What does Covetousness mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἐπιθυμίαν desire 2
πλεονεξίαν greedy desire to have more 2
πλεονεξίᾳ greedy desire to have more 2
בָּ֑צַע profit 2
ἀφιλάργυρος not loving money 1
πλεονεξίας greedy desire to have more 1
πλεονεξία greedy desire to have more 1
בָ֑צַע profit 1
בִּצְע֛וֹ profit 1
בִּצְעֶ֑ךָ profit 1
בִּצְעֵֽךְ profit 1
בֶ֝֗צַע profit 1
בָּֽצַע profit 1

Definitions Related to Covetousness

H1215


   1 profit, unjust gain, gain (profit) acquired by violence.
   

G4124


   1 greedy desire to have more, Covetousness, avarice.
   

G1939


   1 desire, craving, longing, desire for what is forbidden, lust.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 3806, pathos.
   See entry 5845 for comparison of synonyms.
   

G866


   1 not loving money, not avaricious.
   

Frequency of Covetousness (original languages)

Frequency of Covetousness (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Covetousness
A strong desire after the possession of worldly things (Colossians 3:5 ; Ephesians 5:5 ; Hebrews 13:5 ; 1 Timothy 6:9,10 ; Matthew 6:20 ). It assumes sometimes the more aggravated form of avarice, which is the mark of cold-hearted worldliness.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Covetousness
Strong desire to have that which belongs to another. It is considered to be a very grievous offense in Scripture. The tenth commandment forbids coveting anything that belongs to a neighbor, including his house, his wife, his servants, his ox or donkey, or anything that belongs to him (Exodus 20:17 ). Jesus listed covetousness or greed along with many of the sins from within, including adultery, theft, and murder, which make a person unclean (Mark 7:22 ). Paul reminded the Ephesians that greed or covetousness is equated with immorality and impurity, so that these must be put away (5:3). A covetous or greedy person is an idolator (5:5) and covetousness is idolatry (Colossians 3:5 ). James warns that people kill and covet because they cannot have what they want (4:2).
Covetousness, therefore, is basic to the commandments against murder, adultery, stealing, and lying. Those who accept bribes are coveting, leading to murder (Ezekiel 22:12 ). Coveting a neighbor's wife is a form of adultery (Exodus 20:17 ). Achan admitted to coveting a robe and silver and gold, so he stole them, which was a sin against the Lord (Joshua 7:20-22 ). Gehazi, the servant of Elisha, coveted the property of Naaman so much that he lied to get what he wanted from Naaman the leper (2 Kings 5:19-25 ) and was struck with leprosy. Proverbs warns that a covetous person brings trouble to his family (15:27). Thus covetousness is the root of all kinds of sins, so that Jesus gave the warning, "Be on your guard against all kinds of greed" (Luke 12:15 ).
William J. Woodruff
See also Envy
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Covetousness
An unreasonable desire after that we have not, with a dissatisfaction with what we have. It may farther be considered as consisting in,
1. An anxious carking care about the things of this world.
2. A rapacity in getting.
3. Too frequently includes sinister and illegal ways of obtaining wealth.
4. A tenaciousness in keeping. It is a vice which marvellously prevails upon and insinuates into the heart of man, and for these reasons: it often bears a near resemblance to virtue; brings with it man plausible reasons; and raises a man to a state of reputation on account of his riches. "There cannot be, " as one observes, "a more unreasonable sin than this. It is unjust; only to covet, is to wish to be unjust. It is cruel: the covetous must harden themselves against a thousand plaintive voices. It is foolish: it destroys reputation, breaks the rest, unfits for the performance of duty, and is a contempt of God himself: it is unprecedented in all our examples of virtue mentioned in the Scripture. One, indeed, spoke unadvisedly with his lips; another cursed and swore; a third was in a passion; and a fourth committed adultery; but which of the saints ever lived in a habit of covetousness? Lastly, it is idolatry, Col.iii.
5. the idolatry of the heart; where, as in a temple, the miserable wretch excludes God, sets up gold instead of him, and places that confidence in it which belongs to the Great Supreme alone." Let those who live in the habitual practice of it consider the judgments that have been inflicted on such characters, Joshua 7:21 . Acts 5:1-42 :; the misery with which it is attended; the curse such persons are to society; the denunciations and cautions respecting it in the Holy Scripture; and how effectually it bars men from God, from happiness, and from heaven. Scott's Essays, 72, 73. South's Serm., vol. 4: ser. 1; Robinson's Mor. Exercises, ex. iv; Saurin's Serm., vol. 5: ser. 12. Eng. Trans.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Covetousness
COVETOUSNESS . In the Bible, covetousness is a crime. In the Ten Commandments it is put under the ban along with murder, adultery, theft, and slander ( Exodus 20:17 , Deuteronomy 5:21 ). Achan was guilty of this crime, and was stoned to death ( Joshua 7:16-26 ). Every occurrence of the word or the thing in the OT is connected with a prohibition or a curse ( Psalms 10:3 ; Psalms 119:36 , Proverbs 21:26 ; Proverbs 28:16 , Isaiah 57:17 , Habakkuk 2:9 ). In the NT adultery and covetousness are usually classed together ( 1 Corinthians 5:11 ; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10 , Colossians 3:5 , 2 Peter 2:14 ). This conjunction of sensual sin and love of money probably rests upon the authority of Jesus ( Mark 7:21-22 ). Jesus and the Apostles declared that the worshipper of Bacchus and the worshipper of Venus and the worshipper of Mammon belong to one and the same class. Grasping avarice is as incompatible with the spirit of self-sacrifice taught in the NT as is the selfish indulgence in drink or the grosser indulgence in vice. The Bible puts the covetous man in the same category with the murderer and the thief. The Christian Church needs to study anew the Bible teaching concerning covetousness, as found in Jeremiah 22:17 , Micah 2:2 , Luke 12:15 , Romans 7:7 , Ephesians 5:3 ; Ephesians 5:6 , 1 Timothy 6:10 , Hebrews 13:5 , and other passages. No covetous man has any inheritance in the Kingdom of God.
D. A. Hayes.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Covetousness
COVETOUSNESS.—This word (Gr. πλεονεξία) has the root-idea of greed, shown in a strong desire to acquire, even more than in a keen wish to keep. In the Gospels, as elsewhere in Scripture [1], the term is confined to a reference to property; the verb (πλεονεκτέω) is wider in sense. As the complexity of social life increases, so may the shapes the evil can assume. To ordinary avarice have to be added subtle temptations in the realm of rank and fashion, conventional ambition, cultured ease, or delight in successful activity unsubordinated to ethical aims. The tinge of covetousness comes in wherever men so absorb their life in the temporal that they impair its high instincts for the spiritual. ‘What is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world and lose his own soul?’ (Matthew 16:26).
To the mind of Jesus what stands condemned is, characteristically, the possession of a certain spirit—the spirit of grasping selfishness. The forms assumed, the methods employed, are not minutely dealt with, and not matters for specific cure. Rather the one tap-root is to be cut, or a general atmosphere created in which the noxious weed must perish. And the almighty power to this end is the holy spirit of the gospel, which on the one hand is a spirit of loving trust towards God the Father in providence, and on the other a tender feeling towards fellow-mortals which prompts to ready sacrifice of all things to their good. The man with the great possessions (Mark 10:17), who attracted Jesus, had yet one luxury to discover—that of doing good, giving to the poor, and so coveting wealth of the right kind. Not the coming to our hands of earthly good is condemned, but the absence of the one spirit which shall inform and vitalize its use. The triumph of religion is to turn it into ‘treasure in heaven’ (Mark 10:21).
A classical passage is Matthew 6:19-34, with which compare Luke 12:22-34; Luke 16:13-15. The higher life being concerned with faith and goodness and the things of the spirit—the realm revealed in the Beatitudes, it is clear inversion to be absorbed for their own sake in the things of time and sense. ‘Moth and rust’ are the emblems of their corruptibility; and they are unstable, like property exposed to ‘thieves.’ It is the mark of a pagan mind to be full of anxious and self-centred concern for meat and drink and raiment (Matthew 6:32). Such persons reverse unconsciously Christ’s principle that ‘the life is more than meat’ (Matthew 6:25); and the Pharisees, ‘who were covetous’ (Luke 16:14), by their blindness to the true order of importance called forth essentially the same rebuke, ‘that which is highly esteemed amongst men, is abomination in the sight of God’ (Luke 16:15). Though they had one eye for religion, they kept the other for the world, hence inevitably their truly distorted views. In the last resort of psychological analysis ‘no man can serve two masters’ (Matthew 6:24), and the Pharisees are pilloried for evermore as the awful example of hypocrisy in this respect. With Jesus, in these passages, the first postulate of religious worth is, that people must be single-minded and whole-hearted in service—‘Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also’ (Matthew 6:21). And to only one quarter can the enlightened heart turn—‘the kingdom of God and his righteousness’ (Matthew 6:33). Coincident with that, as humble faith feels, all needed things shall be added unto us. With exquisite insight Jesus points to the fowls of the air and the lilies of the field as eloquent at once of the minuteness of Divine Providence, and the trust we may place in a Heavenly Father’s care. ‘Are not ye,’ He asks, ‘much better than they?’ (Matthew 6:26). (Cf. as an enforcement of the lesson, Christ’s own unworldliness of character, and trustfulness in earthly matters. And as a counter-illustration to the Pharisees, cf. the convert from their straitest sect, St. Paul, who having food and raiment learned therewith to be content, 1 Timothy 6:8, cf. Philippians 4:11).
On a question arising of family inheritance (Luke 12:13-15), Jesus warns against covetousness, and for impressive depth nothing excels the summary there—‘A man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth’ (Luke 12:15). As one concerned with the spiritual domain, Jesus refuses to touch the civil matter of property. Wisdom lay in leaving questions of the law to lawyers, although the consideration is doubtless implied that even then there should be found a permeation of the Christian spirit. The point which Jesus presses is the falsity of the vulgar notion that it is ‘possessions’ which make life worth living. Devotion to the outward is, in His gospel, vanity; the loving and discerning soul has God for its possession, and from sheer sympathy of heart joys in His work amongst men.
A parable follows (Luke 12:16-21), not necessarily associated originally with the foregoing incident, although in full affinity of theme. The Rich Fool is the personification of the successfully covetous man, and yet a revelation in almost the same breath of how little such success amounts to from the standpoint of eternity. He sowed only to the world; therefore he reaped inwardly no riches of the spirit. ‘So is he,’ saith Jesus, ‘that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich towards God’ (Luke 12:21). There is affinity of teaching in the parable of Dives and Lazarus (which see).
Literature.—The standard works on the Sermon on the Mount and on the Parables. Among special discourses: F. W. Robertson, Sermons, 2nd series, Serm. I. (with which compare XVII. of 1st series); J. Service on ‘Profit and Loss’ in Salvation Here and Hereafter; J. Oswald Dykes, The Relations of the Kingdom to the World, pt. i.; A. Maclaren, A Year’s Ministry, 1st series, No. 16; J. Martineau, Hours of Thought ii. and iii., Endeavours after the Christian Life, pp. 76–86; Mozley, University Sermons, pp. 275–290.
George Murray.
Webster's Dictionary - Covetousness
(1):
(n.) A strong or inordinate desire of obtaining and possessing some supposed good; excessive desire for riches or money; - in a bad sense.
(2):
(n.) Strong desire.
King James Dictionary - Covetousness
COVETOUSNESS, n.
1. A strong or inordinate desire of obtaining and possessing some supposed good usually in a bad sense, and applied to an inordinate desire of wealth or avarice. Out of the heart proceedeth covetousness. Mark 7 .
Mortify your members--and covetousness which is idolatry. Colossians 3 .
2. Strong desire eagerness.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Covet, Covetous, Covetousness
A — 1: ἐπιθυμέω (Strong's #1937 — Verb — epithumeo — ep-ee-thoo-meh'-o ) "to fix the desire upon" (epi, "upon," used intensively, thumos, "passion"), whether things good or bad; hence, "to long for, lust after, covet," is used with the meaning "to covet evilly" in Acts 20:33 , of "coveting money and apparel;" so in Romans 7:7 ; 13:9 . See DESIRE , FAIN , LUST.
A — 2: ζηλόω (Strong's #2206 — Verb — zeloo — dzay-lo'-o ) is rendered "covet earnestly," in 1 Corinthians 12:31 , AV; RV, "desire earnestly," as in 1 Corinthians 14:39 (AV "covet"). See AFFECT , DESIRE , ENVY , JEALOUS , ZEALOUS.
A — 3: ὀρέγω (Strong's #3713 — Verb — orego — or-eg'-om-ahee ) "to stretch after," is rendered "covet after" in 1 Timothy 6:10 , AV; RV, "reaching after." See DESIRE , REACH.
B — 1: ἐπιθυμητής (Strong's #1938 — Noun Masculine — epithumetes — ep-ee-thoo-may-tace' ) "a luster after" (akin to A, No. 1), is translated in 1 Corinthians 10:6 , in verbal form, "should not lust after." See LUST.
B — 2: ἐπιθυμία (Strong's #1939 — Noun Feminine — epithumia — ep-ee-thoo-mee'-ah ) denotes "coveting," Romans 7:7,8 , RV; AV, "lust" and "concupiscence;" the commandment here referred to convicted him of sinfulness in his desires for unlawful objects besides that of gain. See DESIRE , LUST.
B — 3: πλεονεξία (Strong's #4124 — Noun Feminine — pleonexia — pleh-on-ex-ee'-ah ) "covetousness," lit., "a desire to have more" (pleon, "more," echo, "to have"), always in a bad sense, is used in a general way in Mark 7:22 (plural, lit., "covetings," i.e., various ways in which "covetousness" shows itself); Romans 1:29 ; Ephesians 5:3 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:5 . Elsewhere it is used, (a) of material possessions, Luke 12:15 ; 2 Peter 2:3 ; 2 Corinthians 9:5 (RV, "extortion"), lit., "as (a matter of) extortion" i.e., a gift which betrays the giver's unwillingness to bestow what is due; (b) of sensuality, Ephesians 4:19 , "greediness;" Colossians 3:5 (where it is called "idolatry"); 2 Peter 2:14 (AV, "covetous practices"). See EXTORTION.
Note: Cp. the corresponding verb pleonekteo, "to gain, take advantage of wrong." See ADVANTAGE , DEFRAUD , GAIN , B, Note (2), WRONG.
C — 1: πλεονέκτης (Strong's #4123 — Noun Masculine — pleonektes — pleh-on-ek'-tace ) lit., "(eager) to have more" (see B, No. 3), i.e., to have what belongs to others; hence, "greedy of gain, covetous," 1 Corinthians 5:10,11 ; 6:10 ; Ephesians 5:5 ("covetous man").
C — 2: φιλάργυρος (Strong's #5366 — Adjective — philarguros — fil-ar'-goo-ros ) lit., "money-loving," is rendered "covetous" in the AV of Luke 16:14 ; 2 Timothy 3:2 ; RV, "lovers of money," the wider and due significance.
C — 3: ἀφιλάργυρος (Strong's #866 — Adjective — aphilarguros — af-il-ar'-goo-ros ) No. 2, with negative prefix, is translated "without covetousness" in Hebrews 13:5 , AV; RV, "free from the love of money." In 1 Timothy 3:3 , the AV has "not covetous," the RV, "no lover of money."
Note: Trench, Syn. 24, points out the main distinction between pleonexia and philarguria as being that between "covetousness" and avarice, the former having a much wider and deeper sense, being "the genus of which philarguria is the species." The "covetous" man is often cruel as well as grasping, while the avaricious man is simply miserly and stinting.

Sentence search

Parsimony - Covetousness. ...
See Covetousness
Covetousness - Covetousness, n. Out of the heart proceedeth Covetousness. ...
Mortify your members--and Covetousness which is idolatry
Casiphia - Money; Covetousness
Avarice - —See Covetousness
Covet - The sin of Covetousness covers a wide range of unlawful and self-centred desires. Selfish ambition, sexual lusts and common greed are all forms of Covetousness (Deuteronomy 5:21; Psalms 78:18; Proverbs 6:25; Matthew 5:28; 1 Timothy 6:9-10; James 4:2-3; 1 John 2:16). Because Covetousness drives people to get what they want, it produces all kinds of immoral and unlawful behaviour, such as stealing, oppression, deceit and violence (Exodus 20:17; Joshua 7:21; Micah 2:2; 1 Corinthians 5:9-11). ...
Among the Ten Commandments is one that forbids Covetousness. Sins such as murder, adultery, stealing and lying are outward, but Covetousness is inward. A person may not be guilty of sinful actions that are obvious to all, but still be guilty of the hidden sin of Covetousness (Matthew 5:21-30). He saw, in addition, that Covetousness is a form of idolatry. ...
One reason why Covetousness is so dangerous is that good living, hard working, highly respected people can be guilty of it, yet not be aware of it. ...
Christians can resist the temptation to Covetousness through exercising sacrificial love
Capital Sins - In Catholicism, the seven causes of all sin: pride, Covetousness, lust, anger, gluttony, envy, sloth...
Cupidity - ) Eager or inordinate desire, especially for wealth; greed of gain; avarice; Covetousness...
Misery - ) Covetousness; niggardliness; avarice
Covetousness - Jesus listed Covetousness or greed along with many of the sins from within, including adultery, theft, and murder, which make a person unclean (Mark 7:22 ). Paul reminded the Ephesians that greed or Covetousness is equated with immorality and impurity, so that these must be put away (5:3). A covetous or greedy person is an idolator (5:5) and Covetousness is idolatry (Colossians 3:5 ). ...
Covetousness, therefore, is basic to the commandments against murder, adultery, stealing, and lying. Thus Covetousness is the root of all kinds of sins, so that Jesus gave the warning, "Be on your guard against all kinds of greed" (Luke 12:15 )
Worldliness - ) The quality of being worldly; a predominant passion for obtaining the good things of this life; Covetousness; addictedness to gain and temporal enjoyments; worldly-mindedness
Greed - An excessive or reprehensible desire to acquire; Covetousness. Jesus warned against all types of greed ( Luke 12:15 ; KJV Covetousness)
Horseleach - Typifying rapacious and cruel Covetousness
Covetousness - Covetousness . In the Bible, Covetousness is a crime. In the NT adultery and Covetousness are usually classed together ( 1 Corinthians 5:11 ; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10 , Colossians 3:5 , 2 Peter 2:14 ). The Christian Church needs to study anew the Bible teaching concerning Covetousness, as found in Jeremiah 22:17 , Micah 2:2 , Luke 12:15 , Romans 7:7 , Ephesians 5:3 ; Ephesians 5:6 , 1 Timothy 6:10 , Hebrews 13:5 , and other passages
Avarice - (Latin: avere, to crave) ...
(covetousness) The inordinate love of temporal goods usually estimable in terms of money
Lust - ) To have an eager, passionate, and especially an inordinate or sinful desire, as for the gratification of the sexual appetite or of Covetousness; - often with after
Misery - Covetousness
Extort, Extortion, Extortioner - ...
B — 2: πλεονεξία (Strong's #4124 — Noun Feminine — pleonexia — pleh-on-ex-ee'-ah ) "covetousness, desire for advantage," is rendered "extortion" in 2 Corinthians 9:5 , RV, (AV and RV marg. , "covetousness")
Gehazi - His Covetousness and falsehoods were punished by a perpetual leprosy, 2 Kings 5:20-27 , B
Covet, Covetous, Covetousness - ...
B — 3: πλεονεξία (Strong's #4124 — Noun Feminine — pleonexia — pleh-on-ex-ee'-ah ) "covetousness," lit. , various ways in which "covetousness" shows itself); Romans 1:29 ; Ephesians 5:3 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:5 . 2, with negative prefix, is translated "without Covetousness" in Hebrews 13:5 , AV; RV, "free from the love of money. 24, points out the main distinction between pleonexia and philarguria as being that between "covetousness" and avarice, the former having a much wider and deeper sense, being "the genus of which philarguria is the species
Adultery - ...
Idolatry, Covetousness, and apostasy are spoken of as adultery spiritually ( Jeremiah 3:6,8,9 ; Ezekiel 16:32 ; Hosea 1:2:3 ;; Revelation 2:22 )
Desire - Desire of pleasures of sense, is called sensuality; of honour, is called ambition; of riches, Covetousness
Torment (2) - Christ addressed the startling language of this parable to men who were hurting their souls by Covetousness
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - (John 12:6 ; 13:29 ) The Galilean or Judean peasant found himself entrusted with larger sums of money than before, and with this there came Covetousness, unfaithfulness, embezzlement. ( Matthew 26:6-14 ) (2) Avarice, Covetousness, the thirty pieces of silver. (4) A much larger Covetousness, --an ambition to be the treasurer, not merely of a few poor disciples, but of a great and splendid temporal kingdom of the Messiah
Sobriety - In our pursuit of this world, as opposed to Covetousness
Ahab - Because of his idolatry, lust, and Covetousness, Ahab is referred to as pre-eminently the type of a wicked king (2Kings 8:18; 2 Chronicles 22:3 ; Micah 6:16 )
Steal - Covetousness and greed are usually the cause of stealing (Micah 2:2; James 1:14-15; James 4:1-2; see COVET), though some people steal because they are poor and in desperate need (Proverbs 30:8-9)
Judas Iscariot - Judas, the leading trait in whose character was Covetousness, was probably induced to follow Jesus at first with a view to the riches, honours, and other temporal advantages, which he, in common with the rest, expected the Messiah's friends would enjoy. Even the rebukes of Jesus for his Covetousness, and the detection of his treacherous scheme, although they unquestionably offended Judas, might only serve to stimulate him to the speedier execution of his plot, during the feast of the passover, while the great concourse of the Jews, from all parts assembled, might powerfully support the sanhedrim and their Messiah against the Romans. It will, however, be recollected, that the only key which the evangelic narrative affords, is, Judas's Covetousness; which passion was, in him, a growing one
Covetousness - COVETOUSNESS. The tinge of Covetousness comes in wherever men so absorb their life in the temporal that they impair its high instincts for the spiritual. ...
On a question arising of family inheritance (Luke 12:13-15), Jesus warns against Covetousness, and for impressive depth nothing excels the summary there—‘A man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth’ (Luke 12:15)
Covetousness - One, indeed, spoke unadvisedly with his lips; another cursed and swore; a third was in a passion; and a fourth committed adultery; but which of the saints ever lived in a habit of Covetousness? Lastly, it is idolatry, Col
Contentment - Our Lord inculcated it negatively by His warnings against Covetousness ( Luke 12:15-21 ), positively by His teaching as to the Fatherhood of God ( Matthew 6:25-32 ||) and the Kingdom of God ( Matthew 6:33 , cf
Achan - " A salutary warning to all Israel of the fatal effect of robbing God of His due through Covetousness. The spoil of Jericho was the firstfruits of Canaan, sacred to Jehovah; Achan's sacrilegious Covetousness in appropriating it needed to be checked at the outset, lest the sin spreading should mar the end for which Canaan was given to Israel
Exercise - , "gymnastic"), 1 Timothy 4:7 , with a view to godliness; Hebrews 5:14 , of the senses, so as to discern good and evil; Hebrews 12:11 , of the effect of chastening, the spiritual "exercise" producing the fruit of righteousness; 2 Peter 2:14 , of certain evil teachers with hearts "exercised in Covetousness," RV
Miser - ...
See AVARICE, Covetousness
Advantage - pleonektes, "a covetous person," pleonexia, "covetousness
Judas Iscariot - Satan knew the Covetousness of Judas and put it into his heart to betray the Lord for money, which he did for thirty pieces of silver
Envy (2) - Jealousy is enmity prompted by fear; envy is enmity prompted by Covetousness’ (Century Dictionary, s. Covetousness and Jealousy
Habakkuk - " The rapacity of the Babylonian is spoken of, and then woes are pronounced against the oppressor, for his Covetousness, his blood-shedding, his debauchery, and his idolatry
Boar - Probably they refrained themselves from the flesh, and compromised between conscience and Covetousness by selling them to their neighbors the Gentiles
Pride - It may be considered as the parent of discontent, ingratitude, Covetousness, poverty, presumption, passion, extravagance, bigotry, war, and persecution
Gehazi - In contrast with the spirit of the other characters, his Covetousness and lying stand out in black hideousness in the story of Naaman (wh
Idol - Paul seemingly broadened the scope of idolatry for Christianity when he identified Covetousness with idolatry (Colossians 3:5 )
Cloke - ...
The word ‘cloke’ appears in an extended meaning: (1) ἐν προφάσει πλεονεξίας, ‘a cloke of Covetousness’ (1 Thessalonians 2:5); and (2) ἐπικάλυμμα τῆς κακίας, ‘a cloke of wickedness (or malice)’ (1 Peter 2:16)
Commander - In such a context, śar means “leader,” “ruler,” and “judge”: “Moreover thou shalt provide out of all the people able men, such as fear God, men of truth, hating Covetousness; and place such over them, to be rulers of thousands, and rulers of hundreds, rulers of fifties, and rulers of tens …” ( Pharisees - In numerous cases Christ denounced the Pharisees for their pride and Covetousness, their ostentation in prayers, alms, tithes, and facts, Matthew 6:2,5 Luke 18:9 , and their hypocrisy in employing the garb of religion to cover the profligacy of their dispositions and conduct; as Matthew 23:1-39 Luke 16:14 John 7:48,49 8:9
Money - ...
In 1 Timothy 6:10 , Paul speaks of the "love of money" as a root of all evils; censuring not money itself, but the love of ita prevailing form of human selfishness and Covetousness
Cloke - ...
The word ‘cloke’ appears in an extended meaning: (1) ἐν προφάσει πλεονεξίας, ‘a cloke of Covetousness’ (1 Thessalonians 2:5); and (2) ἐπικάλυμμα τῆς κακίας, ‘a cloke of wickedness (or malice)’ (1 Peter 2:16)
John the Baptist - Self-love and Covetousness were the prevalent sins of the people at large
Gold - —As the emblem of wealth, gold is closely connected with that Covetousness in the will and heart of man which is described as the motive and meeting-place of all idolatries (Colossians 3:5)
Gold - —As the emblem of wealth, gold is closely connected with that Covetousness in the will and heart of man which is described as the motive and meeting-place of all idolatries (Colossians 3:5)
Gift, Giving - Since gifts might be required by custom, law, or force, modifiers are sometimes used to specify gifts given voluntarily: “willing” or freewill offerings or gifts (Exodus 35:29 ); free gift or “gift by grace” (Romans 5:15-17 ; Romans 6:23 ); bountiful gift not motivated by Covetousness (2 Corinthians 9:5 )
Envy - Karlberg...
See also Covetousness ...
...
Business - They are to be honest (1 Thessalonians 4:12), to owe no man anything (Romans 13:8), to avoid Covetousness which leads to dishonesty (Hebrews 13:5), and to refuse to go into partnership with extortioners (1 Corinthians 5:11)
Hate - Jethro advised Moses to select men who hated [5] Covetousness to be secondary judges over Israel ( Idolatry - ...
In the New Testament the term idolatry is used to designate Covetousness (Matthew 6:24 ; Luke 16:13 ; Colossians 3:5 ; Ephesians 5:5 )
Giving - Hence the warnings against Covetousness (Luke 12:15). True liberality is the Divinely appointed safeguard against Covetousness, with this caution, ‘to whomsoever much is given, of him shall much be required’ (Luke 12:48)
Idol, Idolatry - Numbers 25:1-2) and because immorality is a form of Covetousness, idolatry is linked with Covetousness (1 Corinthians 5:11; Ephesians 5:3; Ephesians 5:5)
Elisha - We next read of his predicting a fall of rain when the army of Jehoram was faint from thirst (2 Kings 3:9-20 ); of the multiplying of the poor widow's cruse of oil (4:1-7); the miracle of restoring to life the son of the woman of Shunem (4:18-37); the multiplication of the twenty loaves of new barley into a sufficient supply for an hundred men (4:42-44); of the cure of Naaman the Syrian of his leprosy (5:1-27); of the punishment of Gehazi for his falsehood and his Covetousness; of the recovery of the axe lost in the waters of the Jordan (6:1-7); of the miracle at Dothan, half-way on the road between Samaria and Jezreel; of the siege of Samaria by the king of Syria, and of the terrible sufferings of the people in connection with it, and Elisha's prophecy as to the relief that would come (2 Kings 6:24-7:2 )
Idolatry - The word εἴδωλον is from εἶδος, 'that which is seen, ' and Covetousness is specially characterised as idolatry
Deliverance - ‘Seek ye first the kingdom of God’ (Luke 12:31); ‘Lay up treasure in heaven’ (Matthew 6:20); ‘Beware, and keep yourselves from Covetousness’ (Luke 12:15); ‘If thou wouldst be perfect, go, sell that thou hast, and give to the poor … and come, follow me’ (Matthew 19:21)—such phrases indicate the deliverance from the world and its anxieties which culminates in the invitation of Jesus—‘Come unto me … and I will give you rest’ (Matthew 11:28)
Boasting - 1) along with ‘self-will,’ ‘covetousness,’ and others; in 1 Clem
Laban (2) - " Laban could cloak his Covetousness with hypocrisy too
Ananias - The need there was for such a prescient warning appears from the last protest of the same apostle Peter in his 2nd Epistle, against the growing Covetousness and lust within the church
Arbitration - ) show that Jesus knew that this man was moved by Covetousness; but apart from His censure of a wrong motive, He here affirms that it was no business of His to arbitrate between men
Foolishness - Covetousness, a man’s absorption in heaping up and enjoying things, is folly in so far as it hinders him from attaining to the true riches, treasure of the soul laid up with God (Luke 12:15; Luk_12:21)
World - ...
Living in the world...
Chief among the characteristics of the ordinary (unbelieving) people of the world are Covetousness and pride
the Blind Leaders of the Blind - "For from within, out of the hearts of men, proceed evil thoughts, adulteries, fornication, murders, thefts, Covetousness, an evil eye, blasphemy, pride, foolishness. The Scribes and the Pharisees had eyes enough to preach against adultery and murder when these things once came out of the hearts of the people; but they were as blind as moles to the real roots of these things, as well as to the kindred roots of pride, and Covetousness, and envy, and deceit, of which their own hearts, and the hearts of all their blinded hearers, were full. And these are the things that truly defile a man-evil thoughts, Covetousness, deceit, an evil eye, and such like
Adultery - Hence idolatry, Covetousness, and apostasy are adultery spiritually (Jeremiah 3:6; Jeremiah 3:8-9; Ezekiel 16:82; Hosea 1; 2; 3; Revelation 2:22)
Boldness - ’ θράσος and θρασύτης are used in the sense of ‘over-confidence,’ ‘insolence’ in Patristic literature in company with such words as πλεονεξία, ‘covetousness,’ and ἀλαζονεία, ‘boastfulness’ (Didache iii
Philippi - The gold mines furnished the means of their early liberality, but were a temptation to Covetousness, against which Polycarp warns them
Micah, Book of - Schemes of violence were devised by them to gratify their Covetousness
Jubilee - See Isaiah 37:30, where the reference to Jubilee is not at all certain; also Isaiah 5:7-10, those who by Covetousness prevented the operation of the law of Jubilee
Eusebius of Alexandria, a Writer of Sermons - What sin is worst? All sin is dreadful, but none is worse than Covetousness and remembrance of injuries" (Serm
Balaam - It cannot be denied that the Scripture expressly calls him a prophet, 2 Peter 2:15 , and therefore those are probably right who think that he had once been a good man and a true prophet, till, loving the wages of unrighteousness, and prostituting the honour of his office to Covetousness, he apostatized from God, and, betaking himself to idolatrous practices, fell under the delusion of the devil, of whom he learned all his magical enchantments; though at this juncture, when the preservation of his people was concerned, it might be consistent with God's wisdom to appear to him and overrule his mind by the impulse of real revelations
Judges - The qualifications of a judge are given (Exodus 18:21), "able men, such as fear God, men of truth, hating Covetousness"; "not wresting judgment, not respecting persons, neither taking a gift" (so universal a practice with Eastern judges), Deuteronomy 16:19; "not respecting the person of the poor, nor honouring the person of the mighty" (Leviticus 19:15); "not afraid of the face of man, for the judgment is God's" (Deuteronomy 1:17)
Light - ’s version of the Sermon on the Mount it occurs in a context laying stress upon the supreme need of the heavenly mind in religion; and as the main rival to God in man’s affections is the world, in the shape of material wealth, the pursuit of the single mind is naturally correlated with the avoidance of Covetousness. Hence ‘light’ means that condition of life which is void of Covetousness and the grasping spirit. When the latter is darkened by the intrusion of a divided affection, especially in the form of some appetite such as Covetousness or worldliness, then ‘how great is the darkness’! For religion, as Christ taught it, is not admitting God into life
Babylon, Mystical - ...
The evangelical Protestant church is pure in theory, and eschews image and host-mass worship; but in so far as it yields to "covetousness which is idolatry," and conforms to the world, it partakes of the harlot and ceases to be the bride
Honesty - The reasons for His seeming neglect of the subject may be (1) that there was no dispute about it in His day, the Sixth commandment being taken for granted as universally binding, (2) that He went beneath the precept to the principles underlying it when (a) He discouraged Covetousness (Mark 7:22, Luke 12:15), and (b) He bade His disciples do to others as they would that others should do to them (Matthew 7:12 = Luke 6:31), and (3) that He treated considerations of property as of secondary importance, so that when it was a question of suffering from dishonesty—not committing it, He advised submission (Matthew 5:40); and when the question of the division of an inheritance was submitted to Him, He dismissed it as not within His province, and that with a tone of contempt, as though such a matter had not the importance people usually attached to it (Luke 12:13 f
Judas Iscariot - Covetousness was his besetting sin, and he attached himself to Jesus because, like the rest of the disciples, he expected a rich reward when his Master was seated on the throne of David
Corrupt, Verb And Adjective. Corruption, Corruptible, Incorruption, Incorruptible - Those to whom the Apostle refers in 2 Corinthians 2:17 are such as make merchandise of souls through Covetousness (cp
Jehoiakim - "His eyes and heart were only for Covetousness, shedding innocent blood, oppression, and violence" (Jeremiah 22:13-17)
Care - it follows as a deduction from the parable spoken against Covetousness and the closing saying, ‘So is every one that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God
Ten Commandments - Thus it is that Paul makes the remarkable identification of Covetousness with idolatry ( Ephesians 5:5 ; see also Isaiah 57:13-17 , where the same connection is implied ). But if we give assent to all that and then succumb to the sin of Covetousness, believing that happiness consists in getting hold of something that we have seen in the possession of another, we will have missed the whole point of God's instruction and be in dire peril of falling back into the very pit from which we have been lifted
Timothy, the Second Epistle to - No longer is it "the latter times," but "the last days," characterized by self love, Covetousness, boasting, pride, disobedience to parents, love of plea sure, formality without the power of godliness
Millennium - Business will be attended to without contention, dishonesty, and Covetousness
Timothy, the First Epistle to - ...
(3) To warn against Covetousness, a sin prevalent at Ephesus, and to stimulate to good works (1 Timothy 6:3-19)
Renunciation - Renunciation in its bearing on temporal possessions is expounded in the address that followed the rebuke of Covetousness (Luke 12:13-34, Matthew 6:19-34)
Worldliness - The outstanding example is, of course, the lust of possession-covetousness which is ‘idolatry’ (Colossians 3:5), a fruitful source of spiritual disaster (1 Timothy 6:9), a root of all evil (1 Timothy 6:10), and incompatible with inheritance in the Kingdom of God (Ephesians 5:5)
Hopkinsians - This is the foundation of all Covetousness and sensuality, as it blinds people's eyes, contracts their hearts, and sinks them down, so that they look upon earthly enjoyments as the greatest good
Hopkinsians - It is the foundation of all Covetousness and sensuality; of all falsehood, injustice, and oppression; as it excites mankind, by undue methods, to invade the property of others
Joshua - The mystical interpretation here tells us that pride was the sin of the Amorite, and envy the sin of the Hittite, and wrath of the Perizzite, and gluttony and lechery of the Girgashite and the Hivite, while Covetousness and sloth were the corruptions of the Canaanite and the Jebusite. Gluttony and lust also come to them each under its own cloak of deceit, and Covetousness and sloth also each under its own mask, till all their days many men are tempted and led into this and that besetting sin through early ignorance and simplicity and self-will
Discipline - The Christian must put away anger, bitterness, clamour, Covetousness, envy, evil-speaking, falsehood, fornication, guile, hypocrisy, malice, railing, shameful speaking, uncleanness, wrath (Ephesians 4:17-32, Colossians 3:8-11; cf
Ascension of Isaiah - ’ It describes, briefly stringing together various details in the manner of an epitome, the coming and death of the Beloved; the descent of the angel of the Christian Church; the ascension; the falling away of the Church, and the prevalence of error, impurity, strife, and Covetousness; the coming of Beliar in the likeness of a lawless king, a matricide, who claims to be God, and demands Divine worship, and persecutes the saints for three years, seven months, and twenty-seven days. Covetousness and slander are common vices (cf
Impotence - ‘Sins of the flesh,’ as commonly understood, are notoriously responsible for many of mankind’s worst diseases and infirmities; and the Apostolie catalogue of these sins includes not only adultery, uncleanness, murder, drunkenness, and revellings, but also hatred, variance, wrath, strife, envyings, and Covetousness (Galatians 5:19-21, Colossians 3:5, Ephesians 5:3)
Paul in Arabia - And, then, far over and above those terrible sins of his youth, there was the absolutely unparalleled and absolutely indescribable agony that came upon Paul out of the remaining Covetousness and consequent malice of his heart, and more and more so as his heart was more and more brought down under the ever-increasing and all-piercing spirituality of God's holy law
Divination - Man gradually realized that it was his duty to discover and cultivate relations, friendly or defensive, with these-a duty intensified by his Covetousness of good and his aversion to calamities or privations
Mary Magdalene - ...
Pride, envy, anger, intemperance, lasciviousness, Covetousness, spiritual sloth-these were Dante's seven scars on his sanctified forehead
Wealth - But the law also provides safeguards against theft and Covetousness (Exodus 20:15,17 ; 22:1-15 ), forbids usury or "excessive interest" (22:25; Deuteronomy 23:19-20 ), and includes a variety of constraints against the accumulation of unnecessary wealth
Zechariah, Prophecy of - Subsequently two women (emblematic of commercial Covetousness) come forth (doubtless typical of twin forms of the development of evil), and carry it to the land of Shinar, where Babylon, the mother of idolatry, was built, there to build the ephah a house
Presence (2) - John 4:23), to the illustrations from nature (Matthew 10:29), to the exhortations against anxiety (Luke 12:30-32), towards watchfulness (Luke 12:35-36), against Covetousness (Luke 12:20-21), towards compassion (Matthew 10:40-42)
Hebrews, Epistle to the - Believers should consider those in affliction, should beware of Covetousness, and be content with their present circumstances, if only He is there with them
Idol - The deadly wound is healed also by the prevalenee of "covetousness which is idolatry" (Ephesians 5:5; Colossians 3:5) in all Christendom, reformed and
Christian Life - Covetousness (Colossians 3:5), the spirit of faction and the love of pre-eminence (Philippians 1:15; Philippians 1:17), and dishonesty (1 Thessalonians 4:6)
Property (2) - He warns men against Covetousness on the ground that ‘a man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth’ (Luke 12:15)
Redemption (2) - Matthew 23:27); evolves itself in corrupt words and deeds (Matthew 7:16-20, 1618538728_32); brings under subjection to Satan (Matthew 6:13, Matthew 12:29; Matthew 12:43-45); is the loss of the soul’s true life (Matthew 16:24-26); entails misery and ruin (Luke 15:11-16, Matthew 23:37-38); ripens into hateful vices (impurity, Covetousness, pride, hypocrisy, mercilessness, etc
Anger (2) - What stirred His indignation here was in part the profanity to which sacred places and their proper associations had lost all sacredness; in part, the Covetousness which on the pretext of accommodating the pilgrims had turned the house of prayer into a den of thieves; in part, again, the inhumanity which, by instituting a market so noisy in the Court of the Gentiles, must have made worship for these less privileged seekers after God difficult, if not impossible
Proverbs - If they see a monk wearing a superfluous garment, they cast up to him the Lord’s law, though themselves practising boundless extortion and Covetousness every day
Elisha - Gehazi's Covetousness stands in sad contrast to Elisha's disinterestedness
Noah - The analogy to Sodom is this, the angels' ambition alienating their affections from God is a spiritual fornication analogous to the Sodomites' "going after strange flesh"; so Covetousness is connected with whoremongering, as spiritually related (Ephesians 5:5)
Calendar, the Christian - The true Christian or ‘Gnostic’ fasts in his life in respect of Covetousness and voluptuousness, from which all the vices grow
Covenant - ...
The gracious character of Yahweh's covenant with the patriarchs was highlighted in Yahweh's interactions with Jacob, who was chosen in spite of his Covetousness (25:29-34), deception (27:19), and clever manipulations (30:31-43)
Socialism - 1 Timothy 6:10), and the evil of Covetousness (e
Jesus Christ - 4); but as a class our Lord charges them with sins of Covetousness and inhumanity, which gave the colour of hypocrisy to their ritualistic scruples ( Matthew 24:1-51 ; see Pharisees)
Babylon - And they were denounced against the Babylonians, and the inhabitants of Chaldea, expressly because of their idolatry, tyranny, oppression, pride, Covetousness, drunkenness, falsehood, and other wickedness