What does Consecrate mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
וְקִדַּשְׁתָּ֥ to consecrate 3
קַדְּשׁוּ־ to consecrate 2
לְקַדֵּשׁ֙ to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתָּ֣ to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתָּ֙ to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתָּ֖ to consecrate 1
יְקַדֵּֽשׁוּ to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתֶּם֙ to consecrate 1
וּלְקַדֵּשׁ֙ to consecrate 1
וְהַחֲרַמְתִּ֤י to ban 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתִּ֛י to consecrate 1
וְהִתְקַדִּשְׁתֶּם֙ to consecrate 1
וְקִדְּשׁ֔וֹ to consecrate 1
וְהִ֨תְקַדִּשְׁתֶּ֔ם to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתּ֔וֹ to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתֶּ֗ם to consecrate 1
לְקַדְּשָֽׁם to consecrate 1
לְקַדְּשֽׁוֹ to consecrate 1
אֲקַדֵּ֖שׁ to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתָּ֞ to consecrate 1
לְמַלֹּ֥אות to fill 1
יְמַלֵּ֖א to fill 1
לְמַלֵּ֨א to fill 1
וּמִלֵּאתָ֧ to fill 1
וּמִלֵּאתָ֥ to fill 1
לְמַלֵּ֥א to fill 1
תְּמַלֵּ֥א to fill 1
מִלְא֨וּ to fill 1
וּמִלְא֖וּ to fill 1
וְהִזִּ֤יר to dedicate 1
לְקַדֵּ֥שׁ to consecrate 1
וְהִתְקַדְּשׁוּ֙ to consecrate 1
קַדֶּשׁ־ to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתָּ֥ם to consecrate 1
יִתְקַדָּ֑שׁוּ to consecrate 1
וְקִדַּשְׁתּֽוֹ to consecrate 1
לְקַדְּשׁ֖וֹ to consecrate 1
יַקְדִּ֙ישׁוּ֙ to consecrate 1
הִתְקַדְּשׁ֣וּ to consecrate 1

Definitions Related to Consecrate

H6942


   1 to Consecrate, sanctify, prepare, dedicate, be hallowed, be holy, be sanctified, be separate.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to be set apart, be consecrated.
         1a2 to be hallowed.
         1a3 consecrated, tabooed.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to show oneself sacred or majestic.
         1b2 to be honoured, be treated as sacred.
         1b3 to be holy.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to set apart as sacred, Consecrate, dedicate.
         1c2 to observe as holy, keep sacred.
         1c3 to honour as sacred, hallow.
         1c4 to Consecrate.
      1d (Pual).
         1d1 to be consecrated.
         1d2 consecrated, dedicated.
      1e (Hiphil). 1e1 to set apart, devote, Consecrate. 1e2 to regard or treat as sacred or hallow. 1e3 to Consecrate.
      1f (Hithpael).
         1f1 to keep oneself apart or separate.
         1f2 to cause Himself to be hallowed (of God).
         1f3 to be observed as holy.
         1f4 to Consecrate oneself.
         

H4390


   1 to fill, be full.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to be full.
            1a1a fullness, abundance (participle).
            1a1b to be full, be accomplished, be ended.
         1a2 to Consecrate, fill the hand.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be filled, be armed, be satisfied.
         1b2 to be accomplished, be ended.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to fill.
         1c2 to satisfy.
         1c3 to fulfil, accomplish, complete.
         1c4 to confirm.
      1d (Pual) to be filled.
      1e (Hithpael) to mass themselves against.
      

H2763


   1 to ban, devote, destroy utterly, completely destroy, dedicate for destruction, exterminate.
      1a (Hiphil).
         1a1 to prohibit (for common use), ban.
         1a2 to Consecrate, devote, dedicate for destruction.
         1a3 to exterminate, completely destroy.
      1b (Hophal).
         1b1 to be put under the ban, be devoted to destruction.
         1b2 to be devoted, be forfeited.
         1b3 to be completely destroyed.
   2 to split, slit, mutilate (a part of the body).
      2a (Qal) to mutilate.
      2b (Hiphil) to divide.
      

H5144


   1 to dedicate, Consecrate, separate.
      1a (Niphal) to dedicate oneself, devote oneself.
      1b (Hiphil) to keep sacredly separate.
   2 (Hiphil) to be a Nazarite, live as a Nazarite.
   

Frequency of Consecrate (original languages)

Frequency of Consecrate (English)

Dictionary

Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Consecrate
The Meanings of qds in the Sinai Legislation . In the Sinai material (Exodus 19:1 -nu; 10:10 ) qds [1], which is translated "consecrate/sanctify/make holy, " means separation with relationship to God. Of 263 occurrences the context implies separation in 260 instances and relationship to God in 252. Another meaning is perfection or excellence (70 times), whether ethical/behavioral (37), material (32), or both (1). Less frequent occurrences imply a mysterious/dangerous power (20 instances) or glory (5 instances).
Separation is particularly clear in the bounds set around Mount Sinai (Exodus 19:23 ; see also the wall around Ezekiel's temple, Ezekiel 42:20 ) and in the veil setting off the Holy of Holies (Exodus 26:33 ). The function of the priests is to distinguish between the holy and the common (Leviticus 10:10 ).
Both separation and relationship to God are explicit in the qds [ Exodus 25:8 ; 29:43-46 ).
The clearest reference to ethical perfection in qds [ Leviticus 20:7-8 ; 22:31-32 ).
Material perfection or excellence is most frequently involved in the use of qds [1] for the tabernacle materials. The requirements for perfect sacrifices and the exclusion of physically defective priests from service also include the idea of perfection in qds [1].
Holy Persons, Objects, and Times in the Sinai Material . Persons, objects, and times are holy because they are set apart for God. Of persons, the priests most frequently receive the designation "holy." The firstborn are holy (Numbers 3:13 ), as are the Levites who replace them (Numbers 3:12-13 ), the Nazarites (Numbers 6:8 ; cf. also those dedicated to Yahweh, Leviticus 27:1-8 ), and all Israel (Exodus 19:6,10,14 ). The latter are sometimes described as sanctified by God (Leviticus 20:8 ) and sometimes told to sanctify themselves (20:7). God sanctifies them by separating them from the nations and giving them his statutes; they sanctify themselves by obeying these laws (Exodus 19:5-6 ; Leviticus 20:7-8 ; 22:31-32 ).
Of objects, the tabernacle and its appurtenances are commonly called holy. Whenever the text speaks of contagious holiness, the subject is the "most holy" things (qodes qadasim Exodus 29:37 ; 30:29 ; Leviticus 6:10 ; [4],18 [5],22 [3] ). Common things can be raised to the status of holy if the owner chooses to dedicate them to Yahweh (Leviticus 27 ). This seems to have included even unclean animals (27:11, cf. vv. 26-27).
Of times, the Sabbath (Exodus 20:8 ; etc. ), the feasts (Leviticus 23:37 ), and the year of jubilee (Leviticus 25:10,12 ) are set apart as holy. The Sabbath is also a sign of holiness (Exodus 31:13 — that Israel will realize it is Yahweh who is making them different for himself ).
Israel's Cultic Structure Was a Paradigm of qds.The structure of Israel's cult pictures the predominant meanings of holiness: separation to God and perfection. This is to be seen in the organization of persons into priesthood and laity, in the layout of the sanctuary and the camp around it, and in the regulations for access of persons to holy territory. The nearer the relationship to Yahweh who is holy, the greater the separation from imperfection. For example, the Holy of Holies is the most separate spot and evidences the highest quality of materials and craftsmanship. The high priest only enters on one day of the year, and with no one else in the next room who might see in ( Leviticus 16:17 ). Spanning out from the sanctuary are concentric circles of decreasing holiness the Levites, the twelve tribes, the unclean and the heathen (Gentiles). The more serious the uncleanness, the greater the exclusion of that unclean person and the more elaborate the ritual required for him to regain access to the presence of the holy. Even the sacrifices and washings within the ritual themselves mirror the concept of holiness. That the offerer's sacrifice is killed serves as a metaphor for the separation of a holy God from imperfection. The washings, while serving generally as a hygienic measure to check or prevent disease, also have metaphoric value. The high priest bathes before entering and again upon exiting from the holiest place; contact with the most holy things is contact with contagious holiness, and contagion needs to be washed away to keep the most holy things set apart (Leviticus 16:24 ; 6:27 ). The sprinkling of the Levites at their induction is also a metaphoric cleansing (cf. also after leprosy the shaving of eyebrows, but not all body hair). As washing gets rid of dirt, so it seems on occasion to get rid of status with respect to purity of the cult. One step removed is to make washing a metaphor for riddance of sina step approached most nearly in the Sinai material in the ordeal for a wife suspected of adultery (Numbers 5:17,27-28 ).
The Development of qds in Later Biblical Writers .Later writers in the Old Testament and also the New often emphasize holiness as an ethical and spiritual thing. The prophets during the time when there was no temple (586-516 b.c.) use the temple ritual as a metaphor for holiness (Lamentations 1:8-9,17 ; 4:13-15 ; Ezekiel 36:17,25 ; Haggai 2:10-19 ; Zechariah 3 ). Ezekiel (chaps. 40-48) outlines the whole future temple and its ritual as a pattern of holiness (i.e., separation to God from uncleanness) so that Israel will become ashamed of her iniquities (43:10-12). Peter uses language from Exodus 19 to speak of the church as a holy priesthood/nation that offers up spiritual sacrifices ( 1 Peter 2:4 ).
As in the priestly legislation so in the New Testament God's people are sometimes described as sanctified by God (1 Thessalonians 5:23 ; cf. Ephesians 1:4 ) and sometimes told to sanctify themselves (2 Corinthians 7:1 ; 1 Thessalonians 3:13 ) so as to be blameless. The means whereby God sanctified his church was Jesus' sacrificial death (Colossians 1:22 ). In response, believers are told to present their bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God (Romans 12:1 ). Also they are disciplined by God in order to share his holiness (Hebrews 12:10 ).
Paul calls believers the holy temple of God (1 Corinthians 3:17 ). The direction is for all of one's life to be set apart to and blameless/perfect before God. Zechariah anticipated a day when the commonplace things of life would be raised to the status of holy (14:20-21). Isaiah looked forward to a "highway of holiness" upon which the unclean would not travel (Isaiah 35:8 ). Whereas in the Sinai legislation uncleanness is more contagious than holiness, this appears to be reversed in 1 Corinthians 7:14 the unbelieving husband being sanctified by his wife. The encompassing goal in both Testaments is for God's people to be holy in all their behavior like the Holy One who called them (Leviticus 11:45 ; 19:2 ; 20:26 ; 1 Peter 1:14-16 ).
David Hildebrand
See also Offerings and Sacrifices ; Priest, Priesthood
Bibliography . M. Haran, Temples and Temple Service in Ancient Israel ; J. Milgrom, Cult and Conscience ; idem, Suppl. IDB, 782-84; O. Proksch, TDNT, 1:88-115.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Consecrate
To make sacred; to set apart for sacred use, as theelements in the Holy Communion, Church buildings, etc. A Bishop issaid to be consecrated to his office by the act of Laying on ofHands by other Bishops.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Consecrate, Consecration (2)
CONSECRATE, CONSECRATION.—In the Authorized Version of NT ‘consecrated’ occurs twice. In both places the reference is to the work of Christ, but to two different aspects of that work, neither of which is suggested by the rendering ‘consecrated.’ (1) In Hebrews 7:28 the word used is τετελειωμένον = Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘perfected.’ Our Lord, as ‘a Son perfected for evermore,’ is contrasted with human high priests ‘having infirmity.’ The connexion of thought, obscured in the Authorized Version, is with Hebrews 2:10; Hebrews 5:9 etc. The perfection of Him who ‘abideth for ever,’ and whose priesthood is inviolable, is the result of the human experience of the Divine Son. By His life in the flesh, His lowly obedience, and His sufferings, He has gained that abiding sympathy with men which fits Him to be ‘the author of eternal salvation.’ (2) In Hebrews 10:20 the word used is ἐνεκαίνισεν = Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘dedicated,’ lit. ‘made new.’ Jesus ‘dedicated for us a new and living way’ into the Holy Place. The thought is that by means of His own blood our High Priest passed into the Divine presence, inaugurating a way for us. Because He passed through our human life, and out of it by the rending of ‘the veil, that is to say, his flesh,’ He is not only our representative, but also our forerunner; in full assurance of faith we also may draw near and follow Him into that heavenly sanctuary.
In the (Revised Version margin) ‘consecrate’ is found three times, viz., John 10:36; John 17:17; John 17:19. ἁγιάζειν, of which ‘consecrate’ is an alternative rendering, is usually translated ‘sanctify.’ The exception in the Authorized and Revised Versions is the first petition of the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9 = Luke 11:2)—‘Hallowed be thy name.’ Here the Rheims version has ‘sanctified be thy name’; on the other hand, Wyclif has ‘halowe,’ ‘halowid’ in John 10:36; John 17:17; John 17:19.
The distinction between ‘consecrate’ and ‘sanctify’ turns rather upon usage than upon etymology. Both words mean ‘to make holy.’ But a person or a thing may be made holy in two different ways: (1) By solemn setting apart for holy uses, as when in the LXX Septuagint ἁγιάζειν designates the consecration of a prophet (Jeremiah 1:5, cf. Sirach 45:4; Sirach 49:7); (2) by imparting fitness for holy uses, as when St. Paul speaks (Romans 15:16, cf. 1 Thessalonians 5:23) of his offering as ‘made acceptable’ because it has been ‘sanctified by the Holy Spirit.’ On these lines it now seems possible and desirable to distinguish the two English words which mean ‘to make holy.’ Ideally, consecration implies sanctification. But in modern English ‘consecrate’ suggests the thought of setting apart for holy uses, whilst ‘sanctify’ has come rather to imply making fit for holy uses.
The rendering ‘consecrated’ better suits the context of John 10:36 ‘Say ye of him, whom the Father consecrated and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am Son of God?’ Jeremiah 1:8 supplies a suggestive OT analogy, for the word of the Lord reminds the young prophet that, in the Divine counsel, he was set apart for holy uses before his birth. The thought would be more appropriately presented by ‘consecrated’ than by Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘sanctified’ (LXX Septuagint ἠγίακα). Similarly, as our Lord declares in His argument with the Jews (John 10:36), the Father consecrated His Son to His redemptive mission before sending Him forth to His work. More is implied in this statement than that the Father ‘chose’ or ‘set apart’ His Son. All things were given into His hand (John 3:35), and amongst the all things were ‘life in himself’ (John 5:26), fulness of grace and truth (John 1:14), and the Spirit ‘without measure’ (John 3:34). ‘The fact belongs to the eternal order. The term expresses the Divine destination of the Lord for His work. This destination carries with it the further thought of the perfect endowment of the Incarnate Son’ (Westcott, Com. in loc.). It is only in this sense of complete equipment that the Divine Son was made fit for His sacred mission; the Holy One had no need of sanctification ‘in a way of qualification,’ as the Puritan divines used the word, when they meant inward cleansing from sin and the Holy Spirit’s bestowal of purity of heart.
Our Lord’s words, ‘I consecrate myself’ (John 17:19), are best understood in the light of His earlier saying that ‘the Father consecrated’ Him (John 10:36). The two statements are complementary. His consecration of Himself was the proof of His perfect acquiescence in the Father’s purpose concerning Himself, His disciples, and the world. The secret of His inner life was continually revealed ‘in loveliness of perfect deeds’ which constrained men to acknowledge the truth of His words, ‘I seek not mine own will, but the will of him that sent me’ (John 5:30); the law that ruled His every word and work He was soon to fulfil to the uttermost; His readiness to drink the cup which the Father was about to put into His hands was involved in His calm word, ‘I consecrate myself’; its utterance in this solemn hour affords a glimpse of the spirit of absolute devotion to His Father’s will in which Jesus is finishing His work and consummating in death the self-sacrifice of His life. And as for the sake of His disciples Jesus consecrates Himself, He prays for them, knowing that the future of His kingdom depends on their having the same spirit of complete consecration to the Divine will.
Commentators who follow Chrysostom in regarding ἀγιάζω as practically equivalent to τροσφἑρω σοὶ θυσιαν (cf. Euth. Zig. ἑγὼ ἐκουσίως θυσιάζω ἑμαυτόν), and as connotiog the idea of expiatory sacrifice, support their interpretation by references to OT passages in which ἁγιάζειν (= הקְרִּישׁ) is a sacred word for sacrifices, as, .g., Exodus 13:2, Deuteronomy 15:19 ff., 2 Samuel 8:11 (cf. Meyer, loc.). They are obliged to give the word ἁγιάζειν two different meanings in the same sentence, as does the (Revised Version margin): ‘And for their sakes I consecrate myself, that they themselves also may be sanctified in truth.’ But it is not from the word ἁγιάζειν, that the nature of Christ’s death is to be learnt; that which differentiates the consecration of Christ from the consecration of His disciples is brought out rather by the other words in this pregnant saying. The consecration of Jesus is His own act, but He does not pray that apart from Him the disciples may follow His example and consecrate themselves; His consecration is the pattern of theirs, therefore the same word is used of the Master and of His disciples; but without His consecration ‘for their sakes’ (ὑτὲρ αὑτῶν), their consecration would be impossible, therefore it is said of the Master alone that He consecrates Himself on behalf of others.
If ἀγιάζειν be uniformly rendered ‘consecrate’ in our Lord’s intercessory prayer, it will be seen that He twice expresses His yearning desire for the consecration of the men whom His Father had given Him out of the world: (1) John 17:17 ‘Consecrate them in the truth’; as Jesus sends forth His disciples on the same mission which brought Him into the world at His Father’s bidding, He asks that they also may be set apart for holy service, and may be divinely equipped for their task, even as He was, by the indwelling of the Father’s love (John 17:26). They possess the knowledge and the faith that the world lacks, for they have come to know and to believe that the Father sent the Son (John 17:8; John 17:25, cf. John 17:21; John 17:23). It is because Jesus desires intensely that the world may know and believe, that He so fervently prays for the consecration of the men whose faith and knowledge qualify them to speak in the world the word which He has given them. (2) John 17:19 ‘And for their sakes I consecrate myself, that they also may be consecrated in truth.’ Reasons for departing from the rendering of the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 and the (Revised Version margin) have been given above. No doubt it is important to remember that men ‘having infirmity’ need by inward sanctifying to be made fit for the holy service to which they have been consecrated; but the emphatic words, ‘they also’ (καὶ αὐτοί), suggest not a contrast, but a resemblance,—a consecration common to the Master and His disciples. It is a resemblance not in the letter, but in the spirit. Between their work as witnesses and His as Redeemer there was a contrast; but their lives might be ruled by the ‘inward thought’ (1 Peter 4:1 (Revised Version margin)) which constrained Him to suffer for their sakes. For the disciples of Jesus real consecration consists in having the mind which was in Him, who ‘humbled himself, becoming obedient even unto death, yea, the death of the cross’ (Philippians 2:8). It should also be noted that the consecration spoken of in John 17:19 is, alike in the case of Jesus and of His disciples, ‘not a process but an act completed at once,—in His case, when gathering together in one view all His labours and sufferings, He presented them a living sacrifice to His Father; in theirs, when they are in like manner enabled to present themselves as living sacrifices in His one perfect sacrifice’ (W. F. Moulton, Com. in loc.). See, further, art. Sanctification.
J. G. Tasker.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Consecrate, Consecration
The word ‘consecrate’ occurs twice in the Authorized Version of Hebrews (Hebrews 7:28; Hebrews 10:20). In the first passage it is the translation of τετελειωμένον; in the second of ἐνεκαίνισεν. In neither case is the translation quite suitable.
1. Hebrews 7:28 : υἱὸν εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα τετελειωμένον. Full consideration of τελειόω would encroach on the article Perfect (q.v. [1] ); but there are certain special points connected with this passage that may usefully be noted. τελειοῦν τὰς χεῖρας is frequently used in the Septuagint , but only in the Pentateuch (Exodus 29:9; Exodus 29:29; Exodus 29:33; Exodus 29:35 161916761880 Leviticus 8:33; Leviticus 16:32, Numbers 3:3), to translate the obscure Hebrew phrase millç’ yâd = ‘fill the hand,’ i.e. ‘consecrate’ (a priest). Elsewhere in the Pentateuch and Historical Books (once in Ezekiel [3]) parts of πληρόω, ἐμπίπλημι, πίπλημι are employed. τελείωσις is used alone (Exodus 29:22; Exodus 29:26-27; Exodus 29:31; Exodus 29:34, Leviticus 7:37; Leviticus 8:22; Leviticus 8:28-29; Leviticus 8:31; Leviticus 8:33) for the Heb. millû’îm (= ‘consecration’ [4]). In Leviticus 21:10 τετελειωμένος is used without the rest of the phrase = ‘consecrated,’ although many Manuscripts supply τᾶς χεῖρας αὐτοῦ. These last uses would at least point to the conclusion that τελειόω and τελείωσις tended to become semi-technical terms for the consecration of the priest, having originally been used to translate the verb in the Heb. phrase, which is quite obscure. Most probably its original sense is suggested in the corresponding Assyrian kâtû mullû = ‘hand over to one (or make one responsible for) a person or thing or office’ (cf. F. Delitzsch, Assyrian Handwörterbuch, 1896, p. 409b; ‘Rammanirari, whom Asur has endowed with a dominion incomparable’; and Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iv. 71a).
It follows, then, that Hebrews 7:28 and the other passages where τελειόω occurs (see article Perfect) indicate that the writer is making use of a technical expression and, in harmony with his system of thought, hellenizing it (cf. Moffatt, Introd. to Literature of the New Testament (Moffatt)., 1911, p. 427). There can be little doubt that in Hebrews τελειόω is used in the Aristotelian sense of bringing to the τέλος or final end. Jesus, as High Priest, is ‘perfected’ for evermore, as distinct from the τελείωσις of the Aaronic priesthood. There can be no idea of a moral development in character. Jesus is ‘perfected [5] for evermore’ in the sense that He is endowed with an experience of human suffering in life and in death (Hebrews 4:15); so A. B. Davidson, Hebrews (Handbooks for Bible Classes), pp. 145f., 207f.; von Soden, Hebräerbrief3 (Handkommentar zum NT, Tübingen, 1899), p. 28 n. [6] ; but cf. A. B. Bruce, Hebrews, 1899, p. 283ff.; M. Dods, Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘Hebrews,’ 1910, pp. 265, 319, who argue for the sense of moral perfecting.
2. Hebrews 10:20 : τὴν εἴσοδον … ἥν ἐνεκαίνισεν ἡμῖν ὁδὸν πρόσφατον καὶ ζῶσαν διὰ τοῦ καταπετάσματος. ἐγκαινίζω is used also in Hebrews 9:18. In Authorized Version of Hebrews 10:20 the word is ‘consecrated,’ and in Hebrews 9:18 ‘dedicated.’ In Revised Version in both cases ‘dedicated’ is used. In the Septuagint ἐγκαινίζω is used to translate two Heb. words, ḥânakh (‘initiate,’ ‘consecrate,’ Deuteronomy 20:5, 1 Kings 8:63) and hiddçsh (‘renew,’ ‘make anew,’ 1 Samuel 11:14, 2 Chronicles 15:8, Psalms 50:12). ἐγκαινίζω in Hebrews 10:20 might seem to combine both meanings, implying that some kind of way existed before (cf. Sirach 33:8 [7]). In Hebrews 9:18, also, the word means simply ‘inaugurate,’ unless the pre-existence of a covenant is supposed (cf. Hebrews 9:20; Hebrews 9:23) before the ceremony of Hebrews 9:19-21. That the sense of ‘renewal,’ however, is strongly emphasized is seen also in the use of πρόσφατον (‘fresh,’ ‘hitherto untrodden’). ζῶσαν implies ‘a way that really leads and carries all who enter it into the heavenly rest,’ as opposed to ‘a lifeless pavement trodden by the high priest, and by him alone’ (Delitzsch, Hebrews, Eng. translation , ii. [1] 171). It also implies a way that would never become old, worn, or obsolete; ἤν must be taken as referring to εἴσοδος. Jesus has, by bursting the veil of His flesh in death, ‘inaugurated’ a new entrance into the Presence of God (cf. Mark 15:38). The flesh of Jesus is regarded as symbolic of the ‘veil’ or ‘curtain’ which was removed as the sacrificial blood was carried into the Holy of Holies. ἐγκαινίζω ‘includes the motive of leading into life’ (von Soden, Hebräerbrief3, p. 64). Probably the literal idea of εἴσοδος (= ‘entrance to a house’) is also symbolically present (cf. Nehemiah 3:1 [9]). The ‘house’ in this case is the Church, the new Temple [cf. παῤῥησίαν) in Nehemiah 10:19, and its use in Nehemiah 3:6 and Nehemiah 4:16 is opposed to the attitude of the θεράπων (Nehemiah 3:5). The feast of ἐγκαίνια (John 10:22) was instituted by Judas Maccabaeus (164 b.c.) in memory of the cleansing of the Temple from the pollution of Antiochus Epiphanes (1 Maccabees 4:59).
Literature.-In addition to the references in the course of the article, see R. W. Dale, The Jewish Temple and the Christian Church, 1902, pp. 144ff.; 231ff.; F. Paget, The Spirit of Discipline, 1903, p. 191ff.; J.B. Mozley, University Sermons, 1900, p. 244ff.; articles s.v. in Dict. of Christ and the Gospels (Tasker), Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) (Hastings), and Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics (Feltoe).
R. H. Strachan.
 
Webster's Dictionary - Consecrate
(1):
(v. t.) To set apart to a sacred office; as, to consecrate a bishop.
(2):
(a.) Consecrated; devoted; dedicated; sacred.
(3):
(v. t.) To canonize; to exalt to the rank of a saint; to enroll among the gods, as a Roman emperor.
(4):
(v. t.) To make, or declare to be, sacred; to appropriate to sacred uses; to set apart, dedicate, or devote, to the service or worship of God; as, to consecrate a church; to give (one's self) unreservedly, as to the service of God.
(5):
(v. t.) To render venerable or revered; to hallow; to dignify; as, rules or principles consecrated by time.
King James Dictionary - Consecrate
CONSECRATE, L., to consecrate, sacred. See Sacred.
1. To make or declare to be sacred, by certain ceremonies or rites to appropriate to sacred uses to set apart, dedicate, or devote, to the service and worship of God as, to consecrate a church. Thou shalt consecrate Aaron and his sons. Exodus 29 .
All the silver, and gold, and vessels of brass and iron, are consecrated to the Lord. Joshua 6 .
2. To canonize to exalt to the rank of a saint to enroll among the gods, as a Roman emperor. 3. To set apart and bless the elements in the eucharist. 4. To render venerable to make respected as, rules or principles consecrated by time. CONSECRATE, a. Sacred consecrated devoted dedicated.
They were assembled in that consecrate place.
This word is now seldom used, unless in poetry.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Consecrate
* Note: In Hebrews 7:28 the verb teleioo is translated "perfected" in the RV, for AV, "consecrated;" so in Hebrews 9:18 ; 10:20 , enkainizo, RV, "dedicated." See DEDICATE , PERFECT.

Sentence search

Consecrate - Consecrate, L. , to Consecrate, sacred. To make or declare to be sacred, by certain ceremonies or rites to appropriate to sacred uses to set apart, dedicate, or devote, to the service and worship of God as, to Consecrate a church. Thou shalt Consecrate Aaron and his sons. ...
All the silver, and gold, and vessels of brass and iron, are Consecrated to the Lord. To render venerable to make respected as, rules or principles Consecrated by time. Consecrate, a. Sacred Consecrated devoted dedicated. ...
They were assembled in that Consecrate place
Sacrate - ) To Consecrate
Consecrated - ) of Consecrate...
Misconsecrate - ) To Consecrate amiss
Consecrating - ) of Consecrate...
Reconsecrate - ) To Consecrate anew or again
Sacre - ) To Consecrate; to make sacred
Episcopacy - It therefore completes and perfects the sacerdotal power, and thus is an order distinct from the priesthood; it confers power to ordain and Consecrate, to administer confirmation, to Consecrate things destined for Divine worship, and with legitimate jurisdiction to rule a portion of the Church - called a diocese under the Roman pontiff
Hallow - ) To make holy; to set apart for holy or religious use; to Consecrate; to treat or keep as sacred; to reverence
Desecrate - ) To divest of a sacred character or office; to divert from a sacred purpose; to violate the sanctity of; to profane; to put to an unworthy use; - the opposite of Consecrate
Consecrate - ) To set apart to a sacred office; as, to Consecrate a bishop. ) Consecrated; devoted; dedicated; sacred. ) To make, or declare to be, sacred; to appropriate to sacred uses; to set apart, dedicate, or devote, to the service or worship of God; as, to Consecrate a church; to give (one's self) unreservedly, as to the service of God. ) To render venerable or revered; to hallow; to dignify; as, rules or principles Consecrated by time
Hallow - To render sacred, to Consecrate (Exodus 28:38 ; 29:1 )
Christ - It was a custom of antiquity to Consecrate persons to the sacerdotal and regal offices by anointing them with oil
Hallow - To render sacred, set apart, Consecrate
Mark, Pope Saint - Issued a constitution confirming the power of the bishop of Ostia to Consecrate newly elected popes
Hallow - To make holy to Consecrate to set apart for holy or religious use
Nebaioth - The "rams of Nebaioth" (Isaiah 60:7 ) are the gifts which these wandering tribes of the desert would Consecrate to God
Dedicate - ) Dedicated; set apart; devoted; Consecrated. ) To set apart and Consecrate, as to a divinity, or for sacred uses; to devote formally and solemnly; as, to dedicate vessels, treasures, a temple, or a church, to a religious use
Sanctify - ) To make sacred or holy; to set apart to a holy or religious use; to Consecrate by appropriate rites; to hallow
Devote - ) To appropriate by vow; to set apart or dedicate by a solemn act; to Consecrate; also, to consign over; to doom; to evil; to devote one to destruction; the city was devoted to the flames
Consecration - The Hebrew kadosh and Greek hagiazo are translated by several different English words: holy, Consecrate, hallow, sanctify, dedicate. When persons or things were “consecrated,” they were separated to or belonged to God. When persons were “consecrated,” they were set apart to live according to God's demands and in His service. When the cause is God's, the gift is Consecrated. ” This phrase is usually translated “consecrate” or “ordain. Nazar from which Nazirite is derived, means “to separate” and is translated “consecrate” in Numbers 6:7 , Numbers 6:9 , Numbers 6:12
Priest - ) One who is authorized to Consecrate the host and to say Mass; but especially, one of the lowest order possessing this power
Consecrate, Consecration (2) - CONSECRATE, CONSECRATION. —In the Authorized Version of NT ‘consecrated’ occurs twice. In both places the reference is to the work of Christ, but to two different aspects of that work, neither of which is suggested by the rendering ‘consecrated. ...
In the (Revised Version margin) ‘consecrate’ is found three times, viz. ἁγιάζειν, of which ‘consecrate’ is an alternative rendering, is usually translated ‘sanctify. ...
The distinction between ‘consecrate’ and ‘sanctify’ turns rather upon usage than upon etymology. But in modern English ‘consecrate’ suggests the thought of setting apart for holy uses, whilst ‘sanctify’ has come rather to imply making fit for holy uses. ...
The rendering ‘consecrated’ better suits the context of John 10:36 ‘Say ye of him, whom the Father Consecrated and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am Son of God?’ Jeremiah 1:8 supplies a suggestive OT analogy, for the word of the Lord reminds the young prophet that, in the Divine counsel, he was set apart for holy uses before his birth. The thought would be more appropriately presented by ‘consecrated’ than by Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘sanctified’ (LXX Septuagint ἠγίακα). Similarly, as our Lord declares in His argument with the Jews (John 10:36), the Father Consecrated His Son to His redemptive mission before sending Him forth to His work. ...
Our Lord’s words, ‘I Consecrate myself’ (John 17:19), are best understood in the light of His earlier saying that ‘the Father Consecrated’ Him (John 10:36). The secret of His inner life was continually revealed ‘in loveliness of perfect deeds’ which constrained men to acknowledge the truth of His words, ‘I seek not mine own will, but the will of him that sent me’ (John 5:30); the law that ruled His every word and work He was soon to fulfil to the uttermost; His readiness to drink the cup which the Father was about to put into His hands was involved in His calm word, ‘I Consecrate myself’; its utterance in this solemn hour affords a glimpse of the spirit of absolute devotion to His Father’s will in which Jesus is finishing His work and consummating in death the self-sacrifice of His life. And as for the sake of His disciples Jesus Consecrates Himself, He prays for them, knowing that the future of His kingdom depends on their having the same spirit of complete consecration to the Divine will. They are obliged to give the word ἁγιάζειν two different meanings in the same sentence, as does the (Revised Version margin): ‘And for their sakes I Consecrate myself, that they themselves also may be sanctified in truth. The consecration of Jesus is His own act, but He does not pray that apart from Him the disciples may follow His example and Consecrate themselves; His consecration is the pattern of theirs, therefore the same word is used of the Master and of His disciples; but without His consecration ‘for their sakes’ (ὑτὲρ αὑτῶν), their consecration would be impossible, therefore it is said of the Master alone that He Consecrates Himself on behalf of others. ...
If ἀγιάζειν be uniformly rendered ‘consecrate’ in our Lord’s intercessory prayer, it will be seen that He twice expresses His yearning desire for the consecration of the men whom His Father had given Him out of the world: (1) John 17:17 ‘Consecrate them in the truth’; as Jesus sends forth His disciples on the same mission which brought Him into the world at His Father’s bidding, He asks that they also may be set apart for holy service, and may be divinely equipped for their task, even as He was, by the indwelling of the Father’s love (John 17:26). (2) John 17:19 ‘And for their sakes I Consecrate myself, that they also may be Consecrated in truth. No doubt it is important to remember that men ‘having infirmity’ need by inward sanctifying to be made fit for the holy service to which they have been Consecrated; but the emphatic words, ‘they also’ (καὶ αὐτοί), suggest not a contrast, but a resemblance,—a consecration common to the Master and His disciples
Cleanse - To free from ceremonial pollution, and Consecrate to a holy use
Vow - ) To give, Consecrate, or dedicate to God, or to some deity, by a solemn promise; to devote; to promise solemnly. ) A solemn promise made to God, or to some deity; an act by which one Consecrates or devotes himself, absolutely or conditionally, wholly or in part, for a longer or shorter time, to some act, service, or condition; a devotion of one's possessions; as, a baptismal vow; a vow of poverty
Nazarite - (Hebrew: to Consecrate, to separate) ...
Among the Hebrews one separated from the common ways of men, and by vow Consecrated to God
Nazirite - (Hebrew: to Consecrate, to separate) ...
Among the Hebrews one separated from the common ways of men, and by vow Consecrated to God
Bless - ) To make or pronounce holy; to Consecrate...
(8):...
(v
Jacobites - They Consecrate unleavened bread at the eucharist, and are against confession, believing that it is not of divine institution
Bless - To set apart or Consecrate to holy purposes to make and pronounce holy. To Consecrate by prayer to invoke a blessing upon
Cemetery - As the martyrs were buried in these places, the Christians chose them for building churches on, when Constantine established their religion; and hence some derive the rule which still obtains in the church of Rome, never to Consecrate an altar without putting under it the relics of some saint
Devote - To appropriate by vow to set apart ro dedicate by a solemn act to Consecrate
Paula, Daughter of Toxotius - He desires that she should lead the ascetic life and prepare to Consecrate herself to Christ in virginity; and begs that, if she could not carry out at Rome the system of instruction in scriptural knowledge which he prescribed, she might be sent to Bethlehem
Eulogy - Eulogia, a term made use of in reference to the Consecrated bread. When the Greeks have cut a loaf or piece of bread to Consecrate it, they break the rest into little bits, and distribute it among the persons who have not yet communicated, or send it to persons that are absent: and these pieces of bread are what they call eulogies
Anoint - To Consecrate by unction, or the use of oil. Kings, prophets and priests were set apart or Consecrated to their offices by the use of oil
Anna - Vexed at the affronts cast at her, long sterility, she made a vow, that should God put an end to her barrenness, she would Consecrate her son to God (1 Kings 1). She brought Samuel to Heli, the high priest, and Consecrated him to God
Dedicate - To set apart and Consecrate to a divine Being, or to a sacred purpose to devote to a sacred use, by a solemn act, or by religious ceremonies as, to dedicate vessels, treasures, a temple, an altar, or a church, to God or to a religious use. Consecrated devoted appropriated
Margaret Mary Alacoque, Saint - Having vowed to Consecrate herself to the religious life, she entered the Visitation Convent at Paray, where she was distinguished for obedience, humility, and love of suffering
Alacoque, Margaret Mary, Saint - Having vowed to Consecrate herself to the religious life, she entered the Visitation Convent at Paray, where she was distinguished for obedience, humility, and love of suffering
First-Fruits - ...
...
Every individual, besides, was required to Consecrate to God a portion of the first-fruits of the land (Exodus 22:29 ; 23:19 ; 34:26 ; Numbers 15:20,21 ). ...
...
The law enjoined that no fruit was to be gathered from newly-planted fruit-trees for the first three years, and that the first-fruits of the fourth year were to be Consecrated to the Lord (Leviticus 19:23-25 )
Ecclesiastes - " "The writer concludes by pointing out that the secret of a true life is that a man should Consecrate the vigour of his youth to God
Dedicate, Dedication - of 2 Chronicles 15:8 ; then, to initate or "dedicate," Hebrews 9:18 , with reference to the first covenant, as not "dedicated" without blood; in Hebrews 10:20 , of Christ's "dedication" of the new and living way (AV, "consecrated;" RV, "dedicated"). See Consecrate
Christians of st Thomas - In the Eucharist they Consecrate with little cakes made of oil and salt, and instead of wine make use of water in which raisins have been infused
Vow - To give, Consecrate or dedicate to God by a solemn promise
Marcus, Bishop of Rome - and Anastasius) to have ordained that the bishops of Ostia should Consecrate the bishops of Rome and bear the pallium, and to have been buried in the cemetery of Balbina on the Via Ardeatina, "in basilica quam coemiterium constituit
Orders, Anglican - The form did not specify definitely the nature of the Order to be conferred, and the officiating prelates would not intend to ordain priests to Consecrate the Body and Blood of Christ, to offer sacrifice, to celebrate Mass, since these were in execration at the time and the Ordinal was drawn up precisely to do away with them
Matthew Parker - Deprived of his preferments he retired until he was recalled by Queen Elizabeth, to be Consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury in 1559. Elizabeth decided to retain an episcopacy; hence it became necessary to devise some means of finding a bishop to Consecrate the newly selected prelates. The "Register" at Lambeth, thought by some a forgery, has been proved a regal document testifying that Parker was Consecrated according to the ordinal of Edward VI by Bishop Barlow
Anglican Orders - The form did not specify definitely the nature of the Order to be conferred, and the officiating prelates would not intend to ordain priests to Consecrate the Body and Blood of Christ, to offer sacrifice, to celebrate Mass, since these were in execration at the time and the Ordinal was drawn up precisely to do away with them
Fill - 17:5, “to fill one’s hand” is “to Consecrate” someone to priestly service. 43:26, where no literal hand is filled with anything, but the phrase is a technical term for “consecration”: “Seven days shall they [3] the altar and purify it; and they shall Consecrate themselves. So God commands concerning Aaron and his sons: “And thou … shalt anoint them, and Consecrate them, and sanctify them, that they may minister unto me in the priest’s office” ( Consecration - ...
The words mostly used for 'to Consecrate' are mala yad, which signify 'to fill the hand' (as often rendered in the margin ), doubtless alluding to their taking portions of the ram into their hands and waving them before Jehovah. All was typical of believers being cleansed by water, sprinkled with blood, and anointed with oil: entirely Consecrated to God, and constituted a priestly company for worship in the holiest
Armenians - They Consecrate holy water but once a year; at which time every one fills a pot, and carries it home, which brings in a considerable revenue to the church
Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea - Military force had to be employed to overcome his reluctance and to compel the prelates to Consecrate
Hallowed - ) to the office of Messiah by His submitting to death; and (2) of His disciples (John 17:17; John 17:19) as Consecrated by the truth. Consecrate and Sanctify
Consecrate, Consecration - The word ‘consecrate’ occurs twice in the Authorized Version of Hebrews (Hebrews 7:28; Hebrews 10:20). ‘consecrate’ (a priest). In Leviticus 21:10 τετελειωμένος is used without the rest of the phrase = ‘consecrated,’ although many Manuscripts supply τᾶς χεῖρας αὐτοῦ. In Authorized Version of Hebrews 10:20 the word is ‘consecrated,’ and in Hebrews 9:18 ‘dedicated. words, ḥânakh (‘initiate,’ ‘consecrate,’ Deuteronomy 20:5, 1 Kings 8:63) and hiddçsh (‘renew,’ ‘make anew,’ 1 Samuel 11:14, 2 Chronicles 15:8, Psalms 50:12)
Lord's Supper - In this ordinance Christ ratifies his promises to his people, and they on their part solemnly Consecrate themselves to him and to his entire service
Tammuz - Christian women, instead of weeping over fictitious tales of morbid love and carnal sorrows, ought to Consecrate their fine sensibilities to the active promotion of the glory of Him who is altogether lovely, and whose bitter and unmerited sufferings should call forth our tears of grateful and glowing love
Anthimus, Bishop of Tyana - Basil, thinking to establish an invincible outpost against his aggressive antagonist, Consecrated his friend Gregory bp. (2) A certain Faustus had applied to Basil to Consecrate him to an Armenian see; but as he did not produce the proper authority, the consecration was deferred
Sanctify - In the Old Testament, to sanctify often denotes to separate from a common to a holy purpose; to set apart or Consecrate to God as his special property, and for his service
Paulus of Asia - These were burst into to admit the "synodite" clergy bearing the Consecrated bread, of which the inmates were compelled to partake, though it was necessary in some cases to bind their hands and force it into their mouths. of Aphrodisias had instructions to depose him from the episcopal office and Consecrate him afresh to the see of the Carian Antioch, on the Meander, at the far east of the province and not very distant from Aphrodisias
Anathema - the form Anathema Is generally used as the rendering of the Hebrew word Herem , Derived from a verb which means (1) to Consecrate or devote; and (2) to exterminate
Unction - They also anointed the sacred vessels of the tabernacle and temple, to sanctify and Consecrate them to the service of God. The laity are anointed in the palms of the hands, but priests on the back of it, because the palms of their hands have been already Consecrated by ordination
Euzoius, Arian Bishop of Antioch - of Antioch, summoned Euzoïus from Alexandria, and commanded the bishops of the province to Consecrate him
Patroclus, Bishop of Arles - of Narbonne, to Consecrate the bp
Orders, Holy - ,empowering priests to Consecrate, to administer the sacraments, to preach, etc. , the bishop to be the ordinary minister of Confirmation, to ordain, to Consecrate, and the deacon to chant the Gospel, etc.
MINISTER AND SUBJECT ...
The ordinary minister of a valid ordination is a Consecrated bishop; the extraordinary minister can be a priest who obtains the power to confer some orders, either from law or Apostolic indult, e
Holy Orders - ,empowering priests to Consecrate, to administer the sacraments, to preach, etc. , the bishop to be the ordinary minister of Confirmation, to ordain, to Consecrate, and the deacon to chant the Gospel, etc.
MINISTER AND SUBJECT ...
The ordinary minister of a valid ordination is a Consecrated bishop; the extraordinary minister can be a priest who obtains the power to confer some orders, either from law or Apostolic indult, e
Messiah - 30:30: “And thou shalt anoint Aaron and his sons, and Consecrate them, that they may minister unto me in the priest’s office
Plow - And who then is willing to Consecrate his service this day unto the Lord?”...
Libation - The same expressive sacrificial term occurs in Php_2:17 , where the Apostle represents the faith of the Philippians as a sacrifice, and his own blood as a libation poured forth to hallow and Consecrate it: "Yea, and if I be offered, σπενδουμαι , upon the sacrifice and service of your faith, επι τη θνσια και λειτουργια , I joy and rejoice with you all
Bishop - The functionsof a Bishop are to rule his Diocese, ordain to the Ministry,administer Confirmation, Consecrate Church buildings, etc
Grace at Meals - Some have used themselves to mutter a few words with so low a voice, as though by some secret charm they were to Consecrate the food alone, and there was no need of the rest to join with them in the petitions
Penitents - In 1662, it was erected into a monastery, for the reception of such as having abandoned themselves to impurity, were willing to take up, and Consecrate themselves to God by solemn vows
Clean, Cleanness, Cleanse, Cleansing - ...
B — 1: καθαρίζω (Strong's #2511 — Verb — katharizo — kath-ar-id'-zo ) akin to A, signifies (1) "to make clean, to cleanse" (a) from physical stains and dirt, as in the case of utensils, Matthew 23:25 (figuratively in Matthew 23:26 ); from disease, as of leprosy, Matthew 8:2 ; (b) in a moral sense, from the defilement of sin, Acts 15:9 ; 2 Corinthians 7:1 ; Hebrews 9:14 ; James 4:8 , "cleanse" from the guilt of sin, Ephesians 5:26 ; 1 John 1:7 ; (2) "to pronounce clean in a Levitical sense," Mark 7:19 , RV; Acts 10:15 ; 11:9 ; "to Consecrate by cleansings," Hebrews 9:22,23 ; 10:2
Anoint - ...
Mâshach (מָשַׁח, Strong's #4886), “to anoint, smear, Consecrate. Vessels used in the worship at the sacred shrine (both tabernacle and temple) were Consecrated for use by “anointing” them ( Oil - By this means Moses would "consecrate them so they will be most holy , and whatever touches them will be (or must be') holy " (v. ...
Second, Moses was to use this oil to anoint the priests and thereby Consecrate them to minister in the Consecrated tabernacle (v
Accomplish, Accomplishment - See Consecrate , FINISH , FULFILL , PERFECT
Meshach - ...
Like Daniel he refused the king's dainties with determined "purpose" (Daniel 1:8-16) because a portion of the viands and wine were first offered to idols on the hearth to Consecrate the whole (Deuteronomy 32:38; 1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:10; 1 Corinthians 10:27-28)
Genovefa, Patron Saint of Paris And of France - Addressing himself to the child, he dwelt on the high state of virginity, and engaged her to Consecrate herself
Eustathius (22), Bishop of Berytus - Photius, disregarding this, and continuing to Consecrate bishops for these churches, was excommunicated by Anatolius, and the prelates he had Consecrated were deposed and degraded by Eustathius ( ib
Bless, Blessed, Blessedness, Blessing - The present participle Passive, "blessed, praised," is especially used of Christ in Matthew 21:9 ; 23:39 , and the parallel passages; also in John 12:13 ; (c) "to Consecrate a thing with solemn prayers, to ask God's blessing on a thing," e
Sanctification, Sanctify - ]'>[2] employs the synonymous ‘consecrate’ for ‘sanctify’ in 7 OT passages, which the RV [3] emends in three instances, leaving ‘consecrate’ for the regular Hebrew verb in 2 Chronicles 26:18 ; 2 Chronicles 29:33 ; 2 Chronicles 31:6 , Ezra 3:5 ; the ‘consecrate’ of Hebrews 7:28 and of Hebrews 10:20 is corrected by the RV Zebulun - "They shall call the peoples to the mountain (of the Lord's inheritance, Exodus 15:17); there they shall offer sacrifices of righteousness"; instead of making their abundance into mammon they would Consecrate it to the Lord
Sanctification - To sanctify a person or thing meant to separate it from the common affairs of life and Consecrate it wholly to God (Exodus 13:2; Exodus 19:10; Exodus 19:23; Exodus 29:37; Exodus 29:44; Leviticus 27:21). He was wholly Consecrated to God (John 17:19; Acts 3:14) and he was morally perfect in his life (Hebrews 7:26; 1 Peter 2:22)
Georgius (3), Bishop of Laodicea - of Antioch openly sided with Aetius and the Anomoeans George earnestly appealed to Macedonius of Constantinople and other bishops who were visiting Basil at Ancyra to Consecrate a newly erected church to lose no time in summoning a council to condemn the Anomoean heresy and eject Aetius
Horn - ...
Psalm 118:27 (c) Probably this means that GOD will bind us to our decisions when we Consecrate our lives to Him
Charities - Fortunately there have always been individuals profoundly conscious of the misery of their fellows, who Consecrate themselves to the struggle against this misery, and who arouse society to take action
Sanctification - This term is from qadesh, ἁγιάζω, 'to set apart to sacred purposes, Consecrate
Pelagius i., Bishop of Rome - He proceeded to Rome after the death of Vigilius at Syracuse, and was there Consecrated pope, being supported by Narses, at that time in command of Rome, who acted under the emperor's orders. The appointment was not welcome to the Romans, and there was difficulty in getting prelates to Consecrate him
Seal - By commanding this outward observance of the old covenant, God indicated how human beings could demonstrably Consecrate themselves by faith to him
Micah, Book of - Eventually there would be many nations come against Zion, but the daughter of Zion should beat them to pieces, and Consecrate their spoils to Jehovah, the Lord of the whole earth: comp
Asa - He carried into the house of the Lord the gold and silver vessels which his father Abijam had vowed to Consecrate
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - Peter, to a general oversight ("necessitatem de omnibus tractandi"), and directing his "beloved brethren" to refer all causes to his deputy, Rufus of Thessalonica, and not to Consecrate bishops, nor hold councils, without the sanction of that bishop. " Some Consecrate laymen to the episcopate. Let no one be Consecrated until he has gone through all degrees of the ministry: he who would be a teacher must first be a disciple. " Two years after the expedition of German he Consecrated Palladius, and sent him to "the Scots, who believed in Christ," i. to Consecrate a new bishop) you must go thither also and present to the emperor the letter which you will be charged with for him
Consecration - The Mosaical law ordained that all the first-born, both of man and beast, should be sanctified or Consecrated to God. We find also, that Joshua Consecrated the Gibeonites, as David and Solomon did the Nethinims, to the service of the temple; and that the Hebrews sometimes Consecrated their fields and cattle to the Lord, after which they were no longer in their power. In England, churches have been always Consecrated with particular ceremonies, the form of which was left to the discretion of the bishop. He then read several collects, in one of which he prays God to accept of that beautiful building, and concludes thus: We Consecrate this church, and separate it unto thee as Holy Ground, not to be profaned any more to common use. After this came the sermon, then the sacrament, which the bishop Consecrated and administered in the following manner:...
As he approached the altar, he made five or six low bows; and coming up to the side of it, where the bread and wine were covered, he bowed seven times. Then the elements were Consecrated; and the bishop, having first received, gave it to some principal men in their surplices, hoods, and tippets; after which, many prayers being said, the solemnity of the consecration ended
Aaron - Yet such was the lofty position of Jesus, and such was His consciousness, that He could say, ‘I Consecrate myself’ (John 17:19 m), on the very eve of His priestly sacrifice
Hand - ...
“To fill someone’s hand” may be a technical term for “installing him” in office: “And thou shalt put them upon Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him; and shalt anoint them, and Consecrate them [11], and sanctify them, that they may minister unto me in the priest’s office” ( Olives, Mount of - The majority of these sacred spots now command little or no attention; but three still remain, sufficiently sacred--if authentic--to Consecrate any place
Maximus the Cynic, Bishop of Constantinople - When all was ripe they were followed by a bevy of bishops, with secret instructions from the patriarch to Consecrate Maximus
Angel - They appear to rebuke idolatry (Judges 2:1-4 ), to call Gideon (Judges 6:11,12 ), and to Consecrate Samson (13:3)
Sanctification - The English word sanctification comes from the Latin santificatio , meaning the act/process of making holy, Consecrated. In the Greek New Testament, the root hag - is the basis of hagiasmos , “holiness,” “consecration,” “sanctification”; hagiosyne , “holiness”; hagiotes , “holiness”; hagiazo “to sanctify,” “consecrate,” “treat as holy,” “purify”; and hagios , “holy,” “saint. Additionally, the Nazirite was Consecrated (Numbers 6:8 ), although only for a specified period of time
Irenaeus, Bishop of Tyre - Irenaeus had been Consecrated by Domnus, the patriarch of Antioch, who, therefore, was the first object of attack. Domnus, unwilling to Consecrate a successor, sought to temporize, until fear of ulterior consequences prevailed over his scruples, and Photius was made bp
Leviticus, Theology of - They were Consecrated as such in the ritual of Exodus 24:3-8 . "...
The "sin offering" blood atonement rituals for the priests and for the people cleansed and (re)consecrated the tabernacle from their impurities (vv. It will be recalled that according to verse 19 the sin offering blood both "cleansed" the altar and "consecrated" it. Apparently, it was the scapegoat ritual that "cleansed" the people, but it was the subsequent burnt offerings that "consecrated" them. The sin offering blood atonement procedures purified and Consecrated (i. The combined scapegoat and burnt offering atonement procedures purified and Consecrated the people. It begins in 8:1-2 with the Lord's command to Moses that he Consecrate the tabernacle and priesthood. 1-2) as the basis for the annual Day of Atonement, the purpose of which was to purify, Consecrate, and inaugurate the tabernacle, priesthood, and congregation for the next year. 22), or the relationship between that which has been Consecrated as holy and the community at large (chap. Both formulas begin with "I am" and 20:7 mixes the two together: "Consecrate yourselves and be holy, because I am the Lord your God
Sacraments - sacrare , ‘to Consecrate’) is used esp
Piety - But they who Consecrate to him their youth, they do not profanely tell him to suspend his claims till the rest are served, till they have satisfied the world and the flesh, his degrading rivals
Separate - ...
“To separate” and “to Consecrate” are not distinguished from one another in the early Old Testament books. ” The NIV translates this verse: “Tell Aaron and his sons to treat with respect the sacred offerings the Israelites Consecrated to me, so that they will not profane my holy name. 9:10, the various versions differ in their rendering of nâzar: “I found Israel like grapes in the wilderness; I saw your fathers as the firstripe in the fig tree at her first time: but they went to Baal-peor, and separated [2] themselves unto that shame; and their abominations were according as they loved
War - The men thus became God’s ‘consecrated ones’ ( Isaiah 13:2 RV Consecrate - In the Sinai material (Exodus 19:1 -nu; 10:10 ) qds [1], which is translated "consecrate/sanctify/make holy, " means separation with relationship to God
Sanctification - ...
Concerning the first mentioned, the sanctification which means to set apart, to Consecrate, or appropriate, to solemn and holy purposes, we meet with expressions in Scripture leading to this in both Testaments
Jeroboam - Having appointed a solemn public festival to be observed on the fifteenth day of the eighth month, in order to dedicate his new altar, and Consecrate his golden calves, he assembled the people at Bethel, and himself went up to the altar for the purpose of offering incense and sacrifices
Relics - He adds, too, that bones are often Consecrated, which, so far from belonging to saints, probably do not belong to Christians. Ambrose would not Consecrate a church because it had no relics; and the council of Constantinople in Trullo ordained, that those altars should be demolished under which there were found no relics
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - Believers, on the contrary, give thanks for material things, and Consecrate them with prayer (1 Timothy 4:4-5 )
Wise, Skilled - 28:3: “And thou shalt speak unto all that are wisehearted, whom I have filled with the spirit of wisdom, that they may make Aaron’s garments to Consecrate him, that he may minister unto me in the priest’s office
Petrus ii., Archbaptist of Alexandria - He aimed at "securing the see of Constantinople; and Peter, contradicting himself in writing," as Gregory words it ( de Vita Sua, 1015), commissioned some Egyptian prelates to go to Constantinople and Consecrate Maximus
Priest - In the New Testament on the contrary the separating veil is rent, and the human priesthood superseded, and we have all alike, ministers and laymen, boldness of access by the new and living way, Consecrated through Christ's once torn flesh (Hebrews 10:19-22; Romans 5:2). The targums call these young men the firstborn sons; but all that seems to be meant is, Moses officiated as priest, (Aaron not being yet Consecrated), and employed young men whose strength qualified them for slaying the sacrifices. ) The term "consecrate" (qadash ) is appropriated to the priest, as tahar the "lower term" to the Levites. So essential was this ritual that to "fill the hand" means to Consecrate (Exodus 29:9; 2 Chronicles 13:9 margin). ...
Moses, as representing God, Consecrated, exercising for the time a higher priesthood than the Aaronic; so he is called priest (Psalms 99:6)
Cherub (1) - Gesenius takes the root chaarab "to Consecrate a shrine
Augustinus, Archbaptist of Canterbury - ...
Thus successful in the immediate object of the mission, Augustine repaired to France, and was Consecrated the first archbp. London was to be his metropolitan see, and he was to Consecrate twelve bishops as suffragans. On Mar 12, 604, Gregory died, and two months afterwards according to some authorities, or a year after according to others, Augustine followed his patron and benefactor, and was buried in the cemetery which he himself had Consecrated, beside the Roman road that ran over St
Serve - From the tribe of Levi, Moses was to anoint Aaron and his sons and Consecrate them, that they may “minister” as priests ( Essenes - According to Philo, they rejected the sacrifice of victims, because they considered, that to Consecrate and offer up themselves wholly to God, was the only true sacrifice, the only sacrifice worthy of God
Leviticus - Consecrate Priests to Mediate Between God and People
Nehemiah, Theology of - As they build they Consecrate the walls and gates (3:1)
Idolatry - ...
Sanchoniathon, who wrote his "Phenician Antiquities" apparently with a view to apologize for idolatry, traces its origin to the descendants of Cain, the elder branch, who began with the worship of the sun, and afterward added a variety of other methods of idolatrous worship: proceeding to deify the several parts of nature, and men after their death; and even to Consecrate the plants shooting out of the earth, which the first men judged to be gods, and worshipped as those that sustained the lives of themselves and of their posterity
Worship - This token was remarkably common among them; it was used to Consecrate their rising and their going to bed, their going out and their coming in, and all the actions of daily life; it was the sign which Christians made involuntarily whenever any thing of a fearful nature surprised them. Although, in order to meet the wants of human nature generally, consisting as it does of sense as well as soul, and those of a large body of Christians in particular, who were only in a state of education, and were to be brought up to the ripeness of Christian manhood, men soon selected definite times [2] for religious admonitions, and to Consecrate them to a fuller occupation with religious things, as well as to public devotion, with the intention, that the influence of these definite times should animate and sanctify the rest of their lives, and that Christians who withdrew themselves from the distractions of business on these days, and collected their hearts before God in the stillness of solitude, as well as in public devotion, might make these seasons of service to the other parts of their life; yet this was in itself, and of itself, nothing unevangelical. Thus in the week the Sunday was the joyful festival; and the preparation for it was a day of penitence and prayer, Consecrated to remembrance of the sufferings of Christ and the preparations for them, and this was celebrated on the Friday; and thus also the yearly festivals were to celebrate the resurrection of Christ, and the operations of the Redeemer after he had risen again; the preparation for this day was in commemoration of the sufferings and fastings of our Saviour. Allusion is made to Sunday under the character of a festival, as a symbol of a new life, Consecrated to the Lord in opposition to the old Sabbath, in the epistle of Ignatius to the Magnesians: "If they who were brought up under the Old Testament have attained to a new hope, and no longer keep [3] Sabbaths holy, but have Consecrated their life to the day of the Lord, on which also our life rose up in him, how shall we be able to live without him?" Sunday was distinguished as a day of joy by the circumstances, that men did not fast upon it, and that they prayed standing up and not kneeling, as Christ had raised up fallen man to heaven again through his resurrection. And farther: two other days in the week, Friday and Wednesday, particularly the former, were Consecrated to the remembrance of the sufferings of Christ, and of the circumstances preparatory to them; congregations were held on them, and a fast till three o'clock in the afternoon, but nothing was positively appointed concerning them; in respect to joining in these solemnities every one consulted his own convenience or inclination. The day following this passover was Consecrated to the remembrance of the sufferings of Christ, and the third day from it to the remembrance of his resurrection
War - Sacrifices were also offered, in reference to which the soldiers were said to Consecrate themselves to the war, Isaiah 13:3 ; Jeremiah 6:4 ; Jeremiah 51:27 ; Joel 3:9 ; Obadiah 1:1
Jeroboam - , Consecrated by the Danites' image worship, at which Moses' descendant (See JONATHAN officiated; so that no part of his kingdom was beyond easy reach of one or other of the two sanctuaries. )) He made priests of the people indiscriminately, not of Levi; any who "came to Consecrate himself with a young bullock and seven rams" (2 Chronicles 13:9)
Christ, Christology - Consecrate them so that they may serve me as priests" (Exodus 28:41 )
Sanctification - For example, God commanded the nation of Israel, "consecrate to me every firstborn male" (Exodus 13:2 )
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - of Amasea, sought to Consecrate him by guile, but failed, and adopted the expedient of electing and ordaining him by prayer when he was distant a journey of three days. ...
At his death the number of heathen who now remained in his diocese is said to have dwindled to 17, the exact number of Christians found there when Phaedimus Consecrated him (Vit
Novatianus And Novatianism - In Mar 251 Cornelius was Consecrated bp. He made a journey into distant parts of Italy and brought back 3 bishops who Consecrated Novatian. When visiting Ephesus to Consecrate a bishop a
House - It is now certain that the Canaanites, and the Hebrews after them, were wont to Consecrate the foundation of a new building by a human sacrifice
Offerings And Sacrifices - The purpose of this act was to identify the offerer with his or her offering and possibly also to designate or Consecrate the offering for the purposes of the offering: "He is to lay his hand on the head of the burnt offering, and it will be accepted on his behalf to make atonement for him" (Leviticus 1:4 ). They could eat the flesh of an animal that had been presented, identified, and Consecrated as an offering to the Lord (Leviticus 3:1-2 ; 7:11-21 ). The point of the guilt offering at the beginning of this series of offerings was to reconsecrate the leper so that he could once again become part of the "kingdom of priests, a holy nation" ( Exodus 19:6 ) from which he had been expelled and therefore, in a sense, "desecrated" because of his diseased condition (Leviticus 13:45-46 )
Covenant - (4) Israel was to be a sanctified, dedicated, and Consecrated nation. ...
Sixth, the Israelites had to Consecrate themselves to Yahweh while keeping a distance from Mount Sinai (19:10-15)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - He describes his second vision; seven angels Consecrate him and put on him the high-priestly robes; they foretell his descendants’ three-fold offices (i
Moravians - ...
There being at this time no bishops in the Bohemian church who had not submitted to the papal jurisdiction, three priests of the society of United Brethren were, about the year 1467, Consecrated by Stephen, bishop of the Waldenses, in Austria, (see WALDENSES;) and these prelates, on their return to their own country, Consecrated ten co-bishops, or co-seniors, from among the rest of the presbyters. In 1735, the count, who, under God, had been the instrument of renewing the Brethren's church, was Consecrated one of their bishops, having the year before been examined and received into the clerical order by the Theological Faculty of Tubingen. It considers how many bishops are to be Consecrated to fill up the vacancies occasioned by death; and every member of the synod gives his vote for such of the clergy as he thinks best qualified. Those who have the majority of votes are taken into the lot, and they who are approved are Consecrated accordingly; but, by consecration, they are vested with no superiority over their brethren, since it behoves him who is the greatest to be the servant of all. The powers of the Elders' Conference are, indeed, very extensive: besides the general care which it is commissioned by the synods to take of all the congregations and missions, it appoints, and removes every servant in the Unity, as circumstances may require; authorizes the bishops to ordain presbyters or deacons, and to Consecrate other bishops; and, in a word, though it cannot abrogate any of the constitutions of the synod, or enact new ones itself, it is possessed of the supreme executive power over the whole body of the United Brethren
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - 64), and was comparatively a young man when Consecrated bishop, soon after the Nicene council; not later, because he received some theological instruction from persons who suffered in the persecution under Maximian II. " Some time appears to have elapsed between his death and the assembling of the Egyptian bishops to Consecrate a successor. The Eusebians now resumed a project which had been found impracticable while Constantine lived; this was to place on "the Evangelical throne" an Arian named Pistus, who had been a priest under Alexander, had been deposed by him for adhering to Arius, and had been Consecrated, as it seems ( Apol
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - They forcibly conveyed him to the church where the provincial bishops were assembled, and compelled the unwilling prelates first to baptize and then to Consecrate him. The people warmly espoused Basil's cause; the bishops were compelled to give way, and the triumph of the orthodox cause was consummated by the arrival of the venerable Gregory, who, on learning that one vote was wanting for the canonical election of Basil, while his son was still hesitating full of scruples and refused to quit Nazianzus, left his bed for a litter, had himself carried to Caesarea at the risk of expiring on the way, and with his own hands Consecrated the newly elected prelate, and placed him on his episcopal throne (Greg
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - At the last moment he fled, but was pursued by Basil, and at length Consecrated ( Orat. Did he see the white hair of the aged bishop, and think of his long, unblemished priesthood, whom, it may he, the very angels found worthy of homage (λατρείας ), and did not that move him?" "I adjure you by the name of Christ, by Christ's emptying Himself for us, by the sufferings of Him Who cannot suffer, by His cross, by the nails which have delivered me from sin, by His death and burial, resurrection and ascension; and lastly, by this common table where we sit together, and by these symbols of my salvation, which I Consecrate with the same mouth that addresses to you this prayer—in the name, I say, of this sacred mystery which lifts us up to heaven!" He concluded by praying "that the prefect may find for himself such a judge as he should be for them, and that all meet with merciful judgment here and hereafter" (Orat