What does Creation mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
κτίσεως the act of founding 8
κτίσις the act of founding 5
κτίσει the act of founding 2

Definitions Related to Creation

G2937


   1 the act of founding, establishing, building etc.
      1a the act of creating, Creation.
      1b Creation i.e. thing created.
         1b1 of individual things, beings, a creature, a Creation.
            1b1a anything created.
            1b1b after a rabbinical usage (by which a man converted from idolatry to Judaism was called).
            1b1c the sum or aggregate of things created.
      1c institution, ordinance.
      

Frequency of Creation (original languages)

Frequency of Creation (English)

Dictionary

King James Dictionary - Creation
CREATION, n.
1. The act of creating the act of causing to exist and especially, the act of bringing this world into existence. Romans 1 . 2. The act of making, by new combinations of matter, invested with new forms and properties, and of subjecting to different laws the act of shaping and organizing as the creation of man and other animals, of plants, minerals, &c. 3. The act of investing with a new character as the creation of peers in England. 4. The act of producing. 5. The things created creatures the world the universe. As subjects then the whole creation came.
6. Any part of the things created. Before the low creation swarmed with men.
7. Any thing produced or caused to exist. A false creation, proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Creation
From ancient times persons have had a keen interest in the origin of the universe. Stories or fragments of stories about creation have survived in the literature of several ancient nations. Biblical writers may reflect an awareness of these extra-biblical accounts, but their consistent testimony is that Israel's God was the Creator. His creative activities proceeded in orderly and methodical fashion toward the fulfillment of His purpose to create “good heavens” and “a good earth.”
Creation accounts in the Bible never function simply to satisfy a childlike curiosity to know “how it all began.” The biblical writers' concern with God as Creator grew out of their knowledge of Him as Redeemer. Genesis 1-11 serves as prologue to God's redemptive purpose in calling Abram ( Genesis 12:1-3 ). Similarly, in Isaiah 40:1 concern with God as Creator is in a larger context of concern with God as Redeemer from Babylonian captivity.
Important questions about creation include the following:
1. Where in the Bible is the subject of creation encountered?
2. What is the function of biblical references to creation?
3. What literature contemporary with the Bible contains references to creation?
4. How are biblical and extra-biblical references to creation related?
5. What cosmology is reflected in the Bible?
6. What is the time frame of creation in the Bible?
7. What is humanity's place in creation?
8. How is the New Testament concept of the new creation in Christ related to the biblical concept of physical creation?
Biblical References to Creation Probably the best known reference to creation in the Bible is Genesis 1:1-2:4 . That certainly is not the only place in Scripture where the subject is treated. Psalmists mentioned creation or the Creator frequently (Psalm 8:3-4 ; Psalm 74:17 ; Psalm 95:5 ; Psalm 100:3 ; Psalm 104:24 ,Psalms 104:24,104:30 ; Psalm 118:24 ; Psalm 40:5 ; Psalm 51:10 ; Psalm 64:9 ; Psalm 24:1-2 ; Job 26:12-1341 ; Psalm 145:10 ). The second half of Isaiah (Psalm 40-66 ) has four direct references to creation (Isaiah 40:28 ; Isaiah 43:7 , Isaiah 43:15 ; Isaiah 45:7 ; Isaiah 65:17 ). Job alluded to creation in two speeches (Job 10:8 ; Job 26:7 ), and God's answer to Job contains one reference to the subject (Job 38:4 ).
The New Testament reveals that Jesus “made” all things (John 1:3 ) and that “all things were created by him, and for him” (Colossians 1:16 ). Paul's assertion recorded in Ephesians 3:9 is that God “created all things.” The writer of Hebrews notes that Jesus was the agent God used to create the world ( Hebrews 1:2 ). Because God created all things, He is worthy of “glory and honor and power” (Revelation 4:11 ). Luke testified that the living God “made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and all things that are therein” (Acts 14:15 ). The consistent report of the Bible is that God is the Source of the whole created order.
The Function of Biblical Creation References Genesis is a book about beginnings. The centerpiece of the book is God's redemptive activity following the fall of man. God began by calling Abram out of Ur, by entering into a covenant with him, and by making promises to bless him and to bless all the families of the earth through him.
Genesis 1-11 is prologue to the patriarchal stories ( Genesis 12-50 ). It sets a world stage on which God acted in choosing one man in order to bless all men. Genesis 1-2 contain two accounts of creation, the order of man's creation coming at the end in the first and at the beginning in the second. God's creation, “good” as it was ( Genesis 1:4 ,Genesis 1:4,1:10 ,Genesis 1:10,1:12 ,Genesis 1:12,1:21 ,Genesis 1:21,1:25 ,Genesis 1:25,1:31 ), soon became bad through human rebellion against God. The accounts of creation in Genesis 1-2 prepare the reader for the record of the first people being placed in the Garden of Eden, temptation by the serpent, rebellion against God, expulsion from the garden, and the degenerating effect of sin in society.
God's judgment on sin in the form of a flood did not put an end to sin (Genesis 6-9 ). Noah himself carried sin into the society that survived the flood. Even destroying the tower of Babel, confusing the people's language, and scattering them over the face of the earth did not stop the spread of sin (Genesis 11:1 ). Genesis 11:1 ends by introducing Terah, the father of Abram, through whom God would bless the world in spite of its rebellion against Him. The link between creation and redemption is clear.
Isaiah reminded weary exiles that the God he proclaimed as their Redeemer and Sustainer was “the everlasting God, the Lord, the Creator of the ends of the earth” (Isaiah 40:28 ). The prophet linked God's redemptive activity with His creative activity (Isaiah 43:7 ,Isaiah 43:7,43:15 ). He went on to declare God's plan to “create new heavens and a new earth” as well as a new people (Isaiah 65:17-18 ).
Job lamented that God's hands “made and fashioned” him but for some unexplained reason turned about to “destroy” him (Job 10:8 ). In a later speech Job expressed the effortless manner in which God created the universe (Job 26:7-11 ) and defeated Rahab and the serpent (1618103865_8 ). The Lord's speech in response to Job (Job 38-39 ) makes clear that God is the Creator and that man had no part in creation.
The psalmists' concerns with God as Creator were related to people's place in creation (Psalm 8:3-4 ), to God's redemptive activity (Psalm 74:17 ; Psalm 95:5 ), and to praise for the Creator (Psalm 100:3 ; Psalm 104:1 ; Psalm 24:1-2 ). One psalmist referred to the creation to contrast its perishable nature with the imperishable nature of the Creator (Psalm 102:25-27 ).
The three doxologies in Amos (Amos 4:13 ; Amos 5:8-9 ; Amos 9:5-6 ) magnify God the Creator and Controller of creation. Malachi's reference to God as Creator stresses the fact that one God created all people (Malachi 2:10 ). This fact forms the basis of the prophet's appeal for faithfulness among covenant members.
John based God's worthiness to receive “glory and honor and power” on His creative activity (Revelation 4:11 ). By God's will “all things” existed and were created. John's testimony is that “the Word” made all things (John 1:3 ) and that Jesus is the Word (John 1:14 ).
Paul's perspective was that Christians represent God's workmanship “created in Christ Jesus for good works” (Ephesians 2:10 ). The gospel that God called Paul to preach had been hidden in God who “created all things” (Ephesians 3:9 ). He agreed with John that Jesus the Savior, the firstborn of all creation, was Himself the Source of all creation (Colossians 1:16-17 ).
The author of Hebrews wrote of God's revelation through prophets of old, but “in these last days” God spoke through a Son (Hebrews 1:1-2 ). The Son created the world. Like many Old Testament passages, this passage in Hebrews links God's creative activity with His redemptive activity.
The people of Lystra took Barnabas and Paul to be gods (Acts 14:11 ). Paul and Barnabas set the record straight as they pointed to “the living God which made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and all things that are therein” (Acts 14:15 ).
Relationship of Biblical and Extra-biblical References to Creation The Enuma Elish (“When on High”) is probably the best known extra-biblical reference to creation. This Mesopotamian account reflects a striking correspondence in various details and in order of events when it is compared with the biblical references to creation. What is the explanation for these similarities? Did the Babylonians follow the biblical account? Did the biblical authors follow Babylonian prototypes? Did both Babylonian and biblical writers rely on some unidentified ultimate source?
Based on the dating of Babylonian and biblical materials, apparently biblical writers were aware of Babylonian prototypes. Though the two accounts are similar in some ways, they are poles apart in other ways. Conflict between rival deities dominates the Babylonian story of creation. The biblical accounts feature one God creating a good, orderly, and harmonious universe. Their cosmogony (theory of the origin of the universe) is similar; their religion is radically different. Biblical writers seem to be conscious of Babylonian sources, but they take a critical position toward them.
Human Place in Creation Both detailed stories of creation in the Bible feature people at center stage, even though the creation of persons is last in the order of creative acts in Genesis 1:1-2:4 but first in Genesis 2:4-24 . The author of Psalm 8:1 seems surprised at the attention the Creator gives to mortal humans formed from the dust ( Psalm 8:4 ). Yet God gave humans a place of prominence and set them over the rest of creation (Psalm 8:5-8 ). “For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels” (Psalm 8:5 ) may be a commentary on the Genesis statement that God “created man in his own image” (Genesis 1:27 ).
The language of Genesis 1:1 pictures God at a distance speaking humans into existence. The language of Genesis 2:1 portrays God with a “hands on” closeness shaping Adam and Eve like a potter forming a clay vessel. “Create” (bara') is the dominant verb of creation in Genesis 1:1 . “Formed” (yatsar) is the controlling verb of creation in Genesis 2:1 .
New Creation and Physical Creation The Old Testament is consistent in its use of the verb “create” (bara' ). Only God serves as subject of the verb. Creation is the work of God. People may “make” (asah ) and “form” (yatsar ). God alone creates (bara' ).
Psalm 51:10 may reflect a transition in usage of “create” ( bara' ) to designate a purely physical work. A clean heart is the object of the verb “create” in this Psalm. Isaiah employed “create” in reference to “new heavens and a new earth” as well as “Jerusalem” and “her people” (Isaiah 65:17-18 ). Paul wrote to the Corinthians about being “in Christ” and thereby being “a new creation” (2 Corinthians 5:17 ). “Created in Christ Jesus” is Paul's terminology for spiritual salvation in Ephesians 2:10 . The point in all of these references is that God alone is the Author of spiritual redemption.
God is the Creator of all things. All things belong to God. God gave humans dominion over creation, a stewardship assignment. Therefore, people are accountable directly to God for their use or abuse of creation. God created “good” heavens and a “good” earth. The entrance of human sin has had an adverse effect on creation (Hosea 4:1-3 ). Paul pictured that the whole of creation “groaneth and travaileth” under the burden of human sin (Romans 8:22 ). He also wrote of a time when “the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God” (Romans 8:21 NAS). Paul anticipated a day when God would restore the whole of creation to its original goodness.
Billy K. Smith
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Creation
"In the beginning" God created, i.e., called into being, all things out of nothing. This creative act on the part of God was absolutely free, and for infinitely wise reasons. The cause of all things exists only in the will of God. The work of creation is attributed (1) to the Godhead (Genesis 1:1,26 ); (2) to the Father (1 Corinthians 8:6 ); (3) to the Son (John 1:3 ; Colossians 1:16,17 ); (4) to the Holy Spirit (Genesis 1:2 ; Job 26:13 ; Psalm 104:30 ). The fact that he is the Creator distinguishes Jehovah as the true God (Isaiah 37:16 ; 40:12,13 ; 54:5 ; Psalm 96:5 ; Jeremiah 10:11,12 ). The one great end in the work of creation is the manifestation of the glory of the Creator (Colossians 1:16 ; Revelation 4:11 ; Romans 11:36 ). God's works, equally with God's word, are a revelation from him; and between the teachings of the one and those of the other, when rightly understood, there can be no contradiction. Traditions of the creation, disfigured by corruptions, are found among the records of ancient Eastern nations. (See ACCAD .) A peculiar interest belongs to the traditions of the Accadians, the primitive inhabitants of the plains of Lower Mesopotamia. These within the last few years have been brought to light in the tablets and cylinders which have been rescued from the long-buried palaces and temples of Assyria. They bear a remarkable resemblance to the record of Genesis.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Creation, New
See New Creation
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Create, Creation
Who created and sustains the universe? Why was it created? What is the nature of the Creator-creature relationship? These are the sorts of questions that the Bible addresses when it treats the topic of creation. Such queries are essentially theological in nature. Therefore, the juxtaposition, by some modern interpreters, of scriptural assertions about creation with scientific evidence and theories regarding origins often results in fruitless comparisons of different, although equally relevant, bodies of knowledge. At the risk of oversimplifying the issue, one might say that Scripture deals with the who, why, and what questions posed above, whereas science investigates the problems of when and how the observable universe came into existence and continues to function.
In order to understand what the Bible teaches about creation, one must go beyond delineating the semantic range of relevant words to examine pertinent biblical passages in their historical, literary, and theological contexts. This sort of investigation reveals a degree of similarity between the Bible and antecedent Near Eastern literature. While it is unlikely that biblical authors consulted this corpus directly, they were presumably aware of the various creation traditions of the nations surrounding them. That would account for the similarities. There are also profound differences between the Bible's perspective on the cosmos and its origins and that of contemporaneous literature. The more one compares them, the more evident it becomes that scriptural authors were motivated both to make certain affirmations about creation and to contradict some conceptions about it that were current in their day.
The Eternal Creator Has No Peer . The assertion that the one, eternally existing God of the patriarchs and their descendants is the Creator must surely have been intended, at least in part, as a polemic against the pantheons of gods of other peoples—Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Canaaniteswith whom the Israelites came in contact. The creation myths of these people often included accounts of the origins of the gods and conflicts between the gods. These divine rivalries frequently provided the context for the establishment of the universe and the rhythms of nature.
The Creator Has No Rival . The God of Israel's unchallenged hegemony over the various realms of the cosmos and the creatures that inhabit them further emphasizes his uniqueness in comparison to the gods of other nations. Whereas typically their domains are limited and they must contend with rivals, his rule is uncontested. The author of Genesis 1 takes great pains to demonstrate to his audience that the universe is not populated with deities or demons who need to be subdued or appeased, but that it is all controlled by one Creator. He does not need to struggle with nature in order to make it conform to his plan and purpose. Neither is his creative word the sort of magical incantation that is attributed to Ptah and Re in Egyptian mythology. It is the sovereign God's simple command which, when uttered, produces the desired result. Furthermore, the primeval ocean is not a divine behemoth, like Tiamat, to be butchered in order to fashion earth and sky, but an impersonal part of the universe over which God's potent wind/Spirit broods (v. 2). Indeed, the great sea monsters, which cavort with the myriads of other creatures in the watery depths, are his handiwork (v. 21 cf. Psalm 104:25-26 ). The seas, which are remnants of the original watery chaos, are assigned borders at earth's edges (vv. 9-10 cf. Job 38:8-11 ; Psalm 104:5-9 ; Genesis 1:1-22 ). The sun and moon are not afforded the dignity of their usual Hebrew names (semes [1] and yareah [2]) because those designations might bring to mind the sun-god, Shamash, and the moon-god, Yarih. Instead they are referred to as the greater and lesser lights. These luminaries, along with the stars, are not depicted as deities controlling human destiny, but simply as components of God's creation that function in their assigned roles of providing light and the basis for calendrical calculations (vv. 14-18). Fertility is not something to be deified, as it is in Canaanite religion, for example, but a capacity created by God (vv. 11-12,22, 28).
The Creator Brings Order . In Genesis 1 , the drama of creation begins with the same opening scene as in other ancient traditions, the watery chaos (v. 2 cf. Psalm 24:1-2 ). The reference in 1:1 to the creation of the ordered cosmos (which is what the phrase "heavens and earth" connotes) is probably not to be construed as a description of the first act of creation, which is then followed by a chaotic state and then the return to order. Verse 1 may, instead, serve as a dependent, temporal clause (i.e., "In the beginning when God created" or "When God began to create"), with verse 2 then apparently functioning as a parenthetic comment inserted between verses 1,3, which would then be understood as the main clause (i.e., " [3] God said"). Another possible interpretation is that verse 1 is an independent thematic statement that introduces the content that follows in chapter 1 and that corresponds to the summary statement John 5:16-1903. Verse 2 would then constitute a circumstantial clause modifying verse 3 (i.e., "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Now the earth being formless and empty God said ").
In any case, the curtain that veils the primeval past rises at some point after the absolute beginning since watery chaos already exists. Creation in 1618103865_15:3 has more to do with bringing order to that chaos and populating voids than with generating all matter. That does not mean that this passage is inimical to the idea of God creating all matter. It is just that the issue does not seem to be relevant to this biblical author and his contemporaries. The mystery of ultimate origins is addressed by subsequent revelation that acknowledges that absolutely everything, even the primeval deep, must have its origin in God ( Nehemiah 9:6 ; Psalm 90:2 ; Proverbs 8:22-31 ; 2 Maccabees 7:28 ; Hebrews 11:3 ). It is upon this fuller understanding of the limitless scope of God's sovereignty that the doctrine of creatio ex nihilo, creation out of nothing, may be based.
Creation Week . The portrayal of creation as work accomplished on successive days of the week raises a whole series of literary, chronological, and theological issues that are too involved to explore in any great depth here. Some essential considerations regarding this arrangement should be highlighted.
The first consideration is that the framework of the week of creation is an artistic one designed to convey primarily theological, rather than purely scientific, information. The evidence for this is abundant. First, the concept of the week coincides with the author's focus on the number sevenor a multiple thereofin Genesis 1:1-2:3 (e.g., seven words in the original Hebrew version of the introductory verse [4]; seven paragraphs corresponding to the seven days following the introductory verse fourteen words in v. 2 seven instances of the fulfillment formula signifying that what God called for did take place seven examples of the approval formula stating that what God saw was good seven occurrences altogether of the terms "light" and "day" in the first paragraph [5]; seven references to water in paragraphs 2,3 [6]; three consecutive sentences of seven words each in 2:2-3a; that are part of the seventh paragraph 2:1-3]; whose subject is the seventh day thirty-five words in the seventh paragraph thirty-five occurrences of the word "God" and twenty-one of the word "earth" throughout the narrative ). In the Bible, seven and its multiples frequently connote completeness, totality, fulfillment, or perfection.
Second, compressed into six days of work there are eight creative Acts, each introduced by the formula, wayyomer elohim, "And/Then God said." Analogous to this conforming of facts to a predetermined narrative structure is Matthew's arrangement of Jesus' lineage in three sets of fourteen generations. To achieve that sort of symmetry, however, the evangelist does not hesitate to omit names in a manner consistent with Jewish practice in the formation of genealogies (e.g., Ahaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram/Jehoram and Uzziah/Azariah in 1:8-9; [7]; and Jehoiakim between Josiah and Jechoniah/Jehoiachin in 1:11; [8]).
Third, there are differences with respect to both the sequence and duration of events when Genesis 1:1-2:3 is compared with 2:4-25. Whereas the first account depicts the creation of humans last, the second portrays man's creation first and woman's last. Furthermore, while in the first passage creation is described as a six-day task, in the second the only indication as to how long it takes is given in 2:4: "When the Lord God made the earth and the heavens. The juxtaposition of narratives with such obvious chronological differences makes it clear that an absolute chronology of creation events is not at issue here.
Fourth, the deliberate omission, in Genesis 2:1-3 , of the refrain regarding the evening and morning for the seventh day would seem to suggest that the author intends to portray it as a day without an end. The fact that he does not explicitly call it the Sabbath may, in part, be his way of highlighting the sense in which it is distinct from the Mosaic Sabbath, although with the references in verses 2-3 to God resting from his work he certainly makes the connection implicitly. The author may also wish to prevent any connections between the Sabbath and sabattu or sapattu, which was what the Babylonians and Assyrians called the day of the full moonthe fifteenth of the montha day dedicated to the worship of the moon-god.
The concept of the seventh day as an unending one is presumably part of the background to the discourse by the author of Hebrews on the eschatological Sabbath-rest for the faithful (4:1-11). Jesus, too, does not seem to regard the seventh day of creation week as a literal one, if his response in 1618103865_8 to charges that he has broken the law by healing a paralytic on the Sabbath is any indication. Jesus legitimizes his actions on the grounds that his Father is still working (v. 17) and that he does nothing but what he sees the Father doing (v. 19). His argument appears to be that his works on the Mosaic Sabbath are lawful because they correspond to the Father's activities on the continuing creation Sabbath. This Sabbath, which marks the end of the week of Genesis 1:1-2:3 but not the cessation of the Father's works, is apparently considered by Jesus to coincide with all of history after the six days of Genesis 1 . That view is fully compatible with the understanding of creation week as a literary device.
If the creation week framework is artistic in nature, then what is its significance? The answer to that question is undoubtedly to be found in the linkage between creation and the Sabbath. The anthropomorphic figure of the week furnishes the context for a theology of the Sabbath. It is striking to note that ancient Assyrian calendars identify the seventh, fourteenth, twenty-first, and twenty-eighth days of the month (along with the nineteenth day, which occurs seven weeks after the beginning of the preceding month) as unlucky ones on which important tasks should not be attempted. In contrast, Israel's God designates every seventh day as a holy day, when regular tasks are to be laid aside and there can be pause for refreshment and a renewed focus on the relationship with the Creator (Genesis 2:3 ; Exodus 20:8-11 ; 31:12-17 ). The Sabbath thus symbolizes the fact that human worth and purpose are not to be derived from toil but from that relationship. This is not to denigrate human work, for God assigns responsibilities and duties even prior to the fall (Genesis 1:26-29 ; 2:15,19-20 ). Nevertheless, it is particularly as humans set themselves apart to commune with their Creator, whether on the Sabbath or some other day (Romans 14:5-6 ; 1 Corinthians 16:1-2 ; Revelation 1:10 ), that they find fulfillment.
A second consideration pertaining to the creation week structure is that the events of Genesis 1:1-2:3 are arranged in a logical, although not necessarily chronological, order. The accomplishments of the first six days of that week, which are described in parallel triads, remedy the conditions of formlessness and emptiness described in verse 2. The key activity on days 1 to 3 is separation (i.e., light from darkness [9], waters above the firmament from those below it [5], waters under the sky from dry land [3]), and on days 4 to 6 it is population (i.e., luminaries [12], aquatic and winged creatures [13], animals and humans [14]). There are also connections between the triads due to the fact that the regions demarcated on the first three days are filled by creations fashioned on the next three. Thus luminaries (day 4) correspond to light and darkness (day 1), aquatic and winged creatures (day 5) to water and sky (day 2), and animals and humans (day 6) to dry land (day 3). Additional congruence is evident in that the vegetation created on day 3 is given for food to terrestrial and winged creatures on day 6. The author further distinguishes these two days by means of double usage of the creative utterance (vv. 9,11, 24,26), fulfillment (vv. 9,11, 24,30) and approval (vv. 10,12, 25,31) formulas. This kind of symmetrical arrangement shows that the goal of the inspired author is to compose a theological portrait of his subject in a manner reminiscent of the New Testament evangelists, not merely to chronicle events in the order of their occurrence.
The Creator's Crowning Achievement . A central theme of both Genesis creation accounts is that of humanity as the apex of God's creation. This motif stands in contrast to certain mythological depictions of the human species fashioned as an afterthought to relieve the gods of toil and provide them with sustenance. In Genesis 1 , the primacy of humans is emphasized through their appearance as the last of God's creatures in the narrative sequence, the reference to their being created in God's image, the threefold use of the verb bara [3], in the description of their creation (v. 27), and their dominion over the earth and its creatures as God's vice-regents. In Genesis 2 , human preeminence is highlighted by the male's creation before all other life, his being entrusted with custody of the garden, his being given the privilege of naming the other creatures, and the female's appearance as the last of God's creatures though, like the male, distinct from all other species.
The significance of references to humans created in God's image has long been debated by biblical scholars. The image of God, whatever it means, clearly distinguishes humanity from the rest of creation. Since it is linked in Genesis 1:26 to the mandate for humans to have dominion over the created order, some have equated it with the role of vice-regent. That role, however, seems to be a consequence or function of the divine image. As intimated earlier in comments about the Sabbath, the capacity for a unique and personal relationship with the Creator is apparently what is intrinsic to the concept of the image of God. This is perhaps signaled most clearly by the appearance in Genesis 2:4-7 where the central theme is human origins of the name by which God typically identifies himself to those with whom he enters into covenant, Yahweh (rendered "Lord" in most English translations). Although the term "covenant" is not found in Genesis 1-2 , it is implicit in the reciprocity of God's provisions for the original human couple and their conformity to his expectations of them. Their initial obedience to the command not to partake of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, which allows them to enjoy the benefits of covenant life, constitutes an acknowledgment of the fact that, as Creator, God alone has the prerogative to establish moral absolutes of right and wrong. Their subsequent disobedience, which results in the dissolution of the covenant and death, represents an attempt to usurp that divine prerogative. This whole sequence is typical of relationships between suzerains and their vassals in antiquity. Such relationships are codified in extant treaties whose format is reflected in Old Testament covenant formulations.
Creation Is Good . Another important theme in Genesis 1 is that God's creation is good. Various individual aspects of creation are so designated (vv. 4,10, 12,18, 21,25) whereas the whole taken together is called "very good" (v. 31). These statements are intended to show not only that what God has fashioned and made to conform to the rule of law reflects his glory and his very nature (cf. Psalm 19:1-11 ; [14] 97:6; Romans 1:20 ), but also that the fall of humanity described in Genesis 3 cannot be attributed to any flaw in creation. Clearly Adam and Eve cannot excuse their transgression on the basis of a deficient environment because it is both perfect and provides bountifully for their every need (1:29; 2:8-16,20-25). Neither can God be faulted, for, despite the fact that the serpent which becomes the agent of temptation in this episode is a creature that God has made (3:1), it is a subordinate creature over which humans are to exercise dominion (1:26-28; 2:19-20). Thus their transgression is a consequence of their failure to fulfill the creation mandate.
Community Is Good . Significantly, the prospect of the man being alone is the only thing in the prefall narrative that is explicitly called not good (2:18). This is indicative of the fact that humans are social creatures and that they have an innate need for community. The need is remedied when God creates womaneventually named "Eve, " the mother of all living (3:20) because through her the rest of humanity comes into existence. The marriage relationship (2:24-25) symbolizes all other forms of human coexistence designed to satisfy the primal yearning for fellowship.
It should be pointed out that Genesis emphasizes the spiritual equality and interdependence of the original human couple (1:26-28; 2:18-23). This is epitomized by the expression, kenegdo, "corresponding to him" (2:18,20), which is used of the partner whom God determines to provide for the man. The term, ezer [17] 115:9,10, 11; 146:5; see also 1 Samuel 7:12 ; Psalm 27:9 ; 40:17 ; [18] 46:1; [19] 63:7; [20] 94:17). The reference to woman being created from man's rib highlights the kind of affinity between man and woman that is not possible between humans and other creatures. This is reinforced by man's joyful cry of recognition when God presents the woman to him: "This is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh" (2:23).
Although the preceding touches on the horizontal, human dimension of community, Scripture also emphasizes the vertical, Godward dimension. Both are represented already in Genesis 1:27 in the declaration that humankind is created male and female and in God's image. Indeed, the Bible is essentially a record of God's establishment of, and activity within, the community of faith. The community is expected to respond to him with worship and devotion and to function in an environment characterized by encouragement, instruction, and correction.
Creation and Redemption . A fundamental theme with which creation is combined, particularly in the Book of Isaiah, is redemption. In 43:1, Yahweh asserts that he has both created and redeemed Israel (cf. 44:2,21, 24; 45:9-11; Malachi 2:10 ; and Isaiah 41:14 ; 48:17 ; 49:7 ). The epitome of Yahweh's redemptive Acts in the Old Testament is his deliverance of Israel from Egypt under Moses. It is not surprising, then, that exodus imagery should be used to describe subsequent instances of Yahweh's redeeming work. In Isaiah, the focus in this connection is on a second exodus, the return of the exiles from Babylonian captivity (43:14-21).
Through the prophet, Yahweh the Creator now declares his absolute sovereignty in the universe and in history. Furthermore, he assures his people that, contrary to what they assume, he is aware of their plight (40:12-28). Unlike the idols of Babylon, he announces in advance the overthrow of the Babylonian Empire by Cyrus the Persian and the subsequent emancipation of the Judean exiles. He will ransom them by supplying other nations for Persia to subdue. He will lead the erstwhile captives carefully through the wilderness between Babylon and Judah and provide for their every need along the way and in their restored land.
Re-creation . The theme of original creation also gives rise to another important theological concept: re-creation. It is featured in connection with both spiritual regeneration and eschatological renewal. In the former sense, we recall the plea of the psalmist who, burdened with his iniquity, earnestly entreats God to create a clean heart within him (51:10 [14]). In a similar vein, various passages in the New Testament speak of the Christian or the church as a new creation in Christ (2 Corinthians 5:17 ; Galatians 6:15 ; Ephesians 2:10,15 ). Elsewhere the imagery is of the new self, fashioned according to the likeness or image of the creator (Ephesians 4:24 ; Colossians 3:10 ).
The idea of a new creation in an eschatological sense brings the original theme full circle. What is envisioned for the future is a return to the idyllic state of initial creationnothing less than new heavens and a new earth. The consequences of the fall will be reversed and a renewal of the fruitfulness and vitality that first characterized the cosmos and the garden of Eden will take place (Isaiah 65:17-25 ; 66:22 ; Ezekiel 47:1-12 ; Joel 3:18 ; Amos 9:13 ; Romans 8:18-23 ; 2 Peter 3:7,10-13 ; Revelation 21:1-22:5 ). However, Scripture cautions that only those who have experienced spiritual re-creation may enjoy the eschatological Eden (Revelation 21:1-2,6-8,27 ; 22:14-15 ).
Robert J. V. Hiebert
See also Adam ; Eve ; Genesis, Theology of ; God ; Person, Personhood ; Image of God ; Sabbath ; Woman
Bibliography . B. W. Anderson, Creation in the Old Testament ; H. Blocher, In the Beginning ; W. Brueggemann, Genesis ; U. Cassuto, A Commentary on the Book of Genesis ; H. H. Esser, NIDNTT, 1:378-87; T. Frymer-Kensky, BA 40 (1977): 147-55; J. H. Gronbaek, JSOT 33 (1985): 27-44; G. F. Hasel, Andrews UNIVersity Seminary Studies 10 (1972): 1-20; idem, EvQ 46 (1974): 81-102; C. Hyers, The Meaning of Creation ; D. Kidner, Genesis ; J. B. Pritchard, Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament ; A. P. Ross, Creation and Blessing ; J. Skinner, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Genesis ; E. A. Speiser, Genesis ; H. J. Van Till, The Fourth Day ; H. J. Van Till et al., Portraits of Creation ; G. Von Rad, Genesis ; B. K. Waltke, BSac 132 (1975): 25-36,136-44,216-28,327-42; 133 (1976): 28-41; G. J. Wenham, Genesis 1-15 ; C. Westermann, Genesis: A Practical Commentary .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Creation
Science and revelation being from the same God cannot be mutually opposed. But either, or both, may be misinterpreted; and there have been as many false interpretations of the book of nature as of revelation. As the Copernican theory was ultimately found not to militate against, but to harmonize with, Scripture, when the language of the latter was better understood; so no real scientific discovery ever since has been found adverse to full belief in revelation, when the latter has been better understood. The full knowledge of both has ever advanced side by side. The Bible, having not scientific but religious truth for its object, speaks in phenomenal language, which in part even the scientific have to do, as in the phrases sunrise and sunset. Creation, in the strict sense of the first origination of being out of nothing, does not come within the scope of science.
It is by the Bible alone, and through faith we understand that the worlds were framed (fitly formed) by the word of God, so that not (as, from the analogy of things reproduced from previously existing and visible materials, one naturally would suppose) out of things which appear hath that which is seen been made" (Hebrews 11:3). No human being was witness of creation (Job 38:4). Geology traces ages ascending backward, marked by animal and vegetable existence, less and less highly organized the further back we go; but at last comes to a point beyond which it has no light, and I must fall back on revelation and faith for information. "In the beginning God created" the world, "the heaven and the earth" (Genesis 1:1): "In the beginning the Word WAS" (John 1:1). Βara' , "created," used of creating (1) the universe; (2) the sea monsters whose vastness causes amazement at God's power; (3) man, in the image of God (Genesis 1:27).
Everywhere else God "makes" ('asah ), as from an already created material, the firmament, sun and stars, and the brute (Genesis 1:7; Genesis 1:16; Genesis 1:25), or "forms" (yaatsar ) beasts out of the ground (Genesis 2:19), and "builds up" (Genesis 2:22 margin) the woman of the rib from man. The three verbs occur together (Isaiah 43:7). Βara' is confined to GOD's acts; the other two verbs are used also of man's acts. Though bara' extends to other acts of God besides the original creation, it is only in a secondary application, without reference to preexisting materials; still, except in the original creation, they are not excluded. Moreover, the contextual "in the beginning" can only mean an absolute beginning, in contrast to the previous nonexistence of the world and sole existence of the Creator.
This creation of all things out of nothing distinguishes the Bible from all pagan cosmogonies and philosophical speculations, which make matter eternal. The Creator's mode of "creating" is not revealed, but simply the fact, that it was by the putting forth of His will. Two narratives of creation, the latter (Genesis 2:4, etc.) the supplement to the former (Genesis 1-2:), appear at the forefront as the basis of the Bible revelation. That in Genesis 2:4, etc., evidently continues and recapitulates that in Genesis 1-2:3, in order to prepare the way for the account of paradise and man's fall. The first gives a clear summary of creation, man included, down to the sabbath rest from creation. The second concentrates attention on man. Accordingly, in the first Εlohim (from 'alah "strong"), the name for the mighty God of creation in general, appears. In the second Jehovah (Υahweh , the personal God in covenant relation to man, the unchanging "I AM."
To mark the identity of this personal Jehovah with the Elohim of the previous part, the two, the personal and the generic names, are joined, Jehovah-Elohim "the Lord God." The mighty Elohim who created all things is also the Jehovah, who from the days of paradise down to the days of Moses, the writer of the pentateuch, has been in personal and unchangeable covenant relation with His people. Moreover, Jehovah, being derived from hawah, the Syriac and Chaldee for the Hebrew hayah "to be," must have come down from a time prior to the separation of the Hebrew from the Aramaeans, i.e., prior to Abraham (for Syriac was soon after quite distinct from Hebrew, Genesis 31:47). The accounts of creation and of the construction of the tabernacle resemble each other (the world being God's great tabernacle, Psalm 19); the general plan first (Genesis 1), then the actual creation of the first pair, Eden, etc., next.
Scripture's design being to unfold redemption, only so much of the natural world is set forth as is needed for that design. Genesis 1 is not so much a full narrative of details as a revelation of the scheme in the Creator's mind, the archetype of the actual (Genesis 2:4-5; Gesenius, Targum, and Syriac). "Now no plant of the field was yet in the earth, and no herb of the field had yet sprouted forth, for the Lord God had not caused it to ram," etc. The earth already had brought forth grass (Genesis 1:11); but no cultivated land and no vegetables fit for man's use existed yet; "plant," "field," "grew," do not occur in Genesis 1. In the pattern of the tabernacle shown on the mount the description begins with the furniture of the tabernacle, then goes on to the priests, and ends with the sabbatical law. So, in creation, the process begins with the lower creatures, plants, and animals, then, man, creation's priest, Eden, and lastly the sabbath.
Genesis 1:1 teaches the religious truth needed for a right knowledge of God, that the world is not eternal, that God created it in the beginning; when that beginning was it does not state. But the high antiquity of the earth is expressly taught in Psalms 90:2, where God's formation of "the earth" in general is distinguished from that of "the (Hebrew tebel ) habitable world," Greek oikoumenee (Psalms 102:25; Proverbs 8:22). Geology shows that creation occupied immense ages, but that man's creation was its closing act and at a comparatively recent date. Two views are held as to Genesis 1: The one that between Gen.1:1 and Gen.1:2 intervened the vast geological periods, and that these are undescribed in Genesis 1; and that Genesis 1:2 describes the chaotic state which succeeded the last geological period before the earth's preparation for man; and that the description of the six days refers to this preparation.
If the seventh day sabbath in Proverbs 8:25-28, be an ordinary day, then the six days must be ordinary days and this view is favored. But geology seems to oppose any such state of the earth intervening between the preceding age and that of man's creation as could be described as" without form (desolate) and void." No universal convulsion (IF these words are to be pressed literally) separates the present orders of life from those preceding. No one series of stratified rocks is void of traces of life. Thus, we seem led to the conclusion (2) that the stage in the earth's progress when it became surrounded with chaotic waters (how long after "the beginning" we know not), described in Genesis 1:2, is that which existed before the arrangement of its surface took place. (But see below.) The sabbath of God is described in Hebrew 3-4, as not yet ended; it will last until He who sitteth on the throne shall say, "Behold I make all things new."
God's creating this dark and desolate state of the earth was not in vain, but that in due time it might be "inhabited" (Isaiah 45:18). It was no "fortuitous concourse of atoms," or "laws of nature" acting independently of the continually active divine will of their Author. "The Spirit of God" as the Giver of life "brooded ('moved') upon the waters." Then began organic life, at first in the lower types. Sir W. Jones (Asiatic Researches) states that the Indian philosophers similarly believed (doubtless from the primitive tradition) that water was the first element and work of the creative power. "The waters are called Nara, since they are the offspring of Nera or Iwara, and thence was Narayana named, because His first moving was upon them. THAT WHICH IS (the exact meaning of the I AM or JEHOVAH), the invisible Cause eternal, self-existing, but unperceived, is Brahma."
This address of Menu, Brahma's son, to the sages who consulted him concerning the formation of the world, evidently corresponds with the revelation in Genesis. Then God said "Let there be light," and there was light. Light was first in a diffused state. It is not a separate, distinct body in itself, but caused by undulations of ether propagated through space with inconceivable rapidity. Hence it is not said God created, but God commanded it to be. Scientifically the Bible distinguishes between "light" ('or ), Genesis 1:3-5, and the light hearing "luminaries" (me'orot ), Genesis 1:14-18. Much of the preexisting light diffused through space on the fourth day gathered round the sun's body (compare Job 38:19). Still, through the incandescent photosphere that enwraps the sun we catch glimpses of the orb itself by the spots visible on it.
"Day" is used often for a long period, with a beginning and' close, like morning and evening (Genesis 49:27; Deuteronomy 33:12). As the prophetic "days" at the close (Daniel 12:11-12), so the historical "days" at the beginning of the Bible seem to be not literal but "days of the Lord"; compare Psalms 90:4, "a thousand years in Thy sight are but as yesterday," and 2 Peter 3:8, "one day is with the Lord as a thousand years and a thousand years as one day." Psalm 104 is an inspired commentary on the history of creation in Genesis 1; compare the account in Psalms 104:8; Genesis 2:2 of the upheaval of mountains from beneath the waters and depression of valleys, whereby land was severed from sea; just as we still find traces (sea shells, etc.) of their former submersion on the highest mountains.
The special phrase in the Hebrew for the first day, "one day". [1] marks it as a day unique, just as the day that shall usher in the millennium is called" one (extraordinary and unique) day" (Zechariah 14:7). The seventh day is not described as the previous six, "it was evening, it was morning," because the Lord's sabbath extends over the whole present order of things, eventuating in the "sabbath rest that remaineth for the people of God" (Hebrews 4:9 margin). The Creator entered into the sabbath rest when He ceased from material creation, to carry on the new and spiritual creation in man (2 Corinthians 5:17; Hebrews 4:10). Yet God's sabbath is not an idle one: "My Father worketh hitherto," namely, upholding all creation. Compare Jesus' "day" (John 9:4; John 5:17); man's present short-day-sabbath is a type of God's and the saints' saboatism.
The proportion of the seventh day to the previous six, of whatever length it and they be, is the ground of our seventh-day sabbath. For the "firmament" (Genesis 1:6) translated "the (air) expanse," or sky overhead which supports the clouds or" waters above the heavens." Air, involved in the creation of the expanse, was the second necessity after light. Light was needed for the crystallization of inorganic forms and the molecular arrangement of the mineral matter of rocks. Light and air are needed for even the lowest types of life. Hugh Miller identifies the first day's work with the azoic period; the second day with the silurian or palaeozoic; the third day with the carboniferous; the fourth day with the permian and triassic; the fifth day with the oolitic or cretaceous, the period when, the air and the waters having been previously prepared, the waters brought forth in swarms insects, fish, and monstrous reptiles of sea and land, and fowl flew in the air; the sixth day with the tertiary, which saw first the higher animals, the land mammalia , and lastly MAN.
Plants appear before animals in Genesis 1. Geology does not directly as yet confirm this; but it may hereafter; the cellular structure of the earlier plants was not favorable to their preservation. Moreover, dependent as animals are on vegetation, it must have preceded them. Traces of life are found in the laurentian and certainly in the cambrian strata, the former the oldest rocks, whereas animal creation seemingly does not appear until the fifth day in Genesis 1:20-22. But "fish" (dag ) is omitted in the fifth day; an omission the more remarkable, as "fish" occurs (Genesis 1:26; Genesis 1:28) as among the animals over which God gave man dominion. The creation of fish long previously is therefore assumed, not stated. The tannin , from tanan "to stretch, and romesheth , from raamas "to trample" ("whales" and" every living creature that moveth," Genesis 1:21), answer to the saurians and allied reptiles occurring in the rocks precisely at the point assigned them by Moses.
The narrative in Genesis does not assert simultaneous creation of all the plants on the third day, and of reptiles and birds on the fifth, and of mammals on the sixth day; the divine command and its fulfillment are narrated as distinct. What Moses narrates is, not the first appearance of each class, but the time when each came into remarkable development and prominence. The simplicity and brevity of the narrative exclude the noting of the creation of the primeval types which passed out of existence ages before man appeared. God ordered His own work on a system of law, and from time to time supplied new forces, or gave new directions to existing forces; not that He changed His design, or found His original plan defective. He contemplated the interference from the first, but did not introduce them until their time was come. In the theory of the correlation of forces, electricity, galvanism, chemical action, gravitation, light and heat, are various manifestations of the same thing, called force or energy.
Light is not a material substance, but a mode of motion, undulations of ether propagated with inconceivable velocity. Accurately Moses writes, not God made light, but said on the first day Let light be. But why at the first, before organisms needing light existed? Because, to call forth light was to call into action FORCE in its various manifestations. Matter and force are the two elements out of which visible creation is formed. Matter was already made, but it remained chaotic (Genesis 1:2) until force in the form of "light" was evolved. Then gravitation would begin, light and heat would permeate the mass, elementary substances which chemistry reveals would be developed, and the whole would move toward the center of gravity. The great nebula of Orion illustrates the state of the solar system when light first appeared.
God's dividing the light from the darkness, and calling the light Day and the darkness Night, is the Mosaic phrase which marks His communicating rotatory motion to the mass, so that the earth revolved on its axis, from whence now results the division of day and night; a result however not then ensuing until the sun concentrated the diffused light in itself on the fourth day, when accordingly again the division of day and night is mentioned. Laplace's nebular hypothesis is possible only by supplying what revelation supplies, namely, God's interposition to impart force and rotation to matter. The nebulae in Orion and Argo represent the state of our system on the first appearance of light; there are changes passing over nebulae, some in the purely gaseous stage, others (as the nebula Draco) in transition, others in incipient central condensation.
The 118 Andromeda nebula assumes a lenticular form resulting from rapid rotation, the mass being ready to break up into separate worlds. All the motions of the bodies of our solar system are from W. to E., proving that their motions have a common origin, all at one time existing as a single mass revolving in the same direction. Uranus' satellites alone on the outer verge of our system retrograde, having been acted upon by some disturbing force. Bode's law of planetary distances ceases beyond Uranus, and does not hold good in Neptune. The figure of the earth is that naturally assumed by a plastic mass revolving about its axis; also its traces of intense heat accord with the nebular theory as modified by revelation; also the sun's state as a nebulous star which has not yet gathered up the whole of the original nebula.
At the beginning of THE SECOND DAY the earth had become separated from the gradually condensing mass of the solar system, and formed into a sphere. The "waters" mean the fluid mass of what afterward was divided into solid, fluid, and gas. The sorting of them was the work of the second day. Hydrogen and nitrogen in an incandescent state compose mainly many nebulae, as the spectroscope shows. God's introduction of OXYGEN into active operation produced air and water in our earth, which before the second day had consisted of a fused heterogeneous mass. Almost half of the earth's crust consists of oxygen, which enters into the composition of every rock and metallic ore. Chemical action therefore must have been most intense during the whole second day. By it the waters above the firmament were separated from that molten mass under the firmament which subsequently consolidated into rocks and ores.
Probably all the water, strictly so-called, floated above, in the condition in which Jupiter now appears. His apparent surface is crossed by alternating belts of light and shade, due to vast masses of steam ejected forcibly from the body of the fiery planet. His atmosphere being of vast depth (7,850 miles), the rotatory velocity of its upper portions is much greater than that of the planet's surface; hence the steam arranges itself in belts parallel to its equator. The eight greater planets are divided into two groups of four by the intervening belt of minor planets. The two groups differ much; but the members of each differ little in density, size, and length of day; the moon is the only satellite of the inner group; the outer has 17 satellites. The steam of the earth floating at the second day's commencement would soon lose its heat by radiation into space, and would descend to the surface as rain.
So the nucleus would gradually cool, and solids be formed, as granite, from the heat, moisture, and enormous pressure; and the globe internally molten would have a solid crust, covered all round with water, and surrounded by an atmosphere denser and more complex and extensive than now. The laurentian is the earliest sedimentary rock, 200,000 square miles N. of the Lawrence; the lower laurentian has been displaced from its original horizontal position before the upper was deposited above it. At this point is the first trace of upheaval and subsidence; here the Creator's interposition is marked, "Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear," the first work of THE THIRD DAY.
The first appearance of life is not noted in Genesis In the laurentian rock the first traces of life appear, a lowly organization akin to the foraminifera, the individuals being connected together as in varieties of coral. In the cambrian, the next rocks, ripple marks occur showing that those rocks (the Harlech grit) formed a sea beach. The silurian, deposited in the bed of a sea, and the old red sandstone, afresh water formation, come next. Then the carboniferous, with the coal measures above, testifying to an uniformly high temperature (since coal is found in far N. latitudes), a moist atmosphere, and an enormous terrestrial vegetation. This answers to God's command on the third day, "Let the earth sprout sprouts ('the herb seeding seed,'" and the fruit trees yielding fruit, etc. The majority of the vegetation then was cryptogamous, having only spores which only contain the germ; but seeds contain the germ and nourishment for it.
No traces of grasses are found. The first of the three classes in God's words is the cryptogamous or seedless, the other are seedbearers. Not the first beginnings, but the extraordinary development, of vegetable life is here marked. The cryptogams thrive best in an atmosphere such as then existed, in which light was diffused rather than concentrated in the sun, and in which the atmosphere was full of moisture. They absorbed and decomposed the excess of carbonic acid, and so purified the atmosphere. The great heat was derived from other sources than the sun, perhaps from the interior of the earth.
On THE FOURTH DAY the concentration of light and heat in the sun was so far completed that he became the luminary of the system which heretofore had derived its light and heat from other sources; possibly the light now in the sun had existed as a nebulous ring warming the planets within it, as the nebula ring in Lyra; or as diffused luminous matter, filling a space which included the earth's orbit. The system's light is not even yet wholly concentrated into the sun, but a vast chromosphere or ring of light surrounds his disc. Enormous volumes of hydrogen are ejected from it, and rotate on their axis as a cyclone.
A corona, like the nebula in 4,373, extends beyond the chromosphere, reaching from 400,000 to 1,800,000 miles beyond the sun; besides gaseous hydrogen the corona contains solid or fluid particles giving a spectrum with dark lines indicating matter capable of reflecting light. The zodiacal light is thought to be a faint extension of the corona. The fourth day work was the concentration of light into the sun, "God made two luminaries" (light bearers, marking the distinction between them and light itself). The permian and triassic rocks, of which the magnesian limestone and the new red sandstone are chief representatives in England, answer to the fourth day. The earliest saurian fossils occur in very small numbers, and the first traces of mammalia, namely, small marsupials. Old forms pass away, and the barrenness of new forms of life answers to the Mosaic silence as to new forms of life on the fourth day. The great-sized saurians characterize the lias and oolite and chalk, answering exactly to Moses' account of THE FIFTH DAY.
The mammalia , the rodentia , and mustelidae , predominating in the tertiary period, answer to Moses' account of THE SIXTH DAY. However, in favor of the six days being ordinary days, D'Orbigny maintains that a gulf of darkness and death must have intervened between the tertiary strata and our present fauna and flora; for that not a single species, vegetable or animal, is common to the tertiary and the human periods. Dr. Pusey (Daniel, preface, 19) thinks that the condition of the earth "without form and void" was such as God, who made all things "very good," never created (Genesis 1:2); then for an undefined period (Genesis 1:3) "the Spirit of God was brooding (Hebrew) upon the face of the waters" of the dark and disordered "deep." Then followed successive action in God's remodeling the earth for man's habitation. Possibly the order of Creation of the whole world in six vast periods, called "days," was repeated in six literal days in preparing the earth for man, its noblest occupant, "the minister and interpreter of nature" (Bacon).
Natural selection, and sexual selection, the causes conjectured lately as accounting for change of species, are inadequate; for in each individual the concurrence of many contingent causes through ages is needed f
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - God: His Benevolence in Creation
The benevolence of our great Creator is chanted even by things unpleasant to the ear. 'The nuptial song of reptiles,' says Kirby, 'is not, like that of birds, the delight of every heart; but it is rather calculated to disturb and horrify than to still the soul. The hiss of serpents, the croaking of frogs and toads, the moaning of turtles, the bellowing of crocodiles and alligators, form their gamut of discords.' Here, also, we may read beneficent design. Birds are the companions of man in the lawn and forest, in his solitary walks, amidst his rural labours, and around the home of his domestic enjoyments. They are, therefore, framed beautiful to the eye, and pleasing to the ear; but of the reptile tribes, some are his formidable enemies, and none were ever intended to be his associates. They shun cultivation, and inhabit unfrequented marshes or gloomy wilds. Their harsh notes and ungainly or disgusting forms, serve therefore to warn him of danger, or to turn his steps to places more fit for his habitation: –H. Duncan's Sacred Philosophy of the Seasons.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o Strength, And Stay Upholding All Creation
Hymn for None throughout the year. Possibly written by Saint Ambrose. It has about 20 translations. The English title given is by J. Ellerton and F. Hort.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Creation
In its primary import, signifies the bringing into being something which did not before exist. The term is therefore most generally applied to the original production of the materials whereof the visible world is composed. It is also used in a secondary or subordinate sense to denote those subsequent operations of the Deity upon the matter so produced, by which the whole system of Nature, and all the primitive genera of things, receive their form, qualities, and laws. There is no subject concerning which learned men have differed in their conjectures more than in this of creation. "It is certain, " as a good writer observes, "that none of the ancient philosophers had the smallest idea of its being possible to produce a substance out of nothing, or that even the power of the Deity himself could work without any materials to work upon. Hence some of them, among whom was Aristotle, asserted that the world was eternal, both as to its matter and form. Others, though they believed that the gods had given the world its form, yet imagined the materials whereof it is composed to have been eternal. Indeed, the opinions of the ancients, who had not the benefit of revelation, were on this head so confused and contradictory, that nothing of any consequence can be deduced from them.
The free-thinkers of our own and of former ages have denied the possibility of creation, as being a contradiction to reason; and of consequence have taken the opportunity from thence to discredit revelation. On the other hand, many defenders of the sacred writings have asserted that creation out of nothing, so far from being a contradiction to reason, is not only probable, but demonstrably certain. Nay, some have gone so far as to say, that from the very inspection of the visible system of Nature, we are able to infer that it was once in a state of non-existence." We cannot, however, here enter into the multiplicity of the arguments on both sides; it is enough for us to know what God has been pleased to reveal, both concerning himself and the works of his hands. "Men, and other animals that inhabit the earth and the seas; all the immense varieties of herbs and plants of which the vegetable kingdom consists; the globe of the earth, and the expanse of the ocean; these we know to have been produced by his power. Besides the terrestrial world, which we inhabit, we see many other material bodies disposed around it in the wide extent of space.
The moon, which is in a particular manner connected with our earth, and even dependent upon it; the sun, and the other planets, with their satellites, which like the earth circulate round the sun, and appear to derive from him light and heat; those bodies which we call fixed stars, and consider as illuminating and cherishing, with heat each its peculiar system of planets; and the comets which at certain periods surprise us with their appearance, and the nature of whose connection with the general system of Nature, or with any particular system of planets, we cannot pretend to have fully discovered; these are so many more of the Deity's works, from the contemplation of which we cannot but conceive the most awful ideas of his creative power. "Matter, however, whatever the varieties of form under which it is made to appear, the relative disposition of its parts, or the motions communicated to it, is but an inferior part of the works of creation. We believe ourselves to be animated with a much higher principle than brute matter; in viewing the manners and economy of the lower animals, we can scarce avoid acknowledging even them to consist of something more than various modifications of matter and motion. The other planetary bodies, which seem to be in circumstances nearly analogous to those of our earth, are surely, as well as it, destined for the habitations of rational intelligent beings. the existence of intelligences of an higher order than man, though infinitely below the Deity, appears extremely probable. Of these spiritual beings, called angels, we have express intimation in Scripture (see the article ANGEL.) But the limits of the creation we must not pretend to define.
How far the regions of space extend, or how they are filled, we know not. How the planetary worlds, the sun, and the fixed stars are occupied, we do not pretend to have ascertained. We are even ignorant how wide a diversity of forms, what an infinity of living animated beings may inhabit our own globe. So confined is our knowledge of creation, yet so grand, so awful, that part which our narrow understandings can comprehend!" "Concerning the periods of time at which the Deity executed his several works, it cannot be pretended that mankind have had opportunities of receiving very particular information. Many have been the conjectures, and curious the fancies of learned men, respecting it; but, after all, we must be indebted to the sacred writings for the best information." Different copies, indeed, give different dates. The Hebrew copy of the Bible, which we Christians, for good reasons, consider as the most authentic, dates the creation of the world 3944 years before the Christian era. The Samaritan Bible, again, fixes the era of the creation 4305 years before the birth of Christ. And the Greek translation, known by the name of the Septuagint version of the Bible, gives 5270 as the number of years which intervened between these two periods.
By comparing the various dates in the sacred writings, examining how these have come to disagree, and to be diversified in different copies; endeavouring to reconcile the most authentic profane with sacred chronology, some ingenious men have formed schemes of chronology plausible, indeed, but not supported by sufficient authorities, which they would gladly persuade us to receive in preference to any of those above-mentioned. Usher makes out from the Hebrew Bible 4004 years as the term between the creation and the birth of Christ. Josephus, according to Dr. Wills, and Mr. Whiston, makes it 4658 years; and M. Pezron, with the help of the Septuagint, extends it to 5872 years. Usher's system is the most generally received. But though these different systems of chronology are so inconsistent, and so slenderly supported, yet the differences among them are so inconsiderable, in comparison with those which arise before us when we contemplate the chronology of the Chinese, the Chaldeans, and the Egyptians, and they agree so well with the general information of authentic history, and with the appearances of nature and of society, that they may be considered as nearly fixing the true period of the creation of the earth." Uncertain, however, as we may be as to the exact time of the creation, we may profitably apply ourselves to the contemplation of this immense fabric.
Indeed, the beautiful and multiform works around us must strike the mind of every beholder with wonder and admiration, unless he be enveloped in ignorance, and chained down to the earth with sensuality. These works every way proclaim the wisdom, the power, and the goodness of the Creator. Creation is a book which the nicest philosopher may study with the deepest attention. Unlike the works of art, the more it is examined, the more it opens to us sources of admiration of its great Author; the more it calls for our inspection, and the more it demands our praise. Here every thing is adjusted in the exactest order; all answering the wisest ends, and acting according to the appointed laws of Deity. Here the Christian is led into the most delightful field of contemplation. To him every pebble becomes a preacher, and every atom a step by which he ascends to his Creator. Placed in this beautiful temple, and looking around on all its various parts, he cannot help joining with the Psalmist in saying, "O Lord, how manifold are thy works; in wisdom hast thou made them all!"
See ETERNITY of GOD.
See Ray and Blackmore on the Creation; art. Creation, Enc. Brit.; Derham's Astro and Physico- theology; Hervey's Meditations; La Pluche's Nature Displayed; Sturm's Reflections on the Works of God.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Creation
CREATION . One of the most convincing proofs of the composite authorship of the Pentateuch has always been found in the existence side by side of two independent and mutually irreconcilable accounts of the creation of the world. The first, Genesis 1:1 to Genesis 2:4 a, forms the introduction of the Priestly Code (P [1] ), which was compiled, as is now generally acknowledged, in the 5th cent. b.c. The second, Genesis 2:4 bff., opens the Jahwistic document (J [2] ), whose latest portions must be dated at least a century and a half earlier than the compilation of P [1] . These two narratives, while expressing the same fundamental religious ideas, differ profoundly in their concrete conceptions of the process of creation. The account of P [1] starts with a description ( Genesis 2:2 ) of the primeval chaos a dark formless watery abyss, out of which the world of light and order was to be evolved. Whether this chaotic matter owed its origin to a prior creative act of God is a question depending on a delicate point of grammatical construction which cannot be adequately explained here; but, looking to the analogy of the Babylonian Creation-story (see below), it seems probable that the chaos is conceived as pre-existent, and that the representation of the chapter falls short of the full dogmatic idea of creation as production out of nothing, an idea first unambiguously expressed in 2Ma 7:28 The work of creation then proceeds in a series of eight Divine fiats, viz.: (1) Creation of light and separation of light from the primeval darkness, Genesis 1:3-5 ; (2) division of the chaotic waters by the firmament, Genesis 1:6-8 ; (3) separation of land and sea, Genesis 1:9-10 ; (4) clothing of the earth with vegetation, Genesis 1:11-13 ; (5) formation of the heavenly bodies, Genesis 1:14-19 ; (6) production of fishes and birds, Genesis 1:20-23 ; (7) land animals, Genesis 1:24 f.; and (8) the creation of man in the image of God with dominion over the creatures, Genesis 1:26 ff. The most remarkable formal feature of the record is a somewhat artificial but carefully planned and symmetrical arrangement of the eight works under a scheme of six days. The creative process is thus divided into two parallel stages, each embracing four works and occupying three days, the last day in each division having two works assigned to it. There is an obviously designed, though not quite complete, correspondence between the two series: (1) light || ( Genesis 1:5 ) luminaries; (2) waters and firmament || ( Genesis 1:6 ) fishes and fowls; (3) dry land || ( Genesis 1:7-8 ) terrestrial animals; (4) trees and grasses, and (on the sixth day) the appointment of these as the food of men and animals. The significance of the six days’ scheme is revealed in the closing verses ( Genesis 1:1-3 ), where the resting of the Creator on the seventh day is regarded as the antitype and sanction of the Jewish Sabbath-rest. It is not improbable that the scheme of days is a modification of the original cosmogony, introduced in the interest of the Sabbath law; and this adaptation may account for some anomalies of arrangement which seem to mar the consistency of the scheme.
In the narrative of J [2] (2:4bff.), the earth as originally made by Jahweh was an arid lifeless waste, in which no plant could grow for lack of moisture, and where there was no man to till the ground (vv. 5, 6). The idea of man’s superiority to the other creatures is here expressed by placing his creation, not at the end as in P [1] , but at the beginning (v. 7); followed by the planting of the garden in which he was to dwell and from whose trees he was to derive his food (vv. 8, 9, 15 17); the forming of beasts and birds to relieve his solitude and awake his craving for a nobler companionship (vv. 18 20); and lastly of the woman, in whom he recognizes a part of himself and a helpmeet for him (vv. 21 23). The express reference to the welfare of man in each act of creation makes it doubtful whether a systematic account of the origin of things was contemplated by the writer, or whether the passage is not rather to be regarded as a poetic clothing of ideas generated by reflexion on fundamental facts of human life and society. It is probable, however, that it contains fragments of a fuller cosmogony which has been abridged and utilized as a prologue to the story of Paradise and the Fall. On either view, the divergence from the account of P [1] is so obvious as to preclude the attempt to harmonize the two, or to treat the second as merely supplementary to the first.
Much ingenuity has been expended in the effort to bring the Biblical record of creation into accord with the facts disclosed by the modern sciences of Geology and Astronomy. Naturally such constructions confine their operations to the systematic and semi-scientific account of Genesis 1:1-31 ; for it has probably never occurred to any one to vindicate the scientific accuracy of the more imaginative narrative of J [2] . But even if we were to admit the unique claim of the first chapter to be a revealed cosmogony, the difficulty of harmonizing it with the teachings of science is seen to be insurmountable as soon as the real nature of the problem to be solved is fairly apprehended. It is not sufficient to emphasize the general idea of gradation and upward progress as common to science and Scripture, or to point to isolated coincidences, such as the creation of fishes before mammals, or the late appearance of man on the earth: the narrative must be taken as a whole, and it must be shown that there is a genuine parallelism between the order of days and works in Genesis 1:1-31 and the stages of development recognized by science as those through which the universe has reached its present form. This has never been done; and after making every allowance for the imperfection of the geological record, and the general insecurity of scientific hypothesis as distinguished from ascertained fact, enough is known to make it certain that the required correspondence can never be made out. Thus the formation of the sun and moon after the earth, after the alternation of day and night, and even after the emergence of plant-life, is a scientific impossibility. Again, the rough popular classifications of Genesis (plants, aquatic animals, birds, land animals, etc.) are, for scientific purposes, hopelessly inadequate; and the idea that these groups originated as wholes , and in the order here specified, is entirely contrary to the ‘testimony of the rocks.’ But, indeed, the whole conception of the universe on which the cosmogony of Genesis rests opposes a fatal barrier to any valid reconciliation with scientific theory. The world whose origin is here described is a solid expanse of earth, surrounded by and resting on a world-ocean, and surmounted by a rigid vault called the firmament , above which the waters of a heavenly ocean are spread. Such a world is unknown to science; and the manner in which such a world was conceived to have come into being cannot truly represent the process by which the very different world of science and fact has been evolved. This fact alone would amply justify the emphatic verdict of Professor Driver: ‘Read without prejudice or bias, the narrative of Genesis 1:1-31 creates an impression at variance with the facts revealed by science : the efforts at reconciliation … are but different modes of obliterating its characteristic features, and of reading into it a view which it does not express ’ ( Westm. Com . ‘Genesis,’ p. 26).
To form a correct estimate of the character and religious value of the first chapter of Genesis, it has to be borne in mind that speculative theories of the origin of the universe were an important element of all the higher religions of antiquity. Many of these cosmogonies (as they are called) are known to us; and amidst all the diversity of representation which characterizes them, we cannot fail to detect certain underlying affinities which suggest a common source, either in the natural tendencies of early thought, or in some dominant type of cosmological tradition. That the Hebrew cosmogony is influenced by such a tradition is proved by its striking likeness to the Babylonian story of creation as contained in cuneiform tablets from Ashurbanipal’s library, first unearthed in 1872. From these Assyriologists have deciphered a highly coloured mythological epic, describing the origin of the world in the form of a conflict between Marduk, god of light and supreme deity of the pantheon of Babylon, and the power of Chaos personified as a female monster named Ti’âmat (Heb. Tĕhôm ). Wide as is the difference between the polytheistic assumptions and fantastic imagery of the Babylonian narrative and the sober dignity and elevated monotheism of Genesis, there are yet coincidences in general outline and in detail which are too marked and too numerous to be ascribed to chance. In both we have the conception of chaos as a watery abyss, in both the separation of the waters into an upper and a lower ocean; the formation of the heavenly bodies and their function in regulating time are described with remarkable similarity; special prominence is given to the creation of man; and it may be added that, while the order of creation differs in the two documents, yet the separate works themselves are practically identical. In view of this pervading parallelism, it is clear that the Hebrew and Babylonian cosmogonies are very closely related; and the only question open to discussion is which of them represents more faithfully the primary tradition on which each is based. Looking, however, to the vastly higher antiquity of the Babylonian narrative, to its conformity (even in points which affect the Biblical record) to the climatic conditions of the Euphrates Valley, and to the general indebtedness of Israel to the civilization of Babylon, it cannot reasonably be doubted that the Hebrew narrative is dependent on Babylonian models; though it is of course not certain that the particular version preserved in the tablets referred to is the exact original by which the Biblical writers were influenced.
From this point of view we are able to state the significance of the Scripture account of creation in a way which does justice at once to its unrivalled religious value and to its lack of scientific corroboration. The material is derived from some form of the Babylonian cosmogony, and shares the imperfection and error incident to all pre-scientific speculation regarding the past history of the world. The Scripture writers make no pretension to supernatural illumination on matters which it is the province of physical investigation to ascertain. Their theology , on the other hand, is the product of a revelation which placed them far in advance of their heathen contemporaries, and imparted to all their thinking a sanity of imagination and a sublimity of conception that instinctively rejected the grosser features of paganism, and transformed what was retained into a vehicle of Divine truth. Thus the cosmogony became a classical expression of the monotheistic principle of the OT, which is here embodied in a detailed description of the genesis of the universe that lays hold of the mind as no abstract statement of the principle could do. In opposition to the heathen theogonies, the world is affirmed to have been created, i.e. to have originated in the will of God, whose Personality transcends the universe and exists independently of it. The spirituality of the First Cause of all things, and His absolute sovereignty over the material He employs, are further emphasized in the idea of the word of God as the agency through which the various orders of existence were produced; and the repeated assertion that the world in all its parts was ‘good,’ and as a whole ‘very good,’ suggests that it perfectly reflected the Divine thought which called it into being. When to these doctrines we add the view of man, as made in the likeness of God, and marked out as the crown and goal of creation, we have a body of spiritual truth which distinguishes the cosmogony of Genesis 1:1-31 from all similar compositions, and entitles it to rank amongst the most important documents of revealed religion.
John Skinner.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - New Creation
The specific term "new creation" (kaine ktisis [ 2 Corinthians 5:17 ; Galatians 6:15 ). It is, however, the anthropological and individual side of the broad concept of the renewal of creation that is developed more widely in the New Testament. It is the broader idea, which goes back to passages in the latter part of Isaiah, developments in apocalyptic Jewish thought, and Qumran, which probably gave rise to Paul's specific application. Consequently, it will be helpful to consider this background before attempting to explain the concept in its final form.
Renewal in Isaiah. In the latter half of Isaiah (42:9; 43:18-19; 48:6; 65:17-25; 66:22) two strands of teaching begin to emerge that seem to have played a part in Paul's thinking about salvation. On the one hand, the prophet declares that God is about to do something new (42:9; 43:18-19; 48:6). Salvation is described along the lines of a new exodus ("I am making a way in the desert and streams in a wasteland, Isaiah 43:19 ), and what God is about to do will completely surpass old categories ("new things, hidden things unknown to you. They are created now, and not long ago you have not heard of them before today, 48:6b-7). These passages together declare the promise of God's intervention to deliver his people by doing a new thing.
Then, repeating and enlarging on the themes of newness and renewal, chapters 65,66 declare God's intention to "create new heavens and a new earth" (65:17). This act of God involves a complete reorganization of life; the hazards of life are removed (65:19-20,23, 25). The God who has seemed far off will now be near (65:24), and the existence of his people will no longer be precarious and uncertain but perpetual and safe (66:22).
Both strands of teaching brought hope to the nation, whose sin threatened to destroy its hope in God. The punishment of the exile was replaced by the promise of renewal of the covenant and the establishment of God's kingdom on earth. It is clear that a drastic change was necessary. God himself would carry out this new thing, and it would affect the life of his people.
The Renewal of Creation in Apocalyptic and Sectarian Judaism. During a period of time when Jewish communities felt increasingly the pressure of dominion under foreign powers, religious literature emerged to encourage hope in an imminent, final intervention of God. These extracanonical writings picked up on the theme introduced in the last chapters of Isaiah of the creation of a new heavens and new earth. First Enoch 91:16 speaks of the passing away of the old order and the appearance of the new ("And in it [1] the first heaven shall pass away, and a new heaven shall appear"). First Enoch 72:1 classifies this as a "new work" of God ("until the creation will be made anew to last forever" cf. Isaiah 43:19 ). Similarly, Jubilee 1:29, which casts this message of hope in the form of a revelation from God to Moses on Mount Sinai, speaks of "the day of the new creation, when heaven and earth will be renewed." In 4:26 the term "new creation" appears to have become a technical term within the vocabulary of this stream of Jewish eschatology ("the Garden of Eden, and the Mount of the East, Mount Sinai, and Mount Zion will be sanctified in the new creation"); connected with the concept are the ideas of the purification of the earth and God's people from sin. In what is probably the latest phase of Jewish apocalyptic literature (4Edras 7:75; Syr. Baruch 32:6 ; Baruch 57:2 ; Apoc. to Abraham 17:14) the hope in a final eschatological renewal of the world is repeated without much variation. The literature of Qumran also registers the firm belief in the new creation of the world by God on the final day (1QH 13:11-12:; "For Thou has caused them to see what they had not known, by bringing to an end the former things and by creating things that are new" = Isaiah 65:17 ; 1 QS 4:25 : "For God has allotted these [2] in equal parts until the final end, the time of renewal" = Isaiah 43:19 ). 11 QTemple 29:9 shows evidence that "creation" in the sense of the day of the new creation has become a technical term ("for I shall cause my glory to dwell upon it until the day of blessing on which I shall create [3] my sanctuary"). But while the apocalyptic literature of Judaism and Qumran reflect a growing belief in God's final solution, it is limited to a future, eschatological event (however imminent) and never "individualized" or applied as a description of a new condition of life as in Paul (though these developments may have influenced the apostle's thought).
The Renewal of Creation in the New Testament. That the early church also believed in the ultimate renovation or re-creation of the heavens and the earth at the close of history is clear from 2 Peter 3:13 and Revelation 21:1-5 . Both passages draw on Isaiah 65,66 , but 2 Peter 3:13 is unique in its emphasis on the destruction of the heavens on the day of God. In this vein, Paul writes of the creation's longing to be set free from the futility and bondage to decay, to which is linked the promise of the completion of redemption ( Romans 8:19-22 ). When creation is viewed in these general terms, the focus continues to be on God's intervention on the last day.
The New Creation. With this background in mind, we can now consider the two passages in which "new creation" ( kaine ktisis [4]) actually occurs, along with three others in Paul's writings that seem to reflect the concept.
Paul's earliest recorded use of the term occurs in Galatians 6:15 . The question is, To what does the term refer? The passage shows that the issue was the proper grounds for boasting. To base one's boast on one's confidence in the rite of circumcision or one's refusal to be circumcised amounted to reliance on "the flesh, " or in this case on a ceremony or ritual. Paul's point is that these things provide no grounds for confidence; only Christ's death in our behalf is sufficient (5:12-14). Verse 15 then restates this in principle form: "For neither circumcision nor uncircumcision is anything; but a new creation is everything" (NRSV). Verse 16 reveals that this has indeed the force of a principle or rule: "As for those who will follow this rule (kanon [1:1,10-12; 2:16; 6:1). The new creation, which stands in need of some clarification here (though presumably the Galatians knew the concept already), is characterized by all that participation in Christ's death (5:24; 6:14) affords: new life from death (2:19-20) "in Christ" (3:26-28); "belonging" to Christ (3:29; 5:24); possession of the Spirit (3:3; 4:6); life lived in dependence on and submission to the Spirit (5:16-18,25; 6:8). These are the images that combine to define new creation. According to Paul's theology, salvation, an eschatological promise, has begun now in the present age; the renewal, which is to affect the entire universe, has begun in the hearts and lives of those who respond to the gospel. This means for the Christian the possibility of experiencing life in the Spirit, marked by the fruit of the Spirit (5:22-23) in the present situations of life.
The same connections are evident in 2 Corinthians 5:17 . In response to a situation in which some so-called superapostles were putting confidence in what Paul calls "outward appearance" (whether he means the way one carries oneself, or one's speaking ability, dress, etc.), that is, things that have no eternal significance (v. 12), he drives home again the basic fact of Christ's death for us (vv. 14-15), which should force people to view life in a different way. Again, new creation describes the condition of the one now "in Christ, " for whom "everything is new." The imagery depicts the experience of renovation which, though future in final completion, has already begun in the believer. This participation in "the world to come, " while yet living in the present age, brings a radical reorganizing of priorities (described as living for Christ; v. 15) and a "new" way of looking at life and the people around (v. 16).
Several passages in Ephesians (2:10,15; 4:24) employ the verb "create" (ktizo [2:9): salvation from God (2:8) is defined in anthropological terms as being "created in Christ" (2:10), all of which implies that there is no human ground for boasting. Then, with the Jew/Gentile debate in view—circumcision versus uncircumcisionChrist's work of "creating" a "new" humanity is introduced to demonstrate how the old distinctions and privileges have been rendered obsolete. Finally, in 4:24 Paul says that God has solved the dilemma of the old way of life (sin leading to death) by "creating" a "new" human, whose life is characterized instead by righteousness and holiness. New creation, then, is a Pauline concept in the New Testament. It is clearly related to Paul's belief that the new age (salvation, life in the Spirit) has broken into the old age. The idea of a new heavens and earth or of a renewal of the universe may be behind Paul's concept. If there is a direct relationship, what we have is Paul's anthropological and soteriological application of the broader future promise to the life of individuals in the present age. New creation status implies newness of life and a new manner of life that accords with God's will. The two thoughts are inseparable.
Philip H. Towner
See also Age, Ages ; New Heavens and a New Earth ; Restore, Renew ; Union with Christ
Bibliography . J. Baumgarten, EDNT, 2:230; H. D. Betz, Galatians ; R. Bultmann, Theology of the New Testament ; W. D. Davies, Paul and Rabbinic Judaism ; W. Foerster, TDNT, 3:1033-35; V. P. Furnish, 2Corinthians .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Creation, the New
This stands in contrast to the first creation ranged under Adam, who was blessed by God, and should have maintained his allegiance to Him. "If any one be in Christ, there is a new creation; the old things have passed away; behold all things have become new; and all things are of God." "If even we have known Christ according to flesh, yet now we know him thus no longer." 2 Corinthians 5:16-18 . Those who have died with Christ, and have risen with Christ, have lost their standing in the first Adam, and are in the Second man. "In Christ Jesus neither is circumcision anything, nor uncircumcision; but new creation. And as many as walk by this rule, peace upon them and mercy, and upon the Israel of God." Galatians 6:15,16 . This is the wholly new position into which the believer is brought in Christ. Still, while in the body he is not entirely free from contact with the old creation: the wilderness life is a part of christian life, as well as Canaan and its conflicts. In reverse order to the first creation, here the Man was first brought out (Christ risen), and then those that are His, and lastly the heaven and earth. Revelation 21:1 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Creation
This word is principally applied to the act of bringing things into existence that did not exist before. This is expressed in Hebrews 11:3 : "things which are seen were not made of things which do appear." It is also applied to making new things out of material already in existence, thus, though man was 'made' of the dust of the ground, Genesis 2:7 , he is also said to have been created, the same Hebrew word, bara , being used in Genesis 1:1 for the creation of the world, that is used in Genesis 5:1,2 , for the creation of man. The passage in Hebrews 11 is important, because as men have no idea how anything can be brought into existence from nothing, they have talked of 'the eternity of matter;' the passage says it is 'by faith we understand' that the worlds were made by the word of God, so that seen things were not made of what is apparent.
The discoveries made by geologists of the various strata of the earth, the fossils found therein, together with the time that would necessarily be required for the formation of those strata, raised a cry that scripture must be incorrect in saying all was done in seven days. This led Christians to compare these works of God in creation with His words in scripture; and the principal question resolved itself into this: where in scripture could be found the many thousands of years which were apparently needed under ordinary circumstances for the formation of the strata? Putting aside the theories of the geologists, the facts are undeniable. There are the various beds of different substances in layers, which any one can see for themselves.
There are two ways in which Christians who have studied the subject hold that all difficulties are overcome.
1. That a long gap, of as many thousands of years as were necessary for the formation of the earth's crust, may be placed between verses 1 and 2 of Genesis 1 . That Genesis 1:1 refers to the original creation of the heaven and earth out of nothing; that the different beds were formed with the varying objects that are found therein as fossils, occupying a very long period. Then in Genesis 1:2 another condition is found: the earth by some means had become without form and void.* It was then ordered in view of the creation of man; and the various things were arranged and formed in the six days as detailed in Genesis 1 , as they are now found in and on the earth.
*Some suppose this to have been the work of Satan.
The principal objection to this is, that though there had been upheavals, depressions, earthquakes, sudden deaths, as evidenced by the contortions of fishes, in some of the early strata, there is no appearance after the various beds had been formed of what would answer to Genesis 1:2 , which says "the earth was without form and void."
2. The other theory is that Genesis 1:1 and Genesis 1:2 refer to the formation of the earth as matter, or that Genesis 1:1 refers to the creation of the earth, and that Genesis 1:2 refers to its being disordered by some means, as in the above theory, but that the various beds were formed with the fossils found therein during the six days recorded in Genesis 1 ; and that the days were of any needed indefinite length. It has been shown that the first things named as on the earth were grass and herbs, and these are always found in the lowest beds; and the other things created are found exactly in the same order upwards from the lowest, until man appears. These, in short, form three divisions: plants in the lowest beds; reptiles in the middle; mammals in the highest, with man the most recent. It is also asserted that no break has been discovered, as would be the case if after the beds had been formed destruction had come in, and an entirely new work of creation had begun again in what is recorded in Genesis 1 . Many of the existing species are contemporaneous with those that we know have ceased to exist. It is maintained that the term 'day' is often used for indefinite periods of time in scripture, and therefore may be so in Genesis 1 ; that they refer to God's days, and not to natural days, seeing that 'the evening and the morning' are spoken of before the sun, which naturally causes the evening and morning. Also that it is not consistent to hold that God's rest on the seventh day only alluded to 24 hours.† It is true that the introduction of sin marred God's rest; but this is not there contemplated.
† It is asserted that long before any question of geology arose there were some among the Jews, as Josephus and Philo, and some among the Christians, as Whiston, Des Cartes, and De Luc, who believed that the 'days' of Genesis 1 were long periods. — 'Creation,' Kitto's Cyclopaedia.
To this theory it is objected that the words 'the evening and the morning' are too definite a description of the meaning of the word 'day' to allow the idea of indefinite periods. It is also held that Isaiah 45:18 (translating the passage "He created it not without form, he formed it to be inhabited") proves that God did not create the world in the first instance "without form and void." The word 'created' here is the same as in Genesis 1:1 ; and the words 'in vain' in the A.V. are the same as 'without form' in Genesis 1:2 . As to the correspondence in the order of created things it may be admitted that if the long periods come in between Genesis 1:1 and 2, the after order in the six days' creation is exactly the same — God working, in the same order on the large scale (ages), and on the smaller (six days' work).
Either of these theories sufficiently meets the supposed difficulty, and shows that God in His works does not clash with God in His word, though His word was never intended to teach science.
In the creation we read that of every living thing each was made 'after his kind;' man was entirely separated from all others by God forming him in His own image and likeness, and breathing into his nostrils the breath of life, thus leaving no room for the modern theory of evolution. God, who knew perfectly everything which He had created, declared it to be as it left His hands very good ; and the more His works are examined the more perfection is discovered in every minute detail both as to plan and purpose, suiting everything for the place which each and every one is intended to fill. Sin has come in and spoiled God's fair creation, but man, who has been the occasion of it, dares to ignore God, or to blame Him for the pains and penalties attached to fallen humanity. Man everywhere endorses Adam's sin by his own individual sins.
Webster's Dictionary - Creation
(1):
(n.) That which is created; that which is produced or caused to exist, as the world or some original work of art or of the imagination; nature.
(2):
(n.) The act of creating or causing to exist. Specifically, the act of bringing the universe or this world into existence.
(3):
(n.) The act of constituting or investing with a new character; appointment; formation.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Creation
Everything that exists except God himself. This includes material as well as immaterial things and time. God is the creator, (Hebrews 11:3) we are the creatures. The creator/creature distinction must be maintained to properly remain in humble relationship with God. We are not God, cannot create, nor can we help ourselves do good in order to be saved. Only God is God. Only He can create. And, only He has the ability to save man.
Webster's Dictionary - re-Creation
(n.) A forming anew; a new creation or formation.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Eternal Creation
Faith clearly teaches that this world did not exist from all eternity, but was created in time, i.e.,a measurable span of time has elapsed since the world came into being. Saint Thomas and Suarez deny that we can prove from reason that eternal creation was impossible, that this world could not have existed from all eternity. Many modern philosophers think we can prove it. The difference is only apparent. The former spoke of a priori arguments, of which there are none; the latter speak of arguments drawn from experience, e.g., the transformation of energy, or radioactivity.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - New Creation, New Creature
See CREATION, THE NEW.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Creation
in its primary import, signifies the bringing into being something which did not exist before. The term is therefore most generally applied to the original production of the materials whereof the visible world is composed. It is also used in a secondary or subordinate sense, to denote those subsequent operations of the Deity upon the matter so produced, by which the whole system of nature, and all the primitive genera of things, received their forms, qualities, and laws. The accounts of the creation of the world which have existed among different nations, are called Cosmogonies. Moses's is unquestionably the most ancient; and had it no other circumstance to recommend it, its superior antiquity alone would give it a just claim to our attention. It is evidently Moses's intention to give a history of man, and of religion, and an account of creation. In the way in which he has detailed it, it would have been foreign to his plan, had it not been necessary to obviate that most ancient and most natural species of idolatry, the worship of the heavenly bodies. His first care, therefore, is to affirm decidedly, that God created the heavens and the earth; and then he proceeds to mention the order in which the various objects of creation were called into existence. First of all, the materials, of which the future universe was to be composed, were created. These were jumbled together in one indigested mass, which the ancients called chaos, and which they conceived to be eternal; but which Moses affirms to have been created by the power of God. The materials of the chaos were either held in solution by the waters, or floated in them, or were sunk under them; and they were reduced into form by the Spirit of God moving upon the face of the waters. Light was the first distinct object of creation; fishes were the first living things; man was last in the order of creation.
2. The account given by Moses is distinguished by its simplicity. That it involves difficulties which our faculties cannot comprehend, is only what might be expected from a detail of the operations of the omnipotent mind, which can never be fully understood but by the Being who planned them. Most of the writers who come nearest to Moses in point of antiquity have favoured the world with cosmogonies; and there is a wonderful coincidence in some leading particulars between their accounts and his.
They all have his chaos; and they all state water to have been the prevailing principle before the arrangement of the universe began. The systems became gradually more complicated, as the writers receded farther from the age of primitive tradition; and they increased in absurdity in proportion to the degree of philosophy which was applied to the subject. The problem of creation has been said to be, "Matter and motion being given, to form a world;" and the presumption of man has often led him to attempt the solution of this intricate question. But the true problem was, "Neither matter nor motion being given, to form a world." At first, the cosmogonists contented themselves with reasoning on the traditional or historical accounts they had received; but it is irksome to be shackled by authority; and after they had acquired a smattering of knowledge, they began to think that they could point out a much better way of forming the world than that which had been transmitted to them by the consenting voice of antiquity. Epicurus was most distinguished in this hopeful work of invention; and produced a cosmogony on the principle of a fortuitous concourse of atoms, whose extravagant absurdity has hitherto preserved it from oblivion. From his day to ours, the world has been annoyed with systems; but these are now modified by the theories of chemists and geologists, whose speculations, in so far as they proceed on the principle of induction, have sometimes been attended with useful results; but, when applied to solve the problem of creation, will serve, like the systems of their forerunners, to demonstrate the ignorance and the presumption of man.
3. The early cosmogonies are chiefly interesting from their resemblance to that of Moses; which proves that they have either been derived from him, or from some ancient prevailing tradition respecting the true history of creation. The most ancient author next to Moses, of whose writings any fragments remain, is Sanchoniatho, the Phenician. His writings were translated by Philo Byblius; and portions of this version are preserved by Eusebius. These writings come to us rather in an apocryphal form; they contain, however, no internal evidence which can affect their authenticity; they pretty nearly resemble the traditions of the Greeks, and are, perhaps, the parent stock from which these traditions are derived. The notions detailed by Sanchoniatho are almost translated by Hesiod, who mentions the primeval chaos, and states ερος , or love, to be its first offspring. Anaxagoras was the first among the Greeks who entertained tolerably accurate notions on the subject of creation: he assumed the agency of an intelligent mind in the arrangement of the chaotic materials. These sentiments gradually prevailed among the Greeks; from whom they passed to the Romans, and were generally adopted, notwithstanding the efforts which were made to establish the doctrines of Epicurus by the nervous poetry of Lucretius. Ovid has collected the orthodox doctrines which prevailed on the subject, both among Greeks and Romans; and has expressed them with uncommon elegance and perspicuity in the first chapter of his "Metamorphoses." There is so striking a coincidence between his account and that of Moses that one would almost think that he was translating from the first chapter of Genesis; and there can be no doubt that the Mosaic writings were well known at that time, both among the Greeks and Romans. Megasthenes, who lived in the time of Seleucus Nicanor, affirms, that all the doctrines of the Greeks respecting the creation, and the constitution of nature, were current among the Bramins in India, and the Jews in Syria. He must, of course, have been acquainted with the writings of the latter, before he could make the comparison. Juvenal talks of the writings of Moses as well known:—
Tradidit arcano quodcunque volumine Moses. [1]
We are therefore inclined to think that Ovid actually copied from the Bible; for he adopts the very order detailed by Moses. Moses mentions the works of creation in the following order: the separation of the sea from the dry land; the creation of the heavenly bodies; of marine animals; of fowls and land animals; of man. Observe now the order of the Roman poet:—
Ante mare et terras, et, quod tegit omnia, coelum, Unus erat toto naturae vultus in orbe,
Quem dixere chaos, rudis, indiffestaque moles. Hanc Deus, et melior litem natura diremit. Nam coelo terras, et terras abscidit undis;
Et liquidum spisso secrevit ab aere coelum. Neu regio foret ulla suis animalibus orba;
Astra tenent coeleste solum, formaeque deorum; Cesserunt nitidis habitandae piscibus undae: Terra feras cepit, volucres agitabilis aer. Sanctius his animal, mentisque capacius altae
Deerat adhuc, et quod dominari in caetera posset: Natus homo est.
"Before the seas, and this terrestrial ball, And heav'n's high canopy, that covers all, One was the face of nature; if a face: Rather, a rude and indigested mass:
A lifeless lump, unfashion'd, and unframed, Of jarring seeds; and justly chaos named. But God, or nature, while they thus contend, To these intestine discords put an end;
Then earth from air, and seas from earth were driv'n,
And grosser air sunk from ethereal heav'n.
Thus when the God, whatever god was he, Had formed the whole, and made the parts agree,
That no unequal portions might be found,
He moulded earth into a spacious round.
Then, every void of nature to supply, With forms of gods he fills the vacant sky:
New herds of beasts he sends, the plains to share:
New colonies of birds, to people air; And to their oozy beds the finny fish repair.
A creature of a more exalted kind
Was wanting yet, and then was man design'd:
Conscious of thought, of more capacious breast, For empire formed, and fit to rule the rest: Whether with particles of heav'nly fire
The God of nature did his soul inspire," &c.
DRYDEN.
Here we see all the principal objects of creation mentioned exactly in the same order which Moses had assigned to them in his writings; and when we consider what follows;—the war of the giants; the general corruption of the world; the universal deluge; the preservation of Deucalion and Pyrrha; their sacrifices to the gods on leaving the vessel in which they had been preserved;—there can scarcely remain a doubt that Ovid borrowed, either directly or at second hand, from Moses. What he says, too, is perfectly consistent with the received notions on the subject, though it is probable that they had never before been so regularly methodised. This train of reasoning would lead us to conclude that Ovid, and indeed the whole Heathen world, derived their notions respecting the creation, and the early history of mankind, from the sacred Scriptures: and it shows how deficient their own resources were, when the pride of philosophy was forced to borrow from those whom it affected to despise. With regard to the western mythologists, then, there can be little doubt that their cosmogonies, at least such of them as profess to be historical, and not theoretical, are derived from Moses; and the same may be affirmed with regard to the traditions of the east: as they were the same with those of Greece in the time of Megasthenes, whose testimony to this effect is quoted both by Clemens Alexandrinus and Strabo, we may naturally conclude that they had the same origin.
4. The Hindoo mythology has grown, in the natural uninterrupted progress of corruption, to such monstrous and complicated absurdity, that in many cases it stands unique in extravagance. In the more ancient Hindoo writings, however, many sublime sentiments occur; and in the "Institutes of Menu," many passages are found relating to the creation, which bear a strong resemblance to the account given by Moses. They are thus given in an advertisement, prefixed to the fifth volume of the "Asiatic Researches," and are intended as a supplement to a former treatise on the Hindoo religion:—
"This universe existed only in the first divine idea, yet unexpanded, as if involved in darkness, imperceptible, undefinable, undiscoverable by reason, and undiscovered by revelation, as if it were wholly immersed in sleep. When the sole self-existing Power, himself undiscerned, but making this world discernible, with five elements and other principles of nature, appeared with undiminished glory, expanding his idea, or dispelling the gloom. He, whom the mind alone can perceive, whose essence eludes the
external organs, who has no visible parts, who exists from eternity, even he, the soul of all beings, whom no being can comprehend, shone forth in person. He, having willed to produce various beings from his own divine substance, first with a thought created the waters. The waters are called nara, because they are the production of Nara, or the Spirit of God; and since they were his first ayana,
or place of motion, he thence is called Narayana, or moving on the waters. From that which is, the first cause, not the object of sense, existing every where in substance, not existing to our perception, without beginning or end, was produced the divine male. He
framed the heaven above, and the earth beneath; in the midst he placed the subtile ether, the eight regions, and the permanent
receptacle of waters. He framed all creatures. He, too, first assigned to all creatures distinct names, distinct acts, and distinct occupations. He gave being to time, and the divisions of time; to the stars also, and the planets; to rivers, oceans, and mountains; to level plains, and uneven valleys. For the sake of distinguishing actions, he made a total difference between right and wrong. Having divided his own substance, the mighty Power became half male, half female. He whose powers are incomprehensible, having
created this universe, was again absorbed in the spirit, changing the time of energy for the time of repose."
In these passages we have evidently a philosophical comment on the account of creation given by Moses, or as transmitted from the same source of primitive tradition. We also see in these passages the rudiments of the Platonic philosophy, the eternal ideas in the divine mind, &c; and were any question to arise respecting the original author of these notions, we should have little hesitation in giving it against the Greeks. They were the greatest plagiaries both in literature and philosophy, and they have scarcely an article of literary property which they can call their own, except their poetry. Their sages penetrated into Egypt and India, and on their return stigmatized the natives of these countries as barbarians, lest they should be suspected of stealing their inventions.
5. The Chaldean cosmogony, according to Berosus, when divested of allegory, seems to resolve itself into this, that darkness and water existed from eternity; that Belus divided the humid mass, and gave birth to creation; that the human mind is an emanation from the divine nature. The cosmogony of the ancient Persians is very clumsy. They introduce two eternal principles, the one good, called Oromasdes, the other evil, called Arimanius; and they make these two principles contend with each other in the creation and government of the world. Each has his province, which he strives to enlarge; and Mithras is the mediator to moderate their contentions. This is the most inartificial plan that has been devised to account for the existence of evil, and has the least pretensions to a philosophical basis. The Egyptian cosmogony, according to the account given of it by Plutarch, seems to bear a strong resemblance to the Phenician, as detailed by Sanchoniatho. According to the Egyptian account, there was an eternal chaos, and an eternal spirit united with it, whose agency at last arranged the discordant materials, and produced the visible system of the universe. The cosmogony of the northern nations, as may be collected from the Edda, supposes an eternal principle prior to the formation of the world. The Orphic Fragments state every thing to have existed in God, and to proceed from him. The notion implied in this maxim is suspected to be pantheistic, that is, to imply the universe to be God; which, however, might be a more modern perversion. Plato supposed the world to be produced by the Deity, uniting eternal, immutable ideas, or forms, to variable matter. Aristotle had no cosmogony, because he supposed the world to be without beginning and without end. According to the Stoical doctrine, the divine nature, acting on matter, first produced moisture, and then the other elements, which are reciprocally convertible.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Creation
(1.) the act by which God calls into existence things not previously in being-material or spiritual, visible or invisible, Psalm 148:5 Revelation 4:11 ;
(2.) the molding or reconstituting things, the elements of which previously existed; and
(3.) the things thus "created and made," 2 Peter 3:4 Revelation 3:14 5:13 . It is probably in the first of these senses the word "created" is to be understood in Genesis 1:1 , though some understand it in the second sense. In either case the idea of the eternity of matter is to be rejected, as contrary to sound reason and to the teachings of Scripture, Proverbs 8:22-31 John 1:1-3 Hebrews 11:3 .
Creation is exclusively the work of God. The Father, the Son, and the Spirit are each in turn named as its author, Isaiah 40:28 Colossians 1:16 Genesis 2:2 . It is a work the mysteries of which no finite mind can apprehend; and yet, as it reveals to us the invisible things of God, Romans 1:20 , we may and ought to learn what he reveals respecting it not only in revelation, but in his works. These two volumes are from the same divine hand, and cannot but harmonize with each other. The Bible opens with an account of the creation unspeakably majestic and sublime. The six days there spoken of have usually been taken for our present natural days; but modern geological researches have given rise to the idea that "day" here denotes a longer period. The different rocks of our globe lie in distinct layers, the comparative age of which is supposed to have been ascertained. Only the most recent have been found to contain human remains. Older layers present in turn different fossil remains of animals and plants, many of them supposed to be now extinct. These layers are deeply imbedded beneath the present soil, and yet appear to be formed of matter washed into the bed of some primeval sea, and hardened into rock. Above this may lie numerous other strata of different materials, but which appear to have been deposited in the same manner, in the slow lapse of time. These layers are also thrown up and penetrated all over the world by rocks of still earlier formations, apparently once in a melted state.
There are several modes of reconciling these geological discoveries with the statements of Scripture: First, that the six days of Genesis 1.1-31 denote six long epochs-periods of alternate progressive formation and revolution on the surface of the earth. To the Lord "a thousand years are as one day," Psalm 90:2,4 2 Peter 3:5-10 Revelation 20:1 - 15 . Secondly, that the long epochs indicated in the geological structure of the globe occurred before the Bible account commences, or rather in the interval between the first and second verses of Genesis 1:1-31 . According to this interpretation, Genesis 1:2 describes the state of the earth at the close of the last revolution it experienced, preparatory to God's fitting it up for the abode of man as described in the verses following. Thirdly, that God compressed the work of those untold ages into six short days, and created the world as he did Adam, in a state of maturity, embodying in its rocks and fossils those rudimental forms of animal and vegetable life which seem naturally to lead up to the existing forms.
The "Creature" and "the whole creation," in Romans 8:19-22 , may denote the irrational and inferior creation, which shall be released from the curse, and share in the glorious liberty of the sons of God, Isaiah 11:6 35:1 2 Peter 3:7-13 . The bodies of believers, now subject to vanity, are secure of full deliverance at the resurrection-"the redemption of our body," Romans 8:23 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Creation
(The creation of all things is ascribed in the Bible to God, and is the only reasonable account of the origin of the world. The method of creation is not stated in Genesis, and as far as the account there is concerned, each part of it may be, after the first acts of creation, by evolution, or by direct act of God's will. The word create (bara) is used but three times in the first chapter of Genesis-- (1) as to the origin of matter; (2) as to the origin of life; (3) as to the origin of man's soul; and science has always failed to do any of these acts thus ascribed to God. All other things are said to be made . The order of creation as given in Genesis is in close harmony with the order as revealed by geology, and the account there given, so long before the records of the rocks were read or the truth discoverable by man, is one of the strongest proofs that the Bible was inspired by God. --Ed.)
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Create, Creation, Creator, Creature
A — 1: κτίζω (Strong's #2936 — Verb — ktizo — ktid'-zo ) used among the Greeks to mean the founding of a place, a city or colony, signifies, in Scripture, "to create," always of the act of God, whether (a) in the natural creation, Mark 13:19 ; Romans 1:25 (where the title "The Creator" translates the article with the aorist participle of the verb); 1 Corinthians 11:9 ; Ephesians 3:9 ; Colossians 1:16 ; 1 Timothy 4:3 ; Revelation 4:11 ; 10:6 , or (b) in the spiritual creation, Ephesians 2:10,15 ; 4:24 ; Colossians 3:10 . See MAKE.
B — 1: κτίσις (Strong's #2937 — Noun Feminine — ktisis — ktis'-is ) primarily "the act of creating," or "the creative act in process," has this meaning in Romans 1:20 ; Galatians 6:15 . Like the English word "creation," it also signifies the product of the "creative" act, the "creature," as in Mark 16:15 , RV; Romans 1:25 ; 8:19 ; Colossians 1:15 etc.; in Hebrews 9:11 , AV, "building." In Mark 16:15 ; Colossians 1:23 its significance has special reference to mankind in general. As to its use in Galatians 6:15 ; 2 Corinthians 5:17 , in the former, apparently, "the reference is to the creative act of God, whereby a man is introduced into the blessing of salvation, in contrast to circumcision done by human hands, which the Judaizers claimed was necessary to that end. In 2 Corinthians 5:17 the reference is to what the believer is in Christ; in consequence of the creative act he has become a new creature."* [1]
Ktisis is once used of human actions, 1 Peter 2:13 , "ordinance" (marg., "creation"). See BUILDING , ORDINANCE.
B — 2: κτίσμα (Strong's #2938 — Noun Neuter — ktisma — ktis'-mah ) has the concrete sense, "the created thing, the creature, the product of the creative act," 1 Timothy 4:4 ; James 1:18 ; Revelation 5:13 ; 8:9 .
B — 3: κτίστης (Strong's #2939 — Noun Masculine — ktistes — ktis-tace' ) among the Greeks, the founder of a city, etc., denotes in Scripture "the Creator," 1 Peter 4:19 (cp. Romans 1:20 , under B, No. 1, above).
Note: It is a significant confirmation of Romans 1:20,21 , that in all non-Christian Greek literature these words are never used by Greeks to convey the idea of a Creator or of a creative act by any of their gods. The words are confined by them to the acts of human beings.
B — 4: ζῷον (Strong's #2226 — Noun Neuter — zoon — dzo'-on ) "a living creature:" see BEAST.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Creation
A basic Christian belief is that God created all things, and that all three persons of the godhead were involved in the acts of creation. God spoke and, by the power of his creative word, it happened (Genesis 1:1-3; Job 33:4; Psalms 33:6; Psalms 33:9; Psalms 102:25; John 1:1-3; Hebrews 1:1-2).
The Creator and the universe
God alone is eternal; therefore, before his initial act of creation, nothing existed apart from him. He created all things, visible and invisible. Even spirit beings, though they may have existed before the physical universe, are creatures whom God has made (Genesis 1:1-2; Job 38:4-11; Psalms 33:6-9; Psalms 90:2; Isaiah 40:26-28; Isaiah 42:5; John 1:1-3; Romans 11:36; Colossians 1:16; Hebrews 11:3; Revelation 4:11). Once God had created matter, he used the materials of the universe to make and develop the features of the universe. He made animals and humans, for example, out of materials he had made earlier (Genesis 2:7; Genesis 2:19).
Having created the universe, God did not then leave it to itself, as if it were like a huge clock that he wound up and left to run automatically. God is still active in the physical universe. He maintains what he creates. Though he is Lord of creation and distinct from it, he works through it. He is over all things and in all things (Psalms 147:8-9; Acts 17:24; Acts 17:28; Genesis 1:27-28; Colossians 1:17; Hebrews 1:3; see also PROVIDENCE).
The universe exists, above all, for the praise and glory of God. He created it, not as an act of necessity, but as an act of free grace; not because he had to, but because he chose to (Isaiah 43:7; Acts 17:25; Romans 11:36; Ephesians 1:11; Colossians 1:16; Revelation 4:11). It shows something of God’s love, power and wisdom (Psalms 19:1-4; Jeremiah 10:12; Romans 1:20).
God’s ‘rest’ after creation indicated that he was completely satisfied with all his created works. In his grace he gave the physical world to the people he had created and made them caretakers over it. God wanted them to enjoy his creation in fellowship with himself, and in so doing to share in his ‘rest’ (Ephesians 4:6; Genesis 2:1-3; Hebrews 4:3-10).
But the human creatures refused to submit to their divine Creator, and as a result they ruined the relationship both with the Creator and with the physical creation. They brought disaster upon the human race as a whole and this had damaging consequences in the natural world (Genesis 3:17-19; Romans 1:20-23; Genesis 2:4-7). Only when the redeemed enters their full salvation at the end of the age will the created world enter its full glory (Romans 8:21-23; Philippians 3:21; see NATURE).
Story of creation
The chief purpose of the account of creation in Genesis is to provide an introduction to the story of God’s dealings with the human race. It shows that God created everything out of nothing, and that he brought the universe through various stages of development till it was a fitting dwelling place for human beings (Genesis 1:1; Genesis 1:5; Genesis 1:8; Genesis 1:13; Genesis 1:19; Genesis 1:23; Genesis 1:31; Romans 8:20). Modern science may at times cause people to think they are almost insignificant in relation to the size and complexity of the universe, but the Bible takes a different view. It is concerned above all with people, and says little about how the physical universe operates (Psalms 8:3-9).
God is pleased when men and women want to learn more about the wonders of his creation, but he has appointed that they do so by the hard work of study and investigation (Genesis 3:19; Psalms 111:2). God does not usually give such information by direct revelation. The Bible is not a textbook on science, nor is it concerned with the sort of information that scientists are concerned with. Its purpose is not to teach scientific theories, but to give a short simple account of the beginning of things, and in language that people of any era or any background can understand.
The language of the creation story, like that of the rest of the Bible, is not the technical language of the scientist, but the everyday language of the common people (cf. Genesis 1:16; Genesis 7:11-12; Genesis 40:22). The scientist may speak of the sun as the centre of the solar system, with the earth a minor satellite of the sun, and the moon a minor satellite of the earth. The Bible, by contrast, speaks of the heavens and the earth from the viewpoint of ordinary observers. To them the earth appears stationary, and the sun ‘rises’ and ‘sets’ as it moves around the earth (1 Chronicles 16:30; Ecclesiastes 1:5; Malachi 1:11; Matthew 5:45). The sun is the ‘greater light’ and the moon the ‘lesser light’ (Genesis 1:16). The pictorial language of the Bible is different from the technical language of science, but the two are not necessarily in conflict.
Science may tell us much about God’s creation, though it does so from a viewpoint that is different from the Bible’s. Science can help us understand how nature works, whereas the Bible is concerned with showing that God is the one who makes nature work.
From science we may learn how the stars move, how the weather changes, or how plants grow, but from the Bible we learn that God is the one who makes these things happen (Psalms 65:9-10; Psalms 78:20; Psalms 78:26; Psalms 104:1-30; Psalms 147:8; Matthew 5:45; Matthew 6:30). Although science may investigate how the creation developed, the Bible reveals that the development came about through the creative activity of the sovereign God. The ‘laws of nature’ are God’s laws (Genesis 1:1; Genesis 1:7; Genesis 1:11; Genesis 1:20; Genesis 1:24; Hebrews 11:3).

Sentence search

Beriah - World of Creation, The: (lit. “creation”); more specifically Creation ex nihilo; in Kabbalistic terminology, the second of the four spiritual worlds, the realm of spiritual existence which represents the first beginnings of a consciousness of self ...
Transcendence - A theological term referring to the relation of God to Creation. God is "other," "different" from His Creation. He transcends His Creation
Creation - Creation, n. The act of making, by new combinations of matter, invested with new forms and properties, and of subjecting to different laws the act of shaping and organizing as the Creation of man and other animals, of plants, minerals, &c. The act of investing with a new character as the Creation of peers in England. As subjects then the whole Creation came. Before the low Creation swarmed with men. A false Creation, proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain
Cosmogony - ) The Creation of the world or universe; a theory or account of such Creation; as, the poetical cosmogony of Hesoid; the cosmogonies of Thales, Anaxagoras, and Plato
Creation, New - See New Creation ...
...
Cosmogony - See Creation
Firmament - See Creation
Creation - Stories or fragments of stories about Creation have survived in the literature of several ancient nations. ”...
Creation accounts in the Bible never function simply to satisfy a childlike curiosity to know “how it all began. ...
Important questions about Creation include the following:...
1. Where in the Bible is the subject of Creation encountered?...
2. What is the function of biblical references to Creation?...
3. What literature contemporary with the Bible contains references to Creation?...
4. How are biblical and extra-biblical references to Creation related?...
5. What is the time frame of Creation in the Bible?...
7. What is humanity's place in Creation?...
8. How is the New Testament concept of the new Creation in Christ related to the biblical concept of physical Creation?...
Biblical References to Creation Probably the best known reference to Creation in the Bible is Genesis 1:1-2:4 . Psalmists mentioned Creation or the Creator frequently (Psalm 8:3-4 ; Psalm 74:17 ; Psalm 95:5 ; Psalm 100:3 ; Psalm 104:24 ,Psalms 104:24,104:30 ; Psalm 118:24 ; Psalm 40:5 ; Psalm 51:10 ; Psalm 64:9 ; Psalm 24:1-2 ; Psalm 102:25 ; Psalm 145:10 ). The second half of Isaiah (Psalm 40-66 ) has four direct references to Creation (Isaiah 40:28 ; Isaiah 43:7 , Isaiah 43:15 ; Isaiah 45:7 ; Isaiah 65:17 ). Job alluded to Creation in two speeches (Job 10:8 ; Job 26:7 ), and God's answer to Job contains one reference to the subject (Job 38:4 ). ...
The Function of Biblical Creation References Genesis is a book about beginnings. Genesis 1-2 contain two accounts of Creation, the order of man's Creation coming at the end in the first and at the beginning in the second. God's Creation, “good” as it was ( Genesis 1:4 ,Genesis 1:4,1:10 ,Genesis 1:10,1:12 ,Genesis 1:12,1:21 ,Genesis 1:21,1:25 ,Genesis 1:25,1:31 ), soon became bad through human rebellion against God. The accounts of Creation in Genesis 1-2 prepare the reader for the record of the first people being placed in the Garden of Eden, temptation by the serpent, rebellion against God, expulsion from the garden, and the degenerating effect of sin in society. The link between Creation and redemption is clear. The Lord's speech in response to Job (Job 38-39 ) makes clear that God is the Creator and that man had no part in Creation. ...
The psalmists' concerns with God as Creator were related to people's place in Creation (Psalm 8:3-4 ), to God's redemptive activity (Psalm 74:17 ; Psalm 95:5 ), and to praise for the Creator (Psalm 100:3 ; Psalm 104:1 ; Acts 14:15 ). One psalmist referred to the Creation to contrast its perishable nature with the imperishable nature of the Creator (Psalm 102:25-27 ). ...
The three doxologies in Amos (Amos 4:13 ; Amos 5:8-9 ; Amos 9:5-6 ) magnify God the Creator and Controller of Creation. He agreed with John that Jesus the Savior, the firstborn of all Creation, was Himself the Source of all Creation (Colossians 1:16-17 ). ...
Relationship of Biblical and Extra-biblical References to Creation The Enuma Elish (“When on High”) is probably the best known extra-biblical reference to Creation. This Mesopotamian account reflects a striking correspondence in various details and in order of events when it is compared with the biblical references to Creation. Conflict between rival deities dominates the Babylonian story of Creation. ...
Human Place in Creation Both detailed stories of Creation in the Bible feature people at center stage, even though the Creation of persons is last in the order of creative acts in Genesis 1:1-2:4 but first in Genesis 2:4-24 . Yet God gave humans a place of prominence and set them over the rest of Creation (Psalm 8:5-8 ). “Create” (bara') is the dominant verb of Creation in Genesis 1:1 . “Formed” (yatsar) is the controlling verb of Creation in Genesis 2:1 . ...
New Creation and Physical Creation The Old Testament is consistent in its use of the verb “create” (bara' ). Creation is the work of God. Paul wrote to the Corinthians about being “in Christ” and thereby being “a new Creation” (2 Corinthians 5:17 ). God gave humans dominion over Creation, a stewardship assignment. Therefore, people are accountable directly to God for their use or abuse of Creation. The entrance of human sin has had an adverse effect on Creation (Hosea 4:1-3 ). Paul pictured that the whole of Creation “groaneth and travaileth” under the burden of human sin (Romans 8:22 ). He also wrote of a time when “the Creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God” (Romans 8:21 NAS). Paul anticipated a day when God would restore the whole of Creation to its original goodness
Effection - ) Creation; a doing
New Creation, New Creature - See Creation, THE NEW
Decreation - ) Destruction; - opposed to Creation
Creational - ) Of or pertaining to Creation
Sovereignty of God - The biblical teaching that God is the source of all Creation and that all things come from and depend upon God (Psalm 24:1 ). ...
Creative Sovereignty God is the Lord of Creation, the source of all things, who brought the world into being and who guides His Creation toward a meaningful end. ...
Moral Sovereignty God's sovereignty, His authority over Creation, is grounded in God's essential nature which is moral. God judges His Creation on the basis of His profound moral character. He is both the source of all Creation and the source of all goodness. God is separate from His Creation and works in ways that human beings do not always understand. God's purpose is to bring His Creation—His whole Creation—to fullness and completion, to fellowship with Him: “God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself” (2 Corinthians 5:19 ). The kingdom of God is the end toward which God moves His Creation. The sovereignty of God involves God's self-limitation in order that His Creation might also choose freedom in Him. ...
Sovereignty and Providence God guides, sustains, loves, and longs to have fellowship with His Creation. The sovereign God of the universe chose to identify with His Creation in the cross of Christ. There is no greater example of his care for His Creation
re-Creation - ) A forming anew; a new Creation or formation
Domem - inanimate matter, the lowest of the four categories of Creation...
Four elements - The four basic elements of Creation: fire, wind, water, earth
Antemundane - ) Being or occurring before the Creation of the world
Creative - ) Having the power to create; exerting the act of Creation
Astrogeny - ) The Creation or evolution of the stars or the heavens
Establishment - Name for the Church of England as a state Creation and institution
Creation, the New - This stands in contrast to the first Creation ranged under Adam, who was blessed by God, and should have maintained his allegiance to Him. "If any one be in Christ, there is a new Creation; the old things have passed away; behold all things have become new; and all things are of God. "In Christ Jesus neither is circumcision anything, nor uncircumcision; but new Creation. Still, while in the body he is not entirely free from contact with the old Creation: the wilderness life is a part of christian life, as well as Canaan and its conflicts. In reverse order to the first Creation, here the Man was first brought out (Christ risen), and then those that are His, and lastly the heaven and earth
Nitzotzot - In Kabbalistic-Chassidic terminology refers to the sparks of holiness or G-dliness inherent in all of Creation. When something is used in its Divinely intended context, its sparks are said to be �liberated� and re-absorbed into their Source, thus contributing to the establishment of the Divine dwelling on earth which is the ultimate purpose of Creation
Organotrophic - ) Relating to the Creation, organization, and nutrition of living organs or parts
Creation - (The Creation of all things is ascribed in the Bible to God, and is the only reasonable account of the origin of the world. The method of Creation is not stated in Genesis, and as far as the account there is concerned, each part of it may be, after the first acts of Creation, by evolution, or by direct act of God's will. The order of Creation as given in Genesis is in close harmony with the order as revealed by geology, and the account there given, so long before the records of the rocks were read or the truth discoverable by man, is one of the strongest proofs that the Bible was inspired by God
Lo tashchit - "Do not destroy," the prohibition to destroy or waste of any part of G-d's Creation
Annihilation - Annihilation is opposed to Creation. As in Creation the whole being is produced from nothing, so in annihilation the whole being is reduced to nothing
Kelipah - �shell�) the outer covering which conceals the G-dly light within all Creation; hence, the unholy side of the universe ...
Jewish Calendar - , the date traditionally given for the Creation
in Petto - (Italian: in the breast, secretly) ...
Refers to the Creation of a cardinal, whose name for the time of being the pope does not disclose
Nature, Natural - Their basic interest in nature focused on God as Creator and on heaven and earth as his Creation. ...
Genesis makes it clear that there is a Creation order established by God. "...
There is a close bond between humankind and the rest of Creation (Genesis 3:17-18 ; Psalm 96:10-13 ). There are physiological similarities between humankind and the rest of Creation (Genesis 18:27 ; Job 10:8-9 ; Psalm 103:14 ). Humankind shares in Creation's dependence on God's goodness for its continuance (Psalm 103:15 ; 104 Isa 10440:6-7 ). Nevertheless, Creation order distinctiveness is particularly apparent as it pertains to humankind. Humankind's Creation order distinctiveness is also described as "very good" (1:31). ...
The fall disrupted God's intended order for Creation and for humankind (Genesis 3:16-19 ). Although it is cursed because of sin (3:17-18), Creation is still viewed positively (Psalm 33:5 ; 119:64 ). ...
Men and women are "by nature" objects of wrath (Ephesians 2:3 ), but some dimly reflect the goodness of God's Creation order in that they do "by nature" the things of the law (Romans 2:14 ). " As in the Old Testament, some of the attributes of this divine nature can be seen in the visible world of Creation (Romans 1:18-20 ). ...
God's original Creation order established certain distinctions that he declared to be good. That Creation order was disrupted by the fall, but it was not destroyed. The visible world of Creation still displays, but remains distinct from, God's divine nature. Humankind retains its Creation order distinctiveness, and within the unity of humankind certain ethnic and sexual distinctions are evident. Similarly, although Creation suffers under the curse of the fall, it too looks forward to the restoration of the original Creation order
Hexahemeron - ) The history of the six day's work of Creation, as contained in the first chapter of Genesis
Ages of the World - AGES OF THE WORLD...
There have been generally reckoned six ages from the Creation of the world to the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. ...
YEARS...
* The first, from the Creation to the flood containing a period of 1656...
* The second, from Noah to Abraham 425...
* The third, from Abraham to the going forth of Israel from Egypt 430...
* The fourth, from the departure from Egypt to Solomon's temple 479...
* The fifth from Solomon's in the captivity in Babylon 424...
* The sixth, from the going into Babylon to the coming of Christ 584...
Divrei hayamim - The (two-part) final book of Tanach, authored by Ezra, chronicling the events from Creation until the return of the Babylonian exiles to the Land of Israel
Vishnu - He is regarded as the preserver, while Brahma is the creator, and Siva the destroyer of the Creation
Uncreated - ) Not existing by Creation; self-existent; eternal; as, God is an uncreated being
Omniscience - Omnipotence, Omnipresence, and Omniscience represent the nature of God concerning His relation to the Creation
Universe - ) All created things viewed as constituting one system or whole; the whole body of things, or of phenomena; the / / of the Greeks, the mundus of the Latins; the world; Creation
Divine Freedom - God's freedom does not mean, therefore, that He authors those things which are imperfect or calculated to bring harm to the person or purposes of His Creation (James 1:17 ). God has limited His freedom to act according to His nature and to act within the bounds of His Creation. While God sometimes acts in miracles beyond the natural potentials of His Creation to accomplish His purposes, He does not act inconsistently with the order He established within Creation. Some of the characteristics of God's nature that influence His actions toward His Creation are grace (2 Corinthians 8:9 ), justice (Zephaniah 3:5 ), love (John 3:16 ), and mercy (Micah 7:18 ; Titus 3:5 ). God's Creation was established with the qualities of God inherent in it. A fatalistic view of Creation or of mankind in particular is not in keeping with the way God exercises His freedom. God is interested in people and takes an active, positive role in the affairs of His Creation
Demogorgon - ) A mysterious, terrible, and evil divinity, regarded by some as the author of Creation, by others as a great magician who was supposed to command the spirits of the lower world
Manifestation - ) The act of manifesting or disclosing, or the state of being manifested; discovery to the eye or to the understanding; also, that which manifests; exhibition; display; revelation; as, the manifestation of God's power in Creation
Beth-Biri - (behth-bir' i) Place name meaning, “house of my Creation
Beth-Bir'e-i - (house of my Creation ), a town of Simeon, ( 1 Chronicles 4:31 ) which by comparison with the parallel list in (Joshua 19:6 ) appears to have had also the name Of BETH-LEBAOTH
Creature - Denotes the whole Creation in Romans 8:39 ; Colossians 1:15 ; Revelation 5:13 ; the whole human race in Mark 16:15 ; Romans 8:19-22
Five books of moses - These books � Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy � chronicle events from Creation until Moses' passing and contain the 613 mitzvot
Chaos - ) The confused, unorganized condition or mass of matter before the Creation of distinct and orderly forms
Cosmology - ) The science of the world or universe; or a treatise relating to the structure and parts of the system of Creation, the elements of bodies, the modifications of material things, the laws of motion, and the order and course of nature
Antediluvians - A general name for all mankind who lived before the flood, including the whole human race from the Creation to the deluge
Create - The verb expresses Creation out of nothing, an idea seen clearly in passages having to do with Creation on a cosmic scale: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth” ( Creation (43:16-21; 65:17-25). ...
Though a precisely correct technical term to suggest cosmic, material Creation from nothing, bârâ' is a rich theological vehicle for communicating the sovereign power of God, who originates and regulates all things to His glory. 8:22-23
also suggest the idea of Creation. ” In fact, qny is the primary Ugaritic term to express Creation. There is nothing inherent in the word to indicate the nature of the Creation involved; it is only when ‛âśâh is parallel to bârâ' that we can be sure that it implies Creation. 1:1 uses the verb bârâ' to introduce the Creation account, and Creation, since it is used in that context and follows the technical word bârâ'. 1:26-27, however, ‛âśâh must mean Creation from nothing, since it is used as a synonym for bârâ'. 2:3 refers to the totality of Creation, which God had “created” by “making. ”...
It is unwarranted to overly refine the meaning of ‛âśâh to suggest that it means Creation from something, as opposed to Creation from nothing
New Creation - The specific term "new Creation" (kaine ktisis [ 2 Corinthians 5:17 ; Galatians 6:15 ). It is, however, the anthropological and individual side of the broad concept of the renewal of Creation that is developed more widely in the New Testament. ...
The Renewal of Creation in Apocalyptic and Sectarian Judaism. These extracanonical writings picked up on the theme introduced in the last chapters of Isaiah of the Creation of a new heavens and new earth. First Enoch 72:1 classifies this as a "new work" of God ("until the Creation will be made anew to last forever" cf. Similarly, Jubilee 1:29, which casts this message of hope in the form of a revelation from God to Moses on Mount Sinai, speaks of "the day of the new Creation, when heaven and earth will be renewed. " In 4:26 the term "new Creation" appears to have become a technical term within the vocabulary of this stream of Jewish eschatology ("the Garden of Eden, and the Mount of the East, Mount Sinai, and Mount Zion will be sanctified in the new Creation"); connected with the concept are the ideas of the purification of the earth and God's people from sin. The literature of Qumran also registers the firm belief in the new Creation of the world by God on the final day (1QH 13:11-12:; "For Thou has caused them to see what they had not known, by bringing to an end the former things and by creating things that are new" = Isaiah 65:17 ; 1 QS 4:25 : "For God has allotted these [2] in equal parts until the final end, the time of renewal" = Isaiah 43:19 ). 11 QTemple 29:9 shows evidence that "creation" in the sense of the day of the new Creation has become a technical term ("for I shall cause my glory to dwell upon it until the day of blessing on which I shall create [3] my sanctuary"). ...
The Renewal of Creation in the New Testament. That the early church also believed in the ultimate renovation or re-creation of the heavens and the earth at the close of history is clear from 2 Peter 3:13 and Revelation 21:1-5 . In this vein, Paul writes of the Creation's longing to be set free from the futility and bondage to decay, to which is linked the promise of the completion of redemption ( Romans 8:19-22 ). When Creation is viewed in these general terms, the focus continues to be on God's intervention on the last day. ...
The New Creation. With this background in mind, we can now consider the two passages in which "new Creation" ( kaine ktisis [4]) actually occurs, along with three others in Paul's writings that seem to reflect the concept. Verse 15 then restates this in principle form: "For neither circumcision nor uncircumcision is anything; but a new Creation is everything" (NRSV). The new Creation, which stands in need of some clarification here (though presumably the Galatians knew the concept already), is characterized by all that participation in Christ's death (5:24; 6:14) affords: new life from death (2:19-20) "in Christ" (3:26-28); "belonging" to Christ (3:29; 5:24); possession of the Spirit (3:3; 4:6); life lived in dependence on and submission to the Spirit (5:16-18,25; 6:8). These are the images that combine to define new Creation. Again, new Creation describes the condition of the one now "in Christ, " for whom "everything is new. New Creation, then, is a Pauline concept in the New Testament. New Creation status implies newness of life and a new manner of life that accords with God's will
Hermetic Literature - Others are dualistic (seeing God and the Creation as separate). Poimhyandres offers to reveal to Hermes the secret nature of Creation and God. The Hermetic writings unlike gnosticism did not regard nature as itself evil nor the direct agent of Creation (demiurge ) as the enemy of God. Some scholars have seen the influence of Hermetic doctrine in the Gospel of John (creation by the logos , rebirth)
Genesis - the Book of: The first of the Five Books of Moses, relates the story of Creation and Noah's Flood, and describes the lives and deeds of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and the Twelve Tribes
Sabbath - On this day the Jews were obliged to attend services in the synagogue, and refrain from all kinds of work, because God had finished the work of Creation and rested on this day
Sovereignty - The right of God to do as He wishes (Psalms 50:1; Isaiah 40:15; 1 Timothy 6:15) with His Creation
Psatyrians - A sect of Arians who in the council of Antioch, held in the year 360, maintained that the Son was not like the Father as to will; that he was taken from nothing, or made of nothing; and that in God generation was not to be distinguished from Creation
Create, Creation - Who created and sustains the universe? Why was it created? What is the nature of the Creator-creature relationship? These are the sorts of questions that the Bible addresses when it treats the topic of Creation. Therefore, the juxtaposition, by some modern interpreters, of scriptural assertions about Creation with scientific evidence and theories regarding origins often results in fruitless comparisons of different, although equally relevant, bodies of knowledge. ...
In order to understand what the Bible teaches about Creation, one must go beyond delineating the semantic range of relevant words to examine pertinent biblical passages in their historical, literary, and theological contexts. While it is unlikely that biblical authors consulted this corpus directly, they were presumably aware of the various Creation traditions of the nations surrounding them. The more one compares them, the more evident it becomes that scriptural authors were motivated both to make certain affirmations about Creation and to contradict some conceptions about it that were current in their day. The Creation myths of these people often included accounts of the origins of the gods and conflicts between the gods. These luminaries, along with the stars, are not depicted as deities controlling human destiny, but simply as components of God's Creation that function in their assigned roles of providing light and the basis for calendrical calculations (vv. In Genesis 1 , the drama of Creation begins with the same opening scene as in other ancient traditions, the watery chaos (v. The reference in 1:1 to the Creation of the ordered cosmos (which is what the phrase "heavens and earth" connotes) is probably not to be construed as a description of the first act of Creation, which is then followed by a chaotic state and then the return to order. Creation in Genesis 1:1-2:3 has more to do with bringing order to that chaos and populating voids than with generating all matter. It is upon this fuller understanding of the limitless scope of God's sovereignty that the doctrine of creatio ex nihilo, Creation out of nothing, may be based. ...
Creation Week . The portrayal of Creation as work accomplished on successive days of the week raises a whole series of literary, chronological, and theological issues that are too involved to explore in any great depth here. ...
The first consideration is that the framework of the week of Creation is an artistic one designed to convey primarily theological, rather than purely scientific, information. Whereas the first account depicts the Creation of humans last, the second portrays man's Creation first and woman's last. Furthermore, while in the first passage Creation is described as a six-day task, in the second the only indication as to how long it takes is given in 2:4: "When the Lord God made the earth and the heavens. The juxtaposition of narratives with such obvious chronological differences makes it clear that an absolute chronology of Creation events is not at issue here. Jesus, too, does not seem to regard the seventh day of Creation week as a literal one, if his response in John 5:16-19 to charges that he has broken the law by healing a paralytic on the Sabbath is any indication. His argument appears to be that his works on the Mosaic Sabbath are lawful because they correspond to the Father's activities on the continuing Creation Sabbath. That view is fully compatible with the understanding of Creation week as a literary device. ...
If the Creation week framework is artistic in nature, then what is its significance? The answer to that question is undoubtedly to be found in the linkage between Creation and the Sabbath. ...
A second consideration pertaining to the Creation week structure is that the events of Genesis 1:1-2:3 are arranged in a logical, although not necessarily chronological, order. There are also connections between the triads due to the fact that the regions demarcated on the first three days are filled by Creations fashioned on the next three. A central theme of both Genesis Creation accounts is that of humanity as the apex of God's Creation. In Genesis 1 , the primacy of humans is emphasized through their appearance as the last of God's creatures in the narrative sequence, the reference to their being created in God's image, the threefold use of the verb bara [15], in the description of their Creation (v. In Genesis 2 , human preeminence is highlighted by the male's Creation before all other life, his being entrusted with custody of the garden, his being given the privilege of naming the other creatures, and the female's appearance as the last of God's creatures though, like the male, distinct from all other species. The image of God, whatever it means, clearly distinguishes humanity from the rest of Creation. ...
Creation Is Good . Another important theme in Genesis 1 is that God's Creation is good. Various individual aspects of Creation are so designated (vv. Psalm 19:1-11 ; [16] 97:6; Romans 1:20 ), but also that the fall of humanity described in Genesis 3 cannot be attributed to any flaw in Creation. Thus their transgression is a consequence of their failure to fulfill the Creation mandate. ...
Creation and Redemption . A fundamental theme with which Creation is combined, particularly in the Book of Isaiah, is redemption. ...
Re-creation . The theme of original Creation also gives rise to another important theological concept: re-creation. In a similar vein, various passages in the New Testament speak of the Christian or the church as a new Creation in Christ (2 Corinthians 5:17 ; Galatians 6:15 ; Ephesians 2:10,15 ). ...
The idea of a new Creation in an eschatological sense brings the original theme full circle. What is envisioned for the future is a return to the idyllic state of initial Creationnothing less than new heavens and a new earth. However, Scripture cautions that only those who have experienced spiritual re-creation may enjoy the eschatological Eden (Amos 9:13-8,27 ; 22:14-15 ). Anderson, Creation in the Old Testament ; H. Hyers, The Meaning of Creation ; D. Ross, Creation and Blessing ; J. , Portraits of Creation ; G
Ayin - "nothingness"); in Chassidic terminology, (a) a state of non-being that serves as a contrast to true existence; (b) the void that precedes any act of Creation; (c) in the mortal realm, ayin describes a person who transcends his innate egocentricity and commits himself to the service of G-d
Potter - There is no suggestion of the Creation of sinful beings, or of the Creation of any simply in order to punish them
Palingenesy - ) A new birth; a re-creation; a regeneration; a continued existence in different manner or form
Earthy, - " A man cannot rise morally above the earth except by the power of God in new Creation
Rest - sabbatismos, a Sabbath rest, a rest from all work (Hebrews 4:9 ; RSV, "sabbath"), a rest like that of God when he had finished the work of Creation
Creation - The work of Creation is attributed (1) to the Godhead (Genesis 1:1,26 ); (2) to the Father (1 Corinthians 8:6 ); (3) to the Son (John 1:3 ; Colossians 1:16,17 ); (4) to the Holy Spirit (Genesis 1:2 ; Job 26:13 ; Psalm 104:30 ). The one great end in the work of Creation is the manifestation of the glory of the Creator (Colossians 1:16 ; Revelation 4:11 ; Romans 11:36 ). Traditions of the Creation, disfigured by corruptions, are found among the records of ancient Eastern nations
Cause - ,a Creation or a change. Creation is attributable to God alone as the Primary Cause, all other causes but modify things that already exist
Dominion - Dominion may have a positive connotation as when humankind is given dominion over Creation (Genesis 1:26 ,Genesis 1:26,1:28 ; Psalm 8:6 ) or a negative connotation that approximates the idea of domination (Genesis 37:8 ; Judges 14:4 ; Nehemiah 9:28 ). Though humans exercise dominion in the political sphere and over Creation, ultimate dominion belongs to God (Psalm 72:8 ; Daniel 4:3 ,Daniel 4:3,4:34 )
Revelation - Natural revelation is that which is revealed about God through what we can see in Creation (Romans 1:20 ). Through Creation we may learn that there is a God, that He is in control, that He has an order, and that He is concerned for our welfare
Creation - A basic Christian belief is that God created all things, and that all three persons of the godhead were involved in the acts of Creation. ...
The Creator and the universe...
God alone is eternal; therefore, before his initial act of Creation, nothing existed apart from him. Though he is Lord of Creation and distinct from it, he works through it. ...
God’s ‘rest’ after Creation indicated that he was completely satisfied with all his created works. God wanted them to enjoy his Creation in fellowship with himself, and in so doing to share in his ‘rest’ (Genesis 1:27-28; Genesis 2:1-3; 1618103865_49). ...
But the human creatures refused to submit to their divine Creator, and as a result they ruined the relationship both with the Creator and with the physical Creation. ...
Story of Creation...
The chief purpose of the account of Creation in Genesis is to provide an introduction to the story of God’s dealings with the human race. ...
God is pleased when men and women want to learn more about the wonders of his Creation, but he has appointed that they do so by the hard work of study and investigation (Genesis 3:19; Psalms 111:2). ...
The language of the Creation story, like that of the rest of the Bible, is not the technical language of the scientist, but the everyday language of the common people (cf. ...
Science may tell us much about God’s Creation, though it does so from a viewpoint that is different from the Bible’s. Although science may investigate how the Creation developed, the Bible reveals that the development came about through the creative activity of the sovereign God
Hiddekel - This shows the dependence of the important areas of subsequent world history owed their fertility to God's original garden of Creation
la Marck, Jean Baptiste Pierre Antoine de Monet, c - which assumes original Creation
Jean de la Marck - which assumes original Creation
Enesis - ) The first book of the Old Testament; - so called by the Greek translators, from its containing the history of the Creation of the world and of the human race
Omnipresence - Creation is separate from God, but not independent of Him
Common Grace - The grace of God given to the Creation as a whole
Bereishit - "in the beginning"); Genesis, the first book of the Pentateuch; the first word of the Torah...
Bereishit: The first of the Five Books of Moses, relates the story of Creation and Noah's Flood, and describes the lives and deeds of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and the Twelve Tribes
Sabbath - The Jewish weekly day of rest (which the word means)observed on the seventh day because God rested on that day from Hiswork of Creation
Beginning - ...
b, The Creation, whether it was creating out of nothing or forming the heavens and the earth Isaiah 64:4 ; Hebrews 1:10 . Also the Creation of man and woman
Light - He it is that first caused the light to shine out of darkness in the original Creation of nature. In like manner, he is the first to cause light to shine out of darkness in the new Creation, when the day spring from on high first shines in upon the soul, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ
Image of God - It overflows from the soul to the body, making him fit to rule over lower Creation
God, Image of - It overflows from the soul to the body, making him fit to rule over lower Creation
Jethro - There he suggested the Creation of a hierarchy of magistrates and judges to assist Moses in the task of administrating justice
Joy - He was well pleased with His work in Creation
Purana - ) One of a class of sacred Hindoo poetical works in the Sanskrit language which treat of the Creation, destruction, and renovation of worlds, the genealogy and achievements of gods and heroes, the reigns of the Manus, and the transactions of their descendants
Creation - There is no subject concerning which learned men have differed in their conjectures more than in this of Creation. ...
The free-thinkers of our own and of former ages have denied the possibility of Creation, as being a contradiction to reason; and of consequence have taken the opportunity from thence to discredit revelation. On the other hand, many defenders of the sacred writings have asserted that Creation out of nothing, so far from being a contradiction to reason, is not only probable, but demonstrably certain. "Matter, however, whatever the varieties of form under which it is made to appear, the relative disposition of its parts, or the motions communicated to it, is but an inferior part of the works of Creation. ) But the limits of the Creation we must not pretend to define. So confined is our knowledge of Creation, yet so grand, so awful, that part which our narrow understandings can comprehend!" "Concerning the periods of time at which the Deity executed his several works, it cannot be pretended that mankind have had opportunities of receiving very particular information. The Hebrew copy of the Bible, which we Christians, for good reasons, consider as the most authentic, dates the Creation of the world 3944 years before the Christian era. The Samaritan Bible, again, fixes the era of the Creation 4305 years before the birth of Christ. Usher makes out from the Hebrew Bible 4004 years as the term between the Creation and the birth of Christ. But though these different systems of chronology are so inconsistent, and so slenderly supported, yet the differences among them are so inconsiderable, in comparison with those which arise before us when we contemplate the chronology of the Chinese, the Chaldeans, and the Egyptians, and they agree so well with the general information of authentic history, and with the appearances of nature and of society, that they may be considered as nearly fixing the true period of the Creation of the earth. " Uncertain, however, as we may be as to the exact time of the Creation, we may profitably apply ourselves to the contemplation of this immense fabric. Creation is a book which the nicest philosopher may study with the deepest attention. ...
See Ray and Blackmore on the Creation; art. Creation, Enc
Conversion - It is produced through the preaching of the gospel (Romans 10:14; 1 Corinthians 15:1-4) and results in repentance (Acts 26:20) and a new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17)
Manifestation - The act of disclosing what is secret, unseen or obscure discovery to the eye or to the understanding the exhibition of any thing by clear evidence display as the manifestation of God's power in Creation, or of his benevolence in redemption
Olamot elyonim - "supernal worlds"); in Kabbalistic works there is generally reference made to four spiritual worlds: Atzilut - Emanation, Briyah - Creation, Yetzirah - Formation, and Asiyah - Action
Heavens, New - ...
The promise of a re-creation of the heavens and earth arose because of human sin and God's subsequent curse (Genesis 3:17 ). First, God is the cause of this new Creation (Isaiah 65:17 ; Isaiah 66:22 ; Revelation 21:22 ). Some believe that the Creation of the new heavens and earth will occur immediately after the “great white throne” judgment. Some premillennialists associate the Creation of the new heavens and earth with the beginning of the thousand year millennial reign of Christ. See Angel ; Creation ; Eschatology ; Heaven ; Hell ; Kingdom; New Jerusalem
Deep, the - The deep constitutes the primeval waters of Creation in Genesis 1:2 . Creation includes the concept of bringing order by separating or dividing what is made, and keeping each in its proper place (Proverbs 8:22-31 ). This was, theologically speaking, an act of Creation—creating a people for the Lord, by freeing them from slavery in Egypt. At the extreme described in Genesis 7:1 , it is a reversal of Creation which can only be checked when God again sends the wind or spirit (ruah ) which began Creation (Genesis 1:2 ) and closes the fountains of the deep (Genesis 8:1-3 )
Merry - Man is the merriest species of the Creation
Paradise - The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed immediately after their Creation
Ordination - Designates the Creation of sacred ministers in the Church
Andrew of Wyntoun - In his "Origynale Cronykil of Scotland," so called because it began with the Creation of the angels, he incorporated the work of an unknown author, written in the same easy-flowing, octosyllabic, rhyming verse of the Scots vernacular
Born Again - It means that the person is no longer dead in sins (Ephesians 2:1), no longer spiritually blind (1 Corinthians 2:14), and is now a new Creation in Christ Jesus (2 Corinthians 5:17)
Creation - " It is also applied to making new things out of material already in existence, thus, though man was 'made' of the dust of the ground, Genesis 2:7 , he is also said to have been created, the same Hebrew word, bara , being used in Genesis 1:1 for the Creation of the world, that is used in Genesis 5:1,2 , for the Creation of man. This led Christians to compare these works of God in Creation with His words in scripture; and the principal question resolved itself into this: where in scripture could be found the many thousands of years which were apparently needed under ordinary circumstances for the formation of the strata? Putting aside the theories of the geologists, the facts are undeniable. That Genesis 1:1 refers to the original Creation of the heaven and earth out of nothing; that the different beds were formed with the varying objects that are found therein as fossils, occupying a very long period. * It was then ordered in view of the Creation of man; and the various things were arranged and formed in the six days as detailed in Genesis 1 , as they are now found in and on the earth. The other theory is that Genesis 1:1 and Genesis 1:2 refer to the formation of the earth as matter, or that Genesis 1:1 refers to the Creation of the earth, and that Genesis 1:2 refers to its being disordered by some means, as in the above theory, but that the various beds were formed with the fossils found therein during the six days recorded in Genesis 1 ; and that the days were of any needed indefinite length. It is also asserted that no break has been discovered, as would be the case if after the beds had been formed destruction had come in, and an entirely new work of Creation had begun again in what is recorded in Genesis 1 . — 'Creation,' Kitto's Cyclopaedia. As to the correspondence in the order of created things it may be admitted that if the long periods come in between Genesis 1:1 and 2, the after order in the six days' Creation is exactly the same — God working, in the same order on the large scale (ages), and on the smaller (six days' work). ...
In the Creation we read that of every living thing each was made 'after his kind;' man was entirely separated from all others by God forming him in His own image and likeness, and breathing into his nostrils the breath of life, thus leaving no room for the modern theory of evolution. Sin has come in and spoiled God's fair Creation, but man, who has been the occasion of it, dares to ignore God, or to blame Him for the pains and penalties attached to fallen humanity
Create, Creation, Creator, Creature - A — 1: κτίζω (Strong's #2936 — Verb — ktizo — ktid'-zo ) used among the Greeks to mean the founding of a place, a city or colony, signifies, in Scripture, "to create," always of the act of God, whether (a) in the natural Creation, Mark 13:19 ; Romans 1:25 (where the title "The Creator" translates the article with the aorist participle of the verb); 1 Corinthians 11:9 ; Ephesians 3:9 ; Colossians 1:16 ; 1 Timothy 4:3 ; Revelation 4:11 ; 10:6 , or (b) in the spiritual Creation, Ephesians 2:10,15 ; 4:24 ; Colossians 3:10 . Like the English word "creation," it also signifies the product of the "creative" act, the "creature," as in Mark 16:15 , RV; Romans 1:25 ; 8:19 ; Colossians 1:15 etc. , "creation")
Lichfield, England, Diocese of - Founded 7th century, by transference from Mercia, with Saint Chad as first bishop, and later restricted, although increasing in political importance, by the Creation of Hereford, Worcester, and Dorchester
Farnovians - He asserted that Christ had been engendered or produced out of nothing by the Supreme Being, before the Creation of this terrestrial globe, and warned his disciples against paying religious worship to the Divine Spirit
Sovereignty of God - This attribute is evidently demonstrated in the systems of Creation, providence, and grace; and may be considered as absolute, universal, and everlasting, Daniel 4:35
Shoftim - "judges"); (a) Succession of Torah authorities and leaders who ruled Israel from the year 2533 from Creation (1228 BCE, 17 years after the death of Joshua) to the anointing of Saul as king in 2882 (879 BCE)
Arianism - Jesus, then, was a Creation
Supernational Gift - Wherever found, it is something added to God's primal gift of Creation, something impossible for unaided nature to merit or achieve
Gift, Supernational - Wherever found, it is something added to God's primal gift of Creation, something impossible for unaided nature to merit or achieve
Pantheism - With this view there is a blurring of the distinction between the Creator and the Creation as well as an attack upon the personality and nature of God
Man - Man is the Creation of God. The first man, Adam, was made in God's image (Genesis 1:2627), and placed in the Garden of Eden for the purpose of enjoying the fellowship of the Lord and fulfilling the purpose of God's Creation
Generation - Beside the common acceptation of this word, as signifying descent, it is used for the history and genealogy of any individual, as "The book of the generations of Adam," Genesis 5:1 , the history of Adam's Creation, and of his posterity. "The generations of the heavens and of the earth," Genesis 2:4 , is a recital of the Creation of heaven and earth
Creature - ’ In Romans 8:19-21 it is not merely living creatures in the modern use of the word that wait for deliverance, but the whole Creation of God (as AV Genesis - The first book of the sacred scriptures of the Old Testament, containing the history of the Creation, of the apostasy of man, of the deluge, and of the first patriarchs, to the death of Joseph
Natural Knowledge - God knows this set of knowledge from all eternity, before the Creation of the universe
Vanity - 1: ματαιότης (Strong's #3153 — Noun Feminine — mataiotes — mat-ah-yot'-ace ) "emptiness as to results," akin to mataios (see EMPTY , VAIN), is used (a) of the Creation, Romans 8:20 , as failing of the results designed, owing to sin; (b) of the mind which governs the manner of life of the Gentiles, Ephesians 4:17 ; (c) of the "great swelling words" of false teachers, 2 Peter 2:18
World, the - ” When speaking of the totality of Creation, they used descriptive phrases like “the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1 NIV), “heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them” ( Exodus 20:11 ; compare Philippians 2:10 NIV), or “the heavens, even the highest heavens, and all their starry host, the earth and all that is on it, the seas and all that is in them” ( Nehemiah 9:6 NIV). The doctrine of Creation asserted the sovereignty of God—and the superiority of the God of the Hebrews over the idols worshiped by other peoples. The Hebrews, therefore, did not have a single concept of the world but thought of the Creation in terms of its geographical and temporal extent. The idea of God as Creator and the world as God's Creation was foreign to the Greeks. Even for Plato, however, neither was the demiurge fully God nor was the world a Creation. The doctrine of Creation was still fundamental to the New Testament writers. The biblical writers could therefore refer to “the foundation of the world” ( Matthew 25:34 ; Luke 11:50 ; John 17:24 ; Ephesians 1:4 ; Hebrews 4:3 ; Hebrews 9:26 ; 1 Peter 1:20 ; Revelation 13:8 ; Revelation 17:8 ) or the Creation of the world (see Romans 1:20 ; compare John 17:5 ). Paul referred to the effects of the fall on the whole cosmic order: “The Creation was subjected to frustration [1] the Creation itself will be liberated from its bondage” (Romans 8:19-25 NIV; compare 2 Peter 1:4 ). John still affirmed the Creation of the world through the logos ( John 1:3-4 ). See Creation ; Earth; Heaven
Rahab - Primeval sea monster representing the forces of chaos God overcame in Creation (Job 9:13 ; Job 26:12 ; Psalm 89:10 ; Isaiah 51:9 ; compare Psalm 74:12-17 )
Veracity of God - " He is true in and of himself; he truly and really exists; he is the true and living God: all his perfections are true and real; truth is essential to him; it is pure and perfect in him; it is the first and original in him; he is the fountain of truth: all his works in Creation, providence, and grace, are according to truth
Free Knowledge - The free act of God’s will where, after His free act of Creation, He knows all things that are going to happen and that this knowledge is contingent upon His free creative will
Paradise - ) The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed after their Creation
Rahab - Primeval sea monster representing the forces of chaos God overcame in Creation (Job 9:13 ; Job 26:12 ; Psalm 89:10 ; Isaiah 51:9 ; compare Psalm 74:12-17 )
Eve - The account of Eve's Creation is found at ( Genesis 2:21,22 ) Perhaps that which we are chiefly intended to learn from the narrative is the foundation upon which the union between man and wife is built, viz
Creation - Creation . One of the most convincing proofs of the composite authorship of the Pentateuch has always been found in the existence side by side of two independent and mutually irreconcilable accounts of the Creation of the world. These two narratives, while expressing the same fundamental religious ideas, differ profoundly in their concrete conceptions of the process of Creation. Whether this chaotic matter owed its origin to a prior creative act of God is a question depending on a delicate point of grammatical construction which cannot be adequately explained here; but, looking to the analogy of the Babylonian Creation-story (see below), it seems probable that the chaos is conceived as pre-existent, and that the representation of the chapter falls short of the full dogmatic idea of Creation as production out of nothing, an idea first unambiguously expressed in 2Ma 7:28 The work of Creation then proceeds in a series of eight Divine fiats, viz. : (1) Creation of light and separation of light from the primeval darkness, Genesis 1:3-5 ; (2) division of the chaotic waters by the firmament, Genesis 1:6-8 ; (3) separation of land and sea, Genesis 1:9-10 ; (4) clothing of the earth with vegetation, Genesis 1:11-13 ; (5) formation of the heavenly bodies, Genesis 1:14-19 ; (6) production of fishes and birds, Genesis 1:20-23 ; (7) land animals, Genesis 1:24 f. ; and (8) the Creation of man in the image of God with dominion over the creatures, Genesis 1:26 ff. The idea of man’s superiority to the other creatures is here expressed by placing his Creation, not at the end as in P
Much ingenuity has been expended in the effort to bring the Biblical record of Creation into accord with the facts disclosed by the modern sciences of Geology and Astronomy. It is not sufficient to emphasize the general idea of gradation and upward progress as common to science and Scripture, or to point to isolated coincidences, such as the Creation of fishes before mammals, or the late appearance of man on the earth: the narrative must be taken as a whole, and it must be shown that there is a genuine parallelism between the order of days and works in Genesis 1:1-31 and the stages of development recognized by science as those through which the universe has reached its present form. That the Hebrew cosmogony is influenced by such a tradition is proved by its striking likeness to the Babylonian story of Creation as contained in cuneiform tablets from Ashurbanipal’s library, first unearthed in 1872. In both we have the conception of chaos as a watery abyss, in both the separation of the waters into an upper and a lower ocean; the formation of the heavenly bodies and their function in regulating time are described with remarkable similarity; special prominence is given to the Creation of man; and it may be added that, while the order of Creation differs in the two documents, yet the separate works themselves are practically identical. ...
From this point of view we are able to state the significance of the Scripture account of Creation in a way which does justice at once to its unrivalled religious value and to its lack of scientific corroboration. When to these doctrines we add the view of man, as made in the likeness of God, and marked out as the crown and goal of Creation, we have a body of spiritual truth which distinguishes the cosmogony of Genesis 1:1-31 from all similar compositions, and entitles it to rank amongst the most important documents of revealed religion
Septuagint Chronology - It reckons 1500 years more from the Creation to Abraham than the Hebrew Bible. The following is the reason which is given by Oriental writers; It being a very ancient tradition that Messiah was to come in the sixth chiliad, because he was to come in the last days, (founded on a mystical application of the six days Creation, ) the contrivance was to shorten the age of the world from about 5500 to 3760; and thence to prove that Jesus could not be the Messiah
Rest - The two ideas combined give the perfect view of the heavenly sabbath: rest from weariness, sorrow, and sin; and rest in the completion of God's new Creation (Revelation 21:5). The renovated Creation shall share in it
Septuagint Chronology - It reckons one thousand five hundred years more from the Creation to Abraham than the Hebrew Bible. The following is the reason which is given by the oriental writers: It being a very ancient tradition that Messiah was to come in the sixth chiliad, because he was to come in the last days, founded on a mystical application of the six days of the Creation, the contrivance was to shorten the age of the world from about 5500 to 3760; and thence to prove that Jesus could not be the Messiah
Adam - ...
Adam was made a little lower than "angels" (or "God") at his Creation and "crowned with glory and honor" (Psalm 8:5 ). ) He was commissioned as a vassal king to rule over God's Creation. ...
Many elements present in Mesopotamian Creation stories like Enuma Elish are absent. Man was not created to be waited on but to join God in preserving and propagating Creation. Harris, Man—God's Eternal Creation ; A Ross, Creation and Blessing
Logos - The logos became a distinct entity, specifically the “word of God” active in Creation and revelation. Wisdom (sophia) was preexistent, God's first Creation, His instrument and agent in all the rest of Creation. God became increasingly aloof in Jewish theology and dealt with His Creation only through this subordinate being and through His angels. As the preexistent logos , the Son of God was the agent of Creation. See Christ, Christology ; Creation ; Philo Judaeus ; Prophets; Wisdom
Glory - The glory of God is the manifestation of the divine perfections in Creation, providence, and grace
Episcopal See - The Creation of new sees, and the various modifications (as division, suppression, and change of boundaries) to which they are subject, is reserved to the Holy See
Ecclesiastical Titles Act - Growing out of the anti-popery agitation precipitated by the Creation of a Catholic heirarchy in England, it was opposed by the Liberals, and treated indifferently by the Conservatives
Act, Ecclesiastical Titles - Growing out of the anti-popery agitation precipitated by the Creation of a Catholic heirarchy in England, it was opposed by the Liberals, and treated indifferently by the Conservatives
Abyss - The abyss existed before the Creation, and was the home of the various enemies of God, such as the dragon and the beast
Eternal Creation - Saint Thomas and Suarez deny that we can prove from reason that eternal Creation was impossible, that this world could not have existed from all eternity
See, Episcopal - The Creation of new sees, and the various modifications (as division, suppression, and change of boundaries) to which they are subject, is reserved to the Holy See
Creation - The accounts of the Creation of the world which have existed among different nations, are called Cosmogonies. It is evidently Moses's intention to give a history of man, and of religion, and an account of Creation. His first care, therefore, is to affirm decidedly, that God created the heavens and the earth; and then he proceeds to mention the order in which the various objects of Creation were called into existence. Light was the first distinct object of Creation; fishes were the first living things; man was last in the order of Creation. The problem of Creation has been said to be, "Matter and motion being given, to form a world;" and the presumption of man has often led him to attempt the solution of this intricate question. From his day to ours, the world has been annoyed with systems; but these are now modified by the theories of chemists and geologists, whose speculations, in so far as they proceed on the principle of induction, have sometimes been attended with useful results; but, when applied to solve the problem of Creation, will serve, like the systems of their forerunners, to demonstrate the ignorance and the presumption of man. The early cosmogonies are chiefly interesting from their resemblance to that of Moses; which proves that they have either been derived from him, or from some ancient prevailing tradition respecting the true history of Creation. Anaxagoras was the first among the Greeks who entertained tolerably accurate notions on the subject of Creation: he assumed the agency of an intelligent mind in the arrangement of the chaotic materials. Megasthenes, who lived in the time of Seleucus Nicanor, affirms, that all the doctrines of the Greeks respecting the Creation, and the constitution of nature, were current among the Bramins in India, and the Jews in Syria. Moses mentions the works of Creation in the following order: the separation of the sea from the dry land; the Creation of the heavenly bodies; of marine animals; of fowls and land animals; of man. ...
Here we see all the principal objects of Creation mentioned exactly in the same order which Moses had assigned to them in his writings; and when we consider what follows;—the war of the giants; the general corruption of the world; the universal deluge; the preservation of Deucalion and Pyrrha; their sacrifices to the gods on leaving the vessel in which they had been preserved;—there can scarcely remain a doubt that Ovid borrowed, either directly or at second hand, from Moses. This train of reasoning would lead us to conclude that Ovid, and indeed the whole Heathen world, derived their notions respecting the Creation, and the early history of mankind, from the sacred Scriptures: and it shows how deficient their own resources were, when the pride of philosophy was forced to borrow from those whom it affected to despise. In the more ancient Hindoo writings, however, many sublime sentiments occur; and in the "Institutes of Menu," many passages are found relating to the Creation, which bear a strong resemblance to the account given by Moses. "...
In these passages we have evidently a philosophical comment on the account of Creation given by Moses, or as transmitted from the same source of primitive tradition. The Chaldean cosmogony, according to Berosus, when divested of allegory, seems to resolve itself into this, that darkness and water existed from eternity; that Belus divided the humid mass, and gave birth to Creation; that the human mind is an emanation from the divine nature. They introduce two eternal principles, the one good, called Oromasdes, the other evil, called Arimanius; and they make these two principles contend with each other in the Creation and government of the world
Genesis, the Book of - Creation and birth of the universe, man, and history. " Genesis begins with Creation, then proceeds to show that the Elohim of Creation is the Jehovah in covenant with His people in redemption. ...
So in Colossians 1:16-17, Christ the Head of Creation, BY whom and IN whom as the divine Word carrying in Himself the arche-type of all existence, and FOR whom the universe of things have their being, is also the Head and Originator of the new Creation. Appropriately therefore Εlohim (the name for Divine Might, from alah "mighty") occurs throughout the first general account of Creation (Genesis 1:1-2:3); but Jehovah (Υahweh ), the faithful covenant keeping I AM, in the special account of Creation affecting His covenant with man. Moreover, Genesis alone describes Creation out of nothing, as distinguished from Creation out of preexisting materials. Genesis alone recognizes the law of progress in Creation: first light, then order, then life, vegetable, grass, herb, fruit tree; then animal life. ...
Also progressive advance in life:...
(1) aquatic animals and fish;...
(2) fowl;...
(3) terrestrial animals;...
(4) man, the apex of Creation. The Bible version of the story is simplest, purest, and the one that presents the only common ground from which all the others are likely to have emanated; it represents the facts in a universal worldwide aspect, and the groans of suffering Creation and the sighing of every heart confirm its literal truth. ...
Thus Genesis 2:4 refers back summarily to the previous record of Creation: so Genesis 5:1; Genesis 6:9; Genesis 11:10; Genesis 11:27; Genesis 25:12; Genesis 25:19; Genesis 36:1; Genesis 37:1-2; Genesis 37:3, where Jacob's position is stated and we are taken back to the time, 12 years before Isaac's death previously recorded, when Joseph was 17 years old, that so a new starting point for the history might be presented
Generation - Besides the common acceptation of this word, as signifying race, descent, lineage, it is used for the history and genealogy of a person, as in Genesis 5:1 , "the book of the generations of Adam," that is, the history of Adam's Creation and of his posterity. So in Genesis 2:4 , "The generations of the heavens and of the earth," that is, their genealogy, so to speak, the history of the Creation of heaven and earth; also in Matthew 1:1 , "The book of the generation of Jesus Christ," that is, the genealogy of Jesus Christ," that is, the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the history of his descent and life
New Self - Paul refers to the transformation that occurs at conversion as the Creation of a new self. A parallel expression occurs in 2 Corinthians 5:17 where the individual is described as a "new Creation. For Paul, the Creation of the new self is the antithesis of the decay and death of the old self, the human body: "Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day" (2 Corinthians 4:16 ). ...
John McRay...
See also New Creation ; New Man ; Sanctification ; Spirituality ; Union with Christ ...
...
Monoimus - of the work of Creation to the Son of Man, whence it was inferred that the first principle was properly called Man. It follows that it is a mistake to look for God in Creation; we must seek Him in ourselves, and can best find him by the study of the involuntary operations of our own soul. " The speculations of Monoimus, as reported to us, relate only to the Creation; we are told of none as to redemption. Further traces of the obligations of Monoimus to Simon are found in the reference to the six powers instrumental in Creation, which answer to Simon's six "roots," while a similar indebtedness to Simon on the part of the Naassene writer in Hippolytus is found on comparing the anatomical speculations connected with the name Eden (v
Africanus, Julius - His "Chronicle," in five books, covered the time from the Creation to A
Julius Africanus - His "Chronicle," in five books, covered the time from the Creation to A
Flavius Josephus - His historical works include The Jewish War, a description of the Jewish war of independence (66-73), the Jewish Antiquities, a history of the Jews from the Creation to 66 AD, and his Autobiography
Josephus, Flavius - His historical works include The Jewish War, a description of the Jewish war of independence (66-73), the Jewish Antiquities, a history of the Jews from the Creation to 66 AD, and his Autobiography
Jannes And Jambres - Jannes and Jambres were doubtless the leaders of the Egyptian magicians who imitated the first plagues before Pharaoh; but who, when it was a question of the Creation of life, had to confess that the finger of God was there
Sextus Julius Africanus - His "Chronicle," in five books, covered the time from the Creation to A
Septuagint - ...
The Septuagint chonology makes fifteen hundred years more from the Creation to Abraham, than the present Hebrew copies of the Bible
Word - Genesis 1 firmly establishes God's supremacy over the whole of Creation. His word continues to reign supreme over all of Creation (Psalm 147:15-18 ). Creation in turn speaks words of praise to its Creator (Psalm 19:1-4 ). ...
It unveils God to his Creation . ...
Its qualities describe God to his Creation . ...
It discloses God's plan for his Creation . God discloses his plan for Creation through his word. God's word is in perfect harmony with his will and plan for Creation (2 Samuel 7:21 ; Psalm 103:20-21 ; Lamentations 2:17 ). ...
It is known by Creation . ...
It is for the good of Creation . God's word at times comes upon Creation as judgment, but only as a divine response to disobedience. Its primary objective and appeal was for the well-being of Creation. God's word is like living water, welling up to nourish Creation from the Spring on High (Jeremiah 2:13 ). ...
It is supremely authoritative for all of Creation . God's word is authoritative for all of Creation. The formula, "And God said, Let there be, ' and it was so" provides the pattern for how God created on each day of Creation. ...
Thus in connection to the Old Testament picture of the word of God, the New Testament understands Jesus as the ultimate means through which God created, revealed, and personified himself to Creation. Jesus as the word of God discloses God's saving plan for and to Creation, makes God better known to Creation, is known firsthand by Creation, has come for the saving good of Creation, and is equal to the Father as supreme authority over all of Creation
Chronology - Hence in constructing a system of Biblecal chronology, the plan has been adopted of reckoning the years from the ages of the patriarchs before the birth of their first-born sons for the period from the Creation to Abraham. | Creation 4004 5411 | Flood 2348 3155 | Abram leaves Haran 1921 2078 | Exodus 1491 1648 | Destruction of the | Temple 588 586 ...
To show at a glance the different ideas of the date of the Creation, it may be interesting to note the following: From Creation to 1894
New Heavens And a New Earth - The absence of the sea in the restored universe symbolizes that the deliverance for which the Creation groans has been realized (cf. The use of bara [1] (to create) in 65:17 probably calls to mind the Creation account of Genesis 1 . The old and new Creation thus become the terminal points of redemptive history. Therefore, the question of the nature of bringing the new heavens and earth into existence is in regard to whether the new Creation comes into existence by means of renewal (a renovation of the old) or replacement (a totally new act of Creation). This provides a continuity and fulfillment of the purposes God began in the original Creation and has now been brought to completion. Meadors...
See also New Creation ; Restore, Renew ...
Bibliography
Brute - ) Not possessing reason, irrational; unthinking; as, a brute beast; the brute Creation
Godlessness - Romans 1:20-32 is a classic characterization of godlessness: the godless refuse to acknowledge God in spite of the evidence of Creation ( Romans 1:22 ), engage in willful idolatry (Romans 1:25 ), and practice a life-style unconstrained by divine limits (Romans 1:26-31 )
Marduk - ” He was credited with Creation, a feat reenacted each new year and celebrated with a festival
Evolution - ...
Though you might not expect to find the subject of evolution in a dictionary of theology, it is appropriate since it poses a challenge to Christianity by displacing the Genesis account of special Creation
Genesis - The general divisions of the book are as follows: ...
the Creation of the world and early history of mankind (1-11), including the Fall, the promise of a Redeemer, and the Deluge; ...
the early history of the Jews (12-50), including Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph
Newness - 1); the believer, being a new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ), is to behave himself consistently with this in contrast to his former manner of life; (b) "newness of the spirit," RV, Romans 7:6 , said of the believer's manner of serving the Lord
Sentences, Book of the - The first book treats of God and the Trinity, Providence, predestination, and evil; the second, or Creation, the angels, the fall, grace, and sin; the third, of the Incarnation, Redemption, the virtues, and commandments; the fourth, of the Sacraments and the four last things
Sabbatical Year - God appointed the observance of the Sabbatical year, to preserve the remembrance of the Creation of the world; to enforce the acknowledgment of his sovereign authority over all things, particularly over the land of Canaan, which he had given to the Hebrews; and to inculcate humanity on his people, by commanding that they should resign to servants, to the poor, to strangers and to brutes, the produce of the fields, of their vineyards, and of their gardens
Anthropology - ...
God's profound knowledge of humanity is rooted in His initial act of Creation. Although the Genesis account of Creation intentionally and purposefully tells much about God, the account also speaks volumes about humans. At the same time, though, the passage declares just as boldly that God's Creation is good, indeed humanity is very good (Genesis 1:31 ). The passage explicitly portrays humans as the highest of God's created beings, the center of God's marvelous Creation (Genesis 1:26-30 ). ) Because of the high place that humans occupy in God's Creation, much is both expected and required. Creation points to God's pre-eminence, but it also points to human responsibility to be faithful stewards of God-given abilities, talents, gifts, and both human and natural resources (Genesis 1:29-30 ; compare Matthew 25:14-30 ). Because of God's activity, humanity became a special and unique part of Creation. ...
A second major anthropological truth originally proclaimed in the Genesis account of Creation and echoed by later biblical writers affirms that a person is created in the image and likeness of God. This view asserts that these specific characteristics separate humans from the rest of Creation. Seeing the image of God in this light leads to the conclusion that people occupy a high place in God's Creation. In fact, people are God's representative on earth, the possessor of God-given power and dominion over Creation, and the only part of Creation reflecting God in this way. ...
New Testament The place of people in God's activity of Creation is paralleled by their place in God's activity of redemption. John 3:16 speaks of an intense and passionate love of a mighty God for all Creation. In fact, the worth or value claimed by Scripture for humans is because of God's initial act of Creation or God's great sacrifice through Jesus Christ. To understand adequately the doctrine of humanity is to understand, at least in some measure, the doctrines of Creation, the image of God, salvation, sin, death, eternal life, ethics, and many, many more. These include the high place of people in God's good Creation, the Creation of people in the image of God, a person as a totality of being, and the inadequacy and failing of humans. While the Creation record of Genesis 1-2 has traditionally been called the Age of Innocence, the biblical account of Genesis 3:1Revelation 3:1—19:1 has been called the Age of Responsibility. The relationship of God and humanity in the Old Testament vision points directly to the relationships of human beings within Christ's church, a community of human beings called out to minister to all of God's Creation. This positive statement is grounded in God's creative activity, the ultimate plan of redemption that has been revealed in Jesus Christ, and the ongoing care that God provides for all Creation. This seems to be a central focus of Creation, salvation, and corporate Christian identity. See Salvation ; Sin ; Ethics ; Death ; Eternal Life ; Creation
Immutability of God - This kind of God, who is possessed by an immutability which prohibits relationship to His Creation, is not the God portrayed by the Bible. ...
Biblical Teaching God, as the Scriptures portray Him, responds to the needs of His Creation and, therefore, changes in the sense that He relates to what is not God. ...
The greatest religious significance of the unchanging God is His eternal stance of salvation toward His Creation
Darkness - The darkness which covered the deep before God's Creation of light symbolizes chaos in opposition to God's orderly Creation (Genesis 1:2-3 ). Elsewhere darkness, as well as light, is recognized as the Creation of God (Isaiah 45:7 )
Sight - And in eastern countries, where for capital punishment the eyes are literally scooped from their sockets, it is not simply a restoration to give sight to such miserable eyeless creatures, but it is a new Creation. I beg the reader to connect this idea all along with what is said concerning this feature of character in the Lord Jesus Christ giving sight to the blind, for, it is literally giving eyes also, and consequently a new Creation. And in respect to the souls of his people, which those miracles to the bodies were intended to set forth, surely here was exhibited the new Creation in the most striking manner
Firstborn - Jesus is also the firstborn of all Creation. This means not that the Son of God was created, but that he existed before Creation, has authority over it, and is its rightful heir (Colossians 1:15-17; Hebrews 1:2). He has authority over God’s new Creation, the church, and guarantees its final victory (Colossians 1:18; Revelation 1:5)
Image of God - ...
A Special Creation According to the Scriptures, humans are not an evolutionary accident but a special Creation. ” Image has been considered the essential nature of humans as God's special Creation, and likeness as reflecting this image in such qualities as goodness, grace, and love. ” In Creation God endowed persons with a spiritual aspect of life. Nothing else in all Creation can be called a person. See Body ; Creation ; Flesh ; Humanity ; Soul ;...
Vernon O
New - Scripture expresses God's concern for persons and the larger Creation in the broad categories of a new act and a new relationship. ...
God's New Act Scripture often calls to mind past acts such as the Creation and Exodus which reveal God's care for God's world and people
Hilarianus (1) Quintus Julius, Latin Chiliast Writer - The author counts 5,530 years from the Creation to the Passion; gives the world 6,000; and would therefore end it c. ...
The following is a sketch of his chronology:...
From the Creation to the Deluge
Creation - Creation, in the strict sense of the first origination of being out of nothing, does not come within the scope of science. No human being was witness of Creation (Job 38:4). Though bara' extends to other acts of God besides the original Creation, it is only in a secondary application, without reference to preexisting materials; still, except in the original Creation, they are not excluded. ...
This Creation of all things out of nothing distinguishes the Bible from all pagan cosmogonies and philosophical speculations, which make matter eternal. Two narratives of Creation, the latter (Genesis 2:4, etc. The first gives a clear summary of Creation, man included, down to the sabbath rest from Creation. Accordingly, in the first Εlohim (from 'alah "strong"), the name for the mighty God of Creation in general, appears. The accounts of Creation and of the construction of the tabernacle resemble each other (the world being God's great tabernacle, Psalm 19); the general plan first (Genesis 1), then the actual Creation of the first pair, Eden, etc. So, in Creation, the process begins with the lower creatures, plants, and animals, then, man, Creation's priest, Eden, and lastly the sabbath. Geology shows that Creation occupied immense ages, but that man's Creation was its closing act and at a comparatively recent date. But geology seems to oppose any such state of the earth intervening between the preceding age and that of man's Creation as could be described as" without form (desolate) and void. " Psalm 104 is an inspired commentary on the history of Creation in Genesis 1; compare the account in Psalms 104:8; Proverbs 8:25-28, of the upheaval of mountains from beneath the waters and depression of valleys, whereby land was severed from sea; just as we still find traces (sea shells, etc. The Creator entered into the sabbath rest when He ceased from material Creation, to carry on the new and spiritual Creation in man (2 Corinthians 5:17; Hebrews 4:10). Yet God's sabbath is not an idle one: "My Father worketh hitherto," namely, upholding all Creation. " Air, involved in the Creation of the expanse, was the second necessity after light. Traces of life are found in the laurentian and certainly in the cambrian strata, the former the oldest rocks, whereas animal Creation seemingly does not appear until the fifth day in Genesis 1:20-22. The Creation of fish long previously is therefore assumed, not stated. ...
The narrative in Genesis does not assert simultaneous Creation of all the plants on the third day, and of reptiles and birds on the fifth, and of mammals on the sixth day; the divine command and its fulfillment are narrated as distinct. The simplicity and brevity of the narrative exclude the noting of the Creation of the primeval types which passed out of existence ages before man appeared. Matter and force are the two elements out of which visible Creation is formed. Possibly the order of Creation of the whole world in six vast periods, called "days," was repeated in six literal days in preparing the earth for man, its noblest occupant, "the minister and interpreter of nature" (Bacon)
Humanity - More accurate is the suggestion that the image consists in humankind's lordship over and stewardship of Creation, for this is the theme of the following verses (Genesis 1:28-31 ). This suggests that the essence of being human consists in a three-fold relationship: towards God as Lord, towards other humans as fellow servants, and towards Creation as entrusted to our care. ...
In brief, just as God designed humans, made in His image, for positive relationships with others and with Creation, rooted in dependence upon Him; so human sin is participation in distorted social and ecological relationships, rooted in commitments to other values and powers. It is freedom to participate in and suffer with the Spirit's transforming work throughout all Creation (Romans 8:22-23 ). It is not freedom from involvement, but freedom for loving relationships with other people, the whole Creation, and God. Since our “bodies” are channels which relate us to Creation, to others, and to God, so participation in Christ's body is the primary means by which health is restored. See Image of God ; Body ; Soul ; Spirit ; Creation ; Sin ; Freedom ; Spirit ; Church ; Body of Christ
Agnosticism - The Vatican Council declares that "God, the beginning and end of all, can by the natural light of human reason, be known with certainty from the works of Creation
Week - Its antiquity is so great its observance so widespread, and it occupies so important a place in sacred things, that it must probably be thrown back as far as the Creation of man. They who embrace this view support it by a reference to the six days' Creation and the divine rest on the seventh
Eve - Both sexes shall have equal honour in the plan of Creation and redemption. But in all the after circumstances the woman is to be the womb of Creation
Adam - (1 Corinthians 15:45) And if we compare what the apostle saith of Christ, (Colossians 1:15) with what is said of Adam, at the Creation of the world, (Genesis 1:26) it serves to explain, in what sense we are to limit the expression concerning him, who was formed from the earth as the first man. For so the charter of grace, at the Creation, expressed it: "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness
World - ) The earth and the surrounding heavens; the Creation; the system of created things; existent Creation; the universe
Day - The Hebrews, probably, from the narrative of Creation, Genesis 1:5; see Daniel 8:14, marg. The meaning is sometimes indefinite, as it is with us, Genesis 2:4; and according to some the "days" of Creation, Genesis 1:6; Genesis 1:8; Genesis 1:13; Genesis 1:19; Genesis 1:23; Genesis 1:31, indicate not natural days, but long periods of time
Creation - ...
Creation is exclusively the work of God. The Bible opens with an account of the Creation unspeakably majestic and sublime. ...
The "Creature" and "the whole Creation," in Romans 8:19-22 , may denote the irrational and inferior Creation, which shall be released from the curse, and share in the glorious liberty of the sons of God, Isaiah 11:6 35:1 2 Peter 3:7-13
Modalist Monarchianism - The Deity is one Person but manifests Itself under different modes; in Creation as the Father, in redemption as the Son, in sanctification as the Holy Ghost
Monarchianism - The Deity is one Person but manifests Itself under different modes; in Creation as the Father, in redemption as the Son, in sanctification as the Holy Ghost
Dissolution - It will doubtless be under the direction of the Supreme Being, as its Creation was
Sabaoth - And when we call to mind that the whole Creation of God are his armies, what a sense of greatness and glory do such ideas awaken in the mind! It may serve in some measure to teach us the reverence Moses, the man of God, endeavoured to impress the children of Israel with when he proclaimed JEHOVAH under these characters—"that thou mayest fear (said Moses) this glorious and fearful name, the Lord thy God
Fourteen - Since the number seven is the number which indicates GOD's perfections in His Creation activities, the number fourteen may be used to represent that same precious truth doubled or repeated
Paradise - " The LXX, or Greek translators of the Old Testament, make use of the word paradise, when they speak of the garden of Eden, which Jehovah planted at the Creation, and in which he placed our first parents
Subordinationism - The Deity is one Person but manifests Itself under different modes; in Creation as the Father, in redemption as the Son, in sanctification as the Holy Ghost
Light - One of the most wonderful, cheering, and useful of all the works of God; called into being on the first of the six days of Creation, by his voice: "Let there be light;" and there was light
Monarchianism - The Deity is one Person but manifests Itself under different modes; in Creation as the Father, in redemption as the Son, in sanctification as the Holy Ghost
Genesis - Genesis moves in two parts: (1) universal Creation, rebellion, punishment, and restoration; (2) God's choice of a particular family through whom He promises to bless the nations. Taking up themes and motifs prominent in the literature of their neighbors, the inspired writer showed how only one God participated in Creation of the whole world and in directing the fortunes of all its nations. The focus narrows from Creation of the universe to Creation of the first family (Genesis 1:1-2:25 ). See Creation ; Flood ; Sin ; Humanity ; Anthropology ; Earth; Image of God ; Abraham ; Isaac ; Jacob ; Joseph ; Adam and Eve ; Noah ; Names of God ; God of the Fathers . Comparison with other Creation and flood stories, especially those coming from Sumeria, Babylon, and Assyria, have shown striking similarities to the biblical narrative. Why does the biblical account follow the same basic outline of other Creation and flood narratives? Has one copied the other? Does God inspire a writer to react to other literature and write the authentic version? What role does oral tradition play in one nation learning of the literature of another nation? The least that can be said is that Israel's Creation and flood narratives present a consistent picture of a sovereign God concerned with and in control of all nations. See Creation ; Flood . Human sin, inspired by a tempting part of the Creation, brought divine judgment, resulting in the world of pain, labor, and frustration we now experience. Humans are made in His image and are the climax of His Creation (Genesis 1:1-2:4 )
Heaven - This imagery is often repeated in the Creation account and in poetical passages. ...
Fourth, the phrase “heaven and earth” may denote the entire Creation. , God’s abode is a unique realm not to be identified with the physical Creation: “Behold the heaven and the heaven of heavens is the Lord’s thy God, the earth also, with all that therein is” ( Infinite - God is not limited by time: God existed before the Creation (Genesis 1:1 ); the ordering of time is part of God's creative activity (Genesis 1:5 )
Living Beings, Living Creatures - The four faces represent four classes of Creation: man humanity; lion king of wild beasts; ox king of domestic beasts; eagle king of the birds
Wisdom of God - 10; Ray's Wisdom of God in Creation; Paley's Natural Theology
Motive - ) That which produces conception, invention, or Creation in the mind of the artist in undertaking his subject; the guiding or controlling idea manifested in a work of art, or any part of one
Likeness - Interpreters have identified the divine likeness with the ability to think rationally, to form relationships with other humans and with God, or with the exercise of dominion over Creation (cf. The Christian life is characterized as a new Creation in the likeness of God (Ephesians 4:24 ; compare 2 Corinthians 4:4 )
Age - It is also used in speaking of the times past since the Creation of the world. The first extends from the Creation to the deluge, and comprehends 1656 years. From the Creation to the deluge, 2262 years. From Cyrus to the vulgar aera of Christians, 538 years; the whole period from the Creation to this period containing 6000 years
Animals - In this psalm, animals are pictured in Creation alongside humanity, not beneath it; nor do they exist for the sake of humans. Because they are created by God, all Creation, including animals, should praise God (Psalm 148:7-10 ; 150:6 ; cf. This is a vision of future transformation and harmony, when all Creation will be renewed (cf. In Romans 8:19-22Paul speaks of the groaning of the whole Creation and of the hope that Creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to decay. Humanity is to be redeemed with Creation, not apart from it. Yet the future reality of a new Creation has already begun in Christ. Christians must now live in a way that is consistent with the kingdom, and so are called to embrace kingdom values and goals, including harmony with Creation, and so are to act to preserve and enhance the created order. Yet the exercise of dominion has been flawed by sin and the harmony and peace of Creation have been shattered ( Genesis 3:14-15,17-19 ). This shows God's continuing commitment to all of Creation. Cooper, Green Christianity: C aring for the Whole Creation ; W. Murray, The Cosmic Covenant: Biblical Themes of Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation
Religion - Every line revolves around that thematic center of gravity: how the Creator relates to his Creation, especially humanity, and how humanity does and/or ought to relate to the Creator. What Psalm 104 makes its central theme is elsewhere many times assumed or hinted: that the secure order of Creation, sustaining as it does a profusion of life, is the visible glory-robe of the invisible Creator (see esp. So the Creation itself is theophanous—and not just here and there in special "holy" places. The visible Creation is itself the primal temple of God not built by human hands, where his "power and glory" are ever on display ( Psalm 29:3-9 ; 63:2 ). ...
Nor are the effects of the Creator's actions in and on the Creation discernible only in what is commonly referred to as "nature. Human beings live and move and have their being within the arena of God's Creation. And through God's pervasive engagement with his Creation as he sustains and governs it, they are always and everywhere confronted with the display of his power and glory. Wherever humans turn and by whatever means they experience the Creation, the Creator calls to them for recognition and response. First, humans are created in God's image to be his stewards of the Creationas vocation, not avocation (Genesis 1:26-27 ; 2:15 ; Psalm 8:6-8 ). In whatever ways they act on the Creation they do so as faithful or unfaithful stewards of God's handiwork. Yet these have all been responses to the inescapable manifestations of the Creator's glory in the Creation and the pervasive experience of humanity's existence being conditioned by a power or powers other than its own (Romans 1:21-23 ). ...
Second, it is filled with reverent awe before the majesty of the One who discloses himself in Creation, history, and redemption. All of Israel's life was to be brought into accordance with the will of the Creator, whose concern about his whole Creation remained undiminished
Ebionites - Creation, therefore, is but the transformation of preexisting material
Cheerfulness - He comes with a relish to all those goods which Nature has provided for him, tastes all the pleasures of the Creation which are poured about him, and does not feel the full weight of those evils which may befall him
Ordinance - It is also applied to things in Creation: God giveth "the ordinances of the moon and of the stars for a light by night
Man: Perversion of His Faculties - God made man upright, and placed his thoughtful faculties aloft in the place of sovereignty, but man in his folly permits the appetites which he holds in common with the brute Creation to reign supreme, while the mind, which ought to rule, is degraded to meanest servitude
Arm - It is to be trusted in even by the isles of the Gentiles, that is, by sinners everywhere in Creation
Jew - It was in this kingdom that the Deuteronomic reform occurred, which was the first step in the Creation of an organized religion sharply differentiated from the other religions of the world
Adamites - Epiphanius tells us, that they were called Adamites, from their pretending to be re-established in the state of innocence, such as Adam was at the moment of his Creation, whence they ought to imitate him in going naked
Ordinance - ...
A — 4: κτίσις (Strong's #2937 — Noun Feminine — ktisis — ktis'-is ) "a Creation, creature," is translated "ordinance" in 1 Peter 2:13
Stewardship - Utilizing and managing all resources God provides for the glory of God and the betterment of His Creation. Dominion was God's call for human beings to be good and gracious managers of God's Creation. He still desired that people see God as the Lord of everything and themselves as the managers of God's Creation
Cathedral - Of the Cathedral as an institution a recent writer hassaid: "It must be granted that a Cathedral in its origin wasnothing more than a missionary Creation, where the Bishop of apartly unevangelized country placed his seat with his council ofclergy grouped around him, whose duty was to go forth into thesurrounding districts with the message of the Gospel, to plantsmaller churches which should be subordinate or parochial centres,and to return again periodically to the Diocesan church asheadquarters, for the counsel, direction and inspiration of theirchief
Depths - In Creation water covered the chaotic depths of the earth (Genesis 1:2 , where “deep” combines the physical meaning of lowest places on earth and earth's interior with the emotional meanings of the dark abode of the dead and the uncharted, feared depths of the oceans
Whirlwind - ...
Jehovah speaks the word which sets the machine of providence in motion, "the wheel (cycle) of Creation" or "nature"; James 3:6, ton trochon geneseos , one fourfold wheel, two circles cutting one another at right angles
Position - ) The spot where a person or thing is placed or takes a place; site; place; station; situation; as, the position of man in Creation; the fleet changed its position
Beast - God's executive powers in Creation and providence, ζῶον, unhappily translated 'beasts' in the A
Flashing - ) The Creation of an artifical flood by the sudden letting in of a body of water; - called also flushing
Epoch - ) A fixed point of time, established in history by the occurrence of some grand or remarkable event; a point of time marked by an event of great subsequent influence; as, the epoch of the Creation; the birth of Christ was the epoch which gave rise to the Christian era
Lord (2) - The Lord's day, as the Sabbath, reminds us of the finished work of Creation and redemption
Lord (2) - The Lord's day, as the Sabbath, reminds us of the finished work of Creation and redemption
Lord (2) - The Lord's day, as the Sabbath, reminds us of the finished work of Creation and redemption
Revelation Book of - It unrolls a sublime panorama of Christ's victorious inarch through the world's history till the appearance of the new heaven and the new earth, when the aim of Creation and redemption shall be fully realized
Week - They who embrace this view support it by a reference to the six days' Creation and the divine rest on the seventh
Septuagint - The chronology of the Septuagint differs materially from that of the Hebrew text, adding, for example, 606 years between the Creation and the deluge
Victor Tununensis - Of his Chronicle , from the Creation to a
Water - The Bible states that God made water a part of His good Creation and that He exercises sovereignty over it (Genesis 1-2 ; Isaiah 40:12 ). The Book of Genesis uses water as a symbol of instability before the completion of Creation (Genesis 1:2 ), and Ezekiel spoke of water as a symbol of renewal in the age to come (Ezekiel 47:1-12 ). See Creation ; Famine and Drought ; Flood ; Rain
Lord's Day - Christ's rising from the dead on the first day, to bring in the new Creation, is the ground of transference of the sabbath from the seventh day. ...
If the former Creation out of chaos was rightly marked by the seventh day, much more the more momentous (Isaiah 65:17) new Creation, out of moral chaos (Jeremiah 4:22-23), by the first day
Antichrist - The Old Testament uses the figure of a dragon to symbolize evil's conflict with God existing from the time of Creation to God's final triumph (Isaiah 27:1 ; cf. Genesis 1:21 ; see also the reference to Rahab the dragon/sea monster defeated at the time of Creation, Psalm 89:9-10 ; cf. ...
In both Testaments these figures function not only to describe the magnitude and threat of evil but to affirm God's control over Creation
Sabbath - The day of rest, considered holy to God by His rest on the seventh day after Creation and viewed as a sign of the covenant relation between God and His people and of the eternal rest He has promised them. It was celebrated every seven days and became basic to the recognition and worship of the God of Creation and redemption. The first is that God rested on the seventh day after Creation, thereby making the day holy (Exodus 29:8-11 )
Firstborn - And as He is the first begotten, originating the natural Creation, so He is "the firstborn (proototokos , 'first begotten,' Revelation 1:5) from ("out of", ek ) the dead," and therefore "the Beginning" (Colossians 1:18) of "the church of the firstborn" (Hebrews 12:23), the originating Agent of the new Creation. As He is "the firstborn" in relation to the election church, so it is "the church of the firstborn," "a kind of first-fruits of His creatures" (James 1:18), in relation to the millennial church, and to the hereafter to be regenerated natural Creation. As Christ is "the firstfruits," earnest and pledge of the coming resurrection, so believers are "a kind of first-fruits," a pledge and earnest of the ultimate regeneration of Creation
Image of God - God creates humans in his image, justly punishes them for rebellion, yet graciously provides redemption from that rebellion, and then finally consummates redemptive history by transforming the whole Creation into new heavens and a new earth. Significantly, this passage links God's original Creation of humans in his likeness with the subsequent human procreation of children in Adam's image and likeness. Others have stressed that God mandates that humans function as rulers and managers of the Creation as they image him (Genesis 1:26-28 ; Psalm 8:5-8 ). ...
For Paul salvation from start to finish, encompassing regeneration, sanctification, and glorification, is nothing less than new Creation (Romans 8:18-30 ; 2 Corinthians 4:6 ; 5:17 ; Galatians 2:20 ; 6:15 ; Ephesians 2:10 ; cf. This new Creation is not merely individual but corporate and cosmic as well. Wolters, Creation Regained: Biblical Basics for a Reformational Worldview
Devil - Adorned at his Creation with sanctifying grace, he sinned by pride, and with many other heavenly spirits was denied the' beatific vision
Franz Haydn - " He composed masses and oratorios, notably the "Creation," his masterpiece, and other sacred music
Marist Fathers - The immense area of the vicariate, together with the presence at its head of a secular bishop, soon necessitated the Creation of smaller vicariates under Marist bishops
Fathers, Marist - The immense area of the vicariate, together with the presence at its head of a secular bishop, soon necessitated the Creation of smaller vicariates under Marist bishops
Cornet - The rabbis represent the seventh month as the anniversary of Creation
Old Testament - The Law (Genesis—Deuteronomy) begins with the Creation of the world and concludes as Israel is about to enter the Promised Land
Adam - Our bodies are in the likeness of Adam, and in the new Creation we shall be like CHRIST, the last Adam
Antimony - It is likely that abne-puk refers to some sort of cement or mortar used in the Creation of mosaics, which it is suggested, would make precious stones appear larger and more colorful
Society of Mary (Fathers) - The immense area of the vicariate, together with the presence at its head of a secular bishop, soon necessitated the Creation of smaller vicariates under Marist bishops
Haydn, Franz Joseph - " He composed masses and oratorios, notably the "Creation," his masterpiece, and other sacred music
Night - This usage may probably be traced to the terms employed in describing the Creation, Genesis 1:5,8,13 , etc
Semipelagianism - It should be noted that the term Semipelagianism is a 16th century Creation, having been first urged as a taunt against the opinions of Molina during that theologian's controversy with the Dominicans
Adam, the Second - Christ is the "image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all Creation" (Colossians 1:15 ). Like the first Adam, he is the "ruler of Creation" (Revelation 3:14 ). Anyone in Christ is a "new Creation" (2 Corinthians 5:17 )
Adam - The Creation of man is related twice, Genesis 1:26-27 (P
On the Babylonian affinities with the story of Adam, see Creation, Eden
Covenant - He included the covenant relationship in his Creation activity and handiwork. Jeremiah spoke of the covenant of the day and the night that no one can alter (33:19-20); this covenant is understood to have been initiated in Creation when God separated light from darkness and gave the sun and moon their appointed place and role (Genesis 1:3-5,14 ). God, in his revelation of Creation, presented himself as the Creator. So was the cultural mandate; man and woman were to cultivate (subdue NIV) and rule over the Creation. " An increasing number of biblical students and scholars have come to consider, on the basis of biblical testimony, that it is preferable to speak of the covenant of Creation and that what was considered to constitute the "covenant of works" is but an integral part of the covenant of Creation. Creation was affected, for it too suffered the consequences of Adam and Eve's sin. But Yahweh did not break his covenant with Creation and his vicegerents. All the elements of the Creation covenant remained. Yahweh revealed how this was to be done by adding to his Creation covenant the redemptive and restorative promises and implied stipulations of faith and obedience. God has established an all-embracing binding relationship (covenant) with his Creation, of which humanity is the central establishment of a second covenant within the context and framework of the Creation covenant. As Yahweh God continued revealing himself, and how the redemptive/restorative "second covenant" was to be administered, it was always done with the context and framework of the Creation covenant. Because the covenant of grace received direct and fuller "divine attention" as Yahweh God revealed his kingdom plan, goal, and certain consummation, many biblical students and scholars have concentrated their attention on it, failing to see, understand, or believe its position and role within the context and framework of the Creation covenant that Yahweh certainly maintained and continues to maintain as he carries out and fulfills his plan and goal for his ever enduring kingdom. Yahweh assured Noah that his covenant of Creation and its correlate, the covenant of gracious redemption and restoration, would be maintained with him and his family (6:18). Parts of the Creation covenant mandates were repeated; some were explicated. In confirming his Creation covenant with humanity, God said every living creature was included (9:9-10); God included the death penalty for murder (9:5-6), and meat as legitimate food for humanity (9:2-3). This assurance concerning the continuity of the Creation covenant certainly includes the implication that Yahweh would continue his gracious redemptive/restorative covenant. ...
After Yahweh God had given absolute assurance to Noah and his sons that the Creation covenant would continue, there are not many direct references to it again. Yahweh came to Abram and gave further explication of the redemptive/restorative covenant within the context of the Creational covenant. ...
As Yahweh had promised that his redemptive/ restorative covenant in the broader context of the Creation covenant was to be continued with Isaac (17:19-20), and because Abraham had obeyed Yahweh and kept his laws (26:5), Yahweh did accordingly confirm his covenant with Isaac (26:3-4,24). " With these assurances Jacob could travel, live, work, and prosper anyplace in Yahweh's cosmic kingdom, for Yahweh had repeated his determination to uphold and carry out his Creation covenant and its redemptive/restorative correlate. Jacob was blessed with prosperity (a Creation covenantal cultural reality 30:25-43; 35:23-26). These explicated how life and worship would meet requirements of the Creational covenant's spiritual mandate
Nature - ) is that ‘the living God’ manifests Himself in Creation. ‘He conceives of all Creation as involved in the fortunes of humanity. … Creation is not inert, utterly unspiritual, alien to our life and its hopes. Paul taught that in the visible Creation men may discern the workings of a supreme Mind and Will; he also taught that the revelation of God in His Son is the climax, not the contradiction, of His revelation in Nature. Dykes, The Divine Worker in Creation and Providence, do
Work - Creation . The text climaxes with a poetic depiction of the Creation of humanity, made in the image and likeness of God (Genesis 1:27 ). This poetic climax, as well as God's survey of his completed Creation (1:31), captures something of the ecstatic joy in the Creator's mind evoked by the splendor of his work. ...
In this Creation text human beings are given a mandate to work, which is intimately related to their identity as the image of God (Genesis 1:26 ). As image bearers, the human race is to work by ruling and serving the Creation. As God has shown his transcendence to the created order through his work, human beings replicate the divine likeness by having dominion over the Creation (Genesis 1:26-28 ). ...
Whereas the first Creation narrative presents a comprehensive vision of God's activity, the second (2:4-25) focuses on the Creation of humanity, God's supreme work. ...
The Creation texts confer a sanctity on work. In Creation texts associated with Israel's neighbors, the divine work is not something to be admired, as Creation emerged from either a struggle between the gods (Mesopotamia) or an act of defilement (Egypt—but cf. That is why they attempt to hide in Creation from the Creator; it also explains how their firstborn son, Cain, can destroy God's climactic work, the image of God in the face of his brother (Genesis 4:8 ). The Creation that had been declared repeatedly "good" at the beginning is now full of corruption and strife. This work must have seemed absurd to his contemporaries, but it provided redemption for Creation. When Israel places work under divine lordship, human beings again begin to exercise dominion of the Creation as God intended for them. Human beings are being restored to the divine image in order to exercise dominion over the Creation (Ephesians 4:23-24 ). Babylon, the Creation of the latter, where people marked by the image of the beast work for selfish profit, perishes from the earth (Revelation 18 ). Jerusalem, the Creation of God, where people work for their Redeemer and Savior, lasts for eternity. A return to Eden has finally been accomplished, where the new Adams and Eves, crowned with glory and honor, are restored finally to their rightful positions as kings and queens of the new Creation, God's resplendent images, who will exercise dominion through service and love (22:1-5)
Epicureans - Paul directs against Epicureanism the declaration of Creation (Acts 17:24), providence (Acts 17:26), inspiration (Acts 17:28), the resurrection and judgment (Acts 17:31)
Paradise - But concerning the exact place, we must necessarily be very uncertain, if, indeed, it can be thought at all to exist at present, considering the many changes which have taken place on the surface of the earth since the Creation
Behemoth - It has been suggested that the ancient Babylonian Creation-myth underlies the poet’s description of the two animals (Gunkel, Schöpf
Cherub, Cherubim - Representatives of God's power in Creation and judicial government
Heart - In new Creation there is a 'pure heart,' the Christian being led by the Holy Spirit
Woman - the true place of the woman in subjection to the man is plainly stated, as indicated in Creation; and in the assembly the woman is to be silent, and not to teach
New - ' In all other places the word employed is καινός, and this is important, as indicating the entirely different character of the new covenant, the new Creation, the new man, the new heavens and the new earth, etc
Nicodemus - To this the Lord added that the Son of man must be lifted up: sin must be condemned, and the Son of God be given in love, in order that whosoever believeth in Him should have everlasting life: that is, heavenly blessings in new Creation
Raiment - Is there an allusion to this in Psalms 102:26 : "As a vesture shalt thou change them, and they shall be changed?" If so, it conveys the magnificent idea of the almighty Creator investing himself with the whole Creation as with a robe, and having laid that aside, by new Creations, or the successive production of beings, clothing himself with others, at his pleasure
Sabbath - This was originally the seventh day of the week, the day on which God rested from the work of Creation and this day is still observed by the Jews and some christians, as the sabbath
Eagle, - In Ezekiel and in the Revelation the living creatures have the eagle character as portraying the swiftness in execution of God's power in Creation and judicial government
Leviathan - ’ The leviathan of Job 41:1-34 is the crocodile, with added traits drawn from the ancient Creation myths. But it is at least equally probable that the allusion is to the Creation of the world ( Psalms 74:16-17 ), and to the mythological sea-monsters then vanquished
Adam - ...
Adam represented the climax of God’s Creation. He shared his physical origin with other animals in being made of common earthly chemicals, yet he was uniquely different in that he was made in the image of God (Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:7; see Creation; HUMANITY, HUMANKIND)
Evil - By contrast, the original Creation is very good (Genesis 1:31 ). These are probably only a sample of the actual effects upon the Creation. Paul in Romans 8:22 said that the whole Creation has been affected by human sin and is now in bondage to decay. Thus, an evil force was present within the Creation
Generation - Thus Creation, Adam, Noah, Noah's sons, Shem, Terah, Ishmael, the sons of Ishmael, Isaac, Esau, and Jacob each provide a generation and a structural unit in the Genesis narrative. In writing a narrative this way, Israel followed a pattern long used by Near Eastern neighbors, that of describing Creation as a series of births. Israel simply spoke of the birth of Creation by God's words and actions. This started a process by which human generations would endure as long as the Creation generation endured
Gen'Esis - (origin ), the first book of the law or Pentateuch, so called from its title ia the Septuagint, that is, Creation . --The book of Genesis covered 2369 years,--from the Creation of Adam, A. He begins with the Creation of the world, because the God who created the world and the God who revealed himself to the fathers is the same God
Dove (2) - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Holy Ghost - (3) Creation is ascribed to him (Genesis 1:2 ; Job 26:13 ; Psalm 104:30 ), and the working of miracles (Matthew 12:28 ; 1 Corinthians 12:9-11 )
Love, Spirit of - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Regeneration - ...
The third and crowning step will be the regeneration of our home, this earth, and of "the whole Creation," "the restitution of all things" (Acts 3:21; Matthew 19:28; Romans 8:19-23)
Holy Ghost - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Holy Spirit - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Ring - When we see the might and the majesty of His work in Creation, and of His power in keeping the universe in order, this strikes us with awe
Alpha - All information about Creation has come from Him
Evidence - The works of Creation clearly evidence the existence of an infinite first cause
Foundation of the World - The whole expression is equivalent to the phrase found in Mark 10:6; Mark 13:19 ‘from the beginning of the Creation’ (ἀπὸ ἀρχῆς κτίσεως)
Imagination - The cause of the pleasures of the imagination in whatever is great, uncommon, or beautiful, is this; that God has annexed a secret pleasure to the idea of any thing that is new or rare, that he might encourage and stimulate us in the eager and keen pursuits after knowledge, and inflame our best passions to search into the wonders of Creation and revelation; for every new idea brings such a pleasure along with it, as rewards any pains we have taken in its acquisition, and consequently serves as a striking and powerful motive to put us upon fresh discoveries in learning and science, as well as in the word and works of God
Truth, Spirit of - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Spirit, Creator - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Spirit, Holy - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Spirit of Love - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Spirit of Truth - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Sanctifier, the - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Ghost, Holy - He is also called the Spirit of Truth, the Creator Spirit, the Sanctifier, as the gifts of Creation (or recreation, or regeneration), of revelation, and of sanctification are the outpourings of God's love, and so appropriated to the Spirit of Love, though all eternal Divine effects belong to the common or united action of the Three Divine Persons
Dragon - Doubtless many references here and elsewhere are tinged by current mythological tales of ‘dragons,’ such as that preserved in the Assyrian Creation-epic of the contest between Marduk and Tiamat
Spirit - While soul and spirit are not to be regarded as separate faculties, yet ‘spirit’ expresses the direct dependence of the life in man on God, first in Creation ( Genesis 2:7 ), but especially, according to the Pauline doctrine, in regeneration. The old Creation the derivation of man’s spirit from God ( Genesis 2:7 , Isaiah 42:5 ), offers the basis for the new ( Romans 8:1-17 , 1 Corinthians 2:11-12 ), in which man is united to God (see Inspiration)
Mediterranean Sea, the - ...
God exercises leadership over all Creation. As part of God's Creation, the sea is subserviant to him
New - The theological connotation of the word is used with both these meanings in phrases such as "new covenant" (Luke 22:20 ; 2 Corinthians 3:6 ; Hebrews 8:8,13 ; 9:15 ), "new Creation" (2 Corinthians 5:17 ), "new commandment" (John 13:34 ), and "new self" (Ephesians 2:15 ; 4:24 ; Colossians 3:10 ). Paul wrote that "if anyone is in Christ, he is a new Creation; the old has gone, the new has come!" (2 Corinthians 5:17 )
Sabbath - ...
The Sabbath, originally instituted for man at his Creation, is of permanent and universal obligation. Originally at Creation the seventh day of the week was set apart and consecrated as the Sabbath. It was originally a memorial of Creation. A work vastly greater than that of Creation has now been accomplished by him, the work of redemption
Body - The doctrine of Creation sets forth the essential corporeality of human existence. In the beginning God pronounces that all of his Creation is "very good" (Genesis 1:31 ). The redemption of our bodies ushers in the liberation of the entire Creation, breaking the bondage of suffering and death forever (Romans 8:18-25 ). McKinney, Creation, Christ and Culture: Studies in Honor of T
Image - ...
Certainly, one result of Creation in God’s image is that people have spiritual, moral and intellectual characteristics that make them different from all other creatures. As God’s representative they authority over the lower orders of Creation (Genesis 1:28-30; Genesis 2:15; Genesis 2:19-20). He had complete authority over Creation, because he was the Creator (John 12:45; John 14:9; 2 Corinthians 4:4; Colossians 1:15-16; Hebrews 1:3). ...
While the world is still under the power of sin, people do not enjoy the authority over Creation that their status as being in God’s image entitles them to
Fall, the - They were called to serve as mediators of the Creation covenant—specifically as royal representatives and as priests representing Creation before God and God before Creation. They were created as the crown of Creation and given Eden, the garden palace, as their home in which they were to carry out their roles and mandates. God informed Adam that Creation would not respond to his efforts as before. These are all reasons for the frustrations and groanings of all Creation which, by the ordinance of God and as a result of humanity's sin, will continue until the end of time (Romans 8:18-22 ). God's covenant with Creation would continue
Natural Theology - This science endeavors: ...
To demonstrate the existence of God from the visible things of the world through such principles as those of finality and causality: "For the invisible things of Him, from the Creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made; His eternal Power also and Divinity" (Romans 1)
Revelation - Romans 2:5 ; (g) the saints, to the Creation, in association with Christ in His glorious reign, Romans 8:19 , RV, 'revealing' (AV, 'manifestation'); (h) the symbolic forecast of the final judgments of God, Revelation 1:1 (hence the Greek title of the book, transliterated 'Apocalypse' and translated 'Revelation')
Truth - 'The truth' must refer to God, who is true, but is not called 'the truth:' hence it comprises all that may be known of God, whether declared by Creation or made known by revelation
New Man - This having been put off, the believer has also put on 'the new man,' the state proper to the Christian — a new Creation in Christ
Nature - Thus nature teaches that a man should not have long hair, 1 Corinthians 11:14 ; and a multitude of other things that are of God's order in Creation
Epoch - The first epoch is the Creation of the world, which, according to the Vulgate Bible, Archbishop Usher fixes in the year 710 of the Julian period, and 4004 years before Jesus Christ
Theology, Natural - This science endeavors: ...
To demonstrate the existence of God from the visible things of the world through such principles as those of finality and causality: "For the invisible things of Him, from the Creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made; His eternal Power also and Divinity" (Romans 1)
Origen - He popularized the homily, being called its father, more than 20 of his discourses being preserved in Greek and 118 in Latin; in addition we have his brilliant polemic "Contra Celsum" and "De principiis," dealing with the Trinity, Creation, free-will, and scriptural inspiration and interpretation. He has been accused of admitting only an allegorical interpretation of Scripture too freely, of Subordinationism, of teaching the eternity of Creation, a necessary connection between created spirits and matters, and the final universality of redemption
Build, Builder, Building - ...
B — 3: κτίσις (Strong's #2937 — Noun Feminine — ktisis — ktis'-is ) "a Creation," is so translated in the RV of Hebrews 9:11 (AV "building,") See Creation , B, No
Rest - The basis of the idea is the Divine rest, the rest on which God entered at the completion of His work of Creation. The rest to which God, as quoted by the Psalmist, refers is the Divine rest, after Creation, of which Genesis 2:2 speaks: καὶ κατἐπαυσε τῇ ἡμέρᾳ τῇ ἑβδόμῃ ἀπὸ πάντων τῶν ἔργων αὐτοῦ ὦν ἐπλίνσε, a passage which links the idea of Divine rest indissolubly with the Sabbath. It not only denotes the Divine rest as a Sabbatic rest; it links together, in a most suggestive way, the end with the beginning, the consummation with the Creation
Eve - The account of her Creation is given in Genesis 2:21,22
Generation - tôlĕdhôth (from yâladh , ‘beget’ or ‘bear children’), which is used in the sense of ( a ) genealogies Genesis 5:1 , figuratively of the account of Creation, Genesis 2:4 ; also ( b ) divisions of a tribe , as based on genealogy; tôlĕdhôth occurs only in the Priestly Code, in Ruth 4:18 , and in 1 Chronicles 3:1-24
Decrees, of God - It also follows that God has eternally known all events that have occurred, are occurring, and will occur in this Creation including the fall, redemption, glorification, etc
Chronology - for the antediluvian patriarchs would place the Creation of Adam 2262 years before the end of the flood or B
Pearl - (Revelation 21:21) And indeed it is very blessed to eye Jesus under all the loveliness of everything we meet with in the whole compass of Creation, both in the kingdoms of nature, providence, grace, and glory
God - To the Father is ascribed the work of Creation, to the Son the redemption, to the Holy Spirit the sanctification; but all three Persons take part in all the divine works. Thus, the Son is represented as the Mediator of the Creation
ad'am - The Creation of man was the work of the sixth day--the last and crowning act of Creation
Adam - It was the name given to the first man, whose Creation, fall, and subsequent history and that of his descendants are detailed in the first book of Moses (Gen (Genesis 5 ). He was placed after his Creation in the Garden of Eden, to cultivate it, and to enjoy its fruits under this one prohibition: "Of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die
ad'am - The Creation of man was the work of the sixth day--the last and crowning act of Creation
ad'am - The Creation of man was the work of the sixth day--the last and crowning act of Creation
Bird - ...
Moses, to inspire the Israelites with sentiments of tenderness toward the brute Creation, commands them, if they find a bird's nest, not to take the dam with the young, but to suffer the old one to fly away, and to take the young only, Deuteronomy 22:6 . This is one of those merciful constitutions in the law of Moses which respect the animal Creation, and tended to humanize the heart of that people, to excite in them a sense of the divine providence extending itself to all creatures, and to teach them to exercise their dominion over them with gentleness
Adam - This history of his Creation is narrated in Genesis 1:26-30; Genesis 2:7; Genesis 2:15-25, a single pair being formed, to whom the earth was given for a possession, to replenish it with their children, to enjoy the fruits of it, and to have dominion over the inferior animate. How long it was after his Creation, ingenious men have puzzled themselves to discover, but in vain
Supremacy - ‘In the name of Jesus’ all Creation must bow; all Creation must confess His Lordship (Philippians 2:10-11). All things have been created through Him and unto Him: Creation not only starts from Him, but converges in Him (Colossians 1:16-18). Christ receives the homage of all Creation (Revelation 5:9-14), He is associated with God the Father in the possession of ‘the kingdom of the world’ (Revelation 11:15), He Himself is ‘King of kings and Lord of lords’ (Revelation 19:11-16)
Sabbath - In the Genesis story of Creation, God ceased from his work of Creation after six days, then rested on the seventh (Genesis 2:1-3). Just as God’s daily work in caring for his Creation does not break the Sabbath law, neither did Jesus’ work in healing the sick on the Sabbath (John 5:16-18). It was taken from the symbolic rest of God, which expressed his satisfaction in bringing his creative work to its goal with the Creation of Adam and Eve (Genesis 2:1-3; Exodus 20:11)
Providence - ...
pantheism: this is the opposite error of deism, for it virtually identifies God with His Creation. The Psalms are filled with allusions to God's direction and sustenance of the Creation. ...
Providence is related to Creation on the one hand and to the history of salvation on the other. In the meanwhile, Christians can face the future in the confidence that nothing “in all Creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:39 NRSV)
Righteousness - ...
On the other hand, interpreters who understand “the righteousness of God” to mean “God is righteous” contend that salvation is purely the work of God, God's saving activity in keeping the divine side of the covenant of Creation. God acts in Christ, and part of that action is the Creation of faith on the part of human beings who otherwise have no faith. Thus “the righteousness of God” is the power of God at work saving humanity (and the whole of Creation), through the Creation of faith in sinful persons
Eve - Her Creation takes place after God's assertion that "it is not good for the man to be alone" (Genesis 2:18 ), his announcement that he will make the man a helper who corresponds to him (ezer kenegdo ), his peer and complement, and the observation that no other creature yet formed is suitable (vv. , the man's prior Creation, the woman's derivation from the man, his designation of her as woman, and the focus on a man's initiative in the establishment of a marriage relationship [2]). " The theme of Eve's deception is also present in 1 Timothy 2:14 following the mention of her Creation after Adam (v. Ross, Creation and Blessing ; G
Fall of Man - The loss of those perfections and that happiness which his Maker bestowed on him at his Creation, through transgression of a positive command, given for the trial of man's obedience, and as a token of his holding every thing of God, as lord paramount of the Creation, with the use of every thing in it, exclusive of the fruit of one tree. For, that man is a fallen creature, is evident, if we consider his misery as an inhabitant of the natural world; the disorders of the globe we inhabit, and the dreadful scourges with which it is visited; the deplorable and shocking circumstances of our birth; the painful and dangerous travail of women; our natural uncleanliness, helplessness, ignorance, and nakedness; the gross darkness in which we naturally are, both with respect to God and a future state; the general rebellion of the brute Creation against us; the various poisons that lurk in the animal, vegetable, and mineral world, ready to destroy us: the heavy curse of toil and sweat to which we are liable; the innumerable calamities of life, and the pangs of death
Genesis, Book of - The Creation is the first thing recorded; both the original creating out of nothing, and the ordering of the earth for man. See Creation. ' See ADAM...
A vast amount of learned labour has been lost in trying to account for the name of 'God' in Genesis 1 and 'Jehovah God' in Genesis 2 , often ending with the conclusion that Moses must have had two or more earlier accounts of the Creation before him — one called the Elohistic (which used the name of God) and the other the Jehovistic (which had Jehovah God), and that he copied first a piece of the one, and then a piece of the other
Sabbath - But this verse is part of the history of Creation, the very groundwork of Moses' inspired narrative. There has been no Creation since man's. After six periods of creative activity, answering to our literal days analogously, God entered on that sabbath in which His work is preservation and redemption, no longer Creation. God's rest was satisfaction in contemplating His work, so "very good," just completed in the Creation of man its topstone (Genesis 1:31). As the Old Testament Sabbath was the seal of the first Creation in innocence, so the New Testament Lord's day is the seal of the new Creation. The Father's rest after Creation answers to Christ's after redemption's completion
Mani - Briefly these teachings are a dual principle of Creation, the one good and from God, the other evil and from an antagonistic power, namely Satan and the bad angels who seek to destroy the work of God
Manichaeism - Briefly these teachings are a dual principle of Creation, the one good and from God, the other evil and from an antagonistic power, namely Satan and the bad angels who seek to destroy the work of God
Manichaeus - Briefly these teachings are a dual principle of Creation, the one good and from God, the other evil and from an antagonistic power, namely Satan and the bad angels who seek to destroy the work of God
Decree - NRSV uses “decree” to speak of God's eternal wisdom and plan for Creation
Queen of Heaven - The Massoretes evidently took the first word as m e le’kheth (‘work,’ ‘creation’) supposing that the silent aleph (’) had been omitted and considered the expression a synonym for ‘Host of Heaven’ ( ts e bhâ’ hash-shâmayîm , Jeremiah 8:2 ; Jeremiah 19:13 , Zephaniah 1:5 , Deuteronomy 4:19 ; Deuteronomy 17:3 etc
Rest - The rest of the Sabbath and the Sabbatical year are connected with the rest of God after Creation ( Genesis 2:2 , Exodus 20:11 , Leviticus 25:4 ; see art
Genesis - , "creation" or "generation," being the name given to it in the LXX
Paradise - 3 does not introduce a different vision), beyond the heavens of the natural Creation (see Hebrews 4:14 , RV , with reference to the Ascension)
Babel, Tower of - " In the Babylonian tablets there is an account of this event, and also of the Creation and the deluge
Lake of Fire - First, thrown into this lake, the wicked are permanently separated from God's love and good Creation, and thus experience the "second death" (Revelation 20:14 ; 21:8 )
Infinity - Creation is so great an act of power, that we can imagine nothing impossible to that Being who has performed it, but must therefore ascribe to him infinite power
Head - As to 1 Corinthians 11:10 , taken in connection with the context, the word "authority" probably stands, by metonymy, for a sign of authority (RV), the angels being witnesses of the preeminent relationship as established by God in the Creation of man as just mentioned, with the spiritual significance regarding the position of Christ in relation to the Church; cp
Manichaeism - Briefly these teachings are a dual principle of Creation, the one good and from God, the other evil and from an antagonistic power, namely Satan and the bad angels who seek to destroy the work of God
Head - As to 1 Corinthians 11:10 , taken in connection with the context, the word "authority" probably stands, by metonymy, for a sign of authority (RV), the angels being witnesses of the preeminent relationship as established by God in the Creation of man as just mentioned, with the spiritual significance regarding the position of Christ in relation to the Church; cp
Craft, Craftsman - , suggests that technites brings out the artistic side of Creation, viewing God as "moulding and fashioning
Work, Theology of - He has been at the job of sustaining Creation since He fashioned it. ...
God's People Realize His Plan for Work Also Includes a Plan for Rest After six days of Creation God rested
Grief, Grieving - The end of the ordeal is marked by a reaffirmation of God's covenantal faithfulness to his entire Creation (Genesis 8:21-22 ). In judgment he condemned the Creation of his own hands
Fellowship - ...
By his sacrificial death and glorious resurrection/exaltation, Jesus Christ brought into being a new Creation, a new order, and a new epoch. Christ exercises his relation in this new Creation in and through the controlling and liberating Holy Spirit, whom the Father sends in the name of Christ. "Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new Creation; the old has gone, the new has come" (2 Corinthians 5:17 ). ...
The present position of Christians is that "in Christ"united to him in the Spiritthey are a part of the new order and Creation. Therefore, the richness of the experience of fellowship in the Holy Spirit is because of the reality of the new Creation and of being "in Christ
Adam (1) - )...
As the crown of Creation, he was formed at the close of the sixth day. Genesis 1:1-2:3 is one concerning Creation and man in a general summary. Nay, the names are used in their respective places with singular propriety; for ELOHIM expresses the mighty God of Creation, and is fitting in His relation to the whole world. ...
The Elohim in man's Creation use anthropomorphic language, implying collective counsel: "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness," Abp. Trench remarks: "The whole history of man, not only in his original Creation, but also in his after restoration and reconstitution in the Son, is significantly wrapped up in this double statement; which is double for this very cause, that the divine mind did not stop at the contemplation of his first Creation but looked on to him as renewed in knowledge after the image of Him that created him (Colossians 3:10); because it knew that only as partaker of this double benefit would he attain the true end for which he was made. The Creation of woman from man (marked by the very names isha, ish) subsequently implies the same truth. ...
The unity of the human race is plainly asserted in Acts 17:26 (See Creation)
Decrees of God - " The decree being the act of an infinite, absolute, eternal, unchangeable, and sovereign Person, comprehending a plan including all his works of all kinds, great and small, from the beginning of Creation to an unending eternity; ends as well as means, causes as well as effects, conditions and instrumentalities as well as the events which depend upon them, must be incomprehensible by the finite intellect of man
Man - (See ADAM; CIVILIZATION; Creation
Excuse - 1, below), is used, Romans 1:20 , "without excuse," of those who reject the revelation of God in Creation; Romans 2:1 , RV, for AV, "inexcusable," of the Jew who judges the Gentile
Thought - To bring the mind into a habit of thinking as we ought to think, there should by a constant dependence on and imploring of divine grace; an increasing acquaintance with the sacred Scriptures; and improvement of every opportunity of serious conversation; a constant observance of the works of God in Creation, providence, and grace; and, lastly, a deep sense of the realities of an eternal world as revealed in the word of God
Goodness of God - His general goodness is seen in all his creatures; yea in the inanimate Creation, the sun, the earth, and all his works; and in the government, support, and protection of the world at large, Psalms 36:6 ; Psalms 145:1-21
Thanksgiving - All Creation joins in offering thanks to God (Psalm 145:10 )
Feet (Under) - ...
Psalm 8:6 (a) GOD has made the Lord JESUS CHRIST the sovereign Lord over all Creation
Fish, Fishers, Fishing - On the fifth day of the Creation God said, "Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life
Moon - At the Creation the 'lesser light' was to rule the night
Works - God had rested from His works of Creation on the seventh day, but sin had come in, and in the O
Genesis - The first eleven chapters describe the Creation of things, the history of Adam, the deluge, and the confusion of tongues at Babel
Life, Eternal - From which we gather that eternal life for the Christian refers in its fulness to the glory of God, when the present body as a part of the old Creation will be changed, and there will be complete conformity to Christ, according to the purpose of God
Cloud - They symbolize His sovereign power over all Creation, even the heavenly bodies others would worship (Job 26:8-9 )
God - He is never separated from any part of His Creation. God is known in Scripture as Father in three separate senses that must not be confused: (1) He is Father of Jesus Christ in a unique sense—by incarnation (Matthew 11:25-27 ; Mark 14:36 ; Romans 8:15 ; Galatians 4:6 ; 2 Peter 1:17 ); (2) He is Father of believers—by adoption or redemption (Matthew 5:43-48 ; Luke 11:2 , Job 36:22-334 ; Galatians 3:26 ); (3) He is Father of all persons—by Creation (Psalm 68:5 ; Isaiah 64:8 ; Malachi 2:10 ; Matthew 5:45 ; 1 Peter 1:17 ). ...
God's wisdom is His perfect awareness of what is happening in all of His Creation in any given moment. This includes His knowledge of the final outcome of His Creation and of how He will work from beginning to ending of human history ( Job 11:4-12 ; Job 28:1-28 ; Psalm 139:1 ; 1 Corinthians 12:4-66 ). Creation was His first work but certainly not His last. ...
God works as Redeemer to save the sinful, rebellious human creatures and to renew His fallen Creation. Redemption in Christ completes Creation, carrying out the purposes of God and making final, complete salvation possible
Hermogenes (1), a Teacher of Heretical Doctrine - ...
With regard to the doctrines of Hermogenes, the language of Hippolytus suggests that he denied the physical possibility of Creation from nothing; but in the representation of Tertullian no stress is laid on the philosophic maxim, "Nihil ex nihilo," and the eternal existence of matter seems only assumed to account for the origin of evil. Tertullian replies that God was always God but not always Lord, and appeals to Genesis, where the title God is given to the Creator from the first, but the title Lord not till after the Creation of man. From the assertion of Hermogenes that God was always Lord of matter, Neander inferred that he must have denied any Creation in time, and held that God had been from eternity operating in a formative manner on matter. 44) assumes as undisputed some definite epoch of Creation. If God exercised lordship over matter, why did He not clear it of evil before He employed it in the work of Creation? Or why did He employ in His work that which He knew to be evil? It would really, he says, be more honourable to God to make Him the free and voluntary author of evil than to make him the slave of matter, compelled to use it in His work, though knowing it to be evil. In the discussion every word in the Mosaic account of Creation receives minute examination and there is a good deal of strained verbal interpretation on both sides. But on no other point does Hermogenes approach Gnostic teaching; in his theory of Creation, he recognizes neither emanation from God nor anything intervening between God and matter; his general doctrine was confessedly orthodox and he would seem to have no wish to separate from the church nor to consider himself as transgressing the limits of Christian philosophic speculations. Philaster, however, attributes to his heretics other doctrines which we have no reason to think were held by Hermogenes: that evil proceeded sometimes from God, sometimes from matter; that there was no visible Paradise; that water-baptism was not to be used, seeing that souls had been formed from wind and fire, and that the Baptist had said that Christ should baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire; that angels, not Christ, had created men's souls; that this world was the only "infernum," and that the only resurrection is that of the human race occurring daily in the procreation of children
Sabbath - As the seventh day was observed by the Jewish church in memory of the rest of God after the works of the Creation, and their deliverance from Pharaoh's tyranny, so the first day of the week has always been observed by the Christian church in memory of Christ's resurrection. Doddridge, "certainly to determine which is the seventh day from the Creation; and as, in consequence of the spherical form of the earth, and the absurdity of the scheme which supposes it one great plain, the change of place will necessarily occasion some alteration in the time of the beginning and ending of any day in question, it being always at the same time, somewhere or other, sun- rising and sun-setting, noon and midnight, it seems very unreasonable to lay such a stress upon the particular day as some do. The abolition of it would be unreasonable; unscriptural, Exodus 31:13 ; and every way disadvantageous to the body, to society, to the soul, and even to the brute Creation. As a day of remembrance; of Creation, preservation, redemption
Feasts - They had the constant feast of the Sabbath every seventh day, in commemoration of the Lord's resting on the seventh day from the works of Creation. We have our Christian Sabbaths weekly, in which we commemorate all the blessings of Creation, redemption, and sanctification at once. ...
Doth not every regenerated child of God in honouring the Lord's day, honour at the same time the Lord's work; and while he celebrates God the Father's resting from the works of the old Creation, celebrate also God the Father's work in the new Creation of his precious soul in Christ Jesus? (See Ephesians 2:10) And in the celebration of the sabbath in honour of God the Son, who by his triumph over death, hell, and the grave, when he arose on that day, and manifested himself to be the resurrection and the life; doth not every regenerated child of God thereby prove, "that he is risen with Christ from dead works, to serve the living and true God?" Yea, doth he not manifest his personal interest in that sweet promise, by those acts of giving honour to his Lord, where it said, "Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first resurrection; on such the second death hath no power
Genesis - It is a collection of the earliest traditions of the Israelites regarding the beginnings of things, and particularly of their national history; these traditions being woven into a continuous narrative, commencing with the Creation of the world and ending with the death of Joseph. 1 11), including the Creation of the world, the origin of evil, the beginnings of civilization, the Flood, and the dispersion of peoples. ]'>[2] ), characterized by the use of ‘Jahweh,’ commencing with the Creation ( Genesis 2:4 b ff. ]'>[4] ), also using ‘Elohim,’ which opens with the first account of the Creation ( Genesis 1:1 to Genesis 2:4 a). , the Creation, when the Sabbath was instituted; the Flood, followed by the prohibition of eating the blood; and the Abrahamic Covenant, of which circumcision was the perpetual seal. The accounts of the Creation, the Fall, the Flood, and the Dispersion, all exhibit more or less clearly the influence of Babylonian mythology; and with regard to these the question is one not of trustworthy historical memory, but of the avenue through which certain mythical representations came to the knowledge of Israel
Fruit - Israel, in contrast to her neighbors, recognized the process by which trees reproduce by means of seeds carried in fruit to be a part of God's good plan at Creation (Genesis 1:12 ,Genesis 1:12,1:29 )
Wealth - The Creation is God’s wealth: “I have rejoiced in the way of thy testimonies, as much as in all riches” ( Eden - ...
The fourteen remaining appearances relate to the idyllic place of Creation
Fountain - The unleashing of these waters amounted to a return to the chaos before the Creation (Genesis 1:1 ,Genesis 1:1,1:9 )
Godhead - God is holy (Leviticus 11:44-45 ) and thus exists as separate and different from all of His Creation
Preexistence of Souls - Scripture affirms the material body as the good Creation of God
Repentance of God - ...
The repentance of God was usually in response to His Creation, such as human disobedience (Genesis 6:6-7 ), intercessory prayer (Amos 7:1-6 ), or repentance (Jonah 3:6-10 )
Earnest - The fallen Creation waits earnestly for redemption (Romans 8:19 )
Power - Because God has revealed His power in the act of Creation, He has authority to assign dominion to whomever He wills (Jeremiah 10:12 ; Jeremiah 27:5 )
Accad - Among other notable records, they contain an account of the Creation which closely resembles that given in the book of Genesis, of the Sabbath as a day of rest, and of the Deluge and its cause
Nature - The light of nature does not consist merely in those ideas which heathens have actually attained, but those which are presented to men by the works of Creation, and which, by the exertion of reason, they may obtain, if they be desirous of retaining God in their mind
World - (...
See Creation
Maker - Hence, in reference to this perfection, the Psalmist invites the whole Creation of God to "worship and bow down and kneel, before the Lord our Maker
Gog - And let the reader judge for himself how suitable it was, and proper, that when the Lord Jesus came on earth to do away the sin and guilt of all nations, the solemn transaction of his "one all-sufficient sacrifice and obedience unto death" should be set forth in the center of the earth, that like the sun in the midway of the heavens which illumines both east and west; so Christ, the sun of righteousness, might extend the efficacy of his light, and life, and warmth in every direction to his people; and his blood, as from the high altar of his own divine nature, flowing down, might wash away, from the morning of Creation to the end of time, the whole of human transgression
Shut - Sâgar is used for the first time in the Old Testament in the story of the Creation of the woman from the rib of the man: “And the Lord God … closed up the flesh instead thereof” ( Curse, the - ...
The whole Creation is made subject to vanity, and groans and travails in pain for deliverance
Nature - Some regard this as the course of birth or of Creation, or the course of man's "nature" according to its original Divine purpose; Major (on the Ep
Bondage - , of the condition of Creation, Romans 8:21 ; of that fallen condition of man himself which makes him dread God, Romans 8:15 , and fear death, Hebrews 2:15 ; of the condition imposed by the Mosaic Law, Galatians 4:24
Reconciliation - Believers are already reconciled, through Christ's death, to be presented holy, unblameable, and unreproveable (a new Creation)
Leopard - It is supposed, however, that his predations were not confined to the brute Creation
Heaven - Texts of Holy Writ, such as, "I will be thy reward exceeding great," "I shall be satisfied when Thy glory ap- peareth," prove that God, the Supreme Author of Creation, will be the object of the creature's eternal delight
Fish - The Hebrews recognized fish as one of the great divisions of the animal kingdom, and as such gave them a place in the account of the Creation, (Genesis 1:21,28 ) as well as in other passages where an exhaustive description of living creatures is intended
Earth - (2) Creation was regarded as a progressive work --a gradual development from the inferior to the superior orders of things
Apollos - No doubt Apollos likewise was opposed to the Corinthians’ Creation of factions
Adoption - In a much higher sense, since redemption has been wrought, those who believe in the Lord Jesus Christ are in the new Creation sons by adoption, and the Spirit of God's Son is given them so that they can call God Abba Father, and not only be sons but know and enjoy the relationship with all its blessed privileges
Man - This article will deal only with the religious estimate of man, as other matters which might have been included will be found in other articles (Creation, Eschatology, Fall, Sin, Psychology). Man’s dignity, as made by special resolve and distinct act of God in God’s image and likeness (synonymous terms), with dominion over the other creatures, and for communion with God, as asserted in the double account of his Creation in Genesis 1:1-31 ; Genesis 2:1-25 , and man’s degradation by his own choice of evil, as presented figuratively in the story of his Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 , are the two aspects of man that are everywhere met with
Chaos - ...
God demonstrated His power in Creation graphically in the crushing defeat of chaos. In Creation He curbed the unruly sea and locked it into its boundaries (Job 38:1-11 )
Greatness - ...
Of course, the clearest view of God's greatness comes from his actions toward Creation, especially toward his people. Creation records his greatness and leads to our praise (Psalm 145:6 )
Heir - The complete lordship over Creation was given to Adam (Genesis 1:28, Psalms 8:6). These assurances given to Adam and to Abraham were absolutely fulfilled in Christ, who, as the firstborn of all Creation, Himself both the Agent of the Creator’s work and summing up in His own Person all created objects (1618103865_4), enjoys an eternal and incorruptible inheritance
First-Born First-Begotten - -(a) It refers to His pre-existence in Colossians 1:15 (‘firstborn of all Creation,’ πρωρότοκος πάσης κτίσεως; see Lightfoot’s exhaustive note in Colossians3, 1879, p. )’ The phrase denotes that the Son was before all Creation; to the Arians it was pointed out that the word used is not πρωτόκτιστος, which would have had the meaning they assigned to πρωτότοκος. The phrase further denotes that He is the Lord of all Creation, for He has the right of the Firstborn
Miracles - The physical Creation is not something self-sufficient or mechanical, as if it were like a huge clock that, once wound up, runs on automatically till finally God stops it. The God of Creation is a living God who is active in his Creation (John 5:17). Being sensitive to the needs of his creatures, he may work in his Creation in an extraordinary, even miraculous, way for their benefit (Exodus 17:6; Joshua 10:11-14; 2 Kings 4:42-44; Mark 6:47-51). His calming of the storm foreshadows the final perfection of the natural Creation (Matthew 8:24-27; Romans 8:19-21)
Sabbath - Yet despite any significance that accrues on the basis of its frequency or inclusion in the Decalogue, its importance rests ultimately on its symbolic representation of the order of Creation. They receive the world in an unfinished state so that they may share with God the purposes he seeks by continuing to fashion and subdue the Creation. Sabbath contravenes any pride that may accompany human mastery and manipulation of God's Creation. " Here the acknowledgment that God is the Creator of life is intensified by the acknowledgment that he is also the saving presence in the history of the Jewish people, and by that means of the entire Creation. That is, he places it against the universal horizon of God's intent that it benefit all Creation and not just Israel. The term sabbatismos [ σαββατισμός ]'>[1] appears nowhere else in the New Testament, and may be the writer's own Creation to indicate the superiority of the coming rest to that of the seventh day
Covering the Head - He referred to: (1) the order in Creation ( 1 Corinthians 11:3 ), (2) social customs of the time (1 Corinthians 11:4-6 ), (3) the presence of angels (1 Corinthians 11:10 ), (4) nature itself (1 Corinthians 11:13-15 ), and (5) the common practice in the churches (1 Corinthians 11:16 )
Michelangelo Buonarroti - From 1508-1512 he was occupied, at the command of Pope Julius II, with painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel the history of the Creation and Fall, with numberless additional figures, including the heroic prophets and sibyls
Day by Day (2) - ' Why should you see it till that time comes? What if a person going on a journey of five years should undertake to carry provisions, and clothes, and gold enough to last him during the whole time, lugging them as he travelled, like a veritable Englishman, with all Creation at his back! If he is wise he will supply himself at the different points where he stops
Stoics - They asserted the unity of the Divine Being...
the Creation of the world by the Word...
the doctrine of Providence...
and the conflagration of the universe
Firmament - At times the use of the word connotes the idea of extension or expansion—thus the expanse of the heavens at Creation
Providence - God's providence extends to the natural world (Psalm 104:14 ; 135:5-7 ; Acts 14:17 ), the brute Creation (Psalm 104:21-29 ; Matthew 6:26 ; 10:29 ), and the affairs of men (1 Chronicles 16:31 ; Psalm 47:7 ; Proverbs 21:1 ; Job 12:23 ; Daniel 2:21 ; 4:25 ), and of individuals (1 Samuel 2:6 ; Psalm 18:30 ; Luke 1:53 ; Colossians 1:17 )
Week - (See SABBATH, on the beginning of this division dating as far back as God's rest on the seventh day after Creation)
Leviathan - ...
The sea creature is used interchangably with other mysterious Creations of the divine. See Rahab ; Creation
Ashurbanipal - Of particular importance are the Assyrian copies of the Babylonian Creation and flood stories
Signs - The stupendous distance and marvellous regularity in the movements of the heavenly bodies are a sign of the glory of the One that created them, as is stated of God in Rom, 1:20; "The invisible things of him from the Creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead," or divinity
Imagination - But we have also a power of modifying our conceptions, by combining the parts of different ones so as to form new wholes of our own Creation
Change - ...
B — 1: ἀλλάσσω (Strong's #236 — Verb — allasso — al-las'-so ) "to make other than it is" (from allos, "another"), "to transform, change," is used (a) of the effect of the Gospel upon the precepts of the Law, Acts 6:14 ; (b) of the effect, on the body of a believer, of Christ's return, 1 Corinthians 15:51,52 ; (c) of the final renewal of the material Creation, Hebrews 1:12 ; (d) of a change in the Apostle's mode of speaking (or dealing), Galatians 4:20
Lord - A nobleman a title of honor in Great Britain given to those who are noble by birth or Creation a peer of the realm, including dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts and barons
Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost - ...
That he is a DIVINE PERSON, equally with the Father, and the Son, is proved from his association with tem in a great variety of acts purely divine; as in the work of Creation, Genesis 1:2 Psalm 33:6 104:30
God - It puts a voice into the mute lips of Creation; and not only reveals God in his works, but illustrates his ways in providence, displays the glories of his character, his law, and his grace, and brings man into true and saving communion with him
Genesis - It contains an account of the Creation; the primeval state and fall of man; the history of Adam and his descendants, with the progress of religion and the origin of the arts; the genealogies age, and death of the patriarchs until Noah; the general defection and corruption of mankind, the general deluge, and the preservation of Noah and his family in the ark; the history of Noah and his family subsequent to the time of the deluge; the repeopling and division of the earth among the sons of Noah; the building of Babel, the confusion of tongues, and the dispersion of mankind; the lives of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph
Chron'Icles, First And Second Books of, - The first book contains the sacred history by genealogies from the Creation to David, including an account of David's reign
Firstfruits - ...
Just as the firstfruits of the Israelites were the finest from their harvest, so God wants Christians to be the finest creatures in all his Creation (James 1:18)
Biblical Commission - , universal Creation by God, the special Creation of man, the formation of the first woman from man, the unity of the human race, the original happiness and subsequent fall of Adam and Eve, and the promise of a Redeemer
Adam - ...
Old Testament In Genesis 1:1 mankind is the crown of God's Creation. ...
Psalm 8:1 , like Genesis 1:1 , celebrates the exalted status of mankind in God's sight and the dominion of mankind over God's Creation
Day - …” Here “day” refers to the entire period envisioned in the first six days of Creation. ” The second use introduces one of the most debated occurrences of the word, which is the duration of the days of Creation
History - Creation and Fall Asserting that God is the Creator of the earth suggests that He is ultimately responsible for all of history and nature. Creation reminds us that God is in control of nature and its history. ...
Creation also implies that God is free. He does not need Creation but desired it and loves His Creation. History centered on the relationship between people and God, a relationship begun by God's acts of grace—in Creation and in redemption
History - Creation and Fall Asserting that God is the Creator of the earth suggests that He is ultimately responsible for all of history and nature. Creation reminds us that God is in control of nature and its history. ...
Creation also implies that God is free. He does not need Creation but desired it and loves His Creation. History centered on the relationship between people and God, a relationship begun by God's acts of grace—in Creation and in redemption
Word - John opposed Greek philosophy by arguing that salvation comes not by mankind's escape from this world but by God entering and redeeming Creation. John saw that the same agent of God who gave life in the first Creation was also giving life in the new Creation inaugurated by Jesus' coming
Angel - Some wonder that Moses, in his account of the Creation, should pass over this in silence. To suppose, say they, that no creatures whatever, neither angels nor other worlds, had been created previous to the Creation of our world, is to suppose that a Being of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness, had remained totally inactive from all eternity, and had permitted the infinity of space to continue a perfect vacuum till within these 6000 years; that such an idea only tends to discredit revelation, instead of serving it. As to the time of their fall, we are certain it could not be before the sixth day of the Creation, because on that day it is said, "God saw every thing that he had mad, and behold it was very good;" but that it was not long after, is very probable, as it must have preceded the fall of our first parents
Fall - ...
Sin in the Garden Genesis pictures humans as the special Creation of God (Matthew 2:7 ) placed in the special garden created by God (Matthew 2:8-15 ). This freedom permitted them to take from the goodness of God's Creation (Matthew 2:16 ). This prompted the special Creation of woman from man (Genesis 2:19-22 ). Adam may have passed on this information that he initially received prior to woman's Creation (Genesis 2:17-18 ). Hope ultimately emerged from divine determination to preserve His Creation
Union With God - ...
Again, the eternal Word or pre-existent Christ is at once the active agent in Creation, the underlying ground and teleological goal of the created universe, and the principle of coherence which gives meaning and system to the whole (John 1:3, ‘All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. The completed redemption of mankind will be accompanied by a renewed world fitted to be the home of the redeemed sons of God (Romans 8:22-23, ‘We know that the whole Creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now. -The apostolic conception of the Logos as an essential principle in the nature of God, and also the underlying principle and teleological goal of Creation, which conditions the apostolic conception of the material world and its relation to God, conditions also in a special way the apostolic conception of man and his relation to God. ...
As the highest of the creatures, the crown of Creation, man stands in a relation of special nearness to the Divine Logos, who, while immanent in all created existence, is immanent with special fullness in man. This furnishes the basis for affirming a certain metaphysical union between man and God, in virtue of Creation, which is yet not incompatible with plurality and personal distinctness. Further, the union between man and God which is due to Creation, or to the fact that man’s being is rooted and grounded in the Divine Logos, is not yet a complete ethical and spiritual union, but only furnishes the potential basis for such union, which awaits realization through ethical and spiritual process. The influx of sin, through man’s perverse misuse of his free will, is represented as hindering and preventing this intended spiritual union between man and God, which is the true goal of Creation. Thus, according to the apostolic conception, union of man with God, in the ethical and spiritual sense, implied in the relation of sonship to God, is not something already belonging to man in virtue of Creation, and persisting in spite of sin, but something to be attained to and realized through ethical and spiritual process. ...
Clement has some fine passages about Creation (Ep
Christ, Humanity of - By the first He saw the Divine essence from the first instant of the Creation of His human nature; by the second, He knew like the angels by means of infused ideas, without sensible images and reasoning; and by the third He apprehended by means of His senses and reason (Luke 2)
Kabbala - They are said to have formed the first world, from which proceeds the second world, that of Creation, with its ten Sephiroth of more limited potency
Faithful - ” In other cases, however, “faithful” describes God's mode of relation toward persons or toward God's Creation
Humanity of Christ - By the first He saw the Divine essence from the first instant of the Creation of His human nature; by the second, He knew like the angels by means of infused ideas, without sensible images and reasoning; and by the third He apprehended by means of His senses and reason (Luke 2)
Sanctuary - Whether the earthly sanctuary, which he at once magnifies and depreciates, was the Creation of Moses or of Ezekiel and Ezra, it has now had its day and must cease to be, since the true high priest has passed into the heavenly sanctuary, and become the minister of the true tabernacle, which the Lord pitched, not man (Hebrews 9:1-2)
Preadamite - Our Saviour confirmed this when he said, "From the beginning of the Creation God made them, male and female, " Mark 10:6
God - And further, He has stamped upon all things, in the hour of their Creation, their respective natures, and has given them their work and mission and their length of days, greater or less, in their appointed place
Peter, Second Epistle of - ...
In the concluding part of the epistle (2 Peter 3 ) we have also the closing phase of unbelief (perhaps Jewish), namely, scepticism, built up on the assumed unchangeability of the Creation, as to the coming of the day of the Lord
Conclude - If they will appeal to revelation for their Creation, they must be concluded by it
Akkadian - Fourth, the Akkadian mythico-religious texts have included accounts of Creation and flood, as well as prophetic oracles, curses and blessings, and prayers, which provide a basis for understanding both the common Semitic heritage and the uniqueness of Israel's faith
Aera - ...
The ancient Jews made use of several aeras in their computation; sometimes they reckoned from the deluge, sometimes from the division of tongues; sometimes from their departure out of Egypt; and at other times from the building of the temple; and sometimes from the restoration after the Babylonish captivity: but their vulgar aera was from the Creation of the world, which falls in with the year of the Julian period 953; and consequently they supposed the world created 294 years sooner than according to our computation
Cherubim - 1: Χερούβ (Strong's #5502 — Noun Neuter — cheroubim — kher-oo-beem' ) are regarded by some as the ideal representatives of redeemed animate Creation
Cherub - The fullest of these descriptions represents the cherub as a winged figure, like a man in form, full of eyes, and with a four-fold head—of a man, a lion, an ox, and an eagle, with wheels turning every way, and speed like the lightning: presenting the highest earthly forms and powers of Creation in harmonious and perfect union
Light - Because God is separate from all Creation, and especially from all things sinful, light is symbolic of God’s holiness (Psalms 104:2; Daniel 2:22; 1 Timothy 6:16; 1 John 1:5)
Rest - The first allusion to rest in scripture is on the part of God after His works of Creation
Colossians, Theology of - In fact, God's desire was that the Son have preeminence in all things, as seen in the Son's work in Creation and redemption (as evidenced especially by his own resurrection 1:15-20). This passage has roots in the wisdom tradition of Judaism and its great confessions of the role of God in the Creation (cf. He incarnates God's attributes and bears divine authority as one who participated in the Creation itself. As the firstborn of all Creation (Psalm 89:27 ), he is preeminent among all rulers. He is the sustainer of Creation and rules the kingdom to which the saints belong. Jesus serves as the sovereign mediator of Creation, exercising divine prerogative. ...
The hymn not only considers Jesus' role in Creation; it also considers his mediatorial role in redemption. This redemption involves not just human beings, but extends to the entire Creation, both heaven and earth (1:18-20)
Chronology of the Old Testament - No doubt the authors of the Pentateuchal narratives thought themselves able to give the length of time which had elapsed from the Creation of the world. The summing up of the figures gives us 1656 years from the Creation to the Flood. Now the interest that the writer had in this calculation was probably due to the theory which he had formed or which had come down to him by tradition, that the length of time from the Creation to the coming of the Messiah would be 4000 years. They reckoned nearly 600 years more from the Creation to the Flood than the sum in our Bible, while from the Flood to the Call of Abraham they make nearly 800 more
Heaven - The part of God's Creation above the earth and the waters including “air” and “space” and serving as home for God and His heavenly creatures. Thus it does not seal God off from His Creation and His people. ...
As God's Creation, the heavens praise Him and display His glory and His creativity (Psalm 19:1 ; Psalm 69:34 ) and righteousness (Psalm 50:6 )
Man - By some he is defined thus: "He is the head of the animal Creation; a being who feels, reflects, thinks, contrives, and acts; who has the power of changing his place upon the earth at pleasure; who possesses the faculty of communicating his thoughts by means of speech, and who has dominion over all other creatures on the face of the earth. Man was made last of all the creatures, being the chief and master-piece of the whole Creation on earth. He is a compendium of the Creation, and therefore is sometimes called a microcosm, a little world, the world in miniature; something of the vegetable, animal, and rational world meet in him; spirit and matter; yea, heaven and earth centre in him; he is the bond that connects them both together
Everlasting Punishment - ...
According to the early church's teaching (Hebrews 6:2 ), the eternal fate of Creation and human beings is bound up with gospel preaching and thus with the end-of-time events of Jesus' death, resurrection and promised return
Elder - "The Creation of the office of elder is nowhere recorded in the New Testament, as in the case of deacons and apostles, because the latter offices were created to meet new and special emergencies, while the former was transmitted from the earlies times
Book, Book of Life - The written word was a powerful Creation in the ancient Near East
Copper - But Tubal-cain (Genesis 4:22, from whence probably by corrupted tradition was derived the classic idol, Vulcan, the god of the forge) was "an instructor of every artificer in brass (copper) and iron," 500 years after Creation according to Hebrew, or 1,000 according to Septuagint, chronology
Name - Also His gracious and glorious attributes revealed in Creation and providence (Psalms 8:1; Psalms 20:1; Psalms 20:7)
Everlasting Punishment - According to the early church's teaching (Hebrews 6:2 ), the eternal fate of Creation and human beings is bound up with gospel preaching and thus with the end-of-time events of Jesus' death, resurrection and promised return
Dust - Human lowliness in relationship with God as well as humanity's close relationship with the rest of Creation is expressed in the making of persons from dust (Genesis 2:7 ; Job 4:19 ; Psalm 104:29 )
Foundation - “From the foundations of the earth” means from the time of Creation (Isaiah 40:21 ; Matthew 13:35 ; John 17:24 )
Holy Ghost, Holy Spirit - The Spirit moved upon the face of the waters at the Creation, John 16:8-119 ; and He came upon certain persons in the O
Mercy of God - The brute Creation share in it, Psa 145: 9
Hind - And what equally so to Christ, who is altogether lovely, and the "fairest among ten thousand?" He is lovely in his form and usefulness; hated indeed, by serpents, but to all the Creation of God excellent
Deluge - ...
In the New Testament, the deluge is spoken of as a stupendous exhibition of divine power, like the Creation and the final burning of the world
Soul - ...
But together with this principle of life, which is common to men and brutes, and which in brutes perishes with the body, there is in man a spiritual, reasonable, and immortal soul, the seat of our thoughts, affections, and reasonings, which distinguishes us from the brute Creation, and in which chiefly consists our resemblance to God, Genesis 1:26
Crown - ...
B — 1: στεφανόω (Strong's #4737 — Verb — stephanoo — stef-an-o'-o ) "to crown," conforms in meaning to stephanos; it is used of the reward of victory in the games, in 2 Timothy 2:5 ; of the glory and honor bestowed by God upon man in regard to his position in Creation, Hebrews 2:7 ; of the glory and honor bestowed upon the Lord Jesus in His exaltation, Hebrews 2:9
Heart - Only God can bring about this cleansing or re-creation (Psalms 51:10; Ezekiel 36:26; Acts 8:21-22; Ephesians 3:16; Hebrews 10:22)
Stars - The stars form part of the Divine Creation in Genesis 1:1-31 . At the Creation ‘the morning stars sang together’ ( Job 38:7 ); at the battle between Barak and Sisera ‘the stars in their courses fought against Sisera’ ( Judges 5:20 ): in the former passage it may be that the angels are described as stars (cf
Eve - ' If man is the head, she is the crown; a crown to her husband, the crown of the visible Creation" (Henry). Thus, marriage is the holy appointment of God, based on the relations by Creation between man and woman
Regeneration - When Paul described those in Christ as a “new Creation” (2 Corinthians 5:17 NIV), he was referring to the act of regeneration. ”...
Whether the figure used involves birth, life, Creation, or flowing rivers, the Bible is presenting a new experience of life which is enriching, comprehensive, and thoroughly renewed in holiness
Image - Here, in the story of Creation, man is represented as called into being, not, like the other creatures, by a simple flat , but as the result of a solemn and deliberate act of counsel of the Creator: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. Psalms 8:1-9 echoes the story of man’s Creation in Genesis 1:1-31
Virgin - Jesus was the beginning of a new Creation, separate from and unspoiled by sin. He was not under the curse of sin, but in the end he bore the sin of others, so that they through him might be part of God’s new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17; 2 Corinthians 5:21; Colossians 3:9-10; Titus 3:4-7)
Nag Hammadi - ...
An additional category of documents contains a wide variety of mythological speculations covering such topics as Creation, redemption, and ultimate destiny. Firsthand evidence now exists of the divergent gnostic views of Creation, Christ, redemption, the doctrine of humanity, and the significance of the institutional church
Foreknowledge - "Before the Creation of the world" Christ was "chosen" or "foreknown" to be the Redeemer (1 Peter 1:20 ), a clear indication that God knew from the beginning that humankind would fall into sin. We, too, were chosen "before the Creation of the world, " in accord with the foreknowledge of God (Ephesians 1:4 ; 1 Peter 1:2 )
Rest - "God blessed the seventh day and made it holy because on it he rested from all the work of Creation he had done" (Genesis 2:2 ). When God completed his work of Creation, he rested; likewise when his people complete their service to him on earth, they will enter into God's prepared rest
Fruit - In his original Creation God commanded the land to produce "vegetation: seed-bearing plants and trees on the land that bear fruit with seed in it, according to their various kinds" (Genesis 1:11 ). ...
Man, the Special Fruit of God's Creation
Fall - The whole cause for which JEHOVAH went forth in acts of Creation, as relating to our world, was for the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. As if this image of the invisible God became the only foundation for Creation to rest upon, and the only power to preserve and keep the whole together
Life - When God declared his judgment against Noah's generation, all Creation in which there was the "breath of life" would suffer the destruction of the flood (Genesis 6:17 ; 7:15,21-23 ). Between birth and death, Creation and cessation of life, the living experience varying qualities of life and length of days. " When Eve and Adam listened to the tempter and disobeyed the commandment, eating the fruit of the forbidden tree, they brought a curse upon themselves (Genesis 3:16-19 ), their descendants (Romans 5:12-14 ; 1 Corinthians 15:21-22 ), and upon all Creation (Genesis 3:17 ; Romans 8:19-22 ). As the Son of God, he had been active in Creation (John 1:1-4 ), and came to give new life or birth (3:3,5, 7; 6:33,51) to all who believe in him (3:16). This life is nearly synonymous with entering into the kingdom of God and experiencing the restoration of the divine-human relationship intended in Creation
Sabbath - The seventh day was hallowed at the close of the Creation; its sanctity was afterward marked by the withholding of the manna on that day, and the provision of a double supply on the sixth, and that previous to the giving of the law from Sinai: it was then made a part of that great epitome of religious and moral duty, which God wrote with his own finger on tables of stone; it was a part of the public political law of the only people to whom almighty God ever made himself a political Head and Ruler; its observance is connected throughout the prophetic age with the highest promises, its violations with the severest maledictions; it was among the Jews in our Lord's time a day of solemn religious assembling, and was so observed by him; when changed to the first day of the week, it was the day on which the first Christians assembled; it was called, by way of eminence, "the Lord's day;" and we have inspired authority to say, that both under the Old and New Testament dispensations, it is used as an expressive type of the heavenly and eternal rest. The Sabbath was appointed at the Creation of the world, and sanctified, or set apart for holy purposes, "for man," for all men, and therefore for Christians; since there was never any repeal of the original institution. ...
We may therefore rest well enough satisfied with this,—that as a Sabbath is obligatory upon us, we act under apostolic authority for observing it on the first day of the week, and thus commemorate at once the Creation and the redemption of the world. ...
Thus, even if it were conceded, that the change of the day was made by the agreement of the Apostles, without express directions from Christ, which is not probable, it is certain that it was not done without that general authority which was confided to them by Christ; but it would not follow even from this change, that they did in reality make any alteration in the law of the Sabbath, either as it stood at the time of its original institution at the close of the Creation, or in the decalogue of Moses. The same portion of time which constituted the seventh day from the Creation could not be observed in all parts of the earth; and it is not probable, therefore, that the original law expresses more, than that a seventh day, or one day in seven, the seventh day after six days of labour, should be thus appropriated, from whatever point the enumeration might set out, or the hebdomadal cycle begin. At the conclusion of each division of the work of Creation, he says, "The evening and the morning were the first day," and so on; but at the termination of the whole, he merely calls it the seventh day; a diversity of phrase, which, as it would be inconsistent with every idea of inspiration to suppose it undesigned, must have been intended to denote a day, leaving it to each people as to what manner it is to be reckoned. The first Sabbath kept in the wilderness was calculated from the first day in which the manna fell; and with no apparent reference to the Creation of the world. God appointed the observation of the sabbatical year, to preserve the remembrance of the Creation of the world, to enforce the acknowledgment of his sovereign authority over all things, and in particular over the land of Canaan, which he had given to the Israelites, by delivering up the fruits to the poor and the stranger
Predestination - In the last analysis, the way in which God's guidance of His Creation interfaces with human freedom is unknown to us. There has never been a time, not even before Creation, when God has not shown redemptive love for His Creation. Whatever else predestination means, it assures us...
that God takes the initiative in relation to Creation and that God pursues us with redemptive love
Proverbs, Book of - Some scholars consider Wisdom to be an attribute of God, especially shown in Creation (Proverbs 3:19-20 ; Proverbs 8:22-31 ). More accurately stated, however, Wisdom is “the self-revelation of Creation. ” That is, God has placed in Creation a wise order which speaks to humankind of good and evil, urging humans toward good and away from evil. ...
Thus, the wise person “fears God” and also lives in harmony with God's order for Creation
Care of the Poor - Its ultimate aim is the Creation of a complex of social and economic conditions under which anyone who is able-bodied, fairly efficient, and normally intelligent will be able to support himself and his dependents in ordinary decency
Providence - ...
God’s providence is evident everywhere – in the physical Creation (Psalms 29:3-6; Psalms 78:13-16; Psalms 104:27-28; Matthew 6:26; Matthew 6:28; Acts 14:17), in the events of world history (Proverbs 21:1; Amos 9:7; Luke 1:52; Acts 17:26; Romans 9:17) and in the lives of individuals (Genesis 30:1-2; Job 1:21; Proverbs 16:33; Matthew 6:25; Matthew 6:30; Matthew 10:30; Luke 1:53)
Tongues, Confusion of - ) No explanation is given of the origin of speech, but its exercise is evidently regarded as coeval with the Creation of man
Vanity - Psalms 4:3; Psalms 39:6 and the famous Ecclesiastes 1:2 (‘vanity of vanities’), and concludes that in these cases, as in 2 Peter 2:10, the word approximates to the Pauline use in Romans 8:20 (‘the Creation was subjected to vanity’) and denotes what is simply passing and transient
Trumpets, Feast of - The month being that for sowing, as well as ingathering of the last ripe fruits, its first day was appropriately made commemorative of Creation grain, pleted, when "all the sons of God shouted for joy" (Job 38:7), the birthday of the world
Groaning - The whole Creation is conceived as involved in this painful struggle-it ‘groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now’ (Romans 8:22). Not Creation’s physical sufferings under the bondage of corruption, but her ‘earnest expectation’ of deliverance from it, creates the sense of almost intolerable strain; the ‘firstfruits of the Spirit’ for the moment intensify the burden of the flesh; the deepest groanings of the saint arise from his sense of exile, from his ‘longing to be clothed upon with his habitation from heaven’ (2 Corinthians 5:2)
Camel - In grace the new Creation overcomes all difficulties
Idleness - While all Creation is full of life and activity, and nothing stands still in the universe, he remains idle, forgetting that mankind are connected by various relations and mutual dependencies, and that the order of the world cannot be maintained without perpetual circulation of active duties
Confess - ...
The vista of yâdâh expands both vertically and horizontally—vertically to include all Creation, and horizontally stretching forward to that day when praise and thanksgiving shall be eternal (e
Children (Sons) of God - All people are the Creation of God, and as such all people bear the image of God and should therefore be treated with the greatest respect and dignity; but not all people can be called the children of God in the sense in which the phrase is used in the Bible
Justinus - The second principle is called Elohim, the Father of the Creation, deficient in knowledge, but not represented as subject to evil passion
Ever, Everlasting - In passages where God is viewed as the One Who existed before the Creation was brought into existence, ‛ôlâm (or ‛olam) may mean: (1) “at the very beginning”: “Remember the former things [1] of old: for I am God, and there is none else …” (
Pre-Existence - And, still more definitely, in Colossians 1:15-17 not only priority, but an eternal priority to all Creation is ascribed to Him: ‘he is before all things. ’ With this passage should be compared the opening of the Epistle to the Hebrews, where not only similar descriptions are given of the nature of Christ, but the words of Psalms 102, contrasting the eternity of the Creator with the transitoriness of Creation, are boldly and without any explanation applied directly to Christ (cf
Sabbath - The consecration of the Sabbath was coeval with the Creation. The first scriptural notice of it, though it is not mentioned by name, is to be found in ( Genesis 2:3 ) at the close of the record of the six-days Creation. It was to be a joyful celebration of God's completion of his Creation. But in truth, the prohibition of work is only subsidiary to the positive idea of joyful rest and recreation in communion with Jehovah, who himself "rested and was refreshed
Union - —In a sense the Creation is always closely related to the Creator, and has no separate, independent existence: ‘thy heavens’ (Psalms 8:3), ‘in him we live, and move, and have our being’ (Acts 17:28). Yet it is in a relative independence of the Creation that all things happen. By the redemption of man, God will perfect the relationship of the Creation to Himself
God - For example, the Creation narrative of Genesis 1 employs Elohim [1] since the Creation of the universe is in view and God is acting in his sovereign role, but the parallel narrative of Genesis 2 introduces the dual name Yahweh God (Lord God), in view of Yahweh's personal involvement in the Creation of man and woman. On the other hand, the Creation narratives of Genesis 1-2 , which are best understood as depicting twenty-four-hour days, establish the theological premise that God is distinct from nature, that he brought nature into existence, and that he controls nature. ...
The Creation narrative puts forward what is perhaps, along with the doctrine of the incarnation in the New Testament, the most remarkable concept for making God known in all of Scripture, the image of God (Genesis 1:26-27 ; 9:6 ). This distinctive of Creation meant that God related to humankind personally and imparted something of his own nature to his Creation. The parallel Creation narrative of Genesis 2:4b-25 further communicates this view of God as personal in anthromorphic terms as he forms man from the dust of the ground, breathes the breath of life into his nostrils, makes the birds and beasts of the field, fashions woman from the man, and finally plants a garden for their habitat in Eden. Regardless of whether the Creation narrative is early or late in its composition, its canonical position in the Old Testament gives it anterior advantage, and the biblical reader proceeds through the Old Testament with this view of the Creator God who was personally involved in the world he created
Psalms, Book of - Creation psalms (usually reflecting a mixed form) include Psalm 8:1 ; Psalm 19:1 ; Psalm 104:1 ; and Psalm 139:1 . Emphasis may be placed on God as Creator of heaven and earth, as Creator of humanity, or as the Creator of different elements of Creation. They are closely related to the hymns and to the Creation psalms. However, the main difference is a celebration of Yahweh as king over all Creation
Flood, the - ...
Many lines of biblical evidence converge in affirming the universal extent of the flood and also reveal the theological significance of this conclusion: (1) the trajectory of major themes in Genesis 1-11 Creation, fall, plan of redemption, spread of sinis universal in scope and calls for a matching universal judgment; (2) the genealogical lines from both Adam (Genesis 4:17-26 ; 5:1-31 ) and Noah (Genesis 10:1-32 ; 11:1-9 ) are exclusive in nature, indicating that as Adam was father of all preflood humanity, so Noah was father of all postflood humanity; (3) the same inclusive divine blessing to be fruitful and multiply is given to both Adam and Noah (Genesis 1:28 ; 9:1 ); (4) the covenant (Genesis 9:9-10 ) and its rainbow sign (Genesis 9:12-17 ) are clearly linked with the extent of the flood (Genesis 9:16,18 ); if there was only a local flood, then the covenant would be only a limited covenant; (5) the viability of God's promise (Genesis 9:15 ; cf. ...
The theology of the flood is the pivot of a connected but multifaceted universal theme running through Genesis 1-11 and the whole rest of Scripture: Creation, and the character of the Creator, in his original purpose for Creation; uncreation, in humankind's turning from the Creator, the universal spread of sin, ending in universal eschatological judgment; and re-creation, in the eschatological salvation of the faithful remnant and the universal renewal of the earth. Youngblood, The Genesis Debate: Persistent Questions About Creation and the Flood
Revelation, Idea of - Christians have customarily seen general revelation in Creation and in conscience, distinguished from special, saving revelation in word (Holy Scripture), history (the "acts of God"), and the Person of Jesus Christ (incarnation). Here is the first instance of revelation, as it is by speech that the Creator orders his time-space universe from the beginning of its creaturely existence; "Praise the Lord, for he has spoken, " as the hymn notes, and in response to these first statements by Creator to Creation, "Worlds his mighty voice obeyed. " If we pause to ask how we are to imagine the circumstances thus described, and conclude that they are beyond our understanding when conceived as speech, we nevertheless note that here, once again, the fundamental category of divine revelation is taken to be speecheven in address to the subpersonal Creation. If in Psalm 19,29 speech is the paradigm of nonverbal witness in the created order, here it is the model of divine address to Creation itself. And as in Creation, so in sustaining providence, he upholds all things by his powerful word
Sennacherib - His great achievement was the Creation of Nineveh as a metropolis of the Empire
Expect, Expectation - 2 (below), is clear from the contexts; in Romans 8:19 it is said figuratively of the Creation as waiting for the revealing of the sons of God ("waiting" translates the verb apekdechomai, a strengthened form of A, No
God - He hath been pleased to discover his perfections, in a measure, by the works of Creation and the Scriptures of truth; these, therefore, we ought to study, in order that we may obtain the most becoming thoughts of him
Waiting - Paul vividly describes the eager longing (ἀποκαραδοκία) of all Creation which is waiting for the sons of God to be revealed, that is, the issue of the world-sifting process of life and history in the ultimate triumph of the good (see ExpT xxii
Scripture - Jesus Christ is the center to which everything in Scripture is united and bound together—beginning and end, Creation and redemption, humanity, the world, the fall, history, and future
Millennium - 6000 years) are said to have elapsed from the time of the Creation to the Judgment
Alexandria - , his Alexandrine education would familiarize him with Philo's idea of the word as the mediating instrument of Creation and providence; and John the Baptist's inspired announcement of the personal Messiah would enable him to "teach accurately the things of the Lord" up to that point, when Aquila's and Priscilla's teaching more perfectly informed him of the whole accomplished Christian way of salvation
Amos - Amos is the prophet of the sovereign Lordship of God over all Creation
Aphthartodocetae, a Sect of the Monophysites - An abbot of Edessa, Bar Sudaili, extended this principle even to the Creation, which he thought would at last be wholly absorbed in God
Gallus (11), Abbat, the Apostle of Switzerland - The sermon he preached at John's consecration is extant in Latin—a wonderful specimen of Irish erudition, simple yet full of vigour, learned and devout, giving an abstract of the history of God's dealings from the Creation, of the fall and redemption, of the mission of the apostles and calling of the Gentiles, and ending with a powerful appeal to Christian faith and life, which gives some idea of the state of the corrupt and barbarous society he was seeking to leaven
Die - This idea is especially clear in the Creation account, in which God tells man that he will surely die if he eats of the forbidden fruit ( Travail - ...
B — 2: συνωδίνω (Strong's #4944 — Verb — sunodino — soon-o-dee'-no ) "to be in travail together," is used metaphorically in Romans 8:22 , of the whole Creation
Holy Spirit - The spirit exercised control over the chaotic waters at the beginning of Creation (Genesis 1:2 ; Genesis 8:1 ; Compare Psalm 33:6 ; Job 26:13 ). The reception of the new Spirit, prophesied in Ezekiel and Jeremiah, is dependent upon repentance (Ezekiel 18:31 ) and is associated with the Creation of a new heart (Jeremiah 31:31-34 )
Jehovah - Εlohim (the plural expressing the fullness of God's powers) is appropriate to Creation (Genesis 1 - 2:3); JEHOVAH ELOHIM to paradise and to the covenant of grace at the fall; the combination identifies the Jehovah of the moral government with the Elohim of Creation
Genesis - ...
Although the Bible mentions matters relating to the beginnings of the universe and the early days of the human race, its main concern is not with the scientific aspect of these matters (see Creation). ...
Outline of contents...
Genesis begins with the story of Creation (1:1-2:3) and the rebellion of Adam and Eve (2:4-4:26)
Divine Retribution - The standard has been revealed to all Creation in the events surrounding the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ
Conscience - These standards are reflected in His Creation and especially in persons who are morally responsible because of their capacity of choice
Image - ...
Likeness goes further; but was there not in man a certain moral and mental likeness to God? He not only represents God on earth, but, as one has said, he thinks for others, refers to and delights in what God has wrought in Creation, and in what is good, having his moral place among those who do
Soul, Spirit - ...
The SPIRITis distinctively the higher part of man, it marks the conscious individuality, and distinguishes man thus from the inferior Creation
Sabbath - The Sabbath was soon after definitely enacted in the ten commandments, Exodus 20:8-11 , and reference is there made to God having rested on the seventh day after the work of Creation as the basis of the institution
Dragon - In the Creation-epic Tiâmat is the power of chaos and darkness, personified as a gigantic dragon or monster of the deep, who is eventually overcome by Marduk, the god of light
Meditation - The subjects which ought more especially to engage the Christian mind are the works of Creation, Psalms 19:1-14 : the perfections of God
Fear - There is but one creature in the Creation of God, that is said to be wholly void of fear, namely, the leviathan
Resurrection of Body - The resurrection is styled a conversion to distinguish it from Creation by which an entirely new being comes into existence
Philippus, of Side - It ranged from the Creation to his own times
Vanity - Paul describes the Creation as ‘subject to vanity’ ( Romans 8:20 ), he has in mind the marring of its perfection and the frustration of its Creator’s purpose by sin; nevertheless, the groanings of Creation are, to his ear, the utterance of its hope of redemption
Decrees - This "hardening" involves the Creation of an irrational mind-set. Calvin understood God's choosing us in Christ before Creation and predestinating us to adoption "in accord with his pleasure and will" (Ephesians 1:3-5 ) as an immutable, divine decree
Day - The "days of Creation" in Genesis 1 , given the semipoetic nature of the composition, are quite possibly intended as literary devices, division markers as in a mosaic. The refrain, "And there was evening, and there was morning, " speaks not only of sequence but of an order that is affirmed following the flood as a foundational element in Creation and as an answer to chaos and destruction (Genesis 8:22 )
Flood, the - Man was the head of Creation, and all was involved in the consequences of his sin, and there must be a new start under the figureof the death and resurrection of Noah in the ark. The flood was about 1700 years after the Creation of Adam, and it is impossible to say how many millions of people there were on the earth at the time, or how far they had been dispersed
Sabbath - (Genesis 8:9)...
The Sabbath was instituted, from the first dawn of the Creation; for when JEHOVAH had called into existence the several works of his almighty hand, which his sovereign will and pleasure gave being to "he is said to have rested from his works which he had made;" and reviewing with complacency what his hands had wrought, beholding their number and order in the several ranks and disposals of his design, he sanctified the day of his rest, and commanded every seventh day to be hallowed for his more immediate worship, adoration love, and praise, by all his intelligent creatures. Hence divine honour is given in the observance of the Lord's day on the first day of the week to all the persons of the GODHEAD, for Creation, redemption, and sanctification
Stand - 102:26, which teaches the indestructibility and/or eternity of God— the Creation perishes but He “shalt endure [2]. All other existing depends upon Him; the Creation and all creatures are perishable
New Jerusalem - 1: ‘till the new Creation is accomplished which dureth till eternity’; xci. ’ In the Book of Jubilees the new Creation is mentioned; cf. 29: ‘And the angel of the presence who went before the camp of Israel took the tables of the divisions of the years … from the day of the [1] Creation when the heavens and the earth shall be renewed and all their Creation according to the powers of the heaven, … until the sanctuary of the Lord shall be made in Jerusalem on Mount Zion. : ‘When all Creation visible and invisible, as the Lord created it, shall end, then every man goes to the great judgement, and then all time shall perish, … they (i. ’ Again the renewal of Creation appears in 2 Bar. 6: ‘For there will be a greater trial than these two tribulations when the Mighty One will renew His Creation’; and in Creation. 26: ‘and Mount Zion (which) will be sanctified in the new Creation for a sanctification of the earth; through it will the earth be sanctified from all (its) guilt and its uncleanness throughout the generations of the world’; ‘And the days shall begin to grow many and increase amongst those children of men till their days draw nigh to one thousand years, and to a greater number of years than (before) was the number of the days’ (xxiii
Sanctification - Fallen Creation still witnesses to God's existence and attributes (Psalm 19:1-6 ; Romans 1:20 ). "...
The imperfect state of Creation is a reminder that God's fully sanctified purpose for it has been disrupted by sin. Evil is the deprivation of the good that God intends for the Creation he has designed. The Creation groans, awaiting its sanctification when everything will be set right (Romans 8:21-22 ; Revelation 20-21 ). ...
Human beings, made in God's image, were the pinnacle and focus of his Creation. Human beings are like God in their stewardship over Creation (Genesis 1:26-31 ). In addition to designing the goal of Creation (functioning human beings in a fittingly perfect environment), God has also designed the means of achieving that goal
Assumption of Moses - In the 2500th year from the Creation, after the Exodus, Moses calls Joshua and appoints him his successor as minister of the people and of the tabernacle of the testimony, at the same time committing to his charge certain books which were to be preserved in the place which God had made from the beginning of the world (Jerusalem). The Temple is built by God Himself (2:4) in the place He prepared from the Creation (1:18). 20: ἀπὸ γὰρ πνεύματος ἁγίου αὐτοῦ πάντες ἐκτίσθημεν, thus claiming all Creation as the handiwork of God’s Holy Spirit. God had ‘created the world on behalf of his people’ (a common Jewish view; contrast Hebrews 1:2, Colossians 1:18, Romans 11:36, John 1:3 -where Christ is the final cause of Creation). ‘But he was not pleased to manifest this purpose of Creation from the foundation of the world in order that the Gentiles might thereby be convicted’ (by their own false theories). ’ In Ephesians 1:9-10 the mystery of God’s will, ‘according to his good pleasure, which he purposed in him,’ is not Israel but Christ as the goal of all Creation. In 1 Corinthians 2:7, Ephesians 3:9, Romans 16:25 the purpose precedes the Creation of the world
Providence - Some use the word providence in a more general sense, signifying by it that power or action by which the several parts of the Creation are ordinarily directed. Thus Damascenus defines providence to be that divine will by which all things are ordered and directed to the proper end: which notion of providence supposes no laws at all fixed by the author of nature at the Creation, but that he reserved it at large, to be governed by himself immediately. ...
By providence we may understand, not merely foresight, but a uniform and constant operation of God subsequent to the act of Creation. But it is not mere energy or the constant exertion of power that is discernible in the frame or laws of the universe, in maintaining the succession of men, and in producing men and other beings; but wisdom and skill are also conspicuous in the structure of every object in the inanimate Creation. Beside, with regard to God, all distinctions in the Creation vanish
Revelation of God - Humans, as a direct Creation of God, are a mirror or reflection of God. People are God's unique workmanship evidenced by their place of dominion over the rest of Creation; in their capacity to reason, feel, and imagine; in their freedom to act and respond; and in their sense of right and wrong (Genesis 1:28 ; Romans 2:14-15 ). Special revelation is the declaration of truth about God, His character, and His action and relationship with His Creation to bring all Creation under Christ, the one head (Ephesians 1:9-10 )
Person, Personhood - ...
The Creation account of Genesis 1 portrays human beings as part of the material world created by God. ...
Commonality with all other Creation gives humans their earthiness. They are embedded in Creation, but they are not only in nature, they are also over nature. That human relations are critical to a person's wholeness is seen in the Creation account of Genesis, when God created persons male and female, and in Genesis 2 where the divine assessment is that "it is not good" for the man to be alonea partner is necessary
Heracleon, a Gnostic - Thus he declares that the Evangelist's assertion that all things were made by the Logos must be understood only of the things of the visible Creation, his own doctrine being that the higher aeon world was not so made, but that the lower Creation was made by the Logos through the instrumentality of the Demiurge. The water of Jacob's well which she rejected is Judaism; the husband whom she is to call is no earthly husband, but her spiritual bridegroom from the Pleroma; the other husbands with whom she previously had committed fornication represent the matter with which the spiritual have been entangled; that she is no longer to worship either in "this mountain" or in "Jerusalem" means that she is not, like the heathen, to worship the visible Creation, the Hyle, or kingdom of the devil, nor like the Jews to worship the creator or Demiurge; her watering-pot is her good disposition for receiving life from the Saviour. These are the special Creation of the Logos; they live in Him and become one with Him
God - ...
The personal God revealed...
As people observe the physical world, they may conclude that there is an intelligent and powerful God who is the ultimate cause and controller of all things (Acts 17:23-27; Romans 1:19-20; Hebrews 3:4; see Creation). Nothing in the works of Creation or in the activities of humans or angels can add anything to him or take anything from him (Psalms 50:10-13; Acts 17:24-25; Romans 11:36). He maintains the whole Creation (Psalms 147:8-9; Matthew 5:45; Colossians 1:17), he controls all life (Deuteronomy 7:15; Deuteronomy 28:60; Job 1:21; Psalms 104:29-30; Matthew 10:29) and he directs all events, small and great, towards the goals that he has determined (Genesis 45:5-8; Psalms 135:6 : Proverbs 16:33; Isaiah 10:5-7; Jeremiah 23:24; Isaiah 46:9-11; Amos 3:6; Amos 4:6-11; John 11:49-53; Acts 2:23; Acts 17:26; Romans 8:28; Ephesians 1:11; see PREDESTINATION; PROVIDENCE). Everything in Creation changes, but the Creator never changes (Psalms 33:11; Malachi 3:6; Hebrews 1:10-12; 1 Peter 1:24)
Glory (2) - (b) The revelation of the ideal and perfect condition of human nature, as elevated by its union with God in the Incarnation to that which God means it to be by the law of its Creation, that which already in the mind of God it essentially is. The ‘glory’ of God recognized in Christ by the believer is a new Creation of light (2 Corinthians 4:6). ...
It will be seen that this one word ‘glory’ is really a summary of the Divine purpose for Creation as revealed in Scripture—...
‘From Eden’s loss unto the end of years
Persia - , before the separation of the two Aryan races, the Indians and Persians) and acquainted with the Jewish Scriptures, as appears from his account of Creation (Hyde 9; 10; 22; 31, Shahristani Relig. In his work traces appear of Adam and Eve's history, Creation, the deluge, David's psalms. His Zendavesta has six periods of Creation, ending with man as in Genesis
Providence - " It continues Creation. ...
(I) We can no more account for the world's continued preservation than for its original Creation, without God's interposition. God's interest in His own Creation is Job's argument for God's restoring him (Job 10:3; Job 10:9-12; Job 14:15)
Theophilus, Bishop of Antioch - He contrasts the account of the Creation of the universe and of man on which together with the history contained in the earlier chapters of Genesis he comments at great length but with singularly little intelligence with the statements of Plato "reputed the wisest of all the Greeks" (lib. with his own allegorizing comments upon the successive work of the Creation week. The first three days before the Creation of the heavenly bodies are types of the Trinity—τύποι τῆς τρίαδος—the first place in Christian writings where the word is known to occur (lib
Father - ...
Note: Whereas the everlasting power and divinity of God are manifest in Creation, His "Fatherhood" in spiritual relationship through faith is the subject of NT revelation, and waited for the presence on earth of the Son, Matthew 11:27 ; John 17:25
Regeneration - The nature of the work shows plainly that it is not in the power of men to do it: it is called a Creation, a production of a new principle which was not before, and which man could not himself produce, Ephesians 2:8 ; Ephesians 2:10
Power - This power was demonstrated through his Creation of the universe (Psalms 33:6-9; Isaiah 40:21-23; Jeremiah 10:12-13), his activity in nature (Psalms 29:3-10; Psalms 66:5-7), his control of history (Exodus 9:16; Psalms 33:10; Isaiah 40:15-17) and his saving acts on behalf of his people (Exodus 15:4-12; Exodus 32:11; Psalms 106:8; Psalms 111:6; Isaiah 40:10-11)
Glorification - Moreover, Creation itself participates in this aspect of glorification (Romans 8:21 )
Selah - (Luke 24:44) He is the great end, no doubt, as well as the beginning, in his mediatorial character, of all the Creation of God, the Amen, and the faithful witness of heaven
Breathing - As Westcott observes, ‘the same image which was used to describe the communication of the natural life [1] is here used to express the communication of the new, spiritual life of recreated humanity
Arm - Sometimes the word expresses the might of God’s ceaseless activity either on behalf of His chosen ( Deuteronomy 33:27 , Psalms 44:3 , Isaiah 33:2 ; Isaiah 63:12 , Acts 13:17 ), or in breaking the power of His enemies ( Exodus 6:6 , Deuteronomy 5:15 , Ezekiel 21:6 ; Ezekiel 32:21 ), or again in upholding the movements and harmony of His Creation, ruling in justice with unswerving sternness ( Ezekiel 20:33 f
Amen - " And that Christ is the verification of all the promises is so true that He Himself is called 'the Amen:' " These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the Creation of God
Amen - And surely, the Lord Jesus Christ is all these, and infinitely more, JEHOVAH'S Yea and Amen, as he saith himself; the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the Creation of God; that is in his mediatorial character
New; New Moon - 3:23, where châdâsh appears to mean “renewed”; just as God’s Creation is renewed and refreshed, so is His compassion and lovingkindness: “They are new every morning: great is thy faithfulness
Regeneration - It may be remarked, that though the inspired writers use various terms and modes of speech in order to describe this change of mind, sometimes terming it conversion, regeneration, a new Creation, or the new creature, putting off the old man with his deeds, and putting on the new man, walking not after the flesh, but after the Spirit, &c; yet it is all effected by the word of truth, or the Gospel of salvation, gaining an entrance into the mind, through divine teaching, so as to possess the understanding, subdue the will, and reign in the affections
Joy - Joy is a characteristic of God, and he wants it to be a characteristic that is evident throughout all Creation, particularly among his people (Job 38:7; Psalms 16:11; Psalms 104:31; Luke 2:10; Luke 2:14; John 15:11; Philippians 4:4)
Repentance - As to His own Creation or appointment of objects that fail to answer to His glory
Foreknowledge - Jesus taught that God has complete knowledge of human beings (Matthew 10:29-31 ), and the author of Hebrews wrote that “nothing in all Creation is hidden from God's sight” (Hebrews 4:13 NIV). God's foreknowledge must be understood in terms of personal relationship of God to His Creation
Worship - God’s deeds, whether in Creation, history or redemption, are a cause for unceasing worship and praise from men and women everywhere (Psalms 33:1-19; Psalms 99:1-5; Romans 11:33-36; Ephesians 3:14-21; Judges 1:24-25). ...
There is a sense in which all Creation worships God (Psalms 96:1; Psalms 97:1; Psalms 148:3-4)
Dualism - There is little doubt that the account of the Creation in Genesis 1:1-31 reproduces some of the features of this myth, but it is transformed by the monotheism of the author (see Bennett’s Genesis , pp. Paul in Colossians ( Colossians 1:19 ; Colossians 2:9 ) asserts that the plçrôma , the fulness of the Godhead, dwells bodily in Christ; to this dualism is opposed the union of Creator and Creation, reason and matter in Christ
Adam - He was the last work of the Creation, and received dominion over all that the earth contained
Imagery - New Testament images include: light (Matthew 5:14 ); salt (Matthew 5:13 ); vine branches (John 15:5 ); a new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ); God's temple (1 Corinthians 3:16 ); and a royal priesthood (1 Peter 2:9 ; compare Exodus 19:6 )
Homosexuality - Only heterosexual preference and behavior patterns are approved in Scripture as conforming to God's plan in the Creation of man and woman
Tongues, Confusion of - The character of the narrative makes it impossible to consider it as real history: it bears on its surface manifest evidence that it is a Creation of primitive fancy
Sun - In the history of "greater light," of the Creation the sun is described as "greater light," in contradistinction to the moon, the "lesser light," in conjunction with which it was to serve "for signs and for seasons, and for days, and for years," while its special office was "to rule the day
Bondage - In Romans 8:21 all Creation is represented as being in bondage-‘servitude to decay’-but hoping for deliverance and for that freedom which characterizes ‘the glory of the children of God
Firstborn - He is also described as “firstborn among many brethren” ( Romans 8:29 ) and “firstborn of all Creation” (Colossians 1:15 NAS)
Time - ...
Nevertheless, God is able to use time to bring his purposes to fulfilment (Galatians 4:4), and he gives it to the people of his Creation to use also (Ecclesiastes 5:18; Ecclesiastes 8:15)
Flesh And Spirit - The first mention of flesh occurs in Genesis 2:21 , the account of the Creation of woman from the side of man
Beauty - God announced that Creation was good (Genesis 1 )
Har-Magedon - ’...
Of recent years considerable support has been given to the view, first propounded by Gunkel (Schöpfung und Chaos, 268), that ‘Har-Magedon’ preserves the name of the place where in the Babylonian Creation-myth the dragon Tiämat was overthrown by Marduk, the passage Revelation 16:13-16 being presumably a fragment from some Jewish apocalypse in which the Babylonian mythology had been adapted to an eschatological interest
Bone - ” When Adam remarked of Eve that she was “bone of his bone,” and flesh of his flesh, he was referring to her Creation from one of his rib bones ( Sun - Joshua's causing the sun to stand still phenomenally virtually proclaimed his God Jehovah to be Lord of the sun and all Creation, in the face of pagandom
Pillars - I who at Creation brought the world from chaos into beautiful order will restore it from its present disorganization
Man - ...
Man was God's crowning work of Creation (see ADAM),and He set him in dominion over the sphere in which he was placed
Mountain Range - Although it would be wrong to conclude that God is setting forth this understanding of Creation, yet He used it in explaining His word to men just as He used other contemporaneous ideas
Wing - ...
In the Old Testament kânâph occurs first in the Creation account: “And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that it was good” ( Enoch - 622, and being contemporary with Adam, he had every opportunity of learning from him the story of the Creation, the circumstance of the fall, the terms of the promise, and other important truths
Noah - He gave Noah power over all the brute Creation, and permitted him to kill and eat of them, as of the herbs and fruits of the earth, except the blood, the use of which was prohibited
Providence - It is incompatible with mechanical or pantheistic theories of Creation
Saturninus - ...
The same Creation myth is reported by Irenaeus (I
Theodotus of Byzantium - Hippolytus reports that as to the Deity and the work of Creation the doctrine of Theodotus was orthodox, but as to our Lord's person he agreed with Gnostic speculations, especially in distinguishing Jesus and Christ
Time - Time began at Creation and becomes the agency through which God continues to unveil his divine purpose for it. ...
Furthermore, God imminently expresses concern for his Creation. The Bible does not specify if or in what sense time existed before Creation or will exist after Jesus' return
Image - We may state it more fully thus: Christ is the outcome of His Father’s nature, and so related to Him in a unique manner; and He is especially the means by which the Father has manifested Himself to all that is without, from the first moment of Creation and for ever, though the centre and focus of that manifestation is the Incarnation. There are other modes of the Divine manifestation; through Creation itself he who has an eye to see may behold ‘the invisible things of God’ (Romans 1:20), but there is no revelation or manifestation so sure, so adequate, so satisfying as that in Christ. Man is the image of God in those matters of rational and moral endowment which distinguish him from the humbler Creation
Ecclesiastes, Theology of - Life is valuable on the short run; the rope is silver after all, but it is completely ruined at death, when the process of Creation is undone and the body turns to dust and the spirit returns to God. The fundamental unity of a person as established at Creation (Genesis 2:7 ) is thereby reversed and undone. The Creation waits in eager expectation for the sons of God to be revealed. For the Creation was subjected to frustration, not by its own choice, but by the will of the one who subjected it, in hope that the Creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to decay and brought into the glorious freedom of the children of God
Almighty - From the annunciation by Moses of a divine existence who was "in the beginning," before all things, the very first step is to the display of his almighty power in the Creation out of nothing, and the immediate arrangement in order and perfection, of the "heaven and the earth;" by which is meant, not this globe only with its atmosphere, or even with its own celestial system, but the universe itself; for "he made the stars also. ...
It is declared by the fact of Creation, the Creation of beings out of nothing; which itself, though it had been confined to a single object, however minute, exceeds finite comprehension, and overwhelms the faculties. Were we to forget, for a moment, what is the fact, that their noblest notions stand connected with fancies and vain speculations which deprive them of their force, still their thoughts never rise so high; the current is broken, the round of lofty conception is not completed, and, unconnected as their views of divine power were with the eternal destiny of man, and the very reason of Creation, we never hear in them, as in the Scriptures, "the THUNDER of his power
Sexuality, Human - ...
Those who see women as inherently inferior to men often appeal to the specific account of the Creation of woman (Genesis 2:18,20-22 ) as shedding further light on the relationship that existed between the sexes in their unfallen state: woman, they maintain, is a secondary Creation, a mere "helpmeet" to the man. Woman was made because man's being alone was the only thing pronounced "not good" in the Creation narrative (2:18). ...
To summarize: the Creation texts make it clear that any pattern of absolute male dominance and female inferiority found in the Bible must result from the fall, not from a theology of the created order. The process of redemption taught by the Bible is clear: it seeks to restore humanity, and with it Creation (Romans 8:19-22 ), from the effects of the fall. If the reason for the Creation of woman was to enable the man to become whole and a legitimate microcosm of the human species, then it follows that man/woman relations in a redeemed society would be theologically humanizing. In the Gospels, Jesus makes an appeal to the Edenic narrative and order of Creation theology in order to demonstrate the inappropriateness of casually dissolving a marriage (Matthew 19:4-5 ; Mark 10:6-8 )
Conscience - It is a inward capacity humans possess to critique themselves because the Creator provided this process as a means of moral restraint for his Creation. Romans 12:1-2 makes the point that God desires that his Creation conform to divine values by a process of rational renewal
Gnostics - They corrupted the doctrine of the Gospel by a profane mixture of the tenets of the origin of evil and the Creation of the world, with its divine truths. These last were peculiarly serviceable to them, on account of the allegories and allusions with which they abound, which are capable of different interpretations; though their doctrine concerning the Creation of the world by one or more inferior beings of an evil or imperfect nature, led them to deny the divine authority of the books of the Old Testament, which contradicted this idle fiction, and filled them with an abhorrence of Moses and the religion he taught; alleging, that he was actuated by the malignant author of this world, who consulted his own glory and authority, and not the real advantage of men
Flesh - It may signify a comprehensive sense whereby “all flesh” refers to all of humanity (Joel 2:28 ; Matthew 24:22 ) or including both the human and animal Creation (Genesis 6:13 , Philippians 1:22-24 ; Genesis 7:16 ; Leviticus 17:14 ). ...
Relationship Adam said of Eve's Creation that she is the “bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh” (Genesis 2:23 ; compare Genesis 29:14 ) denoting a kinship between the two, thus Adam and Eve were regarded as one flesh (Genesis 2:24 ; Matthew 19:5 ; 1 Corinthians 6:16 ; Ephesians 5:31 )
Earth, Land - Creation brought to the earth both form and content. An earth that was exceedingly good came from God's Creation (Genesis 1:31 )
Spirit - ...
Spirit of God At the beginning of Creation, the Spirit of God hovered over the waters (Genesis 1:3 ). ...
At the beginning of Scripture we see the Spirit at work in Creation
Immortality - Others with a similar anthropology propound a form of re-creationism, a temporary extinction at death that ends at the resurrection in a new Creation. An associated issue, "soul sleep" (psychopannychy), could be a corollary to either the traditional view or that of re-creation
Proverbs, Book of - All God's works in Creation were carried out in wisdom. He was there before the work of Creation was begun
World - The physical world at its largest extent includes the whole universe, the cosmos (John 1:9 ; Acts 17:24 ) or the Creation (Romans 8:20 ). His Creation includes provision for animals as well as for people (Psalm 104:10-22 )
Encratites - But it does not appear that they held the Gnostic doctrine that matter is essentially evil and its Creation the work of a being inferior or hostile to the Supreme; for the apostle's argument assumes as common ground that the things they rejected were creatures of the good God. We find from the Clementines that the Ebionite sects which arose out of Essenism permitted marriage but disallowed flesh meat and wine; and that their doctrine respecting God's work of Creation was quite orthodox
Feasts - To perpetuate the memory of great events; so, the Sabbath commemorated the Creation of the world; the passover, the departure out of Egypt; the pentecost, the law given at Sinai, &c. ...
The first and most ancient festival, the Sabbath, or seventh day, commemorated the Creation
Type - In contemplating this wonderful system we discern one great intention interwoven, not only into the verbal prophecies and extraordinary events of the history of the Israelites, but into the ordinary transactions of the lives of selected individuals, even from the Creation of the world. The illustration, then, to be derived from the historical types of the Old Testament, is found diffused over the whole period, which extends from the Creation of the world, to the time when vision and prophecy were sealed
Athenagoras - (1) He does not want the power to do it, either through ignorance or weakness—as Athenagoras proves from the works of Creation; defending his positions against the philosophic objections, that the bodies of men after dissolution come to form part of other bodies; and that things broken cannot be restored to their former state. (2) God wants not the will to raise the dead—for it is neither unjust to the raised men, nor to other beings; nor unworthy of Him—which is shewn from the works of Creation. (1) The final cause of man's Creation, to be a perpetual beholder of the Divine wisdom. We easily recognize this view in his language about matter and the souls, angels, natures sensible and intelligible, and the contemplation of God as the end of man's being; and also in that referring to the Son of God as the Logos and Creator (except that this is not at all peculiar to Athenagoras), more especially in his calling the Word "idea (or archetype) and energy" in the work of Creation. the eternal Son assumed, towards the finite, the office and relation of "the Word" or Manifestor of God), to be the Archetype and Effectuating Power of Creation (Apol. But it must be remembered that the apologists present the actings and offices of the three Blessed Persons of the Godhead in Creation, etc
Adam - Up till our day far more was known about the way and process of our redemption than about the way and process of our Creation. 'The Scripture begins,' says Butler, 'with an account of God's Creation of the world, in order to ascertain who He is concerning whose providences, commands, promises, and threatenings this sacred book all along treats, the Maker and Proprietor of the world, He whose creatures we are-the God of Nature, Revelation, indeed, considers the common affairs of this world, and what is going on in it, as a mere scene of distraction, and cannot be supposed to give any account of this wild scene for its own sake. Now Moses, long before Butler, is clear and sure as to the final cause of our Creation. In his opening pages, Moses, after his royal manner, lets us hear the Maker of all things taking counsel with Himself concerning His end and object in the Creation of man. ...
Now, the multiplication and the increase of the image of God is an altogether worthy reason, adequate explanation, and final cause for the Creation of this world, and for all the processes, preparations, and providences through which this world has passed. Which glorious Man is called the Second Adam, says Theophilus, as having in His regeneration that very perfection which the first Adam had in his Creation
Trinity - ...
For example, in the Old Testament references to the Creation there was an inseparable connection between God, the creative power of God’s Word, and the life-giving power of God’s Spirit (Genesis 1:1-3; Job 33:4; John 16:7-118). But with the coming of Jesus, people gained a clearer understanding of the work of the Trinity in all the activity of God, including the Creation (John 1:1-4). ...
The name ‘Father’ speaks of one who has to do with the origin of things, and this is seen in the great works of Creation, history and redemption (Malachi 2:10; Ephesians 1:3-10; Hebrews 12:9; James 1:17)
Judgment - His judgment-seat is at the same time the throne of His glory (Matthew 25:31), as it marks the culmination of the work which He has mediated in Creation and in redemption. It is fitting that He who has mediated Creation, maintenance, and redemption, should pronounce judgment upon man with regard to his attitude and responsibility toward each of these sovereign acts and relations. Judgment stands in the Gospels as the natural terminus of an aeon in the life of the race which began with Creation, was continued under a purpose and revelation of Redemption, and demands a Judgment as its proper culmination
Names of God - In the Creation narrative, we read: “Then Elohim said, “Let us make man in our image. God is absolute, infinite Lord over Creation and history. The Christian sees in this term a pointer to the trinitarian reality of Creation
Corinthians, Epistles to the - ...
1 Corinthians 11 : The fact of Christ being the head of every man, and man being the head of the woman, indicated that the head should be covered by the woman, and uncovered by the men, that the angels might not see God's order in Creation set aside in those who were of the house of God. He introduces the solemn truth of the judgement-seat of Christ, before which all must be manifested, and then passes on to the new Creation, where all is of God. A man in Christ is already of this new Creation
Names Titles And Offices of Christ - ...
Beginning of the Creation of God, Revelation 3:14
Fundamental Theology - Revelation is neither the manifestation of God contained in the works of Creation, nor any religious consciousness, individual or collective, but is the Creator speaking to His creature and proposing religious truth to be believed on Divine authority
Day of the Lord - ...
Whichever interpretation one makes of specific details, the day of the Lord points to the promise that God's eternal sovereignty over all Creation and all nations will one day become crystal clear to all creatures
Power - (3) The subject of power in Scripture may be viewed under the following heads: (a) its original source, in the Persons in the Godhead; (b) its exercise by God in Creation, its preservation and its government; (c) special manifestations of Divine "power," past, present and future; (d) "power" existent in created beings, other than man, and in inanimate nature; (e) committed to man, and misused by him; (f) committed to those who, on becoming believers, were "empowered" by the Spirit of God, are indwelt by Him, and will exercise it hereafter for God's glory
Sin (2) - Sin is a degeneracy from original good, not an original existence, Creation, or generation; not by the Creator's action, but by the creature's defection (Ecclesiastes 7:29)
Hardness of the Heart - But from the beginning of the Creation God made them male and female
Blameless - The blameless character of Christians, however, is the intention of God, who "chose us in him before the Creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight" (Ephesians 1:4 )
Word - It existed before Creation and was the means by which God created
Power - God's kind of power is seen in his Creation (Psalm 19 ; 150:1 ; Jeremiah 10:12 )
Be - ” Here the focus is on the simple occurrence of the events—as seen, for example, in the statement following the first day of Creation: “And so it happened” ( First-Fruit - These men, with all likeminded, were the first-fruits of a new Creation achieved by the spirit of Christianity, and they were the pledge of others who would follow their inspiring example
Cloud - This indeed, is the new Creation the Lord promised upon every dwelling place of mount Zion, and upon all her assemblies
Darkness - In the natural sense of the word, it means the obscurity, such as is described at the original state of things, when JEHOVAH went forth in acts of Creation
Hero - ) bears out the might of God in Creation (v
Light - ...
The first occurrence of 'ôr is in the Creation account: “And God said, Let there be light: and there was light” ( Kingdom of Christ of Heaven - The power and glory of the divine kingdom are shown in a measure in Creation and providence
Kingdom of God - The power and glory of the divine kingdom are shown in a measure in Creation and providence
Kingdom of Heaven - The power and glory of the divine kingdom are shown in a measure in Creation and providence
Power - In Matthew 26:64 the word ‘power’ is employed for God Himself, and it is accordingly very natural that it should be often used to denote the various forms of God’s activity, especially in His works of Creation and redemption
Presbytery - The monarchical bishop is a later Creation
Manna - By these last three peculiarities God miraculously attested the sanctity of the Sabbath, as dating from the Creation and not from Mount Sinai
Theology, Fundamental - Revelation is neither the manifestation of God contained in the works of Creation, nor any religious consciousness, individual or collective, but is the Creator speaking to His creature and proposing religious truth to be believed on Divine authority
Gnosticism - 30) we hold to date from the very beginning of Gnosticism if not in its present shape at least in some rudimentary form as fragments of it appear in different Gnostic systems especially the representation of the work of Creation as performed by an inferior being who still fully believed himself to be the Supreme saying "I am God and there is none beside me," until after this boast his ignorance was enlightened. These sects are quite orthodox as to the Creation their utmost deviation (if it can be called so) from the received belief being the ascription of Creation to the immanent wisdom of God. The mythological personages among whom in the older Gnosis the work of Creation was distributed are in these Hellenic systems replaced by a kind of abstract beings (of whom the Valentinian aeons are an example) which personify the different stages of the process by which the One Infinite Spirit communicates and reveals itself to derived existences. ...
Creation and Cosmogony. ) had inferred from the expression, "Let us make man," of Genesis that God had used other beings as assistants in the Creation of man, and he explains in this way why man is capable of vice as well as virtue, ascribing the origin of the latter to God, of the former to His helpers in the work of Creation. The earliest Gnostic sects ascribe the work of Creation to angels, some of them using the same passage in Genesis (Justin
Romans, Theology of - The social nature of Paul's theology reflects the social nature of the Triune God and God's societal mission of redeeming Creation. The exchange of the truth about God for a lie by sinful humanity and the worshiping of Creation rather than the Creator (1:23) brings about a giving up of human beings to divine wrath (three Romans 1:24,26 , 28 ), even though deep within they knew of God's eternal power and deity and are without excuse (1:19-21,28). This is the first prognosis of hope (in 8:20; Paul says that God subjected the Creation to futility because of human sin, but "in hope" ) and is signaled by the "but now" of 3:21. The latter overwhelms the former, 8:20 being the centerpiece: although God has subjected the Creation to futility because of human sin, he has also subjected it in hope. Since the groaning of Creation and the groaning of believers is undergirded by the divine groaning of the Spirit in intercession for the saints, there is reason for hope and victory, for nothing in Creation "will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord" (8:39)
Christ - " (Revelation 13:8) And no less Christ in his divine nature, he is here represented as testified in those acts of the GODHEAD; for Creation can belong to none but God. And as man only, neither of those acts could have been exercised and carried on, but in the union and junction of both; his GODHEAD gives power to the whole of what is here ascribed to him, and his manhood united to the GODHEAD, renders him the suited Head of all Creation, and upholder of all, that "in all things he might have the pre-eminence. And now having accomplished redemption by his blood, he is, and ever will be, the One glorious object of adoration, love, and praise, to all the Creation of God, angels, and men, to all eternity. ...
The Beginning of the Creation of God, Revelation 3:14
Unity - Although the marks of imperfection and disorganization are everywhere seen upon the face of Creation, although it is in bondage to the law of decay and corruption, and is the scene of apparently fruitless tragedy (Romans 8:20-22), yet it is pervaded by a unity of rational purpose and control (Romans 8:28, Acts 27:22-24); and this is true not only of natural processes and events, but of those that are brought about by the volition of men or other free agents (Acts 2:23; Acts 21:10-14, 2 Corinthians 12:7). ’ In Him, as the Image and Only-begotten of the Father, the undivided fullness of the Godhead dwells (John 1:14, Colossians 2:9); and He is not only, by His Incarnation, the one Mediator to mankind of all Divine life, truth, and saving grace, but the Divine agent in all Creation (John 1:3, Colossians 1:16), and the principle of its unity (Colossians 1:17). Christ must be Head over all things to His Body, which is the Church (Ephesians 1:22); hostile elemental forces must be subdued (1 Corinthians 15:24, Ephesians 1:21); all things, whether on earth or in heaven, must come under His reconciling sway (Colossians 1:20), and the whole Creation be emancipated into the liberty that belongs to the glorified state of God’s children (Romans 8:21), that God may be all in all (1 Corinthians 15:28)
Praise (2) - Revelation 19) or the beneficent action of His providence, as shown more particularly in Creation, revelation, and redemption (thanksgiving); cf. for God’s beneficence in Creation, revelation, and providence—is an essential part of praise. Creation and redemption are combined in the Christian Liturgies
Victorinus Afer - It is an ably written treatise on the Creation, Fall, and Recovery of Man. The following is a summary of his mode of conceiving the relations of the Trinity and the processes of Creation and redemption. To become a creator at a certain moment in time—to act in Creation as much involves change as the act of generation. But this proceeding forth of God in the action of Creation is only not a "change" in the Divine Essence, because it has its origin and ground there. ...
We pass on to his conception of the relation of God to Creation. ") It follows that the Son is very mainly considered as existing with a view to Creation. his description of the process of Creation, as a drawing out of the plenitude of God into a chain or gradation of existences
Work - As a result of sin, people lost the spiritual power that God originally gave, so that the physical Creation, which was intended for their enjoyment, became the means of their torment. Rest and recreation, both physical and mental, are part of the weekly work cycle that the Creator intended for his creatures (Genesis 2:3; Exodus 20:8-11; cf. ...
Frequently the Bible refers to God’s works in relation to Creation (Genesis 2:2; Psalms 8:3; Psalms 19:1; Psalms 104:24; Hebrews 1:10) and the control of history (Psalms 46:8-9; Psalms 66:3; Psalms 107:24; Psalms 111:6; Isaiah 26:11-13; Isaiah 28:21; Revelation 15:2-4)
Son of God - So Proverbs 8:22 (Hebrew), "Jehovah begat (qananiy related to Greek gennaoo ) Me in the beginning of His way (rather omit "in"; the Son Himself was "the Beginning of His way", "the Beginning of the Creation of God", Revelation 3:14) from everlasting . ...
The Son was the Archetype from everlasting of that Creation which was in due time to be created by Him
Numbers as Symbols - Creation was complete on the seventh day, God's rest being the result. A new departure outside of, but connected with, Creation-order: hence in resurrection
Fruit (2) - —Christ Himself is intimately associated with (a) the Divine quest of fruit; (b) the Divine Creation of fruit; (c) the Divine suffering and sacrifice of fruit-production. It is Christ who loves fruit, and who desires to find it in us; and it is He who, in the inspiration and Creation of the fruit, virtually gives Himself to us
Sabbath - God having created the world in six days, "rested" on the seventh, Genesis 2:2,3 ; that is, he ceased from producing new beings in this Creation; and because he had rested on it, he "blessed" or sanctified it, and appointed it in a peculiar manner for his worship. It commemorates not only the Creation of the world, but a still greater event-the completion of the work of atonement by the resurrection of Christ; and as he rose from the dead on the day after the Jewish Sabbath, that day of his resurrection has been observed by Christians ever since
Good, Goodness - A land may be good (Deuteronomy 1:25,35 ) and so may gold (2 Chronicles 3:5,8 ), soil (Luke 8:8 ), a tree (Matthew 7:17 ), wine (John 2:10 ), or all of Creation (seven times in Genesis 1 )
Breath - He gave breath to humans initially in Creation (Genesis 2:7 ), but He also takes breath away eventually at death (Genesis 7:22 ; Job 34:14 )
Second Coming, the - Peter warned against unbelief that could blunt the expectant spirit and cause people to say, “Where is the promise of his coming? for since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of the Creation” (2 Peter 3:3-4 )
Lie, Lying - Membership in the Christian body postulated a new Creation ‘in righteousness and holiness of truth’ ( Ephesians 4:24 f
Generation - It is even used of the Creation of the world (Genesis 2:4 lit
Sennacherib - ...
I have introduced this observation of the Lord's judgment on Sennacherib's army by way of introducing another; namely, what safety are the people of the Lord brought into when all the Creation of God waits as ministering servants to execute the divine judgments on their enemies! "Winds and storms fulfilling his word," sickness and the word, angels and messengers, all wait to execute the Lord's commands
Deliverer - O death, where is thy victory? O death, where is thy sting? The sting of death is sin; and the power of sin is the law; but thanks be to God, who giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ,’ This deliverance applies to the whole man (soul and body) and to the whole Creation (Romans 8:18-25)
Isaacus Ninivita, Anchorite And Bishop - A book, de Causa Causarum or Liber Generalis ad Omnes Gentes , treating of God and the Creation and government of the universe, has been assigned to this Isaacus; it really belongs to Jacobus Edessenus (fl
New - ...
"The new things that the Gospel brings for present obedience and realization are: a new covenant, Matthew 26:28 in some texts; a new commandment, John 13:34 ; a new creative act, Galatians 6:15 ; a new Creation, 2 Corinthians 5:17 ; a new man, i
Father - Consequently, the Bible speaks about God as the Father of Creation, for he is the source of all things (Numbers 16:22; Isaiah 64:8; Malachi 2:10; Luke 3:38; Hebrews 12:9; James 1:17; see GOD)
Generation - It is even used of the Creation of the world (Genesis 2:4 lit
Ecclesiastes - The final section therefore encourages people to have a positive attitude to life (11:1-8); for the Creator holds them accountable for the way they handle the gifts of Creation (11:9-12:14)
Family - The Creation story (Genesis 1-2 ) modeled the monogamous relationship of one male and one female, as does much of the Bible. The account of Creation, however, described the female as being created equal with the male. According to Jesus, neither the nuclear family nor the household was the primary unit of God's Creation
Hell - ...
Since hell is not a natural fixture of Creation but results from the fall and is destiny of the wicked, the New Testament occasionally personifies hell as the demonic forces behind sin. Certainly God loves the creature; Creation itself reflects God's free love. But since God's love is complete in himself, even before Creation, the creature cannot be presumed as his one and only end
Providence of God - And because it is God's governance that is in view, it encompasses everything in the universe, from the Creation of the world to its consummation, inclusive of every aspect of human existence and destiny. Jesus' profound contribution to this is his revelation that God is our heavenly Father, who cares infinitely for his helpless Creation. Through Christ he deals redemptively with the world through all its ages, from Creation to consummation
Homosexuality - The choice of homosexuality in particular is due to Paul's need to find a visible sign of humankind's fundamental rejection of God's Creation at the very core of personhood. The numerous allusions to the Creation account in the passage suggest that Creation theology was foremost in Paul's mind in forming the passage. The major problem with this response is that it shifts the meaning of "natural" from Paul's notion of "that which is in accord with Creation" to the popular notion of "that which one has a desire to do
Heresy - With this highest and perfect immateriality no influence on matter is conceivable, consequently, no Creation and dominion of the world. The succession from the highest deities down to the lowest is not by a sudden descent, but by a continually graduating decrease from the highest, pure, and spiritual natures, down to those which are more substantial and material, which are the nearest related to the gross matter of the Creation, and which consequently possess the property of acting upon it. In like manner, in the Epistle to the Colossians, for the sake of representing to them Christianity in an exalted and important light, and of praising the divine nature of Jesus, he says, that all that exists is his Creation, and is subjected to him, not even the spiritual world excepted. Finally, to destroy completely and decisively the whole doctrinal system, he demonstrates, that Christ, through the work of redemption, has obtained the victory over the entire spiritual Creation, that he drags in triumph the αρχας [6] and εξουσιας [7] as vanquished, and that henceforth their dominion and exercise of power have ceased, Colossians 2:15
Woman - ...
Creation . In the first Creation account, God fashions man and woman as fully equal bearers of his image. The controversial words, "suitable helper" in verse 18 have traditionally been taken to imply a functional subordination of the woman to the man as part of God's design in Creation, but this interpretation is increasingly being rejected. ...
The Old Testament consistently commends women to monogamous marriage and sexual fidelity, based on God's Creation ordinance (Genesis 2:24 ; endorsed again by both Jesus [1] and Paul [2]). But Paul's own explanation appeals instead to the order of Creation (1 Timothy 2:13 ); the explicit evidence of women's roles in the Ephesian heresy elsewhere in the Pastorals is entirely limited to their roles as victims rather than propagators (2 Timothy 3:6-7 )
Union With Christ - "In Christ" there is a "new Creation" (2 Corinthians 5:17 ), the believer having entered an entirely new sphere of existence. " Being in solidarity with Christ makes possible the new Creation, renewal in the image of the Creator (Colossians 3:10 ). "In Christ, " however, the Creation of a new humanity is made possible, which experiences solidarity with him in righteousness and life (Romans 5:18-21 ). The corporate nature of this identification is emphasized by Paul in his treatment of the new Creation, referring to the whole body of Christ as "the one new man" (Ephesians 2:15 ). David Rightmire...
See also Church, the ; New Creation ; Salvation ; Sanctification ; Spirituality ...
Bibliography
Sin - Sin involves the refusal of humankind to accept its God-given position between the Creator and lower Creation. The principal effects of sin are alienation from God, from others, from oneself, and from Creation. The sentence God pronounces upon sin includes grace (3:15) and suggests that he retains sovereign control over his Creation even in its rebellion, but it also establishes our alienation from nature in the curse upon childbearing, work, and Creation itself (3:14-19). Second, evil resides in the heart of the crown of God's Creation, the bearer of God's image, the one appointed to rule the world for God
Jonah, Theology of - The sea is not a person but a part of Creation. ...
The corollary of the doctrine of Creation is that the Creator's prime desire is to preserve life and not to take it
Joel - All God's Creation suffered because of the sinfulness of His people. (2) All of God's Creation is interdependent
Salvation - Psalm 51:12 more than any other Old Testament text associates personal salvation with a conversion experience; renewed joy of salvation accompanies God's Creation of a new heart and right spirit and assurance of God's abiding presence. Scripture uses a wealth of images to describe this act: new birth (Romans 5:8-9 ; Titus 3:5 ); new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ); adoption (Romans 8:15 ; Luke 15:7 ; Ephesians 1:5 ); empowerment to be God's children (John 1:12 ); the status of “saints” (1 Corinthians 1:2 ; 2 Corinthians 1:1 )
Providence - The superintendence and care which God exercises over Creation. The arguments for the providence of God are generally drawn from the light of nature; the being of a God; the Creation of the world; the wonderfully disposing and controlling the affairs and actions of men; from the absolute necessity of it; from the various blessings enjoyed by his creatures; the awful judgments that have been inflicted; and from the astonishing preservation of the Bible and the church through every age, notwithstanding the attempts of earth and hell against them
Attributes of Christ - The Λόγος was in the beginning, He was the ‘mediate Agent of Creation’ (John 1:1; John 1:3, Colossians 1:16, Hebrews 1:2; Hebrews 1:10); He is the upholder of all things (Colossians 1:17, Hebrews 1:3), the ‘first-born of all Creation’ and ‘before all things’ (Colossians 1:15; Colossians 1:17), cf
Angel - ...
Creation of Angels Angels are created beings. If the “us” in Genesis 1:26 is a reference to God's angelic court, then the angels are simply present at the Creation; their origin is not explained
Mediator - Thus for example, in his Epistle to the Ephesians, the first chapter, and the tenth verse, where speaking, of the design of JEHOVAH in redemption, to bring and centre all things in Christ, and finally to make him the glorious end of Creation, he saith, that "in the dispensation of the fulness of time, he might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven, and which are in earth, even in him. Moreover, the glory of opening blind eyes, and the like, would have been unsuitable to any creature; and as JEHOVAH, in the very opening of his address to Christ, claims this as his distinguishing prerogative, would he mean to claim the crown of Creation and yet put the crown of redemption on the head of a mere creature? Would not this have been to have given his glory to another? Oh, how plain, how very plain it is, that in the call and appointment of the Lord Jesus to this blessed office of Mediator, it is God's dear Son, in nature and essence one with the Father, and in office the God-man, Glory-man, Christ Jesus! Oh! that modern infidels, calling themselves Christians, but in name only so, and not in reality, would seriously lay this at heart
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - But he has been perplexed by the question of the origin of evil, and is disposed to accept the solution, much prevalent in the East then, that evil is inextricably mixed up with matter, which therefore could not be the Creation of the Supreme. Marcion's theory was that the visible Creation was the work of the just God; the good God, whose abode he places in the third or highest heaven and whom apparently he acknowledged as the creator of a high immaterial universe, neither concerned Himself with mankind nor was known by them, until, taking compassion on the misery to which they had been brought by disobedience to their Creator who was casting them into his hell, He interfered for their redemption. Marcion himself only counted two ἀρχαί , but used the word in the sense of ruling powers, for it does not appear that he regarded matter as the Creation either of his good or his just God, and therefore it should rightly have been reckoned as an independent principle. The ascription of Creation and redemption to different beings enabled the church writers to convict the Marcionite deity of unwarrantable interference with what did not belong to him. Then the Lord of Creation, seeing that Adam was worthy to serve Him, devised how he might withdraw him from Hyle and unite him to himself. Then Hyle, recognizing that the Lord of Creation had supplanted her, said, "Seeing that he hates me and keeps not his compact with me, I will make a number of gods and fill the world with them, so that they who seek the true God shall not be able to find him. " Thus she filled the world with idolatry; men ceased to adore the Lord of Creation, for Hyle had drawn them all to herself
Fertility Cult - Sacral sexual intercourse by priests and priestesses or by cult prostitutes was an act of worship intended to emulate the gods and share in their powers of procreation or else an act of imitative magic by which the gods were compelled to preserve the earth's fertility (1 Kings 14:23 ; 1 Kings 15:12 ; Hosea 4:14 ). Rather, the ability of plants and animals to reproduce their own kind was rooted in Creation (Genesis 1:11-12 ,Genesis 1:11-12,1:22 ,Genesis 1:22,1:28 )
Revelation - When people humbly submit to God in faith, they see him revealing himself to them through nature (Genesis 9:13-16; Psalms 29:3-10; Habakkuk 3; Matthew 6:26; Matthew 6:30; see also Creation; NATURE)
Desert - It could be described like the original chaos prior to Creation (Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Jeremiah 4:23-26 )
World - In the Bible, as in ordinary speech, ‘the world’ may refer to the physical world of God’s Creation or to the people who inhabit that world (Psalms 90:2; Psalms 98:7; Psalms 98:9; Matthew 25:34; John 3:16; Romans 10:18)
Hand - The Hand of God appears in the activities of Creation (Acts 7:50, Hebrews 1:10; Ep
Hymenaeus - For, when you release the world, you yourselves are not undone, but are lords over Creation and over all corruption
Hermes (1) Trismegistus, Writings of Unknown Authorship - First, the endeavour to take an intellectual survey of the whole spiritual universe, without marking any points where the understanding of man fails and has to retire unsatisfied; this is a disposition which, under different forms and at different times, has been called Pantheism or Gnosticism (though the Gnostic idea of an evil element in Creation nowhere appears in these treatises)
Moon - The great luminary of the night, formed by JEHOVAH on the fourth day of Creation, (Genesis 1:14-19) Philosophers speaks much of this planet, in respect of its magnitude, form, phases, tides, etc
River; Wadi - This passage appears to be a literary allusion to the pagan concept of the Creation and structure of the world—the next verse is “Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord?” ( Millennium - ...
The Spirit will be poured out on all flesh, and Creation, now groaning and travailing in pain, will be delivered from the bondage of corruption
Nestorians - In the sixteenth century the Nestorians were divided into two sects; for in 1551 a warm dispute arose among them about the Creation of a new patriarch, Simeon Barmamas, or Barmana, being proposed by one party, and Sulaka, otherwise named Siud, earnestly desired by the other; when the latter, to support his pretensions the more effectually, repaired to Rome, and was consecrated patriarch in 1553, by Pope Julius III, whose jurisdiction he had acknowledged, and to whose commands he had promised unlimited submission and obedience
Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ - His body was formed in the virgin's womb; but his human soul, they suppose, was the first and most excellent of all the works of God; was brought into existence before the Creation of the world, and subsisted in happy union in heaven with the second person of the Godhead, till his incarnation
Light - They display, for instance, not the image of the spring, of Aurora, of the dreary night, but the sun and stars as rising with increased splendour in a new Creation, or again involved in chaos and primeval darkness
Hand - The Hand of God appears in the activities of Creation (Acts 7:50, Hebrews 1:10; Ep
Julianus, Bishop of Cos - "For where were assembled so many bishops, where were present the holy Gospels, where was so much united prayer, there, we believe, was also present with invisible power the author of all Creation" (Labbe, iv
Trinity - Since, therefore, Elohim is plural, and no plural can consist of less than two in number, and since Creation can alone be the work of Deity, we are to understand by this term so particularly used in this place, God the Father, and the eternal Logos, or Word of God; that Logos whom St. ...
Elohim seems to be the general appellation by which the Triune Godhead is collectively distinguished in Scripture; and in the concise history of the Creation only, the expression, bara Elohim, "the Gods created," is used above thirty times. But, in reality, the reverse is the fact; for in Deuteronomy 32:15 ; Deuteronomy 32:17 , and other places, he uses the singular number of this very noun to express the Deity, though not employed in the August work of Creation: "He forsook God," Eloah; "they sacrificed to devils, not to God," Eloah. From the enumeration of these circumstances, it must be sufficiently evident to the mind which unites piety and reflection, that so far from being silent upon the subject, the ancient Scriptures commence with an avowal of this doctrine, and that, in fact, the Creation was the result of the joint operations of the Trinity. In the first place it is highly degrading to the Supreme Majesty to suppose he would take his model of speaking and thinking from man, though it is highly consistent with the vanity of man to arrogate to himself, as doubtless was the case in the licentiousness of succeeding ages, the style and imagined conceptions of Deity; and it will be remembered, that these solemn words were spoken before the Creation of any of those mortals, whose false notions of greatness and sublimity the Almighty is thus impiously supposed to adopt. "Behold, the man is become as one of us;" a very singular expression, which some Jewish commentators, with equal effrontery, contend was spoken by the Deity to the council of angels, that, according to their assertions, attended him at the Creation
Adam - The manner in which the Creation of Adam is narrated indicates something peculiar and eminent in the being to be formed. Everything therefore, as to man's Creation, is given in a solemn and deliberative form, and contains also an intimation of a Trinity of Persons in the Godhead, all equally possessed of creative power, and therefore Divine, to each of whom man was to stand in relations the most sacred and intimate:—"And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion," &c. " In these passages the Apostle represents the change produced in true Christians by the Gospel, as a "renewal of the image of God in man; as a new or second Creation in that image;" and he explicitly declares, that that image consists in "knowledge," in "righteousness," and in "true holiness. "...
This also may be finally argued from the satisfaction with which the historian of the Creation represents the Creator as viewing the works of his hands as "very good," which was pronounced with reference to each of them individually, as well as to the whole: "And God saw every thing that he had made, and behold it was very good. Every thing good in the Creation must always be a miniature representation of the excellence of the Creator; but, in this case, the "goodness," that is, the perfection, of every creature, according to the part it was designed to act in the general assemblage of beings collected into our system, wholly forbids us to suppose that the image of God's moral perfections in man was a blurred and dim representation
Miracle - The Bible begins with one of God's greatest miracles—the Creation of the universe out of nothing. However literally the various details are taken, Genesis 1-2 primarily describes not the "how" but the "who" of Creation. Humanity is categorically distinct from the rest of Creation by virtue of being created in the image of God ( Genesis 1:26-28 ). Hyers, The Meaning of Creation ; R
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - The foundation of the unity of the Bible is the belief that the sixty-six books of the Bible encode God's self-disclosure of himself and his will to his Creation. It is also interesting that the Gospel authored by the apostle John (assuming he also authored Revelation) focuses on the Creation motif in its prologue. The Bible opens in Genesis 1-3 with a narrative on Creation, fall, and redemption
Chronology - , are thus differently given in the Septuagint, the Hebrew, and the Samaritan Pentateuch:...
Septuagint...
Hebrew...
Samaritan...
Flood after Creation...
2262...
1656...
1307...
Peleg's birth...
401...
101...
401...
Abram's departure from Haran...
616...
266...
616...
3279...
2023...
2324...
Hales takes the long system mainly from the Septuagint account of the patriarchal generations. The rabbinical system is partly accepted in Germany; it takes the Biblical numbers, but makes arbitrary corrections:...
Hales...
Ussher...
Creation...
5411...
4004...
Flood...
3155...
2348...
Abram leaving Haran...
2078...
1921...
Exodus...
1648...
1491...
Foundation of the temple...
1027...
1012...
Destruction of the temple...
586...
588...
The differences between the Hebrew and the Septuagint consist in the periods assigned by them respectively to the patriarchs before and after the births of their oldest sons. Adam's Creation he makes 5361 or 5421
Genesis, Theology of - This concerns not only the Creation of the physical universe and living things, but also the origin of both human evil and of the diverse, competing nations of the present world order. Poetic and wisdom texts also reflect on the doctrine of Creation. Garrett...
See also Abraham ; Adam ; Create, Creation ; Eve ; Fall, the ; Flood, the ...
Bibliography
Brotherhood (2) - This is the more likely in view of such OT passages as Genesis 1:26-28; Genesis 9:5-7, Job 31:13-15, and Malachi 2:10 (which regard it as a corollary of our Creation by the one God and Father), and Leviticus 19:18; Leviticus 19:34 (which not only commands love of neighbour, but also explicitly enjoins like love for the stranger). A new Creation is necessary (Galatians 6:15). Elsewhere the change is called a new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17, Galatians 6:15, Ephesians 2:10), of which Christ is the beginning (Revelation 3:14, Colossians 1:18)
Sabbath - The idea of the Sabbath as a covenant between Jahweh and Israel, which is elaborated in Ezekiel and the code called the Law of Holiness, is foreshadowed in Deuteronomy 5:15 ; and even the more imposing conception of it as a memorial of the Creation finds expression in Exodus 20:11 , which is quite possibly of older date than the Priestly account of Creation in Genesis 1:1-31
Devil - His assuming an animal form, that of a serpent, and the fact of death existing in the pre-Adamite world, imply that evil probably was introduced by him in some way unknown to us, affecting the lower Creation before man's Creation
Cherub (1) - ...
In Revelation 5:9-12 the four living creatures (zooa , not theeria , "beasts") identify themselves as the redeemed (All Creation is summed up in man its lord; from whence Christ's command, "preach the gospel to every creature," for man's redemption involves the restoration of the creature now subject to vanity: Romans 8) "Thou wast slain and hast redeemed us to God by Thy blood out of every kindred and tongue . "...
In Revelation the four living creatures represent the elect redeemed, as they shall be when perfected, ministering as king-priests unto God, and media of blessing to the redeemed earth with its nations and its animal Creation
Fall - The story of the Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 is the immediate sequel to the account of man’s Creation with which the Jahwistic document opens (see Creation)
Spirituality - Furthermore, such attitudes fly in the face of appropriating the Christian doctrine of the Creation and the incarnation. We are baptized into Christ: We die to sin and the "old man" and we are made alive to God as a new Creation (Romans 6:3-11 ; 2 Corinthians 5:17 )
Elements - ) refers to the Creation of the angels of the face (or presence), and the angels who cry ‘holy,’ the angels of the spirit of wind and of hail, of thunder and of lightning, of heat and of cold, of each of the seasons, of dawn and of evening, etc. , ‘Levi,’ 4, where it is said that on the Judgment Day all Creation will be troubled and the invisible spirits melt away (καὶ τῶν ἀοράτων πνευμἀτων τηκομένων)
Africanus, Julius - His great work, a comparative view of sacred and profane history from the Creation of the world, demanded extensive reading; and the fragments that remain refer to the works of a considerable number of historical writers. Africanus set himself to make a complete synopsis of sacred and profane history from the Creation, and to establish a synchronism between the two
Language - I own it imaginable that they might: but still, till that end were attained in perfection, which possibly, might not be in a series of many generations, it must be owned that brutes were better dealt by, and could better attain all the ends of their Creation. And therefore, as certain as it can be, that man was made perfect and happy, and that God is wise and good; so certain is it, that, when Adam and Eve were formed, they were immediately enabled by God to converse and communicate their thoughts, in all the perfection of language necessary to all the ends of their Creation
Shekinah - Though at first regarded as impersonal and passive, as distinct from the Memra, the agent of Creation, in the Talmud it becomes active and takes the place of the latter
Seal - The Christian is marked as a "new self, " a "re-creation" of God (Ephesians 4:24 ), indwelt by the Holy Spirit
Blessedness - The original experience of Adam and Eve in Eden is a blessedness derived from a Creation in which God provides for their spiritual well-being with his companionship and their physical needs with the garden's trees (Genesis 2 )
Marriage - And I think it very plain, from the New Testament doctrine upon this subject, that from the very first order of things, even from the Creation, the spiritual marriage and unity between Christ and his church was all along respected by the marriage-state, and uniformly intended to be shadowed forth
Adoption - The adoption process will be finalized when God restores all Creation, giving His children resurrection bodies (Romans 8:23 )
Aristeas - ’ Lombroso was the first to show that the ‘author was well acquainted with the details of court life in the times of the Ptolemies’; and recent researches have confirmed this; on the other hand, there are interesting connexions with the Greek of the NT; compare καταβολή used absolutely for ‘creation’ (Matthew 13:35 and Aristeas, § 129 Cease - The “sabbath” was the covenant sign of God’s lordship over the Creation
Behmenists - How and what angels and men were in their Creation; that they are in and from God, his real offspring; that their life begun in and from this divine fire, which is the Father of Light, generating a birth of light in their souls; from both which proceeds the Holy Spirit, or breath of divine love, in the triune creature, as it does in the triune Creator
Feasts - God appointed several festivals, or days of rest and worship, among the Jews, to perpetuate the memory of great events wrought in favor of them: the Sabbath commemorated the Creation of the world; the Passover, the departure out of Egypt; the Pentecost, the law given at Sinai, etc
Jesus Christ - 1, and four thousand years after the Creation of Adam
Pen'Tateuch, the, - The work, beginning with the record of Creation end the history of the primitive world, passes on to deal more especially with the early history of the Jewish family, and finally concludes with Moses' last discourses and his death
Angels - ...
Good and bad angels...
At some time before the Creation of humans, some of the angels, under the leadership of one who became known as Satan, rebelled against God and so fell from their original sinless state (2 Peter 2:4; Judges 1:6)
Evil - )...
Human nature...
God created the world good and he wanted the people of his Creation to enjoy it with him (Genesis 1:31; 1 Timothy 4:4; Hebrews 4:4; Hebrews 4:10)
Paradox - We believe that if we could apprehend the whole truth, if we could understand through and through the whole meaning and purpose of Creation, we could express these truths in a manner that would not shock our reason
Mediator - ’ The Son of God is more ancient than all Creation, and ‘through him all things were made’ (1 Corinthians 8:6). Paul insists upon the mediatorial work of the Son of God in both Creation and redemption. He declares that the Son is the ‘image’ or adequate counterpart of the Father, and the ‘firstborn of all Creation,’ i. , not the first being created, but, as the context shows, ‘born before all Creation’ (Colossians 1:15-16). All things were created in Him, since their existence was conditioned by His thought; by Him, since it was through His power that they came into being; unto Him, since all Creation finds in Him the summit of its evolution
God, Name of - ...
As God's image-bearer Adam imitated God's creative speech by naming the Creation (Genesis 2:19-20 ): this naming gave expression to the order in the universe and showed Adam's understanding of the character, place, and function of the animals. The "Name" became a hypostasis for God, an alternative realization of his presence, but freed from the corporeal and physical notions associated with "glory theology"; this substitute way of speaking thus preserved the transcendence of God above and beyond the Creation
Freedom - The fourth commandment, for example, had reference not only to God's resting on the seventh day of Creation (Exodus 20:8-11 ), but also to the liberation of Israel from the hands of Egypt (Deuteronomy 5:12-15 ). Our final liberation is yet to come, when we receive the full adoption of sons, when even our bodies are redeemed, and when the whole Creation will be freed from its bondage and decay and brought into the glorious freedom of the children of God (Romans 8:18-23 )
Hymns - It is addressed to God as Almighty, and evokes the response of the elders, who in the words ‘our God’ claim ‘a rotation to Him which the Creation as such cannot claim’ (H. ...
In 5:12 the angels offer a fuller doxology to the Lamb, and the response of all Creation with a fourfold doxology, and of the living creatures with the familiar ‘Amen’ which ended the eucharistic thanksgiving of the Church on earth, is ‘highly suggestive of the devotional attitude of the Asiatic Church in the time of Domitian towards the Person of Christ’ (Swete, op
Omniscience - But wherever there is wisdom there must be knowledge; and as the wisdom of God in the Creation consists in the formation of things which, by themselves, or in combination with others, shall produce certain effects, and that in a variety of operation which is to us boundless, the previous knowledge of the possible qualities and effects inevitably supposes a knowledge which can have no limit. For as Creation out of nothing argues a power which is omnipotent; so the knowledge of the possibilities of things which are not (a knowledge which, from the effect, we are sure must exist in God,) argues that such a Being must be omniscient
Colossians - He meant to present Jesus as fully God incarnate (Colossians 1:15 ,Colossians 1:15,1:19 ), as supreme Lord over all Creation (Colossians 1:15-17 ), as supreme Lord of the church (Colossians 1:18 ), and as the only Source of reconciliation (Colossians 1:20 ). Christ, having reconciled all Creation to God and embodying the fullness of God, is supreme in the church (Colossians 1:18-20 )
Philosophy - The doctrines of Creation and Providence, of an infinite divine person and of a responsible human will, which elsewhere form the ultimate limits of speculation, are here assumed at the outset. On the one aide are gods regardless of material things, on the other a Being permeating and vivifying all Creation
Holy Ghost - The Spirit is represented as an agent in Creation, "moving upon the face of the waters;" and it forms no objection to the argument, that Creation is ascribed to the Father, and also to the Son, but is a great confirmation of it. That Creation should be effected by all the three Persons of the Godhead, though acting in different respects, yet so that each should be a Creator, and, therefore, both a Person and a divine Person, can be explained only by their unity in one essence. " This is farther confirmed by Job 33:4 : "The Spirit of God hath made me, and the breath of the Almighty hath given me life;" where the second clause is obviously exegetic of the former: and the whole text proves that, in the patriarchal age, the followers of the true religion ascribed Creation to the Spirit, as well as to the Father; and that one of his appellations was, "the Breath of the Almighty. Again: If the personality of the Son and the Spirit be allowed, and yet it is contended that they were but instruments in Creation, through whom the creative power of another operated, but which creative power was not possessed by them; on this hypothesis, too, neither the Spirit nor the Son can be said to create, any more than Moses created the serpent into which his rod was turned, and the Scriptures are again contradicted. To this association of the three Persons in creative acts, may be added a like association in acts of preservation, which has been well called a continued Creation, and by that term is expressed in the following passage: "These wait all upon thee, that thou mayest give them their meat in due season
Covenant - God's covenant with Noah was not a divine afterthought to the flood, a way of making up to His Creation for all the destruction. That priority on and protection of life remains the foundation of God's relationship with His Creation. Within the covenant agreement, God included the Sabbath covenant, Israel's perpetual promise to observe the seventh day as a day of rest, reflecting God's practice in Creation (Exodus 31:16 )
Virgin Birth - ...
The reason for this divine intervention is for the redemptive well-being of Creation: more specifically, as Jesus' name implies, "to save his people from their sins" (Matthew 1:21 ). ...
In contrast to the promiscuous stories of Greek mythology in which male offspring appear as by-products of liaisons between the gods and earthly women, the virgin birth as God's creative work in no way compromises or offends his holiness or his supreme lordship over all Creation. The virgin birth reveals that God cares for his Creation in the way he actively carries out a plan for its restoration
Birds - The term oph occurs repeatedly in the Creation narrative of Genesis 1:1 and Genesis 2:1 ( Genesis 1:20-21 , Genesis 1:22 , Genesis 1:26 , Genesis 1:28 , Genesis 1:30 ; Genesis 2:19-20 ). Biblical writers cite the raven as an example of God's care for His Creation (Job 38:41 ; Psalm 147:9 ; Luke 12:24 ). The God who cares for all of His Creation, even the insignificant sparrow, certainly cares for people
Woman - The Creation narratives in Genesis foreshadow two different perspectives regarding woman. Woman is not in an inferior place in Creation. This account is often cited as supportive of the view that woman should remain subject to man since she has a subordinate position in Creation, but the narrative describes woman as a “suitable partner” (Genesis 2:20 REB) for whom man leaves his family
Wealth - All wealth originally formed part of God's good Creation, over which humans were given dominion (Genesis 1:26 ). But although fallen humanity has used wealth for great evils, God will redeem his originally good purposes in Creation in the new heavens and earth when all wealth will be used for godly ends (21:24). Yet one day, wealth, like the rest of Creation, will be restored to its true and perfect place in God's designs to recreate the cosmos
Art, Christian - Religion however still inspired important movements in art, as in the Creation of what was called the "Jesuit style" in architecture, typified by the Gesu in Rome, a protest against Reformation coldness; or in the German return to primitive religious simplicity, inaugurated early in the 19th century by Overbeck and the Nazarenes, Schadow and the School of Dusseldorf
Christian Art - Religion however still inspired important movements in art, as in the Creation of what was called the "Jesuit style" in architecture, typified by the Gesu in Rome, a protest against Reformation coldness; or in the German return to primitive religious simplicity, inaugurated early in the 19th century by Overbeck and the Nazarenes, Schadow and the School of Dusseldorf
Nature - God is the owner of nature (Psalms 24:1-2; see Creation), and people are answerable to God for the way they treat it (Genesis 2:15; Psalms 8:6-8)
Wisdom - Wisdom existed long before the Creation of the human race
Deluge - Its history is given by Moses, Genesis 6:7 : Its time is fixed by the best chronologers to the year from the Creation 1656, answering to the year before Christ 2293
Justice - The Old Testament looks forward to the time when God will exercise absolute justice over all Creation (Psalm 98:9 ; Ecclesiastes 3:16 ; Isaiah 28:5-6 ; 29:19-21 )
Responsibility - Initially, God gave humans the responsibility of multiplying, subduing the earth, and having dominion over Creation (Genesis 1:28 )
Soul - " The same Hebrew term is then applied to the Creation of humankind in Genesis 2:7 , where dust is vitalized by the breath of God and becomes a "living being
Mercy - ...
"This merciful temper will show and exert itself not only towards those of our own party and acquaintance, but to the whole human species; and not only to the whole human species, but to the animal Creation
Glory - Hence, when the Lord is speaking of the great works of Creation, in creating the heavens and stretching them out, and spreading forth the earth; and also of the wonders of redemption by his Son; he confirms the oneness in nature, work, and design of Christ, and the adoration due to him as one with himself; and saith, "I am the Lord, that is my name, and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images
Job - It teaches the being and perfections of God, his Creation of all things, and his universal providence; the apostasy and guilt of evil spirits and of mankind; the mercy of God, on the basis of a sacrifice, and on condition of repentance and faith, Job 33:27-30 42:6,8 ; the immortality of the soul, and the resurrection of the body, Job 14:7-15 19:25-27
Sculpture - Religion however still inspired important movements in art, as in the Creation of what was called the "Jesuit style" in architecture, typified by the Gesu in Rome, a protest against Reformation coldness; or in the German return to primitive religious simplicity, inaugurated early in the 19th century by Overbeck and the Nazarenes, Schadow and the School of Dusseldorf
Fall (2) - Christ is here presented in relation to the Universe as ‘the firstborn of all Creation,’ in whom and unto whom all things were created, in whom all things hold together, and who becomes also the ‘head of the body, the Church,’ and ‘the firstborn from the dead. Christ is at once the Alpha and the Omega, the medium and the end of Creation, the beginning and the consummation of God’s eternal purpose. The view of the question before us which is most worthy of a true conception of God, and which at the same time agrees with the broad teaching of Scripture, is that in the infinite counsels of Him who sees the end from the beginning, Redemption is wrought into the very fabric of God’s eternal purpose, all parts of which—Creation, Redemption, Incarnation, Atonement, the Final Consummation,—hang together harmoniously as integral and correlated elements in one homogeneous, perfect, and unchangeable unity. 319–327; Westcott, The Gospel of Creation
Regeneration - The doctrine, nevertheless, is a thoroughly Scriptural one, and the change in question is expressed by a great variety of terms and phrases: ‘born,’ ‘born anew,’ ‘a new Creation,’ ‘renewed,’ ‘quickened,’ etc. ); as a new Creation ( 2 Corinthians 5:21 ); as a being raised from the dead ( Ephesians 2:5-6 )
Ten Commandments - The reason for keeping the Sabbath, God’s rest after Creation, is clearly based on Genesis 2:1-3 , which belongs to the post-exilic Priestly Code (P World - ...
(2) But the most frequent term for ‘world’ is kosmos , which is sometimes extended in meaning to the material universe, as in the phrases ‘from the beginning (‘foundation,’ ‘creation’) of the world’ ( e. Matthew 24:21 ; Matthew 25:34 , Hebrews 4:6 , Romans 1:20 ; for the implied thought of Divine Creation cf
Gnosticism - Although wide variations existed among the many gnostic sects in the details of systems, certain major features were common to most of them—the separation of the god of Creation from the god of redemption; the division of Christians into categories with one group being superior; the stress on secret teachings which only divine persons could comprehend; and the exaltation of knowledge over faith. ...
Gnostics generally distinguished between an inferior god whom they felt was responsible for the Creation and the superior god revealed in Jesus as the Redeemer
Flesh - By virtue of being God's Creation flesh is good, like all other parts of God's Creation ( Job 10:8-12 ; Psalm 119:73 ; Isaiah 45:12 )
Tatianus - For the Lord of all, being Himself the substance (ὑπόστασις ) of all, in so far that Creation had not yet taken place, was alone; but in so far as He was Himself all power, and the substance of things visible and invisible, all things were with Him: (and thus) with Him by Logos-power (διὰ λογιχῆς δυνάμεως ), the very Logos Himself, Who was in Him, subsisted (ὑπέστησε ). What persuaded me in these books was the simplicity of the language, the inartificial style of the writers, the noble explanation of Creation, the predictions of the future, the excellence of the precepts, and the assertion of the government of all by One Being. Tatian's doctrine about the Creation is in c. In the Creation itself he recognizes two stages (c. 60) speak directly of His share in the Creation; he rather leads up to His work and office as "the Minister of the suffering God" (c
Covenant - ...
COVENANT OF WORKS, the constitution under which Adam was placed at his Creation
Divination And Magic - In Enuma Elish, the Babylonian Creation Story, the god of wisdom, Ea, killed his father Apsu, god of the fresh river waters, after reciting a spell
Resurrection - In resurrection, God's new Creation will reach completion (2 Corinthians 5:17-21 )
Feasts - The Sabbath ordinances are treated in Exodus 20:11 ; Exodus 31:17 as designed to commemorate the completion of Creation, but Deuteronomy 5:14-15 connects them with the redemption from Egypt, and Exodus 23:12 ascribes them to humanitarian motives
Inspiration - 360) or Spirit of God, who is active in Creation ( Genesis 1:2 , Psalms 104:30 ), is imparted to man that the dust may become living soul ( Genesis 2:7 ), is the source of exceptional powers of body ( Judges 6:34 ; Judges 14:6 ; Judges 14:19 ) or skill ( Exodus 35:31 ); but is pre-eminently manifest in prophecy (wh
New Command - This fact is proven by the centrality of the concept of newness for New Testament theology: new teaching (Mark 1:27 ; Acts 17:19 ); new wine and new wineskins (Luke 5:37-39 ); new commandment (John 13:34 ; 1 John 2:7-8 ; 2 John 5 ); new covenant ( Luke 22:20 ; 1 Corinthians 11:25 ; 2 Corinthians 3:6 ; Hebrews 8:8,13 ; 9:15 ; 12:24 ); new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ; Galatians 6:15 ); new self (Ephesians 2:15 ; 4:24 ; Colossians 3:10 ); new heaven and new earth (2 Peter 3:13 ; Revelation 21:1 ); new name (Revelation 2:17 ; 3:12 ); new Jerusalem (Revelation 3:12 ; 21:2 ); new song (Revelation 5:9 ; 14:3 ); and all things new (Revelation 21:5 )
Presence of God - Fear and trembling are proper responses before the One who controls all Creation (Jeremiah 5:22 )
Jairus - ’ He rejects its identification with OT יָאִיר, and yet he does not hesitate to explain it by reference to יָצִיר, simply because the meaning of the latter term, as he gives it (‘he will awaken’), suits his theory of a fanciful Creation to fit the drift of the story
Will - The sovereignty of God is deepened in a radically personal way when Creation is climaxed by persons who possess wills that can choose to either obey or disobey, to love or not to love
Evolution - In spite of this many writers accept widespread evolution as a fact and so represent it to the public (Creation by Evolution, edited by Frances Mason)
Host - 2:1 tsâbâ' includes the heavens, the earth, and everything in the Creation: “Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them
Eusebius of Alexandria, a Writer of Sermons - He uses the ordinary Eastern phrase, "Christ our God," speaks of Him as Maker of the world, as Master of the Creation, as present from the beginning with the prophets, and as the Lord of Isaiah's vision
Bible, Theology of - The doctrine of God begins in the Old Testament with the work of God in Creation. This means that God has created a spiritual being, made primarily to live in fellowship with God and act responsibly in maintaining God's Creation. ...
The Bible points to a time of ultimate fulfillment when God shall complete what He has been doing in this world from the beginning of Creation
Soul - Wisdom of Solomon 8:19 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ); others (mainly orthodox Rabbis) in its Creation at the Creation of the world (cf. ); others in its premundane Creation (Slavonic Enoch 23:5); others (perhaps the majority) in its concreation with the body, which is apparently the doctrine of the OT (Isaiah 44:2; Isaiah 44:24; Isaiah 49:1; Isaiah 49:5, Job 31:15). † Will of God - God's will is as vast as his entire plan for Creation, and from the standpoint of objective content, it seems to be settled and unchanging. The impression created is that he has worked and continues to interact with his Creation according to a design. ...
The will of God is not simply a passive plan, the blueprint for his Creation
Soul - Wisdom of Solomon 8:19 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ); others (mainly orthodox Rabbis) in its Creation at the Creation of the world (cf. ); others in its premundane Creation (Slavonic Enoch 23:5); others (perhaps the majority) in its concreation with the body, which is apparently the doctrine of the OT (Isaiah 44:2; Isaiah 44:24; Isaiah 49:1; Isaiah 49:5, Job 31:15). † Jesus Christ - His teachings were about “the Father,” what He wanted, what He was like, what He would do for His Creation. With the one shattering new act since Creation, God raised Jesus from the dead
Fulfillment - Even if it is plain that God was acting as the causative agent, as in Creation, for example, all that can be said with certainty is that there was a consistently high quality of power and planning that guided the process in all of its phases, and that quality controls ("and God saw that it was good") were being exercised at certain intervals. ...
This relationship, however, not only draws human beings into the privileged position of participating in God's will for earth's inhabitants, but also in a more narrowly defined sense establishes them as individual messengers of God's purposes for his Creation
Evil (2) - He believed that there is a glorious goal to which the whole Creation is moving. In one passage He calls it Creation’s new birth (παλινγενεσία, Matthew 19:28); but His usual term for it is the ‘Kingdom of God’ (or of Heaven): ‘Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father’ (Matthew 13:43). Before man existed, there were myriads of finite spirits, higher in the order of Creation than he, and of these some fell from their original innocence and became devils
Work - The psalmist was overwhelmed with the majesty of the Lord, as he looked at God’s “work” of Creation: “When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained” ( Creation”)
Gnostics - These successive aeons or emanations appear to have been inferior each to the preceding; and their existence was indispensable to the Gnostic scheme, that they might account for the Creation of the world without making God the author of evil. For, let the intermediate aeons be as many as the wildest imagination could devise, still God was the remote, if not the proximate, cause of Creation
Circumcision - What was fundamentally important in God's sight was being a "new Creation" (Galatians 6:15 ) and keeping God's commandments (1 Corinthians 7:19 ), apart from which circumcision or uncircumcision are meaningless, and allowing faith to work through love (Galatians 5:6 )
Behmenists - How and what angels and men were in their Creation; that they are in and from God, his real offspring; that their life begun in and from this divine fire which is the Father of light, generating a birth of light in the Holy Spirit, or breath of divine love in the triune creature, as it does in the triune Creator
Adoption - By Creation Adam (Luke 3:38) and all men (Acts 17:28-29) are sons of God; by adoption only believers (1 Corinthians 12:3)
Judgment Day - The Hebrew mishpat brings together the ideas of judging and ruling into a single concept focused in the authority of God as Sovereign over the nation of Israel and over Creation
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - It is clear that from the very moment of the Creation of this world that Satan and fallen angels were on the scene, rebels against God
Marriage - The institution of marriage dates from the time of man's original Creation
Samaria, Samaritans - They also believed that 6,000 years after Creation, a Restorer would arise and would live on earth for 110 years
Foreigner - The Creation account records the first human residence in the garden of Eden
Blood - This links all human beings together as a separate group from all the animal Creation and proves the fallacy and the false character of the hypothesis of "evolution
Serpent - (See Job 26:13; Isaiah 27:1)...
The whole tenor of Scripture, therefore being directed to set forth the devil under this image and figure of the serpent, there appears a beautiful analogy between the brazen serpent lifted, up in the wilderness at the command of God, and the Lord Jesus lifted up on the cross for the salvation of his people by the same authority—and for this plain reason, because none but the serpent of all the creatures in the Creation of God was cursed; and therefore none but the serpent among the creatures of God could be the suitable type or figure to represent Christ when redeeming, his people from the curse of the law, "being made a curse for them
Lucifer - Some have supposed it refered to the morning star, because to the name Lucifer is added "son of the morning;" and in confirmation they refer to that passage, (Job 38:7) where at the Creation, the morning stars are said "to have sung together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy
Bless - Thus the whole Creation is shown to depend upon God for its continued existence and function (cf
Son of Man - ...
The kingdom shall be "under the whole heaven," on earth (Daniel 7:18; Daniel 7:27); He shall reign with them as the Son of man, Head of the new Creation, and Restorer of man's lost inheritance
Building - -‘But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building’ (Authorized Version ); better Revised Version ‘but Christ having come a high priest of the good things that are come (Revised Version margin), through the greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this Creation (οὐ ταύτης τῆς κτίσεως)
Shem - Methuselah and Shem were the two links between Adam and Isaac, so that the record of Creation and man's fall came to Isaac on the testimony of the original chief actor, transmitted by only two intervening links
Tree - This beautiful plant of GOD's design and Creation is used in many ways in the Scripture
Set On, Set Up - 4:11“Who hath made man’s mouth? or who maketh the dumb, or deaf …?” The first nuance here signifies the Creation of the thing (fixing its nature) and the second its disposition (fixing its use; cf
Land - ...
The word often represents the whole surface of this planet and, together with the word “heavens,” describes the entire physical Creation and everything in it
Marcus, a Gnostic - This knowledge included the possession of formulae by the use of which the initiated would after death become incomprehensible and invisible to principalities and powers and leaving their bodies in this lower Creation and their souls with the Demiurge ascend in their spirits to the Pleroma
Building - -‘But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building’ (Authorized Version ); better Revised Version ‘but Christ having come a high priest of the good things that are come (Revised Version margin), through the greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this Creation (οὐ ταύτης τῆς κτίσεως)
Basilides, Gnostic Sect Founder - the lost Hypotyposes, the exposition of the higher doctrine ( τῆς κατὰ τὴν ἐποπτικὴν θεωρίαν γνώσεως ,—τὴν τῷ ὄντι γνωστικὴν φυσιολογίαν ) belonging to the department of knowledge which the Stoics called Physics, beginning with the Creation and leading up to Theology proper (Strom. " Then all the heavenly or ethereal Creation (apparently included in the Ogdoad), as far down as the moon, was made by the Great Archon, inspired by his wiser son (23). When the whole world had been finished and the things above the world and nothing was lacking there remained in the seed-mass the third sonship which had been left behind to do good and receive good in the seed; and it was needful that the sonship thus left behind should be revealed (Rom_8:19) and restored up yonder above the Limitary Spirit to join the subtle and imitative sonship and the not-being One as it is written "And the Creation itself groaneth together and travaileth together expecting the revelation of the sons of God. "Because therefore it was needful that we the children of God should be revealed, concerning whom the Creation groaned and travailed, expecting the revelation, the Gospel came into the world, and passed through every principality and power and lordship, and every name that is named. When every sonship has arrived above the Limitary Spirit, "then the Creation shall find mercy, for till now it groans and is tormented and awaits the
Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs - They were of both sexes, and their species was propagated through cohabitation with Adam and Eve during a period of 130 years after the Creation. ...
There are also demons of a lower grade, those, namely, who came into being during the 130 years after the Creation, and who are semi-human;‡ Alpha And Omega (2) - Thus in Revelation 1:17; Revelation 2:8 the Isaian title ‘the first and the last’ is applied to Christ, and in Revelation 3:14 He is called ‘the Amen … the beginning of the Creation of God. ’ Apocalyptic eschatology demanded a representative ‘Son,’ the ‘Beloved,’ chosen ‘in the beginning’ to be head of the ‘Beloved’ people of ‘sons’ in the end, with at least as much logical urgency as speculative cosmology demanded an agent of the Creation itself. Cosmologically, He is the precreative Wisdom, ‘the firstborn of all Creation, in whom all things were created’ (cf
Angels (2) - They are sons of God by Creation and by obedience (Job 1:6; Job 2:1; Job 38:7). They ‘do not owe their existence to the ordinary process of filiation, but to an immediate act of Creation’ (Godet, OT Studies, 7); thus resembling in their origin the bodily nature of those who are ‘sons of the resurrection. The Book of Jubilees, a pre-Christian work extensively read, affirms (Jubilees 1:27) that Moses was taught by Gabriel concerning Creation and the things narrated in Genesis; that angels taught Noah herbal remedies (Jubilees 10:12), and brought to Jacob seven tablets recording the history of his posterity (Jubilees 32:21)
Salvation - ...
Salvation is described as the mystery of God that is now revealed (Ephesians 3:9 ; 6:19 ), a plan conceived before the foundations of the world (Ephesians 1:3-14 ), a light for revelation to the Gentiles (1618103866_7 ), a transition from death to life (Romans 5:8-103 ), a message especially for sinners (Mark 2:17 ), a gift of grace through faith not of works (Ephesians 2:8-9 ), that for which the whole Creation groans (Romans 8:22 ), the revelation of God's righteousness to faith and for faith (Romans 1:16-17 ), the justification that comes through faith (Romans 4:22-25 ), reconciliation (2 Corinthians 5:18-19 ), and redemption (Romans 8:23 ). Salvation means death to and freedom from sin (Romans 6 ), a new perspective that transcends the human point of view and participation in a new Creation (Romans 5:16-17 ), peace with God (Romans 5:1 ), life as adopted children of God's (Galatians 4:4 ), baptism into Christ's death (Romans 6:4 ), and the reception of the Holy Spirit (Romans 5,8 )
Proverbs, Theology of - Unlike Moses, who spoke to God face to face, and the prophets, to whom he gave visions and dreams (Numbers 12:6-8 ), the Lord "spoke" to Solomon and other inspired sages such as Agur (Proverbs 30:1 ) and King Lemuel (31:1) through their observations of Creation and humanity. In other words, the inspired sage observes that within the fallen Creation there is a principle of entropy that destroys life, but with discipline one can overcome the threatening chaos
Death - One of man’s first needs was a word to denote that stark fact of experience the final cessation of life to which he and the whole animated Creation, and the very trees and plants, were all subject. The Creation narratives are silent on this point, yet in Genesis 2:17 man is expected to know what it is to die
Flood - This was a matter of deep regret and sorrow, but the purpose invested in human Creation was not to be thwarted
Truth - The great confession given by Ezra after the Jews returned from bondage in Babylon emphasized God's nature as truth (faithfulness) in what He did in Creation, election, redemption, and the giving of the law: “You came down also upon Mount Sinai, and spoke with them from heaven and gave them right ordinances and true laws, good statutes and commandments, and you made known your holy sabbath to them and gave them commandments and statutes and a law through your servant Moses” (Nehemiah 9:13-14 NRSV)
Fatherhood of God - For Paul this fatherhood is based not so much on God's role in Creation but rather on the redemption and reconciliation he has made available in Jesus Christ
Sex, Biblical Teaching on - Positively, God blesses sex for both companionship and procreation (Genesis 1:28 ; Genesis 2:18-25 ). The new Creation in Christ makes this possible. Within the limits of marriage, sex is for procreation of children, the enhancement of the one-flesh relationship, and the pleasure of the married couple whose love can be nourished thereby
Land, Ground - The Creation accounts (“You are dust or ground”) thus point to the close connection of person and body
Song of Solomon, Theology of - God endowed humans at Creation with sexuality as a blessing, not as a curse
Plagues of Egypt - These were wrought by God to show to Pharaoh and to the Egyptians His great power, and that all the elements of Creation were at His disposal
Sow - 1:29 in the summary of the blessings of Creation which God has given to mankind: “… In the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed
Rab - The next ceremony in the Creation of a rabbi was the imposition of hands on him by the delegates of the sanhedrim, practised in imitation of Moses's ordaining Joshua by this rite, to succeed him in his office, Numbers 27:18 ; Deuteronomy 34:9
Arise, Arose, Arouse, Raise, Rise, Rouse - ...
9: ἀνατέλλω (Strong's #393 — Verb — anatello — an-at-el'-lo ) "to arise," is used especially of things in the natural Creation, e
Job, Book of - The speculative questions discussed in the colloquy are unnoticed, but the declaration of God's absolute power is illustrated by a marvellously beautiful and comprehensive survey of the glory of Creation and his all-embracing providence
Philip the Evangelist - The object of all these systems was to suggest some intelligible scheme through which the God of philosophy might be brought into relations with the God of the OT and the God who was active in Creation
Naturalness - Thus we speak of natural instinct, natural conduct, natural religion, natural science, and the natural Creation, though the single epithet has a different sense in every case
Oneness - For, without social relationship and the mutual support of interdependent men, human nature cannot truly realize itself or completely fulfil the end of its Creation
Sabellianism, or Patripassianism - was the age of Gnosticism, of which one of the essential principles was the emanation theory, which places a number of aeons, emanations from the Divine Being, intermediate between God and the Creation
Time - Hence we find in Genesis 1:1-31 day and night as the first division of time, and, because light was believed to be a later Creation than matter, one whole day is said to be made up of evening and morning; and the day is reckoned, as it still is by the Jews and, in principle, by the Church in her ecclesiastical feasts, from one disappearance of the sun to the next, the divisions between day and night being formed by that appearance and disappearance. The first occurrence of a week is in Genesis 29:27 , though the Creation is represented as having been completed, including the rest of the Almighty, in a period of seven days, and periods of seven days occur in the history of the Flood
Life - Meantime those who do not stumble at a theistic view of Creation hold an entirely worthy and satisfactory position in following the Genesis Creation narratives, and ascribing the origin of all life to God, who ‘giveth to all life and breath and all things’ ( Acts 17:25 )
Marriage - He affirmed this as the principle of marriage inherent in divine Creation (Genesis 2:24 ). Human sexuality (Genesis 1:27 ) and sexual union within marriage (Ephesians 5:21-22,513 ) were part of God's good Creation. Sexual union is for procreation (Genesis 1:28 ) and also for expressing love within the oneness of marriage (1 Corinthians 5:1-1355 ; Proverbs 5:15-19 ; 1 Corinthians 7:2-5 )
God - -That the Son had made a revelation of old by the part which He took in Creation (see below, 6 (e)) is not explicitly stated, but is implied by Romans 1:20, which says that Creation is a revelation of God’s everlasting power and Divinity (θειότης, ‘Divine nature and properties,’ whereas θεότης is ‘Divine Personality’ Sacrifices in the Old Testament - The notion that God is honored by man if the latter, who is the king of all Creation, offers to his Creator some of the beings which are nearer to him, is so natural that we find it put into practise from the very dawn of the history of mankind (Genesis 4)
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - The notion that God is honored by man if the latter, who is the king of all Creation, offers to his Creator some of the beings which are nearer to him, is so natural that we find it put into practise from the very dawn of the history of mankind (Genesis 4)
John, First Epistle of - The character of God morally, which had been seen in Christ, is now seen in those who are the objects of His love; they are identified even in this world with Christ as He is, from whom they derive everything in new Creation
Conflagration - They suppose that from these materials thus refined, as from a second chaos, there will by the power of God arise a new Creation; and then the face of the earth, and likewise the atmosphere, will then be so restored, as to resemble what it originally was in the paradisaical state; and consequently to render it a more desirable abode for human creatures than it at present is: and they urge for this purpose the following texts, viz
Supralapsarians - Now, as the glory of God is last in execution, it must be first in intention, wherefore men must be considered in the decree of the end as not yet created and fallen; since the Creation and permission of sin belong to the decree of the means, which in order of nature is after the decree of the end
Light - ...
Paul concurs as he harks back to the Creation account: "For God, who said, Let light shine out of darkness, ' make his light shine in our hearts to give us the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ" (2 Corinthians 4:6 )
Slave, Slavery - While such accommodation reflects God's way of dealing with his Creation, it does not necessarily imply his ideal will
Restore, Renew - 65) and of the restoration of the world after a judgment of fire (On the Creation )
Philosophy - God is not so immanent that he is the Creation itself
Lamb - (b) At the very centre of the heavenly host, together with God He receives universal homage from the highest beings in heaven-innumerable angels-and the entire animated Creation (Revelation 5:8-13; Revelation 7:9-10)
Servant - ...
In relation to the character of servant, as it refers to the service the whole Creation owe the Lord, we may take up the language of the Psalmist, and say, all things continue, according to JEHOVAH'S ordinance: for all things serve thee
Sanctification - Thus it is said that when JEHOVAH had finished the works of Creation, he blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it—that is, set it apart for his more immediate honor
Cosmopolitanism - It is noteworthy that the ground of marriage fidelity is carried back from Moses to the Creation (Matthew 19:4, Mark 10:6), and the Sadducees are referred, on the subject of the resurrection, to God’s language to the pre-Mosaic patriarchs (Mark 12:18, Luke 20:37); still Christ regards as final a combination of Deuteronomy 6:4 and Leviticus 19:18 (Mark 12:28 ff
Firstborn - By the miraculous impregnation of the Virgin, from the overshadowing power of the Holy Ghost, the opening of womb was specially and peculiarly only effected at the birth of Christ; whereas, in every other instance, from the Creation of the world, as anatomists well know, it is accomplished at the time of conception
Cerinthians - He was certainly a Gnostic in his notion of the Creation of the world, which he conceived to have been formed by angels; and his attachment to that philosophy may explain what otherwise seems inconsistent, that he retained some of the Mosaic ceremonies, such as the observance of Sabbaths and circumcision; though, like other Gnostics, he ascribed the law and the prophets to the angel who created the world
Language - The original language was not the growth of a mere faculty of speech in man, but a Creation of gift of God
Miracle - Old Testament Miracles ...
The Creation of all things, Genesis 1:1-31
Idol, Idolatry - ...
Since images of human Creation can be true representations of God, such images cannot possibly lead to an increased appreciation of God (Isaiah 40:18; Isaiah 55:8-9)
Linus (1) - " We conjecture the compiler to have been a Manichean, but he is quite orthodox in his views as to the work of Creation, the point on which Gnostic speculation was most apt to go astray
Severus Sulpicius, an Historian - 403, was an attempt to give a concise history of the world with dates from the Creation to his own times, the consulship of Stilicho in 400
Evil - ...
However sin and evil may be considered by a secularist, the theological perspective held by the Bible that presupposes an involvement by God in his Creation and an active will of God governing that Creation requires that evil assume a theological dimension. Some suggestions, however, that have been offered about moral evil are: (1) while God is perfect, Creation is only pronounced "very good" (Genesis 1:31 ); it is impossible for a created universe to rival God in perfection and the existence of moral evil is one example of its imperfection; (2) to compel all beings to act morally is to override their free will; likewise, to grant them free moral agency is to concede the possibility that someone at some time will act in an evil manner; and (3) God in his infinite wisdom created the best of all possible worlds; one can only consider that, were the world created any other way it would have been less than the best of all possibilities
Miracles (2) - But taking the teaching of the Lord Jesus, interpreted as it was by His life before God and man, and as it is by an increasing Christian experience, they conceive of God as the Infinite Will and Intelligence that animates while it transcends the whole Creation, visible and invisible, a Divine Presence ever seeking self-realization and self-revelation in His Creation, in some true measure expressing Himself in all the works of His hands, even in the non-human Creation; but most really of all in human life with its manifold sympathies and powers, actual and potential, conscious and sub-conscious (or super-conscious)
Clement of Alexandria - The gospel is, as Clement shews with consummate eloquence, the New Song more powerful than that of Orpheus or Arion, new and yet older than the Creation (c. These are practically unlimited in range, for Greek philosophy, though a gift of God for the training of the nations, is only a recreation for the Christian philosopher in comparison with the serious objects of his study (149–168). Thus, in the fragments which remain, occasion might be given to charge Clement with false opinions on the nature of the Son (§ 19), on the Creation of Eve (§ 21), on the two Words (§§ 6, 7, 19), on Fate (§§ 75 ff. Then follow fragmentary reflections on discipline (9–11), on knowledge, faith, Creation, the new Creation (12–24), fire (25 f
Education in Bible Times - ...
Third, the idea of indeterminism or personal freedom in Hebrew religion gave man and woman dignity as free moral agents in Creation; likewise Hebrew education stressed the responsibility individuals have toward God and others, accountability of human behavior, and the need for disciplined training in making "right" choices. ...
Fifth, the doctrine of human sin and sinfulness stamps both Hebrew religion and education; this introduced the concept of mediation in Israelite religiona requirement for bridging the gap between a righteous God and his fallen Creation; educationally this meant human knowledge and wisdom were flawed and limited and that divine illumination was necessary for grasping certain truths and divine enablement was necessary for doing right. The recitation and festal remembrance of divine Acts in human history were instructive as to the nature of God and his purposes in Creation
Job, Theology of - ...
On a positive note, Job agrees with his friends that God is sovereign Creator and Ruler who has done unsearchable things (9:10) in the Creation and control of the cosmos (9:5-9; 26:7-14). Thus, Job trusts that god's hand controls the elements of chaos in Creation such as the sea, the storm cloud, and the cosmic sea monster Rahab (26:12-13). Utilizing dozens of rhetorical questions, he documents human ignorance of and impotence in controlling each domain of inanimate (38:4-38) and animate (38:39-39:30) Creation, which are under the sovereign care of the all-knowing Lord
Eunomius, Bishop of Cyzicus - Of these Creations of the Divine Energy the Son or Logos holds the first place, as the instrumental creator of the world. The Son may in this sense be regarded as the express image and likeness of the ἐνεργεία of the Father, as He conferred on Him divine dignity in the power of Creation. He was produced by the Father, as an alone Being, the first or most perfect of all Beings, to be, by His will, His instrument in the Creation of all other existences
Paul's Great Heaviness And Continual Sorrow of Heart - For we know that the whole Creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now. For Paul's most noble lamentation over the out-of-door Creation is cold and remote, and is wholly without those bowels and mercies, that would have been stirred in Paul had he walked with a perfect heart before his house at home
Teach, Teacher - ...
The Creation of Adam and Eve signaled the institution of the family (Genesis 1:26-28 ; 2:18-25 ; 4:1 ; 5:1-2 )
Jude, Theology of - God judges sin, rebellion, and apostasy whenever and wherever it occurs—before Creation in the heavenly court (v
Cloud, Cloud of the Lord - At Creation Yahweh makes the clouds his chariots (Psalm 104:3 )
Corrupt, Verb And Adjective. Corruption, Corruptible, Incorruption, Incorruptible - " It is used (a) physically, (1), of the condition of Creation, as under bondage, Romans 8:21 ; (2) of the effect of the withdrawal of life, and so of the condition of the human body in burial, 1 Corinthians 15:42 ; (3) by metonymy, of anything which is liable to "corruption," 1 Corinthians 15:50 ; (4) of the physical effects of merely gratifying the natural desires and ministering to one's own needs or lusts, Galatians 6:8 , to the flesh in contrast to the Spirit, "corruption" being antithetic to "eternal life;" (5) of that which is naturally short-lived and transient, Colossians 2:22 , "perish;" (b) of the death and decay of beasts, 2 Peter 2:12 , RV, "destroyed" (first part of verse; lit
Justice - The order God seeks to reestablish in His Creation where all people receive the benefits of life with Him
Sign - The rainbow witnesses God's covenant with Noah, insuring an orderly Creation not threatened by flood (Genesis 9:12-17 )
Love - Its object tends to become the Creation rather than the Creator; it loses sight of the eternal for the temporal; it focuses on the self, often to the exclusion of God and others
Hades - Since death is not a natural occurrence but invaded Creation through the fall and Satan's destructive work (Genesis 2-3 ), the Old Testament personifies Sheol as the power of Satan and his demonic hosts (Job 18:14 ; Psalm 18:4-5 ; Isaiah 28:15 ; Jeremiah 9:21 )
Praise - " God's kingship is pronounced both in his majestic power displayed through the Creation of the world (Psalm 29,104 ) and in his royal rule, often as deliverer, over his people (Psalm 47,68 , 98,114 )
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - Neither Adam nor Eve thanked God for his Creation, and, compared to Abel's gift of the fat portions from the firstborn of his flock, Cain's gift of "some fruit" seems singularly thankless
God - ...
God's eternal power and divinity may be known in Creation, Romans 1:20 ; but He has revealed Himself in the person of Christ, the Son, the eternal Word
Comfort - The whole Creation was moving towards a Divine event; to those in sympathy with goodness, all things were working together for good (Romans 8)
Apocalyptic - The Creation myths of the Semitic world supplied quarries for the picture language employed by the prophets and apocalyptists
Ark - During the long period between the Creation and the flood, animals must have spread themselves over a great part of the antediluvian earth, and certain animals would, as now, probably become indigenous to certain climates
Evil - And this arises wholly from the abuse of liberty, which God gave to his creatures for other purposes, and which it was reasonable and fit to give them for the perfection and order of the whole Creation; only they, contrary to God's intention and command, have abused what was necessary for the perfection of the whole, to the corruption and depravation of themselves
Praise - The author of Genesis 1:1-31 , like every reader of the chapter, finds the work of Creation an occasion for praising God
Ecclesiastes, Book of - that we get 'new Creation,' that rises above the perplexities of fallen humanity, and reveals 'eternal life' that is in God's Son
Judgement - ' The judgement of the wicked 'dead' will be after the millennium, and will embrace all who have died in their sins from the Creation of the world
Pantaenus, of Alexandria - 15), twice cites Pantaenus as one authority for an interpretation according to which Christ and his church are foreshewn in the history of the Creation of Paradise (I
Perfection (Human) - ’ The perfect man is the man who has reached the end designed in his Creation, the man who represents the ideal set before his own being
Bible - ...
Human sin and divine salvation...
The first book of the Bible, Genesis (meaning ‘origin’ or ‘beginning’), opens with a brief account of the Creation of the world, chiefly as an introduction to the story of the people who live in the world
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - The new birth experienced by the believer is the first appearing of the new order of Creation in Christ. ...
In the New Testament, therefore, aparche [3] is used to signify that the power of the resurrection and the new Creation has broken into the present Creation
Hermas Shepherd of - This is the Son of God, older than Creation, and yet recently made manifest. ‘The Holy Pre-existent Spirit, which created the whole Creation, God made to dwell in flesh that He desired. ‘Behold, the God of Hosts, who by His invisible and mighty power and by His great wisdom created the world, and by His glorious purpose clothed His Creation with comeliness, and by His strong word fixed the heaven, and founded the earth upon the waters, and by His own wisdom and providence formed His holy Church, which also He blessed’ (Vis
Colossians, Epistle to the - In opposition to the position accorded to angelic beings, he breaks into a paean in honour of the Son (a) as sole Redeemer (Colossians 1:14); (b) as the visible Representative of the invisible God (Colossians 1:15); (c) as prior to and supreme over all Creation, including these very angelic powers; as the present stay, and ultimate consummation, of Creation (Colossians 1:15-17); (d) as the supreme Head of the Church in virtue of His Resurrection (Colossians 1:18); (e) as One in whom abide completely all the perfections of the Godhead (Colossians 1:19); (f) as One whose death has made atonement not only for human sin but also for all the disorder that exists in heavenly places, so that not only are the angels unable to ‘make peace,’ but they themselves need the mediation of the Son (1618103866_51). This renders the description by Justin of Christ as ‘first-born of all Creation’ (Dial
Complacency - The work of Creation is a typical instance of the benevolence of God, the Almighty forming the world out of nothing, bringing light out of darkness, beauty out of chaos, life out of death. His love to sinners as redeemed, made a new Creation by that love, is the love of complacency (Matthew 3:17). They show the Christ seeing ‘of the travail of his soul,’ and expressing Himself as ‘satisfied,’ His complacency, as He surveys the work of redemption, appearing as a true parallel to the judgment pronounced by God upon the work of Creation, when ‘God saw everything that he had made, and, behold, it was very good’ (Genesis 1:31)
Job - 38 42:6) is devoted to Jahweh’s answer to Job’s complaint, calling attention to the Divine power, wisdom, and tenderness revealed in Creation, in the control of natural forces and phenomena, in the life of birds and beasts, and in the working of Providence in human history, and suggesting that He who could do all this might surely he trusted to care for His servant; and Job’s penitent retraction of his ‘presumptuous utterances. Instead of reasoning with His servant, Jahweh reminds him of a few of the wonders of Creation and providence, and leaves him to draw the inference. Elihu , who has been shown to be almost certainly the Creation of another writer, is not by any means a copy of one of the three
Barnabas, Epistle of - The six days of Creation are in reality 6000 years; hence the true Sabbath cannot be observed until the coming of the Son of God (ch. They are the new People and yet the old, for they have been latent in God’s intention since the Creation. 9), who was pre-existent, being present at and taking an active part in the Creation (v
Job, the Book of - Job realized that he was getting nowhere with his friends, so he called upon the rest of Creation to witness to his integrity (Job 16:1-17:16 ). First, He described the marvels of Creation and then asked Job if he could have done any better (Job 38:1-40:2 )
Spirit - Genesis 2:7, where nephesh hayyâh occurs, an expression which is also used of the lower life of the animal Creation, Genesis 1:20). By his σάρξ he is in fellowship, spiritual, mental, and physical, with the whole visible Creation
Paul as an Evangelical Mystic - All the mysteries of Creation,-and Creation is as full as it can hold of all kinds of mysteries: all the mysteries of grace,-and grace is full of its own proper mysteries also: yet, all are plain and easy to be understood, compared with the all-surpassing mystery of Christ
Apocalyptic Literature - Certain passages would seem to imply a resurrection of the dead and a renewing of all Creation along with the endless punishment of the wicked. Written in the midst of national misery, it is not able to see any relief except in the Creation of a new world
Antichrist - ...
(1) Earliest of all was the ancient dragon-myth of the Babylonian Creation-epic, with its representation of the struggle of Tiâmat, the princess of chaos and darkness, against Marduk, the god of order and light. ...
(2) Side by side with the dragon-myth must be set the Beliar (Belial) conception, a contribution to Jewish thought from the side of Persian dualism, with its idea of an adversary in whom is embodied not merely, as in the Babylonian Creation-story, the natural forces of chaos and darkness, but all the hostile powers of moral evil
Demoniac - Our Lord and his Apostles adapted their instructions to this prevailing notion, and used the language which had been formed upon it; just as Moses, in his account of the Creation, adapts himself to the popular astronomy of his time, instead of laying before us the true system of the heavenly bodies. With regard to the more specific question of demoniacal possessions, they answer, that though God has often been pleased to accommodate himself to our apprehension by adopting the current language of the countries, where the revelation was first published; yet the account of the Creation given by Moses is not altogether an instance in point
Pentateuch - A division of the Pentateuch based on the contents may be outlined as: Genesis 1-11 , Primeval history, from Creation to Abraham; Genesis 12-36 , Patriarchal history; Genesis 37-50 , Joseph stories; Exodus 1-18 , The Exodus; Exodus 19:1Deuteronomy 32:1-43—10:10 , Israel at Sinai; Numbers 10:11-21:35 , Israel in the Wilderness; Numbers 22:1Deuteronomy 22:1—34:1 , Israel in the Plains of Moab. Narratives describe Creation, judgment (flood), travel (wilderness wanderings), buildings (Ark, tabernacle), marriages (Isaac and Rebekah), and births (Moses)
Incarnation - He is the Agent of Creation (John 1:3 ) and the Mediator of providence (Colossians 1:17 ; Hebrews 1:3 )
Habakkuk, Theology of - All nature is a passive Creation that must do his bidding
Alexander, of Alexandria - The Arians were summoned to appear: they stated their opinions; the Son, they held, was not eternal, but was created by the impersonal "Word," or Wisdom of the Father; foreign, therefore, to the Father's essence, imperfectly cognizant of Him, and, in fact, called into existence to be His instrument in the Creation of man
Leper - Leprosy in the house, a fungous growth on the walls, symbolized the corruption which taints all Creation and which is the effect of the fall
Existence of God - "The works of Creation plainly demonstrate the existence of a God
Pseudepigrapha - It traces the history of Israel from Creation to the time of Moses, dividing time into jubilee periods, forty-nine years each
Body - He is the Head of the entire Creation (Ephesians 1:22-23 ; Colossians 2:10 ) and as Head does not only belong to the church community but rather also stands over against the church
Restitution - And if we find that in Philippians 2:10-11 the adoration of the Exalted Jesus is represented as an act in which the whole Creation participates, while in Ephesians 1:10, Colossians 1:20 Christ appears as summing up all things in Himself and reconciling all things unto Himself, these soaring utterances cannot be interpreted apart from St
Holy Spirit, the - Genesis 1:2, "the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters" at Creation, as distinct from the Word's operation (Genesis 1:3)
Colossians, Epistle to the - It appears to have denied the direct agency of God in the work of Creation, and to have inculcated the worship of angels and other mysterious powers of the unseen world (Colossians 2:18 )
Ephesians, Epistle to - The chief of these are: ( a ) the prominence given to the ‘Catholic’ idea of the Church; ( b ) the doctrine of the pre-existent Christ as the agent of Creation; ( c ) the substitution of the idea of the gradual fulfilment of the Divine purpose for the earlier idea of an imminent return ( Parousia ) of Christ
Worship - The sabbath theology includes the archetypal testimonies of God's saving action in Creation from chaos and in Exodus from slavery
Isaiah - 701]'>[2] Isaiah 30:1-6 ; Isaiah 30:15 , Isaiah 31:1-3 ); and to the fact that from the first he set about the Creation of a society of disciples who were to perpetuate his teaching (cf
Red Heifer - The seven days of Creation, the seventh day for the Sabbath, the seven times seven for the Sabbatical or Jubilee year, and the seventh day becoming an emblem of the everlasting Sabbath of heaven; all these are very high evidences of the peculiar honour conferred on the number
Arnobius - Arnobius hesitates, however, over the details of Creation; thinking apparently that alike the human soul and the lower animals—insects and reptiles—are the work of some intermediate creator (ii
Paul - To him was revealed the truth that the assembly was the body of Christ, and the doctrine of new Creation in Christ Jesus, in which evidently there is no distinction between Jew and Gentile
Ephesians, Epistle to the - There is a new Creation in Christ by God as regards His people
Pelagians - Pelagius asserted, that man, so far from requiring the aid of grace for the performance of good actions, is, through the powers implanted in him at the time of his Creation, capable of fulfilling the whole law, of loving God, and of overcoming all temptations: we, on the contrary, assert that the grace of God is required for the performance of every act of piety
Marriage - --The institution of marriage dates from the time of man's original Creation
Inspiration - That is, God ‘breathed out’ his truth through human writers, so the words they wrote were the Creation of God and bore his authority
Only Begotten - that He did not form part of the Creation
Philaster, Bishop of Brixia - 108); thought that any uncertainty attached to the calculation of the number of the years since the Creation of the world (c
Sanctification - A good analogy with sanctification is patriotism, which is a social and political condition of individual life, in whose Creation the individual has, strictly speaking, no part; which also carries with it certain practical duties that can be refused only at the cost of disloyalty to the State. The Christian is ‘a new Creation in Christ’ (2 Corinthians 5:17). It is the utterance of a heart that looks out on a world both of men and of things that is in its misery far from God, and can yet see in it all the birth-pangs of a new Creation (Romans 8:20-21)
Apocrypha - Nevertheless, apart from the Arian conception, we still have the idea of the Creation of wisdom to account for. When, however, various functions, such as Creation and Providence, seem to be ascribed to her, this cannot be as to a personal agent, because they are also ascribed to God (e. (1) Creation
Law - Again, the law often denotes the rule of good and evil, or of right and wrong, revealed by the Creator and inscribed on man's conscience, even at his Creation, and consequently binding upon him by divine authority; and in this respect it is in substance the same with the decalogue. By commanding to keep holy the Sabbath, as the memorial of the Creation, it establishes the necessity of public worship, and of a stated and outward profession of the truths of religion, as well as of the cultivation of suitable feelings; and it enforces this by a motive which is equally applicable to all mankind, and which should have taught the Jew that he ought to consider all nations as equally creatures of that Jehovah whom he himself adored; equally subject to his government, and, if sincerely obedient, entitled to all the privileges his favour could bestow. It is also remarkable, that this commandment, requiring that the rest of the Sabbath should include the man-servant, and the maid-servant, and the stranger that was within their gates, nay, even their cattle, proved that the Creator of the universe extended his attention to all his creatures; that the humblest of mankind were the objects of his paternal love; that no accidental differences, which so often create alienation among different nations, would alienate any from the divine regard; and that even the brute Creation shared the benevolence of their Creator, and ought to be treated by men with gentleness and humanity
Abortion - These terms designate humanity, over and against the rest of Creation, as somehow modeled after God. ...
The psalmist's portrait of humanity, as distinguished from the rest of Creation, employs language of dignity, honor, and lofty position, rather than of divine image (Psalm 8:3-8 )
Immorality, Sexual - The account of Creation (Genesis 1:1-28 ) includes reproductive activity as an essential part of the developmental scheme. This important function is given special prominence in the narrative describing the Creation of woman (Genesis 2:21-24 ). It comes from balal [1], meaning "to confuse, " and conveys aptly the genetic upheaval that occurs in many cases of inbreeding, since God's rules for procreation have been upset
Light - The Logos-Christ is defined in the Prologue not only as Logos but as Life and Light, the former category being confined to Christ’s being as a Divine factor in the Creation and in the essence of God (John 1:1-3), as well as to His incarnation (John 1:14-18), after which it is dropped. ...
(a) The function of Christ as the Light is described as bearing not only upon the Creation of the Universe, but on the spiritual and moral life of men (John 1:3-4)
Paul as a Student - It was Paul's imperial mind, winged as it was with his wonderful imagination, that first swept, full of eyes, over the whole Old Testament history, and saw, down to the bottom and up to the top, the whole hidden mystery of the Old Testament economies, from the Creation of the first Adam on to the sitting down of the second Adam at the right hand of God. From the Creation of Adam to the call of Abraham; and from the call of Abraham to the giving of the law four hundred and thirty years after; and from the giving of the law till the law was magnified in the life and death of Paul's Master
Omnipresence - They have left us the most sublime proofs of the existence and perfections of the First Cause; but as it was impossible for them to conceive the Creation of matter, the workman, in the Stoic philosophy, was not sufficiently distinguished from the work; while, on the contrary, the spiritual god of Plato and his disciples resembled more an idea than a substance. ...
Could we with the swiftness of a sun beam dart ourselves beyond the limits of the Creation, and for ages continue our progress in infinite space, we should still be surrounded with the divine presence; nor ever be able to reach that space where God is not
Manicheans - From Zoroastrism he took his Dualism, which consisted of two independent principles absolutely opposed to each other, with their opposite Creations: on the one side God (Ahura-Mazda), the original good from whom nothing but good can proceed; on the other side original evil (Angro-Mainyus), whose essence is wild, self-conflicting tumult, matter, darkness, a world full of smoke and vapour. Likewise their theory about the Creation of the material part of man determined their view of the Incarnation, which they regarded as wholly Docetic; if a material body was a prison and a burden to the spirit of man, Christ could scarcely voluntarily imprison His divine Spirit in the same. 433–451, where he points out Buddhist influence on Manichean doctrines as to the opposition between matter and spirit, upon the Creation and end of the world, and upon moral questions
Pre-Existence of Christ - In 1 Corinthians 8:6, as one God, the Father, is the ultimate source and end of all Creation, so one Lord, Jesus Christ, is its Mediator-the first hint of that more fully formulated conception of the ‘cosmic’ Christ which is a feature of later Epistles. In His pre-incarnate state, He is the ἀρχή, the Head or Origin, the πρωτότοκος πάσης κτίσεως, begotten before all creatures and the agent of their Creation, therefore possessing supremacy, absolute and universal (Colossians 1:15-16)
Call, Calling - When God is the one who bestows names, the action is almost equivalent to Creation: "Who created all these? He who brings out the starry host one by one, and calls them each by name
Election - Thus election encompasses the entire range of divine activity from Creation, God's decision to bring the world into being out of nothing, to the end time, the making anew of heaven and earth
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - God's work of Creation was both complete and perfect—and it was completed in seven days
Growing - One set of expressions corresponds to αὑξάνω in the sense already indicated; the other, which is preponderant, marks ‘growth’ of the physical order, seminal growth; and is applied with a great wealth of illustration to the life of plants, trees, the brute Creation, and of man himself
Genealogy - '" History, in ancient times, being based on genealogies, the phrase became a title for a history; so Genesis 2:4, "these are the generations of the heavens and of the earth"; as the history of a man's family is "the book of his generations," so that of the world's productions is "the generations (not the Creation, which had been previously described) of the heavens and the earth
Bible, - brings out not only the history of redemption by the death of Christ, but gives the doctrine of the Church in its various aspects, showing that Christianity is an entirely new order of things — indeed a new Creation
Prophets, the - The binding of Satan; the Creation will be delivered from the bondage of corruption, and Christ will reign over the earth a thousand years in peace, being Antitype of Solomon
Galatians, Epistle to the - In Christ Jesus nothing availed but a new Creation; and upon those who walked according to this rule peace and mercy are invoked
Materialists - A sect in the ancient church, composed of persons, who, being prepossessed with that maxim in philosophy, "ex nihilo mihil fit, " out of nothing nothing can arise, had recourse to an eternal matter, on which they supposed God wrought in the Creation, instead of admitting Him alone as the sole cause of the existence of all things
Divorce (2) - But a prior and higher law is to be found in the Creation narrative, ‘Male and female he created them’ (Genesis 1:27 LXX Septuagint), i
Ecbatana - The sepulchre of the former stands near the centre of the city of Hamadan: the tombs are covered by a dome, on which is the following inscription in Hebrew: "This day, 15th of the month Adar, in the year 4474 from the Creation of the world, was finished the building of this temple over the graves of Mordecai and Esther, by the hands of the good-hearted brothers, Elias and Samuel, the sons of the deceased Ismael of Kashan
Deuteronomy, Theology of - This polarity is suggestive of his immanence, his accessibility to his Creation, but also of his transcendent remoteness. The rare occurrences of Elohim (23 times) and other names and epithets (about 18 times) reinforce the covenant character of the book and its almost exclusive attention to Israel, for these names, especially Elohim and its byforms, occur most regularly in contexts describing God's more cosmic or universal interests in Creation and history
Timothy, First And Second, Theology of - ...
With regard to God's work in Creation, Paul asserts that "everything God created is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving, because it is consecrated by the word of God and prayer" (1 Timothy 4:4-5 ). In another passage related to Creation and in defense of his statement relative to the position of women in the church, Paul points out that "Adam was formed first, then Eve" (1 Timothy 2:13 )
Gods, Pagan - Israel, against the background of this common belief, struggled with the concept that God was the Lord over all aspects of Creation. The Enuma elish , or Babylonian Creation Epic, tells of a cosmic struggle in which, while other gods were powerless, Marduk slew Tiamat (the sea goddess,fjcr representative of chaos)
Faith - ...
The effect of faith in the life of the believer can be generalized under the picture of a new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ), but is also particularized in terms of sonship (Romans 8:14-17 ; Galatians 4:4-7 ), unity (1 Corinthians 1:10 ), love (1 Corinthians 13 ; Galatians 5:6,22 ), hope (Romans 6:8 ; 1 Peter 1:21 ), and steadfastness (Hebrews 11 ). If faith means being a new Creation, why is there so little unity and love in the Corinthian church and so little hope in the Thessalonian church? Paul's answer is twofold
Worship - ...
If the early date is allowed, we find here anticipation of the great thanksgiving of the later liturgies, mention of God’s work in Creation and in redemption, a thanksgiving after Communion and prayer for the Church with the germ of the act of praise which grew into the Gloria in excelsis. 34: ‘For the Scripture saith; Ten thousands of ten thousands stood by Him, and thousands of thousands ministered unto Him: and they cried aloud, Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of Sabaoth; all Creation is full of His glory
Guilt (2) - We have to do with the living God (Hebrews 3:12; Hebrews 4:12; Hebrews 10:31), who is a consuming fire (Hebrews 12:29), self existent and separate from Creation (Hebrews 12:18-21), the supreme lawgiver and judge (Hebrews 10:30, Hebrews 12:23), whom to see, therefore, demands a purifying separation on the part of His suppliant worshipper (Hebrews 9:14, Hebrews 10:22). ’ The teaching of the Rabbis, however, differentiating the actual transgression of Adam from the potentiality of sin involved in his Creation, expressly asserts that death was decreed against the generations of Adam
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - It treats of faith in the Trinity, spiritual Creation, the waters above the firmament, the firmament of heaven, the sun and moon, the devil and the nature of demons, the nature of waters and course of the ocean, Paradise, the nature of man after sin, the diversity of sinners and their place of punishment, purgatorial fire and the future life. —A very brief summary of the principal events from the Creation of the world to the reign of the emperor Heraclius and of king Sisebut
Heaven - For example, the Rabbinical tradition could think of the Law, the Temple, and other central ideas of Judaism as laid up with God before the Creation of the world. In heaven is the throne of God; His will is done in heaven; Christ is there; the angels, and the OT symbols of the power and presence of God in Creation, are seen in heaven
Philo - Creation means form-giving (cosmos). He sees that there are two accounts of Creation in Genesis 1:2 : he understands the first of the ideal man
Idolatry - Nature-worship of all kinds is by implication rebuked with amazing force and dignity in Genesis 1:1-31 , where the word God as Creator is written ‘in big letters over the face of Creation
Unbelief - The discussion in this Epistle centred round the rest of God into which God Himself entered after the work of Creation, and to which He called His people
Destructionists - Everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from the glory of his power, cannot mean annihilation, for that would be no exertion of divine power, but merely the suspension of it: for let the upholding power of God be withheld for one moment, and the whole Creation would sink into nothing
Worldliness - To elucidate the conception of worldliness in the apostolic writings, we must start from the primary truth that the world is God’s world, His by Creation and sustenance, by sovereign purpose and control (see artt
Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ - His body, they think, was formed in the Virgin's womb; his human soul, they suppose, was the first and most excellent of all the works of God; was brought into existence before the Creation of the world, and subsisted in happy union in heaven with the second person in the Godhead, till his incarnation
King - In accordance with their more developed Christology, Christ becomes the end of Creation (Colossians 1:16), and the final consummation is now represented, not as the reign of God, who is to be ‘all in all’ (1 Corinthians 15:28), but as the Kingdom of Christ and God (Ephesians 5:5), or even of Christ alone (2 Timothy 4:1), whose Kingdom is an everlasting one (2 Peter 1:11), and whose sovereignty is declared to extend to the future aeon (Ephesians 1:21)
Corner-Stone - In Job 38:6 the act of laying the foundation corner-stone of a house is made to describe that of the Creation of the world
Gnosticism - The more important of these problems were (1) How to reconcile the Creation of the world by a perfectly good God with the presence of evil; (2) how the human spirit came to be imprisoned in matter, and how it was to be emancipated
Appreciation (of Christ) - It is because he has seen the love eternal that nothing imaginable can utterly root out again from the awakened heart, that he says, ‘Neither death, nor life, … nor any other Creation, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord’ (Romans 8:38 f
Begotten - (Philemon 1:1:10) But whatever the apostle meant by the expression, certain it is, that the act of the new Creation, as the act of the old, is wholly of the Lord
Cerinthus, Opponent of Saint John - ...
His doctrines may be collected under the heads of his conception of the Creation, his Christology, and his Eschatology
Judgment - Creation then shall be uncreated
Pass'Over, - The prophet in a later age spoke of the event as a Creation and a redemption of the nation
Church - ...
By his act of uniting in one body people who were once in conflict with each other, God has carried out part of a wider plan he has for his Creation
Christ in Jewish Literature - Alexander (Jannaeus); this is the year 263 from the building of the Temple, and the 51st year of the Hasmonaeans, and the year 3675 from the Creation (b. Although the Nazarenes say that he was born in the time of Herod, the slave of the Hasmonaeans, in the year 3760 (from the Creation), and that he was hung 35 years before the destruction (of the Temple), being 32 years old, to our shame and to declare to us that at once, speedily, 40 years in advance, the Temple was destroyed for the guilt of what we did to him. He says: ‘Jesus the Nazarene was born in Bethlehem, a “parsah” and a half from Jerusalem, in the year 3761 from the Creation, i
Christ in the Early Church - The Son of God existed before all Creation, and was God’s fellow-counsellor in the work of Creation (Simil. He supports all Creation (ib
Teaching - He appropriated the Jewish beliefs as to the Creation of the world and the nature and sinfulness of man. The legal aspect required the teacher to present the truth as evangelical justification; its regenerative results enabled him to speak of it as a ‘new Creation
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - In 1Peter he is designated as the one "chosen before the Creation of the world … revealed in these last times" (1:20) and as the "living stone—rejected by men but chosen by God" (2:4). He is the firstborn of all Creation (Colossians 1:15 ), and to those who believe in him he is the "firstborn among many brothers" (Romans 8:29 )
Holy Spirit - God's people can look forward to restoration from exile and to a new covenant in which the Spirit will empower all his followers in the Creation of a new spiritual community. Symbolically, the dove may represent peace, re-creation, or love
Metaphor - Speculations of theology and philosophy, glimpses of Deity and hints of various modes of causation, large conceptions of Providence and Creation, strange and indistinct forms of Law and Sin and Death half persons and half powers, quasi-magical notions attached to particular material media, are all blended with the impassioned emotion with which the writer contemplates the love which prompted the Father to send forth his Son, and the love which moved the Son to forsake his high estate and give himself for men’ (J. Paul held that there was a world of spirits brought into being like the rest of Creation by Christ
Samuel - And then he will not only see God in his own mind and heart and imagination, but in Holy Scripture also, in Jesus Christ, in Creation, in providence, in the means of grace, and eventually where Samuel now sees Him. That school of the prophets to which we owe so much of Samuel himself; to which we owe David, and Gad, and Nathan, and all their still greater successors; that great school was the Creation and the care of Samuel's leisure from office
Christ in the Seventeenth Century - They made a distinction between the ‘reflex’ and the ‘direct’ use of omnipotence, declaring that Christ, qua Sacerdos, withdrew the reflex use of His majesty with reference to His own body, while He still, qua Rex, exercised the direct use of it in reference to Creation. It recommended itself to the Lutheran theologian as exalting the human nature, and affording some support to his doctrine that the whole earthly life of Christ rested on the voluntary self-humiliation of the God-man; while to some of the Reformed side it seemed to explain the position of Christ as the type and instrument of Creation, and the medium of revelation prior to the Incarnation
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - ...
Following upon the commentary are 12 metrical expositions of portions of Scripture, such as the Creation of man in God's image, the temptation of Eve, the translation of Enoch, etc. Commenting on the Creation of whales in Gen_1:21 (Opp
Trinity - For example, the word of God is recognized as the agent of Creation (Psalm 33:6 ,Psalms 33:6,33:9 ; compare Proverbs 3:19 ; Proverbs 8:27 ), revelation, and salvation (Psalm 107:20 )
Angels - ...
From the first Creation of our world they took the liveliest interest in the earth (Job 38:7)
Self- Denial - Its object is self-renewal, self-re-creation in Christ
Alexandria - The Creation of Cairo was another blow, and the discovery in 1497 of the new route to the East via the Cape of Good Hope almost destroyed its trade
Parable - , which have their representatives in irrational Creation; if men be introduced, they are represented from their mere animal aspect
Nin'Eveh - Some of the most interesting of these give accounts of the Creation and of the deluge and all agree with or confirm the Bible
Omnipotence - So, in the great days of the prophetic period of Israel’s history, all limiting conceptions are withdrawn from the notion of God, and Jehovah stands revealed as the One Being who has all Creation in the hollow of His hand, maker and controller of all things in heaven and earth, the supreme power working irresistibly to the accomplishment of His great moral ends (Amos 4:13; Amos 5:8, Isaiah 40:12-26, Psalms 33:9-11; Psalms 115:3)
New Moon - ; whilst the phrasing of Genesis 1:16 in the Creation-story surely echoes such conceptions of more ancient days
Miracles - Besides the evidential value of miracles, they are intimately and internally connected with Christianity as a new Creation springing from God manifest in the flesh. Those were worthy objects for which to suspend the so-called (lower) laws of nature, and they illustrate the new spiritual and material Creation which He introduces into our fallen world
Animals - In the story of the Creation, a metaphor from bird-life is employed to describe the Spirit of God fluttering ((Revised Version margin) ‘brooding’) over the waters (Genesis 1:2). The same Spirit rests on the Saviour with whom begins God’s new Creation
Christians, Names of - ...
Believers also visualize themselves as an aroma of Christ (2 Corinthians 2:15 ), firstfruits of all God's Creation (James 1:18 ), and firstfruits to God and the Lamb (Revelation 14:1-4 )
Sea - In Revelation 5:13, also, by a sweep of prophetic imagination, even sea-monsters join with departed spirits in a doxology of praise to the Lamb; while in Revelation 10:6 the thought of God’s creatorship, of earth and heaven and sea, prepares the way for the announcement that the God of Creation and providence is also a God of judgment
Nebuchadnezzar - When man would be as God, like Adam and Nebuchadnezzar he sinks from lordship over Creation to the brute level and loses his true manhood, which is likeness to God (Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:19; Genesis 3:5; Psalms 49:6; Psalms 49:10-12; Psalms 82:6-7); a key to the symbolism which represents the mighty world kingdoms as "beasts" (Daniel 7)
Israel, Israelite - Christianity is not a completely new Creation fallen from heaven, but rather a growth from the religion of Israel—a growth far surpassing the germ from which it sprang, as an oak surpasses an acorn, but yet composed of elements which are discernible in the earlier dispensation in a rudimentary form
Holy Spirit - The account of Creation in Genesis puts us in possession of the root idea ( Genesis 1:2-3 )
Idol, Idolatry - Deuteronomy 4:15-19 states that Israel saw no form of God at Sinai; therefore they were not to make any images of him or any other object of Creation
King, Christ as - Beginning with Genesis 1:1 , the Bible portrays God as the Lord and Sovereign over all Creation, God Most High (Genesis 14:18 ; cf
Light And Darkness - Reference may be made to the Babylonian Creation narrative with its struggle between Marduk, the god of light, and Tiâmat, the god of darkness; to the Skr
Headship - ’ And in Colossians 2:10 Christ is expressly called ‘the head of all principality and power’—words which are explained in Colossians 1:15-16, where He is declared to be ‘the firstborn of all Creation,’ in whom ‘were all things created, in the heavens and upon the earth, things visible and things invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers; all things have been created through him and unto him; and he is before all things, and in him all things consist
Mary - For we road that at the Creation, the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept; and he took one of his ribs and closed up the flesh instead thereof: and the rib, which the Lord God had taken from the man, made he a woman
Head - CHRIST is to be supreme, He is to be the sovereign over all the Creation
Feasts - ...
There was in the Three Feasts a clear prefigurement of the Three Persons; the Father, in the work of Creation, especially adored in the feast of tabernacles; the Son in the Passover sacrifice; the Spirit in the Pentecostal feast
Timothy, Epistles to - The original order in Creation and the history of the fall are cited in support of these injunctions
Carpocrates, Philospher - Whereas the latter represented the God of the Jews and Maker of the world as an evil Being who ought to be resisted, the former only spoke of the makers of the world as inferior beings whose restrictions it is true enlightenment to despise; and the arguments of Epiphanes, derived from the equality that reigns in nature, assume that the Creation is so far conformed to the will of God that from the laws which pervade it we may infer what is pleasing to the supreme power
Cabbala - To the former is ascribed the book entitled "Jezirah," concerning the Creation; and to the latter, the book "Sohar," or brightness; and these are the principal sources from which we derive our knowledge of the cabbala
Ebionites - The Cerinthians, to whom some Unitarians have appealed, did not ascribe the Creation of the world to God, but to an inferior being
Atheist - That the world had a beginning, is evident from universal tradition, and the most ancient history that exists; from there being no memorials of any actions performed previously to the time assigned in that history as the aera of the Creation; from the origin of learning and arts, and the liability of the parts of matter to decay
Predestination - A universal, all-pervading purpose of God in Creation, providence, and human life, is thus everywhere assumed
Inspiration And Revelation - ; Psalms 77:11-20; Psalms 105; Psalms 106, Habakkuk 3 are typical retrospects of the hand of God in Israel’s history; Proverbs 8:22-31, Job 28, Sirach 24, Wisdom 7, 8 are equally typical examples of the praise of Divine Wisdom as expressed in Creation and in the ordering of human life. Paul appeals to the revelation of God in Nature, he singles out in particular those attributes of God as revealed which the impression derived from Nature is best calculated to convey: ‘the invisible things of him since the Creation of the world are clearly seen, being perceived through the things that are made, even his everlasting power and divinity’ (Romans 1:20; cf
Biblical Theology - ...
Creation and Fall . His majesty in Creation is, if anything, exceeded by his graciousness in redemption
Noah - Death existed in the animal world before man's Creation, for man's fall foreseen and the world reflected the sad image of the fall that was to be; moreover, the pre-existing death and physical evil had probably a connection with Satan's fall. Peter (2 Peter 3:3-13) confutes the scoffers of the last days who deny the Lord's coming to judgment on the plea "all things continue as they were from the beginning of the Creation," but the same objection might have been urged before the flood against its possibility
Man - (b) Man depends absolutely on God for his Creation and continued existence; his inner life is easily accessible to spiritual influences from without, both for good and for evil. John specializes the Pauline idea of a ‘new Creation’ (2 Corinthians 5:17, Galatians 6:15) into that of a new birth (John 3:3), which springs from a Divine seed (1 John 3:9)
Heaven - For example, the Rabbinical tradition could think of the Law, the Temple, and other central ideas of Judaism as laid up with God before the Creation of the world. In heaven is the throne of God; His will is done in heaven; Christ is there; the angels, and the OT symbols of the power and presence of God in Creation, are seen in heaven
Gregorius Nyssenus, Bishop of Nyssa - To this class belong his works on the Creation written chiefly to supplement and defend the great work of his brother Basil on the Hexaemeron. (ii) A treatise on the Creation of man written as a supplement to Basil's treatise (vol
Apocalypse - ...
On the side of good, we have (to take great examples) God and His throne, angels such as Michael and Gabriel, or angelic beings resembling men (of whom the chief, when he appears at all, is the Messiah), books written with the names of the saints, the paradise of God with its trees of healing and nourishment, the new Creation with its wonders specialized in the new city and temple. On the representation of this idea in the Genesis narratives of Creation and the relation of the latter to the Babylonian myth of Marduk and Tiâmat, see Gunkel, Schöpfung u
Annunciation, the - It may be pointed out that a new act of Creation would have left no nexus between the Redeemer and those to be redeemed. The choice is not between Creation on the one hand and human parentage (whether with one or two parents) on the other
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - -The most important incident connected with Philippi is a correspondence with the Corinthians, dealing with certain heretical views, of which the main tenets are (a) a denial of the resurrection of the flesh; (b) the human body is not the Creation of God; (c) the world is not the Creation of God; (d) the government of the universe is not in the hands of God; (e) the crucifixion was not that of Christ, but of a docetic phantasm; (f) Christ was not born of Mary, nor was he of the seed of David
John, the Gospel by - His essential Godhead before Creation; He is the Creator; the true Light; the only-begotten of the Father (His eternal Sonship); He is the Incarnate, 'the Word became flesh;' the Lamb of God; the Son of God; the Messiah; the king of Israel; and the Son of man. But the great day of the feast is the eighth, typical of the day of new Creation and of eternal blessing; of this the Spirit is the earnest, as sent from a glorified Christ
Liberty - ‘The glory of the children of God’ is a liberty which all Creation sighs to share
Festivals - It functioned as a reminder of the Lord's rest at the end of the Creation week (Genesis 2:3 ) and also of the deliverance from slavery in Egypt (Deuteronomy 5:12-25 )
Angel - The message of joy having been proclaimed, the heavenly host of angels praised and glorified God (Psalm 148:2,5 ) for a short period, as they had done at the Creation of the world (Job 38:7 ), after which they departed
World - ...
The simple pictorial phrase, ‘the heaven and the earth,’ by which the OT expresses the idea of the visible Creation as contrasted with the Creator, is still retained in the liturgical and rhetorical style (Song of Solomon 1:14; Acts 14:15; Acts 17:24), and for the sake of special emphasis (Ephesians 1:10, Philippians 2:10, Colossians 1:16; Colossians 1:20, Romans 8:19-22,; Revelation 21:1)
Lord - At first the Greeks did not see themselves in a slave/lord relationship with their gods because they did not believe their gods were responsible for their Creation
Babylon, History And Religion of - ...
A number of myths concerning Babylonian gods are known, the most important of which is the Enuma elish , or Creation Epic
Poetry - The Creation itself manifests God's creativity and esthetic nature
Mercy - But the fundamental factor in each act of God is mercy: God's compassionate love for his Creation that leads him to do for it what it cannot do for itself
Imagination - The cold impersonal attitude of the modern scientist towards the Creation was impossible to the Lover of Souls
Glory - ...
(b) But the departed glory is more than restored in Christ, the second Adam, to whom as the Image of God it belongs (2 Corinthians 4:4), who is the Lord of Glory (1 Corinthians 2:8), and in whose face it shines forth in the darkened hearts of men, as at the Creation light first shone upon the face of the earth (2 Corinthians 4:6)
Holy Day - That factor was the Resurrection of Jesus, the experience of the New Creation, and the inevitable sense of victory over all that would fetter Christian freedom (see further, article Sabbath)
Plagues of Egypt - "The whole Creation (we are told) groaneth and travaileth in pain together
Holiness - And this becomes a most interesting part to be considered, because without an eye to the Lord Jesus, nothing in the Creation of God can be farther from holiness, than poor, fallen, ruined, undone man
Adam - But from the beginning of the Creation “he made them male and female
God - ...
In the only verse in the Book of Jeremiah that was written in Aramaic (10:11), the word ĕlâhh appears in plural form to describe “gods” that had not participated in the Creation of the universe
Eternity - In like manner, days, and hours, and moments, are the measures of time: but there is either something in time which answers to these measures; or not only the measure, but the thing itself, is artificial—an imaginary Creation
Adam - But from the beginning of the Creation “he made them male and female
World - ...
The simple pictorial phrase, ‘the heaven and the earth,’ by which the OT expresses the idea of the visible Creation as contrasted with the Creator, is still retained in the liturgical and rhetorical style (Acts 4:24; Acts 14:15; Acts 17:24), and for the sake of special emphasis (Ephesians 1:10, Philippians 2:10, Colossians 1:16; Colossians 1:20, Revelation 20:11; Revelation 21:1)
Revelation (2) - That is, we assume that, supposing God’s creatures to be capable of understanding His purpose in Creation, He is capable, on His part, of making it known to them. Creation involves responsibility for the creature, and thus there is a probability that He who made the world will continue to guide it
Gospels, Apocryphal - ...
‘When Salome asked how long death should have power, the Lord (not meaning that life is evil and the Creation bad) said. ...
‘And those who opposed the Creation of God through shameful abstinence allege also those words spoken to Salome whereof we made mention above
John, Theology of - The Word, according to the teaching of the Prologue, is Eternal, Divine, the Mediator of Creation, the Light of mankind throughout history; and in the latter days the Word made flesh, tabernacling amongst men, is the Only-begotten from the Father full of grace and truth. In all ages the Logos was the medium of Divine revelation, as He had been of Creation itself, and of the Godhead before the world was
Fall - Sin, to which the bent and leaning had already been planted in man by Creation, had become a fact; the “evil impulse” (= cor malignum) gained the mastery over mankind, who can only resist it by the greatest efforts; before the Fall it had had power over him, but no such ascendancy (Uebermacht). The contrast is emphasized in 1 Corinthians 15:45 by the description of the first Adam, in accordance with the account of his Creation in Genesis 2:7, as living soul, while Christ, the last Adam, is a life-giving spirit
Materialism - the doctrine which resolves the thinking principle in man, or the immaterial and immortal soul with which God was pleased to endue Adam at his Creation, into mere matter, or into a faculty resulting from its organization. All communication with outward objects being thus removed, the soul is transported, as it were, into a world of its own Creation
Chronicles, Theology of - Beginning with Creation (Adam), the focus quickly narrows temporally, geographically, and nationally to the tribes of Israel (chaps
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - This pronouncement allowed the Gospel writer to turn the story of Jesus' origins into a theological confession by tracing Jesus' existence back to the Creation of the world and before (John 1:1-5 )
Scripture - "They open to us the mystery of the Creation; the nature of God, angels, and man; the immortality of the soul; the end for which we were made; the origin and connexion of moral and natural evil; the vanity of this world, and the glory of the next
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - During the time that Baal was under the control of Death, the vegetation wilted or ceased and procreation stopped. Enlil was the original chief god until the Code of Hammurabi and the Creation Epic focused on Marduk instead
Galatians, Theology of - A comparison of this verse with 6:15 and 1 Corinthians 7:19 suggests that, in Paul's theology, the principle of a working faith corresponds to the concept of the "new Creation" and to the responsibility of "keeping the commadments of God
Tabernacle - If the fundamental tenet of the Hebrew faith, God's transcendence, is true, if God cannot be magically manipulated through the Creation, then of what ultimate good is the sacrifice of one bull, or, for that matter, tens of thousands of bulls? This seems a hopeless dilemma
Knowledge - Paul teaches clearly (Romans 1:18-23) that, apart from any special revelation, God has exhibited so plainly His attributes of eternal power and divinity in Creation that there is given to man an instinctive knowledge of God
Assyria, History And Religion of - The enuma elish, or Epic of Creation, originated in Babylon where it was recited and reenacted at the New Year's Festival
Day of Atonement - Man is, according to the revelation in Scripture, so bound up with the whole finite order, that the consequences of his actions extend through Creation in some way which we are unable to define
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - And on Monday morning the first thing he did, while the shame and the pain of his bad work were still in his heart, he rose and took his sermon to pieces, re-arranged it in the light of yesterday, re-wrote it from beginning to end, and preached it again next Sabbath, a completely new Creation, and a conscientious, a living, and a life-giving, message
Judas - -To all the tremendous miseries of eternity he had to add, the special and peculiar aggravation in the everlasting and unceasing thought-that he, of all the Creation of God, had this worm of conscience that never dieth, to prey upon him to all eternity, that he it was that betrayed the Lord of life and glory
Naaman - Leprosy was so loathsome, and so utterly incurable and deadly, that it was not looked on as an ordinary disease at all: but, rather, as a special Creation in His anger, and a direct curse of God, both to punish sin, and, at the same time, to teach His people something of what an accursed thing sin really is; till the whole nature of leprosy and all the laws laid down for its treatment, and the miraculous nature of its so seldom cure, all combined to work into the imagination, and into the conscience, and into the heart, and into the ritual, and into the literature of Israel, some of her deepest lessons about the terrible nature and the only proper treatment of sin
Septuagint - Thus, they express the Creation of the world, not by the proper Greek word κτισις , but by γενεσις , a term employed by the philosophers of Alexandria to express the origin of the universe
Fall of Man - The Creation of the world, of man, of woman; the planting of the garden of Eden, and the placing of man there; the duties and prohibitions laid upon him; his disobedience; his expulsion from the garden; the subsequent birth of his children, their lives, and actions, and those of their posterity, down to the flood; and, from that event, to the life of Abraham, are given in the same plain and unadorned narrative; brief, but yet simple; and with no intimation at all, either from the elevation of the style or otherwise, that a fable or allegory is in any part introduced
Church - The church is also seen as God's new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ), the new persons (Ephesians 2:14-15 ), fighters against Satan (Ephesians 6:10-20 ), or bearers of light (Ephesians 5:7-9 )
Parables - For example, He chose from His larger following a special group of twelve disciples (Mark 3:13-19 ), symbolizing His Creation of a new Israel
Praise - ...
A four-fold doxology follows from all Creation (no
Prosper, Saint, a Native of Aquitaine - But before the Creation of the world God foreknew who would believe and be saved, and predestined them to His kingdom, being called by grace and worthy of being chosen and of going out of life sound in faith
Providence - (b) Taking for granted that His hearers believe in God as their Creator, Jesus argues from Creation to providence as from the greater to the less
Prudentius, Marcus (?) Aurelius Clemens Prudentius - The cause of evil is man's free will, but this was needed to secure moral goodness and his power of ruling Creation
Christ in the Middle Ages - While asserting that Christ took upon Him the form of a servant and human nature in its entirety, he shows at once how little his language accords with common-sense usage by saying that the human nature that the Word assumed contains in itself the entire visible and invisible Creation. Thus in assuming and renovating human nature He renovated the whole of the Creation visible and invisible
Lutherans - Avoiding all intricate questions upon the subject, they taught that original sin is a corruption of our nature in a general sense, a depravation of the mental faculties and the corporeal appetites; that the resplendent image of the Deity, which man received at the Creation of the world, although not annihilated, is nevertheless greatly impaired; and that, in consequence, the bright characters of unspotted sanctity, once deeply engraven on his mind by the hand of the living God are become obliterated, the injury extending to his intellect, and affecting as well his reason and his will as his affections and passions. " The disciples of Lombard, in whatever mode disposed to pervert reason and annihilate Scripture, universally held, that neither before nor after the fall was man in himself capable of meriting heaven; that by the gratuitous endowments of his Creation, even in paradise, he was only enabled to preserve his innocence, and not to sin; and that he was utterly incompetent to proceed one step farther, efficaciously to will a remunerable good, and by his natural exertions to obtain a reward above his nature; original righteousness being reputed not a connate quality, but a supernatural habit
Calvinism - ' Whence, then, comes the depravity of man to revolt from his God? Lest it should be thought to come from Creation, God approved and commended what had proceeded from himself. " "For though, by the eternal providence of God, man was created to that misery to which he is subject, yet the ground of it he has derived from himself, not God; since he is thus ruined, solely in consequence of his having degenerated from the pure Creation of God to vicious and impure depravity
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - contained a comprehensive sketch of the history and doctrines of Christianity, beginning with the Biblical account of the Creation. His visible representative, and as such to receive the homage of all Creation. " As a matter of fact, "death came by sin"; and the dissolution of soul and body was followed by the still more serious dissolution of the bond which in the person of man had hitherto knit together the visible and invisible Creations
Law - ...
The fourth commandment begins with "keep" instead of "remember," the reason for its observance in Deuteronomy is Israel's deliverance from Egypt instead of God's resting from Creation
Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies - "The heavens and the earth" (Genesis 1:1 ) circumscribe the entire Creation, or what we call the universe
Heir Heritage Inheritance - In Hebrews 1:2 Jesus is called the ‘heir of all things’ because He was the Instrument in Creation through whom the Father made the worlds (τοὺς αἰῶνας)
Law of God - But from the beginning of the Creation God made them male and female, etc
Lazarus - The story is ‘non-historical, like the History of the Creation in Genesis, and like the records of the other miracles in the Fourth Gospel; all of which are poetic developments
Christian (the Name) - 3), of a disposition to ignore or deny its pagan origin and to represent it as a Creation of the Apostolic or early Christian consciousness
Common Life - He clearly recognized the wisdom and the beauty and the love that shine forth in Creation and Providence
Barnabas - ...
As we read on in the Acts of the Apostles we come to the sad story of Ananias and Sapphira; then to the Creation of the office of the deaconship; then to the great services and the triumphant translation of Stephen; and, then, the east begins to break in the conversion of Saul of Tarsus
Job - In the wonderful speech of the Deity, Job 38, 39, every line delineates his attributes, every sentence opens a picture of some grand object in Creation, characterized by its most striking features
Simon Magus - They have in common the place in the work of Creation assigned to the female principle, the conception of the Deity; the ignorance of the rulers of this lower world with regard to the Supreme Power; the descent of the female ( Sophia ) into the lower regions, and her inability to return
Revelation - All analogy favours the idea that primitive revelation was such a manifestation of God when man was created as would he sufficient to maintain a true relation with Him, that at the Creation man had an immediate capacity, however immature, of entering into fellowship with God; and with this religions endowment we may assume a measure of Divine revelation sufficient to enable man to worship in an elementary way, and to keep true to God
Sin - The growth and arrogance of sin in the human race became so pronounced and universal that He is said to have rejected man completely, and in His wrath to have destroyed His Creation, which was infected by man’s corruption
Trinity - These relationships must be eternal and prior to His temporal relationships to the universe of His own Creation
Isaiah - The messianic hope was considered the blueprint of history fulfilled, the hope of humankind toward which all Creation moves
Romans, Book of - This complex of powers, opposed to God and His purpose in Creation, stands in unwavering hostility and opposition to another triad of powers (see Romans 5:18-21 ) in the realm of Christ: righteousness (against sin), grace (against law), and life (against death)
Winter - The designation ‘Wisdom of God,’ or simply ‘Wisdom,’ is sometimes applied to the Spirit of God as manifest in Creation and redemption, in the illumination of the mind and regeneration of the soul
Marriage - God's image in Genesis 1 includes ruling, creativity (procreation), reasoning power, decision-making, and relationship. ...
God commanded the male and female to perform two specific functions: procreation ("fruitful and multiply") and ruling over the earth ("subdue" and "rule") (Genesis 1:28 ). Humankind (male and female) receive God-ordained authority to rule over the rest of Creation, but not over each other. However, a married couple should desire to obey the divine injunction of procreation if possible
Ten Commandments - This shows that the succeeding commands, many of which are stated in terms of cases, are nevertheless based on principles inherent in God's Creation, and not simply situationally derived attempts to promote social harmony
Grace - That fact implies a fresh out-flow of energy from God and a fresh uplift of the world’s life; man is ‘a new Creation,’* Gregorius (32) Turonensis, Bishop of Tours - ...
Gregory begins his History with the Creation, and his first book consists largely of extracts from Eusebius, Jerome, and Orosius (Hist
Example - ...
In addition to these and all other specific expressions of the thought of Christ’s exampleship, there stands the great fact that the whole picture which the Evangelists drew of Jesus was made under the powerful influence of the twofold conviction that He was the image of the Father, so that by Him we know the ‘Christ-like God,’ and that He was the Ideal Man—not an ideal Creation of human fancy, but the Ideal-Real come from God Himself
Word - Almost immediately it is added, "All things were made by him;" which can only mean the Creation of universal nature
Psalms - It abounds not with those sudden changes of the person speaking which dazzle and astonish; but the imagery is borrowed from the delightful scenes with which Creation cheers the sight, and the pencil of the divine artist is dipped in the softer colours of nature
Poetry - The facts of experience are so grouped and wrought upon by the imagination as to become a new Creation
Peter, Second Epistle of - 2, and in the view of Creation, the Flood, and the Day of the Lord ( 2 Peter 3:5-7 )
Philippians, Epistle to - Rome was not so homogeneous, nor did it acknowledge his gospel so whole-heartedly as the Churches of his own Creation; thither would come Christians of every shade of opinion Judaists, Hellenists, Petrinists, and sympathizers with St
Predestination - Before the ages of time God foreordained the glory of the saints, and with a view to that consummation He purposed both Creation and redemption (1 Corinthians 2:7 with T
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - Some suggest that it is anchored in Creation vocabulary (e
Time - The later Jewish usage settled down to reckoning all events from the Creation of the world, which was supposed to have occurred in the 3761st year before the birth of Christ
Bible - The names we use are from the Greek Septuagint: "Genesis" (creation) answering to bereeshit ("in the beginning"
Number - in the Jewish text Methuselah lives to the age of 969, and is the longest lived of the patriarchs; in the Samaritan he lives only to be 720, and is surpassed by many of the other patriarchs; and the interval from the Creation to the Flood is 2262 years in the Septuagint, 1656 in the Jewish text, 1307 in the Samaritan text
Worldliness (2) - But just as, possessing a twofold nature, carnal and spiritual, he knows that the spiritual is the higher, so, enjoying a twofold communion, he is to learn that the spiritual fellowship must take precedence, its realization being his supreme duty and the end of his Creation
Justification - ’ Then, man’s self is appreciated from the Divine standpoint, as God saw Creation in its first being, not as it actually is in present attainment, nor as it will be in perfect fruition, but as it is ideally becoming when put upon the right basis and in the right atmosphere, the condition we find in ‘the stature of a perfect man’-Christ-the root and direction rather than the end or goal determining the judgment of its character
Ethics - The ideal man had figured largely in earlier ethical systems, but the ideal man of philosophy had been entirely a Creation of the imagination, and his actual existence never seems to have been thought of as a practical possibility
Justice (2) - Maeterlinck may be right in saying that nature knows nothing of justice; but in that case we should have to believe with him that neither can nature be regarded as the Creation of a Being in whom ethical attributes are supreme (Maeterlinck, Buried Temple, Essay on the ‘Mystery of Justice’)
Sorrow, Man of Sorrows - The world is a κόσμος, a Creation of order and beauty
Hebrews, Epistle to the - The rest now is neither that of Creation nor that of Canaan, but one still future, into which those enter who believe
Begetting - When John, speaking for himself, says in the Prologue (John 1:14), ‘The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among as, and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only-begotten of the Father,’ the subject of the sentence is He of whom he has just spoken as having been in the beginning with God, and as having been God’s agent in the work of Creation
Evolution (Christ And) - Creation awakes in man to the sense of its own origin and the possibility of its own consummation in a life of free spiritual communion with God
Fellowship (2) - ...
Little as the primitive Christians differed outwardly from the Jewish world, their inner world was a new Creation
Force - Paul himself by the working in him of Divine power (Ephesians 3:7); (3) the working of the same Divine power in the Creation or evolution of an order of moral unity in the relations of all men to one another in Christ; (4) the working of the same power as in Christ as destined to fashion the resurrection body of believers into the glorious likeness of His own, ‘according to the working whereby he is able even to subject all things unto himself’ (Philippians 3:21)
Prophet - ...
The formula "that it might be fulfilled" implies that the divine word spoken through the prophets ages before produced the result, which followed in the appointed time as necessarily as Creation followed from the creative word
David - in His Races - And then Law winds up with this, and I wish it would send you all to the golden works of that holiness-laden writer-Sometimes, he adds, imagine to yourselves that you saw holy David with his hands upon his harp, and his eyes fixed upon heaven, calling in transport upon all Creation, sun and moon, light and darkness, day and night, men and angels, to join with his rapturous soul in praising the Lord of heaven
Jonathan - It was a sweet fancy of Plato that at the great aboriginal Creation of human souls they all came from the hand of the God of power, and wisdom, and love, and holiness twain in one
Christ, Christology - The term “Messiah,” where it is found, relates to a human figure who, as a member of David's family, would usher in the restored kingdom and promote Israel's interests in the world, usually implying a triumph over Israel's enemies in a war of liberation (Song of Solomon), or in the Creation of a purified people (as in the hope entertained by the sect of the Dead Sea Scrolls at Qumran)
Paul - The person of faith is a new Creation with a new motivating, energizing force, the Holy Spirit (Romans 8:9-11 )
Grace - That fact implies a fresh out-flow of energy from God and a fresh uplift of the world’s life; man is ‘a new Creation,’* Christ, Christology - Christos [2], from chrio [3], to anoint), whom God has anointed to redeem his people and Creation
Canon of the Old Testament - Israel’s language was in its main features an inheritance from the common ancestors of the Semites; even its religious vocabulary was only in part its own Creation
Holy, Holiness - God's glorious nature, though radically distinct from Creation, is nonetheless manifested (Exodus 19:18 ; Isaiah 1,4 )
Kingdom Kingdom of God - Paul seems to express the belief that physical nature as now known to us must undergo some transformation at Christ’s return before it can be the scene of His Kingdom; ‘we know that the whole Creation groaneth and travaileth together in pain even until now
Humility - Humility as a sovereign grace is the Creation of Christianity
Communion (2) - The Word was the Agent in the work of Creation (John 1:3; John 1:10, cf
Deluge - According to the most approved systems of chronology, this remarkable event happened in the year 1656 after the Creation, or about 2348 before the Christian aera
John the Baptist - John in writing his Gospel, as we are assured by Irenaeus, Jerom, and others, was to refute the Cerinthians, Ebionites, and other heretics, whose tenets, though they branched out into a variety of subjects, all originated from erroneous opinions concerning the person of Christ, and the Creation of the world
Parable - This conception, as was stated above, is not held to be their own Creation, but is thought to be one that came to them from the age of the Jewish-Hellenistic literature
Synagogue - The synagogue is a new Creation for which the Exile alone offered the conditions (see Wellhausen, Isr
Eschatology - They began to understand that the Spirit, like Jesus, was the “firstfruits” of a new Creation (Romans 8:23 ), while those who turned to Christ became the firstfruits of a new humanity (Romans 16:5 ; James 1:18 ; Revelation 14:4 )
Revelation, the Book of - This now enthroned Lord will return to conclude world history (and the tribulations of the readers) with the destruction of God's enemies, the final salvation of His own people, and the Creation of a new heaven and a new earth
Life - He was the ‘living’ God, who could be known only through His activity in the Creation and moral government of the world
Character - The business of Jesus was not the chiselling and polishing of character, but primarily its Creation among the multitudes who would be shut out by the Pharisees from the kingdom of righteousness
Peter - The miraculous draught of fish overwhelmed Simon with awe at Jesus' presence; He who at Creation said, "let the waters bring forth abundantly" (John 21:166), now said, "let down your nets for a draught
Father, Fatherhood - It marks an advance upon that conception of Fatherhood which is derived from the fact of Creation, but it is still far removed from the view of Jesus
Jesus Christ - Is Creation a work of God? "By Jesus Christ were all things created, " Colossians 1:1-29
Jeremiah - " Touching Jeremiah's mouth (as Isaiah's; compare Jesus' touch, Matthew 9:21-29), Jehovah put His words in the prophet's mouth, so that the prophetic word became divinely efficient to produce its own fulfillment; even as the Word was the efficient cause of Creation
Perseverance - The will of God holds the primacy in ‘all Creation’ (Romans 11:36, etc
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - Moreover, the formation of God's new covenant people in Christ (2 Corinthians 3:1-18 ) is nothing less than a new Creation (Colossians 2:9-2960 )
Amos, Theology of - This renewed existence is described in terms that suggest a restored Eden and a new Creation (cf
Prophecy - Every object of nature and of art which could furnish allusions is explored with industry; every scene of Creation, and every page of science, seems to have unfolded its rich varieties to the sacred writers, who, in the spirit of Eastern poetry, delight in every kind of metaphorical embellishment
Inspiration - Or we may say that as God revealed Himself in Creation, in the history of His people, and especially, in Jesus Christ, He also enabled certain persons to perceive and express the significance of that revelation; and this ability is what we mean by inspiration
Immortality - The full manifestation of this life will bring deliverance for Creation (Romans 8:21) from the bondage of corruption (φθορά)
Caesarea Philippi - Acts 15:16), Jesus not only points to the future for the origin of His Church, but declares that it will be His own Creation
Fire - The old Creation is to be dissolved, and pass away in the final world-conflagration which prepares the way for the advent of new heavens and a new earth
Egypt - According to the Egyptian cosmogony, all things sprung from athor, or night, by which they denoted the darkness of chaos before the Creation
Parousia - 1 Thessalonians 1:10), they will reign in life (Romans 5:17); the justified have been predestined for this purpose and will finally be conformed to the image of Christ (Romans 8:29-30); their bodies will be quickened through the power of the Spirit of Christ already dwelling in them (Romans 8:11); when they are manifested the whole Creation also will be delivered from the bondage of corruption (Romans 8:19-21); when the fullness of the Gentiles is come in (i
Humility - Humility as a sovereign grace is the Creation of Christianity
Fire - The old Creation is to be dissolved, and pass away in the final world-conflagration which prepares the way for the advent of new heavens and a new earth
Quakers - We also are clearly of the judgment, that if the benevolence of the Gospel were generally prevalent in the minds of men, it would effectually prevent them from oppressing, much more from enslaving, their brethren (of whatever colour or complexion, ) for whom, as for themselves, Christ died; and would even influence their conduct in their treatment of the brute Creation, which would no longer groan, the victims of their avarice, or of their false ideas of pleasure
Judgment Damnation - It is improbable that this conception was a Creation of the Church; rather have we to think of the adoption and Christianizing of a current pagan myth of a saviour-god descending into the under world to wrest the sceptre from its powers
Ideas (Leading) - Its perfect realization belongs to the great future: it is the end to which all Creation and all history are tending
Turning - ), the new Creation (2 Corinthians 5:17, Galatians 6:15), the washing of regeneration and renewing of the Holy Ghost (Titus 3:5), all point to another side of the matter
Grace - ...
In connecting grace to election Paul sees God as electing us before the Creation of the world for the purpose of holiness and blamelessness (Ephesians 1:4 )
Lord's Day - a connexion with the first day of Creation and ever, with the Ascension was assumed; though these were trifling compared with some mediaeval developments
Gnosticism - The view was that from God there emanated a series of beings called ‘aeons,’ each step in the genealogy meaning a diminution of purity; and the Demiurge was the Creation of an aeon far down, indeed the very lowest in the scale
Son of God - ’ (1) The angels are thus designated, as when in the Book of Job (Job 38:7) it is mentioned that at the dawn of Creation ‘the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy
Apocalyptic Literature - The second vision (85–90) unfolded before him the whole history of Israel from the Creation of man to the end of time
Ascension (2) - ’ But the new Creation is his own proper life, to live below it is to degrade his nature
Methodists - It is a new Creation; and none can create a soul anew but He who at first created the heavens and the earth
Mahometanism - In the Koran are advanced the following assertions, among others already noticed: That both Jews and Christians are idolaters; that the patriarchs and Apostles were Mohammedans; that the angels worshipped Adam, and that the fallen angels were driven from heaven for not doing so; that our blessed Saviour was neither God, nor the Son of God; and that he assured Mohammed of this in a conference with the Almighty and him; yet that he was both the word and Spirit of God: not to mention numberless absurdities concerning the Creation, the deluge, the end of the world, the resurrection, the day of judgment, too gross to be received by any except the most debased understandings
Omnipresence - It is not a substantial, but an operative presence of God in Creation which is suggested to us by the word ‘spirit
Personality - 154), ‘No intellectual Creation can ever be perfected by dint of a mere psychological possibility; it must first be fructified and awakened by a higher inspiration
Psalms (2) - ’ According to the Epistle, however, Jesus took part in the Creation, and was pre-existent before all eternity (Hebrews 1:2; Hebrews 1:10); consequently we must suppose that the ‘begetting to-day’ refers to His eternal generation
Romans, Epistle to the - How glorious and how certain is our inheritance! That redemption for which Creation groans most surely awaits us, far more than recompensing our present woes; and patience becomes us who have already received the first-fruits of the Spirit
Atonement - -This is the starting-point of the new experience; the ultimate root of the apostolic doctrine of atonement was the presence of the Risen Christ in the consciousness of the primitive Christian community; for it was the secret of the restoration and enrichment of personal faith, the re-creation of the corporate confidence of the community which ‘was begotten again unto a, living hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead’ (1 Peter 1:3)
Samaria, Samaritans - Still, the modern Samaritan believes in a resurrection, in the distinction between good and evil spirits, in a judgment, and in the Creation from nothing
Israel - This is clearly the case with the Creation and Deluge narratives, parallels to which have been found in Babylonian and Assyrian literature
Law - Our Lord’s reformation of the marriage law is also a case for ( b ) above: He rectifies the law by the aid of the law; in man’s Creation He finds a principle which nullifies the provisions that facilitated divorce
Psalms, Theology of - The hymnic psalms focus on the praise of Yahweh for his majesty and his sovereignty and beneficence in the realms of Creation, history, and human affairs
Josephus - In the Antiquities Josephus recounts in twenty books the history of his people from the Creation of the world
Gospels (Apocryphal) - The child Jesus is a boy among boys, taking His part in the usual games and occupations of childhood; and yet the belief in His supernatural dignity is evidenced by the extraordinary miracles attributed to Him, and by His astonishing knowledge, which drew the confession from His teacher: ‘This child is not earthborn; assuredly he was born before the Creation of the world’ (ch
Jesus Christ - Jesus, in short, is needed to explain the Church and cannot be Himself explained as the product of His own Creation
Freedom of the Will - ’ The paragraph begins with a call to resist temptation; it goes on to show the inevitable results of attending to the suggestions of evil; it ends with the assertion that God brought us forth to be first-fruits, as it were, of His own Creation-that is, around man’s freedom of choice lies God’s purpose of blessing and salvation; and we complete the NT view if we add that the fulfilment of this purpose means a freedom which is no more of choice but of absolute oneness with the great orbital movement of God’s love
Divinity of Christ - It is illegitimate to seek to resolve it into a Creation of the religious idealizing faculty of believers in Him
Eusebius (60), Bishop of Nicomedia - "The external (prophoric) word was a created Being made in the beginning of all things as the visible emblem of the internal (endiathetic) word, and (used as) the instrument of God's purposes towards His Creation" (Newman, l
Moses - ...
To Moses we owe that important portion of Holy Scripture, the Pentateuch, which brings us acquainted with the Creation of the world, the entrance of sin and death, the first promises of redemption, the flood, the peopling of the postdiluvian earth, and the origin of nations, the call of Abraham, and the giving of the law
Prophet - 3) speaks of Him as ‘the only High Priest of all men, the only King of all Creation, and the Father’s only supreme Prophet of prophets’ (see also Ambrose on Ps 118:79, and Cassiodorus on Psalms 132:2)
Valentinus, Founder of a Gnostic Sect - They shall dissolve the world without themselves suffering dissolution and be lords over the Creation and over all transitory things (Valent
John, Gospel of (Critical) - ’ He brings forward other analogies, all of which are equally fanciful, but serve to show that this firm belief in the fourfold Gospel as a Divine arrangement could not have been a Creation of his own mind, but represents a tradition of considerable antiquity
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - For the Logos as the Agent in Creation, and its life-giving and sustaining principle, cf
Incarnation (2) - In particular, there is a tendency to hypostatize the Word of God and to ascribe to it almost as to a person the functions of Creation and of judgment. Whatever mediation is wanted is found in man himself, who is Creation’s crown, to whom nature is bound by community of substance, in whose destiny, for weal or woe, nature is profoundly implicated
Enoch Book of - 7th: general apostasy; the elect righteous elected to receive seven-fold instruction concerning all Creation (= Enoch’s revelations)
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - He translated the Chronicle of Eusebius, a large work, which embraces the chronology from the Creation to a
Character of Christ - , that contemporary I ideas and experiences have influenced their authors or editors, that in some cases the Evangelists have misunderstood or misreported their Master; yet the fact remains, that the character of Christ, as presented in these documents, was not, and could not have been, an invention or a fiction, a product of progressive meditation, or a Creation of enthusiastic feeling
Christ in Modern Thought - The extreme deistic view is, that Creation is left to itself save for occasional Divine interferences
Hippolytus Romanus - Though Hippolytus acknowledges the Logos to have been from eternity dwelling in God as His intelligence, he yet appears to teach that there was a definite epoch determined by the will of God, prior no doubt to all Creation, when that Logos, which had previously dwelt impersonally in God, assumed a separate hypostatic existence, in order that by Him the world should be framed and the Deity manifested to it
Art - He meets Celsus’ charge that ‘we shrink from raising altars, statues, and temples,’ by saying that Celsus ‘does not perceive that we regard the spirit of every good man as an altar,’ and that Christ is ‘the most excellent image in all Creation,’ and ‘that we do refuse to build lifeless temples to the Giver of all life, let anyone who chooses learn how we are taught that our bodies are the temple of God
Fact And Theory - Thus the Creation of the Universe and of man, with God’s image in his heart and able to see God in the work of His hands, is to be regarded as an act of self-revelation on the part of God
Archaeology And Biblical Study - Of particular interest are mythological stories relating traditions of Creation and of a great flood as understood by the people of ancient Mesopotamia
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - For Constantinople, as a city whose imperial dignity was of modern Creation, was not a metropolitan see, but subject ecclesiastically to the metropolitan of Heraclea (otherwise Perinthus), who was exarch of the province of Thrace
Cyprianus (1) Thascius Caecilius - ) by direct succession, and the diaconate is the Creation of his predecessors
God - By this were manifested—his eternity and self- existence, as he who creates must be before all creatures, and he who gives being to others can himself derive it from none:—his almighty power, shown both in the act of Creation and in the number and vastness of the objects so produced:—his wisdom, in their arrangement, and in their fitness to their respective ends:—and his goodness, as the whole tended to the happiness of sentient beings
Bible - Five of them proceed from Moses; they include as well the laws, as an account of the Creation of man, extending to the time of his (Moses) death
Jesus Christ - In the very first promise of redemption, his superiority to that great and malignant spirit who destroyed the innocence of man, and blighted the fair Creation of God, is unquestionably implied; while the Angel of the Divine Presence, the Angel of the Covenant, who appears so prominent in the patriarchal times, and the early periods of Jewish history, and was understood by the early Jews as the future Messiah, is seen at once as a being distinct from Jehovah and yet Jehovah himself; bearing that incommunicable name; and performing acts, and possessing qualities of unquestionable divinity. " In the same manner Psalms 102:25-28 , is applied to Christ by the same authority, and there he is represented as the creator of all things, changing his Creations as a vesture, and yet himself continuing the same unchanged being amidst all the mutations of the universe
Person of Christ - All that the Apostles say of the pre-existing glory of Christ with God, or of Creation as mediated through His agency, takes a place quite naturally as part of its implicit content
Paul (2) - The impression that the Apostle received was so overpowering, that it seemed to make his whole life a different thing; ‘a new Creation,’ he called it himself (Galatians 6:15); ‘the life which I now live in the flesh, I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me’ (Galatians 2:20)
Pelagianism And Pelagius - Nature was magnified, as if the admission of a subsequent corruption was derogatory to the goodness of the original Creation
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - ) the history of the Creation
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - The story of the bird was evidently suggested to Mohammed by the account of the Creation of twelve sparrows from mud, recorded in the apocryphal Gospel of Thomas the Israelite
Mahometanism - That both Mahomet, and those among his followers who are reckoned orthodox, had and continued to have just and true notions of God and his attributes, appears so plain from the Koran itself, and all the Mahometan divines, that it would be loss of time to refute those who suppose the God of Mahomet to be different from the true God, and only a fictitious deity or idol of his own Creation