfaction of a Debt or to levy on lands, as an execution
Trouble - To sue for a Debt. He wishes not to trouble his Debtors
Reckon, Reckoning - 3); in Romans 4:3,5,6,9,11,22-24 , of "reckoning" faith for righteousness, or "reckoning" righteousness to persons, in all of which the RV uses the verb "to reckon" instead of the AV "to count or to impute;" in Romans 4:4 the subject is treated by way of contrast between grace and Debt, which latter involves the "reckoning" of a reward for works; what is owed as a Debt cannot be "reckoned" as a favor, but the faith of Abraham and his spiritual children sets them outside the category of those who seek to be justified by self-effort, and, vice versa, the latter are excluded from the grace of righteousness bestowed on the sole condition of faith; so in Galatians 3:6 (RV, "was reckoned," AV, "was accounted"); since Abraham, like all the natural descendants of Adam, was a sinner, he was destitute of righteousness in the sight of God; if, then, his relationship with God was to be rectified (i
Contract - ) To bring on; to incur; to acquire; as, to contract a habit; to contract a Debt; to contract a disease
Confess - To own, acknowledge or avow, as a crime, a fault, a charge, a Debt, or something that is against one's interest, or reputation
Servant - He might sell himself in default of payment of Debt. When the Debt or other obligation was met
Shoulder - ) To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a Debt
Demand - The creditor demands principal and interest of his Debt
Wrong - ...
The obligation to redress a wrong, is at least as binding as that of paying a Debt
Debt, Debtor (2) - DEBT, DebtOR. Debt in their old national life had been regarded as a passing misfortune, rather than a basal element in trading conditions. ), the poor Debtor had ample reason to rejoice. Often the more impoverished the Debtor, the greater the exaction, as Horace expressly puts it (Sat. There are pictures of indebtedness in the parables of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:41-42), the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), and the Pounds (Luke 19:11-27). Imprisonment for Debt appears in Matthew 5:25-26; and in unmitigated form in the story of the Two Creditors (Matthew 18:21-35), with selling into slavery, accompanied by the horror of ‘tormentors’ (Matthew 18:34), although the whole passage is to be interpreted with caution, because Jesus in the fancied features of His tale may be reflecting, not the manners of His own land, but the doings of some distant and barbaric potentate. Enough that in the time of Christ there was seizure of the Debtor’s person, and the general treatment of him was cruel. The Sadducees, whose love of money was whetted by enjoyment of the Temple dues, were not the men to show mercy to a Debtor, nor were the Pharisees behind them, more Puritanic in zeal, and rigidly enforcing the letter of their writs. The dynamic in the whole matter, with Jesus, is the remembrance of the pitiful nature of our own plight before God, to whom on the strict requirements of law we are indebted in countless ways. ‘Debt’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible. ...
Debtor. —There remains the question of Debt as the emblem of moral short-coming (ὁφείλημα, Matthew 6:12. ...
The story of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:36-50) shows the vital contrast of the matter in the persons of the Woman who was a Sinner—truly gracious in her doings, because full now of penitence and faith and love—and Simon, hide-bound and censorious like his class, with no disciplined sense of having been humbled like her before God. The latter, like the Debtor of the trivial fifty pence, had little reaction of wholesome feeling in his mind; the former had manifestly much, like the man over-joyed to find himself relieved from a financial peril ten times greater. The story, as a story, is remarkable for simple force; we feel the horror of the implacable attitude of the servant forgiven for a great indebtedness, who failed to show goodwill in turn to a subordinate for a default infinitely less. ‘Debt’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, the Comm
Remission, Remit - ...
A — 2: πάρεσις (Strong's #3929 — Noun Feminine — paresis — par'-es-is ) "a passing by of Debt or sin," Romans 3:25 , AV, "remission" (RV and AV marg
Pledge - ) The transfer of possession of personal property from a Debtor to a creditor as security for a Debt or engagement; also, the contract created between the Debtor and creditor by a thing being so delivered or deposited, forming a species of bailment; also, that which is so delivered or deposited; something put in pawn
Principal - ) A chief obligor, promisor, or Debtor, - as distinguished from a surety. ) A capital sum of money, placed out at interest, due as a Debt or used as a fund; - so called in distinction from interest or profit
Accept - ...
râtsâh can be used in the sense of “to pay for” or “to satisfy a Debt,” especially as it relates to land lying fallow in the sabbath years: “Then shall the land enjoy her sabbaths, as long as it lieth desolate, … even then shall the land rest, and enjoy her sabbaths” ( Exchange - The form of exchanging one Debt or credit for another or the receiving or paying of money in one place, for an equal sum in another, by order, draft or bill of exchange. A in London draws a bill of exchange on B in New York C in London purchases the bill, by which A receives his Debt due from B in New York
Poor - , thirst after prostrating the poor by oppression, so as to lay their heads in the dust; or less simply (Pusey) "grudge to the poor Debtor the dust which as a mourner he strewed on his head" (2 Samuel 1:2; Job 2:12). In Deuteronomy 15:4 the creditor must not exact a Debt in the year of release, "save when there shall be no poor among you," but as Deuteronomy 15:11 says "the poor shalt never cease out of the land," translated "no poor with thee," i. release the Debt for the year except when no poor person is concerned, which may happen, "for the Lord shall greatly bless thee": you may call in a loan on the year of release, when the borrower is not poor
Death - ...
Death is the effect of sin (Hebrews 2:14 ), and not a "debt of nature
Redemption - The Debt against us is not viewed as simply cancelled, but is fully paid
Release - ) Discharge from obligation or responsibility, as from Debt, penalty, or claim of any kind; acquittance
Enter - To set down in writing to set an account in a book or register as, the clerk entered the account or charge in the journal he entered Debt and credit at the time
Sink - ) To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national Debt
Adullam - The 'Cave of Adullam' has become a proverbial expression for a refuge in distress, because there gathered to David, besides his relatives, "every one that was in distress, and every one that was in Debt, and every one that was discontented," or bitter of soul, and he became their captain
Purgatory - Few depart this life so pure as to be totally exempt from spots of this nature, and from every kind of Debt due to God's justice. Therefore few will escape without suffering something from his justice for such Debts as they have carried with them out of this world, according to that rule of divine justice by which he treats every soul hereafter according to its own works, and according to the state in which he finds it in death. From these propositions, which the Papist considers as so many self-evident truths, he infers that there must be some third place of punishment; for since the infinite goodness of God can admit nothing into heaven which is not clean and pure from all sin both great and small, and his infinite justice can permit none to receive the reward of bliss who as yet are not out of Debt, but have something in justice to suffer, there must of necessity, be some place or state, where souls departing this life, pardoned as to the external guilt or pain, yet obnoxious to some temporal penalty, or with the guilt of some venial faults, are purged and purified before their admittance into heaven
Purgatory - Few depart this life so pure as to be totally exempt from spots of this nature, and from every kind of Debt due to God's justice. Therefore, few will escape without suffering something from his justice for such Debts as they have carried with them out of this world, according to the rule of divine justice, by which he treats every soul hereafter according to his works, and according to the state in which he finds it in death. From these positions, which the papist considers as so many self- evident truths, he infers that there must be some third place of punishment; for since the infinite holiness of God can admit nothing into heaven that is not clean and pure from all sin, both great and small, and his infinite justice can permit none to receive the reward of bliss, who as yet are not out of Debt, but have something in justice to suffer, there must, of necessity, be some place or state, where souls departing this life, pardoned as to the eternal guilt of sin, yet obnoxious to some temporal penalty, or with the guilt of some venial faults, are purged and purified before their admittance into heaven
Note - A written or printed paper acknowledging a Debt and promising payment as a promissory note a bank-note a note of hand a negotiable note
Account - A sum stated on paper a registry of a Debt or credit of Debts and credits, or charges an entry in a book or on paper of things bought or sold, of payments, services &c. Account signifies a single entry or charge, or a statement of a number of particular Debts and credits, in a book or on a separate paper and in the plural, is used for the books containing such entries. A computation of Debts and credits, or a general statement of particular sums as, the account stands thus let him exhibit his account
Concern - Persons connected in business or their affairs in general as a Debt due to the whole concern a loss affecting the whole concern
Mesha - Place name meaning, “debt
Burden - In the interpretation of the parable, if any stress were laid on this detail, it might be the long and conscientious fulfilment of duty in the Christian life, which, though it must receive recognition in the end, gives no claim on God as one who rewards of Debt, nor allows the worker to glory over another who has been less richly furnished with opportunity
Mesha - Place name meaning, “debt
Hell - In a broad sense it may mean: ...
the limbo of infants (limbus parvulorum), where those who die in original sin, but without personal mortal sin, are deprived of the happiness which would come to them in the supernatural order, but not of happiness in the natural order; ...
the limbo of the Fathers (limbus patrum) where the souls of the just who died before Christ awaited their admission to heaven, which had been closed against them in punishment for the sin of Adam; ...
purgatory, where the just who die in venial sin or who still owe a Debt of temporal punishment for sin are cleansed by suffering before their admission to heaven
Want - The sum want a dollar of the amount of Debt
the Unmerciful Servant - How did your reckoning time come to you? What was it that brought your Debt to a head? What was it that brought you up to God's judgment seat before the time? What great trespass was it of yours? What great accumulation of Debt was it of yours? And did you do like this Galilean procurator? Did you fall down and worship God and appeal to His patience? Did you promise to pay all the Debt if only He would let you have sufficient time in which to pay it? Did you swear to Him that you would never commit that great trespass again? Did you engage also that you would watch, and pray, and would crucify your flesh, with its affections and lusts, if only He would not deliver you to the tormentors. Now we are such, and our fellow-servants are such, that they are continually running into all kinds of Debt to us, and to all depths of Debt. Partly through his offensiveness and injuriousness, and partly through our imagining all kinds of offences and injuries at his hand, the most immense Debts are being run up between us. From the heart to forgive Debts like these no, never, I cannot do it. Well, how do you do when you come to the fifth petition, which is this-And forgive us our Debts, as we forgive our Debtors? Dr. When the fellow-servants of this unmerciful servant saw him so forget his own ten thousand talents as to take his hundred-pence Debtor by the throat and cast him into prison, they were both sorry and angry, and went and told their Lord what had taken place
Oates, Titus - In 1667 he was entered as a sizar at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, but soon migrated to Saint John's, where Dr Watson wrote of him: "He was a great dunce, ran into Debt, and, being sent away for want of money, never took a degree
Children - The child might be sold to bondage until the Jubilee year for a parent's Debt (2 Kings 4:1; Nehemiah 5:5)
Answer - To comply with, fulfill, pay or satisfy as, he answered my order to answer a Debt
Heavy - Large in amount as a heavy expense a heavy Debt
Titus Oates - In 1667 he was entered as a sizar at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, but soon migrated to Saint John's, where Dr Watson wrote of him: "He was a great dunce, ran into Debt, and, being sent away for want of money, never took a degree
Redeem - In commerce, to purchase or pay the value in specie, of any promissory note, bill or other evidence of Debt, given by the state, by a company or corporation, or by an individual
Grace - This grace is free; it is not due to us: if it were due to us, it would be no more grace; it would be a Debt, Romans 11:6 ; it is in its nature an assistance so powerful and efficacious, that it surmounts the obstinacy of the most rebellious human heart, without destroying human liberty
Quit - To pay to discharge hence, to free from as, to quit the Debt of gratitude
Post - ) The doorpost of a victualer's shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a Debt
Surety - (Hebrews 7:22) By which we understand that in the antient settlement of eternity, the Lord Jesus Christ stood up at the call of his Father, the covenant Head and Surety of his people, to answer both for their Debt and their duty
Post - ) The doorpost of a victualer's shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a Debt
Post - ) The doorpost of a victualer's shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a Debt
Usury, Interest, Increase - See also Debt
Ram - ...
Numbers 5:8 (c) This animal paid the Debt that was due from the sinner
Have - ...
The nation has to pay the interest of an immense Debt
Forgive, Forgave, Forgiveness - A — 1: ἀφίημι (Strong's #863 — Verb — aphiemi — af-ee'-ay-mee ) primarily, "to send forth, send away" (apo, "from," hiemi, "to send"), denotes, besides its other meanings, "to remit or forgive" (a) Debts, Matthew 6:12 ; 18:27,32 , these being completely cancelled; (b) sins, e. , Luke 5:20 ; Debts (see above) (opheilema), Matthew 6:12 ; (opheile), Matthew 18:32 ; (daneion), Matthew 18:27 ; the thought (dianoia) of the heart, Acts 8:22 . ...
A — 2: χαρίζομαι (Strong's #5483 — Verb — charizomai — khar-id'-zom-ahee ) "to bestow a favor unconditionally," is used of the act of "forgiveness," whether Divine, Ephesians 4:32 ; Colossians 2:13 ; 3:13 ; or human, Luke 7:42,43 (debt); 2 Corinthians 2:7,10 ; 12:13 ; Ephesians 4:32 (1st mention)
Charge - ) To place something to the account of as a Debt; to debit, as, to charge one with goods
Composition - Mutual agreement for the discharge of a Debt, on terms or by means different from those required by the original contract, or by law, as by the payment of a different sum, or by making other compensation
Complete - Debts were not to be left unpaid. After providing the widow with the amount needed, Elisha directed her: “Go sell the oil, and pay [3] thy Debt …” (2 Kings 4:7)
Matthew - He could not help squeezing the last drop of blood out of this and that helpless Debtor. The Debt was due, it was too long overdue, and it must be paid, if both the Debtor and his children have to be sold in the slave-market to pay the Debt. Even if not for Himself and for his widowed mother, the carpenter would often leave His bench to go to Matthew's toll-booth to expostulate with him, and to negotiate with him, and to become surety to him for this and that poor neighbour of His who had fallen into sickness, and into a Debt that he was not able to pay
Jonah - The fantastic Debt in Matthew 18:24 may be compared
Impute - The original Debtor, and the Surety, who pays for that Debtor, cannot both have the Debt at the same time charged, upon them
Need, Needs, Needful - "it is due to become," translated "(if) need (so) require," See BEHOVE , BOUND , Debt , DUE , DUTY , GUILTY , INDEBTED , MUST , OUGHT , OWE
Servant - He might become bound to this service in various ways, chiefly through poverty, Exodus 21:7 Leviticus 25:39-47 ; to acquit himself of a Debt he could not otherwise pay, 2 Kings 4:1 ; to make restitution for a theft, Exodus 22:3 ; or to earn the price of his ransom for captivity among heathen
Grace - Grace excludes, therefore, all notion of ‘debt’ as owing from God to men, all thought of earning the Messianic blessings ( Romans 4:4 ) by establishing ‘a righteousness of one’s own’ ( Romans 10:3 ); through it men are ‘justified gratis ’ ( Romans 3:24 ) and ‘receive the gift of righteousness’ ( Romans 5:17 ). ]'>[5] ) to grant in Acts 27:24 , Galatians 3:18 , Philippians 1:29 , Philippians 1:22 , give in Philippians 2:9 , freely give in Romans 8:32 , 1 Corinthians 2:12 , and (with ‘wrong’ or ‘debt’ for object, expressed or implied) forgive in Luke 7:42 f
Charge - That which constitutes Debt, in commercial transactions an entry of money or the price of goods, on the debit side of an account
To - I have a Debt to pay on Saturday
Obedience - But to obey one’s superior is a Debt we owe in accordance with the Divine order immanent in things; and as a consequence is good
Redeem - ” Its basic use had to do with the deliverance of persons or property that had been sold for Debt, as in Debt. The redemption price was determined by the number of years remaining until the release of Debts in the year of jubilee ( Neonomianism - Nor whether the Gospel be a law, the promises whereof entitle the performers of its conditions to the benefits as of Debt
Jubilee, the Year of - "Apparently this periodic emancipation applied to every class of Hebrew servants --to him who had sold himself because he had become too poor to provide for his family, to him who had been taken and sold for Debt, and to him who had been sold into servitude for crime
Call - ...
To call in, to collect, as to call in Debts or money or to draw from circulation, as to call in clipped coin or to summon together to invite to come together as, to call in neighbors or friends. To call on, to make a short visit to also, to solicit payment, or make a demand of a Debt
Jubilee - Remission of Debts was on each sabbatical seventh year; the bondage for Debt was all that Jubilee delivered from
Paula, a Roman Lady - Her charities were so incessant that Jerome states that she left Eustochium with a great Debt, which she could only trust the mercy of Christ would enable her to pay (c
Slave, Slavery - (4) From native Israelites who, through poverty and Debt, had been forced to sell themselves ( Exodus 21:2 , Amos 2:6 ; Amos 8:6 , Deuteronomy 15:12 , Leviticus 25:39 , Proverbs 11:29 [5]3 Proverbs 22:7 [5]3) or their children ( Exodus 21:7 , 2 Kings 4:1 , Nehemiah 5:6 ; Nehemiah 5:8 , Isaiah 50:1 , Job 24:9 ) into servitude. ...
Whether the creditor had the right to force the Debtor into slavery against his will is not clear. While a man could be sold into slavery for Debt (see above), man-stealing is prohibited on pain of death ( Exodus 21:16 = Deuteronomy 24:7 )
Prison, Prisoners - ...
New Testament In New Testament times, persons could be imprisoned for nonpayment of Debt (Matthew 5:25-26 ; Luke 12:58-59 ), political insurrection and criminal acts (Luke 23:19 ,Luke 23:19,23:25 ), as well as for certain religious practices (Luke 21:12 ; Acts 8:3 )
Slave/Servant - ...
A person could become a slave as a result of capture in war, default on a Debt, inability to support and “voluntarily” selling oneself, being sold as a child by destitute parents, birth to slave parents, conviction of a crime, or kidnapping and piracy
Head - He was head and ears in Debt, that is, completely overwhelmed
Covenant - as he took the whole Debt upon him, freed his people from the charge, obeyed the law, and engaged to bring his people to glory, Hebrews 7:22 . In the covenant of works man is considered as working, and the reward as to be given of Debt
Decrees - Ephesians 2:15 ) states that Christ by the cross canceled the certificate of Debt consisting of "decrees" (NASB; Gk
Baxterianism - Christ paid not, therefore, the idem, but the tantundem, or aequivalens; not the very Debt which we owed and the law required, but the value: (else it were not strictly satisfaction, which is redditio aequivalentis: [1] and (it being improperly called the paying of a Debt, but. ]'>[3] The law knoweth no vicarius poenae; [4] though the law ...
maker may admit it, as he is above law; else there were no place for pardon, if the proper Debt be paid and the law not relaxed, but fulfilled
Gospel - The first Debtor in Matthew 18:23-35 has earned nothing but the right to be sold into slavery; instead the king cancels his enormous Debt. Yet in keeping God's commands, they do not put him in their Debt; they are simply doing their duty (Luke 17:7-10 )
Give - To pledge as, I give my word that the Debt shall be paid
Goel - " "If one Nubian," remarks Burckhardt, "happen to kill another, he is obliged to pay the Debt of blood to the family of the deceased, and a fine to the governors of six camels, a cow, and seven sheep, or they are taken from his relations
Philemon, Epistle to - , for the solemn formula ‘I Paul,’ 1 Corinthians 16:21 , 2 Corinthians 10:1 , Colossians 4:18 , 2 Thessalonians 3:17 ) gives his bond for the Debt, ‘I Paul write it with my own hand, I will repay it
Wages - God's incredible grace is lavished on all who are mired in spiritual Debt. The parable of the unforgiving servant demonstrates that all are deeply in Debt to God; all Debts that human beings owe to each other are trivial in comparison
the Much Forgiven Debtor And His Much Love - There was a certain creditor which had two Debtors: the one owed five hundred pence, and the other fifty. Till, when He spoke out, and told the story of the creditor and his two Debtors, and then wound up the story with such a home-thrust at Simon, they wished themselves seated at another table. To have been frankly forgiven such a fearful Debt, and then, as if that were not enough, to have been washed whiter than the snow, and from such unspeakable pollution. Yes; but what about those to whom He did both? Both frankly forgave them their fearful Debt; and also, though their sins were as scarlet: though they were from scalp to sole one slough and crust of sin, made them as white as snow; and though they were red like crimson, made them to be as wool
Loose - He died to pay the Debt of our sins as in Romans 5:6, and we are saved by His life as we read in Romans 5:10
Good - His security is good for the amount of the Debt applied to persons able to fulfill contracts
Compassion - In the parable of the unforgiving servant, the master had compassion and forgave the servant's Debt (Matthew 18:27 )
Magi - A more important Debt of Judaism to Persian faith is alleged to be found in the doctrine of the Future Life
Elisha - " The widow of one of the prophets having told Elisha, that her husband's creditor was determined to take her two sons and sell them for slaves, Elisha multiplied the oil in the widow's house, in such quantity that she was enabled to sell it and to discharge the Debt
Lot - You put God in your Debt as often as you do any handsome and unselfish thing; and, especially, anything in the pure interests of righteousness and peace. And it is wise and politic to put God in your Debt now and then. For He always pays His Debts sooner or later
Go - This sun will not go far towards full payment of the Debt
Punishment - If the thief could not pay, he could be sold as a slave to pay the Debt (Exodus 22:1 )
Friend, Friendship - A friend may put one into Debt by asking security for a loan (Proverbs 6:1-5 ; 11:15 ; 17:18 ; 22:26-27 )
Hand - 2 Kings 5 ...
To strike hands, to make a contract, or to become surety for another's Debt or good behavior
Run - ) To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; - often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in Debt
Neonomians - Nor whether the Gospel be a law, the promises whereof entitle the performers of its conditions to the benefits as of Debt
Septuagint - There are few more interesting lines of study than to trace the Debt which Christianity owed to the LXX Septuagint in the matter of words and terms, and to see how the borrowed terminology was consecrated and adapted to higher uses
Agriculture - Accumulation of Debt was obviated by prohibiting interest on principal lent to fellow citizens (Leviticus 25:8-16; Leviticus 25:28-87)
Gospel - In the Third, the Pauline, Gospel, we have our Lord’s story of the two Debtors, both of whom, when they had nothing to pay, were frankly forgiven. Paul had been painfully trying to pay that Debt. Brought to the knowledge that he had nothing wherewith to pay, he made the great discovery that Christ had paid the Debt and set him free
Land (of Israel) - A number of laws in the Book of Deuteronomy are rooted in the land: the year of release from Debt (15:1-11), appointing just judges (16:18-20), selection of a king (17:14-20), abominations of the nations (18:9-14), the cities of refuge (19:1-13), removing landmarks (19:14), unknown murder (21:1-9), leaving a hanged man on a tree (21:22-23), divorce (24:1-4), and just weights and measurements (25:13-16)
Punishment (2) - Scourging, used among the Jews as a penalty for Debt (Matthew 18:34) or for offences of a religious character (Matthew 10:17; Matthew 23:34), was also the customary precursor to Roman crucifixion
Lord's Prayer, the - ...
Give us this day our bread for the morrow...
Give us each day our bread for the morrow ...
Give us this day our bread for the morrow ...
And forgive us our Debts as we also have forgiven our Debtors;...
And forgive us our sins for we ourselves forgive every one who is indebted to us;...
And forgive us our Debt as we also forgive our Debtors;...
And cause us to go not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. ” “Forgive us our Debts or sins” may very well refer to the ultimate forgiveness of sins on the last day, but it also refers to the continuing forgiveness of the disciples by their Heavenly Father as they, living in this age, continually forgive those indebted to them. ...
The Lord's Prayer in the New Testament is a community's prayer: “Our Father,” “Give us our bread,” Forgive us our Debts,” “as we forgive our Debtors,” “Cause us ,” “Deliver us
Alexandria - Plato and Pythagoras, they declared, were deeply in Debt to Moses
Amen - They have a deep interest for Christians, not merely as a reminder of their essential unity and their ancient history, and as a recollection of the Debt which we owe to a race so often despised, but as a reminiscence of the very words which came from our Lord’s own mouth, in the days when He was sowing the seed of which we are reaping the fruits
Philemon Epistle to - ‘Let me discharge his Debt,’ writes St
Hammurabi - The large economic dependence upon slavery and the overwhelming personal indebtedness provided the means and reason for developing a standard of law. By setting the wages for technical and agricultural laborers and by decreeing the release from Debt or slavery, the king could control much of the life of the nation. These treat slaves and Debtors more harshly than do the Hebrew laws
Pharisees - ...
The defect in the Pharisees which Christ stigmatized by the parable of the two Debtors was not immorality but want of love, from unconsciousness of forgiveness or of the need of it. Christ recognizes Simon's superiority to the woman in the relative amounts of sin needing forgiveness, but shows both were on a level in inability to cancel their sin as a Debt. Tradition set aside moral duties, as a child's to his parents by" Corban"; a Debtor's to his creditors by the Mishna treatise, Avodah Zarah (1:1) which forbade payment to a pagan three days before any pagan festival; a man's duty of humanity to his fellow man by the Avodah Zarah (2:1) which forbids a Hebrew midwife assisting a pagan mother in childbirth (contrast Leviticus 19:18; Luke 10:27-29)
the Penitent Thief - For every one that was in distress came to David, and every one that was in Debt, and every one that was discontented, and he became a captain over them; and there were with David about four hundred men
Hell - Since pride conceals the sinner's true Debt to God the Judge, again this question should be answered by examining Christ's priestly work of propitiation
Elijah - ' And I, for one, am for ever deep in their Debt for their so doing, for the prophetic and apostolic idiom in the margin takes possession of my imagination
David - David escaped to the cave of Adullam, and his brethren and his father's house went to him, also those in distress, and those in Debt, and the discontented; the prophet Gad was with him, and soon afterwards Abiathar the priest
Retribution (2) - The unmerciful servant finds his old Debt back upon him, because the conditional forgiveness of his master has not touched his character
Parable - The TWODEBTORS: the poor woman was forgiven much, and she loved much; not forgiven because she loved much. The Debt of the Gentiles to them is expressed in the hundred pence [2]; whereas the indebtedness of the Jews to God is seen in the ten thousand talents [3]
Jordanis, Historian of the Goths - For the spirit of the age and times which we thus seem to gather from Jordanis's work we owe him a Debt of gratitude, and also for his preservation, if only in a broken form, of fragments from the greatest work of Theodoric's great secretary
Nehemiah - Nehemiah also remedied the state of Debt and bondage of many Jews by forbidding usury and bond service, and set an example by not being chargeable all the twelve years that he was governor, as former governors had been, on the Jews; "so did not I," says he, "because of the fear of God" (Nehemiah 5)
Law - Some laws assume the existence of conditions such as Debt slavery ( Exodus 21:2-11 ), specific species of animals (Exodus 29:22 -fat; tail sheep ), or the climate of Palestine (feast held at end of harvest season, Leviticus 23:33-39 ), which make these laws inapplicable in other cultural environments
the Ten Virgins - It would have been well, and we would have been deep in their Debt, had some of the twelve said to their Master at that moment: Declare to us the parable of the ten virgins also
Paul as a Controversialist - Speaking on this whole matter for myself, I owe a great Debt to the conductors of that journal, and to Butler, and to Bengel
Apocrypha - He sends his son Tobias to Rages in Media to collect a Debt
Nabal - The-Joy-of-her-father,-for that was the name of the sheep-master's beautiful bride,-was also the joy of her bridegroom, till he sent two hundred loaves of bread, and two bottles of wine, and five sheep ready dressed, and five measures of parched corn, and an hundred clusters of raisins, and two hundred cakes of figs to Adullam, so that every one that was in distress, and every one that was in Debt, and every one that was discontented, ate and drank and said, Let the God of Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah, and Jacob and Rachel be the God of that great man in Maon and Abigail his bride. Nabal died of a strange disease-indebtedness to his wife
Roman Catholics - " By indulgences they do not mean leave to commit sin, nor pardon for sins to come; but only releasing, by the power of the keys committed to the church, the Debt of temporal punishment which may remain due upon account of our sins, after the sins themselves, as to their guilt and eternal punishment, have been already remitted through repentance and confession, and by virtue of the merit of Christ, and of all the saints
Economic Life - ...
Israelites could sell their families or themselves into slavery to resolve a Debt (Exodus 21:7-11 ; Leviticus 25:39 ; Matthew 18:25 )
Trade And Commerce - The same may have been the fate of those persons who, for non-payment of Debt, were assigned to their creditors ( 2 Kings 4:1 ). The money-lender appears at the very commencement of the history of the Israelitish kingdom, where we are told that David’s followers were to some extent insolvent Debtors; and the Jewish law allowed the taking of pledges, but not (it would seem) the taking of interest, except from foreigners
Colossians, Theology of - Thus, God "makes alive" by forgiving the sinner, cancelling out the Debt of sin, and defeating those who stand opposed to humanity through Christ and the cross (2:13-15)
Diseases - The Greeks acknowledged their Debt to the Egyptians and were particularly appreciative of the information these doctors had gathered about the use of plants in medical practice
Merit - ...
(b) Jesus criticised the Pharisaic doctrine of reward according to strict legal merit, by teaching that the reward which God gives is not according to Debt, but according to grace
Collection - The spiritual Debt which the Gentiles owed to the Jews (ὀφειλέται εἰσὶν αὐτῶν, Romans 15:27; cf
Nebuchadnezzar - I frankly acknowledge my great Debt to Nebuchadnezzar
Jephthah And His Daughter - David's misery acquainted him with every one that was in Debt, and with every one that was in distress, and with every one that was discontented, and he became a captain over them, as did Jephthah long before David's day. Debtors, broken men, injured and outcast men, orphan and illegitimate sons, prodigal sons, and sons with whom their fathers were wearied out; with, no doubt, a sprinkling of salt here and there, as there always is among the most corrupt characters and the most abandoned men
Jonath - O thou wicked servant, I forgave thee all that Debt, because thou desiredst me: shouldest not thou also have had compassion on thy fellow-servant, even as I had pity on thee?...
Everybody has the Book of Jonah by heart
Kings, the Books of - Assyrian and Chaldee forms occur, found in Jeremiah, but not found in the earlier historical books (Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel): eekoh for 'eekow (2 Kings 6:13); 'akilah , "meat" (1 Kings 19:8); 'almugim ((1 Kings 10:11, 12); 'omnowt , "pillars" (2 Kings 18:16); ura'owt , "stalls" (1 Kings 4:26); barbuwrim , "fowls" (1 Kings 4:23); gahar , "stretch" ((1 Kings 18:42); 'apheer for 'eepheer ((1 Kings 20:38, 41); gub , "husbandman" (2 Kings 25:12); galom , "wrap" (2 Kings 2:8); dobrot , "floats" (1 Kings 5:9);Ζif (1 Kings 6:1; 1 Kings 6:37); chapha' , "act secretly" (2 Kings 17:9); yatsiah , "chamber" (1 Kings 6:5-6; 1 Kings 6:10) ma'abeh , "clay" (1 Kings 7:46); nada' , "drive" (2 Kings 17:21); neshiy , "debt" (2 Kings 4:7); sar , "heavy" (1 Kings 20:43; 1 Kings 16:30); pharbar , "suburbs" (2 Kings 23:11); qab , "measure" (2 Kings 6:25); qabal , "before" (Romans 11:2-4); tabanowt , "camp" (2 Kings 6:8); kothereth "chaptier", mezammerot "snuffers", both in Kings, Chronicles, and Jeremiah; mekonah , "base", in Ezra also
Guilt (2) - GUILT is the state of the sinner before God, whereby, becoming the object of God’s wrath, he incurs the Debt and punishment of death. It is the ‘debts’ which remain as the permanent result of past ‘trespasses,’ for which we ask forgiveness in the Lord’s Prayer (1 John 2:1-295 Luke 11:4); and when we crave deliverance, it is not from the sick will, but from the ‘Evil One’ (Matthew 6:13), the personal enemy of God who has received a guilty allegiance
Doctrines - Such a complete change as these words imply—‘change of mind’ (μετάνοια), ‘convert,’ ‘turn round’ (ἐπιστρέφειν, Matthew 13:15), ‘new birth’ or ‘birth from above’ (γεννηθῇ ἄνωθεν, John 3:3), is necessary for all, as Jesus shows by addressing His teaching on this theme not only to Pharisees like Nicodemus, but to His own disciples—notably in the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:21-35), in which, in answer to a question of Peter, He likens the condition of all recipients of the Divine forgiveness to that of a man who owes a Debt of ten thousand talents, clearly meaning by that the infinitude of
Trade And Commerce - ); a metaphor from the earnest, the large portion of the price paid as a first instalment of a Debt, is ἀρραβών (2 Corinthians 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:5, Ephesians 1:14), and βεβαιόω, βεβαίωσις (1 Corinthians 1:6, Philippians 1:7) are supposed by some to be connected with surety
Metaphor - have been discovered granting remission of Debt
Law of Moses - (b) LAWS OF Debt. -- (1) All Debts (to an Israelite) to be released at the seventh (sabbatical year; a blessing promised to obedience, and a curse on refusal to lend
Law - If man keeps the whole Law, he is rewarded with ‘life’ (Galatians 3:12 = Leviticus 18:5), and this is bestowed not of grace, but of Debt (Romans 4:4 : κατὰ ὀφείλημα); while if he does not keep the Law in its entirety, he is accursed (Galatians 3:10 = Deuteronomy 27:26), and passes into the power of death (Romans 6:23; Romans 7:10, 1 Corinthians 15:56)
Lord's Prayer (ii) - For while in the one case our Debt to God and to man is laid upon us from above as a commandment that must be obeyed, in the other we look up to God, crying like Augustine, ‘Da quod jubes, et jube quod vis’ (Conf. —‘Forgive us our Debts (ὀφειλήματα), as we forgive our Debtors. Prayer is substituted for ‘debts’ in the Lord’s Prayer itself. ‘Debts’ is particularly suggestive. But most solemn of all is the thought that sin makes us Debtors before God, Debtors who have wasted our Lord’s money and are called to render account. But further, ‘debts’ reminds us of a class of sins we are most apt to forget—our sins of omission. ...
By teaching us to offer this petition our Lord teaches that God is ready to forgive all our Debts
Acts of the Apostles (2) - ...
We owe a special Debt of gratitude to the author of the Acts for having drawn for us several pictures illustrating the prominent part played in the early Church by the Spirit and the Name of the exalted Christ
Money - The one Debt, occupying little more space than 100 sixpences, could be carried in the pocket; for the payment of the other, an army of nearly 8600 carriers, each with a sack 60 lbs
Sirach - Nevertheless his Debt to Greek authors is, as has been seen, considerable; and though in one place he ridicules sacrifices to idols (Sirach 30:19), which he compares with the practice of offering meats to the dead, his book is on the whole singularly free from that invective against foreign cults which reaches its climax in Isaiah and the Wisdom of Solomon, and made the Jews, in the words of Pliny, notorious for their contempt of the gods
Work - A cycle of seven sabbatical years ends in the year of Jubilee, not only a time of rest and liberty, but a time of Debt cancellation and the return of property to its original owners (Leviticus 25 )
Apocalypse - ]'>[6] occur those references to the pre-existent Messiah under the title ‘Son of man,’ which Hilgenfeld and others hare ascribed to Christian interpolation, but whose direct Debt is probably only to Daniel (see esp
Trade And Commerce - ); a metaphor from the earnest, the large portion of the price paid as a first instalment of a Debt, is ἀρραβών (2 Corinthians 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:5, Ephesians 1:14), and βεβαιόω, βεβαίωσις (1 Corinthians 1:6, Philippians 1:7) are supposed by some to be connected with surety
Romans, Epistle to the - Paul goes on to urge his readers to obey the governing powers; to pay to all the Debt of love, which alone fulfils the Law; to put off all sloth and vice, since the day is at hand (ch
Augustinus, Aurelius - For she will not answer that she owes nothing, lest she should be confuted and seized by the crafty accuser; but she will answer that her Debt has been forgiven by Him, to Whom none can give back the ransom which He paid on our behalf, though He owed it not
Lutherans - They stated, that we may so prepare ourselves for grace as to become entitled to it congruously, not as to a Debt which in strict justice God is bound to pay, but as to a grant which it is congruous in him to give, and which it would be inconsistent with his attributes to withhold