What does Copts mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Copts
(1):
(n. pl.) An Egyptian race thought to be descendants of the ancient Egyptians.
(2):
(n. pl.) The principal sect of Christians in Egypt and the valley of the Nile.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Copts
a name given to the Christians of Egypt who do not belong to the Greek church, but are Monophysites, and in most respects Jacobites. Scaliger and Father Simon derive the name from Coptos, once a celebrated town of Egypt, and the metropolis of the Thebaid; but Volney and others are of opinion, that the name Copts is only an abbreviation of the Greek word Aigouptios, "an Egyptian." The Copts have a patriarch, whose jurisdiction extends over both Egypts, Nubia, and Abyssinia; who resides at Cairo, but who takes his title from Alexandria. He has under him eleven or twelve bishops, beside the abuna, or bishop of the Abyssinians, whom he appoints and consecrates. The rest of the clergy, whether secular or regular, are composed of the orders of St. Anthony, St. Paul, and St. Macarius, who have each their monasteries. Their arch-priests, who are next in degree to bishops, and their deacons, are said to be numerous; and they often confer the order of deacon even on children. Next to the patriarch is the bishop, or titular patriarch, of Jerusalem, who also resides at Cairo, because there are only few Copts at Jerusalem. He is, in reality, little more than bishop of Cairo; except that he goes to Jerusalem every Easter, and visits some other places in Palestine, which own his jurisdiction. To him belongs the government of the Coptic church, during the vacancy of the patriarchal see. The ecclesiastics are said to be, in general, of the lowest ranks of the people; and hence that great degree of ignorance which prevails among them. They have seven sacraments; baptism, the eucharist, confirmation, ordination, faith, fasting, and prayer. They admit only three oecumenical councils; those of Nice, Constantinople, and Ephesus. There are three Coptic liturgies; one attributed to St. Basil, another to St. Gregory, and the third to St. Cyril. At present, however, little more than the mere shadow of Christianity can be seen in Egypt; and, in point of numbers, not more than fifty thousand Christians in all can be found in this country. There are not more than three Christian churches at Cairo.

Sentence search

Coptic - ) Of or pertaining to the Copts. ) The language of the Copts
Coptic - Pertaining to the descendants of the ancient Egyptians, called Copts, or cophti, as distinct from the Arabians and other inhabitants of modern Egypt. Whatever may be the origin of Copt, the adjective Coptic now refers to the people called Copts, who are Christians, and to their language. The language of the Copts
Coptic - The Afro-Asiatic language of the Copts, which survives only as a liturgical language of the Coptic Church
Lent, Mary's - A period of fasting, 1 to August 14, observed among the Greeks, the Copts, and the Russians, during which they abstain from meat, eggs, and sometimes fish and milk, etc
Mary's Lent - A period of fasting, 1 to August 14, observed among the Greeks, the Copts, and the Russians, during which they abstain from meat, eggs, and sometimes fish and milk, etc
Thebaic - ) Of or pertaining to Thebes in Egypt; specifically, designating a version of the Bible preserved by the Copts, and esteemed of great value by biblical scholars
Nourry, Agathangelus, Blessed - He took the Capuchin habit at Le Mans, taught theology at Rennes, and was sent to Egypt to convert the Copts
Agathangelus Nourry, Blessed - He took the Capuchin habit at Le Mans, taught theology at Rennes, and was sent to Egypt to convert the Copts
Copts - Scaliger and Father Simon derive the name from Coptos, once a celebrated town of Egypt, and the metropolis of the Thebaid; but Volney and others are of opinion, that the name Copts is only an abbreviation of the Greek word Aigouptios, "an Egyptian. " The Copts have a patriarch, whose jurisdiction extends over both Egypts, Nubia, and Abyssinia; who resides at Cairo, but who takes his title from Alexandria. Next to the patriarch is the bishop, or titular patriarch, of Jerusalem, who also resides at Cairo, because there are only few Copts at Jerusalem
Ablution - The Syrians, Copts, & 100: have their solemn washings on Good Friday; the Turks also have their ablutions, their Ghast, their Wodou, Aman, & 100:...
Monophysites - This heresy still prevails in the East among the Copts and the Syrian Jacobites
Monophysitism - This heresy still prevails in the East among the Copts and the Syrian Jacobites
Monophysites - This heresy still prevails in the East among the Copts and the Syrian Jacobites
Monophysitism - This heresy still prevails in the East among the Copts and the Syrian Jacobites
Greek Rites - ...
ANTIOCH ...
(1) Pure, survives only in the "Apostolic Constitutions"
(2) Modified at Jerusalem in the Liturgy of Saint James
(a) Greek Saint James, used once a year by the Orthodox
(b) Syriac Saint James (Jacobites and Catholic Syrians)
(c) Maronite Rite
(3) Chaldean Rite (Nestorians and Chaldean Uniats)
(a) Malabar Rite (Uniats and non-Uniats of Malabar)
(4) Byzantine Rite (Orthodox, Bulgarians, Byzantine Uniats, and Bulgarian Uniats)
(5) Armenian Rite (Uniat and non-Uniat Armenians)
ALEXANDRIA ...
(1)
(a) Greek Liturgy of Saint Mark; no longer used
(b) Coptic Liturgies of Saint Cyril, Saint Basil and Saint Gregory Nazianzus (Uniat and non-Uniat Copts)
(2) AEthiopic Liturgy (non-Uniat Abyssinians)
Rites, Greek - ...
ANTIOCH ...
(1) Pure, survives only in the "Apostolic Constitutions"
(2) Modified at Jerusalem in the Liturgy of Saint James
(a) Greek Saint James, used once a year by the Orthodox
(b) Syriac Saint James (Jacobites and Catholic Syrians)
(c) Maronite Rite
(3) Chaldean Rite (Nestorians and Chaldean Uniats)
(a) Malabar Rite (Uniats and non-Uniats of Malabar)
(4) Byzantine Rite (Orthodox, Bulgarians, Byzantine Uniats, and Bulgarian Uniats)
(5) Armenian Rite (Uniat and non-Uniat Armenians)
ALEXANDRIA ...
(1)
(a) Greek Liturgy of Saint Mark; no longer used
(b) Coptic Liturgies of Saint Cyril, Saint Basil and Saint Gregory Nazianzus (Uniat and non-Uniat Copts)
(2) AEthiopic Liturgy (non-Uniat Abyssinians)
Alexandria, Egypt, City of - It finally divided into two communions: the native Copts, bound to error; and the foreign Greeks, faithful to schismatic orthodoxy
Joseph, Saint - Public recognition of Saint Joseph is first found among the Eastern Copts in the 4th century; the Church began to celebrate his feast in the 6th century
Ablution - The Egyptian priests had their diurnal and nocturnal ablutions; the Grecians, their sprinklings; the Romans, their lustrations and lavations; the Jews, their washings of hands and feet, beside their baptisms; the ancient Christians used ablution before communion, which the Romish church still retains before the mass, sometimes after; the Syrians, Copts, &c
Simon the Apostle, Saint - The Greeks, Copts, and Ethiopians identify him with Nathanael of Cana; the Abyssinians relate that he suffered crucifixion as Bishop of Jerusalem, after he had preached the gospel in Samaria, confusing him with Simeon, Bishop of Jerusalem; according to the Greeks he preached on the Black Sea, and in Egypt, Northern Africa, and even in Britain; the Latin and Armenian traditions hold that he labored in Persia
Abyssinian Church - They are a branch of the Copts, with whom they agree in admitting only one nature in Jesus Christ, and rejecting the council of Chalcedon; whence they are also called Monophysites and Eutychians, which see
e'Gypt - (land of the Copts ), a country occupying the northeast angle of Africa
Alexandria - The population consists of Turks, Arabs, Copts, Jews, and Armenians
Abyssinian Church - They were compelled to retreat to Grand Cairo, from whence, by leave of the patriarch, they visited the Copts, at Behrusser, and formed a small society; but in 1783, they were driven thence, and compelled to return to Europe
Egyptians - The Copts in modern Egypt are considered to be the descendants of the ancient race
Cross - The pagan Egyptians, Copts, Indians, and Persians, all have the same sacred emblem
Egypt - The Copts, or descendants of the ancient Egyptians. The Copts are nominal Christians, and the clerks and accountants of the country
Maronites - The most valuable advantage that has resulted from these labours is, that the art of writing has become more common among the Maronites, and rendered them, in this country, what the Copts are in Egypt, that is, they are in possession of all the posts of writers, intendants, and kaiyas among the Turks, and especially of those among their allies and neighbours, the Druses
Philoxenus, a Monophysite Leader - He shares with Severus of Antioch, the true scientific head of the previously leaderless party of the Acephali, the reputation of having originated the Jacobite form of Monophysitism, which was long supreme in Egypt and is still adopted by the Copts
Monophysitism - The lay Copts have become educated and even wealthy. Two missions to the Copts have been sent of late years from England, one in 1843 and the other in the last decade of the 19th cent. Neither of them were successful, and the Copts will probably be allowed for the future to carry out the much-needed reforms in their system in their own way
Philistia - The Cherethites were probably Caphtorim, the modern Copts
Bethlehem - 90), writing in 1893, and founding upon personally ascertained figures, gives 8035 as the population, which he classifies in respect of religion as follows: Latins, 3827; Greeks, 3662; Moslems, 260; Armenians, 185; Protestants, 54; Copts and Syrians, 47
Bible - It is the version now used ecclesiastically by the Copts
Moravians - In upper Egypt there was a prospect of their being useful among the Copts, who were visited for many years
Arabia - At this time, however, it does not appear that the Arabians had any version of the Scriptures in their own language, to which some writers attribute the ease with which they were drawn into the Mohammedan delusion; while the "Greeks, Syrians, Armenians, Abyssinians, Copts, and others," who enjoyed that privilege, were able to resist it