What does Conscience mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
συνείδησιν the consciousness of anything. / the soul as distinguishing between what is morally good and bad 16
συνειδήσεως the consciousness of anything. / the soul as distinguishing between what is morally good and bad 7
συνειδήσει the consciousness of anything. / the soul as distinguishing between what is morally good and bad 3
συνείδησις the consciousness of anything. / the soul as distinguishing between what is morally good and bad 3
συνειδήσεώς the consciousness of anything. / the soul as distinguishing between what is morally good and bad 1

Definitions Related to Conscience

G4893


   1 the consciousness of anything.
   2 the soul as distinguishing between what is morally good and bad, prompting to do the former and shun the latter, commending one, condemning the other.
      2a the Conscience.
      

Frequency of Conscience (original languages)

Frequency of Conscience (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Conscience
(1):
(n.) The faculty, power, or inward principle which decides as to the character of one's own actions, purposes, and affections, warning against and condemning that which is wrong, and approving and prompting to that which is right; the moral faculty passing judgment on one's self; the moral sense.
(2):
(n.) The estimate or determination of conscience; conviction or right or duty.
(3):
(n.) Tenderness of feeling; pity.
(4):
(n.) Knowledge of one's own thoughts or actions; consciousness.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Manifestation of Conscience
A practise in many religious orders and congregations by which subjects reveal the state of their conscience to the superior, to the spiritual director, or to the confessor, in order that he may know them more intimately, and thus be able to further their spiritual progress. It consists in revealing the affections and inclinations of the soul towards the various virtues and vices; in exposing temptations, trials, and difficulties experienced in the spiritual life in order that the individual may receive help and guidance in the way of perfection. Canon 530 of the Code of Canon Law forbids all religious superiors to induce their subjects in any way to make such a manifestation of conscience. At the same time it allows subjects freely to open the state of their souls to their superiors, and encourages them to treat with their superiors with filial confidence, and also, provided the superiors be priests, to expose to them their doubts and troubles of conscience.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Conscience
refers in general to that human moral awareness that judges an action right or wrong.
Although the word “conscience” does appear in the Old Testament, the Hebrew word usually translated “heart” does refer to conscience in a number of passages, for example, “Afterward David's heart smote him” (1 Samuel 24:5 ). Compare 2 Samuel 24:10 ; Job 27:6 . The New Testament also uses this Hebraic reference to conscience: “if our heart condemn us” (1 John 3:20-21 .) The word for “reins” or “kidneys” sometimes refers to conscience. In Psalm 16:7 the psalmist thanked God for giving him counsel and because his reins or kidneys admonished him, meaning his conscience reproved him. (See Psalm 73:21 for “heart” and “reins” in the same verse.)
“Conscience” in the New Testament is the translation of a Greek word derived from a verb that means “to know with.” This suggests a moral consciousness which compares an action with a standard. Paul, it seems, took a word from popular Greek usage in Corinth and used it to reply to some of the Corinthian Christians. For Paul, God is the Creator and Sustainer of all things. God judges persons by His standards as revealed in Jesus Christ. These standards are reflected in His creation and especially in persons who are morally responsible because of their capacity of choice. To Paul the “conscience” is a person's painful reaction to a past act which does not meet the standard. A person can react wrongly because of wrong information, wrong environment, and wrong habit. Yet Paul would have said that, in spite of these liabilities, a person's conscience must be obeyed. Paul, however, would not have said that a person has no other guide. If past actions have not been such as to produce painful reactions, the person is said to have a “pure conscience” (1 Timothy 3:9 ; 2 Timothy 1:3 ). When sensitive and active in judging past acts, the conscience is said to be “good” (Acts 23:1 ; 1Timothy 1:5,1 Timothy 1:19 ; 1Peter 3:16,1 Peter 3:21 ; Hebrews 13:18 ) or “void of offence toward God” (Acts 24:16 ). If the conscience is not active in judging past acts, it is said to be “weak” (1Corinthians 8:7,1Corinthians 8:10,1 Corinthians 8:12 ) and may be wounded (1 Corinthians 8:12 ). When the conscience is insensitive, it is “seared” (1 Timothy 4:2 ). The sinful conscience is “defiled” (Titus 1:15 ) or “evil” (Hebrews 10:22 ).
In 1 Corinthians 4:4 , Paul used the verb from which the word for “conscience” is derived. He wrote: “For I know nothing by myself.” This phrase means “my conscience does not accuse me.” Paul completed the sentence by saying: “yet am I not hereby justified: but he that judgeth me is the Lord.” Paul, in short, taught that a pure conscience is valuable, but that Christ is the final standard by which a person is judged.
H. Page Lee
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Case of Conscience
A famous casuistic problem proposed in 1701 to know whether absolution might be given to a cleric who declared that he held on certain points the sentiments of Jansenists, especially that of respectful silence on the question of fact, i.e.,to say as to whether or not the propositions condemned by Innocent XII as Jansenistic are actually contained in Jansenius' work "Augustinus." This case was decided affirmatively by 40 noted doctors of the Sorbonne, but as this was a denial of the power of the pope to decide whether a certain book does or does not contain errors against faith, the solution was condemned by Clement XI in his Brief, "Cum nuper" (1703), and by the faculties of theology of Louvain, Douai, and Paris.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Conscience
Conscience is a term that describes an aspect of a human being's self-awareness. It is part of a person's internal rational capacity and is not, as popular lore sometimes suggests, an audience room for the voice of God or of the devil. Conscience is a critical inner awareness that bears witness to the norms and values we recognize and apply. The complex of values with which conscience deals includes not only those we own, but the entire range of values to which we are exposed during life's journey. Consequently, there is always a sense of struggle in our reflective process. The witness of conscience makes its presence known by inducing mental anguish and feelings of guilt when we violate the values we recognize and apply. Conscience also provides a sense of pleasure when we reflect on conformity to our value system.
There is no Hebrew term in the Old Testament that is a linguistic equivalent for the classical Greek term suneidesis [ Job 27:6 ; and Leviticus 5:1 ). Rabbinic Judaism and the Dead Sea Scrolls are consistent with the Old Testament in their lack of a vocabulary of conscience.
There are thirty occurrences of suneidesis [ John 8:9 ). The verb form (suneidon [ 1 Timothy 1:5,19 ; cf. Acts 23:1 ) and "clear" (1 Timothy 3:9 ; 2 Timothy 1:3 ; cf. Acts 24:16 ) are used to depict the conscience as affirming right action. This action, however, is not determined by conscience but by other criteria to which conscience bears witness. Paul's reference to the conscience being "seared" and "corrupted" (1 Timothy 4:2 ; Titus 1:15 ) indicates that the function of conscience as a capacity for sound inward critique has been thwarted by resistance to God's revealed values. The writer of Hebrews views conscience as bearing a witness of being "clear" or "guilty" (9:9,14; 10:2,22; 13:18). First Peter reflects both the classical use of "awareness" (2:19) and the Pauline "clear" (3:16) and "good" (3:21) pattern.
Why is there such a significant usage of this term by Paul when it seems almost nonexistent in the Old Testament? The idea has been proposed that Paul's usage of suneidemsis was prompted by his debate with the Corinthian church. The usages in the Corinthians correspondence are the first chronological occurrences of the term in the New Testament. They also present a unique critique of the role of conscience in relation to a knowledge base.
A thematic survey of the occurrences of suneidesis [1] in the New Testament yield at least three major ideas. First, conscience is a God-given capacity for human beings to exercise self-critique. First Corinthians 4:4 and Romans 2:14-15 illustrate this capacity. In 1 Corinthians 4:4 Paul reflects upon his ministry and motives and "knows nothing against himself" ( sunoida ; translated "My conscience is clear" by the NIV), but affirms that he is still subject to critique by God. Here Paul illustrates that conscience is not an end in itself, but is subject to critique. Romans 2:14-15 is used in its context as an illustration that the Gentiles are in one sense superior to the Jews. The Gentiles' "self-critique mechanism" (i.e., conscience) is more consistent in reference to their own law (i.e., values) than the Jews' is to theirs (i.e., the real law). The Jews resisted the law's role as convictor while the Gentiles' convictor (conscience) worked. The illustration serves to shame the Jews in their position of greater privilege. The point of Romans 2:14-15 is merely illustrative of how the two parties function. The Gentiles are demonstrating a more consistent "moral" consciousness, "the work of the law" (its function, not its content is in view), in regard to their values than the privileged Jew is in regard to the value of God's law.
Second, conscience is consistently imaged as a "witness" to something (cf. Romans 2:15 ; 9:1 ; 2 Corinthians 1:12 ; 4:2 ; 5:11 ; along with the implications of adjectives such as a "good, " "clear" conscience ). Conscience is not an independent authority that originates judgments. The idea of conscience as a judge or legislator in the sense of originating an opinion is a modern innovation. A witness does not create evidence but is bound to respond to evidence that exists. The conscience does not dictate the content of right or wrong; it merely witnesses to what the value system in a person has determined is right or wrong. In this regard, conscience is not a guide but needs to be guided by a thoroughly and critically developed value system.
Third, conscience is a servant of the value system. An analysis of 1 Corinthians 8,10 exposes this principle. In the context of 1Corinthians, a weak conscience is one without an adequate knowledge base in regard to idols and meat (i.e., a wrong value system), and therefore suffers feelings of guilt. The strong have a proper knowledge and are therefore free of guilt (cf. how "knowledge" is used almost as a substitute for conscience in the Romans 14 discussion). The issue is not resolved on the basis of conscience but on the basis of worldview. Conscience merely monitors the worldview that exists in our internal conversation. Paul's comments about "ask no questions on account of conscience" in 1 Corinthians 10 has often been used to mean "what you don't know won't hurt you." Paul would hardly promote such an idea! Rather, Paul's use of the fixed phrase "on account of conscience" actually means "ask no questions because it really isn't a matter of conscience and therefore is not open for debate."
Paul does protect the function of conscience in weak believers of 1Corinthians, but not because they are correct or because their views should be forever tolerated. If the strong were to force the weak to conform against their values (albeit wrong), they would thereby destroy a process of conviction God created so society could police itself. The solution is to address the foundational values. As the value set is informed and changed, conscience will follow. Herein is a needful principle for the Christian community. While a person's judgment may be wrong in light of a biblically enlightened worldview, he or she must be given correct information and the opportunity to pursue maturity without oppressive external manipulation. This is the way of love (cf. 1 Corinthians 8:1-3 ). On the other hand, the classic question, "How long do you put up with the weak?" is easily answered by contextual implication. You work with their weakness until they have had the opportunity to learn the correct way and it becomes a new conviction for them. If they refuse to learn and mature, then they have shifted from the category of weak to belligerent and thereby come under new rules of engagement.
Conclusion . Conscience is an aspect of self-awareness that produces the pain and/or pleasure we "feel" as we reflect on the norms and values we recognize and apply. Conscience is not an outside voice. It is a inward capacity humans possess to critique themselves because the Creator provided this process as a means of moral restraint for his creation. The critique conscience exercises related to the value system which a person develops. Romans 12:1-2 makes the point that God desires that his creation conform to divine values by a process of rational renewal. The Scriptures provide the content for this renewal.
Gary T. Meadors
Bibliography . P. W. Gooch, NTS 33 (1987); R. Jewett, Paul's Anthropological Terms ; C. S. Lewis, Studies in Words ; C. A. Pierce, Conscience in the New Testament ; M. E. Thrall, NTS 14 (1964).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Cases of Conscience
Problems in the application of the moral and canon law to the conduct of men and women in various circumstances. Thus, one has injured another, how far and in what way is he obliged to make reparation; one has taken what belongs to another, to what extent and in what manner is he obliged to make restitution; persons living as husband and wife begin to doubt about the validity of their marriage, what impediments may there have been that would render the marriage null and void. See also: casuistry.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Conscience: Hardening
It is a very terrible thing to let conscience begin to grow hard, for it soon chills into northern iron and steel. It is like the freezing of a pond. The first film of ice is scarcely perceptible; keep the water stirring and you will prevent the frost from hardening it; but once let it film over and remain fiuiet, the glaze thickens over the surface, and it thickens still, and at last it is so firm that a wagon might he drawn over the solid ice. So with conscience, it films over gradually, until at last it becomes hard and unfeeling, and is not crushed even with ponderous loads of iniquity.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Conscience
Signifies knowledge in conjunction; that is, in conjunction with the fact to which it is a witness, as the eye is to the action done before it; or, as South observes, it is a double or joint knowledge, namely, one of a divine law or rule, and the other of a man's own action. It may be defined to be the judgment which a man passes on the morality of his actions as to their purity or turpitude; or the secret testimony of the soul, whereby it approves things that are good, and condemns those that are evil. Some object to its being called an act, habit, or faculty. An act, say they, would be represented as an agent, whereas conscience is a testimony. To say it is a habit, is to speak of it as a disposition acting, which is scarce more accurate than ascribing one act to another; and, besides, it would be strange language to say that conscience itself is a habit. Against defining it by the name of a power or faculty, it is objected, that it occasions a false notion of it, as a distinct power from reason. The rules of conscience. We must distinguish between a rule that of itself and immediately binds the conscience, and a rule that is occasionally of use to direct and satisfy the conscience.
Now in the first sense the will of God is the only rule immediately binding the conscience. No one has authority over the conscience but God. All penal laws, therefore, in matters of mere conscience, or things that do not evidently affect the civil state, are certainly unlawful; yet, secondly, the commands of superiors, not only natural parents, but civil, as magistrates or masters, and every man's private engagements, are rules of conscience in things indifferent.
3. The examples of wise and good men may become rules of conscience: but here it must be observed, that no example or judgment is of any authority against law: where the law is doubtful, and even where there is no doubt, the side of example cannot be taken till enquiry has been first made concerning what the law directs.
Conscience has been considered, as,
1. Natural, or that common principle which instructs men of all countries and religions in the duties to which they are all alike obliged. There seems to be something of this in the minds of all men. Even in the darkest regions of the earth, and among the rudest tribes of men, a distinction has ever been made between just and unjust, a duty, and a crime.
2. A right conscience is that which decides aright, or, according to the only rule of rectitude, the law of God. This is also called a well-informed conscience, which in all its decisions proceeds upon the most evident principles of truth.
3. A probable conscience is that which, in cases which admit of the brightest and fullest light, contents itself with bare probabilities. The consciences of many are of no higher character; and though we must not say a man cannot be saved with such a conscience, yet such a conscience is not so perfect as it might be.
4. An ignorant conscience is that which may declare right, but, as it were, by chance, and without any just ground to build on.
5. An erroneous conscience is a conscience mistaken in its decisions about the nature of actions.
6. A doubting conscience is a conscience unresolved about the nature of actions; on account of the equal or nearly equal probabilities which appear for and against each side of the question.
7. Of an evil conscience there are several kinds. Conscience, in regard to actions in general, is evil when it has lost more or less the sense it ought to have of the natural distinctions of moral good and evil: this is a polluted or defiled conscience. Conscience is evil in itself when it gives either none or a false testimony as to past actions; when reflecting upon wickedness it feels no pains, it is evil, and said to be seared or hardened, 1 Timothy 4:2 . It is also evil when during the commission of sin it lies quiet.
In regard to future actions, conscience is evil if it does not startle at the proposal of sin, or connives at the commission of it. For the right management of conscience, we should,
1. Endeavour to obtain acquaintance with the law of God, and with our own tempers and lives, and frequently compare them together.
2. Furnish conscience with general principles of the most extensive nature and strongest influence; such as the supreme love of God; love to our neighbours as ourselves; and that the care of our souls is of the greatest importance.
3. Preserve the purity of conscience.
4. Maintain the freedom of conscience, particularly against interest, passion, temper, example, and the authority of great names.
5. We should accustom ourselves to cool reflections on our past actions.
See Grove's and Paley's Moral Philosophy; South's Sermons, vol. 2: sermon 12; and books under CASUISTRY.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Conscience
CONSCIENCE . The term occurs 30 times in the NT; it signifies joint knowledge . The two things known together may be two motives, two deeds, etc.; or the comparison instituted may be between a standard and a volition, etc. Self or others may be judged, and approval ( Acts 23:1 ; Acts 24:16 , Romans 9:1 , 2 Corinthians 1:12 , 1 Timothy 1:5 ; 1 Timothy 1:19 ; 1 Timothy 3:9 , 2 Timothy 1:3 , Heb 13:18 , 1 Peter 3:16 ; 1 Peter 3:21 ) or disapproval ( John 8:9 , Hebrews 9:9 ; Hebrews 10:2 ; Hebrews 10:22 ) may be the issue. The conviction that a certain course of conduct is right is accompanied by a sense of obligation, whether that course receives ( Romans 13:5 ) or fails to secure ( 1 Peter 2:19 , Acts 4:19-20 ) legal confirmation. The belief on which the consciousness of duty depends is not necessarily wise ( 1Co 8:7 ; 1 Corinthians 8:10 ; 1 Corinthians 8:12 , Acts 26:9 ), though the holders of the belief should receive careful consideration on the part of more enlightened men ( Romans 15:1 , 1 Corinthians 8:1-13 ; 1 Corinthians 10:25 ; 1 Corinthians 10:29 ). Unfaithfulness to moral claims leads to fearful deterioration, resulting in confusion ( Matthew 6:22-23 ) and insensitiveness ( 1 Timothy 4:2 , Titus 1:15 ).
1. Sphere . The sphere of conscience is volition in all its manifestations. That which merely happens and offers to us no alternative movement lies outside morality. Let there be a possibility of choice, and conscience appears. Appetites, so far as they can be controlled; incentives of action admitting preference; purposes and desires, all deeds and Institutions that embody and give effect to human choice; all relationships that allow variations in our attitude give scope for ethical investigation, and in them conscience is directly or indirectly implicated. Conscience makes a valuation. It is concerned with right, wrong; worthiness, unworthiness; good, bad; better, worse. This appraisement is ultimately occupied with the incentives that present themselves to the will, in regard to some of which (envy and malice, for instance) there is an Immediate verdict of badness, and in regard to others a verdict of better or worse. The dispositions that are commended by the Saviour’s conduct and teachings purity of heart, meekness, mercifulness, desire for righteousness, etc. are recognized as worthy of honour. The conscience censures the selfishness of the Unjust Judge ( Luke 18:6 ), and assents to the injunction of considerateness and justice ( Philippians 2:4 ). The rightness of many general statements is discerned intnitively, and is carried over to the deeds that agree therewith. Sidgwick considers that the statement ‘I ought not to prefer my own lesser good to the greater good of another’ is axiomatic, and that some such intnitively discerned principle is a necessary foundation of morals. We do not question the baseness of some pleasures; their curse is graven on their foreheads. Both mediately and immediately we arrive at ethical convictions. The appearance in one’s life of a person of distinguished excellence will cause many virtues to shine in our estimation. The mind surveying a course of conduct can judge it as bad or good on the whole. A precept to seek to raise the whole tone of one’s life ( Matthew 5:48 , Colossians 4:12 ) is felt to be reasonable, and as the capacity for improvement is greater in man than in any other creature, better motives, deeds, habits, aims, characters may righteously be demanded.
2. Obligation . ‘In the recognition of any conduct as right there is involved an authoritative prescription to do it.’ This feeling of oughtness which is the core of conscience can be exhibited but not analyzed. It is an ultimate. It is unique. It is an evidence within the soul that we are under government. There is a ‘categorical imperative’ to aim at that which we have admitted to be right. From the duty discerned there issues a command which cannot be silenced so long as the duty is present to the mind. Likings or dislikings, hopes or fears, popularity or unpopularity no matter what may be advanced, the dictatorial mandate is unaltered:
‘’Tis man’s perdition to be safe,
When for the truth he ought to die.’
When Jesus Christ asserts His supremacy and demands deference to Himself at all costs, He does so as the incarnation of the moral law. To be His friend is to be under His orders (John 15:14 ), and one is bound to follow Him without regard to any claims that can be urged by self or kindred ( Matthew 10:37-38 , Luke 14:33 ). Let it be ascertained that this is the way and the command is at once heard, ‘Walk ye in it.’ The peremptory claim made by conscience is eminently reasonable, because it rests upon what we have admitted to be right. It is a provision in our nature that links or that would link if we were loyal belief and practice, and would cause us to be builders as well as architects. ‘Had it strength as it has right; had it power as it has manifest authority, it would absolutely govern the world’ (Butler, Serm . ii.).
3. The ethical feeling . The perception of oughtness has its own emotional tone. There is, of course, a sense of relief when the mind has arrived at a decision; but is there not an additional element? Is there not an inclination at least a faint one in favour of the behest? And in men habitually conscientious, is not the inclination immediate and strong? All men are clearly aware that they are wrong in case of refusal to obey. Man is a born judge of himself, and the verdict that results from self-examination brings peace or uneasiness. Herod is ill at ease by reason of self-judgment ( Mark 6:20 ), and so is Felix ( Acts 24:25 ). Peter sees himself as one who has broken the law, and the light hurts him ( Luke 5:8 ). All the best men have had some experience like that of Isaiah ( Isaiah 6:5 ) and that of Job ( Job 42:6 ), for with them the moral susceptibility has been great. All the emotional accompaniments of penitence and remorse, as well as the glow incident to the hearing of noble deeds all anticipations of the Lord’s ‘Well done!’ are instances of moral feeling. These pleasures and pains are a class by themselves. They are as distinct from those of sensation and intellect as colours are distinct from sound. That pleasures are qualitatively different was rightly maintained by J. S. Mill, though his general theory was not helped by the opinion. In consciousness we know that sorrow for sin is not of the same order as any physical distress, nor is it to be ranked with the feeling of disappointment when we are baffled in a scientific inquiry. The difference between the moral and the unmoral emotions is one of kind and not of quantity, of worth and not of amount: some pleasures low in the scale of value are very intense, while the moral satisfactions may have small intensity and yet are preferred by good men to any physical or intellectual delights. It should be noticed that the pleasure attendant upon a choice of conduct known to be right may be not unmixed; for the feelings, clinging for a while to that which has been discarded, interfere with the satisfaction due to the change that has been made. Converts are haunted by renounced beliefs, and their peace is disturbed; beside the main current of emotion there is a stream which comes from past associations and habits.
4. Education of conscience . (1) No training can impart the idea of right: it is constitutional. (2) Malevolent feelings (as vindictiveness, the desire to give pain gratuitously) are known by all to be wrong; immediately they are perceived at work, they are unconditionally condemned. (3) The inward look makes no mistake as to our meaning, gets no wavering reply to such questions as, ‘Do you desire to have full light? to know all the facts? to be impartial? to act as a good man should act in this particular?’ For this accurate self-knowledge provision is made in our nature. (4) Some general moral principles are accepted as soon as the terms are understood. (5) When two competing incentives are to be judged, we know, and cannot be taught, which is the higher. (6) The imperative lodged in a moral conviction is intuitively discerned. ‘I do not know how to impart the notion of moral obligation to any one who is entirely devoid of it’ (Sidgwick). (7) The feeling of dishonour comes to us without tuition when we have refused compliance with known duty. Belonging to a moral order, we are made to react in certain definite ways to truths, social relations, etc. The touch of experience is enough to quicken into action certain moral states, just as the feelings of cold and heat are ours because of the physical environment, and because we are what we are. We can evoke while we cannot create the elementary moral qualities. ‘An erring conscience is a chimera’ (Kant). ‘Conscience intuitively recognizes moral law; it is supreme in its authority; it cannot be educated’ (Calderwood). These sentences are not intended to deny that in the application of principles there is difficulty. One may readily admit the axioms of geometry, and yet find much perplexity when asked to establish a geometrical theorem the truth of which directly or indirectly flows from the axioms. The Apostle Paul prayed that his friends might improve in moral discrimination ( Philippians 1:10 , Colossians 1:9 ). We have to learn what to do, and often the problems set by our domestic, civic, and church relationships are hard even for the best and wisest to solve. The scheme of things to which we belong has not been constructed with a view to saving us the trouble of patient, strenuous, and sometimes very painful investigation and thought.
5. Implications . Of the many implications the following are specially noteworthy. The feeling of responsibility suggests the question, to Whom? Being under government, we feel after the Ruler if haply we may find Him. Jesus tells us of the ‘Righteous Father.’ The solemn voice of command is His. The preferences which we know to be right are His. The pain felt when righteous demands are resisted, and the joy accompanying obedience, are they not His frown and smile? Neither our higher self nor society can be the source of an authority so august as that of which we are conscious. To the best minds we look for guidance; but there are limits to their rights over us, and how ready they are to refer us to Him before whom they bow! We are made to be subjects of the Holy One. Admitting that we are in contact with Divine Authority, and that His behests are heard within, the encouraging persuasion is justified that He sympathizes with the soul in its battles and renders aid ( Philippians 2:12-13 ). The inference that it is God with whom we have to do makes it fitting for us to say that conscience is man’s capacity to receive progressively a revelation of the righteousness of God. But is law the last word? May there not be mercy and an atonement? Cannot the accusing voices be hushed? May the man who admits the sentence of conscience be pardoned? Conscience is a John the Baptist preparing the way for the Saviour, who has a reply to the question ‘What must I do to be saved?’
W. J. Henderson.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Conscience
That faculty of the mind, or inborn sense of right and wrong, by which we judge of the moral character of human conduct. It is common to all men. Like all our other faculties, it has been perverted by the Fall (John 16:2 ; Acts 26:9 ; Romans 2:15 ). It is spoken of as "defiled" (Titus 1:15 ), and "seared" (1 Timothy 4:2 ). A "conscience void of offence" is to be sought and cultivated (Acts 24:16 ; Romans 9:1 ; 2 co 1:12 ; 1 Timothy 1:5,19 ; 1 Peter 3:21 ).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Conscience
The conscious knowledge of good and evil. This resulted from the fall of Adam. He could have had no knowledge of good and evil before any evil was there. It is remarkable that the word conscience does not occur in the O.T. In the N.T. the word is συνείδησις, lit. 'joint-knowledge.' This agrees with what God said of Adam after the fall, "Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil." Genesis 3:22 . The above word occurs once in the LXX in Ecclesiastes 10:20 : "Curse not the king, no not in thy conscience." This knowledge of good and evil is universal: some of the most benighted heathen, for instance, have owned that they knew such things as stealing were wrong. They are thus 'a law to themselves:' their conscience bearing witness and their thoughts accusing or excusing themselves between themselves. Romans 2:14,15 . The law gave more light as to what was right and wrong: Paul said, "I had not had conscience also of lust unless the law had said, Thou shalt not lust." Romans 7:7 . Christianity brings the conscience into the light of God, fully revealed by His word; the believer is thus exercised to have a conscience void of offence towards God and men. This may be called a 'tender conscience.' Acts 24:16 .
Scripture speaks of
1. a 'good conscience,' enabling one when accused of evil, to know that the charge is untrue. 1 Peter 3:16 .
2. a 'pure conscience,' which is characterised by the separation from evil. 1 Timothy 3:9 .
3. a 'weak conscience,' as on the subject of meats, days, etc. 1 Corinthians 8:7 .
4. a 'purged conscience.' Through faith in the infinite efficacy of the blood of Christ the believer has no more conscience of sins. This does not mean no consciousness of ever sinning, but that as regards imputation of sins before God, the conscience is purged. Paul speaks of some who have a 'defiled mind and conscience,' Titus 1:15 ; and of others who in departing from the faith have their 'conscience seared with a hot iron,' 1 Timothy 4:2 , that is, a hardened conscience, insensible to that which should touch them to the quick.
Conscience, with the Christian, should be exercised in the sight of God fully revealed in Christ, and be governed by the word, otherwise, on the plea of 'conscience,' many actions displeasing to God way be advocated. This is exemplified in the case of Paul before his conversion. He could say that he had lived in all good conscience before God, and yet he had been haling men and women to prison because they were Christians. Doubtless he did it with an unoffending conscience, according as the Lord stated: "The time cometh, that whosoever killeth you will think that he doeth God service." John 16:2 . Paul's zeal for Judaism so blinded his eyes that he was unable to recognise in his conscience the God who gave the law, and had sent His Son also; nor to see that God could act outside of it: it was an unenlightened conscience, a zeal without knowledge, by which even the Christian may be led astray.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Conscience
(συνείδησις)
1. The word and its history.-Both the Lat. conscientia, from which ‘conscience’ is derived, and the Gr. συνείδησις, of which it is the invariable rendering in the NT, have originally the more general meaning of ‘consciousness’-the knowledge of any mental state. Down to the 17th cent., as the Authorized Version itself bears witness, ‘conscience’ too was sometimes used in this wider sense. In 1 Corinthians 8:7 ‘conscience of the idol,’ and in Hebrews 10:2 ‘conscience of sins,’ would now be better rendered ‘consciousness.’ Some exegetes would prefer ‘consciousness’ to ‘conscience’ in 1 Peter 2:19 ‘conscience toward (or of) God.’ With these exceptions, ‘conscience’ in the NT denotes not consciousness generally, but the moral faculty in particular-that power by which we apprehend moral truth and recognize it as having the authority of moral law. The history of the words ‘conscience,’ conscientia, συνείδησις, shows that it is entirely fanciful to suppose on etymological grounds that the prefixes con and συν point to the subject’s joint knowledge along with God Himself. The joint knowledge denoted is knowledge with oneself, a self-knowledge or self-consciousness in which the inner ‘I’ comes forward as a witness. This does not, of course, exclude the further view that, as man is made in the image of God, and as his individual personality is rooted in that of the absolute moral Ruler, the testimony of conscience actually is the voice of God bearing witness in the soul to the reality and authority of moral truth.
It is a significant fact that the word ‘conscience’ is nowhere found in the OT text, though in Ecclesiastes 10:20 both Authorized Version and Revised Version give it in the margin as an alternative for ‘thought,’ to represent the Heb. מַרָּע, which Septuagint here renders by συνείδησις. In ancient Israel it was an external law, not an inward lawgiver, that held the seat of authority; and though the prophets addressed their appeals to the moral sense of their hearers (cf. Micah 6:8), they furnished no doctrine of conscience. Nor does the word occur either in the Synoptics or the Fourth Gospel; for the clause of John 8:9 where it is found does not belong to the correct text (see Revised Version ). Jesus in His teaching constantly addresses Himself to the conscience, and clearly refers to it when He speaks of ‘the light that is in thee’ (Matthew 6:23, Luke 11:35), but His mission was to illumine and quicken the moral faculty by the revelation He brought, not to analyze it, or define it, or lay down a doctrine on the subject. In the Acts and Epistles, however, the effects of the revelation in Christ become apparent. We have the word ‘conscience’ 31 times in Authorized Version and 30 times in Revised Version -the latter reading συνηθείᾳ for συνειδήσει in 1 Corinthians 8:7. Heb. has it 5 times and 1 Pet. thrice; with these exceptions it is a Pauline word. There are anticipations of the NT use of it in the Apocrypha (Wisdom of Solomon 17:11, Sirach 14:2, 2 Maccabees 6:11), and suggestions for St. Paul’s treatment of it in contemporary Greek teaching, and especially in the moral philosophy of the Stoics. But it was Christian faith that raised it out of the region of ethical abstraction and set it on a throne of living power.
2. The NT doctrine
(1) The nature of conscience.-According to its etymology, conscience is a strictly cognitive power-the power of apprehending moral truth; and writers of the intuitional school frequently restrict the use of the term to this one meaning (cf. Calderwood, Handbook of Moral Philosophy, p. 78). Popularly, however, conscience has a much wider connotation, including moral judgments and moral feelings as well as immediate intuitions of right and wrong; and it is evident that in the NT the word is employed in this larger sense so as to include the whole of the moral nature. When conscience is said to ‘bear witness’ (Romans 2:15; Romans 9:1) or to give ‘testimony’ (2 Corinthians 1:12), it is the clear and direct shining of the inner light that is referred to. When it is described as ‘weak’ or over-scrupulous (1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:10; 1 Corinthians 8:12), and is contrasted by implication with a conscience that is strong and walks at liberty, the reference is to those diversities of opinion on moral subjects which are due to variations of judgment in the application of mutually acknowledged first principles. When it is spoken of on the one hand as ‘good’ (1 Timothy 1:5; 1 Timothy 1:19, Hebrews 13:18, 1 Peter 3:16; 1 Peter 3:21) or ‘void of offence toward God and men’ (Acts 24:16), and on the other as ‘defiled’ (1 Corinthians 8:7), ‘wounded’ (1 Corinthians 8:12), ‘evil’ (Hebrews 10:22), ‘seared (or branded) with a hot iron’ (1 Timothy 4:2), the writers are thinking of those pleasant or painful moral feelings which follow upon obedience or disobedience to moral law, or of that deadness to all feeling which falls upon those who have persistently shut their ears to the inward voice and turned the light that is in them into darkness.
The fundamental passage for the Pauline doctrine is Romans 2:14-15. The Apostle here seems to lay down as unquestionable, (a) that there is a Divine law written by Nature on the heart of every man, whether Jew or Gentile; (b) that conscience is the moral faculty which bears witness to that law; (c) that in the light of that witness there is an exercise of the thoughts or reasonings (λογισμοί), in other words, of the moral judgment; (d) that, as the result of this judgment before the inward bar, men are subject to the feelings of moral self-approval or self-reproach. Covering in this passage the whole ground of the moral nature of man, St. Paul appears to distinguish conscience as the witness-bearing faculty from the moral judgments and moral feelings that accompany its testimony. But elsewhere, as has been already shown, he frequently speaks of conscience in that larger sense which makes it correspond not only with the immediate apprehension of moral truth, but with the judgments based upon the truth thus revealed, and the sentiments of satisfaction or dissatisfaction to which these judgments give rise.
(2) The authority of conscience.-However men differ in their theories as to the nature and origin of the moral faculty, there is general agreement as to the authority of the moral law which it enjoins. Few will be found to challenge Butler’s famous assertion of the supremacy of conscience: ‘Had it strength as it has right, had it power as it has manifest authority, it would absolutely govern the world’ (Serm. ii.). And while adherents of the sensational school of ethics may dispute Kant’s right to describe the imperative of morality as ‘categorical’ in its nature (Metaphysic of Ethics, p. 31), even they will not seek to qualify his apostrophe to duty (p. 120) or the exalted language in which he describes the solemn majesty of the Moral Law (p. 108). For the NT authors conscience is supreme, and it is supreme because in its very nature it is an organ through which God speaks to reveal His will. In the case of the natural man it testifies to a Divine law which is written on the heart (Romans 2:15); in the case of the Christian man this law of Nature is reinforced by a vital union with Jesus Christ (Galatians 2:20) and by the assenting witness of the Holy Spirit (Romans 9:1). The claim of right which Butler makes on behalf of conscience is transformed for St. Paul into a law of power. The pure and loyal Christian conscience has might as it has right; it not only legislates but governs. What the law could not do in that it was weak through the flesh, is actually fulfilled in those who take Christ to be the companion of their conscience and who walk not after the flesh but after the spirit.
In Acts we have many examples of the way in which conscience, in Butler’s words, ‘magisterially exerts itself’ in the case alike of bad men and of good. The suicide of Judas (Acts 1:18; cf. Matthew 27:3 ff.), the heart-pricks of the men of Jerusalem under St. Peter’s preaching (Acts 2:37), the claim of St. Peter and St. John that they must obey God rather than men (Acts 4:19; Acts 5:29), Saul’s experience that it was hard to kick against the pricks (Acts 9:5), Felix trembling as St. Paul reasoned of righteousness, temperance, and judgment to come (Acts 24:25)-all these are examples of the authority of conscience. And what in Acts we see practically exemplified is laid down in the Epistles as a matter of rule and doctrine. St. Paul enjoins submission to the civil authority (Romans 13:1 ff.), but vindicates its right to govern on the ground of the higher authority of conscience (Romans 13:5). The writer of Heb. represents the sin-convicting conscience as a sovereign power which impelled men to lay their gifts and sacrifices on the altar, but was never satisfied until Jesus Christ ‘through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish unto God’ (Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 10:2; Hebrews 10:22). St. Peter teaches that, in a matter of conscience before God, men must be willing to ‘endure griefs, suffering wrongfully’ (1 Peter 2:19). Nor is it only the personal conscience whose dignity and supremacy must be acknowledged; a like reverence is to be shown for the conscience of others. St. Paul sought to commend himself to every man’s conscience in the sight of God (2 Corinthians 4:2; cf. 2 Corinthians 5:11). He taught that the exercise of Christian liberty must be Limited by regard for another’s conscience (1 Corinthians 10:29), and that even when that conscience is weak, it must not be wounded or bewildered or defiled (1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:10; 1 Corinthians 8:12) lest the other’s sense of moral responsibility should thereby be impaired.
The source of this, magisterial authority of conscience is represented by the NT writers as lying altogether in the Divine will, of which conscience is the instrument. For St. Paul conscience is not an individualized reflexion of social opinion, nor a subtle compound of feelings evolved in the course of the long struggle for existence, nor yet a mysterious faculty that claims to regulate the life of man by virtue of some right inherent in its own nature. Its authority is that of a judge, who sits on the bench as the representative of a law that is higher than himself. Its function is to bear witness to the law of God (Romans 2:15; Romans 9:1, 2 Corinthians 1:12); its commendation is a commendation in His sight (2 Corinthians 4:2); its accusation is an anticipation of the day when He shall judge the secrets of men (Romans 2:15-16). Similarly for St. Peter a matter of conscience is a question of ‘conscience toward God’ (1 Peter 2:19). Some commentators would render συνείδησις θεοῦ in this verse by ‘consciousness of God’; and the very ambiguity of the expression may suggest that in the Apostle’s view conscience is really a God-consciousness in the sphere of morality, as faith is a God-consciousness in the sphere of religion.
(3) Varieties of conscience.-What has just been said as to the absolute and universal authority of conscience may seem difficult to reconcile with the distinctions made by the NT writers between consciences of very varied types. There are consciences that are weak and timid, and others that are strong and free (1 Corinthians 8:7 ff.). A conscience may be ‘void of offence’ (Acts 24:16), or it may be defiled and wounded (1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:12, Titus 1:15). It may be good (1 Timothy 1:5; 1 Timothy 1:19, Hebrews 13:18, 1 Peter 3:16; 1 Peter 3:21), or it may be evil (Hebrews 10:22). It may be pure (1 Timothy 3:9, 2 Timothy 1:3), or in need of cleansing (Hebrews 9:14). It may possess that clear moral sense which discerns intuitively both good and evil (Hebrews 5:14), or it may be ‘seared with a hot iron’ (1 Timothy 4:2) and condemned to that judicial blindness to which nothing is pure (Titus 1:15). The explanation of the difficulties raised by such language lies in the fact already noted that ‘conscience’ in the NT is used to denote not the power of moral vision only, but the moral judgment and the moral feelings. As the organ which discerns the Moral Law, conscience has the authority of that law itself; its voice is the voice of God. It leaves us in no doubt as to the reality of moral distinctions; it assures as that right is right and wrong is wrong, and that ‘to him that knoweth to do good and doeth it not, to him it is sin’ (James 4:17). But for the application to particular cases of the general law of duty thus revealed, men must depend upon their moral judgments; and moral judgments are liable to error just as other judgments are. It was a want of ‘knowledge’ that led some in the Corinthian Church to shrink from eating meat that had been offered to an idol (1 Corinthians 8:7), and a consequent mistake of judgment when they came to the conclusion that such eating was wrong. Their consciences were weak because their moral judgments were weak. And as the result of their weakness in the decision of moral questions, their moral feelings were misdirected, and so their consciences were stained and wounded by acts in which a man of more enlightened conscience saw no harm. Similarly, when a conscience is said to be ‘good’ or ‘pure’ or ‘void of offence,’ the reference is to the sense of peace and moral harmony with God and man which comes to one who has loyally obeyed the dictates of the Moral Law; while an uncleansed or evil conscience is one on which there rests the burden and pain of sin that is unatoned for and unforgiven. A ‘seared’ or ‘branded’ conscience, again, may point to the case of those in whom abuse of the moral nature has led to a perversion of the moral judgment and a deadening of the moral sentiments. Compare what St. Paul says of those whose understanding is darkened, whose hearts are hardened, and who are now ‘past feeling’ (Ephesians 4:18).
(4) The education of conscience.-Some intuitionalists have held that conscience, being an infallible oracle, is incapable of education; and Kant’s famous utterance, ‘An erring conscience is a chimera’ (op. cit. p. 206), has often been quoted in this connexion. But it is only in a theoretical and ideal sense that the truth of the saying can be admitted-only when the word of conscience is taken to be nothing less and nothing more than the voice of God, and its light to be in very reality His ‘revealing and appealing look’ (J. Martineau, Seat of Authority in Religion3, London, 1891, p. 71). In the NT, however, as in general usage, ‘conscience’ is not restricted to the intuitive discernment of the difference between right and wrong, but is applied to the whole moral nature of man; and when understood in this way there can be no question that it shares in the general weakness of human nature, and that it is both capable of education and constantly in need of an educative discipline. The distinction made by the NT writers between a good and an evil conscience implies the need of education; their moral precepts imply its possibility. St. Paul says that be ‘exercised himself’ to have a conscience void of offence toward God and men (Acts 24:16); the author of Heb. speaks of those who ‘by reason of use have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil’ (Hebrews 5:14).
In various aspects the necessity for this exercise or training of the moral faculty comes before us. Even as a power of intuition or vision by which the Moral Law is discerned, conscience is capable of improvement. Ignorance darkens it (Ephesians 4:18), sin defiles it (Titus 1:15); and only an eye that is purged and enlightened can see clearly. ‘My conscience is nott so,’ said Queen Mary to Knox. ‘Conscience, Madam,’ he replied, ‘requyres knowledge; and I fear that rycht knowledge ye have none’ (Knox, Works, ed. Laing, Edinburgh, 1864, ii. 283). But conscience is also a faculty of moral judgment, and in moral matters, as in other matters, human judgments go astray. The ‘weak’ conscience is the natural accompaniment of the weak and narrow mind (1 Corinthians 8:7); a selfish and impure heart usually compounds with its conscience for the sins to which it is inclined, and a conscience that accepts hush-money is apt to grow dumb until contact with another conscience stronger and purer than itself makes it vocal once more (Acts 24:25). Moral sentiments, again, gather around a false judgment as readily as around a true. Christ’s apostles were killed by men who thought that they were thereby doing God service (John 16:2), and St. Paul himself once believed it to be his duty ‘to do many things contrary to the name of Jesus of Nazareth’ (Acts 26:9). In such cases persecution to the death carried no self-reproach with it, but a sense of moral complacency.
Granting, then, that conscience needs to be educated, how, according to the NT, is the work to be done? Three ways are especially suggested-the ways of knowledge, obedience, and love; in other words, the way of the mind, the way of the will, and the way of the heart. (a) Knox said to Queen Mary that conscience requires knowledge; and that is what St. Paul also taught (1 Corinthians 8:7). Before the man of God can be ‘furnished completely unto every good work’ he has need of ‘instruction in righteousness’ (2 Timothy 3:16-17). Education of this kind can be obtained from many masters, but the best teachers of all are Scriptures Inspired of God (ib.). St. Paul’s own Epistles are full of instruction as regards both the broad principles of Christian ethics and their application under varying circumstances to all the details of personal, family, and social life. And in the teaching of Christ Himself, above all in that Sermon on the Mount whose echoes are heard so frequently in the Epistle of James, enlightenment comes to the human conscience through the revelation of the fundamental laws of the Divine Kingdom.
(b) Conscience is educated, in the next place, by obedience to the Divine law when that law is recognized. It is the use of knowledge already possessed that exercises the senses to keener moral discernment (Hebrews 5:14); it is the man who is willing to do God’s will who comes to know the Divine voice whenever he hears it (John 7:17). The ethics of the NT are not the ingenious elaboration of a beautiful but abstract moral scheme; they are practical through and through. Christians are called upon to acknowledge not the right of conscience only, but its might; they are commanded everywhere to bring their dispositions, desires, passions, and habits into captivity to its obedience. To follow Christ is to have the light of life (John 8:12); while to hate one’s brother is to walk in darkness with blinded eyes, and so to lose the knowledge of the way (1 John 2:11; cf. John 12:35). Obedience, in short, is the organ of spiritual knowledge (cf. F. W. Robertson, Sermons, 2nd ser., new ed., London, 1875, no. viii.). A good conscience goes with a pure heart (1 Timothy 1:5). But sin so perverts and blinds the inward eye that the very light that is in us is darkness (Matthew 6:23).
(c) But something more is required before the education of conscience is complete. Knowledge is much, and the will to obedience is more, but what if the power of love be wanting? In that case the conscience will not be void of offence toward God and men. According to the NT writers the conscience must be set free by being delivered from the sense of guilt through the atoning power of Christ’s sacrifice (Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 10:22); it must learn its close dependence upon the mystery of faith (1 Timothy 3:9; cf. 1 Timothy 1:19); it must be taught that love out of a pure heart and a good conscience and faith unfeigned are ‘the end of the charge’ and the fulfilling of the law (1 Timothy 1:5). To be perfectly educated, in short, a conscience must experience the constraining and transforming power of the love of Christ, in whom men are new creatures, so that old things are passed away and all things are become new (2 Corinthians 5:14; 2 Corinthians 5:17). Thus, in the view of the NT writers, ethics passes into religion, and the Christian conscience is the conscience of one who lives the life of faith and love, and who can say with St. Paul, ‘I live, and yet no longer I, but Christ liveth in me’ (Galatians 2:20).
Literature.-J. Butler, Analogy and Sermons, London, 1852, Sermons. ii. iii.; I. Kant, Metaphysic of Ethics, Eng. translation , 1869, p. 245ff.; T. H. Green, prolegomena to Ethics, Oxford, 1883, p. 342ff.; H. Calderwood, Handbook of Moral Philosophy, London, 1872, pt. i.; H, Martensen, Christian Ethics, Edinburgh, 1881-82, i. 356ff.; Newman Smyth, Christian Ethics, do. 1892, index s.v.; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , article ‘Conscience’; Realencyklopädie für protestantische Theologie und Kirche 3, article ‘Gewissen’; B. Weiss, NT Theol., Eng. translation , Edinburgh. 1882-83, i. 476, ii. 40, 211.
J. C. Lambert.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Examination of Conscience
One of the fundamental means of furthering personal sanctification. Christ has clearly indicated the possibility of formalism and self-deception in devout sentiments unless one consciously holds oneself to a practical performance of the will of God (e.g., Matthew 7). This supposes self-examination. In its commonest form this examination of conscience is used as a preparation for confession and deals with actions distinctly sinful. Persons striving for Christian perfection put it to a further use in searching out minor sins and imperfections of act and of motive, and in keeping account of conscious acts of virtue. Especially adapted to this purpose is the so-called particular examen which segregates a certain failing and concentrates effort on it for the purpose of reducing the number of daily failures until it is eliminated entirely. Each morning a special resolution is made for the day. At noon and at night account is taken of the progress made and the resolution is renewed. The process is also adaptable to the acquisition of virtuous habits. Saint Ignatius in his Spiritual Exercises suggests five points for the examination of conscience.
An act of gratitude to God for all His benefits. This will dispose the soul for contrition based largely on the loftier motives.
A petition for grace to know and detest one's sins.
An accurate examination of one's thoughts, words and actions throughout the hours of the day or according to the activities in which one has been occupied.
An act of contrition and an appeal for pardon, the principal point of the whole exercise.
A resolution to amend, a petition for God's assisting grace, and finally an Our Father.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Conscience
is that principle, power, or faculty within us, which decides on the merit or demerit of our own actions, feelings, or affections, with reference to the rule of God's law. It has been called the moral sense by Lord Shaftsbury and Dr. Hutcheson. This appellation has been objected to by some, but has been adopted and defended by Dr. Reid, who says, "The testimony of our moral faculty, like that of the external senses, is the testimony of nature, and we have the same reason to rely upon it." He therefore considers conscience as an original faculty of our nature, which decides clearly, authoritatively, and instantaneously, on every object that falls within its province. "As we rely," says he, "upon the clear and distinct testimony of our eyes, concerning the colours and figures of the bodies about us, we have the same reason to rely, with security, upon the clear and unbiassed testimony of our conscience, with regard to what we ought and ought not to do." But Dr. Reid is surely unfortunate in illustrating the power of conscience by the analogy of the external senses. With regard to the intimations received through the organs of sense, there can be no difference of opinion, and there can be no room for argument. They give us at once correct information, which reasoning can neither invalidate nor confirm. But it is surely impossible to say as much for the power of conscience, which sometimes gives the most opposite intimations with regard to the simplest moral facts, and which requires to be corrected by an accurate attention to the established order of nature, or to the known will of God, before we can rely with confidence on its decisions. It does not appear, that conscience can with propriety be considered as a principle distinct from that which enables us to pronounce on the general merit or demerit of moral actions. This principle, or faculty, is attended with peculiar feelings, when we ourselves are the agents; we are then too deeply interested to view the matter as a mere subject of reasoning; and pleasure or pain are excited, with a degree of intensity proportioned to the importance which we always assign to our own interests and feelings. In the case of others, our approbation or disapprobation is generally qualified, sometimes suspended, by our ignorance of the motives by which they have been influenced; but, in our own case, the motives and the actions are both before us, and when they do not correspond, we feel the same disgust with ourselves that we should feel toward another, whose motives we knew to be vicious, while his actions are specious and plausible. But in our own case, the uneasy feeling is heightened in a tenfold degree, because self- contempt and disgust are brought into competition with the warmest self- love, and the strongest desire of self-approbation. We have then something of the feelings of a parent, who knows the worthlessness of the child he loves, and contemplates with horror the shame and infamy which might arise from exposure to the world.
2. Conscience, then, cannot be considered as any thing else than the general principle of moral approbation or disapprobation applied to our own feelings or conduct, acting with increased energy from the knowledge which we have of our motives and actions, and from the deep interest which we take in whatever concerns ourselves; nor can we think that they have deserved well of morals or philosophy, who have attempted to deduce our notions of right and wrong from any one principle. Various powers both of the understanding and of the will are concerned in every moral conclusion; and conscience derives its chief and most salutary influence from the consideration of our being continually in the presence of God, and accountable to him for all our thoughts, words, and actions. A conscience well informed, and possessed of sensibility, is the best security for virtue, and the most awful avenger of wicked deeds; an ill-informed conscience is the most powerful instrument of mischief; a squeamish and ticklish conscience generally renders those who are under its influence ridiculous.
Hic murus aheneus esto,
Nil conscire sibi, nulla pallescere culpa.
(Let a consciousness of innocence, and a fearlessness of any accusation, be thy brazen bulwark.)
3. The rule of conscience is the will of God, so far as it is made known to us, either by the light of nature, or by that of revelation. With respect to the knowledge of this rule, conscience is said to be rightly informed, or mistaken; firm, or wavering, or scrupulous, &c. With respect to the conformity of our actions to this rule when known, conscience is said to be good or evil. In a moral view, it is of the greatest importance that the understanding be well informed, in order to render the judgment or verdict of conscience a safe directory of conduct, and a proper source of satisfaction. Otherwise, the judgment of conscience may be pleaded, and it has actually been pleaded, as an apology for very unwarrantable conduct. Many atrocious acts of persecution have been perpetrated, and afterward justified, under the sanction of an erroneous conscience. It is also of no small importance, that the sensibility of conscience be duly maintained and cherished; for want of which men have often been betrayed into criminal conduct without self-reproach, and have deluded themselves with false notions of their character and state.
See MORAL OBLIGATION .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Conscience
Is that faculty common to all free moral agents, Romans 2:13-15 , in virtue of which we discern between right and wrong, and are prompted to choose the former and refuse the latter. Its appointed sphere is in the regulation, according to the will of God revealed in nature and the Bible, of all our being and actions so far as these have a moral character. The existence of this faculty proves the soul accountable at the bar of its Creator, and its voice is in an important sense the voice of God. We feel that when pure and fully informed, it is an unerring guide to duty, and that no possible array of inducements can justify us in disregarding it. In man, however, though this conviction that we must do what is right never fails, yet the value of conscience is greatly impaired by its inhering in a depraved soul, whose evil tendencies warp and pervert our judgment on all subjects. Thus Paul verily thought that he ought to persecute the followers of Christ, Acts 26:9 . His sin was in his culpable neglect to enlighten his conscience by all the means in his power, and to purify it by divine grace. A terrible array of conscientious errors and persecutions, which have infested and afflicted the church in all ages, warns us of our individual need of perfect light and sanctifying grace. A "good" and "pure" conscience, 1 Timothy 1:5 3:9 , is sprinkled with Christ's blood, clearly discerns the will of God, and urges us to obey it from the gospel motives; in proportion as we thus obey it, it is "void of offence," Acts 24:16 , and its approbation is one of the most essential elements of happiness. A "weak," or irresolute and blind conscience, 1 Corinthians 8:7 ; a "defiled" conscience, the slave of a corrupt heart, Titus 1:15 Hebrews 10:22 ; and a "seared" conscience, 1 Timothy 4:2 , hardened against the law and the gospel alike, unless changed by grace, will at length become an avenging conscience, the instrument of a fearful and eternal remorse. No bodily tortures can equal the agony it inflicts; and though it may slumber here, it will hereafter be like the worm that never dies and the fire that never can be quenched.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Conscience
1: συνείδησις (Strong's #4893 — Noun Feminine — suneidesis — soon-i'-day-sis ) lit., "a knowing with" (sun, "with," oida, "to know"), i.e., "a co-knowledge (with oneself), the witness borne to one's conduct by conscience, that faculty by which we apprehend the will of God, as that which is designed to govern our lives;" hence (a) the sense of guiltness before God; Hebrews 10:2 ; (b) that process of thought which distinguishes what it considers morally good or bad, commending the good, condemning the bad, and so prompting to do the former, and avoid the latter; Romans 2:15 (bearing witness with God's law); Hebrews 9:1 ; 2 Corinthians 1:12 ; acting in a certain way because "conscience" requires it, Romans 13:5 ; so as not to cause scruples of "conscience" in another, 1 Corinthians 10:28,29 ; not calling a thing in question unnecessarily, as if conscience demanded it, 1 Corinthians 10:25,27 ; "commending oneself to every man's conscience," 2 Corinthians 4:2 ; cp. 2 Corinthians 5:11 . There may be a "conscience" not strong enough to distinguish clearly between the lawful and the unlawful, 1 Corinthians 8:7,10,12 (some regard consciousness as the meaning here). The phrase "conscience toward God," in 1 Peter 2:19 , signifies a "conscience" (or perhaps here, a consciousness) so controlled by the apprehension of God's presence, that the person realizes that griefs are to be borne in accordance with His will. Hebrews 9:9 teaches that sacrifices under the Law could not so perfect a person that he could regard himself as free from guilt. For various descriptions of "conscience" see Acts 23:1 ; 24:16 ; 1 Corinthians 8:7 ; 1 Timothy 1:5,19 ; 3:9 ; 4:2 ; 2 Timothy 1:3 ; Titus 1:15 ; Hebrews 9:14 ; 10:22 ; 13:18 ; 1 Peter 3:16,21 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Conscience
There is within the human mind something that acts as a moral judge. It tells people what is right and wrong, urges them to do right, and gives them feelings of either innocence or guilt, depending on whether they obey or disobey it. This moral judge we call conscience (Romans 2:15-16; 1 John 3:19-21).
Although the Old Testament does not mention the word ‘conscience’, it certainly refers to the activity of conscience (Genesis 3:7-8; 2 Samuel 24:10; Ephesians 2:1-34; Psalms 32:3; Psalms 51:3-4). Conscience is not a perfect judge, because sin has affected the conscience as it has affected every other part of human nature (Luke 11:35; 1618399498_2). Therefore the conscience, like the rest of human nature, needs cleansing from the effects of sin, and this comes about only through the sacrificial death of Jesus Christ (Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 10:22).
The conscience also needs instruction, because it can only make judgments according to the knowledge it possesses (Romans 2:14-15; 1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:10). Christians must therefore train and discipline the conscience so that it is well instructed, pure, active and sensitive (Acts 24:16; Ephesians 4:17; Ephesians 4:23; 1 Timothy 1:5; 1 Timothy 1:19; 2 Timothy 1:3). When people ignore conscience, it can easily become defiled, hardened or dead (1 Timothy 4:2; Titus 1:15).
A properly developed conscience will lead people to do what is right, whether a written law demands it or not (Romans 13:5; 1 Peter 3:16). Christians must be careful to keep the conscience clear in all that they do (2 Corinthians 1:12; Hebrews 13:18). At the same time they must realize that a clear conscience does not necessarily mean they are faultless (1 Corinthians 4:4-5). Sometimes the conscience may be clear in relation to something they want to do, but they decide not to do it because of the bad effect it could have on others (Romans 14:22-23; 1 Corinthians 10:28-29). The conscience must be clear before God, not just clear according to standards people set for themselves (Acts 23:1; Romans 9:1).

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Conscienceless - ) Without Conscience; indifferent to Conscience; unscrupulous
Conscience - It is remarkable that the word Conscience does not occur in the O. The above word occurs once in the LXX in Ecclesiastes 10:20 : "Curse not the king, no not in thy Conscience. They are thus 'a law to themselves:' their Conscience bearing witness and their thoughts accusing or excusing themselves between themselves. The law gave more light as to what was right and wrong: Paul said, "I had not had Conscience also of lust unless the law had said, Thou shalt not lust. Christianity brings the Conscience into the light of God, fully revealed by His word; the believer is thus exercised to have a Conscience void of offence towards God and men. This may be called a 'tender Conscience. a 'good Conscience,' enabling one when accused of evil, to know that the charge is untrue. a 'pure Conscience,' which is characterised by the separation from evil. a 'weak Conscience,' as on the subject of meats, days, etc. a 'purged Conscience. ' Through faith in the infinite efficacy of the blood of Christ the believer has no more Conscience of sins. This does not mean no consciousness of ever sinning, but that as regards imputation of sins before God, the Conscience is purged. Paul speaks of some who have a 'defiled mind and Conscience,' Titus 1:15 ; and of others who in departing from the faith have their 'conscience seared with a hot iron,' 1 Timothy 4:2 , that is, a hardened Conscience, insensible to that which should touch them to the quick. ...
Conscience, with the Christian, should be exercised in the sight of God fully revealed in Christ, and be governed by the word, otherwise, on the plea of 'conscience,' many actions displeasing to God way be advocated. He could say that he had lived in all good Conscience before God, and yet he had been haling men and women to prison because they were Christians. Doubtless he did it with an unoffending Conscience, according as the Lord stated: "The time cometh, that whosoever killeth you will think that he doeth God service. Paul's zeal for Judaism so blinded his eyes that he was unable to recognise in his Conscience the God who gave the law, and had sent His Son also; nor to see that God could act outside of it: it was an unenlightened Conscience, a zeal without knowledge, by which even the Christian may be led astray
Conscience - An act, say they, would be represented as an agent, whereas Conscience is a testimony. To say it is a habit, is to speak of it as a disposition acting, which is scarce more accurate than ascribing one act to another; and, besides, it would be strange language to say that Conscience itself is a habit. The rules of Conscience. We must distinguish between a rule that of itself and immediately binds the Conscience, and a rule that is occasionally of use to direct and satisfy the Conscience. ...
Now in the first sense the will of God is the only rule immediately binding the Conscience. No one has authority over the Conscience but God. All penal laws, therefore, in matters of mere Conscience, or things that do not evidently affect the civil state, are certainly unlawful; yet, secondly, the commands of superiors, not only natural parents, but civil, as magistrates or masters, and every man's private engagements, are rules of Conscience in things indifferent. The examples of wise and good men may become rules of Conscience: but here it must be observed, that no example or judgment is of any authority against law: where the law is doubtful, and even where there is no doubt, the side of example cannot be taken till enquiry has been first made concerning what the law directs. ...
Conscience has been considered, as, ...
1. A right Conscience is that which decides aright, or, according to the only rule of rectitude, the law of God. This is also called a well-informed Conscience, which in all its decisions proceeds upon the most evident principles of truth. A probable Conscience is that which, in cases which admit of the brightest and fullest light, contents itself with bare probabilities. The Consciences of many are of no higher character; and though we must not say a man cannot be saved with such a Conscience, yet such a Conscience is not so perfect as it might be. An ignorant Conscience is that which may declare right, but, as it were, by chance, and without any just ground to build on. An erroneous Conscience is a Conscience mistaken in its decisions about the nature of actions. A doubting Conscience is a Conscience unresolved about the nature of actions; on account of the equal or nearly equal probabilities which appear for and against each side of the question. Of an evil Conscience there are several kinds. Conscience, in regard to actions in general, is evil when it has lost more or less the sense it ought to have of the natural distinctions of moral good and evil: this is a polluted or defiled Conscience. Conscience is evil in itself when it gives either none or a false testimony as to past actions; when reflecting upon wickedness it feels no pains, it is evil, and said to be seared or hardened, 1 Timothy 4:2 . ...
In regard to future actions, Conscience is evil if it does not startle at the proposal of sin, or connives at the commission of it. For the right management of Conscience, we should, ...
1. Furnish Conscience with general principles of the most extensive nature and strongest influence; such as the supreme love of God; love to our neighbours as ourselves; and that the care of our souls is of the greatest importance. Preserve the purity of Conscience. Maintain the freedom of Conscience, particularly against interest, passion, temper, example, and the authority of great names
Conscience - This moral judge we call Conscience (Romans 2:15-16; 1 John 3:19-21). ...
Although the Old Testament does not mention the word ‘conscience’, it certainly refers to the activity of Conscience (Genesis 3:7-8; 2 Samuel 24:10; Job 27:6; Psalms 32:3; Psalms 51:3-4). Conscience is not a perfect judge, because sin has affected the Conscience as it has affected every other part of human nature (Luke 11:35; Ephesians 2:1-3). Therefore the Conscience, like the rest of human nature, needs cleansing from the effects of sin, and this comes about only through the sacrificial death of Jesus Christ (Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 10:22). ...
The Conscience also needs instruction, because it can only make judgments according to the knowledge it possesses (Romans 2:14-15; 1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:10). Christians must therefore train and discipline the Conscience so that it is well instructed, pure, active and sensitive (Acts 24:16; Ephesians 4:17; Ephesians 4:23; 1 Timothy 1:5; 1 Timothy 1:19; 2 Timothy 1:3). When people ignore Conscience, it can easily become defiled, hardened or dead (1 Timothy 4:2; Titus 1:15). ...
A properly developed Conscience will lead people to do what is right, whether a written law demands it or not (Romans 13:5; 1 Peter 3:16). Christians must be careful to keep the Conscience clear in all that they do (2 Corinthians 1:12; Hebrews 13:18). At the same time they must realize that a clear Conscience does not necessarily mean they are faultless (1 Corinthians 4:4-5). Sometimes the Conscience may be clear in relation to something they want to do, but they decide not to do it because of the bad effect it could have on others (Romans 14:22-23; 1 Corinthians 10:28-29). The Conscience must be clear before God, not just clear according to standards people set for themselves (Acts 23:1; Romans 9:1)
Conscience - ...
Although the word “conscience” does appear in the Old Testament, the Hebrew word usually translated “heart” does refer to Conscience in a number of passages, for example, “Afterward David's heart smote him” (1 Samuel 24:5 ). The New Testament also uses this Hebraic reference to Conscience: “if our heart condemn us” (1 John 3:20-21 . ) The word for “reins” or “kidneys” sometimes refers to Conscience. In Psalm 16:7 the psalmist thanked God for giving him counsel and because his reins or kidneys admonished him, meaning his Conscience reproved him. )...
“Conscience” in the New Testament is the translation of a Greek word derived from a verb that means “to know with. To Paul the “conscience” is a person's painful reaction to a past act which does not meet the standard. Yet Paul would have said that, in spite of these liabilities, a person's Conscience must be obeyed. If past actions have not been such as to produce painful reactions, the person is said to have a “pure Conscience” (1 Timothy 3:9 ; 2 Timothy 1:3 ). When sensitive and active in judging past acts, the Conscience is said to be “good” (Acts 23:1 ; 1Timothy 1:5,1 Timothy 1:19 ; 1Peter 3:16,1 Peter 3:21 ; Hebrews 13:18 ) or “void of offence toward God” (Acts 24:16 ). If the Conscience is not active in judging past acts, it is said to be “weak” (1Corinthians 8:7,1Corinthians 8:10,1 Corinthians 8:12 ) and may be wounded (1 Corinthians 8:12 ). When the Conscience is insensitive, it is “seared” (1 Timothy 4:2 ). The sinful Conscience is “defiled” (Titus 1:15 ) or “evil” (Hebrews 10:22 ). ...
In 1 Corinthians 4:4 , Paul used the verb from which the word for “conscience” is derived. ” This phrase means “my Conscience does not accuse me. ” Paul, in short, taught that a pure Conscience is valuable, but that Christ is the final standard by which a person is judged
Conscience - Conscience is a term that describes an aspect of a human being's self-awareness. Conscience is a critical inner awareness that bears witness to the norms and values we recognize and apply. The complex of values with which Conscience deals includes not only those we own, but the entire range of values to which we are exposed during life's journey. The witness of Conscience makes its presence known by inducing mental anguish and feelings of guilt when we violate the values we recognize and apply. Conscience also provides a sense of pleasure when we reflect on conformity to our value system. Rabbinic Judaism and the Dead Sea Scrolls are consistent with the Old Testament in their lack of a vocabulary of Conscience. Acts 24:16 ) are used to depict the Conscience as affirming right action. This action, however, is not determined by Conscience but by other criteria to which Conscience bears witness. Paul's reference to the Conscience being "seared" and "corrupted" (1 Timothy 4:2 ; Titus 1:15 ) indicates that the function of Conscience as a capacity for sound inward critique has been thwarted by resistance to God's revealed values. The writer of Hebrews views Conscience as bearing a witness of being "clear" or "guilty" (9:9,14; 10:2,22; 13:18). They also present a unique critique of the role of Conscience in relation to a knowledge base. First, Conscience is a God-given capacity for human beings to exercise self-critique. In 1 Corinthians 4:4 Paul reflects upon his ministry and motives and "knows nothing against himself" ( sunoida ; translated "My Conscience is clear" by the NIV), but affirms that he is still subject to critique by God. Here Paul illustrates that Conscience is not an end in itself, but is subject to critique. , Conscience) is more consistent in reference to their own law (i. The Jews resisted the law's role as convictor while the Gentiles' convictor (conscience) worked. ...
Second, Conscience is consistently imaged as a "witness" to something (cf. Romans 2:15 ; 9:1 ; 2 Corinthians 1:12 ; 4:2 ; 5:11 ; along with the implications of adjectives such as a "good, " "clear" Conscience ). Conscience is not an independent authority that originates judgments. The idea of Conscience as a judge or legislator in the sense of originating an opinion is a modern innovation. The Conscience does not dictate the content of right or wrong; it merely witnesses to what the value system in a person has determined is right or wrong. In this regard, Conscience is not a guide but needs to be guided by a thoroughly and critically developed value system. ...
Third, Conscience is a servant of the value system. In the context of 1Corinthians, a weak Conscience is one without an adequate knowledge base in regard to idols and meat (i. how "knowledge" is used almost as a substitute for Conscience in the Romans 14 discussion). The issue is not resolved on the basis of Conscience but on the basis of worldview. Conscience merely monitors the worldview that exists in our internal conversation. Paul's comments about "ask no questions on account of Conscience" in 1 Corinthians 10 has often been used to mean "what you don't know won't hurt you. " Paul would hardly promote such an idea! Rather, Paul's use of the fixed phrase "on account of Conscience" actually means "ask no questions because it really isn't a matter of Conscience and therefore is not open for debate. "...
Paul does protect the function of Conscience in weak believers of 1Corinthians, but not because they are correct or because their views should be forever tolerated. As the value set is informed and changed, Conscience will follow. Conscience is an aspect of self-awareness that produces the pain and/or pleasure we "feel" as we reflect on the norms and values we recognize and apply. Conscience is not an outside voice. The critique Conscience exercises related to the value system which a person develops. Pierce, Conscience in the New Testament ; M
Consciousness - We must not confound the terms consciousness and Conscience; for though the Latin be ignorant of any such distinction, including both in the word conscientia, yet there is a great deal or difference between them in our language. Conscience extends to all human actions, bodily as well as mental. Consciousness is the knowledge of the existence; Conscience of the moral nature of actions. Consciousness is a province of metaphysics, Conscience of morality
Conscience - , "a co-knowledge (with oneself), the witness borne to one's conduct by Conscience, that faculty by which we apprehend the will of God, as that which is designed to govern our lives;" hence (a) the sense of guiltness before God; Hebrews 10:2 ; (b) that process of thought which distinguishes what it considers morally good or bad, commending the good, condemning the bad, and so prompting to do the former, and avoid the latter; Romans 2:15 (bearing witness with God's law); Hebrews 9:1 ; 2 Corinthians 1:12 ; acting in a certain way because "conscience" requires it, Romans 13:5 ; so as not to cause scruples of "conscience" in another, 1 Corinthians 10:28,29 ; not calling a thing in question unnecessarily, as if Conscience demanded it, 1 Corinthians 10:25,27 ; "commending oneself to every man's Conscience," 2 Corinthians 4:2 ; cp. There may be a "conscience" not strong enough to distinguish clearly between the lawful and the unlawful, 1 Corinthians 8:7,10,12 (some regard consciousness as the meaning here). The phrase "conscience toward God," in 1 Peter 2:19 , signifies a "conscience" (or perhaps here, a consciousness) so controlled by the apprehension of God's presence, that the person realizes that griefs are to be borne in accordance with His will. For various descriptions of "conscience" see Acts 23:1 ; 24:16 ; 1 Corinthians 8:7 ; 1 Timothy 1:5,19 ; 3:9 ; 4:2 ; 2 Timothy 1:3 ; Titus 1:15 ; Hebrews 9:14 ; 10:22 ; 13:18 ; 1 Peter 3:16,21
Qualm - ) A prick or scruple of Conscience; uneasiness of Conscience; compunction
Conscienced - ) Having a Conscience
Compunct - ) Affected with compunction; Conscience-stricken
Self-Reproached - ) Reproached by one's own Conscience or judgment
Conscionable - ) Governed by, or according to, Conscience; reasonable; just
Self-Accused - ) Accused by one's self or by one's Conscience
Conscience - conscientia, from which ‘conscience’ is derived, and the Gr. , as the Authorized Version itself bears witness, ‘conscience’ too was sometimes used in this wider sense. In 1 Corinthians 8:7 ‘conscience of the idol,’ and in Hebrews 10:2 ‘conscience of sins,’ would now be better rendered ‘consciousness. ’ Some exegetes would prefer ‘consciousness’ to ‘conscience’ in 1 Peter 2:19 ‘conscience toward (or of) God. ’ With these exceptions, ‘conscience’ in the NT denotes not consciousness generally, but the moral faculty in particular-that power by which we apprehend moral truth and recognize it as having the authority of moral law. The history of the words ‘conscience,’ conscientia, συνείδησις, shows that it is entirely fanciful to suppose on etymological grounds that the prefixes con and συν point to the subject’s joint knowledge along with God Himself. This does not, of course, exclude the further view that, as man is made in the image of God, and as his individual personality is rooted in that of the absolute moral Ruler, the testimony of Conscience actually is the voice of God bearing witness in the soul to the reality and authority of moral truth. ...
It is a significant fact that the word ‘conscience’ is nowhere found in the OT text, though in Ecclesiastes 10:20 both Authorized Version and Revised Version give it in the margin as an alternative for ‘thought,’ to represent the Heb. Micah 6:8), they furnished no doctrine of Conscience. Jesus in His teaching constantly addresses Himself to the Conscience, and clearly refers to it when He speaks of ‘the light that is in thee’ (Matthew 6:23, Luke 11:35), but His mission was to illumine and quicken the moral faculty by the revelation He brought, not to analyze it, or define it, or lay down a doctrine on the subject. We have the word ‘conscience’ 31 times in Authorized Version and 30 times in Revised Version -the latter reading συνηθείᾳ for συνειδήσει in 1 Corinthians 8:7. The NT doctrine...
(1) The nature of Conscience. -According to its etymology, Conscience is a strictly cognitive power-the power of apprehending moral truth; and writers of the intuitional school frequently restrict the use of the term to this one meaning (cf. Popularly, however, Conscience has a much wider connotation, including moral judgments and moral feelings as well as immediate intuitions of right and wrong; and it is evident that in the NT the word is employed in this larger sense so as to include the whole of the moral nature. When Conscience is said to ‘bear witness’ (Romans 2:15; Romans 9:1) or to give ‘testimony’ (2 Corinthians 1:12), it is the clear and direct shining of the inner light that is referred to. When it is described as ‘weak’ or over-scrupulous (1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:10; 1 Corinthians 8:12), and is contrasted by implication with a Conscience that is strong and walks at liberty, the reference is to those diversities of opinion on moral subjects which are due to variations of judgment in the application of mutually acknowledged first principles. The Apostle here seems to lay down as unquestionable, (a) that there is a Divine law written by Nature on the heart of every man, whether Jew or Gentile; (b) that Conscience is the moral faculty which bears witness to that law; (c) that in the light of that witness there is an exercise of the thoughts or reasonings (λογισμοί), in other words, of the moral judgment; (d) that, as the result of this judgment before the inward bar, men are subject to the feelings of moral self-approval or self-reproach. Paul appears to distinguish Conscience as the witness-bearing faculty from the moral judgments and moral feelings that accompany its testimony. But elsewhere, as has been already shown, he frequently speaks of Conscience in that larger sense which makes it correspond not only with the immediate apprehension of moral truth, but with the judgments based upon the truth thus revealed, and the sentiments of satisfaction or dissatisfaction to which these judgments give rise. ...
(2) The authority of Conscience. Few will be found to challenge Butler’s famous assertion of the supremacy of Conscience: ‘Had it strength as it has right, had it power as it has manifest authority, it would absolutely govern the world’ (Serm. For the NT authors Conscience is supreme, and it is supreme because in its very nature it is an organ through which God speaks to reveal His will. The claim of right which Butler makes on behalf of Conscience is transformed for St. The pure and loyal Christian Conscience has might as it has right; it not only legislates but governs. What the law could not do in that it was weak through the flesh, is actually fulfilled in those who take Christ to be the companion of their Conscience and who walk not after the flesh but after the spirit. ...
In Acts we have many examples of the way in which Conscience, in Butler’s words, ‘magisterially exerts itself’ in the case alike of bad men and of good. Paul reasoned of righteousness, temperance, and judgment to come (Acts 24:25)-all these are examples of the authority of Conscience. ), but vindicates its right to govern on the ground of the higher authority of Conscience (Romans 13:5). represents the sin-convicting Conscience as a sovereign power which impelled men to lay their gifts and sacrifices on the altar, but was never satisfied until Jesus Christ ‘through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish unto God’ (Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 10:2; Hebrews 10:22). Peter teaches that, in a matter of Conscience before God, men must be willing to ‘endure griefs, suffering wrongfully’ (1 Peter 2:19). Nor is it only the personal Conscience whose dignity and supremacy must be acknowledged; a like reverence is to be shown for the Conscience of others. Paul sought to commend himself to every man’s Conscience in the sight of God (2 Corinthians 4:2; cf. He taught that the exercise of Christian liberty must be Limited by regard for another’s Conscience (1 Corinthians 10:29), and that even when that Conscience is weak, it must not be wounded or bewildered or defiled (1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:10; 1 Corinthians 8:12) lest the other’s sense of moral responsibility should thereby be impaired. ...
The source of this, magisterial authority of Conscience is represented by the NT writers as lying altogether in the Divine will, of which Conscience is the instrument. Paul Conscience is not an individualized reflexion of social opinion, nor a subtle compound of feelings evolved in the course of the long struggle for existence, nor yet a mysterious faculty that claims to regulate the life of man by virtue of some right inherent in its own nature. Peter a matter of Conscience is a question of ‘conscience toward God’ (1 Peter 2:19). Some commentators would render συνείδησις θεοῦ in this verse by ‘consciousness of God’; and the very ambiguity of the expression may suggest that in the Apostle’s view Conscience is really a God-consciousness in the sphere of morality, as faith is a God-consciousness in the sphere of religion. ...
(3) Varieties of Conscience. -What has just been said as to the absolute and universal authority of Conscience may seem difficult to reconcile with the distinctions made by the NT writers between Consciences of very varied types. There are Consciences that are weak and timid, and others that are strong and free (1 Corinthians 8:7 ff. A Conscience may be ‘void of offence’ (Acts 24:16), or it may be defiled and wounded (1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 8:12, Titus 1:15). The explanation of the difficulties raised by such language lies in the fact already noted that ‘conscience’ in the NT is used to denote not the power of moral vision only, but the moral judgment and the moral feelings. As the organ which discerns the Moral Law, Conscience has the authority of that law itself; its voice is the voice of God. Their Consciences were weak because their moral judgments were weak. And as the result of their weakness in the decision of moral questions, their moral feelings were misdirected, and so their Consciences were stained and wounded by acts in which a man of more enlightened Conscience saw no harm. Similarly, when a Conscience is said to be ‘good’ or ‘pure’ or ‘void of offence,’ the reference is to the sense of peace and moral harmony with God and man which comes to one who has loyally obeyed the dictates of the Moral Law; while an uncleansed or evil Conscience is one on which there rests the burden and pain of sin that is unatoned for and unforgiven. A ‘seared’ or ‘branded’ Conscience, again, may point to the case of those in whom abuse of the moral nature has led to a perversion of the moral judgment and a deadening of the moral sentiments. ...
(4) The education of Conscience. -Some intuitionalists have held that Conscience, being an infallible oracle, is incapable of education; and Kant’s famous utterance, ‘An erring Conscience is a chimera’ (op. But it is only in a theoretical and ideal sense that the truth of the saying can be admitted-only when the word of Conscience is taken to be nothing less and nothing more than the voice of God, and its light to be in very reality His ‘revealing and appealing look’ (J. In the NT, however, as in general usage, ‘conscience’ is not restricted to the intuitive discernment of the difference between right and wrong, but is applied to the whole moral nature of man; and when understood in this way there can be no question that it shares in the general weakness of human nature, and that it is both capable of education and constantly in need of an educative discipline. The distinction made by the NT writers between a good and an evil Conscience implies the need of education; their moral precepts imply its possibility. Paul says that be ‘exercised himself’ to have a Conscience void of offence toward God and men (Acts 24:16); the author of Heb. Even as a power of intuition or vision by which the Moral Law is discerned, Conscience is capable of improvement. ‘My Conscience is nott so,’ said Queen Mary to Knox. ‘Conscience, Madam,’ he replied, ‘requyres knowledge; and I fear that rycht knowledge ye have none’ (Knox, Works, ed. But Conscience is also a faculty of moral judgment, and in moral matters, as in other matters, human judgments go astray. The ‘weak’ Conscience is the natural accompaniment of the weak and narrow mind (1 Corinthians 8:7); a selfish and impure heart usually compounds with its Conscience for the sins to which it is inclined, and a Conscience that accepts hush-money is apt to grow dumb until contact with another Conscience stronger and purer than itself makes it vocal once more (Acts 24:25). ...
Granting, then, that Conscience needs to be educated, how, according to the NT, is the work to be done? Three ways are especially suggested-the ways of knowledge, obedience, and love; in other words, the way of the mind, the way of the will, and the way of the heart. (a) Knox said to Queen Mary that Conscience requires knowledge; and that is what St. And in the teaching of Christ Himself, above all in that Sermon on the Mount whose echoes are heard so frequently in the Epistle of James, enlightenment comes to the human Conscience through the revelation of the fundamental laws of the Divine Kingdom. ...
(b) Conscience is educated, in the next place, by obedience to the Divine law when that law is recognized. Christians are called upon to acknowledge not the right of Conscience only, but its might; they are commanded everywhere to bring their dispositions, desires, passions, and habits into captivity to its obedience. A good Conscience goes with a pure heart (1 Timothy 1:5). ...
(c) But something more is required before the education of Conscience is complete. Knowledge is much, and the will to obedience is more, but what if the power of love be wanting? In that case the Conscience will not be void of offence toward God and men. According to the NT writers the Conscience must be set free by being delivered from the sense of guilt through the atoning power of Christ’s sacrifice (Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 10:22); it must learn its close dependence upon the mystery of faith (1 Timothy 3:9; cf. 1 Timothy 1:19); it must be taught that love out of a pure heart and a good Conscience and faith unfeigned are ‘the end of the charge’ and the fulfilling of the law (1 Timothy 1:5). To be perfectly educated, in short, a Conscience must experience the constraining and transforming power of the love of Christ, in whom men are new creatures, so that old things are passed away and all things are become new (2 Corinthians 5:14; 2 Corinthians 5:17). Thus, in the view of the NT writers, ethics passes into religion, and the Christian Conscience is the Conscience of one who lives the life of faith and love, and who can say with St. ; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , article ‘Conscience’; Realencyklopädie für protestantische Theologie und Kirche 3, article ‘Gewissen’; B
Erinys - ) An avenging deity; one of the Furies; sometimes, Conscience personified
Criminatory - ) Relating to, or involving, crimination; accusing; as, a criminatory Conscience
Self-Reproved - ) Reproved by one's own Conscience or one's own sense of guilt
Self-Reproach - ) The act of reproaching one's self; censure by one's own Conscience
Compunctious - ) Of the nature of compunction; caused by Conscience; attended with, or causing, compunction
Reprover - Conscience is a bold reprover
Approving - Yielding approbation as an approving Conscience
Conscience - " He therefore considers Conscience as an original faculty of our nature, which decides clearly, authoritatively, and instantaneously, on every object that falls within its province. "As we rely," says he, "upon the clear and distinct testimony of our eyes, concerning the colours and figures of the bodies about us, we have the same reason to rely, with security, upon the clear and unbiassed testimony of our Conscience, with regard to what we ought and ought not to do. Reid is surely unfortunate in illustrating the power of Conscience by the analogy of the external senses. But it is surely impossible to say as much for the power of Conscience, which sometimes gives the most opposite intimations with regard to the simplest moral facts, and which requires to be corrected by an accurate attention to the established order of nature, or to the known will of God, before we can rely with confidence on its decisions. It does not appear, that Conscience can with propriety be considered as a principle distinct from that which enables us to pronounce on the general merit or demerit of moral actions. Conscience, then, cannot be considered as any thing else than the general principle of moral approbation or disapprobation applied to our own feelings or conduct, acting with increased energy from the knowledge which we have of our motives and actions, and from the deep interest which we take in whatever concerns ourselves; nor can we think that they have deserved well of morals or philosophy, who have attempted to deduce our notions of right and wrong from any one principle. Various powers both of the understanding and of the will are concerned in every moral conclusion; and Conscience derives its chief and most salutary influence from the consideration of our being continually in the presence of God, and accountable to him for all our thoughts, words, and actions. A Conscience well informed, and possessed of sensibility, is the best security for virtue, and the most awful avenger of wicked deeds; an ill-informed Conscience is the most powerful instrument of mischief; a squeamish and ticklish Conscience generally renders those who are under its influence ridiculous. The rule of Conscience is the will of God, so far as it is made known to us, either by the light of nature, or by that of revelation. With respect to the knowledge of this rule, Conscience is said to be rightly informed, or mistaken; firm, or wavering, or scrupulous, &c. With respect to the conformity of our actions to this rule when known, Conscience is said to be good or evil. In a moral view, it is of the greatest importance that the understanding be well informed, in order to render the judgment or verdict of Conscience a safe directory of conduct, and a proper source of satisfaction. Otherwise, the judgment of Conscience may be pleaded, and it has actually been pleaded, as an apology for very unwarrantable conduct. Many atrocious acts of persecution have been perpetrated, and afterward justified, under the sanction of an erroneous Conscience. It is also of no small importance, that the sensibility of Conscience be duly maintained and cherished; for want of which men have often been betrayed into criminal conduct without self-reproach, and have deluded themselves with false notions of their character and state
Cauterize - ) To sear, as the Conscience
Pricked - Psalm 73:21 (b) GOD's dealings with this dear man of GOD, Asaph, David's song leader, hurt his mind and Conscience, and he thus describes his feelings. ...
Acts 9:5 (a) It must be that Saul's persecution of the Christians was hurting his own heart and Conscience while he was doing it
Conscience - In man, however, though this conviction that we must do what is right never fails, yet the value of Conscience is greatly impaired by its inhering in a depraved soul, whose evil tendencies warp and pervert our judgment on all subjects. His sin was in his culpable neglect to enlighten his Conscience by all the means in his power, and to purify it by divine grace. A "good" and "pure" Conscience, 1 Timothy 1:5 3:9 , is sprinkled with Christ's blood, clearly discerns the will of God, and urges us to obey it from the gospel motives; in proportion as we thus obey it, it is "void of offence," Acts 24:16 , and its approbation is one of the most essential elements of happiness. A "weak," or irresolute and blind Conscience, 1 Corinthians 8:7 ; a "defiled" Conscience, the slave of a corrupt heart, Titus 1:15 Hebrews 10:22 ; and a "seared" Conscience, 1 Timothy 4:2 , hardened against the law and the gospel alike, unless changed by grace, will at length become an avenging Conscience, the instrument of a fearful and eternal remorse
Scruple - ) To be reluctant or to hesitate, as regards an action, on account of considerations of Conscience or expedience. ) Hesitation as to action from the difficulty of determining what is right or expedient; unwillingness, doubt, or hesitation proceeding from motives of Conscience
Confessing - Owning avowing declaring to be true or real granting or admitting by assent receiving disclosure of sins, or the state of the Conscience of another
Manifestation of Conscience - A practise in many religious orders and congregations by which subjects reveal the state of their Conscience to the superior, to the spiritual director, or to the confessor, in order that he may know them more intimately, and thus be able to further their spiritual progress. Canon 530 of the Code of Canon Law forbids all religious superiors to induce their subjects in any way to make such a manifestation of Conscience. At the same time it allows subjects freely to open the state of their souls to their superiors, and encourages them to treat with their superiors with filial confidence, and also, provided the superiors be priests, to expose to them their doubts and troubles of Conscience
Compunction - ) A picking of heart; poignant grief proceeding from a sense of guilt or consciousness of causing pain; the sting of Conscience
Obligatory - ) Binding in law or Conscience; imposing duty or obligation; requiring performance or forbearance of some act; - often followed by on or upon; as, obedience is obligatory on a soldier
Casuist - One that studies and settles cases of Conscience. Mayer has published a bibliotheca of casuists, containing an account of all the writers on cases of Conscience, ranged under three heads; at first comprehending the Lutheran, the second the Calvinist, and the third the Romish casuists
Casuist - one who studies and decides upon cases of Conscience. Mayer has published a bibliotheca of casuists, containing an account of all the writers on cases of Conscience, ranged under three heads; the first comprehending the Lutheran; the second, the Calvinistic; and the third, the Roman casuists
Pillows - The luxurious appliances mentioned in Ezekiel 13:18-19 , were temptations to ease and voluptuousness; and emblems of similar soporifics for the Conscience
Damnation - ...
In Romans 14:23 the word "damned" means "condemned" by one's own Conscience, as well as by the Word of God. , is not clear in his Conscience as to "meats", will violate his Conscience "if he eat," and in eating is condemned; and thus one ought not so to use his liberty as to lead one who is "weak" to bring upon himself this condemnation
Remorse - ) The anguish, like gnawing pain, excited by a sense of guilt; compunction of Conscience for a crime committed, or for the sins of one's past life
Antonio Escobar y Mendoza - The orthodoxy of his writings is above criticism, hence Pascal's efforts to fasten the charge of laxism on Escobar's "Manual of Cases of Conscience" do not merit serious consideration
Miscreant - ) Destitute of Conscience; unscrupulous
Conscience: Hardening - It is a very terrible thing to let Conscience begin to grow hard, for it soon chills into northern iron and steel. So with Conscience, it films over gradually, until at last it becomes hard and unfeeling, and is not crushed even with ponderous loads of iniquity
Scandalous - ) Giving offense to the Conscience or moral feelings; exciting reprobation; calling out condemnation
Jean Gury - His compendium of moral theology and his cases of Conscience, based on Busenbaum and Saint Alphonsus, have been repeatedly reprinted and adapted, and have contributed largely to the extirpation of Jansenism
Scandalize - ) To offend the feelings or the Conscience of (a person) by some action which is considered immoral or criminal; to bring shame, disgrace, or reproach upon
Gury, Jean Pierre - His compendium of moral theology and his cases of Conscience, based on Busenbaum and Saint Alphonsus, have been repeatedly reprinted and adapted, and have contributed largely to the extirpation of Jansenism
Embolden - ), the delinquent being built up, so to speak, to do what is contrary to his Conscience
Answer - An answer is (1) an apology or defence, as 2 Timothy 4:16 ‘at my first answer no man stood by me’; so perhaps 1 Peter 3:21 ‘the answer of a good Conscience’; (2) oracle, Divine response, as Romans 11:4 ‘what saith the answer of God?’...
Enlighten - ) To make clear to the intellect or Conscience; to shed the light of truth and knowledge upon; to furnish with increase of knowledge; to instruct; as, to enlighten the mind or understanding
Remorse - The keen pain or anguish excited by a sense of guilt compunction of Conscience for a crime committed
Hypocrisy - Is there no room for Conscience to pry between thy feigned profession and thy real ungodliness, and bear witness against thee? Remember, if Conscience do it not, certainly 'the watcher and the Holy One' will make a thorough search within thee
Breastplate - of iron (steeled Conscience)
Angelo Carletti di Chivasso, Blessed - His "Cases of Conscience" is a famous dictionary of moral theology
Interrogation - Some take the word to indicate that baptism affords a good Conscience, an appeal against the accuser
Whose Rule, His Religion - The principle trampled on all rights of Conscience
Disregard - ) Not to regard; to pay no heed to; to omit to take notice of; to neglect to observe; to slight as unworthy of regard or notice; as, to disregard the admonitions of Conscience
Shipwreck - 1: ναυαγέω (Strong's #3489 — Verb — nauageo — now-ag-eh'-o ) signifies (a) literally, "to suffer shipwreck" (naus, "a ship," agnumi, "to break"), 2 Corinthians 11:25 ; (b) metaphorically, "to make shipwreck," 1 Timothy 1:19 , "concerning the faith," as the result of thrusting away a good Conscience (both verbs in this ver
Infirmity - Romans 15:1 calls upon the strong (in Conscience) to bear with the weaknesses (KJV infirmity) of those without strength
Peace - ) Exemption from, or subjection of, agitating passions; tranquillity of mind or Conscience
Candle - It is used as a figure of Conscience (Proverbs 20:27 ), of a Christian example (Matthew 5:14,15 ), and of prosperity (Job 21:17 ; Proverbs 13:9 )
Offend - ) To be offensive to; to harm; to pain; to annoy; as, strong light offends the eye; to offend the Conscience
Conscience - ) The estimate or determination of Conscience; conviction or right or duty
Casuistry - ) The science or doctrine of dealing with cases of Conscience, of resolving questions of right or wrong in conduct, or determining the lawfulness or unlawfulness of what a man may do by rules and principles drawn from the Scriptures, from the laws of society or the church, or from equity and natural reason; the application of general moral rules to particular cases
Evangelical Protestant Association of Congregation - They believe in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, protesting against any compulsion in matters of faith and Conscience, and granting to everyone the privilege of individual examination and research
Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America - They believe in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, protesting against any compulsion in matters of faith and Conscience, and granting to everyone the privilege of individual examination and research
German Evangelical Ministers' Conference - They believe in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, protesting against any compulsion in matters of faith and Conscience, and granting to everyone the privilege of individual examination and research
German Evangelical Protestant Ministers' Associati - They believe in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, protesting against any compulsion in matters of faith and Conscience, and granting to everyone the privilege of individual examination and research
Purification - In Christianity the purification required extends to the heart, Acts 15:9 ; James 4:8 ; the soul , 1 Peter 1:22 ; and the Conscience through the blood of Christ
Forum - In canon law, internal forum, the realm of Conscience, is contrasted with the external or outward forum; thus, a marriage might be null and void in the internal forum, but binding outwardly, i
Conviction - ) The state of being convinced or convicted; strong persuasion or belief; especially, the state of being convicted of sin, or by one's Conscience
Sternness - It is said of that eminent saint and martyr, Bishop Hooper, that on one occasion a man in deep distress was allowed to go into his prison to tell his tale of Conscience, but Bishop Hooper looked so sternly upon him, and addressed him so severely at first, that the poor soul ran away, and could not get comfort until he had sought out another minister of a gentler aspect
Conscience - A "conscience void of offence" is to be sought and cultivated (Acts 24:16 ; Romans 9:1 ; 2 co 1:12 ; 1 Timothy 1:5,19 ; 1 Peter 3:21 )
Ministry: Best Men Needed For it - Amongst the Jesuits they have a rule, that they who are unapt for greater studies, shall study cases of Conscience
Arrow - In scripture, the arrows of God are the apprehensions of his wrath, which pierce and pain the Conscience
Worm - ...
Isaiah 66:24, (b) No doubt this is an emblem of the gnawing pains of Conscience which must be endured constantly and forever by those who are lost, and are in the lake of fire
Dispensation, Dispensationalism - Scofield says there are seven dispensations: of innocence, of Conscience, of government, of promise, of law, of grace, and of the kingdom
Hadadrimmon - It is quoted as an illustration of the great mourning there will be at Jerusalem when the sin of Judah is brought home to their Conscience for having demanded the death of their Messiah
Convict - ) To prove or find guilty of an offense or crime charged; to pronounce guilty, as by legal decision, or by one's Conscience
Zacchaeus - On being called a sinner, Zacchaeus said "The half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken anything from any man by false accusation, I restore fourfold," showing apparently that he had a tender Conscience and a generous heart; but the Lord declared that He had brought salvation to the house; for though a tax-gatherer, he was a son of Abraham
Money-Making: no Time For - ' Christian, have you time to serve your God and yet to give your whole soul to gaining wealth? The question is left for Conscience to answer
Interest in Christ - Pike's Cases of Conscience, p
Scruple - (Latin: scrupulus, diminutive of scrupus, a sharp stone) ...
To scruple, or to have a scruple, is to doubt about and to hestitate doing something on false grounds of Conscience
Casuistry - The doctrine and science of Conscience and its cases, with the rules and principles of resolving the same; drawn partly from natural reason or equity, and partly from the authority of Scripture, the canon law, councils, fathers, &c. It must be acknowledged that nice distinctions, metaphysical reasonings, and abstruse terms, cannot be of much service to the generality, because there are so few who can enter into them; yet, when we consider how much light is thrown upon a subject by the force of good reasoning, by viewing a case in all its bearings, by properly considering all the objections that may be made to it, and by examining it in every point of view; if we consider also how little some men are accustomed to think, and yet at the same time possess that tenderness of Conscience which makes them fearful of doing wrong; we must conclude that such works as these, when properly executed, may certainly be of considerable advantage. The reader may consult Ames's Power and Cases of Conscience; Bishop Taylor's Cuctor Dubitantium; Dr
Breast - Figuratively, the heart the Conscience the disposition of the mind the affections the seat of the affections and passions
Conviction - This conviction is produced by the Holy Spirit (John 16:8), the Gospel (Acts 2:37), the Conscience (Romans 2:15), and the Law (James 2:9)
Registers, Parochial - Five distinct books, in which the parish priest is required to record respectively the baptisms, confirmations, and marriages that take place in his parish (except marriages of Conscience, which are recorded in the secret archives of chancery), deaths among his people, and, as far as possible, the actual spiritual condition of his parish
Cain - The punishment inflicted upon him included an increase of physical wants and hardships, distress of Conscience, banishment from society, and loss of God's manifested presence and favor, Genesis 4:16
Tenderness - Scrupulousness caution extreme care or concern not to give or to commit offense as tenderness of Conscience
Conscience - Conscience . The sphere of Conscience is volition in all its manifestations. Let there be a possibility of choice, and Conscience appears. Appetites, so far as they can be controlled; incentives of action admitting preference; purposes and desires, all deeds and Institutions that embody and give effect to human choice; all relationships that allow variations in our attitude give scope for ethical investigation, and in them Conscience is directly or indirectly implicated. Conscience makes a valuation. The Conscience censures the selfishness of the Unjust Judge ( Luke 18:6 ), and assents to the injunction of considerateness and justice ( Philippians 2:4 ). ’ This feeling of oughtness which is the core of Conscience can be exhibited but not analyzed. ’ The peremptory claim made by Conscience is eminently reasonable, because it rests upon what we have admitted to be right. Education of Conscience . ‘An erring Conscience is a chimera’ (Kant). ‘Conscience intuitively recognizes moral law; it is supreme in its authority; it cannot be educated’ (Calderwood). The inference that it is God with whom we have to do makes it fitting for us to say that Conscience is man’s capacity to receive progressively a revelation of the righteousness of God. But is law the last word? May there not be mercy and an atonement? Cannot the accusing voices be hushed? May the man who admits the sentence of Conscience be pardoned? Conscience is a John the Baptist preparing the way for the Saviour, who has a reply to the question ‘What must I do to be saved?’...
W
Heart - " ...
The heart is also the seat of the Conscience (Romans 2:15 ). "Hardness of heart evidences itself by light views of sin; partial acknowledgment and confession of it; pride and conceit; ingratitude; unconcern about the word and ordinances of God; inattention to divine providences; stifling convictions of Conscience; shunning reproof; presumption, and general ignorance of divine things
Sin-Offering - As each individual, even the most private member of the congregation, as well as the congregation at large, and the high priest, was obliged, on being convicted by his Conscience of any particular sin, to come with a sin-offering, we see thus impressively disclosed the need in which every sinner stands of the salvation of Christ, and the necessity of making application to it as often as the guilt of sin renews itself upon his Conscience
Confess - In the Catholic Church, to acknowledge sins and faults to a priest to disclose the state of the Conscience to a priest, in private, with a view to absolution sometimes with the reciprocal pronoun. CONFESS', To make confession to disclose faults, or the state of the Conscience as, this man went to the priest to confess
Reprove - The heart or Conscience reproves us
Upright - Conscience rewards upright conduct with pleasure
Antitype - In the latter passage, the apostle, speaking of Noah's flood, and the deliverance only of eight persons in the ark from it, says, Baptism being an antitype to that, now saves us; not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good Conscience towards God, &c. The meaning is, that righteousness, or the answer of a good Conscience towards God, now saves us, by means of the resurrection of Christ, as formerly righteousness saved these eight persons by means of the ark during the flood
Examination of Conscience - In its commonest form this examination of Conscience is used as a preparation for confession and deals with actions distinctly sinful. Saint Ignatius in his Spiritual Exercises suggests five points for the examination of Conscience
Examination of Self - In its commonest form this examination of Conscience is used as a preparation for confession and deals with actions distinctly sinful. Saint Ignatius in his Spiritual Exercises suggests five points for the examination of Conscience
Casuistry - the doctrine and science of Conscience and its cases, with the rules and principles of resolving the same; drawn partly from natural reason, or equity, and partly from the authority of Scripture, the canon law, councils, fathers, &c. Although the morality of the Gospel is distinguished by its purity and by its elevation, it is necessarily exhibited in a general form; certain leading principles are laid down; but the application of these to the innumerable cases which occur in the actual intercourse of life, is left to the understanding and the Conscience of individuals. The manner, however, in which the Gospel inculcates the law of God, combined with other causes in leading to a species of moral discussion, which, pretending to ascertain in every case what ought to be practised, and thus to afford plain and safe directions to the Conscience, terminated in what has been denominated casuistry. The corruption of manners which was introduced into the church during the dark ages rendered casuistry very popular; and, accordingly, many who affected to be the most enlightened writers of their age, and perhaps really were so, tortured their understanding or their fancy in solving cases of Conscience, and often in polluting their own imaginations and those of others, by employing them on possible crimes, upon which, however unlikely was their occurrence in life, they were eager to pronounce a decision. The venerable Bishop Hall published a celebrated work, to which he gave the appellation of "Cases of Conscience Practically resolved;" and he introduces it with the following observations addressed to the reader: "Of all divinity, that part is most useful which determines cases of Conscience; and of all cases of Conscience, the practical are most necessary, as action is of more concernment than speculation; and of all practical cases, those which are of most common use are of so much greater necessity and benefit to be resolved, as the errors thereof are more universal, and therefore more prejudicial to the society of mankind
Shambles - The Apostle enjoins upon the believer to enter into no inquiry, so as to avoid the troubling of Conscience (contrast 1 Corinthians 10:28 )
Terror: of Convicted Consciences - ' ...
Thus when alarmed by an awakened Conscience men walk in fear from hour to hour, trembling lest a thought or word of sin should bring down upon them the impending wrath of God
Dictate - ) A statement delivered with authority; an order; a command; an authoritative rule, principle, or maxim; a prescription; as, listen to the dictates of your Conscience; the dictates of the gospel
Confession - The act of disclosing sins or faults to a priest the disburdening of the Conscience privately to a confessor sometimes called auricular confession
Judging - It is the right and duty of a moral being to judge of the goodness or badness of actions and qualities ; and Christianity, by exalting the moral standard and quickening the Conscience, makes ethical judgments more obligatory than before. As possessed of a Conscience, a man is called upon to view the world in the discriminating light of the moral law ( Romans 2:14 ff. As possessed of a Christian Conscience, a Christian man must test everything by the law of Christ ( Philippians 1:10 RVm Duty - Conscience (reason) must, in the premises, extend its inquiry beyond the conflicting laws to discover wherein duty lies
Betting - Though a bet be and often is, null and void in the eyes of the law, yet it may be a valid contract binding in Conscience if the object is honest and if it fulfills the following conditions: ...
(a) the parties must have the free disposal of what they stake and both must bind themselves to pay if they lose; ...
(b) both must understand the matter of the bet in the same sense; ...
(c) neither must have absolutely certain evidence of the truth of his contention which he does not reveal to the other
Jotham (1) - The parable, which is somewhat incongruous in parts, is intended as an appeal to the Conscience of the Shechemites; in case the appeal should turn out to be fruitless (which indeed proved to be the case), Jotham utters a curse ( Judges 9:20 ) against both Abimelech and the Shechemites; this curse is shortly afterwards fulfilled
Probity - "It consists in the habit of actions useful to society, and in the constant observance of the laws which justice and Conscience impose upon us
Confess - ) To make confession; to disclose sins or faults, or the state of the Conscience
Conviction: of Sin - Well do I remember when I felt the sentence of death within me, and trembled lest it should be executed; my Conscience was a minor hell, a fagot of the pile of Tophet
Damnation - is condemned both by his own Conscience, and the word of God, because he is far from being satisified that he is right in so doing
Peace - Spiritual peace is deliverance from sin, by which we were at enmity with God, Romans 5:1 ; the result of which is peace, in the Conscience, Hebrews 10:1-39
Saul - Being forsaken of God, without faith or Conscience he resorted to one with a familiar spirit, and there heard his doom
Flee - ...
To flee the question or from the question, in legislation, is said of a legislator who, when a question is to be put to the house, leaves his seat to avoid the dilemma of voting against his Conscience, or giving an unpopular vote
Candle - or the Conscience or understanding
Saul - Being forsaken of God, without faith or Conscience he resorted to one with a familiar spirit, and there heard his doom
Paul as a Believing Man - It was the overwhelming wind of God's wrath that rose with such fury upon Paul's Conscience out of Paul's past life. And that wrath of God would awaken in his Conscience, and would assault his faith, just as that same wrath of God assaults your faith and mine every day we live: if, that is to say, we live at all. From every city and village and house I had ever lived in, the wind blew and beat upon my Conscience. Not only is Paul's past sin all collected up and laid on Christ crucified; but almost more all Paul's present sinfulness comes up upon his Conscience only to find Paul dead to his Conscience, and to his sinfulness too, so truly and so completely is he crucified with Christ. As it is, though nobody will believe it, or make sense of how it can so be, your unspeakable sinfulness never gets the length even of darkening your mind or imprisoning your Conscience. And that is because your mind and your Conscience are both in the keeping of Christ crucified. As Luther's Conscience was. "The law is not the lord of my Conscience," protested that Paul-like, that lion-like, believer. "Jesus Christ is Almighty God, and He is the Lord of my Conscience. He is the Lord of the law also, both unbroken, broken, and repaired, and He keeps the law out of my Conscience by keeping my Conscience continually sprinkled with His own peace-speaking blood. A true believer's corruption of heart comes up into his consciousness not in order to produce there a bad Conscience, but in order to find the believer crucified already for all that corruption with Christ. But His blood, the blood of God,-It is surely able to speak peace in my Conscience and comfort in my heart: in my curse-filled Conscience, and in my hell-filled heart
the Disobedient Prophet - ...
Just as the man of God is setting out to go back to Judah with a hungry belly indeed, but with a good Conscience, we are taken by the hand and are led into the house of an old prophet who dwells at Bethel. '...
What is it that makes the decrepit old prophet of Bethel post at such a pace after the man of God who is on his way home to Judah? Has his Conscience at last been awakened? Have the tidings of his delighted sons filled the poor old time-server with bitter remorse for his fat table and for his dumb pulpit? Or, is it deadly envy and revenge at the man who has so stolen his sons' hearts that day till they are about to set off to Judah to go to school to this man of God? It is too late now for him to command his sons' reverence and love. ...
...
And then this-follow your Conscience to the end, let men and angels say what they will, A man is but a man: an angel is but an angel: and false prophets have come out into the world. But Conscience is more than Conscience. Conscience is God, Conscience is Immanuel, God in us. My Conscience, accordingly, is more to me than all prophets and apostles and preachers, and very angels themselves. If that had been Paul sitting under that oak, and had the old Bethelite deceiver come riding on his ass, with his certificate of office, and with his story about an angel to Paul, we have Paul's answer to him in the Galatians: 'If an angel from heaven bids me go against God in my Conscience, let him be accursed. 'Conscience,' says Sanderson, 'is a fast friend, and a fierce foe. ' 'I take my ears,' said King Charles, 'to other preachers; but I take my Conscience to Mr. ' And go you to the preacher who speaks closest to your Conscience, whatever denomination he preaches in, and then hold fast by your enlightened and awakened Conscience against men and devils. ...
At the same time, to be slain by a lion on the way home was surely much too sharp a punishment for taking one's supper with a prophet and an angel; uneasy Conscience and all. Our office quickens our Conscience; it makes the law cut deeper and deeper into our hearts every day; and it compels us to a public and private life we would otherwise have escaped
Stumble - 1: προσκόπτω (Strong's #4350 — Verb — proskopto — pros-kop'-to ) "to strike against," is used of "stumbling," (a) physically, John 11:9,10 ; (b) metaphorically, (1) of Israel in regard to Christ, whose Person, teaching, and atoning Death, and the Gospel relating thereto, were contrary to all their ideas as to the means of righteousness before God, Romans 9:32 ; 1 Peter 2:8 ; (2) of a brother in the Lord in acting against the dictates of his Conscience, Romans 14:21
Alexander - ...
...
A coppersmith who, with Hymenaeus and others, promulgated certain heresies regarding the resurrection (1 Timothy 1:19 ; 2 Timothy 4:14 ), and made shipwreck of faith and of a good Conscience
Blasphemy - ...
When the Jewish rulers, who had such numerous proofs of Jesus' Messiahship, shut their hearts against conviction, and at last stifled Conscience and the light so utterly as to attribute His miracles of love, as the casting out of unclean spirits, to the help of the prince of demons, Christ pronounced that they were either committing or on the verge of committing the sin against the Holy Spirit which is forgiven neither in this world nor in the world to come, though all sin against the Son of man can be forgiven (Matthew 12:31, etc. ...
None can now commit formally the same sin of attributing Jesus' miracles against Satan's kingdom to Satan's help, so evident a self contradiction that nothing short of a seared Conscience, and a hardened determination to resist every spiritual impression and even malign the Spirit's work before other men, could have given birth to such a sin. He who has committed it is so given over to a reprobate mind as to have no pang of Conscience about it, and the very fear of anyone that he has committed it is proof positive that he has not, for if he had he would have been "past feeling" (Hebrews 6:4-6; 1 John 5:16)
Disestablishment of the Anglican Church - As such it received the support, through taxation, of British subjects regardless of creed; and many, in order to exercise freedom of Conscience, were forced to support it in addition to the Church of their convictions
James ii - In 1687 he issued the Declaration of Indulgence by which all laws against all classes of nonconformists were suspended and liberty of Conscience inaugurated
Excuses - ' Thus each had satisfied his Conscience, because of some point beyond which he had not gone
Candle - Image of Conscience, "the candle of the Lord, searching the inward man" (Proverbs 20:27)
Penitentiary - ) An office of the papal court which examines cases of Conscience, confession, absolution from vows, etc
Beast - the ignorance of man, Psalm 73:22 ; and for his acting as an irrational creature, that is, without Conscience before God
Antinomies - and yet of gladness; teaches a morality which is austere and yet joyful
appears the opponent and yet the support of the State; its rival and yet its ally
upholds the equality of men and yet the inequality of property and power
is full of scandals and yet all holy; proclaims a law at once difficult and yet easy
upholds and yet opposes religious freedom and liberty of Conscience
is one and yet Christendom has ever been divided
is ever the same and yet ever changing
is ever being defeated and yet ever victorious
Anglican Church, Disestablishment of the - As such it received the support, through taxation, of British subjects regardless of creed; and many, in order to exercise freedom of Conscience, were forced to support it in addition to the Church of their convictions
Hornet - (See Deuteronomy 7:20; Joshua 24:12) But some, beside the history of the fact itself, in the hornets the Lord literally and truly sent to drive out before Israel their enemies, take the expression also in a figurative sense, and consider hornets from the Lord as the buzzing and stinging effects of a guilty Conscience
Law - Sometimes Paul uses the word "law" (without the article) in a wider sense—of principle, rule of moral conduct—and speaks of the heathen as having such a law written on their Conscience or being a law to themselves
Sacred Penitentiaria - It also deals with questions of Conscience submitted to the judgment of the Holy See
Reproach - A man's Conscience will reproach him for a criminal, mean or unworthy action
Imagination - The word suggests the contemplation of actions as a result of the verdict of Conscience
Warnings - ' The lion thus wounded rushed, away in great fear, and on a fox exhorting him to be of good courage, and not to run away at the first attack: 'You counsel me in vain, for if he sends so fearful a messenger, how shall I abide the attack of the man himself?' ...
If the warning admonitions of God's ministers fill the Conscience with terror, what must it be to face the Lord himself? If one bolt of judgment bring a man into a cold sweat, what will it be to stand before an angry God in the last great day? ...
...
Grace - Common grace, if it may be so called, is what all men have; as the light of nature and reason, convictions of Conscience, &c. ; Pike and Hayward's Cases of Conscience; Saurin on 1 Corinthians 9:26-27
Conclude - The world will conclude I had a guilty Conscience. The world will conclude that I ahd a guilty Conscience--that is here the object, referring to the subsequent clause of the sentence
Superstition - Or else, the irresistible force of his inward nature impels man to recognize that higher power from which he would fain free himself entirely, and to seek that connection with it which he cannot but feel needful to his comfort; but, inasmuch as he is without any real inward sympathy of disposition with the Divinity, and wants a true sense of holiness, the Divinity appears to his darkened religious Conscience only under the form of power and arbitrary rule. His Conscience paints to him this power as an angry and avenging power. But there is also another kind of superstition, which makes it easy for man, by certain outward observances, to silence his Conscience under all kinds of sin, and which therefore serves as a welcome support to it
Revelation - ...
Revelation through nature and Conscience...
God has given humankind a general revelation of himself through nature. This unwritten standard, which makes possible the operation of the human Conscience, is sometimes called ‘natural law’ (Galatians 1:11-12; see Conscience). ...
The revelation through Conscience, like the revelation through nature, gives people some understanding of God, but it does not give them the detailed knowledge that is necessary for salvation
Quiet - ) Not excited or anxious; calm; peaceful; placid; settled; as, a quiet life; a quiet Conscience
Evil - ) Moral badness, or the deviation of a moral being from the principles of virtue imposed by Conscience, or by the will of the Supreme Being, or by the principles of a lawful human authority; disposition to do wrong; moral offence; wickedness; depravity
Corban - Thus they violated a precept of the moral law, through a superstitious devotion to Pharisaic observances, and the wretched casuistry by which they were made binding upon the Conscience
Evil - ) Moral badness, or the deviation of a moral being from the principles of virtue imposed by Conscience, or by the will of the Supreme Being, or by the principles of a lawful human authority; disposition to do wrong; moral offence; wickedness; depravity
Religion - Religion is false if, when claiming to be revealed, it is unable to show a divine guarantee, or when its dogmas and practises sin against right reason and Conscience
Sentence - The Church resorts to penalties latae sententiae simply because her field of action embraces the Conscience of man as well as his external life
Sanction - Experience proves their necessity and that the sanctions of this life such as remorse of Conscience, sufferings, social and legal penalties, etc
General Clergy Relief Fund - The Conscience of the Church makes herfeel obligated, like the national government, to take care of herfaithful servants in their old age and disability, and also toprovide for the care of the widows and orphans of deceasedclergymen
Heart - The monitions of the Conscience are said to proceed from the heart ( Job 27:6 ), and the counterpart of the NT expression ‘branded in their own Conscience as with a hot iron’ ( 1 Timothy 4:2 RV Mortal Sin - It tarnishes the soul, and causes remorse of Conscience, an inclination to evil, darkening of the intellect, weakening of the will
Self: Watchfulness Over - Their counting-house, or their Conscience, which is to be scrupulously watched, and no false reckonings allowed, lest we deceive our own souls
Scripture - As in a nation 'the records' are referred to as authority, so in the church, it is 'the scriptures' that bind the Conscience, and should be an end of all controversy
Liberty - The Conscience set free from guilt, as when the Lord said to several, "Thy sins be forgiven thee: go in peace
Damn - Paul here speaks; but probably the true sense is the bringing guilt upon the Conscience, and thereby a liability, without remission, to future judgment
Sin, Mortal - It tarnishes the soul, and causes remorse of Conscience, an inclination to evil, darkening of the intellect, weakening of the will
Peace - Freedom from agitation or disturbance by the passions, as from fear, terror, anger, anxiety or the like quietness of mind tranquillity calmness quiet of Conscience
Will of God - The question is this: "How may a person who is desirous of following the dictates of Providence in every respect, know the mind and will of God in any particular circumstance, whether temporal or spiritual? Now, in order to come at the knowledge of that which is proper and needful for us to be acquainted with, we are taught by prudence and Conscience to make use of, ...
1. " Pike and Hayward's Cases of Conscience, p
Levit'Icus - We may not always be able to say what the exact relation is between the type and the antitype; but we cannot read the Epistle to the Hebrews and not acknowledge that the Levitical priests "served the pattern and type of heavenly things;" that the sacrifices of the law pointed to and found their interpretation in the Lamb of God; that the ordinances of outward purification signified the true inner cleansing of the heart and Conscience from dead works to serve the living God
Godliness - "It supposes knowledge, veneration, affection, dependence, submission, gratitude, and obedience; or it may be reduced to these four ideas; knowledge in the mind, by which it is distinguished from the visions of the superstitious; rectitude in the Conscience, that distinguishes it from hypocrisy; sacrifice in the life, or renunciation of the world, by which it is distinguished from the unmeaning obedience of him who goes as a happy constitution leads him; and, lastly, zeal in the heart, which differs from the languishing emotions of the lukewarm
Moral - Moral sense, that whereby we perceive what is good, virtuous, and beautiful in actions, manners, and characters; or it is a kind of satisfaction in the mind arising from the contemplation of those actions of rational agents which we call good or virtuous: some call this natural Conscience, others intuitive perception of right and wrong, &c
Witness - He it is that convinceth the heart of sin, and proves in the Conscience the absolute necessity of Christ
Experience - , and as ‘the seal’ or ‘witness (testimony) of the Holy Spirit,’ ‘of our Conscience,’ etc
Mene - Doth not every day an hand-writing, even the solemn word of God, appear on the wall of every sinner's Conscience? And are not the awful judgments threatened thereon fully executed? Who shall describe the trembling loins of sinners, and the paleness of soul, which seizeth them in the dying hour, on entering eternity?...
Rhode Island - Although the Rhode Island charter of 1663 supposedly guaranteed freedom of Conscience, a book of laws published in 1719 expressly excepted Catholics from holding office
Impute - The law of Conscience existed, but that is not in view in the passage, which deals with the fact of external commandments given by God
Rellyanists - They are not observers of ordinances, such as water-baptism and the sacrament; professing to believe only in one baptism, which they call an immersion of the mind or Conscience into truth by the teaching of the Spirit of God; and by the same Spirit they are enabled to feed on Christ as the bread of life, professing that in and with Jesus they possess all things. In general they appear to believe that there will be a resurrection to life, and a resurrection to condemnation; that believers only will be among the former, who as first fruits, and kings and priests, will have part in the first resurrection, and shall reign with Christ in his kingdom of the millennium; that unbelievers who are after raised, must wait the manifestation of the Saviour of the world, under that condemnation of Conscience which a mind in darkness and wrath must necessarily feel; that believers, called kings and priests, will be made the medium of communication to their condemned brethren; and like Joseph to his brethren, though he spoke roughly to them, in reality overflowed with affection and tenderness; that ultimately every knee shall bow, and every tongue confess that in the Lord they have righteousness and strength; and thus every enemy shall be subdued to the kingdom and glory of the Great Mediator
Oath - Other expressions such as "By my Conscience" or "As God lives" are; at most doubtful
Freedom of Worship - However, the Catholic Church admits the duty of the individual to follow his own Conscience, and it would be unjust to force an external compliance that would be merely hypocritical
Law - It is generally designated by the term Conscience, or the capacity of being influenced by the moral relations of things
Cock - The first crowing being fainter in the distance did not awaken his slumbering Conscience; but the second with its loud sound was the crowing which alone is recorded by Matthew (Matthew 26:34), Luke (Luke 22:34), and John (John 13:38), being that which roused him to remember bitterly his Lord's neglected warning
Heart (Broken): Its Prevalence With God - The young man being sorely troubled in his Conscience, said to those about him, 'I am dying, take me from my bed, and let me lie in sackcloth and ashes, in token of my sorrow for my ingratitude to my father
Worship, Freedom of - However, the Catholic Church admits the duty of the individual to follow his own Conscience, and it would be unjust to force an external compliance that would be merely hypocritical
Hypocrisy - Christians can learn to overcome it through practising genuine love and developing a sensitive Conscience (Romans 12:9; Romans 14:13; 1 Timothy 1:5)
Modernism - Modernists were clamoring for emancipation from ecclesiastical authority, for the emancipation of science, of the state, of Conscience, without particularizing wherein authority was tyrannical, wherein science, state, or Conscience were enthralled
Temptation - of his Sermons; Pike and Hayward's Cases of Conscience; and Bishop Porteus's Sermons, ser
Worm - ) Mark 9:44; Mark 9:46; Mark 9:48, "THEIR worm" is the gnawing self reproach of Conscience, ever continuing and unavailing remorse
Inner Man - It is between the law which passion blindly follows, and that to which ‘the mind’ or the informed Conscience yields a delighted because a reasoned obedience (cf
Praise - When passing its natural line, it becomes the ruling spring of conduct; when the regard which we pay to the opinions of men encroaches on that reverence which we owe to the voice of Conscience and the sense of duty; the love of praise, having then gone out of its proper place, instead of improving, corrupts; and instead of elevating, debases our nature
Saint Barnabas Society, the - In many instances the society is instrumental in finding Catholic friends for those who by heroically following the call of Conscience have forfeited former friendships, one of the trials of most converts; it helps to educate the children of married convert clergymen, and arranges temporary hospitality for whole families
Sharpen - The abuse of wealth and greatness may hereafter sharpen the sting of Conscience
Heifer - ’ To the awakened Conscience ‘sin was death, and had wrought death, and the dead body as well as the spiritually dead soul were the evidence of its sway’; while cedar-wood, hyssop, and scarlet may ultimately have been regarded-though this is more doubtful-as ‘the symbols of imperishable existence, freedom from corruption, and fulness of life’ (A. If (a particle which posits a fact, and scarcely insinuates a doubt) the blood of goats and bulls and the ashes of a heifer cleanse the flesh, defiled by contact with death, much more does the life-blood of the Messiah cleanse the Conscience from dead works
Heart - The Conscience, for instance, is associated with the heart. In fact, the Hebrew language had no word for Conscience, so the word heart was often used to express this concept: “my heart shall not reproach me so long as I live” (Job 27:6 ). The Revised Standard Version translates the word for “heart” as “conscience” in 1 Samuel 25:31 (RSV). For instance, the work of the law is “written in their hearts,” and Conscience is the proof of this (Romans 2:15 )
Deceit, Deception, Guile - ...
‘There is, I believe,’ says Bishop Gore, ‘nothing to which in our time attention needs to be called more than to the fact that Conscience is only a faculty for knowing God and His will. ‘I doubt whether most of those who have been formed by the faith and traditions of the Evangelical movement are sufficiently impressed by the necessity of educating the Conscience. The faculty of Conscience requires a great deal of education if we are to distinguish between the right and the wrong in all the details of life’ (The Evangelical Revival, p. Maurice, The Conscience and Social Morality; J
Nathan - It was Nathan who had to condemn David's conduct with respect to Bathsheba and her husband; he delicately brought the sin home to his Conscience by means of a suited parable
Sensation - The highest, the noblest, and the most durable pleasure is that of doing well; and the most bitter and painful sentiment, the anguish and remorse of a guilty Conscience
Images, Veneration of - This process can be followed in the practise of the Christian Conscience from the earliest times
Murder - It is remarkable that God often gives up murderers to the terrors of a guilty Conscience, Genesis 4:13 ; Genesis 4:15 ; Jonah 4:1
Illuminati (2) - They said further, that none of the doctors of the church knew any thing of religion; that Paul and Peter were well-meaning men, but knew nothing of devotion; that the whole church lay in darkness and unbelief; that every one was at liberty to follow the suggestions of his Conscience; that God regarded nothing but himself; and that within ten years their doctrine would be received all over the world; then there would be no more occasion for priests, monks, and such other religious distinctions
Veneration of Images - This process can be followed in the practise of the Christian Conscience from the earliest times
Request - A court of Conscience for the recovery of small debts, held by two aldermen and four commoners, who try causes by the oath of parties and of other witnesses
Revive - Sin revives, when the Conscience is awakened by a conviction of guilt
Solomon's Song - Its majestic style, its power on men's Conscience to promote holiness and purity the harmony of its language with that of Christ's parables and the books of Revelation, the sincerity of the bride in acknowledging her faults, and its general reception by the Jewish and Christian church, sufficiently prove it inspired of God. To such as read it with a carnal and especially with a wanton mind, it is the savor of death unto death, as the mind and Conscience of such are defiled; but to such as have experienced much fellowship with Christ, and read it with a heavenly and spiritual temper of mind, it will be the savor of life unto life
Catholic Attitude Toward Prohibition - There can be no doubt that reasonable laws enacted by the state bind in Conscience, but to be reasonable a law should not infringe upon the liberty of the individual, and it should be directed to the good of the individual
Excuse - , "to speak oneself off," hence "to plead for oneself," and so, in general, (a) "to defend," as before a tribunal; in Romans 2:15 , RV, "excusing them," means one "excusing" others (not themselves); the preceding phrase "one with another" signifies one person with another, not one thought with another; it may be paraphrased, "their thoughts with one another, condemning or else excusing one another;" Conscience provides a moral standard by which men judge one another; (b) "to excuse" oneself, 2 Corinthians 12:19 ; cp
Happiness - Nor is it to be found in greatness, rank, or elevated stations, as matter of fact abundantly testifies; but happiness consists in the enjoyment of the divine favour, a good Conscience, and uniform conduct
Hearing: For Others - The want of a self-applying Conscience causes much of the best of preaching to fall like rain upon a rock, from which it soon runs off; or if a little is caught in a hollow, it only stagnates, and then dries away, leaving no blessing behind
Self-Righteousness: Destroyed by Conviction of Sin - Slavery in mines where the sun never shines must be preferable to the miseries of a soul goaded by an awakened Conscience to seek salvation by its own merits
Heifer, Red - The Holy Spirit applies, by the word, the truth of the condemnation of sin in the cross of Christ to the heart and Conscience, to purify the believer, without applying the blood again
Peace - Hence the believer is justified by faith, and has peace (peace of Conscience) with God through the Lord Jesus Christ
Liberty - In the sense of freedom of Conscience. The development of such a notion naturally followed upon the development of the notion of Conscience itself, which in turn was bound up with the growing sense of human individuality and personal responsibility. So far from morality consisting simply in compliance with commands embodying the will of the community of which the man is a part (which commands may also be conceived as Divinely originated), when man realizes his individual responsibility to God, Conscience emerges, and, criticizing those very commands, may disapprove as well as approve, whilst it may also find a whole area of moral interests which the injunctions of external authority do not touch and in which it must decide for itself. ...
To the rise of Christianity we very specially owe an advanced conception of Conscience and its corollary, the claim to freedom to act in accord with the behests of Conscience. And the clash between the new order and the old necessarily brought with it abundant scope for the outcrop of cases of Conscience such as St. ...
Freedom of this kind can be properly claimed and used only by the conscientious man-the man who is above all else concerned for harmony between the laws and customs he is called to observe and the inward regulative principle, and who departs from such laws only when an enlightened Conscience imperatively demands it
Edification, Edify, Edifying - In 1 Corinthians 8:10 , where it is translated "emboldened," the Apostle uses it with pathetic irony, of the action of a brother in "building up" his brother who had a weak Conscience, causing him to compromise his scruples; "strengthened," or "confirmed," would be suitable renderings
Fortitude - The noble cause in which the Christian is engaged; the glorious Master whom he serves; the provision that is made for his security; the illustrious examples set before him; the approbation of a good Conscience; and the grand prospect he has in view, are all powerful motives to the exercise of this grace
Habits: Destructive Power of - ' ...
This heart-rending picture is a terribly accurate representation of a man with a Conscience alarmed by remorse, struggling with his sinful habits, but finding them too strong for him
Sprinkle, Sprinkling - Hebrews 9:22 ) under Divine judgment upon sin (the voluntary act to be distinguished from that which took place after His death in the piercing of His side); so again in Hebrews 9:19,21 (see B); in Hebrews 10:22 , Passive Voice, of the purging (on the ground of the same efficacy) of the hearts of believers from an evil Conscience
Hallowed - The child of God beseeches Him to manifest with effect His holy character, in the Conscience of men, so that all impure idolatry, gross or refined, as well as all formal Pharisaism, may be completely removed, and that every human being may unite with the seraphim in the anthem of adoration, “Holy, Holy, Holy
Candle - ...
Proverbs 20:27 (a) This is probably man's spirit enlightened by GOD and called by men "an enlightened Conscience
Jealousy, - The woman was required to drink bitter water, composed of 'holy water,' in which was placed dust from the floor of the tabernacle (type of the Holy Spirit applying what death is, as God's judgement of sin, by the word to the Conscience)
Perfect - " There are various applications of the term which can be gathered from the context of each occurrence, but in general it may be said to have reference either to the purging of Conscience, which is indispensable to the service of God, or to intelligence of a true standard (dead and risen with Christ) as a necessity to testimony for Christ here
Liberty - Liberty of Conscience is freedom from restraint in our choice of, and judgment about matters of religion
Buy - To buy off, to influence to compliance to cause to bend or yield by some consideration, as to buy off Conscience to detach by a consideration given, as to buy off one from a party
Hell - The misery of hell will consist in the privation of the vision and love of God, exclusion from every source of happiness, perpetual sin, remorse of Conscience in view of the past, malevolent passions, the sense of the just anger of God, and all other sufferings of body and soul which in the nature of things are the natural results of sin, or which the law of God requires as penal inflictions
Testimony - Evidence suggested to the mind as the testimony of Conscience
Void - Free clear as a Conscience void of offense
Heart - Conscience, or sense of good or Every man's heart and Conscience--doth either like or disallow it
Error - ‘We so often talk as if we were only obliged to “follow our Conscience”; as if no one could lay anything to our charge unless we were acting against the present voice of Conscience. We are also obliged to enlighten our Conscience and keep it enlightened. He was like one who says that he must follow his Conscience, but who does not continually seek to enlighten his Conscience by confronting it with higher aspects of truth
Hymenaeus - "Having put away a good Conscience," and so "concerning faith having made shipwreck" (for when one's faith does not better his morals, his moral defects will corrupt his faith), therefore "delivered (by Paul) to Satan to learn not to blaspheme" (1 Timothy 1:20)
Doeg - The cruel sycophancy of Doeg was so well known to David that he said unto Abiathar, the only survivor of the slaughter, "I knew it that day, when Doeg the Edomite was there, that he would surely tell Saul;" therefore with characteristic sensitiveness of Conscience David adds, "I have occasioned the death of all the persons of thy father's house
Indolence - The Conscience must be kept awake and intelligent (Matthew 5:23-24)
Naaman - He now had an exercised Conscience, and, fearing the consequences of making a stand against the world, he asked that Jehovah might pardon him when as a servant he went into the idol's temple with his master
Honor - ) A nice sense of what is right, just, and true, with course of life correspondent thereto; strict conformity to the duty imposed by Conscience, position, or privilege
Saul - There is no character in history more pitiable than this wretched king, swayed by evil impulse, tormented by his own Conscience, powerless as it seemed for everything but mischief
Sacramental Confession - Since the priest's juridical office demands that he have a complete knowledge of the penitent's Conscience, the latter should confess both the nature and the number of his mortal sins
Holy Day - The reference here to the observance of ‘days’ is connected with the question of the responsibility of the strong for the Conscience of the weak (Romans 14:1). They are the ‘scrupulous’ in Conscience, who, like the Galatians, are afraid to be guided except by definite legal enactments. He is one whose Conscience has to be considered, but within limits, as the rebuke to his censoriousness in Romans 14:4 shows. By indifference to external observances, a ‘free’ Christian may injure the Conscience of another. The authority of the Church is neither more nor less than the authority of Jesus, interpreted by the individual Conscience, in close Christian relationship to those who constitute the Church a body of believers. It is only by ‘being fully assured in our own mind,’ by contracting the habit of deciding for ourselves in such matters, and at the same time by having regard to the mind of Christ, as expressed in the constraint of Christian brotherhood, that true Christian freedom of Conscience will be developed, and that fear, which so often manifests itself in scrupulosity, obscurantism, and legalism, will be cast out
Exercise - ...
A — 2: ἀσκέω (Strong's #778 — Verb — askeo — as-keh'-o ) signifies "to form by art, to adorn, to work up raw material with skill;" hence, in general, "to take pains, endeavor, exercise by training or discipline," with a view to a Conscience void of offense, Acts 24:16
Equity - This excellent precept carries greater evidence to the Conscience, and a stronger degree of conviction in it, than any other rule of moral virtue
Charity: Spies Out the Good Points in All - It gave me pain in my Conscience, for it seemed thenceforward so easy and so vulgar to say satirical things, and so much nobler to be benign and merciful; and I took the lesson so home that I was in great danger of falling into the opposite extreme: of seeking the beautiful even in the midst of the corrupt and the repulsive
Judgment--Comparable to Balances - It would be well if the scales of Conscience would turn even at the finest dust, but how rarely is this the case! False weights and balances are an abomination unto the Lord, yet many use them, they weigh their neighbours so as to underestimate them, and they use balances far too favourable to themselves; they give the Lord a portion sadly too small, and to their own pleasures a dowry much too great
Bind - : To oblige, restrain, or hold, by authority, law, duty, promise, vow, affection, or other moral tie; as, to bind the Conscience; to bind by kindness; bound by affection; commerce binds nations to each other
Guile - His own Conscience was clear; his ‘guile’ as a soul-winner was not only innocent but praiseworthy
Mistakes: Our Aptness to Make - ours! We meant to cheer a troubled Conscience and instead thereof we wounded it yet more
Joy - A moral joy, which is a self-approbation, or that which arises from the performance of any good actions; this is called peace, or serenity of Conscience: if the action be honourable, and the joy rise high, it may be called glory
Miser - Sometimes it is Conscience, which convinces him, good man, that he hath already exceeded in compassion and alms-giving, and done too much
Offend - To shock to wound as, to offend the Conscience
Thought - Inward reasoning the workings of Conscience
Good Works - Nevertheless, Christians must carry out their good works not in a hard or legalistic spirit, but in an attitude of genuine love for others and with a clear Conscience
Uriah - ...
David's attempt to hide his sin by bringing Uriah home to his wife from the war with Ammon was foiled by Uriah's right sentiment as a soldier and chivalrous devotion to Israel and to God: "the ark and Israel and Judah abide in tents, and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are encamped in the open fields; shall I then go into mine house to eat, drink, and lie with my wife?" This answer was well fitted to pierce David's Conscience, but desire of concealment at all costs urged David on. Happily Uriah fell unconscious of his wife's dishonour; she "mourned" his death with the usual tokens of grief, but apparently with no sense of shame or remorse; her child's death probably first awakened her Conscience
Authority - God forbids anarchy and is at the back of every state, binding men in Conscience to observe the laws of the state within its competence "that every soul be subject to Higher Power for there is no power but from God and those that are ordained of God. The state, however, is not to be obeyed as against God, neither can a state command anything and everything; thus to dictate to Conscience, to interfere with man's eternal destiny, or his relation with his Maker, to formulate civillaws in conflict with the moral law, to deny the parents' right in the education of the child, and to prevent religious instruction are beyond the power of the state
Liberalism - The principles of the French Revolution form the basis of modern liberalism, which advocates absolute freedom of thought, religion, Conscience, speech, press, and politics, thus denying any authority derived from God
God - Conscience and human history testify that "verily there is a God that judgeth in the earth
Copper - Seth's race was less distinguished for advancement in arts and luxuries than Cain's race, which was wise in their generation; but the truest civilization is that which develops man's moral and highest nature; in this respect Seth's descendants were far superior, walking in recognition of Conscience and of the providence and grace of God
New Order - His atonement is able to "cleanse our Consciences from Acts that lead to death, so that we may serve the living God" (v. The old sacrificial system was defective precisely because it was not "able to clear the Conscience of the worshiper" (v
Abstinence - ...
Paul lays down the principle that Christians should act each according to his Conscience in the matter, but not, even in the exercise of Christian liberty, so as to cast a stumbling-block before weaker brethren
Pontius Pilate - His washing his hands before the multitude, and saying, "I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it," is evidence that he had a bad Conscience, he senselessly condemned himself by his own lips
Philosophy - The Greek manifold gropings after truth (Acts 17:27) and the failure of even the divine law of Moses to appease Conscience and give peace were the appointed preparation for the Christian scheme, which secures both to the believer
Law - ) In morals: The will of God as the rule for the disposition and conduct of all responsible beings toward him and toward each other; a rule of living, conformable to righteousness; the rule of action as obligatory on the Conscience or moral nature
Soul - Scripture ascribes to man alone understanding, Conscience, the knowledge of God, wisdom, immortality, and the hope of future everlasting happiness
Transgress, Transgression - Conscience thus had a standard external to itself; by the Law men are taught their inability to yield complete obedience to God, that thereby they may become convinced of their need of a Savior; in Romans 2:23 , RV, "transgression (of the Law)," AV, "breaking (the Law);" Hebrews 2:2 ; 9:15
Heart - God sees the inner condition and judges the person accordingly (1 Samuel 16:7; Psalms 44:21; Matthew 5:8; Revelation 2:23; see also Conscience)
Dispensation - Conscience (Genesis 3:23 ) This is the awakening of human Conscience and the expulsion from the garden
Clean, Unclean, Common - These details of conduct were left to the reason and the Conscience. Paul recognizes the value of forms for the human spirit, but he subordinates them to the Conscience
Authority in Religion - Its prescriptions, while mediated, at least so far as the knowledge of them goes, through the understanding, terminate upon the Conscience and the will. He represents God as in the most absolute sense ‘Lord of the Conscience. Indeed, He virtually puts it upon the same plane for authority as the primary intuition and verdict of Conscience, namely, that ‘it is lawful to do good—on the Sabbath day’ (Matthew 12:12). The authority conferred in these passages is, indeed, large and significant, but none of them necessarily implies that the Apostles were to be organs through whom God would make substantive additions to the commands laid upon the human Conscience. At the same time, intermingled with His judicial expositions of the law of God, we hear Him lay His own commands upon the Conscience. And, finally, here we must not overlook Matthew 28:18 b ‘All authority is given to me in heaven and on earth,’ which certainly constitutes a claim comprehensive enough to include the authority to prescribe laws to the Conscience. For not only does our Lord represent God as ‘Lord of the Conscience,’ but with equal emphasis and great explicitness He teaches that ‘God alone is Lord of the Conscience, and hath left it free from the doctrines and commandments of men which are in anything contrary to His word, or beside it in matters of’ religious truth and duty. —As legislative authority has particularly to do with duty, so judicial authority has particularly to do with truth: the former prescribes what one is to do or to be; the latter, what he is to believe: the former creates and defines relation and obligations; the latter declares and interprets them: the former is mainly concerned with the Conscience; the latter, with the understanding. For, in this case, the same character that guarantees to the Conscience the righteousness of the relation or obligation created by the will of the lawgiver, guarantees also to the understanding the truth of the finding of the judge. Not only did He consent, like any other man of His day, to plead at the bar of the ecclesiastical and civil authorities, but, while He always spake as one having authority, He never failed to submit His credentials along with His claims at the bar of the individual reason and Conscience
Iron - The imagery includes other aspects of ironworking: the furnace was a symbol of oppression (1 Kings 8:51 ), and the cauterizing effect of hot iron was used by Paul to describe those with no Conscience (1 Timothy 4:2 )
Iron - The imagery includes other aspects of ironworking: the furnace was a symbol of oppression (1 Kings 8:51 ), and the cauterizing effect of hot iron was used by Paul to describe those with no Conscience (1 Timothy 4:2 )
Gehazi - Gehazi presumptuously stifled Conscience with the plea that a "Syrian" pagan ought not to have been" spared," as his master had "spared this Naaman," and even dared to invoke Jehovah's name, as though his obtaining money by false pretenses from him would be a meritorious act: "as the Lord liveth, I will take somewhat of him
Prophesyings - The archbishop, however, instead of obeying the commands of his royal mistress, thought that she had made some infringement upon his office, and wrote the queen a long and earnest letter, declaring that his Conscience would not suffer him to comply with her commands
Flax - The believer is the lamp (Greek, Matthew 5:15; John 5:35), his Conscience enlightened by the Holy Spirit is the wick; "smoking "means dimly burning, smoldering, the flame not extinct; "bruised" in himself, but having some spark lighted from above, Christ will supply such a one with grace as with oil, and will not stifle the little flame
Exercise - Herein do I exercise myself, to have always a Conscience void of offense towards God and men
Idleness - Having once tainted the soul, it leaves no part of it sound; and at the same time gives not those alarms to Conscience which the eruptions of bolder and fiercer emotions often occasion
Armenia - More tolerant, indeed, than the Saracens, liberty of Conscience was still not to be purchased of them but by great sacrifices, which for three centuries the Armenians have patiently endured, and exhibit to the world an honourable and solitary instance of a successful national opposition of Christianity to Mohammedanism
Heart - Is used for the soul, and all the powers thereof; as the understanding , Conscience, will, affections, and memory. This state evidences itself by light views of the evil of sin; partial acknowledgment and confession of it; frequent commission of it; pride and conceit: ingratitude; unconcern about the word and ordinances of God; inattention to divine providences; stifling convictions of Conscience; shunning reproof; presumption, and general ignorance of divine things
Strong And Weak - ...
"Weak" and "strong" serve as operative terms that combine such concepts as the kingdom of God, knowledge, love, Conscience, freedom, and judgment. Those who have an accurate understanding of God and his kingdom and are able to actualize their Christian freedom without a conflict in Conscience are "strong. Their scrupulosity oversensitizes their Consciences. Rather, they should be fully convinced in their own minds and not do anything that conflicts with their Consciences (14:5,14)
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - " ( Matthew 27:3-10 ) He saw his sin in a new light, and "his Conscience bounded into fury. " (Acts 1:25 ) "A guilty Conscience must find neither hell or pardon
Offence - πρόσκομμα is found only in Romans 14:20, signifying ‘something to strike against’: a man runs, as it were, against an obstacle, and does wrong when he eats contrary to the dictates of his Conscience. As an adjective, ἀπρόσκοπος is used in Acts 24:16 with respect to the Conscience, also in 1 Corinthians 10:32 and in Philippians 1:10 as giving no occasion of stumbling. The casuistry concerning meats offered to idols should involve the consideration of the hyper-sensitive Consciences of the weaker brethren, who are not to be offended or made to stumble by those who are less scrupulous (Romans 14; Romans 15:1-3)
Self-Examination - —Every man’s Conscience bears witness to the reasonableness and necessity of self-examination. The mission of the ancient prophet, as distinct from that of the priest, was to apply a constant spur to the Consciences of men. But how shall a man know himself unless he brings his thoughts, his passions, his conduct, into strict review, and scrutinizes them in the ligh of Conscience and duty? What a large place, again, did this work of self-examination fill in the lives of serious-minded men and women of earlier and simpler times than ours. ‘He that does not frequently search his Conscience,’ he remarks, ‘is a house without a window
Presumption - Deuteronomy 1:13 ; inattention to the remonstrances of Conscience, Acts 7:51 ; opposition to the dispensations of Providence, 2 Chronicles 28:22 ; and repeated commission of the same sin, Psalms 78:17
Soul - It is also argued from the consent of all nations; the consciousness that men have of sinning; the sting of Conscience; the justice and providence of God
Boar - Probably they refrained themselves from the flesh, and compromised between Conscience and covetousness by selling them to their neighbors the Gentiles
Orthodoxy - This is laying a great temptation in the way of such as desire to undertake the office of teachers in the church, and will be most likely to deter and afflict those who have the greatest tenderness of Conscience, and therefore (caet par. the preserving and uniformity of opinion, since persons of little integrity may satisfy their Consciences, in subscribing what they do not at all believe as articles of peace, or in putting the most unnatural sense on the words
Spirits in Prison - And their participation in the triumph of Christ is assured by their pledge of a good Conscience in baptism (v
Andrew - Void of the boldness and rocklike robustness of Peter's character, which but few can aspire to, he had that feature which makes him a pattern within the reach of all, a simple, earnest determination in carrying out the dictates of Conscience
Festus, Porcius - Had Agrippa yielded himself "altogether" to the convictions of Conscience then, what an eternal blessing would have ensued to himself, what a reflex blessing probably to Festus! Compare in Caesar's palace at Rome, Philippians 1:12-14
Natural - Here it is plain that by "the natural man," is not meant a person, devoid of natural judgment, reason, or Conscience, in which sense the expression is often used among men
Chancellor - To him belongs the appointment of all justices of the peace he is keeper of the kings Conscience, visitor of all hospitals and colleges founded by the king, guardian of all charitable uses, and judge of the high court of chancery
Sacrifice - The former, though they cleansed from ceremonial uncleanness, could not possibly expiate sin, or purify the Conscience from the guilt of it; and so it is said that God was not well pleased in them, 1618399498_67 ; Hebrews 10:8 ; Hebrews 10:11 . But Christ, by the sacrifice of himself, hath effectually, and for ever, put away sin, having made an adequate atonement unto God for it, and by means of faith in it he also purges the Conscience from dead works to serve the living God, Hebrews 9:10-26 ; Ephesians 5:2
Ananias - He was so enraged at Paul's noble declaration, "I have lived in all good Conscience before God until this day," that he commanded one of his attendants to smite him on the mouth
Nature - He binding nature fast in fate, Left Conscience free and will
Lawlessness - The Conscience of man finds exercise and discipline
Magistrate (2) - The subject of the relation between Christ and the magistrate runs into questions of Church and State, the spiritual and the civil power, individual Conscience and public law
Iron - ...
1 Timothy 4:2 (a) As heat destroys the feeling in any part that is burned, so sinning dulls the Conscience about GOD and His Word
Felix - ) Greed of gain supplanted Conscience, so that instead of repenting of his shameful life he would not even do common justice to Paul, but left him a prisoner because he got no bribe to set him free
Ministerial Call - The introduction of ministers into their office by patronage, of whatever form, hath its origin from popery, tends to establish a tyranny over men's Conscience, which and whom Christ hath made free, and to fill pulpits with wicked and indolent clergymen
Adam - They were transgressors, had fallen from their state of innocence, and acquired a Conscience, and with it the sense of their own evil and guilt
Kedar - Hence mount Sinai covenant is represented as a dispensation, like the mount itself, of blackness and darkness and terror; because it set forth that dread of Conscience which filled the mind when under a conscious sense of having broken it
Adam - They were transgressors, had fallen from their state of innocence, and acquired a Conscience, and with it the sense of their own evil and guilt
Iniquity - , "unrightness" (a, negative, dike, "right"), a condition of not being right, whether with God, according to the standard of His holiness and righteousness, or with man, according to the standard of what man knows to be right by his Conscience
Trust - ...
We trust we have a good Conscience
Prophecy - It is described as touching the heart and Conscience, convicting, instructing, edifying, comforting
Casuistry - Cases of Conscience are one of the exercises at the conferences of priests meeting usually about the ember-days four times a year
Tribute - Paul admonishes his readers to pay tribute (φόρους) as a matter of Conscience, since rulers are God’s instruments in the preservation of civic order
Ark of Noah - It is thus referred to in 1 Peter 3:20,21 , "into which few, that is, eight souls, were saved through water: which figure also now saves you, [1] baptism, not a putting away of [2] filth of flesh, but [2] demand as before God of a good Conscience, by [2] resurrection of Jesus Christ
Canon of Scripture - It carries its own credentials to the heart and Conscience of the Christian in the power of the Holy Spirit
Sin Offering - It was less connected with the Conscience than the sin offering (Leviticus 4:3)
Mordecai - Probably, therefore, the reverence ordered to be done to this great man was a kind of divine honour, such as was sometimes addressed to the Persian monarchs themselves; which, being a species of idolatry, Mordecai refused for the sake of a good Conscience
Heart, Heartily - ...
As to its usage in the NT it denotes (a) the seat of physical life, Acts 14:17 ; James 5:5 ; (b) the seat of moral nature and spiritual life, the seat of grief, John 14:1 ; Romans 9:2 ; 2 Corinthians 2:4 ; joy, John 16:22 ; Ephesians 5:19 ; the desires, Matthew 5:28 ; 2 Peter 2:14 ; the affections, Luke 24:32 ; Acts 21:13 ; the perceptions, John 12:40 ; Ephesians 4:18 ; the thoughts, Matthew 9:4 ; Hebrews 4:12 ; the understanding, Matthew 13:15 ; Romans 1:21 ; the reasoning powers, Mark 2:6 ; Luke 24:38 ; the imagination, Luke 1:51 ; Conscience, Acts 2:37 ; 1 John 3:20 ; the intentions, Hebrews 4:12 , cp
Trespass - " ...
In Galatians 6:1 , RV, "(in any) trespass" (AV, "fault"), the reference is to "the works of the flesh" (Galatians 5:19 ), and the thought is that of the believer's being found off his guard, the "trespass" taking advantage of him; in James 5:16 , AV, "faults" (RV, "sins" translates the word hamartias, which is found in the best texts), auricular confession to a priest is not in view here or anywhere else in Scripture; the command is comprehensive, and speaks either of the acknowledgement of sin where one has wronged another, or of the unburdening of a troubled Conscience to a godly brother whose prayers will be efficacious, or of open confession before the church
Supremacy - ...
Christ plainly claims supremacy over the moral nature of man, over human Conscience and human destiny—a supremacy extending through all time, and without limitation. The Christian Conscience, however laggard the will, cannot but confess the justice of the Master’s question: ‘Why call ye me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?’ (Luke 6:46)
Shame - ...
Shame may also follow an action; and here too the idea is not the conviction of sin, but the confusion which comes from discovery, though this may be an element in a future awakening of Conscience. Though the word is not mentioned, it is presumably the feeling of the man who hid his talent or pound, when brought face to face with his master (Matthew 25:24, Luke 19:20); and it is certainly implied in John 8:9, whether the words ‘convicted by their Conscience’ are genuine or not
Moral Obligation - If any thing else were understood by it, then the moral sense must be the same with Conscience, which we know to vary with the judgment, and cannot therefore be the basis of moral obligation. If Conscience be not meant, then the moral sense must be considered as instinctive: a notion, certainly, which is disproved by the whole moral history of man
Shame - ...
Shame may also follow an action; and here too the idea is not the conviction of sin, but the confusion which comes from discovery, though this may be an element in a future awakening of Conscience. Though the word is not mentioned, it is presumably the feeling of the man who hid his talent or pound, when brought face to face with his master (Matthew 25:24, Luke 19:20); and it is certainly implied in John 8:9, whether the words ‘convicted by their Conscience’ are genuine or not
Odd Fellows, Order of - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Freemasonry - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Independent Order of Odd Fellows - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Knights of Pythias - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
International Order of Odd Fellows - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Defile, Defilement - " It is used in the figurative sense, of a Conscience "defiled" by sin, 1 Corinthians 8:7 ; of believers who have kept themselves (their "garments") from "defilement," Revelation 3:4 , and those who have not "soiled" themselves by adultery or fornication, Revelation 14:4
Repentance - A natural repentance, or what is merely the effect of natural Conscience
Laver - The "holy water" in the trial of jealousy (Numbers 5:17), and in consecrating the Levites by purifying and sprinkling, was probably from the laver (Numbers 8:7); type of the true and efficacious sprinkling of Christ's blood on the Conscience (Hebrews 9:9-10; Hebrews 10:22; Titus 3:5; Ephesians 5:26); not to be so washed entails eternal death
Masonry - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Masons - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Heifer, Red - The meaning of the rite is divinely declared in Hebrews 9:13, "if the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh, how much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered Himself without spot to God, purge your Conscience from dead works to serve the living God?" The Egyptian priests, the Persians according to the Zendavesta, the Romans, and Greeks, and the modern New Zealanders, have had strict rules as to defilement by contact with the dead
Zacchaeus - There is no reason to believe that Zacchaeus was a notoriously bad representative of his class; but, on the other hand, having regard to that remorseful cry of his which seems to have been the product of an awakened Conscience (Luke 19:8), it does not appear that his methods were always strictly equitable
Titus, Epistle to - To the pure all things are pure, but nothing is pure to the defiled and unbelieving, the mind and Conscience being defiled
Law - The nations that had not the law were however a law unto themselves, having some sense of good and evil, and their Conscience bore witness accordingly
Claudius - Felix trembled before this powerful exhibition of truths so arousing to his Conscience; but he remanded St
Antinomians - " "The feelings of Conscience, which tell them that sin is theirs, arise from a want of knowing the truth. " "It is but the voice of a lying spirit in the hearts of believers, that saith they have yet sin wasting their Consciences, and lying as a burden too heavy for them to bear
Meats - But at the same time he enjoins, that the law of charity and prudence should be observed; that men should be cautious of scandalizing or offending weak minds; that though all things may be lawful, yet all things are not always expedient; that no one ought to seek his own accommodation or satisfaction, but that of his neighbour; that if any one should say to us, "This has been offered to idols," we may not then eat of it, for the sake of him who gives the information; not so much for fear of wounding our own Conscience, but his; in a word, that he who is weak, and thinks he may not indifferently use all sorts of food, should forbear, and eat herbs, rather than offend a brother, Romans 14:1-2
Liberty - Religious liberty, is the free right of adopting and enjoying opinions on religious subjects, and of worshiping the Supreme Being according to the dictates of Conscience, without external control
Law - It was written by the Creator on the Conscience of man, and sin has never fully erased it, Romans 1:19 2:12-15
Sons of Temperance - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Secret Societies - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Societies, Secret - Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, Conscience, etc
Judas - Instead he committed suicide; though first he tried to ease his Conscience by returning the money that the priests had given him (Matthew 27:3-5)
Commentary - ...
There are some people so wise in their own conceit, and think human helps of so little worth, that they despise commentaries on the Scriptures altogether: but every student or preacher whose business is to explain the sacred oracles, to make known the mind of God to others, to settle cases of Conscience, to oppose the sophistry of sceptics, and to confound the arguments of infidels, would do well to avail himself of the most judicious, clear, copious, critical, and sound commentaries on the Bible. The sprightly notes, the just inferences, the original thoughts, and the warm applications to the Conscience, makes this work justly admired. Burkitt contains many ingenious observations, fine turns, natural plans, and pungent addresses to the Conscience
Jehovah Our Righteousness - And reader, do but attend to the several blessed causes by which it is confirmed and assured to the heart and Conscience, and very fully will it appear to you, in all its glory, if so be God the Holy Ghost be your teacher
Laodicea - The danger is of disregarded principle; religion enough to lull the Conscience, not to save the soul; halting between two opinions (1 Kings 18:21; 2 Kings 17:41; Ezekiel 20:39; Matthew 6:24)
Singing - Jonathan Edwards, observes, that "as it is the command of God that all should sing, so all should make Conscience of learning to sing, as it is a thing that cannot be decently performed at all without learning
Belshazzar - His daring bravado was in an instant changed into abject fear; Conscience can turn the most foolhardy into a coward
Self-Deception - And lastly, we should learn to ascertin the evidence of not being deceived, which are such as these: when sin is the object of our increasing fear, a tenderness of Conscience, when we can appeal to God as to the sincerity of our motives and aims, when dependent on God's promise, providence, and grace, and when conformed to him in all righteousness and true holiness
Baxterians - Well grounded hopes of salvation, peace of Conscience, and spiritual communion with the church mystical in heaven and earth, Romans 5:12
Man - see), and describes him as ‘dust and ashes’ in comparison with God ( Genesis 2:7 ; Genesis 3:19 ; Genesis 18:27 ), yet as made in God’s image it endows him with reason, Conscience, affection, free will
Vengeance - ’ War as a method of giving expression to the law of international righteousness is admittedly repugnant to the Christian Conscience; but until the method is superseded as the result of a consensus gentium, a Christian nation is not absolved from the duty of vindicating either by offensive or by defensive warfare the eternal principles of right and justice
Bond - Ephesians 2:15), though ‘the moral assent of the Conscience’ (Lightfoot, in loc
Cheerfulness - One may rejoice in a good Conscience (2 Corinthians 1:12), in the joy set before those running the good race (Hebrews 12:2), in the inspirations and consolations of Christian faith (Romans 5:2; Romans 5:11; Romans 15:13; 2 Corinthians 1:24; 2 Corinthians 5:6 f
Boasting - He gloried in the Cress (Galatians 6:14), in free grace (Romans 5:11), in an approving Conscience (2 Corinthians 1:12), in his independence as an apostle (2 Corinthians 11:10), in his convert (2 Thessalonians 1:4), and above all in Christ Jesus (Romans 15:17) and in God (1 Corinthians 1:31), in the spirit of the Psalmist (Psalms 44:8), and of the Prophet (Jeremiah 9:23) who said in the name of God, ‘Let not the wise man glory in his wisdom … but let him that glorieth glory in this, that he understandeth, and knoweth me, that I am the Lord
Affection - Now, in order to ascertain whether our affections are excited in a spiritual manner, we must enquire whether that which moves our affections be truly spiritual, whether our Consciences be alarmed, and our hearts impressed; whether the judgment be enlightened, and we have a perception of the moral excellency of divine things; and lastly, whether our affections have a holy tendency and produce the happy effects of obedience to God, humility in ourselves, and justice to our fellow creatures. 517; Edwards on the Affections; Pike and Hayward's Cases of Conscience; Watts' Use and Abuse of the Passions; M'Laurin's Essays, sect
Infidelity - ...
Its inconsistency with reason; its incongruity with the nature of man; its cloudy and obscure prospects; its unsatisfying nature; its opposition to the dictates of Conscience; its pernicious tendency to eradicate every just principle from the breast of man, and to lead the way for every species of vice and immorality, show us that it cannot flourish, but must finally fall
Mordecai - This poor despised Jew could not in Conscience bow down and do homage to one of the spawn of Agag
Divorce - It is true, as far as the Mosaic statute or the civil law was concerned, the husband had a right thus to do; but it is equally clear, that the ground of just separation must have been, not a trivial, but a prominent and important one, when it is considered, that he was bound to consult the rights of the woman, and was amenable to his Conscience and his God
Fire - The sting and remorse of Conscience is the worm that will never die; and the wrath of God upon their souls and bodies, the fire that shall never go out
Friends - Penn's treaty with the Indians, and the liberty of Conscience which he granted to all denominations, even those which had persecuted his own, do honour to his memory
Dispensation, - Among these ignorance of God prevailed in spite of the testimony of God's power and divinity, and the admonition of Conscience spoken of in Romans 1,2
Kill - , separation from God, realized through the presentation of the commandment to Conscience, breaking in upon the fancied state of freedom; the argument shows the power of the Law, not to deliver from sin, but to enhance its sinfulness; in 2 Corinthians 3:6 , "the letter killeth," signifies not the literal meaning of Scripture as contrasted with the spiritual, but the power of the Law to bring home the knowledge of guilt and its punishment; in Ephesians 2:16 "having slain the enmity" describes the work of Christ through His death in annulling the enmity, "the Law" ( Ephesians 2:15 ), between Jew and Gentile, reconciling regenerate Jew and Gentile to God in spiritual unity "in one body
Offence - , the local church), RV, "no occasion of stumbling" (AV, "none offense"); (b) in the Passive sense, "blameless, without stumbling;" Acts 24:16 , "(a Conscience) void of offense;" Philippians 1:10 , "void of (AV, without) offense
Meats - The former, while in obedience to their own Conscience they carefully abstained from the food in question, were charged to view with charity the conduct of those who did not share their scruples
Worm - Remorse that which incessantly gnaws the Conscience that which torments
Ignorance, Ignorant, Ignorantly - " Yet, as the Conscience of the believer receives enlightenment, what formerly may have been done in "ignorance" becomes a sin against the light and demands a special confession, to receive forgiveness, 1 John 1:8,9
Son of God - ...
Men may commit awful sins in fanatical zeal for God, with the Scriptures in their hands, while following unenlightened Conscience; Conscience needs to be illuminated by the Spirit, and guided by prayerful search of Scripture
Biblical Commission - On November 18, 1907, Pius X declared that all Catholics are bound in Conscience to accept the decisions published by this commission
Die, Dead, Dying - 1 here; Acts 2:29 ; 7:15 ; Hebrews 11:22 (RV, "his end was nigh"); (b) of the gnawings of Conscience in self reproach, under the symbol of a worm, Mark 9:48 (vv
Strife - There is, however, an altogether different kind of strife, which at once commends itself to the Christian heart and Conscience
Hell - On the negative side it is alleged, that the terms above- mentioned are metaphorical, and signify no more than raging desire or acute pain; and that the Divine Being can sufficiently punish the wicked, by immediately acting on their minds, or rather leaving them to the guilt and stings of their own Conscience
Hell - On the negative side it is alleged, that the terms above- mentioned are metaphorical, and signify no more than raging desire or acute pain; and that the Divine Being can sufficiently punish the wicked, by immediately acting on their minds, or rather leaving them to the guilt and stings of their own Conscience
Right (2) - The encouragements to right are found in (a) the joy of satisfaction in obedience to God; (b) the approving testimony of Conscience as the result of rignteousness; (c) the blessing of God manifestly resting upon the life (Matthew 10:28-31); (d) fellowship with Christ in faithful and true living (Matthew 10:25, Matthew 12:50)
Ananias - Violent tempered to such a degree that he caused Paul to be smitten on the mouth for saying, "I have lived in all good Conscience before God"; himself on the contrary "a whited wall
Harlot - It may be added in respect of guilt of this description, that the peace of Conscience begotten of faith in the Redeemer’s atoning blood is oftentimes as deep as the sense of guilt was poignant
Adversary (2) - Therefore he who would be accepted of God must do justly by his brother and have all cause of difference with him removed, for if he regards iniquity in his heart, has upon his Conscience the guilt of wrongdoing or ill-will, or a grudge, the Lord will not hear him (Psalms 66:16)
Naaman - To this the prophet returns no direct answer; making no other reply than, "Go in peace;" putting it, probably, upon his Conscience to act as that should dictate, and not being willing to relieve him from this trial of his recent faith
Friend - ...
However, this being spoken in the person of him who made the feast, it is generally taken for a usual compellation, and that Christ, following the like courteous custom of appellation and friendly greeting, did so salute Judas, which yet left a sting behind it in his Conscience, who knew himself to be the reverse of what he was called
Answer - " Baptism is therefore the ground of an "appeal" by a good Conscience against wrong doing
Psychology - rendered ‘ Conscience ,’ is used in the NT consistently for what Kant called the practical reason, man’s moral consciousness ( Acts 23:1 ; Acts 24:16 , Romans 2:15 ; Romans 9:1 ; Romans 13:6 , 1Co 8:7 ; 1 Corinthians 8:10 ; 1 Corinthians 8:12 ; 1 Corinthians 10:25 ; 1Co 10:27-29 , 2 Corinthians 1:12 ; 2 Corinthians 4:2 , 1 Timothy 1:5 ; 1 Timothy 1:19 ; 1 Timothy 3:9 ; 1 Timothy 4:2 , 2 Timothy 1:3 , Titus 1:15 , Hebrews 9:9 ; Hebrews 9:14 ; Hebrews 10:22 ; Hebrews 13:18 , 1Pe 2:19 ; 1 Peter 3:16 ; 1 Peter 3:21 ), and is an instance of the influence of the Stoic ethics on ‘the moral vocabulary of the civilized world at the time of the Christian era
Harlot - It may be added in respect of guilt of this description, that the peace of Conscience begotten of faith in the Redeemer’s atoning blood is oftentimes as deep as the sense of guilt was poignant
Day of Atonement - Through his sacrificial blood he has entered the presence of God, obtained eternal salvation, and cleansed the repentant sinner’s Conscience (Hebrews 9:11-14)
Revelation of God - General revelation occurs through (1) nature, (2) in our experience and in our Conscience, and (3) in history. Especially through this moral sense God reveals Himself in the Consciences of men and women. ...
God's general revelation is plain, whether in nature, in human Conscience, or in history. According to Paul, the act of suppressing the awareness of God and His demands warps our reason and Conscience
Person, Personhood - ...
The Conscience is also associated with the heart. This is clearly seen in the statement: "Afterward David was Conscience-stricken for having cut off a corner of his [21]4 robe" (1 Samuel 24:5 ). The cry for a "clean heart" in Psalm 51:10 is a plea for a pure Conscience
Paul's Blamelessness as a Minister - But Paul's pastoral map bites far deeper, and with far sharper teeth, into every minister's Conscience than even Boston's mordant map will bite, though it is warranted to draw ordained blood also. For once-what a heartless chapter! Was it not enough for Paul that he should enjoy his own good Conscience as a minister, but he must make my Conscience even more miserable than it was before? What delight can it give him to pour all this condemnation and contempt upon me and my ministry? And, did he not know, did he not take time to consider, that he was trampling upon multitudes of broken hearts? I wonder at Paul. Oh, my brethren, the never-to-be-redeemed opportunities of our pulpits; and the lasting blame of God and our people, and our own Consciences, for our misuse and neglect of our pulpits! Rock of Ages, cleft for ministers! The "unedifying converse" of our pastorate, and so on: till we take up this terrible chapter, and read it continually, deploring before God and man, to our dying day, all that Paul was, and that we were not: and all that he was not, and that we were. All that we need to do is to open a few pages of our Communion-rolls and visiting books, and a short turn up and down those painful pages, with some Conscience, and some heart, and some imagination, will always make high-mindedness, and fearlessness, for ever impossible to us
Absolution - ‘Inquiry-rooms’ have been of notable service in modern ‘missions,’ and it is a common thing for people in trouble of Conscience about some special sin to long to unbosom themselves about it to one whom they feel to have spiritual authority. All the Churches, to a greater or less extent, supplement the preaching of the word by ‘discipline,’ and their admission to communion and exclusion from it tell powerfully on the individual Conscience. The exhortation before the Communion contains this invitation, to be pronounced by the curate: ‘If there be any of you who … cannot quiet his own Conscience, let him come to me, or to some other discreet and learned minister of God’s word, and open his grief, that by the ministry of God’s holy word he may receive the benefit of absolution, together with ghostly counsel and advice to the quieting of his Conscience, and avoiding of all scruple and doubtfulness. ...
In the service for the visitation of the sick, the minister is enjoined ‘to move the sick person to make a special confession of his sins if he feel his Conscience troubled with any weighty matter
Heart - ...
The heart functions as the Conscience. David prays that God would create for him a pure heart to replace his defiled Conscience (Psalm 51:10 )
Judgment, Last - The accusations of natural Conscience are testimonies in favour of this belief, Romans 2:1-29 . The book of Conscience, Romans 1:1-32 ...
3
Amos - Whether in addressing other nations, Israel, or Judah, the prophet condemned those who sin against a universal Conscience (Amos 1:1-2:3 ), the revealed law (Amos 2:4-5 ), or God's redeeming love (Amos 2:6-16 ). Because of such injustice and the failure to bind authentic religious experience with a social Conscience, Amos claimed that the nation was already dead
Diet - In this assembly (wherein presided the archduke Ferdinand) the duke of Saxony, and the landgrave of Hesse, demanded the free exercise of the Lutheran religion: upon which it was decreed, that the emperor should be desired to call a general, or national, council in Germany within a year, and that, in the mean time, every one should have liberty of Conscience
Ignorance (2) - The light of reason and of Conscience shines even in the darkness of heathenism, and the heathen are plainly in fault if they ‘apprehend’ it not (John 1:5)
Mind - Here the mind is clearly the Conscience or organ of moral knowledge, man’s highest faculty, by which he recognizes the will of God for his own life
Deacon - Bishops must be ‘apt to teach’ ( 1 Timothy 3:2 ); deacons were only called to ‘hold the mystery of the faith in a pure Conscience’ ( 1 Timothy 3:9 )
Aaron (2) - None of the sacrifices of the Law could ‘make perfect as pertaining to the Conscience’ (Hebrews 9:9)
Rest - To be calm or composed in mind to enjoy peace of Conscience
Paul as a Pastor - And thus it is that he so returns upon his past temptations, and with a good Conscience toward the truth, tells them that they may safely take all he had ever taught them and build upon it; for he had neither kept back anything that had been committed to his ministry among them, nor, on the other hand, had he added anything of his own to it. By that terrible thorn in his flesh; by a Conscience full of the most remorseful memories; as well as by incessant trials and persecutions and sufferings of all conceivable kinds, Paul was made and was kept the humblest of all humble men. For they too have each their own thorn in their own flesh, their own crook in their own lot, their own sword of God in their own heart and Conscience. I cannot get it out of my Conscience, I cannot get it out of my heart
Alexander the Coppersmith - But Paul's side did not turn out to be so serviceable to the coppersmith as he had expected, and thus it is that he is next discovered to us as having made complete shipwreck of faith and a good Conscience. Unless you are a man of a very single heart and a very sound Conscience, it is a great temptation to you to be able in a time of public commotion to speak so as to sway the swaying multitude and to command their applause and their support. I am not without blame in his shipwreck of faith and a good Conscience
Typology - Baptism as a fulfillment of the type Peter, after discussing Christ's work in preaching in the spiritual realm to spirits in prison, mentioned Noah's ark and the flood: “Into which ark a few [2] were saved through water, which water [3] as a fulfullment of the type now saves you through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, not through removing of dirt from the body but as a pledge of a good Conscience towards God” (1 Peter 3:20-21 ). Here it is called a pledge—an acted-out pledge of a good Conscience
Drunkenness - The inordinate use of wine and strong drink becomes morally impossible for a Christian, not because there is an external law which forbids it, but because his own enlightened Conscience condemns it. The Christian Conscience needed to be educated, the spiritual taste to be cultivated
Evil - Nor are we warranted in saying that Conscience here is playing tricks on man, frightening him with illusions. To revert to the distinctions made in the beginning of this article, the apostolic view recognizes no metaphysical evil, for to be the creature, subject, and child of God, is for man only good; it links physical with moral evil, and makes deliverance from pain dependent on salvation from sin; and it throws all the emphasis on moral evil; for it is concerned not with the speculative intellect, but only with the moral Conscience and religions consciousness of man
Doubt - In the Romans passage doubt is related to one's Conscience
Rest - Christ's "rest" is not a "rest" from work, but in work, "not the rest of inactivity but of the harmonious working of all the faculties and affections, of will, heart, imagination, Conscience, because each has found in God the ideal sphere for its satisfaction and development" (J
Fall of Man - ...
Again, it is evident, if we consider him as a citizen of the moral world; his commission of sin; his omission of duty; the triumph of sensual appetites over his intellectual faculties; the corruption of the powers that constitute a good head, the understanding, imagination, memory, and reason; the depravity of the powers which form a good heart, the will, Conscience, and affections; his manifest alienation from God; his amazing disregard even of his nearest relatives; his unaccountable unconcern about himself; his detestable tempers; the general our-breaking of human corruption in all individuals; the universal overflowing of it in all nations
Knowledge - Paul argued that knowledge puffs up but love builds up, and the knowledge exercised by the “strong” in faith could cause the “weak” in faith to go against their Christian Conscience and lead to their spiritual ruin
Boldness - ), of a clear Conscience and an obedient life (1 John 3:20-23)
Assurance - "We do not affirm, " says Saurin, "that Christians of whose sincerity there may be some doubt have a right to assurance; that backsliders, as such, ought to persuade themselves that they shall be saved; nor do we say that Christians who have arrived to the highest degree of holiness, can be persuaded of the certainty of their salvation in every period of their lives; nor, if left to their own efforts can they enjoy it; but believers, supported by the Divine aid, who walk in all good Conscience before him, these only have ground to expect this privilege
Remove, Depart - To “lift one’s face” means to be able to look someone straight in the eye, to have a clear Conscience toward someone or with reference to something ( Answer - In 1 Peter 3:21 of the same chapter ‘the answer (Authorized Version ) of a good Conscience towards God’ is a difficult phrase, and the commentaries should be consulted
Breastplate - Paul seems especially to allude to this translation of Urim and Thummim by the Septuagint, when he speaks of himself and his fellow labourers, "commending themselves to every man's Conscience by manifestation of the truth;" in opposition to those who by their errors and compliances with the Jewish prejudices, or with the philosophical taste of the Greeks, obscured the truth, and rendered ambiguous the guidance of Christian doctrine
Condemn, Condemnation - A — 1: καταγινώσκω (Strong's #2607 — Verb — kataginosko — kat-ag-in-o'-sko ) "to know something against" (kata, "against," ginosko, "to know by experience"), hence, "to think ill of, to condemn," is said, in Galatians 2:11 , of Peter's conduct (RV, "stood condemned"), he being "self-condemned" as the result of an exercised and enlightened Conscience, and "condemned" in the sight of others; so of "self-condemnation" due to an exercise of heart, 1 John 3:20,21
Judge - , the light of the heart-searching testimony of the assembly probes the Conscience of the unregenerate, sifting him judicailly
Sacrament of Penance - Penance also confers a claim to actual graces necessary to retain God's friendship; frequently, too, it gives peace of Conscience and joy of spirit
Russia - The reactionary party of the Orthodox Church brought about the modification of laws relating to liberty of Conscience; and many of the outrages of former years were repeated, the government taking particular pains to prevent the reestablishment of the United Church in Russia
Germany - In 1919 the republic was established, and according to the new constitution there is no State Church, but entire freedom of Conscience and equality among all religious denominations, each of which manages its own affairs and makes appointments to office without interference from the State
Touch - I never bore any touch of Conscience with greater regret
More - ...
A — 2: ἔτι (Strong's #2089 — Adverb — eti — et'-ee ) "yet, as yet, still," used of degree is translated "more" in Matthew 18:16 , "(one or two) more;" Hebrews 8:12 ; 10:17 , "(will I remember no) more;" Hebrews 10:2 , "(no) more (conscience);" Hebrews 11:32 , "(what shall I) more (say)?" Revelation 3:12 , "(he shall go out thence no) more;" Revelation 7:16 , "(no) more" and "any more;" Revelation 9:12 , AV "more" (RV, "hereafter"); Revelation 18:21-23 , "(no) more" "any more" (5 times); Revelation 20:3 , "(no) more;" Revelation 21:1,4 (twice); Revelation 22:3
Persecution - The unlawfulness of persecution for Conscience sake must appear plain to every one that possesses the least degree of thought or of feeling. "Persecution for Conscience sake, " says Dr. She also, it is said, put two Brownists to death; and though her whole reign was distinguished for its political prosperity, yet it is evident that she did not understand the rights of Conscience; for it is said that more sanguinary laws were made in her reign than in any of her predecessors, and her hands were stained with the blood both of Papists and Puritans. came to the throne, who showed himself a warm friend to the rights of Conscience. To conclude this article, Who can peruse the account here given without feeling the most painful emotions, and dropping a tear over the madness and depravity of mankind? Does it not show us what human beings are capable of when influenced by superstition, bigotry, and prejudice? ...
Have not these baneful principles metamorphosed men into infernals; and entirely extinguished all the feelings of humanity, the dictates of Conscience, and the voice of reason? Alas! what has sin done to make mankind such curses to one another? Merciful God! by they great power suppress this worst of all evils, and let truth and love, meekness and forbearance universally prevail! Limborch's Introduction to his History of the Inquisition; Memoirs of the Persecutions of the Protestants in France by Lewis De Enarolles; Comber's History of the Parisian Massacre of St
Judah - Conscience and natural feeling wrought on Judah, "what profit is it (like the antitype Judas, and in the keen bargaining spirit of the Jews ages afterward: John 12:4-5; Matthew 26:15), if we slay our brother and conceal his blood? Come and let us sell him . " Conscience was stupefied, and cupidity gratified, by this scheme
Authority of Christ - The difficulty is that the ‘mind,’ or ‘conscience,’ or ‘moral personality,’ on which our recognition of the truth and authority of Jesus’ teaching is here made dependent, is not a fixed quantity, and still less a ready-made faculty; it is rather a possibility or potentiality in our nature, which needs to he evoked into actual existence; and among the powers which are to evoke it and make it actual and valuable, by far the most important is that teaching of Jesus which it is in some sense allowed to judge. Nothing is less like Jesus than to do violence to anyone’s liberty, or to invade the sacredness of Conscience and of personal responsibility; but the broad fact is unquestionable, that without coercing others Jesus dominated them, without breaking their wills He imposed His own will upon them, and became for them a supreme moral authority to which they submitted absolutely, and by which they were inspired. There is a single case of Conscience which Jesus diagnoses, and for which He prescribes heroic treatment; but it is not in the patient to rise to such treatment. It lay in the Good Master Himself, in His own identification with the good cause, in His own renunciation of all things for the Kingdom of God’s sake; it lay in His power to reveal to this man the weak spot in his moral constitution, and in the inward witness of the man’s Conscience (attested by his sorrow as he turned away) that the voice of Jesus was the voice of God, and that through obedience to it he would have entered into life. When they are literally read, Conscience simply refuses to take them in. What commands Conscience in the most startling words of Jesus is the truth and love which dictate them, but to recognize the truth and love is to recognize that no form of words is binding of itself
Lois And Eunice - They did not cast up the days of their husband's love-making to his accusing Conscience. The Greek father's bad Conscience because he had never even tried to fulfil to those two over-trustful women what he had so often so solemnly promised them; his bad Conscience would often exasperate his temper at them, and at the Scriptures they were always reading
Law - The moral precepts are eternally obligatory, because based on God's own unchangeable character, which is reflected in the enlightened Conscience; their positive enactment is only to clear away the mist which sin has spread over even the Conscience. Conscience (without the law) caused only a vague discomfort to the sinner
Baptize, Baptism - It is as an appeal for a "clear Conscience, " and through the triumphant resurrection and ascension of Christ above all "authorities, " that baptism achieves this "salvation. "...
The readers' situation is outlined in 3:13-17,4:1-5, where again "a clear Conscience" is urged and explained. Against this background, baptism is no merely physical washing (as in Judaist, Essene, or pagan circles), but "the pledge of a good Conscience towards God" and threatening civic authorities, ensuring innocent social conduct
Nicodemus - But he was not free; he did not feel free and able to act as his Conscience told him he ought immediately to act. My whole mind and imagination and heart and Conscience would have to be taken down and built up again upon an absolutely other pattern; my whole experience, observation, and study of all these divine things would have to be turned upside down before I could possibly believe in what is called "baptismal regeneration. "...
...
"Now I saw that there would be no answer to me till I had entire purity of Conscience, and no longer regarded any iniquity whatsoever in my heart
Image of God - Persons have a censoring Conscience which they may defy
Condemnation - At times the word is also used in a broader context to refer to negative evaluations of a person by peers or by one's own Conscience
Mephibosheth - Impatiently (for Conscience told him he had been unjust to Mephibosheth and still was only half just) David replied, "why speakest thou any more of thy matters? Thou and Ziba divide the land
Struggles of Soul - His conflict with the scribes and Pharisees regarding Sabbath observance, fasting, ceremonial washing, and intercourse with sinners must have distressed His spirit; for He too would need to face the issue—would He follow custom or Conscience? We have more distinct evidence of the inward strain felt by Him, because His regard for Jewish prejudice and exclusiveness in relation to the Gentiles, in order that He might not estrange His countrymen, compelled Him to assume an attitude of aloofness to the Gentiles (the Roman centurion, Matthew 8:10; the Syrophœnician mother, Matthew 15:26; the Greeks, John 12:23)
Gentleness (2) - It is not the expression of a nature of such softness as to be always on the verge of tears, or of a sentimentalism which has little strength of Conscience, and no power of moral indignation and repulsion
Mercy - With regard to criminals or delinquents, it is false compassion to suppress the salutary abmonition, and refuse to set their guilt before them, merely because the sight of it will give their Conscience pain: such unseasonable tenderness in a surgeon may prove the death of his patient: this, however it may appear is not mercy, but cruelty
Blessedness - It stands for a good which is above happiness, and dwells not least with those who are counted worthy to sacrifice happiness for Conscience’ sake
Flesh - In 9:10,13 the rituals of the old order affect only external purification, leaving the Conscience untouched. First Peter 3:21 echoes the same contrast found in Hebrews 9 between the cleansing of the flesh and the Conscience
Goodness (Human) - ‘A good Conscience’ (Acts 23:1, 1 Timothy 1:19, 1 Peter 3:21) is a Conscience deriving its quality from its content, and therefore presupposes that the acts approved by it are good in themselves
Scribes - (Mark 7:13 ) The casuistry became at once subtle and prurient, evading the plainest duties, tampering with Conscience
Self- Examination - The fact of unworthiness in motive and life is already detected even if not generally admitted by the believer: self-examination will bring it home to the Conscience and show the necessity for aiming at the higher spiritual ideal in thought and action
Irenaeus, Bishop of Tyre - Domnus turned for counsel to Theodoret, who replied that "it was better to fall under the ill-will of man than to offend God and wound one's own Conscience
Eusebius of Alexandria, a Writer of Sermons - "If thy Conscience is clear, approach, and receive the Body and Blood of the Lord
Law of Moses - The Gentiles are described as not having the law, Romans 2:14 , though they had the work of the law written in their hearts, and a Conscience which bore witness when they did wrong
Natural - History confirms the Apostle’s judgment that ‘natural’ instincts and passions unbridled by reason and Conscience lead to unnatural crimes which are dishonouring alike to man and to God
Revelation - This applies to the traces of God in man’s Conscience with its sense of obligation, in his emotional nature with its desire and capacity for fellowship, in his personality which demands personality for its satisfaction. In addition to revelation through nature, Conscience, and reason, Christianity implies a special revelation in the Person of Christ. This special inspiration is (1) testified to by the Scriptures themselves, (2) has ever been held in the Christian Church, and (3) constantly authenticates itself to the Christian Conscience through the ages
Expediency - ; or, still worse, that with an easy Conscience they might satisfy their own sinful lusts. For example, although in itself one kind of meat is neither better nor worse than another, the law of Christian love imposes restraint where indulgence would cause offence or lead to a violation of Conscience. By indifference to external observances we may injure another man’s Conscience
Wisdom - Salvation by the cross is a Divine act which the Conscience must appropriate as such. … The fact evaporates in ideas, and no longer acts on the Conscience with the powerful reality which determines conversion’ (F. Even though ‘by the enticing words of man’s wisdom’ a number of intellectually disposed Greeks had been attracted to the Church, in the absence of what has been called ‘profound Conscience-work,’ the results were not lasting. ‘The wants of the understanding and imagination had, in many cases, more to do with their adherence than those of the heart and Conscience’ (F
Herod - Not to let Conscience have time to restrain him, he ordered the execution as "immediately" as she had demanded it. ...
When Christ appeared Conscience reasserted her supremacy; he said unto his servants, "This is John the Baptist, therefore mighty works do show forth themselves in him. " A Pharisee would have regarded John's reappearance in Jesus as an instance of the transmigration of the souls of good men, and would have felt no perplexity; Herod's "perplexity" is just what we might expect from a Sadducee, accused by a guilty Conscience and trembling lest the world of spirits and the judgment should prove after all to be realities. ...
And that he was so comes out in the most incidental and undesigned way, a clear mark of the truth of the narrative: On his lending himself, fox-like, to the Pharisees' design to get Christ out of Galilee into Judea (see Fox) his superstitious fears were too great to admit of his repeating in Christ's case the execution which, to his own torment of Conscience, he had perpetrated in John's case; but he was glad of any, means to relieve himself of Christ's presence which "perplexed" him (Luke 13:32)
Anger (2) - In a more general sense it means to mislead, or to be the cause that another falls into sin which his better Conscience condemns. To keep people ignorant of religious truth, neither living by it ourselves, nor letting them do so (Matthew 23:13); to make piety or the pretence of it a cloak for avarice (Matthew 23:14, only introduced here from || Mark); to raise recruits for our own faction on the pretext of enlisting men for the kingdom of God (Matthew 23:15); to debauch the simple Conscience by casuistical sophistries (Matthew 23:16-22); to destroy the sense of proportion in morals by making morality a matter of law in which all things stand on the same level (Matthew 23:23 f. His words are never to be read as statutes, but as appeals to Conscience. Exhortations like those in Ephesians 4:31, Colossians 3:8, James 1:19, show that anger was known to the Church mainly in forms which the Christian Conscience condemned
Abstinence - While Christianity has general laws to distinguish the good from the bad, yet for each individual Christian these laws are focused in the Conscience, and the function of the latter is to discriminate between the good and the bad-it cannot devolve this duty on outward rules. The NT is not afraid to place in the Christian Conscience the decision of what is to be abstained from and what is not, because it believes in the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, and because it exalts personal responsibility. in the sphere of things indifferent) is the Christian Conscience. ), and it was done in simplicity and godly sincerity of Conscience (2 Corinthians 1:12, Acts 24:16)
Disease - A psalmist teaches those who desire long life and "many good days" to keep from speaking evil and falseness, to depart from evil and practice good, and diligently to pursue peace in all situationsa clean mind, unburdened Conscience, and peaceable spirit, making for healthy living (Psalm 34:11-14 , ; quoted in 1 Peter 3:10-12 ). And this use of medical metaphors for spiritual and moral "sickliness" or "infirmity" continues into the New Testament in phrases like "the body is weak" (Matthew 26:41 ), "weak in Conscience" (1 Corinthians 8:7-12 ), "weak in faith" (Romans 14:1-2 ; 15:1 ) and (morally) "powerless" (Romans 5:6 )
Atonement - ) Conscience feels instinctively the penal claims of violated divine justice, and can only find peace when by faith it has realized that those claims have been fully met by our sacrificed substitute (Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 10:1-2; Hebrews 10:22; 1 Peter 3:21). ...
The Conscience reflects the law and will of God, though that law condemns the man
Timothy, Epistles to - The end of what was enjoined was love out of 1, a pure heart; 2, a good Conscience; and 3, unfeigned faith. ...
After a salutation in which he desires mercy for Timothy, as well as grace and peace, Paul thanks God, whom he had served from his forefathers with pure (not always enlightened) Conscience, having Timothy in unceasing remembrance in prayer, calling to mind his unfeigned faith and that of his maternal ancestors; and he desires that Timothy would rekindle the gift that he had received by the imposition of Paul's hands, for God had given, not a spirit of cowardice, but of power, of love, and of a wise discretion
Bone - He is hurt by his Conscience as the pain of a broken bone hurts the body
Minister - They are also called divines, and may be distinguished into polemic, or those who possess controversial talents; casuistic, or those who resolve cases of Conscience; experimental, those who address themselves to the feelings, cases, and circumstances of their hearers; and, lastly, practical, those who insist upon the performance of all those duties which the word of God enjoins
Ananias - Paul began as follows: "Men and brethren, I have lived in all good Conscience before God until this day
Nazareth - Paul recalls the time when his unenlightened Conscience drove him to take active measures against ‘Jesus the Nazarene,’ a name which he used at that time with fierce scorn (Acts 26:9)
Nazareth - Paul recalls the time when his unenlightened Conscience drove him to take active measures against ‘Jesus the Nazarene,’ a name which he used at that time with fierce scorn (Acts 26:9)
Christ in Modern Thought - The genius of Northern Europe had later to enter in and infect the Conscience of the Church with its own deep feeling. Fresh grace is discovered in the Conscience. He had no consciousness of God distinct from the dictates of Conscience. ...
He starts with the perception of Conscience of a radical evil dwelling in human nature as an indubitable fact of experience. As Kant inherited the sturdy Conscience of the Lutheran Reform in his ‘categorical imperative,’ so Schleiermacher embodies its religious fervour in his ‘feeling of dependence,’ or experience of God
Personality - μακάριος οὖ οὐ κατέγνω ἡ ψυχὴ αὐτοῦ (Sirach 14:2), which is a plain reference to Conscience. Self-consciousness becomes thereby a Conscience of slavery, of impotence (Romans 7, esp. ...
‘Thus Conscience does make cowards of us all;...
And thus the native hue of resolution...
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought. In the experience of the justified man, the ‘conscience of sins’ is transmuted into a consciousness of ‘peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ’ (Romans 5:1)
Truth (2) - The prerequisite for coming to the light of the Logos is a sound moral disposition, faithfulness to the light of Conscience, and genuine sincerity of thought and deed. ‘He reigns as Himself holy and true, by the power of the truth which He reveals—truth in the Conscience, truth in the heart, and truth in the mind—and over those who, through His grace and spirit, have become fundamentally true; who stand in the eternal, abiding relationship of peace and love and holiness towards God’ (Reith, The Gospel of John, ii. The conditions of that personal knowledge are singleness of mind, purity of Conscience, and openness of heart
Justification - Catholic dogma, equally with Protestant, safeguards the Divine initiative and the work of Christ, but neither the honour of Christ nor individual assurance, since, concerning the former, Christ, though His righteousness is available for our salvation, is not regarded as indwelling in us as our Righteousness; and, concerning the latter, the organized machinery of means of grace brings in all the elements of uncertainty, leaving the doctrine unsatisfactory in the most crucial point, Luther’s is a purely religious conception, vastly deeper within its limits than the other, comprising not only pardon of sin and escape from the Divine wrath, but peace of Conscience and assurance of salvation. It is also the essence of the idea in the apostolic Conscience-the love of God seeking the love of man and finding it. Pre-Christian evolution deepened the Conscience in at least three directions-the difficulty in the way of justification, the possibility of its accomplishment, the mode and means of its reality
Hebrews, Epistle to the - ...
The tender way in which the apostle deals with the Consciences of the Jews still clinging to Judaism, stands in marked contrast to the severe manner in which he writes to the Galatians, who as Gentiles never should have placed themselves under law. The way into the holiest had not been manifest while the first tabernacle was standing, wherein gifts and sacrifices were offered, which could not give to those who brought them a perfect Conscience. The yearly sacrifices never perfected those who brought them; else they would have ceased to be offered by worshippers having no more Conscience of sins; sins were in fact brought to mind every year, not put away for ever. Let us then "approach with a true heart, in full assurance of faith, sprinkled as to our hearts from a wicked Conscience, and washed as to our bodies with pure water
Medicine - On the whole, however, we may infer that the Jews (like other ancient peoples) regarded the heart as the seat of mental and moral activity (exceptions to this view are Daniel 2:28 ; Daniel 4:5 ; Daniel 7:1 ), the reins or kidneys as the seats of impulse, affection, Conscience ( Jeremiah 11:20 ; Jeremiah 12:2 , Psalms 7:9 ), the bowels as the organs of sympathy ( Psalms 40:8 , Job 30:27 ). words are translated by ‘sickness,’ ‘disease,’ ‘infirmity’; the allusion in 1 Corinthians 11:30 may be to mental weakness, and in Romans 15:1 to weakness of Conscience
Heart - of Conscience and faith. And He made it (3) a gracious influence,—commending itself to the general Conscience, winning reverence, inspiring self-devotion, and transmitting from heart to heart fervours of aspiration after the things of God
Silence - Herod was a weak man, with a Conscience certainly, but a Conscience that could be touched only by his superstitious fears
the Unmerciful Servant - And all your days you would have attributed any success of yours to that teacher who first printed that proverb on your young Conscience, and at the same time showed you how to perform it. He acted on his own intelligence, and judgment, and Conscience, in some matter in which we had the insolence and effrontery to dictate to him
Matthew - But, over against that, he had to content himself with a publican's companionships, and with a publican's inevitable evil Conscience. He felt sure that the Preacher was not well disposed toward him, and his Conscience would continually say to his face, How could He be? But at that so commanding gesture, and at those so commanding words, the chains of a lifetime of cruelty and extortion fell on the floor of the receipt of custom; till, scarcely taking time to clasp up his books and to lock up his presses, Matthew the publican of Capernaum rose up and followed our Lord
Ethics - God gave them a revelation of the standards of conduct he required in human relationships, and each individual’s Conscience judged that person according to those standards. Matthew 7:11; see Conscience; REVELATION)
Heart - of Conscience and faith. And He made it (3) a gracious influence,—commending itself to the general Conscience, winning reverence, inspiring self-devotion, and transmitting from heart to heart fervours of aspiration after the things of God
Truth - ( a ) In the Pauline writings there is a constant use of ‘the truth’ to describe God’s will as revealed primarily to the reason and Conscience of the natural man ( Romans 1:18 ; Romans 1:25 ), but especially in the gospel of Jesus Christ ( 2 Corinthians 4:2 , Galatians 3:1 etc
Hussites - However, his enemies so far prevailed, that, by the most scandalous breach of public faith, he was cast into prison declared a heretic, because he refused to plead guilty against the dictates of his Conscience, in obedience to the council, and burnt alive in 1415; a punishment which he endured with unparalleled magnanimity and resolution
Establishments - Religion, if it have any power, operates on the Conscience of men; and, resting solely on the belief of invisible realities, it can derive no weight or solemnity from human sanctions. Finally, though all Christians should pay respect to civil magistrates as such, and all magistrates ought to encourage the church, yet no civil magistrates have any power to establish any particular form of religion, binding upon the Consciences of the subject; nor are magistrates even represented in scripture as officers or rulers of the church
Water - It is his conviction that, while the blood of goats and bulls and the ashes of a heifer (according to a Scripture which he does not question) cleanse the flesh (Hebrews 9:13), and while water purifies the body (Hebrews 10:22), only the blood of Christ can sprinkle the heart from an evil Conscience (Hebrews 9:14, Hebrews 10:22)
Ignorance - Ignorance arose, according to the apostles, as much from the condition of the Conscience and the spirit as from the state of the mind (cf
Hell - ...
A perpetual fire was kept to consume this putrefying matter; hence it became the image of that awful place where all that are unfit for the holy city are cast out a prey to the ever gnawing "worm" of Conscience from within and the "unquenchable fire" of torments from without
Nonconformists - Such as absent themselves on the plea of Conscience; as Presbyterians, Independents, Baptists, &c. However some affect to treat these men with indifference, and suppose that their Consciences were more tender than they need be, it must be remembered, that they were men of as extensive learning, great abilities, and pious conduct as ever appeared. King William coming to the throne, the famous Toleration Act passed, by which they were exempted from suffering the penalties above-mentioned, and permission given them to worship God, according to the dictates of their own Consciences
Ark of the Covenant - ...
New Testament Hebrews 9:1-10 shows the ark was a part of the old order with external regulations waiting for the new day of Christ to come with a perfect Sacrifice able to cleanse the human Conscience
Jacob - ' Then he had to meet Esau, and doubtless Conscience smote him, for he was greatly alarmed
Pilate - This was enough to justify Jesus Christ, as Calmet observes, and to prove that he held him as innocent; but it was not enough to vindicate the Conscience and integrity of a judge, whose duty it was as well to assert the cause of oppressed innocence, as to punish the guilty
Jacob - ' Then he had to meet Esau, and doubtless Conscience smote him, for he was greatly alarmed
Law - A rule of direction a directory as reason and natural Conscience. ...
Wager of law, a species of trial formerly used in England, in which the defendant gave security that he would, on a certain day, make his law, that is, he would make oath that he owed nothing to the plaintiff, and would produce eleven of his neighbors as compurgators, who should swear that they believed in their Consciences that he had sworn the truth
Balaam - Bishop Butler speaks of the self-deception by which he persuades himself that the sin he commits can be justified to Conscience and to God; Newman regards him as an instance of the trouble that can come on a character, otherwise noble, when the thought of material advancement is always allowed to dwell with it; Arnold adduces him as an instance of the familiar truth that the purest form of religious belief may coexist with a standard of action immeasurably below it; F
Naturalness - ...
It is quite in keeping with this view of the facts, that the Lord Jesus never hesitated to appeal to the natural instinct of men On questions of Conscience
Gospel - And this refers to the observance not of one part of the Law but of the whole; what appealed to the Conscience of men everywhere, ceremonial Judaism, and the tradition of the elders-all that νόμος means is included. The ‘parenthesis’ of the Law had for its purpose to create the full knowledge of sin (διὰ νόμον ἐπίγνωσις ἁμαρτίας), to produce in the Conscience the conviction of it. The last verse of Romans 7 marks the point at which the great harden which lay upon the Conscience rolls away; and the next chapter begins with an uplifting of the heart in recovered peace and serenity; “There is therefore now no condemnation to them that are in Christ Jesus” ’ (Sanday-Headlam, op
Guilt (2) - The Gentiles have the Law, being enlightened by Conscience (Romans 2:14-15; cf. ), the evil Conscience (Hebrews 10:22). The Conscience must be purged from dead works (Hebrews 9:14, Hebrews 10:22), which are to be distinguished from their present results in character
Sacrifice - ...
The sacrifice had no intrinsic efficacy, and could never "make him that did the service perfect as pertaining to the Conscience" (Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 10:1; Hebrews 10:11); but they vividly typified "Christ who through the eternal Spirit offering Himself without spot to God purges the Conscience front dead works to serve the living God" (Hebrews 9:14); so that we can "draw near with a true heart, in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil Conscience" (Hebrews 13:10-13)
John the Baptist - All the appetites of John's body, and all the affections of John's mind and heart, were drunk up and drained dry by the all-consuming fires of his unquenchable Conscience. If all sight and sense and Conscience of sin had utterly died out of Israel in that day, it had only died out of all other men's hearts to rage like the bottomless pit itself in the great broken heart of Elizabeth's substituted son
Consecrate - Milgrom, Cult and Conscience ; idem, Suppl
Sin - , through the holiness of the Law, the true nature of sin was designed to be manifested to the Conscience; ...
(b) a governing principle or power, e
Sandemanians - They had taught that though acceptance with God, which included the forgiveness of sins, was merely on account of the imputed righteousness of Christ, yet that none was accepted of God, nor forgiven, till he repented of his sin, and received Christ as the only Saviour; but he insists that there is acceptance with God through Christ for sinners, while such, or before "any act, exercise, or exertion of their minds whatsoever:" consequently before repentance; and that "a passive belief of this quiets the guilty Conscience, begets hope, and so lays the foundation for love
Monotheism - The bitter experiences of exile and suffering on the one hand, and on the other the lofty teachings of prophets and men of God, had eradicated all tendencies to polytheism, and had fixed immovably in the Conscience and conviction of the entire nation the faith that Jehovah was the one God of the whole earth
Alexander - excommunicated, because he withstood the apostle, and made shipwreck of faith and of good Conscience, and even blasphemed, with Hymenaeus
Philosophists - Conscience and remorse are nothing but the foresight of those physical penalties to which crimes expose us
Giving - Rules which the individual may lay down for his own guidance are for the individual Conscience to determine, but ‘the Christian law is the spirit of Christ, that Enthusiasm of Humanity which He declared to be the source from which all right action flows’ (Ecce Homo)
Heart - ”...
The “heart” may be the seat of Conscience and moral character
Heaven - Instead of the land of Canaan, we have heaven; for the earthly Jerusalem, we have the heavenly, the city of the living God; in place of the congregation of Israel after the flesh, we have the general assembly and church of the first-born, that is, all true believers "made perfect;" for just men in the imperfect state of the old dispensation, we have just men made perfect in evangelical knowledge and holiness; instead of Moses, the mediator of the old covenant, we have Jesus the Mediator of the new and everlasting covenant; and instead of the blood of slaughtered animals, which was sprinkled upon the Israelites, the tabernacle, and all the vessels of the sanctuary, to make a typical atonement, we have the blood of the Son of God, which was shed for the remission of the sins of the whole world; that blood which doth not, like the blood of Abel, call for vengeance but for mercy, which hath made peace between heaven and earth, effected the true and complete atonement for sin, and which therefore communicates peace to the Conscience of every sinner that believes the Gospel
New Commandment - It is a ‘law of liberty,’ which the enlightened Conscience originates for itself
Prodigal Son - Love alone is capable of rendering the Conscience sensitive to the finest shades of justice
Will - But to me it seems the testimony of Conscience and experience, which, in natural religion, must, as I conceive, be preferred to abstract hypothesis. But the experience of common sense and Conscience will always decide, that no man can conscientiously make this excuse for his crimes, that he could not have willed or acted otherwise than he did. In the case of nations, however, considered merely as bodies politic, the internal sanction of an approving or reproaching Conscience, of subdued or distracting passions, can have no existence; and therefore the external sanctions are more uniformly enforced
Hebrews, Theology of - Instead of a temporary covering for sin it provides for each believer "a purifying of the Conscience to serve the living God, " from a heart motivated totally by confidence in the unconditional nature of his redemptive love. The believer is provided with optimum assurance of salvation: a Conscience purified from the tyranny of dead works, released to serve the living God
Confession - The language of penitence lay in the OT ready for use when John’s fervent appeal stirred the Consciences of men into self-accusation. For him Conscience was supreme arbiter, No troubled Conscience can find relief save in full acknowledgment of fault
Call, Calling - ’ ‘Call’ as a substantive occurs in English much earlier than our Authorized Version, but presumably the purely physical idea—the audible call—was too strongly marked in it to allow of its standing for God’s address to the Conscience. Paul would never make it matter of Conscience that a Christian should refrain from changing his trade]'>[5]
Obedience (2) - Were this the testimony of the Jews, who were self-righteous, and thus incapacitated for judging of their true spiritual condition, it would have no value; but it is the testimony of a specially sensitive Conscience, one which saw deeper into the meaning of the Law than others, which enjoyed perfect communion with God (John 14:9; John 12:45). The spirit will bring him into eventual accord with the objective demands of reason and Conscience
Laws, Penal - In Massachusetts, where Congregationalism was established, only Church members were admitted to civicfreedom, heresy was punished by banishment (1631), Catholics were not allowed to live in the colony, death was the punishment for the return of a banished Jesuit, and although in 1691 liberty of Conscience was decreed to all Christians, the clause "except Papists" was inserted
Saint - The moral activities of the saint are rooted in a ‘patience’ which obeys the voice of illumined Conscience, and humbly believes in Jesus at all costs (Revelation 14:12; cf
Death - The fear of death is a source of uneasiness to the generality, and to a guilty Conscience it may indeed be terrible; but to a good man it should be obviated by the consideration that death is the termination of every trouble; that it puts him beyond the reach of sin and temptation: that God has promised to be with the righteous, even to the end, Hebrews 13:5
Union - In the region of the Conscience, union with Christ gives peace (Romans 8:1); in that of the will, regeneration (Galatians 2:20); in regard to our activity, ‘we are labourers together with God’ (1 Corinthians 3:9, 2 Corinthians 6:1); and in regard to all events, we are sharers with Christ in suffering and in glory (Romans 8:17, 2 Timothy 2:12; see also John 17:20-24)
Corban - Which has the higher claim on a man’s Conscience? The service of God, promoted by the gift, and the Law obeyed by keeping the vow inviolate? or, the support of poor aged parents, the Law broken and the vow violated? It was a delicate matter, and we can scarcely wonder that the Rabbis of Christ’s day adhered to the literal significance of Deuteronomy 23:21-23, and held that nothing could justify the retractation of a vow
Denial - It has been suggested that his falsehoods would sit lightly on his Conscience, on the ground that he felt justified in giving no kind of information about himself or his Master which might compromise a movement which he imagined was but temporarily arrested
Book of Life - ‘We must therefore understand it of a certain Divine power by which it shall be brought about that every one shall recall to memory all his own works, whether good or evil, and shall mentally survey them with a marvellous rapidity, so that this knowledge will either accuse or excuse Conscience, and thus all and each shall be simultaneously judged
Decius, Emperor - Others found an ingenious way of satisfying their Conscience and securing their position and life
Stumbling - —'Why do you not, then,' said I, interrupting him, ‘why do you not perform your promise by changing horses, when you are convinced in your Conscience (if you have any) that it was part of our agreement?'— ‘Once for all, I tell you,' interrupted he, ‘I will not give up this horse
Hebrews Epistle to the - They could not cleanse the Conscience or take away real sin. Frequent repetition was necessary because they had no efficacy in the spiritual sphere; they could not take away sin or cleanse the Conscience (Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 10:1-4). It has the power ‘to cleanse the Conscience from dead works’ (Hebrews 9:14) and ‘to make perfect for ever them that are sanctified’ ( Faith - Paul towards the close of the Epistle to the Romans 14, where those weak in faith do not understand the extent of their freedom in Christ, and find themselves bound in Conscience by irritating non-Christian customs. They must be clear in mind and Conscience before they break even these customs. Deacons must hold the ‘mystery of the faith in a pure Conscience’ (1 Timothy 3:9)
Faith - Paul towards the close of the Epistle to the Romans 14, where those weak in faith do not understand the extent of their freedom in Christ, and find themselves bound in Conscience by irritating non-Christian customs. They must be clear in mind and Conscience before they break even these customs. Deacons must hold the ‘mystery of the faith in a pure Conscience’ (1 Timothy 3:9)
Unbelief - Through this principle of deifying the powers of nature, by which every exertion of bare power, even though immoral, might be received among the objects of religious veneration, the idea of holiness which beams forth from man's Conscience must continually have been thrown into the back ground and overshadowed. Man is not struck by the inquiry, "How shall I, unclean as I am, approach the holy God, and stand before him, when he judges me according to the holy law which he has himself engraven on my Conscience? What shall I do to become free from the guilt which oppresses me, and again to attain to communion with him?" To make inquiries such as these, this spirit of deism considers as fanaticism; and it casts away from itself all notions of God's anger, judgments, or punishments, as representations arising only from the limited nature of the human understanding
Lot - But as Lot's guardian angel would have it, one of Lot's herdmen escaped; and how his heart would sink as he came near Abraham's encampment at Hebron! But to whom else could he go? His own Conscience of the past bitterly upbraided him as he told Abraham the disaster; but Abraham had something else to do than to trample on a fallen man. But to come out of that manufacture, that import, that export; to refund with usury those moneys; to rise up at the loss of thousands and thousands, nay, possibly at the loss of every penny a man possesses; to leave a splendidly paying business merely at the twinge of a secretly tortured Conscience,-no man ever does it
Sacrifices - Now, they had a Conscience of sin. Thus, to meet the displeasure of God witnessed by an accusing Conscience (Romans 2:15) or by experience of the state of the world (Romans 1:18), there was need of ‘the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, whom God set forth to be a propitiation by his blood’ (Romans 3:24 f
Moravians - The persecutions which took place at the beginning of the eighteenth century, were the occasion that many of the scattered descendants of the Bohemian and Moravian Brethren at length resolved to quit their native land, and seek liberty of Conscience in foreign countries
Necessitarians - We blame and condemn ourselves when we do amiss; but guilt, and inward sense of shame, and remorse of Conscience, are feelings which are inconsistent with the scheme of necessity
Josiah - His tenderness of heart (conscience) and his humbling himself before God with tears and rent garments brought God's promise through Huldah that he should be "gathered to his grave in peace," and "should not see the evil God was about to bring on" Jerusalem
Sanctification - Through the death of Christ the worshipper has the individual experiences of forgiveness, freedom from guilt, purification of Conscience. His God is ‘a consuming fire’ (Hebrews 12:29); the word of God is ‘sharper than any two-edged sword,’ penetrating to the inmost recesses of the human Conscience (Hebrews 4:12). The sacrifice of Jesus, therefore, in virtue of this essential unity, realized in the Incarnation, is effective for the purification of the human Conscience, and in making men fit to stand in the presence of the Holy God
Law - It is, in a manner, far more miraculous that God should at that early age, among those half-civilized tribes, have written these laws by His spirit on man’s Conscience and understanding, than that amid thunder and flame He should have inscribed them with His own fingers upon two tables of stone. The law stands because the Saviour, in laying down for us the correct lines of its interpretation has sealed it with the stamp of Divine approval, but also because the Conscience and reason of mankind have recognized in its simplicity and comprehensiveness a sublime exposition of man’s duty to his God and to his neighbour; because ‘by manifestation of the truth it has commended itself to every man’s Conscience in the sight of God’ (cf
Freedom of the Will - Both systems, however, are definitely opposed to Butler’s expedient of placing ‘reasonable self-love’ on a level with Conscience. In so far as Butler’s conception of Conscience corresponds with Kant’s categorical imperative, reasonable self-love leads to sheer heteronomy; and if we may compare obedience to Conscience with the new life of freedom which, in St
Forgiveness (2) - In spite of the long controversy which has taken place as to the mysterious sin against the Holy Ghost and the misunderstandings concerning it which have caused unspeakable spiritual anguish to thousands, there seems little question that the only sin thus pronounced unpardonable is that of wilful and persistent sinning against light till light itself is turned into darkness,—the perverting of truth at its very source, where the Holy Spirit Himself instructs the Conscience, and thus poisoning the wells of the soul. ’ The sin of Christ’s murderers, heinous indeed beyond expression, was a sin against the Son of man, and—at least in the case of most of those implicated and so far as the full gravity of the offence was concerned—it was not such a deliberate and complete perversion of Conscience as to amount to a sin against the Holy Spirit. Rather is it to be understood that the unforgiving man shows essential impenitence, or at best an uneducated Conscience in respect of his relations with his fellows
Bible - The exact adaptation of the Bible to man's complex being, body, soul, and spirit - reason, emotion, Conscience - and to outward nature in its varied aspects, confirms its divine authorship. It gives peace to the Conscience, without lowering the holy strictness of God's justice, but, on the contrary, in Christ "magnifying the law and making it honorable
Light - the inner light of Conscience, the heart, or the soul. ); Christ’s revelation is an appeal to the reason and Conscience of mankind as the controlling principle of conduct; ‘the light of life’ is the light which brings life, and life is more than mere intellectualism (John 17:3)
Fire - Men have made a type out of it saying it refers to a burning Conscience. Those who seek to spiritualize the word, and make it mean the "torment of a Conscience" have no ground whatever for their philosophy)
Sabbath - ), to the category of things morally indifferent, with regard to which each man must follow the dictates of his Conscience
Bereans - Upon this subject they say, the majority of professed Christians stumble at the very threshold of revelation; and, by admitting the doctrine of natural religion, natural Conscience, natural notices, &c
Timothy, the First Epistle to - ...
Not knowing the true use of "the law" (1 Timothy 1:7-8) the false teachers "put away good Conscience," as well as "the faith" (1 Timothy 1:19; 1 Timothy 4:2), "spoke lies in hypocrisy, corrupt in mind," regarded "piety as a means of gain" (1 Timothy 6:5; Titus 1:11); "overthrew the faith" by heresies "eating as a canker, saying the resurrection is past, leading captive silly women, ever learning yet never knowing the truth, reprobate as Jannes and Jambres (2 Timothy 3:6-8), defiled, unbelieving, professing to know God but in works denying Him, abominable, disobedient, reprobate" (Titus 1:15-16)
Questions And Answers - ...
(c) Appeals to the Conscience of the hearers: Matthew 23:17 ff
Voice (2) - Its interpretation is left to the Conscience of catholic Israel
Fall - ...
(3) What, then, is meant by the ‘knowledge of good and evil,’ which was acquired by eating of the tree? Does it mean simply an enlargement of experience such as the transition from childhood to maturity naturally brings with it, and of which the feeling of shame (Genesis 3:7 ) is the significant index? Or is it, as has generally been held, the experimental knowledge of moral distinctions, the awaking of the Conscience, the faculty of discerning between right and wrong? It is very difficult to say which of these interpretations expresses the thought in the mind of the writer
Ahab - Conscience made Ahab a coward, and selfishness made him reckless of his professed friendship to Jehoshaphat
Growing - If they had eyes to see these things, and ears to hear them,—if they would only ‘consider’ (Luke 12:24; Luke 12:27) them,—heart and Conscience would do the rest
Liberty (2) - Paul prays that the word may have ‘free course,’ may run (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ) (τρεχῃ), spreading the gospel abroad with a free unhindered spirit (2 Thessalonians 3:1), and leaving each worker to develop his own methods (1 Corinthians 9:1) and rules of conduct—‘Why is my liberty judged by another man’s Conscience?’ (10:29)
Marriage (i.) - In the Epistles it is evident that the higher conception of marriage prevalent among the Jews was gravely endangered by the inherited views still familiar to the mind, though condemned by the Conscience, in the Gentile membership of the Church (1 Corinthians 7)
Fornication - He bases the right on the law of expediency, but he recommends regard for the weak brother’s Conscience (1 Corinthians 8:4-13; 1 Corinthians 10:18, Romans 14:20 f
Providence - Conscience stings the wicked, or civil punishments or the consequences of violating nature's laws overtake them
Abraham - ‘He goes through life,’ it has been well said, ‘listening for the true tôrâ , which is not shut up in formal precepts, but revealed from time to time to the Conscience; and this leaning upon God’s word is declared to be in Jahweh’s sight a proof of genuine righteousness
Offices of Christ - On account of that moral evil which blinds the soul to the knowledge and perception of God, we need a Mediator to reveal God and to enlighten the Conscience; and here Christ, as the Light of the world, appears in His prophetic office
Balaam - Do you remember how James Stuart dragged Robert Bruce about, seeking a place and a point of view from which that great preacher and great patriot might be got to preach and to pray to the king's dictation? If our young ministers would have a life-long lesson and illustration in fearlessness, in fidelity, and in a good Conscience to the end of a life of bribes on the one hand, and of persecution and banishment on the other, let them read themselves deeply into those two narratives so unsurpassable in effectiveness for a minister, the Life of Balaam in the history of Israel, and the Life of Bruce in the history of Scotland and of England. And that other who changes his minister for the peace of his Conscience, he also is Balak and Balaam seeking a spot where they can get at their sin without that restraint
Temple - Had he been advised by James to prove that he habitually observed the Law as a matter of Conscience, he could never have consented
Sin - The strong influences of Conscience, will-power, civil laws and social customs may stop people from doing all that their hearts are capable of, and may even cause them to do good (Luke 6:33; Luke 11:13; Romans 2:14-15; Romans 13:3)
Blood - ...
In the language of sacrifice we have “expiation” (removal of sins, Romans 3:25 ); “sprinkling of the blood of Jesus” (1 Peter 1:1-2 ); “redeemed by precious blood as of a lamb without spot and without blemish” (1 Peter 1:19 ); “blood of His Son cleanses us from all sin” (1 John 1:7 ); “blood that cleanses the Conscience” (Hebrews 9:14 ); and “blood of an eternal covenant” (Hebrews 13:20 )
Fall, the - No one would come into life with a pure heart and Conscience
Stephen - The forerunner of Paul, whose conversion was the first fruit of his prayer for his murderers; among the pricks of Conscience which Saul vainly strove to resist (Acts 9:5) the foremost was remorse at the remembrance of the part he took in the last touching scene of the holy martyr's execution
Gnosticism - It is only mere speculative knowledge that is ‘falsely so called’ ( 1 Timothy 6:20 ), because it does not take its rise and find its life and sustenance in God’s revelation in Christ; but Christian gnosis received into the heart, mind, Conscience and will, is that by which we are enabled to see the true as opposed to the false ‘to distinguish things that differ’ ( Philippians 1:10 ), and to adhere closely to the way of truth and life
Philosophy - On the one side he upheld the supremacy of Conscience, on the other the working of Providence
Joab - ...
Conscience at times works on the most daring, as in this case
Neighbour (2) - Paul treats of the matter in reference to a particular instance, pointing out that even Christian liberty must be willingly laid aside if it in any way tends to hurt the Conscience of a weaker brother
Christ in the Early Church - It is quite evident that the general Conscience of the Church revolted against both Adoptianism and Patripassianism, though the uncertainty of theological terms, the absence of a fixed theological vocabulary, and the difficulty of arriving at common action owing to the stress of frequent persecutions, rendered it difficult for the Church as a whole to come to close quarters with these different forms of error. We thus enter upon the era of the great Councils, called ‘Œcumenical,’ as involving an appeal to the universal Conscience and witness of the Christian Church throughout the world. With all its mystery, the Catholic faith of Nicaea and Chalcedon was felt by the common Christian Conscience alone to satisfy all the different sides of truth as they are contained in Scripture, and to do justice to all that Christians from the first had believed concerning their Master
High Priest - ...
Superior to the Aaronic priests (Hebrews 7:11; Hebrews 7:16; Hebrews 7:22; Hebrews 8:1-2; Hebrews 8:6) in that He was "consecrated with an oath" (Hebrews 7:20-21), has an intransmissible priesthood (margin of Hebrews 7:23; Hebrews 7:28), was "holy, harmless, and undefiled," and without "infirmity" (Judaeorum 5:5,), "faithful to Him that appointed Him" as the "Son," whereas Moses the lawgiver was but a "servant"; needed no sacrifice for Himself (Hebrews 7:27); Himself the sacrifice, purifying "the heavenly things" (Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 9:26), "better" than the sacrifices which "purified the patterns of things in the heavens" (Hebrews 7:23); not often, but offered once for all (Hebrews 7:27; Hebrews 9:25-26; Hebrews 9:28; Hebrews 10:1-2; Hebrews 10:12; Hebrews 10:9-10; Hebrews 10:14; Hebrews 10:17-18); "making him that did the service perfect, as pertaining to the Conscience," which the law sacrifices could not (Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 10:1-2; Hebrews 10:16-22). ...
Having such a "high priest passed into the heavens," "over the house of God," we ought to "hold fast our profession," "without wavering," ever "drawing near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil Conscience" (Hebrews 4:14; Hebrews 10:21-23)
Anger - ...
The idea of the ‘Divine anger’-this attitude of Deity towards certain courses of human life-is a justifiable inference from the intuitions of Conscience, but another and an unsound argument played a part in the historical formation of the doctrine. ...
The death of Jesus may be regarded partly as a vicarious sacrifice of the order recognized in the Synoptic-suffering and self-denial for the sake of the Kingdom of God, for Conscience, and men’s uplifting
Peter, First Epistle of - Quickened in spirit by death, Christ carried the gospel to the godless world that perished in the Flood, through which Noah and his family were saved, a type of the Christian who in his baptism asks God for a good Conscience, and is cleansed through the risen Christ now triumphant over all His enemies,1 Peter 3:18-22 1 Peter 3:18-22 . At baptism the believer has his Conscience cleansed through the risen Christ; and the new life springing from the seed of the word of God planted in the heart grows by feeding upon that word
Regeneration - Especially there comes into view here the peculiar awakening of the soul through the Conscience, which takes the form of what we call conviction of sin towards God (cf
Judgment - Judgments are continuous in the sphere of moral life, as Conscience persistently affirms
Temptation - Natural instincts and appetites, which are morally neutral, become sinful only when seen to be in conflict with the will of God as revealed in Conscience
Mammon - At best, then, it is a means, not an end, for the Christian, and a means which demands care and Conscience for its wise employment, lest life degenerate into the mercenary and narrowing spirit which devotes itself to what Bacon called ‘a Sabbathless pursuit of fortune,’ a culpable love of acquisition and material goods, and an insidious appetite for self-gratification which deadens the higher faculties of the soul and stunts the instinct of self-sacrifice
Intercession - ...
In Philippians 1:9-11 he prays that love and knowledge and discernment may inspire them to approve things that are excellent with a pure Conscience that offends none, and a life filled with the fruits of righteousness
Corinthians, Epistles to the - ...
1 Corinthians 8 : This refers to things offered to idols, a question which could only arise in the same way in a heathen country, though the principle of regarding the Conscience of a weak brother is always true
Blasphemy (2) - But when it was perceived and yet deliberately treated as evil, the action would indicate a wilful reversal of the dictates of Conscience
Gospel - It is styled, "the Gospel of Christ," because he is the Author and great subject of it, Romans 1:16 ; and "the Gospel of peace and salvation," because it publishes peace with God to the penitent and believing, gives, to such, peace of Conscience and tranquillity of mind, and is the means of their salvation, present and eternal
Hellenists - They often allowed their converts to take up a kind of dead monotheism, and merely exchange one kind of superstition for another; they taught them, that, by the mere outward worship of one God, and outward ceremonials, they were sure of the grace of God, without requiring any change of life; and they gave to them only new means of silencing their Conscience, and new support in the sins which they were unwilling to renounce: and hence our Saviour reproached these proselyte- makers, that they made their converts ten times more the children of hell, than they themselves were
Herod - This and other calamities, joined to a guilty Conscience, preying upon a broken constitution, threw the wretched monarch into a mortal disease, which was doubtless a just judgment of heaven on the many foul enormities and impieties of which he had been guilty
Adultery - Conscience and imagination would conspire together, and render it almost impossible for her to drink it out
Law - 3), is used in Romans 2:12 (twice), where "(have sinned) without law" means in the absence of some specifically revealed "law," like the "law" of Sinai; "(shall perish) without law" predicates that the absence of such a "law" will not prevent their doom; the "law" of Conscience is not in view here
Joannes ii, Bishop of Jerusalem - He professes to know nothing about Origen, not even who he was, while yet he has condemned his opinions; and as to Rufinus, he only says that, if his translation of the works of Origen implies an acceptance of his opinions (a matter which he leaves to his own Conscience), he must see where he can procure absolution
Temptation - Natural instincts and appetites, which are morally neutral, become sinful only when seen to be in conflict with the will of God as revealed in Conscience
Intercession - ...
In Philippians 1:9-11 he prays that love and knowledge and discernment may inspire them to approve things that are excellent with a pure Conscience that offends none, and a life filled with the fruits of righteousness
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - Nor can they be solved, unless the relation of the individual Conscience to the public, and of the individual soul to the church, were accurately known and defined. It should be remembered that the Christian faith had by its own influences so elevated and organized the influence of the human Conscience as to have become a temporal power by the nature of things
Old Testament - On occasion the Apostle might approach their Conscience by this path (cf. ...
The author applies the same categories to the Law, by which, however, he means not the moral command that pressed so hard on the Conscience of St
Offence (2) - The danger of doing this is the more serious that it is possible to do it (so to speak) with a good Conscience. In the whole region in which liberty can be asserted, it is to be exercised only in subordination to love; to violate this rule and so injure others in their Conscience and in their relation to Christ is the most un-Christian sin of which a Christian can be guilty
Unity - Apart from special revelation, man possesses a rational and moral nature, made for the knowledge and love of God, with capacities for discerning the self-manifestations of God in His creative and providential activities (Acts 14:17, Romans 1:19-21); and especially does Conscience bear witness to the sovereign imperative of His righteousness (Romans 2:14-15)
Paul as a Preacher - ...
We preach not ourselves, Paul asserts with a good Conscience in another sermon of his. Paul rips open all the dark secrets of our Consciences, and all the hidden rottennesses of our hearts, till he is the one preacher of all preachers for us
Atonement - Through it, sin is forgiven (Ephesians 1:7 ), and the Conscience is cleansed (Hebrews 9:14 )
the Publican - It was not what the publican had actually and openly done that festered like hell-fire in his heart and Conscience, it was what he himself inwardly was, and inwardly was to himself alone
Balaam - ...
But what decides the infamy of Balaam's character is this, that under all the impressions that the Lord had blessed Israel, and would bless them, Balaam was still so very earnest to oblige Balak, and get his promised reward, that he set off expressly the purpose of cursing Israel; neither, as the apostle saith, did "the dumb ass, speaking with man's voice, forbidding the madness of the prophet," keep back his feet from the evil of his journey; so much did he love the wages of unrighteousness? (See 2 Peter 2:16)...
I need not go through with a comment on the several interesting particulars of Balaam's tampering with his Conscience while with Balak, in seeking enchantments, and in using every effort to curse God's people, while all he said and did the Lord over-ruled to make him bless them
Swedenborgians - It is believed, by a large majority of them, that it was never his intention that any particular sect should be formed upon his doctrines, but that all who receive them, whether in the establishment, or in any other communion of Christians, should be at perfect liberty either to continue in their former communion, or to quit it, as their Conscience dictates
David - And then occurred those shameful deeds, the adultery with Bath-sheba, and the murder of Uriah, which at first, it seems, did not touch his Conscience, but which, when charged home upon him by the prophet Nathan, humbled the guilty monarch in the dust
David - " "They have ascribed unto David ten thousands, and to me but thousands, and what can he have more but the kingdom?" Conscience told him he had forfeited his throne; and remembering Samuel's word after his disobedience as to the Amalekites (1 Samuel 15:28), "the Lord hath rent the kingdom of Israel from thee this day, and hath given it to a neighbor of thine that is better than thou," he "eyed David" as possibly the "neighbor" meant. Greatly trembling at the Philistine hosts, war-like though he was, but cowed by a guilty Conscience, he who had made David to "wander up and down" now in his turn wanders hither and there for that spiritual guidance which Jehovah withheld and at last by night in disguise was a suppliant before the witch of Endor, which sealed his destruction (1 Samuel 28; 1 Chronicles 10:13)
Quakers - They inculcate submission to the laws in al cases wherein Conscience is not violated. "...
The yearly meeting of London, in the year 1675, appointed a meeting to be held in that city, for the purpose of advising and assisting in case of suffering for Conscience-sake, which hath continued with great use to the society to this day
Sin - Can we separate, or must we identify, guilt and sense of guilt? Is there an objective fact and a subjective feeling? If sin is confined strictly to conscious and voluntary acts, then guilt, it would seem, must be measured by the sense of guilt, the blame-worthiness or evil desert that the Conscience of the sinner assigns to him. Paul was echoing the teaching not only of the OT and of Jesus Himself (Matthew 11:22; Matthew 23:37; Matthew 23:39) but of the universal human Conscience, confirmed by the course of human history
Death of Christ - And it is only thus that the cultured Christian Conscience can find true, adequate, abiding moral satisfaction. Out of this fact springs the inspiration necessary to illuminate the human Conscience with divinest moral ideas, and to make it live in the divinest power of moral sentiment
Peter Epistles of - Believers are not being arraigned because it is a crime per se to be a Christian, nor are they condemned on this charge; it is only from the point of view of their own clear Conscience that they can glory in being reproached for the name of Christ. This fact may have furnished one of the incentives for the writing of 1 Peter, exhorting believers to maintain a firm defence of their faith in Christ, yet a defence to be made with meekness and fear, while they thus retain a good Conscience and hope for the best (1 Peter 3:15 f
Wine And Strong Drink - Romans 14:13-21 ) appeals to the individual Conscience with greater urgency and insistence than ever before in the experience of Jew or Christian
Clean, Unclean - Typologically, the ashes of the red heifer (for corpse contamination), the sin offering, and the ritual baths foreshadowed the power of Jesus' blood to cleanse the Conscience (Hebrews 9:13-14 ; 10:22 ; 1 John 1:7 ; Revelation 7:14 )
Balaam - He at first speaks plainly to the Conscience His will; if the sinner resists the voice of His Spirit and His word He "answers the fool according to his folly," and "gives him up to his own desire" (Psalms 78:29-30; compare Romans 1:25-26; Romans 1:28; Proverbs 1:31); after long resistance by man, God's Spirit ceases to strive with him (Genesis 6:3)
the Unprofitable Servant - But I defy any apostle of Jesus Christ ever to have that ploughman's good Conscience
Sacrifice - Unlike the animal sacrifices, Christ’s sacrifice removes sin, cleanses the Conscience, brings total forgiveness and secures eternal redemption (1618399498_47; Leviticus 17:11; Hebrews 10:14-18)
Seventy (2) - Peace would include peace with God as well as with men, peace of Conscience, the peace of discipleship to a perfect Master (Matthew 11:28-30): the Kingdom of God would be, not a mere external, but an internal theocracy, the reign of God within as well as over men (Matthew 12:28, Mark 4:26-27); and this Empire of God was Peace
Jehoram - Their Conscience and superstitious feelings were so roused (probably a divine sign visibly accompanying this feeling) that they gave up the siege and the subjugation of Moab
Ishmael - The only fruit Ishmael derived from his crimes was being forced to flee as an outlaw, bearing about, Cain like, the murderer's brand, and a self torturing Conscience, the earnest of the worm that never dieth
Logos - But from Him there flows also the higher life of man as a spiritual being possessed of reason and Conscience, for His life becomes the universal light of human souls ( John 1:4 , cf
Hardening - They take for granted that responsibility which the Conscience, unless corrupted by sophistry, regards as the prerogative of every human being
Commandment - In so far as primitive Christianity, in contrast to the OT, appeals to the Conscience as the supreme tribunal of moral judgment (1 Corinthians 8:7 ff
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - You will go home at peace with God and with your own Conscience through the sin-atoning death of the Son of God
Excommunication (2) - If he will not listen, one or two other Christian brethren are to accompany the first as witnesses—not in any legal sense, we must suppose, but because ‘consensus in moral judgment carries weight with the Conscience’ (Bruce, op
Diocletian, Emperor - The Christian officers and servants of the emperor were present as part of their duty, and satisfied their Conscience by making the sign of the cross upon their foreheads
Elijah - It touches my heart; it speaks to my Conscience and that because, after all these years of prayer, how seldom it is that we really 'pray in our prayers,' as the apostle tells us that the prophet prayed
Romans, Epistle to the - Indeed, so far has corruption advanced that the Consciences of many have been defiled. His keener Conscience, if it leaves him unrepentant, will evoke the heavier penalty. Both Jew and Gentile will be judged alike, the Conscience in the Gentile corresponding to the Law in the case of the Jew ( 1618399499_59 )
Elijah - " There by the grand voice of nature, the strong wind rending the rocks, the earthquake, and the fire, (in none of which, though emanating from God, did He reveal Himself to Elijah,) and lastly by "a still small voice," God taught the impatient and desponding prophet that it is not by astounding miracles such as the fire that consumed the sacrifice, nor by the wind and earthquake wherewith God might have swept away the guilty nation, but by the still small voice of God's Spirit in the Conscience, that Jehovah savingly reveals Himself, and a revival of true religion is to be expected. )...
With Jehu and Bidkar his retinue riding behind, he proceeded to take possession of the coveted vineyard on the following day (compare "yesterday," 'emesh , "yesternight," the mock trial and murder of Naboth having taken place the day before); but, like a terrible apparition, the first person he meets there is the enemy of his wickedness, whom his Conscience quails before, more than before all other foes
Sinlessness - This was the spontaneous effect on a sensitive Conscience of the proximity of the Divine; it was the terror of sin at the manifestation of sinlessness. On the contrary, Strauss, in his books on the Life of Jesus, advanced further and further in the direction of denial; and Pécaut in Le Christ et la Conscience, 1859, displayed a zeal worthy of a better cause in heaping up every conceivable objection to the Saviour’s conduct
Mental Characteristics - ), and appealed without hesitation to the Conscience and instinct of every man, as to a sufficient and trustworthy test (Luke 13:15-16). ’ Thus exaltation never passed into ecstasy; zeal never into rashness or one-sidedness; sympathy never into sentimentality; determination never into obstinacy; Conscience never into scrupulosity; the habit of moral discrimination never into casuistry; standing indignation against the hypocrisies of the day never made Him censorious; a wonderful tenderness of heart left Him stern and uncompromising; and an energy which rejoiced in work, and shrank from nothing, never led Him to become exacting towards others or inconsiderate of their weakness
Eusebius (60), Bishop of Nicomedia - " Their Consciences did not scruple to "find evasions of a test. " They undoubtedly compromised themselves by signature; yet they did not treat as unimportant that which they were wont to declare such but set all the machinery of church and empire in motion to enforce their latitudinarian view on the Conscience of the church. The term Homoousion as applied to the Son of God rallied for a while their Conscience and Eusebius declared it to be untenable
Law - Again, the law often denotes the rule of good and evil, or of right and wrong, revealed by the Creator and inscribed on man's Conscience, even at his creation, and consequently binding upon him by divine authority; and in this respect it is in substance the same with the decalogue. It is from those common notions, handed down by tradition, though often imperfect and perverted, that the Heathens themselves distinguished right from wrong, by which "they were a law unto themselves, showing the work of the law written in their hearts, their Conscience bearing witness," Romans 2:12-15 , although they had no express revelation
Persecution - In short, the whole problem is concerned with the assertion on the part of the individual, and the denial on the part of the State, that there is a sphere within which the subject is free, and must be permitted to follow the promptings of his Conscience. Antiochus Epiphanes, the most powerful representative of the Seleucid dynasty, made an effort to complete the subjugation of Judah by conquering her soul, but in his campaign he came across a stronghold in the nation’s Conscience-or her religious self-consciousness-which defied all his assaults
Hebrews, the Epistle to the - Compare the Greek idiom, Hebrews 13:5, with Romans 12:9; Romans 13:18, "we trust we have a good Conscience," with
Retribution (2) - If men know where to find their happiness, how to seek for their reward, they have it now, just as the retribution of the evil Conscience is immediate
Priest, Priesthood - Since the Lord was physically present within the physical tabernacle structure in their midst, therefore, the physical purity of Israel was essential to the habitation of the Lord among them (note the contrast between cleansing the "flesh" by the Old Testament sacrifices as opposed to the cleansing of the "conscience" by the sacrifice of Christ in Hebrews 9:8-10,13-14 )
Revelation, Idea of - Christians have customarily seen general revelation in creation and in Conscience, distinguished from special, saving revelation in word (Holy Scripture), history (the "acts of God"), and the Person of Jesus Christ (incarnation)
God (2) - They had violated Conscience; they had quenched, at least for the moment, this inner and fundamental voice of God
Kenosis - The statement to the woman of Samaria about the number of her husbands (John 4:17-18) is very perplexing; and possibly, as the conversation was probably reported by the woman, may have been made more definite by her guilty Conscience than it actually was, even as she exaggerates in her account of what Christ had told her (John 4:29)
the Children of Capernaum Playing at Marriages And Funerals in the Market-Place - And to all such among you, amid scenes of misery caused by your wicked temper and your tyranny, your own Conscience must have told you to your face that you are the man
Thomas - It is the jealousy and the rage of a guilty Conscience
Judas - -To all the tremendous miseries of eternity he had to add, the special and peculiar aggravation in the everlasting and unceasing thought-that he, of all the creation of God, had this worm of Conscience that never dieth, to prey upon him to all eternity, that he it was that betrayed the Lord of life and glory
Job - And it is this-with his unparalleled sufferings, and with the incessant insinuations and insults of his three friends-it is all this that so racks and tortures Job's tender Conscience, and so darkens and crushes his pious heart, and so embitters and exasperates, sometimes almost to rank blasphemy, his far too many defences of himself
Naaman - Leprosy was so loathsome, and so utterly incurable and deadly, that it was not looked on as an ordinary disease at all: but, rather, as a special creation in His anger, and a direct curse of God, both to punish sin, and, at the same time, to teach His people something of what an accursed thing sin really is; till the whole nature of leprosy and all the laws laid down for its treatment, and the miraculous nature of its so seldom cure, all combined to work into the imagination, and into the Conscience, and into the heart, and into the ritual, and into the literature of Israel, some of her deepest lessons about the terrible nature and the only proper treatment of sin
Mary Magdalene - Do you not both know and confess all these things before yourself and before God every day? Do you not? O stone-dead soul! O sport and prey of Satan! O maker of God a liar, and the truth is not in you! I would not have your devil-possessed heart, and your Conscience seared with a redhot iron, for the whole world
Methodists, Protestant - he believed that man would never turn to God, if God did not begin the work: he often said that the first approaches of grace to the mind are irresistible; that is, that a man cannot avoid being convinced that he is a sinner; that God, by various means, awakens his Conscience; and whether the man will or no, these convictions approach him. "Have you faith in Christ? Are you going on to perfection? Do you expect to be perfected in love in this life? Are you groaning after it? Are you resolved to devote yourself wholly to God and to his work? Have you considered the rules of a helper? Will you keep them for Conscience' sake? Are you determined to employ all your time in the work of God? Will you preach every morning and evening? Will you diligently instruct the children in every place? Will you visit from house to house? Will you recommend fasting both by precept and example? "We then man receive him as a probationer, by giving him the Minutes of the Conference, inscribed thus:...
'To A
Lutherans - It was, therefore, in the loss of this celestial aid, this superadded gift, and not in any depravity of his mind, that they supposed the principal evil derivable from his lapse to consist; a loss, however, which, by a due exertion of his innate abilities, they deemed to be retrievable; and hence sprung that offensive doctrine of human sufficiency which, in the Lutheran's eye, completely obscured the glory of the Gospel, and which, when applied to the sinner's Conscience, taught the haughty to presume, and the humble to despair. They represented it as an effect produced by the infusion of divine grace into the mind; not as a consequent to a well spent life, but as preceding all remunerable obedience, as the intervening point between might and day, the gloom of a guilty and the light of a self-approving Conscience; or, in other words, and to adopt their own phraseology, as the exact boundary where merit of congruity ends and where merit of condignity begins, the infallible result of a previous disposition on our part, which never fails of alluring from on high that supernatural quality which, being itself love, renders the soul beloved
Sanctification, Sanctify - This He effects God-ward by ‘making propitiation for’ their ‘sins’ ( Hebrews 2:17 ), and man-ward by ‘cleansing their Conscience’ with the virtue of ‘his blood’ by removing the sense of personal guilt before God even as the animal sacrifices ‘sanctified’ the Israelites ‘unto the cleanness of the flesh’ ( Hebrews 9:13 f
Deuteronomy, the Book of - But if it was the whole Pentateuch put by the Levites, at Moses' command, in the sides of the ark (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:26; 2 Chronicles 34:14), still Deuteronomy was the part that mainly awakened the Conscience of king and people (Deuteronomy 12:2-3; Deuteronomy 12:16; Deuteronomy 12:18; Deuteronomy 29:25-27; compare Joshua 5:2; 2 Kings 22:23)
Baptism - "...
It saves us also, not of itself (any more than the water saved Noah of itself; the water saved him only by sustaining the ark, built in faith), but the spiritual thing conjoined with it, repentance and faith, of which it is the seal: as Peter proceeds to explain, "not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good Conscience toward God (the instrument whereby it so saves, being) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ" (Colossians 2:12; Ephesians 1:19-20); not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but of the soul. ...
The "good Conscience's" ability to give a satisfactory "answer" to the interrogation concerning faith and repentance ensures the really saving baptism of the Spirit into living fellowship with the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
Reality - —With no demure, sanctimonious airs, and no pretentious tones such as the Rabbis were wont to assume, He spoke straight to the heart and Conscience; and common people felt that His utterances came home with an authority they were compelled to own (Matthew 7:29)
Trust - Moreover, not even what men call a good Conscience can give security (1 Corinthians 4:3-4, 1 John 1:8 ff
Unpardonable Sin - Selfishness and pride, and not least religious selfishness and pride, may slowly harden the heart and sear the Conscience and seal the eyes, until men come to call good evil and light darkness, and are ready at last to say, even of one who manifests the Spirit of God and of Christ, ‘He hath a devil
Golden Rule - Nevertheless, at the basis of this contention there lies a truth, well expressed by Wesley: ‘It commends itself, as soon as heard, to every man’s Conscience and understanding; insomuch that no man can knowingly offend against it, without carrying his condemnation in his own breast’ (Sermon xxx
Individuality - the special demands of our own Conscience, to do nothing that is not of faith (Romans 14:23); to attend so far to the weakness of our own individuality as not to be enslaved to anything; and to regard the individuality of our neighbour so far as to take heed to what edifies (1 Corinthians 10:23)
Lazarus - ‘Not by any fault of his own, but by that of others, his Conscience had lost something of its original purity
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - Or he took his own judgment and Conscience for his guide in some matter in which you demanded to dictate to him
Devotion - Fasting, too, is associated with the Temptation (Matthew 4:2), of which one lesson is that a pure Conscience and an ideal conformity with God can be attained or retained only by self-discipline and hard steadfastness under testing
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - As also that the noblest and best men in all lands, and in all dispensations, are those who know themselves, and who out of that knowledge keep themselves under, and wait upon God, till they attain in His good time to both a blameless heart, a blameless Conscience, and a for ever blameless life
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - With every new advance in holiness, with every new progress in the knowledge of God and of himself, with every deeper and deeper entrance of the exquisitely holy law and spirit of God into his heart and Conscience, a minister's temptations multiply upon him, till he feels himself to be the most beset, behind and before, of all beset men that dwell upon the earth
the Ethiopian Eunuch - "I pray thee, of whom speaketh the prophet this? of himself, or of some other mar?" What struck the imagination and the Conscience of the eunuch was this: the absolutely unearthly picture that the prophet draws of his own character and conduct: if indeed it is of his own character and conduct the prophet speaks
Agony - The fickleness of the multitude, the hypocrisy and bigotry of the Pharisees, the worldliness and selfishness of the priesthood, the treachery of Judas, the denial by Peter, the antagonism of the disciples generally to the Master’s saving purpose, the falsehood of His accusers, the hate and the craft of His persecutors,—all these were present to the consciousness of Jesus as an intolerable offence to His Conscience, and an unspeakable grief to His heart
Barnabas - And shall Barnabas take on himself the immense responsibility, and, indeed, immense risk, of sending for Saul of Tarsus, and bringing him to Antioch? And shall Barnabas take this great step without first submitting Saul's name to the authorities at Jerusalem? There were great risks in both of these alternatives, and Barnabas had to act on his own judgment and Conscience and heart
Individuality - the special demands of our own Conscience, to do nothing that is not of faith (Romans 14:23); to attend so far to the weakness of our own individuality as not to be enslaved to anything; and to regard the individuality of our neighbour so far as to take heed to what edifies (1 Corinthians 10:23)
Gifts - Likewise, the approach to God by the believer is ‘a new and living way’ in that it is by the medium of the soul and Conscience, unaccompanied by outward gift or sacrifice, except that, like his Lord, the believer offers himself, or rather his body (cf
Friendship - His friendship is our better self, our Conscience
Jesuits - ...
Every novice who offers himself as a candidate for entering into the order, is obliged to manifest his Conscience to the superior, or a person appointed by him; and is required to confess not only his sins and defects, but to discover the inclinations, the passions, and the bent of the soul
Nehemiah - We should set ourselves to study what we less like, till that, too, has had its proper effect in moulding our Conscience and shaping our character
Peter, Second Epistle of - Scripture, and the Christian Conscience
Pilate - That Pilate had a tender enough Conscience or a sound enough idea of justice to try to save this ‘slave,’ should be remembered to his credit
Presence (2) - At the very moment when Judaism had its opportunity, it failed to give that abiding pledge of the presence of God which should satisfy heart, mind, and Conscience
Paul - During these years of diligent study he lived "in all good Conscience," unstained by the vices of that great city
Ethics - Such consent of the enlightened Conscience ensures that obedience is free, spontaneous, approving
Ethics - The term ‘conscience’ does not appear till NT times, and perhaps it was then borrowed from the Stoics; but the thing itself is conspicuous enough in the records of God’s ancient people
Hypocrisy - ...
Then the sin which lives by corrupting the Conscience has cut itself off from the usual appeal of holiness and love by which our Lord seeks to win men from other sins
Paul as a Man of Prayer - What a quiet Conscience Paul must have had, and what a happy heart, in this matter of intercessory prayer, compared with the most of us
Joseph - He allayed the fears of his Conscience-stricken brothers by the assurance that they had been the agents of Providence ‘to preserve life’ ( Genesis 45:5 ; cf
Peter, the Epistles of - the answer of a good Conscience toward God" (1 Peter 3:21); "consciousness of God" (1 Peter 2:19 Greek), i
Nebuchadnezzar - Can it be said about any of our living preachers of righteousness that his counsels have been acceptable to us, and that we have forgiven and obeyed him to the tranquillity of our Conscience to this day?...
Rather than bear the pain of truth, fools stray;The proud will rather lose than ask their way
Persecution - The moment that this was attempted, the foundation was laid for the most inflexible intolerance; because reluctance to submit was no longer regarded solely as a matter of Conscience, but as interfering with the interest and the dominion of the ruling party
Hypocrisy - ...
Then the sin which lives by corrupting the Conscience has cut itself off from the usual appeal of holiness and love by which our Lord seeks to win men from other sins
David - Nathan the prophet (2 Samuel 7:1-17 ; 12:1-23 ) was sent by God to bring home his crimes to the Conscience of the guilty monarch
Jacob - When his Conscience made him feel his flight was the just penalty of his deceit God comforts him by promises of His grace
Versions - "I call God to record (says he) against the day we shall appear before the Lord Jesus to give a reckoning of our doings, that I never altered one syllable of God's word against my Conscience, nor would this day, if all that is in the world, whether pleasure, honour, or riches, might be given me
Worship - This is expressed in Hebrews 10:22 : ‘Let us draw near with a true heart in fulness of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil Conscience, and our body washed with pure water
Forgiveness - Milgrom, Cult and Conscience: The Asham and the Priestly Doctrine of Repentance ; G
Humility - In presence of the holy revelation of the Son of God, Conscience becomes sensitive, and the sense of guilt, as in the case of Peter (Luke 5:8), weighs men down
Offerings, the - If the question be of a sinner's approach to God, the sin offering must necessarily come first: the question of sin must be met for the Conscience before the one who approaches can be in the position of a worshipper
Serpent - His reason assured him that there must be a God; his Conscience assured him that God was good; but he felt and acknowledged the prevalence of evil, and attributed it naturally to an evil agent
Philanthropy - It is the secret of civilization, and its hold upon the imagination and Conscience has become so great that it is now woven into the moral consciousness of men
Property (2) - The way in which renunciation is to be given effect to depends upon the circumstances of each case, and is a matter for the Conscience of each individual
Sanctification - One sanctifies Christ by responding to unbelievers meaningfully, out of a good Conscience and faithful life
Metaphor - Thus, 1 Timothy 1:19 : ‘holding faith and a good Conscience; which some having thrust from them made shipwreck concerning the faith
Sin (2) - Paul’s appeal is not to the equivocal testimony of external facts, which considered in themselves are non-moral, but to facts as interpreted by Conscience
Presbyterians - The presbytery treats of such matters as concern the particular churches within its limits; as the examination, admission, ordination, and censuring of ministers; the licensing of probationers, rebuking the gross or contumacious sinners, the directing the sentence of excommunication, the deciding upon references and appeals from kirk sessions, resolving cases of Conscience, explaining difficulties in doctrine or discipline; and censuring, according to the word of God, any heresy or erroneous doctrine which hath either been publicly or privately maintained within the bounds of its jurisdiction
Samuel - He was a clear-eyed, firm-handed, sure-footed, resolute-minded, righteous man, with an inborn sense of truth and righteousness: and all his opinions, and decisions, and sentences carried all men's consent and Conscience with them
Adam - O, if Adam had only believed God about sin and death! O, if he had only stopped his ears against the father of lies! O, if he could only have foretasted guilt and remorse and agony of Conscience as he was led up to the tree! O, if he could only at that fatal moment have foreseen that coming garden where the Son of God Himself lay among the dark olive-trees recoiling from sin and death in a sweat of blood! O, if he could only have seen spread out before him all the death-beds of all his children on the earth, and all the beds of their second death in hell! O Adam and Eve in Eden, and still under the tree of temptation, look before it is too late; look on through the endless ages at the unutterable woes that you are working! 'Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die
Prayer - The word of God is properly an instrument, because it contains the doctrine which that Spirit explains and applies, and the motives to faith and obedience which he enforces upon the Conscience and affections; and although prayer brings these truths and motives before us, prayer cannot properly be said to be an instrument of our regeneration, because that which is thus brought by prayer to bear upon our case is the word of God itself introduced into our prayers, which derive their sole influence in that respect from that circumstance
Propitiation (2) - Through His sacrifice a ‘purification of sins’ (Hebrews 1:3), a cleansing of the ‘conscience from dead works’ (Hebrews 9:14), is wrought, and access to God assured (Hebrews 10:9-22)
Presbyterians - The presbytery treats of such matters as concern the particular churches within its limits; as the examination, admission, ordination, and censuring of ministers; the licensing of probationers, rebuking the gross or contumacious sinners, the directing the sentence of excommunication, the deciding upon references and appeals from kirk sessions, resolving cases of Conscience, explaining difficulties in doctrine or discipline; and censuring, according to the word of God, any heresy or erroneous doctrine which hath either been publicly or privately maintained within the bounds of its jurisdiction
Lust - as the law of his own Conscience (Romans 7:7 ff
Justification (2) - But the deeper insight of his Conscience will not allow him to suppose that God can be satisfied with a mere preponderance of performance over transgression
Inspiration - The response of Conscience to the Law confirmed the traditional accounts of its origin, and the belief in its inspiration was inevitable
Acts of the Apostles (2) - In all these instances, as was fitting in addresses meant to lead the hearers to conviction and repentance, the innocence of Jesus is emphasised as a point to awaken Conscience, not as an element in a doctrine of the atoning death of Christ
Joshua - We are left to look for the answers to all these questions in our own house, among our own sons and daughters, and in our own heart and Conscience
Esther - What a long, and complex, and shining chain, link after link, till Mordecai fashioned its last link and bound it with his strong but tender hands upon both the imagination, and the Conscience, and the heart of Esther in these noble words: 'Think not with thyself that thou shalt escape in the king's house, more than all the Jews
Baptism - Some deferred it out of a tender Conscience; and others out of too much attachment to the world; it being the prevailing opinion of the primitive times, that baptism, whenever conferred, washed away all antecedent stains and sins
Arminianism - But he endeavoured, in the first place, to assert liberty of Conscience, and of worship; and then, upon that fundamental principle, to persuade all Christians, however divided in opinion, to lay aside the distinctions of sect and party, and in one united body to consult that tranquillity and peace which is so agreeable to the Christian name
Adam - "His reason would be clear, his judgment uncorrupted, and his Conscience upright and sensible
Jesus Christ - followed by the same silent gesture, made them feel the power of Conscience and withdraw
Humility - In presence of the holy revelation of the Son of God, Conscience becomes sensitive, and the sense of guilt, as in the case of Peter (Luke 5:8), weighs men down
Resurrection - Christian Baptism for him receives its spiritual validity ‘through the resurrection of Jesus Christ,’ which enables us to satisfy ‘the appeal of a good Conscience toward God’ ( 1 Peter 3:21 )
Inspiration And Revelation - There was a certain reflexion of God in the heart of man: His will was made known through the Conscience
Redemption - But the fundamental point in our present passage is that Christ could ransom men from their sins, that is to say, from the consequences of their sins, including, of course, that consciousness of sin which bites into the Conscience (Hebrews 9:14), only by dying
Religion (2) - But He insisted on basing what He taught on the authority of their own hearts and Consciences. His spirit has broken and broken again the bands of ecclesiastical systems which multiply the scruples of Conscience
Trial of Jesus - But their very scantiness proves that the instinct for embroidering the facts with unhistorical fancies did not operate to any serious extent within the primitive Christian traditions, while their tone of moderation tells in favour of the essential historicity of the method in which they record actions of the Jews and Romans which must have outraged and shocked the later Christian Conscience
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - David confessed his sin and repented: "I have sinned against the Lord" (2 Samuel 12:13 ); "David was Conscience-stricken after he had counted the fighting men, and he said to the Lord, I have sinned greatly in what I have done
Eschatology (2) - It is with the problem raised by this conflict between the prophetic Conscience and the facts, that the apocalyptic literature from Daniel onwards is concerned
Gospels (2) - ...
It is scarcely necessary to add that these facts or requirements would be ‘commended to every man’s Conscience’ (2 Corinthians 4:2) by examples of the wisdom, sublimity, and beauty of the Saviour’s moral and spiritual teaching
Mediator - It has an inward power to cleanse the soul in response to the interrogation of a good Conscience, because Christ rose and lives
Greek Versions of ot - The Establishment Of Such A Conformity Was In Fact Origen’s Main Object, Though His Conscience As A Scholar And His Reverence For The LXX Jeremiah - It came from the will of the king, not from the Conscience of the people
John, Epistles of - But his exhortations do not enter into details: he is concerned with principles of conduct, the minute application of which he leaves to the individual Conscience
John, the Gospel by - " They went out of His presence one by one, convicted by their own Conscience
Joseph - ) As they had seen his anguish of soul so now their souls were in terrified anguish, with the stings of Conscience added (Genesis 42:21-22): retribution in kind (Numbers 32:23 ff; Matthew 7:2)
Prayer - whether they have been committed against knowledge, against the warnings of Conscience, &c
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - Conscience]'>[9] and that of deceit; the mind Sacrifice (2) - Peter bids his readers follow in the steps of Christ; ‘for this is thankworthy,’ he says, ‘if a man for Conscience toward God endure grief, suffering wrongfully
Eucharist - But this does not involve the consequence that their intellectual belief about the Eucharist was seriously different from his, but rather that their Conscience needed to be awakened
Ethics (2) - But the apparently partial view is to be regarded as the natural reaction of the heart and the Conscience against the legalistic ossification and externalization of religion
John Epistles of - How can we know that we are on the side of truth, and still the accusations of our Consciences?-By throwing ourselves on God’s omniscience. When a man feels confidence towards God and finds that his prayers are answered-that he wishes for and does the things that God wills-his Conscience ceases to accuse (1 John 3:19-22)
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - 1), ‘the champion and protector of them that in a pure Conscience serve His excellent Name’ (xlv
Arius the Heresiarch - He had, as we have seen, contrived the restoration of Arius to the emperor's favour by inducing the latter to write an insincere retractation, and when the emperor, deceived by this manœuvre, laid his commands on Athanasius to readmit Arius to communion, Athanasius, naturally, pleaded reasons of Conscience against doing so
Church - Speculations about Conscience, sin, and judgment to come, about the efficacy of sacrifices, and the possibility of forgiveness and of life after death, had prepared men for what Christianity had to offer
Divinity of Christ - God and Conscience are not so vividly active
Fall - ...
(a) What has already been urged must be repeated: that the teaching of the OT regarding sin and salvation does not rest at all on the narrative in Genesis 3, but on the reality of human experience and the testimony of human Conscience; that the teach
Miracles - Falsehood naturally entangles men in contradiction, and confounds them with dismay: but the love of truth invigorates the mind; the consciousness of integrity anticipates the approbation of God; and Conscience creates a fortitude, to which mere unsupported nature is often a stranger
Paul - His judgment concerning a hesitating Conscience, his opinion of the moral indifferency of many actions, yet of the prudence and even the duty of compliance, where non-compliance would produce evil effects upon the minds of the persons who observed it, are all in proof of the calm and discriminating character of his mind; and the universal applicability of his precepts affords strong presumption of his inspiration
Paul - There is a reverence which a completed book inspires; and the idea that there was no Conscience about this in ancient times or in the land of Judaea is one with nothing to justify it; on the contrary, as regards the Jews, cf
Ambrosius of Milan - At last Ambrose said, "Enable me to offer the sacrifice for thee with a clear Conscience
Augustinus, Aurelius - Conscience shamed him that after ten years of study he was still carrying a burden which men wearied by no research had already cast aside
Character of Christ - ’ It is certain that one who uttered this phrase out of the fulness of a child’s unreflective experience, had never passed through the agonies of a violated Conscience
Christ in Reformation Theology - ...
‘This is the first principle and most excellent article, how Christ is the Father: that we are not to doubt that whatsoever the man says and does is reckoned, and must be reckoned, as said and done in heaven for all angels; and in the world for all rulers; in hell for all devils; in the heart for every evil Conscience and all secret thoughts
Hermas, Known as the Shepherd - The vision presents all the characteristics of a real dream; the want of logical connexion between the parts, the changes of scene, the fading out of Rhoda as principal figure and the appearance of the aged lady in her room; the substitution of quite a different offence for the sinful thought which weighed on his Conscience at the beginning; the physical distress in his sleep at first presenting the idea of walking on and on without being able to find an outlet, afterwards of mental grief at words spoken to him; the long reading of which only the words spoken immediately before awaking are remembered,—all these indicate that we are reading not a literary invention like the dream of the Pilgrim's Progress, but the recital, a little dressed up it may be, of a dream which the narrator really had
Back to Christ - The gospel is not given with the character, teaching, and ministry of Christ, in their direct appeal to the heart and Conscience; only the doctrinal interpretation of these facts—that the pre-existent Son of God assumed human nature, lived among men, and atoned by His death for their sin—has a right to the name
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - On this principle, which every healthy Conscience now repudiates, Chrysostom proceeded to plan and execute a deliberate fraud to entrap his friend Basil into consecration to the episcopate
Worship - Praise calls forth the grateful emotions, and gives cheerfulness to piety; and that instruction in righteousness which is so perpetually repeated, diffuses the principles of morality and religion throughout society; enlightens and gives activity to Conscience; raises the standard of morals; attaches shame to vice, and praise to virtue; and thus exerts a powerfully purifying influence upon mankind
Holy Ghost - This is nearly, if not exactly, the same with ‘the testimony of a good Conscience toward God;' and is the result of reason or reflection on what we feel in our own souls
Person of Christ - He called men to repentance; He condemned the ‘righteous’ unsparingly; He predicted that He should one day judge the world; He urged confession upon His disciples, and put the Lord’s Prayer upon their lips: yet He Himself never uttered the cry of the burdened Conscience, never spoke one word of contrition
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - The effect upon his Conscience of condemning as a public officer what he was secretly practising must have been hardening and demoralizing
Palestine - ’ Similarly, the prominence given in Christianity to the command to love our neighbour as ourself, in the West will always find at least a theoretical assent, for it will be backed by the sentiment or at least the Conscience of sympathy between man and man as such