What does Damascus mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
דַּמֶּ֔שֶׂק an ancient trading city 8
δαμασκῷ one of the most ancient and most important cities of Syria lying in almost lovely and fertile plain at the eastern base of the Antilibanus. 8
δαμασκόν one of the most ancient and most important cities of Syria lying in almost lovely and fertile plain at the eastern base of the Antilibanus. 4
δαμασκὸν one of the most ancient and most important cities of Syria lying in almost lovely and fertile plain at the eastern base of the Antilibanus. 3
דַּמֶּ֧שֶׂק an ancient trading city 2
דַּמָּ֑שֶׂק an ancient trading city 2
דַּרְמֶ֔שֶׂק an ancient trading city 2
דַמֶּ֙שֶׂק֙ an ancient trading city 2
דַּמֶּ֗שֶׂק an ancient trading city 2
דַמֶּ֛שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
לְדַמֶּ֗שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דַּמֶּ֖שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
מִדַּמֶּ֖שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דַמָּֽשֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
כְדַמֶּ֖שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דַּמֶּ֥שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
לְדַמָּֽשֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דַּמֶּ֤שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דַּמֶּשֶׂק֩ an ancient trading city 1
לְדַמָּ֑שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דַמֶּ֔שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
מִדַּמָּֽשֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
מִדַּמֶּ֔שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
מִדַּמֶּ֗שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
בְּדַמָּ֑שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דּוּמֶּ֔שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דַּמֶּ֙שֶׂק֙ an ancient trading city 1
דַרְמֶשֶׂק֮ an ancient trading city 1
דַּרְמָ֑שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
דַּרְמָֽשֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
בְּדַרְמֶ֖שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
בְדַמֶּ֙שֶׂק֙ an ancient trading city 1
דַמָּ֑שֶׂק‪‬ an ancient trading city 1
בְּדַמֶּ֖שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
בְּדַמָּֽשֶׂק an ancient trading city 1
וְדַמֶּ֖שֶׂק an ancient trading city 1

Definitions Related to Damascus

H1834


   1 an ancient trading city, capital of Syria, located in the plain east of Hermon, 130 (205 km) miles northeast of Jerusalem.
   Additional Information: Damascus = “silent is the sackcloth weaver”.
   

G1154


   1 one of the most ancient and most important cities of Syria lying in almost lovely and fertile plain at the eastern base of the Antilibanus.
   Additional Information: Damascus = “silent is the sackcloth weaver”.
   

Frequency of Damascus (original languages)

Frequency of Damascus (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Damascus
(duh mass' cuhss) Capital of important city-state in Syria with close historical ties to Israel. Apparently Damascus has been occupied continuously for a longer period of time than any other city in the world and can claim to be the world's oldest city.
Setting Its geographical location enabled Damascus to become a dominant trading and transportation center. Standing 2300 feet above sea level, it lay northeast of Mount Hermon and about 60 miles east of Sidon, the Mediterranean port city. Both major international highways ran through Damascus the Via Maris from Mesopotamia in the east through Damascus and the Jezreel Valley to the Plain of Sharon and the Mediterranean coast, then south to Egypt; and the King's Highway from Damascus south through Ashtaroth, Rabbath-ammon, and Bozrah to Elath on the Red Sea and to Arabia. By the same token, Damascus saw armies march along the highways, often using Damascus as the staging area.
History Archaeology cannot contribute much to the study of Damascus, since the continued existence of the city makes excavation difficult, if not impossible. Explorations do indicate settlement from before 3000 B.C. Tablets from the Syrian center of Ebla mention Damascus about 2300 B.C. Thutmose III of Egypt claimed to have conquered Damascus about 1475 B.C. The Hittites battled Egypt for control of Damascus until the Hittites were defeated by the Sea Peoples about 1200 B.C. At this time Arameans from the nearby desert came in and took control of an independent Damascus, gradually establishing a political power base.
In the Bible Abraham chased invading kings north of Damascus to recover Lot, whom they had taken captive (2 Kings 10:32-33 ). Abraham's servant Eliezer apparently came from Damascus (Genesis 15:2 ).
Soldiers of Damascus attempted to help Hadadezer, king of Zobah another Syrian city-state against David. David won and occupied Damascus (2 Samuel 8:5-6 ). The weakness of Zobah encouraged Rezon to organize a renegade band, much as David had in opposing Saul (1 Samuel 22:2 ). Rezon became the leader of Syria headquartered in Damascus (1 Kings 11:23-25 ). God used him to harass Solomon.
The new Syrian city-state faced a strong opponent from the east as Assyria rose to power. Ben-hadad strengthened Damascus to the point that Asa, king of Judah (910-869), paid him tribute to attack Baasha, king of Israel, and relieve pressure on Judah (1 Kings 15:16-23 ). This gave Damascus reason to interfere repeatedly in politics in Palestine.
1 Kings 20:1 also features Ben-hadad of Damascus, giving reason to believe that Ben-hadad (literally, “son of Hadad”) was a royal title in Syria, identifying the king of Damascus as a worshiper of the god Hadad, another name for Baal. See 1 Kings 20:26 ). Again a prophet pointed the way to Israel's victory. Ahab agreed to a covenant treaty with the defeated Syrian king, for which he met a prophet's strong judgment (1 Kings 20:35-43 ).
Naaman, a Syrian officer, sought Elisha's help in curing his skin disease but decided Abana and Pharphar, the great rivers of Damascus, offered greater help than did the Jordan (2 Kings 5:12 ). These rivers made Damascus an oasis in the midst of the desert. Elisha helped deliver Samaria when Ben-hadad besieged it (2 Kings 6-7 ). Elisha also prophesied a change of dynasty in Damascus, naming Hazael its king (2 Kings 8:7-15 ). Shalmaneser III of Assyria (858-824) claimed to have defeated both Ben-hadad and Hazael. The first important battle came at Qarqar in 853 B.C. Ahaziah, king of Judah (841), joined Joram, king of Israel (852-841), in battle against Hazael with Joram being wounded. Jehu took advantage of the wounded king and killed him (2 Kings 8:25-9:26 ).
Having fought against Damascus in campaigns in 853,849, 848, and 845, Shalmaneser III of Assyria severely weakened Damascus, besieging it in 841 and then receiving tribute again in 838. After this, Hazael of Damascus exercised strong influence, gaining influence in Israel, Judah, and Philistia (Genesis 14:15 ). His son Ben-hadad maintained Damascus' strength (2 Kings 13:3-25 ). Finally, Jehoash, king of Israel (798-782), regained some cities from Damascus (2 Kings 13:25 ). Jeroboam II, king of Israel (793-753), expanded Israelite influence and gained control of Damascus (2 Kings 14:28 ). This was possible because Assyria threatened Syria again, as Adad-nirari III, king of Assyria (810-783), invaded Syria from 805 to 802 and again in 796. About 760 B.C. Amos the prophet condemned Damascus and its kings Hazael and Ben-hadad (Amos 1:3-5 ).
Tiglath-pileser III, king of Assyria (744-727), threatened Damascus anew. King Rezin of Damascus joined with Pekah, king of Israel, about 734 B.C. in an effort to stop the Assyrians. They marched on Jerusalem, trying to force Ahaz of Judah to join them in fighting Assyria (2 Kings 16:5 ). The prophet Isaiah warned Ahaz not to participate with Syria and Israel (Isaiah 7:1 ). He also said that Assyria would destroy Damascus (Isaiah 8:4 ; compare Isaiah 17:1 ). Rezin of Damascus had some military success (2 Kings 16:6 ), but he could not get Ahaz of Judah to cooperate. Neither could Isaiah. Instead, Ahaz sent money to Tiglath-pileser, asking him to rescue Judah from Israel and Damascus. The Assyrians responded readily and captured Damascus in 732 B.C., exiling its leading people (2 Kings 16:7-9 ). Damascus had one last influence on Judah; for when Ahaz went to Damascus to pay tribute to Tiglath-pileser, he liked the altar he saw there and had a copy made for the Jerusalem Temple (2 Kings 16:10-16 ). Damascus sought to gain independence from Assyria in 727,720 but without success. Thus Damascus became a captive state of first the Assyrians, then the Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Ptolemies, and Seleuccids. Finally, Rome gained control under Pompey in 64 B.C. Jews began to migrate to Damascus and establish synagogues there. Thus Saul went to Damascus to determine if any Christian believers were attached to the synagogues there so that he might persecute them (Acts 9:1 ). Thus the Damascus Road became the sight of Saul's conversion experience and Damascus the sight of his introduction to the church. He had to escape from Damascus in a basket to begin his ministry (2 Corinthians 11:32 ). Damascus gained importance, eventually becoming a Roman colony. It also gained importance as a Christian city, with a bishop stationed there prior to A.D. 400. The Arabs captured it in 636 and made it a capital city for the Moslem world, which it continues to be. See Hadad ; Syria .
Trent C. Butler
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Damascus, Syria
One of the oldest cities in the world, and a Latin archiepiscopal titular see; also a metropolitan see for the Catholic and non-Catholic Melchite Greeks, for the Catholic Syrians, and a Maronite episcopal see. Mentioned in Genesis and on the pylons of Karnak, with the fall of the Kingdom of Syria it seems to have lost its autonomy, and appears only occasionally in the history of the Jews, Greeks, and Romans. When Syria became a Roman province, 65 B.C., Damascus was the chief commercial emporium for the nomad Arabs. In the vicinity occurred Saint Paul's conversion. In early times Damascus was a metropolis with eleven suffragan sees, subject to the Patriarchate of Antioch. Besides its Greek prelates, numerous Jacobite bishops are known, and many illustrious names are associated with its history, notably Saint John Damascene. After its capture by the Arabs, 635, freedom of worship was allowed to the Christians, and from 660 to 753 it was the capital of the Arabian Empire. In the following centuries its history is one of broils and revolutions, unsuccessful sieges of the Crusaders, and invasions of the Tatars, until the French occupation of 1860, following frightful slaughter of the Christians.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Damascus
Activity, the most ancient of Oriental cities; the capital of Syria (Isaiah 7:8 ; 17:3 ); situated about 133 miles to the north of Jerusalem. Its modern name is Esh-Sham; i.e., "the East." The situation of this city is said to be the most beautiful of all Western Asia. It is mentioned among the conquests of the Egyptian king Thothmes III. (B.C. 1500), and in the Amarna tablets (B.C. 1400).
It is first mentioned in Scripture in connection with Abraham's victory over the confederate kings under Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:15 ). It was the native place of Abraham's steward (15:2). It is not again noticed till the time of David, when "the Syrians of Damascus came to succour Hadadezer" (q.v.), 2 Samuel 8:5 ; 1 Chronicles 18:5 . In the reign of Solomon, Rezon became leader of a band who revolted from Hadadezer (1 Kings 11:23 ), and betaking themselves to Damascus, settled there and made their leader king. There was a long war, with varying success, between the Israelites and Syrians, who at a later period became allies of Israel against Judah (2 Kings 15:37 ).
The Syrians were at length subdued by the Assyrians, the city of Damascus was taken and destroyed, and the inhabitants carried captive into Assyria (2 Kings 16:7-9 ; Compare Isaiah 7:8 ). In this, prophecy was fulfilled (Isaiah 17:1 ; Amos 1:4 ; Jeremiah 49:24 ). The kingdom of Syria remained a province of Assyria till the capture of Nineveh by the Medes (B.C. 625), when it fell under the conquerors. After passing through various vicissitudes, Syria was invaded by the Romans (B.C. 64), and Damascus became the seat of the government of the province. In A.D. 37 Aretas, the king of Arabia, became master of Damascus, having driven back Herod Antipas.
This city is memorable as the scene of Saul's conversion (Acts 9:1-25 ). The street called "Straight," in which Judas lived, in whose house Saul was found by Ananias, is known by the name Sultany, or "Queen's Street." It is the principal street of the city. Paul visited Damascus again on his return from Arabia (Galatians 1:16,17 ). Christianity was planted here as a centre (Acts 9:20 ), from which it spread to the surrounding regions.
In A.D. 634Damascus was conquered by the growing Mohammedan power. In A.D. 1516 it fell under the dominion of the Turks, its present rulers. It is now the largest city in Asiatic Turkey. Christianity has again found a firm footing within its walls.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Rivers of Damascus
The Abana and Pharpar (2 Kings 5:12 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Damascus
The most ancient city of Syria, at the foot of the S.E. range of Antilibanus, which rises 1,500 ft. above the plain of Damascus, which is itself 2,200 above the sea. Hence, Damascus enjoys a temperate climate cooled by breezes. The plain is a circle of 30 miles diameter, watered by the Barada (the ABANA of 2 Kings 5), which bursts through a narrow cleft in the mountain into the country beneath, pouring fertility on every side. This strikes the eye the more, as bareness and barrenness characterize all the hills and the plain outside. Fruit of various kinds, especially olive trees, grain and grass abound within the Damascus plain. The Barada flows through Damascus, and thence eastward 15 miles, when it divides and one stream falls into lake el Kiblijeh: another into lake esh-Shurkijeh, on the border of the desert. The wady Helbon on the N. and Awaj on the S. also water the plain.
The Awaj is probably the scriptural PHARPAR. First mentioned in Genesis 14:15; Genesis 15:2. Abraham entering Canaan by way of Damascus there obtained Eliezer as his retainer. Josephus makes Damascus to have been founded by Uz, son of Aram, grandson of Shem. The next Scriptural notice of Damascus is 2 Samuel 8:5, when "the Syrians of Damascus succored Hadadezer king of Zobah" against David. David slew 22,000 Syrians, and "put garrisons in Syria of Damascus, and the Syrians became servants to David and brought gifts" (1 Chronicles 18:3-6). Nicholaus of Damascus says Hadad (so he named him) reigned over "all Syria except Phoenicia," and began the war by attacking David, and was defeated in a last engagement at the Euphrates River. His subject Rezon, who escaped when David conquered Zobah, with the help of a band made himself king at Damascus over Syria (1 Kings 11:23-25), and was an adversary to Israel all the days of Solomon.
Hadad's family recovered the throne; or else (See BENHADAD I, who helped Baasha against Asa and afterward Asa against Baasha, was grandson of Rezon. He "made himself streets" in Samaria (1 Kings 20:34), so completely was he Israel's master. His son, Benhadad II, who besieged Ahab (1 Kings 20:1), is the Ben-idri of the Assyrian inscriptions. These state that in spite of his having the help of the Phoenicians, Hittites and Hamathites, he was unable to oppose Assyria, which slew 20,000 of his men in just one battle. Hazael, taking advantage of his subjects' disaffection owing to their defeats, murdered Benhadad (2 Kings 8:10-15; 1 Kings 19:15). Hazael was defeated by Assyria in his turn, with great loss, at Antilibanus; but repulsed Ahaziah's and Jehoram's attack on Israel (2 Kings 8:28), ravaged Gilead, the land of Gad, Reuben, and Manasseh (2 Kings 10:32-33); took also Gath, and was only diverted from Jerusalem by Jehoash giving the royal and the temple treasures (2 Kings 12:17-18). (See HAZAEL.)
Benhadad his son continued to exercise a lordship over Israel (2 Kings 13:3-7; 2 Kings 13:22) at first; but Joash, Jehoahaz' son, beat him thrice, according to Elisha's dying prophecy (2 Kings 13:14-19), for "the Lord had compassion on His people ... because of His covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, neither east He them from His presence us yet" (2 Kings 13:23). Jeroboam II, Joash's son, further "recovered Damascus and Hamath, which belonged to Judah, for Israel ... according to the word of the Lord ... by Jonah the prophet" (2 Kings 14:23-28), 836 B.C. Rezin of Damascus, a century later, in a respite from the Assyrian invasions, allied himself to Pekah of Israel against Judah, with a view to depose Ahaz and set up one designated "the son of Tabeal." (See AHAZ.) The successive invasions of Pul and Tiglath Pileser suggested the thought of combining Syria, Israel, and Judah as a joint power against Assyria. Ahaz' leaning to Assyria made him obnoxious to Syria and Israel.
But, as their counsel was contrary to God's counsel that David's royal line should continue until Immanuel, it came to nought (2 Kings 15:19; 2 Kings 15:29; 2 Kings 15:57; 2 Kings 16:5; Isaiah 7:1-6). Elath on the shore of the Red Sea, in Edom, built by Azariah of Judah on territory alleged to be Syrian, was "recovered" by Rezin. Whereupon Ahaz begged Assyria's alliance; and the very policy of Damascus and Israel against Assyria, namely, to absorb Judah, was the very means of causing their own complete absorption by Assyria (2 Kings 16:6-9; 2 Kings 16:17; Isaiah 7:14-25; Isaiah 8:6-10; Isaiah 10:9). The people of Damascus were carried captive to Kir, as Amos (Amos 1:5) foretold, the region from which they originally came, associated with Elam (Isaiah 22:6), probably in Lower Mesopotamia = Kish or Cush, i.e. eastern Ethiopia, the Cissia of Herodotus (G. Rawlinson).
Isaiah (Isaiah 17:1) and Amos (Amos 1:4) had prophesied that Damascus should be "taken away from being a city, and should be a ruinous heap," that Jehovah should "send a fire into the house of Hazael, which should devour the palaces of Benhadad"; and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 49:24-25) that "Damascus is waxed feeble .... How is the city of praise not left, the city of my joy!" By the time of the Mede-Persian supremacy Damascus had not only been rebuilt, but was the most famous city in Syria (Strabo, 16:2,19). In Paul's time (2 Corinthians 11:32) it was part of (See ARETAS' (see) kingdom. It is still a city of 150,000 inhabitants, of whom about 130,000 are Mahometans, 15,000 Christians, and about 5,000 Jews. Damascus was the center through which the trade of Tyre passed on its way to Assyria, Palmyra, Babylon, and the East.
It supplied "white wool and the wine of Helbon" (in Antilebanon, 10 miles N.W. of Damascus) in return for "the wares of Tyre's making" (Ezekiel 27:18). Its once famous damask and steel were not manufactured until Mahometan times, and are no longer renowned. The street called "Straight" is still there, leading from one gate to the pasha's palace, i.e. from E. to W. a mile long; it was originally divided by Corinthian colonnades into three avenues, of which the remains are still traced (Acts 9:11); called by the natives "the street of bazaars." The traditional localities of Acts 9:3; Acts 9:25; 2 Corinthians 11:33 (Paul's conversion on his way to Damascus, and his subsequent escape in a basket let down from the wall) are more than doubtful. Now es-Sham, "The East." Magnus was its bishop at the council of Nice, A.D. 325. The khalif Omar A.D. 635 took it. It fell into the hands of the Turks, its present masters, under Selim I, A.D. 1516.
Webster's Dictionary - Damascus Steel
See Damask steel, under Damask.
Webster's Dictionary - Damascus
(n.) A city of Syria.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Damascus
DAMASCUS
1. Situation , etc. The chief city of N. Syria, situated in lat. 33° 30′ N. and long. 36° 18′ E. It lies in a plain east of the Anti-Lebanon, famous for its beauty and fertility, and watered by the Barada River, the Abanah (wh. see) of the Bible. The luxuriance of its gardens has long been renowned: the English traveller W. G. Browne in 1797 noted that the fruit-trees were so numerous that those which died and were cut down were sufficient to supply the town with firewood. Its population is estimated at from 150,000 to 220,000. It derives its modern importance from local manufactures (woodwork, furniture, artistic metal and textile work), from its situation and convenience as a market for the desert tribes, and from its religious significance as the starting-point of the annual Syrian pilgrim caravan to Mecca. Railways run from Damascus to Haifa, Beyrout, and Mezerîb, and the important line to Mecca, begun in 1901, is expected to be finished in 1910. The writer of Canticles, in his appreciation of the sensuous beauty of scenery, has not forgotten Damascus: the nose of the Shulammite is compared to the ‘tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus’ ( Song of Solomon 7:4 ).
The history of Damascus begins in remote antiquity: the time of its foundation is quite unknown; but that a settlement should have been founded in so desirable a locality was inevitable from the very beginning of human association. It was probably already an ancient city at the time of the Tell el-Amarna tablets, on which we meet with its name more than once. It also appears in the tribute lists of Thothmes III. as Demesku .
2. OT references . In the Biblical history we first meet with the name of Damascus as a territorial indication in defining the line of Abram’s pursuit of the five kings ( Genesis 14:15 ). In Genesis 15:2 the name of Abram’s steward is given in the MT [1] as Dammesek Eliezer (so RV [2] ) a name probably corrupt. It is explained in the Aram. [1]2 , Targum, and Syr. as ‘Eliezer the Damascene,’ which gives sense, though it presupposes a most improbable corruption in the Hebrew text. We must therefore pass this passage by with the remark that it is not unlikely that Abram’s servant was a native of Damascus. We hear nothing more of Damascus till 2 Samuel 8:5-6 , which describes David’s capture of the city as a reprisal for its assistance given to Hadadezer, king of Zobah; David garrisoned it and reduced it to a tributary condition (cf. 1 Chronicles 18:5 ). The general of Hadadezer, however, Rezon by name, succeeded in establishing himself as king in Damascus in the time of Solomon, and made himself continuously a very troublesome neighbour ( 1 Kings 11:23-24 ). In the wars between Asa and Baasha ( 1 Kings 15:17 ff., 2 Chronicles 16:2 ff.) the king of Judah invoked the aid of Ben-hadad, king of Syria, whose royal city was Damascus, against his Israelite enemy. By gifts he persuaded him to break the truce already existing between Ben-hadad and Israel, and to join partnership with Judah. Accordingly Ben-hadad proceeded to harass Baasha on his northern borders, and so induced him to desist from his plan of erecting border fortifications between the two Hebrew kingdoms. Hostilities continued between Syria and Israel till the days of Ahab: Ahab’s sparing of Ben-hadad after the battle of Aphek and his making a truce with him, were the cause of a prophetic denunciation ( 1 Kings 20:42 ). In the reign of Jehoram, the Syrian general Naaman came to be cleansed of leprosy ( 2 Kings 5:1-27 ), and Elisha’s directions led to his famous depreciating comparison of the muddy Jordan with the clear-flowing Abanah and Pharpar (v. 12). The Chronicler ( 2 Chronicles 24:23 ) reports a victorious invasion of Judah by Damascus in the days of Joash. The city of Damascus was re-taken by Jeroboam II. ( 2 Kings 14:28 ), though the circumstances are not related; but must have been lost again immediately, for we find the Syrian king Rezin there ( 2 Kings 16:1-20 ) oppressing Ahaz, so that he was led to the policy, which (as Isaiah foresaw, Isaiah 7:1-25 ; Isaiah 10:5-11 ) proved suicidal, of calling in the aid of Tiglath-pileser, king of Assyria, and submitting himself as a vassal of that great king. Prophetic denunciations of Damascus, as of the other enemies of the Hebrews, are found in Isaiah 17:1-14 , Jeremiah 49:23 , Amos 1:3-5 , and Zechariah 9:1 . Damascus as a commercial centre was always of great importance, and Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 27:18 ) alludes to its trade in vines and wool. It is, of course, included in the imaginary restoration of the kingdom ( Ezekiel 47:17 ).
3. NT references . Damascus appears only in connexion with St. Paul. Here took place his miraculous conversion ( Acts 9:1-43 ; Acts 22:1-30 ; Acts 26:1-32 ) with the well-known attendant circumstances, and his escape from Aretas (wh. see), the governor, by being lowered in a basket over the wall ( Acts 9:25 , 2 Corinthians 11:32-33 ), and hither he returned after his Arabian retirement ( Galatians 1:17 ).
4. Later history . The late extra-Biblical history is very complicated. In 333 b.c., after the battle of Issus, the city was surrendered to Parmenio, the general of Alexander the Great, and during the subsequent Græco-Egyptian wars it fell more than once into the hands of the Ptolemys. In 111 b.c., on the partition of Syria between Antiochus Grypus and A. Cyzicenus, the latter obtained possession of the city. His successor, Demetrius Eucærus, invaded Palestine in 88 b.c. and defeated Alexander Jannæus at Shechem. His brother, who succeeded him, was driven out by the Arabian Haritha (Aretas). For a while it remained in Arab hands, then, after a temporary occupation by Tigranes, king of Armenia, it was conquered by Metellus, the Roman general. It was a city of the Decapolis. The great temple of the city was by one of the early Christian emperors probably Theodosius transformed into a church. It is now the principal mosque of the city, but was partly destroyed by fire in 1893. Since 635 Damascus has been a Muslim city, though governed from time to time by different tribes and dynasties of that faith. It was conquered by the Seljuks in 1075. The Crusaders never succeeded in making a strong position for themselves in the city. In 1860 about 6000 Christians were massacred by the Muslim population of the city. Few remains of antiquity are to be seen in the modern city, which is attractive principally for its undiluted Oriental life and its extensive markets and bazaars. The mosque just mentioned, a mediæval castle, and part of the ancient walls, are the principal relics. Of course, there are the usual traditional sites of historical events, but these are not more trustworthy at Damascus than anywhere else in Syria and Palestine.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Damascus, Damascenes
Damascus (Δαμασκός) cannot now be regarded as the oldest city in the world, but it has a surer title to fame in its possession of the secret of eternal youth. While Tadmor and Palmyra, Baalbek and Jerash, have only a ‘glory hovering round decay,’ Damascus is still ‘the head of Syria,’ the queen of Oriental cities. The creations of architectural genius have their day and cease to be, but Damascus is the perennial gift of Nature. The green oasis between Mount Hermon and the desert must always be a theatre of human activity. Wheresoever the river comes, there is life. Damascus has no means of self-defence, has never done anything memorable in warfare, has been captured and plundered many times, and more than once almost annihilated, but it has always quickly recovered itself, and to-day the white smokeless city, embowered in its gardens and orchards and surrounded by its hundred villages, is to every Arab what it was to young Muhammad gazing down upon it from the brow of Salahiyeh-the symbol of Paradise.
During the centuries of Greek and of Roman sway in Syria, Damascus had to yield precedence to Antioch. The Hellenic city in the Levant became the first metropolis of Gentile Christianity, and organized the earliest missions to the Western nations. Yet in a sense the religion of Europe came by the way of Damascus, which was the scene of the conversion of the greatest of all missionaries. It is in connexion with this event alone that the city is ever mentioned in the NT. The story is told three times in Acts (Acts 9:1-23; Acts 22:3-16; Acts 26:1-20).
In the 1st cent. of our era the Jewish colony in Damascus was large and influential. During a tumult in the reign of Nero 10,000 Jews were massacred. Josephus indicates the extent of Jewish proselytism in the city when he states that the Damascenes ‘distrusted their own wives, who were almost all addicted to the Jewish religion’ (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) II. xx. 2). It is not known when or how Christianity first came to Damascus. There were doubtless Syrian Jews in Jerusalem at every feast of Pentecost, though none are mentioned in Acts 2. Damascus was the first of the ‘foreign cities’ (Acts 26:11) from which the Jewish authorities resolved to root out the Nazarene heresy. St. Paul came to it as a voluntary inquisitor, to call the Christian Jews to account for their apostasy. He was armed with ‘the authority and commission of the chief priests’ (Acts 26:12).
‘In a certain sense the Sanhedrin exercised jurisdiction over every Jewish community in the world.… Its orders were regarded as binding throughout the entire domain of orthodox Judaism. It had power, for example, to issue warrants to the congregations (synagogues) in Damascus for the apprehension of the Christians that quarter’ (Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. tr. of GJV).] II. i. [1] 185).
St. Paul had instructions to deal summarily ‘with any that were of the way’ (Acts 9:2), but the letters which he carried ‘for the synagogues’ (Acts 9:2) were never delivered, and his ‘commission’ (Acts 26:12) was never executed. One of the Christians whom he intended to ‘bring bound to Jerusalem’ (Acts 9:2) baptized him (Acts 9:18), and ‘with the disciples who were at Damascus’ (Acts 9:19) he enjoyed his first Christian fellowship. None of them were among the confessors who afterwards haunted him ‘with their remembered faces, dear men and women whom’ he ‘sought and slew.’ In Damascus he ‘preached Jesus’ (Acts 9:20), the substance of his gospel being ‘that he is the Son of God,’ ‘that this is the Christ’ (Acts 9:20; Acts 9:22). The incident of St. Paul’s escape from conspirators by his being let down over the city wall in a basket (q.v. [2] ) is recorded by the writer of Acts (Acts 9:23-25), and confirmed in one of St. Paul’s own letters (2 Corinthians 11:32). While St. Luke ascribes the plot against him to the Jews. St. Paul relates that it was the ethnarch under Aretas the king who guarded the city of the Damascenes to take him. The two versions of the story can be reconciled by supposing that the governor turned out the garrison and set a watch at the instigation of influential Jews, who represented St. Paul as a disturber of the peace of the city. The alleged ascendancy of the Nabataean king in Damascus at that time raises a difficult historical problem, which has an important bearing upon the chronology of the primitive Church. This point is discussed under Arabia, Aretas, Ethnarch.
Literature.-G. A. Smith, Historical Geography of the Holy Land (G. A. Smith) , 1897, p. 641ff.; Baedeker, Handbook to Syria and Palestine, 1912, p. 298ff.; W. Smith, Dict. of Gr. and Rom. Geog. i. [3] 748; R. W. Pounder, St. Paul and his Cities, 1913, p. 58; H. Macmillan, Gleaning in Holy Fields, 1899, pp. 101, 114; E. B. Redlich, St. Paul and his Companions, 1913.
James Strahan.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Damascus
A sack full of blood; the similitude of burning
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Damascus
The chief city of Syria; so called from Damashech, a place of blood, from Damah, blood. Here Paul was directing his course for the destruction of the church when the Lord converted him. (Acts 9:2-6, etc.)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Damascus
a celebrated city of Asia, and anciently the capital of Syria, may be accounted one of the most venerable places in the world for its antiquity. It is supposed to have been founded by Ux, the son of Aram; and is, at least, known to have subsisted in the time of Abraham, Genesis 15:2 . It was the residence of the Syrian kings, during the space of three centuries; and experienced a number of vicissitudes in every period of its history. Its sovereign, Hadad, whom Josephus calls the first of its kings, was conquered by David, king of Israel. In the reign of Ahaz, it was taken by Tiglath Pileser, who slew its last king, Rezin, and added its provinces to the Assyrian empire. It was taken and plundered, also, by Sennacherib, Nebuchadnezzar, the generals of Alexander the Great, Judas Maccabeus, and at length by the Romans in the war conducted by Pompey against Tigranes, in the year before Christ, 65. During the time of the emperors, it was one of the principal arsenals in Asia, and is celebrated by the emperor Julian as, even in his day, "the eye of the whole east." About the year 634, it was taken by the Saracen princes, who made it the place of their residence, till Bagdad was prepared for their reception; and, after suffering a variety of revolutions, it was taken and destroyed by Tamerlane, A.D. 1400. It was repaired by the Mamelukes, when they gained possession of Syria; but was wrested from them by the Turks, in 1506; and since that period has formed the capital of one of their pachalics. The modern city is delightfully situated about fifty miles from the sea, in a fertile and extensive plain, watered by the river which the Greeks called Chrysorrhoras, or "Golden River," but which is known by the name of Barrady, and of which the ancient Abana and Pharpar are supposed to have been branches. The city is nearly two miles in length from its north-east to its north-west extremity; but of very inconsiderable breadth, especially near the middle of its extent, where its width is much contracted. It is surrounded by a circular wall, which is strong, though not lofty; but its suburbs are extensive and irregular. Its streets are narrow; and one of them, called Straight, mentioned in Acts 9:11 , still runs through the city about half a mile in length. The houses, and especially those which front the streets, are very indifferently built, chiefly of mud formed into the shape of bricks, and dried in the sun; but those toward the gardens, and in the squares, present a more handsome appearance. In these mud walls, however, the gates and doors are often adorned with marble portals, carved and inlaid with great beauty and variety; and the inside of the habitation, which is generally a large square court, is ornamented with fragrant trees and marble fountains, and surrounded with splendid apartments, furnished and painted in the highest style of luxury. The market places are well constructed, and adorned with a rich colonnade of variegated marble. The principal public buildings are, the castle, which is about three hundred and forty paces in length; the hospital, a charitable establishment for the reception of strangers, composing a large quadrangle lined with a colonnade, and roofed in small domes covered with lead; and the mosque, the entrance of which is supported by four large columns of red granite; the apartments in it are numerous and magnificent, and the top is covered with a cupola ornamented with two minarets.
Damascus is surrounded by a fruitful and delightful country, forming a plain nearly eighty miles in circumference; and the lands, most adjacent to the city, are formed into gardens of great extent, which are stored with fruit trees of every description. "No place in the world," says Mr. Maundrell, "can promise to the beholder at a distance a greater voluptuousness;" and he mentions a tradition of the Turks, that their prophet, when approaching Damascus: took his station upon a certain precipice, in order to view the city; and, after considering its ravishing beauty and delightful aspect, was unwilling to tempt his frailty by going farther; but instantly took his departure with this remark, that there was but one paradise designed for man, and that, for his part, he was resolved not to take his in this world. The air or water of Damascus, or both, are supposed to have a powerful effect in curing the leprosy, or, at least, in arresting its progress, while the patient remains in the place.
The Rev. James Conner visited Damascus in 1820, as an agent of the Church Missionary Society. He had a letter from the archbishop of Cyprus to Seraphim, patriarch of Antioch, the head of the Christian church in the east, who resides at Damascus. This good man received Mr. Conner in the most friendly manner; and expressed himself delighted with the systems and operations of the Bible Society. He undertook to encourage and promote, to the utmost of his power, the sale and distribution of the Scriptures throughout the patriarchate; and, as a proof of his earnestness in the cause, he ordered, the next day, a number of letters to be prepared, and sent to his archbishops and bishops, urging them to promote the objects of the Bible Society in their respective stations.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Damascus
One of the oldest cities in the world, being mentioned as a known city in the days of Abraham. Genesis 14:15 ; Genesis 15:2 . Josephus says it was founded by Uz, grandson of Shem. It is not again mentioned in scripture until the time of David. It was the capital of Syria. Isaiah 7:8 . The Syriansof Damascus sided with Hadadezer, king of Zobah, against Israel, but David slew 22,000 of the Syrians. 2 Samuel 8:5 . David put garrisons in Syria, and they brought him gifts. 1 Chronicles 18:3-6 . Rezon escaped and established himself at Damascus as king of Syria and was an adversary to Israel all the days of Solomon. 1 Kings 11:23-25 .
A few years later Ben-hadad was induced by Judah to attack Baasha king of Israel, when all the land of Naphtali was smitten. 1 Kings 15:16-20 . About 30 years after this Benhadad II. besieged Samaria; but God wrought for their deliverance, and Ben-hadad was taken prisoner; but Ahab called him 'brother' and released him, for which he was rebuked by a prophet. 1 Kings 20 . About B.C. 890 Hazael murdered Ben-hadad and became king of Syria; and we read that Jehovah began to cut Israel short and He used Hazael as His instrument. He smote all the coasts of Israel, from Jordan eastward, in Gilead and the lands of Gad, Reuben, and Manasseh. 2 Kings 10:32,33 . He took also Gath, and was only diverted from Jerusalem by Jehoash giving up the royal and temple treasures. 2 Kings 12:17,18 . Ben-hadad III. his son continued to exercise dominion over Israel, 2 Kings 13:3-7,22 ; but Jehovah had compassion on Israel, and Joash, according to the dying prophecy of Elisha, overcame the king of Syria three times and recovered the cities of Israel. 2 Kings 13:14-19,23-25 . Jeroboam also 'restored' the coast of Israel, and recovered Damascus and Hamath, according to the prophecy of Jonah. 2 Kings 14:23-28 .
About a century later, Rezin king of Syria and Pekah king of Israel attacked Ahaz and besieged Jerusalem. Ahaz sent the royal and temple treasures to Tiglath-pileser king of Assyria to induce him to resist Rezin. He attacked Damascus, and took it, and carried away the inhabitants to Kir, and slew Rezin, about B.C. 740. 2 Kings 16:5-9 ; Isaiah 7:1-9 .
Isaiah prophesied that Damascus should be a ruinous heap, because of its confederacy with Ephraim against God's city Jerusalem. Isaiah 17:1 : cf. also Amos 1:3-5 ; Jeremiah 49:23-27 ; Zechariah 9:1 . God had used the kings of Syria to punish Israel; but, as in other cases, He afterwards for their arrogance and cruelty brought them to nought.
In the time of the Medo-Persian kingdom, Damascus was again rebuilt and was the most famous city of Syria; it afterwards belonged to the Greeks, and later to the Romans, and eventually to the Arabs, Saracens, and Turks.
In the N.T. Damascus is of note as the city near to which Paul was converted, and where he received his sight, and began to preach. He escaped from his enemies by being let down by the wall in a basket. Acts 9:2-27 ; Acts 22:5-11 . In 2 Corinthians 11:32 its inhabitants are called DAMASCENES. Damascus was the first Gentile city in which Jesus was preached as 'the Son of God;' and though it is now in possession of Muslims, yet in their great mosque a stone has been preserved that formed part of a church erected on the spot, bearing this inscription in Greek: " Thy kingdom, O Christ, is an everlasting kingdom, and Thy dominion endureth throughout all generations. " The city is also lamentably memorable on account of the outburst of Muslim hatred in 1860, when on the 9th, 10th and 11th of July not less than 2,500 adult Christians were murdered by them in cold blood, and many besides lost their lives in their flight.
The city is beautifully situated (33 30' N, 36 18' E ) at the foot of the south-east range of Antilibanus on a large plain, watered by the two rivers Barada and Awaj (the Abana and Pharpar of 2 Kings 5:12 ), the former of which runs through the city, and may be said to be the life of the place. The plain abounds in corn-fields, olive-groves, and meadows, with vines, figs, apricots, citrons, plums, pomegranates, and other fruits. There is a long street of more than a mile in length that may well have been called 'Straight,' but is now a street of Bazaars. This was divided into rows by Corinthian columns, the remains of which can still be traced.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Damascus
Damascus (da-măs'kus). The ancient city of Syria, 133 miles northeast of Jerusalem. It is on a fertile plain, 30 miles in diameter, with mountains on three sides. The plain is well watered by the Barada, the Chrysorrhoas (or "Golden Stream" of the Greeks, the Abana of Scripture; now El Aʾwaj, "the Crooked"), and the Pharpar of Scripture. 2 Kings 5:12. The climate is delightful; the nights are cool and the dews heavy: yet the people sleep on the flat roofs of their houses. Damascus is called by the Arabs "the Eye of the Desert" and the "Pearl of the East." It is to the Mohammedan the earthly reflection of Paradise. Travellers have vied with each other in describing the beauty of Damascus. "From the edge of the mountain range," says Stanley, "you look down on the plain.... The river Abana (the Barada), with its green banks, is seen at the bottom rushing through the cleft: it bursts forth, and as if in a moment scatters over the plain, through a circle of 30 miles, the same verdure which had hitherto been confined to its single channel.... Far and wide in front extends the level plain, its horizon bare, its lines of surrounding hills bare, all bare far away on the road to Palmyra and Bagdad. In the midst of this plain lies at your feet the vast lake or island of deep verdure, walnuts and apricots waving above, corn and grass below; and in the midst of this mass of foliage rises, striking out its wide arms of streets hither and thither, and its white minarets above the trees which embosom them, the city of Damascus. On the right towers the snowy height of Hermon, overlooking the whole scene. Close behind are the sterile limestone mountains; so that you can stand literally between the living and the dead." Sinai and Palestine, p. 410. Damascus has been called the oldest city in the world. Josephus says it was founded by Uz, a grandson of Shem; Abraham' visited it, Genesis 14:15; Genesis 15:2, A. V., but the R. V. reads "Dammesek Eliezer;" it was conquered by David, 2 Samuel 8:5-6; was allied with Israel and against Israel, 1 Kings 15:18; 1 Kings 15:20; 2 Chronicles 16:3; was taken by Tiglath-pileser; denounced by Jeremiah, Jeremiah 49:27; and afterward seldom noticed in Old Testament history. It was surrendered to Alexander the Great after the battle of Issus, b.c. 333. In the New Testament it is noticed as the place of the scene of Paul's conversion, Acts 9:1-25; later it became the residence of a Christian bishop; was conquered by the Arabs a.d. 635; became a provincial capital of the Turkish empire, 1516; and is now the residence of a Turkish governor. It is the hot-bed of Mohammedan fanaticism. In 1860, 6000 Christians were massacred by the Moslems in cold blood, in the city and adjoining districts. It has a population of from 110,000 to 150,000. The principal street, known as Sultany, or Queen's street, runs in nearly a straight line from east to west, and is supposed to be the same as the street called "Straight" in Acts 9:11.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Damascus
A celebrated metropolis of Syria, first mentioned in Genesis 14:15 15:2 , and now probably the oldest city on the globe. It stands on the river Barada, the ancient Chrysorrhoas, in a beautiful and fertile plain on the east and south east of Anti-Lebanon. See ABANA, and Pharpar. This plain is about fifty miles in circumference; it is open to the desert of Arabiaon the south and east, and is bounded on the other sides by the mountains. The region around and north of Damascus, including probably the valley between the ridges of Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon, is called in the Scriptures, "Syria of Damascus," 2 Samuel 8:5 , and by Strabo, Coelesyria. This city, which at first had its own kings, was taken by David, 2 Samuel 8:5,6 ; and by Jeroboam 2 Kings 14:28 . Its history at this period is to be found in the accounts given of Naaman, Ben-hadad, Hazael, and Rezin. It was subdued by Tiglath-pileser, 2 Kings 16:9 ; and was afterwards subject to the Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Seleucidea, and Romans. In the days of Paul it appears to have been held, for a time at least, by Aretas, king of Arabia Petraea, the father-in-law of Herod Antipas. At this period the city was so much thronged by the Jews, that, according to Josephus, ten thousand of them, by command of Nero, were put to death at once. It is memorable to Christians as the scene of the miraculous conversion of that most illustrious "servant of the Lord Jesus Christ," the apostle Paul, Acts 9:1-27 22:1-16 . Since 1506, Damascus has been held by the Turks; it is the metropolis of "the Pashalic of Damascus," and has a population of about one hundred and fifty thousand. The Arabs call it Eshshams. It is still celebrated, with the surrounding country, by all travellers, as one of the most beautiful and luxuriant regions in the world. The orientals themselves call it "Paradise on earth," and it is pretended that Mohammed refused to enter it, lest he should thereby forfeit his heavenly Paradise. The plain around the city is well watered and of exuberant fertility; and the eye of the traveller from any direction is fascinated by the view-a wilderness of verdure, interspersed with innumerable villas and hamlets, with gardens, fountains, and groves. A nearer view of the city discloses much that is offensive to the senses, as well as to the spirit. It is the most purely oriental city yet remaining of all that are named in the Bible. Its public buildings and bazaars are fine; and many private dwellings, though outwardly mean, are decorated within in a style of the most costly luxury. Its position has made it from the very first a commercial city, Ezekiel 27:18 . They cloth called Damask is supposed to have originated here, and Damascus steel has never been equaled. It still caries on an extensive traffic in woven stuffs of silk and cotton, in fine inlaid cabinet work, in leather, fruits, sweetmeats, etc. For this purpose huge caravans assemble here at intervals, and traverse, just as of old, the desert routes to remote cities. Here too is a chief gathering-place of pilgrims to Mecca. People from all the nations of East resort to Damascus, a fact which shows its importance as a missionary station. An encouraging commencement has been made by English Christians, and the fierce and bigoted intolerance of its Mussulman population has begun to give way. A street is still found here called "Straight," probably the same referred to in Acts 9:11 . It runs a mile or more through the city from the eastern gate.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Damascus
One of the world’s most ancient cities, Damascus has existed from at least the time of Abraham (Genesis 14:15). It is important in the Bible story as capital of the nation Syria, which was much involved in Israel’s affairs from the time of the division of the Israelite kingdom in 930 BC to the conquest of Syria by Assyria in 732 BC. (For the history of Damascus during this period see SYRIA.)
The city of Damascus was on the major trade routes that crossed the region and was an important commercial centre (1 Kings 20:34; Ezekiel 27:18). It was also the religious centre of Syria. The ungodly Judean king Ahaz worshipped the Syrian gods there, and built a copy of the Syrian altar in Jerusalem (2 Kings 16:10-16; 2 Chronicles 28:22-24).
After Alexander the Great’s conquest in 333 BC, Syria was made into an important province of the eastern part of the Greek Empire. But instead of making Damascus the provincial capital, the new rulers built a new capital at Antioch. With the Roman conquest of 64 BC, Damascus came under the administration of Rome, though for one brief period it was in the hands of an Arab king called Aretas (2 Corinthians 11:32-33).
The great persecutor of the early Christians, Paul, was converted to Christianity while on the way to Damascus (Acts 9:1-19). There were several Jewish synagogues in the city, and the Jews opposed Paul so violently that he had to escape to save his life (Acts 9:20-25). After a period in Arabia, he returned to Damascus (Galatians 1:17). It is not known how often Paul visited Damascus, though it is known that on several occasions he visited churches in Syria (Acts 15:41; Galatians 1:21).

Sentence search

Damascene - (dam' a ssceene) Resident and/or citizen of Damascus. See Damascus
Damascus - Apparently Damascus has been occupied continuously for a longer period of time than any other city in the world and can claim to be the world's oldest city. ...
Setting Its geographical location enabled Damascus to become a dominant trading and transportation center. Both major international highways ran through Damascus the Via Maris from Mesopotamia in the east through Damascus and the Jezreel Valley to the Plain of Sharon and the Mediterranean coast, then south to Egypt; and the King's Highway from Damascus south through Ashtaroth, Rabbath-ammon, and Bozrah to Elath on the Red Sea and to Arabia. By the same token, Damascus saw armies march along the highways, often using Damascus as the staging area. ...
History Archaeology cannot contribute much to the study of Damascus, since the continued existence of the city makes excavation difficult, if not impossible. Tablets from the Syrian center of Ebla mention Damascus about 2300 B. Thutmose III of Egypt claimed to have conquered Damascus about 1475 B. The Hittites battled Egypt for control of Damascus until the Hittites were defeated by the Sea Peoples about 1200 B. At this time Arameans from the nearby desert came in and took control of an independent Damascus, gradually establishing a political power base. ...
In the Bible Abraham chased invading kings north of Damascus to recover Lot, whom they had taken captive (Genesis 14:15 ). Abraham's servant Eliezer apparently came from Damascus (Genesis 15:2 ). ...
Soldiers of Damascus attempted to help Hadadezer, king of Zobah another Syrian city-state against David. David won and occupied Damascus (2 Samuel 8:5-6 ). Rezon became the leader of Syria headquartered in Damascus (1 Kings 11:23-25 ). Ben-hadad strengthened Damascus to the point that Asa, king of Judah (910-869), paid him tribute to attack Baasha, king of Israel, and relieve pressure on Judah (1 Kings 15:16-23 ). This gave Damascus reason to interfere repeatedly in politics in Palestine. ...
1 Kings 20:1 also features Ben-hadad of Damascus, giving reason to believe that Ben-hadad (literally, “son of Hadad”) was a royal title in Syria, identifying the king of Damascus as a worshiper of the god Hadad, another name for Baal. ...
Naaman, a Syrian officer, sought Elisha's help in curing his skin disease but decided Abana and Pharphar, the great rivers of Damascus, offered greater help than did the Jordan (2 Kings 5:12 ). These rivers made Damascus an oasis in the midst of the desert. Elisha also prophesied a change of dynasty in Damascus, naming Hazael its king (2 Kings 8:7-15 ). ...
Having fought against Damascus in campaigns in 853,849, 848, and 845, Shalmaneser III of Assyria severely weakened Damascus, besieging it in 841 and then receiving tribute again in 838. After this, Hazael of Damascus exercised strong influence, gaining influence in Israel, Judah, and Philistia (2 Kings 10:32-33 ). His son Ben-hadad maintained Damascus' strength (2 Kings 13:3-25 ). Finally, Jehoash, king of Israel (798-782), regained some cities from Damascus (2 Kings 13:25 ). Jeroboam II, king of Israel (793-753), expanded Israelite influence and gained control of Damascus (2 Kings 14:28 ). Amos the prophet condemned Damascus and its kings Hazael and Ben-hadad (Amos 1:3-5 ). ...
Tiglath-pileser III, king of Assyria (744-727), threatened Damascus anew. King Rezin of Damascus joined with Pekah, king of Israel, about 734 B. He also said that Assyria would destroy Damascus (Isaiah 8:4 ; compare Isaiah 17:1 ). Rezin of Damascus had some military success (2 Kings 16:6 ), but he could not get Ahaz of Judah to cooperate. Instead, Ahaz sent money to Tiglath-pileser, asking him to rescue Judah from Israel and Damascus. The Assyrians responded readily and captured Damascus in 732 B. Damascus had one last influence on Judah; for when Ahaz went to Damascus to pay tribute to Tiglath-pileser, he liked the altar he saw there and had a copy made for the Jerusalem Temple (2 Kings 16:10-16 ). Damascus sought to gain independence from Assyria in 727,720 but without success. Thus Damascus became a captive state of first the Assyrians, then the Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Ptolemies, and Seleuccids. Jews began to migrate to Damascus and establish synagogues there. Thus Saul went to Damascus to determine if any Christian believers were attached to the synagogues there so that he might persecute them (Acts 9:1 ). Thus the Damascus Road became the sight of Saul's conversion experience and Damascus the sight of his introduction to the church. He had to escape from Damascus in a basket to begin his ministry (2 Corinthians 11:32 ). Damascus gained importance, eventually becoming a Roman colony
Hobah - of Damascus. Tradition makes Masjad Ibrahim, "the prayer place of Damascus," at the village of Burzeh, three miles N. of Damascus, the scene of his thanksgiving to God after routing the kings. Nicolaus of Damascus makes him to have reigned there (Josephus, Rezon - ” An Aramaean leader who led a successful revolt against Solomon and established an independent state with its capital at Damascus (1 Kings 11:23-25 ). See Damascus
Bazaar - Benhadad of Damascus gave Ahab permission to set up bazaars in Damascus as Ben-hadad's father had done in Samaria (1 Kings 20:34 )
Helbon - ) "The wine of Helbon and white wool" Ezekiel (Ezekiel 27:18) makes Damascus supply to Tyre. Not Aleppo, which is a long overland journey from Damascus, but a village still called Helbon, three hours and a half journey N. of Damascus, high up in a wild glen of Anti-Lebanon; still famed for the finest grapes, also a depot for wool through its trade with the Bedouin shepherds
Abanah - The river of Damascus mentioned by Naaman, 2 Kings 5:12 . It is identified with the Barada , a river rising on the eastern slope of the Anti-Lebanon, which runs first southward, then westward, through the Wady Barada and the plain of Damascus. About 18 miles from Damascus, after dividing fan-wise into a number of branches, it flows into the Meadow Lakes
Phar'Par - (swift ), the second of the "two rivers of Damascus" --Abana and Pharpar --alluded to by Naaman. ( 2 Kings 5:18 ) The two principal streams in the district of Damascus are the Barada and the Awaj, the former being the Abana and the latter the Pharpur. The Awaj rises on the southeast slopes of Hermon, and flows into the most southerly of the three lakes or swamps of Damascus
Straight Street - A street in Damascus where Paul was staying after being struck blind in his experience with the risen Christ (Acts 9:10-12 ). See Damascus
Pharpar - (fahr' pahr) A river associated with Damascus (2 Kings 5:12 ). The river is perhaps the Nahr el A'waj which flows from Mount Hermon, passing about ten miles south of Damascus, or else the Nahr Taura
Damask - ) To decorate in a way peculiar to Damascus or attributed to Damascus; particularly: (a) with flowers and rich designs, as silk; (b) with inlaid lines of gold, etc. ) Pertaining to, or originating at, the city of Damascus; resembling the products or manufactures of Damascus. ) Damask or Damascus steel; also, the peculiar markings or "water" of such steel
Silk - demeshek, "damask," silk cloth manufactured at Damascus, Amos 3:12 . , "in the corner of a bed, and in Damascus in a couch;" RSV, "in the corner of a couch, and on the silken cushions of a bed" (marg. , "in Damascus on a bed")
Pharpar - One of the chief rivers of Syria, eight miles from Damascus 2 Kings 5:12); the Awaj, as the Abana is the Baruda. The ridge jebel Aswad separates Pharpar from Damascus. side of Hermon ends in the bahret Hijaneh, the most southern of the three lakes or swamps of Damascus, due E
Zabade'Ans, - an Arab tribe who were attacked and spoiled by Jonathan, on his way back to Damascus from his fruitless pursuit of the army of Demetrius. Their name probably survives in the village of Zebdany , about 26 miles from Damascus
Damascus - One of the world’s most ancient cities, Damascus has existed from at least the time of Abraham (Genesis 14:15). (For the history of Damascus during this period see SYRIA. )...
The city of Damascus was on the major trade routes that crossed the region and was an important commercial centre (1 Kings 20:34; Ezekiel 27:18). But instead of making Damascus the provincial capital, the new rulers built a new capital at Antioch. With the Roman conquest of 64 BC, Damascus came under the administration of Rome, though for one brief period it was in the hands of an Arab king called Aretas (2 Corinthians 11:32-33). ...
The great persecutor of the early Christians, Paul, was converted to Christianity while on the way to Damascus (Acts 9:1-19). After a period in Arabia, he returned to Damascus (Galatians 1:17). It is not known how often Paul visited Damascus, though it is known that on several occasions he visited churches in Syria (Acts 15:41; Galatians 1:21)
Hobah - ‘to the north’) of Damascus. of Damascus
Damascenes - Inhabitants of Damascus
Zahar - ” If the Hebrew refers to a place, the association with Damascus and Helbon suggests a Syrian site, perhaps modern as-Sahra northwest of Damascus
Hobah - Place 'on the left hand,' that is, to the north of Damascus, to which Abraham pursued the kings who had captured Lot. of Damascus
Zabadaeans - of Damascus. Perhaps Zebedâni , on the Anti-Lebanon, about 20 miles on the way from Damascus to Baalbek, represents the ancient name
Pharpar - A river of Damascus
Abana - Naaman, the leper, on being directed to wash in the river Jordan, says, 2 Kings 5:12 , "Are not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel?" Probably the Abana is a branch of the Barrady, or Chrysorrhoas, which derives its source from the foot of Mount Libanus, eastward; runs round and through Damascus, and continues its course till lost in the wilderness, four or five leagues south of the city. Benjamin of Tudela will have that part of Barrady which runs through Damascus to be the Abana, and the streams which water the gardens without the city, to be Pharpar; but perhaps the Pharpar is the same with Orontes, the most noted river of Syria, which taking its rise a little to the north or north-east of Damascus, glides through a delightful plain, till, after passing Antioch, and running about two hundred miles to the north-west, it loses itself in the Mediterranean sea, 2 Kings 5:12
Abana, And Pharpar - Rivers of Damascus, 2 Kings 5:12 . It is a clear, cold, and swift mountain stream, rising in Anti-Lebanon, north east of Hermon, flowing south east into the plain, and near Damascus turning eastward, skirting the northern wall of the city, and terminating 20 miles east in one of three large lakes. ...
The only other independent river of any size in the territory of Damascus is the Awaj, which crosses the plain south of Damascus, and enters the southernmost of the three lakes above referred to. As these rivers of Damascus were never dry, but made the region they watered like the Garden of Eden for fertility and beauty, Naaman might well contrast them with most of "the waters of Israel," which dry up under the summer sun
Hobah - A place north of Damascus, visited by Abraham, Genesis 14:15 ; now unknown
Sibraim - A northern landmark of Palestine, lying between Damascus and Hamath
Abana - (ab' uh nuh) or ABANAH (NASB) River in Damascus in Syria. Its modern name is Barada, and it travels swiftly from snow-capped Mount Hermon through Damascus to end in a marsh
Damascus - above the plain of Damascus, which is itself 2,200 above the sea. Hence, Damascus enjoys a temperate climate cooled by breezes. Fruit of various kinds, especially olive trees, grain and grass abound within the Damascus plain. The Barada flows through Damascus, and thence eastward 15 miles, when it divides and one stream falls into lake el Kiblijeh: another into lake esh-Shurkijeh, on the border of the desert. Abraham entering Canaan by way of Damascus there obtained Eliezer as his retainer. Josephus makes Damascus to have been founded by Uz, son of Aram, grandson of Shem. The next Scriptural notice of Damascus is 2 Samuel 8:5, when "the Syrians of Damascus succored Hadadezer king of Zobah" against David. David slew 22,000 Syrians, and "put garrisons in Syria of Damascus, and the Syrians became servants to David and brought gifts" (1 Chronicles 18:3-6). Nicholaus of Damascus says Hadad (so he named him) reigned over "all Syria except Phoenicia," and began the war by attacking David, and was defeated in a last engagement at the Euphrates River. His subject Rezon, who escaped when David conquered Zobah, with the help of a band made himself king at Damascus over Syria (1 Kings 11:23-25), and was an adversary to Israel all the days of Solomon. Jeroboam II, Joash's son, further "recovered Damascus and Hamath, which belonged to Judah, for Israel . Rezin of Damascus, a century later, in a respite from the Assyrian invasions, allied himself to Pekah of Israel against Judah, with a view to depose Ahaz and set up one designated "the son of Tabeal. Whereupon Ahaz begged Assyria's alliance; and the very policy of Damascus and Israel against Assyria, namely, to absorb Judah, was the very means of causing their own complete absorption by Assyria (1 Kings 20:34; 2 Kings 16:17; Isaiah 7:14-25; Isaiah 8:6-10; Isaiah 10:9). The people of Damascus were carried captive to Kir, as Amos (Amos 1:5) foretold, the region from which they originally came, associated with Elam (Isaiah 22:6), probably in Lower Mesopotamia = Kish or Cush, i. ...
Isaiah (Isaiah 17:1) and Amos (Amos 1:4) had prophesied that Damascus should be "taken away from being a city, and should be a ruinous heap," that Jehovah should "send a fire into the house of Hazael, which should devour the palaces of Benhadad"; and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 49:24-25) that "Damascus is waxed feeble . How is the city of praise not left, the city of my joy!" By the time of the Mede-Persian supremacy Damascus had not only been rebuilt, but was the most famous city in Syria (Strabo, 16:2,19). Damascus was the center through which the trade of Tyre passed on its way to Assyria, Palmyra, Babylon, and the East. of Damascus) in return for "the wares of Tyre's making" (Ezekiel 27:18). " The traditional localities of Acts 9:3; Acts 9:25; 2 Corinthians 11:33 (Paul's conversion on his way to Damascus, and his subsequent escape in a basket let down from the wall) are more than doubtful
Sibraim - of the Holy Land (Ezekiel 47:16), between the boundary of Damascus and Hamath
Lysanias - Tetrarch of Abilene (Luke 3:1 ), on the eastern slope of Anti-Lebanon, near the city of Damascus
Pharpar - One of the two rivers of Damascus which the proud Naaman declared to be better than the waters of the Jordan. It is in the district of Damascus, but does not approach the city nearer than about eight miles
Abana - It rises in a cleft of the Anti-Lebanon range, about 23 miles north-west of Damascus, and after flowing southward for a little way parts into three smaller streams, the central one flowing through Damascus, and the other two on each side of the city, diffusing beauty and fertility where otherwise there would be barrenness
Choba - CHOBA ( Jdt 4:4 ; Chobai Jdt 15:4-5 , noticed with Damascus)
Pharpar - A river of Damascus—Abana and Pharpar—alluded to by Naaman
Hobah - Hiding-place, a place to the north of Damascus, to which Abraham pursued Chedorlaomer and his confederates (Genesis 14:15 )
Hezion - ” Grandfather of King Ben-hadad of Damascus (1 Kings 15:18 ). His relationship to Rezon, founder of the Damascus dynasty, is not certain
Jerusalem, Cosmas of - Eigth century hymn-writer, born probably Damascus; died probably Maiuma, port of Gaza, southern Phenicia. He was foster-brother of Saint John of Damascus and entered with him the monastery of Saint Sabas, near Jerusalem
Rezin - to attack Damascus, and this caused Rezin to withdraw for the purpose of defending his own kingdom. Damascus was taken, and Rezin was slain in battle by the Assyrian king, and his people carried into captivity, B
Hagiopolltes - Eigth century hymn-writer, born probably Damascus; died probably Maiuma, port of Gaza, southern Phenicia. He was foster-brother of Saint John of Damascus and entered with him the monastery of Saint Sabas, near Jerusalem
Rezin - King of Damascus. But Ahaz invited Tiglath Pileser to his help, who took Damascus and slew Rezin, fulfilling Isaiah's prophecy. In the monuments records his defeat of Rezin and Damascus
Eliezer - Of Damascus, the lawful heir of Abraham, should he die childless, Genesis 15:2 . But as the name of the latter is not given; as Abraham had near relatives, Lot and others; and as there is no evidence that he ever lived in Damascus, some think Eliezer must have been a near relative of Abraham residing at Damascus; and that "steward of my house" and "born in my house"-literally son of my house, Genesis 15:2,3 -mean the same thing, the lawful family heir
Pharpar - Swift, one of the rivers of Damascus (2 Kings 5:12 ). This river empties itself into the lake or marsh Bahret Hijaneh, on the east of Damascus
ab'Ana - (perennial, stony ), one of the "rivers of Damascus. " ( 2 Kings 5:12 ) The Barada and the Awaj are now the chief streams of Damascus, the former representing the Abana and the latter the Pharpar of the text
Aretas - ” The ruler of Damascus in New Testament times. The name Aretas was born by several Arabian kings centered in Petra and Damascus
Eden, House of - A place or district connected politically with Damascus ( Amos 1:5 RVm Eliezer (abraham's servant) - (a) Trusted servant of Abraham, native of Damascus
ho'Bah - ( Genesis 14:15 ) It was situated "to the north of Damascus
Arpad - A city dependent on Damascus, and always named with Hamath (now Hamah on the Orontes)
Decapolis - Pliny gives them as follows: Scythopolis, Hippos, Gadara, Pella, Philadelphia, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Raphana, Damascus. Six are deserted, and none have many inhabitants except Damascus
Arpad - A Syrian city, associated with Hamath, 2 Kings 18:34 ; 19:1-37 ; Isaiah 10:9 ; 36:19 and with Damascus, Jeremiah 49:23
Damascene - ) Of or relating to Damascus
Arpad - A town or region in Syria, near Hamath, 2 Kings 18:34; Isaiah 10:9, dependent on Damascus, Jeremiah 49:23
Abana - The chief river of Damascus, the modern Barada, called by the Greeks "the golden stream," flowing through the heart of the city and supplying it with water. The Pharpar mentioned with it in 2 Kings 5:12 is further from Damascus, and answers to the Awaj. Hence, we see the significance of Naaman's boast, "Are not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel?"...
These rivers render the environs of Damascus though bordering on a desert one of the loveliest spots on earth; whereas the Israelite streams, excepting Jordan, are dry for a large part of the year, and running in deep channels but little fertilize the land through which they flow. Soon after issuing from Antilebanon, it parts into three smaller streams, the central flowing through Damascus and the other two one on each side of the city, diffusing beauty and fertility where otherwise there would be the same barrenness as characterizes the vast contiguous plains
Abana - " A river of Damascus, one of those which Naaman, in his pride, preferred to the waters of Israel. Having emerged from the mountains into the plains of Damascus, it flows through orchards and meadows till it enters the city, and passing through it, falls finally into a marshy lake, 15 or 20 miles below. At its rise the river is 3343 feet above the sea, and 1149 above Damascus, which is distant from the source about 22 miles. Damascus is thus made, though on the edge of a desert, one of the loveliest spots in the world. This may well account for the question of Naaman the Syrian: "Are not Abana and Pharphar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel?" 2 Kings 5:12
Zedad - ” It is Sadad, 62 miles north of Damascus
ma'Her-Shal'al-Hash'-Baz - hasten-booty speedspoil ), whose name was given by divine direction to indicate that Damascus and Samaria were soon to be plundered by the king of Assyria
Decapolis - The original ten cities, as enumerated by Pliny, were Scythopolis, Pella, Dion, Gerasa, Philadelphia, Gadara, Raphana, Kanatha, Hippos, and Damascus. The region of Decapolis ( Matthew 4:25 , Mark 5:20 ; Mark 7:31 ) was the territory in which these cities were situated; that is (excluding Damascus), roughly speaking, the country S
Tiglath-Pileser - He invaded Samaria, 2 Kings 15:29, and after some years destroyed Damascus, taking many captives. The occasion of the first attack was probably the refusal of Pekah to pay tribute; of the second, the call of Ahaz upon him for assistance against Pekah and Rezin, the king of Syria, Tiglath-pileser at Damascus met Ahaz, who became his vassal
Tebah - Tebah is perhaps associated with tubihi, a site somewhere between Damascus and Kadesh
Rezon - Son of Eliadad and a subject of Hadadezer king of Zobah: he fled to Damascus, and established himself as king
Moab - ...
(2) A rich and populous land (4Kings 3), home of the Moabites, 50 miles long, and 30 miles broad, commanding the routes from Arabia to Damascus
Helbon - It is modern Halbun about eleven miles north of Damascus
Amana - The southern part or summit of Anti-Lebanon, adjacent to and north of Hermon, from which the river Amana or Abana poured down towards Damascus, Song of Song of Solomon 4:8
Tabri(m)Mon - ” Father of king Ben-Hadad of Damascus (1 Kings 15:18 )
Sibraim - Apparently the northern border between Damascus and Hamath
e'Phra-im, Gate of, - one of the gates of the city of Jerusalem, (2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chronicles 25:23 ; Nehemiah 8:16 ; 12:39 ) probably at or near the position of the present "Damascus gate
Damascus, Damascenes - Damascus (Δαμασκός) cannot now be regarded as the oldest city in the world, but it has a surer title to fame in its possession of the secret of eternal youth. While Tadmor and Palmyra, Baalbek and Jerash, have only a ‘glory hovering round decay,’ Damascus is still ‘the head of Syria,’ the queen of Oriental cities. The creations of architectural genius have their day and cease to be, but Damascus is the perennial gift of Nature. Damascus has no means of self-defence, has never done anything memorable in warfare, has been captured and plundered many times, and more than once almost annihilated, but it has always quickly recovered itself, and to-day the white smokeless city, embowered in its gardens and orchards and surrounded by its hundred villages, is to every Arab what it was to young Muhammad gazing down upon it from the brow of Salahiyeh-the symbol of Paradise. ...
During the centuries of Greek and of Roman sway in Syria, Damascus had to yield precedence to Antioch. Yet in a sense the religion of Europe came by the way of Damascus, which was the scene of the conversion of the greatest of all missionaries. of our era the Jewish colony in Damascus was large and influential. It is not known when or how Christianity first came to Damascus. Damascus was the first of the ‘foreign cities’ (Acts 26:11) from which the Jewish authorities resolved to root out the Nazarene heresy. It had power, for example, to issue warrants to the congregations (synagogues) in Damascus for the apprehension of the Christians that quarter’ (Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. One of the Christians whom he intended to ‘bring bound to Jerusalem’ (Acts 9:2) baptized him (Acts 9:18), and ‘with the disciples who were at Damascus’ (Acts 9:19) he enjoyed his first Christian fellowship. ’ In Damascus he ‘preached Jesus’ (Acts 9:20), the substance of his gospel being ‘that he is the Son of God,’ ‘that this is the Christ’ (Acts 9:20; Acts 9:22). The alleged ascendancy of the Nabataean king in Damascus at that time raises a difficult historical problem, which has an important bearing upon the chronology of the primitive Church
Cinneroth, All - " Laid waste by Benhadad king of Damascus, ally of Asa king of Judah (1 Kings 15:20)
Rezon - The founder of a dynasty in Syria-Damascus in the time of David, and a great annoyance to Solomon, 1 Kings 11:23-25
Aretas - 2 Corinthians 11:32; "in Damascus the governor ethnarch) under Aretas the king kept the city of the Damascenes with a garrison, desirous to apprehend me; and through a window in a basket was I let down by the wall, and escaped his hands. Damascus had been a city of the Roman province, Syria; and we have Damascene coins of Augustus and Tiberius, and afterward of Nero, etc. This implies that some change in the government of Damascus took place under Caligula, Tiberius's successor. , he also granted Damascus to Aretas. The incidental way in which Paul alludes to Aretas' kingship over Damascus at the time of his escape from the ethnarch under him, by being let down in a basket from a house on the city wall (compare Acts 9:23-25), is a strong presumption for the truth of the Acts and Second Epistle to Corinthians
Aretas - The king of Arabia Petræa at the time the governor of Damascus attempted to apprehend Paul. It is likely that Aretas was restored to the good graces of the Romans, and that Caligula granted him Damascus, which had already formed part of his predecessor's kingdom
Ijon - ” Place in northern Israel captured by King Ben-Hadad of Damascus as a result of his agreement with King Asa of Judah (910-869 B. ) to break the treaty between Damascus and Baasha, king of Israel (1 Kings 15:20 )
Arabia Deserta - When Paul says he "went into Arabia and returned again to Damascus," he meant doubtless the northern part of Arabia Deserta, which lay adjacent to the territories of Damascus, Galatians 1:17
Aretas - 37), took possession of Damascus (2 Corinthians 11:32 ; Compare Acts 9:25 ). At this time Paul returned to Damascus from Arabia
Street - The street called "Straight" at Damascus (Acts 9:11 ) is "a long broad street, running from east to west, about a mile in length, and forming the principal thoroughfare in the city. "It is remarkable," says Porter, "that all the important cities of Palestine and Syria Samaria, Caesarea, Gerasa, Bozrah, Damascus, Palmyra, had their 'straight streets' running through the centre of the city, and lined with stately rows of columns
Aretas - The deputy of Aretas in Damascus sought to arrest Paul. He made certain changes in the East, and it is supposed that Damascus was detached from the province of Syria and given to Aretas
Zoba(h) - Zobah seems to be roughly where Syria later became a nation, northeast of Damascus. It was the leading Syrian power before the rise of Damascus
Hadrach - It is supposed to be found on the Assyrian monuments in the names Hatarakka, and Hatarika, where it is associated with Damascus and Hamath, as in Zechariah
Damascus - Damascus...
1. Railways run from Damascus to Haifa, Beyrout, and Mezerîb, and the important line to Mecca, begun in 1901, is expected to be finished in 1910. The writer of Canticles, in his appreciation of the sensuous beauty of scenery, has not forgotten Damascus: the nose of the Shulammite is compared to the ‘tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus’ ( Song of Solomon 7:4 ). ...
The history of Damascus begins in remote antiquity: the time of its foundation is quite unknown; but that a settlement should have been founded in so desirable a locality was inevitable from the very beginning of human association. In the Biblical history we first meet with the name of Damascus as a territorial indication in defining the line of Abram’s pursuit of the five kings ( Genesis 14:15 ). We must therefore pass this passage by with the remark that it is not unlikely that Abram’s servant was a native of Damascus. We hear nothing more of Damascus till 2 Samuel 8:5-6 , which describes David’s capture of the city as a reprisal for its assistance given to Hadadezer, king of Zobah; David garrisoned it and reduced it to a tributary condition (cf. The general of Hadadezer, however, Rezon by name, succeeded in establishing himself as king in Damascus in the time of Solomon, and made himself continuously a very troublesome neighbour ( 1 Kings 11:23-24 ). ) the king of Judah invoked the aid of Ben-hadad, king of Syria, whose royal city was Damascus, against his Israelite enemy. The Chronicler ( 2 Chronicles 24:23 ) reports a victorious invasion of Judah by Damascus in the days of Joash. The city of Damascus was re-taken by Jeroboam II. Prophetic denunciations of Damascus, as of the other enemies of the Hebrews, are found in Isaiah 17:1-14 , Jeremiah 49:23 , Amos 1:3-5 , and Zechariah 9:1 . Damascus as a commercial centre was always of great importance, and Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 27:18 ) alludes to its trade in vines and wool. Damascus appears only in connexion with St. Since 635 Damascus has been a Muslim city, though governed from time to time by different tribes and dynasties of that faith. Of course, there are the usual traditional sites of historical events, but these are not more trustworthy at Damascus than anywhere else in Syria and Palestine
Ephraim, Gate of - By its name it would evidentlyhave been on the north of the city, as is the present Damascus gate
Decapolis - (Greek: ten cities) ...
A district in Palestine east and south of the Sea of Galilee which took its name from the confederation of ten cities of which it was composed; those of interest are Damascus, Gadara, and Pella
Abilene - Abela, or Abila, the capital, was north of Damascus, and south of Heliopolis
ar'Pad - (strong city ), ( Isaiah 36:19 ; 37:13 ) a city or district in Syria, apparently dependent on Damascus
Nabateans - Damascus requested a ruler of the Nabateans. Paul narrowly escaped being arrested by the Nabateans in Damascus (2 Corinthians 11:32 )
Damascus - It is not again noticed till the time of David, when "the Syrians of Damascus came to succour Hadadezer" (q. In the reign of Solomon, Rezon became leader of a band who revolted from Hadadezer (1 Kings 11:23 ), and betaking themselves to Damascus, settled there and made their leader king. ...
The Syrians were at length subdued by the Assyrians, the city of Damascus was taken and destroyed, and the inhabitants carried captive into Assyria (2 Kings 16:7-9 ; Compare Isaiah 7:8 ). 64), and Damascus became the seat of the government of the province. 37 Aretas, the king of Arabia, became master of Damascus, having driven back Herod Antipas. Paul visited Damascus again on his return from Arabia (Galatians 1:16,17 ). 634Damascus was conquered by the growing Mohammedan power
Mearah - This may be the cave of Jezzin in Lebanon, 10 miles east of Sidon, on the Damascus road; or probably, as others think, Mogheirizeh, north-east of Sidon
Andrew of Crete, Saint - 740) Confessor, Archbishop of Gortyna, Crete, hymnographer, born Damascus, Syria
Hamath - ” City-state located in the valley of the Orontes River, roughly 120 miles north of Damascus. King Irhuleni of Hamath joined a coalition including Ben-hadad II of Damascus and Ahab of Israel which successfully thwarted the advance of Shalmaneser II of Assyria into northern Syria. Adad-nirari III of Assyria crushed Damascus and levied a heavy tax upon it. During the following decades, the king of Hamath, probably named Zakir, waged a successful rivalry with Damascus. From this time, Hamath's history seems to merge with that of Damascus (Jeremiah 49:23 )
Tahash - ” Third son of Nahor and Reumah (Genesis 22:24 ) and ancestor of an Arab tribe, perhaps associated with Tahshi north of Damascus
Hezion - It has been plausibly suggested that Hezion is identical with Rezon of 1 Kings 11:23 , the founder of the kingdom of Damascus, and an adversary to Solomon
Aha'va - Perhaps it is the modern Hit, on the Euphrates due east of Damascus
Hazar-Enan - Its exact location is not known, but some locate it at Qaryatein about 70 miles east north east of Damascus
Tibhath - The site is likely in the vicinity of Zobah north of Damascus
Rezon - Gathered the Syrian remnant, after David's slaughter of his master Hadadezer (2 Samuel 8:3-8), and set up a petty kingdom at Damascus, and thence harassed Solomon's kingdom
Maonites - Their abode may have been near the place now called Maan, nearly east of Petra, on the Haj route from Damascus to Mecca
Tema - An Ishmaelite tribe and district, in the north of Arabia Deserta towards Damascus, Genesis 25:15
Ashteroth Karnaim - The Samaritan version renders the word by "Sunamein," the present es-Sunamein, 28 miles south of Damascus
Amana - ), a stream near Damascus
Hazarenan - of Damascus, where there are copiousfountains, which 'Enan' seems to imply
Kir - A country from which the Syrians had come, and to which they were carried from Damascus by the Assyrians
Trachonitis - This province had Arabia Deserta to the east, Batanea to the west, Iturea to the south, and the country of Damascus to the north
Damascene, John, Saint - Confessor, Doctor of the Church, born Damascus, Syria, 676; died 770. John was educated by the monk Cosmas; after his father's death he was made chief councilor of Damascus
John Damascene, Saint - Confessor, Doctor of the Church, born Damascus, Syria, 676; died 770. John was educated by the monk Cosmas; after his father's death he was made chief councilor of Damascus
ju'Das, - (Matthew 1:2,3 ) ...
A man residing at Damascus, in "the street which is called Straight," in whose house Saul of Tarsus lodged after his miraculous conversion
Rezon - Son of Eliadah, a Syrian, who when David defeated Hadadezer king of Zobah, put himself at the head of a band of adventurers and set up a petty kingdom at Damascus
ju'Das, - (Matthew 1:2,3 ) ...
A man residing at Damascus, in "the street which is called Straight," in whose house Saul of Tarsus lodged after his miraculous conversion
Tiglathpileser, Tilgathpilneser - In the days of Ahaz, when Pekah had formed an alliance with Rezin, king of Damascus, against Judah, Ahaz appealed to the king of Assyria. Tiglath-pileser attacked Damascus, and according to his monuments he destroyed that city and put Rezin to death. The monuments also state that he held a court at Damascus where the kings met him, to own their submission, and pay their tribute
Ben-ha'Dad - (son of Hadad ), the name of three kings of Damascus. , King of Damascus, which in his time was supreme in Syria. , son of the preceding, and also king of Damascus
Ituraea - Its boundaries cannot be well defined, but it reached toward Damascus and embraced the southern slopes of Anti-Lebanon
Garrison - David, in turn, placed garrisons in Damascus (2 Samuel 8:6 ) and in Edom (2 Samuel 8:14 ) with the result that the natives became his servants, that is, they were subjugated and forced to pay tribute. The KJV of 2 Corinthians 11:32 mentions that the city of Damascus was guarded with a garrison
Pharpar - A river of Damascus mentioned with the Abanah ( 2 Kings 5:12 ) by Naaman as contrasting favourably with the Jordan. The principal obstacle to this identification is the distance of the river from the city; but Naaman was perhaps thinking as much of the fertile plain of Damascus as of the city itself
Basket - Paul’s escape from Damascus, one, σφυρίς or σπυρίς (Acts 9:25), being the same as is found in the miracle of feeding the 4000 (Matthew 15:37, Mark 8:8), the other, σαργάνη, being peculiar to the Apostle’s own version of the incident (2 Corinthians 11:33). The basket-making industry was located in the neighbourhood of the Sea of Galilee, with headquarters at Scythopolis, and a ready outlet for the manufactured article was found in Damascus (see S. It need not be said that present-day tradition’s in Damascus are of little value. Only the lower half of the wall dates possibly from NT times (see Encyclopaedia Biblica , article ‘Damascus’)
Pannag - Others take it as the name of some place, identifying it with Pingi, on the road between Damascus and Baalbec
Abilene - A plain, a district lying on the east slope of the Anti-Lebanon range; so called from its chief town, Abila (Luke 3:1 ), which stood in the Suk Wady Barada, between Heliopolis (Baalbec) and Damascus, 38 miles from the former and 18 from the latter
ar'Gob - In later times it was called Trachonitis, and it is now apparently identified with the Leiah, a very remarkable district south of Damascus and east of the Sea of Galilee
ar'Gob - In later times it was called Trachonitis, and it is now apparently identified with the Leiah, a very remarkable district south of Damascus and east of the Sea of Galilee
Ben-Hadad - The name of three kings of Damascus in the 9th cent. , the son of Tab-rimmon of Damascus. Under him Damascus lost his father’s conquests in Palestine ( 2 Kings 13:24 f
Aram - There were probably several petty kingdoms included under Aram, as Aram-zobah, Aram Beth-rehob, Aram Damascus, Padan-aram; all these were gradually absorbed by that of Damascus, which became the capital of all "Aram," or Syria
Pekah - In the latter part of his evil reign he formed an alliance with the Syrians of Damascus, and they attacked Ahaz king of Judah, who in turn sought the aid of Assyria. The result was, that Damascus was taken by Tiglath-Pileser king of Assyria, and with it all the lands of Israel east of the Jordan and north of the Sea of Galilee, their inhabitants being carried captive
Arpad - (Isaiah 10:9 ; 36:19 ; 37:13 ), also Arphad, support, a Syrian city near Hamath, along with which it is invariably mentioned (2 Kings 19:13 ; 18:34 ; Isaiah 10:9 ), and Damascus (Jeremiah 49:23 )
Hazar-Enan - More probably, however, it has been identified with Kuryetein, about 60 miles east-north-east of Damascus
Shear Jashub - His name was a standing memorial to Ahaz, symbolizing the saving of the remnant of Judah when Israel was cast away (Isaiah 7:1-7; Isaiah 10:20-22; Isaiah 6:13), therefore that Pekah of Israel and Rezin of Damascus could not succeed
Second Crusade - These crusaders besieged Damascus, 1148, but never reached Edessa
Zobah - It seems to have lain near Damascus, and to have included the city Hamath conquered by Solomon, 2 Chronicles 8:3 , but also to have extended towards the Euphrates, 2 Samuel 8:3
Ituraea - It is bounded on the east by Trachonitis, on the south by Gaulanitis, on the west by Hermon, and on the north by the plain of Damascus
Gates of Jerusalem And the Temple - On the north, the principal gateway (Damascus Gate) opened onto the Damascus Road
Nose - Among the rest he saith, "her nose is as the tower of Lebanon, which looketh towards Damascus. And not only the discoveries, by the smell of his garments, of righteousness, like the myrrh, and aloes, and cassia, but the looking towards Damascus, implying the extent of that longing for Christ which, like the tower, or an high mountain, may be seen from afar off; so the church is always on the look-out for Jesus, when coming over the mountains of spices and hills of frankincense
Trachonitis - of Damascus and E. Jerome places Trachonitis rightly between Damascus and Bostra; having Kenath among its chief towns. by Ituraea (Jedur) and Damascus
Rezin - The last king of Damascus. Damascus and Israel were under the suzerainty of Assyria. enumerates the articles paid him in tribute by Ra-sun-nu of Damascus and Menahem of Israel (b. Damascus sustained a siege of more than a year’s duration, but was eventually taken (b
Zoba - It adjoined the Damascus territory, and stretched toward the Euphrates(See HADADEZER
Maher-Shalal-Hash-Baz - Plunder speedeth; spoil hasteth, (Isaiah 8:1-3 ; Compare Zephaniah 1:14 ), a name Isaiah was commanded first to write in large characters on a tablet, and afterwards to give as a symbolical name to a son that was to be born to him (Isaiah 8:1,3 ), as denoting the sudden attack on Damascus and Syria by the Assyrian army
Hadrach - made two expeditions, the first against Damascus B
Kir - A wall or fortress, a place to which Tiglath-pileser carried the Syrians captive after he had taken the city of Damascus (2 Kings 16:9 ; Amos 1:5 ; 9:7 )
Window - From them the spies at Jericho were let down, and Paul at Damascus (Joshua 2:15; 2 Corinthians 11:33)
Ash'Teroth Karna'im - " It is probably the modern Es-Sanamein , on the Haj route, about 25 miles south of Damascus
Mahershalalhashbaz - ' The child was to be so called because before he should "have knowledge to cry, My father, and my mother, the riches of Damascus and the spoil of Samaria" should be taken away before the king of Assyria
Hadrach - A place in Syria mentioned in Zechariah 9:1 as being, at the time of the writing of that passage, confederate with Damascus
Zoba, Zobah - District in the north of Syria lying between Hamath and Damascus
a'Bel - The traditional site of his murder and his grave are pointed out near Damascus
Rezin - King of Damascus: allied himself with Pekah and defeated Ahaz, but was himself defeated by Tiglath-pileser II
Hauran - Ezekiel 47:16 , was originally a small district south of Damascus, and east of the sea of Tiberias, but was afterwards extended to the south and east, and under the Romans was called Auranitis
Hel'Bon - (fertile ), a place mentioned only in ( Ezekiel 27:18 ) Geographers have hitherto represented Helbon as identical with the city of Aleppo, called Haleb by the Arabs; but there are strong reasons against this, and the ancient city must be identified with a village within a few miles of Damascus still bearing the ancient name Helbon, and still celebrated as producing the finest grapes in the country
a'Bel - The traditional site of his murder and his grave are pointed out near Damascus
Ahaz - The only notable event of his reign, so far as we know, was the invasion made by his northern neighbours, Pekah of Israel and Rezin of Damascus. ...
Tiglath-pileser was already on the march, and at once laid siege to Damascus, thus freeing Jerusalem from its enemies. Two years later the Assyrian king entered Damascus, and was visited there by Ahaz
zo'ba, - Hadadezer's allies, the Syrians of Damascus, were defeated in a great battle. A man of Zobah, Rezon son of Eliadah, made himself master of Damascus where he proved a fierce adversary to Israel all through the reign of Solomon. The name however, is found at a later date in the inscriptions of Assyria, where the kingdom of Zobah seems to intervene between Hamath and Damascus
Benbadad - The name of three kings of Damascus. was either son or grandson of Rezon, and in his time Damascus was supreme in Syria. , son of the preceding, and also king of Damascus
Ituraea - toward Hauran, and from Damascus to northern Bashan. , and the Damascus plain on its N
Anani'as - ...
A Jewish disciple at Damascus, (Acts 9:10-17 ) of high repute, (Acts 22:12 ) who sought out Saul during the period of blindness which followed his conversion, and announced to him his future commission as a preacher of the gospel. Tradition makes him to have been afterwarded bishop of Damascus, and to have died by martyrdom
Abilene - Abilene was located about eighteen miles northwest of Damascus in the Anti-Lebanon mountain range
Helam - ” The earliest Greek translation of Ezekiel 47:16 apparently locates it between Damascus and Hamath in Syria
Abilene - The name of a district of country on the eastern declivity of Anti-Lebanon, from twelve to twenty miles north-west of Damascus, towards Heliopolis, or Baalbek; so called from the city of ABILA, and also called Abilene of Lysanias, to distinguish it from others
Tema - South; desert, one of the sons of Ishmael, and father of a tribe so called (Genesis 25:15 ; 1 Chronicles 1:30 ; Job 6:19 ; Isaiah 21:14 ; Jeremiah 25:23 ) which settled at a place to which he gave his name, some 250 miles south-east of Edom, on the route between Damascus and Mecca, in the northern part of the Arabian peninsula, toward the Syrian desert; the modern Teyma'
Rezon - Abandoning the service of Hadadezer, the king of Zobah, on the occasion of his being defeated by David, he became the "captain over a band" of marauders, and took Damascus, and became king of Syria (1 Kings 11:23-25 ; 2 Samuel 8:3-8 )
Trachonitis - The region of Trachonitis lay to the north-east of Palestine, between Lake Galilee and Damascus
Nobah - But Ewald identified Nobah with Nawa on the Damascus road, 16 miles E
Trachonitis - In the time of Christ, was, as its name imports, a rugged province, lying on the northeast border of Palestine, south of Damascus, between the mountains of Arabia Deserta on the east, and Iturea, Auranitis, and Batania on the west and south, Luke 3:1
Damascus - The Syriansof Damascus sided with Hadadezer, king of Zobah, against Israel, but David slew 22,000 of the Syrians. Rezon escaped and established himself at Damascus as king of Syria and was an adversary to Israel all the days of Solomon. Jeroboam also 'restored' the coast of Israel, and recovered Damascus and Hamath, according to the prophecy of Jonah. He attacked Damascus, and took it, and carried away the inhabitants to Kir, and slew Rezin, about B. ...
Isaiah prophesied that Damascus should be a ruinous heap, because of its confederacy with Ephraim against God's city Jerusalem. ...
In the time of the Medo-Persian kingdom, Damascus was again rebuilt and was the most famous city of Syria; it afterwards belonged to the Greeks, and later to the Romans, and eventually to the Arabs, Saracens, and Turks. Damascus is of note as the city near to which Paul was converted, and where he received his sight, and began to preach. Damascus was the first Gentile city in which Jesus was preached as 'the Son of God;' and though it is now in possession of Muslims, yet in their great mosque a stone has been preserved that formed part of a church erected on the spot, bearing this inscription in Greek: " Thy kingdom, O Christ, is an everlasting kingdom, and Thy dominion endureth throughout all generations
Damascus - The region around and north of Damascus, including probably the valley between the ridges of Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon, is called in the Scriptures, "Syria of Damascus," 2 Samuel 8:5 , and by Strabo, Coelesyria. Since 1506, Damascus has been held by the Turks; it is the metropolis of "the Pashalic of Damascus," and has a population of about one hundred and fifty thousand. They cloth called Damask is supposed to have originated here, and Damascus steel has never been equaled. People from all the nations of East resort to Damascus, a fact which shows its importance as a missionary station
Ahava - It has, however, been supposed to be the name of a place (Ezra 8:15 ) now called Hit, on the Euphrates, east of Damascus
Edrei - Its location is modern Dera halfway between Damascus and Amman
Ahava - of Damascus; Ihi-dakira, "the spring of bitumen," was its name subsequently to Ezra's times
Ananias - ...
(2) Disciple at Damascus, figuring in the baptism and conversion of Paul (Acts 9)
Kir - The country whence the Syrians emigrated when they came to settle in the region north of Palestine, and to which Tiglath-pileser sent the captive Syrians after the conquest of Damascus
Coele-Syr'ia - The only mention of the region as a separate tract of country which the Jewish Scriptures contain is probably that in ( Amos 1:5 ) where "the inhabitants of the plain of Aven" are threatened in conjunction with those of Damascus
Damascus, Syria - , Damascus was the chief commercial emporium for the nomad Arabs. In early times Damascus was a metropolis with eleven suffragan sees, subject to the Patriarchate of Antioch
Hauran - Extending from near Damascus southward as far as the Jabbok. It is still the granary of Damascus
Ananias - A Jewish disciple at Damascus, Acts 9:10-17, of high repute, Acts 22:12, who sought out Saul during the period of blindness and dejection which, followed his conversion, and announced to him his future commission as a preacher of the gospel. Tradition makes him to have been afterwards bishop of Damascus, and to have died by martyrdom
Uz - Unspecified territory, most likely in Hauran south of Damascus (Jeremiah 25:20 ) or else between Edom and northern Arabia (Job 1:1 ; Lamentations 4:21 )
Wool - " (2 Kings 3:1 ) The wool of Damascus was highly prized in the mart of Tyre
Berothah, Berothai - Ezekiel places it between Hamath and Damascus; the site is otherwise unknown
Zobah - It was on the north of Damascus
Damascus - Damascus (da-măs'kus). Damascus is called by the Arabs "the Eye of the Desert" and the "Pearl of the East. Travellers have vied with each other in describing the beauty of Damascus. In the midst of this plain lies at your feet the vast lake or island of deep verdure, walnuts and apricots waving above, corn and grass below; and in the midst of this mass of foliage rises, striking out its wide arms of streets hither and thither, and its white minarets above the trees which embosom them, the city of Damascus. Damascus has been called the oldest city in the world
Hobah - The town or region must lie somewhere north of Damascus, but its precise location is not known
Eliada - Father of Rezon, who established himself as king of Damascus after David conquered Zobah ( 1 Kings 11:23 )
Rezin - when Damascus fell to the Assyrians
Dothan - Caravans still pass this place, as of old, on their way from Damascus to Egypt
Iturae'a - (Genesis 25:15,16 ) It adjoined Trachonitis, and lay along the base of Libanus between Tiberias and Damascus
Rezin - Rezin was slain, Damascus made desolate, and the people carried into captivity
Judas - At whose house, in the street called Straight at Damascus (now the "street of bazaars," reaching long, straight, and wide from the S
Aretas - There is a difficulty here, for Damascus was ordinarily in the Roman province of Syria. 85; the Roman coins of Damascus end a. does not necessarily imply anything like a permanent tenure of Damascus by Aretas’ ethnarch
pe'Kah - He must have made the treaty by which he proposed to share its spoil with Rezin king of Damascus, when Jotham was still on the throne of Jerusalem (2 Kings 10:37 ) but its execution was long delayed, probably in consequence of that prince's righteous and vigorous administration. Its chief result was the Jewish port of Elath on the Red Sea; but the unnatural alliance of Damascus and Samaria was punished through the complete overthrow of the ferocious confederates by Tiglath-pileser. The kingdom of Damascus
Rezon - of Damascus and not far from the Sea of Tiberias, whom David overthrew ( 2 Samuel 8:3 ff. For some unknown reason he deserted Hadadezer, gathered a band of freebooters, seized Damascus, and founded there the dynasty which created the most powerful of the Syrian kingdoms
Fish - Fish are found in enormous numbers in all the inland waters of Palestine, and especially in the Lake of Galilee, Lake Huleh, and the ‘meadow lakes’ of Damascus. The cat-fish, Clarias macracanthus , not being a scaly fish, cannot be eaten by the Jews ( Deuteronomy 14:9 ), though considered a delicacy by the Christians of Damascus
Ben-Hadad - ...
...
King of Damascus, and successor of his father Hazael on the throne of Syria (2 Kings 13:3,4 )
Ramath-Mizpeh - It has been identified with the modern es-Salt, where the roads from Jericho and from Shechem to Damascus unite, about 25 miles east of the Jordan and 13 south of the Jabbok
Tabeel - Father of a man whom king Rezin of Damascus and king Pekah of Israel hoped to install as puppet king of Judah rather than Ahaz (Isaiah 7:6 )
Hazar-Enan - declivities of the northern part of the Antilibanus range, excluding the Damascus plain and its contiguous valleys, were included in the borders of the promised land (Speaker's Commentary, Numbers 34:9)
Maacah - or BETH-MAACHA, a little province of Syria to the east and the north of the sources of the river Jordan, upon the road to Damascus
Syria - Further south, Damascus was probably in existence (Genesis 15:2 ), though it is unknown from contemporary records. The Old Testament mentions the Aramean kingdoms of Beth-eden in north Syria, Zobah in south-central Syria, and Damascus in the south. As a result Zobah and its vassals, apparently including Damascus, became subject to David (2 Samuel 8:3-8 ; 2 Samuel 10:19 ). Late in Solomon's reign, he established himself as king in Damascus (1 Kings 11:23-25 ), taking southern Syria out of Israelite control. Subsequent occurrences of “Aram” or “Arameans” (“Syria” or “Syrians”) in the Old Testament refer to this Aramean kingdom of Damascus. ...
The rise of Aram-Damascus' power was facilitated by the division of Israel following the death of Solomon. When Baasha of Israel built a fort at Ramah threatening Jerusalem, Asa of Judah enticed the king of Damascus, “Ben-hadad the son of Tabrimmon, the son of Hezion,” to break his league with Israel and come to Judah's aid (1 Kings 15:18-19 ). See Damascus . Paul was converted on the road to Damascus (Acts 9:1-9 ) and subsequently evangelized in the province (Acts 15:41 ; Galatians 1:21 )
Ashteroth-Karnaim - of Damascus, N
Oboth - Now the halting place el Ahsa on the pilgrim route between Damascus and Mecca
Berothai - In Ezekiel 47:16 connected with Hamath and Damascus, as the northern boundary of the future inheritance of restored Israel
Wool - The wool of Damascus, famous for its whiteness, was of great repute in the Tyrian market (Ezekiel 27:18 )
Decapolis - of Jordan), Hippos, Gadara, Philadelphia, Pella, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Damascus, Raphana (all E
Tadmor - The site has been identified with Palmyra, a great Arabian city, located about 120 miles northeast of Damascus
Zobah - The exact location is uncertain; but this whole group of Aramæan settlements lay between Damascus and the entrance to Cœle-Syria
Aroer - District near Damascus
Governor - ἐθνάρχης 'governor of a nation,' an ethnarch, as the ruler of Damascus was called
re'Zin -
King of Damascus
Tiglath-Pileser Iii. - He is first mentioned in Scripture, however, as gaining a victory over Pekah, king of Israel, and Rezin of Damascus, who were confederates. In the Assyrian annals it is further related that, before he returned from Syria, he held a court at Damascus, and received submission and tribute from the neighbouring kings, among whom were Pekah of Samaria and "Yahu-khazi Tig'Lath-Pile'Ser - He first marched, naturally, against Damascus. After this, probably, he proceeded to chastise Pekah, whose country he entered on the northeast, where it bordered upon "Syria of Damascus. " Here he overran the whole district to the east of Jordan, carrying into captivity "the Reubenites, the Gadites and the half tribe of Manasseh," (1 Chronicles 5:26 ) Before returning into his own land, Tiglath pileser had an interview with Ahaz at Damascus
Ben-Hadad - ” Biblical references to Israel's interaction with Damascus and other city-states in Syria show the power of the kings of Damascus. See Damascus ; Syria
Damas'Cus, - According to Josephus, Damascus was founded by Uz grandson of Shem. (1 Kings 15:20 ) Under Ahaz it was taken by Tiglath-pileser, (2 Kings 16:7,8,9 ) the kingdom of Damascus brought to an end, and the city itself destroyed, the inhabitants being carried captive into Assyria. ( Acts 9:1-25 ) Damascus has always been a great centre for trade
Ben-Hadad - A name common to three kings of Damascus. David, having conquered him, put garrisons in Syria of Damascus; Rezon retook Damascus, and reigned there "an adversary to Israel all the days of Solomon" (1 Kings 11:23). Ben-Hadad I grandson of Rezon (probably), as king in Damascus, which had absorbed by that time the petty kingdoms around, helped Baasha against (See ASA king of Judah. ...
Shortly after Ben-Hadad fell sick, and sent Hazael with large presents to consult Elisha who was in Damascus (2 Kings 8:7-15)
Jannes And Jambres - The Damascus Document from the Qumran Sect describes the two as brothers raised up by Belial, the evil one
Ashurites - of Damascus
Hauran - Its northern boundary was Damascus; eastern, the Jebel Druze; western, the Golan Heights; and Southern, the Yarmuk River
King's Highway - It runs from Damascus to the Gulf of Aqabah and is the main caravan route for the Transjordan
Chedorlaomer - He returned by this latter route, for he was near Damascus when Abram overtook him
Abilene - It was described by ancient writers as eighteen miles from Damascus on the way to Heliopolis or Baalbek, and Robinson reached its site in six hours, on the eastern slope of the Anti-Libanus
Decapolis - According to Pliny, they were, Scythopolis, Philadelphia, Raphanae, Gadara, Hippos, Dios, Pella, Gerasa, Canatha, and Damascus
Bero'Thah - The first of these two names is given by Ezekiel, ( Ezekiel 47:16 ) in connection with Hahlath and Damascus as forming part of the northern boundary of the promised land
Rimmon - Syrian idol at Damascus
Naaman - , whom he accompanied officially when he went to worship in the temple of Rimmon, 2 Kings 5:18, at Damascus, the capital. " How long Naaman lived to continue a worshipper of Jehovah while assisting officially at the worship of Rimmon we are not told; "but his memory is perpetuated by a leper hospital which occupies the traditional site of his house in Damascus, on the banks of the Abana
Hadadezer - The Syrians of Damascus, who had come to help Hadadezer, were also routed, and Damascus was made tributary to David
Hazael - ” A powerful and ruthless king of the Syrian city-state of Damascus during the last half of the eighth century B. See Damascus ; Syria
Eliezer - a native of Damascus, and the steward of Abraham's house. In the earliest period of the patriarchal history, we find Abraham complaining for want of children; and declaring that either Eliezer of Damascus, or probably one born from him in his house, was his heir, to the exclusion of Lot, his favourite nephew, and all the other collateral branches of his family
Arabia - To the north ‘their territory reached as far as Damascus, which was under their protection, and even beyond Damascus, and enclosed as with a girdle the whole of Palestinian Syria’ (Mommsen, Provinces2, Lond. Paul relates how ‘the governor’ (ὁ ἐθνάρχης) of Damascus ‘under Aretas the king’ was foiled in the attempt, probably made at the instigation of the Jews, to put him under arrest soon after his conversion (2 Corinthians 11:32 f. 34; and, as the legate of Syria was engaged in hostilities with Aretas till the close of the reign of Tiberius, it is very unlikely that this emperor yielded up Damascus to the Nabataean king. But the accession of Caligula brought a great change, and the suggestion is naturally made that he bought over Aretas by ceding Damascus to him. Talking of the voluntary submission of the city of Damascus to the king of the Nabataeans, he says that...
‘probably this dependence of the city on the Nabataean kings subsisted so long as there were such kings Tiglath-Pileser - Among those who gave tribute on this occasion were Rezin of Damascus, Hiram of Tyre, and Pisiris of Carchemish. 733 came the turn of Damascus and also of Israel, the immediate cause being affairs in Judah. Taking advantage of the change, Pekah of Israel made an alliance with Rezln of Damascus to attack Judah, and captured Elath ( 2 Kings 16:5 ff. Pekah saved his land from further harm by paying tribute, but things went harder with Rezin, his ally, who shut himself up in Damascus. Mitinti of Ashkelon, seeing the fate of Rezin of Damascus, seems to have gone mad. After the fall of the capital, Damascus became an Assyrian province. It was in Damascus that Ahaz made homage to the conqueror, and seeing there an altar which took his fancy, had one made like it
Chestnut Tree - It attains great development; a wonderful specimen, which has a small room or shop within its hollow trunk, is to be seen in one of the streets of Damascus
Helam - In this case it must have lain on the border between Damascus and Hamath
Rehob - Father of a king of Zobah, an Aramaean city north of Damascus (2Samuel 8:3,2 Samuel 8:12 )
Jeroboam (2) - Very little is recorded of this king except that he obtained signal victories over the Syrians, and Hamath and Damascus were recovered, for the Lord had mercy on Israel
Abilene - It is one of the most picturesque spots on the railroad to Damascus
Tob - It is supposed to be the same as Ishtob, one of the small principalities of Syria, which appears, like the other little kingdoms in its neighbourhood, to have been swallowed up in the kingdom of Damascus
Hazael - An officer of Benhadad king of Syria, whose future accession to the throne was revealed to the prophet Elijah, then at Damascus, as to his recovery from sickness, and on the next day smothered the king with a wet cloth, 2 Kings 8:7-15 , B
Poplar - euphratica ; they both flourish round Damascus, where their trunks are much used in making supports for the mud roofs
Tiglath Pileser - Conquered Rezin of Damascus and Pekah of Israel at Ahaz' solid citation. The king of Assyria hearkend unto Ahaz; went up against Damascus and took it, carried the people captive to Kir, and slew Rezin. " Probably it was an Assyrian altar which Ahaz copied, as a formal recognition of the gods of the sovereign nation (which required subject kings to set up in their capital "the laws of Asshur"), and a token of submission: the visit of Ahaz to Damascus (where "he saw the altar") "to meet king Tiglath Pileser" accords with Tiglath Pileser's inscription that before quitting Syria he held his court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute from the neighbouring sovereigns, among whom he mentions Pekah and Jahu-Khaz (Ahaz) of Judah. He warred successfully in Media, Armenia, and upper Mesopotamia; but it was only on the western frontier that he made permanent additions to the empire, namely, Damascus, Syria, and Gilead
Tob - Hermon and Damascus in the 12th cent
Aven - Probably the great plain of Lebanon, Coele-Syria (included in the Scripture designation, "Syria of Damascus"), in which the idol temple of Baalbek or Heliopolis, the city of the sun god Baal, stood
Maacah - Between Bashan and the kingdom of Damascus, on the skirts of Mount Hermon, E
Baalbec - It was a city of Coele-Syria, on the lowest declivity of Anti-Libanus, about 42 miles north-west of Damascus
Snow - It was "carried to Tyre, Sidon, and Damascus as a luxury, and labourers sweltering in the hot harvest-fields used it for the purpose of cooling the water which they drank (Proverbs 25:13 ; Jeremiah 18:14 )
Window - The spies in Jericho and Paul at Damascus were let down from the windows of houses abutting on the town wall (Joshua 2:15 ; 2 co 11:33 )
Urijah -
A high priest in the time of Ahaz (2 Kings 16:10-16 ), at whose bidding he constructed an idolatrous altar like one the king had seen at Damascus, to be set up instead of the brazen altar
Aram - Damascus became at length the capital of the several smaller kingdoms comprehended under the designation "Aram" or "Syria
Street - " But shuq etymology means "a place of concourse", and rume is applied to the "straight" street of Damascus (Acts 9:11)
Governor - Damascus had a governor under Aretas the king
Hadadezer - under the more Aramaic form Adadidri , as the equivalent of Benhadad of Damascus, who led the great combination, including Ahab of Israel, against the Assyrians in b
Trachonitis - It lay to the east of Ituræa and Gaulonitis and to the south of Damascus, and included the remarkable region of the modern Lejah (see Argob) and part of the western slopes of Jebel Hauran
Decapolis - Historians are not quite agreed as to which were the ten cities, but they are now generally held to have been Hippos, Gadara, Pella, Philadelphia, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Damascus, Raphana, and Scythopolis
Caesarea Philippi - It was situated at the foot of Mount Hermon, near the head of the Jordan; and was about fifty miles from Damascus, and thirty from Tyre
Ramoth - It was famous during the reigns of the later kings of Israel, and was the occasion of several wars between these princes and the kings of Damascus, who had conquered it, and from whom the kings of Israel endeavored to regain it
Dial - The dial of Ahaz, 2 Kings 20:11 Isaiah 38:1-9 , seems to have been peculiar either in structure or size, and was perhaps borrowed from Babylon or Damascus, 2 Kings 16:10
Helbon - Formerly supposed to be Haleb, or as called in Europe, Aleppo, a city of Syria, about one hundred and eighty miles north of Damascus, and about eighty miles north from the Mediterranean Sea
Judas - One in Damascus with whom Paul lodged
Syria - Under the Ottoman system Syria denotes no more than the district of Damascus, for the vilayets of Aleppo and Beyrout, as well as the sanjaks of Lebanon and Jerusalem, form separate areas. To the east of Hermon, the Abana (or Barada), after creating the oasis of Damascus, loses itself in desert marshes. to a little beyond Damascus in the S. 636) the old Semitic capital, Damascus, regained its ascendancy. Porter, Five Years in Damascus, 2 vols
Trachonitis - of Damascus, known to the Greeks as Trachon , and to modern Arabs as the Lejâ
Carchemish - ) from Damascus to the Euphrates at Bir; 200 miles higher up on the Euphrates than the classical Circesium
Arpad - Jeremiah noted Arpad's confusion as he pronounced doom on Damascus (Jeremiah 49:23 )
Abana - A river of Damascus, made memorable on account of Naaman's leprosy
Doves' Dung - Great quantities of these are sold in Cairo to the pilgrims going to Mecca; and at Damascus there are many shops where nothing else is done but preparing chickpeas
ba'Asha - of Damascus
Ananias - A disciple who lived in the city of Damascus (Acts 9:10-19 ). In response to a vision he received from the Lord, this Ananias visited Saul (Paul) three days after Saul had his Damascus road experience
Hadarezer - Helped by the Damascus Syrians (See HADAD); driven by David beyond the river Euphrates (2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Samuel 8:5; 2 Samuel 10:6-9; 1 Chronicles 18:3; 1 Chronicles 19:7-19). )...
Rezonof Hadarezer's retainers escaped, and with "bands" marauded the thinly-peopled district between the Jordan and the Euphrates (2 Kings 5:2; 1 Chronicles 5:18-22), then became master of Damascus, and as an "adversary" did "mischief" to Israel in Solomon's days (1 Kings 11:28-25)
Aramean - ...
The most important city of the Arameans was Damascus. See Assyria; Damascus ; Aramaic
Aretas - Under him the mountain fortress of Petra began to assume the aspect of a Hellenistic city, and the Nabataean sway was extended as far as Damascus. He could not, however, prevent Lollius and Metellus from taking possession of Damascus (Ant. 36 (so Turner), and, some time after, the Jews of Damascus conspired to kill him (Acts 9:22 f. The question is thus raised when and how Aretas became overlord of Damascus. 10), and he may at the same time have given Damascus to Aretas as a peace-offering. 149), based on 2 Corinthians 11:32, that Damascus was continuously in subjection to the Nabataean kings from the beginning of the Roman period down to a
Beth-Shean - It is on the road from Jerusalem to Damascus, about 5 miles from the Jordan, and 14 from the south end of the Lake of Gennesaret
Rose - The famed rose of Damascus is white, but there are also red and yellow roses
Decapolis - , "city of the Scythians", (ancient Bethshean, the only one of the ten cities on the west of Jordan), Hippos, Gadara, Pella (to which the Christians fled just before the destruction of Jerusalem), Philadelphia (ancient Rabbath-ammon), Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Raphana, and Damascus
Dumah - Rulers in Dumah apparently led coalitions supported by Damascus and later by Babylon against Assyria between 740,700 B
Rimmon - Naaman worshiped Rimmon in Damascus (2 Kings 5:18 )
Ramoth - It became famous during the reigns of the latter kings of Israel, and was the occasion of several wars between them and the kings of Damascus, who had made a conquest of it, which the sovereigns of Israel endeavoured to regain, 1 Kings 22:3-5
Rimmon - The name of an idol worshipped in Damascus
Kir - A region to which Tiglath-pileser transported the captive people of Damascus, 2 Kings 16:9 ; believed to have been in the vicinity of the river Kur or Cyrus, on the northeast of Armenia
Assyria - This led to Ahab's casting off the yoke of Damascus and allying himself with Judah. Some years after this the Assyrian king marched an army against Hazael, king of Damascus. Ahaz, the king of Judah, when engaged in a war against Israel and Syria, appealed for help to this Assyrian king by means of a present of gold and silver (2 Kings 16:8 ); who accordingly "marched against Damascus, defeated and put Rezin to death, and besieged the city itself. " Leaving a portion of his army to continue the siege, "he advanced through the province east of Jordan, spreading fire and sword," and became master of Philistia, and took Samaria and Damascus. From an early period Assyria had entered on a conquering career, and having absorbed Babylon, the kingdoms of Hamath, Damascus, and Samaria, it conquered Phoenicia, and made Judea feudatory, and subjected Philistia and Idumea
Aphik - ...
...
A town on the road from Damascus to Palestine, in the level plain east of Jordan, near which Benhadad was defeated by the Israelites (1 Kings 20:26,30 ; 2 Kings 13:17 )
Hauran - Province on the east of the Jordan forming part of the ancient kingdom of Bashan, lying to the south of Damascus
Ahaz - Being harassed and weakened by Pekah king of Israel, Rezin king of Damascus, and others, he called to his aid Tiglath-pileser king of Assyria, to whom he gave the treasures of Jerusalem; who after dispersing those who warred against Ahaz, himself 'distressed' him and made him tributary. Ahaz displaced the altar of burnt offering by one made like an altar he had seen at Damascus when on a visit to Tiglath-pileser
Damascus - ...
Damascus is surrounded by a fruitful and delightful country, forming a plain nearly eighty miles in circumference; and the lands, most adjacent to the city, are formed into gardens of great extent, which are stored with fruit trees of every description. Maundrell, "can promise to the beholder at a distance a greater voluptuousness;" and he mentions a tradition of the Turks, that their prophet, when approaching Damascus: took his station upon a certain precipice, in order to view the city; and, after considering its ravishing beauty and delightful aspect, was unwilling to tempt his frailty by going farther; but instantly took his departure with this remark, that there was but one paradise designed for man, and that, for his part, he was resolved not to take his in this world. The air or water of Damascus, or both, are supposed to have a powerful effect in curing the leprosy, or, at least, in arresting its progress, while the patient remains in the place. James Conner visited Damascus in 1820, as an agent of the Church Missionary Society. He had a letter from the archbishop of Cyprus to Seraphim, patriarch of Antioch, the head of the Christian church in the east, who resides at Damascus
Aretas - Aretas, taking advantage of this supineness, seems to have made an incursion and got possession of Damascus, over which he appointed a governor or ethnarch, who, A
Ahaz - Notwithstanding the remonstrances and warnings of Isaiah, Hosea, and Micah, he appealed for help against Rezin, king of Damascus, and Pekah, king of Israel, who threatened Jerusalem, to Tiglath-pileser, the king of Assyria, to the great injury of his kingdom and his own humilating subjection to the Assyrians (2Kings 16:7,9; 15:29)
Receipt of Custom - Capernaum was close to the junction of the great north road to Damascus with the road that led eastwards round the northern end of the Lake of Galilee, and the important revenue station situated at this point is what we are to understand by the ‘place of toll’ in the Gospel story
Uriah - By the order of the king he built an altar at Jerusalem after the fashion of one seen by Ahaz at Damascus, 2 Kings 16:10-16 , where he is called URIJAH
Aphek - It is identified with Fik, 32 47' N, 35 41' E, on the great road between Damascus and Jerusalem
Bozrah - It is near the Hauran, 60 miles south of Damascus
Dumah - The region thus indicated is supposed to be the oasis formerly called by the Arabs Dûmat el-Jendel and now known as el-Jôf , about three-fourths of the way from Damascus to Medina
Hadad - Nicolaus of Damascus (Fragm. 2), confirms 2 Samuel 8:3 as to David's defeating Hadadezer or Hadarezer, king of Zobah, "when he went to recover his border at the river Euphrates"; Nicolaus says, "a certain Hadad, a native Syrian, had great power, ruling over Damascus and all Syria except. Phoenicia (this accords with 2 Samuel 8:5, 'the Syrians of Damascus came to support Hadadezer,' being his vassals); he contended against David king of Judea in many battles; in the last, which was by the Euphrates, he suffered defeat (making his third defeat: 2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Samuel 8:5; 2 Samuel 10:18), showing himself a prince of the greatest prowess
Sela - "The caravans from all ages, from the interior of Arabia and from the Gulf of Persia, from Hadramaut on the ocean, and even from Sabea or Yemen, appear to have pointed to Petra as a common centre; and from Petra the tide seems again to have branched out in every direction, to Egypt, Palestine, and Syria, through Arsinoe, Gaza, Tyre, Jerusalem, and Damascus, and by other routes, terminating at the Mediterranean
Tombs - All evidence is in favour of the opinion that this tomb was somewhere near the Damascus gate, and outside the city, and cannot be identified with the so-called "holy sepulchre
Tadmor - It stood in the great Syrian wilderness, 176 miles from Damascus and 130 from the Mediterranean and was the centre of a vast commercial traffic with Western Asia
Straight - A — 1: εὐθύς (Strong's #2117 — Adjective — euthus — yoo-thoos' ) "direct, straight, right," is translated "straight," figuratively, of the paths of the Lord, Matthew 3:3 ; Mark 1:3 ; Luke 3:4 ; in Luke 3:5 of the rectification of the crooked, with reference to moral transformation; in Acts 9:11 , the name of a street in Damascus, still one of the principal thoroughfares
Argob - A district lying to the south of Damascus and which formed a part of Bashan, where the giants resided
Asa - Politically he took a mistaken course when he submitted to Benhadad of Damascus to secure his aid against Baasha of Israel, who had captured Ramah
Aroer - The site is still called Ayra, Numbers 32:34; Joshua 13:25; 2 Samuel 24:5; Isaiah 17:2; but possibly another city near Damascus
Hermon - It is a part of the great Anti-Lebanon Range; at the point where an eastern and lower arm branches off, a little south of the latitude of Damascus, and runs in a southerly direction terminating east of the head of the sea of Galilee
Snow - Snow from Anti-Lebanon is still sold at Damascus and Beyroot in the simmer, and even conveyed to Egypt
Retreat - Paul in the desert near Damascus, St
Likeness - ...
First, the word means “pattern,” in the sense of the specifications from which an actual item is made: “Now King Ahaz went to Damascus … and saw the altar which was at Damascus; and King Ahaz sent to Urijah the priest the pattern of the altar and its model, according to all its workmanship” (2 Kings 16:10, NASB)
na'Aman - , whom he accompanied officially and supported when he went to worship in the temple of Rimmon, (2 Kings 5:18 ) at Damascus, the capital. " How long Naaman lived to continue a worshipper of Jehovah while assisting officially at the worship of Rimmon we are not told; ("but his memory is perpetuated by a leper hospital which occupies the traditional site of his house in Damascus, on the banks of the Abana
Christ, Portraits of - Many portraits have been based on two descriptions, one by John of Damascus (8th century), the other purporting to be by the fictitious Publius Lentulms, Pilate's predecessor in Judea
Eliezer -
"Of Damascus," the "steward" (RSV, "possessor") of Abraham's house (Genesis 15:2,3 )
Lebo-Hamath - Lebwe is close to the Litani River about 43 miles north of Damascus
Kir - It is said in 2 Kings 16:9 that Tiglath-pileser carried the people of Damascus captive to Kir, while in Isaiah 22:6 Kir is mentioned in connexion with Elam as furnishing soldiers to the Assyrian army which fought against Israel
Arnon - Hazael, king of Damascus, retook the territory from Jehu of Israel (841-814 B
Tadmor - Palmyra was situated about midway between Damascus and Tiphsah or Thapsacus on the Euphrates
c Sarea-Philippi - Cæsarea-Philippi (sĕs-a-rç'ah-fĭ-lĭp'pî), now called Banias by the Arabs, is a town at the base of Mount Hermon, about 20 miles north of the Sea of Galilee and 45 miles southwest of Damascus
a'Ven - It was situated in a plain near the foot of the Anti-Libanus range of mountains, 42 miles northwest of Damascus
Basket, Basketful - That the "basket" in which Paul was let down from a window in Damascus is spoken of by Luke as a spuris, and by Paul himself as a sargane, is quite consistent, the two terms being used for the same article
Aphek - A walled city in the plains of Syria, on the road to Damascus
Capernaum - It lay on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee, about five miles from the Jordan and on the frequented route from Damascus to the Mediterranean
Dothan - Clearly a place suitable for defence, it must have been of importance when the neighbouring high-road, still much used, was a main thoroughfare from Damascus to Egypt
ra'Moth-Gil'Ead - [1] Later it was taken by Israel, and held in spite of all the efforts of Hazael who was now on the throne of Damascus, to regain it
a'Hab - king of Damascus, two defensive and one offensive. (1 Kings 20:1-21 ) Next year Ben-hadad again invaded Israel by way of Aphek, on the east of Jordan; yet Ahab's victory was so complete that Ben-hadad himself fell into his hands, but was released contrary to God's will, (1 Kings 20:22-34 ) on condition of restoring the cities of Israel, and admitting Hebrew commissioners into Damascus
Hadad-Ezer - Rezon then established a kingdom for himself in the Syrian city of Damascus
Hanani - ) for paying tribute to King Ben-hadad of Damascus rather than relying on God (2 Chronicles 16:7 )
Aphek - of the sea of Galilee, still on the great road between Damascus, Nabulus, and Jerusalem
Against - Urijah made it against king Ahaz came from Damascus
Governor - The "governor" of Damascus would seem to have been the ethnarch who held the place as the king's lieutenant or vassal
Abana - Oneof the rivers of Damascus, which the proud Naaman declared were better than all the waters of Israel, 2 Kings 5:12 ; the other is Pharpar
Hauran - At present it extends from about twenty miles south of Damascus to a little below Bozra, including the rocky district of El Ledja, the ancient Trachonitis, and the mountainous one of the Djebel Haouran
Elie'Zar -
Abraham's chief servant, called by him "Eliezer of Damascus
Jeho'Ahaz - (2 Kings 13:22 ) he was kept in subjection by Hazael king of Damascus
Hazael - Elisha coming to Damascus, the capital of Syria, Benhadad, the reigning monarch, being then indisposed, sent Hazael, who was one of his principal officers, to wait upon the prophet, and consult him as to the issue of his disorder, 2 Kings 8:7-13 . Some years passed after this, before Hazael undertook any thing against the kingdom of Judah, it being remote from Damascus; but in the reign of Joash, the son of Jehoahaz, A
Israel, Kingdom of - Hazael, the ablest king of Damascus, reduced Jehoahaz to the condition of a vassal, and triumphed for a time over both the disunited Hebrew kingdoms. , the most powerful of all the kings of of Israel, captured Damascus, and recovered the whole ancient frontier from Hamath to the Dead Sea. Abandoning the northern and transjordanic regions to the encroaching power of Assyria under Tiglath-pileser, he was very near subjugating Judah, with the help of Damascus, now the coequal ally of Israel. But Assyria interposing summarily put an end to the independence of Damascus, and perhaps was the indirect cause of the assassination of the baffled Pekah
Ananias - A Christian of Damascus, who restored the sight of Paul, after his vision of the Savior, Acts 9:10-17 ; 22:12
Judah, Kingdom of - For the most part they were in friendly alliance, co-operating against their common enemies, especially against Damascus
Ahaziah - He joined his uncle Jehoram, king of Israel, in an expedition against Hazael, king of Damascus; but was wounded at the pass of Gur when attempting to escape, and had strength only to reach Megiddo, where he died (2Kings 9:22-28)
Dove - There is a species of dove found at Damascus "whose feathers, all except the wings, are literally as yellow as gold" (68:13)
Dial - As Ahaz copied the altar at Damascus (2 Kings 16:7; 2 Kings 16:10) so he probably copied the sun dial 700 B
Geshur - bordering on Syria of Damascus (1 Chronicles 2:23)
Jehoahaz - A turn for the better seems to have come before his death, because the forces of Assyria pressing on the north of Damascus turned the attention of that country away from Israel ( 2 Kings 13:3-5 )
Hazael - When Elisha visited Damascus, and Ben-hadad, who was sick, had sent Hazael, a trusted servant, to inquire whether he should recover, Elisha intimated his approaching sovereignty
Rose - Tournefort mentions fifty-three kinds, of which the Damascus rose, and the rose of Sharon, are the finest
Pool, Pond - ; and also to large basins, such as lend freshness to the courts of the houses in Damascus
Geshur, Geshuri, Geshurites - There seems to have been here an important pass on the route to Damascus and the East
ha'Math - 900) Hamath appears as a separate power, in alliance with the Syrians of Damascus, the Hittites and the Phoenicians
Haz'a-el - (whom God sees ), a king of Damascus who reigned from about B
Ahaz - Rezin, king of Damascus, and Pekah of Israel leagued against Judah, to put on the throne the son of Tabeal, probably a Syrian (Isaiah 7:6). What mock humility in one who scrupled not to use God's brazen altar to divine with, and had substituted for God's altar in God's worship the pattern, which pleased his aesthetic tastes, of the idol altar at Damascus (2 Kings 16:11-15); perhaps the adoption of this pattern, an Assyrian one, was meant as a token of vassalage to Assyria, by adopting some of their religious usage's and idolatries; indeed Tiglath Pileser expressly records in the Assyrian monuments that he held his court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute of both Pekah of Samaria and Ahaz of Judah. It is true the Assyrian slew Rezin, and carried captive the Syrians of Damascus to Kir; but their ruin did not prove Ahaz's safety, "the king of Assyria helped him not. Distress, instead of turning Ahaz to Him who smote them, the Lord of hosts (Isaiah 9:12-13), only made him "trespass yet more," sacrificing to the gods of Damascus which had smitten him, that they might help him as he thought they had helped the Syrians; "but they were the ruin of him and of all Israel
Aram - Various cities in the western part of Aram gave their own names to the regions around them: as Damascus, (Aram-Dammesek,) 2 Samuel 8:6 ; Maachah, near Bashan, 1 Chronicles 19:6 ; Geshur, Joshua 12:5 2 Samuel 15:8 ; Zobah, and Beth-rehob, 2 Samuel 10:6,8
Street - The street called "Straight," in Damascus, (Acts 9:11 ) was an exception to the rule of narrowness: it was a noble thoroughfare, one hundred feet wide
Aram - ) Damascus subsequently absorbed these
Street (2) - ’ But the distinction is ignored elsewhere; and certainly the ‘street’ (ῥύμη) called ‘Straight’ in Damascus (Acts 9:11) is no ‘alley
Confound - ...
Saul confounded the Jews at Damascus
Agate - ; they came from Damascus
a'Ram - " In the later history we meet with a number of small nations or kingdoms forming parts of the general land of Aram; but as Damascus increased in importance it gradually absorbed the smaller powers, (1 Kings 20:1 ) and the name of Aram was at last applied to it alone
a'sa - king of Damascus, by a large payment of treasure, forced Baasha to abandon his purpose, and destroyed the works which he had begun at Ramah
a'Haz - At the time of his accession, Rezin king of Damascus and Pekah king of Israel had recently formed a league against Judah, and they proceeded to lay siege to Jerusalem
Caraites - They are found chiefly in the Crimea, Lithuania, and Persia; at Damascus, Constantinople, and Cairo
Ananias - " ...
...
A Christian at Damascus (Acts 9:10 ). He was "a devout man according to the law, having a good report of all the Jews which dwelt" at Damascus (22:12)
House - Abram said, "Lord God! what wilt thou give me, seeing I go childless, and the steward of ray house is this Eliezer of Damascus?" (Genesis 15:1-2) meaning, that he was not born of his bowels, but Damascus born, probably a black
Hazael - King of Damascus from 886 to 840 B. Jehovah therefore threatened, and executed his threat, "for three transgressions of Damascus, and for four, I will not turn away the punishment thereof; because they have threshed Gilead with threshing instruments of iron; and I will send a fire into the house of Hazael," etc. He took Gath and even "set his face to go up to Jerusalem" (2 Kings 12:17) in Joash's reign (2 Chronicles 24:23-24), "and destroyed all the princes of the people from among the people" (it was God's righteous retribution, for it was "the princes of Judah" who with flattering "obeisance" at Jehoiada's death persuaded Joash to "leave the house of the Lord God of their fathers, to serve groves and idols," 2 Kings 12:17-18, and stoned Zechariah son of Jehoiada, who "testified against them," 2 Kings 12:19-22), and sent all the spoil to Damascus; Jehovah delivering "a very great host into the hand of a small company of Syrians, because the Jews had forsaken the Lord God of their fathers" (2 Kings 12:23-24)
Hedge - ...
Maundrell describes the walls round the gardens of Damascus, they are built of great pieces of earth hardened in the sun, placed on one another in two rows, making a cheap, expeditious, and in that dry country a durable wall
Thresh - ...
Amos 1:3 (a) This is a description of the persecution and whipping given to Gilead by the armies of Damascus
Mat'Thew - His home was at Capernaum His business was the collection of dues and customs from persons and goods crossing the Sea of Galilee, or passing along the great Damascus road which ran along the shore between Bethsaida, Julius and Capernaum
Demetrius - Having been defeated by Zabinas at Damascus, he fled to Ptolemais, and thence to Tyre, where in b. On the death of his father he established himself in Cœle-Syria, with Damascus as his capital (Jos
Apple Tree - As the best apples of Egypt, though ordinary, are brought thither by sea from Rhodes, and by land from Damascus, we may believe that Judea, an intermediate country between Egypt and Damascus, has none that are of any value
Ananias - A Christian disciple who dwelt in Damascus, and to whom Christ appeared in a vision telling him to go to Saul of Tarsus, who was praying and had Seen in a vision a man named Ananias coming in and laying his hands on him that he might receive his sight (Acts 9:10-17). Paul describes Ananias as ‘devout according to the law,’ and as one ‘to whom witness was borne by all that dwelt’ at Damascus. He is also described as bishop of Damascus, and reported to have met a violent death, slain by the sword of Pôl, the general of Aretas, according to one authority (Book of the Bee, by Solomon of Basra [3], ch. 227]'>[4]), stoned to death after undergoing torture at the hand of Lucian, prefect of Damascus
Rimmon (1) - ’ He is mentioned, however (in 2 Kings 5:18 ), not as a Palestinian or Babylonian, but as a Syrian, deity, who was honoured as the chief god of Damascus
Omri (1) - The wars with Damascus were not so successful
Hittites - The Tell Amarna tablets show that they seized upon Damascus then held by Egypt
Ananias - A ‘devout man according to the law’ at Damascus, a disciple who instructed and baptized Saul of Tarsus after his conversion, restoring to him his sight by imposition of hands; he had been warned by the Lord in a vision ( Acts 9:10 ff; Acts 22:12 ff
Ananias - Disciple at Damascus, who, being instructed by the Lord, found out Saul and laid his hands upon him that he might receive sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit
e'Den - ...
BETH-EDEN, "house of pleasure:" probably the name of a country residence of the kings of Damascus
Pekah - The fall of Damascus was followed by the ravaging of the districts of Israel north and east of Samaria, and the transportation of their inhabitants to remote portions of the empire
e'Den - ...
BETH-EDEN, "house of pleasure:" probably the name of a country residence of the kings of Damascus
Theodorus Lector - They have been collected out of Nicephorus Callistus, John of Damascus, and the fifth action of the seventh general council
Assyria, History And Religion of - , at Qarqar in north Syria, Shalmaneser fought a coalition of twelve kings including Hadad-ezer (Ben-Hadad, 1Kings 20:26,1 Kings 20:34 ) of Aram-Damascus and Ahab of Israel. This confrontation is not mentioned in the Bible, but it may have taken place during a three-year period of peace between Israel and Aram-Damascus (1 Kings 22:1 ). , he finally defeated Hazael of Damascus and on Mt. ) entered Damascus, taking extensive tribute from Ben-hadad III. He is probably the “savior” of 2 Kings 13:5 , who allowed Israel to escape domination by Aram-Damascus. ...
As Tiglath-pileser, also called Pul, arrived on the coast of Phoenicia, Menahem of Israel (2 Kings 15:19 ) and Rezin of Aram-Damascus brought tribute and became vassals of Assyria. Israel and Aram-Damascus attacked Jerusalem about 735 B. ), and annexed Aram-Damascus (732 B
Eliezer - He was 'of Damascus' though born in Abraham's house
Samaritans - They are said to be scattered; some at Damascus, some at Gaza, and some at Grand Cairo, in Egypt
Aroer - Jehu's sins brought God's punishment on Israel, including the loss of Aroer to Hazael of Damascus (about 840 B
Abilene - It was called after its capital Abila, situated on the Barada, about 18 miles from Damascus, and represented by the modern village of Suk
Hamath - During the time of David, Toi was king of Hamath ( 2 Samuel 8:9 ); the greatness of the city is referred to by the prophet Amos ( Amos 6:2 ), and it is classed by Zechariah with Damascus, Tyre and Zidon ( Zechariah 9:1 f
Gilead - In the restoration of Israel their border eastward will extend to Damascus and Gilead
Hebron - It lies about 3000 feet above the level of the sea, and is one of the oldest towns in the world and mentioned before Damascus, Genesis 13:18; Genesis 14:13; and was built 7 years before Zoan, or Tanis, in Egypt, Numbers 13:22
Ben-Hadad - Shortly before his death, Ben-hadad, being sick, sent Hazael to ask the prophet Elisha, then at Damascus, what the issue would be
Gilead - In the restoration of Israel their border eastward will extend to Damascus and Gilead
Lebanon - , is now extensively supplied with excellent carriage roads, and the range is crossed by the French railway from Beyrout to Damascus, the highest point traversed being 4880 feet above sea-level. This hollow plain, besides being crossed transversely by the Damascus railway and road, is traversed over more than half its length by the new line past Baalbek, Homs, and Hamath to Aleppo Some part of this plain, ‘the valley of the Lebanon, would appear to have been conquered by the Israelites ( Joshua 11:17 ). In Song of Solomon 7:4 it is referred to as ‘the tower of Lebanon that looketh towards Damascus. extremity of this plain, runs down the Wady Barada to Damascus
Eden - It has been placed in Armenia, in the region west of the Caspian Sea, in Media, near Damascus, in Palestine, in Southern Arabia, and in Babylonia
Hamath - Fortress, the capital of one of the kingdoms of Upper Syria of the same name, on the Orontes, in the valley of Lebanon, at the northern boundary of Palestine (Numbers 13:21 ; 34:8 ), at the foot of Hermon (Joshua 13:5 ) towards Damascus (Zechariah 9:2 ; Jeremiah 49:23 )
Ahab - , king of Damascus
Eden - Amos 1:5 refers to the ruler of Damascus as holding the scepter of the house of Eden
Rimmon - An idol worshipped by the Syrians of Damascus (2 Kings 5:18)
Chedorlaomer - Abraham with 318 armed servants however defeated him in turn, and rescued Lot, and pursued the invader to Hobah on the left of Damascus
Zarephath - The choice, among all others, of the widow of pagan Phœnician Zarephath, and of Naaman the leper of heathen Syrian Damascus, to receive the favours of the prophets Elijah and Elisha, filled the crabbed synagogue hearers of Nazareth with wrath and murder (Luke 4:25 ff
Eliezer - ’ Whatever the exact construction, the words, unless there is a corruption in the text, must be intended to suggest that Eliezer was in some way connected with Damascus)
Hazael - When an officer of Ben-hadad, he was sent to Elisha (who was visiting Damascus) to know whether Ben-hadad should recover of his sickness
Calvary - It is also a spot from whence the crucifixion could have been seen by the passers-by (on the road from the Damascus gate)
Benhadad - Afterwards when Ben-hadad was sick he sent Hazael to Elisha, who had come to Damascus, to know whether he would recover
Abila - Abila stood in the Suk ("a market") wady Barada, a gorge where the river breaks down through the mountain Antilebanon toward the plain, with a semicircular background of cliffs three or four hundred feet high, between Heliopolis (Baalbec), 32 miles off; and Damascus,...
18
Jehoash - Elisha bade him take bow and arrows and shoot the arrow of victory towards Damascus, then to strike the ground with the arrows
Ephraim - One of the gates of ancient Jerusalem, 2 Kings 14:13; 2 Chronicles 25:23; Nehemiah 8:16; Nehemiah 12:39; probably on the north side, as the present Damascus gate is
Hamath - Hamath, like Jerusalem and Damascus, is one of the few places in Syria and Palestine which have retained a certain degree of importance from the very earliest ages to the present time
Persecution - Saul of Tarsus was the moving spirit in this matter, until, on his road to Damascus to proceed against the Christians there, ‘Christ’s foe became His soldier
Theodorus of Amasea - 78) and Damascus (Johan
Elisha - On his way from Sinai to Damascus he found Elisha at his native place engaged in the labours of the field, ploughing with twelve yoke of oxen. ...
We then find Elisha at Damascus, to carry out the command given to his master to anoint Hazael king over Syria (2 Kings 8:7-15 ); thereafter he directs one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, king of Israel, instead of Ahab
Lebanon - Eastward in the glens of Antilibanus flow toward Damascus Abana (Barada) and Pharpar (nahr el Awaj). "The tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus" is Hermon (Song of Solomon 7:4)
Street - The only street referred to by name in the apostolic writings is the street in Damascus which is called ‘Straight’ (Revelation 22:1-278). Damascus above)
Hermon - A center to Syria and Palestine; the watershed of the Jordan fountains, and of the Syrian Abana and Pharpar of Damascus, the Orontes of Antioch, and the Leontes. Bashan, Damascus, Syria, and Israel converged there
Immanuel - Such a possibility is supported by the two verses immediately after 7:14 that tell us that the boy will still be young when Ahaz's enemies—the kings of Samaria and Damascus—will lose their power (a prediction fulfilled in 732 b. Both Immanuel in 7:15-16 and Maher-Shalal-Hash-Baz in 8:4 are young children when Damascus and Samaria collapse
Ptolemais - On a coast peculiarly unfriendly to the mariner, the Bay of ‘Akka is one of the few spots where nature has lent its encouragement to the building of a harbour; its importance in history has always been as the port of Galilee and Damascus, of the Hauran and Gilead, while in the days of Western domination the Roman Ptolemais and the Crusading St. ...
Under modern conditions, Haifa , with its better anchorage for modern steamships, and its new railway to Damascus, is likely to form a successful rival to ‘Akka
Decapolis - writer Pliny named the ten cities as Damascus, Philadelphia (modern Amman), Canatha, Scythopolis, Pella, Hippos, Gadara, Dion, Raphana, and Gerasa (modern Jerash)
Riblah - From this position the Phœnician cities of the coast were within easy command, as also were Cœle-Syria and the kingdom of Damascus, along with the land-routes leading farther south
Sargon - States under Ilu-bihdi, who drew Hamath, Arpad, Damascus, and Palestine into revolt
Matthew - ) As subordinate to the head farmers of the Roman revenues he collected dues at Capernaum on the sea of Galilee, the route by which traffic passed between Damascus and the Phoenician seaports
Syria - All these separate little kingdoms afterwards became subject to Damascus
Reveal - ...
"The objective use is that in which something is presented to the senses, sight or hearing, as, referring to the past, (f) the truth declared to men in the gospel, Romans 1:17 ; 1 Corinthians 2:10 ; Galatians 3:23 ; (g) the Person of Christ to Paul on the way to Damascus, Galatians 1:16 ; (h) thoughts before hidden in the heart, Luke 2:35 ; referring to the future, (i) the coming in glory of the Lord Jesus, Luke 17:30 ; (j) the salvation and glory that await the believer, Romans 8:18 ; 1 Peter 1:5 ; 5:1 ; (k) the true value of service, 1 Corinthians 3:13 ; (l) the wrath of God (at the Cross, against sin, and, at the revelation of the Lord Jesus, against the sinner), Romans 1:18 ; (m) the Lawless One, 2 Thessalonians 2:3,6,8
False Apostles - The false apostles appear to have been Jewish Christians (2 Corinthians 11:22 ), well-trained in speech (2 Corinthians 11:6 ), who perhaps claimed “visions and revelations of the Lord” (2 Corinthians 12:1 ) as authenticating marks of apostleship (Compare the role of Paul's Damascus Road experience, Acts 9:15 ; Acts 22:14-15 ; Acts 26:16-19 )
Hazael - Both these passages introduce Hazael somewhat abruptly; in each case the Israelite prophet goes to Damascus; and each passage has for its central point the question of Hazael’s succeeding to the throne of Syria; these considerations (not to mention others) suggest that the passages come from different sources, and are dealing with two accounts of the same event
Trachonitis - ; Schumacher, Across the Jordan; Porter, Damascus, ii
Armageddon - Here ran the ancient highway between Egypt and Damascus
Naaman - He had his own thoughts about how the prophet should have cured him, and asked if the rivers of Damascus were not better than the Jordan
Lebanon - The road from Beyrout [1] to Damascus crosses both the mountains of Lebanon
Jeroboam - He followed up his father's successes over the Syrians, took Hamath and Damascus, and all the region east f the Jordan down to the Dead Sea, and advanced to its highest point the prosperity of that kingdom
he'Bron - Hebron is one of the most ancient cities in the world still existing; and in this respect it is the rival of Damascus
Ananias - A Jew Christian at Damascus, "a devout man according to the law, having a good report of all the Jews which dwelt there" (Acts 9:10, etc. Tradition makes Ananias subsequently bishop of Damascus and a martyr
Paul Apprehended of Christ Jesus - " And thus it was that Saul actually went to the high priest in Jerusalem, and desired of him letters to Damascus, to the synagogues, that if he found any of this way, whether they were men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem. And, accordingly, on that errand, out at the Damascus-gate of Jerusalem, he rode with his band of temple police behind him: out past Gethsemane: out past Calvary, where he shook his spear in the face of the Crucified, and cried, Aha, aha! Thou deceiver! and posted on breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord. Thine arrows are sharp in the hearts of the King's enemies, whereby the people fall under Thee!...
And thus it was that, as Saul journeyed, and came near Damascus, suddenly there shone down upon him a great light from heaven. And Saul arose from the earth, and they led him by the hand, and brought him into Damascus. He was not groaning out the seventh of the Romans when he was galloping at the top of his speed on his way to Damascus. Saul got his conversion out of that overthrow on the way to Damascus, while all his companions only got some bodily bruises from their fall, and the complete upsetting of their errand out of it. The temple officers had each his own story to tell when they returned without any prisoners to Jerusalem: only, none of them needed to be led by the hand into Damascus, and none of them were baptized by Ananias, but Saul only
Omri - To strengthen his dynasty he allied himself to Benhadad I of Damascus, surrendering cities as the price of the alliance (1 Kings 20:34), including Ramoth Gilead (1 Kings 22:3)
Hadad - see) among the Aramæans of Damascus and apparently worshipped by all the Aramæan peoples, as well as among both South-Arabian and North-Arabian tribes, and also among the Assyrians
Jeroboam - This was due to the attacks of the Assyrians upon the northern border of Damascus ( 2 Kings 14:23-29 )
Capernaum - This city lay on the great highway from Damascus to Acco and Tyre
Wilderness - ...
The wilderness of Damascus was far north, and that of BEER-SHEBA far south; and that of SHUR, still farther south-west
Uriah - He fashioned in unscrupulous subserviency an altar like the idolatrous pattern from Damascus furnished to him; this altar he put in the temple court E. side of the Damascus altar, and Ahaz used it for his own private divinations
Decapolis - 18), these were Scythopolis (Beisân), Hippos (Susieh), Gadara (Umm Keis), Pella (Fahil), Philadelphia (’Amman), Gerasa (Jerâsh), Dion, Canatha (Kanawât), Damascus, and Raphana. He omits Raphana from Pliny’s list, and adds nine, most of the new members of the confederation belonging to the district just south of Damascus
Paul in Arabia - He had come down to Damascus with horses and servants like a prince, but he set out alone for Arabia like Jacob with his staff. And thus it was that as soon as he was baptized in Ananias's house in Damascus, Paul immediately set out for Arabia. Thy word is more to me than my necessary food, and thy love is better than wine!...
What a three years were those three years that Paul spent in Arabia! Never did any other lord receive his own again with such usury as when Paul went into Arabia with Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms in his knapsack, and returned to Damascus with the Romans and the Ephesians and the Colossians in his mouth and in his heart. A little understood writing; and no wonder!...
The Apostle came back from Arabia to Damascus, after three years' absence, absolutely ladened down with all manner of doctrines, and directions, and examples, for us and for our salvation, if we would only attend to them and receive them. Jesus Christ had revealed Himself to Paul already at the gate of Damascus, but God's revelation of His Son in Arabia was a revelation of far more than of Jesus Christ whom Paul was persecuting. The one, that grand and epoch-making revelation made on the way to Damascus, and made immediately by Jesus Christ, whom Paul was at that moment persecuting
Assyria - Hazael of Damascus was also defeated; and from Yahua, the son of Khumri, that is, Jehu, whom he incorrectly calls son of Omri, king of Israel, he received tribute; but of this scripture says nothing. He extended his victories to what he calls, 'the shore of the sea of the setting sun,' which is doubtless the Mediterranean, and imposed tribute on the Phoenicians, Israelites, Edomites, Philistines, and the king of Damascus. In his inscriptions occur the names of Jehoahaz (Ahaz) of Judah; Pekah, and Hoshea of Israel; Reson (Resin) of Damascus; and Hiram of Tyre. Ahaz sought his alliance against Rezin the king of Damascus
Judas - " ...
...
...
A Jew of Damascus (Acts 9:11 ), to whose house Ananias was sent
Kir - From Kir the Syrians migrated originally; and to it they were removed from Damascus by Tiglath Pileser (2 Kings 16:9)
Argob (2) - of Damascus, E
Escape - 1), is said of the "escape" of prisoners, Acts 16:27 ; of Sceva's sons, "fleeing" from the demoniac, Acts 19:16 ; of Paul's escape from Damascus, 2 Corinthians 11:33 ; elsewhere with reference to the judgments of God, Luke 21:36 ; Romans 2:3 ; Hebrews 2:3 ; 12:25 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:3
Hamath - Mentioned as an ally of the Syrians of Damascus in the Assyrian inscriptions of Ahab's time
Matthew (Apostle) - ) near Capernaum, which lay on the road from Damascus to the Mediterranean; here he collected dues for Herod the tetrarch
Way (2) - Saul ‘desired of the high priest letters to Damascus to the synagogues, that if he found any that were of the Way, he might bring them bound unto Jerusalem
Matthew - Matthew's office was located on the main highway that ran from Damascus, down the Jordan Valley to Capernaum, then westward to Acre to join the coastal road to Egypt or southward to Jerusalem
Gihon - ...
An aqueduct discovered lately (1872) runs from near the Damascus gate, on the Bezetha hill, to the souterrain at the convent of the Sisters of Zion
Caiaphas - He is probably the high priest referred to in Acts 5:17-21; Acts 5:27; Acts 7:1; Acts 9:1 who imprisoned Peter and John, presided at the trial of Stephen, caused the persecution recorded in Acts 8, and gave Saul of Tarsus letters to Damascus to apprehend the Christians there
Sychar - However Sychar may have been close to the well; and (Thomson, Land and Book, 31) the present village, Aschar, just above Jacob's well, on the side of Ebal and on the road by which caravans pass from Jerusalem to Damascus, and by which doubtless Jesus passed between Judaea and Galilee, may answer to Sychar
Alliance - The temptation is to stave off the danger from the east by alliance with Damascus or Egypt
Garden - The orange and lemon groves of Jaffa and Sidon are famous; and the orchards around Damascus form one of the main attractions of that ‘earthly paradise
Pekah - To strengthen his kingdom which had suffered much by civil wars and foreign exactions (2 Kings 15:19-20; 2 Kings 15:25-31), and to gain spoil, he joined alliance with Rezin of Damascus against Jotham of Judah (2 Kings 15:37-38)
Immanuel - ) Ahaz, king of Judah, received this as a sign given by the Lord Himself, when the king refused to ask one, that Pekah of Israel and Rezin of Damascus, who had already "smitten him with a great slaughter," so that "his and his people's heart was moved as the trees of the wood with the wind" (2 Chronicles 28; Isaiah 7:1-2), should nevertheless not subdue Jerusalem, but be themselves and their land subdued. ...
Just two years after Pekah of Israel was slain by Hoshea, and Rezin of Damascus by Tiglath Pileser king of Assyria
Meals - the inner corner where the two sides of the divan meet, the place of dignity (Pusey), "and in Damascus (in) a couch"; not as Gesenius "on a damask couch," for Damascus was then famed for the raw material "white wool" (Ezekiel 27:18), not yet for damask
Roads - Skirting the shores of the Sea of Galilee, it crossed the Jordan near Bethsaida, and went over a spur of the Anti-Libanus, and then east by north to Damascus. From Damascus there came another road, a little to the east of the former, which reached almost to the Sea of Galilee, and then, bending southward on the east side of Jordan, passed beyond the Dead Sea
New Testament - Saul "a young man" Acts 7:58-60 ...
Great persecution, disciples scattered except the apostles Acts 8:1-4 ...
36 Conversion of Saul (three years before...
his flight from Damascus. ) Acts 9:26-28 ; (Galatians 1:18 )...
37 Caius (Caligula) emperor of Rome; reigns 4 years...
Herod Agrippa succeeds Herod Antipas...
Caiaphas deposed, and Jonathan made high priest...
38 Paul, at Damascus and in Arabia
Jeroboam - He repelled the Syrian invaders, took their capital city Damascus, 2 Kings 14:28, and recovered the whole of the ancient dominion from Hamath to the Dead sea
Judas - After his experience on the road to Damascus Paul went to the house of a man named Judas who lived on Straight Street
Court - In Damascus we find several courts connected with a single house, in some cases of rare richness and beauty
Syria, Syrian - ...
Damascus was the capital of the part of Syria which was often in conflict with Israel
ox, Oxen, Herd, Cattle - They are most plentiful in Galilee, where the pasturage is better; and a much larger breed, the cows of which give excellent milk, flourishes around Damascus
Way - ’ Saul, if he finds at Damascus ‘any that were of the Way’ (ἐάν τινας εὕρῃ τῆς ὁδοῦ ὄντας), is to bring them to Jerusalem (Acts 9:2)
Calvary - ...
Since 1842, a rocky hill outside the Damascus Gate has vied for veneration as Calvary
Olive (Tree) - ...
Isaiah 17:6 (c) Perhaps this represents the fact that Damascus would not be completely destroyed, but that some families would remain and the city would continue to be a city
Twist - ) A material for gun barrels, consisting of iron and steel twisted and welded together; as, Damascus twist
Caves - "Beyond Damascus," says Strabo, "are two mountains, called Trachones, from which the country has the name of Trachonitis; and from hence, toward Arabia and Iturea, are certain rugged mountains, in which there are deep caverns; one of which will hold four thousand men
Peraea - It was attached by the Moslems to the province of Damascus, Subsequently it was under Kerak
Paul - But while on the way to Damascus to capture Christians, Paul had a dramatic experience that changed him completely. )...
Preparation for future ministry...
After his conversion, Paul remained for a while in Damascus, trying to convince the Jews that Jesus was Lord and Messiah. Part of the next three years Paul spent in Arabia, after which he returned to Damascus
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - But to see Him even once, as He was in the flesh, Paul would have gone from Damascus to Jerusalem on his hands and his knees, "I went up to Jerusalem to history Peter," is what Paul really says. And never before nor since had Peter such a hungry hearer as just his present visitor and interrogator from Arabia and Damascus. 'Whether we were in the body, or out of the body, as she told me about Nazareth, and as I told her about Damascus and Arabia, I cannot tell: God knoweth. Damascus, Arabia, Jerusalem,-this, in our day also, is the God-guided progress, in which the true successors of the Apostle Paul are still travelling, in their spiritual experience, and in their evangelical scholarship
Vision - Paul once makes incidental reference to his ‘visions’ ( 2 Corinthians 12:1 ), and perhaps confirms the objective character of the revelation to him on the road to Damascus ( Galatians 1:11-17 , 1 Corinthians 9:1 ; 1 Corinthians 15:8 )
Jerobo'am - He repelled the Syrian invaders, took their capital city Damascus, (2 Kings 14:28 ) and recovered the whole of the ancient dominion from Hamah to the Dead Sea
Lamentations, Book of - According to tradition, he retired after the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar to a cavern outside the Damascus gate, where he wrote this book
Hebrew Language - But through intercourse with Damascus, Assyria, and Babylon, from the time of David, and more particularly from the period of the Exile, it comes under the influence of the Aramaic idiom, and this is seen in the writings which date from this period
Samaritan Pentateuch - Pietro della Valle purchased a very neat copy at Damascus, in 1616, for M
City - Damascus is said to be the oldest existing city in the world
Forty Martyrs, the - , a church in their honour is noted at Huns, near Damascus; cf
Jehu - He probably hoped to secure the great king’s protection against Damascus
Head - It signifies a chief or capital city: "The head of Syria is Damascus," Isaiah 7:8
Judas - A Jew at Damascus, with whom Paul lodged, Acts 9:11
Lebanon - "The tower of Lebanon which looketh towards Damascus," Song of Song of Solomon 7:4 , is brought to recollection by the accounts given by modern travelers of the ruins of ancient temples, built of stones of vast size
Judah, Kingdom of - Hanani's remonstrance, ( 2 Chronicles 16:7 ) prepares us for the reversal by Jehoshaphat of the policy which Asa pursued toward Israel and Damascus
Nebaioth - 13:13, section 3; 15, section 2) king Aretas, who was chosen also king of Damascus; his successors assumed the name as an official designation (2 Corinthians 11:32)
Market, Market-Place - The street called ‘Straight’ (Acts 9:11) in Damascus was thus laid out
Ethnarch - The man there mentioned was doubtless ruler of the Jews in Damascus and its territory, who were ‘permitted to exercise their own religious law very freely and fully’ (Ramsay, Pictures of the Apostolic Church, London, 1910, p
Iron - ...
Amos 1:3 (a) The type in this passage represents the power and strength of the invaders from Damascus
Wine - 27:18 inform us that “wine” was an article of commerce: “Damascus was thy merchant in the multitude of the wares of thy making, for the multitude of all riches; in the wine of Helbon, and white wool
Tadmor or Tamar - It was about one hundred and twenty miles northeast of Damascus, more than half the distance to the Euphrates
Zechariah, the Book of - (1) In the first section he threatens Damascus and the seacoast of Palestine with misfortune, but declares that Jerusalem shall be protected
Assur - Ahaz' idolatrous altar set up from a pattern at Damascus, where lie had just given his submission to Tiglath Pileser, may have been required as a token of allegiance, for the inscriptions say that wherever they established their supremacy they set up "the laws of Asshur," and "altars to the great gods. Cuneiform scholars all agree that Benhadad and Hazael, of Damascus, are mentioned as opposed to him in his Syrian wars, and that he took tribute from Jehu of Israel. Unable to take Damascus, Shalmaneser marched to the Mediterranean coast, where he set up a pillar at the mouth of the Dog River commemorating his victories. He conquered Rezin, king of Damascus, at Ahaz' solicitation, also Israel, whom he deprived of much territory. ...
By the end of Esarhaddon's reign Hamath, Damascus, and Samaria had been absorbed, Judaea made tributary, Philistia and Idumea subjected, Babylon recovered, and cities planted in Media
Ahab - , king of Damascus. ...
He was defeated and taken prisoner, but released, on condition of restoring to Ahab all the cities of Israel which he held, and making streets for Ahab in Damascus, as his father had made in Samaria (i. of assigning an Israelites' quarter in Damascus, where their judges should have paramount authority, for the benefit of Israelites resident there for commerce and political objects)
Uz - 1 with Damascus and Trachonitis
Judah - All these reported to the Satrap of the Persian satrapy of Abarnaharah which encompassed the land west of the Euphrates River with its center in Damascus (Ezra 5:3 ,Ezra 5:3,5:6 ; Ezra 6:6 ,Ezra 6:6,6:13 )
Megiddo - ) Now El Lejjun; in Eusebius and Jerome "Legio," on the caravan route between Egypt and Damascus, "15 miles from Nazareth, four from Taanach
Hebron - Rivaling Damascus in antiquity
Golgotha - With regard to the ‘green hill’ outside the Damascus gate, which has secured so much support in some quarters, its claims are based upon the four presuppositions that Golgotha was shaped like a skull, that the present skull-shaped hill had such an appearance at the time of the Crucifixion, that the ancient road and wall ran as they do to-day, and that the Crucifixion was near the Jewish ‘place of stoning’ (which is said by an unreliable local Jewish tradition to be situated here)
Immanuel, Emmanuel - And doubtless Isaiah 7:16 refers to Shearjashub; and before this child could have grown to maturity, Pekah had been killed by Hoshea, and Damascus had been taken and Rezin slain by the king of Assyria
Apostles - And as for Paul, his Apostolic title was bitterly contested; and he triumphantly defended it on the double ground that, though he had not companied with Jesus in the days of His flesh, he had seen Him after His glorification on the road to Damascus ( 1 Corinthians 9:1 ), and though he was not one of the original Apostles, his Apostleship had the Lord’s own sanction ( 1 Corinthians 9:2 , 2 Corinthians 12:12 )
Street - ” The “street” was the place for setting up bazaars: “The cities, which my father took from thy father, I will restore; and thou shalt make streets for thee in Damascus, as my father made in Samaria” (1 Kings 20:34)
Elijah - Again he is sent on a long journey to Damascus to anoint Hazael as king of Syria
Sidon (2) - Each sent its trading vessels seaward to the Mediterranean world; landward, each was in touch with the markets of Damascus and the East by means of those caravans of ‘ships of the desert’; each sat as queen over a semicircular domain with a radius of some 15 to 20 miles. Beirût, with its Damascus railway and improved harbour, has robbed Sidon of its last vestiges of commerce
Dates - The rule of Aretas over Damascus. Before 33-34 and after 62-63 Damascus was under direct Roman administration. Since some allusion is always made where subject princes intervene, the case seems clearly made out that only after 34 and before 62 could a Nabataean king have secured ascendancy at Damascus. The Nabataean ascendancy in Damascus was thus near its beginning during the last years of Aretas (Harithath) IV. Paul must therefore have acted his part of guarding the gates of Damascus before the year 39. And since from Galatians 1:17 it is clear that Saul returned to Damascus as a Christian leader after a period of three years spent in Arabia, and the flight from Damascus (2 Corinthians 11:32) cannot be identified with any later event than this visit, his conversion must have taken place not later than 36, and perhaps several years earlier
Hittites - They inhabited the whole region between the Euphrates and Damascus, their chief cities being Carchemish on the Euphrates, and Kadesh, now Tell Neby Mendeh, in the Orontes valley, about six miles south of the Lake of Homs
Kedron - of the Damascus gate of Jerusalem; for three fourths of a mile, it runs toward the city, then inclines E
Nazareth - The main road for traffic between Egypt and the interior of Asia passed by Nazareth near the foot of Tabor, and thence northward to Damascus
Eden - Another, in Coelosyria, near Damascus (Amos 1:5)
Judas - Judas, a Jew of Damascus ( Acts 9:11 )
Sidon - ...
No details are given of our Lord’s visit to Sidon, though it is definitely stated that He came through it, or at least its surrounding territory (reading διά not καί in Mark 7:31, with the best Manuscripts ), on His way to Decapolis, which He probably reached by the highway over the Lebanon to Damascus (see H
Gate - It is used thus of Damascus (Acts 9:24) and Philippi (Acts 16:13 -here Authorized Version renders ‘city’-a not unnatural substitution)
Camel - Benhadad of Damascus also sent a present to Elisha, "forty camels' burden" (2 Kings 8:9 )
Publican - Levi's post was on the great road between Damascus and the seaports of Phoenicia
Arabia - The Nabateans controlled what is today southern Jordan and the Negeb of Israel; for a time they controlled as far north as Damascus
Joash - The Syrians made great havoc, defeated the troops of Joash, entered Jerusalem, slew the princes of Judah, and sent a great booty to the king of Syria at Damascus
Wine - It was made at Damascus; the Persians had planted vineyards there on purpose, says Posidosius, quoted, by Athenaeus
Abraham - Nicolaus of Damascus ascribed to him the conquest of Damascus on his way to Canaan. Scripture records nothing further than that his chief servant was Eliezer of Damascus; he pursued Chedorlaomer to Hobah, on the left of Damascus, subsequently (Genesis 14:15), Abraham entered Canaan along the valley of the Jabbok, and encamped first in the rich Moreh valley, near Sichem, between mounts Ebal and Gerizim
Jerusalem - But from any other side the ascent is perpetual; and to the traveller approaching the city from the east or west it must always have presented the appearance, beyond any other capital of the then known world—we may say beyond any important city that has ever existed on the earth—of a mountain city; breathing, as compared with the sultry plains of Jordan, a mountain air; enthroned, as compared with Jericho or Damascus, Gaza, or Tyre, on a mountain fastness. , from Damascus by Pompey, to Mahanaim by David. The chief gates of Jerusalem, now are four: the Damascus gate on the north, the Jaffa gate on the west, David or Zion gate on the south, and St. Stephen's gate; before that they were located to the north about the Damascus gate. The second wall began at the gate Gennath, in the old wall, probably near the Hippicus, and passed round the northern quarter of the city, enclosing the great valley of the Tyropœon, which leads up to the Damascus gate; and then, proceeding southward, joined the fortress Antonia. In the northwest corner of the city the foundations of one of the great towers of ancient Jerusalem have been uncovered, and massive work of the same age is found at the Damascus Gate
Rabbah - The Haj railway, from Damascus to Mecca, passes near ‘Ammân , which has a station on the line
Ramah - A city of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:36 ) not otherwise known, perhaps Râmeh between ‘Akka and Damascus, 8 miles W
Tadmor - ...
Tadmor, of whose origin and earlier history we know nothing, lay upon a great natural road through the desert, not far from the Euphrates, and not very far from Damascus
Convert, Conversion - Among such examples are Paul's change of direction at the Damascus road, Cornelius, the instant response of the Philippian jailer, and the picture of Lydia
Wall - An instance falling within the Apostolic Age is found in the wall of Damascus, referred to in Acts 9:25 (cf
Solomon - Rebellions led by the king of Edom, Rezon of Damascus, and Jeroboam, one of Solomon's own officers, indicates that Solomon's long reign was not without its turmoil
Camel - These animals are employed near Beersheha, and also regularly to carry the mails across the desert from Damascus to Baghdad
Ahab - ...
The reign of Ahab was marked by frequent wars with the Syrian kingdom of Damascus
Zebulun - "The way of the sea," the great road from Damascus to the Mediterranean, traversed a good part of Zebulun (Isaiah 9:1-2; Matthew 4:12; Matthew 4:16)
Church: Her Glory in Tribulation - Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus,
Gaza - It was ‘the frontier city of Syria and the Desert, on the south-west, as Damascus on the north-east’ (Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, London, 1877, p
Earthquake - From the region of the Dead Sea northward along the Jordan valley and as far as Damascus the whole country must have been visited by tremendous earthquakes in prehistoric ages
Judas - The one whose house in Straight street, Damascus, sheltered Paul during his blindness
Abel - Tradition makes the place of his murder and grave to be near Damascus
Gilead - For cruelties to Gileadites, Damascus and Ammon are denounced by Amos ( Amos 1:3 ; Amos 1:13 ), while on the other hand Hosea ( Hosea 6:8 ; Hosea 12:11 ) speaks bitterly of the sins of Gilead
Amos, Book of - Syria under its chief city Damascus
Dispersion - It appears from 1 Kings 20:34 that an Israelltish colony was established in Damascus in the reign of Ahab
Isaiah - Ahaz, king of Judah, at this crisis refused to co-operate with the kings of Israel and Syria in opposition to the Assyrians, and was on that account attacked and defeated by Rezin of Damascus and Pekah of Samaria (2 Kings 16:5 ; 2 Chronicles 28:5,6 )
Earthquake - From the region of the Dead Sea northward along the Jordan valley and as far as Damascus the whole country must have been visited by tremendous earthquakes in prehistoric ages
Jerusalem - On the north is the Damascus gate, and one called Herod's gate walled up; on the east an open gate called St. A street runs nearly north from Zion gate to Damascus gate; and a street from the Jaffa gate runs eastward to the Mosque enclosure These two streets divide the city into four quarters of unequal size. ...
About a hundred yards east of the Damascus gate is the entrance to a quarry, which extends a long way under the city, and from which a quantity of stone must have been extracted
Galatians Epistle to the - Paul’s conversion was followed by a visit to Arabia, a ‘return’ to Damascus, and then, ‘after three years,’ a visit to Jerusalem. Paul returned directly from Damascus to Jerusalem (Acts 9:23-26). The expression ὡς δὲ ἐπληροῦντο ἡμέραι ἱκαναί (Acts 9:23) suggests that the Apostle spent a considerable time at Damascus, but nothing is said concerning any visit to Arabia. Paul’s return from Damascus and his departure to Cilicia (Acts 9:30, Galatians 1:21). Paul’s visit to Arabia, which the Apostle himself describes as a temporary absence in the course of a long stay in Damascus (ὑπέστρεψα [6])
Arabia, Arabs - Again, the part of Arabia to which he withdrew after his conversion ( Galatians 1:17 ) must have been a desert region not far from Damascus, which then also was under the sway of the king of the Nabatæans. of Damascus, dating from the year a
Transgress - A nation can sin in this sense against another nation: “For three transgressions of Damascus, and for four … because they have threshed Gilead with threshing instruments of iron” (Amos 1:3)
Caesarius, Bishop of Chrysostom - The genuineness was first assailed by Le Quien (1712) in the preface to his edition of John of Damascus, and his arguments were adopted and enlarged by Montfaucon
Paul - Not contented with displaying his hatred to the Gospel in Judea, he obtained authority from the high priest to go to Damascus, and to bring back with him bound any Christians whom he might find in that city. Paul was baptized at Damascus, he went into Arabia; but we are not informed how long he remained there. He returned to Damascus; and being supernaturally qualified to be a preacher of the Gospel, he immediately entered upon his ministry in that city. The boldness and success with which he enforced the truths of Christianity so irritated the unbelieving Jews, that they resolved to put him to death, Acts 9:23 ; but, this design being known, the disciples conveyed him privately out of Damascus, and he went to Jerusalem, A. Paul's real conversion, and of his exertions at Damascus, they acknowledged him as a disciple, Acts 9:27 . Paul preached at Jerusalem had the same effect as at Damascus: he became so obnoxious to the Hellenistic Jews, that they began to consider how they might kill him, Acts 9:29 ; which when the brethren knew, they thought it right that he should leave the city
Paul - Hearing that fugitives had taken refuge in Damascus, he obtained from the chief priest letters authorizing him to proceed thither on his persecuting career. He had reached the last stage of his journey, and was within sight of Damascus. Ananias, a disciple living in Damascus, was informed by a vision of the change that had happened to Saul, and was sent to him to open his eyes and admit him by baptism into the Christian church (9:11-16). " Coming back, after three years, to Damascus, he began to preach the gospel "boldly in the name of Jesus" (comp 10:30-434 ), but was soon obliged to flee (9:25; Paul - 35) Three accounts tell of Paul's Damascus Road experience: Acts 9:3-19 ; Acts 22:6-21 ; Acts 26:13-23 . Paul was traveling to Damascus to arrest Jewish people who had accepted Jesus as the Messiah. See Damascus ; Messiah . ...
As Paul neared Damascus, a startling light forced him to the ground
Paul - Christ revealed himself to him near and at Damascus
Head - Damascus was the “head” (capital) of Syria (Isaiah 7:8 )
Matthew - As a publican Matthew was employed collecting the toll at Capernaum on the highway between Damascus and the Mediterranean, and was no doubt in the service of Herod the Tetrarch
Boldness - In this sense παρρησιάζεσθαι is used of Saul at Damascus and Jerusalem (Acts 9:27 f
Palmtree - For TADMOR (2 Chronicles 8:4) in 1 Kings 9:18 the best reading is Tamar, "the palm city," Roman "Palmyra," on an oasis of the Syrian desert, in the caravan route between Damascus and the Euphrates
Asa - When Asa was informed of this, he sent to Benhadad, king of Damascus, all the gold and silver of his palace, and of the temple, to induce him to break his alliance with Baasha, and to assist him against the king of Israel
Wine - ...
The "wine of Helbon" was made in the vicinity of Damascus, and sent from that city to Tyre, Ezekiel 27:19
Paul the Apostle - Thereafter he secured authority from the high priest to go to Damascus in order to arrest all the disciples, and to bring them bound to Jerusalem ( Acts 9:1 f. The journey to Damascus was the great turning-point of Saul’s life ( Acts 9:3 ff. When approaching Damascus he saw a strong light, and Jesus appearing to him (so explicitly 1 Corinthians 9:1 ), saying, ‘Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?’ The voice was unintelligible to his companions ( Acts 22:9 ), though they saw the light ( ib . Saul was blinded by the vision and led into Damascus, where he was instructed and baptized by one Ananias. Immediately he confesses Christ in the synagogues at Damascus ( Acts 9:20 ), and then retires into Arabia (perhaps the Sinaitic peninsula, see Lightfoot’s 1618835481_8 , p
Assyria - ), its capital, and Media (Mada), with Ecbatana (Agamtanu = Achmetha, Ezra 6:2), its capital, and Armenia (Urartu = Ararat, 2 Kings 19:37), and the land of the Hittites (Chatti), who, we thus learn, as well as from the Egyptian inscriptions, had their chief seat far to the north of Damascus—Carchemish (Gargamish), their capital, being on the Euphrates, not far from the latitude of Nineveh (modern Jerabis). encounters Benhadad of Damascus, and probably Ahab of Israel
Jerusalem - ...
"Jerusalem is a city of contrasts, and differs widely from Damascus, not merely because it is a stone town in mountains, whilst the latter is a mud city in a plain, but because while in Damascus Moslem religion and Oriental custom are unmixed with any foreign element, in Jerusalem every form of religion, every nationality of East and West, is represented at one time
Covenant - ...
Ben-Hadad, king of Damascus in Syria, promised to return captured cities to Israel and to provide Israel with markets for its products in Damascus if the king of Israel would make a peace treaty or political alliance with him (1 Kings 20:31-35 ). Earlier, Asa, king of Judah, had used the Temple treasury to pay tribute to Ben-Hadad of Damascus to entice Ben-Hadad to break his vassal treaty with Baasha, king of Israel, and enter into a similar treaty with Judah (1 Kings 15:19 ; 2 Chronicles 16:3 )
Barnabas - It was but yesterday that Saul was seen setting out for Damascus, breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord. "They were all afraid of Saul, and believed not that he was a disciple, But Barnabas took Saul, and brought him to the apostles, and declared unto them how he had seen the Lord in the way to Damascus, and that the Lord had spoken to him, and how he had preached boldly at Damascus in the name of Jesus Christ
Iconium - ) to the oasis of Damascus
Jordan - There is another called Jisr el-Mujamîyeh , close by that of the new railroad from Haifa to Damascus, or about 7 miles south of the Sea of Galilee. A third, built of black basalt and having three arches, is known as the Jisr ‘Benat-Yâ‘gub , or ‘bridge of the daughters of Jacob,’ situated about two miles south of Lake Huleh on the direct caravan route from Acre to Damascus
Paul - " Saul naturally turned his thoughts to Damascus. It was in Damascus that he was received into the church by Ananias, and here to the astonishment of all his hearers, he proclaimed Jesus in the synagogues, declaring him to be the Son of God. The narrative in the Acts tells us simply that he was occupied in this work, with increasing vigor, for "many days," up to the time when imminent danger drove him from Damascus. We know nothing whatever of this visit to Arabia; but upon his departure from Damascus we are again on a historical ground, and have the double evidence of St. Having escaped from Damascus, Saul betook himself to Jerusalem (A
Altar - Ahaz replaced this altar with one modeled on an alter he had seen in Damascus (2 Kings 16 )
Ebal - on the further side of the main route from Syria and Damascus to Jerusalem and Egypt, through the center of Palestine
Amos - Amos 1:1 to Amos 2:13; the sins of Syria, Philistia, Tyre, Edom, Ammon, Moab, the neighbors of Israel and Judah Amos 2:4 to Amos 6:14; Israel's own state and consequent punishment; the same coasts "from the entering in of Hamath," which Jeroboam has just recovered from Syria, shall be "afflicted," and the people carried into "captivity beyond Damascus" (Amos 5:27)
Zechariah - ) The other witness was Uriah, or Urijah, a priest, whom Urijah used as his tool in copying the Damascus altar
Proverbs - "The moralists of the east," says Sir William Jones, "have, in general, chosen to deliver their precepts in short sententious maxims, to illustrate them by sprightly comparisons, or to inculcate them in the very ancient forms of agreeable apologues: there are, indeed, both in Arabic and Persian, philosophical tracts on ethics, written with sound ratiocination and elegant perspicuity; but in every part of the eastern world, from Pekin to Damascus, the popular teachers of moral wisdom have immemorially been poets: and there would be no end of enumerating their works, which are still extant in the five principal languages of Asia
Jerusalem - It was restored, in 1242, to the Latin princes, by Saleh Ismael, emir of Damascus; they lost it in 1291 to the sultans of Egypt, who held it till 1382. At present, this city is included in the pashalic of Damascus, though it has a resident Turkish governor. There are now in use only four gates: the Jaffa or Bethlehem gate on the west, the Damascus gate on the north, St
Amos - He saw that the Assyrian would eventually push past Damascus down into Palestine, and bring in the day of account; and although he nowhere names Assyria as the agent of God’s anger, the references are unmistakable ( Amos 5:27 , Amos 6:7 ; Amos 6:14 , Amos 7:17 ). Damascus, Gaza, Tyre, Edom, Ammon, Moab, Judah, and Israel are all passed under review
Zebulun - ...
Zebulun shared in the natural richness and fertility of the rest of Galilee, and the great ‘way of the sea’ (the via maris of the Crusaders) which ran through its territory, and from Acco to Damascus, brought it into touch with the outer world and its products
Resurrection of Christ - ...
...
...
In addition to the above, mention might be made of Christ's manifestation of himself to Paul at Damascus, who speaks of it as an appearance of the risen Saviour (Acts 9:3-9,17 ; 1 Corinthians 15:8 ; 9:1 )
Synagogue - ...
After Saul's conversion, he immediately preached Christ in the synagogues in Damascus (Acts 9:20 )
Letter - When Saul went to Damascus to persecute believers, he went armed with letters from the high priest (Acts 9:1-2 ; Acts 22:5 )
Matthew (2) - Along the north end of the Sea of Galilee there was a road leading from Damascus to Acre on the Mediterranean, and on that road a customs-office marked the boundary between the territories of Philip the tetrarch and Herod Antipas
Altar - ), the site of which is marked by the present mosque of ‘the Dome of the Rock’; the altar erected by Ahaz after the model of one seen by him at Damascus ( 2 Kings 16:10 ff
Eden - Thus the Prophet Amos 1:5 , speaks of an Eden in Syria, which is generally considered to have been in the valley of Damascus, where a town called Eden is mentioned by Pliny and Ptolemy, and where the tomb of Abel is pretended to be shown
Ananias - ANANIAS, a disciple of Christ, at Damascus, whom the Lord directed to visit Paul, then lately converted
Nazareth - But on the road to Damascus he learned its true meaning, when his question ‘Who art thou, Lord?’ was answered, ‘I am Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 22:8)
Nazareth - But on the road to Damascus he learned its true meaning, when his question ‘Who art thou, Lord?’ was answered, ‘I am Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 22:8)
Elisha - At the same time he sent much gold, silver, and the rich raiments (lebush , robe of ceremony) of Damascus; as though "God's gift may be purchased with money" (Acts 8:20). " But, like men offended at the simplicity of the gospel message of salvation, Naaman having expected a more ceremonial mode of cure, and despising Jordan in comparison with the magnificent waters of his own Damascus, went off in a rage. Elisha, when Joram and Israel failed to be reformed by God's mercies, proceeded to Damascus to execute Elijah's commission (1 Kings 19:15-16). Benhadad respectfully inquired by Hazael, who brought a kingly present, 40 camels laden with every good thing of Damascus, "thy son (regarding Elisha as a father and lord) saith, Shall I recover of this disease?" "Then mayest certainly (i
Transjordan - ...
An important trade route passed through the Transjordan during biblical times, connecting Damascus and Bostra of Syria with the Gulf of Aqabah and western Arabia
Barnabas - , and had "preached boldly at Damascus in the name of Jesus" (Acts 9:27)
Memphis - , he thinks, built the great pyramid under God's guidance, and the cities Salem, of which Melchizedek was shepherd priestking, and Damascus
Jews in the New Testament - After his dramatic conversion on the road to Damascus, his fellow Jews sought to kill him (Acts 9:23 )
River - The river and the street run side by side through the city, as the Barada and the street upon its left bank do to-day in the city of Damascus
Desert, Wilderness - Thus we read of the Wilderness of Gibeon (2 Samuel 2:24), of Tekoa (2 Chronicles 20:20), of Damascus (1 Kings 19:15)
Synagogue - "...
Paul also was permitted to speak in the synagogue at Damascus, when he showed the Jews that Jesus was the Son of God, Acts 9:20 ; and often afterwards he 'reasoned' or 'disputed' (διαλέγομαι)with the Jews in their synagogues
a'Braham - Lot with his family and possessions having been carried away captive by Chedorlaomer king of Elam, who had invaded Sodom, Abram pursued the conquerors and utterly routed them not far from Damascus
Cities - Some of their gates are plated over with brass; such are the enormous gates of the principal mosque at Damascus, formerly the church of John the Baptist
Archaeology - the city of Damascus)
Leprosy - At Damascus also there is a community, some members of which are also drawn from Palestine, but the majority from Syria and around Damascus; the traditional ‘House of Naaman’ is their home. Including these last, there must be between 100 and 120 lepers in Jerusalem, some 25 at Ramleh, about 40 at Nâblus; altogether, allowing for some Palestine lepers in the Damascus community, there are not more than 200 known victims of this disease in the country
Chronology of the New Testament - Conversion near Damascus, Acts 9:3 ; Acts 22:5 ; Acts 26:12 ; retirement to Arabia, Galatians 1:17 ; preaching in Damascus, Acts 9:20-22 (?), Galatians 1:17
Assyria - Of the conquests of this second king of Assyria against the kings of Israel and Syria, when he took Damascus, and subdued the Syrians, we have an account in 2 Kings 15:29 ; 2 Kings 15:37 ; 2 Kings 16:5 ; 2 Kings 16:9 ; 1 Chronicles 5:26 ; by which the prophecy of Amos was fulfilled, and from which it appears that the empire of the Assyrians was now become great and powerful. This Chyniladon is supposed by Newton to be the Nebuchadonosor mentioned in the book of Judith, Judges 1:1-15 , who made war upon Arphaxad, king of the Medes; and, though deserted by his auxiliaries of Cilicia, Damascus, Syria, Phoenicia, Moab, Ammon, and Egypt, routed the army of the Medes, and slew Arphaxad
Reuben - It is, however, still mentioned in 2 Kings 10:32 as though it maintained its separate organization when Hazael of Damascus overran and smote the eastern Israelites
Sanhedrin - Thus we see that it could issue warrants for the apprehension of Christians in Damascus to the synagogue there ( Acts 9:2 ; Acts 22:5 ; Acts 26:12 ); but the extent to which Jewish communities outside of Judæa were willing to submit to such orders depended entirely on how far they were favourably disposed towards the central authority; it was only within the limits of Judæa proper that real authority could he exercised by the Sanhedrin
Elijah - Here the Lord appeared unto him and said, "What dost thou here, Elijah?" In answer to his despondent words God manifests to him his glory, and then directs him to return to Damascus and anoint Hazael king over Syria, and Jehu king over Israel, and Elisha to be prophet in his room (1 Kings 19:13-21 ; Compare 2 Kings 8:7-15 ; 9:1-10 )
Dibon - Moab is omitted in the list of Syrian independent states confederate with Benhadad of Damascus against Shalmaneser of Nineveh
Satan - The Hebrew word satan [ 1 Samuel 29:4 ), Rezon of Damascus (1 Kings 11:23,25 ), and the angel of the Lord (Numbers 22:22,32 )
Ammonites - , benefiting from the active commerce which moved along the old trade route connecting Damascus and Bostra with the Gulf of Aqabah and western Arabia
Nazareth - The whole annual expenses of the Terra Santa convents are about fifteen thousand pounds; of which the pasha of Damascus receives about twelve thousand pounds
Samaritans - They were chiefly found at Gaza, Neapolis or Shechem, (the ancient Sichem or Naplouse,) Damascus, Cairo, &c
Lebanon - Clarke, in the month of July, saw some of the eastern summits of Lebanon, or Anti-Libanus, near Damascus, covered with snow, not lying in patches, as is common in the summer season with mountains which border on the line of perpetual congelation, but do not quite reach it, but with that perfect white, smooth, and velvet-like appearance, which snow only exhibits when it is very deep,—a striking spectacle in such a climate, where the beholder, seeking protection from a burning sun, almost considers the firmament to be on fire
Chapters - But the Greeks do not disavow, that this Typicum or monastic ritual was not by himself, that it perished in the invasions of the barbarians, and was composed anew by John of Damascus, with references memoriter, [1] to that of Sabas
Jerusalem - The central ravine or depression, running toward the Damascus gate, is the Tyropeon. Beyond the Damascus or northern gate the wall crosses the royal caverns. On his return, finding Jerusalem still not taken, he ravaged Judea, and leaving Pekah at Jerusalem he carried a number of captives to Damascus
Paul - unto strange cities," and "breathing out threatenings and slaughter," he was on his journey to Damascus with authoritative letters from the high priest empowering him to arrest and bring to Jerusalem all such, trusting doubtless that the pagan governor would not interpose in their behalf. From Arabia he returned to Damascus, where with his increased spiritual "strength" he confounded the Jews. Thence He returned to Damascus; then he went to Jerusalem to see Peter
Apostle - Stephen, several of the leading men among the Christians were dispersed; some of them travelled through the regions of Judea and Samaria, and others to Damascus, Phoenicia, the Island of Cyprus, and various parts of Syria; but the twelve Apostles remained, with undaunted firmness, at Jerusalem, avowing their attachment to the persecuted interest of Christ, and consulting how they might best provide for the emergencies of the church, in its infant and oppressed state. Some have supposed that Saul saw the person of Jesus, when he was converted, near the city of Damascus; but others, who conceive from the history of this event, that this could not have been the case, as he was instantly struck blind, are of opinion that the season, when his Apostolic qualification and commission were completed, was that mentioned by himself, ...
Acts 22:17 , when he returned to Jerusalem the second time after his conversion, saw the Lord Jesus Christ in person, and received the command to go quickly out of Jerusalem, that he might be sent unto the Gentiles
Tomb - Third, that known as the tomb of the kings, about half a mile north of the Damascus Gate
Body of Christ - Luke's description of Paul's experience outside Damascus ( Acts 9:4-5 ) suggests a close association between the exalted Jesus and his followers on earth, but actual "body" language is entirely absent
Wisdom of Christ - ) To understand the growth in wisdom here spoken of as merely exhibitive—Christ being; supposed, as He grew in age, to manifest more and more of the hidden wisdom which He possessed entire from the first (so John of Damascus and most of the later Fathers; also Aquinas and the Scholastics)—is not only bad exegesis, but is virtual Apollinarism
Elisha - On one occasion he appears to be as much at home in Damascus as in Samaria
House (2) - 1 Samuel 9:25); indeed, could even step from roof to roof, and thus walk the whole length of a street, as the present writer once did in Damascus (cf
Elisha - At the end of the seven years' famine, which the prophet had foretold, he went to Damascus, to execute the command which God had given to Elijah many years before, of declaring Hazael king of Syria
Paul - It was Christ who revealed himself to his soul at Damascus, Acts 26:15 1 Corinthians 15:8 ; to Christ he gave his whole heart, and soul, mind, might, and strength; and thenceforth, living or dying, he was "the servant of Jesus Christ
Joannes (520), Monk And Author - The authorship of the Pratum used sometimes to be attributed to Sophronius, in whose name it is cited by John of Damascus ( de Imagin
Canaan - "Tadmore in the wilderness," (Palmyra,) which the Jewish monarch is stated to have built, (that is, either founded or fortified,) is considerably to the north-east of Damascus, being only a day's journey from the Euphrates; and Hamath, the Epiphania of the Greeks, (still called Hamah,) in the territory belonging, to which city Solomon had several "store cities," is seated on the Orontes, in latitude 34...
45' N. Damascus revolted during the reign of Solomon, and shook off the Jewish yoke. Jerusalem, Hebron, Nablous, Tiberias, and in fact, the greater part of Palestine, are included in the pashalic of Damascus, now held in conjunction with that of Aleppo; which renders the present pasha, in effect, the viceroy of Syria
Paul the Apostle - As he traveled the 150 miles from Jerusalem to Damascus armed with legal authority to hunt down Jewish Christians (Acts 9:1-2 ), bright light and a heavenly voice stopped him dead in his tracks. He spent various lengths of time in Arabia, Damascus, and Jerusalem, eventually spending a lengthier stint far to the north in Syria and his native Cilicia (Galatians 1:15-21 )
Manifestation - Paul’s companions did on the road to Damascus (Acts 9:7), but not the face of Christ
Paul - As the Jews sought his life at Damascus, he departed into Arabia, where doubtless he had deep exercise of heart and learnt more of the Lord
Judah, Kingdom of - Asa hired Benhadad I, of Damascus, to counteract him, for which Hanani reproved him
Paul as a Student - It was just the law of God that he so reasoned out, and debated with them, as well as taught and preached it with such matchless success in every synagogue from Damascus to Rome. And then, after those three reading, meditating, praying, law-discovering, self-discovering, Christ-discovering, years, Paul came back to Damascus, carrying in his mind and in his heart the copestone of New Testament doctrine, with shoutings of grace! grace! unto it
Exile - In 732, Tiglath-pileser took control of Damascus, the capital city of Syria
Truth - Paul in his special experience learned on the way to Damascus and in the solitude of the desert that the gospel came to him through no human means but through revelation of Jesus Christ (Galatians 1:12)
Wine - The wine of Helbon near Damascus was especially prized (Ezekiel 27:18), and that of Lebanon for its bouquet (Numbers 14:7)
Remnant - Damascus will become a ruinous heap, and the remnant of Syria will cease (Isaiah 17:3 )
Isaiah, Book of - Moab, Damascus, "the land shadowing with wings which is beyond the rivers of Ethiopia," Egypt, "the desert of the sea," Dumah, Arabia, "the valley of vision" (Jerusalem), Tyre, "the earth [1] made empty and waste, and turned upside down;" and finally the hosts on high and kings on the earth punished
Elisha - ...
The prophet went to Damascus, and Ben-hadad, being sick, sent Hazael to inquire if he should recover
Dead Sea Scrolls - ...
A second important rule containing legal statutes and organizational regulations for the community is the Damascus Rule (CD). The Damascus Rule seems to exhibit an expectation of one Messiah, the Messiah of Aaron and Israel, rather than two
Jeru'Salem - But from any other side the ascent is perpetual; and to the traveller approaching the city from the east or west it must always have presented the appearance beyond any other capital of the then known world --we may say beyond any important city that has ever existed on the earth --of a mountain city; breathing, as compared with the sultry plains of Jordan, a mountain air; enthroned, as compared with jericho or Damascus, Gaza or Tyre, on a mountain fastness. Stephen's gate and the golden gate (now walled up), in the east wall; ...
The Damascus gate and ...
Herod's gate, in the north wall; and ...
The Jaffa gate, in the west wall
Hittites And Hivites - ) in which Egypt conceded all territories north of Damascus to the Hittites would seem to suggest that the balance of power, for a time at least, favored the Hittites
Abraham - They attacked and routed his army, and pursued it over the range of Anti-Libanus as far as to Hobah, near Damascus, and then returned, bringing back all the spoils that had been carried away
Image - All his thought turns on his doctrine of the Divinity of Christ, and the basis of that doctrine was the bright vision he had beheld on the way to Damascus
Genesis, the Book of - ...
The names of God occurring are: ΕL , the shortened form of ΕLΟΗΙΜ ; ΕLΙΟΝ , "Most High" (only in Genesis 14:18 ΕL ΕLΙΟΝ , but in Psalms found alone, and with ΕLΟΗΙΜ and JEHOVAH Υahweh ); and SΗΑDDΑΙ "Almighty," in the Pentateuch generally with EL, The plural is that of excellence and majesty; Elohim combining in Himself the several attributes assigned to distinct gods by the pagan false gods as well as to the true God; and is the word used where pagan people, as the Egyptians, or foreigners, as Hagar, Eliezer of Damascus, the Egyptians, etc
Bethesda - ’ John of Damascus (about a
Temple - The quarries of Solomon have been discovered under the present city of Jerusalem, near the Damascus gate
Canaan - At present, Palestine is subject to the sultan of Turkey, under whom the pashas of Acre and Gaza govern the seacoast and the pasha of Damascus the interior of the country
Christ in the Middle Ages - For the Greek Church the Christology of John of Damascus, who in the 8th cent. That the influence of the Areopagite and of Maximus was brought mightily to bear upon the orthodoxy of the East is manifest in the Fountain of Knowledge of John of Damascus (d. His great master was John of Damascus; but he was well acquainted with Augustinian thought, and no doubt with the works of Anselm and Abelard
Apostle - Not only does Acts depict Paul as manifesting the signs of an apostle, but in its three accounts of the Damascus Road encounter, his apostolic task is presented as the direct action of the risen Christ (9:3-5; 22:6-8; 26:12-18; cf
Edom - Aretas, the father-in-law of Herod Antipas (Matthew 14), took Damascus at the time of Paul's conversion (Acts 9:25; 2 Corinthians 11:32)
Wilderness (2) - They are found even near towns; thus the OT mentions the wildernesses of Gibeon, of Tekoa, of Damascus, of Riblah (Massoretic Text Diblah, Ezekiel 6:14)
King - Caravans passing from Egypt to Damascus paid toll ( 1 Kings 10:16 ), and in the days of Solomon foreign trade by sea seems to have been a royal monopoly ( 1 Kings 10:16 )
Bible, Translations - In the fourth century Pope Damascus invited Jerome to revise current Latin translations based on Hebrew and Greek manuscripts
New Covenant - In two places in the Damascus Document (text A) it is said explicitly that those who belong to the community have actually entered the new covenant (6:19; 8:21; cf
Preach, Proclaim - Here it is the converted Saul who proclaims Jesus as the Son of God in the synagogues of Damascus
Jeremiah, Book of - Judgements were to fall upon Egypt, the Philistines, Moab, the Ammonites, Edom, Damascus, Kedar, Elam, and Babylon
City - 74) enumerates them as follows: Scythopolis, Hippos, Gadara, Dion, Pella, Gerasa, Philadelphia, Canatha, and, with less probability, Damascus and Raphana
Hellenists - Paul "disputed against the Grecians, they went about to slay him," Acts 9:29 , as the Jews at Damascus had done before, Acts 9:23
Shepherds - In the house of Abraham, this honourable station was held by Eliezer, a native of Damascus, a servant in every respect worthy of so great and good a master
Commerce - The economic and political importance of these trading communities is seen in Solomon's construction of storehouse cities in Hamath (2 Chronicles 8:4 and in Ahab's negotiations with Ben-Hadad of Syria for the establishment of “market areas in Damascus” ( 1 Kings 20:34 NIV)
Jeremiah - ...
Finally there is a collection of messages for foreign nations: Egypt (46:1-28), Philistia (47:1-7), Moab and Ammon (48:1-49:6), Edom (49:7-22), Damascus, Kedar, Hazor and Elam (49:23-39), and Babylon (50:1-51:64)
Missions - ‘Chronology of the NT’]'>[4]) the faith of Christ had spread to Damascus, and had gained such hold there, that Saul was sent thither by the Sanhedrin to bring ‘any of the Way,’ whom he might find, bound to Jerusalem (Acts 9:2). ...
Taking Turner’s estimate as above (though we prefer Ramsay’s), the gospel was firmly established in Damascus (and in Antioch) 6 or 7 years after the Crucifixion
Samaria - In the Middle Ages there were colonies of them in Nâblus, Caesarea, Damascus, and Cairo
Elijah - As far as we know, only the last of these three commissions was executed by the prophet himself, who, after this sublime incident, made his headquarters in the wilderness of Damascus ( Ki 19: 15); the other two were carried out either by Elisha or by members of the prophetic guilds ( 2 Kings 8:7 ff; 2 Kings 9:2 )
Altar - side of the new altar which Urijah the priest had made after the pattern which Ahaz had seen at Damascus (2 Kings 16:14)
Patriarchs, the - ...
When Abram proposed to appoint Eliezer of Damascus as his heir (Genesis 15:2 ), God entered into a formal covenant with Abram and promised him vast amounts of land for his descendants
Deuteronomy - 782 43), by whom the Syrians of Damascus were defeated
Terah - His childhood spent in ancient Chaldea; his very crossing of the flood Euphrates on such an errand; the snows of Lebanon; the oaks of Bashan; Damascus; Salem; the Nile; the pyramids; the great temples; the famous schools and schoolmasters of Egypt, at whose feet Moses was to sit in after days,-all that, and much more that we neither know nor can imagine. What were Babylon, and Nineveh, and Damascus, and Salem, and all Egypt, to this western world and to this nineteenth century after Christ! What were all the science of Chaldea, and all the lore of Egypt, but the merest rudiments and first elements of that splendid sunshine of all manner of truth and opportunity which floods around us from our youth up! And as we are led on from school to school; and from author to author; and from preacher to preacher; and from one stage of intellectual and spiritual migration and growth to another; to what a stature, to what a breadth, and to what a height of faith, and knowledge, and love, and all manner of grace and truth may we not attain
Palesti'na - The commerce of Damascus, and beyond Damascus, of Persia and India, passed this way to Egypt, Rome and the infant colonies of the West; and that traffic and the constant movement of troops backward and forward must have made this plain, at the time of Christ, one of the busiest and most populous regions of Syria
Trade And Commerce - In addition to the Indian route mentioned in the last paragraph, goods from India could be brought by the port of Charax at the mouth of the Persian Gulf, by the Euphrates, and then by the caravan route passing through Palmyra to Damascus. Another trade-route which passed through Syria was that by the head of the Arabian Gulf to Petra through Bostra to Damascus or, for southern Syria, to the port of Gaza
Wine And Strong Drink - of Damascus, were two localities specially celebrated for their wines
Jehoram - Jehoram's conversation with Gehazi about Elisha's great works and his raising the dead lad, and the Shunammite woman's return at that very time, occurred probably while the prophet was at Damascus prophesying to Hazael his coming kingship (2 Kings 8)
Eternal Fire (2) - In Amos 1, 2, Damascus, Gaza, etc
David - He followed on to smite Moab; then extended his border to the river Euphrates, and put garrisons in Syria of Damascus; he smote of the Syrians in the valley of Salt 18,000
Roads And Travel - The shortest route from Jerusalem to Damascus was to cross the Jordan and go via Gerasa. from Damascus there was a road passing through Caesarea Paneas to Tyre, and another to Sidon
Church - Paul? What was it that turned Saul the persecutor of the Church into Paul the apostle of Jesus Christ? It was the indelible conviction that Jesus was the Messiah, and that He had risen from the dead and conversed with him on the road to Damascus, that converted and ever afterwards controlled St. Paul there were Christians at Samaria (Acts 8:14), Damascus (9:19), and Antioch (11:20), which soon eclipsed Jerusalem as the Christian metropolis
Jews - There are numbers of this sect at Gaza, Damascus, Grand Cairo, and in some other places of the east; but especially at Sichem, now called Naplouse, which is risen out of the ruins of the ancient Samaria, where they sacrificed not many years ago, having a place for this purpose on Mount Genzim. At Damascus ten thousand unarmed Jews were killed: and at Bethshan the Heathen inhabitants caused their Jewish neighbours to assist them against their brethren, and then murdered thirteen thousand of these inhabitants
Transportation And Travel - Megiddo, which commanded the western entrance into the Jezreel Valley, controlled the traffic along the Via Maris as it moved inland and then north to Damascus
Olives, Mount of - Jerusalem is wholly hidden from view until the last ridge is reached, from which the road rapidly descends and passes to the Damascus gate; the grey northern wall and the mosque, etc
Nineveh - ...
Ahaz enlisted him as ally against Samaria and Damascus; Tiglath Pileser conquered them and received tribute from Jahu-khazi or Ahaz
Numbers, the Book of - In Numbers 34 more territory is assigned to Israel than they permanently occupied, and less than they for a time held (namely, Damascus, in the reigns of David, Solomon, and Jeroboam II)
Genesis, Theology of - God identifies himself, then rejects the suggestion that Eliezer of Damascus might be Abraham's heir, and promises Abraham many descendants and the land of Canaan
Galilee (2) - ’ To this came the road from Damascus and the intervening country
James the Lord's Brother - " He was seen of James somewhere, and to somewhat of the same result, that He was seen of Saul at the gate of Damascus
Elijah - Here he had visions of the glory and majesty of God, and conversed with him; and was commanded to return to the wilderness of Damascus, to anoint Hazael king over Syria, and Jehu king over Israel, and to appoint Elisha his successor in the prophetic office
Jonah - Amos (Amos 5:27) had foretold that Israel for apostasy should be carried "captive beyond Damascus," i
Jerusalem (2) - This, commencing near the present Damascus Gate, runs S. Although extensively filled up in places, the outline of the valley may still be clearly seen from any high point in the city near the Damascus Gate, and its bed is to-day traversed by one of the two carriage roads in the city
Paul (2) - So the vision on the road to Damascus held his fascinated gaze throughout his career. —We go back to the Damascus vision
Croisade, or Crusade - The emperor's army was either destroyed by the enemy, or perished through the treachery of Manuel, the Greek emperor; and the second army, through the unfaithfulness of the Christians of Syria, was forced to break up the siege of Damascus
Sadducees - They deal with the beliefs and practices of a sect that lived in Damascus probably two centuries b
Galilee - Six miles north of the lake, the river is crossed by the ‘Bridge of the daughters of Jacob,’ on the famous Via Maris of the Middle Ages, the principal thoroughfare between Damascus and the Mediterranean ports
House - Paul is let down through the town wall and escapes, in both cases from Damascus, for both passages seem to refer to the same incident (cf
Judgments of God - A Roman officer, to oblige this Maximinus, greatly oppressed the church at Damascus: not long after, he destroyed himself
Antioch - Such was the magnificent Greek substitute for the ancient and beautiful but too essentially Semitic capital of Syria-Damascus
Job - Bochart strenuously advocated the former opinion, in which he has been powerfully supported by Spanheim, Calmet, Carpzov, Heidegger, and some later writers; Michaelis and Ilgen place the scene in the valley of Damascus; but Bishops Lowth and Magee, Dr
Jeroboam - ) Jeroboam took Syria's capital, Damascus (Amos 1:3-5; Amos 6:14; where Amos warns Israel not to exult in having just taken Hamath, for that shall be the foe's starting point to afflict you: contrast 1 Kings 8:65), and Hamath, and restored the tribes E
Sin - Damascus, Philistia, Tyre, Edom, Ammon, and Moab, as well as Judah and Israel, all come under the displeasure of the prophet Amos
Solomon - Rezon ( 1 Kings 11:23 ) conquered Damascus and founded a dynasty, but we hear nothing of any serious war
Isaiah - Those thus singled out included Babylon (Isaiah 13-14 ), Moab (Isaiah 15-16 ), Damascus (Isaiah 17:1-14 ), Ethiopia (Isaiah 18:1 ), Egypt (Isaiah 19-20 ), and Tyre (Isaiah 23:1 )
Lot - True, there was that Eliczer of Damascus, and some other men who were deep in Abraham's confidence, and much trusted by him,-but blood is thicker than water, and Lot will live in hope
Ephesians, Theology of - ...
To grasp fully the theological core of this letter, it is important to remember the nature of Paul's conversion/call on the road to Damascus
Entry Into Jerusalem - ]'>[10] 191) mentions that in recent times the people of Bethlehem cast their cloaks before the horse of the consul of Damascus
Locust - Dried locusts are generally exposed for sale in the markets of Medina, Bagdad, and even Damascus
Edom - " And the Hadj routes (routes of the pilgrims) from Damascus and from Cairo to Mecca, the one on the east and the other towards the south of Idumea, along the whole of its extent, go by it, or touch partially on its borders, without passing through it
Bride - These customs appear to have been derived from a very remote antiquity; for when Eliezer of Damascus went to Mesopotamia to take a wife from thence unto his master's son, he disclosed the motives of his journey to the father and brother of Rebecca; and Hamor applied to Jacob and his sons, for their consent to the union of Dinah with his son Shechem
Palestine - Several major international roads crossed the area, and caravan traffic from Damascus through Capernaum to the south was heavy
Locust - Dried locusts are generally exposed for sale in the markets of Medina, Bagdad, and even Damascus
Song of Songs - He points out that the wasf is not limited to wedding festivities, but is sung by the tent-fire, in the village inn, in the coffee-house where townsmen gather at night; that it is usually brief when descriptive of the beauty of bride or bridegroom; that in Palestine itself however true Wetzstein’s account of Damascus and the Hauran there are but scanty traces of the temporary royalty of the bridal pair, and none of the threshing-sledge throne
Temple - Solomon’s altar was superseded in the reign of Ahaz by a larger altar of more artistic construction, which this sovereign caused to be made after the model of one seen by him at Damascus ( 2 Kings 16:10-16 )
Trade And Commerce - From the plain of Esdraelon a road led to Damascus, touching the N
Isaiah - ...
Moses' general prophecy (Leviticus 26:33; Deuteronomy 28:64) had assumed more definiteness in Ahijah's specification of the direction of the exile, "beyond the river," in Jeroboam's time 1 Kings 14:15), and Amos 5:27, "beyond Damascus"; and now the place is defined, Babylon
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - After the demise of the Judean kingdom, the Nabataeans established a similar monopoly over the same marine commerce and the overland caravan routes through Petra to Damascus and Gaza for transshipment on the Mediterranean
Maccabees - This decision, however, did not end the controversy between the brothers, and they appealed to Pompey himself, who meantime had arrived at Damascus
Kings, Books of - History also told that he had suffered by the revolt of Edom and Damascus
Philippians, Theology of - He was God's Anointed, God's "Christ" par excellence!...
Paul came to understand all this as a result of having encountered the living, resurrected Christ on the road to Damascus, who, in a moment, had transferred him out of the kingdom of darkness, freed him from the power of evil, saved him from his sin, and gave him life instead of death
Gods, Pagan - The Arameans of Damascus (Syria) worshiped the generic Semitic storm god Hadad, frequently referred to by the epithet Rimmon (2 Kings 5:18 ), meaning “thunder
Galatians, Epistle to the - In the Epistle we read of two visits ( Galatians 1:18 , Galatians 2:1 ), the former 3 years after his conversion (or after his return to Damascus), to visit Cephas, when of the Apostles he saw only James the Lord’s brother besides, and the latter 14 years after his conversion (or after his first visit), when he went ‘by revelation’ with Barnabas and Titus and privately laid before the Twelve (this probably is the meaning of ‘them’ in Galatians 2:2 : James, Cephas, and John are mentioned) the gospel which he preached among the Gentiles
James Epistle of - Paul’s raid on the Christians of Damascus Solomon - On Lebanon he built lofty towers (2 Chronicles 8:6; Song of Solomon 7:4) "looking toward Damascus" (1 Kings 9:19)
Judea - Auranitis, or Ituraea, a mountainous and barren tract north of Batantaea, and bounded on the west by a branch of Mount Hermon, contained Bostra, or Bozra, about fifty miles east from the sea of Tiberias, bordering on Arabia Petraea, afterward enlarged by Trajan, and named Trajana Bostra; and Trachonitis, in 33 15' north latitude, between Hermon and Antilibanus, eastward from the sources of Jordan, and containing Baal-gad, Mispah, Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi, and AEnos, nearly twenty-five miles east of Panaeas, and as far south south-west of Damascus
Synagogue - Damascus also had a number of synagogues; in these Paul the Apostle preached (Acts 9:2-20)
Evil - In Jeremiah 49:23 , Hamath and Arpad hear evil tidings about the fall of Damascusevil to them because Damascus was their ally and her fall portends their own fates
High Priest - ...
On the other hand the priests truckled to the idolatrous Manasseh; the high priest Urijah was Ahaz' ready tool in copying the Damascus altar, supplanting Jehovah's brazen altar (2 Kings 16:10-16)
Roman Law in the nt - In Acts 9:2, Acts 26:13 the synagogue at Damascus is requested by the Sanhedrin to exercise its powers (cf
Hellenistic And Biblical Greek - In the numerous Hellenistic towns situated between the Phœnician coast and a line to the east of the Lake of Gennesaret and the Jordan-cities like Antioch, Acco, Damascus, and Gadara-the Greek language prevailed, as also did Greek administration, law, and culture
Golgotha - The theory that Golgotha is the skull-shaped knoll above Jeremiah’s grotto, outside the present north wall, near the Damascus gate, was first suggested by Otto Thenius in 1849
Prayer - So it was said of Saul of Tarsus, "Behold, he prayeth!" He prayed in fact then for the first time; but that was in consequence of the illumination of his mind as to his spiritual danger, effected by the miracle on the way to Damascus, and the grace of God which accompanied the miracle
Acts of the Apostles (2) - The appearance of the Exalted One near Damascus is the great matter which St
House - This ancient custom still survives in the sacrifice of a sheep or other animal, which is indispensable to the safe occupation of a new house in Moslem lands, and even to the successful inauguration of a public work, such as a railway, or as the other day in Damascus of an electric lighting installation
Temple - ...
In the Bezetha vast cavern, accidentally discovered by tapping the ground with a stick outside the Damascus gate at Jerusalem, evidences still remain of the marvelous energy with which they executed the work; the galleries, the pillars supporting the roof, and the niches from which the huge blocks were taken, of the same form, size, and material as the stones S
Resurrection - Paul believed to be a trustworthy historical event, supported by contemporary evidence and confirmed for himself by his Damascus experience, that it is unnecessary to discuss the question of whether he owed this conception to one of the mystery-religions
Gospels (2) - At the time of his conversion there was a Christian community of some importance at Damascus; and it is probable in the highest degree that the Church there had the advantage of hearing the story of Jesus from one of those who had companied with Him during His ministry
Man - Paul’s experience on the road to Damascus, by which he was convinced of the continued existence, the Divine authority, and the spiritual power of Christ
Magi - Appellius, Amerius, Damascus: Magalath, Pangalath, Saracen: Ator, Sator, Peratoras, etc
Colossians, Epistle to the - The suggestions of John of Damascus, who identifies it with 1 Tim
Job - (2) The dialogue, which is unquestionably one of the oldest portions, indicates familiarity with national catastrophes, such as the destruction of the kingdom of Samaria, the overthrow of Damascus, and the leading away of large bodies of captives, including priests and nobles, from Jerusalem to Babylon ( Job 12:17-25 ), which again, on the assumption that the writer is an Israelite, points to an advanced stage of Israelitish history
Faith - Paul’s experience on the way to Damascus when he was convinced of the Messiahship and Lordship of Jesus of Nazareth became the dominant factor in all his life, and led to his abandonment of allegiance to law and to the strenuous vindication of the place of faith in the religious life
Faith - Paul’s experience on the way to Damascus when he was convinced of the Messiahship and Lordship of Jesus of Nazareth became the dominant factor in all his life, and led to his abandonment of allegiance to law and to the strenuous vindication of the place of faith in the religious life
Elijah - to the wilderness of Damascus, and anoint Hazael king over Syria, Jehu
Revelation (2) - Paul when the vision of the Christ at the gates of Damascus changed the whole course of his carcer; ‘it pleased God to reveal his Son in me’ (Galatians 1:16) is his description of the experience
Sacrifice (2) - It is his own personal experience of salvation that has caused him to understand—the marvellous change wrought in him by the Lord who appeared to him on the road to Damascus, and which lie has expressed in the words, ‘I am crucified with Christ; nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me’ (Galatians 2:20; cf
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - In the meantime, before that eschatological moment, there would be a number of divine in-breakings on the historical scene in which the fall of cities such as Samaria, Damascus, Nineveh, Jerusalem, and Babylon would serve as harbingers or foreshadowings of God's final intrusion into the historical scene at the end of history
Jerusalem - of the Damascus Gate
Josephus - For the reign of Herod the Great he manifestly utilizes the voluminous work of Nicolaus of Damascus, who, as the counsellor of Herod, had exalted his patron to the skies
Joram - A little to the north of Beisan there is a bridge, which dates from the Middle Ages, the Jisr el-Mujamieh, on the way—an ancient Roman road—leading from the plain of Jezreel to Gadara and Damascus
Messiah - Sabatai now resolves for Smyrna, and then for Constantinople, Nathan writes to him from Damascus, and thus he begins his letter; "To the king, our king, lord of lords, who gathers the dispersed of Israel, who redeems our captivity, the man elevated to the height of all sublimity the Messias of the God of Jacob, the true Messias, the celestial Lion, Sabatai Sevi
Clementine Literature - The disciples fly to Jericho, and the enemy hastens to Damascus, whither he supposes Peter to have fled in order there to make havoc of the faithful
Jerusalem - Clarke entered it by the Damascus gate: and he describes the view of Jerusalem, when first descried from the summit of a hill, at about an hour's distance, as most impressive
Inspiration - As he journeyed to Damascus, about noon, to bring the Christians who were there bound to Jerusalem, there shone from heaven a great light round about him
Palestine - From the heights of Nazareth He had seen the march of the legions on the Roman road across Esdraelon from Acre to the Jordan, and watched the long lines of laden camels moving slowly from the coast to Damascus and back, along the road that lies like a flung ribbon along the hillsides to the north
Preaching Christ - ‘Saul confounded the Jews that dwelt in Damascus, proving that this is the Christ’ (Acts 9:22)
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - Some say she went with Joseph and the child to Damascus, to the house of a rich man, who protected and provided for them