What does Corinth mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
κορίνθῳ an ancient and famous city of Greece 3
κόρινθον an ancient and famous city of Greece 2
κορίνθῳ» an ancient and famous city of Greece 1

Definitions Related to Corinth

G2882


   1 an ancient and famous city of Greece, on the Isthmus of Corinth, and about 40 miles (65 km) west of Athens.
   Additional Information: Corinth = “satiated”.
   

Frequency of Corinth (original languages)

Frequency of Corinth (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Corinth
One of four prominent centers in the New Testament account of the early church, the other three being Jerusalem, Antioch of Syria, and Ephesus. Paul's first extended ministry in one city was at Corinth. On his first visit to Corinth, he remained for at least eighteen months (Acts 18:1-18 ). Paul's three longest letters are associated with Corinth. First and Second Corinthians were written to Corinth, and Romans, from Corinth. Prominent Christian leaders associated with Corinth include Aquila, Priscilla, Silas, Timothy, Apollos, and Titus.
History of Corinth Corinth was located on the southwest end of the isthmus that joined the southern part of the Greek peninsula with the mainland to the north. The city was located on an elevated plain at the foot of Acrocorinth, a rugged hill reaching 1,886 feet above sea level. Corinth was a maritime city located between two important seaports: the port of Lechaion on the Gulf of Corinth about two miles to the north and the port of Cenchreae on the Saronic Gulf about six miles east of Corinth.
Corinth was an important city long before becoming a Roman colony in 44 B.C. In addition to the extant works of early writers, modern archaeology has contributed to knowledge of ancient Corinth. Excavation was begun by the American School of Classical Studies in Athens in 1896. From the results of this continuing work, important information has been published.
The discovery of stone implements and pottery indicates that the area was populated in the Late Stone Age. Metal tools have been found that reveal occupation during the Early Bronze Age (between 3000 B.C. and 2000 B.C.). The rising importance of Corinth during the classical period began with the Dorian invasion about 1000 B.C.
Located at the foot of Acrocorinth and at the southwest end of the isthmus, Corinth was relatively easy to defend. The Corinthians controlled the east-west trade across the isthmus as well as trade between Peloponnesus and the area of Greece to the north. The city experienced rapid growth and prosperity, even colonizing Siracuse on Sicily and the Island of Corcyra on the eastern shore of the Adriatic. Pottery and bronze were exported throughout the Mediterranean world.
For a century (about 350 to 250 B.C.) Corinth was the largest and most prosperous city of mainland Greece. Later, as a member of the Achaean League, Corinth clashed with Rome. Finally, the city was destroyed in 146 B.C. L. Mummius, the Roman consul, burned the city, killed the men, and sold the women and children into slavery. For a hundred years the city was desolate.
Julius Caesar rebuilt the city in 44 B.C., and it quickly became an important city in the Roman Empire. An overland shiproad across the isthmus connected the ports of Lechaion and Cenchreae. Cargo from large ships was unloaded, transported across the isthmus, and reloaded on other ships. Small ships were moved across on a system of rollers. Ships were able, therefore, to avoid 200 miles of stormy travel around the southern part of the Greek peninsula. Today, a modern ship canal, constructed in A.D. 1881–1893, connects the two ports.
Description of Corinth in Paul's Day When Paul visited Corinth, the rebuilt city was little more than a century old. It had become, however, an important metropolitan center. Except where the city was protected by Acrocorinth, a wall about six miles in circumference surrounded it. The Lechaion road entered the city from the north, connecting it with the port on the Gulf of Corinth. As the road entered the city, it widened to more than twenty feet with walks on either side. From the southern part of the city a road ran southeast to Cenchreae.
Approaching the city from the north, the Lechaion road passed through the Propylaea, the beautiful gate marking the entrance into the agora (market). The agora was rectangular and contained many shops. A line of shops divided the agora into a northern and a southern section. Near the center of this dividing line the Bema was located. The Bema consisted of a large elevated speaker's platform and benches on the back and sides. Here is probably the place Paul was brought before Gallio (Acts 18:12-17 ).
Religions of Corinth Although the restored city of Paul's day was a Roman city, the inhabitants continued to worship Greek gods. West of the Lechaion road and north of the agora stood the old temple of Apollo. Probably partially destroyed by Mummius in 146 B.C., seven of the original thirty-eight columns still stand. On the east side of the road was the shrine to Apollo. In the city were shrines also to Hermes, Heracles, Athena, and Poseidon.
Corinth had a famous temple dedicated to Asclepius, the god of healing, and his daughter Hygieia. Several buildings were constructed around the temple for the sick who came for healing. The patients left at the temple terra cotta replicas of the parts of their bodies that had been healed. Some of these replicas have been found in the ruins.
The most significant pagan cult in Corinth was the cult of Aphrodite. The worship of Aphrodite had flourished in old Corinth before its destruction in 146 B.C. and was revived in Roman Corinth. A temple for the worship of Aphrodite was located on the top of the Acropolis. Strabo wrote concerning this temple.
And the temple of Aphrodite was so rich that it owned more than a thousand temple-slaves, courtesans, whom both men and women had dedicated to the goddess. And therefore it was also on account of these women that the city was crowded with people and grew rich; for instance, the ship-captains freely squandered their money, and hence the proverb, “Not for every man is the voyage to Corinth.”
Although the accuracy of Strabo has been questioned, his description is in harmony with the life-style reflected in Paul's letters to the Corinthians.
Jewish worship also was a part of the religious life of the city. Paul began his Corinthian ministry in the synagogue in Corinth.
Summary The city of Corinth as Paul found it was a cosmopolitan city composed of people from varying cultural backgrounds. Being near the site of the Isthmian games held every two years, the Corinthians enjoyed both the pleasures of these games and the wealth that the visitors brought to the city. While their ships were being carried across the isthmus, sailors came to the city to spend their money on the pleasures of Corinth. Even in an age of sexual immorality, Corinth was known for its licentious life-style.
R. E. Glaze
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Corinth
A Grecian city, on the isthmus which joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. It is about 48 miles west of Athens. The ancient city was destroyed by the Romans (B.C. 146), and that mentioned in the New Testament was quite a new city, having been rebuilt about a century afterwards and peopled by a colony of freedmen from Rome. It became under the Romans the seat of government for Southern Greece or Achaia (Acts 18:12-16 ). It was noted for its wealth, and for the luxurious and immoral and vicious habits of the people. It had a large mixed population of Romans, Greeks, and Jews. When Paul first visited the city (A.D. 51 or 52), Gallio, the brother of Seneca, was proconsul. Here Paul resided for eighteen months (18:1-18). Here he first became aquainted with Aquila and Priscilla, and soon after his departure Apollos came to it from Ephesus. After an interval he visited it a second time, and remained for three months (20:3). During this second visit his Epistle to the Romans was written (probably A.D. 55). Although there were many Jewish converts at Corinth, yet the Gentile element prevailed in the church there. Some have argued from 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 13:1 , that Paul visited Corinth a third time (i.e., that on some unrecorded occasion he visited the city between what are usually called the first and second visits). But the passages referred to only indicate Paul's intention to visit Corinth (Compare 1 Corinthians 16:5 , where the Greek present tense denotes an intention), an intention which was in some way frustrated. We can hardly suppose that such a visit could have been made by the apostle without more distinct reference to it.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Corinth
Famed for its commerce, chiefly due to its situation between the Ionian and AEgean seas, on the isthmus connecting the Peloponnese with Greece. In Paul's time it was capital of Achaia, and seat of the Roman proconsul (Acts 18:12). Its people had the Greek love of philosophical subtleties. The immorality was notorious even in the pagan world; so that "to Corinthianize" was proverbial for playing the wanton. The worship of Venus, whose temple was on Acrocorinthus, was attended with shameless profligacy, 1,000 female slaves being maintained for the service of strangers. Hence, arose dangers to the purity of the Corinthian church (1 Corinthians 5-7), founded by Paul on his first visit in his second missionary journey (Acts 18:1-17). The early Greek Corinth had been left desolate for 100 years; its merchants had withdrawn to Delos, and the presidency of the isthmian games had been transferred to Sicyon, when Julius Caesar refounded the city as a Roman colony.
Gallio the philosopher, Seneca's brother, was proconsul during Paul's first residence, in Claudius' reign. Paul had come from Athens, shortly afterward Silas and Timothy from Macedonia joined him. His two earliest epistles, 1 and 2 Thessalonians, were written there, A.D. 52 or 53. Here he made the friendship of Aquila and Priscilla, and labored at tentmaking with the former. Here, after his departure, Apollos came from Ephesus. The number of Latin names in Paul's epistle to the Romans, written during his second visit of three months at Corinth (2 Corinthians 3:8-182), A.D. 58, is in undesigned harmony with the origin of many of its people as a Roman colony. At the time of Paul's visit Claudius' decree banishing the Jews from Rome caused an influx of them to Corinth. Hence, many Jewish converts were in the Corinthian church (Acts 18), and a Judaizing spirit arose.
Clement's epistles to the Corinthians are still extant. Corinth is now the seat of an episcopal see. It is a poor village, called by a corruption of the old name, Gortho. The remains of its ancient Greek temple, and of the Posidonium or sanctuary of Neptune (N.E. of Corinth, near the Saronic gulf), the scene of the Isthmian games, are remarkably interesting. The stadium for the foot race (alluded to in 1 Corinthians 9:24), and the theater where the pugilists fought (1 Corinthians 9:26), and the pine trees of which was woven the "corruptible crown" or wreath for the conquerors in the games (1 Corinthians 9:25), are still to be seen. The Acrocorinthus eminence rising 2,000 feet above the sea was near Corinth, and as a fortress was deemed the key of Greece. N. of it was the port Lechaeum on the Corinthian gulf; on the other side on the Saronic gulf was Cenchraea (Acts 18:18). The ornate "Corinthian order" of architecture, and "the Corinthian brass" or choice bronze statuary, attest the refinement of its people.
FIRST EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS. Its authenticity is attested by Clement of Rome (Ep., c. 47), Polycarp (Ep. to Philipp., c. 11), Ignatius (ad Eph., 2), and Irenaeus (Adv. Haer., 4:27, section 3). Its occasion and subject. Paul had been instrumental in converting many Gentiles (1 Corinthians 12:2) and some Jews (Acts 18:8), notwithstanding the Jews' opposition (Acts 18:5-6), during his one year and a half sojourn. The converts were mostly of the humbler classes (1 Corinthians 1:26). Crispus, Erastus, and Gaius (Caius), however, were men of rank (2 Corinthians 2:1-113; Acts 18:8; Romans 16:23). 1 Corinthians 11:22 implies a variety of classes. The immoralities abounding outside at Corinth, and the craving even within the church for Greek philosophy and rhetoric which Apollos' eloquent style gratified, rather than for the simple preaching of Christ crucified (1 Corinthians 2:1, etc.; Acts 18:24, etc.), as also the opposition of Judaizing teachers who boasted of having "letters of commendation" from Jerusalem the metropolis of the faith, caused the apostle anxiety.
The Judaizers depreciated his apostolic authority (1 Corinthians 9:1-2; 2 Corinthians 10:1; 2 Corinthians 10:7-8), professing, some to be the followers of the chief apostle, Cephas; others to belong to Christ Himself, rejecting all subordinate teaching (1 Corinthians 1:12; 1 Corinthians 16:17-188). Some gave themselves out to be apostles (2 Corinthians 11:5; 2 Corinthians 11:13), alleging that Paul was not of the twelve nor an eye-witness of the gospel facts, and did not dare to prove his apostleship by claiming support from the church (1 Corinthians 9). Even those who declared themselves Paul's followers did so in a party spirit, glorying in the minister instead of in Christ. Apollos' followers also rested too much on his Alexandrian rhetoric, to the disparagement of Paul, who studied simplicity lest aught should interpose between the Corinthians and the Spirit's demonstration of the Savior (1 Corinthians 2).
Epicurean self-indulgence led some to deny the resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:32). Hence, they connived at the incest of one of them with his stepmother (1 Corinthians 5). The elders of the church had written to consult Paul on minor points: (1) meats offered to idols; (2) celibacy and marriage; (3) the proper use of spiritual gifts in public worship; (4) the collection for the saints at Jerusalem (1 Corinthians 16:1, etc.). But they never told him about the serious evils, which came to his ears only through some of the household of Chloe (1 Corinthians 1:11), contentions, divisions, lawsuits brought before pagan courts by Christian brethren against brethren (1 Corinthians 6:1). Moreover, some abused spiritual gifts to display and fanaticism (1 Corinthians 14); simultaneous ministrations interrupted the seemly order of public worship; women spoke unveiled, in violation of eastern usage, and usurped the office of men; even the Holy Communion was desecrated by reveling (1 Corinthians 11).
These then formed topics of his epistle, and occasioned his sending Timothy to them after his journey to Macedonia (1 Corinthians 4:17). In 1 Corinthians 4:18; 1 Corinthians 5:9, he implies that he had sent a previous letter to them; probably enjoining also a contribution for the poor saints at Jerusalem. Upon their asking directions as to the mode, he now replies (1 Corinthians 16:2). In it he also announced his design of visiting them on his way to and from Macedon (2 Corinthians 1:15-16), which design he changed on hearing the unfavorable report from Chloe's household (1 Corinthians 16:5-7), for which he was charged with fickleness (2 Corinthians 1:15-17). Alford remarks, Paul in 1 Corinthians alludes to the fornication only in a summary way, as if replying to an excuse set up after his rebuke, rather than introducing it for the first time.
Before this former letter, he paid a second visit (probably during his three years' sojourn at Ephesus, from which he could pass readily by sea to Corinth Acts 19:10; Acts 20:31); for in 2 Corinthians 12:14; 2 Corinthians 13:1, he declares his intention to pay a third visit. In 1 Corinthians 13:2 translated "I have already said (at my second visit), and declare now beforehand, as (I did) when I was present the second time, so also (I declare) now in my absence to them who have heretofore sinned (namely, before my second visit, 1 Corinthians 12:21) and to all others" (who have sinned since it, or are in danger of sinning). "I write," the Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, and Sinaiticus manuscripts rightly omit; KJV "as if I were present the second time," namely, this time, is inconsistent with verse 1, "this is the third time I am coming" (compare 2 Corinthians 1:15-16).
The second visit was a painful one, owing to the misconduct of many of his converts (2 Corinthians 2:1). Then followed his letter before the 1 Corinthians, charging them "not to company with fornicators." In 1 Corinthians 5:9-12 he corrects their misapprehensions of that injunction. The Acts omits that second visit, as it omits other incidents of Paul's life, e.g. his visit to Arabia (Galatians 1:17-28). The place of writing was Ephesus (1 Corinthians 16:8). The English subscription "from Philippi" arose from mistranslating 1 Corinthians 16:5, "I am passing through Macedonia;" he intended (1 Corinthians 16:8) leaving Ephesus after Pentecost that year. He left it about A.D. 57 (Acts 19:21). The Passover imagery makes it likely the date was Easter time (1 Corinthians 5:7), A.D. 57.
Just before his conflict with the beastlike mob of Ephesus, 1 Corinthians 15:32 implies that already he had premonitory symptoms; the storm was gathering, his "adversaries many" (1 Corinthians 16:9; Romans 16:4). The tumult (Acts 19:29-30) had not yet taken place, for immediately after it he left Ephesus for Macedon. Sosthenes, the ruler of the Jews' synagogue, after being beaten, seems to have been won by Paul's love to an adversary in affliction (Acts 18:12-17). Converted, like Crispus his predecessor in office, he is joined with Paul in the inscription, as "our brother." A marvelous triumph of Christian love! Paul's persecutor paid in his own coin by the Greeks, before Gallio's eyes, and then subdued to Christ by the love of him whom he sought to persecute. Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus, were probably the bearers of the epistle (1618454803_49); see the subscription.
SECOND EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS. Reasons for writing. To explain why he deferred his promised visit to Corinth on his way to Macedonia (1 Corinthians 4:19; 1 Corinthians 16:5; 2 Corinthians 1:15-16), and so to explain his apostolic walk, and vindicate his apostleship against gainsayers (2 Corinthians 1:12; 2 Corinthians 1:24; 2 Corinthians 6:3-18; 2 Corinthians 7:2; 2 Corinthians 7:10; 2 Corinthians 7:11; 2 Corinthians 7:12). Also to praise them for obeying his first epistle, and to charge them to pardon the transgressor, as already punished sufficiently (1618454803_19; 2 Corinthians 7:6-16). Also to urge them to contributions for the poor brethren at Jerusalem (2 Corinthians 8). Its genuineness is attested by Irenaeus (Haer., 3:7, section 1), Athenagoras (De Res. Mort.), Clement of Alexandria (Strom., 3:94, 4:101), and Tertullian (Pudic., 13).
Time of writing. After Pentecost A.D. 57, when Paul left Ephesus for Troas. Having stayed for a time at Troas preaching with success (2 Corinthians 2:12-13), he went on to Macedonia to meet Titus there, since he was disappointed in not finding him at Troas as he had expected. In Macedonia he heard from him the comforting intelligence of the good effect of the first epistle upon the Corinthians, and having experienced the liberality of the Macedonian churches (2 Corinthians 8) he wrote this second epistle and then went on to Greece, where he stayed three months; then he reached Philippi by land about Passover or Easter, A.D. 58 (Acts 20:1-6). So that the autumn of A.D. 57 will be the date of 2 Corinthians. Place of writing. Macedonia, as 2 Corinthians 9:2 proves. In "ASIA" (see) he had been in great peril (2 Corinthians 1:8-9), whether from the tumult at Ephesus (Acts 19:23-41) or a dangerous illness (Alford).
Thence he passed by way of Troas to Philippi, the first city that would meet him in entering Macedonia (Acts 20:1), and the seat of the important Philippian church. On comparing 2 Corinthians 11:9 with Philippians 4:15-16 it appears that by "Macedonia" there Paul means Philippi. The plural "churches," however, (2 Corinthians 8:1) proves that Paul visited other Macedonian churches also, e.g. Thessalonica and Berea. But Philippi, as the chief one, would be the center to which all the collections would be sent, and probably the place of writing 2 Corinthians Titus, who was to follow up at Corinth the collection, begun at the place of his first visit (2 Corinthians 8:6). The style passes rapidly from the gentle, joyous, and consolatory, to stern reproof and vindication of his apostleship against his opponents. His ardent temperament was tried by a chronic malady (2 Corinthians 4:7; 2 Corinthians 5:1-4; 2 Corinthians 12:7-9).
Then too "the care of all the churches" pressed on him; the weight of which was added to by Judaizing emissaries at Corinth, who wished to restrict the church's freedom and catholicity by bonds of letter and form (1618454803_46). Hence, he speaks of (2 Corinthians 7:5-6) "rightings without" and "fears within" until Titus brought him good news of the Corinthian church. Even then, while the majority at Corinth repented and excommunicated, at Paul's command, the incestuous person, and contributed to the Jerusalem poor fund, a minority still accused him of personal objects in the collection, though he had guarded against possibility of suspicion by having others beside himself to take charge of the money (2 Corinthians 8:18-28). Moreover, their insinuation was inconsistent with their other charge, that his not claiming maintenance proved him to be no apostle.
They alleged too that he was always threatening severe measures, but was too cowardly to execute them (2 Corinthians 10:8-16; 2 Corinthians 13:2); that he was inconsistent, for he had circumcised Timothy but did not circumcise Titus, a Jew among the Jews, a Greek among the Greeks (1 Corinthians 9:20, etc.; Galatians 2:3). That many of his detractors were Judaizers appears from 2 Corinthians 11:22. An emissary from Judaea, arrogantly assuming Christ's own title "he that cometh" (Matthew 11:3), headed the party (2 Corinthians 11:4); he bore "epistles of commendation" (2 Corinthians 3:1), and boasted of pure Hebrew descent, and close connection with Christ Himself (2 Corinthians 11:13; 2 Corinthians 11:22-23). His high-sounding pretensions and rhetoric contrasted with Paul's unadorned style, and carried weight with some (2 Corinthians 10:10; 2 Corinthians 10:13; 2 Corinthians 11:6). The diversity in tone, in part, is due to the diversity between the penitent majority and the refractory minority. Two deputies chosen by the churches to take charge of the collection accompanied Titus, who bore this 2 Corinthians (2 Corinthians 8:18-22).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Corinth
CORINTH was the capital of the Roman province Achaia, and, in every respect except educationally (see Athens), the most important city in Greece in Roman times. It was also a most important station on the route between E. and W., the next station to it on the E. being Ephesus, with which it was in close and continual connexion. Its situation made it a leading centre of Christianity. The city occupied a powerful position at the S. extremity of the narrow isthmus which connected the mainland of Greece with the Peloponnese. Its citadel rises 1800 feet above sea-level, and it was in addition defended by its high walls, which not only surrounded the city but also reached to the harbour Lechæum, on the W. (1 1 / 2 miles away). The other harbour, Cenchreæ, on the E., on the Saronic Gulf, was about 8 1 /2 miles away. The view from the citadel is splendid. The poverty of the stony soil and the neighbourhood of two quiet seas made the Corinthians a maritime people. It was customary to haul ships across from the one sea to the other on a made track called the Diolkos. This method at once saved time and protected the sailors from the dangers of a voyage round Cape Malea (S. of the Peloponnese). Larger ships could not, of course, be conveyed in this way, and in their case the goods must have been conveyed across and transhipped at the other harbour. The place was always crowded with traders and other travellers, and we find St. Paul speaking of Gaius of Corinth as ‘my host and of the whole Church’ ( Romans 16:23 ).
The city had been destroyed by the Romans in 146 b.c., but exactly a hundred years afterwards it was refounded by Julius Cæsar as a colonia , under the name Laus Julia Corinthus (see Colony). A number of Roman names in the NT are found in connexion with Corinth; Crispus, Titius Justus ( Acts 18:7-8 ), Lucius, Tertius, Gaius, Quartus ( Romans 16:21-23 ), Fortunatus ( 1 Corinthians 16:17 ). The population would consist of (1) descendants of the Roman colonists of 46 b.c., the local aristocracy; (2) resident Romans, government officials and business men; (3) a large Greek population; (4) other resident strangers, of whom Jews would form a large number (their synagogue Acts 18:4 ). Of these some joined St. Paul ( Acts 18:4-8 , Romans 16:21 , 1 Corinthians 9:20 ), and the hatred against him in consequence led to a plot against his life. The church, however, consisted chiefly of non-Jews (see 1 Corinthians 12:2 ).
St. Paul did not at first intend to make Corinth a centre of work (Acts 18:1 ), but a special revelation altered his plans ( Acts 18:9-10 ), and he remained there at least 18 months. The opposition he met in the Jewish synagogue made him turn to the Gentiles. St. Paul left the baptism of his converts almost entirely to his subordinates, and himself baptized only Stephanas ( 1 Corinthians 16:15 ), Gaius ( Romans 16:23 ), and Crispus, the ruler of the synagogue ( 1 Corinthians 1:14-16 ). Some weeks after his arrival in Corinth, St. Paul was joined by Silas and Timothy, returning from Macedonia. News brought by Timothy caused him to write there the First Ep. to the Thess. ( 1 Thessalonians 3:6 ), and the Second was probably written there also, immediately after the receipt of an answer to the First. While St. Paul was in Corinth, Gallio came there as proconsul of the second grade to govern Achaia, probably in the summer of the year 52 a.d. The Jews brought an action before him against St. Paul, but Gallio, rightly recognizing that his court could take no cognizance of a charge of the sort they brought, dismissed the action. St. Paul’s preaching was thus declared to he in no way an offence against Roman law, and in future he relied more on his relation to the State, against the enmity of the Jews. After the examination Gallio permitted the populace to show their hatred to the Jews ( Acts 18:17 ). It was in Corinth that St. Paul became acquainted with Prisca and Aquila ( Acts 18:2-3 ; Acts 18:18 ; Acts 18:26 ), and he lived in their house during all his stay. They worked at the same industry as himself, and no doubt influenced his plans for later work. They also left for Ephesus with him.
Christianity grew fast in Corinth, but the inevitable dissensions occurred. Apollos had crossed from Ephesus to Corinth (Acts 18:27 , 2 Corinthians 3:1 ) and done valuable work there ( Acts 18:27-28 , 1 Corinthians 1:12 ). He unconsciously helped to bring about this dissension, as did also Cephas, if (but see next art. § 3 ) he visited Corinth. The subject of these dissensions is, however, more appropriately dealt with under the following two articles. The Apostle wrote at least three letters to the church: the first, which is lost ( 1 Corinthians 5:9 ); the second, which we call First Corinthians, and which was probably carried by Titus (Timothy also visited Corinth at the instance of St. Paul, 1 Corinthians 4:17 ); the third, our Second Corinthians, which was taken by Titus and Luke ( 2 Corinthians 8:16-18 ; 2 Corinthians 12:18 ). St. Paul spent three months in Greece, chiefly no doubt at Corinth, in the winter of 56 57. Whether the Corinthians actually contributed or not to St. Paul’s collection for the poor Christians at Jerusalem must remain uncertain (but see p. 159 b , § 2 ad fin .).
A. Souter.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Corinth
Capital of the province of Achaia. The city visited by Paul was founded by Julius Caesar about a century after the fall of a former Corinth on the same site. It was a great centre of commercial traffic on the route from Rome to the East. It was also rich and very profligate. Paul on his first visit remained there eighteen months (A.D. 52-3), and from thence wrote the two epistles to the Thessalonians. A church was gathered out, to which Paul wrote two epistles. In A.D. 58 he again visited Corinth, staying three months, Acts 20:2,3 , during which time he wrote the Epistle to the Romans. The Jews plotted against his life, and he left the city. Acts 18:1,11 ; Acts 19:1 ; 1 Corinthians 1:2 ; 2 Corinthians 1:1,23 ; 2 Timothy 4:20 . It is now a mean village, called Gortho, with only relics here and there of its former greatness.
King James Dictionary - Corinth
CORINTH, n.
1. A city of Greece. Hence, 2. A small fruit, now called currant, which see.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Corinth
Which is satisfied; ornament; beauty
Webster's Dictionary - Corinth
(1):
(n.) A city of Greece, famed for its luxury and extravagance.
(2):
(n.) A small fruit; a currant.
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Dionysius (3), Bishop of Corinth
Dionysius (3) , bp. of Corinth, probably the successor of Primus, placed by Eusebius in his Chronicle under a.d. 171, (see also Eus. H. E. ii. 25, iii. 4, iv. 21, 23, 35; Hieron. Catal. 27). He was the writer of certain pastoral letters, which gained so much authority in his own lifetime that heretics (probably the followers of Marcion) found it worth while, as he complains, to circulate copies falsified by interpolations and omissions. Eusebius mentions having met with 8 of these letters—viz. seven which he calls "Catholic Epistles," addressed to Lacedemon, Athens, Nicomedia, Gortyna and other churches in Crete, Amastris and other churches in Pontus, Cnossus and Rome; and one to "his most faithful sister Chrysophora." Probably the letters were already collected into a volume and enumerated by Eusebius in the order they occurred there, or he would probably have mentioned the two Cretan letters consecutively. Nothing remains of them, except the short account of their contents given by Eusebius, and a few fragments of the letter to the Roman church which, though very scanty, throw considerable light on the state of the church at the time. Eusebius praises Dionysius for having given a share in his "inspired industry" to those in foreign lands. A bp. of Corinth might consider Lacedaemon and Athens as under his metropolitan superintendence, but that he should send letters of admonition to Crete, Bithynia, and Paphlagonia not only proves the reputation of the writer, but indicates the unity of the Christian community. A still more interesting proof of this is furnished by the letter to the Roman church, which would seem to be one of thanks for a gift of money, and in which he speaks of it as a custom of that church from the earliest times to send supplies to churches in every city to relieve poverty, and to support the brethren condemned to work in the mines, "a custom not only preserved, but increased by the blessed bp. Soter, who administered their bounty to the saints, and with blessed words exhorted the brethren that came up as an affectionate father his children." The epithet here applied to Soter is usually used of those deceased in Christ; but there are instances of its application to living persons, and Eusebius speaks of him as still bishop when the letter of Dionysius was written. This letter is remarkable also as containing the earliest testimony that St. Peter suffered martyrdom in Italy at the same time as St. Paul. The letters indicate the general prevalence of episcopal government when they were written. In most of them the bishop of the church addressed is mentioned with honour; Palmas in Pontus, Philip and Pinytus in Crete, Soter at Rome. That to the Athenians reminds them of a former bp. Publius, who had suffered martyrdom during persecutions which reduced that church very low, from which condition it was revived by the zeal of Quadratus, the successor of Publius. This form of government was then supposed to date from apostolic times, for in the same letter Dionysius the Areopagite is counted as the first bp. of Athens; but the importance of the bishop seems to be still subordinate to that of his church. The letters, including that to Rome, are each addressed to the church, not to the bishop; and Soter's own letter, like Clement's former one, was written not in his own name, but that of his church ( ὑμῶν τὴν ἐπιστολὴν ). The letters, indeed, of Dionysius himself were written in his own name, and he uses the 1st pers. sing. in speaking of them, but adds that they were written at the request of brethren. Eusebius mentions two, Bacchylides and Elpistus, at whose instance that to the churches of Pontus was written.
The letters also illustrate the value attached by Christians to their sacred literature. Dionysius informs the church of Rome that the day on which he wrote, being the Lord's day, had been kept holy, and that they had then read the letter of the Roman church, and would continue from time to time to read it for their instruction, as they were in the habit of reading the letter formerly written from the same church by the hand of Clement; and speaking of the falsification of his own letters, he adds, "No marvel, then, that some have attempted to tamper with the Scriptures of the Lord, since they have attempted it on writings not comparable to them (οὐ τοιαύταις )." Thus we learn that it was then customary to read sacred books in the Christian assemblies; that this practice was not limited to our canonical books; that attempts were made by men regarded as heretics to corrupt these writings, and that such attempts were jealously guarded against. The value attached by Christians to writings was regulated rather by the character of their contents than by the dignity of the writer; for while there is no trace that the letter of Soter thus honoured at Corinth passed beyond that church, the letter of Dionysius himself became the property of the whole Christian community. But we learn the preeminent authority enjoyed by certain books, called the Scriptures of the Lord, which we cannot be wrong in identifying with some of the writings of our N.T. Dionysius, in the very brief fragments remaining, shews signs of acquaintance with the St. Matt., the Acts, I. Thess., and the Apocalypse. There is, therefore, no reason for limiting to the O.T. the "expositions of the divine Scriptures," which Eusebius tells us were contained in the letter of Dionysius to the churches of Pontus. In speaking of attempts to corrupt the Scriptures, Dionysius probably refers to the heresy of Marcion, against which, we are told, he wrote in his letter to the church of Nicomedia, "defending the rule of truth." We cannot lay much stress on a rhetorical passage where Jerome (Ep. ad Magnum, 83) includes Dionysius among those who had applied secular learning to the refutation of heresy, tracing each heresy to its source in the writings of the philosophers. Dionysius had probably also Marcionism in view, when he exhorted the church of Gortyna "to beware of the perversion of heretics," for we are told that its bp. Philip had found it necessary to compose a treatise against Marcion. We may see traces of the same heresy in the subjects treated of in the letter to the churches of Pontus (the home of Marcion), to which Dionysius gave instructions concerning marriage and chastity (marriage having been proscribed by Marcion), and which he also exhorted to receive back those who returned after any fall, whether into irregularity of living or into heretical error. But the rigorist tendencies here combated were exhibited also, not only among the then rising sects of the Encratites and Montanists, but by men of undoubted orthodoxy. Writing to the Cnossians Dionysius exhorts Pinytus the bp., a man highly commended by Eusebius for piety, orthodoxy, and learning, not to impose on the brethren too heavy a burden of chastity, but to regard the weakness of the many. Eusebius reports Pinytus as replying with expressions of high respect for Dionysius, which were understood by Rufinus to imply an adoption of his views. But he apparently persevered in his own opinion, for he exhorts Dionysius to impart to his people some more advanced instruction, lest if he fed them always with milk instead of with more solid food, they should continue in the state of children.
We are not told anything of the time or manner of the death of Dionysius. It must have been before the Paschal disputes in a.d. 198, when we find Palmas of Pontus still alive, but a new bishop (Bacchylus) at Corinth. The Greek church counts Dionysius among martyrs, and the Menaea name the sword as the instrument of his death; but there is no authority for his martyrdom earlier than Cedrenus, i.e. the end of the 11th cent. The Roman church only counts him among confessors. The abbey of St. Denis in France claimed to be in possession of the body of Dionysius of Corinth, alleged to have been brought from Greece to Rome, and given them in 1215 by Innocent III. The pope's bull is given by the Bollandists under April 8. See Routh, Rel. Sac. (2nd ed.), i. 178-201.
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People's Dictionary of the Bible - Corinth
Corinth (Kŏr'inth), the capital of Achaia and a noted city of Greece. It had two seaports, Cenchrea and Lechæum. On the south a rocky mountain called Acrocorinthus rises abruptly to the height of 2000 feet, upon the summit of which was a temple of Venus. Paul preached at Corinth, about a.d. 53, a year and six months, Acts 18:11; paid it, a.d. 54-57, a short second visit ("by the way"), not mentioned in the Acts, but implied in 1 Corinthians 16:7; 2 Corinthians 12:13-14; 2 Corinthians 13:1, where he speaks of an intended third journey to Corinth, which coincides with that in Acts 20:2; and spent there the three winter months, from 57 to 58, during which he wrote the Epistle to the Romans. Acts 20:2-3; comp. 1 Corinthians 16:6; Romans 16:1, He wrote two letters to the Christians in that city, rebuking their sins, and refers to the Isthmian games celebrated at Corinth every Olympiad. The city is now desolate, the little miserable village of Gortho occupying its site.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Corinth
a celebrated city, the capital of Achaia, situated on the isthmus which separates the Peloponnesus from Attica. This city was one of the best peopled and most wealthy of Greece. Its situation between two seas drew thither the trade of both the east and west. Its riches produced pride, ostentation, effeminacy, and all vices, the consequences of abundance. For its insolence to the Roman legates, it was destroyed by L. Mummius. In the burning of it, so many statues of different metals were melted together, that they produced the famous Corinthian brass. It was afterward restored to its former splendour by Julius Caesar.
Christianity was first planted at Corinth by St. Paul, who resided here eighteen months, between the years 51 and 53; during which time he enjoyed the friendship of Aquila and his wife Priscilla, two Jewish Christians, who had been expelled from Italy, with other Jews, by an edict of Claudius. The church consisted both of Jews and of Gentiles; but St. Paul began, as usual, by preaching in the synagogue, until the Jews violently opposed him, and blasphemed the name of Christ; when the Apostle, shaking his garment, and declaring their blood to be upon their own heads, left them, and made use afterward of a house adjoining the synagogue, belonging to a man named Justus. The rage of the Jews, however, did not stop here; but, raising a tumult, they arrested Paul, and hurrying him before the tribunal of the pro-consul Gallio, the brother of the famous Seneca, accused him of persuading men to worship God contrary to the law. But Gallio, who was equally indifferent both to Judaism and Christianity, and finding that Paul had committed no breach of morality, or of the public peace, refused to hear their complaint, and drove them all from the judgment seat. The Jews being thus disappointed in their malicious designs, St. Paul was at liberty to remain some time longer at Corinth; and after his departure, Apollos, a zealous and eloquent Jewish convert of Alexandria, was made a powerful instrument in confirming the church, and in silencing the opposition of the Jews, Acts 18. How much it stood in need of such support, is evident from the Epistles of St. Paul; who cautions the Corinthians against divisions and party spirit; fornication, incest, partaking of meats offered to idols, thereby giving an occasion of scandal, and encouragement to idolatry; abusing the gifts of the Spirit, litigiousness, &c. The Corinthians, indeed, were in great danger: they lived at ease, free from every kind of persecution, and were exposed to much temptation. The manners of the citizens were particularly corrupt: they were, indeed, infamous to a proverb. In the centre of the city was a celebrated temple of Venus, a part of whose worship consisted in prostitution; for there a thousand priestesses of the goddess ministered to dissoluteness under the patronage of religion: an example which gave the Corinthians very lax ideas on the illicit intercourse of the sexes. Corinth also possessed numerous schools of philosophy and rhetoric; in which, as at Alexandria, the purity of the faith by an easy and natural process, became early corrupted.
There occurs a chronological difficulty in the visits of St. Paul to Corinth. In 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1-2 , the Apostle expresses his design of visiting that city a third time; whereas only one visit before the date of the Second Epistle is noticed in the Acts 18:1 , about A.D. 51; and the next time that he visited Greece, Acts 20:2 , about A.D. 57, no mention is made of his going to Corinth. Mr. Horne observes on this subject, "It has been conjectured by Grotius, and Drs. Hammond and Paley, that his First Epistle virtually supplied the place of his presence; and that it is so represented by the Apostle in a corresponding passage, 1 Corinthians 5:3 . Admitting this solution to be probable, it is, however, far-fetched, and is not satisfactory as a matter of fact. Michaelis has produced another, more simple and natural; namely, that Paul, on his return from Crete, visited Corinth a second time before he went to winter at Nicopolis. This second visit is unnoticed in the Acts, because the voyage itself is unnoticed. The third visit, promised in 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1-2 , was actually paid on the Apostle's second return to Rome, when he took Corinth in his way, 2 Timothy 4:20 . ‘Thus critically,' says. Dr. Hales, ‘does the book of the Acts harmonize, even in its omissions, with the epistles; and these with each other, in the minute incidental circumstances of the third visit.'"
About A.D. 268, the Heruli burned Corinth to ashes. In 525, it was again almost ruined by an earthquake. About 1180, Roger, king of Sicily, took and plundered it. Since 1458, it was till lately under the power of the Turks; and is so decayed, that its inhabitants amount to no more than about fifteen hundred, or two thousand; half Mohammedans, and half Christians. A late French writer, who visited this country, observes, "When the Caesars rebuilt the walls of Corinth, and the temples of the gods rose from their ruins more magnificent than ever, an obscure architect was rearing in silence an edifice which still remains standing amidst the ruins of Greece. This man, unknown to the great, despised by the multitude, rejected as the offscouring of the world, at first associated himself with only two companions, Crispus and Gaius, and with the family of Stephanas. These were the humble architects of an indestructible temple, and the first believers at Corinth. The traveller surveys the site of this celebrated city; he discovers not a vestige of the altars of Paganism, but perceives some Christian chapels rising from among the cottages of the Greeks. The Apostle might still, from his celestial abode, give the salutation of peace to his children, and address them in the words, "Paul to the church of God, which is at Corinth."
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Corinth
Called anciently Ephyra, the capital of Achaia, and seated on the isthmus which separates the Ionian Sea from the Aegean, and hence called bimaris, "on two seas." The city itself stood a little inland; but it had two ports, Lechaeum on the west, and Cenchrea on the east. Its position gave it great commercial and military importance; for while the traffic of the east and west poured through its gates, as over the isthmus of Darien the commerce of two oceans, it was also at the gate of the Peloponnesus, and was the highway between Northern and Southern Greece. Its defense, besides the city walls, was in the Acro-corinth, a mass of rock, rising 2,000 feet above the sea, with precipitous sides, and with room for a town upon its summit. Corinth thus became one of the most populous and wealthy cities of Greece; but its riches produced pride, ostentation, effeminacy, and all the vices generally consequent on plenty. Lasciviousness, particularly, was not only tolerated, but consecrated here, by the worship of Venus, and the notorious prostitution of numerous attendants devoted to her. Corinth was destroyed by the Romans, B.C. 146. It was afterwards restored by Julius Caesar, who planted in it a Roman colony; but though it soon regained its ancient splendor, it also relapsed into all its former dissipation and licentiousness. Paul arrived at Corinth, A. D. 52, Acts 18:1 , and lodged with Aquila and his wife Priscilla, who, as well as himself, were tentmakers. Supporting himself by this labor, he remained at Corinth a year and a half, preaching the gospel at first to the Jews, and afterwards more successfully to the Gentiles. During this time he wrote the epistles to the Thessalonians; and in a subsequent visit, the epistles to the Galatians and Romans. Some suppose he made a short intervening visit, not narrated in the Bible. Compare 2 Corinthians 13:1 with 2 Corinthians 1:15 2:1 12:14,21 13:2 . Apollos followed him in his labors at Corinth, and Aquila and Sosthenes were also among its early minister, Acts 18:1 1 Corinthians 1:1 16:19 . Its sited is now unhealthy and almost deserted, with few vestiges of its former greatness.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Corinth
The city of Corinth was a prosperous manufacturing and trading centre in Achaia, the southern province of Greece (see map under ACTS, BOOK OF). An overland route went north from Corinth to Macedonia, and sea routes went east, west and south. The city was so well known for its immorality and vice that people of the time commonly referred to a person of loose morals as one who ‘behaved like a Corinthian’ (cf. 1 Corinthians 6:9-11; 1 Corinthians 6:15-18).
Paul’s first visit to Corinth was on his second missionary journey. He stayed eighteen months, and during that time he founded the Corinthian church (Acts 18:1-17). Another church was established at Cenchreae, the seaport a few kilometres east (Acts 18:18; Romans 16:1-2). Paul revisited the church at Corinth during his third missionary journey (Acts 20:2-3). He also wrote the church a number of letters, two of which have been preserved in the New Testament. (For the added information these letters give concerning life in Corinth see CORINTHIANS, LETTERS TO THE).

Sentence search

Achaicus - (uh chay' ih cuhss) Personal name of messenger who came to Paul from Corinth before he wrote 1Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:17 ). The three brought news and perhaps a letter (1 Corinthians 7:1 ) to Paul from the church at Corinth. They may have carried 1Corinthians back to Corinth
Corinth - Paul's first extended ministry in one city was at Corinth. On his first visit to Corinth, he remained for at least eighteen months (Acts 18:1-18 ). Paul's three longest letters are associated with Corinth. First and Second Corinthians were written to Corinth, and Romans, from Corinth. Prominent Christian leaders associated with Corinth include Aquila, Priscilla, Silas, Timothy, Apollos, and Titus. ...
History of Corinth Corinth was located on the southwest end of the isthmus that joined the southern part of the Greek peninsula with the mainland to the north. The city was located on an elevated plain at the foot of Acrocorinth, a rugged hill reaching 1,886 feet above sea level. Corinth was a maritime city located between two important seaports: the port of Lechaion on the Gulf of Corinth about two miles to the north and the port of Cenchreae on the Saronic Gulf about six miles east of Corinth. ...
Corinth was an important city long before becoming a Roman colony in 44 B. In addition to the extant works of early writers, modern archaeology has contributed to knowledge of ancient Corinth. The rising importance of Corinth during the classical period began with the Dorian invasion about 1000 B. ...
Located at the foot of Acrocorinth and at the southwest end of the isthmus, Corinth was relatively easy to defend. The Corinthians controlled the east-west trade across the isthmus as well as trade between Peloponnesus and the area of Greece to the north. ) Corinth was the largest and most prosperous city of mainland Greece. Later, as a member of the Achaean League, Corinth clashed with Rome. ...
Description of Corinth in Paul's Day When Paul visited Corinth, the rebuilt city was little more than a century old. Except where the city was protected by Acrocorinth, a wall about six miles in circumference surrounded it. The Lechaion road entered the city from the north, connecting it with the port on the Gulf of Corinth. ...
Religions of Corinth Although the restored city of Paul's day was a Roman city, the inhabitants continued to worship Greek gods. ...
Corinth had a famous temple dedicated to Asclepius, the god of healing, and his daughter Hygieia. ...
The most significant pagan cult in Corinth was the cult of Aphrodite. The worship of Aphrodite had flourished in old Corinth before its destruction in 146 B. and was revived in Roman Corinth. And therefore it was also on account of these women that the city was crowded with people and grew rich; for instance, the ship-captains freely squandered their money, and hence the proverb, “Not for every man is the voyage to Corinth. ”...
Although the accuracy of Strabo has been questioned, his description is in harmony with the life-style reflected in Paul's letters to the Corinthians. Paul began his Corinthian ministry in the synagogue in Corinth. ...
Summary The city of Corinth as Paul found it was a cosmopolitan city composed of people from varying cultural backgrounds. Being near the site of the Isthmian games held every two years, the Corinthians enjoyed both the pleasures of these games and the wealth that the visitors brought to the city. While their ships were being carried across the isthmus, sailors came to the city to spend their money on the pleasures of Corinth. Even in an age of sexual immorality, Corinth was known for its licentious life-style
Cenchreae - ]'>[1] Cenchrea is wrong) was the southern harbour of Corinth, and was on the Saronic Gulf about 7 miles E. of Corinth. It was a mere village, and existed solely for the transit of goods to and from Corinth
Chloe - ” A woman whose household members informed Paul of dissension within the church at Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:11 ). Where she lived and how her people learned of the situation in Corinth are not known
Erastus - He was sent by Paul into Macedonia, and later on is found abiding at Corinth. Chamberlain or treasurer of Corinth
Fortunatus - 1 Corinthians 16:17 , came from Corinth to Ephesus, to visit Paul. They carried Paul's first epistle to Corinth
Corinthiac - ) Pertaining to Corinth
Corinth - The city of Corinth was a prosperous manufacturing and trading centre in Achaia, the southern province of Greece (see map under ACTS, BOOK OF). An overland route went north from Corinth to Macedonia, and sea routes went east, west and south. The city was so well known for its immorality and vice that people of the time commonly referred to a person of loose morals as one who ‘behaved like a Corinthian’ (cf. 1 Corinthians 6:9-11; 1 Corinthians 6:15-18). ...
Paul’s first visit to Corinth was on his second missionary journey. He stayed eighteen months, and during that time he founded the Corinthian church (Acts 18:1-17). Paul revisited the church at Corinth during his third missionary journey (Acts 20:2-3). (For the added information these letters give concerning life in Corinth see CorinthIANS, LETTERS TO THE)
Achaichus - (1Corinthians 16:17), one of the members of the church of Corinth who, with Fortunatus and Stephanas, visited Paul while he was at Ephesus, for the purpose of consulting him on the affairs of the church. These three probably were the bearers of the letter from Corinth to the apostle to which he alludes in 1Corinthians 7:1
Chloe - Paul was told of the factions in Corinth ὑπὸ τῶν Χλόης, ‘by them of Chloe’ (1 Corinthians 1:11). It is not said that she was a Christian, nor is it clear whether she lived in Corinth or in Ephesus. her Christian slaves, or companions, or even children) had brought back disquieting news after visiting Corinth. Corinthians,’ p. Weizsäcker discusses the situation in Corinth, and takes a different view about Chloe: see his Apostolic Age, i
Achaia - Is used in the New Testament for the whole region of Greece south of Macedonia, including the Peloponnesus, or Morea, and some territory north of the gulf of Corinth, Acts 18:12 ; 19:21 ; 1 Corinthians 11:10 . Achaia Proper, however, was a province of Greece, of which Corinth was the capital, and embraced the northwestern part of the Pelopennesus
Sicyon - It was situated on the Gulf of Corinth, about 18 miles W. of Corinth
Erastus - ]'>[1] ‘chamberlain’) of the city’ (Corinth). Paul from Ephesus to Macedonia ( Acts 19:22 ), and who later remained in Corinth ( 2 Timothy 4:20 ), is perhaps the same
Quartus - A Christian at Corinth whose salutations Paul sends to the Roman Christians (Romans 16:23)
Gallio - The deputy or proconsul of Achaia headquartered in Corinth, where his judgment seat has been discovered. This places Gallio in office in Corinth between A. The date gives evidence from outside the Bible for the time Paul was in Corinth and founded the church there. ...
Finding the climate at Corinth unhealthy, Gallio apparently welcomed the opportunity to return to Rome, where he counseled Nero until he and Seneca joined a conspiracy against the emperor. See Achaia ; Corinth ; 1,2Corinthians; Paul ; Roman Empire
Corinth - Corinth (Kŏr'inth), the capital of Achaia and a noted city of Greece. On the south a rocky mountain called Acrocorinthus rises abruptly to the height of 2000 feet, upon the summit of which was a temple of Venus. Paul preached at Corinth, about a. 54-57, a short second visit ("by the way"), not mentioned in the Acts, but implied in 1 Corinthians 16:7; 2 Corinthians 12:13-14; 2 Corinthians 13:1, where he speaks of an intended third journey to Corinth, which coincides with that in Acts 20:2; and spent there the three winter months, from 57 to 58, during which he wrote the Epistle to the Romans. 1 Corinthians 16:6; Romans 16:1, He wrote two letters to the Christians in that city, rebuking their sins, and refers to the Isthmian games celebrated at Corinth every Olympiad
Cenchrea - The harbor of Corinth on the Saronic gulf, and its channel of trade with Asia Minor, as Lechaeum, on the Corinthian gulf, was with Italy and the W. Corinth was joined by walls to Lechaeum; so that the pass between Corinth and Cenchrea (nine miles apart from one another) was the only one into the Morea from Greece
Master-Builder - ' Paul was such, and laid the foundation of God's building at Corinth. 1 Corinthians 3:10
Corinth - Corinth, n
Chloe - CHLOE (mentioned only in 1 Corinthians 1:11 ). Paul had been informed of the dissensions at Corinth prob. Chloe herself may have been either a Christian or a beathen, and may have lived either at Corinth or at Ephesus. Paul’s usual tact, which would not suggest the invidious mention of his informants’ names, if they were members of the Corinthian Church
Erastus - city steward and treasurer of Corinth (Romans 16:23). He ministered to Paul, accompanying him on his last journey to his second imprisonment at Rome; but "abode at Corinth," going no further, as Paul notes (2 Timothy 4:20) to depict his utter desertion by man
Steph'Anas, - a Christian convert of Corinth whose household Paul baptized as the "first-fruits of Achaia. " (1 Corinthians 1:16 ; 16:15 ) (A
Crispus - Ruler of the synagogue at Corinth, who, with his household, believed, and was baptised by Paul. Acts 18:8 ; 1 Corinthians 1:14
Crispus - President of the synagogue at Corinth, converted under the preaching of Paul, Acts 18:8 , and baptized by him, 1 Corinthians 1:14
Mitylene - The place where Paul passed in his way from Corinth to Jerusalem
Cris'Pus - (curled ), ruler of the Jewish synagogue at Corinth, ( Acts 18:8 ) baptized with his family by St. (1 Corinthians 1:14 ) (A
Crispus - Curled, the chief of the synagogue at Corinth (Acts 18:8 ). He was converted and, with his family, baptized by Paul (1 Corinthians 1:14 )
Sosthenes - A Jew at Corinth who was seized and beaten in the presence of Gallio
Quartus - A Christian residing at Corinth, but according to his name of Roman origin, whose salutation Paul sends to the brethren at Rome, Romans 16:23
Quar'Tus - (fourth ), a Christian of Corinth, ( Romans 16:23 ) said to have been one of the seventy disciples, and afterward bishop of Berytus
Achaia - Saint Paul was very active here (2 Corinthians 1:9), and founded a flourishing church in Corinth (Acts 18)
Sos'Thenes - (saviour of his nation ) was a Jew at Corinth who was seized and beaten in the presence of Gallio
Stephanas - Christian convert at Corinth, who with his household was baptised by Paul: he was 'the firstfruits of Achaia. ' 1 Corinthians 1:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:15,17
Erastus -
The "chamberlain" of the city of Corinth (Romans 16:23 ), and one of Paul's disciples. Corinth was his usual place of abode (2 Timothy 4:20 ); but probably he may have been the same as the preceding
Fortunatus - A Christian of Corinth mentioned by Paul. 1 Corinthians 16:17
Aquila - Eagle, a native of Pontus, by occupation a tent-maker, whom Paul met on his first visit to Corinth (Acts 18:2 ). Paul sojourned with him at Corinth, and they wrought together at their common trade, making Cilician hair-cloth for tents. On Paul's departure from Corinth after eighteen months, Aquila and his wife accompanied him to Ephesus, where they remained, while he proceeded to Syria (Acts 18:18,26 ). When they became Christians we are not informed, but in Ephesus they were (1 Corinthians 16:19 ) Paul's "helpers in Christ Jesus
Corinth - Its defense, besides the city walls, was in the Acro-corinth, a mass of rock, rising 2,000 feet above the sea, with precipitous sides, and with room for a town upon its summit. Corinth thus became one of the most populous and wealthy cities of Greece; but its riches produced pride, ostentation, effeminacy, and all the vices generally consequent on plenty. Corinth was destroyed by the Romans, B. Paul arrived at Corinth, A. Supporting himself by this labor, he remained at Corinth a year and a half, preaching the gospel at first to the Jews, and afterwards more successfully to the Gentiles. Compare 2 Corinthians 13:1 with 2 Corinthians 1:15 2:1 12:14,21 13:2 . Apollos followed him in his labors at Corinth, and Aquila and Sosthenes were also among its early minister, Acts 18:1 1 Corinthians 1:1 16:19
Justus - A Christian at Corinth; Paul lodged with him (Acts 18:7)
Fortunatus - Fortunate, a disciple of Corinth who visited Paul at Ephesus, and returned with Stephanas and Achaicus, the bearers of the apostle's first letter to the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:17 )
Gaius - Paul the apostle's host in Corinth (Romans 16:23 ). According to 1 Corinthians 1:14 , he was one of the individuals in Corinth whom Paul personally had baptized
Gaius - Paul’s host at Corinth, converted and baptized by him ( Romans 16:23 , 1 Corinthians 1:14 ). He was perhaps the same as ‘Gaius of Derbe’ who accompanied the Apostle from Greece to Asia ( Acts 20:4 ); if so, he would be a native of Derbe, but a dweller at Corinth
Cenchrea - Millet, the eastern harbour of Corinth, from which it was distant about 9 miles east, and the outlet for its trade with the Asiatic shores of the Mediterranean. The western harbour of Corinth was Lechaeum, about a mile and a half from the city
Gai'us - He went with Paul from Corinth in his last journey to Jerusalem. ) ...
Of Corinth, whom Paul baptized and who was his host in his second journey in that city. (1 Corinthians 1:14 ; Romans 16:23 ) (These are supposed by some to be only one person
Espouse - 2 Corinthians 11:2 (a) Paul brought the Church of Corinth before GOD in prayer for Him to love them
Apollos - He laboured at Corinth, following the apostle Paul, who could hence say 'I have planted, Apollos watered,' and subsequently he greatly desired Apollos to revisit Corinth. His name is associated with that of Paul in connection with the party spirit at Corinth, which the apostle strongly rebuked; but from his saying he had 'transferred these things to himself and to Apollos,' it would appear that the Corinthians had local leaders, under whom they ranged themselves, whom he does not name; and that he taught them the needed lesson, and established the general principle by the use of his own name and that of Apollos rather than the names of their leaders. Acts 18:24 ; Acts 19:1 ; 1 Corinthians 1:12 ; 1 Corinthians 3:4-22 ; 1 Corinthians 4:6 ; 1 Corinthians 16:12 ; Titus 3:13
Crispus - ” Leader of synagogue in Corinth (Acts 18:8 ) and one of few whom Paul personally baptized (1 Corinthians 1:14 )
ti'Tus Jus'Tus - (The form given in the Revised Version, of the proselyte Justus, at whose house in Corinth Paul preached when driven from the synagogue
Fortunatus - Fortunatus was one of three deputies from the Church in Corinth who visited St. Paul in Ephesus, perhaps bearing letters, and to whom he refers in 1 Corinthians 16:17-18. § 65) as accompanying his messengers from Rome to Corinth, but distinguishes him from them; the name, however, is too common for identification (see Achaicus and Stephanas)
Corinthian - ) Of or pertaining to an amateur sailor or yachtsman; as, a Corinthian race (one in which the contesting yachts must be manned by amateurs. ) Of or relating to Corinth. ) A native or inhabitant of Corinth. ) Of or pertaining to the Corinthian order of architecture, invented by the Greeks, but more commonly used by the Romans
aq'Uila - Paul found at Corinth on his arrival from Athens. On the departure of the apostle from Corinth, a year and eight months after, Priscilla and Aquila accompanied him to Ephesus
Cenchrea - (cehn' chrih uh) or CENCHREAE The eastern port city of Corinth
Aquila And Priscilla - Converted to Christianity, they entertained Saint Paul in Corinth and later at Ephesus. They are mentioned in Acts 18; Romans 16; 1 Corinthians 16; and 2 Timothy 4
Erastus - A Christian chamberlain or treasurer of Corinth
Cenchrea - Eastern sea-port of Corinth, from which it was distant 9 miles
Sosthenes - Chief ruler of the synagogue at Corinth, who was beaten by the rabble. One whom Paul (when at Ephesus) unites with himself in the First Epistle to the Corinthians. 1 Corinthians 1:1
Sosthenes - Ruler of the synagogue at Corinth, whom ‘they all’ (RV Phebe - a deaconess of the port of Corinth, called Cenchrea. Paul had a particular esteem for this holy woman; and Theodoret thinks the Apostle lodged at her house for some time, while he continued in or near Corinth
Gaius or Caius - A Corinthian convert of Paul, who hospitable entertained the apostle while laboring at Corinth, Romans 16:23 1 Corinthians 1:14 . Of Derbe; an attendant of Paul from Corinth, in his last journey to Jerusalem, Acts 20:4
Clement - There are no sufficient grounds for identifying him with Clement, bishop of Rome, the writer of the Epistle to the Church of Corinth
Corinthians, Second Epistle to the - Shortly after writing his first letter to the Corinthians, Paul left Ephesus, where intense excitement had been aroused against him, the evidence of his great success, and proceeded to Macedonia. Here he expected to meet with Titus, whom he had sent from Ephesus to Corinth, with tidings of the effects produced on the church there by the first epistle; but was disappointed (1 Corinthians 16:9 ; 2 co 1:8 ; 2:12,13 ). He then left Troas and proceeded to Macedonia; and at Philippi, where he tarried, he was soon joined by Titus (2 Corinthians 7:6,7 ), who brought him good news from Corinth, and also by Timothy. Under the influence of the feelings awakened in his mind by the favourable report which Titus brought back from Corinth, this second epistle was written. 58, and was sent to Corinth by Titus. This letter he addresses not only to the church in Corinth, but also to the saints in all Achaia, i. The contents of this epistle may be thus arranged: ...
...
Paul speaks of his spiritual labours and course of life, and expresses his warm affection toward the Corinthians (2co. "--Lias, Second Corinthians. ...
Of the effects produced on the Corinthian church by this epistle we have no definite information. We know that Paul visited Corinth after he had written it (Acts 20:2,3 ), and that on that occasion he tarried there for three months
Gallio - Brother of Seneca the philosopher and proconsul of Achaia when Saint Paul was at Corinth (Acts 18)
Aristarchus of Thessalonica, Saint - (1century) Disciple of Saint Paul whom he accompanied in his Apostolic missions (Acts 20; 27) to Ephesus, Corinth, Jerusalem, and finally Rome
Achaicus - 1 Corinthians 16:17 . The subscription to the epistle states that it was sent to Corinth by the above three and Timotheus
Fortunatus - ” Christian whose presence with Paul as he wrote 1Corinthians pleased and renewed Paul (1 Corinthians 16:7 ). Fortunatus was apparently a member of the church at Corinth and brought Paul news from the church
Chamberlain - , the treasurer or steward of the City of Corinth, whose salutations Paul sent to Rome
Fortunatus - ” Christian whose presence with Paul as he wrote 1Corinthians pleased and renewed Paul (1 Corinthians 16:7 ). Fortunatus was apparently a member of the church at Corinth and brought Paul news from the church
Stephanas - A Christian of Corinth, whose family Paul baptized, the first convert to the gospel in Achaia, probably about A. 52,1 Corinthians 1:16 . He was forward in the service of the church, and came to Paul at Ephesus, 1 Corinthians 16:15,17
Baptism For the Dead - Only mentioned in 1 Corinthians 15:29 . " Some also regard the statement here as an allusion to the strange practice which began, it is said, to prevail at Corinth, in which a person was baptized in the stead of others who had died before being baptized, to whom it was hoped some of the benefits of that rite would be extended. This they think may have been one of the erroneous customs which Paul went to Corinth to "set in order
Quartus - ” Christian, most likely from Corinth, who sent greetings to the Roman church through Paul (Romans 16:23 )
Jason - He seems also to have been with him at Corinth, five years afterwards, Romans 16:21
Titus - ...
Paul’s representative to Corinth...
Much of the Bible’s information about Titus has to do with the church in Corinth. From Ephesus Paul had written at least one letter to the Corinthians, and had made a rushed visit to Corinth in an effort to deal with serious problems in the Corinthian church. When he heard that his efforts had only made people more rebellious, he wrote a severe letter and sent it to Corinth with Titus, his special representative (2 Corinthians 2:3-4; 2 Corinthians 2:9; 2 Corinthians 7:8; 2 Corinthians 12:18). )...
Paul’s plan was for Titus to return from Corinth via Troas. Being eager to hear of the Corinthians’ response to his letter, Paul went to Troas to meet Titus. Unable to wait patiently, he then went across to Macedonia in the hope of finding Titus there (2 Corinthians 2:12-13). Titus met Paul with the news that the severe letter had produced the desired results (2 Corinthians 7:5-6; 2 Corinthians 7:13-15). It is called 2 Corinthians and it was taken to Corinth by Titus (2 Corinthians 8:16-18). ...
Titus was also Paul’s appointed representative to encourage the Corinthian church to participate enthusiastically in an important project Paul was organizing. Paul was collecting money among the Gentile churches of Asia Minor and Greece to take to the needy Jewish Christians in Jerusalem (2 Corinthians 8:1-6; 2 Corinthians 8:16-24)
Corinth - Corinth was the capital of the Roman province Achaia, and, in every respect except educationally (see Athens), the most important city in Greece in Roman times. The poverty of the stony soil and the neighbourhood of two quiet seas made the Corinthians a maritime people. Paul speaking of Gaius of Corinth as ‘my host and of the whole Church’ ( Romans 16:23 ). , but exactly a hundred years afterwards it was refounded by Julius Cæsar as a colonia , under the name Laus Julia Corinthus (see Colony). A number of Roman names in the NT are found in connexion with Corinth; Crispus, Titius Justus ( Acts 18:7-8 ), Lucius, Tertius, Gaius, Quartus ( Romans 16:21-23 ), Fortunatus ( 1 Corinthians 16:17 ). Paul ( Acts 18:4-8 , Romans 16:21 , 1 Corinthians 9:20 ), and the hatred against him in consequence led to a plot against his life. The church, however, consisted chiefly of non-Jews (see 1 Corinthians 12:2 ). Paul did not at first intend to make Corinth a centre of work (Acts 18:1 ), but a special revelation altered his plans ( Acts 18:9-10 ), and he remained there at least 18 months. Paul left the baptism of his converts almost entirely to his subordinates, and himself baptized only Stephanas ( 1 Corinthians 16:15 ), Gaius ( Romans 16:23 ), and Crispus, the ruler of the synagogue ( 1 Corinthians 1:14-16 ). Some weeks after his arrival in Corinth, St. Paul was in Corinth, Gallio came there as proconsul of the second grade to govern Achaia, probably in the summer of the year 52 a. It was in Corinth that St. ...
Christianity grew fast in Corinth, but the inevitable dissensions occurred. Apollos had crossed from Ephesus to Corinth (Acts 18:27 , 2 Corinthians 3:1 ) and done valuable work there ( Acts 18:27-28 , 1 Corinthians 1:12 ). § 3 ) he visited Corinth. The Apostle wrote at least three letters to the church: the first, which is lost ( 2 Corinthians 8:16-18 ); the second, which we call First Corinthians, and which was probably carried by Titus (Timothy also visited Corinth at the instance of St. Paul, 1 Corinthians 4:17 ); the third, our Second Corinthians, which was taken by Titus and Luke ( 1 Corinthians 5:9 ; 2 Corinthians 12:18 ). Paul spent three months in Greece, chiefly no doubt at Corinth, in the winter of 56 57. Whether the Corinthians actually contributed or not to St
Phebe - A "deaconess of the church at Cenchrea," the port of Corinth
Sisyphus - ) A king of Corinth, son of Aeolus, famed for his cunning
Aquila - A Jew of Pontus whom Paul found at Corinth on his arrival from Athens. On the departure of the apostle from Corinth, a year and six months after, Priscilla and Aquila accompanied him to Ephesus
Achaia - In the days of the Roman Empire, Achaia was the southern of two Greek provinces, the other being Macedonia (Acts 19:21; Romans 15:26; 2 Corinthians 9:2; 1 Thessalonians 1:8). The administrative centre of Achaia was Corinth, and the educational centre, Athens (Acts 17:21; Acts 18:1; Acts 18:12; 2 Corinthians 1:1). ...
A church was founded in Corinth during Paul’s second missionary journey, and another at the port of Cenchreae nearby (Acts 18:1-18; Romans 16:1; 1 Corinthians 16:15; see Corinth). Paul revisited the area during his third missionary journey (Acts 19:21; Acts 20:1-3), when he collected money that the churches of Achaia, like other churches, had put aside to help the poor Christians in Judea (Romans 15:26; 2 Corinthians 9:1-2)
Crispus - The chief ruler of the Jewish synagogue at Corinth ( Acts 18:8 ). The Apostle mentions him ( 1 Corinthians 1:14 ) as one of the few persons whom he himself had baptized
Gaius - Paul baptized a man named Gaius in Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:14), and this was probably the person Paul stayed with on a later visit to Corinth (Romans 16:23)
Erastus - In Romans 16:23 Erastus is ‘the treasurer of the city’ (ὁ οἰκονόμος τῆς πόλεως, arcarius civitatis) of Corinth, who sends salutations with ‘Quartus the brother. Paul, said to have remained in Corinth, i. Paul’s informing Timothy that an important city official ‘abode at Corinth. ’ It is held by some scholars that these salutations from Corinthian Christians in the postscript of the ‘Roman’ Epistle point to an Ephesian destination of the passage. It is easier to believe that the members of the Church at Corinth had friends at Ephesus than at Rome; but, as Lightfoot reminds us, personal acquaintance was not necessary in the Apostolic Church to create Christian sympathy
Apollo - A friend of Saint Paul, he preached the Gospel in Corinth with great, success (Acts 18)
si'Las - Paul proceeded to Athens, (Acts 17:14 ) and we hear nothing more of his movements until he rejoined the apostle at Corinth. (Acts 18:5 ) His presence at Corinth is several times noticed. (2 Corinthians 1:19 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:1 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:1 ) Whether he was the Silvanus who conveyed St. A tradition of very slight authority represents Silas to have become bishop of Corinth
Aquila - Paul was, the Apostle lodged and wrought with him at Corinth. Paul afterward quitted Aquila's house, and abode with Justus, near the Jewish synagogue at Corinth; probably, as Calmet thinks, because Aquila was a converted Jew, and Justus was a convert from Paganism, that in this case the Gentiles might come and hear him with more liberty. When the Apostle left Corinth, Aquila and Priscilla accompanied him as far as Ephesus, where he left them with that church while he pursued his journey to Jerusalem
Tertius - Paul's amanuensis in writing the epistle to the Romans (Romans 16:22) from Corinth
Virgin, Virginity, - Paul had espoused the saints at Corinth to one husband to 'present them as a chaste virgin to Christ. ' 2 Corinthians 11:2 : cf. In their natural application the words apply to both sexes, and in 1 Corinthians 7:36,37 it is perhaps better translated 'his virginity
Jason - He was apparently one of the kinsmen of Paul (Romans 16:21 ), and accompanied him from Thessalonica to Corinth
Corinth - In the burning of it, so many statues of different metals were melted together, that they produced the famous Corinthian brass. ...
Christianity was first planted at Corinth by St. Paul was at liberty to remain some time longer at Corinth; and after his departure, Apollos, a zealous and eloquent Jewish convert of Alexandria, was made a powerful instrument in confirming the church, and in silencing the opposition of the Jews, Acts 18. Paul; who cautions the Corinthians against divisions and party spirit; fornication, incest, partaking of meats offered to idols, thereby giving an occasion of scandal, and encouragement to idolatry; abusing the gifts of the Spirit, litigiousness, &c. The Corinthians, indeed, were in great danger: they lived at ease, free from every kind of persecution, and were exposed to much temptation. In the centre of the city was a celebrated temple of Venus, a part of whose worship consisted in prostitution; for there a thousand priestesses of the goddess ministered to dissoluteness under the patronage of religion: an example which gave the Corinthians very lax ideas on the illicit intercourse of the sexes. Corinth also possessed numerous schools of philosophy and rhetoric; in which, as at Alexandria, the purity of the faith by an easy and natural process, became early corrupted. Paul to Corinth. In 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1-2 , the Apostle expresses his design of visiting that city a third time; whereas only one visit before the date of the Second Epistle is noticed in the Acts 18:1 , about A. 57, no mention is made of his going to Corinth. Hammond and Paley, that his First Epistle virtually supplied the place of his presence; and that it is so represented by the Apostle in a corresponding passage, 1 Corinthians 5:3 . Michaelis has produced another, more simple and natural; namely, that Paul, on his return from Crete, visited Corinth a second time before he went to winter at Nicopolis. The third visit, promised in 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1-2 , was actually paid on the Apostle's second return to Rome, when he took Corinth in his way, 2 Timothy 4:20 . 268, the Heruli burned Corinth to ashes. A late French writer, who visited this country, observes, "When the Caesars rebuilt the walls of Corinth, and the temples of the gods rose from their ruins more magnificent than ever, an obscure architect was rearing in silence an edifice which still remains standing amidst the ruins of Greece. These were the humble architects of an indestructible temple, and the first believers at Corinth. The Apostle might still, from his celestial abode, give the salutation of peace to his children, and address them in the words, "Paul to the church of God, which is at Corinth
Achaia - Paul’s time by a proconsul of the second grade, with headquarters at Corinth ( Acts 18:12 ). ’ There were Jewish settlements in this province, at Corinth, Athens, etc
Corinth - The city visited by Paul was founded by Julius Caesar about a century after the fall of a former Corinth on the same site. 58 he again visited Corinth, staying three months, Acts 20:2,3 , during which time he wrote the Epistle to the Romans. Acts 18:1,11 ; Acts 19:1 ; 1 Corinthians 1:2 ; 2 Corinthians 1:1,23 ; 2 Timothy 4:20
Trophimus - He came from Ephesus to Corinth with the Apostle, and kept him company in his whole journey from Corinth to Jerusalem, A
Contribution For the Saints - ...
Paul urged the church at Corinth to give to this offering (1 Corinthians 16:1-4 ). He evidently promoted the offering in the churches of Galatia (1 Corinthians 16:1 ) and in the churches of Macedonia (2 Corinthians 8:1 ). When the offering lagged in Corinth, he encouraged the church to give generously (2 Corinthians 8-9 ). Paul accompanied some members of those churches to Jerusalem to deliver the offering (1 Corinthians 16:3 , Acts 24:17 ). See Jerusalem ; Stewardship ; Paul ; Corinth
Mitylene - Paul, during his third missionary journey, touched at this place on his way from Corinth to Judea (Acts 20:14 ), and here tarried for a night
Achaia - Major cities in Achaia included Sparta, Athens, and Corinth, which was the administrative center
Cenchrea - A port of Corinth, now called Kikries, whence Paul sailed for Ephesus, Acts 18:18
Clement - The church at Corinth having been disturbed by divisions, Clement wrote a letter to the Corinthians, which was so much esteemed by the ancients, that they read it publicly in many churches
Sosthenes - The chief of the synagogue at Corinth, who was beaten by the Gentiles when the Jews carried Paul before Gallio the proconsul, Acts 18:17 . Whether he was converted, and is identical with the "Sosthenes our brother" in 1 Corinthians 1:1 , is unknown
Gal'Lio - Paul was at Corinth, A
Apollos - He was very useful at Corinth, where he watered what St. Paul had planted, 1 Corinthians 3:6 . Paul mentions and reproves in his First Epistle to the Corinthians, did not prevent Paul and Apollos, personally, from being closely united in the bonds of Christian charity and affection. Paul wrote the first Epistle to the Corinthians; in which he observes, that he had earnestly entreated Apollos to return to Corinth: but though he had not prevailed with him, Apollos gave him room to hope that he would visit that city at a favourable opportunity. Some have supposed, that the Apostle names Apollos and Cephas, not as the real persons in whose name parties had been formed in Corinth, but that, in order to avoid provoking a temper which he wished to subside, he transfers "by a figure" to Apollos and himself what was really meant of other parties, whom from prudence he declines to mention. However this might be, the reluctance of Apollos to return to Corinth seems to countenance the general opinion. Jerom says that Apollos was so dissatisfied with the division which had happened on his account at Corinth, that he retired into Crete with Zeno, a doctor of the law; but that the evil having been corrected by the letter of St. Paul to the Corinthians, Apollos returned to that city, of which he afterward became bishop
Stephanas - Crown, a member of the church at Corinth, whose family were among those the apostle had baptized (1 Corinthians 1:16 ; 16:15,17 ). The First Epistle to the Corinthians was written from Philippi some six years after the jailer's conversion, and he was with the apostle there at that time
Nicopolis - Titus 3:12 was written from Corinth in the autumn, Paul then purposing a journey through Aetolia and Acarnania into "Epirus," there "to winter"; a good center for missionary tours N
Jason - In Romans 16:21 Paul sends Jason's salutations from Corinth, calling him his "kinsman" or fellow tribesman, or fellow countryman, as the word is used Romans 9:3
Achaicus - The name of a member of the Church at Corinth. He was with Stephanas and Fortunatus ( 1 Corinthians 16:17 f
Prisca, Priscilla - " Paul met them at Corinth, and they travelled with him to Ephesus, where they were enabled to expound unto Apollos the way of God more perfectly. Acts 18:2,18,26 ; Romans 16:3 ; 1 Corinthians 16:19 ; 2 Timothy 4:19
Achaia - This name is used to denote the whole of Greece, as it existed as a Roman province; or Achaia Proper, a district in the northern part of the Peloponnesus, on the bay of Corinth, and in which the city of that name stood. It appears to have been used in the former sense in 2 Corinthians 11:10 ; and in the latter, in Acts 19:21
Erastus - A Christian friend and fellow-laborer of Paul, a Corinthian, and chamberlain-that is, steward or treasurer-of the city. He was again at Corinth when Paul wrote to the Romans, Romans 16:23 ; and remained there when Paul went as a prisoner to Rome, 2 Timothy 4:20
Phoebe - "A servant (Greek "deaconess") of the church at Cenchrea" (the eastern port of Corinth; where Paul had his head shorn for a vow: Acts 18:18). Phoebe was the bearer of this epistle, written from the neighbouring Corinth in the spring of A
Thessalonians - The First Epistle was probably the first of all the Pauline letters, and written, not at Athens, but at Corinth, about a. The Second Epistle, also written at Corinth, near the close of a
Excommunication - ...
In the church we have a case of 'putting away' at Corinth. 1 Corinthians 5:13 . He was afterwards repentant, and then the Corinthian saints were instructed to forgive him and to receive him again into communion. 2 Corinthians 2:6-11 . " 1 Corinthians 3:17 . ...
Connected with the case at Corinth there was also mentioned the delivering unto Satan of the guilty person for the destruction of the flesh, but this was the determination of Paul as being there in spirit with them (1 Corinthians 5:4,5 ), which seems to stamp it as an apostolic act. The positive injunction to the church at Corinth was to put away from among themselves the wicked person. As is seen at Corinth, 'putting away' should be an act of the assembly, not of an individual
Cen'Chrea, - (accurately Cenchre'ae ) ( millet ), the eastern harbor of Corinth (i
Corinthians, Second Epistle to - CorinthIANS, SECOND EPISTLE TO...
1. We may best start by noticing that the Epistle was clearly written when the Apostle was burdened by some great anxiety, perhaps physical, but assuredly spiritual ( 2 Corinthians 11:28 ). Paul had written to Corinth, either our 1 Cor. , or an Epistle now lost ( 2 Corinthians 7:8 ); ( c ) the treatment of some offender at Corinth, either the guilty one of 1 Corinthians 5:1 , or some resolute opponent of St. In 2 Corinthians 8:1-578 we read of a projected third visit (for such seems the most natural interpretation of the words), and this presupposes a second visit of which we have no record. Paul and Corinth . After leaving, he kept up communications ( 2 Corinthians 12:17 ), though it was only at Ephesus on the Third Missionary Journey in 56 ( Acts 19:1 ) that he could resume personal intercourse. While there, he heard of the terrible immorality, and wrote a short letter ( 1 Corinthians 5:9 ), ordering them to have no intercourse with fornicators. This letter, now lost, may be referred to in 2 Corinthians 1:18 ; and if so, it may have contained a statement that he would come to Corinth before going to Macedonia. This project, however, was altered ( 1 Corinthians 16:5 ). 56) he possibly paid a second visit from Ephesus to Corinth, which caused him great pain and grief ( 2 Corinthians 2:1 ; 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 2 Corinthians 12:21 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1 ). , and on the strength of his Apostolic authority ordered the punishment of the incestuous person ( 1 Corinthians 5:1-5 ). At the same time he sent Timothy on a mission ( 1 Corinthians 4:17 ; 1 Corinthians 16:10 ) to support and supplement his letter. , or another now lost ( 2 Corinthians 2:3 ; 2 Corinthians 7:8 ), in which St. Paul leaves Ephesus owing to riot ( Acts 19:1-41 ), expects to see Titus in Troas, but does not meet him until they reach Macedonia in the summer or autumn of 57 ( 2 Corinthians 2:12-13 ). The news Titus brought from Corinth is mixed. The majority of the Church had obeyed his orders and punished the offender ( 2 Corinthians 2:6-11 ), but the Judaizers had grown stronger in opposition to the Apostle, charging him with inconsistency, false Apostleship, boasting, and money-making. They were also probably endeavouring to thwart his collections for Jerusalem ( 1 Corinthians 16:1 , 2 Corinthians 8:9 ). Not least of all was the still existing danger for Gentile converts of relapsing into heathen worship and impurity ( 2 Corinthians 6:14 ; 2 Corinthians 7:1 ; 2 Corinthians 12:19-21 ). Then followed a visit (the third) to Corinth, and a stay of three months ( Acts 20:3 ). from those in 1 Corinthians. Paul was anxious Most probably it is one now lost, and not our 1 Corinthians. entirely out of 1 Corinthians. , which visit is thought to be the painful and recent one in 2 Corinthians 13:11-133 f. , 2 Corinthians 1:23 . 495), is perhaps the best scheme of events: (1) Foundation of Church at Corinth ( Acts 18:1-5 ). (2) Apollos at Corinth ( Acts 19:1 , 1 Corinthians 1:12 ). [3] (4) Lost letter of 1 Corinthians 5:9 (perhaps announcing the plan of 2 Corinthians 1:16 ). (5) Some would put second visit to Corinth here. (6) Visit of Stephan as and others from Corinth to St. Paul at Ephesus ( 1 Corinthians 16:17-18 ), asking for advice on certain matters ( 1 Corinthians 7:1 ; 1 Corinthians 8:1 ). sent by Titus and the ‘brother’ ( 2 Corinthians 12:18 ). Paul determines to pay a double visit to Corinth ( 2 Corinthians 1:15 ). (9) Painful news from Corinth through Titus leads to a change of plan. (11) Titus sent to Corinth ( 2 Corinthians 7:7-15 ), with, on the whole, favourable results. (13) Titus sent to Corinth with 2 Corinthians. Paul’s visit to Corinth and three months’ stay ( Acts 20:3 ). Not only did the Apostle go again to Corinth, but actually wintered there. Not least of all, his favourite project the collection for Jerusalem was brought to a successful completion, and the Church of Corinth had some of its members included in the delegation to Jerusalem (Acts 20:4 ). His vigorous Epistle was therefore not in vain, and Corinth and the whole Church have been the gainers by it in the overruling providence of God. Paul had left Asia ( 2 Corinthians 1:8 ), and had passed through Troas ( 2 Corinthians 2:12 ), and was in Macedonia ( 2 Corinthians 2:13 , 2 Corinthians 9:2 ). From Acts 20:3 we know that he wintered at Corinth, and so 2 Cor. This would suit the circumstances of Timothy’s and Titus’ visits, and account for the great change at Corinth towards St. Not even Galatians gives so full a revelation of the Apostle’s mind and soul as does 2 Corinthians. His spiritual experiences are also brought out here as nowhere else; his visions ( 2 Corinthians 12:1 ), his ‘thorn’ ( 2 Corinthians 12:7 ), his conflicts ( 2 Corinthians 2:10 , 2 Corinthians 12:7 ), his physical weakness ( 2 Corinthians 4:7 ), his constant sufferings ( 2 Corinthians 11:23-27 ), We see something of what he had to endure from his unscrupulous Judaizing foes in their remarks about his personal appearance ( 2 Corinthians 10:10 ), his fickleness ( 2 Corinthians 1:17 ), his pretended Apostleship and Jewish birth ( 2 Corinthians 11:22 ), and his doubtful, if not dishonest, motives about the collection ( 2 Corinthians 6:3 ). We have not a few indications of his personal relation to Christ and his oneness with his Master in suffering ( 2 Corinthians 1:5 , 2 Corinthians 4:10 ), fellowship ( 2 Corinthians 12:8-9 ), and the hope of glory ( 2 Corinthians 5:1 ). 3), the teaching about Christ’s death (2 Corinthians 5:14-21 ), the eschatology ( 2 Corinthians 4:16 to 2 Corinthians 5:8 ), the Christology ( 2 Corinthians 8:19 ), and the Trinitarian expression of the concluding Benediction ( 2 Corinthians 13:14 ), are among the leading Apostolic thoughts. The evidence for the text of the Epistle is, of course, practically on the same basis as that of 1 Corinthians. Their connexion is mainly chronological: 2 Corinthians 1:12 to 2 Corinthians 7:16 dealing with the past in relation to himself and Corinth, 2 Corinthians 8:1 to 2 Corinthians 9:15 dealing with a special and important matter of present duty, and 2 Corinthians 10:1 to 2 Corinthians 13:10 taking up a question that affected the entire future of his relations to them and the whole Church. ...
(1) Personal Introduction, 2 Corinthians 1:1-11 . ...
(2) 2 Corinthians 1:12 to 2 Corinthians 7:16 . Himself and his ministry with special reference to Corinth. ...
( a ) 2 Corinthians 1:12 to 2 Corinthians 2:11 . ...
( b ) 2 Corinthians 2:12 to 2 Corinthians 7:3 . Its power, 2 Corinthians 2:14 to 2 Corinthians 4:6 . Its tribulations and hopes, 2 Corinthians 4:7 to 2 Corinthians 5:10 . Its object and source, 2 Corinthians 5:11-21 . Its fulfilment by himself,2 Corinthians 6:1 2 Corinthians 6:1 to 2 Corinthians 7:3 . ...
( c ) 2 Corinthians 7:4-16 . ...
(3) 2 Corinthians 8:1 to 2 Corinthians 9:15 . ...
( b ) 2 Corinthians 8:6 to 2 Corinthians 9:5 . ...
( c ) 2 Corinthians 9:6-15 . The Corinthian Church encouraged to give. ...
(4) 2 Corinthians 10:1 to 2 Corinthians 13:10 His approaching visit to Corinth, and the consequent need of a personal vindication in the face of enemies. ...
( a ) 2 Corinthians 10:1-18 . ...
( b ) 2 Corinthians 11:1 to 2 Corinthians 12:18 . ...
( c ) 2 Corinthians 12:19 to 2 Corinthians 13:10
Corinth - Although there were many Jewish converts at Corinth, yet the Gentile element prevailed in the church there. Some have argued from 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 13:1 , that Paul visited Corinth a third time (i. But the passages referred to only indicate Paul's intention to visit Corinth (Compare 1 Corinthians 16:5 , where the Greek present tense denotes an intention), an intention which was in some way frustrated
Apollos - When he decided to move across to Corinth, the Ephesian Christians wrote to the Christians in Corinth to recommend him to them as a worthy teacher (Acts 18:24-28). ...
Foolishly, the immature Corinthian Christians made favourites of different teachers who had helped them, and soon there was tension between various groups in the church. Among these groups was a pro-Apollos faction and a pro-Paul faction (1 Corinthians 1:11-12). They were fellow servants of God (1 Corinthians 3:4-9). No doubt Apollos likewise was opposed to the Corinthians’ creation of factions. This was probably the reason why, after leaving Corinth, he thought it best not to return for a while, in spite of Paul’s enthusiastic urging (1 Corinthians 16:12)
Aquila - When the Jews were banished from that city by the emperor Claudius, Aquilla and his wife retired to Corinth. They afterwards became the companions of Paul in his labors, and are mentioned by him with much commendation, Acts 18:2,3,24-26 Romans 16:3,4 1 Corinthians 16:19 2 Timothy 4:19
Secundus - The Greek of the verse is obscure, but the meaning probably is that Aristarchus and Secundus and those mentioned afterwards went direct to Troas from Corinth and waited there for the Apostle, who came with Sopater by way of Macedonia
Silvanus - A Christian who had laboured at Corinth, and who was there with Paul when he wrote the two Epistles to the Thessalonians. 2 Corinthians 1:19 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:1 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:1
John, Third Epistle of - Is addressed to Caius, or Gaius, but whether to the Christian of that name in Macedonia (Acts 19 :: 29 ) or in Corinth (Romans 16:23 ) or in Derbe (Acts 20:4 ) is uncertain
Husbandry - 1: γεώργιον (Strong's #1091 — Noun Neuter — georgion — gheh-ore'-ghee-on ) akin to the above, denotes "tillage, cultivation, husbandry," 1 Corinthians 3:9 , where the local church is described under this metaphor (AV, marg. , "tilled land"), suggestive of the diligent toil of the Apostle and his fellow missionaries, both in the ministry of the Gospel, and the care of the church at Corinth; suggestive, too, of the effects in spiritual fruitfulness
Covering the Head - In 1 Corinthians 11:1-16 , Paul dealt with the matter of covering the head in worship services. This extended treatment shows that this must have been a subject of considerable interest in Corinth. ...
Some of the Corinthian Christian women had evidently appeared in worship without a veil on their heads. ...
The effects of such a change in dress style had been disruptive to the worship services and Christian witness in Corinth. ...
Paul cited various reasons in 1 Corinthians 11:1-16 for his position. He referred to: (1) the order in creation ( 1 Corinthians 11:3 ), (2) social customs of the time (1 Corinthians 11:4-6 ), (3) the presence of angels (1 Corinthians 11:10 ), (4) nature itself (1 Corinthians 11:13-15 ), and (5) the common practice in the churches (1 Corinthians 11:16 ). See Corinth ; Worship ; Women
Gallio - Paul was in Corinth. The Jews of Corinth brought St
Aquila And Priscilla - were a married couple who came from Italy to Corinth after the emperor Claudius ordered Jews expelled from Rome, became Christians, and assisted Paul in his ministry. They came into contact with Paul, who was a tentmaker, in Corinth (Acts 18:2 ). A church met in their home, and they joined Paul in writing to the Corinthian church (1 Corinthians 16:19 )
Titus Justus - He was a Gentile who had been brought under the influence of the Jewish synagogue in Corinth. Gaius was an early convert in Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:14); and St. Headlam describes Titus Justus as ‘evidently a Roman or a Latin, one of the coloni of the colony Corinth’ (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. Paul accepted the offer of his house not because it was so near the synagogue as to be a rival meeting-house, but because it afforded the Apostle access to the more educated classes of the Corinthian population. Ramsay, article ‘Corinth,’ ib. ]'>[3] ; Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘1 Corinthians,’ do
Sosthenes - ” A ruler of a synagogue in Corinth (Acts 18:17 ). Tradition holds that Sosthenes later was converted and became one of Paul's helpers (1 Corinthians 1:1 )
Greece - Its cities noticed in Scripture are Athens, Corinth, and Cenchrea
Cenchrea - The eastern harbor of Corinth, on the Saronic Gulf, and the emporium of its trade with the Asiatic shores of the Mediterranean, about nine miles east of that city; the western harbor was Lechæum
Sosthenes - ” A ruler of a synagogue in Corinth (Acts 18:17 ). Tradition holds that Sosthenes later was converted and became one of Paul's helpers (1 Corinthians 1:1 )
Eras'Tus - (2 Timothy 4:20 ) ...
Erastus the chamberlain, or rather the public treasurer, of Corinth, who was one of the early converts to Christianity
Sosthenes - Safe in strength, the chief ruler of the synagogue at Corinth, who was seized and beaten by the mob in the presence of Gallio, the Roman governor, when he refused to proceed against Paul at the instigation of the Jews (Acts 18:12-17 ). Some identify him, but without sufficient grounds, with one whom Paul calls "Sosthenes our brother," a convert to the faith (1 Corinthians 1:1 )
Gaius - Paul's host at Corinth when Paul wrote (Romans 16:23), "mine host and of the whole church. " Baptized by that apostle (1 Corinthians 1:14)
Gaius - Christian at Corinth whom Paul baptised and who was his 'host' and of the whole church. Romans 16:23 ; 1 Corinthians 1:14
Gaius - A Macedonian, Acts 19:29, Paul's host at Corinth when the Epistle to the Romans was written, Romans 16:23, and baptized with his household by Paul. 1 Corinthians 1:14
Tychicus - He was of the province of Asia, and accompanied Paul in his journey from Corinth to Jerusalem, Acts 20:4
Harlot - 1: πόρνη (Strong's #4204 — Noun Feminine — porne — por'-nay ) "a prostitute, harlot" (from pernemi, "to sell"), is used (a) literally, in Matthew 21:31,32 , of those who were the objects of the mercy shown by Christ; in Luke 15:30 , of the life of the Prodigal; in 1 Corinthians 6:15,16 , in a warning to the Corinthian church against the prevailing licentiousness which had made Corinth a byword; in Hebrews 11:31 ; James 2:25 , of Rahab; (b) metaphorically, of mystic Babylon, Revelation 17:1,5 (AV, "harlots"),15,16; 19:2, RV, for AV, "whore
Titus - We find him, at a later period, with Paul and Timothy at Ephesus, whence he was sent by Paul to Corinth for the purpose of getting the contributions of the church there in behalf of the poor saints at Jerusalem sent forward (2 Corinthians 8:6 ; 12:18 ). He rejoined the apostle when he was in Macedonia, and cheered him with the tidings he brought from Corinth (7:6-15)
Gaius - In 1 Corinthians 1:14, a member of the Church of Corinth, baptized by St. In Romans 16:23, a member of the Church of Corinth, whom St. He was evidently a man of position and means (the greeting from him immediately precedes that from Erastus, ‘the treasurer of the city’), whether his hospitality took the form of keeping open house for Christians and Christian visitors like the Apostle at Corinth or of allowing the Christians to meet for common worship and edification under his roof. Paul’s first visit to Corinth entertained him on his second visit. Now it is perhaps easier to believe that this Corinthian would have friends, whom he would wish to salute, at Ephesus rather than at Rome, and these salutations in Romans 16:23 are thought by some scholars to point to an Ephesian destination of the passage
Titus - A convert from heathenism ( 2 Corinthians 8:15-2478 ), probably won by St. Paul as one of his missionary companions and assistants, but we have no distinct reference to him until some 10 years after the Council at Jerusalem, namely, when the Apostle wrote 2 Corinthians. In this Epistle Titus is mentioned nine times, and from it we gather that he visited Corinth as the Apostle’s delegate probably three times. was written ( 2 Corinthians 8:10 ), he came with an unnamed ‘brother’ ( 2 Corinthians 12:18 ), and on his arrival set on foot the necessary organization to secure the local contributions towards the collection for the poor Christians of Judæa which the Apostle had inaugurated ( 1 Corinthians 16:1-2 ). After his departure from Corinth serious trouble vexed the Church there, and he was a second time sent to reduce matters to order. Probably on this occasion he was the bearer of the letter referred to in 2Co 2:3 ff; 2 Corinthians 7:8 ff. Paul anxiously awaited at Troas the return of Titus ( 2 Corinthians 2:12 ); but the journey took longer than was expected; and so the Apostle moved on into Macedonia, with a view to meeting him the sooner on his road. Here Titus ultimately reached him, and bringing good news from Corinth refreshed his spirit ( 2 Corinthians 2:14 ). Titus was then despatched a third time to Corinth, bearing the 2nd Epistle ( 1618454804_6 ), and was charged to complete ‘the collection’ the organization for which he had commenced the year before ( 2 Corinthians 8:10 ). Paul, and the fact that the former was chosen to deal with so sharp a crisis as presented itself at Corinth shows that prudence, tact, and firmness marked his Christian character
Sosthenes - In Acts 18:17 a Sosthenes is ‘the ruler of the synagogue’ in Corinth. Although in the Diaspora this title gained a more extended sense than in Palestine as an honorary title, there seems to have been only one ruler of the synagogue in Corinth. Paul in 1 Corinthians 1:1. If Acts 18:17 and 1 Corinthians 1:1 refer to the same person, Sosthenes must have been converted subsequently and become a Christian leader. Paul in Ephesus is explicable on two grounds: (a) his presence in Corinth as a Christian might irritate the Jews and make Christian work harder; (b) his social position and ability would probably mark him out as a suitable fellow-worker with St. Paul mentions Sosthenes not as an amanuensis but as a Christian of standing, whose name is well known in Corinth and will carry authority with the Church. But it would be an interesting coincidence that both Crispus and Sosthenes should be mentioned in 1 Corinthians 1, if both were converted rulers of the synagogue. Ramsay, article ‘Corinth,’ ib. Godet, Commentary on 1st Corinthians (Eng. 391, and ‘1 Corinthians,’ do
Gaius -
A Macedonian, Paul's fellow-traveller, and his host at Corinth when he wrote his Epistle to the (Romans 16:23 ). He with his household were baptized by Paul (1 Corinthians 1:14 )
Masterbuilder - , "architect"), "a principal artificer," is used figuratively by the Apostle in 1 Corinthians 3:10 , of his work in laying the foundation of the local church in Corinth, inasmuch as the inception of the spiritual work there devolved upon him
Race - Among the most famous games were those celebrated on the isthmus of Corinth, hence called the Isthmian games; and to these Paul alludes in his letters to Corinth, 1 Corinthians 9:24-27
Titus - A distinguished Christian minister of Greek origin, Galatians 2:3 ; converted under the preaching of Paul, Titus 1:4 , whose companion and fellow-labor he became, 2 Corinthians 8:23 . He joined Paul and Barnabas in the mission from Antioch to Jerusalem, Acts 15:2 Galatians 2:1 ; and subsequently was sent to Corinth and labored with success, 2 Corinthians 8:6 12:18 . He did not rejoin the apostle at Troas, as was expected, but at Philippi, 2 Corinthians 2:12,13 7:6 ; and soon after resumed his labors at Corinth in connection with a general effort for the relief of poor Christians in Judea, taking with him Paul's second epistle, 2 Corinthians 8:6,16,17
Aquila And Priscilla - As she is often named first (only in Acts 18:2; 1 Corinthians 16:19 Aquila has the first place; Acts 18:26 in Sin. Paul found them at Corinth on his first visit there (Acts 18:2). A year and a half after Priscilla and Aquila accompanied Paul from Corinth to Ephesus on his way to Syria. ) In 1 Corinthians 16:19 we find them still at Ephesus, and having "a church (assembling) in their house. She and he together, as true yokefellows in the Lord, to all within their reach; to Apollos, who became the mighty champion of Christianity, convincing the Jews from the Scriptures at Corinth; setting up "a church in their house" wherever they were: in Ephesus; then at Rome, risking their lives for Paul, and earning thanks of "all the churches of the Gentiles
Apollos - ...
Later on Apollos worked in Corinth, with great success. His eloquence and Philonic culture won him a name for wisdom, and made his preaching attractive, so that many declared themselves his special followers (1 Corinthians 1:12 ). Apollos’ teaching in Corinth may have been marked by allegorical interpretation, insistence on Divine knowledge, and on the need of living according to nature (see St. Paul’s sarcastic reference to ‘nature’ in 1 Corinthians 11:14 ). But the party-strife at Corinth was not of his intending. Apollos and Paul were agreed in their gospel ( 1 Corinthians 3:8 ) a fact the Corinthians overlooked. Apollos refused the request of the Corinthians for a speedy second visit ( 1 Corinthians 16:12 ). Paul apparently speaks of Apollos as an Apostle ( 1 Corinthians 4:9 )
Paul - Acts 26:15; 1 Corinthians 15:8. ...
45-49...
Apostolic Council at Jerusalem; conflict between Jewish and Gentile Christianity; Paul's third journey to Jerusalem, with Barnabas and Titus; settlement of the difficulty: agreement between the Jewish and Gentile apostles; Paul's return to Antioch; his difference with Peter and Barnabas at Antioch, and temporary separation from the latter...
Paul's second missionary journey from Antioch to Asia Minor, Cilicia, Lycaonia, Galatia, Troas, and Greece (Philippi, Thessalonica, Beræa, Athens, and Corinth). From this tour dates the Christianization of Europe...
Paul at Corinth (a year and a half). Excursion to Macedonia, Corinth, and Crete (not mentioned in the Acts); First Epistle to Timothy (?). Second Epistle to the Corinthians...
Paul's third sojourn at Corinth (three months). 52, 53, from Corinth. ...
1 Corinthians, written a. ...
2 Corinthians, written a. 58, from Corinth. ...
1 and 2 Corinthians: moral and practical questions
Justus - ...
...
A Jewish proselyte at Corinth, in whose house, next door to the synagogue, Paul held meetings and preached after he left the synagogue (Acts 18:7 )
Judgment Seat - According to Acts 18:12 , Paul the apostle was brought before the judgment seat in Corinth. In Romans 14:10 and 2 Corinthians 5:10 , the judgment seat of Christ is a theological concept
Chamberlain - " Erastus, "the chamberlain of the city of Corinth," Romans 16:23, was the treasurer of the city; the R
Achaia - The name was given by the Romans, when they took Corinth and destroyed the Achaian League (146 D
Phebe - A Christian woman of Cenchrea, the eastern port of Corinth, bearer of the epistle of Paul to the Romans, in which he commends her to their confidence and Christian love
Gallio - His residence was at Corinth; and when the Jews of the city made an insurrection against Paul, and dragged him before the judgment seat, Gallio refused to entertain their clamorous and unjust demands
Colony - The cities of Corinth and Philippi were Roman colonies during the time of Caesar
Wages - 5, denotes (a) "soldiers' pay," Luke 3:14 ; 1 Corinthians 9:7 ("charges"); (b) in general, "hire, wages of any sort," used metaphorically, Romans 6:23 , of sin; 2 Corinthians 11:8 , of material support which Paul received from some of the churches which he had established and to which he ministered in spiritual things; their support partly maintained him at Corinth, where he forebore to receive such assistance (2 Corinthians 11:9,10 )
Timotheus, Timothy - They joined Paul at Athens, and Timothy was sent back to Thessalonica, and brought his report to Paul at Corinth. ...
During Paul's stay at Ephesus Timothy was with him, and was sent to Corinth, but was again with Paul in Macedonia when the Second Epistle to the Corinthians was written. He was also with Paul when the Epistle to the Romans was written from Corinth
Thessalonians, Epistles to the - It was in all probability written from Corinth, where he abode a "long time" (Acts 18:11,18 ), early in the period of his residence there, about the end of A. ...
The second epistle to the Thessalonians was probably also written from Corinth, and not many months after the first
Achaia - Achaia (Ἀχαΐα) was, in the classical period, merely a strip of fertile coast-land stretching along the south of the Gulf of Corinth, from the river Larisus, which separated it from Elis, to the Sythas, which divided it from Sicyonia, while the higher mountains of Arcadia bounded it on the south. Paul’s residence in Corinth. The administrative centre was Corinth (q. (1 Maccabees 15:23), and Philo’s Legatio ad Gaium (§ 36) testifies to the presence of Jews in Bœotia, aetolia, Attica, Argos, and Corinth. Only three Achaean cities are mentioned in the NT-Athens, Corinth, and Cenchreae-but the address of 2 Cor. to ‘all the saints who are in the whole of Achaia,’ and the liberality of ‘the regions of Achaia’ (2 Corinthians 9:2; 2 Corinthians 11:10), prove that there must have been many other unnamed centres of Christian faith and life in the province. While 1 Corinthians 16:15 refers to the house of Stephanas as ‘the firstfruits of Achaia,’ Acts 17:34 rather indicates that the Apostle’s brief visit to Athens had already borne some fruit, ‘Dionysius, Damaris, and others with them’ being Achaean believers
Apollos - Passing thence into Achia, he preached with great power and success, especially among the Jews, Acts 19:1 1 Corinthians 3:6 . His character was not unlike that of Paul; they were equally grieved at the dissension of the Corinthians, and at those personal partialities which led many away from Christ, 1 Corinthians 3:4-22 16:12 ; and they cooperated to the end in serving him, Titus 3:13 . Jerome is of opinion that Apollos afterwards returned to Corinth from Crete
Apostle - Thus Dionysius of Corinth is called the Apostle of France, Xavier the Apostle of the Indies, &c
Sosipater - Paul at Corinth at the time of writing or had become missionary companions of the Apostle. It is perhaps in favour of this theory that the salutations of Lucius, Jason, and Sosipater are sent with those of Timothy and not with those of the Corinthian Christians, Gaius, Erastus, Quartus (Acts 20:23), the personal greeting of the amanuensis being interposed (Acts 20:22). If we think the identification unlikely, we shall suppose Sosipater and the others to have been members of the church at Corinth
Greece - The country was evangelized by Saint Paul during his second and third missions, when he visited Neapolis, Philippi, where the first Christian Church on European soil was established, Thessalonica, Berooa, Corinth, and Athens, where he converted Dionysius the Areopagite, first Bishop of Athens. The Churches of Athens and Corinth were the most important, the latter being the first center of Christianity in Greece
Romans, Epistle to the - This epistle was probably written at Corinth. Phoebe (Romans 16:1 ) of Cenchrea conveyed it to Rome, and Gaius of Corinth entertained the apostle at the time of his writing it (16:23; 1 Corinthians 1:14 ), and Erastus was chamberlain of the city, i. , of Corinth (2 Timothy 4:20 ). , at the close of his second visit to Greece, during the winter preceding his last visit to that city (Romans 15:25 ; Compare Acts 19:21 ; 20:2,3,16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:1-4 ), early in A
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - CorinthIANS, FIRST EPISTLE TO THE...
1. Paul’s first evangelization of Corinth when he addressed the present Epistle to the Christians in that great centre of commerce. No doubt there had been frequent communications, especially during the Apostle’s stay in Asia, for the journey between Corinth and Ephesus was a very easy one; but the communications were probably by letter only. A former epistle is mentioned in 1 Corinthians 5:9 , in which St. Paul had bidden his disciples ‘to have no company with fornicators’ advice which was no doubt considered hard to obey in the most vicious and pleasure-loving city of the world, and which to some extent is modified in the present Epistle ( 1 Corinthians 5:10 f. ); and a letter from the Corinthians to St. Paul is the immediate object of the Apostle’s writing on the present occasion ( 1 Corinthians 7:1 ). But before answering it, he reproves the Corinthians for certain abuses which he had heard of from ‘the [1] of Chloe’ ( 1 Corinthians 1:11 ), namely, schism and party spirit, a bad case of incest, and litigiousness; for ‘they of Chloe’ seem to have been St. Chloe was perhaps a woman of importance who carried on a trade in Corinth, as Lydia of Thyatira did at Philippi ( Acts 16:14 ). She therefore not improbably belonged to Asia Minor the reference to her seems to imply that she was not a Corinthian, and ‘they of Chloe’ would be her agents who passed to and fro between Ephesus and Corinth. Having reproved the Corinthians for these abuses, the Apostle answers the questions put in their letter to him, as to marriage and other social questions; perhaps also as to Christian worship, the doctrine of the Resurrection, and the collection for the poor of Judæa. The state of the Corinthian Church . It will be remembered that the majority of the Christians at Corinth were Gentiles, though there were some Jews among them ( Romans 16:21 , 1 Corinthians 7:18 ; 1 Corinthians 9:20 ; 1 Corinthians 12:13 ), including such influential men as Crispus ( Acts 18:8 ) and (probably) Sosthenes ( Acts 18:17 , 1 Corinthians 1:1 ). It was the heathen antecedents of the Corinthians that led to most of the evils for which St. Paul rebukes them ( 1Co 12:1-31 , 1 Corinthians 12:2 ). The Apostle, though he had not intended to stay long in Corinth when he first went there, desiring to return to Macedonia ( 1 Thessalonians 2:18 ), yet, when his wish was found to be impracticable, threw himself with all his heart into the task of making heathen Corinth, the famous trade centre which lay on one of the greatest routes of communication in the Empire, into a religious centre for the spread of the gospel (cf. At Corinth the vices of the city had lowered the tone of public opinion; and when St. Paul preached Christ crucified with all plainness of speech ( 1 Corinthians 1:17 ff. He preached no longer ‘wisdom’ to the Jewish lawyer or the Greek sophist ( 1 Corinthians 1:20 ), but salvation to the plain man; the Gentiles had no sense of sin, and the preaching of a personal Saviour was to them ‘folly’ ( 1 Corinthians 1:23 ). ]'>[2] 98) points out, that the passage 1 Corinthians 1:26 ff. describes Corinthian Christians as distinguished from those in other places; the disciples at Corinth were not merely the ‘dregs of society,’ separated from the rest of the population, as the negro from the white man in some countries to-day. It certainly included men of means ( 1 Corinthians 11:20 ff. ...
It has been debated how far the Church was organized at Corinth at this time. The ministry is seldom referred to in these two Epistles; the ‘bishops and deacons’ of Philippians 1:1 are not mentioned; but we read of apostles, prophets, and teachers ( 1 Corinthians 12:28 ). It would, however, be unsafe to conclude that there was not a settled local ministry at Corinth. A settled order of clergy is implied in 1 Corinthians 9:7 ; 1 Corinthians 9:12 ; 1 Corinthians 9:14 . Party Spirit at Corinth . It is more correct to say that there were parties in the Church than that the Corinthians had made schisms. 1, 47), writing less than 50 years later, refers to the factions prevalent at Corinth in his time. Paul’s time there was a Paul-party, and also an Apollos-party, a Cephas-party, and a Christ-party ( 1 Corinthians 1:12 ), though the words ‘but I [3] of Christ’ are interpreted by Estius ( Com . 1 Corinthians 3:23 ). 1 Corinthians 2:1 ; 1 Corinthians 2:13 , Act 18:24 , 2 Corinthians 10:10 ; 2 Corinthians 11:6 ). At Corinth the great dispute about the Law was as yet in its infancy; it seems to have grown when 2 Corinthians was written (see § 7 ( c ) below). 2 Corinthians 10:7 where St. There is no sufficient reason for deducing from 1 Corinthians 1:12 ; 1 Corinthians 9:5 that St. Peter had visited Corinth, and that this party consisted of his personal disciples. They were united by baptism with Christ, not with him ( 1 Corinthians 1:13 ). Perhaps his father had been separated from her on his becoming a Christian, but (if 2 Corinthians 7:12 refers to this incident) was still alive; and the son thereupon married her. The Corinthian Church, in the low state of public opinion, did not condemn this, and did not even mention it in their letter to St. The Roman law of affinity was undoubtedly very strict, and Corinth, as a colony, would be familiar with Roman law; though the law was not usually put in force. 1 Corinthians 5:12 ), but the man is to be ‘delivered unto Satan’ ( 1 Corinthians 5:5 , cf. 5:13), though many take it to denote the infliction of some miraculous punishment, disease, or death, and deny that the offender of 2 Corinthians 2:1-17 ; 2 Corinthians 7:1-16 is the incestuous Corinthian of 1 Corinthians 5:1-13 . Paul rebukes the Corinthians for litigiousness, 1 Corinthians 6:1-8 . Paul reproves the Corinthians for taking their umpires from among the heathen instead of from among their Christian brethren. Questions of Moral Sin and of Marriage ( 1 Corinthians 6:12 to 1 Corinthians 7:40 ). Probably the passage 1 Corinthians 6:12-20 is part of the answer to the Corinthian letter. True marriage is the most perfect symbol of the relation between Christ and the Church ( 1 Corinthians 6:15 ff. 7 the Apostle answers the Corinthians’ questions about marriage. Ramsay supposes, therefore, that the Corinthians wished to make marriage compulsory, and that St. After positive commands as to divorce ( 1 Corinthians 7:10 ff. ) the Apostle answers in 1 Corinthians 7:25 ff. Social Questions ( 1 Corinthians 8:1 to 1 Corinthians 11:1 )...
( a ) Food . Another question was whether Christians may eat meats which had previously been offered to Idols, as most of the meat sold in Corinth would have been. Paul’s answer is a running commentary on the Corinthians’ words (so Lock, Exp . ...
Why is the decree of Acts 15:29 not quoted? Lock suggests that it is because at Corinth there was no question between Jew and Gentile, but only between Gentile and Gentile, and Jewish opinion might be neglected. The Corinthians had said (he supposes): ‘Why should we be tied down by the Council’s decree here at Corinth, so long after? We know better than to suppose that a non-existent idol can taint food. ...
( b ) Idol Feasts ( 1 Corinthians 8:10-13 , 1 Corinthians 10:14 to 1 Corinthians 11:1 ). Probably many of the Corinthians had retained their connexion with pagan clubs. ...
( c ) Digression on Forbearance ( 1 Corinthians 9:1 to 1 Corinthians 10:13 ). Paul says that he habitually considers the rights of others and does not press his own rights as an Apostle to the full; he implies that the Corinthians should not press their liberty so as to scandalize others. This passage shows how little as yet the Judaizers had been at work in Corinth. Paul announces his position as an Apostle, and the right of the Christian minister to live of the gospel, but he will not use his rights to the full ( 1 Corinthians 9:18 RV
( a ) Veiling of Women . 2 Corinthians 3:14 ff. It is based on the subordination of the woman to the man, and is illustrated by the existence of regulated ranks among the angels; for this seems to be the meaning of 1 Corinthians 11:10 . The Corinthians joined together in a social meal somewhat later called an Agape or Love-feast and the Eucharist, probably in imitation both of the Last Supper and of the Jewish and heathen meals taken in common. But the party-spirit, already spoken of, showed itself in this custom; the Corinthians did not eat the Lord ’s supper, but their own, because of their factions. As a matter of fact, however, it is not improbable that the Lukan form was really much shorter than the Pauline, and that some early scribe has lengthened it to make it fit in with 1 Corinthians 11:23 ff. ...
( c ) Spiritual Gifts ( 1 Corinthians 6:11 ; 1 Corinthians 13:1-13 ; 1 Corinthians 14:1-40 ). Tongues [10]), seems to have been very common at Corinth. not to prophesy?) in the public assemblies ( 1 Corinthians 14:34 f. In 1 Corinthians 11:5 (Cf. 1 Corinthians 14:35 ). The Resurrection of the Body ( 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 ). Apparently the Gentile converts at Corinth felt a great difficulty in accepting the doctrine of the resurrection of the body; it appeared to them too material a doctrine to he true ( 1 Corinthians 15:12 , cf. 10, The Corinthian scepticism does not seem to have died out at the end of the century, for Clement of Rome, writing to Corinth, strongly emphasizes the doctrine ( Cor . 47), who speaks of the parties of Paul, Cephas, and Apollos, but omits the Christ-party (see above § 3 ); we cannot infer from his phrase ‘the Epistle of the blessed Paul’ that he knew only one Epistle to the Corinthians, as early usage shows (Lightfoot, Clement , ii. ) refers to 1 Corinthians 1:20 ; 1 Corinthians 1:23 f. , 1 Corinthians 4:13 and probably 1 Corinthians 2:6 ; Polycarp (§ 11) quotes 1 Corinthians 6:2 as Paul’s; references are found in the Martyrdom of Polycarp , in Justin Martyr, and in the Epistle to Diognetus ; while Irenæus, Clement of Alexandria, and Tertullian at the end of the 2nd cent. Against that of our Epistle in particular it has been alleged that it is dependent on Romans thus, 1 Corinthians 4:6 (‘the things which are written’) is said to be a quotation of Romans 12:3 , surely a most fanciful idea and on the Synoptic Gospels, especially in two particulars, the account of the Last Supper (see § 8 ( b ) above), and that of the Resurrection appearances of our Lord ( 1 Corinthians 15:4 ff. Paul left Corinth in the early spring, after spending three months there (Acts 20:3 ; Acts 20:6 ). This seems to have been the visit to Corinth promised in 2 Corinthians 13:1 , which was the third visit. In 1 Corinthians 16:6 the Apostle had announced his intention of wintering in Corinth, and it is possible that the visit of Acts 20:3 is the fulfilment of this intention, though St. Paul certainly did not carry out all his plans at this time ( 2 Corinthians 1:15 f. , 2 Corinthians 1:23 ). Moreover, the Corinthians had begun the collection for the poor Jews ‘a year ago’ when St. ( 2 Corinthians 8:10 ; 2 Corinthians 9:2 ), and it seems, therefore, that at least a year must have elapsed since the injunction of 1 Corinthians 16:1
Gallio - , proconsul, as in Revised Version, of Achaia, under the emperor Claudius, when Paul visited Corinth (Acts 18:12 )
Aquila - A converted Jew of Pontus, husband of Priscilla, whom Paul first met at Corinth. They were still at Ephesus when Paul wrote 1Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:19 ); and were at Rome when the epistle to the saints there was written, in which Paul said they had laid down their necks for his life, and that to them all the churches, with Paul, gave thanks
Love Feasts - 1 Corinthians 11:21 ). The evil dealt with at Corinth (l
Silas - ...
Silas, when he and Timothy (apparently together) came from Macedonia, found Paul at Corinth (Acts 18:5). Whether in the meantime he had joined Paul at Athens, and been sent thence to Thessalonica with Timothy (1 Thessalonians 3:2), and joined him again at Corinth, is not recorded. Paul notices his preaching at Corinth and associates his name with his own in the heading of the two epistles to the Thessalonians (2 Corinthians 1:19; 1 Thessalonians 1:1; 2 Thessalonians 1:1)
Chloe - 1 Corinthians 1:11. A matron at Corinth, some of whose household informed Paul of the divisions in the Corinthian church. The Corinthians had "written" to Paul consulting him about marriage, things offered to idols, decorum in church assemblies, but not a syllable about the disorders that had crept in. That information reached him from other quarters: compare 1 Corinthians 5:1-2
Epistles - Paul said that the saints at Corinth were his 'epistle' written in his heart. 2 Corinthians 3:2,3
Tychicus - 58, he made his journey from Corinth to Jerusalem, Acts 20:4
Apol'Los - After this he became a preacher of the gospel, first in Achaia and then in Corinth. (Acts 18:27 ; 19:1 ) When the apostle wrote his First Epistle to the Corinthians, Apollos was with or near him, (1 Corinthians 16:12 ) probably at Ephesus in A
Deaconess - (2) Cenchreæ was one of the ports of Corinth; and in St. Paul’s letters to the Corinthian Church there is a notable absence of any signs of a definite ecclesiastical organization in that city. The conclusion is that the diakonia of Phœbe in Cenchreæ, like the diakonia (‘ministry’) of Stephanas and his household in Corinth ( 1 Corinthians 16:15 ), was a gracious but unofficial ministry to the saints (cf
Apollos - ...
Apollos is last mentioned in the Book of Acts as being in Corinth (Acts 19:1 ). Paul referred to Apollos frequently, particularly in 1Corinthians. Here the majority of the references (1 Corinthians 1:12 ; 1Corinthians 3:4-6,1 Corinthians 3:22 ) have to do with the schisms in the Corinthian church centering on personalities. In 1 Corinthians 4:6 Paul placed Apollos on the same level as himself. ...
Paul referred to Apollos in 1 Corinthians 16:12 as “our brother,” showing how much Paul considered him as one of the team. See Aquila and Priscilla ; Ephesus ; Corinth ; 1Corinthians ; 2Corinthians
Collection For the Poor Saints - These included churches in Philippi, Thessalonica, Corinth, and Galatia. In 1 Corinthians 16:1-4 , Paul indicated that he wanted the church to put something aside on the first day of each week. In 2 Corinthians 8-9 , Paul wrote that the churches of Macedonia had given liberally and Titus would oversee the completion of the offering in Corinth
Aquila - They moved to Corinth in Achaia, the southern part of Greece, where they met Paul. )...
When Paul left Corinth for Ephesus eighteen months later, Aquila and Priscilla went with him, and remained in Ephesus when Paul moved on (Acts 18:11; Acts 18:18-19). Acts 20:31), during which he wrote the letter known to us as 1 Corinthians. At this time the church in Ephesus used the house of Aquila and Priscilla as a meeting place (1 Corinthians 16:19)
Apollos - In this connexion, the Western reading is interesting: that ‘the brethren’ who encouraged Apollos to go to Achaia were Corinthian Christians. ...
The work of Apollos in Corinth is described as ‘helping them much which had believed through grace’ (Acts 18:27). Paul’s mission must have left a number of uninstructed Christians in Corinth. ...
This conception of the work of Apollos in Corinth is in accord with St. Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians 3:6, ‘I planted; Apollos watered. Paul’s reference to men who ‘build on the foundation’ he had laid (1 Corinthians 3:11-12), and to ‘tutors in Christ’ (1 Corinthians 4:15) in contrast to himself as their ‘father,’ Evidently Apollos’ work was not so much preaching the gospel to the unconverted as buttressing the faith of Christians, partly by an eloquent exposition of the OT, and partly by a powerful apologetic which silenced opponents and strengthened believers. ...
But this confirming work done by Apollos in Corinth had other effects which were less useful. Thus there arose a party in the Corinthian Church with the watch-word ‘I am of Apollos. 1 Corinthians 2:10-16; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 12:1-4). Even in Corinth his efforts were to show by the Scriptures that Jesus was the Christ (Acts 18:28). ...
(2) Despite Weizsäcker’s disclaimer, some of the results of the teaching of Apollos can he recognized in those irregularities in the Corinthian Church to which St. Paul refers in 1 Corinthians. Would not his eloquence, his philosophical bent, and his reiterated emphasis on Jesus as the Christ, lead to imperfect conversions? And may not the preference for the gift of tongues, or the difficulties about marriage, be traced naturally to this eloquent ascetic? In Corinth, St. Paul resolved ‘not to know anything save Christ, and him crucified’ (1 Corinthians 2:2). Paul was very anxious to avoid friction in Corinth. In the same spirit, Apollos did not accept the invitation of the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:12). He is not mentioned among the founders of the Church in 2 Corinthians 1:19. In 1 Corinthians 16:12 he is referred to only as ‘the brother,’ whore other people’s work is described with enthusiasm. Paul, Apollos tried to avoid fomenting the party spirit in Corinth; and the NT leaves him in Crete, as a travelling preacher. -articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) and Encyclopaedia Biblica on ‘Apollos,’ ‘Corinth,’ ‘Corinthians’; W
Maranatha - (mahr uh na' thuh) An Aramaic expression Paul used (1 Corinthians 16:22 ) in closing a letter to the church at Corinth. Having prayed that those who do not love Christ (compare 1 Corinthians 13:1 ) would be anathema (see anathema ), Paul used a formula probably used in celebration of the Lord's Supper to pray that Christ would come. One way to show such love would be to obey Paul's instructions in 1Corinthians
Stephanas - A Christian at Corinth whose household, "the firstfruits of Achaia," Paul baptized (1 Corinthians 1:16; 1 Corinthians 16:15-17). By joining Paul at Ephesus they with Stephanas supplied means of communion between Paul and the Corinthians, taking his letter back with them. They refreshed his spirit as representatives of the absent Corinthians, they helped and laboured with him. So Paul urges the Corinthians, "acknowledge ye them," by a kindly welcome recognizing their true worth. The partisans of Apollos, Cephas, and Christ, might possibly receive them coldly as having been baptized by Paul, hence he "beseeches" the Corinthians in their behalf. They had "addicted themselves to the ministry of the saints" voluntarily (2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:1), namely, to their temporal relief (Romans 15:25; Hebrews 6:10)
Epistle to the Romans - Paul wrote this Epistle at Corinth, c
Romans, Epistle to the - Paul wrote this Epistle at Corinth, c
Macedonia - At the close of this journey he returned from Corinth to Syria
Proconsul - To the former belonged the "proconsuls" at Ephesus, Acts 19:38 (AV, "deputies"); to the latter, Sergius Paulus in Cyprus, Acts 13:7,8,12 , and Gallio at Corinth, Acts 18:12
Apollos - He then proceeded to Corinth, where he met Paul (Acts 18:27 ; 19:1 ). He was there very useful in watering the good seed Paul had sown (1 Corinthians 1:12 ), and in gaining many to Christ. His disciples were much attached to him (1 Corinthians 3:4-7,22 ). He was with Paul at Ephesus when he wrote the First Epistle to the Corinthians; and Paul makes kindly reference to him in his letter to (Titus 3:13 )
Lord (2) - His charge "concerning the collection for the saints" to the church in Corinth is, "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him. " 1 Corinthians 16:1-2
Lord (2) - His charge "concerning the collection for the saints" to the church in Corinth is, "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him. " 1 Corinthians 16:1-2
Messenger - 1: ἄγγελος (Strong's #32 — Noun Masculine — angelos — ang'-el-os ) "a messenger, an angel, one sent," is translated "messenger," of John the Baptist, Matthew 11:10 ; Mark 1:2 ; Luke 7:27 ; in the plural, of John's "messengers," Luke 7:24 ; of those whom Christ sent before Him when on His journey to Jerusalem, Luke 9:52 ; of Paul's "thorn in the flesh," "a messenger of Satan," 2 Corinthians 12:7 ; of the spies as received by Rahab, James 2:25 . ...
2: ἀπόστολος (Strong's #652 — Noun Masculine — apostolos — ap-os'-tol-os ) "an apostle," is translated "messengers" in 2 Corinthians 8:23 regarding Titus and "the other brethren," whom Paul describes to the church at Corinth as "messengers of the churches," in respect of offerings from those in Macedonia for the needy in Judea; in Philippians 2:25 , of Epaphroditus as the "messenger" of the church at Philippi to the Apostle in ministering to his need; RV marg
Lord (2) - His charge "concerning the collection for the saints" to the church in Corinth is, "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him. " 1 Corinthians 16:1-2
Trophimus - A disciple of Paul, a Gentile and an Ephesian by birth, came to Corinth with the apostle, and accompanied him in his whole journey to Jerusalem, A
Church - In the New Testament it usually means a congregation of religious worshippers, either Jewish, as Acts 7:38 , or Christians, as Matthew 16:18 1 Corinthians 6:4 . A particular church or body of professing believers, who meet and worship together in one place; as the churches of Rome, Corinth, Ephesus, Philippi, etc
Stephanas - In 1 Corinthians 1:16 St. ’ From 1 Corinthians 16:17 we learn that Stephanas was with St. Two reasons for the less usual course are suggested in 1 Corinthians 16:15 : ‘Ye know the house of Stephanas, that it is the first-fruits of Achaia. ’ It was natural for the Apostle to wish to baptize his first converts in Corinth; perhaps there was nobody else to baptize them. ’ Stephanas himself was one of the deputation sent by the Corinthian Church to St. The Corinthian Christians are urged to ‘be in subjection unto such,’ and to ‘acknowledge them that are such. They seem to have been among the first assistants of the Apostle, outside the inner circle of his chosen companions, and they were specially valuable to the work in Corinth. ‘ἔταξαν ἑαυτοὺς … implies a systematic laying out of themselves for service, such as is possible only to those free to dispose, as they choose, of their persons and their time’ (Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘1 Corinthians,’ London, 1900, in loc
Corinth - The immorality was notorious even in the pagan world; so that "to Corinthianize" was proverbial for playing the wanton. The worship of Venus, whose temple was on Acrocorinthus, was attended with shameless profligacy, 1,000 female slaves being maintained for the service of strangers. Hence, arose dangers to the purity of the Corinthian church (1 Corinthians 5-7), founded by Paul on his first visit in his second missionary journey (Acts 18:1-17). The early Greek Corinth had been left desolate for 100 years; its merchants had withdrawn to Delos, and the presidency of the isthmian games had been transferred to Sicyon, when Julius Caesar refounded the city as a Roman colony. The number of Latin names in Paul's epistle to the Romans, written during his second visit of three months at Corinth (Acts 20:3), A. At the time of Paul's visit Claudius' decree banishing the Jews from Rome caused an influx of them to Corinth. Hence, many Jewish converts were in the Corinthian church (Acts 18), and a Judaizing spirit arose. ...
Clement's epistles to the Corinthians are still extant. Corinth is now the seat of an episcopal see. of Corinth, near the Saronic gulf), the scene of the Isthmian games, are remarkably interesting. The stadium for the foot race (alluded to in 1 Corinthians 9:24), and the theater where the pugilists fought (1 Corinthians 9:26), and the pine trees of which was woven the "corruptible crown" or wreath for the conquerors in the games (1 Corinthians 9:25), are still to be seen. The Acrocorinthus eminence rising 2,000 feet above the sea was near Corinth, and as a fortress was deemed the key of Greece. of it was the port Lechaeum on the Corinthian gulf; on the other side on the Saronic gulf was Cenchraea (Acts 18:18). The ornate "Corinthian order" of architecture, and "the Corinthian brass" or choice bronze statuary, attest the refinement of its people. ...
FIRST EPISTLE TO THE CorinthIANS. Paul had been instrumental in converting many Gentiles (1 Corinthians 12:2) and some Jews (Acts 18:8), notwithstanding the Jews' opposition (Acts 18:5-6), during his one year and a half sojourn. The converts were mostly of the humbler classes (1 Corinthians 1:26). Crispus, Erastus, and Gaius (Caius), however, were men of rank (1 Corinthians 1:14; Acts 18:8; Romans 16:23). 1 Corinthians 11:22 implies a variety of classes. The immoralities abounding outside at Corinth, and the craving even within the church for Greek philosophy and rhetoric which Apollos' eloquent style gratified, rather than for the simple preaching of Christ crucified (1 Corinthians 2:1, etc. ...
The Judaizers depreciated his apostolic authority (1 Corinthians 9:1-2; 2 Corinthians 10:1; 2 Corinthians 10:7-8), professing, some to be the followers of the chief apostle, Cephas; others to belong to Christ Himself, rejecting all subordinate teaching (1 Corinthians 1:12; 2 Corinthians 10:7). Some gave themselves out to be apostles (2 Corinthians 11:5; 2 Corinthians 11:13), alleging that Paul was not of the twelve nor an eye-witness of the gospel facts, and did not dare to prove his apostleship by claiming support from the church (1 Corinthians 9). Apollos' followers also rested too much on his Alexandrian rhetoric, to the disparagement of Paul, who studied simplicity lest aught should interpose between the Corinthians and the Spirit's demonstration of the Savior (1 Corinthians 2). ...
Epicurean self-indulgence led some to deny the resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:32). Hence, they connived at the incest of one of them with his stepmother (1 Corinthians 5). The elders of the church had written to consult Paul on minor points: (1) meats offered to idols; (2) celibacy and marriage; (3) the proper use of spiritual gifts in public worship; (4) the collection for the saints at Jerusalem (1 Corinthians 16:1, etc. But they never told him about the serious evils, which came to his ears only through some of the household of Chloe (1 Corinthians 1:11), contentions, divisions, lawsuits brought before pagan courts by Christian brethren against brethren (1 Corinthians 6:1). Moreover, some abused spiritual gifts to display and fanaticism (1 Corinthians 14); simultaneous ministrations interrupted the seemly order of public worship; women spoke unveiled, in violation of eastern usage, and usurped the office of men; even the Holy Communion was desecrated by reveling (1 Corinthians 11). ...
These then formed topics of his epistle, and occasioned his sending Timothy to them after his journey to Macedonia (1 Corinthians 4:17). In 1 Corinthians 4:18; 1 Corinthians 5:9, he implies that he had sent a previous letter to them; probably enjoining also a contribution for the poor saints at Jerusalem. Upon their asking directions as to the mode, he now replies (1 Corinthians 16:2). In it he also announced his design of visiting them on his way to and from Macedon (2 Corinthians 1:15-16), which design he changed on hearing the unfavorable report from Chloe's household (1 Corinthians 16:5-7), for which he was charged with fickleness (2 Corinthians 1:15-17). Alford remarks, Paul in 1 Corinthians alludes to the fornication only in a summary way, as if replying to an excuse set up after his rebuke, rather than introducing it for the first time. ...
Before this former letter, he paid a second visit (probably during his three years' sojourn at Ephesus, from which he could pass readily by sea to Corinth Acts 19:10; Acts 20:31); for in 2 Corinthians 12:14; 2 Corinthians 13:1, he declares his intention to pay a third visit. In 1 Corinthians 13:2 translated "I have already said (at my second visit), and declare now beforehand, as (I did) when I was present the second time, so also (I declare) now in my absence to them who have heretofore sinned (namely, before my second visit, 1 Corinthians 12:21) and to all others" (who have sinned since it, or are in danger of sinning). "I write," the Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, and Sinaiticus manuscripts rightly omit; KJV "as if I were present the second time," namely, this time, is inconsistent with verse 1, "this is the third time I am coming" (compare 2 Corinthians 1:15-16). ...
The second visit was a painful one, owing to the misconduct of many of his converts (2 Corinthians 6:3-18). Then followed his letter before the 1 Corinthians, charging them "not to company with fornicators. " In 1 Corinthians 5:9-12 he corrects their misapprehensions of that injunction. The place of writing was Ephesus (1 Corinthians 16:8). The English subscription "from Philippi" arose from mistranslating 1 Corinthians 16:5, "I am passing through Macedonia;" he intended (1 Corinthians 16:8) leaving Ephesus after Pentecost that year. The Passover imagery makes it likely the date was Easter time (1 Corinthians 5:7), A. ...
Just before his conflict with the beastlike mob of Ephesus, 1 Corinthians 15:32 implies that already he had premonitory symptoms; the storm was gathering, his "adversaries many" (1 Corinthians 16:9; Romans 16:4). Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus, were probably the bearers of the epistle (1 Corinthians 16:17-18); see the subscription. ...
SECOND EPISTLE TO THE CorinthIANS. To explain why he deferred his promised visit to Corinth on his way to Macedonia (1 Corinthians 4:19; 1 Corinthians 16:5; 2 Corinthians 1:15-16), and so to explain his apostolic walk, and vindicate his apostleship against gainsayers (2 Corinthians 1:12; 2 Corinthians 1:24; 2 Corinthians 2:1; 2 Corinthians 7:2; 2 Corinthians 7:10; 2 Corinthians 7:11; 2 Corinthians 7:12). Also to praise them for obeying his first epistle, and to charge them to pardon the transgressor, as already punished sufficiently (2 Corinthians 2:1-11; 2 Corinthians 7:6-16). Also to urge them to contributions for the poor brethren at Jerusalem (2 Corinthians 8). Having stayed for a time at Troas preaching with success (2 Corinthians 2:12-13), he went on to Macedonia to meet Titus there, since he was disappointed in not finding him at Troas as he had expected. In Macedonia he heard from him the comforting intelligence of the good effect of the first epistle upon the Corinthians, and having experienced the liberality of the Macedonian churches (2 Corinthians 8) he wrote this second epistle and then went on to Greece, where he stayed three months; then he reached Philippi by land about Passover or Easter, A. 57 will be the date of 2 Corinthians. Macedonia, as 2 Corinthians 9:2 proves. In "ASIA" (see) he had been in great peril (2 Corinthians 1:8-9), whether from the tumult at Ephesus (Acts 19:23-41) or a dangerous illness (Alford). On comparing 2 Corinthians 11:9 with Philippians 4:15-16 it appears that by "Macedonia" there Paul means Philippi. The plural "churches," however, (2 Corinthians 8:1) proves that Paul visited other Macedonian churches also, e. But Philippi, as the chief one, would be the center to which all the collections would be sent, and probably the place of writing 2 Corinthians Titus, who was to follow up at Corinth the collection, begun at the place of his first visit (2 Corinthians 8:6). His ardent temperament was tried by a chronic malady (2 Corinthians 4:7; 2 Corinthians 5:1-4; 2 Corinthians 12:7-9). ...
Then too "the care of all the churches" pressed on him; the weight of which was added to by Judaizing emissaries at Corinth, who wished to restrict the church's freedom and catholicity by bonds of letter and form (2 Corinthians 3:8-18). Hence, he speaks of (2 Corinthians 7:5-6) "rightings without" and "fears within" until Titus brought him good news of the Corinthian church. Even then, while the majority at Corinth repented and excommunicated, at Paul's command, the incestuous person, and contributed to the Jerusalem poor fund, a minority still accused him of personal objects in the collection, though he had guarded against possibility of suspicion by having others beside himself to take charge of the money (2 Corinthians 8:18-28). ...
They alleged too that he was always threatening severe measures, but was too cowardly to execute them (2 Corinthians 10:8-16; 2 Corinthians 13:2); that he was inconsistent, for he had circumcised Timothy but did not circumcise Titus, a Jew among the Jews, a Greek among the Greeks (1 Corinthians 9:20, etc. That many of his detractors were Judaizers appears from 2 Corinthians 11:22. An emissary from Judaea, arrogantly assuming Christ's own title "he that cometh" (Matthew 11:3), headed the party (2 Corinthians 11:4); he bore "epistles of commendation" (2 Corinthians 3:1), and boasted of pure Hebrew descent, and close connection with Christ Himself (2 Corinthians 11:13; 2 Corinthians 11:22-23). His high-sounding pretensions and rhetoric contrasted with Paul's unadorned style, and carried weight with some (2 Corinthians 10:10; 2 Corinthians 10:13; 2 Corinthians 11:6). Two deputies chosen by the churches to take charge of the collection accompanied Titus, who bore this 2 Corinthians (2 Corinthians 8:18-22)
Trophimus - ...
Trophimus was probably one of the two brethren who with Titus carried the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (2 Corinthians 8:16-24, especially 2 Corinthians 8:22, since 2 Corinthians 8:18 refers to Luke). Trophimus was probably the brother sent before with Titus (2 Corinthians 12:18), and therefore must have been sent from Ephesus; he was moreover an Ephesian. Connected with Paul in the mission of collecting for the poor in Judaea; he was moreover with Paul on his return from this very visit to Corinth
Apostle - Thus Dionysius of Corinth is called the apostle of France and the Jesuit Missionaries are called apostles
Gondi, Jean Francois Paul - From 1638 to 1641 he took part in the plots of the Count de Soissons against Richelieu, but after the death of the former, devoted himself to an ecclesiastical career, and in 1644 was consecrated at Notre Dame, receiving the title of Archbishop of Corinth
Army (2) - When the Church spreads into the Province Asia, to Rome and Corinth, the impression of the army of Rome is much stronger both in the incidents of the Acts and in the figurative allusions of the Epistles
Tychicus - It is possible that the reference in 2 Corinthians 8:18 to ‘the brother whose praise in the gospel is spread through all the churches,’ and who was deputed along with Titus and another unnamed Christian to carry the Second Epistle to the Corinthians from Ephesus to Corinth, may be Tychicus, and the other unnamed deputy may be Trophimus. This, however, is little more than conjecture, although from Acts 20:4 we may gather that these two Ephesians were known to the church in Corinth, and that the two deputies referred to in 2 Corinthians 8:18 were also well known to those addressed
Clement - He calls it 'an Epistle in the name of the church of Rome (over which churchClement is recorded as bishop) to the church at Corinth. ' Apparently there was dissension in the church at Corinth: he thus addresses them: "It is disgraceful, beloved, yea, highly disgraceful and unworthy of your Christian profession, that such a thing should be heard of as that the most steadfast and ancient church of the Corinthians should, on account of one or two persons, engage in sedition against its presbyters
Timothy - Indeed, Paul seems to claim him as a personal convert in 1 Corinthians 4:17 , describing him as his ‘beloved and faithful child in the Lord. He rejoined the Apostle in Corinth and cheered him by a favourable report ( 1 Thessalonians 3:1-3 , Acts 18:5 ). While in Corinth, Paul wrote his Epistles to the Thessalonians, and included Timothy in the greetings ( 1 Thessalonians 1:1 , 2 Thessalonians 1:1 ). Shortly after Timothy’s departure, Paul despatched by direct sea route his First Epistle to the Corinthians. In this he mentions that Timothy (travelling via Macedonia) would shortly reach them ( 1 Corinthians 4:17 ); he bespeaks a kindly welcome for him, and adds that he wishes him to return with ‘the brethren’ ( i. probably those who had borne the Epistle) to Ephesus ( 1 Corinthians 16:10-11 ; 1 Corinthians 16:8 ). Timothy may not have reached Corinth on this occasion, being detained in Macedonia; and the absence in the Second Epistle of all mention of his being there points in this direction. was written, in Macedonia ( 2 Corinthians 1:1 ). Paul in due course reached Corinth, and Timothy with him, for his name occurs among the greetings in the Epistle to the Romans which was then written (1 Romans 16:21 ; cf
Defect - " In 1 Corinthians 6:7 the reference is to the spiritual "loss" sustained by the church at Corinth because or their discord and their litigious ways in appealing to the world's judges
Colony - Pisidian Antioch, Lystra, Corinth, and Ptolemais, not to mention others, were coloniœ
Jason - The Jason who sends greetings from Corinth in Romans 16:21 , a ‘kinsman’ of St
Thessalonica - He wrote the two Epistles to the saints there during his stay at Corinth of a year and a half (Acts 18:11 )
Bounty, Bountifully - 1: εὐλογία (Strong's #2129 — Noun Feminine — eulogia — yoo-log-ee'-ah ) "a blessing," has the meaning of "bounty" in 2 Corinthians 9:5 , of the offering sent by the church at Corinth to their needy brethren in Judea. ...
2: ἁπλότης (Strong's #572 — Noun Feminine — haplotes — hap-lot'-ace ) from haplous, "simple, single," is translated "bountifulness" in 2 Corinthians 9:11 , AV; RV, "liberality" (marg. 2 Corinthians 8:2 ; 9:13 ; from sincerity of mind springs "liberality. " The thought of sincerity is present in Romans 12:8 ; 2 Corinthians 11:3 ; Ephesians 6:5 ; Colossians 3:22 . ...
3: ἁδρότης (Strong's #100 — Noun Feminine — charis — had-rot'-ace ) "grace," is rendered, "bounty" in 1 Corinthians 16:3 , RV, (AV, "liberality"), by metonymy for a material gift. , "fatness" (from hadros, "thick, well-grown"), is used of a monetary gift, in 2 Corinthians 8:20 , AV, "abundance," RV, "bounty
Virgin - 1: παρθένος (Strong's #3933 — Noun Feminine — parthenos — par-then'-os ) is used (a) of "the Virgin Mary," Matthew 1:23 ; Luke 1:27 ; (b) of the ten "virgins" in the parable, Matthew 25:1,7,11 ; (c) of the "daughters" of Philip the evangelist, Acts 21:9 ; (d) those concerning whom the Apostle Paul gives instructions regarding marriage, 1 Corinthians 7:25,28,34 ; in 1 Corinthians 7:36-38 , the subject passes to that of "virgin daughters" (RV), which almost certainly formed one of the subjects upon which the church at Corinth sent for instructions from the Apostle; one difficulty was relative to the discredit which might be brought upon a father (or guardian), if he allowed his daughter or ward to grow old unmarried. The interpretation that this passage refers to a man and woman already in some kind of relation by way of a spiritual marriage and living together in a vow of virginity and celibacy, is untenable if only in view of the phraseology of the passage; (e) figuratively, of "a local church" in its relation to Christ, 2 Corinthians 11:2 ; (f) metaphorically of "chaste persons," Revelation 14:4
Silas - Acts 23:3 , and 2 Corinthians 1:19 , the former name being a contraction of the latter; one of the chief men among the first disciples at Jerusalem, Acts 15:22 , and supposed by some to have been of the number of the seventy. He was imprisoned with him at Philippi, joined him at Corinth after a brief separation, bringing, it is supposed, the donation referred to in 2 Corinthians 11:9 Philippians 4:10,15 , and probably went with him to Jerusalem, Acts 16:19,25 17:4,10,14 18:5 1 Thessalonians 1:1 2 Thessalonians 1:1 . He appears always as a "faithful brother," well known and praised by all the churches, 2 Corinthians 1:19 1 Peter 5:12
Cup - The "cup" of blessing, 1 Corinthians 10:16 , is so named from the third (the fourth according to Edersheim) "cup" in the Jewish Passover feast, over which thanks and praise were given to God. This connection is not to be rejected on the ground that the church at Corinth was unfamiliar with Jewish customs. That the contrary was the case, see 1 Corinthians 5:7 ; (b) figurative, of one's lot or experience, joyous or sorrowful (frequent in the Psalms; cp
Thessalonica - Located on the Thermaic Gulf (Gulf of Salonika) with an excellent harbor—and at the termination of a major trade route from the Danube—it became, with Corinth, one of the two most important commercial centers in Greece. Like Corinth, it had a cosmopolitan population due to the commercial prowess of the city
Deacon, Deaconess - In the NT it implies the noble service of doing work for God (2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 11:23, Ephesians 6:21, 1 Thessalonians 3:2), or ministering to the needs of others (Romans 16:1; cf. 1 Corinthians 16:15, 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:1); and the meaning of the term, with its cognates ‘service’ or ‘ministry’ and ‘to serve’ or ‘to minister’ (διακονία and διακονεῖν) is nearly everywhere quite general and does not indicate a special office. She may be a female deacon; but this is very unlikely, for there is no trace of deacons or other officials in the church of Corinth at this time. Phœbe was probably a lady, living at the port of Corinth, who rendered much service to St
Cenchreae - Cenchreae (not ‘Cenchrea,’ as in Authorized Version ; Κεγχρεαί [1], Κενχρεαί [2]; now the village of Kichries) was the eastern port of Corinth, 7 miles from the city, on the Saronic Gulf, opposite to Lechaeum on the Corinthian Gulf. Between Cenchreae and Schœnus was a famous sanctuary, in which stood ‘the temple of Isthmian Neptune, shaded above with a grove of pine-trees, where the Corinthians celebrated the Isthmian games’ (Strabo, loc. Paul contrasts with immortal crowns (1 Corinthians 9:24-27). During his prolonged residence in Corinth, Cenchreae had become the seat of a church, of which Phœbe was a διάκονος-if not a deaconess in the full technical meaning of later times, at any rate in a more definite sense than is implied by ‘servant’ (Romans 16:1)
Phoebe - _), a small town on the Saronic Gulf, was the eastern port of Corinth, about seven miles from the city. Paul’s first visit to Corinth. ’ It was during his second (recorded) visit to Corinth that he wrote the letter containing Phoebe’s introduction. ...
We shall suppose that Phoebe herself was sailing eastward from Cenchreae or westward from Lechaeum, the port on the Corinthian Gulf, according to the view we take of the probable destination of Romans 16 (or Romans 16:1-2, detached by some scholars from the rest of the chapter). If πρᾶγμα bears here its common forensic sense (1 Corinthians 6:1 Berea - "...
Sopater, or Sosipater, one of them, became Paul's missionary companion (Acts 20:4; Romans 16:21) in returning to Asia from his second visit to Europe, where he had been with him at Corinth
Titus - Paul describes him to the Corinthian church as "my partner [1] and fellow-helper" on their behalf. He had been sent to Corinth, and from thence brought word of the effect of Paul's First Epistle to the church there. 2 Corinthians 2:13 ; 2 Corinthians 7:6-14 ; 2 Corinthians 8:6-23 ; 2 Corinthians 12:18 ; Galatians 2:1,3
Tongues, Gift of - 1 Corinthians 14:21 . Paul thanked God that he spake with tongues more than all at Corinth; but in the assembly he would rather speak five words through his understanding, that he might teach others, than ten thousand words in a tongue. 1 Corinthians 12:10,28,30 ; 1 Corinthians 13:1,8 ; 1 Corinthians 14:2-39
Compel - 1: ἀναγκάζω (Strong's #315 — Verb — anankazo — an-ang-kad'-zo ) denotes "to put constraint upon (from ananke, 'necessity'), to constrain," whether by threat, entreaty, force or persuasion; Christ "constrained" the disciples to get into a boat, Matthew 14:22 ; Mark 6:45 ; the servants of the man who made a great supper were to constrain people to come in, Luke 14:23 (RV, "constrain"); Saul of Tarsus "strove" to make saints blaspheme, Acts 26:11 , RV (AV, "compelled"); Titus, though a Greek, was not "compelled" to be circumcised, Galatians 2:3 , as Galatian converts were, Galatians 6:12 , RV; Peter was "compelling" Gentiles to live as Jews, Galatians 2:14 ; Paul was "constrained" to appeal to Caesar, Acts 28:19 , and was "compelled" by the church at Corinth to become foolish in speaking of himself, 2 Corinthians 12:11
Lascivious, Lasciviousness - 1: ἀσέλγεια (Strong's #766 — Noun Feminine — aselgeia — as-elg'-i-a ) denotes "excess, licentiousness, absence of restraint, indecency, wantonness;" "lasciviousness" in Mark 7:22 , one of the evils that proceed from the heart; in 2 Corinthians 12:21 , one of the evils of which some in the church at Corinth had been guilty; in Galatians 5:19 , classed among the works of the flesh; in Ephesians 4:19 , among the sins of the unregenerate who are "past feeling;" so in 1 Peter 4:3 ; in Jude 1:4 , of that into which the grace of God had been turned by ungodly men; it is translated "wantonness" in Romans 13:13 , one of the sins against which believers are warned; in 2 Peter 2:2 , according to the best mss
Chronology of the New Testament - ...
Epistles to Thessalonians, from Corinth. ...
66-8...
Epistles to the Galatians, Corinthians, and Romans
Thessalonians, Epistle to the 1 And 2 - These were the earliest of Paul's epistles, and were written from Corinth, in A
Silas or Silyanus - From Athens a message is sent by Paul, instructing them to come to him with all speed (Acts 17:15), but he has left that city and arrived at Corinth before they rejoin him (Acts 18:5). In both Epistles to the Thessalonians, probably written at Corinth, he appears as joint-author with Paul and Timothy, and unites in their friendly greetings (1 Thessalonians 1:1, 2 Thessalonians 1:1). In 2 Corinthians 1:19 he is again mentioned with them as a co-worker in the gospel at Corinth. The inference is that he was the same person as Silas, whom Acts represents as the companion of Paul and Timothy both at Thessalonica and at Corinth. One passage, when compared with Acts, may be supposed to present a difficulty, if it is presumed that Silas and Timothy were inseparable from the time when they parted with Paul at BerCEa till they rejoined him at Corinth. (1 Corinthians 1:16; 1 Corinthians 3:16 f. , 1 Corinthians 15:20-34, 1 Corinthians 16:13-18) are interpolations by him, and that he wrote the apocalyptic portions of the Epistles to the Thessalonians (R
Italy - From the harbour there the traveller either sailed across the Adriatic to Dyrrhachium, and went by the Egnatian road to Thessalonica and beyond, or sailed across to the Gulf of Corinth, transhipped from Lechæum to Cenchreæ (wh
Silas - He was with Paul through dangerous experiences in Philippi, Thessalonica, Berea and Corinth (Acts 16:19-40; 1618454804_7; Acts 18:5-11), and Paul often spoke warmly of him as his fellow worker (2 Corinthians 1:19; 1 Thessalonians 1:1; 2 Thessalonians 1:1)
Secundus - The Apostle on this occasion intended to sail from Corinth, but the discovery of a plot at the last moment caused him to sail for Macedonia, where he may have met the deputies of the churches of Thessalonica and BerCEa
Thessalonica - Paul wrote two epistles to the Thessalonian church from Corinth
Occasion - " In the NT it occurs as follows: "(a) the Law provided sin with a base of operations for its attack upon the soul, Romans 7:8,11 ; (b) the irreproachable conduct of the Apostle provided his friends with a base of operations against his detractors, 2 Corinthians 5:12 ; (c) by refusing temporal support at Corinth he deprived these detractors of their base of operations against him, 2 Corinthians 11:12 ; (d) Christian freedom is not to provide a base of operations for the flesh, Galatians 5:13 ; (e) unguarded behavior on the part of young widows (and the same is true of all believers) would provide Satan with a base of operations against the faith, 1 Timothy 5:14 . (2) In 2 Corinthians 8:8 , AV, the phrase "by occasion of" translates the preposition dia, "through, by means of" (RV, "through")
Thessalonica - ...
When Paul left Macedonia for Athens and Corinth, he left behind him Timothy and Silas, at Thessalonica, that they might confirm those in the faith who had been converted under his ministry
ti'Tus - Paul must be drawn entirely from the notices of him in the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, the Galatians, and to Titus himself, combined with the Second Epistle to Timothy. Here he expected to meet Titus, (2 Corinthians 2:13 ) who had been sent on a mission to Corinth. (2 Corinthians 7:6,7,13-15 ) The mission to Corinth had reference to the immoralities rebuked in the First Epistle, and to the collection at that time in progress, for the poor Christians of Judea. (2 Corinthians 8:6 ) Thus we are prepared for what the apostle now proceeds to do after his encouraging conversations with Titus regarding the Corinthian church. He sends him back from Macedonia to Corinth, in company with two other trustworthy Christians, bearing the Second Epistle, and with an earnest request, ibid. (2 Corinthians 8:6,17 ) that he would see to the completion of the collection. (2 Corinthians 8:6 ) A considerable interval now elapses before we come upon the next notices of this disciple
Thessalonians - Paul at Corinth. ...
It is generally believed that the messenger who carried the former epistle into Macedonia, upon his return to Corinth, informed St. It was written from Corinth, probably at the end of A
Romans - This epistle was written from Corinth, A. Paul dictated it, by Tertius; and the person who conveyed it to Rome was Phoebe, a deaconess of the church of Cenchrea, which was the eastern port of the city of Corinth, Romans 16:1 ; Romans 16:22 . Paul, when he wrote this epistle, had not been at Rome, Romans 1:13 ; Romans 15:23 ; but he had heard an account of the state of the church in that city from Aquila and Priscilla, two Christians who were banished from thence by the edict of Claudius, and with whom he lived during his first visit to Corinth
Stretch - ...
2 Corinthians 10:14 (a) The expression is used in this passage to indicate the fact that Paul was not doing an unusual thing when he came to Corinth with the Gospel
Achaicus - In 1 Corinthians 16:17 St. ’ Probably they formed a deputation from the Corinthian Church; they may have been bearers of the letter of inquiry which St. His language suggests that their coming somewhat reassured him after the disquieting news brought by Chloe’s household, and other ugly rumours (1 Corinthians 5:1). Perhaps they represented the parties in Corinth; yet they must have been trusted by the Church and must also have shown themselves loyal to the Apostle. Corinthians,’ i
Dionysius (3), Bishop of Corinth - of Corinth, probably the successor of Primus, placed by Eusebius in his Chronicle under a. of Corinth might consider Lacedaemon and Athens as under his metropolitan superintendence, but that he should send letters of admonition to Crete, Bithynia, and Paphlagonia not only proves the reputation of the writer, but indicates the unity of the Christian community. The value attached by Christians to writings was regulated rather by the character of their contents than by the dignity of the writer; for while there is no trace that the letter of Soter thus honoured at Corinth passed beyond that church, the letter of Dionysius himself became the property of the whole Christian community. 198, when we find Palmas of Pontus still alive, but a new bishop (Bacchylus) at Corinth. Denis in France claimed to be in possession of the body of Dionysius of Corinth, alleged to have been brought from Greece to Rome, and given them in 1215 by Innocent III
Apollos - " Thus having received new light he went forth to Achaia, watering the seed there that Paul had already planted (1 Corinthians 3:4-6), and "helped them much which had believed through grace. " Some at Corinth abused his name. But Paul, while condemning their party spirit, commends Apollos, and writes that he had "greatly desired our brother Apollos to come" unto the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:12). ...
Those who made his name their party cry were attracted by his rhetorical style acquired in Alexandria, as contrasted with the absence of "excellency of speech and enticing words of man's wisdom" (1 Corinthians 2:1-4), and even in their estimation "the contemptible speech" (2 Corinthians 10:10), of Paul. " Jerome states that Apollos remained at Crete until he heard that the divisions at Corinth had been healed by Paul's epistle; then he went and became bishop there
Strong, Stronger - 14, in contrast to "the weak in faith," those who have scruples in regard to eating meat and the observance of days; 2 Corinthians 12:10 , where the strength lies in bearing sufferings in the realization that the endurance is for Christ's sake; 2 Corinthians 13:9 , where "ye are strong" implies the good spiritual condition which the Apostle desires for the church at Corinth in having nothing requiring his exercise of discipline (contrast No. 2 in 1 Corinthians 4:10 ). 1); 19:18, "mighty;" metaphorically, (4) the church at Corinth, 1 Corinthians 4:10 , where the Apostle reproaches them ironically with their unspiritual and self-complacent condition; (5) of young men in Christ spiritually strong, through the Word of God, to overcome the evil one, 1 John 2:14 ; of (b) things: (1) wind, Matthew 14:30 (in some mss. ), "boisterous;" (2) famine, Luke 15:14 ; (3) things in the mere human estimate, 1 Corinthians 1:27 ; (4) Paul's letters, 2 Corinthians 10:10 ; (5) the Lord's crying and tears, Hebrews 5:7 ; (6) consolation, Hebrews 6:18 ; (7) the voice of an angel, Revelation 18:2 (in the best texts; some have megas, "great"); (8) Babylon, Revelation 18:10 ; (9) thunderings, Revelation 19:6 . 2, is used (a) of Christ, Matthew 3:11 ; Mark 1:7 ; Luke 3:16 ; (b) of "the weakness of God," as men without understanding regard it, 1 Corinthians 1:25 ; (c) of a man of superior physical strength, Luke 11:22 ; (d) in 1 Corinthians 10:22 , in a rhetorical question, implying the impossibility of escaping the jealousy of God when it is kindled. ...
B — 2: κραταιόω (Strong's #2901 — Verb — krataioo — krat-ah-yo'-o ) "to strengthen" (akin to kratos, "strength"), is rendered (a) "to wax strong," Luke 1:80 ; 2:40 ; "be strong," 1 Corinthians 16:13 , lit
Quartus - (Κούαρτος, a common Latin name)...
Quartus is a Christian whose greeting is sent in Romans 16:23 from Corinth with that of Erastus, ‘the treasurer of the city. If we suppose Rome to have been the destination of these Corinthian salutations, Quartus may have been a Roman with friends in the church in the city. It is, however, easier to believe that members of the Church at Corinth had friends in Ephesus, to which city some scholars think that the greetings were directed. Elsewhere in the Pauline Epistles, Apollos (1 Corinthians 16:12), Epaphroditus (Philippians 2:25), Onesimus (Colossians 4:9), Sosthenes (1 Corinthians 1:1), Timothy (2 Corinthians 1:1, etc. ), Titus (2 Corinthians 2:13), Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21, Colossians 4:7) are similarly described (cf. also 2 Corinthians 8:18; 2 Corinthians 12:18), while two Christian women, Phoebe and Apphia, are alluded to as ‘our sister’ (Romans 16:1, Philemon 1:2)
Titus - ) He was with Paul at Ephesus (Acts 19), and was sent thence to Corinth to commence the collection for the Jerusalem saints, and to ascertain the effect of the first epistle on the Corinthians (2 Corinthians 7:6-9; 2 Corinthians 8:6; 2 Corinthians 12:18); and there showed an unmercenary spirit. ...
Next, Titus went to Macedon, where he rejoined Paul who had been eagerly looking for him at Troas (Acts 20:1; Acts 20:6; 2 Corinthians 2:12-13); "Titus my brother" (2 Corinthians 7:6; 2 Corinthians 8:23), also "my partner and fellow helper concerning you. " The history (Acts 20) does not record Paul's passing through Troas in going from Ephesus to Macedon, but it does in coming from that country; also that he had disciples there (Acts 20:6-7) which accords with the epistle (2 Corinthians 2:12): an undesigned coincidence confirming genuineness. Hence, though a wide door of usefulness opened to Paul at Troas, his eagerness to hear from Titus about the Corinthian church led him not to stay longer there, when the time fixed was past, but to hasten on to Macedon to meet Titus there. Then he was employed by Paul to get ready the collection for the poor saints in Judaea, and was bearer of the second epistle to the Corinthians (2 Corinthians 8:16-17; 2 Corinthians 8:23). Macknight thinks Titus was bearer of the first epistle also: 2 Corinthians 12:18; 1 Corinthians 16:12, "the brethren" (but see CorinthIANS, FIRST EPISTLE. ...
Titus seems to have been bolder and less timid than Timothy, whose going to Corinth was uncertain (1 Corinthians 16:10-11). Hence, he was able so well to execute Paul's delicate commission, and see how the Corinthians were affected by Paul's reproof of their tolerating immorality in his first epistle. Titus enforced his rebukes, and then was not less "comforted in respect to the Corinthians" than Paul himself; "his spirit was refreshed by them all"; "his inward affection" and "joy" were called into exercise, so that we see in Titus much of the sympathizing, and withal bold, disposition of the apostle himself. His energy appeared in his zeal at Paul's request to begin at his former visit to Corinth the collection about which the Corinthians were somewhat remiss (2 Corinthians 8:6; 2 Corinthians 8:16-17; 2 Corinthians 8:18). Trustworthiness and integrity were conspicuous traits in him (2 Corinthians 12:18); readiness also to carry out heartily the apostle's wishes. To Cretanize was proverbial for "to lie", as to "Corinthianize" for "to be licentious". " Paul tells Titus to hospitably help forward Zenas the converted Jewish lawyer or scribe and Apollos, with the latter of whom Titus had been already associated in connection with Corinth (1 Corinthians 15:12; 2 Corinthians 7:6; 2 Corinthians 7:9; 2 Corinthians 8:6; 2 Corinthians 12:18; Acts 19:1)
Romans, the Epistle to the - Paul wrote while at Corinth, for he commends to the Romans Phoebe, deaconess of Cenchreae, the port of Corinth (Romans 16:1-2). He was lodging at Gaius' house (Romans 16:23), a chief member of the Corinthian church (1 Corinthians 1:14). Erastus, "treasurer" ("chamberlain", KJV), belonged to Corinth (2 Timothy 4:20; Acts 19:22). The time was during his visit in the winter and spring following his long stay at Ephesus (Romans 20:3); for he was just about to carry the contributions of Macedonia and Achaia to Jerusalem (Romans 15:25-27; compare Acts 20:22), just after his stay at Corinth at this time (Acts 24:17; 1 Corinthians 16:4; 2 Corinthians 8:1-2; 2 Corinthians 9:1, etc. Thus, Paul wrote it in his third missionary journey, at the second of the two visas to Corinth recorded in Acts. Thus, it is logically connected with the epistles to the Galatians and Corinthians. He wrote 1 Corinthians before leaving Ephesus; 2 Corinthians on his way to Corinth; and Galatians at Corinth, where also he wrote Romans. The epistle to the Galatians and the two almost contemporaneous epistles to the Corinthians are the most intense in feeling and varied in expression of Paul's epistles. noble were called" (1 Corinthians 1:26). The epistles to Corinthians and Galatians, immediately preceding chronologically, are full of personal references. The epistle to the Romans summarizes what he had just written; namely, epistle to Corinthians representing the attitude of the gospel to the Gentile world, the epistle to Galatians its relation to Judaism. What was in these two epistles immediately drawn out by special Judaizing errors of the Galatians, and Gentile licence of the Corinthians, is in Romans methodically combined together add arranged for general application. ...
The doctrine of justification by faith only on the one hand is stated (Romans 1-5) as in Galatians; on the other antinomianism is condemned (Romans 6); and the avoidance of giving offence as to meats (Romans 14) answers to 1 Corinthians 6:12, etc. , 1 Corinthians 8:1, etc
Galatia - Paul founded several "churches" in the Galatian region, not residing for long in one place and forming a central church, as at Ephesus and Corinth (Galatians 1:2; 1 Corinthians 16:1; Acts 16:6)
Paradise - ...
Paul in a trance was caught up even to the third heaven, into paradise (2 Corinthians 12:2; 2 Corinthians 12:4). Earthly cities, Nineveh, Babylon, and Thebes, rested on mere force; Athens and Corinth on intellect, art, and refinement, divorced from morality; Tyre on gain; even Jerusalem on religious privileges more than on love, truth, righteousness, and holiness of heart before God
Nereus - possible the ‘household of Stephanas’ in Corinth, who were ‘the firstfruits of Achaia’ and who ‘set themselves to minister unto the saints’ (1 Corinthians 16:15)
Contention, Contentious - 1: ἔρις (Strong's #2054 — Noun Feminine — eris — er'-is ) "strife, quarrel," especially "rivalry, contention, wrangling," as in the church in Corinth, 1 Corinthians 1:11 , is translated "contentions" in Titus 3:9 , AV. 3, is used in 1 Corinthians 11:16
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - Was written from Ephesus (1 Corinthians 16:8 ) about the time of the Passover in the third year of the apostle's sojourn there (Acts 19:10 ; 20:31 ), and when he had formed the purpose to visit Macedonia, and then return to Corinth (probably A. The news which had reached him, however, from Corinth frustrated his plan. He had heard of the abuses and contentions that had arisen among them, first from Apollos (Acts 19:1 ), and then from a letter they had written him on the subject, and also from some of the "household of Chloe," and from Stephanas and his two friends who had visited him (1 Corinthians 1:11 ; 16:17 ). Titus and a brother whose name is not given were probably the bearers of the letter (2 Corinthians 2:13 ; 8:6,16-18 ). and with streaming eyes' (2 Corinthians 2:4 ); yet he restrained the expression of his feelings, and wrote with a dignity and holy calm which he thought most calculated to win back his erring children. This error arose from a mistranslation of 1 Corinthians 16:5 , "For I do pass through Macedonia," which was interpreted as meaning, "I am passing through Macedonia
Divisions - There are many passages in his Epistles which refer to this, but the subject cannot be better studied than in 1 Corinthians 1:10 ff. The Corinthian Church, though outwardly united, was divided in its allegiance to different teachers-‘I am of Paul, and I of Apollos, and I of Cephas, and I of Christ. At Corinth his learning and eloquence made a great impression, and there might be many who would regard him as a leader in the faith; but there need not have been any serious division in the Church on this account. The Epistle to the Galatians gives us an insight into their tactics then, and it is highly probable that in the ‘Christ’ party of 1 Corinthians 1:10 ff. In the Second Epistle to the Corinthians the Apostle defends his authority and apostolicity in much the same way as he does in the Epistle to the Galatians (2 Corinthians 10:11-12, Galatians 1:11; Galatians 2:21). They were Hebrews; they claimed to be apostles; they preached another gospel and another Jesus (2 Corinthians 11). The Corinthians were infatuated with their new teachers, and turned against the Apostle. Paul, and led to his paying a visit to Corinth. This visit is not recorded in the Acts but is alluded to in this Epistle (2 Corinthians 13). This was followed by a stern letter which some think is preserved in 2 Corinthians 10-13; and finally, on receipt of the good news of their repentance, St. Paul wrote with thankfulness the Epistle which we have in 2 Corinthians 1-9
Nazarites - Paul, being at Corinth, and having made the vow of a Nazarite, had his hair cut off at Cenchrea, a port of Corinth, and deferred the rest of his vow till he came to Jerusalem, Acts 18:18
Approve, Approved - ...
As to the gifts from the church at Corinth for poor saints in Judea, those who were "approved" by the church to travel with the offering would be men whose trustworthiness and stability had been proved, 1 Corinthians 16:3 (the RV margin seems right, "whomsoever ye shall approve, them will I send with letters"); cp. 2 Corinthians 8:22 . " This meaning is confined to Romans and 2Corinthians. The saints at Corinth had "approved themselves in everything to be pure," in the matter referred to, 2 Corinthians 7:11 . The word often denotes "to commend," so as to meet with approval, Romans 3:5 ; 5:8 ; 16:1 ; 2 Corinthians 4:2 ; 6:4 (RV); 10:18; 12:11, etc
Love-Feast - For we know that that was the case at Corinth, and it is exceedingly probable that the communism of the Church at Jerusalem would involve common meals. The ‘breaking of the bread’ is an unusual phrase, and as it seems clear that in Corinth the Eucharist took place during or at the end of a supper, so it probably did in Jerusalem. In 1 Corinthians. -We now come to the account given in 1 Corinthians 11:18-34 of the Eucharist at Corinth: ‘When ye assemble yourselves together, it is not possible to eat the Lord’s supper: for in your eating each one taketh before other his own supper; and one is hungry, and another is drunken. Paul blames the Corinthians for misbehaviour at the supper, which should be the Lord’s Supper, but cannot be so regarded in view of their behaviour. ]'>[1]4 It must be admitted that his language in 1 Corinthians 11:22, ‘Have ye not houses to eat and to drink in?’ seems logically to imply that the assembly of Christians is not a suitable occasion for a meal. There is no doubt that there was a supper at Corinth at the time when St. This meal was desecrated by the Corinthians, who ignored its sacred character, making it no longer an expression of the brotherhood of the community, but an ordinary meal, and an occasion for display and gluttony. It seems most probable that, as in Corinth, the Eucharist took place at or near the end of the supper. Paul’s words μετὰ τὸ δειπνῆσαι in 1 Corinthians 11:25 make it fairly certain that Chrysostom is wrong in his statement that the Eucharist was followed by a meal. It was not purely a charity-supper, though the evidence of the Corinthians shows us that it was intended that this characteristic should not be wholly absent. But abuses arose in connexion with it both in Corinth and-apparently-among those to whom the Epistle of Jude was written
Thessalonians, First Epistle to the - From Athens he sent for them, waiting till they should arrive ( Acts 17:15-16 ), but apparently they did not rejoin him till he had passed on to Corinth ( Acts 18:5 ). It is clear, then, that the Epistle was written from Corinth, but in the compressed narrative of Acts, St. ...
The occasion of the letter, then, was the return of Timothy from his mission: its date falls within the eighteen months’ sojourn in Corinth, as late as possible, to allow time for the history of the church as sketched in the Ep. , also written from Corinth. The varying schemes of Pauline chronology assign for the departure from Corinth the spring of some year between 50 and 54; perhaps 52 is the most probable date for 1 Thessalonians. Paul’s later letters ( 2 Corinthians 5:1 , Philippians 1:21-24 ; Philippians 3:11 ; 1618454804_3 ; Philippians 4:5 , Colossians 1:5 ; Colossians 1:12-13 )
Aquila And Priscilla - ]'>[1] ...
The references to this husband and wife are Acts 18, Romans 16:3, 1 Corinthians 16:19, and 2 Timothy 4:19. ...
Aquila and Priscilla came from Italy to Corinth, ‘because Claudius had commanded all the Jews to depart from Rome’ (Acts 18:2). Priscilla accompanied her Jewish husband to Corinth, where they followed their trade as tent-makers. Paul lodged with Aquila and Priscilla in Corinth; but their favourable attitude to Christianity must have been a strong inducement on both sides. Writing to the Corinthian Church in after years, the Apostle says: ‘Aquila and Priscilla greet you much in the Lord’ (1 Corinthians 16:19). Nevertheless, Aquila and Priscilla seem to have fulfilled their mission with skill and courage; and, when a Church was gathered, the members met in their house (1 Corinthians 16:19). The decree of expulsion was not enforced permanently; their connexion with a leading Roman family made it more possible for them to return to Rome than for Jews with no influence; whilst their knowledge of the city, their social standing, as well as their experience in Corinth and in Ephesus, with their devotion to himself, fitted them pre-eminently for such work as St. -articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) on ‘Aquila,’ ‘Priscilla,’ ‘Corinth,’ ‘Corinthians’; in Encyclopaedia Biblica (by Schmiedel) on ‘Acts’ and ‘Aquila’; and in Schaff-Herzog Baptism For the Dead - First Corinthians 15:29 remains an enigma, although over thirty "explanations" have been suggested. ...
If docetic type Christians infected the church at Corinth, they may have accepted baptism for departed souls : but how would that prove bodily resurrection? Similarly, some Dionysian rites and some practices of the mystery religions were held to ensure access, and safe journeying, in the spiritual world, even for those already dead. , 1 Corinthians 10:20-22 ). ...
Yet even as a Pharisee Paul could not conceive a disembodied immortality, leaving the surviving personality incomplete (see 2 Corinthians 5:1-4 )
Luke - Luke adopted Philippi as his home, remaining behind there to superintend the young church while Paul went on to Corinth during the second missionary journey (Acts 16:40 )
Gallio - Paul for converting many Gentiles, and dragged him to the tribunal of Gallio, who, as proconsul, generally resided at Corinth, Acts 18:12-13
Corinth'Ians, First Epistle to the, - Paul toward the close of his nearly three-years stay at Ephesus, (Acts 19:10 ; 20:31 ) which, we learn from (1 Corinthians 16:8 ) probably terminated with the Pentecost of A. It appears to have been called forth by the information the apostles had received of dissension in the Corinthian church, which may be thus explained: --The Corinthian church was planted by the apostle himself, (1 Corinthians 3:6 ) in his second missionary journey. (Acts 18:11 ) A short time after the apostle had left the city the eloquent Jew of Alexandria, Apollos, went to Corinth, (Acts 19:1 ) and gained many followers, dividing the church into two parties, the followers of Paul and the followers of Apollos. To this third party we may perhaps add a fourth, that, under the name of "the followers of Christ," ( 1 Corinthians 2:12 ) sought at first to separate themselves from the factious adherence to particular teachers, but eventually were driven by antagonism into positions equally sectarian and inimical to the unity of the church. At this momentous period, before parties had become consolidated and that distinctly withdrawn from communion with one another, the apostle writes; and in the outset of the epistle, 1 Corinthians 1-4:21 , we have this noble and impassioned protest against this fourfold rending of the robe of Christ
Effect - ...
3: κενόω (Strong's #2758 — Verb — kenoo — ken-o'-o ) "to make empty, to empty," is translated "should be made of none effect" in 1 Corinthians 1:17 , AV (RV "made void"); it is used (a) of the Cross of Christ, there; (b) of Christ, in emptying Himself, Philippians 2:7 ; (c) of faith, Romans 4:14 ; (d) of the Apostle Paul's glorying in the Gospel ministry, 1 Corinthians 9:15 ; (e) of his glorying on behalf of the church at Corinth, 2 Corinthians 9:3
Devour - Ezekiel 2:8 ; 3:1-3 ; Jeremiah 15:16 ); (b) metaphorically, "to squander, to waste," Luke 15:30 ; "to consume" one's physical powers by emotion, John 2:17 ; "to devour" by forcible appropriation, as of widows' property, Matthew 23:14 (AV only); Mark 12:40 ; "to demand maintenance," as false apostles did to the church at Corinth, 2 Corinthians 11:20 ; "to exploit or prey on one another," Galatians 5:15 , where "bite . The meaning "to swallow" is found in Matthew 23:24 ; 1 Corinthians 15:54 ; 2 Corinthians 2:7 ; 5:4 ; Hebrews 11:29 , RV (for AV, "drowned"); Revelation 12:16
Trophimus - In 2 Corinthians 8:18-24 reference is made to two companions of the Apostle who accompanied Titus from Ephesus to Corinth with the Second Epistle to the Corinthians. It has been suggested that these two were the Ephesian friends of the Apostle, Tychicus and Trophimus, who had previously been appointed to travel with him, carrying the offerings of the Churches (2 Corinthians 8:19). Bernard, in Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘2 Corinthians,’ 1903, p
Epistles to the Corinthians - Saint Paul learned that dissensions and strife regarding the worth of various preachers had arisen at Corinth and that eome Christians had caused grave scandal by their evil conduct; at the same time, the Corinthians sent him a letter in which various questions were proposed for solution. The epistle is thus divided: ...
(1) apologetic, 1:12, to 7:16, in which Saint Paul defends himself against accusations, commends the Corinthians, and exhorts them to greater virtue;
(2) hortatory, 8 to 9, in which they are exhorted to generosity towards the poor;
(3) polemical, 10 to 13, in which Paul attacks and unmasks the false apostles and shows his own Apostolic power and authority
Jealousy - In the New Testament Paul speaks of his divine jealousy for the Christians at Corinth (2 Corinthians 11:2 ). Jealousy, like envy, is common in vice lists ( Romans 13:13 ; 2 Corinthians 12:20 ; Galatians 5:20-21 )
Boasting - One result of pride and self-sufficiency is that people boast of their achievements instead of giving honour to God (Deuteronomy 8:11-14; Jeremiah 9:23; Daniel 4:30; 1 Corinthians 4:7; James 4:13-16). If they boast at all, they boast in what God has done, not in what they have done (Jeremiah 9:24; 1 Corinthians 1:31; Galatians 6:14; see also PRIDE). But his purpose was to answer certain people in Corinth who opposed him. These people too easily believed the boasting of men who set themselves up as super apostles (2 Corinthians 10:8; 2 Corinthians 10:13; 2 Corinthians 11:1-5; 2 Corinthians 11:16-21; 2 Corinthians 12:1-11). By contrast, most of the things that Paul boasted of were things that the normally boastful person would be ashamed to speak about, namely, his personal humiliations (2 Corinthians 11:23-30)
Food Offered to Idols - ” Compare 1 Corinthians 10:28 where Paul used one of these terms as an example of a possible comment by a non-Christian to a Christian. It is this type of religio-social event that stands behind the question raised by the letter (1 Corinthians 7:1 ; 1 Corinthians 8:1 ) from the church at Corinth to Paul and consequently as the background for Paul's response in 1 Corinthians 8:1 . This situation is reflected in Paul's comments in 1 Corinthians 10:23-11:1 . ...
The term “food offered to idols” also appears in 1Corinthians 8:1,1Corinthians 8:4,1Corinthians 8:7,1 Corinthians 8:10 and 1 Corinthians 10:19 (some manuscripts include it in 1 Corinthians 10:28 ). At Corinth, Paul had plunged into the pagan world in an attempt to bring them the message of Christ
Love Feast - The ‘breaking of bread from house to house’ ( Acts 2:46 ) probably included both under the title ‘the Lord’s Supper’ ( 1 Corinthians 11:20 ). Paul was constrained to rebuke at Corinth in a. 57 58 ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-34 ), shows that not all who came to the Love Feast were in a fit condition to communicate. On the other hand, fear of calumnies regarding any more or less secret feast, and experience of disorders like those which prevailed at Corinth, were motives which from time to time hindered the practice in certain districts, and finally extinguished it
Steward - The city here is apparently Corinth, where St. Paul was at the time of writing (the Erastus mentioned in Acts 19:22 as a messenger of the Apostle from Asia to Macedonia can hardly be the same person; and even the one mentioned in 2 Timothy 4:20 as still at Corinth is perhaps more likely to be the same as the latter than the former). ...
(1) General, with further description: εἰ γὰρ ἑκὼν τοῦτο πράσσω (= εὐαγγελίζομαι), μισθὸν ἔχω· εἰ δὲ ἄκων, οἰκονομίαν πεπίστευμαι (‘I have to bear in mind that I am charged with a stewardship and must carry it out’) (1 Corinthians 9:17). In 1 Corinthians 4:2, ζητεῖται ἐν τοῖς οἰκονόμοις ἵνα πιστός τις εὑρεθῇ, the faithfulness of stewards in general is spoken of; but the phrase follows directly upon a special kind of stewardship (οἰκονόμους μυστηρίων θεοῦ). of grace, of mystery, or of mysteries): ἕκαστος καθὼς ἔλαβεν χάρισμα, εἰς ἑαυτοὺς αὐτὸ διακονοῦντες ὡς καλοἱ οἰκονόμοι ποικίλης χάριτος θεοῦ, 1 Peter 4:10; εἴ γε ἠκούσατε τὴν οἰκονομίαν τῆς χάριτος τοῦ θεοῦ τῆς δοθείσης μοι εἰς ὑμᾶς, Ephesians 3:2; οὕτως ἡμᾶς λογιζέσθω ἄνθρωπος ὡς ὑπηρέτας Χριστοῦ καὶ οἰκονόμους μυστηρίων θειῦ, 1 Corinthians 4:1; τίς ἡ οἰκονομία (v
Gallio - Gallio came to Corinth, the residence of the governor, during the time of St. article ‘Corinth,’ i
Aquila And Priscilla - Paul in 1 Corinthians 16:19 , and by St. On this supposition their ready welcome of the Apostle to their home at Corinth is most easily explained. Paul’s eighteen months’ residence in Corinth, Aquila and Priscilla accompanied him to Ephesus . At their house Christians assembled for worship, and, according to an early gloss (DG al ) on 1 Corinthians 16:19 , the Apostle again lodged with them
Abuse, Abusers - In both 1 Corinthians 7:31; 1 Corinthians 9:18 καταχράομαι means ‘use to the full. ...
(a) 1 Corinthians 7:31. 1 Corinthians 7:29 a, 1 Corinthians 7:31 b). ...
(b) 1 Corinthians 9:18. Paul’s accommodating conduct (συγκατάβασις) for the gospel’s sake was the voluntary abridgment of his rights of maintenance by the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 9:7-14, 2 Corinthians 11:8). -A lawful use of the world (1 Corinthians 7:31) or even of Christian rights (1 Corinthians 9:18) becomes harmful when dissociated from eternal issues, or pursued without regard to others. ...
(c) In 1 Corinthians 6:9 and 1 Timothy 1:10 ἀρσενοκοῖται is translated ‘abusers of themselves with mankind’ (cf. Romans 1:27 written from Corinth). Paul’s view sins of uncleanness were the inevitable Divine penalty of forgetfulness of God-a view strengthened by the association between uncleanness and the worship of Aphrodite in places like Corinth
Greece - The southernmost area, the Peloponnesus, is itself virtually an island, connected to the mainland by only a narrow neck of land known as the Isthmus of Corinth. ...
No city received more attention nor provoked more correspondence from Paul than Corinth. Located on the narrow isthmus that connects the Peloponnesus to the rest of Greece, Corinth was a brawling, sinful seaport town, the crossroads of the Mediterranean (Acts 18:1-17 ). At least five New Testament books are written to churches in Greek cities (Philippians, 1,2Thessalonians, 1,2Corinthians)
Corinthians, Letters to the - Corinth was an important port in the Roman province of Achaia in the south of Greece. It was a lively commercial centre, and was well known for its colourful lifestyle and low moral standards (see Corinth). Paul stayed in Corinth for eighteen months during his second missionary journey and established a church there (Acts 18:1-21). 1 Corinthians 1:26-27; 1 Corinthians 6:9-11), it is not surprising that problems arose in the church
Timothy - We next find him at Corinth (1 Thessalonians 1:1 ; 2 th 1:1 ) with Paul
False Apostles - A designation for Paul's opponents in 2 Corinthians 11:13 , also designated deceitful workers (2 Corinthians 11:13 ) and ministers of Satan (2 Corinthians 11:15 ). The false apostles appear to have been Jewish Christians (2 Corinthians 11:22 ), well-trained in speech (2 Corinthians 11:6 ), who perhaps claimed “visions and revelations of the Lord” (2 Corinthians 12:1 ) as authenticating marks of apostleship (Compare the role of Paul's Damascus Road experience, Acts 9:15 ; Acts 22:14-15 ; Acts 26:16-19 ). Though they cut in on Paul's missionary territory, the “false apostles” are characterized as boasting (2 Corinthians 10:13-16 ) according to human standards. Their leadership style was oppressive (2 Corinthians 11:20 ). In contrast to Paul, these false apostles relied on the Corinthian Christians for financial support (2Corinthians 11:7-11,2 Corinthians 11:20 ; 2 Corinthians 12:14 ). ” Paul countered that suffering for Christ was the mark of true apostleship (2 Corinthians 11:23 ). Weakness, not dominating power, reveals God's power (2 Corinthians 11:30 ; 2Corinthians 12:5,2 Corinthians 12:9 ). If the “super-apostles” (2Corinthians 11:5;2 Corinthians 12:11 NRSV, REB, NIV) are identified with the leaders of the Jerusalem church, they should be distinguished from the false apostles at Corinth
Faithfulness of God - To spiritual, 1 Corinthians 1:9 . In supporting them in temptation, 1 Corinth
Titus - Titus also seems to have been a very capable person, called by Paul “my partner and fellow worker” (2 Corinthians 8:23 NIV). He was entrusted with the delicate task of delivering Paul's severe letter ( 2 Corinthians 2:1-4 ) to Corinth and correcting problems within the church there (2 Corinthians 7:13-15 ). Titus' genuine concern for and evenhanded dealing with the Corinthians (2 Corinthians 8:16-17 ; 2 Corinthians 12:18 ) no doubt contributed to his success which he reported in person to Paul, anxiously awaiting word in Macedonia (2 Corinthians 2:13 ; 2Corinthians 7:5-6,2 Corinthians 7:13-15 ). Paul responded by writing 2Corinthians which Titus probably delivered (2Corinthians 8:6,2Corinthians 8:16-18,2 Corinthians 8:23 )...
Paul apparently was released after his first Roman imprisonment and made additional journeys, unrecorded in Acts
Thessalo'Nians, Second Epistle to the, - appears to have been written from Corinth not very long after the first, for Silvanus and Timotheus were still with St. ( 2 Corinthians 2:16,17 ; 3:16 ) The epistle ends with a special direction and benediction. (2 Corinthians 3:17,18 ) The external evidence in favor of the Second Epistle is somewhat more definite than that which can be brought in favor of the first
Accord - " ...
B — 1: αὐθαίρετος (Strong's #830 — Adjective — authairetos — ow-thah'ee-ret-os ) from autos, "self," and haireomai, "to choose, self-chosen, voluntary, of one's own accord," occurs in 2 Corinthians 8:3,17 , of the churches of Macedonia as to their gifts for the poor saints in Judea, and of Titus in his willingness to go and exhort the church in Corinth concerning the matter. In 2 Corinthians 8:3 the RV translates it "(gave) of their own accord," consistently with the rendering in 2 Corinthians 8:17
Copper - " The Septuagint renders it σκευη χαλκου στιλβοντος ; the Vulgate and Castellio, following the Arabic, "vasa aeris fulgentis;" and the Syriac, "vases of Corinthian brass. " It is more probable, however, that this brass was not from Corinth, but a metal from Persia or India, which Aristotle describes in these terms: "It is said that there is in India a brass so shining, so pure, so free from tarnish, that its colour differs nothing from that of gold
Soter, Bishop of Rome - of Corinth, to the Romans, acknowledging their accustomed benevolence to sufferers elsewhere, and the fatherly kindness of bp
Thessalonians, the Epistles to the - ...
Paul and Silas had to flee by night to Berea; but the church and ministers had been constituted, and the Thessalonians became missionaries virtually themselves (for which the city's commerce gave facilities) both by word and by example, the report of which had reached Macedonia where Paul had been, and Achaia where he now was, at Corinth (1 Thessalonians 1:7-8). Silas does not appear to have come to Paul at Athens at all, though Paul had desired him and Timothy to "come to him with all speed" (Acts 17:15), but with Timothy (who from Thessalonica called for him at Berea) joined Paul at Corinth first (Acts 18:1; Acts 18:5; "when Silas and Timothy were come from Macedonia". The place of writing was Corinth, where Timothy, with Silas, rejoined Paul (Acts 18:5). 53 at the beginning of his stay of one year and a half at Corinth (Acts 18:11). The second group of epistles, Corinthians, Romans, and Galatians, five years later, in opposition to the latter, unfold the cardinal doctrines of grace and justification by faith. He must have written at Corinth during his one year and six months' stay (Acts 18:11, namely, beginning with the autumn A. 53; for Timothy and Silas, whose names are joined with his own in the inscription were with him at Corinth, and not with him for a long time after he left that city (1 Thessalonians 1:10 compare Acts 19:22). Colossians 2:8; Colossians 2:16 with 2 Thessalonians 1:3; 1 Corinthians 15:24-28 with 2 Thessalonians 1:8-9; Romans 1:18 with 2 Thessalonians 1:8; 2 Thessalonians 1:10) his style is elevated, abrupt, and elliptical
Tim'Othy - He returns from Thessalonica, not to Athens, but to Corinth, and his name appears united with St. Paul according to a previous arrangement, (1 Corinthians 16:11 ) and was thus with him when the Second Epistle was written to the church of Corinth. (2 Corinthians 1:1 ) He returns with the apostle to that city, and joins in messages of greeting to the disciples whom he had known personally at Corinth, and who had since found their way to Rome
Timothy - The joint testimony to his character of the brethren of Lystra and Iconium implies that already he was employed as "messenger of the churches," an office which constituted his subsequent life work (2 Corinthians 8:23). To obviate Jewish prejudices (1 Corinthians 9:20) in regard to one of half Israelite parentage, Paul first circumcised him, "for they knew all that his father was a Greek. Afterward, he went on to Athens and was immediately sent back (Acts 17:15; 1 Thessalonians 3:1) by Paul to visit the Thessalonian church; he brought his report to Paul at Corinth (1 Thessalonians 3:2; 1 Thessalonians 3:6; Acts 18:1; Acts 18:5). ) Hence both the epistles to the Thessalonians written at Corinth contain his name with that of Paul in the address. During Paul's long stay at Ephesus Timothy "ministered to him" (Acts 19:22), and was sent before him to Macedonia and to Corinth "to bring the Corinthians into remembrance of the apostle's ways in Christ" (1 Corinthians 4:17; 1 Corinthians 16:10). ...
His name accompanies Paul's in the heading of 2 Corinthians 1:1, showing that he was with the apostle when he wrote it from Macedonia (compare 1 Corinthians 16:11); he was also with Paul the following winter at Corinth, when Paul wrote from thence his epistle to the Romans, and sends greetings with the apostle's to them (1 Corinthians 16:21). His timidity is glanced at in Paul's charge to the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:10-11), "if I come, see that he may be with you without fear, let no man, despise him
Corinthians, Epistles to the - Some three years after Paul's first visit to Corinth he heard that there were divisions among them, 1 Corinthians 1:11,12 ; that there was allowed evil in their midst, 1 Corinthians 1:1 ; and that there were some among them who said that there was no resurrection. 1 Corinthians 15:12 . These things, and the fact that he had received a letter of inquiry from them (1 Corinthians 7:1 ) called forth the First Epistle. It must be noted that this epistle, though written to the church of God at Corinth is also addressed to "all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ our Lord. ...
1 Corinthians 3 : The apostle could not speak unto them as unto spiritual but as to fleshly-minded Christians, who needed to be fed with the simplest food. ...
1 Corinthians 4 : The apostles were stewards of the mysteries of God, not to be judicially examined by the Corinthians or of man's day, but by the Lord. The Corinthians were reigning as kings (as though the gospel were intended to make men prosperous in this world), while the apostles were in affliction and dishonour, yet rendering blessing for railing. ...
1 Corinthians 5 : This refers to the flagrant case of sin in their midst. ...
1 Corinthians 6 : Paul reproves them for their litigation before the world, and their defrauding one another. Each one was a temple of the Holy Spirit, in distinction from 1 Corinthians 3:16 , where collectively they were the temple of God. ...
1 Corinthians 7 : The apostle answers their questions as to marriage. It was an institution of God, but Paul gave it as his judgement, for the time of distress (1 Corinthians 7:26 ), that it was better when persons had the power to remain unmarried. ...
1 Corinthians 8 : This refers to things offered to idols, a question which could only arise in the same way in a heathen country, though the principle of regarding the conscience of a weak brother is always true. ...
1 Corinthians 9 : Paul asserts his apostleship, which some among them were setting at naught. ...
1 Corinthians 10 : The failings of Israel are dwelt upon, and held up as a warning to the Corinthians. ...
1 Corinthians 11 : The fact of Christ being the head of every man, and man being the head of the woman, indicated that the head should be covered by the woman, and uncovered by the men, that the angels might not see God's order in creation set aside in those who were of the house of God. ...
1 Corinthians 12 : Spiritual manifestations are referred to. ...
1 Corinthians 13 : The character and workings of love. ...
1 Corinthians 14 : Here we get the practical working of the organisation of chapter 12 when actually in assembly, love being the spring, and the edification of the saints the result. All had been confusion at Corinth. ...
1 Corinthians 15 : Speculations having arisen as to the resurrection, the subject is discussed. ...
1 Corinthians 16 : Speaks of the collection for the poor saints. He was still concerned for the spiritual well-being of the Corinthians, but refers to his own authority with tenderness. ...
2 Corinthians 3 : Paul enters on the subject of his ministry, the authority of which had been much shaken by the devices of Satan at Corinth. ...
2 Corinthians 4 : Paul shows how the gospel of the glory of Christ was set forth in himself as the vessel of it, so that, if veiled, it was in those that were lost, not in him. The outcome of it was life in the Corinthians. ...
2 Corinthians 5 : Enlarging on this subject he refers to the house from heaven with which the believer is to be clothed in the eternal state. ...
2 Corinthians 6 : He shows how he and his fellow-labourers commended themselves in everything as God's ministers. His heart being enlarged towards the Corinthians, he entreats them to be wholly separated from the world and every pollution of the flesh and spirit, so that, as regards their testimony, the grace of God might not be received in vain. ...
2 Corinthians 7 : Paul continues his appeal, setting forth all the deep exercises he had passed through as to them. ...
2 Corinthians 8 - 9: Contributions for the poor saints and exhortations to liberality. ...
2 Corinthians 10 - 12: The apostleship of Paul is maintained in contrast to the false teachers who were counteracting his influence at Corinth. ...
2 Corinthians 13 : Paul tells them to examine themselves; if they were Christians, was not that a proof that Christ had been speaking in Paul? A few exhortations follow, and the epistle closes without any being greeted by name
Reign - 1: βασιλεύω (Strong's #936 — Verb — basileuo — bas-il-yoo'-o ) "to reign," is used (I) literally, (a) of God, Revelation 11:17 ; 19:6 , in each of which the aorist tense (in the latter, translated "reigneth") is "ingressive," stressing the point of entrance; (b) of Christ, Luke 1:33 ; 1 Corinthians 15:25 ; Revelation 11:15 ; as rejected by the Jews, Luke 19:14,27 ; (c) of the saints, hereafter, 1 Corinthians 4:8 (2nd part), where the Apostle, casting a reflection upon the untimely exercise of authority on the part of the church at Corinth, anticipates the due time for it in the future (see No. , "them that reign;" (II) metaphorically, (a) of believers, Romans 5:17 , where "shall reign in life" indicates the activity of life in fellowship with Christ in His sovereign power, reaching its fullness hereafter; 1 Corinthians 4:8 (1st part), of the carnal pride that laid claim to a power not to be exercised until hereafter; (b) of Divine grace, Romans 5:21 ; (c) of sin, Romans 5:21 ; 6:12 ; (d) of death, Romans 5:14,17 . 1), is used of the future "reign" of believers together and with Christ in the kingdom of God in manifestation, 1 Corinthians 4:8 (3rd part); of those who endure 2 Timothy 2:12 , cp
Read, Reading - , Matthew 12:3,5 ; 21:16 ; 24:15 ; of the private "reading" of Scripture, Acts 8:28,30,32 ; of the public "reading" of Scripture, Luke 4:16 ; Acts 13:27 ; 15:21 ; 2 Corinthians 3:15 ; Colossians 4:16 (thrice); 1 Thessalonians 5:27 ; Revelation 1:3 . In 2 Corinthians 1:13 there is a purposive play upon words; firstly, "we write none other things unto you, than what ye read (anaginosko)" signifies that there is no hidden or mysterious meaning in his Epistles; whatever doubts may have arisen and been expressed in this respect, he means what he says; then follows the similar verb epiginosko, "to acknowledge," "or even acknowledge, and I hope ye will acknowledge unto the end. Similarly, in 2 Corinthians 3:2 the verb ginosko, "to know," and anaginosko, "to read," are put in that order, and metaphorically applied to the church at Corinth as being an epistle, a message to the world, written by the Apostle and his fellow missionaries, through their ministry of the gospel and the consequent change in the lives of the converts, an epistle "known and read of all men. , Romans 12:3 , phroneo, huperphroneo, sophroneo; 1 Corinthians 2:13,14 , sunkrino, anakrino; 2 Thessalonians 3:11 , ergazomai, and periergazomai; 1 Corinthians 7:31 , chraomai and katachraomai; 1 Corinthians 11:31 , diakrino and krino; 1 Corinthians 12:2 , ago and apago; Philippians 3:2,3 , katatome and peritome. ...
B — 1: ἀνάγνωσις (Strong's #320 — — anagnosis — an-ag'-no-sis ) in nonbiblical Greek denoted "recognition" or "a survey" (the latter found in the papyri); then, "reading;" in the NT the public "reading" of Scripture, Acts 13:15 ; 2 Corinthians 3:14 ; 1 Timothy 4:13 , where the context makes clear that the reference is to the care required in reading the Scriptures to a company, a duty ever requiring the exhortation "take heed
Timothy - Paul referred to Timothy as his child in the faith (1 Corinthians 4:17 ; 1 Timothy 1:2 ; 2 Timothy 1:2 ). ...
Timothy not only accompanied Paul but also was sent on many crucial missions by Paul (Acts 17:14-15 ; Acts 18:5 ; Acts 19:22 ; Acts 20:4 ; Romans 16:21 ; 1 Corinthians 16:10 ; 2 Corinthians 1:19 ; 1Thessalonians 3:2,1 Thessalonians 3:6 ). For example, when Paul was unable to go to Corinth, he sent Timothy to represent Paul and his teachings (1 Corinthians 4:17 ). ...
So close were Paul and Timothy that both names are listed as the authors of six of Paul's letters (2 Corinthians 1:1 ; Philippians 1:1 ; Colossians 1:1 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:1 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:1 ; Philippians 1:1 )
Glass - Corinth became known for the production of glass after the time of Paul. ...
The KJV uses glass in five other passages where a polished metal mirror is probably being referred to (Job 37:18 ; Isaiah 3:23 ; 1 Corinthians 13:12 ; 2 Corinthians 3:18 ; James 1:23 )
Clement - In that case Clement was in Rome, and one of the arguments against identifying him with Clement, bishop of Rome, who wrote the Letter to the Church of Corinth, would disappear
Games - A direct reference to the exhibitions that I took place on such occasions is made in (1 Corinthians 15:32 ) St. Paul's epistles abound with allusions to the Greek contests, borrowed probably from the Isthmian games, at which he may well have been present during his first visit to Corinth. The competitors, ( 1 Corinthians 9:25 ; 2 Timothy 2:5 ) required a long and severe course of previous training, (1 Timothy 4:8 ) during which a particular diet was enforced. (1 Corinthians 9:25,27 ) In the Olympic contests these preparatory exercises extended over a period of ten months, during the last of which they were conducted under the supervision of appointed officers. (1 Corinthians 4:9 ; Hebrews 10:33 ) The games were opened by the proclamation of a herald, (1 Corinthians 9:27 ) whose office it was to give out the name and country of each candidate, and especially to announce the name of the victor before the assembled multitude. The judge was selected for his spotless integrity; (2 Timothy 4:8 ) his office was to decide any disputes, (Colossians 3:15 ) and to give the prize, (1 Corinthians 9:24 ; Philippians 3:14 ) consisting of a crown, (2 Timothy 2:6 ; 4:8 ) of leaves of wild olive at the Olympic games, and of pine, or at one period ivy, at the Isthmian games
Romans, Epistle to the - ...
The place of writing was Corinth. (Acts 8:4 ; 11:10 ) At first we may suppose that the gospel had preached there in a confused and imperfect form, scarcely more than a phase of Judaism, as in the case of Apollos at Corinth, (Acts 18:25 ) or the disciples at Ephesus
Nicopolis - , for he was occupied with the settlement of difficulties in the Corinthian Church. Paul may have visited the island with his fellow-worker, and left him to labour there, shortly before his final visit to Corinth. Paul’s stay of three winter months in Corinth (20:3)
Collection - Robertson-Plummer, 1 Corinthians [1] 382); and doubtless as Christian teaching spread and was accepted by the people, and converts became gradually separated from the rest of the community, they would lose their share of these gifts. All these occur in his letters to the Corinthians and Romans, and are as follows: λογία (1 Corinthians 16:1), χάρις (1 Corinthians 16:3, 2 Corinthians 8:4), κοινωνία (Romans 15:26, 2 Corinthians 8:4, etc. ), ἁδροτής (2 Corinthians 8:20), εὐλογία (2 Corinthians 9:5), λειτουργία (2 Corinthians 9:12), διακονία (2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:1; 2 Corinthians 9:12 f. From the tone of his reference to this work which he began in Galatia (2 Corinthians 9:1-5,7) we are able to infer not only that he exercised his apostolic authority but that he gave detailed directions to the churches there in accordance with arrangements (διέταξα) personally thought out by himself. The instructions sent by letter to the Corinthians are no doubt a brief epitome of those delivered to the Galatian Christians (οὕτως καὶ ὑμεῖς ποιήσατε), and include details as to the careful and systematic ear-marking by each Christian believer of his personal subscription ‘on every first day of the week’ (κατὰ μίαν σαββάτον). 1 Corinthians 16:3]'>[3]) delegates who should carry their gift to Jerusalem (τὴν χάριν ὑμῶν). On this journey he was accompanied by envoys or messengers (ἀπόστολοι, 2 Corinthians 8:23) from the churches contributing (Acts 20:4), and so keen was his desire to bring the undertaking to a successful issue that no consideration of the dangers involved could turn him from his purpose (see Acts 20:3; Acts 20:22 f. 58 he never loses sight of the importance and justice of the collection, not alone as it affected those who were to receive it, but also as it affected the givers (see Romans 15:27; 2 Corinthians 9:6; 2 Corinthians 8:6 ff; 2 Corinthians 12). 2 Corinthians 8:1-5; 1618454804_31 Romans 15:26 f. It is a good example of the Apostle’s method, and recalls the accusation of wiliness (πανοῦργος δόλῳ, 2 Corinthians 12:16) brought against him by the Corinthian Christians. Paul and the church in Corinth was to a large extent developed and moulded by the niggardliness (ἐὰν δὲ ἄξιον ᾖ τοῦ κἀμὲ πορεύεσθαι [6]) and suspicious meanness of its members. Their response to the appeal of Titus, who was the original deputed organizer of the Corinthian collection, was prompt and willing (τὸ θέλειν); and yet, in spite of the fact that they had so early (προενήρξασθε ἀπὸ πέρυσι, 2 Corinthians 8:10) given their assent to his wishes, they seem to have repented soon of their promised support and to have accused St. Paul of having hurried them deceitfully into an unwelcome undertaking (ἐγὼ οὐ κατεβάρησα, 2 Corinthians 12:16). The disingenuous nature of their charges appears again and again in his vigorous self-defence (see his words, ἠδικήσαμεν, ἐφθείραμεν, ἐπλεονεκτήσαμεν, 2 Corinthians 7:2). Of one fact he constantly reminds them-he never accepted the smallest help towards his own support during his two visits to Corinth (cf. Acts 18:3, 1 Corinthians 9:12; 1 Corinthians 9:15; 1 Corinthians 9:18, 2 Corinthians 11:7 ff. ); and if, as seems very probable, his Second Epistle to the Corinthians is represented by the last four chapters of our Canonical Second Epistle (see J. Kennedy, The Second and Third Epistles to the Corinthians, 1900), we find that the Apostle’s indignation was so keen that he expressly determined, before he wrote the more conciliatory Third Epistle (2 Corinthians 1-9), never to accept monetary aid at their hands (2 Corinthians 11:9; 2 Corinthians 11:12; 2 Corinthians 12:14). It is satisfactory to note that this intense and proud independence was met by a complete reconciliation; and the success of his mission was such that he was moved to exclamations of thankfulness and praise (2 Corinthians 9:15). Perhaps an even more significant proof of his feeling in this respect is to be discovered in the tone of friendliness with which he mentions his Corinthian friends in the document written immediately afterwards (Romans 16:1 f. At the time of writing the Epistle to the Romans he was the guest of Gaius in Corinth, and the unpleasant character of his relations with the Corinthian Church had undergone a complete change. Again, if we are allowed to draw an inference from the list of delegates who accompanied him (Acts 20:4), it would seem that the amount of the Corinthian collection was so small that there was little or no need for a representative. 57 the Macedonian churches had appointed their delegates (2 Corinthians 8:19; see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iii. On the other hand, as the Apostle intended to spend the winter months in Corinth, the selection would naturally await his arrival; and more especially would this delay occur as the bitter quarrel not only just been amicably settled. It may be that his reference to the example of the Galatian collection (see the emphatic ὑμεῖς, 1 Corinthians 16:1) points to a work already successful. Again, as the time of his journey to Jerusalem drew near, confidence in a not unworthy response by the Corinthian Church seems to have been restored (see his παρρησία, καύχησις, 2 Corinthians 7:4; περισσεύετε, 2 Corinthians 8:7; προθυμία, 2 Corinthians 8:11; τὴν οὖν ἔνδειξιν τῆς ἀγάπης ὑμῶν, 2 Corinthians 8:24; cf. 2 Corinthians 9:2; 2 Corinthians 9:7; 2 Corinthians 9:13; 2 Corinthians 9:15). It is not improbable that the triumphant joyousness (ἡ καρδία ἡμῶν πεπλάτυνται, 2 Corinthians 6:11) of his late appeal to them was due to their having chosen himself as their ambassador or representative to convey their ‘gracious’ gift (ἀπενεγκεῖν τὴν χάριν ὑμῶν εἰς Ἰερουσαλήμ, 1 Corinthians 16:3) to its destination. His satisfaction that all discontent and suspicion were at an end is expressed by his sending before him to Corinth along with Titus two well-known and tried brethren (οὖ ὁ ἔπαινος ἐν τῷ εὐαγγελίῳ, ὃν ἐδοκιμάσαμεν ἐν πολλοῖς, 2 Corinthians 8:18; 2 Corinthians 8:22), to complete the collection and to have everything in readiness against his arrival in company probably with some Macedonian representatives (2 Corinthians 9:4; cf. It is pleasant to learn that the unsavoury bickerings in Corinth were forgotten when, during that winter’s sojourn there, St. In that document he refers only to the good-will and the pleasure with which the Corinthians adopted and carried out the purpose of his pacificatory labours (τὸν καρπὸν τοῦτον, Romans 15:28). Galatians 6:6, 1 Corinthians 9:11) demanded an answering service (λειτουργῆσαι) in ministering to their temporal needs (see the contrast involved in the words πνευματικοῖς … σαρκικοῖς, Romans 15:27). Another reason which he adduces arises out of the duty which wealth universally owes to poverty (mark again the contrast, περίσευμα … ὑστέρημα, 2 Corinthians 8:14), in order that, as equal opportunities in things spiritual is the norm of Christian life, there may also be equality (ὅπως γένηται ἰσότης, 2 Corinthians 8:14) in the satisfaction of worldly necessities. Paul justifies us in assuming that he deliberately set himself the task of conciliating the jealousy of the Jewish Christians by establishing a bond of fellowship and communion between them and the Gentile converts (2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:13; cf. ...
All this is the more remarkable as at this period the sinister machinations of the Jews in both Corinth and Jerusalem were active and unremitting (Acts 20:3; cf. Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen, 1895, also article ‘Corinth’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i. 2 [6]3, ii
Tongues, Gift of - In 1Co 12:1-31 ; 1 Corinthians 13:1-13 ; 1 Corinthians 14:1-40 , among the charismata or (spiritual) gifts are ‘divers kinds of tongues’ and ‘the interpretation of tongues’ ( 1 Corinthians 12:10 ; 1 Corinthians 12:30 ). Paul, who possessed the gift himself ( 1 Corinthians 14:18 ), considers it to be of little importance as compared with prophecy. In itself it is addressed to God, and unless interpreted it is useless to those assembled; it is a sign to believers, but will not edify, but rather excite the ridicule of, unlearned persons or heathens ( 1 Corinthians 14:23 ). Whatever the gift was, speaking with tongues was at Corinth ordinarily unintelligible to the hearers, and sometimes even to the speaker ( 1 Corinthians 14:14 ), though the English reader must note that the word ‘unknown’ in AV Corinthians - Paul left Corinth A. From Ephesus he wrote his First Epistle to the Corinthians, in the beginning of A. This letter produced in the Corinthians great grief, vigilance against the vices reproved, and a very beneficial dread of God's anger. They repaired the scandal, and expressed abundant zeal against the crime committed, 2 Corinthians 7:9-11 . ...
To form an idea of the condition of the Corinthian church, we must examine the epistles of the Apostle. The different factions into which they were divided, exalted above all others the chiefs, τους υπερ λιαν αποστολους [1] 2 Corinthians 11:5 ; 2 Corinthians 12:11 , whose notions they adopted, and whose doctrines they professed to follow, and attempted to depreciate those of the opposite party. The question itself divided all these various parties into two principal factions: the partisans of Cephas and James were for the law; the friends of Paul adopted his opinion, as well as Apollos, who, with his adherents, was always in heart in favour of Paul, and never wished to take a part in a separation from him, 1 Corinthians 16:12 . The leaders of the party against Paul, these ψευδαποστολοι , [2] as Paul calls them, and μετασχηματιζομενοι εις αποστολους Χριστου , [3] who declared themselves the promulgators and defenders of the doctrines of Cephas, and James, were, as may be easily conceived, converted Jews, 2 Corinthians 11:22 , who had come from different places,—to all appearance from Palestine, ερχομενοι , [4] 2 Corinthians 11:4 ,—and could therefore boast of having had intercourse with the Apostles at Jerusalem, and of an acquaintance with their principles. They were not even of the orthodox Jews, but those who adhered to the doctrines of the Sadducees; and though they were even now converted to Christianity, while they spoke zealously in favour of the law, they were undermining the hopes of the pious, and exciting doubts against the resurrection, 1 Corinthians 15:35 ; so that Paul, from regard to the teachers, whose disciples they professed to be, was obliged to refute them from the testimony of James and Cephas, 1 Corinthians 15:5 ; 1 Corinthians 15:7 . These, proud of their own opinions, 1 Corinthians 1:17 , not without private views, depreciated Paul's authority, and extolled their own knowledge, 1 Corinthians 2:12 ; 2 Corinthians 11:16-17 . Instead of eating together, and refreshing their poor brethren out of that which they had brought with them, each one, as he came, ate his own, without waiting for any one else, and feasted often to excess, while the needy was fasting, 1 Corinthians 11:17 . When also some were preparing for prayers or singing, others raised their voices to instruct, and commenced exercises in spiritual gifts, tongues, prophesyings, and interpretations, 1 Corinthians 7, 13, 14; moreover, the women, to bring confusion to its highest pitch, took their part in interlocutions and proposals of questions, 1 Corinthians 14:34 . Now, as their mutual confidence in each other more and more decreased, they brought, to the disgrace of Christianity, their complaints before the Pagan tribunals, 1 Corinthians 6:1 . The Jews required circumcision as an indispensable act of religion; while Paul's disciples attempted to lay the foundation of a new doctrine respecting it, and to extinguish all traces of circumcision, 1 Corinthians 7:18 . As the Jewish party observed and maintained a distinction of meats, that of Paul ate without distinction any thing sold in the markets, and even meats from the Heathen sacrifices, 1 Corinthians 10:25 ; 1 Corinthians 10:28 ; 1 Corinthians 8:1 . Among other things, they also took part in many scandalous practices which were common there, and fell, by means of their imprudence, into still greater crimes, 1 Corinthians 10:20-21 ; 1 Corinthians 8:10 . The anti-judaists abolished this custom of the synagogue, 1 Corinthians 11:5-6 ; 1 Corinthians 11:10 ; and herein imitated the Heathen practices. Paul's example, 1 Corinthians 7:7-8 ; and this they also recommended to others, 1 Corinthians 7:1-25 . Some went even so far, that, although married, they resolved to practise a continual continency, 1 Corinthians 7:3-5 . ...
Paul, having understood the good effects of his first letter among the Corinthians, wrote a second to them, A. Near the end of the year 57, he came again to Corinth, where he staid about three months, and whence he went to Jerusalem. Just before his second departure from Corinth, he wrote his Epistle to the Romans, probably in the beginning of A
Figure - (2) For metaschematizo, rendered "I have in a figure transferred" in 1 Corinthians 4:6 , where the fact stated is designed to change its application, i. , from Paul and Apollos to circumstances in Corinth, see FASHION
Tychicus - ...
In Titus 3:12 Paul proposes to send Artonus or Tychicus (from Corinth or else Ephesus, where Tychicus was with Paul) to take Titus' place (which his past services to Paul in the neighbouring Asia qualified him for) at Crete, and so to set Titus free to join Paul at Nicopolis. Some make Tychicus the first "brother" in 2 Corinthians 8:16-24, and Trophimus the other
Apollinaris, Saint And Mart - Afterwards, being expelled from the city, he preached in Dalmatia, Pannonia, Thrace, and Corinth
Lord's Table, the; the Lord's Supper - The first of these expressions is used in 1 Corinthians 10:21 , in contrast to the table of demons with which those were identified who partook of idolatrous feasts. The 'one loaf ' was expressive of the oneness of the company of believers at Corinth, as bound together in the fellowship of the death of Christ. ...
The expression 'the Lord's supper' is found in 1 Corinthians 11:20 , and is in connection with the remembrance of the Lord in the breaking of bread and drinking the cup by the saints as in assembly. This chapter gives the positive character of the ordinance, as 1 Corinthians 10 is rather the separation consequent on it. In 1 Corinthians 12 - 1 Corinthians 14 , which succeed, the organisation, the motive spring, and functions of the assembly are referred to. *...
* The word 'broken' in 1 Corinthians 11:24 is omitted from some Greek MSS, and by some editors
Assembly - , Acts 20:28 ; 1 Corinthians 1:2 ; Galatians 1:13 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:1 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:1 ; 1 Timothy 3:5 , and in the plural, with reference to churches in a district. Again, in Romans 16:23 , that Gaius was the host of "the whole church," simply suggests that the "assembly" in Corinth had been accustomed to meet in his house, where also Paul was entertained
Bonifacius i, Pope - The people of Corinth had elected a certain Perigenes bishop, and sent to Rome to ask the pope to ratify the election. The party in Corinth opposed to Perigenes appealed to the Eastern emperor. Proposals, however, had actually been made for the convocation of a provincial council to consider the Corinthian election
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - Dissension had arisen within the Christian community at Corinth, and the Church was torn asunder. A fierce controversy was raging, and the Corinthian Church, hitherto renowned for its virtues, especially such as are the outcome of brotherly love (i. Once before, the Church of Corinth had shown the same spirit of faction (1 Corinthians 1:10; 1 Corinthians 1:12). Ill news travels apace, and Rome is within easy reach of Corinth. Yet in the ordinary course of things the Roman Church would soon hear of the Corinthian trouble, for communication seems to have been fairly frequent between the principal Christian communities in the early days (note the stress laid on the duty of hospitality, i, x, xi, xii, xxxv. At any rate the Christians at Rome heard of the Corinthian dissension while it was still at its height (xlvi. 1), but as soon as the storm had abated, a letter was written in the name of the Church at Rome to the Church at Corinth, expressing the sorrow which the Corinthian feud had caused to the Christians at Rome, and admonishing the Corinthians to remember the primary duty of φιλαδελφία and bring their strife to an end. It is known as ‘the First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians. The second persecution was still in progress when the news of the Corinthian schism was brought to Rome. An earlier date is precluded by the following facts: (a) the Church of Corinth is already called ἀρχαία (xlvii. Nor indeed do we find in the statements of Hegesippus, Dionysius of Corinth, and Irenaeus, the three earliest writers who connect the Epistle with the name of Clement, any definite assertion that Clement was the author. Eusebius, to whom we owe our knowledge of Hegesippus, does indeed declare that that writer ‘makes some remarks concerning the Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians’ (HE
(1) The Corinthian trouble-its cause and the remedy. -Now at last we have an opportunity of speaking our mind about ‘the detestable and unholy sedition which a few headstrong and self-willed persons have kindled’ till the once honoured name of the Church of Corinth is now greatly reviled (i. For indeed the Church of Corinth has hitherto been a model of Christian virtues, especially of sobriety in all things, of self-sacrifice and moderation (i. ...
(4) The Corinthians have disobeyed not only a specific ordinance of God, but also the fundamental Christian law of love. Then at least you professed to follow apostles or apostolic men, but now ‘the steadfast and ancient Church of the Corinthians, for the sake of one or two persons, maketh sedition against its presbyters’ (xlvii. His indwelling was the source of the manifold virtues which had formerly distinguished the Church of Corinth (ii. It does not seem to have had any connexion with the Corinthian disagreement. Possibly it may have been suggested to the writer by a recent perusal of 1 Corinthians 15 (see xl
Athens - The governor had his residence at Corinth, and the merchant-princes had forsaken the Piraeus for Lecheum and Cenchreae. Not driven from the city by hostile feeling, but quitting it of his own accord, too unimportant to be noticed, too harmless to be molested, he departed with a crushing sense of failure, and, apparently as a consequence, began his mission in Corinth ‘in weakness and fear and much trembling’ (1 Corinthians 2:3). It is significant that in Corinth the Apostle determined-not, indeed, for the first time, but certainly with a new emphasis-not to know anything save Jesus Christ and Him crucified (1 Corinthians 2:2), who was for both Jews and Hellenes the power of God and the wisdom of God (1:24). Paul met some ‘devout persons’-σεβόμενοι, Gentiles more or less influenced by Judaism-was probably small, for the university city did not attract his compatriots like Corinth, the seat of commerce
Wisdom - -The discussion may be confined to the use of the term in 1 Corinthians 1-3. ...
‘The Church of God which is at Corinth’ explains the vindication which St. For Corinth was the city of licence. ‘Corinthian words’ was only another synonym for rhetoric and the frothy speech with which one intellectual party confuted the opinions of another. Thus, in Corinth, Hellenism and Judaism met and mingled, and there sprang from the combination the pseudo-philosophy which is the morbid growth of an intellectual age among a people that has passed its meridian. ...
The intellectual ferment imported from the city and the schools into the church at Corinth manifested itself in an outcrop of party-feeling and division which at first was of Jewish origin. But the corrupting leaven soon spread in a community that Clement of Rome (Letter to the Church of Corinth, iii. ...
The difficulties of the Church were increased by the fact that in Corinth the Christian religion had to find its footing on Graeco-Roman soil. Paul’s speech and the thing he preached were not in persuasive words of wisdom (1 Corinthians 2:4-5 RVm ). There is no ground for connecting Apollos with the special method favoured by the Corinthians, which departed from St. Paul’s First Epistle we are left in no doubt as to the substance of his first gospel preaching in Corinth. These are the historical facts he imparted to them in the first instance: ‘I delivered unto you first of all that which also I received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scripture; and that he was buried; and that he hath been raised on the third day according to the scriptures; and that he appeared to Cephas; then to the twelve; then he appeared to above five hundred brethren at once, of whom the greater part remain until now, but some are fallen asleep; then he appeared to James; then to all the apostles; and last of all, as unto one born out of due time, he appeared to me also’ (1 Corinthians 15:3-8). The verdict of history had shown that ‘the world by wisdom knew not God’ (1 Corinthians 1:21). The wisdom of the world (κόσμος = the material world) in its very nature could not but fail to interpret the spiritual world (1 Corinthians 2:11-12). 1 Corinthians 2:14). ...
The Apostle’s experience in Athens (Acts 17:16-34) had not encouraged him to meet philosophers on their own ground, and, when he came to Corinth, it was with the deliberate purpose of not commending his message by the devices of rhetorical display, or the arguments of philosophy-‘I came not with any striking rhetorical or philosophical display, for I determined not to know anything among you save Jesus Christ, and him crucified’ (1 Corinthians 2:1-2). Paul’s presentation of his message: οὐκ ἐν σοφίᾳ λόγου, ἵνα μὴ κενωθῇ ὁ σταυρὸς τοῦ Χριστοῦ (1 Corinthians 1:17), ‘The term κενοῦν denotes an act which does violence to the object itself, and deprives it of its essence and virtue. Paul’s First Epistle to the Corinthians, Edinburgh, 1893, i. ...
His method was justified by his experience of the Corinthian Church. Godet, 1 Corinthians, i. From the Corinthian letter we can see that there was an outcrop of old pagan habits and a reversion to type among men who had never really been evangelized. ’...
Yet, while the Apostle rebukes and resists the superficial σοφία of the Corinthians, he also has his wisdom by which he relates the fact of Christ and ‘the word of the cross’ to his general view of the world: ‘unto them that are called, both Jews and Greeks, [4] Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God’ (1 Corinthians 1:24). But, since the Corinthians were no philosophers (1 Corinthians 1:26), ‘we speak wisdom among them that are perfect’ (2:6), i. This wisdom the Apostle would have proclaimed ab initio, for it is no esoteric doctrine; but how could he? The Corinthians were Christians, they had believed (3:5) but they had not yet (οὔπω) reached the stage of a purely spiritual appreciation. McFadyen, The Epistles to the Corinthians, London, 1911, p. Paul says, ‘I was not able (οὐκ ἠδυνήθην), because ye were not yet able (οὔπω ἐδύνασθε)’ (1 Corinthians 3:1-2). Those foolish Corinthians have many successors among ourselves, who fancy that the pulpit would gain greatly in power if ministers would only discourse more about science and philosophy, nature and history, political and social reform, and the various so-called questions of the day. There is always the aversion of men of taste to evangelical religion, from Corinth to the present day. Paul and the Corinthian seekers after wisdom is seen in historical examples; in the message of Luther and Erasmus; the Evangelical Revival, ‘by its intense reality, its earnestness of belief, its deep tremulous sympathy with the sin and sorrows of mankind, did what no intellectual movement could, it changed in a few years the whole temper of English Society’ (J. Paul preached: Christ Jesus who was made unto us Wisdom-that is to say, righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption (1 Corinthians 1:30); ‘a triangular constellation, with Wisdom reigning in splendour in the centre’ (cf. ; ICC , ‘1 Corinthians,’ Edinburgh, 1911 (Robertson and Plummer), ‘Ephesians and Colossians,’ do
Colossians, Epistle to the - , those to Corinth), this seems to have been written in consequence of information which had somehow been conveyed to him of the internal state of the church there (Colossians 1:4-8 )
Thessaloni'ca - In fact it was nearly if not quite on a level with Corinth and Ephesus in its share of the commerce of the Levant
Ruler - In Corinth, however (Acts 18:17), the normal practice of having one ruler of the synagogue with real power appears to have been maintained
Incest - Paul, speaking of the incestuous man of Corinth, says, "It is reported commonly, that there is fornication among you, and such fornication as is not so much as named among the Gentiles, that one should have his father's wife:" 1 Corinthians 5:1
Galatia - It was also the seat of colonies from various nations, among whom were many Jews; and from all of these Paul appears to have made many converts to Christianity, 1 Corinthians 16:1 . Paul, learning their state, probably at Corinth, A
Timothy - Under whom he was converted to Christianity it is impossible to say, for there is no contradiction between 1 Corinthians 4:17 and Acts 16:1-3. We know, however, from 1 Corinthians 9:19 ff. Soon he became acquainted with the life of hardship and suffering that his master led, and so grew into his spirit that Paul calls him his ‘son in the Lord,’ and tells the Corinthians that he can interpret to them his mind and practice (2 Timothy 3:10-11, 1 Corinthians 4:17). In Philippi Timothy seems to have escaped imprisonment; in Berœa he stays on with Silas to finish the work, and later joins Paul in Corinth. He seems to have soon won his way into the trust and affection of the Corinthians, for when, after the departure of the Apostle to Ephesus, troubles break out in Corinth, Paul first sends Timothy to compose the disorder, giving him authority to speak in his name (1 Corinthians 4:17). As his son in the gospel, he understands fully the Apostle’s mind and purpose, and is an example to the brethren of what Paul would have them become (1 Corinthians 4:17; 1 Corinthians 16:10-11, Philippians 2:19-23). He seems to have lacked strength of character, but his failure in reconciling the warring factions of Corinth did not cause him to lose the confidence of Paul or of the churches
Thessalonians, Second Epistle to the - Scattered indications fix the letter (if genuine) as written from Corinth, not long after the First Epistle. Paul left Corinth. Very possibly 2 Thessalonians 3:2 is to be explained by the opposition encountered at Corinth, recorded in Acts 18:1-28 . ...
Now, of the elements of this conception, that of an ‘apostasy’ is not un-Pauline: it appears 2 Corinthians 11:13-15 , Romans 16:17-20 (as well as Acts 20:29-30 , and throughout the Pastoral Epp. 2 Corinthians 6:15 ), in Rev. 53 or thereabouts?...
Now, at that date the Apostle of the Gentiles had lately experienced the determined enmity of the Jews to his whole Christian mission, at Thessalonica, Berœa, and Corinth
Paul - Luke in the Acts of the apostle in his Second Epistle the Corinthians. Here the apostle delivered that wonderful discourse reported in (Acts 17:22-31 ) He gained but few converts at Athens, and soon took his departure and went to Corinth. They were written from Corinth A. When Silas and Timotheus came to Corinth, St. Corinth was the chief city of the province of Achaia, and the residence of the proconsul. The Corinthian spectators, either favoring Paul or actuated only by anger against the Jews, seized on the principal person of those who had brought the charge, and beat him before the judgment-seat. The apostle therefore, was not allowed to be "hurt," and remained some time longer at Corinth unmolested. ( Acts 18:23 ; Acts 21:17 ) --The great epistles which belong to this period, those to the Galatians, Corinthians and Romans, show how the "Judaizing" question exercised at this time the apostle's mind. (1 Corinthians 18:1 ) It is probable that the Epistle to the Galatians was written soon after this visit--A. During this time many things occurred of which the historian of the Acts chooses two examples, the triumph over magical arts and the great disturbance raised by the silversmiths who made shrines Diana --among which we are to note further the writing of the First Epistle to the Corinth A. Before leaving Ephesus Paul went into Macedonia, where he met Titus, who brought him news of the state of the Corinthian church. Thereupon he wrote the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, A. 57, and sent it by the hands of Titus and two other brethren to Corinth. Paul travelled throughout Macedonia, perhaps to the borders of Illyricum, (Romans 15:19 ) and then went to Corinth. That this was written at this time from Corinth appears from passages in the epistle itself and has never been doubted. Before his departure from Corinth, St
Mediterranean Sea, the - Paul's work involved such Mediterranean cities as Caesarea, Antioch, Troas, Corinth, Tyre, Sidon, Syracuse, Rome, and Ephesus
Simplicity - 1 Corinthians 14:20, ‘Be not children in mind: howbeit in malice, be ye babes’). 2 Corinthians 8:2 [3] 2 Corinthians 9:11; 2 Corinthians 9:13, James 1:5). ...
In 2 Corinthians 11:3 St. Paul fears lest the church at Corinth, like tempted Eve, ‘should be corrupted from the simplicity (both Authorized Version and Revised Version ) that is toward Christ. The Authorized Version translation ‘simplicity’ of 2 Corinthians 1:12 rests on an inferior reading-ἁπλότηι for ἁγιότητι
Philippians, Epistle to the, - After the lapse of five years, spent chiefly at Corinth and Ephesus, St. He wrote at Philippi his second Epistle to the Corinthians
Murmuring - The verb is used in the same connexion in 1 Corinthians 10:10 -‘Neither murmur ye, as some of them murmured, and perished by the destroyer,’ the allusion being apparently to the rebellion of Korah against the authority of Moses and Aaron, which was followed by the punishment of violent death (Numbers 16). The OT reference and the evil of partisanship which had become conspicuous at Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:12; 1 Corinthians 3:6; 1 Corinthians 4:6; 1 Corinthians 4:18 f. Philippians 4:2) and is obviously a warning similar to that of 1 Corinthians 10:10. 1 Corinthians 10:10 and Judges 1:16 suggest that, as in the case of Korah, such murmurings are really against God Himself
Timothy, the Second Epistle to - Corinth. Paul now had shortly before been at Corinth and left Erastus there (2 Timothy 4:20), but Paul had not been at Corinth for several years before his first imprisonment, and in the interval Timothy had been with him; so Paul did not need to write to Timothy about that visit. Compare 1 Timothy 1:13, "I obtained mercy," especially needed by ministers, whose office is the leading topic in then, (compare 1 Corinthians 7:25). "Faithful sayings, "probably inspired utterances of church prophets, take the place of Old Testament quotations (compare 1 Timothy 4:1; 1 Timothy 4:1 Corinthians 14)
Conscience - Paul, it seems, took a word from popular Greek usage in Corinth and used it to reply to some of the Corinthian Christians. If the conscience is not active in judging past acts, it is said to be “weak” (1Corinthians 8:7,1Corinthians 8:10,1 Corinthians 8:12 ) and may be wounded (1 Corinthians 8:12 ). ...
In 1 Corinthians 4:4 , Paul used the verb from which the word for “conscience” is derived
Silas - There can be little doubt that the Silvanus of the Pauline Epistles ( 2 Corinthians 1:19 , 1 Thessalonians 1:1 , 2 Thessalonians 1:1 ) is the same as the Silas of Acts. But they seem to have been sent back on a mission to Macedonia ( 1 Thessalonians 3:1 : Paul was ‘left behind at Athens alone ’), Timothy to Thessalonica, Silas perhaps to Philippi; they rejoined Paul at Corinth, and are associated with him in the letters, probably written thence, to the Thessalonians. But there is no reason for suspecting a defection like that of Mark; the cordial reference to his former preaching in 2 Corinthians 1:19 (written on the Third Journey) contradicts this
Gallio - Junius Annaeus Gallio, Roman proconsul (Greek, KJV, "deputy ") of Achaia when Paul was at Corinth A. Sosthenes himself seems, by Paul's sympathy in trouble, to have been won to Christ, like Crispus (1 Corinthians 1:1)
Letter - On the other hand, the so-called First Epistle of Clement, which is written in the name of one entire community to another, is a peculiar composite of ‘letter’ and ‘epistle’; it was certainly meant to be a true letter, arising out of the actual circumstances of the writer’s own church at Rome, and having in view the actual circumstances of the church in Corinth, but it is quite clear that Clement was working upon a tradition of Christian letters and epistles, so that-especially in regard to the length of his message-he does not altogether succeed in maintaining the characteristics of a true letter
Commendation - ...
(b) παρίστημι is translated ‘commend’ in 1 Corinthians 8:8 (‘Meat commendeth us not to God’) in the sense of presenting to God; ‘non exhibebit nos Deo’ (Meyer); ‘will not bring us into God’s presence’ (Weymouth). The Ephesian Christians wrote such a letter for Apollos to the Church at Corinth (Acts 18:27). Paul in 2 Corinthians 8:16-24 gives an introduction for Titus and his companions to the Corinthian Church. In 2 Corinthians 3:1 St. (4) The verb, reflexively used to convey the idea of self-praise, occurs in 2 Corinthians 3:1; 2 Corinthians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 10:12; 2 Corinthians 10:18 (where the pronoun coming before the verb occupies the prominent position); (5) but in 2 Corinthians 4:2; 2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 7:11 (where the pronoun follows the verb) the reference is to legitimate demonstration of one’s faith and work; e. zeal for purity is such a commendation (2 Corinthians 7:11). An apostle’s true credentials are unwearied labour, self-sacrifice, character, and loftiness of spirit (2 Corinthians 6:4)
Curse - He called for a similar judgment on any person who preached a false gospel (Galatians 1:8) or who hated Christ (1 Corinthians 16:22). It seems that in Corinth, some who spoke in strange tongues even used the expression in Christian meetings. Paul referred to this to demonstrate that speaking in tongues was not necessarily speaking by the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:3)
Barnabas - It is possible that Barnabas later became associated with Paul in Corinth (1 Corinthians 9:6)
Home - ’ ‘At home’ renders ἐν οἴκῳ in 1 Corinthians 11:34; 1 Corinthians 14:35. ]'>[4] and figuratively in 2 Corinthians 5:6; 2 Corinthians 5:8 by ἐνδημεῖν, ‘to be at home’ (lit. The ‘apostle’ may be married (1 Corinthians 9:5), but his home life is not emphasized; while in the case of the local officials the home is much spoken of. Paul (Acts 16:15; Acts 16:40), the jailer there brings the apostles into his house and sets meat before them (Acts 16:34); Titus Justus at Corinth (Acts 18:7), Philip at Caesarea (Acts 21:8), Mnason of Cyprus at Jerusalem, or at a village between Caesarea and Jerusalem (Acts 21:16; see W. In Romans 16:23 Gains is famous for this quality; he is the host of the whole Church, apparently at Corinth (cf. 1 Corinthians 1:14)
Greece - New Corinth, Caesar’s Roman colony, the least Hellenic of the cities of Greece, became the seat of government. 44, when Claudius restored the province to the senate; whence there was once more a proconsul (ἀνθύπατος) in Corinth (Acts 18:12). Gladiatorial shows were never popular in Greece, except in the Roman colony of Corinth, and Dio Chrysostom (i. (see Athens and Corinth), but made slow progress throughout the country, where paganism, in one form or another, maintained itself till about a
Timothy, the First Epistle to - section 3-4; 4:16, section 3; 2:14, section 8; 3:11, section 1; 1:16, section 3) quotes 1 Timothy 1:4; 1 Corinthians 15:12-328; 1 Timothy 6:20; 2 Timothy 4:9-11-21; Titus 3:10. Timothy and Titus exercised the same power in ordaining elders in Ephesus and Crete as Paul had in the Gentile churches in general (2 Corinthians 11:28). In 1 Timothy 3:14 Paul says "I write, hoping to come unto thee shortly"; but on the earlier occasion of his passing from Ephesus to Macedon he had planned to spend the summer in Macedon and the winter in Corinth (1 Corinthians 16:6). Corinth may have been the place. Between it and Ephesus communication was easy; his course on former occasions was from Macedon to Corinth (Acts 17-18). Coincidences occur between 1 Timothy 2:11-14 and 1 Corinthians 14:84 as to women being silent in church; 1 Timothy 5:17-18 and 1 Corinthians 9:8-10 as to ministers' maintenance, on the law's maxim not to muzzle the ox treading the grain; and 1 Timothy 5:19-20 and 2 Corinthians 13:1-4 as to charges against elders before witnesses
Fornication - -(1) πορνεία is used sometimes in the strict sense of ‘prostitution’ or ‘fornication’ (1 Corinthians 6:13), It is thus different from μοιχεία, or ‘adultery’ (Hebrews 13:4 Fornication - Here again prostitution played a central role in worship in places like Corinth and Athens. He dealt with the problem particularly in writing the Corinthians who faced a society permeated with sexual religion and the sexual sins of a seaport. A believer must decide to be part of Christ's body or a prostitute's body (1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ). Voluntary sexual intercourse of an unmarried person with someone of the opposite sex (1 Corinthians 7:2 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:3 ). Various forms of unchastity (John 8:41 ; Acts 15:20 ; 1 Corinthians 5:1 )
Stealing - Paul, writing to the church at Corinth, mentions among those who cannot inherit the Kingdom of God fornicators and thieves, adding ‘and such were some of you’ (1 Corinthians 6:10)
Claudius, the Emperor - Paul arrived at Corinth and when the decree is mentioned as recent
See, Roman - Before the end of the 1century the church at Corinth appealed to the Roman Church to heal a schism
Roman See - Before the end of the 1century the church at Corinth appealed to the Roman Church to heal a schism
Resurrection - 1 Corinthians 15 refers only to the resurrection of the saints, as may be seen in 1 Corinthians 15:23,24 . There were those at Corinth who said that there was no resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:12 ); and on the other hand it appears from 2 Timothy 2:18 , some held that the resurrection had already past, that they had in fact reached a final condition!...
Few distinct intimations of the resurrection are found in the O
Jews in the New Testament - ...
Following his conviction that the gospel should be preached first to the Jews (Romans 1:16 ), Paul on his missionary journeys began his preaching in the Jewish synagogues—at Salamis on Cyprus (Acts 13:5 ), at Iconium (Acts 14:1 ), at Thessalonica (Acts 17:1 ), at Athens (Acts 17:15-17 ), and at Corinth (Acts 18:1 ). Though he made some converts among the Jews, even converting the synagogue ruler at Corinth (Acts 18:8 ), and no doubt had success among the “god fearers” or proselytes who were interested in converting to Judaism (Acts 13:43 ; Acts 17:4 ), the majority of the Jews reacted violently against Paul's message (Acts 13:50 ; Acts 14:2 ; Acts 17:5 ; Acts 18:12 )
Church - In 1 Corinthians 3 . 1 Corinthians 12:13 . Ephesians 4:4 ; 1 Corinthians 12:13 . ...
If division has come in on every hand, as it did at Corinth, faith will still recognise that the body is one, and will maintain the truth of it. ...
It must be carefully observed that the churches or assemblies at Jerusalem, Corinth, Rome, etc
Nazarite - ...
For some reason, probably in the midst of his work at Corinth, Paul took on himself the Nazarite vow
Nazarites - Paul, being at Corinth, and having made a vow of a Nazarite, had his hair cut off at Cenchrea, and put off fulfilling the rest of his vow til he should arrive at Jerusalem, Acts 18:18
Mirror - (ἕσοπτρον, 1 Corinthians 13:12, James 1:23; the classical word was κάτοπτρον, whence κατοπτρίζεσθαι, in 2 Corinthians 3:18; Lat. Corinthian mirrors were considered the best, and it is interesting that St. Paul’s two figurative uses of the word occur in his letters to Corinth. To bring home to the imagination the limitations of human knowledge, he says that in the present life we see only by means of a mirror darkly (διʼ ἐσόπτρου ἐν αἰνίγματι, 1 Corinthians 13:12). Mark 9:2) into the same image (2 Corinthians 3:18)
Saints - Thus Paul the apostle, addressing his first Epistle to the Corinthians, useth these remarkable words—"Unto the church of God which is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called robe saints. " (1 Corinthians 1:2) I do not presume to point out the difference,—I only state it as it is
Business - They are to be honest (1 Thessalonians 4:12), to owe no man anything (Romans 13:8), to avoid covetousness which leads to dishonesty (Hebrews 13:5), and to refuse to go into partnership with extortioners (1 Corinthians 5:11). Business disputes between Christians are not to be carried before heathen tribunals (1 Corinthians 6:5-8). It is evident that, at any rate in Corinth, converts found it difficult at first in ordinary business dealings to rise to the new standard
Wash - , "get thyself baptized"); the aorist tenses mark the decisiveness of the acts; in 1 Corinthians 6:11 , lit. ) again indicates that the converts at Corinth, by their obedience to the faith, voluntarily gave testimony to the complete spiritual change Divinely wrought in them
Church - 1 Corinthians 14:34 . The particular societies of Christians in these districts are mentioned in the plural number, 2 Corinthians 8:1 . 1 Corinthians 14:33 . The church of Corinth the same, 1 Corinthians 14:23 . There was a church at Cenchrea, a port of Corinth, distinct from the church in that city, Romans 16:1-27 : He that was a member of one church was not a member of another. 2 Corinthians 10:4-5 . Many that were admitted members in the churches of Judea, Corinth, Philippi, Laodicea, Sardis, &c. 1 Corinthians 1:11 ; 1 Corinthians 5:11 . They come out from the world, 1 Corinthians 6:17 . 1 Corinthians 8:5-6 . 1 Corinthians 5:1-13 ; 2 Timothy 2:26 . Earnest endeavours to prevent each other's stumblings, 1 Corinthians 10:2-3 . Subject to the friendly reproof or kind advice of the saints, 1 Corinthians 12:25 . 1 Corinthians 14:15 . The Lord's supper, 1 Corinthians 11:23 , &c. If any member walk disorderly, and continue to do so, the church is empowered to exclude him, 1 Corinthians 5:7
Paul - 35, his miraculous conversion took place, the circumstances of which are recorded in Acts ix, and are frequently alluded to in his epistles, 1 Corinthians 15:9 ; Galatians 1:13 ; 1 Timothy 1:12-13 . From Athens, Paul went to Corinth, Acts 18, A. 51, and lived in the house of Aquila and Priscilla, two Jews, who, being compelled to leave Rome in consequence of Claudius's edict against the Jews, had lately settled at Corinth. Among the few Jews who embraced the Gospel, were Crispus, the ruler of the synagogue, and his family; and many of the Gentile Corinthians "hearing believed, and were baptized. Paul was encouraged in a vision, to persevere in his exertions to convert the inhabitants of Corinth; and although he met with great opposition and disturbance from the unbelieving Jews, and was accused by them before Gallio, the Roman governor of Achaia, he continued there a year and six months, "teaching the word of God. From Corinth St. Previous to the disturbance raised by Demetrius, Paul had intended to continue at Ephesus till Titus should return, whom he had sent to inquire into the state of the church at Corinth, 2 Corinthians 12:18 . 56; and having taken an affectionate leave of the disciples, he set out for Troas, 2 Corinthians 2:12-13 , where he expected to meet Titus. Paul, after preaching in Macedonia, receiving from the Christians of that country liberal contributions for their poor brethren in Judea, 2 Corinthians 8:1 , went to Corinth, A. The Christians also of Corinth, and of the rest of Achaia, contributed to the relief of their brethren in Judea. Paul's intention was to have sailed from Corinth into Syria; but being informed that some unbelieving Jews, who had discovered his intention, lay in wait for him, he changed his plan, passed through Macedonia, and sailed from Philippi to Troas in five days, A. Paul to rectitude of principle above every other religious accomplishment, is weighty: "Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal," &c, 1 Corinthians 13:1-3 . His antitheses, Romans 2:21-24 ; 2 Corinthians 4:8-12 ; 2 Corinthians 6:9-11 ; 2 Corinthians 9:29-30; his enumerations, 1 Corinthians 13:4-10 ; 2 Corinthians 6:4-7 ; Acts 22:4 ; Ephesians 4:4-7 ; Ephesians 5:3-6 ; his gradations, Romans 8:29-30 ; Titus 3:3-4 ; the interrogations, exclamations, and comparisons, sometimes animate his language even so as to give a visible existence to it
Supper - (δεῖπνον, 1 Corinthians 11:20-21, Revelation 19:9; Revelation 19:17; cf. ...
(1) 1 Corinthians 11:20-21, ‘When therefore ye assemble yourselves together, it is not possible to eat the Lord’s supper (κυριακὸν δεῖπνον): for in your eating each one taketh before other his own supper; and one is hungry, and another is drunken. 1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 10:21). Paul is here rebuking the Corinthians concerning their manners and worship. Only harlots were accustomed to do so in Corinth; therefore let women take heed not to abuse their liberty in Christ. But there had developed factions in the church at Corinth. It was unbecoming for the followers or Christ: there was a want of love in the exercise; the corporate spirit was absent; the unity of the brotherhood was destroyed; and, consequently, the Corinthian Christians were rapidly becoming ‘weak and sickly’ in a spiritual sense (1 Corinthians 11:30)
Romans, Letter to the - ) At the time of writing, Paul was in Corinth in the south of Greece (Romans 16:23; cf. 1 Corinthians 1:14), and he sent the letter with a lady from the Corinth region who was travelling to Rome (Romans 16:1-2)
Ephesus - Corinth was the next great station on the way to Rome, and communication between the two places was constant. The ship in Acts 18:19 , bound from Corinth for the Syrian coast, touched first at Ephesus. The references to Ephesus in the Epistles show that the opposition to Christianity there was as long-continued as it was virulent ( 1 Corinthians 15:32 ; 1Co 16:9 , 2 Corinthians 1:8 ; 2 Corinthians 1:10 )
Galatians, the Epistle to the - However, the resemblance of this epistle to the epistle to the Romans favors the view (Conybeare and Howson) that it was not written until his stay at Corinth (Acts 20:2-3, during the winter of A. ...
It seems unlikely that 1 and 2 Corinthians, so dissimilar, should intervene between those so much alike as Galatians and Romans, or that Galatians should intervene between 2 Thessalonians and 1 Corinthians. A sudden exigency (tidings of Galatian Judaizing having reached him at Corinth from Ephesus) apparently called forth this epistle, for it maintains Christian liberty from carnal ceremonialism, and justification by faith only, in an admonitory and controversial tone
Apostolic Fathers - ...
The Apostolic Fathers include two writings under the name of Clement, a Roman presbyter-bishop at the end of the first century, but only his letter to the Corinthians, the Epistle of 1Clement can be considered authentic. What is entitled The Second Letter of Clement to the Corinthians is actually an early sermon which dates from around A. 96, in response to a disturbance in the church at Corinth. In part two (37-61) he discussed the divisions at Corinth and called for the restoration of order by submission to persons appointed presbyters by the apostles and their successors
pe'Ter - There is, however strong reason to believe that he visited Corinth at an early period. The name of Peter as founder or joint founder is not associated with any local church save the churches of Corinth, Antioch or Rome, by early ecclesiastical tradition
Athens - The city of Minerva, the chief city of Attica in Greece, situated on the Saronic Gulf, forty-six miles east of Corinth, and about five miles from the coast
Thanksgiving - We note this especially in 2 Corinthians 1:11, when the dark cloud of grief over the backsliders at Corinth is passing (cf. 2 Corinthians 4:15). ...
The great collection for the poor saints in Jerusalem is to be motived by thanksgiving, and will produce results beyond the material offering in the recipients as in the givers: ‘Ye being enriched in everything unto all liberality which maketh through us thanksgiving to God’ (2 Corinthians 9:11-12)
Thessalo'Nians, First Epistle to the, - was written by the apostle Paul at Corinth, a few months after he had founded the church at Thessalonica, at the close of the year A
Galatians, Epistle to the - The epistle was probably written, either from Ephesus or Corinth, between A
Idolatry - ...
As to the sacrificing being to demons, the same thing is said of the idolatry at Corinth, with its Grecian mythology. 1 Corinthians 10:20
Cheerfulness - Paul is described as once saying that his service has been with tears (Acts 20:19; Acts 20:31), and in his letter to Corinth confesses that he writes with many tears and with deep suffering and depression of spirit (2 Corinthians 2:4), such utterances stand isolated among a multitude of phrases suggestive of rejoicing and exultation. The Apostle’s references to depressing circumstances of life are usually to indicate his triumph over them (Philippians 3:7-8, 2 Corinthians 4:7 f. ; 2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 11:30; 2 Corinthians 12:9). Hebrews 12:11, James 1:2), as winning an eternal weight of glory (2 Corinthians 4:17). There is much in human life to give gladness-meetings with friends (Philippians 2:28-29, 2 Timothy 1:4, 2 John 1:12), even the very remembrance of them (Philippians 1:4), the sharing of the joys of others (Romans 12:15, 1 Corinthians 12:26), the success of one’s work (Philippians 2:16), the faithfulness of converts (1 Thessalonians 2:19-20), their repentance after error (2 Corinthians 7:9), their thoughtful liberality (Philippians 4:10). One may rejoice in a good conscience (2 Corinthians 1:12), in the joy set before those running the good race (Hebrews 12:2), in the inspirations and consolations of Christian faith (Romans 5:2; Romans 5:11; Romans 15:13; 2 Corinthians 1:24; 2 Corinthians 5:6 f. Human good cheer is only for a season (1 Corinthians 7:30); there is a laughter which should be turned to grief, and gladness to shame (James 4:9)
Colony - )...
A number of towns mentioned in the NT were coloniœ at the time the events narrated there took place: Corinth (since 44-43 b
Epistle to the Galatians - The epistle was probably written, either from Ephesus or Corinth, between A
Darkness - Hence Paul, when speaking of the conversion of the church at Corinth, saith, "God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined into our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. " (2 Corinthians 4:6) The darkness of the grave, and the darkness of hell, are both also spoken of in Scripture. Christ is beheld in the very character he had taken at the call of God the Father; first, made sin, and then, a curse, (see these Scriptures,) 2 Corinthians 5:21; Galatians 3:13 then follows, darkness, soul-trial, and death
Greece - ...
Peloponnesus, more anciently called Pelasgia, and Argos, and now the Morea, was the southern peninsula; it included the famous cities, Sparta, Messene, Elis, Corinth, Argos, etc
Praedestinatus, an Author - , write against Heracleon, who lived in the latter half of the century; the Tertullianists are condemned by Soter, who must have been dead 30 years before Tertullian separated from the church; the imaginary heresiologist, Hesiod of Corinth, is made to be the bishop who first opposed Arius, and in answer to whose prayers that heretic died
Thanksgiving - We note this especially in 2 Corinthians 1:11, when the dark cloud of grief over the backsliders at Corinth is passing (cf. 2 Corinthians 4:15). ...
The great collection for the poor saints in Jerusalem is to be motived by thanksgiving, and will produce results beyond the material offering in the recipients as in the givers: ‘Ye being enriched in everything unto all liberality which maketh through us thanksgiving to God’ (2 Corinthians 9:11-12)
Eucharist - Significant it certainly was; and its significance is fixed by our evidence about the Church of Corinth. Paul’s doctrine of the Eucharist, and a description of the Eucharist in the Church of Corinth. Paul finds it necessary to deal with these matters in 1 Corinthians. Paul’s language to the Corinthians makes it certain that he must have given similar teaching to his converts elsewhere, and indeed the account of the ‘breaking of bread’ at Troas, when read in the light of the passage in 1 Cor. ...
It appears from 1 Corinthians 11:20-34 that from time to time-presumably on Sundays-the members of the Church met together ‘to eat the Lord’s Supper,’ This supper was a real meal, and the food was provided by those who attended it. Paul reminds the Corinthians of the great solemnity of the Lord’s Supper. ...
In 1 Corinthians 10 St. Paul warns the Corinthians of the dangers of idolatry. He holds up before them the example of the Israelites, who, though they were ‘baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea,’ and ate the same spiritual food and drank the same spiritual drink, yet died in the wilderness because of their sins (1 Corinthians 10:1-6). You cannot share the lord’s table and a table of demons’ (1 Corinthians 10:21). The question arises as to whether the whole meal is a communion, or whether communion takes place during or after the meal, 1 Corinthians 10:16 suggests that the latter is the true view. 1 Corinthians 11:25), the president blessed the cup and broke the bread; and the cup so blessed and the bread so broken assumed their special and sacred character. Paul’s suggestion that the Corinthians’ own houses are the proper places in which to cat and drink, and his injunction that if they are hungry they should eat at home (1 Corinthians 11:22; 1 Corinthians 11:34) indicate the way in which the setting of the Eucharist came se soon to be altered. The first is the fact that in 1 Corinthians 10:16 St. Luke and in the Didache, it is not possible to suppose that at Corinth the cup actually did precede the bread. Paul gives (1 Corinthians 11:23-25) places the bread before the cup, and it is most unlikely that that order was reversed in the Corinthian Church. But in any case it is misleading to regard 1 Corinthians 10:16 as having any real connexion with a tradition of the cup having preceded the bread at the Last Supper. ...
The second point is the phrase in 1 Corinthians 11:26 : ‘Ye proclaim the Lord’s death till he come. ‘Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, because we all partake of that one bread’ (1 Corinthians 10:17). Paul’s views on the subject of the Eucharist differed from those of the Corinthians. Paul adopts the view of the Corinthians, but in ch. It is true that the behaviour of the Corinthians at the supper would suggest at first sight that their beliefs about it were of no very solemn character, and it may seem strange that men who believed that they were actually commemorating Christ’s Last Supper and Death, should treat the meal as an opportunity for self-indulgence; but it is by no means impossible that this may have been so. His view of the nature of the Eucharist refits ultimately upon his view of the institution, and at to this he expressly states that he had given them instruction before (1 Corinthians 11:23). What the Corinthians had learned about the Eucharist they had learned from St. Corinthians, Epistles to the. Paul refers the communion at Corinth back to an institution by our Lord on the night of His betrayal-an institution at which He alluded to His Death in sacrificial terms, and commanded the performance of the rite in memory of Himself, This narrative of the institution (1 Corinthians 11:23-34) is introduced by the words ἐγὼ γὰρ παρέλαβον ἀπὸ τοῦ Κυρίου. Paul’s own views were much influenced by conceptions current among Corinthian Christiana has no support in our authorities. He explicitly states that the account of the institution is no new teaching, but that he has taught it himself to the Corinthians before; and it is on this account of the institution that his doctrine is based. Paul’s doctrine of the Eucharist was peculiar to himself, and arose in the first place owing to purely local causes at Corinth, fails to account for the universality of the Eucharist. The ‘breaking of the bread’ in the primitive community at Jerusalem did not carry with it all the ideas which were associated with the Eucharist at Corinth. As has been pointed out above, if it had not been for accidental circumstances at Corinth, we should not have heard anything about the Eucharist in St
Games - ...
In 1 Corinthians 15:32 Paul alludes to "fights with beasts" (though his fights were with beast-like men, Demetrius and his craftsmen, not with beasts, from which his Roman citizenship exempted him), at Ephesus. The "fighters with beasts" were kept to the "last" of the "spectacle"; this he alludes to, 1 Corinthians 4:9; "God hath set forth (exhibited previous to execution) us the apostles last, as it were appointed to death, for we are made a spectacle unto the world," etc. ...
In 2 Timothy 4:7, "I have striven the good strife," not merely a fight, any competitive contest as the race-course, 1 Timothy 6:12 which was written from Corinth, where national games recurred at stated seasons, which accounts for the allusion: "strive" with such earnestness in "the good strife" as to "lay hold" on the prize, the crown or garland of the winner, "eternal life. , if so be that I may lay hold on the prize for obtaining which I was laid hold on by Christ at conversion (Song of Solomon 1:4; 1 Corinthians 13:12). ...
In 1 Corinthians 9:24 the Isthmian games, celebrated on the isthmus of Corinth, are vividly alluded to. They were a subject of patriotic pride to the Corinthians, a passion rather than a pastime; so a suitable image of Christian earnestness. Paul wrote 1 Corinthians at Ephesus, and in addressing the Ephesian elders he uses naturally the same image, an undesigned coincidence (Acts 20:24). " Paul further urges Christians, run so as not only to receive salvation but a full reward (compare 1 Corinthians 3:14-15; 2 John 1:8). ...
So Paul denied himself, in not claiming sustenance, in view of "reward," namely, "to gain the more" (1 Corinthians 9:18-23). 1 Corinthians 9:25; "striveth for the mastery," namely, in wrestling, more severe than the foot-race. " Ye gain no end, he implies to the Corinthians, in your eating idol meats
Abundance, Abundant, Abundantly, Abound - A — 1: ἁδρότης (Strong's #100 — Noun Feminine — hadrotes — had-rot'-ace ) which, in 2 Corinthians 8:20 , in reference to the gifts from the church at Corinth for poor saints in Judea, the RV renders "bounty" (AV, "abundance"), is derived from hadros, "thick, fat, full-grown, rich" (in the Sept. In regard, therefore, to the offering in 2 Corinthians 8:20 the thought is that of bountiful giving, a fat offering, not mere "abundance". ...
A — 2: περισσεία (Strong's #4050 — Noun Feminine — perisseia — per-is-si'-ah ) "an exceeding measure, something above the ordinary," is used four times; Romans 5:17 , "of abundance of grace;" 2 Corinthians 8:2 , "of abundance of joy;" 2 Corinthians 10:15 , of the extension of the Apostle's sphere of service through the practical fellowship of the saints at Corinth; in James 1:21 it is rendered, metaphorically, "overflowing," AV "superfluity," with reference to wickedness. ...
A — 3: περίσσευμα (Strong's #4051 — Noun Neuter — perisseuma — per-is'-syoo-mah ) denotes "abundance" in a slightly more concrete form, 2 Corinthians 8:13,14 , where it stands for the gifts in kind supplied by the saints. , "a throwing beyond" (huper, "over," ballo, "to throw"), donotes "excellence, exceeding greatness," of the power of God in His servants, 2 Corinthians 4:7 ; of the revelations given to Paul, 2 Corinthians 12:7 ; with the preposition kata, the phrase signifies "exceeding," Romans 7:13 ; "still more excellent," 1 Corinthians 12:31 ; "exceedingly," 2 Corinthians 1:8 ; "beyond measure," Galatians 1:13 ; and, in a more extended phrase, "more and more exceedingly," 2 Corinthians 4:17 . In this sense it is used also of consolation, 2 Corinthians 1:5 ; of the effect of a gift sent to meet the need of saints, 2 Corinthians 9:12 ; of rejoicing, Philippians 1:26 ; of what comes or falls to the lot of a person in large measure, as of the grace of God and the gift by the grace of Christ, Romans 5:15 ; of the sufferings of Christ, 2 Corinthians 1:5 . " ...
(b) "to redound to, or to turn out abundantly for something," as of the liberal effects of poverty, 2 Corinthians 8:2 ; in Romans 3:7 , argumentatively, of the effects of the truth of God, as to whether God's truthfulness becomes more conspicuous and His glory is increased through man's untruthfulness; of numerical increase, Acts 16:5 . ...
(c) "to be abundantly furnished, to abound in a thing," as of material benefits, Luke 12:15 ; Philippians 4:18 of spirtual gifts; 1 Corinthians 14:12 , or "to be pre-eminent, to excel, to be morally better off," as regards partaking of certain meats; 1 Corinthians 8:8 , "are we the better;" "to abound" in hope, Romans 15:13 ; the work of the Lord, 1 Corinthians 15:58 ; faith and grace, 2 Corinthians 8:7 ; thanksgiving, Colossians 2:7 ; walking so as to please God, Philippians 1:9 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:1,10 ; of righteousness, Matthew 5:20 ; of the Gospel, as the ministration of righteousness, 2 Corinthians 3:9 , "exceed. , to provide a person richly so that he has "abundance," as of spiritual truth, Matthew 13:12 ; the right use of what God has entrusted to us, 25:29; the power of God in conferring grace, 2 Corinthians 9:8 ; Ephesians 1:8 ; to "make abundant" or to cause to excel, as of the effect of grace in regard to thanksgiving, 2 Corinthians 4:15 ; His power to make us "to abound" in love, 1 Thessalonians 3:12 . 1, signifies "to abound exceedingly," Romans 5:20 , of the operation of grace; 2 Corinthians 7:4 , in the Middle Voice, of the Apostle's joy in the saints. ...
B — 3: πλεονάζω (Strong's #4121 — Verb — pleonazo — pleh-on-ad'-zo ) from pleion, or pleon, "more" (greater in quantity), akin to pleo, "to fill," signifies, (a) intransitively, "to superabound," of a trespass or sin, Romans 5:20 ; of grace, Romans 6:1 ; 2 Corinthians 4:15 ; of spiritual fruit, Philippians 4:17 ; of love, 2 Thessalonians 1:3 ; of various fruits, 2 Peter 1:8 ; of the gathering of the manna, 2 Corinthians 8:15 , "had . See also 2 Corinthians 3:10 (RV, "surpasseth;" AV, "excelleth"); 9:14, "exceeding;" Ephesians 1:19 ; 2:7 . 1, "abundant," is translated "advantage" in Romans 3:1 , "superfluous" in 2 Corinthians 9:1 . 1, is translated as follows: in Matthew 11:9 , and Luke 7:26 , RV, "much more" (AV, "more"); in Mark 12:40 , "greater;" in Luke 12:4,48 , "more;" in 1 Corinthians 12:23,24 , "more abundant;" in 2 Corinthians 2:7 , "overmuch;" in 2 Corinthians 10:8 , RV, "abundantly;" AV, "more. In 2 Corinthians 11:23 , see the RV. 4, denotes "above measure," 2 Corinthians 11:23
Romans Epistle to the - (1 Corinthians 16:1, 2 Corinthians 8:3), which belong to the same period of St. ...
(4) Phoebe, a ‘deaconess’ of Cenchreae, the port of Corinth, is prominently mentioned (Romans 16:1); possibly she is the bearer of the Epistle. ...
(5) Gains is the Apostle’s host (Romans 16:23), and we hear also of a Gaius at Corinth, evidently in close personal relation to St. Paul, since he was one of the few baptized by him (1 Corinthians 1:14). ...
(6) We hear of Erastus, chamberlain of the city (Romans 16:23); in 2 Timothy 4:20 we read that an Erastus was left at Corinth, which may thus have been his home. ’ Biblical Chronology - His second journey probably lasted from 50-52, in the course of which he was brought to trial by the Jews of Corinth before the Proconsul, Gallio, who entered upon his office, 51-52
Titus - When affairs had reached a dangerous climax in the church of Corinth during Paul’s sojourn in Ephesus, Timothy was first dispatched by the Apostle to restore peace; but he failed, and Titus was then sent. Paul was confronted with a revolt of one of his important churches, the seriousness of which may be estimated by the tension of the Apostle as he awaited news of the mission of Titus (2 Corinthians 2:13; 2 Corinthians 7:5-6). As a result of his service, there sprang up between Titus and that church a deep affection, and he championed them in the matter of their liberality towards ‘the saints’ at Jerusalem, claiming that they would not be behind Paul’s favourite churches of Macedonia (2 Corinthians 8:6; 2 Corinthians 8:16-19). It may be reasonably assumed that historical material lies embedded in this letter; and, if so, Titus continued to be Paul’s ‘partner and fellow-helper’ (2 Corinthians 8:23) until the end of his life, and retained his confidence as one who was able to carry out difficult tasks to the Apostle’s liking (Titus 1:5)
Tongues - They were a gift that the Holy Spirit gave to certain people to exercise in their praise to God (1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 12:30; 1 Corinthians 14:2). This indicates that whereas the tongues referred to in Acts were irresistible, those referred to in Corinthians were under the control of the speaker (1 Corinthians 14:13; 1 Corinthians 14:27-28). Also, those who spoke in tongues in the church were to do so one at a time, and no more than two or three in all (1 Corinthians 14:27). The Christians at Corinth, still influenced by attitudes from their former idolatrous days, were apparently impressed by these tongues, and considered that those who spoke them were spiritually superior. According to Paul, this was evidence that those who spoke in tongues were not necessarily speaking by the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:1-3; cf. He encouraged them rather to seek those gifts that proclaimed God’s Word and consequently built up the hearers (1 Corinthians 12:28-31; 1 Corinthians 14:3-5). Any speaking that took place in the church had to have meaning to the audience (1 Corinthians 14:6-12; 1 Corinthians 14:19). It had also to have meaning to the speaker, for he was not likely to be spiritually built up if he did not understand what he was saying (1 Corinthians 14:13-15). ...
The Corinthians’ concern for the spectacular demonstrated their immaturity, and their misuse of tongues brought dishonour on the church (1 Corinthians 14:20-25). Like all the gifts of the Spirit, the gift of tongues was given to only some in the church, and it could be wrongly used or falsely copied (1 Corinthians 12:3; 1 Corinthians 12:7; 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 12:30; 1 Corinthians 13:1)
Titus, Epistle to - It is difficult to determine the actual place where Paul wrote, though Rome and Corinth have been mentioned by various scholars
Romans, Book of - Scholars generally agree that Paul's close relationship with the Corinthian church would have resulted in his staying there, and this is confirmed by Paul's mentioning that he was staying with Gaius (Romans 16:23 ) who was a convert in Corinth (see 1 Corinthians 1:14 ). The fixed point for dating Paul's stay in Corinth is his appearance (on an earlier visit to Corinth) before Gallio, the proconsul of Achaia (Acts 18:12-17 ), who was in office between A. Estimating the time from Paul's appearance before Gallio until his return to Corinth is difficult because of Luke's general statements of time—”Paul stayed many days longer” (Acts 18:18 RSV)—but most scholars would date Romans between A. First, Romans does not contain any discussion or emphasis on some things Paul clearly believed strongly as we know from his other letters—such as the Lord's Supper (1 Corinthians 11:17-34 ) and the second coming of Christ (1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:11 )
Paul - He abode a year and a half at Corinth, where he wrote the two EPISTLES TO THE THESSALONIANS. At Ephesus he wrote theFIRST EPISTLE TO THE CorinthIANS, and probably the EPISTLE TO THE GALATIANS. After the tumult raised by Demetrius he went to Macedonia, and there wrote the SECOND EPISTLE TO THE CorinthIANS. He again visited Corinth and wrote the EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS. 2 Corinthians 4:4 . He was severe however to the Corinthians when they were allowing sin in their midst, and to them he had to assert his apostolic authority when traducers were seeking to nullify his influence among them. ' 2 Corinthians 12:9,10 . The catalogue he gives of his privations and sufferings in 2 Corinthians 11:23-28 discloses the fact that but a small part of his gigantic labours is recounted in the Acts of the Apostles
New Testament - (1) The New Covenant itself (Luke 22:20, 1 Corinthians 11:25, 2 Corinthians 3:6 etc. Many of the Epistles plainly show their ‘occasional’ origin (1 Corinthians 7:1, 2 Corinthians 9:1, Galatians 1:6, 2 Thessalonians 2:1 f. Men were looking for Christ’s speedy return (2 Thessalonians 2:2), and eye-witnesses of His ministry were at first plentiful (Acts 1:22, 1 Corinthians 15:6). Dionysius of Corinth (c. of Corinth (c
Clemens Romanus of Rome - ...
(3) Next in antiquity among the notices of Clement is the general ascription to him of the Epistle to the Church of Corinth, commonly known as Clement's first epistle. of Corinth, who, acknowledging another letter written from the church of Rome to the church of Corinth by their then bp. 22) he reports that Hegesippus, whose historical work was written in the episcopate next after Soter's, and who had previously visited both Rome and Corinth, gives particulars concerning the epistle of Clement, and concerning the dissensions in the Corinthian church which had given rise to it. to the Corinthians already mentioned. Its main object is to restore harmony to the Corinthian church, which had been disturbed by questions apparently concerning discipline rather than doctrine. to the Corinthians that we cannot lay much stress on the fact that one of the topics of that epistle is fully treated. The form of expression distinguishing Fortunatus from the Roman delegates favours the supposition that he was a Corinthian, and as Clement urges on those who had been the cause of dissension to withdraw for peace' sake, it is possible that Fortunatus might have so withdrawn and found a welcome at Rome. to the Corinthians. , used convertibly, and there is no trace that in the church of Corinth one presbyter had any very pronounced authority over the rest. to the Corinthians; and twice reminds his hearers of words of our Lord. ...
To fix more closely the date of the epistle, the principal fact available is, that in the opening an apology is made that the church of Rome had not been able to give earlier attention to the Corinthian disputes, owing to the sudden and repeated calamities which had befallen it. No such disputes appear in the dissensions at Corinth; and at Rome the Gentile and Jewish sections of the church seem in Clement's time to be completely fused. the two letters of Clement to the Corinthians are books enumerated among N. ...
The Second Epistle to the Corinthians. it is marked as Clement's second epistle, but not expressly described as to the Corinthians. The second epistle is first expressly cited as to the Corinthians by Severus of Antioch early in the same cent. We therefore refer the place of composition to Rome, notwithstanding an apparent reference to the Isthmian games which favours a connexion with Corinth. to the Corinthians, never strongly supported by external evidence, is disproved by the newly discovered conclusion, whence it clearly appears that the work is, as Dodwell and others had supposed, no epistle, but a homily. But it is not strange that an anonymous, but undoubtedly early document of the Roman church should come to be ascribed to the universally acknowledged author of the earliest document of that church; nor that when both had come to be received as Clement's, the second should come to be regarded as, like the first, an epistle to the Corinthians. The letters to the Corinthians cannot be described as encyclical; and the topics specified are not treated of in them, while they are dwelt on in the Syriac letters. Jerome, though in his catalogue of ecclesiastical writers he follows Eusebius in mentioning only the two letters to the Corinthians as ascribed to Clement, yet must be understood as referring to the letters on virginity in his treatise against Jovinian where he speaks of Clement as composing almost his entire discourse concerning the purity of virginity
Fertility Cult - Her temple at Corinth was the home of cult prostitutes responsible for the city's reputation for immorality. (Compare 1 Corinthians 6:15-20
Edification - Half of these are found in 1 Corinthians 14, where they bear the special meaning. Paul frequently applies the metaphor of building to the structure and growth of the Christian life (1 Corinthians 3:9 f. ), in contrast especially with boasted knowledge (1 Corinthians 8:1) or self-seeking (1 Corinthians 10:23 f. Paul’s description of the variety and exercise of these endowments in Corinth (1 Corinthians 12, 14) is probably true of most places in which the Church was established. There were evidently meetings held almost exclusively for ‘edification,’ to which unbelievers were admitted (1 Corinthians 14:23 f. It was not a formal service for Divine worship, but rather a fellowship meeting with the practical aim of affording members with a ‘gift’ an opportunity of using their supernaturally bestowed powers for the spiritual welfare of all present (1 Corinthians 12:6; cf. At such times the most notable contributions would be: (a) teaching (διδαχή), which included the ‘word of wisdom’ and the ‘word of knowledge’ (1 Corinthians 12:8); (b) prophecy (προφητεία) which dealt with future events (Acts 11:28) or revealed an insight into the needs of those present (1 Corinthians 14:3; 1 Corinthians 14:24 f. ); (c) glossolalia or tongues (γένη γλωσσῶν), which were probably incomprehensible utterances expressive of prayer or praise (1 Corinthians 14:13). ...
Closely connected with prophecy was ‘discerning of spirits,’ and with glossolalia ‘the interpretation of tongues’ (1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:27 ff. In addition there would be prayer, the reciting or singing of hymns, the reading of Scripture, and the ‘word of exhortation’ (1 Corinthians 14:26, Ephesians 5:19, Colossians 3:16, Acts 13:15). ...
In order that genuine edification might result from such a variety of gifts, exercised often under stress of great excitement, two rules were laid down for the Corinthian Church: (1) the comparative value of χαρίσματα must be recognized-e. prophecy is superior to ‘tongues’ for purposes of edification (1 Corinthians 14:1-25); (2) there must be an observance of due order in the meetings (1 Corinthians 14:26-40)
Church - Particular portions of the whole body of Christians are also called the church, as the church at Jerusalem, at Corinth, etc. Acts 8:1; 1 Corinthians 1:2; 1 Corinthians 4:17
Peter - After his marriage he resided at Capernaum, Matthew 8:14 Luke 4:38 , though called at a later period to labor else where as an apostle, and it would seem often accompanied in his journeys by his wife, 1 Corinthians 9:5 . He seems to have labored at Corinth, 1 Corinthians 1:12 3:22 , and at Babylon, 1 Peter 5:13 . Whatever honor and authority he received from Christ, in establishing the first institutions of Christianity and declaring what it enjoined and from what it released, Matthew 16:18-19 , the other apostles also received, Matthew 18:18 John 20:23 1 Corinthians 5:3,5 Ephesians 2:20 Revelation 21:14
Marriage, Marry - Judges 15:1 ) ...
B — 1: γαμέω (Strong's #1060 — Verb — gameo — gam-eh'-o ) "to marry" (akin to A), is used (a) of "the man," Matthew 5:32 ; 19:9,10 ; 22:25 (RV; AV, "married a wife"); Matthew 22:30 ; 24:38 ; Mark 6:17 ; 10:11 ; 12:25 ; Luke 14:20 ; 16:18 ; 17:27 , RV, "married" (AV, "married wives"); Luke 20:34,35 ; 1 Corinthians 7:28 (1st part); 1 Corinthians 7:33 ; (b) of "the woman," in the Active Voice, Mark 10:12 ; 1 Corinthians 7:28 (last part); 1 Corinthians 7:34 ; 1 Timothy 5:11,14 ; in the Passive Voice, 1 Corinthians 7:39 ; (c) of "both sexes," 1 Corinthians 7:9,10,36 ; 1 Timothy 4:3 . In this part of the Epistle, the Apostle was answering a number of questions on matters about which the church at Corinth had written to him, and in this particular matter the formal transition from "marriage" in general to the subject of giving a daughter in "marriage," is simple
Romans, Epistle to the - The letter to the Romans belongs to the central group which includes also Galatians, and the two letters to the Corinthians of St. was written from Corinth at the close of the so-called third missionary journey ( i. From the letter itself we learn that he was staying with Gains ( Acts 16:23 ), who is probably to be identified with the Gains of 1 Corinthians 1:14 . At the time of writing, Paul and Timothy are together, for the latter’s name appears in the salutation ( 1 Corinthians 16:21 ). Phœbe, the bearer of the letter, belongs to Cenchreæ, one of the ports of Corinth. The allusions in the letter all point to the stay in Corinth implied in Acts 20:1-38 . It is then more than probable that the letter was written from Corinth during the three months’ stay in Greece recorded in Acts 20:3 . Paul seems to be giving his readers the result of his controversial experiences in Corinth and Galatia, not so much because the Church in Rome was placed in a similar situation, as because he wished to enable her members to profit from the mistakes of other Churches. The missionary statesmanship which led him to seize on the great trade-centres like Ephesus and Corinth found its highest expression in his passionate desire to see Rome
Paul - He passed over to Corinth, the seat of the Roman government of Achaia, and remained there a year and a half, labouring with much success. While at Corinth, he wrote his two epistles to the church of Thessalonica, his earliest apostolic letters, and then sailed for Syria, that he might be in time to keep the feast of Pentecost at Jerusalem. ...
Very shortly before his departure from Ephesus, the apostle wrote his First Epistle to the Corinthians (q. The silversmiths, whose traffic in the little images which they made was in danger (see 2 Corinthians 2:12 ), whence after some time he went to meet Titus in Macedonia. Here, in consequence of the report Titus brought from Corinth, he wrote his second epistle to that church. Having spent probably most of the summer and autumn in Macedonia, visiting the churches there, specially the churches of Philippi, Thessalonica, and Berea, probably penetrating into the interior, to the shores of the Adriatic (Romans 15:19 ), he then came into Greece, where he abode three month, spending probably the greater part of this time in Corinth (Acts 20:2 )
Paul - He wrote that Jesus had appeared to him (1 Corinthians 15:8-10 ; 1 Corinthians 9:1 ); the gospel Paul preached had come by revelation (Galatians 1:12 ); he had been called by God (Acts 14:1-4 ; Ephesians 3:2-12 ). It was like dying and receiving a new life (Galatians 2:20 ) or being created anew (2 Corinthians 5:17-20 ). His work in Corinth (the province of —Achaia) was well received and even approved, in an oblique fashion, by the Roman governor, Gallio. From Corinth, Paul returned to Caesarea, visited Jerusalem, and then Antioch (Acts 18:22 ). From Ephesus he carried on a correspondence with the Corinthian church and possibly other churches. While in Corinth at the end of this journey, he wrote the Epistle to the Romans. During his travels, he often returned to Jerusalem to visit the church, and he brought gifts to it on more than one occasion (Acts 11:29-30 ; 1 Corinthians 16:1-4 ). The lengthy correspondence with the church at Corinth was Paul's effort to persuade them to adopt the correct attitude towards specific problems as well as toward himself. “God was in Christ reconciling the world unto himself” (2 Corinthians 5:19 ). “For I determined not to know anything among you, save Jesus Christ, and him crucified” (1 Corinthians 2:2 ). “If Christ be not risen, then your faith is also vain” ( 1 Corinthians 15:14 ). Paul could think of Christ's death as a Passover sacrifice (1 Corinthians 5:7 ), as a representative sacrifice (2 Corinthians 5:14 ), or as a ransom (1 Timothy 2:5-6 ). It guarantees the hope that the complete resurrection and the new world is sure to come (1 Corinthians 15:20-24 ). This response in faith is so dynamic and vital that it has transforming power and is like creating a new person ( Galatians 2:20 ; 2 Corinthians 5:17-19 ). He listed vices: Galatians 5:19-21 ; Colossians 3:5-11 ; Ephesians 4:17-19 ; 1 Corinthians 5:1 ; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10 ; 2 Corinthians 12:20-21 , and others. He offered guidance in marriage matters: 1 Corinthians 7:1 . In an extended discussion about Christian conduct (1 Corinthians 8:1-11:1 ) he emphasized that a believer will be sensitive to the effect his conduct will have on a fellow believer (1 Corinthians 8:9-12 )
Church Government - In 1 Corinthians 12:28 he counts up ‘first, apostles; second, prophets; third, teachers; then powers; then gifts of healing, helps, governments, kinds of tongues. The Apostles were not limited to the Eleven, or to the number twelve, though twelve was always the ideal number ( 1 Corinthians 15:5 , Revelation 21:14 ; perhaps Acts 2:14 ; Acts 6:2 ). ...
The Apostle’s first qualification was to have seen the risen Lord (Acts 1:22 , 1 Corinthians 9:5 ), for his first duty was to bear witness of the Resurrection. A direct call was also needed, for ( 1 Corinthians 12:28 , Galatians 1:1 , Ephesians 4:11 ) no human authority could choose an Apostle. His work was not to serve tables, but to preach and to make disciples of all nations, so that he led a wandering life, settling down only in his old age, or in the sense of making, say, Ephesus or Corinth his centre for a while. His point is not that the Galatians are mistaken, but that they are altogether falling away from Christ; not that the Corinthian is a bad offender, but that the church sees no great harm in the matter. He does not advise the Corinthians on further questions without plain hints ( 1 Corinthians 6:5 ; 1 Corinthians 10:14 ; 1 Corinthians 11:14 ) that they ought to have settled most of them for themselves. Women also might prophesy ( 1 Corinthians 11:5 ), like Philip’s daughters ( Acts 21:9 ) at Cæsarea, or perhaps the mystic Jezebel ( Revelation 2:20 ) at Thyatira. Since, however, Phœbe was a deaconess at Cenchreæ in 58, there were probably deacons there and at Corinth, though St
Thessalonians, Epistles to the - He was cheered by the news which Timothy brought of their faith and love, and wrote the First Epistle from Corinth, about A. Silvanus, or Silas, being with Paul when this epistle was written, leads to the conclusion that it, as well as the First Epistle, was sent from Corinth during the eighteen months that Paul abode there, Acts 18:11 ; its date may be A. The Thessalonians were right in expecting the former, but were wrong in thinking that the day of the Lord was (not 'at hand,' but) 'present,' as 2 Thessalonians 2:2 should read, as may be seen by the translation of the same word (ἐνίστημι) in Romans 8:38 ; 1 Corinthians 3:22
Catholic Epistles - With this usage we may compare his application of the term ‘catholic’ to the Epistles of Dionysius of Corinth in HE Troas - To Troas he came again, after his flight from Ephesus (Acts 20:1-6), ‘for the gospel of Christ,’ eager to preach to willing hearers, yet restlessly preoccupied by thoughts of Corinth, and soon compelled to turn his back upon ‘an open door’ (2 Corinthians 2:12-13)
Church - Thus all the disciples in Antioch, forming several congregations, were one church (Acts 13:1 ); so also we read of the "church of God at Corinth" (1 Corinthians 1:2 ), "the church at Jerusalem" (Acts 8:1 ), "the church of Ephesus" (Revelation 2:1 ), etc. ...
...
The whole body of professing Christians throughout the world (1 Corinthians 15:9 ; Galatians 1:13 ; Matthew 16:18 ) are the church of Christ. , are "saints", a title which designates the members of the Christian church (1 Corinthians 7:14 )
Knowledge - Knowledge gives direction, conviction, and assurance to faith (2 Corinthians 4:14 ). Knowledge is a spiritual gift (1 Corinthians 12:8 ) which can grow, increase, be filled, and abound (Philippians 1:9 ; Colossians 1:9-10 ; 2 Corinthians 8:7 ). ...
But though Paul recognized the importance of knowledge, he also knew that it could be a divisive factor in churches such as at Rome and Corinth where some Christians claimed to be more spiritual because of their knowledge of spiritual matters (Romans 14:1-15:6 ; 1 Corinthians 8:1-13 ). Knowledge can be misused (1 Corinthians 8:1 ). Love is more important than knowledge (1 Corinthians 13:1 ), yet knowledge is still a gift, necessary for Christian teaching (1 Corinthians 14:6 ) and for Christian growth toward a mature faith (1 Corinthians 8:7 ; 2 Peter 1:5-6 ; 2 Peter 3:18 )
Philippi - Paul visited Philippi again on his way from Ephesus into Macedon (Acts 20:1), and a third time on his return from Greece (Corinth) to Syria by way of Macedon (Acts 20:3; Acts 20:6). They alone supplied his wants twice in Thessalonica soon after he left them (Philippians 4:15-16); a third time, through Epaphroditus, just before this epistle (Philippians 4:10; Philippians 4:18; 2 Corinthians 11:9). ...
Its people were poor, but most liberal (2 Corinthians 8:1-2); persecuted, but faithful: only there was a tendency to dissension which Paul reproves (Philippians 1:27; Philippians 2:1-4; Philippians 2:12; Philippians 2:14; Philippians 4:2)
New Testament - ...
Felix made procurator...
52 Paul spends a year and a half at Corinth Acts 18:11 ...
Fathers - 116; Justin Martyr, 140; Dionysius of Corinth, 170; Tatian, 172; Hegesippus, 173; Melito, 177; Irenaeus, 178; Athenagoras, 178; Miltiades, 180; Theophilus, 181; Clement of Alexandria, 194; Tertullian, 200; Minutius Felix, 210; Ammonius, 220; Origen, 230; Firmilian, 233; Dionysius of Alexandria, 247; Cyprian, 248; Novatus or Novatian, 251; Arnobius, 306; Lactantius, 306; Alexander of Alexandria, 313; Eusebius, 315; Athanasius, 326; Cyril of Jerusalem, 348; Hilary, 354; Epiphanius, 368; Basil, 370; Gregory of Nazianzum, 370; Gregory of Nyssa, 370; Optatus, 370; Ambrose, 374; Philaster, 380; Jerome, 392; Theodore of Mopsuestia, 394; Ruffin, 397; Augustine, 398; Chrysostom, 398; Sulpitius Severus, 401; Cyril of Alexandria, 412; Theodoret, 423; and Gennadius, 494
Titus - Paul in his second apostolical journey, and from that time he seems to have been constantly employed by him in the propagation of the Gospel; he calls him his partner and fellow-helper, 2 Corinthians 8:23 . Paul sent him from Ephesus with his First Epistle to the Corinthians, and with a commission to inquire into the state of the church at Corinth; and he sent him thither again from Macedonia with his Second Epistle, and to forward the collections for the saints in Judea
Obedience - 1 Peter 1:22, ὑπακοὴ τῆς ἀληθείας; Romans 1:5; Romans 16:26, ὑπακοὴ πίστεως; 2 Corinthians 10:5, ἱπακοὴ τοῦ Χριστοῦ. Finally we find ὑπακοή standing alone, as a mode of manifestation of Christian faith (Romans 15:16; Romans 16:19, 2 Corinthians 7:15; 2 Corinthians 10:6, Philemon 1:21, 1 Peter 1:2; 1 Peter 1:14; cf. the verb, Philippians 2:12, 2 Corinthians 7:15, and the adjective, 2 Corinthians 2:9). , for the noun, 2 Corinthians 9:13, Galatians 2:5, 1 Timothy 2:11; 1 Timothy 3:4; and for the verb, Romans 10:3, James 4:7, 1 Peter 2:13; 1 Peter 5:5, Hebrews 12:9). , an Epistle written to deal with a state of disorder in Corinth occasioned by the insurrection of some of the younger men of the Church against the elders, bring it about that the virtue of obedience and subjection is particularly commended in this Epistle (cf. ’...
It is this obedience not merely to the express commands of God, but to whatever is understood to be His will, which constitutes true Christian obedience, which is an obedience from the heart (Romans 6:17), an obedience even of the thoughts (2 Corinthians 10:5)
Timotheus - Paul tells Timothy, "Erastus abode at Corinth, but Trophimus have I left at Miletum sick," 2 Timothy 4:20 . Paul was at Corinth and Miletum, prior to his first imprisonment at Rome, Timothy was with him at both places; and Trophimus could not have been then left at Miletum, for we find him at Jerusalem immediately after St
Titus, Epistle to - ...
It has been thought possible that the visit alluded to in our Epistle might have taken place during the Apostle’s lengthened sojourn at Corinth (Acts 18:11 ) or at Ephesus ( Acts 19:10 )
Games - Some believe that Paul was a spectator at the Isthmian Games (near Corinth), one of these international spectacles. It is evident that the apostle was familiar with athletics (Galatians 2:2 ; Philippians 3:13-14 ; 2 Timothy 2:5 ; 1 Corinthians 9:25-27 )
Blasphemy - ’ ‘As we be slanderously reported’ (βλασφημούμεθα, Romans 3:8); ‘why am I evil spoken of?’ (τί βλασφημοῦμαι; 1 Corinthians 10:30); ‘to speak evil of no man’ (μηδένα βλασφημεῖν, Titus 3:2); ‘those. The Jews of Pisidian Antioch ‘contradicted the things which were spoken by Paul and blasphemed’ (Acts 13:45); those of Corinth ‘opposed themselves and blasphemed’ (Acts 18:6); and the historian might have multiplied instances without end
Lord's Supper - Paul calls it, literally, the supper of the Lord, because Christians keep it on the Lord’s authority and in his honour (1 Corinthians 11:20). Paul speaks of it also as a communion, meaning an act of fellowship, or sharing together, in Christ (1 Corinthians 10:16; see COMMUNION). Another name, the Eucharist (from the Greek word for ‘thanksgiving’), refers to Jesus’ act of giving thanks for the bread and wine (Mark 14:23; 1 Corinthians 11:24). Isaiah 53:4-6; 1 Corinthians 11:20-22). The Old Testament system, having reached its fulfilment, is replaced by the new covenant with its unlimited blessings (Matthew 26:28; 1 Corinthians 11:25). When Christians observe the Lord’s Supper, they remind themselves that they have eternal life only through the death of Christ (1 Corinthians 11:23-24; cf. 1 Corinthians 5:7). In that day there will be far more blessed fellowship between Christ and his people, likened to a heavenly feast with new wine (Matthew 26:29; Luke 22:16; Luke 22:18; 1 Corinthians 11:26). At Corinth, however, many of the rich greedily ate their own food, without waiting for others to arrive and without sharing it with others. ...
Paul reminded the Corinthian church that if Christians make a mockery of the Lord’s Supper through wrong behaviour, they may bring judgment upon themselves. They must therefore examine themselves and correct any wrong attitudes they may have towards the Lord’s Supper (1 Corinthians 11:27-34). They show that they are united with each other and with Christ in one body (1 Corinthians 10:17; cf. 1 Corinthians 11:18-21). It is not a time of mourning, but a time of joyful fellowship with the risen Lord (1 Corinthians 10:16; Acts 2:46-47; cf. John 6:48-51; 1 Corinthians 11:26). Acts 2:42; 1 Corinthians 14:26; Colossians 3:16; see WORSHIP)
Maximus the Cynic, Bishop of Constantinople - We hear of him next at Corinth, with a high reputation for religion, leading about a band of females—"the swan of the flock"—under colour of devotion (Carm
Galatians, Letter to the - Does “Galatia” in Acts 16:6 and Acts 18:23 refer to the southern portion of the Roman province, or does it indicate that Paul went north and founded churches in the territory of Galatia? Paul probably addressed his epistle to the churches in the southern part of the Roman province, for two reasons: 1) When describing churches founded by him, Paul normally used the titles of the Roman provinces in which the churches were located as in Galatians 6:11-18 ; 2 Corinthians 2:1 ) Acts specifically mentioned that Paul founded churches in the southern region, but was silent concerning churches in the north. Then he moved on to Corinth (A. It was perhaps from Corinth that he wrote the epistle. ...
Paul closed (2 Corinthians 9:2 ) again urging them not to yield to circumcision and all it represented
Intercession - There is a striking phrase in 2 Corinthians 1:11, when he has received the good news from Corinth, and pictures their prayers for his deliverance from peril: ‘Ye also helping together on our behalf by your supplication; that, for the gift bestowed upon us by means of many, thanks may be given by many persons on our behalf. ...
(a) Clement goes to the root of the troubles at Corinth when he asks that intercession should be made ‘for them that are in any transgression, that forbearance and humility may be given them’ (Ep
Intercession - There is a striking phrase in 2 Corinthians 1:11, when he has received the good news from Corinth, and pictures their prayers for his deliverance from peril: ‘Ye also helping together on our behalf by your supplication; that, for the gift bestowed upon us by means of many, thanks may be given by many persons on our behalf. ...
(a) Clement goes to the root of the troubles at Corinth when he asks that intercession should be made ‘for them that are in any transgression, that forbearance and humility may be given them’ (Ep
Italy - This was the occasion of the journey of Aquila and Priscilla ‘from Italy’ to Corinth (Acts 18:2)
Miletus - Paul was leaving Ephesus, intending to return by Macedonia to Corinth (1 Corinthians 16:5), he may have had reasons for first visiting Miletus, and been obliged to leave Trophimus, who became sick there; or, though he did not personally visit Miletus, he might use a condensed expression, which meant that his friend, having been sent to Miletus and detained there by sickness, was unable to return to Ephesus before the time of sailing, and so was left behind
Garden - Indeed, the church is sometimes called gardens, to denote both their number and variety; by which is meant, the particular names of the churches of Jesus, such as the apostles of Christ; yea, Christ himself directed Epistles to the churches at "Rome, Corinth, Galatia, Philippi," and the like, and the seven churches in Asia. " (1 Corinthians 12:11) Fifthly, a garden is under the eye and inspection of its owner, and very frequently visited by him; and the Lord Jesus is said to have his eyes upon his Judea from the one end of the year even to the other end of the year
Measure - ; see the RV); Revelation 21:17 ; (II) "that which is measured, a determined extent, a portion measured off," Romans 12:3 ; 2 Corinthians 10:13 (twice); Ephesians 4:7 , "(according to the) measure (of the gift of Christ);" the gift of grace is "measured" and given according to the will of Christ; whatever the endowment, His is the bestowment and the adjustment; Ephesians 4:13 , "the measure (of the stature of the fullness of Christ)," the standard of spiritual stature being the fullness which is essentially Christ's; Ephesians 4:16 , "(according to the working in due) measure (of each several part)," i. ...
Notes: (1) In 2 Corinthians 10:14 , AV, huperekteino, "to stretch out overmuch," is translated "we stretch (not ourselves) beyond measure," (RV ". " (2) In 2 Corinthians 11:9 , Rv, prosanapleroo, "to fill up by adding to, to supply fully," is translated "supplied the measure" (AV, "supplied"). (3) For the phrases in the AV, "beyond measure," Galatians 1:13 ; "out of measure," 2 Corinthians 1:8 , see ABUNDANCE , A, No. (5) For the phrase "be exalted above measure," 2 Corinthians 12:7 , AV, see EXALT , A, No. ...
B — 1: ὑπερβαλλόντως (Strong's #5234 — Adverb — huperballontos — hoop-er-bal-lon'-toce ) "beyond measure" (huper, "over, beyond," ballo, "to throw;" for the verb huperballo, see EXCEEDING), is rendered "above measure" in 2 Corinthians 11:23 . 1), is used in the neuter plural in an adverbial phrase in 2 Corinthians 10:13,15 , eis ta ametra, lit. , "unto the (things) without measure," RV, "(we will not glory) beyond our measure;" AV, "(we will not boast) of things without measure," referring to the sphere Divinely appointed for the Apostle as to his Gospel ministry; this had reached to Corinth, and by the increase of the faith of the church there, would extend to regions beyond. , Revelation 11:1,2 ; 21:15,16,17 ; metaphorically, 2 Corinthians 10:12 ; (b) in the sense of "measuring" out, giving by "measure," Matthew 7:2 , "ye mete" (some mss
Disease - Disease had a religious dimension for all ancient peoples, partly from the natural recourse to superhuman help in danger or distress; idol shrines at Corinth, Ephesus, and Rome were as beset with sufferers as was the Jerusalem temple. ...
Job's friends thus argued that his disease and suffering proved his sinfulness; the Pharisees argued likewise, as did Jesus' disciples (John 9:2 ); and Paul so interprets the sickness prevalent at Corinth (1 Corinthians 11:27-30 ). Paul, too, looked upon his "thorn" as a spiritual discipline and education (1 Corinthians 11:30 ). And this use of medical metaphors for spiritual and moral "sickliness" or "infirmity" continues into the New Testament in phrases like "the body is weak" (Matthew 26:41 ), "weak in conscience" (1 Corinthians 8:7-12 ), "weak in faith" (Romans 14:1-2 ; 15:1 ) and (morally) "powerless" (Romans 5:6 )
Games - Thus the Olympic games were held in honour of Olympian Zeus in connexion with the magnificent temple in Olympia in Elis; the Isthmian games on the Isthmus of Corinth in honour of Poseidon; the Pythian were associated with the worship of the Pythian Apollo at Delphi; the Nemean were celebrated at Nemea, a valley of Argolis, to commemorate the Nemean Zeus. 1 Corinthians 9:24-27 ) were due to his personal observation of these games, which must have taken place while he was at Corinth. Paul in 1 Corinthians 9:24-27 makes use of the spirit of these contests to illustrate to the Corinthians, to whom it must have specially appealed, the self-denial, the strenuousness, and the glorious issue of the Christian conflict, drawing his metaphorical allusions partly from the foot-race and partly from the boxing and wrestling matches. The reference to fighting ‘with wild beasts at Ephesus’ in 1 Corinthians 15:32 is probably a metaphorical allusion to such contests as were common afterwards in the Colosseum at Rome, and were, according to Schmitz (see ‘Isthmia’ in Smith’s Dict
Excommunication - See also Matthew 13:49; Matthew 25:32, 2 Corinthians 6:17, Galatians 2:12. Paul’s method of dealing with the case of the incestuous person at Corinth (1 Corinthians 5, 2 Corinthians 2:6-11). ...
The object of this act of discipline was to reform the sinner (1 Corinthians 5:5), and to preserve the purity of the Church. Where a difference of opinion existed as to the course to be pursued, the verdict was decided by the majority (2 Corinthians 2:6). The sentence might be modified or rescinded according to sub-sequent events (2 Corinthians 2:6-8). ‘To deliver such a one unto Satan for the destruction of the flesh, that the spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord Jesus’ (1 Corinthians 5:5), is an obscure passage. In his opinion certain afflictions of the body were due to the operations of Satan (2 Corinthians 2:11; 2 Corinthians 12:7, 1 Timothy 1:20). If we may take 2 Corinthians 2:6-11 to refer to the same case, the desired result was reached. ...
‘It cannot have been unknown to Paul that he was here using a form of words similar to the curses by which the Corinthians had formerly been accustomed to consign their personal enemies to destruction by the powers of the world of death. It seems not open to doubt that the Corinthians would understand by this phrase that the offender was to suffer disease and even death as a punishment for sin; and Paul goes on to add that this punishment of the flesh is intended to bring salvation ultimately to his soul (ἴνα τὸ πνεῦμα σωθῇ): by physical suffering he is to atone for his sin. This punishment must not be confounded with the anathema of Romans 9:3, 1 Corinthians 16:22, Galatians 1:8-9. Μαρὰν ἀθά (1 Corinthians 16:22) was a formula of excommunication. ...
In addition to the specific case at Corinth and general references in such passages as 1 Thessalonians 5:14, 2 Thessalonians 3:14 (cf
Letter - (Compare also Acts 23:16-35 ; Acts 28:21 ; 1 Corinthians 16:3 ; 2 Corinthians 3:1-2 ). Paul's critics in Corinth accused Paul of being bolder in his letters than in his personal ministry. He viewed his letters as consistent with what he would have said had he been there in person (2 Corinthians 10:9-11 ). Perhaps two such letters are mentioned in 1 Corinthians 5:9 and 2 Corinthians 7:8
Building - 1 Corinthians 3:9. In this light the factions of Corinth are manifested. 2 Corinthians 5:1. The Apostle is here moving among the conceptions of what he calls ‘the spiritual body’ (1 Corinthians 15:42-45), adumbrating in his paradox thoughts which are really unspeakable
Love-Feasts - It would seem at Corinth, in the Apostles' days, they were ordinarily held before; for when the Corinthians are blamed for unworthily receiving the Lord's Supper, it is partly charged upon this, that some of them came drunk to that ordinance, having indulged to excess at the preceding love-feast: "Every one taketh before, προλαμβανει , his own supper, and one is hungry, and another is drunken," 1 Corinthians 11:21 . Jude mentions certain persons, who were spots in the feasts of charity, εν ταις αγαπαις , 1 Corinthians 11:12 , he means in the Christian love- feasts; though Dr
Building - 1 Corinthians 3:9. In this light the factions of Corinth are manifested. 2 Corinthians 5:1. The Apostle is here moving among the conceptions of what he calls ‘the spiritual body’ (1 Corinthians 15:42-45), adumbrating in his paradox thoughts which are really unspeakable
Victor, Bishop of Rome - Synods were held on the subject in various parts—in Palestine under Theophilus of Caesarea and Narcissus of Jerusalem, in Pontus under Palmas, in Gaul under Irenaeus, in Corinth under its bishop, Bachillus, at Osrhoene in Mesopotamia, and elsewhere, by all of which synodical letters were issued, unanimous in disapproval of the Asian custom, and in declaring that "on the Lord's Day only the mystery of the resurrection of the Lord from the dead was accomplished, and that on that day only we keep the close of the paschal fast" (Eus
Timothy, Epistles to - From other allusions in the Epistles we gather that the Apostle visited not only Ephesus and Macedonia, but also Troas ( 2 Timothy 4:13 ), Corinth and Miletus ( 2 Timothy 4:20 ), and Crete ( Titus 1:5 ), and that he purposed wintering in Nicopolis ( Titus 3:12 ). In 2 Timothy 2:18 one heresy is distinctly named the belief that the resurrection was already past; this opinion may have been the same as that held by those within the Gentile Corinthian Church who said there was no resurrection ( 1 Corinthians 15:12 ). 2 Corinthians 9:10 , Romans 6:13 ; Romans 8:10 ), while justification by faith is emphasized in the Pastoral Epistles ( 2 Timothy 1:9 , Titus 3:5 ). Some years before, they had acted in this capacity on special commissions ( 1 Corinthians 4:17 , Philippians 2:19 , 2 Corinthians 8:13-18 ); and, as on those occasions, so on these, they seem to have been appointed temporarily to carry out the functions entrusted to them until the Apostle’s return ( 1Ti 1:3 ; 1 Timothy 3:14 ; 1 Timothy 4:13 , Titus 3:12 ). Probably prophecy, which is an abnormal gift and not a stated function, was not very active in the Ephesian or Cretan Churches at the time, or, if active, was under due control, and so did not call for special treatment as formerly at Corinth ( 1 Corinthians 14:29 ff
Vision(s) - Angelic visions freed Peter from prison (12:9), called Paul to a European ministry (16:9), and encouraged Paul in his ministry at Corinth (18:9)
Timothy - The relationship between the two was such that Paul called Timothy his son, and spoke often of his love for Timothy and Timothy’s devotion to him (1 Corinthians 4:17; Philippians 2:19-20; 1 Timothy 1:18). Often Paul gave him tasks that would develop courage and win him greater respect throughout the churches (1 Corinthians 16:10-11; 1 Timothy 1:3; 1 Timothy 4:12-16; 2 Timothy 1:6-8; 2 Timothy 4:1-2). By this time Paul was in Corinth, and Timothy helped in the preaching there (2 Corinthians 1:19)
Kerygma - ...
There are two occurrences (1:21; 2:4) of the term "kerygma" in the first major unit of 1Corinthians (1:18-2:5). The believers in Corinth seem to view the gospel through Sophist eyes as "wisdom" and the evangelists as "wisdom teachers. ...
At the end of 1Corinthians, in the last major unit on the resurrection (15:1-58), Paul returns to the theme of kerygma. Thus, even though the word "kerygma" occurs only in the closing doxology, Romans in fact is Paul's own masterful development of his earlier definition of kerygma in 1Corinthians, which was written about two years before Romans. Fee, The First Epistle of the Corinthians ; D. Morris, 1Corinthians
Thessalonians Epistles to the - ...
(c) From Acts 18:5 it would naturally be inferred that Silas and Timothy first rejoined Paul at Corinth. Left alone in Athens, after a sojourn in that city of not more than four or five weeks Paul went on to Corinth, where Silas and Timothy found him on their return from Macedonia* Christian Life - to Corinthians, where the Jewish type of theology prevails, salvation is placed in the future as the reward of the faithful. Christ is the fulfilment and end of the Law (Romans 10:4) and the founder of a new law of love (Galatians 6:2, 1 Corinthians 9:21), in that His Spirit is a new vital power. With the truth of the Incarnation several of his greatest precepts are allied (2 Corinthians 8:9, Philippians 2:5, Galatians 2:20, Colossians 3:13, Romans 15:7), and there is often a direct connexion between his ethics and his theological and christological doctrine. The body is a temple of the Holy Ghost (1 Corinthians 6:19). is pointed by the actual life of Corinth, the city from which he wrote the Epistle, and there is hardly an Epistle in which reference is not made to sexual vice (cf. The famous ‘hymn of love’ (1 Corinthians 13) places love at the head of his ethical system, and is indirectly an indictment against all forms of self-seeking elsewhere specified: e. ]'>[2] is frequently proclaimed (Romans 12:12, 1 Corinthians 7:5, Philippians 4:6, Colossians 4:2). ...
Finally, there is the duty of the ‘strong’ to help the weak (Galatians 6:1), the care for and liberality towards the poor (see 1 Corinthians 16), and, above all, obedience to civic and Imperial authorities (Romans 13:1-10). For his views with regard to the subordination of women (1 Corinthians 7), St. His doctrine of the solidarity of society-a sin against a brother is a sin against Christ (1 Corinthians 8:12)-and of the equality of all men in Christ (Galatians 3:28, Colossians 3:11) prepared the way for the up-lifting of the masses, and identified Christianity with the spirit of brotherhood, even though the references to love of the brethren are more frequent than to love of mankind as a whole (see article Fellowship). ...
In 1 Peter, Hebrews, and the Epistle of the Roman Church to the Church of Corinth (1 Clem. On the other hand, at Corinth since the 40 years when St
Chronology of the New Testament - Second Missionary Journey, from Antioch through Syria-Cilicia to Derbe and Lystra, Acts 15:41 ; Acts 16:1 ; through the ‘Phrygo-Galatic’ region of the province Galatia to Troas, Acts 16:6-8 ; to Macedonia, Acts 16:11 ; Athens, Acts 17:15 ; and Corinth, Acts 18:1 , where 18 months are spent; thence by sea to Ephesus, Acts 18:19 ; Jerusalem (fourth visit), Acts 18:22 ; and Antioch, where ‘some time’ is spent, Acts 18:23 . Third Missionary Journey, from Antioch by the ‘Galatic region’ and the ‘Phrygian region,’ Acts 18:23 , to Ephesus, Acts 19:1 , where two years and three months are spent, Acts 19:8 ; Acts 19:10 ; by Troas 2 Corinthians 2:12 , to Macedonia, Acts 20:1 ; and Corinth, Thessalonians, First And Second, Theology of - This servant of Jesus Christ had experienced harsh treatment at the hands of both misguided Gentiles and hostile Jews for the sake of Jesus (2 Corinthians 11:23-27 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:2 ; cf. While some might unfortunately be tempted to view this great apostle to the Gentiles as an authoritarian personality because of some statements in letters he wrote to the Galatians and Corinthians, readers are encouraged to gain a sense of the other side of Paul by studying the Thessalonian correspondence. It was followed by 1,2Corinthians and Galatians, which dealt with inadequate responses to the meaning of salvation. First Thessalonians was undoubtedly written from Achaia (probably Corinth) following Paul's hasty departure from Thessalonica and Berea (cf. Together with 1Corinthians it provides a unique study in contrast. In 1 Corinthians 16:5-12 one has the feeling that none of the missionaries are anxious to go to Corinth whereas Macedonia is quite another matter ( 1 Corinthians 16:5 ). Those familiar with the famous faith, hope, and love triad of 1 Corinthians 13 may not realize that Paul frequently employs triadic thinking in his writing or that this famous triad is employed to identify a theological emphasis. In the case of 1Corinthians the theological emphasis falls on authentic living, the second aspect of the salvation triad (justification, sanctification, glorification)
Body - Occasionally σῶμα is used of a dead body, whether of man (Acts 9:40, Judges 1:9) or beast (Hebrews 13:11), but ordinarily it denotes the living body of animals (James 3:3) or of men (1 Corinthians 6:15 etc. When distinguished from σάρξ (English Version ‘flesh’), which applies to the material or substance of the living body (2 Corinthians 12:7), σῶμα designates the body as an organic whole, a union of related pads (1 Corinthians 12:12); but σῶμα and σάρξ are sometimes used in connexions which make them practically synonymous (cf. 1 Corinthians 5:3 with Colossians 2:5, 2 Corinthians 4:10 with 2 Corinthians 4:11). From the literal meaning of σῶμα as an organism made up of interrelated parts comes its figurative employment to describe the Christian Church as a social whole, the ‘one body’ with many members (Romans 12:5, 1 Corinthians 12:12 ff. m 1 Corinthians 12:27 etc. Symbolically the broad of the Lord’s Supper is designated as the body of Christ (1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 11:24; 1 Corinthians 11:27; 1 Corinthians 11:29). When he charges the Corinthians with being ‘carnal’ (1 Corinthians 3:3), he is condemning, not sensuality, but jealousy and strife. His doctrines of the sanctification of the body (1 Corinthians 6:15; 1 Corinthians 6:19) and of the absolute sinlessness (2 Corinthians 5:21) of one born of a woman (Galatians 4:4) would have been impossible if he had regarded the principle of sin as lying in man’s corporeal nature. The ‘carnal’ man, with his ‘mind of the flesh’ at enmity with God (Romans 8:7), is the same as the ‘natural’ man who receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God (1 Corinthians 2:14), and so is to be distinguished from the ‘spiritual’ man in whom a supernatural and Divine principle is already at work (1 Corinthians 2:13 ff. 2 Corinthians 5:1-49; 1 Corinthians 3:3). Hence his determination to bring the body into subjection (1 Corinthians 9:27), and his summons to others to mortify its deeds (Romans 8:13; cf. The emphasis he lays on the inner and spiritual side of personality enables him, it is true, to conceive of existence, and even a blessed existence, in the disembodied state (2 Corinthians 5:8). But as Christ by His Spirit dwelling in ns can subdue the power of sin, so also can He gain the victory over death-the culminating proof of sin’s power (1 Corinthians 15:26). In Christ the promise is given of a body not only raided from the grave, but redeemed from the power of evil, and thus capable of being transformed from a natural body into a spiritual body (1 Corinthians 15:44; cf. In Corinth the perverted notion had grown up that since the body was not a part of the true personality, bodily acts were morally indifferent things (1 Corinthians 6:13 ff. Yet this view of the communion of the body in man’s spiritual life and its participation in the sanctifying powers of the Divine Spirit did not blind him to the fact that the body, as we know it, is weak and tainted, ever ready to become the instrument of temptation and an occasion of stumbling (Romans 6:19, 1 Corinthians 9:27). To him the resurrection of Christ was a fact of the most absolute certainty (Romans 1:4, 1 Corinthians 15:3 ff. ); and that fact carried with it the assurance that the dead are raised (1 Corinthians 15:15 ff. But while he clung passionately to the hope of the resurrection, he did not believe in the resurrection of the present body of flesh and blood (1 Corinthians 15:50). He looked for a body in which corruption had given place to incorruption (1 Corinthians 15:42-43) and humiliation had been changed into glory (Philippians 3:21). His doctrine of the resurrection includes the assurance that when the dead in Christ are raised (he has little to say of the physical resurrection of others), it will not be in the old bodies of their earthly experience, but in new ones adapted to heavenly conditions (1 Corinthians 15:47 ff. moving on the plane of man’s natural experience in the world, but pneumatical (1 Corinthians 15:44 ff. -In 1 Corinthians 12:12 ff. Paul describes the relations in which Christians stand to Christ and to one another under the figure of a body and its members; and towards the end of the chapter (1 Corinthians 12:27) he says of the Corinthian Church quite expressly, ‘Now ye are a body of Christ (σῶμα Χριστοῦ), and members in particular. As yet, however, the figure is plastic, and the anarthrous σῶμα suggests that it is the Church of Corinth only which St. Paul in his narrative of the institution (1 Corinthians 11:24). ‘The bread which we break,’ he writes, ‘is it not a communion of the body of Christ?’ (1 Corinthians 10:16). In like manner he says that whosoever shall eat the bread of the Lord unworthily shall be guilty of the body of the Lord (1 Corinthians 11:27), and that a participant of the Supper eats and drinks judgment unto himself ‘if he discern not the body’ (1 Corinthians 11:29)
Church Government - Corinth had its charismatic ministry, and this seems to have sufficed for a time. The Apostle does not address his letters to any official at Thessalonica, Corinth, or Rome. These Gentile churches have gifted persons who take the lead in public worship, ‘apostles, prophets, and teachers’ (1 Corinthians 12:28, Ephesians 4:11; cf. Paul gives the earliest directions respecting this, and what he lays down for the Corinthians is based on principles which can be applied everywhere. When Christians were told not to take their disputes into Roman civil courts (1 Corinthians 6), that involved the growth of Christian civil law, which the permanent officials had to administer; and here the influence of Roman legislation came in to develop what was derived from Christ’s teaching and that of the OT. Already in apostolic times the clergy had three distinct rights: honour and obedience (1 Thessalonians 5:12); maintenance (1 Corinthians 9:4-14); and freedom from frivolous accusations (1 Timothy 5:19). 1910; Robertson-Plummer, 1 Corinthians, Edinburgh, 1911, pp
Timothy, Letters to - The Bible gives no details of route he followed, but among the places he visited was Corinth in southern Greece (2 Timothy 4:20)
Roman Empire - So Corinth, Troas, and the Pisidian Antioch
Growth Increase - In writing to the Corinthian Church, he compares the work done by himself and Apollos, and declares, ‘I planted, Apollos watered, God increased’ (1 Corinthians 3:6). The object of all three verbs is the faith of the believers in Corinth, which St. Paul’s preaching had kindled and Apollos had nourished; but the work of both would have been ineffective but for God’s working, His making the seed to grow and increase (1 Corinthians 3:7)
Giving - Paul associates the liberality of the Christians of Corinth and this grace of God (2 Corinthians 9:15), he is true to the mind of Christ. All tender ministries are the expression of a Divine compassion, ‘the exceeding grace of God in you’ (2 Corinthians 9:14)
Alaric - Athens capitulated, and afterwards Corinth, Argos, and Sparta
Roman Law in the nt - Paul came to Corinth, had again been disjoined from Macedonia and had become senatorial (Ramsay, Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i. 2 Corinthians 11:24 f. The colonics mentioned in the NT are; Antioch of Pisidia (Acts 13:14), Lystra (Acts 14:6), Philippi (Acts 16:12, where alone of NT passages κολωνία is found), Corinth (Acts 18:1), Ptolemais (Acts 21:7). Paul did not always assert his exemption (2 Corinthians 11:24 f. At Corinth Gallio treats the question before him as one of Jewish law (Acts 18:15)
Peter - He was married and led about his wife in his apostolic journeys (1 Corinthians 9:5). sick of a fever," and 1 Corinthians 9:5, "have we not power to lead about a sister, a wife, as well as Cephas?" is also a delicate confirmation of the truth of the miraculous cure, as no forger would be likely to exhibit such a minute and therefore undesigned correspondence of details. As "Simon" he was but an hearer; as Peter or Cephas he became an apostle and so a foundation stone of the church, by union to the one only Foundation Rock (Ephesians 2:20; 1 Corinthians 3:11). " Peter by his believing confession identified himself with Christ the true Rock (1 Corinthians 3:11; Isaiah 28:16; Ephesians 2:20), and so received the name; just as Joshua bears the name meaning "Jehovah Saviour", because typifying His person and offices. To Peter first of the apostles Jesus appeared (Luke 24:34; 1 Corinthians 15:5). Peter apparently visited Corinth before the first epistle to the Corinthians was written, for it mentions a party there who said "I am of Cephas" (1 Corinthians 1:12). Clemens Romanus (1 Corinthians 4) implies the same, Dionysius of Corinth asserts it, A. Dionysius of Corinth (in Eusebius, H. 2:25) says Paul and Peter both planted the Roman and Corinthian churches and endured martyrdom in Italy at the same time
Oracle - Apollo had the greatest number: such as those of Claros, of the Branchidae, of the suburbs of Daphne at Antioch, of Delos, of Argos, of Troas, AEolis, &c, of Baiae in Italy, and others in Cilicia, in Egypt, in the Alps, in Thrace, at Corinth, in Arcadia, in Laconia, and in many other places enumerated by Van Dale. Juno had several oracles: one near Corinth, one at Nysa, and others at different places. Sometimes the responses of the oracles were mere banter, as in the case of the man who wished to know by what means he might become rich, and who received for answer from the god, that he had only to make himself master of all that lay between Sicyon and Corinth
Spiritual Gifts - , 1 Corinthians 12:1-31 ; 1 Corinthians 13:1-13 ; 1 Corinthians 14:1-40 , Ephesians 4:7 ff. The gifts may be divided into the apparently miraculous and the non-miraculous, ( a ) The miraculous include speaking with tongues (probably ecstatic utterances, usually unintelligible to the speaker; see Tongues [1]), and their interpretation; gifts of healing, and the working of miracles or ‘powers’; of these we may instance the power of exorcism ([2] Mark 16:17 , Acts 16:18 ; Acts 19:12 ), and the punishment of offenders ( Acts 5:1-11 ; Act 13:9 , 1 Corinthians 4:21 ; 1 Corinthians 5:5 ). powers of administration); mercy and almsgiving; money, as affording opportunity for service and hospitality; 1 Corinthians 7:7 adds the gift of continence, and Galatians 5:22 gives a list of the fruits of the Spirit, as shown in the Christian character. the chief evidence for the miraculous is connected with Corinth. Paul speaks of his own powers in this respect as well known ( 1Co 2:4 ; 1 Corinthians 14:18 , 2 Corinthians 12:2 ); and Hebrews 2:4 mentions them as a recognized characteristic of the first age of Christianity. The gifts may be sporadic and intermittent; none the less their use must be orderly ( 1 Corinthians 14:40 ); ecstasy is no excuse for loss of self-control (v. Chrysostom, in his remarkable homily on 1 Corinthians 12:1-31 , calls attention to the change of word in vv. The same truth is emphasized in Romans 12:1-21 , 1 Corinthians 14:1-40 , 1 Peter 4:1-19 , in fact in every place where the charismata are mentioned at any length; St. Paul’s own object is always to ‘impart’ to others ( Romans 1:11 , 1 Corinthians 14:19 ; cf. The former, indeed, are not decisive as to their origin; they are not peculiar to Christianity, and may be the accompaniment of evil and falsehood ( Matthew 7:22 ; Matthew 24:24 , 2Th 2:9 , 1 Corinthians 12:3 , 1618454804_11 ). The test is on the one side doctrinal ( 1 Corinthians 12:2 ; 1 Corinthians 12:8 , 1 John 4:1-8 ); on the other the moral life ( Matthew 7:15 ff. , Romans 8:9 , 1 Corinthians 13:1-13 ) and the practical tendency to edification ( 1 Corinthians 14:1-40 ). The ‘discerning of spirits’ is itself an important gift ( 1 Corinthians 12:10 , 1 Thessalonians 5:21 , 1 John 4:1 )
Lord's Day, the - The adjective is found only one other time in the New Testament, in 1 Corinthians 11:20 , where Paul speaks of "the Lord's Supper. In 1Corinthians 16:1-3Paul exhorts the church at Corinth to set aside a sum of money "on the first day of every week" for the church at Jerusalem, as the Galatian churches were already doing. Alternately, Paul's comments to the Corinthians concerning the laying aside of money on the first day of the week do not indicate whether this action was connected with a formal gathering of the church (1 Corinthians 16:13 ). Acts 2:42 ; 1 Corinthians 11:20-22 )
Head, Headship - This might explain why Paul says "a woman ought to have a sign of authority on her head" (1 Corinthians 11:10 ). ...
First Corinthians 11:2-16 . Corinth was a port city and a commercial crossroad. He offers himself as an example of one who tried to please everybody for the sake of their salvation (1 Corinthians 10:31-11:1 ). ...
In 11:2 Paul praises the Corinthians for always following his directions. A woman may pray and prophesy in public if her dress shows submission to her husband's authority (1 Corinthians 11:5-6 ). He may not deprive her of what she needs for her happiness and well-being (1 Corinthians 7:3 ). We are not our own but are bought with a price (1 Corinthians 3:23 ; 6:19-20 ; Ephesians 5:23-33 )
Repentance - ...
In Paul's letters the verb metanoeo [ 2 Corinthians 12:21 ) and the noun metanoia [ Romans 2:4 ; 2 Corinthians 7:9,10 ; 2 Timothy 2:25 ). Paul did not "regret" the sorrow caused by his severe letter to Corinth (2 Corinthians 7:8 ); instead, the pain brought "repentance" (metanoia [2]) that leads to salvation, and leaves no "regret" (vv
Diana - Evidence of this cult has been found in numerous cities of Asia Minor as well as in the following places further afield: Autun, Marseilles, Rhone Mouth (France), Emporiae, Hemeroscopeum, Rhode (Spain), Epidaurus, Megalopolis, Corinth, Scillus (Greece), Neapolis (Samaria), Panticapaeum (Crimea), Rome, and Syria
Appoint, Appointed - The house of Stephanas at Corinth had "set themselves" to the ministry of the saints (AV, "addicted"), 1 Corinthians 16:15 . , of what was "appointed" for tax collectors to collect, Luke 3:13 ; of the tabernacle, as "appointed" by God for Moses to make, Acts 7:44 ; of the arrangements "appointed" by Paul with regard to himself and his travelling companions, Acts 20:13 ; of what the Apostle "ordained" in all the churches in regard to marital conditions, 1 Corinthians 7:17 ; of what the Lord "ordained" in regard to the support of those who proclaimed the Gospel, 1 Corinthians 9:14 ; of the Law as Divinely "ordained," or administered, through angels, by Moses, Galatians 3:19 . It is also said of those who were "appointed" (not by voting, but with general approbation) by the churches in Greece to accompany the Apostle in conveying their gifts to the poor saints in Judea, 2 Corinthians 8:19 . ...
Note: Epithanatios, "appointed to death," doomed to it by condemnation, 1 Corinthians 4:9 , AV, is corrected to "doomed to death" in the RV (epi, "for," thanatos, "death")
Life, Living, Lifetime, Life-Giving - Eternal life is the present actual possession of the believer because of his relationship with Christ, John 5:24 ; 1 John 3:14 , and that it will one day extend its domain to the sphere of the body is assured by the Resurrection of Christ, 2 Corinthians 5:4 ; 2 Timothy 1:10 . ...
"Zoe is also used of that which is the common possession of all animals and men by nature, Acts 17:25 ; 1 John 5:16 , and of the present sojourn of man upon the earth with reference to its duration, Luke 16:25 ; 1 Corinthians 15:19 ; 1 Timothy 4:8 ; 1 Peter 3:10 . " Since Christ had no sins of his own to die for, His death was voluntary and vicarious, John 10:15 with Isaiah 53:5,10,12 ; 2 Corinthians 5:21 . (3) In 2 Corinthians 1:8 , "we despaired even of life," the verb zao, "to live," is used in the infinitive mood, as a noun, and translated "life" (lit. ...
B — 1: βιωτικός (Strong's #982 — Adjective — biotikos — bee-o-tee-kos' ) "pertaining to life" (bios), is translated "of this life," in Luke 21:34 , with reference to cares; in 1 Corinthians 6:3 , "(things) that pertain to this life," and 1 Corinthians 6:4 , "(things) pertaining to this life," i. , matters of this world, concerning which Christians at Corinth were engaged in public lawsuits one with another; such matters were to be regarded as relatively unimportant in view of the great tribunals to come under the jurisdiction of saints hereafter. 3), "without life," 1 Corinthians 14:7 . 6), and, particularly, of resurrection life, John 5:21 ; Romans 4:17 ; (b) of Christ, who also is the bestower of resurrection life, John 5:21 (2nd part); 1 Corinthians 15:45 ; cp. 1 Corinthians 15:22 ; (c) of the resurrection of Christ in "the body of His glory," 1 Peter 3:18 ; (d) of the power of reproduction inherent in seed, which presents a certain analogy with resurrection, 1 Corinthians 15:36 ; (e) of the 'changing,' or 'fashioning anew,' of the bodies of the living, which corresponds with, and takes place at the same time as, the resurrection of the dead in Christ, Romans 8:11 ; (f) of the impartation of spiritual life, and the communication of spiritual sustenance generally, John 6:63 ; 2 Corinthians 3:6 ; Galatians 3:21
Greece, Religion And Society of - ...
Throughout the history of Greece there were important cities: Athens, Sparta, Corinth, Argos, Pylos, Delphi, Eretria, Thebes, Pella, Olynthus, and others. Almost every major city had its Asclepian including Corinth, Athens, Pergammom, cities in Cyprus, Crete, and throughout the Greek world
Paul the Apostle - Paul's conversion was never the focal point of his preachinghe preached Christ, not his personal experience (2 Corinthians 4:5 )but it does not fail to influence him in later years (Acts 22:2-12 ; 26:2-18 ). From there Barnabas enlisted his services for teaching duties in the church at Syrian Antioch (2 Corinthians 11:12-15 ). 50-53) and resulted in churches founded in Philippi, Berea, Thessalonica, and Corinth. 53 to 57 and centered on a long stay in Ephesus, from where he wrote 1Corinthians. During a sweep through Macedonia he wrote 2Corinthians. At the end of this time, awaiting departure for Jerusalem, he wrote Romans from Corinth (ca. Since the Enlightenment most critics have agreed that Romans, 1,2Corinthians, Galatians, Philippians, 1Thessalonians, and Philemon are definitely from Paul's hand. God comforts the afflicted and raises the dead (2 Corinthians 1:3,9 ). He is faithful (2 Corinthians 1:18 ); his "solid foundation stands firm" (2 Timothy 2:19 ). He grants believers his own Spirit as a downpayment of greater glory in the coming age (2 Corinthians 1:21-22 ). Paul's preaching in Acts 13:17 and his numerous references to Abraham in Romans and Galatians (9 references in each epistle see also 2 Corinthians 11:22 ) confirm that Paul did not see himself as founder of a new religion. In this sense Paul was not the originator of Christianity but merely its faithful witness and divinely guided interpreter (1 Corinthians 7:40 )granted, with the advantage of hindsight available after "the time had fully come" when "God sent his Son to redeem those under law, that we might receive the full rights of sons" (Galatians 4:4-5 ). Paul saw himself claimed by the God of the ages, who had chosen himof all people, for he had persecuted Christ by persecuting the church (Acts 9:4 ; 22:4 ; 26:11 ; 1 Corinthians 15:9 ; Galatians 1:13,23 ; Philippians 3:6 )to make plain secrets that were previously hidden (Ephesians 3:4-9 )
Expediency - συμφέπον (2 Corinthians 12:1). 1 Corinthians 7:35). As in the case of the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 3:1 f. Paul’s general attitude in 1 Corinthians. -Here we shall have to deal chiefly with the Epistles to the Corinthians, more especially 1 Corinthians. These Epistles represent the campaign and slow victory of the new Christian spirit over the debasing influence of the Corinthian ideal, which was the relentless pursuit of his own life by each individual. And so the keynote of the Epistle is found in 1 Corinthians 16:14 ‘Let all you do be done in love. ’ The first direct reference to expediency is found in 1 Corinthians 6:12 ‘All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient’ (ἀλλʼ οὐ πάντα συμφέρει). Paul here refers to some saying of his, which was subsequently drawn out of its limiting context by some members of the Corinthian Church who were inclined to exaggerate Christian liberty, so that they could please themselves in the matter of food, drink, etc. It was necessary to show the Corinthians that there is an essential contrast between things in themselves indifferent and things in their very nature evil. ‘All things are lawful for me, but I will not be brought under the power of any’ (1 Corinthians 6:12). That some at Corinth exposed themselves to this danger is quite evident. Being free from all men, yet he made himself servant unto all, that he might gain the more (1 Corinthians 9:19). He became all things to all men (1 Corinthians 9:22). He pleased all men in all things, not seeking his own profit (τὸ ἐμαυτοῦ συμφέρον), but the profit of many (1 Corinthians 10:33). ’ And again, he tells the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 8:13): ‘Wherefore, if meat make my brother to offend, I will eat no flesh while the world standeth, lest I make my brother to offend. , 1 Corinthians 11:1). 1 Corinthians 10:32, where the sphere of moral obligation is enlarged. It is evident that some at Corinth had taken St. It is to such sinister criticism that he alludes when in 2 Corinthians 5:11, after saying ‘we persuade men,’ he adds, ‘but we are become manifest unto God’; i
Dispersion - Acts 18:14-15), and were apparently permitted to inflict punishment for what they looked upon as schism or apostasy (Acts 26:11, 2 Corinthians 11:24). This brief account must be qualified, however, by the statement in Acts (18:28), that it was a gifted Alexandrian Jew, Apollos, who, after ‘the way of God had been expounded to him more carefully,’ demonstrated the Messiahship of Jesus publicly, before the Jews in Corinth, with energy and success (cf. The names of Barnabas of Cyprus, Philip of Caesarea, Lucius of Cyrene, Timothy of Lystra, Jason of Thessalonica, Sopater of Berœa, Crispus of Corinth, Aquila of Pontus, illustrate how largely the Church’s assets consisted of Jews settled abroad
Dispersion - Acts 18:14-15), and were apparently permitted to inflict punishment for what they looked upon as schism or apostasy (Acts 26:11, 2 Corinthians 11:24). This brief account must be qualified, however, by the statement in Acts (18:28), that it was a gifted Alexandrian Jew, Apollos, who, after ‘the way of God had been expounded to him more carefully,’ demonstrated the Messiahship of Jesus publicly, before the Jews in Corinth, with energy and success (cf. The names of Barnabas of Cyprus, Philip of Caesarea, Lucius of Cyrene, Timothy of Lystra, Jason of Thessalonica, Sopater of Berœa, Crispus of Corinth, Aquila of Pontus, illustrate how largely the Church’s assets consisted of Jews settled abroad
Body - The body is the place of proper worship (Romans 12:1 ), the Temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19-20 ), and thus is to be disciplined (1 Corinthians 9:27 ). In Corinth the people emphasized spiritual life. The inner spiritual life is not to be played off against the outer, physical life (Matthew 6:22 ; 1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ; 2Corinthians 4:7,2 Corinthians 4:10 ). Every action must be accounted for before God one day (2 Corinthians 5:10 ). Because the body of the Christian belongs to the Creator, Redeemer, and Holy Spirit, sexual sin is forbidden for the Christian (1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ). The earthly body of lowliness will be renewed like the glorious body of the resurrected Jesus, becoming an unearthly body or building or house (1 Corinthians 15:35-49 ; 2 Corinthians 5:1-10 ; Philippians 3:21 ). The body of Christ also designates the body of the Crucified One “given for you,” with which the church is united together in the celebration of the Lord's Supper (Mark 14:24 ; 1 Corinthians 10:16 ; 1 Corinthians 11:24 ). The image of the body calls the differing individual members into a unity (1 Corinthians 12:12-27 ); however, the church is not just similar; it is one body, and, indeed, one body in Christ (Romans 12:5 ; 1 Corinthians 10:17 ). The community of Christians does not produce the body; the body is a previously given fact (1 Corinthians 12:13 )
Communion - ]'>[2] ‘communion’ in only 3 passages ( 1 Corinthians 10:16 , 2 Corinthians 6:14 ; 2 Corinthians 13:14 ), while it is frequently rendered ‘ fellowship ’ (AV [4] 15 times), and twice ‘contribution’ or ‘distribution’ ( Romans 15:26 , 2 Corinthians 9:13 [RV [9] to the saints. ’ The Christians of Corinth might have communion with their brethren in Jerusalem by imparting to them out of their own abundance. In Romans 15:26 and 2 Corinthians 9:13 , accordingly, the word is properly enough rendered ‘contribution. Paul’s teaching, those who believed in Christ enjoyed a common participation in Christ Himself which bound them to one another in a holy unity ( 1 Corinthians 1:9 , cf. 1 Corinthians 1:10 ff. In the great central rite of their faith this common participation in Christ, and above all in His death and its fruits, was visibly set forth: the cup of blessing was a communion of the blood of Christ; the broken bread a communion of the body of Christ ( 1 Corinthians 10:16 ). 2 Corinthians 13:11 , Philippians 2:1 f
Judaizing - This was especially the case at Corinth, as we learn from the Second Epistle to the Corinthians
Hegesippus, Father of Church History - Hegesippus had an inquiring mind, and had travelled much; he endeavoured to learn all he could of the past and present state of the churches that he visited: at Corinth the first epistle of Clement excited his curiosity; at Rome the history of its early bishops
Communion - The Greek word κοινωνία has a wider scope (see Fellowship) than the English word ‘communion,’ which the English Version uses particularly in regard to the Lord’s Supper (1 Corinthians 10:16). Paul complains of the divisions at Corinth (1 Corinthians 11:18): the members of the Church do not share their meal in a brotherly way, nor do they wait for one another (i. Paul, in speaking of ‘the Lord’s Supper’ (1 Corinthians 11:20), indicates another point of view, which may be called the religious and sacramental conception: the Lard’s Supper is not only a supper held at the Lord’s command, or a supper held in honour of the Lord (cf. 1 Corinthians 11:23; 1 Corinthians 11:28), but it is also a supper in communion with the Lord, where the Lord is present, participating as the Host. ...
Now, when we turn to 1 Corinthians 10:16 again, we see clearly that it is not the bread and the wine that constitute sacramental communion by themselves; nor is communion the partaking of Christ’s material body and blood. From this conception of the transfigured body it is easy to pass to the other one of a spiritual body whose members are the partakers (1 Corinthians 10:17)
Ephesians, Epistle to the - Paul first visited Ephesus on his way from Corinth to Syria: he did not stay then, but left Priscilla and Aquila there, who were afterwards joined by Apollos. ...
In 1 Corinthians 15:32 Paul speaks of having fought with beasts at Ephesus, doubtless alluding to the strong opposition manifested towards him there by the Jews
Faithfulness - ...
This Divine faithfulness was made by the apostles the ground of forgiveness and cleansing to those who confessed their sins (1 John 1:9), of deliverance in temptation from the power of evil (1 Corinthians 6:13, 2 Thessalonians 3:3), and of confidence in the final salvation of those who were called into the fellowship of Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 1:9, 1 Thessalonians 5:24). Paul repelled with heat the charge of fickleness that had been brought against him by critics in Corinth (2 Corinthians 1:19-22). He who was called to be a minister of God was reminded that a steward must be found faithful (1 Corinthians 4:2). Paul claimed that he exhibited his faithfulness in teaching when he was dealing with the ease of fathers and their unmarried daughters (1 Corinthians 7:25). The first necessity for a Christian worker is that he should be, like Lydia, ‘faithful to Christ’ (πιστήν τῴ κυρίῳ, Acts 16:15); but he should be also, like Timothy, ‘faithful in Christ’ (πιστήν τῴ κυρίῳ, 1 Corinthians 4:17), i. Paul we find the Apostle on no fewer than six different occasions calling upon his readers to ‘stand fast’: ‘stand fast in the faith’ (στήκετε, ‘stand firmly and faithfully,’ 1 Corinthians 16:13); ‘stand fast in the liberty’ (Galatians 5:1); ‘in one spirit’ (Philippians 1:27); ‘in the Lord’ (Philippians 4:1, 1 Thessalonians 3:8); ‘and hold the traditions which ye were taught’ (2 Thessalonians 2:15)
Joshua, Book of - 2 Corinthians 5:16 . The sin of Achan was accounted as a sin of the people: 'Israel hath sinned,' God said; and there could be no power or blessing until the evil was put away (as in the action enjoined upon the church at Corinth)
Roads And Travel - Nothing is said in the Book of Acts about this, but the general reference in 2 Corinthians 11:26 serves to fill out the Acts narrative (cf. on 2 Corinthians 11:23-25 : ‘haec in Actibus non omnia repperiuntur, quia nec in Epistulis omnia quae ibi scripta sunt continentur’). From Athens (Acts 17:15 to Acts 18:1) he went, by sea no doubt, to Corinth, and from there by the short land journey to the southern port of Corinth, Cenchreae (Acts 18:18). Whether he took the sea-journey to Athens on this occasion also from the unknown port near BerCEa is uncertain; but to Athens and Corinth he went
Christianity - The first triumphs of Christianity were in the heart of Greece itself, the nursery of learning and the polite arts; for churches were planted at a very early period at Corinth, Ephesus, Beraea, Thessalonica, and Philippi. Among the proselytes to Christianity we find Nicodemus, and Joseph of Arimathea, members of the senate of Israel; Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue; Zaccheus, the chief of the publicans at Jericho; Apollos, distinguished for eloquence; Paul, learned in the Jewish law; Sergius Paulus, governor of the island of Cyprus; Cornelius, a Roman captain; Dionysius, a judge and senator of the Athenian areopagus; Erastus, treasurer of Corinth; Tyrannus, a teacher of grammar and rhetoric at Corinth; Publius, governor of Malta; Philemon, a person of considerable rank at Colosse; Simon, a noted sophist in Samaria; Zenas, a lawyer; and even the domestics of the emperor himself
Church - the ecclesia of the Thessalonians ( 1 Thessalonians 1:1 ), of Laodicea ( Colossians 4:16 ), of Corinth ( 1 Corinthians 1:2 ); cf. This language has doubtless given rise to the modern conception of ‘the churches’; but it must be observed that the Pauline idea is territorial, the only apparent departure from this usage being the application of the name to sections of a local ecclesia , which seem in some instances to have met for additional worship in the houses of prominent disciples ( Romans 16:5 , 1 Corinthians 16:19 etc. Thither missionaries return with reports of newly-founded Gentile societies and contributions for the poor saints ( Acts 15:2 ; Acts 24:17 , 1 Corinthians 16:1-3 ). Baptism, administered by the local ecclesiœ and resulting in rights and duties in respect of them, is yet primarily the method of entrance to the ideal community ( Romans 6:3-4 , 1 Corinthians 12:13 , Galatians 3:27-28 , Ephesians 4:5 ), to which also belong those offices and functions which, whether universal like the Apostolate ( 1 Corinthians 12:27-28 ) or particular like the presbyterate ( Acts 20:17 ; Acts 20:28 ; cf. 1 Corinthians 12:8-11 , Ephesians 4:11 ), are exercised only in relation to the local societies. It is the Church of God that suffers persecution in the persons of those who are of ‘the Way’ ( 1 Corinthians 15:9 , Acts 8:3 ; Acts 9:1 ); is profaned by misuse of sacred ordinances at Corinth ( 1 Corinthians 11:22 ); becomes at Ephesus the pillar and ground of the truth ( 1 Timothy 3:16 ). The Church is essentially visible, the shrine of God ( 1 Corinthians 3:16-17 ), the body of Christ ( Ephesians 1:23 etc. ), His complement or fulness ( Ephesians 1:23 ), deriving its life from Him as He does from the Father ( Ephesians 1:22 , 1 Corinthians 11:3 ). This truth, besides being definitely asserted ( Ephesians 5:25 ; Ephesians 5:27 , Acts 20:28 , Titus 2:14 ), is involved in the conception of Christ as the second Adam ( Romans 5:12-21 , 1 Corinthians 15:20-22 ), the federal head of a redeemed race; underlies the institutions of Baptism and the Eucharist; and is expressed in the Apostolic teaching concerning the two Sacraments (see above, also 1 Corinthians 10:16-18 ; 1 Corinthians 11:20-34 ). So the sacrifice of the Cross is our Passover ( 1 Corinthians 5:7 ). The worship of the Christian congregation is the Paschal feast ( 1 Corinthians 5:8 , cf
Preaching - ’ Sometimes the full expression κηρύσσειν τὸ εὐαγγέλιον, ‘to proclaim the gospel’ (Galatians 2:2, 1 Thessalonians 2:9), occurs, while εὐαγγελίζειν frequently characterizes the content of the good tidings, specifically as ‘the gospel’ (τὸ εὐαγγέλιον, 1 Corinthians 15:1, 2 Corinthians 11:7, Galatians 1:11), or more variously as ‘Jesus Christ’ (Acts 5:42), ‘peace’ (Ephesians 2:17), or ‘the word’ (Acts 15:35). ‘To one is given through the Spirit the word of wisdom, and to another the word of knowledge, … to another prophecy’ (1 Corinthians 12:4-11; cf. That a clearly marked differentiation of function was believed to be Divinely appointed appears from the two formal lists of spiritually gifted members, in which ‘teachers’ are mentioned after apostles and prophets (1 Corinthians 12:28, Ephesians 4:11). Subjectively their call to preach consisted in a feeling of ‘necessity’ (1 Corinthians 9:16), but an objective test was applied to them and their message by the spiritual communities to which they ministered (1 Thessalonians 5:21, 1 Corinthians 12:3; 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 John 4:1 f. But the preacher, when duly approved, had the right to expect support (1 Corinthians 9:4 ff. , 2 Corinthians 11:8 f. The preachers of the gospel, on the contrary, did not depend upon the assent of reason (1 Corinthians 2:1; 1 Corinthians 2:4). And a careful study of the NT shows that such a close connexion between preaching and faith was established: ‘So we preach, and so ye believed’ (1 Corinthians 15:11). The gifts of the Spirit received by the ‘hearing of faith’ authenticated both the believer (Galatians 3:2) and the preacher (1 Corinthians 2:4). This included the facts of His earthly life, and His death and resurrection (Galatians 4:4, 1 Corinthians 15:3 f. In these spiritual communities meetings for edification were held, in which every one who had a ‘gift’-whether of prophecy or interpretation, or ‘tongues,’ or praise (1 Corinthians 14:26 f. But it was in Corinth that he opposed his central theme of ‘Christ crucified’ to the impurity, commercialism, and superstitions of the city (1 Corinthians 1:22; 1 Corinthians 2:2). Paul warns the Corinthians against anyone who ‘preacheth another Jesus, whom we did not preach’ (ἐκηρύξαμεν, 2 Corinthians 11:4) and he rejoices when, even under conditions of faction, ‘Christ is proclaimed’ (Χριστὸς καταγγέλλεται, Philippians 1:18). Later in Corinth he testified that ‘Jesus was the Christ’ (Acts 18:5), reminding them afterwards that the ‘gospel preached’ unto them was that ‘Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures … and that he hath been raised on the third day according to the scriptures’ (1 Corinthians 15:1-4). It must be remembered that the good tidings of the resurrection of Jesus carried with it the glad message also of the believers’ share in the Messianic blessings (Acts 3:19-26), and a participation in the future resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:20 ff. ‘We preach’ (κηρύσσομεν), he says, ‘a Messiah crucified’ (1 Corinthians 1:23). ‘I determined not to know anything among you, save Jesus Christ, and him crucified’ (1 Corinthians 2:2). It was because ‘the word of the cross’ (1 Corinthians 1:18) was also the ‘word of reconciliation’ (2 Corinthians 5:19) that St. ’ in Expositor’s Bible, ‘1 Corinthians,’ 1889; artt
Peter - He appeared to Peter before he appeared to the rest of the apostles (Acts 5:18-215; 1 Corinthians 15:5; cf. He travelled over a wide area (accompanied by his wife) and preached in many churches, including, it seems, Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:12; 1 Corinthians 9:5)
Tongues, Gift of - Mark 16:17; Acts 2:1-13; Acts 10:46; Acts 19:6; Acts 19:1 Corinthians 12,14. The "tongues like as of fire" in the establishing of the New Testament church answer to Exodus 19:18, at the giving of the Old Testament law on Sinai, and Ezekiel 1:4 "a fire enfolding itself"; compare 1 Corinthians 14:20-2360; Luke 24:32. The places where tongues were exercised were just where there was least need of preaching in foreign tongues (Acts 2:1-4; Acts 10:46; Acts 19:6; Acts 19:1 Corinthians 14). Probably Paul did so in Lycaonia (Acts 14:11; Acts 14:15; he says (1 Corinthians 14:18) "I speak with tongues (the Vaticanus manuscript, but the Sinaiticus and the Alexandrinus manuscripts 'with a tongue') more than ye all. " Throughout his long notice of tongues in 1 Corinthians 14 he never alludes to their use for making one's self intelligible to foreigners. The epistles are all in Greek, not only to Corinth, but to Thessalonica, Philippi, Rome. In 1 Corinthians 12 and 1 Corinthians 14 tongues are placed lowest in the scale of gifts (1 Corinthians 12:31; 1 Corinthians 14:5). ...
They, like prophesyings, were under control of their possessors (1 Corinthians 14:32), and needed to be kept in due order, else confusion in church meetings would ensue (1 Corinthians 14:23; 1 Corinthians 14:39). The tongues, as evidencing a divine power raising them above themselves, were valued by Paul; but they suited the childhood (1 Corinthians 14:20; 1 Corinthians 13:11), as prophesying or inspired preaching the manhood, of the Christian life. The possessor of the tongue "spoke mysteries," praying, blessing, and giving thanks, but no one understood him; the "spirit" (pneuma ) but not "understanding" (nous ) was active (1 Corinthians 14:14-19). Yet he might edify himself (1 Corinthians 14:4) with a tongue which to bystanders seemed a madman's ravings, but to himself was the expression of ecstatic adoration. " Tongues either awaken to spiritual attention the unconverted or, if despised, condemn (compare "sign" in a condemnatory sense, Ezekiel 4:3-4; Matthew 12:39-42), those who, like Israel, reject the sign and the accompanying message; compare Acts 2:8; Acts 2:13; 1 Corinthians 14:22; "yet, for all that will they not hear Me," even such miraculous signs fail to arouse them; therefore since they will not understand they shall not understand. "Tongues of men" and "divers kinds of tongues" (1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 12:28; 1 Corinthians 13:1) imply diversity, which applies certainly to languages, and includes also the kind of tongues which was a spiritual language unknown to man, uttered in ecstasy (1 Corinthians 14:2). ...
He who spoke (praying) in a tongue should pray that he might (be able to) interpret for edification of the church (1 Corinthians 14:13; 1 Corinthians 14:26-27). Hebrew and Aramaic words spoken in the spirit or quoted from the Old Testament often produced a more solemn effect upon Greeks than the corresponding Greek terms; Compare 1 Corinthians 16:22, Μaranatha , 1 Corinthians 12:3; Lord of sabaoth , James 5:4; Αbba , the adoption cry, Romans 8:15; Galatians 4:6; Alleluia, Revelation 19:1; Revelation 19:6; Hosannah, Matthew 21:9; Matthew 21:15. "Tongues of angels" (1 Corinthians 13:1) are such as Daniel and John in Revelation heard; and Paul, when caught up to paradise (2 Corinthians 12:4). ...
An intonation in speaking with tongues is implied in Paul's comparison to the tones of the harp and pipe, which however he insists have distinction of sounds, and therefore so ought possessors of tongues to speak intelligibly by interpreting their sense afterward, or after awakening spiritual attention by the mysterious tongue they ought then to follow with "revelation, knowledge, prophesying or doctrine" (1 Corinthians 14:6-11); otherwise the speaker with a tongue will be "a barbarian," i. ...
Either the speaker with a tongue or a listener might have the gift of interpreting, so he might bring forth deep truths from the seemingly incoherent utterances of foreign, and Aramaic, and strange words (1 Corinthians 14:7; 1 Corinthians 14:11; 1 Corinthians 14:13; 1 Corinthians 14:27). When the age of miracle passed (1 Corinthians 13:8) the tongues ceased with it; the scaffolding was removed, when the building was complete as regards its first stage; hymns and spiritual snugs took the place of tongues, as preaching took the place of prophesying. Not these, but the confession of Jesus as Lord with heart and tongue was the declared test of real discipleship (1 Corinthians 12:3; 1 John 4:2-3)
Macedonia - , the First Letter to the Thessalonians which Paul wrote from Corinth after he had preached in Beroea and in Athens (Acts 17:13-15 )
Mission(s) - ...
Empowered by the Holy Spirit, the church did mission by preaching Jesus (Acts 2:1 ; Acts 8:35 ; Acts 10:36-44 ; 1 Corinthians 2:1-2 ). The church's mission to the world was strengthened through its intimate fellowship and unity (Acts 2:44 ), and every effort was made to maintain this characteristic (Acts 6:1-7 ; Acts 15:1 ; and Paul's letters to the churches in Corinth and Galatia). After the resurrection, missionaries were arrested (Acts 4:1 and Acts 5:1 ), suffered (2 Corinthians 4:7-10 ), and died (Acts 7:1 ). He preached Jesus (1 Corinthians 2:1-2 ), met people on their own level (Acts 17:1 ), established autonomous, indigenous churches (Acts 14:23 ), and worked with others—often training them to do the works of the ministry (Acts 16:1-3 ). Significantly, he identified with those with whom he worked (1 Corinthians 9:19-23 )
Jude, Epistle of - ideas similar to these were troubling the Church ( 1Co 5:10 ; 1 Corinthians 11:17 ff. Compare Judges 1:1 with 1Th 1:4 , 2 Thessalonians 2:13 ; Judges 1:10 ; Judges 1:19 with 1 Corinthians 2:14 ; Judges 1:20-21 with Romans 5:5 ; Romans 8:26 , Colossians 2:7 ; Judges 1:24-25 with Romans 16:25-27 , Colossians 1:22 ; and with the Pastoral Epistles frequently, e. Bigg suggests ‘that the errors denounced in both Epistles took their origin from Corinth, that the disorder was spreading, that St
Luke (2) - The NT itself is not without examples of such names; Σίλας (Σιλέας) for Σιλουανός, Ἀμπλιᾶς (Romans 16:8) for Ἀμπλίατος, Ὀυμπᾶς (Romans 16:15) for Ὀλυμπιόδωρος, Δημᾶς (Colossians 4:14) for Δημήτριος, Ἐπαφρᾶς (Colossians 4:12) for Ἐπαφρόδιτος, Ἀπολλώς for Ἀπολλώνιος, Ζηνᾶς (Titus 3:13) for Ζηνόδωρος, Ἀντιπᾶς (Revelation 2:13) for Ἀντίπατρος, Στεφανᾶς (1 Corinthians 16:15) for Στεφανηφόρος. Corinth, Lystra, Ptolemais, and Pisidian Antioch, to mention no others, were also Roman colonies; yet the author affixes the title to Philippi only. Paul, is not mentioned in Acts, is that he was Luke’s brother, especially as the only natural way to take the words τὸν ἀδελφόν in 2 Corinthians 12:18 is as ‘his brother,’ i
Galatians, Epistle to the - In 1 Corinthians 16:1 we read that Paul had instructed the churches in Galatia as to the collection for the poor. This was written to Corinth about A
Fruit - -These are James 5:7; James 5:18 (in illustration of patience and prayer), Acts 14:17 (God’s gift of rain and fruitful seasons), 1 Corinthians 9:7 (in support of the apostles’ right to sustenance; cf. Paul’s use of the grain or wheat in the great Resurrection argument of 1 Corinthians 15 is familiar to all, and is an echo of Christ’s word in John 12:24-25. -We may begin our study of the spiritual lessons inculcated under the image of fruit with another passage from Corinthians. In 1 Corinthians 3:9 the Apostle reminds his readers that they are ‘God’s husbandry,’ i. Thus the Apostle hopes, as he looks forward to his visit to Rome, that he may ‘have some fruit among’ the people of that city as he had in Corinth and Ephesus (Romans 1:13). 2 Corinthians 9:6)
Drunkenness - At Corinth the ἀγάπη, or love-feast, which ended in the Lord’s Supper, all too readily degenerated into something not very unlike the banquets in the idol-temples. ‘One is hungry, and another is drunken’ (μεθύει, 1 Corinthians 11:21). No drunkard can ‘inherit the Kingdom of God’ (1 Corinthians 6:10), and the task of Christian churches and governments is ‘to make it easy for men to do good and difficult for them to do evil
Unity (2) - (1 Corinthians 1:13; 1 Corinthians 11:18; 1 Corinthians 12:25) is the first to use ‘schism’ (σχίσμα) with an approach to its present technical meaning. There is no suggestion that those who called themselves ‘of Paul’ had ceased to communicate with those who called themselves ‘of Apollos’ (1 Corinthians 1:12). The ‘divisions’ apparent in their meetings for worship (1 Corinthians 11:13-21) were of class, of richer and poorer (1 Corinthians 11:22), and did not prevent the common meeting. The ‘schism’ deprecated in his parable of body and members (1 Corinthians 12:25) amounts only to carelessness of mutual interest; solution of continuity in the body of Christ is not contemplated. Undoubtedly He desires that the vital and spiritual unity which He effects should have a concrete expression—such expression as is apprehensible, not only to the spiritual man discerning spiritual things (1 Corinthians 2:11-16), but to the world, which cannot receive the Spirit (John 14:17), and is aware of that only which with eyes of flesh it sees. It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that this ‘one thing’ is, spiritually, the Kingdom which His Incarnation brings among us (Luke 17:21); representatively, the Society which He builds (Matthew 16:18), to which by His institution the one Baptism (Ephesians 4:5) admits, and which the one Bread (1 Corinthians 10:17) shows. Many as we are, we are one loaf and one body, being partakers of the one sacramental food (1 Corinthians 10:17; cf. The one Spirit makes us one body, and members one of another (1 Corinthians 12:4-27), ‘that there should be no schism in the body. It is against first principles to assume the name of any leader as a party distinction (1 Corinthians 1:13); to do so is ‘carnal’ (1 Corinthians 3:3-4). The Churches of God have no custom of love of controversy (1 Corinthians 11:16); God is not the author of confusion but of peace; and so it is in all the Churches (1 Corinthians 14:33). ...
In the earlier stages of the Church’s life, government by bishops and presbyters in one local community could coexist with government by college of presbyters in another, without offence to either; Antioch, Epbesus, Smyrna communicated with Rome and Corinth. Clement has no criticism for the absence of a bishop at Corinth, but only for insubordination to its presbyters
Holy Spirit, Gifts of - Four New Testament passages delineate specific gifts that God's Spirit gives to his people (Romans 12:3-8 ; 1 Corinthians 12-14 ; Ephesians 4:7-13 ; 1 Peter 4:10-11 ). The terminology varies from ordinary words for gift (dorea, doma — Ephesians 4:7-8 ) to a cognate of grace (charisma Romans 12:6 ; 1 Corinthians 12:4,9 , 28,30-31 ; 1 Peter 4:10 ), to a substantive formed from the adjective "spiritual" (pneumatika 1 Corinthians 12:1 ; 14:1,37 ). But the concept remains the same: distinctive, divinely originated endowments to serve the Triune God for the common benefit of his people, the church (Romans 12:4-5 ; 1 Corinthians 12:7 ; Ephesians 4:12-13 ; 1 Peter 4:10 ). In 1 Corinthians 12 , Paul enumerates nine key principles. ...
First Corinthians 13 stresses that without love spiritual gifts are worthless. Echoing the identical sequence of 1 Corinthians 12-13 , Paul then moves on to exhortations concerning love (12:9-13:10). The two most controversial gifts in Corinth were tongues and prophecy, so Paul devotes an entire chapter to their regulation (1 Corinthians 14 ). ...
In 1 Corinthians 14 , Paul enjoins the Corinthians to prefer prophecy to tongues because it is more immediately intelligible (vv. Herein lies the most probable explanation of the restriction on women speaking in 1 Corinthians 14:33b-38 . ...
As a spiritual gift given only to those whom God chooses, discernment of spirits (1 Corinthians 12:10 ) cannot be the same as the responsibility of evaluating prophecy incumbent on all believers. ...
The nature of the gifts of tongues and their interpretation must be determined by Paul's own teaching, rather than presupposing that the three instances of tongues-speaking in Acts (2:1-13; 10:46; 19:6) must determine the form of glossolalia in Corinth. The reference to angelic language in 1 Corinthians 13:1 makes it even more likely that Corinthian tongues were not merely foreign languages; parallel phenomena in the surrounding cultures strongly confirms this. 18-19); it is not clear if Paul would consider this the same gift as public speaking in tongues, but he clearly tries to temper the Corinthians' enthusiasm for this gift in church (v. The plural nouns (1 Corinthians 12:10,28 ) in each instance suggest that there may be different kinds of miraculous gifts or that these gifts are not the permanent possession of an individual but repeatedly given for the specific occasions in which they are to be used. ...
Wisdom and knowledge manifest themselves in wise and knowledgeable speech (1 Corinthians 12:8 ). The Corinthians had boasted of their wisdom and knowledge (1 Corinthians 4:10 ; 8:1 ), perhaps in the tradition of the pagan Sophists, but Paul recognized their boasts as hollow and unfounded. ...
Faith is the clearest example of a gift that amplifies an attribute required of all Christians (1 Corinthians 12:9 ). "Those able to help others" (1 Corinthians 12:28 ) may be the Corinthian equivalent to three of the above gifts. ...
Although Luke usually reserves "apostle" for one of the Twelve (Acts 1:21-22 ; but 14:14), Paul uses the term less technically as a spiritual gift (1 Corinthians 12:29 ; Ephesians 4:11 ). "...
Like apostles, evangelists (1 Corinthians 12:28 ; Ephesians 4:11 ) preach the gospel to unsaved people. ...
Kybernesis [ 1 Corinthians 12:28 ), generally translated as "administration, " may also be rendered "oversight" or "guidance, " and encompasses the ruling or governing aspect of church leadership. They are God's characteristic endowments for Christian service in the New Testament age, arguably the most fundamental way ministry occurs (Acts 2:17-21 ; 1 Corinthians 1:7 ). First Corinthians 14:39-40 concludes Paul's treatment of the topic with remarkably clear commands, which, if obeyed, could go a long way toward eliminating divisiveness in the church over the gifts. Fee, The First Epistle to the Corinthians ; C. Grudem, The Gift of Prophecy in 1Corinthians ; K
Roman Law - Also noteworthy is the fact that Acts twice links Paul with Roman proconsuls (Sergius Paulus on Cyprus in Acts 13:6-12 and Annius Gallio at Corinth in Acts 18:12-17 )
Church - It means an organized body, whose unity does not depend on its being met together in one place; not an assemblage of atoms, but members in their several places united to the One Head, Christ, and forming one organic living whole (1 Corinthians 12). Also of "the whole church" (Romans 16:23; 1 Corinthians 12:28). " Founded on the Rock, "the Christ the Son of the living God," the only Foundation (Matthew 16:16; Matthew 16:18; 1 Corinthians 3:11). The ministry of the word and the two sacraments, baptism, and the supper of the Lord, (both in part derived from existing Jewish rites, 1618454804_96; 1 Corinthians 5:7-8). The visible church, while avoiding needless alterations, has power under God to modify her polity as shall tend most to edification (Matthew 18:18; 1 Corinthians 12:28-30; 1 Corinthians 14:26; 1 Corinthians 1:2). When the ruler of the synagogue became a Christian, he naturally was made bishop, as tradition records that Crispus became at Corinth (Acts 18:8). Common to both church and synagogue were the discipline (Matthew 18:17), excommunication (1 Corinthians 5:4), and the collection of alms (1 Corinthians 16:2)
Trade And Commerce - Paul (2 Corinthians 2:17) contrasts himself with the many who ‘hawk (make merchandise of, καπηλεύοντες) the word of God. ’ ‘Christ has bought us (ἐξηγόρασεν) from the law’s curse’ (Galatians 3:13; Galatians 4:5, 1 Corinthians 6:20; 1 Corinthians 7:23; 1 Corinthians 7:30); we are advised ‘to buy up,’ ‘make a market of’ (ἐξαγοραζόμενοι) the opportunity (Ephesians 5:16, Colossians 4:5; cf. 2 Corinthians 8:9, 1 Corinthians 1:5, Romans 2:4, Ephesians 1:7) of spiritual wealth; cf. , is δόκιμος, ‘approved,’ and cognates (Romans 14:18, 2 Corinthians 10:18, etc. ); a metaphor from the earnest, the large portion of the price paid as a first instalment of a debt, is ἀρραβών (2 Corinthians 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:5, Ephesians 1:14), and βεβαιόω, βεβαίωσις (1 Corinthians 1:6, Philippians 1:7) are supposed by some to be connected with surety. Partnership in business is suggested by κοινωνός (2 Corinthians 1:7, etc. ), κοινωνία μετοχή (2 Corinthians 6:14; 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:13, Philippians 1:5), συνκοινωνός, συνκοινωνέω, συνμέτοχος (Ephesians 3:6; Ephesians 5:7; Ephesians 5:11, Philippians 4:14, Romans 11:17). Profit, gain, is suggested by κέρδος (Philippians 3:7), by the constant use of περισσός and its derivatives, by πλεονάζω, πλεονεξία (2 Corinthians 8:15; 2 Corinthians 9:5, etc. ]'>[3] , 3920), taking the dangerous route by the south of the Peloponnese on each occasion, instead of the easier method of trans-shipment over the Isthmus of Corinth. Besides the classic account of the great voyage in Acts 27, we learn from 2 Corinthians 11:25-26, which of course antedates, and does not post-date, as Pelagius imagined, the narrative in Acts, that St. The Mysteries of Eleusis near Athens and of Samothrace, the Feasts of Dionysus at Argos and of Pythian Apollo at Delphi, the Isthmian Games at Corinth, and the Olympian Games in Elis (Peloponnese), all attracted countless visitors and stimulated trade, being the ancient counterparts of the Stourbridge, Leipzig, and Nijni Novgorod fairs of more modern times
Presbyterians - ' Accordingly we find that Timothy was resident for a time at Philippi and Corinth (Philippians 2:19 . 1 Corinthians 4:1-21 ; 1 Corinthians 16:10-11 . ' This text might lead us to suppose that Timothy was bishop of Corinth as well as of Ephesus; for it is stronger than that upon which his episcopacy of the latter church is chiefly built
Presbyterians - The identity of the office of bishop and presbyter is still more apparent from Hebrews 13:7 ; 1 Corinthians 4:1-2198 . ' Accordingly we find that Timothy was resident for a time at Philippi and Corinth (Philippians 2:19 . 1618454804_9 ; 1 Corinthians 16:10-11 . ' This text might lead us to suppose that Timothy was bishop of Corinth as well as of Ephesus; for it is stronger than that upon which his episcopacy of the latter church is chiefly built
Tradition - Paul frequently referred to the traditions which he had received and which he passed on to the churches (1 Corinthians 11:23-25 ; 1 Corinthians 15:3-7 ). Paul clearly referred to conflicting traditions and allegiances at Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:10-12 )
Trinity - The first is the trinitarian formula of Matthew 28:19 ; 2 Corinthians 13:14 ; 1 Peter 1:2 ; Revelation 1:4 . ...
Paul, in 2 Corinthians 13:14 , finalized his thoughts to the Corinthian church with a pastoral appeal that is grounded in “the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit” (NIV). Paul was calling attention to the trinitarian consciousness, not in the initial work of salvation which has already been accomplished at Corinth, but in the sustaining work that enables divisive Christians to achieve unity. Two passages cast in this structure are Ephesians 4:4-6 and 1 Corinthians 12:3-6
Preach, Proclaim - First Corinthians contains four occurrences of "proclaim. First Corinthians 9:27 is a brief reference to Paul's having proclaimed to othersthe gospel is understood. Second Corinthians 1:19 affirms that Jesus Christ was proclaimed to the Corinthians by Paul. Second Corinthians 4:5 asserts that Paul proclaims Jesus Christ as Lord. Second Corinthians 11:4, as part of Paul's defense of his apostolic authority at Corinth, contains two mentions of "proclaim. " The same statement mentions his opponents' proclamations and also that he had proclaimed the true gospel to the Corinthians
Head - Paul’s words to blaspheming Jews at Corinth: ‘Your blood be upon your own heads’ (Acts 18:6; cf. Paul argues against the Corinthian practice of allowing women publicly to pray or prophesy with unveiled heads, on three grounds (1 Corinthians 11:3 f. (No satisfactory explanation of the phrase ‘authority [3] on her head’ [4] seems yet to have been given, but the context seems to imply that the veil expresses the authority of man over woman, in accordance with which the Revised Version inserts the words ‘a sign of’ before ‘authority. In the most detailed application of the analogy (1 Corinthians 12:12 f; cf. ...
The bodily union of the members with Christ the Head is conceived in close relation with the initial act of baptism: ‘in one Spirit were we all baptized into one body’ (1 Corinthians 12:13)
Blasphemy (2) - The second charge is suddenly sprung upon, Jesus by the high priest on the ground of His words at the council; and, on this account, as guilty of blasphemy, He was condemned to death, although it was useless to cite the words before Pilate, who would have dismissed the case as Gallio at Corinth dismissed what he regarded as ‘a question about words and names’ (Acts 18:15)
Foundation - The rivalries of the Christian Church in heathen lands, while whole tracts are lying unevangelized, are a sad sight,...
(2) To the Church of Christian Corinth, St. Paul writes: ὡς σοφὸς ἀρχιτέκτων θεμέλιον ἕθηκα, ‘as a wise master-builder, I laid a foundation’ (1 Corinthians 3:10), and again: θεμέλιον γὰρ ἅλλον οὐδεὶς δύναται θεῖναι παρὰ τὸν κείμενον ὅς ἐστιν Ἰησοῦς Χριστός, ‘for other foundation can no man lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ’ (1 Corinthians 3:11 Revised Version ). McFadyen (The Epistles to the Corinthians, London, 1911, p. to the Corinthians, London, 1873, pp. Paul by a change of metaphor (1 Corinthians 3:11) presents the apostles and prophets as themselves the foundation, and Christ as the corner-stone ‘binding together both the walls and the foundations
Bishop, Elder, Presbyter - Clement’s Epistle shows that the trouble at Corinth was about persons-whether certain presbyters had been rightly deposed; not about principles-whether government by presbyters could be rightly maintained. Clement is the first Christian writer to take the fateful first step of interpreting the nature of office in the Church by reference to Jewish institutions, for which, to a certain extent, the way is prepared in 1 Corinthians 9:9 and 1 Timothy 5:18 (Harnack, Constitution and Law of the Church, London, 1910, p. Neither bishops, elders, nor deacons appear in the lists of ministers and ministerial gifts in 1 Corinthians 12:28-30, Romans 12:6-8, Ephesians 4:11
Perfect Perfection - From the same root (ἄρτιος) is derived, with a strengthening prefix, the causative verb καταρτίζειν, which in the RV_ is rendered (a) ‘restore’ in Galatians 6:1; 1 Peter 5:10 RVm_; (b) ‘make perfect’ in 1 Thessalonians 3:10, Hebrews 13:21; (c) ‘perfect’ in 1 Corinthians 1:10, 2 Corinthians 13:11; 1 Peter 5:10. The cognate nouns are translated ‘perfecting’ in 2 Corinthians 13:9, Ephesians 4:12. The word has probably the same significance in 1 Corinthians 1:10. Paul deplores the existence of splits or schisms in the Church at Corinth; he therefore desires that its members may be ‘well and surely adjusted’ (coagmentati, Bengel); cf. Findlay (in EGT_, ‘1 Corinthians,’ London, 1900, p. Edwards (1 Corinthians2, London, 1885, p. ...
In three important passages the RV_ renders τέλειος ‘full-grown,’ twice in the text (Ephesians 4:13, Hebrews 5:14), and once in the margin (1 Corinthians 2:6). Mature Christians are contrasted with babes in Christ, as in 1 Corinthians 14:20, where, however, τέλειοι is translated ‘men’: ‘howbeit in malice be ye babes, but in mind be men. 1 Corinthians 13:10 f. , Galatians 4:3); as compared with the fresh uninstructed convert, the disciplined and experienced Christian is τέλειος (1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 14:20, Ephesians 4:13, Philippians 3:15, Colossians 1:28; Colossians 4:12, James 1:4)
Head - Paul’s words to blaspheming Jews at Corinth: ‘Your blood be upon your own heads’ (Acts 18:6; cf. Paul argues against the Corinthian practice of allowing women publicly to pray or prophesy with unveiled heads, on three grounds (1 Corinthians 11:3 f. (No satisfactory explanation of the phrase ‘authority [3] on her head’ [4] seems yet to have been given, but the context seems to imply that the veil expresses the authority of man over woman, in accordance with which the Revised Version inserts the words ‘a sign of’ before ‘authority. In the most detailed application of the analogy (1 Corinthians 12:12 f; cf. ...
The bodily union of the members with Christ the Head is conceived in close relation with the initial act of baptism: ‘in one Spirit were we all baptized into one body’ (1 Corinthians 12:13)
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - It can be demonstrated that such an idea — the overlapping of the two ages is the key to understanding 1,2Corinthians as well. ...
In tandem with the aforementioned eschatological frame of reference is another matter that contributes to the theology of 1,2Corinthians: the nature of Paul's opposition at Corinth. The Corinthian church, while loved by Paul, nevertheless provided a constant source of frustration to his ministry. The Corinthians' infatuation with themselves undoubtedly originated from some sort of overrealized eschatology. The Corinthians apparently believed that the kingdom of God had fully come and that they, as saints, were already reigning and judging in it (4:5,8). In essence, the Corinthians thought they had attained the status of the angels (hence their claim to speak in angelic language
By the time Paul wrote 2Corinthians, the plot had thickened in his relationship with the Corinthian congregation. Whereas in 1Corinthians Paul was dealing with basically an in-house problem, he now had to respond to his audience's demands to supply proof of his apostolic call (no doubt fueled by outside intruders who denied Paul's ministerial credentials). The primary criticism that Paul felt constrained to ward off in that letter was his opponents' denial of his apostleship because he lacked outward power and glory (see 2 Corinthians 3:1-7:16 ; 10:13 ). Second Corinthians seeks to correct that imbalance by holding the concept of the two ages together in dynamic tension. ...
Therefore, it can be argued that the overlapping of the two ages colors the major theological categories that occur in the Corinthian correspondences: theology, Christology, soteriology, pneumatology, and ecclesiology. With regard to theology proper (the study of God) in 1,2Corinthians, one of the major themes developed therein is the kingdom of God. For Paul, the kingdom of God has already been inaugurated (1 Corinthians 4:20 ; 15:24 ) by virtue of the cross and resurrection of Jesus (1:18-2:5; 15:1-22), but it is not yet complete (1 Corinthians 6:9-10 ; 15:50 ). The idea of the kingdom of God in 1,2Corinthians transcends the terminology. One of the clear-cut signs that the kingdom of God has come to earth is the formation of the church, the new people of God (1 Corinthians 1:2 ; 2 Corinthians 1:1 ). This group is identified by Paul, among other things, as the "saints" (Corinthians 2:1-164 ; 2 Corinthians 1:1 ). Romans 2:28-29 ; 1 Corinthians 5:1-13 ; 1 Peter 2:9-10 ; etc. Furthermore, believers have been called into fellowship with God through his Son, Jesus (1 Corinthians 1:9 ; 15:23-28 ; cf. In fact, Christians have already begun to reign in Christ's spiritual kingdom, and therefore should act accordingly (1 Corinthians 6:2-3 ). Moreover, the formation of God's new covenant people in Christ (2 Corinthians 3:1-18 ) is nothing less than a new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ). Their present struggle with sin attests to that stark reality (1 Corinthians 6:9-10 ) as does the futurity of their resurrection bodies (1 Corinthians 15:50 ). According to the Corinthian letters, that demise was initiated with the first advent of Christ. With his death on the cross and resurrection from the grave, the wisdom of this age, with its propensity to disobey God, has begun to pass away (1 Corinthians 1:29 ; 7:29-30 ). The same is the case for the rulers of this age (1 Corinthians 2:6 ), however one may define those misinformed culprits (as demons, rulers, or, more likely, both; the former energizing the latter). As a result, Christ, through his servants like Paul, is leading the enemies of God as captives, parading their collapse (2 Corinthians 2:14-18 ; cf. Colossians 2:15 ) and destroying their spiritual stronghold by the word of his power (2 Corinthians 10:3-6 ). According to Paul, they are still alive and operative in the affairs of humans, blinding the minds of unbelievers (2 Corinthians 4:3-4 ) and, if possible, even Christians (1 Corinthians 10:20-21 ; 2 Corinthians 6:14-18 ; 11:13-14 ). And still the greatest of God's enemiesdeathremains at large (1 Corinthians 15:25-27,53-56 ). Perhaps the dominant christological perspective operative in 1,2Corinthians is that Jesus the Messiah, by his death on the cross and resurrection from the grave, has effected the shift of the two ages. ...
According to 1 Corinthians 1:18-25 , the cross was the turning point of the ages. 1 Corinthians 2:6-8 ). ...
First Corinthians 10:11 continues the thought that Christ's death and resurrection inaugurated the age to come when it describes Christians as the ones "on whom the fulfillment of the ages has come. " The catalyst for this inbreaking of the age to come was the sacrificial death of Christ (1 Corinthians 10:16 ; 5:7 ; 11:23-25 ; 2 Corinthians 8:9 ). Paul expands on this theme in 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 which, in the context of the chapter, attests to the truth that Christ's death and resurrection have brought about several endtime blessings for Christians: (1) The general resurrection of the endtime has been projected back into the present period in the resurrection of Christ, the firstfruits of the dead (15:12-22). ) is currently being dispensed through Christ, the "life-giving Spirit, " who is the "last" (eschaton [ 1 Corinthians 15:11-22,42-49 ), who now must spread that message to others. At that time the present, invisible glorious reign of Christ in heaven will be made visible on earth (1 Corinthians 11:26 ; 16:22 ); such an event will cause the invisible glory within Christians to shine forth, transfiguring their earthly bodies (1 Corinthians 15:50-57 ; 2 Corinthians 4:16-5:10 ). Only at the parousia will that which is "perfect" arrive (1 Corinthians 13:10 ). Thus, even Christ himself, according to the Corinthian letters, lives in the interfacing of the two ages, between his first and second advents. We encounter in 1,2Corinthians a certain amount of ambiguity concerning Paul's concept of salvation, which can be explained by the overlapping of the two ages. ...
The first term, "salvation, " is scattered throughout the Corinthian epistles. In 1Corinthians 1:18-31Paul delineates the mixed reaction Christians receive. ...
The term "save" also occurs in 1 Corinthians 9:22 with reference to those who embrace Christ (cf. 2 Corinthians 2:15 ). They are the ones upon whom the "fulfillment of the ages has come" (10:11) and yet their salvation is not finalized (1 Corinthians 9:24-10:13 ). ...
The already/not yet tension is at work in two other key texts on salvation in the Corinthian letters. In 1Corinthians 15:1-2Paul reminds his audience that their salvation is based on the gospel, "the gospel which you received By this gospel you are saved. " However, that salvation is dependent on the Corinthians holding fast to the gospel. A similar statement is found in 2 Corinthians 6:2 , where Paul announces that the day of salvation has arrived. Nevertheless the Christians at Corinth can forfeit that gift by failing to receive Paul as the apostle of grace (2 Corinthians 6:1-7:2 ). ...
The second term in 1,2Corinthians possessing salvific content is "sanctification, " a word that means to set apart for holiness. On the one hand, the Corinthians (and all believers for that matter) are sanctified or set apart for God in Christ (Romans 11:25-368 ; 6:11 ; 3:16-17 ]). However, notwithstanding their exalted position as saints (1:2), the fact that the Corinthians still lived in this present age (1 Corinthians 3:18 ) embroiled them in a deep-seated struggle with sin. The result was a long list of unsanctimonious behavior on their part, including division (1 Corinthians 1:10-17 ); carnality (1 Corinthians 3:1-15 ); the approval of immorality (Galatians 6:16 ), even to the point of engaging in it themselves (1 Corinthians 6:16-18 ; 7:2 ); litigation (1 Corinthians 6:1-8 ); and the improper use of Christian liberty (1 Corinthians 8:1-13 ). If the Corinthians persisted in these forbidden activities, they could jeopardize their salvation (1 Corinthians 6:9-10 ; cf. 2 Corinthians 13:5 ). The cure for their struggle was to glorify God in their bodies (1 Corinthians 6:19-20 ), though sin will continue to wage spiritual holy war with them (and all Christians) until the age to come is fully realized. ...
The third related soteriological term in 1,2Corinthians is "glory. " For the apostle Paul, the death and glorious resurrection of Jesus Christ inaugurated the glory of the age to come (1 Corinthians 15:42-49 ). This is clear from passages like 2 Corinthians 3:1-4:6,4:16 (cf. However, this glory resides in the Christian's heart (2 Corinthians 3:18 ; 4:6 ); it has not yet transformed the body. That event awaits the parousia (see 1 Corinthians 15:50-56 ; 2 Corinthians 5:1-5 ). In the meantime, because Christians continue to live in this evil age, they will share in the sufferings of this life (2 Corinthians 1:1-22 ). Paul, too, suffers for righteousness' sake and in the service of his Lord in this present world (1 Corinthians 4:9-13 ; 15:30-32 ; 2 Corinthians 4:7-15 ; 6:3-10 ; 11:23-33 ; 12:7-10 ). On the contrary, those who emphasize exterior glory and look upon suffering with chagrin, thinking that Christians are "divine men" displaying miraculous signs and wonders, are actually the false apostles (see 2 Corinthians 5:12 ; 11:13-15 ). The Corinthian correspondence associates three ideas with the Spirit: wisdom, the temple of God, and spiritual gifts. 1 Corinthians 2:1-16 ; with 1618454804_67 ; Ephesians 1:15-23 ; 3:14-21 ; Colossians 2:9-29 ). However, the Corinthians, despite having the wisdom of the Spirit, nevertheless continue to live in this age. Consequently, they are enamored with its "wisdom, " contrary to the will of God though it is (1 Corinthians 1:20 ; 2:6 ; 3:18 ). Therefore, for Paul to announce that the Christian and the church now constitute the temple of God's Spirit was nothing short of an eschatological pronouncementthe temple of the endtimes had arrived (see 1 Corinthians 3:16 ; 6:19-20 ; 2 Corinthians 6:16-18 ). A related concept to the temple of God is found in 2 Corinthians 1:22,5:5 the Spirit is the earnest of the resurrection body (cf. This point was one that the Corinthians needed to hear because, in their newfound enthusiasm over the Spirit, their tendency was to assume that the kingdom of God had fully arrived and that they had already received the resurrection body in this age (see 1 Corinthians 4:8 ; 15:12-28 ). More than that, the Corinthians' mimicking of the "spirit" of this evil age tended to belie the truth that they were the temple of God's Holy Spirit: they divided, and thereby were destroying it (1 Corinthians 3:12-17 ); they joined themselves to harlots, thereby defiling God's temple (1 Corinthians 6:15-18 ); and, in general, they subjected it to idolatry (2 Corinthians 6:14-18 ). Each of the gifts in 1,2Corinthians can be understood eschatologically. 1 Corinthians 14 with Psalm 74:9 ; Lamentations 2:9 ; Joel 2:28-32 ). 1 Corinthians 12:28 ; with Acts 2-3 ). 1 Corinthians 12:10,29 ; with 1 Timothy 4:1 ; 2 Timothy 4:1-5 ). Tongues and interpretation of tongues were associated by Paul and the Corinthians with the proleptic restoration of paradise, especially in the worship setting of the church. The gifts of faith (1 Corinthians 12:9 ; 13:2 ), miracles (1 Corinthians 12:10,28 ), and healings (1 Corinthians 12:9,28 ) continued the powerful ministry of Jesus through his church, and signaled the invasion of the earth by the messianic kingdom. Finally, the gifts of helps (1 Corinthians 12:28 ) and administration (1 Corinthians 12:28 ) provided the needed support and leadership of the people of God in the last days, respectively. The Corinthian letters affirm this fundamental perception of Paul that the church is yet another sign that the age to come has already dawned, though it is not yet complete. ...
The dominant metaphor for the church in 1,2Corinthians is the body of Christ. The body of Christ can be seen, then, to be the eschatological Adam (1 Corinthians 15:45 ), the new humanity of the endtime that has appeared in history. Yet it is obvious from Paul's comments to the Corinthian church that it continues to exist in this age. ...
According to 1,2Corinthians, the sacraments of the church are twofold: baptism and the Lord's Supper. ...
The worship of the church in 1,2Corinthians, as we noted earlier, centers around the community's usage of the gifts of the Spirit ( Acts of the Apostles - Acts 13:8 (no reason given for Elymas’ opposition, it is not explicitly said that Paul preached to the proconsul), Acts 13:13 (the reason for Mark’s departure not stated, nor yet for Paul and Barnabas going to Pisidian Antioch), Acts 16:35 (no reason given for the Philippi prætors’ change of attitude), Acts 17:15 (not said that the injunction was obeyed, but from 1 Thessalonians 3:1 we see that Timothy had rejoined Paul at Athens and was sent away again to Macedonia, whence he came in Acts 18:5 to Corinth), Acts 20:16 (not stated that they arrived in time for Pentecost, but it must be understood), Acts 27:43 (it must be inferred that the injunction was obeyed). Paul to make Christianity the religion of the Roman Empire (see § 7 ; henceforward the author calls Saul of Tarsus by his Roman name, one which he must have borne all along, for the purposes of his Roman citizenship); the Council of Jerusalem, the vindication of Pauline teaching by the Church; the call to Macedonia, not as being a passing from one continent to another, for the Romans had not this geographical idea, nor yet as a passing over to a strange people, but partly as a step forwards in the great plan, the entering into a new Roman province, and especially the association for the first time with the author (§ 3 ); the residence at Corinth, the great city on the Roman highway to the East, where Gallio’s action paved the way for the appeal to Cæsar; and the apprehension at Jerusalem. 1 Corinthians 13:13 RVm Sabbath - The Epistle of Barnabas, Dionysius of Corinth writing to Rome A. ) The early church met to break bread on the first day (Acts 20:7); it was the day for laying by of alms for the poor (1 Corinthians 16:2)
Lord's Day - Paul’s career we find him urging the Christians at Corinth to make weekly contributions towards the fund for the relief of the impoverished church at Jerusalem, and to do it on the first day of the week (1 Corinthians 16:2). When, however, it is suggested, as an alternative explanation, that the first day of the week is named because probably this or the day before was the pay-day for working folk at Corinth, we need some definite evidence for this which is not forthcoming. This strengthens the view that 1 Corinthians 16:2 incidentally gives evidence of early movements towards the setting up of the Lord’s Day as an institution, especially when taken along with Acts 20:7; for when could the contributions of the people be better collected in readiness for the Apostle than at their meetings on the special day of worship?...
It is fair also to suggest (with Hessey, Sunday, p. Thus we find it used in specific association (which became permanent) with the Supper (κυριακὸν δεῖπνον, 1 Corinthians 11:20), with the Day (as here), with the Sayings of Jesus (λόγια κυριακά, Papias), with the House, the domus ecclesiae (τὸ κυριακόν)
Paul the Apostle - Paul wrote other letters than these; references to lost ones are found, probably, in 2 Thessalonians 3:17 and 1 Corinthians 5:9 . ) uses 1 Corinthians and probably Ephesians; Ignatius certainly uses Ephesians; Polycarp uses almost all the thirteen, including the Pastorals. These were written from Corinth 52 or 53 a. Colossians 2:3 , 1 Corinthians 8:1 ; 1 Corinthians 12:8 ), a heresy more Jewish in tone than even that which appears in Colossians ( Titus 1:14 ); because the ministry is said to be too fully developed for the lifetime of St. 1 Corinthians 9:15 , 1 Thessalonians 2:9 , 2 Thessalonians 3:8 ); for it is very probable that his family cast him off because of his conversion, and especially because of his attitude to the Gentiles; and moreover, it was the custom for all Jewish boys to be taught a trade. It is noteworthy that he seems to have laid much stress on evangelizing Roman Colonies like Corinth, Pisidian Antioch, Lystra, and Philippi. 1 Corinthians 9:1 with 1 Corinthians 15:8 ), though he would be there in Jesus’ lifetime on earth. He was brought up a strict Pharisee ( Acts 23:6 ; Acts 26:5 , Galatians 1:14 , Philippians 3:5 ), and long after his conversion he retained a certain pride in his Jewish hirth and a great affection for his own people ( Romans 4:1 ; Romans 9:3 ; Romans 10:1 ; Romans 11:1 , 2 Corinthians 11:22 ). , 1 Corinthians 9:1 ; 1 Corinthians 15:8 , Philippians 3:7 etc. When approaching Damascus he saw a strong light, and Jesus appearing to him (so explicitly 1 Corinthians 9:1 ), saying, ‘Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?’ The voice was unintelligible to his companions ( Acts 22:9 ), though they saw the light ( ib . Romans 1:1 ; Rom 1:5 , 1 Corinthians 1:1 ; 1Co 4:1 ; 1 Corinthians 9:1 f. , 1 Corinthians 15:9 )
Trade And Commerce - Paul (2 Corinthians 2:17) contrasts himself with the many who ‘hawk (make merchandise of, καπηλεύοντες) the word of God. ’ ‘Christ has bought us (ἐξηγόρασεν) from the law’s curse’ (Galatians 3:13; Galatians 4:5, 1 Corinthians 6:20; 1 Corinthians 7:23; 1 Corinthians 7:30); we are advised ‘to buy up,’ ‘make a market of’ (ἐξαγοραζόμενοι) the opportunity (Ephesians 5:16, Colossians 4:5; cf. 2 Corinthians 8:9, 1 Corinthians 1:5, Romans 2:4, Ephesians 1:7) of spiritual wealth; cf. , is δόκιμος, ‘approved,’ and cognates (Romans 14:18, 2 Corinthians 10:18, etc. ); a metaphor from the earnest, the large portion of the price paid as a first instalment of a debt, is ἀρραβών (2 Corinthians 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:5, Ephesians 1:14), and βεβαιόω, βεβαίωσις (1 Corinthians 1:6, Philippians 1:7) are supposed by some to be connected with surety. Partnership in business is suggested by κοινωνός (2 Corinthians 1:7, etc. ), κοινωνία μετοχή (2 Corinthians 6:14; 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:13, Philippians 1:5), συνκοινωνός, συνκοινωνέω, συνμέτοχος (Ephesians 3:6; Ephesians 5:7; Ephesians 5:11, Philippians 4:14, Romans 11:17). Profit, gain, is suggested by κέρδος (Philippians 3:7), by the constant use of περισσός and its derivatives, by πλεονάζω, πλεονεξία (2 Corinthians 8:15; 2 Corinthians 9:5, etc. ]'>[3] , 3920), taking the dangerous route by the south of the Peloponnese on each occasion, instead of the easier method of trans-shipment over the Isthmus of Corinth. Besides the classic account of the great voyage in Acts 27, we learn from 2 Corinthians 11:25-26, which of course antedates, and does not post-date, as Pelagius imagined, the narrative in Acts, that St. The Mysteries of Eleusis near Athens and of Samothrace, the Feasts of Dionysus at Argos and of Pythian Apollo at Delphi, the Isthmian Games at Corinth, and the Olympian Games in Elis (Peloponnese), all attracted countless visitors and stimulated trade, being the ancient counterparts of the Stourbridge, Leipzig, and Nijni Novgorod fairs of more modern times
Bible, Canon of the - It is felt that statements in the writings themselves (such as 1 Corinthians 2:13 ; 14:37 ; Galatians 1:8-9 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:13 ) would cause local churches to preserve them and eventually collect them in a general canon. ...
Paul refers to a previous letter he wrote to Corinth (1 Corinthians 5:9 ) and to a letter to the Laodiceans (Colossians 4:16 ), neither of which the early church preserved in its canon
Religion - ...
That religion has a place in human life springs from two fundamental realities: (1) humans have been created in the image of God (Genesis 1:26-27 ; 9:6 ; Psalm 8:5 ; 1 Corinthians 11:7 ; Colossians 3:10 ; James 3:9 ), and so are both addressable by God and capable of responses appropriate to persons (beliefs, attitudes, and conduct that is consciously chosen); and (2) the Creator has disclosed himself to humankind and continues to address them. By this invasion of the alienated world with its many gods (2 Kings 17:29-33 ; Jeremiah 2:28 ; 1 Corinthians 8:5 ), the Creator calls all peoples of the world to turn from the sham gods they have made and return to him. For that reason the apostle Paul instructed the church at Corinth, "So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God" (1 Corinthians 10:31 )
Heal, Health - Medicine is mentioned (Proverbs 17:22 ) and defended as "sensible" ( 2 Corinthians 12:1-107 ). It is evident that the gift of healing was by no means limited to apostles, but bestowed "as the Spirit wills" (1 Corinthians 12:9,11 ). There was repeated and serious illness in the churches at Corinth and Thessalonica (1 Corinthians 11:30 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 )
Ephesus - Paul’s time had become thoroughly Greek, maintaining constant intercourse with Corinth and the rest of Greece proper. Paul, therefore, found that, while Ephesus opened ‘a door wide and effectual’ (ἐνεργής) there were ‘many adversaries’ (1 Corinthians 16:9). ...
With the religious history of Ephesus are also associated the names of Priscilla and Aquila (Acts 18:18), Apollos (Acts 18:24, 1 Corinthians 16:12), Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21), Timothy (1 Timothy 1:3, 2 Timothy 4:9), and especially John the Apostle and John the Presbyter
Martyr - He cites Dionysius of Corinth as asserting that both apostles suffered about the same time in Rome, and adds, from the Roman Gaius, a minute description of their tombs
Calling - Thus it is said, "Paul may plant, and Apollos water, but God giveth the increase," 1 Corinthians 3:6-7 . The invitation, "the calling," of the first preachers was to all who heard them in Rome, in Ephesus, in Corinth, and other places; and those who embraced it, and joined themselves to the church by faith, baptism, and continued public profession, were named, especially and eminently, "the called," because of their obedience to the invitation. "But unto them which are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God;" the wisdom and efficacy of the Gospel being, of course, acknowledged in their very profession of Christ, in opposition to those to whom the preaching of "Christ crucified" was "a stumbling block," and "foolishness," 1 Corinthians 1:24 . Is any called in uncircumcision? let him not be circumcised," 1 Corinthians 7:18
Baptism - (Cornelius and his friends), Acts 16:15 (Lydia and her household), Acts 16:33 (the Philippian jailer ‘and all his’), Acts 18:8 (Crispus and his house, and many Corinthians), Acts 19:5 (about twelve Ephesians), 1 Corinthians 1:14; 1 Corinthians 1:16 (Crispus, Gaius, and the household of Stephanas). -1 Corinthians 6:11, sanctification and justification connected with the washing of baptism; three aorists, referring to a definite event: ‘ye washed away (ἀπελούσασθε, middle) [1] … in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and in the Spirit of our God’; cf. ’-1 Corinthians 12:13, [2] all baptized in one Spirit into one body. The clement is mentioned or alluded to in Acts 8:36, 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Corinthians 12:13 (‘drink of one Spirit’), Ephesians 5:26, Titus 3:5, Hebrews 10:22, 1 Peter 3:20, and is necessitated by the metaphor of burial in baptism in Romans 6:4, Colossians 2:12. The Israelites, by a metaphor from it, are said to have been baptized into (εἰς) Moses in the cloud and in the sea (1 Corinthians 10:2). Whatever view is taken of baptism for the dead (1 Corinthians 15:29), it alludes to the Christian rite. It is probable that the problem is insoluble with our present knowledge, and that the reference is to some ceremony in the then baptismal rite at Corinth of which we hear no more, but not to vicarious baptism (see Plummer in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i. For anointing, see 2 Corinthians 1:21 (χρίσας, aorist), 1 John 2:20; 1 John 2:27 (the anointing abides in us and is not only a historical act). ...
For sealing, see 2 Corinthians 1:22 (same context as the anointing), Ephesians 1:13 (‘having believed ye were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise’), Ephesians 4:30 (‘sealed in the Holy Spirit’). (The metaphor is used in Romans 4:11 of circumcision; and otherwise in John 3:33; John 6:27, Romans 15:28, 1 Corinthians 9:2, 2 Timothy 2:19. , 2 Corinthians 7; Clem. , Mark 7:3 πυγμῇ νίψωνται, John 2:6; John 3:25); and the allusions to washing in connexion with baptism (above, 1) would be familiar to the early Christians, who also had the metaphor of cleansing; see 2 Corinthians 7:1, 1 John 1:7, Revelation 1:5 (some Manuscripts ) Revelation 7:14; cf
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - ’ It was evidently a function in which women might share, as we gather from 1 Corinthians 11:5, where public prophecy and public prayer are associated as gifts of Christian women. We have evidence of prophecy not only in the churches of Jerusalem and Caesarea, but also in Antioch (Acts 11:27; Acts 13:1), in Rome, Corinth, and Thessalonica (Romans 12:6 f. , 1 Corinthians 14:32 f. 1 Corinthians 14:6 (where the Apostle might speak ‘either by apocalypse, or gnosis, or prophecy, or teaching’). Prophecy is connected not only with revelations, but with ‘visions’ (2 Corinthians 12:1-3). In 1 Corinthians 14:3 St. ‘He edifieth a church,’ while ‘the speaker with tongues edifieth himself,’ In Romans 12:6 by the use of the phrase ἀναλογία τῆς πίστεως the Apostle declares that a prophecy is required to agree with the accepted doctrines of the faith; while 1 Corinthians 12:10 (διακρίσεις πνευμάτων) shows that criticism of prophecy was a regular practice (cf. 1 Corinthians 14:29). The canon of edification is conspicuous in the remarkable set of rules laid down in 1 Corinthians 14:26 f. The author of Revelation speaks of the prophets as his fellow-servants, and of the Church as made up of ‘saints, apostles, and prophets’ (Revelation 18:20), ‘prophets and saints’ Revelation 18:24), and ‘saints and prophets’ (1 Corinthians 16:6); and in such a connexion it is easy to understand how ecstasy might lead to a vivid realization of the circumstances of the Parousia. But the general evidence is in favour of the spiritual and ethical quality of the prophetic utterances, which, as we gather from 1 Corinthians 14:24, were addressed to pagans as well as to Christians. Paul’s (‘no man can say that Jesus is Lord, but in the Holy Spirit’ [2])
Paul - in Acts 6:7, Acts 9:31, Acts 12:24, Acts 16:5, 1 Corinthians 6:12-135 Acts 28:31. -The chronology is an extremely difficult question, because the fixed points that seem to be obtained by the sacred history touching on profane history (Aretas, 2 Corinthians 11:32; Herod, Acts 12:20-23; Claudius, Acts 11:27-30, Acts 12:25; Felix and Festus, Acts 24:27) fail, when closely scrutinized, to remain fixed. Paul must have been at Corinth, during his second missionary journey, in a. -The Epistle to the Galatians, both in subject and treatment, bears so strong a resemblance to the Epistle to the Romans that it used to be assumed that the composition of both must be assigned to about the same time; and, as the latter indubitably belongs to the residence in Corinth at the close of the third missionary journey, it was taken for granted that Galatians must be placed there too. ’...
(c) 1 and 2 Corinthians. He had sent one which has not come down to us (see 1 Corinthians 5:9); and this raises the question whether he may not have written other Epistles which have shared the same fate. After receiving the Epistle now lost, the Corinthians had written to the founder of their church, describing their own condition and asking his opinion and advice about a number of problems and difficulties that had arisen among them. Paul had heard of the condition of the Corinthians from ‘them of the household of Chlce’ (1 Corinthians 1:11), and he was far from being satisfied that all was well with his spiritual children. The intimate nature of the questions propounded in the letter received from the Corinthians leads him to enter into minute details; accordingly, this Epistle exhibits by far the fullest picture in existence of the interior of an apostolic church. 1618454804_17; 1 Corinthians 8:1-4; 1 Corinthians 10:33; 1 Corinthians 15:12; Discipline - Paul himself five times received a severe form of punishment administered by the synagogue for heresy, the "forty lashes minus one" (2 Corinthians 11:24 ). Paul equates warnings with witnesses when he writes of his impending third visit to the Corinthians (2 Corinthians 13:1-2 ). " Romans 16:17 tells believers to "watch out" for wrongdoers; 1Corinthians 5:11, 2 Thessalonians 3:14 enjoin, "do not associate" with offenders; 2 Thessalonians 3:6 commands, "keep away from" the disobedient. First Corinthians 5:11 is more specific in instructing believers not to eat with those under discipline (cf. The key text in this regard is 1 Corinthians 5:1-5 , where Paul responds to a case of incest by commanding, "hand this man over to Satan, " an expression employed similarly in 1 Timothy 1:20 . That the sentence is reformatory is confirmed by the fact that Paul ends the pronouncement in 1 Corinthians 5:5 with the express intent that the offender's spirit may be "saved in the day of the Lord"; similarly, 1 Timothy 1:20 notes that "Hymenaeus and Alexander were handed over to Satan to be taught not to blaspheme. " The phrase in 1 Corinthians 5:5 , "so the sinful nature may be destroyed, " is ambiguous. Hebrews 12:15 ), and the disciplinary measures in Romans 16:17,2 Corinthians 13:1-2 appear to respond to division caused by heterodoxy (cf. Moral deviations are in view in the two most lengthy passages, 2Thessalonians 3:6-15, 1 Corinthians 5:1-13 ( 1 Timothy 5:19-22 ; is ambiguous cf. In 1 Corinthians 5 , Paul is obviously concerned about porneia [ 2 Thessalonians 3:15 ) who is "greedy, or is an idolater, reviler, drunkard, or robber" (v. The fact that the list is expanded in 6:9-10 with special attention to sexual and property values suggests that it is not random, after the fashion of contemporary moralists, but is consciously directed at the sins of Corinth. Galatians 5:19-21 ), but they are particularly dangerous to the Corinthians. Fee, The First Epistle to the Corinthians ; G
Luke, the Gospel According to - Compare as to the special revelation to Paul 1 Corinthians 11:23; 1 Corinthians 15:3; Galatians 1:1; Galatians 1:11-12. Paul was an "eye-witness" (1 Corinthians 9:1; Acts 22:14-15); his expression "according to my gospel" implies the independency of his witness; he quotes words of Christ revealed to him, and not found in the four Gospels (Acts 20:35). ...
Luke's account of the Lord's Supper, making an interval between His giving the bread and the cup to the disciples, accords most with Paul's in 1 Corinthians 11:23, which that apostle says he received directly from the Lord Jesus. ...
The allusion in 2 Corinthians 8:18, "the brother whose praise is in the Gospel throughout all the churches," may be to Luke. " Possibly during Paul's three months' sojourn there (Acts 20:3) Luke was sent to Corinth, and it is to his evangelistic labours the reference is. But Luke's drawing information from persons who had been with the Lord from the begining is quite consistent with Paul's revelations (Ephesians 3:3; 1 Corinthians 9:1; 1 Corinthians 11:23) forming a prominent part of the substance of Luke's Gospel. Paul's words correspond with Luke's (Luke 10:7 with 1 Corinthians 10:27; Luke 17:27-29; 1618454804_4; with 1 Thessalonians 5:2-3; 1 Thessalonians 5:6-7). Paul and Luke alone have the expressive word (atenizoo ) "stedfastly behold" or "look" (Acts 1:10; Acts 14:9; Acts 3:4; 2 Corinthians 3:7; 2 Corinthians 3:13). His accuracy appears in his giving exact dates (Luke 2:1-3 (See CYRENIUS and JESUS CHRIST, on the difficulty here; Cyrenius was twice governor of Syria; 1 Corinthians 15:3; also in his marking the two distinct sightings of Jerusalem observed by travelers in coming across Olivet; first at Luke 19:37, secondly, at
Rome And the Roman Empire - 51 during the time Paul was in Corinth (Acts 18:12 )
Baptism - It must be acknowledged that the formula of the threefold name, which is here enjoined, does not appear to have been employed by the primitive Church, which, so far as our information goes, baptized ‘in’ or ‘into the name of Jesus’ (or ‘Jesus Christ’ or ‘the Lord Jesus’: Acts 2:38 ; Acts 8:16 ; Acts 10:48 ; Acts 19:5 ; cf, 1 Corinthians 1:13 ; 1 Corinthians 1:15 ), without reference to the Father or the Spirit. That baptism was the normal, and probably the indispensable, condition of being recognized as a member of the Christian community appears from allusions in the Epistles ( 1 Corinthians 12:13 , Galatians 3:27 ), and abundantly from the evidence in Acts. Peter, led to the profession of faith through baptism, though the Apostle seems as a rule to have left the actual administration to others ( 1 Corinthians 1:14-17 ): ‘for Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel. ’ At Philippi Lydia was baptized ‘and her household’; there also the jailor, ‘and all that were his’ ( Acts 16:15 ; Acts 16:33 ); at Corinth, Crispus and Gaius, and ‘the household of Stephanas’ ( 1 Corinthians 1:14 ; 1 Corinthians 1:16 ). These are in the main three: ( a ) the ‘remission of sins’ ( Act 2:38 , 1 Corinthians 6:11 ; cf. ( c ) Baptism conferred incorporation in the one body of Christ ( 1 Corinthians 12:13 ), and was thus adapted to serve as a symbol of the true unity of Christians ( Ephesians 4:5 ). 1 Corinthians 12:3 ), or whether it expressed the content of the faith more fully. ...
In 1 Corinthians 15:29 Paul refers to the practice of persons allowing themselves to be baptized on behalf of the dead . The Apostle assumes as a fact beyond dispute that the children of believers are ‘holy’ ( 1 Corinthians 7:14 ), i
Sacrifice And Offering - He associated Jesus with the Passover sacrifice (1 Corinthians 5:7 ). The church at Corinth was embroiled in a controversy over whether or not it was permissible for Christians to eat meat offered to idols (1 Corinthians 8-10 )
Ebionism - In Corinth, too, they have been active (2 Corinthians 10-13)
Cross, Cross-Bearing - Paul speaks rather of ‘Christ crucified,’ more properly, ‘Christ as crucified’ (predicate), Χριστὸν ἐσταυρωμένον (1 Corinthians 1:23), and once he sharply accents the idea by saying Ἰησοῦν Χριστὸν καὶ τοῦτον ἑσταυρωμένον (1 Corinthians 2:2), in opposition to his Judaizing opponents. Paul’s use of the term with the Lord of glory (1 Corinthians 2:8), and yet He was crucified in weakness (2 Corinthians 13:4). ‘But we preach Christ crucified’ (1 Corinthians 1:23), says St. Paul, as opposed to Jewish spectacular apocalyptics and Greek philosophizing; and he preached nothing else, not simply at Corinth, for he had done so at Athens (Acts 17:31), and this was the settled purpose of his ministry (1 Corinthians 2:2). Paul preached, but Jesus as the crucified Saviour, who, and not Paul, was crucified ‘in your behalf’ (1 Corinthians 1:13). ‘The word of the cross’ (1 Corinthians 1:18), then, is St. It was to proclaim this truth that Christ sent him forth (1 Corinthians 1:17); and this he will do by holding fast to the great essential fact rather than by fine-spun theories (1 Corinthians 1:17; 1 Corinthians 2:5), lest the gospel be emptied of all real power (κενωθῇ). Paul found that Christ crucified was to the sign-seeking Jews a stumbling-block (1 Corinthians 1:23). But the philosophical Greeks took the matter more lightly, and considered the preaching of the cross to be foolishness (1 Corinthians 1:18; 1 Corinthians 1:23), though in truth the cross reveals the hitherto hidden wisdom of God (1 Corinthians 2:6 f
the Thorn in Paul's Flesh - With all his boasted knowledge of the mind of Christ, there was not a catechumen in Corinth or in Philippi with more of a fretful child in him than the so-called great Apostle was when his thorn came into his own flesh
Apocrypha, New Testament - This may be the motivation behind the Third Epistle to the Corinthians (to provide some of the missing correspondence between Paul and the Corinthian church) and the Epistle to the Laodiceans (to supply the letter referred to in Colossians 4:16 ). It is divided into three sections: (1) the Acts of Paul and Thecla, a girl from Iconian who assisted Paul on his missionary travels, (2) correspondence with the Corinthian church, and (3) the martyrdom of Paul. The Third Epistle to the Corinthians was purported to be Paul's reply to a letter from Corinth. The Apocalypse of Paul is probably motivated by Paul's reference in 2 Corinthians 12:2 of a man in Christ being caught up to the third heaven
Church - As a consequence of this broad background of meaning in the Greek and Old Testament worlds, the term “church” is used in the New Testament of a local congregation of called-out Christians, such as the “church of God which is at Corinth”(1 Corinthians 1:2 ), and also of the entire people of God, such as in the affirmation that Christ is “the head over all things to the church, Which is his body” (Ephesians 1:22-23 ). First, the church is seen as the body of Christ; and a cluster of images exists in this context as emphasis falls on the head (Ephesians 4:15-16 ), the members (1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ), the body (1 Corinthians 12:12-27 ), or the bride (Ephesians 5:22-31 ). The church is also seen as God's new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ), the new persons (Ephesians 2:14-15 ), fighters against Satan (Ephesians 6:10-20 ), or bearers of light (Ephesians 5:7-9 ). Thirdly, the church is quite often described as a fellowship of faith with its members described as the saints (1 Corinthians 1:2 ), the faithful (Colossians 1:2 ), the witnesses (John 15:26-27 ), or the household of God (1 Peter 4:17 ). ...
The worship of the early church demonstrated the lordship of Christ, not only in the fact that He was extolled and praised but also in the fact that worship demonstrated the obligation of Christians to love and to nurture one another (1 Corinthians 11:17-22 ; 1 Corinthians 14:1-5 ). In distinction from worship as it was practiced in the pagan cults of Greece and Rome, Christian worship not only stressed the relation of a person to the Deity but went beyond this to stress that worship should edify and strengthen the Christians present (Acts 2:5-47 ) and should challenge pagans to accept Christ (1 Corinthians 14:20-25 ). Christian worship was often enthusiastic and usually involved all Christians present as participants (1 Corinthians 14:26 ). This openness both inspired creativity and opened the way for excesses which were curbed by specific suggestions (1 Corinthians 14:26-33 ; 1 Timothy 2:1-10 ) and by the rule that what was done should be appropriate to those committed to a God of peace (1 Corinthians 14:33 ). How central this belief was to the early church is illustrated by the fact that the Lord's Supper, which they observed at His command was seen as proclaiming “the Lord's death till he come (1 Corinthians 11:26 ). Paul used the imagery of the human body to illustrate this unique feature of the church's life, stressing that every Christian has a necessary function and a responsibility to function with an awareness of his or her share in the body of Christ (1 Corinthians 12:12-31 ). The guiding principle was that the church was the body of Christ with a mission to accomplish, and the church felt free to respond to the leading of the Holy Spirit in developing a structure that would contribute to its fulfilling its responsibilities (1618454804_55 ; 1 Corinthians 12:4-11 ; Ephesians 4:11-16 ). The bridge to the Gentiles was the Hellenistic Jewish Christianity, which sprang into existence with the conversion of Jews from the dispersion who were visiting in Jerusalem and converted at Pentecost (1 Corinthians 14:26 )
Philippi - Paul’s mode of saving her is an example of the mighty workings (δυνάμεις) of which he speaks (1 Corinthians 12:28). Or who will blame him if he sometimes chose to suffer in silence-τρὶς ἐρραβδίσθην (2 Corinthians 11:25)-like ordinary Christians, who could not shelter themselves under the aegis of the Roman citizenship?...
The magistrates of Philippi are first called ἄρχοντες (Acts 16:19) and then στρατηγοί (Acts 16:20; Acts 16:22; Acts 16:35-36; Acts 16:38). To Thessalonica, and again to Corinth, their messengers followed him with the tokens of their love (Philippians 4:16, 2 Corinthians 11:9); and when he was a prisoner in Rome, Epaphroditus of Philippi made a journey of 700 miles over land and sea to bring him yet another gift, which was acknowledged in the most affectionate letter St
John, the Epistles of - " Sonship involves present self purification, first because we desire now to be like Him, "even as He is pure," secondly because we hope hereafter to be perfectly like Him, our sonship now hidden shall be manifested, and we shall be made like Him when He shall be manifested (answering to Paul's Colossians 3), for our then "seeing him as He is" involves transfiguration into His likeness (compare 2 Corinthians 3:18; Philippians 3:21). 3 John 1 is directed to Gaius or CAIUS, probably of Corinth, a "host of the church. ) See Romans 16:23; 1 Corinthians 1:14
Presence - Paul’s mention of his presence (or absence) in the letters to Philippi (Philippians 2:12), Corinth, and Thessalonica. The question of the Apostle’s ‘bodily presence’ being ‘insignificant’ (2 Corinthians 10:1-10) is discussed elsewhere (see Paul). No man, however wise or strong, may boast in the presence of God (1 Corinthians 1:29); in that presence Christ appears on our behalf (Hebrews 9:24); and there ‘before the presence of his glory’ we ourselves may hope to stand (Judges 1:24). Paul’s ‘God’ hath ‘shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ’ (2 Corinthians 4:6). Christ dwells in their hearts by faith (Ephesians 3:17); they ‘have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ; through whom also we have had our access by faith into this grace wherein we stand’; they ‘rejoice in hope of the glory of God’ (a synonym for His radiant favouring presence, Romans 5:1-2), and Christ who is the ‘image and glory of God’ (1 Corinthians 11:7) becomes at last in them ‘the hope of glory,’ i. Paul would have the Corinthian Christians worship in such a fashion that if the man in the street chanced to drop in to one of their services he should be ‘reproved by all … judged by all,’ so that the secrets of his heart should be made manifest, ‘and so he will fall down on his face and worship God, declaring that God is among [2] you indeed’ (1 Corinthians 14:24 f. He speaks of death as a door into the nearer presence of Christ (Philippians 1:23 ‘to be with Christ; for it is very far better’); he is ‘willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be at home with the Lord’ (2 Corinthians 5:8); and he warns his readers that all must ‘be made manifest before the judgement-seat of Christ’ to give an account of their earthly life (2 Corinthians 5:10). The ‘Comforter’ is promised as Christ’s representative presence with His disciples after His departure to the Father (John 14:16), while He remains with the Father, and makes preparation for the time when His followers will rejoin Him, that where He is there they may be also (2 Corinthians 5:17). John than that suggested in 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17 or 1 Corinthians 15:51 f
Name (2) - Paul expresses his readiness not to be bound only, but also to die ‘for the name of the Lord Jesus’ (Acts 21:13)—what are we to understand by these expressions? No doubt in several of these cases ‘name’ is practically synonymous with Person; and so to suffer for Christ’s name is equivalent to suffering for His sake—an alternative phrase which is also employed (John 13:37-38, 2 Corinthians 12:10, Philippians 1:29). And if the name Χριστιανοἰ was not current within the Church, there was a party in Corinth that claimed to be distinctively ‘of Christ’ (Χριστοῦ, 1 Corinthians 1:12), while St. Paul not only protests, with reference to this claim, ‘Is Christ divided?’ (1 Corinthians 1:13), but says a little further on in the Ep. , with regard to the whole Christian body, ‘Ye are of Christ’ (ὑμεῖς δὲ Χριστοῦ, 1 Corinthians 3:23). The name used is ‘Jesus Christ,’ or ‘the Lord Jesus,’ or perhaps even simply ‘Christ’ (1 Corinthians 1:13 suggests the last); while the relation to the name is variously expressed by εἰς, ἐν ἐπί (ἐπὶ [5] τῷ ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, Acts 2:38; εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ Κυρίου Ἰησοῦ, Acts 8:16; Acts 19:5; ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι τοῦ Κυρίον, Acts 10:48; εἰς Χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν, Romans 6:3; εἰς Χριστόν, Galatians 3:27)
Sanctification, Sanctify - John 17:8 , 2 Corinthians 4:6 , also Jeremiah 9:23 f. Holiness); once as ‘sanctified in Christ Jesus’ ( 1 Corinthians 1:2 ), a phrase synonymous with ‘called saints,’ i. 1 Corinthians 1:9 ; 1 Corinthians 1:26-30 , 1 Thessalonians 1:4 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:12 ). 1 Corinthians 6:11 , Acts 20:32 ; Acts 26:18 ). Paul, is a term of relationship, not primarily of character, is evident from 1 Corinthians 7:14 , where ‘the unbelieving husband’ or ‘wife’ is said to ‘have been sanctified in’ the Christian wedded partner, so that their offspring are ‘holy’: the person of the unbeliever, under the marriage-bond, is holy in the believer’s eyes, as indeed every possession and instrument of life must be (see 1618454804_30 ). Accordingly, in 1 Thessalonians 4:4 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:7 ‘sanctification’ is opposed specifically to ‘lust’ and sexual ‘uncleanness’ by contrast, probably, with the pagan ‘consecration’ to impure deities, as in the case of the hieroduloi of Corinth (cf. 1 Corinthians 6:13-20 ). see); together, these constitute the present work of salvation, the re-instatement of the sinful man before his Maker, his instatement into the Christian standing and condition (see 1 Corinthians 6:11 , and the connexion between chs. The ‘anointing’ and ‘sealing’ of 2 Corinthians 1:21 f. He ‘bought’ men with the ‘price’ of His blood the bodily ‘limbs’ along with the inner self so that we are no longer ‘our own’ and may not ‘live for ourselves,’ but are, from the hour we know this, men ‘living for God in Christ Jesus’; and Christ ‘presents’ His redeemed ‘to God as holy’ and makes them God’s ‘sure possession,’ destined ‘for the praise of His glory’ (1 Corinthians 6:19 f. Being our Head and Representative before God, dedicating ‘all his own’ ( John 17:10 ) to the Father in the offering of Calvary, Jesus virtually accomplished the sanctification of His people, with their justification, once for all ( 1 Corinthians 1:30 ): Paul’s saying, ‘I have been crucified with Christ’ ( Galatians 2:20 ; Galatians 6:14 ), implies that he has been, by anticipation, included in the perfect sacrifice; he thus unfolds the implicit doctrine of John 17:9 f. The Holy Spirit is, with much emphasis, identified with the work of sanctification; Christian believers are ‘sanctified in the Holy Spirit’ ( Romans 15:16 , 1 Corinthians 6:11 ; also 1 Thessalonians 4:7 f. To receive ‘the gift of the Spirit’ and to be sanctified are the same thing; when God takes possession of the believer, his ‘body’ becomes a ‘temple of the Holy Ghost’ ( 1 Corinthians 6:19 ) then he is a holy man; and to possess ‘the Spirit’ is, in effect, to have ‘Christ dwelling in the heart’ ( Ephesians 3:16-19 ). This twofold identity (‘sanctified’ = ‘in the Spirit’ = ‘joined unto the Lord’) holds alike of the Church and of the individual Christian ( 1 Corinthians 3:16 f
Testimony - God is spirit (John 4:24 ; 2 Corinthians 3:17-18 ) and invisible (Colossians 1:15 ; 1 Timothy 1:17 ). Jesus is the image of the invisible God (2 Corinthians 4:4 ; Colossians 1:15 ); he is the exact representation of God's being (Hebrews 1:3 ). Because of the incarnation, we have now received "the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ" (2 Corinthians 4:6 ). Paul, for instance, while at Corinth "devoted himself exclusively to preaching, testifying to the Jews that Jesus was the Christ" (Acts 18:5 )
Gestures - So Paul and Barnabas did at Pisidian Antioch (Acts 13:51), and so Paul ‘shook out his raiment’ against the unbelieving Jews at Corinth (Acts 18:6)
Confession - ...
The Epistles bear the same witness: ‘No one can say that Jesus is the Lord, save in the Holy Ghost’ (1 Corinthians 12:3). 2 Corinthians 13:14)-clearly enough. The thought is rather that of 1 Corinthians 12:3, quoted above, where St. The case of discipline at Corinth, when St. Paul was constrained to condemn a brother so sternly for incest, led to public confession not only by him but also by those who had been implicated in shielding him (2 Corinthians 7:11). Clement writes to the Corinthians (57): ‘Ye therefore that laid the foundation of the sedition, submit yourselves unto the presbyters and receive chastisement unto repentance, bending the knees of your heart
Wealth - En route to Canaan, however, God very clearly places stipulations on the accumulation of wealth; manna and quail were to be collected so that no one had too little or too much (Exodus 16:16-18 ; quoted in 2 Corinthians 8:15 ). ...
Members of the Pauline churches, particularly in Corinth, are predominantly poor and hence more receptive to the gospel, which seems foolish to persons of power and influence (1 Corinthians 1:18-31 ). This is one of Paul's reasons for not seeking support from the churches to which he ministers (1 Corinthians 9 ), while still accepting such support when it comes unsolicited (Philippians 4:10-19 ), and encouraging Christians to support others who teach or lead them (Galatians 6:6 ; 1 Timothy 5:17-18 ; 2 Timothy 2:6 ). ...
In 2 Corinthians 8-9 , Paul stresses that such giving should be sacrificial (8:1-3), sincere (v. 1 Corinthians 16:2 b). In the context of this collection appears the first record of a weekly Sunday offering (1 Corinthians 16:2 a). Perhaps more than any other writer, Paul gives the lie to the so-called prosperity gospel, by stressing hardships, including economic ones, as standard fare for the believer (1 Corinthians 4:8-13 ; 2 Corinthians 6:3-10 ; 11:23-29 )
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - Ephesians 3 ) to Perigenes of Corinth and eight other prelates of eastern Illyricum, asserting his right, as successor of St
Judges, the Book of - The possession of inspired gifts did not always ensure the right use of them, just as the miraculous gifts at Corinth were abused (1 Corinthians 14)
Woman - The mutual dependence of man and woman, and their common origin in God, teach that the male has no exclusive place ‘in the Lord’ (1 Corinthians 11:11-12). ...
The details of Church life which we gather from the Pauline Epistles, particularly as to the Church at Corinth, amply confirm what has been said (e. Philippians 4:2-3, 1 Corinthians 1:11; the numerous salutations to women in Romans 16). It is clear that women equally with men could be regarded as the organs of the prophetic spirit in the Corinthian Church (cf. Priscilla and Maximilla among the Montanists), since Paul desires that every woman praying or prophesying shall have her head veiled (1 Corinthians 11:5). To this proof of woman’s religious equality with man there seems to be no necessary contradiction in the fact that Paul a little later (1 Corinthians 14:34) forbids women to speak (λαλεῖν) in the churches (see, however, the Commentaries on this disputed passage); the contrast simply shows that the Spirit could over-ride ordinary social conventions (cf. the prophesying of the four daughters of Philip the evangelist, Acts 21:9; the virginity of these, as of the daughters named in 1 Corinthians 7:36, does not yet constitute an ‘order’). But he recognizes both the innocence of the sexual tie and the equal claims of the man and the woman in regard to it (1 Corinthians 7:3 f. , Ephesians 5:3), so characteristic of early Christian ethics, is based on the principle that the body is the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19); the condemnation of extramarital sexual relationships is the natural complement of the attitude to marriage itself (1 Thessalonians 4:4). The moral tie that unites the Christian even to an unbelieving partner is fully recognized (1 Corinthians 7:12 f. The Jewish training of Paul, for example, accounts for much in his attitude, such as the argument that women should be veiled ‘because of the angels’ (1 Corinthians 11:10). The expectation of a speedy end largely explains his preference of celibacy to marriage (1 Corinthians 7:7; cf. Robertson and A Plummer, ICC , ‘1 Corinthians,’ Edinburgh, 1911, pp
Minister, Ministration - He and Apollos and Cephas are ὑπηρέται Χριστοῦ (1 Corinthians 4:1). Evidently the ritual sense of this group of words is always present to the mind of the Apostle when he has occasion to use them (Romans 15:16 ‘Paul the ministering priest, the preaching of the gospel his priestly function, the believing Gentiles his offering’ [5], Romans 15:27, 2 Corinthians 9:12, Philippians 2:17 ‘the Philippians the priests, their faith the sacrifice, the apostle’s life-blood the accompanying libation’ [6], Philippians 2:25; Philippians 2:30; cf. There are differences of διακονίαι (1 Corinthians 12:5), but the manifold faculties for ‘the work of ministering’ are gifts from the Exalted Lord (Ephesians 4:12), and each disciple has received a gift of some kind to be laid out in Christian service (1 Peter 4:10-11). Some are called to the ministry of the word (Acts 6:4, 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 6:4, Colossians 4:17, 1 Thessalonians 3:2, 2 Timothy 4:5), to testify the gospel of the grace of God (Acts 20:24) and win men to faith (1 Corinthians 3:5); God has committed to such ‘the ministry of reconciliation’ (2 Corinthians 5:18). Some can render invaluable help in the local churches, as Stephanas and his household at Corinth (1 Corinthians 16:15), and Phœbe at Cenchreae (Romans 16:1)
Gifts - From the literature of the time we note the connexion between the gift of God’s grace in Christ, the ‘Unspeakable gift’ (2 Corinthians 9:15), and the ethical practice of Christ’s followers. The generosity of Stephanas (1 Corinthians 16:15), which impelled him at his own expense to journey to the Apostle with Fortunatus and Achaicus (his slaves), is singled out by St. The same Epistle (1 Corinthians 16:1) emphasizes the duty of the Christian community in the matter of the Collection (q. Paul insists on the duty of supporting not only the Church and its ministry but also poorer churches at a distance (2 Corinthians 8:1-5; 2 Corinthians 9:12-13) and of supplying a portion for the communion-meal, while his eulogy of cheerful giving (2 Corinthians 9:7) in general sets the standard and model of Christian liberality and of systematic gifts to spiritual objects, to the support of the poor and helpless (cf. The use of δωρεά as the ‘free gift’ of God, springing from His χάρις, or ‘grace,’ is found in Acts 2:38; Acts 8:26; Acts 10:45; Acts 11:17, Romans 5:15; Romans 5:17, 2 Corinthians 9:15, Ephesians 3:7; Ephesians 4:7, Hebrews 6:4, and is also used by apostolic writers like Clement (cf. Paul hints in 2 Corinthians 8:5, the giving up of self to God being the act that hallows all other gifts. 185); but also an original gift, capable of being wakened into fresh life*
The locus classicus for charisms is 1 Corinthians 12:4-12 and v. The Corinthian passage, on the other hand, in addition to the more stable and authorized modes of ministry, mentions several others of a special order, perhaps peculiar to the Corinthian Church with its exuberant manifestations of spiritual energy, and certainly, as the evidence of later Church history shows, of a temporary character, and exhausting themselves (cf. Then in 1 Corinthians 12:28 we have the following classification: ‘God hath set some in the church, first apostles, secondly prophets, thirdly teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healings, helps (ἀντιλήμψεις), governments (κυβερνήσεις, literally ‘pilotings’), divers kinds of tongues’; this is a classification of charisms in order of spiritual rank and dignity. On 1 Corinthians 2, London, 1885, in loc. The absence of any reference to officials later designated as ‘bishops,’ ‘presbyters,’ ‘deacons,’ ‘pastors’ (in Ephesians 4:11), suggests a rudimentary church organization, or rather a purely democratic government in the Christian community at Corinth; and it may be that the profusion of services and functions with the accompanying perils of spiritual pride and disorder suggested to the Apostle the necessity of the more disciplined and edifying forms of service and administration which afterwards prevailed in the apostolic churches. In fact, this is the burden of the Apostle’s teaching in 1 Corinthians 14, following on the exhortation to ‘covet earnestly “the greater charisms” ’ (1 Corinthians 12:31), and the noble hymn (1 Corinthians 13) which sets forth love as ‘a still more excellent way’ in that it transcends all the χαρίσματα and is the real foundation of the Church. It is a charism out of which spring others described in 1 Corinthians 12:9 as ‘charisms of healing,’ where the plural appears to indicate different powers for healing different forms of disease, and ‘workings of powers or miracles. His symbol of the single body with many members (Romans 12:4, 1 Corinthians 12:12-27) shows that he aimed at a unity in which the witness of the individual should have free play and yet be subordinated to the welfare of the community
Paul's Blamelessness as a Minister - Instead of saying to us Here is Philippi, and here is Ephesus, and here is Corinth, and so on: Paul says to us Here were afflictions, and here were necessities, and here were troubles on every side. In so scourging the proud-hearted and uplifted Corinthians he must have forgotten all us poor ministers, who, to all time, would read his blameless and boasted ministry, only to be utterly crushed by it
Baptism - (Cornelius and his friends), Acts 16:15 (Lydia and her household), Acts 16:33 (the Philippian jailer ‘and all his’), Acts 18:8 (Crispus and his house, and many Corinthians), Acts 19:5 (about twelve Ephesians), 1 Corinthians 1:14; 1 Corinthians 1:16 (Crispus, Gaius, and the household of Stephanas). -1 Corinthians 6:11, sanctification and justification connected with the washing of baptism; three aorists, referring to a definite event: ‘ye washed away (ἀπελούσασθε, middle) [1] … in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and in the Spirit of our God’; cf. ’-1 Corinthians 12:13, [2] all baptized in one Spirit into one body. The clement is mentioned or alluded to in Acts 8:36, 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Corinthians 12:13 (‘drink of one Spirit’), Ephesians 5:26, Titus 3:5, Hebrews 10:22, 1 Peter 3:20, and is necessitated by the metaphor of burial in baptism in Romans 6:4, Colossians 2:12. The Israelites, by a metaphor from it, are said to have been baptized into (εἰς) Moses in the cloud and in the sea (1 Corinthians 10:2). Whatever view is taken of baptism for the dead (1 Corinthians 15:29), it alludes to the Christian rite. It is probable that the problem is insoluble with our present knowledge, and that the reference is to some ceremony in the then baptismal rite at Corinth of which we hear no more, but not to vicarious baptism (see Plummer in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i. For anointing, see 2 Corinthians 1:21 (χρίσας, aorist), 1 John 2:20; 1 John 2:27 (the anointing abides in us and is not only a historical act). ...
For sealing, see 2 Corinthians 1:22 (same context as the anointing), Ephesians 1:13 (‘having believed ye were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise’), Ephesians 4:30 (‘sealed in the Holy Spirit’). (The metaphor is used in Romans 4:11 of circumcision; and otherwise in John 3:33; John 6:27, Romans 15:28, 1 Corinthians 9:2, 2 Timothy 2:19. , 2 Corinthians 7; Clem. , Mark 7:3 πυγμῇ νίψωνται, John 2:6; John 3:25); and the allusions to washing in connexion with baptism (above, 1) would be familiar to the early Christians, who also had the metaphor of cleansing; see 2 Corinthians 7:1, 1 John 1:7, Revelation 1:5 (some Manuscripts ) Revelation 7:14; cf. Lydia’s baptism followed a preaching (Acts 16:18), as did that of the Corinthians (Acts 18:5). The allusions to the instruction of Christians in 1 Corinthians 14:19, Galatians 6:6 (κατηχέω), Romans 12:7, Colossians 1:28 etc
Nazirite - deliverance from danger at Corinth (Acts 18:1-17) or recovery from sickness, the ‘thorn in the flesh’ to which he was subject
Philippians, Epistle to - As one of the Churches of Macedonia referred to in 2 Corinthians 8:2 ff. Paul seems to have treated the Philippians in an exceptional way, by accepting from them support which he ordinarily refused ( 2 Corinthians 11:7 ff. He must have visited Philippi at least three times ( Acts 16:12 , 2 Corinthians 2:13 , Acts 20:6 ), and he always found his own love reciprocated by the Church, and experienced a unique joy in their fellowship with him for the furtherance of the gospel ( Philippians 1:3-8 ). The Apostle’s ascendency in the Church was never questioned, as in Corinth. Like 2 Corinthians 8:9 , the dynamic of the truth lies not in an intellectual interpretation of the mystery of Christ’s personality, for little is told further than that He was in His nature essentially Divine, and enjoyed the prerogatives of Divinity; but it lies in the fact that St
Nazirite - deliverance from danger at Corinth (Acts 18:1-17) or recovery from sickness, the ‘thorn in the flesh’ to which he was subject
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - In the New Testament, equivalent expressions, such as "day of Jesus Christ, " are found in 1 Corinthians 1:8 ; 2 Corinthians 1:14 ; Philippians 1:6,10 ; and 2 Peter 3:10,12 . Paul's mention of the "day of our Lord Jesus Christ" (1 Corinthians 1:8 ) is likely the day of "the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our being gathered together to him" (2 Thessalonians 2:1 ). With this prospect and other promises in mind, Paul urges Christians to persevere (1 Corinthians 1:8 ). Paul urges the church at Corinth to discipline the immoral person so that at the day of the Lord his spirit may be saved (1 Corinthians 5:5 )
Paul as a Student - Athens was a great city, Corinth was a great city, and Ephesus was a great city
Family - It is used (1) for all living under one roof-father, mother, near relations, and dependents-frequently in the NT: Acts 7:10 (Pharaoh), Acts 10:2 and Ephesians 2:20-22 (Cornelius), Acts 16:31 (Philippian jailer: so Acts 16:34 πανοικί ‘with all his house,’ here only in NT), Acts 18:8 (Crispus), 1 Corinthians 1:6 (Stephanas), 1 Timothy 3:4 f. ...
(c) οἰκία is similarly used for a ‘household’ in Philippians 4:22 (Caesar), Matthew 10:13; Matthew 12:25, John 4:53 (the Capernaum royal officer), 1 Corinthians 16:15 (Stephanas); and therefore for ‘possessions’ in the phrase ‘widows’ houses,’ Mark 12:40, Luke 20:47, and inferior Manuscripts of Matthew 23:14. Romans 13:1, 1 Corinthians 15:28, and 1 Peter 5:5), and then applies it to Christian families. A similar case is perhaps that of Chloe; she seems to have been a widow whose household (‘they of Chloe,’ 1 Corinthians 1:11) traded between Ephesus and Corinth. , Mark 6:3; Joseph was probably dead), notwithstanding that they themselves, or some of them, were married (1 Corinthians 9:5). These exhortations were probably intended to take away any misapprehension that might have arisen from such passages as Galatians 3:28, 1 Corinthians 7:21 f. It was owing to the good example set a’ Christian slaves to their heathen masters that Christianity, which at first took root in the lower social circles of society (1 Corinthians 1:26), spread rapidly upwards. 2), and the stewards of 1 Corinthians 4:2, Galatians 4:2. Metaphorically οἰκονόμος is used of Christian ministers (1 Corinthians 4:1; of ‘bishops, 1 Timothy 1:17), of Christians generally (1 Peter 4:10)-the idea is doubtless taken from our Lord’s words about the ‘wise slave whom his lord had set over his household to give them their food in due season’ (Matthew 24:45), (2) The guardian of a child, ἐπίτροπος, was concerned with his education (Galatians 4:2); perhaps this is the same as the following. (3) The pedagogue or tutor (παιδαγωγός, Galatians 3:24 f, 1 Corinthians 4:15) was a slave deputed to take the child to school (not a teacher or schoolmaster as the Authorized Version ); this: was a Greek institution adopted by the Romans, for in education Greece led the way, (4) The physician (ἰατπός, Colossians 4:14) was also regarded as an tipper slave. ...
Under this head we may notice four households mentioned in the NT: the ‘household of Caesar’ (ἠ Καίσαρος οἰκία), Philippians 4:22; ‘they of Aristobulus,’ Romans 16:10; ‘they of Narcissus,’ Romans 16:11; and ‘they of Chloe,’ 1 Corinthians 1:11. Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:9; Revelation 22:17 -and He is the Bridegroom, Matthew 9:15; Matthew 22:2 ff; Matthew 25:6, Mark 2:19, John 3:29, 2 Corinthians 11:2; Christians are the οἰκεῖοι, members, of the household, of the faith. The most usual designation of Christians among themselves is ‘the brethren’ (Acts, passim); even heretics are ‘false brethren,’ 2 Corinthians 11:26, Galatians 2:4. ‘A brother,’ ‘brethren,’ denote Christians as opposed to unbelievers in Philemon 1:16, 1 Timothy 6:2; and so in 1 Corinthians 9:5 ‘a sister, a wife’ means ‘a Christian wife’ (the ‘apostle’ may have a Christian wife; cf. 1 Corinthians 7:39 ‘only in the Lord); in 1 Corinthians 7:15 ‘the brother or the sister’ means the Christian spouse of an unbeliever (cf. 1 Corinthians 7:14 and 1 Corinthians 5:11); in Romans 16:23 Revised Version (‘Quartus the brother’) the definite article seems to distinguish this Christian from some unbelieving Quartus. also 2 Corinthians 8:18 (‘the brother whose praise in the gospel is spread through all the churches’: but some translate ‘his brother’-i. Luke) 2 Corinthians 8:22 f
Fellowship (2) - Most frequently it is translated ‘fellowship’ (Acts 2:42, 1 Corinthians 1:9, Matthew 11:27-3057; 2 Corinthians 8:4, Galatians 2:9, Philippians 1:5; Philippians 2:1; Philippians 3:10). It is rendered ‘communion’ in 1 Corinthians 10:16 ((Revised Version margin) ‘participation in’) and 2 Corinthians 13:14; ‘contribution’ (Authorized Version ‘distribution’) in 2 Corinthians 9:13, cf. In 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:13 and Romans 15:26 the word κοινωνία is translated ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885) ‘contribution’; but ‘there is always at the root of κοινωνία, in the NT, the idea of Christian communion in one form or another. Indeed, the Macedonians regard it as a signal token of Divine favour to be allowed thus to help those from whom they had received the gospel; and the poor Jewish Christians, who had made experience of the liberal Christian kindliness of the Gentiles, could hardly refuse to call them brethren (2 Corinthians 8:1-5; 2 Corinthians 9:11-14). This brotherhood was one everywhere (1 Peter 5:9), and in writing to the Corinthians St. Paul assumes that what he says will be of interest not only to them, but ‘to all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ our Lord, both theirs and ours’ (1 Corinthians 1:2). The Church of God which is in Corinth is a visible but partial manifestation of the larger whole. ...
From the world they became outwardly separate, ‘saints’ chosen out of it and consecrated to God (Romans 1:7, 1 Corinthians 1:2, Galatians 1:4), and so forming one family, ‘the household’ of faith (Galatians 6:10, Ephesians 2:19), throughout the empire of this world. All that is sordid in almsgiving is removed, and generosity becomes a choice token of fellowship (2 Corinthians 8:2; 2 Corinthians 9:11; 2 Corinthians 9:13)
Gods, Pagan - Although not mentioned in the New Testament, a temple to Aphrodite at Corinth was said to employ a thousand cultic prostitutes and contributed to the city's reputation for immorality
Galatians, Epistle to the - Paul nowhere in his Epistles mentions the four cities where such eventful things happened, except once for blame in 2 Timothy 3:11 a silence made more remarkable by the fact that in the collection of the alms he does mention ‘the churches of Galatia’ ( 1 Corinthians 16:1 ). Paul contrasts it with Macedonia, the only other Roman province in Greece, and therefore clearly uses it in its Roman sense, Romans 15:25 , 2 Corinthians 9:2 ; 2Co 11:10 , 1 Thessalonians 1:7 f. 1 Corinthians 16:5 ), ‘Macedonia,’ ‘Illyricum’ ( Romans 15:19 only; the Greeks did not use this name popularly as a substantive, and none but a Roman could so denote the province; in 2 Timothy 4:10 St. Galatians 1:6 ‘ye are so quickly removing’); but Lightfoot postpones the date for some two years, and thinks that the Epistle was written from Macedonia ( Acts 20:1 ), rather earlier than Romans and after 2 Corinthians. The likeness is much less marked between Galatians and I and 2 Corinthians; but in 2 Corinthians the Apostle vindicates his authority much as in Galatians. Timothy, he thinks, had been sent to his home at Lystra from Corinth, and rejoined Paul at Syrian Antioch, bringing news of the Galatian defection. Until lately Galatians, Romans 1:1-32 and 2 Corinthians were universally acknowledged to be by St. As for the testimony, Clement of Rome explicitly mentions and quotes 1 Corinthians, and his date cannot be brought down later than a
Ships, Sailors, And Navigation - Corinth appears to have been the first to launch such a fleet sometime after 700 B
Lord's Supper. (i.) - Paul, who, he thinks, was the real originator of the rite, having ‘turned a pagan ceremony to Christian use’ in a moment of ecstasy under the influence of what he had seen of the Greek mysteries in Corinth. —Though 1 Corinthians 5:7-8 is often interpreted so as to make St. Perhaps 1 Corinthians 10:1-2; 1 Corinthians 10:6; 1 Corinthians 10:15-16 have the imagery of the Passover; ‘the cup of blessing’ (1 Corinthians 10:16) was one of the most sacred elements of the Paschal meal (Edersheim, op. ...
The figure of 1 Corinthians 5:7-8 may refer to an actual celebration of the Christian Passover in the Corinthian Church, for we know that in the middle of the 2nd cent. —Mark 14:22-26, Matthew 26:26-30, Luke 22:15-20, 1 Corinthians 11:23-26 :...
Mk...
And as they were eating He took bread and when He had blessed...
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And as they were eating Jesus took bread and blessed...
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And He took bread and when He had given thanks...
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In the night in which He was betrayed the Lord Jesus took bread and when He had given thanks...
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He brake it and gave to them and said, Take ye this is my body...
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And brake it and He gave to the disciples and said, Take eat this is my body...
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He brake it and gave to them saying this is ray body which is given for you...
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He brake it and said this is my body which is for you...
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This do in remembrance of me
Woman - ...
Chloe in Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:11 ) and Nympha in Colossae (Colossians 4:15 ) are women whose households figure prominently (and the fact that the households are attributed to these women suggest that no male heads are present). First Corinthians 12:7,11, makes clear that God's Spirit dispenses his spiritual gifts as he wills, which surely implies "irrespective of gender. ...
In 1 Corinthians 11:3-16 , Paul commands women to cover their heads (with either veils or long hair) as a sign of respect to their spiritual headstheir husbands. ...
In 1 Corinthians 14:33b-38 Paul enjoins women to be silent in church. Others take verses 33b-35 to be a Corinthian slogan that Paul refutes in verses 36-38, but this relatively new interpretation ignores the quite different length, style, and content of all other Corinthian slogans (e. Inasmuch as twenty of the other twenty-one references to "speak" ( laleo [8]) in 1 Corinthians 14 refer to tongues, their interpretation, prophecy, or evaluation, it is probably better to see one of these forms of speech in view. 29-33a), and that the ultimate responsibility of reevaluating prophecy would have fallen to the (presumably) all male leadership of the Corinthian congregation, it is best to limit Paul's prohibition to speech in the context of the church's authoritative response to prophecy
Synagogue - Throughout Asia Minor, Macedonia, Greece and its islands, in cities such as Ephesus, Philippi, Thessalonica, Athens, and Corinth, the synagogues, being the gathering-places for Jews and ‘God-fearing’ half-proselytes (Acts 13:16; Acts 13:26; Acts 13:43; Acts 17:17), offered a sphere of activity to St
Vespasian - In Corinth he learned of the murder of Galba, of the arming of Vitellius, and of the accession of Otho
Food - also Acts 15:20 ; Acts 15:29 , 1 Corinthians 8:1-10 ; 1 Corinthians 10:19 ; 1 Corinthians 10:28 ). John 13:29 ); and Corinth, we may be sure, was not the only city of the time that had a provision-market ( 1 Corinthians 10:25 , EV Anger - Paul fears lest he shall find these evils in the Church when he comes to Corinth (2 Corinthians 12:20). One of the marks of the greatest of Christian virtues is that it ‘does not blaze forth in passionate anger’ (οὐ παροζύνεται [1]). Paul claims that, ‘when reviled, we bless; when persecuted, we bear it patiently; when slandered, we try to conciliate’ (1 Corinthians 4:12), thus following the example of Jesus (1 Peter 2:23). 1 Corinthians 1:14; 1 Corinthians 5:5, etc. The man who does not love the Lord Jesus, or the one who preaches a false gospel, let him be accursed-ἀνάθεμα (1 Corinthians 16:22). The indignation (ἀγανάκτησις) of the Corinthian Church against the guilty person in the case of immorality, to which St. Paul has drawn attention, is commended by him (2 Corinthians 7:11). Paul ‘burns’ if another is ‘made to stumble’ (2 Corinthians 11:29)
Papyri And Ostraca - The more we realize the missionary character of Primitive Christianity, the more clearly we grasp the greatness of the Apostle Paul working among the proletariat of the great centres of the world’s commerce Ephesus, Corinth, etc. Paul, we are not far from knowing the Corinthians and the men of Asia Minor of the same period
Peter, First Epistle of - Peter died in Rome is supported by a very strong chain of evidence, being deducible from Clement of Rome, Ignatius, Papias; and it is held by Dionysius of Corinth, Irenæus, Tertullian, and Clement of Alexandria
Philippians Epistle to the - He was sent to Corinth through Macedonia Paul - ) The leading facts of his life which appear in that history, subsidiary to its design of sketching the great epochs in the commencement and development of Christ's kingdom, are: his conversion (Acts 9), his labours at Antioch (Acts 11), his first missionary journey (Acts 13; 14), the visit to Jerusalem at the council on circumcision (Acts 15), introduction of the gospel to Europe at Philippi (Acts 16),: visit to Athens (Acts 17), to Corinth (Acts 18), stay at Ephesus (Acts 19), parting address to the Ephesian elders at Miletus (Acts 20), apprehension at Jerusalem, imprisonment at Casesarea, and voyage to Rome (Acts 21-27). Aratus; 1 Corinthians 15:33, Menander; Titus 1:12, Epimenides). ...
At midday a light shone upon him and his company, exceeding the brightness of the sun; he and all with him fell to the earth (Acts 26:14; in Acts 9:7 "stood speechless," namely, they soon rose, and when he at length rose they were standing speechless with wonder), "hearing" the sound of a "voice," but not understanding (compare 1 Corinthians 14:2 margin) the articulate speech which Paul heard (Acts 22:9, "they heard not the voice of Him that spoke") in Hebrew (Acts 26:14), cf6 "Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou Me?" (in the person of My brethren, Acts 11:2-176). He who was the most learned and at the same time humblest (Ephesians 3:8; 1 Corinthians 15:9) of the apostles was the one whose pen was most used in the New Testament Scriptures. He"saw" the Lord in actual person (Acts 9:17; Acts 22:14; Acts 23:11; Acts 26:16; 1 Corinthians 15:8; 1 Corinthians 9:1), which was a necessary qualification for apostleship, so as to be witness of the resurrection. The light that flashed on his eyes was the sign of the spiritual light that broke in upon his soul; and Jesus' words to him (Acts 26:18), "to open their eyes and to turn them from darkness to light" (which commission was symbolized in the opening of his own eyes through Ananias, Acts 9:17-18), are by undesigned coincidence reproduced naturally in his epistles (Colossians 1:12-14; 2 Corinthians 4:4; Ephesians 1:18, contrast Ephesians 4:18; Ephesians 6:12). ...
He calls himself "the one untimely born" in the family of the apostles (1 Corinthians 15:8). Then on their watching to kill him lie was "let down by the wall in a basket," under Aretas (2 Corinthians 11:32; Galatians 1:15-18). Paul received it by special revelation (1 Corinthians 11:23; 1 Corinthians 15:3; 1 Thessalonians 4:15). He had a vision later than that of Acts 22:17-18, namely, in 2 Corinthians 12:1, etc
Fire - The NT furnishes some analogous cases in which the theophanic fire is simply a manifestation of the Divine presence or attributes (Acts 2:8, Revelation 1:14 f; Revelation 4:5), and others in which it is an accompaniment of the Divine judgment (2 Thessalonians 1:8, 2 Peter 3:10-12), (2) The use of fire as a testing and purifying agent has led to its figurative application as a criterion for distinguishing between what possesses genuine moral worth and what does not, and as a means of purifying human character (1 Corinthians 3:12 f, 1 Peter 1:7). Acts 10:46 f, 1 Corinthians 14 passim). But assuming the reasonableness of this conjecture, the passage under discussion sheds no light on the constitution of the new environment in which a spiritual body takes the place of a natural body (1 Corinthians 15:44). 1 Corinthians 3:13). ), ‘and the fire itself shall prove each man’s work of what sort it is’ (1 Corinthians 3:13-15 Revised Version ). It may have been suggested by ‘the conflagration of Corinth under Mummius; the stately temples standing amidst the universal destruction of the meaner buildings’ (A. Stanley, Epistles to the Corinthians2, 1858, p
Abstinence - Christian sanctification takes place not in innocent men, but in sinners who have to be cleansed from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit (2 Corinthians 7:1). Acts 27:21-22, 1 Corinthians 4:11, 2 Corinthians 6:5* [1] 2 Corinthians 11:27,* 161845480421 Philippians 4:12). If they are caused by devotion to Christian service, they are, like all other privations so caused, badges of fidelity; and they may be referred to with reasonable pride by Christ’s ministers (2 Corinthians 6:4 f. ; 2 Corinthians 11:23). 6; and, in the same connexion, the Interpolations in the NT [6]). , 2 Corinthians 12:1 f. ‘Though I give all my goods to feed the poor and have not love, it profiteth me nothing’ (1 Corinthians 13:3). 1 Corinthians 9:24-27). Paul’s language in 1 Corinthians 9:24 ff. It may be said that interpolations like 1 Corinthians 7:5 (cf. Romans 8:13, 1 Corinthians 5:5; 1 Corinthians 7:1-8; 1 Corinthians 9:27, 2 Corinthians 4:10-11, Colossians 3:5); but even those who hold this view of these Pauline passages admit ‘that there is very little asceticism, in the ordinary sense, in St. Thus, while total abstinence is in itself not an obligatory duty, it may become so on the principle that we ought not to do anything by which our brother stumbles, or is offended, or is made weak (1 Corinthians 8:13). In 1 Corinthians 8 the Apostle is dealing with the conditions of his own time; our conditions did not engage his attention. This is his ἄσκησις for the gospel’s sake (1 Corinthians 9:19-22). This conduct was not due to fickleness or guile (1 Corinthians 2:15, 1 Thessalonians 2:3), but to love (2 Corinthians 5:13 f. ), and it was done in simplicity and godly sincerity of conscience (2 Corinthians 1:12, Acts 24:16). It was different from the loveless superior liberty of Corinthian liberalism, and from the servile man-pleasing of weak Judaism (Galatians 1:2). It is a warning to Christian liberalism in Corinth not to degenerate into licence and so to fall
Fire - The NT furnishes some analogous cases in which the theophanic fire is simply a manifestation of the Divine presence or attributes (Acts 2:8, Revelation 1:14 f; Revelation 4:5), and others in which it is an accompaniment of the Divine judgment (2 Thessalonians 1:8, 2 Peter 3:10-12), (2) The use of fire as a testing and purifying agent has led to its figurative application as a criterion for distinguishing between what possesses genuine moral worth and what does not, and as a means of purifying human character (1 Corinthians 3:12 f, 1 Peter 1:7). Acts 10:46 f, 1 Corinthians 14 passim). But assuming the reasonableness of this conjecture, the passage under discussion sheds no light on the constitution of the new environment in which a spiritual body takes the place of a natural body (1 Corinthians 15:44). 1 Corinthians 3:13). ), ‘and the fire itself shall prove each man’s work of what sort it is’ (1 Corinthians 3:13-15 Revised Version ). It may have been suggested by ‘the conflagration of Corinth under Mummius; the stately temples standing amidst the universal destruction of the meaner buildings’ (A. Stanley, Epistles to the Corinthians2, 1858, p
Roman Empire - Stirrings and dissensions in Greece and Macedonia led in 146 to the destruction of Corinth by Mummius, and the constitution of the first eastern province, Achaea, which comprised both countries
Calendar, the Christian - That it was the custom for Christians to meet together for worship on the first day of the week appears also from 1 Corinthians 16:2 (κατὰ μίαν σαββάτου), where the Corinthians are hidden each to ‘lay by him in store,’ that there might be no collection when the Apostle came. 1 Thessalonians 5:2 ἡμέρα Κυρίου, Acts 2:20 from Joel 2:31; 2 Peter 3:10, 1 Corinthians 1:8 ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ τοῦ Κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, and 1 Corinthians 5:5, 2 Corinthians 1:14, Philippians 1:6), and would mean that the Apocalyptist is carried forward in vision to the day of the end of the world. He also explicitly mentions the Sunday collection of alms, as in 1 Corinthians 16:2. Dionysius of Corinth (a
John, Epistles of - , Galus of Corinth ( 1 Corinthians 1:14 ; cf
Peter - Paul (1 Corinthians 1:12; 1 Corinthians 3:22; 1 Corinthians 9:5; 1 Corinthians 15:5, Luke 5:1-11; Galatians 2:9; Galatians 2:11; Galatians 2:14); and John once speaks of ‘Cephas (which is by interpretation, Peter)’ (John 1:42). He was generally thought to have been the first disciple to see-if not to believe in (John 20:8)-the Risen Lord (1 Corinthians 15:5, Mark 16:7, Luke 24:34), and, as St. Peter is seen to have been the first to obtain a vision of the Risen Lord (1 Corinthians 15:5); and thus from the outset he occupied a position of primacy in the community and was also first among the apostles, while St. Paul reckons himself last (1 Corinthians 15:9). Paul’s ancestry entitles him to a full share in that advantage (Romans 11:1, 2 Corinthians 11:22, Philippians 3:5). An incidental reference to Peter as a travelling missionary accompanied by his wife and deriving support from those to whom he ministered (1 Corinthians 9:5), and mention of a Cephas party in Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:12; 1 Corinthians 3:22), complete the list of Pauline data
Mss - Peter, writing in the name of the Roman Church to their brethren in Corinth, wrote in Greek
Trial-at-Law - A renewed charge of illegal worship brought against Paul by the Jews of Corinth recoiled on their own heads; for the philosophic proconsul, Gallio, not merely resolved the accusation into a mere matter of ‘words and names’ and questions affecting their own law, but calmly permitted the mob to seize and beat Sosthenes, the ruler of the synagogue, before the very tribunal (Acts 18:12 ff
Canon of the New Testament - Clement of Rome assumed that the church at Corinth was acquainted with 1 Corinthians, although he was writing nearly 40 years after St
Passover - Similarly we find the other primary Jewish festivals (Tabernacles and Pentecost) used in the same way-John 7:2 (Tabernacles), Acts 2:1; Acts 20:16, 1 Corinthians 16:8 (Pentecost). It is generally admitted that this was the third cup or cup of blessing which is still drunk at the conclusion of the meal (‘after supper,’ Luke 22:20, 1 Corinthians 11:25). And when he makes an allusion to the feast in writing to the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 5:6-8), it shows only that the feast per se has no longer any interest for him. ’-We have already referred in passing to 1 Corinthians 5:6-8, but both here and in 1 Corinthians 15:20; 1 Corinthians 15:23 there are allusions to Passover (‘the firstfruits,’ ἀπαρχή) which call for a rather more extended notice. 469) translates (no doubt advisedly) 1 Corinthians 15:20, ‘being the first to do so of those who are asleep’; and again 1 Corinthians 15:23, ‘Christ having been the first to rise’: but this entirely obscures the beautiful figure of the harvest field. Paul’s treatment of a crying scandal in the Church at Corinth which incidentally gives us some light on the practice of the times (1 Corinthians 10:16 f. , 1 Corinthians 11:17 ff. Paul’s mention of the ‘cup of blessing’ (1 Corinthians 10:16), coupled with the fact that he had already seen in the Paschal lamb an illustration of Christ, makes it clear that he at any rate viewed this ordinance as the Christian counterpart of the Jewish Passover. Paul represent the later reflexion of a period when the idea of Christ as the true Passover (1 Corinthians 5:7, John 19:36) had influenced the conception of the institution’ (art
Polycarpus, Bishop of Smyrna - A second note states that these Acts were transcribed by Socrates (or Isocrates) of Corinth, from a copy made by Caius, a companion of Polycarp's disciple Irenaeus
Church (2) - Paul the term ecclesia is constantly used of the local communities, of which he had frequent occasion to speak; the church in a city (1 Corinthians 1:2) or even in a house (Romans 16:5, Colossians 4:15) is a familiar expression, and the churches of a region are spoken of (1 Corinthians 16:1; 1 Corinthians 16:19) in a way that possibly suggests the beginnings of a provincial organization. As the individual Christian, in spite of his imperfections, is a saint, so the existing body of Christians whom he is addressing is the Body of Christ, which is to be presented a glorious Church, holy and without blemish (1 Corinthians 12:27, Ephesians 5:27). The existence from the first of the power of excommunication (1 Corinthians 5, etc. A lack of charity, leading to party spirit, such as existed at Corinth, was regarded by St
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - Peter of Corinth, a young bishop, did the same, owning that Flavian held with Cyril; the Easterns exclaimed, "Peter thinks as does" (St
Worship - The Lord's Supper was celebrated by the body of believers collectively: and this Apostle prescribes to the Corinthians regulations for the exercises of prayer and prophesyings, "when they came together in the church,"—the assembly. Thus Gaius of Corinth, Romans 16, is called the host of the church, because the church was in the habit of assembling in a room of his house
Justinianus i, Emperor - of what is now Russia down upon Thrace, ravaged it and Macedonia, penetrated on one occasion to the isthmus of Corinth, and six years before Justinian's death, in 559, appeared in great force under the walls of Constantinople, from which they were repulsed by the skill and vigour of Belisarius
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - is proved by its antagonists in numerous countries: Dionysius in Corinth writing to Nicomedia, Philip in Crete, Theophilus in Antioch, besides Modestus (Eus. Again, since the baptism of a married person was only permitted in articulo mortis , it would sometimes happen that catechumens were surprised by death before baptism, and it is not incredible that in such cases the device of a vicarious baptism may have been resorted to, as Chrysostom tells in speaking on the passage in Corinthians about being baptized for the dead