What does Court mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הֶֽחָצֵר֙ court 8
הֶחָצֵ֥ר court 7
בַּחֲצַ֣ר court 6
הֶחָצֵ֖ר court 6
הֶחָצֵֽר court 6
חֲצַ֣ר court 5
הֶחָצֵ֑ר court 4
בַּחֲצַ֥ר court 4
הֶחָצֵ֣ר court 4
הֶחָצֵ֗ר court 4
בַּחֲצַ֖ר court 4
הֶֽחָצֵ֔ר court 3
הֶחָצֵ֨ר court 3
לֶחָצֵ֣ר court 3
הֶחָצֵ֔ר court 2
הֶחָצֵ֜ר court 2
הֶחָצֵ֛ר court 2
הֶֽחָצֵ֗ר court 2
לֶחָצֵ֖ר court 2
לֶחָצֵ֥ר court 2
לֶֽחָצֵר֙ court 2
הֶחָצֵ֤ר court 2
הֶֽחָצֵ֜ר court 2
αὐλὴν among the Greeks in Homer’s time 2
לַחֲצַ֤ר court 1
מֵחֲצַ֣ר court 1
הֶֽחָצֵ֖ר court 1
κριτήρια the instrument or means of trying or judging anything. / the place where judgment is given. / the matter judged 1
חָצֵ֖ר court 1
הֶֽחָצֵ֑ר court 1
ἡμέρας the day 1
αὐλῇ among the Greeks in Homer’s time 1
בֶּחָצֵ֣ר court 1
חָצֵ֔רָה court 1
לַחֲצַ֣ר court 1
בֶּחָצֵ֤ר court 1
יוֹעִידֵֽנִי to fix 1
הַמִּשְׁפָּ֖ט judgment 1
בַּמִּשְׁפָּֽט judgment 1
וְהָעֲזָרָ֖ה enclosure. 1
לָעֲזָרָ֛ה enclosure. 1
הָעֲזָרָה֒ enclosure. 1
(חָצֵ֖ר) excitement 1
הַפְּנִימִית֙ inner. 1
בַּפַּרְוָרִ֑ים a structure or building attached to the west side of Solomon’s temple. 1
מֵֽהֶחָצֵ֖ר court 1
דִּינָ֥א judgment. 1
בֶּחָצֵ֑ר court 1
αὐλῆς among the Greeks in Homer’s time 1
לֶחָצֵ֜ר court 1
؟ בֶחָצֵ֑ר court 1
בֶּֽחָצֵ֔ר court 1
הֶֽחָצֵ֤ר court 1
הֶֽחָצֵר֩ court 1
בַּחֲצַ֤ר court 1
בַּחֲצַ֕ר court 1
בַּחֲצֵר֖וֹ court 1
לַחֲצַ֖ר court 1
וְלַחֲצַ֧ר court 1
חָצֵר֙ court 1
הֶחָצֵר֙ court 1
וְלֶחָצֵ֛ר court 1
וְחָצֵ֨ר court 1
וְהֶֽחָצֵר֙ court 1
חָצֵ֣ר court 1
הֶחָצֵ֧ר court 1
וְחִלּ֖וּ to be or become weak 1
וְדִינָ֖א judgment. 1
חָצֵ֥ר court 1
לָרִ֗ב to strive 1

Definitions Related to Court

H2691


   1 Court, enclosure.
      1a enclosures.
      1b Court.
   2 settled abode, settlement, village, town.
   

H5835


   1 enclosure.
      1a ledge (surrounding Ezekiel’s altar).
      1b Court (outer one of temple).
      

G833


   1 among the Greeks in Homer’s time, an uncovered space around the house, enclosed by a wall, in which the stables stood, hence among the Orientals that roofless enclosure by a wall, in the open country in which the flocks were herded at night, a sheepfold.
   2 the uncovered Court-yard of the house.
   In the O.
   T.
   particularly of the courts of the tabernacle and of the temple in Jerusalem.
   The dwellings of the higher classes usually had two, one exterior, between the door and the street; the other interior, surrounded by the buildings of the dwelling itself.
   The latter is mentioned Mat. 26:69.
   3 the house itself, a palace.
   

G2250


   1 the day, used of the natural day, or the interval between sunrise and sunset, as distinguished from and contrasted with the night.
      1a in the daytime.
      1b metaph.
      , “the day” is regarded as the time for abstaining from indulgence, vice, crime, because acts of the sort are perpetrated at night and in darkness.
   2 of the civil day, or the space of twenty four hours (thus including the night).
      2a Eastern usage of this term differs from our western usage.
      Any part of a day is counted as a whole day, hence the expression “three days and three nights” does not mean literally three whole days, but at least one whole day plus part of two other days.
   3 of the last day of this present age, the day Christ will return from heaven, raise the dead, hold the final judgment, and perfect his kingdom.
   4 used of time in general, i.e. the days of his life.
   

H6442


   1 inner.
   

H4941


   1 judgment, justice, ordinance.
      1a judgment.
         1a1 act of deciding a case.
         1a2 place, Court, seat of judgment.
         1a3 process, procedure, litigation (before judges).
         1a4 case, cause (presented for judgment).
         1a5 sentence, decision (of judgment).
         1a6 execution (of judgment).
         1a7 time (of judgment).
      1b justice, right, rectitude (attributes of God or man).
      1c ordinance.
      1d decision (in law).
      1e right, privilege, due (legal).
      1f proper, fitting, measure, fitness, custom, manner, plan.
      

H3259


   1 to fix, appoint, assemble, meet, set, betroth.
      1a (Qal) to appoint, assign, designate.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to meet.
         1b2 to meet by appointment.
         1b3 to gather, assemble by appointment.
      1c (Hiphil) to cause to meet.
      1d (Hophal) to be set, be placed before, be fixed.
      

H7378


   1 to strive, contend.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to strive.
            1a1a physically.
            1a1b with words.
         1a2 to conduct a case or suit (legal), sue.
         1a3 to make complaint.
         1a4 to quarrel.
      1b (Hiphil) to contend against.
      

H2470


   1 to be or become weak, be or become sick, be or become diseased, be or become grieved, be or become sorry.
      1a (Qal) to be weak, be sick.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to be or become weak, feel weak.
         1b2 to become sick, become ill.
         1b3 (CLBL) to entreat, pray, beg.
      1c (Niphal).
         1c1 to make oneself sick.
         1c2 to be made sick.
         1c3 to be tired.
      1d (Pual) to be made weak, become weak.
      1e (Hithpael) to make oneself sick.
      1f (Hiphil).
         1f1 to make sore.
         1f2 to make sick.
         1f3 to show signs of sickness, become sick.
         1f4 to grieve.
      1g (Hophal).
         1g1 to be made sick.
         1g2 to be wounded.
         

H1780


   1 judgment.
   

H6503


   1 a structure or building attached to the west side of Solomon’s temple.
   Additional Information: Parbar = “open apartment”.
   

G2922


   1 the instrument or means of trying or judging anything.
      1a the rule by which one judges.
   2 the place where judgment is given.
      2a the tribunal of a judge.
      2b a bench of judges.
   3 the matter judged, thing to be decided, suit, case.
   

Frequency of Court (original languages)

Frequency of Court (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Court Tennis
See under Tennis.
Webster's Dictionary - Court
(1):
(n.) The residence of a sovereign, prince, nobleman, or ether dignitary; a palace.
(2):
(n.) The collective body of persons composing the retinue of a sovereign or person high in authority; all the surroundings of a sovereign in his regal state.
(3):
(n.) Any formal assembling of the retinue of a sovereign; as, to hold a court.
(4):
(n.) Attention directed to a person in power; conduct or address designed to gain favor; courtliness of manners; civility; compliment; flattery.
(5):
(n.) The hall, chamber, or place, where justice is administered.
(6):
(n.) The persons officially assembled under authority of law, at the appropriate time and place, for the administration of justice; an official assembly, legally met together for the transaction of judicial business; a judge or judges sitting for the hearing or trial of causes.
(7):
(n.) An inclosed space; a courtyard; an uncovered area shut in by the walls of a building, or by different building; also, a space opening from a street and nearly surrounded by houses; a blind alley.
(8):
(n.) A tribunal established for the administration of justice.
(9):
(n.) The judge or judges; as distinguished from the counsel or jury, or both.
(10):
(n.) The session of a judicial assembly.
(11):
(n.) Any jurisdiction, civil, military, or ecclesiastical.
(12):
(n.) A place arranged for playing the game of tennis; also, one of the divisions of a tennis court.
(13):
(v. i.) To play the lover; to woo; as, to go courting.
(14):
(v. t.) To endeavor to gain the favor of by attention or flattery; to try to ingratiate one's self with.
(15):
(v. t.) To endeavor to gain the affections of; to seek in marriage; to woo.
(16):
(v. t.) To attempt to gain; to solicit; to seek.
(17):
(v. t.) To invite by attractions; to allure; to attract.
Webster's Dictionary - Base-Court
(1):
(n.) The secondary, inferior, or rear courtyard of a large house; the outer court of a castle.
(2):
(n.) An inferior court of law, not of record.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Diocesan Court
A fully organized diocese must have various officials to assist the bishop. These form the diocesan court. It consists of:
a vicar-general with general vicarious power in spiritual and temporal matters, who is one tribunal with his bishop and can be removed from office at will;
an official, who corresponds to a chief justice in the civilcourts, having ordinary power;
a chancellor, to keep the records a promoter of justice, like a district attorney;
a defender of the bond of Marriage and Sacred Orders, whose duty it is to defend the existence of a true marriage or valid Orders when either is attacked;
synodal judges, who may be called associate justices and who are generally named in the diocesan synod;
examiners, who preside at examinations of the clergy and intervene in certain cases of removal of parish priests;
parish priest consultors, who also are called in sometimes in the removal of irremovable pastors or in the transfer of ordinary pastors; auditors, who assist the judges in ecclesiastical trials by citing witnesses, etc.;
messengers or beadles, to serve citations on parties to suit;
notaries, who act as secretaries and sign all official acts of a trial.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Court of the Prison
An open court in the Jerusalem palace reserved for the detention of prisoners during the day of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 32:8 ,Jeremiah 32:8,32:12 ; Jeremiah 33:1 ; Jeremiah 37:21 ; Jeremiah 38:6 ,Jeremiah 38:6,38:13 ,Jeremiah 38:13,38:28 ; Jeremiah 39:14-15 ). Translated in the modern versions as “court of the guard.”
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Matrimonial Court
Disputed cases concerning marriage are usually brought before the matrimonial court of a diocese. This tribunal consists of a judge, a secretary or notary, and the Defensor Vinculi, or Defender of the Tie. The cases which occur most frequently are those in which a "decree of nullity" is sought, a judgment that a certain marriage was and is invalid. All decisions of the court, to be effective, must have the approval of the bishop. An appeal from the diocesan court may be made to Rome; or, under certain restrictions, a case may be sent there directly. In the Romani "Curia" or Court, the Congregation of the Holy Office has exclusive jurisdiction concerning the, Pauline Privilege, the impediment of disparity of worship and that of mixed religion; but it may refer cases to another Congregation, such as that of the Sacraments, or to the Tribunal of the Rota. Any Catholic has the right to bring a case before the proper Roman Congregation or Tribunal, usually through a procurator or advocate.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Court of the Guard
See Court of the Prison .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Court Systems
The court systems of ancient Israel are not fully described in the Old Testament or in any extra-biblical source. Laws governing the conduct of judges and witnesses, reports about leaders who were consulted for legal decisions, and narratives of judicial proceedings supplement the accounts of Moses' appointment of assistant judges (Exodus 18:1 ) and Jehoshaphat's judicial reform (Exodus 23:1-318 ). Archaeological investigation has not yet discovered court documents from ancient Israel.
Legal disputes could be settled at the level of society in which they arose. The head of a family had authority to decide cases within his household without bringing the matter before a professional judge (Genesis 31:1 ; Genesis 38:1 ). The law codes limit his authority in some cases (Numbers 5:11-31 ; Deuteronomy 21:18-21 ; Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ). When persons from more than one family were involved, the case was taken before the elders of the town, who were the heads of the extended families living together in that place and represented the community as a whole. The elders would serve as witnesses to a transaction (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ; Ruth 4:1-12 ), decide guilt or innocence (Deuteronomy 19:1 ; Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ; Joshua 20:1-6 ), or execute the punishment due the guilty party (Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-3 ). The elders helped to preserve the community by seeing that disputes were settled in a manner that everyone would recognize as just.
Disputes between tribes were more difficult to resolve. When a Judahite woman who was the concubine of a Levite living in the territory of Ephraim was raped and murdered in Gibeah of Benjamin, several tribes were involved (Judges 19-21 ). The Levite, therefore, appealed to all the tribes of Israel for justice. The initial attempts at negotiation were rebuffed when the men of Benjamin refused to hand over the guilty persons for punishment. Israel then went to war against the whole tribe of Benjamin, defeated them, and vowed not to let them intermarry with the rest of the tribes. The biblical historian comments regretfully that this sort of thing happened when there was no king to execute the law (Judges 21:25 ).
During the period of Israelite history covered by the book of Judges, special judicial authority was possessed by several individuals appointed by God. The so-called “minor judges” (Judges 10:1-5 ; Judges 12:8-15 ) are not credited with delivering Israel from oppression by military means, so their function may have been purely judicial or political. Some scholars have identified their office as “judge of all Israel” in the tribal league, but others have argued that their jurisdiction was over a smaller area. Deborah, and later Samuel, also decided cases. Their judicial activities took place in a limited area (Judges 4:4-5 ; 1 Samuel 7:15-17 ). We do not know whether they only heard cases on appeal. The Bible does not say how any of these individuals came to possess their authority as judges. Both Deborah and Samuel were prophets. The other deliverer judges were called by God and possessed by God's Spirit, so judicial authority was probably also a divine gift.
A hierarchical system of courts and judges could exist when political authority was centralized. In Exodus 18:13-26 Moses appointed assistant judges to decide the smaller cases so that his own energy could be preserved for the difficult ones. A system in which local courts referred complex cases to the supreme judges is described in Deuteronomy 17:2-13 ; Deuteronomy 19:16-19 . This was not an appeals court to which dissatisfied parties could bring their cases for reconsideration; it was a court of experts who could pass judgment in cases too complicated for the local judges to decide themselves. The court system instituted by Jehoshaphat also followed this pattern (2 Chronicles 19:4-11 ). Although appointed by the king, the judges were responsible directly to God (2 Chronicles 19:6 ). It is not clear whether the residents of Jerusalem went directly to the central court. We only know that Jeremiah was tried in Jerusalem by “the princes of Judah” after being charged by the priests and prophets with a crime worthy of death. The system described in Deuteronomy 17:1 ; Deuteronomy 19:1 ; 2 Chronicles 19:1 has both priests and secular officials as judges in the central court in Jerusalem.
The king possessed limited judicial authority. Despite his supreme political power, he was not personally above the law. Saul's death sentences on Jonathan (1 Samuel 14:39 ) and the priests at Nob (1 Samuel 22:6-23 ) were not accepted by the people. Jonathan was not punished, and the priests were finally killed by a non-Israelite. David was led to convict himself of his crimes against Uriah and his mistreatment of Absalom (2 Samuel 12:1-6 ; 2 Samuel 14:1-24 ). Unlike Saul, David and Solomon were able to exercise authority to execute or spare persons who represented a threat to their reigns (2 Samuel 1:1-16 ; 2 Samuel 4:1-12 ; 2 Samuel 19:16-23 ; 2 Samuel 21:1-14 ; 1 Kings 2:19-46 ). Jezebel used the existing town court to dispose of Naboth and confiscate his vineyard. She and Ahab, however, were punished by God for having Naboth executed on trumped-up charges even though Ahab was king (1 Kings 21-22 ). Deuteronomy 17:18-20 places the king at the same level as his subjects with respect to the requirements of God's law. In Israel the king did not have the authority to enact new laws or to make arbitrary legal rulings contrary to the prevailing understanding of justice.
The ideal of the just king who oversees the dispensing of justice for all his subjects was known in Israel. In this role the king himself was the leading example of a just and honest judge and was personally involved in hearing cases as well as appointing other judges. Absalom was able to take advantage of David's failure to live up to this ideal (2 Samuel 15:1-6 ). Solomon is the supreme example of the just king, having been granted discernment and wisdom by God (1 Kings 3:1 ).
The relationship of the king's court to the rest of the judicial system is uncertain. The wise woman from Tekoah appealed to David, a decision which had been made within her extended family (2 Samuel 14:1 ). The Shunammite widow successfully appealed to the king of Israel for the restoration of her house and land, which she had abandoned during a time of famine (2 Kings 8:1-6 ). The famous case of the two prostitutes and their infant sons was brought directly to Solomon without any previous judgment (1 Kings 3:16-28 ). All of these cases seem to be exceptional. Powerful third parties were involved in the first two cases; Joab set up the audience with David, and the Shunammite had an advocate present in the person of Gehazi, Elisha's servant. The two prostitutes had no families to settle their dispute. We are not certain, therefore, what these accounts can tell us about how cases usually came to be heard by the king. There are no Old Testament laws which define the process of judicial appeal to the king.
Priests also possessed judicial authority. The passages about the high court in Jerusalem mention priests alongside the secular judge (Deuteronomy 17:9 ; Deuteronomy 19:17 ; 2Chronicles 19:8,2 Chronicles 19:11 ). Some scholars believe that this division between religious and civil courts reflects the post-exilic period, in which the secular authority was that of the Persian king and Jewish priests administered the law of God (Ezra 7:25-26 ). Israelite priests, however, possessed a body of knowledge from which they ruled on matters pertaining to the worship of God and the purity of the community. The cult and the judicial system were both concerned with removing blood-guilt from the community (Deuteronomy 21:1-9 ). We cannot determine how the priestly judges were related to the other court systems or how cases were assigned to the various judges.
Actual court procedures may be partially reconstructed as follows. There were no prosecutors or defense attorneys; accuser and accused argued their own cases. The burden of proof lay with the defendant. Physical evidence was presented when necessary (Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ), but proving one's case depended primarily on testimony and persuasive argument. The word of at least two witnesses was required to convict (Deuteronomy 19:15 ). The system depended on the honesty of witnesses and the integrity of judges (Exodus 18:21 ; Exodus 20:16 ; 1618450124_9 ,Exodus 23:1-3,23:6-9 ; Leviticus 19:15-19 ; Deuteronomy 16:19-20 ; Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ; 2 Chronicles 19:6-7 ). The prophets condemned corrupt judges (Isaiah 1:21-26 ; Amos 5:12 ,Amos 5:12,5:15 ; Micah 7:3 ) and those who supported them (Amos 5:10 ). Cases brought by a malicious witness giving false testimony were referred to the central court (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ). In some circumstances the accused could submit to an ordeal or an oath to prove his or her innocence (Exodus 22:6-10 ; Numbers 5:11-31 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-8 ). If guilty, he or she would be punished directly by God. Casting lots to discover the guilty party was another extraordinary procedure. In both cases reported in the Bible the person identified also confessed his guilt (1 Samuel 14:24-46 ; Joshua 7:1 ). The judges were responsible to administer punishment, often with the whole community participating (Deuteronomy 21:21 ). The court systems could only function well when the community agreed with their decisions and cooperated to enforce them. By judging justly, the courts taught God's law and the principles of divine justice. The courts worked together with the people to restore the community to peace and wholeness under God whenever they recognized the one in the right and imposed an appropriate penalty on the guilty one.
Pamela J. Scalise
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Besford Court Hospital
Worcestershire, England. Welfare home for mentally-defective Catholic children, restricted to feeble-minded boys from the ages of about seven to twenty-one. It consists of a junior department, conducted by nuns, in which the Montessori system of instruction is followed, and a senior department where the following vocations are taught: skilled carpentry, bricklaying, plumbing, gardening, rural handicrafts, and painting. To provide an intermediate stage between institutional life and life in the community, hostels have been constructed on the estate where the youth lives the life of an ordinary workman two or three years a before dismissal.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Court
The enclosure of the tabernacle (Exodus 27:9-19 ; 40:8 ), of the temple (1 Kings 6:36 ), of a prison (Nehemiah 3:25 ), of a private house (2 Samuel 17:18 ), and of a king's palace (2 Kings 20:4 ).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hampton-Court Conference
A conference appointed by James I. at Hampton-Court, in 1603, in order to settle the disputes between the church and the Puritans. Nine bishops, and as many dignitaries of the church, appeared on one side, and four Puritan ministers on the other. It lasted for three days. Neale calls it a mock conference, because all things were previously concluded between the king and the bishops; and the Puritans borne down not with calm reason and argument, but with the royal authority, the king being both judge and party. The proposals and remonstrances of the Puritans may be seen in Neale's History of the Puritans, chap. 1: part 2:
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Court
COURT (αὐλή, translation ‘court’ in Revelation 11:2, ‘sheepfold’ or ‘fold’ in John 10:1; John 10:16, and ‘palace’ [1] in Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:69 etc.).* [2].] —The ‘court’ is an essential part of the typical Oriental house. The Eastern house represented on the monuments of Egypt and Assyria is much like that now found, and doubtless found in the time of Christ, in Palestine. It is built around an open square called ‘the court,’ into which each room opens, seldom one room into another. Sometimes the house has more than one ‘court,’ if the wealth or the official station of the owner warrants it.
In the richer private and public houses the ‘court’ is fitted up with great magnificence. In Damascus we find several courts connected with a single house, in some cases of rare richness and beauty. The houses of two or more storeys have chambers on each floor opening on to a common balcony running round the inside of the court, with a staircase in a corner of the court open to the sky. This type of ‘court’ is usually paved with marble or flagging, and has a well or fountain in the centre (2 Samuel 17:18), with orange and lemon trees and other shrubs around it. Some of them are planted with choice tropical trees, and the walls, verandahs, staircases, etc., are covered and adorned with creepers and vines of untold varieties.
In Matthew 26:69 it is said that ‘Peter sat without, ἐν τῇ αὐλῇ,’ i.e. in the ‘court’ of the high priest’s house (Matthew 26:58). It was during the trial of Jesus; and ‘without’ is used in contrast with an implied ‘within’—the interior of the audience-room in which Jesus was appearing before the authorities. Peter was not allowed into this room, but was out in the open air of the ‘court’; and this was ‘beneath’ (Mark 14:66), i.e. on a somewhat lower level than the audience-chamber.
The ‘court of the Gentiles,’ which was ‘without the temple’ (Revelation 11:2), was on the lowest level or terrace of the Holy Mountain, and separated from the ‘Sanctuary’ or ‘Mountain of the House’ by a stone wall four or five feet high, called ‘the Soreg.’ All Gentiles were warned to remain outside of this sacred enclosure under penalty of death (cf. Acts 21:28-29; Acts 24:11; Acts 26:21). See also artt. Door, House.
Geo. B. Eager.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Court
COURT . See House, § 2 ; Justice; Tabernacle; Temple.
Webster's Dictionary - Court-Leet
(n.) A court of record held once a year, in a particular hundred, lordship, or manor, before the steward of the leet.
Webster's Dictionary - Court-Cupboard
(n.) A movable sideboard or buffet, on which plate and other articles of luxury were displayed on special ocasions.
Webster's Dictionary - Court-Craft
(n.) The artifices, intrigues, and plottings, at courts.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Court
Psalm 84:2-10 (b) This refers to the presence of the Lord in which the Christian delights to live. It also refers to the beautiful place CHRIST has gone to prepare for the eternal home of the soul.
Psalm 92:13 (b) The term is used to describe the throne room of GOD where the believer presents petitions for himself and for others, and prospers in his heavenly ministry of prayer.
Webster's Dictionary - Court-Martialed
(imp. & p. p.) of Court-martial
Webster's Dictionary - Court-Baron
(n.) An inferior court of civil jurisdiction, attached to a manor, and held by the steward; a baron's court; - now fallen into disuse.
Webster's Dictionary - Court-Plaster
(n.) Sticking plaster made by coating taffeta or silk on one side with some adhesive substance, commonly a mixture of isinglass and glycerin.
Webster's Dictionary - Court-Martialing
(p. pr. & vb. n.) of Court-martial
Webster's Dictionary - Court-Martial
(1):
(v. t.) To subject to trial by a court-martial.
(2):
(n.) A court consisting of military or naval officers, for the trial of one belonging to the army or navy, or of offenses against military or naval law.
King James Dictionary - Court
COURT, n.
1. A place in front of a house, inclosed by a wall or fence in popular language, a court-yard. 2. A space inclosed by houses, broader than a street or a space forming a kind of recess from a public street. 3. A palace the place of residence of a king or sovereign prince. 4. The hall, chamber or place where justice is administered. St. Paul was brought into the highest court in Athens.
5. Persons who compose the retinue or council of a king or emperor. 6. The persons or judges assembled for hearing and deciding causes, criminal, military, naval or ecclesiastical as a court of law a court of chancery a court martial a court of admiralty an ecclesiastical court court baron &c. Hence, 7. Any jurisdiction, military, or ecclesiastical. 8. The art of pleasing the art of insinuation civility flattery address to gain favor. Hence the phrase, to make court, to attempt to please by flattery and address. 9. In scripture, an inclosed part of the entrance into a palace or house. The tabernacle had one court the temple, three. The first was the court of the Gentiles the second, the court of Israel, in which the people worshiped the third was the court of the priests, where the priests and Levites exercised their ministry. Hence places of public worship are called the courts of the Lord. 10. In the United States, a legislature consisting of two houses as the General court of Massachusetts. The original constitution of Connecticut established a General Court in 1639. 11. A session of the legislature. COURT,
1. In a general sense, to flatter to endeavor to please by civilities and address a use of the word derived from the manners of a court. 2. To woo to solicit for marriage. A thousand court you, though they court in vain.
3. To attempt to gain by address to solicit to seek as, to court commendation or applause.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Arches, Court of
The court of the Archbishop of Canterbury, acting also as a court of appeal from diocesan tribunals within the Province of Canterbury; formerly held at the church of Saint Mary of the Arches (Saint Mary-le-Bow), Cheapside, London.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Court
Châtsêr (חָצֵר, Strong's #2691), “court; enclosure.” This word is related to a common Semitic verb that has two meanings: “to be present,” in the sense of living at a certain place (encampment, residence, court), and “to enclose, surround, press together.” In the Hebrew Old Testament, châtsêr appears about 190 times; its usage is welldistributed throughout, except for the minor prophets.
In some Hebrew dictionaries, the usage of châtsêr as “settled abode,” “settlement,” or “village” is separated from the meaning “court.” But most modern dictionaries identify only one root with two related meanings.
The first biblical occurrence of châtsêr is in Gen. 25:16: “These are the sons of Ishmael, and these are their names, by their towns and by their castles; twelve princes according to their nations.” Here châtsêr is related to the first meaning of the root; this occurs less frequently than the usage meaning “court.” The châtsêr (“settlement”) was a place where people lived without an enclosure to protect them. The word is explained in Lev. 25:31: “But the houses of the villages which have no wall round about them shall be counted as the fields of the country: they may be redeemed, and they shall go out in the jubilee.” Châtsêr signifies the “settlements” of seminomadic peoples: the Ishmaelites (Gen. 25:16), the Avim (Deut. 2:23), and Kedar (Isa. 42:11).
Châtsêr also denotes a “settlement” of people outside the city wall. The cities of Canaan were relatively small and could not contain the whole population. In times of peace, residents of the city might build homes and workshops for themselves outside the wall and establish a separate quarter. If the population grew, the king or governor often decided to enclose the new quarter by surrounding it with a wall and incorporating the section into the existing city, in order to protect the population from bandits and warriors. Jerusalem gradually extended its size westward; at the time of Hezekiah, it had grown into a large city. Huldah the prophetess lived in such a development, known in Hebrew as the mishneh: “… she dwelt in Jerusalem in the Second Quarter” (2 Kings 22:14, RSV).
The Book of Joshua includes Israel’s victories in Canaan’s major cities as well as the suburbs: “Ain, Remmon, and Ether, and Ashan; four cities and their villages …” (19:7; cf. 15:45, 47; 21:12).
The predominant usage of châtsêr is “court,” whether of a house, a palace, or the temple. Each house generally had a courtyard surrounded by a wall or else one adjoined several homes: “Nevertheless a lad saw them, and told Absalom: but they went both of them away quickly, and came to a man’s house in Bahurim, which had a well in his court; whither they went down” (2 Sam. 17:18). Solomon’s palace had several “courts”— an outer “court,” an “enclosed space” around the palace, and a “court” around which the palace was built. Similarly, the temple had various courts. The psalmist expressed his joy in being in the “courts” of the temple, where the birds built their nests (Ps. 84:3); “For a day in thy courts is better than a thousand. I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God, than to dwell in the tents of wickedness” (Ps. 84:10). God’s people looked forward to the thronging together of all the people in God’s “courts”: “… In the courts of the Lord’s house, in the midst of thee, O Jerusalem” (Ps. 116:19).
The Septuagint translations are: aule (“courtyard; farm; house; outer court; palace”), epaulis (“farm; homestead; residence”), and kome (“village; small town”). The KJV gives these translations: “court; village; town.”
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Court
an entrance into a palace or house ( See HOUSE. ) The great courts belonging to the temple of Jerusalem were three; the first called the court of the Gentiles, because the Gentiles were allowed to enter so far, and no farther; the second was the court of Israel, because all the Israelites, provided they were purified, had a right of admission into it; the third was that of the priests, where the altar of burnt-offerings stood, where the priests and Levites exercised their ministry. Common Israelites, who were desirous of offering sacrifices, were at liberty to bring their victims as far as the inner part of the court; but they could not pass a certain line of separation, which divided it into two; and they withdrew as soon as they had delivered their sacrifices and offerings to the priests, or had made their confession with the ceremony of laying their hands upon the head of the victim, if it were a sin-offering. Before the temple was built, there was a court belonging to the tabernacle, but not near so large as that of the temple, and encompassed only with pillars, and veils hung with cords.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Gentiles, Court of the
Josephus says there was in the court of the temple a wall or balustrade, breast high, having pillars at regular distances, with inscriptions on them in Greek and Latin, importing that strangers were forbidden to approach nearer to the altar, Ephesians 2:14 . See TEMPLE .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Roman Court
The ensemble of departments or ministries which assist the Sovereign Pontiff in the government of the Church. It comprises the elevan Roman Congregations, the Roman Tribunals, which number three, and the five offices of Curia.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Court
(Heb. chatser ), an open enclosure surrounded by buildings, applied in the Authorized Version most commonly to the enclosures of the tabernacle and the temple. ( Exodus 27:9 ; 40:33 ; Leviticus 6:16 ; 1 Kings 6:36 ; 7:8 ; 2 Kings 23:12 ; 2 Chronicles 33:5 ) etc.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Court
1: ἀγοραῖος (Strong's #60 — Adjective — agoraios — ag-or-ah'-yos ) is an adjective, "signifying pertaining to the agora, any place of public meeting, and especially where trials were held," Acts 19:38 ; the RV translates the sentence "the courts are open;" a more literal rendering is "court days are kept." In Acts 17:5 it is translated in the RV, "rabble;" AV, "baser sort," lit., "frequenters of the markets." See BASER.
2: αὐλή (Strong's #833 — Noun Feminine — aule — ow-lay' ) primarily, "an uncovered space around a house, enclosed by a wall, where the stables were," hence was used to describe (a) "the courtyard of a house;" in the OT it is used of the "courts" of the tabernacle and Temple; in this sense it is found in the NT in Revelation 11:2 ; (b) "the courts in the dwellings of well-to-do folk," which usually had two, one exterior, between the door and the street (called the proaulion, or "porch," Mark 14:68 ), the other, interior, surrounded by the buildings of the dwellings, as in Matthew 26:69 (in contrast to the room where the judges were sitting); Mark 14:66 ; Luke 22:55 ; AV, "hall;" RV "court" gives the proper significance, Matthew 26:3,58 ; Mark 14:54 ; 15:16 (RV, "Praetorium"); Luke 11:21 ; John 18:15 . It is here to be distinguished from the Praetorium, translated "palace." See HALL , PALACE. For the other meaning "sheepfold," John 10:1,16 , see FOLD.
3: βασίλειον (Strong's #933 — Noun Neuter — basileion — bas-il'-i-on ) an adjective meaning "royal," signifies, in the neuter plural, "a royal palace," translated "kings' courts" in Luke 7:25 ; in the singular, 1 Peter 2:9 , "royal." See ROYAL.

Sentence search

Court - Court, n. A place in front of a house, inclosed by a wall or fence in popular language, a Court-yard. Paul was brought into the highest Court in Athens. The persons or judges assembled for hearing and deciding causes, criminal, military, naval or ecclesiastical as a Court of law a Court of chancery a Court martial a Court of admiralty an ecclesiastical Court Court baron &c. Hence the phrase, to make Court, to attempt to please by flattery and address. The tabernacle had one Court the temple, three. The first was the Court of the Gentiles the second, the Court of Israel, in which the people worshiped the third was the Court of the priests, where the priests and Levites exercised their ministry. Hence places of public worship are called the Courts of the Lord. In the United States, a legislature consisting of two houses as the General Court of Massachusetts. The original constitution of Connecticut established a General Court in 1639. Court, ...
1. In a general sense, to flatter to endeavor to please by civilities and address a use of the word derived from the manners of a Court. A thousand Court you, though they Court in vain. To attempt to gain by address to solicit to seek as, to Court commendation or applause
Woo - ) To Court; to make love. ) To solicit in love; to Court. ) To Court solicitously; to invite with importunity
Courtship - ) Courtliness; elegance of manners; Courtesy. ) The act of paying Court, with the intent to solicit a favor. ) Court policy; the character of a Courtier; artifice of a Court; Court-craft; finesse
Burghmote - ) A Court or meeting of a burgh or borough; a borough Court held three times yearly
Placitum - ) A Court, or cause in Court. ) A public Court or assembly in the Middle Ages, over which the sovereign president when a consultation was held upon affairs of state
Tolt - ) A writ by which a cause pending in a Court baron was removed into a country Court
Areopagus - ) The highest judicial Court at Athens. Hence, any high Court or tribunal...
Chancellor - ) A judicial Court of chancery, which in England and in the United States is distinctively a Court with equity jurisdiction
Profert - ) The exhibition or production of a record or paper in open Court, or an allegation that it is in Court
Nullity, Decree of - A judgment by a competent Court that a certain marriage was and is invalid, i. See also matrimonial Court
Decreet - ) The final judgment of the Court of Session, or of an inferior Court, by which the question at issue is decided
Court-Baron - ) An inferior Court of civil jurisdiction, attached to a manor, and held by the steward; a baron's Court; - now fallen into disuse
Antiphrasis - ) The use of words in a sense opposite to their proper meaning; as when a Court of justice is called a Court of vengeance
Trial - ) In Acts 19:38, margin, "the Court days are now being kept," i. the Court is now sitting, "and there are deputies. " The assembly of citizens then sitting formed the conventus, out of which the "deputy" or proconsul (anthupatos ) selected "judices" or assessors (anthupatoi ); thus the Court consisted of the proconsul and his assessors
Essoign - ) An excuse for not appearing in Court at the return of process; the allegation of an excuse to the Court
Duces Tecum - A judicial process commanding a person to appear in Court and bring with him some piece of evidence or other thing to be produced to the Court
Base-Court - ) The secondary, inferior, or rear Courtyard of a large house; the outer Court of a castle. ) An inferior Court of law, not of record
Chancery - ) In England, formerly, the highest Court of judicature next to the Parliament, exercising jurisdiction at law, but chiefly in equity; but under the jurisdiction act of 1873 it became the chancery division of the High Court of Justice, and now exercises jurisdiction only in equity. ) In the Unites States, a Court of equity; equity; proceeding in equity
Pone - ) An original writ, now superseded by the writ of certiorari, for removing a case from an inferior Court into the Court of Exchequer. ) An obsolete writ to enforce appearance in Court by attaching goods or requiring securities
Centumvir - ) One of a Court of about one hundred judges chosen to try civil suits. Under the empire the Court was increased to 180, and met usually in four sections
Hall - aule, Luke 22:55 ; RSV, "court"), the open Court or quadrangle belonging to the high priest's house. In Matthew 26:69 and Mark 14:66 this word is incorrectly rendered "palace" in the Authorized Version, but correctly "court" in the Revised Version. The "porch" in Matthew 26:71 is the entrance-hall or passage leading into the central Court, which is open to the sky
Courtier - ) One who is in attendance at the Court of a prince; one who has an appointment at Court. ) One who Courts or solicits favor; one who flatters
Adjudicate - ) To adjudge; to try and determine, as a Court; to settle by judicial decree. ) To come to a judicial decision; as, the Court adjudicated upon the case
Court - COURT (αὐλή, translation ‘court’ in Revelation 11:2, ‘sheepfold’ or ‘fold’ in John 10:1; John 10:16, and ‘palace’ [1] in Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:69 etc. *
In the richer private and public houses the ‘court’ is fitted up with great magnificence. In Damascus we find several Courts connected with a single house, in some cases of rare richness and beauty. The houses of two or more storeys have chambers on each floor opening on to a common balcony running round the inside of the Court, with a staircase in a corner of the Court open to the sky. This type of ‘court’ is usually paved with marble or flagging, and has a well or fountain in the centre (2 Samuel 17:18), with orange and lemon trees and other shrubs around it. in the ‘court’ of the high priest’s house (Matthew 26:58). Peter was not allowed into this room, but was out in the open air of the ‘court’; and this was ‘beneath’ (Mark 14:66), i. ...
The ‘court of the Gentiles,’ which was ‘without the temple’ (Revelation 11:2), was on the lowest level or terrace of the Holy Mountain, and separated from the ‘Sanctuary’ or ‘Mountain of the House’ by a stone wall four or five feet high, called ‘the Soreg
Certiorari - ) A writ issuing out of chancery, or a superior Court, to call up the records of a inferior Court, or remove a cause there depending, in order that the party may have more sure and speedy justice, or that errors and irregularities may be corrected. It is obtained upon complaint of a party that he has not received justice, or can not have an impartial trial in the inferior Court
Bail Bond - (1):...
A bond or obligation given by a prisoner and his surety, to insure the prisoner's appearance in Court, at the return of the writ. ...
(2):...
Special bail in Court to abide the judgment
Baston - ) An officer bearing a painted staff, who formerly was in attendance upon the king's Court to take into custody persons committed by the Court
Contumacy - ) A willful contempt of, and disobedience to, any lawful summons, or to the rules and orders of Court, as a refusal to appear in Court when legally summoned
Hazor - Court; hay
Copyhold - ) A tenure of estate by copy of Court roll; or a tenure for which the tenant has nothing to show, except the rolls made by the steward of the lord's Court
Arches, Court of - The Court of the Archbishop of Canterbury, acting also as a Court of appeal from diocesan tribunals within the Province of Canterbury; formerly held at the church of Saint Mary of the Arches (Saint Mary-le-Bow), Cheapside, London
Friend of the King - The title of a Court official (1 Kings 4:5 ). Hushai evidently held this office in David's Court; Zabud held it in Solomon's
Courtly - ) Relating or belonging to a Court. ) Elegant; polite; Courtlike; flattering. ) Disposed to favor the great; favoring the policy or party of the Court; obsequious. ) In the manner of Courts; politely; gracefully; elegantly
Court-Martial - ) To subject to trial by a Court-martial. ) A Court consisting of military or naval officers, for the trial of one belonging to the army or navy, or of offenses against military or naval law
Dies Juridicus - A Court day
Bencher - ) A member of a Court or council. ) One of the senior and governing members of an Inn of Court
Courts-Martial - ) of Court-martial...
Adramyttium - The Court of death
Azor - A helper; a Court
Vehmgericht - ) A vehmic Court
Defaulter - ) One who makes default; one who fails to appear in Court when Court when called
Judicature - ) A Court of justice; a judicatory. ) The right of judicial action; jurisdiction; extent jurisdiction of a judge or Court
Court of the Guard - See Court of the Prison
Law, Administration of - See Court System; Judges; Sanhedrin
Beautiful Gate - It is supposed to have been the door which led from the Court of the Gentiles to the Court of the women
North Gate - Designation of two gates in Ezekiel's vision of the renewed Temple, a gate entering the outer Court (Ezekiel 8:14 ; Ezekiel 44:4 ; Ezekiel 46:9 ; Ezekiel 47:2 ) and a gate entering the inner Court (Ezekiel 40:35 ,Ezekiel 40:35,40:40 ,Ezekiel 40:40,40:44 )
Triable - ) Liable to undergo a judicial examination; properly coming under the cognizance of a Court; as, a cause may be triable before one Court which is not triable in another
Quadrangle - ) A square or quadrangular space or inclosure, such a space or Court surrounded by buildings, esp. such a Court in a college or public school in England
Forejudge - ) To expel from Court for some offense or misconduct, as an attorney or officer; to deprive or put out of a thing by the judgment of a Court
Audience - Admittance to a hearing public reception to an interview a ceremony observed in Courts, or by official characters, when ambassadors or applicants to men in office are permitted to appear and state their business in person. In the Spanish dominions, a Court as the audience of Seville, which is a Court of oyer and terminer and the audience pretorial, in the Indies, which is a high Court of judicature. In England, a Court held by the arch-bishop of Canterbury, on the subject of consecrations, elections, institutions, marriages, &c
Court-Martialed - ) of Court-martial...
Courting - ) of Court...
Outcourt - ) An outer or exterior Court
Romana, Curia - The Roman, that is Papal, Court
Beit din - "house of law"); rabbinical Court...
Hall - 1: αὐλή (Strong's #833 — Noun Feminine — aule — ow-lay' ) "a Court," most frequently the place where a governor dispensed justice, is rendered "hall" in Mark 15:16 ; Luke 22:55 , AV (RV, "court"). See Court , FOLD , PALACE
Treasury, - They stood in the Court of the women. It would seem probable that this Court was sometimes itself called "the treasury" because it contained these repositories
Accourt - ) To treat Courteously; to Court
Court-Martialing - ) of Court-martial...
Kitrug - an accusatory voice in the Heavenly Court...
Defender of the Tie - (Latin: Defensor Vinculi) ...
Member of a diocesan matrimonial Court whose duty is to uphold the validity of a disputed marriage until sufficient evidence has been adduced to show its nullity. If he is dissatisfied with the ruling of the Court, he has the right of appeal to a higher tribunal
Tie, Defender of the - (Latin: Defensor Vinculi) ...
Member of a diocesan matrimonial Court whose duty is to uphold the validity of a disputed marriage until sufficient evidence has been adduced to show its nullity. If he is dissatisfied with the ruling of the Court, he has the right of appeal to a higher tribunal
Appeal - The principle, of appeal was recognized by the Mosaic law in the establishment of a central Court under the presidency of the judge or ruler for the time being, before which all cased too difficult for the local Court were to be tried. Jehoshaphat delegated his judicial authority to a Court permanently established for the purpose. (2 Chronicles 19:8 ) These Courts were re-established by Ezra. Paul, as a Roman citizen, exercized a right of appeal from the jurisdiction of the local Court at Jerusalem to the emperor
Court - Court
Decerniture - ) A decree or sentence of a Court
Ulam - The porch; the Court; their strength; their folly
Extrajudicial - ) Out of or beyond the power authority of a Court or judge; beyond jurisdiction; not valid as a part of a judicial proceeding; as, extrajudicial oaths, judgments, etc. ) Out of or beyond the proper authority of a Court or judge; beyond jurisdiction; not legally required
Patio - , a Court or Courtyard of a house or other building; esp. , an inner Court open to the sky
Session - ) Hence, also, the time, period, or term during which a Court, council, legislature, etc. The session of a judicial Court is called a term. ) The actual sitting of a Court, council, legislature, etc
Courtyard - ) A Court or inclosure attached to a house
Curiality - ) The privileges, prerogatives, or retinue of a Court
Querele - ) A complaint to a Court
Vehme - ) A vehmic Court
Justiceable - ) Liable to trial in a Court of justice
Macer - ) A mace bearer; an officer of a Court
Habeas Corpus - A writ having for its object to bring a party before a Court or judge; especially, one to inquire into the cause of a person's imprisonment or detention by another, with the view to protect the right to personal liberty; also, one to bring a prisoner into Court to testify in a pending trial
Recorder - The TEV identified the recorder as the official in charge of [1] records. The term possibly refers to a Court herald
Peristyle - ; specifically, a complete system of columns, whether on all sides of a Court, or surrounding a building, such as the cella of a temple. Used in the former sense, it gives name to the larger and inner Court of a Roman dwelling, the peristyle
Sist - ) To cause to take a place, as at the bar of a Court; hence, to cite; to summon; to bring into Court
Areopagite - A member of the Court of Areopagus (Acts 17:34 )
Assoilyie - ) To absolve; to acquit by sentence of Court
Sederunt - ) A sitting, as of a Court or other body
Courtlike - ) After the manner of a Court; elegant; polite; Courtly
Gentiles - For ‘Court of the Gentiles,’ see Temple
Officialty - ) The charge, office, Court, or jurisdiction of an official
Justiciable - ) Proper to be examined in a Court of justice
Leetman - ) One subject to the jurisdiction of a Court-leet
Majordomo - (Latin: major, elder; domus, house) ...
The chief governor of the papal household, formerly Prefect of the Apostolic Palace, whose principal office is to supervise religious functions at which the pope and his Court assist, to draw up nominations to Court offices or posts of honor in the Vatican, and to act as Governor of the Conclave during a vacancy
Court of the Prison - An open Court in the Jerusalem palace reserved for the detention of prisoners during the day of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 32:8 ,Jeremiah 32:8,32:12 ; Jeremiah 33:1 ; Jeremiah 37:21 ; Jeremiah 38:6 ,Jeremiah 38:6,38:13 ,Jeremiah 38:13,38:28 ; Jeremiah 39:14-15 ). Translated in the modern versions as “court of the guard
Ahilud - ” The father of Jehoshaphat, David's Court recorder (2 Samuel 8:16 ), who retained the position under Solomon (1 Kings 4:3 ). Probably the same Ahilud was father of Baana, Solomon's official to get Court provisions from the province around Taanach, Megiddo, and Beth-shean (1 Kings 4:12 )
Venire Facias - ...
(2):...
A judicial writ or precept directed to the sheriff, requiring him to cause a certain number of qualified persons to appear in Court at a specified time, to serve as jurors in said Court
Folkmoter - ) One who takes part in a folkmote, or local Court
Zethar - One of the chamberlains at the Persian Court
Mootman - ) One who argued moot cases in the inns of Court
Dedans - ) A division, at one end of a tennis Court, for spectators
Shethar - A star, a prince at the Court of Ahasuerus (Esther 1:14 )
Peribolos - ) In ancient architecture, an inclosed Court, esp
Penitentiaryship - ) The office or condition of a penitentiary of the papal Court
Areopagite - A member of the Court of the Areopagus
Reargument - ) An arguing over again, as of a motion made in Court
Tourn - ) The sheriff's turn, or Court
Areop'Agite - a member of the Court of Areopagus
Appeal - A party to an ecclesiastical trial who considers that he has a grievance against the sentence, as well as the promoter of justice and the defender of the bond, in suits in which they took part, have the right of appealing from the sentence to the next highest Court or to the Holy See. Within ten days from the notification of the sentence, the appeal is lodged before the lower Court. Within the next month, unless the lower judge grants an extension of the time, the one appealing must follow up his application by calling on the higher Court to amend the decision, enclosing a copy of the sentence and of his own bill of appeal. The Court of appeal has to confine itself to the exact case decided by the lower Court, but will admit any additional proofs that have come to light in the meantime
Puisne - ) Younger or inferior in rank; junior; associate; as, a chief justice and three puisne justices of the Court of Common Pleas; the puisne barons of the Court of Exchequer
Assessorial - ) Of or pertaining to an assessor, or to a Court of assessors
Propylaeum - ) Any Court or vestibule before a building or leading into any inclosure
Shebna - He was in the Court of Hezekiah
Barmote - ) A Court held in Derbyshire, in England, for deciding controversies between miners
Essoin - ) To excuse for nonappearance in Court
Abagtha - One of the seven eunuchs in Ahasuerus's Court (Esther 1:10 ; 2:21 )
Manciple - ) A steward; a purveyor, particularly of a college or Inn of Court
Portmote - ) In old English law, a Court, or mote, held in a port town
Homologate - ) To approve; to allow; to confirm; as, the Court homologates a proceeding
Feodary - ) An ancient officer of the Court of wards
Vacatur - ) An order of Court by which a proceeding is set aside or annulled
Protonotary - ) A register or chief clerk of a Court in certain States of the United States. ) Formerly, a chief clerk in the Court of King's Bench and in the Court of Common Pleas, now superseded by the master
Jurisdiction - ) The legal power, right, or authority of a particular Court to hear and determine causes, to try criminals, or to execute justice; judicial authority over a cause or class of causes; as, certain suits or actions, or the cognizance of certain crimes, are within the jurisdiction of a particular Court, that is, within the limits of its authority or commission. ) Sphere of authority; the limits within which any particular power may be exercised, or within which a government or a Court has authority
King's Bench - Formerly, the highest Court of common law in England; - so called because the king used to sit there in person. Its jurisdiction was transferred by the judicature acts of 1873 and 1875 to the high Court of justice created by that legislation
Roofs - They are built round a paved Court, into which the entrance from the street is through a gateway or passage room furnished with benches, and sufficiently large to be used for receiving visits or transacting business. The stairs which lead to the roof are never placed on the outside of the house in the street, but usually in the gateway, or passage room to the Court, sometimes at the entrance within the Court. This Court is now called, in Arabic, el woost, or ‘the middle of the house,' literally answering to το μ εσον of St. It is customary to fix cords from the parapet walls, Deuteronomy 22:8 , of the flat roofs across this Court, and upon them to expand a veil or covering, as a shelter from the heat. They rolled back the veil, and let the sick man down over the parapet of the roof into the area or Court of the house, before Jesus. " The windows of the eastern houses being chiefly within, facing the Court, in order to see what was going on without in the streets of the city, the only way was to run up to the flat roof
Jehudi - Son of Nethaniah, and an attendant at the Court of Jehoiakim
Libelant - ) One who libels; one who institutes a suit in an ecclesiastical or admiralty Court
Hega'i - (eunuch ), one of the eunuchs of the Court of Ahasuerus
ha'Tach - (verily ), one of the eunuchs in the Court of Ahasuerus
Matrimonial Court - Disputed cases concerning marriage are usually brought before the matrimonial Court of a diocese. All decisions of the Court, to be effective, must have the approval of the bishop. An appeal from the diocesan Court may be made to Rome; or, under certain restrictions, a case may be sent there directly. In the Romani "Curia" or Court, the Congregation of the Holy Office has exclusive jurisdiction concerning the, Pauline Privilege, the impediment of disparity of worship and that of mixed religion; but it may refer cases to another Congregation, such as that of the Sacraments, or to the Tribunal of the Rota
Compear - ) To appear in Court personally or by attorney
Tubman - ) One of the two most experienced barristers in the Court of Exchequer
Abag'Tha - (God-given ), one of the seven eunuchs in the Persian Court of Ahasuerus
Dionysius - Member of the supreme Court at Athens, converted under the preaching of Paul
Arnishment - ) Warning, or legal notice, to one to appear and give information to the Court on any matter. ) Warning to a person in whose hands the effects of another are attached, not to pay the money or deliver the goods to the defendant, but to appear in Court and give information as garnishee
Statute of Provisors - English statute of Edward III incidental to the controversy between the English kings and the Court of Rome, concerning filling of ecclesiastical benefices by means of papal provisions. It enacts that elections of bishops shall be free, that owners of advowsons shall have free collation and presentment, and that attempted reservation, collation, or provision by the Court of Rome shall cause the right of collation to revert to the king
Beautiful Gate, the - This gate was situated on the east side of the inner enclosure at the top of a flight of 15 steps, and led from the outer Court, or Court of the Gentiles, to the Women's Court, a most likely place for the scene narrated in Acts 3, as beggars were not allowed within the sacred precincts, and as all men and women entering the Temple on that side had to go through that gate
Hangings - Μasak , "the covering before the door (rather 'the curtain for the entrance,' so KJV distinguishes the words rightly at Numbers 3:26) of the tabernacle" (Exodus 26:36-37); of variegated stuff "wrought with needlework" ("the work of' the embroiderer"), hung on five pillars of acacia wood; the curtain, unlike the hangings at the sides and back of the Court, could be drawn up or aside at pleasure. Another before the entrance of the Court (Exodus 27:16). Qelaim , hangings of fine twined linen for the walls of the Court of the tabernacle, like our tapestry (Exodus 27:9)
Homologation - ) Confirmation or ratification (as of something otherwise null and void), by a Court or a grantor
Shadrach - A Chaldean name given to Ananias at the Court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:7
Returned - Restored given or sent back repaid brought or rendered to the proper Court or officer
Zabud - Gift, the son of Nathan, who was "king's friend" in the Court of Solomon (1 Kings 4:5 )
R. yitzchak eizik epstein of homel - (Gomel): a leading chassid of the first three Chabad-Lubavitch Rebbes; head of the Rabbinic Court in Homil ...
Abdenago - Babylonian name for Azarilts, one of the three companions of the prophet Daniel at the Court of Nabuchodonosor
Mainpernor - ) A surety, under the old writ of mainprise, for a prisoner's appearance in Court at a day
Chambre Ardente - This name was given, some say, because the place where the commission sat was lighted exclusively by torches, while others see in it a reference to the severity displayed by this Court towards the Huguenots. The term was also applied to a Court established by Louis XIV to stamp out poisoning and sorcery
Ardente, Chambre - This name was given, some say, because the place where the commission sat was lighted exclusively by torches, while others see in it a reference to the severity displayed by this Court towards the Huguenots. The term was also applied to a Court established by Louis XIV to stamp out poisoning and sorcery
Cite - ) To notify of a proceeding in Court. ) To call upon officially or authoritatively to appear, as before a Court; to summon
Joah - Son of Asaph, and ‘recorder’ at Hezekiah’s Court ( 2 Kings 18:18 ; 2 Kings 18:26 ; 2 Kings 18:37 = Isaiah 36:3 ; Isaiah 36:11 ; Isaiah 36:22 ). Son of Joahaz, and ‘recorder’ at Josiah’s Court ( 2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Curialistic - ) Pertaining to a Court
Archchancellor - ) A chief chancellor; - an officer in the old German empire, who presided over the secretaries of the Court
Silentiary - ) One appointed to keep silence and order in Court; also, one sworn not to divulge secrets of state
Belshazzar - Prince of Bel, the Chaldean name given to Daniel at the Court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:7 4:8
Aulic - audicus, from aula, a hall, Court or palace Gr. ...
Pertaining to a royal Court. The epithet is probably confined to the German Empire, where it is used to designate certain Courts or officers composing the Courts. They always follow the Emperor's Court, and decide without an appeal
Court - ) The great Courts belonging to the temple of Jerusalem were three; the first called the Court of the Gentiles, because the Gentiles were allowed to enter so far, and no farther; the second was the Court of Israel, because all the Israelites, provided they were purified, had a right of admission into it; the third was that of the priests, where the altar of burnt-offerings stood, where the priests and Levites exercised their ministry. Common Israelites, who were desirous of offering sacrifices, were at liberty to bring their victims as far as the inner part of the Court; but they could not pass a certain line of separation, which divided it into two; and they withdrew as soon as they had delivered their sacrifices and offerings to the priests, or had made their confession with the ceremony of laying their hands upon the head of the victim, if it were a sin-offering. Before the temple was built, there was a Court belonging to the tabernacle, but not near so large as that of the temple, and encompassed only with pillars, and veils hung with cords
Memucan - Dignified, one of the royal counsellors at the Court of Ahasuerus, by whose suggestion Vashti was divorced (Esther 1:14,16,21 )
Embracery - ) An attempt to influence a Court, jury, etc
Sheshach - A poetical name for Babylon, signifying, as some judge, house or Court of the prince, Jeremiah 25:26 ; 51:41
Mordecai - The uncle of Esther, who rose to dignity and honor in the Court of Ahasuerus
Melzar - The name or the official title of a butler or steward at the Court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:11-16
be-ar'Bel - (house of God's Court ), named only in ( Hosea 10:14 ) as the scene of a sack and massacre by Shalman
Butler - ” The butler was an officer of the royal Court who had charge of wines and other beverages. The butler was a trusted member of the royal Court as this person helped prevent the poisoning of the king
Consistory - ) A civil Court of justice. ) The spiritual Court of a diocesan bishop held before his chancellor or commissioner in his cathedral church or elsewhere
Parbar - Others offer plausible translations: (western) collonade (NRSV, REB); western pavilion (TEV); Court to the west (NIV). Suggested renderings of the plural of parbar (or a related term) in 2 Kings 23:11 include: precincts (NAS, NRSV), Court (NIV), and suburbs (KJV)
Nobleman - Rather "royal Courtier"; perhaps at Herod Antipas' Court
Sanhedrin - the central rabbinical supreme Court of ancient Israel, composed of 71 sages; also, the tractate of the Talmud of that name ...
Allocatur - , by a Court, judge, or judicial officer
Pepper Box - ) A buttress on the left-hand wall of a fives Court as the game is played at Eton College, England
Palsgrave - ) A count or earl who presided in the domestic Court, and had the superintendence, of a royal household in Germany
Appealed - Removed to a higher Court, as a cause prosecuted for a crime by a private person, as a criminal
Marshalsea - ) The Court or seat of a marshal; hence, the prison in Southwark, belonging to the marshal of the king's household
na'Than-me'Lech - (the gift of the king ), a eunuch (Authorized Version "chamberlain") in the Court of Josiah
Contumacious - ) Willfully disobedient to the summous or prders of a Court
Caravansary - ) A kind of inn, in the East, where caravans rest at night, being a large, rude, unfurnished building, surrounding a Court
Mispereth - (mihss' peh rehth) Personal name meaning, “court recorder” or “learned
Pelota - ) A Basque, Spanish, and Spanish-American game played in a Court, in which a ball is struck with a wickerwork racket
Court-Leet - ) A Court of record held once a year, in a particular hundred, lordship, or manor, before the steward of the leet
Demster - ) An officer whose duty it was to announce the doom or sentence pronounced by the Court
Datary - ) An officer in the pope's Court, having charge of the Dataria
Areopagite - One connected with the Court of Areopagus at Athens, where Dionysius heard Paul and "clave to him and believed
Compluvium - ) A space left unroofed over the Court of a Roman dwelling, through which the rain fell into the impluvium or cistern
Held - A Court was held in Westminster hall
Bigthan - A eunuch at the Court of Ahasuerus, whose conspiracy against that king was frustrated by the vigilance of Mordecai, Esther 2:21
Bricole - ) In Court tennis, the rebound of a ball from a wall of the Court; also, the side stroke or play by which the ball is driven against the wall; hence, fig
Oyer - , as when a defendant in Court prays oyer of a writing
Fronde - , who opposed the government, and made war upon the Court party
Retraxit - ) The withdrawing, or open renunciation, of a suit in Court by the plaintiff, by which he forever lost his right of action
Lawsuit - ) An action at law; a suit in equity or admiralty; any legal proceeding before a Court for the enforcement of a claim
Michaiah - A young prince at the Court of Jehoiakim, who communicated to the king's counselors the solemn warnings of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 36:11 - 13
Appearance - ) The coming into Court of either of the parties; the being present in Court; the coming into Court of a party summoned in an action, either by himself or by his attorney, expressed by a formal entry by the proper officer to that effect; the act or proceeding by which a party proceeded against places himself before the Court, and submits to its jurisdiction
Writ - In law, precept issued from the proper authority to the sheriff, his deputy or other subordinate officer, commanding him to perform some act, as to summon a defendant into Court to answer, and the like. In England, writs are issued from some Court under seal. An original writ, in England, is issued from the high Court of chancery. A judicial writ is issued by order of a Court upon a special occasion, during the pendency of the suit
Officer - In New Testament used to translated hufretes "minister" (Matthew 5:25), and practor "exacter" or "officer of the Court," only in Luke 12:58
Filacer - ) A former officer in the English Court of Common Pleas; - so called because he filed the writs on which he made out process
Apposer - Formerly, in the English Court of Exchequer, an officer who audited the sheriffs' accounts
Exigenter - ) An officer in the Court of King's Bench and Common Pleas whose duty it was make out exigents
Monsignore - ) My lord; - an ecclesiastical dignity bestowed by the pope, entitling the bearer to social and domestic rank at the papal Court
Judicious - ) Of or relating to a Court; judicial
Nathan-Melech - An officer in the Court of Manasseh, king of Judah, 2 Kings 23:11
Wert - ...
Werth, worth, in names, signifies a farm, Court or village
Curia - ) The Court of a sovereign or of a feudal lord; also; his residence or his household. ) Any Court of justice
Embassador - A minister of the highest rank employed by one prince or state, at the Court of another, to manage the public concerns of his own prince or state, and representing the power and dignity of his sovereign. Embassadors are ordinary, when they reside permanently at a foreign Court or extraordinary, when they are sent on a special occasion
Procedendo - ) A writ by which a cause which has been removed on insufficient grounds from an inferior to a superior Court by certiorari, or otherwise, is sent down again to the same Court, to be proceeded in there. ) In English practice, a writ issuing out of chancery in cases where the judges of subordinate Courts delay giving judgment, commanding them to proceed to judgment
Consistory - A word commonly used for a council house of ecclesiastical persons, or place of justice in the spiritual Court: a session or assembly of prelates. Every archbishop and bishop of every diocese hath a consistory Court, held before his chancellor or commissary, in his catherdral church, or other convenient place of his diocese for ecclesiastical causes. The bishop's chancellor is the judge of this Court, supposed to be skilled in the civil and canon law; and in places of the diocese far remote from the bishop's consistory, the bishop appoints a commissary to judge in all causes within a certain district, and a register to enter his decrees, &c
Courteous - CourtEOUS, a. from Court
Third-Penny - ) A third part of the profits of fines and penalties imposed at the country Court, which was among the perquisites enjoyed by the earl
Jester - ) A buffoon; a merry-andrew; a Court fool
Vouchee - ) The person who is vouched, or called into Court to support or make good his warranty of title in the process of common recovery
Recorder - Or remembrancer, a sort of registrar of affairs at the Court of Judah, 2 Samuel 8:16 ; 1 Kings 4:3 ; 2 Kings 18:18
Durbar - ) An audience hall; the Court of a native prince; a state levee; a formal reception of native princes, given by the governor general of India
Contempt - ) Disobedience of the rules, orders, or process of a Court of justice, or of rules or orders of a legislative body; disorderly, contemptuous, or insolent language or behavior in presence of a Court, tending to disturb its proceedings, or impair the respect due to its authority
Amerce - To inflict a penalty at mercy to punish by a pecuniary penalty, the amount of which is not fixed by law, but left to the discretion or mercy of the Court as, the Court amerced the criminal in the sum of one hundred dollars
Inquisition - In some catholic countries, a Court or tribunal established for the examination and punishment of heretics. This Court was established in the twelfth century by father Dominic, who was charged by pope Innocent III
Hague Tribunal - The permanent Court of arbitration created by the "International Convention for the Pacific Settle of International Disputes. From these persons an arbitration tribunal is chosen by the parties to a difference submitted to the Court
Recognizance - ) An obligation of record entered into before some Court of record or magistrate duly authorized, with condition to do some particular act, as to appear at the same or some other Court, to keep the peace, or pay a debt
Comforter - ” The background of the Greek term lies in the law Court where the Paraklete helped someone. Meanwhile, Jesus is the Paraklete in the heavenly Court (1 John 2:1 )
Bouch - ) An allowance of meat and drink for the tables of inferior officers or servants in a nobleman's palace or at Court
Parvise - ) a Court of entrance to, or an inclosed space before, a church; hence, a church porch; - sometimes formerly used as place of meeting, as for lawyers
Folkmote - ) a general assembly of the people to consider and order matters of the commonwealth; also, a local Court
Polystyle - ) Having many columns; - said of a building, especially of an interior part or Court; as, a polystyle hall
Judicatory - ) A Court of justice; a tribunal
Belteshazzar - The name given to the prophet Daniel at the Court of Nebuchadnezzar
Manaen - ” In the Old Testament, those who shared the king's table were persons recognized as valued members of the Court ( 2 Samuel 9:10-13 ; 2 Samuel 19:28 ; 1 Kings 2:7 ; 2 Kings 25:29 ; Nehemiah 5:17 ). The earliest Greek translation uses syntropoi to refer to those generals who were reared with Alexander ( 1 Maccabees 1:6 ) as well as for members of Court (2 Maccabees 9:29 ). The meanings “member of Court” and “childhood companion” are both possible for Acts 13:1
Laver - It stood in the Court between the altar and the door of the tabernacle. , a foot, which, as well as the laver itself, was made from the mirrors of the women who assembled at the door of the tabernacle Court. In Solomon's temple, besides the great molten sea, there were ten lavers of brass, raised on bases, 1 Kings 7:27; 1 Kings 7:39, five on the north and five on the south side of the Court of the priests
Decree - Judicial decision, or determination of a litigated cause as a decree of the Court of chancery. The decision of a Court of equity is called a decree that of a Court of law, a judgment. To determine judicially to resolve by sentence as, the Court decreed that the property should be restored or they decreed a restoration of the property
Damaris - ” An Athenian woman who became a Christian following Paul's sermon at Mars' Hill, the highest Court in Athens (Acts 17:34 )
Apparitor - ) A messenger or officer who serves the process of an ecclesiastical Court
Porte - ) The Ottoman Court; the government of the Turkish empire, officially called the Sublime Porte, from the gate (port) of the sultan's palace at which justice was administered
Outer - Being on the outside external opposed to inner as the outer wall the outer part of a thing the outer Court or gate
Hall - The Authorized Version renders αὐλή by ‘palace’ in Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:58; Matthew 26:69, Mark 14:54; Mark 14:66, Luke 11:21, John 18:15, when the reference is to the place where the governor dispensed justice; by ‘fold’ in John 10:1; John 10:16 of the place where the sheep were kept at night; and by ‘court’ in Revelation 11:2, as designating the Court of the temple. Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 more consistently renders αὐλή by ‘court’ instead of ‘palace,’ everywhere except in John 10:1 ἡ αὐλὴ τῶν προβάτων, where it has ‘the fold of the sheep’ (cf. Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:58; Matthew 26:69, where the inner Court of the high priest’s official residence seems to be meant; in Matthew 26:69 ‘Peter sat without in the palace’ (Authorized Version); ‘without’ stands in contrast with the audience-room in which Jesus was appearing before the authorities, i. Peter was not in the room of the official residence where the trial was going on, but out in the open Court, around which the house was built; and this was ‘beneath,’ or on a lower level than the audience-room. See also Court, Praetorium
Appeal - To refer to a superior judge or Court, for the decision of a cause depending, or the revision of a cause decided in a lower Court. APPE'AL, To call or remove a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or Court. This may be done after trial and judgment in the lower Court or by special statute or agreement, a party may appeal before trial, upon a fictitious issue and judgment. The removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior tribunal, as from a common pleas Court to a superior or supreme Court
Court - Châtsêr (חָצֵר, Strong's #2691), “court; enclosure. ” This word is related to a common Semitic verb that has two meanings: “to be present,” in the sense of living at a certain place (encampment, residence, Court), and “to enclose, surround, press together. ...
In some Hebrew dictionaries, the usage of châtsêr as “settled abode,” “settlement,” or “village” is separated from the meaning “court. ” Here châtsêr is related to the first meaning of the root; this occurs less frequently than the usage meaning “court. ...
The predominant usage of châtsêr is “court,” whether of a house, a palace, or the temple. Each house generally had a Courtyard surrounded by a wall or else one adjoined several homes: “Nevertheless a lad saw them, and told Absalom: but they went both of them away quickly, and came to a man’s house in Bahurim, which had a well in his Court; whither they went down” ( Courts. The psalmist expressed his joy in being in the “courts” of the temple, where the birds built their nests ( Courts is better than a thousand. God’s people looked forward to the thronging together of all the people in God’s “courts”: “… In the Courts of the Lord’s house, in the midst of thee, O Jerusalem” ( Court; palace”), epaulis (“farm; homestead; residence”), and kome (“village; small town”). The KJV gives these translations: “court; village; town
Monitory - ) Admonition; warning; especially, a monition proceeding from an ecclesiastical Court, but not addressed to any one person
Headnote - ) A note at the head of a page or chapter; in law reports, an abstract of a case, showing the principles involved and the opinion of the Court
Elisor - ) An elector or chooser; one of two persons appointed by a Court to return a jury or serve a writ when the sheriff and the coroners are disqualified
Yamen - ) In China, the official headquarters or residence of a mandarin, including Court rooms, offices, gardens, prisons, etc
Mandamus - ) A writ issued by a superior Court and directed to some inferior tribunal, or to some corporation or person exercising authority, commanding the performance of some specified duty
Gabbai - (Aramaic) (a) the person responsible for the proper functioning of a synagogue or communal body (b) an official of the Rebbe�s Court, who admits people for yechidut, private meetings...
Ashpenaz - The master of the eunuchs of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1:3 ), the "Rabsaris" of the Court
Julia - Paul in Romans 16:15 , perhaps a ‘dependent of the Court,’ and wife or sister of Philologus (Lightfoot, Phitipp
Piepowder - ) An ancient Court of record in England, formerly incident to every fair and market, of which the steward of him who owned or had the toll was the judge
Consultation - Writ of consultation, in law, a writ awarded by a superior Court, to return a cause, which had been removed by prohibition from the Court Christian, to its original jurisdiction so called because the judges on consultation find the prohibition founded
Abednego - Abednego (a-bĕd'ne-gô), servant of Nego or Nebo, a Chaldee name given to Azariah, one of the three captive young princes of Judah, who were Daniel's companions at the Court of the king of Babylon. Their virtue, wisdom, and piety secured their promotion at Court, Daniel 1:3-19; Daniel 2:17-49; and their firmness in witnessing for God among idolaters, with their deliverance from the fiery furnace by Jehovah, led many to acknowledge the true God, and rendered these pious youths forever illustrious
Palatine - In the Church the term was similarly transferred to persons connected with the papal Court
Rabble - * For RABBLE see Court , No
Bench Warrant - A process issued by a presiding judge or by a Court against a person guilty of some contempt, or indicted for some crime; - so called in distinction from a justice's warrant
Potiphar - An officer in the Court of Pharaoh—master to the patriarch Joseph (Genesis 37:36) His name is derived, as it should seem to be, from Parah, which means to scatter
Arret - ) A judgment, decision, or decree of a Court or high tribunal; also, a decree of a sovereign
Embassador - ) A minister of the highest rank sent to a foreign Court to represent there his sovereign or country
Mayor - In some American cities there is a city Court of which the major is chief judge
Arret - ) A judgment, decision, or decree of a Court or high tribunal; also, a decree of a sovereign
Laver - It stood in the Court between the altar and the door of the tabernacle. a foot, which, was well as the laver itself, was made from the mirrors of the women who assembled at the door of the tabernacle Court. (Leviticus 8:10,11 ) ...
In Solomon's temple, besides the great molten sea, there were ten lavers of brass, raised on bases, (1 Kings 7:27,39 ) five on the north and five on the south side of the Court of the priests
Melzar - , chief butler; the title of an officer at the Babylonian Court (Daniel 1:11,16 ) who had charge of the diet of the Hebrew youths
Quod - ) A quadrangle or Court, as of a prison; hence, a prison
Areopagus - (Greek: Ares, Mars; pagos, hill: Hill of Mars) ...
Low hill situated near the Acropolis at Athens; Court held on this hill before which Saint Paul was brought to explain his dactrine (Acts 17 ) ...
Inner - Interior farther inward than something else, as an inner chamber the inner Court of a temple or palace
Venality - ) The quality or state of being venal, or purchasable; mercenariness; prostitution of talents, offices, or services, for money or reward; as, the venality of a corrupt Court; the venality of an official
Remittitur - ) A sending back, as when a record is remitted by a superior to an inferior Court
Residency - ) A political agency at a native Court in British India, held by an officer styled the Resident; also, a Dutch commercial colony or province in the East Indies
Big'Than, - (gift of God ), a eunuch (chamberlain, Authorized Version) in the Court of Ahasuerus, one of those "who kept the door," and conspired with Teresh against the king's life
Jealousy, Image of - An idolatrous object, seen in vision by Ezekiel (Ezekiel 8:3,5 ), which stood in the priests' or inner Court of the temple
Crier - ) an officer who proclaims the orders or directions of a Court, or who gives public notice by loud proclamation; as, a town-crier
Ben-Hur - ” Solomon's district supervisor over Mount Ephraim in charge of supplying the royal Court one month a year (1 Kings 4:8 )
Abagtha - One of the seven eunuchs in Ahasuerus' Court; akin to the name Bigthan (Esther 1:10; Esther 2:21)
Jongler - ) In the Middle Ages, a Court attendant or other person who, for hire, recited or sang verses, usually of his own composition
Residencia - ) In Spanish countries, a Court or trial held, sometimes as long as six months, by a newly elected official, as the governor of a province, to examine into the conduct of a predecessor
Temple, Herod's - The main part of the building was completed in ten years, but the erection of the outer Courts and the embellishment of the whole were carried on during the entire period of our Lord's life on earth (John 2:16,19-21 ), and the temple was completed only A. It had two Courts, one intended for the Israelites only, and the other, a large outer Court, called "the Court of the Gentiles," intended for the use of strangers of all nations. These two Courts were separated by a low wall, as Josephus states, some 4 1/2 feet high, with thirteen openings. Along the top of this dividing wall, at regular intervals, were placed pillars bearing in Greek an inscription to the effect that no stranger was, on the pain of death, to pass from the Court of the Gentiles into that of the Jews. ...
It is of importance to notice that the word rendered "sanctuary" in the inscription was used in a specific sense of the inner Court, the Court of the Israelites, and is the word rendered "temple" in John 2:15 and Acts 21:28,29 . Within this partition wall stood the temple proper, consisting of, (1) the Court of the women, 8 feet higher than the outer Court; (2) 10 feet higher than this Court was the Court of Israel; (3) the Court of the priests, again 3 feet higher; and lastly (4) the temple floor, 8 feet above that; thus in all 29 feet above the level of the outer Court. The temple Courts thus are supposed to have occupied the southern portion of the "enclosure," forming in all a square of more than 900 feet
Leo xi, Pope - Of a famous Florentine family he held the position of ambassador at the Court of Tuscany for 15 years; then he was elected Bishop of Pistoia, and Archbishop of Florence. As cardinal he was sent to the French Court of Henry IV where he was instrumental in repressing Huguenot influence
Abednego - Servant of Nego; a Chaldee name give to Azariah, one of the three captive young princes of Judah, who were Daniel's companions at the Court of the king of Babylon, Daniel 1:7 . Their virtue, wisdom, and piety secured their promotion at Court, Daniel 1:3-19 2:17,49 ; and their steadfastness in witnessing for God among idolaters, with their deliverance from the fiery furnace by the Angel-Jehovah, led many to acknowledge the true God, and rendered these pious youth for ever illustrious as monuments of the excellence and safety of faith in Him, Daniel 3:1-30 Hebrews 11:34
Trophimus - Paul had brought him into the inner Court of the Temple, separated from the outer ‘Court of the Gentiles’ by a barrier on which were inscriptions in Greek and Latin forbidding any non-Jew to enter on pain of death
Appeal - Deuteronomy 17:8-9 implies a Court of appeal in hard cases; compare Judges 4:5. Jehoshaphat appointed Levites, priests, and some of the fathers to constitute a Court of appeal (2 Chronicles 19:8)
Palace - the palace of the high priest, αὐλή, signifies his Court. In Philippians 1:13 the word is πραιτώριον, 'the Court of the praetor,' or governor, or perhaps 'the praetorian guard,' from which Paul's keepers were taken
Council - The Sanhedrin, the supreme Court of the Jews, the fountain of their government, which sat at Jerusalem. The lesser Courts. Josephus states that each Court consisted of seven judges, with two Levites as assessors
Attentat - ) A proceeding in a Court of judicature, after an inhibition is decreed
Forum - ) A tribunal; a Court; an assembly empowered to hear and decide causes
Acquittal - ) A setting free, or deliverance from the charge of an offense, by verdict of a jury or sentence of a Court
Implead - To institute and prosecute a suit against one in Court to sue at law
Defensor - ) A defender or an advocate in Court; a guardian or protector
Nebushasban - Adorer of Nebo, or Nebo saves me, the "Rabsaris," or chief chamberlain, of the Court of Babylon
Mordecai - A Jew in the Persian Court who caused the deliverance of the Jews from the destruction plotted by Haman
Commissary - An officer of the bishop, who exercises spiritual jurisdiction in places of a diocese so far from the episcopal see, that the chancellor cannot call the people to the bishop's principal consistory Court without great inconvenience
Ahinadab - ” One of Solomon's 12 province officials, he provided supplies for the royal Court from Mahanaim (1 Kings 4:14 )
Returnable - ) Legally required to be returned, delivered, given, or rendered; as, a writ or precept returnable at a certain day; a verdict returnable to the Court
Laver - A vessel for washing a large basin in scripture history, a basin placed in the Court of the Jewish tabernacle, where the officiating priests washed their hands and feet and the entrails of victims
Hall, - used of the Court of the high priest's house
Ceremonies, Congregation of the - In charge of the ceremonies in the pontifical chapel and Court, of functions performed by cardinals outside of the pontifical chapel, of regulating questions of precedence of cardinals, and of representation of various nations at the Vatican
Bigthan - One of the eunuchs who "kept the door" in the Court of Ahasuerus
Ben-Hesed - He supplied the royal Court one month a year (1 Kings 4:10 )
Diplomatical - ) Pertaining to diplomacy; relating to the foreign ministers at a Court, who are called the diplomatic body
Malkot - ("lashes"): ("lashes") The Jewish Court would administer lashes to a person who intentionally violated a negative commandment
Personable - ) Enabled to maintain pleas in Court
Mittimus - ) A writ for removing records from one Court to another
President - a "head"), a high officer in the Persian Court, a chief, a president, used of the three highest ministers
Hegai - Hegias is mentioned by the pagan Ctesias as of Xerxes' ("Ahasuerus") Court
Amend - The offender,being led into Court with a rope about his neck, begs pardon of his God, the Court, &c. These words denote also a recantation in open Court, or in presence of the injured person
Default - ) To call a defendant or other party whose duty it is to be present in Court, and make entry of his default, if he fails to appear; to enter a default against. ) To fail to appear in Court; to let a case go by default. ) A neglect of, or failure to take, some step necessary to secure the benefit of law, as a failure to appear in Court at a day assigned, especially of the defendant in a suit when called to make answer; also of jurors, witnesses, etc
Probate - ) Official proof; especially, the proof before a competent officer or tribunal that an instrument offered, purporting to be the last will and testament of a person deceased, is indeed his lawful act; the copy of a will proved, under the seal of the Court of Probate, delivered to the executors with a certificate of its having been proved. ) Of or belonging to a probate, or Court of probate; as, a probate record
Diplomatic - ) A minister, official agent, or envoy to a foreign Court; a diplomatist
Beth-Arbel - House of God's Court, a place alluded to by (Hosea 10:14 ) as the scene of some great military exploit, but not otherwise mentioned in Scripture
Mars Hill - The Areopagus or rocky hill in Athens, north-west of the Acropolis, where the Athenian supreme tribunal and Court of morals was held
Meshach - The title given to Mishael, one of the three Hebrew youths who were under training at the Babylonian Court for the rank of Magi (Daniel 1:7 ; 2:49 ; 3:12-30 )
Arraignment - ) The act of arraigning, or the state of being arraigned; the act of calling and setting a prisoner before a Court to answer to an indictment or complaint
Ben-Abinadab - ” The district supervisor over Dor in charge of provisions for Solomon's Court one month a year
Prisoner - ) A person under arrest, or in custody, whether in prison or not; a person held in involuntary restraint; a captive; as, a prisoner at the bar of a Court
Taxable - ) That may be legally charged by a Court against the plaintiff of defendant in a suit; as, taxable costs
Lex - ) Law; as, lex talionis, the law of retaliation; lex terrae, the law of the land; lex fori, the law of the forum or Court; lex loci, the law of the place; lex mercatoria, the law or custom of merchants
Tales - In law, tales de circumstantibus, spectators in Court, from whom the sheriff is to select men to supply any defect of jurors who are impaneled, but who may not appear, or may be challenged
Christian Herdtrich - In 1671 he became Court mathematician of Emperor Kang-he
Hazar-Maveth - Court of death, the third son of Joktan, and a region in Arabia-Felix settled by him (Genesis 10:26 ; 1 Chronicles 1:20 )
Nathan-Melech - A eunuch or chamberlain in Josiah's Court, by whose chamber at the entering in of Jehovah's house, in the suburbs, were the horses sacred to the sun; these Josiah took away and burned the sun chariots with fire (2 Kings 23:11)
Shimeath - ” Parent of Court official who murdered King Joash about 796 B
Sanhedrin - It often served as a Court to settle legal and religious matters
Per - ) Through; by means of; through the agency of; by; for; for each; as, per annum; per capita, by heads, or according to individuals; per curiam, by the Court; per se, by itself, of itself
Forum - A tribunal a Court any assembly empowered to hear and decide causes also, jurisdiction
Herdtrich, Christian Wolfgang - In 1671 he became Court mathematician of Emperor Kang-he
Per - ) Through; by means of; through the agency of; by; for; for each; as, per annum; per capita, by heads, or according to individuals; per curiam, by the Court; per se, by itself, of itself
Judge, Ecclesastical - The judge of appeal from a diocesan Court is the archbishop's Court, or the Rota, in Rome
Exhibit - ) A document produced and identified in Court for future use as evidence. ) To submit, as a document, to a Court or officer, in course of proceedings; also, to present or offer officially or in legal form; to bring, as a charge
Ecclesiastical Judge - The judge of appeal from a diocesan Court is the archbishop's Court, or the Rota, in Rome
Justification - The Court listened to the evidence and arguments in justification of the prisoner's conduct. In law, the showing of a sufficient reason in Court why a defendant did what he is called to answer
Michael Faraday - Born on September 22, 1791 at Newington Butts, England; died on August 25, 1867 at Hampton Court
Martyrs of Uganda - Christian Court pages of Mwanga, King of Uganda, Africa, who, influenced by Arabs, began a persecution against the Christians
Postman - ) One of the two most experienced barristers in the Court of Exchequer, who have precedence in motions; - so called from the place where he sits
Harbinger - ) One who provides lodgings; especially, the officer of the English royal household who formerly preceded the Court when traveling, to provide and prepare lodgings
Tiling - This in Luke 5:19 is supposed by some to refer to the verandah of the open Court under which the Lord might be sitting; or it may have been a light roofing accessible by the stairs outside the house, and easily broken through
Varlet - ) In a pack of playing cards, the Court card now called the knave, or jack
Litigate - ) To make the subject of a lawsuit; to contest in law; to prosecute or defend by pleadings, exhibition of evidence, and judicial debate in a Court; as, to litigate a cause
Eliakim - An officer of king Hezekiah's Court, appointed with others to treat with Rabshakeh, general of the Assyrian forces them besieging Jerusalem, 2 Kings 18:1-19:37 Isaiah 36:22
Gentiles, Court of the - Josephus says there was in the Court of the temple a wall or balustrade, breast high, having pillars at regular distances, with inscriptions on them in Greek and Latin, importing that strangers were forbidden to approach nearer to the altar, Ephesians 2:14
Uganda, Martyrs of - Christian Court pages of Mwanga, King of Uganda, Africa, who, influenced by Arabs, began a persecution against the Christians
Dionysius the Areopagite - A member of the University Court of the Areopagus at Athens ( Acts 17:34 ), converted by St
Jehu'di - (a Jew ), son of Nethaniah, a man employed by the princes of Jehoiakim's Court to fetch Baruch to read Jeremiah's denunciation, ( Jeremiah 36:14 ) and then by the king to fetch the volume itself and read it to him
Temple - The temple itself, strictly so called, which comprised the Porch, the Sanctuary, and the Holy of Holies, formed only a small part of the sacred precincts, being surrounded by spacious Courts, chambers, and other apartments, which were much more extensive than the temple itself. It should be observed that the word temple does not always denote the central edifice itself, but in many passages some of the outer Courts are intended. ...
Solomon's temple appears to have been surrounded by two main Courts: the inner Court, that "of the Priests," 1 Kings 6:36 2 Chronicles 4:1-22 ; and the outer Court, that "of Israel;" these were separated by a "middle wall of partition," with lodges for priests and Levites, for wood, oil, etc. The ensuing description is applicable to the temple Courts in the time of our Lord. ...
The "court of the Gentiles" was so called because it might be entered by persons of all nations. It was the exterior Court, and by far the largest of all the Courts belonging to the temple, and is said to have covered a space of more than fourteen acres. It entirely surrounded the other Courts and the temple itself; and in going up to the temple from its east or outer gate, one would cross first this Court, then the Court of the Women, then that of Israel, and lastly that of the Priests. This outmost Court was separated from the Court of the women by a wall three cubits high of lattice work, and having inscriptions on its pillars forbidding Gentiles and unclean persons to pass beyond it, on pain of death, Acts 21:28 Ephesians 2:13,14 . From this Court of the Gentiles our Savior drove the persons who had established a cattle-market in it, for the purpose of supplying those with sacrifices who came from a distance, Matthew 21:12-13 . We must not overlook the beautiful pavement of variegated marble, and the "porches" or covered walks, with columns supported magnificent galleries, with which this Court was surrounded. The porch called Solomon's John 10:23 Acts 3:11 , was on the east side or front of this Court, and was so called because it was built by this prince, upon a high wall rising from the alley of Kidron. ...
The "court of the Women," called in Scripture the "new Court," 2 Chronicles 20:5 , and the "outer Court," Ezekiel 46:21 , separated the Court of the Gentiles from the Court of Israel, extending along the east side only of the latter. It was called the Court of the women because it was their appointed place of worship, beyond which they might not go, unless when they brought a sacrifice, in which case they went forward to the Court of Israel. The gate which led into this Court from that of the Gentiles, was "the Beautiful gate" of the temple, mentioned in Acts 3:2,10 ; so called, because the folding doors, lintel, and side-posts were all overlaid with Corinthian brass. It was in this Court of the women, called the "treasury," that our Savior delivered his striking discourse to the Jews, related in John 8:1-20 . It was into this Court also that the Pharisee and the publican went to pray, Luke 18:10-13 , and hither the lame man followed Peter and John, after he was cured- the Court of the women being the ordinary place of worship for those who brought no sacrifice, Acts 3:8 . From thence, after prayers, he went back with them, through the "Beautiful gate" of the temple, where he had been lying, and through the sacred fence, into the Court of the Gentiles, where, under the eastern piazza, or Solomon's porch, Peter preached Christ crucified. It was in the same Court of the women that the Jews laid hold of Paul, when they judged him a violator of the temple by taking Gentiles within the sacred fence, Acts 21:26-29 . ...
The "court of Israel" was separated from the Court of the women by a wall thirty-two and a half cubits high on the outside, but on the inside only twenty-five. The reason of which difference was, that as the rock on which the temple stood became higher on advancing westward, the several Courts naturally became elevated in proportion. The ascent into this Court from the east was by a flight of fifteen steps, of a semicircular form, and the magnificent gate Nicanor. " The whole length of the Court from east to west was one hundred and eighty-seven cubits, and the breadth from north to south, one hundred and thirty-five cubits. In this Court, and the piazza which surrounded it, the Israelites stood in solemn and reverent silence while their sacrifices were burning in the inner Court, and while the services of the sanctuary were performed, Luke 1:8-11,21,22 . ...
Within this Court, and surrounded by it, was the "court of the Priests;" one hundred and sixty-five cubits long and one hundred and nineteen cubits wide, and raised two and a half cubits above the surrounding Court, from which it was separated by pillars and a railing. Within this Court stood the brazen altar on which the sacrifices were consumed, the molten sea in which the priests washed, and the ten brazen lavers for washing the sacrifices; also the various utensils and instruments for sacrificing, which are enumerated in 2 Chronicles 4:9 . It is necessary to observe here, that although the Court of the Priests was not accessible to all Israelites, as that of Israel was to all the priests, yet they might enter it for three several purposes: to lay their hands on the animals which they offered, or to kill them, or to wave some part of them. ...
From the Court of the Priests, the ascent to the temple was by a flight of twelve steps, each half a cubit in height, which led into the sacred porch. It was within the door of the porch, and in the sight of those who stood in the Courts immediately before it, that the two pillars, Jachiin and Boaz, were placed, 2 Chronicles 3:17 Ezekiel 40:49 . During the supremacy of the Romans there was a Roman garrison in the strong tower of Antonia, which, with its various Courts and fortifications, adjoined the temple area on the north, and was connected with it by passages both above and under ground, John 18:12 Acts 4:1 5:1618450124_78
Hesed - He brought provisions for the royal Court one month a year from his district of Arubboth
Metastasio - Court poet of Vienna, 1730-1782
Malagrida, Gabriel - After laboring nearly thirty years on the Brazilian mission, he was called to the Portuguese Court; later he incurred the animosity of Pombal, who had him falsely accuied of conspiracy and strangled to death at an auto-da-fe
Dunstable, England - Here Cranmer held the Court which in 1533 pronounced the marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon invalid
Pethahiah - ...
A descendant of Judah who had some office at the Court of Persia (Nehemiah 11:24 )
Bailey - ) A prison or Court of justice; - used in certain proper names; as, the Old Bailey in London; the New Bailey in Manchester
Amerce - ) To punish by a pecuniary penalty, the amount of which is not fixed by law, but left to the discretion of the Court; as, the amerced the criminal in the sum on the hundred dollars
Zabla - A procedure for convening a rabbinical Court of law to hear a case involving a dispute over money or property; each litigant chooses one judge or arbiter, and these two judges then designate the third judge...
Gabriel Malagrida - After laboring nearly thirty years on the Brazilian mission, he was called to the Portuguese Court; later he incurred the animosity of Pombal, who had him falsely accuied of conspiracy and strangled to death at an auto-da-fe
Diplomacy - ) The body of ministers or envoys resident at a Court; the diplomatic body
Redundancy - ) Surplusage inserted in a pleading which may be rejected by the Court without impairing the validity of what remains
Receiver's Certificate - An acknowledgement of indebtedness made by a receiver under order of Court to obtain funds for the preservation of the assets held by him, as for operating a railroad
Trepassi, Pietro Antonio Domenico Bonaventuba - Court poet of Vienna, 1730-1782
Plead - ]'>[1] ‘plead’ always means to ‘argue for or against a cause’ as in a Court of justice, never to ‘pray’ or ‘beseech
Bench - ) The persons who sit as judges; the Court; as, the opinion of the full bench. ) The seat where judges sit in Court
Inn - In England, a college of municipal or common law professors and students formerly, the town-house of a nobleman, bishop or other distinguished personage, in which he resided when he attended the Court. Inns of Court, colleges in which students of law reside and are instructed
Esther, Book of - It portrays Persian Court life with great exactness of detail and apparently is based upon Court annals and written Jewish sources
Housetop - The house was often built round a Court, across the top of which cords were fixed from the parapet walls for supporting a covering from the heat. The housetop could be reached by stairs outside the building; the paralytic in Luke 5:19 could be let down into the Court or area by rolling back the covering
Ben-Geber - He provided supplies for the royal Court one month a year
Seresh - A chamberlain in King Ahasuerus's Court
Plenipotentiary - ) A person invested with full power to transact any business; especially, an ambassador or envoy to a foreign Court, with full power to negotiate a treaty, or to transact other business
Teresh - A chamberlain in King Ahasuerus's Court
Unembarrassed - ) Free from perplexing connection; as, the question comes into Court unembarrassed with irrelevant matter
Butler - Formerly, an officer in the Court of France, being the same as the grand echanson or great cup-bearer of the present times
Asup'Pim, - Some understand it as the proper name of chambers on the south of the temple others of certain store-rooms, or of the council chambers in the outer Court of the temple in which the elders held their celebrations
Bigthan - A chamberlain in King Ahasuerus's Court
House - The door opens into a porch or passage, which leads into an open Court, but so arranged that no one can see into the Court when the door is opened. The Court is large, sometimes open to the sky, in which visitors are received and business transacted: some have two Courts, or even three. Often there is a fountain and trees in the Court. Around the Court are entrances to more private rooms, where meals are served and to chambers where the inmates repose. ...
Stairs in the corner of the Court lead to upper private rooms; and often there are stairs outside the house that lead to the roof
Term Day - A day which is a term (as for payment of rent), or is a day in a term, as of the sitting of a Court; esp
Apostolic, Preacher - A dignitary of the pontifical household whose duty it is to preach to the assembled papal Court four times during Advent, and weekly during Lent
Hall - Hebrew: aulee , the "court" or "uncovered space", on a lower level than the lowest floor, in the midst of a house, as the high priest's (Luke 22:55)
Geber - He collected provisions to supply the royal Court
Hatach - ” A eunuch serving King Ahasuerus in the Persian Court whom the king assigned as Esther's servant (Esther 4:5-6 )
Praetorian Guard - The underlying Greek ( praitorion ) can also refer to the imperial high Court
Auditor - ) One who hears judicially, as in an audience Court
Plaint - ) A private memorial tendered to a Court, in which a person sets forth his cause of action; the exhibiting of an action in writing
Magicians - Such were the magicians in the Court of Pharaoh, Exodus 7:11, etc
Bolting - ) A private arguing of cases for practice by students, as in the Inns of Court
Roque - The Court has a wood border often faced with rubber, used as a cushion in bank shots
Abbreviator - ) One of a college of seventy-two officers of the papal Court whose duty is to make a short minute of a decision on a petition, or reply of the pope to a letter, and afterwards expand the minute into official form
Gaston, William - After serving as state senator and Federalist congressman, he was elected judge of the Supreme Court of North Carolina
William Gaston - After serving as state senator and Federalist congressman, he was elected judge of the Supreme Court of North Carolina
Eloi, Saint - He was a source of edification at Court, building and restoring several basilicas and monasteries, the most important of which was at Solignac, 632, where he introduced the Irish monastic rule. On the death of Dagobert, 639, he left Court and entered the priesthood, becoming Bishop of Noyon, 640
Officer - , "one who does," or "accomplishes" (akin to prasso, "to do"), was used in Athens of one who exacts payment, a collector (the word is frequently used in the papyri of a public accountant); hence, in general, a Court "officer," an attendant in a Court of justice (so Deissmann); the word is used in Luke 12:58 (twice)
Eligius, Saint - He was a source of edification at Court, building and restoring several basilicas and monasteries, the most important of which was at Solignac, 632, where he introduced the Irish monastic rule. On the death of Dagobert, 639, he left Court and entered the priesthood, becoming Bishop of Noyon, 640
Appeal - ) An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or Court for reexamination or review. ) To make application for the removal of (a cause) from an inferior to a superior judge or Court for a rehearing or review on account of alleged injustice or illegality in the trial below. We say, the cause was appealed from an inferior Court. ) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or Court for the purpose of reexamination of for decision
Temple (2) - the Court of the Gentiles, the Court of the Women, the Court of the Israelites, the Priests’ Court, and the Holy Place, together with the Holy of Holies. : in reference to the Court of the Gentiles, Matthew 21:12-16; Matthew 21:23, Mark 11:15-18; Mark 11:27, John 2:14-15; Luke 22:53, Luke 19:45; John 5:14; John 8:59; in reference to the Court of the Women, Mark 12:41, Luke 2:27; Luke 2:37; Luke 21:1; in reference to the Court of the Israelites, Matthew 26:55, Mark 12:33, Luke 2:46; Luke 18:10; Luke 20:1, John 7:14; John 7:28; John 11:56; John 18:20. The particular part of the temple referred to cannot always be ascertained with certainty, especially in the case of the Men’s Court (Court of the Israelites), but presumably the mention of ‘teaching in the temple’ would usually refer to Christ teaching the Jews (in view of such passages as ‘I am not sent save unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel,’ Matthew 15:24), in which case the women, according to Jewish custom, would not be present. The Outer Court. ]'>[5]1 All these gates led directly into the great temple area, or outer Court; around the whole area, within the walls, were ranged porticoes with double rows of pillars; but the finest was that on the south side; here there were four rows of Corinthian columns made of white marble. This temple area was called the ‘Court of the Gentiles’; it was not part of the temple proper, and therefore not sacred soil, consequently any one might enter it. It is to this outer Court that reference is made in Matthew 21:12-18, Mark 11:15 ff. The Court of the Israelites. —This inner Court was raised fifteen cubits§ [5]0 above the outer one just referred to; it was surrounded by a terrace (hêl), ten cubits in breadth, which was approached from the outer Court by ascending fourteen steps; these steps ran round the whole terrace, and at the bottom of them there was a low wall or breastwork (sôrçg) which was the limit to which non-Israelites might approach; along it were placed, at intervals, inscriptions warning Gentiles not to pass beyond, on pain of death; they were written in Latin and Greek; one of the latter has been discovered by Clermont-Ganneau. ]'>[5]8 On entering this inner Court, ‘holy’ ground was reached, which accounted for the prohibition just referred to; only the seed of Abraham might enter here, hence its name. It was divided into two portions:...
(a) The Women’s Court. The Court received its name from the fact that it formed the limit to which women might advance towards the sanctuary, not because it was reserved for the use of women. ]'>[18] It was on a lower level than the Men’s Court, which was entered through six of the nine gates belonging to the Women’s Court. ]'>[8] Gate’; it was fifty cubits high and forty broad; fifteen steps, semicircular in form, led up to it from the Women’s Court. Whether the ‘Beautiful Gate’ mentioned in Acts 3:2 referred to this or to the Eastern gate of the Outer Court (see above) is quite uncertain. ...
(b) But the Court of the Israelites proper was the western and larger Court, called also the Men’s Court, and to this only men had access. It ran round the whole of the Sanctuary itself, in which was included the Priests’ Court (see below). In the Men’s Court were (according to Josephus) the treasury-chambers, where all the more valuable temple belongings were kept. The ‘treasury’ spoken of in Mark 12:41; Mark 12:43, Luke 21:1 was clearly entered by women; the discrepancy may, however, be explained by supposing that one of the trumpet-shaped receptacles into which offerings were cast, and which usually stood in the Men’s Court, was at certain times placed in the eastern portion of the Court, so that every one, including the women, might have the opportunity of making the offerings; on such occasions the Women’s Court was, for the time being, a treasury. ]'>[4] to refer to that in the Men’s Court, the word being used here in the strict sense (see, too, Matthew 27:5-6). The Court of the Priests. —Before entering the most sacred parts of the Sanctuary, the Priests’ Court had to be traversed. In this Court there stood, in the centre, the great altar for burnt-sacrifices, and close to it the brazen laver for the priestly ablutions. On either side of the Court were the priests’ chambers; it is probable that one of these was the Lishkath parhedrin, ‘the Hall of the πρόεδροι’ (‘assessors’), in which the members of the Sanhedrin met in a quasi-private character before they met officially in the Lishkath ha-gazith,‡ Parbar - ), as the word is rendered in 2 Kings 23:11 ; a space between the temple wall and the wall of the Court; an open portico into which the chambers of the official persons opened (1 Chronicles 26:18 )
Chamberlain - Title of several classes of palace officials of the Roman Court
Sansannah - A town in the Negeb or south country (Joshua 15:31), also called Ηazar Susah or Susim , "horse Court," i
Ben-Deker - ” Solomon's district supervisor in charge of supplying the royal Court one month a year
Palatine Count - In the times of the Frankish kings and German emperors palatine counts were the representatives of the crown and as such presided in the high Court of justice of a palatinate
Cupbearer - A high officer in eastern Courts, e. Rabshakek was "chief cupbearer" in Sennacherib's Court (Isaiah 36:2), as his name implies
Shim'Sha-i, - (sunny ), the scribe or secretary of Kehum, who was a kind of satrap of the conquered province of Judea and of the colony of Samaria, supported by the Persian Court
Earl Marshal - The Court of chivalry was formerly under his jurisdiction, and he is still the head of the herald's office or college of arms
Maimonides - Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, known by the acronym the �Rambam�, 1135-1204; Cordoba (Spain), Fez (Morocco) and Fostat (old Cairo, Egypt); codifier, philosopher, communal leader, and Court physician to Sultan Salamin of Egypt; author of a commentary on the Mishnah, the Book of Mitzvot, Mishneh Torah, the Guide to the Perplexed and many other works ...
Delaiah - Son of Shemaiah and prince at the Court of Jehoiakim
Leger - ) A minister or ambassador resident at a Court or seat of government
Talmai - The latter avenged the wrongs of his sister Tamar by the murder of Amnon, and then took refuge at the Court of his grandfather, where he remained three years, 2 Samuel 3:3,13,14
Rab-Mag, - [1] (it probably means chief of the magi ; at all events it was "an office of great power and dignity at the Babylonian Court, and probably gave its possessor special facilities for gaining the throne
Hungary, Elizabeth of, Saint - She was the daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary, and at the age of four was betrothed to Hermann, eldest son of Hermann I, Landgrave of Thuringia, and was sent to the Thuringian Court to be educated. In spite of her position at Court, Elizabeth led an austerely simple life, practised penance, and devoted herself to works of charity. After the death of her husband, 1227, she was driven from Court by her brother-in-law, Henry Raspe, according to the older records; more recent accounts, however, state that she left voluntarily
Assize - ) The time or place of holding the Court of assize; - generally in the plural, assizes. ) A Court, the sitting or session of a Court, for the trial of processes, whether civil or criminal, by a judge and jury. ) The periodical sessions of the judges of the superior Courts in every county of England for the purpose of administering justice in the trial and determination of civil and criminal cases; - usually in the plural
Elizabeth of Hungary, Saint - She was the daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary, and at the age of four was betrothed to Hermann, eldest son of Hermann I, Landgrave of Thuringia, and was sent to the Thuringian Court to be educated. In spite of her position at Court, Elizabeth led an austerely simple life, practised penance, and devoted herself to works of charity. After the death of her husband, 1227, she was driven from Court by her brother-in-law, Henry Raspe, according to the older records; more recent accounts, however, state that she left voluntarily
Palace - This included the ‘House of the Forest of Lehanon,’ a great hall, 100 cubits long, 50 broad, 30 high, with four rows of pillars; a ‘porch of pillars,’ 50 cubits by 30; the ‘porch of the throne’ for a Court of justice; a dwelling-house for himself, and another for Pharaoh’s daughter. Round about the whole was a great Court of hewn stones and cedar beams. The royal apartments were in an inner, the halls of audience in an outer, Court. If we include all the buildings required for Courtiers and officials, the ‘palace’ becomes not a house, but a royal city
Cajetan, Saint - He was made prothonotary Apostolic at the Court of Pope Julius II in 1506 and was instrumental in effecting a reconciliation between the Holy See and the Republic of Venice. Retiring from Court life in 1513 he founded a society of priests and prelates called the Oratory of Divine Love, and was himself ordained priest, 1516
Gaetano, Saint - He was made prothonotary Apostolic at the Court of Pope Julius II in 1506 and was instrumental in effecting a reconciliation between the Holy See and the Republic of Venice. Retiring from Court life in 1513 he founded a society of priests and prelates called the Oratory of Divine Love, and was himself ordained priest, 1516
Areopagus, or Mars Hill - Here was held the highest and most ancient and venerable Court of justice in Athens for moral and political matters. The Court was situate on a rocky hill opposite the west end of the Acropolis
Decree - ) A decision, order, or sentence, given in a cause by a Court of equity or admiralty. ) To determine judicially by authority, or by decree; to constitute by edict; to appoint by decree or law; to determine; to order; to ordain; as, a Court decrees a restoration of property
Cancelli - ) An interwoven or latticed wall or inclosure; latticework, rails, or crossbars, as around the bar of a Court of justice, between the chancel and the nave of a church, or in a window
Foresters, Catholic Orders of - Three fraternal insurance societies organized on the plan of the Foresters' Courts: ...
established in Massachusetts, 1879, with membership confined to the state, and one Court at Providence, Rhode Island; ...
established in Chicago, 1883, and extending into 26 states and Canada, with an official organ "The Catholic Forester," published at Milwaukee; ...
for women only, established in Chicago, 1892
Jacques Clement - He is said to have been chapel-master to the Court of Charles V
Rambam - Acronym for "Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon" 1135-1204; Cordoba (Spain), Fez (Morocco) and Fostat (old Cairo, Egypt); known as Maimonides, he was a codifier, philosopher, communal leader, and Court physician to Sultan Salamin of Egypt; author of a commentary on the Mishnah, the Book of Mitzvot, Mishneh Torah, the Guide to the Perplexed and many other works
Hazar - Hazer is the "court" or quadrangle of a palace; and applies to the villages of rovers, semi-permanent collections of dwellings, such as still exist, rough stone walls being covered with tent cloths, holding thus a middle place between the tent and the town
Amercement - ) The infliction of a penalty at the discretion of the Court; also, a mulct or penalty thus imposed
Punishment - ) A penalty inflicted by a Court of justice on a convicted offender as a just retribution, and incidentally for the purposes of reformation and prevention
Admiralty - ) The system of jurisprudence of admiralty Courts. ) The Court which has jurisdiction of maritime questions and offenses
Enroll - ) To insert in a roil; to register or enter in a list or catalogue or on rolls of Court; hence, to record; to insert in records; to leave in writing; as, to enroll men for service; to enroll a decree or a law; also, reflexively, to enlist
Proselyte - And as a proselyte, meant a proselyte of the gate, one converted from heathenism to the truth, and admitted into what was called the Court of the Gentiles, no doubt the name was very proper
Reencloth - ) A board or Court of justice formerly held in the counting house of the British sovereign's household, composed of the lord steward and his officers, and having cognizance of matters of justice in the household, with power to correct offenders and keep the peace within the verge of the palace, which extends two hundred yards beyond the gates
Embassy - ) The public function of an ambassador; the charge or business intrusted to an ambassador or to envoys; a public message to; foreign Court concerning state affairs; hence, any solemn message
Empower - ) To give authority to; to delegate power to; to commission; to authorize (having commonly a legal force); as, the Supreme Court is empowered to try and decide cases, civil or criminal; the attorney is empowered to sign an acquittance, and discharge the debtor
Courtier - CourtIER, n. from Court. A man who attends or frequents the Courts of princes. One who Courts or solicits the favor of another one who flatters to please one who possesses the art of gaining favor by address and complaisance. There was not among all our princes a greater Courtier of the people than Richard III
High Priest - The chief priest of the Jews, whose special duties were to officiate on the Day of Atonement, preside over the Court of judgment, and consult the Divine oracle; his office was usually for life
Manasseh - According to the Midrash, he served as his father's interpreter in the royal Court
Hanging, Hangings - Exodus 26:36,37 ; 39:38 ...
The "hangings"; were used for covering, the walls of the Court of the tabernacles just as tapestry is used in modern times
Jeffersonian Simplicity - The absence of pomp or display which Jefferson aimed at in his administration as President (1801-1809), eschewing display or ceremony tending to distinguish the President from the people, as in going to the capital on horseback and with no escort, the abolition of Court etiquette and the weekly levee, refusal to recognize titles of honor, etc
Lawyers - Lawyers, Luke 7:30, called also "doctors of the law," Luke 5:17, among the Hebrews, were not pleaders before a Court, but expounders of the Mosaic and priestly law, and copied it, so that it is not certain what was the difference between a lawyer and a scribe
Attali'a - Leake fixes Attalia at Adalia , on the south Court of Asia Minor, north of the Duden Su , the ancient Catarrhactes
za'Bud - (given ), son of Nathan, ( 1 Kings 4:5 ) is described as a priest (Authorized Version "principal officer"), and as holding at the Court of Solomon the confidential post of "king's friend," which had been occupied by Hushai the Archite during the reign of David
Degrees, Song of - Jewish tradition relates the title to the fifteen steps leading from the Court of the women to the Court of Israel in the Temple
Recorder - , "the mentioner," "rememberancer"), the office first held by Jehoshaphat in the Court of David (2 Samuel 8:16 ), also in the Court of Solomon (1 Kings 4:3 )
Plea - ) A cause in Court; a lawsuit; as, the Court of Common Pleas
Sergeant - ) Formerly, in England, an officer nearly answering to the more modern bailiff of the hundred; also, an officer whose duty was to attend on the king, and on the lord high steward in Court, to arrest traitors and other offenders. He is now called sergeant-at-arms, and two of these officers, by allowance of the sovereign, attend on the houses of Parliament (one for each house) to execute their commands, and another attends the Court Chancery
Arch - In Ezekiel's vision of the Temple, each gate leading into the Court of the Gentiles also had a vestibule (Ezekiel 40:7-26 ) as did the gates to the Court of the Israelites (Ezekiel 40:29-37 )
Changers of Money - They set up their tables in the Court of the Gentiles, to exchange at a price the foreign coin of Jews and proselytes coming from distant lands for the Hebrew half shekel (which was required from every adult from 20 years old and upward: Exodus 38:26) in presenting themselves to worship at the tabernacle or temple. The Court of the Gentiles, as distinguished from that of Israel and that of the priests, was designed not only for an unclean Jew, but also for the uncircumcised Gentile proselytes. The priests let the Court to the moneychangers, making godliness into a source of gain
Equity - Hence a Court of equity or chancery, is a Court which corrects the operation of the literal text of the law, and supplies its defects, by reasonable construction, and by rules of proceeding and deciding, which are not admissible in a Court of law. Equity then is the law of reason, exercised by the chancellor or judge, giving remedy in cases to which the Courts of law are not competent
Jehoshaphat - An official at David's Court (2 Samuel 8:16 ), called the “recorder” or “secretary of state” (REB). ” Some Bible students compare the office to the Egyptian Court herald who reported events to the king and made public announcements. Solomon's official in tribal territory of Issachar in charge of providing provisions for the royal Court one month a year (1 Kings 4:17 )
Request - Court of requests, in England, a Court of equity for the relief of such persons as addressed his majesty by supplication. A Court of conscience for the recovery of small debts, held by two aldermen and four commoners, who try causes by the oath of parties and of other witnesses
Society of Our Lady of Good Counsel - Until this society was constituted, April 26, 1926, there was no means in Great Britain whereby a poor person could obtain legal assistance, excepting only advice, in regard to police Court and county Court cases, and it is in these Courts that most cases of immediate personal concern to the poor are tried. Attached to the society is a Ladies Committee which undertakes to collect funds for such necessary expenses as office rent, Court fees, etc. While it is no part of the society's work to foster litigation, its aim being rather to induce just and equitable settlement of disputes, it does in cases of necessity aid its clients as far as the Court of Criminal Appeal, in which tribunal, as elsewhere, it has achieved notable successes
Map, Walter - He was educated at the University of Paris, was at the English Court, 1162, represented the king at the Third Lateran Council, 1179, and in 1197 became Archdeacon of Oxford. He wrote "De Nugis Curialium" (Courtier's Triflings) and probably the French poem on which is based the earliest prose "Lancelot
John o'Hagan - His brilliant career at the bar was crowned by his elevation to the High Court of Justice by Gladstone
Mattan - She probably had brought him from Samaria to introduce the Baal worship of her father Ahab into the Court of Jehoram her husband, Jehoshaphat's son (2 Chronicles 21:6; 2 Chronicles 21:13)
Pethahiah - Royal advisor to the Persian king, either at his Court or as his representative in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:24 )
o'Hagan, John - His brilliant career at the bar was crowned by his elevation to the High Court of Justice by Gladstone
Hazarmaveth - ("the Court of death") Third of Joktan's sons (Genesis 10:26)
Committee - ) One or more persons elected or appointed, to whom any matter or business is referred, either by a legislative body, or by a Court, or by any collective body of men acting together
Glitter - To be showing, specious or striking, and hence attractive as the glittering scenes of a Court
Cringe - ) To draw one's self together as in fear or servility; to bend or crouch with base humility; to wince; hence; to make Court in a degrading manner; to fawn
Disapprove - ) To refuse official approbation to; to disallow; to decline to sanction; as, the sentence of the Court-martial was disapproved by the commander in chief
Contentious - Relating to contention in law relating to litigation having power to decide causes between contending parties as a Court of contentious jurisdiction
Trinket - ) To give trinkets; hence, to Court favor; to intrigue
Ahi'Kam - (a brother who raises up ), son of Shaphan the scribe, an influential officer at the Court of Josiah, was one of the delegates sent by Hilkaih to consult Huldah
Orator - Such a person, distinct from the professional lawyer, was hired, as a professional speaker, to make a skillful presentation of a case in Court
Queen - The title was also given to the consort of a reigning sovereign, as queen Esther; and to the queen-mother, who often had great influence at Court, as Bathsheba, Jezebel, etc
Giffard, Bonaventure - He was appointed Court preacher by James II of England, and in 1688 was consecrated bishop in charge of the newly erected Midland vicariate Apostolic
Walter Map - He was educated at the University of Paris, was at the English Court, 1162, represented the king at the Third Lateran Council, 1179, and in 1197 became Archdeacon of Oxford. He wrote "De Nugis Curialium" (Courtier's Triflings) and probably the French poem on which is based the earliest prose "Lancelot
Rab'Shakeh - ) The English version takes Rabshakeh as the name of a person; but it is more probably the name of the office which he held at the Court, that of chief cupbearer
Officer - ὑπηρέτης, and denotes an official of the Sanhedrin sent to bring the apostles before the Court
House - Sometimes a small Court for the cattle is attached; and in some cases the cattle are housed in the same building, or the live in a raised platform, and, the cattle round them on the ground. Within this is a Court or Courts with apartments opening into them. (2 Kings 9:30 ) An awning is sometimes drawn over the Court, and the floor is strewed with carpets on festive occasions. The stairs to the upper apartments are in Syria usually in a corner of the Court. Around part, if not the whole, of the Court is a veranda, often nine or ten feet deep, over which, when there is more than one floor, runs a second gallery of like depth, with a balustrade. When there is no second floor, but more than one Court, the women's apartments --hareems, harem or haram --are usually in the second Court; otherwise they form a separate building within the general enclosure, or are above on the first floor. There are no chimneys, but fire is made when required with charcoal in a chafing-dish; or a fire of wood might be made in the open Court of the house (Luke 22:65 ) Some houses in Cairo have an apartment open in front to the Court with two or more arches and a railing, and a pillar to support the wall above. He "turned and looked" on Peter as he stood by the fire in the Court, (Luke 22:56,61 ; John 18:24 ) whilst he himself was in the "hall of judgment
Biscop, Benedict, Saint - He was educated at the Court of Oswy, King of Northumbria, and received the Benedictine habit at Lérins, 666, becoming Abbot of Saint Peter's, Canterbury
Francesco Guicciardini - He represented Florence at the Spanish Court; later governed Modena and Reggio for Leo X; aided in forming the anti-imperial League of Cognac, and in subjugating Florence to the Medicean rule; but fell into disfavor on opposing the absolutism of Cosimo de' Medici
Fleury, Claude - After practising law for nine years, he became a priest, and for over 30 years was tutor to several young Court nobles
Mcmahon, Martin Thomas - After the war he was corporation counsel of New York City, minister to Paraguay, senator, and judge of the Court of General Sessions
Solomon's Porch - The raised outermost part of Herod's Temple with columns that went all the way around the outer Court (John 10:23 ; Acts 3:11 )
Money Changers - They set up tables in the Court of the Gentiles, to supply at a profit foreign Jews with the Jewish half shekels (1 shillings, 3 pence) required for the yearly payment into the temple treasury, in exchange for foreign coin
Benedict Biscop, Saint - He was educated at the Court of Oswy, King of Northumbria, and received the Benedictine habit at Lérins, 666, becoming Abbot of Saint Peter's, Canterbury
Martin Mcmahon - After the war he was corporation counsel of New York City, minister to Paraguay, senator, and judge of the Court of General Sessions
Messenger - One who bears a message or an errand the bearer of a verbal or written communication, notice or invitation from one person to another, or to a public body one who conveys dispatches from one prince or Court to another
Competency - ) Right or authority; legal power or capacity to take cognizance of a cause; as, the competence of a judge or Court
Ruling - ) A decision or rule of a judge or a Court, especially an oral decision, as in excluding evidence
Guicciardini, Francesco - He represented Florence at the Spanish Court; later governed Modena and Reggio for Leo X; aided in forming the anti-imperial League of Cognac, and in subjugating Florence to the Medicean rule; but fell into disfavor on opposing the absolutism of Cosimo de' Medici
Oration - ) An elaborate discourse, delivered in public, treating an important subject in a formal and dignified manner; especially, a discourse having reference to some special occasion, as a funeral, an anniversary, a celebration, or the like; - distinguished from an argument in Court, a popular harangue, a sermon, a lecture, etc
Seraglio - ) The palace of the Grand Seignior, or Turkish sultan, at Constantinople, inhabited by the sultan himself, and all the officers and dependents of his Court
Verdict - ) The answer of a jury given to the Court concerning any matter of fact in any cause, civil or criminal, committed to their examination and determination; the finding or decision of a jury on the matter legally submitted to them in the course of the trial of a cause
Decide - ) To determine; to form a definite opinion; to come to a conclusion; to give decision; as, the Court decided in favor of the defendant
Acquaviva, Rudolph, Blessed - He spent three years at the Court of the Great Mogul
Judicial - ) Pertaining or appropriate to Courts of justice, or to a judge; practiced or conformed to in the administration of justice; sanctioned or ordered by a Court; as, judicial power; judicial proceedings; a judicial sale
Litter - ) To be showy, specious, or striking, and hence attractive; as, the glittering scenes of a Court
Litter - ) To be showy, specious, or striking, and hence attractive; as, the glittering scenes of a Court
Dionysius - A member of the Court of the Areopagus at Athens, converted under the preaching of Paul, Acts 17:34
Rudolph Acquaviva, Blessed - He spent three years at the Court of the Great Mogul
Harvey, William - Married to Elizabeth Brown, daughter of the Court physician to Elizabeth I
William Harvey - Married to Elizabeth Brown, daughter of the Court physician to Elizabeth I
Francis Jaccard, Blessed - Summoned to the Court of Min-Menh to translate the manuscript of a French philosopher, his proficiency caused the king to order Father Jaccard to settle in the neighborhood of the Court for future service
Carlovingian Schools - " In 782Alcuin was placed at the head of the Court school of military tactics and good manners, established under the Merovingian kings, and taught there grammar, arithmetic, astronomy, and music. In 787 Charlemagne issued the famous capitulary on education and Theodulf, who succeeded Alcuin as Court adviser, enacted that priests should establish free schools in every town and village
Jaccard, Francis, Blessed - Summoned to the Court of Min-Menh to translate the manuscript of a French philosopher, his proficiency caused the king to order Father Jaccard to settle in the neighborhood of the Court for future service
Authority - ) Legal or rightful power; a right to command or to act; power exercised buy a person in virtue of his office or trust; dominion; jurisdiction; authorization; as, the authority of a prince over subjects, and of parents over children; the authority of a Court. ) A precedent; a decision of a Court, an official declaration, or an opinion, saying, or statement worthy to be taken as a precedent
Sentence - ) In civil and admiralty law, the judgment of a Court pronounced in a cause; in criminal and ecclesiastical Courts, a judgment passed on a criminal by a Court or judge; condemnation pronounced by a judgical tribunal; doom
Inn - Passing through strong gateway, the guest enters a large Court, in the centre of which is a spacious raised platform, used for sleeping upon at night or for the devotions of the faithful during the day. Around this Court are arranged the rooms of the building
Sacra Romana Rota - Cases are heard by three of the auditors in turn, and sometimes by the full Court. Ordinarily the Rota is an appellate Court
Rota, Sacra Romana - Cases are heard by three of the auditors in turn, and sometimes by the full Court. Ordinarily the Rota is an appellate Court
Ireland, Clement of, Saint - So great was his fame that Charlemagne invited him to his Court and made him regent of the school of Paris from 775 until his death
Flattering - The minister gives a flattering account of his reception at Court
Campbell, James - Nominated for judge of the supreme Court, he was defeated by anti-Catholic prejudice, but became attorney-general of Pennsylvania, and postmaster-general in Pierce's cabinet, 1853
James Campbell - Nominated for judge of the supreme Court, he was defeated by anti-Catholic prejudice, but became attorney-general of Pennsylvania, and postmaster-general in Pierce's cabinet, 1853
Pinnacle - On the southern side of the temple Court was a range of porches or cloisters forming three arcades
Eutychus - " The lattice-work of the window being open to admit the air, the lad fell out and down to the Court below
Fillets - , joinings (Exodus 27:17 ; 38:17,28 ), the rods by which the tops of the columns around the tabernacle Court were joined together, and from which the curtains were suspended (Exodus 27:10,11 ; 36:38 )
Chamberlain - ) An officer having the direction and management of the private chambers of a nobleman or monarch; hence, in Europe, one of the high officers of a Court
Beadle - ) A messenger or crier of a Court; a servitor; one who cites or bids persons to appear and answer; - called also an apparitor or summoner
Achmetha - But Cyrus held his Court at Achmetha; and Ezra, writing a century after, correctly mentions the place where the decree of Cyrus was found
Bering Sea Controversy - A Court of arbitration, meeting in Paris in 1893, decided against the claim of the United States, but established regulations for the preservation of the fur seal
lo-Debar - It was the retreat of Mephibosheth till he was summoned to Court by David ( 2 Samuel 9:4-5 )
Mishael - (c, 400 BCE) Exiled to Babylon together with Daniel, Hananiah, and Azariah, where they were trained to be chamberlains in the royal Court
Ahinoam - David's wife; along with Abigail, accompanied him to Achish's Court (1 Samuel 25:43; 1 Samuel 27:3)
Exchequer - ) One of the superior Courts of law; - so called from a checkered cloth, which covers, or formerly covered, the table. ) To institute a process against (any one) in the Court of Exchequer
Arcadius, Saint - They accompanied the Vandal King Genseric to Africa, but when persecution broke out were banished from Court
Equitable - ) That can be sustained or made available or effective in a Court of equity, or upon principles of equity jurisprudence; as, an equitable estate; equitable assets, assignment, mortgage, etc
Dismiss - ) To lay aside or reject as unworthy of attentions or regard, as a petition or motion in Court
Eunuch - In Acts 8:27, a Eunuch was "a Court official of Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, who was in charge of all her treasure
Eutychianus, Saint - They accompanied the Vandal King Genseric to Africa, but when persecution broke out were banished from Court
Martial - ) Belonging to war, or to an army and navy; - opposed to civil; as, martial law; a Court-martial
Hazarma'Veth - (court of death ), the third in order of the sons of Joktan ( Genesis 10:26 ) The name is preserved in the Arabic Hadramawt and Hadrumawl , the appellation of a province and an ancient people of southern Arabia
Barzil'la-i - ) He declined the king's offer of ending his days at Court
Chamberlain, - an officer attached to the Court of a king, who formerly had charge of the private apartments or chambers of the palace
Recorder, - In David's Court the recorder appeal's among the high officers of his household
Marshal - During a vacancy in the office of high constable, the earl marshal has jurisdiction in the Court of chivalry. ...
Knight marshal, or marshal of the king's house, formerly an officer who was to execute the commands of the lord steward, and have the custody of prisoners committed by the Court of verge hence, the name of a prison in Southwark. He attends on the Court and has the charge of the prisoners committed by them
Counterfoil - ) That part of a tally, formerly in the exchequer, which was kept by an officer in that Court, the other, called the stock, being delivered to the person who had lent the king money on the account; - called also counterstock
Cup-Bearer - ) was cup-bearer in the Assyrian Court (2 Kings 18:17 )
Chaplain - ) A clergyman who is officially attached to the army or navy, to some public institution, or to a family or Court, for the purpose of performing divine service
Continuance - ) The adjournment of the proceedings in a cause from one day, or from one stated term of a Court, to another
Camel's Hair - Jesus contrasted John's cloak to the “soft raiment” of the members of the Court (Matthew 11:8 )
Pannier - ) A table waiter at the Inns of Court, London
Provocation - ) An appeal to a Court
Ancients - Mentioned in the Apocalypse (4,4; 5,5,8; 7,13; 19,4; 21,12-14) as part of the Court of the Lamb of God whom they adore and to whom they offer the prayers of the saints
Disfavor - ) The state of not being in favor; a being under the displeasure of some one; state of unacceptableness; as, to be in disfavor at Court
Abednego - (uh behd' nih goh) In Daniel 1:7 , the Babylonian name given to one of the three Hebrew youths who were conscripted along with Daniel to serve in the king's Court
Responsible - ) Liable to respond; likely to be called upon to answer; accountable; answerable; amenable; as, a guardian is responsible to the Court for his conduct in the office
Aldric, Saint - As a youth he lived at the Court of Charlemagne and Louis I
Legation - ) The place of business or official residence of a diplomatic minister at a foreign Court or seat of government
Smith, James, Writer - He was a solicitor to the Supreme Court in Edinburgh, but after his conversion he devoted himself to literature
Outcast - Outcast rather designates one banished from Court (2 Samuel 14:14 RSV) or more often dispersed persons, exiles, or refugees ( Deuteronomy 30:4 ; Psalm 147:2 : Isaiah 11:12 ; Isaiah 56:8 ; Jeremiah 30:17 ; Micah 4:6-7 )
Chronicles of Kings of Israel And of Judah - They probably were official Court records compiled for the use of each of the kings
Gown, the Black - An Academical gown; an official or distinctivedress worn by students and officers of a College or University,and also by officials of a Court of Justice
Sentence - In law, a judgement pronounced by a Court or judge upon a criminal a jdicial decision publicly and officially declared in a criminal prosecution. In cases, the decision of the Court is called a judgement
Clerk - ) One employed to keep records or accounts; a scribe; an accountant; as, the clerk of a Court; a town clerk
Asuppim - door of the temple in the outer Court; it had
Hananiah - (a) (c, 400 BCE) Exiled to Babylon together with Daniel, Mishael, and Azariah, where they were trained to be chamberlains in the royal Court
Royal - Luke 7:25 , for which see Court , No
Gemariah - Son of Shaphan, the Court scribe, who had a room in the Temple, where Baruch read from Jeremiah's sermons to the congregation (Jeremiah 36:10 )
Bealoth - Region with Asher making up a district to supply food for Solomon's Court (1 Kings 4:16 )
Attendance - A waiting on a being present on business of any kind as, the attendance of witnesses of persons in Court attendance of members of the legislature
Complaint - ) A formal allegation or charge against a party made or presented to the appropriate Court or officer, as for a wrong done or a crime committed (in the latter case, generally under oath); an information; accusation; the initial bill in proceedings in equity
Tobiah - He afterwards became allied to Eliashib the priest, but Nehemiah turned out his goods from a chamber he occupied in the Court of the house
Tribunal - ) Hence, a Court or forum; as, the House of Lords, in England, is the highest tribunal in the kingdom
Reasoning - The reasonings of the advocate appeared to the Court conclusive
Azariah - (a) (c, 400 BCE) Exiled to Babylon together with Daniel, Hananiah, and Azariah, where they were trained to be chamberlains in the royal Court
Chananiah - (a) (c, 400 BCE) Exiled to Babylon together with Daniel, Mishael, and Azariah, where they were trained to be chamberlains in the royal Court
Delai'ah - ) ...
Son of Shemaiah, one of the "princes" about the Court of Jehoiakim
Manger - It means a crib or feeding trough; but according to Schleusner its real signification in the New Testament is the open Court-yard attached to the inn or khan, in which the cattle would be shut at night, and where the poorer travellers might unpack their animals and take up their lodging, when they mere either by want of means excluded from the house
Dwelling - Sometimes a small Court for the cattle is attached; and in some cases the cattle are housed in the same building, or the people live on a raised platform, and the cattle round them on the ground. ...
A modern eastern house of the better class presents a dead wall to the street, with an interior Court. A passage from the outer door, which is attended to by the porter, John 18:16-17; Acts 12:13-14, leads into the first or outer Court, but is so contrived that the entrance to the Court is not exactly opposite to the external door; so that no view of the Court is obtained from the street, nor any of the street from the Court. The principal apartment looks into this Court, and some of them are open to it. The Court is occasionally shaded by an awning; and on the floor or pavement of it, rugs are spread on festive occasions; while in the centre there is often a fountain. Around the Court, or part of it, a veranda runs, and over this, when the house has more than one story, there is often another balustraded gallery. In the corner of the Court are the stairs to the upper apartments. Immediately opposite the side of entrance is the principal reception room, open to the Court. When there is no second floor, out more than one Court, the women's apartments—hâreem, harem or haram—are usually in the second Court; otherwise they form a separate building within the general enclosure, or are above on the first floor. There are no chimneys, but fire is made when required with charcoal in a brazier, or a fire of wood might be kindled in the open Court of the house. He "turned and looked" on Peter as he stood by the fire in the Court, Luke 22:56; Luke 22:61; whilst he himself was in the "hall of judgment. This towards the street is a wall, towards the interior Court usually a balustrade. Apartments were warmed when needed by fire-pans, Jeremiah 36:22; or fires were kindled in the Court, Mark 14:54; Luke 22:55; John 18:18. Different rooms, too, as already mentioned in modern practice, were used in summer-time and in winter-time, Amos 3:15; and, whereas those for use in warm weather were open to the Court, those for colder seasons were closed in with lattice-work, and curtains, and, probably for want of glass in the windows, with shutters. Our Lord was perhaps in the veranda; while the people crowded the Court and impeded the passage from the street. The fountains which gush out in the Courts, and the methods used for excluding heat, and securing currents of fresh air render modern eastern houses very refreshing in the torrid heat of summer
Court Systems - The Court systems of ancient Israel are not fully described in the Old Testament or in any extra-biblical source. Archaeological investigation has not yet discovered Court documents from ancient Israel. ...
A hierarchical system of Courts and judges could exist when political authority was centralized. A system in which local Courts referred complex cases to the supreme judges is described in Deuteronomy 17:2-13 ; 1618450124_95 . This was not an appeals Court to which dissatisfied parties could bring their cases for reconsideration; it was a Court of experts who could pass judgment in cases too complicated for the local judges to decide themselves. The Court system instituted by Jehoshaphat also followed this pattern (2 Chronicles 19:4-11 ). It is not clear whether the residents of Jerusalem went directly to the central Court. The system described in Deuteronomy 17:1 ; Deuteronomy 19:1 ; 2 Chronicles 19:1 has both priests and secular officials as judges in the central Court in Jerusalem. Jezebel used the existing town Court to dispose of Naboth and confiscate his vineyard. ...
The relationship of the king's Court to the rest of the judicial system is uncertain. The passages about the high Court in Jerusalem mention priests alongside the secular judge (Deuteronomy 17:9 ; Deuteronomy 19:17 ; 2Chronicles 19:8,2 Chronicles 19:11 ). Some scholars believe that this division between religious and civil Courts reflects the post-exilic period, in which the secular authority was that of the Persian king and Jewish priests administered the law of God (Ezra 7:25-26 ). We cannot determine how the priestly judges were related to the other Court systems or how cases were assigned to the various judges. ...
Actual Court procedures may be partially reconstructed as follows. Cases brought by a malicious witness giving false testimony were referred to the central Court (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ). The Court systems could only function well when the community agreed with their decisions and cooperated to enforce them. By judging justly, the Courts taught God's law and the principles of divine justice. The Courts worked together with the people to restore the community to peace and wholeness under God whenever they recognized the one in the right and imposed an appropriate penalty on the guilty one
Publican - Hence the Jews classed them with sinners, and would not allow them to enter the temple or the synagogues, to partake of the public prayers or offices of judicature, or to give testimony in a Court of justice
Shaphan - ” Prominent Court official during King Josiah's reign in Judah (2 Kings 22:1 )
Boaz - ...
...
The name given (for what reason is unknown) to one of the two (the other was called Jachin) brazen pillars which Solomon erected in the Court of the temple (1 Kings 7:21 ; 2 Chronicles 3:17 )
Appeal - A reference of any case from an inferior to a superior Court
Rabshakeh - Chief of the princes, the name given to the chief cup-bearer or the vizier of the Assyrian Court; one of Sennacherib's messengers to Hezekiah
Porch, Solomon's - ...
...
Proaulion, the entrance to the inner Court (Mark 14:68 )
Altars of the Tabernacle - The altar of holocaust was within the Court of the Tabernacle to the east of the entrance
Fawn - ) To Court favor by low cringing, frisking, etc
Overrule - ) To supersede, reject, annul, or rule against; as, the plea, or the decision, was overruled by the Court
Ahin'o-am - ) She lived with him and his other wife Abigail at the Court of Achish, (1 Samuel 27:3 ) was taken prisoner with her by the Amalekites when they plundered Ziklag, (1 Samuel 30:5 ) but was rescued by David
Resident - ) A diplomatic representative who resides at a foreign Court; - a term usualy applied to ministers of a rank inferior to that of ambassadors
Rota - ) An ecclesiastical Court of Rome, called also Rota Romana, that takes cognizance of suits by appeal
File - ) To put upon the files or among the records of a Court; to note on (a paper) the fact date of its reception in Court. ) To bring before a Court or legislative body by presenting proper papers in a regular way; as, to file a petition or bill
House - ...
The universal mode of building houses in the East, is in the form of a hollow square, with an open Court or yard in the center; which is thus entirely shut in by the walls of the house around it. Into this Court all the windows open, there being usually no windows towards the street. Some houses of large size require several Courts, and these usually communicate with each other. These Courts are commonly paved; and in many large houses parts of them are planted with shrubs and trees, Psalm 84:3 128:3 ; they have also, when possible, a fountain in them, often with a jet d' eau, 2 Samuel 17:18 . It is customary in many houses to extend an awning over the whole Court in hot weather; and the people of the house then spend much of the day in the open air, and indeed often receive visits there. In Aleppo, at least, there is often on the south side of the Court an alcove in the wall of the house, furnished with divans or sofas, for reclining and enjoying the fresh air in the hot seasons. ...
In the middle of the front of each house is usually an arched passage, leading into the Court-not directly, lest the Court should be exposed to view from the street, but by turning to one side. The entrance into the house is either from this passage or from the Court itself. Large doors, spacious chambers, marble pavements, cloistered Courts, with fountains sometimes playing in the midst, are certainly conveniences very well adapted to the circumstances of these climates, where the summer heats are generally so intense. The jealously likewise of these people is less apt to be alarmed, while all the windows open into their respective Courts, if we except a latticed window or balcony which sometimes looks into the streets", 2 Kings 9:30 . From hence we are received into the Court, or quadrangle, which, lying open to the weather, is, according to the ability of the owner, paved with marble, or such materials as will immediately carry off the water into the common sewers. The Court is the usual place of their reception, which is strewed accordingly with mats and carpets for their more commodious entertainment. In the summer season, and upon all occasions when a large company is to be received, this Court is commonly sheltered from the heat or inclemency of the weather by a veil or awning, which, being expanded upon ropes from one side of the parapet wall to the other, may be folded or unfolded at pleasure. The Court is for the most part surrounded with a cloister or colonnade; over which, when the house has two or three stories, there is a gallery erected, of the same dimensions with the cloister, having a balustrade, or else a piece of carved or latticed work going round about it to prevent people from falling from it into the Court. From the cloister and galleries we are conducted into large spacious chambers, of the same length with the Court, but seldom or never communicating with one another. The stairs were usually in a corner of the Court, beside the gateway, Matthew 24:17 . The other, which I call the parapet wall, hangs immediately over the Court, being always breast high; we render it the battlements,' Deuteronomy 22:8 . Instead of this parapet wall, some terraces are guarded in the same manner the galleries are, with balustrades only, or latticed work; in which fashion probably, as the name seems to import, was the net, or lattice,' as we render it, that Ahaziah, 2 Kings 1:2 , might be carelessly leaning over, when he fell down from thence into the Court. Among other pretended difficulties and absurdities relating to this fact, it has been urged that the uncovering or breaking up on the roof, Mark 2:4 , or the letting a person down through it, Luke 5:19 , suppose that the crowd being so great around Jesus in the Court below, that those who brought the sick man could not come near him, they went upon the flat roof, and removing a part of the awning, let the sick man down in his mattress over the parapet, quite at the feet of Jesus. Such was the "little chamber upon the wall," which the Shunammite had built for Elisha, 2 Kings 4:10 ; the "summer parlor" of Eglon, Judges 3:20 ; and the "chamber over the gate," where David retired to weep, 2 Samuel 18:33 ; and perhaps in the New Testament the "upper chamber" where Tabitha was laid out, Acts 9:37 , and whence Eutychus fell from the window of the third loft into the Court, Acts 20:9
Mephibosheth - A son of Jonathan, who was granted special position and privilege in David's Court (2 Samuel 9:1 ). When David invited Mephibosheth to be a part of his Court, he entrusted the family property to a steward, Ziba
Nathan - But the best known Nathan is the prophet who belonged to David’s Court. Like many prophets, Nathan was a Court historian (1 Chronicles 29:29; 2 Chronicles 9:29; 2 Chronicles 29:25)
Cupbearer - An officer of considerable importance at Oriental Courts, whose duty it was to serve the wine at the table of the king. 34) speaks of the office at the Court of Cambyses, king of Persia, as ‘an honour of no small account,’ and the narrative of Nehemiah shows the high esteem of the king, who is so solicitous for his welfare that he asks the cause of his sadness ( Nehemiah 2:2 ). The cupbearers among the officers of king Solomon’s household ( 1 Kings 10:5 ) impressed the queen of Sheba, and they are mentioned among other indications of the grandeur of his Court, which was modelled upon Courts of other Oriental kings
Appearance - Personal presence exhibition of the person as, he made his first appearance at Court or on the stage. A being present in Court a defendant's filing common or special bail to a process
Execution - In law, the carrying into effect a sentence or judgment of Court the last act of the law in completing the process by which justice is to be done, by which the possession of land or debt, damages or cost, is obtained, or by which judicial punishment is inflicted. An execution issues from the clerk of a Court, and is levied by a sheriff, his deputy or a constable, on the estate, goods or body of the debtor
Town - ) The Court end of London; - commonly with the. ) A farm or farmstead; also, a Court or farmyard
Yard - The yard in front of a house is called a Court, and sometimes a Court-yard
Sanhedrin - (Greek: syn, with; hedra, seat) ...
The supreme council and Court of justice among the Jews. For criminal judgments a quorum of at least 23 members was required; a majority of one vote was sufficient for acquittal, but for conviction a majority of two votes was necessary; a unanimous vote for conviction set the defendant free, the Court, by some fiction of law, being by this very fact declared incompetent. Prior to the reduction of Judea to the status of a Roman province, criminal law was administered by the Sanhedrin and by a number of lesser Courts in various towns, the Sanhedrin acting as a Court of appeals and having also the function of a trial Court in certain cases
Chancellor - To him belongs the appointment of all justices of the peace he is keeper of the kings conscience, visitor of all hospitals and colleges founded by the king, guardian of all charitable uses, and judge of the high Court of chancery. ...
Chancellor of an Ecclesiastical Court, is the bishops lawyer, versed in the and canon law, to direct the bishop in causes of the church, and criminal. ...
Chancellor of the Exchequer, is an officer who presides in that Court, and takes care of the interest of the crown. ...
In the United States, a chancellor is the judge o a Court of chancery or equity, established by statute
Tamarisk - Saul convened his Court under one (1 Samuel 22:6 )
Hazar - A Hebrew term meaning a Court or enclosed space
Scandal - ) Anything alleged in pleading which is impertinent, and is reproachful to any person, or which derogates from the dignity of the Court, or is contrary to good manners
Advocate - Specifically: One who pleads the cause of another before a tribunal or judicial Court; a counselor
Pave - ) To lay or cover with stone, brick, or other material, so as to make a firm, level, or convenient surface for horses, carriages, or persons on foot, to travel on; to floor with brick, stone, or other solid material; as, to pave a street; to pave a Court
Sackbut - This was an instrument of music known in the Court of the Chaldeans; but we do not find mention of it elsewhere
Hearing - ) A listening to facts and evidence, for the sake of adjudication; a session of a Court for considering proofs and determining issues
Vouch - ) To call into Court to warrant and defend, or to make good a warranty of title
Affirm - ) to assert or confirm, as a judgment, decree, or order, brought before an appellate Court for review
Shewbread - As a general rule the old could be eaten by the priests alone, and by them only in the Court of the sanctuary
Areopagite, Areopagus - It is approached from the agora, or market-place, by an old, worn stairway of sixteen steps, and upon the top can still be seen the rough, rock-hewn benches, forming three sides of a square, upon which the Court eat in the open air, in order that the judges should not be under the same roof as the accused. -(b) The expression was also used of the Court itself (Cicero, ad Att. From time immemorial this Court held its meetings on the hill in question, and was at once the mot ancient and most revered tribunal in the city. It thus fulfilled the functions of both Court and council. ) set themselves to limit the power of the Court (Aristotle, Const. 25), and it became largely a criminal Court, while religious matters seem to have been controlled, at least in part, by the King Archon. But the reforms of Ephialtes mainly concerned interference in public affairs; and the statements of aeschylus in the tragedy Eumenides, which appeared at the time in defence of the Court, appear to be exaggerated. As to the origin of the Court, according to popular legend Ares was called before a Court of the twelve gods to answer for the murder of Halirrhotius (Paus
Sanhedrin - That this cannot have been the case is seen already in the fact that, according to Biblical authority itself, king Jehoshaphat is mentioned as having instituted the supreme Court at Jerusalem ( 2 Chronicles 19:8 ); but that this Court cannot have been identical with the Sanhedrin of later times is clear from the fact that, whereas the latter had governing powers as well as judicial functions, the former was a Court of justice and nothing else. ...
The Sanhedrin was conceived of mainly as a Court of justice , the equivalent Heb. A member of this Court was called a bouteutes (‘councillor’). It was thus the supreme native Court, as contrasted with the foreign authority of Rome; to it belonged all such judicial matters as the local provincial Courts were incompetent to deal with, or as the Roman procurator did not attend to himself. Above all, it was the final Court of appeal for questions connected with the Mosaic Law; its decision having once been given, the judges of the lower Courts were, on pain of death, bound to acquiesce in it. ...
While the Sanhedrin could not hold a Court of supreme jurisdiction in the absence, or, at all events, without the consent, of the Roman procurator, it enjoyed, nevertheless, wide powers within the sphere of its extensive jurisdiction. At the same time, it had sometimes to submit to the painful experience of realizing its dependent position in face of the Roman power, even in matters which might be regarded as peculiarly within the scope of its own jurisdiction; for the Roman authorities could at any time take the initiative themselves, and proceed independently of the Jewish Court, as the NT testifies, e. The members sat in a semicircle in order to be able to see each other; in front stood clerks of the Court, and behind these, three rows of the disciples of the ‘learned men
Cultivate - ) To seek the society of; to Court intimacy with
Forum - A public square in Roman cities where markets and assemblies for judicial or political purposes were held; hence a Court, a tribunal; a place of jurisdiction
Newdigate, Sebastian, Blessed - Educated at Cambridge, he later went to Court and became a favorite of King Henry VIII, to whom he served as privy councilor
Treasury - These stood in the outer "court of the women
Chancellor - A lay officer under a bishop, who is judge of his Court
Cavalier - ) One of the Court party in the time of king Charles I
Conviction - ) A judgment of condemnation entered by a Court having jurisdiction; the act or process of finding guilty, or the state of being found guilty of any crime by a legal tribunal
Rechab - He and his brother murdered Saul's son Ish-bosheth, thinking to Court David's favor
Trophimus - Paul's free association with Trophimus led to the false charge that Paul had defiled the Temple by bringing a Gentile within the Court of Israel (Acts 21:19 )
Assignment - ) An allotting or an appointment to a particular person or use; or for a particular time, as of a cause or causes in Court
Determination - Judicial decision the ending of a controversy or suit by the judgment of a Court
Dome - ) Decision; judgment; opinion; a Court decision
Adjourn - ) To suspend business for a time, as from one day to another, or for a longer period, or indefinitely; usually, to suspend public business, as of legislatures and Courts, or other convened bodies; as, congress adjourned at four o'clock; the Court adjourned without day
Shallecheth, the Gate - " The gate was at the road of ascent from the middle valley of Jerusalem to the western side of the temple Court
Frequent - ...
He frequented the Court of Augustus
Atrium - In Roman architecture the principal entrance hall or reception room of a residence; in church architecture an open Court, consisting of a large quadrangle, with colonnaded walks on four sides, forming a cloister between the porch and the body of the church, and containing a fountain for washing the hands
Outer - ) Being on the outside; external; farthest or farther from the interior, from a given station, or from any space or position regarded as a center or starting place; - opposed to inner; as, the outer wall; the outer Court or gate; the outer stump in cricket; the outer world
Decision - ) An account or report of a conclusion, especially of a legal adjudication or judicial determination of a question or cause; as, a decision of arbitrators; a decision of the Supreme Court
Paradise - ) An open space within a monastery or adjoining a church, as the space within a cloister, the open Court before a basilica, etc
Ecclesiastical Privileges - , the clerical privileges of protection against violence (privilegium canonis), of ecclesiastical Court (privilegium fori), of personal immunity, of benefit in case of insolvency
Porch - The porch, (Matthew 26:71 ) may have been the passage from the street into the first Court of the house, in which, in eastern houses, is the mastabah or stone bench, for the porter or persons waiting, and where also the master of the house often receives visitors and transacts business
Sebastian Newdigate, Blessed - Educated at Cambridge, he later went to Court and became a favorite of King Henry VIII, to whom he served as privy councilor
Officer - The two words so rendered in the New Testament denote --
An inferior officer of a Court of justice, a messenger or bailiff, like the Roman viator or lictor. (Matthew 5:25 ; Acts 5:22 ) ...
Officers whose duty it was to register and collect fines imposed by Courts of justice
Count - ) To plead orally; to argue a matter in Court; to recite a count. ) A formal statement of the plaintiff's case in Court; in a more technical and correct sense, a particular allegation or charge in a declaration or indictment, separately setting forth the cause of action or prosecution
Athaliah - Some have suggested Omri was her father, but her brother Ahab raised her at Court and thus functioned as her father. She brought the northern Court's devotion to Baal to the Court of Judah
Base, Baser - It is also used of affairs usually transacted in the market-place, and hence of judicial assemblies, Acts 19:38 , RV, "courts" (AV, "law"); the margin in both RV and AV has "court days are kept. " See Court
Record - ) The various legal papers used in a case, together with memoranda of the proceedings of the Court; as, it is not permissible to allege facts not in the record. ) An official contemporaneous memorandum stating the proceedings of a Court of justice; a judicial record. ) To preserve the memory of, by committing to writing, to printing, to inscription, or the like; to make note of; to write or enter in a book or on parchment, for the purpose of preserving authentic evidence of; to register; to enroll; as, to record the proceedings of a Court; to record historical events
Bar - ) The railing that incloses the place which counsel occupy in Courts of justice. Hence, the phrase at the bar of the Court signifies in open Court. ) The place in Court where prisoners are stationed for arraignment, trial, or sentence. ) The whole body of lawyers licensed in a Court or district; the legal profession
Judge - A officer who is invested with authority to hear and determine causes, or criminal, between parties, according to his commission as the judges of the king's bench, or of the common pleas judges of the supreme Court, of district Courts, or of a county Court. The judge of a Court of equity is called a chancellor. One who presides in a Court of judicature
Respite - ) The delay of appearance at Court granted to a jury beyond the proper term
Druzes - Their name is derived from their leader, Dorazy, a Persian at the Egyptian Court of El Hakim, whom he proclaimed to be an incarnation of the deity, and fleeing the anger of the crowd, c
Frumentius, Saint - On the journey they were overtaken by pirates, and all were killed except the two brothers, who were taken as slaves to the Court of the King of Axum
Pantaleon, Saint - Martyr; one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers; died c305 According to legend he was the son of a rich pagan, but was instructed in Christianity by his mother; he studied medicine and became Court physician to Emperor Maximianus; he was denounced to the emperor as a Christian by envious colleagues, but resisted firmly the temptations offered him to apostatize, was condemned to death, subjected to atrocious tortures from which he remained miraculously immune, and was finally decapitated
Martyr - "
In a Court of justice (Matthew 18:16 ; 26:65 ; Acts 6:13 ; 7:58 ; Hebrews 10:28 ; 1 Timothy 5:19 )
Ethiopian Eunuch - He was an official in the Court of the queen of Ethiopia
Penitentiary - Penitentiary, also, in the Court of Rome, is an office in which are examined and delivered out the secret bulls, dispensations, &c
Asia - It had its "assize days" (agoraioi , margin "the Court days are kept
Below - ) In Court or tribunal of inferior jurisdiction; as, at the trial below
Breve - ) Any writ or precept under seal, issued out of any Court
Caveat - ) A notice given by an interested party to some officer not to do a certain act until the party is heard in opposition; as, a caveat entered in a probate Court to stop the proving of a will or the taking out of letters of administration, etc
Rabsaris - (rab' ssuh rihss) An Assyrian Court position with strong military and diplomatic powers
Kitchens - Ezekiel's vision of the Temple included four small Courts at the corners of the Court of the Gentiles where the sacrifices that the common people were permitted to eat were boiled (Ezekiel 46:24 )
Nehemiah - (a) A minister in the Persian King Artaxerxes' Court, he returned to Israel in 335 BCE to strengthen the fledgling Jewish commonwealth
Recovery - ) The obtaining in a suit at law of a right to something by a verdict and judgment of Court
Contempt - In law, disobedience of the rules and orders of a Court, which is a punishable offense
Early - Being in good season as, the Court met at an early hour
Prayer - ) The act of praying, or of asking a favor; earnest request or entreaty; hence, a petition or memorial addressed to a Court or a legislative body
Procure - ) To manage business for another in Court
Ethelbert of East Anglia, Saint - Although preferring a life of celibacy, he agreed to woo Altrida (Alfrida) daughter of Offa, King of the Mercians, and, undeterred by portents, repaired to Offa's Court, where he was murdered
Areopagus - the high Court at Athens, famed for the justice of its decisions; and so called, because it sat on a hill of the same name, or in the suburbs of the city, dedicated to Mars, the god of war, as the city was to Minerva, his sister
Respect of Persons - Thus ought men to estimate and treat their fellow men; and to Court the favor of the rich and influential is sharply censured in Scripture, Proverbs 28:21 James 2:1-9 Jude 1:16
Guard - Modern translation frequently use the expression “court of the guard” where the KJV used “court of the prison” (Nehemiah 3:25 ; Jeremiah 32:2 )
Mordecai - When she was brought into the king's harem and made queen in the room of the deposed queen Vashti, he was promoted to some office in the Court of Ahasuerus, and was one of those who "sat in the king's gate" (Esther 2:21 ). ) the Agagite had been raised to the highest position at Court
East Gate - (2) The East Gate of the outer Court of the Temple. (3) The East Gate of the inner Court of the Temple
Dispatch - The king dispatched and envoy to the Court of Madrid. The president dispatched a special envoy to the Court of St
Hanging, Hangings - ]'>[1] ’s term for the portière closing the entrance to the Court of the Tent of Meeting ( Exodus 35:17 etc. ]'>[4] of a different original denoting the curtains ‘of fine twined linen’ which surrounded the Court (Exodus 27:9 etc
Gentiles - Court OF THE. Josephus says there was, in the Court of the temple, a wall, or balustrade, breast-high, with pillars at particular distances, and inscriptions on them in Greek and Latin, importing that strangers were forbidden from entering farther; here their offerings were received, and sacrifices were offered for them, they standing at the barrier; but they were not allowed to approach to the altar
Motion - ) An application made to a Court or judge orally in open Court
Areopagus - Here sat the Court or council of the Areopagus, a most ancient and venerable tribunal, celebrated through Greece. Those who had held the office of archon were members of this Court, and they sat for life, unless guilty of some crime
Palace - 1: αὐλή (Strong's #833 — Noun Feminine — aule — ow-lay' ) "a Court, dwelling, palace:" see Court. " In the AV the word appears only once, Mark 15:16 , "the hall, called Praetorium" (RV, "within the Court which is the Praetorium," marg. , "Caesar's Court," RV, "throughout the whole praetorian guard," marg
Bank - ) A bench; a high seat, or seat of distinction or judgment; a tribunal or Court. ) The regular term of a Court of law, or the full Court sitting to hear arguments upon questions of law, as distinguished from a sitting at Nisi Prius, or a Court held for jury trials
Common - That body of rules, principles and customs which have been received from our ancestors, and by which Courts have been governed in their judicial decisions. The evidence of this law is to be found in the reports of those decisions, and the records of the Courts. ...
Common pleas, in Great Britain, one of the kings Courts, now held in Westminster-Hall. It consists of a chief justice and three other justices, and has cognizance of all causes, real, personal or mixed, as well by original writ, as by removal from the inferior Courts. A writ of error, in the nature of an appeal, lies from this Court to the Court of kings bench. ...
In some of the American states, a Court of common pleas is an inferior Court, whose jurisdiction is limited to a county, and it is sometimes called a county Court. This Court is variously constituted in different states, and its powers are defined by statutes. It has jurisdiction of causes, and of minor offenses but its final jurisdiction is very limited all causes of magnitude being removable to a higher Court by appeal or by writ of error
Leontius, Priest And Martyr of Armenia - He acted a conspicuous part in the stand of the Armenian church against the Court of Persia, as related chiefly in the History of Varian by Elisha Vartabed and in the historical work of Lazarus of Barb. 450 700 magian priests, sent under escort to instruct the Armenians in the Court religion, arrived at Ankes in the centre of Armenia. Joseph, Leontius, and their companions, were taken to the Court of Persia, and put on their defence
Divorce - ) A legal dissolution of the marriage contract by a Court or other body having competent authority
Counsel - ) One who gives advice, especially in legal matters; one professionally engaged in the trial or management of a cause in Court; also, collectively, the legal advocates united in the management of a case; as, the defendant has able counsel
Donato Bramante - About 1499 he designed in the classic spirit the little circular temple in the Court of San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, and became a leader of the High Renaissance
Innocent vi, Pope - As pope he banished luxury from his Court and commanded visiting clergy to leave Avignon and repair to their "respective places of residence
Daniel - 400 BCE) Together with Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, was exiled to Babylon and trained to be a chamberlain in the royal Court. par ...
Daniel, the Book of: The book of Tanach describing the experiences of Daniel - and his friends Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah - in the Babylonian and Persian royal Courts, as well as several of Daniel's prophecies
Madmen (2) - David availed himself of this half reverential, half-contemptuous forbearance toward madmen, to save himself at Achish's Court by feigning madness (1 Samuel 21:13-15)
Hampton-Court Conference - at Hampton-Court, in 1603, in order to settle the disputes between the church and the Puritans
Window - The windows generally look into the inner Court of the house, but in every house one or more look into the street
Barzillai - After the death of Absalom, Barzillai went across Jordan with the king, but declined to go to Court ( 2 Samuel 19:31 ff
Quirk - ) A piece of ground taken out of any regular ground plot or floor, so as to make a Court, yard, etc
Apparel - They who are gorgeously appareled are in kings Court
Approve - ) To sanction officially; to ratify; to confirm; as, to approve the decision of a Court-martial
Girzites - to 1 Samuel 27:8 , David and his men’ while living at the Court of Achish king of Gath, ‘made a raid upon the Geshurites and the Girzites (RVm Basilides, Saint - The best-known saint by this name, however, was an officer of the Court at Alexandria, who was commissioned to lead Saint Potamiana to her death
Pavilion - Psalms 27:5, sok ; Psalms 18:11; Psalms 31:20, a spiritual pavilion, namely, Jehovah's favor and protection; explained in the parallel, "the secret of Thy presence"; none have access to an eastern king's pavilion in the "inner Court" save those he admits (Esther 4:11)
Porch - The porch (puloon or proaulion ), Matthew 26:71, is the passage beneath the housefront from the street to the aule or Court inside, open to the sky
Needlework, - The veil of the tabernacle, the ten curtains, and the hangings for the door, and for the gate of the Court were of needlework of blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine-twined linen
Laver - They were stationed within the Court of the priests, in front of the temple, five on each side
Eunuch - In the Courts of oriental monarchs, the charge of the female and interior apartments is committed to eunuchs. Hence the word came to signify merely a Court officer
Areopagus - The hill of Mars, the seat of the ancient and venerable supreme Court of Athens, called the Areopagites, Acts 17:19-34 . The stone seats of the Areopagus lay open to the sky; in the Court stood Epicureans, Stoics, etc
Access - Each royal Court had its own rules. The Persian Court which Esther faced set the death penalty for anyone who sought access to the king without royal permission (Esther 4:11 )
Verge - ) The compass of the Court of Marshalsea and the Palace Court, within which the lord steward and the marshal of the king's household had special jurisdiction; - so called from the verge, or staff, which the marshal bore
Review - ) The judicial examination of the proceedings of a lower Court by a higher. ) To reexamine judically; as, a higher Court may review the proceedings and judgments of a lower one
Judges - That such a Court subsisted in the time of our Lord is certain, and continued until the destruction of the temple. That this Court, composed of seventy persons, possessed great power, even in the days when the Jews were under tribute to the Romans, is certain But thought they contended with Pilate, in their wishes for the death of Christ, that they had a law, yet we do not find, excepting upon this occasion, any mention made of its exercise
Tabernacle - The tabernacle consisted of the outer Court and the tabernacle. The outer Court was entered from the East. The outer Court contained the altar of burnt offering (Exodus 27:1-8) and the bronze laver (Exodus 30:17-21). The tabernacle stood within the Court (Exodus 26:1ff
Basilica - ) A building used by the Romans as a place of public meeting, with Court rooms, etc
Blackguard - ) The scullions and lower menials of a Court, or of a nobleman's household, who, in a removal from one residence to another, had charge of the kitchen utensils, and being smutted by them, were jocularly called the "black guard"; also, the servants and hangers-on of an army
Cupbearer - A high ranking official in the Courts of Ancient Near Eastern kings. The Rabshakeh may have been the title given to cupbearers in the Assyrian Court (2 Kings 18:17-37 ; Isaiah 36:2 )
Areopagus - This Court took cognizance of high crimes, impiety and immorality, and watched over the laws and the public treasury
Cherubini, Maria Luigi Carlo Zenobio Salvatore - This secured him the directorship of Court concerts to Napoleon I but, failing to please the emperor, he accepted the patronage of the Prince de Chi may and composed his Mass in F for the dedication of the village church of Chimay
Caroline Books - A work in four books, which, though purporting to be Charlemagne's composition, was only written at his request by another, possibly Alcuin or some Irish theologian at the Frankish Court c
Eunuch - A — 1: εὐνοῦχος (Strong's #2135 — Noun Masculine — eunouchos — yoo-noo'-khos ) denotes (a) "an emasculated man, a eunuch," Matthew 19:12 ; (b) in the 3rd instance in that verse, "one naturally incapacitated for, or voluntarily abstaining from, wedlock;" (c) one such, in a position of high authority in a Court, "a chamberlain," Acts 8:27-39 . ...
B — 1: εὐνουχίζω (Strong's #2134 — Verb — eunouchizo — yoo-noo-khid'-zo ) "to make a eunuch" (from A), is used in Matthew 19:12 , as under (b) in A; and in the Passive Voice, "were made eunuchs," probably an allusion by the Lord to the fact that there were eunuchs in the Courts of the Herods, as would be well known to His hearers
Comforter - It means properly "one who is summoned to the side of another" to help him in a Court of justice by defending him, "one who is summoned to plead a cause
Comforter - It means properly "one who is summoned to the side of another" to help him in a Court of justice by defending him, "one who is summoned to plead a cause
Lourdel, Simeon - During the ascendancy of the Arab party at Court, the missionaries were obliged to withdraw to Bokumbi, but were invited back to Uganda in 1885
Notaries - They are similar to registrars and clerks of the Court in civiltrials, and are usually clerics
Chimham - Taken by David to Court, instead of Barzillai the Gileadite, his father, to whom the king owed a debt of gratitude for help in his flight from Absalom
Needlework - Needlework was used in the decoration of the screens for the tabernacle door (Exodus 26:36 ; Exodus 36:37 ) and for the gate to its Court (Exodus 27:16 ; Exodus 38:18 ) as well as for Aaron's girdle (Exodus 28:39 ; Exodus 39:29 )
Did - ...
And Mordecai walked every day before the Court of the womens house, to know how Esther did
Disgrace - A state of being out of favor disfavor disesteem as, the minister retired from Court in disgrace
Beaufort, Pierre Roger de - At the insistence of Saint Catherine of Siena he moved his Court from Avignon to Rome in 1376
Presentment - ) The official notice (formerly required to be given in Court) of the surrender of a copyhold estate
Gregory xi, Pope - At the insistence of Saint Catherine of Siena he moved his Court from Avignon to Rome in 1376
Embrace - ) To attempt to influence corruptly, as a jury or Court
Argue - ) To debate or discuss; to treat by reasoning; as, the counsel argued the cause before a full Court; the cause was well argued
Recess - ) Remission or suspension of business or procedure; intermission, as of a legislative body, Court, or school
Process - ) The whole course of proceedings in a cause real or personal, civil or criminal, from the beginning to the end of the suit; strictly, the means used for bringing the defendant into Court to answer to the action; - a generic term for writs of the class called judicial
Purgation - It was either canonical, which was prescribed by the canon law, the form whereof used in the spiritual Court was, that the person suspected take his oath that he was clear of the matter objected against him, and bring his honest neighbors with him to make oath that they believes he swore truly; or vulgar, which was by fire or water ordeal, or by combat
Simeon Lourdel - During the ascendancy of the Arab party at Court, the missionaries were obliged to withdraw to Bokumbi, but were invited back to Uganda in 1885
Visible - Factions at Court became more visible
Persep'Olis, - mentioned only in 2 Maccabees 9:2 , was the capital of Persia proper, and the occasional residence of the Persian Court from the time of Darius Hystaspes, who seems to have been its founder, to the invasion of Alexander
Theocracy - Theocracy is shown in action as Yahweh is portrayed as the Heavenly King in His divine council, as He governs the affairs of humanity and His Court. The divine will is expressed in decrees that are implemented by members of Yahweh's Court (see 1 Kings 22:1 ; Isaiah 6:1 ; Job 1-2 ; Zechariah 3:1 )
Money Changers - To help visitors change money into that acceptable in Jerusalem, money changers set up tables in the Temple Court of the Gentiles. ...
In anger at this corruption of the purpose of the Temple, Jesus turned over the tables of the money changers and drove them and the sellers of animals out of the Temple Court (Matthew 21:12 )
Ambassador - The first permanent envoys of the Holy See were the apocrisarii (Greek: apokrisis, an answer) sent to the Court of Constantinople about the middle of the 5th century. The use of a private chapel for the ambassadors of a Catholic country at a Protestant Court and vice versa, is always allowed
Antonia, Tower of - 6 that served as a palace residence for King Herod, barracks for the Roman troops, a safe deposit for the robe of the high priest, and a central Courtyard for public speaking. Herod the Great built the tower at the northwest corner of the Temple Court to replace the Maccabean fort. ...
Josephus describes the splendor of the tower with spacious apartments, elaborate baths, and beautiful Courtyards. Capable of accommodating at least a Roman cohort (500-600 men), the tower housed portions of the Roman army used to guard the Jews inside the Temple Court. ...
The pavement beneath the modern convent of Notre Dame de Sion has been thought to be the place of the tower's Courtyard, traditionally considered the site of Jesus' trial before Pilate (John 19:13 )
Salvina - While still a girl, Salvina was transferred by Theodosius to his own Court, as a pledge of the loyalty of her father and of the province of Africa which he governed. She devoted herself to God's service, and, as her husband had done, protected the Oriental churches and ecclesiastics at the Court of Arcadius
Document - Ecclesiastical documents are attested or witnessed by the chancellor, or clerk of Court, or prothonotary apostolic
Zedekiah - Son of Chenaanah, and one of Ahab’s four hundred Court prophets ( 1 Kings 22:11 ; 1 Kings 22:24-25 , 2 Chronicles 18:10 ; 2 Chronicles 18:23-24 )
Cadets of the Cross - By 1729 no traces of the Camisards could be found in the French Court, and although they fled to England they were soon wiped out
Camisards - By 1729 no traces of the Camisards could be found in the French Court, and although they fled to England they were soon wiped out
Camisards, White - By 1729 no traces of the Camisards could be found in the French Court, and although they fled to England they were soon wiped out
Jareb - (jay' rehb) Personal name meaning, “the great one” or “he contends” (in Court)
Louis Bourdaloue - He began to preach in his 33year and was so successful that he was invited to appear before the Court no less than 10 times and preached in Paris for 34 consecutive years
Appear - ) To stand in presence of some authority, tribunal, or superior person, to answer a charge, plead a cause, or the like; to present one's self as a party or advocate before a Court, or as a person to be tried
Divan - ) In Turkey and other Oriental countries: A council of state; a royal Court
Admission - ) A fact, point, or statement admitted; as, admission made out of Court are received in evidence
Area - ) The sunken space or Court, giving ingress and affording light to the basement of a building
Calendar - ) An orderly list or enumeration of persons, things, or events; a schedule; as, a calendar of state papers; a calendar of bills presented in a legislative assembly; a calendar of causes arranged for trial in Court; a calendar of a college or an academy
Zebadiah - Son of Ishmael who ruled civil cases in a Court system Jehoshapaht set up (2 Chronicles 19:11 )
Foursquare - Apparently it was the shape of the 'panels' of the base of the molten sea in Solomon's temple, 1 Kings 7:31 ; also of the Court of the future temple, Ezekiel 40:47 ; the altar of the same, Ezekiel 43:16 ; the portion of the land offered as a holy oblation, Ezekiel 48:20 ; for the sanctuary, Ezekiel 45:2 ; and for the city, Ezekiel 48:16
Above - ) Higher in rank or power; as, he appealed to the Court above
Prosecute - ) To seek to obtain by legal process; as, to prosecute a right or a claim in a Court of law
Antonia - 5,8) says it was situated "at the corner of two cloisters of the Court of the temple; of that on the west, and that on the north; it was erected upon a rock fifty cubits in height and was on a great precipice
Mall - ) A Court of justice
Justification - ) The showing in Court of a sufficient lawful reason why a party charged or accused did that for which he is called to answer
Treasury - 1: γαζοφυλάκιον (Strong's #1049 — Noun Neuter — gazophulakion — gad-zof-oo-lak'-ee-on ) from gaza, "a treasure," phulake, "a guard," is used by Josephus for a special room in the women's Court in the Temple in which gold and silver bullion was kept
White Camisards - By 1729 no traces of the Camisards could be found in the French Court, and although they fled to England they were soon wiped out
Record - To register to enroll to write or enter in a book or on parchment, for the purpose of preserving authentic or correct evidence of a thing as, to record the proceedings of a Court to record a deed or lease to record historical events
Zedekiah - Son of Chenaanah, and one of Ahab’s four hundred Court prophets ( 1 Kings 22:11 ; 1 Kings 22:24-25 , 2 Chronicles 18:10 ; 2 Chronicles 18:23-24 )
Court - ) Any formal assembling of the retinue of a sovereign; as, to hold a Court. ) Attention directed to a person in power; conduct or address designed to gain favor; Courtliness of manners; civility; compliment; flattery. ) An inclosed space; a Courtyard; an uncovered area shut in by the walls of a building, or by different building; also, a space opening from a street and nearly surrounded by houses; a blind alley. ) A place arranged for playing the game of tennis; also, one of the divisions of a tennis Court. ) To play the lover; to woo; as, to go Courting
Test Act - 2, which directs all officers, civil and military, to take the oaths, and make the declaration against transubstantiation, in the Court of King's Bench or chancery, the next term, or at the next quarter sessions, or (by subsequent statutes) within six months after their admission; and also within the same time to receive the sacrament of the Lord's supper, according to the usage of the church of England, in some public church, immediately after divine service or sermon, and to deliver into Court a certificate thereof, signed by the minister and church-warden: and also to prove the same by two credible witnesses, upon forfeiture of five hundred pounds, and disability to hold the said office
Challenge - ) An exception to a juror or to a member of a Court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. ) To object to or take exception to, as to a juror, or member of a Court
Shimei - Court personality who refused to support Adonijah against Solomon (1 Kings 1:8 ). District supervisor in territory of Benjamin responsible for supplying Solomon's Court one month each year (1 Kings 4:18 ); he could be identical with 4
Register - The word appropriately denotes an official account of the proceedings of a public body, a prince, a legislature, a Court an incorporated company and the like, and in this use it is synonymous with record. The officer or person whose business is to write or enter in a book accounts of transactions, particularly of the acts and proceedings of Courts or other public bodies as the register of a Court of probate a register of deeds
Court - 1: ἀγοραῖος (Strong's #60 — Adjective — agoraios — ag-or-ah'-yos ) is an adjective, "signifying pertaining to the agora, any place of public meeting, and especially where trials were held," Acts 19:38 ; the RV translates the sentence "the Courts are open;" a more literal rendering is "court days are kept. ...
2: αὐλή (Strong's #833 — Noun Feminine — aule — ow-lay' ) primarily, "an uncovered space around a house, enclosed by a wall, where the stables were," hence was used to describe (a) "the Courtyard of a house;" in the OT it is used of the "courts" of the tabernacle and Temple; in this sense it is found in the NT in Revelation 11:2 ; (b) "the Courts in the dwellings of well-to-do folk," which usually had two, one exterior, between the door and the street (called the proaulion, or "porch," Mark 14:68 ), the other, interior, surrounded by the buildings of the dwellings, as in Matthew 26:69 (in contrast to the room where the judges were sitting); Mark 14:66 ; Luke 22:55 ; AV, "hall;" RV "court" gives the proper significance, Matthew 26:3,58 ; Mark 14:54 ; 15:16 (RV, "Praetorium"); Luke 11:21 ; John 18:15 . ...
3: βασίλειον (Strong's #933 — Noun Neuter — basileion — bas-il'-i-on ) an adjective meaning "royal," signifies, in the neuter plural, "a royal palace," translated "kings' Courts" in Luke 7:25 ; in the singular, 1 Peter 2:9 , "royal
Porch - 7)-and faced the entrance to the Women’s Court, was a double portico, about 50 ft. It was in the style of contemporary Hellenistic architecture, and was only less magnificent than the triple colonnade known as the ‘Royal Porch’-στοὰ βασιλική-which ran along the south side of the Temple Court
Report - To give an account or statement of cases and decisions in a Court of law or chancery. An account or statement of a judicial opinion or decision, or of a case argued and determined in a Court of law, chancery, &c. An official statement of facts, verbal or written particularly, a statement in writing of proceedings and facts exhibited by an officer to his superiors as the reports of the heads of departments to congress, of a master in chancery to the Court, of committees to a legislative body and the like
Judgment - In law, the sentence of doom pronounced in any cause, or criminal, by the judge or Court by which it is tried. Judgment, though pronounced by the judge or Court, is properly the determination or sentence of the law. A Court or tribunal
Jocelin, Bishop - Travelled extensively and served as chaplain in the royal Court of Scotland
Claw - ) To relieve from some uneasy sensation, as by scratching; to tickle; hence, to flatter; to Court
Depend - ) To hang in suspense; to be pending; to be undetermined or undecided; as, a cause depending in Court
Shelemiah - Court official whom King Jehoiakim (609-597 B
Rab-Saris - ]'>[2] title rabû (or rubû ) -sha-rçshu , borne by a high Court-official, who may perhaps have been the ‘chief eunuch,’ though his office cannot be determined with absolute certainty
Caesar - Roman citizens as Paul had the right of "appeal to Caesar," and in criminal cases were sent for judgment to Rome, where was the emperor's Court (Philippians 4:22; compare Philippians 1:13); Nero is the emperor meant
Atrium - ) An open Court with a porch or gallery around three or more sides; especially at the entrance of a basilica or other church
Nergal-Sharezer - ” He is mentioned as being among the officers of Nebuchadnezzar's Court who helped destroy Jerusalem in 586 B
Absence - In law, non-appearance a not being in Court to answer
Prosecution - ) The institution and carrying on of a suit in a Court of law or equity, to obtain some right, or to redress and punish some wrong; the carrying on of a judicial proceeding in behalf of a complaining party, as distinguished from defense
Testify - ) To make a solemn declaration under oath or affirmation, for the purpose of establishing, or making proof of, some fact to a Court; to give testimony in a cause depending before a tribunal
a'Saph - ...
The keeper of the royal forest or "paradise" of Artaxerxes, (Nehemiah 2:8 ) a Jew, in high office at the Court of Persia
Changer - In the Court of the Gentiles, in the temple precincts, were the seats of those who sold selected and approved animals for sacrifice, and other things
Moot - ) Specifically: To discuss by way of exercise; to argue for practice; to propound and discuss in a mock Court
Nebuzar-a'Dan - chief of the slaughterers (Authorized Version "captain of the guard"), a high officer in the Court of Nebuchadnezzar
Present - ) To lay before a public body, or an official, for consideration, as before a legislature, a Court of judicature, a corporation, etc. ) Hence: To endow; to bestow a gift upon; to favor, as with a donation; also, to Court by gifts. ) To lay before a Court as an object of inquiry; to give notice officially of, as a crime of offence; to find or represent judicially; as, a grand jury present certain offenses or nuisances, or whatever they think to be public injuries
Advocate - Advocate, in its primary sense, signifies, one who pleads the cause of another in a Court of law. One who pleads the cause of another before any tribunal or judicial Court, as a barrister in the English Courts. ...
Juridical advocates became judges, in consequence of their attending causes in the earl's Court. ...
Faculty of advocates, in Scotland, is a society of eminent lawyers, who practice in the highest Courts, and who are admitted members only upon the severest examination, at three different times. ...
Judge advocate, in Courts martial, a person who manages the prosecution. ...
In English and American Courts, advocates are the same as counsel, or counselors
Flock, Fold - In John 10:1, and in the first clause of John 10:16, the Greek word is αὐλή = ‘enclosure,’ ‘court,’ ‘fold,’ in the strict sense. It is the word used of the enclosed Court of the high priest’s palace (Matthew 26:3, Mark 14:54, Luke 22:55, John 18:15), of the strong man’s palace (Luke 11:21), and of the outer Court of the Temple (Revelation 11:2)
Black Book - ...
(3):...
A book compiled in the twelfth century, containing a description of the Court of exchequer of England, an official statement of the revenues of the crown, etc
Obadiah - The officer of Ahab's Court who hid 150 prophets from Jezebel
Argue - To debate or discuss to treat by reasoning as, the counsel argued the cause before the supreme Court the cause was well argued
Lectern - That found in Thessalonica in the Court of the church of Saint Pantalremon is considered the oldest
Letturn - That found in Thessalonica in the Court of the church of Saint Pantalremon is considered the oldest
Bible in Public Schools - In several states either the Courts or the school superintendents or commissioners have forbidden this reading as tending to sectarianism. The latest decision is that of the Court at Lead, South Dakota
Pinnacle - This (likely conflated) account suggests a high structure overlooking the Temple Court
Shavsha - ]'>[1] ‘secretary’), an office made necessary by the growth of the Court and relations with other states
Instruct - On this question the Court is not instructed
Reference - ) The process of sending any matter, for inquiry in a cause, to a master or other officer, in order that he may ascertain facts and report to the Court
Default - In law, a failure of appearance in Court at a day assigned, particularly of the defendant in a suit when called to make answer
Hincmar - He was educated at the Abbey Saint Denis by Hilduin, whom he accompanied in 822 to the Court of Louis the Pious
Mer'Ari, Mer'Arites - Their charge was the cords of the tabernacle and the Court, and all the tools connected with setting them up
Access - By his death, also, the middle wall of partition was broken down, and Jew and Gentile had both free access to God; whereas, before, the Gentiles had no nearer access in the temple worship than to the gate of the Court of Israel
Esther, the Book of - It presents a graphic picture of the Persian Court and customs, and is intensely Jewish in its spirit
Paulus the Silentiary - Paulus (110) , sometimes called "the Silentiary," from his position as an officer of Justinian's Court, wrote several epigrams preserved in the Anthologia Palatina , and some other works of minor importance; his poetical account of the buildings and dedication of the Great Church of Constantinople must, as the evidence of a contemporary, always be an important authority on the greatest effort of Byzantine church architecture
Deborah - She held Court at “the palm tree of Deborah,” in the southern part of the territory of Ephraim, between Ramah and Bethel (Judges 4:4-5 ). Nothing is said about the procedures at her Court or about the extent of her jurisdiction
Inn - The caravanserai , a square building enclosing an open Court, with arcades around and a terrace over them, is alluded to in Jeremiah 9:2. Though lonely and often filthy, the terrace is tolerably clean, but the Court and stabling littered with chopped straw and dirt
Bail - Hence: The space inclosed by it; the outer Court. ) The person or persons who procure the release of a prisoner from the custody of the officer, or from imprisonment, by becoming surely for his appearance in Court
Minister - A delegate an embassador the representative of a sovereign at a foreign Court usually such as is resident at a foreign Court, but not restricted to such
Ethiopian Eunuch - Αἰθίοψ has been briefly discussed above, εὐνοῦχος implies that he was one of the Court officials and perhaps subject to the physical disability which the name ordinarily implies, but not ‘chamberlain’ in the strict sense of the term, as he ‘was in charge of all her treasure’ (see Candace), Becker (Charicles, Eng. δυνάστης suggests that he possessed unusual power and influence at Court; the word is not found in a similar connexion elsewhere in the NT (it is used of God in 1 Timothy 6:15 and of kings in Luke 1:52), but we have two good instances in Xenophon (Anab
Chaldean Language - There must be some reason why in Daniel it is said the wise men answered the king in 'Aramaic:' this is held to be not the learned and Court language, but the common language of the people; and the wise men may have used it that all who heard it might judge of the reasonableness of what they said, though the king might condemn them. The language spoken at Court would be different and has been judged by some to be a branch of the Aryan dialect, the ancient language of Central Asia; or perhaps it may have been the ancient Accadian
Saul - David was introduced to the Court to soothe Saul, and there he became acquainted with the manners of the Court, and the business of government
Porch - ]'>[1] , ‘forecourt’ (Mark 14:63 ), as distinguished from the ‘court’ ( Mark 14:66 RV Benvenuto Cellini - He worked exclusively as a goldsmith, the leading one of his day, until he visited the Court of Francis I, in 1537, when he began casting bronze statues
Maury, Jean Siffrein - In 1789 he was deputy to the States-General for the clergy of Peronne where he became the acknowledged leader of the Court and Church party
Hubert, Saint - Son of Bertrand, Duke of Aquitaine, he was educated at the Neustrian Court, and married the daughter of Dagobert, Count of Louvain
Ockenheim, Jean d' - After receiving Holy-Orders, he held the post of Court chapel-master under three French kings, 1453-1495, at the same time acting by royal appointment as treasurer of Saint Martin's Church at Tours
Okeghem, Jean d' - After receiving Holy-Orders, he held the post of Court chapel-master under three French kings, 1453-1495, at the same time acting by royal appointment as treasurer of Saint Martin's Church at Tours
Montcalm, Louis Joseph Gozon, Marquis de - Against the odds of discordant relations with Governor Vaudreuil, Bigot's dishonesty, apathy of the French Court, impoverished condition of the colony and army, and disproportionate resources of the enemy, Montcalm was heroically faithful to duty
Levitical Priesthood - The original duties of the priests were the following: ...
to offer the daily sacrifice in the Court of the Tabernacle or Temple (Exodus 29; 3Kings 8)
to sprinkle the blood of the victims on the altar (Leviticus 1)
to burn the victims on the altar (Leviticus 1)
to renew the loaves of proposition every Sabbath (Leviticus 24)
to offer incense morning and evening (Exodus 30)
to supply the lamps in the sanctuary with oil every day (Exodus 27)
to inspect the lepers (Leviticus 14)
to purify women after childbirth (Leviticus 12)
to teach and interpret the Law to the people (Leviticus 10)
to pray for the people (Leviticus 5)
Cellini, Benvenuto - He worked exclusively as a goldsmith, the leading one of his day, until he visited the Court of Francis I, in 1537, when he began casting bronze statues
Jean Maury - In 1789 he was deputy to the States-General for the clergy of Peronne where he became the acknowledged leader of the Court and Church party
Jean d'Ockenheim - After receiving Holy-Orders, he held the post of Court chapel-master under three French kings, 1453-1495, at the same time acting by royal appointment as treasurer of Saint Martin's Church at Tours
Jean d'Okeghem - After receiving Holy-Orders, he held the post of Court chapel-master under three French kings, 1453-1495, at the same time acting by royal appointment as treasurer of Saint Martin's Church at Tours
Hypocrites: Seeking Their Own Advantage - I have read of one that offered his prince a great sum of money to have leave once or twice a-day to come into his presence, and only say, 'God save your Majesty!' The prince wondering at this large offer for so small a favor, asked him, 'What advantage would this afford him?' 'O sire,' saith he, 'this, though I have nothing else at your hands, will get me a name in the country for one who is a great favorite at Court, and such an opinion will help me to more at the year's end, than it costs me for the purchase
Louis Gozon - Against the odds of discordant relations with Governor Vaudreuil, Bigot's dishonesty, apathy of the French Court, impoverished condition of the colony and army, and disproportionate resources of the enemy, Montcalm was heroically faithful to duty
Nicolas Poussin - Choosing subjects from mythology and the Old Testament he attained such fame by 1639 that he was invited to the French Court by Louis XIII
Basemath - Daughter of Solomon who married Ahimaaz, district supervisor providing supplies for the royal Court from Naphtali (1 Kings 4:15 )
Petition - ) To make a prayer or request to; to ask from; to solicit; to entreat; especially, to make a formal written supplication, or application to, as to any branch of the government; as, to petition the Court; to petition the governor
Gozon, Louis Joseph, Marquis de Montcalm - Against the odds of discordant relations with Governor Vaudreuil, Bigot's dishonesty, apathy of the French Court, impoverished condition of the colony and army, and disproportionate resources of the enemy, Montcalm was heroically faithful to duty
Gape - To gape for or after, to desire earnestly to crave to look and long for as, men often gape after Court favor
Gate - A frame of timber which opens or closes a passage into any Court, garden or other inclosed ground also, the passage
Haunt - ...
Those cares that haunt the Court and town
Shaphan - Shaphan must have been then an old man, for his son Ahikam was then a man of influence at Court
Yazoo Fraud - The claims of the purchasers, whom Georgia had refused to compensate, were sustained by the United States Supreme Court, which (1810) declared the repealing act of 1796 unconstitutional
Gentile - ...
Court of the Gentiles
Face - Genesis 48:11, to have entrance to his Court, if he be of high rank, as a king, Genesis 43:3; Genesis 43:5; 2 Samuel 14:24; 2 Samuel 14:28; 2 Samuel 14:32; hence this phrase denoted the royal favor, dignity or privilege
Shemaiah - A prophet of Israel, by whom God forbade Rehoboam to endeavor to coerce the ten tribes back to their allegiance, and called the king and his Court to repent at the invasion of Shishak
Dodo - Court
Nobleman - ]'>[1] ‘courtier,’ or ‘ruler’; (Revised Version margin) ‘king’s officer. Weymouth expresses the meaning well: ‘a certain officer of the king’s Court. 4) uses the word to distinguish the Courtiers and other officers of the king from those, of Rome. The ‘king’ in whose Court this officer served was Herod Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee. The title ‘king’ was not his by right, but was given to him in Courtesy (Matthew 14:9). ); the strong faith of the centurion (Matthew 8:10) ‘becomes intelligible, without ceasing to be admirable, when we reflect that he was evidently aware of the miracle formerly wrought for another inhabitant of the same city, an eminent person, one of the Court which his own sword protected
King, Kingship - Saul established no central government or bureaucracy, had no Court or standing army, and his seat at Gibeah was a fortress and not a palace. Unlike Saul, David was able to fuse the tribes of Israel together into a nation who owed allegiance to the crown, to establish and maintain a Court, and to establish a standing army. ...
The King's Court The officials at the king's Court included the body guard (2 Samuel 8:18 ; 1 Kings 1:38 ; 2 Kings 11:4 ), captain of the host or general of the army (1 Samuel 14:50 ; 2 Samuel 8:16 ), recorder (2 Samuel 8:16 ; 1 Kings 4:3 ), secretary or scribe (2 Samuel 8:17 ; 2 Kings 18:18 ), chief administrator over the twelve district officers (1 Kings 4:5 ; compare 1 Kings 4:7-19 ), steward of the palace household (1 Kings 4:6 ; 1 Kings 18:3 ; 2 Kings 18:18 ; Isaiah 22:15 ), overseer of forced labor (2 Samuel 20:24 ; 1 Kings 4:6 ; 1 Kings 5:13-17 ; 1 Kings 11:28 ; compare modern translations for KJV tribute), friend of the king (2 Samuel 15:37 ; 1 Kings 4:5 ; 1 Chronicles 27:33 ), counselor (2 Samuel 15:12 ), keeper of the wardrobe (2 Kings 22:14 ), officials in charge of the royal farms (1 Chronicles 27:25-31 ), priests (2 Samuel 8:17 ; 2 Samuel 20:25 ; 1 Kings 4:4 ), and prophets (1 Samuel 22:5 ; 2 Samuel 7:2 ; 2 Samuel 12:25 ; 2 Samuel 24:10-25 ). ...
To raise the necessary revenue to support a Court of this size, Solomon introduced a system of taxation. Saul's Court was simple and did not require extensive financial support (1 Samuel 22:6 ), while David depended on spoils of war (2 Samuel 8:1-14 ). Solomon divided the nation into twelve districts each of which would be responsible to support the Court for one month out of the year (1 Samuel 8:7 Kings 4:27-28 ). ...
Other revenue for the king's Court included royal property (1 Chronicles 27:25-31 ; 2 Chronicles 26:10 ; 2 Chronicles 32:27-29 ) and forced labor (2 Samuel 20:24 ; 1 Kings 4:6 ; 1 Kings 11:28 )
Ranges - " The Levites were appointed to guard the king's person within the temple (2 Chronicles 23:7 ), while the soldiers were his guard in the Court, and in going from the temple to the palace
Innsbruck - Among the buildings of interest are the Franciscan or Court church of the 16th century containing the tomb or Maximilian, university, Ferdinandeum (museum), and Jesuit church
Ferdinand, Blessed - He was the son of King John I of Portugal, and from his youth led a life of sanctity at Court, reciting the canonical hours daily and devoting himself to the poor
Pharaoh's Daughters - It would seem that she was alive and in some position of influence about the Court when Moses was compelled to flee from Egypt, and thus for forty years he had in some way been under her influence
Bahurim - Here, in the Court of a house, Jonathan and Ahimaaz lay hidden under the well's covering upon which grain was spread
Christmas - That it was kept before the time of Constantine we have a melancholy proof; for whilst the persecution raged under Dioclesian, who then kept his Court at Nicomedia, that tyrant among other acts of cruelty, finding the multitudes of Christians assembled together to celebrate Christ's nativity, commanded the church doors where they were met to be shut, and fire to be put to it, which soon reduced them and the church to ashes
Sea, the Molten - It stood in the south-eastern corner of the inner Court
Hall - ) A name given to many manor houses because the magistrate's Court was held in the hall of his mansion; a chief mansion house
Christian - ) Pertaining to the church; ecclesiastical; as, a Christian Court
Lully, Raymond, Blessed - During the early years of his life, he was prominent at the Court of King James the Conqueror
Tiberius Caesar - This event was probably not noted at the emperor's Court
Array - ) The whole body of jurors summoned to attend the Court
Beethoven, Ludwig Van - were Pfeiffer, a tenor singer, and Van den Eeden and Neefe, organists to the Court Chapel
Slander - In a Court of law it means to falsely accuse another (Exodus 20:16 ; Deuteronomy 5:20 )
Preaching: Fruit And Flowers - At Hampton Court Palace every one regards with wonder the enormous vine loaded with so vast a multitude of huge clusters: just outside the vine-house is as fine a specimen of the wistaria, and when it is in full bloom, the cluster-like masses of bloom, cause you to think it a flower-bearing vine, as the other is a fruit-bearing vine
Penitentiary - ) An office of the papal Court which examines cases of conscience, confession, absolution from vows, etc
Execution - ) The carrying into effect the judgment given in a Court of law
Ahimaaz - He served as one of David's secret messengers from the Court when Absalom rebelled and drove his father from Jerusalem (2 Samuel 15:36 ; 2 Samuel 7:17 )
Asa - Asa is praised by the Biblical writer for his religious zeal, which led him to reform the worship, and even to depose his mother from her place of influence at Court because of her idolatrous practices
Friend - A friend at Court, one who has sufficient interest to serve another
Vault - ) To form with a vault, or to cover with a vault; to give the shape of an arch to; to arch; as, vault a roof; to vault a passage to a Court
Cup-Bearer - An officer of high dignity at Eastern Courts, as the butler of Pharaoh. Cup-bearers are mentioned in the description of Solomon's Court, 1 Kings 10:5; and Rabshakeh, as his name indicates, was cup-bearer to the king of Assyria
Kindle - 1), is used of "lighting" a fire in the midst of a Court in Luke 22:55 (some mss
Ptol'Emee, - v, 61, a Courtier who possessed great influence with Antiochus Epiphanes. On the accession of Antiochus Eupator his conciliatory policy toward the Jews brought him into suspicion at Court
Minister - ) A representative of a government, sent to the Court, or seat of government, of a foreign nation to transact diplomatic business
Understand - ) To have just and adequate ideas of; to apprehended the meaning or intention of; to have knowledge of; to comprehend; to know; as, to understand a problem in Euclid; to understand a proposition or a declaration; the Court understands the advocate or his argument; to understand the sacred oracles; to understand a nod or a wink
Shushan - Between these two was probably the inner Court, where Esther appeared before the king
Nathan - How long he lived under the reign of Solomon is unknown; but two of his sons were high officers at Court, 1 Kings 4:5
Semi-Arianism - The temporary success of the semi-Arians was largely due to their favor at Court; when this favor was withdrawn the influence of the party began to wane and after the Second General Council (Constantinople, 381) rapidly disappeared
University of Rome - It declined after the transfer of the Papal Court to Avignon, and was closed in 1310
Rome, University of - It declined after the transfer of the Papal Court to Avignon, and was closed in 1310
Semi-Arianism - The temporary success of the semi-Arians was largely due to their favor at Court; when this favor was withdrawn the influence of the party began to wane and after the Second General Council (Constantinople, 381) rapidly disappeared
Jethro - Moses spent forty years after his exile from the Egyptian Court as keeper of Jethro's flocks
Nestorius, Bishop of Side - He was arrested by the local Irenarch, required to sacrifice, and on refusing dispatched in charge of two lictors to the Court of the president Pollio, who tortured and then crucified him
Abiathar - ...
Later, when David became king, Abiathar and another priest, Zadok, became part of David’s royal Court (2 Samuel 8:17)
Raca - the supreme Jewish Court, the Sanhedrin) in Matthew 5:22 , implying its possession of the power of life and death, is especially difficult. ’ Rabbinic law is very stringent against libellous expressions, which were to be treated as serious offences liable for punishment to the supreme Court (like murder)
Board - A table at which a council or Court is held hence a council, convened for business, or any authorized assembly or meeting as a board of directors. A body of men constituting a quorum in session a Court, or council as a board of trustees a board of officers
Remembrancer - We find this officer, in the Court of David, in the person of Jehoshaphat. I pause over the title and office purposely to notice an infinitely higher in the same department, in the Court and church of the spiritual David
Sanhedrin - The room, in which they met, according to the rabbins, was a rotunda, half of which was built without the temple, that is, without the inner Court of Israel, and half within, the latter part being that in which the judges sat. It decided causes brought before it by appeal from inferior Courts; and even the king, the high priest, and the prophets, were under its jurisdiction. Jews in foreign cities appear to have been amenable to this Court in matters of religion, Acts 9:2
Worth - Termination, signifies a farm or Court as in Wordsworth. As none but she, who in that Court did dwell, could know such worth, or worth describe so well
Elam - The region is also named Susiana or Susis from its capital Susa, called Shushah in Daniel 8:2, where Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:1) waited on king Artaxerxes, and where Ahasuerus (Xerxes) held his Court in Esther's (Esther 1:2; Esther 2:5) time. From Darius Hystaspes' time to Alexander the Great it was the Persian king's Court residence. Susa, its capital, became capital of the empire and the Court residence
Honor - ...
Court of honor, a Court of chivalry a Court of and criminal jurisdiction, having power to redress injuries of honor, and to hold pleas respecting matters of arms and deeds of war
Guest-Chamber - The smaller houses (see House) had only one Court; in these the guest-chamber was on the ground-floor, the women’s apartments being above. But in the larger houses of the wealthier classes, which had two or three Courts, the women’s apartments were hidden away in an inner Court, and the guest-chamber occupied the first floor of the outer Court (hence ἀνάγαιον, ὑπερῷον). In either case it was open to the Court, so that all that took place in the one could be seen from the other. On the opposite side of the Court was another chamber, equal in size to the first, but fronted with lattice-work filled in with coloured glass; this served as a winter guest-chamber
Sanhedrin (2) - —The supreme council and high Court of justice in Jerusalem during the Greek and Roman periods. ...
These names throw light upon the composition and functions of the Court. συνέδριον suggests a Court of justice, and so, still more explicitly, does בֵּית דִּין. The identity of the two terms can hardly he doubted, as there is no evidence of the existence of any other Court to which the name γερουσία might he applied. ) here, it must be supposed that the author used one of the words loosely, regarding συνἐδριον as an inner circle within the general Court. Quite as suggestive are the names of the various classes of members of the Court. The high priest was president of the Court according to Josephus and NT (cf. ...
These names indicate with sufficient clearness the general character and composition of the Court. It was an aristoeratic assembly and high Court of justice, in which, alongside of the priestly nobility and the noble families outside the priestly circle, representatives of the more numerous Pharisee party found a place, the Sadducee element, however, retaining the weight of influence. According to the Mishna, new members were appointed by the Court itself. The Sanhedrin was thus a political assembly and Court of justice, representing in the main the aristocratic elements in the Jewish community. According to the Mishnic literature, on the other hand, it was a Court of Rabbis, presided over by the leading Rabbi of the time, in which the priestly element as such does not appear, while the Sadducees are mentioned only as heretics to be refuted. The character of this Sanhedrin, which bore little more resemblance to the older Court than the ‘Sanhedrin’ which Napoleon endeavoured to establish, was transferred to the assembly of which we have accurate descriptions in the contemporary Greek sources. At the time of John Hyrcanus, therefore, the Sanhedrin consisted of adherents of the Hasmonaean dynasty—the new aristocracy combined with the remnants of the old, representing two of the three elements of the later Court, the chief priests and the elders—and was overwhelmingly, if not exclusively, Sadducee. Gabinius went further, and established five συνέδρια in place of the single Court, thus largely destroying its influence (57–55 b. ...
Under the totally new conditions which prevailed after the destruction of Jerusalem, a new Court established itself, bearing the name ‘Sanhedrin,’ but differing in essential features from the older body. An effective sentence of death could be pronounced only by the procurator’s Court
Attaint - ) A writ which lies after judgment, to inquire whether a jury has given a false verdict in any Court of record; also, the convicting of the jury so tried
Cause - ) A suit or action in Court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action
Decrees of Roman Pontiffs And Congregations - Judicial decrees are all the rulings of an ecclesiastical Court not comprised in incidental and final decisions
Hanging - masak, (a) before the entrance to the Court of the tabernacle ( Exodus 35:17 ); (b) before the door of the tabernacle (26:36,37); (c) before the entrance to the most holy place, called "the veil of the covering" (35:12; 39:34), as the word properly means
Chaucer, Geoffrey - Serving as a page at Court, he was later sent to Italy on a diplomatic mission, which greatly influenced his literary career
Eshcol - " From Kadesh the spies went and returned with grapes of Eshcol, which cannot be near Hebron, for grapes could not well be brought such a distance as that between Hebron and Kadesh, and the spies would Court secrecy and haste (Numbers 13:24)
Zoan - Here Pharaoh was holding his Court at the time of his various interviews with Moses and Aaron
Porch - ...
3: προαύλιον (Strong's #4259 — Noun Neuter — proaulion — pro-ow'-lee-on ) "the exterior Court" or "vestibule," between the door and the street, in the houses of well-to-do folk, Mark 14:68 , "porch" (RV marg. , "forecourt")
Church Congress - It isnot a legislative body, but rather an "Open Court" for the free exchange of views
Nathan - His two sons, Zabad (1 Chronicles 2:36 ) and Azariah (1 Kings 4:5 ) occupied places of honour at the king's Court
Ancient - ) One of the senior members of the Inns of Court or of Chancery
Chapel - ) A choir of singers, or an orchestra, attached to the Court of a prince or nobleman
Gallery - In this case the Temple measurements in Ezekiel 41:15-16 would refer to the base of the elevated inner Court
Necessity - The cause of all the distractions in his Court or army proceeded from the extreme poverty and necessity his majesty was in
Pillar of Cloud And Fire - In Jesus' day, the celebration of the Feast of Tabernacles (John 7:2 ) included the lighting of great, golden lamps in the Temple Court as a reminder of the pillar of fire and cloud
Insignificant Subjects: Not Fit For the Pulpit - Carlyle in narrating an instance of the preservation of etiquette at the Court of Louis XVI
Bezalel - He was also charged with the construction of the furniture for Court and Tabernacle, as well as with the preparation of the priestly garments, and of the necessary oil and incense
Elkanah - A high official, ‘next to the king,’ at the Court of Ahaz ( 2 Chronicles 28:6-7 )
Judgment-Hall - With the development of civic life, however, special Courts of justice began to be built. The Sanhedrin also convened for judgment in the ‘Hall of Hewn Stone’ on the south side of the great Court of the Temple. In Rome, too, the Imperial Age saw the law-courts transferred to basibicae, or open colonnades near the Forum, and finally to closed halls, where cases were heard in secret (in secretario)
Trial - ) The formal examination of the matter in issue in a cause before a competent tribunal; the mode of determining a question of fact in a Court of law; the examination, in legal form, of the facts in issue in a cause pending before a competent tribunal, for the purpose of determining such issue
Hear - ) To give audience or attention to; to listen to; to heed; to accept the doctrines or advice of; to obey; to examine; to try in a judicial Court; as, to hear a recitation; to hear a class; the case will be heard to-morrow
Jesse - After David was compelled to leave the Court of Saul, he took his father and his mother into the country of Moab, and there they disappear from the records of Scripture, b
Zebadiah - Zebadiah probably acted for the king, Amariah the high priest for the priesthood and ecclesiastical interests in the Court consisting of priests, Levites, and chief men, over which they jointly presided, and which decided all causes civil and ecclesiastical
Confide - ...
Congress may, under the constitution, confide to the circuit Court, jurisdiction of all offenses against the United States
Ziba - When Mephibosheth was invited to the Court of David, and the possessions of Saul were made over to him, Ziba was instructed with his fifteen sons and twenty servants, to manage the estates for Mephibosheth
Team - ) A royalty or privilege granted by royal charter to a lord of a manor, of having, keeping, and judging in his Court, his bondmen, neifes, and villains, and their offspring, or suit, that is, goods and chattels, and appurtenances thereto
Witness - ) One who testifies in a cause, or gives evidence before a judicial tribunal; as, the witness in Court agreed in all essential facts
Abomination - shows the idolatry that was carried on in secret, and the 'greater abomination,' of bringing it actually into the inner Court of the Lord's house, between the porch and the altar! The word is but seldom used in the N
Sentence - (Latin: sententia, judgment) ...
In canon law the decision of the Court upon any issue brought before it
cy'Rus - The prophet Daniel's home for a time was at his Court
Judgment Hall - The word "palace," or "Caesar's Court
Counselor - David employed certain advisors or counselors in his Court, including Ahithophel, Jehoida, and Jonathan (1 Chronicles 27:32 ). The ascended Christ is seen as a counselor or advocate in God's heavenly Court (1 John 2:1 )
Fatherless - In societies where the basic social unit was the clan headed by a father (the eldest male relative, perhaps a grandfather or uncle), those without a father or husband were social misfits without one to provide for their material needs and represent their interests in the Court (Job 31:21 ). The Old Testament image of the orphan without a helper at the Court perhaps forms the background for Jesus' promise that His disciples would not be left orphans (John 14:18 , NAS, NIV, NRSV; “comfortless”, KJV; “bereft”, REB)
Palace - Behind was the inner Court (1 Kings 7:8) with gardens, fountains, and cloisters, and Courts for residence of attendants and guards, and for the 300 women of the harem. ...
On the side of the great Court opposite the inner Court was the palace of Pharaoh's daughter
Eustathius (22), Bishop of Berytus - of Berytus (Beyrout), a time-serving prelate attached to the Court, who kept steadily in view the aggrandizement and independence of his see of Berytus, then suffragan to Tyre. As a reward for his support of the Court party at the "Latrocinium," Eustathius had obtained from Theodosius a decree giving metropolitical rank to Berytus (Lupus, in Canon. Flavian's successor Anatolius, together with Maximus of Antioch and other Court bishops, had consequently, at the close of 449, dismembered the diocese of Tyre and assigned five churches to the formerly suffragan see of Berytus (Labbe, iv
Tabernacle - It was divided into two parts, the one covered, and properly called the tabernacle, and the other open, called the Court. The Court was a place a hundred cubits long, and fifty in breadth, inclosed by twenty columns, each of them twenty cubits high, and ten in breadth, covered with silver, and standing on copper bases, five cubits distant from each other, between which there were curtains drawn, and fastened with hooks. In the tabernacle was the ark of the covenant, the table of shew bread, the golden candlestick, and the altar of incense; and in the Court opposite to the entrance of the tabernacle, or holy place, stood the altar of burnt- offerings, and the laver or bason for the use of the priests
Temple - There were several Courts about the temple which were upon different levels. The outer Court, or Court of the Gentiles, came first; then the Court of the women, the Court of Israel, the Court of the priests, and then the temple itself. The Court of Israel, 10 cubits by 135, was 15 steps higher up, and upon them the 15 Songs of Degrees—Psalms 120:1-7; Psalms 121:1-8; Psalms 122:1-9; Psalms 123:1-4; Psalms 124:1-8; Psalms 125:1-5; Psalms 126:1-6; Psalms 127:1-5; Psalms 128:1-6; Psalms 129:1-8; Psalms 130:1-8; Psalms 131:1-3; Psalms 132:1-18; Psalms 133:1-3; Psalms 134:1-3, inclusive—were sung. The Court of the priests, or sanctuary, 135 by 176 cubits, was 2½ cubits higher than the Court of Israel, the wall being 1 cubit high, with 3 steps above it On the wall there was a platform from which the priests blessed the people. The Child Jesus was found amid the doctors of the law in the temple Courts
Tabernacles, the Feast of - These were the ceremony of pouring out some water of the pool of Siloam and the display of some great lights in the Court of the women. One of the priests fetched some water in a golden ewer from the pool of Siloam, which he brought into the Court through the water-gate. In the evening, both men and women assembled in the Court of the women, expressly to hold a rejoicing for the drawing of the water of Siloam. At the same time there were set up in the Court two lofty stands, each supporting four great lamps. The huts and the lulabs must have made a gay end striking spectacle over the city by day, and the lamps, the flambeaux, the music and the joyous gatherings in the Court of the temple must have given a still more festive character to the night
Jurisdiction, Ecclesiastical - When this jurisdIction is exercised over the relations of man to God, as in teh Sacrament of Penance, or in the dispensing from vows, it is spoken of as jurisdiction of the forum (court) of Heaven, or of the internal forum
Diocesan Court - These form the diocesan Court. It consists of: ...
a vicar-general with general vicarious power in spiritual and temporal matters, who is one tribunal with his bishop and can be removed from office at will;
an official, who corresponds to a chief justice in the civilcourts, having ordinary power;
a chancellor, to keep the records a promoter of justice, like a district attorney;
a defender of the bond of Marriage and Sacred Orders, whose duty it is to defend the existence of a true marriage or valid Orders when either is attacked;
synodal judges, who may be called associate justices and who are generally named in the diocesan synod;
examiners, who preside at examinations of the clergy and intervene in certain cases of removal of parish priests;
parish priest consultors, who also are called in sometimes in the removal of irremovable pastors or in the transfer of ordinary pastors; auditors, who assist the judges in ecclesiastical trials by citing witnesses, etc
Leo x, Pope - As pope he was the patron of the literati, artists and worldlings, who made the papal Court a center of amusement
Nehemias - The hero of 2Esdras, and cupbearer at the Persian Court of Susa, who obtained the commission to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem in the 20th year of the reign of Artaxerxes I (445 B
Nehemiah - The hero of 2Esdras, and cupbearer at the Persian Court of Susa, who obtained the commission to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem in the 20th year of the reign of Artaxerxes I (445 B
Campeggio, Lorenzo - In 1528 he was sent to England to form jointly with Wolsey a Court to try the divorce suit of Henry VIII
Laver - It stood in the Court between the altar and the door of the tabernacle (30:19,21)
Bithiah - This princess evidently, like Ruth, renounced home, country, and a royal Court to take an Israelite husband and to have Israel's God for her God
Sequester - ) To separate from the owner for a time; to take from parties in controversy and put into the possession of an indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as property belonging to another, and hold it till the profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or till the owner has performed the decree of Court, or clears himself of contempt; in international law, to confiscate
Lorenzo Campeggio - In 1528 he was sent to England to form jointly with Wolsey a Court to try the divorce suit of Henry VIII
Treasure, Treasury - In Jesus' day the term also applied to thirteen trumpet-shaped offering receptacles in the Temple Court of the women where Jesus watched people make their offerings (Mark 12:41 )
Sin: Insidious Nature of - In the gardens of Hampton Court you will see many trees entirely vanquished and well nigh strangled by huge coils of ivy, which are wound about them like the snakes around the unhappy Laocoon: there is no untwisting the folds, they are too giant-like, and fast fixed, and every hour the rootlets of the climber are sucking the life out of the unhappy tree
Imitation: of Good Men Its Limit - In Richard the Third's Court humps upon the back were the height of fashion
Baana - One of Solomon's district supervisors to provide food one month a year for the Court
Latin - In such provinces as Judæa the Latin language alone had place in official acts and Roman Courts. Where Greek was allowed in Court pleadings, it was, so to speak, an act of grace on the judge’s part, and there can be little doubt that, e
Judgment Hall - The word "palace," or "Caesar's Court," in the A
Ashkelon, Askelon - In modern times the city was held by the Crusaders, and within its walls Richard of England held his Court: the walls which this king aided with his own hands to repair may, it is thought, still be traced, and masses of masonry and broken columns of granite still lie about
Sanhedrin or Sanhedrim - It was the highest Court of the Jews, acting 'in all causes, and over all persons, ecclesiastical and civil
Error - ) A mistake in the proceedings of a Court of record in matters of law or of fact
Areopagus - From the earliest times known to us this hill was associated with murder trials, and a Court known as the ‘Council from the Areopagus’ met on or near it to try such cases
Curtain - This word may be from the root of Court, and from the sense of separating
Defend - DEFEND, To make opposition as, the party comes into Court, defends and says
Romance - ) A species of fictitious writing, originally composed in meter in the Romance dialects, and afterward in prose, such as the tales of the Court of Arthur, and of Amadis of Gaul; hence, any fictitious and wonderful tale; a sort of novel, especially one which treats of surprising adventures usually befalling a hero or a heroine; a tale of extravagant adventures, of love, and the like. ) An adventure, or series of extraordinary events, resembling those narrated in romances; as, his Courtship, or his life, was a romance
Recall - ) Short for recall of judicial decisions, the right or procedure by which the decision of a Court may be directly reversed or annulled by popular vote, as was advocated, in 1912, in the platform of the Progressive party for certain cases involving the police power of the state
Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction - When this jurisdIction is exercised over the relations of man to God, as in teh Sacrament of Penance, or in the dispensing from vows, it is spoken of as jurisdiction of the forum (court) of Heaven, or of the internal forum
Ewing, Thomas - Stricken while arguing a case (1869) he was baptised in the Court room, and received into the Catholic Church in the following year
Jambres - Some have supposed, that they were the magicians who for a while confronted Moses, when, at the command and in the name of the Lord, he wrought miracles before Pharaoh and his Court
Haman - King Ahasuerus, having taken him into favour, promoted him above all the princes of his Court, who bent the knee to him (probably prostrated themselves wholly before him, as to a deity) when he entered the palace: this Mordecai the Jew declined, for which slight, Haman plotted the extirpation of the whole Jewish nation; which was providentially prevented
Degrees - The Jews believe that they were sung by the Levites on the fifteen steps which separated the men's Court from the women's in the temple
Thomas Ewing - Stricken while arguing a case (1869) he was baptised in the Court room, and received into the Catholic Church in the following year
Try - To examine judicially by witnesses and the principles of law as causes tried in Court
Heliopolis - The most notable remains are those of three temples, the largest of which, with its Court and portico, extended 1,000 feet from east to west. A magnificent portico, 180 feet long, with twelve lofty and highly wrought columns, led to a large hexagonal Court, and this to a vast quadrangle, 440 feet by 370
Strife - The noun rı̂yb is used of conflicts outside the realm of law cases and Courts. This “dispute” is set in the context of a mutual law structure binding both parties and a Court which is empowered to decide and execute justice. 25:1, where the two disputants go to Court (having a “case or dispute” does not mean one is a wrongdoer): “If there be a controversy between men, and they come unto judgment, that the judges may judge them; then they shall justify the righteous, and condemn the wicked. ”...
Rı̂yb may represent what goes on in an actual Court situation
Severianus, Bishop of Gabala - Severian, in Chrysostom's absence undermined his influence with the Court, and fostered the dislike of the worldly and luxurious clergy of Constantinople, whom Chrysostom's severity had greatly alienated. Severian joined in a plot, under the inspiration of the empress and the powerful female influence of the Court, for Chrysostom's humiliation, which ultimately proved only too successful (Pallad. We find them at Constantinople seconding new designs for the destruction of Chrysostom set on foot by Eudoxia and the Court party, and securing his final condemnation (Pallad
Isabella i - She led the way in fostering the love of study and in many respects her Court recalls that of Charlemagne
Isabella the Catholic - She led the way in fostering the love of study and in many respects her Court recalls that of Charlemagne
Dioceses, Cardinalitial - Their bishops comprise the order of cardinal-bishops which is largely occupied in the business of the papal Court; some have had auxiliary bishops for centuries, and by his constitution, "Apostolicae Romanorum" (1910), Pius X ordained that there should be suffragan bishops for all the cardinalitial dioceses
Dioceses, Suburbicarian - Their bishops comprise the order of cardinal-bishops which is largely occupied in the business of the papal Court; some have had auxiliary bishops for centuries, and by his constitution, "Apostolicae Romanorum" (1910), Pius X ordained that there should be suffragan bishops for all the cardinalitial dioceses
Ashkelon - It was beseiged and taken by Richard the Lion-hearted, and "within its walls and towers now standing he held his Court
Nob - After being supplied with the sacred loaves of showbread, and girding on the sword of Goliath, which was brought forth from behind the ephod, David fled from Nob and sought refuge at the Court of Achish, the king of Gath, where he was cast into prison
Catholic, Isabella the - She led the way in fostering the love of study and in many respects her Court recalls that of Charlemagne
Cardinalitial Dioceses - Their bishops comprise the order of cardinal-bishops which is largely occupied in the business of the papal Court; some have had auxiliary bishops for centuries, and by his constitution, "Apostolicae Romanorum" (1910), Pius X ordained that there should be suffragan bishops for all the cardinalitial dioceses
Barzillai - ...
Instead of grasping at honors and favors at Court, he remembers his age, fourscore, "How long have I to live, that I should go P" and prefers to die among his own people, independent though in less grandeur
Eunuch - By extension, the Hebrew word translated eunuch could be used of any Court official (At Genesis 37:36 and Genesis 39:1 the reference is to a married man)
Insult - Jesus warned that one insulting a brother was in danger of standing before the Sanhedrin, the Jewish supreme Court (Matthew 5:22 )
Jaazaniah - Stood as leader in the midst of the 70 ancients (elders) of Israel with censers in their hands, worshipping idols portrayed upon the wall of the Court of Jehovah's house; seen by Ezekiel (Ezekiel 8:11)
Dial - ...
The dial was of such a size and so placed that Hezekiah, when convalescent, could witness the miracle from his chamber; probably "in the middle Court," the point where Isaiah turned back to announce to Hezekiah God's answer to his prayer (2 Kings 20:4; 2 Kings 20:9; Isaiah 38:21-22)
Sabaoth - ” Part of a divine title, “Lord of Hosts” variously interpreted as Lord of Israel's armies (compare 1 Samuel 17:45 ); the deposed Canaanite nature gods whose title Yahweh assumed; the stars; members of Yahweh's heavenly Court or council; a comprehensive title for all beings, heavenly and earthly; an intensive title describing God as all powerful
Knee, Kneel - In the Court of an Eastern judge the writer has often seen men prostrate themselves, and then make their plea, resting upon their knees
Galilaean - —Twice Jesus is mentioned as a Galilaean: once by a maid-servant (Matthew 26:69); once when Pilate was anxious to transfer the trial of Jesus from his own to Herod’s Court (Luke 23:6)
Seguestration - ) A prerogative process empowering certain commissioners to take and hold a defendant's property and receive the rents and profits thereof, until he clears himself of a contempt or performs a decree of the Court
Asaph - Father of Court official under King Hezekiah (715-686 B
Anna - At the Presentation of the Infant Messiah ( Luke 2:22-24 ) she entered the sacred Court, and, hearing Simeon’s benediction and prophecy, took up the refrain of praise and talked about the Holy Child to her godly intimates, quickening their hope and preparing a welcome for the Saviour when He should by and by be manifested unto Israel
Fault - ) Failure to serve the ball into the proper Court
Concord - In law, an agreement between the parties in a fine, made by leave of the Court
Continuance - In the United States, the deferring of a trial or suit from one stated term of the Court to another
Dance - To dance attendance, to wait with obsequiousness to strive to please and gain favor by assiduous attentions and officious civilities as, to dance attendance at Court
Depend - We use the participle as, the suit is still depending in Court
Evidence - The declarations of a witness furnish evidence of facts to a Court and jury and reasoning, or the deductions of the mind from facts or arguments, furnish evidence of truth or falsehood
Familiar - In the Court of Inquisition, a person who assists in apprehending and imprisoning the accused
Tax - ) To assess, fix, or determine judicially, the amount of; as, to tax the cost of an action in Court
Produce - ) To bring forward; to lead forth; to offer to view or notice; to exhibit; to show; as, to produce a witness or evidence in Court
Hoshea - The alliance did him no good; it was revealed to the Court of Nineveh by the Assyrian party in Ephraim, and Hoshea was immediately seized as a rebellious vassal, shut up in prison, and apparently treated with the utmost Indignity
Tithes - The nine parts were tithed again, and of this second tithe a feast was made in the Court of the sanctuary, or in some apartment connected with it
Liberty - ) A privilege conferred by a superior power; permission granted; leave; as, liberty given to a child to play, or to a witness to leave a Court, and the like
Zacharias - A person mentioned in Matthew 23:35 Luke 11:51 , and most probably designating the son of the high-priest Jehoida, or Barachias, who was stoned to death by order of king Joash for publicly rebuking the king, his Court and the people for their growing corruption, 2 Chronicles 24:20-22
Jurisdiction - Thus we speak of certain suits or actions, or the cognizance of certain crimes being within the jurisdiction of a Court, that is, within the limits of their authority or commission. Inferior Courts have jurisdiction of debt and trespass, or of smaller offenses the supreme Courts have jurisdiction of treason, murder, and other high crimes
Zerubbabel or Zorobabel - They procured from the Persian Court an order that the work should cease; and it was not resumed until the second year of Darius son of Hystapes, 521 BC
Settle - The supreme Court have settled the question
Suburbicarian Dioceses - Their bishops comprise the order of cardinal-bishops which is largely occupied in the business of the papal Court; some have had auxiliary bishops for centuries, and by his constitution, "Apostolicae Romanorum" (1910), Pius X ordained that there should be suffragan bishops for all the cardinalitial dioceses
Trial - Trial in causes, may be by record or inspection it may be by witnesses and jury, or by the Court
Hoshe'a - The alliance did him no good; it was revealed, to the Court of Nineveh by the Assyrian party in Ephraim, and Hoshea was immediately seized as a rebellious vasal, shut up in prison, and apparently treated with the utmost indignity
Haz'a-el - He appears to have been previously a person in a high position at the Court of Ben-hadad, and was sent by his master to Elisha to inquire if he would recover from the malady under which he was suffering
Julianus, Missionary Priest to the Nubians - Julian reached the Nubian Court first, won over the king and secured the rejection of the emperor's envoy when he arrived
Constantius i, Flavius Valerius, Emperor - As the health of Constantius began to fail, he sent for his son Constantine, who was already exceedingly popular, and who was jealously kept by Galerius at his own Court. He had Christians at his Court
Temple - The whole area enclosed by the outer walls formed a square of about 600 feet; but the sanctuary itself was comparatively small, inasmuch as it was intended only for the ministrations of the priests, the congregation of the people assembling in the Courts. The outer Court was no doubt double the size of that of the tabernacle; and we may therefore safely assume that if was 10 cubits in height, 100 cubits north and south, and 200 east and west. If contained an inner Court, called the "court of the priests;" but the arrangement of the Courts and of the porticos and gateways of the enclosure, though described by Josephus, belongs apparently to the temple of Herod. The outer Court there was a new altar of burnt offering, much larger than the old one. 9 --eight years from the commencement --the Court and cloisters of the temple were finished, and the bridge between the south cloister and the upper city (demolished by Pompey) was doubtless now rebuilt with that massive masonry of which some remains still survive. At the time when Herod rebuilt it, he enclosed a space "twice as large" as that before occupied by the temple and its Courts --an expression that probably must not be taken too literally at least, if we are to depend on the measurements of Hecataeus. From this a double funnel nearly 200 feet in length, leads to a flight of steps which rise to the surface in the Court of the temple, exactly at that gateway of the inner temple which led to the altar, and is one of the four gateways on this side by which any one arriving from Ophel would naturally wish to enter the inner enclosure. The most magnificent part of the temple, in an architectural point of view, seems certainly to have been the cloisters which were added to the outer Court when it was enlarged by Herod. " The Court of the temple was very nearly a square. To the eastward of this was the Court of the women. The great ornament of these inner Courts seems to have been their gateways, the three especially on the north end south leading to the temple Court. But the wonder of all was the great eastern gate leading from the Court of the women to the upper Court
Temple - ...
Before we proceed to describe this venerable edifice, it may be proper to remark, that by the temple is to be understood not only the fabric or house itself, which by way of eminence is called the temple, namely, the holy of holies, the sanctuary, and the several Courts both of the priests and Israelites, but also all the numerous chambers and rooms which this prodigious edifice comprehended; and each of which had its respective degree of holiness, increasing in proportion to its contiguity to the holy of holies. The temple itself, strictly so called, which comprised the portico, the sanctuary, and the holy of holies formed only a small part of the sacred edifice on Mount Moriah, being surrounded by spacious Courts, making a square of half a mile in circumference. The first or outer Court, which encompassed the holy house and the other Courts, was named the Court of the Gentiles; because the latter were allowed to enter into it, but were prohibited from advancing farther. This outer Court being assigned to the Gentile proselytes, the Jews, who did not worship in it themselves, conceived that it might lawfully be put to profane uses: for here we find that the buyers and sellers of animals for sacrifices, and also the money-changers, had stationed themselves; until Jesus Christ, awing them into submission by the grandeur and dignity of his person and behaviour, expelled them; telling them that it was the house of prayer for all nations, and was not to be profaned, Matthew 21:12-13 ; Mark 11:15-17 . Within the Court of the Gentiles stood the Court of the Israelites, divided into two parts, or Courts; the outer one being appropriated to the women, and the inner one to the men. The Court of the women was separated from that of the Gentiles by a low stone wall, or partition, of elegant construction, on which stood pillars at equal distances, with inscriptions in Greek and Latin, importing that no alien should enter into the holy place. In this Court was the treasury, over against which Christ sat, and beheld how the people threw their voluntary offerings into it, for furnishing the victims and other things necessary for the sacrifices, Mark 12:41 ; John 8:20 . From the Court of the women, which was on higher ground than that of the Gentiles, there was an ascent of fifteen steps into the inner or men's Court: and so called because it was appropriated to the worship of the male Israelites. In these two Courts, collectively termed the Court of the Israelites, were the people praying, each apart by himself, for the pardon of his sins, while Zacharias was offering incense within the sanctuary, Luke 1:10 . Within the Court of the Israelites was that of the priests, which was separated from it by a low wall, one cubit in height. From this Court twelve steps ascended to the temple, strictly so called; which was divided into three parts, the portico, the outer sanctuary, and the holy place. Our Saviour, in the course of his public instructions, having said, "Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up again,"...
John 2:19 , it was construed into a contemptuous disrespect, designedly thrown out against the temple; his words instantly descended into the heart of the Jews, and kept rankling there for some years; for, upon his trial, this declaration, which it was impossible for a Jew ever to forget or to forgive, was immediately alleged against him, as big with the most atrocious guilt and impiety; they told the Court they had heard him publicly assert, "I am able to destroy this temple," Matthew 26:61
House - ...
(2) The Court is the chief feature of every eastern house. The passage into it is so contrived that the Court cannot be seen from the street outside. " At the side of the Court opposite the entrance was the:...
(3) guest chamber (Luke 22:11-12), Hebrew lishkah , from laashak , "to recline"; where Samuel received his guests (1 Samuel 9:22). In the Court the palm and olive were planted, from whence the psalmist writes, "I am like a green olive tree in the house of God"; an olive tree in a house would be a strange image to us, but suggestive to an eastern of a home with refreshing shade and air. So Psalms 92:13, "those that be planted in the house of the Lord shall flourish in the Courts of our God. a Court for owls" (Isaiah 34:13). Eutychus from "the third loft" fell down into the Court. Little chambers surround the Courtyard, piled upon one another, the half roof of the lower forming a walking terrace of the higher, to which the ascent is by a ladder or flight of steps. A fire was sometimes burned in the open Court (Luke 22:55-56; Luke 22:61); Peter warmed himself at such a fire, when Jesus on His trial in the large hall, open in front to the Court, with arches and a pillar to support the wall above, "turned and looked" on him
End Justifies the Means - The Supreme Court of Cologne, March 30, 1905, decided that in no one of the citations was the maxim employed in the sense attributed to the Jesuits ("The Messenger
Francis Borgia, Saint - Francis was educated at Saragossa, served as page to the Infanta Catarina, in 1528 was sent to the Court of Emperor Charles V, and in 1529 married Eleanor de Castro
Cecil, William, Baron Burghley - From custos brevium on the Court of common pleas, Historic Caughnawaga and secretary for the Lord Protector Somerset, William Cecil rose to the position of chief secretary of state under Queen Elizabeth, in which position he practically dictated England's policy for 40 years
Catholic Indian Missions, Bureau of - President Roosevelt, recognizing the value of the Bureau, gave it marked consideration, and by his order contracts producing a yearly income of $100,000 for the benefit of the contract schools, payable out of Indian tribal funds, were granted, 1904, and confirmed by the United States Supreme Court, 1908
Jean Racine - Early an orphan, he was sent by relatives to the College of Beauvais, to Port Royal, and to the College of Harcourt. In 1663 he wrote two odes which made him known at Court, and in 1664 his first play, La Thebaide, was performed
Tiglath-Pileser Iii. - In the Assyrian annals it is further related that, before he returned from Syria, he held a Court at Damascus, and received submission and tribute from the neighbouring kings, among whom were Pekah of Samaria and "Yahu-khazi Street - Their character is mainly fixed by the climate and the style of architecture, the narrowness being due to the extreme heat, and the gloominess to the circumstance of the windows looking for the most part into the inner Court
Cock - The second cockcrowing (Mark 14:72), which marked Peter's third denial of Jesus, was probably at the beginning of the fourth watch between 3 and 4 in the morning, not long before the first day dawn, just when our Lord was being led bound to Caiaphas across the Court where Peter was standing
Street (2) - Seclusion is a main object aimed at in building Eastern houses: the wall to the street is seldom pierced by windows; the door usually leads through a passage into a Court, round which the rooms are arranged
Hur - The father of one of the twelve officers who supplied Solomon and his Court with food ( 1 Kings 4:8 RV Jahaziel - Under the Spirit, who came upon him, he encouraged Jehoshaphat and the congregation of Judah in the house of the Lord, before the new Court: "thus saith the Lord unto you, Be not
Salvation: in Christ - A man had been condemned in a Spanish Court to be shot, but being an American citizen and also of English birth, the consuls of the two countries interposed, and declared that the Spanish authorities had no power to put him to death
Zadok - Zadok and Abiathar were the two Levitical priests who became members of David’s royal Court (2 Samuel 8:17)
Application - ) The act of making request of soliciting; as, an application for an office; he made application to a Court of chancery
Authority - Precedents, decisions of a Court, official declarations, respectable opinions and says, also the books that contain them, are call authorities, as they influence the opinions of others and in law, the decisions of supreme Courts have a binding force upon inferior Courts, and are called authorities
Gregory i, Pope Saint - He was appointed cardinal-deacon, and then sent to the Byzantine Court to secure aid against the Lombards
Gregory the Great, Pope Saint - He was appointed cardinal-deacon, and then sent to the Byzantine Court to secure aid against the Lombards
Docket - ) An abridged entry of a judgment or proceeding in an action, or register or such entries; a book of original, kept by clerks of Courts, containing a formal list of the names of parties, and minutes of the proceedings, in each case in Court. ) A list or calendar of causes ready for hearing or trial, prepared for the use of Courts by the clerks
Dock - ) The place in Court where a criminal or accused person stands
Refer - ; to make over, or pass over, to another; as, to refer a student to an author; to refer a beggar to an officer; to refer a bill to a committee; a Court refers a matter of fact to a commissioner for investigation, or refers a question of law to a superior tribunal
Inn - "lodging-place," at which Joseph's brethren stopped, and where Moses was met by the Lord, Genesis 42:27; Exodus 4:24—or else a khan or caravanserai, which was, and is, a large square building enclosing an open Court, in whose centre is a fountain; the building contains a number of rooms
Tiglathpileser, Tilgathpilneser - The monuments also state that he held a Court at Damascus where the kings met him, to own their submission, and pay their tribute
Ambassador - Representative of one royal Court to another
Appeal - The Jewish writers say that before and after the time of Christ on earth, appeals could be carried through the various Courts to the Grand Sanhedrim at Jerusalem. ...
In the case of Paul appealing to Caesar, it was not an appeal from a judgement already given, as is the case in what is now called an appeal; but Paul, knowing the deadly enmity of the Jews, and the corruption of the governors, elected to be judged at the Court of Caesar, which, as a Roman, he had the right to do
Agrippa ii - He had been brought up at the Court of Rome, and was attached to the Romans
Ahimaaz - But being discovered by a young lad who gave information concerning them to Absalom, that prince sent orders to pursue them: Ahimaaz and Jonathan, fearing to be taken, retired to a man's house at Baharim, in whose Court-yard there was a well, wherein they concealed themselves
Leek - הציר , in Numbers 11:5 , translated "leek;" in 1 Kings 18:5 ; 2 Kings 19:26 ; Job 40:15 ; Psalms 37:2 ; Psalms 90:5 ; Psalms 103:15 ; Psalms 104:14 ; Psalms 129:6 ; Psalms 147:8 ; Isaiah 35:7 ; Isaiah 37:27 ; Isaiah 40:6 , it is rendered "grass;" in Job 8:12 , "herb;" in Proverbs 27:25 ; Isaiah 15:6 , "hay;" and in Isaiah 34:13 , "a Court
William Cecil, Baron Burghley - From custos brevium on the Court of common pleas, Historic Caughnawaga and secretary for the Lord Protector Somerset, William Cecil rose to the position of chief secretary of state under Queen Elizabeth, in which position he practically dictated England's policy for 40 years
Pretorium - It was a magnificent building, and inclosed a spacious Court, Matthew 27:27 Mark 15:16 John 18:28,33
Racine, Jean - Early an orphan, he was sent by relatives to the College of Beauvais, to Port Royal, and to the College of Harcourt. In 1663 he wrote two odes which made him known at Court, and in 1664 his first play, La Thebaide, was performed
Tire - A dull advocate may tire the Court and jury, and injure his cause
ma'Achah - " (2 Chronicles 13:2 ) During the reign of her grandson Asa she occupied at the Court of Judah the high position of "king's mother," comp
Minister - In the Old Testament it is applied (1) to an attendance upon a person of high rank, (Exodus 24:13 ; Joshua 1:1 ; 2 Kings 4:43 ) (2) to the attaches of a royal Court, ( 1 Kings 10:5 ; 2 Chronicles 22:8 ) comp
Ordinance - To neglect one or the other was to Court disaster. To observe them carefully was to Court God's blessings on the individual and the community (Deuteronomy 28 )
Nero - Here he continued two years, preaching the Gospel with freedom, till he became famous even in the emperor's Court, in which were many Christians; for he salutes the Philippians in the name of the brethren who were of the household of Caesar, that is, of Nero's Court, Php_1:12-13 ; Php_4:22
Regard - Court of regard, or survey of dogs, a forest Court in England, held every third year for the lawing or expeditation of mastifs, that is, for cutting off the claws and ball of the fore feet, to prevent them from running after deer
Jehoshaphat - He set up Courts and appointed judges in all the chief cities of Judah, with the chief Court in Jerusalem. Some Courts dealt specifically with religious matters, and these were under the control of the high priest. Jehoshaphat, however, did not trust Ahab’s Court prophets, who seemed more concerned with pleasing Ahab than with telling him God’s will
Gate - The gate of judgment is a term still common to the Arabians to express a Court of justice, and even introduced by the Saracens into Spain. " And thus, long before him, Sandys, at Gaza, in Palestine: "We lodged under an arch in a little Court, together with our asses; the door exceeding low, as are all that belong unto Christians, to withstand the sudden entrance of the insolent Turks. " "To exalt the gate," would consequently be to Court destruction
Treasury - 5), there stood in the Court of the women, the most frequented part of the sacred enclosure, 13 brazen chests, into which were dropped the contributions made for the service of the Temple, the support of the poor, and other pious purposes. Now, we know that there were special treasure-chambers within the inner Court, in which not only the precious vessels of the sacrificial service and the costly garments of the priests, but vast sums of money and various other valuables were kept, and that these treasure-chambers, which were under the charge of officers known as γαζοφύλακες, were called γαζοφυλάκια (Nehemiah 10:37 LXX Septuagint ; Josephus BJ vi. 481), and then understand γαζοφυλάκιον to denote that part of the Women’s Court in which the treasure-chests were kept
Bar - The railing that incloses the place which counsel occupy in Courts of justice. Hence the phrase, at the bar of the Court, signifies in open Court. Hence also licensed lawyers are called barristers and hence the whole body of lawyers licensed in a Court, are customarily called the bar. A trial at bar, in England, is a trial in the Courts of Westminster, opposed to a trial at Nisi Prius, in the circuits
Sanhedrin - form of συνέδριον, ‘council,’ specifically ‘court of justice’ [3]) is the name of the high Court of justice and supreme council, specifically at Jerusalem (Sanh. 4) in contradistinction to ‘the Little Sanhedrin of Twenty-three,’ the Bçth, Dîn shel shib‛îm we eḥâd, ‘the Court of justice of seventy-one’ (Sanh. 4) and most frequently Bçth Dîn hag-gadôl shebyerûshâlaim, ‘the high Court of justice of Jerusalem’ (Sôṭâ, i. 4), also Bçth Dîn hag-gadôl shebhlishkath haggâzîth, ‘the great Court of justice which has its sessions in the hall of hewn stones’ (Sifrç Dt. The story in 2 Chronicles 19:1-2 of a high Court of justice established by king Jehoshaphat, after Deuteronomy 17:8 f. The name Synhedrion (Aramaized Sanhedrin), which denotes chiefly a Court of justice, came into popular use under Ptolemaic rule; and, as its Hebrew equivalent, the name Ḥeber hâ-Yehûdîm appears on Hasmonaean coins, which read: ‘Joḥannan the high priest, the head, and the Council (representative) of the Jews’ (Madden, op. Two such masters known under the name of zûggôth (= duumviri), one with the title of Nâsî (prince), the other with that of Ab Bçth Dîn (‘father of the Court of justice’), are recorded to have presided over the Sanhedrin from about the middle of the 2nd to the middle of the 1st cent. Now there is a trace of seven judges instead of the Talmudic three in each city Court (Sanh. For the high Court at Jerusalem, however, a duumvirate, consisting of the high priest and the prophet, is ordained, and neither Kuenen (Gesamm. 16b) and in Jerusalem, one at the entrance to the Temple hill, the other at the entrance to the Temple Court or the Rampart (Sanh. 2), and the other before the Temple Court, probably the one concerned with the Temple practice and the priestly legitimacy (Ant. 6), and the main body of the high Court, also consisting of twenty-three (Tôs. 1), that is, 3 × 23 = 69, besides the patriarch of the Court and the president or Nâsî. 1) that the Sanhedrin selected for each city Court, the one found to be wise, humble, sin-fearing, of blameless character, and popular as judge, and then had him promoted to membership, first of the two Little Sanhedrins in Jerusalem, and finally to the Great Sanhedrin in the hall of hewn stones. ’...
There is, however, no cause for questioning the correctness of the tradition that the meeting-place of the Great Sanhedrin was in the hall of hewn stones, the lishkath hag-gâzîth on the south side of the great Court in which the priests held their daily morning service and where other priestly functions were performed (Midd. In all matters of great importance, or in cases when the lower Courts could come to no decision, the Great Sanhedrin, composed of three departments (3 × 23 = 69), together with the president and the patriarch (Nâsî and Ab Bçth Dîn), and forming the supreme tribunal ‘from which the law went forth to all Israel’ (Sanh
Temple - ]'>[2] 9 , are the most influential, have maintained that the Temple and its Courts occupied an area about 600 ft. The Court of the Temple and its furniture ( a ) The Court and gates . The Temple of Solomon formed part of a large complex of buildings, comprising an arsenal, a judgment-hall, the palace with its harem, and finally the royal chapel, the whole surrounded by ‘the great Court’ of 1 Kings 7:9 ; 1 Kings 7:12 . Within this enclosure, at its upper or northern end, was ‘the inner Court’ of 1 Kings 6:36 , 1 Kings 7:12 within which, again, stood the Temple ( 1 Kings 8:34 ). It is of importance to note that this single Court of the Temple was open to the laity as well as to the priests ( 1 Kings 8:62 ), as is specially evident from Jeremiah 35:1 ff; 1 Kings 7:1-517 etc. The great Court. The ‘other’ or middle Court. The inner (or Temple) Court. ...
Several gates of this Court are mentioned by later writers, but their precise position is uncertain. The ‘gate of the guard’ ( 2 Kings 11:19 ), on the other hand, may be looked for in the south wall separating the Temple Court from ‘the other Court’ ( 1 Kings 7:8 ) in which the royal palace was situated (cf. In the Court, to the south of the line between the altar and the Temple ( 1 Kings 7:39 ), stood one of the most striking of the creations of Solomon’s Phœnician artist, Huram-abi of Tyre
Tabernacle - ...
The tabernacle thus described stood in an open space or Court of an oblong form, one hundred cubits in length, and fifty in breadth, situated due east and west, Exodus 27:18 . This Court was surrounded with pillars of brass, filleted with silver, and placed at the distance of five cubits from each other, twenty on each side and ten on each end. These curtains, which formed an enclosure round the Court, were of fine twined white linen yarn, Exodus 27:9 38:9,16 , except that at the entrance on the east end, which was of blue and purple and scarlet and fine white twined linen, with cords to draw it either up or aside when the priests entered the Court, Exodus 27:16 38:18 . This altar was placed in a line between the door of the Court and the door of the tabernacle, but nearer the former, Exodus 40:6,29 ; the laver stood the altar of burnt-offering and the door of the tabernacle, Exodus 38:8 . In this Court all the Israelites presented their offerings, vows, and prayers. ...
But although the tabernacle was surrounded by the Court, there is no reason to think that it stood in the center of it. This festival derives its name from the booths in which the people dwelt during its continuance, which were constructed of the branches and leaves of trees, on the roofs of their houses, in the Courts, and also in the streets
da'Vid - His life may be divided into three portions:
His youth before his introduction to the Court of Saul; ...
His relations with Saul; ...
His reign. (Psalm 18:33,34 ) After the anointing David resumes his accustomed duties, and the next we know of him he is summoned to the Court to chase away the king's madness by music, (1 Samuel 16:14-19 ) and in the successful effort of David's harp we have the first glimpse into that genius for music and poetry which was afterwards consecrated in the Psalms. Saul inquired his parentage, and took him finally to his Court. His position in Saul's Court seems to have been first armor-bearer, ( 1 Samuel 16:21 ; 18:2 ) then captain over a thousand, (1 Samuel 18:13 ) and finally, on his marriage with Michal, the king's second daughter, he was raised to the high office of captain of the king's body-guard, second only, if not equal, to Abner, the captain of the host, and Jonathan, the heir apparent. He had two faithful allies, however, in the Court --the son of Saul, his friend Jonathan, and the daughter of Saul, his wife Michal. He at first found a home at the Court of Achish, among the Philistines; but his stay was short. He became a king on the scale of the great Oriental sovereigns of Egypt and Persia, with a regular administration and organization of Court and camp; and he also founded an imperial dominion which for the first time realize the prophetic description of the bounds of the chosen people
Determine - ) To bring to a conclusion, as a question or controversy; to settle authoritative or judicial sentence; to decide; as, the Court has determined the cause
Eunuch - ...
So in the Persian Court there were eunuchs as "keepers of the women," through whom the king gave commands to the women, and kept men at a distance (Esther 1:10; Esther 1:12; Esther 1:15-16; Esther 2:3; Esther 2:8; Esther 2:14)
Attach - ) To take by legal authority: (a) To arrest by writ, and bring before a Court, as to answer for a debt, or a contempt; - applied to a taking of the person by a civil process; being now rarely used for the arrest of a criminal
Panel - ) A prisoner arraigned for trial at the bar of a criminal Court
Demand - ) To call into Court; to summon
Find - ) To determine an issue of fact, and to declare such a determination to a Court; as, the jury find for the plaintiff
Appear - To stand in presence of, as parties or advocates before a Court, or as persons to be tried
Asaph - The father of Joah, the ‘recorder’ or chronicler at the Court of Hezekiah ( 2 Kings 18:18 ; 2 Kings 18:37 etc
Vest - ) To clothe with authority, power, or the like; to put in possession; to invest; to furnish; to endow; - followed by with before the thing conferred; as, to vest a Court with power to try cases of life and death. ) To place or give into the possession or discretion of some person or authority; to commit to another; - with in before the possessor; as, the power of life and death is vested in the king, or in the Courts
Eusebius (126), Eunuch Under Constantius ii - Ammianus describes him as the prime mover of all the Court intrigues of his day, and sarcastically calls the emperor one of his favourites ( ib
Esther (2) - " The circumstantial minuteness of detail, the vividness of the portraits, the Persian words, and the whole tone of the book indicate that the author was a Jew who lived about the time of the events recorded, at the Court of Persia, where he had access to the official documents of the kingdom
Money-Changers - In our Lord's time they had established themselves in the Court of the temple; a profanation which had probably grown up with the influence of Roman manners, which allowed the argentarii [1] to establish their usurious mensas, tables, by the statues of the gods, even at the feet of Janus, in the most holy places, in porticibus Basilicarum, or in the temples, pone aedem Castoris
Obtain - We acquire or obtain a good title to lands by deed, or by a judgment of Court but we do not acquire spirit by distillation nor do we acquire an answer to a letter or an application
Gilgal - Here the tabernacle rested, until its removal to Shiloh; here also, according to the prevalent opinion, Samuel offered sacrifices, and held his Court as a judge of Israel; and here Saul was crowned, 1 Samuel 7:16 10:8 11:15 1 Samuel 13:7-9 15:33
Remove - To carry from one Court to another as, to remove a cause or suit by appeal
Justice - A person commissioned to hold Courts, or to try and decide controversies and administer justice to individuals as the Chief Justice of the king's bench, or of the common pleas, in England the Chief Justice of the supreme Court in the United States, &c
Rubens, Peter Paul - On his return to Antwerp he was made Court-painter by the Archduke Ferdinand
Testify - In judicial proceedings, to make a solemn declaration under oath, for the purpose of establishing or making proof of some act to a Court to give testimony in a cause depending before a tribunal
Town - In England,the Court end of London
Witness - One who gives testimony as, the witnesses in Court agreed in all essential facts
Jez'Ebel - ( 1 Kings 21:25 ) The first effect of her influence was the immediate establishment of the Phoenician worship on a grand scale in the Court of Ahab
om'ri - Thereupon he broke up the siege of Gibbethon and attacked Tirzah, where Zimri was holding his Court as king of Israel
Nomus, Leading Personage at Constantinople - Through them Dioscorus of Alexandria and the Eutychian doctrines he supported were brought into favour at Court
Report - ) An official statement of facts, verbal or written; especially, a statement in writing of proceedings and facts exhibited by an officer to his superiors; as, the reports of the heads af departments to Congress, of a master in chancery to the Court, of committees to a legislative body, and the like. ) An account or statement of a judicial opinion or decision, or of case argued and determined in a Court of law, chancery, etc
Rule - ) To lay down and settle a rule or order of Court; to decide an incidental point; to enter a rule. ) To require or command by rule; to give as a direction or order of Court. ) An order regulating the practice of the Courts, or an order made between parties to an action or a suit
Excommunication - The offender was first cited to appear in Court; and if he refused to appear or to make amends, his sentence was pronounced. The sentence was delivered by a Court of ten, and was accompanied by a solemn malediction
Palace - Next in importance was the hall or "porch of judgment," a quadrangular building supported by columns, as we learn front Josephus, which apparently stood on the other side of the great Court, opposite the house of the forest of Lebanon. Behind this, we are told, was the inner Court, adorned with gardens and fountains, and surrounded by cloisters for shade; and there were other Courts for the residence of the attendants and guards, and for the women of the harem
Trial-at-Law - ’ This higher platform of justice is represented by the simple Courts that survive to the present day among the Arabs of the desert, and in the primitive village communities of Southern Russia. the heads of families) seated as a formal Court of justice. The procedure before these ‘courts’ was much the same as among other primitive nations. ...
Though the old district Courts survived till at least the age of Ezra, the establishment of the monarchy imposed limits on their authority. As supreme judge, the king not merely acted as a final Court of appeal, but exercised independent powers as well. As administrators of the oath, and keepers of the sacred lot (the Urim and Thummim), they had long enjoyed special authority in the Courts. Thence was evolved the Court of the Sanhedrin, the institution of which dates probably from the beginning of the Greek era. The name is sometimes used of the local Courts of seven that now finally superseded the original councils of elders. It was technically applied, however, to the Great Sanhedrin of Jerusalem, the 71 members of which decided all cases of appeal from the lower Courts, as well as the graver questions of law and conduct. Even in civil suits the principle is laid down that ‘the Court shall not listen to the claims of one party in the absence of the other’ (i. If the accused was found innocent, the case was dismissed before nightfall; otherwise, judgment was deferred till the following day, the Court meanwhile conferring together, ‘eating little meat, and drinking no wine during that whole day. Even after sentence of death was finally passed, the Court remained sitting, to receive any evidence that might yet be brought in the criminal’s favour; and he would be recalled, at a given signal, from the very place of execution (v. Procedure in Roman Courts. Clear distinctions were drawn between cases civil and criminal, separate Courts being assigned to each. On the day appointed, each appeared in Court with a staff (festuca), the symbol of ownership, by which he laid claim (vindicatio) to the person or property in question. According to ancient custom, the persona or res in dispute must be present in Court. If the res were immoveable, the Court adjourned to the place, and vindicatio was made there, though at a later date some turf or stone taken from the spot was accepted in lieu of the property. The formula being accepted by both parties and their respective witnesses (litis contestatio), it was forwarded to a index, to be tried on a day fixed by the Court. Appeal was allowed, either by a simple Appello in Court, or by application for a dimissory letter to the judge of appeal, the letter stating the fact of the appeal and the names of parties and judge. Final judgment was arrived at through the evidence submitted to the higher Court; and an unsuccessful appellant was made liable for four-fold his rival’s costs in appeal. Execution was forthwith carried out by officials of the Court, unless the accused had previously made good his escape and become an exile. ...
The multiplicity of criminal cases under the Republic suggested the institution of special Courts (quaestiones), which Maine has aptly compared with the Committees of the House of Commons (Ancient Law, p. The institution of these Courts was ‘in some sort a fusion of the processes of civil jurisdiction with those of the old criminal Courts’ (A. The Court was summoned to meet on a certain date, not earlier than ten days from the delatio. As under the older system of public hearings, the case was opened by plaintiff’s counsel and followed up by defendant’s, in set speeches (perpetuae orationes), calculated to appeal not merely to the reason, but even more strongly to the feelings of the Court. The effect of this appeal was heightened by the appearance of the accused (now a reus), who sat in Court often in mourning, and with the deepest marks of grief on his face. On both sides it was carefully sifted, and a written précis made in Court. A wise governor respected the customary laws of his province, allowing minor offences to be tried before the local Courts, and even in graver crimes directing the proceedings of the national councils with a view to securing full Roman justice, rather than suppressing their former prerogatives. Though the provincials had no direct appeal against the arbitrary acts of an unjust governor like Verres, they could successfully impeach him before the Roman Courts, and secure his condemnation and recall. The popular comitia, indeed, passed out of existence; but the quaestiones remained as the regular Courts for criminal procedure till almost the close of the 2nd cent. The praetors, too, maintained their position as presidents of the law-courts, their number being actually increased to sixteen. He had not merely the absolute power of repeal or reversal of the judgments of the regular Courts, but in cases involving grave matters of State, or the life and honour of persons in high rank, he held extraordinary jurisdiction, while the right of private complaint in criminal cases passed over to the infamous delator, who was too often a mere creature in the Emperor’s power. At Ephesus, again, the Apostle was saved from the fanatical violence of the mob by the sanity of the town-clerk (ὁ γραμματεύς, the city scribe or secretary), who reminded them that the Courts were open and the proconsuls (ἀνθύπατοι, plur
Mari - Apparently a two-story edifice, the palace was constructed to include many large open Courts surrounded by a constellation of rooms that were interconnected by high doorways, thereby permitting ventilation and light to penetrate throughout a ground floor in which there were no windows. His archive contains hundreds of bureaucratic registers which detail in a most graphic way certain aspects of daily life in a Mesopotamian Court: where and how the king worshiped and his temples were serviced; where, what, and how often the king ate or was luxuriated; how Courtiers were selected for the Court or enticing female dancers were selected for the royal harem; what were various forms of entertainment for the Court and/or visiting dignitaries; where, how far, and how frequently did the king journey; how was royalty attired
Moore, Thomas - He accepted appointment as registrar of the Admiralty Court of Bermuda, 1803, but after four months appointed a deputy and traveled in the United States and Canada, returning to London the following year
Chamber - ) A room or rooms where a lawyer transacts business; a room or rooms where a judge transacts such official business as may be done out of Court
Ecbatana - But Cyrus held his Court permanently at Ecbatana, and therefore kept his archives there
Plead - ) To discuss, defend, and attempt to maintain by arguments or reasons presented to a tribunal or person having uthority to determine; to argue at the bar; as, to plead a cause before a Court or jury
Felix (26) i, Bishop of Aptunga - The Donatist party, having failed in the Court of Inquiry at Rome, under Melchiades, Oct
Diet - ) In the old German or Holy Roman Empire, the great formal assembly of counselors (the Imperial Diet or Reichstag) or a small, local, or informal assembly of a similar kind (the Court Diet, or Hoftag)
Recover - ) To gain as a compensation; to obtain in return for injury or debt; as, to recover damages in trespass; to recover debt and costs in a suit at law; to obtain title to by judgement in a Court of law; as, to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery; to gain by legal process; as, to recover judgement against a defendant
Receiver - ) A person appointed, ordinarily by a Court, to receive, and hold in trust, money or other property which is the subject of litigation, pending the suit; a person appointed to take charge of the estate and effects of a corporation, and to do other acts necessary to winding up its affairs, in certain cases
Represent - ) To stand in the place of; to supply the place, perform the duties, exercise the rights, or receive the share, of; to speak and act with authority in behalf of; to act the part of (another); as, an heir represents his ancestor; an attorney represents his client in Court; a member of Congress represents his district in Congress
Gabbatha - (John 19:13) It means an elevated spot; probably it formed a balustrade, or gallery, from whence to the Court below, Pilate might more conveniently speak to the people
Sheaf - This sheaf was threshed in the Court; and of the grain they took a full omer, and after it had been winnowed, parched, and bruised, they sprinkled oil over it, and added a handful of incense; then the priest who received the offering, waved it before the Lord to the four quarters of the world, crosswise; he cast part of it upon the altar, and the rest was his own
Ordinary - An embassador in ordinary, is one constantly resident at a foreign Court
Thomas Moore - He accepted appointment as registrar of the Admiralty Court of Bermuda, 1803, but after four months appointed a deputy and traveled in the United States and Canada, returning to London the following year
Vest - To vest with, to clothe to furnish with to invest with as, to vest a man with authority to vest a Court with power to try cases of life and death to vest one with the right of seizing slave ships
Bathsheba - When Adonijah then tried to use Bathsheba to advance himself in Solomon’s Court, Solomon executed him for treason (1 Kings 2:13-25)
Alms - Thirteen receptacles for free offerings were in the women's Court of the temple (Mark 12:41-44). Alms are "righteousness," not that they justify a man (which Romans 3; 4; 5 prove they do not), but they are the doing that which is right and which our neighbor has a rightful claim upon us for, in the Court of God's equity, though not of human law
Gate - The pylon is associated mainly with Egyptian Temples, and consists of the imposing towers flanking the gate by which access was given to the Court. The passage may have been closed in similar fashion at the other end, which opened on the Court (see, further, Door)
Pillars - Open Persian halls have the fronts supported by pillars and shaded by curtains fastened to the ground by pegs or to trees in the Court (Esther 1:6). gate of the inner Court (compare Ezekiel 46:2) for the king's use on festive occasions 2 Kings 23:3), the brazen scaffold of Solomon (2 Chronicles 6:13; Keil)
Open - ) To enter upon; to begin; as, to open a discussion; to open fire upon an enemy; to open trade, or correspondence; to open a case in Court, or a meeting. ) Free to be used, enjoyed, visited, or the like; not private; public; unrestricted in use; as, an open library, museum, Court, or other assembly; liable to the approach, trespass, or attack of any one; unprotected; exposed
Daniel - He was chosen, with his three companions, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, to reside at Nebuchadnezzar's Court, where he received a suitable education, and made great progress in all the sciences of the Chaldeans, but declined to pollute himself by eating provisions from the king's table, which would often be ceremonially unclean to a Jew, or defiled by some connection with idol-worship. He maintained his integrity in the most difficult circumstances, and amid the fascinations of an eastern Court he was pure and upright
Condemn - ...
Old Testament The word appears first in the context of a Court of law (Exodus 22:9 ) where a judge hears a charge against a thief and condemns the culprit. The law Court context is seen in Jesus' prediction of His coming trial in Jerusalem (Matthew 20:18 ), in a remark of one of the men crucified with Jesus (Luke 23:40 ), and in the final vote of the Sanhedrin (Mark 14:64 )
Interpretation - From the story of Joseph we learn that a special class at the Court of the Pharaohs discharged the function of interpreters of dreams (cf. ]'>[1] ‘sacred scribes’] and ‘wise men,’ Genesis 41:8 ), A similar body of wise or learned men is mentioned in the Book of Daniel, for the same object at the Court of Babylon ( Daniel 2:2 ff; Daniel 4:6 f. Turning again to the history of Joseph, we find there an incidental remark which leads us to believe that there was an official interpreter, or a body of interpreters, whose work it was to translate foreign languages into the language of the Court (cf. The qualification to act as interpreter seems to have been required of those who acted as ambassadors at foreign Courts (cf
Bar-Jesus - Hearing of Barnabas and Paul as travelling teachers in the island, the governor, a highly educated man, interested in science and philosophy, invited them to his Court. This was a challenge to Bar-Jesus, who had been the dominant religious influence in the Court. Amongst Jewish surroundings Paul’s Jewish name ‘Saul’ was used naturally; but ‘by a marvellous stroke of historic brevity’ (Ramsay, 83) the author sets forth by a formula how in the Court of the Roman governor, when the Apostle challenged the system represented by Bar-Jesus, he stood forth as Paul the Roman citizen, a freeborn member of that Greek-Roman world to which he carried his universal gospel
House - 50:4, however, uses bayith in the sense of “a royal Court” or all the people in a king’s Court: “And when the days of his mourning were past, Joseph spake unto the house of Pharaoh. …” The ideas “royal Court” and “descendant” are joined in Music - Professional musicians soon became attached to the Court. " ( 2 Samuel 19:35 ) Solomon did the same, (Ecclesiastes 2:8 ) adding to the luxury of his Court by his patronage of art, and obtaining a reputation himself as no mean composer. The kings had their Court musicians, ( 2 Chronicles 35:25 ; Ecclesiastes 2:8 ) and in the luxurious times of the later monarchy the effeminate gallants of Israel amused themselves with devising musical instruments while their nation was perishing ("as Nero fiddled while Rome was burning")
Pharaoh - ...
An ancient pharaoh was an absolute monarch, supreme commander of the armies, chief justice of the royal Court, and high priest of all religion
Isaiah - He was probably a counselor at Court under Ezechias
Isaias - He was probably a counselor at Court under Ezechias
Order, Carthusian - Called to Rome, 1088, as adviser to Pope Urban II, his former pupil at Rheims, he obtained permission in 1090, to leave the papal Court and retire to his retreat, but this time in Calabria
Carthusian Order - Called to Rome, 1088, as adviser to Pope Urban II, his former pupil at Rheims, he obtained permission in 1090, to leave the papal Court and retire to his retreat, but this time in Calabria
Loyola, Ignatius, Saint - He was educated in the atmosphere of the Spanish Court of Ferdinand and Isabella, entered the army, 1517, and served in several campaigns
Ignatius Loyola, Saint - He was educated in the atmosphere of the Spanish Court of Ferdinand and Isabella, entered the army, 1517, and served in several campaigns
Mosque - Before the chief gate there is a square Court paved with white marble, and low galleries round it, whose roof is supported by marble pillars
Micah - Whereas the other Court prophets said only those things that pleased Ahab, Micaiah spoke the truth, whether Ahab liked it or not (1 Kings 22:5-9)
Color - ) An apparent right; as where the defendant in trespass gave to the plaintiff an appearance of title, by stating his title specially, thus removing the cause from the jury to the Court
Sidon And Tyre - , Ahab married Jezebel, the daughter of the Phoenician king, bringing Baal worship to Israel's Court
Dispense - The Court will dispense with your attendance, or with you compliance
Annuaire Pontifical Catholique - The first twenty volumes cover the following topics: ...
the Roman Calendar, comprising the Latin and Oriental rites, causes of the Servants of God, reforms in the liturgy; ...
the Sovereign Pontiffs, comprising the family, birth, early life, and papal acts of the reigning pope and a list of popes with some biographical notes; ...
the Cardinals, comprising their sees, duties, and biographical notes; ...
the Episcopate, comprising the bishops, with their sees and biographical notes, the Eastern churches, schismatical and heretical churches, and occasionally a few dioceses treated in detail; ...
Missions, giving their scope, societies, and activities; ...
Religious Orders, comprising a general list of the Orders, with notes on each; ...
the Pontifical Court and prelates; ...
the Ecclesiastical Courts and Roman Congregations, comprising congregations, tribunals, offices, and commissions; ...
the Vicariate of Rome, comprising the Curia, parishes, cemeteries, hospitals, and population; ...
Miscellanea, comprising information which is liturgical, theological, archreological, historical, statistical, bibliographical, and necrological
Judgment - ) The act of determining, as in Courts of law, what is conformable to law and justice; also, the determination, decision, or sentence of a Court, or of a judge; the mandate or sentence of God as the judge of all
Degrees - Others are of opinion, that they were so denominated, because sung in a gallery, which was in the Court of Israel, where the Levites sometimes read the law
Gallio - " He shared in the fortunes of his brothers, as well when out of favour as in their prosperity at Court
Edward the Confessor, Saint - Upon the election of Canute to the throne of England, when Edward was only ten years of age, he went with his brother Alfred and his mother to live at the Court of his uncle, the duke of Normandy
Incense - While it was offered, the people prayed in the Court without, and their prayers ascended with the sweet odor of the incense, until the priest returned and gave the blessing
Spirituals - 1274,under the leadership first of Liberato, then of Angelo da Clareno, 1307; see also Fraticelli
the Spirituals of Provence, France, led by Pierre Jean Olivi, to which group is due the great process between the Spirituals and the Community at the papal Court at Avignon (1310 to 1312)
the Spirituals of Tuscany, appearing in 1309, excommunicated by Pope John XXII in 1318
The movement of the Spirituals failed to obtain its aim; it even led, through the errors of its leaders, to schism and heresy, but stricter observance of the rule, regenerated by their zeal and shortly after combined with full submission to authority, led the order to new prosperity
Issue - A sending out as the issue of an order from a commanding officer or from a Court the issue of money from a treasury
Bethel - Samuel held his Court here in turn, 1 Samuel 7:16
Pash'ur - (Ezra 2:38 ; Nehemiah 7:41 ; 10:3 ) The individual from whom the family was named was probably Pushur the son of Malchiah, who in the reign of Zedekiah was one of the chief princes of the Court
Houses - From the gate of the porch, one is conducted into a quadrangular Court, which, being exposed to the weather, is paved with stone, in order to carry off the water in the rainy season. Hence, he conjectures that our Lord was at this time instructing the people in the Court of one of these houses; and it is by no means improbable, that the quadrangle was to him and his Apostles a favourite situation, while they were engaged in disclosing the mysteries of redemption. The Court is for the most part surrounded with a cloister, over which, when the house has a number of stories, a gallery is erected of the same dimensions with the cloister, having a balustrade, or else a piece of carved or latticed work, going round about, to prevent people from failing from it into the Court. These large windows admit the light and the breeze into spacious apartments of the same length with the Court, but which seldom or never communicate with one another. It is surrounded by a wall breast-high, which forms the partition with the contiguous houses, and prevents one from falling into the street on the one side, or into the Court on the other. Of the same kind, probably, was the lattice or net, as the term שבכה , seems to import, through which Ahaziah, the king of Samaria, fell down into the Court, 2 Kings 1:2 . Rahab concealed the spies on the roof, with the stalks of flax which she had laid in order to dry, Joshua 2:6 ; the king of Israel, according to the custom of his country, rose from his bed, and walked upon the roof of his house, to enjoy the refreshing breezes of the evening, 2 Samuel 11:2 ; upon the top of the house the prophet conversed with Saul, about the gracious designs of God, respecting him and his family, 1 Samuel 9:25 ; to the same place Peter retired to offer up his devotions, Acts 10:9 ; and in the feast of tabernacles, under the government of Nehemiah, booths were erected, as well upon the terraces of their houses, as in their Courts, and in the streets of the city, Nehemiah 8:16
Olive Olive-Tree - , Psalms 52:8, an olive being often planted in the Court of a building, Psalms 128:3, young shoots springing, from an old trunk; Jeremiah 11:16; Hosea 14:6
Ananias - As high priest, he was president of the Jewish Court known as the Sanhedrin which tried Paul in Jerusalem (Acts 23:1 )
Iddo - Father of Solomon's district supervisor who supplied the royal Court provisions for one month a year in the area of Mahanaim (1 Kings 4:14 )
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, City of - In the same year the Reverend Patrick Kelly came to Milwaukee, and held services in the Court-house until the erection of the first Catholic church (Saint Peter's) in 1839, which served as the cathedral for many years
Money-Changers - It was mainly for the convenience of the Jews of the Dispersion that the changers were allowed to set up their tables in the outer Court of the Temple ( Matthew 21:12 ff
David, King - He then received a permanent position at Court, and married Michol, daughter of Saul, but Saul's jealousy of his popularity forced him into exile
Joan of Arc, Saint - She hesitated for more than three years before obeying; then, in spite of violent opposition, she repaired to Chinon where Charles VII was holding Court. After overcoming more opposition from churchmen and Courtiers, she was given a small army with which she raised the siege of Orleans, May 8, 1429
Cardinal - Cardinals residing in Rome are called Cardinals of the Court
Haeretico Comburendo - This writ is thought by some to be as ancient as the common law itself; however, the conviction of heresy by the common law was not in any petty ecclesiastical Court, but before the archbishop himself, in a provincial synod, and the delinquent was delivered up to the king, to do with him as he pleased; so that the crown had a control over the spiritual power: but by 2 Henry IV. But this statute does not extend to take away or abridge the jurisdiction of Protestant archbishops, or bishops, or any other judges of any ecclesiastical Courts, in cases of atheism, blasphemy, heresy, or schism; but they may prove and punish the same, according to his majesty's ecclesiastical laws, by excommunication, deprivation, degradation, and other ecclesiastical censures, not extending to death, in such sort, and no other, as they might have done before the making of this act
Cistern - ...
A cistern might contain only rain water conveyed from the Court or flat roof during the rainy season by gutters and pipes, or might be fed by a conduit led from a spring at a distance
Shu'Shan, - Between these two was probably the inner Court, where Esther appeared before the king
Thyati'ra, - A fane stood outside the walls, dedicated to Sambatha --the name of the sibyl who is sometimes called Chaldean, sometimes Jewish, sometimes Persian-- in the midst of an enclosure designated "the Chaldaeans' Court
Chedorlaomer - There is mentioned among the Babylonian kings one who held his Court at Ur in Lower Chaldaea, an Elamite prince, Kudur-Mabuk (or Chedorlaomer; Lagomer being an Elamite goddess of which Mabuk is the Hamitic name)
Security - It is natural to meet a Latin legal term in this Roman Court; the politarchs of Thessalonica may even have used the Latin instead of the κοινή
Curate - The lowest degree in the church of England; he who represents the incumbent of a church, parson, or vicar, and officiates in his stead: he is to be licensed and admitted by the bishop of the diocese, or by an ordinary having episcopal jurisdiction; and when a curate hath the approbation of the bishop, he usually appoints the salary too; and, in such case, if he be not paid, the curate hath a proper remedy in the ecclesiastical Court, by a sequestration of the profits of the benefice: but is the curate be not licensed by the bishop, he is put to his remedy at common law, where he must prove the agreement, &c
Determine - We say, I had determined this question in my own mind the Court has determined the cause
File - A file is a record of Court
Address - ) To make suit to as a lover; to Court; to woo
Prison - '...
Jeremiah was confined in 'the Court of the prison,' a place to which the Jews could come and where they could converse with him
Commission - ...
Commission of lunacy, is a commission issuing from the Court of chancery, to authorize an inquiry whether a person is a lunatic or not
Hear - To attend to the facts, evidence, and arguments in a cause between parties to try in a Court of law or equity
History - We say, we have a concise history of the prisoner in the testimony offered to the Court
Amaziah - He speedily avenged the murder of his father, who had been killed by Court servants
Judge - ) A public officer who is invested with authority to hear and determine litigated causes, and to administer justice between parties in Courts held for that purpose. ) To hear and determine by authority, as a case before a Court, or a controversy between two parties
Reformatories - Under the modern juvenile Court procedure, the delinquent boy or girl is kept at home whenever possible, and efforts are there made to treat each case on an individual basis, so that the cause of the delinquency may be eliminated in character or surroundings, and at the same time valuable traits and powers may be developed
Tiberias - As the Arabs say, "The king of the fleas holds his Court at Tubariyeh
Recover - To obtain title to by judgment in a Court of law as, to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery
Saint Bartholomew's Day - The majority of historians deny that the Holy See was the accomplice of the French Court in this outrage
Temple - In England,the Temples are two inns of Court, thus called because anciently the dwellings of the knights Templars
Truth - The duty of a Court of justice is to discover the truth
Understand - I understood the preacher the Court perfectly understand the advocate or his argument
Mars' Hill, - This body existed as a criminal tribunal before the time of Solon, and was the most ancient and venerable of all the Athenian Courts. Before the time of Solon the Court tried only cases of willful murder, wounding, poison, and arson: but he gave it extensive powers of a censorial and political nature
Absalom - But one of David’s chief advisers stayed behind as a spy in Absalom’s Court
Base - So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base Court. So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base Court
May Laws -
The law of May 12, respected the disciplinary powers of ecclesiastical superiors and established a secular Court for deciding ecclesiastical questions, bestowing on it the right, under certain circumstances, of dismissing the clergy from their posts. A law was passed enacting that clergy who refused to submit when ejected from office by the secular Court might be expelled either from a certain locality or from the empire (1874)
Laws, May -
The law of May 12, respected the disciplinary powers of ecclesiastical superiors and established a secular Court for deciding ecclesiastical questions, bestowing on it the right, under certain circumstances, of dismissing the clergy from their posts. A law was passed enacting that clergy who refused to submit when ejected from office by the secular Court might be expelled either from a certain locality or from the empire (1874)
Chicago, Illinois - " Catholics distinguished in public life in Chicago are: Eliza Allen Starr, convert, artist and teacher of Christian art; Judge Gibbons; Judge Clifford, both of the Circuit Court of Chicago; Judge Marcus Kavanaugh of the Superior Court; Dr
Zacharias - " By Joash's command they stoned Zacharias "in the Court of the house of Jehovah!" And to it the tradition may be due which assigns the tomb in the valley of Jehoshaphat to Zacharias. in the interior Court of the priests, in which was the altar of burnt offerings
Witness - Heavy penalties fell on anyone who lied to a Court. The ninth commandment may well have immediate reference to such a concrete Court situation ( Courts are (as a rule) to keep judge and “witness” separate, the “witnesses” do participate in executing the penalty upon the guilty party ( Elders - But their peculiar business is expressed by the name ruling elders; for in every jurisdiction within the parish they are the spiritual Court, of which the minister is officially moderator; and in the presbytery, of which the pastors of all the parishes within its bounds are officially members, lay elders sit as the representatives of the several sessions or consistories. This, according to the generality of interpreters, was the beginning of the sanhedrim; but, to support this opinion, many things must be supposed, whereby to infer, that this Court of justice was constantly in being during the Scripture history
Daniel - He was placed in the Court of Nebuchadnezzar, and was afterward raised to situations of great rank and power, both in the empire of Babylon and of Persia. Daniel seems to have been the only prophet who enjoyed a great share of worldly prosperity; but amidst the corruptions of a licentious Court he preserved his virtue and integrity inviolate, and no danger or temptation could divert him from the worship of the true God
Praetorium - He was taken into a Court, to which also the name of prœtorium is given (Matthew 27:27, Mark 15:16), and mocked by such of the soldiers as were off duty. 5); and the existence of such a Court would be necessary for the maintaining of order in Jerusalem and the vicinity
Praetorium - He was taken into a Court, to which also the name of prœtorium is given (Matthew 27:27, Mark 15:16), and mocked by such of the soldiers as were off duty. 5); and the existence of such a Court would be necessary for the maintaining of order in Jerusalem and the vicinity
Shushan - ...
The inner Court where Esther begged Ahasuerus' favor (Esther 5:1) was the space between the northern portico and "the king's gate"; the outer Court was the space between the king's gate and the northern terrace wall. "In the Court of the garden of the king's palace" in front of the eastern or western porch Ahasuerus "made a feast unto all the people . The feast, was evidently out of doors, in tents put up in one of the palace Courts
Government - Although several tribes might join together to fight a common enemy under the leadership of a judge, judgeship carried no sense of the permanence, hereditary character, or royal Court of the monarchy. The king had his royal Court to carry out his mandate. A royal Court and professional army required revenue, so a taxation system was developed with its attendant officials. Surrounding the royal Court were such officials as “the one who is over the house” a sort of Secretary of State or Prime Minister; the recorder who was a herald, press secretary, and chief of protocol combined; the chief scribe; counselors; priests; and prophets ( 1 Kings 4:1 ). This is seen especially in the trial of Jesus which involved hearings before the religious Court (at that time the highest Jewish Court) and before the Roman authorities
Tabernacle - The holy place was separated from the outer Court which enclosed the tabernacle by a curtain, which hung over the six pillars which stood at the east end of the tabernacle, and by which it was entered. ...
Round about the tabernacle was a Court, enclosed by curtains hung upon sixty pillars (Exodus 27:9-18 ). This Court was 150 feet long and 75 feet broad
Tabernacles, Feast of - ...
In Jerusalem the booths were built on the roofs, in house Courts, in the temple Court, and in the street of the water gate and of the Ephraim gate. Coming next day at daybreak to the temple Court as they were extinguishing the artificial lights, two colossal golden candlesticks in the center of the temple Court, recalling the pillar of fire in the wilderness, Jesus said, cf6 "I am the Light of the world" (John 8:1-2; John 8:12)
Toleration Act - whereby all persons are required to resort to their parish church or chapel, upon pain of punishment by the censures of the church; and also upon pain that every person so offending, shall forfeit for every such offence twelve pence; nor the statute made in the 3d year of the late King James, inituled "An act for the better discovering and repressing Popish Recusants;" nor that other statute, intituled ...
"An act to prevent and avoid dangers which may grow by Popish Recussants;" nor any other law or statute of this realm made against Papists or Popish Recusants, shall be construed to extend to any person or persons dissenting from the Church of England, that shall take the oaths (of allegiance and supremacy) and shall make and subscribe the declaration (against Popery;) which oaths and declaration the justices of the peace at the general sessions of the peace for the county, or place where such persons shall live, are hereby required to administer to such persons as shall offer themselves to make and subscribe the same, and thereof to keep a register; and likewise, none of the persons aforesaid shall give or pay, as any fee or reward, to any officer belonging to the Court, above the sum of sixpence, for his entry of his taking the said oaths, &c. That every person that shall take the said oaths and make and subscribe the declaration aforesaid, shall not be liable to any pains, penalties, or forfeitures, mentioned in an act made in the 35th of the late Queen Elizabeth, nor in an act made in the 22d of Charles the Second, intituled "An act to prevent and suppress Seditious Conventicles;" nor shall any of the said persons be prosecuted in any ecclesiastical Court for their nonconforming to the Church or England. Provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed to exempt any of the persons aforesaid from paying of tithes, or other parochial duties; nor from any prosecution in any ecclesiastical Court or elsewhere, for the same. That no person dissenting from the church of England in holy orders, or pretended holy orders, or pretending to holy orders, nor any preacher or teacher of any congregation of Dissenting Protestants, that shall make and subscribe the declaration aforsaid, and take the said oaths at the General or Quarter Sessions of the Peace, to be held for the county, town, parts, or division where such person lives, which Court is hereby empowered to administer the same, and shall also declare his approbation of and subscribe the Articles of Religion mentioned in the statute made in the 13th of Q. That no congregation or assembly for religious worship shall be permitted or allowed by this act until the place of such meeting shall be certified to the Bishop of the diocess, or to the Archdeacon of that archdeaconry, or to the justices of the peace at the General or Quarter Sessions of the peace for the county, city, or place in which such meeting shall be held, and registered in the said Bishop's or Archdeacon's Court respectively, or recorded at the said General or Quarter Sessions; the register or clerk of the peace whereof respectively is hereby required to register the same, and to give certificate thereof to such person as shall demand the same; for which there shall be no greater fee or reward taken than the sum of sixpence
Flavius Valerius Constantinus - Son of a Roman officer, Constantius, and Saint Helena, Constantine attended the Court of Diocletian and later fought under Galerius, the Eastern Emperor
Bread - The old loaves were removed every Sabbath, and were to be eaten only by the priests in the Court of the sanctuary ( Exodus 25:30 ; Leviticus 24:8 ; 1 Samuel 21:1-6 ; Matthew 12:4 )
Abner - He first introduced David to the Court of Saul after the victory over Goliath (1Samuel 17:57)
Shushan - ...
The great feast that was held by Ahasuerus with his nobles and princes for seven days was not apparently held in any of the halls inside the palace, but in the open air, "in the Court of the garden of the king's palace," surrounded by "white, green and blue hangings, fastened with cords of fine linen and purple to silver rings and pillars of marble
Inn - A larger inn might have small rooms surrounding the Court
Sanhedrim - As the highest Court of judicature, "in all causes and over all persons, ecclesiastical and civil, supreme," its decrees were binding, not only on the Jews in Palestine, but on all Jews wherever scattered abroad
See - (d) The pope or his Court at Rome; as, to appeal to the see of Rome
Officer - see), but, as Genesis 39:1 shows, the original ( sârîs ) must here signify, more generally, a Court official
Board - ) A table at which a council or Court is held
Cloud - Jehovah came down upon Sinai in a cloud (Exodus 19:9 ); and the cloud filled the Court around the tabernacle in the wilderness so that Moses could not enter it (Exodus 40:34,35 )
Waterlandians - Each congregation is independent of all foreign jurisdiction, having its own Court of government, composed of the presbyters and deacons
Act - ) The result of public deliberation; the decision or determination of a legislative body, council, Court of justice, etc
Sit - ) To hold a session; to be in session for official business; - said of legislative assemblies, Courts, etc. ; as, the Court sits in January; the aldermen sit to-night
Great, Constantine the - Son of a Roman officer, Constantius, and Saint Helena, Constantine attended the Court of Diocletian and later fought under Galerius, the Eastern Emperor
Bind - ...
To bind over is to oblige by bond to appear at a Court
Cost - In law, the sum fixed by law or allowed by the Court for charges of a suit awarded against the party losing, in favor of the party prevailing, &c
Council - In London, a Court consisting of the lord mayor and aldermen in one house, and of representatives of the several wards, called common-council-men, in the other
Advocate - Ancient Greeks used the term for one called in to assist or speak for another, frequently in a Court setting. 1John portrayed a Courtroom scene in which Jesus Christ, the righteous One, intercedes with the Father on behalf of sinners
Jehoiakim - Jeremiah’s escape was due to powerful friends at Court ( Jeremiah 22:13-19 ; Jeremiah 36:1-26 ; Jeremiah 26:20-24 )
Term - ) The time in which a Court is held or is open for the trial of causes
Minister, Serve - In the manner of the modern “public servant” idea, the word is used in reference to Court officials and royal servants ( Porters of the Temple - The office of porter was in some sort military; properly speaking, they were the soldiers of the Lord, and the guards of his house, to whose charge the several gates of the Courts of the sanctuary were appointed by lot, 1 Chronicles 26:1 ; 1 Chronicles 26:13 ; 1 Chronicles 26:19 . Their proper business was to open and shut the gates, and to attend at them by day, as a sort of peace officers, in order to prevent any tumult among the people; to keep strangers and the excommunicated and unclean persons, from entering into the holy Court; and, in short, to prevent whatever might be prejudicial to the safety, peace, and purity of the holy place and service. They also kept guard by night about the temple and its Courts; and they are said to have been twenty-four, including three priests, who stood sentry at so many different places
Lodge, Lodging - A — 1: αὐλίζομαι (Strong's #835 — Verb — aulizomai — ow-lid'-zom-ahee ) properly, "to lodge in a Courtyard" (aule, See Court , No
Feasts - On each of these occasions every male Israelite was commanded to "appear before the Lord," that is, to attend in the Court of the tabernacle or the temple, and to make his offering with a joyful heart
Judgment - Is put, in Matthew 5:21,22 , for a Court of judgment, a tribunal, namely, the tribunal of seven judges, which Josephus mentions as existing in every city, and which decided causes of minor importance
Wait - The Court was obliged to wait for a witness
Jonathan - ...
When David became a member of Saul’s Court and then of his army, he and Jonathan became close friends (1 Samuel 18:1-4)
Procopius of Caesarea - Born at Caesarea in Palestine, he went during the reign of Anastasius to Constantinople, where he taught rhetoric and pleaded in the Courts. ; and a work entitled Anecdota or a secret history of Justinian, the empress Theodora, Belisarius, his wife Antonina, and others of the Court. This last, intended for publication only after the author's death, is described by Cave in the strongest terms of reprobation, as written to shew the Court of Justinian as no better than a diabolorum lerna , and as exhibiting such audacity, falsehood, calumny, and charges of unheard-of crimes, that it has been doubted whether Procopius really wrote it
Temple, Solomon's - Round about the building were, ...
...
The Court of the priests (2 Chronicles 4:9 ), called the "inner Court" (1 Kings 6:36 ). ...
The great Court, which surrounded the whole temple (2 Chronicles 4:9 )
Nehemiah - 445 444, Nehemiah is at Susa, the chief city of Elam and the winter residence of the Persian Court. ...
Shortly after these events, it would seem, Nehemiah returned to the Persian Court, and was absent from Jerusalem for some years. ’ On the whole it seems probable that Nehemiah 5:14 means that during the twelve years Nehemiah, though absent on Court duty, was actually governor, ruling by deputies; and that in the 32nd year of the king’s reign he again secured leave of absence, and came to Jerusalem (b
Atonement, Day of - This done, he returned to the Court, to enter immediately, for the second time, the inner sanctuary, carrying a basin with the blood of the bullock, which he sprinkled on the front of the mercy-seat once, and seven times on the ground before the ark. ...
( c ) In the second stage ( Leviticus 16:15-19 ) atonement was made in succession for the Most Holy Place, the Holy Place, and the outer Court. , to ‘cleanse and hallow’ the altar of burnt-offering, which stood in the outer Court. Returning to the Court, he offered the burnt-offerings for himself and the people, together with the fat of the sin-offering
Hananiah - Father of Zedekiah, a Court official, in time of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 36:12 )
Moses - ), at a time of grievous persecution, when Pharao had ordered the killing of all male Hebrew children (Exodus 1) Exposed on the waters of the Nile, he was rescued by Pharao's daughter and educated at Court
Domicile - Thus he is bound to obey the bishop of his domicile and the particular laws of the diocese (except when abroad), and can be sued only in the Court of that diocese
Ashkelon - Within the walls, of which the ruins still stand, Richard I held his Court in the crusades
King - The officers of his Court were, (1) the recorder or remembrancer (2 Samuel 8:16 ; 1 Kings 4:3 ); (2) the scribe (2 Samuel 8:17 ; 20:25 ); (3) the officer over the house, the chief steward (Isaiah 22:15 ); (4) the "king's friend," a confidential companion (1 Kings 4:5 ); (5) the keeper of the wardrobe (2 Kings 22:14 ); (6) captain of the bodyguard (2 Samuel 20:23 ); (7) officers over the king's treasures, etc
Christ: the Soul's Only Defence - A third hade her hide herself of the woods, but alas! these are the hawk's own estates, where he holds his Court
Hypocrisy: Present Age Suitable to - There was an age of chivalry, when no craven Courted knighthood, for it involved the hard blows, the dangerous wounds, the rough unhorsings, and the ungentle perils of the tournament; nay, these were but child's play: there were distant eastern fields, where Paynim warriors must be slain by valiant hands, and blood must flow in rivers from the Red-cross knights. Then men who lacked valour preferred their hawks and their jesters, and left heroes to Court death and glory on the battle-field
Beloved Disciple - A disciple was known to the high priest and at the trial of Jesus managed to get Peter into the Court area (John 18:15 )
Guile - Bar-Jesus the Magian, who tried to undermine his influence at the Court of Sergius Paulus (Acts 13:8), was actuated by a mad jealousy, realizing as he did that the position which he had skilfully won was fast becoming insecure
Action - ) A suit or process, by which a demand is made of a right in a Court of justice; in a broad sense, a judicial proceeding for the enforcement or protection of a right, the redress or prevention of a wrong, or the punishment of a public offense
Joash - When Joash was 7 years of age, Jehoiada planned with Azariah and others, to place young Joash upon the throne, and to dethrone his grandmother, the wicked Athaliah; and the young king was crowned in the Court of the temple with great solemnity. Joash behaved himself well while Jehoiada lived and was his guide; but no sooner was this good man dead than he began to listen to the counsels of his wicked Courtiers
Aristotle - He next married Pythias, adopted daughter of Hermias, at whose Court in Asia Minor he spent three years
Attend - To be present in business to be in company from curiosity, or from some connection in affairs as, lawyers or spectators attend a Court
Fast - , as to make possible unusual rapidity of play or action; as, a fast racket, or tennis Court; a fast track; a fast billiard table, etc
Apocalypse - ...
The Apocalypse takes us to the very Court of heaven picturing for us God in all His Majesty, surrounded by angels who do His bidding in heaven and on earth, and Christ, the Lamb of God, slain for man's Redemption but now surrounded by the elect who have kept His word
Seceders - Against this, he and his friends protested; and being joined by many others, both ministers and elders, declaring their secession from the national church, they did, in 1736, constitute themselves into an ecclesiastical Court, which they called the Associate Presbytery, and published a defence of their proceedings
Judgment Seat - The word became used for a tribune, two of which were provided in the law Courts of Greece, one for the accuser and one for the defendant; it was applied to the tribunal of a Roman magistrate or ruler, Matthew 27:19 ; John 19:13 ; Acts 12:21 , translated "throne;" 18:12,16,17; 25:6,10,17. , "criterion"), then, a tribunal, law Court, or "lawsuit," 1 Corinthians 6:2 (last clause), for which see JUDGE , B, No
Jehoiakim - In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the Court of the temple
Cause - A suit or action in Court any legal process which a party institutes to obtain his demand, or by which he seeks his right or his supposed right
Publican - It is even said that they would not allow them to enter the temple or the synagogues, to engage in the public prayers or offices of judicature, or to give testimony in a Court of justice
na'Aman - Whatever the particular exploit referred to was, it had given Naaman a great position at the Court of Ben-hadad
Obadi'ah - ...
An officer of high rank in the Court of Ahab
Jotham - gate of the inner or upper Court (see Ezekiel 8:3; Ezekiel 8:5; Ezekiel 8:14; Ezekiel 8:16; Ezekiel 9:2; Ezekiel 40:38-43), and built much at the wall of the Ophel (the S
Macarius, Presbyter of Athanasius - Macarius is next found at the imperial Court at Nicomedia on a mission with another priest, Alypius, when three Meletian clergy, Ision, Eudaemon, Callinicus, brought their accusation against Athanasius in reference to the linen vestments
Advocate - People today usually think of an advocate as one who pleads on behalf of another in a Court of law, but only occasionally does the Bible use the word in this legal sense (e
Tiberius ii., Emperor of Constantinople - Gregory, afterwards pope Gregory the Great, then a deacon and Roman apocrisiarius at the imperial Court, at once detected heresy in the patriarch's teaching
Gallery - Shaw in his Travels, page 274-5, tell us, that the Court in the summer-season, among persons of rank, is sheltered from the heat, or inclemency of the weather, by a velum umbrella, or veil; which being expanded upon ropes from one side of the parapet wall to the other, may be folded or unfolded at pleasure. " (Psalms 104:1-35) This Court is, for the most part, surrounded with a cloister or colonnade, over which there is a gallery erected of the same dimensions with the cloister, having a balustrade of carved or latticed work
Tabernacle - Round about the tabernacle was an open Court into which the people were admitted, 100 cubits in length and 50 broad. There are some parts of the description of the pillars and hangings of the Court which it is not easy to understand
Justice - Justice in magistrates, rulers, and judges, must be fearless and impartial, and all its decisions such as will bear revision before the Court of heaven, Deuteronomy 1:16,17 2 Samuel 23:3 2 Chronicles 19:6-10 . Afterwards, in the absence of more formal Courts, the elders of a household, tribe, or city, were its judges by natural right. Their informal Courts were held in the gate of the city, as the most public and convenient place, Deuteronomy 21:9 22:15 25:7 ; and in the same place contracts were ratified, Ruth 4:1,9 Jeremiah 32:7-15 . Samuel established virtually a circuit Court, 1 Samuel 7:16 8:1 ; and among the kings, Jehoshaphat made special provision for the faithful administration of justice, 2 Chronicles 19:1-11
Julianus, Bishop of Cos - From Mar 453 he was apocrisiarius or deputy of the see of Rome at the Court of Constantinople. Leo requests him to remain constantly at Court, watching zealously over the interests of the faith ( Epp
Solomon - )...
Under Solomon there was a large increase in the numbers of officials in the royal Court, the national administration and the armed forces. He built a magnificent palace, which took a further thirteen years (1 Kings 7:1; 1 Kings 9:10), a military headquarters called the House of the Forest of Lebanon (1 Kings 7:2; 1 Kings 10:17), an auditorium called the Hall of Pillars (1 Kings 7:6), a central law Court called the Hall of Judgment (1 Kings 7:7) and a separate palace for his Egyptian queen (1 Kings 7:8). All these buildings, including the temple, were made of costly stone and best quality timber, and were enclosed in an area known as the Great Court (1 Kings 7:9-12)
Keep, Keeping - " The verb ago is used in Acts 19:38 of "keeping" certain occasions, as of the holding of law Courts, RV "(the Courts) are open," AV marg. , "court days are kept;" Moulton and Milligan illustrate from the papyri the use of the adjective agoraios, in the plural with hemerai, "days," understood, in regard to certain market days; certain Court days are what are indicated here. The conjecture that the meaning is "courts are now being held" (sunodoi being understood as meetings of the Court instead of "days") is scarcely so appropriate to the circumstances
Procurator - In the ordinary Civil Court (Recorder’s Court, Court of Common Pleas) they had a jurisdiction like that of other governors, and in later times at least they could appoint a guardian to a ward (tutoris datio)
Micah - Micheas is the prophet of the common folk and the villages, as Isaias was the oracle of the Court and the capital
Micheas - Micheas is the prophet of the common folk and the villages, as Isaias was the oracle of the Court and the capital
Catholic Prisoners' Aid Society - Deals with necessitous Catholics on their discharge from prison or police Court, and, if necessary, with dependents of prisoners while the latter are in prison; its essential object is reclamation by means of religion
Bethel - Here also Samuel held in rotation his Court of justice (1 Samuel 7:16 )
Benaiah - Jehoiada, father of Benaiah, was next after Ahithophel in David's Court (1 Chronicles 27:34)
Nehemiah - Nehemiah was governor of Jerusalem twelve years, Nehemiah 5:14-19; and then returned to the Persian Court, where he remained "certain days
Divorce - The law of this country, in conformity to our Saviour's injunction, confines the dissolution of the marriage contract to the single case of adultery in the wife; and a divorce even in that case can only be brought about by an act of parliament, founded upon a previous sentiment in the spiritual Court, and a verdict against the adulterer at common law; which proceedings taken together, compose as complete an investigation of the complaint as a cause can receive
Nebuchadnezzar - )...
Through his contact with Jews at his Court in Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar learnt about the Jews’ God, Yahweh
Esther - The combined wisdom of Mordecai and courage of Esther became the means of doing a great service to the very large number of Jews living under Persian rule; for, owing to the craft and hatred of Haman , the chief Court favourite, the Jews were in danger of being massacred en bloc ; but Esther, instigated by Mordecai, revealed her Jewish nationality to the king, who realized thereby that she was in danger of losing her life, owing to the royal decree, obtained by Haman, to the effect that all those of Jewish nationality in the king’s dominions were to be put to death
Lawyer - His functions were three-fold: to study and interpret the Law (and the traditions arising from it), to hand it down by teaching, and to apply it in the Courts of Justice. Their work in the law-courts covered a wide range. The most general representative of law was the cognitor, or attorney, whose place (in Gaius’s time) was partially filled by the procurator litis, or legal agent; but in Court the case was pleaded by the patronus or orator, the skilled counsel of whom Cicero is so illustrious an example, often assisted by the advocatus, or legal adviser
Fine - ) To impose a pecuniary penalty upon for an offense or breach of law; to set a fine on by judgment of a Court; to punish by fine; to mulct; as, the trespassers were fined ten dollars
Place - ) A broad way in a city; an open space; an area; a Court or short part of a street open only at one end
Oration, Orator - The judicial mode, the speech of the law Court, concerns guilt and innocence
Zechariah - Son of Jehoiada the priest: he rebuked the people for their idolatry, and by commandment of the king he was stoned by the people in the Court of the temple
ab'Salom - Here he ordered his servants to murder Amnon, and then fled for safety to his grandfather's Court at Geshur, where he remained for three years. He tried to supplant his father by Courting popularity, standing in the gate, conversing with every suitor, and lamenting the difficulty which he would find in getting a hearing
Law - ) An oath, as in the presence of a Court. : The rules of construction, or of procedure, conforming to the conditions of success; a principle, maxim; or usage; as, the laws of poetry, of architecture, of Courtesy, or of whist
Society, Catholic Prisoners' Aid - Deals with necessitous Catholics on their discharge from prison or police Court, and, if necessary, with dependents of prisoners while the latter are in prison; its essential object is reclamation by means of religion
Firstfruits - They were offered in the temple before the crop was gathered on the fifteenth of Nisan, in the evening, and threshed in a Court of the temple
View - View of frankpledge, in law, a Court of record, held in a hundred, lordship or manor, before the stewart of the leet
Lawyer - His functions were three-fold: to study and interpret the Law (and the traditions arising from it), to hand it down by teaching, and to apply it in the Courts of Justice. Their work in the law-courts covered a wide range. The most general representative of law was the cognitor, or attorney, whose place (in Gaius’s time) was partially filled by the procurator litis, or legal agent; but in Court the case was pleaded by the patronus or orator, the skilled counsel of whom Cicero is so illustrious an example, often assisted by the advocatus, or legal adviser
Gate - , they try by bribes and misrepresentations to ensnare into a false decision the judge who would in public Court reprove them for their iniquity, or to ensnare the prophet who publicly reproves them (Jeremiah 7:2). "The Beautiful Gate" of Herod's temple (Acts 3:2) was the outer one, made of Corinthian brass, surpassing in costliness even nine others of the outer Court, which were covered with gold and silver. Daniel "sat in" such a "gate" before the palace of Babylon as "ruler over the whole province of Babylon" (Daniel 2:48-49) The Courtiers of Ahasuerus attended him "in the gate" similarly (Esther 3:2)
Burnt-Offering - The altar stood in the Court of the priests in front of (eastward of) the Temple building. The altar on which burnt-offering was offered, from its great size, its frequent use, and its standing visibly in the Court of the priests, was emphatically ‘the altar,’ and it was before this that He directed the offending brother to leave his gift (Matthew 5:23)
Barachiah - is an account of the stoning of Zechariah the son of Jehoiada (LXX Septuagint B has ‘Azariah’ for ‘Zechariah,’ but Lagarde prints ‘Zechariah’) in the Court of the house of the Lord. In the Jerusalem Talmud (Taanith 69a) the question is raised where Zechariah was killed, with the answer that it was in the Court of the priests (cf
Inquisition - This Court was founded in the twelfth century, under the patronage of pope Innocent, who issued out orders to excite the Catholic princes and people to extirpate heretics, to search into their number and quality, and to transmit a faithful account thereof to Rome. That nothing might be wanting to render this spiritual Court formidable and tremendous, the Roman pontiffs persuaded the European princes, and more especially the emperor Frederick II
Adoration - ...
Adoration is also used in the Court of Rome, in the ceremony of kissing the pope's feet. It is not certain at what period this practice was introduced into the church: but it was probably borrowed from the Byzantine Court, and accompanied the temporal power
Zedeki'ah - Jerusalem seems to have taken the lead, since in the fourth year of Zedekiah's reign we find ambassadors from all the neighboring kingdoms --Tyre, Sidon, Edom and Moab --at his Court to consult as to the steps to be taken. ...
Son of Chenaanah, a false prophet at the Court of Ahab, head, or, if not head, virtual leader, of the college
Petrus, Patriarch of Jerusalem - The Origenists were supported by a powerful Court party, headed by the abbats Domitian and Theodore Ascidas (Evagr. Theodore maintained his position at Court and threatened Peter with deposition if he continued to refuse to receive back the expelled Origenistic monks ( Vit
the Widow With the Two Mites - " When one after another of her neighbours and her kindred railed on her for going up to the Court of the Women in her deep poverty, she answered them not again. There were special chests elsewhere in the temple for the poor, and for the education of the children of the poor, but the treasury chests over against which our Saviour sat that day were just the Deacons' Courts of our own Free Church and other churches. It is doing no exegetical or homiletical violence to this exquisite scene to transfer every syllable of it to ourselves as a congregation and a Court. It is no irreverence, but only a becoming gratitude and love to say it, that as I sit at the head of the monthly table of our Deacons' Court I have something in my heart not unlike what was in His heart who sat that day in the treasury of the temple. If you could all see, as I every first Monday of every month see, our splendidly-equipped and splendidly-managed Deacons' Court, the sight would both move, and inflame, and sanctify your heart also. And, taken along with all that, its absolutely unique and unapproached Deacons' Court
Shemaiah - Father of an official at Jehoikim's Court about 600 B
Aramaic - This must not be confounded with the 'learning and the tongue of the Chaldeans' in Daniel 1:4 , which is the Aryan dialect and literature of the Chaldeans, and probably the ordinary language which Daniel spoke in the Court of Babylon
Sports - The Court had their balls, masquerades, and plays, on the Sunday evenings, while the youth of the country were at their morrice-dances, May-gmes, church and clerk ales, and all such kind of revelling
Moses - He was educated at the Egyptian Court, and "was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians, and was mighty in words and in deeds
Prophesyings - Archbishop Grindal endeavoured to regulate the prophesyings, and cover them from the objections that the Court made against them, by enjoining the ministers to observe decency and order, by forbidding them to meddle with politics and church government, and by prohibiting all non-conformist ministers and laymen from being speakers
Aramaic - This was a dialect known from documents from Assyria and known best from documents from the Persian empire, for which Aramaic had become the official Court language
Might - ...
The Septuagint gives the following translations: dunasteis (“ruler, sovereign; Court official”); ischus (“strength; power; might”); and dunamis (“power; strength; might; ability; capability”)
Case - A cause or suit in Court as, the case was tried at the last term
First-Fruits - The first of these first-fruits, offered in the name of the nation, was a sheaf of barley, gathered on the fifteenth of Nisan in the evening, and threshed in a Court of the temple
Nehemiah - , though perhaps not for the first time, he returned to his post at the Court of Babylon, Nehemiah 2:6 5:14 13:6 ; but after a few years, was recalled to Jerusalem to reform certain growing irregularities neglect of the temple service, breaches of the Sabbath, marriages with the heathen, etc
Festivals - On each of these occasions every male Israelite was commanded to "appear before the Lord," that is, to attend in the Court of the tabernacle or the temple, and to make his offering with a joyful heart
Sigismundus, Saint - While his father was still living, Sigismund was invested with regal dignity and held his Court at Geneva (Avit
Adonijah - The story of Adonijah (typical of many an Oriental Court intrigue) is recorded in 1 Kings 1:1-53 ; 1 Kings 2:1-36 ; as here recounted it permits of more than one interpretation, for that this passage has been subjected to an ‘editorial’ process can scarcely be doubted, and, in face of the difficulties of interpretation brought about by this, we are forced to reconstruct the course of events to some extent. But Bathsheba, it appears, was anxious to secure the succession for her son, Solomon; with this object in view, she, assisted by the prophet Nathan, heads a party at the Court inimical to the claims of Adonijah
Build - The Bible also refers to the heavenly Court as the “sons of God” (Job 1:6). 6:2, the phrase “sons of God” is variously understood as members of the heavenly Court, the spiritual disciples of God (the sons of Seth), and the boastful among mankind
Eudoxius, Bishop of Constantinople - Excusing himself on the plea that the affairs of Germanicia required his presence, he hastened to Antioch, and, representing himself as nominated by the emperor, got himself made bishop, and sent Asphalus, a presbyter of Antioch, to make the best of the case at Court. The majority signed the "Creed of the Dedication"; Eudoxius who was present, was deposed by the less heretical party, and appears to have sought the shelter of the Court at Constantinople. Eudoxius, mounting his episcopal throne before the expectant multitude of Courtiers, ecclesiastics, and citizens, began with the words: "The Father is ἀσεβής , the Son is εὐσεβής
Paulinus, Missionary to Northumbria - That act probably accelerated the birth of Ethelburga's first child, a daughter, and Paulinus thanked God for the preservation of his master and mistress with such fervour that Edwin, touched at last, promised to become a Christian if he could be avenged upon those who had sent forth the assassin, and, to shew he was in earnest, permitted Paulinus to baptize the new-born princess, with eleven Courtiers who chose to accompany her to the font. Paulinus reminded the hesitating monarch of what had taken place twelve years before at Redwald's Court. Whether Paulinus was the stranger himself, or had gathered from the queen, or some Courtier, that Edwin had seen and heard all this in a dream, is a matter of doubt. A national gathering took place at Goodmanham, near York, to consider the subject, and resulted in the king, Court, and many of the people becoming Christians
Temple - There were besides ten lavers, five on each side of the altar, for washing the entrails; these were in the inner (1 Kings 7:36) or higher (Jeremiah 36:10) or priests' Court, raised above the further off one by three rows of hewed stone and one of cedar beams (1 Kings 6:36; 2 Chronicles 4:9). ...
The great Court or that of the people, outside this, was surrounded by walls, and accessible by brass or bronze doors (2 Chronicles 4:9). )...
The dimensions are those of Solomon's temple; an inner shrine 20 cubits square (Ezekiel 41:4); the nave 20 cubits by 40 cubits; the chambers round ten wide, including the thickness of the walls; the whole, with the porch, 40 cubits by 80 cubits; but the outer Court 500 reeds on each of its sides (Ezekiel 42:16), i. The temple of Herod had an outer Court which with porticoes, measuring 400 cubits every way, was a counterpart on a smaller scale to the outer Court of Ezekiel's temple and had nothing corresponding in Solomon's temple or Zerubbabel's. 1:21, section 1): he employed 10,000 skilled workmen, and 1,000 priests acquainted with fine work in wood and stone; in one year and a half the temple was ready for the priests and Levites; in eight the Courts were complete; but for the 46 years up to Jesus' ministry (John 2:20) various additions were being made, and only in the time of Agrippa II the works ceased. Gentiles had access to the outer Court. long leads to a flight of steps which rise to the surface in the Court of the temple just at the gateway of the inner temple which led to the altar; it is the one of the four gateways on the S. ...
The Court of the women was eastward (Josephus, B. 5:5, section 3), with the magnificently gilt and carved eastern gate leading into it from the outer Court, the same as "the Beautiful gate" (Acts 3:2; Acts 3:11)
Tabernacle - ) Qodesh and miqdash , "sanctuary," are applied to...
(1) the whole tabernacle (Exodus 25:8),...
(2) the Court of the priests (Numbers 4:12), and...
(3) in the narrowest sense to the holy of holies (Leviticus 4:6). " The brazen altar and the tabernacle were the two grand objects within the Court. The altar of burnt offering outside marks that only through shedding of blood can sinful man be admitted within His Courts; and the mercy-seat within the veil, sprinkled with blood of the victim slain outside, typifies Christ, our propitiation or propitiatory within the heavenly holy of holies (Romans 3:25), who is the sinner's only meeting place with God. Once admitted within the Courts by the propitiation of Christ, we as king priests can offer incense of prayer and praise, as the priests burnt incense with holy fire on the altar of incense within (Psalms 141:2; Malachi 1:11). As 10 (= 1 + 2 + 3 + 4) the number for completeness predominates in the tabernacle itself, so five the half of ten, and the number for imperfection, predominates in the Courts; four appearing in the perfect cube of the holiest expressed worldwide extension and divine order. As the Court represents the Jewish dispensation, so the holy place the Christian and the holiest place the glorified church. The church having passed through the outer Court, where atonement has been once for all made, ministers in the holy place, as consisting of king priests (1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:9; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10) without earthly mediator, with prayer, praise, and the light of good works; and has access in spirit already (Hebrews 10:19), and in body finally, into the heavenly holiest. ...
In another point of view the Court is the body, the holy place the soul, the holiest the spirit
Justice - In Exodus 18:13-27 we have what purports to be the original institution of the administration of justice by the elders of clans, Moses himself acting in the capacity of a kind of Court of appeal ( Exodus 18:26 ); it is, of course, quite possible that, so far as Israel was concerned, this account is historically true, but the institution must have been much older than the time of Moses, and in following Jethro’s guidance, Moses was probably only re-instituting a régime which had long existed among his nomad forefathers. ...
Regarding what would correspond to the modern idea of a law Court, we have no data to go upon so far as the earliest period is concerned; but it may be taken for granted that, among the nomads, those who had a quarrel would repair to the tent of the sheik, in which an informal Court would be held. The open space in the immediate vicinity of the city gate was the usual place for assemblies of the people, and it was here that the more formal ‘courts of law’ were held (see Amos 5:12 ; Amos 5:15 , Deuteronomy 21:19 ; Deuteronomy 22:15 ; Deuteronomy 25:7 , Zechariah 8:16 ; the ‘porch of judgment’ of king Solomon [8], already referred to, was of course exceptional). At the time of Ezra we find that the administration of justice by the elders of the city, which had continued throughout the period of the monarchy, is still in vogue (see Ezra 7:25 ; Ezra 10:14 ); they presided over the local Courts in the smaller provincial towns. These smaller Courts consisted of seven members; in the larger towns the corresponding Courts consisted of twenty-three members. In the event of these lower Courts not being able to come to a decision regarding any matter brought before them, the case was carried to the superior Court at Jerusalem, the Sanhedrin (wh. The procedure in these Courts was of the simplest character: the injured person brought his complaint before the judges, previous notice having been given, and publicly gave his version of the matter; the accused then in his turn defended himself; judging from Job 31:35 a written statement was sometimes read out; the testimony of two witnesses at least was required to substantiate an accusation; according to the Talmud, these witnesses had to be males and of age, but the testimony of a slave was not regarded as valid. The form of such an appeal was the simple pronunciation of the word ‘Appello’; there was no need to make a written appeal, the mere utterance of the word in Court suspended all further proceedings there
Mordecai - Mordecai had neither wife nor child, brought up his cousin Esther in his own house, and had access to the Court of the women, all which circumstances accord with his being a eunuch as Matacas was, a class from whom the king had elevated many to the highest posts
Thyatira - " A shrine outside Thyatira walls was sacred to the sibyl Sambatha, a Jewess or Chaldaean, in an enclosure called "the Chaldaean Court
Eldad - The 70 elders appointed by Jethro's advice at Sinai (Exodus 18) to help Moses in judging are distinct from the 70 here endowed with the Spirit to help hint as his executive Court, to govern the rebellious people, and establish his authority, shaken by the people's murmurings against Jehovah and himself because of the want of flesh
Nathan - Prophet in royal Court during reign of David and early years of Solomon
Figure - ) To make a figure; to be distinguished or conspicious; as, the envoy figured at Court
Gallus (11), Abbat, the Apostle of Switzerland - ]'>[1] When Columbanus in 612 left Switzerland to escape the persecution of the Burgundian Court, Gallus was detained at Bregenz by a fever, but as soon as he could, returned to his friend the priest Willimar, at Arbona on the S
Festus, Porcius - "...
Paul answered, "I would to God that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day (including Festus) were both almost (in a small measure) and altogether (in a great measure) such as I am, except these bonds" (mark his refined Courtesy in the exception). Festus sided with Agrippa against the Jews as to the high wall they built to prevent Agrippa seeing from his dining room in the palace into the temple Court, for it hindered the Roman guard also from seeing the temple from the castle of Antonia during the great feasts
Gain - To gratify the queen,and gain the Court
Gehazi - Gehazi, like his master, had access to the Court, for we read of him narrating to the king the story of the prophet’s dealings with the Shunammite ( 2 Kings 8:4-5 )
the Brazen Altar - The position of the brazen altar arrested the offerer as he entered the Court, and pointed out that the only way of access to the Lord was by a sacrifice
Finger - Thus the magicians in the Court of Pharaoh were compelled to acknowledge the finger of God concerning several of the ten plagues of Egypt which the Lord brought upon the Egyptians
Virgin - ” Thus all the women in the Court are described
Grecia - Greece was certainly intended by the Prophet Daniel under the symbol of the single-horned goat; and it is probable that when he calls Greece Chittim, he spoke the language of the Hebrew nation, rather than that of the Persian Court
pi'Late - It must have occurred at some feast at Jerusalem, in the outer Court of the temple
Prison, Prisoners - Jeremiah later was placed under house arrest in the “court of the guard” (Jeremiah 37:20-21 ). Because the latter enraged the princes, Jeremiah was confined for a time to a muddy cistern in the “court of the guard” (Jeremiah 38:4-13 )
Judges - Salian has observed, that they not only presided in Courts of justice, but were also at the head of the councils, the armies, and of every thing that concerned the government of the state; though they never assumed the title either of princes, governors, or the like. ...
Beside these superior judges, every city in the commonwealth had its elders, who formed a Court of judicature, with a power of determining lesser matters in their respective districts. It is certain, however, that there was a Court of judges and officers, appointed in every city, by the law of Moses, Deuteronomy 16:18 . The lower Courts of justice, in their several cities, were held in their gates, Deuteronomy 16:15
Quarter - Quarter-sessions, in England, a general Court held quarterly by the justices of peace of each county, with jurisdiction to try and determine felonies and trespasses but capital offenses are seldom or never tried in this Court
Moses - ...
During this time he lived at the Egyptian Court, and "was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians, and was nightly in words and in deeds," Acts 7:22 . What a contrast between the former period, spent amid the splendors and learning of a Court, and this lonely nomadic life
Jehoiada - The first of the three divisions stood by the gate Sur (2 Kings 11) or Jesod (2 Chronicles 23 "the foundation," a gate in the outer Court at the hollow of the Tyropeon or the Kedron). the gate of the guard (2 Kings 11:6; 2 Kings 11:19), the gate leading from the temple Court to the royal palace on Zion; or else this division had to guard the royal avenue to the temple from the palace outside, they watching from a post in the outer Courts what went on in the palace. ...
Those relieved on the sabbath, whom Jehoiada still retained (for "he dismissed not the courses," 2 Chronicles 23:8) kept watch of Jehovah's house about (in respect to) the king (2 Kings 11:7) in two divisions; these answer to (2 Chronicles 23:5) "all the people (the remainder besides the three bodies under the captains) in the Courts of the house of Jehovah" (2 Kings 11:13; 2 Kings 11:19). The whole royal body guard, probably after Athaliah's slaughter, joined the people in the Courts, to lead the king thence to the palace; at all events the relieved Levite guards were with the people in the Courts, and probably some of the royal guards who took share in the plot. The guard and people kept to the Courts, none but the priests and consecrated Levites entered the holy place (2 Chronicles 23:6). " The fickle people, princes, and king soon forgot all his benefits, and slew his son Zechariah "in the Court of the Lord's house," (the very scene of Jehoiada's reverent care to remove pollution, 2 Chronicles 23:14, in restoring the throne and the temple,) for his faithful reproofs of their idolatry (2 Chronicles 24:15-16; 2 Chronicles 24:20-22)
Aetius, Arian Sect Founder And Head - A violent earthquake and the intrigues of the Court brought about its division into two synods. Whatever triumph was gained rested with the opponents of the Aetians, who appealed to the emperor and the Court, and a second general council was summoned to meet at Constantinople (Athan. Julian recalled all the banished bishops, and invited Aetius to his Court (Ep
Government - Side by side with the power of the sword came the growth of a Court, with its harem and luxurious entourage , its palace and its throne. The prophetic pictures of the Court and its administration are not favourable ( Amos 3:8 ; Amos 4:1 ; Amos 4:6 , Isaiah 5:1-30 etc. This must have lessened the power of the local elders , who no doubt had also to yield to the central Court officials. 2 Chronicles 19:5-11 describes a judicial system organized by Jehoshaphat, which agrees in its main features with that implied by Deuteronomy 16:18 ; Deuteronomy 17:8-13 ; there are local Courts, with a central tribunal. word ‘Torah’), and in the Deuteronomic code the priests appear side by side with the lay element in the central Court ( Exodus 17:9 , Exodus 19:17 ; cf. Except for the power of life and death the Sanhedrin held the supreme judicial authority; there were also local Courts connected with the Synagogue ( Matthew 5:22 )
Edom - In Petra, "where kings kept their Court, and where nobles assembled, there no man dwells; it is given by lot to birds, and beasts, and reptiles
Locust - Every terrace, Court, and inner chamber is filled with them in a moment
Judge (Office) - Instructions on proper exercise of judgment include: the call to judge reputed prophets by their fruits (Matthew 7:5-17 ); encouragement for Christians to judge what is right for themselves and thus avoid pagan lawcourts (Luke 12:57-59 ; 1 Corinthians 6:1-6 ); and instructions regarding church cases (Matthew 18:15-20 ). 1 Corinthians 5:3-5 illustrates the function of a church Court
Close - ) A narrow passage leading from a street to a Court, and the houses within
Sheba, Queen of - It is hard to believe that the monarch of a highly civilized and exceedingly wealthy State would be dumbfounded by the luxury of the Court of Jerusalem ( 2 Chronicles 9:5 ); that reads as though the chieftain of a petty tribe of Arabs was in question
Eunuch - For the services rendered at Court by persons of this class and the power which they often acquired, see Jos
Governor - 41:40) it is probably the Ta-te , the second after the king in the Court of the palace; cf
Ethnarch - 2) shows us that the large Jewish community in the great city of Alexandria had an ‘ethnarch’ over it, and he defines his duties precisely thus: διοικεῖ τε τὸ ἔθνος καὶ διαιτᾷ κρίσεις καὶ συμβολαίων ἐπιμελεῖται καὶ προσταγμάτων, ὡς ἃν πολιτείας ἄρχων αὐτοτελοῦς (‘he governs the race and decides trials in Court and has charge of contracts and ordinances as if he were an absolute monarch’)
Enter - ) To place in regular form before the Court, usually in writing; to put upon record in proper from and order; as, to enter a writ, appearance, rule, or judgment
Den - It was the feast of the Passover, and the Temple Courts were crowded by those who sold sheep, oxen, and pigeons, while the moneychangers also carried on their trade. ) that the spaces in the Court were probably let out to traffickers at an exorbitant rate
Seraphim - ...
Besides praising God they are secondly the medium of imparting spiritual fire from God to His prophet; when Isaiah laments alike his own and the people's uncleanness of lips, in contrast to the seraphim chanting in alternate responses with pure lips God's praises, and (Isaiah 6:5-7) with a deep sense of the unfitness of his own lips to speak God's message to the people, one of the seraphim flew with a live coal which he took from off the altar of burnt offering in the temple Court, the fire on it being that which God at first had kindled (Leviticus 9:24), and laid it upon Isaiah's mouth, saying, "lo, this hath touched thy lips, and thine iniquity is taken away and thy sin purged
Caesarius, of Nazianzus - ...
Refusing a post of honour and emolument at Byzantium, he came home for a time, but returned to the Court and was much honoured by Julian
Athanasius - Arianism, however, being in favour at Court, he was condemned by a council convened at Arles, and by another at Milan, and was obliged to fly into the deserts
Enter - ) To place in regular form before the Court, usually in writing; to put upon record in proper from and order; as, to enter a writ, appearance, rule, or judgment
Aaron - Aaron was noted for his eloquence, and was appointed by Jehovah to speak for Moses in the Court of Pharaoh
Tadmor or Tamar - " Volney observes, "In the space covered by these ruins, we sometimes find a palace, of which nothing remains but the Court and walls; sometimes a temple, whose peristyle is half thrown down; and now a portico, a gallery, a triumphal arch
San Francisco, California, City of - Burnett, who became the first American Governor of California and was later Justice of the Supreme Court of California and president of the Pacific Bank of San Francisco;
Charles Warren Stoddard, author and journalist;
Garret W
Money - There were also money brokers who had stands in the outer Court of the temple, probably to exchange foreign for Jewish coins; and to accommodate those who wished to pay the yearly half-shekel tax, Exodus 30:15 , or to present an offering
Jehu - He also wrote the Court record of Jehoshaphat’s reign (2 Chronicles 19:2; 2 Chronicles 20:34)
Joannes, Silentiarius, Bishop of Colonia - of Colonia, the noble of the Byzantine Court, fetched water from a torrent, cooked for the builders, brought stones and other materials for the work
Mammaea or Mamaea, Julia - On the election of her nephew Elagabalus as emperor, she went with him and her son Alexander, then 13 years old, to Rome, and it speaks well for her prudence and goodness that she continued to secure the life of her son from the jealous suspicions of the tyrant and to preserve him from the fathomless impurity which ran riot in the imperial Court
Valens, Emperor - 35) for securing the succession of Theodorus, one of the principal Court officials
Ausonius, Decimus Magnus, Poet - His poems, which are singularly communicative as to his private history, display him to us in riper years both as student and Courtier, professor and prefect, poet and consul. At the age of 30 he was promoted to the chair of rhetoric in his native city, and not long after was invited to Court by the then Christian emperor Valentinian I. It was no doubt during the residence of the Court at Trèves at this time that he composed his Mosella
Set On, Set Up - 40:8 the verb means “to set up,” in the sense of “to place or put something so that it is perpendicular or vertical”: “And thou shalt set up the Court round about, and hang up the hanging at the Court gate
Sepulchre - You approach to it at the east side through an entrance cut out of the natural rock, which admits you into an open Court of about forty paces square, cut down into the rock with which it is encompassed instead of walls. " ...
"On the west side of the Court is a portico nine paces long and four broad, hewn likewise out of the natural rock
House - It is possible sometimes to walk from one end of the village to the other without descending the ladders or staircases to the Courtyards and streets. -In the East these now usually look into the Courtyard, not into the street, as privacy is of the greatest importance. The entry (πυλών) is either the same as, or else leads into, the fore-court (προαύλιον) of Mark 14:68, where || Matthew 26:71 has πυλών. Inside the gate, perhaps in the fore-court, were the water-pots for washing (John 2:6); evidently not in the guest-room. The Courtyard (αὐλή). On this Courtyard the rooms opened; our Lord inside was visible to Peter in the Court (Luke 22:61). The rooms, in places where there is little cold weather, might be entirely open to the Court, as may be seen at the present day, e. at Mosul; or, in colder places, might open on the Court with doors and windows, with or without a covered gallery. (With this arrangement for an upper room we may compare the ordinary provision in a caravanserai of a room or rooms over the gateway for the guests, while the stables are below, and round the Courtyard
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - You would seek out those in this city who had sometimes been at Court. And if there was any book of palace etiquette and Court ceremonial to be had for love or money, you would sit up all night over it; you would set your very Bible aside night after night in order to give all your mind to the Court Guide. And if you could accuse yourself of neglecting the very utmost precaution, and thus fell into some disgraceful blunder at Court, you would never forget it, and you would never forgive yourself, to your dying day
Daniel, Prophet - He was educated for the service of the Court
Figure - The envoy figured at the Court of St
Shimei, Shimeites - In the Court intrigues connected with the royal succession, a Courtier, Shimei (cf
Zechariah - He was stoned with stones at the commandment of the king in the Court of the house of the Lord
Charlemagne - ...
Charlemagne undertook the agricultural development of his realm, organized and codified the principles of ancient Frankish law, and through the scholars whom he attracted to his Court inaugurated educational reform
Charles the Great - ...
Charlemagne undertook the agricultural development of his realm, organized and codified the principles of ancient Frankish law, and through the scholars whom he attracted to his Court inaugurated educational reform
Syracuse - At the Court of her kings were to be found such men of letters as Pindar and aeschylus, while the splendid site which Nature had given her was adorned with some of the finest buildings in the world. Conybeare and Howson not only suggest that Julius was probably Courteous enough to let him go ashore, but have no difficulty in giving credit to the local tradition which makes St
Banking - Jesus sternly disrupted this business of banking in the Court of the Gentiles (Matthew 21:12 ) because it went beyond the intended convenience and profaned the worship of God
Avenger - Vengeance could be exercised only before the murderer reached the city of refuge or after the Court either at the victim's hometown or at the murder site judged the case (Numbers 35:12 )
Arsacius - The churches once so thronged became empty; with the exception of a few officials, the dependants of the Court party, and the expectants of royal favour, the people of Constantinople refused to attend any religious assembly at which he might be expected to be present
Hold - ; hence, to direct and bring about officially; to conduct or preside at; as, the general held a council of war; a judge holds a Court; a clergyman holds a service
Street - Craftsmen plied their trade on certain “streets” named after the guild—for example, the Bakers’ Street: “Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the Court of the prison, and that they should give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers’ street, until all the bread in the city were spent” ( Claudius, the Emperor - When Herod Antipas and Herodias came to Court the favour of Caligula (Joseph
Athens - Paul's celebrated sermon, Acts xvii, was preached on the Areopagus, or Hill of Mars, where a celebrated Court was held which took cognizance of matters of religion, blasphemies against the gods, the building of temples, &c
Neomenia - Ezekiel says that the burnt-offerings offered on the day of the new moon were provided at the king's expense, and that on this day was to be opened the eastern gate of the Court of the priests, Ezekiel 45:17 ; Ezekiel 46:1-2 ; 1 Chronicles 23:31 ; 2 Chronicles 8:13
Apple Tree - ...
To the manner of serving up these citrons in his Court, Solomon seems to refer, when he says, "A word fitly spoken is like golden citrons in silver baskets;" whether, as Maimonides supposes, in baskets wrought with open work, or in salvers curiously chased, it nothing concerns us to determine; the meaning is, that an excellent saying, suitably expressed, is as the most acceptable gift in the fairest conveyance
Sabbath - The sacrifices of the temple were doubled; the shew-bread was changed; the inner Court of the temple was opened for solemn services: the prophets and the Levites took the occasion for imparting religious instruction to the people
Banking - Jesus sternly disrupted this business of banking in the Court of the Gentiles (Matthew 21:12 ) because it went beyond the intended convenience and profaned the worship of God
Palace - The crowd in Matthew 26:1 gathered in the Courtyard of the high priest's residence. Modern translations rendered aule variously: palace (NIV, NRSV, TEV); Court (NAS); house (REB). The strong man of Luke 11:1 guarded the open Courtyard of his home
King, - " He had a Court of Oriental magnificence
jo'Ash - When he was rebuked for this by Zechariah, the son of Jehoiada, Joash caused him to be stoned to death in the very Court of the Lord's house
Joannes Scholasticus, Bishop of Constantinople - This would bring him into touch with the Court at Constantinople
Hussites - This occasioned a violent quarrel between the incensed archbishop of Prague and the zealous reformer, which the latter inflamed and augmented from day to day, by his pathetic exclamations against the Court of Rome, and the corruption that prevailed among the sacerdotal order. This event no sooner happened, than Huss began to inveigh, with greater freedom than he had done before, against the vices and corruptions of the clergy; and to recommend in a public manner the writings and opinions of Wickliffe, as far as they related to the papal hierarchy, the despotism of the Court of Rome, and the corruption of the clergy
Excommunication - ...
The form of excommunication in the church of England anciently ran thus: "By the authority of God the Father Almighty, the Son, and Holy Ghost, and of Mary the blessed mother of God, we excommunicate, anathematize, and sequester from the holy mother church, & 100:" The causes of excommunication in England are, contempt of the bishops' Court, heresy, neglect of public worship and the sacraments, incontinency, adultery, simony, &c. It is described to be twofold; the less is an ecclesiastical censure, excluding the party from the participation of the sacrament; the greater proceeds farther, and excludes him not only from these, but from the company of all christians; but if the judge of any spiritual Court excommunicates a man for a cause of which he has not the legal cognizance, the party may have an action against him at common law, and he is also liable to be indicted at the suit of the king
Tabernacle - It consisted of a two-roomed timber structure inside a tent, which in turn was set in a large Court surrounded by a fence. Within the rooms, and in the open Court, were articles of sacred furniture
Antonius - 311), in which their bishop had fallen, he went to comfort the Christians of Alexandria; and though the presence of monks at these trials was forbidden as encouraging the martyrs in their disobedience to the emperor's edict, he persisted in appearing in Court. His influence was great at the Court of the emperor
Ezra - With the aid, possibly, of Jews at Court, he enlisted the goodwill of Artaxerxes, and secured an Imperial firman investing him with all the authority necessary for his purpose. A general congregation of the community authorizes the establishment of a divorce Court, presided over by Ezra, which finishes its labours after three months’ work:’ and they made an end with the whole business’ (10:17 [2]), many innocent women and children being made to suffer in the process
Agrippa - After the death of his father Aristobulus, Josephus informs us that Herod, his grandfather, took care of his education, and sent him to Rome to make his Court to Tiberius. The emperor, we are told by Josephus, was inclined to give him all the dominions that had been possessed by his father, but was dissuaded from it, Agrippa being only seventeen years of age; and he kept him therefore at his Court four years
David - In his early pastoral life he distinguished himself by his boldness, fidelity, and faith in God; and while yet a youth was summoned to Court, as one expert in music, valiant, prudent in behavior, and comely in person. He returned to Court crowned with honor, received a command in the army, acquitted himself well on all occasions, and rapidly gained the confidence and love of the people
Altar - It was placed in the Court before the tabernacle, towards the east
Tongues, Confusion of - But the Lord discerned their ambitious purposes, and, after consulting with the Divine beings who constituted His council and Court (cf
Jeremiah - It was in such circumstances that Jeremias, yielding to the inspiration of God, placed himself in the Court of the Temple, and announced its destruction (26)
Jeremias - It was in such circumstances that Jeremias, yielding to the inspiration of God, placed himself in the Court of the Temple, and announced its destruction (26)
Prov'Erbs, Book of - 25-29, which, according to the superscription, professes to be collection of Solomon's proverbs, consisting of single sentences, which the men of the Court of Hezekiah copied out
Synagogue - ) ...
The synagogue was also sometimes used as a Court of judicature, in which the rulers presided (Matthew 10:17 ; Mark 5:22 ; Luke 12:11 ; 21:12 ; Acts 13:15 ; 22:19 ); also as public schools
Jonathan - An uncle of David who functioned as counselor and scribe in the royal Court (1 Chronicles 27:32 )
Laver - It and the altar stood in the Court of the tabernacle. sides of the priests' Courts; each contained 40 "baths" (1 Kings 7:27; 1 Kings 7:39; 2 Chronicles 4:5-6)
Ur - It was like passing from one Court of a temple into another
Council - corner of a Court near the temple. ...
There were two lesser Courts or "councils" (Matthew 10:17) in Jerusalem; one in each town of Palestine, 23 members in each in a town of 120, three when the population was below 120 (Talmud). They were connected with the several synagogues and possessed the right of scourging (2 Corinthians 11:24); but Josephus represents the local Courts, as constituted by Moses, to have consisted of seven, with two Levitical assessors apiece. Matthew 5:21-22, "the judgment," perhaps alludes to such Courts
Gilgal - Gilgal was also one of the three places where Samuel annually held circuit Court (1 Samuel 7:16 )
San'Hedrin - ...
The place in which the sessions of the Sanhedrin were ordinarily held was, according to the Talmad, a hall called Gazzith, supposed by Lightfoot to have been situated in the southeast corner of one of the Courts near the temple building. As a judicial body the Sanhedrin constituted a supreme Court, to which belonged in the first instance the trial of false prophets, of the high priest and other priests, and also of a tribe fallen into idolatry
Ishbosheth - Pretending to fetch wheat from the inner Court for their men, in the still noon when Ishbosheth was taking his midday sleep on his bed, they smote and took away his head, making their escape all that night through the valley of the Jordan
Zedekiah - Others who bore the name Zedekiah were a prophet in the Court of Ahab (1 Kings 2:11; 1 Kings 2:24), an administrator in the government of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:12), a son of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 39:1-3) and a false prophet among the Jewish captives in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:21-23)
Sidon - Raising no question as to whether the king’s displeasure was just or not, and facing the plain fact that ‘their country was fed from the king’s country,’ they looked about for a friend at Court and humbly asked for peace
Obed Edom - gate in the outer Court (1 Chronicles 26:15)
Back - To support to maintain to second or strengthen by aid as, the Court was backed by the House of Commons
Sun - The horses sacred to the sun, and used in processions to meet the rising sun, were kept at the entering in of the house of Jehovah in the portico (as Gesenius explains parwarim in 2 Kings 23:11, not "suburbs") at the western side of the outer temple Court
Gershon, Gershonites - (1) During the desert wanderings the Gershonites were on the west side of the Tent (Numbers 3:23 ); their duty was to carry all the hangings which composed the Tent proper, and the outer coverings and the hangings of the Court, with their cords ( Numbers 3:25 f
Grace - He might at his pleasure grace or disgrace whom ...
he would in Court
Hand - ...
In Court the accuser stands on the right hand (Psalms 109:6 , Zechariah 3:1 )
Intercession of Christ - Christ appears before God with his own body; but whether he intercedes vocally or not cannot be known: though it is most probable, I think, that he does not: however, it is certain that he does not intercede in like manner as when on earth, with prostration of body, cries and tears, which would be quite inconsistent with his state of exaltation and glory; nor as supplicating an angry judge, for peace is made by the blood of the cross; nor as litigating a point in a Court of judicature; but his intercession is carried on by showing himself as having done, as their surety, all that law and justice could require, by representing his blood and sacrifice as the ground of his people's acceptance with the Father, Revelation 5:6
Publican - Hence the rabbis declared, as one robber disgraced his whole family, so one publican in a family; promises were not to be kept with murderers, thieves and publicans (Nedar 3:4); the synagogue alms box and the temple corban must not receive their alms (Baba Kama 10:1); it was not lawful to use riches received from them, as gotten by rapine; nor could they judge or give testimony in Court (Sauhedr
Annas - These booths were situated either in the temple Court (Keim, Jesus of Nazara, v
Gate - Certain “gates” were only the thickness of a curtain: “And for the gate of the Court [1] shall be a hanging of twenty cubits …” ( Courts: “Stand in the gate of the Lord’s house, and proclaim there this word, and say, Hear the word of the Lord, all ye of Judah, that enter in at these gates to worship the Lord” ( Courts convened: “And if the man like not to take his brother’s wife, then let his brother’s wife go up to the gate unto the elders, and say, My husband’s brother refuseth …” ( je'hu - All the descendants of Ahab that remained in Jezreel, together with the officers of the Court and the hierarchy of Eastward, were swept away
Abyssinian Church - Bruce, by the report of his medical skill, contrived to introduce himself to the Court, where he even obtained military promotion; and was in such repute, that it was with great difficulty he obtained leave to return to England
Cloud - The Lord appeared at Sinai in the midst of a cloud, Exodus 19:9 ; Exodus 24:5 ; and after Moses had built and consecrated the tabernacle, the cloud filled the Court around it, so that neither Moses nor the priests could enter, Exodus 40:34-35
Sion - This hill was, perhaps, on this account, made choice of by the Jebusites for building a fort or citadel upon; which fort was taken by David, who transferred his Court thither from Hebron, and brought the ark of the Lord and set it in a tabernacle or tent pitched for it
Beard - To avoid ridicule, David did not wish them to appear at his Court till their beards were grown again
Comfort, Comforter, Comfortless - It was used in a Court of justice to denote a legal assistant, counsel for the defense, an advocate; then, generally, one who pleads another's cause, an intercessor, advocate, as in 1 John 2:1 , of the Lord Jesus
Swallows - The dome is rough cast over; before the mosque there is a Court, well planted with many high plane trees, on which we saw a great many storks, that haunt thereabout all the year round
Shushan - The "pillars of marble" may perhaps be even now traced in the ruined colonnade forming a great central Court; the huge columns were fluted and highly ornamented, and one of the capitals measured was twenty-eight feet high
Liberty - The witness obtained liberty to leave the Court
Jezebel - ) She established the Phoenician idolatry on a grand scale at her husband's Court, maintaining at her table 450 prophets of Baal and 400 of Astarte (so "the groves" ought to be translated): 1 Kings 16:31-32; 1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:13. She survived Ahab 14 years, and still as queen mother exercised an evil influence in the Courts of her sons Ahaziah and Joram of Israel, and in that of her daughter Athaliah's husband Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:6; 2 Chronicles 22:2)
Ahab - Most of the Court prophets were corrupt, and gave Ahab whatever advice they thought would please him
Columbanus, Abbat of Luxeuil And Bobbio - " Thus simply does the Irish calendar refer to an Irishman famous in France, Switzerland, and Italy, the great champion of public morals at a cruel and profligate Court, the zealous preacher of the Gospel in lands where it had been all but forgotten, and the pious founder of monasteries. He excited against himself strong feeling among the Gallican clergy and in the Burgundian Court. But he received great opposition from the Burgundian Court
Jerusalem - Hill to the outer Court of the Temple. limit of the outer Court of Herod’s temple (Expository Times xx. The fore-court of Antonia must therefore have projected some distance into the present Ḥaram area, and the rock on which the castle stood, while scarped on the other three sides, must on the S. point of the fore-court of Antonia and ran S. Antonia formed a fortress by itself, likewise the Temple both in its outer Court and in the inner sanctuary. 64 that operations in the Courts of the Temple were at an end. This is topographically exact, whether we take the outer Court or the sanctuary proper, which only Jews could enter (Acts 21:28 ff. [7] 280) that the Beautiful Door is to be sought in the inner Courts, and preferably on the E. side of the Court of the Women. As shown above, it is probable that some slight re-adjustment of the forecourt of Antonia and of the N. it is evident that the Temple area was at a lower level than the Castle, for stairs led down to the Court. By cutting down the cloisters a barricade could be erected to prevent entrance to the Temple Courts from the Castle, as was done by the Jews in the time of Florus (a
Tabernacle - ...
In the outer Court. The furniture of the Court was connected with sacrifice; that of the sanctuary itself with the deeper mysteries of mediation and access to God. THE Court OF THE TABERNACLE, in which the tabernacle itself stood, was an oblong space, 100 cubits by 50 (i. In the outer or east half of the Court was placed the altar of burnt offering, and between it and the tabernacle itself; the laver at which the priests washed their hands and feet on entering the temple
Tabernacle - The term "tabernacle" is sometimes used to refer to one part of a larger complex: the tent-like structure that stood within a Court enclosed by linen curtains. The color white, which was especially prominent in the linen curtains of the Court, calls attention to the purity of God and the necessary purity of those who would live in his presence. The Court itself speaks of the separation between God and the sinner. ...
But this brings to the fore the question raised by the great altar in the Court outside
Synagogue - It seems probable that the council was the larger tribunal of twenty-three, which sat in every city, and that under the term synagogue we are to understand a smaller Court, probably that of the ten judges mentioned in the Talmud. The Church, either by itself or by appointed delegates, was to act as a Court of arbitration in all disputes its members
Obadiah - " Ahab cared more for these than for his perishing subjects! In a corrupt Court, in spite of the persecuting idolatrous queen Jezebel, "Obadiah feared Jehovah," not merely a little but "greatly. Godliness is a hardy plant that can live amidst the frosts of persecution and the relaxing warmth of a corrupt Court, and not merely in the conservatory of a pious family (1 Corinthians 10:13; Isaiah 27:3; 1 Peter 1:5)
Ahaz - What mock humility in one who scrupled not to use God's brazen altar to divine with, and had substituted for God's altar in God's worship the pattern, which pleased his aesthetic tastes, of the idol altar at Damascus (2 Kings 16:11-15); perhaps the adoption of this pattern, an Assyrian one, was meant as a token of vassalage to Assyria, by adopting some of their religious usage's and idolatries; indeed Tiglath Pileser expressly records in the Assyrian monuments that he held his Court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute of both Pekah of Samaria and Ahaz of Judah. He adopted the Babylonian sun dial (which he probably erected in the temple, perhaps in "the middle Court," where Isaiah saw it and gave its shadow as a sign to Hezekiah), becoming acquainted with it through the Assyrians (2 Kings 20:11; 2 Kings 20:4; 2 Kings 20:9)
Maronites - The Court of Rome, in affiliating the Maronites, has granted them a hospitium at Rome, to which they may send several of their youth to receive a gratuitous education. It is also certain that there are Maronites in Syria, who still behold the church of Rome with the greatest aversion and abhorrence; nay, what is still more remarkable, great numbers of that nation residing in Italy, even under the eye of the pontiff, opposed his authority during the seventeenth century, and threw the Court of Rome into great perplexity
David - ...
David’s introduction to Saul’s Court was as one whose music relaxed the king’s troubled nerves (1 Samuel 16:16). After his victory over the Philistines’ champion fighter, he became Saul’s armour-bearer and full-time Court musician (1 Samuel 16:21; 1 Samuel 17:50; 1 Samuel 18:2)
Moses - He grew up amid all the grandeur and excitement of the Egyptian Court, maintaining, however, probably a constant fellowship with his mother, which was of the highest importance as to his religious belief and his interest in his "brethren. ...
After the termination of the war in Ethiopia, Moses returned to the Egyptian Court, where he might reasonably have expected to be loaded with honours and enriched with wealth. But "beneath the smooth current of his life hitherto, a life of alternate luxury at the Court and comparative hardness in the camp and in the discharge of his military duties, there had lurked from childhood to youth, and from youth to manhood, a secret discontent, perhaps a secret ambition
David - He was introduced to Court as a man expert in music, a singularly valiant man, a man of war, prudent in matters, of a comely person, and one favoured of the Lord. In his exalted station, and amidst the dangers that encompassed him, he behaved with singular prudence, so that he was in high esteem both in the Court and camp. But Saul's jealousy returned by a fresh victory David gained over the Philistines; who, finding the king was determined to seek his life, retired from Court, and was dismissed in peace by Jonathan, after a solemn renewal of their friendship, to provide for his own safety
Blow - And through the Court his Courtesy was blown
Napoleon i - Metternich encouraged alliance with Archduchess Marie Louise of Austria, but the Viennese Court required dissolution of the spiritual bond
Tabernacles, Feast of - John 7:37 ); and the illumination of the women’s Court in the Temple by the lighting of the 4 golden candelabra (cf
High Priest - The sounding of the bells intimated to the people in the outer Court the time when the high priest entered into the holy place to burn incense before the Lord (Exodus 28 )
Caesarea - ) official residence; the Herodian kings also kept Court there
Encampment - This would be varied according to local requirements; but the ideal was reproduced in the square Court with which the temple was surrounded, and in the heavenly city of Ezekiel 48:20; Revelation 21:16; Revelation 20:9
Zechariah - After the death of Jehoiada he boldly condemned both the king and the people for their rebellion against God (2 Chronicles 24:20 ), which so stirred up their resentment against him that at the king's commandment they stoned him with stones, and he died "in the Court of the house of the Lord" (24:21)
Esarhaddon - The monuments tell us of a similar act of Esarhaddon whereby he gave a territory on the Persian gulf to Merodach Baladan's son, on his submission as a refugee at his Court
Song of Songs - The book contains a number of references to the splendour of Solomon and his Court, and is sometimes called the Song of Solomon (Song of Song of Solomon 1:1; Song of Solomon 1:5; Song of Solomon 3:7-11; Song of Solomon 8:11-12)
Fine - To impose on one a pecuniary penalty, payable to the government, for a crime or breach of law to set a fine on by judgment of a Court to punish by fine
Necromancy - As a result, he turned to a woman known to Saul's Court as a "medium
Gallio - He was the elder brother of Seneca the philosopher, to whose influence at Court he may have owed his governorship
Ahab - Other prophets do not seem to have been disturbed, for we find them at the Court of Ahab in the last year of his life ( 1 Kings 22:6 )
Arsenius - The time that Arsenius spent at the Court came to an end when he was forty years old, in 394
High - We speak of high and low of a high office high rank high station a high Court
Shiloh (2) - Major Wilson says northwards the tell at Seilun slopes down to a broad shoulder, across which a level Court has been cut, 77 by 412 ft
Return - ) The rendering back or delivery of writ, precept, or execution, to the proper officer or Court
Make (Cut) a Covenant - ” This noun, which occurs only 3 times, refers to “beams” in the sense of things “cut off” in 1 Kings 6:36: “And he built the inner Court with three rows of hewed stone, and a row of cedar beams
Wayfaring Men - Our horses were taken into the Court yard of the house, and unburdened of their saddles, without a single question being asked on either side; and it was not until we had seated ourselves that our intention to remain here for the night was communicated to the master of the house: so much is it regarded a matter of course, that those who have a house to shelter themselves in, and food to partake of, should share those comforts with wayfarers
Friends - Fox evidently considered himself as acting under a divine commission, and went, not only to fairs and markets, but into Courts of justice and "steeple houses," as he called the churches, warning all to obey the Holy Spirit, speaking by him. For refusing to pay tithes, &c, however, they are still liable to suffer in the exchequer and ecclesiastical Court, both in Great Britain and Ireland
Love - Courtship chiefly in the phrase, to make love, that is, to Court to woo to solicit union in marriage
Presbytery - the Letters of Ignatius, passim ), corresponding not to the modern presbytery of the Presbyterian Churches, which is a district Court composed of ministers and elders drawn from a number of separate congregations, but to the kirk-session or body of elders by which in those churches a single congregation is ruled
Musical Instruments of the Hebrews - Another drum was more like our kettledrum; and one of these, the rabbins say, was placed in the temple Court to the priests to prayer, and could be heard from Jerusalem to Jericho
Jehoshaphat - The king prayed in the Court of the temple, "O our God, wilt thou not judge them? for we have no might against this great company that cometh against us
Joash - Zechariah, son of Jehoiada, attempted to call them back to the worship of God, but by command of the king he was stoned to death in the Court of the temple
Serapion, Bishop of Heraclea - Severian was ambitious and devoid of a high sense of honour, and Serapion had soon to report, probably with exaggerations, that he was undermining Chrysostom's influence with the Court and aristocracy, and seeking to outdo him as a preacher
Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus - His 30 years of influence at the Court of Justinian and his high personal qualities gave him very considerable authority among his own party. 581 he mentions his old intimacy with Tiberius at the Court of Justin: "He and I were often together, and stood with the other Courtiers before the serene Justin " (iii. Their changes were admitted, but the "Nestorians and semi-Nestorians" of the Court—so John puts it—scared the timid emperor into further alterations, of which the chief was an inserted clause, " that the customs of the church were to be maintained," which meant that the obnoxious council was still to be proclaimed from the diptychs. By another imprisonment Eutychius wrung from him the resignation of a property which Callinicus, a chief officer of the Court, had bestowed, and which John had largely improved and converted into a monastery
Esther - The Persians in the provinces would be only the officials, whose orders from Court were not to take part against the Jews. Similarly, Daniel, Ezra, and Nehemiah, who held official posts in the Persian Court, wrote under inspiration the books which bear their names, and which describe the relations of the Jews to the pagan world power. Ezra and the men of the great synagogue at Jerusalem probably edited and added it to the canon, having previously received it, and the book of Daniel, while at the Persian Court
Ireland - By the Act of Settlement, 600 Catholics were restored to their lands, and more would have been restored if the Court of claims had continued its sittings, but through the influence of the Marquis of Ormond, who hated the Catholics, it closed its doors with 3,000 cases untried. When he ascended the throne, he appointed Catholics to high positions, opened the corporations and universities to them, had a papal nuncio at his Court, and suspended the penal laws
New York, City of - Brady, first Catholic judge of the Supreme Court; Charles G. MacNeven, professor at College of Physicians and Surgeons, first Catholic physician to attain eminence in America; John Newton, engineer, famed for renowned work on Hell Gate; Lorenzo da Ponte, first instructor of Italian at Columbia and first in the United States to point out the beauties of Dante; Denis O'Brien, first Catholic judge of Court of Appeals; Thomas O'Conor, a pioneer American Catholic editor, published "Shamrock, or Hibernian Chronicle," 1810, compiled a history of the War of 1812; Conde Pallen poet, philosopher, and educator; Thomas Fortune Ryan, financier
Tabernacle, the - Any one drawing near to the tabernacle would see first its Court, a space enclosed with curtains hanging from pillars. On entering the Court by its one gate the first thing approached was the brazen altar
Sanhedrim - SANHEDRIN, or SYNEDRIUM, among the ancient Jews, the supreme council or Court of judicature, of that republic; in which were despatched all the great affairs both of religion and policy. As to the personal qualifications of the judges of this Court, it was required that they should be of untainted birth; and they were often of the race of the priests or Levites, or of the number of inferior judges, or of the lesser sanhedrim, which consisted of twenty-three judges. This council decided causes brought before it by appeal from inferior Courts
Manes, Called Also Mani - Being very zealous for the faith, he was ordained priest while yet young, but becoming a heretic he went to the Court of Sapor, whom he proselytized to his views, c. 102; Book about the Giants, known in Syriac at the Court of Baghdad so late as the 9th cent
Hezekiah - Shebna was one of these half hearted, self indulgent, and ostentatious officers at Court. as being a foreigner (his name is un-Hebrew like, he was probably a Syrian brought from abroad to Ahaz' Court) thou hast no paternal burying place or kindred here. God granted his earnest prayer; "afore Isaiah had gone out into the middle Court the word of the Lord came to him," i. God gave Hezekiah as a sign of recovery the recession of the shadow ten degrees on Ahaz's (See DIAL, an obelisk in the midst of the Court, the shadow of which could be seen by Hezekiah from his sick chamber, falling on the successive steps ascending to his palace. Probably he recovered the Babylonian kingdom when Sennacherib was weakened by his disaster in Judea, and sent the embassy not merely to congratulate Hezekiah on his recovery but mainly to Court Hezekiah's alliance, as having like himself cast off the Assyrian yoke
Jesuits - They aimed, in the next place, to become the spiritual directors of the higher ranks; and soon established themselves in most of the Courts which were attached to the papal faith, not only as the confessors, but frequently also as the guides and ministers, of superstitious princes. About the beginning of the seventeenth century, they obtained from the Court of Madrid the grant of the large and fertile province of Paraguay, which stretches across the southern continent of America, from the mountains of Potosi to the banks of the river La Plata; and, after every deduction which can reasonably be made from their own accounts of their establishment, enough will remain to excite the astonishment and applause of mankind. Under the regency of the duke of Orleans, the Jesuits, and all theological personages and principles were disregarded with atheistical superciliousness; but under Louis XV, they partly recovered their influence at Court, which, even under Cardinal Fleury, they retained in a considerable degree. In March, 1762, the French Court received intelligence of the capture of Martinico by the British; and, dreading a storm of public indignation, resolved to divert the exasperated feelings of the nation, by yielding the Jesuits to their impending fate. All their property was confiscated, and a small pension assigned to each individual as long as he should reside in a place appointed, and satisfy the Spanish Court as to his peaceable demeanour. Their zeal to extend the jurisdiction of the Court of Rome over every civil government, gave currency to tenets respecting the duty of opposing princes who were hostile to the Catholic faith: which shook the basis of all political allegiance, and loosened the obligations of every human law
House - In a Syrian village of to-day the typical abode of the fellah consists of a walled enclosure, within which is a small Court closed at the farther end by a house of a single room. As in all Eastern domestic architecture, the rooms were built on one or more sides of an open Court ( 2 Samuel 17:18 , Jeremiah 32:2 etc. ...
Should occasion arise, through the marriage of a son or otherwise, to enlarge the house, this was done by building one or more additional rooms on another side of the Court. ]'>[5] ), the house would consist of two or even more Courts, in which case the rooms about the ‘inner Court’ ( Esther 4:11 ) were appropriated to the women of the family. The Court, further, often contained a cistern to catch and retain the precious supply of water that fell in the rainy season ( 2 Samuel 17:18 ). Access to the roof was apparently obtained, as at the present day, by an outside stair leading from the Court
Arius, Followers of - But her influence was still more strongly felt in the next reign, and after the death of the astute and able Eusebius of Nicomedia, mere intriguers, such as Ursacius and Valens, and even the worthless eunuchs about the Court, were able to persuade the emperor into unreasonable and tortuous courses, of which jealousy of the great Athanasius formed in reality the secret motive. Court intrigue occupies a prominent place in the history. Yet it gradually became clear, as far as the march of opinion was concerned, that the West was irrevocably attached to the views of Athanasius, while in the East opinion was divided and variable, and the Court influence grew more decisive on the progress of events in proportion as the power of Constantius increased. The Court party, whose object was simply to produce a formula which would, as they thought, meet the emperor's views by putting a stop to controversy, endeavoured to force another creed on the council, but in vain. But the Courtiers perceived that there was no chance whatever of forcing their views upon a phalanx consisting, as it is now thought, of about 100 Western bishops devoted to the decisions of Nicaea. ...
Meanwhile the Court intriguers resumed their activity. Among their opponents no concert reigned, but only confusion; their ascendancy was founded on Court intrigue and imperial violence
Hezekiah - Hezekiah was not willing to Court the favor of the Assyrian kings
Archangel - On occasion, they are associated with a heavenly Court (Joshua 5:13-14 ; 1 Kings 22:19 )
Temple, the Second - ...
This second temple also differed from the first in that, while in the latter there were numerous "trees planted in the Courts of the Lord," there were none in the former. The second temple also had for the first time a space, being a part of the outer Court, provided for proselytes who were worshippers of Jehovah, although not subject to the laws of Judaism
Bethel - Bethel became the king's chapel" (sanctuary) "the king's Court" ("house of the kingdom") (Amos 7:13; Amos 3:14-15)
Nehemiah - Nehemiah was the last of the governors sent from the Persian Court
Epistle - Sanballat's "open letter" was an infraction of the etiquette of the Persian Court (Nehemiah 6:5)
Will (Testament) - Paul’s argument savours more of the Rabbinic school than of the Roman law-court
Tiglath Pileser - " Probably it was an Assyrian altar which Ahaz copied, as a formal recognition of the gods of the sovereign nation (which required subject kings to set up in their capital "the laws of Asshur"), and a token of submission: the visit of Ahaz to Damascus (where "he saw the altar") "to meet king Tiglath Pileser" accords with Tiglath Pileser's inscription that before quitting Syria he held his Court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute from the neighbouring sovereigns, among whom he mentions Pekah and Jahu-Khaz (Ahaz) of Judah
Azariah - Son of Nathan in charge of the system of obtaining provisions for the Court from the twelve government provinces ( 1 Kings 4:5 )
Spies - Christ was always conscious of the presence of such men, and on these occasions seemed to Court publicity for His actions; cf
Advocate - ’...
And thus it was expedient for us that He should go away, that we might enjoy a double advocacy the Holy Spirit’s here, pleading with us for God; and that of Jesus in the Court of heaven, pleading with God for us
Dancing - In the cities and in the houses of the rich, the large reception room, or the open paved Court, into which all the apartments opened, was available for the purpose
Herod - Mark 6:14; but he was opposed at the Court of Caligula by the emissaries of Agrippa, and condemned to perpetual banishment at Lugdunum, a
Tadmor - "In the space covered by these ruins," says Volney, "we sometimes, find a palace of which nothing remains but the Court and walls; sometimes a temple, whose peristyle is half thrown down; and now a portico, a gallery, or triumphal arch
Publican - It is even said, that they would not allow them to enter into their temple or synagogues, nor to join in prayers, nor even allow their evidence in a Court of justice on any trial; nor would they accept of their offerings in the temple
Naaman - " He farther says, "In this the Lord pardon thy servant, that when my master goes into the house of Rimmon, to worship there, and he leaneth upon my hand, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon; when I bow down in the house of Rimmon, the Lord pardon thy servant in this thing," 2 Kings 5:18 ; which some understand to be a reserve, denoting that he would renounce idolatry no farther than was consistent with his worldly interest, with his prince's favour, and his place at Court
Throne - "This short expedition," says Malcolm, "was brought to a close by the personal submission of Abool Fyze Khan, who, attended by all his Court, proceeded to the tents of Nadir Shah, and laid his crown, and other ensigns of royalty, at the feet of the conqueror, who assigned him an honourable place in his assembly, and in a few days afterward restored him to his throne
Baruch - He had a brother of the name of Seraiah, who occupied an important station in the Court of King Zedekiah; but he himself adhered to the person of the Prophet Jeremiah, and was his most steady friend, though his attachment to him drew on himself several persecutions and much ill treatment
Table - In England, the chirographer tables the fines of every county, and fixes a copy in some open place of the Court
Porphyrius, Patriarch of Antioch - By his powerful influence with the party then dominant about the Court, Porphyry obtained an imperial rescript banishing Constantius to the Oasis
Canticles; the Song of Solomon - The literalists explain it as displaying "the victory of humble and constant love over the temptations of wealth and royalty": Solomon tempting a Shulamite shepherdess, who, in spite of the fascinations of his splendid Court, pines for her shepherd lover from whom she has been severed. The sudden transitions from the Court to the grove are inexplicable on the literal interpretation. ...
Proverbs, said the rabbis, are the outer Court of Solomon's temple; Ecclesiastes, the holy place; Cantitles, the holy of holies
Profaning, Profanity - For any foot of Gentile or Samaritan to pass beyond the Court of the Gentiles meant death to the transgressor. ...
The presence of the stall-keepers and cattle-drovers and money-changers was strictly within the letter of the Law, since it was in the Court of the Gentiles that this market was held, i. For the Temple authorities this was quite enough; they had no compunctions about a traffic that was technically legal—least of all as the rents paid by the traders for the privilege of using the Temple Court as a bazaar passed into their own pockets
Passover (i.) - The first section entered the Court of the Priests, the gates being thereupon closed, and the trumpets blown three times. The lambs were hung on iron hooks fastened to the walls and pillars of the Court, and when these were all in use, upon staves which rested on the shoulders of two men; if the day were a Sabbath, the use of staves was not permitted, and two offerers laid one the left hand the other the right on his neighbour’s shoulder and so suspended the lambs. The company was then dismissed to their dwellings to partake of the feast, the incense was burnt, the lamps trimmed, and the Temple Court washed. On the 16th day the barley for the omer (Leviticus 23:11) that was to be presented was cut; this was threshed in the Court of the Priests, parched, and then ground fine
Priscillianus And Priscillianism, Priscillian - Instantius, Salvianus, and Priscillian went to Rome to clear themselves and their party in the papal Court. The Priscillianists had, however, friends at Court powerful enough to ward off the danger. The cause was taken out of the hands of Gregory and transferred to the Court of Volventius the vicar of Spain. By Idacius and Ithacius, ably supported by two bishops of a like stamp, Magnus and Rufus, powerful at Court, Maximus was unremittingly urged to take severe measures
Synagogue (2) - The synagogue was a school and a Court of local government before it became pre-eminently a place of worship. Besides all this, he had to teach the children, and to scourge such culprits as the synagogue, when acting as a Court of law, condemned to that punishment. The synagogue as a Court. Hence, in places where the population was preponderantly Jewish, local administration was in the hands of a Court, which took cognizance of all the Jewish interests of the neighbourhood, and of which the Roman over-rule was apt to avail itself for both executive and minor judicial business. The Court proper consisted of twenty-three members where the population was considerable, elsewhere of seven; and this college of elders (Luke 7:3) or rulers (Matthew 9:18; Matthew 9:23, Luke 8:41) exercised a wide jurisdiction. Thus a secularizing—or, from a Jewish point of view, a communal—tendency developed, such as had already shown itself in the case of the Courts of the Temple (Matthew 21:12, Mark 11:15, John 2:14 ff. People were forbidden to discuss trifles on the premises of a synagogue, or to walk aimlessly about, to shelter there from the heat or rain, to come in with soiled shoes or garments, or to make a thoroughfare of the Courts
Government - Court cases were heard by a tribunal of three judges, usually priests, who allowed both written and oral evidence, the latter being given under oath. " The role of elders and nobles was recognized (1 Kings 21:8,11 ), the former discharging their duties as judges at the city gate and the latter acting as advisors to the royal Court. ...
David instituted a number of bureaucrats such as the recorder (1 Chronicles 18:15 ), a powerful archivist who also controlled much of Court life; the scribe (1 Chronicles 18:6 ), who with his assistants maintained official records; the priest (1 Chronicles 18:17 ), who evidently served the king in an advisory capacity; the supervisor of labor (2 Samuel 20:24 ), who recruited captives and others for forced labor in the kingdom; the palace steward (1 Kings 18:3,6 ), who was a highly placed royal official; and the bureaucrat, who was chiefly responsible for collecting taxes. At a later period in the monarchy it became the tradition to appoint special Court officials to serve as ambassadors (cf. Under Roman rule the Sanhedrin was responsible for governing Judea, and in Christ's time it was respected as the supreme Court of justice (Matthew 26:59 ; John 11:47 )
Jeremiah - and more summarily in Jeremiah 26:1-2; Jeremiah 26:6, at the feast of tabernacles, when the law was commanded to be read, or at either of the other two great feasts, before the people of "all the cities of Judah," assembled for worship "in the Court of Jehovah's house"; he "diminished not a word" through fear of offending. Therefore Zedekiah shut him up in the Court of the prison. Zedekiah committed him to the Court of the prison (the open space occupied by the guard, Jeremiah 32:2, where his friends had access to him: Jeremiah 32:12; Jeremiah 37:12-21), and commanded bread to be supplied to him until all in the city was spent (Psalms 37:19; Isaiah 33:16). entry of the outer or inner temple Court. Jeremiah stayed in the Court of the prison until Jerusalem was taken
David - ...
In Saul's Court David's musical talent, combined with his reputation as a fighter, led one of Saul's servants to recommend David as the person to play the harp for Saul when the evil spirit from God troubled him (1 Samuel 16:18 ). David became a permanent part of Saul's Court, not returning home (1 Samuel 18:2 )
Greek Church - The Greek church had several complaints against the Latin; particularly it was thought a great hardship for the Greeks to subscribe to the definition of a council according to the Roman form, prescribed by the pope, since it made the church of Constantinople dependent on that of Rome, and set the pope above an aecumenical council; but, above all, the pride and haughtiness of the Roman Court gave the Greeks a great distaste; and as their deportment seemed to insult his imperial majesty, it entirely alienated the affections of the emperor Basil. ...
See Mocheim, Gregory, and Hawies's Church History; King's Rites and Ceremonies of the Greek Church in Russia; The Russian Catechism; Secret Memoirs of the Court of Petersburgh; Tooke's History of Russia; Ricaut's State of the Greek Church; Enc
Jehoiachin - Now he cut the gold off (not "cut in pieces," 2 Kings 24:13) the larger vessels which were plated, the altar of burnt offering, the table of shewbread, and the ark, so that at the third conquest of Jerusalem under Zedekiah there were only the large brazen vessels of the Court remaining, beside a few gold and silver basins and firepans (2 Kings 25:13-17). The "princes" (satire) are the king's great Court officials; "the mighty men of valor" (gibbowrey hachail , "mighty men of wealth," same Hebrew as 2 Kings 15:20) are men of property, rather than prowess: 2 Kings 15:14
Abgar - Arriving in Edessa he took lodgings, and without reporting himself at the Court engaged extensively in works of healing. When the king heard thereof he suspected that he was the disciple promised by Jesus, and had him brought to Court. On the appearance of Thaddaeus ‘a great vision appeared to Abgar in the countenance of Thaddaeus,’ which led the former to prostrate himself before the latter, to the astonishment of the Courtiers, who did not see the vision
Advocate - It is not enough, in our common Courts of justice, between man and man, that many an able and a feeling heart could stand up for poor guilty criminals, and plead their cause. He that advocates for them, must have a legal call to the office, and be sworn into it, according to the laws of the Court. (Job 33:24; Isaiah 42:21; Matthew 17:5; Romans 3:25) Now, then, let me pause, and ask, Hath not this almighty advocate a right to plead for his own rights, and those of his people in him? Was it not an absolute promise, in the charter of grace, that "when he had made his soul an offering for sin, he should see of the travail of his soul, and be satisfied?" (Isaiah 53:10-11) And shall not the blessed Jesus stand up and plead for the fulfilment of those promises? Hath he, indeed, given himself as the sinner's surety "an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweet smelling savour?" and can he rest satisfied, till he hath brought all his ransomed people around him in glory?...
Moreover, there is one point more to be considered in this subject of Christ's advocacy, which we have not yet even glanced at, though it forms a principal object, for which the Lord Jesus carries on his high priestly office, in the Court of heaven, namely, the destruction of all his enemies, and the enemies of his dear people
Arians - But such was the good nature and credulity of Constantine, that these men, by their usual artifices, easily imposed upon him, and brought him to such a full persuasion of their agreement with the Nicene faith, that in about three years' time they were not only recalled from banishment, but restored to their sees, and to a considerable degree of interest at Court. The emperor did not long survive; and Constantius, his successor, became warmly attached to the Arian cause, as were all the Court party
Levi - They shall teach Jacob Thy judgments and Israel Thy law (Leviticus 10:11), they shall present incense before Thee (in the holy place) and whole burnt offering upon Thine altar (in the Court)
Saul, King of Israel - After David’s victory over Goliath, Saul, unaware of God’s purposes for David, made him his armour-bearer and full-time Court musician (1 Samuel 16:21-23; 1 Samuel 18:2)
Heathen - 60; Gale's Court of the Gentiles; Considerations on the Religious Worship of the Heathen; Rev
Hezekiah - There was always an Egyptian party at the Court of Jerusalem, though at this time Egypt was suffering from internal dissensions
Sam'Son - They brought forth the blind champion to make sport for them, end placed him between the two chief pillars which supported the roof that surrounded the Court
Uriah - He fashioned in unscrupulous subserviency an altar like the idolatrous pattern from Damascus furnished to him; this altar he put in the temple Court E
Clergy - A clergyman cannot be compelled to serve on a jury, nor to appear at a Court leet, which almost every other person is obliged to do; but is a layman be summoned on a jury, and before the trial takes orders, he shall notwithstanding appear, and be sworn
Veil - = (1) מָסָךְ, the curtain before the door of the Holy Place and before the gate of the fore-court in the Tabernacle; and (2) פָרכָח, the curtain between the Holy Place and the Holy of Holies (similarly Philo, Vita Moysis, iii
Caesarea - Its special features were a large harbour protected by a huge mole and by a wall with 10 lofty towers and colossi; a promenade round the port, with arches where sailors could lodge; a temple of Augustus raised on a platform, and visible far out at sea, containing two colossal statues of Rome and the Emperor; a system of drainage whereby the tides were utilized to flush the streets; walls embracing a semicircular area stretching for a mile along the sea-coast; two aqueducts, one of them 8 miles in length, displaying great engineering skill; a hippodrome; an amphitheatre capable of seating 20,000 persons; a theatre; a Court of justice, and many other noble structures
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Blood - ...
In judicial language, “to stand against one’s blood” means to stand before a Court and against the accused as a plaintiff, witness, or judge: “Thou shalt not go up and down as a talebearer among thy people: neither shalt thou stand against the blood Flavianus (16), Bishop of Antioch - 32), and at the time of his consecration "apocrisiarius" or nuncio of the church of Antioch at the Court of Constantinople (Vict
Baptists - However, these confessions are not binding, as the Word of God is considered the final Court of appeal
Arians - ...
This so enraged them, that, by their interest at Court, they procured that prelate to be deposed and banished; but the church of Alexandria still refusing to admit Arius into their communion, the emperor sent for him to Constantinople; where upon delivering in a fresh confession of his faith in terms less offensive, the emperor commanded him to be received into their communion; but that very evening, it is said, Arius died as his friends were conducting him in triumph to the great church of Constantinople
Martyr - Perhaps this consideration might excite many to Court martyrdom, as we believe many did
Door - Ezekiel 40:11 [1]) is best understood as a door abutting on the street or lane, which gave the entry to a covered passage communicating with the Court of the house, in which the living rooms were situated (see Gate)
Judge - Washed in the blood of Christ while upon the earth, they will be found without spot and blameless then at the Court of heaven: clothed in the robe of Jesus's righteousness now, it is impossible to be found naked then
Aichmalotarch - The princes of the captivity resided at Babylon, where they were installed with great ceremony, held Courts of justice, &c, and were set over the eastern Jews, or those settled in Babylon, Chaldaea, Assyria, and Persia. ...
The Court of the Resch-Glutha is described as splendid
Proselyte - Gentiles were allowed to worship and offer sacrifices to the God of Israel in the outer Court of the temple; and some of them, persuaded of the sole and universal sovereignty of the Lord Jehovah, might renounce idolatry without embracing the Mosaic law; but such persons appear to me never to be called proselytes in Scripture, or in any ancient Christian writer
Captivity - The books of Nehemiah and Daniel describe Jews in high positions at Court, and the book of Esther celebrates their numbers and power in the Persian empire
Elder - Those who locally administered justice are said to have been termed "elders of the gate," Proverbs 31:23; Lamentations 5:14; because that was the place where a Court was often held
Captivity - The book of Daniel shows us a Jew in a high position at Court, and the book of Esther celebrates their numbers and power in the Persian empire
Servant - The servants of Pharaoh, of Saul, and of David, were their subjects in general, and their Court officers and counselors in particular
Mesrobes - Gregory the Illuminator, to whom also Mesrobes acted as secretary, an office which he likewise filled in the Court of king Varaztad till dethroned by the Romans a
Prison (2) - The condemned cell of a Roman prison resembled that dungeon in the Court of the prison into which Jeremiah was let down with cords, and where he sank in the mire (Jeremiah 38:6)
Door - Ezekiel 40:11 [1]) is best understood as a door abutting on the street or lane, which gave the entry to a covered passage communicating with the Court of the house, in which the living rooms were situated (see Gate)
Veil - = (1) מָסָךְ, the curtain before the door of the Holy Place and before the gate of the fore-court in the Tabernacle; and (2) פָרכָח, the curtain between the Holy Place and the Holy of Holies (similarly Philo, Vita Moysis, iii
Job, Theology of - After Job's numerous possessions are removed, Job demands that God give him a fair trial in Court (10:2). When Job assumes that God owes him physical blessing since he has been obedient to Him, he was imbibing a concept that undergirded ancient Near Eastern religions—that the human relationship to the gods was like a business contract of mutual claims that was binding in Court. , to provide the bail or surety needed in his desired Court case) may support that Job refers to God in 16:19. Since he believes strongly in his innocence, there must be someone pleading his case in the heavenly Court just as in an earthly Court
Angels (2) - A lone king—a king without a Court—is almost a contradiction in terms. And inasmuch as the recognition of God as King is the earliest and most prevalent of Israel’s conceptions of God, we naturally expect the belief in angels, as God’s Court, serving Him in His palace and discharging the function of messengers, to be ancient and pervasive. They form a Court. The angels, as Courtiers, stand in vast multitudes before the throne (Revelation 5:11; Revelation 7:11). As in earthly Courts there are gradations of rank and dignity, so in heaven. ’ Again, in many Courts, and particularly in that of the Persians, there were secretaries or scribes, whose business it was to keep a ‘book of records’ (Esther 6:1), in which the names and deeds of those who had deserved well of the king were honourably recorded. The metaphor of heaven as a palace and Court is so far kept up, that the Jews often spoke of books in heaven in which men’s deeds are recorded
Synagogue - They were built, in imitation of the temple of Jerusalem, with a Court and porches, as is the case with the synagogues in the east at the present day. In the centre of the Court is a chapel, supported by four columns, in which, on an elevation prepared for it, is placed the book of the law, rolled up. In addition to the chapel, there is erected within the Court a large covered hall or vestry, into which the people retire, when the weather happens to be cold and stormy, and each family has its particular seat
Hold - The estate is held by copy of Court-roll. To have in session as, to hold a Court or parliament to hold a council
Jesuits - He had heeled under pressure of the Spanish Court and the Duc de Choiseul and other strong influenses
Jesus, Company of - He had heeled under pressure of the Spanish Court and the Duc de Choiseul and other strong influenses
Jesus, Society of - He had heeled under pressure of the Spanish Court and the Duc de Choiseul and other strong influenses
Colour - The hangings of the tabernacle Court (Exodus 27:9 ; 38:9 ), the coats, mitres, bonnets, and breeches of the priests (Exodus 39:27,28 ), and the dress of the high priest on the day of Atonement (Leviticus 16:4,32 ), were white
Micaiah - The access of Satan to the heavenly Court in Old Testament times appears here and Job 1:6; Job 2:1 (but compare Revelation 12:7-10 as to the New Testament times)
Sep'Tuagint - The commonly-received story respecting its origin is contained in an extant letter ascribed to Aristeas, who was an officer at the Court of Ptolemy Philadelphus
Dove - The sellers of doves profaned the temple Court by selling doves to meet the wants of the poorer classes (John 2:13-17)
Garden - The house Court or area generally had its shady terebinth
Sergius Paulus - These travelling teachers were summoned to Court
Gregorius, Saint., the Illuminator - the priests and supporters of the old religion—and baptized the king and his Court in the Euphrates
Act of Faith - ...
After the prisoners, comes a troop of familiars on horseback; and after them the Inquisitors, and other officers of the Court, on mules: last of all, the Inquisitor-general on a white horse, led by two men with black hats and green hat-bands
Aristeas - ’ Lombroso was the first to show that the ‘author was well acquainted with the details of Court life in the times of the Ptolemies’; and recent researches have confirmed this; on the other hand, there are interesting connexions with the Greek of the NT; compare καταβολή used absolutely for ‘creation’ (Matthew 13:35 and Aristeas, § 129 Ostrich - " Isaiah 34:13 translated "a dwelling for ostriches," not "a Court for owls" (Isaiah 43:20, margin)
Catharine, Martyr of Alexandria - Catharine's martyrdom, with horrible details of her tortures, an exact report of her dispute in public with the philosophers of the city and of the learned oration by which she converted them and the empress Faustina and many of the Court, and how her corpse was transported to Mount Sinai by angels (Martin, Vies des Saints, tom
Strength - Chel'âh (חֶלְאָה, Strong's #2458), “strength; power; wealth; property; capable; valiant; army; troops; influential; upper-class people (courtiers). , in the royal Court (NASB, “wealthy men”; Dionysius (19), Monk in Western Church - It began with March 25, now kept as the festival of the Annunciation; and from this epoch all the dates of bulls and briefs of the Court of Rome are supposed to run (Butler's Lives of the Saints, Oct
Inn - These houses of reception are always built without the precincts of towns, and consist of four wings round a square Court, which serves by way of enclosure for the beasts of burden
Barrenness - Then did the wife forget her jealousy, and provoke, instead of resenting, the faithlessness of her husband, Genesis 16:2 ; Genesis 30:3 ; Genesis 30:9 ; then did the mother forget a parent's part, and teach her own child treachery and deceit, Genesis 25:23 ; Genesis 27:13 ; then did daughters turn the instincts of nature backward, and deliberately work their own and their father's shame, Genesis 19:31 ; then did the daughter-in-law veil her face, and Court the incestuous bed, Genesis 38:14 ; and to be childless, was to be a by- word, Genesis 16:5 ; Genesis 30:1 ; and to refuse to raise up seed to a brother, was to be spit upon, Genesis 38:26 ; Deuteronomy 25:9 ; and the prospect of the promise, like the fulfilment of it, did not send peace into families, but a sword; and three were set against two, and two against three, Genesis 27:41 ; and the elder, who would be promoted unto honour, was set against the younger, whom God would promote, Genesis 4:5 ; Genesis 27:41 ; and national differences were engendered by it, as individuals grew into nations, Genesis 19:37 ; Genesis 26:35 ; and even the foulest of idolatries may be traced, perhaps, to this hallowed source; for the corruption of the best is the worst corruption of all, Numbers 25:1-3
Judge - ...
Notes: (1) In 1 Corinthians 6:2 (last clause) "to judge" represents the noun kriterion, which denotes "a tribunal, a law Court," and the meaning thus is "are ye unworthy of sitting upon tribunals of least importance?" (see RV marg
Vine - " "Immediately on entering," says Turner, "I was ushered into the Court yard of the aga, whom I found smoking under a vine, surrounded by horses, servants, and dogs, among which I distinguished an English pointer
Society of Jesus - He had heeled under pressure of the Spanish Court and the Duc de Choiseul and other strong influenses
Russia - Ivan the Terrible sent an embassy to Pope Gregory XIII in 1580, and the Jesuit Antonio Possevino was dispatched to the Court of Moscow
Babylon - Cyrus took it without resistance, and held his Court there
To - The Court will sit in February to try some important causes
Pen'Tateuch, the, - The attempt to call in question the popular belief was made by Astruc, doctor and professor of medicine in the Royal College at Paris, and Court physician to Louis XIV
Luciferus i, Bishop of Calaris - He evidently Courted persecution, and even martyrdom. Astonished at this audacity, the emperor ordered Florentius, an officer of his Court, to send the book back to Lucifer to ask if it were really his
Tabernacle - Since the tents of the Hebrew tribes, those of the priests and Levites, and the three divisions of the sanctuary Court, holy place, and the holy of holies represent ascending degrees of holiness in the scheme of the Priestly writer, the appropriate order of study will be from without inwards, from the perimeter of the sanctuary to its centre. ...
( a ) We begin, therefore, with ‘the Court of the dwelling ’ ( Exodus 27:9 ). Since the perimeter of the Court measured 300 cubits, 60 pillars in all were required for the curtains and the screen, and are reckoned in the text in groups of tens and twenties, 20 for each long side, and 10 for each short side. ...
( b ) In the centre of the Court is placed the altar of burnt-offering ( Exodus 27:1-8 ), called also ‘ the brazen altar ’ and ‘ the altar ’ par excellence
Temple of Jerusalem - The worshipers could gather for prayer and sacrifice in the Temple Courtyard(s) where they could sing psalms as they saw their offerings presented to Yahweh on His great altar. The spirit of Israel's prayer and praise is to be found in the Psalms and in the worship experiences such as that of Isaiah when he surrendered to his prophetic call experience in the forecourt of the Temple (Isaiah 6:1-8 ). The arrangement prescribed for the wall of the inner Court, “three courses of hewn stone and one course of cedar beams” was followed in Solomonic buildings excavated at Megiddo (1 Kings 6:36 ; 1 Kings 7:12 ). The marvelous furnishings of the holy place and the Courtyard require another chapter to describe (1 Kings 7:9-51 ). ...
The molten sea, which may have had some kind of cosmic symbolism, stood in the south-central quadrant of the inner Courtyard opposite the bronze altar. ...
The third great engineering feat was the crafting of ten ornate, rolling stands for ten lavers, five on either side of the Courtyard. , even stripping some of the bronze furnishings in the Courtyard (2Kings 16:8-9,2 Kings 16:17 ). ...
The differences between the two sanctuaries have to do with furniture and Courtyard arrangements or gates. Through the Huldah gates, double and triple arches of which can still be seen, worshipers went up through enclosed passageways into the Court of the Gentiles. Greek inscriptions separating this Court from the Court of the women and the holier inner Courts of Israel (men) and the priests have been found
Daniel - Daniel was put in training with three others of the royal seed, still "children" (Daniel 1:4), according to eastern etiquette, to become Courtiers; and to mark his new position he received a Babylonian name, Belteshazzar (compare 2 Kings 23:34; 2 Kings 24:17; Ezra 5:14; Esther 2:7). Daniel's high position while still a mere youth (Daniel 1:3-5; Daniel 1:11-16; Daniel 2:1), at the Court of the Jews' conqueror and king, gave them a vivid interest in their illustrious countryman's fame for righteousness and wisdom; for in his person they felt themselves raised from their present degradation. As at the beginning of the covenant people's history their kinsman Joseph, so toward its close Daniel, by the interpretation of dreams (Daniel 2; Daniel 4), was promoted to high place in the Court of their pagan masters
Temple - Peter and John went up into the Temple at the hour of prayer (Acts 3:1), and in the fulfilment of their commission as witnesses for Christ (Acts 1:8) they found their best audiences in the Temple-courts. At the Beautiful Gate-either the Gate of Nicanor leading into the Court of the Israelites or the Eastern Gate of the outer Court-they moved the crowd by performing an act of healing in Christ’s name; and in Solomon’s Porch-the long colonnade in the east of the Temple area-Peter testified to the raising of the Prince of Life whom the rulers had in ignorance killed
Ebla - ...
Two rooms adjoining a large “audience” Court of the royal palace became the repositories for the official documents of the dynasty. A larger room was part of the Court library where a majority of its 14,000 texts dealt with an international textile trade and the payment of taxes and tribute in metals, mainly silver and gold
Proverbs, Book of - It is difficult to know precisely the role Solomon and his Court may have had in starting the process which culminated in the Book of Proverbs. For dating, Proverbs 25:1 places the copying or editing of Proverbs 25-29 in the Court of Hezekiah, thus about 700 B
Brother - Would any man be shy of going to an earthly Court if the king of that Court was his brother? Nay, would he not be often going there; often telling of it to ever one around him; and delighting to have it known that he had access, at all times, to the person of the king his brother, and might have whatever he asked of him? But what are these privileges, or what great cause for taking pride and consequence in these transitory dignities, compared to that real unfading honour in a consciousness of not only coming to Jesus, the King of kings, and Lord of lords, as to a brother, but who hath made all his redeemed kings and priests to God and the Father, and "they shall reign with him for ever and ever!" (Revelation 1:6; Rev 22:5)...
Suffer me yet farther to add, that the Scriptures of our God have made this subject of Christ's brotherhood, so peculiarly endearing to the church, that the gracious design of our Lord Jesus, in the assuming of our manhood, is not answered when his church "makes no use of it
Dead - Thus did the king of Persia testify his sorrow for the decree, into which his wily Courtiers had betrayed him, and which, without the miraculous interposition of Heaven, had proved fatal to his favourite minister; "Then the king went to his palace, and spent the night, fasting; neither were instruments of music brought before him," Daniel 6:18 . Chardin informs us that when the king of Persia dies, his physicians and astrologers lose their places, and are excluded from the Court; the first, because they could not cure their sovereign, and the last, because they did not give previous notice of his death. If the conjecture of that intelligent traveller be well founded, the venerable prophet had been forced by the established etiquette of the Court to retire from the management of public affairs at the death of Nebuchadnezzar; and had remained in a private station for twenty- three years, neglected or forgotten, till the awful occurrence of that memorable night rendered his assistance necessary, and brought him again into public notice
Ebla - ...
Two rooms adjoining a large “audience” Court of the royal palace became the repositories for the official documents of the dynasty. A larger room was part of the Court library where a majority of its 14,000 texts dealt with an international textile trade and the payment of taxes and tribute in metals, mainly silver and gold
Leander (2) - —In 589 a great gathering at Toledo of the king and queen, the Court, and 62 bishops, Arian and Catholic, changed the whole outer face of Visigothic history and entirely shifted its centre of gravity. at the East-Roman Court
Ambrosius of Milan - He practised at the Court of the praetorian prefect of Italy, Probus, who appointed him "consular" magistrate of the provinces of Liguria and Aemilia. He made an admirable magistrate, and became known to the people of Milan, where he held his Court, as a high-minded, conscientious, and religious man. This being refused, some persons of the Court came to Ambrose, and begged him to concede—probably for partial use only—the newer and larger basilica, and to exert his influence to prevent any popular disturbance. The Court chamberlain sent him a message: "Whilst I am alive, shall you despise Valentinian? I will take off your head. Ambrose was asked to hold a discussion with Auxentius, an Arian bishop, before chosen judges in the presence of the Court, or else to withdraw from Milan. Again the Court party found themselves worsted, and gave way
Painting, Religious - Later art took a more worldly turn under the influence of the Court, the names of Nicholas Poussin and Claude Gellee in the 16th century being the only notable ones in religious painting
Sun - We gather from Ezekiel 8:16 that this sun-worship actually took place in the inner Court at the door of the Temple, between the porch and the altar; the worshippers turned their backs upon the Temple itself, and worshipped the sun towards the east
Samaritan, the Good - He thought to display his superior knowledge, and humble Jesus before the congregation; and his question was a foretaste of the dialectical warfare which awaited Jesus in Jerusalem, and which reached its climax in that succession of encounters with the rulers in the Temple Court during the Passion week
Revelation - Campbell on Revelation; Ellis on Divine Things; Gale's Court of the Gentiles
Heaven - From heaven, which is God's Court, angels are sent down to this earth, as the multitude of the heavenly host (distinct from the host of heaven," Acts 7:42), and to which they return (Luke 2:13-15; Luke 22:43)
Justice - Human judges do well to remember God in their Courts. At times it is better to suffer injustice than to bring the gospel into disrepute by taking a brother to Court (1 Corinthians 6:7-8 )
Despise - Adopting the current Jewish doctrine of angels as guardian spirits, our Lord tells His hearers that children have friends in the Court of heaven, in close nearness to the King Himself, whose ‘Face’ they always see; there they are not thought lightly of, here they must not be despised
Captivity - At this time, from which is dated the "seventy years" of captivity (Jeremiah 25 ; Daniel 9:1,2 ), Daniel and his companions were carried to Babylon, there to be brought up at the Court and trained in all the learning of the Chaldeans
Damascus - In these mud walls, however, the gates and doors are often adorned with marble portals, carved and inlaid with great beauty and variety; and the inside of the habitation, which is generally a large square Court, is ornamented with fragrant trees and marble fountains, and surrounded with splendid apartments, furnished and painted in the highest style of luxury
Anitipas - When the king was celebrating his birth day, with the principal persons of his Court, the daughter of Herodias danced before them, and pleased him so well that he swore to give her whatever she should ask
Ways - The emperor of Hindostan, in his progress through his dominions, as described in the narrative of Sir Thomas Roe's embassy to the Court of Delhi, was preceded by a very great company, sent before him to cut up the trees and bushes, to level and smooth the road, and prepare their place of encampment
Olives - " On ascension eve, the Christians come and encamp in the Court, and that night they perform the offices of the ascension
Baal - In the times of the kings it became the religion of the Court and people of the ten tribes, 1 Kings 16:31-33; 1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:22, and appears never to have been wholly abolished among them
Religious Painting - Later art took a more worldly turn under the influence of the Court, the names of Nicholas Poussin and Claude Gellee in the 16th century being the only notable ones in religious painting
Junilius, Quaestor of the Sacred Palace - He filled for seven years in the Court of Justinian the important office of quaestor of the sacred palace, succeeding the celebrated Tribonian (Procop
Roman Law in the nt - At Athens, also a ‘free’ city, we find a Greek institution, the Court of the Areopagus (Acts 17:19; Acts 17:22), the members of which were called ‘Areopagites’ (Acts 17:34). This, however, was not a Court of law, and St. It was rather a University Court, ‘in the midst of’ which (Acts 17:22) the Apostle made his defence as a teacher. ]'>[8] ), to have been on Mars’ Hill outside the city, whence the Court derived its name, but Ramsay with more probability (St
Daniel, Book of - ...
As did the wisdom writers, Daniel served in a royal Court counseling a ruler. The Faithful Young Men in a Foreign Court (Daniel 1:1-6:28 ) ...
A
Genseric, King of the Vandals - Sebastian had come as a friend to take refuge at his Court, but Genseric, who feared his renown as a statesman and general, tried to convert him to Arianism, that his refusal might supply a pretext for putting him to death. Genseric, by the advice of the Arian bishops, commanded all officials of his Court to embrace Arianism
Jehoshaphat - Recorder or annalist in David's and Solomon's Court. He also set judges in the several cities, and a supreme Court for references and appeals ("controversies") in Jerusalem, made up of Levites, priests, and chief fathers of Israel (the judges in the cities were probably of the same classes)
Pope - ...
These cardinals are commonly promoted from among such clergyman as have borne offices in the Roman Court; some are assumed from religious orders; eminent ecclesiastics of other countries are likewise often honoured with this dignity. They are divided into different congregations for the more easy despatch of business; and some of them have the principal offices in the pontiffical Court; as that of cardinal, vicar, penitentiary, chancellor, chamberlain, prefect of the signature of justice, prefect of memorials, and secretary of state
Babylon - 681Esar-haddon became king of Assyria but held his Court at Babylon, to which place Manasseh king of Judah was carried prisoner about B. For 24 years after the death of Nebuchadnezzar Babylon continued the seat of the imperial Court
City - The Court which he mentions (Ant. Caesarea was the seat of the Roman Procurator, except during the great Jewish feasts, when he found it necessary to reside at Jerusalem to restrain the turbulence of a fanatically patriotic people who were ready to Court martyrdom for the national cause
Authority in Religion - —As to judicial authority, our Lord teaches that it is distributed among a number of repositories, somewhat as the same I kind of authority in a modern State is distributed among a number of Courts from the lowest to the highest. ...
In the case of such Courts, no one thinks of denying to the least and lowest of them the character of a true Court. Its jurisdiction may be limited, its decisions liable to reversal, but so long as it keeps within its jurisdiction, so long as the appeal from its decisions is pending, its authority is not only as real but as absolute as that of the highest Court. Further, even the lowest Court possesses a genuine independence: its functions cannot be discharged for it, nor can they be wrested from it by any other Court. Further still, it is for each Court, at least in the first instance, to interpret and declare the law by which it was created, and its duties and prerogatives under the law
Salt - A special ‘salt chamber’ is mentioned among the chambers adjoining the Priests’ Court in the description of Herod’s Temple given in the Mishna
Zephaniah, Book of - Punishment would come upon the nobles at the king's Court, those who gained materially through violence, the merchants, and those who denied the power of God to reward good or punish evil
Kulturkampf - Then followed the May Laws of 1873 dealing with the training and nomination of the clergy, the powers of ecclesiastical superiors, the establishment of a secular Court for deciding ecclesiastical questions and bestowing on it the right of dismissing the clergy from their posts, curtailing the Church's power of punishing, and prescribing rules for those desirous of leaving the Church
Mizpah - Traces of the outer Court of the tabernacle are yet discoverable, and a curious rock cut approach
Age, Old (the Aged) - ...
The adjective zaqen [ Genesis 24:2 ) or to the officers of the Egyptian royal Court (Genesis 50:7 )
Veil of the Temple - The women of Elis were forbidden to penetrate the sanctuary of Olympian Zeus; so the Hebrew women could not pass the Court of women
Corinth - Paul, but Gallio, rightly recognizing that his Court could take no cognizance of a charge of the sort they brought, dismissed the action
Minister - word in each case) of Joshua as the personal attendant of Moses ( Exodus 24:13 , Joshua 1:1 ), of the servants in the Court of Solomon ( 1 Kings 10:5 ), of angels and the elemental forces of nature as the messengers and agents of the Divine will ( Psalms 103:21 ; Psalms 104:4 ; cf
Sanctuary - However, it is also used alone or in various combinations to distinguish between certain holy precincts within the sanctuary, specifically, the area of the Court near the altar sometimes referred to as "the holy place" (Leviticus 10:17-18 ), the outer "Holy Place" in the tabernacle or temple building itself (e. However, it is also used alone or in various combinations to distinguish between certain holy precincts within the sanctuary, specifically, the area of the Court near the altar sometimes referred to as "the holy place" (Leviticus 10:17-18 ), the outer "Holy Place" in the tabernacle or temple building itself (e
Sadducees - Their name identifies them as members of household-court of the Herods or supporters of the dynasty
Lasciviousness - 154): ‘Here the reference is probably to the dissolute life of the Herodian Court, and of the Greek cities of Galilee and the Decapolis; if δόλος characterized the Jew, his Greek neighbour was yet more terribly branded by ἀσέλγεια
Germanus, Saint, Bishop of Auxerre - His body was embalmed, and a magnificent funeral journey to Gaul attested the reverence of the Court
Aretas - The first known to history, ‘Aretas, prince of the Arabians,’ is said to have had the fugitive high-priest Jason shut up at his Court (2 Maccabees 5:8; the Gr
Shimei - " The impunity of Shimei as of Joab had brought the law into discredit, for Shimei was living in Court favor at Jerusalem, "thou hast with thee Shimei" (1 Kings 2:8)
Acacius, Bishop of Beroea - The influence of the aged Acacius was powerful at Court
Maronites - It is certain that there are Maronites in Syria who still behold the church of Rome with the greatest aversion and abhorrence; nay, what is still more remarkable, great numbers of that nation residing in Italy, even under the eye of the pontiff, opposed his authority during the last century, and threw the Court of Rome into great perplexity
Goat - It is said, that when the two goats were led into the inner Court of the temple and presented to the high priest, according to the Lord's appointment of casting lots, (Leviticus 16:8) the scape goat, or as the margin of the Bible expresseth it, the Azazel, had then a fillet, or a narrow piece of scarlet, fastened to its head, which soon became white
Kill - The provision gave the manslayer access to the Court system, for he might be “killed” by the blood avenger if he stayed within his own community ( Zechari'ah - After the death of Jehoiada, Zechariah probably succeeded to his office, and in attempting to check the reaction in favor of idolatry which immediately followed he fell a victim to a conspiracy formed against him by the king, and was stoned in the Court of the temple
Isaiah - Isaiah lived in Jerusalem, where he was an adviser to Judah’s royal Court (Isaiah 7:3; Isaiah 37:2; Isaiah 38:1; Isaiah 39:3)
Greece, Religion And Society of - (2) The Areopagus functioned as a Court of justice judging persons who had committed murder, mutilation, poisoning, or treason. Solon assigned to them the task of monitoring the education, religion, and customs of the people with the privilege of reviewing judicial decisions, serving as a Supreme Court. To assure fair trials, Solon mandated that citizens over sixty years of age could form a Court of arbitration for trials. Modern ways of Courtship were unknown
Jesuits - They were the spiritual guides of almost every person eminent for rank or power; they possessed the highest degree of confidence and interest with the papal Court, as the most zealous and able champions for its authority; they possessed, at different periods, the direction of the most considerable Courts in Europe; they mingled in all affairs, and took part in every intrigue and revolution. ...
Under the pretext of promoting the success of their missions, and of facilitating the support of their missionaries, they obtained a special license from the Court of Rome, to trade with the nations which they laboured to convert: in consequence of this, they engaged in an extensive and lucrative commerce, both in the East and West Indies; they opened warehouses in different parts of Europe, in which they vended their commodities. They have attributed to the Court of Rome a jurisdiction as extensive and absolute as was claimed by the most presumptuous pontiffs in the dark ages. They never communicated them to strangers, nor even to the greater part of their own members: they refused to produce them when required by Courts of justice; and by a strange solecism in policy, the civil power in different countries authorized or connived at the establishment of an order of men, whose constitution and laws were concealed with a solicitude which alone was a good reason for having excluded them
Nestorian Church - Though he was released at last, and passed his last days in honour at Court, there is no doubt that his sufferings hastened his death. A series of patriarchs of the three stock eastern types (court favourite, respectable nonentity, and strict ascetic) ruled the church, and the services were arranged much in their present form. The patriarchate was then vacant (Chosroes had been so annoyed by the substitution of another Gregory for the Gregory whom he had nominated to that office, that he had refused to allow any election when that man died in 608), and when petition was made for the granting of a patriarch, the Monophysites, whose interest at Court was powerful, petitioned for the nomination of a man of their own. ...
A deputation of Dyophysites came to Court to endeavour to secure a patriarch of their own colour, and a most unedifying wrangle over the theological point followed, Chosroes sitting as umpire
Physician - Physicians were put in charge during epidemics, gave expert testimony in Courts, accompanied armies and fleets, and practised at places provided at public expense. Afterwards, taken captive and brought to the Court of Dareios, he cured the king of a sprained ankle and treated his gum for mammary abscess. ), for seventeen years a prisoner at the Persian Court of Artaxerxes Mnemon, showed a general interest in poisons, and wrote a book on hellebore. ’ Erasistratos of Julis, of the island of Ceos, son of a physician, left the Court of Seleucus Nicator and went to Alexandria, where he wrote on fevers, paralysis, hygiene, and therapeutics. Krateros at the Court of Mithridates VI
Stoning - But, if the occasion which led to Stephen’s being put on his defence was the accusation of blasphemy brought against him by the witnesses (and the statement of Acts 6:13 can hardly be challenged), it is difficult to conceive of a self-constituted tribunal attempting to adjudicate upon a grave charge of the sort, involving the penalty of death, with which the supreme Court of justice alone among the Jews had authority to deal. ...
(c) There is no reason to question the reality of the scene depicted in the narrative, in which, after the utterance that excited the fury of the hearers (‘Behold, I see the heavens opened, and the Son of man standing on the right hand of God’), the Court was at once transformed into an infuriated mob, and hurried the alleged blasphemer, now judged out of his own mouth, without further ceremony to the place of execution (Acts 7:57 f
Impostors - The bogus Knights of Columbus oath has been circulated freely in spite of much counter-publicity, and, in several cases, Court sentences for Protestant ministers who circulated it among their flocks
Seal, Signet - Court official]'>[4] of Jeroboam
Manasseh - He early fell under the influence of the heathen Court circle, and his reign was characterized by a sad relapse into idolatry with all its vices, showing that the reformation under his father had been to a large extent only superficial (Isaiah 7:10 ; 2 Kings 21:10-15 )
Wisdom And Wise Men - However, during Solomon's day, the wisdom movement took on a whole new significance, for Solomon and his Court became world renowned for their wisdom (1 Kings 4:29-34 ; 1 Kings 10:1 )
Gamaliel - He presided over the Court of Jabne, recognized as the highest Jewish authority of the day
Liberality - ...
In the Court of the Women, within the Temple, were the shopharoth, or ‘trumpets,’ vessels whose shape is indicated by their name, in which contributions for religious purposes and for charitable objects might be placed
Hierocles of Alexandria, a Philosopher - When sojourning at Constantinople he came into collision with the government (or, as Kuster interprets it, with the Christian authorities) and was severely beaten in the Court of justice, possibly (as Zeller conjectures) for his adherence to the old religion
Assembly - If Demetrius and his gildsmen had just ground of complaint, they should have earned their case before the proper Court, over which the proconsul presided, for the present gathering was outside the law, and had ‘no power to transact business
Stand - With this same preposition this verb can be used judicially of (1) the act of being in Court, or standing before a judge (1 Kings 3:16), and (2) the position (whether literal or figurative) assumed by a judge when pronouncing the sentence ( Dog - They were not, however, shut up in their houses or Courts, but forced to seek their food where they could find it. I was miserable, and almost driven to despair, at seeing my hunting dogs, twice let loose by the carelessness of my servants, bringing into the Court yard the heads and arms of slaughtered men, and which I could no way prevent but by the destruction of the dogs themselves
Proterius, Saint, Patriarch of Alexandria - But the schism, once begun, was not thus to be abated; the zealous seceders raised a cry, which has practically never died out, that the Egyptian adherents of the council of Chalcedon were a mere state-made church, upheld by the Court against the convictions of the faithful
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - But two of Athanasius's priests, happening to be at Court, at once refuted this calumny; and Constantine wrote to Athanasius, condemning his accusers, and summoning him to Nicomedia. Ischyras accompanied the commissioners, as "a sharer in lodging, board, and wine-cup"; they opened their Court in the Mareotis. Many of them, in alarm, fled homewards; but the two Eusebii, Theognis, Patrophilus, Valens, and Ursacius repaired to Court, and, saying nothing of "the chalice," or the report of the commission, presented a new charge, like the former quasi-political ones—that Athanasius had talked of distressing Constantinople by preventing the sailing of Alexandrian corn-ships. The charge did not come well from a party which had leaned so much on the Court and the State; but it must be allowed that Athanasius's return had given some colour to the objection, although he doubtless held that the assembly at Tyre had forfeited all moral right to be respected as a council. It was notified in a formal edict of the prefect that not Pistus, but a Cappadocian named Gregory, was coming from the Court to be installed as bishop (Encycl
Julius (5), Bishop of Rome - He contrasts the conduct of Athanasius, who had come of his own accord to Rome to Court investigation, with the unwillingness of his accusers to appear against him. " In these canons we notice, firstly , they were designed to provide what recent events had shewn the need of, and what the existing church system did not adequately furnish—a recognized Court of appeal in ecclesiastical causes. He might refuse to interfere, thus confirming the decision of the provincial synod; or he might constitute the bishops of a neighbouring province as a Court of appeal; he might further, if requested and if he thought it necessary, send one or more presbyters as his legates to watch the proceedings, or appoint representatives of himself to sit as assessors in the Court
Pharaoh - Is this singular fact to be explained from the presence of some of Joseph's kindred at the Egyptian Court? Pharaoh said to Joseph, "Thy father and thy brethren are come unto thee: the land of Egypt is before thee; in the best of the land make thy father and brethren to dwell" (Genesis 47:5,6 ). During his forty years' residence at the Court of Egypt, Moses must have known this ruler well
Daniel, the Book of - He does not, as they writing amidst the covenant people do, make God's people the foreground; but writing in a pagan Court he makes the world kingdoms the foreground, behind which he places the kingdom of God, destined ultimately to be all in all. Daniel's position in the Babylonian Court answers to the altered relations of the theocracy and the world power; see above
Constantius ii, Son of Constantius - He put forward also, with the same love for uncontrolled preeminence, the same literary and theological pretensions: he loved to shew off his eloquence and to harangue his Courtiers. Athanasius was received with honour at the Court of Constans, for whose use he had prepared some books of Holy Scripture (Athan. —The usurpation of Magnentius in Gaul seems to have been largely a movement of paganism against Christianity and of the provincial army against the Court
Magi - They formed the highest portion of the king's Court, the council about the king's person
Memphis - of modern Cairo; the Court of the idol bull Apis
Daniel, Book of - ]'>[2] Court in the 6th century
Zerubbabel - The decree was found at Achmetha ((See ECBATANA), a delicate proof of Scripture accuracy, that being Cyrus' Court residence; and Darius decreed anew the building of the temple with three rows of great stones and a row of new timber at the king's expense, and the restoration of the golden and silver vessels, and the supply of young bullocks, rams, and lambs for burnt offerings, and wheat, salt, wine, and oil, that they might offer sacrifices of sweet savours unto the God of heaven, and pray for the life of the king and of his sons
Antiochus - After a few months, however, he caused the assassination of Antiochus by the physicians of the Court, and reigned in his stead ( 1Ma 13:31 f
Version, the Authorised - It was discussed at the Hampton Court Conference in 1604, but nothing definitely settled
Mendicants - Nor did the influence and credit of the Mendicants end here; for we find in the history of this and of the succeeding ages, that they were employed not only in spiritual matters, but also in temporal and political affairs of the greatest consequence, in composing the differences of princes, concluding treaties of peace, concerting alliances, presiding in councils, governing Courts, levying taxes, and other occupations, not only remote from, but absolutely inconsistent with the monastic character and profession. They treated with the utmost insolence and contempt all the different orders of the priesthood; they affirmed, without a blush, that the true method of obtaining salvation was revealed to them alone; proclaimed with ostentation the superior efficacy and virtue of their indulgences; and vaunted beyond measure their interest at the Court of heaven, and their familiar connexions with the Supreme Being, the Virgin Mary, and the saints in glory
Friends Friendship - Paul in an hour of peril at Ephesus, Acts 27:3 friends of the same Apostle at Sidon; Acts 12:20 reveals Blastus in the character of ‘a friend at Court
Turn - ) A Court of record, held by the sheriff twice a year in every hundred within his county
Call - This verb is also used in judicial contexts, to mean being “summoned to Court”if a man is accused of not fulfilling his levirate responsibility, “then the elders of his city shall call him, and speak unto him …” ( Access - It was, however, used later in a technical sense, the Court προσαγωγεύς being a functionary whose business it was to bring visitors or suppliants into the king’s presence, προσαγωγή came thus to mean access to the royal presence and favour
Reformation - The popes, indeed, remonstrated against this, but still they were compelled to lower their tone; and they were often reminded, even within the precincts of their own Court, that the period was fast approaching when the fallacy of many of their pretensions would be ascertained and exposed
Leave, Left - ...
12: ἐκβάλλω (Strong's #1544 — Verb — ekballo — ek-bal'-lo ) "to cast out" (ek, "from," ballo, "to cast"), "to drive out," is used in the sense of "rejecting" or "leaving out," in Revelation 11:2 , as to the measuring of the Court of the Temple (marg
Pha'Raoh, - The dumb tumults covers the misfortune: which was suffered, for the record of these events was inseparably connected with the humiliating confession of a divine visitation, to which a patriotic writer at the Court of Pharaoh would hardly have brought his mind
Prison - ) was probably attached to the Temple or high priest’s palace, as it would appear to have been adjacent to the Court in which the Sanhedrin subsequently met for the trial
Access - It was, however, used later in a technical sense, the Court προσαγωγεύς being a functionary whose business it was to bring visitors or suppliants into the king’s presence, προσαγωγή came thus to mean access to the royal presence and favour
Timotheus, Called Aelurus - But when the Eutychians of Constantinople, deeming his arrival a godsend, hastened to pay Court to him, he disappointed them by declaring that he for his part accepted the statement which Cyril had in effect adopted at his reunion with John of Antioch, that "the Incarnate Word was consubstantial with us, according to the flesh" (ib
Synagogue - The general management of the synagogue of a Jewish town, where it served also as a Court of justice and in the smaller towns and villages at least as a school, was in the hands of the elders of the community. To him fell also the duty of scourging criminals condemned by the Court ( Matthew 10:17 ; Matthew 23:34 etc
Ezekiel - He was contemporary also with Daniel, whose ministry was then in the Babylonian Court whereas Ezekiel was among the Jews. ...
For Daniel was rather a seer, unveiling the future in the pagan Court, but not discharging the prophetical office as Ezekiel among the covenant people; therefore his book was not classed with the prophets but with the hagiographa
Day of Atonement - He next sprinkled the blood of each animal on the altar of incense in the Holy Place; and, lastly, he sprinkled the mingled blood of bullock and goat on the brazen altar in the outer Court. Again, the return of the high priest to the people in the outer Court at the close of the ceremony recalls the words of Hebrews 9:28, ‘a second time without sin shall he appear to them that wait for him
Elesbaan, a King, Hermit, And Saint of Ethiopia - of Asia at Justinian's Court. He received Justinian's letter with every sign of respect, and began to prepare his forces to take part in the Persian war even before Julian was dismissed from his Court with the kiss of peace (Johannis Malalae, Chronographia , xviii
Vigilius, Bishop of Rome - But there were two Origenistic abbats from Palestine, resident at his Court, in great credit with him, Theodore of Ascidas and Domitian, who suggested that he might better serve the cause of orthodoxy by procuring a condemnation of certain writers accused of Nestorianism but acquitted by the council of Chalcedon, viz. Facundus attributes his whole action to desire of Court favour and position, as his earlier secret promise to Theodora had been due to ambition
Crimes And Punishments - The offenses subject to capital punishment were: intentional homicide (Exodus 21:12 ; Leviticus 24:17 ; Numbers 35:16-21 ,Numbers 35:16-21,35:29-34 ), giving false testimony in capital cases (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ), idolatry (Exodus 20:3-5 ; Leviticus 20:1-5 ; Numbers 25:1-9 ; Deuteronomy 13:2-19 ; Deuteronomy 17:2-7 ; 1 Kings 15:11-13 ; 2 Kings 10:18-28 ), kidnapping an Israelite (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ), incest, homosexuality, and beastiality (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 20:11-17 ), rape (if the victim did not cry for help, she, too, should be executed; Deuteronomy 22:23-27 ), adultery (Leviticus 20:10-12 ; Deuteronomy 22:22 ), other sexual relations outside marriage (Leviticus 21:9 ; Deuteronomy 22:20-21 ,Deuteronomy 22:20-21,22:23-24 ), false prophecy (Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 18:20-22 ; 1 Kings 22:19-28 ; Jeremiah 26:9 ,Jeremiah 26:9,26:15-16 ; Jeremiah 28:5-9 ), magic, divination, and witchcraft (Exodus 22:18 ; Leviticus 19:26 ,Leviticus 19:26,19:31 ; Leviticus 20:6 ,Leviticus 20:6,20:27 ; Deuteronomy 18:10 ; 1Samuel 28:3,1 Leviticus 17:3-4,17 ), violation of the Sabbath (Exodus 20:8-11 ; Exodus 23:12 Exodus 31:14-17 ; Exodus 34:21 ; Exodus 35:1 ;Exodus 35:1;2:1 ; Leviticus 23:3 ; Numbers 15:32-36 ; Nehemiah 13:15-22 ), blasphemy (Leviticus 24:14-16 ,Leviticus 24:14-16,24:23 ; 1 Kings 21:13 ), cursing or striking one's parents (Exodus 21:15 ,Exodus 21:15,21:17 ), disobeying the ruling of the Court of appeals (Deuteronomy 17:8-13 ), and certain crimes against the king (1 Samuel 20:31 ; 1 Samuel 22:7-19 ; 2 Samuel 12:5 ; 2 Samuel 13:30 ; 2 Samuel 15:12 ; 2Samuel 16:5-9,2 Samuel 16:21 ; 1Kings 1:21,1 Kings 1:51 ; 1 Kings 2:22-25 ; 1 Kings 12:18-19 ; 1 Kings 21:10 )
Sacrifices in the Old Testament - The choice pieces (fat, kidneys, lobes of the liver) were burnt on the altar, and the rest eaten by the priests in the outer Court
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - The choice pieces (fat, kidneys, lobes of the liver) were burnt on the altar, and the rest eaten by the priests in the outer Court
Nazirite - corner of the women’s Court, where the Nazirites boiled their peace-offerings, cut off their hair and cast it into the caldron
No - Within the second and grand Court stood a Christian church afterward. The Courts of the Karnak temple occupy 1,800 square feet, and its buildings represent every dynasty from Ptolemy Physcon, 117 B
Alexander - Alexander at the sight of the linen arrayed priests, and the high priest in blue and gold with the miter and gold plate on his head bearing Jehovah's name, adored it, and embraced him; and having been shown Daniel's prophecies concerning him, he sacrificed to God in the Court of the temple, and granted the Jews liberty to live according to their own laws, and freedom from tribute in the sabbatical years
Philosophists - They contrived, however, to engage the ministers of the Court of France in their favour, by pretending to have nothing in view but the enlargement of science, in works which spoke indeed respectfully of revelation, while every discovery which they brought forward was meant to undermine its very foundation
Manaen (2) - Besides Manaen, we know of spiritual interests kindled in Joanna, wife of Herod’s major-domo (Luke 8:3), in the king’s Courtiers (βασιλικός, John 4:46), perhaps in Herodion (Romans 16:11), whose name indicates Court connexions; we know, further, that there were servants to whom Herod talked on religious topics (Matthew 14:1 f
Temple, the - ...
In the Court of the temple were two pillars which received the names of JACHIN, "He will establish;" and BOAZ, "in him is strength," which perfectly agrees with the fact that it was God's house that was being built. the word ναός refers to the house itself, and ἱερόν to the buildings and Courts in general
Cassiodorus (or Rather, Cassiodorius) Magnus Aurelius - His writings shew him to have been animated by a truly patriotic spirit; and if he adapted himself skilfully to the varying humours of the Court, it was that he might be able to alleviate the misfortunes of his conquered countrymen
Angels of the Seven Churches - The fact that in the Apocalypse these ‘angels’ are to such a degree the recipients of praise and blame would seem to put both these simple interpretations out of Court
Jehu - Jehu also caused to be put to death all Ahab's relatives and friends, the officers of his Court, and the priests whom he had entertained at Jezreel, 2 Kings 10:1-11
Vine - Often, however, they are trained upon trellis-work, over walls, trees, arbors, the porches and walls of houses, and at times within the house on the side of the central Court
Nebuchadnezzar - He took away several persons from Jerusalem; among others, Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, all of the royal family, whom the king of Babylon caused to be carefully educated in the language and learning of the Chaldeans, that they might be employed at Court, 2 Kings 24:1 2 Chronicles 36:6 Daniel 1:1 . Within this were two other walls and a great tower, besides the palace buildings, Courts, gardens, etc
Priest - They were to act (whether individually or collectively does not distinctly appear) as a Court of appeal in the more difficult controversies in criminal or civil cases
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - He was "a never-failing attendant at the law Courts, and passionately enamoured of the theatre" ( de Sacerdot. The portraits of the emperors, which decorated the walls of the Court, were pelted with stones and filth, and torn to shreds, the Augusti themselves were loaded with curses, and the statues of Theodosius and his deceased wife, the excellent Flaccilla, were torn from their pedestals and ignominiously dragged through the streets. He studiously avoided the Court and association with the great, and even ordinary conversation, except when duty compelled ( ib. The next day the emperor with his Court visited the shrine, and, laying aside his diadem, reverenced the holy martyrs. of Gabala, who basely abused his trust to undermine Chrysostom's influence at Court. Some half-heard words of Severian, uttered in annoyance at Serapion's discourtesy, were distorted by the archdeacon into a blasphemous denial of Christ's Divinity (Socr
Eunomius, Bishop of Cyzicus - He accompanied Aetius to Antioch at the beginning of 358, to attend the Arian council summoned by Eudoxius, who had through Court favour succeeded to the see of Antioch. The next year Theodosius, finding some officers of the Court infected with Eunomian views, expelled them from the palace, and having seized Eunomius at Chalcedon, banished him to Halmyris in Moesia, on the Danube
Satan (2) - The being thus described as ‘the Satan’ or the Adversary appears in Zechariah as an official accuser, and in the Book of Job he takes his place among ‘the sons of God’ in the Court of heaven as one having a right to be there, and that in connexion with the function attributed to him of ‘going to and fro upon the earth,’ and ‘considering’ and reporting upon the conduct of the sons of men. All that appears to be indicated there is the thought that there is in the Court of God one whose office it is to plead for the condemnation of sinners
Tombs - ) His un-Hebrew name implies he was an alien, probably brought to Court by Hezekiah's ungodly predecessor Ahaz. in a loculus closed with a stone, so as to prevent effluvia , in the garden or Court attached to the dwelling
Sadducees - What is the standard? What the final Court of appeal? The Sadducees held that it was contained only in the written Law. It began when Jesus interfered with the prerogatives of the Sanhedrin by expelling the money-changers from the Temple-court
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - Baker ( Genesis 40:5 ) is mentioned early in Scripture as a member of the Egyptian pharaoh's Court. Within ancient governments, scribes served the royal Court, keeping records of the king's reign
Testimony - The biblical concept of testimony or witness is closely allied with the conventional Old Testament legal sense of testimony given in a Court of law. ...
Testimony and the Lawcourt of God . ...
Old Testament writers frequently use the language of the lawcourt to express God's disposition toward various individuals and groups of people. First, it appears as a literal Courtroom defense of Jesus and the gospel. Luke recounts numerous occasions when believers appeared in Court settings bearing witness to Jesus as savior before Jewish, Greek, and Roman authorities
Oaths - 267) says, that was done only in Courts of law, and Christ is not referring to this at all. If the prohibition is absolute, on what ground can the practice of taking oaths in Courts of law be defended? The answer is that the spirit in which the oath is taken in such a case is very different from that which our Lord condemns in the present instance. In a Court of law we take the oath to convince our fellow-men, who cannot see our heart and judge of our regard for truth, of our good faith. We may still keep the spirit of our Lord’s command though we break the letter of it by taking an oath in Court, just, as we may keep the spirit of many other injunctions of the Sermon on the Mount, e
Righteousness - A Court of justice was, in theory, ‘the place of righteousness’ ( Ecclesiastes 3:16 )
Jude, Theology of - God judges sin, rebellion, and apostasy whenever and wherever it occurs—before creation in the heavenly Court (v
Cross, Crucifixion - ...
Not only is the language of the cultus used in Romans 3 , but also the language of justification (the law Court) and redemption (the slave market)
Samuel - "And all Israel gathered themselves together, and lamented him, and buried him in his house at Ramah" (25:1), not in the house itself, but in the Court or garden of his house
Judges, Book of - A shophet , or “judge,” was a military leader, civil administrator, and decider of cases at law, very likely acting as an appellate Court
Magi - The ‘Wise Lord,’ Ahura Mazda (later Ormazd ), reigned alone without equal or second; but Zoroaster surrounded Him with personified attributes, six in number, called Amesha Spenta ( Amshaspands ), ‘Immortal Holy Ones,’ who were the archangels of the heavenly Court
Gods - If their beloved Law, to which they were constantly appealing, hesitated not to designate as ‘gods’ (אֳלהים) the judges whose partiality and injustice provoked their arraignment by God, and the solemn warning to ‘judge the weak and fatherless, do justice to the afflicted and destitute’ (Psalms 82:3), surely the charge of blasphemy came badly from those men who recognized in this Law their final Court of appeal
Sorcery - The Rabmag (" translation="">Jeremiah 39:3; " translation="">Jeremiah 39:13) was probably the (or a) chief of this tribe who may have been either the chief physician attached to the Court or, more probably, a high official charged with the care of the horse and chariotry (see A. The Rabmag (" translation="">Jeremiah 39:3; " translation="">Jeremiah 39:13) was probably the (or a) chief of this tribe who may have been either the chief physician attached to the Court or, more probably, a high official charged with the care of the horse and chariotry (see A
Caesar, Caesar's Household - Any aggrieved citizen could thus appeal to him, and the Emperor could quash the verdict of a lower Court, and substitute his own verdict
Pilate - ...
(3) He mingled the blood of Galileans witk their sacrifices, probably at a feast at Jerusalem, when riots often occurred, and in the temple outer Court (Luke 13:1-4)
Alexander - Being sensible that his end was near, he sent for the grandees of his Court, and declared that "he gave the empire to the most deserving
Joannes Cappadox, Bishop of Constantinople - The Court and people, equally enthusiastic, surged into St
Boyhood of Jesus - 247) argues that Joseph and Mary set out for home before the close of the Feast, because the Talmud says that ‘during Feasts’ (not after them) ‘the members of the Temple Sanhedrin came out on to the terrace and taught the people, contrary to the usual custom of sitting as a Court of appeal,’ and he thinks that Christ was there. It is usually thought that Christ sat, as scholars did, on the floor, with the Rabbis on a raised bench or divan, arranged perhaps in a semicircle, ἐν τῷ μέσῳ occurs in Acts 4:7, where it cannot mean more than ‘present in a central position where others could see and hear,’ yet apart from the members of the Court. If this was so, their action would be somewhat similar to that in a British Court of justice where a distinguished visitor, or even witness, is sometimes complimented by an invitation to ‘take a seat on the Bench
Joseph - Court attendant, of Pharaoh, chief of the executioners (Hebrew, or "commander of the body guard"), the superintendence of executions belonging to the chiefs of the military caste. ) Like Daniel in the great heathen worldking's Court at the close of Israel's history, so Joseph at its beginning, in like circumstances and with like abstinence from fleshly indulgences, interprets the Gentile monarch's dreams; marking, the immeasurable superiority of the kingdom of God, even at its lowest point, to the world kingdoms. ) Pharaoh and his Court were pleased at the arrival of his brethren, and rendered him all help in removing his father and the whole household
Solomon - 1 Kings 1:13 implies a previous promise to Bathsheba, perhaps a ‘court secret’; the public proclamation of 1 Chronicles 22:2-19 , if at all historical, must be misplaced. He had an enormous Court (note list of officers in 1 Kings 4:2 ) and harem ( 1 Kings 11:1 ), necessitating a luxurious daily provision ( 1 Kings 4:22 )
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Such musicians took their place both at Court (1Kings 1:34,1 Kings 1:39-40 ; 1 Kings 10:12 ; Ecclesiastes 2:8 ) and in religious ritual. ...
Nearly two thirds of the psalms contain terms indicating collections, compilers, or authors in their headings: David, portrayed in biblical tradition as a composer, instrumentalist, Court musician, and dancer, being most often mentioned. The practice of dancers entertaining at royal Courts in Hellenistic and Roman times is attested by the dance of Herodias' daughter, Salome, (Matthew 14:6 )
Job, the Book of - Still others have suggested that Job is written in the form of a Court room trial. Job: Humans cannot win an argument in Court against the Creator (Job 9:1-10:22 )
Seceders - " This sentence being intimated to them, they protested that their ministerial office and relation to their respective charges should be held as valid as if no such sentence had passed; and that they were now obliged to make a secession from the prevailing party in the ecclesiastical Courts; and that it shall be lawful and warrantable for them to preach the Gospel, and discharge every branch of the pastoral office, according to the word of God, and the established principles of the church of Scotland. ...
And accordingly the ejected ministers declared in their protest, that they were laid under the disagreeable necessity of seceding, not from the principles and constitution of the church of Scotland, to which, they said, they steadfastly adhered, but from the present church-courts, which had thrown them out from ministerial communion. " As this appointment neither condemned the act of the preceding assembly, nor the conduct of the commission, the seceding ministers considered it to be rather an act of grace than of justice; and therefore, they said, they could not return to the church-courts upon this ground; and they published to the world the reasons of their refusal, and the terms upon which they were willing to return to the communion of the established church. They now erected themselves into an ecclesiastical Court, which they called the Associated Presbytery, and preached occasionally to numbers of the people who joined them in different parts of the country. The supreme Court among them is designated The General Associate Synod, having under its jurisdiction three provincial synods in Scotland and one in Ireland
Rome, Romans - On one side were the Curia or senate-house and the Basilica aemilia, a law-court; along the whole of the other side, with the Sacra Via between, stretched the Basilica Julia, a very large law-court, surrounded by two rows of square columns
Woman - ‘At the worst, these vices infected only a comparatively small class, idle, luxurious, enervated by the slave system, depraved by the example of a vicious Court. We naturally think of the ‘Court of the Women’ in the Temple, beyond which no woman might pass. ‘The Courtesan was the one free woman of Athens’ (Lecky, op
Gratianus, Emperor - Justina fixed her Court at Sirmium; and the Western empire was perhaps nominally divided between the two brothers, Gratian having Gaul, Spain, and Britain, and Valentinian, Italy, Illyricum, and Africa (Zos. The internal condition of the West was insecure, from the tacit antagonism between the two Courts, and the East was now suddenly thrown upon his hands, as Valens had left no children. The Western provincials—never very contented—felt the absence of the imperial Court. Ambrose went round to the park gates, entered unperceived by the huntsmen, and never left Gratian till he had overcome his arguments and those of his Courtiers and obtained remission of the sentence
Zechariah, Theology of - However, at this stage in progressive revelation, he was not understood to be thoroughly evil either, since he is presented as a member of the divine King's Court. They could enter the Court of the Gentiles in the Jerusalem temple but were forbidden upon pain of death from going beyond the wall of partition between Jews and Gentiles
Nehemiah - Speaking of the preachers of Jerusalem and their support, just as we get our Presbytery, and our Kirk-Session, and our Expository Pulpit, and our Puritan Sabbath from the new Jerusalem of that day, so we get our Deacons' Court and our Sustentation Fund from Ezra and Nehemiah. If our pulpit of wood and its method of work on the Word of God is ancient and honourable, so also is our Deacons' Court
Go - These cases go to show that the Court will vary the construction of instruments
Leper - That performed outside the camp restored him to intercourse with the people (Leviticus 14:3-9), that performed in the tabernacle Court seven days after the former restored him to all spiritual privileges of Jehovah's worshippers (Leviticus 14:10-32)
King - The queen mother was regent during a son's minority, and always held a high position of power at Court (1 Kings 2:19; 2 Kings 24:12; 2 Kings 24:15; 2 Kings 11:1-3; Athaliah)
Solomon - The royal magnificence and splendour of Solomon's Court were unrivalled
Esther, Book of - But Mordecai falls out with the Court favourite, Haman , on account of his refusing to bow down and do reverence to the latter
Make - Matthew 22 ...
To make love, ...
To make suit, to Court to attempt to gain the favor or affection
Friend, Friendship - A friend may offer help at the risk of death, as Hushai the Arkite does when he spies for David in the Court of Absalom the usurper (2 Samuel 15:32-37 ; 16:16-19 ; 17:5-16 )
Manifestation - Not in the Court as a king’s son, not in the Temple as the member of a priestly family, not in the wilderness as the son of some aged solitary who had given up the world, but in the familiar commonplace surroundings of a peasant family, as the Son of Mary, the wife of a village carpenter
Samaria - Shechem previously had been the capital, Tirzah the Court residence in summer (1 Kings 15:21; 1 Kings 15:33; 1 Kings 16:1-18)
Proselytes - ...
(4) King's table proselytes, seeking to gain Court favor, as under Solomon
Angel - If the “us” in Genesis 1:26 is a reference to God's angelic Court, then the angels are simply present at the creation; their origin is not explained
Righteous, To Be - When the Court system failed became of corruption, the wicked were falsely “justified” and the poor were robbed of justice because of trumped-up charges
Commerce - They are large square buildings, in the centre of which is an area, or open Court
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - He took away several persons from Jerusalem; among others Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, all of the royal family, whom the king of Babylon caused to be carefully instructed in the language and in the learning of the Chaldeans, that they might be employed at Court, Daniel , 1
Rome, - ( Acts 28:15 ) [1] (2) "The palace," Or "Caesar's Court" (praetorium,) (Philippians 1:13 ) This may mean either the great camp of the Praetorian guards which Tiberius established outside the walls on the northeast of the city, or, as seems more probable, a barrack attached to the imperial residence on the Palatine
Elijah - His burning zeal, bluntness of address, fearlessness of man, were nurtured in lonely communion with God, away from the polluting Court, amidst his native wilds. Ahab rides in his chariot across the plain 16 miles to Jezreel, in haste lest the rainflood of the Kishon should make the Esdraelon or Jezreel plain impassable with mud; Elijah, with Spirit-imparted strength from "the hand of the Lord upon" him, running before, but no further than the entrance of the city, for he shrank from the contamination of the Court and its luxuries. ...
Jehovah there said, "What doest thou here, Elijah?" thou whose name implies thy calling to witness for God Jehovah, away from the Court and people whom thou wast called to reprove! Elijah pleads his "jealousy for Jehovah God of hosts," and that with all his zeal he is left
Babel - " Kudur Nakhunta of Elam, whose Court was at Susa, in 2286 invaded Chaldaea and carried off the Babylonian images. Sin-shada holds Court at Erech 25 miles to the N. ...
He held his Court alternately in Nineveh and Babylon, which explains the difficulty and shows the accurate propriety of the Scripture statement that Manasseh, king of Judah, was carried by the captains of the king of Assyria to Babylon (2 Chronicles 33:11)
Eusebius (60), Bishop of Nicomedia - We cannot say under what pretext he was translated to the see of Nicomedia a city which was still the principal seat of the imperial Court. We must give him credit for moral courage in risking his position as bishop and as Court favourite for the sake of his theological views and opposing himself almost single-handed to the nearly unanimous judgment of the first representative assembly of the Christian episcopate—a judgment fanned into enthusiasm by martyrs and monks from the African monasteries and accepted hurriedly but passionately by the emperor. Thenceforward Eusebius used his great power at Court and his ascendancy over the mind of Constantine to blast the character and quench the influence of the most distinguished advocates of anti-Arian views
Leadership - At David's Court there were permanent counselors ( 1 Chronicles 27:32-33 ). They functioned as a supreme Court for the entire church
Helena, Saint, Mother of Constantine the Great - When Constantine succeeded in 306, he probably recalled his mother to the Court, but direct proof of this is wanting. ...
The following inscription from Salerno marks the power of Helena in her son's Court: "To our sovereign lady Flavia Augusta Helena, the most chaste wife of the divine Constantius, the mother of our Lord Constantine, the greatest, most pious and victorious Augustus, the grandmother of our Lords Crispus and Constantine and Constantius, the most blessed and fortunate Caesars, this is erected by Alpinius Magnus, vir clarissimus, corrector of Lucania and Bruttii, devoted to her excellence and piety" (Mommsen, u
Exodus - This city was at that time the residence of the Egyptian Court, and here the interviews between Moses and Pharaoh had taken place
Devil - In Zechariah and Job 1–2 the satan appears as God's agent and minister who seeks to bring charges against individual people before God and the heavenly Court
Dress - Μalbush a state dress, Court apparel (1 Kings 10:5), or religious vestment (2 Kings 10:22)
Cherub (1) - heaven's Court will be transferred here (Revelation 21:3), and the world is subject to a never ending theocracy" (DeBurgh)
Macedonia - The famous Greek tragedian Euripides spent some time at the Court of the Macedonian kings; and Aristotle, before he founded his philosophical school in Athens, served as the teacher of the Macedonian prince Alexander
Mission(s) - The architecture of the Temple provided a place for foreigners to worship in the Court of the Gentiles (1 Kings 8:41-43 ), and the prayer of Solomon at the Temple dedication mentioned this fact (2 Chronicles 6:32-33 )
Herod - In the splendour of his good fortune Agrippa did not forget his Jewish countrymen, but fitfully at least, and probably from motives of policy, exerted his influence at the Roman Court to mitigate the wrongs and restrictions entailed on them by their religion
Growing - Luke 12:27) between the lilies of the field and the garish splendour of Solomon’s Court dress, it is less upon the beauty of the flowers that Christ lays stress than upon their growth, gradual and all unconscious, spontaneous, effortless
Interpretation - Paul presupposed his readers’ acquaintance with its writings, which he assumed to be the final Court of appeal in all argumentation
Assyria - According to an inscription he claimed the sovereignty of Babylon, and held his Court there
Persia - Alexander in a drunken fit, to please a Courtesan, burned the palace. The organization of the Persian kingdom and Court as they appear in Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther, accords with independent secular historians
Caracalla, the Nickname of m. Aurelius Severus Antoninus Bassianus - He continued to Court the city populace, and enriched Rome with magnificent baths, which even in ruins are the most superb monuments of refined luxury
Eusebius, Bishop of Dorylaeum - 1389) and an "agens in rebus" to the Court ( Gesta de Nom
Solomon - And because the altar of burnt-offerings was not sufficient for all these victims, the king consecrated the Court of the people
Pillar - The conical pillar standing in the Court of the temple of Astarte, as represented on the coins of Byblus, is an illustration of this higher conception
Maximus Magnus, Christian Emperor in the West - Ambrose, indeed, was a political opponent, but Maximus Courted Siricius, and was very obsequious to Martin. ) At the beginning of 387 the struggle about the basilicas gave him a pretext for interfering on the Catholic side with the Court of Milan, a proceeding which he may have thought would gain him the sympathy of his old opponent St
Samuel, Books of - likewise includes three sections: (1) David at Saul’s Court ( 1 Samuel 16:1 to 1 Samuel 21:1 ); (2) David as a fugitive outlaw ( 1 Samuel 21:2 - 2 Samuel 1:1-27 ); (3) David as king in Hebron ( 2 Samuel 2:1 to 1Sa 10:9-167 )
Satan - His special function is to watch over human affairs and beings with the object of searching out men’s sins and accusing them in the celestial Court
Confess, Confession - Reflected here is the secular Greek use of the word to denote solemn and binding public testimony in a Court of law
Joseph (2) - In the Court at the entrance to the tomb, the preparation would be made
Titus (Emperor) - ]'>[1] ), at the Court of the latter. Afterwards he followed the usual career in the law Courts, and at the same period married Arrecina Tertulla, daughter of the knight M
Roman Law - The entire system, known as the ordo iudiciorum publicoum , perhaps is best translated as “the list of national Courts. This perplexing delay could be explained by a congested Court list, the failure of his accusers to appear to lodge their charges, or the upheaval that characterized Nero's reign
Altar - The central altar in the Court of Solomon's temple was a bronze altar. Generally reconstructions of the tabernacle and Temple locate the altar in the center of the Courtyard, but the text seems to favor a location near the entrance of the tabernacle/Temple structure. ...
Ezekiel's vision of the restored Temple had the altar of burnt offering located in the center of the Courtyard. This altar was apparently larger than the bronze altar of Solomon and was placed in the central position in the Courtyard to be the main altar of sacrifice
Scribes - Five pairs of teachers represent the succession of scribes, each pair consisting of the president of the Sanhedrin and the father of the house of judgment presiding in the supreme Court
Athens - Paul’s address before the Court or council of Areopagus (q. Faced by an audience half-courteous and half-derisive, he was first ridiculed and then ignored, when he would have preferred to be contradicted and persecuted
Hunneric, King of the Vandals. - Hunneric next deprived Catholics who held posts at the Court or belonged to the army of their offices and pay; many of the former were forced to work in the fields near Utica and the latter were deprived of their property and exiled to Sicily or Sardinia
Euric, King of Toulouse - By the influence of Euric's minister, Leo, he was released after a year's imprisonment, and appeared at the Gothic Court at Bordeaux, where, during a stay of two months, he succeeded in obtaining only one audience of the king, so great was the crowd of ambassadors, and the pressure of important business awaiting the decision of Euric and his minister
Mill - Clarke, in his Travels: "Scarcely had we reached the apartment prepared for our reception, when, looking from the window into the Court yard belonging to the house, we beheld two women grinding at the mill, in a manner most forcibly illustrating the saying of our Saviour: ‘Two women shall be grinding at the mill, the one shall be taken and the other left
Habits - The Jewish nobles and Courtiers, upon great and solemn occasions, appeared in scarlet robes, dyed, not as at present with madder, with cochineal, or with any modern tincture, but with a shrub, whose red berries give an orient tinge to the cloth. It is not, however, improbable, that the bulk of the nation continued to follow their ancient custom; and that the compliance prevailed only among those Jews who were connected with the Babylonish Court; for many ages after that, we find Antiochus Epiphanes introducing the habits and fashions of the Grecians among the Jews; and as the history of the Maccabees relates, he brought the chief young men under his subjection, and made them wear a hat, or turban
Turn - The sheriff's turn is a Court of record, held by the sheriff twice a year in every hundred within his county
Maxentius, Joannes, Presbyter And Archimandrite - Both parties had influential supporters in the imperial Court, the monks being vigorously upheld by Vitalian, then apparently in great favour with the emperor Justin, who held the office of magister militum (Evagr
Province - Prouincia is in fact ‘a sphere of duty,’ whether that be in an office or Court, like that of the urban praetor at Rome, or that of a governor of a vast district
Hosius (1), a Confessor Under Maximian - " Traces exist of the presence of Hosius at the imperial Court in 316, when the Donatists, having been condemned at the council in Nov. No trace of a return to the Court of Constantine remains, and it does not appear that they ever met again. Severely rebuking the emperor and endeavouring to convince him of his error, he withdrew from the Court and returned to his own country
Expiation - The blood of this goat he carried into the most holy sanctuary, and sprinkled it seven times between the ark and the vail, which separated the holy from the sanctuary: from thence he returned into the Court of the tabernacle, and sprinkled both sides of it with the blood of the goat. During all this, none of the priests or people were admitted into the tabernacle, or into the Court. The sanctuary, the Court, and the altar, being thus purified, the high priest directed the goat which was set at liberty by the lot to be brought to him
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - This naturally did not incline him to the religion inculcated by Arian or semi-Arian Court bishops, who probably laid stress upon their peculiar points of divergence from the orthodox faith, and neglected the rest of Christian theology. Italy near the Court, being removed from place to place (Jul. —About May 355 Julian was permitted to go to Athens, but a few months later was summoned again to the Court (Jul. All this attracted the people, but was not agreeable to many of the Courtiers
Justinianus i, Emperor - We are told that he was easy of access—a rare merit in the despotic centre of a highly formal Court—pleasant and reassuring in manner, but also deceitful and capable of treachery and ingratitude. There was in his Court an active, though probably concealed, Monophysite party, headed by, and sheltering itself under, the empress Theodora. In spite of his protestations of respect for the clergy, the important place they held at his Court, and the privileges which his legislation gave them, he never hesitated to resort to despotism and banishment to bend them to his will
Nestorius And Nestorianism - He contrived to bring the ladies of the Court, including Pulcheria, over to his side. So the influence of the Court was now openly exerted in favour of Cyril, and the Oriental bishops began to waver. He had thrown his influence on the side of the Court, and he was determined to persevere in his policy
Synagogue - 13) and acted as lictor of the synagogue Court in scourging offenders (Mak. On Monday and Thursday the villagers coming to the cities for the Court or the market attended the synagogue in sufficient numbers to have a portion of the Torah read (Tôs
Peter - Transpose the first and second denials in John; then the first took place at the fire (Matthew 26:69; Mark 14:66-67; Luke 22:56; John 18:25), caused by the fixed recognition of the maid who admitted Peter (Luke 22:56); the second took place at the door leading out of the Court, where he had withdrawn in fear (Matthew 26:71; Mark 14:68-69; Luke 22:58; John 18:17); the third took place in the Court an hour after (Luke 22:59), before several witnesses who argued from his Galilean accent and speech, near enough for Jesus to cast that look on Peter which pierced his heart so that he went out and wept bitterly
Sol'Omon - All the equipment of his Court, the "apparel" of his servants was on the same scale
Episcopacy - The meeting of the dean and chapter, practised in the church of England, is but a faint shadow of the second, the ecclesiastical Court of the third, and the convocation of the fourth
King - Saul’s primitive Court would be supported by his ancestral estate and by the booty taken from the enemy, perhaps along with presents, more or less compulsory, from his friends or subjects ( 1 Samuel 10:27 ; 1 Samuel 16:20 )
Bible, Translations - ...
With Elizabeth's death and the coming of King James I to the throne at the Hampton Court Conference in January 1604, the king accepted the proposal that a new translation be made
Inn - ...
Some of these commendations obviously refer to the interchange of Courtesies among members of the Christian community only (e. ’...
The influx of Greeks into Palestine, the constant presence of a large Roman element, civil and military, the mixed retinue attached to the Herodian Court, the increase of trade, the importation of foreign workmen, the presence in several towns of companies of gladiators, actors, and the like,—would necessitate not only inns, but various kinds and grades of inns
Arrest - ’ What had kept them from arresting Him in the temple-court? It was fear of the multitude (cf
Bethlehem - On the contrary, it was evidently a manger belonging to the inn or khan: in other words, the upper rooms being wholly occupied, the holy family were compelled to take up their abode in the Court allotted to the mules and horses, or other animals
Philistim - The houses, on a nearer view, are only so many huts, (cottages,) sometimes detached, at others ranged in the forms of cells, around a Court yard, enclosed by a mud wall
Eye - A son of the Great Mogul was actually suffering this punishment when Sir Thomas Roe visited the Court of Delhi
Shepherds - These overseers, in the language of the Hebrews, were called the princes of the flock; they were treated with great distinction, and seem to have been selected in the reign of David from among the nobles of his Court
Adultery - If she persisted in denying the fact, she was led to the eastern gate of the Court of Israel, stripped of her own clothes, and dressed in black, before great numbers of her own sex
Law - (4) For Acts 19:38 , AV, "the law is open" (RV, "courts," etc. ) see Court , No
Commerce - The Aqaba port of Elath (Ezion-geber) served the needs of the Court of Solomon and subsequent kings as well
Nationality - Before the death of Herod the Great, two Pharisees were burnt alive for leading an assault upon the golden eagle he had fixed over the gate of the Temple Court
Preaching - Many of the discourses were preached in camps and Courts, in streets, schools, cities, and villages, sometimes with great composure and coolness, at other times with vehement action and rapturous energy; sometimes in a plain blunt style, at other times in all the magnificent pomp of Eastern allegory. Hence false prophets, had men who found it worth while to affect to be good, crowded the Courts of princes. ...
Narni himself was so disgusted with his office, that he renounced preaching, and shut himself up in his cell to mourn over his irreclaimable contemporaries; for bishops went back to Court, and rope-makers lay idle again. Old Latimer, in a coarse frieze gown, trudged afoot, his Testament hanging at one end of his leathern girdle, and his spectacles at the other, and without ceremony instructed the people in rustic style from a hollow tree; while the Courtly Ridley in satin and fur taught the same principles in the cathedral of the metropolis. Crammer, though a timorous man, ventured to give king Henry the Eighth a New Testament, with the label, Whoremongers and adulterers God will judge; while Knox, who said, there was nothing in the pleasant face of a lady to affray him, assured the queen of Scots, that, "If there were any spark of the Spirit of God, yea, of honesty and wisdom in her, she would not be offended with his affirming in his sermons, that the diversions of her Court were diabolical crimes evidences of impiety or insanity
Acts of the Apostles - Contrast the account of the conduct of the Greek magistrates at Iconium and Thessalonica who were active against him, or of the Court of the Areopagus at Athens who were contemptuous, with the silence about the action of the Roman magistrates of Pisidian Antioch and Lystra, or the explicit statements about Sergius Paulus, Gallio, Felix, Festus, Claudius Lysias and Julius the centurion, who were more or less fair or friendly. ( f ) The old Court of the Areopagus at Athens ( Acts 17:19 ), which really ruled the city, though it was a ‘free city,’ as the demos or popular assembly had lost its authority
Hammurabi - Four of the letters are addressed by Hammurabi to either the king or Court officials at Mari
Saul - ...
David was now sent for as a "cunning player on an harp" (1 Samuel 16:16,18 ), to play before Saul when the evil spirit troubled him, and thus was introduced to the Court of Saul
Headship - The other passage occurs in connexion with our Lord’s injunction to make ‘the church’ the final Court of appeal in cases of disputes among brethren
Sabbath - ...
The "holy convocation" on it (Leviticus 23:2-3) was probably a meeting for prayer, meditation, and hearing the law in the Court of the tabernacle before the altar at the hour of morning and evening sacrifice (Leviticus 19:30; Ezekiel 23:38)
Feasts - , attend in the Court of the tabernacle or temple and make his offering with gladness (Leviticus 23; Deuteronomy 27:7). Then finding in the law directions as to the feast of tabernacles, they brought branches of olive, pine, myrtle, and palm, and thick trees, and made booths on their roofs and in their Courts, and in the Courts of God's house, and sat under them with "great gladness" (Nehemiah 8). , 17), and the rich Courting the praise of liberality
Fall - This point did not fall under the cognizance or deliberations of the Court
Excommunication - So, in spiritual matters, the Church may pass sentences of separation more or less complete, and though the supreme judge alone can pronounce the sentence of death in an absolute sense, yet the Church can pass such a sentence in a relative sense-the offender being regarded as dead from the standpoint of the ecclesiastical Court. From Christ Himself the Church received authority, not only to ‘bind’ the impenitent and unbelieving and to ‘loose’ the penitent believer, but also, in its properly constituted Courts, to condemn and expel gross offenders and to forgive and re-instate them if truly penitent
Work - The artisan plied his craft during the work week, known in Hebrew as “the days of work,” and rested on the Sabbath: “Thus saith the Lord God; The gate of the inner Court that looketh toward the east shall be shut the six working days; but on the sabbath it shall be opened, and in the day of the new moon it shall be opened” ( Jacobus Baradaeus, Bishop of Edessa - But the splendour of the Court had no attractions for him
Greek Versions of ot - This document, which purports to be written by a Greek official of high rank in the Court of Ptolemy ii. But if not, the writer of the Letter cannot have been the person of rank in Ptolemy’s Court that he represents himself to be, and the credit of the document is severely shaken
Exodus, Book of - God delivered the baby Moses from danger, and he grew up in pharaoh's Court as son of pharaoh's daughter
Prophecy, Prophets - The prophets were at times allowed to see into the throne room or heavenly Court (Isaiah 6:1-7 ; 1 Kings 22:19-23 ; Jeremiah 23:18-22 ; compare Amos 3:7 ; Job 1:6-12 ; Job 2:1-6 ; 2 Corinthians 12:1-4 ; Revelation 1:1-3 ; Revelation 22:18-19 )
Salutations - Paul, or were actually present when he dictated this letter, join in his salutation; ‘All the saints salute you, especially they that are of Caesar’s household’ (Philippians 4:22), where we are reminded of what recent research in inscriptions has shown, not to speak of the literary evidence-that converts, and some of them of high rank, were in the Imperial Court, besides many in the city of the highest circles
Micah, Theology of - In 6:1b-8 Micah is pictured as the Lord's plenipotentiary from the heavenly Court, who has come to Jerusalem to accuse Israel of having broken the Mosaic covenant. In the third prophecy (2:1-5), Micah accuses rich land barons of exploiting Israel's middle class by taking their lands away from them in corrupt Courts (vv
Education (2) - And once, when they heard Him discoursing in the Temple-court, they marvelled whence He had derived His wisdom
Magnificat - Luke was supplied with a special (written) source, through one of the women mentioned in Luke 8:3; Luke 24:10, possibly Joanna, who, being the wife of Herod’s steward, may also have supplied information about the Court of Herod
Silence - It was the silence of indignation against the utter mockery of His trial and the attitude of the time-serving president of the Court
Antioch - He further strove to render Antioch the intellectual rival of Alexandria, by inviting to his Court scholars, such as Aratus the astronomer, and by superintending the translation into Greek of learned works in foreign tongues
Diocletian, Emperor - Altars were set up in every Court of justice, and both parties to suits compelled to sacrifice
Ammonites - On entering it at the south end," he adds, "we came to an open square Court, with arched recesses on each side, the sides nearly facing the cardinal points
Divination - Doubtless the above class of men were eminent for their learning, as those were at the Court of Babylon, over whom Daniel was made chief
Sea - ...
The BRAZEN or MOLTEN SEA, made by Solomon for the temple, was...
a circular vessel at least fifteen feet in diameter, which stood in...
the Court of the temple, and contained three thousand baths,...
according to 2 Corinthians 4:5 , or two thousand baths according to 1Ki...
7:26
mo'Ses - here was the first part of Moses' training, --a training at home in the true religion, in faith in God, in the promises to his nation, in the life of a saint, --a training which he never forgot, even amid the splendors and gilded sin of Pharaoh's Court
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - Martin objected to a case of heresy being left to a secular tribunal, begged Ithacius not to press the charges against Priscillian before such a Court, and besought Maximus not to allow any other punishment of the accused beyond excommunication
Presentation - The Virgin would not go further—even when she had been cleansed—than the Court of the Women
Nero - Paul had been arraigned, and in such cases a Roman citizen could appeal from the Court of a procurator to the Emperor himself
Bible - King James bore it an inveterate hatred, on account of the notes, which, at the Hampton Court conference, he charged as partial, untrue, seditious, &c. the last English Bible was that which proceeded from the Hampton Court conference, in 1603; where, many exceptions being made to the Bishops' Bible, king James gave order for a new one; not, as the preface expresses it, for a translation altogether new, nor yet to make a good one better; or, of many good ones, one best
Josephus - He devotes considerable space to the traditions-taken from the Epistle of Aristeas-regarding the Greek version of the Mosaic Law executed at the Court of Ptolemy ii. How little the horizon of Josephus extended beyond Palestine is shown also by the brevity with which he treats of the persecutions of the Jews in Alexandria, and of the famous embassy of Philo to the Court of Gaius Caligula (xviii
Augustine - or, as he is sometimes called in the Court style of the middle ages, ST. One of his Christian countrymen, Pontinius, who held a high situation at Court, having perceived a copy of St
Moses - And while he was instructed "in all the wisdom of the Egyptians," and bred up in the midst of a luxurious Court, he acquired at home the knowledge of the promised redemption of Israel; and, "by faith" in the Redeemer Christ, "refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter, choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; esteeming the reproach of Christ," or persecution for Christ's sake, "greater riches than the treasures of Egypt: for he had respect to the recompense of reward," Exodus 2:1-10 ; Acts 7:20-22 ; Hebrews 11:23-26 ; or looked forward to a future state. ...
At their second interview with Pharaoh, in obedience to the divine command, again requiring him to let the children of Israel go out of his land; Pharaoh, as foretold, demanded of them to show a miracle for themselves, in proof of their commission, when Aaron cast down his rod, and it became a serpent before Pharaoh and before his servants, or officers of his Court
Persecution - To change the figure, whilst the individual admits the right of the State to enter the Outer Court and even the Holy Place, there is a Holy of Holies which is reserved for himself. In other lands the prophets were obliging Courtiers and fell in with the royal wishes. That was the privilege of the Court-prophets whose message was inspired from the throne
Monophysitism - The passionate protest raised in Egypt against the heresy of NESTORIUS, supported as it was by Court influence, was carried so far that it led to a strong reaction. The party of Eutyches had recourse to Court intrigue, and the empress Eudocia contrived to deprive her sister-in-law Pulcheria, who favoured Flavian, of all her influence with the emperor
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - ...
The glory of the Court of Solomon is twice referred to in the Gospels, and that in words of Christ. The second occasion is the reference to the story of the visit of the ‘queen of the South’ to the Court of Solomon, and the argument that inasmuch as a greater than Solomon is here,’ she will bring into condemnation Christ’s contemporaries
Pharisees (2) - The Reformers under Ezra and Nehemiah were forerunners of the Pharisees, as the priestly Court party under Zerubbabel foreshadowed the Sadducees. They received the name ‘Pharisees’ or separated, when they withdrew from the Saddrcee Court party of the Maccabaean rulers under John Hyrcanus (b. They represented the authority of the Scriptures in home, school, synagogue, Courts of law, and daily life. Jesus dropped the whole Law as a way of salvation,—a way the Pharisees themselves could not keep (Romans 7:8), as appeared in their numerous evasions of it, such as ‘blending of Courts,’ and their ostentatious putting of appearance in place of reality
Transportation And Travel - Jacob's sons carried their grain purchases from Egypt to Canaan on donkey back (Genesis 42:26 ); Jesse sent David and a donkey loaded with provisions to Saul's Court (1 Samuel 16:20 ); and Nehemiah became incensed when he saw Judeans transporting grain on donkeys during the sabbath (Nehemiah 13:15 )
Ezekiel - During the crisis that followed, Jehoiakim died or perhaps was killed by those in his own Court
Egypt - Documents from Akhetaton, the Amarna Letters, represent diplomatic correspondence between local rulers in Egypt's sphere of influence and pharaoh's Court
Herod - He had served a long apprenticeship in the Imperial Court, where immorality, adaptability, and flattery were the price of position
Nineveh - Nahum (Nahum 1:10; Nahum 3:11) accords with Diodorus Siculus that the final assault was made during a drinking bout of king and Courtiers: "while they are drunken as drunkards, they shall be devoured as stubble fully dry . ) Of it 60 Courts, halls (some 150 ft. wide, guarded also by winged bulls; inside was the great door, opening into a sculpture adorned passage; then the inner Court, then the state apartments
Unconscious Faith - The first is that of the men of Nineveh, whose repentance on Jonah’s appearance among them is told in the Book of Jonah; the second is that of the Queen of the South, whose visit to Solomon’s Court is picturesquely narrated in the Book of Kings
Bible, Texts And Versions - ...
Over twenty major editions of the English New Testament appeared before the Hampton Court Conference in which King James approved the project that produced the KJV
Stoics - An advocate of poverty and self-abnegation, he became wealthy and maintained his position at Court by abject flattery and perhaps worse
Historical - The only Court of appeal from ‘scientific fact’ is ‘metaphysical reality
Manliness - Three degrees of opinion on this question may be distinguished: (1) that of those who altogether ignore the teaching of Jesus as impracticable; (2) that of those who find in His teaching the condemnation of all resistance to evil, whether private or public, and so condemn alike war between States and private quarrels, whether settled by physical force or by an appeal to Courts of law, the decisions of which ultimately rest on force; (3) that of those who find in the teaching of Jesus primarily the inculcation of a spirit of love the manifestation of which is determined in every case by the circumstances, and which accordingly condemns neither war nor an appeal to force, nor an appeal to Courts of law, apart from the occasion which gives rise to them. These principles, in their mutual interaction, condemn all personal vindictiveness and malice, such an appeal to violence as duelling, that litigious spirit which aims at getting the better of another in a law-court, and all wars of aggression, as well as those which spring from national or personal pride
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - What do you think would be the thoughts of the half-dead Jew as he saw his own temple-kinsmen passing by on the other side, and then saw this dog of a Samaritan leaping off his mule? What would he think and say all night as he saw this excommunicated Samaritan lighting the candle to pour oil and wine into his wounds and watching all night at his bedside? That Samaritan mule hobbling down the Jericho-pass with that half-dead burden on its back always reminds me of Samuel Johnson hobbling along to Bolt Court with the half-dead streetwalker on his back and laying her down on old Mrs
Boethius, Anicus Manlius Severinus - ) downwards, that Boëthius laid down his life in his zeal for the Catholic faith against the Arian invaders of Italy, this is not his own account of his fall from Court favour nor is it supported by any contemporary writer
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - But when Polycarp was robing for presentation at Court, so Pionius tells us, his young men would not let him so much as touch his own shoe-latchet
Numbers, Book of - There were twelve tribes besides the Levites, who were reserved for the service of the tent of testimony, and would be located round the Court
the Importunate Widow - Avenge me of mine adversary! She stood in the way of the unjust judge's chariot all day and cried out, Avenge me of mine adversary! She burst in upon the business of his Court and cried, Avenge me of mine adversary! She stood under his window all night and cried out, Avenge me of mine adversary! And he would not for a while
Independents - ...
These small societies he pronounced independent, jure divino, and entirely exempt from the jurisdiction of the bishop, in whose hand the Court had placed the reins of a spiritual government; and also from that of presbyters and synods, which the Puritans regarded as the supreme visible sources of ecclesiastical authority
Barzillai - ...
Barzilla's truly Highland Courtesy, also, is abundantly conspicuous in the too-short glimpse we get of the lord of Rogelim. A perfect and a finished Courtesy has always its roots struck deep down into humility; which humility, again, has its roots struck deep down into the grace of God. Humility and Courtesy are the Court manners of the kingdom of heaven. A true, a finished, and an unconscious Courtesy is the perfected etiquette of the palace and the presence of the great King. I shall need all my time; for I am fourscore years old this day, and how shall I go up with the king to Jerusalem?' Who can help loving the octogenarian Barzillai, with his 'courtesy in conversation,' and when, like Pompey in Plutarch, he 'gave without disdain, and took with great honour'? And the king kissed Barzillai and blessed him, and Barzillai returned to his place at Rogelim. He shows us also how, with all willingness, and sweetness, and Courtesy, and divine wisdom to leave cities, and feasts, and crowds, and trumpets, and honours, and promotions to younger men, and to apply our whole remaining strength, and our whole remaining time, to end our days as our days should be ended
Constantinus i - The seat of his Court was Treves, which he embellished with many buildings, including several temples and basilicas, and the forum
Alexander the Coppersmith - One of our latest and best authorities thinks that Alexander even followed Paul to Rome, and did his best to poison Nero and his Court still more against Paul
Daniel - It was the largeness, and the expansiveness, and the hospitality of Daniel's fine mind, all combined with his extraordinary nobility and beauty of character, that gave Daniel such an unparalleled position in the Court of Chaldea, and which has gained for Daniel such a famous and such a proverbial name in all subsequent literature, Ezekiel, a contemporary prophet, has heard so much of the wisdom of Daniel, that, to a proud enemy of Israel, he exclaims in irony: Thou art wiser than Daniel! We see the popular belief about Daniel strikingly illustrated also in the Apocryphal addition that was made to the Book of Daniel by its Greek translator and editor, and which was called the story of Susannah and the judgment of Daniel, And we are gratified to read in our own tongue a tribute to the same noble tradition in Shylock's exclamation;-...
A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!The prophet Daniel became a great proficient both in penitential and in intercessory prayer also as the years went on
Septuagint - For this purpose, it is reported, that he sent Aristeas and Andreas, two distinguished officers of his Court, to Jerusalem, on an embassy to Eleazar, then high priest of the Jews, to request of the latter a copy of the Hebrew Scriptures, and that there might also be sent to him seventy-two persons, six chosen out of each of the twelve tribes, who were equally well skilled in the Hebrew and Greek languages
Presence - When a ruler turned his countenance towards a suppliant or Courtier, it meant that his desire was granted, or that he was a persona grata in the Court (cf
Jordanis, Historian of the Goths - Yet even with all the notices he could collect from Greek or Roman authorities and the stories and sagas he heard at the Court of Ravenna, his stock of accurate information about the early history of the Goths cannot have been large
Multitude - ...
Christ, however, was not deceived as to the depth of these impressions; He did not Court their applause or seek their favour
Nation (2) - They constituted the majority of the Sanhedrin, which, as the supreme Court of appeal, professedly represented the remnant of Jewish independence
Prudentius, Marcus (?) Aurelius Clemens Prudentius - He speaks of his early life as stained with much sinfulness, but must have been held in high respect, for after practising as an advocate, he twice held an important civil office, and was at last raised to some high position at the emperor's Court (cf
Rome - The main hall, used as a law-court, etc. It is on record that an orator with a specially powerful voice who was pleading before one tribunal received applause from the crowds attending in all four Courts. ...
Law-courts. As the volume of legal business increased with the settled state of the Empire, now free from the curse of civil war, additional law-courts became necessary, and Emperors vied with one another in building them. ...
Of all Trajan’s magnificent buildings nothing remains uncovered but the central portion-about half the area-of the Basilica Ulpia, with the Column of Trajan in a rectangular Court at the further side of the Basilica
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - The aspect of a Court of justice with its official state and band of ministers prepared to execute its sentence might inspire awe. The emperor, in abject alarm, sent the chief military officials of the Court, Terentius and Arinthaeus, who were known to be his friends, to entreat Basil to come and pray over the sick child
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - According to a priest named Athanasius, Cyril's nephew, Dioscorus, from the outset of his episcopate ("which he obtained one knows not how," says the petitioner), harassed him and his brother by using influence with the Court, so that the brother died of distress, and Athanasius, with his aunts, sister-in-law, and nephews, were bereft of their homes by the patriarch's malignity. At Nicaea, on his way to the Court, he caused ten bishops whom he had brought from Egypt to sign a document excommunicating pope Leo (Mansi, vi
Eutyches And Eutychianism - ...
Court favour inclined to Eutyches; and early in 449 the emperor appointed a commission to examine a charge of falsification of the acts of the late synod of Constantinople, proffered by Eutyches against Flavian. 25 Marcian, accompanied by Pulcheria and the Court, opened and closed the sixth session
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - 104–109), and a letter of his to Alexander of Hierapolis, whom he was representing, informing him how matters were going on at Chalcedon, telling him of the popularity of the deputies with the people, who, in spite of the hostility of the clergy and monks by whom they had been repeatedly stoned, flocked to hear them, assembling in a large Court surrounded with porticos, the churches being closed against them; but Theodoret laments their ill-success with the emperor. " These accusations were accepted at Court, and Dioscorus obtained an imperial edict (dated by Tillemont Mar 30, 449) that as a disturber of the peace of the church Theodoret should keep to his own diocese
Ezra, the Book of - , 2-4) confirm this by mentioning that Cyrus held his Court permanently at Ecbatana, and so would have his archives there
Meals - Saul and his mess-mates sat upon ‘seats’ ( 1 Samuel 20:25 ), the precise form of which is not specified, as did Solomon and the high officials of his Court ( 1 Kings 10:5 , where the queen of Sheba admires the ‘sitting,’ i
Scribes - ’ ‘These laid down three rules: Be careful in pronouncing judgment! bring up many pupils! and make a fence about the Law!’ The professional employment of the Scribes, therefore, fell under three heads:—(1) The study and development of the Law itself; (2) the teaching of it to their pupils; and (3) its practical administration in the Sanhedrin and other Courts; that is to say, they acted as students, teachers, and judges. In Jerusalem, lectures were delivered in the Temple, somewhere in the outer Court. In the local Courts they were also naturally looked to for advice and judgment. Any one, indeed, who possessed the confidence of the community might be appointed a local judge, and probably for the most part the small local Courts were presided over by unprofessional men
Pietists - Certain pious and learned professors of philosophy, and particularly Franckius, Schadius, and Paulus Antonius, the disciples of Spencer, who at that time was ecclesiastical superintendent of the Court of Saxony, began to consider with attention the defects that prevailed in the ordinary method of instructing the candidates for the ministry; and this review persuaded them of the necessity of using their best endeavours to supply what was wanting, and correct what was amiss
Law of God - What God says in Scripture, the inspired record of Revelation, is for Jesus the final Court of appeal
Henoticon, the - 235), "complacently admitted when ratifying or compulsorily enforcing ecclesiastical decrees, and usually adopted without scruple on other occasions by the party with which the Court happened to side
Apocrypha - Josephus refers to the legend regarding the three Courtiers contained in this book. These writers attached to their books as a rule the name of some famous personage, not by way of deception, but to Court favour for the views set forth
Acts - They were not permitted beyond their own Court in the Temple, and in the synagogues they were forced to stand behind a partition while men read from the Scriptures
Roman Catholics - He keeps his Court in great state at the palace of the Vatican, and is attended by seventy cardinals as his privy counsellors, in imitation of the seventy disciples of our Lord
Apostle - This Court of the Jews was so awed and incensed, as to plot the death of the twelve Apostles, as the only effectual measure for preventing the farther spread of Christianity. The Apostles, however, were not discouraged nor restrained; they counted it an honour to suffer such indignities, in token of their affection to their Master, and zeal in his cause; and they persisted in preaching daily in the Courts of the temple, and in other places, that Jesus of Nazareth was the promised and long expected Messiah
Minucius Felix, Marcus - 1), who describes him as a lawyer, "non ignobilis inter causidicos loci," but Lactantius may be merely drawing a natural inference from the introduction to the book itself, where Minucius tells how he had taken advantage of the Court holidays to leave Rome for Ostia, "ad vindimeam feriae judiciariam curam relaxaverant
Sin - We must remember also that, side by side with the introduction of foreign religious ideas, vice peculiar to Oriental despotism invaded the royal Court and the nation of Israel
Isaiah - He was alive to what was transpiring in the Court, in the marketplace, in high society with its shallowness, and in the political frustrations of the nation
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - The Court sat in the hall of Eustathius's episcopal residence
Economic Life - Ezion-geber, a port on the Red Sea, was acquired from the Edomites and serviced a fleet of ships bringing gold from Ophir and rare woods and other luxury items to the royal Court (1 Kings 9:26 ; 1 Kings 10:11-12 )
Paul the Apostle - Thereafter he was shipped to Rome on appeal to the imperial Court of Nero
Minister, Ministration - Matthew 5:25 (the officer of a Court of justice = πράκτωρ, Luke 12:58), Matthew 26:58, Mark 14:54; Mark 14:65, John 7:32; John 7:45-46; John 18:3; John 18:12; John 18:18; John 18:22; John 19:6, Acts 5:22; Acts 5:26 (the Temple police, or apparitors of the Sanhedrin; cf
Samson - Not one word are we told, neither about what kind of cases came up before Samson, nor how he managed his Court, nor about the wisdom, or otherwise, of his judgments, nor about the manner of life that Israel lived for that whole generation under her gigantic judge
Saul - the spoil" (Genesis 49:27), Saul was energetic, choleric, and impressible, now prophesying with the prophets whose holy enthusiasm infected him, now jealous to madness of David whom he had loved greatly and brought permanently to Court (1 Samuel 16:21; 1 Samuel 18:2) and made his armour bearer; and all because of a thoughtless expression of the women in meeting the conquerors after the battle with Goliath, "Saul hath slain his thousands, David his ten thousands" (1 Samuel 17; 1 Samuel 18:7)
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - In Fitzjames Stephen's brilliant four-days' speech before the Court of Arches, that learned and eloquent counsel said,-"My Lord, such differences have always existed in the Church
Miriam - Was she glad in her heart when she heard of Miriam's leprosy? Did she laugh behind the door like Sarah? Did she say, Let her rot in the wilderness, for she deserves it? Was she sad all the eighth day and night after Miriam had been healed? Or, did she go up to the Court of the Ethiopians, and there importune her brother Aaron to importune his God on behalf of his sister? Did she look out at the gate many times every day all that week, but could never see or hear Miriam for weeping? Did she buy the two birds for the cleansing of a leper with her own money, and did she have them all ready with her own hands for days before Aaron could as yet take Miriam back? I do not know
Edom - And thorns shall come up in her palaces, nettles and brambles in the fortresses thereof; and it shall be a habitation of dragons, and a Court for owls
Heresy - Paul found a magus at the Court of the proconsul at Paphos, Acts 13:6
Magi - Nor are we to suppose the impression confined to the Court; for the history of the three Hebrew youths, of Nebuchadnezzar's dream, sickness, and reformation from idolatry, of the interpretation of the hand writing on the wall by Daniel the servant of the living God, of his deliverance from the lions, and the publicity of the prophecy of Isaiah respecting Cyrus, were too recent, too public, and too striking in their nature, not to be often and largely talked of
Philippians, Epistle to - Paul was handed over to the judicial prefects of the Prætorian guard, who presided over the supreme Imperial Court in Rome
Pilate - The Court sought evidence which would lead to the death of Jesus, but failed to find any that was reliable. This exchange of Courtesy led to a renewal of the friendship between Pilate and Herod, which had been interrupted for some reason or other
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - ...
Naturally a better side of Arianism is exhibited in this work than elsewhere in the main not controversial but exegetical and practical written when all Court favour had long been lost and when the sect met from the state with nothing but persecution
Sidonius Apollinaris, Saint - In 460, when the emperor was holding his Court at Arles, and had gathered round him the most eminent literary men Of Gaul, Domnulus, Lampridius, and Severianus, Sidonius distinguished him
Song of Songs - On the other hand, he is stirred by the pomp of a Court, the magnificence of a royal litter, the glittering whiteness of an ivory tower, martial trophies, the rich attire of women, their jewels and perfumes
Mission - Why should it be thought incredible that Jesus hoped ultimately to win men of all nations? Was not exclusiveness distressing to Him? Was He not ready with a reference to mercies granted to the woman of Zarephath and to Naaman the Syrian (Luke 4:25-27)? The outer Court of the Temple was the only part of the sacred structure to which a Gentile had access, and all the Evangelists report that Jesus insisted that this enclosure should be kept clean and quiet ‘for all the nations’ (Matthew 21:12-13, Mark 11:15-17, Luke 19:45-46, John 2:14; John 2:16)
Church - ‘Tell it to the ecclesia ’ can hardly refer directly to communities of Jesus’ disciples, as these did not exist in the time of the Galilæan ministry, but rather to the Jewish congregation, or its representative Court, in the place to which the disputants might belong
Maccabees - The affairs of Syria growing ever more desperate under the succession of feeble kings, John ceased payment of the tribute which had been exacted by Antiochus, and established a brilliant Court, issuing coins as high priest and head of the Congregation of the Jews
Ethics - The third safeguards the oath in Court and marketplace; the fourth asserts God's claim on human time, with humanitarian overtones
Ethics - Frequently the laws are, such as only a judge may administer: thus the claim of ‘an eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth’ ( Deuteronomy 19:21 ), being a maxim of fairness to be observed by a magistrate who has to decide between contending parties, is too harsh for guidance outside a Court of law ( Matthew 5:38-39 )
Canaan, History And Religion of - They represent correspondence between the Egyptian Court at Tell el-Amarna and numerous Canaanite cities, including Jerusalem, Megiddo, and Shechem
Language of Christ - It has ruled Hebrew out of Court
Merit - ...
‘The judgment on men before the heavenly Court of justice takes place with reference to the question whether the man shall live or die—whether he shall be found worthy of the future Kingdom of God or not’ (Weber, p
Messiah - The Immanuel prophecy, which contained the assurance of God’s presence among His people, delivered to the doubting Ahaz and his unbelieving Court during the dark days of b
Paul as a Pastor - Now from this priceless little paper of Luke's we learn that, the session being constituted, Paul immediately took occasion to review those long past three years that he had spent in their city, and had sat at the head of their Court
Joseph - ...
In Egypt, Joseph was bought by Potiphar, a Court official, whose title makes him chief of the royal butchers and hence of the body-guard; and the alertness and trustworthiness of the slave led quickly to his appointment as major domo (Egyp. Everything prospered under Joseph’s management; but his comeliness and Courtesy attracted the notice of his master’s wife, whose advances, being repelled, were transformed into a resentment that knew no scruples. In Egypt the sons were received Courteously, and invited to a feast in Joseph’s house, where they were seated according to their age ( Genesis 43:33 ), and Benjamin was singled out for the honour of a special ‘mess’ (cf
Prophet - ...
Daniel on the other hand is excluded from them, though abounding in the predictive element, because he did not belong to the order of prophets officially, but ministered in the pagan Court of the world power, Babylon
Egypt - Inscriptions on the monuments speak of the dreams of Pharaoh; the butler's and baker's duties are indicated in pictures; one of the oldest papyri relates the story that a foreigner was raised to the highest rank in the Court of Pharaoh; and Dr
Preaching - Many of the discourses were preached in camps and Courts, in streets, schools, cities, villages; sometimes, with great composure and coolness; at other times, with vehement action and rapturous energy; sometimes, in a plain, blunt style; at other times, in all the magnificent pomp of eastern allegory. Hence, false prophets, bad men, who found their account in pretending to be good, crowded the Courts of princes. Narni himself was so disgusted with his office, that he renounced preaching, and shut himself up in his cell to mourn over his irreclaimable contemporaries; for bishops went back to the Court, and rope makers lay idle again
Pronunciation of Proper Names - … There is no single Court of appeal
Theophilus, Bishop of Alexandria - To Eunapius the temple-breakers were impious men who "threw everything into confusion, boasted of having conquered the gods," enriched themselves by the plunder, "brought into the sacred places the so-called monks, men in form but swinish in life," deified the, "bones and heads of worthless men who had been punished by the Courts for their offences," and assigned to "bad slaves who had borne the marks of the lash the title of martyrs and intercessors with the gods. When at last he set forth, as he passed through Lycia he is said to have boasted that he was "going to Court to depose John" ( ib
Versions - The Puritans, through Reinolds, 1604, at the Hampton Court Conference, asked for a new or revised translation
Sibylline Oracles - ] prefer to find traces of a Babylonian (Greek) Sibylline oracle, and Schürer’s criticism of this theory does not succeed in ruling it out of Court
David - At one time there seemed to be some hope of reconciliation between Saul and David ( 1 Samuel 26:24-25 ), but evidently this was short-lived, for soon afterwards David escapes once more, and comes with six hundred followers to the Court of Achish, king of Gath
Solomon - There were 45 side rooms, forming three stories of 15 rooms each, built upon the lower rows of pillars in ranges of 15 each; the windows of the three stories on one side were vis a vis to those on the opposite side of the inner open Court enclosed between them (Keil on 1 Kings 7)
John the Apostle - John has been also identified with the ‘other disciple’ mentioned in John 18:15-16 as known to the high priest and having a right of entrance into the Court, which was denied to Peter
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - The king, with his Court magnates, was present, and threw himself on the earth before the bishops, and with tears and sighs entreated their intercession with God, and exhorted them to observe the ancient decrees of the church and to reform abuses
Egypt - first king of the twenty-second dynasty, who heldhis Court at Bubastis
Philo - in control of the custom-houses on the Arabian, frontier), and he presented the magnificent brazen doors for the inner Court of the Temple in Jerusalem (Jos
Weights And Measures - This measure ‘ house of two seahs ’ is the standard of measurement in the Mishna, and is defined as the area of the Court of the Tabernacle, or 100×50 cubits (c
Woman - Martha's traditional preoccupation for domestic chores receives only censure! Jesus chooses women as the first witnesses to his resurrection (Luke 24:1-12 ), even though their testimony would have been thrown out of a legal Court, and Mary Magdalene becomes the "apostle to the (male ) apostles" (John 20:1-2,18 )
Vespasian - Nero felt compelled to recall Vespasian to Court as the only suitable man to inflict the deserved punishment on the Jews
Food - Even the outer Court of the Temple itself had in our Lord’s day become a ‘house of merchandise’ ( John 2:16 )
Hellenistic And Biblical Greek - This modified Attic was used at the Macedonian Court before the time of Alexander the Great
Presbyterians - As to the church government among the Scotch Presbyterians, no one is ignorant, that, from the first dawn of the reformation among us till the aera of the revolution, there was a perpetual struggle between the Court and the people, for the establishment of an episcopal or a presbyterian form: the former model of ecclesiastical polity was patronised by the house of Stuart on account of the support which it gave to the prerogatives of the crown; the latter was the favourite of the majority of the people, perhaps not so much on account of its superior claim to apostolical institution, as because the laity are mixed with the clergy in church judicatories, and the two orders, which under episcopacy are kept so distinct, incorporated, as it were, into one body. ...
The laymen who thus form an essential part of the ecclesiastical Courts of Scotland are called ruling elders, and hold the same office, as well as the same name, with those brethren (Acts 15:1-41 :) who joined with the apostles and elders at Jerusalem in determining the important question concerning the necessity of imposing upon the Gentile converts the ritual observances of the law of Moses. Appeals are brought from all the other ecclesiastical Courts in Scotland to the general assembly; and in questions purely religious, no appeal lies from its determinations
Passover - The head of the family or anyone ceremonially clean brought the lamb to the sanctuary Court, and slew it, or on special occasions gave it to Levites to slay (2 Chronicles 30:17)
Law of Moses - A Court of exactly this nature is noticed as appointed to supreme power by Jehoshaphat
Philippians Epistle to the - The saints of Caesar’s household were not members of the ruling family but freedom and slaves connected with the imperial Court (cf
Joannes, Bishop of Antioch - Cyril and the Court began
Presbyterians - As to the church government among the Scotch Presbyterians, no one is ignorant, that, from the first dawn of the reformation among us till the aera of the revolution, there was a perpetual struggle between the Court and the people, for the establishment of an episcopal or a presbyterian form: the former model of ecclesiastical polity was patronised by the house of Stuart on account of the support which it gave to the prerogatives of the crown; the latter was the favourite of the majority of the people, perhaps not so much on account of its superior claim to apostolical institution, as because the laity are mixed with the clergy in church judicatories, and the two orders, which under episcopacy are kept so distinct, incorporated, as it were, into one body. ...
The laymen who thus form an essential part of the ecclesiastical Courts of Scotland are called ruling elders, and hold the same office, as well as the same name, with those brethren (Acts 15:1-41 :) who joined with the apostles and elders at Jerusalem in determining the important question concerning the necessity of imposing upon the Gentile converts the ritual observances of the law of Moses. Appeals are brought from all the other ecclesiastical Courts in Scotland to the general assembly; and in questions purely religious, no appeal lies from its determinations
Jerusalem - Jewish tradition placed the altars and sanctuary in Benjamin, the Courts of the temple in Judah. Jehoshaphat, Asa's son, probably added "the new Court" to the temple (2 Chronicles 20:5)
Immortality (2) - Such an interpretation could not be ruled out of Court on the ground that it is not suggested elsewhere in Christ’s teaching
Dates - ...
The only consideration that offers any difficulty in the way of this conclusion is the fact that Josephus associates the recall of Felix with the influential period of Pallas at Court; but (a) Josephus may have been in error in attributing Felix’s escape from punishment to the intercession of Pallas
Birth of Christ - Luke had some special source of information connected with the Court of the Herods, and Joanna the wife of Chuza, Herod’s steward, appears no fewer than four times upon the stage of the Gospel history
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - to restrain his ministers from "dogmatizing" to the council, the Court being then favourable to Nestorius
Anger (2) - What stirred His indignation here was in part the profanity to which sacred places and their proper associations had lost all sacredness; in part, the covetousness which on the pretext of accommodating the pilgrims had turned the house of prayer into a den of thieves; in part, again, the inhumanity which, by instituting a market so noisy in the Court of the Gentiles, must have made worship for these less privileged seekers after God difficult, if not impossible
Animals - John’s account of the cleansing of the Temple Court
Esther - And Mordecai walked every day before the Court of the women's house, to know how Esther did, and what should become of her
Jesus Christ - ...
They were not witnesses in Court; there was no judicial trial
Persecution - ...
A horrible scene of things, says Thuanus, when the very streets and passengers resounded with the noise of those that met together for murder and plunder; and groans of those who were dying, and the shrieks of such as were just going to be butchered, were everywhere heard; the bodies of the slain thrown out of the windows; the Courts and chambers of the houses filled with them; the dead bodies of others dragged through the streets; their blood running through the channels in such plenty, that torrents seemed to empty themselves in the neighbouring river, in a word, an innumerable multitude of men, women with child, maidens, and children, were all involved in one common destruction; and the gates and entrances of the king's palace all besmeared with their blood. Thus even the unborn child was burnt for heresy! O God, what is human nature when left to itself! Alas! dispositions ferocious as infernal then reign, and usurp the heart of man! The queen erected a commission Court, which was followed by the destruction of near eighty more. When the Moors conquered Spain, in the eighth century, they allowed the Christians the free exercise of their religion; but in the fifteenth century, when the Moors were overcome, and Ferdinand subdued the Moriscoes, the descendants of the above Moors, many thousands were forced to be baptised, or burnt, massacred, or banished, and the children sold for slaves; besides innumerable Jews, who shared the same cruelties, chiefly by means of the infernal Courts of inquisition
Religion (2) - there was, if one may say so, an artificial construction of ‘natural’ religion, in which Christ was put out of Court
Trial of Jesus - Even the Markan tradition includes a morning examination (Mark 15:1 = Matthew 27:1, a full and formal meeting of the Court), which, after the nocturnal one, would be no more than a closing deliberation or a hasty ratification of the sentence already passed
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - This passage is usually interpreted as superseding heathen imperial tribunals by voluntary Christian Courts for all cases, such as the Jews often had. ]'>[2] 274) suggests that the Apostle, who usually treats Roman institutions with respect, is not here considering serious questions of crime and fraud at all, nor yet law Courts whether heathen or Christian, but those smaller matters which Greeks were accustomed to submit to arbitration. In Roman times, as this procedure developed, the arbiters became really judges of an inferior Court, recognized by the law, and the magistrates appointed them
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - The prophets were the guardians of the theocracy and therefore functioned mainly at its center, the royal Court
Sirach - 39 is autobiographical, he must at some time have obtained employment at a Court