What does Daniel mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
דָּנִיֵּ֣אל the 2nd son of David 5
דָּֽנִיֵּ֔אל the 2nd son of David 4
לְדָ֣נִיֵּ֔אל the 2nd son of David 3
דָּנִיֵּ֥אל the 2nd son of David 3
דָנִיֵּ֖אל the 2nd son of David 3
δανιὴλ the name of a Jewish prophet 2
דָנִיֵּ֔אל the 2nd son of David 2
דָּנִיֵּ֜אל the 4th of the greater prophets 2
לְדָנִיֵּ֔אל the 4th of the greater prophets 2
לְדָנִיֵּ֖אל the 4th of the greater prophets 2
דָּֽנִיֵּאל֙ the 4th of the greater prophets 2
לְדָנִיֵּ֗אל the 4th of the greater prophets 2
דָנִיֵּאל֙ the 4th of the greater prophets 2
(דָּנִיֵּ֣אל‪‬) the 2nd son of David 2
דָנִיֵּ֗אל the 2nd son of David 2
דָּנִיֵּ֑אל the 2nd son of David 2
וְדָנִיֵּ֣אל the 2nd son of David 2
דָּנִיֵּאל֙ the 2nd son of David 2
דָֽנִיֵּאל֙ the 2nd son of David 2
לְדָֽנִיֵּ֔אל the 2nd son of David 2
דָנִיֵּ֡אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָֽנִיֵּ֑אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָּֽנִיֵּ֜אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָֽנִיֵּ֔אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
וּלְדָ֣נִיֵּ֔אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
בְּדָ֣נִיֵּ֔אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
לְדָֽנִיֵּאל֙ the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָּנִיֶּ֔אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
וְדָנִיֵּאל֙ the 4th of the greater prophets 1
לְדָנִיֵּ֥אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
וְ֠דָנִיֵּאל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
לְדָנִיֵּ֑אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
בְּדָנִיֵּֽאל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָּנִיֵּ֛אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
וְדָנִיֵּ֖אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָּֽנִיֵּ֖אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
לְדָנִיֵּ֣אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָּנִיֵּ֕אל the 2nd son of David 1
לְדָֽנִיֵּ֜אל the 2nd son of David 1
דָּ֣נִיֵּ֔אל the 2nd son of David 1
דָּנִיֵּ֖אל the 2nd son of David 1
כְּדָנִיֵּ֣אל the 2nd son of David 1
דָנִיֵּ֤אל the 2nd son of David 1
דָנִיֵּאל֒ the 2nd son of David 1
דָֽנִיֵּ֗אל the 2nd son of David 1
(מִדָּֽנִיֵּ֑אל‪‬) the 2nd son of David 1
לְדָנִיֵּ֜אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָּנִיֵּ֗אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
לְדָנִיֵּֽאל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
וְדָ֣נִיֵּ֔אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָּנִיֵּ֔אל the 2nd son of David 1
לְדָנִיֵּ֛אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָנִיֵּ֛אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
וּלְדָנִיֵּ֖אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1
דָֽנִיֵּ֜אל the 4th of the greater prophets 1

Definitions Related to Daniel

H1840


   1 the 2nd son of David, by Abigail the Carmelitess.
   2 the 4th of the greater prophets, taken as hostage in the first deportation to Babylon, because of the gift of God of the interpretation of dreams, he became the 2nd in command of the Babylon empire and lasted through the end of the Babylonian empire and into the Persian empire.
   His prophecies are the key to the understanding of end time events.
   Noted for his purity and holiness by contemporary prophet, Ezekiel.
      2a also, ‘Belteshazzar’ (01095 or 01096).
   3 a priest of the line of Ithamar who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah.
   Additional Information: Daniel = “God is my judge”.
   

H1841


   1 the 4th of the greater prophets, taken as hostage in the first deportation to Babylon, because of the gift of God of the interpretation of dreams, he became the 2nd in command of the Babylon empire and lasted through the end of the Babylonian empire and into the Persian empire.
   His prophecies are the key to the understanding of end time events.
   Noted for his purity and holiness by contemporary prophet, Ezekiel.
      1a also, ‘Belteshazzar’ (01095 or 01096).
      Additional Information: Daniel = “God is my judge”.
      

G1158


   1 the name of a Jewish prophet, noted for his wisdom and prophecies.
   Additional Information: Daniel = “judgment of God”.
   

Frequency of Daniel (original languages)

Frequency of Daniel (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Daniel
(dan' iehl) Personal name meaning, “God is judge” or “God's judge.” 1. A son of David and Abigail, the Carmelitess (1 Chronicles 3:1 ), who is also called Chileab in 2 Samuel 3:3 . 2 . A priest of the Ithamar lineage (Ezra 8:2 ; Nehemiah 10:6 ) who returned with Ezra from the Babylonian captivity.
3. Daniel of Ezekiel 14:14 ,Ezekiel 14:14,14:20 ; Ezekiel 28:3 is spelled differently in Hebrew from all the other forms in the Old Testament. This Daniel was a storied figure of antiquity mentioned with Noah and Job. He was famous for wisdom and righteousness. Due to the similarity in the spelling of the name and the common attributes of wisdom and righteousness, some interpreters identify this Daniel with the Daniel of the canonical book of Daniel.
Most interpreters, however, take note of the differences in the spelling and also the fact of antiquity. Some identify the “Daniel” of Ezekiel with “Danel” of ancient Ugaritic literature.
4. The most common usage of “Daniel” refers to the hero of the Book of Daniel. This young man of nobility was taken captive by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, and elevated to high rank in the Babylonian and Persian kingdoms.
The Babylonians sought to remove all vestiges of Daniel's nationality and religion. For this reason, they sought to change the name of Daniel to Belteshazzar. (Daniel 1:7 ; Daniel 2:26 ; Daniel 4:8-9 ,Daniel 4:8-9,4:18-19 ; Daniel 5:12 ; Daniel 10:1 ).
Daniel was transported from Judah to Babylon in his early youth at the battle of Carchemish, 605 B.C. The text does not indicate his precise age. He was trained in the arts, letters, and wisdom in the Babylonian capital. Eventually, he rose to high rank among the Babylonian men of wisdom.
He was active throughout the long reign of Nebuchadnezzar (604-562 B.C.). No mention is made in Daniel of the times of Evil-Merodach (561-560 B.C.), Neriglissar (559-555 B.C.), or Labashi-Marduk (555 B.C.). However, much information is provided concerning Daniel's involvement during the reign of Nabonidus (555-539 B.C.). While Nabonidus was absent from his country for extended periods of time, he put his son Belshazzar in charge of the affairs of government.
Daniel was in Babylon when the forces of Cyrus, the Persian, captured Babylon. Successively, Daniel was a high governmental official during the reigns of Cyrus (539-529 B.C.) and Cambyses (529-522 B.C.). He served also during his old age into the reign of Darius I, the son of Hystaspes (522-486 B.C.). Daniel would probably have celebrated his one hundredth birthday during the reign of Darius.
He had outstanding physical attraction. He demonstrated at an early age propensities of knowledge, wisdom, and leadership. In addition to his wisdom, he was skilled in dream interpretation.
Throughout his entire life he demonstrated an unshakable faith in his God. It took courage to resist the temptations and threats which confronted him repeatedly. He recognized that God was continuously judging him. He remained faithful.
J. J. Owens
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Daniel, Prophet
(Hebrew: God is my Judge)
The hero and traditional author of the book of the Old Testament which bears his name. At about 16 years of age he was taken captive by the army of Nabuchodonosor, and carried away into the Babylonian captivity. He was educated for the service of the court. His wonderful wisdom was made manifest to the king when he not only recalled a forgotten dream, but also ex. plained its mysterious meaning. Thus he rose to a position of honor and confidence. In this lofty station he remained under Nabuchodonosor's successors. In the times of King Baltasar he deciphered the "hand-writing on the wall," and was cast into the lion's den for the first time. Under the ruler called Darius the Mede in our present text, he received the vision of "the seventy weeks," announcing the death of the Messias. In the third year of Cyrus he foretold the course of earthly empires till the end of time. When the 70 years of captivity were over and many of the Jews returned to their fatherland, he remained in the land of exile. The book comprises 14 chapters, among which three languages are represented. A preliminary section (1 to 2,4) in Hebrew, tells of Daniel's capture and education. The first part of his prophecies (2,5, to 7), written in Aramaic, presents those which regard the world power in relation to God's people; particularly the dream of the great statue and the vision of the four beasts. In this part Daniel also offers the credentials for his ministry, which prove to his contemporaries that God was with him and that his prophecies about later periods were equally reliable. The second part of his prophecies (7 to 12), written in Hebrew, describes the various fortunes of God's people in relation to the world power. Finally the book is concluded by the so-called deuterocanonical parts (12 to 14), which are wanting in the Hebrew Bible, but are endorsed by the tradition represented in the Septuagint Greek version. Here we find the narratives of the chaste Susanna, the omnivorous idol Bel, the dragon destroyed by Daniel, and a second peril in the lion's den. Daniel is the man of desires and the prophet of hope. There is little direct exhortation to the people, but much that is descriptive of God's rule over human empires. In depicting the future he stresses the spaces of time that lie between events. Here prophecy is so precise as to be taken for history. Its place among canonical books is guaranteed by Jewish tradition. Our Lord quotes from it the words: "When therefore you shall see the abomination of desolation which was spoken of by Daniel the prophet" (Matthew 24; Daniel 9). The Church has embodied the full 14 chapters in her list of inspired books. They are used in the Breviary during the whole week beginning with the third Sunday of November until the following Saturday inclusively; in the Missal on the Saturday of ember week in September, on the twentieth Sunday after Pentecost, and on the feasts of many saints.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Daniel, Gabriel
Author, born Rouen, France, 1649; died Paris, France, 1728. He entered the Society of Jesus, 1667, became historiographer of France. He wrote on the questions of probabilism and grace but is best known for his refutation of Pascal's "Provincial Letters" and for his great history of France.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Daniel Noble
Born 1810; died 1885. Distinguished for his contributions to the study of mental and epidemic diseases.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Daniel, Book of
High hopes and great expectations highlight the Book of Daniel. It provides the highest example of Old Testament ethics and the climax of Old Testament teaching about the future of God's people. It also provides Bible students some of the most perplexing questions they ever seek to answer. Too often so much ink is used talking about the problems that little information about the book itself can be learned. Thus this article will look at the facts and teachings of the book before investigating a few of the problems.
Literary Features Daniel combines characteristics of prophecy, wisdom, and apocalyptic writing into a unique type of literature. Matthew identified Daniel as a prophet (Matthew 24:15 ). The book addresses a current situation with a call for moral uprightness, as did the prophets. It also points to hope for the future rising out of God's words and promises. It focuses on the nations as well as Israel, as did the other prophets. It does not, however, use the literary forms of the prophets, particularly the standard formulas such as, “Thus says the Lord”; nor does it represent a collection of prophetic sermons.
As did the wisdom writers, Daniel served in a royal court counseling a ruler. He was highly-educated. The book seeks to instill moral wisdom in young persons. Yet it does not string proverbs or wisdom poetry together nor delve into the problems Job or Ecclesiastes tackled. It is wisdom literature and more.
Apocalyptic literature best describes Daniel for most Bible students. Apocalyptic writings originate from times of national, communal, or personal tribulations. See Apocalyptic . They make profuse use of symbols, numbers, figures of speech, and signs to interpret history and events during dreadful persecution and personal danger. They present visions of God and His future acts, describing in figurative language the future of peace and victory rising out of current troubles. Often a messianic figure stands in the center. Angels and demons are prominent. Generally, apocalyptic writings bear the name of ancient heroes such as Adam, Enoch, or Baruch, who demonstrated in their time the type of character needed in the current situation of the writer. See Apocalyptic .
The visions and angelic figures of Daniel along with its strongly figurative, symbolic language tie it closely to the apocalyptic. Its opening stories serve as the tie to times of persecution and call for moral living. The letters to the churches serve a similar function in Revelation.
Daniel uses two languages—Aramaic (Daniel 2:4-7:28 ) and Hebrew (Daniel 1:2-2:4 ; Daniel 8:1-12:13 )—plus loan words from Persian and Greek to write the complex work of prophecy, wisdom, and apocalyptic writing. This is apparently a combination of the language of worship (Hebrew) and the language of daily life (Aramaic). The two languages combine to form two distinctly separate sections of the book (1–6; 7–12), the first told in narrative form about Daniel and his friends with a historical conclusion (Daniel 7:1-2842 ) and the second told in form of Daniel's visions.
Canon and Authority The basic twelve chapters of Daniel appear in the Hebrew Bible between Esther and Ezra in the last section called the Writings rather than in the Law or the Prophets. The Greek translation called the Septuagint introduced Daniel into the prophets and also introduced additional materials: the prayer of Azariah, the song of the three children, story of Susanna, Bel and the Dragon. See Apocrypha . The Christian church has followed the Septuagint in placing Daniel among the prophets, but Protestant Christianity has not accepted the additions, whereas the Catholic tradition has. All agree the basic Book of Daniel is God's authoritative Word for His people. Questions rise in interpretation not in the book's authority.
Unity Many things appear to separate Daniel into unrelated parts. The position of the person Daniel differs in various portions of the book. He is more central in Daniel 1-2 and Daniel 4-7 than in the rest of the book. In Daniel 1-6 Daniel is spoken of in the third person in the form of a biography. In Daniel 7-12 , however, Daniel speaks in the first person in the form of autobiography (except Daniel 10:1 ).
In Daniel 1-6 the dreams or phenomena come to heathen kings, but in Daniel 7-12 Daniel has the visions. In Daniel 1-6 Daniel is the one who interprets the dreams, but in 7–12 “someone” else interprets the dreams and visions to Daniel. Daniel 1-6 have simplicity, whereas Daniel 7-12 are complex.
The Book of Daniel acts as a unit despite these differences in languages used and types of literature employed. Each of the twelve chapters contributes to this unity. The unifying theme is that God expects His followers to maintain fidelity in face of threats, wars, legal pronouncements, or changing customs. God judges mankind constantly, and He also provides His presence and strength. God continuously judges.
Outline
I. The Faithful Young Men in a Foreign Court (Daniel 1:1-6:28 )
A. Loyalty to God leads Daniel and his friends to high political positions (Daniel 1:1-21 ).
B. Interpretation of the king's dream leads to the king's confession of God and to important positions for the friends (Daniel 2:1-49 ).
C. Loyalty to God brings deliverance from the fiery furnace, royal decree protecting the right to worship God, and further promotion for the friends (Daniel 3:1-30 ).
D. Interpretation and fulfillment of the king's dream leads the king to praise God (Daniel 4:1-37 ).
E. Loyalty to God and His rewards allows interpretation of the handwriting on the wall, brings promotion in the kingdom, and spells doom for Babylon (Daniel 5:1-31 ).
F. Faithfulness in prayer despite secular laws overcomes conspiracy, brings deliverance from the lions' den, leads the king to command fear of the true God, and brings political prosperity (Daniel 6:1-28 ).
II. Daniel's Visions Point the Way Through Persecution to Hope (Daniel 7:1-12:13 ).
A. Vision of four beasts shows four kingdoms to be overcome by Son of man and saints of the Most High, who will reign forever (1618102512_1 ).
B. Vision of ram, he goat, and four horns points to passing of Persians, Medes, and of proud Greeks, one of whom will interrupt daily sacrifices of Temple for a while (Daniel 8:1-27 ).
C. Daniel confesses the nation's sins, seeks forgiveness, and learns meaning of Jeremiah's 70 weeks as pointing to Messiah and to desolation of Jerusalem (Daniel 9:1-27 ).
D. A heaven-sent vision shows that Scripture points to battles between north and south until the northern king proudly triumphs and persecutes the people of God's covenant, taking away their sacrificial system and desecrating the Temple, but facing disaster in the end (Daniel 10:1-11:45 ).
E. Heavenly intervention will bring the time of the end and the resurrection of God's faithful people (Daniel 12:1-13 ).
Meaning Daniel encouraged the reader to remain faithful to God, God's law, and to the scriptural traditions of God's people. War, danger, threat, heathen kings, temptation, greedy desire for luxury, prosperity, and position lead away from God's way. Daniel encouraged the faithful to stand firm in faithfulness to the heritage of Israel. This resolve is painted in a characteristic prophetic outline. The essence of the book appears in a condensed form (Daniel 1:1-8 ). Then the author enlarged upon the theme he had expressed (Daniel 1:8-6:28 ). Finally, in typical Hebrew parallelism, he explained the purpose of the book in full form (Daniel 7:1-12:13 ).
Daniel 1:8-6:28 shows how in history Israelite heroes stood firm in their resolve to stay true to God and their heritage. In six different situations an Israelite hero faced extreme pressure to forsake God and tradition for personal safety and gain. In each case the hero resisted threats or danger of loss of life with no assurance of victory other than his faith.
Daniel 7:1-12:13 brought these truths to bear upon an extremely tense situation. Throughout the book the author focused upon the “fourth kingdom,” that of a tyrannical despot. As the ancient heroes remained faithful, so people facing the despot could double their resolve and experience victorious faith. They faced the choice: believe a ruthless foreign conqueror, or stay true to the faith of the fathers and the God of their history.
Interpretation The literary features, authority, outline, and meaning of the book are rather clear. The historical setting and details of interpretation bring varying opinions. The basic issue is the nature of inspired prophecy and Daniel's relationship to prophecy. All agree that prophecy is both exhortation of a present generation to faithfulness and painting of a future hope. The point at issue among interpreters is the fidelity to detail that prophecy must contain and whether Daniel with its wisdom and apocalyptic overtones must have the same type of historical setting and perspective as do the classic prophets of Israel.
To simplify the picture, two major stances on Daniel can be summarized. The first sees Daniel standing in the precise line of previous prophets, so that every detail of his visions points to the future and not the past. This assumes that Daniel in the sixth century B.C. wrote the book and described the history of contemporary Babylonian, Median, and Persian history and future Greek, Ptolemaic, Seleuccid, Maccabean, and Roman history, as well as the events of end time. Those interpreters who use a dispensational system (see Dispensations) to interpret Daniel see antichrist , tribulation , and the final kingdom pictured in Daniel.
A second stance emphasizes Daniel's relationship to other apocalyptic literature in which writers often use the names of ancient heroes to describe history long past to bring a message to a present generation facing extreme persecution. Writing in the name of the ancient hero gives authority to the writing and protection in the situation of extreme danger. This stance views Daniel as the hero but not the author of the book. The author is an unknown inspired writer who lived in the time of Antiochus Ephiphanes shortly before 164 B.C. The author used contemporary methods of interpreting the prophecies of Ezekiel, Jeremiah, and others to give hope to his generation when many Jews were seeking favor with the Syrian government of Antiochus by adopting a Hellenistic life-style and ignoring Jewish traditions. He used biblical traditions and other knowledge of his day to review the history of Babylon, the Medes, Persia, Greece, the Ptolemies of Egypt, and the Seleuccids of Syria. He then pointed to an immediate future when God would judge Antiochus and his followers who enforced the present persecution of God's people. This interpretation may then take another step and say that the book lends itself to valid new interpretations in light of Jesus Christ and the Christian hope, but that these were not necessarily the main points of the original author.
Whichever stance one takes in interpreting the details of Daniel, the inspired book continues to give hope, strength, and courage to God's people, especially in times of persecution, and to call for ultimate faithfulness no matter the temptations faced.
J. J. Owens and Trent C. Butler
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Daniel, Anthony
Martyr (1601-1648), born Dieppe, France; died near Ontario, Canada. Having joined the Society of Jesus in 1621, he arrived in Canada, 1632, and was stationed at Cape Breton. He was sent to the Huron mission, Ihonatiria (1634-48), where he was slain in the Iroquois attack and his body was thrown into the burning chapel in which he had just celebrated Mass.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Daniel, Saint
Martyrs, died Ceuta, Morocco, 1227. Daniel was the Franciscan provincial of Calabria. He went to preach the Gospel to the infidels of Morocco, accompanied by the monks Agnellus, Samuel, Donulus, Leo, Hugolinus, and Nicholas. At Ceuta they were imprisoned for propagating the Faith, and beheaded. Canonized, 1516. Feast, Franciscans, October 13,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Daniel o'Connell
Orator and leader, surnamed "The Liberator"; born Carhen, County Kerry, Ireland, August 6, 1775; died Genoa, Italy, 1847. He studied at Saint Omer and Douai where his stay was cut short by the French Revolution and in 1798 was called to the Irish Bar. Though the penal laws had been relaxed, Catholics had only limited legal rights and O'Connell determined that they should have a voice in the making of the laws and should have religious freedom. The French Revolution had inspired him with a horror of violence and he determined to secure his end by peaceful means, with the cooperation of the oppressed masses. His first public appearance, 1800, was to denounce the projected union of parliaments, but when the act was passed, he organized the Catholics to fight for emancipation. He struggled undauntedly against bigotry and government oppression for years, opposing the proposed English veto power over episcopal elections and welcoming George IV to Ireland, 1820. By 1826 his Catholic Association was strong enough to contest parliamentaiy elections successfully; two years later he himself won the election in Clare amidst tremendous popular enthusiasm. He then refused to take the anti-Catholic oath in Parliament required by law; the crisis had come; Wellington feared a rebellion, so the Government capitulated, granting Catholic Emancipation, 1829, and O'Connell was the uncrowned King of Ireland. He now bent his efforts towards reform of the poor and tithe laws, and above all to repeal the Union. Eventually the Repeal Movement made mighty strides, monster meetings were held throughout the country, O'Connell was flung into prison but was released on appeal. Unfortunately his health began to fail, the generation of Young Irelanders was chafing under his prudent discipline; then came the horrors of the Great Famine. He was forced to seek restoration in a warmer climate and wished to die in Rome; but the end came after he reached Genoa. He had bequeathed his heart to the Eternal City and his body to Ireland, where it rests under the beautiful round tower at Glasnevin, Dublin.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - du Lhut, Sieur Daniel Greysolon
Pioneer ranger, born Saint Germain-en-Laye, France, 1640; died Montreal, Canada, 1710; an officer in the French army, he went to Canada and took possession of the Sioux country in the name of the King of France. He was the first Canadian to explore the West and for 30 years succeeded in keeping the region west of the Great Lakes under French control. In 1668 he laid the foundation of the post of Detroit. The city of Duluth, Minnesota, takes its name from him. Du Lhut visited the countries around the Great Lakes, 1679-1680. It was during these journeys that he met the Recollect Father Louis Hennepin and his two companions Michel Accault and Antoine Auguelle and rescued them from their captivity among the Sioux Indians.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Daniel Rock
Priest and ecclesiologist. Born on August 31, 1799 in Liverpool, England; died on November 28, 1871 in London, England. Author of Hierurgia, or the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, and The Church of Our Fathers; the latter, treating of the Sarum Rite and medieval observances, in profoundly influenced liturgical study in England.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Daniel
(a) (c. 400 BCE) Together with Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, was exiled to Babylon and trained to be a chamberlain in the royal court. After successfully interpreting Nebuchadnezzar's dream, he was appointed to a high government position. During the reign of Belshazzar, Daniel deciphered writing that mysteriously appeared, predicting Babylon's downfall. He was thrown into a lions' den during Darius’ reign for praying to G-d; miraculously, he wasn’t harmed. (b) A common Jewish name.par
Daniel, the Book of: The book of Tanach describing the experiences of Daniel - and his friends Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah - in the Babylonian and Persian royal courts, as well as several of Daniel's prophecies.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Daniel, Theology of
Daniel is one of the most controversial books of the Bible, yet its message is clear and unmistakable. While Bible scholars debate issues like when it was written and whether it is historically accurate, the Book of Daniel consistently calls God's people of every generation to faithfulness.
Daniel is the only Old Testament book written completely in apocalyptic language. As such, Daniel is similar to the Book of Revelation in the New Testament, which is the oldest document actually claiming the title "apocalypse" or "revelation." In this sense, Daniel forms an important bridge between the Testaments. Daniel, like other Old Testament prophets, is concerned with the Sinai covenant (9:11,13, 15) and with the basic social message of the other prophets (4:27). At the same time, he deals with issues of the distant future in a manner that sets the pattern for New Testament prophecies.
Daniel's unique position in the Old Testament can also be seen in its purpose. Unlike other Old Testament prophecies, this book does not call its readers to repent and lead a new life. Daniel's concern is consistent faithfulness among believers, continued obedience among God's people during times of hardship.
The Book of Daniel has two discernible parts: the historical narratives of chapters 1-6 and the visions of chapters 7-12. The stories of the first half relate the events of Daniel and his ministry in the foreign courts of Babylonia and Persia. The visions of the second half are the personal accounts of Daniel dated to the later part of his life.
The narratives of chapters 1-6 have in common a single theme: Daniel and his three friends successfully bear witness to their faith before a hostile world. Though the circumstances are often unpleasant, these young men consistently stand up for righteousness against overwhelming odds. In the process they find that God is faithful. The historical section in general forms a theology of history in which God delivers those who faithfully represent him in the world and humiliates the proud who fail to acknowledge him.
Though the visions of chapters 7-12 are in general less well known than the beloved stories of the first half, they nonetheless contain individual passages that are noted for their theological importance. The vision of chapter 7 portrays God as "the Ancient of Days"; another figure is called "the Son of Man, " a designation Jesus applied to himself (Matthew 16:27 ; 24:30 ; 26:64 ; Mark 8:38 ; 13:26 , ; etc. ). The interpretation of the vision of chapter 9 includes the hotly debated "seventy sevens" or "seventy weeks of years" passage (vv. 24-27). The concluding vision contains the only explicit Old Testament reference to the resurrection (12:1-3).
There are at least four themes that dominate this book: the sovereignty of God; the self-destructive pride of humankind; the ultimate victory of God's kingdom; and the coming of his servant, the Messiah.
The Sovereignty of God . Other Old Testament prophets knew that Yahweh, the god of Israel, was sovereign over the whole world, including the other nations. But Daniel illustrates this fact in graphic new ways. Through both the narratives and visions, Daniel demonstrates the lordship of God over the whole world, not just Jerusalem and the Israelites. This truth was meant to be a source of great comfort for exiled Israelites living in a foreign context.
This pervasive theme is apparent from the outset of chapter 1. The first verse of the book asserts that Nebuchadnezzar came to besiege Jerusalem. The reader of the book might assume the Babylonian king has come in his own awesome strength and at his own instigation. But the next verse makes it clear that Nebuchadnezzar was not acting in opposition to the will of God. In fact, whatever success [1] hand" (v. 2, Heb. natan, "give, " is a key word in this chapter).
After Daniel steadfastly resisted the cultural pressure to compromise, God "gave" (natan [2]) him favor before Nebuchadnezzar's chief of staff (v. 9). Later, God "gave" (natan [2]) the four young Jews surpassing knowledge and discernment, particularly to Daniel, a gift for understanding visions and dreams (v. 17). So this chapter emphasizes God's sovereignty over the affairs of nations (Babylon and Israel, v. 2) as well as individuals (Daniel and this three companions, v. 17).
The sovereignty of God is played out in the rest of the book in the conflict between the proud and arrogant rules of the world and the kingdom of God. The stone cut by supernatural forces in chapter 2 demolished the statue of Nebuchadnezzar's dream symbolizing the human kingdoms of the earth. The God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego controlled the forces of nature with startling effect on Nebuchadnezzar (chap. 3), as he also did for Daniel in the lions' den (chap. 6). Daniel is given the ability to interpret dreams and visions that are mysterious and impossible for the noblest and wisest of Babylon's wisemen to discern (chaps. 2,4, and 5). The handwriting on the wall episode demonstrates God's sovereign control over nations and individual rulers (chap. 5).
The Book of Daniel adds a new twist to the prophetic view of the nations who might oppose God. Most of the other prophets have oracles against Israel's enemy nations, a prophetic form that is ancient in Israelite literature (see, e.g., Isaiah 13-23 ; Jeremiah 46-51 , etc.). But Daniel views the key empires in sequential order of four, followed by a fifth, eternal kingdom. Rather than present sermons against Israel's immediate neighbors, Daniel sees visions of future empires that oppose God worldwide and oppress his people everywhere. Both the historical narratives and the visions portray a struggle between these successive rulers of the world and God's kingdom. The stories relate how God's servants (Daniel and his friends) were able to overcome the strongest human forces of earth in their efforts to remain faithful to God.
The first of the visions (chap. 7) portrays three frightening beasts and a grotesque monster that threatens to exterminate God's people. But the Ancient of Days prevails and establishes an eternal kingdom for his saints. Even in persecution and death, the sovereign Lord of the kingdom will provide resurrection (12:1-3). God's sovereignty over the proud and arrogant rules of the world climaxes in Michael's final victory provided for all who are written in "the book" (12:1). In the historical narratives, God was sovereign over all his enemies of the past. The visions reveal how that sovereignty will play itself out in human history.
This emphasis on God's sovereignty leads naturally to the next two primary themes of the book: prideful and rebellious humankind is self-destructive because it fails to acknowledge the sovereign Lord of the universe; and God's people will ultimately succeed, because with him they cannot fail.
The Pride of Humankind . A further emphasis of the Book of Daniel is the pride and arrogance of humankind and God's total condemnation of egotism. In chapters 1-6 human pride is the subsurface issue behind the problem that introduces each chapter. In the visions of chapters 7-12, the arrogance of future world leaders is the enemy of God and his people. Ultimately, the each case, God has acted, or will act, to turn human pride and arrogance to shame and ridicule.
In the narratives of chapters 1-6, Nebuchadnezzar and Belshazzar are perfect examples of human leaders who rebel against God's authority. In both cases, their pride reduces them to pathetic states of helplessness and ridicule. After God has acted, they are hardly recognizable as kings of the great and mighty Babylon (4:33; 5:6).
The pride of the world empires is central to the ideas of chapters 7-12. The scheme of empires in chapters 7,8 is a succession of world leaders, which depicts the limits of imperial pride, reaching the climax at the little horn with the big mouth (7:8). But a new heavenly kingdom, led by the Ancient of Days and the Son of Man, replaces these proud earthly reigns. In chapters 10-12 the supernatural forces of heaven will move to crush the ultimate anti-Christian ruler of earth, who has arrogantly raised himself above every god (11:36).
The Book of Daniel is especially pertinent for every new generation of believers because it addresses the ultimate problem of the human condition. Sin and rebellion always find root in pride and self-absorption. So salvation must involve confession, rejection of prideful self-sufficiency, and dependence on God (Mark 8:34 ), all of which are so magnificently modeled by Daniel, his three companions, and later, by the saints of the Most High.
The Ultimate Victory of God's Saints . Daniel also reveals much about the kingdom of God. The fundamental message of Daniel is that through every possible circumstance of life, it is possible to live a life of faith and victory with God's help. God reigns supreme in heaven and earth, and those allied with him share in his triumph. No matter how severe the persecution, the enemies of God cannot bring an end to his community of believers. The unique apocalyptic nature of Daniel teaches that this has always been so (chaps. 1-6) and always will be (chaps. 7-12). Even in death, God's people are victorious (12:1-3).
Prevalent in this book is the idea of four great world kingdoms followed by a fifth (chaps. 2,7). Conservative authorities have traditionally taken these kingdoms to refer to Babylonia, Medo-Persia, Greece, and Rome, respectively. Though the precise details are in doubt, the message is clear and irrefutable. All earthly kingdoms are temporary, even fleeting, no matter how impressive they may look at the moment. Ultimately, the eternal kingdom of the Ancient of Days will be ushered in by the Son of Man (7:14).
Although this promise is certain and sure, the rest of the book describes a delay in the arrival of God's eternal kingdom. During the postponement, God's faithful people will endure severe testing and persecution at the hands of proud, irreligious leaders of the world. The seventy weeks of years (9:24-27) and the promise of the resurrection (12:1-3) presuppose that the faithful saints of God will have to endure hardship for a limited time. But those who faithfully endure and await his timing will participate in his final victory.
Daniel is the primary source in the Old Testament revealing events of the future. Together with the New Testament Book of Revelation, it provides data for the various theories about the endtimes. Though Christians disagree on issues such as when Christ will return in relation to a millennial (thousand-year) reign, all are agreed that the most important question is whether the church is currently living a life worthy of his blessing and acceptance, whenever he comes again.
In other words, the details of eschatology are not as crucial as eschatological ethics: behaving Christ-like now in this world, and living in the expectation and anticipation of Christ's return. Daniel teaches that God's people can and should live holy, righteous lives while suffering the injustices of this life. They are encouraged to do so because, in the end, God will conclusively reward them with victory.
God's Messiah . The role of the "Son of David" is a central theme among Israel's prophets. Israel never forgot God's promise to provide seed from her ideal King to rule forever on the throne in Jerusalem (2 Samuel 7:16 ). Isaiah thought of God's commitment to David as a pattern for the everlasting covenant God wanted with Israel (55:3-4). Jeremiah asserted that the covenant with David was as unbreakable and secure as God's appointment of the sun to rule the day and the moon to rule the night (33:20-22).
The son of David figure was an "anointed one, " since the kings of Israel were traditionally anointed with oil by a prophet. This anointed one ("Messiah" in Hebrew, "Christ" in Greek) was the principal figure for the prophets, who speak of a movement from chaos and defeat to victory and redemption for national Israel. But as an exilic prophet, Daniel was living and working after the actual loss of the monarchy. No ancient Near Eastern community could survive the absence of a king. But Israel had the capacity to preserve spiritually what she had lost materially.
In Daniel, the concept of the Messiah was reinterpreted toward the universal, rather than being limited to a single nation, Israel. Thus there is a Davidic substratum, or ideological undercurrent in Daniel 7:13-14 . Daniel had envisioned evil incarnate in the form of the little horn, the symbol of a ruthless human dictator who stops at nothing to achieve his own selfish ambitions (7:8,8:9, though the two horns are not identical). Now Daniel sees the Messiah as the antithesis of personified evil. Eventually the Son of Man will lead his people ("the saints of the Most High") into triumph.
The political and military dimensions of the son of David, the king-Messiah, are broadened in Daniel. In chapter 7 the nationalistic interpretation of the Messiah is transcended. Instead of savior of national Israel, who leads his people to victory over enemy nations that are evil, the Messiah becomes victorious over evil in general.
William T. Arnold
See also Apocalyptic ; Jesus Christ, Name and Titles of ; Messiah ; Revelation, Theology of
Bibliography . J. G. Baldwin, Daniel: An Introduction and Commentary ; J. E. Goldingay, Daniel ; D. W. Heaton, The Book of Daniel ; A. LaCocque, Daniel in His Time ; D. S. Russell, The Method and Message of Jewish Apocalyptic ; E. J. Young, Daniel: An Introduction and Commentary ; idem, The Prophecy of Daniel: A Commentary .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Daniel, Book of
The historical part of the book treats of the period of the Captivity. Daniel is "the historian of the Captivity, the writer who alone furnishes any series of events for that dark and dismal period during which the harp of Israel hung on the trees that grew by the Euphrates. His narrative may be said in general to intervene between Kings and Chronicles on the one hand and Ezra on the other, or (more strictly) to fill out the sketch which the author of the Chronicles gives in a single verse in his last chapter: 'And them that had escaped from the sword carried he [1] away to Babylon; where they were servants to him and his sons until the reign of the kingdom of Persia'" (2 Chronicles 36:20 ).
The prophetical part consists of three visions and one lengthened prophetical communication.
The genuineness of this book has been much disputed, but the arguments in its favour fully establish its claims.
We have the testimony of Christ (Matthew 24:15 ; 25:31 ; 26:64 ) and his apostles (1 Corinthians 6:2 ; 2 th 2:3 ) for its authority; and (2) the important testimony of (Ezekiel 14:14,20 ; 28:3 ).
The character and records of the book are also entirely in harmony with the times and circumstances in which the author lived.
The linguistic character of the book is, moreover, just such as might be expected. Certain portions (Daniel 2:4 ; 7 ) are written in the Chaldee language; and the portions written in Hebrew are in a style and form having a close affinity with the later books of the Old Testament, especially with that of Ezra. The writer is familiar both with the Hebrew and the Chaldee, passing from the one to the other just as his subject required. This is in strict accordance with the position of the author and of the people for whom his book was written. That Daniel is the writer of this book is also testified to in the book itself (7:1,28; 8:2; 9:2; 10:1,2; 12:4,5). (See BELSHAZZAR .)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Daniel, the Book of
AUTHENTICITY. That Daniel composed it is testified by Daniel 7:1-28; Daniel 8:2; Daniel 9:2; Daniel 10:1-2; Daniel 12:4-5. In the first six chapters, which are historical, he does not mention himself in the first person, for in these the events, not the person, are prominent (compare Isaiah 7:3; Isaiah 20:2). In the last six, which are prophetical, wherein his divine commission needed to be shown, he comes forward personally as the writer. Being a "seer," having the gift and spirit, not the theocratical office and work, of a prophet, his book stands in the third rank in the Hebrew canon, namely, in the Hagiographa (Kethubim) between Esther and Ezra, the three relating to the captivity. Its position there, not among the prophets as one would expect, shows it was not an interpolation of later times, but deliberately placed where it is by Ezra and the establishers of the Jewish canon. Daniel was "the politician, chronologer, and historian among the prophets" (Bengel).
Similarly, the Psalms, though largely prophetic, are ranked with the Hagiographa, not the prophets. He does not, as they writing amidst the covenant people do, make God's people the foreground; but writing in a pagan court he makes the world kingdoms the foreground, behind which he places the kingdom of God, destined ultimately to be all in all. His book written amidst pagan isolation is the Old Testament Apocalypse, as the Revelation of John written in the lonely Patmos is the New Testament Apocalypse; the two respectively stand apart, his from the prophets, John's from the epistles. Porphyry in the third century A.D. assailed the Book of Daniel as a forgery in the time of the Maccabees, 170-164 B.C. But the forgery of a prophecy, if Daniel were spurious, would never have been received by the Jews from an age when confessedly there were no prophets. Antiochus Epiphanes' history and attack on the holy people are so accurately detailed (Daniel 11) that Porphyry thought they must have been written after the event.
But Zechariah, Ezra, and Nehemiah allude to it; Jesus in His peculiar designation "the Son of man" (Matthew 24:30, compare Daniel 7:13) refers to it, and especially in the crisis of His trial when adjured by the living God (Matthew 26:64), and stamps him authoritatively as "the prophet Daniel," and ratifies his particular prophecies (Matthew 24:15; Matthew 24:21; compare Daniel 12:1, etc.). Luke 1:19-26 mentions Gabriel, whose name occurs elsewhere in Scripture only in Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21. The prophecies tally with those in Revelation. The judgment of the world given to the saints, and the destruction of the blasphemous king at the Lord's coming, (Daniel 7:8; Daniel 7:25; Daniel 11:36) foretold by Daniel, are further unfolded by Paul (1 Corinthians 6:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:3-12).
The deliverance from fire and lions (Daniel 2 and Daniel 6) are referred to in Hebrews 11:33-34. Thus, the New Testament attests (Daniel 2-3; 6-7; 11) expressly on the three points to which rationalists object, namely, the predictions, the miracles narrated, and the manifestations of angels. The former part also is referred to by Christ, namely, as to "the stone" smiting the image (Daniel 2:34-35; Daniel 2:44-45), in Matthew 21:44. The miracles, like those of Moses in Egypt, were designed to show to the seemingly victorious world power the really superior might of the seemingly prostrate kingdom of God, and so to encourage the captive Jews to patient trustfulness in God. What completely disproves Porphyry's theory is, 1 Maccabees (1 Maccabees 1:24; 1 Maccabees 9:27; 1 Maccabees 9:40) refers to Daniel as an accredited book, and even to Septuagint version of it; compare Daniel 11:26 (Septuagint Daniel 12:1).
Daniel's place in the Septuagint shows it was received by the Jews before the Maccabean times. What a strange testimony then does Porphyry unwillingly bear to the divine inspiration of the book; the events so minutely fulfilling the prophecies about Antiochus that it might be supposed to be a history of the past instead of, as it is proved to be, a prediction of events then future. Josephus (Ant. 7:11, section 8) records that Alexander the Great had designed to punish the Jews for their fidelity, to Darius; but Jaddua (332 B.C.) the high priest, at the head of a procession, met him and averted his wrath by showing him Daniel's prophecy that a Grecian monarch should overthrow Persia (Daniel 8:5-8). Josephus' statement, if true, accounts for the fact that Alexander favored the Jews; it certainly proves that the Jews of Josephus' time believed in the existence of Daniel's book in Alexander's time long before the Maccabees. With Jaddua, high priest in 341-322 B.C, the Old Testament history ends (Nehemiah 12:11).
As this was long after Nehemiah, who died about 400 B.C., the register of priests and Levites must have been inserted in Nehemiah with divine sanction subsequently. The language of Daniel from Daniel 2:4 to the end of Daniel 7 is Chaldee, the world empire's language, the subject here being about the world at large. The rest is Hebrew generally, as the subject concerns the Jews and their ultimately restored theocratic kingdom. Daniel's circumstances exactly tally to this, he being Hebrew by birth and still keeping up intercourse with Hebrew, and at the same time Chaldee by residence and associations. The union of the two languages in one book would be as unnatural to one in a later age, and therefore not similarly circumstanced, as if, is natural to Daniel. Daniel's Hebrew is closely like that of Ezekiel and Habakkuk, that is, just those prophets living nearest the assumed age of Daniel. The Aramaic, like Ezra's, is of an earlier form than in any other Chaldaic document. Two predictions establish Daniel's prophetic character, and that the events foretold extend to subsequent ages.
(1) That the four world monarchies should rise (Daniel 2; Daniel 7), Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece, and Rome, and that Rome in a tenfold divided form should be the last, and should be overthrown by Messiah's kingdom alone; Charlemagne, Charles V, and Napoleon have vainly tried to raise a fifth.
(2) The time of Messiah's advent dating from the foretold decree to restore the temple, His being cut off, and the city's destruction, are foretold definitely. "He who denies Daniel's prophecies undermines Christianity, which is founded on Daniel's prophecies concerning Christ" (Sir Isaac Newton).
The vision mode of revelation, which is the exception in other prophets, is the rule in Daniel and in Zechariah 1-6. A new stage in the theocracy begins with the captivity. Hence arose the need for miracles to mark the new era. National miracles in Egypt, the wilderness, and Canaan marked the beginning of the theocracy or outwardly manifested kingdom of God. Personal miracles mark the beginning of the church, the spiritual kingdom of God, coming not with outward observation in "the times of the Gentiles," which began from the captivity. Originally, Abraham was raised out, of the "sea" (Daniel 7:2) of nations as an island holy to God, and his seed chosen as God's mediator of His revelation of love to mankind. Under David and Solomon the theocracy attained its Old Testament climax, being not only independent but ruling the surrounding pagan; so this period was made type of the Messianic (as it ultimately shall be manifested).
But when God's people rested on the world powers the instrument of their sin was made the instrument of their punishment. So the ten tribes' kingdom, Israel, fell by Assyria (722 B.C.), on whom it had leaned, and Judah similarly by Babylon (Ezekiel 23). The theocracy, in the strict sense of the manifested kingdom of God on earth, has ceased since the Babylonian exile, and shall only be resumed with a glory vastly exceeding the former at the millennium (Revelation 11:15; Revelation 11:20). Daniel's position in the Babylonian court answers to the altered relations of the theocracy and the world power; see above. He represents the covenant nation in exile, and in subjection to the world power externally. But his heavenly insight into dreams which baffle the Chaldaeans' lore represents the covenant people's inner superiority to their pagan lords. His high dignities in the world typify the ultimate giving of the earth kingdom "to the people of the saints of the Most High" (Daniel 7:27).
Thus his personal history is the basis of his prophecy. Daniel 2-7 represent the world powers developed historically; Daniel 8-12 their development in relation to Israel. The period of Daniel's prophecies is that from the downfall of the theocracy to its final restoration; it is the period of the world's outward supremacy, "the times of the Gentiles" (Luke 21:24; Daniel 9:27; Daniel 12:7), not set aside by Christ's first coming (John 18:36; Matthew 4:8-10); for Satan yet is "prince of this world," and Israel has been depressed and Judah's kingdom prostrate ever since the Babylonian captivity. But His second advent shall usher in the restored Israelite theocracy and His worldwide manifested kingdom. In Daniel 2 the world kingdoms are seen by the pagan king in their outward unity and glory, yet without life, a metal colossus; in Daniel 7 they appear to the prophet of God in their real character as instinct with life, but mere beast life, terrible animal power, but no true manhood; for true manhood can only be realized by conscious union with God, in whose image man was made.
The Son of God as "the Son of man" is the true ideal Standard and Head of humanity. (See BEAST.) In Revelation 4; 5, the four cherubim are "living creatures," not "beasts" as KJV. The "beast" (theerion ) appears in Revelation 13; Revelation 14; Revelation 17; Revelation 19, as in Daniel 7-8. When Nebuchadnezzar glorified and deified self, becoming severed from God, he became beast-like and consorted with the beasts, that look downward to the earth, having lost his true humanity; but when "he lifted up his eyes to heaven his understanding returned, and he blessed the Most High, whose dominion is an everlasting dominion" (Daniel 4:28-34).
Nebuchadnezzar's degradation, repentance, and restoration contrast strikingly with Belshazzar's sacrilegious luxury and consequent doom; and Daniel develops definitely the prophetical germs already existing as to Messiah (Daniel 7; Daniel 9), the resurrection (Daniel 12:2-3), and the ministry of angels (Daniel 8:16; Daniel 8:10; Daniel 12:1). The "seventy weeks" (Daniel 9:24) probably date from 457 B.C., when Ezra (Ezra 7) in the 7th year of Artaxerxes Longimenus returned to Jerusalem empowered to restore the temple and the national polity, 13 years before the rebuilding of Jerusalem by Nehemiah, who carried out the commission of Ezra, which virtually included the rebuilding of the city.
457 B.C. (the A.D. dating four years after Christ's actual birth.)
30 A.D. the crucifixion.
3 1/2 years, afterward, of gospel preaching to the Jews only.
=====
490 1/2
So, Jeremiah foretold that 70 years of the captivity would begin at 606 B.C., 18 years before the actual destruction of Jerusalem, when Judah's independent theocracy ceased, Jehoiakim being put in fetters by Nebuchadnezzar. The seventy weeks of years are divided into 7, 62, and
1. The 70th one week, the period of New Testament revelation in Messiah, consummates the preceding ones, as the sabbath succeeds and crowns the work days. The Messianic time (seven years) is the sabbath of Israel's history, in which it had the offer of all God's mercies, but was cut off temporarily for rejecting them. The seven weeks or sevens in the beginning, i.e. 49 years, answer to the period closing Old Testament revelation, namely, that of Ezra, Nehemiah, and Malachi. The 62 are the intermediate period of 434 years between the seven and the one, and in them was no revelation; in all 490 years. The closing one week (or seven years) includes the 3 1/2, years of Jesus' own preaching to the Jews, and 3 1/2 of the apostles' preaching to the Jews only; then the persecution as to Stephen drove the evangelists from Jerusalem to Samaria.
The universal expectation of a Savior existed even in the Gentile world at the very time He came; doubtless due to Daniel's prophecy carried far and wide by the Jews (Tacitus, Hist., 5:13; Suetonius, Vespasian 4). Jerusalem was not actually destroyed until A.D. 70, but virtually and theocratically was "dead" A.D. 33, 3 1/2 years after Christ's death, having failed to use that respite of grace (Luke 13:7-9). Genesis 2:17, in the day that Adam sinned he died, though his actual death was long subsequent. Hosea 13:1-2; Jerusalem's destruction by Titus only consummated the removal of the kingdom of God from Israel to the Gentiles, which took place at the scattering of the disciples from Jerusalem (Matthew 21:43), to be restated at Christ's second advent, when Israel shall head the nations (Matthew 23:39; Acts 1:6-7; Romans 11:25-31; Romans 15).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Daniel
God is my judge, or judge of God.
David's second son, "born unto him in Hebron, of Abigail the Carmelitess" (1 Chronicles 3:1 ). He is called also Chileab (2 Samuel 3:3 ).
One of the four great prophets, although he is not once spoken of in the Old Testament as a prophet. His life and prophecies are recorded in the Book of Daniel. He was descended from one of the noble families of Judah (Daniel 1:3 ), and was probably born in Jerusalem about B.C. 623, during the reign of Josiah. At the first deportation of the Jews by Nebuchadnezzar (the kingdom of Israel had come to an end nearly a century before), or immediately after his victory over the Egyptians at the second battle of Carchemish, in the fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim (B.C. 606), Daniel and other three noble youths were carried off to Babylon, along with part of the vessels of the temple. There he was obliged to enter into the service of the king of Babylon, and in accordance with the custom of the age received the Chaldean name of Belteshazzar, i.e., "prince of Bel," or "Bel protect the king!" His residence in Babylon was very probably in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar, now identified with a mass of shapeless mounds called the Kasr, on the right bank of the river. His training in the schools of the wise men in Babylon (Daniel 1:4 ) was to fit him for service to the empire. He was distinguished during this period for his piety and his stict observance of the Mosaic law (1:8-16), and gained the confidence and esteem of those who were over him. His habit of attention gained during his education in Jerusalem enabled him soon to master the wisdom and learning of the Chaldeans, and even to excel his compeers.
At the close of his three years of discipline and training in the royal schools, Daniel was distinguished for his proficiency in the "wisdom" of his day, and was brought out into public life. He soon became known for his skill in the interpretation of dreams (1:17; 2:14), and rose to the rank of governor of the province of Babylon, and became "chief of the governors" (Chald. Rab-signin) over all the wise men of Babylon. He made known and also interpreted Nebuchadnezzar's dream; and many years afterwards, when he was now an old man, amid the alarm and consternation of the terrible night of Belshazzar's impious feast, he was called in at the instance of the queen-mother (perhaps Nitocris, the daughter of Nebuchadnezzar) to interpret the mysterious handwriting on the wall. He was rewarded with a purple robe and elevation to the rank of "third ruler." The place of "second ruler" was held by Belshazzar as associated with his father, Nabonidus, on the throne (5:16). Daniel interpreted the handwriting, and "in that night was Belshazzar the king of the Chaldeans slain."
After the taking of Babylon, Cyrus, who was now master of all Asia from India to the Dardanelles, placed Darius (q.v.), a Median prince, on the throne, during the two years of whose reign Daniel held the office of first of the "three presidents" of the empire, and was thus practically at the head of affairs, no doubt interesting himself in the prospects of the captive Jews (Daniel 9 ), whom he had at last the happiness of seeing restored to their own land, although he did not return with them, but remained still in Babylon. His fidelity to God exposed him to persecution, and he was cast into a den of lions, but was miraculously delivered; after which Darius issued a decree enjoining reverence for "the God of Daniel" (6:26). He "prospered in the reign of Darius, and in the reign of Cyrus the Persian," whom he probably greatly influenced in the matter of the decree which put an end to the Captivity (B.C. 536).
He had a series of prophetic visions vouch-safed to him which opened up the prospect of a glorious future for the people of God, and must have imparted peace and gladness to his spirit in his old age as he waited on at his post till the "end of the days." The time and circumstances of his death are not recorded. He probably died at Susa, about eighty-five years of age.
Ezekiel, with whom he was contemporary, mentions him as a pattern of righteousness (14:14,20) and wisdom (28:3). (See NEBUCHADNEZZAR .)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Daniel
i.e. "God is my judge"; or as others, "the judge of God," as his Chaldee name Belteshazzar means "the prince of Bel." Probably from royal blood; compare Daniel 1:3 with 1 Chronicles 3:1, from whence it appears he bore the same name as David's son by Abigail (who is called Chileab in 2 Samuel 3:3 "like his father".) Carried to Babylon in Nebuchadnezzar's first deportation of captives, in the fourth (Jeremiah 25:1; Jeremiah 46:2) or third (Daniel 1:1 counting only complete years) year of Jehoiakim, the first of Nebuchadnezzar (acting under Nabopolassar in the last year of the latter's reign, but reigning alone not until the year after; as Daniel 2:1 proves, for after Daniel's three years' training the year is nevertheless called the "second" of Nebuchadnezzar, i.e. of his sole reign). Daniel was put in training with three others of the royal seed, still "children" (Daniel 1:4), according to eastern etiquette, to become courtiers; and to mark his new position he received a Babylonian name, Belteshazzar (compare 2 Kings 23:34; 2 Kings 24:17; Ezra 5:14; Esther 2:7).
He gave a noble proof of faithfulness combined with wisdom at this early age, by abstaining from the food of the king's table, as being defiled with the usual idolatry at pagan feasts (Daniel 1:8-16), living for ten days' trial on pulse and water, and at the end looking fairer and fatter than those fed on the king's dainties. Those who would excel in piety and wisdom must early subject the flesh to the spirit. Daniel experienced the truth of Deuteronomy 8:3. Ezekiel in the early part of his ministry refers to hint as a model of "righteousness" and "wisdom" (Ezekiel 14:14; Ezekiel 14:20; Daniel 1:3-59), for Daniel had not yet become a writer. Noah before and at the flood, Job in the postdiluvian patriarchal age, and Daniel toward the close of the legal theocracy are made types of "righteousness."
So Ezekiel's reference, in what it alleges and in what it omits, exactly tallies with what we should expect, presuming that Ezekiel and Daniel lived and wrote when and where they are represented. Daniel's high position while still a mere youth (1618102512_58; Daniel 1:11-16; Daniel 2:1), at the court of the Jews' conqueror and king, gave them a vivid interest in their illustrious countryman's fame for righteousness and wisdom; for in his person they felt themselves raised from their present degradation. As at the beginning of the covenant people's history their kinsman Joseph, so toward its close Daniel, by the interpretation of dreams (Daniel 2; Daniel 4), was promoted to high place in the court of their pagan masters. Thus, they both represented Israel's destined calling to be a royal priesthood among the nations, and ultimately to be the bearers of Messiah's light to the whole Gentile world (Ezekiel 28:3; Romans 11:15).
Daniel was made by Nebuchadnezzar, governor of Babylonia and president of the Babylonian "wise men," not to be confounded with the later Persian magi. Under Belshazzar Daniel was in a lower office, and was occasionally away from Babylon (Daniel 5:7-8; Daniel 5:12) at Susa (Daniel 8:2; Daniel 8:27). His interpretation of the mystical handwriting on the wall caused his promotion again, a promotion which continued under Darius and Cyrus. Under Darius he was first of the three presidents of the empire. Envy often follows high office which men so covet; so, by a law cunningly extorted by his enemies from the weak Darius, that none should offer petition to man or god except to the king for 30 days, as though it were a test of loyalty, on pain of being cast into a lions' den, Daniel was cast in and was delivered by God, who thus rewarded his pious faithfulness (Daniel 6).
It is an accordance with Medo-Persian ideas which flows from the truth of Scripture, that the mode of capital punishment under the Babylonian rule is represented as burning (Daniel 3), but under the Medes and Persians' exposure to wild beasts, for they would have regarded fire as polluted by contact with a corpse, while they approved the devouring of bodies by animals. Berosus calls the last Babylonian king Nabonidus, and says that he surrendered to Cyrus in Borsippa, and was assigned an honorable abode in Carmania. Rawlinson has shown that the Babylonian inscriptions at Ur (Umqueir) explain the seeming discrepancy. Belshazzar or Bel-shar-ezer (on the mother's side descended front Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 5:11) was joint king with his father; having shut himself up in Babylon he fell there while his father at Borsippa survived. (See BELSHAZZAR.) Berosus as being a Chaldaean suppressed all concerning Belshazzar, since it was to the national dishonor.
If Daniel's book had been a late one, he would have copied Berosus; if it had been at variance with that prevalent in Babylonia, the Jews there would have rejected it. His mention of Darius the Mede's reign, which profane history ignores (probably because it was eclipsed by Cyrus' glory), shows that he wrote as a contemporary historian of events which He knew, and did not borrow from others. He must have been about 84 years old when he saw the visions (Daniel 10-12) concerning his people, extending down to the resurrection and the last days. Though advanced years forbade his return to the Holy Land, yet his people's interests were always nearest his heart (Daniel 9; Daniel 10:12).
His last recorded vision was in the third year of Cyrus (534 B.C.), on the banks of the Tigris (Hiddekel) Daniel 10:1-4. In Daniel 3:2, Hebrew for "princes," Nebuchadnezzar summons his satraps ('achashdarpni , Persian khshtrapa ). Some allege that Daniel erroneously attributes to the Babylonians the satrapial form of government. But Gedaliah was virtually a satrap under Nebuchadnezzar in Judaea, i.e. a governor over a province, instead of its being left under the native kings (2 Kings 25:23). Berosus speaks of Nabopolassar's "satrap of Egypt, Coelosyria, and Phoenicia." Daniel writing for Jews under Persia at the time uses naturally the familiar Persian term "satrap" instead of the corresponding Babylonian term. (On Daniel's representation of the relation of the Medes to the Persians and Darius the Mede (possibly equating to Astyages, or his son, the former of whom Cyrus deposed and treated kindly) to Cyrus. (See CYRUS.)
The objection to Daniel on the ground that Susa, or at least its palace, was not built when Daniel saw the vision there, rests on Pliny alone, who alleges it to have been built by Darius Hystaspis. But the Assyrian inscriptions prove it was one of the most ancient Mesopotamian cities, and its palace (the Memnonium is the name the Greeks give it) famous centuries before Daniel. Darius Hystaspes was only the first to build at Susa a palace in Persian fashion. Daniel, like Moses, was trained in all the learning of the world; his political experience moreover, as a minister of state under successive dynasties of the great world powers, gave the natural qualifications to which God added supernatural spiritual insight, enabling him to characterize to the life the several world monarchies which bore or were to bear sway until Messiah's kingdom shall come with power.
Personal purity and selfrestraint amidst the world's corrupting luxuries (Daniel 1:8-16; compare Moses, Hebrews 11:25; Joseph, Genesis 39:9); faithfulness to God at all costs, and fearless witnessing for God before great men (Daniel 5:17-23), unbribed by lucre and unawed by threats (Daniel 6:10-11); the holiest and most single-minded patriotism which with burning prayers interceded for his chastened countrymen (Daniel 9); intimate communion with God, so that, like the beloved disciple and apocalyptic seer of the New Testament, John, Daniel also is called" a man greatly beloved," and this twice, by the angel of the Lord (Daniel 9:23; Daniel 10:11), and received the exact disclosure of the date of Messiah's advent, the 70 weeks of years, and the successive events down to the Lord's final advent for the deliverance of His people: these are all prominent characteristics of this man of God.
It is not stated in Daniel 3 why Daniel was not among the rulers summoned to worship Nebuchadnezzar's golden image. Perhaps he was on state business in some distant part of the empire where the summons had not time to reach him. The Jews' enemies found it more political to attack first the three nearer at hand before proceeding to attack Daniel, the most influential. The king also, regarding him as divine (Daniel 2:46), forbore to summon him to worship the image, the self-deifying formation and setting up of which Daniel's own interpretation probably had suggested unintentionally to Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 2:37-39). As Daniel 2 and Daniel 7 go together, so Daniel 3 and Daniel 6; Daniel 4 and Daniel 5; the pair Daniel 3 and Daniel 6 shows God's nearness to save His saints, if faithful, just when they are on the point of being crushed by the world power.
The pair Daniel 4 and Daniel 5 shows God's power to humble the world power in the height of its impious arrogance; first Nebuchadnezzar, whose coming hypochondriacal exile among the beasts Daniel foretells with fidelity and tenderness; then Belshazzar, whose blasphemy he more sternly reproves. As Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego refuse positive homage to the world power's image, so Daniel refuses it even negative homage by omitting even for a few days worship to Jehovah. Jehovah's power manifested for the saints against the world first in individual histories (Daniel 3; 6) is exhibited next in worldwide prophetical pictures (Daniel 2 and Daniel 7). God manifested His irresistible power in Daniel and his friends, as representing the theocracy then depressed, before the pagan king who deemed himself divine. Thus, God secured the heathen's respect for His covenant people which found its culmination in Cyrus' decree for their restoration and the rebuilding of the temple of Jehovah, whom he confessed to be preeminently "THE God of heaven" (Ezra 1:1-4). Ezra 8:2 and Nehemiah 10:6 mention another Daniel, Ithamar's descendant.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Noble, Daniel
Born 1810; died 1885. Distinguished for his contributions to the study of mental and epidemic diseases.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o'Connell, Daniel
Orator and leader, surnamed "The Liberator"; born Carhen, County Kerry, Ireland, August 6, 1775; died Genoa, Italy, 1847. He studied at Saint Omer and Douai where his stay was cut short by the French Revolution and in 1798 was called to the Irish Bar. Though the penal laws had been relaxed, Catholics had only limited legal rights and O'Connell determined that they should have a voice in the making of the laws and should have religious freedom. The French Revolution had inspired him with a horror of violence and he determined to secure his end by peaceful means, with the cooperation of the oppressed masses. His first public appearance, 1800, was to denounce the projected union of parliaments, but when the act was passed, he organized the Catholics to fight for emancipation. He struggled undauntedly against bigotry and government oppression for years, opposing the proposed English veto power over episcopal elections and welcoming George IV to Ireland, 1820. By 1826 his Catholic Association was strong enough to contest parliamentaiy elections successfully; two years later he himself won the election in Clare amidst tremendous popular enthusiasm. He then refused to take the anti-Catholic oath in Parliament required by law; the crisis had come; Wellington feared a rebellion, so the Government capitulated, granting Catholic Emancipation, 1829, and O'Connell was the uncrowned King of Ireland. He now bent his efforts towards reform of the poor and tithe laws, and above all to repeal the Union. Eventually the Repeal Movement made mighty strides, monster meetings were held throughout the country, O'Connell was flung into prison but was released on appeal. Unfortunately his health began to fail, the generation of Young Irelanders was chafing under his prudent discipline; then came the horrors of the Great Famine. He was forced to seek restoration in a warmer climate and wished to die in Rome; but the end came after he reached Genoa. He had bequeathed his heart to the Eternal City and his body to Ireland, where it rests under the beautiful round tower at Glasnevin, Dublin.
Webster's Dictionary - Daniel
(n.) A Hebrew prophet distinguished for sagacity and ripeness of judgment in youth; hence, a sagacious and upright judge.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ammen, Daniel
(1820-1898) Naval officer and author, born Brown County, Ohio; died Washington, D.C. He served with Dupont's fleet during the Civil War, was chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1869-71, and of the Bureau of Navigation, 1871-78. He designed the ram, Katahdin, and a life-raft, Ammen balsa, used in the navy, and made a survey for a Nicaraguan Canal which he strongly advocated. Ammendale, near Washington, was named after him; it is the seat of a Christian Brothers' novitiate. Appointed rear-admiral, 1877, he resigned, 1878. His writings include "Recollections of Grant" and "The Old Navy and the New" (autobiographical).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gabriel Daniel
Author, born Rouen, France, 1649; died Paris, France, 1728. He entered the Society of Jesus, 1667, became historiographer of France. He wrote on the questions of probabilism and grace but is best known for his refutation of Pascal's "Provincial Letters" and for his great history of France.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Daniel
DANIEL . 1. Two passages in the Book of Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 14:14-20 ; Ezekiel 28:3 ), written respectively about b.c. 592 and 587, mention a certain Daniel as an extraordinarily righteous and wise man, belonging to the same class as Noah and Job, whose piety availed with God on behalf of their unworthy contemporaries. All three evidently belonged to the far-distant past: Ezekiel’s readers were familiar with their history and character. Daniel, occupying the middle place, cannot be conceived of as the latest of them. He certainly was not a younger man than the prophet who refers to him, as the hero of the Book of Daniel would have been. For Daniel 1:1-3 makes the latter to have been carried into captivity in b.c. 606, a mere decade prior to Ezekiel 14:2 . See Abigail. 3 . A priest who accompanied Ezra from Babylon to Jerusalem ( Ezra 8:2 , Nehemiah 10:6 ). He was head of his father’s house, and traced his descent from Ithamar. At 1Es 8:29 the name is spelled Gamelus or Gamael , which probably rests on a corrupt Heb. text. Driver ( Daniel , p. xviii.) notes that amongst his contemporaries were ‘a Hananiah ( Nehemiah 10:23 ), a Mishael ( Nehemiah 8:4 ), and an Azariah ( Nehemiah 10:2 ); but the coincidence is probably accidental.’ It is, however, quite as likely that the author of Dn. borrowed the three names from Nehemiah.
J. Taylor.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Daniel, Book of
DANIEL, BOOK OF
1. Authorship and Date . The first six chapters of this book contain a series of narratives which tell of ( a ) the fidelity of Daniel and his friends to their religion, and ( b ) the incomparable superiority of their God to the deities of Babylon. The remaining six chapters relate four visions seen by Daniel and the interpretation of them. Chs. 1 6 speak of Daniel in the third person; in 7 12 he is the speaker (yet see Daniel 7:1 , Daniel 10:1 ). But both parts are from the same pen, and the primâ facie impression is that of an autobiography. Porphyry argued against this in the 3rd cent. a.d., and it is now generally abandoned, for such reasons as the following: (1) In the Jewish Canon Dn. stands in the third division, ‘the Writings.’ Had it been the production of a prophet of the 6th cent. it would have been put in the second division, ‘the Prophets.’ (2) Neither the man nor the book is mentioned in the list of Sir 44:1-23 ; Sir 45:1-26 ; Sir 46:1-20 ; Sir 47:1-25 ; Sir 48:1-25 ; Sir 49:1-16 ; Sir 50:1-29 ( c [1] . b.c. 200): and Sir 49:15 seems to have been written by one who was not acquainted with the story. (3) There is no reason for believing that a collection of sacred writings, including Jer., had been formed in the reign of Darius, as is implied in Daniel 9:2 . (4) The Heb. of Dn. is of a later type than even that of Chronicles. The Aramaic is a West-Syrian dialect, not in use at the Bab. [2] court in the 6th century. More Persian words are employed than a Heb. author would be familiar with at the close of the Bab. [2] empire. In a document composed prior to the Macedonian conquest we should not have found the three Greek words which are here used. (5) There are inaccuracies which a contemporary would have avoided. It is doubtful whether Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem in b.c. 606 ( Daniel 1:1-2 ). The name ‘Chaldæans’ as designating the learned class is a later usage ( Daniel 2:2 ). Belshazzar was not ‘the king’ ( Daniel 5:1 ), nor was Neb. his ancestor ( Daniel 5:2 ; Daniel 5:11 ). Darius the Mede never ‘received the kingdom’ ( Daniel 5:31 ). Xerxes did not follow Artaxerxes ( Daniel 11:2 ) but preceded him. (6) The relations between Syria and Egypt, from the 4th to the 2nd cents. b.c., are described with a fulness of detail which differentiates Daniel 7:1-28 ; Daniel 11:1-45 from all OT prophecy: see the precision with which the reign of Antiochus Epiphanes is related in ch. 11; the events from 323 175 occupy 16 verses; those from 175 164 take up 25; at Daniel 11:34 the lines become less definite, because this is the point at which the book was written; at v. 40 prediction begins, and the language no longer corresponds with the facts of history. There can be little doubt that Dn. appeared about b.c. 166. Its object was to encourage the faithful Jews to adhere to their religion, in the assurance that God would intervene. The unknown writer was intensely sure of the truths in which he believed: to him and to his readers the historical setting was but a framework. Not that he invented the stories. We saw in the preceding article that the exiled Jews knew of a Daniel, famous for piety and wisdom. Round his name, in the course of the ages, stories illustrative of these qualities had gathered, and the author of our book worked up the material afresh with much skill.
2. Language, Unity, Theology . (1) From Daniel 2:4 b to Daniel 7:26 is in Aramaic . Four explanations have been offered: ( a ) This section was originally written in Aramaic, about b.c. 300, and incorporated, with additions, into the work of 166. ( b ) The corresponding portion of a Heb. original was lost and its place filled by an already current Aram. [4] translation. ( c ) The author introduced the ‘Chaldees’ as speaking what he supposed was their language, and then continued to write it because it was more familiar than Heb. to himself and his readers. ( d ) The likeliest suggestion is that the entire book was Aramaic, but would not have found admission into the Canon if it had not been enclosed, so to speak, in a frame of Heb., the sacred language.
(2) The unity of the book has been impugned by many critics, but it is now generally agreed that the question is settled by the harmony of view and consistency of plan which bind the two halves together. The text has suffered more or less in Daniel 1:20-21 , Daniel 6:20 , Daniel 7:5 , Daniel 9:4-20 , Daniel 10:4 ; Daniel 10:8-9 , Daniel 10:20 to Daniel 11:2 , Daniel 12:11 f.
(3) The theological features are what might be expected in the 2nd cent. b.c. Eschatology is prominent. The visions and their interpretations all culminate in the final establishment of the Kingdom of God. And in this connexion it should be mentioned that Dn. is the earliest example of a fully developed Apocalypse . The doctrine of the Resurrection is also distinctly asserted: individuals are to rise again; not all men, or even all Israelites, but the martyrs and the apostates. At no earlier period is there such an angelology. Watchers and holy ones determine the destinies of an arrogant king. Two angels have proper names, Gabriel and Michael. To each nation a heavenly patron has been assigned, and its fortunes here depend on the struggle waged by its representative above.
3. Text . The early Church set aside the LXX [5] in favour of the less paraphrastic version of Theodotion. In both translations are found the Additions to Daniel. (1) 67 verses are inserted after Daniel 3:22 , consisting of ( α ) the Prayer of Azarias . ( β ) details concerning the heating of the furnace , ( γ ) the Benedicite . These teach the proper frame of mind for all confessors, and dilate on the miraculous element in the Divine deliverance. (2) The History of Susanna , which demonstrates God’s protection of the unjustly accused and illustrates the sagacity in judgment of the youth who is rightly named Daniel , ‘El is my judge.’ (3) Bel and the Dragon , two tracts which expose the imbecility of idolatry, and bring out Daniel’s cleverness and God’s care for His servant in peril. Swete ( Introd. to OT in Greek , p. 260) rightly remarks that internal evidence appears to show that (1) and (2) originally had a separate circulation.
J. Taylor.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Daniel
DANIEL.—The influence of Daniel on the Apocalyptic conceptions of the Gospels is profound (see Apocalyptic Literature). For the possible influence of Daniel 7:13 see Son of Man. The only passage in which the book is explicitly mentioned is Matthew 24:15, where the phrase τὸ βδέλυγμα τῆς ἐρημώσεως (‘the abomination of desolation’) is quoted. See art. Abomination of Desolation. It is to be noted that in the corresponding passage in Mark (Mark 13:14), no mention is made of Daniel. In view of the accepted priority of Mark and his closer fidelity, and also of Matthew’s fondness for OT references, the absence of the clause raises the suspicion that it is not part of the original utterance, but a comment added by the latter Evangelist. In that case it would not be necessary to assume that Jesus meant to use the phrase in the same sense as it is used in Daniel. He may have only adopted or borrowed it as a current popular expression to describe some minatory event which He foresaw portending the forthcoming calamity.
A. Mitchell Hunter.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Seventy Weeks of Daniel
This period is taken from an important prophecy in Daniel 9:25-27 . The seventy weeks are divided into three parts, namely, seven, sixty-two, and one. We shall see in the sequel that 'weeks of years' are evidently intended. The first period of seven weeks refers to the building of the street and the wall, or moat, in troublous times, of which times an account is found in the book of Nehemiah. The second period of sixty-two weeks extends to the times of Messiah the Prince, after which He should be cut off and have nothing (margin ) — nothing of His Messianic glory. To reconcile with this the dates of history, it must be noticed that these weeks do not date from the commandment to build the temple (which was in the first year of Cyrus king of Persia, Ezra 1:1 ), but from the commandment to restore and build the city of Jerusalem, which was given in the twentieth year of Artaxerxes. Nehemiah 2:1 .
The date commonly given for this is B.C. 445; but Usher gave 455, and Hengstenberg and others contend that this is the true date. Hengstenberg shows in his "Christiology" how the mistake arose. Vitringa rectified the date, and Krüger, by an independent enquiry, also proved that the old date was wrong. Some hieroglyphic inscriptions in Egypt have shown that Artaxerxes was associated with his father in the twelfth year of the reign of Xerxes, and this information confirms the date given by Usher and others.
We start then from … … … … B.C. 455.
7 weeks are … … … … 49 years
62 weeks are … … … … 434 "
483
Deduct … … … … 455
28
Add 1 year to adjust the
eras B.C. and A.D. 1
29 A.D.
The year A.D. 29 is the date now commonly given for the crucifixion. It is generally agreed that the Lord lived on the earth thirty-three and a half years, but if He was born B.C. 4, and was crucified A.D. 33 (as given in the A.V.), He must have lived here 37 or 38 years; hence there must be a discrepancy somewhere. Early christian writers appealed confidently to a document called "The Acts of Pilate," which, though now considered spurious as far as Pilate is concerned, must have been an early writing, and this points to the date A.D. 29 for the crucifixion. Clement and Origen place the destruction of Jerusalem as forty-two years after the crucifixion. The destruction was in A.D. 70, which confirms the date of the latter as not later than 29. The definite time may be Christ's triumphant entry into Jerusalem, about a week before the last passover, agreeing with "Thy King cometh unto thee" in Zechariah 9:9 .
It is judged however by some that the sixty-nine weeks reach only up to Messiah the Prince as entering on His ministry; after which (indefinitely) He was cut off: and therefore the sixty-nine weeks should end at least three years earlier. This is probably the true view, though it may be impossible now to precisely adjust dates.
This leaves the last week of the seventy. The rest of the prophecy in Daniel 9:26 agrees with the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus, and foretells a determined period of desolation till war against it will end. Then Daniel 9:27 takes up the outward circumstances of the last week, which is future, though probably one half of it has been, for faith, fulfilled in the ministry of Christ. The prophecy is concerning Israel; the present period (during which the church is being formed) comes in parenthetically, and occupies no part of the seventy weeks. The last week, in agreement with the above, will occupy a period of seven years.
Daniel 9:26,27 speak of 'the prince that shall come,' who shall confirm a covenant with the many for one week. He will no doubt be the head of the resuscitated Roman Empire: this is confirmed by Revelation 17:9-12 , in speaking of a kingdom that 'was, and is not,' and shall come. This head makes a covenant with Israel for seven years, but breaks it in the middle of the week; causes the sacrifice and the oblation to cease; and dire desolation by the Assyrian closes the scene. See ABOMINATION OF DESOLATION. The most momentous events will take place during the latter half of the week, as detailed in the Revelation. This will be a period of three and a half years, and if this interpretation is correct, we might expect to find such a period definitely mentioned. And so it is: the period of three and a half years is pointed out no fewer than seven times, as follows:
Daniel 7:25 ; "time, times, and dividing of times " (that the word 'times' refers to 'years' cf. Daniel 11:13 margin ).
Daniel 12:7 ; Revelation 12:14 ; "time, times, and half a time."
Revelation 11:2 ; Revelation 13:5 ; "42 months."
Revelation 11:3 ; Revelation 12:6 ; "1,260 days."
Thus the half week is given in years, 3½; in months, 42; and in days, 1,260.
As already stated, the church does not appear in the above: it has nothing to do with times and seasons — they belong to Israel and to the earth. The church is heavenly, and its hope is the coming of the Lord according to His promise to present it to Himself, and this He may do at any moment. He said, "Surely I come quickly:" to which the response of the church is, "Even so, come, Lord Jesus."
Seeing however that the Lord Jesus is referred to in the Seventy Weeks, not only in His being 'cut off' but also in His coming again to subdue His enemies, to bless His ancient people Israel, and to establish His kingdom on earth, it becomes His saints to study such a prophecy as this, and to be assured that nothing can happen to hinder or set aside the purposes of God: all is being ordered, and is hastening on to the time when the Lord Jesus will be acknowledged on earth as King of kings and Lord of lords.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Daniel
Judgment of God; God my judge
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Anthony Daniel, Blessed
Martyr (1601-1648), born Dieppe, France; died near Ontario, Canada. Having joined the Society of Jesus in 1621, he arrived in Canada, 1632, and was stationed at Cape Breton. He was sent to the Huron mission, Ihonatiria (1634-48), where he was slain in the Iroquois attack and his body was thrown into the burning chapel in which he had just celebrated Mass.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Barber, Daniel
Remarkable early converts in the United States. Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children. They were followed into the Church by Mrs. Daniel Barber (Chloe Case Sims), her husband, and seven children. Virgil Barber and his wife entered religion, he becoming a Jesuit and she a Visitation nun, their profession taking place on the same day in Georgetown convent. All their children became religious.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Daniel
The prophet of the Lord. His name is very significant, meaning, the judgment Daniel was descended from the royal family of David, and was carried away captive to Babylon when quite a youth. The Chaldeans artfully gave him the name of Belteshazzar, which signifies, master or lord of the treasure; by way, it is most likely, of causing him to forget the Lord God of his fathers. (See Daniel 1:7) We have this man's history in his writings, and in the accounts given of him by Ezekiel 14:14 for his great sanctity of life and manners. And his wisdom was so highly esteemed, that it became proverbial to denote a wise man by calling him Daniel. Hence, the prophet Ezekiel, (Ezekiel 28:3) speaking, by the Lord's command, to the prince of Tyrus, speaks of his vanity and pride, as if he thought himself wiser than Daniel. The prophecies of Daniel concerning the Messiah were so bright and clear, that the modern Jews endeavoured to call in question their authenticity, but without effect. In fact, the corresponding fulfilment of the prophecy with the prediction, becomes the best and most decided testimony to their truth; for this is the seal of God the Holy Ghost. The death of this prophets in the place, and time, and manner, is not known. Some have thought, that he returned to Judea with the captives that returned with Ezra; but the word of God hath not noticed it, which renders it improbable. It is enough for us to be blessed with his ministry, in his inspired writings, while he lived, and to rest assured, that he died in the faith of that glorious Saviour, whose advent, and sufferings, and death, he was commissioned by the Lord so clearly to describe. This is enough for us to know. And the voice John heard from heaven concerning all such is conclusive and satisfactory. (See Revelation 14:13)
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Daniel, the Stylite
Daniel (9) the Stylite, of the 5th cent., was a Mesopotamian by birth, and in his youth had visited Symeon the Stylite. After having lived a monastic life in convents for several years, at the age of 47 he received as a legacy the cowl of Symeon, and established his pillar 4 miles N. of Constantinople. The patriarch Gennadius ordained him presbyter against his will, standing at the foot of his column. Then the patriarch, by means of a ladder, administered the Eucharist, and received it in turn from the Stylite. He lived on his pillar for 33 years, and died at the age of 80. He was visited with reverence by kings and emperors as an oracle; but discouraged all who brought complaints against their bishops. Towards the end of his life, solicited eagerly by both sides, he took part in the dispute between the emperor Basiliscus, a Monophysite, and Acacius patriarch of Constantinople. Descending from his pillar, he appeared in the city, denounced Basiliscus, and inflamed the people with such zeal that Basiliscus published an orthodox edict. The following is his prayer before he began his life on the pillar: "I yield Thee glory, Jesus Christ my God, for all the blessings which Thou hast heaped upon me, and for the grace which Thou hast given me that I should embrace this manner of life. But Thou knowest that in ascending this pillar I lean on thee alone, and that to Thee alone I look for the happy issue of mine undertaking. Accept, then, my object; strengthen me that I finish this painful course; give me grace to end it in holiness." In his last will to his disciples, after commending them to the common Father of all, and to the Saviour Who died for them, Daniel bade them "hold fast humility, practise obedience, exercise hospitality, keep the fasts, observe the vigils, love poverty, and above all maintain charity, which is the first and great commandment; avoid the tares of the heretics; separate never from the church your mother: if you do these things your righteousness shall be perfect." Baronius places his death in a.d. 489. Vita S. Daniel , ap. Surium, ad diem ii. decemb. cap. xli. xlii. xliii.; Robertson, Ch. Hist. ii. 41-43, 274; Ceillier, x. 344, 403, 485. Baronius, ed. Theiner, vol. viii. ad an. 460, § 20; 464, § 2; 465, § 3, 12, 13; 476, § 48, 50, 51, 53; 489, § 4.
[1]
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Daniel
THERE is always a singular lustre, and nobility, and stately distinction about Daniel. There is a note of birth, and breeding, and aristocracy about Daniel's whole name and character. There is never at any time anything common or conventional in anything that Daniel says or does. Munro has gathered it all up in these three eloquent words: 'His refinement, his reserve, and the high sculpture of his character.'
The first thing in which Daniel's great qualities all come out is his so wise and so noble self-control and self-denial at the king's table. The narrative is a noble one. 'And the king appointed them a daily provision of the king's meat, and of the wines which he drank, so nourishing them three years, that at the end thereof they might stand before the king. But Daniel proposed not to defile himself with the portion of the king's meat, nor with the wine which he drank: therefore he requested of the prince of the eunuchs that he might not defile himself. Prove thy servants, I beseech thee, ten days; and let them give us pulse to eat and water to drink. Then let our countenances be looked upon before thee, and as thou then seest deal with thy servants. And at the end of the ten days their countenances appeared fairer and fatter in flesh than all the children that did eat of the king's meat.' 'I have remarked,' says an Eastern traveller, 'that their faces are ill fact more rosy and smooth than those of others, and that those who fast much, I mean the Armenians and the Greeks, are very beautiful, sparkling with health, and of a clear and lively countenance.' At the same time, Daniel did not at all times and in all places live on bare pulse and water. Calvin says that when Daniel and his three companions got far enough away from the royal table they would both eat flesh with pleasant bread, and would drink wine also in the wayside inns of Babylon, just as they had done when they were at home in Jerusalem. It was the company at the king's table; it was the idolatry, and the self-indulgence, and the indecency, and the riot among the young men of the palace that made Daniel determine that it would be both far easier and far safer to abstain altogether and from the beginning. When he was far enough away at any time from those snares and temptations and associations, and when he was alone with his three virtuous and temperate companions, Daniel did not make a voluntary and an ostentatious virtue of pulse and water.
A neat repast shall feast us, light and choice,Of Canaan's taste, with wine, whence we shall rise.He who of those delights can judge, and spareTo interpose them oft, is not unwise-Belteshazzar would say on occasion to Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego, just as our English Daniel said in his fine sonnet toLawrence, of virtuous father virtuous son.At the same time, there was nothing morose or melancholy in Daniel's total abstinence. Daniel was not of a sad countenance over his pulse and water. Daniel did not disfigure his face at the royal feasts. Because of his abstinence Daniel all the more anointed his head and washed his face; till, unless you had watched him well, you would have thought that all that affability, and good humour, and merriment of his must come of the abundance of the king's wine that be drank. Unless you had been in the secret you would never have supposed that Daniel was not eating and drinking with the same self-indulgence as all the rest. In nothing was Daniel's fine character finer seen, not even when his window was set open towards Jerusalem, not even when he stepped down into the den of lions, than it was when he was the last to rise from the royal feasts, with such sweetness, and geniality, and simplicity did he converse with the men of Babylon. Daniel did not expect the young men of Chaldea to deny themselves like captive Hebrews. They had not either his Hebrew sorrow or his Hebrew hope in their hearts, and he did not look for those things in them. Now it is just here that so many of ourselves both injure ourselves and injure other people by our abstinence. We enter on our abstinence out of some constraint and compulsion. We are abstainers, many of us, against our own hearts; or, if our hearts are in our abstinence, then it is our hard and self-righteous hearts. We abstain with self-importance, and with self-righteousness, and with sourness and soreness at those who still preserve their liberty. And this makes one man peevish and melancholy in his abstinence, and another man fierce and intolerant. And thus our latter end is worse than our beginning; and our self-denial than our self-indulgence. We must not only abstain, but we must make our abstinence genial and full of liberty and delight. 'Furthermore,' says Plutarch, 'Alexander was far less given to wine than men would have judged. He was thought to be a far greater bibber than he was because he sat long at the board, but it was rather to talk than to eat and drink. For even when he ate and drank he would propound some new and interesting subject, and yet but when he was at leisure. For, having matters to do, there was neither feast, nor banquet, nor marriage, nor any pastime that could stay him, as they had done other captains. He would ever sup late, and after his long day's work was done, and he was very curious to see that every man at his board was alike served, and would sit long at the table, because he ever loved to talk, as we have told you before. And in all other ways he was as gracious a prince and as noble to wait upon, and as pleasant as ever was.' One of Lord Ardmillan's daughters used to say of my dear old friend her father, that 'he breakfasted on the newspapers and dined on conversation.' And so he did; and thus it was that his step was the lightest, and his laugh the merriest, and his heart the most childlike of all the Parliament House men of his day. And in all other ways, like Plutarch's Alexander, Ardmillan was, I think, the most gracious and gentlemanly man I ever knew.
The Chaldean Schools: their literature, their true science and their pseudo-science, their architecture, their music, their political and military methods, their religion and the sacred arts connected with their religion-nothing of all that was at all foreign, or alien, or despicable to Daniel. The captive prince entered into all that with all the zest and with all the labour of what we would call a true student. Daniel foresaw that his whole life would have to be spent in Babylon, and he determined that his exile there should not be so much lost time either to his mind or to his heart. The Chaldean astrology has long since given way before the modern science of astronomy, and with it the so-called Magi, the star-gazers, and the soothsayers, and the sorcerers. But the truly philosophic temper that Daniel exhibited among the wise men of Babylon is still the true and wise temper for us all among the studies and the speculations and the scepticisms of our more learned, more scientific, and more speculative day. Daniel, by God's mercy, possessed the truth that the Chaldeans sought after in sun and moon and stars: in dreams and in incantations. And when he was cast among the speculations and superstitions of Chaldea he was able to study all he saw and all he heard with an interest, with an intelligence, and with a sympathy that are only to be found in a truly religious and a truly cultivated mind. In his birth, in his upbringing, in his breeding, and in his books, Daniel possessed a knowledge of God and of man that no sage of Chaldea could possibly approach: but, at the same time, Daniel was student enough to see that Chaldea had attained to a learning and to a religion of her own that well deserved his best attention. Till Daniel at last came to be acknowledged as more than the equal of the king's most learned and most consulted men. It was the largeness, and the expansiveness, and the hospitality of Daniel's fine mind, all combined with his extraordinary nobility and beauty of character, that gave Daniel such an unparalleled position in the court of Chaldea, and which has gained for Daniel such a famous and such a proverbial name in all subsequent literature, Ezekiel, a contemporary prophet, has heard so much of the wisdom of Daniel, that, to a proud enemy of Israel, he exclaims in irony: Thou art wiser than Daniel! We see the popular belief about Daniel strikingly illustrated also in the Apocryphal addition that was made to the Book of Daniel by its Greek translator and editor, and which was called the story of Susannah and the judgment of Daniel, And we are gratified to read in our own tongue a tribute to the same noble tradition in Shylock's exclamation;-
A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!The prophet Daniel became a great proficient both in penitential and in intercessory prayer also as the years went on. And he came to that great proficiency just as a great proficiency is come to in any other science or art: that is to say, by constant, and unremitting, and enterprising practice. Lord, teach us to pray, said a disciple on one occasion to our Lord. But not even our Lord with all His willingness, and with all His ability, can teach any of us off-hand to pray. Every man must teach himself, every day he lives, this most personal, most secret, and most experimental of all the arts. Every man must find out the best ways of prayer for himself. There is no royal road; there is no short or easy road to proficiency in prayer. It is like all the other arts that you have ever mastered; it must be early begun and assiduously practised, else you will be but a bungler at it all your days. You must also have special and extraordinary seasons of prayer, as Daniel had, over and above his daily habit of prayer. Special and extraordinary, original and unparalleled seasons of prayer, when you literally do nothing else day nor night but pray. You must pray an your very dreams. Till you will come at last to live, and move, and have your whole being in prayer. Now, it is plain that you cannot teach a lifetime of experiment and attainment like that to any chance man: and, especially, you cannot teach it to a man who still detests the very thought of such prayer. It was his yoke in his youth that first taught Daniel to pray. And Babylon taught Daniel and his three friends all to pray, and to pray together in their chambers, as we read. To be arrested in their fathers' houses by Nebuchadnezzar's soldiers; to have Babylonian chains put on their hands and their feet: to see the towers of Zion for the last time: to be asked to sing some of the songs of Zion to amuse their masters as they toiled over the Assyrian sands-you would have become experts yourselves in a school of prayer like that. You would have held little prayer-meetings yourselves with your class-fellows and your companions, if you had come through the half that Daniel and his three companions came through. It is because you are not being emptied from vessel to vessel all the week that we never see you at the prayer-meeting. Jeremiah, a great authority on why some men pray, and why other men never pray, has this about you in his book: 'Moab hath been at his ease from his youth up: he hath settled on his lees: he hath not been emptied from vessel to vessel: neither hath he gone into captivity; and, therefore, his taste remaineth in him, and his scent is not changed.'
'Why,' asks Pascal, 'has God established prayer?' And the first answer out of the three that Pascal gives to himself is this,-'To communicate to His creatures the dignity of causality.' And Daniel was of Pascal's deep and original mind. For Daniel, just because he read in Jeremiah that deliverance was at the door, all the more set himself to pray as if his prayer was to be the alone and predestinated cause of the coming deliverance. Daniel put on sackcloth, and fasted, and prayed, and went back upon all his own and all his people's sins in a way that confounds us to our face. We cannot understand Daniel. We are not deep enough. He prayed, and fasted, and returned to an agony of prayer, as if he had never heard of the near deliverance: he prayed in its very presence as if he despaired of ever seeing it. He fasted and prayed as he had not done all those seventy fasting and praying years. Read, all you experts in prayer, with all your mind, and with all your heart, and with all your experience, and with all your imagination this great causality chapter. It is written by a proficient for proficients. It is written by a great saint of God for all such. Read it and think about it. Read it with your Pascal open before you. Read it and sink down into the deep things of God and the soul. Read it and practise it till you know by experiment and by experience that decree, and covenant, and prophecy, and promise, and all, however sure, and however near, are only fulfilled in immediate and dependent answer to penitential and importunate prayer. Read it and pray as never before after the answer has actually begun. See the answer out to the last syllable before you begin to restrain penitence and prayer. And after the answer is all fulfilled, still read it and the still deeper chapters that follow it, till you learn new fastings, and new sackcloth, and new ashes, and new repentance, away out to your saintliest old age. Read Daniel's greatest prayer and
Know thy dread power-a creature, yet a cause.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Daniel the Prophet
One of the tribe of Judah and of the royal family of David, he was carried to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar. He was chosen, as one who was well favoured and without blemish, to stand before the king, and to be taught the learning and tongue of the Chaldeans; his name being changed to BELTESHAZZAR. He was to be fed with the king's meat and to drink the king's wine, but Daniel resolved not to be thus defiled; the food had probably been offered to idols. He requested that he and his companions might be allowed to live upon vegetable food and water for a few days, and God blessed this faithfulness and when tested they were found well nourished. God also gave them knowledge and skill in learning, and to Daniel He gave understanding in all visions and dreams.
This was soon to be put to the proof, for the king having had a remarkable dream, which perhaps he had forgotten, he required the wise men to tell him the dream as well as its interpretation; or he may have intended it as a test. If by help of the gods they were able to give the true interpretation, the same gods could enable them to recall the dream. But they declared that this was an unheard-of demand. The magic and astrology of Chaldea was not equal to it, and Daniel and his companions were in danger of being destroyed with all the wise men; but they turned to the God of heaven and prayed to Him, and the dream was revealed to Daniel in a night vision. Daniel thanked and worshipped the God of his fathers. It was the vision of the Great Image. Its revelation had such an effect on the king that he did homage to Daniel, and said Daniel's God was the God of gods and the Lord of kings. He made Daniel ruler over the whole of Babylon and chief governor over all the wise men of Babylon. He sat in the gate of the king. Daniel was also able to interpret the dream that foretold Nebuchadnezzar's lunacy. He was next called to interpret the writing on the wall at Belshazzar's feast, and was made third ruler of the kingdom; but the city was taken and the kingdom fell into other hands.
Darius in settling the government made three presidents over 120 princes or satraps, and Daniel was first of the three. This raised their jealousy and they laid a plot to destroy him, finding nothing on which to accuse him except concerning his piety. Spite of the king's decree (which they had instigated) that no one should ask a petition of God or man for thirty days except of the king, Daniel still three times a day prayed and gave thanks to his God, having his window opened towards Jerusalem: cf. 1 Kings 8:47-49 . On his being accused thereof Darius was grieved, but saw no way of keeping the law and saving Daniel, so he was cast into the lions' den. Darius spent the night in fasting, and in the morning he found that Daniel's God had been able to save him from the lions. He was rescued and his enemies were cast into the den. A decree was then sent throughout the kingdom that all should fear the God of Daniel, 'for He is the living God.' "So this Daniel prospered in the reign of Darius, and in the reign of Cyrus the Persian." Daniel 6:28 .
This closes the history of Daniel in connection with the kings of Babylon and Persia. It reveals him as faithful to his God first, and then faithful to those whom he served. He was greatly concerned for the welfare of Israel, and confessed their sins as his own. God answered and blessed him, and revealed His purposes to him; gave him favour with those he served, and preserved him from the malice of his enemies. He is twice classed with Noah and Job as a faithful one. Ezekiel 14:14,20 . He typifies the faithful Jewish remnant during the Gentile supremacy, in bondage yet possessing the secret of the Lord. Finally through them the Gentiles magnify their God.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Daniel, Book of
This book holds a peculiar place among the prophecies: its subject is the "Times of the Gentiles." It is not an appeal to Israelites, but is mostly taken up with prophecies concerning the Gentile powers. The times of Gentile domination had begun by Nebuchadnezzar taking Jerusalem and being called king of kings, to whom God had given a kingdom, and made him ruler over all the children of men. God's personal dealings with this monarch are recorded and the kingdoms that would follow are revealed.
The book divides itself into two portions: the first six chapters give Daniel's intercourse with the great monarchs; and the latter six chapters the visions and revelations made to Daniel himself. For the personal history of the prophet see DANIEL. The prophetical aspect of the first division begins with Nebuchadnezzar's dream.
Daniel 2 : Under the figure of the Great Image are described the four Gentile empires that were to succeed each other, further particulars of which were afterwards revealed to Daniel. It is plainly manifested that these empires would depreciate. The first is compared to gold, the second to silver, the third to brass, and the fourth to iron and clay which would not mingle together. It is noteworthy that, notwithstanding this declaration, the great effort of many in modern days is to endeavour to unite the iron and clay, and others strive to make the clay (the mass of the people) the ruling power. The fourth empire will be resuscitated, for the Lord Jesus at His first coming did not set up His kingdom — He was rejected; but during the future renewal of the Roman empire God will set up a kingdom that shall subdue all others. The 'stone' is Christ who will break in pieces all that oppose, and will reign supreme. This prophecy presents the moral deterioration of Gentile power, until it is supplanted by the kingdom of God.
Daniel 3 : It is here uniformity of religion, established by the king, not by God — the principle of Church and State. Nebuchadnezzar commanded all to worship the image he had set up; but three faithful ones refused to obey, and were thrown into the fiery furnace. The king had to learn that the God of the Jews was the Most High God, who was able to set him and all his powers at defiance. The king acknowledged God's power and sent a proclamation to that effect throughout his kingdom; though his subsequent history proves that he was not humbled. In the last days the faithful Jews will be in the furnace of tribulation for not complying with the Imperial religion. They will be delivered, and God will be glorified by the nations: cf. Revelation 13 . Thus is seen that the first characteristic of Gentile supremacy is idolatry .
Daniel 4 : The dream and the interpretation shows that Nebuchadnezzar himself was thegreat tree to be cut down, and the prophet exhorted him to renounce his sins and reform his ways, and peradventure the judgement might be postponed. But his pride was not subdued, for at the end of the year he boasted of the great city which he had built by the might of his power and for the honour of his majesty; but not a word about God. He was driven among the cattle for seven years. It is a solemn thing to have to do with the living God; but God had mercy on the king, his reason returned, and the kingdom was restored to him. Now he could say, "I Nebuchadnezzar praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgement: and those that walk in pride he is able to abase." He had learned God's lesson, and we hear of him no more. In the last days the Gentile rulers, after having used their power as 'beasts,' will acknowledge God as the source of all authority, and be brought into blessing in connection with Israel. The second characteristic which marked Gentile rule is that, refusing to own God, it descends to the level of a beast.
Daniel 5 : About twenty-five years later Belshazzar was reigning at Babylon. The monuments have revealed that he was son of Nabonadius, or Labynetus, and was reigning with his father. Nabonadius was defending the kingdom outside in the open country, and though defeated was not slain; his son was besieged inside, and was slain that night while holding a festival to the gods. This accounts for Belshazzar promising that Daniel should be the third ruler in the kingdom. Thus the monuments have now cleared away that which with respect to this kinghad seemed to make scripture and the historians discordant, for previously the name of Belshazzar had not been discovered. Daniel faithfully reminded Belshazzar of how God had dealt with his father (or rather his grandfather) Nebuchadnezzar for his pride; adding that though the king knew all this he had lifted up himself against the God of heaven, and had desecrated the vessels of God's house by drinking wine in them to his gods, and foretells his destruction. Type of the judgement on the Gentile world at the coming of Christ: cf. Revelation 18 : The third characteristic of imperial power is, that it is infidel and profane.
Daniel 6 : Darius the Mede had to learn the power of God, his own weakness, and the faithfulness of Daniel the servant of God. Daniel was saved from the lions, and the God of Daniel was proclaimed throughout the empire as the living God. Typically, Darius represents the last Gentile emperor, who will be worshipped; Daniel, the godly Jews who will be saved from the very jaws of destruction; his opposers, the future infidel accusers of God's people. The fourth characteristic is self-exaltation.
Daniel 7 : This begins the second part of the book. It gives the character of the Gentile kings, already noted in chapter 4, as before God, and their conduct towards those who acknowledge God. The four empires prophesied of in Daniel 2 are here further described under the figure of 'great beasts.' The lion is Chaldean; the bear, Medo-Persian; the leopard, Grecian (or Macedonian); and the fourth, which was like no living animal, Roman, distinguished as having ten horns (ten kings), Daniel 7:24 . Out of the last arises a little horn, a power which persecutes the saints for 3-1/2 years; but which is judged by the Ancient of Days, and the saints of the Most High, or rather of the high places, eventually take the kingdom. This power is doubtless the future Roman prince in the West, who will combine with Satan and the Antichrist, as in Revelation 13 .
Daniel 8 : The second and the third of the four empires are again prophesied of. Out of the third kingdom, the Grecian, after it was divided into four, arose a little horn, which magnified itself; and then follows the ceasing of the daily sacrifice at Jerusalem, 'the pleasant land;' but in Daniel 11:36-39 and part of verse 12 there is a change from 'it' to 'he;' and in Daniel 8:17 and Daniel 8:19 'the time of the end' is spoken of. Therefore, though the little horn refers to Antiochus Epiphanes (and though he caused the worship at Jerusalem to cease) a later and still future period is evidently referred to, and another king of Syria, who will stand against the Prince of princes, and shall be broken without hand. Daniel 8:25 . Daniel 8:23-25 are distinctly future: 'in the latter time.'*
* In reference to the 2300 days of Daniel 8:14 , see under 'Antiochus '
B.C. 175 ANTIOCHUS IV., Epiphanes (third paragraph)
Daniel 9 : Daniel was a student of prophecy, and learned from Jeremiah that the desolations of Jerusalem were to last 70 years. These were almost accomplished, and Daniel confessed his sins and the sins of his people; he prayed for forgiveness, and for the sanctuary which was lying desolate; he begged God to hearken and do, to defer not for His own sake, because the city and the people were called by His name. While he was yet speaking Gabriel was sent with a communication, which embraced not only the rebuilding of Jerusalem in the days of Ezra and Nehemiah, but the coming of the Messiah, and the action of a prince (head of the Roman power) in the last of the seventy weeks. See SEVENTY WEEKS.
Daniel 10 : Daniel mourned three full weeks. This was in the third year of Cyrus: in the first year Cyrus had proclaimed that God had charged him to rebuild the temple. Ezra 1:1 . Some were elated at the small restoration in Ezra 1 - 3, but Daniel was still before God about His people, the previous chapter having revealed that 70 weeks (of years) would have to run on before blessing; Messiah would be rejected, etc. He did not go back to Jerusalem, but continued to mourn for God's people and sought to understand the prophecies. One was sent to comfort Daniel, and he revealed the fact that unseen evil powers had delayed his coming the entire three weeks. The messenger said, "I am come to make thee understand what shall befall thy people in the latter days: for yet the vision is for many days . . . . now will I return to fight with the prince of Persia: and when I am gone forth, lo, the prince of Grecia shall come." Daniel 10:14,20 . This introduces Daniel 11 and 12 ( Daniel 10,11 , and 12: being one). God's answer is a revelation extending from the days of Daniel to the final blessing of God's people. The city and sanctuary are in view in Daniel 9 , here the people.
Daniel 11 : Daniel 11:1-35 are a history of the contests between the king of the north (Syria) and the king of the south (Egypt) — branches of the Grecian empire — often in the land of Palestine which lay between them. The prophecies are so definite that some critics have said they must have been written after the events. The correspondence of history with the particulars given in this chapter will be found under ANTIOCHUS. Daniel 11:21 to 35 refer to Antiochus Epiphanes, type of the king of the north, or Assyrian of the last days: cf. also Daniel 8 .
Daniel 11:36-45 . The Spirit here, as elsewhere, passes from the type to the fulfilment at the end of the days, leaping over the present interval. Daniel 8:11 are a parenthesis and refer to Antichrist as a king: he will be a Jew and not regard 'the God of his fathers,' nor the Messiah as 'the desire of women,' nor regard any known god; but will set himself up above all. Yet apparently he will honour the god of war (for which nations are getting ready).
Daniel 11:40-45 . This is the final contest between a king of the North and a king of the South. The king of the North (elsewhere spoken of as 'the Assyrian,' antitype of Epiphanes) succeeds and passes into 'the glorious land,' and is generally victorious (but not against Edom and Moab, and the children of Ammon: these are judged later by the instrumentality of Israel. Isaiah 11:14 ). Like Sennacherib's host of old, he will be smitten by the hand of God.
Daniel 12 : This is the deliverance and blessing of the Jewish remnant. Michael, their champion in the heavenlies, stands up for them. There is to be a time of great trouble such as never was: cf. Jeremiah 30:7 ; Matthew 24 . Many of Israel that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake: some to millennial blessing, and some to judgement. This is not the resurrection of the dead, but a national rising of all Israel from among the Gentiles, like the rising from the valley of dry bones in Ezekiel 37 : a remnant only will enter the kingdom. Daniel was told to seal up the book to the time of the end: cf. Revelation 22:10 . He heard one ask, "How long shall it be to the end of these wonders?" The reply is "a time, times, and a half " — 3-1/2 years, the last half-week of Daniel's 70 weeks. Two other periods are given: 1290 days from the time of the daily sacrifice being taken away: this is 30 days beyond the 3-1/2 years. Then blessed is he that waiteth and cometh to the 1335 days — full blessing. Daniel was told to go: he should stand in his lot at the end of the days.
Much of this remarkable prophecy stands alone, though it has many links that fit exactly with other prophecies. A general knowledge of prophecy wonderfully helps the understanding of any part of it, in this or in any other book. It is important to remember that Daniel's prophecy embraces the 'times of the Gentiles' — running on from the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar to the restoration of the Jews whenruled over by the Son of David. The present governments or states of Europemay be said to be the representatives of Gentile supremacy, but through the depreciation of the Roman empire by the mixture of the iron and clay. The Church and the Gospel have no place in Daniel.
The book is not all written in Hebrew: from Daniel 2:4 to end of Daniel 7 . — namely, what concerns the Gentiles — is written in what is there called Syriac, or Aramaic — usually called Chaldee, the Gentiles' tongue.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Daniel
was a descendant of the kings of Judah, and is said to have been born at Upper Bethoron, in the territory of Ephraim. He was carried away captive to Babylon when he was about eighteen or twenty years of age, in the year 606 before the Christian aera. He was placed in the court of Nebuchadnezzar, and was afterward raised to situations of great rank and power, both in the empire of Babylon and of Persia. He lived to the end of the captivity, but being then nearly ninety years old, it is most probable that he did not return to Judea. It is generally believed that he died at Susa, soon after his last vision, which is dated in the third year of the reign of Cyrus. Daniel seems to have been the only prophet who enjoyed a great share of worldly prosperity; but amidst the corruptions of a licentious court he preserved his virtue and integrity inviolate, and no danger or temptation could divert him from the worship of the true God. The book of Daniel is a mixture of history and prophecy: in the first six chapters is recorded a variety of events which occurred in the reigns of Nebuchadnezzar, Belshazzar, and Darius; and, in particular, the second chapter contains Nebuchadnezzar's prophetic dream concerning the four great successive monarchies, and the everlasting kingdom of the Messiah, which dream God enabled Daniel to interpret. In the last six chapters we have a series of prophecies, revealed at different times, extending from the days of Daniel to the general resurrection. The Assyrian, the Persian, the Grecian, and the Roman empires, are all particularly described under appropriate characters; and it is expressly declared that the last of them was to be divided into ten lesser kingdoms; the time at which Christ was to appear is precisely fixed; the rise and fall of antichrist, and the duration of his power, are exactly determined; and the future restoration of the Jews, the victory of Christ over all his enemies, and the universal prevalence of true religion, are distinctly foretold, as being to precede the consummation of that stupendous plan of God, which "was laid before the foundation of the world," and reaches to its dissolution. Part of this book is written in the Chaldaic language, namely, from the fourth verse of the second chapter to the end of the seventh chapter; these chapters relate chiefly to the affairs of Babylon, and it is probable that some passages were taken from the public registers. This book abounds with the most exalted sentiments of piety and devout gratitude; its style is clear, simple, and concise; and many of its prophecies are delivered in terms so plain and circumstantial, that some unbelievers have asserted, in opposition to the strongest evidence, that they were written after the events which they describe had taken place. With respect to the genuineness and authenticity of the book of Daniel, there is abundance both of external and internal evidence; indeed all that can well be had or desired in a case of this nature: not only the testimony of the whole Jewish church and nation, who have constantly received this book as canonical, but of Josephus particularly, who recommends him as the greatest of the prophets; of the Jewish Targums and Talmuds, which frequently cite and appeal to his authority; of St. Paul and St. John, who have copied many of his prophecies; and of our Saviour himself, who cites his words, and styles him "Daniel the prophet." Nor is the internal less powerful and convincing than the external evidence; for the language, the style, the manner of writing, and all other internal marks and characters, are perfectly agreeable to that age; and finally, he appears plainly and undeniably to have been a prophet by the exact accomplishment of his prophecies.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Daniel
1. Second son of David, by Abigail the Carmelitess. 1 Chronicles 3:1 . Same as CHILEAB. 2 Samuel 3:3 .
2. Descendant of Ithamar, he returned with Ezra and sealed the covenant. Ezra 8:2 ; Nehemiah 10:6 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Daniel
Daniel (dăn'i-el, or dăn'yel), judgment of God. 1. A son of David by Abigail the Carmelitess. 1 Chronicles 3:1. In 2 Samuel 3:3 he is called Chileab. 2. The name of one of "the greater prophets." Nothing is certainly known of his parentage or family. He appears, however, to have been of royal or noble descent, Daniel 1:3, and to have possessed great natural talents. Daniel 1:4. He was taken to Babylon in "the third year of Jehoiakim," and trained for the king's service. He and his companions resolved to abstain from the "king's meat" for fear of defilement. Daniel 1:8-16. At the close of his three years' discipline, Daniel 1:5; Daniel 1:18, Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, Daniel 1:17, of interpreting dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi. Daniel 2:14 ff. In consequence of his ability, by divine assistance, to reveal the dream to the king, he was made "ruler of the whole province of Babylon." Daniel 2:48. He afterwards interpreted a second dream of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 4:8-27, and the handwriting on the wall which disturbed the feast of Belshazzar. Daniel 5:10-28. At the accession of Darius he was made "first," according to the A. V., but the R. V. reads "one" of the "three presidents" of the empire, Daniel 6:2, and was delivered from the lion's den, into which he had been cast for his faithfulness in the worship of Jehovah. Daniel 6:10-23. At the accession of Cyrus he still retained his prosperity. Daniel 6:28, compare; Daniel 1:21, though he does not appear to have remained at Babylon, and in "the third year of Cyrus" he saw his last recorded vision, on the banks of the Tigris. Daniel 10:1; Daniel 10:4. In the prophecies of Ezekiel mention is made of Daniel as a pattern of righteousness, Ezekiel 14:14; Ezekiel 14:20, and wisdom, Ezekiel 28:3. The narrative implies that Daniel was distinguished for purity and knowledge at a very early age. Daniel 1:19. 3. A descendant of Ithamar, who returned with Ezra. Ezra 8:2. 4. A priest who sealed the covenant drawn up by Nehemiah. Nehemiah 10:6. He is perhaps the same as No. 3.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Daniel (2)
Daniel, book of. The book of Daniel was not placed among the prophetical books in the Hebrew Bible, but in the third division (writings) and after the Psalms. It is written partly in Chaldaic or Aramaic, and partly in the sacred Hebrew. The introduction, Daniel 1:1 to Daniel 2:4 a, is written in Hebrew. At the answer of the Chaldæans, which the A. V. says was made in "Syriac," the language changes to Aramaic, and this is retained till the close of the seventh chapter or Daniel 2:4-7. The personal introduction of Daniel as the writer of the text, 8:1, is marked by a change of the language again back to the Hebrew, which continues to the close of the book. Chs. 8 to 12. The book may be divided into three parts. The first chapter forms an introduction. The next six chapters, 2-7, give a general view of the progressive history of the powers of the world, and of the principles of the divine government as seen in the events of the lire of Daniel. The remainder of the book, chs. 8-12, traces in minuter detail the fortunes of the people of God, as typical of the fortunes of the Church in all ages. In the first seven chapters Daniel is spoken of historically; in the last five he appears personally as the writer. The cause of the difference of person is commonly supposed to lie in the nature of the case. The New Testament incidentally acknowledges each of the characteristic elements of the book, its miracles, Hebrews 11:33-34, its predictions, Matthew 24:15, and its appearance of the angel Gabriel, Luke 1:19; Luke 1:26. Statements in the book itself imply that it was written by Daniel, and this is confirmed by references to it in the New Testament and in first book of Maccabees 1:54; 2:59, 60. Josephus also reports that it was written by Daniel, "one of the greatest of the prophets." Antiq. 10:11. Some historical difficulties in the book have been removed by late discoveries, and as more light is gained respecting the history of this period, the external evidence tends to support the historical claims of the book.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Daniel
1. Called Belteshazzar by the Chaldeans, a prophet descended from the royal family of David, who was carried captive to Babylon, when very young, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim king of Judah, B. C. 606. He was chosen, with his three companions, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, to reside at Nebuchadnezzar's court, where he received a suitable education, and made great progress in all the sciences of the Chaldeans, but declined to pollute himself by eating provisions from the king's table, which would often be ceremonially unclean to a Jew, or defiled by some connection with idol-worship. At the end of their three years' education, Daniel and his companions excelled all others, and received honorable appointments in the royal service. Here Daniel soon displayed his prophetic gifts in interpreting a dream of Nebuchadnezzar, by whom he was made governor of Babylon, and head of the learned and priestly class. He seems to have been absent, perhaps on some foreign embassy, when his three companions were cast into the fiery furnace. At a later period he interpreted another dream of Nebuchadnezzar, and afterwards the celebrated vision of Belshazzar-one of whose last works was to promote Daniel to an office much higher than he had previously held during his reign, Daniel 5:29 8:27 .
After the capture of Babylon by the Medes and Persians, under Cyaxares and Cyrus, Daniel was continued in all his high employments, and enjoyed the favor of these princes until his death, except at one short interval, when the envy of the other officers prevailed on the king of the other officers prevailed on the king to cast him into the lion's den, an act which recoiled on his foes to their own destruction. During this period he earnestly labored, by fasting and prayer as well as by counsel, to secure the return of the Jews to their own land, the promised time having come, Daniel 9:1-27 . He lived to see the decree issued, and many of his people restored; but it is not known that he ever revisited Jerusalem. In the third year of Cyrus, he had a series of visions disclosing the state of the Jews till the coming of the promised Redeemer; and at last we see him calmly awaiting the peaceful close of a well-spent life, and the gracious resurrection of the just. Daniel was one of the most spotless characters upon record. His youth and his age were alike devoted to God. He maintained his integrity in the most difficult circumstances, and amid the fascinations of an eastern court he was pure and upright. He confessed the name of God before idolatrous princes; and would have been a martyr, but for the miracle which rescued him from death. His history deserves the careful and prayerful study of the young, and the lessons that it inculcates are weighty and rich in instruction.
2. The second son of David, also called Chileab, 1 Chronicles 3:1 2 Samuel 3:3 .
3. A descendant of Ithamar, the fourth son of Aaron. He was one of the chiefs who accompanied Ezra from Babylon to Judea, and afterwards took a prominent part in the reformation of the people, Ezra 8:2 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Rock, Daniel
Priest and ecclesiologist. Born on August 31, 1799 in Liverpool, England; died on November 28, 1871 in London, England. Author of Hierurgia, or the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, and The Church of Our Fathers; the latter, treating of the Sarum Rite and medieval observances, in profoundly influenced liturgical study in England.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Daniel, Book of
This is a mixture of history and prophecy. The first six chapters are chiefly historical, and the remainder prophetical. It was completed about B. C. 534. The wonders related are of a peculiar and striking character, and were designed to show the people of God that, amid their degeneracy, the Lord's hand was not shortened that it could not save; and also to exhibit to their enemies that there was an essential difference between Jehovah and idols, between the people of God and the world. The prophecies contained in the latter part of the book extend from the days of Daniel to the general resurrection. The Assyrian, the Persian, the Grecian, and the Roman empires are described under appropriate imagery. The precise time of Christ's coming is told; the rise and the fall of antichrist, and the duration of his power, are accurately determined; the victory of Christ over his enemies, and the universal prevalence of his religion are clearly pointed out. The book is filled with the most exalted sentiments of piety and devout gratitude. Its style is simple, clear, and concise, and many of the prophecies are delivered in language so plain and circumstantial, that some infidels have asserted that they were written after the events they described had taken place. Sir Isaac Newton regards Daniel as the most distinct and plain of all the prophets, and most easy to be understood; and therefore considers that in things relating to the last times, he is to be regarded as the key to the other prophets.
With respect to the genuineness and authenticity of the book, there is the strongest evidence, both internal and external. We have the testimony of Christ himself, Matthew 24:15 ; of St. John and St. Paul, who have copied his prophecies; of the Jewish church and nation, who have constantly received this book as canonical; of Josephus, who recommends him as the greatest of the prophets; and of the Jewish Targets and Talmuds, which frequently cite his authority. As to the internal evidence, the style, the language, the manner of writing, perfectly agree with the age; and especially, he is proved to have been a prophet by the exact fulfilment of his predictions. This book, like that of Ezra, is written partly in Hebrew, and partly in Chaldee, the prevailing language of the Babylonians.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Daniel
Through the example of his life and the visions recorded in his book, Daniel had a great influence upon people of later generations. The name that Jesus most commonly used of himself, the Son of man, was taken from Daniel’s vision of the heavenly and universal king (Daniel 7:13-14; Mark 2:28; Mark 14:62); the writer to the Hebrews used Daniel as an example of the person of true faith (Hebrews 11:33); and John, in the book of Revelation, recorded visions that were based largely on those of Daniel (cf. Daniel Chapters 2,7 and 8 with Revelation Chapters 11, 12 and 13).
A man of faith
As a youth Daniel had been carried off captive to Babylon when Nebuchadnezzar first attacked Jerusalem (605 BC; Daniel 1:1-6). Being handsome and intelligent, he was trained to be a courtier in Nebuchadnezzar’s palace. He proved the genuineness of his faith in God by resisting the pressures upon him to conform to the ungodly ways of Babylon. God gave him success in his studies and the ability to interpret dreams (Daniel 1:17; Daniel 1:20).
This ability enabled Daniel to interpret a puzzling dream for Nebuchadnezzar. As a reward he was promoted to chief administrator in Babylon and head over Nebuchadnezzar’s council of advisers (Daniel 6:1-20). Daniel knew, however, that his success in interpreting Nebuchadnezzar’s dream came only through his faith in God (Daniel 2:16-19; Daniel 2:24).
Daniel’s trust in God showed itself also in the fearless way he told Nebuchadnezzar of the judgment that would fall upon him because of his pride (Daniel 4:19; Daniel 4:25). But Daniel had no joy in announcing the punishment, preferring rather that Nebuchadnezzar change his ways and so avoid the threatened judgment (Daniel 4:27). In the time of a later ruler, Belshazzar, Daniel was even bolder in his denunciation of royal pride and arrogance (Daniel 5:18-23).
Belshazzar was the last of Babylon’s rulers, for it was during his reign that Persia, under Cyrus, conquered Babylon. By this time (539 BC) Daniel was at least eighty years of age, but he was given one of the highest positions in the new administration (1618102512_15; cf. Daniel 1:21; Daniel 5:30). When jealous fellow administrators laid a trap that they thought would force Daniel either to deny his God or be put to death, Daniel refused to deny his God and God saved him from death (Daniel 6:5; Daniel 6:23).
One way Daniel maintained and demonstrated his faith was through prayer (Daniel 2:17-23; Daniel 6:10). This applied not only to his involvement in great crises with heathen kings and governors, but also to his concern for the spiritual well-being of his own people, the Jews. On one occasion he humbly linked himself with the rebellious Israelite people as a whole in confessing their sin and asking God’s mercy (Daniel 9:1-19), and in reply received God’s assurance of forgiveness (Daniel 9:20-23). On another occasion his prayers were accompanied by three weeks of mourning and fasting (Daniel 10:2-3), and once again his faith was rewarded by answered prayer (Daniel 10:11).
The book of Daniel
Although the book of Daniel is commonly known as one of the Major Prophets, the Jews who arranged the books in their Bible included Daniel not among the prophets but among the miscellaneous writings. To them Daniel was a statesman who served God in a foreign palace, rather than a preacher who brought the message of God to his people. Nevertheless, the New Testament refers to Daniel as a prophet (Matthew 24:15), for he was one through whom God revealed his purposes.
In broad outline, the purpose of the book of Daniel is to show to both Jews and foreigners that all nations and their rulers are under the control of God. The kingdoms of the world may fight against God, but in the end they must fall beneath the all-conquering power of his kingdom. The book of Daniel presents this message in two parts. The first deals with stories of selected people of God in a heathen country, the second with visions that God gave to his servant Daniel.
These revelations are concerned in the first place with the long period of confusion and conflict that followed the Persian period and reached its climax in the events of the New Testament era. Their meaning, however, is not limited to those events, for the New Testament writers apply features of them to the final triumph of God’s kingdom, which is yet to take place.
Because of the many visions recorded in it, the book of Daniel has characteristics of that kind of Hebrew literature known as apocalyptic (from the Greek apokalupto, meaning ‘to reveal or uncover’). In apocalyptic literature the visions are always strange, with weird symbolism that often features fierce beasts. The overall purpose is to picture great conflicts out of which God and his people triumph (see APOCALYPTIC LITERATURE).
Contents of the book
After Daniel and his friends proved their faithfulness to God during their time of testing in the Babylonian palace (1:1-21), an occasion arose where Daniel showed his remarkable ability to interpret dreams. Nebuchadnezzar had a dream which, Daniel explained, showed that God is the ruler of the world and he sets up and destroys kingdoms according to his will (2:1-49).
Daniel’s success at interpreting the king’s dream brought promotion for him and his friends, but this in turn brought jealousy from some of the other officials. They accused Daniel’s friends of treason for refusing to worship an idol that the king had set up, and had them thrown into a fiery furnace; but God saved them through their ordeal (3:1-30). When Nebuchadnezzar refused to heed Daniel’s warning of the danger of pride, God humbled him. Nebuchadnezzar was then forced to acknowledge that Daniel’s God was the one and only true God (4:1-37).
A succeeding king, Belshazzar, failing to learn from Nebuchadnezzar’s experience, brought about his nation’s destruction. In his reign Babylon fell to Persia (5:1-31). Daniel, now an old man but a leading official in the Persian administration, was the victim of a plot by jealous fellow officials. Though he was sentenced to death and thrown into a den of lions, God saved him (6:1-28).
The first of Daniel’s visions was of four beasts that symbolized the successive empires of Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece and Rome. In spite of their increasing opposition to God and his people, God’s kingdom triumphed in the end (7:1-28). The next vision developed details of one of the four empires, namely, the Greek (8:1-27).
At the time of Daniel’s visions, the Jews were still in captivity in Babylon, but expected to return to their homeland soon. In response to a prayer of Daniel on behalf of his people (9:1-19), God showed that he was now bringing his age-long purposes to completion. He would deal decisively with the whole problem of sin and bring in everlasting righteousness (9:20-27). Before that climax would arrive, however, the Jews would have intense suffering This would be so particularly during the Greek period, when they would suffer terrible persecution at the hands of Antiochus Epiphanes (10:1-12:13; for details see GREECE).

Sentence search

Magi - " Isaiah 44:25; Jeremiah 50:35; Daniel 2:12-27; Daniel 4:6; Daniel 4:18; Daniel 5:7-8; Daniel 5:11-12; Daniel 5:15. " Daniel 1:20; Daniel 2:2; Daniel 2:27; Daniel 4:7; Daniel 5:7; Daniel 5:11. Daniel describes them as men of wisdom, Daniel 1:20; he intercedes for them with Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 2:24; and accepts a position as their chief or master. Daniel 5:11
Sackbut - The word thus (probably erroneously) translated, sabbeca, occurs only in Daniel. Daniel 3:5; Daniel 3:7; Daniel 3:10; Daniel 3:15
Grecia - (gree' cih uh) KJV spelling of Greece in Daniel 8:21 ; Daniel 10:20 ; Daniel 11:2
Trigon - (tri' gahn) Small, three-cornered harp with four strings (Daniel 3:5 ,Daniel 3:5,3:7 ,Daniel 3:7,3:10 ; KJV, sackbut)
Daniel - Daniel (dăn'i-el, or dăn'yel), judgment of God. He appears, however, to have been of royal or noble descent, Daniel 1:3, and to have possessed great natural talents. Daniel 1:4. Daniel 1:8-16. At the close of his three years' discipline, Daniel 1:5; Daniel 1:18, Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, Daniel 1:17, of interpreting dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi. Daniel 2:14 ff. " Daniel 2:48. He afterwards interpreted a second dream of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 4:8-27, and the handwriting on the wall which disturbed the feast of Belshazzar. Daniel 5:10-28. reads "one" of the "three presidents" of the empire, Daniel 6:2, and was delivered from the lion's den, into which he had been cast for his faithfulness in the worship of Jehovah. Daniel 6:10-23. Daniel 6:28, compare; Daniel 1:21, though he does not appear to have remained at Babylon, and in "the third year of Cyrus" he saw his last recorded vision, on the banks of the Tigris. Daniel 10:1; Daniel 10:4. In the prophecies of Ezekiel mention is made of Daniel as a pattern of righteousness, Ezekiel 14:14; Ezekiel 14:20, and wisdom, Ezekiel 28:3. The narrative implies that Daniel was distinguished for purity and knowledge at a very early age. Daniel 1:19
Scarlet - Color used especially in clothing, often designating royal honor (Daniel 5:7 ,Daniel 5:7,5:16 ,Daniel 5:16,5:29 )
Bagpipe - Modern translation of a musical instrument translated as “dulcimer” by the KJV (Daniel 3:5 ,Daniel 3:5,3:10 ,Daniel 3:10,3:15 )
Belteshazzar - The name given to the prophet Daniel at the court of Nebuchadnezzar. Daniel 1:7. See Daniel
Ashpenaz - ) (Daniel 1:3 ). He administered the diet and life-style of Daniel and his three friends, giving them new Babylonian names (Daniel 1:7 ). Daniel developed a close, loving relationship with him
Belteshazzar - ” Name prince of eunuchs under Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, gave to Daniel (Daniel 1:7 ). See Daniel
me'Dian, the - Darius, "the son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes," (Daniel 9:1 ) or "the Mede," ch. (Daniel 11:1 ) is thus denoted in (Daniel 5:31 )
Dan'Iel - He appears, however, to have been of royal or noble descent, (Daniel 1:3 ) and to have possessed considerable personal endowments. (Daniel 1:4 ) He was taken to Babylon in "the third year of Jehoiakim" (B. (Daniel 1:8-16 ) At the close of his three years discipline, (Daniel 1:5,18 ) Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, (Daniel 1:17 ) of interpreting dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi. (Daniel 2:14 ) ff. " (Daniel 2:48 ) He afterwards interpreted the second dream of Nebuchadnezzar, (Daniel 4:8-27 ) and the handwriting on the wall which disturbed the feast of Belshazzar. (Daniel 5:10-28 ) At the accession of Darius he was made first of the "three presidents" of the empire, (Daniel 6:2 ) and was delivered from the lion's den, into which he had been cast for his faithfulness to the rites of his faith. (Daniel 6:10-23 ) cf. At the accession of Cyrus he still retained his prosperity, (Daniel 6:28 ) cf. (Daniel 1:21 ) and in "the third year of Cyrus" (B. (Daniel 10:1,4 ) In the prophecies of Ezekiel mention is made of Daniel as a pattern of righteousness, (Ezekiel 14:14,20 ) and wisdom. (Ezekiel 28:3 ) The narrative in (Daniel 1:11 ) implies that Daniel was conspicuously distinguished for purity and knowledge at a very early age
Daniel - Through the example of his life and the visions recorded in his book, Daniel had a great influence upon people of later generations. The name that Jesus most commonly used of himself, the Son of man, was taken from Daniel’s vision of the heavenly and universal king (Daniel 7:13-14; Mark 2:28; Mark 14:62); the writer to the Hebrews used Daniel as an example of the person of true faith (Hebrews 11:33); and John, in the book of Revelation, recorded visions that were based largely on those of Daniel (cf. Daniel Chapters 2,7 and 8 with Revelation Chapters 11, 12 and 13). ...
A man of faith...
As a youth Daniel had been carried off captive to Babylon when Nebuchadnezzar first attacked Jerusalem (605 BC; Daniel 1:1-6). God gave him success in his studies and the ability to interpret dreams (Daniel 1:17; Daniel 1:20). ...
This ability enabled Daniel to interpret a puzzling dream for Nebuchadnezzar. As a reward he was promoted to chief administrator in Babylon and head over Nebuchadnezzar’s council of advisers (Daniel 2:48). Daniel knew, however, that his success in interpreting Nebuchadnezzar’s dream came only through his faith in God (Daniel 2:16-19; Daniel 2:24). ...
Daniel’s trust in God showed itself also in the fearless way he told Nebuchadnezzar of the judgment that would fall upon him because of his pride (Daniel 4:19; Daniel 4:25). But Daniel had no joy in announcing the punishment, preferring rather that Nebuchadnezzar change his ways and so avoid the threatened judgment (Daniel 4:27). In the time of a later ruler, Belshazzar, Daniel was even bolder in his denunciation of royal pride and arrogance (Daniel 5:18-23). By this time (539 BC) Daniel was at least eighty years of age, but he was given one of the highest positions in the new administration (Daniel 6:1-2; cf. Daniel 1:21; Daniel 5:30). When jealous fellow administrators laid a trap that they thought would force Daniel either to deny his God or be put to death, Daniel refused to deny his God and God saved him from death (Daniel 6:5; Daniel 6:23). ...
One way Daniel maintained and demonstrated his faith was through prayer (Daniel 2:17-23; Daniel 6:10). On one occasion he humbly linked himself with the rebellious Israelite people as a whole in confessing their sin and asking God’s mercy (Daniel 9:1-19), and in reply received God’s assurance of forgiveness (Daniel 9:20-23). On another occasion his prayers were accompanied by three weeks of mourning and fasting (Daniel 10:2-3), and once again his faith was rewarded by answered prayer (Daniel 10:11). ...
The book of Daniel...
Although the book of Daniel is commonly known as one of the Major Prophets, the Jews who arranged the books in their Bible included Daniel not among the prophets but among the miscellaneous writings. To them Daniel was a statesman who served God in a foreign palace, rather than a preacher who brought the message of God to his people. Nevertheless, the New Testament refers to Daniel as a prophet (Matthew 24:15), for he was one through whom God revealed his purposes. ...
In broad outline, the purpose of the book of Daniel is to show to both Jews and foreigners that all nations and their rulers are under the control of God. The book of Daniel presents this message in two parts. The first deals with stories of selected people of God in a heathen country, the second with visions that God gave to his servant Daniel. ...
Because of the many visions recorded in it, the book of Daniel has characteristics of that kind of Hebrew literature known as apocalyptic (from the Greek apokalupto, meaning ‘to reveal or uncover’). ...
Contents of the book...
After Daniel and his friends proved their faithfulness to God during their time of testing in the Babylonian palace (1:1-21), an occasion arose where Daniel showed his remarkable ability to interpret dreams. Nebuchadnezzar had a dream which, Daniel explained, showed that God is the ruler of the world and he sets up and destroys kingdoms according to his will (2:1-49). ...
Daniel’s success at interpreting the king’s dream brought promotion for him and his friends, but this in turn brought jealousy from some of the other officials. They accused Daniel’s friends of treason for refusing to worship an idol that the king had set up, and had them thrown into a fiery furnace; but God saved them through their ordeal (3:1-30). When Nebuchadnezzar refused to heed Daniel’s warning of the danger of pride, God humbled him. Nebuchadnezzar was then forced to acknowledge that Daniel’s God was the one and only true God (4:1-37). Daniel, now an old man but a leading official in the Persian administration, was the victim of a plot by jealous fellow officials. ...
The first of Daniel’s visions was of four beasts that symbolized the successive empires of Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece and Rome. ...
At the time of Daniel’s visions, the Jews were still in captivity in Babylon, but expected to return to their homeland soon. In response to a prayer of Daniel on behalf of his people (9:1-19), God showed that he was now bringing his age-long purposes to completion
Belteshazzar - Beltis protect the king!, the Chaldee name given to Daniel by Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1:7 )
Astrologer - Daniel shows repeatedly that Babylon's well-educated, professional magicians could not match Daniel and his friends. Daniel apparently has magicians and masters of incantations and spells rather than astrologers. The “Chaldeans” of Daniel 2:2 ; Daniel 4:7 ; Daniel 5:7 ,Daniel 5:7,5:11 may be the nearest reference to astrologers in the book
Daniel - " Probably from royal blood; compare Daniel 1:3 with 1 Chronicles 3:1, from whence it appears he bore the same name as David's son by Abigail (who is called Chileab in 2 Samuel 3:3 "like his father". ) Carried to Babylon in Nebuchadnezzar's first deportation of captives, in the fourth (Jeremiah 25:1; Jeremiah 46:2) or third (Daniel 1:1 counting only complete years) year of Jehoiakim, the first of Nebuchadnezzar (acting under Nabopolassar in the last year of the latter's reign, but reigning alone not until the year after; as Daniel 2:1 proves, for after Daniel's three years' training the year is nevertheless called the "second" of Nebuchadnezzar, i. Daniel was put in training with three others of the royal seed, still "children" (Daniel 1:4), according to eastern etiquette, to become courtiers; and to mark his new position he received a Babylonian name, Belteshazzar (compare 2 Kings 23:34; 2 Kings 24:17; Ezra 5:14; Esther 2:7). ...
He gave a noble proof of faithfulness combined with wisdom at this early age, by abstaining from the food of the king's table, as being defiled with the usual idolatry at pagan feasts (Daniel 1:8-16), living for ten days' trial on pulse and water, and at the end looking fairer and fatter than those fed on the king's dainties. Daniel experienced the truth of Deuteronomy 8:3. Ezekiel in the early part of his ministry refers to hint as a model of "righteousness" and "wisdom" (Ezekiel 14:14; Ezekiel 14:20; Ezekiel 28:3), for Daniel had not yet become a writer. Noah before and at the flood, Job in the postdiluvian patriarchal age, and Daniel toward the close of the legal theocracy are made types of "righteousness. "...
So Ezekiel's reference, in what it alleges and in what it omits, exactly tallies with what we should expect, presuming that Ezekiel and Daniel lived and wrote when and where they are represented. Daniel's high position while still a mere youth (Daniel 1:3-5; Daniel 1:11-16; Daniel 2:1), at the court of the Jews' conqueror and king, gave them a vivid interest in their illustrious countryman's fame for righteousness and wisdom; for in his person they felt themselves raised from their present degradation. As at the beginning of the covenant people's history their kinsman Joseph, so toward its close Daniel, by the interpretation of dreams (Daniel 2; Daniel 4), was promoted to high place in the court of their pagan masters. ...
Daniel was made by Nebuchadnezzar, governor of Babylonia and president of the Babylonian "wise men," not to be confounded with the later Persian magi. Under Belshazzar Daniel was in a lower office, and was occasionally away from Babylon (Daniel 5:7-8; Daniel 5:12) at Susa (Daniel 8:2; Daniel 8:27). Envy often follows high office which men so covet; so, by a law cunningly extorted by his enemies from the weak Darius, that none should offer petition to man or god except to the king for 30 days, as though it were a test of loyalty, on pain of being cast into a lions' den, Daniel was cast in and was delivered by God, who thus rewarded his pious faithfulness (Daniel 6). ...
It is an accordance with Medo-Persian ideas which flows from the truth of Scripture, that the mode of capital punishment under the Babylonian rule is represented as burning (Daniel 3), but under the Medes and Persians' exposure to wild beasts, for they would have regarded fire as polluted by contact with a corpse, while they approved the devouring of bodies by animals. Belshazzar or Bel-shar-ezer (on the mother's side descended front Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 5:11) was joint king with his father; having shut himself up in Babylon he fell there while his father at Borsippa survived. ...
If Daniel's book had been a late one, he would have copied Berosus; if it had been at variance with that prevalent in Babylonia, the Jews there would have rejected it. He must have been about 84 years old when he saw the visions (Daniel 10-12) concerning his people, extending down to the resurrection and the last days. Though advanced years forbade his return to the Holy Land, yet his people's interests were always nearest his heart (Daniel 9; Daniel 10:12). ), on the banks of the Tigris (Hiddekel) Daniel 10:1-4. In Daniel 3:2, Hebrew for "princes," Nebuchadnezzar summons his satraps ('achashdarpni , Persian khshtrapa ). Some allege that Daniel erroneously attributes to the Babylonians the satrapial form of government. " Daniel writing for Jews under Persia at the time uses naturally the familiar Persian term "satrap" instead of the corresponding Babylonian term. (On Daniel's representation of the relation of the Medes to the Persians and Darius the Mede (possibly equating to Astyages, or his son, the former of whom Cyrus deposed and treated kindly) to Cyrus. )...
The objection to Daniel on the ground that Susa, or at least its palace, was not built when Daniel saw the vision there, rests on Pliny alone, who alleges it to have been built by Darius Hystaspis. But the Assyrian inscriptions prove it was one of the most ancient Mesopotamian cities, and its palace (the Memnonium is the name the Greeks give it) famous centuries before Daniel. Daniel, like Moses, was trained in all the learning of the world; his political experience moreover, as a minister of state under successive dynasties of the great world powers, gave the natural qualifications to which God added supernatural spiritual insight, enabling him to characterize to the life the several world monarchies which bore or were to bear sway until Messiah's kingdom shall come with power. ...
Personal purity and selfrestraint amidst the world's corrupting luxuries (Daniel 1:8-16; compare Moses, Hebrews 11:25; Joseph, Genesis 39:9); faithfulness to God at all costs, and fearless witnessing for God before great men (Daniel 5:17-23), unbribed by lucre and unawed by threats (Daniel 6:10-11); the holiest and most single-minded patriotism which with burning prayers interceded for his chastened countrymen (Daniel 9); intimate communion with God, so that, like the beloved disciple and apocalyptic seer of the New Testament, John, Daniel also is called" a man greatly beloved," and this twice, by the angel of the Lord (Daniel 9:23; Daniel 10:11), and received the exact disclosure of the date of Messiah's advent, the 70 weeks of years, and the successive events down to the Lord's final advent for the deliverance of His people: these are all prominent characteristics of this man of God. ...
It is not stated in Daniel 3 why Daniel was not among the rulers summoned to worship Nebuchadnezzar's golden image. The Jews' enemies found it more political to attack first the three nearer at hand before proceeding to attack Daniel, the most influential. The king also, regarding him as divine (Daniel 2:46), forbore to summon him to worship the image, the self-deifying formation and setting up of which Daniel's own interpretation probably had suggested unintentionally to Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 2:37-39). As Daniel 2 and Daniel 7 go together, so Daniel 3 and Daniel 6; Daniel 4 and Daniel 5; the pair Daniel 3 and Daniel 6 shows God's nearness to save His saints, if faithful, just when they are on the point of being crushed by the world power. ...
The pair Daniel 4 and Daniel 5 shows God's power to humble the world power in the height of its impious arrogance; first Nebuchadnezzar, whose coming hypochondriacal exile among the beasts Daniel foretells with fidelity and tenderness; then Belshazzar, whose blasphemy he more sternly reproves. As Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego refuse positive homage to the world power's image, so Daniel refuses it even negative homage by omitting even for a few days worship to Jehovah. Jehovah's power manifested for the saints against the world first in individual histories (Daniel 3; 6) is exhibited next in worldwide prophetical pictures (Daniel 2 and Daniel 7). God manifested His irresistible power in Daniel and his friends, as representing the theocracy then depressed, before the pagan king who deemed himself divine. Ezra 8:2 and Nehemiah 10:6 mention another Daniel, Ithamar's descendant
Mishael - One of Daniel's three friends (Daniel 1:6-7 ,Daniel 1:6-7,1:11 ,Daniel 1:11,1:19 ; Daniel 2:17 ), given the Babylonian name Meshach
Abednego - (uh behd' nih goh) In Daniel 1:7 , the Babylonian name given to one of the three Hebrew youths who were conscripted along with Daniel to serve in the king's court. God delivered them from the fiery furnace (Daniel 2:48-3:30 ). See Daniel, Book of ; Azariah
Belshazzar - Prince of Bel, the Chaldean name given to Daniel at the court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:7 4:8
Daniel - A priest of the Ithamar lineage (Ezra 8:2 ; Daniel 4:8-9 ) who returned with Ezra from the Babylonian captivity. Daniel of Ezekiel 14:14 ,Ezekiel 14:14,14:20 ; Ezekiel 28:3 is spelled differently in Hebrew from all the other forms in the Old Testament. This Daniel was a storied figure of antiquity mentioned with Noah and Job. Due to the similarity in the spelling of the name and the common attributes of wisdom and righteousness, some interpreters identify this Daniel with the Daniel of the canonical book of Daniel. Some identify the “Daniel” of Ezekiel with “Danel” of ancient Ugaritic literature. The most common usage of “Daniel” refers to the hero of the Book of Daniel. ...
The Babylonians sought to remove all vestiges of Daniel's nationality and religion. For this reason, they sought to change the name of Daniel to Belteshazzar. (Daniel 1:7 ; Daniel 2:26 ; Nehemiah 10:6 ,Daniel 4:8-9,4:18-19 ; Daniel 5:12 ; Daniel 10:1 ). ...
Daniel was transported from Judah to Babylon in his early youth at the battle of Carchemish, 605 B. No mention is made in Daniel of the times of Evil-Merodach (561-560 B. However, much information is provided concerning Daniel's involvement during the reign of Nabonidus (555-539 B. ...
Daniel was in Babylon when the forces of Cyrus, the Persian, captured Babylon. Successively, Daniel was a high governmental official during the reigns of Cyrus (539-529 B. Daniel would probably have celebrated his one hundredth birthday during the reign of Darius
Ulai - (yoo' li) Canal connecting the Kerkha and Abdizful rivers just north of Susa (Daniel 8:2 ,Daniel 8:2,8:16 )
Baltasar - form of Belshazzar ( Daniel 5:1-31 , etc. ) and of Belteshazzar ( Daniel 4:1-37 , etc
Daniel, Book of - High hopes and great expectations highlight the Book of Daniel. ...
Literary Features Daniel combines characteristics of prophecy, wisdom, and apocalyptic writing into a unique type of literature. Matthew identified Daniel as a prophet (Matthew 24:15 ). ...
As did the wisdom writers, Daniel served in a royal court counseling a ruler. ...
Apocalyptic literature best describes Daniel for most Bible students. ...
The visions and angelic figures of Daniel along with its strongly figurative, symbolic language tie it closely to the apocalyptic. ...
Daniel uses two languages—Aramaic (Daniel 2:4-7:28 ) and Hebrew (Daniel 1:2-2:4 ; Daniel 8:1-12:13 )—plus loan words from Persian and Greek to write the complex work of prophecy, wisdom, and apocalyptic writing. The two languages combine to form two distinctly separate sections of the book (1–6; 7–12), the first told in narrative form about Daniel and his friends with a historical conclusion (Daniel 6:28 ) and the second told in form of Daniel's visions. ...
Canon and Authority The basic twelve chapters of Daniel appear in the Hebrew Bible between Esther and Ezra in the last section called the Writings rather than in the Law or the Prophets. The Greek translation called the Septuagint introduced Daniel into the prophets and also introduced additional materials: the prayer of Azariah, the song of the three children, story of Susanna, Bel and the Dragon. The Christian church has followed the Septuagint in placing Daniel among the prophets, but Protestant Christianity has not accepted the additions, whereas the Catholic tradition has. All agree the basic Book of Daniel is God's authoritative Word for His people. ...
Unity Many things appear to separate Daniel into unrelated parts. The position of the person Daniel differs in various portions of the book. He is more central in Daniel 1-2 and Daniel 4-7 than in the rest of the book. In Daniel 1-6 Daniel is spoken of in the third person in the form of a biography. In Daniel 7-12 , however, Daniel speaks in the first person in the form of autobiography (except Daniel 10:1 ). ...
In Daniel 1-6 the dreams or phenomena come to heathen kings, but in Daniel 7-12 Daniel has the visions. In Daniel 1-6 Daniel is the one who interprets the dreams, but in 7–12 “someone” else interprets the dreams and visions to Daniel. Daniel 1-6 have simplicity, whereas Daniel 7-12 are complex. ...
The Book of Daniel acts as a unit despite these differences in languages used and types of literature employed. The Faithful Young Men in a Foreign Court (Daniel 1:1-6:28 ) ...
A. Loyalty to God leads Daniel and his friends to high political positions (Daniel 1:1-21 ). Interpretation of the king's dream leads to the king's confession of God and to important positions for the friends (Daniel 2:1-49 ). Loyalty to God brings deliverance from the fiery furnace, royal decree protecting the right to worship God, and further promotion for the friends (Daniel 3:1-30 ). Interpretation and fulfillment of the king's dream leads the king to praise God (Daniel 4:1-37 ). Loyalty to God and His rewards allows interpretation of the handwriting on the wall, brings promotion in the kingdom, and spells doom for Babylon (Daniel 5:1-31 ). Faithfulness in prayer despite secular laws overcomes conspiracy, brings deliverance from the lions' den, leads the king to command fear of the true God, and brings political prosperity (Daniel 6:1-28 ). Daniel's Visions Point the Way Through Persecution to Hope (Daniel 7:1-12:13 ). Vision of four beasts shows four kingdoms to be overcome by Son of man and saints of the Most High, who will reign forever (Daniel 7:1-28 ). Vision of ram, he goat, and four horns points to passing of Persians, Medes, and of proud Greeks, one of whom will interrupt daily sacrifices of Temple for a while (Daniel 8:1-27 ). Daniel confesses the nation's sins, seeks forgiveness, and learns meaning of Jeremiah's 70 weeks as pointing to Messiah and to desolation of Jerusalem (Daniel 9:1-27 ). A heaven-sent vision shows that Scripture points to battles between north and south until the northern king proudly triumphs and persecutes the people of God's covenant, taking away their sacrificial system and desecrating the Temple, but facing disaster in the end (Daniel 10:1-11:45 ). Heavenly intervention will bring the time of the end and the resurrection of God's faithful people (Daniel 12:1-13 ). ...
Meaning Daniel encouraged the reader to remain faithful to God, God's law, and to the scriptural traditions of God's people. Daniel encouraged the faithful to stand firm in faithfulness to the heritage of Israel. The essence of the book appears in a condensed form (Daniel 1:1-8 ). Then the author enlarged upon the theme he had expressed (Daniel 1:8-6:28 ). Finally, in typical Hebrew parallelism, he explained the purpose of the book in full form (Daniel 7:1-12:13 ). ...
Daniel 1:8-6:28 shows how in history Israelite heroes stood firm in their resolve to stay true to God and their heritage. ...
Daniel 7:1-12:13 brought these truths to bear upon an extremely tense situation. The basic issue is the nature of inspired prophecy and Daniel's relationship to prophecy. The point at issue among interpreters is the fidelity to detail that prophecy must contain and whether Daniel with its wisdom and apocalyptic overtones must have the same type of historical setting and perspective as do the classic prophets of Israel. ...
To simplify the picture, two major stances on Daniel can be summarized. The first sees Daniel standing in the precise line of previous prophets, so that every detail of his visions points to the future and not the past. This assumes that Daniel in the sixth century B. Those interpreters who use a dispensational system (see Dispensations) to interpret Daniel see antichrist , tribulation , and the final kingdom pictured in Daniel. ...
A second stance emphasizes Daniel's relationship to other apocalyptic literature in which writers often use the names of ancient heroes to describe history long past to bring a message to a present generation facing extreme persecution. This stance views Daniel as the hero but not the author of the book. ...
Whichever stance one takes in interpreting the details of Daniel, the inspired book continues to give hope, strength, and courage to God's people, especially in times of persecution, and to call for ultimate faithfulness no matter the temptations faced
Gabriel - At an earlier period he was sent to Daniel to unfold a vision. Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21
Astrologer - In Daniel 1:20 ; Daniel 2:2,10,27 ; Daniel 4:7 ; Daniel 5:7,11,15 the Hebrew word is ashshaph, signifying 'enchanter, magician;' one who practised occult arts
Gabriel - He was sent to the Prophet Daniel, to explain to him the visions of the ram and goat, and the mystery of the seventy weeks, which had been revealed to him, Daniel 8:15 ; Daniel 9:21 ; Daniel 11:1 , &c
Counsellor - But in Daniel 3:2-3 it means a justice; and in Mark 15:43 , Luke 23:50 , it is used of Joseph of Arimathæa as a member of the Sanhedrin. In Daniel 3:24 ; Daniel 3:27 ; Daniel 4:36 ; Daniel 6:7 the peculiar word rendered ‘counsellor’ in AV Melzar - The government of the person of Daniel and his companions when captives in Babylon, (Daniel 1:16) The word Melzar is of the Chaldean language, and signifies steward
Presidents - Three presidents are mentioned, of whom Daniel was the first (Daniel 6:2-7 )
Mene - (numbered ), the first word of the mysterious inscription written upon the wall of Belshazzar's palace, in which Daniel read the doom of the king and his dynasty. ( Daniel 5:25,26 )
Mishael - One of Daniel's three companions at Babylon (Daniel 1:6-19; Daniel 2:17; Daniel 3). (See Daniel; ANANIAH; AZARIAH; MESHACH; ABEDNEGO
Melzar - ]'>[2] ‘steward’) in Daniel 1:11 ; Daniel 1:16 , in both cases with the article. ]'>[4] to conclude for Belshazzar as the true reading, and to read in Daniel 1:11 : ‘And Daniel said to Belshazzar, prince of the eunuchs,’ etc
Chaldeans (Wise Men) - These are mentioned repeatedly in Daniel along with magicians, astrologers, and soothsayers. In Daniel 5:11 it is said that Daniel had been made 'master' of them, doubtless because it had been discovered that he had more wisdom than all of them. , were called in before the king to interpret the writing on the wall, Daniel was not among them, and we may be sure he kept himself aloof from such
Gabriel - The angel who was sent to Daniel to explain the vision he had seen of the ram and the he-goat, and to reveal to him the prophecy of the Seventy Weeks. Daniel calls him 'the man Gabriel,' and one that had 'the appearance of a man. ' Daniel 8:15 ; Daniel 9:21
Abednego - Abednego (a-bĕd'ne-gô), servant of Nego or Nebo, a Chaldee name given to Azariah, one of the three captive young princes of Judah, who were Daniel's companions at the court of the king of Babylon. Daniel 1:7. Their virtue, wisdom, and piety secured their promotion at court, Daniel 1:3-19; Daniel 2:17-49; and their firmness in witnessing for God among idolaters, with their deliverance from the fiery furnace by Jehovah, led many to acknowledge the true God, and rendered these pious youths forever illustrious. Daniel 3:1-30; Hebrews 11:34
Ancient of Days - A title of God used by Daniel, alluding to His eternity. It cannot be separated from Christ; for in Daniel 7 : the Lord is called both the Ancient of Days and the Son of man, yet the Son of man came to the Ancient of Days to receive dominion, glory, and a kingdom. Daniel 7:9,13,22
Archangel - In this last passage it is applied to Michael, who, in Daniel 10:13; Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1, is described as "one of the chief princes," having a special charge of the Jewish nation, and in Revelation 12:7-9 as the leader of an angelic army
Sheriff - In Daniel 3:2 ; Daniel 3:8 ‘sheriffs’ Is the EV Mene - (Daniel 5:25,26 ), numbered, one of the words of the mysterious inscription written "upon the plaister of the wall" in Belshazzar's palace at Babylon. The writing was explained by Daniel
Daniel, Book of - Daniel, BOOK OF...
1. The first six chapters of this book contain a series of narratives which tell of ( a ) the fidelity of Daniel and his friends to their religion, and ( b ) the incomparable superiority of their God to the deities of Babylon. The remaining six chapters relate four visions seen by Daniel and the interpretation of them. 1 6 speak of Daniel in the third person; in 7 12 he is the speaker (yet see Daniel 7:1 , Daniel 10:1 ). , had been formed in the reign of Darius, as is implied in Daniel 9:2 . 606 ( Daniel 1:1-2 ). The name ‘Chaldæans’ as designating the learned class is a later usage ( Daniel 2:2 ). Belshazzar was not ‘the king’ ( Daniel 5:1 ), nor was Neb. his ancestor ( Daniel 5:2 ; Daniel 5:11 ). Darius the Mede never ‘received the kingdom’ ( Daniel 5:31 ). Xerxes did not follow Artaxerxes ( Daniel 11:2 ) but preceded him. , are described with a fulness of detail which differentiates Daniel 7:1-28 ; Daniel 11:1-45 from all OT prophecy: see the precision with which the reign of Antiochus Epiphanes is related in ch. 11; the events from 323 175 occupy 16 verses; those from 175 164 take up 25; at Daniel 11:34 the lines become less definite, because this is the point at which the book was written; at v. We saw in the preceding article that the exiled Jews knew of a Daniel, famous for piety and wisdom. (1) From Daniel 2:4 b to Daniel 7:26 is in Aramaic . The text has suffered more or less in Daniel 1:20-21 , Daniel 6:20 , Daniel 7:5 , Daniel 9:4-20 , Daniel 10:4 ; Daniel 10:8-9 , Daniel 10:20 to Daniel 11:2 , Daniel 12:11 f. In both translations are found the Additions to Daniel. (1) 67 verses are inserted after Daniel 3:22 , consisting of ( α ) the Prayer of Azarias . (2) The History of Susanna , which demonstrates God’s protection of the unjustly accused and illustrates the sagacity in judgment of the youth who is rightly named Daniel , ‘El is my judge. ’ (3) Bel and the Dragon , two tracts which expose the imbecility of idolatry, and bring out Daniel’s cleverness and God’s care for His servant in peril
Abed'Nego - servant of Nego, perhaps the same as Nebo ), the Chaldean name given to Azariah, one of the three friends of Daniel, miraculously save from the fiery furnace. Daniel 3
me'Shach - (guest of a king ), the name given to Mishael, one of the companions of Daniel, who with three others was taught, ( Daniel 1:4 ) and qualified to "stand before" King Nebuchadnezzar, (Daniel 1:5 ) as his personal attendants and advisers. (Daniel 1:20 ) But notwithstanding their Chaldeans education, these three young Hebrews were strongly attached to the religion of their fathers; and their refusal to join in the worship of the image on the plain of Dura gave a handle of accusation to the Chaldeans. The rage of the king, the swift sentence of condemnation passed upon the three offenders, their miraculous preservation from the fiery furnace heated seven times hotter than usual, the king's acknowledgement of the God of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, with their restoration to office, are written in the third chapter of Daniel, and there the history leaves them
Shadrach - ” One of Daniel's three friends taken to Babylon during the Exile (Daniel 1:6-7 ). The Lord miraculously delivered them, and they were given places of honor in the kingdom (Daniel 3:30 ). See Daniel
Belteshazzar - Nebuchadnezzar is said to have conferred this name on the youthful Daniel ( Daniel 1:7 ). The Babylonian form would be Balatsu-usur (“protect his life!”) or, according to Daniel 4:8 , Bel balatsu-usur
Pulse - General term for peas, beans, and lentils (Daniel 1:12 ,Daniel 1:12,1:16 )
Dominion - Either political authority (Numbers 24:19 ; Daniel 7:6 ,Daniel 7:6,7:12 ,Daniel 7:12,7:14 ) or the realm in which such authority is exercised (1 Kings 4:24 ; 1 Kings 9:19 ). Though humans exercise dominion in the political sphere and over creation, ultimate dominion belongs to God (Psalm 72:8 ; Daniel 4:3 ,Daniel 4:3,4:34 )
Belteshazzar - See Daniel
Maccabees - ) Books of the Apocrypha: interesting as giving a Jewish history of many events which occurred after the sacred Canon closed with Malachi; especially the heroic and successful struggle of the Maccabees for Judah's independence against the Old Testament antichrist and persecutor, Antiochus Epiphanes, of whom Daniel 8; Daniel 11 foretells. (See CANON; BIBLE; Daniel; JERUSALEM
Alexander the Great - He then entered the city, offered sacrifice, was shown the passages in Daniel relating to himself, granted the people unmolested use of their customs, promised to befriend their eastern settlements, and welcomed Jews to his army ( Ant . The objections to this story are: (1) that although there are references to Alexander and his successors in Daniel ( Daniel 2:40 ff. , Daniel 7:7 ; Daniel 8:5 ; Daniel 8:8 ; Daniel 8:21 ; Daniel 11:3 f
Dari'us - Daniel 5:31 ; Daniel 6:9-28 ; Daniel 9:1 ; Daniel 11:1 . See BABYLON and Daniel
Gabriel - The messenger sent to Daniel, and to Zacharias, and to the Virgin Mary. (Daniel 9:21; Luke 1:11-26) His name is compounded of Gaber, strength; and I-ei, my God
Pulse - Daniel 1:12; Daniel 1:16, zeronim , edible "seeds" or grain of any kind, barley, wheat, millet, vetches
Abednego - The Chaldee name, signifying 'servant of Nego,' given to Azariah, one of Daniel's companions. Daniel 1:7 ; Daniel 3:1-30
ga'Briel - He was also sent to Daniel to explain his visions. ( Daniel 8:16 ; 9:21 )
Dari'us -
DARIUS THE MEDE, (Daniel 6:1 ; 11:1 ) "the son of Ahasuerus," (Daniel 9:1 ) who succeeded to the Babylonian kingdom ont he death of Belshazzar, being then sixty-two years old. (Daniel 5:31 ; 9:1 ) (B. ) Only one year of his reign is mentioned, (Daniel 9:1 ; 11:1 ) but that was of great importance for the Jews. Daniel was advanced by the king to the highest dignity, (Daniel 6:1 ) ff. Daniel 6
Tekel - Weighed (Daniel 5:27 )
Daniel, the Book of - That Daniel composed it is testified by Daniel 7:1-28; Daniel 8:2; Daniel 9:2; Daniel 10:1-2; Daniel 12:4-5. Daniel was "the politician, chronologer, and historian among the prophets" (Bengel). assailed the Book of Daniel as a forgery in the time of the Maccabees, 170-164 B. But the forgery of a prophecy, if Daniel were spurious, would never have been received by the Jews from an age when confessedly there were no prophets. Antiochus Epiphanes' history and attack on the holy people are so accurately detailed (Daniel 11) that Porphyry thought they must have been written after the event. ...
But Zechariah, Ezra, and Nehemiah allude to it; Jesus in His peculiar designation "the Son of man" (Matthew 24:30, compare Daniel 7:13) refers to it, and especially in the crisis of His trial when adjured by the living God (Matthew 26:64), and stamps him authoritatively as "the prophet Daniel," and ratifies his particular prophecies (Matthew 24:15; Matthew 24:21; compare Daniel 12:1, etc. Luke 1:19-26 mentions Gabriel, whose name occurs elsewhere in Scripture only in Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21. The judgment of the world given to the saints, and the destruction of the blasphemous king at the Lord's coming, (Daniel 7:8; Daniel 7:25; Daniel 11:36) foretold by Daniel, are further unfolded by Paul (1 Corinthians 6:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:3-12). ...
The deliverance from fire and lions (Daniel 2 and Daniel 6) are referred to in Hebrews 11:33-34. Thus, the New Testament attests (Daniel 2-3; 6-7; 11) expressly on the three points to which rationalists object, namely, the predictions, the miracles narrated, and the manifestations of angels. The former part also is referred to by Christ, namely, as to "the stone" smiting the image (Daniel 2:34-35; Daniel 2:44-45), in Matthew 21:44. What completely disproves Porphyry's theory is, 1 Maccabees (1 Maccabees 1:24; 1 Maccabees 9:27; 1 Maccabees 9:40) refers to Daniel as an accredited book, and even to Septuagint version of it; compare Daniel 11:26 (Septuagint Daniel 12:1). ...
Daniel's place in the Septuagint shows it was received by the Jews before the Maccabean times. ) the high priest, at the head of a procession, met him and averted his wrath by showing him Daniel's prophecy that a Grecian monarch should overthrow Persia (Daniel 8:5-8). Josephus' statement, if true, accounts for the fact that Alexander favored the Jews; it certainly proves that the Jews of Josephus' time believed in the existence of Daniel's book in Alexander's time long before the Maccabees. The language of Daniel from Daniel 2:4 to the end of Daniel 7 is Chaldee, the world empire's language, the subject here being about the world at large. Daniel's circumstances exactly tally to this, he being Hebrew by birth and still keeping up intercourse with Hebrew, and at the same time Chaldee by residence and associations. The union of the two languages in one book would be as unnatural to one in a later age, and therefore not similarly circumstanced, as if, is natural to Daniel. Daniel's Hebrew is closely like that of Ezekiel and Habakkuk, that is, just those prophets living nearest the assumed age of Daniel. Two predictions establish Daniel's prophetic character, and that the events foretold extend to subsequent ages. ...
(1) That the four world monarchies should rise (Daniel 2; Daniel 7), Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece, and Rome, and that Rome in a tenfold divided form should be the last, and should be overthrown by Messiah's kingdom alone; Charlemagne, Charles V, and Napoleon have vainly tried to raise a fifth. "He who denies Daniel's prophecies undermines Christianity, which is founded on Daniel's prophecies concerning Christ" (Sir Isaac Newton). ...
The vision mode of revelation, which is the exception in other prophets, is the rule in Daniel and in Zechariah 1-6. Originally, Abraham was raised out, of the "sea" (Daniel 7:2) of nations as an island holy to God, and his seed chosen as God's mediator of His revelation of love to mankind. Daniel's position in the Babylonian court answers to the altered relations of the theocracy and the world power; see above. His high dignities in the world typify the ultimate giving of the earth kingdom "to the people of the saints of the Most High" (Daniel 7:27). Daniel 2-7 represent the world powers developed historically; Daniel 8-12 their development in relation to Israel. The period of Daniel's prophecies is that from the downfall of the theocracy to its final restoration; it is the period of the world's outward supremacy, "the times of the Gentiles" (Luke 21:24; Daniel 9:27; Daniel 12:7), not set aside by Christ's first coming (John 18:36; Matthew 4:8-10); for Satan yet is "prince of this world," and Israel has been depressed and Judah's kingdom prostrate ever since the Babylonian captivity. In Daniel 2 the world kingdoms are seen by the pagan king in their outward unity and glory, yet without life, a metal colossus; in Daniel 7 they appear to the prophet of God in their real character as instinct with life, but mere beast life, terrible animal power, but no true manhood; for true manhood can only be realized by conscious union with God, in whose image man was made. The "beast" (theerion ) appears in Revelation 13; Revelation 14; Revelation 17; Revelation 19, as in Daniel 7-8. When Nebuchadnezzar glorified and deified self, becoming severed from God, he became beast-like and consorted with the beasts, that look downward to the earth, having lost his true humanity; but when "he lifted up his eyes to heaven his understanding returned, and he blessed the Most High, whose dominion is an everlasting dominion" (Daniel 4:28-34). ...
Nebuchadnezzar's degradation, repentance, and restoration contrast strikingly with Belshazzar's sacrilegious luxury and consequent doom; and Daniel develops definitely the prophetical germs already existing as to Messiah (Daniel 7; Daniel 9), the resurrection (Daniel 12:2-3), and the ministry of angels (Daniel 8:16; Daniel 8:10; Daniel 12:1). The "seventy weeks" (Daniel 9:24) probably date from 457 B. ...
The universal expectation of a Savior existed even in the Gentile world at the very time He came; doubtless due to Daniel's prophecy carried far and wide by the Jews (Tacitus, Hist
Mene - A Chaldean word, signifying, what Daniel interpreted it, together with the word Tekel, or Thechel, he was weighed. " (Daniel 5:25) The whole taken together was the doom which, by a miraculous hand written upon the wall, was directed to the impious monarch Belshazzar, and explained by Daniel. The hand-writing upon the wall was, as I have stated it, Mene, Merle, Tekel Upharsin—but Daniel renders it Mene, God hath numbered thy kingdom, and finished it—Tekel, thou art weighed in the balance, and found wanting. Upharsin, Daniel makes Peres; but the sense is the same. Daniel therefore takes both together, and renders it Peres, thy kingdom is divided. Solemn as this event was, and faithfully as Daniel's prediction was fulfilled, yet there is nothing uncommon in it
Melzar - An official title, for the precedes Melzar in the Hebrew "The steward" or" tutor," superintending the nurture and education of the young, subordinate to "the master of the eunuchs" (Daniel 1:11; Daniel 1:16); from Persian mal cara , "head cupbearer," or nazar to guard
Greece - It is named four times in the Old Testament as Greece or Grecia, Zechariah 9:13; Daniel 8:21; Daniel 10:20; Daniel 11:2, and once in the New Testament, Acts 20:2
Sheriffs - (Daniel 3:2 ), Babylonian officers
Image, Nebuchadnezzar's - The figure in Nebuchadnezzar's dream (Daniel 2:31-45 ); 2 . a colossal figure Nebuchadnezzar erected on the plains of Dura (Daniel 3:1-18 ). Nebuchadnezzar is clearly the head of gold (Daniel 2:38 ). According to one interpretation, the various materials refer to the line of Neo-Babylonian kings which came to an end with the conquest of Cyrus who is identified as the divinely ordained rock (Daniel 2:45 ; compare Isaiah 44:28 ; Isaiah 45:1 ). Interpreters divide over whether to identify the kingdom that rules the world (Daniel 2:39 ) with that of Cyrus who made this claim or with Alexander who in fact conquered much of the known world. The fourth “divided” kingdom (Daniel 2:41 ) is frequently identified with the division of Alexander's empire by his generals. The mixing of iron and clay is possibly a reference to failed attempts to unite these kingdoms by marriage treaties (Daniel 2:43 ). Many historicists recognize that the Maccabees only partially fulfilled the hopes of the writer of Daniel and thus find the ultimate fulfillment in the kingdom established by Christ. The Roman period extends until the time of Christ who is the God-ordained Rock which ends the power of the Gentiles (Daniel 7:1 ; Luke 21:24 ; Revelation 16:19 ). ...
The charge of not worshipping the gods of Nebuchadnezzar leveled against the Jews (Daniel 3:12 ,Daniel 3:12,3:14 ) suggests a statue of Bel-merodach, the patron deity of Babylon, though the statue was possibly of Nebuchadnezzar himself
Hiddekel - One of the rivers of Eden, the river which "goeth eastward to Assyria," Genesis 2:14, and which Daniel calls "the great river," Daniel 10:4, rightly identified with the Tigris
Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin - (mee' nih, mee' nih, tee' kehl, yoo fahr' ssihn) An inscription that King Belshazzar of Babylon saw a detached hand write on his palace wall as the king was hosting a drunken party (Daniel 5:1-29 ). After the wise men of the kingdom could not decipher the writing, Daniel was brought in to give an interpretation. ” Daniel interpreted the inscription with a wordplay using Hebrew words which sound similar to each word of the inscription, taking it to mean, “numbered, weighed, and—divided. ”...
Daniel's interpretation was that Nebuchadnezzar and his kingdom had been weighed in the balance and found wanting. Daniel 5:30 records that the overthrow occurred that very night. Thus God worked through Daniel to show His wisdom was greater than that of Persia's wise counselors and magicians and that only the God of Israel controlled history and human destiny
Belshazzar - (behl sshaz' zuhr; Bel'ss prince) The Babylonian king whose drunken feast was interrupted by the mysterious appearance of the fingers of a human hand that wrote a cryptic message on the palace wall (Daniel 5:1 ). When the Babylonian seers were unable to interpret the writing, Daniel the Hebrew was called. He interpreted the message for the king, explaining that it meant the kingdom would be taken from Belshazzar and given to the Medes and Persians (Daniel 5:28 ). According to Daniel 5:30 , Belshazzar was slain on the very night of this incident. ...
Apart from the account in the Book of Daniel, little is known about Belshazzar
Daniel - DANIEL. —The influence of Daniel on the Apocalyptic conceptions of the Gospels is profound (see Apocalyptic Literature). For the possible influence of Daniel 7:13 see Son of Man. It is to be noted that in the corresponding passage in Mark (Mark 13:14), no mention is made of Daniel. In that case it would not be necessary to assume that Jesus meant to use the phrase in the same sense as it is used in Daniel
Ulai - Ulai (û'lâi or û'la-î), strong water? A river of Susiana, on whose banks Daniel saw his vision of the ram and he-goat. Daniel 8:2-16. This bifurcation of the stream explains the otherwise difficult passage, "I heard a man's voice between the banks of Ulai," Daniel 8:16—that is, between the banks of the two streams of that divided river
Daniel (2) - Daniel, book of. The book of Daniel was not placed among the prophetical books in the Hebrew Bible, but in the third division (writings) and after the Psalms. The introduction, Daniel 1:1 to Daniel 2:4 a, is written in Hebrew. says was made in "Syriac," the language changes to Aramaic, and this is retained till the close of the seventh chapter or Daniel 2:4-7. The personal introduction of Daniel as the writer of the text, 8:1, is marked by a change of the language again back to the Hebrew, which continues to the close of the book. The next six chapters, 2-7, give a general view of the progressive history of the powers of the world, and of the principles of the divine government as seen in the events of the lire of Daniel. In the first seven chapters Daniel is spoken of historically; in the last five he appears personally as the writer. Statements in the book itself imply that it was written by Daniel, and this is confirmed by references to it in the New Testament and in first book of Maccabees 1:54; 2:59, 60. Josephus also reports that it was written by Daniel, "one of the greatest of the prophets
Hose - (Daniel 3:21 ), a tunic or undergarment
Ancient of Days - ANCIENT OF DAYS occurs 3 times in Daniel ( Daniel 7:9 ; Daniel 7:13 ; Daniel 7:22 ) as a title of God in His capacity as Judge of the world. The picture is no doubt suggested by the contrast between the Eternal God ( Psalms 55:19 ) and the new-fangled deities which were from time to time introduced ( Judges 5:8 , Deuteronomy 32:17 ), rather than, as Hippolytus (quoted by Behrmann, Das Buch Daniel , p. In the troublous times which are represented by the Book of Daniel, it was at once a comfort and a warning to remember that above the fleeting phases of life there sat One who remained eternally the same ( Psalms 90:1-3 ; Psalms 102:24-27 )
Pulse - Our English word means peas, beans, lentiles, and the produce of similar podded plants, but in Daniel 1:12; Daniel 1:16 the Hebrew word probably denotes vegetable food in general, and in 2 Samuel 17:28 parched peas, which are still a favorite food in the east
Belshazzar - Daniel 5:1; Daniel 5:18. Daniel was called in to explain the mystery, which, interpreted, proved to be a prophecy of the king's death and the kingdom's overthrow, which took place in the course of the succeeding night, when Darius the Median captured the city. Daniel 5:25-31
Daniel, Book of - ...
The book divides itself into two portions: the first six chapters give Daniel's intercourse with the great monarchs; and the latter six chapters the visions and revelations made to Daniel himself. For the personal history of the prophet see Daniel. ...
Daniel 2 : Under the figure of the Great Image are described the four Gentile empires that were to succeed each other, further particulars of which were afterwards revealed to Daniel. ...
Daniel 3 : It is here uniformity of religion, established by the king, not by God — the principle of Church and State. ...
Daniel 4 : The dream and the interpretation shows that Nebuchadnezzar himself was thegreat tree to be cut down, and the prophet exhorted him to renounce his sins and reform his ways, and peradventure the judgement might be postponed. ...
Daniel 5 : About twenty-five years later Belshazzar was reigning at Babylon. This accounts for Belshazzar promising that Daniel should be the third ruler in the kingdom. Daniel faithfully reminded Belshazzar of how God had dealt with his father (or rather his grandfather) Nebuchadnezzar for his pride; adding that though the king knew all this he had lifted up himself against the God of heaven, and had desecrated the vessels of God's house by drinking wine in them to his gods, and foretells his destruction. ...
Daniel 6 : Darius the Mede had to learn the power of God, his own weakness, and the faithfulness of Daniel the servant of God. Daniel was saved from the lions, and the God of Daniel was proclaimed throughout the empire as the living God. Typically, Darius represents the last Gentile emperor, who will be worshipped; Daniel, the godly Jews who will be saved from the very jaws of destruction; his opposers, the future infidel accusers of God's people. ...
Daniel 7 : This begins the second part of the book. The four empires prophesied of in Daniel 2 are here further described under the figure of 'great beasts. ' The lion is Chaldean; the bear, Medo-Persian; the leopard, Grecian (or Macedonian); and the fourth, which was like no living animal, Roman, distinguished as having ten horns (ten kings), Daniel 7:24 . ...
Daniel 8 : The second and the third of the four empires are again prophesied of. Out of the third kingdom, the Grecian, after it was divided into four, arose a little horn, which magnified itself; and then follows the ceasing of the daily sacrifice at Jerusalem, 'the pleasant land;' but in Daniel 8:11 and part of verse 12 there is a change from 'it' to 'he;' and in Daniel 8:17 and Daniel 8:19 'the time of the end' is spoken of. Daniel 8:25 . Daniel 8:23-25 are distinctly future: 'in the latter time. '*...
* In reference to the 2300 days of Daniel 8:14 , see under 'Antiochus '...
B. , Epiphanes (third paragraph)...
Daniel 9 : Daniel was a student of prophecy, and learned from Jeremiah that the desolations of Jerusalem were to last 70 years. These were almost accomplished, and Daniel confessed his sins and the sins of his people; he prayed for forgiveness, and for the sanctuary which was lying desolate; he begged God to hearken and do, to defer not for His own sake, because the city and the people were called by His name. ...
Daniel 10 : Daniel mourned three full weeks. Some were elated at the small restoration in Ezra 1 - 3, but Daniel was still before God about His people, the previous chapter having revealed that 70 weeks (of years) would have to run on before blessing; Messiah would be rejected, etc. One was sent to comfort Daniel, and he revealed the fact that unseen evil powers had delayed his coming the entire three weeks. " Daniel 10:14,20 . This introduces Daniel 11 and 12 ( Daniel 10,11 , and 12: being one). God's answer is a revelation extending from the days of Daniel to the final blessing of God's people. The city and sanctuary are in view in Daniel 9 , here the people. ...
Daniel 11 : Daniel 11:1-35 are a history of the contests between the king of the north (Syria) and the king of the south (Egypt) — branches of the Grecian empire — often in the land of Palestine which lay between them. Daniel 11:21 to 35 refer to Antiochus Epiphanes, type of the king of the north, or Assyrian of the last days: cf. also Daniel 8 . ...
Daniel 11:36-45 . Daniel 11:36-39 are a parenthesis and refer to Antichrist as a king: he will be a Jew and not regard 'the God of his fathers,' nor the Messiah as 'the desire of women,' nor regard any known god; but will set himself up above all. ...
Daniel 11:40-45 . ...
Daniel 12 : This is the deliverance and blessing of the Jewish remnant. Daniel was told to seal up the book to the time of the end: cf. He heard one ask, "How long shall it be to the end of these wonders?" The reply is "a time, times, and a half " — 3-1/2 years, the last half-week of Daniel's 70 weeks. Daniel was told to go: he should stand in his lot at the end of the days. It is important to remember that Daniel's prophecy embraces the 'times of the Gentiles' — running on from the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar to the restoration of the Jews whenruled over by the Son of David. The Church and the Gospel have no place in Daniel. ...
The book is not all written in Hebrew: from Daniel 2:4 to end of Daniel 7
Gabriel - He was sent to the prophet Daniel to explain his vision; also to Zacharias, to announce to him the future birth of John the Baptist, Daniel 8:16 9:21 Luke 1:11,19
Prince - So also the "princes" mentioned in Daniel 6:1,3,4,6,7 were the officers who administered the affairs of the provinces; the "satraps" (as rendered in RSV). The promised Saviour is called by (Daniel 9:25 ) "Messiah the Prince" (Heb. The angel Micheal is called (Daniel 12:1 ) a "prince" (Heb
Shadrach - The name given to Hananiah ( Daniel 1:7 )
Pulse - (Daniel 1:12,16 ), RSV "herbs," vegetable food in general
Ashpenaz - The chief of Nebuchadrezzar’s eunuchs ( Daniel 1:3 )
Mishael or Meshach - A fellow-captive with Daniel in Babylon
Dulcimer - ]'>[1] in Daniel 3:5 ; Daniel 3:15 as tr
Daniel - Daniel . 592 and 587, mention a certain Daniel as an extraordinarily righteous and wise man, belonging to the same class as Noah and Job, whose piety availed with God on behalf of their unworthy contemporaries. Daniel, occupying the middle place, cannot be conceived of as the latest of them. He certainly was not a younger man than the prophet who refers to him, as the hero of the Book of Daniel would have been. For Daniel 1:1-3 makes the latter to have been carried into captivity in b. Driver ( Daniel , p
Prince, Princess - In Daniel these same are called achashdarpenayya , 'chief governors. ' Daniel 3:2,3,27 ; Daniel 6:1-7 . Daniel 10:13-21
Gamael - 1Es 8:29 = Daniel , No
Abomination, Abomination of Desolation - ...
“Abomination of desolation” is a special term in Daniel 9:27 ; Daniel 11:31 ; Daniel 12:11 ; Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ; Luke 16:15 ; Revelation 17:4-5 ; Revelation 21:27 . ...
Daniel 9:27 ; Daniel 11:31 ; and Daniel 12:11 give evidence of a heathen idol or altar. ...
The term “desolation” (shomem ) permeates the book of Daniel (Daniel 8:13 ; Daniel 9:2 ,Daniel 9:2,9:17-18 ,Daniel 9:17-18,9:26-27 ; Daniel 11:31 ; and Daniel 12:11 ). ...
In Daniel, the historical situation was apparently the building of an altar of Zeus by Antiochus Epiphanes in Jerusalem in his attempt at complete hellenization of Israel in the second century B. ...
The historical situation of Daniel is clarified in 1 Maccabees 1:54 ; 1 Maccabees 6:7 ; 2 Maccabees 6:2 ; 2 Maccabees 1:1 Enoch 89:68-90:27; and Testament of Levi 16-17. Some would interpret the “eschaton” or end time in the Book of Daniel to be the end of Antiochus Epihyphanes. The original passage in Daniel serves as the textual and historical presaging for later applications
Medes, Media - He is called Ahasuerus in Daniel 9:1 . Astyages succeeded Cyaxares, but Cyrus the Persian was rising in power and subdued Astyages, but allowed him to reign as king, and he was probably Darius the Mede of Daniel. The kingdom was called at first that of the 'Medes and Persians,' as in Daniel 5:28 ; Daniel 6:8,12,15 ; but, at a later period, the Persians had the pre-eminence (cf. Daniel 8:3 ), and are mentioned first. See Daniel. Esther 10:2 ; Isaiah 13:17 ; Isaiah 21:2 ; Jeremiah 25:25 ; Jeremiah 51:11,28 ; Daniel 8:20 ; Acts 2:9 . Darius in Daniel 5:31 is called the MEDIAN
Daily Sacrifice - (Daniel 8:12 ; 11:31 ; 12:11 ), a burnt offering of two lambs of a year old, which were daily sacrificed in the name of the whole Israelitish people upon the great altar, the first at dawn of day, and the second at evening (Daniel 9:21 ), or more correctly, "between the two evenings
Dulcimer - A Hebraized Greek name, sumfonia , in Daniel 3:5; Daniel 3:15
Satraps - ]'>[3] lieutenants ), Daniel 3:2-3 ; Daniel 3:27 ; Daniel 6:1 ff
Abednego - Servant of Nego; a Chaldee name give to Azariah, one of the three captive young princes of Judah, who were Daniel's companions at the court of the king of Babylon, Daniel 1:7 . Their virtue, wisdom, and piety secured their promotion at court, Daniel 1:3-19 2:17,49 ; and their steadfastness in witnessing for God among idolaters, with their deliverance from the fiery furnace by the Angel-Jehovah, led many to acknowledge the true God, and rendered these pious youth for ever illustrious as monuments of the excellence and safety of faith in Him, Daniel 3:1-30 Hebrews 11:34
Daniel - During the reign of Belshazzar, Daniel deciphered writing that mysteriously appeared, predicting Babylon's downfall. par ...
Daniel, the Book of: The book of Tanach describing the experiences of Daniel - and his friends Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah - in the Babylonian and Persian royal courts, as well as several of Daniel's prophecies
u'la-i - (pure water ) is mentioned by Daniel, ( Daniel 8:2,16 ) as a river near to Susa, where he saw his vision of the ram and the he-goat. This bifurcation explains ( Daniel 8:16 )
Daniel the Prophet - He was to be fed with the king's meat and to drink the king's wine, but Daniel resolved not to be thus defiled; the food had probably been offered to idols. God also gave them knowledge and skill in learning, and to Daniel He gave understanding in all visions and dreams. The magic and astrology of Chaldea was not equal to it, and Daniel and his companions were in danger of being destroyed with all the wise men; but they turned to the God of heaven and prayed to Him, and the dream was revealed to Daniel in a night vision. Daniel thanked and worshipped the God of his fathers. Its revelation had such an effect on the king that he did homage to Daniel, and said Daniel's God was the God of gods and the Lord of kings. He made Daniel ruler over the whole of Babylon and chief governor over all the wise men of Babylon. Daniel was also able to interpret the dream that foretold Nebuchadnezzar's lunacy. ...
Darius in settling the government made three presidents over 120 princes or satraps, and Daniel was first of the three. Spite of the king's decree (which they had instigated) that no one should ask a petition of God or man for thirty days except of the king, Daniel still three times a day prayed and gave thanks to his God, having his window opened towards Jerusalem: cf. On his being accused thereof Darius was grieved, but saw no way of keeping the law and saving Daniel, so he was cast into the lions' den. Darius spent the night in fasting, and in the morning he found that Daniel's God had been able to save him from the lions. A decree was then sent throughout the kingdom that all should fear the God of Daniel, 'for He is the living God. ' "So this Daniel prospered in the reign of Darius, and in the reign of Cyrus the Persian. " Daniel 6:28 . ...
This closes the history of Daniel in connection with the kings of Babylon and Persia
Gabriel - ...
In the time of Judah’s captivity, Gabriel made an appearance to Daniel as a man-like figure and explained the meaning of one of Daniel’s visions (Daniel 8:15-17). Later he appeared again, this time to bring God’s answer to Daniel’s prayer of confession on behalf of the nation. He assured Daniel that God would now restore the Jews to their land and bring his age-long purposes to fulfilment with the coming of the Messiah (Daniel 9:20-27)
Gabriel - In the first rank of the innumerable hosts of the heavenly hierarchy ( Daniel 7:10 ) there are seven who occupy the first place the seven archangels; of these Gabriel is one. In Daniel 8:15 ff. Gabriel is sent to explain to Daniel the meaning of the vision of the ram and the he-goat; in Daniel 9:21 ff. he tells Daniel of the seventy weeks which are ‘decreed’ upon the people and the holy city
Antiochus - These are so clear and definite that sceptics have foolishly said that at least this part of the prophecy of Daniel must have been writtenafter the events! The Greek kingdom, the third of the four great empires, was, on the death of Alexander the Great, divided amonghis four generals, and this resulted principally in a series of kings who ruled in Egypt bearing the general name of PTOLEMY, and are called in scripture 'Kings of the South;' and another series, called 'Kings of the North,' who bore the general name of either SELEUCUS or ANTIOCHUS. The following is a list of the kings, with the dates when they began to reign, noticing the principal events that were prophesied of them in Daniel 11 . See Daniel 11:6 . Daniel 11:7-9 . Daniel 11:10-12 . Daniel 11:16 . Daniel thus ...
speaks of it: "He shall give him the daughter of women, corrupting her, but she shall not ...
stand on his side, neither be for him. " Daniel 11:17 . Daniel 11:18,19 . ' Daniel 11:20 . ' Daniel 11:21-24 . Daniel 11:25,26 . ' Daniel 11:27 . 'At the appointed time he shall return and come toward the South,' ...
Daniel 11:29 ; but he was stopped by Rome; 'ships of Chittim,' ships from Macedonia,...
came against him; and in great anger he returned and vented his wrath on Jerusalem. Daniel relates "They shall pollute the ...
sanctuary of strength, and shall take away the daily sacrifice, and they shall place the ...
abomination that maketh desolate. " Daniel 11:31 : cf. also Daniel 8:9-12 where the 'little ...
horn' refers to Antiochus Epiphanes. ...
Bleek, Delitzsch, and others consider that in Daniel 8:14 , the 2,300 'evening, ...
morning,' margin , refer to the daily sacrifice, which is spoken of in Daniel 8:11,12,13 ; ...
and that by 2,300 is meant 1,150 days : cf. also Daniel 8:26 . ...
Daniel 11:32 b, 33-35 refer to the change that soon took place under Judas ...
Maccabeus and his brothers, commencing B. The historical notices in Daniel end ...
at Daniel 11:35
Abomination of Desolation - This exact expression occurs only in Matthew 24:15 and Mark 13:14 , referring to what had been revealed to Daniel in Daniel 12:11 , where it is connected with the great tribulation (ver. Daniel 9:27 shows that the time of the abomination is in the last half of the last of the seventy weeks of Daniel named in Daniel 9:24 . Daniel 11:40
Ulai - According to Daniel 8:2 ; Daniel 8:16 and the Assyrian inscriptions, it flowed past the city of Shushan (Susa)
Melzar - (mehl' zahr) KJV transliteration of what is likely an Assyrian loanword meaning “guard” (NIV), “overseer” (NAS), or “steward” (RSV) at Daniel 1:11 ,Daniel 1:11,1:16
Choler - ]'>[1] ‘colic’); and in Daniel 8:7 ; Daniel 11:11 in the sense of bitter anger
Hiddekel - The river Tigris, mentioned as the third river of Paradise ( Genesis 2:14 ), and as ‘the great river’ by the side of which Daniel had his vision ( Daniel 10:4 )
Arioch - See Daniel 2:14-25 ). He confided in Daniel, who was able to interpret the king's forgotten dream and prevent the death of the wise counselors of Babylon
Quaking - ...
Daniel 10
Cogitations - (Or "thoughts," as the Chaldee word in Daniel 7:28 literally means), earnest meditation
Gabriel - ) (Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21; Luke 1:19; Luke 1:26). Thus, Gabriel explains to Daniel the appalling prophecy concerning the ram and he-goat, and cheers him with the prophecy of Messiah's advent within the "70 weeks," in answer to his prayer; and in New Testament announces to Zacharias the glad tidings of the birth of John the forerunner, and of Messiah Himself to the Virgin (Luke 1:19; Luke 1:26)
Pulse - " In Daniel 1:12 ; Daniel 1:16 , the word זדעים , rendered pulse, may signify seeds in general
Darius - Darius the Median, Daniel 5:31, was the son of Ahasuerus; he took Babylon from Belshazzar the Chaldæan, being at that time about 62 years old. "Only one year of the reign of Darius is mentioned, Daniel 9:1; Daniel 11:1; and if, as seems probable, Darius (Astyages) occupied the throne of Babylon as supreme sovereign, with Nerigalsarasser as vassal-prince, after the murder of Evil-merodach (Bel-shazzar), b. 558, in exact accordance with the notices in Daniel. " Under him Daniel was advanced to the highest dignity, which exposed him to the malice of enemies and led to his being cast into the den of lions, but by a miracle he escaped injury. Alexander defeated him, and thus the prophecy of Daniel, Daniel 8:1-27, was fulfilled
Hat - karb'ela, (Daniel 3:21 ), properly mantle or pallium
Chileab - Elsewhere called Daniel (1 Chronicles 3:1)
Seleucus - the king of Egypt’s]'>[1] princes’ ( Daniel 11:5 ). 246 226), son of Antiochus Soter , is entitled the ‘king of the north’ in the passage ( Daniel 11:7-9 ) which alludes to the utter discomfiture of the Syrian king and the capture of Seleucia. ’s]'>[2] sons’ ( Daniel 11:10 ), was murdered during a campaign in Asia Minor: the struggle with Egypt was continued by his brother Antiochus ( Daniel 11:10-16 ). Daniel 11:20 ). The four first-named belong to the ‘ten horns’ of Daniel 7:24
Day - " Daniel 8:14 margin. "Hour" is first mentioned Daniel 3:6; Daniel 3:15; Daniel 5:5. The usual times of prayer were the third, sixth, and ninth hours (Daniel 6:10; Acts 2:15; Acts 3:1)
Ulai - A river near Shushan, by the banks of which Daniel saw the vision of the ram and the he goat (Daniel 8:2; Daniel 8:16). In Daniel 8:16 Daniel says, "I heard a man's voice between the banks of Ulai," referring either to the bifurcation or to the river and one of its chief channels, for Eulaeus by artificial canals surrounded the Shushan citadel
Ancient of Days - is a phrase used in Daniel 7:1 to describe the everlasting God. ”...
Several biblical passages are related in terms and ideas with Daniel 7:1 ( Genesis 24:1 ; Job 36:26 ; Psalm 50:1-6 ; Psalm 55:19 ; 1 Kings 22:19-20 ; Isaiah 26:1-27:1 ; Isaiah 44:6 ; Ezekiel 1:1 ; Joel 3:2 ). ”...
Coupled with the figures of speech in the context of Daniel 7:1 , Ancient of days suggests age, antiquity, dignity, endurance, judgment, and wisdom. ...
Disliking the anthropomorphic picture of God in Daniel 7:1 , Jephet, an 11th century Qaraite Jew, identified the Ancient of days as an angel like other angels in the Book of Daniel
Night - Night is frequently a time of encounter with God, either through dreams or visions (Genesis 20:3 ; Genesis 31:24 ; Genesis 46:2 ; 1 Kings 3:5 ; Job 33:15 ; Daniel 2:19 ; Daniel 7:2 ,Daniel 7:2,7:7 ,Daniel 7:7,7:13 ; Acts 16:9 ; Acts 18:9 ), appearances (Genesis 26:24 ; Numbers 22:20 ; 1 Chronicles 17:3 ; 2 Chronicles 1:7 ; 2 Chronicles 7:12 ; Acts 23:11 ; Acts 27:23 ), or by speech (Judges 6:25 ; Judges 7:9 ; 1 Samuel 15:16 )
Michael the Archangel - In Daniel he is called 'one of the chief princes,' 'your prince,' 'the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people. ' He went to the assistance of one (probably an angel) who had been sent with a message to Daniel, but who had been detained twenty-one days by the prince of the kingdom of Persia (doubtless Satan, or one of Satan's angels, who was acting for the kingdom of Persia, as Michael was prince for the children of Israel). Daniel 10:13,21 ; Daniel 12:1
Lengthening - Daniel 4
Grecia, Greece - The same word is translated 'Grecia' in Daniel and 'Greece' in Zechariah. Greece is referred to in Daniel as the seat of the third great Gentile empire, of which Alexander the Great was the head, though he was a Macedonian; but he conquered Greece, and the empire he established bears that name. Daniel 8:21 ; Daniel 10:20 ; Daniel 11:2 . ...
THE GRECIAN EMPIRE is called 'a kingdom of brass,' as inferior to the Babylonian and the Persian: Daniel 2:39 . Daniel 7:6 . " Daniel 8:6,8,21
Mishael - (c, 400 BCE) Exiled to Babylon together with Daniel, Hananiah, and Azariah, where they were trained to be chamberlains in the royal court. Miraculously, they emerged unscathed, as described in the Book of Daniel
Hid'Dekel - (rapid ), one of the rivers of Eden, the river which "goeth eastward to Assyria," ( Genesis 2:14 ) and which Daniel calls "the great river," (Daniel 10:4 ) seems to have been rightly identified by the LXX
Daniel, Theology of - Daniel is one of the most controversial books of the Bible, yet its message is clear and unmistakable. While Bible scholars debate issues like when it was written and whether it is historically accurate, the Book of Daniel consistently calls God's people of every generation to faithfulness. ...
Daniel is the only Old Testament book written completely in apocalyptic language. As such, Daniel is similar to the Book of Revelation in the New Testament, which is the oldest document actually claiming the title "apocalypse" or "revelation. " In this sense, Daniel forms an important bridge between the Testaments. Daniel, like other Old Testament prophets, is concerned with the Sinai covenant (9:11,13, 15) and with the basic social message of the other prophets (4:27). ...
Daniel's unique position in the Old Testament can also be seen in its purpose. Daniel's concern is consistent faithfulness among believers, continued obedience among God's people during times of hardship. ...
The Book of Daniel has two discernible parts: the historical narratives of chapters 1-6 and the visions of chapters 7-12. The stories of the first half relate the events of Daniel and his ministry in the foreign courts of Babylonia and Persia. The visions of the second half are the personal accounts of Daniel dated to the later part of his life. ...
The narratives of chapters 1-6 have in common a single theme: Daniel and his three friends successfully bear witness to their faith before a hostile world. But Daniel illustrates this fact in graphic new ways. Through both the narratives and visions, Daniel demonstrates the lordship of God over the whole world, not just Jerusalem and the Israelites. ...
After Daniel steadfastly resisted the cultural pressure to compromise, God "gave" (natan [2]) him favor before Nebuchadnezzar's chief of staff (v. Later, God "gave" (natan [2]) the four young Jews surpassing knowledge and discernment, particularly to Daniel, a gift for understanding visions and dreams (v. 2) as well as individuals (Daniel and this three companions, v. 3), as he also did for Daniel in the lions' den (chap. Daniel is given the ability to interpret dreams and visions that are mysterious and impossible for the noblest and wisest of Babylon's wisemen to discern (chaps. ...
The Book of Daniel adds a new twist to the prophetic view of the nations who might oppose God. But Daniel views the key empires in sequential order of four, followed by a fifth, eternal kingdom. Rather than present sermons against Israel's immediate neighbors, Daniel sees visions of future empires that oppose God worldwide and oppress his people everywhere. The stories relate how God's servants (Daniel and his friends) were able to overcome the strongest human forces of earth in their efforts to remain faithful to God. A further emphasis of the Book of Daniel is the pride and arrogance of humankind and God's total condemnation of egotism. ...
The Book of Daniel is especially pertinent for every new generation of believers because it addresses the ultimate problem of the human condition. So salvation must involve confession, rejection of prideful self-sufficiency, and dependence on God (Mark 8:34 ), all of which are so magnificently modeled by Daniel, his three companions, and later, by the saints of the Most High. Daniel also reveals much about the kingdom of God. The fundamental message of Daniel is that through every possible circumstance of life, it is possible to live a life of faith and victory with God's help. The unique apocalyptic nature of Daniel teaches that this has always been so (chaps. ...
Daniel is the primary source in the Old Testament revealing events of the future. Daniel teaches that God's people can and should live holy, righteous lives while suffering the injustices of this life. But as an exilic prophet, Daniel was living and working after the actual loss of the monarchy. ...
In Daniel, the concept of the Messiah was reinterpreted toward the universal, rather than being limited to a single nation, Israel. Thus there is a Davidic substratum, or ideological undercurrent in Daniel 7:13-14 . Daniel had envisioned evil incarnate in the form of the little horn, the symbol of a ruthless human dictator who stops at nothing to achieve his own selfish ambitions (7:8,8:9, though the two horns are not identical). Now Daniel sees the Messiah as the antithesis of personified evil. ...
The political and military dimensions of the son of David, the king-Messiah, are broadened in Daniel. Baldwin, Daniel: An Introduction and Commentary ; J. Goldingay, Daniel ; D. Heaton, The Book of Daniel ; A. LaCocque, Daniel in His Time ; D. Young, Daniel: An Introduction and Commentary ; idem, The Prophecy of Daniel: A Commentary
Archangel, Gabriel the - " Mention of him occurs four times in the Bible; he foretold the destruction of the Persian Empire by Alexander the Great and its division among his generals after his death (Daniel 8), interpreted to Daniel the Messianic visions (Daniel 9); predicted to Zachary the birth of the precursor (Luke 1); and announced to Mary that she was to be the mother of God (Luke 1)
Gabriel the Archangel - " Mention of him occurs four times in the Bible; he foretold the destruction of the Persian Empire by Alexander the Great and its division among his generals after his death (Daniel 8), interpreted to Daniel the Messianic visions (Daniel 9); predicted to Zachary the birth of the precursor (Luke 1); and announced to Mary that she was to be the mother of God (Luke 1)
Shadrach - A Chaldean name given to Ananias at the court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:7
Day - The Hebrews, probably, from the narrative of creation, Genesis 1:5; see Daniel 8:14, marg. The first mention of an hour is by the prophet Daniel, Daniel 3:6; Daniel 3:15; Daniel 4:19, "for a while," R. Day is also used symbolically, Numbers 14:34; and sharp contests there are among interpreters of prophecy whether the days of Daniel 12:11-12; Revelation 11:3; Revelation 11:9 do not mean years
Abdenago - Babylonian name for Azarilts, one of the three companions of the prophet Daniel at the Court of Nabuchodonosor
Watcher - Daniel 4:13,17,23 , a figurative designation of heavenly beings, apparently angels, as seen by Nebuchadnezzar in his dream
Cornet - A wind instrument of music, of a curved form, 1 Chronicles 15:28 Daniel 3:5,7
Jewry - In Daniel 5:13 it refers to Judah
Michael - The ARCHANGEL (Daniel 10:13; Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1; 2 Peter 2:11; Revelation 12:7). Michael will usher in the coming resurrection by standing up for God's people, as their unique champion (Daniel 12:1-2; Daniel 10:21), "your prince. "...
"Michael when contending with the devil about the body of Moses (which Jehovah buried, but which was probably translated shortly afterward, for 'no man knoweth of his sepulchre'; hence, he appeared in a body, as did Elijah, at the transfiguration; Satan, the accuser of the brethren, probably opposed his translation on the ground of his sins, but Michael contended with him and prevailed) durst not (from reverence to Satan's former dignity, Daniel 10:8) bring against him a railing accusation, but said The Lord rebuke thee. The angel in Daniel 10:13 says that Michael (apparently distinct from the divine Son described Daniel 10:5-6; Revelation 1:13-15) as patron of Israel before God "helped" him, while "he was detained with the (angel of the) kings of Persia. Daniel 10:21, "none holdeth with me in these things, but Michael your prince," means that Michael alone, with the angelic speaker, had the office of protecting Israel, the world powers were all against Israel
Beast - ...
Apocalyptic literature such as Daniel and Revelation utilize beasts of various sorts in their symbolism (see Psalm 74:19 ; Jeremiah 12:9 ). Daniel saw four great beasts who represented four great kings arise out of the sea (Daniel 7:2-14 ). These four beasts would ncthreaten God's kingdom, but God's people would prevail over them (Daniel 7:18 ). This beast has several of the characteristics of the four beasts of Daniel 7:1
Magicians - hartumim, (Daniel 1:20 ) were sacred scribes who acted as interpreters of omens, or "revealers of secret things
Ancient of Days - Expression applied by the Prophet Daniel to God, contrasting His eternal power with the frail existence of worldly empires
Negeb - Daniel used the term to refer to Egypt (Daniel 11:15 ,Daniel 11:15,11:29 )
Javan - In Daniel 8:21 , where the Hebrew is the same, Alexander the Great is king of Javan, agreeing with Daniel 10:20 ; Daniel 11:2 ; , Zechariah 9:13 that Javan refers to Greece
Meshach - Name given by the prince of the eunuchs to Mishael, one of Daniel's companions at Babylon: he was one of the three noble men who, faithful to God in refusing to worship the image set up by the king, were cast into the fiery furnace; but were miraculously preserved by God, there being not even the smell of fire on their garments. Daniel 1:7 ; Daniel 2:49 ; Daniel 3:12-30
Dan'Iel, Apocryphal Additions to - The Greek translations of Daniel contain several pieces which are not found int he original text. The first of these is supposed to be the triumphal song of the three confessors in the furnace, ( Daniel 3:23 ) praising God for their deliverance, of which a chief part (35-66) has been used as a hymn in the Christian Church since the fourth century. The second, called also The Judgment of Daniel , relates the story of the clearing of Susannah from a charge of adultery; and the third gives an exaggerated account of Daniel's deliverance
Hour - And, when the word "hour" first occurs, it is used loosely and indefinitely, Daniel 3:6; Daniel 3:15; Daniel 4:33; Daniel 5:5; as it is frequently in the New Testament, Mark 13:32; John 2:4; and as very commonly among ourselves
Arioch - A captain of Nebuchadnezzar's guard, Daniel 2:14
Melzar - The name or the official title of a butler or steward at the court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:11-16
Mishael - ...
...
One of the three Hebrew youths who were trained with Daniel in Babylon (Daniel 1:11,19 ), and promoted to the rank of Magi
Hananiah - (a) (c, 400 BCE) Exiled to Babylon together with Daniel, Mishael, and Azariah, where they were trained to be chamberlains in the royal court. Miraculously, they emerged unscathed, as described in the Book of Daniel
Gabriel - Champion of God, used as a proper name to designate the angel who was sent to (Daniel 8:16 ) to explain the vision of the ram and the he-goat, and to communicate the prediction of the seventy weeks (Daniel 9:21-27 )
Corruption - ...
Daniel 10:8 (a) When Daniel examined his own life, faith, and many virtues in the light of GOD's presence, they seemed wholly filthy and vile
Science - They are rendered 'science' only in Daniel 1:4 , where 'knowledge' and 'wisdom' are also mentioned; and in 1 Timothy 6:20 , where it is science, or knowledge, 'falsely so called,' doubtless alluding in Daniel to the speculations of the Magi, and in the Epistle to Timothy to the philosophers or Gnostic heretics, whose 'knowledge' had no real foundation
Azariah - (a) (c, 400 BCE) Exiled to Babylon together with Daniel, Hananiah, and Azariah, where they were trained to be chamberlains in the royal court. Miraculously, they emerged unscathed, as described in the Book of Daniel
Chananiah - (a) (c, 400 BCE) Exiled to Babylon together with Daniel, Mishael, and Azariah, where they were trained to be chamberlains in the royal court. Miraculously, they emerged unscathed, as described in the Book of Daniel
League - KJV used league at Daniel 11:23 in the sense of an agreement (NIV), alliance (NAS, NEB, NRSV), or treaty (TEV)
Mene Mene Tekel Upharsin - The words of the handwriting on the wall, which, according to Daniel 5:5 ; Daniel 5:26 , appeared mysteriously at Belshazzar’s feast, and was successfully deciphered by Daniel alone ( Daniel 5:26-28 ), in Daniel 5:25 the words of the inscription (‘the writing … inscribed ,’ RV [1] ) are given as above, but in the explanation ( Daniel 5:26-28 ) are quoted in a divergent form, and no account is taken of the repetition of the first word. This discrepancy can best be accounted for by assuming that the words of the inscription as given in Daniel 5:25 already lay in their present form before the author, and are not the product of his free invention; while Daniel 5:26-28 are the result of ‘an attempt to extract from the words, in spite of grammar, a meaning suitable to the occasion. In deducing a meaning fitted to the occasion Daniel’s skill as an interpreter of riddles is strikingly set forth. Possibly ‘an actual inscription found on the walls of the palace at Babylon, or, at any rate, found somewhere, was worked by the author of Daniel into this dramatic scene and arbitrarily explained’ (D
Arioch - Captain of Nebuchadnezzar's guard (Daniel 2:14)
Tekel - (Daniel 5:25) The word means weight, from Thechel, to weigh
Chains - as the insignia, of office: Joseph and Daniel were invested with gold chains. Genesis 41:42 ; Daniel 5:7
Ulai - River flowing near to the city of Shushan where Daniel saw himself in a vision. Daniel 8:2,16
Leopard - 1: πάρδαλις (Strong's #3917 — Noun Feminine — pardalis — par'-dal-is ) denotes "a leopard or a panther," an animal characterized by swiftness of movement and sudden spring, in Daniel 7:6 symbolic of the activities of Alexander the Great, and the formation of the Grecian kingdom, the third seen in the vision there recorded. In Revelation 13:2 the imperial power, described there also as a "beast," is seen to concentrate in himself the characteristics of those mentioned in Daniel 7
Sackbut - sambuke), a Syrian stringed instrument resembling a harp (Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 ); not the modern sackbut, which is a wind instrument
Ten - ...
The ten day diet of pulse and water which Daniel desired was not sufficient normally to show improvement in the body. ( Daniel 1:12). ...
The magicians and astrologers were ten times as weak and insufficient as Daniel. ( Daniel 1:20)
Sheriffs - The word is tiphtaye : Fürst translates it 'judges,' and Gesenius 'those learned in the law': the word occurs only in Daniel 3:2,3
Uphaz - We read of the gold of Upham, perhaps the same as Opher: the certain man, Daniel saw in a vision, had his loins apparently girded with it. (Daniel 10:5) The church speaks of her Lord's head, as of this gold
Gabriel - ” The heavenly messenger who interpreted to Daniel the meaning of the vision of the ram and the goat. Twice he appeared to Daniel (John 8:15-27 ; John 9:20-27 )
Barber, Chloe - Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children. Daniel Barber (Chloe Case Sims), her husband, and seven children
Barber, Daniel - Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children. Daniel Barber (Chloe Case Sims), her husband, and seven children
Barber Family - Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children. Daniel Barber (Chloe Case Sims), her husband, and seven children
Barber, Virgil - Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children. Daniel Barber (Chloe Case Sims), her husband, and seven children
Baltasar - While he was giving a banquet a mysterious hand wrote on the wall the words, Mane, Thecel, Phares, interpreted by Daniel as: ...
God hath numbered thy kingdom and hath finished it; thou art weighed in the balance and art found wanting; thy kingdom is divided and is given to the Medes and Persians. (Daniel 5) ...
Nabuchodonosor ii - Of a humane disposition, he repeatedly spared Jerusalem, and destroyed it only when it became a political necessity (4Kings 25; Daniel 1). He commanded that Sidrach, Misach, and Abdenago be placed in the fiery furnace, from which they were rescued by an angel of the Lord (Daniel 3). God punished him for his pride "Therefore, Nabuchodonosor, do now praise, and magnify, and glorify the King of heaven: because all his works are true, and his ways judgments, and them that walk in pride he is able to abase" (Daniel 4)
Dulcimer - Apparently a Greek word used to name a musical instrument in Daniel 3:10
Michael - When, in the time of Daniel, the Jews suffered a number of setbacks because of opposition from the ruling Persian authorities, Michael came to the Jews’ rescue. An evil spirit was behind the rulers of Persia and had prevented a messenger of God from reaching Daniel, but the good spirit Michael overpowered the evil spirit and freed the heavenly messenger (Daniel 10:12-14). ...
The messenger knew that later he would be opposed by an evil spirit working on behalf of Greece (the nation that would succeed Persia as the Jews’ ruler), but he was confident that Michael’s help would again bring him victory (Daniel 10:20-21). Opposition to the Jews would increase, but God’s people could always depend on Michael to fight for them (Daniel 12:1)
Decree - ]'>[1] the term is frequently used in Esther, Ezra, Daniel, with different Heb. ]'>[2] words, for royal decrees (in Daniel 6:1-28 RV [3] ‘interdict’; in Daniel 2:9 RV Chaldea - As a result of this Chaldean domination, the practice arose of using ‘Chaldea’ as a name for the land of Babylon as a whole, and ‘Chaldeans’ as a name for Babylonians in general (Isaiah 13:19; Isaiah 47:1; Isaiah 48:14; Isaiah 48:20; Jeremiah 25:12; Daniel 5:30; Daniel 9:1). This is the sense in which the Bible uses the name in the expression ‘magicians, enchanters, Chaldeans and astrologers’ (Daniel 4:7; Daniel 5:7; Daniel 5:11)
Peres - Divided, one of the mysterious words "written over against the candlestick upon the plaster of the wall" of king Belshazzar's palace (Daniel 5:28 )
Ptolemy - This name of the later Egyptian kings does not occur in scripture, though the acts of the Ptolemies are prophesied of in Daniel
Uphaz - Jeremiah 10:9 ; Daniel 10:5 ; supposed according to some ancient versions to be the same as OPHIR,q
Mishael - (See Daniel 1:7) The meaning of Mishael is, one asked for of God
Den - Daniel was cast into "the den of lions" (Daniel 6:16,17 )
Queen - malkah "queen regnant" (1 Kings 10:1; Daniel 5:10; Esther 1:9); sheegal "the queen consort" (Psalms 45:9; Daniel 5:2-3); gebirah "powerful mistress," "the queen mother
Pulse - PULSE ( zçrô‘îm , Daniel 1:12 ; zçrô‘nîm , Daniel 1:16 RVm Mene - He is numbered; TEKEL, he is weighed; Daniel 5:1-31 . Daniel, however, received skill to understand and courage to declare their awful meaning; and the same night witnessed their fulfillment
Mauzzim - The marginal note to the Authorized Version of ( Daniel 11:38 ) "the god of forces," gives as the equivalent of the last word "Mauzzim, or gods protectors, or munitions. " There can be little doubt that mauzzim is to be taken in its literal sense of "fortresses," just as in (Daniel 11:19,39 ) "the god of fortresses" being then the deity who presided over strongholds
Chileab - In 1 Chronicles 3:1 he is called Daniel
Chileab - Protected by the father, David's second son by Abigail (2 Samuel 3:3 ); called also Daniel (1 Chronicles 3:1 )
Daniel - THERE is always a singular lustre, and nobility, and stately distinction about Daniel. There is a note of birth, and breeding, and aristocracy about Daniel's whole name and character. There is never at any time anything common or conventional in anything that Daniel says or does. '...
The first thing in which Daniel's great qualities all come out is his so wise and so noble self-control and self-denial at the king's table. But Daniel proposed not to defile himself with the portion of the king's meat, nor with the wine which he drank: therefore he requested of the prince of the eunuchs that he might not defile himself. ' At the same time, Daniel did not at all times and in all places live on bare pulse and water. Calvin says that when Daniel and his three companions got far enough away from the royal table they would both eat flesh with pleasant bread, and would drink wine also in the wayside inns of Babylon, just as they had done when they were at home in Jerusalem. It was the company at the king's table; it was the idolatry, and the self-indulgence, and the indecency, and the riot among the young men of the palace that made Daniel determine that it would be both far easier and far safer to abstain altogether and from the beginning. When he was far enough away at any time from those snares and temptations and associations, and when he was alone with his three virtuous and temperate companions, Daniel did not make a voluntary and an ostentatious virtue of pulse and water. He who of those delights can judge, and spareTo interpose them oft, is not unwise-Belteshazzar would say on occasion to Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego, just as our English Daniel said in his fine sonnet toLawrence, of virtuous father virtuous son. At the same time, there was nothing morose or melancholy in Daniel's total abstinence. Daniel was not of a sad countenance over his pulse and water. Daniel did not disfigure his face at the royal feasts. Because of his abstinence Daniel all the more anointed his head and washed his face; till, unless you had watched him well, you would have thought that all that affability, and good humour, and merriment of his must come of the abundance of the king's wine that be drank. Unless you had been in the secret you would never have supposed that Daniel was not eating and drinking with the same self-indulgence as all the rest. In nothing was Daniel's fine character finer seen, not even when his window was set open towards Jerusalem, not even when he stepped down into the den of lions, than it was when he was the last to rise from the royal feasts, with such sweetness, and geniality, and simplicity did he converse with the men of Babylon. Daniel did not expect the young men of Chaldea to deny themselves like captive Hebrews. ...
The Chaldean Schools: their literature, their true science and their pseudo-science, their architecture, their music, their political and military methods, their religion and the sacred arts connected with their religion-nothing of all that was at all foreign, or alien, or despicable to Daniel. Daniel foresaw that his whole life would have to be spent in Babylon, and he determined that his exile there should not be so much lost time either to his mind or to his heart. But the truly philosophic temper that Daniel exhibited among the wise men of Babylon is still the true and wise temper for us all among the studies and the speculations and the scepticisms of our more learned, more scientific, and more speculative day. Daniel, by God's mercy, possessed the truth that the Chaldeans sought after in sun and moon and stars: in dreams and in incantations. In his birth, in his upbringing, in his breeding, and in his books, Daniel possessed a knowledge of God and of man that no sage of Chaldea could possibly approach: but, at the same time, Daniel was student enough to see that Chaldea had attained to a learning and to a religion of her own that well deserved his best attention. Till Daniel at last came to be acknowledged as more than the equal of the king's most learned and most consulted men. It was the largeness, and the expansiveness, and the hospitality of Daniel's fine mind, all combined with his extraordinary nobility and beauty of character, that gave Daniel such an unparalleled position in the court of Chaldea, and which has gained for Daniel such a famous and such a proverbial name in all subsequent literature, Ezekiel, a contemporary prophet, has heard so much of the wisdom of Daniel, that, to a proud enemy of Israel, he exclaims in irony: Thou art wiser than Daniel! We see the popular belief about Daniel strikingly illustrated also in the Apocryphal addition that was made to the Book of Daniel by its Greek translator and editor, and which was called the story of Susannah and the judgment of Daniel, And we are gratified to read in our own tongue a tribute to the same noble tradition in Shylock's exclamation;-...
A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!The prophet Daniel became a great proficient both in penitential and in intercessory prayer also as the years went on. You must also have special and extraordinary seasons of prayer, as Daniel had, over and above his daily habit of prayer. It was his yoke in his youth that first taught Daniel to pray. And Babylon taught Daniel and his three friends all to pray, and to pray together in their chambers, as we read. You would have held little prayer-meetings yourselves with your class-fellows and your companions, if you had come through the half that Daniel and his three companions came through. ' And Daniel was of Pascal's deep and original mind. For Daniel, just because he read in Jeremiah that deliverance was at the door, all the more set himself to pray as if his prayer was to be the alone and predestinated cause of the coming deliverance. Daniel put on sackcloth, and fasted, and prayed, and went back upon all his own and all his people's sins in a way that confounds us to our face. We cannot understand Daniel. Read Daniel's greatest prayer and...
Know thy dread power-a creature, yet a cause
Riddle - Daniel had such wisdom (Daniel 5:12 ). Daniel C
Horns - Horns are spoken of frequently in Daniel and the Revelation as a symbol for kings: "the ten horns which thou sawest are ten kings. " Daniel 7:7-24 ; Daniel 8:3-21 ; Revelation 12:3 ; Revelation 13:1 ; Revelation 17:3-16
Shushan - Hence, Daniel might be standing on the "banks of the Ulai" and also "between Ulai. " Daniel 8:2; Daniel 8:16
Magi - The earliest Greek translation of Daniel 2:2 ,Daniel 2:2,2:10 uses “magi” to translate the Hebrew term for astrologer (compare Daniel 4:7 ; Daniel 5:7 )
Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin - Daniel 5:25 . Daniel 5:8 . It may have been because the letters were the ancient Hebrew characters, which, though known to Daniel, would be unknown to them. Each word appears to have had a hidden meaning which was revealed to Daniel
Treasure Houses - The houses or magazines built for the safe keeping of treasure and valuable articles of any kind (Ezra 5:17 ; 7:20 ; Nehemiah 10:38 ; Daniel 1:2 )
Claw - In Daniel 4:33 ‘claw’ means a bird’s claw; but in Deuteronomy 14:6 and Zechariah 11:16 it has the obsolete meaning of an animal’s hoof
Sovereignty - Of God, his absolute right to do all things according to his own good pleasure (Daniel 4:25,35 ; Romans 9:15-23 ; 1 Timothy 6:15 ; Revelation 4:11 )
Ashpenaz - The master of the eunuchs of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1:3 ), the "Rabsaris" of the court
Ancient of Days - An expression applied to Jehovah three times in the vision of (Daniel 7:9,13,22 ) in the sense of eternal
Uphaz - A region producing fine gold, Jeremiah 10:9 Daniel 10:5
Homage - Homage is sometimes paid to holy men (Samuel, 1 Samuel 28:14 NAS; Daniel, Daniel 2:46 NAS, NRSV)
Dial - Daniel at Babylon ( Daniel 3:6 ) is the first to make mention of the "hour
Time - Besides the ordinary uses of this word, the Bible sometimes employs it to denote a year, as in Daniel 4:16 ; or a prophetic year, consisting of three hundred and sixty natural year, a day being taken for a year. Thus in Daniel 7:25 12:7 , the phrase "a time, times, and the dividing of a time" is supposed to mean three and a half prophetic years, or 1,260 natural years
Ulai - Or Euleus, a river which ran by the city Shushan, in Persia, on the bank of which Daniel had a famous vision, Daniel 8:2,16
Hosen - KJV term for hose or leggings (Daniel 3:21 )
Uphaz - A supposed country or region mentioned in Jeremiah 10:9 , Daniel 10:5 , as a source of gold
Fahrenheit - ) Conforming to the scale used by Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit in the graduation of his thermometer; of or relating to Fahrenheit's thermometric scale
Melzar - The Authorized Version is wrong in regarding melzar as a proper name; it is rather an official title, ( Daniel 1:11,16 ) the marginal reading, "the steward," is therefore more correct
Lieutenants - The Hebrew achash darpan was the official title of the satraps or viceroys who governed the provinces of the Persian empire; it is rendered "prince" in ( Daniel 3:2 ; 6:1 )
Alexan'Der Iii - ( Daniel 7:6 ; 8:5 ; 11:3 ) Alexander is intended in (Daniel 2:39 ) and also Dani 7:6; 8:5-7; 11:3,4 The latter indicating the rapidity of his conquests and his power. He ruled with great dominion, and did according to his will, (Daniel 11:3 ) "and there was none that could deliver . " (Daniel 8:7 )
Belteshazzar - This name was given to Daniel by the Chaldeans in the time of the captivity. (Daniel 1:7) And no doubt, the design was evil; that he might in it lose sight both of his own name, and with it the remembrance of the Lord God of his fathers. And what a change it was! Daniel, a compound of Dan, judgment; and I, E1, my God: my judgment is with God, or God is my judge. From Daniel's history, it should seem to convey the idea, as though the name Belteshazzar was given to him in compliment, on account of his great wisdom; but there can be but little question, that the great object was, that he might, in time, forget the Lord God of Israel, and be incorporated with the Chaldeans
Ancient of Days - Three times, in the Prophecy of Daniel, and in the same chapter, we find the Lord distinguished by this name, and in no other part of Scripture. (Daniel 7:9; Dan 7:13; Dan 7:22) Some have thought that the person of God the Father is meant, and it should seem to be so, because it is also said, that One like the Son of man, (a well known character of the Lord Jesus Christ) came to him. See Daniel 7:13
Melzar - , chief butler; the title of an officer at the Babylonian court (Daniel 1:11,16 ) who had charge of the diet of the Hebrew youths
Book - A sacred or canonical document ( Daniel 9:2 ); see Canon of OT
Nails (Animal Claws) - Daniel 7:19 (a) These represent the terrible power of the Roman empire to grasp, hold and destroy her enemies
Upharsin - And they are dividing, a Chaldee word, an active plural form with the conjunction prefixed; while PERES or PHARES, from the same root, is a passive participle, and means divided, Daniel 5:25,28
El - It is very often found in proper names, as Bethel, Daniel, Elijah, etc
Week - Daniel 9
Comeliness - Daniel 10:8 (a) A word used to describe the virtues and excellent qualities in Daniel's life which became utterly vile to him when he was brought into the conscious presence of the Lord
Daniel - His name is very significant, meaning, the judgment Daniel was descended from the royal family of David, and was carried away captive to Babylon when quite a youth. (See Daniel 1:7) We have this man's history in his writings, and in the accounts given of him by Ezekiel 14:14 for his great sanctity of life and manners. And his wisdom was so highly esteemed, that it became proverbial to denote a wise man by calling him Daniel. Hence, the prophet Ezekiel, (Ezekiel 28:3) speaking, by the Lord's command, to the prince of Tyrus, speaks of his vanity and pride, as if he thought himself wiser than Daniel. The prophecies of Daniel concerning the Messiah were so bright and clear, that the modern Jews endeavoured to call in question their authenticity, but without effect
Darius - DARIUS THE MEDE ...
Daniel 5:31 9:1 11:1 , was son of Astyages king of the Medes, and brother of Mandane mother of Cyrus, and of Amyit the mother of Evil-merodach and grandmother of Belshazzar: thus he was uncle, by the mother's side, to Evil-merodach and to Cyrus. In his reign Daniel was cast into the lion's den, Daniel 6:1-28 . Thus were verified the prophecies of Daniel, Daniel 8:1-27 , who had foretold the enlargement of the Persian monarchy, under the symbol of a ram, butting with its horns westward, northward, and southward, which nothing could resist; and its destruction by a goat having a very large horn between his eyes, (Alexander the Great,) coming from the west, and overrunning the world without touching the earth
Executioner - Where “official” executioners are mentioned, they are portrayed as the agents of despotic rulers ( Daniel 2:14 ,Daniel 2:14,2:24 ; Mark 6:27 )
Belshazzar - Son of Nebuchadnezzar, last king of Babylon, before its capture by Cyrus ( Daniel 5:1 ). in Daniel]; and Josephus says he was son of Naboandçlos
Consummation - The term comes from Daniel 9:27 speaking of the complete destruction God had decreed on the prince who threatened His sanctuary
Hat - An article of clothing for the head (Daniel 3:21 )
Abednego - Servant of Nego (same as Nebo), the Chaldee name given to Azariah, one of Daniel's three companions (Daniel 2:49 )
Belshazzar - His history, which is very awful, we have, (Daniel 5:1-31) His name is compounded of Baal, lord; and Otzer, treasure; intimating, no doubt, his great riches and power
Seventy - ...
Daniel 9
Prince - Philistines, 1 Samuel 18:30 ), of the chief butler and baker ( Genesis 40:2 ; Genesis 40:16 ), of the keeper of prison ( Genesis 39:21 ), of the taskmaster ( Exodus 1:11 ), of the prince of the eunuchs ( Daniel 1:7 ). It came later to be applied to the guardian angels of the nations ( Daniel 10:13 ; Daniel 10:20-21 ), to Michael the archangel ( Daniel 12:1 ). ’ It is applied to the governor of the palace ( 2 Chronicles 28:7 ), the keeper of the treasury ( 1 Chronicles 26:24 ), the chief of the Temple ( 1 Chronicles 9:11 , 2 Chronicles 31:13 ); also to the chief of a tribe ( 2 Chronicles 19:11 ), the son of a king ( 2 Chronicles 11:22 ), the king himself ( 1 Samuel 25:30 ), the high priest ( Daniel 9:25 ), and is occasionally in AV Vision - A supernatural presentation of certain scenery or circumstances to the mind of a person either while awake or asleep, Isaiah 6:1-13 Ezekiel 1:1-28 Daniel 8:1-27 Acts 26:13
Antichrist - It is a rather late term in Christianity, although its origin can be traced back to the Old Testament book of Daniel. Especially in Daniel, there arose the expectation of one who would oppose the Lord and His people Israel. This evil leader was referred to as the king of the north (Daniel 11:40 ) who would come with a mighty army to crush the nations, to persecute the righteous (Daniel 7:25 ), to bring death (Daniel 8:10 ), and to set up his throne in the Temple (Daniel 8:13 ). ...
In Daniel one also finds a collective antichrist. In Daniel 7:7-28 the Fourth Empire was viewed as a collective antichrist
Shinar - A level region of indefinite extent around Babylon and the junction of the Euphrates and Tigris, Genesis 10:10 11:2 14:1 Joshua 7:21 Isaiah 11:11 Daniel 1:2 Zechariah 5:11
President - (sarac or sareca , only used ( Daniel 6:1 )
Desolation, Abomination of - A portent of the ruin of the House of God mentioned by Daniel, and referred to by Christ as a sign to the faithful to flee from Judea; commonly interpreted as a symbol of idolatry in the Temple
John o'Connell - Writer; son of Daniel O'Connell; born Dublin, Ireland, 1810; died Kingstown, County Dublin, Ireland, 1858
o'Connell, John - Writer; son of Daniel O'Connell; born Dublin, Ireland, 1810; died Kingstown, County Dublin, Ireland, 1858
Necklace - The gift of a gold necklace is sometimes the sign of installation to a high office (Genesis 41:42 ; Daniel 5:29 )
Abomination of Desolation - A portent of the ruin of the House of God mentioned by Daniel, and referred to by Christ as a sign to the faithful to flee from Judea; commonly interpreted as a symbol of idolatry in the Temple
Antiochus - He is regarded as the "king of the north" referred to in Daniel 11:13-19 . 187) by his son, Seleucus Philopater, spoken of by (Daniel 11:20 ) as "a raiser of taxes", in the Revised Version, "one that shall cause an exactor to pass through the glory of the kingdom. His career and character are prophetically described by (Daniel 11:21-32 )
Angel - The only angels mentioned by name are Gabriel (Daniel 8:16; Dan 9:21 ), Michael (Daniel 10:13,21; 112:1), and Lucifer (Luke 10:18). Michael is always mentioned in the context of battle (Daniel 10:13) and Gabriel as a messenger (Luke 1:26)
Darius - (See Daniel; BABYLON; BELSHAZZAR; CYRUS. ) Daniel 5:31; Daniel 6:1; Daniel 9:1; Daniel 11:1. This Darius "received the kingdom" (Daniel 5:31) of Babylon as viceroy from Cyrus, according to G. Rawlinson, which may be favored by Daniel 9:1; "Darius, the son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes, which was made king over the realm of the Chaldaeans. Hence he retained the royal title and is called "king" by Daniel. Aeschylus describes Cyaxares' son as having "a mind guided by wisdom"; this is applicable both to Darius in Daniel 6:1-3, and to Astyages in Herodotus. Xenophon's account of Cyaxares agrees remarkably with Daniel's account of Darius. Xenophon says Cyrus conquered Babylon by Cyaxares' permission, and appointed for him a royal palace and rule and home there (see Daniel 6:1-28; Daniel 9:1; Daniel 5:31). Daniel's statement that Darius was 62 years old accords with Xenophon that when Cyaxares gave Cyrus his daughter he gave him along with her the Median kingdom, himself having no male heir, and being so old as not to be likely to have a son. Darius' weakness in yielding to his nobles (Daniel 6) accords with Xenophon's picture of Cyaxares' sensuality
Sorcerer - In Daniel 2:2 it is the rendering of the Hebrew mekhashphim, i
Science - KJV term (Daniel 1:4 ; 1 Timothy 6:20 ) for knowledge. Scripture describes Daniel's knowledge with admiration and approval but warns against meaningless debate of issues for the sake of human pride not leading to useful knowledge
Meshach - The title given to Mishael, one of the three Hebrew youths who were under training at the Babylonian court for the rank of Magi (Daniel 1:7 ; 2:49 ; 3:12-30 )
Mene - The first word of the mysterious handwriting (Daniel 5:25-26), "God hath numbered thy kingdom and finished it," i
Dura - ” Plain in Babylonia where King Nebuchadnezzar set up a mammoth golden image of a god or of himself (Daniel 3:1 )
Confession -
An acknowledment of sins to God (Leviticus 16:21 ; Ezra 9:5-15 ; Daniel 9:3-12 ), and to a neighbour whom we have wronged (James 5:16 ; Matthew 18:15 )
Ability - ]'>[1] ‘ability’ is either material ( Leviticus 27:8 , Ezra 2:69 , Acts 11:29 ) or personal ( Daniel 1:4 , Matthew 25:15 ) capacity
Troublous - Daniel 9 ...
Belshazzar - Though remonstrated with by Daniel he showed no signs of repentance, and in the midst of the festivities the city was taken by Cyrus or one of his generals and the king was slain. See MENE...
For a long time Daniel's account of the taking of the city and of Belshazzar being the last king, was held to be contradicted by history, which names several kings between Nebuchadnezzar and the close of the empire. This agrees with his saying to Daniel that if he could interpret the writing he should be the third in the kingdom. Daniel 5:1-30 ; Daniel 7:1 ; Daniel 8:1
Hagiography - For though, as Maimonides saith, it is the general consent of their nation, that several of the sacred writings, such as Daniel; and the Book of the Psalms, were written by the influence of the Holy Spirit, yet they say, not by prophecy; thus making a distinction between the works of the Spirit, than which nothing can be more absurd. The prophecy of Daniel in particular, was so exact in pointing to the time of the Messiah's coming and the object of his sufferings, that one of the Rabbins who lived about fifty years before the coming of Christ, asserted, that the time of the Messiah, as signified by Daniel, could not be deferred longer than those fifty years. Maimonides himself owns, that Daniel, and the other writers of the Hagiography, may be called prophets. And Josephus doth not scruple to say that Daniel was one of the greatest prophets
Dan'Iel, the Book of, - Daniel is composed partly in the vernacular Aramaic (Chaldee) and partly in the sacred Hebrew. The introduction, Daniel 1-2:4 a, is written in Hebrew. The personal introduction of Daniel as the writer of the text, 8:1, is marked by the resumption of the Hebrew, which continues to the close of the book. The next six chapters, 2-7, give a general view of the progressive history of the powers of the world, and of the principles of the divine government as seen in the events of the life of Daniel. In the first seven chapters Daniel is spoken of historically ; int he last five he appears personally as the writer
Flute - A musical instrument, probably composed of a number of pipes, mentioned Daniel 3:5,7,10,15
Mishael - Name of one of Daniel's companions, changed to MESHACH, q. Daniel 1:6-19
Jewry - " It occurs once in the Old Testament, Daniel 6:13, where it is rendered "Judah" in the R
Dwelling - Daniel 4 ...
Chittim - Chittim seems to denote primarily the island Cyprus, and also to be employed, in a wider sense, to designate other islands and countries adjacent to the Mediterranean, as for instance, Macedonia, Daniel 11:30 , and Rome, Numbers 24:24
Dulcimer - sumphoniah ) a musical instrument, mentioned in ( Daniel 3:5,15 ) probably the bagpipe
Heliodorus - There is commonly supposed to be a reference to Heliodorus in Daniel 11:20 , but the interpretation of the passage is doubtful. Further, he is frequently reckoned as one of the ten or the three kings of Daniel 7:7 f
Abomination - Hence our Lord forewarned his disciples, that when they saw the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, in the holy place, namely, the temple, they should accept this, as a token, that Jerusalem would be destroyed, and should accordingly then take their flight. Compare (Daniel 9:27 with Matthew 24:15
Nebuchadnezzar, or Nebuchadrezzar - Judah about this time became tributary to Babylon, and some captives (including Daniel) and holy vessels were carried away. 2 Chronicles 36:5-7 ; Daniel 1:1-4 . ...
The more personal history of Nebuchadnezzar is given by Daniel. Daniel could say to him, "Thou, O king, art a king of kings: for the God of heaven hath given thee a kingdom, power, and strength, and glory . In setting up the image of gold he denied the God of heaven, and the head of Gentile power became idolatrous; but on the occasion of his casting into the fiery furnace the three Hebrew companions of Daniel, because they would not worship the image he had set up, he was amazed to see another Person in the furnace like a son of God. Daniel counselled him to break off his sins by righteousness, and his iniquities by showing mercy to the poor. He remained thus apparently seven years, signified by 'seven times' (as a time, times, and half a time signify three and a half years in Daniel 12:7 ); then his reason returned, and the kingdom was restored to him. " Daniel 2 — Daniel 4
Seventy Weeks - The time spoken of in Daniel 9:24-27 , usually understood as seventy weeks of years or 490 years. The 49 years are associated with rebuilding Jerusalem in “times of trouble” (Daniel 9:25 NIV). The 434 years relate to the intervening time before a cutting off of the Anointed One ( Daniel 9:26 ). The 7 years are connected with the period of a covenant between a ruler and Jerusalem, which is violated in the middle of the 7 years (Daniel 9:27 )
Alexander the Great - Related Old Testament Passages—Daniel 7:6 (leopard Alexander the Great); Daniel 8:8 (broken horn death of Alexander); Daniel 11:3-4 (mighty king Alexander); Zechariah 9:1-8 (Alexander's conquest of Palestine). His empire is one element of the historical background of Daniel
Astrologer - (Daniel 1:20 ; 2:2,10,27 , etc
Vision - Daniel 1:17 ; Daniel 2:28 ; Daniel 4:5 , cf. The common phrase ‘visions of the night’ embodies the same conception ( Daniel 2:19 , Job 4:13 , Isaiah 6:1-1397 ; cf. ]'>[1] ]), detached from the dream-state and furthered by fasting, prayer, and self-discipline ( Daniel 10:2-9 , cf. But in the later OT books neither ecstasy nor the objective vision, with its disclosure in cryptic symbolism of future happenings (Daniel), or of the nature and purposes of God (Ezekiel, Zechariah), has a place in the normal line of development of man’s conception of the methods of Divine revelation
Nebuchadnezzar - Took Jerusalem in the third year of Jehoiakim, and "carried into the land of Shinar, to the house of his god (Merodach), part of the vessels of the house of God" (Daniel 1:1-2; 2 Chronicles 36:6). Daniel and the three children of the royal seed were at that time taken to Babylon. ...
Daniel (Daniel 4:30) also records his boast, "is not this great Babylon which I have built by the might of my power and for the honour of my majesty?" Sir H. ...
The long list of various officers in Daniel 3:1-3; Daniel 3:27, also of diviners forming a hierarchy (Daniel 2:48), shows the extent of the organization of the empire, so that the emblem of so vast a polity is "a tree . had shadow and the fowls dwelt in the boughs and all flesh was fed of it" (Daniel 4:10-12). In Daniel 2:37 he is called "king of kings," i. "...
The kingdom originally given to Adam (Genesis 1:28; Genesis 2:19-20), forfeited by sin, God temporarily delegated to Nebuchadnezzar, the "head of gold," the first of the four great world powers (Daniel 2 and Daniel 7). As Nebuchadnezzar and the other three abused the trust, for self not, for God, the Son of Man, the Fifth, to whom of right it belongs, shall wrest it from them and restore to man his lost inheritance, ruling with the saints for God's glory and man's blessedness (Psalms 8:4-6; Revelation 11:15-18; Daniel 2:34-35; Daniel 2:44-45; Daniel 7:13-27). Nebuchadnezzar was punished with the form of insanity called lycanthropy (fancying himself to be a beast and living in their haunts) for pride generated by his great conquest and buildings (Daniel 4). When man would be as God, like Adam and Nebuchadnezzar he sinks from lordship over creation to the brute level and loses his true manhood, which is likeness to God (Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:19; Genesis 3:5; Psalms 49:6; Psalms 49:10-12; Psalms 82:6-7); a key to the symbolism which represents the mighty world kingdoms as "beasts" (Daniel 7). ) states: "Nebuchadnezzar having ascended upon his palace roof predicted the Persian conquest of Babylon (which he knew from Daniel 2:39), praying that the conqueror might be borne where there is no path of men and where the wild beasts graze"; a corruption of the true story and confirming it. ...
His nobles cooperated in his being "driven from men" (Daniel 4:33); these same "counselors and lords sought unto him," weary of anarchy after the "seven times," i. Pride, violence and fury, and cruel sternness, were Nebuchadnezzar's faults (Daniel 2:12; Daniel 3:19; 2 Kings 25:7; 2 Kings 24:8). Not to Daniel but to Nebuchadnezzar, the first representative head of the world power who overcame the theocracy, the dreams were given announcing its doom. But an Israelite must interpret it; and Nebuchadnezzar worshipped Daniel, an earnest of the future prostration of the world power before Christ and the church (Revelation 3:9; 1 Corinthians 14:25; Philippians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 6:2; Luke 19:17). The image set up by Nebuchadnezzar represented himself the head of the first world power, of whom Daniel had said "thou art this head of gold. " Daniel was regarded by Nebuchadnezzar as divine, and so was not asked to worship it (Daniel 2:46)
Science - ]'>[1] only twice ( Daniel 1:4 , 1 Timothy 6:20 ), and in both places it simply means ‘knowledge’; as in Barlowe’s Dialoge , p
Mede - Madai), a Median or inhabitant of Media (Daniel 11:1 )
Shinar - Its chief towns were Babel, Erech and Accad, and its most famous warrior was Nimrod (Genesis 10:9-10; Genesis 11:1-9; Genesis 14:1; Isaiah 11:11; Daniel 1:2)
Diverse - Daniel 7
Flute - The word flute is used only in Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 , and is supposed to mean a pipe with two reeds, such as are still to be found in the East
Music - , Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 , for Aramaic sumponya (not in ver
Winds - Blowing from the four quarters of heaven (Jeremiah 49:36 ; Ezekiel 37:9 ; Daniel 8:8 ; Zechariah 2:6 ). The rush of invaders is figuratively spoken of as a whirlwind (Isaiah 21:1 ); a commotion among the nations of the world as a striving of the four winds (Daniel 7:2 )
Daniel - At the end of their three years' education, Daniel and his companions excelled all others, and received honorable appointments in the royal service. Here Daniel soon displayed his prophetic gifts in interpreting a dream of Nebuchadnezzar, by whom he was made governor of Babylon, and head of the learned and priestly class. At a later period he interpreted another dream of Nebuchadnezzar, and afterwards the celebrated vision of Belshazzar-one of whose last works was to promote Daniel to an office much higher than he had previously held during his reign, Daniel 5:29 8:27 . ...
After the capture of Babylon by the Medes and Persians, under Cyaxares and Cyrus, Daniel was continued in all his high employments, and enjoyed the favor of these princes until his death, except at one short interval, when the envy of the other officers prevailed on the king of the other officers prevailed on the king to cast him into the lion's den, an act which recoiled on his foes to their own destruction. During this period he earnestly labored, by fasting and prayer as well as by counsel, to secure the return of the Jews to their own land, the promised time having come, Daniel 9:1-27 . Daniel was one of the most spotless characters upon record
Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar was the Babylonian king throughout this time, and the books of 2 Kings, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel mention him by name repeatedly. Upon seeing how this God revealed mysteries and miraculously saved people from death, he concluded that Yahweh must have been the greatest of all the gods (Daniel 2:47; Daniel 3:29). However, he was a proud man, whose empire-building achievements led him to believe that he could ignore God and take no notice of the warnings given him by God’s messenger Daniel. The result was that God punished Nebuchadnezzar with a disease of temporary madness, till he learnt that God was the sovereign ruler over the kingdoms of the world (Daniel 4:27-33)
Nebushasban - chief of the eunuchs (as Ashpenaz, Daniel 1:3), as Nebuzaradan was Rab-tabbachim, i
Benedicite - It is taken from an apocryphal addition to the third chapter of Daniel
Hagiographa - It comprises Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Canticles, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles
a'Rioch - (Daniel 2:14 ) etc
Jew'ry - It occurs several times in the Apocalypse and the New Testament, but once only in the Old Testament -- ( Daniel 5:13 ) Jewry comes to us through the Norman-French, and is of frequent occurrence in Old English
Shushan - Here Daniel saw one of his visions (Daniel 8 ); and here also Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1 ) began his public life. Modern explorers have brought to light numerous relics, and the ground-plan of the splendid palace of Shushan, one of the residences of the great king, together with numerous specimens of ancient art, which illustrate the statements of Scripture regarding it (Daniel 8:2 )
Michael - Archangel who served as the guardian of the national of Israel (Daniel 10:13 ,Daniel 10:13,10:21 ; Daniel 12:1 )
Babylon (2) - Daniel 2:49; Daniel 3:1; Daniel 3:12; Daniel 3:30; Daniel 4:29. Images of the gods were exhibited, probably on frames or sacred vehicles, and, as some suppose, were sometimes set up in a public place, as on the plain of Dura, Daniel 3:1; but late investigations indicate that the image there set up was a statue of Nebuchadnezzar
Daniel, Saint - Daniel was the Franciscan provincial of Calabria
Leo, Saint - Daniel was the Franciscan provincial of Calabria
Donulus, Saint - Daniel was the Franciscan provincial of Calabria
Nicholas, Saint Martyr - Daniel was the Franciscan provincial of Calabria
Hugolinus, Saint - Daniel was the Franciscan provincial of Calabria
Agnellus, Saint Martyr - Daniel was the Franciscan provincial of Calabria
Magicians - Daniel 1:20)...
See Balaam
Samuel, Saint - Daniel was the Franciscan provincial of Calabria
Daniel - His life and prophecies are recorded in the Book of Daniel. He was descended from one of the noble families of Judah (Daniel 1:3 ), and was probably born in Jerusalem about B. 606), Daniel and other three noble youths were carried off to Babylon, along with part of the vessels of the temple. His training in the schools of the wise men in Babylon (Daniel 1:4 ) was to fit him for service to the empire. ...
At the close of his three years of discipline and training in the royal schools, Daniel was distinguished for his proficiency in the "wisdom" of his day, and was brought out into public life. Daniel interpreted the handwriting, and "in that night was Belshazzar the king of the Chaldeans slain. ), a Median prince, on the throne, during the two years of whose reign Daniel held the office of first of the "three presidents" of the empire, and was thus practically at the head of affairs, no doubt interesting himself in the prospects of the captive Jews (Daniel 9 ), whom he had at last the happiness of seeing restored to their own land, although he did not return with them, but remained still in Babylon. His fidelity to God exposed him to persecution, and he was cast into a den of lions, but was miraculously delivered; after which Darius issued a decree enjoining reverence for "the God of Daniel" (6:26)
Sorcerer - , only in Daniel 2:2,10 , of the "enchanters," RV (AV, "astrologers"), of Babylon. The superior Greek version of Daniel by Theodotion has it also at 1:20; 2:27; 4:7; 5:7,11,15
Son of Man - See also Daniel 7:13. The term son of man is applied to Ezekiel and Daniel, meaning merely "man," as it does in Numbers 23:19; Job 25:6; Psalms 8:4, etc
Ptolemy v - the Great; this matrimonial alliance between the Ptolemys and the Seleucids is alluded to in Daniel 2:43 . ; this is probably what is alluded to in Daniel 11:13-18 ; see Jos
Chain - ...
the gold chain placed about Joseph's neck, (Genesis 41:42 ) and that promised to Daniel, (Daniel 5:7 ) are instances of the first use
Number - ...
Zechariah and Daniel dwell upon seven; Daniel and Revelation use several numbers to "characterize periods", rather than indicate arithmetical duration. The Trinity (Revelation 1:4; Revelation 4:8); three great feasts (Exodus 23:14-17; Deuteronomy 16:16); the threefold blessing (Numbers 6:14; Numbers 6:24); the thrice holy (Isaiah 6:3); the three hours of prayer (Daniel 6:10; Psalms 55:17); the third heaven (2 Corinthians 12:2). Daniel 7:25; John 19:23-248 time, times, and a half, 1,260 days, three days and a half. Witnessing churches will be followed by witnessing individuals, even as the apostate church will give place to the personal man of sin (Daniel 7:25; Revelation 11:2-3). The 2,300 (Daniel 8:14) years may date from Alexander's conquests (323 B. The 1,290 (Daniel 12:11-12) and 1,335 days correspond to 1290, during which Antiochus Epiphanes profaned the temple, from the month Ijar, 145th year of the era of the Seleucidae, to Judas Maccabeus' restoration of worship, the 25th day of the ninth month Chisleu, 148th year (1 Maccabees 1:54; 1 Maccabees 4:52-56); in 45 days more Antiochus died, ending the Jews' calamities; in all 1,335. , the time of Xerxes' invasion of Greece (Daniel 11:2), and A. Thirdly, the 2,300 may date from Antichrist's profanation (Daniel 9:27). It answers to the three years and a half of Christ's witness for the truth, when the Jews disowned and the God-opposed world power crucified Him (Daniel 9:27). 2,520, though they approach it in the 2,300 (Daniel 8:14). The four winds and quarters of the earth (Revelation 7:1; Daniel 7:2). ; Joshua 5:13-65 in contrast to the four beasts, Daniel 7; Daniel 2:40 the four kingdoms); Eden's four streams (Genesis 2:10; Ezekiel 40:47). Daniel 4:16; Daniel 4:25, "seven times shall pass over thee" (Nebuchadnezzar)
Darius - ‘Darius the Mede’ ( Daniel 11:1 ), son of Ahasuerus of the seed of the Medes ( Daniel 9:1 ), is said ( Daniel 5:31 ) to have succeeded to the kingdom of Babylon after Belshazzar’s death, and to have been sixty-two years old when he received the kingdom. Daniel 6:1 ), and seems from the Babylonian Chronicle to have been in the attack which resulted in Belshazzar’s death
Chaldean Language - At Babylon Daniel and his companions had to acquire 'the learning and the tongue of the Chaldeans,' that is, their ancient literature and language. Daniel 1:4 . The question is what was that language? In Daniel 2:4 we find that the wise men answered the king in the Syriac language, that is Aramaic: cf. There must be some reason why in Daniel it is said the wise men answered the king in 'Aramaic:' this is held to be not the learned and court language, but the common language of the people; and the wise men may have used it that all who heard it might judge of the reasonableness of what they said, though the king might condemn them
Medes - We meet with the account of the Medes and Persians in the prophecy of Isaiah, and in the prophecy of Daniel. If the reader wishes to possess the Scriptural account of those kingdoms, he must consult what, Isaiah and Daniel have declared concerning them. Daniel takes up the subject at the period where the prophecy of Isaiah came to be accomplished, and in Daniel 5:1-31 relates to the church the downfall of Babylon, and the death of the impious gang Belshazzar. From this time Bablyon sunk to rise no more, and the Persian empire succeeded: so that from the close of Daniel's prophecy, if we prosecute the history of the church as an history, we must begin with the book of Ezra, the date of whose first chapter (Ezra 1:1-11) nearly corresponds with the close of Daniel's prophecy
Holy City - Designation for Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:1 ,Nehemiah 11:1,11:18 ; Isaiah 48:2 ; Isaiah 52:1 ; Daniel 9:24 ; Matthew 4:5 ; Matthew 27:53 ; Revelation 11:2 ) and for the new, heavenly Jerusalem (Revelation 21:2 ,Revelation 21:2,21:10 ; Revelation 22:19 ) because the holy God lived there
Susan'na -
The heroine of the story of the Judgment of Daniel
Ulai - Hence (Daniel 8:2,16 ) speaks of standing "between the banks of Ulai", i
Uphaz - (yoo' faz) Unidentified source of fine gold (Jeremiah 10:9 ; Daniel 10:5 ) or else a term for fine gold
Sackbut, - (Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 ) the rendering in the Authorized Version of the Chaldee sacbbeca
Archangel - The archangels Michael (Daniel 10:13 ; Daniel 12:1 ; Enoch 9:1; 10:11), Gabriel (Daniel 8:16 ; Enoch 9:1; 20:7; 40:9), Raphael (Tobit 3:17 ; Tobit 12:15 ; Enoch 10:4; 40:9) and Uriel (Enoch 9:1; 19:1; 20:2) gain particular hero status. In particular, Michael (Daniel 10:13 ,Daniel 10:13,10:21 ; Daniel 12:1 ; Jude 1:9 ; Assumption of Moses 12:7-9), Gabriel (gabriel , “hero of God”; Daniel 8:16 ; Daniel 9:21 ; Luke 1:19 ,Luke 1:19,1:26 ), and Raphael (rapael “God has healed”; a chief figure in the book of Tobit, see Tobit 3:16-17 ) were cast as important interpreters, advocates, and intercessors
Emperor Worship - The most obvious example of emperor worship in the Old Testament is the well-known story of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego (Daniel 3:1 ). King Nebuchadnezzar made an image of gold, presumably of himself, and commanded everyone to fall down and worship the image or be killed (Daniel 3:5-6 ). Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego refused to commit idolatry by worshiping the image (Daniel 3:16-18 ). They were thrown into a furnace, but were not burned (Daniel 3:27 ). Thereafter, Nebuchadnezzar permitted them to worship their God unhindered (Daniel 3:29 )
Men of the great assembly - A panel of 120 prophets and sages--including Ezra, Nehemiah, Mordecai, Daniel, Simeon the Righteous and the prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi--which constituted the ultimate religious authority at the onset of the Second Temple Era (4th century BCE)
Wise Men - Mentioned in Daniel 2:12 included three classes, (1) astrologers, (2) Chaldeans, and (3) soothsayers
Wool - Symbolizing purity and whiteness (Isaiah 1:18, "shall be as wool" restored to its original undyed whiteness; Daniel 7:9; Revelation 1:14)
Nubians - (nyoo' bih uhnss) Residents of an ancient kingdom along the Nile river in southern Egypt and northern Sudan (Daniel 11:43 , NIV; also NRSV margin)
Flute - , PIPE ), A musical instrument mentioned amongst others, (Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 ) as used at the worship of the golden image which Nebuchadnezzar had set up
Anshei knesset hagdolah - A panel of 120 prophets and sages--including Ezra, Nehemiah, Mordecai, Daniel, Simeon the Righteous and the prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi--which constituted the ultimate religious authority at the onset of the Second Temple Era (4th century BCE)
Temptation - " ...
Temptation is common to all (Daniel 12:10 ; Zechariah 13:9 ; Psalm 66:10 ; Luke 22:31,40 ; Hebrews 11:17 ; James 1:12 ; 1 Peter 1:7 ; 4:12 ). We read of the temptation of Joseph (Genesis 39 ), of David (2 Samuel 24 ; 1 Chronicles 21 ), of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 32:31 ), of Daniel (Daniel 6 ), etc
Seventy Years - Prophetic and apocalyptic figure pointing to time of Israel's Exile in Babylon and to the end of tribulation in Daniel's vision. ...
Daniel meditated on Jeremiah's prophecy (Daniel 9:2 ) and learned that 70 weeks of years were intended (Daniel 9:24 )
Hananiah - The Hebrew name of SHADRACH, a companion of Daniel. Daniel 1:6-19 ; Daniel 2:17
Horn - Sometimes horns were symbolic of powerful rulers (Daniel 7:7; Daniel 7:24; Daniel 8:20; Revelation 17:3; Revelation 17:12)
Captivity, Babylonian - They preserved their old clan relations (1 Esdras 2); had their own judges and magistrates (Jeremiah 29; Daniel 13); and some rose to positions of honor and responsibility (Daniel 1; Jeremiah 52; Esther 2)
Sceptre - " Whoever will not obey Thy loving sceptre, as the Good Shepherd, shall be crushed with an iron sceptre (Matthew 21:44; Daniel 2:34-35; Daniel 2:44)
Babylonian Captivity - They preserved their old clan relations (1 Esdras 2); had their own judges and magistrates (Jeremiah 29; Daniel 13); and some rose to positions of honor and responsibility (Daniel 1; Jeremiah 52; Esther 2)
Darius - The first of three people named Darius mentioned in the Bible is Darius the Mede, who took control of Babylon when the city fell to the Medo-Persian armies in 539 BC (Daniel 5:30-31). The name may be that of a Median leader whom the Persian Emperor Cyrus placed in charge of Babylon, or it may be another name for Cyrus himself (see also Daniel; PERSIA)
Aram - ...
Written Aramaic used letters that were similar to Hebrew letters, and isolated sections of the Old Testament are written in Aramaic instead of the usual Hebrew (Ezra 4:8-24; Ezra 5; Ezra 6:1-18; Ezra 7:12-26; Jeremiah 10:11; Daniel 2:4-49; Daniel 3; Daniel 4; Daniel 5; Daniel 6; Daniel 7)
Michael - מִיכָאַל, ‘Who is like God?’)...
In Daniel 10:21 Michael is described as the ‘prince,’ i. the patron or guardian angel of Israel, in antithesis to the ‘prince’ of Persia and the ‘prince’ of Greece (Daniel 10:20). In the account of the troublous times of the Last Days in Daniel 12:1, Michael, ‘the great prince,’ is Israel’s champion, by whom deliverance is wrought. In the NT he is twice mentioned by name (Judges 1:9, where he is described as ‘the archangel,’ and Revelation 12:7), and in both cases discharges functions that are in keeping with the position assigned him in Daniel. (2) In Revelation 12:7 as in Daniel 12 Michael plays a leading part in the conflict that is to issue in the Messianic triumph of the Last Days. ), there is war in heaven, and Michael and his angels go forth to war with the great red dragon (otherwise described as ‘the old serpent, he that is called the Devil and Satan,’ Daniel 12:9) and his angels, with the result that the latter are overthrown and cast down to the earth. It is by him, not by the ‘man child who is to rule all the nations with a rod of iron’ (Daniel 12:5), that the dragon is overcome and cast out from heaven (cf
Hiddekel - ...
KJV also retains the transliteration for Tigris in Daniel 10:4
Shushan - SHUSHAN ( Daniel 8:2 , Nehemiah 1:1 etc
Desolation, Abomination of - The references are to Daniel 9:27
Dura - The circle, the plain near Babylon in which Nebuchadnezzar set up a golden image, mentioned in Daniel 3:1
Olympius - 168 ( 2Ma 6:2 ), and the setting up of his image is the ‘abomination of desolation’ ( Daniel 9:27 )
Forecast - Daniel 11
Face - The "light of God's countenance" is his favour (Psalm 44:3 ; Daniel 9:17 ). The Jews prayed with their faces toward the temple and Jerusalem (1 Kings 8:38,44,48 ; Daniel 6:10 )
Mouth - peh ( Daniel 7:5 etc. ‘door’ ( Daniel 3:26 )
Beast - Great worldly powers, cheyva, θηρίον, having different characters according to the symbolic creature specified, but signifying in each case the absence of all moral connection with God: used by Daniel for the four great kingdoms, Daniel 7:3-23 ; and in Revelation 13:1 to Revelation 20:10 for the revived Roman empire and for the Antichrist
Ulai - The memorable river near the city of Shushan, from the banks of which Daniel heard the man's voice. (Daniel 8:16) When we consider what is said of the voice of the Lord God, walking in the garden in the cool of the day, Genesis 3:8; when we mark the same grace manifested upon many occasions during the Old Testament dispensation, 1 Samuel 3:4; 1 Kings 19:9; and when we call to mind, the numberless sweet and gracious tokens of the Lord Jesus, manifested to his servants in the early ages, before he openly tabernacled in substance of our flesh: may we not venture to suppose this voice to have been Him, who in after ages openly tabernacled among us? I only humbly propose the question
Astyages - ...
ASTYAGES, otherwise called Ahasuerus in the Greek, Daniel 9:1 , or Cyaxares in Xenophon, or Apandus in Ctesias, was appointed by his father Cyaxares governor of Media, and sent with Nabopolassar, king of Babylon, against Saracus, otherwise called Chynaladanus, king of Assyria. Astyages was with Cyrus at the conquest of Babylon, and succeeded Belshazzar, king of the Chaldeans, as is expressly mentioned in Daniel 5:30-31 , A
Javan, - In Daniel 8:21 ; Daniel 10:20 ; Daniel 11:2 , where ‘the king,’ ‘the prince,’ and ‘the kingdom’ of Javan are mentioned, the passages have reference to the Græco-Macedonian empire
Punishments - ...
The mode of capital punishment usual among the Hebrew was stoning, Deuteronomy 13:9-10 Joshua 17:18 John 8:7 ; but various other modes became known to them by intercourse with other nations: as decapitation, 2 Kings 10:6-8 Matthew 14:8-12 ; precipitation from rocks, 2 Chronicles 25:12 Luke 4:29 ; hanging, Joshua 8:29 Esther 7:10 ; burning, Daniel 3:1-30 ; cutting asunder, Daniel 2:5 3:29 Hebrews 11:27 ; beating, on a wheel-like frame, Hebrews 11:35 ; exposure to wild beasts, Daniel 6:1-28 1 Corinthians 15:32 ; drowning, Matthew 18:6 ; bruising in a mortar, Proverbs 27:22 ; and crucifixion, John 19:18
Media - Madai, which is rendered in the Authorized Version (1) "Madai," Genesis 10:2 ; (2) "Medes," 2 Kings 17:6 ; 18:11 ; (3) "Media," Esther 1:3 ; 10:2 ; Isaiah 21:2 ; Daniel 8:20 ; (4) "Mede," only in Daniel 11:1 . Daniel gives an account of the reign of Darius the Mede, who was made viceroy by Cyrus (Daniel 6:1-28 )
Horn - ...
The ram with two horns (Daniel 8:3) represents the Medo-Persian double power. The "notable horn" of the "he goat" (Daniel 8:5) is Alexander the Great who on coins is represented with horns. (On "the little horn" of the third and of the fourth world powers (Daniel 7:8; Daniel 8:9)
Michael - In the OT he is alluded to several times in the Book of Daniel ( Daniel 10:13 ; Daniel 10:21 ; Daniel 12:1 ) as ‘one of the chief princes,’ ‘the prince,’ and ‘the prince which standeth for the people,’ and he is opposed to the prince-angels of Persia and of Greece
Hananiah - Daniel 1:1-2 ). The friend of Daniel, who received the name Shadrach from the ‘prince of the eunuchs’ ( Daniel 1:7 ; Daniel 1:11 )
Brook - Yeor, the Nile canals, Isaiah 19:6-8; Isaiah 23:3; Isaiah 23:10, but general in Daniel 12:5-7
Lehabim - They served in the Egyptian armies (2 Chronicles 12:3; 2 Chronicles 16:8; Nahum 3:9; Daniel 11:43)
Hoffmanists - Those who espoused the sentiments of Daniel Hoffman, professor in the university of Helmstadt, who in the year 1598 taught that the light of reason, even as it appears in the writings of Plato and Aristotle, is adverse to religion; and that the more the human understanding is cultivated by philosophical study, the more perfectly is the enemy supplied with weapons of defence
Psaltery - In Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 , the word thus rendered is Chaldaic, pesanterin, which is supposed to be a word of Greek origin denoting an instrument of the harp kind
Dulcimer - Daniel 3:5,10 , an instrument of music, which the rabbins describe as a sort of bagpipe, composed of two pipes connected with a leathern sack, and of a harsh, screaming sound
Elam - The city Susa, or Shushan, was in it, Daniel 8:2
Son of Man - ...
It was understood as a designation of the Messiah, according to Old Testament predictions, Psalm 80:17 Daniel 7:13,14 ; but appears to indicate especially his true humanity or oneness with the human race
Persia - The greatest victory for the Medo-Persian army came in 539 BC, when it conquered Babylon and Cyrus became undisputed ruler of the region (Isaiah 13:17; Isaiah 21:1-10; Isaiah 44:28; Isaiah 45:1; Jeremiah 51:11; Jeremiah 51:28; Daniel 5:30-31; Daniel 8:20; Daniel 9:1; Daniel 10:1). Daniel 5:30-31
Abomination of Desolation - " The Lord quotes Daniel 9:27; Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11, in Matthew 24:15 "the abomination of desolation," as the sign of Jerusalem's coming destruction. Daniel makes the ceasing of the sacrifice and oblation the preliminary to it. The last antichrist, many think, is about to set up an idol on a wing of the restored temple (compare Matthew 4:5; John 5:43) in the latter half of the last, or 70th, of Daniel's prophetic weeks; for the former three and a half days (years) of the prophetic week he keeps his covenant with the Jews; in the latter three and a half breaks it (Zechariah 11:16-17; Zechariah 11:12; Zechariah 11:13; Zechariah 11:14; Daniel 9; 11)
Governor - nagid, a prominent, conspicuous person, whatever his capacity: as, chief of the royal palace (2 Chronicles 28:7 ; Compare 1 Kings 4:6 ), chief of the temple (1 Chronicles 9:11 ; Jeremiah 20:1 ), the leader of the Aaronites (1 Chronicles 12:27 ), keeper of the sacred treasury (26:24), captain of the army (13:1), the king (1 Samuel 9:16 ), the Messiah (Daniel 9:25 ). shallit, one who has power, who rules (Genesis 42:6 ; Ezra 4:20 ; Ecclesiastes 8:8 ; Daniel 2:15 ; 5:29 ). See also Genesis 47:6 ; Exodus 1:11 ; Daniel 1:7 ; Judges 10:18 ; 1 Kings 22:26 ; 20:15 ; 2 Kings 1:9 ; 2 Samuel 24:2 ). It is used also of angels, guardian angels (Daniel 10:13,20,21 ; 12:1 ; 10:13 ; 8:25 ). , friend of the king; adjutant; governor of a province ( 2 Kings 18:24 ; Isaiah 36:9 ; Jeremiah 51 :: 57 ; Ezekiel 23:6,23 ; Daniel 3:2 ; Esther 3 :: 12 ), or a perfect (Nehemiah 3:7 ; 5:14 ; Ezra 5:3 ; Haggai 1:1 ). ...
...
The Chaldean word Segan Is applied to the governors of the Babylonian satrapies ( Daniel 3:2,27 ; 6:7 ); the prefects over the Magi (2:48)
Persia, Persians - In the great image of Daniel 2 Nebuchadnezzar was represented by the head of gold. Daniel 2:31-39 . " Daniel 7:5 . ...
The history in Daniel 5 relates that it was Darius the Mede that 'took the kingdom. This agrees also with the above passage in Daniel 7 which represents the bear as raising itself on one side. The same chapter (Daniel 8:6,7 ) speaks of a he-goat that rushed upon the ram and smote it and cast it to the ground and stamped upon it; and none could deliver it. Cyaxares, king of Media … … … 633 Ahasuerus: Daniel 9:1 . See Daniel and ESTHER
Apocalyptic Literature - ...
The Old Testament books of Ezekiel, Daniel and Zechariah (also Isaiah Chapters 24-27) show some of the apocalyptic features that began to develop in the later prophetical writings. Isaiah 24:21-23; Isaiah 25:6-12; Daniel 7:9-14; Revelation 19:1-5; Revelation 21:1-8). Ezekiel 39:1-6; Ezekiel 39:21; Ezekiel 39:25; Daniel 12:6-13; Mark 13:24-27; Mark 13:32). In most cases they contained features that were weird and abnormal, such as unnatural beasts and mysterious numbers (Daniel 8:3-8; Daniel 9:24; Daniel 12:11-12; Revelation 13:1-5; Revelation 13:11-18). The visions had symbolic meaning and were often interpreted by angels (Ezekiel 40:2-4; Daniel 8:15-19; Zechariah 1:9; Zechariah 1:19; Zechariah 5:5-6; Revelation 21:9; Revelation 21:15). Such writings enabled the Jews to comment safely on the oppressors who ruled them; for they were able to use symbols (usually beasts) instead of the names of their overlords (Daniel 7:1-8; Mark 13:14; Revelation 13:1-4; Revelation 17)
Susa (Shushan) - When Elam was absorbed by Persia, Susa became capital of Persia, and remained so throughout the era of the Persian Empire (Ezra 4:9; Nehemiah 1:1; Esther 1:2; Esther 1:5; Esther 4:8; Esther 8:14; Daniel 8:2; see PERSIA)
Meshach - The name Mishael , by which one of Da niel’s three companions, of the children of Judah, was originally called, was changed by the prince of the eunuchs into Meshach ( Daniel 1:7 and ch
Cornet - In Daniel 3:5-15 the word is qeren and signifies 'horn or cornet
Device - ...
Daniel 11:24 (b) This refers to the wicked plans of men who have a desire to shut GOD out from their arrangements
Plaster, Plaister - This was used to cover the walls of houses, Leviticus 14:42-48 ; Daniel 5:5 ; and was also spread on large stones, on which the law could be inscribed
Chileab - The name appears as Daniel in 1 Chronicles 3:1
Son of God - A peculiar appellation of Christ, expressing his eternal relationship to the Father, Psalm 2:7 Daniel 3:25 Luke 1:35 John 1:18,34
Prince, Princess - ...
The "princes" mentioned in (Daniel 6:1 ) (see Esther 1:1 ) wore the predecessors of the satraps of Darius Hystaspes
Nebuchadnezzar - 1-4 We know of him through the book of Daniel. 605, Jeremiah 46:2, taking Jerusalem and carrying off a portion of the inhabitants as prisoners, including Daniel and his companions. Daniel 1:1-4. The words, "The king spake and said, Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of my kingdom, by the might of my power, and for the honor of my majesty?" Daniel 4:30, are proved to be characteristic by those on an inscription: "I say it, I have built the great house which is the centre of Babylon for the seat of my rule in Babylon. Rawlinson in a manner which finds its readiest explanation in the fact stated in Daniel 4:33 : "For four years the residence of my kingdom did not delight my heart: in no one of my possessions did I erect any important building by my might. " Nebuchadnezzar is denominated "king of kings" by Daniel 2:37, and ruler of a "kingdom with power and strength and glory. He is said to have worshipped the "King of heaven," Daniel 4:37, but it may be questioned whether he did not conceive of the Jehovah of the Hebrews to be only one of many gods
Cornet - The shophar was long and straight; the qeren (Daniel 3) crooked. Shophar is generally translated "trumpet," qeren "cornet" (Daniel 3)
Prince - Daniel 8:25 refers to God as “Prince of princes. ” Daniel 12:1 gives Michael, the angelic advocate of Israel, the title prince
Nebuchadnezzar - We have much said in Scripture concerning this monarch, in the book of Daniel. Various have been the opinions of men concerning the wonderful change wrought upon Nebuchadnezzar, as related Daniel 4:28; Dan 4:33; but, after all that hath been said on this subject, the matter stands just where the Scriptures have left it
Rabbabbi - The word RAB in Hebrew signifies chief; thus Nebuzaradan is the chief or captain of the guard, 2 Kings 25:8 , in Hebrew rabtabbachim; so Ashpenaz is the rab, chief or master of the eunuchs, and Daniel of the mag, Daniel 1:3 5:11
cy'Rus - (the sun ), the founder of the Persian empire --see ( 2 Chronicles 36:22,23 ; Daniel 6:28 ; 10:1,13 ) --was, according to the common legend, the son of Cambyses, a Persian of the royal family of the Achaemenidae. The prophet Daniel's home for a time was at his court. (Daniel 6:28 ) The edict of Cyrus for the rebuilding of the temple, (2 Chronicles 36:22,23 ; Ezra 1:1-4 ; 3:7 ; 4:3 ; 5:13,17 ; 6:3 ) was in fact the beginning of Judaism; and the great changes by which the nation was transformed into a church are clearly marked
Abomination That Causes Desolation, the - An expression that occurs three times in the Septuagint of Daniel (9:27; 11:31; 12:11) and twice in the words of Jesus (Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ), where slight linguistic variation exists. First Maccabees, quoting Daniel, refers these words to the sacrifice of swine's flesh on the altar in Jerusalem by Antiochus IV, Epiphanes, in 168 b. Josephus, without referring to Daniel, recounts this episode in detail (Antiq. Jesus, in using these cryptic words of Daniel, is also predicting a desecration of the temple, or at lest the temple area, which will parallel the catastrophic event of the past, so well remembered by the Jews of his day. Others have argued, especially in light of Luke 21:20 and Daniel's words, that either the destruction of Jerusalem in a
Canticle of the Three Children - (Canticle of the Three Children) Canticle uttered by Sidrach, Misach, and Abdenago when they remained unharmed upon being cast into the fiery furnace by Nabuchodonosor for refusing to adore a golden statue he had set up (Daniel 3)
Leopard - This word is used symbolically (Daniel 7:6 ; Revelation 13:2 )
Seventy Weeks - A prophetic period mentioned in Daniel 9:24 , and usually interpreted on the "year-day" theory, i
Lubim - Allies or tributaries of Egypt (2 Chronicles 12:3; 2 Chronicles 16:8; Nahum 3:9; Daniel 11:23)
Benedicite, the - (Canticle of the Three Children) Canticle uttered by Sidrach, Misach, and Abdenago when they remained unharmed upon being cast into the fiery furnace by Nabuchodonosor for refusing to adore a golden statue he had set up (Daniel 3)
Executioner - So Nebuzaradan (Jeremiah 39:9), and Arioch (Daniel 2:14; Mark 6:27)
Nebuchadnezzar - During the reign of Joiakim and Jehoiachin, Nebuchadnezzar exiled to Babylon many of the politically powerful Jews and members of the royal family, including Daniel and his colleagues Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah
Ahasuerus - It is he who figures in the Book of Esther; Daniel 9:1 erroneously makes him father of Darius the Mede, confusing the latter with Darius Hystaspis, the father of Xerxes
Deep - ...
Daniel 2:22 (b) This is a figure to describe the marvelous mysteries of GOD which cannot be discovered or understood except by divine revelation
Plaster - In Daniel 5:5 the accuracy of Scripture appears; the Nineveh walls were paneled with alabaster slabs, but no alabaster being procurable at Babylon enamel or stucco ("plaster") for receiving ornamental designs covers the bricks; on it Belshazzar's doom was written
Shadow - Sometimes denotes intense darkness and gloom, Psalm 23:4 , and sometimes a cool retreat, Isaiah 33:2 , or perfect protection, Psalm 17:8 Isaiah 49:2 Daniel 4:12
Dreams - The dreams of Nebuchadnezzar described in Daniel 2:1 and Daniel 4:1 are good examples of this kind of dream. Even Daniel himself had dreams in which the symbolism was so complex that he had to seek divine interpretation ( Daniel 8:1 ). ...
In the Old Testament Joseph and Daniel are the preeminent interpreters of dreams. Daniel's story in Daniel 2:1 , especially, demonstrates several points about dream interpretation. Third, Daniel was able to narrate the dream to the king and to explain the dream after Daniel and his friends had prayed
Antichrist - ) Daniel's "little horn" from among the ten horns of the fourth beast, or Roman empire (Daniel 7:7-27). ) Daniel's "little horn" from one of the four notable horns of the third beast, or Graeco Macedonia divided into four at Alexander's death, the willful king (Daniel 8:8-25; Daniel 11:36-39). ) Daniel's "little horn" (Daniel 7:7-27) of the fourth kingdom is the papacy as a temporal power, rising on the ruins of the Roman empire, and plucking up three of its ten horns. ) Distinct from the" little horn" of Daniel 8, which is connected with the third, not the fourth, kingdom; ANTIOCHUS Epiphanes, of the Syrian fourth part of the divided Graeco-Macedonian or third kingdom, who persecuted the Jews, prohibited circumcision, and substituted the worship of Jupiter Olympius, with whom he identified himself as if God, instead of that of Jehovah, in the templeat Jerusalem. The language of Daniel 8:8-25 and Daniel 11:36-39, partially fulfilled by Antiochus, is exhaustively fulfilled only in the last Antichrist. , and power is given to it for forty-two months (Revelation 13:1; Revelation 13:5), so the little horn (Daniel 7:3; Daniel 7:7) absorbs the power of the ten-horned fourth beast out of the sea (the Roman empire) and wears out the saints for three and a half times (3 1/2 years, i. Both have "a mouth speaking great things" (Daniel 7:8; Daniel 7:11-20; Daniel 7:25); both blaspheme against the Most High (Revelation 13:6-7); both make war with the saints, and prevail; both persecute the saints (Revelation 13:7-10; Revelation 17:6), the beast being under the guidance of the harlot "drunken with their blood. " The little horn of Daniel 7 therefore is the first beast of Revelation 13. of the three territories (answering to the three horns plucked up before the little horn, Daniel 7:8): Rome, the kingdom of the Lombards, and the exarchate of Ravenna; 1260 years from this date would end in 2014. , outwardly resembling Christ or Messiah (Revelation 13:11); sitting in God's temple as God, apparently restored Israel's persecutor, whence the sacred Hebrew is the language of Daniel 8-12, wherein the little horn from the East is a leading subject, whereas the world's language, Chaldee, is that of Daniel 7 wherein the Romish little horn is described. At first hailed by Israel with hosannahs as her Messiah (John 5:43), and making a covenant with the Jews, then breaking it (Daniel 9; 11; 12; Zechariah 11; 12; 13; 14). Heretofore infidelity and superstition have been on opposite sides, but when these shall combine against law, liberty, and Christianity, a period mercifully brief shall ensue, unparalleled in horrors by any that has gone before (Daniel 12:1-3). ...
The Hebrew letters of Balaam (type of the false prophet whose spiritual knowledge shall be perverted to Satanic ends; Revelation 2:14 favors this, also the fact that Antichrist mainly shall oppress Israel, Daniel 8; 9; 11; 12) amount to 666
Chain - Daniel was given by Belshazzar a chain of gold about his neck, a token of investiture as "the third ruler in the kingdom" of Babylon (Daniel 5:7; Daniel 5:29)
Dream - The revelation of God's will in dreams is characteristic of the early and less perfect patriarchal times (Genesis 28:12; Genesis 31:24; Genesis 37:5-10); to Solomon, 1 Kings 3:5, in commencing his reign; the beginnings of the New Testament dispensation (Matthew 1:20; Matthew 2:13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22); and the communications from God to the rulers of the pagan world powers, Philistia, Egypt, Babylon (Genesis 20:3; Genesis 40:5; Genesis 41:1); Elihu, Job 33:15; Daniel 2; Daniel 4:5, etc. But it is the Israelites Joseph and Daniel who interpret; for pagandom is passive, Israel active, in divine things to the glory of the God of Israel
Kingdom - Thus we read of the kingdom of God, Psalms 103:19 ; Daniel 4:3 ; or his universal empire and dominion over all creatures; in reference to which it is said, "Jehovah is a great God, and a great King above all gods," Psalms 95:3 . Campbell, in which there is a manifest allusion to the predictions in which the dispensation of the Messiah was revealed by the prophets in the Old Testament, particularly by Daniel, who mentions it as "a kingdom which the God of heaven would set up, and which should never be destroyed,"...
Daniel 2:44 . The same prophet also speaks of it as a kingdom to be given, with glory and dominion over all people, nations, and languages, to one like unto the Son of man, Daniel 7:13-14 . According to the prophecy of Daniel, this kingdom was to take place during the existence of the Roman empire, the last of the four great monarchies that had succeeded each other, Daniel 2:44
Daniel - Daniel seems to have been the only prophet who enjoyed a great share of worldly prosperity; but amidst the corruptions of a licentious court he preserved his virtue and integrity inviolate, and no danger or temptation could divert him from the worship of the true God. The book of Daniel is a mixture of history and prophecy: in the first six chapters is recorded a variety of events which occurred in the reigns of Nebuchadnezzar, Belshazzar, and Darius; and, in particular, the second chapter contains Nebuchadnezzar's prophetic dream concerning the four great successive monarchies, and the everlasting kingdom of the Messiah, which dream God enabled Daniel to interpret. In the last six chapters we have a series of prophecies, revealed at different times, extending from the days of Daniel to the general resurrection. With respect to the genuineness and authenticity of the book of Daniel, there is abundance both of external and internal evidence; indeed all that can well be had or desired in a case of this nature: not only the testimony of the whole Jewish church and nation, who have constantly received this book as canonical, but of Josephus particularly, who recommends him as the greatest of the prophets; of the Jewish Targums and Talmuds, which frequently cite and appeal to his authority; of St. John, who have copied many of his prophecies; and of our Saviour himself, who cites his words, and styles him "Daniel the prophet
Chain - A chain of precious metal was worn as a sign of rank, as by Joseph and Daniel, or purely as an ornament
Archangel - In this last passage it is applied to Michael, who, in Daniel 10:13,21 12:1 , is described as having a special charge of the Jewish nation, and in Revelation 12:7-9 as the leader of an angelic army
Evil-Merodach - Influenced probably by Daniel, he showed kindness to Jehoiachin, who had been a prisoner in Babylon for thirty-seven years
Mauzzim - Margin, Daniel 11:38, "the god of forces," rather "of fortresses
Similitude - Three words are translated “similitude” in the Old Testament: demuth (2 Chronicles 4:3 ; Daniel 10:16 ), tabnith (Psalm 106:20 ; Psalm 144:12 ), and temunah (Numbers 12:8 ; Deuteronomy 4:12 )
Furnaces - The furnace into which Daniel's three friends were cast was large, and remained open after they were cast in, Daniel 3:1-30
Chamber - (Genesis 43:30 ; 2 Samuel 18:33 ; Psalm 19:5 ; Daniel 6:10 ) The word chamber in these passages has much the same significance as with us, meaning the private rooms of the house --the guest chamber, as with us, meaning a room set apart for the accommodation of the visiting friend
Daniel, Prophet - A preliminary section (1 to 2,4) in Hebrew, tells of Daniel's capture and education. In this part Daniel also offers the credentials for his ministry, which prove to his contemporaries that God was with him and that his prophecies about later periods were equally reliable. Here we find the narratives of the chaste Susanna, the omnivorous idol Bel, the dragon destroyed by Daniel, and a second peril in the lion's den. Daniel is the man of desires and the prophet of hope. Our Lord quotes from it the words: "When therefore you shall see the abomination of desolation which was spoken of by Daniel the prophet" (Matthew 24; Daniel 9)
Vision(s) - A prophetic work could be titled as a vision (Isaiah 1:1 ; Nahum 1:1 ), and certain prophecies—Ezekiel, Daniel, Zechariahdeveloped a greater capacity for visionary revelation. Ezekiel, Daniel, Zechariah, and Revelation are the biblical books that exhibit the traits of apocalyptic material most clearly, though there are other passages in the Bible and other books from the ancient world that have similar features. "...
As an apocalyptic book, Daniel is also a book of visions. The first six chapters are historical narratives in which the God-given ability to interpret dreams and visions plays an important role (Daniel 1:17 ). It was Daniel's vision of the night that saved Daniel and the wisemen of Babylon from the irrational Nebuchadnezzar, who had been frightened by his own bizarre dream (Daniel 2:1,19 ). Daniel was the only "wiseman" in Babylon who could interpret Nebuchadnezzar's second dream (chap. The second half of Daniel contains four visions of great theological importance. The third vision (Daniel 9:20-27 ) comes to Daniel as a result of his prayer
Magi - Nebuchadnezzar gathered round him the religious teachers and wise men of the nations he conquered (Daniel 1:3-4; Exodus 7:11-124). ...
The Magians probably lost some of the original purity of the simpler Median religion by contact with the superstitions of Babylon: still there remained some elements of truth and opposition to idolatry, which formed common ground between them and Daniel (Daniel 5:11; Daniel 6:3; Daniel 6:16; Daniel 6:26; Ezra 1:1-4; Isaiah 44:28). " Accordingly the very guide they look to is a star (a meteor probably), and the question they ask is "where is He that is born King of the Jews?"...
Moreover, Daniel, "chief of the Magi," had foretold Messiah's kingdom (Daniel 2:44; Daniel 9:25); naturally the Magi ("wise men") looked for the kingdom and the king among the people of him whose fame as a Magian they had heard of
Signet - Examples of such rings in the Bible are: Pharaoh's ring given to Joseph (Genesis 41:42 ), Ahasuerus' ring given to Haman and then to Mordecai after Haman was hanged (Esther 3:10 ,Esther 3:10,3:12 ; Esther 8:2 ), King Darius' sealing the den of lions after Daniel was thrown into it (Daniel 6:17 )
Iron - Daniel 7:7,19 ; and in the great image the character of the various kingdoms had depreciated from gold to silver, then to brass, thence to iron and clay, that would not unite, the traces of which are seen around us in the national governments of the present day. Daniel 2:33-45
Iron - Daniel 7:7,19 ; and in the great image the character of the various kingdoms had depreciated from gold to silver, then to brass, thence to iron and clay, that would not unite, the traces of which are seen around us in the national governments of the present day. Daniel 2:33-45
Deputy - ]'>[1] ‘ruler’), Daniel 3:2-3 ; Daniel 6:7 (AV mi'Chael - (Ezra 8:8 ) ...
"One," or "the first, of the chief princes" or archangels, (Daniel 10:21 ) as the "prince" of Israel, and in ch. (Daniel 12:1 ) as "the great prince which standeth" in time conflict "for the children of thy people
Chalde'Ans, - This is no doubt the "learning" and the "tongue" to which reference it made in the book of Daniel, ( Daniel 1:4 ) The Chaldeans were really the learned class; they were priests, magicians or astronomers, and in the last of the three capacities they probably effected discoveries of great importance
Exile - In the Old Testament ‘the exile’, or ‘the captivity’, refers to the period of approximately seventy years that followed Babylon’s conquest of Jerusalem and deportation of the people into captivity in Babylon (2 Kings 24; 2 Kings 25:1-21; Jeremiah 25:11-12; Jeremiah 29:10; Daniel 1:1-4; Ezekiel 1:1-3). For details of life in captivity in Babylon see Daniel; EZEKIEL
Ptolemae'us, - Ptolemy Soter is described very briefly in Daniel, (Daniel 11:6 ) as one of those who should receive part of the empire of Alexander when it was "divided toward the four winds of heaven. (Daniel 11:7 ) He extended his conquests as far as Antioch, and then eastward to Babylon, but was recalled to Egypt by tidings of seditions which had broken out there. " (Daniel 11:8 ) This capture of sacred trophies earned for the king the name Euergetes -- "Benefactor. 217) in the book of Daniel gives a vivid description of his character. ( Daniel 11:10-12 ) cf. In the strong language of Daniel "The robbers of the people exalted themselves to establish the vision. " (Daniel 11:14 ) The accession of Ptolemy and the confusion of a disputed regency furnished a favorable opportunity for foreign invasion. (Daniel 11:14,15 ) The Romans interfered, and in order to retain the provinces of Coele-Syria, Phoenicia and Judea, Antiochus "gave him [4] a young maiden" [5]. (Daniel 11:27 ) But in the end his policy only partially succeeded. 170,168, are briefly described in (Daniel 11:25,30 ) The whole of Syria was afterward subdued by Ptolemy, and he was crowned at Antioch king of Egypt and Asia
Aramaic - This word occurs 2 Kings 18:26 ; Ezra 4:7 ; and Isaiah 36:11 , where it is translated 'the Syrian language' or 'tongue;' also in Daniel 2:4 , where it is 'Syriack. ...
In Daniel 2:4 the Chaldeans spoke to the king in Aramaic, the popular language of Babylon, and what follows to the end of chap. This must not be confounded with the 'learning and the tongue of the Chaldeans' in Daniel 1:4 , which is the Aryan dialect and literature of the Chaldeans, and probably the ordinary language which Daniel spoke in the court of Babylon
Azariah - name of Abednego ( Daniel 1:6-7 ; Daniel 1:11 ; Daniel 1:19 ; Daniel 2:17 )
Sovereignty of God - This attribute is evidently demonstrated in the systems of creation, providence, and grace; and may be considered as absolute, universal, and everlasting, Daniel 4:35
Hosen - ‘ox,’ ‘oxen’), only Daniel 3:21 AV Aramaic - Fragments of the Old Testament (Daniel 2:4-7:29) and Saint Matthew's Gospel were written originally in Aramaic
Psaltery - In Daniel 3:5-15 the word is pesanterin
du'ra - (a circle ), the plain where Nebuchadnezzar set up the golden image, ( Daniel 3:1 ) has been sometimes identified with a tract a little below Tekrit , on the left bank of the Tigris, where the name Dur is still found
Belshazzar - the last king of Babylon, and, according to Hales and others, the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 5:18 . ...
The only circumstances of his reign, recorded, are the visions of the Prophet Daniel, in the first and third years, Daniel 7:1 ; Daniel 8:1 ; and his sacrilegious feast and violent death, Daniel 5:1-30 . In this crisis, and at the instance of the queen mother, the Prophet Daniel was sent for, to whom honours were promised, on condition of his explaining the writing. Daniel refused the honours held out to him; but having with great faithfulness pointedly reproved the monarch for his ingratitude to God who had conferred on him such dignity, and particularly for his profanation of the vessels which were consecrated to his service, he proceeded to the interpretation of the words which had been written, and still stood visible on the wall. Perhaps, however, the character was that of the ancient Hebrew, or what we now call the Samaritan; and in that case it would be familiar to Daniel, though rude and unintelligible to the Chaldeans. But even if Daniel could read the words, the import of this solemn graphic message to the proud and impious monarch could only have been made known to the prophet by God
Meshach - The Babylonian name given to Mishael, one of Daniel's three companions, of the blood royal of Judah (fulfilling the prophetic threat, Isaiah 39:7); with the first syllable of Mish-ael retained, but Sheik the Babylonian goddess (from whom Babylon is called Shesbach, Jeremiah 25:26) being substituted for El; the goddess of love and mirth, during whose feast Cyrus took Babylon, Venus or the Earth. ...
Like Daniel he refused the king's dainties with determined "purpose" (Daniel 1:8-16) because a portion of the viands and wine were first offered to idols on the hearth to consecrate the whole (Deuteronomy 32:38; 1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:10; 1 Corinthians 10:27-28). (See Daniel. " Daniel, when promoted to be chief governor over all the wise men of Babylon and ruler over the whole province, remembered his three friends (contrast Genesis 40:23; Ecclesiastes 9:15-16; Amos 6:6); and at his request the king set them over the affairs of the province of Babylon (Daniel 2:48-49)
Gabbatha - ...
He has a somewhat similar function in the only OT passage in which he is mentioned, Daniel 8-10. Daniel was perplexed at the strange vision which he had seen. Daniel falls in a faint as the messenger approaches, and Gabriel lifts him up and explains the mysterious vision. Still again Daniel has a similar experience (Daniel 10:5 ff
Palmer, William - His early writings deal mainly with the problem of intercommunion; as a Catholic he wrote a treatise on early Christian symbolism and a commentary on the Book of Daniel
Deuterocanonical - ...
Of the Old Testament these are: ...
1,2Machabees
Baruch
Ecclesiasticus
Judith
Tobias
Wisdom
parts of Daniel (3,24-90; 13,14)
parts of Esther (10:4, to 16:14)
Of the New Testament these are: ...
2,3John
2Peter
Apocalypse
Hebrews
James
John (7,53, to 8,11)
Luke (22,43-44)
Mark (16,9-20)
Protestants commonly reject the deuterocanonical books of the Old Testament as apocryphal
Bodyguard - Members of a king's bodyguard mentioned in the Bible include: David (1 Samuel 22:14 ; 1 Samuel 28:2 ), Benaiah ben Jehoiada (2 Samuel 23:23 ), Potiphar (Genesis 37:36 ), Nebuzaradan (2 Kings 25:8 ; Jeremiah 39:9-13 ; Jeremiah 52:12-16 ), and Arioch (Daniel 2:14 )
Arioch - The captain of the king’s guard in the time of Nebuchadrezzar ( Daniel 2:14 )
Javan - Alexander the Great is called the "king of Javan" (rendered "Grecia," Daniel 8:21 ; 10:20 ; comp 11:2; Zechariah 9:13 )
William Palmer - His early writings deal mainly with the problem of intercommunion; as a Catholic he wrote a treatise on early Christian symbolism and a commentary on the Book of Daniel
Jupiter - Antiochus Epiphanes (Daniel 8, 11), the Old Testament antichrist, to subvert the Jewish religion, dedicated the temple of Jehovah at Jerusalem to the Greek Olympian Jupiter
Shushan - Its first mention chronologically is in Daniel 8:2 . Objections have been raised as to Daniel being at Shushan in the reign of Belshazzar; but the prophecy does not say definitely that he was there. ...
Daniel speaks of the palace or fortress as being in the province of Elam, and he was by the river of Ulai
Pride - It remains a characteristic feature of fallen human nature and one of the hardest evils to overcome (Proverbs 16:18; Daniel 5:20; Obadiah 1:3; Mark 7:21-22; Romans 1:28-30). But if the pleasure is a feeling of conceit, the pride is sinful (Isaiah 25:11; Daniel 4:30). Those who practise it bring against themselves God’s opposition, and guarantee for themselves a humiliating punishment (Leviticus 26:19; Proverbs 29:23; Isaiah 13:11; Isaiah 16:6; Daniel 4:37; Luke 1:51; Luke 18:14; James 4:6)
Javan - Greece, and her king Alexander, is prophetically mentioned (Daniel 8:21; Daniel 10:20; Daniel 11:2)
Magician - Daniel also speaks of magicians and diviners in Chaldea, under Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:20 , &c; ולאשפים ...
זלמכשפים זלכשדים לחרטמים . He names four sorts: Chartumim, Asaphim, Mecasphim, and Casdim, Daniel 2:2
Persia, Persians - To them is possibly to be added Cambyses, son of Cyrus the Great, made king of Babylon in 538, and thus corresponding to the misnomer’ Darius the Mede’ of Daniel 6:1 ff; Daniel 9:1 ; Daniel 11:1
Alexander - He is alluded to in Daniel 7:6 8:4-7 , under the figures of a leopard with four wings, and a one-horned he-goat, representing the swiftness of his conquests and his great strength. In the statue seen by Nebuchadnezzar in his dream, Daniel 2:39 , the belly of brass was the emblem of Alexander
Lucifer - The language is primarily drawn from that of Satan himself, the spirit that energized the pagan world power Babylon, that now energizes the apostate church, and shall at last energize the last secular antichrist (the fourth kingdom little horn) and his champion, the false prophet (the third kingdom little horn), the harlot's successor, who shall oppress Israel, as the fourth kingdom little horn oppresses the Gentile world: Daniel 7:8-26 (Chaldee); Daniel 8:9-11 (Hebrew); Revelation 13:4; Revelation 16:13-14; 2 Thessalonians 2:9
Horn - In prophetic symbolism borns stand for kings and military powers ( Daniel 7:8 ; Daniel 8:21 etc
Grass - ]'>[3] dethe ), Jeremiah 14:5 , Proverbs 27:25 , Job 38:27 , Isaiah 66:14 (‘pasture land’), Daniel 4:15 ; Daniel 4:23 (‘tender grass’)
Knee, Kneel - from terror ( Job 4:4 , Daniel 5:8 ), or fasting ( Psalms 109:24 ). In many passages of Scripture kneeling is spoken of as the attitude assumed in prayer ( 1 Kings 8:54 , Psalms 95:8 , Daniel 6:10 , Acts 20:36 etc
Anointed, the - Daniel spoke of Messiah the Prince, and that He would be cut off and have nothing. Daniel 9:25,26
Irish Martyrs - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Son of Man - ...
A heavenly figure...
The title ‘son of man’ comes from a vision recorded in the Old Testament book of Daniel. In this vision a person like a son of man came into the heavenly presence of God and received from him a universal and everlasting kingdom (Daniel 7:13-14). God’s kingdom will reach its fullest expression when Jesus returns at the end of the age to punish evil, remove Satan and reign in righteousness (Daniel 7:13-14; Matthew 13:41-43; Matthew 24:30-31; Mark 8:38). ...
The vision in Daniel shows, however, that the Son of man shares the kingdom with his people (Daniel 7:14; Daniel 7:27). ...
When the Jewish leaders finally understood Jesus’ usage of the title (namely, that he claimed to be both the Davidic Messiah and the supernatural heavenly Messiah of Daniel 7:13-14), they accused him of blasphemy and had him crucified (Mark 14:61-64)
Martyrs, Irish - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Archangel - according to some, means an angel occupying the eighth rank in the celestial order or hierarchy; but others reckon it a title only applicable to our Saviour; Judges 1:9 ; Daniel 12:1 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16 . It cannot be proved from holy writ, and, if not from holy writ, it cannot be proved at all, that any archangel exists but the one archangel Michael, and this one archangel Michael is unquestionably the Michael of the book of Daniel. ...
"To ascertain, if we can, to what order of beings the archangel Michael may belong, let us see how he is described by the Prophet Daniel, who never mentions him by that title; and what action is attributed to him in the book of Daniel and in another book, in which he bears a principal part. ...
"Now Daniel calls him ‘one of the chief princes,' or ‘one of the capital princes,' or ‘one of the princes that are at the head of all:'...
for this I maintain to be the full and not more than the full import of the Hebrew words. Gabriel, speaking of him to Daniel, calls him ‘Michael your prince,' and ‘the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people;' that is, not for the nation of the Jews in particular, but for the children, the spiritual children, of that holy seed the elect people of God; a description which applies particularly to the Son of God, and to no one else; and in perfect consistence with this description of Michael in the book of Daniel, is the action assigned to him in the Apocalypse, in which we find him fighting with the old serpent, the deceiver of the world, and...
victorious in the combat
Book - Prophecy in the Old Testament was comparatively a sealed volume until Jesus, who "alone is worthy," "opened the seals" (Daniel 12:4-9). John reveals what Daniel veils; therefore Daniel is told to "seal the book," John "not to seal the book" (Revelation 22:10). ...
Daniel's book was sealed because referring to the then distant future; John's unsealed because the events foretold were immediately to begin their fulfillment. ...
An image of God's book of predestination to eternal life (Psalms 139:16; Psalms 87:6; Exodus 32:32; Daniel 12:1; Luke 10:20; Philippians 4:3; Revelation 13:8; Revelation 17:8; Revelation 21:27)
Bel - It was, probably, the statue of this god which Nebuchadnezzar, being returned to Babylon after the end of the Jewish war, set up and dedicated in the plain of Dura; the story of which is related at large, Daniel 3. It was always rejected by the Jewish church, and is extant neither in the Hebrew, nor in the Chaldee languages; nor is there any proof that it ever was so, although the council of Trent allowed it to be part of the canonical book of Daniel, in which it stands in the Latin Vulgate. There are two Greek texts of this fragment, that of the Septuagint, and that found in Theodotion's Greek version of Daniel. Daniel probably, by detecting the mercenary contrivances of the idolatrous priests of Babylon, and by opening the eyes of the people to the follies of superstition, might furnish some foundation for the story; but the whole is evidently charged with fiction, though introduced with a pious intent
Hip - Belshazzar's fear at the handwriting on the wall (Daniel 5:6 NAS) was evidenced by his hip joint going slack
Beryl - The stones decorated the high priest's breastplate (Exodus 28:20 ), the king of Tyre (Ezekiel 28:13 ), the man in Daniel's vision (Daniel 10:6 ), and the eighth foundation of the new Jerusalem (Revelation 21:20 )
Sackbut - (ssack' buht) KJV term for musical instrument (Daniel 3:5 ), identified in modern translations as zither (TEV), lyre (NIV), trigon (NAS, NRSV), or triangle (REB)
Consumption - word ( kâlâh ) which is translated ‘consummation’ in Daniel 9:27 is rendered ‘consumption’ in Isaiah 10:23 ; Isaiah 28:22 , these Eng
Sackbut - (Daniel 3:1-30) The Hebrews had a variety of stringed and wind instruments as well as a kind of tympanum or drum
Island - ) The shores of the Mediterranean are called the "islands of the sea" ( Isaiah 11:11 ), or the "isles of the Gentiles" (Genesis 10:5 ), and sometimes simply "isles" (Psalm 72:10 ); Ezekiel 26:15,18 ; 27:3,35 ; Daniel 11:18 )
Africa - Other African nations mentioned in the Bible are Libya (2 Chronicles 12:3; 2 Chronicles 16:8; Daniel 11:43), Put (Jeremiah 46:9; Ezekiel 30:5; Ezekiel 38:5; Nahum 3:9), and Lud (Jeremiah 46:9; Ezekiel 30:5)
Poetry - ...
Poetry in the Old Testament...
Ezekiel 28:12-193 ; Genesis 3:14-19 ; Genesis 3:23-24 ; Genesis 8:22 ; Genesis 9:25-27 ; Genesis 14:19-20 ; Genesis 16:11-12 ; Genesis 25:23 ; Genesis 27:27-29 ,Genesis 27:27-29,27:39-40 ; Genesis 48:15-16 ; Genesis 49:2-27 ...
Exodus 15:1-18 ,Exodus 15:1-18,15:21 ...
Leviticus 10:3 ...
Numbers 6:24-27 ; Numbers 10:35-36 ; Numbers 12:6-8 ; Numbers 21:14-15 ; Numbers 21:17-18 ,Numbers 21:17-18,21:27-30 ; Numbers 23:7-10 ; Numbers 23:18-24 ; Numbers 24:3-9 ,Numbers 24:3-9,24:15-24 ...
Deuteronomy 32:1-43 ; Deuteronomy 33:2-29 ...
Joshua 10:12-13 ...
Judges 5:2-31 ; Judges 14:14 ,Judges 14:14,14:18 ; Judges 15:16 ...
Ruth 1:16-17 ,Ruth 1:16-17,1:20-21 ...
1 Samuel 2:1-10 ; 1Samuel 15:22-23,1 Samuel 15:33 ; 1 Samuel 18:7 ; 1 Samuel 21:11 ; 1 Samuel 29:5 ...
2 Samuel 1:19-27 ; 2 Samuel 3:33-34 ; 2 Samuel 22:2-51 ; 2 Samuel 23:1-7 ...
1 Kings 8:12-13 ; Ezekiel 32:12-15 ...
2 Kings 19:21-28 ...
1 Chronicles 16:8-36 ...
2 Chronicles 5:13 ; 2 Chronicles 6:41-42 ; 2 Chronicles 7:3 ; 2 Chronicles 10:16 ; 2 Chronicles 20:21 ...
Ezra 3:11 ...
Job 3:2-42:6 ...
Psalm 1-150 ...
Proverbs 1-31 ...
Ecclesiastes 1:2-11 ,Ecclesiastes 1:2-11,1:15 ,Ecclesiastes 1:15,1:18 ; Ecclesiastes 3:2-9 ; Ecclesiastes 7:1-13 ; Ecclesiastes 8:1 ; Ecclesiastes 10:1-4 ,Ecclesiastes 10:1-4,10:8-20 ; Ecclesiastes 11:1-4 ...
Song of Song of Solomon 1-8 ...
Isaiah—largely poetry...
Jeremiah—poetic selections throughout except for 32–45...
Lamentations 1-5 ...
Ezekiel 19:2-14 ; Ezekiel 23:32-34 ; Ezekiel 24:3-5 ; Ezekiel 26:17-18 ; Ezekiel 27:3-9 ; Ezekiel 27:25-36 ; Ezekiel 28:1-10 ; 1618102512_18 ; Ezekiel 28:22-23 ; Ezekiel 29:3-5 ; Ezekiel 30:2-4 ; Ezekiel 30:6-8 ; Ezekiel 30:10-19 ; Ezekiel 31:2-9 ; Ezekiel 32:2-8 ; 1 Kings 12:16 ; Ezekiel 32:19 ...
Daniel 2:20-23 ; Daniel 4:3 ; Daniel 4:34-35 ; Daniel 6:26-27 ; Daniel 7:9-10 ; Daniel 7:13-14 ; 7:23-27 Hosea—all poetry except for 1; Daniel 2:16-20 ; Daniel 3:1-5 ...
Joel—all poetry except for Daniel 2:30-3:8 ...
Amos—largely poetry...
Obadiah 1:1 ...
Jonah 2:2-9 ...
Micah 1-7 ...
Nahum 1-3 ...
Habakkuk 1-3 ...
Zephaniah 1-3 ...
Zechariah 9-11:3 ; Zechariah 11:17 ; Zechariah 13:7-9 ...
Parallelism The predominant feature of Hebrew poetry is parallelism
Highest - In the Old Testament, Most High often occurs as a designation for the God of Israel when Gentiles are in view (Genesis 14:18-22 ; Numbers 24:16 ; and frequently in Daniel)
Rock - In Daniel 2:45 the Chaldaic form of the Hebrew word is translated "mountain
Tatnai - It is sometimes translated "captain" (1 Kings 20:24 ; Daniel 3:2,3 ), sometimes also "deputy" (Esther 8:9 ; 9:3 )
Bridle - Isaiah 37:29, "I will put My hook in thy nose and My bridle in thy lips," is illustrated in the Assyrian monuments, which represent captives with bridles attached to rings inserted in their under lip, and held in the hand of the king; some of the captives with short beards, tasseled caps, long tunics, and hosen or boots (Daniel 3:21), seem in physiognomy Jews, or Israelites of the ten tribes
Look - ...
Daniel 7:20 (b) This figure also represents a fierce countenance of severe determination which is intended to frighten and to bring dismay
Abomination of Desolation, - Mentioned by our Saviour, (Matthew 24:15 ) as a sign of the approaching destruction of Jerusalem, with reference to (Daniel 9:27 ; 11:31 ; 12:11 ) The prophecy referred ultimately to the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, and consequently the "abomination" must describe some occurrence connected with that event
Elam - Susiana, in later times, seems to have been a part of this country, Daniel 8:2 ; and before the captivity the Jews seem always to have intended Persia by the name of Elam
Captain - ...
Katsin , occasionally rendered captain, applies Sometimes to a military, ( Joshua 10:24 ; Judges 11:6,11 ; Isaiah 22:3 ; Daniel 11:18 ) sometimes to a civil command, e
Leopard - Allusions are made in the Bible to its manner of watching for its prey, Jeremiah 5:6; Hosea 13:7; its fleetness, Habakkuk 1:8; its fierceness and cruelty, Isaiah 11:6, and in Daniel 7:6 it is made the emblem of power
Trees - Were frequently used as types of kings, or men of wealth and power, Psalm 37:35 Isaiah 2:13 Daniel 4:10-26 Zechariah 11:1,2
Angels - Their glorious appearance (Daniel 10:6), like our Lord's when transfigured and afterward as the ascended Savior (Revelation 1:14-16), and their human form (Luke 24:4; Acts 1:10), favor the same view. Close kindred of nature between angels and men is implied in both being alike called "sons of God" (Job 1:6; Job 38:7; Daniel 3:25; Daniel 3:28) and "gods" (Εlohim ) (Psalms 8:5; Hebrew Εlohim "angels," Psalms 97:7; Luke 3:38). Worship and service are their twofold function; priests in the heavenly temple (1618102512_8; 1 Kings 22:19; Daniel 7:9-10; Revelation 5:11), and sent forth thence on God's missions of love and justice. The probation of the elect angels is over; their crown is won, they are the "holy ones" now (Daniel 8:13), under the blessed necessity of sinning no more. "Watchers" of men, jealous for God's honor (Daniel 4:13; Daniel 4:23). By God's angel Daniel was saved in the lions' den (Daniel 6:22); compare Daniel 3:28 as to the fiery furnace. ...
Michael (whom some questionably identify with the Son of God) is represented as Israel's champion against Israel's (the literal and the spiritual) accuser, Satan (Daniel 12:1, compare Revelation 12:7-10). Daniel 10 unfolds the mysterious truth that there are angel princes in the spirit world, answering to the God-opposed leaders of kingdoms in the political world, the prince of Persia and the prince of Grecia standing in antagonism to Michael. Their number is counted by myriad's (Hebrews 12:22; Greek "to myriads, namely the festal assembly of angels") (Deuteronomy 33:2; Psalms 68:17; Daniel 7:10; Judges 1:14). ...
There are various ranks, thrones, principalities, powers in the angelic kingdom of light, as there are also in Satan's kingdom of darkness (Ephesians 1:22; Ephesians 6:12; Colossians 1:16; Daniel 10:13; Daniel 12:1; Romans 8:38)
Nebuchadnezzar - The proud position of the king of Babylon among all the kings of that day will best be seen from the words of Daniel who assuredly was no flatterer of great men. ' It could have been no ordinary greatness that drew from a man like Daniel an estimate and an eulogium like that. ' Though long dead, King Nebuchadnezzar still speaks in the Book of Daniel, and on a thousand cylinders in the British Museum; and, as on every page of Daniel, so on every brick of Babylon, he that runs may read this evening's text:-'Those that walk in pride the King of heaven is able to abase. '...
But, with alt that, I see in my own children every day a far worse kind of pride than any that the big child Nebuchadnezzar shows either in the Book of Daniel, or on the bricks of Babylon. As I read of Nebuchadnezzar's humility, and makeableness, and teachableness in Daniel's hands I am amazed at the boldness of the young Belteshazzar, and still more at the behaviour of his mighty master. When I put myself into Nebuchadnezzar's place, when I recall my own temper and my own conduct, I honour Nebuchadnezzar, and I cannot cease from wondering that the king of Babylon has not been far more made of as a pattern of humility and meekness both under the dispensations of God and under the doctrines of Daniel. After his orders had been disobeyed-in his own palace, remember, and at his own table-in the matter of the meat that Daniel and his three companions were to eat, and the wine they were to drink: and after he was compelled publicly to admit that the prince of the eunuchs had acted on far better advice than the king's commandment,-instead of Melzar's head being endangered to the king, Nebuchadnezzar communed with Daniel, and Daniel stood before the king. Then, again, after his great dream, and its interpretation to the destruction of his kingdom, 'King Nebuchadnezzar fell upon his face, and worshipped Daniel, and commanded that they should offer an oblation and sweet odours unto Daniel. And, then, at the end of his life, the king not only let Daniel say this to him, 'Wherefore, O king, break off thy sins by righteousness, and thine iniquities by showing mercy to the poor, if it may be a lengthening of thy tranquillity,' but he bowed his head and did it. A nobler state paper was never sent out even by the most Christian of kings than is that great document that we have in the fourth chapter of the Book of Daniel. The proud man holds you henceforth to be his mortal enemy if you tell him the truth as Daniel told Nebuchadnezzar, and as Daniel was honoured and rewarded for telling it. But Daniel's counsel was acceptable to Nebuchadnezzar, till that king broke off all the sins and all the iniquities that Daniel so boldly named to him. We hear of baptized kings every day walking in their palaces in Christendom at the end of the nineteenth century, and speaking far more proudly than heathen Nebuchadnezzar spake, and no Daniel dares to stand up and tell them that their feet are partly iron mixed with miry clay. Did you ever read the fourth chapter of the Book of Daniel?-that splendid autobiographic chapter which king Nebuchadnezzar wrote out of his own inkhorn, and gave the document to Daniel to embody in his book? 'Come, all ye that fear God,' Nebuchadnezzar begins, 'and I will tell you what He did for my soul. ...
But Nebuchadnezzar would not have needed to be made to eat grass as an ox if he had early enough and often enough asked Daniel to teach him to pray. Daniel himself was mightily tempted to pride far more than Nebuchadnezzar ever was with all his wars and with all his palaces. For, was not Nebuchadnezzar, with all his power and with all his pride, prostrate again and again at Daniel's feet? Did not king Nebuchadnezzar fall upon his face, and worship Daniel, and command that they should offer an oblation and sweet odours to Daniel? What could it have been, then, that kept Daniel's heart so sweetly humble through all that, till Daniel was a man greatly beloved of Him who resisteth the proud and giveth grace to the humble? It was prayer that did it. Look in at that window in Babylon that stands open toward Jerusalem, and you will see Daniel on his knees and on the palms of his hands till all his comeliness is turned to corruption
Gold - It was very abundant (1 Chronicles 22:14 ; Nahum 2:9 ; Daniel 3:1 ). ...
In Daniel 2:38 , the Babylonian Empire is spoken of as a "head of gold" because of its great riches; and Babylon was called by (Isaiah 14:4 ) the "golden city" (RSV marg
Chaldaea, Chaldaeans - ...
The name as applied since Jerome to the Aramaic portions of Daniel and Ezra is incorrect. The use of the term ‘Chaldæan’ (Daniel 1:4 and often) to denote a class of astrologers is not found in native sources, but arose from a transfer of a national name to the Babylonians in general, and occurs in Strabo, Diodorus, etc
Steward - For the ‘steward’ of Daniel 1:11 ; Daniel 1:18 (RV Eunuch - ' Jeremiah 29:2 ; Daniel 1:3-18 ; Acts 8:27 . The case of Daniel and his companions was an instance of the fulfilment of this, for they were committed to the care of 'the master of the eunuchs
Seal - Treasures were sealed up (Deuteronomy 32:34); the lions' den in Daniel's case (Daniel 6:17); so our Lord's tomb (Matthew 27:66). ...
Sealing up was also to ensure secrecy (Daniel 12:4; Revelation 5:1)
Lion - " The Bible reader will remember the exploits of Samson and of David, Judges 14:5,6 1 Samuel 17:34-36 , the story of the disobedient prophet slain by a lion, 1 Kings 13:28 , and of the obedient Daniel, safe in the lion's den, Daniel 6:1-28 ; also the sublime image of Jehovah's care for his people, in Isaiah 31:4
Daniel, Book of - Daniel is "the historian of the Captivity, the writer who alone furnishes any series of events for that dark and dismal period during which the harp of Israel hung on the trees that grew by the Euphrates. Certain portions (Daniel 2:4 ; 7 ) are written in the Chaldee language; and the portions written in Hebrew are in a style and form having a close affinity with the later books of the Old Testament, especially with that of Ezra. That Daniel is the writer of this book is also testified to in the book itself (7:1,28; 8:2; 9:2; 10:1,2; 12:4,5)
Irony - In Daniel 2:1 , the magicians were the impostors who claimed that no one could interpret the king's dream. Daniel was the ironist who taught them where wisdom arises (Daniel 2:20 ) and revealed the truth (Daniel 2:30 )
Darius -
Darius the Mede (Daniel 11:1 ), "the son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes" (9:1). 538-536) Daniel was promoted to the highest dignity (Daniel 6:1,2 ); but on account of the malice of his enemies he was cast into the den of lions. After his miraculous escape, a decree was issued by Darius enjoining "reverence for the God of Daniel" (6:26)
Chief - Ri'shon is number one, the first ( Daniel 10:13 ). Re'shith is the first or beginning one (Daniel 11:41 ). Sar is one with dominion or rule, thus an official or ruler ( Genesis 40:2 ; 1 Samuel 17:18 ; 1 Kings 4:2 ; 1 Kings 5:16 ; 1 Chronicles 24:5 ; Daniel 10:20 ). Rab means numerous or great and is used in several compound words to represent the chief or greatest one ( 2 Kings 18:17 ; Jeremiah 39:13 ; Daniel 5:11 )
Alexander the Great - This conqueror is not mentioned by name in scripture, but his kingdom is certainly referred to in prophecy, principally in Daniel, some 200 years before he was born. " Daniel 2:32,39 . Daniel 7:6 . , where the kingdom of Media and Persia is compared to a ram, Greece is compared to a he goat, with a great horn, which is its first king, Alexander, Daniel 8:21 . Daniel 8:5-8
ma'gi - " It is with such men that, we have to think of Daniel and his fellow exiles as associated. The office which Daniel accepted (Daniel 5:11 ) was probably rab-mag --chief of the Magi. Isai 9,11; Dani 7 (4) Daniel himself was a prince and chief among this very class of wise men. His prophecies: were made known to them; and the calculations by which he pointed to the very time when Christ should be born became, through the book of Daniel, a part of their ancient literature
Dublin Review - A Catholic quarterly, founded, 1836, by Dr Nicholas Wiseman, Daniel O'Connell, and Michael Quin, for the purpose of rousing English Catholics to a greater enthusiasm for their faith, and demonstrating the breadth of the Catholic system as understood by Wiseman
Hagiographa - The hagiographa in their Hebrew order include: Psalms, Proverbs, and Job; the “five scrolls” (Megilloth ) read at major festivals, namely, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, and Esther; Daniel; and Ezra-Nehemiah and Chronicles
Abomination of Desolation - The Daniel 9:27 denotes, probably, the image of Jupiter, erected in the temple of Jerusalem by command of Antiochus Epiphanes
Goat - In Daniel's prophecy of the kingdoms, that of Greece was comparedto a 'rough he goat,' but with a notable horn between his eyes. Daniel 8:5,8,21
Sackcloth - They also put on sackcloth as a sign of sorrow for personal sins (1 Kings 21:27-29; Nehemiah 9:1-2) or urgency in prayer (Daniel 9:3)
Legion - Matthew 26:53, "thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to My Father, and He shall presently give Me more than twelve legions of angels," against this band from the Roman "legion"; not merely My twelve apostles, but twelve "legions," and these "angels?" (compare 2 Kings 6:17; Daniel 7:10
Heres - It is probably connected with Beth-shemesh ( 1 Kings 4:9 , 2 Chronicles 28:18 ) or Ir-shemesh ( Joshua 19:41 ), on the boundary between Judah and Daniel 2:1-49
Magnify - Daniel 8 ...
Accomplish - Daniel 9 ...
2
Guard - tabbach, slaughterer, executioner, attached to the body-guard of the king Genesis 37:36 ; Daniel 2:14
Contempt - Daniel 7
Antichrist - Daniel 7, speaks of him as the "man of sin
Visions - With the prophets they were frequently employed: more than twenty times we read of them in Daniel
Reconciliation - Daniel 9
Ekron - The most northern city of the Philistines, allotted to Judah by Joshua 15:45 , but afterwards given to Daniel 12:13 , though it does not appear that the Jews ever peaceably possessed it
Terrible - Daniel 2 ...
2
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - He took away several persons from Jerusalem; among others Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, all of the royal family, whom the king of Babylon caused to be carefully instructed in the language and in the learning of the Chaldeans, that they might be employed at court, Daniel , 1. He ordered all his diviners and interpreters of dreams to be sent for; but none could tell him the dream or the interpretation: and, in wrath, he sentenced them all to death, which was about to be put in execution, when Daniel was informed of it. God in the night revealed to him the king's dream, and also the interpretation: "Thou," said Daniel, "art represented by the golden head of the statue. " Then the king raised Daniel to great honour, set him over all the wise men of Babylon, and gave him the government of that province. The result, as to the three Jews, companions of Daniel, who would not bend the knee to the image, is stated in Daniel 3. Daniel probably was absent. The effect of the miracle was so great that Nebuchadnezzar gave glory to the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego; and he exalted the three Hebrews to great dignity in the province of Babylon, Daniel 4. Suddenly, an angel descending from heaven, commanded that the tree should be cut down, but that the root should be preserved in the earth, Daniel 4. The king sent for all the diviners in the country, but none could explain his dream, till Daniel, by divine revelation, showed that it represented his present greatness, his signal approaching humiliation, and his restoration to reason and dignity
Eunuch - Daniel and his companions were, possibly, mutilated so as to become eunuchs to the Babylonian king (2 Kings 20:17-18; Daniel 1:3-7)
Muteness - Daniel experienced muteness in response to the appearance of a heavenly messenger (Daniel 10:15 )
Greece, Greeks, Gre'Cians - , is in Javan ( Daniel 8:21 ; Joel 3:6 ) the Hebrew, however, is sometimes regained. Prophetical notice of Greece occurs in ( Daniel 8:21 ) etc
Abomination of Desolation - Daniel 9:25, Revelation 2:7; Revelation 13:18); (3) the command to flee to the mountains, which seems to have been obeyed by the Christians who escaped to Pella (Euseb. ...
The phrase we are considering occurs three times in the LXX Septuagint of Daniel:† [6] Daniel 9:27 (βδ. τῶν ἐρημώσεων), Daniel 11:31 (βδ. τῶν ἐρημώσεων) and Daniel 12:11 (cf. Daniel 8:13), and is quoted in 1 Maccabees 1:54. Thus it is plain that Christ, in quoting the words of Daniel, intends to foretell a desecration of the Temple (or perhaps of the Holy City) resembling that of Antiochus, and resulting in the destruction of the national life and religion. In support of this view it is urged (a) that the ‘little Apocalypse’ (2 Thessalonians 2:1-12, a passage closely resembling this) clearly contemplates a Jewish apostasy; (b) that the word used in Daniel (שׁקּוּץ = βδέλυγμα) is properly used not of idolatry in the abstract, but of idolatry or false worship adopted by Jews (1 Kings 11:5, 2 Kings 23:13, Ezekiel 5:11); (c) that there was among the Jews a tradition to the effect that Jerusalem would be destroyed if their own hands should pollute the Temple of God (ἐὰν χεῖρες οἰκεῖαι προμιάνωσι τὸ τοῦ θεοῦ τέμενος, Josephus BJ iv vi. Bevan, The Book of Daniel, ad loc
Dispensations - (See Daniel) (Daniel 4:37; Daniel 6:25-27; Ezra 1:1, etc. ) Zoroaster was probably contemporary with Daniel, and drew from the Hebrew Scriptures the principles on which he reformed the Persian religion which had become corrupted by the worship of fire, and of an evil principle as well as a good
Nebuchadnezzar - But Nabopolassar was ambitious of reconquering from Necho the western provinces of Syria, and for this purpose he sent his son with a powerful army westward (Daniel 1:1 ). Nebuchadnezzar also subdued the whole of Palestine, and took Jerusalem, carrying away captive a great multitude of the Jews, among whom were Daniel and his companions (Daniel 1:1,2 ; Jeremiah 27:19 ; 40:1 ). Having completed the subjugation of Phoenicia, and inflicted chastisement on Egypt, Nebuchadnezzar now set himself to rebuild and adorn the city of Babylon (Daniel 4:30 ), and to add to the greatness and prosperity of his kingdom by constructing canals and aqueducts and reservoirs surpassing in grandeur and magnificence everything of the kind mentioned in history (Daniel 2:37 ). ...
After the incident of the "burning fiery furnace" (Daniel 3 ) into which the three Hebrew confessors were cast, Nebuchadnezzar was afflicted with some peculiar mental aberration as a punishment for his pride and vanity, probably the form of madness known as lycanthropy (i. (See Daniel
Captain - Rendered "chief," Genesis 40:2 ; 41:9 ; rendered also "prince," Daniel 1:7 ; "ruler," Judges 9:30 ; "governor,' 1 Kings 22:26 . Nebuzar-adan (Jeremiah 39:13 ) and Arioch (Daniel 2:14 ) held this office in Babylon. katsin) so translated denotes sometimes a military ( Joshua 10:24 ; Judges 11:6,11 ; Isaiah 22:3 "rulers;" Daniel 11:18 ) and sometimes a civil command, a judge, magistrate, Arab
Daniel, the Stylite - Daniel (9) the Stylite, of the 5th cent. " In his last will to his disciples, after commending them to the common Father of all, and to the Saviour Who died for them, Daniel bade them "hold fast humility, practise obedience, exercise hospitality, keep the fasts, observe the vigils, love poverty, and above all maintain charity, which is the first and great commandment; avoid the tares of the heretics; separate never from the church your mother: if you do these things your righteousness shall be perfect. Daniel , ap
Angels - They were created before humans, they belong to a higher order than humans, and their number is countless (Psalms 103:20; Psalms 148:2; Isaiah 6:2-3; Daniel 7:10; Luke 12:8-9; Luke 15:10; Colossians 1:16; Hebrews 12:22; Revelation 4:8; Revelation 5:11-12; Revelation 7:11). ...
To the godly, an angel may be a guide (Genesis 24:7; Genesis 24:40; Exodus 14:19; Acts 8:26; Acts 27:23), a protector (Psalms 34:7; Psalms 91:11; Daniel 6:22; Daniel 10:13; Daniel 10:21; Matthew 18:10), a deliverer (Isaiah 63:9; Daniel 3:28; Matthew 26:53; Acts 5:19), an interpreter of visions (Daniel 8:16; Zechariah 1:8-14; Revelation 1:1; Revelation 22:6) and, in fact, a sympathetic helper in all circumstances (Mark 1:13; Luke 22:43; Hebrews 1:13-14)
Son of Man - In the Old Testament it is used only in Psalm 80:17 and Daniel 7:13 with this application
Abase - Daniel 4
Herald - The herald of Daniel 3:4 was responsible for publicizing the king's law and the penalty of disobedience
Hananiah - ...
Shadrach, one of the "three Hebrew children" (Daniel 1 ; 6:7 )
Dulcimer - sumphoniah), a musical instrument mentioned in Daniel 3:5,15 , along with other instruments there named, as sounded before the golden image
Pound - 1 Kings 10:17 , maneh; Daniel 5:25,26 , mene), in Attic Greek 100 drachmai, in weight about 15 oz
Antichrist - " ...
This name has been applied to the "little horn" of the "king of fierce countenance" (Daniel 7:24,25 ; 8:23-25 )
Balance - , "two poisers", also so rendered ( Daniel 5:27 )
Herald - The word occurs only in Daniel 3:4 as tr
Lubim - ]'>[1] for the Libyans in Nahum 3:9 , 2Ch 12:3 ; 2 Chronicles 16:8 , and replaced by the word ‘Libyans’ itself in Daniel 11:43
Alter - Daniel 4
Ithamar - Daniel, a descendant of Ithamar, returned from exile
Abigail, - At Hebron she bore him a son, whose name may have been Chileab ( 2 Samuel 3:3 ), or Daniel ( 1 Chronicles 3:1 ), or Dodiel (the LXX Michael - We meet with this name only five times in Scripture: thrice in Daniel 10:13; Dan 10:21; Dan 12:1, once in Jude 1:1:9, and once in Revelation 12:7
Chit'Tim, Kit'Tim - (Numbers 24:24 ; Isaiah 23::1,12 ; Jeremiah 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:6 ; Daniel 11:30 ) In the above passages, the "isles of Chittim," the "ships of Chittim, the "coasts of Chittim," are supposed to refer to the island of Cyprus
Understanding - ...
Understanding is seen as a gift of God (Daniel 2:21 ) and it is to be prayed for (Psalm 119:34 ). Hearing is no assurance of understanding (Daniel 12:8 ). This can be seen in references to the understanding of a foreign language (Isaiah 33:19 ) and Daniel's understanding of all the subjects in which he was interrogated by Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1:20 ). Daniel possesses apocalyptic understanding (Daniel 9:2,23 ; 10:1 )
Abomination - The "abomination of desolation" foretold by the Prophet Daniel 10:27, 11:31, is supposed by some interpreters to denote the statue of Jupiter Olympius, which Antiochus Epiphanes caused to be erected in the temple of Jerusalem. The Jews applied the above passage of Daniel to the Romans, as we are informed by Jerome. on Daniel xi, xii, observes, that in the sixteenth year of the emperor Adrian. 132, the Romans accomplished the prediction of Daniel by building a temple to Jupiter Capitolinus, where the temple of God in Jerusalem had stood. Others again have applied the prediction of Daniel to the invasion and desolation of Christendom by the Mohammedans, and to their conversion of the churches into mosques
Apocalyptic - ...
The Bible contains two great examples of apocalyptic: Daniel and Revelation. Daniel usually receives visionary dreams in his sleep (2:19; 7:1), but he also has day-time visions (10:4-5) and is able to pass on words from God like a traditional prophet (5:25-28). Both Daniel and Revelation are full of speech, but in both books the only occasion on which the voice of God is unequivocally heard is Revelation 21:5-8 , a passage all the more climactic because of this rarity. In both books a particular angel Acts as a guide and instructor (Daniel 9:21 ; Mark 4:1-20 ; 22:8 ). The usual pattern, both in Daniel and in the extrabiblical apocalypses, is that a vision is followed by an explanation of the symbolism (Daniel 7:15-27 ; Zechariah 1:7-21 ), rather like the instances in which a parable of Jesus is followed by an interpretation (Matthew 13:24-30,36-43 ; Revelation 17:1 ). The same is true, though less clearly, in Daniel. There are heavenly counterparts of earthly realities, like the "angels of the seven churches" (Revelation 1:20 ), and the four living creatures by the throne (Revelation 4:6 ), and the "son of man" of Daniel 7:13 , who to some extent represents God's people in heaven (Daniel 7:18 ). Daniel 7:26 ), and events in heaven have a radical effect on earth (such as the ejection of the defeated dragon from heaven, Revelation 12:9,12 ). ...
God's Rule over a Chaotic World The basic message of Daniel 2-5 is that "the Most High God is sovereign over the kingdoms of men and sets over them anyone he wishes" ( Daniel 5:21 ). ...
The Protection of God's People The presentation of the "son of man" before God assures the status and security of "the people of the Most High" ( Daniel 7:13,22 ). The great beast, whose power Daniel sees being transferred to the "son of man, " will still wage war on the saints and prevail over them (7:21,25)
Decree - Decrees were proclaimed publically by criers (Jonah 3:5-7 ) designated “heralds” (Daniel 3:4 ) often throughout the territory of the monarch (1 Samuel 11:7 ; Ezra 1:1 ). ...
As King of the earth, God issues decrees regulating the world of nature (the sea, Proverbs 8:29 ; rain, Job 28:26 ) and of humanity (Daniel 4:24 )
Tribulation - Dispensational premillennialism connects such a seven-year tribulation with the seventieth week of a prophetic framework taken from Daniel 9:24-27 . The last half, often called the Great Tribulation, is measured variously as three and a half years (Daniel 9:27 ), forty-two months (Revelation 11:2 ; Revelation 13:5 ), 1,260 days ( Revelation 11:3 ; Revelation 12:6 ), or “a time, and times, and half a time” (Revelation 12:14 )
Nest - though thou set thy nest among the stars" (in thy ambitious pride regarding thy lofty dwelling as raised beyond the reach of injury; type of antichrist: Isaiah 14:13; Daniel 8:10; Daniel 11:37), i
Angels of the Seven Churches - word, which is of very frequent occurrence, is invariably used in this sense; (2) our Lord’s utterance in Matthew 18:10 , which suggests a doctrine of angelic guardianship; (3) the fact that in Daniel, to which the Apocalypse is so closely related, the guardianship of angels is extended to nations ( Daniel 12:1 ). , Daniel 3:1 ; Daniel 3:15 ff
Nation - God may also use nations as his instruments to bring deliverance and blessing (Isaiah 45:1-5), for he controls the destinies of all nations (Jeremiah 18:7-10; Daniel 4:17). The only lasting kingdom is the kingdom of God (Daniel 2:44; Daniel 4:30; Romans 2:28-29). God accepts people into his family on the basis of their faith, not their nationality (Luke 4:25-27; Daniel 4:34; Romans 4:1-3; Romans 4:16-17)
Shushan - The capital city of Elam, or Persia, Genesis 14:1 Daniel 8:2 , on the river Ulai. Here Daniel had the vision of the ram and he-goat, in the third year of Belshazzar, Daniel 8:1-27 . Large blocks of marble, covered with hieroglyphics, are not unfrequently here discovered by the Arabs, when digging in search of hidden treasure; and at the foot of the most elevated of the pyramids (ruins) stands the tomb of Daniel, a small and apparently a modern building, erected on the spot where the relics of that prophet are believed to rest
Number - (Jeremiah 25:11 ) ...
Five appears in the table of punishments, of legal requirements, ( Exodus 22:1 ; Leviticus 5:16 ; 22:14 ; 27:15 ; Numbers 5:7 ; 18:16 ) and in the five empires of Daniel. (Daniel 2:1 ) . ...
Four is used in reference to the 4 winds, ( Daniel 7:2 ) and the so-called 4 corners of the earth; the creatures, each with 4 wings and 4 faces, of Ezekiel, (Ezekiel 1:5 ) ff. ; 4Rivers of Paradise (Genesis 2:10 ) 4Beasts, (Daniel 7:1 )
Prophets, the - Those referring to the times of the Gentiles, which began with Nebuchadnezzar, and, continuing beyond the days of the Messiah on earth, are still running on: these are almost entirely given in Daniel. The prophets Ezekiel and Daniel speak from the land of Chaldea, when all present hope was over for both Israel and Judah, and the times of the Gentiles had set in. ...
The twelve prophets that follow the Book of Daniel are often called THE MINOR PROPHETS, simply because they are shorter than the others, and not as being in any respect inferior. Isaiah 28:14-18 ; Daniel 2:40-43 ; Daniel 7:7,8 ; Daniel 9:27 ; Revelation 17:7,8,10-13 . Daniel 7:19-25 ; Daniel 9:27 ; Daniel 11:36-39 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:4 ; Revelation 13:1-18 . Daniel 2:34,35,44,45 ; Matthew 24:30 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10 ; Revelation 19:11-21 . Isaiah 11:11-14 ; Ezekiel 36 , Ezekiel 38 , Ezekiel 39 ; Daniel 12:2,3 ; Romans 11:26,27
Four - ...
Daniel 3:25 (c) The number here represents GOD's power to overrule the king, and to quench the violence of fire, and to deliver His own children. ...
Daniel 7:2 (c) By this we understand that GOD had power to raise up kingdoms, and to destroy kings as He wills. (See Daniel 7:3). (See Daniel 7:17). ...
Daniel 8:8 (c) The great horn was Alexander the Great. (See Daniel 8:22, Daniel 11:4)
Seventy Weeks of Daniel - This period is taken from an important prophecy in Daniel 9:25-27 . The rest of the prophecy in Daniel 9:26 agrees with the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus, and foretells a determined period of desolation till war against it will end. Then Daniel 9:27 takes up the outward circumstances of the last week, which is future, though probably one half of it has been, for faith, fulfilled in the ministry of Christ. ...
Daniel 9:26,27 speak of 'the prince that shall come,' who shall confirm a covenant with the many for one week. And so it is: the period of three and a half years is pointed out no fewer than seven times, as follows:...
Daniel 7:25 ; "time, times, and dividing of times " (that the word 'times' refers to 'years' cf. Daniel 11:13 margin ). ...
Daniel 12:7 ; Revelation 12:14 ; "time, times, and half a time
Darius - DARIUS the Mede, spoken of in Daniel 5:31 ; Daniel 9:1 ; Daniel 11:1 , &c, was the son of Astyages, king of the Medes, and brother to Mandane, the mother of Cyrus, and to Amyit, the mother of Evil-merodach, and grandmother of Belshazzar. The Septuagint, in Daniel vii, give him the name of Artaxerxes; the thirteenth, or apocryphal chapter of Daniel, calls him Astyages; and Xenophon designates him by the name of Cyaxares. Daniel does not inform us of any previous war between them; but the prophets Isaiah and Jeremiah supply this deficiency. Thus were verified the prophecies of Daniel, viii, who had foretold the destruction of the Persian monarchy, under the symbol of a ram, which butted with its horns westward, northward, and southward, and which nothing could resist; but a goat which had a very large horn between his eyes, and which denoted Alexander the Great, came from the west, and overran the world without touching the earth; springing forward with impetuosity, the goat ran against the ram with all his force, attacked him with fury, struck him, broke his two horns, trampled him under foot, and no one could rescue the ram
Astrologers - It was fancied that the stars and planets had an influence, for good or for evil, on human affairs, and that certain aspects and relative positions of the heavenly bodies were full of meaning to those who had skill to interpret them, Daniel 2:2
Shadrach - Aku's command, the Chaldean name given to Hananiah, one of the Hebrew youths whom Nebuchadnezzar carried captive to Babylon (Daniel 1:6,7 ; 3:12-30 )
Ekron - It was assigned to Judah (Joshua 13:3 ), and afterwards to (Daniel 19:43 ), but came again into the full possession of the Philistines (1 Samuel 5:10 )
Cornet - In Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 , the word (keren) so rendered is a curved horn
Greece - Prophetic notice is taken of Greece in Daniel 8:21
Soothsayer - In Daniel 2:27 ; 5:7 the word is the rendering of the Chaldee gazrin, i
Exactor - Elsewhere the term is translated taskmaster, one who “exacts” labor (Exodus 3:7 ) or as raiser of taxes (Daniel 11:20 )
Tema - Having conquered and rebuilt Tema, Nabonidus, the last king of Babylon, remained there ten years, leaving his son Belshazzar as vice-regent in Babylon ( Daniel 5:1 )
Notable - Daniel 8
Ave Maria English Publication - Founded 1875 with the financial aid of Empress Eugenie of France, it was edited from 1875 to 1929 by Daniel E
Example - ...
Daniel, the model of decision
Bangor, Carnarvonshire, North Wales, Diocese of - Probably founded in the 6th century, either by Saint Daniel (died 584?) or by Saint David
ab'Igail - By her he had a son, called Chileab in (2 Samuel 3:3 ) but Daniel in (1 Chronicles 3:1 ) ...
A sister of David, married to Jether the Ishmaelite , and mother, by him , of Amasa
Abigail - By her he had a son, called Chileab in 2 Samuel 3:3, but Daniel in 1 Chronicles 3:1
Reader - The expression, ‘Let him that readeth understand,’ in Matthew 24:15, cannot refer to the reading of Daniel 9:27, because, although Daniel is mentioned earlier in this passage of Mt. ’s parallel passage there is no reference to Daniel (see Mark 13:14)
Prophecy - In the writings of the prophets (Isaiah 2:18-21 ), (Jeremiah 27:3-7 ; 29:11-14 ), (Ezekiel 5:12 ; 8 ), Daniel Daniel 9:26,27 ), (Hosea 9:17 ), there are also many prophecies regarding the events which were to befall that people. ...
There is in like manner a large number of prophecies relating to those nations with which the Jews came into contact, as Tyre (Ezekiel 26:3-5,14-21 ), Egypt (Ezekiel 29:10,15 ; 30:6,12,13 ), Ethiopia (Nahum 3:8-10 ), Nineveh (Nahum 1:10 ; 2:8-13 ; 3:17-19 ), Babylon (Isaiah 13:4 ; Jeremiah 51:7 ; Isaiah 44:27 ; Jeremiah 50:38 ; 51:36,39,57 ), the land of the Philistines (Jeremiah 47:4-7 ; Ezekiel 25:15-17 ; Amos 1:6-8 ; Zephaniah 2:4-7 ; Zechariah 9:5-8 ), and of the four great monarchies (Daniel 2:39,40 ; 7:17-24 ; 8:9 )
Azariah - One carried away with Daniel to Babylon, probably of the seed royal: his name was changed to ABED-NEGO. Daniel 1:6-19 ; Daniel 2:17
Man of Sin - His familiarity with it may be traced not only in the language of Daniel 11:4, but in the references to the Beliar-Satan conception which are present in the passage. In Daniel 11:9 the coming of the man of lawlessness is said to be ‘according to the working of Satan. [5] 472) that on the evidence of the Septuagint and Aquila ἡ ἀποστασία (Daniel 11:3) is a rendering of Heb. בְּלִיַעַל, ὁ ἄνθρωπος τῆς ἀνομίας (Daniel 11:3) of אִישׁ בְּלִיַעַל (‘man of Belial’), and ὁ ἀντικείμενος (Daniel 11:4) of שָׂטָן. Out of Judaism he pictured the Antichrist as coming, though there are features in his representation which imply that the sway of the man of lawlessness would extend far beyond the confines of Judaism-that he would cause an apostasy in the Church (Daniel 11:3), that he would break down the restraining power of the Empire (Daniel 11:7), that he would draw after him a deluded and perishing world (Daniel 11:10-12). Daniel 11:36), and whose hostility to the truth of God which brings salvation would reach its climax in the blasphemous claim to be himself Divine
Sorcery - It is translated in Exodus 7:11, Daniel 2:2, Malachi 3:5 ‘sorcerers’ (Authorized Version and Revised Version ), and in Septuagint φαρμακός, while the feminine מְכַשֵׁפִה in Exodus 22:17 (18) is translated by ‘witch’ (Authorized Version ), ‘sorceress’ (Revised Version ), New Hampshire - The permanent establishment of the Church in the state was connected with the conversion of Reverend Daniel Barber and his son, Virgil Horace Barber, both Episcopalian ministers, the former at Claremont, New Hampshire, and the latter the principal of an academy near Utica, New York. The latter preached to the Catholics of Claremont and said Mass for them in the home of Daniel Barber
Horn - Horns are emblems of power, dominion, glory, and fierceness, as they are the chief means of attack and defence with the animals endowed with them (Daniel 8:5,9 ; 1 Samuel 2:1 ; 16:1,13 ; 1 Kings 1:39 ; 22:11 ; Joshua 6:4,5 ; Psalm 75:5,10 ; 132:17 ; Luke 1:69 , etc. ...
Horns are also the symbol of royal dignity and power (Jeremiah 48:25 ; Zechariah 1:18 ; Daniel 8:24 )
Euphrates And Tigris Rivers - ...
The Tigris is not as prominent in the Bible as is the Euphrates, but it is the site of the major vision of the prophet Daniel (Daniel 10:4 )
Book of Life - A second natural step was to conceive of God as keeping two sets of books, a Book of Life ( Daniel 12:1 ff. Daniel 7:10 , Eth
Horn - ); also, (b) in a concrete sense, to represent kings and empires (Daniel 7:24; Daniel 8:20 f
Excellency, Excellent - expressions, a complete list of which will be found in Driver’s Daniel (Camb. ’ In Daniel 1:20 it is said that ‘in all matters of wisdom and understanding, that the king inquired of them, he found them ten times better than all the magicians and astrologers that were in all his realm’; and this is summed up in the heading of the chapter in the words, ‘their excellency in wisdom
Finish - The prophet Daniel, when proclaiming to the church the time of the Messiah's coming, added this also, as the distinguishing feature of his mission. (Daniel 9:24) And Zechariah no less, while describing him as the great Zerubbabel declared, that the same hands which laid the foundation of the spiritual temple should also finish it
Like - ...
Among them all was found none like Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah. Daniel 1
Pollution - (ἀλίσγημα, only found as noon in Acts 15:20; as verb in Daniel 1:8, Malachi 1:7; Malachi 1:12, Sirach 40:29 [1])...
ἀλίσγημα is probably from a root meaning ‘smear with fat or blood’ (cf. ’ Its use in the LXX_ suggests also that it referred to the ordinary food of Gentiles (Daniel 1:8, Sirach 40:29) as well as to idol offerings
Elam - Daniel was at Shushan, which was in the province of Elam. Isaiah 11:11 ; Isaiah 21:2 ; Isaiah 22:6 ; Jeremiah 25:25 ; Jeremiah 49:34-39 ; Ezekiel 32:24 ; Daniel 8:2
Horn - ); also, (b) in a concrete sense, to represent kings and empires (Daniel 7:24; Daniel 8:20 f
Abigail - The issue of the marriage was, as some critics suppose, two sons, Chileab and Daniel, 2 Samuel 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 3:1 ; but it is most probable that these names were borne by one person
Shinar - A term employed in the OT for the greater part, if not the whole, of Babylonia ( Genesis 10:19 ; Genesis 11:2 ; Genesis 14:1 ; Genesis 14:9 , Joshua 7:21 , Isaiah 11:11 , Zechariah 5:11 , Daniel 1:2 )
Leaf - There are numerous allusions to leaves, their flourishing, their decay, and their restoration (Leviticus 26:36 ; Isaiah 34:4 ; Jeremiah 8:13 ; Daniel 4:12,14,21 ; Mark 11:13 ; 13:28 )
Sea, the - In Daniel 7:3 , Revelation 13:1 it may mean the tumultuous changes among the nations of the earth
Dominion - Daniel 4
Finish - ...
Daniel 9
Kneel - Kneeling was the posture of prayer (Daniel 6:10 ; Acts 7:60 ; Acts 9:40 ; Acts 20:36 ; Ephesians 3:14 ; compare 1 Kings 18:42 ), acknowledging a superior (2 Kings 1:13 ; Matthew 17:14 ; Matthew 27:29 ; Mark 1:40 ; Mark 10:17 ; Luke 5:8 ), or worship of God (1 Kings 8:54 ), Jesus (Philippians 2:10 ), or idols (1 Kings 19:18 ; Isaiah 66:3 where blessing an idol refers to kneeling before an idol)
Chains - An ornament worn around the neck either signifying investiture in office with political award (Genesis 41:42 ; Daniel 5:7 ) or for personal jewelry (Numbers 31:50 )
Abednego - Nebo or Mercury, the interpreter of the gods) for Azariah, one of Daniel's three companions, miraculously delivered from the furnace into which they were cast for not worshipping Nebuchadnezzar's golden image (Daniel 3)
Furnace - Daniel 3
Time - Daniel 12:7 (a) This is taken to mean one year
Abigail - By her David had a son called Chileab (2Samuel 3:3), elsewhere called Daniel (1Chronicles 3:1)
Habakkuk - (See Hebrews 10:38) Some have endeavoured to soften the story, by supposing the dinner Habakkuk is said to have carried Daniel was his writings, particularly that passage in them where it is said, "The just shall live by his faith
Abigail - By Abigail David had a son named Chileab 2 Samuel 3:3 ; but called Daniel in 1 Chronicles 3:1
Goat - This animal is sometimes introduced in Scripture symbolically, as in Daniel 8:5; Daniel 8:21; comp
Abednego - the Chaldee name given by the king of Babylon's officer to Azariah, one of Daniel's companions, Daniel 1:7 . A great temporary effect was produced by this and other miracles related in the book of Daniel; but the people relapsed again into idolatry, and justly brought upon themselves all those wasting judgments which in succession swept over the mightiest and most ancient states
Fasting - 3 ) The Partial Fast—in Daniel 10:3 the emphasis is upon the restriction of diet rather than complete abstinence. However, this verse indicates that there was a revelation given to Daniel as a result of this time of fasting
Book of Life - ...
The Old Testament refers to a record kept by God of those who are a part of His people (Exodus 32:32 ; Isaiah 4:3 ; Daniel 12:1 ; Malachi 3:16 ). Those whose names are written in the book are destined for life in a restored Jerusalem (Isaiah 4:3 ) and deliverance through future judgment (Daniel 12:1 )
Shu'Shan, - In the time of Daniel Susa was in the possession of the Babylonians, to whom Elam had probably passed at the division of the Assyrian empire made by Cyaxares and Nabopolassar. ( Daniel 8:2 ) The conquest of Babylon by Cyrus transferred Susa to the Persian dominion; and it was not long before the Achaemenian princes determined to make it the capital of their whole empire and the chief place of their own residence
Vision - The vision of prophets such as Isaiah, Amos, Hosea, Micah, Ezekiel, Daniel, and John are representative of this aspect of revelation. ...
Vision in varying forms occurs approximately thirty times in the Book of Daniel
Goat - Sair , the goat of the sin-offering (Leviticus 9:3), "the rough hairy goat" (Daniel 8:21). So Daniel 8:5
Flood - ...
Daniel 9:26 (a) By this we understand the power of the army of the Romans who destroyed Jerusalem. ...
Daniel 11:22 (b) This type describes the power of the antichrist as he seeks to destroy all that belongs to CHRIST JESUS, and to establish Satanic rule
Iron - ברזל ; occurs first in Genesis 4:22 , and afterward frequently; and the Chaldee פרזל , in Daniel 2:33 ; Daniel 2:41 , and elsewhere often in that book; σιδηρος , Revelation 18:12 , and the adjectives, Acts 12:10 ; Revelation 2:27 ; Revelation 9:9 ; Revelation 12:5 ; Revelation 19:15 ; a well known and very serviceable metal
Goat - (2) tsâphîr (root ‘to leap’), ‘he-goat,’ 2 Chronicles 29:21 , Ezra 8:35 , Daniel 8:5 ; Daniel 8:8 . Daniel 8:21 ‘rough goat’; se‘îrah , Leviticus 5:6 ‘she-goat’; se‘îrîm , tr
Soothsaying - In Daniel 2:27; Daniel 4:7(4), Daniel 5:7; Daniel 5:11 ‘soothsayers’ is the translation of participles of the verb גְּוַר, ‘to cut,’ ‘to decree,’ ‘to decide,’ the Septuagint employing participles of a verb which is evidently a mere transliteration of the Hebrew
Zacharias - (Luke 1:68-80; Isaiah 12:1-3; Zechariah 12:10,) "The horn of salvation in the house of David" contrasts beautifully with "the little horn" or antichrist destroying Israel before Messiah shall appear for Israel's help (Daniel 7:8; Daniel 8:9-14; Daniel 8:11; Daniel 12:1-3)
Kingdom of Christ of Heaven - ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 4:17; Matthew 3:1-17, Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 21:13; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 8:1-34, the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. The prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Psalms 2:1-12; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it. 2 Timothy 4:1; Daniel 7:13; Matthew 13:43; Luke 22:29
Kingdom of God - ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 4:17; Matthew 3:1-17, Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 21:13; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 8:1-34, the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. The prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Psalms 2:1-12; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it. 2 Timothy 4:1; Daniel 7:13; Matthew 13:43; Luke 22:29
Kingdom of Heaven - ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 4:17; Matthew 3:1-17, Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 21:13; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 8:1-34, the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. The prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Psalms 2:1-12; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it. 2 Timothy 4:1; Daniel 7:13; Matthew 13:43; Luke 22:29
Branch - A symbol of kings descended from royal ancestors (Ezekiel 17:3,10 ; Daniel 11:7 ); of prosperity (Job 8:16 ); of the Messiah, a branch out of the root of the stem of Jesse (Isaiah 11:1 ), the "beautiful branch" (4:2), a "righteous branch" (Jeremiah 23:5 ), "the Branch" (Zechariah 3:8 ; 6:12 )
Nativity of Christ - The birth of our Lord took place at the time and place predicted by the prophets (Genesis 49:10 ; Isaiah 7:14 ; Jeremiah 31:15 ; Micah 5:2 ; Haggai 2:6-9 ; Daniel 9:24,25 )
Adore - Falling down and worshipping prostrate was the worship subsequently paid to Babylonian idols (Daniel 3:5-6)
Heaven - The first, however, apparently refers to the atmospheric heavens of the fowl (Hosea 2:18) and clouds (Daniel 7:13)
Eschatology - But some that are more prominently eschatological are Daniel, Ezekiel, Isaiah, Joel, Zechariah, Matthew, Mark, Luke, 2Thessalonians, and of course Revelation
Pinnacle - Tregelles translated Daniel 9:27, "upon the wing (kenaph ) of abominations shall be that which causeth desolation," namely, an idol set up on a wing or pinnacle of the temple by antichrist, who covenants with the restored Jews for the last of the 70 weeks of years (John 5:43) and breaks the covenant in the midst of the week, causing the daily sacrifices to cease
Leopard - namer ) is invariably given by the Authorized Version as the translation of the Hebrew word, which occurs in the seven following passages: ( Song of Solomon 4:8 ; Isaiah 11:6 ; Jeremiah 5:6 ; 13:23 ; Daniel 7:6 ; Hosea 13:7 ); Habb 1:8 Leopard occurs also in Sirach 28:23 and in ( Revelation 13:2 ) From (Song of Solomon 4:8 ) we learn that the hilly ranges of Lebanon were in ancient times frequented by these animals
Interpretation - Revealing the true meaning of supernatural dreams, Genesis 41:1-57 Daniel 2:4 , unknown tongues, etc
Ezra, the Book of - The 70 weeks (490 years) of Daniel 9:24-25 probably date from this seventh year of Artaxerxes, when Ezra received leave to restore the temple and the people and the holy city (457 B. ...
Ezra's placing of Daniel in the canon immediately before his own book and Nehemiah's implies that his commission began the fulfillment of Daniel's prophecy; Christ's 30th year in beginning His ministry would be A. "...
Daniel would necessarily, as just made "third ruler in the kingdom," and having foretold its transfer to "the Medes and Persians" (Daniel 5:28-29), come under Cyrus' notice immediately on the capture of Babylon; moreover, it is stated "he prospered in the reign of Cyrus the Persian" (Daniel 6:28), he would therefore be sure to mention to Cyrus Isaiah's prophecy. ...
The transitions of first to third persons, and vice versa, are found in Daniel, Ezra, and Nehemiah; so Moses of old uses the third person of himself in Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers, but in the recapitulation in Deuteronomy the first. Hervey conjectures Daniel was author of Ezra 1, which would supply the omission of Cyrus' decree in Daniel's own book (Daniel 1:21; Daniel 1:9; Daniel 1:10), where we might naturally have expected to find it. Ezra 1:1 refers to Jeremiah's prophecy, just as Daniel 9:2. The formula "in the first year of Cyrus king of Persia" answers to Daniel 1:1; Daniel 2:1; Daniel 10:1. The narrator (Ezra 1) evidently wrote in Babylon not in Jerusalem; and Ezra might think the portion at the close of 2 Chronicles and beginning of Ezra more suitably placed there than in Daniel. A close connection of Ezra with Daniel is probable, and that Ezra wrote or compiled the former part of his book in Babylon
Son of Man - ...
The Old Testament With the exception of Ezekiel and Daniel, the term Son of man appears in the Old Testament as a synonym for “man,” “humankind” ( Isaiah 56:2 ; Jeremiah 50:40 ; Psalm 8:4 ; Psalm 80:17 ; Psalm 146:3 ; Job 25:6 ). Daniel The most distinctive Old Testament use of “Son of man” is in Daniel 7:13 . Scholars are divided over whether the Son of man of Daniel's vision should be seen as an angel, as the Messiah, or as all of Israel. (The latter conclusion is drawn from the fact that in Daniel 7:27 the “saints of the most High” were granted dominion over an everlasting kingdom. The picture of the Son of man in these passages is strongly reminiscent of Daniel 7:13 (quoted in Matthew 24:30 ; Matthew 26:64 ; Mark 13:26 ; Mark 14:62 ; Luke 21:27 ; Luke 22:69 ). Faithful disciples are to join the Son of man in this judgment (Matthew 19:28 ), which perhaps reflects the dual role of the Son of man and saints of the Most High found in Daniel 7:13 ,Daniel 7:13,7:27
Gog - ...
Antiochus Epiphanes, the Old Testament antichrist, the "little horn" of the third world empire, who defiled Jehovah's temple and altar with swine sacrifices and set up Jupiter's altar there, prefigures the "king of fierce countenance" who, "when the transgressors shall come to the full, shall destroy the holy people" (Daniel 8:10-26); "the king of the N. " (compare Ezekiel 39:2), who "shall do according to his will, and exalt and magnify himself above every god, and speak marvelous things against the God of gods, and shall enter also into the glorious land and plant the tabernacles of his palaces between the seas in the glorious holy mountain, and shall come to his end," through Michael's interposition, after a "time of trouble such as never was since there was a nation" (Daniel 11:21-45; Daniel 12:1; Zechariah 13:9; Zechariah 14:2-3)
Decrees - "...
Terms translated "decree" in Hebrew and/or Aramaic include dat [1] (a loanword from Persian) used in Daniel, Ezra, and Esther for decrees of God and human (especially Persian) monarchs, taam [2] for the orders of high officials including kings, hoq/huqqaa [3] used especially of God's laws, esar [4] (lit. ...
God delivers Daniel and his friends from various human decrees—one by Nebuchadnezzar to kill the sages of Babylon (Daniel 2:13 ), another to cremate anyone not worshiping the image of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 3:10-11 ), a third "immutable" decree to cast to lions anyone praying to a god or person besides Darius the Mede (Daniel 6:7-9 ). God decrees Ahab's doom (1 Kings 22:23 ) and destruction on Israel (Isaiah 10:23 ); "Seventy sevens'" (often understood as "weeks of years") have been decreed for the history of Daniel's people (Daniel 9:24 )
Media - Medes shared as equals with Persians in the military and civil administration of the Persian Empire, and sometimes the names Medes and Persians were used interchangeably (Ezra 6:1-3; Esther 1:3; Esther 1:14; Esther 1:19; Isaiah 13:17; Isaiah 21:2; Jeremiah 51:11; Jeremiah 51:28; Daniel 5:30-31; Daniel 6:8; Daniel 6:28; Daniel 8:20; Daniel 9:1; Daniel 11:1)
Son of Man - God addresses Daniel (Daniel 8:17) once, Ezekiel so about 80 times, to remind him of his human lowliness and frailty, as "man lower than the angels," though privileged to enjoy visions of the cherubim and of God Himself, "lest he should be exalted through the abundance of the revelations" (2 Corinthians 12:7). "...
The title "the Son of man" implies at once Messiah's lowliness and His exaltation in His manifestations as THE REPRESENTATIVE MAN respectively at His first and second comings; His humiliation on the one hand (Psalms 8:4-8; Matthew 16:13; Matthew 20:18; Revelation 5:9-10) and His exaltation on the other hand, just "because He is the Son of man": Daniel 7:13-14, Hebrew not Βen -ish or -Αdam , son of a hero or of man generically viewed, but Βen enosh , "Son of man," frail and abject, marking the connection of His humiliation and exaltation as man (Philippians 2:5-11; Matthew 26:64; John 5:27). ...
The kingdom shall be "under the whole heaven," on earth (Hebrews 2:6-80; Daniel 7:27); He shall reign with them as the Son of man, Head of the new creation, and Restorer of man's lost inheritance. " Another exception is John so calls Him in apocalyptic vision (Revelation 1:13; Revelation 14:14), corresponding to the Old Testament apocalypse (Daniel 7:13)
Padua, Italy, Diocese of - Padua, the birth place of many celebrated men and women, gave many martyrs to the Church, Saint Giustina and Saint Daniel, and Bishop Maximus
Tigris - " Daniel 10:4, "the great river
Shinar, Plain of - Daniel 1:1-2 and probably Zechariah 5:11 equate Babylon and Shinar, thus limiting Shinar to its major city in the writers' day
Clay - ...
Daniel 2:42 (b) Here the "clay" represents the friability and inconstancy of the nations at the end of the age
Abomination - * Father - Daniel 5
Taxes, Taxation, Taxing - Daniel 11:20 ; see ANTIOCHUS, SELEUCUS IV
Symbols - Ezekiel, Daniel, and the Revelation are especially full of them
Ptolemy vi - References to Philometor are to be found in 1Ma 1:18 ; 1Ma 10:51 ff; 1Ma 11:1-18 ; 1Ma 15:16-23 , Daniel 11:25-30 ; and see Jos
Gold - (Genesis 43:21 ) Gold was extremely abundant in ancient times, (1 Chronicles 22:14 ; 2 Chronicles 1:15 ; 9:9 ; Daniel 3:1 ; Nahum 2:9 ) but this did not depreciate its value, because of the enormous quantities consumed by the wealthy in furniture, etc
Grass - Dethe, the Aramaic equivalent of deshe, depicts the vegetation to be grazed in the field (Daniel 4:15 ,Daniel 4:15,4:23 )
Messiah - ) In KJV only in Daniel 9:25-26 of Old Testament; John 1:41; John 4:25, of New Testament Having the immeasurable unction of the Holy Spirit as Prophet, Priest, and King at one and the same time. ...
His birthplace (Micah 5:2), His lineage (Isaiah 11:1), His time of coming (Daniel 9:25-26), while the second temple stood (Haggai 2:9), and His forerunner (Isaiah 40:3-5; Malachi 3:1) are foretold
Firmament - The firmament is mentioned nine times in Genesis, the Psalms, Ezekiel, and Daniel. It is described as bright, transparent like crystal, revealing the handiwork of God, and signifying His seat of power ( Psalm 19:1 ; Psalm 150:1 ; Ezekiel 1:22 ; Daniel 12:3 )
Week - ...
As Judah's captivity in Babylon was for 70 years, so its time of deliverance by Messiah was to be 70 sevens of years (Daniel 9:24-27). (See Daniel
Messiah - The lineage from which Messiah should descend was foretold, Genesis 49:10; Isaiah 11:1, the place in which he should be born, Micah 5:2, the time of his appearance, Daniel 9:20; Daniel 9:25; Haggai 2:7; Malachi 3:1, etc
Languages of the Bible - The Old Testament was first written in Hebrew, with the exceptions of much of Ezra 4-7 and Daniel 2:4-7:28 , which appear in Aramaic. See Alphabet; Aramaic ; Daniel, Book of ; Ezra, Book of ; Greek; Hebrew
Confession - It is beautiful to see how Ezra, Nehemiah, and Daniel confessed the sins of the people as if they had been their own. Ezra 9:1-15 ; Ezra 10:1 ; Nehemiah 1:6 ; Nehemiah 9:2,3 ; Daniel 9:4-20
Abominable - This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple. Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11
Abomination - This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple. Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11
Kingdom of Heaven - The ancient prophets, when describing the character of the Messiah, Daniel 2:44 7:13,14 Micah 4:1-7 , and even when speaking of his humiliation and sufferings, were wont to intersperse hint of his power, his reign, and his divinity. He introduced his disciples into it while on earth, and more fully after his resurrection and ascension, John 20:22 Acts 2:32-36 ; is "head over all things," in order to make it triumphant and supreme even on earth, Daniel 7:27 Ephesians 1:20-22
Grecians - " Daniel (Daniel 8:5; Daniel 8:21; Daniel 11:3) foretold the rise of Alexander the Great, "the great horn between the eyes of the rough goat" which "came from the W. on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground (overrunning the earth with incredible swiftness, the 'leopard' Daniel 7:6), and smote the ram" (Medo-Persia)
Day - ...
The mention of שעה , hours, occurs first in Daniel 3:6 ; Daniel 3:15 ; Daniel 5:5 . These hours, it would seem, were consecrated by Daniel to prayer, Daniel 6:10 ; Acts 2:15 ; Acts 3:1 ; Acts 10:9
Michael - Who is like God?
The title given to one of the chief angels (Daniel 10:13,21 ; 12:1 )
Dream - Other significant dreams are also recorded, such as those of Abimelech (Genesis 20:3-7 ), Pharaoh's chief butler and baker (40:5), Pharaoh (41:1-8), the Midianites (Judges 7:13 ), Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 2:1 ; 4:10,18 ), the wise men from the east (Matthew 2:12 ), and Pilate's wife (27:19)
Maschil - The "instruction" aimed at is to bring reckless man to spiritual understanding, the true wisdom (Psalms 111:10; Daniel 12:10)
Furnace - The furnace of Daniel 3:1 was probably a large furnace used for smelting ore or for firing bricks
Mauzzim - phrase ’ĕlôah mâ’uzzîm ( Daniel 11:38 ) has been very variously understood
Chittim - " Daniel prophesied (11:30) that the ships of Chittim would come against the king of the north
Jabneel - 5:1, section 22) assigns it to Daniel That tribe and the Philistines were in constant warfare for the towns in the lowland
Year - In the various data given for the last half of the last of Daniel's Seventy Weeks, it will be seen that all the months are reckoned as having thirty days; thus 'a time, times, and a half' in Daniel 12:7 and Revelation 12:14 point out three and a half years: this period is again called forty two months in Revelation 11:2 ; Revelation 13:5 ; and again twelve hundred and sixty days in Revelation 11:3 ; Revelation 12:6
Bear - ...
Daniel 7:5 (b) This animal is used as a type of the Medo-Persian empire which was the second great world kingdom to appear following the fall of Babylon
Shushan - (Daniel 8:2) It is a word also used for Shushan, or Susanna, a lilly
Gift - Daniel 5 ...
5
Enchanter - The noun appears only twice in biblical Hebrew, and only in the Book of Daniel
Ordinance - , Esther 3:9 ; in some texts, Daniel 2:13,15
Septuagint - The inferior version of Daniel was later displaced by the revision of that book by Theodotion
Pavilion - The NAS used pavilion in the literal sense of tent in Daniel 11:45
Magi or Wise Men - See Isaiah 47:13,14 Daniel 2:9,27 , show that as a class they were destitute of true wisdom
Girdle, - A finer girdle was made of linen, (Jeremiah 13:1 ; Ezekiel 16:10 ) embroidered with silk, and sometimes with gold and silver thread, (Daniel 10:5 ; Revelation 1:13 ; 15:6 ) and frequently studded with gold and precious stones or pearls
Horn - Daniel 7:8 ; 8:9 ; Zechariah 1:18 , etc
Color, Symbolic Meaning of - Jeremiah 30:6 ; Daniel 10:8 ). ...
An expensive dye, purple represents wealth and royalty (Judges 8:26 ; Esther 8:15 ; Daniel 5:7,16 , 29 ; Luke 16:19 ); for this reason, idols were attired in purple (Jeremiah 10:9 ). It represents the absolute moral purity of God (Daniel 7:9 ), Christ (Revelation 1:14 ; Mark 9:3 ; pars
Iron (2) - " Iron symbolizes the fourth kingdom in Nebuchadnezzar's vision (Daniel 2), namely, Rome. As it "breaketh in pieces," so, in righteous retribution, itself will be "broken in pieces" at last by the kingdom of the Stone, Messiah the Rock (Daniel 2:40; Daniel 2:44; Revelation 13:10)
Government - He is the source of all authority and he has given to governments, as his representatives on earth, the authority to administer society (Jeremiah 27:5; Daniel 4:17; John 19:11). As a result they may suffer penalties (Daniel 3:8-12; Daniel 6:13; Daniel 6:16; Matthew 10:18; Acts 5:29; Acts 5:40; 1 Peter 4:12-16). Exodus 3:7; Daniel 3:16-18; Luke 6:28; Luke 23:34; 1 Timothy 2:1-2; see PERSECUTION). In due course he will deal with them, in whatever way and with whatever means he chooses (1 Kings 11:29-37; Isaiah 1:23-26; Daniel 5:24-28; Amos 6:4-7; Micah 3:1-4; Revelation 18:1-2; Revelation 18:24)
Angel - ]'>[7] ); ‘the holy ones’ ( qedoshim ), Zechariah 14:5 ; ‘keepers’ ( shômerim ), Isaiah 62:6 ; ‘watchers’ ( ‘irim ), Daniel 4:14 (17). Angelic beings seem to be referred to as ‘watchmen’ in Isaiah 62:6 and Daniel 4:14 (17). In Daniel there is a further development; the angels are termed ‘watchers’ ( Luke 12:8-95 ; Daniel 4:17 ), and ‘princes’ ( Daniel 10:13 ); they have names, e. Michael ( Daniel 10:13 , Ezekiel 12:1 ), Gabriel ( Daniel 8:16 ), and there are special angels (‘princes’) who fight for special nations ( Daniel 10:20-21 ). so in Daniel there are different orders among the angels, but in the latter book the different categories are more fully developed. , and Daniel than the angelology of these to that of the rest of the OT; this will be clearly seen by enumerating briefly the main characteristics of angels as portrayed in the Apocrypha. an angel takes the prophet Habakkuk by the hair and carries him from Judah to Babylonia, in order that he may share his dinner with Daniel in the lion’s den; and, once more, in Three 26, 27 an angel smites the flame of the furnace into which the three heroes had been cast, and makes a cool wind to blow in its place (cf. Daniel 3:23 ff
Antiochus - " (Daniel 11:6. Hence, and because of his craftily supplanting Demetrius, the rightful heir, he is called in Daniel 11: "a vile person. This was the gravest peril that ever betel the theocratic nation; hence arose the need of a prediction so detailed as Daniel 8; 11. ...
But as Messianic events are foretold in Daniel, Jesus' adversaries, the Jews, would never have forged the prophecies which confirm His claims. Daniel 9 would comfort the faithful Jews amidst the "abominations" against "the covenant," with the prospect of Messiah, who would confirm it. Language is used (Daniel 11:31-45) which only in type applies to Antiochus, but exhaustively to Antichrist. " Seven brothers and their mother submitted to a torturing death rather than deny their faith, the third saying, "Thou takest us out of this present life, but the King of the world shall raise us up who have died for His laws unto everlasting life" (compare Daniel 12:2). The prominence given to Antiochus in Daniel is because it was the turning point in Jewish history, deciding whether Greek worldly refinements were to stifle Israel's true faith. Disregarding his hereditary gods himself (Daniel 11:37-39), and only recognizing the Roman war god or "god of forces," he regarded "fortresses" as the true temples (the Hebrew for "forces" may be translated "fortresses"), and was incapable of appreciating the power which true religion can call forth. Thus he is the vivid type of the last Antichrist, whose terrible, though short, persecutions shall drive Israel to their Savior, and so usher in their coming glory (Zechariah 11; 12; 13; 14; Daniel 12; Ezekiel 37; 38; 39)
Ahasuerus - The father of Dares the Mede, Daniel 9:1
Hour - First found in Daniel 3:6 ; 4:19,33;5:5
Fable - Daniel B
Sleep - One day all people will rise from death to meet the great judge of the universe and receive either his blessing or his punishment (Daniel 12:2; John 5:28-29)
Sele-u'Cus iv - (Daniel 11:20 ) His son Demetrius I
Chain - A chain of gold was placed about Joseph's neck (Genesis 41:42 ); and one was promised to (Daniel 5:7 )
Beast - Daniel 7:3 (a) These beasts represent four great kingdoms, all of them cruel, evil and Satanic in their power and influence
Artaxerxes - It was in the 20th year of this king that the command to build the city was given, from which began the dates of the prophecy of the Seventy weeks of Daniel, which is fixed by Usher and Hengstenburg at B
Complete - To fulfil to accomplish to perform as, the prophecy of Daniel is completed
Apocrypha - The entire list of books of the apocrypha are: 1 Esdras 2Esdras, Tobit, Judith, the Rest of Esther, the Wisdom of Solomon, Sirach, (also titled Ecclesiasticus), Baruch, The Letter of Jeremiah, Song of the Three Young Men, Susanna, Bel and the Dragon, The Additions to Daniel, The Prayer of Manasseh, and 1,2Maccabees
Grecians - "Prophetical notice of Greece occurs in Daniel 8:21, etc
Greeks - "Prophetical notice of Greece occurs in Daniel 8:21, etc
Leopard - The Grecian kingdom was compared to a leopard with four wings, Daniel 7:6 ; and it answered to this in the rapidity of its conquests
Treasure - So they say, a treasure of corn, of wine, of oil, of honey, Jeremiah 41:8 ; treasures of gold, silver, brass, Ezekiel 28:4 ; Daniel 11:43
Archangel - 1: ἀρχάγγελος (Strong's #743 — Noun Masculine — archangelos — ar-khang'-el-os ) "is not found in the OT, and in the NT only in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and Jude 1:9 , where it is used of Michael, who in Daniel is called 'one of the chief princes,' and 'the great prince' (Sept
Lion - The language not improbably recalls that of Psalm 22:21 ; Daniel 6:20
Revelation Book of - It is for the New Testament what Daniel is for the Old Testament
Libya - Libya received its name from the Lehabim of Lubim, Genesis 10:13 ; a warlike people, who assisted Shishak king of Egypt, and Zerah the Ethiopian, in their wars against Judea, 2 Chronicles 12:3 14:9 16:8 Daniel 11:43
Obey - Daniel 7
Horn - The Lord exalted the horn of David, and of his people; he breaketh the horn of salvation, and of defiling the horn in the dust, Deuteronomy 33:17 1 Samuel 2:1,10 Job 16:15 Psalm 75:10 Daniel 7:20-24 Luke 1:69
Brass - It is also a symbol of strength, Psalm 107:16 Daniel 2:39 Zechariah 6:1
ez'ra, Book of, - Much of the book was written by Ezra himself, though the first chapter was probably written by Daniel; and other hands are evident
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - IF James Durham had lived in Kirriemuir in Disruption days he would to a certainty have said that very much what Daniel Cormick was in the presbytery of Forfar, that the angel of Philadelphia was among the seven churches in Asia. No minister all round about had less strength of some kinds than Daniel Cormick: but, then, like the angel of Philadelphia, by universal consent, he was by far the holiest man of them all and by far the most successful minister of them all. Cormick used to say in his humility that had it not been for the liberality of Lady Fowlis he would never have got to College at all, and that had it not been for the leniency of some of his professors he would never have got the length of being a minister, Be that as it may, it will be to the everlasting salvation of many that Daniel Cormick was ever sent to College, was carried through his studies, and was ordained a minister. And it was such things as these in Daniel Cormick that far more than made up for the fewness of the talents his Sovereign Master had seen good to commit to the stewardship of His servant. There never was a kirk-session in Kirriemuir or anywhere else like Daniel Cormick's kirk-session, and the pillars of it were almost all and almost wholly of their minister's own quarrying and hewing and polishing and setting up. When David White of Airlie became awakened to see what he was, and what a minister ought to be, he sought out Daniel Cormick for his counsellor. As Walter Marshall sought out Thomas Goodwin, and as Thomas Scott sought out John Newton, so did David White sit at Daniel Cormick's feet. I am taking up too much time with Daniel Cormick, deserving of it all as he is. It was James Durham, in the way he speaks about "the little strength" of the angel of Philadelphia, that led me back to speak of Daniel Cormick with all this love and reverence and thankfulness. Now Daniel Cormick had not that temptation, for he possessed none of its literature, and even had he lived in our so-learned day and possessed all the learned apparatus of our day, he would not have given way to our temptations in his pulpit. "You, brethren," said Andrew Bonar in Daniel Cormick's funeral sermon, "are witnesses that in all his ministry your pastor ceased not to preach in public, and from house to house, repentance towards God, and faith towards our Lord Jesus Christ. Now, there was one special kind of prayer that Daniel Cormick was greatly noted for among those who were intimate with him. The difference with Daniel Cormick was that he would get, now Robert M'Cheyne, and now Andrew Bonar, and now John Baxter, to pray both with him and for him after his preaching. If it took a man like Daniel Cormick all his might to keep his crown from being all stolen from him, what chance, think you, have the most of us ministers?...
...
But look up! Who is that glorified saint shining as the brightness of the firmament, and as the stars for ever and ever? That is the angel of the Church that once was in Philadelphia
Horn - ...
Old Testament The basic meaning of horns relate to animal horns (Genesis 22:13 ; Deuteronomy 33:17 ; Daniel 8:5 ). There is an apocalyptic use of the word in Daniel 7:7
Dung - The removal to separate receptacles, and exposure of human and other ordure, gives the force to the threats, Daniel 2:5; Daniel 3:29; Ezra 6:11; 2 Kings 10:27; "a draught house," 2 Kings 9:37; 1 Kings 14:10; Jeremiah 8:2
Salutation - ...
"Live for ever" was the salutation to the Babylonian and Persian kings (Daniel 2:4; Daniel 6:6)
Macedonia - ...
This power was foretold by Daniel, Daniel 8:3-8 , under the symbol of a goat with one horn; and it is worthy of note that ancient Macedonian coins still exist, bearing that national symbol
Jehoiakim - It was at this time that Daniel also and his three companions were taken captive to Babylon (Daniel 1:1,2 )
Sheshbazzar - 2 Kings 23:34 ; 2 Kings 24:17 , Daniel 1:7 ). Then the possibility of the one person bearing two names, while not impossible, seems unlikely here, because (1) both names are of foreign origin, unlike the double names Daniel and Belteshazzar , where the one is Hebrew and the other foreign; and (2) as a rule the Chronicler is careful to note the identification e. ‘Daniel whose name was Belteshazzar
Elam - The region is also named Susiana or Susis from its capital Susa, called Shushah in Daniel 8:2, where Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:1) waited on king Artaxerxes, and where Ahasuerus (Xerxes) held his court in Esther's (Esther 1:2; Esther 2:5) time. Daniel mentions the river Ulai near, i. It was a province of Babylonia from Nebuchadnezzar's time (Daniel 8:2)
Shushan - Here also Daniel had the vision of the ram with two horns, and the goat with one horn, &c, in the third year of Belshazzar's reign. Large blocks of marble, covered with hieroglyphics, are not unfrequently here discovered by the Arabs when digging in search of hidden treasure; and at the foot of the most elevated of the pyramids stands the tomb of Daniel, a small and apparently a modern building, erected on the spot where the relics of that prophet are believed to rest. Monteith and myself to take shelter for the night within the walls that encompass Daniel's tomb. " He also observes, respecting the authenticity of this tomb, that "although the building at the tomb of Daniel be comparatively modern, nothing could have led to its being built where it is, but a belief that this was the real site of the prophet's sepulchre
Peace - Except in Daniel 8:25 ; Daniel 11:21 ; Daniel 11:24 (where RV Medes, me'Dia - " ( Daniel 5:28 ; 6:8,12,15 ) The references to the Medes in the canonical Scriptures are not very numerous, but they are striking. (Jeremiah 25:25 ) Daniel relates the fact of the Medo-Persia conquest, (Daniel 5:25,31 ) giving an account of the reign of Darius the Mede, who appears to have been made viceroy by Cyrus. (Daniel 6:1-58 ) In Ezra we have a mention of Achmetha (Ecbatana), "the palace in the province of the Medes," where the decree of Cyrus was found, ( Ezra 6:2-5 ) --a notice which accords with the known facts that the Median capital was the seat of government under Cyrus, but a royal residence only, and not the seat of government, under Darius Hystaspis
Apocrypha - ...
The Song of the Three Young Men is one of three additions to the book of Daniel. It follows Daniel 3:23 in the Greek text. This writing, along with the other two additions to Daniel, probably comes from near 100 B. ...
Susanna...
The story of Susanna is added at the close of the Book of Daniel in the Septuagint. Daniel then stated that the judges were lying, and he would prove it. ...
Bel and the Dragon...
The third addition to Daniel is Bel and the Dragon, placed before Susanna in the Septuagint. King Cyrus asked Daniel why he did not worship Bel, and Daniel replied that Bel was only a man-made image. Daniel had ashes sprinkled on the floor of the temple and food placed on Bel's altar before sealing the temple door. Daniel killed the dragon by feeding it cakes of pitch, fat, and hair. The people were outraged, and Daniel was thrown into the lions' den for seven days. Daniel in the Old Testament and Revelation in the New Testament represent this type of writing
Medical Science - The science comprising: ...
anatomy, which treats of organic structure
bacteriology, the science of bacteria
cytology, the spience of cell organisms
embryology, which treats of the early development of organisms
hygiene, which treats of health improvement and preservation
physiology, which deals with the functions and processes of living organisms
surgery
The following names are distinguished in the various branches of the science: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Bedford, Gunning Samuel
Bernard, Claude
Caldani, Leopoldo Marco Antonio
Carnoy, Jean Baptiste
Dwight, Thomas
Eustachius, Bartolomeo
Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Hieronymus
Fallopio, Gabriello
Laennec, Rene Theophile Hyacinthe
Larrey, Baron Dominique Jean
Malpighi, Marcello
Morgagni, Giovanni Battista
Müller, Johannes Peter
Nelaton, Auguste
Noble, Daniel
O'Dwyer, Joseph
Paracelsus, Theophrastus
Renaudot, Theophraste
Schwann, Theodor
Semmelweiss, Ignaz Philipp
Skoda, Josef
Spallanzani, Lazzaro
Steno, Nicolaus
Vesalius, Andreas
OTHER CHRISTIANS ...
Baglivi, Giorgio
Bell, Charles
Boerhaave, Hermann
Cooper, Astley Paston
Flourens, Marie Jean Pierre
Hahnemann, Christian Friedrich Samuel
Hall, Marshall
Haller, Albrecht von
Harvey, William
Hufeland, Christoph Wilhelm
Hyrtl, Josef
Koch, Heinrich Hermann Robert
Lister, Joseph
Paget, James
Simpson, James Young
Vierordt, Karl von
Volkmann, Alfred Wilhelm
Wagner, Rudolph
Tigris - ]'>[1] of Genesis 2:14 and Daniel 10:4 , where both AV Leopard - Hence the symbol for Greece and Alexander's rapid victories (Daniel 7:6; Revelation 13:2)
Stone - In Daniel 2:45 it refers also to the Messiah
Rib - ...
Daniel 7:5 (b) Here is indicated the ferocity and devastating effect of this Medio-Persian kingdom in destroying the Babylonian kingdom and retaining some of the fragments of its characteristics
Judaea - A name applied to that part of Canaan occupied by those who returned after the Assyrian and Babylonian captivities, The word first occurs, Daniel 6:13 (A
Chaldees - They were so called till the time of the Captivity (2 Kings 25 ; Isaiah 13:19 ; 23:13 ), when, particularly in the Book of (Daniel 5:30 ; 9:1 ), the name began to be used with special reference to a class of learned men ranked with the magicians and astronomers
Sardine - As the jasper (or else diamond) represents the divine brightness or holiness, so the red sardine (our cornelian) His fiery wrath; the same union as in Ezekiel 1:4; Ezekiel 8:2; Daniel 7:9
Certain - Daniel 2
Science, Medical - The science comprising: ...
anatomy, which treats of organic structure
bacteriology, the science of bacteria
cytology, the spience of cell organisms
embryology, which treats of the early development of organisms
hygiene, which treats of health improvement and preservation
physiology, which deals with the functions and processes of living organisms
surgery
The following names are distinguished in the various branches of the science: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Bedford, Gunning Samuel
Bernard, Claude
Caldani, Leopoldo Marco Antonio
Carnoy, Jean Baptiste
Dwight, Thomas
Eustachius, Bartolomeo
Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Hieronymus
Fallopio, Gabriello
Laennec, Rene Theophile Hyacinthe
Larrey, Baron Dominique Jean
Malpighi, Marcello
Morgagni, Giovanni Battista
Müller, Johannes Peter
Nelaton, Auguste
Noble, Daniel
O'Dwyer, Joseph
Paracelsus, Theophrastus
Renaudot, Theophraste
Schwann, Theodor
Semmelweiss, Ignaz Philipp
Skoda, Josef
Spallanzani, Lazzaro
Steno, Nicolaus
Vesalius, Andreas
OTHER CHRISTIANS ...
Baglivi, Giorgio
Bell, Charles
Boerhaave, Hermann
Cooper, Astley Paston
Flourens, Marie Jean Pierre
Hahnemann, Christian Friedrich Samuel
Hall, Marshall
Haller, Albrecht von
Harvey, William
Hufeland, Christoph Wilhelm
Hyrtl, Josef
Koch, Heinrich Hermann Robert
Lister, Joseph
Paget, James
Simpson, James Young
Vierordt, Karl von
Volkmann, Alfred Wilhelm
Wagner, Rudolph
Judaea, Judea - This name occurs in Ezra 5:8 for the territory of Judah; in Daniel 5:13 the same is called JEWRY
Paphnutius, Surnamed Bubalus - 1) regarding his promotion of abbat Daniel to the diaconate and priesthood have been held to prove that a presbyter had the power of ordaining, but Bingham ( Ant
Theodotion, Otherwise Theodotus - Thus in these books we have fuller materials for learning the character of his version than that of either of the others; and still more in his version of Daniel, which has come down to us entire, having since before Jerome's time (how long before we are not told) superseded that of the LXX so completely that the latter was lost for centuries, and is now extant only in a single Greek copy, the Cod. Indeed, the greater part of this Chisian Daniel cannot be said to deserve the name of a translation at all. 646) that Origen himself ("in nono Stromatum volumine") abandoned this supposed LXX Daniel for Theodotion's. Indeed, all the citations of Daniel, some of them long and important passages in Origen's extant works, agree almost verbatim with the text of Theodotion now current, and differ, sometimes materially, from that of the reputed LXX as derived from the Chisian MS. Of the apocryphal books, he is only known to have included Baruch and the additions to Daniel
Antichrist - But it was characteristic of the forward look of Prophetism and Messianism that the idea of a conflict between God and the dragon was transferred from cosmogony to eschatology and represented as a culminating episode of the last days (Isaiah 27:1, Daniel 7). Ezekiel’s prophecy of the overthrow of Gog and Magog (Ezekiel 38); Zechariah’s vision of the destruction of the destroyers of Jerusalem (Zechariah 14); above all, the representation in Daniel, with reference to Antiochus Epiphanes, of a world-power that waxed great even to the host of heaven (Daniel 8:10), and trod the sanctuary under foot (Daniel 8:13), and stood up against the Prince of princes until it was finally ‘broken without hand’ (Daniel 8:25)-all contributed to the idea of a great coming conflict with the powers of a godless world before the Divine Kingdom could be set up. 38, 39) would lend themselves to this, and so would the picture in Daniel of the little horn magnifying itself even against the prince of the host (Daniel 8:11). But the distinctive character of this Pauline view of the Antichrist is that, while features in the picture are evidently taken from the description of Antiochus Epiphanes in Daniel (cf. 2 Thessalonians 2:4 with Daniel 7:25; Daniel 11:36), the Antichrist is conceived of, not after the fashion of the later Judaism as a heathen potentate and oppressor, but as a false Messiah from within the circle of Judaism itself, who is to work by means of false signs and lying wonders, and so to turn men’s hearts away from that love of the truth which brings salvation (Daniel 11:9). ), and its form is an adaptation to Christianity of the ideas and imagery of those Jewish Apocalypses, from Daniel onwards, which were chiefly responsible for the growth of the Christian Antichrist conception. 17 are described in language which recalls the apocalyptic imagery of Daniel (see esp. In Daniel that power was the kingdom of the Seleucidae under Antiochus Epiphanes; here it is very plainly indicated as the Roman Empire (Revelation 17:3; Revelation 17:9; Revelation 17:18) with the Emperor at its head (Revelation 13:6-8)
Abomination - ...
(Daniel 11:31 ), in that section of his prophecies which is generally interpreted as referring to the fearful calamities that were to fall on the Jews in the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, says, "And they shall place the abomination that maketh desolate. The same language is employed in Daniel 9:27 (Compare Matthew 24:15 ), where the reference is probably to the image-crowned standards which the Romans set up at the east gate of the temple (A
Christ, the Christ, - " We find the title 'Messiah' in Daniel 9:25,26 in the prophecy of the Seventy Weeks. ...
In Daniel we read that Messiah the Prince would be cut off and have nothing (margin), which was fulfilled when, instead of being hailed as Messiah by the Jews, He was rejected, cut off, and had, at the time, nothing of His Messianic honours, though, in His death, He laid the foundation of His future glory on earth, as well as effecting eternal redemption for the saved
Daniel, Book of - The prophecies contained in the latter part of the book extend from the days of Daniel to the general resurrection. Sir Isaac Newton regards Daniel as the most distinct and plain of all the prophets, and most easy to be understood; and therefore considers that in things relating to the last times, he is to be regarded as the key to the other prophets
Saints - In the LXX Septuagint (Daniel 7:22; Daniel 7:25; Daniel 7:27; Daniel 8:24) ἅγιοι is the equivalent of קְּרשׁים ‘the holy ones’ (i
Lion - More remotely the story of Daniel suggests this mighty achievement, yet here God and not Daniel is said to have shut the lions’ mouths (Daniel 6:22). Daniel 7:4 ff
Wine - The vine being natural to the soil of Canaan and its vicinity, wine was much used as a beverage, especially at festivals, Esther 1:7 5:6 Daniel 5:1-4 John 2:3 . Son and shame are connected with the first mention of wine in the Bible, and with many subsequent cases, Genesis 9:20 19:31-36 1 Samuel 25:36-37 2 Samuel 13:28 1 Kings 20:12-21 Esther 1:10-11 Daniel 5:23 Revelation 17:2 . Daniel and the Rechabites saw good reason for total abstinence from wine, Jeremiah 35:14 Daniel 1:8 ; and the sentiment of Paul, on a mater involving the same principles, is divinely commended to universal adoption, Romans 14:21 1 Corinthians 8:13
Polychronius, Bishop of Apamea - (8) A commentary on Daniel, quoted in 9th cent. " So Mai, who points out the fulness of historical illustration in his commentary on Daniel. His comments are based (the book of Daniel excepted) on the LXX. Daniel and the Greek additions, refusing to comment upon the Song of the Three Children as not being in the original
Chronicles, the Books of - Iddo's "book concerning genealogies and the prophet Shemaiah's words," for Rehoboam's acts (2 Chronicles 12:15); "the book of the kings of Israel and Judah" (2 Chronicles 25:26; 2 Chronicles 27:7; 2 Chronicles 32:32; 2 Chronicles 33:18), "the sayings of the seers" (2 Chronicles 33:19, choza ), for many subsequent reigns; "the words of Jehu the son of Hanani" (2 Chronicles 20:34), for Jehoshaphat's reign; "the vision of the prophet Isaiah" (Daniel 9:5-83; 2 Chronicles 32:32), for Uzziah's and Hezekiah's reigns. Hervey conjectures that Daniel at Babylon, under Nebuchadnezzar, and afterward under the Persian kings, vividly remembering Jeremiah's prophecies and bewailing the nation's perversity, wrote the close of Chronicles and Ezra 1, just as Jeremiah wrote the close of Kings. Compare with these passages Daniel 5:2; Daniel 5:23; Daniel 9:2; 1618102512_59; Daniel 1:3; Daniel 1:7; Daniel 1:11. ...
The close of 2 Chronicles and Ezra 1 supplies the gap between Daniel 9 and Daniel 10
Belshazzar - His solemnly instructive history is graphically told in Daniel 5. His promise that whosoever should read the writing should be "third ruler in the kingdom" is probably an undesigned coincidence with the historic truth now known that Nabonedus was the chief king, Belshazzar secondary, and so the ruler advanced to the next place would be THIRD (Daniel 5:7). ...
Daniel having been summoned at the suggestion of Nitocris, the queen mother, probably wife of Evil Merodach, Nebuchadnezzar's son, faithfully reproved him for that though knowing how God had humbled his forefather Nebuchadnezzar for God-despising, self-magnifying pride, he yet "lifted himself against the Lord of heaven"; therefore ΜΕΝΕ , God has numbered thy years of reign and the number is complete, compare Psalms 90:12
Musical Instruments of the Hebrews - ...
The flute , alluded to in ( Daniel 3:6 ) probably a kind of double flageolet. ...
The dulcimer , ( Daniel 3:5 ) a kind of bagpipe with two shrill reeds. It more resembles the ancient psaltery than the dulcimer of ( Daniel 3:5 ) --ED
Persia - Although Daniel was taken into Exile by the Babylonians (Daniel 1:1 ), his ministry continued through the fall of the Babylonians (Daniel 5:1 ) into the time of the Persians (Daniel 6:1 ). Daniel 6:1 shows a stable government but one in which Jews could still be at risk
Chaldaea - This is "the learning and the tongue of the Chaldaeans" (Daniel 1:4), in which the four Jewish youths were instructed, and which is quite distinct from the Aramaean, or Chaldee so-called (allied to Hebrew), of those parts of the book of Daniel which are not Hebrew, as not being so connected with the Jews as with the Babylonians. All who studied it were called "Chaldaeans," whatever might be their nation; so Daniel is called "master of the Chaldaeans" (Daniel 5:11). The Chaldee of parts of the Bible (Daniel 2:4-7:28; Ezra 4:8-6:18; Ezra 7:12-26; Jeremiah 10:11) more closely approaches the Hebrew idiom than the Chaldee of the Targum of Onkelos
Magi - But in the LXX Septuagint Daniel the word is used to render the Heb. ‘ashshâphim Authorized Version ‘astrologers,’ of Babylonia (Daniel 1:20; Daniel 2:2; Daniel 2:10; Daniel 2:27; Daniel 4:7; Daniel 5:7; Daniel 5:11; Daniel 5:15. The latter term, however, is properly used in Daniel (Daniel 1:4; Daniel 2:2; Daniel 2:4-5; Daniel 2:10; Daniel 4:7; Daniel 5:7; Daniel 5:11) and by classical authorities (Herod. 29–31) to represent a class, or the class, of Babylonian priests or learned men (Driver, Daniel, pp. in Daniel 2, cf
Furnace - attun, a large furnace with a wide open mouth, at the top of which materials were cast in (Daniel 3:22,23 ; Compare Jeremiah 29:22 )
Michael, Saint - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12)
Michael the Archangel - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12)
Dedicate, Dedication - The things that were set apart included the altar in the tabernacle (Numbers 7:10-88 ), images of pagan deities (Daniel 3:2-3 ), silver and gold (2 Samuel 8:11 ), Temple (1 Kings 8:63 ; Ezra 6:16-18 ), walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:27 ), and private dwellings (Deuteronomy 20:5 )
Franz Liszt - Brilliant concert tours in Switzerland and England were followed by a period of unfortunate associations with Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Heine, and George Sand at Paris, when he became intimate, 1834-1844, with the Countess d'Agoult (Daniel Stern)
Liszt, Ferencz - Brilliant concert tours in Switzerland and England were followed by a period of unfortunate associations with Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Heine, and George Sand at Paris, when he became intimate, 1834-1844, with the Countess d'Agoult (Daniel Stern)
Liszt, Franz - Brilliant concert tours in Switzerland and England were followed by a period of unfortunate associations with Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Heine, and George Sand at Paris, when he became intimate, 1834-1844, with the Countess d'Agoult (Daniel Stern)
Ezekiel - 595-573, during part of which he was contemporary with (Daniel 14:14 ; 28:3 ) and Jeremiah, and probably also with Obadiah
Rabbi - The Rab of an house, or family, means the head of it; hence Daniel speaking of Ashpenaz, the master of the eunuchs, calls him Rab Sarism
Wind - Jeremiah 49:36 ; Daniel 7:2 ); the contexts indicate that these are connected with the execution of Divine judgments
Ahasuerus - Father of Darius, incidentally named in Daniel 9:1
Signet - A seal used to attest documents (Daniel 6:8-10,12 )
Engraver - lie is the "stone cut out of the mountain without hands" (Daniel 2:45)
Ahasuerus -
The father of Darius the Mede, mentioned in Daniel 9:1
Magistrate - The term for magistrate at Daniel 3:2-3 is an Old Persian term of uncertain meaning
Archangel, Michael the - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12)
Floor - ...
Daniel 2:35 (a) This is typical of the day of GOD's judgment when the saved and the unsaved will be separated as the farmer separates the wheat and the chaff on the threshing floor
Belly - ...
Daniel 2:32 (a) The word is used here to represent the third great world kingdom mentioned in Daniel's image, Alexander the Great and his Grecian empire
Thigh - ...
Daniel 2:32 (b) Probably this represents the chronology of the kingdoms
Compare, Comparison - Genesis 40:8,16,22 ; 41:12,15 ; Daniel 5:12 ); (b) "to place together;" hence, "judge or discriminate by comparison, compare, with or among," 2 Corinthians 10:12 (thrice)
Leopard - It is swift, craft, and cruel; dangerous to all domestic cattle, and even to man, Jeremiah 5:6 13:23 Daniel 10:6 Hosea 13:7 Habakkuk 1:8
Iron - Daniel 2 4
Beard - It was cherished with great care, Psalm 133:2 Daniel 10:3
Judae'a, - The word first occurs (Daniel 5:13 ) Authorized Version "Jewry," and the first mention of the "province of Judea" is in the book of Ezra, (Ezra 5:8 ) It is alluded to in (Nehemiah 11:3 ) (Authorized Version "Judah")
Head-Dress - " The word rendered "hats" in (Daniel 3:21 ) properly applies to a cloak
Exile - Nebuchadnezzar, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 25:1 ), invaded Judah, and carried away some royal youths, including Daniel and his companions (B. 606), together with the sacred vessels of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:7 ; Daniel 1:2 )
Palace - In the Authorized Version there are many different words so rendered, presenting different ideas, such as that of citadel or lofty fortress or royal residence (Nehemiah 1:1 ; Daniel 8:2 ). It denotes also a spacious building or a great house (Daniel 1:4 ; 4:4,29 : 1 Kings 7:1-129 ; 7:7 ), and a fortified place or an enclosure (Ezekiel 25:4 )
Azariah - Hebrew name of (See ABEDNEGO (Daniel 1:6-19; Daniel 1:3); of the seed royal of Judah; fulfilling the prophecy to Hezekiah (Isaiah 39:5-7); famed for beauty, wisdom, above all faithfulness unto death, and for his miraculous deliverance from the furnace
ox, Oxen, Herd, Cattle - Arab- thaur ) is used in Ezra 6:8 ; Ezra 6:17 ; Ezra 7:17 and Daniel 4:25 ; Daniel 4:32-33 ; shôr is used collectively and also for a single member of the bovine species of any age and either sex
Mouth - peh [ Joshua 10:18,22 ), a well (Genesis 29:2,8 , 10 ; 2 Samuel 17:19 ), a sack (Genesis 42:27 ), or a lion's den (Daniel 6:17 ). It is used for the necessities of human life, eating and drinking (Psalm 78:30 ; Daniel 10:3 ), or for intimate contact, kissing (Job 31:27 ; 1 Kings 19:18 )
Sleep (And Forms) - The exception to this is Daniel 12:2. ...
Daniel 12:2 (a) Those who have died are referred to in this passage as being asleep and it includes both the godly and the ungodly
Aramaic - Related Old Testament Passages—2 Kings 18:26 ; Ezra 4:8-6:18 ; Ezra 7:12-26 ; Daniel 2:4-7:28 ; Jeremiah 10:11 . ...
Parts of the Old Testament were written in Aramaic: Ezra 4:8-6:18 ; Ezra 7:12-26 ; Daniel 2:4-7:28 ; Jeremiah 10:11
Resurrection of the Dead - In the Old Testament also we find, though less frequently, the doctrine asserted; as for example, Isaiah 26:19 Daniel 12:2 . But they shall be raised, not to be glorified with Christ, but to be judged by him, and sentenced to eternal punishment, Daniel 12:2 John 5:28,29 compared with Matthew 28:20 Acts 24:15
Fasting - Daniel, when he understood that the Jewish captivity drew to an end, 9th and 10th chapters of Nehemiah, Joshua, &c. "If, " says Marshall, "abstinence divert our minds, by reason of a gnawing appetite, then you had better eat sparingly, as Daniel in his greatest fast, " Daniel 10:2-3
Azariah - Friend of Daniel renamed Abednego by Persian officials. God delivered him from the fiery furnace (Daniel 1:7 ; Daniel 4:1-30 )
Anoint - To cease anointing was a mark of mourning (2 Samuel 14:2; Daniel 10:3; Matthew 6:17). Isaiah 61:1; Messiah, twice so designated in the Old Testament (Psalms 2:2; Daniel 9:25-26), at once Prophet, Priest, and King, the Center of all prophecy, the Antitype of all priesthood, and the Source and End of all kingship (Luke 4:18; Acts 4:27; Acts 10:38). , the Assyrian oppression shall be taken away from Judah, because of the consecration that is upon the elect nation, its prophets, priests, kings, and holy place (Psalms 105:15); the Antitype to all which is Messiah, "the Anointed" (Daniel 9:24)
Horn - ...
Daniel 7:7 (b) Here and throughout this book horns are a sign of both men and nations in their power to rule or misrule. ...
Daniel 8:3 (a) These two horns represent the two kings as are mentioned. ...
Daniel 8:8 (b) This figure describes a prominent and well-known ruler
Dream - In the OT dreams are described somewhat in detail, especially those of Jacob (Genesis 28:10-22), of Joseph (Genesis 37:5-10), of Nebuchadrezzar (Daniel 2, 4), and of Daniel (Daniel 7)
Names of God - The following are found in Holy Scripture: ...
Almighty, Genesis 17:1
Benign, II Esdras 9:17
Blessed, Genesis 14:20
Creator, 2Machabees 1:24
Everlasting, Isaiah 40:28
Father, Matthew 6:9
First and Last, Isaiah 44:6
God of Peace, Romans 15:33
God of Vengeance, Psalms 93:1
Great, Psalms 76:14
Helper, Isaiah 50:9
Hidden, Isaiah 45:15
Holy, Apocalypse 4:8
Hope, Romans 15:13
I am who am, Exodus 3:14
Immortal, 1 Timothy 1:17
Invisible, Colossians 1:15
Jealous, Exodus 20:5
Judge, Psalms 7:12
Just, Isaiah 45:21
Life Eternal, 1 John 5:20
Living God, Daniel 6:26
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 5:7
Lord, Psalms 117:27
Merciful, Exodus 34:6
Most High, Luke 1:32
Most Strong, Genesis 46:3
Protector, Psalms 30:3
Redeemer, Psalms 18:15
Salvation, Apocalypse 19:1
Saviour, Psalms 24:5
Spirit, John 4:24
Strength, Apocalypse 7:12
True, Jeremiah 10:10
In his celebrated treatise, The Names of God (New York, 1912), Lessius has many others, not taken from Scripture but principally from the liturgy, with brief explanations
Bible, Books of the - According to the Council of Trent, there are three groups in the Old Testament, embracing 46 books: ...
21 historical books:
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Josue
Judges
Ruth
1,2Kings (1,2Samuel)
3,4Kings (1,2Kings)
1,2Paralipomenon (1,2Chronicles)
Esdras
Nehemiah
Tobias
Judith
Esther
1,2Machabees
7 didactical books:
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Canticle of Canticles (Song of Solomon)
Wisdom and
Ecclesiasticus (Sirach)
18 prophetical books:
Isaias
Jeremias (with Lamentations)
the major prophets
Baruch
Ezechiel
Daniel
the minor prophets
Osee
Joel
Amos
Abdias or Obadiah
Jonas
Micah
Nahum
Habacuc
Sophonias or Zephaniah
Aggeus or Haggai
Zacharias
Malachias
The difference between the Jewish and Catholic counting is due to the fact that the Catholics accept also the so-called deuterocanonical books
Ethiopia - ...
Ethiopia is spoken of in prophecy (Psalm 68:31 ; 87:4 ; Isaiah 45:14 ; Ezekiel 30:4-9 ; Daniel 11:43 ; Nahum 3:8-10 ; Habakkuk 3:7 ; Zephaniah 2:12 )
Copper - The vessels of "fine copper" of Ezra 8:27 were probably similar to those of "bright brass" mentioned in 1 Kings 7:45 ; Daniel 10:6
Eternal Life - This expression occurs in the Old Testament only in Daniel 12:2 (RSV, "everlasting life")
Eshtaol - A town in the shephelah or low country of Judah (Joshua 15:33; Joshua 19:41), allotted to Daniel On the Philistine border between Azotus and Askelon
Day - ) The division of the day by hours is first mentioned in Daniel 3:6,15 ; 4:19 ; 5:5
Azariah - ...
...
The original name of Abed-nego (Daniel 1:6,7,11,16 )
ti'Gris - It appears, indeed, under the name of Hiddekel, among the rivers of Eden, ( Genesis 2:14 ) and is there correctly described as "running eastward to Assyria;" but after this we hear no more of it, if we accept one doubtful allusion in Nahum (Nahum 2:6 ) until the captivity, when it becomes well known to the prophet Daniel
Chaff - So the final doom of the world powers before the coming manifested kingdom of Messiah (Daniel 2:35)
Seal - Daniel 6:17) as well as by placing soldiers to guard it
Togarmah - (Daniel 11:40); Bochart makes Goghasan the original form, among the Colchians, Armenians, and Chaldaeans, for which the Greeks gave Caucasus
Kittim - A use of the word, still more vague, is found in Daniel 11:30 , where it refers to the Romans, while in Numbers 24:24 (as in Malachi 1:1 Malachi 1:1 ; 1Ma 8:5 ) it is applied apparently to the Macedonians
Sore - Large, exceeding (Daniel 6:14 )
God, Names of - The following are found in Holy Scripture: ...
Almighty, Genesis 17:1
Benign, II Esdras 9:17
Blessed, Genesis 14:20
Creator, 2Machabees 1:24
Everlasting, Isaiah 40:28
Father, Matthew 6:9
First and Last, Isaiah 44:6
God of Peace, Romans 15:33
God of Vengeance, Psalms 93:1
Great, Psalms 76:14
Helper, Isaiah 50:9
Hidden, Isaiah 45:15
Holy, Apocalypse 4:8
Hope, Romans 15:13
I am who am, Exodus 3:14
Immortal, 1 Timothy 1:17
Invisible, Colossians 1:15
Jealous, Exodus 20:5
Judge, Psalms 7:12
Just, Isaiah 45:21
Life Eternal, 1 John 5:20
Living God, Daniel 6:26
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 5:7
Lord, Psalms 117:27
Merciful, Exodus 34:6
Most High, Luke 1:32
Most Strong, Genesis 46:3
Protector, Psalms 30:3
Redeemer, Psalms 18:15
Salvation, Apocalypse 19:1
Saviour, Psalms 24:5
Spirit, John 4:24
Strength, Apocalypse 7:12
True, Jeremiah 10:10
In his celebrated treatise, The Names of God (New York, 1912), Lessius has many others, not taken from Scripture but principally from the liturgy, with brief explanations
Magi - " In this sense Daniel was called master of the 'magicians,' but which others translate as 'scribes. By the scattering of the Jews they may have heard of the prophecy of Balaam (Numbers 24:17 ) or of Daniel's prophecy
Toe - ...
Daniel 2:41 (a) These represent the smallest divisions of the kingdom of the Roman empire
Side - ...
Daniel 7:5 (b) The Medio-Persian empire is described as a bear
Seal - The ring or the seal as an emblem of authority in Egypt, Persia, and elsewhere is mentioned in Genesis 41:42; 1 Kings 21:8; Esther 3:10; Esther 3:12; Esther 8:2; Daniel 6:17; and as an evidence of a covenant, in Jeremiah 32:10; Jeremiah 32:44; Nehemiah 9:38; Nehemiah 10:1; Haggai 2:23
Cush - But, more commonly, Cush signifies Ethiopia proper, lying south and southeast of Egypt, and now called Abyssinia, Isaiah 18:1 20:3-5 Jeremiah 13:23 Ezekiel 29:10 Daniel 11:43
Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona - An institute founded at Verona, Italy in 1861 by Saint Daniel Comboni, as a society of secular priests for the African missions
Gifts - Prophets received gifts, or declined them, as duty required, 2 Kings 5:15 8:9 Daniel 2:48 5:17
Seal - Daniel 6:17) as well as by placing soldiers to guard it
Music, Instrumental - ...
The sumponyah, rendered "dulcimer" (Daniel 3:5 ), probably a sort of bagpipe. ...
The maskrokith'a (Daniel 3:5 ), rendered "flute," but its precise nature is unknown
Magic - Sometimes it may have a partly good intent in trying to reverse evil spells and curses (Colossians 1:11-1300; Numbers 24:10; 1 Samuel 6:2; 2 Kings 17:17; 2 Kings 21:6; Daniel 2:2; Revelation 9:21). Magicians were among the chief advisers to kings in many ancient countries (Exodus 7:11; Daniel 2:2)
Star - ...
Daniel 8:10 (b) Alexander the Great was the horn. ...
Daniel 12:3 (a) These are symbols of the honor and glory that will be given to those who are engaged in GOD's service, and who are used of the Lord to turn men to the Lord
Angel - (Daniel 7:10 ; Matthew 26:53 ; Luke 2:13 ; Hebrews 12:22,23 ). They are also spoken of as of different ranks in dignity and power (Zechariah 1:9,11 ; Daniel 10:13 ; 12:1 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ; Jude 1:9 ; Ephesians 1:21 ; Colossians 1:16 ). Such expressions as "like the angels" (Luke 20:36 ), and the fact that whenever angels appeared to man it was always in a human form (Genesis 18:2 ; 19:1,10 ; Luke 24:4 ; Acts 1:10 ), and the titles that are applied to them ("sons of God," Job 1:6 ; 38:7 ; Daniel 3:25 ; Compare 28) and to men (Luke 3:38 ), seem all to indicate some resemblance between them and the human race. In the days of the prophets, from Samuel downward, the angels appear only in their behalf (1 Kings 19:5 ; 2 Kings 6:17 ; Zechariah 1-6 ; Daniel 4:13,23 ; 10:10,13,20,21 )
Alexander - on the face of the whole earth and not touching the ground (implying the incredible swiftness of his conquests); and the goat had A NOTABLE HORN (Alexander) between his eyes, and he came to the ram that had two horns (Media and Persia, the second great world kingdom, the successor of Babylon; under both Daniel prophesied long before the rise of the Macedon-Greek kingdom) standing before the river (at the river Granicus Alexander gained his first victory over Darius Codomanus, 334 B. ) and ran unto him in the fury of his power, moved with choler against him (on account of the Persian invasions of Greece and cruelties to the Greeks), and smote the ram and broke his two horns; and there was no power in the ram to stand before him; but he cast him down to the ground and stamped upon him, and there was none that could deliver the ram out of his hand: therefore the he-goat waxed very great, and when he was strong the great horn was broken, and for it came up four notable ones toward the four winds of heaven" (Daniel 8:5-8). ...
The "he-goat" answers to the "leopard" (Daniel 7:6) whose "wings" similarly marked the winged rapidity of the Greek conquest of Persia. ...
The" leopard" is smaller than the "lion" (Daniel 7:4; Daniel 7:6); swift (Habakkuk 1:8), cruel (Isaiah 11:6), springing suddenly on its prey (Hosea 13:7). Alexander at the sight of the linen arrayed priests, and the high priest in blue and gold with the miter and gold plate on his head bearing Jehovah's name, adored it, and embraced him; and having been shown Daniel's prophecies concerning him, he sacrificed to God in the court of the temple, and granted the Jews liberty to live according to their own laws, and freedom from tribute in the sabbatical years
Girdle - The common girdle was made of leather (2 Kings 1:8 ; Matthew 3:4 ); a finer sort of linen (Jeremiah 13:1 ; Ezekiel 16:10 ; Daniel 10:5 )
Horites - ...
Daniel C
Belong - Daniel 9 ...
7
English Post Reformation Oaths - The Irish Oath, 1774, was followed by the so-called relief bills, and other tests involving also English Catholics, until, owing to the influence of Daniel O'Connell and the Irish, Catholic Emancipation was granted, 1829, without any tests
Oaths, English Post Reformation - The Irish Oath, 1774, was followed by the so-called relief bills, and other tests involving also English Catholics, until, owing to the influence of Daniel O'Connell and the Irish, Catholic Emancipation was granted, 1829, without any tests
Brass - The thighs of brass in Nebuchadnezzar's image (Daniel 2:32) represent the brazen armed Greeks
Noah - Ezekiel (Ezekiel 14:14; Ezekiel 14:20) knows of three men, Noah, Daniel, and Job, efficient mediators to deliver the people by their righteousness; but in the present case, even the three shall be able to deliver only themselves (see also Hebrews 11:7)
Province - (Daniel 2:49 ; 3:1,30 ) and the Persian kingdom
Day - Compare the three and half years of Daniel 7:25 , with the forty-two months and twelve hundred and sixty days of Revelation 11:2,3
Noah - Ezekiel (Ezekiel 14:14; Ezekiel 14:20) knows of three men, Noah, Daniel, and Job, efficient mediators to deliver the people by their righteousness; but in the present case, even the three shall be able to deliver only themselves (see also Hebrews 11:7)
Dan (2) - This too would be an additional reason for the Danites naming their city close by Abraham's camping ground, Daniel The repetition thrice of "the city" (Judges 18:28-29) marks that there was already another application of the name "Dan," namely, to Abraham's camping ground (compare Deuteronomy 34:1). ...
Now Tel-el-Kady (the Arabic equivalent to Dan), "the judge's mound," whose long level top is strewed with ruins, probably those of Daniel From its foot gushes out one of the largest fountains in the world, the main source of the Jordan, called el Led-dan, a corruption of Dan, and the stream from it Nahr ed Dahn; all these names confirming Le Clerc's view
Iron - ...
Daniel 2:33 (b) This represents the strength that will characterize the world empires. ...
Daniel 7:7 (b) This is a picture of the fierceness and power that will characterize the revived Roman Empire
Beast - the four beasts in Daniel 8:3 ff. Daniel 7:17 ff
Commander - In the Book of Daniel, śar is used of “superhuman beings” or “patron angels. Daniel 8:25 speaks of a king who will arise and “stand up against the Prince of princes” (i
Archangel - And if the reader will compare the passage, particularly in Jude, with what the prophet Daniel saith, (Daniel 10:13-21) I conceive that both together will throw light upon the subject. " And again, he calls the same person, (Daniel 10:21) "Michael, your prince
Anoint, Anointing - of Ruth 3:3 ; 2 Samuel 12:20 ; Daniel 10:3 ; Micah 6:15 ; in the NT, Matthew 6:17 ; Luke 7:38,46 ; John 11:2 ; 12:3 ; or of the sick, Mark 6:13 ; James 5:14 ; or a dead body, Mark 16:1 . " In Daniel 9:26 chrisma stands for the "anointed" one, "Christ," the noun standing by metonymy for the person Himself, as for the Holy Spirit in 1 John 2 . , Exodus 30:31 , of the "anointing" of the priests; Isaiah 61:3 , metaphorically, of the oil of joy; Daniel 10:3 , of physical refreshment
Captivity - 606, when Daniel and others were carried to Babylon. 2 Kings 24:1-2; Daniel 1:1. The books of Nehemiah and Daniel describe Jews in high positions at court, and the book of Esther celebrates their numbers and power in the Persian empire
Captivity - 606, when Daniel and others were carried to Babylon, 2 Kings 24:1,2 Daniel 1:1 2 . The book of Daniel shows us a Jew in a high position at court, and the book of Esther celebrates their numbers and power in the Persian empire
Greece - ...
Greece and the Bible Very few references to Greece appear in the Old Testament with most of them being found in the Book of Daniel (Daniel 8:21 ; Daniel 10:20 ; Daniel 11:2
Time - The word ‘time’ in Biblical apocalyptic literature has another meaning ‘time’ stands for ‘a year’ both in Daniel ( Daniel 4:16 ; Daniel 4:23 ; Daniel 4:25 ; Daniel 4:32 ; Daniel 7:25 , where the plural ‘times’ seems to stand for two years) and in Revelation 12:14 (derived from Daniel 7:25 ). In the passages in Daniel where the word hour occurs in the EV [1] , the term is quite an indefinite one, the ‘one hour’ of Daniel 4:19 in AV Prayer - Toward it the prayer of the nation, and of individuals, however distant, was directed (1 Kings 8:30; 1 Kings 8:35; 1 Kings 8:38; 1 Kings 8:46-49; Daniel 6:10; Psalms 5:7; Acts 4:24-306; Psalms 138:2). The regular times of prayer were the third (morning sacrifice), sixth, and ninth hours (evening sacrifice); Psalms 55:17; Daniel 6:10; Daniel 9:21; Acts 3:1; Acts 10:3; Acts 2:15. Kneeling, in humiliation: 1 Kings 8:54; 2 Chronicles 6:13; Ezra 9:5; Psalms 95:6; Daniel 6:10. The prophets contain many such prayers (Isaiah 12; 25; 26; Isaiah 37:14-20; Isaiah 38:9-20; Daniel 9:3-23). ...
So Moses (Numbers 11:2; Numbers 12:13; Numbers 21:7); Samuel (1 Samuel 7:5; 1 Samuel 12:19; 1 Samuel 12:23); David (2 Samuel 24:17-18); Hezekiah (2 Kings 19:15-19); Isaiah (Isaiah 19:4; 2 Chronicles 32:20); Asa (2 Chronicles 14:11); Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 20:6-12); Daniel (Daniel 9:20-21). ...
Confession of sin, and the pleading God's past mercies as a ground of future mercies, characterize the seven (the perfect number) prayers given in full in the Old Testament: of David (2 Samuel 7:18; 2 Samuel 7:29), Solomon (2 Chronicles 6), Hezekiah (2 Kings 19), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 32:16), Daniel (Daniel 9:3), Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1; Nehemiah 9)
Captivity - In Daniel 1:1-2, we find that in the third year of Jehoiakim Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem and carried away part of the temple vessels of Jehovah to the land of Shinar, to the house of his god Bel. ) Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, of the blood royal of Judah, were among the captives. In the first year of Darius (Daniel 9:2-19) the 70 years were nearly run out. So it would be in the 68th year of the captivity that Daniel prayed pardon for Jerusalem. Daniel (Daniel 2; 6) and his three friends and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1) subsequently held high offices near the king. Jeremiah, Ezekiel (who died after 27 years' exile at least, Ezekiel 29:17), and Daniel, and some of the Psalms (e
Babylon - Daniel 4:30 . He with Cyaxares (the Ahasuerus of Daniel 9:1 ) founder of the Median kingdom, attacked and took Nineveh, and put an end to the Assyrian rule. He was the 'head of gold' in Daniel's great image. Babylon is also of note as being the first of the four great empires prophesied of by Daniel. " Daniel 2:37,38 . Daniel 5:30 . Daniel 5:31 says, "Darius the Median took the kingdom. " This king has not been found mentioned by name on the monuments, but he is well accredited as king in Daniel
Guard - tabbah (properly a "cook," and in a secondary sense "executioner," because this office fell to the lot of the cook in Eastern countries), the bodyguard of the kings of Egypt (Genesis 37:36 ) and Babylon (2 Kings 25:8 ; Jeremiah 40:1 ; Daniel 2:14 )
Brass - ...
The Macedonian empire is described as a kingdom of brass (Daniel 2:39 )
Hazael - ...
Daniel B
Nebuchadrezzar - At this time he first captured Jerusalem ( Daniel 1:1-2 )
Silver - Only in Chronicles and Daniel is gold considered to have more worth
Horse - In the early part of Zechariah the prophet had visions of horses of different colours, they are called spirits of the heavens, and as such they acted in the four great Gentile empires described by Daniel
Fiery - ...
Daniel 7:9-10 (a) This is a type of the severity and certainty of GOD's judgments wherein He executes wrath upon all the guilty
Bear, - ...
In Daniel 7:5 the Medo-Persian kingdom was compared to a bear, with three ribs in its mouth; and to it was said, "Arise, devour much flesh
Babylon - This eminent city, which was once the most noble and magnificent in the whole earth, the capital of the Chaldean empire: and concerning which the Scriptures themselves speak so highly, (See Daniel 4:30) is now so totally overthrown, that not a vestige remains
Ahasue'Rus -
In (Daniel 9:1 ) Ahasuerus is said to be the father of Darius the Mede
Ahasuerus - In Daniel 9:1 Ahasuerus is said to be the father of Darius the Mede
Obtain - Daniel 11
Worship of God - ...
"Worship" is sometimes used of the form of homage paid by subjects to kings, or of honor to one held entitled to it, Daniel 2:46 Luke 14:10
Language - Daniel 3
River - It is always applied to the Nile and its various canals, except in Job 28:10 Daniel 12:5,6,7 2
White - Daniel 7:9 ), Revelation 1:14 (twice); ripened grain, John 4:35 ; a stone, Revelation 2:17 , an expression of the Lord's special delight in the overcomer, the new name on it being indicative of a secret communication of love and joy; a horse (in a vision), Revelation 6:2 ; 19:11,14 (1st part); a cloud, Revelation 14:14 ; the throne of God, Revelation 20:11
Feet - ...
Daniel 2:33, Daniel 2:42 (a) These represent a kingdom ruled over by ten kings. If so, it is mentioned also in Daniel 7:7 and Daniel 7:19. ...
Daniel 10:6 (a) Here is a type of the perfect walk of our Lord
Alexander - commonly called the Great, son and successor of Philip, king of Macedon, is denoted in the prophecies of Daniel by a leopard with four wings, signifying his great strength, and the unusual rapidity of his conquests, Daniel 7:6 ; and by a one-horned he-goat running over the earth so swiftly as not to touch it, attacking a ram with two horns, overthrowing him, and trampling him under foot, without any being able to rescue him, Daniel 8:4-7 . In the statue beheld by Nebuchadnezzar in his dream, Daniel 2:39 , the belly of brass was the emblem of Alexander. Jaddus is said to have showed him the prophecies of Daniel, in which the destruction of the Persian empire by Alexander is declared
Prophecy - A great portion of the prophecies of Isaiah, of Jeremiah, of Daniel, of Jonah, of Haggai, is direct or indirect history. ...
Jonah...
856-784...
Amos...
810-785...
Hosea...
810-725...
Isaiah...
810-698...
Joel...
810-660...
Micah...
758-699...
Nahum...
720-698...
Zephaniah...
640-609...
Jeremiah...
628-586...
Habakkuk...
612-598...
Daniel...
606-534...
Obadiah...
588-583...
Ezekiel...
595-536...
Haggai...
520-518...
Zechariah...
520-518...
Malachi...
436-420...
Meat - ...
Daniel 1:3 (c) The rich food which came from the king's table had been offered first to an idol. Daniel would have none of that which was highly esteemed among men, and especially among royalty
Doubt - In this sense ‘doubt’ is now nearly obsolete; as it is in the meaning riddle, knotty question , which it bears in Daniel 5:12 ; Daniel 5:16
Dreams - Genesis 40:5 ; Genesis 40:8 ; Genesis 41:1 , Daniel 2:5 ), and manuals were compiled to aid the work of elucidation (cf. In both Testaments we find significance attached to dreams ( Genesis 37:6 ; Genesis 37:9 ; Genesis 41:25 , Judges 7:13 , Daniel 2:28 ; Daniel 7:1 ff
Eschatology (2) - Deutero-Isaiah) or in the Apocalypse of Daniel, which had originally no reference to an individual Messiah,‡ [9] ...
Two points have recently been much in dispute: (a) Whether in view of the grammatical possibilities of Aramaic, as used in the time of Jesus, He could have applied to Himself the phrase ‘Son of Man’ or ‘Man’ as a title, basing on Daniel 7:13; and (b) Whether He could have done this so habitually as our Gospels represent. ]'>[12] ...
It is indubitable that in the time of our Lord the Book of Daniel and other Apocalypses modelled on it were much read by a considerable portion of the Jewish people. 168–165)—the time of the Apocalypse of Daniel—it was taught that death formed no insuperable barrier to the inheritance of the Kingdom. Probably the author of Daniel (Daniel 12:2 f. It is with the problem raised by this conflict between the prophetic conscience and the facts, that the apocalyptic literature from Daniel onwards is concerned. Hence even in Daniel 12:2, which cannot be said to teach a universal resurrection, among the ‘many’ who awake from the dust of the earth there are ‘some’ who arise to ‘shame and everlasting contempt
Jew - In other words, it was used in general as a name for all Israelites (Ezra 6:7; Nehemiah 6:6; Esther 3:6; Esther 3:10; Jeremiah 44:1; Daniel 3:8)
Beast - The four beasts of Daniel 7:3,17,23 represent four kingdoms or kings
Seal - (Genesis 38:18 ) The ring or the seal as an emblem of authority in Egypt, Persia and elsewhere is mentioned in (Genesis 41:42 ; 1 Kings 21:8 ; Esther 3:10,12 ; 8:2 ; Daniel 6:17 ) and as an evidence of a covenant, in (Jeremiah 32:10,44 ; Nehemiah 9:38 ; 10:1 ; Haggai 2:23 ) Engraved signets were in use among the Hebrews in early times
Chittim - The "ships of Chittim" in Daniel 11:30 are the Macedonian-Greek or even Italian vessels, in which the Roman ambassador Popilius Laenas arrived to check Antiochus Epiphanes
Wheel - Perhaps they represented the wheels of God's invisible chariot moving across the sky (“chariots of the sun,” see 2 Kings 23:11 ) or the wheels of God's throne (Daniel 7:9 )
Girdle - The finer girdle was of linen (Jeremiah 13:1), often embroidered with gold (Daniel 10:5; Revelation 1:13)
Flame - ...
Daniel 7:9 (a) This figure indicates GOD's justice and righteousness against all evil, sin and hypocrisy
Balances - ...
Daniel 5:27 (b) This represents GOD's judgment in Heaven wherein He weighed the life of the king on one side of the scales, and the just demands of the law on the other side
Concubines - Esther 2:14 and Daniel 5:2 show that concubinage was a custom also among the heathen
Form - Daniel 3
Dreams - He also used dreams in the case of Nebuchadnezzar and of Daniel in order to reveal His will and purpose concerning, the future
Hours - This mode of dividing the day prevailed among the Jews at least after the exile, and perhaps earlier, Daniel 3:6 4:19
Prophet - So Jonah 3; Daniel 4:9-27. ...
Daniel on the other hand is excluded from them, though abounding in the predictive element, because he did not belong to the order of prophets officially, but ministered in the pagan court of the world power, Babylon. So also Jeremiah, Matthew 2:18; Hebrews 8:8; Daniel, Matthew 24:15; Hosea, Matthew 2:15; Romans 9:25; Joel, Acts 2:17; Amos, Acts 7:42; Acts 15:16; Jonah, Matthew 12:40; Micah, Matthew 12:7; Habakkuk, Acts 13:41; Haggai, Hebrews 12:26; Zechariah, Matthew 21:5; Mark 14:27; John 19:37; Malachi, Matthew 11:10; Mark 1:2; Luke 7:27. They diligently inquired as to the deep significancy of their own words, and were told that the full meaning would only be known in subsequent gospel times (Daniel 12:8-9; Zechariah 4:5; 1618102512_67). The dream and vision were lower forms of inspiration than Moses enjoyed, namely, "mouth to mouth, not in dark speeches"; directly, without the intervention of dream, vision, or person (compare Exodus 33:11 with Joel 2:28; Daniel 1:17). The prophets did net generally speak in ecstatic unconsciousness, but with self possession, for "the spirits of the prophets are subject to the prophets" (1 Corinthians 14:32); but sometimes they did (Genesis 15; Daniel 7; Daniel 8; Daniel 10; Daniel 11; Daniel 12, "the visions of Daniel"); "the vision of Isaiah" (Isaiah 6); "the vision of Ezekiel" (Ezekiel 1); "the visions of Zechariah" (Zechariah 1; Zechariah 4; Zechariah 5; Zechariah 6); the vision of Peter (Acts 10); of Paul (Acts 22:17; Acts 22:2 Corinthians 12); Job ( John Carroll - His father, Daniel Carroll, a native of Ireland, was a successful merchant in Upper Marlboro; his mother, Eleanor Darnall, was closely related to the wife of Charles Carroll of Carrollton; his brother, Daniel Carroll (1733-1829), was a member of the Colonial Congress (1780-1784) and of the new Congress (1789-1791) and was one of the two Catholic signers of the Constitution in 1787
Carroll, John - His father, Daniel Carroll, a native of Ireland, was a successful merchant in Upper Marlboro; his mother, Eleanor Darnall, was closely related to the wife of Charles Carroll of Carrollton; his brother, Daniel Carroll (1733-1829), was a member of the Colonial Congress (1780-1784) and of the new Congress (1789-1791) and was one of the two Catholic signers of the Constitution in 1787
Predestination - God is the sovereign ruler of the universe, one who is perfect in wisdom and power and who determines all things according to his will (Isaiah 46:10; Daniel 4:35; Acts 4:28; Ephesians 1:11). ...
Predestination is concerned with the controlling will of God in all things, whether matters concerning the universe as a whole (Psalms 135:6-7; Hebrews 1:10-12), the nations of the world (Deuteronomy 7:6-8; Daniel 4:32) or individual people (Jeremiah 1:5; Acts 9:15)
Gift, Giving - Gifts were given on numerous occasions for a variety of purposes: as dowry for a wife (Genesis 34:12 ); as tribute to a military conqueror (2 Samuel 8:2 ); as bribes (Exodus 23:8 ; Proverbs 17:8 ; Isaiah 1:23 ); as rewards for faithful service and to insure future loyalty (Daniel 2:48 ); and as relief for the poor (Esther 9:22 ). Various human abilities are likewise given by God: the ability to work (Deuteronomy 8:18 ); artistic abilities (Exodus 31:6 ); the ability to acquire learning and master communication skills (Daniel 1:17 )
Beauty - Though the Hebrews did not exalt the human form as did the ancient Greeks, some men are referred to as exceedingly handsome: David (1 Samuel 16:12 ), Absalom (2 Samuel 14:25 ), Daniel (Daniel 1:15 ), Joseph, Jonathan, and even Moses as a child (Exodus 1 )
Servant, Service - ...
Many persons in the Old Testament are called "servants, " among them Abraham (Genesis 26:24 ), Jacob (Genesis 32:4 ), Joshua (Joshua 24:29 ), Ruth (Ruth 3:9 ), Hannah (1 Samuel 1:11 ), Samuel (1 Samuel 3:9 ), Jesse (1 Samuel 17:58 ), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:21 ), Joab (2 Samuel 14:20 ), Isaiah (Isaiah 20:3 ), Daniel (Daniel 9:17 ), Ben-Hadad of Aram (1 Kings 20:32 ), and Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 25:9 )
Ahasuerus - The Jews' enemies, in the third year of Cyrus (Daniel 10:12; Daniel 10:18; Ezra 4:5), sought by "hired counselors" to frustrate the building of the temple, and wrote against them to Ahasuerus (Cambyses) and Artaxerxes (Pseudo-Smerdis) successively
White - ...
Daniel 7:9 (b) Here is a beautiful type of the holiness of the Judge in whom is no spot nor shadow of turning. (See also Daniel 12:10)
Targum - The principal ones are the Pentateuch by Onkelos, and the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and the Prophets (except Daniel), by Jonathan Ben Uzziel. ...
The language agrees with the Chaldaic or Aramaic parts of Daniel and Ezra
Apocalypse - In the NT we have the Apocalypse of John and in the OT we have the Book of Daniel, which is unmistakably both in style and substance of the same literary genus. Daniel and the Apocalypse of John mark respectively the beginning and the end of what may be called the apocalyptic period, which thus covers upwards of 260 years (say 168 b. † [6] occur those references to the pre-existent Messiah under the title ‘Son of man,’ which Hilgenfeld and others hare ascribed to Christian interpolation, but whose direct debt is probably only to Daniel (see esp. Daniel 7:13). In Daniel, which belongs to the period of the Maccabaean struggle, we may see the high-water mark of spiritual faith reached by this ideal; in the fact that after the fall of the Jewish State, the kernel† Interpretation - ]'>[1] ‘sacred scribes’] and ‘wise men,’ Genesis 41:8 ), A similar body of wise or learned men is mentioned in the Book of Daniel, for the same object at the court of Babylon ( Daniel 2:2 ff; Daniel 4:6 f
Captivity - After a brief siege he took that city, and carried away the vessels of the sanctuary to Babylon, and dedicated them in the Temple of Belus (2 Kings 24:1 ; 2 Chronicles 36:6,7 ; Daniel 1:1,2 ). At this time, from which is dated the "seventy years" of captivity (Jeremiah 25 ; Daniel 9:1,2 ), Daniel and his companions were carried to Babylon, there to be brought up at the court and trained in all the learning of the Chaldeans
Babylon - Within this were also "the hanging gardens," an immense artificial mound 400 feet high, sustained by archers upon arches, terraced off for trees and flowers, the water for which was drawn from the river by machinery concealed in the mound, Daniel 4:29,30 . Justly therefore might the prophets call her "the great," Daniel 4:20 ; "the praise of the whole earth," Jeremiah 51:41 ; "the beauty of the Chaldees' excellency," Isaiah 13:19 ; "the lady of kingdoms," Isaiah 47:5 ; but also "the tender and delicate," and "given to pleasures," Isaiah 47:1,8 . Cyrus had previously caused a canal, which ran west of the city, and carried off the superfluous water of the Euphrates into the lake of Nitocris, to be cleared out, in order to turn the river into it; which, by this means, was rendered so shallow, that his soldiers were able to penetrate along its bed into the city, Daniel 5:1-31
Poetry - The prophetical books except Daniel are largely in poetry
Arad - ...
Daniel C
House - They were used, not only as places of recreation in the evening, but also sometimes as sleeping-places at night (1 Samuel 9:25,26 ; 2 Samuel 11:2 ; 16:22 ; Daniel 4:29 ; Job 27:18 ; Proverbs 21:9 ), and as places of devotion (Jeremiah 32:29 ; 19:13 )
Seven - ...
The expression ‘seven times’ seems to have been used as a figure of speech to indicate fulness or finality (Genesis 4:15; Genesis 4:24, Leviticus 26:18; Leviticus 26:21; 1 Kings 18:43-44; 2 Kings 5:10; Psalms 12:6; Psalms 119:164; Isaiah 30:26; Daniel 3:19; Matthew 18:21-22; cf
Resurrection of the Dead - Will be simultaneous both of the just and the unjust (Daniel 12:2 ; John 5:28,29 ; Romans 2:6-16 ; 2 th 1:6-10 )
Onias - 175 he was murdered ( Daniel 9:26 )
Prophecy: Too Often Interpreted by Imagination - The other day one of the seers saw Sebastopol in the prophecies, and now another detects the Suez Canal, and we feel pretty sure that the Council at Rome will soon be spied out in Daniel or Ezekiel
Sodom And Gomorrah - ...
Daniel C
Lightning - A radiant face ( Daniel 10:8 ), and gleaming garments ( Matthew 28:3 ), are like lightning
Job - , probably about two centuries before the writing of the Book of Job-along with Noah and Daniel as a proverbially righteous man
Girdle - Daniel 10:5, a similar passage, where ‘pure gold of Uphaz’ Jehoiakim - 2 Chronicles 36:5-8 ; Daniel 1:2
Wheel - (See also Daniel 7:9)
Eat - Daniel 4 ...
2
Rings - The ring was used chiefly to seal with, and Scripture generally assigns it to princes and great persons; as the king of Egypt, Joseph, Ahaz, Jezebel, King Ahasuerus, his favourite Haman, Mordecai, King Darius, 1 Kings 21:8 ; Esther 3:10 , &c; Daniel 6:17
Tribulation - Revelation 12:13-17 ); in this tribulation Gentile witnesses for God will share (Revelation 7:9 ), but it will be distinctly "the time of Jacob's trouble" (Jeremiah 30:7 ); its beginning is signalized by the setting up of the "abomination of desolation" (Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 , with Daniel 11:31 ; 12:11 )
Fasting - Especially in times of public calamity, they appointed extraordinary fasts, and made even the children at the breast fast, Joel 2:16 Daniel 10:2-3
Beasts - Animals were classed in the law as clean or unclean, with a primary reference to animal sacrifices, Genesis 7:2 Leviticus 11:1-47 The word beasts is figuratively used to symbolize various kings and nations, Psalm 74:14 Isaiah 27:1 Ezekiel 29:3 Daniel 7:1-28,8 Revelation 12:13
Psaltery - (Daniel 3:6,10,15 ) pesanterin
Petrus, a Solitary - His companion and attendant, named Daniel, he had delivered from an evil spirit
Music - It had originally only four, but subsequently twenty, strings, Daniel 3:5 ; Daniel 3:7 ; Daniel 3:10 ; Daniel 3:15 . The instrument called משרוקיתא , used in Babylon, Daniel 3:5 , was of a similar construction. סומפוניה , or, according to the marginal reading, סיפניא , Daniel 3:5 ; Daniel 3:10 , was a wind instrument made of reeds, by the Syrians called sambonja, by the Greeks samponja, and by the Italians zampogna
Nebuchadnezzar - He took away several persons from Jerusalem; among others, Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, all of the royal family, whom the king of Babylon caused to be carefully educated in the language and learning of the Chaldeans, that they might be employed at court, 2 Kings 24:1 2 Chronicles 36:6 Daniel 1:1 . "Is not this," said he, "great Babylon that I have built for the house of my kingdom, by the might of my power, and for the honor of my majesty?" But God vanquished his pride, and he was reduced for a time to the condition of a brute, according to the predictions of Daniel. See Daniel 1
Zechariah, the Book of - " Like Ezekiel and Daniel, Zechariah delights in symbols, allegories, and visions of angels ministering before Jehovah and executing His commands on earth. Contrast the "little horn" with the "eyes of a man" (Daniel 7:8). ...
The "two olive trees" supplying oil to the "bowl" answer to the Holy Spirit supplying with infinite fullness Jesus the fount (bowl) at the head of the church, for the twofold function of bringing the grace of atonement as our Priest, and of sanctification and glorification as our King, Every mountain in Zerubbabel's way must yield; so, antitypically, the "destroying mountain" antichrist (Jeremiah 51:25; Daniel 2:34; Daniel 2:45; Matthew 21:44; Isaiah 40:4; Colossians 1:191) must give place to the "stone cut out of the mountain without hands"; and the top stone shall crown the completed church "with shoutings, Grace, grace unto it. The breaking of the two staves Beauty (Israel's peculiar excellence above other nations: Deuteronomy 4:7; Daniel 8:9; Daniel 11:16; Psalms 147:19-20; and the temple beauty of holiness, Psalms 29:2) and Bands (the brotherhood between Judah and Israel: Nehemiah 10:29) answers to the destruction of the temple, which constituted the chief visible beauty and He of brotherhood uniting the nation. Jehovah gave them up to a foolish (wicked) shepherd (Daniel 2:45) since they would not have the good Shepherd; namely, Rome pagan and papal, and finally the blasphemous antichrist (John 5:43; Daniel 11:35-38; Daniel 12:1; Daniel 9:27; 2 Thessalonians 2:3-12; Revelation 13:5-6; Revelation 13:13-18)
Hall - Belshazzar's banqueting hall (KJV banquet house) was the scene of the famous handwriting on the wall ( Daniel 5:10 )
Kentucky - When Right Reverend Benedict Flaget, who had visited Louisville on his missionary journey, 1792, arrived at his See at Bardstown; 1811, as the first bishop of the whole Northwest Territory he found about 10 log churches in central Kentucky, and one of brick built at the Irish settlement of Danville on land given by Daniel McElroy
Messiah - The Greek form "Messias" is only twice used in the New Testament, in John 1:41,4:25 (RSV, "Messiah"), and in the Old Testament the word Messiah, as the rendering of the Hebrew, occurs only twice ( Daniel 9:25,26 ; RSV, "the anointed one")
Nergal-Sharezer - Belshazzar, who comes into notice in connection with the taking of Babylon, was by some supposed to have been the same as Nabonadius, who was called Nebuchadnezzar's son (Daniel 5:11,18,22 ), because he had married his daughter
Anoint - ...
...
The promised Deliverer is twice called the "Anointed" or Messiah (Psalm 2:2 ; Daniel 9:25,26 ), because he was anointed with the Holy Ghost (Isaiah 61:1 ), figuratively styled the "oil of gladness" (Psalm 45:7 ; Hebrews 1:9 )
Bear - Daniel 7:5; "it raised up itself on one side," lying on one of its fore feet and standing on the other; a figure still to be seen in Babylonian monuments, but see margin
Branch - ‘Branch’ is used figuratively for human offspring ( Job 15:32 ), especially for the scion of a royal house ( Daniel 11:7 ); also for persons in lofty station ( Isaiah 9:14 )
Brook - Once it is used for the water-channel ( Job 28:10 ); once ( Isaiah 33:21 ) it is rendered ‘stream’; while in Daniel 12:1-13 it stands for the Tigris
Courage - In Daniel 11:25 ‘courage’ is the rendering of the Heb
Lift - Eyes, hands, heart, and soul are frequently lifted up to God in fervent prayer (Psalm 25:1 ; Psalm 28:2 ; Psalm 63:4 ; Psalm 134:2 ; Psalm 141:2 ; Lamentations 2:19 ; Daniel 4:34 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 )
Oak - The "tree" in Nebuchadnezzar's dream (Daniel 4) is 'ilan , any "strong tree"
Majesty - It is applied to David (2 Samuel 7:21) and to the kings of the earth (Daniel 7:27); elsewhere to the sovereign greatness of God (Deuteronomy 32:3, 1 Chronicles 29:11, Psalms 145:3; Psalms 145:6, etc
Abigail - At Nabal's death by God's visitation David made her his wife, and by her David had a son, Chileab (2 Samuel 3:3), or Daniel (1 Chronicles 3:1), i
Abigail - They lived first at Gath and then at Hebron, where Abigail gave birth to Chileab, who is also called Daniel
Apostasy - Daniel 12:11) that the return of Christ would be preceded by such a revelation of the power of the Antichrist (q
England, John - He was as ardent as Daniel O'Connell in the cause of Catholic Emancipation, founding "The Chronicle" with that end in view
Sleep - Daniel 12:2 , speaks of those that sleep in the dust of the grave
Bull - תור , Chaldee taur, and Latin taurus; the ox accustomed to the yoke: occurs only in Ezra 6:9 ; Ezra 6:17 ; Ezra 7:17 ; Daniel 4:25, 32, 33; 22:29, 30
Ethiopia - Its history is much involved with that of Egypt, and the two countries are often mentioned together in Bible, Isaiah 20:3-6 43:3 45:15 Ezekiel 30:1-26 Daniel 11:43
Names - Kings often changed the names of those to whom they gave offices, Daniel 1:6,7 ; hence the honor and privilege implied in a "new name," Revelation 2:17
Restore - Daniel 9
ez'ra - The principal works ascribed to him by the Jews are--
The instruction of the great synagogue; ...
The settling the canon of Scripture, and restoring, correcting and editing the whole sacred volume; ...
The introduction of the Chaldee character instead of the old Hebrew or Samaritan; ...
The authorship of the books of Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and, some add, Esther; and, many of the Jews say, also of the books of Ezekiel, Daniel, and the twelve prophets; ...
The establishment of synagogues
Day - (John 18:28 ) The word held to mean "hour" is first found in (Daniel 3:6,15 ; 5:5 ) Perhaps the Jews, like the Greeks, learned from the Babylonians the division of the day into twelve parts
Plains - " (Daniel 3:1 ) ...
Ha shefelah the invariable designation of the depressed, flat or gently-undulating region which intervened between the highlands of Judah and the Mediterranean, and was commonly in possession of the Philistines
Jew - JEWRY means Judea (Daniel 5:13)
Judea - First so-called as a "province" of Persia (Daniel 5:13; Ezra 5:8; Nehemiah 11:3; Esther 8:9)
Courage - It is obvious also in cases where, by speaking or acting in a certain way, a person knowingly faces consequences where physical suffering is a clear possibility (Numbers 13:30-32; Daniel 3:16-18; Mark 6:17-18; John 2:13-17; Acts 4:13; Acts 5:27-30)
Boasting - One result of pride and self-sufficiency is that people boast of their achievements instead of giving honour to God (Deuteronomy 8:11-14; Jeremiah 9:23; Daniel 4:30; 1 Corinthians 4:7; James 4:13-16)
Laetare Medal - " Following is a partial list of the recipients of the award: ...
1883 - John Gilmary Shea, historian
1884 - Patrick J Keeley, architect
1885 - Eliza Allen Starr, artist
1886 - General John Newton, army engineer
1887 - Edward Preuss, journalist
1888 - Patrick V Hickey, founder "Catholic Review"
1889 - Anna Hanson Dorsey, novelist
1890 - William T Onahan, organizer Catholic Congress
1891 - Daniel Dougherty, orator
1892 - Henry F Brownson, philosopher
1893 - Patrick Donahoe, founder "Boston Pilot"
1894 - Augustin Daly, theatrical manager
1895 - Mrs James Sadlier, writer
1896 - General William S Rosecrans, leader Army of Cumberland
1897 - Thomas Addis Emmett, surgeon
1898 - Timothy E Howard, jurist
1899 - Mary Gwendolin Caldwell, benefactor Catholic University
1900 - John Creighton, founder Creighton University
1901 - William Bourke Cockran, orator
1902 - John B Murphy, surgeon
1903 - Charles J Bonaparte, attorney-general
1904 - Richard C Kerens, philanthropist
1905 - Thomas B Fitzpatrick, business man
1906 - Francis Quinlan, medical specialist
1907 - Katherine E Conway, author
1908 - James C Monaghan, lecturer
1909 - Frances Tiernan, (Christian Reid), litterateur
1910 - Maurice Francis Egan, writer
1911 - Agnes Repplier, essayist
1912 - Thomas M Mulry, charity worker
1913 - Charles G Herbermann, editor-in-chief "Catholic Encyclopedia"
1914 - Edward Douglas White, chief justice of the United States
1915 - Mary V Merrick, founder, Christ Child Society
1916 - James J Walsh, physician and author
1917 - William Shepherd Benson, admiral
1918 - Joseph Scott, lawyer
1919 - George Duval, philanthropist
1920 - Lawrence F Flick, physician
1921 - Elizabeth Nourse, artist
1922 - Charles P Neil, economist
1923 - Walter George Smith, lawyer
1924 - Charles D Maginnis, architect
1925 - Albert Francis Zahm, scientist
1926 - Edward N Hurley, business man
1927 - Margaret Anglin, actress
1928 - Jack J Spalding, lawyer
1929 - Alfred Emmanuel Smith, statesman
1930 - Frederick P Kenkel, director of Central Bureau of the Central Verein
1931 - James J Phelan, philanthropist
1932 - Stephen J Maher, tuberculosis expert
1933 - John McCormack, vocalist
1934 -
1935 - Frank H Spearman, author
1936 -
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1942 - Helen Constance White, teacher and author
1943 -
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1955 - George Meaney, labour leader
1956 -
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1965 - Frederick Dominic Rossini, teacher and scientist
1966 -
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1972 - Dorothy Day, activist
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1984 - John T Noonan, jurist
1985 - Guido Calabresi, jurist
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1992 - Daniel Patrick Moynihan, US senator
1993 - L John Durney, teacher and journalist
1994 -
1995 -
1996 - Sister Helen Prejean, anti-death penalty activist
1997 - Father Virgilio Elizondo, theologian and writer
1998 -
1999 -
2000 - Andrew J McKenna, businessman
2001 - Monsignor George G Higgins, labour activist priest
2002 - Father John Smyth, educator
2003 - Peter and Peggy Steinfels, writers
2004 - Father Bryan Hehir, theologian
2005 - Joseph E Murray, organ transplant pioneer
Wing - ...
Daniel 7:4 (b) The lion represents the King of Babylon, and the wings represent the power and swiftness, as well as the ease with which this king operated his kingdom and conquered his enemies. ...
Daniel 7:6 (b) The leopard represents the King of Greece, Alexander the Great
Gennadius (10), Bishop of Constantinople - ...
Gennadius ordained Daniel the Stylite presbyter, as related in that saint's life, at the request of the emperor Leo, standing at the foot of the Pharos and performing the ceremonies there. ...
Gennadius wrote a commentary on Daniel and many other parts of O
Anointing - 2 Samuel 14:2; Daniel 10:3; Matthew 6:17. In the Old Testament a Deliverer is promised under the title of Messiah, or Anointed, Psalms 2:2; Daniel 9:24-26; and the nature of his anointing is described to be spiritual, with the Holy Ghost
Persia - Previously to their union under Cyrus, Daniel speaks of the law of the Medes and Persians as being the same. Its inhabitants retain to a remarkable extent the manners and custom of ancient Persia, of which we have so vivid a picture in Esther, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Daniel
Music (2) - In Daniel 3:5; Daniel 3:15 (LXX Septuagint ) συμφωνία is usually taken to mean a bagpipe; but such a meaning in Luke 15:25 is unlikely
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - --Of the sixteen prophets, four are usually called the great prophets, namely, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel, and twelve the Minor prophets, namely, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakuk,Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi. They may be divided into four groups: the prophets of the northern kingdom --Hosea, Amos, Joel, Jonah; the prophets of the southern kingdom --Isaiah, Jeremiah, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah; the prophets of the captivity --Ezekiel and Daniel; the prophets of the return --Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi. They may be arranged in the following chronological order, namely, Joel, Jonah, Hoses, Amos, Isaiah, Micah, Nahum, Zephaniah, Habakkuk, Obadiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi
Prayer - Genesis 24:12-13 , Jonah 2:1 , Psalms 42:6 ; Psalms 61:2 , Daniel 6:10 , John 4:21-234 , Acts 16:24-25 ; Acts 21:6 ), and is disclaimed by Christ in view of true worship ( Exodus 8:120 ), yet naturally specific worship-centres were regarded as appropriate: thus in early times Shiloh, where the ark rested ( 1 Samuel 1:9-10 ), Mizpah ( 1 Samuel 7:5 , 1Ma 3:48 ), Gibeon ( 1 Kings 3:4 ff. , Psalms 28:2 , Daniel 6:10 , 1Es 4:56 ). Distinctively Christian worship was held in ordinary buildings ( Acts 1:13-14 ; Acts 4:23 ; Acts 12:12 , Colossians 4:15 ) a practice made natural by Jewish arrangements for private prayer ( Daniel 6:10 , Jdt 8:6 ; Jdt 10:2 , Matthew 6:8 , Acts 10:9 ; Psalms 142:1-73 ) or for Passover celebration ( Matthew 26:16 ). ? Psalms 55:17 [6], Daniel 6:10 , Amos 7:2-34 ; Acts 10:9 ; Acts 10:30 ; cf. Deuteronomy 3:23-258 , 1 Samuel 1:26 , Nehemiah 9:5 , Mark 11:25 , Luke 18:11 ; Luke 18:13 [7]); ( b ) kneeling ( Psalms 95:6 , Isa 45:23 , 1 Kings 8:54 , Ezra 9:6 , Daniel 6:10 , Luke 22:41 , Daniel 6:1-28 ; Acts 9:40 ; Jdt 13:4-5 ; Acts 21:5 , Ephesians 3:14 ); ( c ) prostrate, face to ground ( Exodus 34:6 , Nehemiah 8:6 , 1Es 8:91 , Jdt 9:1 , Psalms 88:1-18 , Matthew 26:39 ); face between knees ( Nehemiah 1:4-11 , cf. Being appropriate for times of solicitude and sorrow, fasting naturally became associated with prayer ( Psalms 35:13 ), especially after the Exile ( Nehemiah 1:4 , Daniel 9:3 ; cf. 106), Daniel 9:4-19 . Ezra 9:1-15 , Daniel 9:1-27 )
Apocrypha - ...
The Roman Catholic Apocrypha consists of Tobit, Judith, the Additions to Esther, the Additions to Daniel (the Prayer of Azariah and the Three Young Men, Susanna, and Bel and the Dragon), the Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus (also called Sirach), Baruch (also called 1Baruch), the Letter of Jeremiah, 1Maccabees, and 2Maccabees. The Additions to Daniel have a less unified purpose. Susanna (chapter 13 of the Greek Daniel) is a delightful little story affirming God's vindication of those who hope in him, and Bel and the Dragon (chapter 14 of the Greek Daniel) exposes the folly of idolatry. The Prayer of Azariah and the Three Young Men, placed after Daniel 3:23 , is a prayer of trust in God offered up by Azariah (i. , Abednego — Daniel 1:7 ) and his companions (Shadrach and Meshach) in the fiery furnace
Angel - Tobit, who is thought to have resided in Nineveh some time before the captivity, mentions the angel Raphael, Tob_3:17 ; Tob_11:2 ; Tob_11:7 ; and Daniel, who lived at Babylon some time after Tobit, has taught us the names of Michael and Gabriel, Daniel 8:16 ; Daniel 9:21 ; Daniel 10:21 . The passages in Daniel brought to favour this notion are capable of a much better explanation; and when our Lord declares that the "angels" of little children "do always behold the face of God," he either speaks of children as being the objects of the general ministry of angels, or, still more probably, by angels he there means the disembodied spirits of children; for that the Jews called disembodied spirits by the name of angels, appears from Acts 12:15 . Daniel 7:10 , says of the Ancient of Days, "A fiery stream came from before him; thousand thousands ministered unto him, and ten thousand times ten thousand stood before him
Canon of the Old Testament - " Daniel (Daniel 9:2) "understood by THE books (so the Hebrew) the number of the years whereof the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah the prophet, that He would accomplish seventy years in the desolation of Jerusalem"; probably Jeremiah's letter to the captives in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:1-10), others explain it the books of the Old Testament or of the prophets. the FIVE of MOSES; THIRTEEN prophetical books, namely,...
(1) Joshua,...
(2) Judges and Ruth,...
(3) the two of Samuel,...
(4) the two of Kings...
(5) the two of Chronicles,...
(6) Ezra and Nehemiah,...
(7) Esther,...
(8) Isaiah,...
(9) Jeremiah and Lamentations,...
(10) Ezekiel,...
(11) Daniel,...
(12) the twelve minor prophets,...
(13) Job; and FOUR remaining, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon: the 22 thus being made to answer to the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet. "Whatever is not included in the enumeration here made is to be placed among the Apocrypha" He puts Daniel in the hagiographa
Seal, Signet - A roll or other document intended for preservation was sealed up before it was parted with ( Daniel 12:4 ); the seals, accordingly, had to be broken before it could be read ( Revelation 6:3 etc. Darius’ ‘den of lions’ ( Daniel 6:17 ) and the sepulchre of our Lord ( Matthew 27:66 ) were both in all probability sealed in this way by means of a cord which passed over the stone covering the entrance, and was sealed at either end by a lump of clay impressed with one or more seals (cf. Thus, in Daniel 9:24 , sealing is a figure for the ratification of prophecy; in John 6:27 the figure is based on the public acknowledgment of the seal as one nowadays acknowledges one’s signature
Judgment Day - The eschatological interpretation of this day is most evident in Daniel 7:22 ,Daniel 7:22,7:27 ; Daniel 12:1-3
Astrology - ...
Daniel seems to have been familiar with astrologers (2:27; 4:7) and with their inability to interpret the king's dreams. Some writers have suggested that the term "Chaldean, " used to describe the wise men of Babylon who acted as astrologers, had actually been written galdu, "astrologers, " by Daniel, but later on was transcribed incorrectly as kaldu, since by then Chaldea (mat Kaldu ) had become known as the place where they flourished. Daniel repudiated their supposed abilities by declaring that only God can be regarded as the true source of revelations concerning the future (5:14-16)
Chronology - )...
From the 1st year of Cyrus to the 20th year of Artaxerxes, ...
when the 70 weeks of Daniel commenced … … … … … … 81...
(Not given in scripture. … … … … … … 454...
(From the 20th of Artaxerxes to the crucifixion is, according to Daniel 9 , ...
69 weeks = 483 years; from which deduct 29, the date of the crucifixion:...
483 - 29 = 454). ...
The Seventy Weeks of Daniel begin
Dream (2) - ’ When on rare occasions God did vouchsafe symbolical dreams to men, the professed dream-interpreters of the most highly trained castes stood helpless before them (Genesis 37, 40, 41, Daniel 2, 4). 142)—those in which direct Divine revelations are communicated (Genesis 15:12; Genesis 20:3; Genesis 20:6; Genesis 28:12; Genesis 31:10-11, 1 Kings 3:5, Matthew 1:20; Matthew 2:12-13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22; Matthew 27:19) and symbolical dreams which receive Divine interpretations (Genesis 37:5-6; Genesis 37:10; Jeremiah 27:9; Genesis 41:1; Genesis 41:5, Judges 7:13-15, Daniel 2:1; Daniel 2:3; Daniel 2:26; Daniel 4:5; Daniel 7:1)—only some half-score of clear instances are given. All the symbolical dreams, it will be observed further, with the exception of the one recorded in Judges 7:13-15 (and this may have been only a ‘providential’ dream), occur in the histories of Joseph and Daniel; and all the dreams of direct Divine communication, with the exception of the one to Solomon (1 Kings 3:5), in the histories of the nativity of Israel or of the nativity of Israel’s Redeemer. In effect, the patriarchal stories of the Book of Genesis, the story of Daniel at the palace of the king, and the story of the birth of Jesus, are the sole depositions of supernatural dreams in Scripture; the apparent exceptions (Judges 7:13-15, 1 Kings 3:5, Matthew 27:19) may be reduced to the single one of 1 Kings 3:5. We have but to think of Abraham and Abimelech, of Jacob and Laban, of Joseph and Pharaoh, of Daniel and Nebuchadnezzar, of Joseph and the Magi, to observe how near at hand the suggestion lies that the choice of dreams in these instances as the medium of revelation has some connexion with the relation in which the recipient stood at the moment to influences arising from the outer world, or at least to some special interaction between Israel and that world. If no example is recorded during the whole period from Solomon to Daniel; so none is recorded from the patriarchs to Solomon, or again from Daniel to our Lord. Genesis 15:12; Genesis 26:24; Genesis 46:2, Numbers 22:20, 1 Chronicles 17:3, 2 Chronicles 7:12, Job 4:13; Job 20:8; Job 33:15, Daniel 2:19, Acts 16:9; Acts 18:9; Acts 23:11; Acts 27:24)
Ass - Of wild asses two species are noticed, (1) that called in Hebrew 'Arod , Mentioned Job 39:5 and Daniel 5:21 , noted for its swiftness; and (2) that called Pe're , The wild ass of Asia ( Job 39:6-8 ; 6:5 ; 11:12 ; Isaiah 32:14 ; Jeremiah 2:24 ; 14:6 , etc
Adoration - Demanded by Nebuchadnezzar in honour of his image, Daniel 3:5 ; requested by Satan, at the temptation of our Lord, Matthew 4:9 ; paid to the Lord when an infant by the wise men, and often in the Gospels, Matthew 2:11 ; Mark 5:33 ; Luke 5:8 ; John 11:32 ; and in heaven by the elders to God and the Lord Jesus, Revelation 4:10 ; Revelation 5:8,14 ; Revelation 19:4
Titus - ...
Daniel C
Providence - God's providence extends to the natural world (Psalm 104:14 ; 135:5-7 ; Acts 14:17 ), the brute creation (Psalm 104:21-29 ; Matthew 6:26 ; 10:29 ), and the affairs of men (1 Chronicles 16:31 ; Psalm 47:7 ; Proverbs 21:1 ; Job 12:23 ; Daniel 2:21 ; 4:25 ), and of individuals (1 Samuel 2:6 ; Psalm 18:30 ; Luke 1:53 ; James 4:13-15 )
Winds - (Ezekiel 37:9 ; Daniel 8:8 ; Zechariah 2:6 ; Matthew 24:31 ) The north wind, or, as it was usually called "the north," was naturally the coldest of the four, Sirach 43:20 and its presence is hence invoked as favorable to vegetation in ( Song of Solomon 4:16 ) It is described in (Proverbs 25:23 ) as bringing rain; in this case we must understand the northwest wind
Headdress - In Daniel 3:21 for" hats" translated "outer mantles
Ask - Daniel 2
Arise - Daniel 6
Finger - ...
Daniel 5:5 (c) This is a picture to show that GOD uses human instruments to present divine truths
Fowl - ...
Daniel 7:6 (b) Here is a type of the swiftness with which Alexander's four armies and generals would progress in their campaign to conquer the earth
Weight - ...
Daniel 5:27 (a) Before we die, and while we are still living, GOD estimates the value and the worth of each soul
Brass - Daniel 10:6), is descriptively applied to the feet of Christ as He appeared in the vision of St
Obadiah, Book of - Obadiah depicts the Jews themselves as God's instruments for the destruction of Esau; which agrees with Isaiah 11:14 ; Daniel 11:41
Leg - ...
Daniel 2:33 (a) These legs represent the Roman empire which was unusually strong and durable both in its civil power and its military might
Fasts - (Daniel 10:3 ) Those who fasted frequently dressed in sackcloth or rent their clothes, put ashes on their head and went barefoot
Lord - Daniel 4
Judgment - And this judgement and separation will be eternal: the former will rise in holiness and joy, and the latter sink in sin and woe forever, Ecclesiastes 11:9 Daniel 12:2 Matthew 10:15 12:36 25:31-46 26:64 John 5:22 Acts 17:31 Romans 14:10-12 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10 2 Peter 2:9 3:7 1 John 4:17 Revelation 20:12-15
Wear - Daniel 7
Hair - (Daniel 7:9 ; Revelation 1:14 ) The chief beauty of the hair consisted in curls, whether of a natural or an artificial character
Month, Months - Daniel 7:25 ; 9:27 ; 12:7 with Revelation 11:2,3 ; 12:6,14 ; 13:5 ; whence we conclude that 3 1/2 years or 42 months = 1260 days, i
Fasting - It may have been to express sorrow (1 Samuel 31:13; 1 Kings 21:27; Nehemiah 1:4), repentance (1 Samuel 7:6; Joel 2:12; Daniel 9:3-4) or sincerity in prayer (2 Chronicles 20:3-4; Ezra 8:23)
Canticle - ...
Canticle of the Three Children, Daniel 3:57-88,56, Sunday at Laud. ...
Canticle of the Three Children, Daniel 3:52-57
Theophany - Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel, giants among the prophets, saw God in visions (Isaiah 6:1 ; Ezekiel 1:1 ; Daniel 7:9 )
Breath - It identifies God as the source of life ( Genesis 2:7 ; Job 27:3 ; Job 33:4 ; Daniel 5:23 ). Breath can become weak (Daniel 10:17 ); it is limited (Genesis 7:22 ; 1 Kings 17:17 )
Hand, Right Hand - God's hand is normally understood as a metaphor but in the prophetic books something like a hand is felt ( Daniel 10:10 ) and is seen lifting Ezekiel (Ezekiel 8:3 ), writing on a wall (Daniel 5:5 ), holding a plumb line (Amos 7:7 ), and emanating rays (Habakkuk 3:4 ; cf
Brass (Brazen) - ...
Daniel 7:19 (a) The metal in this place indicates that the fourth beast which was the Roman empire would be a grasping, destructive nation with hard, cruel power over all her enemies. ...
Daniel 10:6 (a) In this vision it may be that we are given a description of the Lord CHRIST as to His power, purity and position
Japheth - And by Daniel: "For the ships of Chittim shall come against him," 161810251314 Daniel 11:30
Confession - The Mosaic ritual makes provision for the confession of both individual ( Leviticus 5:1 ff; Leviticus 26:40 ) and national ( Leviticus 16:21 ) transgressions; and many examples may be found of humble acknowledgment of both classes of sin, for instance in the Penitential Psalms and in such prayers as those of Ezra ( Ezra 10:1 ), Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 1:6-7 ), and Daniel ( Daniel 9:4 ff. , Daniel 9:20 )
Mouth - ...
Daniel 7:5 (b) The prophet is describing in an interesting way the King of the Media-Persian empire, Darius. ...
Daniel 7:8 (b) The proud and boastful language of the Roman emperors is thus described by this figure. (See also Daniel 7:20)
Angels - Gabriel is the only other name of an angel revealed to us: he appeared to Daniel, to Zacharias, and to Mary: he said that he stood in the presence of God. Daniel 8:16 ; Daniel 9:21 ; Luke 1:19,26
Antichrist - With respect to the commonly received opinion, that the church of Rome is antichrist, Mede and Newton, Daubuz and Clarke, Lowman and Hurd, Jurieu, Vitringa, and many other members of the Protestant churches who have written upon the subject, concur in maintaining, that the prophecies of Daniel, St. ...
In the book of Daniel it is foretold, that this power should exercise dominion until a time and times, and the dividing of time, Daniel 7:25
Bible - The former was written mostly in Hebrew, and was the Bible of the ancient Jewish church; a few chapters of Daniel and Ezra only were written in Chaldee. The second division, the Prophets, is subdivided into the former prophets, namely, the historical books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings; and the later, that is, the prophets proper, with the exception of the book of Daniel. The Holy Writings (Hagiographa) embrace all the remaining books of the Old Testament, namely, (according to the Masorectic arrangement,) Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Canticles, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, Chronicles
Thessalonians, Second Epistle to the - For Ezekiel 38:1-23 ; Ezekiel 39:1-29 , Daniel 7:1-28 ; Daniel 8:1-27 ; Daniel 9:1-27 ; Daniel 11:1-45 ; Daniel 12:1-13 , and later extra-canonical Jewish apocalyptic literature present, under varied historic colouring, the same conception of a final rally of the powers of evil before the last days, and of the triumph of Messiah over ‘antichrist
Apocrypha - The History of Susanna is an account of Daniel’s discovery of a malicious slander against the good woman Susanna. The story is prefixed to the book of Daniel. The Song of the Three Holy Children is found inserted between Daniel 3:23 and Daniel 3:24 . The Story of Bel and the Dragon follows Daniel 12:1-13 . It is a proof by Daniel that the priests of Bel and their families ate the food set before the idol. Daniel slays the dragon, and is a second time thrown into the lions’ den. The three preceding stories are found in the Septuagint of Daniel, and a MS of No
Oak - ...
...
'Elan, only in Daniel 4:11,14,20 , rendered "tree" in Nebuchadnezzar's dream
Hananiah - Jewish name of Daniel's friend Shadrach (Daniel 1:7 )
Hyksos - ...
Daniel C
Catholic Association - Perpetuates in Great Britain the name of an organization instituted in Ireland by Daniel O'Connell at the time he was preparing the way for the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829
Isaac - ...
Daniel C
Pharisees - 1: Φαρισαῖος (Strong's #5330 — Noun Masculine — pharisaios — far-is-ah'-yos ) from an Aramaic word peras (found in Daniel 5:28 ), signifying "to separate," owing to a different manner of life from that of the general public
King - The people of God are also called "kings" (Daniel 7:22,27 ; Matthew 19:28 ; Revelation 1:6 , etc
Images - The materials used in idol manufacture were clay ( Wis 15:13 , Bel 7), wood ( Isaiah 44:15 , Wis 13:13 ), silver and gold ( Hosea 8:4 , Daniel 3:1 )
Banquet - In the Old Testament and New Testament, banquets and feasts are prominent in sealing friendships, celebrating victories, and for other joyous occasions (Daniel 5:1 ; Luke 15:22-24 )
Bruise - ...
Daniel 2:40 (b) This informs us that the fourth kingdom, the Roman Empire, would injure and damage many nations, but would not completely destroy them
Lord - ...
He is the Lord of kings Daniel 2:47
Ever - Daniel 6 ...
The latter phrase is however anomalous or-ever being equivalent to before, and or may be a mistake for ere
Association, Catholic - Perpetuates in Great Britain the name of an organization instituted in Ireland by Daniel O'Connell at the time he was preparing the way for the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829
Seal - He gives the same command to Daniel 12:4
Ahasuerus - ...
Ahasuerus is also a name given in Scripture, Ezra 4:6 , to Cambyses, the son of Cyrus; and to Astyages, king of the Medes, Daniel 9:1
Zechariah - ...
Zechariah's prophecies concerning the Messiah are more particular and express than those of most other prophets, and many of them, like those of Daniel, are couched in symbols
Messiah or Messias - The time of his appearance was predicted in Genesis 49:10 Daniel 9:20,25 Haggai 2:7 Malachi 3:1
Seal, Sealing - , guarded it from being opened clandestinely, Song of Song of Solomon 4:12 Daniel 6:17 Matthew 27:66
Targum - This paraphrast wrote only upon the books of Moses; and his style approaches nearly to the purity of the Chaldee, as it is found in Daniel and Ezra. There is no Targum upon Daniel, or upon the books of Ezra and Nehemiah
Nehemiah, the Book of - Birah said of the palace or temple in the four and Daniel. ...
"The God of the heavens," in Ezra, Nehemiah, and Daniel
Resurrection - Daniel (Daniel 12:2): Hebrew "many from among the sleepers, these (the partakers of the first resurrection, Revelation 20) shall be unto everlasting life; but those (the rest who do not rise until after the thousand years) shall be unto shame" (1 Corinthians 15:23)
Decrees of God - Are his settled purposes, whereby he foreordains whatsoever comes to pass, Daniel 4:24 . "For he doeth according to his will in the armies of heaven, and among the inhabitants of the earth; and none can stay his hand, or say unto him, What doest thou?" Daniel 4:35
Sleep - When the word is used literally, as it frequently is, it usually depicts sleep as a simple fact of human experience (Genesis 28:16 ; Daniel 8:18 ; Matthew 25:5 ). This is common in the Old Testament (Job 7:21 ; 14:12 ; Psalm 13:3 ; Jeremiah 51:57 ; Daniel 12:2 )
Pride - ...
Finally, in the Old Testament, what are some of the results of pride? It led to Uzziah's downfall (2 Chronicles 26:16 ); it hardened the heart of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 5:20 ); it goes before destruction (Proverbs 16:18 ); it does not seek God (Psalm 10:4 ); it brings disgrace (Proverbs 11:2 ); it breeds quarrels (Proverbs 13:10 ); it deceives (Jeremiah 49:16 ; Obadiah 1:3 ); it brings low (Proverbs 29:23 ; Isaiah 2:11 ; 23:9 ); it humbles (Isaiah 2:17 ; Daniel 4:37 )
Teeth - ...
Daniel 7:5 (a) This is an excellent picture of the complete victory which the Medio-Persian empire won over Babylon. ...
Daniel 7:19 (a) Again we see that this fourth Kingdom had cruel power which was very destructive in character
Kingdom, Kingdom of God, Kingdom of Heaven - In Daniel 2:44 it is predicted that "In the days of these kings [1] shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed: and the kingdom shall not be left to other people, but it shall break in pieces and consume all these kingdoms, and it shall stand for ever:" cf. also Daniel 7
Goat - צפיר , a name for the goat, of Chaldee origin, and found only in Ezra 6:17 ; Ezra 8:35 ; Daniel 8:5 ; Daniel 8:21
Clouds - In the tent of revelation during the wilderness period (Exodus 40:34-38 ), in the Jerusalem Temple (1 Kings 8:10-11 ), on Mount Sinai (Exodus 34:5 ), and in His direction and protection by means of the clouds and the pillar of fire, Israel experienced that God came to them (Exodus 33:7-11 ) but still remained wholly other (Leviticus 16:2 ,Leviticus 16:2,16:13 ) even when he came as the Son of Man (Daniel 7:13 ). Mark 13:26 ; Mark 14:62 ; and Revelation 1:7 combined the motif of the Son of Man from Daniel 7:1 with the word of judgment from Zechariah 12:10 and referred them to the parousia or coming of Christ
Advent, Second - we find that the Antichrist will co-operate with another 'beast,' the head of the future Roman empire; and in Daniel 9 . that this latter power will make a covenant with Israel and will break the covenant in the midst of the week: all which intimates that this apparent triumph of wickedness will spread over at least seven years, otherwise spoken of as the last week of the seventy weeks of Daniel
Bible - " The term "Bible," though dating only from the 5th century in its sacred and exclusive use, is virtually expressed in the designations occurring in itself: "The Scripture" (John 10:35; John 20:9; Romans 4:3; 2 Peter 1:20); "the Book" (Psalms 40:7, cepher ); "the Scripture (kithab ) of truth" (Daniel 10:21). Daniel is not included among the prophets, because he did not hold the prophet's office among the chosen people. ...
The Hagio-grapha, or "sacred writings" (kethubim , from kathab , to write), include (1) Psalms, Proverbs, Job; (2) The Song of Solomon of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther; (3) Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, 1 and 2 Chronicles. Finally comes Revelation, answering to Daniel, the prophetic Apocalypse of the Old Testament The first three Gospels are called "the synoptical Gospels," giving a synopsis of Christ's ministry in Galilee; John's gives His ministry in Judea. ) We find Daniel shortly before having in his hands the book of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 9:2). Yet God is throughout represented as ruling in the kingdoms of men, Gentiles as well as Jews (Daniel 4:17). And His revealing His will "in many portions" (polumeros ; Hebrews 1:1, one prophet or inspired person or writer receiving one portion of revelation, another another: to Noah the quarter of the world where Messiah should appear, to Abraham the nation, to Jacob the tribe, to David and Isaiah the family, to Micah the town, to Daniel the time), and "in divers manners," corresponds to tits sending from time to time a Bacon, Newton, Shakespeare, etc. " The tongue through which the Old Testament revelation of God speaks is the Hebrew, that of the chosen nation, except parts of Ezra and Daniel and Jeremiah
Obadiah - (Daniel 2:44; Daniel 7:14; Daniel 7:27; Zechariah 14:9; Luke 1:33; Revelation 11:15; Revelation 19:6, "Alleluia! for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth
Angels of the Seven Churches - There is, no doubt, a natural inclination to see in his use of the phrase a reminiscence of the ‘princes’ of the Apocalypse of Daniel (ὁ ἄρχων βασιλείας Περσῶν, Daniel 10:13; cf. Μιχαὴλ ὁ ἄγγελος, Daniel 10:21)
Kingdom - ...
"The Kingdom of God is (a) the sphere of God's rule, Psalm 22:28 ; 145:13 ; Daniel 4:25 ; Luke 1:52 ; Romans 13:1,2 . God has not relinquished His sovereignty in the face of rebellion, demoniac and human, but has declared His purpose to establish it, Daniel 2:44 ; 7:14 ; 1 Corinthians 15:24,25 . Daniel 4:26 ) does not occur elsewhere in NT, but see 2 Timothy 4:18 , "His heavenly Kingdom
Music - SABECA, "sackbut," Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 . PESANTERIN, "psaltery," occurs Daniel 3:7 , and is supposed to represent the NEBEL. MISHROKITHA, Daniel 3:5 , etc
Prayer - (1 Kings 8:46-49 ; Psalm 5:7 ; 28:2 ; Romans 16:25-27 ; Daniel 6:10 ) The regular hours of prayer seem to have been three (see) (Psalm 55:17 ; Daniel 6:10 ) "the evening," that is the ninth hour (Acts 3:1 ; 10:3 ) the hour of the evening sacrifice, (Daniel 9:21 ) the "morning," that is, the third hour (Acts 2:15 ) that of the morning sacrifice; and the sixth hour, or "noonday