What does Congregation mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הָעֵדָ֖ה congregation 14
הָ֣עֵדָ֔ה congregation 13
הָעֵדָֽה congregation 11
עֲדַ֣ת congregation 9
הָֽעֵדָ֔ה congregation 8
עֲדַ֤ת congregation 7
עֲדַ֥ת congregation 7
הָעֵדָ֜ה congregation 5
עֲדַ֖ת congregation 4
הָעֵדָ֑ה congregation 4
עֲדַ֧ת congregation 4
הָעֵדָ֗ה congregation 4
הָֽעֵדָה֙ congregation 3
הָעֵדָ֔ה congregation 3
עֲדַת֙ congregation 3
בַּעֲדַ֥ת congregation 3
הָעֵדָ֣ה congregation 2
מֵעֲדַ֣ת congregation 2
עֲדַ֛ת congregation 2
מוֹעֵ֖ד appointed place 2
וַעֲדַ֣ת congregation 1
וְעֵדָֽה congregation 1
הָעֵדָה֙ congregation 1
עֵדָ֛ה congregation 1
עֲדָתְךָ֨ ׀ congregation 1
בַּעֲדַת־ congregation 1
לָעֵדָ֑ה congregation 1
קָהָל֙ assembly 1
הָ֨עֵדָ֤ה congregation 1
קָהָ֣ל assembly 1
לַעֲדַ֨ת congregation 1
؟ הָעֵדָ֖ה congregation 1
ἐκκλησίᾳ a gathering of citizens called out from their homes into some public place 1
לָֽעֵדָ֑ה congregation 1
הָעֵדָ֡ה congregation 1
הָעֵדָה֮ congregation 1
הָעֵדָ֤ה congregation 1
לָעֵדָ֤ה congregation 1
הָעֵדָ֧ה congregation 1
ἐκκλησίας a gathering of citizens called out from their homes into some public place 1
עֵדָ֖ה congregation 1
וַעֲדָת֖וֹ congregation 1
לַעֲדָתָֽם congregation 1
בָּעֵדָ֑ה congregation 1
עֲדַ֨ת congregation 1
עֲדַֽת־ congregation 1
חַיָּתְךָ֥ living 1
קְהִלַּ֥ת assembly 1

Definitions Related to Congregation

H5712


   1 Congregation, gathering.
   

H4150


   1 appointed place, appointed time, meeting.
      1a appointed time.
         1a1 appointed time (general).
         1a2 sacred season, set feast, appointed season.
      1b appointed meeting.
      1c appointed place.
      1d appointed sign or signal.
      1e tent of meeting.
      

H2416


   1 living, alive.
      1a green (of vegetation).
      1b flowing, fresh (of water).
      1c lively, active (of man).
      1d reviving (of the springtime).
   2 relatives.
   3 life (abstract emphatic).
      3a life.
      3b sustenance, maintenance.
   4 living thing, animal.
      4a animal.
      4b life.
      4c appetite.
      4d revival, renewal.
   5 community.
   

H6951


   1 assembly, company, Congregation, convocation.
      1a assembly.
         1a1 for evil counsel, war or invasion, religious purposes.
      1b company (of returning exiles).
      1c Congregation.
         1c1 as organised body.
         

G1577


   1 a gathering of citizens called out from their homes into some public place, an assembly.
      1a an assembly of the people convened at the public place of the council for the purpose of deliberating.
      1b the assembly of the Israelites.
      1c any gathering or throng of men assembled by chance, tumultuously.
      1d in a Christian sense.
         1d1 an assembly of Christians gathered for worship in a religious meeting.
         1d2 a company of Christian, or of those who, hoping for eternal salvation through Jesus Christ, observe their own religious rites, hold their own religious meetings, and manage their own affairs, according to regulations prescribed for the body for order’s sake.
         1d3 those who anywhere, in a city, village, constitute such a company and are united into one body.
         1d4 the whole body of Christians scattered throughout the earth.
         1d5 the assembly of faithful Christians already dead and received into heaven.
         

H6952


   1 assembly, Congregation.
   

Frequency of Congregation (original languages)

Frequency of Congregation (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Christian Retreat, Congregation of the
An order composed of two branches, the Fathers, and the Sisters, of the Christian Retreat, founded at Fontenelle, France, by Father Antoine Receveur, 1789. The Fathers of the Christian Retreat formerly directed colleges in France, and still hold the office of chaplains to the various houses of the congregation, whose purpose is the giving of spiritual retreats and the education of the young. The Sisters teach, and do fine needlework. The congregation has over 10 houses, including schools, in England, France, Switzerland, and Belgium. The government is under a mother-general. Total religious, upwards of 1,000.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Oriental Church, Congregation For the
Deals with all matters concerning persons, discipline and rites of the Eastern Church, and questions arising from the relations with the Latin Church. This congregation has the same faculties for the Eastern Church which the other congregations, with the exception of the Holy Office, have in their various jurisdictions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jesus And Mary, Congregation
Ecclesiastical society founded in 1643, at Caen, France, by Saint John Eudes, for the education of priests in seminaries, and for the giving of missions. The society is not a religious order proper, but an ecclesiastical body under the immediate jurisdiction of the bishops. It is composed of priests, postulants, and lay-brothers. During the lifetime of Father Eudes the society established seminaries at Caen, Coutances, Lisieux, Rouen, Evreux, and Rennes. During the French Revolution, three Eudists, Fathers Hebert, Potier, and Lefranc, perished in Paris in the massacres of 1792, and the society was dispersed. Reestablished in 1826 by the surviving members, the order began to prosper in the latter half of the century. Too late to resume the direction of seminaries, the Eudists entered upon missionary work and secondary education in colleges. The "Law of Associations" (1906) ruined the establishments in France. Besides scholasticates in Belgium and Spain, the society conducts seminaries at Cartagena, Antioquia, Pamplona, and Panama, South America; and San Domingo, West Indies. In Canada they are entrusted with the Vicariate Apostolic of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, a seminary at Halifax, Nova Scotia, a college at Church Point, New Brunswick, etc. in France, where the majority still remain, the Eudists continue to preach missions and to take part in various other works. Statistics: 40 houses, and about 600 members.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jesus-Mary, Congregation of
Founded by Claudine Thevenet at Lyons, France, 1818, primarily for the education of girls. The congregation has 70 houses, including colleges, normal schools, boarding and day schools, orphanages, dispensaries, and guesthouses, in France, Spain, England, Ireland, Switzerland, Italy, Germany, India, Argentina, Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The mother-house is in Rome; the total number of religious Isaiah 1,600.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - France, Congregation of
Founded in 1837 by Pope Gregory XVI, was declared the successor of all the former congregations of French Benedictines, including that of Saint Maur.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Discipline, Congregation of
Founded July 18, 1695, by Innocent XII as the Congregation for the Discipline and Reformation of Regulars, to replace the Congregation of the State of Regulars. Its work consisted chiefly in designating in Italy and the adjacent islands monasteries or convents of men as novitiates or houses of study, granting permission for the admission of novices, seeing to the observance of a perfect community life, and dispensing from rules in regard to the internal discipline of a religious house. Regarding the regulars in other parts of the world, its duty was to offer the pope suggestions for the promotion of regular discipline. It had its own cardinal-prefect until Pius IX, March 12, 1856, placed it under the cardinal-prefect of the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars. Pius X, May 26, 1906, suppressed it, transferring its power to the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Mount of the Congregation
KJV expression generally rendered Mount of Assembly by modern translations. Part of Isaiah's exposure of the pride of the King of Babylon is the charge that he desired to ascend to the distant mountain where according to Babylonian myth the gods assembled (Isaiah 14:13 ). The desire is tantamount to a claim to divinity.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Maronite Congregation of Aleppo
Popular name for the members of various orders under the patronage of Saint Anthony or professing to follow his rule. The original society was founded in the 4th century by Saint Anthony. There are now four important orders so known:
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers;
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers;
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers;
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Maronites of the Baladite Congregation
Popular name for the members of various orders under the patronage of Saint Anthony or professing to follow his rule. The original society was founded in the 4th century by Saint Anthony. There are now four important orders so known:
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers;
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers;
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers;
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias
Popular name for the members of various orders under the patronage of Saint Anthony or professing to follow his rule. The original society was founded in the 4th century by Saint Anthony. There are now four important orders so known:
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers;
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers;
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers;
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Congregation
The assembled people of God. Congregation translates the Hebrew words edah and qahal primarily. These terms may apply to any individual or class collectively such as “the wicked,” “the hypocrites,” etc. While edah is once used to refer to a herd of bulls ( Psalm 68:30 ) and once to a hive of bees (Judges 14:8 ), both words primarily describe the Israelite people as a holy people, bound together by religious devotion to Yahweh rather than by political bonds. There is no apparent distinction in meaning between the two. Every circumcised Israelite was a member of the congregation. The congregation was subdivided into the tribe and then the most basic unit, the family. The congregation of Israel functioned in military, legal, and punishment matters.
In the Greek Old Testament edah was usually translated by sunagoge, qahal by ekklesia . In late Judaism sunagoge depicted the actual Israelite people and ekklesia the ideal elect of God called to salvation. Hence ekklesia became the term for the Christian congregation, the church. Sunagoge in the New Testament is almost entirely restricted to the Jewish place of worship. (An exception is James 2:2 , which may refer to a Christian assembly.) The English word “synagogue” is merely a transliteration of sunagoge . Ekklesia means “called out,” and in classical Greek referred to the body of free citizens called out by a herald. In the New Testament the “called out ones” are the church, the assembly of God's people. There is a direct spiritual continuity between the congregation of the Old Testament and the New Testament church. Significantly the Christian community chose the Old Testament term for the ideal people of God called to salvation ( ekklesia ), rather than the term which described all Israelites collectively (sunagoge ).
Joe E. Lunceford
Holman Bible Dictionary - Congregation, Mount of
The mountain considered by Israel's neighbors to stand in the far north and serve as a meeting place of the gods. Babylon's king was so proud he thought he could storm the meeting (Isaiah 14:13 ).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Index, Congregation of the
This congregation, so called from the Index or catalog of forbidden books, was created by Pope Pius V in 1571. Pope Benedict XV suppressed it on March 25, 1917, its duties being left entirely to the Holy Office. The Congregation of the Index consisted of a number of cardinals, one of whom was its prefect. The Master of the Sacred Palace (a Dominican) was ex officio its assistant, and another Dominican its secretary. There was also a college of consultors whose office was to deliver written opinions on the books submitted to their judgment by the congregation. The congregation censured and condemned books which it considered dangerous to faith or morals. It could grant permission for the reading of a condemned book, or for the publication of corrected editions. The congregation was also charged with the work of seeking out pernicious publications, and, after mature examination, of condemning and proscrlbrng them.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ceremonies, Congregation of the
In charge of the ceremonies in the pontifical chapel and court, of functions performed by cardinals outside of the pontifical chapel, of regulating questions of precedence of cardinals, and of representation of various nations at the Vatican.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Cassinese Congregation
Name applied to two Benedictine Congregations. A Benedictine reform instituted at the monastery of Saint Justina, Padua, 1409, by Abbot Ludovico Barbo, received the title of "Cassinese Congregation" in 1504. This reform gradually spread to all the chief Benedictine monasteries in Italy, including Monte Cassino, Subiaco, Saint Paul's in Rome, Saint George's at Venice, La Cava, and Farfa. Characterized by a centralized form of government, its strength and prosperity continued until reduced by the Italian Revolution and later decrees of the Italian government.
The Cassinese Congregation of Primitive Observance was established, 1851, by Pius IX when he joined into one federation all the monasteries which took up the reform initiated at Genoa by Abbot Casaretto of Subiaco. This federation was called after its chief house, the "Province of Subiaco." Before long, monasteries in other countries adopted the same reformed observance and became affiliated to Subiaco. Besides the Italian province, the congregation includes the English province, originally founded by Saint Augustine of Canterbury; the Belgian province, dating from 1858 with the subjection of the ancient Abbey of Termonde to Subiaco; the French province, formed in 1859, with the affiliation of Pierre-qui-Vire; the Spanish province, founded in 1862 when the Abbey of Monserrat joined the congregation.
The American Cassinese Congregation (founded by Pope Pius IX, 1855), comprises 13 abbeys throughout the United States, and has for its president, Right Reverend Ernest Helmstetter, O.S.B., Abbot of Saint Mary's, Newark, New Jersey
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Mount of the Congregation
Only in Isaiah 14:13 , a mythic mountain of the Babylonians, regarded by them as the seat of the gods. It was situated in the far north, and in Babylonian inscriptions is described as a mountain called Im-Kharasak, "the mighty mountain of Bel, whose head reaches heaven, whose root is the holy deep." In their geography they are said to have identified it with mount El-wend, near Ecbatana.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint ho
Popular name for the members of various orders under the patronage of Saint Anthony or professing to follow his rule. The original society was founded in the 4th century by Saint Anthony. There are now four important orders so known:
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers;
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers;
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers;
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Congregation
eedah . CONVOCATION, qaahaal (restricted to the Pentateuch, except Isaiah 1:13). The Hebrew, regarded in their collective capacity as a "holy" community, gathered in sacred assembly composed of the homeborn Israelites. Settlers, only if circumcised, were admitted to the privileges (Exodus 12:19). Each Israelite was member of a house; the family was a collection of houses; the tribe, a collection of families; the congregation, a collection of tribes. The CONGREGATION was a national parliament, with legislative and judicial powers. The CONVOCATION was restricted to religious meetings (Leviticus 23). Each house, family, and tribe had its head; these representative heads were "the elders" or "princes."
Moses selected 70 elders by God's appointment to share the burden of government with him (Numbers 11:16). The sounding of the two silver trumpets was the signal for the whole body of the people assembling at the door of the tabernacle, which was there called "the tabernacle of the congregation," the moed , literally, a place of meeting (Numbers 10:2-4). The princes were convened with only one trumpet. The people were bound to abide by the acts of their representatives (Joshua 9:18). In later times the Sanhedrin council (corresponding to Moses' seventy elders) represented the congregation. Synagogue, which originally applied to the assembly, came to mean the place of worship.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Notre Dame de Montreal, Congregation of
Founded at Montreal, in 1657, by Marguerite Bourgeoys, for the teaching of girls, in missions and schools. The congregation has 170 houses, including schools, colleges, a teachers' institute, normal schools, a cooking school, business schools, and kindergartens, in Canada, and the United States. The mother-house is in Montreal; the total number of religious is about 1,900.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Mount of the Congregation
MOUNT OF THE CONGREGATION . See Congregation.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Congregation
An assembly of people met together for religious worship. The term has been also used for assemblies of cardinals appointed by the pope for the discharge of certain functions, after the manner of our offices and courts; such as the congregation of the inquisition, the congregation of rites of alms, &c.&c.
It also signifies a company or society of religious persons cantoned out of this or that order and making an inferior order, &c. Such are the congregations of the Oratory; those of Clupy, &c. among the Benedictines.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Holy And Immaculate Heart of Mary, Congregation of
A congregation founded for the education of girls by Father Dupuis in Pondicherry, India, 1844, under the rules of the Third Order Regular of Saint Francis of Assisi. The congregation has 37 convents; to the more important of these an orphanage is usually attached. The religious, numbering 250, are also in charge of schools and pharmacies; the mother-house is at Pondicherry.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Holy Cross, Congregation of the
An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau. The congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The oldest and most extensive existing province is that of the United States, with the mother-house at Notre Dame, Indiana, dating from 1842; the Canadian Province was established five years later. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal. At the General Chapter of 1920 the rules and constitutions were thoroughly revised to conform to the New Code of Canon Law.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Holy Office, Congregation of the
It was founded by Paul III in 1542. The pope is prefect with a cardinal as secretary. Besides officials common to other congregations it has an assessor who acts as secretary, a commissary, a Dominican, who conducts the trials, his two companions who are also Dominicans, a prosecuting attorney and one for the defense. Besides consultors there are also qualifiers or theologians who advise the cardinals on the degree of truth or error in the theses and books submitted to the congregation. This congregation defends Catholic teaching of faith and morals. Its decrees are not infallible, even when specifically approved by the pope; but they call for a true assent. It censors and condemns books judged dangerous to faith or morals, and can grant permission to read such books. It can dispense priests from the fast required before celebrating Mass. It has exclusive jurisdiction over questions about the Pauline Privilege and the impediments of disparity of worship and mixed religion. As a tribunal it judges all cases of mixed marriages carried to the Roman Curia. It also judges heresy and all offences leading to a suspicion of heresy. Its members are bound to the strictest secrecy, called the secret of the Holy Office.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Congregation
(Heb. kahal), the Hebrew people collectively as a holy community (Numbers 15:15 ). Every circumcised Hebrew from twenty years old and upward was a member of the congregation. Strangers resident in the land, if circumcised, were, with certain exceptions (Exodus 12:19 ; Numbers 9:14 ; Deuteronomy 23:1-3 ), admitted to the privileges of citizenship, and spoken of as members of the congregation (Exodus 12:19 ; Numbers 9:14 ; 15:15 ). The congregation were summonded together by the sound of two silver trumpets, and they met at the door of the tabernacle (Numbers 10:3 ). These assemblies were convened for the purpose of engaging in solemn religious services (Exodus 12:27 ; Numbers 25:6 ; Joel 2:15 ), or of receiving new commandments (Exodus 19:7,8 ). The elders, who were summonded by the sound of one trumpet (Numbers 10:4 ), represented on various occasions the whole congregation (Exodus 3:16 ; 12:21 ; 17:5 ; 24:1 ). After the conquest of Canaan, the people were assembled only on occasions of the highest national importance (Judges 20 ; 2 Chronicles 30:5 ; 34:29 ; 1 Samuel 10:17 ; 2 Samuel 5:1-5 ; 1 Kings 12:20 ; 2 Kings 11:19 ; 21:24 ; 23:30 ). In subsequent times the congregation was represented by the Sanhedrim; and the name synagogue, applied in the Septuagint version exclusively to the congregation, came to be used to denote the places of worship established by the Jews. (See CHURCH .)
In Acts 13:43 , where alone it occurs in the New Testament, it is the same word as that rendered "synagogue" (q.v.) in ver. 42, and is so rendered in ver. 43 in RSV
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Congregation, Mount of the
(Isaiah 14:13 ), has been supposed to refer to the place where God promised to meet with his people (Exodus 25:22 ; 29:42,43 ) i.e., the mount of the Divine presence, Mount Zion. But here the king of Babylon must be taken as expressing himself according to his own heathen notions, and not according to those of the Jews. The "mount of the congregation" will therefore in this case mean the northern mountain, supposed by the Babylonians to be the meeting-place of their gods. In the Babylonian inscriptions mention is made of a mountain which is described as "the mighty mountain of Bel, whose head rivals heaven, whose root is the holy deep." This mountain was regarded in their mythology as the place where the gods had their seat.
Webster's Dictionary - Congregation
(1):
(n.) An assembly of persons; a gathering; esp. an assembly of persons met for the worship of God, and for religious instruction; a body of people who habitually so meet.
(2):
(n.) The act of congregating, or bringing together, or of collecting into one aggregate or mass.
(3):
(n.) A collection or mass of separate things.
(4):
(n.) The whole body of the Jewish people; - called also Congregation of the Lord.
(5):
(n.) A body of cardinals or other ecclesiastics to whom as intrusted some department of the church business; as, the Congregation of the Propaganda, which has charge of the missions of the Roman Catholic Church.
(6):
(n.) A company of religious persons forming a subdivision of a monastic order.
(7):
(n.) The assemblage of Masters and Doctors at Oxford or Cambrige University, mainly for the granting of degrees.
(8):
(n.) the name assumed by the Protestant party under John Knox. The leaders called themselves (1557) Lords of the Congregation.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Congregation
The term is constantly applied in the O.T. to the community of Israel, and also to the actual assembling together of the people according to the unity of the congregation. Every descendant of the twelve tribes formed a part of that community. Those of other nations were received into the congregation on becoming PROSELYTES, q.v. The Ammonite and the Moabite were forbidden ever to come into the congregation of Jehovah, and there were a few other restrictions. Deuteronomy 23:1-4 . For various offences an Israelite was cut off from the congregation. Exodus 12:19 ; Numbers 9:13 , etc. See EXCOMMUNICATION.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Congregation
In Tindale’s Version (1534) and in Cranmer’s (1539) ‘congregation’ was used instead of ‘church’ to translate both ἐκκλησία and συναγωγή. But Wyclif had used ‘church,’ and the Geneva Version, followed by Authorized Version , reverted to it. Revised Version , with one exception, has ‘church’ exclusively in the text, though in several places ‘congregation’ appears in the margin. The exception is Hebrews 2:12, where in the quotation from Psalms 22:25 ‘congregation’ is in the text and ‘church’ in the margin. F. J. A. Hort (The Christian Ecclesia, London, 1897) chose ‘Ecclesia’ as a word free from the disturbing associations of ‘church’ and ‘congregation,’ though the latter has not only historical standing (as above) but also the advantage of suggesting some of these elements of meaning which are least forcibly brought out by the word ‘church’ according to our present use (cf. Expository Times viii. [1] 386). So far, however, as there is any substantive difference between the two words as found in the English Bible, the ‘congregation’ of Revised Version margin points to an actual church assembled in one place.
In the NT ἐκκλησία naturally designates the Christian Church. The associations of συναγωγή were against its Christian use, though it is retained in James 2:2 to describe an assembly of Jewish-Christians; but this is explained by the destination of the letter-‘to the twelve tribes which are of the Dispersion.’
In St. Paul’s address to the elders of Miletus (Acts 20:17) we see the old Jewish συναγωγή in the process of passing into the more distinctively Christian ἑκκλησία. He quotes Psalms 74:2 ‘Remember thy congregation which thou didst purchase of old’; but for the Septuagint συναγωγή he puts ἐκκλησία. Thus in the Apostle’s hands this passage becomes ‘one of the channels through which the word “ecclesia” came to denote God’s people of the future’ (Expository Times viii. 387). Cf. also article Assembly; and, for the Heb. and Gr. terms in the OT, article ‘Congregation’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) .
W. M. Grant.
King James Dictionary - Congregation
CONGREGATION, n.
1. The act of bringing together, or assembling. 2. A collection or assemblage of separate things as a congregation of vapors. 3. More generally, an assembly or persons and appropriately, an assembly of persons met for the worship of God, and for religious instruction. 4. An assembly of rulers. Numbers 35 . 5. An assembly of ecclesiastics or cardinals appointed by the pope as the congregation of the holy office, &c. Also, a company or society of religious cantoned out of an order. 6. An academical assembly for transacting business of the university.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Congregation
A gathering of people, usually of believers, in a common religious faith.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evangelical Protestant Association of Congregation
Formerly Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America. A religious denomination formed in 1911 at Cincinnati by consolidation of the German Evangelical Protestant Ministers' Association, and the German Evangelical Ministers' Conference. Since October 20, 1925, the Association has been regularly affiliated with the National Council of the Congregational Churches of the United States. They believe in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, protesting against any compulsion in matters of faith and conscience, and granting to everyone the privilege of individual examination and research.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evangelization of Peoples, Congregation For the
Founded as the Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide (for the Propagation of the Faith) was founded by Pope Gregory XV on June 22, 1622 to regulate ecclesiastical affairs in the so-called "missionary countries," i.e.,countries in which the hierarchy is not yet, or only imperfectly, established. For most of its life it was referred to as the Congregation of Propaganda the name was changed in 1982 since the word propaganda had taken sinister overtones in the 20th century. The Congregation has its own cardinal prefect, a number of cardinals with the usual officials, and a body of consultors. It has authority over all missionary countries and their inhabitants, over societies of ecclesiastics and seminaries founded exclusively for the foreign missions, and also over religious as missionaries. It attends to everything regarding the holding and recognition of councils held in its territory. It has no competency, however, in matters of faith, marriage causes, questions of sacred rites, and over religious as such. The headquarters of the Pontifical Society for the Propagation of the Faith are in this Congregation, the secretary of the congregation being president of the superior general council of the society.
Prefects of the Congregation:
Antonio Maria Cardinal Sauli (1622)
Ludovico Cardinal Ludovisi (1622-1632)
Antonio Marcello Cardinal Barberini (1632-1671)
Paluzzo Cardinal Paluzzi Altieri Degli Albertoni (1671-1698)
Carlo Cardinal Berberini (1698-1704)
Giuseppe Cardinal Sacripanti (1704-1727)
Vincenzo Cardinal Petra (1727-1747)
Silvio Cardinal Valenti Gonzaga (1747-1756)
Giuseppe Cardinal Spinelli (1756-1763)
Giuseppe Maria Cardinal Castelli (1763-1780)
Leonardo Cardinal Antonelli (1780-1795)
Giacinto Cardinal Sigismondo Gerdil (1795-1802)
Stefano Cardinal Borgia (pro-prefect 1798-1800, prefect 1802-1804)
Antonio Cardinal Dugnani (1804-1805)
Michele Cardinal di Pietro (1805-1814)
Lorenzo Cardinal Litta (1814-1818)
Francesco Cardinal Fontana (1818-1822)
Ercole Cardinal Consalvi (pro-prefect 1822-1824, prefect 1824)
Giulio Maria Cardinal della Somaglia (pro-prefect 1824-1826)
Mauro Cardinal Capellari (1826-1831)
Carlo Maria Cardinal Pedicini (1831-1834)
Filippo Cardinal Fransoni (1834-1856)
Allesandro Cardinal Barnabò (1856-1874)
Alessandro Cardinal Franchi (1874-1878)
Giovanni Cardinal Simeoni (1878-1892)
Mieczyslaw Halka Cardinal Ledóchowski (1892-1902)
Girolamo Maria Cardinal Gotti (1902-1916)
Domenico Cardinal Serafini (pro-prefect 1916, prefect 1916-1918)
Willem Marinus Cardinal van Rossum (1918-1932)
Pietro Cardinal Fumasoni Biondi (1933-1960)
Samual Alphonse Cardinal Stritch (pro-prefect 1958)
Grégoire-Pierre XV Cardinal Agagianian (pro-prefect 1958-1960, prefect 1960-1970)
Agnelo Cardinal Rossi (1970-1984)
Dermot Ryan (pro-prefect 1984-1985)
Jozef Cardinal Tomko (pro-prefect 1985, prefect 1985-2001)
Crescenzio Cardinal Sepe (2001- )
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs, Congregation
Founded by Pius VII:1805. It was reestablished by him after his exile, June 18, 1814, as the Extraordinary Congregation for the Ecclesiastical Affairs of the Catholic World. In 1827 it reassumed its former name which it retains. Pius XI, July 5, 1925, made the cardinal secretary of state prefect eiC officio of this congregation. Until then it had no prefect, although the presiding officer was the secretary of state. This congregation establishes and divides dioceses and appoints to vacant sees in countries where these matters have to be taken up with the civilgovernment either because of a concordat or for political reasons. It deals also with all matters presented to it by the pope through the secretary of state, especially matters which refer to the civillaws and to concordats made with the various nations. Its members and officials are bound to observe by special oath the so-called secret of the Holy Office.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Congregation
‛Êdâh (עֵדָה, Strong's #5712), “congregation.” This word may have etymologically signified a “company assembled together” for a certain purpose, similar to the Greek words sunagoge and ekklesia, from which our words “synagogue” and “church” are derived. In ordinary usage, ‛êdâh refers to a “group of people.” It occurs 149 times in the Old Testament, most frequently in the Book of Numbers. The first occurrence is in Exod. 12:3, where the word is a synonym for qahal “assembly.”The most general meaning of ‛êdâh is “group,” whether of animals—such as a swarm of bees (Judg. 14:8), a herd of bulls (Ps. 68:30), and the flocking together of birds (Hos. 7:12)— or of people, such as the righteous (Ps. 1:5), the evildoers (Ps. 22:16), and the nations (Ps. 7:7).
The most frequent reference is to the “congregation of Israel” (9 times), “the congregation of the sons of Israel” (26 times), “the congregation” (24 times), or “all of the congregation” (30 times). Elders (Lev. 4:15), family heads (Num. 31:26), and princes (Num. 16:2; 31:13; 32:2) were placed in charge of the “congregation” in order to assist Moses in a just rule.
The Septuagint translation is sunagoge (“place of assembly”). The KJV has these translations: “congregation; company; assembly.”
Mô‛êd (מוֹעָדָה, 4150), “appointed place of meeting; meeting.” The noun mô‛êd appears in the Old Testament 223 times, of which 160 times are in the Pentateuch. The historical books are next in the frequency of usage (27 times).
The word mô‛êd keeps its basic meaning of “appointed,” but varies as to what is agreed upon or appointed according to the context: the time, the place, or the meeting itself. The usage of the verb in Amos 3:3 is illuminating: “Can two walk together, except they be agreed?” Whether they have agreed on a time or a place of meeting, or on the meeting itself, is ambiguous.
The meaning of mô‛êd is fixed within the context of Israel’s religion. First, the festivals came to be known as the “appointed times” or the set feasts. These festivals were clearly prescribed in the Pentateuch. The word refers to any “festival” or “pilgrimage festival,” such as Passover (Lev. 23:15ff.), the feast of first fruits (Lev. 23:15ff.), the feast of tabernacles (Lev. 23:33ff.), or the Day of Atonement (Lev. 23:27). God condemned the people for observing the mô‛êd ritualistically: “Your new moons and your appointed feasts my soul hateth …” (Isa. 1:14).
The word mô‛êd also signifies a “fixed place.” This usage is not frequent: “For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God: I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation [1], in the sides of the north …” (Isa. 14:13). “For I know that thou wilt bring me to death, and to the house appointed for all living” (Job 30:23).
In both meanings of mô‛êd—“fixed time” and “fixed place”—a common denominator is the “meeting” of two or more parties at a certain place and time—hence the usage of mô‛êd as “meeting.” However, in view of the similarity in meaning between “appointed place” or “appointed time” and “meeting,” translators have a real difficulty in giving a proper translation in each context. For instance, “He hath called an assembly [1] against me” (Lam. 1:15) could be read: “He has called an appointed time against me” (NASB) or “He summoned an army against me” (NIV).
The phrase, “tabernacle of the congregation,” is a translation of the Hebrew ‘ohel mô‛êd (“tent of meeting”). The phrase occurs 139 times— mainly in Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers, rarely in Deuteronomy. It signifies that the Lord has an “appointed place” by which His presence is represented and through which Israel was assured that their God was with them. The fact that the tent was called the “tent of meeting” signifies that Israel’s God was among His people and that He was to be approached at a certain time and place that were “fixed” (ya’ad) in the Pentateuch. In the KJV, this phrase is translated as “tabernacle of the congregation” (Exod. 28:43) because translators realized that the noun mô‛êd (“congregation”) is derived from the same root as mô‛êd. The translators of the Septuagint had a similar difficulty. They noticed the relation of mô‛êd to the root ‘ud (“to testify”) and translated the phrase ’ohel hamo’ed as “tabernacle of the testimony.” This phrase was picked up by the New Testament: “And after that I looked, and, behold, the temple of the tabernacle of the testimony in heaven was opened …” (Rev. 15:5).
Of the three meanings, the appointed “time” is most basic. The phrase “tent of meeting” lays stress on the “place of meeting.” The “meeting” itself is generally associated with “time” or “place.”
The Septuagint has the following translations of mô‛êd: kairos (timew), eortel (“feast; festival”). The English translators give these senses: “congregation” (KJV, RSV, NASB, NIV); “appointed time” (NASB); “appointed feast” (RSV, NASB); “set time” (RSV, NASB, NIV).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Roman Congregation
A department of the Roman Curia, consisting of a number of cardinals, and permanently established to handle a certain class of administrative business. One of the cardinals presides over it as prefect, or as secretary if the pope is the prefect. To it are attached the required officials and a body of consultors. Its function is to see that laws are observed, to publish instructions to this end, to apply the law in particular cases, and to grant dispensations within its competency. The congregations lack legislative and, except the Holy Office, judicial power. As first organized by Sixtus V, January 22, 1588, there were 15 congregations; but the number has varied according to the needs of the times. Today there are 11, excluding the so-called Congregation of the Fabric of Saint Peter's. These are the
Congregation for Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs
Congregation for the Affairs of Religious
Congregation for the Oriental Church
Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith
Congregation of Sacred Rites
Congregation of Seminaries and Universities
Congregation of the Ceremonies
Congregation of the Consistory
Congregation of the Council
Congregation of the Discipline of the Sacraments
Congregation of the Holy Office
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Seminaries And Studies, Congregation of
Congregation was founded by Pope Benedict XV on November 4, 1915, who united to it the Congregation of Studies. The presiding officer is the cardinal prefect who is ex officio a member of the Holy Office and of the Biblical Commission. The cardinal secretary of the Consistorial Congregation is by law a member of this congregation. This congregation supervises everything pertaining to the government, discipline, administration, and alienation of the temporalities, and the studies of all seminaries which are not subject to the Congregation of Propaganda. It directs the government and studies of all universities and faculties which are under the authority of the Church, including those directed by religious orders or congregations. It examines and approves new institutions, grants the power to confer academic degrees, and prescribes the conditions for granting them. It can itself confer degrees.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Rites, Congregation of
Created by Pope Sixtus V on January 2, 1588; its prefect is a cardinal. The officials peculiar to this Congregation are the Promotor of the Faith (popularly called the devil's advocate), who raises objections against beatifications and canonizations, and the hymnographer, who prepares and corrects new offices. There are two groups of consultors: one for beatifications and canonizations, the other for sacred liturgy. This Congregation is charged with the direction of the liturgy of the Latin Church and therefore with supervising the performance of the rites prescribed for celebrating Mass and other ecclesiastical functions. It also grants all privileges relating to the rites and ceremonies of the Church. The inspection, correction, and condemnation of liturgical books, the approbation of new liturgical feasts and offices, and the solution of all doubts about liturgical matters pertain to it. To it also belongs the decision of causes of beatification and canonization of the faithful, and of the veneration of their relics.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide
Founded as the Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide (for the Propagation of the Faith) was founded by Pope Gregory XV on June 22, 1622 to regulate ecclesiastical affairs in the so-called "missionary countries," i.e.,countries in which the hierarchy is not yet, or only imperfectly, established. For most of its life it was referred to as the Congregation of Propaganda the name was changed in 1982 since the word propaganda had taken sinister overtones in the 20th century. The Congregation has its own cardinal prefect, a number of cardinals with the usual officials, and a body of consultors. It has authority over all missionary countries and their inhabitants, over societies of ecclesiastics and seminaries founded exclusively for the foreign missions, and also over religious as missionaries. It attends to everything regarding the holding and recognition of councils held in its territory. It has no competency, however, in matters of faith, marriage causes, questions of sacred rites, and over religious as such. The headquarters of the Pontifical Society for the Propagation of the Faith are in this Congregation, the secretary of the congregation being president of the superior general council of the society.
Prefects of the Congregation:
Antonio Maria Cardinal Sauli (1622)
Ludovico Cardinal Ludovisi (1622-1632)
Antonio Marcello Cardinal Barberini (1632-1671)
Paluzzo Cardinal Paluzzi Altieri Degli Albertoni (1671-1698)
Carlo Cardinal Berberini (1698-1704)
Giuseppe Cardinal Sacripanti (1704-1727)
Vincenzo Cardinal Petra (1727-1747)
Silvio Cardinal Valenti Gonzaga (1747-1756)
Giuseppe Cardinal Spinelli (1756-1763)
Giuseppe Maria Cardinal Castelli (1763-1780)
Leonardo Cardinal Antonelli (1780-1795)
Giacinto Cardinal Sigismondo Gerdil (1795-1802)
Stefano Cardinal Borgia (pro-prefect 1798-1800, prefect 1802-1804)
Antonio Cardinal Dugnani (1804-1805)
Michele Cardinal di Pietro (1805-1814)
Lorenzo Cardinal Litta (1814-1818)
Francesco Cardinal Fontana (1818-1822)
Ercole Cardinal Consalvi (pro-prefect 1822-1824, prefect 1824)
Giulio Maria Cardinal della Somaglia (pro-prefect 1824-1826)
Mauro Cardinal Capellari (1826-1831)
Carlo Maria Cardinal Pedicini (1831-1834)
Filippo Cardinal Fransoni (1834-1856)
Allesandro Cardinal Barnabò (1856-1874)
Alessandro Cardinal Franchi (1874-1878)
Giovanni Cardinal Simeoni (1878-1892)
Mieczyslaw Halka Cardinal Ledóchowski (1892-1902)
Girolamo Maria Cardinal Gotti (1902-1916)
Domenico Cardinal Serafini (pro-prefect 1916, prefect 1916-1918)
Willem Marinus Cardinal van Rossum (1918-1932)
Pietro Cardinal Fumasoni Biondi (1933-1960)
Samual Alphonse Cardinal Stritch (pro-prefect 1958)
Grégoire-Pierre XV Cardinal Agagianian (pro-prefect 1958-1960, prefect 1960-1970)
Agnelo Cardinal Rossi (1970-1984)
Dermot Ryan (pro-prefect 1984-1985)
Jozef Cardinal Tomko (pro-prefect 1985, prefect 1985-2001)
Crescenzio Cardinal Sepe (2001- )
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sacred Congregation For the Propagation of the Fai
Founded as the Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide (for the Propagation of the Faith) was founded by Pope Gregory XV on June 22, 1622 to regulate ecclesiastical affairs in the so-called "missionary countries," i.e.,countries in which the hierarchy is not yet, or only imperfectly, established. For most of its life it was referred to as the Congregation of Propaganda the name was changed in 1982 since the word propaganda had taken sinister overtones in the 20th century. The Congregation has its own cardinal prefect, a number of cardinals with the usual officials, and a body of consultors. It has authority over all missionary countries and their inhabitants, over societies of ecclesiastics and seminaries founded exclusively for the foreign missions, and also over religious as missionaries. It attends to everything regarding the holding and recognition of councils held in its territory. It has no competency, however, in matters of faith, marriage causes, questions of sacred rites, and over religious as such. The headquarters of the Pontifical Society for the Propagation of the Faith are in this Congregation, the secretary of the congregation being president of the superior general council of the society.
Prefects of the Congregation:
Antonio Maria Cardinal Sauli (1622)
Ludovico Cardinal Ludovisi (1622-1632)
Antonio Marcello Cardinal Barberini (1632-1671)
Paluzzo Cardinal Paluzzi Altieri Degli Albertoni (1671-1698)
Carlo Cardinal Berberini (1698-1704)
Giuseppe Cardinal Sacripanti (1704-1727)
Vincenzo Cardinal Petra (1727-1747)
Silvio Cardinal Valenti Gonzaga (1747-1756)
Giuseppe Cardinal Spinelli (1756-1763)
Giuseppe Maria Cardinal Castelli (1763-1780)
Leonardo Cardinal Antonelli (1780-1795)
Giacinto Cardinal Sigismondo Gerdil (1795-1802)
Stefano Cardinal Borgia (pro-prefect 1798-1800, prefect 1802-1804)
Antonio Cardinal Dugnani (1804-1805)
Michele Cardinal di Pietro (1805-1814)
Lorenzo Cardinal Litta (1814-1818)
Francesco Cardinal Fontana (1818-1822)
Ercole Cardinal Consalvi (pro-prefect 1822-1824, prefect 1824)
Giulio Maria Cardinal della Somaglia (pro-prefect 1824-1826)
Mauro Cardinal Capellari (1826-1831)
Carlo Maria Cardinal Pedicini (1831-1834)
Filippo Cardinal Fransoni (1834-1856)
Allesandro Cardinal Barnabò (1856-1874)
Alessandro Cardinal Franchi (1874-1878)
Giovanni Cardinal Simeoni (1878-1892)
Mieczyslaw Halka Cardinal Ledóchowski (1892-1902)
Girolamo Maria Cardinal Gotti (1902-1916)
Domenico Cardinal Serafini (pro-prefect 1916, prefect 1916-1918)
Willem Marinus Cardinal van Rossum (1918-1932)
Pietro Cardinal Fumasoni Biondi (1933-1960)
Samual Alphonse Cardinal Stritch (pro-prefect 1958)
Grégoire-Pierre XV Cardinal Agagianian (pro-prefect 1958-1960, prefect 1960-1970)
Agnelo Cardinal Rossi (1970-1984)
Dermot Ryan (pro-prefect 1984-1985)
Jozef Cardinal Tomko (pro-prefect 1985, prefect 1985-2001)
Crescenzio Cardinal Sepe (2001- )
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Regular Clerks of the Congregation of Saint Paul
Founded in Milan, Italy in 1530, by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria, Barthelemy Ferrari, and Jacopo Morigia, with the special object of reviving zeal among the clergy. They preach, catechize, shrive, give missions, administer the sacraments, and educate the young in Italy, Austria, France, Czechoslovakia, Belgium, Malta, China, and Brazil.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sacraments, Congregation of the
Provides for and regulates the reception and reservation of the Seven Sacraments, dispensations for candidates for Holy Orders, and dispensations for Matrimony. The doctrine of the Sacrament is the province of the Holy Office, and the ceremonial that of the Congregation of Rites.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Congregation
This describes the Hebrew people in its collective capacity under its peculiar aspect as a holy community, held together by religious rather than political bonds. Sometimes it is used in a broad sense as inclusive of foreign settlers, (Exodus 12:19 ) but more properly as exclusively appropriate to the Hebrew element of the population. (Numbers 15:15 ) The congregation was governed by the father or head of each family and tribe. The number of these representatives being inconveniently large for ordinary business, a further selection was made by Moses of 70, who formed a species of standing committee. (Numbers 11:16 ) Occasionally indeed the whole body of people was assembled at the door of the tabernacle, hence usually called the tabernacle of the congregation. (Numbers 10:3 ) The people were strictly bound by the acts of their representatives, even in cases where they disapproved of them. (Joshua 9:18 )
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Congregation
1: ἐκκλησία (Strong's #1577 — Noun Feminine — ekklesia — ek-klay-see'-ah ) is translated "congregation" in Hebrews 2:12 , RV, instead of the usual rendering "church." See ASSEMBLY.
2: συναγωγή (Strong's #4864 — Noun Feminine — sunagoge — soon-ag-o-gay' ) is translated "congregation" in Acts 13:43 , AV (RV, "synagogue"). See SYNAGOGUE.

Sentence search

Roman Congregation - The Congregations lack legislative and, except the Holy Office, judicial power. As first organized by Sixtus V, January 22, 1588, there were 15 Congregations; but the number has varied according to the needs of the times. Today there are 11, excluding the so-called Congregation of the Fabric of Saint Peter's. These are the ...
Congregation for Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs
Congregation for the Affairs of Religious
Congregation for the Oriental Church
Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith
Congregation of Sacred Rites
Congregation of Seminaries and Universities
Congregation of the Ceremonies
Congregation of the Consistory
Congregation of the Council
Congregation of the Discipline of the Sacraments
Congregation of the Holy Office
Mount of the Congregation - MOUNT OF THE Congregation . See Congregation
c.s.b. - = Congregation of Saint Basil; Basilians...
- or -...
= Congregation of Saint Bridget ...
Sheliach tzibbur - "emmisary of the Congregation"); one who leads the Congregation in prayer...
Seminaries And Studies, Congregation of - Congregation was founded by Pope Benedict XV on November 4, 1915, who united to it the Congregation of Studies. The cardinal secretary of the Consistorial Congregation is by law a member of this Congregation. This Congregation supervises everything pertaining to the government, discipline, administration, and alienation of the temporalities, and the studies of all seminaries which are not subject to the Congregation of Propaganda. It directs the government and studies of all universities and faculties which are under the authority of the Church, including those directed by religious orders or Congregations
Samaj - ) A society or Congregation; a church or religious body. ) A society; a Congregation; a worshiping assembly, or church, esp
Maurists, the - A Benedictine Congregation in France, an offshoot of the reformed Congregation of Saint-Vannes, became independent, 1618, as the Congregation of Saint Maur, with the approval of Louis XIII and Cardinals de Retz and Richelieu; and sanctioned by Popes Gregory XV, 1621, and Urban VIII, 1627. Before 1800 there were over 180 monasteries, the Congregation being divided into six provinces: France, Normandy, Brittany, Burgundy, Chezal-Benoit, and Gascony. The Maurists were suppressed by the French Revolution; an attempt to restore them in 1817, being disapproved by the Holy See, the Congregation ceased to exist
Congregation - to the community of Israel, and also to the actual assembling together of the people according to the unity of the Congregation. Those of other nations were received into the Congregation on becoming PROSELYTES, q. The Ammonite and the Moabite were forbidden ever to come into the Congregation of Jehovah, and there were a few other restrictions. For various offences an Israelite was cut off from the Congregation
Mother - A title used to designate the superioress of a large community or Congregation of religious women. It is used principally to designate the superior general of an entire Congregation, the provincial superior, if the Congregation be divided into provinces, and sometimes to designate the local superior of an independent community
Mazzella, Camillo - Prefect of the Congregation of the Index, Congregation of Studies, and Congregation of Rites
Camillo Mazzella - Prefect of the Congregation of the Index, Congregation of Studies, and Congregation of Rites
Sisters of Charity of Saint Louis - A Congregation founded at Vannes, France in 1803 by Madame Mole, for educating poor girls. The Congregation has houses, including schools, in France, England, Canada, and the United States
Sisters of Notre Dame (of Cleveland) - A Congregation founded in Westphalia in 1850 by the Miss Hildegonda Wollbring and Miss Lisette Kuebling, members of the Congregation of Notre Dame de Namur. The Congregation manages schools, academies, orphanages, a college, and a home for girls, in Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, South America, and the United States
Kibzaim - Congregation
Index, Congregation of the - This Congregation, so called from the Index or catalog of forbidden books, was created by Pope Pius V in 1571. The Congregation of the Index consisted of a number of cardinals, one of whom was its prefect. There was also a college of consultors whose office was to deliver written opinions on the books submitted to their judgment by the Congregation. The Congregation censured and condemned books which it considered dangerous to faith or morals. The Congregation was also charged with the work of seeking out pernicious publications, and, after mature examination, of condemning and proscrlbrng them
Little Sisters of the Holy Family - Religious Congregation founded at Memramcook, New Brunswick, 1874, for the temporal care of seminaries, colleges, and episcopal residences. The Congregation has 50 missions in Canada, the United States, and Italy
Holy Family, Little Sisters of the - Religious Congregation founded at Memramcook, New Brunswick, 1874, for the temporal care of seminaries, colleges, and episcopal residences. The Congregation has 50 missions in Canada, the United States, and Italy
Institute of Presentation Brothers - Religious Congregation founded in 1802, at Dublin, by Edmund Ignatius Rice. It continued as a diocesan Congregation approved of by Rome until 1889, when a change was made in the constitution. Since that time the Congregation has spread to England and Canada, where it conducts colleges, primary schools, orphanages, and industrial schools
Congregational - ) Of or pertaining to a Congregation; conducted, or participated in, by a Congregation; as, Congregational singing. ) Belonging to the system of Congregationalism, or to Congregationalist; holding to the faith and polity of Congregationalism; as, a Congregational church
Assembly - See Congregation
Kohath - Congregation; wrinkle; bluntness
c.c.r. - = Congregation of Carmelite Religious ...
c.f.c. - = Congregation of Christian Brothers ...
c.n.d. - = Congregation of Notre Dame ...
c.s.j. - = Congregation of Saint Joseph ...
c.f.x. - = Congregation of Xaverian Brothers ...
Jekabzeel - The Congregation of God
Kehelahath - A whole; a Congregation
Kabzeel - The Congregation of God
Tefillah betzibbur - praying with a Congregation...
Sisters of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin - A Congregation founded by Father Jean Harper and four young girls of his parish in Nicolet, Canada in 1864. The Congregation has 90 schools in Canada and the United States
Religious of Notre Dame de Sion - A religious Congregation founded by the brothers Marie-Theodore and Marie-Alphonse Ratisbonne in Paris, France in 1843 for the conversion of the Jews and the education of the young. The nuns receive their spiritual guidance from the priests of Notre Dame de Sion, a Congregation of secular priests. The Congregation has houses, schools and orphanages in France, Belgium, Italy, Austria, Hungary, Rumania, Bulgaria, Turkey, Palestine, Egypt, Tunis, England, Australia, Canada, Brazil, Costa Rica, and the United States
c.m.m. - = Congregation of Marian Hill Missionaries ...
c.s.p. - = Congregation of Saint Paul; Paulists ...
c.o. - = Congregation of the Oratory; Oratorians ...
c.p. - = Congregation of the Passion; Passionists ...
Mount of Assembly - See Mount of the Congregation
Fort Augustus Abbey - Fort Augustus, Scotland, founded, 1876, by Dom Jerome Vaughan of the Anglo-Benedictine Congregation, upon the site of a fort built, 1729. Made an independent abbey, 1882, under the immediate jurisdiction of the Holy See, the primate exercises the powers peculiar to the head of a Congregation
Abbey, Fort Augustus - Fort Augustus, Scotland, founded, 1876, by Dom Jerome Vaughan of the Anglo-Benedictine Congregation, upon the site of a fort built, 1729. Made an independent abbey, 1882, under the immediate jurisdiction of the Holy See, the primate exercises the powers peculiar to the head of a Congregation
Abbey, Saint Benedict's, Scotland - Fort Augustus, Scotland, founded, 1876, by Dom Jerome Vaughan of the Anglo-Benedictine Congregation, upon the site of a fort built, 1729. Made an independent abbey, 1882, under the immediate jurisdiction of the Holy See, the primate exercises the powers peculiar to the head of a Congregation
Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament - A Congregation founded by Saint Katharine Drexel at Philadelphia, 1889, for missionary labor among the Indians and blacks of the United States. The Congregation manages schools, a college, and a house of social service, all in the United States
Saint Benedict's Abbey, Scotland - Fort Augustus, Scotland, founded, 1876, by Dom Jerome Vaughan of the Anglo-Benedictine Congregation, upon the site of a fort built, 1729. Made an independent abbey, 1882, under the immediate jurisdiction of the Holy See, the primate exercises the powers peculiar to the head of a Congregation
Sisters of Charity of Nazareth - Congregation founded by Father B. The Congregation manages schools, orphanages, and hospitals in the United States
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo - There are now four important orders so known: ...
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers; ...
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation - There are now four important orders so known: ...
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers; ...
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias - There are now four important orders so known: ...
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers; ...
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint ho - There are now four important orders so known: ...
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers; ...
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests
Antonians - There are now four important orders so known: ...
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers; ...
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests
Aleppines - There are now four important orders so known: ...
Maronite Congregation of Aleppo, or Aleppines, founded in 1695, having in 1910,10 convents, 8 hospices, 75 priests, and 45 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Baladite Congregation, founded in 1695, having in 1910,31 convents, 27 hospices, 400 priests, and 300 lay brothers; ...
Maronites of the Congregation of Saint Isaias, founded in 1700, having in 1925,22 convents, 9 residences, 20 parishes, 12 hospices, 15 schools, 150 priests, and 100 lay brothers; ...
Chaldean Antonians of the Congregation of Saint Hormisdas, founded in 1808 by Gabriel Dembo, and having 3 convents and 70 religious, of whom 20 are priests
m.s.u. - = Congregation of Monks Studitas of Ukraine ...
c.c.f. - = Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith ...
c.p.m. - = Congregation of the Fathers of Mercy ...
c.h.m. - = Congregation of the Humility of Mary ...
c.r.p. - = Congregation of the Reformed Premonstratensians; Premonstratensians ...
Parnas - the leader-head of the Congregation...
Church - * For CHURCH see ASSEMBLY and Congregation ...
Congregation - Congregation, n. A collection or assemblage of separate things as a Congregation of vapors. An assembly of ecclesiastics or cardinals appointed by the pope as the Congregation of the holy office, &c
Resurrectionists - A Congregation of Polish origin, founded at Paris, 1836, by Peter Semenenko with Jerome Kajsiewicz under the direction of Bogdan Janski. The Congregation devotes itself to work in parishes and missions, and to the education of youth in colleges and seminaries, established in Italy, Canada, and in the United States. Members of the Congregation may belong to the Latin or to the Greek Rite
Sisters of the Most Holy Sacrament - A religious Congregation established in Louisiana in 1872 primarily for the education of children. Originally a dependent branch of the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration founded by Catherine de Bar (in religion Mother Mechtilde of the Blessed Sacrament) in Paris, France in 1658, the Congregation separated from the French province in 1892, later adopting the Rule of Saint Augustine. Still later the name of the Congregation was changed to the present title
Sisters of the Good Samaritan - A Congregation of the Third Order of Saint Benedict founded in Sydney, Australia in 1857 by Archbishop Polding for the instruction of the young, visits to the sick, and other charitable works. The Congregation manages schools, homes, and an orphanage, all in Australia
Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin - Religious Congregation founded at Thueyts, France, by Mother Marie Rivier in 1796 for the education of girls. The Congregation has houses, including schools and academies, in France, Switzerland, England, Spain, Italy, the Madeira Islands, Canada, and the United States
Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word - Congregation founded at Galveston, Texas by Bishop Claude Dubuis in 1866 for the education of the young, and the care of the aged, the sick, and orphans. The Congregation has schools, hospitals, and orphanages, in the United States, Mexico, and Ireland
d.c. - = Congregation of Fathers of Christian Doctrine; Doctrinarians ...
c.f.i.c. - = Congregation of Franciscans of the Immaculate Conception ...
c.j.m. - = Congregation of Jesus and Mary; Eudist Fathers ...
c.s.s.f. - = Congregation of Sisters Saint Felice Cantalicio; Felicians ...
Koa - Hope; a Congregation; a line; a rule
Cantor - One who leads the Congregation in prayer...
Sisters of Saint Ann - A religious Congregation founded at Vanldreuil, Canada in 1850, by Monsignor I. The Congregation manages day, boarding, and trade schools, kindergartens, hospitals, and a private sanitarium, in Canada, the United States, and Alaska
Sisters, Servants of the Holy Ghost of Perpetual a - A religious Congregation founded by Father Arnold Janssen at Steyl, the Netherlands in 1896 for the propagation of the Faith and sanctification of the priesthood through the apostleship of prayer. The Congregation has houses in the Netherlands, Germany, the United States, and the Philippine Islands
Sisters of Misericorde - Religious Congregation foundecl by Madame Rosalie Jette assisted by Monsignor I. The Congregation runs hospitals, orphanages, and training schools for nurses, in Canada and the Unitecl States
Congregation - 1: ἐκκλησία (Strong's #1577 — Noun Feminine — ekklesia — ek-klay-see'-ah ) is translated "congregation" in Hebrews 2:12 , RV, instead of the usual rendering "church. ...
2: συναγωγή (Strong's #4864 — Noun Feminine — sunagoge — soon-ag-o-gay' ) is translated "congregation" in Acts 13:43 , AV (RV, "synagogue")
Camaldolese Order - For six centuries the order steadily increased as one community but in time it became divided into the five Congregations of: ...
the Holy Hermitage,
San Michele di Murano,
Monte Corona,
the Congregation of Turin, and
Notre Dame de Consolation (France).
There are at the present date (1929) three Congregations in the Camaldolese order: ...
the Congregation of Cenobites, which possesses 3 abbeys, 2 priories, 4 parishes, and 60 religious;
the Congregation of Hermits of Etruria, comprising 7 residences and 65 religious; and
the Congregation of Hermits of Monte Corona, with 10 houses, 1 novitiate, and 130 religious
c.c.r.s.a. - = Congregation of the Clerics Regular of Saint Augustine ...
er.Cam. - = Camaldolese Hermits of the Congregation of Monte Corona ...
Sisters of Our Lady of Perpetual Help - A Congregation founded at Saint Damien, Canada in 1892 by Abbe J. The Congregation manages schools, orphanages, and homes for the old and infirm, all in Canada
Scalabrinians - The Congregation, governed by a superior-general at Rome, is dependent on the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Sisters of the Most Holy Cross And Passion - The primary purpose of the Congregation was to provide homes for working girls in the manufacturing towns of England. In 1874 the sisters petitioned to be affiliated with the Congregation of the Passionists, and in time became the second and active branch of the Passionist Nuns, receiving final approbation in 1887. The Congregation includes homes and orphanages, in England, Scotland, Ireland, the United States, Chile, and Argentina
c.r.c.s. - = Clerks Regular of the Congregation of Somaschi; Somaschi Fathers ...
c.m.r.i. - = Congregation of Mary Immaculate Queen (Congregatio Mariae Reginae Immaculatae) ...
c.i.c.m. - = Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (Scheut Missions) ...
s.c.i. - = Congregation of the Priests of the Sacred Heart; Dehonians ...
s.c.j. - = Congregation of the Priests of the Sacred Heart; Dehonians ...
Chazan - "cantor"); one who leads the Congregation in prayer...
Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Sacred Heart of Jes - A purely Australian Congregation founded at Penola, South Australia in 1866 by Father Julian Tennison Woods and Blessed Mary Mackillop. The Congregation has over 140 houses, including schools, in Australia and New Zealand
Discipline, Congregation of - Founded July 18, 1695, by Innocent XII as the Congregation for the Discipline and Reformation of Regulars, to replace the Congregation of the State of Regulars. It had its own cardinal-prefect until Pius IX, March 12, 1856, placed it under the cardinal-prefect of the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars. Pius X, May 26, 1906, suppressed it, transferring its power to the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars
o.ss.r. - = Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer; Congregatio Sanctissimi Redemptoris; Redemptoristines ...
Kohath - Son of Levi, Genesis 46:11 signifies Congregation, from Karah
Andreis, Felix de - (1778-1820) First superior of the Congregation of the Mission (Vincentians) in the United States, born Demonte, Italy; died Saint Louis, Missouri. He accompanied Bishop Dubourg to Saint Louis, 1818, where the Congregation had its first establishment, and died soon after exhausted by missionary labors
Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary - A Congregation begun in 1831 by five women in Dublin, Ireland, and established in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1833 by Father T. The Congregation has schools, academies, and colleges, all in the United States
Sisters of the Assumption - A Congregation founded by Eugenie Milleret de Brou in Paris in1839 for the teaching of young girls. The Congregation has houses and schools in France, Belgium, Italy, Spain, England, Denmark, North America, Central America, South America, and the Philippines
c.s.c. - = Congregatio Sanctæ Crucis; Congregation of the Holy Cross; Holy Cross Fathers ...
Homilist - ) One who prepares homilies; one who preaches to a Congregation
ss.cc. - = Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary; Picpus Fathers ...
Oblates of Saint Francis de Sales of Troyes - Congregation of priests and lay brothers founded originally by Saint Francis de Sales, and reestablished in 1871 by Father P. The Congregation gradually developed in France and numbered seven colleges and five other institutes of learning when the government closed them all, July 31, 1903. At this time the mother-house was transferred to Rome and the Congregation divided into three provinces: Latin, German, and English; the first comprising France, Belgium, Italy, Greece and South America; the second, Austria, Germany, and the southern half of its southwest African colony; the third, England, the United States, and the northwestern part of Cape Colony
o.s.f. - = Congregation of Servants of Holy Infancy Jesus...
- or -...
= Franciscan Brothers; Franciscan Sisters ...
Holy And Immaculate Heart of Mary, Congregation of - A Congregation founded for the education of girls by Father Dupuis in Pondicherry, India, 1844, under the rules of the Third Order Regular of Saint Francis of Assisi. The Congregation has 37 convents; to the more important of these an orphanage is usually attached
Redemptorist - ) One of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, founded in Naples in 1732 by St. The Fathers of the Congregation devote themselves to preaching to the neglected, esp
Sisters of the Holy Cross And of the Seven Dolors - The sisters were recognized as a distinct Congregation in 1883. The Congregation has house in Canada and the United States, and a mission in Bengal
Servants of the Most Blessed Sacrament - A religious Congregation founded by Saint Pierre Julien Eymard assisted by Mother Margaret of the Blessed Sacrament at Angers, France in 1858, for the propagation of the devotion to the Most Blessed Sacrament. The Congregation has houses in France, Belgium, Canada, and Brazil
Assembly - See Congregation
s.s.s. - = Societas Sanctissimi Sacramenti; Fathers of the Blessed Sacrament; Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament; Sacramentines ...
Marguerite Bourgeoys, Venerable - (1620-1700) Foundress of the Congregation of Notre Dame de Montreal, born Troyes, France; died Montreal, Canada. A member in Troyes of the lay confraternity attached to the Congregation de Notre Dame, founded in Lorraine by Saint Peter Fourier, 1598, she volunteered to go to Canada in 1653 with Paul de Chomedey de Maisonneuve, the governor of Montreal, and opened a free school there in 1657. Later she returned to France for helpers, and in 1676 established the Congregation of Notre Dame de Montreal, whose rules were formally drawn up and approved in 1698
Little Sisters of the Assumption - A Congregation founded in Paris, 1865, by Reverend Etienne Pernet, A. The Congregation has houses in France, Italy, England, Ireland, Spain, Belgium, the United States, and South America
Joseph Passerat, Venerable - Member of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, born Joinville, France, 1772; died Bruges, Belgium, 1858. He left the army to enter the Congregation at Warsaw
Elect Lady - The recipient of John's second letter (2 John 1:1 ) sometimes understood to be an individual but the phrase probably is a way of referring to a local church Congregation. The “elect sister” of 2 John 1:13 would be another Congregation whose members were sending greeting
Assumption, Little Sisters of the - A Congregation founded in Paris, 1865, by Reverend Etienne Pernet, A. The Congregation has houses in France, Italy, England, Ireland, Spain, Belgium, the United States, and South America
Sisters of the Holy Ghost - A Congregation founded by Renee Burel and Marie Balavenne in Brittany, France in 1706 primarily for the education of children, but for other charitable works, including the care of the sick in their own homes. The Congregation has 350 houses, including schools, orphanages, homes, hospitals, and day nurseries, in France, Belgium, England, and the United States
Congregation - In Tindale’s Version (1534) and in Cranmer’s (1539) ‘congregation’ was used instead of ‘church’ to translate both ἐκκλησία and συναγωγή. Revised Version , with one exception, has ‘church’ exclusively in the text, though in several places ‘congregation’ appears in the margin. The exception is Hebrews 2:12, where in the quotation from Psalms 22:25 ‘congregation’ is in the text and ‘church’ in the margin. Hort (The Christian Ecclesia, London, 1897) chose ‘Ecclesia’ as a word free from the disturbing associations of ‘church’ and ‘congregation,’ though the latter has not only historical standing (as above) but also the advantage of suggesting some of these elements of meaning which are least forcibly brought out by the word ‘church’ according to our present use (cf. So far, however, as there is any substantive difference between the two words as found in the English Bible, the ‘congregation’ of Revised Version margin points to an actual church assembled in one place. He quotes Psalms 74:2 ‘Remember thy Congregation which thou didst purchase of old’; but for the Septuagint συναγωγή he puts ἐκκλησία. terms in the OT, article ‘Congregation’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols)
Farnborough Abbey - Farnborough, England, founded, 1895, by Benedictines of the Solesmes Congregation; erected into an abbey, 1903
Abbey, Farnborough - Farnborough, England, founded, 1895, by Benedictines of the Solesmes Congregation; erected into an abbey, 1903
Abbey, Saint Michael's - Farnborough, England, founded, 1895, by Benedictines of the Solesmes Congregation; erected into an abbey, 1903
Tertiaries of the Society of the Atonement - Members of the third Congregation of the Society of the Atonement, living in the world
Saint Michael's Abbey - Farnborough, England, founded, 1895, by Benedictines of the Solesmes Congregation; erected into an abbey, 1903
Congregation - Every circumcised Hebrew from twenty years old and upward was a member of the Congregation. Strangers resident in the land, if circumcised, were, with certain exceptions (Exodus 12:19 ; Numbers 9:14 ; Deuteronomy 23:1-3 ), admitted to the privileges of citizenship, and spoken of as members of the Congregation (Exodus 12:19 ; Numbers 9:14 ; 15:15 ). The Congregation were summonded together by the sound of two silver trumpets, and they met at the door of the tabernacle (Numbers 10:3 ). The elders, who were summonded by the sound of one trumpet (Numbers 10:4 ), represented on various occasions the whole Congregation (Exodus 3:16 ; 12:21 ; 17:5 ; 24:1 ). In subsequent times the Congregation was represented by the Sanhedrim; and the name synagogue, applied in the Septuagint version exclusively to the Congregation, came to be used to denote the places of worship established by the Jews
c.r. - = Congregation of the Resurrection; Resurrectionist Fathers ...
= Community of the Resurrection (Anglican) ...
= Order of Clerics Regular; Theatines ...
Foreign Mission Sisters of Saint Dominic (Maryknol - A Congregation founded by Mother Mary Joseph, O. The Congregation has 20 houses, including schools, orphanages, and a hospital; missions are established in China, Korea, Manchuria, and the Philippine and Hawaiian Islands
Missionary Sisters, Servants of the Holy Ghost - Religious Congregation founded at Steyl, the Netherlands, 1889, by Saint Arnold Janssen, founder of the Society of the Divine Word. The Congregation has houses in the Netherlands, Austria, Germany, Argentina, Brazil, Japan, China, Dutch East Indies, the Philippines, New Guinea, and the United States
Sisters of the Holy Cross (Notre Dame, Indiana) - A branch of the Sisters Marianites of the Holy Cross founded by Blessed Basile Moreau in 1841 at Le Mans, France to cooperate in the work of the Congregation of the Holy Cross. In 1869 the sisters in the United States were recognized as a distinct Congregation
Servants of the Holy Heart of Mary - Religious Congregation founded at Paris, France in 1860 by Pere Delaplace and Marie Jeanne Moisan for the Christian education of children and the visitation and care of the sick in hospitals and in their own homes. The Congregation manages schools, hospitals, orphanages, homes for the aged, kinder gartens, dispensaries, and houses of retreat for women in France, Canada, and the United States
Sisters of the Heart of Mary - Religious Congregation founded at Paris, France in 1860 by Pere Delaplace and Marie Jeanne Moisan for the Christian education of children and the visitation and care of the sick in hospitals and in their own homes. The Congregation manages schools, hospitals, orphanages, homes for the aged, kinder gartens, dispensaries, and houses of retreat for women in France, Canada, and the United States
Little Sisters of the Poor - A Congregation founded at Saint-Servan, France, 1840, by the Abbe Augustin Le Pailleur, and Jeanne Jugail, Marie Jamet, and Virginie Tredaniel. The purpose of the Congregation is the spiritual and temporal care of the aged poor of both sexes. The Congregation has homes in France, Italy, Sicily, Spain, Belgium, Portugal, Turkey, Hungary, Switzerland, England, Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, Gibraltar, Malta, Canada, the United States, India, Ceylon, Burma, China, New Zealand, Australia, Africa, Argentina, Chile, and Colombia
c.s.sp. - = Congregatio Sancti Spiritus; Fathers of the Holy Ghost; Holy Ghost Fathers; Congregation of the Holy Spirit; Spiritans ...
Mechitarist - ) One of a religious Congregation of the Roman Catholic Church devoted to the improvement of Armenians
Congregation - Congregation translates the Hebrew words edah and qahal primarily. Every circumcised Israelite was a member of the Congregation. The Congregation was subdivided into the tribe and then the most basic unit, the family. The Congregation of Israel functioned in military, legal, and punishment matters. Hence ekklesia became the term for the Christian Congregation, the church. There is a direct spiritual continuity between the Congregation of the Old Testament and the New Testament church
c.m. - = Congregation of the Mission; Fathers of the Company of Mary; Vincentians; Lazarists ...
= causa mortis (on occasion of death) ...
Cassinese Congregation - Name applied to two Benedictine Congregations. A Benedictine reform instituted at the monastery of Saint Justina, Padua, 1409, by Abbot Ludovico Barbo, received the title of "Cassinese Congregation" in 1504. ...
The Cassinese Congregation of Primitive Observance was established, 1851, by Pius IX when he joined into one federation all the monasteries which took up the reform initiated at Genoa by Abbot Casaretto of Subiaco. Besides the Italian province, the Congregation includes the English province, originally founded by Saint Augustine of Canterbury; the Belgian province, dating from 1858 with the subjection of the ancient Abbey of Termonde to Subiaco; the French province, formed in 1859, with the affiliation of Pierre-qui-Vire; the Spanish province, founded in 1862 when the Abbey of Monserrat joined the Congregation. ...
The American Cassinese Congregation (founded by Pope Pius IX, 1855), comprises 13 abbeys throughout the United States, and has for its president, Right Reverend Ernest Helmstetter, O
Raccolta - It was first published in Italian in 1807; editions of 1877,1885,1898 are the official publications of the Sacred Congregation of Indulgences. An English translation has been authorized by the same Congregation
Sisters of Charity of Jesus And Mary - A Congregation founded by Father P. The Congregation manages boarding and day schools, institutes for the deaf, dumb, and blind, hospitals, sanitariums, homes for aged and incurables, mental hospitals, and orphanages, in Belgium, Holland, England, Congo, and India
Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy - A Congregation founded in the Netherlands in 1832 by Father John Zwijsen assisted by Mary M. The Congregation manages schools, hospitals, orphanages, homes for the aged, and a leper colony, in the Netherlands, Belgium, England, the East and West Indies, and the United States
Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Apparition - A religious Congregation founded at Gaillac, France in 1832 by Emilie de Vialar for the education of children, the care of the sick, and various kinds of charitable works in the missions. The Congregation has approximately houses, include schools, hospitals, and dispensaries in France, Italy, Malta, Bulgaria, Greece, Cyprus, Crete, Chios, Syria, Palestine, Turkey, Armenia, Africa, Burma, and Australia
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Cluny - Religious Congregation founded by Blessed Anne Marie Javouhey at Seurre, France in 1798 for educating the young, nursing the sick, and caring for orphans. The Congregation manages schools, hospitals, dispensaries, clinics, sanitariums, insane asylums, and orphanages, in France, England, Ireland, Scotland, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, India, Ceylon, Africa, Madagascar, the Seychelles Islands, Nossi-Be, Reunion, the West Indies, Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, French Guiana, Chile, Peru, and Oceania
Hagbah - "lifting"); the ritual of lifting the Torah scroll and displaying it to the Congregation after the Torah reading...
Kedushah - �holiness�); a passage in the public prayer service, with portions recited responsively by the chazan and the Congregation...
Saint Laurent, College of - Conducted by the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Daughters of the Cross (French) - Congregation of women founded at Roy, Picardy, France, 1625, by Father Pierre Guerin, Françoise Unalet, and Marie Fannier, for the Christian education of girls. Opposition to this innovation resulted in the separation of religious and secular branches of the Congregation. The Congregation is diocesan
Oblate Sisters of Providence - A Congregation of nuns founded at Baltimore, Maryland on July 2, 1829 by Father James Nicholas Joubert, a Sulpician, and Mother Mary Lange, OSP. It was the first Congregation in the New World for women of African descent; their mission was the education of black children. See also the Congregation's web site
Daughters of Divine Charity - A religious Congregation founded in Vienna, 1868, by Franziska Lechner. The Congregation has approximately 20 houses, including residences for women and schools, in Austria, Hungary, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Poland, England, the United States, and South America
Hospital Sisters of the Mercy of Jesus - A Congregation of the Order of Saint Augustine, traditionally dating from the first community of women founded by Saint Augustine at Hippo, 423. The Congregation has 30 houses, including hospitals, in France, England, Canada, and Africa
Sisters of the Divine Saviour - A Congregation founded in Rome, Italy in 1888 by Father John Baptist Jordan to supplement the work of the Salvatorian Fathers. The Congregation includes schools, homes for aged women, industrial schools for women; they nurse the sick in hospitals and in their own homes
Convocation - This term (with one exception)-- (Isaiah 1:13 ) is applied invariably to meetings of a religious character, in contradistinction to Congregation
Notre Dame College - Provincial house of the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Notre Dame Des Neiges - Provincial house of the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of Africa - A Congregation founded by Cardinal Lavigerie in Algiers, 1869, to help the White Fathers in their work in Africa. The Congregation has postulates and procures in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada, and a procure in the United States at Metuchen
White Sisters - A Congregation founded by Cardinal Lavigerie in Algiers, 1869, to help the White Fathers in their work in Africa. The Congregation has postulates and procures in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada, and a procure in the United States at Metuchen
Sisters of the Holy Humility of Mary - A religious Congregation founded by Mlle. The Congregation has includes academies, schools, hospitals, an orphanage, a home for crippled children, and one for working boys
University, Saint Edward's - Conducted by the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Saint Edward's University - Conducted by the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Irish Sisters of Charity - A Congregation founded in Dublin, 1815, by Mother Mary Augustine Aikenhead, for the care of the poor and the sick in their own homes and the direction of charitable institutions. The Congregation has about 60 houses, including hospitals, asylums, rescue homes, homes for the unemployed, orphanages, primary and industrial schools and other institutions in Ireland, Australia, and England
Francis Caracciolo, Saint - Confessor, co-founder of the Congregation of the Minor Clerks Regular, born Abruzzo, Italy, 1563; died Agnone, Italy, 1608. He collaborated with John Augustine Adorno in drawing up rules for the Congregation, which was approved by Pope Sixtus V, 1588
Caracciolo, Francis, Saint - Confessor, co-founder of the Congregation of the Minor Clerks Regular, born Abruzzo, Italy, 1563; died Agnone, Italy, 1608. He collaborated with John Augustine Adorno in drawing up rules for the Congregation, which was approved by Pope Sixtus V, 1588
Sisters of Notre Dame - A branch of the Congregation of Notre Dame founded in France by Saint Peter Fourier in 1597 for the education of youth. The Congregation is under the government of the general mother-house at Munich; the American mother-house and commissariat is at Milwaukee, Wisconsin
School Sisters of Notre Dame - A branch of the Congregation of Notre Dame founded in France by Saint Peter Fourier in 1597 for the education of youth. The Congregation is under the government of the general mother-house at Munich; the American mother-house and commissariat is at Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Francis Libermann - Founder of the Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, born Saverne, Alsace, 1804; died Paris, France, 1852. After several years of prayer and patience, the Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary was authorized at Rome and the novitiate opened at La Neuville near Amiens September 27, 1841. In 1848 the institute was amalgamated with the revived Congregation of the Holy Ghost, which had a similar object, and Father Libermann was chosen superior general of the united societies
Libermann, Francis Mary Paul - Founder of the Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, born Saverne, Alsace, 1804; died Paris, France, 1852. After several years of prayer and patience, the Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary was authorized at Rome and the novitiate opened at La Neuville near Amiens September 27, 1841. In 1848 the institute was amalgamated with the revived Congregation of the Holy Ghost, which had a similar object, and Father Libermann was chosen superior general of the united societies
Alascans - Foreign Protestants in London in the reign of Edward VI, named from John a Lasco, Polish Protestant refugee, superintendent of the foreign Congregation there, 1550
Congregation - The term has been also used for assemblies of cardinals appointed by the pope for the discharge of certain functions, after the manner of our offices and courts; such as the Congregation of the inquisition, the Congregation of rites of alms, &c. Such are the Congregations of the Oratory; those of Clupy, &c
Grey Nuns of the Sacred Heart - A religious Congregation formed as an independent foundation at Philadelphia in 1921 by a group of nuns who were members of the Grey Nuns of the Cross. The Congregation undertakes any good work, such as teaching and the direction of charitable institutions; it Numbers 15 houses, including D'Youville College (Buffalo), schools and academies, hospitals, an orphanage, and a home for the aged in the archdioceses of Boston and Philadelphia, and the dioceses of Brooklyn, Buffalo, Trenton, and Ogdensburg
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Toronto) - The Congregation from which have branched the other foundations of Sisters of Saint Joseph in Upper Canada. The Congregation manages a college, academies for girls, and for small boys, separate and parochial schools, hospitals, training schools for nurses, an orphanage, and a House of Providence, for the aged poor and infirm, in the archdioceses of Toronto, Winnipeg, and Vancouver, the Diocese of Victoria, and the Vicariate Apostolic of the Yukon
Saint Viator College - Conducted by the Congregation of the Clerks of Saint Viator
Blessing - ...
Paul says, "the cup which WE bless," namely, the minister and the Congregation; not he alone by any priestly authority, but as representing the Congregation who virtually through Him bless the cup. The minister is the leader of the Congregation
Congregation - ) The whole body of the Jewish people; - called also Congregation of the Lord. ) A body of cardinals or other ecclesiastics to whom as intrusted some department of the church business; as, the Congregation of the Propaganda, which has charge of the missions of the Roman Catholic Church. The leaders called themselves (1557) Lords of the Congregation
Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs, Congregation - It was reestablished by him after his exile, June 18, 1814, as the Extraordinary Congregation for the Ecclesiastical Affairs of the Catholic World. Pius XI, July 5, 1925, made the cardinal secretary of state prefect eiC officio of this Congregation. This Congregation establishes and divides dioceses and appoints to vacant sees in countries where these matters have to be taken up with the civilgovernment either because of a concordat or for political reasons
Scolopii - In 1617 these two societies were separated and by a Brief; the Congregation of Saint Joseph Calasanctius was instituted, the members professing three simple vows. Suppressed by a Bull in 1646, the Congregation of Pious Schools was restored in 1656 with simple vows and an oath of perseverance in the Congregation
Congregation - Each Israelite was member of a house; the family was a collection of houses; the tribe, a collection of families; the Congregation, a collection of tribes. The Congregation was a national parliament, with legislative and judicial powers. The sounding of the two silver trumpets was the signal for the whole body of the people assembling at the door of the tabernacle, which was there called "the tabernacle of the Congregation," the moed , literally, a place of meeting (Numbers 10:2-4). In later times the Sanhedrin council (corresponding to Moses' seventy elders) represented the Congregation
University of Saint Joseph's College - Conducted by the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Basilians - Recently the monasteries established by Greek monks in these countries have been united into Congregations: ...
the Melchite Congregation of Saint Saviour, dating from 1715, has 10 monasteries, 170 priests, 15 brothers, and 30 sisters; ...
the Ruthenian Congregation of Saint Saviour, united to the Church in 1595 and reorganized by Saint Josaphat, has 21 monasteries, 360 religious of whom 113 are priests, and 117 lay brothers; ...
the Congregation of Aleppo, separated in 1829 from the Congregation of Chueir, has 7 monasteries, 47 priests, 18 brothers, and 26 sisters; ...
the Baladite Congregation has 4 monasteries and 3 hospices
Congregationalists - A denomination of Protestants who reject all church government, except that of a single Congregation under the direction of one pastor, with their elders, assistants, or managers
Altar Side - That part of the altar facing the Congregation
Antiphony - ) An anthem or psalm sung alternately by a choir or Congregation divided into two parts
Side, Altar - That part of the altar facing the Congregation
Doxology - ) In Christian worship: A hymn expressing praise and honor to God; a form of praise to God designed to be sung or chanted by the choir or the Congregation
Christian Retreat, Congregation of the - The Fathers of the Christian Retreat formerly directed colleges in France, and still hold the office of chaplains to the various houses of the Congregation, whose purpose is the giving of spiritual retreats and the education of the young. The Congregation has over 10 houses, including schools, in England, France, Switzerland, and Belgium
Fathers of the Christian Retreat - The Fathers of the Christian Retreat formerly directed colleges in France, and still hold the office of chaplains to the various houses of the Congregation, whose purpose is the giving of spiritual retreats and the education of the young. The Congregation has over 10 houses, including schools, in England, France, Switzerland, and Belgium
Baptistines -
Congregation of the Hermits of Saint John the Baptist, of France, founded, c. ...
Congregation of Missionary Priests of Saint John the Baptist, founded in Genoa by Domenico Olivieri, c
Associations Law - Enacted by the French Government, 1901, providing that no religious Congregation of men or of women could be formed without a legislative act, which should determine the functions of such a Congregation
Sisters of the Christian Retreat - The Fathers of the Christian Retreat formerly directed colleges in France, and still hold the office of chaplains to the various houses of the Congregation, whose purpose is the giving of spiritual retreats and the education of the young. The Congregation has over 10 houses, including schools, in England, France, Switzerland, and Belgium
Definitors - Definitors, strictly so-called, differ from mere consultors in having a decisive vote in Congregation equally with the general or provincial superior
Annates - They are now paid on the occasion of appointments to dioceses not subject to the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Parmenas - ” One of the seven chosen by the Jerusalem Congregation to distribute food to the Greek-speaking widows of that church (Acts 6:5 )
Stigmatine Fathers - The Congregation has its mother-house at Rome and is represented in Italy, North and South America, and China
Matrimonial Court - In the Romani "Curia" or Court, the Congregation of the Holy Office has exclusive jurisdiction concerning the, Pauline Privilege, the impediment of disparity of worship and that of mixed religion; but it may refer cases to another Congregation, such as that of the Sacraments, or to the Tribunal of the Rota. Any Catholic has the right to bring a case before the proper Roman Congregation or Tribunal, usually through a procurator or advocate
Belmont Abbey - (Abbey of Saint Michael and All Angels) Hereford, England, founded, 1859, by the Benedictines as a central novitiate and house of studies for the English Congregation; erected into an abbey, 1920; priests, 14
Abbey, Belmont - (Abbey of Saint Michael and All Angels) Hereford, England, founded, 1859, by the Benedictines as a central novitiate and house of studies for the English Congregation; erected into an abbey, 1920; priests, 14
Abbey of Saint Michael And All Angels - (Abbey of Saint Michael and All Angels) Hereford, England, founded, 1859, by the Benedictines as a central novitiate and house of studies for the English Congregation; erected into an abbey, 1920; priests, 14
Jesuats - Religious Congregation of men founded 1361 at Siena, Italy, by Saint John Colombini, for the care of the sick, particularly the plague-stricken, the burial of the dead, prayer, and strict mortification. Under his successors Francesco Mini and Blessed Jerome Dasciano, the Congregation spread rapidly throughout, Italy
Quesnel, Pasquier - He joined the Congregation of the Oratory but the doctrines propounded in his writings were condemned by Pope Clement XI. Expelled from the Congregation of the Oratory in 1684, Quesnel went to Belgium and published numerous works under assumed names
Caspar Del Bufalo, Blessed - (1786-1837) Confessor, founder of the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood, born Rome; died there. Banished and imprisoned, 1810-1814, for refusing to swear allegiance to Napoleon, he returned to Rome and established, 1815, a Congregation of secular-priests to give missions and spread devotion to the Most Precious Blood
Giovanni Bona - Having entered the Cistercian monastery at Pignerola, and labored at Turin, Asti, and Mondovi, he was called to Rome (1651) to preside over the whole Cistercian Congregation. Pope Alexander VII, his intimate friend, appointed him consultor to the Congregation of the Index and to the Holy Office, and in 1669 he was created cardinal
African Missions of Lyons - A Congregation of secular priests founded at Lyons, France in 1856, by Monsignor de Bresillac and Father Planque. Its constitutions were provisionally approved in 1890, and definitively in 1900; they were revised and again approved by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples in 1923,1928
Baker, David Augustine - He became a Catholic, and later a Benedictine (1605), first, of the Cassinese Congregation in England, but afterward of the English Congregation
Notre Dame, University of - Conducted by the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Assumption Abbey - Benedictine abbey of the Swiss American Congregation, founded as the monastery of Saint Mary by Vincent Wehrle, O
Maurist - ) A member of the Congregation of Saint Maur, an offshoot of the Benedictines, originating in France in the early part of the seventeenth century
University of Notre Dame - Conducted by the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Hamilton) - The Congregation manages schools, hospitals, a sanitarium, and an orphanage, all in the Diocese of Hamilton
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Saint Hyacinthe - The Congregation has houses and schools in Canada and the United States
Alternation - In liturgy, the response of a Congregation praying in turn with the officiating minister, as in saying the Rosary or litanies; or the recitation of the Divine Office in choir, each side reciting a verse in turn
Litany - ) A solemn form of supplication in the public worship of various churches, in which the clergy and Congregation join, the former leading and the latter responding in alternate sentences
Chapter, General - There are various kinds of assemblies: conventual, provincial, and general, the latter composed of delegates of an entire order, Congregation, or group of monasteries. The idea of general chapters originated with Saint Benedict of Aniane in thc 9th century, was revived at Cluny in the l0th, and finally culminated in the Congregational system promulgated by the Fourth Lateran Council, 1215. Since that time general chapters have been held by practically every order and Congregation
General Chapter - There are various kinds of assemblies: conventual, provincial, and general, the latter composed of delegates of an entire order, Congregation, or group of monasteries. The idea of general chapters originated with Saint Benedict of Aniane in thc 9th century, was revived at Cluny in the l0th, and finally culminated in the Congregational system promulgated by the Fourth Lateran Council, 1215. Since that time general chapters have been held by practically every order and Congregation
Sisters of Divine Providence (Lorraine) - Suppressed in 1792, the Congregation was re-established after the French Revolution. The Congregation has houses, including academies, schools, homes, and one infant asylum, in France, Belgium, and the United States
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Chambery - The Congregation, formerly diocesan, then became subject to a superior-general. The Congregation has 147 houses, including parochial and high schools, hospitals, a leper asylum, homes for the aged, workrooms for girls, and orphanages, in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Italy, Brazil, and the United States (in the Archdiocese of Baltimore, and the dioceses of Hartford and Springfield)
Missionary Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary - The Congregation conducts missions in West Africa, Colombia, Bolivia, and Brazil, and they are established in the dioceses of Westminster and Brentwood, England
Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Mary - The Congregation manages colleges, academies, schools, and orphanages in France, England, Ireland, Spain, Brazil, and the United States
General Thanksgiving, the - It is called General as being suitableto all men, and in contradistinction to the special Thanksgivingsto be used by request of members of the Congregation for specialmercies vouchsafed
Evangelization of Peoples, Congregation For the - Founded as the Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide (for the Propagation of the Faith) was founded by Pope Gregory XV on June 22, 1622 to regulate ecclesiastical affairs in the so-called "missionary countries," i. For most of its life it was referred to as the Congregation of Propaganda the name was changed in 1982 since the word propaganda had taken sinister overtones in the 20th century. The Congregation has its own cardinal prefect, a number of cardinals with the usual officials, and a body of consultors. The headquarters of the Pontifical Society for the Propagation of the Faith are in this Congregation, the secretary of the Congregation being president of the superior general council of the society. ...
Prefects of the Congregation: ...
Antonio Maria Cardinal Sauli (1622)
Ludovico Cardinal Ludovisi (1622-1632)
Antonio Marcello Cardinal Barberini (1632-1671)
Paluzzo Cardinal Paluzzi Altieri Degli Albertoni (1671-1698)
Carlo Cardinal Berberini (1698-1704)
Giuseppe Cardinal Sacripanti (1704-1727)
Vincenzo Cardinal Petra (1727-1747)
Silvio Cardinal Valenti Gonzaga (1747-1756)
Giuseppe Cardinal Spinelli (1756-1763)
Giuseppe Maria Cardinal Castelli (1763-1780)
Leonardo Cardinal Antonelli (1780-1795)
Giacinto Cardinal Sigismondo Gerdil (1795-1802)
Stefano Cardinal Borgia (pro-prefect 1798-1800, prefect 1802-1804)
Antonio Cardinal Dugnani (1804-1805)
Michele Cardinal di Pietro (1805-1814)
Lorenzo Cardinal Litta (1814-1818)
Francesco Cardinal Fontana (1818-1822)
Ercole Cardinal Consalvi (pro-prefect 1822-1824, prefect 1824)
Giulio Maria Cardinal della Somaglia (pro-prefect 1824-1826)
Mauro Cardinal Capellari (1826-1831)
Carlo Maria Cardinal Pedicini (1831-1834)
Filippo Cardinal Fransoni (1834-1856)
Allesandro Cardinal Barnabò (1856-1874)
Alessandro Cardinal Franchi (1874-1878)
Giovanni Cardinal Simeoni (1878-1892)
Mieczyslaw Halka Cardinal Ledóchowski (1892-1902)
Girolamo Maria Cardinal Gotti (1902-1916)
Domenico Cardinal Serafini (pro-prefect 1916, prefect 1916-1918)
Willem Marinus Cardinal van Rossum (1918-1932)
Pietro Cardinal Fumasoni Biondi (1933-1960)
Samual Alphonse Cardinal Stritch (pro-prefect 1958)
Grégoire-Pierre XV Cardinal Agagianian (pro-prefect 1958-1960, prefect 1960-1970)
Agnelo Cardinal Rossi (1970-1984)
Dermot Ryan (pro-prefect 1984-1985)
Jozef Cardinal Tomko (pro-prefect 1985, prefect 1985-2001)
Crescenzio Cardinal Sepe (2001- )
Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide - Founded as the Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide (for the Propagation of the Faith) was founded by Pope Gregory XV on June 22, 1622 to regulate ecclesiastical affairs in the so-called "missionary countries," i. For most of its life it was referred to as the Congregation of Propaganda the name was changed in 1982 since the word propaganda had taken sinister overtones in the 20th century. The Congregation has its own cardinal prefect, a number of cardinals with the usual officials, and a body of consultors. The headquarters of the Pontifical Society for the Propagation of the Faith are in this Congregation, the secretary of the Congregation being president of the superior general council of the society. ...
Prefects of the Congregation: ...
Antonio Maria Cardinal Sauli (1622)
Ludovico Cardinal Ludovisi (1622-1632)
Antonio Marcello Cardinal Barberini (1632-1671)
Paluzzo Cardinal Paluzzi Altieri Degli Albertoni (1671-1698)
Carlo Cardinal Berberini (1698-1704)
Giuseppe Cardinal Sacripanti (1704-1727)
Vincenzo Cardinal Petra (1727-1747)
Silvio Cardinal Valenti Gonzaga (1747-1756)
Giuseppe Cardinal Spinelli (1756-1763)
Giuseppe Maria Cardinal Castelli (1763-1780)
Leonardo Cardinal Antonelli (1780-1795)
Giacinto Cardinal Sigismondo Gerdil (1795-1802)
Stefano Cardinal Borgia (pro-prefect 1798-1800, prefect 1802-1804)
Antonio Cardinal Dugnani (1804-1805)
Michele Cardinal di Pietro (1805-1814)
Lorenzo Cardinal Litta (1814-1818)
Francesco Cardinal Fontana (1818-1822)
Ercole Cardinal Consalvi (pro-prefect 1822-1824, prefect 1824)
Giulio Maria Cardinal della Somaglia (pro-prefect 1824-1826)
Mauro Cardinal Capellari (1826-1831)
Carlo Maria Cardinal Pedicini (1831-1834)
Filippo Cardinal Fransoni (1834-1856)
Allesandro Cardinal Barnabò (1856-1874)
Alessandro Cardinal Franchi (1874-1878)
Giovanni Cardinal Simeoni (1878-1892)
Mieczyslaw Halka Cardinal Ledóchowski (1892-1902)
Girolamo Maria Cardinal Gotti (1902-1916)
Domenico Cardinal Serafini (pro-prefect 1916, prefect 1916-1918)
Willem Marinus Cardinal van Rossum (1918-1932)
Pietro Cardinal Fumasoni Biondi (1933-1960)
Samual Alphonse Cardinal Stritch (pro-prefect 1958)
Grégoire-Pierre XV Cardinal Agagianian (pro-prefect 1958-1960, prefect 1960-1970)
Agnelo Cardinal Rossi (1970-1984)
Dermot Ryan (pro-prefect 1984-1985)
Jozef Cardinal Tomko (pro-prefect 1985, prefect 1985-2001)
Crescenzio Cardinal Sepe (2001- )
Sacred Congregation For the Propagation of the Fai - Founded as the Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide (for the Propagation of the Faith) was founded by Pope Gregory XV on June 22, 1622 to regulate ecclesiastical affairs in the so-called "missionary countries," i. For most of its life it was referred to as the Congregation of Propaganda the name was changed in 1982 since the word propaganda had taken sinister overtones in the 20th century. The Congregation has its own cardinal prefect, a number of cardinals with the usual officials, and a body of consultors. The headquarters of the Pontifical Society for the Propagation of the Faith are in this Congregation, the secretary of the Congregation being president of the superior general council of the society. ...
Prefects of the Congregation: ...
Antonio Maria Cardinal Sauli (1622)
Ludovico Cardinal Ludovisi (1622-1632)
Antonio Marcello Cardinal Barberini (1632-1671)
Paluzzo Cardinal Paluzzi Altieri Degli Albertoni (1671-1698)
Carlo Cardinal Berberini (1698-1704)
Giuseppe Cardinal Sacripanti (1704-1727)
Vincenzo Cardinal Petra (1727-1747)
Silvio Cardinal Valenti Gonzaga (1747-1756)
Giuseppe Cardinal Spinelli (1756-1763)
Giuseppe Maria Cardinal Castelli (1763-1780)
Leonardo Cardinal Antonelli (1780-1795)
Giacinto Cardinal Sigismondo Gerdil (1795-1802)
Stefano Cardinal Borgia (pro-prefect 1798-1800, prefect 1802-1804)
Antonio Cardinal Dugnani (1804-1805)
Michele Cardinal di Pietro (1805-1814)
Lorenzo Cardinal Litta (1814-1818)
Francesco Cardinal Fontana (1818-1822)
Ercole Cardinal Consalvi (pro-prefect 1822-1824, prefect 1824)
Giulio Maria Cardinal della Somaglia (pro-prefect 1824-1826)
Mauro Cardinal Capellari (1826-1831)
Carlo Maria Cardinal Pedicini (1831-1834)
Filippo Cardinal Fransoni (1834-1856)
Allesandro Cardinal Barnabò (1856-1874)
Alessandro Cardinal Franchi (1874-1878)
Giovanni Cardinal Simeoni (1878-1892)
Mieczyslaw Halka Cardinal Ledóchowski (1892-1902)
Girolamo Maria Cardinal Gotti (1902-1916)
Domenico Cardinal Serafini (pro-prefect 1916, prefect 1916-1918)
Willem Marinus Cardinal van Rossum (1918-1932)
Pietro Cardinal Fumasoni Biondi (1933-1960)
Samual Alphonse Cardinal Stritch (pro-prefect 1958)
Grégoire-Pierre XV Cardinal Agagianian (pro-prefect 1958-1960, prefect 1960-1970)
Agnelo Cardinal Rossi (1970-1984)
Dermot Ryan (pro-prefect 1984-1985)
Jozef Cardinal Tomko (pro-prefect 1985, prefect 1985-2001)
Crescenzio Cardinal Sepe (2001- )
Congregation - ‛Êdâh (עֵדָה, Strong's #5712), “congregation. ...
The most frequent reference is to the “congregation of Israel” (9 times), “the Congregation of the sons of Israel” (26 times), “the Congregation” (24 times), or “all of the Congregation” (30 times). 16:2; 31:13; 32:2) were placed in charge of the “congregation” in order to assist Moses in a just rule. The KJV has these translations: “congregation; company; assembly. ” This usage is not frequent: “For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God: I will sit also upon the mount of the Congregation [1], in the sides of the north …” ( Congregation,” is a translation of the Hebrew ‘ohel mô‛êd (“tent of meeting”). In the KJV, this phrase is translated as “tabernacle of the Congregation” ( Duquesne University - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, founded 1878; conducted by the Congregation of the Holy Ghost; preparatory school; colleges of arts, sciences, education; schools of accounts, finance, and commerce, oratory, law, pharmacy, music; graduate, special, pre-medical and pre-dental, extension, and summer schools
Chaumonot, Pierre Joseph - He labored among the Hurons and the New York Onondagas, established the Canadian Congregation of the Holy Family, and founded the settlement now known as Jeune Lorette ...
Choral - ) A hymn tune; a simple sacred tune, sung in unison by the Congregation; as, the Lutheran chorals
Hospitallers of Chartres - A religious Congregation founded in the last half of the seventeenth century, for teaching and the care of the sick and poor
Abbey, Ramsgate - Founded by Benedictines of the English Congregation in 1861
Ramsgate Abbey - Founded by Benedictines of the English Congregation in 1861
Sisters of Saint Paul of Chartres - A religious Congregation founded in the last half of the seventeenth century, for teaching and the care of the sick and poor
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Ogdensburg) - The Congregation manages academies, grade and high schools, a conservatory of music, an orphanage, and a hospital, in the Diocese of Ogdensburg
University, Duquesne - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, founded 1878; conducted by the Congregation of the Holy Ghost; preparatory school; colleges of arts, sciences, education; schools of accounts, finance, and commerce, oratory, law, pharmacy, music; graduate, special, pre-medical and pre-dental, extension, and summer schools
Excellency - Title of patriarchs by a decree of the Congregation of Ceremonies, June 3, 1893, instead of "His Beatitude," which is reserved for the sovereign pontiff
Lazarite - ) One of the Congregation of the Priests of the Mission, a religious institute founded by Vincent de Paul in 1624, and popularly called Lazarists or Lazarites from the College of St
Sacraments, Congregation of the - The doctrine of the Sacrament is the province of the Holy Office, and the ceremonial that of the Congregation of Rites
Jane Frances de Chantal, Saint - Foundress of the Visitation Congregation, born Dijon, France, 1572; died Visitation Convent, Moulins, France, 1641. Having provided for the welfare of her children, she went to Annecy with her two daughters and established the Congregation of the Visitation, 1610
Endowment, Ecclesiastical - Among the Dissenters, they are benefactions left to their place or Congregation, for the support of their ministers. Where the Congregation is poor or small, these have been found beneficial; but in many cases they have been detrimental
Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona - In 1885 the society became a Congregation and its members were called Sons of the Sacred Heart. By a decree of 1923, this institute was divided into two Congregations: the Congregation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus for the missions of central Africa, comprising 140 religious, all Italians, and having its mother-house at Verona; and the Congregation of Missionaries of the Sons of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, composed of religious of Austrian, German, and other nationalities. The constitutions of both Congregations are practically the same
Erdington Abbey, Birmingham, England - Founded, 1876, by the Benedictine, Dom Placid Walter, arch-abbot of the Beuron Congregation, and a party of monks driven from Germany; raised to an abbey, 1896
Spanish College - Directed by the Spanish Congregation of the Operarii Direcesani
Armenian College - Students attend lectures at the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Burlington) - The Congregation has elementary, boarding, and high schools, a commercial school, a day nursery, and a home for aged women, all in the Diocese of Burlington
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Chicago) - The Congregation manages academies and parochial schools, all in the Archdiocese of Chicago
Sisters of Saint Joseph of le Puy (Fall River) - Established in 1902 by nine sisters from the mother-house at Le Puy, France, who took charge of schools in French parishes of the Diocese of Fall River, where the Congregation has now manages schools
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Wheeling) - The Congregation manages hospitals, training schools for nurses, an academy, and orphanages, besides parochial elementary and high schools conducted by the sisters, in various parts of the Diocese of Wheeling
Majella, Gerard, Saint - Beginning life as a tailor's apprentice, he subsequently entered the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, 1749
Oriental Church, Congregation For the - This Congregation has the same faculties for the Eastern Church which the other Congregations, with the exception of the Holy Office, have in their various jurisdictions
Responsibility - John Brown, of Haddington, said to a young minister, who complained of the smallness of his Congregation, 'It is as large a one as you will want to give account for in the day of judgment
Sisters of the Holy Family -(New Orleans) - A Congregation of black sisters following the Rule of Saint Augustine, founded in 1842 under the direction of Father Etienne Rousselon for work among their own race
Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus And Mary - A religious Congregation founded at Longueuil, Quebec, under the patronage of Bishop Bourgot of Montreal in 1843 for the Christian education of youth
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Saint Augustine) - The Congregation manages missions, academies, and an orphanage, in the Diocese of Saint Augustine
Gerard Majella, Saint - Beginning life as a tailor's apprentice, he subsequently entered the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, 1749
Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Presentation - A religious Congregation founded in France in 1826 by Abbe Fleury and Mlle
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Peterborough) - The Congregation manages academies, high schools, continuation and separate schools, hospitals, orphanages, missions, and a House of Providence, in the dioceses of Peterborough, Saulte-Sainte-Marie, and Alexandria, and the archdiocese of Ottawa
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Saint Vallier - Congregation founded in 1683 by Monsignor Jean Baptiste de la Croix with two sisters of Saint Joseph from Le Puy, who took charge of his hospital at Saint Vallier, France, where the mother-house is still located
Scapular of the Passion (Black) - Badge of a confraternity associated with the Congregation of the Passionists (Passionist Fathers). At various times indulgences have been granted to the faithful who wear this scapular, the Summary being last approved by the Congregation of Indulgences on May 10, 1877
Institute of the Brigidines - The Congregation has (approximately) 30 houses, including primary, secondary, and boarding schools in Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand
Clerk - Also the person who reads the responses of the Congregation in the church, or gives out the hymns at a meeting
Sisters of Saint Ursula of the Blessed Virgin - A religious Congregation founded at Dole, France, by Anne de Xainctonge in 1606 for the teaching of girls, and works of mercy both spiritual and corporal
Sisters of Saint Brigid - The Congregation has (approximately) 30 houses, including primary, secondary, and boarding schools in Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand
Orate Fratres - (Latin: pray, brethren) ...
The exhortation addressed to the people by the celebrant immediately after the Offertory and ablutions in the Mass and immediately preceding the Secrets, the server responding in the name of the Congregation
Kandy, Sri Lanka, Diocese of - Entrusted to the Benedictines of the Congregation of Saint Silvester, Abbot
Society of Saint Raphael For Italian Immigrants - Emigrant aid society, founded in New York, 1891, by the members of the Congregation of Saint Charles Borromeo
Oratorians - The Congregation of Rome is composed of independent communities of secular priests under obedience but not bound by vows. The French Congregation, though taking its origin and some of its rules from that of Saint Philip, is a distinct institution founded at Paris, 1611, by Cardinal de Berulle with the official title, "Congregation des Prêtres de l'Oratoirede N. See also the Congregation's web site
Oratory of Saint Philip Neri - The Congregation of Rome is composed of independent communities of secular priests under obedience but not bound by vows. The French Congregation, though taking its origin and some of its rules from that of Saint Philip, is a distinct institution founded at Paris, 1611, by Cardinal de Berulle with the official title, "Congregation des Prêtres de l'Oratoirede N. See also the Congregation's web site
Fathers of the Holy Cross - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Josephites - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Fourier, Peter, Saint - He later reformed the Lorraine branch of this order, organizing with them, in 1629, the Congregation of Our Saviour, of which he became head. In 1598 he founded the Congregation of Notre Dame, who teach poor girls gratuitously; he is also founder of the Sodality of the Immaculate Conception, or "Children of Mary"
Dacca, India, Diocese of - In 1850 the Vicariate was divided into East and West, with the Vicariage Apostolic of East Bengal headquartered in Dacca entrusted to the Congregation of Holy Cross. Erected as the diocese of Dacca, India on September 1, 1886 as a suffragan of Calcutta, entrusted to the Congregation of the Holy Ghost, and comprised of several districts of Bengal and the native state of Hill Tipperah
Holy Cross, Congregation of the - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Holy Cross, Fathers of the - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Holy Cross, Priests of the - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Holy Cross, Religious of the - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Religious Congregations - (Latin: congregure, to collect together) ...
Originally, a religious community dwelling in a monastery, as that instituted by Saint Pachomius, c318 The regular organization of religious Congregations began with the Rule of Saint Benedict in the 6th century. From the 10th century a group of monasteries bound together by a common rule would, for the sake of closer unity, acknowledge the authority of a particular one, as in France where sixty-five monasteries followed Cluny (Congregation of Cluny). Later the term "congregation" was applied to an association of priests not bound by vows, e
Religious of the Holy Cross - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Religious of the Notre Dame of the Holy Cross - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Salvatorists - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Saint Joseph, Brothers of - The Congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal
Congregation - (Numbers 15:15 ) The Congregation was governed by the father or head of each family and tribe. (Numbers 11:16 ) Occasionally indeed the whole body of people was assembled at the door of the tabernacle, hence usually called the tabernacle of the Congregation
Abbey, Faversham - A former Benedictine monastery of the Cluniac Congregation near Canterbury, founded by King Stephen and Queen Matilda
Faversham Abbey - A former Benedictine monastery of the Cluniac Congregation near Canterbury, founded by King Stephen and Queen Matilda
Mount Saint Bernard College - Conducted by the Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame
Institute of the Christian Virgins - They follow the rules of the Congregation of Providence, and devote themselves to the care of the sick and to the Christian instruction of pagan Chinese women and children in their homes
Celebret - Secular priests receive these from their ordinaries; religious from their superiors; orientals, traveling through Latin jurisdictions, from the Congregation for the Oriental Church
Notre Dame de Montreal, Congregation of - The Congregation has 170 houses, including schools, colleges, a teachers' institute, normal schools, a cooking school, business schools, and kindergartens, in Canada, and the United States
Diaspora - (b) By extension, to Christians isolated from their own communion, as among the Moravians to those living, usually as missionaries, outside of the parent Congregation
Meeting - An assembly a Congregation a collection of people a convention
Propaganda - ) A Congregation of cardinals, established in 1622, charged with the management of missions
Abbey, Buckfast - Near Ashburton, England, founded probably about the middle of the 10th century; incorporated into the Benedictine Congregation of Savigny (later part of the Cistercian Order) in the 12th century; and suppressed, 1538
Alternation - ) The response of the Congregation speaking alternately with the minister
Anthony Zaccaria, Saint - He worked among the poor at Milan, and established the Confraternity of Eternal Wisdom and the Congregation of secular clergy to relieve the conditions in northern Italy
Congregationalists - a denomination of Protestants who reject all church government, except that of a single Congregation under the direction of one pastor, with their elders, assistants, or managers. In one particular, the Congregationalists differ from the Independents: the former invite councils, which, however, only tender their advice; but the latter are accustomed to decide all difficulties within themselves
Pastor - A minister of the gospel who has the charge of a church and Congregation, whose duty is to watch over the people of his charge, and instruct them in the sacred doctrines of the christian religion
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Buffalo) - The Congregation manages schools, academies, orphanages, homes for the aged, for infants, and for working girls, an institute for the deaf, and a protectory for homeless boys, all in the Diocese of Buffalo
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Detroit) - The Congregation manages a college and academy, a boarding school for small boys, parish schools, an old peoples home, hospitals, a foundling home, and an orphanage, all in the Diocese of Detroit
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Brooklyn) - The Congregation manages parochial and trade schools, academies, a college for women, hospitals and orphanages, all in the diocese of Brooklyn
Zaccaria, Anthony, Saint - He worked among the poor at Milan, and established the Confraternity of Eternal Wisdom and the Congregation of secular clergy to relieve the conditions in northern Italy
Rites, Congregation of - The officials peculiar to this Congregation are the Promotor of the Faith (popularly called the devil's advocate), who raises objections against beatifications and canonizations, and the hymnographer, who prepares and corrects new offices. This Congregation is charged with the direction of the liturgy of the Latin Church and therefore with supervising the performance of the rites prescribed for celebrating Mass and other ecclesiastical functions
Jesus-Mary, Congregation of - The Congregation has 70 houses, including colleges, normal schools, boarding and day schools, orphanages, dispensaries, and guesthouses, in France, Spain, England, Ireland, Switzerland, Italy, Germany, India, Argentina, Canada, the United States, and Mexico
John de Britto, Blessed - A Jesuit missionary in Madura, India, he was expelled from the country and returned to Portugal 1688, as deputy to the triennial Congregation of Procurators
John Perboyre, Blessed - As a priest of the Congregation of the Mission in 1835 his superiors, already impressed with his sanctity, granted the permission he had sought for 14 years and sent him to the Chinese mission
Gillespie, Eliza Maria - Her brother, Neal Henry (1831-1874), the first graduate of Notre Dame University, joined the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Athering - ) A crowd; an assembly; a Congregation
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Erie) - The Congregation manages a college and academy, hospitals, a day nursery, an orphanage, a training school for boys, and a home for the aged, besides parochial schools, in the Diocese of Erie
Sisters of Saint Agnes of Rome - The Congregation manages an academy, primary and secondary schools, hospitals, orphanages, a home for the aged, and the Leo House at New York for the care of immigrants, all in the United States
Sisters of Divine Providence (San Antonio) - Founded at Castroville, Texas, in 1866, by Sister Saint Andrew from the Congregation of the Sisters of Divine Providence of Lorraine at the request of Bishop Dubuis of Galveston
Sister-Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (g - The Congregation manages schools, orphanages, a maternity house, a home for wayward girls, a home for working girls, and a home for foundlings in Canada and the United States
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Pittsburgh) - The Congregation manages grade and high schools, an academy for boys, a preparatory school for the novitiate, a teacher's college, a hospital and dispensary, a training school for nurses, and an infant home in the dioceses of Pittsburgh and Altoona, and a mission in Yuanchow, China
Francis Clet, Blessed - Director of the internal seminary at mother-house of the Congregation of the Lazarists in Paris, he asked to be sent to China after the community had been disbanded by the Revolutionists
Jeshaiah - Apparently, they proclaimed God's will to the worshiping Congregation
Death: Peace in - Young of Jedburgh, was once visiting the death-bed of an aged member of his Congregation, who was hourly looking for his last change
Roaring - , or of a noisy Congregation
Hegumenos - His assistants are two counselors, elected by the Congregation from among the monks who have been professed not less than six years
Sisters of Providence - The Congregation has houses, including schools, in Italy, England, and Wales
Sisters of the Institute of Charity (Rosminians) - The Congregation has houses, including schools, in Italy, England, and Wales
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Springfield) - The Congregation manages a scholasticate connected with the novitiate, a college and academy, and parochial schools, in the Diocese of Springfield
Sisters of Christian Charity - The Congregation has schools, academies, colleges, hospitals, an orphanage, and other charitable institutions in the United States, South America, and Europe
Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Diocese of - Erected as the Prefecture Apostolic of Cook and Manihiki on November 27, 1922, entrusted to the Congregation of Picpus
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Boston) - The Congregation manages parochial schools, academies, a college, trade school, homes for women, adolescents, and working-girls, in the archdiocese of Boston, at Sierra Madre, and Los Angeles
Kem'Uel - (congregation of God )
Theatines - Despite the severity of their rule and strict vow of poverty; the Congregation rapidly developed, both in Italy and in foreign countries. Pope Pius X in 1909 united the Theatines to the Spanish Congregation of the Holy Family, but this union was dissolved in 1916. A Congregation of Theatine nuns, dating from, c
Order of Clerks Regular - Despite the severity of their rule and strict vow of poverty; the Congregation rapidly developed, both in Italy and in foreign countries. Pope Pius X in 1909 united the Theatines to the Spanish Congregation of the Holy Family, but this union was dissolved in 1916. A Congregation of Theatine nuns, dating from, c
Lazarists - A Congregation of priests and laymen, founded at Paris, 1625, by Saint Vincent de Paul. The special object of the Congregation determines that each member, besides devoting himself to his own perfection, shall be employed in preaching the Gospel to the poor, especially to poor country people, and in helping ecclesiastics to the knowledge and virtues requisite for their state. During the lifetime of the founder establishments were made not only in France but also in Poland and in Italy, and the Congregation undertook missionary work in Ireland, the Hebrides, Barbary, and Madagascar. In 1804 an imperial decree reestablished the Congregation; under the government of the Restoration, 1816, a royal ordinance recognized it and in 1901 the Council of State considered it as legally recognized in France. The first Scotch house was established at Lanark, 1859; the Australian mission was begun in 1885; and the Congregation was brought to the United States, 1816
Vincentians - A Congregation of priests and laymen, founded at Paris, 1625, by Saint Vincent de Paul. The special object of the Congregation determines that each member, besides devoting himself to his own perfection, shall be employed in preaching the Gospel to the poor, especially to poor country people, and in helping ecclesiastics to the knowledge and virtues requisite for their state. During the lifetime of the founder establishments were made not only in France but also in Poland and in Italy, and the Congregation undertook missionary work in Ireland, the Hebrides, Barbary, and Madagascar. In 1804 an imperial decree reestablished the Congregation; under the government of the Restoration, 1816, a royal ordinance recognized it and in 1901 the Council of State considered it as legally recognized in France. The first Scotch house was established at Lanark, 1859; the Australian mission was begun in 1885; and the Congregation was brought to the United States, 1816
Liguori, Alphonsus, Saint - In 1732, with the help of bishop Thomas Falcoia of Castellamare, he founded the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer at Scala. Enfeebled by illness and the constant struggle for recognition of his Congregation by the civilauthorities, Alphonsus continued to work diligently and practise mortification
Assumptionists - A Congregation which had its origin in the College of the Assumption, established in Nimes, France, in 1843, by Reverend Emmanuel d'Alzon, to combat irreligion in Europe and schism in the East. At the time of its suppression this Congregation had 20 Apostolic schools, with hospitals, orphanages, and branches in 80 dioceses; and La Bonne Presse which issued periodicals, pamphlets, and books in great numbers, the chief publication being La Croix
Augustinians of the Assumption - A Congregation which had its origin in the College of the Assumption, established in Nimes, France, in 1843, by Reverend Emmanuel d'Alzon, to combat irreligion in Europe and schism in the East. At the time of its suppression this Congregation had 20 Apostolic schools, with hospitals, orphanages, and branches in 80 dioceses; and La Bonne Presse which issued periodicals, pamphlets, and books in great numbers, the chief publication being La Croix
Magdalen - In each of these monasteries there were three kinds of persons and Congregations; the first consisted of those who were admitted to make vows, and those bear the name of St. Magdalen; the Congregation of St. Martha was the second, and was composed of those whom it was not thought proper to admit to vows finally; the Congregation of St
Society of the Blessed Sacrament - Congregation of priests founded at Paris, France in 1865 by Blessed Pierre Julien Eymard, to devote themselves exclusively to the worship of the Holy Eucharist. From every house of the Congregation emanates a series of Eucharistic works, as: Eucharistic Weeks, or, Lights and Flowers; People's Eucharistic League; Priests' Eucharistic League; Sacerdotal Eucharistic League, etc
Liguorians - The Congregation was introduced into Poland, in 1786, by Saint Clemens Mary Hofbauer and Father Thaddeus Hubl. Prior to 1848 six houses had been founded in Austria; the Congregation had been introduced into Belgium, where four houses were opened; and it had established itself at Wittem, Holland, 1836. As a result of the revolution that swept over Europe in 1848, the Congregation suffered greatly; in 1847 it had been banished from Switzerland, and in 1848 from Austria. The Congregation spread to Ecuador during the presidency of Garcia Moreno, and a few years later gained a foothold in Peru, Chile, and Colombia
Redemptorists - The Congregation was introduced into Poland, in 1786, by Saint Clemens Mary Hofbauer and Father Thaddeus Hubl. Prior to 1848 six houses had been founded in Austria; the Congregation had been introduced into Belgium, where four houses were opened; and it had established itself at Wittem, Holland, 1836. As a result of the revolution that swept over Europe in 1848, the Congregation suffered greatly; in 1847 it had been banished from Switzerland, and in 1848 from Austria. The Congregation spread to Ecuador during the presidency of Garcia Moreno, and a few years later gained a foothold in Peru, Chile, and Colombia
Cellites - Congregation under patronage of Saint Alexius of Edessa, founded by Tobias at Mechlin, Brabant, in the 15th century, to nurse the sick and bury the dead during the Black Death
Alimentation - Under it would fall the obligation of parents towards children, of children towards parents, husbands towards wives, of a religious order or Congregation towards its members
Famous - Two hundred and fifty princes of the assembly, famous in the Congregation
ha'Shum - ) ...
One of the priests or Levites who stood on Ezra's left hand while he read the law to the Congregation
Regem Melech - Sent by Jews of the country (Zechariah 7:5) to "the house of God" (Βethel ) or Congregation at Jerusalem. But the Congregation, headed by their priests, was "the house of God," paving the way for the spiritual New Testament "house of God" (Hebrews 3:6; Zechariah 3:7; Hosea 8:1). ...
Jacob's "house of God" consisted as yet of but a pillar first and an altar afterward (Genesis 28:17-18; Genesis 28:22; Genesis 36:1; Genesis 36:7); so the house of God at the time of Regem Melech consisted merely of an altar, and Congregation, and priests favored with God's presence in worship at it
Sisters of Saint Joseph - " A number of young women, eager for social service in religion, offered themselves and were received by the bishop as the first members of the Congregation. The Congregation spread over the whole of France, to Savoy, Italy, and Corsica, with numerous hospitals, schools, and orphanages. Dispersed in 1793, their property confiscated, the community was reassembled at Saint Etienne in 1807 by Mother Saint John Fontbonne, thence removed to Lyons, from which mother-house foundations have been made in Armenia, Egypt, Corsica, the Indies, Mexico, and the United States; the Congregation is now represented in nearly every country of Europe, Asia, and Africa
Chevalerie, Henriette Aymer de la - Co-founder of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary (Picpus)
Palm - They are the special badge of martyrs, and the Congregation of Rites, 1688, regarded the representation of a palm on a catacomb tomb as proof that a martyr was interred there, but this was later declared untenable
Cahenslyism - Cahensly, a member of the German parliament, to divide the foreign-born population of the United States, for ecclesiastical purposes, according to European nationalities, and to appoint bishops and priests of like race and speaking the same language as the majority of the members of a diocese or Congregation
Henriette Aymer de la Chevalerie - Co-founder of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary (Picpus)
Bar Convent - Founded outside the Micklegate Bar (barrier, city limit) by the Congregation of the English Ladies (now the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary) in 1680
Abbey, Stanbrook - It is under the immediate jurisdiction of the Benedictine monks of the English Congregation, whose original foundation was at Cambrai, Flanders in 1625
Evangelistic Associations - There are 14 bodies grouped under this head: ...
Apostolic Christian Church
Apostolic Faith Movement
Christian Congregation
Church of Daniel's Band
Church of God as Organized by Christ
Church Transcendent
Hephzibah Faith Missionary Association Inc
Lumber River Missions
Metropolitan Church Association
Missionary Bands of the World
Missionary Church Association
Peniel Missions
Pillar of Fire
Voluntary Missionary Society in America
Carmelite - The Carmelites have four tribes, and they have now thirty-eight provinces, besides the Congregation in Mantua, in which are fifty-four monasteries, under a vicar general, and the Congregations of barefooted Carmelites in Italy and Spain
Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul (Halif - The Congregation manages orphanages, foundling asylums, hostels for young women, schools, hospitals, and a home for aged women, in Canada, Bermuda, and the United States
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Annecy - The Congregation is in charge of elementary, day and boarding schools, a college, orphanages, workhouses, organizations for unemployed girls, hospitals, and dispensaries
Sisters of Charity of Saint Paul - A religious Congregation founded at Chartres, France in 1704, by Monsignor Marechaux assisted by Mlle de Tilly and Mlle de Tronchet, for teaching, visiting and nursing the poor, and caring for orphans, the aged, and the insane
Stanbrook Abbey - It is under the immediate jurisdiction of the Benedictine monks of the English Congregation, whose original foundation was at Cambrai, Flanders in 1625
Saint Mary's Convent - Founded outside the Micklegate Bar (barrier, city limit) by the Congregation of the English Ladies (now the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary) in 1680
Fabric, Ecclesiastical - A special Congregation is in charge of the fabric of Saint Peter's, Rome
Louis Brisson - With Marie de Sales Chappuis of the Visitandines of Troyes, whose confessor he had been for 30 years, he revived the Congregation of Oblates of Saint Francis de Sales, when he established Saint Bernard's College, 1869
Gemariah - Son of Shaphan, the court scribe, who had a room in the Temple, where Baruch read from Jeremiah's sermons to the Congregation (Jeremiah 36:10 )
Mary, Society of - The Congregation has 23 houses, including day and boarding schools in France, England, Ireland, and Belgium
Gregorian Altar - The Congregation of Indulgences approved this confidence
Altar, Gregorian - The Congregation of Indulgences approved this confidence
Ecclesiastical Fabric - A special Congregation is in charge of the fabric of Saint Peter's, Rome
Meeting - ) A Congregation; a collection of people; a convention; as, a large meeting; an harmonius meeting
Society of Mary (Sisters) - The Congregation has 23 houses, including day and boarding schools in France, England, Ireland, and Belgium
Lindi, Tanzania, Diocese of - Erected as the Prefecture Apostolic of Lindi, East Africa, Tanganyika Territory on November 12, 1913 under the jurisdiction of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Margaret of Cortona, Saint - She founded a Congregation of Tertiary sisters (Poverelle) a confraternity of Our Lady of Mercy, and a hospital for the sick poor
Dechamps, Victor Augustin Isidore - He helped found the Holy Family Confraternity, became consultor general of his Congregation, Bishop of Namur, 1865, Archbishop of Mechlin and primate, 1875
Sherezer - the Congregation of priests at Jerusalem ministering at the altar, (the temple was not yet completed), to ask whether they should still observe the fast on the tenth day of the fifth month, the anniversary of the burning of the temple
Saint Paul's Outside the Walls - Pope Martin V entrusted the monastery to the monks of the Congregation of Monte Cassino in 1425
Victor Dechamps - He helped found the Holy Family Confraternity, became consultor general of his Congregation, Bishop of Namur, 1865, Archbishop of Mechlin and primate, 1875
Sisters of Charity of Providence - The Congregation manages hospitals, orphan asylums, homes, and Indian missions, in the United States, Canada, and Alaska
Songea, Tanzania, Archdiocese of - Erected as the Prefecture Apostolic of Lindi, East Africa, Tanganyika Territory on November 12, 1913 under the jurisdiction of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
University of Saint Thomas - Conducted by the priests of the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Saint Thomas, University of - Conducted by the priests of the Congregation of the Holy Cross
Seven Dolors, Scapular of the - The summary of indulgences was last approved by the Congregation of Indulgences on March 7, 1888
Scapular of the Seven Dolors - The summary of indulgences was last approved by the Congregation of Indulgences on March 7, 1888
Letter of Transfer - Canon 12, Section I, Title 2 of the Digestprovides that, "A communicant removing from one parish to anothershall procure from the Rector (if any) of the parish of his lastresidence, or if there be no Rector, from one of the Wardens, acertificate stating that he or she is a communicant in good standing;and the Rector of the Parish or Congregation to which he or sheremoves shall not be required to receive him or her as a communicantuntil such letter be produced
Feuillants - In 1581Gregory XIII issued a Brief of commendation, and in 1589 one of confirmation, establishing the Feuillants as a separate Congregation. Pope Urban VIII, 1630, separated the Congregation into two branches: that of France, called Notre-Dame des Feuillants, and that of Italy, known as the Bernardoni or Reformed Bernardines
Isaac Hecker - A misunderstanding between them and their European brothers having arisen, Hecker went to Rome to obtain an authoritative solution, and there received his exeat from the Congregation. His Congregation of Missionaries of Saint Paul the Apostle, the only community of men of United States origin, has prospered and has widely influenced Catholic life, especially in devotion to the liturgy and preaching
Master, Novice - The religious to whom is committed the training of the novices and the government of the novitiate of religious order or Congregation. His duty is to see that the time devoted to the period of the noviceship be passed in prayer, meditation and the development of character through a study of the Life of Christ and of the saints, church history, and the vows and the constitution of his order or Congregation, and within the time of this probation, he must make a report about each novice to the proper authorities regarding these matters
Master of Novices - The religious to whom is committed the training of the novices and the government of the novitiate of religious order or Congregation. His duty is to see that the time devoted to the period of the noviceship be passed in prayer, meditation and the development of character through a study of the Life of Christ and of the saints, church history, and the vows and the constitution of his order or Congregation, and within the time of this probation, he must make a report about each novice to the proper authorities regarding these matters
Canonesses Regular - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congr - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Canonesses Regular of the Lateran - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Canons, Augustinian - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Canons, Austin - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Canons Regular - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Novice Master - The religious to whom is committed the training of the novices and the government of the novitiate of religious order or Congregation. His duty is to see that the time devoted to the period of the noviceship be passed in prayer, meditation and the development of character through a study of the Life of Christ and of the saints, church history, and the vows and the constitution of his order or Congregation, and within the time of this probation, he must make a report about each novice to the proper authorities regarding these matters
Novices, Master of - The religious to whom is committed the training of the novices and the government of the novitiate of religious order or Congregation. His duty is to see that the time devoted to the period of the noviceship be passed in prayer, meditation and the development of character through a study of the Life of Christ and of the saints, church history, and the vows and the constitution of his order or Congregation, and within the time of this probation, he must make a report about each novice to the proper authorities regarding these matters
Holy Office, Congregation of the - Besides officials common to other Congregations it has an assessor who acts as secretary, a commissary, a Dominican, who conducts the trials, his two companions who are also Dominicans, a prosecuting attorney and one for the defense. Besides consultors there are also qualifiers or theologians who advise the cardinals on the degree of truth or error in the theses and books submitted to the Congregation. This Congregation defends Catholic teaching of faith and morals
Augustinian Canons - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Augustinians Canons - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Austin Canons - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Regular, Canonesses - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Regular, Canons - ...
Canonesses regular are Congregations of religious women similar to the canons regular, following the Rule of Saint Augustine, sometimes modified according to local conditIons. They include the Canonesses Regular of the Lateran, the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher, and the Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congregation of Notre Dame. The Congregation of the Poor Sisters of the Schools of Notre Dame, founded, 1809, by Bishop Wittman in Bavaria, has spread throughout Europe and America
Hecker, Isaac Thomas - A misunderstanding between them and their European brothers having arisen, Hecker went to Rome to obtain an authoritative solution, and there received his exeat from the Congregation. His Congregation of Missionaries of Saint Paul the Apostle, the only community of men of United States origin, has prospered and has widely influenced Catholic life, especially in devotion to the liturgy and preaching
Our Lady of Ransom, Scapular of - The summary of indulgences of the confraternity was last approved by the Congregation of Indulgences on July 30, 1868
Mission Workers of the Sacred Heart - The Congregation in the United States is recognized under the official title, "Mission Workers of the Sacred Heart
Chartreuse, la Grande - The Congregation of La Grande Chartreuse was expelled by the French Government in 1903; it now resides with the general, at Farnea, near Lucca, Italy
Wednesday, Ash - The first day of Lent, when, in the primitive church, notorious sinners were put to open penance thus: They appeared at the church door barefooted, and clothed in sackcloth, where, being examined, their discipline was proportioned according to their offences; after which, being brought into the church, the bishop singing the seven penitential psalms, they prostrated themselves, and with tears begged absolution; the whole Congregation having ashes on their heads, to signify, that they were both mortal and deserved to be burnt to ashes for their sins
Grande Chartreuse, la - The Congregation of La Grande Chartreuse was expelled by the French Government in 1903; it now resides with the general, at Farnea, near Lucca, Italy
Augouard, Philippe Prosper - He entered the Congregation of the Holy Ghost, opened the first mission station of Saint Augustin, East Africa, 1881, and assisted French exploration by erecting hospitals and schools
Response - ) The answer of the people or Congregation to the priest or clergyman, in the litany and other parts of divine service
Sisters Adorers of the Most Precious Blood (Ruma) - A branch of the Congregation founded at Gurtweil, Baden in 1857 under the direction of Father Herman Kessler
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Concordia) - The Congregation manages a college for women, academies, high and grade schools, hospitals, a sanitarium, training schools for nurses, an orphanage, and a home for the aged, in the Archdiocese of Chicago, and the dioceses of Concordia, El Paso, Grand Island, Kansas City, Leavenworth, Marquette, and Rockford
Scapular of Our Lady of Ransom - The summary of indulgences of the confraternity was last approved by the Congregation of Indulgences on July 30, 1868
Scapular of Saint Benedict - To associate the faithful, who were not Oblates of Saint Benedict, in a certain measure with the Benedictine Order, a confraternity of Saint Benedict was founded in the second half of the nineteenth century, at first by the English Congregation
Saint Benedict, Scapular of - To associate the faithful, who were not Oblates of Saint Benedict, in a certain measure with the Benedictine Order, a confraternity of Saint Benedict was founded in the second half of the nineteenth century, at first by the English Congregation
Antiphonal - The alternate singing or chanting by two sides of thechoir and Congregation, each taking a verse in turn
Alien - They might be naturalized and permitted to enter into the Congregation of the Lord by submitting to circumcision and abandoning idolatry (Deuteronomy 23:3-8 )
Obedience - Usually it is the subject of a vow in a religious order or Congregation
Dominus Vobis Cum - The answer, "Et cum spiritu tuo" (And with thy spirit), formerly an acclamation by the entire Congregation at Mass, is also scriptural (2 Timothy 4:22)
Osculatorium - It was used in the Middle Ages to convey the kiss of peace to the faithful, and was first brought to the altar for the celebrant to kiss at the proper place in tke Mass, then brought to each of the Congregation in turn at the altar rails
Lefebvre, Camille - He entered the Congregation of the Holy Cross, and was appointed to the Acadian parish of Memramcook, New Brunswick, 1864
Massillon, Jean Baptiste - He entered the Congregation of the Oratory at the age of 18, and after his ordination began his career as a preacher which was to give him rank with Bossuet and Bourdaloue
Feast of the Holy Name of Mary - It is the titular feast of the Society of Mary (Marianists) and of the Congregation of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate
Padroado - When vicars Apostolic were appointed over territories included under the Padroado, a struggle ensued between the clergy of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples and that of the Padroado, both parties claiming canonical rights
Camille Lefebvre - He entered the Congregation of the Holy Cross, and was appointed to the Acadian parish of Memramcook, New Brunswick, 1864
Jean Massillon - He entered the Congregation of the Oratory at the age of 18, and after his ordination began his career as a preacher which was to give him rank with Bossuet and Bourdaloue
John Eudes, Saint - He established the Congregation of Our Lady of Charity, and in 1643 the Society of Jesus and Mary
Eunuch - The law of Moses excluded them from the Congregation (Deuteronomy 23:1 )
Kehelathah - During the 38 years of penal wandering the "congregation" was broken up, only round the tabernacle an organized camp of Levites, priests, and chiefs continued, and it moved from place to place
Immaculate Heart of Mary, Scapular of the - It was sanctioned and endowed with indulgences by Pope Pius IX on May 11, 1877, and approved by the Congregation of Rites in 1907
Hanukkah - ) The Jewish Feast of the Dedication, instituted by Judas Maccabaeus, his brothers, and the whole Congregation of Israel, in 165 b
Holy Name of Mary, Feast of the - It is the titular feast of the Society of Mary (Marianists) and of the Congregation of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate
Air Machine Blessing - A formula for blessing air machines, approved by the Congregation of Rites, March 24, 1920, and inserted in the Roman Ritual, as follows: ...
"O God who hast ordained all things for Thine own, and devised all the elements of this world for the human race; bless, we beseech thee, this machine consigned to the air; that it may serve for the praise and glory of Thy Name and, free from all injury and danger, expedite human interests and foster heavenly aspirations in the minds of all who use it
Agostino Ciasca - In 1893 he was made secretary for the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Abbey of Bury Saint Edmunds - Two 15th-century monks of this Congregation were the bibliographer John Boston and John Lydgate, a poet
Orientation - ), the placing of a church so that the chancel, containing the altar toward which the Congregation fronts in worship, will be on the east end
Eudes, John, Saint - He established the Congregation of Our Lady of Charity, and in 1643 the Society of Jesus and Mary
Abbey, Saint-Denis - In 1633 it was united to the Congregation of Saint-Maur
Salutation - It is common also in the Liturgy, as when at Mass the priest salutes the Congregation with "Dominus vobiscum" (The Lord be with you) or "Orate, fratres" (Brethren, pray)
Seventh-Day Adventists - A Congregation of Adventists which observes the seventh day of the week as the Sabbath
Tablet, Peace - It was used in the Middle Ages to convey the kiss of peace to the faithful, and was first brought to the altar for the celebrant to kiss at the proper place in tke Mass, then brought to each of the Congregation in turn at the altar rails
Sorin, Edward - Shortly after his ordination he was selected to establish the Congregation of the Holy Cross in the United States In 1841 he began the foundation of Notre Dame, at first a missionary station, later a prosperous educational institution
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet - The Congregation, comprising five provinces (Saint Louis, Saint Paul, Troy, Los Angeles, and Augusta) in 26 archdioceses and dioceses of the United States includes colleges, academies, diocesan high schools, Indian and deaf-mute schools, hospitals, orphan
Sisters of Divine Providence (Saint Mary-of-the-wo - The primary object of the Congregation is the instruction of youth and they were the first American sisterhood to take up work in the foreign missions
Scapular of the Immaculate Heart of Mary - It was sanctioned and endowed with indulgences by Pope Pius IX on May 11, 1877, and approved by the Congregation of Rites in 1907
Phlegon - Possibly all were greeted by the Apostle as leaders of the Congregation by virtue of seniority as Christians
Catholic Foreign Mission Society of America - Walsh, 1911; formally incorporated under the seal of the State of New York, 1912; brought under the immediate jurisdiction of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples which approved the rule of the society for ten years from 1915. At first under the Canton Vicariate, the Maryknoll mission field became independent in 1926 with three missions in China: Wuchow, Kaying, and the Prefecture Apostolic of Kongmoon, erected, 1924; an area in the northwestern province of Pengyang, Korea, embracing one-fifth of all Korea, in the Vicariate of Seoul, assigned by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples in 1922; and a mission in Manchuria, established, 1925
Maryknoll - Walsh, 1911; formally incorporated under the seal of the State of New York, 1912; brought under the immediate jurisdiction of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples which approved the rule of the society for ten years from 1915. At first under the Canton Vicariate, the Maryknoll mission field became independent in 1926 with three missions in China: Wuchow, Kaying, and the Prefecture Apostolic of Kongmoon, erected, 1924; an area in the northwestern province of Pengyang, Korea, embracing one-fifth of all Korea, in the Vicariate of Seoul, assigned by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples in 1922; and a mission in Manchuria, established, 1925
Montreal, Quebec, Canada, City of - She was followed, 1653, by Marguerite Bourgeoys who, five years later, established the Sisters of the Congregation, for the education of girls, and, 1694, the Charron Brothers came to establish the General Hospital of Montreal. Although the new governors forbade the reception of novices into tbe Order, they permitted the priests driven out of France during the Revolution, to enter Canada, and among those who came were twelve Sulpicians; thus the Congregation of Montreal was saved from complete extinction. The College of Montreal had been founded, 1767, the Hotel Dieu and the house of the Sisters of the Congregation, both destroyed by fire, were rebuilt, 1765,1769, and in 1836 Montreal was erected into a diocese. This event was followed by rapid progress in the work of education; the Brothers of the Christian Schools arrived the following year; the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, 1841; the Grand Seminaire, founded, 1840, was followed by the Seminaire de Philosophie, 1894; by order of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples a branch of Laval University was opened in Montreal, 1876, and in 1896 the Jesuits established Loyola College
Fathers, Josephite - Congregation which began its labors in 1871 when four priests from Mill Hill were assigned to Saint Francis Xavier's Church at Baltimore
Josephite Fathers - Congregation which began its labors in 1871 when four priests from Mill Hill were assigned to Saint Francis Xavier's Church at Baltimore
Fransalians - In 1845 the first members of this society set out for India, and the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples allotted to them a large tract of land which later formed the dioceses of Nagpur and Vizagapatam
Missionaries of Saint Francis de Sales of Annecy - In 1845 the first members of this society set out for India, and the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples allotted to them a large tract of land which later formed the dioceses of Nagpur and Vizagapatam
Canons Regular of Saint Augustine - Canons Regular of Saint Augustine are divided into two Congregations: the Congregation of Saint Augustine, Saint Bernard, and Saint Nicholas, and that of the Abbey Nullius of Agaunum
Poor: as Hearers - ' Preaching in Monktown church, a large old, ruinous building, he says, 'I suppose it has scarce had such a Congregation during this century
Aikenhead, Mary - When she wished to enter the religious life Archbishop Murray of Dublin desired her to found a Congregation of the Sisters of Charity in Ireland
Altieri, Emilio - He fulfilled many important missions before his election, especially as Nuncio to Naples, Secretary of the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars, and Superintendent of the Papal Exchequer, and was made cardinal in 1669
Battandier, Albert - Appointed consultor of the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars, 1881,/a>, he soon became recognized as an authority on church legislation and on laws of religious communities
Hofbauer, Clement Mary, Saint - With a companion, Thaddäus Hübl, he introduced the Congregation into Warsaw, 1786, where it had phenomenal success until 1808, when its houses were suppressed and the fathers exiled from the grand-duchy
Obedience - ) The written precept of a superior in a religious order or Congregation to a subject
Emilio Altieri - He fulfilled many important missions before his election, especially as Nuncio to Naples, Secretary of the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars, and Superintendent of the Papal Exchequer, and was made cardinal in 1669
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Bourg - Constituted as an independent diocesan Congregation in 1823
Society of Foreign Missions of Milan - They follow a rule approved by the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda
Saint Joseph's Society of the Sacred Heart - Congregation which began its labors in 1871 when four priests from Mill Hill were assigned to Saint Francis Xavier's Church at Baltimore
Intone - In many parishes the services are also musicallyrendered, the Clergy intoning the prayers, the responses being sungby the Congregation
Bastard - To restrain the licentious desires of the heart, Jehovah by an express law fixed a stigma upon the bastard, which was not to be removed till the tenth generation; and to show that the precept was on no account to be violated, or suffered to fall into disuse, it is emphatically repeated, "A bastard shall not enter into the Congregation of the Lord; even to his tenth generation shall he not enter into the Congregation of the Lord,"...
Deuteronomy 23:2
Margaret Hallahan - The Congregation, the Dominican Congregation of Saint Catherine of Siena (third order), received papal approval in 1851, and began building its first convent in 1852. Margaret refused government aid for her schools, or to allow government inspection, but her Congregation now follows the custom of the country in these respects
Hallahan, Margaret - The Congregation, the Dominican Congregation of Saint Catherine of Siena (third order), received papal approval in 1851, and began building its first convent in 1852. Margaret refused government aid for her schools, or to allow government inspection, but her Congregation now follows the custom of the country in these respects
Abbey of Corbey - At the incorporation of the abbey into the Congregation of Saint-Maur in 1618 its declining fortunes revived
Mabillon, Jean - Entering the Maurist Congregation, 1627, he was sent to Saint-Germain-des- Pres, 1664, remaining there until death
Miecislas Halka Ledochowski - In 1892 he was appointed Prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Ledochowski, Miecislas Halka - In 1892 he was appointed Prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Frances of Rome, Saint - Mystic, widow, foundress of the Benedictine Oblate Congregation of Tor di Specchi, born Rome, Italy, 1384; died there, 1440
Monastery, Canonical Erection of - ,of the Congregation of Religious ...
(2) permission in writing of the Ordinary of the place ...
(3) sufficient provision for the housing and sustenance of the community ...
That this monastery be a domus formata, it is required that at least six members of the community be professed, of whom four at least must be priests, if the Order is clerical
Juliana Falconieri, Saint - In 1305, with several companions, she founded the first convent of the Sisters of the Third Order of Servites, where she remained superior until her death; the purpose of the Congregation was the care of the sick
Falconieri, Juliana, Saint - In 1305, with several companions, she founded the first convent of the Sisters of the Third Order of Servites, where she remained superior until her death; the purpose of the Congregation was the care of the sick
Jean Mabillon - Entering the Maurist Congregation, 1627, he was sent to Saint-Germain-des- Pres, 1664, remaining there until death
Canonical Erection of Monastery - ,of the Congregation of Religious ...
(2) permission in writing of the Ordinary of the place ...
(3) sufficient provision for the housing and sustenance of the community ...
That this monastery be a domus formata, it is required that at least six members of the community be professed, of whom four at least must be priests, if the Order is clerical
Abbey of Corbie - At the incorporation of the abbey into the Congregation of Saint-Maur in 1618 its declining fortunes revived
Bartolommeo Gavantus - His chief work, dedicated to Pope Urban VIII (1623-1644), who appointed him perpetual consultor to the Congregation of Rites in recognition of his great services, is entitled, "Thesaurus sacrorum rituum
Henry Rawes - He was Superior of the Oblate Congregation from 1880 until his death
Gavantus, Bartolommeo - His chief work, dedicated to Pope Urban VIII (1623-1644), who appointed him perpetual consultor to the Congregation of Rites in recognition of his great services, is entitled, "Thesaurus sacrorum rituum
All Souls Day - Abbot Odilo of Cluny instituted it in the monasteries of his Congregation in 998, other religious orders took up the observance, and it was adopted by various dioceses and gradually by the whole Church
Absolution - In this view it is innocent; and although any private Christian has a right to declare and pronounce the same doctrine to his neighbour, the official publication of the grace of the Gospel is the public duty of its ministers in the Congregation, since they are Christ's "Ambassadors
Rawes, Henry Augustus - He was Superior of the Oblate Congregation from 1880 until his death
Rome, Frances of, Saint - Mystic, widow, foundress of the Benedictine Oblate Congregation of Tor di Specchi, born Rome, Italy, 1384; died there, 1440
Sin-Offering - As each individual, even the most private member of the Congregation, as well as the Congregation at large, and the high priest, was obliged, on being convicted by his conscience of any particular sin, to come with a sin-offering, we see thus impressively disclosed the need in which every sinner stands of the salvation of Christ, and the necessity of making application to it as often as the guilt of sin renews itself upon his conscience
Neri, Philip, Saint - Ordained priest in 1551, he founded the Congregation of the Oratory, approbation of which was granted by Pope Gregory XIII, 1575
Daughters of Wisdom - Since the first establishement at La Rochelle, 1713, the Congregation has grown to over 420 houses in France, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Italy, South Africa, England, Canada, the United States, Haiti, and Colombia; the mother-house is at Saint-Laurent-sur-Sevre, La Vendee, France; the total number of religious Isaiah 4,912
Les Filles de la Sagesse - Since the first establishement at La Rochelle, 1713, the Congregation has grown to over 420 houses in France, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Italy, South Africa, England, Canada, the United States, Haiti, and Colombia; the mother-house is at Saint-Laurent-sur-Sevre, La Vendee, France; the total number of religious Isaiah 4,912
Irvingites - " Irving attempted to restore the Primitive Church as he interpreted it, and established an elaborate ministry, consisting of apostles, prophets, evangelists and pastors; each Congregation is in charge of an "angel" who ranks as a pastor, assisted by 24 priests and 7 deacons
Pisidia - The New Testament does not record any missionary activity in Pisidia itself, probably because there were few Jews there with which to start a Congregation
Rohrbacher, Rene Francois - He was ordained in 1812, and after doing parish work for a while at Luneville, he joined the Congregation of Saint Peter founded by the brothers De Lamennais, and for eight years directed the theological and philosophical studies of the postulants
Rene Rohrbacher - He was ordained in 1812, and after doing parish work for a while at Luneville, he joined the Congregation of Saint Peter founded by the brothers De Lamennais, and for eight years directed the theological and philosophical studies of the postulants
Helps - He is not speaking of select persons whom he or the Congregation had appointed to any office; and neither he nor they can confer the gifts; that is the work of the Spirit. He exhorts the whole Congregation to ‘continue to desire earnestly the greater gifts’; and individuals might receive more than one gift from the Spirit. ’ The Apostle did not nominate them to any office of ‘helper,’ nor did the Congregation elect them to any such post
Minister - Lightfoot says, Baal Aruch expounds the chazan, or minister of the Congregation, by sheliach hatzibbor, or angel of the Congregation; and from this common platform and constitution of the synagogue, we may observe the Apostle's expression of some elders ruling and labouring in word and doctrine, others in the general affairs of the synagogue
Most Blessed Trinity, Scapular of the - The indulgences of this confraternity were last approved by a Decree of the Congregation of Indulgences of August 13, 1899
Lambruschini, Luigi - He held important offices in the Barnabite Order and as secretary of the Congregation of Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs was influential in concluding concordats with Naples, Bavaria and other states
Liberia - The country became part of the Vicariate Apostolic of the Two Guineas; and the Congregation of the Holy Ghost and the Immaculate Heart of Mary, the Company of Mary, and the Priests of the African Missions have sent most of the missionaries
Julie Billiart, Blessed - Virgin, foundress and first superior-general of the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame of Namur; born Cuvilly, France, 1751; died Nalllur, Belgimn, 1816
Billiart, Julie, Blessed - Virgin, foundress and first superior-general of the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame of Namur; born Cuvilly, France, 1751; died Nalllur, Belgimn, 1816
Hallelujah - ) quotes its use with certain psalms, after the Jewish manner, said or sung by the whole Congregation
Friday - In the Prayer Book we find that Friday of each weekis placed in the Table of Fasts to be observed in this Churchthroughout the year, and the rubric directs that it be announced tothe Congregation on the Sunday before
Biddelians - So called from John Biddle, who in the year 1644 formed an independent Congregation in London
Luigi Lambruschini - He held important offices in the Barnabite Order and as secretary of the Congregation of Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs was influential in concluding concordats with Naples, Bavaria and other states
Bason - Similar bowls or basins of silver were presented by the princes of the Congregation ( Numbers 7:13 ff
Parish - ) An ecclesiastical society, usually not bounded by territorial limits, but composed of those persons who choose to unite under the charge of a particular priest, clergyman, or minister; also, loosely, the territory in which the members of a Congregation live
Assembly - A Congregation or religious society convened
Abbey of Einsiedeln - In 1854 a colony was sent to America and from its first settlement, Saint Meinrad's Abbey, Indiana, the Swiss-American Congregation was founded
Sin, Wilderness of - Israel moved by detachments; and only at the wilderness of Sin "all the Congregation" assembled for the first time
Einsiedeln, Abbey of - In 1854 a colony was sent to America and from its first settlement, Saint Meinrad's Abbey, Indiana, the Swiss-American Congregation was founded
Santiago, Chile, City of - Confraternities of all kinds flourish in the parishes, including those of the Blessed Sacrament, Our Lady of Mount Carmel, the Apostleship of Prayer, the Sacred Heart, the Children of Mary, the Congregation of Mary and Saint Aloysius, the Most Holy Rosary, Christian Doctrine, Christian Mothers, and Peterspence
Scapular of the Most Blessed Trinity - The indulgences of this confraternity were last approved by a Decree of the Congregation of Indulgences of August 13, 1899
Saint Malo, France - The monastery of Saint Malo founded at the same time passed over to the French (Maurist) Congregation in 1672
Society of the Divine Word - The founder did not intend originally to create a Congregation; he wished a simple association without vows, but in 1885 the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, were adopted
Baptism, Private - The child is tobe brought afterwards into the Church to the intent that thecongregation may be certified of the true Form of Baptism privatelybefore used. Then it is publicly received and the Sponsors answerfor the child and become responsible for its Christian training,publicly before the Congregation
Order of Reformed Cistercians of Our Lady of la tr - The reorganized Congregation of the ancient Order of Citeaux founded 1098 by Saint Robert in accordance with the Rule of Saint Benedict, reformed by the Abbot de Rance, 1664. Reunited in France under the title "Congregation of the Cistercian Monks of Notre-Dame de la Trappe," 1884, they were again divided by a decree of the Holy See, 1847, forming the two Congregations of "The Ancient Reform of Our Lady of La Trappe," following the Constitutions of de Rance, and "The New Reform of Our Lady of La Trappe," to conform to the Rule of Saint Benedict. Many new foundations were made under this arrangement and by 1892 the Congregations were strong enough to combine once more with one head and a uniform observance
Assembly - 4:13 we find that the sin of the whole Congregation of Israel can escape the notice of the “assembly” (the judges or elders who represent the Congregation). The whole Congregation of the sons of Israel complained that Moses had brought them forth into the wilderness to kill the whole assembly with hunger ( Missionaries of the Sacred Heart of Jesus of Issou - Religious Congregation founded at Issoudun, archdiocese of Bourges, France, in 1854, by Jules Chevalier
Congregation, Mount of the - The "mount of the Congregation" will therefore in this case mean the northern mountain, supposed by the Babylonians to be the meeting-place of their gods
Antiphon - ...
(1) A psalm or hymn sung in alternate chant by two choirs or by choir and Congregation
Alcantara, Peter of, Saint - Confessor; founder of the Reform Congregation of the Spanish Discalceates (Alcantarini); born Alcantara, Spain, 1499; died Arenas, 1562
Elders - In the Presbyterian Church the term includes the clergy, called the "teaching elders" but in ordinary language it is restricted to the "lay" or "ruling elders" who are chosen in each Congregation to assist the minister in the management of church affairs
Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul (Paris - Congregation founded in Paris, France in 1633 by Saint Vincent de Paul, Blessed Louise de Marillac, and Mlle Le Gras for the practise of works of charity among the poor
Ebal, Mount - Parties of travellers often separate themselves, some going up mount Ebal, and others on mount Gerizim, and prove that the Congregation in the valley could hear the voice from both mountains
Institute of Charity - A religious Congregation founded in 1828 by Antonio Rosmini-Serbati at Domodossola, Italy
Calderon de la Barca, Pedro - In 1651 he was ordained priest, and became superior of the Congregation of Saint Peter, 1666
Chaplains of Sisters - In case of need, however, the bishop may appoint priests who are members of a religious order or Congregation
Bastards - Forbidden to enter the Lord's Congregation to the tenth generation, i
Diocese - Originally the Bishop went first in the establishing of the Churchin any nation or country; out of this Jurisdiction grew the parishesor local Congregation, being ministered to by the Priests underthe Bishop
Episcopal Church in the United States of America - The system of government includes the parish or Congregation, the diocese, the province, and the general convention
Antonio Rosmini-Serbati - His ontology and natural theology and his Trattato della Coscienza were severely criticized and 40 of his propositions were condemned by the Congregation of the Inquisition in 1887
Apostolic, Prothonotary - The system of government includes the parish or Congregation, the diocese, the province, and the general convention
Rosminians - A religious Congregation founded in 1828 by Antonio Rosmini-Serbati at Domodossola, Italy
Sisters of the Precious Blood (Maria Stein) - Through the Congregation of Priests of the Precious Blood, to which they were affiliated, the sisters were enabled to make a permanent foundation in America at New Riegel, Ohio, and in 1886 they became an independent community
Sisters Marianites of the Holy Cross - The Congregation comprises two provinces, that of Louisiana and that of France, the latter including the houses in New York
Society of the Divine Saviour - The Congregation has been assigned a new mission field in the province of Fu-kien, China, to replace the Prefecture Apostolic of Assam, India, transferred after World War I to the Salesians
Salvatorians (2) - The Congregation has been assigned a new mission field in the province of Fu-kien, China, to replace the Prefecture Apostolic of Assam, India, transferred after World War I to the Salesians
Society of the Priests of Mercy of the Immaculate - Dispersed again in 1830; re-established as a new society of Fathers of Mercy, approved and affiliated to the Congregation for Propaganda in 1834; Constitutions approved in 1908
Sisters, Chaplains of - In case of need, however, the bishop may appoint priests who are members of a religious order or Congregation
Rosmini-Serbati, Antonio - His ontology and natural theology and his Trattato della Coscienza were severely criticized and 40 of his propositions were condemned by the Congregation of the Inquisition in 1887
Gib'Eonites, the, - the people of Gibeon, and perhaps also of the three cities associated with Gibeon, (Joshua 9:17 ) --Hivites; and who, on the discover of the stratagem by which they had obtained the protection of the Israelites, were condemned to be perpetual bondmen, hewers of wood and drawers of water for the Congregation and for the house of God and altar of Jehovah
Missionary Society of Saint Paul the Apostle - With four associates, under recommendation of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, the new society was formed for the conyersion of America, to be effected by lecturing, preaching, the giving of missions, and through the press
Hemorrhage - Those ritually unclean were separated from God (represented by the tabernacle, Leviticus 15:31 ) and from the Congregation of Israel (Numbers 5:2 )
Cajetan, Saint - In 1523 he went to Rome where he established the Congregation of Clerks Regular, known as Theatines, combining the spirit of monasticism with active ministry
Fasts, Table of - ...
These Fasting Days must always be announced to the Congregation inChurch, the rubric in the Communion Office requiring that "Then theMinister shall declare unto the People what Holy Days or FastingDays are in the week following to be observed
Host, Elevation of the - The ceremony in the Mass according to the Roman Rite wherein, immediately after the Consecration of the Host, the celebrant raises It high enough to be seen and adored by the Congregation
Gaetano, Saint - In 1523 he went to Rome where he established the Congregation of Clerks Regular, known as Theatines, combining the spirit of monasticism with active ministry
Abbey of Grottaferrata - In 1608 it became a member of the Basilian Congregation established by Pope Gregory XIII, and in 1881Pope Leo XIII restored the Greek Rite at the abbey, which has always been a center of Greek learning
Shewbread - And the call of the church as strongly referred to him, when the united prayer of the Congregation went up, "Behold, O God, our shield, and look upon the face of thine anointed
Prince, Princess - ' It is applied to 'the princes of the Congregation': these would be the heads of families in the various tribes
Society of Saint Francis de Sales - The work was perpetuated by the formation of a religious Congregation under rules drawn up in 1857 and approved in 1859
Salesians of Don Bosco - The work was perpetuated by the formation of a religious Congregation under rules drawn up in 1857 and approved in 1859
Elevation of the Host - The ceremony in the Mass according to the Roman Rite wherein, immediately after the Consecration of the Host, the celebrant raises It high enough to be seen and adored by the Congregation
Birthright - Thus the "princes" of the Congregation had probably rights of primogeniture
Parish - The term "Parish" as used in the American Church signifiesa local Congregation having a church building, and duly organizedunder the title of "Rector, Wardens and Vestrymen
Oratory - There were two Congregations of religious, one in Italy, the other in France, which were called by his name. approved this Congregation, under the title of the Oratory of Jesus. This Congregation consisted of two sorts of persons; the one, as it were, incorporated; the other only associates: the former governed the houses of this institute; the latter were only employed in forming themselves to the life and manners of ecclesiastics. And this was the true spirit of this Congregation, in which they taught neither human learning nor theology, but only the virtues of the ecclesiastical life
Class - ) One of the sections into which a church or Congregation is divided, and which is under the supervision of a class leader
Order of Our Lady of Mercy For the Ransom of Capti - A Congregation founded at Barcelona in 1218 by Saint Peter Nolasco, especially devoted to the ransom of captives from the Moors, and following the rule drawn up by Saint Augustine
Dowry - Should a religious leave the order or Congregation for any reason, the capital which constituted her dowry must be returned to her without interest
Liturgical Books - The sources for the composition of Liturgical Books are the Missal, Breviary, Martyrology, Pontifical, Roman Ritual, Ceremoniale Episcoporum, Memoriale Rituum, Octavarium Romanum, and the decrees of the Congregation of Rites (Decreta Authentica)
Felix of Valois, Saint - Saint Felix labored in France, where he established the monastery of Cerfroi and looked after the interests of the Congregation
Canonization - The decree is issued only after the Congregation of Rites has accepted proof of two miracles through the intercession of the Blessed who had been formally beatified, occurring after the beatification and of three miracles for one whose beatification had taken place without the ordinary process
Mercedarians - A Congregation founded at Barcelona in 1218 by Saint Peter Nolasco, especially devoted to the ransom of captives from the Moors, and following the rule drawn up by Saint Augustine
Ludovisi, Alessandro - He established the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples to regulate missionary work; founded the InternatIonal college for Benedictines at Rome; issued the last papal ordinance against witchcraft, 1623; sent financial aid to Emperor Ferdinand II to regain Bohemia; secured more tolerance for Catholics in England; and aided the Catholic reaction in the Netherlands
Psalmody - At other times, the psalms were sung alternately, the Congregation dividing themselves into two parts, and singing verse about, in their turns
American College, Louvain, Belgium - It forms an integral part of the School of Sacred Sciences of the University of Louvain, its general plan being based upon that of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples at Rome
Gregory xv, Pope - He established the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples to regulate missionary work; founded the InternatIonal college for Benedictines at Rome; issued the last papal ordinance against witchcraft, 1623; sent financial aid to Emperor Ferdinand II to regain Bohemia; secured more tolerance for Catholics in England; and aided the Catholic reaction in the Netherlands
Census - ...
After the return from Exile the whole Congregation of Israel was numbered, and found to amount to 42,360 (Ezra 2:64 )
Abbey, Solesmes - Pope Gregory XVI raised Solesmes to the rank of an abbey in 1837, making it at the same time the mother-house of the "Congregation of France
Alessandro Ludovisi - He established the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples to regulate missionary work; founded the InternatIonal college for Benedictines at Rome; issued the last papal ordinance against witchcraft, 1623; sent financial aid to Emperor Ferdinand II to regain Bohemia; secured more tolerance for Catholics in England; and aided the Catholic reaction in the Netherlands
lu'Cius - (Acts 13:1 ) Whether Lucius was one of the seventy disciples is quite a matter of conjecture; but it is highly probable that he formed one of the Congregation to whom St
Solesmes Abbey - Pope Gregory XVI raised Solesmes to the rank of an abbey in 1837, making it at the same time the mother-house of the "Congregation of France
Sisters of Mercy - A Congregation of women, founded in 1827 in Dublin, Ireland by Catherine McAuley, in religion known as Sister Mary Catherine
Ordain - In America, men are ordained over a particular church and Congregation, or as evangelists without the charge of a particular church, or as deacons in the episcopal church
Society of Saint Edmund - Formerly, the Congregation had also possession of the Abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, and colleges at Laval, Chateau Gontier, and Sens
Valois, Felix of, Saint - Saint Felix labored in France, where he established the monastery of Cerfroi and looked after the interests of the Congregation
Church - In the New Testament it usually means a Congregation of religious worshippers, either Jewish, as Acts 7:38 , or Christians, as Matthew 16:18 1 Corinthians 6:4
Augustinians Hermits - Several reformed Congregations known as "Regular Observants" were instituted about this time. The most important of these were the Hermits Recollects of Saint Augustine, a reform begun in Spain, 1438, established, 1588, and formed into a distinct order in 1912, and the German or Saxon Reformed Congregation, recognized in 1493 and comprising many important convents in Germany afterwards affiliated with the Lombardic Congregation
Hermits of Saint Augustine - Several reformed Congregations known as "Regular Observants" were instituted about this time. The most important of these were the Hermits Recollects of Saint Augustine, a reform begun in Spain, 1438, established, 1588, and formed into a distinct order in 1912, and the German or Saxon Reformed Congregation, recognized in 1493 and comprising many important convents in Germany afterwards affiliated with the Lombardic Congregation
Prince - Also Israel had her “princes” (“rulers”): “… On the sixth day they gathered twice as much bread, two omers for one man: and all the rulers of the Congregation came and told Moses” ( Congregation returned unto him: and Moses talked with them” ( pu'Rim - When the reader comes to the name of Haman, the Congregation cry out, "May his name be blotted out," or, "Let the name of the ungodly perish. " When the Megillah is read through, the whole Congregation exclaim, "Cursed be Haman; blessed be Mordecai; cursed be Zoresh (the wife of Haman); blessed be Esther; cursed be all idolaters; blessed be all Israelites, and blessed be Harbonah who hanged Haman
Directory - The substance of it is as follows:...
It forbids all salutations and civil ceremony in the churches;...
the reading the scriptures in the Congregation is declared to be part of the pastoral office;...
all the canonical books of the old and New Testament (but not of the Apocrypha) are to be publicly read in the vulgar tongue: how large a portion is to be read at once, is left to the minister, who has likewise the liberty of expounding, when he judges it necessary. ...
The Directory recommends the use of the Lord's Prayer, as the most perfect model of devotion; it forbids private or lay persons to administer baptism, and enjoins it to be performed in the face of the Congregation; it orders the communion-table at the Lord's supper to be so placed, that the communicant may sit about it. It also orders, that the sabbath be kept with the greatest strictness, both publicly and privately; that marriage be solemnized by a lawful minister of the word, who is to give counsel to, and pray for the parties; that the sick be visited by the minister under whose charge they are; the dead to be buried without any prayers or religious ceremonies; that days of fasting are to be observed when the judgments of God are abroad, or when some important blessings are desired; that days of thanksgiving for mercies received be also observed; and, lastly, that singing of Psalms together in the Congregation is the duty of Christians
Devotion to the Pure Heart of Mary - The office and Mass were approved by the Congregation of Rites on July 21, 1855
Lamennais, Felicite Robert de - With Lacordaire, Maurice de Guerin and others, he founded the Congregation of Saint Peter, a religious society for the defense of the Church
Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, Diocese of - In 1881 the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples put the mission of North Borneo and Labuan under the jurisdiction of the Society for Foreign Missions of Mill Hill, England
Institute of Mary - Founded by Mary Ward at Rome, 1633; reconstituted from her first Congregation suppressed in 1630
Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary - Founded by Mary Ward at Rome, 1633; reconstituted from her first Congregation suppressed in 1630
Downside Abbey - Founded in 1605 at Douai, Flanders, by English Benedictines of the Spanish Congregation
Beguines - A Congregation of nuns founded either by St
Despondency: Its Quick Eye For Evils - Smith's church holds fifteen hundred people, and is perfectly filled by its Congregation, of this circumstance Smith is pardonably proud
Loretto Nuns - Founded by Mary Ward at Rome, 1633; reconstituted from her first Congregation suppressed in 1630
Insignificant Subjects: Not Fit For the Pulpit - When trivial subjects are descanted upon from the pulpit, while souls are perishing for lack of knowledge, the same comparison may be used; as for instance, when a Congregation is collected, and the preacher talks about the drying up of the Euphrates, or ventilates his pet theory for reconciling Moses and geology
Flock - ) A Christian church or Congregation; considered in their relation to the pastor, or minister in charge
Abbey, Downside - Founded in 1605 at Douai, Flanders, by English Benedictines of the Spanish Congregation
English Ladies, the - Founded by Mary Ward at Rome, 1633; reconstituted from her first Congregation suppressed in 1630
Nethinim - The Gibeonites were made "hewers of wood and drawers of water for the Congregation and for the altar
Responsive Service - Thus worship becomes general throughout the whole Congregation and thepeople are not silent spectators, nor yet simply an audience
Synagogue - of the Old Testament, Psalm 74:8 , but the same Hebrew word (moed ) is many times translated 'congregation. " The word συναγωγή occurs very often in the LXX, but as a translation of some twenty different Hebrew words: 'congregation' or 'gathering' is the main thought. the sheliach, a delegate of the Congregation, who acted as chief reader: he is not mentioned in the New Testament. There were at least ten of these attached to each synagogue, so as to form a quorum, ten being the lowest number to form a Congregation. These are declared to be liars, for they really form a Congregation of Satan, doing his work in seducing the saints from their heavenly character
Visitandines - Religious order founded by Saint Francis de Sales and Saint Jane de Chantal at Annecy, France, in 1610, as a Congregation for the observance of the contemplative life and the care of children and young ladies needing home life and education, also for the visitation of the sick; canonically erected into a religious order, its active ministry abandoned and enclosure adopted, under the Rule of Saint Augustine, 1618; constitutions by the founder
Canons, White - In 1856 a new Congregation of Norbertine canons, since incorporated with the order, was formed at Frigolet by Dom Edmund Boulbon and possessed 4 convents and 70 religious
Chancery, Apostolic - Since the reorganization of the Roman Curia by Pope Pius X in 1908 the Apostolic Chancery has become merely the expediting office of the Congregation of Consistory and of the pope directly
Relief - Gillespie was deprived of his parish, he removed to Dumferline, and preached there to a Congregation who were attached to him, and vehemently opposed the law of patronage. The relief synod consists of about sixty Congregations, and about 36, 000 persons
Church Building Fund - Its object isto create by an annual offering from every Congregation, asrecommended by the General Convention, and by individual gifts,a Fund of One Million Dollars, portions of the principal to beloaned, and of the interest given, to aid the building of churcheswherever needed
Decalogue - " While the commandmentswere originally introduced to our Liturgy as a warning and safeguardagainst the lawlessness of extreme Puritans, they are, nevertheless,helpful to all as a preparation for the right reception of the HolyCommunion; leading the Congregation to an examination of their"lives and conversation by the rule of God's commandments
Humiliati - Though the suppression of the male branch of the order was a serious misfortune to the Congregation, some houses continued their existence and are still found in Italy
Nuns of the Visitation of Mary - Religious order founded by Saint Francis de Sales and Saint Jane de Chantal at Annecy, France, in 1610, as a Congregation for the observance of the contemplative life and the care of children and young ladies needing home life and education, also for the visitation of the sick; canonically erected into a religious order, its active ministry abandoned and enclosure adopted, under the Rule of Saint Augustine, 1618; constitutions by the founder
Norbertines - In 1856 a new Congregation of Norbertine canons, since incorporated with the order, was formed at Frigolet by Dom Edmund Boulbon and possessed 4 convents and 70 religious
Galesians - Religious order founded by Saint Francis de Sales and Saint Jane de Chantal at Annecy, France, in 1610, as a Congregation for the observance of the contemplative life and the care of children and young ladies needing home life and education, also for the visitation of the sick; canonically erected into a religious order, its active ministry abandoned and enclosure adopted, under the Rule of Saint Augustine, 1618; constitutions by the founder
Apostolic Chancery - Since the reorganization of the Roman Curia by Pope Pius X in 1908 the Apostolic Chancery has become merely the expediting office of the Congregation of Consistory and of the pope directly
Abihu - And they have formed this opinion, on the precept in the ninth verse: where it is said to Aaron, "Do not drink wine nor strong drink, thou, nor thy sons with thee, when ye go into the tabernacle of the Congregation; lest ye die
Bishop - These presbyters or bishops of the apostolic period were the regular teachers and pastors, preachers and leaders, of the Congregations. Each Congregation of Christians as gathered by the apostles, was organized into a church, having a number of elders, or bishops, ordained over it, Acts 15:23; Acts 20:17; Acts 20:28; Philippians 1:1; Titus 1:5; Titus 1:7, indicating that the office was the same
Visitation Nuns - Religious order founded by Saint Francis de Sales and Saint Jane de Chantal at Annecy, France, in 1610, as a Congregation for the observance of the contemplative life and the care of children and young ladies needing home life and education, also for the visitation of the sick; canonically erected into a religious order, its active ministry abandoned and enclosure adopted, under the Rule of Saint Augustine, 1618; constitutions by the founder
White Canons - In 1856 a new Congregation of Norbertine canons, since incorporated with the order, was formed at Frigolet by Dom Edmund Boulbon and possessed 4 convents and 70 religious
Society For the Propagation of the Faith - The president is Monsignor Marchetti-Salvaggiani, and the society is attached to the Congregation of the Propaganda, the head of which is Cardinal Van Rossum
Psalms - In 1 Corinthians 14:26 he assumes that members of the Congregation will bring their assembly psalms which they have composed or learnt and wish to sing with or before others
Patrobas - In each case the names mentioned probably represent ‘the first nucleus, the leading individuals,’ of the Congregation (see C
Josephites (2) - Congregation founded at Ghent, Belgium in 1817 by Canon van Crombrugghe for the Christian education of the poor
Missionaries of la Salette - In 1876 they became a religious Congregation proper and in 1890 were approved by Rome
la Salette, Missionaries of - In 1876 they became a religious Congregation proper and in 1890 were approved by Rome
Faber, Frederick William - When in 1848 Newman began the Congregation of the Oratory at Birmingham, Faber and some of his community entered as novices. " His hymns, now the staple of Congregational singing, were composed especially for his evening services
Frederick William Faber - When in 1848 Newman began the Congregation of the Oratory at Birmingham, Faber and some of his community entered as novices. " His hymns, now the staple of Congregational singing, were composed especially for his evening services
Missionaries, Montfort - The order arrived in Canada in 1883; two residences were founded in the Diocese of Brooklyn, one in 1903 and one in 1904; the Vicariate Apostolic of San Martino, Colombia, erected in 1903, was entrusted to the Montfortists; the Constitutions were approved in 1904; the Congregation was divided into provinces; the Diocese of Port de Paix (Haiti) was taken over, and the French mission school was transferred to Romsey, England
Missionaries of the Company of Mary - The order arrived in Canada in 1883; two residences were founded in the Diocese of Brooklyn, one in 1903 and one in 1904; the Vicariate Apostolic of San Martino, Colombia, erected in 1903, was entrusted to the Montfortists; the Constitutions were approved in 1904; the Congregation was divided into provinces; the Diocese of Port de Paix (Haiti) was taken over, and the French mission school was transferred to Romsey, England
Montfort Missionaries - The order arrived in Canada in 1883; two residences were founded in the Diocese of Brooklyn, one in 1903 and one in 1904; the Vicariate Apostolic of San Martino, Colombia, erected in 1903, was entrusted to the Montfortists; the Constitutions were approved in 1904; the Congregation was divided into provinces; the Diocese of Port de Paix (Haiti) was taken over, and the French mission school was transferred to Romsey, England
Carmelite Nuns - Offshoots of the French Congregation are in Australia and Cochin-China
Eunuch - Such were excluded from serving as priests (Leviticus 21:20 ) and from membership in the Congregation of Israel (Deuteronomy 23:1 )
Wailing-Place, Jews' - "The Congregation at the wailing-place is one of the most solemn gatherings left to the Jewish Church, and as the writer gazed at the motley concourse he experienced a feeling of sorrow that the remnants of the chosen race should be heartlessly thrust outside the sacred enclosure of their fathers' holy temple by men of an alien race and an alien creed
Feasts or Festivals - The rubric in the Communion Office requires thateach Feast shall be announced to the Congregation on the Sundaypreceding the day on which it occurs
Kiss - 2:57; 8:11) in the early church (Justin Martyr, Apology 1:65), especially at the Lord's supper, when the kiss was passed through the Congregation, the men kissing the men, the women the women (Romans 16:16; 1 Corinthians 16:20; 2 Corinthians 13:12; Acts 20:37; 1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 Peter 5:14)
Eucharist - " Then the deacon cried out aloud, "Mutually embrace and kiss each other, " which being done, the whole Congregation prayed for the universal peace and welfare of the church, for the tranquility and repose of the world, for the prosperity of the age, for wholesome weather, and for all ranks and degrees of men
Immaculate Conception, Scapular of the - Pope Clement XI granted certain indulgences for the wearing of the scapular, succeeding popes increased the number, and the summary was approved by the Congregation of Indulgences first in 1845 and finally on August 26, 1882
Abbey of Bursfeld - When approved by the Council of Basel, 1446, the Abbot of Bursfeld was ex officio one of the three presidents of the Congregation, which became a powerful force of reform among the monasteries of Germany, numbering 36 monasteries at the death of its founder, and at its height, over 135
Generation - "A bastard shall not be admitted into the Congregation, till the tenth generation," Deuteronomy 23:2
Scapular of the Immaculate Conception - Pope Clement XI granted certain indulgences for the wearing of the scapular, succeeding popes increased the number, and the summary was approved by the Congregation of Indulgences first in 1845 and finally on August 26, 1882
Sons of Saint Joseph - Congregation founded at Ghent, Belgium in 1817 by Canon van Crombrugghe for the Christian education of the poor
Saint Joseph, Sons of - Congregation founded at Ghent, Belgium in 1817 by Canon van Crombrugghe for the Christian education of the poor
Music, Church - But I also feel thatif members of the choir accept from God and the minister theprivilege of taking part in the services, the one thing theyowe to Almighty God, to the Congregation and to themselves, isREVERENCE
Host - 1:2-3 the word means “military service”: “Take ye the sum of all the Congregation of the children of Israel … from twenty years old and upward, all that are able to go forth to war in Israel. 22:12, where the word represents serving in a military campaign: “And when the children of Israel heard of it, the whole Congregation of the children of Israel gathered themselves together at Shiloh, to go to war against them. 4:2-3: “Take the sum of the sons of Kohath … from thirty years old and upward even until fifty years old, all that enter [4], to do the work in the tabernacle of the Congregation. 4:23 with the meaning of “serving in worship”: “… all that enter in to perform the service, to do the work in the tabernacle of the Congregation
Jahaziel - Under the Spirit, who came upon him, he encouraged Jehoshaphat and the Congregation of Judah in the house of the Lord, before the new court: "thus saith the Lord unto you, Be not
Gregory Xvi, Pope - As cardinal, and prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, he arranged concordats between William of Holland and the Belgian Catholics, and the Ottoman Empire and the Armenian Catholics
Bartolomeo Alberto Cappellari Colomba - As cardinal, and prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, he arranged concordats between William of Holland and the Belgian Catholics, and the Ottoman Empire and the Armenian Catholics
Apostolic Schools - Among these schools in the United States are those at Cornwells, under the Fathers of the Holy Ghost; Perryville, Missouri, under the Congregation of the Mission; South Langhorne, Pennsylvania, under the Society of Mary; and San Antonio, Texas, under the Oblates of Mary
Schools, Apostolic - Among these schools in the United States are those at Cornwells, under the Fathers of the Holy Ghost; Perryville, Missouri, under the Congregation of the Mission; South Langhorne, Pennsylvania, under the Society of Mary; and San Antonio, Texas, under the Oblates of Mary
Independents - They derive their name from their maintaining that every particular Congregation of Christians has, according to the New Testament, a full power of ecclesiastical jurisdiction over its members, independent of the authority of bishops, synods, presbyteries, or any other ecclesiastical assemblies. But Robinson and his companions not only rejected the appointments of the church on these heads, but denied its authority to enact them; contending, that every single Congregation of Christians was a church, and independent of all legislation, save that of Christ; standing in need of no such provision or establishment as the state can bestow, and incapable of soliciting or receiving it. The Congregationalist and Independent have been generally considered as convertible and synonymous: many, however, in the present day, prefer the former appellation, considering it desirable, in many cases, to unite, for mutual advice and support, more closely than the term independent seems to warrant
Kohlmann, Anthony - He was ordained priest after completing his theological studies at Fribourg, and joined the Congregation of the Fathers of the Sacred Heart, 1796
Knox, John - Knox was commissioned by the Lords of the Congregation to compile a new creed, and produced the famous Scottish Confession
Fontevrault, Abbey of - By 1849 there were three houses of the revived Congregation, which became subject to the ordinary
Fontevrault, Order of - By 1849 there were three houses of the revived Congregation, which became subject to the ordinary
Order of Fontevrault - By 1849 there were three houses of the revived Congregation, which became subject to the ordinary
John Knox - Knox was commissioned by the Lords of the Congregation to compile a new creed, and produced the famous Scottish Confession
Abbey of Fontevrault - By 1849 there were three houses of the revived Congregation, which became subject to the ordinary
Anthony Kohlmann - He was ordained priest after completing his theological studies at Fribourg, and joined the Congregation of the Fathers of the Sacred Heart, 1796
Acclamation - Other meanings attached to the word are: the applause of the Congregation which often, in ancient times, interrupted the sermons of favorite preachers; the prayers and good wishes found upon sepulchral monuments; brief liturgical formulre, such as "Deo gratias"; a form of papal election in which the cardinals without previous consultation or the formality of balloting, unanimously proclaim one of the candidates Supreme Pontiff
Heifer - The ashes were to be gathered up, and preserved in a secure and clean place, for the use of the Congregation, by the sprinkling of which ashes in water, it became a water of separation, by means of which a typical or ceremonial purification for sin was effected, Hebrews 9:13
Devotion to the Holy Family - This period witnessed the establishment in France of a religious Congregation of women known as Daughters of the Holy Family. At the present day there are several religious Congregations both of brothers and of sisters under the patronage of the Holy Family. By decree of the Congregation of Rites, October 26, 1921, a feast of the Holy Family was instituted for the universal Church, to be celebrated on the Sunday within the octave of the Epiphany
Family, Holy - This period witnessed the establishment in France of a religious Congregation of women known as Daughters of the Holy Family. At the present day there are several religious Congregations both of brothers and of sisters under the patronage of the Holy Family. By decree of the Congregation of Rites, October 26, 1921, a feast of the Holy Family was instituted for the universal Church, to be celebrated on the Sunday within the octave of the Epiphany
Holy Family, Devotion to the - This period witnessed the establishment in France of a religious Congregation of women known as Daughters of the Holy Family. At the present day there are several religious Congregations both of brothers and of sisters under the patronage of the Holy Family. By decree of the Congregation of Rites, October 26, 1921, a feast of the Holy Family was instituted for the universal Church, to be celebrated on the Sunday within the octave of the Epiphany
Excommunication - The third excommunication was an entire cutting off from the Congregation. (2 Corinthians 1:23 ; 13:10 ) We find, (1) that it is a spiritual penalty, involving no temporal punishment, except accidentally; (2) that it consists in separation from the communion of the Church; (3) that its object is the good of the sufferer, (1 Corinthians 5:5 ) and the protection of the sound members of the Church, (2 Timothy 3:17 ) (4) that its subjects are those who are guilty of heresy, (1 Timothy 1:20 ) or gross immorality, (1 Corinthians 5:1 ) (5) that it is inflicted by the authority of the Church at large, (Matthew 18:18 ) wielded by the highest ecclesiastical officer, (1 Corinthians 5:3 ; Titus 3:10 ) (6) that this officer's sentence is promulgated by the Congregation to which the offender belongs, (1 Corinthians 5:4 ) in defence to his superior judgment and command, (2 Corinthians 2:9 ) and in spite of any opposition on the part of a minority, (2 Corinthians 2:6 ) (7) that the exclusion may be of indefinite duration, or for a period; (8) that its duration may be abridged at the discretion and by the indulgence of the person who has imposed the penalty, (2 Corinthians 2:8 ) (9) that penitence is the condition on which restoration to communion is granted, (2 Corinthians 2:8 ) (10) that the sentence is to be publicly reversed as it was publicly promulgated
Laying on of Hands - Sins of the Congregation were transferred by the elders (Leviticus 4:15 ) or the high priest (Leviticus 16:21 ) as the people's representatives. Acts 6:1 relates the selection of seven men who were put in charge of the daily service to the widows of the Jerusalem Congregation. These men were chosen by the Congregation, brought before the apostles, and, after prayer, had hands (whether the Congregation's or the apostles' is unclear) laid on them
Faculties, Canonical - These faculties are granted to the missionary Ordinaries by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples according to locality
Medium - Acting as a medium was punishable by stoning (Leviticus 20:27 ); consulting a medium, by exclusion from the Congregation of Israel (Leviticus 20:6 )
Canonical Faculties - These faculties are granted to the missionary Ordinaries by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples according to locality
Ursulines - granted new privileges to this Congregation
Azure Vestments - According to a decree of the Congregation of Rites, February 12, 1884, by special indult some dioceses of Spain must use blue vestments instead of white on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, during its octave, and during the year whenever the Mass of the Immaculate Conception is said
Cattle - 1:16: “These were the renowned of the Congregation, princes of the tribes of their fathers, heads of thousands [2] in Israel
Splendor - ...
In many cases hôd focuses on “dignity and splendor” with overtones of superior power and position but not to the degree seen in oriental kings: “And thou shalt put some of thine honor upon him, that all the Congregation of the children of Israel may be obedient” ( Rod - "Rod is sometimes put to signify a tribe or a people; "Remember thy Congregation which thou hast purchased of old, the rod of thine inheritance which thou hast redeemed,"...
Psalms 74:2
Vestments, Azure - According to a decree of the Congregation of Rites, February 12, 1884, by special indult some dioceses of Spain must use blue vestments instead of white on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, during its octave, and during the year whenever the Mass of the Immaculate Conception is said
Vestments, Blue - According to a decree of the Congregation of Rites, February 12, 1884, by special indult some dioceses of Spain must use blue vestments instead of white on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, during its octave, and during the year whenever the Mass of the Immaculate Conception is said
Canticles - According to the Talmud the beloved is taken to be God; the loved one , or bride, is the Congregation of Israel
Maurus, Saint, Founder of Glanfeuil Monastery - , was in the middle ages one of great influence, and the "Congregation of St
Appoint - Joshua's ordination consisted of receiving commissioning while standing before the priest and the Congregation (Numbers 27:18-23 ). ...
At the conclusion of the first missionary journey Paul and Barnabas established leadership in the new Congregations. There remains a question in Acts 14:23 regarding who appointed the elders—the apostles or the Congregation. Perhaps in these settings the apostles' wisdom was necessary to establish leadership, though the apostles' selection may have been confirmed by vote of the Congregations (see also Titus 1:5 )
Jude, the Book of - This is because the content of the faith is clearly fixed (Jude 1:3 ) and the Congregation is comprised of second-generation Christians (Jude 1:17 ). ...
The hard-hitting attack denounces the demoralizing faction that has slipped into the Congregation (Jude 1:4 ,Jude 1:4,1:12 )
Synagogue - Hebrew eedah , "a Congregation" or "appointed solemn meeting," in the Pentateuch; qaahaal , "a meeting called", represents ekklesia the "Church". In Psalms 74:4; Psalms 74:8 (compare Jeremiah 52:13; Jeremiah 52:17, which shows that the psalm refers to the Chaldaean destruction of the sanctuary) the "congregations" and "synagogues "refer to the tabernacle or temple meeting place between God and His people; "mo'eed mo'adee " in the psalm is the same word as expresses "the tabernacle of Congregation," or meeting between God and His people, in Exodus 33:7, compare Exodus 29:42-43. So Psalms 107:32, "the Congregation of the people . The officiating minister was delegate (sheliach , answering to the term apostle, "sent") of the Congregation, the forerunner of "the angel (messenger sent) of the church" (Revelation 1:20; Revelation 2:1). ...
There were also the ten batlaniym or "men of leisure", permanently making up a Congregation (ten being the minimum (minyan "quoram") to constitute a Congregation), that no single worshipper might be disappointed; also acting as alms collectors
Synagogue - ]'>[1] see Congregation), ‘synagogue’ is used in NT in a double signification: (1) in the sense of a community organized for religious purposes, as Acts 6:9 ; Acts 9:2 (cf. The larger portion of the area was occupied by benches for the Congregation, the worshippers facing southwards, in Galilee at least, towards the holy city. A few special seats in front of the bçmâ , and facing the Congregation, were occupied by the heads of the community. Their recitation by the Congregation was preceded and followed by one or two short benedictions, such as that beginning, ‘Blessed be thou, Adonai, our God, King of the universe, who didst form the light and create darkness. In contrast to the first item of the service, in which all took part, the prayers were said by a single individual chosen for the purpose, named ‘the deputy of the Congregation,’ the worshippers’ however, repeating the Amen at the close of each collect. When a likely stranger was present, he was invited by the ruler of the synagogue to address the Congregation ( Acts 13:15 ). ...
On some occasions, at least, it was usual to ask the alms of the Congregation (Matthew 6:2 ) on behalf of the poor. At the other services, such as those held daily in the larger towns, where ten ‘men of leisure’ were available to form the minimum legal Congregation, and the Monday and Thursday services, some of the items were omitted
Avignon - Thereafter, Avignon was governed by a papal legate, later by the Congregation of Avignon, domiciled in Rome
Fourteen Holy Helpers - In 1890 the Congregation of Rites gave permission for a Mass in their honor to be celebrated on the fourth Sunday after Easter at Langheim and also at Hammelburg in the Diocese of Würzburg, renowned for observance of the devotion
New Hampshire - Many of the Congregation of 150 were converts
Bohemian Brethren - The rebaptized all such as joined themselves to their Congregation
Monastic - This made the first Congregation of several houses under one chief immediately subject to the pope, so as to constitute one body, or as they now call it, one religious order
Assembly - 'The whole assembly of the Congregation' were to eat the passover, Exodus 12:6 , though each family ate it in its own house
Zimri - When Israel were being plagued for the impure worship of Baal Peor, and were weeping and craving mercy before the tabernacle, Zimri shamelessly brought a Midianitess, Cozbi daughter of Zur, into the dome-shaped tent (qubbah , the al-cove, or arched inner recess appropriated to the women, or else a tent appropriated to Peor's vile worship) in sight of Moses and the Congregation
Basilica - As the priest was supposed always to face the east, basilicas were built with the entrance facade toward the east when he faced the Congregation and toward the west when it became customary for him to turn his back to them
Incense - (Luke 1:10 ) Profound silence was observed among the Congregation who were praying without, cf
Pomegranate - The high estimation in which it was held by the people of Israel, may be inferred from its being one of the three kinds of fruit brought by the spies from Eshcol to Moses and the Congregation in the wilderness, Numbers 13:23 ; Numbers 20:5 ; and from its being specified by that rebellious people as one of the greatest luxuries which they enjoyed in Egypt, the want of which they felt so severely in the sandy desert
Scapular of the Help of the Sick - The scapular is the badge of the confraternity, which received its indulgences from Pope Pius IX in 1860, and from Pope Leo XIII in 1883; these were last ratified by a Rescript of the Congregation of Indulgences on July 21, 1883
Help of the Sick, Scapular of the - The scapular is the badge of the confraternity, which received its indulgences from Pope Pius IX in 1860, and from Pope Leo XIII in 1883; these were last ratified by a Rescript of the Congregation of Indulgences on July 21, 1883
Litany, the - By reason of its responsivecharacter the Litany is a very soul stirring and heart searchingsupplication, is designed to keep the attention constantly on thealert and to enliven devotion by calling upon the Congregation tomake their petitions for those deliverances and blessings recitedby the minister
Synagogue - --The word synagogue ( sunagoge ), which means a "congregation," is used in the New Testament to signify a recognized place of worship. The Congregation were divided, men on one side, women on the other a low partition, five or six feet high, running between them. " (Luke 8:41,49 ; 13:14 ; Acts 18:8,17 ) The most prominent functionary in a large synagogue was known as the sheliach (= legatus ), the officiating minister who acted as the delegate of the Congregation and was therefore the chief reader of prayers, etc. From the synagogue, lastly, come many less conspicuous practices, which meet us in the liturgical life of the first three centuries: Ablution, entire or partial, before entering the place of meeting, (John 13:1-15 ; Hebrews 10:22 ) standing, and not kneeling, as the attitude of prayer, (Luke 18:11 ) the arms stretched out; the face turned toward the Kibleh of the east; the responsive amen of the Congregation to the prayers and benedictions of the elders
Hell - The inhabitants of sheol are "the Congregation of the dead" (Proverbs 21:16 )
Massachusetts - The same fall a Congregation of about 100 was gathered together in Boston and the building of a brick church, under the patronage of the Holy Cross, was undertaken on the site of a former Huguenot church on School Street, by Reverend Claude de la Poterie, who had come from France
James Gibbons - He championed the rights of labor, and one of his ablest documents was a famous plea contained in his letter on the Knights of Labor to the Prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, February 28, 1887
Purim - On Haman's name being mentioned the Congregation exclaim, "let his name be blotted out!" His sons' names are read in one enunciation to mark they were all hanged at once
Heaven: to be Shut Out of at Last - Several years ago we heard an old minister relate the following incident:: 'He had preached the Word for many a year in a wood hard by a beautiful village in the Inverness-shire Highlands, and it was his invariable custom, on dismissing his own Congregation, to repair to the Baptist Chapel in this village to partake of the Lord's Supper with his people assembled there
Penitence - Congregation of penitents of St
Korah, Dathan, Abiram - 17) describes a revolt of Korah, at the head of 250 princes of the Congregation, against Moses and Aaron , in the interests of the people al large as against the tribe of Levi
Bell - In churches and other public buildings, bells are now used to notify the time of meeting of any Congregation or other assembly
Trumpets - There were two trumpets made of silver which the priests used, and instructions were given as to blowing different sounds for calling the princes together, or for summoning all the Congregation, or as an alarm for war
Ecclesiastical Property - If canonically established as moral persons, chapters, religious orders, religious Congregations and seminaries, can also exercise this right. The members of this corporation are ex officio the bishop, vicar general, and the pastor, who selects two laymen from the parish to represent the Congregation
England, John - A pioneer in intellectual activities as well as in religion, he organized in 1823 a Book Society, designed to have branches in each Congregation, founded the same year the "United States Catholic Miscellany," the first Catholic newspaper in the United States, and established a seminary and College called "The Philosophical and Classical Seminary of Charleston," of which he was president and chief teacher
Apostolic Council - ...
The council showed the working of the early church with strong leadership yet involving the voice of the Congregation (Acts 15:12 ,Acts 15:12,15:22 ), the messengers sent from Jerusalem to Antioch not being part of the twelve apostles
Gibbons, James - He championed the rights of labor, and one of his ablest documents was a famous plea contained in his letter on the Knights of Labor to the Prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, February 28, 1887
Hymn - In this sense a hymn expresses the Congregation's praise of God's greatness and majesty, usually addressing members of the Congregation and inviting them to praise God. A hymn usually includes a call to the Congregation to join in praise (Psalm 33:1-3 ), a list of reasons to praise God (Psalm 33:4-19 ), and a concluding call to praise or statement of trust (Psalm 33:20-22 )
Toleration Act - That no person dissenting from the church of England in holy orders, or pretended holy orders, or pretending to holy orders, nor any preacher or teacher of any Congregation of Dissenting Protestants, that shall make and subscribe the declaration aforsaid, and take the said oaths at the General or Quarter Sessions of the Peace, to be held for the county, town, parts, or division where such person lives, which court is hereby empowered to administer the same, and shall also declare his approbation of and subscribe the Articles of Religion mentioned in the statute made in the 13th of Q. That every teacher or preacher in holy orders, or pretended holy orders, that is, a minister, preacher, or teacher of a Congregation, that shall take the oaths herein required, and make and subscribe the declaration aforesaid, &c. Provided, That all the laws made and provided for the frequenting of divine service on the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday, shall be still in force, and executed against all persons that offend against the said laws, except such persons come to some Congregation or assembly of religious worship, allowed or permitted by this act. Provided, That if any person or persons do and shall willingly, maliciously, or contemptuously, come into any cathedral or parish-church, chapel, or other Congregation permitted by this act, and disquiet or disturb the same, or misuse any preacher or teacher, such person or persons, upon proof thereof before any justice of the peace, by two or more sufficient witnesses, shall find two sureties, to be bound by recognizance in the penal sum of 50l. That no Congregation or assembly for religious worship shall be permitted or allowed by this act until the place of such meeting shall be certified to the Bishop of the diocess, or to the Archdeacon of that archdeaconry, or to the justices of the peace at the General or Quarter Sessions of the peace for the county, city, or place in which such meeting shall be held, and registered in the said Bishop's or Archdeacon's court respectively, or recorded at the said General or Quarter Sessions; the register or clerk of the peace whereof respectively is hereby required to register the same, and to give certificate thereof to such person as shall demand the same; for which there shall be no greater fee or reward taken than the sum of sixpence
Jesuit Relations - Opening with the letters of Biard, 1616, the custom of writing the letters was brought to an end by the order of Pope Clement X forbidding missionaries to publish matter concerning the missions without permission of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Order of the Most Holy Trinity - Nuns have been affiliated to the order since 1256, but the true Trinitarian Sisters, forming an integral part of the Congregation, date from 1612
Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament - Then with his hands covered by a veil pendent: from his shoulders he makes the sign of the cross over the Congregation with the ostensorium; after which the consecrated Host is replaced in the tabernacle
Hor - ) His death resembled Moses' in being on a mountain, but differed from it in being in the presence of Moses and Eleazar on the mount to which they ascended "in the sight of all the Congregation
Waterlandians - Each Congregation is independent of all foreign jurisdiction, having its own court of government, composed of the presbyters and deacons
Korah - There were gathered to them two hundred and fifty princes of the Congregation who were Levites
Minister, Serve - They also are “to stand before the Congregation to minister unto them” ( Proseuchae - In synagogues, he says, the prayers were offered up in public forms in common for the whole Congregation; but in the proseuchae they prayed, as in the temple, every one apart for himself
Synagogue - Greek term means a Congregation
Relations, Jesuit - Opening with the letters of Biard, 1616, the custom of writing the letters was brought to an end by the order of Pope Clement X forbidding missionaries to publish matter concerning the missions without permission of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
Trinitarians - Nuns have been affiliated to the order since 1256, but the true Trinitarian Sisters, forming an integral part of the Congregation, date from 1612
the Widow With the Two Mites - " I have an ancient friend in this Congregation who, also, has God's law in this respect within her heart. It is doing no exegetical or homiletical violence to this exquisite scene to transfer every syllable of it to ourselves as a Congregation and a court. So much so, that wherever you see a Free Church door open on a Sabbath morning, in town or country, and the people flocking up to it, you have had a hand in opening that door, and in sustaining that minister, and in preaching the unsearchable riches of Christ to that Congregation. And you would see, not by any means to perfection, but to a certain honest approximation, what a modern treasury-chest of the Lord's house ought to be, and what it will yet be in every Congregation in the coming days of the Church of Christ in Scotland. For it is not by any means the enormous wealth of this Congregation that has given to Free St. Candlish's Congregation
Missions Etrangeres de Paris - A Congregation based on the plans of Alexandre de Rhodes as represented to Pope Innocent X in 1650
Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools - As only a religious Congregation could furnish a permanent supply of educators teaching without compensation, the institute was formed of young men attracted by the religious life to take the three usual vows but not Holy Orders
Doctors of the Church - Since then more than twenty renowned theologians, all of them canonized saints, have received the same seal of approval, either from some pope or from the Sacred Congregation of Rites; the latest are Saint Peter Canisius and Saint John of the Cross, who received this honor from Pius XI
Birthright - The "princes" of the Congregation were so probably by primogeniture (Numbers 7:2; Numbers 21:18)
Ammonite - They showed no kindness to the Israelites when passing through their territory, and therefore they were prohibited from "entering the Congregation of the Lord to the tenth generation" (Deuteronomy 23:3 )
Korah - The rebels contended that the entire Congregation was sanctified and therefore qualified to perform priestly functions
Inghamites - ...
Such confessions as this threw the Congregation into some confusion, which was considerably increased when they found, that, on their having recourse as usual to the lot, that there were votes against their admission, which was considered as a rejection from the Lord
Church - It is probably connected with kirk , the Latin circus, circulus, the Greek kuklos (kuklos) because the Congregations were gathered in circles. It was in this last sense that the word was adapted and applied by the writers of the New Testament to the Christian Congregation
Society of Foreign Missions of Paris - A Congregation based on the plans of Alexandre de Rhodes as represented to Pope Innocent X in 1650
Sisters of Saint Clare - The Congregation spread throughout Europe, many convents holding property in the name of the community
Second Order of Saint Francis - The Congregation spread throughout Europe, many convents holding property in the name of the community
New Orleans, Louisiana, City of - , the founder of the Jesuit mission in New Orleans, brought over a Congregation of Ursulines to minister in a hospital and school. The Fathers of the Congregation of the Holy Cross established a manual industrial school for male orphans, 1855, and opened their college, 1879
Brownists - He began to inveigh openly against the ceremonies of the church, at Norwich, in 1580; but, being much opposed by the bishops, he with his Congregation left England, and settled at Middleburgh, in Zealand, where they obtained leave to worship God in their own way, and form a church according to their own model. Among the Brownists, too, were the famous John Robinson, a part of whose Congregation from Leyden in Holland, made the first permanent settlement in North America; and the laborious Canne, the author of the marginal reference to the Bible
Camp - and called it the tabernacle of the Congregation. The word used signifies 'the tent,' and it was doubtless a tent anticipatory of the tabernacle significantly pitched by Moses outside the camp, to show that God's dwelling could not be where there was an idol, for it is added, "Every one which sought the Lord went out unto the tabernacle of the Congregation, which was without the camp
Moravians - ...
By the indefatigable exertions of count Zinzendorf these disputes were allayed; and statutes being, in 1727, drawn up and agreed to for the regulation both of the internal and of the external concerns of the Congregation, brotherly love and union was again established; and no schism whatever, in point of doctrine, has since that period disturbed the church of the United Brethren. It has been already observed, that the church of the United Brethren is episcopal; but though they consider episcopal ordination as necessary to qualify the servants of the church for their respective functions, they allow to their bishops no elevation of rank or pre-eminent authority; their church having from its first establishment been governed by synods, consisting of deputies from all the Congregations, and by other subordinate bodies, which they call Conferences. In the first sitting a president is chosen, and these elders lay down their office; but they do not withdraw from the assembly; for they, together with all bishops, seniores civiles, or lay elders, and those ministers who have the general care or inspection of several Congregations in one province, have seats in the synod without any particular election. The other members are, one or more deputies sent by each Congregation, and such ministers or missionaries as are particularly called to attend. Women, approved by the Congregations are also admitted as hearers, and are called upon to give their advice in what relates to the ministerial labour among their sex; but they have no decisive vote in the synod. In every synod the inward and outward state of the unity, and the concerns of the Congregations and mission, are taken into consideration. The Helpers' department, which watches over the purity of doctrine, and the moral conduct of the different Congregations. The powers of the Elders' Conference are, indeed, very extensive: besides the general care which it is commissioned by the synods to take of all the Congregations and missions, it appoints, and removes every servant in the Unity, as circumstances may require; authorizes the bishops to ordain presbyters or deacons, and to consecrate other bishops; and, in a word, though it cannot abrogate any of the constitutions of the synod, or enact new ones itself, it is possessed of the supreme executive power over the whole body of the United Brethren. Besides this general Conference of Elders, which superintends the affairs of the whole Unity, there is another Conference of elders belonging to each Congregation, which directs its affairs, and to which the bishops and all other ministers, as well as the lay members of the Congregation are subject. This body, which is called the Elders' Conference of the Congregations, consists, ...
1. Of the Minister, as president, to whom the ordinary care of the Congregation is committed, except when it is very numerous, and then the general inspection of it is intrusted to a separate person, called the Congregation Helper. Of the Warden, whose office it is to superintend; with the aid of his council, all outward concerns of the Congregation, and to assist every individual with his advice. As the Elders' Conference of each Congregation is answerable for its proceedings to the Elders' Conference of the Unity, visitations from the latter to the former are held from time to time, that the affairs of each Congregation, and the conduct of its immediate governors, may be intimately known to the supreme executive government of the whole church. In their opinion, episcopal consecration does not confer any power to preside over one or more Congregations; and a bishop can discharge no office but by the appointment of a synod, or of the Elders' Conference of the Unity. ...
They have likewise seniores civiles, or lay elders, in contradistinction to spiritual elders, or bishops, who are appointed to watch over the constitution and discipline of the Unity of the Brethren, over the observance of the laws of the country in which Congregations or missions are established, and over the privileges granted to the Brethren by the governments under which they live. ...
The brother who marries out of the Congregations is immediately cut off from church fellowship. Part of the Indian Congregation will remain at Fairfield, in Canada, as a good seed; our missionaries entertaining hopes that the Gospel may yet find entrance among the wild Chippeway tribe inhabiting those parts. "The Mission among the Hottentots at the Cape of Good Hope was begun in 1736, by George Schmidt, a man of remarkable zeal and courage, who laboured successfully among these people, till he had formed a small Congregation of believers, whom he left to the care of a pious man, and went to Europe with a view to represent the promising state of the mission, and to return with assistants. ...
Since that time to the year 1792 the brethren did not cease to make application to the Dutch government for leave to send missionaries to the Cape, especially as they heard that the small Hottentot Congregation had kept together for some time, in earnest expectation of the return of their beloved teacher
Church - ]'>[4] ‘ Congregation ’). For ‘synagogue’ was the name regularly applied after the Babylonian exile to local Congregations of Jews formally gathered for common worship, and from them subsequently transferred to similar Congregations of Hebrew Christians ( James 2:2 ). ‘Tell it to the ecclesia ’ can hardly refer directly to communities of Jesus’ disciples, as these did not exist in the time of the Galilæan ministry, but rather to the Jewish Congregation, or its representative court, in the place to which the disputants might belong. There is no evidence that ecclesia , like ‘synagogue,’ was transferred from the Congregation of Israel to the religious assemblies which were its local embodiment. In Exodus 12:6 we have the phrase ‘the whole assembly of the Congregation (Gr. The existence of independent Congregations of Christians within a single area, like the Hellenistic and Hebrew synagogues (see Acts 6:1 ; Acts 6:9 ), does not appear to be contemplated in the NT. There is therefore little doubt that Jesus meant His disciples to understand the establishment of Messiah’s Kingdom; and that the use of the less common word ecclesia , far from being unintentional, is designed to connect with the new and enlarged Israel only the spiritual associations of Jehovah’s Congregation, and to discourage the temporal aspirations which they were only too ready to derive from the promised Kingdom. It was to realize the hopes of that Congregation of Israel which had been purchased and redeemed of old ( Psalms 74:2 ), and of which the Davidic monarchy had been the pledge ( Micah 4:8 , Isaiah 55:3 etc. The passage combines in a remarkable degree the three elements in the Divine Society, namely, the redeemed Congregation of Israel ( Psalms 74:2 ), the Kingdom or ecclesia of Messiah ( Matthew 16:18 ), and the body established upon the Atonement ( Colossians 1:20-22 , Ephesians 2:13 ). The worship of the Christian Congregation is the Paschal feast ( 1 Corinthians 5:8 , cf
Korah - Korah with "250 princes of the assembly, famous in the Congregation, men of renown" (not restricted to the tribe of Reuben: Numbers 27:3), said to Moses and Aaron, "ye take too much upon you, seeing all the Congregation are holy, every one of them, and the Lord is among them" (compare Exodus 19:6). from the tabernacle which these had set up in common opposition to the great tabernacle of the Congregation
Psalmody - At other times the Psalms were sung alternately; the Congregation dividing themselves into two parts and singing verse for verse. Antholin's, London, when a psalm was sung in the Geneva fashion, all the Congregation, men, women, and boys, singing together. The Presbyterians, it seems, were not quite so unmusical; for the Directory of the Westminster divines distinctly stated, that "it is the duty of Christians to praise God publicly by singing of Psalms together in the Congregation
Liberalism - Liberalism was condemned by the Church, explicitly and in detail in the encyclical and syllabus of Pius IX, 1864, in the Vatican Council, 1870, in the encyclicals of Leo XIII, in the allocution of Pius X, 1907, and in the decree of the Congregation of the Inquisition, 1907
Mithraism - They laid stress on good-fellowship and brotherliness, excluded women from the practise of the cult, insisted on a high moral standard among their followers, and formed a social, legal, and religious Congregation
Gilgal - A place on the east border of Jericho ( Joshua 4:19 ), where the Israelites first encamped after crossing Jordan, and which remained the headquarters of the Congregation till after the rout of the northern kings at Merom ( Joshua 14:6 )
Amen - It is also used to express acquiescence in another's prayer, 1 Kings 1:36 , where it is defined as "(let) God say so too," or in another's thanksgiving, 1 Chronicles 16:36 , whether by an individual, Jeremiah 11:5 , or by the Congregation, Psalm 106:48
Assembly - , "congregation"), to a company consisting of professed believers, e
Prayer Book, the - " It is called Common Prayer, because it isto be used by the Congregation in Public Worship, and is thusdistinguished from prayer in private
Church - The Church of England's definition of the church is truly scriptural (Article xix): "a Congregation of faithful men in the which the pure word of God is preached, and the sacraments be duly ministered according to Christ's ordinance in all those things that of necessity are requisite to the same. " For a minister to pretend to offer a literal sacrifice in the Lord's supper, or to have the sacerdotal priesthood (which pertains to Christ alone), would be the sin which Moses charged on Korah: "Seemeth it but a small thing unto you that the God of Israel hath separated you from the Congregation to bring you near to Himself, . to stand before the Congregation to minister to them; and seek ye the priesthood also?" The temple then not being the model to the Christian church, the synagogue alone remained to be copied. Synagogue expresses a Congregation not necessarily bound together; church, a people mutually bound together, even when not assembled, a body called out (ekkleesia , from ekkalein ) from the world in spirit, though not in locality (John 17:11; John 17:15)
Elder - On the one side it is observed, that these officers are no where mentioned as being alone or single, but always as being many in every Congregation
Reader - Among the Jews any member of the Congregation—even a minor—might be the reader both of the Law and of the Prophets, although if a priest or a Levite were present he should have precedence (Gittin, v
Israel, Spiritual - This is in contrast to most references in the Old Testament to religious or secular assemblies or to those in the New Testament that designate a local Congregation of Christians, but never in any way mean a building
Penitents - Penitents, or Converts of the name of Jesus, a Congregation of religious at Seville, in Spain, consisting of women who have led a licentious life, founded in 1550
Turtle (Dove) - ...
The turtle dove represents "the Congregation of God's poor" which the psalmist (Psalms 74:19) prays God not to deliver "unto the wild beasts" (Septuagint, Vulgate, Arabic), or "to the greedy host" (Maurer)
Raiment - The songs of David echoed throughout the empire, there was prosperity, and the fear of GOD permeated the Congregation
Deacon, Deaconess - The special function of deacons, whether men or women, was to distribute the alms of the Congregation and to minister to the needs of the poor; they were the church’s relieving officers
Confess - The subject is not primarily the isolated individual, but the Congregation
Glory - The glory of God in the writings of Moses, denotes, generally, the divine presence; as when he appeared on Mount Sinai; or, the bright cloud which declared his presence, and descended on the tabernacle of the Congregation, Exodus 24:9-10 ; Exodus 24:16-17
Purim - In later times it was celebrated by a synagogue meeting on the evening of the 13th and the morning of the 14th, when the Book of Esther was read through, special prayers and thanks were offered, and the Congregation ejaculated curses on Haman and blessings on Esther and Mordecai
Secularization - A secularized religious is no longer a member of his institute; he must lay aside the habit of the order or Congregation, and as to Mass and canonical hours, the use and the administration of the sacraments, he is likened to seculars
Tabernacle - , where the people were called to meet God), a preferable description to "the tabernacle of the Congregation," as in the AV in the OT; the outer part, Hebrews 9:2,6 ; the inner sanctuary, Hebrews 9:3 ; (c) the heavenly prototype, Hebrews 8:2 ; 9:11 ; Revelation 13:6 ; 15:5 ; 21:3 (of its future descent); (d) the eternal abodes of the saints, Luke 16:9 , RV, "tabernacles" (AV, "habitations"); (e) the Temple in Jerusalem, as continuing the service of the tabernacle, Hebrews 13:10 ; (f) the house of David, i
Exodus, Book of - "Then the cloud covered the tent of the Congregation, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. " Moses was unable to enter the tent of the Congregation because of the cloud
Samaritan, the Good - Luke 4:16), and discoursed to the Congregation. He thought to display his superior knowledge, and humble Jesus before the Congregation; and his question was a foretaste of the dialectical warfare which awaited Jesus in Jerusalem, and which reached its climax in that succession of encounters with the rulers in the Temple court during the Passion week
Ever, Everlasting - ...
With the preposition ’ad, the word can mean “into the indefinite future”: “An Ammonite or Moabite shall not enter into the Congregation of the Lord; even to their tenth generation shall they not enter into the Congregation of the Lord for ever” ( Psalms, Book of - Psalms has been understood as both the “hymnal” and prayerbook of the postexilic Congregation of Israel with its final compilation and its inclusion within the canon. The psalmist promises to fulfill vows made to God during the distress and invites the Congregation to join in thanksgiving and praise to God. Hymns lift the Congregation's praise to God, describing God's greatness and majesty. Wisdom psalms probe life's mysteries to teach the Congregation about itself and God. Liturgical psalms describe activities and responses of God's worshiping Congregation
Nethinim - The Gibeonites similarly, having obtained by craft a covenant from Joshua (Joshua 9:9; Joshua 9:27), "because of the name" and "fame of Jehovah, Israel's God," were made "hewers of wood and drawers of water for the Congregation and altar
Sinai - The cliff, rising like a huge altar in front of the whole Congregation, and visible against the sky in lonely grandeur from end to end of the whole plain, is the very image of the 'mount that might be touched,' and from which the voice of God might be heard far and wide over the plain below
Assemble - " In Acts 13:43 the RV suitably has "synagogue," for the AV "congregation," the building standing by metonymy for the people therein (cp
Vestments - It has been pointed out that "The clergy and all who actministerially in divine service are clad in surplices and othervestments, not that they may have a decent and uniform appearancein sight of the Congregation, but as wearing robes distinctive oftheir office in ministering before Him whom they worship
Surpliced Choir - This is not to be wondered at, for it is found byactual experience that the surpliced choir of men and boys,numbering from twenty to sixty voices according to the size ofthe parish, is better suited to render the Church's music, morein keeping with the Church's devotions and more inspiring andhelpful to the Congregation. Many a parish has thus been liftedup, strengthened, the services made more attractive and theattendance at them increased, because the music rendered in thismanner becomes thoroughly Congregational, such as the peoplethemselves can join in and make it their own
Episcopacy - The number of Christians in most of the primitive churches was at first small: they could easily, when not prevented by persecution, assemble together; and they thus formed one church or Congregation; for, in Scripture, the term church is never used in the more modern acceptation of the word, but is employed to denote either the whole church of Christ, or a number of disciples meeting for the celebration of divine worship. There were in this way gradually established, first in the towns or cities in which the Apostles had called men to the truth, and then in the contiguous district of country, several Congregations: in these pastors officiated, who were authorized by the bishop and presbytery, whose superintendence was extended, so that parochial episcopacy was insensibly but naturally changed into diocesan episcopacy; many of the presbyters sent out by the bishop residing at their churches, but nevertheless composing part of his council, and being summoned to meet with him upon important occasions. In the immediate neighbourhood of the bishop, and where one person was sufficient, he would merely perform the duties that had been assigned to him previous to his mission; but the same reasons that led the Apostles to plant several presbyters in the churches which they founded might render it expedient that more than one, sometimes that a considerable number, should be attached to the newly-formed Congregations; more particularly when the number attending was large, and when there was the prospect of their still farther increasing. The different Congregations or churches which were established in various cities and the adjoining districts were in so far independent of each other, that the bishops and presbyters of each had the rule of their particular church, and of the churches which had sprung from it, and were entitled, by their own authority, to make such regulations as appeared to them to be requisite; and this species of independence continued for a considerable time, every bishop presiding in his Congregation, and afterward in his diocess
Red Heifer - Eleazer was then to take of her blood with his finger, and sprinkle of her blood directly before the tabernacle of the Congregation seven times. And a man that was clean was to gather the ashes of the heifer and lay them up without the camp in a clean place, to be kept for the Congregation of the children of Israel for a water of separation: it is a purification for sin. " (Galatians 2:21)...
Seventhly, the whole Congregation are said to be alike interested in this heifer, both in providing it, and in the enjoyment of the privileges of it
Bishop - The other four uniformly referred to one who had a role or office in an early Gentile Christian Congregation
Carnutum - In 1914 the Congregation of the Consistory confirmed the apostolicity of the Church of Chartres and the ancient origin of the famous statue of the Virgin
Chartres, France - In 1914 the Congregation of the Consistory confirmed the apostolicity of the Church of Chartres and the ancient origin of the famous statue of the Virgin
Macedonia - Lydia was the first European convert, and women were Paul's first Congregation (Acts 16:13-14); so the female element is prominent at Philippi in the epistle to the Philippians as working for Christ (Philippians 4:2-3)
Tobiah - Hence, it was deemed necessary to read before the people the law that "the Ammonite and the Moabite should not come into the Congregation of God forever" (Nehemiah 13:1)
Music, Ecclesiastical - In the monasteries of Syria and Egypt two forms of rendering the psalms and canticles of the Bible were developed: the antiphonal chant, which consisted in the alternation of two choirs; and the responsorial chant, which was solo singing in which the Congregation joined in a refrain
Feasts - The feasts of Jehovah, as instituted under the lawas given by Moses, partake more of the character of commemorations, or assemblies of the Congregation to celebrate special dealings of the Lord, and consequently special seasons in the history of His people, being called 'holy convocations
Autricum - In 1914 the Congregation of the Consistory confirmed the apostolicity of the Church of Chartres and the ancient origin of the famous statue of the Virgin
Ecclesiastical Music - In the monasteries of Syria and Egypt two forms of rendering the psalms and canticles of the Bible were developed: the antiphonal chant, which consisted in the alternation of two choirs; and the responsorial chant, which was solo singing in which the Congregation joined in a refrain
Holy - All of the people are in a sense “holy,” as members of the covenant community, irrespective of their faith and obedience: “And they gathered themselves together against Moses and against Aaron, and said unto them, Ye take too much upon you, seeing all the Congregation are holy, every one of them, and the Lord is among them: wherefore then lift ye up yourselves above the Congregation of the Lord?” ( Synagogue - כְּנָסֶת, ‘assembly,’ like ἐκκλησία, Septuagint for either עֵדִה or קָהָל, ‘congregation’) denotes primarily the religious community of Jews (Sirach 24:23, Luke 12:11, Acts 9:2; Acts 26:11; also used by the Judaeo-Christians the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - There are people, indeed, in every Congregation that our Lord Himself could not make men of understanding: at the same time, it is the ministers who are mostly at fault if their people remain stupid in their intellects and dark in their hearts. I do not know any Congregation, anywhere, that hears the Word of God with such joy as this Congregation. Now, there are honest, and there are dishonest, hearts in every Congregation. But there are others, it is to be feared, in every Congregation. They were in our Lord's Congregations, and they are in ours
Apostolic Constitutions And Canons - The church building lies eastwards-in the direction of the earthly Paradise-and is arranged with special seats for the Presbytery and the different sexes and ages in the Congregation. He makes, for example, an unhappily conceived attempt at an elaborate analogy between a well-arranged church and a ship, the deacons being the sailors, the Congregation passengers, and so forth. 41 has been doubtfully attributed to Lucian of Antioch-a suggestion which might, as Achelis points out, connect the ‘Constitutions’ with his Congregation. 57) the bishops and presbyters sit, the deacons stand near, the Congregation are seated according to age and sex, children may stand beside their parents. Lessons from the historical and poetical books of the OT respectively are followed by a Psalm sung solo, the Congregation joining ‘at the conclusions of the verses’; then comes a lesson from the Acts or Epistles, and after this all stand at the reading of the Gospel
Pastor - Literally a shepherd; figuratively a stated minister appointed to watch over and instruct a Congregation
Cord - 2:5: “Therefore thou shalt have none that shall cast a cord by lot in the Congregation of the Lord
Name - ...
Shêm can connote “renown” and “continuance” (in those remaining after one): “And they rose up before Moses, with certain of the children of Israel, two hundred and fifty princes of the assembly, famous in the Congregation, men of renown” ( Vitalius - of the Apollinarian Congregation at Antioch
Jansenists - In the year 1652, the pope appointed a Congregation for examining into the dispute relative to grace. In this Congregation Jansenius was condemned; and the bull of condemnation published in May, 1653, pope Alexander VII
Praise - ...
Second, in some cases tehillâh represents the words or song by which God is publicly lauded, or by which His “glory” is publicly declared: “My praise [1] shall be of thee in the great Congregation …” ( Congregation will I praise thee
Heifer, Red - Contact with death, the visible penalty of sin (Genesis 2:17), was a defilement requiring purgation before one could have communion with the Congregation of the living Israel (Isaiah 4:3)
Love Feast - That this unity was a very serious matter can be seen in that the love feast is mentioned in the context of a denunciation of false teachers and admonishment of the Congregation
Liturgy - "...
The properties required in a public liturgy, " says Paley, "are these: it must be compendious; express just conceptions of the divine attributes; recite such wants as a Congregation are likely to feel, and no other; and contain as few controverted propositions as possible
Antioch - In Antioch the believers were first called Christians (Acts 11:26 ), and it was to Antioch that Barnabas fetched Saul (Paul) from Tarsus so that they could teach this mixed Congregation of Jewish and Gentile followers of the Lord
Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon - None of the nation were to be allowed to enter the Congregation of Israel to the tenth generation, that is, for ever
Liturgy - "The properties required in a public liturgy," says Paley, "are these: it must be compendious; express just conceptions of the divine attributes; recite such wants as a Congregation are likely to feel, and no other; and contain as few controverted propositions as possible
Hair - The head of Aaron was anointed with a precious oil, compounded after the art of the apothecary; and in proof that they had already adopted the practice, the Congregation were prohibited, under pain of being cut off, to make any other like it, after the composition of it, Exodus 30:32-33
Caleb - Moses and Aaron no sooner heard this than they fell upon their faces before the whole Congregation, and Joshua and Caleb rent their clothes, imploring them to take courage and march boldly on; since, if God were with them, they might easily make a conquest of the whole land
Philippus, the Arabian - 34) gives without vouching for its truth, namely, that Philip being a Christian wished at Easter to join in the prayers with the Congregation, but that on account of the many crimes be had committed the bishop of the place refused to admit him until he had confessed and taken his place among the penitents, and that he willingly obeyed
Church - As a consequence of this broad background of meaning in the Greek and Old Testament worlds, the term “church” is used in the New Testament of a local Congregation of called-out Christians, such as the “church of God which is at Corinth”(Romans 10:9-135 ), and also of the entire people of God, such as in the affirmation that Christ is “the head over all things to the church, Which is his body” (Ephesians 1:22-23 ). ...
Persons were admitted to the local Congregation only upon their placing their trust in Christ as Savior (Acts 3:37-42 ), openly confessing this (1618614215_45 ), and being baptized (Acts 10:44-48 ). When Christ accepted the person, the Congregation did also, even though the members might be aware of weaknesses (Romans 14:1-4 ). Since their duties are not specified and they are usually listed with the bishops, it is usually assumed that deacons devoted themselves to the larger work of the local church, assisting in whatever ways were most appropriate to the local Congregation of Christians as the seven did in Acts (1 Timothy 6:1-7 )
Pentateuch - At this time Hoshea was king of Israel, and so far disposed to countenance the worship of the true God, that he appears to have made no opposition to the pious zeal of Hezekiah; who, with the concurrence of the whole Congregation which he had assembled, sent out letters and made a proclamation, not only to his own people of Judah, 2 Chronicles 30:1 , "but to Ephraim and Manasseh and all Israel, from Beersheba even unto Dan, that they should come to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, to keep the passover unto the Lord God of Israel; saying, Ye children of Israel, turn again to the Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and he will return to the remnant of you who are escaped out of the hands of the kings of Assyria; and be not ye like your fathers and your brethren, which trespassed against the Lord God of their fathers, who therefore gave them up to desolation as ye see. "Nevertheless," says the sacred narrative, "divers of Asher and Manasseh and of Zebulun humbled themselves and came to Jerusalem; and there assembled at Jerusalem much people, to keep the feast of unleavened bread in the second month, a very great Congregation; and they killed the passover, and the priests and Levites stood in their places after their manner, according to the law of Moses, the man of God
Atonement, Day of - The mode of affliction was not prescribed, but all work was forbidden on pain of cutting off from the Lord's Congregation. Many think Azazel to be the devil, to whom, as the source of sin, "the entirely separate one," the scape-goat, with its lead of sin taken of from the Congregation, was sent to the wilderness (the abode of evil spirits) to be given up to, as sin and the wicked shall be hereafter (Revelation 20:14-15; Matthew 25:41; Luke 16:20): entirely separated from God. ...
As other offerings arched typically for the sins of the individual, the nation's sins as a whole Congregation or church, were expiated on the great day of atonement
Shiloh - At Shiloh the Congregation deliberated regarding the altar built by the men of the eastern tribes in the Jordan Valley ( Joshua 22:12 ff
Ammon - Their unwillingness to help Israel, and their joining Moab in hiring Balaam (Deuteronomy 23:2; Deuteronomy 23:46; Nehemiah 13:2), caused their exclusion (like that of a bastard) from the Lord's Congregation for ten generations; whereas Edom, who had not hired him, was only excluded for three
Flesh - 16:22: “O God, the God of the spirits of all flesh, shall one man sin, and wilt thou be wroth with all the Congregation?” In such passages, then, bâśâr emphasizes the “visible and structural part” of man or animal
Angel - The only true interpretation of this phrase is the one which makes the angels the rulers and teachers of the Congregation, so called because they were the ambassadors of God to the churches, and on them devolved the pastoral care and government
Presbytery - the Letters of Ignatius, passim ), corresponding not to the modern presbytery of the Presbyterian Churches, which is a district court composed of ministers and elders drawn from a number of separate Congregations, but to the kirk-session or body of elders by which in those churches a single Congregation is ruled. But early in the post-Apostolic age one of the Congregational presbyter-bishops rose, by what was probably a process of natural evolution (cf. in the Presbyterian and Congregational Churches the precedence of the minister over the elders and deacons respectively, although, properly speaking, a ‘minister’ is simply a diakonos or deacon). Ephesians 4:1-32 ) is a Congregational bishop, the president of a body of Congregational presbyters
Altar - The place of the altar was at the door of the tabernacle of the Congregation
Paulus, Bishop of Emesa - " The test title was received with loud acclamations by the Congregation "This is the true faith"; "This is the gift of God," which were repeated when he proceeded to enunciate the doctrine of "the combination of two perfect natures in the one Christ," with shouts of "Welcome orthodox bishop the worthy to the worthy" (Labbe iii
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - IN the opening chapter of the Acts of the Apostles we are introduced into the first Congregational meeting, so to call it, that ever was held in the Church of Christ. There are a hundred-and-twenty members present in the upper room, and the Presbytery of Jerusalem are met there with the Congregation: moderator, clerk, and all. And thus it is that Peter is now sitting in that seat of honour and influence and authority, and is conducting the election of a successor to Judas, with all that holy fear and with all that firm faith which makes that upper room, under Peter's presidency, such a pattern to all vacant Congregations to all time. And then one of the eleven led the Congregation in prayer in these well-remembered words-"Lord, Thou knowest the hearts of all men: show whether of these two Thou hast chosen. And more than that, Peter certified to the whole Congregation that, when many who had been baptized, apostatised and went back and walked no more with John and Jesus, Matthias, said Peter, has this to his praise, that he has endured and has persevered up to this very present. How well it is, both for Congregations and candidates, that He knows all men's hearts, and that all men's hearts are in His hands. If Matthias had been a modern probationer you would not have found him going about complaining against this committee and that Congregation
Litany of the Sacred Heart - It is derived from a litany compiled at Marseilles in 1718 by Venerable Anne Madeleine Remuzat and consisting of 27 invocations, to which the Sacred Congregation of Rites added six, taken from the 1691 litany of Father Croiset, which had already furnished 17 of the invocations in the Marseilles litany
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - It is derived from a litany compiled at Marseilles in 1718 by Venerable Anne Madeleine Remuzat and consisting of 27 invocations, to which the Sacred Congregation of Rites added six, taken from the 1691 litany of Father Croiset, which had already furnished 17 of the invocations in the Marseilles litany
Uncleanness - All these kinds of uncleanness disqualified for holy functions: as the layman so affected might not approach the Congregation and the sanctuary, so any priest who incurred defilement must abstain from holy things
Verily - ]'>[2] The Congregation responded Amen to the prayers in the synagogue, a usage which passed into the Christian ecclesia;‡ Elder (2) - Further, there is a distinction between local ‘elders’ (those of a city) and ‘the elders of Israel,’ ‘elders of the Congregation,’ ‘elders of the people,’ as they are variously called
Mennonites - They have a Mennonite college at Amsterdam, and the ministers are chosen in some places by the Congregation, and in others by the elders only
Bless - Thus Moses instructed Aaron, and his descendants, to bless the Congregation, "In this wise shall ye bless the children of Israel, saying unto them, The Lord bless thee, and keep thee; the Lord make his face to shine upon thee; the Lord lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace," Numbers 4:23
Fasting - Beside the solemn fast of expiation instituted by divine authority, the Jews appointed certain days of humiliation, called the fasts of the Congregation
Altar - The place of the altar was at "the door of the tabernacle of the Congregation
Sacred Heart, Litany of the - It is derived from a litany compiled at Marseilles in 1718 by Venerable Anne Madeleine Remuzat and consisting of 27 invocations, to which the Sacred Congregation of Rites added six, taken from the 1691 litany of Father Croiset, which had already furnished 17 of the invocations in the Marseilles litany
Severianus, Bishop of Gabala - Chrysostom consented, and exhorted his Congregation to submit, as loyal subjects and good Christians, to the wishes of those in authority (Homil
Excommunication (2) - It is true, no doubt, that excommunication properly denotes a formal sentence passed by the officials of the Congregation (Schürer, HJP Synagogue (2) - The chief seats (Matthew 23:6, Mark 12:39, Luke 11:43; Luke 20:46) were in front of the platform and ark, or in larger synagogues at the further end of the building, opposite the doors, and in either case faced the Congregation, who generally sat on chairs or mats arranged across the building, sometimes lengthways, with an open space between the first ranks on either side. In small Congregations he had to read the lesson himself (Bab. Other officials, where the synagogue was large enough to need them, comprised the administrators and collectors of alms, and the translators of the Scripture lessons from Hebrew into the vernacular of the Congregation. The sections of the Law were apportioned among several members of the Congregation, any male who was acquainted with Hebrew being eligible. Gradually, as Hebrew ceased to be a spoken language, it was found necessary to translate the lessons into Aramaic or Greek or whatever might be the vernacular of the Congregation. —Most of the officials of the synagogue were honorary; but the schoolmaster and the attendant would require at least partial support, whilst the cost of erection, with that of repairs and maintenance, must have been considerable, to say nothing of the fees paid at a later period to ‘ten unemployed men’ as the minimum of a Congregation
Moravians - By degrees, they established Congregations in various places, and spread themselves into Moravia and other neighbouring states. ...
After the establishment of a regular Congregation of the United Brethren at Herrnhut multitudes of pious persons from various parts flocked to it, many of whom had private opinions in religious matters, to which they were strongly attached. The Moravian church, from its first establishment, has been governed by synods, consisting of deputies from all the Congregations, and by other subordinate bodies, which they call conferences. According to their regulations, episcopal ordination, of itself, does not confer any power to preside over one or more Congregations; and a bishop can discharge no office except by the appointment of a synod, or of its delegate, the elders' conference of the unity. The synods are generally held once in seven years; and beside all the bishops, and the deputies sent by each Congregation, those women who have appointments as above described, if on the spot, are also admitted as hearers, and may be called upon to give their advice in what relates to the ministerial labour among their own sex; but they have no decisive vote in the synod
Joshua, Book of - An altar was built unto Jehovah, and the law was written upon stones, the whole of it being read before all the Congregation: cf. The tabernacle was set up at Shiloh, which was fairly central, 32 3' N, and the allotment of the possessions of the tribes was made in Shiloh before the Lord, at the door of the tabernacle of the Congregation
Order of Saint Benedict - Cluny's centralized method of government was followed by a number of monasteries which united themselves in groups, the groups later forming Congregations. The French Congregation of Saint Maur, dating from 1621, attained fame by reason of its extensive activity in the field of literature and the devout lives of its members. At present the Benedictines number 15 Congregations, viz: the Cassinese, English, Hungarian, Swiss, Bavarian, Brazilian, French, American-Cassinese, Swiss-American, Beuronese, Cassinese of Primitive Observance, Austrian (of the Immaculate Conception), Austrian (of Saint Joseph), Saint Ottilien, and Belgian. The convents are not united in the Congregational system, but are either under the direction of a particular abbey or else subject to the episcopal jurisdiction of the diocese in which they are located
Catholic Indian Missions of the United States - In 1699 the Paris Congregation of Foreign Missions made settlements in Mississippi and Arkansas, and in 1700 the Jesuits undertook missions in Alabama and Louisiana, and later took over the control of the Louisiana colony, the Ursuline convent established at New Orleans in 1727 being due to their efforts
Meat - Therefore, the meat offerings did not denote merely the sanctification of earthly food, but symbolized the spiritual food enjoyed by the Congregation of the Lord
Tabernacle - Two compound phrases (ohel moed and ohel haeduth are used in the Bible to designate this tent: “the tabernacle of the Congregation” ( Exodus 29:42 ,Exodus 29:42,29:44 ), literally the “tent of meeting” (NRSV, NIV, NAS, REB) and “the tabernacle of witness” (Numbers 17:7 ) or “tent of witness
Benedictine Order - Cluny's centralized method of government was followed by a number of monasteries which united themselves in groups, the groups later forming Congregations. The French Congregation of Saint Maur, dating from 1621, attained fame by reason of its extensive activity in the field of literature and the devout lives of its members. At present the Benedictines number 15 Congregations, viz: the Cassinese, English, Hungarian, Swiss, Bavarian, Brazilian, French, American-Cassinese, Swiss-American, Beuronese, Cassinese of Primitive Observance, Austrian (of the Immaculate Conception), Austrian (of Saint Joseph), Saint Ottilien, and Belgian. The convents are not united in the Congregational system, but are either under the direction of a particular abbey or else subject to the episcopal jurisdiction of the diocese in which they are located
Benedictines - Cluny's centralized method of government was followed by a number of monasteries which united themselves in groups, the groups later forming Congregations. The French Congregation of Saint Maur, dating from 1621, attained fame by reason of its extensive activity in the field of literature and the devout lives of its members. At present the Benedictines number 15 Congregations, viz: the Cassinese, English, Hungarian, Swiss, Bavarian, Brazilian, French, American-Cassinese, Swiss-American, Beuronese, Cassinese of Primitive Observance, Austrian (of the Immaculate Conception), Austrian (of Saint Joseph), Saint Ottilien, and Belgian. The convents are not united in the Congregational system, but are either under the direction of a particular abbey or else subject to the episcopal jurisdiction of the diocese in which they are located
Nestorians - About the middle of the seventeenth century, the Romish missionaries gained over to their communion a small number of Nestorians, whom they formed into a Congregation or church; the patriarchs or bishops of which reside in the city of Amida, or Diarbeker, and all assume the denomination of Joseph
Edification - -In its specialized use, οἰκοδομή is a technical term for the exercise of ‘spiritual gifts’ (χαρίσματα) within the Christian Congregation by its members, for the mutual ‘edification’ of individuals
Atonement, Day of - For the Congregation two goats were taken for a sin offering, and a ram for a burnt offering
Curse - ]'>[2] (c) The ban of extermination gave place, under certain conditions, to the remedial discipline of excommunication; that is to say, a temporary ‘cutting off from the Congregation’; referred to, as a Jewish institution, in John 9:22; John 12:42; John 16:2, and, as a Christian (apparently), in Matthew 18:17
Blood - In other places, the phrase “to shed blood” refers to a non-ritualistic slaughter of an animal: “What man soever there be of the house of Israel, that killeth an ox, or lamb … in the camp, or that killeth it out of the camp, and bringeth it not unto the door of the tabernacle of the Congregation, to offer an offering unto the Lord before the tabernacle of the Lord; blood [2] shall be imputed unto that man” ( Baptists - 1606,when a Congregation of separatists established themselves in Holland under the leadership of John Smyth. The polity of the Baptist Church is Congregational, each church being independent of control regarding discipline and worship, appointment of pastor, and election of deacons and other officers
Watch - Mishmereth refers to the priestly or Levitical service itself: “Therefore shall ye abide at the door of the tabernacle of the Congregation day and night seven days, and keep the charge of the Lord …” ( Proselyte - Tomline, "proselytes were those, and those only, who took upon themselves the obligation of the whole Mosaic law, but retained that name till they were admitted into the Congregation of the Lord as adopted children
Church - The church had in New Testament times, elders, overseers or bishops, in each Congregation
Elder - In every Congregation of believers, as gathered by the apostles, a number of elders were ordained. They were local officers of Congregations, sometimes called bishops or overseers
Justice - These judges were perhaps the "princes of the Congregation," and the chiefs of the families and tribes of whom we afterwards read, Numbers 27:3
Moses - At Meribah Kadesh the Congregation murmured against Moses, for bringing them into a barren wilderness without water; when the Lord commanded Moses to take his rod, which had been laid up before the Lord, and with Aaron to assemble the Congregation together, and to speak to the rock before their eyes; which should supply water for the Congregation and their cattle. "But Moses said unto the Congregation, when they were assembled, Hear now, ye rebels, must we fetch you water out of this rock? And he smote the rock twice with his rod, and the water came out abundantly; and the Congregation drank, and their cattle also. And the Lord spake unto Moses and Aaron, Because ye believed me not, to sanctify me in the eyes of the children of Israel; therefore ye shall not bring this Congregation into the land which I have given them," Numbers 20:1-13 ; and afterward in stronger terms: "Because ye rebelled against my commandment," &c
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - A city Congregation was looking out for a colleague and successor to their old minister. The ambitious and not unfaithful young minister had his sermon all ready, but as there would be a small Congregation that snowy morning he would not throw away his whole week's work on such a handful, and so he left his sermon at home. He had for long been ambitious of the city, and he had a sharp punishment that day for despising his small Congregation; for hiding his talent at home because there would not be enough people to appreciate it
Independents - A sect of Protestants, so called from their maintaining that each Congregation of Christians which meet in one house for public worship is a complete church; has sufficient power to act and perform every thing relating to religious government within itself; and is in no respect subject or accountable to other churches. ...
See CHURCH CongregationAL, and EPISCOPACY. Brown was for dividing the whole body of the faithful into separate societies or Congregations; and maintained that such a number of persons as could be contained in an ordinary place of worship ought to be considered as a church, and enjoy all the rights and privileges that are competent to an ecclesiastical community. Hitherto the sect had been called Brownists; but Robinson having in his apology affirmed that all Christian Congregations were so many independent religious societies, that had a right to be governed by their own laws, independent of any farther or foreign jurisdiction, the sect was henceforth called Independents, of which the apologist was considered as the founder. ...
The first Independent or Congregational church in England was established by a Mr. Jacob, who had fled from the persecution of bishop Bancroft, going to Holland, and having imparted his design of getting up a separate Congregation, like those in Holland, to the most learned Puritans of those times, it was not condemned as unlawful, considering there was no prospect of a national reformation. They were also much more attentive than the Brownists in keeping on foot a regular ministry in their communities; for, while the latter allowed promisquously all ranks and orders of men to teach in public, the Independents had, and still have, a certain number of ministers, chosen respectively by the Congregations where they are fixed; nor is it common for any person among them to speak in public before he has submitted to a proper examination of his capacity and talents, and been approved of by the heads of the Congregation. ...
It appears from two confessions of faith, one composed by Robinson in behalf of the English Independents in Holland, and published at Leyden in 1619, entitled, Apologia pro Exulibus Anglis, qui Brownistae vulgo appellantur; and another drawn up in London in 1658, by the principal members of this community in England, entitled, "A Declaration of the Faith and Order owned and practised by the Congregational Churches in England, agreed upon and consented unto by their Elders and Messengers, in their meeting at the Savoy, Oct. The Congregations of the Independents are very numerous, both in England and America, and some of them very respectable. ...
See CHURCH CongregationAL; NONCONFORMISTS, and books under those articles
Theophilanthropists - This religious breviary found favour; the Congregation became numerous; and in the second edition of their Manual they assumed the less harsh denomination of Theophilanthropists, 1: e
Micaiah - " Instead of Moses' blessing on Ephraim awaiting Ahab, as Zedekiah had said, Moses' picture of what Israel would be at his death, "Jehovah's Congregation as sheep having no shepherd," if no successor were appointed, would be realized (Numbers 27:17)
Trespass - Joshua challenged Israel not to follow the example of Achan: “Did not Achan the son of Zerah commit [3] a trespass [3] in the accursed thing, and wrath fell on all the Congregation of Israel?” ( Baltimore, Maryland, City of - The first German Catholic Congregation was established in 1702, and in 1755 nine hundred Catholic Acadians went to Maryland, and though Catholics were forbidden to harbor them they obtained an unfinished house in Baltimore to serve as a chapel
Part - A portion of number, separated or considered by itself as a part of the nation or Congregation
Offerings And Sacrifices - In the scapegoat ritual the high priest was to lay both hands on the animal and confess the sins of the whole Congregation in order to expressly transfer the sins to the goat. Leviticus 4:2 states: "Say to the Israelites: When anyone sins unintentionally and does what is forbidden in any of the Lord's commands'" Leviticus 4:3 then begins the first of the four major divisions: the sin offering of the priest (4:3-12), the whole Congregation (4:13-21), the leader (4:22-26), and the common person (4:27-5:13). ...
The focal point of the sin offering ritual was blood manipulation and the way it was done was different when it was brought for the priest and whole Congregation as opposed to the leader and the common people. For the priests and the whole Congregation the priest sprinkled the blood with his finger seven times in front of the veil of the sanctuary (i. , the "priest" could enter the Holy Place, and the "congregation" included the priests)
Dead Sea Scrolls - In addition, it anticipates the coming of the Interpreter of the Law and the Prince of the whole Congregation. ...
The Rule of the Congregation (1QSa) is a short document setting forth regulations for ordering the Qumran community in the last days. The Rule of the Congregation provides some noteworthy parallels to the New Testament. ...
The Blessings (1QSb) is a series of blessings pronounced by the Master over the members of the community, the high priest, the priests, the Sons of Zadok, and the Prince of the Congregation, an eschatological figure who will establish, and rule, God's eternal kingdom
Elder - All elders have the task of oversight and discipline of the Congregation (Acts 20:28 ) and all have the responsibility to rule and guide the people of God with the Word in a manner that is pleasing to God (Acts 20:29-31 ). ...
With respect to the elder's task of ruling and guiding, he has been set over the Congregation (1 Thessalonians 5:12 ; 1 Timothy 5:17 ). Elders could be simply appointed (Titus 1:5 ) although Congregational participation may very well have been involved in at least some instances
Church - To this agree the definition given by the compilers of the thirty-nine articles:...
"A Congregation of faithful men, in which the true word of God is preached, and the sacraments duly administered according to Christ's ordinances, in all those things that of necessity are requisite to the same. Congregational church is so called from their maintaining that each Congregation of Christians which meet in one place for religious worship is a complete church, and has sufficient power to act and perform every thing relative to religious government within itself, and is in no respect subject or accountable to any other church. It seems plain, then, that the primitive churches of Christ were properly Congregational. As to church order and discipline, it may be observed, that every Christian society formed on the Congregational plan is strictly independent of all other religious societies
Serve - The priests were chosen for the “service” of the Lord: “And they shall keep his charge, and the charge of the whole Congregation before the tabernacle of the Congregation, to do the service of the tabernacle” ( Diodorus, Presbyter of Antioch - Valens having forbidden the Catholics to meet within the walls of cities, Diodorus gathered his Congregation in the church in the old town S. When forcibly driven out of this church, he gathered his Congregation in the soldiers' exercising ground, or "gymnasium," and exhorted them from house to house
Interpretation - The speaker himself might possess the gift of interpretation and use it for the benefit of the Congregation (see 1 Corinthians 14:5 ; 1 Corinthians 14:13 ), or, on the other hand, he might not
Stranger - But the gçr is not even yet the full equal of the Israelite, for he is not compelled to be circumcised, and no one can belong to the Congregation who has not submitted to that rite ( Exodus 12:47 ff
Council - In this council the doctrine of the Trinity was decided: but upon separation the pope called a Congregation, in which the cardinals pretended they had no right to judge of doctrinal points; that this was the privilege peculiar to the pope
Puritans - ' Some secret attempts that had been made by them to establish a separate Congregation and discipline had been carefully repressed by the strict hand which Elizabeth held over all her subjects
Aaron - In function Aaron stood between God and the Congregation, representing each to the other
Moab, Moabites - The Moabites were not allowed to be received into the Congregation of the Lord for ever
Perish - The leaders of the rebellion against the Aaronic priesthood (Korah, Dathan, and Abiram) and their families were swallowed up by the ground: “… and the earth closed upon them: and they perished from among the Congregation” ( Mourning (2) - A mourner being ‘free’ must attend the synagogue; when he appeared, the Congregation faced him as he entered, and said: ברוד מינחם אבל ‘Blessed is He that comforteth the mourner
Presbyterians - and 1 Thessalonians 5:12 ; for the bishops are there represented as governing the flock, speaking to them the word of God, watching for their souls, and discharging various offices, which it is impossible for any man to perform to more than one Congregation. They must therefore have been either the joint pastors of one Congregation, or the pastors of different Congregations in one city; and as it was thus in Ephesus, so it was in Philippi; for we find the apostle addressing his epistle 'to all the saints in Jesus Christ which are at Philippi, with the bishops and deacons. Being solemnly engaged to use their utmost endeavours for the suppression of vice and the cherishing of piety and virtue, and to exercise discipline faithfully and diligently, the minister, in the presence of the Congregation, sets them apart to their office by solemn prayer; and concludes the ceremony, which is sometimes called ordination, with exhorting both elders and people to their respective duties. The kirk session, which is the lowest ecclesiastical judicatory, consists of the minister and those elders of the Congregation. For the other side of the question, and against Presbyterian church government, see articles BROWNISTS, CHURCH CongregationAL, EPISCOPACY, and INDEPENDENTS
Presbyterians - and 1 Thessalonians 5:12 ; for the bishops are there represented as governing the flock, speaking to them the word of God, watching for their souls, and discharging various offices, which it is impossible for any man to perform to more than one Congregation. They must therefore have been either the joint pastors of one Congregation, or the pastors of different Congregations in one city; and as it was thus in Ephesus, so it was in Philippi; for we find the apostle addressing his epistle 'to all the saints in Jesus Christ which are at Philippi, with the bishops and deacons. Being solemnly engaged to use their utmost endeavours for the suppression of vice and the cherishing of piety and virtue, and to exercise discipline faithfully and diligently, the minister, in the presence of the Congregation, sets them apart to their office by solemn prayer; and concludes the ceremony, which is sometimes called ordination, with exhorting both elders and people to their respective duties. The kirk session, which is the lowest ecclesiastical judicatory, consists of the minister and those elders of the Congregation. For the other side of the question, and against Presbyterian church government, see articles BROWNISTS, CHURCH CongregationAL, EPISCOPACY, and INDEPENDENTS
Episcopacy - As to the angels of the seven churches in Asia, it is certain that, for any thing which appears in our Lord's epistles to them (Revelation 2:3 :) they might be no more than the pastors of single Congregations with their proper assistants. Justin Martyr speaks of the president, but then he represents him as being present at every administration of the eucharist, which he also mentions as always making a part of their public worship; so that the bishop here must have only been the pastor of one Congregation. Origen speaks distinctly of bishops and presbyters, but unites them both, as it seems, under the common name of priests, saying nothing of the power of bishops as extending beyond one Congregation, and rather insinuates the contrary, when he speaks of offenders as brought before the whole church to be judged by it
Intercession - The farewell prayers with the elders of Ephesus (Acts 20:36), and the whole Congregation of Tyre (Acts 21:5-6), are typical in all probability of many similar services. ) translates ‘from many faces,’ a graphic word-picture of the upturned faces of the whole Congregation
Intercession - The farewell prayers with the elders of Ephesus (Acts 20:36), and the whole Congregation of Tyre (Acts 21:5-6), are typical in all probability of many similar services. ) translates ‘from many faces,’ a graphic word-picture of the upturned faces of the whole Congregation
Age, Old (the Aged) - As the fledgling church began to grow, elders were appointed or ordained as overseers for each local Congregation (Acts 14:23 )
Carpenter - … They shall not sit high in the Congregation … and they shall not be found where parables are spoken
Judges - We read also of the princes of the Congregation, who presided in judiciary matters
Zechari'ah - ...
Son of Meshelemiah or Shelemiah a Korhite, and keeper of the north gate of the tabernacle of the Congregation, (1 Chronicles 9:21 ) (B
Joshua - You will sometimes see stranger young men crowding around a minister in his classes and in his Congregational work, and saving their own souls by so doing, while those young men that have been born in the family are never so much as seen or heard of. 'Let the Lord, the God of the spirits of all flesh, set a man over the Congregation, which may go out before them, and which may lead them out, and which may bring them in; that the Congregation of the Lord be not as sheep which have no shepherd. And thou shalt put some of thine honour upon him, that all the Congregation of Israel may be obedient. ' And the children of the Gibeonites, while thorns in their eyes and scourges in their sides, and snares and traps to them, were at the same time hewers of wood and drawers of water for the Congregation, and for the altar of the Lord to this day, in the place which the Lord shall choose
Moab - It was only when Moab seduced Israel to idolatry and impurity (Numbers 25), and hired Balaam to curse them, that they were excluded from Jehovah's Congregation to the tenth generation (Deuteronomy 23:3-4). The exclusion of a Moabite from the Congregation only forbade his naturalization, not his dwelling in Israel nor an Israelite marrying a Moabitess
Tabernacle - It is called "the tabernacle of the Congregation," rather "of meeting", i
Epistle - These for the most part differ in no essential point from hortative addresses to a Congregation, and the epistolary form, where it is present at all, or where, as in Hebrews, it is no more than suggested, is merely a form, which, in fact, is completely shattered by the contents
Evangelist - Paul, in his list of five kinds of ministers which have been given by Christ to His Church (Ephesians 4:11), places ‘evangelists’ after ‘apostles’ and ‘prophets’ and before ‘pastors’ and ‘teachers’; and ‘evangelists’ may be classed with the two groups which precede, ‘Apostles, prophets, and evangelists’ were itinerant ministers, preaching wherever they found a door opened to them, while ‘pastors and teachers’ were attached to some Congregation or locality
Gad (1) - of Jordan for their possession (Numbers 32), as suited for their "multitude of cattle," but accompanied the nine tribes and a half across Jordan to war with the Canaanites; and only after their conquest and the apportionment of the whole land to their brethren "at the doorway of the tabernacle of the Congregation in Shiloh, before Jehovah" (Joshua 19:51; Joshua 22:1-8), were they dismissed "to their tents (for still they led a half nomadic life) and the land of their possession
Evangelist - Paul, in his list of five kinds of ministers which have been given by Christ to His Church (Ephesians 4:11), places ‘evangelists’ after ‘apostles’ and ‘prophets’ and before ‘pastors’ and ‘teachers’; and ‘evangelists’ may be classed with the two groups which precede, ‘Apostles, prophets, and evangelists’ were itinerant ministers, preaching wherever they found a door opened to them, while ‘pastors and teachers’ were attached to some Congregation or locality
Minister - A name applied to those who are pastors of a Congregation, or preachers of God's word
Synagogue - The other, in which the Congregation assembled, was termed the body of the synagogue
Pillar - Here it stands for the Congregation of believers among whom God dwells
Paul as a Pastor - In that also there is a glass held up for all ministers and all Congregations in which to see and to examine both themselves, and all their past and fast-passing relations to one another, both in the pulpit and in the pew. " There are few things in ministerial history that makes my heart bleed like the tragedy of Jonathan Edwards' breach with his Congregation, and then his banishment from his Congregation. If you are a pastor, and if your visits up and down among your people help to keep your and their friendships in repair; to re-kindle and to fan the smoking flax of brotherly love; if your visits operate to the cementing and the stability of the Congregation; then, that is already more than one-half of the whole end of your ministry, both pulpit and pastoral, accomplished
the Angel of the Church in Pergamos - For let a minister but succeed in his own battle against Satan, let a minister but "overcome," as our Lord's word is in every one of these ministerial Epistles, and his whole Congregation will soon begin to share in the spoils of their minister's victory. At the same time, let all intending ministers count well the cost lest, haply, after they have laid the foundation and are not able to finish, both men and devils shall point at them and say, this minister began to build for himself and for his Congregation, for eternity, but come and see the ruin he has left! Count well, I say again, whether or no you are able to finish
the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses - ...
This very same message and invitation was once sent to a Congregation of people just like yourselves; and they all, with one consent, began to make excuse. And from tonight onward this call will go forth to all this Congregation,-The Lord's Supper is again made ready
Elder - Although “bishop” usually occurs in the singular form, none of these passages indicate that there was only one elder in each Congregation
Look - , as ἀτενίζω, ‘to gaze fixedly’ (employed to describe a Congregation gazing at Jesus, Luke 4:20; the maid staring at St
Ezra - A general Congregation of the community authorizes the establishment of a divorce court, presided over by Ezra, which finishes its labours after three months’ work:’ and they made an end with the whole business’ (10:17 [2]), many innocent women and children being made to suffer in the process
Isaacus, Egyptian Solitary - ) had banished an offending brother from the Congregation
Fellowship - John, strive hard to maintain this exclusiveness in their churches-not for reasons of utility, as in the case of the Greek clubs; not from national prejudice, as in the case of the Jewish synagogues; but from the standpoint of Christian morals: the fulfilment of the high ordinances of the gospel is only possible in the midst of a Christian Congregation (1 Corinthians 6:1-11)
Separate - ...
Most frequently in Old Testament usage, nâzı̂yr is an appellation for one who vowed to refrain from certain things for a period of time: “And this is the law of the Nazarite, when the days of his separation are fulfilled: he shall be brought unto the door of the tabernacle of the Congregation” ( Mouth - 7:5: “Take it of them, that they may be to do the service of the tabernacle of the Congregation; and thou shalt give them unto the Levites, to every man according to his service
Hebrew Language - On this account it was, that, when the Scriptures were read, it was found necessary to interpret them to the people in the Chaldean language; as, when Ezra the scribe brought the book of the law of Moses before the Congregation, the Levites are said to have caused the people to understand the law, because "they read in the book, in the law of God, distinctly, and gave the sense, and caused them to understand the reading," Nehem
Tabernacle - By ‘the tabernacle’ without further qualification, as by the more expressive designation ‘ tabernacle of the Congregation ’ (RV [3] ’s ‘ tabernacle of the Congregation ,’ is now universally acknowledged. ]'>[3] ‘congregation’), the mô‘çd or assembly of the gods
Versions - " The merit of his translation is its noble simplicity and truthfulness: thus "favour" for "grace," "love" for "charity," "acknowledge" for "confess," "repentance" for "penance," "elders" for "priests," "congregation" for "church. "Love" for "charity" appears in 1 Corinthians 13 and "congregation" for "church"; yet, with characteristic vacillation between Tyndale and the sacerdotalists, he has in 1 Timothy 4:14 "with authority of priesthood. "Church" was to be translated for" Congregation," and "charity" for "love
Scripture - "One circumstance, " as a writer observes, "why this should be attended to in Congregations is, that numbers of the hearers, in many places, cannot read them themselves, and not a few of them never hear them read in the families where they reside. "Remember that God no sooner caused any part of his will, or word, to be written, than he also commanded the same to be read, not only in the family, but also in the Congregation, and that even when all Israel were assembled together (the men, women, and children, and even the strangers that were within their gates;) and the end was, that they might hear, and that they might learn, and fear the Lord their God, and observe to do all the words of his law, Deuteronomy 31:12 . "This work, or practice, of reading the Scripture in the Congregation, is warranted, and recommended in the New Testament, as well as in the Old
Tabernacle - "The tabernacle (tent) of the Congregation" (rather "of meeting" without the article) is in the full designation "the tabernacle of the tent of meeting" (Exodus 40:2; Exodus 40:29), i. The separation of the church from the world is marked by the exclusion of any but priests from the holy place, and of the people from the Congregation while unclean; the need of holiness by the various purifications (compare Psalm 24)
Sacrifice And Offering - If the priest or the Congregation of Israel sinned, then a bull was required. When the priest or the Congregation sinned, the blood was sprinkled seven times before the veil in the sanctuary, and some of it was placed on the horns of the incense altar
Priest, Priesthood - They also blew the trumpets in Israel for summoning and directing the Congregation and its leaders in their travels (Numbers 10:2-6 ), convening the Congregation (Numbers 10:7-8 ), blowing the alarm in battle (10:9), or on worship and festival occasions (10:10)
Church Government - He leaves it to the Congregation to punish and pardon offenders, to manage the collection of money, and to decide who shall take charge of the fund. They are not classes of officials each with special duties; they are individual believers with special gifts, with which they edify Congregations. They are ‘spiritual’ men (πνευματικοί), endowed by the Spirit (πνεῦμα) with powers (χαρίσματα) which are not common to all Christians; and their authority depends not upon election or appointment by others, but upon these personal endowments, exercised with the consent of the Congregation. Congregations which consisted chiefly of Jewish Christians had ‘elders’ analogous to ‘elders’ among the Jews; and in the Gentile communities something similar would grow up, with or without the suggestion of the Apostle who founded the church. This ordination was for mission work, but ordination for the work of ruling Congregations was probably similar
Sanhedrin - 6); when a vacancy occurred the members co-opted some one ‘from the Congregation’ to fill the place ( Sanhed
le'Vites - The conquered Hivites became "hewers of wood and drawers of water" for the house of Jehovah and for the Congregation
Theophilus - Similarly in Matthew, though there is a great development beyond the position of Mark, the question is that of the Law, not of the Church, or Congregation of God
Fruit of the Spirit - In 1 Corinthians 1:4-7 Paul thanks God, among other things, for the fact that the Corinthian Congregation was not lacking any spiritual gift; yet at the same time he rebukes them for their being carnal and obviously lacking the fruit of the Spirit in their lives ( 1 Corinthians 3:1-3 )
Refuge - And so exact was the law to be regarded, that on the poor fugitive's arrival at the suburbs of either of those cities, the Congregation was to proceed on the subject of enquiry; and if any malice pretense was found in the mind towards the person he had murdered, the law enjoined that he should be taken even from the altar, and put to death
Water - So Aaron and his sons were to be washed with “water” as a part of the rite consecrating them to the priesthood: “And Aaron and his sons thou shalt bring unto the door of the tabernacle of the Congregation, and shalt wash them with water” ( Nazareth - Connor reports the Greeks to be the most numerous: there is, besides, a Congregation of Greek Catholics, and another of Maronites
Heaven - Instead of the land of Canaan, we have heaven; for the earthly Jerusalem, we have the heavenly, the city of the living God; in place of the Congregation of Israel after the flesh, we have the general assembly and church of the first-born, that is, all true believers "made perfect;" for just men in the imperfect state of the old dispensation, we have just men made perfect in evangelical knowledge and holiness; instead of Moses, the mediator of the old covenant, we have Jesus the Mediator of the new and everlasting covenant; and instead of the blood of slaughtered animals, which was sprinkled upon the Israelites, the tabernacle, and all the vessels of the sanctuary, to make a typical atonement, we have the blood of the Son of God, which was shed for the remission of the sins of the whole world; that blood which doth not, like the blood of Abel, call for vengeance but for mercy, which hath made peace between heaven and earth, effected the true and complete atonement for sin, and which therefore communicates peace to the conscience of every sinner that believes the Gospel
Rabbulas, Bishop of Edessa - 565) we learn that Rabbûlas's fiery zeal for orthodoxy had led him to anathematize Andrew before his Congregation at Edessa; and according to the panegyrist, Rabbûlas, when visiting Constantinople, preached in the presence of Nestorius and denounced his doctrine
Wilderness of the Wanderings - In Numbers 20:1 the words "Israel even the whole Congregation" mark the reassembling of the people at the close of the 40 years, as the same words in Numbers 13:26; Numbers 14:1, mark the commencement of the penal wandering. ...
The 38 intervening years are a blank, during which the covenant was in abeyance and the "congregation" broken up
the Man Who Found Treasure Hid in a Field - The multitude in every Congregation stumble about lucklessly and unprofitably even among the richest of fields. An old office-bearer of this very Congregation told me long ago, how he had lately summoned a conference of his whole household in order to make a great family choice and decision
Joshua - Moses gave Joshua a charge before the high priest and Congregation. The Congregation set up the tabernacle at Shiloh (Joshua 18)
New York, City of - , was its pastor the Congregation numbered 14,000, of which the majority were Irish and the remainder French, German, and Italian
Bishop - The absence of literal, positive directions as to church government, and the statement of the broad principle, "Let all things be done unto edifying" 1 Corinthians 14:26), and the continual presence of the Holy Spirit in the church to raise up fresh agencies for fresh needs of the church, while justifying episcopacy in its general following of the apostolic order, show us that it is not exclusively the divine platform, but that in all churches holding the essential truths of Scripture "we ought to judge those ministers lawfully called and sent, who be chosen and called to this work by men who have public authority given unto them in the Congregation, to call and send ministers into the Lord's vineyard
Prayer - Jesus did not reject group prayer, but his warning might apply to a believer who prays to impress a Congregation (Matthew 6:5-6 )
Body of Christ - That body of Christ language could apply both to the local Congregation (1 Corinthians 12:27 ) and to something more universal (1 Corinthians 12:13 ) not only attests to the flexibility of the metaphor but also reflects an important element in Paul's ecclesiology: the local church is a localized manifestation of the church universal (1 Corinthians 1:2 ; 2 Corinthians 1:1 )
Lord's Day, the - Next, the Congregation rises for prayer, following which the bread and wine are brought in for the Lord's Supper. After prayers and thanksgivings by the president and a Congregational "Amen, " the deacons distribute the bread and wine to those who are present (and then carry some to those who are absent)
Hallel - ’ (b) The last nine verses of the same Psalm are also repeated, in part alternately, in part together, by Reader and Congregation
Tabernacle, the - This is variously styled the 'tabernacle of testimony, or of witness,' the 'tabernacle of the Congregation,' or 'tent of meeting
Poor (Person), Weak (Person) - Even apart from outward affliction, the pious are frequently described as the “afflicted” or “poor” for whom God provides: “Thy Congregation hath dwelt therein: thou, O God, hast prepared of thy goodness for the poor” ( Praise - ...
Praise was certainly a part of the varied service rendered by the Levites in the Temple ritual of later Judaism, and an examination of that ritual will show how far praise was given over to them, and how much was retained by the Congregation
Joannes Cappadox, Bishop of Constantinople - The procession passed into the inclosure, but the excited Congregation went on shouting outside the gates of the choir in similar strains: "You shall not come out unless you anathematize Severus," referring to the heretical patriarch of Antioch
Seceders - The assembly which met next year, deposed them from the office of the ministry; which, however, they continued to exercise in their respective Congregations, who still adhered to them, and erected meeting-houses, where they preached till their death. James Fisher, the last survivor of them, was by a unanimous call in 1741, translated from Kinclaven to Glasgow, where he continued in the exercise of his ministry among a numerous Congregation, respected by al ranks in that large city, and died in 1775, much regretted by his people and friends. Where a Congregation is very numerous, as in Stirling, Dunfermline, and Perth, it is formed into a collegiate charge, and provided with two ministers. In most of their Congregations, they celebrate the Lord's supper twice in the year; and they catechise their young people concerning their knowledge of the principles of religion previously to their admission to that sacrament
Leviticus, Theology of - 11-19), the single scapegoat sin offering for the whole Congregation (including the priests and the people, vv. 1-2) as the basis for the annual Day of Atonement, the purpose of which was to purify, consecrate, and inaugurate the tabernacle, priesthood, and Congregation for the next year
Joel - Assemble the Congregation for mourning and repentance (Joel 2:15-17 )
Sermon - That a man may preach, and do good, without knowing much of grammar, is not to be doubted; but certainly it cannot be pleasing to hear a man, who sets himself up as a teacher of others, continually violating all the rules of grammar, and rendering himself a laughing-stock to the more intelligent part of the Congregation; "and yet, " says one, "I have heard persons, who could scarce utter three sentences without a false construction, make grammatical criticisms not only on the English language, but on Latin, Greek, and Hebrew
Leper - ...
First, he was restored to a right footing with the general Congregation
Hutchinsonians - the heavens must declare God's righteousness and truth in the Congregation of the saints, Matthew 22:1-462
Ministry, Minister - ); and ministry to the Congregation (tongues, interpretation of tongues, etc. Apart from the apostles, prophets, and evangelists, we read of elders/presbyters, bishops, and deacons, who were settled in local Congregations
Remember, Remembrance - Remembering the courage and blamelessness of the apostles (Acts 20:31 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:9 ) or the good works within a Congregation (1 Thessalonians 1:3 ) also functions as encouragement in the Christian life
Heathen - Peter in the presence of the Congregation at Antioch (Galatians 2:14) was justly aimed against the moral inconsistency of his first eating with the Gentile converts (σύ … ἐθνικῶς ζῇς; cf
Moses - " Moses then had to hear the voice of God saying "Because ye believed me not, to sanctify me in the eyes of the children of Israel, therefore ye shall not bring this Congregation into the land which I have given them
Proselytes - ...
Under the kings strangers rose to influential positions: Doeg the Edomite (1 Samuel 21:7), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:3), Araunah the Jebusite (2 Samuel 24:23), Zelek the Ammonite (2 Samuel 23:37), Ithmah the Moabite (1 Chronicles 11:46, the law in Deuteronomy 23:3 forbidding an Ammonite or Moabite to enter the Congregation to the tenth generation does not forbid their settlement in Israel, the law must have been written in times long before David whose great grandmother was Ruth the Moabtress), Ittai the Gittite (2 Samuel 15:19), Shebna the secretary of state under Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:37; Isaiah 22:15), Ebedmelech the Ethiopian under Zedekiah (Jeremiah 38:7), the Cherethites and Pelethites
Head - This word may be used numerically, meaning the total number of persons or individuals in a group: “Take ye the sum of all the Congregation of the children of Israel, after their families, by the house of their fathers, with the number of their names, every male by their polls” ( Severus, Aurelius Alexander - A curious anecdote of Lampridius (44) shews the emperor's acquaintance with Christian usages and also the antiquity of the practice of publishing to the Congregation the names of those who sought ordination
Leadership - Their commitment was to the Congregation of believers, not to Peter. Then there must be proof in his own home of his ability to lead the life of the Congregationhigh value was placed on a well-ordered and hospitable home. There the Twelve led the Congregation to select seven men for that Job (though Stephen and Philip at least were also known as preachers and teachers of the Word)
Preaching - When Ezra ascended the pulpit, he produced and opened the book of the law, and the whole Congregation instantly rose up from their seats, and stood. " The wise and benevolent sentiments of these noble souls were imbibed by the whole Congregation, and fifty thousand troubled hearts were calmed in a moment
Lord's Supper - ...
The consecration is not by priestly authority but is the corporate act of the church represented by the minister, "the cup which we (I and you, the whole Congregation) bless
Sinai - Here lay the plain where the whole Congregation might be assembled; here was the mount which might be approached and touched; and here the mountain brow where alone the lightnings and the thick cloud would be visible, and the thunders and the voice of the trump be heard, when the Lord came down in the sight of all the people upon Mount Sinai
Worship - ” Then a hymn was sung; then another and another, for several of the brethren have composed or selected hymns at home which they wish to be sung by the Congregation. ║ Then followed the benediction; “The Grace of the Lord Jesus be with you all”; the “kiss of peace”; and the Congregation dispersed. ’...
The Divine Office of a later age, which traces its roots to the simple Congregational meetings for edification, allied, as we have seen, to the Synagogue services, is based on the thought of the Perpetual Priesthood of Christ
Holy Spirit, Gifts of - Ephesians 2:20 ); teachers then nurture young believers and newly planted Congregations; finally, all of the rest of the gifts can come into play. , the Congregation]'>[2] should weigh carefully what is said" (v. Martin, The Spirit and the Congregation ; W
Offerings, the - Thus the priest or the whole Congregation for a sin offering had to bring a bullock, but a goat or a lamb sufficed for one of the people. ...
In the case of sin on the part of the priest or the whole Congregation, all approach was interrupted: so the blood had to be carried into the holy place, sprinkled there seven times, and placed on the horns of the altar of incense — the place of the priest's approach — for the re-establishment of approach
Ecclesiastes, the Book of - Qoheleth addresses "the great Congregation" (Psalms 22:25; Psalms 49:2-4), giving his testimony for godliness as the only solid good, as the seal of his repentance under chastisement for apostasy (1 Kings 11:14; 1 Kings 11:23; Psalms 89:30; Psalms 89:33). The reference to hopeless oppression (Ecclesiastes 4:1-3) is made the ground for supposing the period was one of the Congregations's suffering, as Israel suffered under Persia after the return from Babylon
Judgment - The last reluctant sinner is finally separated from the Congregation of the righteous, Psalms 1:5 ; and inflexible justice, so often disregarded, derided, and defied, gives forth their eternal doom! But to the saints this shall be a day of glory and honour
Expiation - As a farther proof of the vicarious character of the principal sacrifices of the Mosaic economy, we may instance those statedly offered for the whole Congregation. " The law appoints a certain day in the year for expiating the sins both of the high priest himself and of the whole Congregation, and that for all high priests and all generations of the Congregation
Law of Moses - But uncontrolled power of life and death was apparently refused to the father, and vested only in the Congregation. (1 Kings 13:1-6 ) The princes of the Congregation
High Priest - The sin offering for the high priest (Leviticus 4:3-12 ) was identical to that required “if the whole Congregation of Israel commits a sin” (Leviticus 4:13-21 )
Ezra, Book of - He was a preacher: he used a pulpit (Nehemiah 8:4 ); he publicly read the Scriptures; and he helped to interpret them to his Congregation (Nehemiah 8:8 )
Jehoshaphat - " His prayer in the Congregation in the Lord's house is a model "O Lord God of our fathers (therefore we the children have a covenanted claim on Thee), art not Thou God in heaven (therefore hast rule thence over all)? Rulest not Thou over all the kingdoms of the pagan (therefore the pagan invaders of Thine elect nation cannot escape Thee)? And in Thine hand is there not power and might, so that none is able to withstand Thee (therefore this horde cannot)? Art not Thou our God who didst drive out the inhabitants of this land before Thy people Israel, and gavest it to the seed of Abraham Thy friend for ever? (Thy covenant forever with 'Thy friend,' and Thine honour at stake, require Thy interposition)
Edom - Psalms 83:3-5; Psalms 83:12 probably was written by Jahaziel, of the sons of Asaph, upon whom'" came the Spirit of the Lord in the midst of the Congregation
Amen - It is uncertain how far this formed part of the people’s response in the ritual of the Temple, but it is certain that it acquired a fixed place in the services of the synagogues, where it still forms a common response of the Congregation
Tabernacle - This is usually called the tabernacle of the Congregation, or tent of assembly, and sometimes the tabernacle of the testimony
Pharisees - He points out that the Pharisees were the popular party; that one of their precepts was, ‘Separate not thyself from the Congregation,’ and that they reproached the Sadducees as the separatists
Preaching - When Ezra ascended the pulpit, he produced and opened the book of the law, and the whole Congregation instantly rose up from their seats, and stood. ...
The wise and benevolent sentiments of these noble souls were imbibed by the whole Congregation, and fifty thousand troubled hearts were calmed in a moment
Deuteronomy, the Book of - The style is sermonic, that of a preacher addressing his Congregation with words designed to move them to obedience and commitment
Romans, the Epistle to the - The joint episcopate of Linus and Cletus subsequently may be explained by supposing one ruled over the Jewish, the other over the Gentile Congregation; this gives point to the general argument of Romans 1-3 and Romans 10:12, that there is no respect of nationality with God
House - showing Himself through the lattice," the types and prophecies were lattice glimpses of Him to the Old Testament Congregation (Song of Solomon 2:9; John 8:56)
Leviticus - Remove sin from the Congregation (Leviticus 16:1-10 , Leviticus 16:20-22 )
Altar - The altar was at "the door of the tabernacle of the tent of the Congregation" (Leviticus 16:18-19)
the Angel of the Church in Thyatira - ...
Marriage or celibacy, an helpmeet or an hindrance, children or childlessness, good children or bad, health or sickness, Congregational prosperity or Congregational adversity, and all else; absolutely and without any reserve everything must come under that great law for all men, but a thousand times more for all ministers; that great law which the greatest of ministers has thus enunciated:-"For we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to His purpose. "He that overcometh" is just that minister who meets all the temptations and trials of life, at home and abroad, with more and more charity, and with more and more faith, and with more and more patience, as long as there is a hard heart in his house at home or in his Congregation abroad
Feasts - ...
The "congregations," "calling of assemblies," "solemn meetings" (Isaiah 1:13; Psalms 81:3), both on the convocation days of the three great feasts, passover, Pentecost, and tabernacles, and also on the sabbaths, imply assemblies for worship, the forerunners of the synagogue (compare 2 Kings 4:23). ...
Solomon (appropriately to his name, which means king of peace) also did so, for his reign was preeminently the period of peaceful possession when every man dwelt under his own vine and figtree (1 Kings 4:25); immediately after that the last relic of wilderness life was abolished by the ark being taken from under curtains and deposited in the magnificent temple of stone in the seventh month (2 Chronicles 5:3), the feast of tabernacles was celebrated on the 15th day, and on the 23rd Solomon sent the great Congregation away glad in heart for the goodness that the Lord had showed unto David, Solomon, and Israel His people
Work - ...
Used in association with “Sabbath” or the name of other holy days, this word signifies “keeping” or “celebrating”: “All the Congregation of Israel shall keep it [3]” ( Socinians - In Holland they were more fortunate: and in England they established only one Congregation, which differed in some points from the parent sect, and which soon dwindled away
Angel - Prideaux observes, that the minister of the synagogue, who officiated in offering the public prayers, being the mouth of the Congregation, delegated by them, as their representative, messenger, or angel, to address God in prayer for them, was in Hebrew called sheliack-zibbor, that is, the angel of the church; and that from hence the chief ministers of the seven churches of Asia are in the Revelation, by a name borrowed from the synagogue, called angels of those churches
Propitiation - The mercy seat was so called, because, under the Old Testament, it was the place where the high priest, on the feast of expiation, sprinkled the blood of the sin-offerings, in order to make an atonement for himself and the whole Congregation; and, since God accepted the offering which was then made, it was, for this reason, accounted the medium through which God showed himself propitious to the people
John the Apostle - ...
Returning some time afterward John said to the bishop: "restore the pledge which I and the Saviour entrusted to you before the Congregation
Sanhedrin - ), the final judgment of a rebellious elder (Deuteronomy 17:12), the bringing of a guilt offering in the case of an unintentional sin committed by the whole Congregation of Israel (Leviticus 4:13), the installation of a king or of a high priest (Tôs. 46) refers the name to the democratic government established by the Zealots (Vita, 39), and compares the Talmudic ‛çdâh (‘congregation’) with the Sanhedrin (Sanh
Hebrews - In this case, Hebrews 1-12 would represent the original sermon, and Hebrews 3:1-48 would represent the brief note ( Hebrews 13:22 ) attached for the second Congregation
the Unprofitable Servant - He got a good Congregation committed to his charge when he was ordained
Stranger, Alien, Foreigner - Jerome’s “hedera” for the established “cucurbita,” such a tumult was raised, that if the bishop had persevered he would have been left without a Congregation’ (G
Prophecy, Prophets - ...
New Testament prophecy was limited (2 Peter 1:20-218 ); it was to be evaluated by the Congregation (1 Corinthians 14:29 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:20-21 )
Salutations - Jülicher says: ‘One must presuppose a kind of popular emigration from the Pauline Congregations in the East to Rome, in order to find so many friends of the apostle in Rome. Paul’s journey to Rome was well known in the city, many disciples met him at Forum Appii or Tres Tabernae, and gave him full particulars concerning the Roman Congregation
Leviticus - Thus the sin-offering for the Congregation is a bullock in Leviticus 3:14 instead of the goat of Leviticus 9:15 and Numbers 15:24 ; and the high priest’s sin-offering ( Numbers 15:3-12 ) is more elaborate than that in Numbers 9:8-11 and Numbers 29:10-14 ; Leviticus 5:1-13 (examples of unintentional sins which require a sin-offering, and mitigations for the case of those who cannot afford a lamb or a goat) has suffered change, since Leviticus 5:2-3 evidently break the connexion between Leviticus 5:1 and Leviticus 5:4
James, Theology of - In fact, it is likely that in 1:9-10 James recognizes the presence of rich people among his Congregation
Popery - ) so almost every sick man desires the Congregation to be his mediators, by remembering him in their prayers
Minister Ministry - In the earliest Congregations of Christians it was soon found that some individuals had certain gifts, and they exercised these gifts for the good of the Congregation
Atonement - Sin was, so to speak, consumed in it, and the blood was sprinkled seven times before the tabernacle of the Congregation
Ammonites - However, neither the one nor the other were to be admitted into the Congregation to the tenth generation, because they did not come out to relieve them in the wilderness, and were implicated in hiring Balaam to curse them
Samaria, Samaritans - On the evening of the 14th Nisan the whole Congregation assembles, and the high priest reads the words of institution in Exodus 12:1-12. Each member of the Congregation then marks his forehead with the blood
Church - In the OT, two different words are used to denote gatherings of the chosen people or their representatives-‘çdhâh (Revised Version ‘congregation’) and qâhâl (Revised Version ‘assembly’). At Antioch in Syria the momentous change was made to a mixed Congregation containing both Jews and Christians
Jonah - 1) that the ritual of a public fast in time of drought included reference by the leader of the Congregation to the Book of Jonah, and it has been used from ancient times to the present day in the ceremonial of the Day of Atonement
Targums - When, therefore, the Scriptures were read in synagogues, it became necessary to translate them, in order that they might be understood by the Congregation
Tabernacle - It was also called the sanctuary and the tabernacle of the Congregation
Children (Sons) of God - For if the religion of Israel had really attained to any clear conception of God as Father and of men as His children, it would most naturally find utterance in these compositions, in which we have at once the devoutest expression of the personal religious consciousness and the chosen vehicle of the worship of the Congregation
Numbers, Book of - ]'>[11] ’s challenge they burned incense on censers in front of the Tabernacle; the whole Congregation were present, and the glory of J″ Time, Meaning of - Then we will speak and testify in “the great Congregation” (see Psalm 22:25 NRSV), recreating in our worship the reality of Christ
Ezekiel - That shall be the period of public liturgy, or perfect outward worship of the great Congregation on earth, as the present time is one of gathering out the spiritual worshippers one by one, who shall reign in glorified bodies with Christ over Israel and the nations in the flesh
Exodus, the - The awful and lengthened approach as to some natural sanctuary, the plain not shut in but presenting a long retiring sweep against which the people could remove and stand afar off; the cliff rising suddenly and steeply so that it could easily be marked off by 'bounds' like a huge altar in front of the whole Congregation, and visible against the sky in lonely grandeur from end to end of the whole plain, the very image of the 'mount that might be touched,' and from which the 'voice of God' might be heard far and wide over the stillness of the plain below, widened at that point to the utmost extent by the confluence of all the contiguous valleys; the adytum (shrine) withdrawn as if in the end of the world from all the stir and confusion of earthly things" (Stanley, in Cook's essay, vol
Numbers, the Book of - ...
Children begotten of Egyptians entered the Congregation in the third generation (Deuteronomy 23:7-8)
Thousand Years - Now is the time of preaching; then shall be the time of liturgy of "the great Congregation" (Psalms 22:25; Ezekiel 40 to 48; Zechariah 14:16-21; Isaiah 2:3). The millennial heaven and earth, connected but separate, are but a foretaste of the everlasting state, when the upper and lower Congregations shall be no longer separate and new Jerusalem shall descend from God out of heaven
Day of Atonement - The whole Congregation had morally to take an active part
Numbers, Book of - The whole Congregation exclaimed, "Would God that we had died in this wilderness," and proposed to return into Egypt
the Angel of the Church of Ephesus - I gave thee that Congregation when I might have given it to another
John the Baptist - " The greatest preacher of the past generation when preaching to a Congregation of young preachers said this to them: "He who has before his mental eye the four last things will have the true earnestness
Ananias And Sapphira - It was like those country Congregations where the minister has to do everything himself, till he has neither time nor strength nor spirit left to give himself continually to prayer, and to the ministry of the word. Do you know the premonition, the sensation, the smell, so to say, when Satan approaches you to fill your heart? And what do you say to him? What do you do to him? Do you set a chair for him? Do you lay a cover and set glasses for him? Do you share your pillow with him? "Ah! you are there again, my man!" So an old saint in the Congregation salutes Satan as often as her practised nostrils catch the beginning of his brimstone on her stairhead
Praise - ’...
This level is worthily sustained in Hebrews 2:12 : ‘in the midst of the Congregation will I sing praise unto thee,’ when the writer quotes Psalms 22:22
Hippolytus Romanus - We can only suggest that if there were at the time, as there are grounds for supposing, a Greek Congregation at Rome, the head of it is very likely to have been Hippolytus, and the head of such a Congregation might naturally be entrusted with the episcopal power of admitting or excluding members, since doubtful cases could scarcely be investigated by a Latin-speaking pope
Donatus And Donatism - They allowed returning Donatist clergy to retain their clerical position and functions, if they had not rebaptized, and if they brought their Congregations with them; and decided that children of Donatists, even if they had received Donatist baptism, should not be excluded from the service of the altar. In 418 a council at Carthage passed resolutions regulating the proceedings when Donatist bishops clergy and Congregations came back to the church. The majority of Emeritus's Congregation had returned to the church. Gaudentius and his Congregation assembled in their church, determined to set fire to it and perish in the flames
Confession - To acknowledge our sins and offences to God, either by private or public confession; or to our neighbour whom we have wronged; or to some pious persons from whom we expect to receive comfort and spiritual instruction; or to the whole Congregation when our fault is published, Psalms 32:5 ; Matthew 3:6 ; James 5:16 ; 1 John; James 1:9 . They only urge it as entitling a person to the prayers of the Congregation; and as useful for supporting the authority of wholesome discipline, and for maintaining the purity of the Christian church. Though the Romish church early appropriated to itself the exclusive title of catholic, or universal; and though, for many centuries, its unscriptural tenets pervaded the far greater part of Europe; not only were there always some individuals who adhered to the doctrines of genuine Christianity, but, long before the Protestant reformation, there appear to have been whole Congregations who maintained, in considerable purity, the substance of the faith contained in Scripture
Lois And Eunice - Little did that devout and chastened saint think that many of us in this Congregation tonight would carry home lessons of salvation from her house to our own house at home
Paul as a Believing Man - It is impossible properly, or even with safety, to describe to a whole Congregation Paul's experience
Woe - Sentence is first pronounced upon the Pharisees for being so punctilious about matters of a subordinate nature, which should be kept in their proper place, while they neglected those moral obligations, which, were of far higher moment, ‘judgment and the love of God’ (Luke 11:42); for putting themselves forward into the first seats in the face of the Congregation, and their fondness for having reverence done to them in public (Luke 11:43); and for being a secret source of defilement to others who were not aware of the evil tendency of their principles (Luke 11:44, cf
Shimei - ...
The magnificent use to which God puts the greatest of all His people's evils must not be attempted before a common Congregation
the Man Who Cast Seed Into the Round And it Grew up he Knew Not How - It is as if our Lord came into this house and said:-So is this Congregation
the Disobedient Prophet - After you have faced for hours a surging Congregation, and have worked yourself and them up to heaven,-to see them scatter, and to be left worn out and alone,-then comes the hour of temptation: a temptation that has been fatal in more ways than one to some temperaments of men
Wealth - Still, there is a small merchant class in James' Congregation (4:13-17), and the rich in 1:10 probably are believers
Pentateuch - There is the same general assembly or Congregation and princes (Joshua 9:18-21; Joshua 20:6; Joshua 20:9; Joshua 22:30; Exodus 16:22); the same elders of Israel (Joshua 7:6; Deuteronomy 31:9); elders of the city (Numbers 35:11-15; 1 Samuel 16:2-5); judges and officers (Joshua 8:33; Deuteronomy 16:18); heads of thousands (Joshua 22:21; Numbers 1:16)
Moab - God ordained that the Moabites should not enter into the Congregation of his people, because they had the inhumanity to refuse the Israelites a passage through their country, nor would they supply them with bread and water in their necessity
Temple - The whole area enclosed by the outer walls formed a square of about 600 feet; but the sanctuary itself was comparatively small, inasmuch as it was intended only for the ministrations of the priests, the Congregation of the people assembling in the courts
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - Now, that there were two men of such rare genius among the first seven deacons is a remarkable proof of the insight of the Congregation that elected them, as well as of the wealth of all kinds of talent in the Apostolic Church
Miriam - And the Lord spake suddenly unto Moses, and unto Aaron, and unto Miriam-Come out, ye three, unto the tabernacle of the Congregation
Amen (2) - (In the great synagogue of Alexandria the attendant used to signal the Congregation with a flag when to give the response). ...
Jerome has an interesting reference to the loud Congregational Amen, which he describes as resounding like thunder (‘ad similitudinem cœlestis tonitrui’—Com
Nehemiah - And neither in the new Jerusalem of Nehemiah's day, nor in the same Jerusalem in Peter's day, was the prophetic and apostolic and diaconate compact better observed, on the deacons' side at any rate, than it is in our own Congregations at the present moment. ...
And if any young minister should be ordained, like Nehemiah, over such a Congregation as Jerusalem was in that day; if he finds the gates thereof burned with fire, and the walls laid waste, and the whole house of God in reproach round about; let him read the Book of Nehemiah till he has it by heart
Mephibosheth - And Joshua made a league with them, to let them live; and the princes of the Congregation sware unto them
Philippians, Epistle to - There were, it is true, rivalries in the Congregation, especially, it would seem, among some of the active women of the Church, and St
Predestination - The belief that God in His predestinating purpose has His elect-known to Him when unknown to man-in every community and every Congregation where Christ is preached, is an encouragement to faithful ministry, as it was to St
Sidonius Apollinaris, Saint - 2, the procession before daybreak, the large Congregation of both sexes, the psalms sung antiphonally by monks and clerks, the Eucharistic celebration, the great heat caused by the crowd and the number of lights, cooled after a time by the autumnal morning
Bible - The divisions of the prophets were called Haphtaroth, from patar , to "dismiss"; as Missa or "Mass" comes from the dismissal of the Congregation on its completion
Maccabees - The affairs of Syria growing ever more desperate under the succession of feeble kings, John ceased payment of the tribute which had been exacted by Antiochus, and established a brilliant court, issuing coins as high priest and head of the Congregation of the Jews
Eucharist - The significant relation of the Apostles to the Congregation of the spiritual Israel, prominent in Mark from the first ( Mark 3:14 ), is not only emphasized by their seclusion with Jesus in this supreme hour, but explicitly stated by Luke ( Luke 22:24-34 ). The form of tradition here reproduced brings out explicitly the fact that the Eucharist was regarded in the Apostolic Church as an ordinance to be observed in Christian Congregations till the Lord’s Coming (‘as oft as ye drink,’ with comment 1 Corinthians 11:26 )
Paul as a Student - But to master Paul, as Paul mastered Moses and Christ; to annotate, and illustrate, and bring freshly home to ten thousand readers, the Galatians, or the Romans, or the Colossians; to have eyes to see what Israel ought to do, and to have the patience, and the courage, to lead a church to do it; to feed, and to feed better and better for a lifetime, the mind and the heart of a Congregation of God's people, and then to depart to be with Christ,-let the finest minds and the deepest and richest hearts in every new generation fall down while they are yet young and say, Lord Jesus, what wilt Thou have me to do with my life, and with whatsoever talents Thou hast intrusted to me?...
And, then, the best of all callings being chosen, the better his mind and the better his heart are, the more profit, to employ Paul's own word about himself, will be made by the true student
Priest - Mediation and greater nearness to God is the radical idea in a priest, he presenting the atonement for the Congregation and the gifts of a reconciled people (Numbers 16:5; Numbers 17:5), and bringing back from God blessing and peace (Leviticus 9:22-23; Numbers 6:22-27)
Paul - Paul began his missionary activities out of a Congregation of believers
Hezekiah - " The priests were too few to flay the burnt offerings which the Congregation "of a free heart" brought in; therefore the Levites helped them "until the other priests had sanctified themselves, for the Levites were more upright in heart to sanctify themselves than the priests
Descent Into Hades - : ‘Sheol saw me, and was made miserable: Death cast me up and many along with me … I made a Congregation of living men amongst his dead men, and I spake with them by living lips … and those who had died … said, Son of God, have pity on us … and bring us out from the bonds of darkness; and open to us the door by which we shall come out to thee
Sacrifice - "...
But in the sin offering, for one of the common people or a ruler, he took of the blood with his finger and put it upon the horns of the altar of burnt offering, and poured out what blood remained at the bottom of the altar; in the sin offering for the Congregation and for the high priest he brought some of the blood into the sanctuary and sprinkled it seven times before the veil, and put some on the horns of the altar of incense (Leviticus 4:3; Hebrews 9:7-124; Leviticus 4:25; Leviticus 4:30)
Solomon - The ceremonial of coronation and anointing was repeated more solemnly before David and all the Congregation, with great sacrifices and glad feastings, Zadok at the same time being anointed "priest"; and Jehovah magnified Solomon exceedingly in the sight of all Israel, and bestowed upon him such royal majesty as had not been on any king before him in Israel (1 Chronicles 29:20-25)
Woman - 29-33a), and that the ultimate responsibility of reevaluating prophecy would have fallen to the (presumably) all male leadership of the Corinthian Congregation, it is best to limit Paul's prohibition to speech in the context of the church's authoritative response to prophecy. " In view of the distinction between (apparently) all male overseers and both male and female deacons in 3:1-13, a plausible interpretation of 2:12 is that women may not hold the highest office in a given ecclesial context (perhaps roughly analogous to modern-day senior pastors in Congregationally governed churches)
Church - To this agrees the definition given by the compilers of the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England: "A Congregation of faithful men, in which the true word of God is preached, and the sacraments duly administered according to Christ's ordinances, in all those things that of necessity are requisite to the same," Acts 9:31 ; Acts 20:17 ; Galatians 1:2 ; Galatians 1:22 ; 1 Corinthians 14:34 ; Colossians 4:15 . On the subject of the church, opinions as opposite or varying as possible have been held, from that of the Papists, who contend for its visible unity throughout the world under a visible head, down to that of the Independents, who consider the universal church as composed of Congregational churches, each perfect in itself, and entirely independent of every other. It may, indeed, be allowed, that some of the smaller and more insulated churches might, after the death of the Apostles and Evangelists, retain this form for some considerable time; but the larger churches, in the chief cities, and those planted in populous neighbourhoods, had many presbyters, and, as the members multiplied, they had several separate assemblies or Congregations, yet all under the same common government
Teaching - But local Congregations tested both the message and the moral character of these visiting instructors. -Instruction was often given collectively, in public or in private, ‘in the temple and at home’ (Acts 5:42), in the Christian Congregation (Acts 11:26), and more generally in the meeting for edification such as St
High Priest - ...
To draw nigh to God by any other high priest, or to say self-sufficiently" all the Congregation are holy," incurs Korah's guilt and penalty (Numbers 16)
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - In Acts Peter aims to convict his audience, while the apocalyptic writer offers multiple images of Jesus to encourage the Congregation in a time of intense persecution
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - Nehemiah 13:1) no Moabite was ever to enter into the Congregation; Bathsheba was an adulteress
Atonement (2) - This fact, reinforced by successive appearances of the risen Christ whether to individuals or the assembled disciples, led to the further conviction, the ultimate root of the doctrine of the Atonement, that Jesus of Nazareth, crucified, risen, ascended, was present in the midst of the Christian Congregation
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - ...
By the time Paul wrote 2Corinthians, the plot had thickened in his relationship with the Corinthian Congregation
Atonement - ...
The design of all these sacrifices (even of the peace-offering, as features of the ritual show) was ‘to make atonement’ for the sin of the offerer, or of the Congregation (Leviticus 1:4 ; 1618614216_8 ; Romans 5:8-11 ; Leviticus 4:31 ; Leviticus 5:6 ; Leviticus 17:11 etc
Childhood - ’ There could have been no room for such an utterance when Jesus left His mother’s side, henceforth to take His place among the men in the Congregation
Paul - "...
After the Congregation was broken up many Jews and proselytes followed Paul and Barnabas, and heard more of "the grace of God
Priest - The ministers of a Congregation, whether engaged in teaching or administration (1 Timothy 5:17), were called elders or presbyters, probably in imitation of the practice of the synagogue (Acts 11:30; Acts 14:23; Acts 15:2)
Moses - ...
Moses after the calf worship removed the temporary tabernacle (preparatory to the permanent one, subsequently described) outside the camp; and as he disappeared in this "tent of meeting" (rather than "tabernacle of Congregation") the people wistfully gazed after him (Exodus 33:7-10)
Temple - The spiritual lesson is, the church of God, the temple of the Holy Spirit, hereafter to be manifested on earth, shall be on a scale far surpassing its present dimensions; then first shall Jehovah be worshipped by the whole Congregation of the earth, led by Israel the leader of the grand choir
Hellenism - Oriental, but was this not in itself a sign of something Divine or an evidence of venerable age? Thus many a heathen became an adherent of this broad Judaism, being admitted as a worshipper and supporting the Jewish Congregation by means of his wealth, and lending it his influence
Terah - And, thank God, at every new vision and at every new voice of His we ever find such sons of Terah in the church and in the state, in the Congregation and in the family, and a right honourable place they fill, and a right fruitful
Boyhood - The teacher of the school was usually the hazzân or servant of the Congregation (Luke 4:20; Shabbath i
Gregorius Nyssenus, Bishop of Nyssa - " A terrifying dream, which seemed to reproach him with neglect, led him to become a "lector" and as such read the Bible lections in the Congregation (Greg
Psalms - The Psalms draw out of the typical ceremonial of the law its tuner spirit, adapting it to the various requirements of the individual and the Congregation
Peter Epistles of - ...
(5) Under these circumstances both the leaders of the community and the members of the Congregation should order their lives according to the strictest ideals of perfection, knowing that they will ultimately receive their respective rewards
Prayer - Stated meetings for social prayer are such as are held weekly in some places which have a special regard to the state of the nation and churches: missionary prayer-meetings for the spread of the Gospel: weekly meetings held in most of the Congregations which have a more particular reference to their own churches, ministers, the sick, feeble, and weak of the flock. We now come, lastly, to take notice of public prayer, or that in which the whole Congregation is engaged, either in repeating a set form, or acquiescing with the prayer of the minister who leads their devotions
Sinlessness - In every Christian Congregation there are at least a few specimens of character so striking that even those who are themselves destitute of religious aspiration acknowledge them to be no earthly products, but to have a heavenly origin; while more sympathetic observers will say that to them the sight of one such holy person has been a more convincing argument for the reality and the blessedness of religious experience than all the verbal arguments they have ever listened to
Bible - Justinian, bishop of Nebio, printed at Genoa an Arabic version of the Psalter, with the Hebrew text and Chaldee paraphrase, adding Latin interpretations: there are also Arabic versions of the whole Scripture in the Polyglots of London and Paris; and we have an edition of the Old Testament entire, printed at Rome, in 1671, by order of the Congregation de propaganda fide; but it is of little esteem, as having been altered agreeably to the Vulgate edition
Egypt - " Their kindness to Israel, even during the latter's bondservice, was probably the reason for their being admitted into the Congregation in the third generation (Deuteronomy 23:3-8)
Gospels (Apocryphal) - ...
Roman Catholic writers have denied their claim to be in any sense authoritative sources of Evangelic history, and have uttered warnings against their incautious use; an unfavourable judgment was passed upon them by the Papal Congregation of Rites as recently as 1884, in connexion with the proposal to celebrate in the following year the nineteen hundredth anniversary of the birth of Mary; but, all this notwithstanding, these apocryphal stories, likened by Harnack to twining plants which, when cut down, spring up again from beneath and choke much that is healthy, have securely rooted themselves in the popular imagination, and have been the fruitful source of many superstitious beliefs
Apocrypha - For instance, the opening passage, describing how Wisdom stood up in the Congregation of the Most High to celebrate her own praises, would lose all its force of appeal if it were taken in prosaic literalness
Montanus - Thus Tertullian himself derives his doctrine as to the materiality and the form of the soul from a revelation made to an ecstatica of his Congregation ( de Anima , 9)
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - It is uncertain whether the interpreter was a fixed official, or whether his function was left open to be undertaken by any competent member of the Congregation
Pharisees (2) - The confused view of the Pharisees, that the Jew was partly in national relations to God and partly member of a holy Congregation, disappears
Enoch Book of - 1-5); after this the Righteous and Elect One shall cause the house of His Congregation to appear (liii
Ambrosius of Milan - He had nothing private from the Congregation in the Basilica
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - By way of harassing Athanasius, the Eusebians, apparently about this time, made Ischyras a bishop, after obtaining an order in the name of the emperor that a church should be built for him—an order which failed to procure him a Congregation ( Apol
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - Nicetas assumes that the Congregation compelled Gregory to accept ordination (cf
Eusebius of Caesarea - The synod thought that Arius should be allowed to gather his Congregation about him as heretofore, but added that he must render obedience to Alexander and entreat to be admitted to communion with him (Soz
Eutyches And Eutychianism - For it is directed against those who attempt to rend the mystery of the Incarnation into a duad of Sons; it repels from the sacred Congregation those who dare to say that the Divinity of the Only-begotten is capable of suffering; it is opposed to those who imagine a mixture or confusion of the two natures of Christ; it drives away those who fancy that the form of a servant which was taken by Him of us is of an heavenly or any other substance; and it condemns those who speak of two natures of the Lord before the union, and feign one after the union
Lutherans - ...
In 1523 Luther drew up a liturgy, that, in many things, differed but little from the Mass Book; but he left his followers to make farther reforms, as they saw them necessary; and, in consequence, the forms of worship in the Lutheran churches vary in points of minor importance: but they agree in reading the Scriptures publicly, in offering prayers and praises to God through the Mediator in their own language, in popular addresses to the Congregation, and the reverend administration of the sacraments. The Lutherans in Germany reject both Episcopacy and Presbyterianism, but appoint superintendents for the government of the church, who preside in their consistories, when that office is not supplied by a delegate from the civil government; and they hold meetings in the different towns and villages, to inquire into the state of the Congregations and the schools
Neology - "I remember," he says, "that a theologian of no common learning, piety, and practical knowledge, νυν εν αγιοις , told me, that a certain monarch, at his suggestion, applied to a university, where there was a large concourse of students of theology, for two candidates for holy orders, who, by the excellence and purity of their doctrine, and by holiness of life, might serve as an example to the Congregation committed to their charge; the professors candidly answered that there was no such student of theology among them
Odes of Solomon - 17-25), which, according to Harnack, exhibits the most distinct traces of interpolation:...
‘Sheol saw me and was made miserable: Death cast me up and many along with me; I was gall and bitterness to him, and I went down with him to the utmost of his depths: and the feet and the head he let go, for they were not able to endure my face: and I made a Congregation of living men amongst his dead men, and I spake with them by living lips: in order that my word might not be void: and those who had died ran towards me: and they cried and said, Son of God, have pity on us and do with us according to thy kindness, and bring us out from the bonds of darkness: and open to us the door by which we shall come out to thee
Pelagianism And Pelagius - If they scoffingly asked men are born sinners from a sinful parent why are not men born righteous from believing parents who have been justified by baptism? If Adam's sin hurt those who had not sinned why by parity of consequence should not the death of Christ profit those who have not believed on Him? Towards the close of his sermon Augustine read to the Congregation from the epistle of their martyred bishop St
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - We meet as a Congregation and pray to God in united supplication