What does Confess mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
וְהוֹד֣וּ to throw 4
ὁμολογήσῃ to say the same thing as another 3
ὁμολογήσει to say the same thing as another 2
ὁμολογήσω to say the same thing as another 2
ἐξομολογήσεται to confess. 1
וְהִתְוַדּ֗וּ to throw 1
וּמִתְוַדֶּ֗ה to throw 1
וְהִ֨תְוַדָּ֔ה to throw 1
וְהִתְוַדּ֤וּ to throw 1
וְהִתְוַדָּ֣ה to throw 1
אוֹדֶ֑ךָּ to throw 1
ὁμολογήσῃς to say the same thing as another 1
ὡμολόγησας to say the same thing as another 1
ἐξομολογήσηται to confess. 1
ὁμολογῶμεν to say the same thing as another 1
ὁμολογῶ to say the same thing as another 1
ὁμολογοῦσιν to say the same thing as another 1
ἐξομολογεῖσθε to confess. 1
אוֹדֶ֤ה to throw 1

Definitions Related to Confess

H3034


   1 to throw, shoot, cast.
      1a (Qal) to shoot (arrows).
      1b (Piel) to cast, cast down, throw down.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to give thanks,, laud, praise.
         1c2 to Confess, Confess (the name of God).
      1d (Hithpael).
         1d1 to Confess (sin).
         1d2 to give thanks.
         

G3670


   1 to say the same thing as another, i.e. to agree with, assent.
   2 to concede.
      2a not to refuse, to promise.
      2b not to deny.
         2b1 to Confess.
         2b2 declare.
         2b3 to Confess, i.e. to admit or declare one’s self guilty of what one is accused of.
   3 to profess.
      3a to declare openly, speak out freely.
      3b to profess one’s self the worshipper of one.
   4 to praise, celebrate.
   

G1843


   1 to Confess.
   2 to profess.
      2a acknowledge openly and joyfully.
      2b to one’s honour: to celebrate, give praise to.
      2c to profess that one will do something, to promise, agree, engage.
      

Frequency of Confess (original languages)

Frequency of Confess (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Confess
(1):
(v. t.) To acknowledge faith in; to profess belief in.
(2):
(v. t.) To make known or acknowledge, as one's sins to a priest, in order to receive absolution; - sometimes followed by the reflexive pronoun.
(3):
(v. t.) To hear or receive such confession; - said of a priest.
(4):
(v. t.) To admit as true; to assent to; to acknowledge, as after a previous doubt, denial, or concealment.
(5):
(v. t.) To make acknowledgment or avowal in a matter pertaining to one's self; to acknowledge, own, or admit, as a crime, a fault, a debt.
(6):
(v. i.) To acknowledge; to admit; to concede.
(7):
(v. t.) To disclose or reveal, as an effect discloses its cause; to prove; to attest.
(8):
(v. i.) To make confession; to disclose sins or faults, or the state of the conscience.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Confess, Confession
The biblical concepts expressed by the words "confess" and "confession" have in common the idea of an acknowledgment of something. This is the root idea of the two verbs that lie behind the great majority of occurrences of the words "confess" and "confession" in the English Bible: Hebrew yadaa [1] (in the hiphil root) and Greek homologeo [2]. English versions such as the NIV therefore sometimes translate these verbs as "acknowledge." From this common root emerge two distinct theological senses: the acknowledging or confessing of faith (in God, Christ, or a particular doctrine), and the acknowledging or confessing of sins before God.
Confession of Faith . Those who are in relationship with God have the joy and responsibility of publicly acknowledging that relationship and the beliefs that are part of it. Solomon alludes to such public profession of commitment to God in his prayer at the dedication of the temple: "When your people Israel have been defeated by an enemy because they have sinned against you, and when they turn back to you and confess your name, then hear from heaven and forgive the sin of your people Israel" (1 Kings 8:33-34 ; cf. v. 35 2 Chronicles 6:24,26 ). But the reference to Israel's sins suggests that confessing God's name here involves also the acknowledgment of sin before him. The two biblical ideas of confession are here, therefore, united.
It is in the New Testament that confession in the sense of acknowledging allegiance to the faith becomes prominent. Confessing God's name (Hebrews 13:15 ) or the "name of the Lord" (2 Timothy 2:19 ) is the mark of a believer. And, since God has revealed himself and his truth decisively in Jesus Christ, confessing Christ becomes the hallmark of genuine Christianity. Jesus taught that "Whoever acknowledges me before men, I will also acknowledge him before my Father in heaven" (Matthew 10:32 ; Luke 12:8 ; cf. Revelation 3:5 ). Reflected here is the secular Greek use of the word to denote solemn and binding public testimony in a court of law. Confession of Christ, then, is no private matter, but a public declaration of allegiance. Such claims can, however, be spurious, and are revealed by a lifestyle incompatible with a genuine relationship to Christ (Titus 1:16 ).
Confessing Christ, then, requires both a matching Christian lifestyle and a matching Christian theology. In what is perhaps the most characteristic New Testament use of the language, the writers stress that Christian confession includes adherence to certain truths about Christ. This doctrinal sense of the word can be seen generally in Luke's reminder that the Pharisees acknowledge the teachings about the resurrection and the spiritual realm (Acts 23:8 ). Central to New Testament doctrine, of course, is the truth about Jesus Christ, and this is the point continually stressed by the New Testament writers. Perhaps the earliest and most basic of Christian confessions was the simple assertion that "Jesus is Lord" (Romans 10:9-10 ). Paul here makes "confessing with the mouth" parallel to "believing in the heart" as a means of salvation. He does not mean by this that public confession is a means of salvation in the way that faith is, for his choice of wording is dictated by the allusion to the heart and the mouth in his earlier quotation of Deuteronomy 30:14 (v. 8). But the text does highlight the fact that genuine faith has its natural result in a public confession of adherence to Christ.
A variation of the formula "Jesus is Lord" that is probably just as early is the confession "Jesus is the Christ, or the Messiah." John tells us that the Pharisees refused to confess that Jesus was the Messiah (12:42), and forced out of the synagogue all Jews who did make such a confession (9:22). Here also we see the way in which public confession of Christ could lead to persecution. It is perhaps because Timothy faces such persecution that Paul urges him to imitate his Lord's example before the Roman governor Pontius Pilate by making "your good confession in the presence of many witnesses" (1 Timothy 6:12 ; cf. v. 13 ).
As the church was exposed to more and more alien influences, Christian doctrinal confessions had to become more specific and detailed. Contesting heretics who denied the reality of Jesus' humanity, John insists that only those who confess that Jesus had come in the flesh could claim to know God (1 John 2:23 ; 4:2-3,15 ; 2 John 7 ). Similarly, the author to the Hebrews exhorts his wayward readers to "hold fast our confession" (4:14, RSV; 10:23), a confession that is focused on the identity of Christ (see 3:1). This New Testament use of the language of confession led to the later church's use of the word "confession" to denote a summary of what Christians believe (e.g., "The Augsburg Confession, " "The Westminster Confession of Faith"). From the beginning, the church found it necessary to define what it meant to be a Christian by formulating statements of Christian belief that could be recited publicly. First Timothy 3:16, introduced by the words "Great indeed, we confess, is the mystery of our religion" (RSV), may be just such an early confession; and scholars have suggested that other such early confessions or creeds may be found in texts such as Romans 1:3-4 , Colossians 1:15-20 , and Philippians 2:6-11 .
Confession of Sins . If confession of faith is more prominent in the New Testament, confession of sins is found more often in the Old Testmaent. The word that is most often used in such contexts is the Hebrew verb yada [3] [4] [5]). This acknowledging before God of the sins of the nation as a whole (an acknowledgment in which individual Israelites were to take part) was a necessary prerequisite for God's mercy and restoring grace in the midst of judgment. The confession needed, of course, to be sincere. Jeremiah's call on the people to acknowledge their guilt (3:13) leads only to an insincere confession (14:20) that the Lord does not heed. One way in which the sincerity of confession can be tested is by accompanying Acts of repentance. In Ezra's day, for example, confession of sin in taking foreign wives was to be followed by a putting away of those wives (Ezra 10 ). But the Old Testament also recognizes the importance of individual confession of sins and in contexts not obviously tied to the sacrificial system. David reflects, "I acknowledged my sin to you and did not cover up my iniquity. I said, I will confess my transgressions to the Lord'—and you forgave the guilt of my sin" (Psalm 32:5 ). David experienced the principle stated in Proverbs 28:13 : "He who conceals his sins does not prosper, but whoever confesses and renounces them finds mercy."
Confession of sins in the New Testament (usually expressed with the compound word exomologeo ) is mentioned in only five passages. This is not, however, to minimize its importance, as confession is certainly included in the widespread call to "repent" from one's sins. Thus, John the Baptist's call for repentance is met by the people's confession of their sins (Matthew 3:6 ; Mark 1:5 ). Perhaps the most familiar text on confession is 1 John 1:9 : "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness." Making forgiveness conditional on confession raises theological problems for some. For does not Christ's sacrifice wipe out for the believer the guilt of all sinspast, present, and future? Perhaps it is best to distinguish between the judicial basis for the forgiveness of sinsthe once-for-all work of Christand the continuing appropriation of the benefits of that sacrificethrough repeated repentance and confession of sins. Secured for us eternally in our justification by faith, forgiveness is always provided, but we are to ask for it ( Matthew 6:12,14 ), as we confess our sins.
The setting of the confession of sins in the Old Testament is frequently public. This raises the question about whether confession should be private or public. James suggests the importance of public confession: "Confess your sins to each other" (James 5:16 ; cf. also Acts 19:18 ). This exhortation was a key scriptural basis for the early "methodist" lay gatherings, in which public confession of sin played a large role. Even in public confessions, of course, it is the Lord who is the primary "audience, " for all sin is ultimately sin against him, and all confession must be directed ultimately to him. Moreover, public confession of sin does not seem to be a standard feature of New Testament church life. While its biblical basis is not completely clear, therefore, there is wisdom in the principle that sin should be confessed to those whom it has directly harmed. When the whole church has been affected, the whole church should hear the confession. When one other person has been harmed, we should confess to that person. But when the sin is a "private" one, we may well keep the confession between ourselves and God. Certainly there is no New Testament warrant for the later Roman Catholic insistence on auricular confession to a priest. Although "elders" are mentioned in James 5:14 , the exhortation to confess sins to "one another" in verse 16 clearly has in view the entire Christian community.
Douglas J. Moo
See also Forgiveness ; Mouth
Bibliography . O. Cullmann, The Earliest Christian Confessions ; J. N. D. Kelly, Early Christian Creeds ; O. Michel, TDNT, 5:199-220; V. H. Neufeld, The Earliest Christian Confessions ; J. R. W. Stott, Confess Your Sins: The Way of Reconciliation .
King James Dictionary - Confess
CONFESS', to own or acknowledge.
1. To own, acknowledge or avow, as a crime, a fault, a charge, a debt, or something that is against one's interest, or reputation. Human faults with human grief confess.
I confess the argument against me is good and not easily refuted.
let us frankly confess our sins.
"Confess thee freely of thy sins," used by Shakespeare, is not legitimate, unless in the sense of Catholics.
2. In the Catholic Church, to acknowledge sins and faults to a priest to disclose the state of the conscience to a priest, in private, with a view to absolution sometimes with the reciprocal pronoun. The beautiful votary confessed herself to this celebrated father.
3. To own, avow or acknowledge publicly to declare a belief in and adherence to. Whoever shall confess me before men. Matthew 10 .
4. To own and acknowledge, as true disciples, friends or children. Him will I confess before my father who is heaven.
5. To own to acknowledge to declare to be true, or to admit or assent to in words opposed to deny. Then will I confess to thee, that thine own right hand can save thee. Job 11 .
These-- confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on earth. Hebrews 11 .
6. To show by the effect to prove to attest. Tall thriving trees confessed the fruitful mold.
7. To hear or receive the confession of another as, the priest confessed the nuns. CONFESS', To make confession to disclose faults, or the state of the conscience as, this man went to the priest to confess.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Confess
Yâdâh (יָדָה, Strong's #3034), “to confess, praise, give thanks.” The root, translated “confess” or “confession” about twenty times in the KJV, is also frequently rendered “praise” or “give thanks.” At first glance, the meanings may appear unrelated. But upon closer inspection, it becomes evident that each sense profoundly illumines and interprets the other.
Yâdâh overlaps in meaning with a number of other Hebrew words implying “praise,” such as halal (whence halleluyah). Man is occasionally the object of yâdâh; but far more commonly, God is the object.
The usual context seems to be public worship, where the worshipers affirm and renew their relationship with God. The subject is not primarily the isolated individual, but the congregation. Especially in the hymns and thanksgivings of the Psalter, it is evident that yâdâh is a recital of, and thanksgiving for, Yahweh’s mighty acts of salvation.
An affirmation or confession of God’s undeserved kindness throws man’s unworthiness into sharp relief. Hence, a confession of sin may be articulated in the same breath as a confession of faith or praise and thanksgiving. The confession is not a moralistic, autobiographical catalogue of sins—individual infractions of a legal code— but a confession of the underlying sinfulness that engulfs all mankind and separates us from the holy God. God is even to be praised for His judgments, by which He awakens repentance (e.g., Ps. 51:4). So one is not surprised to find praises in penitential contexts, and vice versa (1 Kings 8:33ff.; Neh. 9:2ff.; Dan. 9:4ff.). If praise inevitably entails confession of sin, the reverse is also true: The sure word of forgiveness elicits praise and thanksgiving on the confessor’s part. This wells up almost automatically from the new being of the repentant person.
Often the direct object of yâdâh is the “name” of Yahweh (e.g., Ps. 105:1; Isa. 12:4; 1 Chron. 16:8). In one sense, this idiom is simply synonymous with praising Yahweh. In another sense, however, it introduces the entire dimension evoked by the “name” in biblical usage. It reminds us that the holy God cannot be directly approached by fallen man, but only through His “name”—i.e., His Word and reputation, an anticipation of the incarnation. God reveals Himself only in His “name,” especially in the sanctuary where He “causes His name to dwell” (a phrase especially frequent in Deuteronomy).
The vista of yâdâh expands both vertically and horizontally—vertically to include all creation, and horizontally stretching forward to that day when praise and thanksgiving shall be eternal (e.g., Ps. 29; 95:10; 96:7-9; 103:19-22).

Sentence search

Confess - Confess', to own or acknowledge. Human faults with human grief Confess. ...
I Confess the argument against me is good and not easily refuted. ...
let us frankly Confess our sins. ...
"Confess thee freely of thy sins," used by Shakespeare, is not legitimate, unless in the sense of Catholics. The beautiful votary Confessed herself to this celebrated father. Whoever shall Confess me before men. Him will I Confess before my father who is heaven. Then will I Confess to thee, that thine own right hand can save thee. ...
These-- Confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on earth. Tall thriving trees Confessed the fruitful mold. To hear or receive the Confession of another as, the priest Confessed the nuns. Confess', To make Confession to disclose faults, or the state of the conscience as, this man went to the priest to Confess
Acknowledge - See Confess, Confession ...
...
Lahad - Praising; to Confess
Confessed - ) of Confess...
Controversy - 1: ὁμολογουμένως (Strong's #3672 — Adverb — homologoumenos — hom-ol-og-ow-men'-oce ) "confessedly, by common consent," akin to homologeo, "to Confess" (homos, "same," lego, "to speak"), is rendered in 1 Timothy 3:16 "without controversy;" some translate it "confessedly. " See Confess , A, No
Beknow - ) To Confess; to acknowledge
Confessing - ) of Confess...
Acknow - ) To acknowledge; to Confess
Profess, Profession - ...
A — 2: ὁμολογέω (Strong's #3670 — Verb — homologeo — hom-ol-og-eh'-o ) is translated "to profess" in Matthew 7:23 ; Titus 1:16 ; in 1 Timothy 6:12 , AV (RV, "confess"). See Confess. 2, "confession," is translated "profession" and "professed" in the AV only. See Confess
Blushingly - ) In a blushing manner; with a blush or blushes; as, to answer or Confess blushingly
Unbosom - ) To disclose freely; to reveal in confidence, as secrets; to Confess; - often used reflexively; as, to unbosom one's self
Shrove Tuesday - The day before Ash Wednesday or Lent, on which, in former times, persons went to their parish churches to Confess their sins
Frankly - Openly freely ingenuously without reserve, constraint or disguise as, to Confess one's faults frankly
Confession - The one is the Confession of sin. It is beautiful to see how Ezra, Nehemiah, and Daniel Confessed the sins of the people as if they had been their own. When John the Baptist was fulfilling his mission, the people 'confessed' their sins, and were baptised, Matthew 3:5,6 ; and of the Christian it is said, "If we Confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. We are exhorted to Confess our faults one to another. ...
The other application of the term is Confessing the Lord Jesus. The Jewish rulers agreed that if any one 'confessed' that Jesus was the Christ he should be excommunicated. On the other hand, "If thou shalt Confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved . Confession is made unto salvation. ...
The Lord Jesus before Pontius Pilate witnessed a good Confession: He Confessed that He was king of the Jews. Every tongue will have to Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord to the glory of God the Father. What grace for the believer to be able from the heart to Confess Him now! To Him be the glory for evermore!...
Profess - ; to avow or acknowledge; to Confess publicly; to own or admit freely. ) To take a profession upon one's self by a public declaration; to Confess
Glory - ...
...
The phrase "Give glory to God" (Joshua 7:19 ; Jeremiah 13:16 ) is a Hebrew idiom meaning, "Confess your sins. " The words of the Jews to the blind man, "Give God the praise" (John 9:24 ), are an adjuration to Confess. They are equivalent to, "Confess that you are an impostor," "Give God the glory by speaking the truth;" for they denied that a miracle had been wrought
Shrive - ) To receive Confessions, as a priest; to administer Confession and absolution. ) To Confess, and receive absolution; - used reflexively. ) To hear or receive the Confession of; to administer Confession and absolution to; - said of a priest as the agent
Honestly - With frank sincerity without fraud or disguise according to truth as, to Confess honestly one's real design
Vouchsafe - See Confess , PROFESS , PROMISE , THANKS , B, Note
Avouch - ) To acknowledge deliberately; to admit; to Confess; to sanction
Deposit - Leviticus 6:2-7 gives guidelines for one wishing to Confess mishandling a deposit
Common Prayer - So we make our commonsupplications, Confess our common sins, and offer our commonsacrifice of praise and thanksgiving, of alms and devotion
Shrove Tuesday - , to Confess and be absolved
Confession - ConfessION . the words ‘confess,’ ‘confession’ denote either a profession of faith or an acknowledgment of sin; and they are used in EV
(2) Coming to the NT, we find that ‘confess’ is of frequent occurrence in the sense we are considering, and that Confession now gathers expressly round the Person and the Name of Jesus Christ. Moreover, the idea of Confession has been elaborated, its immediate relation to faith and vital importance for salvation being clearly brought out. ...
( a ) The meaning of Confession . In the earlier period of our Lord’s ministry, Confession meant no more than the expression of belief that Jesus was the expected Messiah (
John 1:41 ). Peter’s Confession at Cæsarea Philippi, ‘Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God’ ( Matthew 16:16 ||). After the Resurrection, Confession of Christ carried with it readiness to bear witness to that supreme fact ( John 20:28-29 , Romans 10:9 ); and this of course implied an acceptance of the historical tradition as to His marvellous life and character which made it impossible for death to hold Him (cf. All that was at first demanded of converts, however, may have been the Confession ‘Jesus is Lord’ ( 1 Corinthians 12:3 ; cf. At a later period the growth of heresy made a more precise Confession necessary. In the Johannine Epistles it is essential to Confess, on the one hand, that ‘Jesus Christ is come in the flesh’ ( 1 John 4:2-3 , 2 John 1:7 ), and, on the other, that ‘Jesus is the Son of God’ ( 1 John 4:15 ). With this developed type of Confession may be compared the gloss that has been attached to the narrative of the Ethiopian eunuch’s baptism ( Acts 8:37 , see RVm [2] ), probably representing a formula that had come to be employed as a baptismal Confession. It was out of baptismal formulas like this that there gradually grew those formal ‘Confessions’ of the early Church which are known as the Apostles’ and the Nicene Creeds. ...
( b ) The value of Confession . If we Confess Him before men, He will Confess us before His Father in heaven; if we deny Him, He will also deny us ( Matthew 10:32 f. Peter at Cæsarea Philippi was the reward of the Apostle’s splendid profession of faith; and it contained the assurance that against the Church built on the rock of believing Confession the gates of Hades should not prevail ( Matthew 16:17-19 ). the value of Confession is emphasized not less strongly. Paul, the spirit of faith must speak ( 2 Corinthians 4:13 ), and Confession is necessary to salvation ( Romans 10:8-10 ). John regards a true Confession of Christ as a sign of the presence of the Divine Spirit ( 1 John 4:2 ), a proof of the mutual indwelling of God in man and man in God ( 1 John 4:15 ). Confession of sin . The Mosaic ritual makes provision for the Confession of both individual ( Leviticus 5:1 ff; Leviticus 26:40 ) and national ( Leviticus 16:21 ) transgressions; and many examples may be found of humble acknowledgment of both classes of sin, for instance in the Penitential Psalms and in such prayers as those of Ezra ( Ezra 10:1 ), Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 1:6-7 ), and Daniel ( Daniel 9:4 ff. It is fully recognized in the OT that Confession is not only the natural expression of penitent feeling, but the condition of the Divine pardon ( Leviticus 5:1-19 ; Leviticus 6:1-30 , Psalms 32:5 , Proverbs 28:13 ). ...
(2) In the NT ‘confess’ occurs but seldom to express acknowledgment of sin (Luke 15:17-18 = Mark 1:5 , James 5:16 , 1 John 1:9 ). But the duty of Confessing sin both to God and to man is constantly referred to, and the indispensableness of Confession in order to forgiveness is made very plain ( Luke 18:10 f. ...
( a ) Confession to God . This meets us at many points in our Lord’s teaching in His calls to repentance, in which Confession is involved ( Matthew 4:17 = Mark 1:15 , Luke 11:29 ; Luke 11:32 ; Luke 24:47 ), in the petition for forgiveness in the Lord’s Prayer ( Matthew 6:12 , Luke 11:4 ), in the parables of the Prodigal Son ( Matthew 3:6 ; Luke 15:21 ) and the Pharisee and the Publican ( Luke 18:10 f. It is very noteworthy that while He recognizes Confession as a universal human need ( Luke 11:4 ||), He never Confesses sin on His own account or shares in the Confessions of others. ...
( b ) Confession to man . Besides Confession to God, Christ enjoins Confession to the brother we have wronged ( Matthew 5:23-24 ), and He makes it plain that human as well as Divine forgiveness must depend upon readiness to Confess ( Luke 17:4 ). ]'>[3] ) we are told to Confess our sins one to another. But the Confession referred to is plainly not to any official of the Church, much less to an official with the power of granting absolution, but a mutual unburdening of Christian hearts with a view to prayer ‘one for another
Confess, Confession - The biblical concepts expressed by the words "confess" and "confession" have in common the idea of an acknowledgment of something. This is the root idea of the two verbs that lie behind the great majority of occurrences of the words "confess" and "confession" in the English Bible: Hebrew yadaa [1] (in the hiphil root) and Greek homologeo [2]. " From this common root emerge two distinct theological senses: the acknowledging or Confessing of faith (in God, Christ, or a particular doctrine), and the acknowledging or Confessing of sins before God. ...
Confession of Faith . Solomon alludes to such public profession of commitment to God in his prayer at the dedication of the temple: "When your people Israel have been defeated by an enemy because they have sinned against you, and when they turn back to you and Confess your name, then hear from heaven and forgive the sin of your people Israel" (1 Kings 8:33-34 ; cf. But the reference to Israel's sins suggests that Confessing God's name here involves also the acknowledgment of sin before him. The two biblical ideas of Confession are here, therefore, united. ...
It is in the New Testament that Confession in the sense of acknowledging allegiance to the faith becomes prominent. Confessing God's name (Hebrews 13:15 ) or the "name of the Lord" (2 Timothy 2:19 ) is the mark of a believer. And, since God has revealed himself and his truth decisively in Jesus Christ, Confessing Christ becomes the hallmark of genuine Christianity. Confession of Christ, then, is no private matter, but a public declaration of allegiance. ...
Confessing Christ, then, requires both a matching Christian lifestyle and a matching Christian theology. In what is perhaps the most characteristic New Testament use of the language, the writers stress that Christian Confession includes adherence to certain truths about Christ. Perhaps the earliest and most basic of Christian Confessions was the simple assertion that "Jesus is Lord" (Romans 10:9-10 ). Paul here makes "confessing with the mouth" parallel to "believing in the heart" as a means of salvation. He does not mean by this that public Confession is a means of salvation in the way that faith is, for his choice of wording is dictated by the allusion to the heart and the mouth in his earlier quotation of Deuteronomy 30:14 (v. But the text does highlight the fact that genuine faith has its natural result in a public Confession of adherence to Christ. ...
A variation of the formula "Jesus is Lord" that is probably just as early is the Confession "Jesus is the Christ, or the Messiah. " John tells us that the Pharisees refused to Confess that Jesus was the Messiah (12:42), and forced out of the synagogue all Jews who did make such a Confession (9:22). Here also we see the way in which public Confession of Christ could lead to persecution. It is perhaps because Timothy faces such persecution that Paul urges him to imitate his Lord's example before the Roman governor Pontius Pilate by making "your good Confession in the presence of many witnesses" (1 Timothy 6:12 ; cf. ...
As the church was exposed to more and more alien influences, Christian doctrinal Confessions had to become more specific and detailed. Contesting heretics who denied the reality of Jesus' humanity, John insists that only those who Confess that Jesus had come in the flesh could claim to know God (1 John 2:23 ; 4:2-3,15 ; 2 John 7 ). Similarly, the author to the Hebrews exhorts his wayward readers to "hold fast our Confession" (4:14, RSV; 10:23), a Confession that is focused on the identity of Christ (see 3:1). This New Testament use of the language of Confession led to the later church's use of the word "confession" to denote a summary of what Christians believe (e. , "The Augsburg Confession, " "The Westminster Confession of Faith"). First Timothy 3:16, introduced by the words "Great indeed, we Confess, is the mystery of our religion" (RSV), may be just such an early Confession; and scholars have suggested that other such early Confessions or creeds may be found in texts such as Romans 1:3-4 , Colossians 1:15-20 , and Philippians 2:6-11 . ...
Confession of Sins . If Confession of faith is more prominent in the New Testament, Confession of sins is found more often in the Old Testmaent. Confession of sin in the Old Testament often comes in the context of the offering of sacrifices. Leviticus 5:5 makes Confession of sin the intermediate step between awareness that a sin has been committed (vv. Here we see the idea of Confession as a conscious and public acknowledgement that God's holy law has been transgressed (see also Leviticus 26:40 ; Numbers 5:7 ). The Old Testament also stresses the way in which representative figures among the people of Israel can publicly Confess sins on behalf of the people as a whole (the high priest on the Day of Atonement [16:21; Ezra 10:1 ]'>[3] [4] [1]). The Confession needed, of course, to be sincere. Jeremiah's call on the people to acknowledge their guilt (3:13) leads only to an insincere Confession (14:20) that the Lord does not heed. One way in which the sincerity of Confession can be tested is by accompanying Acts of repentance. In Ezra's day, for example, Confession of sin in taking foreign wives was to be followed by a putting away of those wives (Ezra 10 ). But the Old Testament also recognizes the importance of individual Confession of sins and in contexts not obviously tied to the sacrificial system. I said, I will Confess my transgressions to the Lord'—and you forgave the guilt of my sin" (Psalm 32:5 ). David experienced the principle stated in Proverbs 28:13 : "He who conceals his sins does not prosper, but whoever Confesses and renounces them finds mercy. "...
Confession of sins in the New Testament (usually expressed with the compound word exomologeo ) is mentioned in only five passages. This is not, however, to minimize its importance, as Confession is certainly included in the widespread call to "repent" from one's sins. Thus, John the Baptist's call for repentance is met by the people's Confession of their sins (Matthew 3:6 ; Mark 1:5 ). Perhaps the most familiar text on Confession is 1 John 1:9 : "If we Confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness. " Making forgiveness conditional on Confession raises theological problems for some. For does not Christ's sacrifice wipe out for the believer the guilt of all sinspast, present, and future? Perhaps it is best to distinguish between the judicial basis for the forgiveness of sinsthe once-for-all work of Christand the continuing appropriation of the benefits of that sacrificethrough repeated repentance and Confession of sins. Secured for us eternally in our justification by faith, forgiveness is always provided, but we are to ask for it ( Matthew 6:12,14 ), as we Confess our sins. ...
The setting of the Confession of sins in the Old Testament is frequently public. This raises the question about whether Confession should be private or public. James suggests the importance of public Confession: "Confess your sins to each other" (James 5:16 ; cf. This exhortation was a key scriptural basis for the early "methodist" lay gatherings, in which public Confession of sin played a large role. Even in public Confessions, of course, it is the Lord who is the primary "audience, " for all sin is ultimately sin against him, and all Confession must be directed ultimately to him. Moreover, public Confession of sin does not seem to be a standard feature of New Testament church life. While its biblical basis is not completely clear, therefore, there is wisdom in the principle that sin should be Confessed to those whom it has directly harmed. When the whole church has been affected, the whole church should hear the Confession. When one other person has been harmed, we should Confess to that person. But when the sin is a "private" one, we may well keep the Confession between ourselves and God. Certainly there is no New Testament warrant for the later Roman Catholic insistence on auricular Confession to a priest. Although "elders" are mentioned in James 5:14 , the exhortation to Confess sins to "one another" in verse 16 clearly has in view the entire Christian community. Cullmann, The Earliest Christian Confessions ; J. Neufeld, The Earliest Christian Confessions ; J. Stott, Confess Your Sins: The Way of Reconciliation
Glory - We may be said to give glory to God when we Confess our sins, when we love him supremely, when we commit ourselves to him, are zealous in his service, improve our talents, walk humbly, thankfully, and cheerfully before him, and recommend, proclaim, or set forth his excellencies to others
Mercy Seat - " We come to the Lord JESUS, both as our High Priest, and also as our Mercy Seat, that we may Confess our failures and receive again the cleansing of the precious Blood
Deny - To disown to refuse or neglect to acknowledge not to Confess
Confession - In many languages, including the languages of the Bible, ‘confession’ is a word with a range of meanings. In the Bible’s usage of the word, these meanings fall into two groups, those concerned with Confession of sins, and those concerned with Confession of faith. ...
Confession of sins...
God is willing to forgive people’s sins, but he requires on their part repentance and faith; that is, he requires that they see their sin as rebellion against God, that they Confess it to God as deserving his punishment, that they turn from it decisively, and that they trust in God’s mercy to forgive them (Ezra 10:10-11; Psalms 32:5; Psalms 51:3-4; Matthew 3:6; Matthew 6:12; Luke 18:13; 1 John 1:5-10). ...
There is no suggestion that sin causes believers to lose their salvation and that Confession is necessary to win it back. Failures will spoil their fellowship with God and they will need to Confess them, but if their faith is truly in what Christ has done for them, their salvation is secure (1 John 1:6-9; 1 John 2:1-2). )...
If believers sin against others, they must also Confess their sin to those concerned and put right whatever wrong they have done (Numbers 5:6-8; Matthew 5:23-24; James 5:16). Such Confession is usually a private matter, but some cases may require public Confession (Acts 19:18). Confession of sin is a necessary part of prayer, and a lack of Confession could be one reason why prayers are not answered (1 Kings 8:33-36; Ezra 9:6-7; Nehemiah 1:4-11; Psalms 66:18; Daniel 9:4-9; Matthew 6:12; Luke 18:13). )...
Confession of faith...
If Confession of sin is, in a sense, negative (admitting oneself to be a wrongdoer), Confession of faith is, by contrast, positive (declaring oneself to be a believer in and follower of God). The Confession of faith that Christians make is an open acknowledgment of their belief in Jesus Christ as the Son of God, the Messiah, the chosen one of God who died on the cross and rose victoriously to be crowned Lord of all (Matthew 16:16; John 1:49; Romans 10:9; 1 Timothy 6:12; 1 John 4:2; 1 John 4:15). ...
Jesus made such a Confession in relation to himself and suffered persecution as a result (Mark 14:60-62; John 18:33-37; 1 Timothy 6:13). When his followers make a similar Confession, they too may be persecuted (Matthew 10:32-33; John 9:22; 2 Timothy 2:11-13). Those who by their Confession of faith identify themselves with Christ will be rewarded by God, but those who deny Christ will suffer God’s judgment (Matthew 10:32-33; John 12:42; 1 John 2:22-23). One day all people will Confess Jesus Christ as Lord, to the glory of God (Philippians 2:11)
Descent Into Hell - An article of the Creed in which we Confess ourbelief that our Lord while His Body lay in the grave, descended intothe place of departed spirits
Tongue - To Confess our sins to God
Jannes And Jambres - Jannes and Jambres were doubtless the leaders of the Egyptian magicians who imitated the first plagues before Pharaoh; but who, when it was a question of the creation of life, had to Confess that the finger of God was there
Gehenna - When, therefore, we Confess in the Creedthat our Lord "descended into Hell," we do not mean that He enteredthe "place of torment," but the "place of departed spirits" orHades
Avoid - Thus, in a replication, the plaintiff may deny the defendant's plea, or Confess it, and avoid it by stating new matter
Gabbatha - Before announcing the decision, however, Pilate introduced Jesus as King of the Jews, giving the Jewish leaders one last chance to Confess their Messiah
Prayer: For Help to Pray - Fuller's advice began to Confess his not knowing how to pray as he ought to pray, begging to be taught to pray, and so proceeded in prayer to the satisfaction of all the company
Acknowledge - ...
Note: In 1 John 2:23 , "acknowledgeth" translates the verb homologeo, "to Confess," RV, "confesseth
Confession - James 5:16; "confess your faults one to another (the apostle does not say to the priest), and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. Confession is desirable...
(1) in case of wrong done to a neighbor, Matthew 18:15;...
(2) to a Christian adviser, ordained or unordained, anyone who can apply God's written word suitably to one's need, and "pray for" and with one, James 5:16;...
(3) open Confession of any wrong done to the church, which has caused scandal to religion, in token of penitence. Not auricular: Matthew 3:6; Acts 19:18, "many Confessed and shewed (openly, not in the ear of a priest under the seal of secrecy) their deeds
Conviction: of Sin - If any poor wretch recanted and so escaped the fire, they were accustomed to make him carry a fagot at the next burning, as if to let him see what he had escaped, and make him Confess what he had deserved
Sacramental Confession - Confession was constituted an essential part of this sacrament by Christ Himself, when He said: "Whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them; and whose sins you shall retain, they are retained" (John 20). Now, in order to perform this office properly, a priest must have a knowledge of the penitent's transgressions, which can be obtained only from a sincere Confession of the penitent himself. This self-accusation should include all mortal sins not yet properly Confessed and forgiven, since they constitute the necessary matter of this sacramental judgment. Venial sins need not be Confessed, for they can be remitted by contrition, independently of the Sacrament of Penance. That Confession was regarded even from the first ages of Christianity as a necessary condition for the pardon of sins committed after Baptism is attested in the writings of the early Fathers, e. In the first centuries Confession was often public; but private or auricular Confession was also in use, especially for occult sins. Since the priest's juridical office demands that he have a complete knowledge of the penitent's conscience, the latter should Confess both the nature and the number of his mortal sins. , in the case of a regiment of soldiers on their way to battle, a general acknowledgment of sin is sufficient for a sacramental Confession; but one who has received absolution in such circumstances is obliged to Confess his mortal sins in detail the next time he approaches the tribunal of Penance
Praise of God - Praise properly terminates in God, on account of his natural excellencies and perfections, and is that act of devotion by which we Confess and admire his several attributes: but thanksgiving is a more contracted duty, and imports only a grateful sense and acknowledgment of past mercies
Sadducees - " Acts (23), "For the Sadducees say that there is no resurrection, neither angel nor spirit: but the Pharisees Confess both
Stoning - They say that when a man was condemned to death, he was led out of the city to the place of execution, and there exhorted to acknowledge and Confess his fault
Admit - ) To concede as true; to acknowledge or assent to, as an allegation which it is impossible to deny; to own or Confess; as, the argument or fact is admitted; he admitted his guilt
Avoid - Thus, in a replication, the plaintiff may deny the defendant's plea, or Confess it, and avoid it by starting new matter
Praise - (2) In the following the AV translates doxa, "glory," by "praise" (RV, "glory"); John 9:24 , where "give glory to God" signifies "confess thy sins" (cp. Joshua 7:19 , indicating the genuine Confession of facts in one's life which gives glory to God); John 12:43 (twice); 1 Peter 4:11 . , "I will Confess"): see Confess , A, No
Thank, Thanks, Thankful, Thankfulness, Thanksgiving, Thankworthy - ...
B — 2: ἐξομολογέω (Strong's #1843 — Verb — exomologeo — ex-om-ol-og-eh'-o ) in the Middle Voice, signifies "to make acknowledgement," whether of sins (to Confess), or in the honor of a person, as in Romans 14:11 ; 15:9 (in some mss. in Revelation 3:5 ); this is the significance in the Lord's address to the Father, "I thank (Thee)," in Matthew 11:25 ; Luke 10:21 , the meaning being "I make thankful Confession" or "I make acknowledgment with praise. " See Confess , No. ...
Note: For homologeo, rendered "giving thanks" in Hebrews 13:15 (RV, "make Confession"), See Confess , A, No
Profession (2) - In general, profession and Confession are so closely related that one Greek word (ὁμολογέω) is employed indifferently for both; and the Authorized Version has not clearly distinguished between them. Yet they are by no means identical; for while both words imply the utterance or declaration of faith or of fact, Confession invariably implies that there is harmony between what is declared and the inward thought or feeling of the speaker, while profession carries no such implication. ...
Thus the word ‘confess’ answers in the OT to ידה, which always implies the utterance of genuine faith or feeling (Hiph. = contritely to Confess sin, Leviticus 5:5; Leviticus 16:21 [2]); while ‘profess’ answers to הִנִּיר = ‘tell out,’ ‘declare,’ ‘make manifest’ (it may be in the way of thankful acknowledgment, Deuteronomy 26:3, or of not concealing one’s sin, Psalms 38:18, or even of showing forth one’s sin openly and impudently, Isaiah 3:9 ‘They declare their sin as Sodom’). The difference reappears in the NT, where ‘confess’ is used as translation of ἐξομολογέομαι, which is exactly parallel to ידה in both its senses, and also as translation of ὁμολογιέω in the specific sense of publicly owning one’s relationship of faith and devotion to Christ, Matthew 10:32, Luke 12:8; whereas ‘profess’ answers to ἐπαγγέλλομαι = to make a profession, whether sincerely or not; φάσκω = to assert or pretend; and to ὁμολογέω in the sense of making a formal declaration, or in the bad sense of making au outward pretence. The Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , in substituting ‘confession’ for ‘profession’ in the translation of ὁμολογία, for the owning of the Christian faith (Hebrews 3:1) or the faith which the Christian owns (4:14), has logically followed the rendering of ὁμολογέω in its specific Christian significance, and has helped to put the distinction between the two terms in clearer light. ...
The ‘profession’ of Christ or of Christianity is at once more and less than the Confession of Christ. It is more than Confession; for while the latter is the witness to actual faith or feeling, profession also covers all ill-grounded utterances to which there is little or-nothing in the heart to correspond. And profession is also less than Confession: it is limited to the verbal expression of faith, while Confession gives evidence of itself in the tone and conduct of life as well. Confession shows itself in the exercise of faith as well as in the assertion of it. The distinction between profession and Confession is valuable when we consider the varying emphasis laid by the Gospels on verbal testimony as an element in the Confession of Christ. The duty of verbal profession is at times strongly insisted on (see Confession [3], ii. Wait till the times are ripe and faith is ripe; till the private Confession wells forth irresistibly from the lips; or till the crisis comes when everyone is called to proclaim his faith. Then those who have been Confessing Christ in heart and life will also profess their faith boldly with their lips, and face all the consequences of their profession. It is then, when the day and hour are calling for a clear and living testimony, that profession becomes one with Confession, and the word has fullest force: ‘Whosoever shall Confess me before men, him will I also Confess before my Father which is in heaven’ (Matthew 10:32 f
Acknowledge - To own or Confess, as implying a consciousness of guilt
Blasphemy Against the Holy Ghost - While on the other hand the vilest blasphemer, who feels the relenting of godly sorrow for his sins, and the desire to Confess them at the Savior's feet, may be sure of realizing the truth of Christ's word
Confess - Yâdâh (יָדָה, Strong's #3034), “to Confess, praise, give thanks. ” The root, translated “confess” or “confession” about twenty times in the KJV, is also frequently rendered “praise” or “give thanks. ...
An affirmation or Confession of God’s undeserved kindness throws man’s unworthiness into sharp relief. Hence, a Confession of sin may be articulated in the same breath as a Confession of faith or praise and thanksgiving. The Confession is not a moralistic, autobiographical catalogue of sins—individual infractions of a legal code— but a Confession of the underlying sinfulness that engulfs all mankind and separates us from the holy God. If praise inevitably entails Confession of sin, the reverse is also true: The sure word of forgiveness elicits praise and thanksgiving on the Confessor’s part
Glory - When the Hebrews required an oath of any man, they said, "Give glory to God:" Confess the truth, give him glory, Confess that God knows the most secret thoughts, the very bottom of your hearts, ...
Joshua 7:19 ; John 9:24
Baptism, Holy - The grace conferred in Holy Baptismis threefold, (1) Regeneration, or the New Birth (See REGENERATION);(2) Admission into the Spiritual Kingdom, or the Holy CatholicChurch, and (3) The forgiveness of all our sins, for in the NiceneCreed we Confess, "I acknowledge one Baptism for the Remissions ofsins
Fraternity - It is divided into two branches, called the common rosary, and the perpetual rosary; the former of whom are obliged to Confess and communicate every first Sunday in the month, and the latter to repeat the rosary continually
Heart (Broken): Its Prevalence With God - , in the ages gone by, was provoked to take up arms against his ungrateful and rebellious son, he besieged him in one of the French towns, and the son being near to death, desired to see his father, and Confess his wrong-doing; but the stern old sire refused to look the rebel in the face. If ye, being evil, are overcome by your children's tears, how much more shall your Father who is in heaven find in your bemoanings and Confessions an argument for the display of his pardoning love through Christ Jesus our Lord? This is the eloquence which God delights in, the broken heart and the contrite spirit
Oath - ...
Leviticus 5:1 has been interpreted as signifying that when the voice of adjuration was heard, persons were compelled to Confess what they knew as to any charge
Devotion - "Wherever the vital and unadulterated spirit of Christian devotion prevails, its immediate objects will be to adore the perfections of God; to entertain with reverence and complacence the various intimations of his pleasure, especially those contained in holy writ; to acknowledge our absolute dependence on and infinite obligations to him; to Confess and lament the disorders of our nature, and the transgressions of our lives; to implore his grace and mercy through Jesus Christ; to intercede for our brethren of mankind; to pray for the propagation and establishment of truth, righteousness, and peace, on earth; in fine, to long for a more entire conformity to the will of God, and to breathe after the everlasting enjoyment of his friendship
Breeches - We are not to Confess that we are saved by grace but kept by works
Promise - ...
B — 3: ὁμολογέω (Strong's #3670 — Verb — homologeo — hom-ol-og-eh'-o ) "to agree, Confess," signifies "to promise" in Matthew 14:7 . See Confess
Confession (of Christ) - CONFESSION (of Christ). —The words ‘confess’ and ‘confession’ are employed in common usage to express not only an acknowledgment of sin, but an acknowledgment or profession of faith. The Authorized Version affords many illustrations of this use, and the examples are still more numerous in the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885, which in several passages has quite consistently substituted ‘confess’ and ‘confession’ for ‘profess’ and ‘profession’ of the Authorized Version in the rendering of ὁμολογέω, ὁμολογία (2 Corinthians 9:13, 1 Timothy 6:12, Hebrews 3:1; Hebrews 4:14; Hebrews 10:23). A corresponding twofold use of terms meets us in the original, the verbs ὁμολογέω and ἐξομολογέω being used to denote both Confession of sin and Confession of faith (e. The noun ὁμολογία, however, in NT Greek is employed only with reference to the Confession of faith. ...
In the OT it is Jehovah who is the personal object of the Confessions of faith which we find on the lips of psalmists and prophets (e. Psalms 7:1; Psalms 48:14, Isaiah 12:2; Isaiah 61:10 and passim); but in the NT it is Jesus Christ whom men are constantly challenged to Confess, and it is around His person that the Confession of faith invariably gathers. This lies in the very nature of the case, since personal faith in Jesus Christ constitutes the essence of Christianity, and Confession is the necessary utterance of faith (Romans 10:10, cf. What is meant by the Confession of Christ. —In the earlier period of the ministry of Jesus the faith of His followers did not rise above the belief that He was the long-expected Messiah; and it was this conviction which was expressed in their Confessions. John tells us that the Jews had agreed that if any man should Confess Jesus to be Christ, he should be put out of the synagogue (John 9:22); that they actually cast out, for making such a Confession, the blind man whom Jesus had cured (John 9:34); and that through fear of excommunication many of the chief rulers who believed in His Messiahship refrained from the Confession of their faith (John 12:42). It was no small thing to Confess that Jesus was the Christ, crude and unspiritual in most cases as the notions of His Messiahship might still be. John 6:69), shows a great extension of spiritual content in the Confession of Christ, as our Lord’s language on the occasion plainly implies. ...
After the Resurrection had taken place, faith in that transcendent fact, and readiness to bear witness to it, were henceforth implied in the Confession of Christ (1618644792_2 Romans 10:9). But while any profession of faith would have as its implicate the acceptance of the great facts of the historical tradition, all that was actually demanded of converts at first may have been the Confession, ‘Jesus is Lord’ (1 Corinthians 12:3; cf. Philippians 2:11, 2 Timothy 1:6): a Confession of which an echo perhaps meets us in their being baptized ‘into (or in) the name of the Lord’ (εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ, Acts 8:16; Acts 19:6; ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι τοῦ κυρίου, Acts 10:48). At a later time the growth of heretical opinions rendered it necessary to formulate the beliefs of the Church more exactly, and to demand a fuller and more precise Confession on the part of those who professed to be Christ’s disciples. In the Johannine Epistles a Confession on the one hand that ‘Jesus Christ is come in the flesh’ (1 John 4:2-3, 2 John 1:7), and on the other that ‘Jesus is the Son of God’ (1 John 4:15), is represented as essential to the evidence of a true and saving Christian faith. With this developed Johannine type of Confession may be compared the later gloss that has been attached to the narrative of the baptism of the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:37, see (Revised Version margin)), which is not improbably the reproduction of a formula of question and answer which had come to be employed as a baptismal Confession in the early Church. ...
It may be noticed here that it was out of the Confession of personal faith which was demanded of the candidate for baptism that the formulated ‘Confessions’ of the Church appear to have sprung. There can be little doubt that the so-called Apostles’ Creed was originally a baptismal Confession. The importance attached to the Confession of Christ. He showed the value He set upon it not only by the deep solemnity of His affirmations upon the subject, but by expressing the truth in a double form, both positively and negatively, declaring that the highest conceivable honour awaits every one who Confesses Him before men, and the doom of unspeakable shame all those who are guilty of denying Him (Matthew 10:32-33, Luke 12:8-9; cf. But, above all, we see it in the words addressed at Caesarea Philippi to this same Apostle, who, though afterwards he fell so far in an hour of weakness, rose nevertheless on this occasion to the height of a glorious Confession (Matthew 16:17-19). Peter’s language, the thrill of glad surprise which seems to have shot through Him and which quivers through the benediction into which He burst, the great benediction itself,—these things show the supreme worth He attached to this Confession of His strong Apostle. Peter’s utterance in the everlasting promise which Christ then gave not to him merely, but to all who should hereafter believe on His name and Confess Him after a like fashion: ‘Upon this rock I will build my Church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it’ (Matthew 16:18). Peter’s Confession or St. Peter himself is a matter of little moment; for if the latter is meant, it is undoubtedly as a type of believing Confession that the Apostle receives the splendid promise, and it is on the firm foundation of such Confession as his that Jesus declares that His Church shall be built. ...
(2) If Jesus laid great stress upon the Confession of Himself, the importance of such Confession is not less prominent in the teaching of the Apostles. Even if baptism ‘into the name of the Lord Jesus’ did not imply an explicit Confession of Jesus as Lord (though this seems by no means improbable), at all events the Christian baptism which meets us constantly from the earliest days of the Church (Acts, passim) clearly involved, in the relations of Christianity whether to the Jewish or the Gentile world, a Confessing of Christ before men. Paul makes very plain his conviction that, in order to salvation, believing with the heart must be accompanied by Confession with the mouth (Romans 10:9-10), though he also enlarges our conception of the forms which Confession may take when he finds a Confession of the Christian gospel not only in words spoken but in liberal gifts cheerfully bestowed for the service of the Church (2 Corinthians 9:13). In 1 Timothy he commends the young minister of the Church in Ephesus because be had ‘confessed the good Confession in the sight of many witnesses’ (1 Timothy 6:12), and finds in this matter the perfect example for Christian imitation in the ‘good Confession’ which Christ Jesus Himself witnessed before Pontius Pilate (1 Timothy 6:13); while in 2 Timothy we have an evident re-echo of the Lord’s own language in the warning, ‘If we shall deny him, he also will deny us’ (2 Timothy 2:12). ...
In the Epistle to the Hebrews Jesus is described as ‘the Apostle and High Priest of our Confession’ (Hebrews 3:1), and that Confession the author exhorts his readers to hold fast (Hebrews 4:14, Hebrews 10:23). In the Johannine Epistles, as we have seen, Confession begins to assume a more theological form than heretofore, but the writer is not less emphatic than those who have preceded him in insisting upon its spiritual value. The reason for the importance attached to Confession. —When we ask why such supreme value is set upon Confession by Christ and His Apostles and all through the NT, there are various considerations which suggest themselves. (1) Confession is nothing else than the obverse side of faith. Paul says, is at once in the mouth and in the heart (Romans 10:8), and whatever value belongs to faith as a vital and saving power necessarily belongs to Confession also. Like all living things, faith must give evidence of itself, and Confession is one of its most certain and convincing signs. Paul, it belongs to the very spirit of faith to believe and therefore to speak (2 Corinthians 4:13); and if the readiness to Confess Christ begins to fail, we may take it as a sure evidence that faith itself is failing. But it is by hard trials that the soldier of Christ learns to endure hardness, and gains the unflinching strength which enables him to Confess the good Confession in the sight of many witnesses (1 Timothy 6:12), and not be ashamed of the testimony of our Lord (2 Timothy 1:8). It is a matter of common experience that nothing transforms pale belief into strong full-blooded conviction like the Confession of belief in the presence of others. And it is not till men have publicly Confessed their belief in Christ that faith rises to its highest power, so that ‘belief unto righteousness’ becomes ‘confession unto salvation’ (Romans 10:10). It is to the psychological experiences that were naturally attendant on the public Confession of Christ that we must attribute much of the language used in the NT with regard to the effect of baptism upon the soul (Acts 22:16, Romans 6:3 ff. And it is worth noting how the author of Hebrews connects in the same sentence holding fast ‘the Confession of our hope’ and drawing near to God in ‘fulness’ or ‘full assurance’ of faith (Hebrews 10:22-23; cf. ...
(5) But, above all, the value attached to Confession in the NT seems to lie in the fact that it is the great Church-building power. The grand typical case of Confession of Christ is that of St. Peter at Caesarea Philippi (Matthew 16:15-16); and this was the occasion on which Jesus for the first time spoke of His Church, and declared that on the rock of Christian Confession that Church was to be built (Matthew 16:18). Peter’s powerful testimony to Jesus as the risen Lord and Christ (Acts 2:32-36) that 3000 souls on the day of Pentecost were led gladly to receive the word, and in baptism to Confess Christ for themselves (Acts 2:37-41). Paul knew the mighty power that inheres in Confession, and both in his preaching and writing made much of the story of his own conversion (Acts 22:6 ff; Acts 26:12 ff. ), thereby Confessing Jesus afresh as his Saviour and Lord. It was above all else by the personal Confessions of humble individuals—a testimony often sealed with blood (Revelation 2:13; Revelation 12:11)—that the pagan empire of Rome was cast down and the Church of Christ built upon its ruins. And it is still by personal Confession, in one form or another, that the word of the Lord grows and multiplies, and His Church prevails against the gates of Hades. The secret of the influence exerted by such Confession lies not only in the appealing grace of the Lord whom we Confess, but in the subtle and mysterious power of a believing and Confessing heart over its fellow
Jews - ‘For fear of the Jews’ men hesitated to Confess Christ (John 7:13; John 9:22)
Feet (Under) - Every knee must bow to Him, and every tongue must Confess to Him
Fasting - The Jews often had recourse to this practice, when they had occasion to humble themselves before God, to Confess their sins and deprecate his displeasure, Judges 20:26 1 Samuel 7:6 2 Samuel 12:16 Nehemiah 9:1 1 Kings 19:8 Jeremiah 36:9
Manner - ...
Augustinus does in a manner Confess the charge
Pelican - " And if this psalm be considered (as I Confess I feel much inclined to believe) to have more of David's Lord in it than David, there is something very stalking in the similitude of the pelican
Reconciliation - Reconciliation will extend in result to all things in heaven and on earth, Colossians 1:20 ; not to things under the earth (the lost), though these will have to Confess that "Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father
Naaman - When Naaman was cleansed he could stand before the man of God, and gladly Confess that there was no God in all the earth but in Israel
Fasts - (Joel 2:1-15 ) (See (1 Samuel 7:6 ; 2 Chronicles 20:3 ; Jeremiah 36:6-10 ) ) Three days after the feast of tabernacles, when the second temple was completed, "the children of Israel assembled with fasting, and with sackclothes and earth upon them," to hear the law read and to Confess their sins
Faithful - “If we Confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9 )
Hide - In Scripture, not to Confess or disclose or to excuse and extenuate
Fasts - After the feast of tabernacles, when the second temple was completed," the children of Israel were assembled with fasting, and with sackcloth and earth upon them," to hear the law read and to Confess their sins
Prodicus, a Gnostic Teacher - In the first passage Prodicus and Valentinus are spoken of as teaching that Christ did not wish His disciples to Confess Him publicly if that would expose their lives to danger; in the second they are described as introducing in opposition to the Creator, not a single rival god like Marcion, but a multiplicity of gods
Advocate - In Jesus they have a heavenly advocate who, when they Confess their sin, brings their case before the merciful God and asks his forgiveness
Courage - It is of this sustained heroism that Jesus says, ‘In your patience (ὑπομονή, ‘patient endurance’) ye shall win your souls’ (Luke 21:19), ‘He that endureth to the end shall be saved’ (Matthew 10:22; Matthew 24:13); and those who, in spite of pain and persecution, Confess Him before men, He declares He will Confess before His Father and the holy angels (Luke 12:8, cf
Army - In face of God, humans can only Confess, “Is there any number of his armies?” (Job 25:3 )
Counsel - They all Confess that, in the working of that first cause, counsel is used, reason followed, and a way observed
Philadelphia - To Smyrna the promise is, "the synagogue of Satan" should not prevail against her faithful ones; to Philadelphia, she should even win over some of "the synagogue of Satan," (the Jews who might have been the church of God, but by opposition had become "the synagogue of Satan") to "fall on their faces and Confess God is in her of a truth" (1 Corinthians 14:25)
Tell - To relate in Confession to Confess or acknowledge
Consent - See Confess , THANK
Profession - Several words are used in Acts and the Epistles to express avowal, professing, or Confessing. (2) In the particular sense of professing or Confessing faith, the words ὁμολογεῖν and ὁμολογία are regularly used. In this connexion the word ‘profession’ disappears from the RV_ and the more accurate word ‘confession’ takes its place: e. ‘Christ Jesus, who before Pontius Pilate witnessed the good Confession’ (1 Timothy 6:13). In the specific sense of Confessing faith in Jesus Christ it is the technical term. The locus classicus is Romans 10:9-10 : ‘If thou shalt Confess with thy mouth Jesus as Lord … thou shalt be saved: for with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth Confession is made unto salvation’ (cf. In the 1st and 2nd Epistles of John, particular stress is laid on the Confession of the reality of the human life of Jesus-no doubt with reference to the Docetic heresy: e. ‘Every spirit which Confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is of God’ (1 John 4:2, also 1 John 4:3, 2 John 1:7). Those who Confessed their faith ‘said the same things’ about Him as those who were already in the society. At first the contents of the Confession were very simple. Most probably the Confession was the avowal of belief in Jesus as the Messiah, as in the great Confession of Peter, ‘Thou art the Christ’ (Mark 8:29). Out of that simple Confession there quickly grew other relative beliefs which were implicit in it, e. His resurrection (Romans 10:9), His Divine Sonship (1 John 1:4; 1 John 1:7), His coming in the flesh (1 John 4:2), and the baptismal Confession or formula (Matthew 28:19). ...
Some writers on the Creeds believe that there are references to statements of belief, or summaries of doctrines which may have been included in the Confession, in such phrases as ‘the form of sound words’ (2 Timothy 1:13), the ‘first principles of Christ’ (Hebrews 6:1), etc. As the custom of baptizing immediately after conversion gave way to the system of the catechumenate, the particular elements of Christian doctrine in which the catechumens had been instructed would naturally reappear in the questions that were asked, or the Confession of faith that was made, before baptism. The rise of error also had a marked influence in determining the particular beliefs that were to be Confessed at different times, or at least the particular form in which they were to be Confessed. ...
In the early Church the Confession of faith was made in public, or before the Church. The Pauline principle, ‘If thou shalt Confess with thy mouth Jesus as Lord’ (Romans 10:9), was decisive on that point, to say nothing of our Lord’s evident dislike for secret disciples. The public Confession was not only a testimony for Christ, leading, it might be, to the conversion of others; it had a strong psychological effect on those who made the Confession, confirming them in their relation to Christ, and calling certain forces of their nature to the side of devotion. Those who were to be received into the Church sometimes had a form of words provided for them which they might use, but the convert was also allowed to speak for himself, as in the famous instance of Victorinus, whose testimony or Confession can still be read with interest (see Augustine’s Confessions, bk. _ ‘Confession (of Christ),’ in DCG_; W. _ ‘Confessions,’ in ERE_ iii
Sight - I am free to Confess that I did not discover the whole loveliness of it until reading somewhat of the manners and customs among eastern nations
Syria, Syrian - In connection with Rebekah the wife of Isaac, Laban (grandson of Nahor, Abraham's brother) 'the Syrian' is introduced, Genesis 25:20 ; Genesis 28:5 ; Genesis 31:20,24 ; and an Israelite, in presenting his basket of first-fruits, was instructed to Confess before the Lord, "A Syrian ready to perish was my father," followed by a rehearsal of what God had done for the descendants of Jacob, and how He had brought them into the promised land
Obligation - " ...
But I Confess this has a difficulty in it to me; because it carries with it an idea that if a man should by his habitual practice of iniquity be so hardened as to lose a sense of duty, and not perceive the reasons why he should act morally, then he is under no obligation
Lots - The righteous could Confess that God was their lot ( Psalm 16:5 )
Mouth - He also says that the Confession of the mouth, "Jesus is Lord" ( Romans 10:7-10 ), reveals the belief in one's heart. It is not the Confession that redeems a person, but the belief of the heart, where the Confession originates. Adams...
See also Anthropomorphism ; Confess, Confession ; Person, Personhood ...
...
Andreas Samosatensis of Samosata - His own letters give us a high idea of his sound, practical wisdom, readiness to Confess an error, and firmness in maintaining what he believed right
Heavy - My heavy eyes you say Confess ...
A heart to love and grief inclined
Denial - —The verb ἀρνεῖσθαι, ‘to deny,’ is used in contrast with ὁμολογεῖν, ‘to Confess’ (Matthew 10:32 f. As Confession of Christ (wh. see) is the outward expression of personal faith in Him, so denial of Him is (1) the withholding, (2) refusing, or (3) withdrawing such Confession. In the first of these categories are included those who, like some members of the Sanhedrin (John 12:42), believed on Christ, but did not Confess Him; in the second, those who did not believe on Him, and as a natural result did not Confess Him; and, in the third, those who have Confessed Him, but, through fear of men, deny Him in times of persecution. ) This is to reduce the person of the Messiah to a compendious formula for His teachings, and ignores the fact that, after the great Confession at Caesarea Philippi, Christ grounded on His Messiahship a claim to absolute self-surrender and self-sacrifice (Mark 8:34 f
Denial - To know what is true, yet Confess a falsehood; the forsaking of self in wholehearted consecration to Christ and in service to his kingdom
Rellyanists - In general they appear to believe that there will be a resurrection to life, and a resurrection to condemnation; that believers only will be among the former, who as first fruits, and kings and priests, will have part in the first resurrection, and shall reign with Christ in his kingdom of the millennium; that unbelievers who are after raised, must wait the manifestation of the Saviour of the world, under that condemnation of conscience which a mind in darkness and wrath must necessarily feel; that believers, called kings and priests, will be made the medium of communication to their condemned brethren; and like Joseph to his brethren, though he spoke roughly to them, in reality overflowed with affection and tenderness; that ultimately every knee shall bow, and every tongue Confess that in the Lord they have righteousness and strength; and thus every enemy shall be subdued to the kingdom and glory of the Great Mediator
Rainbow - And moreover, when I call to mind, what the beloved apostle John saw when heaven was opened to his view, "the rainbow round about the throne," (Revelation 4:3) and also that mighty, angel whom he saw with a "rainbow upon his head," (Revelation 10:1) I Confess I feel great delight
Say - To Confess
Ship - It was among the prophecies of the dying patriarch Jacob, (Genesis 49:13) that Zebulun should dwell in "the haven of the sea, and be an haven for ships" And how distant soever this allusion may appear to some concerning the days of Christ, and the eventual dispersion of the gospel to the Gentile islands of the sea, yet from subsequent prophecies to the same amount, when illustrated by each other, I Confess that I am inclined to believe that some great maritime power, such as our own, may be fairly referred to in the several prophecies to this amount
Knowledge - Be humble and courageous enough to retract any mistake, and Confess an error
Antinomians - ...
It is necessary, however, to observe here, and candour obliges us to Confess that there have been others, who have been styled Antinomians, who cannot, strictly speaking, be ranked with these men: nevertheless, the unguarded expressions they have advanced, the bold positions they have laid down, and the double construction which might so easily be put upon many of their sentences, have led some to charge them with Antinomian principles
Joannes, Silentiarius, Bishop of Colonia - John was obliged to Confess that he was a bishop
Obscurity - Thus in the Last Discourse they are found exclaiming, ‘We know not what he saith’ (John 16:18); and a little later they gratefully Confess, ‘Lo, now speakest thou plainly, and speakest no proverb’ (John 16:29)
Confession - Confession of Christ. -The duty of Confessing Christ before men was very plainly taught by the Lord. He had challenged by a leading question the Confession of St. Peter and the other apostles openly Confessed Jesus as the Christ (Acts 2:31 f. The references to baptism into the name of the Lord most probably refer to the Confession of faith in Him which was made by all candidates for baptism. ‘If thou shalt Confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thy heart that Cod hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved’ (Romans 10:9). ’ Our difficulties begin when we try to piece together any sort of longer Confession which might be regarded as the archetype of the later creeds. Hebrews 3:1 reads, ‘consider the Apostle and High Priest of our Confession, even Jesus. ): ‘In Christ our “confession,” the faith which we hold and openly acknowledge, finds its authoritative promulgation and its priestly application,’ In Hebrews 4:14 the idea is expressed of clinging to faith in one who is truly human and truly Divine. In Hebrews 10:23 this confidence is described as the Confession of our hope, by which it is shaped. In 1 John 2:23 Confession is contrasted with denial as entailing the privilege of having the Father. The true inspiration of the Spirit is shown in Confession of ‘Jesus Christ come in the flesh’ (1 John 4:2 f. 146): ‘Whosoever shall Confess that Jesus is the Son of God, God abideth in him and he in God’ (John 4:15). 7, where he urges Confession of Jesus Christ come in the flesh, echoing 1 John 4:2. But he does not bring it into connexion with his Confession of Christ. ...
From a study of Ignatius we may work backwards to the problem of the Confession of faith in the Pastoral Epistles of St. Paul reminds Timothy of the Confession which he made before many witnesses, we may suppose at his baptism (1 Timothy 6:12). He calls it the beautiful Confession to which Christ Jesus has borne witness before Pontius Pilate, and charges Timothy ‘before God, who quickeneth all things, to keep the commandment undefiled, irreproachable, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ. The word ‘confession’ seems to draw attention to the fact that He Confessed rather than to any form of words. ’ ‘Remember Jesus Christ, risen from the dead, of the seed of David, according to my gospel’ (2 Timothy 2:8), We can safely say that that gospel included teaching about God who quickeneth all things, reference to Pontius Pilate, to the resurrection, and to the return to judgment; but the inference is most precarious by which Zahn puts them all into the creed with Confession of the Holy Spirit, who is named in 2 Timothy 1:14, but not with emphatic correlation of His Person to the Persons of the Father and the Son (cf. Paul teaches that it is under the influence of the Spirit that any man Confesses Jesus as the Lord. ]'>[1] ...
It is important, however, to remember that the fact of Confession is of greater importance than any form in which it is made. Paul implies that it is not the eating of flesh in itself, but with the open Confession, ‘I am a Christian,’ that makes the difference (Romans 14:14). ) might be the pressing forward with open Confession of Christianity during another man’s trial. If, as von Dobschütz thinks, the Epistles to Timothy represent the transition to Catholicism, the exhortations to fearless Confession may he explained by opposition to a Gnosticism that, fought shy of Confession (2 Timothy 1:6; 2 Timothy 2:3). In Revelation the condition of the churches varies widely, but it is only the Church of Philadelphia which sets the pattern of joyous Confession coupled with active missionary zeal (Revelation 3:7 ff. Confession of sin. The ceremonial of the Day of Atonement, the Confessions in the Books of Ezra and Daniel, the Penitential Psalms must be remembered when we reflect on the Confessions made publicly by disciples of John the Baptist. ...
(1) Confession to God. -The repentance demanded from all candidates for Christian baptism (Acts 2:38) must have included Confession of sins as a necessary element, in private if not in public. ...
(2) Confession before men. In 1 John 1:9 Confession of sins is connected with the Divine blessing, and the word implies open acknowledgment in the face of men. Paul is represented as receiving many Confessions publicly at Ephesus (Acts 19:18), when many ‘came, Confessing, and declaring their deeds,’ and there was a bonfire of books of magic. Paul was constrained to condemn a brother so sternly for incest, led to public Confession not only by him but also by those who had been implicated in shielding him (2 Corinthians 7:11). James records, it would seem, the practice of the Church in Jerusalem in relation to visits of the elders of the Church to sick persons whom they anointed with prayer; ‘Confess therefore your sins one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed’ (James 5:16). Much has been made of Cardinal Cajetan’s opinion that this does not relate to sacramental Confession (Epp. ...
Both Clement and Hermas witness to the custom of public Confession. 51: ‘For it is good for a man to make Confession of his trespasses rather than to harden his heart’ (cf. Hermas, the prophet, tells us bluntly in the Shepherd of the Confessions of untruthfulness and dishonesty which he was constrained to make publicly (Mand. He was constrained also to Confess neglect of his home, double-mindedness, and doubts. But, as von Dobschütz says, these Confessions reveal ‘the magnificent moral earnestness of the man, and not of him only, but of the Christianity of his time’ (Christian Life in the Primitive Church, p. The writer teaches definitely: ‘Thou shalt Confess thy sins’ (ch. ...
‘This Confession is a disciplinary act of great humiliation and prostration of the man; it regulates the dress, the food; it enjoins sackcloth and ashes; it defiles the body with dust, and subdues the spirit with anguish; it bids a man alter his life, and sorrow for past sin; it restricts meat and drink to the greatest simplicity possible; it nourishes prayer by fasting; it inculcates groans and tears and invocations of the Lord God day and night, and teaches the penitent to cast himself at the feet of the presbyters, and to fall on his knees before the beloved of God, and to beg of all the brethren to intercede on his behalf’ (de Pœn
Heracleon, a Gnostic - "Men mistake in thinking that the only Confession is that made with the voice before the magistrates; there is another Confession made in the life and conversation, by faith and works corresponding to the faith. The first Confession may be made by a hypocrite: and it is one not required of all; there are many who have never been called on to make it, as for instance Matthew, Philip, Thomas, Levi [1]; the other Confession must be made by all. He who has first Confessed in his disposition of heart will Confess with the voice also when need shall arise and reason require. Well did Christ use concerning Confession the phrase 'in Me' (ἐὰν ὁμολογήσῃ ἐν ἐμοί ), concerning denial the phrase 'Me. ' A man may Confess 'Him' with the voice who really denies Him, if he does not Confess Him also in action; but those only Confess 'in Him' who live in the Confession and in corresponding actions. Nay, it is He Whom they embrace and Who dwells in them Who makes Confession 'in them'; for 'He cannot deny Himself
Hussites - Civil war and the destructive forces of the Hussites ravaged Bohemia for over fifteen years, but finally peace was obtained by the Compactata of Basle, 1433, which permitted Communion under both forms to those who had reached the age of discretion and were in the state of grace, under these conditions: that the Hussites Confess that the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ was contained whole and entire both under the form of bread and under that of wine, and that they retract the statement that communion under both forms is necessary for salvation
Utraquists - Civil war and the destructive forces of the Hussites ravaged Bohemia for over fifteen years, but finally peace was obtained by the Compactata of Basle, 1433, which permitted Communion under both forms to those who had reached the age of discretion and were in the state of grace, under these conditions: that the Hussites Confess that the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ was contained whole and entire both under the form of bread and under that of wine, and that they retract the statement that communion under both forms is necessary for salvation
Supremacy - He accepts, indeed, with praise the Confession of the centurion (Matthew 8:5-13), that such authority belongs naturally to Him; yet He does not represent these wonders as being the chief purpose of His ministry. ‘In the name of Jesus’ all creation must bow; all creation must Confess His Lordship (Philippians 2:10-11). Polycarp, confronted with death, Confesses Him as ‘Saviour and King. The Christian conscience, however laggard the will, cannot but Confess the justice of the Master’s question: ‘Why call ye me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?’ (Luke 6:46)
Antinomians - Some of their teachers expressly maintained, that as the elect cannot fall from grace nor forfeit the divine favour, the wicked actions they commit are not really sinful, nor are to be considered as instances of their violation of the divine law; and that consequently they have no occasion either to Confess their sins, or to break them off by repentance. " "Repentance and Confession of sin are not necessary to forgiveness. A believer may certainly conclude before Confession, yea, as soon as he hath committed sin, the interest he hath in Christ, and the love of Christ embracing him
John, the Letters of - Whereas the Gospel was written “that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God” (John 20:31 ), 1John insists that one must Confess that Jesus Christ has come in flesh (1 John 4:2 ). 2 John 1:7 likewise identifies as deceivers those who do not Confess “Jesus Christ come [1] in flesh. His real concern, however, was to warn “the elect lady” (2 John 1:1 ) about those “who Confess not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh” (2 John 1:7 )
Spitting - (Hebrews 12:2)...
I do not presume to speak decidedly upon a subject so infinitely great, and wrapped up as it is in mystery; but I Confess that I am inclined to think that no small part of the glory of Christ's work in redemption consisted in the humiliation of the Son of God in the accomplishment of it. " Precious Lord Jesus! the hour is hastening when that sacred head once crowned with thorns, and that glorious face so blasphemously spit upon, shall be seen with ho1y joy by all thy redeemed, when "every knee shall bow before thee, and every tongue Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father
Tongue - They may Confess Christ as Lord, or deny all knowledge of him (Romans 10:9; Matthew 26:70-74; see ConfessION; DENIAL). But a Confession of faith may be false (1 Timothy 1:19), and a denial of Christ may be a temporary failure that a person soon corrects (John 21:15-17)
Zacharias - ...
Faith (dictating the name for his son given by the angel: Luke 1:13; Luke 1:63-64) opened his mouth, as faith shall cause Israel in the last days to Confess her Lord, and the veil on her heart shall be taken away (2 Corinthians 3:15-16)
Aphraat (Aphrahat, Farhad - ) and on another Confess both the Trinity and the Divinity of Christ (vi
Anger - To suppress this passion the following reflections of arch-deacon Paley, may not be unsuitable: "We should consider the possibility of mistaking the motives from which the conduct that offends us proceeded; how often our offences have been the effect of inadvertency, when they were construed into indications of malice; the inducement which prompted our adversary to act as he did, and how powerfully the same inducement has, at one time or other, operated upon ourselves; that he is suffering, perhaps, under a contrition, which he is ashamed or wants opportunity to Confess; and how ungenerous it is to triumph by coldness or insult over a spirit already humbled in secret; that the returns of kindness are sweet, and that there is neither honor, nor virtue, nor use, in resisting them; for some persons think themselves bound to cherish and keep alive their indignation, when they find it dying away of itself
Peter - He made a remarkable Confession of the divinity of our Lord. The name "Peter" or "Cephas" was a prophecy of the prominent position which he, as the Confessor of Christ, would occupy in the primitive age of the church. The church was built (not on Petros, but Petra—a rock), on his Confession of the foundation, "Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. He was the first to Confess and the first to deny his Lord and Saviour, yet he repented bitterly, and had no rest and peace till the Lord forgave him
Hell - Doddridge observes, we must here Confess our ignorance; and shall be much better employed in studying how we may avoid this place of horror, than in labouring to discover where it is
Hell - Doddridge observes, we must here Confess our ignorance; and shall be much better employed in studying how we may avoid this place of horror, than in labouring to discover where it is
Forgiveness - ...
The general principle as to forgiveness is stated in 1 John 1:9 ; "If we Confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins;" and to this is added, "and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness
Abel - Cain in self-righteous unbelief, refusing to Confess his guilt and need of atonement (typified by sacrifice), presented a mere thank offering of the first fruits; not, like Abel, feeling his need of the propitiatory offering for sin
Job, the Book of - However, there was still hope if he would Confess his sin and turn to God (Job 4:1-5:27 ). However, he, too, held out hope if Job would just Confess (Job 8:1-22 ). This should lead Job to Confess his sin and praise God. Zophar: Feeble, ignorant humans must Confess sins (Job 11:1-20 )
Charities - From this developed the feeling that still persists, that to receive charity is to Confess oneself in utter degradation
Priesthood of the Believer - Any believer can be the channel of God's Spirit and mediate the grace of God in prayer, Confession, or witness in particular situations. ...
(2) We are also urged to Confess our sins to one another and to bear one another's burden. The ancient role of the priest was to receive the Confession of the people and to convey it to God to receive His forgiveness
Boasting - ...
Proper Boasting In Psalm 44:8 the sons of Korah Confess, "In God we make our boast all day long
Repose - ...
‘Drop Thy still dews of quietness,...
Till all our strivings cease:...
Take from our souls the strain and stress,...
And let our ordered lives Confess...
The beauty of Thy peace
Atonement, Day of - The other, after being presented before the Lord, was brought forth: on him Aaron laid both his hands and Confessed over him "all the iniquities of the children of Israel and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat," Leviticus 16:21 , which was then sent away into the wilderness, a land of forgetfulness. They will also at this time learn and Confess that He was wounded for theirtransgressions
Mary Magdalene - And I Confess it seemed to me that Dante and he together had established the doctrine that any envy at all is absolutely, and in the nature of things, quite incompatible with such a lofty pride as that was which wholly possessed Dante's heart. Do you not both know and Confess all these things before yourself and before God every day? Do you not? O stone-dead soul! O sport and prey of Satan! O maker of God a liar, and the truth is not in you! I would not have your devil-possessed heart, and your conscience seared with a redhot iron, for the whole world. For what would it profit me if I gained the whole world of knowledge and everything else, and lost my fast-passing opportunity of having all this pandemonium that is within me for ever cast out of me?...
I will Confess it again: How the whole seven could possibly be cast out of her heart in this present life, I, for one, cannot imagine; and I do not believe it
King, Christ as - At the name of Jesus every knee will bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue will Confess that Jesus is Lord to the glory of God the Father (Philippians 2:9-11 )
Adultery - No instance is recorded in Scripture; so that the terror of it seems to have operated either to restrain from guilt, or to lead the guilty to Confess it without recourse to the ordeal
Sergius Paulus - Acts 8:13, ‘Simon believed’ (though Simon became a pervert), and John 12:42, ‘the rulers believed … but did not Confess,’ and especially John 20:8
Glory - Every tongue shall Confess His lordship to the glory of God the Father
Gervasius - 8; Confess
Jonah - He had to Confess he was fleeing from Jehovah, the God of heaven who made the sea and the dry land
Eutyches And Eutychianism - " "We Confess that Jesus Christ, after the Incarnation, was of two natures in one Hypostasis and in one Person; one Christ, one Son, one Lord. Cyril's letter to John of Antioch was again read, in which occurred the following: "We Confess our Lord Jesus Christ . consubstantial with the Father, according to the Godhead, and consubstantial with us according to the manhood; for a union of the two natures was made; wherefore we Confess one Christ, one Son, one Lord. And in accordance with the perception of the unconfused union (τὴν τῆς ἀσυγχύτου ἑνώσεως ἔννοιαν ), we Confess the Holy Virgin θεοτόκος , because God the Word was made flesh, and became man and united to Himself by conception the temple taken from her. Eutyches was interrogated; and when the archbishop put the plain question: "Do you Confess that Christ is of two natures?" Eutyches answered, "I have never yet presumed to dispute about the nature of my God; that He is consubstantial with us have I never said. In the letter to Pulcheria (same date) the pope considers Eutyches to have fallen into his error "through want of knowledge rather than through wickedness"; to the archimandrites of Constantinople he states his conviction that they do not share the views of Eutyches and exhorts them to deal tenderly with him should he renounce his error; and to the synod he quotes the Confession of St. Diogenes of Cyzicus urged that Eutyches had not repeated the Nicene Creed as it then stood; for the second general council (Constantinople, 381) had certainly appended (against Apollinaris and Macedonius) to the words "He was incarnate," the words "by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary," though he considered this an explanation rather than an addition; but the Egyptian bishops present disclaimed (as Cyril had previously done) any such revised version of the Nicene Confession and greeted the words of Diogenes with loud disapproval. We then," was the conclusion, "following the holy Fathers, all with one consent teach men to Confess one and the same Son, one Lord Jesus Christ; the same perfect in Godhead and also perfect in manhood; truly God and truly man, of a reasonable soul and body; consubstantial with the Father according to the Godhead, and consubstantial with us according to the manhood; in all things like unto us without sin; begotten before all ages of the Father according to the Godhead, and in these latter days, for us and for our salvation, born of Mary, the Virgin Mother of God, according to the Manhood; one and the same Christ, Son, Lord, Only-begotten, to be acknowledged in two natures, inconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, inseparably (ἐν δύο φύσεσιν ἀσυγχύτως, ἀτρέπτως, ἀδιαιρέτως, ἀχωρίστως γνωριζόμενον ), the distinction of natures being by no means taken away by the union, but rather the property of each nature being preserved, and concurring in one person and one hypostasis, not parted or divided into two persons, but one and the same Son and Only-begotten, God the Word, the Lord Jesus Christ, as the prophets from the beginning have declared concerning Him, and the Lord Jesus Christ Himself has taught us, and the creed of the holy Fathers has delivered to us. The archdeacon Aetius recited in his presence the Confession of faith approved at the previous session, and when the emperor asked if it expressed the opinion of all, shouts arose from all sides, "This is the belief of us all! We are unanimous, and have signed it unanimously! We are all orthodox! This is the belief of the Fathers; this is the belief of the Apostles; this is the belief of the orthodox; this belief hath saved the world! Long live Marcian, the new Constantine, the new Paul, the new David! Long live Pulcheria, the new Helena!" ...
Imperial edicts speedily followed the close of the council (Nov
Confession - signifies a public acknowledgment of any thing as our own: thus Christ will Confess the faithful in the day of judgment, Luke 12:8 . To acknowledge our sins and offences to God, either by private or public Confession; or to our neighbour whom we have wronged; or to some pious persons from whom we expect to receive comfort and spiritual instruction; or to the whole congregation when our fault is published, Psalms 32:5 ; Matthew 3:6 ; James 5:16 ; 1 John; James 1:9 . In the Jewish ceremony of annual expiation, the high priest Confessed in general his own sins, the sins of other ministers of the temple, and those of all the people. When an Israelite offered a sacrifice for sin, he put his hand on the head of the victim, and Confessed his faults, Leviticus 4. On the day of atonement, the Jews still make a private Confession of their sins, which is called by them cippur, and which is said to be done in the following manner: Two Jews retire into a corner of the synagogue. He who performs the office of Confessor gives the penitent nine-and-thirty blows on the back with a leathern strap, repeating these words, "God, being full of compassion, forgave their iniquity, and destroyed them not; yea, many a time turned he his anger away, and did not stir up all his wrath. In the meantime, the penitent declares his sins, and at the Confession of every one beats himself on his breast. This being finished, he who has performed the office of Confessor prostrates himself on the ground, and receives in turn from his penitent nine-and-thirty lashes. The Romish church not only requires Confession as a duty, but has advanced it to the dignity of a sacrament. These Confessions are made in private to the priest, who is not to reveal them under pain of the highest punishment. The council of Trent requires "secret Confession to the priest alone, of all and every mortal sin, which, upon the most diligent search and examination of our consciences, we can remember ourselves to be guilty of since our baptism; together with all the circumstances of those sins, which may change the nature of them; because, without the perfect knowledge of these, the priest cannot make a judgment of the nature and quality of men's sins, nor impose fitting penance for them. " This is the Confession of sins which the same council confidently affirms "to have been instituted by our Lord, and by the law of God, to be necessary to salvation, and to have been always practised in the catholic church. " It is, however, evident, that such Confession is unscriptural. James, indeed, says, "Confess your faults one to another," James 5:16 ; but priests are not here mentioned, and the word faults seems to confine the precept to a mutual Confession among Christians, of those offences by which they may have injured each other. Certain it is, that from this passage the necessity of auricular Confession, and the power of priestly absolution, cannot be inferred. Though many of the early ecclesiastical writers earnestly recommend Confession to the clergy, yet they never recommend it as essential to the pardon of sin, or as having connection with a sacrament. Chrysostom condemns all secret Confession to men, as being obviously liable to great abuses; and Basal, Hilary, and Augustine, all advise Confession of sins to God only. Daille, that private, auricular, sacramental Confession of sins was unknown in the primitive church. But, though private auricular Confession is not of divine authority, yet, as Archbishop Tillotson properly observes, there are many cases in which men, under the guilt and trouble of their sins, can neither appease their own minds, nor sufficiently direct themselves, without recourse to some pious and prudent guide. To this purpose a general Confession is for the most part sufficient; and where there is occasion for a more particular discovery, there is no need of raking into the minute and foul circumstances of men's sins to give that advice which is necessary for the cure and ease of the penitent. Auricular Confession is unquestionably one of the greatest corruptions of the Romish church. It goes upon the ground that the priest has power to forgive sins; it establishes the tyrannical influence of the priesthood; it turns the penitent from God who only can forgive sins, to man who is himself a sinner; and it tends to corrupt both the Confessors and the Confessed by a foul and particular disclosure of sinful thoughts and actions of every kind without exception. ...
ConfessIONS OF FAITH, simply considered, is the same with creed, and signifies a summary of the principal articles of belief adopted by any individual or society. In his treatise against heresies, this father affirms that "the faith of the church planted throughout the whole world," consisted in the belief of "one God, the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth and sea, and all that are in them; and one Christ Jesus, the Son of God, who became incarnate for our salvation; and one Holy Spirit, who foretold, through the Prophets, the dispensations and advents, and the generation by the virgin, and the passion, and the resurrection from the dead, and the ascension in the flesh into heaven, of Jesus Christ our beloved Lord, and his appearing from heaven in the glory of the Father, to unite together all things under one head, and to raise every individual of the human race; that unto Christ Jesus, our Lord and God, and Saviour and King, every knee may bow, and every tongue Confess; that he may pronounce just sentence upon all. Of its great antiquity, however, there can be no doubt; the whole of it, as it stands in the English liturgy, having been generally received as an authoritative Confession in the fourth century. ...
This Confession of faith was then preeminently named symbolum; which might be understood in the general acceptation of sign, as the characteristic, representative sign of the Christian faith; or, in a more restricted sense, in reference to the συμβυλον στρατιωτικον , or tessera militaris, the watch word of the Christian soldier, communicated to each man at his first entrance into the service of Christ. Perhaps this word, at first, only denoted the formula of baptism, and was afterward transferred to the Confession of faith. 325,) in which Arianism was not only condemned, but proscribed, the Confession established as the universal standard of truth and orthodoxy runs thus: "I believe, in one God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible; and in one Lord Jesus, the only begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father, before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten not made, being of one substance with the Father; by whom all things were made; who for us men, and for our salvation, descended from heaven, and became incarnate by the Holy Ghost, of the virgin Mary; and was made man, was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate. "...
It were endless to specify the particular shades of difference by which the Arian Confessions (the number of which amounted nearly to twenty in the space of a very few years) were distinguished from each other; suffice it to say, that while they agreed generally in substance, especially in rejecting the Nicene term, ομοουσιος , as applied to the Son, their variations of expression concerning the nature of his subordination to the Father were so astonishingly minute, as almost to bid defiance to any attempt which might be made, at this distance of time, to determine in what their real and essential differences consisted. "The Book of Armagh," a very ancient collection of interesting national documents, which have recently been published by Sir William Betham in the second part of his curious "Irish Antiquarian Researches," contains the Confession of St. For this is my retribution, that, after my rebuking, punishment, and acknowledgment of God, I should exalt him, and Confess his wonderful acts before every nation which is under the whole heaven; because there is no other God, nor ever was before, nor will be after him, except God, the unbegotten Father, without beginning, possessing all things, as we have said, and his Son Jesus Christ, who, we bear witness, was always with the Father, before the formation of the world, in spirit (or spiritually) with the Father, inexpressibly begotten before all beginning, through whom visible things were made: he became man, having overcome death, and was received into heaven. And God has given to him all power ‘above every name, as well of the inhabitants of heaven as of the earth and of the powers below, that every tongue should Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord and God;' whom we believe, and whose coming we expect, as presently about to be Judge of the living and dead, who will render unto every man according to his actions, and has poured upon us abundantly the gift of his Holy Spirit, and the pledge of immortality; who makes us that believe and are obedient to be the sons of God and joint heirs of Christ; whom we believe and adore, one God in the Trinity of the sacred name. ' And again he says, ‘It is an honourable thing to reveal and Confess the works of God. The Confession promulgated on this occasion, and which "gave the finishing touch to what the council of Nice had left imperfect, and fixed, in a full and determinate manner, the doctrine of the Trinity, as it is still received among the generality of Christians," exactly coincides with the Nicene Confession, except in the article respecting the Spirit, which it thus extends: "And I believe in the Holy Ghost, the Lord, and Giver of life, who proceedeth from the Father and the Son, who, together with the Father and the Son, is worshipped and glorified. 1553,) which prevailed for centuries in the Romish church, it would be no easy task to ascertain the real articles of its Confession. The Greek church has no public or established Confession; but its creed, so far as can be gathered from its authorized catechisms, admits the doctrines of the Nicene and Athanasian Creeds, with the exception of the article in each concerning the procession of the Holy Spirit, which it affirms to be "from the Father only, and not from the Father and the Son. Such were the churches of the Waldenses in the valleys of Piedmont, whose Confession, of so early a date as the beginning of the twelfth century, is still preserved
Root - They will publicly Confess their GOD, and bear fruit to His glory, as the tree grows upward above its roots
Resurrection - They at least Confess a conviction that the living God is able to intervene in life's darkest hours
Remember - The NASB and the NIV translate the last clause “and invoke the God of Israel”; and the RSV has “confess
Eutychius - Some of his friends told Gregory that, a few minutes before his end, he touched the skin of his hand, saying, "I Confess that in this flesh we shall rise again" (Paul
Gratianus, Emperor - For He will teach me, Whom I do not deny, Whom I Confess to be my God and my Lord, not raising as an objection against His divinity that He took upon Himself a created nature like my own [2]. I Confess that I can add nothing to the glory of Christ; but I should wish to commend myself to the Father in glorifying the Son. of Alexandria—that is to say, should Confess the one deity and equal majesty of the three persons of the Blessed Trinity, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; and further, that they alone who hold this faith are to be called Catholics , and their places of meeting churches ; while the rest are branded as heretics, and are threatened with an indefinite punishment (Cod
Forgiveness - An act of God's grace to forget forever and not hold people of faith accountable for sins they Confess; to a lesser degree the gracious human act of not holding wrong acts against a person
History - Old Testament saints recited their Confession by recounting what God had done (Deuteronomy 26:5-9 ). Biblical writers Confess God's control and their own meaningful freedom to act. All four Gospel writers Confess that the discovery of the empty tomb did not produce faith in a living Jesus
Popery - In this connection we may mention the popish distinction of venial and mortal sins: the greatest evils arising from the former, are the temporary pains of purgatory; but no man, it is said, can obtain the pardon of the latter, without Confessing to a priest, and performing the penances which he imposes. ) has expressly decreed, that every one is accursed who shall affirm that penance is not truly and properly a sacrament instituted by Christ in the universal church, for reconciling those Christians tot he Divine Majesty, who have fallen into sin after baptism; and this sacrament, it is declared, consists of two parts, the matter and the form: the matter is the act of the penitent, including contrition, Confession, and satisfaction; the form of it is the act of absolution on the part of the priest. Accordingly it is enjoined, that it is the duty of every man who hath fallen after baptism, to Confess his sins once a year, at least, to a priest; that this Confession is to be secret; for public Confession is neither commanded nor expedient: and that it must be exact and particular, including every kind and act of sin, with all the circumstances attending it. this secret or auricular Confession was first decreed and established in the fourth council of Lateran, under Innocent III. ) And the decree of this council was afterwards confirmed and enlarged in the council of Florence and in that of Trent, which ordains, that Confession was instituted by Christ; that by the law of God it is necessary to salvation, and that it has always been practised in the Christian church. ...
And this decree the Papists endeavour to defend by the following observations: they Confess that we have but one mediator of redemption: but affirm that it is acceptable to God that we should have many mediators of intercession
Excommunication (2) - Luke 6:22 (‘blessed are ye … when they shall separate you from their company’—ἀφορίσωσιν ὑμᾶς), John 9:22 (‘for the Jews had agreed already that if any man should Confess him to be Christ, he should be put out of the synagogue’—ἀποσυνάγωγος γένηται), John 12:42 (‘they did not Confess him, lest they should be put out of the synagogue’—ἵνα μὴ ἀποσυνάγωγοι γένωνται), Leviticus 13:45-46, (‘they shall put you out of the synagogues’—ἀποσυναγώγους ποιήσουσιν ὑμᾶς). When we read that the rulers decreed that any one who Confessed Jesus to be Christ should be put out of the synagogue (John 9:22; John 12:42), this may show that they possessed a large discretionary power of fixing the grounds of ecclesiastical censure. Jesus had already spoken at Caesarea of the ἐκκλησία that is built on Christian faith and Confession (Matthew 16:18), and it was altogether natural that on this later occasion He should refer to it again in speaking of the relations between Christian brethren
History - Old Testament saints recited their Confession by recounting what God had done (Deuteronomy 26:5-9 ). Biblical writers Confess God's control and their own meaningful freedom to act. All four Gospel writers Confess that the discovery of the empty tomb did not produce faith in a living Jesus
Guilt - Sinners could Confess their sins and make restitution for the wrongs they had committed (Numbers 5:6-10 )
Exaltation - Christ's sovereign authority will be displayed; every knee will bow and every tongue will Confess that he is Lord (Philippians 2:10-11 )
Nicodemus - The rich were ashamed to Confess Jesus openly, in spite of convictions of the reality of His mission; so Joseph of Arimathea "a disciple, but secretly for fear of the Jews" (John 19:38). He now virtually Confesses Jesus, though in actual expression all he demands is fair play for an injured Person
Ignorance - Christians knew that love, but even at the end they had to Confess their ignorance, for it passed knowledge (Ephesians 3:19)
Sermon on the Mount - When we fail while trying our best, we need not despair; God is a God of grace and forgiveness for all who Confess and repent of their sins
Jansenists - When I read Jansenius, or his disciples Pascal or Quesnel, I bow before such distinguished excellencies, and Confess them my brethren; shall I say my fathers? Their principles are pure and evangelical; their morals formed upon the apostles and prophets; and their zeal to amend and convert, blessed with eminent success
Angel - 1 Samuel 14:14 ; but I must Confess, that, though I do not at all see the impropriety of considering the providences of God as his angels or messengers for good or for evil, yet the passages generally adduced under this head do not prove to me that the providences of God are meant in distinction from created angels
Synagogue - Of others we read that many of the chief rulers believed on the Lord, but feared to Confess Him lest they should be cast out, "for they loved the praise of men more than the praise of God. The Lord told His disciples that they would be scourged in the synagogues, Matthew 10:17 ; and Paul Confessed that when persecuting the church he had imprisoned and beaten in every synagogue those that believed on the Lord
Praise - ...
The variation in translation may be seen in 1 Kings 8:33: “confess” thy name (KJV, NEB, NASB); acknowledge (RSV); praise (JB, NAB)
Doctrine - Doctrine is a living Confession; it is “that which is handed on”—but not unrelated to the cultural context in which it must be lived. We testify to God's search for humanity and Confess that we have “been found” in Christ. ...
This Confession has as its fulcrum the kerygma. Intellect The church has framed the canon, creeds, and Confessions as a means of giving coherent interpretation to the witness of the earliest church. We must learn from the church's history and thus use Confessions, creeds, and abstracts, to formulate Christian teaching for the present generation
Abba - And under such high encouragement and authority, I Confess, that I feel a disposition, upon every occasion, to adopt it, considering it the peculiar privilege of all true believers in Christ, to bring it into constant use, whenever they draw nigh to a throne of grace
Firstborn - "Every knee shall bow before him, and every tongue Confess, that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father
Prodigal Son - He therefore resolves to return home, Confess his fault, and solicit the place of a servant in his father’s household
Lord - )]'>[2] every knee should bow, of things in heaven and things on earth and things under the earth, and that every tongue should Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. ’ In view of the Confession of Lordship to which the passage leads up, it seems natural to adopt this interpretation. To Confess Him as Lord with one’s mouth, and to believe in one’s heart that God has raised Him from the dead (observe the connexion between the Resurrection and Lordship), is to be assured of salvation (Romans 10:9). In cases of ecstasy such Confession was the infallible sign of the presence of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:3)
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - And I have repeatedly heard his guests remark on that reverential habit of his, and I have heard them Confess that they went home rebuked, as I have often gone home rebuked and instructed myself. Confess it where you sit
the Angel of the Church in Sardis - ...
And then to put the copestone on this far-shining case of a minister's recovery, and to send him back to his work till, like his much-tried neighbour in Thyatira, his last years should be far better than his first, this splendid seal was set on his second conversion-"to him that overcometh, the same shall be clothed in white raiment: and I will not blot his name out of the book of life, but I will Confess his name before my Father and before His angels. And so on, till Christ will stop the accuser's mouth, and will Confess His servant's name
Sanballat - And every man who labours to keep his imagination and his heart open and clean and unstained, will have to Confess what a tremendous task he has undertaken. ...
And, then, when at any time, and towards any party, or towards any person whatsoever, you find in yourself that you are growing in love, and in peace, and in patience, and in toleration, and in goodwill, and in good wishes, acknowledge it to yourself; see it, understand it, and Confess it
Expiation, Propitiation - In the Septuagint, the earliest Greek translation of the Old Testament, hilasmos appears in Leviticus 25:9 in the expression, “day of atonement”; in Psalm 130:4 to Confess that there is “forgiveness” with God; in Numbers 5:8 in the expression the “ram of the atonement”; and in Ezekiel 44:27 as a “sin-offering
Beatitudes - "Happy" focuses narrowly on emotional well-being, not taking into account that within relationship to God sin is Confessed (Psalm 32:3-5 ). Since the poor (Luke 6:20 ), those who Confess sin (Psalm 32:3-5 ), and the dead (Revelation 14:13 ) are subjects of the beatitudes, "happy" and "fortunate" seem inappropriate
Womanliness - the rebuke of Peter, Matthew 16:23); His repulse of the Syrophœnician mother (Mark 7:27) was His own indignant protest against Jewish exclusiveness; His requirement that the woman healed by touching His garment should Confess her deed was no violence done to her sense of modesty, but was intended to replace the uncertainty of a cure snatched unawares by the assurance of healing willingly bestowed (Mark 5:34)
Son of Man - He will come as judge to condemn the unrighteous (Matthew 13:41 ; Matthew 16:27 ; John 5:27 ) and to take as His own those who have faith and Confess Him (Luke 12:8 ; Luke 18:8 ; Luke 21:36 )
Praise - Words that are often used as synonyms or in parallel with "praise, " and so help point to its meaning, are "bless, " "exalt, " "extol, " "glorify, " "magnify, " "thank, " and "confess. The audience is enlarged beyond the worshiping community when the worshiper announces, "I will praise you [4], O Lord, among the nations" (Psalm 57:9 ), and more enlarged still, "In the presence of angels [2] I will sing my praise" (Psalm 138:1 ; nab )
Repentance - ...
Confession of sins is both commanded and frequently illustrated (e. When one is guilty of various sins, "he must Confess in what way he has sinned" in order to receive atonement and forgiveness (Leviticus 5:5 ; 26:40-42 ). Thus, Confession belongs to repentance, and is needed for divine forgiveness (cf
Numbers as Symbols - Six hundred sixty and six talents of gold were brought him in a year, 1 Kings 10:14 ; yet he had to Confess that all was vanity and vexation of spirit
Iniquity - God expects Confession of sin: “I acknowledged my sin unto thee, and mine iniquity have I not hid. I said, I will Confess my transgressions unto the Lord; and thou forgavest the iniquity of my sin” ( Leovigild, Arian King of the Visigoths - Isidore and Joannes mournfully Confess that many yielded
Perfection (Human) - Every man must Confess that he falls far short of this glory; it belongs to God alone
Sermon - For this purpose the context often forms a source of appropriate remark; and this, though called a hackneyed way, is one of the best for opening gradually to the subject; though, I Confess, always to use it is not so well, as it looks formal
Manasseh - But where no better data are obtainable, we must Confess ignorance as frankly as we reject the etymologizing tales of our sources
Timothy - ...
Less probably, Smith's Bible Dictionary states that it was at the time of his Roman imprisonment with Paul, just before Paul's liberation (Hebrews 13:23), on the ground that Timothy's "profession" is put into juxtaposition with Christ Jesus' "good Confession before Pilate. " seeing that "thou art called" to it, "and hast professed a good profession" (the same Greek, "confession. Christ's part was with His vicarious sacrifice to attest the good Confession, i. Christianity; Timothy's to "confess" it and "fight the good fight of faith," and "keep the (gospel) commandment" (John 13:34; 1 Timothy 1:5; Titus 2:12; 2 Peter 2:21; 2 Peter 3:2)
Cross - ...
The Jews Confess, indeed, that they crucified people in their nation, but deny that they inflicted this punishment upon any one alive
Salvation - With reference to Christ's atoning work, the believer can Confess, “I was saved when Jesus died for me. God's initial work in the believer's life breaks down into various scenes: conviction of sin (John 16:8 ); repentance (turning) from sin to God (Luke 15:7 ,Luke 15:7,15:10 ; 2 Corinthians 7:10 ); faith which involves commitment of one's whole life to Christ (John 3:16 ,John 3:16,3:36 ); Confession of Christ as Lord (Acts 2:21 ; Romans 10:9-10 )
Jesus, the Lord - Though rejected here by men, He was "raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father," and "God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; and that every tongue should Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord to the glory of God the Father
Judah - " This reading doth not convey to us the expression as strongly though the sense is the same, as by reading it thus: Thou, Judah, thy brethren shall (confessor,) or praise, (as Jehudah;) "thy father's children shall bow down to thee:" that is, they shall acknowledge thee to be the Jeehudah, and as such shall bow down to thee. ...
And this forms a beautiful correspondence to what the apostle, in the gospel-church, in after ages, was commissioned, by the same Holy Spirit that moved the patriarch, (2 Peter 1:1-21; 2Pe 3:18) to tell the people of the Lord Jesus, who sprang out of Judah after the flesh, and was, and is the Jehudah of his people- "who being (saith the apostle) in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God; but made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: and being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross: wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; and that every tongue should Confess, that Jesus Christ is Lord to the glory of God the Father. " Here was a confirmation to the one part of Jacob's dying prophecy, that the Shiloh should not come until the sceptre was departed from Judah-the chief priests Confessed that that sceptre was departed, for they acknowledged that they had then no king but Cæsar; and, therefore, the Shiloh was come
Anathema - They were in a sense within the Christian community, and conscious therefore of certain obligations to Christ; but they were so provoked by the attempt to set Jesus on the same level with the supreme God, and by the apparently absolute incompatibility of that belief with their fundamental conviction of the unity of God, that they were prepared to renounce Jesus and even to denounce Him rather than to Confess His Godhead and submit to His claims. The Spirit of God is the author of any Confession that Jesus is Lord; ecstasy or even demoniac possession may be pleaded for the assertion that Jesus for His teaching is destined to Divine destruction, but never the breath of the Holy Spirit. Between those two extremes there are many halting-places, and the insecurity of each of them is in proportion to its remoteness from the Confession of Jesus Christ as Lord
Vigilantius - But Vigilantius was brought to Confess himself in the wrong and to ask pardon (Hieron
Angels (2) - To the same circle of ideas belong the words of the Lord Jesus: ‘Every one that shall Confess me before men, him will the Son of Man Confess before the angels of God; but he that denieth me in the presence of men shall be denied in the presence of the angels of God’ (Luke 12:8-9). Evidently the angels are interested spectators of men’s behaviour, responsive to their victories and defeats, their sins and struggles; and we are here taught that to be denied before such a vast responsive assembly intensifies the remorse of the apostate, as to be Confessed before them intensifies the joy of those who are ‘faithful unto death. In 2 Esdras 4:52, in revealing eschatological events, the angel gives the tokens of the coming end, but Confesses his ignorance as to whether Esdras will be alive at the time. ’ The interpreting angel Confesses to unity of service with the Church, and in so doing implies a oneness of sympathy and love with the saints
Nebuchadnezzar - I FRANKLY Confess myself a convert to Nebuchadnezzar. I frankly Confess that I had wholly misunderstood Nebuchadnezzar, and both the design and the end of God's ways with Nebuchadnezzar
Jonath - What ails Jonah? Why is God's prophet in such a passion? Why is it better for Jonah to die than to live? Even Calvin Confesses that he suspects some of his own explanations and apologies for Jonah to be but specious pretences, as they are. Pusey, 'that some European or Asiatic people were to carry our own people captive out of our land, more than would be willing to Confess it of themselves, would still inwardly rejoice that such a calamity as the earthquake of Lisbon befell the capital of that people. 'I beseech Thee now, O God'-they are Augustine's words-'to reveal me to myself still more than Thou hast yet done; so that I may Confess myself to my brethren, who have promised to pray for me
Samuel, Books of - He could work through an imperfect king who committed the outlandish sin with Bathsheba (2 Samuel 5:17-25 ) because the king was willing to Confess his sin (2 Samuel 12:13 )
Drunkenness - ’ Yet even Omar Khayyam, after all his praise of the Vine, is obliged to Confess that he has ‘drowned his glory in a shallow cup’; and, in the light of Christianity, drunkenness stands condemned as a sin against the body which is a ‘member of Christ
Eusebius, Bishop of Dorylaeum - The crucial question he put to Eutyches was: "My lord archimandrite, do you Confess two natures after the Incarnation, and do you say that Christ is consubstantial with us according to the flesh or not?" To the first part Eutyches would not assent; he was condemned by all the bishops, and sentence of deposition was passed. But none can deny him the credit of having been a watchful guardian of the doctrine of the Incarnation all through his life, and a keen-sighted and persistent antagonist of error, whether on the one side or the other, who by his sufferings for the orthodox faith merits the title of Confessor
Forgiveness - 16), while over the other he is to Confess all the wickedness of the sons of Israel and all their rebelliontheir sinand release this second goat into the wilderness. But Leviticus 16:21 stipulates that Aaron will Confess over the goat "all the wickedness and rebellion of the Israelitesall their sins"; the fact that these three terms are used in tandem to denote sin in its totality implies that otherwise unforgivable violations of the Torah were forgiven on that day. Expiation comes by Confession, after which the sinner will be cleansed from all unrighteousness by Jesus' expiatory sacrifice
Red Sea - And a copy of these queries was left, also, for Bruce, to join his inquiries likewise; his observations on which are excellent: "I must Confess, however learned the gentlemen were who proposed these doubts, I did not think they merited any attention to solve them. "But in contradiction to this," says Bruce, "I must Confess, that I never in my life, and I have seen the whole extent of it, saw a weed of any sort in it
Plagues of Egypt - The design of these visitations, growing more awful and tremendous in their progress, was to make Pharaoh know, and Confess, that the God of the Hebrews was the supreme Lord, and to exhibit his power and his justice in the strongest light to all the nations of the earth, Numbers 10:33-366 ; 1 Samuel 4:8 , &c; to execute judgment upon the Egyptians and upon all their gods, inanimate and bestial, for their cruelty to the Israelites, and for their grovelling polytheism and idolatry, Exodus 7:14-17 ; Exodus 12:12 . This plague, therefore, was particularly disgraceful to the magicians themselves; and when they tried to imitate it, but failed, on account of the minuteness of the objects, (not like serpents, water, or frogs, of a sensible bulk that could be handled,) they were forced to Confess that this was no human feat of legerdemain, but rather "the finger of God
John, the Gospel of - Thomas's doubt was overcome, and Thomas voiced the Gospel's climactic Confession: “My Lord, and my God!” (John 20:28 ). ...
As a result of their Confession of Jesus as the Christ, these Christian Jews were expelled from the synagogue and persecuted by the Jewish community. The purpose of the Gospel, therefore, was twofold: (1) to call believers to reaffirm their faith and move on to a more mature faith, and (2) to call the “secret believers” (John 12:42 ; John 19:38 ) to Confess Jesus as the Christ and join the Christian community
Unbelief - Hence the poignancy of the Confession: ‘He came unto his own, and they that were his own received him not’ (John 1:11). ’ He suggested that an assembly where all were speaking with this strange utterance would seem to an outsider like a gathering of madmen, and would confirm any unbeliever in his unbelief, whereas the general practice of prophesying would reach the reason and the heart of any unbelievers who happened to be present, and would lead such to Confess that God was truly present in this Christian assembly (1 Corinthians 14:22-24)
Uniqueness - In words which match the significance of the Pauline declaration that in His name every knee shall bow and every tongue Confess His lordship (Philippians 2:10 f), He pictured the gathering of all nations before His throne of judgment, to receive from His lips the merited sentence (Matthew 25:31 ff
Hospitality - Those who Confess Jesus as Christ become aliens and strangers in the world (John 15:18-19 ; 1 Peter 1:1 ; 2:11 ). The audience of 1Peter apparently suffered social ostracism because of their Christian Confession (4:12-16), but in turn they received divine hospitality as members of the "household of God" (4:17; 2:9-10; Ephesians 2:19 ; Philippians 3:20 )
Rain - " I Confess the expression by a figure may be said to be from heaven, even when the whirlwind is made by the winds on the sand of the earth, because it is the Lord's judgment: yet, I humbly conceive, somewhat more is meant by this rain of powder and dust than the raising it from the earth
Confession (of Sin) - CONFESSION (of sin). —In the OT a large place is given to the Confession of sin, as being the necessary expression of true penitence and the condition at the same time of the Divine forgiveness. It may surprise us at first to find that in the Gospels the Confession of sin is expressly named on only one occasion, and that in connexion with the ministry of John the Baptist (ἐξομολογούμενοι τὰς ἁμαρτίας αὐτῶν, Matthew 3:6, Mark 1:5). But apart from the use of the actual phrase, we shall see that the Gospel narratives take full account of the Confession of sin, and that, as in the OT, Confession is recognized both as the necessary accompaniment of repentance and as the indispensable condition of forgiveness and restoration to favour, whether human or Divine. There are three topics which call for notice: (1) Confession of sin to God; (2) Confession of sin to man; (3) Christ’s personal attitude to the Confession of sin. Confession of sin to God. —It is to God that all Confession of sin is primarily due, sin being in its essential nature a transgression of Divine law (cf. And in the teaching and ministry of Jesus the duty of Confession to God is fully recognized. And as Confession is inseparable from true penitence, being the form which the latter instinctively and inevitably takes in its approaches to God, we may say that all through His public ministry, by insisting upon the need of repentance, Jesus taught the necessity of the Confession of sin. The prayer which He gave His disciples as a pattern for all prayer includes a petition for forgiveness (Matthew 6:12, Luke 11:4); and such a petition is equivalent, of course, to a Confession of sin. In the parable of the Prodigal Son the prodigal’s first resolution ‘when he came to himself’ was to go to his father and acknowledge his sin (Luke 15:17-18); and his first words on meeting him were the frank and humble Confession, ‘Father, I have sinned’ (Luke 15:21). It was the total absence of the element of Confession from the Pharisee’s prayer, and the presence instead of a self-satisfied and self-exalting spirit, that made his prayer of no effect in the sight of God; while it was the publican’s downcast eyes, his smitten breast, his cry, ‘God be merciful to me a sinner!’ that sent him down to his house ‘justified rather than the other’ (Luke 18:10-14; cf. ...
Under this head may be included one or two cases of Confession of sin to Christ. When Peter cries, ‘Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord’ (Luke 5:8), and when the sinful woman in the house of the Pharisee silently makes Confession to Jesus as she washes His feet with her tears (Luke 7:37-38), it is too much to say of these Confessions, in Pliny’s language (Ep. Luke, who is pre-eminently the Evangelist of salvation for the sinful, supplies us with the great bulk of the Gospel evidence that the Divine forgiveness is conditioned by the Confession of sin. Confession of sin to man. —According to the teaching of Christ and the Gospels, Confession of sin should be made not only to God but to man, and, in particular, to any one whom we have wronged. In Matthew 5:23-24 Confession to a justly offended brother is directly enjoined; and more than that, it is implied that the very gifts laid on God’s altar are shorn of their value if such Confession has not first been made. In Luke 17:4 again, our own forgiveness of an offender is made to depend on his coming and Confessing, ‘I repent. ’ But apart from this Confession to the person wronged, a wider and more public Confession of sin meets us in the Gospels. The necessity of such Confession is implied, for instance, in our Lord’s denunciations of hypocrisy—in His condemnation of the life of false pretence (Matthew 23:14); of the cup and platter outwardly clean, while inwardly full of extortion and excess (Matthew 23:25); of the whited sepulchres fair to look at, though festering with rottenness within (Matthew 23:27). There may, of course, be a Confession that is spiritually fruitless, to which men are urged not by the godly sorrow of true repentance, but by the goads of sheer remorse and despair. Of this nature was the Confession of Judas to the chief priests and elders (Matthew 27:4, cf. On the other hand, the Confession of the penitent thief to all who heard him (Luke 23:41) was the beginning of that swift work of grace which was accomplished in his heart through the influence of Jesus. It illustrates George Eliot’s words, ‘The purifying influence of public Confession springs from the fact that by it the hope in lies is for ever swept away, and the soul recovers the noble attitude of simplicity’ (Romola, p. Christ’s personal attitude to the Confession of sin. —That our Lord never made Confession to man, and never felt the need of doing so, is sufficiently shown by His challenge, ‘Which of you convicteth me of sin?’ (John 8:46). But did He make Confession of sin to God? The fact that John’s baptism was ‘the baptism of repentance’ (Mark 1:4 ||), and that the people ‘were baptized of him in Jordan, Confessing their sins’ (Matthew 3:6), together with the further fact that Jesus Himself came to the Jordan to be baptized (Matthew 3:13, Mark 1:9, Luke 3:21), might be so interpreted. It is not as an act of Confession, but as one of self-consecration (including, it may be, an element of sympathetic self-humiliation, cf. He had no sins to Confess, but He knew that John was the prophet divinely commissioned to inaugurate the kingdom of righteousness (cf. The reason probably was that while the attitude of a sinful suppliant and the element of Confession, whether uttered or unexpressed, are indispensable to the acceptableness of ordinary human prayer, these could find no place in the prayers of Jesus. ‘Confession’; Ullmaon, Sinlessness of Jesus, p
Scribes - This school was better disposed to Christ than Shammai's; to it probably belonged Nicodemus, Joseph of Arimathea, and others too timid to Confess Jesus (John 12:42; John 19:38; Luke 23:50-51)
Dead - " In Judea, the mourner was clothed in sackcloth of hair and by consequence, in sable robes; and penitents, by assuming it, seemed to Confess that their guilt exposed them to death
Pity - §§ 56, 57); but even if we hesitate to accept this, we must Confess that unless we are led through pity to understand love, the message of pity has failed
Assumption of Moses - The two tribes are carried into captivity, and Confess their punishment to be just, as also do the ten tribes. The king of the kings of the earth (Antiochus Epiphanes) crucifies those who Confess to circumcision, and compels them to blaspheme the law and beat idols, and persecutes them with tortures
Sin - “Iniquity” is something to be Confessed: “And Aaron shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live goat, and Confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel …” ( Confessed their sins, and the iniquities of their fathers” ( Confess it ( Confessed that his mother was in the condition of sin and guilt (cf
Christian - It was natural that those who were called ‘to suffer as Christians’ should come to glory in the name that brought the call and the opportunity to Confess Christ
Temptation - He seems to Confess His own liability to temptation when He refuses the epithet ‘good’ (Luke 18:19), although He never Confesses to have fallen before temptation; and the attitude He assumes to sinners implies His own sinlessness. Peter was rebuked as the Tempter (Matthew 16:23) almost immediately after being commended as the Confessor, because he sought to turn Jesus from His sacrifice
Psalms, Book of - Psalmists protest their innocence or Confess their sins
Preach, Proclaim - ...
Matthew (10:27) and Luke (12:3) also use "proclaim" in the special exhortation to the disciples to courageously Confess Jesus
Imitation - We have not fully unlearned the dreary external programme of imitation till we Confess Christ unambiguously as our life and our only hope. Confessing this, we are prepared to learn those further things He has to teach us about the ways of conformity to His image
Adoption - ...
It is easy, then, to conceive the propriety of the term as used by the apostle in reference to this act, though it must be Confessed there is some difference between civil and spiritual adoption. They who are the children by adoption are supposed to have the same liberty of access as those who are partakers of the blessings of spiritual adoption will prove it, by a reverential, yet familiar address to the Father of spirits: they will Confess their unworthiness, acknowledge their dependence, and implore the mercy and favour of God
Ave Maria - ...
As their power of spiritual perception increased, the disciples learnt to apprehend and accept the startling renovation, the sudden depth, and the delightful expansion that the Master gave to old religious truths, but there were always meanings about which they had to seek an interpretation in private, and to the end of their fellowship they had often to Confess that they knew not what He said. Peter felt himself so immediately in the presence of Divine power that he Confessed his own sinfulness, and he and James and John decided to leave all and follow Him (Luke 5:1-11)
Adultery - After this, both the man and the woman were conveyed to Jerusalem, and placed before the sanhedrim; the judges of which, by threats and other means, endeavoured to confound the woman, and make her Confess
Pre-Eminence - Therefore God exalted Him, so that at the name of Jesus every knee shall bow and every tongue Confess Him Lord (Ephesians 2:6-11)
Temptation - He seems to Confess His own liability to temptation when He refuses the epithet ‘good’ (Luke 18:19), although He never Confesses to have fallen before temptation; and the attitude He assumes to sinners implies His own sinlessness. Peter was rebuked as the Tempter (Matthew 16:23) almost immediately after being commended as the Confessor, because he sought to turn Jesus from His sacrifice
Hell - 7 it is said: ‘Confess that ye have the Lord, lest denying Him ye be delivered into prison (εἰς δεσμωτήριον). 10 occurs the passage:...
‘And thou wilt look from on high and see thine enemies in Gehenna, and thou wilt recognize them and rejoice, and thou wilt give thanks and Confess thy Creator
Last Supper - When an honest attempt is made to arrive at a conclusion, a great authority on the history of Christ’s ministry is compelled to Confess his inability to solve the enigma. To us, we Confess, it seems that the details of a Paschal celebration have been discovered after the importation of ideas which are not on the surface of the narrative
Hell - 7 it is said: ‘Confess that ye have the Lord, lest denying Him ye be delivered into prison (εἰς δεσμωτήριον). 10 occurs the passage:...
‘And thou wilt look from on high and see thine enemies in Gehenna, and thou wilt recognize them and rejoice, and thou wilt give thanks and Confess thy Creator
Unity - He must reign: it is unto Him that all things must be subdued; it is as the fruit of His sacrifice that God will reconcile all things unto Himself; it is in His name that every knee shall bow, Him that every tongue must Confess as Lord, to the glory of God the Father
Atheist - He who disbelieves the existence of a God, as an infinite, intelligent, and a moral agent, is a direct or speculative Atheist; he who Confesses a Deity and providence in words, but denies them in his life and actions, is a practical Atheist. If they argue, that our notion of God arises not from nature and reason, but from the art and contrivance of politicians; that argument itself forces them to Confess, that it is manifestly for the interest of human society, that it should be believed there is a God. If they argue against providence, from the faultiness and inequality which they think they discover in the management of the moral world; this is a plain Confession, that it is a thing more fit and desirable in itself, that the world should be governed by a just and good Being, than by mere chance or unintelligent necessity
Deuteronomy - , but it is best to Confess that the chapter is still a crux
Heal, Health - James offers pastoral counsel for the sick: Send for elders of the church, who will encourage, advise, and intercede for the patient; if sin truly underlies the sickness, let the sick Confess and receive forgiveness; let soothing oil, the universal panacea for all discomforts, be applied
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - A woman at your time of life having to make such a Confession. "When praying at night," he says to his people, "do not forget to Confess with all importunity, and sincerity, and contrition, those sins into which you have fallen during the past day
Matthew - ...
Matthew does not say so himself, but Luke is careful to tell us that Matthew made a great feast that very night, and gathered into it a supper-party of his former friends and acquaintances that they might see with their own eyes the Master that he is henceforth to Confess, and to follow, and to obey
Eternity - As long as metaphysicians use the term, they must take the idea: if they spurn the idea, they have no right to the term, and ought at once to Confess that they can go no farther
Psalms, Theology of - In this connection, supplicants may protest their innocence with regard to false charges (7:3-5; 35:11; 44:17-21; 59:3-4), Confess their sin (25:7,11, 18; 38:18; 51:3-5; 79:9), provide extravagant descriptions of their distress in order to move Yahweh to pity (6:6-7; 22:12-18; 31:9-12; 38:3-10; 88:15-18; 102:3-11; 109:22-25) or appeal to Yahweh's honor and reputation (6:5; 58:11; 59:13; 74:10,18, 22-23; 88:10-12; 109:21; 143:11-12). Furthermore, petitioners whose distress is due to personal sin would be advised to Confess it and to ask for forgiveness since God's judgments on members of the covenant community can be grievous as well. In this psalm, too, there is a Confession of personal folly and wrongdoing (v
Monophysitism - But he tried to secure his safety by declaring his willingness to Confess the two natures intheone Christ, if Dioscorus and Leo of Rome should require it. We Confess that the Father's sole prerogative is to originate, the Son's to reveal, the Spirit's to guide, direct, inspire
Papias - … For every one who shall not Confess that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is antichrist [7]; and whosoever shall not Confess the testimony of the Cross, is of the devil; and whosoever shall perversely interpret the Oracles of the Lord (μεθοδεὐῃ τὰ λόγια τοῦ κυρίου) to his own lusts, and say that there is neither resurrection nor judgment, that man is the firstborn of Satan
Polycarpus, Bishop of Smyrna - He says, "Every one who doth not Confess that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is antichrist; and whosoever doth not Confess the testimony of the Cross is of the devil; and whosoever perverteth the oracles of the Lord to his own lusts and saith that there is neither resurrection nor judgment, this man is a first-born of Satan. " The proconsul then had recourse to threats but finding them unavailing ordered his crier thrice to proclaim in the midst of the stadium "Polycarp has Confessed himself a Christian
Heaven - This they found on the apostle's words, in which he says, That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, and that every tongue should Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord; which they suppose has a respect to the heavenly state, because it is said to be done both by those that are in heaven, and those that are on earth, Phil
Children (Sons) of God - What is exceptional in the Synoptics ( Matthew 11:25 , Luke 10:22 ) becomes the normal teaching of the Fourth Gospel: to see, know, believe, love, Confess the Son, is the one way of access to the Father ( John 14:1-31 ; John 15:1-27 ; John 16:1-33 ; John 17:1-26 , 1 John 2:23 )
Unconscious Faith - Of these it is written that they ‘all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen and greeted them from afar, and having Confessed that they were strangers and sojourners on the earth’ (Hebrews 11:13, cf. It brings all time before Christ’s earthly manifestation, and all races which have not known Him, and—we may fairly add—all souls which love and revere the holiness which they see in Him, though they do not feel able to Confess His Name as the Saviour, or the Son of God, within the reach of healing and help in virtue of their unconscious faith
Righteousness - Yet what Jesus proclaims and outlines is certainly not a self-righteousness, for it is portrayed as the outflowing of a life that is centered on submitting to, worshiping, and seeking after God and Confessing Jesus as the Messiah (see especially 5:17-42). Further, Jesus himself as the Servant of Yahweh is the righteous or innocent one (23:47), even as the centurion Confessed at the cross. In fact, Paul Confessed that the power of the gospel to be the word of salvation to both Jew and Greek was based on the revelation of the righteousness of God thereinof God the Father acting justly for the sake of his Son (Romans 1:16-17 ). At the last day, God the Father will be vindicated and all will Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord
the Labourer With the Evil Eye - " And in like manner, instead of it being difficult to believe that there was ever such a dog in the manger as this murmuring labourer, we are all such dogs, and he who does not know and Confess it-the shell is yet on his head
the Blind Leaders of the Blind - Speaking only for myself in all these matters, but speaking honestly for myself, I Confess to you that I find far more comfort just in this dreadful discovery of the hearts of men, and of my own heart, than I find in far more ostensibly evangelical scriptures
Paul as Sold Under Sin - Augustine-"I Confess that I am entirely in the dark as to what the Apostle meant when he wrote this chapter
Job - My sins are ever before me, was Job's continual Confession made toward God; while, all the time, he held fast his integrity toward all men, and in the face of all men. But, all the time, we see Job turning from all men to God and Confessing, with the most poignant shame and sorrow, both his past sins and his present sinfulness. We Confess with pain and shame and guilt concerning our children, that Job here condemns us to our face
Naaman - Augustine's best book is his Confessions and John Bunyan's his Grace Abounding, and Jacob Behmen's his Way to Christ. It will humble you to do it, and you are not a humble man; but if you ever come back from Jordan with your flesh like the flesh of a little child, you will be the foremost to Confess that you had almost been lost through your pride, and your prejudice, and your ill-nature
Principality Principalities - 58): ‘what the organization is of that supremely happy society in heaven: what the differences of rank are, … and what are the various significations of those four names under which the apostle seems to embrace the whole heavenly company without exception, “whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers”:-let those who are able answer these questions, if they can also prove their answers to be true; but as for me, I Confess my ignorance
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - Before he could arrive there the superior sent off Arsenius, but was himself arrested by the deacon, and obliged to Confess "that Arsenius was alive. Orthodox bishops were scourged and imprisoned; Potammon never recovered from his stripes; Sarapammon, another Confessor-bishop, was exiled (Hist. Narcissus, Maris, and two other prelates appeared before Constans at Trèves, spoke in support of the decisions against Athanasius, and presented a creed which might, at first sight, appear all but to Confess the "Homoousion
Christ in Reformation Theology - ‘No one can deny,’ he says, ‘that we hold, believe, sing, and Confess all things in correspondence with the Apostles’ Creed, that we make nothing new therein, nor add anything thereto, and in this way we belong to the old Church, and are one with it. ’ The Schmalkald Articles and the Augsburg Confession begin with stating over again the doctrines of the Old Catholic Church, founding on the Nicene Creed, and quoting Ambrose and Augustine; and Luther’s contention always was that, if the sophistry of the Schoolmen could be cleared away, the old doctrines of the ancient Church would stand forth in their original purity. He Confessed with some impatience that technical theological terms were sometimes necessary, but he did not like them, and he used them as little as possible. This is our Christian faith, and therefore we rightly Confess: “I believe in Jesus Christ His only Son, our Lord, who was born of Mary, suffered and died. The old creeds Confessed One God, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, and the Confession contented him, whatever words were used. ]'>[3] ...
In conformity with these thoughts, the Confessions of the Reformation all agree in repudiating prayers to the saints. The Augsburg Confession says:...
‘The Scripture teacheth not to invoke saints, nor to ask the help of saints, because it propoundeth to us one Christ: the Mediator, Propitiatory, High Priest, and Intercessor. The Second Helvetic Confession in its fifth chapter lays down the rule that prayer is to be through Christ alone, and saints and relics are not to be worshipped. Their Confessions abound in expressions which are meant to magnify the Person and work of Christ, and to show that He fills the whole field of believing thought and worship; and, as Reformation the
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - Similar approbation was given to another passage containing the characteristic formula of Eutychianism: "I Confess that our Lord was of two natures before the incarnation; but after the incarnation [1] I Confess one nature. " "They want to deny all that is Confessed to be the fact," said Dioscorus; "let them next say they were not there
Calvinism - "I Confess," says he, "indeed, that all the descendants of Adam fell, by the Divine will, into that miserable condition in which they are now involved; and this is what I asserted from the beginning, that we must always return at last to the sovereign determination of God's will; the cause of which is hidden in himself. How the passage may be proved from its context to have no respect to the eternal state of men at all; but, if that were less obvious, it gives no answer to the objection; and we are brought round again, as indeed he Confesses, to his former, and indeed only, argument, that the whole matter as he states it, is to be referred back to the divine will; which will, though perfectly arbitrary, is, as he contends, the highest rule of justice: "I say, with Augustine, that the Lord created those whom he certainly foreknew would fall into destruction; and that this was actually so, because he willed it; but of his will, it belongs not to us to demand the reason, which we are incapable of comprehending; nor is it reasonable, that the divine will should be made the subject of controversy with us, which is only another name for the highest rule of justice. " "It is a HORRIBLE DEGREE, I Confess; but no one can deny that God foreknew the future fate of man before he created him; and that he did foreknow it, because it was appointed by his own decree
Matthew, the Gospel of - Peter Confessed it (Matthew 16:16 ). The author wanted the reader to be aware that Jesus, the Son of God, is the One crucified on the cross; so Jesus called out to “my God” from the cross (Matthew 27:46 ), and a Gentile centurion Confessed that the dying One is “truly the Son of God” (Matthew 27:54 ). Disciples Confess Jesus in all situations (1618644792_10 )
Lord (2) - The clause in brackets is added to interpret the Confessional title ‘Christ. He was speaking to a Gentile, who, though he was ‘a devout man and one that feared God,’ may not have understood the Confessional significance of the term ‘Christ. The Saviour of the world must not have a local or national Confessional title, (cf. Also, ‘No man can say that Jesus is Lord but by the Holy Ghost’ (1 Corinthians 12:3), and ‘every tongue should Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father,’ Philippians 2:11). They deal with the risen life of Jesus, and were written at a time when the higher conceptions of His personality gave a deeper significance to the title, and when its Confessional meaning was universally known. First, as the translation of the Aramaic titles in use among the disciples; and second, as the substitute for χριστός with Confessional meaning among Gentiles
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - I will not insist on what you call introspection, but I for one both feel and Confess the truth of His words when my Lord says to me-Preacher, Beware! lest having discoursed so beautifully on humility to others, you yourself, through your self-esteem, should be a castaway from the kingdom of God
Simon Magus - Now, what he should have done, and what Philip should have insisted on him to do, was to discover to himself and to Confess to himself his besetting sin, and every day to drive another nail of self-crucifixion into it
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - I have myself, to my confusion of face I Confess it, wasted many a precious hour in this pulpit on Euroclydon, and on the times when the Prophets, and the Psalms, and the Gospels, were writ
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - of Alexandria, affirm what he affirms—confess our faith
Roman Catholics - Peter himself, as the name signifies, and not his Confession, as the Protestants explain it. " Penance is a sacrament in which the sins we commit after baptism, duly repented of, and Confessed to a priest, are forgiven; and which they think was instituted by Christ himself when he breathed upon his Apostles after his resurrection, and said, "Receive ye the Holy Ghost; whose sins ye remit, are remitted; and whose sins ye retain, are retained," John 20:23 . " By indulgences they do not mean leave to commit sin, nor pardon for sins to come; but only releasing, by the power of the keys committed to the church, the debt of temporal punishment which may remain due upon account of our sins, after the sins themselves, as to their guilt and eternal punishment, have been already remitted through repentance and Confession, and by virtue of the merit of Christ, and of all the saints. I Confess, also, that under either kind alone, Christ whole and entire, and a true sacrament, is received
Plan - (3) At Caesarea Philippi, when He at last broke the silence, He elicited a spontaneous Confession from His disciples. Instead of continuing His chosen work until the whole people should spontaneously Confess Him as His own disciples had done, He resolved to go up to Jerusalem and proclaim Himself openly at the Passover feast
Lot - Every new acre of pasture land, and every new well of water for his cattle, and every new time of stocktaking, only made Abraham Confess himself more and more a stranger and a pilgrim with God on the earth
Soul - he who Confesses me in time of persecution, and suffers a martyr’s death), shall find it (in heaven)’; (see also Matthew 16:25, Luke 17:33, John 12:35)
Saul - NEWMAN, after attempting three times to preach on Saul, is compelled to Confess that Saul's character continues to be obscure to him, and he warns us that we must be exceedingly cautious while considering Saul's so obscure character
Jesuits - ...
Every novice who offers himself as a candidate for entering into the order, is obliged to manifest his conscience to the superior, or a person appointed by him; and is required to Confess not only his sins and defects, but to discover the inclinations, the passions, and the bent of the soul. From their first institution, they considered the education of youth as their peculiar province: they aimed at being spiritual guides and Confessors; they preached frequently in order to instruct the people; they set out as missionaries to convert unbelieving nations. they had become the Confessors of almost all its monarchs' a function of no small importance in and reign, but, under a weak prince, superior to that of minister. Here, indeed, it must be Confessed, they were of service: the found the inhabitants in a state little different from that which takes place among men when the first begin to unite together; stangers to the arts; subsisting precariously by hunting or fishing; and hardly acquainted with the first principles of subordination and government. ...
Though it must be Confessed that the Jesuits cultivated the study of ancient literature, and contributed much towards the progress of polite learning; though they have produced eminent masters in every branch of science, and can boast of a number of ingenious authors; yet, unhappily for mankind, their vast influence has been often exerted with the most fatal effects
Antichrist - the refusal to acknowledge the Son as well as the Father; more explicitly it is the refusal to Confess that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh (1 John 4:2-3, 2 John 1:7)
Angels - Yet some of the Jews rejected all belief in them, and this sharply divided the Pharisees from the Sadducees, who said ‘that there is no resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit’; the Pharisees Confessed both (Acts 23:8). In Acts 23:8 the Pharisees are said to Confess ‘both,’ i
Mephibosheth - 'I am full of self-love, fear to Confess Thee, or to hazard myself, or my estate, or my peace
Soul - he who Confesses me in time of persecution, and suffers a martyr’s death), shall find it (in heaven)’; (see also Matthew 16:25, Luke 17:33, John 12:35). … Did not the same dispensation obtain in Hades, so that even there, all the souls, on hearing the preaching, might either exhibit repentance, or Confess that their punishment was just because they believed not?’ (Strom
Faith - ’ Again, the fact that oppression and suffering entered so largely into the life of OT believers has coloured their Confessions in psalm and prophecy; instead of believing in Jehovah, they speak of cleaving to Him, taking refuge under His wings, making Him a shield, a tower , etc. To ‘confess with one’s mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in one’s heart that God raised him from the dead,’ was therefore to fulfil the essential conditions of the Christian salvation ( Romans 10:9 ), since the Lord’s resurrection, including His ascension which completes it, gives assurance of the peace with God won by His accepted sacrifice ( Hebrews 7:25 ; Hebrews 9:11-14 ; Hebrews 10:19 ; Hebrews 10:22 ); it vindicates His Divine Sonship and verifies His claims on human homage ( Romans 1:4 , Acts 2:36 , 1 Peter 1:21 ); it guarantees ‘the redemption of the body,’ and the attainment, both for the individual and for the Church, of the glory of the Messianic Kingdom, the consummated salvation that is in Christ Jesus ( 1 Corinthians 15:12-28 , John 12:38 , Ephesians 1:17-23 , Acts 17:31 , Revelation 1:5 ; Revelation 1:17 f
Paul as a Pastor - And, yet, I must frankly Confess, that explanation does not satisfy every case, even in my own experience. ...
Even the Apostle Peter makes the Confession that he had found some things in Paul's Epistles hard to be understood
Solomon - Besides my innumerable sins, I Confess before Thee that I am debtor to Thee for the gracious talent of Thy gifts and graces, winch I have neither put into a napkin nor put it as I ought to exchangers, but have mis-spent it in things for which I was least fit, so as I may truly say my soul hath been a stranger in the house of my pilgrimage
Jacob - And till Laban had to give it up and to Confess himself completely outwitted; and till he piously and affectionately proposed a covenant at Mizpah, saying, This pillar be witness that I will not pass over it to harm thee, nor thou to harm me
David - in His Services - ' That dusts away all merit; that teaches us to uncover our heads before God and to Confess that forgiveness is of His grace and not of our desert at all
Omnipresence - These defective notions are Confessed by Gibbon, a writer not disposed to undervalue their attainments: "The philosophers of Greece deduced their morals from the nature of man, rather than from that of God. Otherwise there would be no revelation, we do not say of the modus, [1] (for that is Confessedly incomprehensible,) but of the fact. Could blind, thoughtless particles thus continually keep on their way, through numberless windings, without once blundering, if they were not guided by an unerring hand? Can the most perfect human skill from earth and water form one grain, much more a variety of beautiful and relishing fruits? Must not the directing mind, who does all this constantly, be most wise, mighty, and benevolent? Must not the Being who thus continually exerts his skill and energy around us, for our benefit, be Confessed to be always present and concerned for our welfare? Can these effects be ascribed to any thing below an all-wise and almighty cause? And must not this cause be present wherever he acts? Were God to speak to us every month from heaven, and with a voice loud as thunder declare that he observes, provides for, and governs us; this would not be a proof, in the judgment of sound reason, by many degrees so valid: since much less wisdom and power are required to form such sounds in the air, than to produce these effects; and to give, not merely verbal declarations, but substantial evidences of his presence and care over us. It is best to Confess with one who had thought deeply on the subject, "There is an incomprehensibleness in the manner of every thing about which no controversy can or ought to be concerned
Transubstantiation - At one synod held at Rome, under the immediate eye of the pope, the fathers of whom it consisted so successfully alarmed Berenger, that, not having sufficient vigour of mind to stand firm against their cruelty, he Confessed that he had been in error, and subscribed the following declaration composed by one of the cardinals: "The bread and wine which are placed on the altar are, after consecration, not merely a sacrament, symbol, or figure, but even the true body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is handled by the hands of the priests, and broken and chewed by the teeth of the faithful. The French Protestants in their Confession thus express themselves: "We affirm that the holy supper of our Lord is a witness to us of our union with the Lord Jesus Christ, because that he is not only once dead and raised up again from the dead for us, lint also he doth indeed feed and nourish us with his flesh and blood. " Knox, who revered Calvin, carried into Scotland the opinions of that reformer; and in the original Scottish Confessions, similar language, though somewhat more guarded than that which has been just quoted, is used: "We assuredly believe that in the supper rightly used, Christ Jesus is so joined with us, that he becometh the very nourishment and food of our souls. We most assuredly believe that the bread which we break is the communion of Christ's body, and the cup which we bless is the communion of his blood; so that we Confess and undoubtedly believe, that the faithful in the right use of the Lord's table so do eat the body and drink the blood of the Lord Jesus, that he remaineth in them and they in him; yea, that they are so made flesh of his flesh, and bones of his bones, that as the eternal Godhead hath given to the flesh of Christ Jesus life and immortality, so doth Christ Jesus's flesh and blood, eaten and drunken by us, give to us the same prerogatives. " The church of Scotland, which did not long use this first Confession, seems to have seen, in the course of the following century, the propriety, if not of relinquishing, yet of more cautiously employing the phraseology now brought into view; for in the Westminster Confession, which is still the standard of faith in that church, there is unquestionably a great improvement in the style which has been adopted in treating of this subject
Christ, Christology - ” When Peter Confessed “Thou art the Christ” (Mark 8:29 ), Jesus' response was guarded: not denying it, but distancing Himself from the political and social connotations which a nationalist Judaism had accepted as commonplace in the expected Deliverer. Specifically, this means that a choice has to be considered whether the interpreter will begin with creedal formulations that Confess that Jesus Christ is “true God” and “true man,” and then work backward to the way this teaching arose in the early church and the New Testament. One of the exciting discoveries in recent scholarship has been to see how even the indirect evidence of the Gospels and Epistles witnesses to the truth enshrined in the creeds, and provides the “raw materials” out of which the later church built its Confession, “Thou art the King of glory, O Christ
Versions - " The merit of his translation is its noble simplicity and truthfulness: thus "favour" for "grace," "love" for "charity," "acknowledge" for "confess," "repentance" for "penance," "elders" for "priests," "congregation" for "church
Holy Spirit, Gifts of - (1) A basic criterion for distinguishing Spirit-gifted people from impostors is whether they Confess Jesus as Lord (vv
Solomon - He acknowledges His omniscience as knowing already the plague of each heart which the individual may Confess before Him. ...
The queen of Sheba Confessed that she believed not the report until her own eyes saw its truth, yet that half was not told her, his wisdom and prosperity exceeded the fame which she had heard (compare spiritually John 1:46; John 4:42)
Eli - ...
'The Psalm of Ichabod, the son of Phinehas, the son of Eli, which he sang after that the Lord had repented Him of the evil, and had restored the priesthood to the house of Eli: I will Confess my iniquity and the iniquity of my fathers
Church - Thus government flows necessarily from the very nature of the institution of the Christian church; and since this institution has the authority of Christ and his Apostles, it is not to be supposed, that its government was left unprovided for; and if they have in fact made such a provision, it is no more a matter of mere option with Christians whether they will be subject to government in the church, than it is optional with them to Confess Christ by becoming its members
Sanctify, Sanctification - To Confess Him and His words is the same as building upon them; whilst to be ashamed of them is to refuse to make them the foundation for conduct
Righteousness - ’ It may sound like a Confession of defeat to say that we cannot reproduce the word precisely in English. ]'>[11] But here is what faith-righteousness says: Confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord, believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, [12] and you will be saved; for with his heart man believes and is justified, with his mouth he Confesses and is saved
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - Indeed, for them the divine name, YHWH, was given to Jesus, that every knee should bow to him and every tongue Confess that he is Lord (Philippians 2:9-11 ; cf. It can be concluded that belief in Jesus' essential divinity (along with his obvious full humanity) extends to all levels of early Christian Confession. The Confession is therefore rooted in the earliest days of church life where the prevailing linguistic milieu was Semitic
Jesus Christ - " That we shall all be judged, we allow; but how do you prove that Christ shall be our Judge? Because, adds the apostle, it is written, "As I live, saith the Lord, every knee shall bow to me, and every tongue shall Confess to God, " Romans 14:10-11 , with Is
Absolution - And following as they do on his great Confession—being a prize and reward of that Confession—they belong to him as a man who had attained by the revelation of the Father to a true faith that Jesus was the Christ the Son of God: they belonged to all the Apostles as men of like faith: and they belong to the whole Church of which these twelve were the nucleus, in proportion as that faith is alive in it. Evangelical religious newspapers have found that they supply a demand by setting apart a column, often largely used, for the answers of some minister of reputation to men who open their minds to him, Confess their chief sins, doubts, or temptations, and seck comfort through him. —In the NT age there is no trace of the practice of private Confession to ministers of the Church for private absolution (James 5:16 cannot be so interpreted). But very early in the history of the Church it became customary for those who, after baptism, had fallen into gross sins, especially the sins of idolatry, adultery, or murder, to be cut off from fellowship, and to be readmitted after repentance manifested by public Confession in the church. 440), the custom grew of private Confession and private absolution. ’ It is admitted that ‘perfect sorrow for sin without addition of external rite blots out the stains, and restores the peace of God in the soul’; yet this perfect sorrow involves in a well-instructed Catholic the intention of Confessing and receiving the priest’s absolution when opportunity offers. Protestants truly penitent may indeed receive the peace of God, because this desire of Confession may be regarded as implicit in them. But Confession to the priest is a necessary duty, and priestly absolution may not be omitted without loss of salvation. ...
The Lutheran Church did not entirely abolish Confession and absolution; but Luther made changes which very greatly altered its character. Confession was not made compulsory: it was a free opportunity that might be used in ease of sins about which the penitent could not otherwise attain to peace. Luther made it unnecessary in Confession to enumerate every individual sin; and so little was absolution sacerdotal that it might be given by a Christian layman. In course of time, private Confession to the pastor mostly died out in the Lutheran Church. ’ From this, the teaching of the Church of England appears to be similar to that of the Lutheran, making Confession exceptional not compulsory, and absolution not sacerdotal, but a part of the ministry of the Word. ...
In the service for the visitation of the sick, the minister is enjoined ‘to move the sick person to make a special Confession of his sins if he feel his conscience troubled with any weighty matter. After which Confession the priest shall absolve him (if he humbly and heartily desire it) after this sort: “Our Lore Jesus Christ, who hath left power to His Church to absolve all sinners who truly repent and believe in Him, of His great merey forgive thee thine offences: and by His authority committed to me, I absolve thee from all thy sins in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. ‘Penance’; Canon Carter’s The Doctrine of Confession in the Church of England; Dean Wace’s Confession, and Absolution; Dr. Drury’s Confession and Absolution; Dr
Will - Even we, whose minds are enlightened by the pure precepts of the Gospel, and urged by the motives which it suggests, must still be convinced of our weakness and depravity, and Confess, in the words of the tenth article, that "we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the grace of God preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us when we have that good will. And surely the Confessions, the prayers, the repentance, and the sacrifices of the humble and pious of all ages show that they felt, not only that they were themselves to blame for their actions, and therefore that they might have done otherwise, that is, they had a free will, but that, to make this will operative in spiritual matters, they required an aid beyond the reach of mere human attainment
Propitiation - (d) The idea of the offender hiding or covering his sin is not tolerated; he is to Confess and repent of it: ‘the object is never the sin, but the person (or thing) on whose behalf the offering is made’ (ib
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - He also felt the full influence of that great development of Egyptian monasticism which was encouraged by the seclusion of Athanasius during his third exile and by the persecution of the "holy solitaries" after his death, and which made so deep an impression on the as yet unconverted Augustine ( Confess
Elisha - ...
The mission of Elijah, as his name implied, was to bring Israel to Confess that Jehovah alone is God ('Εel ); Elisha further taught them, as his name implies, that Jehovah if so Confessed would prove the salvation of His people
Religion (2) - Augustine (Confess. ‘Having then a great high priest, who hath passed through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our Confession … let us draw near with boldness unto the throne of grace’ (Hebrews 4:14; Hebrews 4:16)
Offerings And Sacrifices - In the scapegoat ritual the high priest was to lay both hands on the animal and Confess the sins of the whole congregation in order to expressly transfer the sins to the goat
Gospel (2) - He foretold His death and resurrection, directly He had brought His disciples to Confess His Messiahship (Matthew 16:21)
John the Baptist - In the case of all who came to him John insisted upon repentance; and they ‘were baptized of him in Jordan, Confessing their sins’ (Matthew 3:2; Matthew 3:6). His baptism, we have said, was a baptism of preparation for the Kingdom, preparation which took the form of repentance and Confession. But if John’s words of protest (Matthew 3:14) imply that even in the baptism of Christ the cleansing aspect of the rite was in view, was it not proper that the ‘Lamb of God’ (John 1:29; John 1:36), who had no sense of personal guilt, nothing to repent of or Confess, should even now begin to bear upon His heart the burden of the sins of others, even as on a coming day He was to bear them ‘in his own body on the tree’ (1 Peter 2:24)?...
2. Even if we suppose that in spite of their kinship and the friendship between their mothers the two had not met before, the fact that John’s baptism was a baptism of repentance and Confession seems to imply a personal interview with applicants previous to the performance of the rite—an interview which in the case of Jesus must have revealed to one with the Baptist’s insight the beauty and glory of His character
John, Epistles of - 115 to the Philippians, quotes the words, ‘For whosoever does not Confess that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is antichrist,’ with evident allusion to 1 John 4:3 , though the author is not named
Offering - 5:7-8), 'ăbaṭṭı̂yach represents the repayment made to one who has been wronged: “Then they shall Confess their sin which they have done: and he shall recompense his trespass with the principal thereof, and add unto it the fifth part thereof, and give it unto him against whom he hath trespassed
Peter Epistles of - Through His suffering they have been made heirs of a sure salvation; consequently they should continue loyally to Confess His Lordship. But they are not to compromise their ideals by resorting to the heathen mode of living, nor are they to hesitate in Confessing Christ’s Lordship (1 Peter 3:15). They are admonished to refrain from needlessly provoking the authorities, recognizing in the latter Divinely appointed guardians of the civil order (1 Peter 2:13-17), and they are to suffer willingly for righteousness’ sake; that is, they are to stand loyal to their Confession of Christ and to affirm unhesitatingly their hope of salvation, and thus they may congratulate themselves on suffering for the name of Christ, although formally they are being punished for crimes with which their opponents are-falsely, the author hopes-charging them. This, so far as our extant information is concerned, is the first time in history when the mere Confession of the name ‘Christian’ itself constituted a punishable offence in the eyes of the law, but henceforth persecution for the ‘Name’ was the ordinary form of procedure. Henceforth, if one persistently Confessed Christianity, that in itself was sufficient basis for legal action. ...
1 Peter can hardly have been designed to meet the new condition of affairs following the rescript of Trajan, if, as seems probable, the mere Confession of Christianity was henceforth the only point needing to be established in law (‘si deferantur et arguantur Prayer - A request or petition for mercies; or it is "an offering up our desires to God, for things agreeable to his will, in the name of Christ, by the help of his Spirit, with Confession of our sins, and thankful acknowledgment of his mercies. ) It has been generally divided into adoration, by which we express our sense of the goodness and greatness of God, Daniel 4:34-35 ; Confession, by which we acknowledge our unworthiness, 1 Samuel 24:1-228 ; supplication, by which we pray for pardon, grace, or any blessing we want, Matthew 7:7 ; intercession, by which we pray for others, James 5:16 ; and thanksgiving, by which we express our gratitude to God, Philippians 4:6 . We should not content ourselves merely with generals; but if we wish to be furnished with larger supplies of matter, we must descend to particulars in our Confessions, petitions, and thanksgivings. We should express our sins, our wants, and our sorrows, with a particular sense of the mournful circumstances that attend them: it will enlarge our hearts with prayer and humiliation if we Confess the aggravations that increase the guilt of our sins, viz. We should let those parts of prayer have the largest share in the performance for which our spirits is best prepared, whether it be adoration, petition, Confession, or thanksgiving
Sinlessness - He never makes any Confession of personal sin. Of His intimate life of prayer we possess pretty ample records; but in none of these are there any Confessions of sin. The most prominent names of the OT are all remarkable for their frequent and ample Confessions of personal guilt. John Confesses: ‘If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us’ (1 John 1:8). If He sinned, like the other children of Adam, but failed to be humbled and to Confess His fault, this brings Him down beneath the religious heroes of the race; for what feature of religious genius is more essential than humility? But if it was no defect, what other explanation of it can there be but sinlessness?...
4
Ignatius - As to when and why Ignatius took the name of Θεοφόρος, we have to Confess complete ignorance. It would be useless to retrace the history of this painful controversy with its tedious conflict of Confessional (Saumaise, Blondel, Daillé) or pseudo-critical (Baur, Hilgenfeld, Lipsius) prejudices, which was finally terminated by Zahn’s Ignatius von Antiochien (Gotha, 1873) and F
Josephus - Presently his flatterers, one here, another there, called out words which were not to turn out to his good, addressing him as a god, and adding: “Be thou propitious; if till now we feared thee as a man, henceforth we Confess that thou art exalted above mortal nature
John Epistles of - The statement (1 John 4:2-3) is followed by a short meditation (1 John 4:4-6) on the attitude of the Church and the world to the two Confessions and those who make them. Every spirit which does not Confess (dissolves?) Jesus is ‘not of God’; Antichrist is working in many subordinates (1 John 2:2-3). This is shown by the writer’s insistence on the Confession that Jesus is the Messiah (1 John 2:22; cf. The Confession demanded of ‘Jesus Christ come in flesh’ is a protest against the Gnostic doctrine of the impossibility of real union between the spiritual seed and flesh
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - Let us therefore-and especially those who have caused strife-confess our offences and not harden our hearts as Pharaoh did, lest like Pharaoh we perish (li
Divinity of Christ - It was the primary conviction which entitled to the name of believer, and Confession of it meant salvation. James [5]) practically Confess the failure of past attempts, and succeed in evading the postulate of Divinity only by attributing to the human life so ample a magnificence as to make it embrace all that Christian thought understands by Divinity
Koran - These letters the Mahometans believe to be the peculiar marks of the Koran, and to conceal several profound mysteries; the certain understanding of which, the more intelligent Confess, has not been communicated to any mortal, their prophet only excepted: notwithstanding which, some take the liberty of guessing at their meaning by that species of cabala called by the Jews, Notarikon. ' The Koran, therefore, upon a fair examination, far from supporting its arrogant claim to a supernatural work, sinks below the level of many compositions Confessedly of human original; and still lower does it fall in our estimation, when compared with that pure and perfect pattern which we justly admire in the Scriptures of truth
Paul - Paul had committed some heinous offence; and carrying him off, he gave orders that he should be forced by scourging to Confess his crime
Polycarp - 1]'>[2]: ‘Whosoever shall not Confess the testimony of the Cross is of the devil; and whosoever shall pervert the oracles of the Lord to his own lusts and say that there is neither resurrection nor judgment, that man is the first-born of Satan’). The proconsul ordered his herald to proclaim in the middle of the stadium: ‘Polycarp hath Confessed himself to be a Christian’ (xii
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - Though faint echoes of this idea may possibly be met with here and there in the Gospel,—I Confess I do not notice them,—the predominating thought is essentially that of Christ as the Son of God, who obediently executes what the Father has shown and appointed Him’ (ZThK Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - This view of Palestine is always present to Jerome, however much he has to Confess the actual secularization of Jerusalem (lviii
Augustinus, Aurelius - For his first thirty-three years we have, in the Confessions , the most perfect of religious autobiographies (see below, § 8, ad init. The word "Confessions" includes not only the idea of self-accusation, but also that of thanksgiving (see IX. This may modify our natural inferences from the self-accusing language of the Confessions. "He knew that he did not know, and was not ashamed to Confess the fact . " Augustine's account of her life and character, and of his conversations with her, shortly before her death, on Eternal Life, forms perhaps the most exquisite and touching part of the Confessions (IX
Desire - For he is compelled to Confess, rather reluctantly, perhaps, that some pleasures, i
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - He induced the bishop to make a public Confession of orthodoxy, and delivered a sermon on the occasion ( Orat. It is necessary to hold to the truth that there is one God, and to Confess that there are three persons, and attributes proper to each; but for this there is need of the Spirit's help
Hermas, Known as the Shepherd - At length he succeeded in crossing the water by which his path had been washed away, and coming into smooth ground knelt to Confess his sins to God
Hippolytus Romanus - All Greek lists of the popes, as well as the Latin, include Callistus, and make no mention of Hippolytus; and the Confessed ignorance of Eusebius about the see of Hippolytus is proof enough that he was not in possession of the key to the difficulty. of Rome regarded as a matter of such purely local concern that controversy could go on at Rome for years and the outside world know nothing of it, and that although the unsuccessful claimant was a person on other grounds very widely known? Is it conceivable, if Hippolytus really set up a rival chair to Callistus, that he, whose books and letters widely circulated in the East, made no attempt to enlist on his side the bishops of the great Eastern sees? Or is it likely, if Hippolytus had started a long-continued and dangerous schism at Rome, that the predominant party should have completely condoned his offence, that he should have been honoured for centuries as a saint and a martyr, and that his name should have been handed down with no hint of that schism until words of his own came to light to suggest it? These improbabilities in the theory hitherto most generally received, amount almost to impossibilities, though we Confess it difficult to find a satisfactory substitute. Hippolytus was a man of whose learning the whole Roman church must have been proud; he was of undoubted piety, and of courage which he proved in his good Confession afterwards
Expiation - When we speak, too, of vicarious sacrifice, we do not mean either, on the one hand, such a substitution as that the victim should bear the same quantum of pain and suffering as the offender himself; or, on the other, that it was put in the place of the offender as a mere symbolical act, by which he Confessed his desert of punishment; but substitution made by divine appointment, by which the victim was exposed to sufferings and death instead of the offender, in virtue of which the offender himself was released. On the day appointed for this general expiation, the priest is commanded to offer a bullock and a goat, as sin offerings, the one for himself, and the other for the people; and, having sprinkled the blood of these in due form before the mercy seat, to lead forth a second goat, denominated "the scape-goat;" and, after laying both his hands upon the head of the scapegoat, and Confessing over him all the iniquities of the people, to put them upon the head of the goat, and to send the animal, thus bearing the sins of the people, away into the wilderness; in this manner expressing, by an action which cannot be misunderstood, that the atonement, which, it is affirmed, was to be effected by the sacrifice of the sin offering, consisted in removing from the people their iniquities by this translation of them to the animal. Shall we account for it by saying that sacrifices were offered for the benefit of the worshipper, but exclude the notion of expiation? But here we are obliged to confine the benefit to reconciliation and the taking away of sins, and that by the appointed means of the shedding of blood, and the presentation of blood in the holy place, accompanied by the expressive ceremony of imposition of hands upon the head of the victim; the import of which act is fixed, beyond all controversy, by the priests Confessing over that victim the sins of all the people, and at the same time imprecating upon its head the vengeance due to them, Leviticus 16:21 . Here is Confession of sin; Confession before God at the door of the tabernacle; the substitution of a victim; the figurative transfer of sins to that victim; the shedding of blood, which God appointed to make atonement for the soul; the carrying the blood into the holiest place, the very permission of which clearly marked the divine acceptance; the bearing away of iniquity; and the actual reconciliation of the people to God. They are themselves utterly silent as to this point; and the varying theories of those who reject the doctrine of atonement, in fact, Confess that their writings afford no solution of the difficulty. He first offered a bullock and a ram for his own sins, and those of the priests: putting his hands on the heads of these victims, he Confessed his own sins and the sins of his house
Person of Christ - Peter’s Confession at Cæsarea Philippi (Matthew 16:16 ) was the earliest point at which the Messianic dignity of Jesus became the explicit subject of conversation between the Master and the Twelve; this may be inferred with certainty from the wording of His question and the joy He evinced at the reply. Peter’s Confession; yet at least that crisis does mark an incipient understanding of its significance on the disciples’ part. No prophet had ever called upon men to Confess his name; no prophet had declared that the relation of men to him would decide their final destiny; no prophet had ever said: ‘All things are delivered unto me of my Father. He called men to repentance; He condemned the ‘righteous’ unsparingly; He predicted that He should one day judge the world; He urged Confession upon His disciples, and put the Lord’s Prayer upon their lips: yet He Himself never uttered the cry of the burdened conscience, never spoke one word of contrition
Justinianus i, Emperor - He continued to coerce the recalcitrant bishops of Africa, depriving some of their sees, and, after various negotiations with Vigilius, issued in 551 a second edict against the Three Articles addressed to the whole Christian world, which has been preserved under the name of the Confession of Faith, ὁμολογία πίστεως Ἰουστινιανοῦ αὐτοκράτορος (Mansi, ix. 414), addressed to the patriarch Eutychius, in which he owns that he was in the wrong and is now glad to Confess it