What does Compassion mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἐσπλαγχνίσθη to be moved as to one’s bowels 6
σπλαγχνισθεὶς to be moved as to one’s bowels 4
σπλαγχνίζομαι to be moved as to one’s bowels 2
וְרִֽחַמְךָ֣ to love 1
וְרִחֲמֶ֑ךָ to love 1
וְרִחַמְתִּ֖י to love 1
אֲרַחֵֽם to love 1
מֵרַחֵ֖ם to love 1
וְרִֽחַמְתִּ֑ים to love 1
ἐλέησον to have mercy on. / to help one afflicted or seeking aid. / to help the afflicted 1
וְרִֽחֲמֽוּם to love 1
וְרִחַ֖ם to love 1
יְרַֽחֲמֵ֔נוּ to love 1
רַחֲמֶיהָ֮ womb. 1
לְרַחֲמִ֛ים womb. 1
לְרַחֲמִים֙ womb. 1
וַֽיְרַחֲמֵם֙ to love 1
יִתְנֶחָֽם to be sorry 1
רַח֨וּם ׀ compassionate. 1
וְ֝הִנָּחֵ֗ם to be sorry 1
ἐλέους mercy: kindness or good will towards the miserable and the afflicted 1
יִתְנֶחָ֑ם to be sorry 1
לְחֻמְלָ֣ה (Qal) to spare 1
וַתַּחְמֹ֣ל (Qal) to spare 1
חָמַ֛ל (Qal) to spare 1
חָמַ֥ל (Qal) to spare 1
חֲמַלְתֶּ֖ם (Qal) to spare 1
πολύσπλαγχνός full of pity 1
οἰκτιρμοῦ compassion 1
οἰκτίρω to pity 1
οἰκτιρήσω to pity 1
ἔλεος mercy: kindness or good will towards the miserable and the afflicted 1
וְרַֽחֲמִ֔ים womb. 1

Definitions Related to Compassion

G4697


   1 to be moved as to one’s bowels, hence to be moved with Compassion, have Compassion (for the bowels were thought to be the seat of love and pity).
   

G3627


   1 to pity, have Compassion on.
   

H7355


   1 to love, love deeply, have mercy, be compassionate, have tender affection, have Compassion.
      1a (Qal) to love.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to have Compassion, be compassionate.
            1b1a of God, man.
      1c (Pual) to be shown Compassion, be compassionate.
      

H7356


   1 womb.
   2 Compassion.
   

H7349


   1 compassionate.
      1a always of God with one possible exception.
      

H5162


   1 to be sorry, console oneself, repent, regret, comfort, be comforted.
      1a (Niphal).
         1a1 to be sorry, be moved to pity, have Compassion.
         1a2 to be sorry, rue, suffer grief, repent.
         1a3 to comfort oneself, be comforted.
         1a4 to comfort oneself, ease oneself.
      1b (Piel) to comfort, console.
      1c (Pual) to be comforted, be consoled.
      1d (Hithpael).
         1d1 to be sorry, have Compassion.
         1d2 to rue, repent of.
         1d3 to comfort oneself, be comforted.
         1d4 to ease oneself.
         

G3628


   1 Compassion, pity, mercy.
      1a bowels in which Compassion resides, a heart of Compassion.
      1b emotions, longings, manifestations of pity.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 1653, eleeo.
      See entry 5842 for comparison of synonyms.
      

G1656


   1 mercy: kindness or good will towards the miserable and the afflicted, joined with a desire to help them.
      1a of men towards men: to exercise the virtue of mercy, show one’s self merciful.
      1b of God towards men: in general providence; the mercy and clemency of God in providing and offering to men salvation by Christ.
      1c the mercy of Christ, whereby at his return to judgment he will bless true Christians with eternal life.
      

G1653


   1 to have mercy on.
   2 to help one afflicted or seeking aid.
   3 to help the afflicted, to bring help to the wretched.
   4 to experience mercy.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 3628, oikturmos.
   See entry 5842 for comparison of synonyms.
   

H2550


   1 (Qal) to spare, pity, have Compassion on.
   

G4184


   1 full of pity, very kind.
   

Frequency of Compassion (original languages)

Frequency of Compassion (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Compassion
COMPASSION . See Pity.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Institute of the Divine Compassion
Founded in New York City, 1873, by Right Reverend Thomas Preston, for the reformation of erring girls, and the religious, mental, and industrial training of girls in moral danger from ignorance, indolence, waywardness, or dangerous influences. The order has six houses, including a college, an academy, two schools, a Catholic Girls' Club, and a house of religious instruction, all in the Archdiocese of New York. The mother-house is located at White Plains, New York.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Compassion
That (human) disposition that fuels Acts of kindness and mercy. Compassion, a form of love, is aroused within us when we are confronted with those who suffer or are vulnerable. Compassion often produces action to alleviate the suffering, but sometimes geographical distances or lack of means prevent people from acting upon their compassionate feelings. Compassion is not a uniquely Christian response to suffering (cf. Exodus 2:6 ; Luke 10:33 ), even though Christians have unique reasons for nurturing their compassionate dispositions.
The Hebrew (hamal [1], rachuwm [2]) and Greek (splanchnisomai [3]) words sometimes translated as "compassion" also bear a broader meaning such as "to show pity, " "to love, " and "to show mercy." Other near synonyms for compassion in English are "to be loved by, " "to show concern for, " "to be tenderhearted, " and "to act kindly."
The Old Testament . God's compassion is freely (Exodus 33:19 ; Romans 9:15 ) and tenderly given, like a mother's (Isaiah 49:15 ) or father's (Hosea 11:8 ) compassion for a child. Yahweh boldly declares, "I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion" (Exodus 33:19 ). While his compassion can be thwarted by disobedience (Deuteronomy 13:17 ; 30:3 ; 2 Chronicles 30:9 ), there are times when his disobedient people's only hope is that his compassion overcomes his anger (Hosea 11:8 ). Yahweh's compassion is rooted in his covenant relationship with his people (2 Kings 13:23 ). Hope for the future (Isaiah 49:13 ; Jeremiah 12:15 ) is also rooted in God's compassion. It is said that compassion follows wrath (Jeremiah 12:15 ; Lamentations 3:32 ), is new each morning (Lamentations 3:22-23 ), and overcomes sin (Psalm 51:1 ; Micah 7:19 ) rather than ignoring it.
Since compassionate Acts flow from compassionate persons, we are not surprised to learn that compassion is constitutive of God's very being (Exodus 34:6 , "The Lord, the Lord, the compassionate and gracious God" ). Echoes of this declaration are found throughout Scripture. God's compassion was essential for the maintenance of the covenant and his people praised him for it continually (Psalm 78:38 ; 86:15 ; 103:13 ; 145:8 ).
"Compassion" is not frequently used with a human subject. It is found, however, in a mother's attitude toward her son (1 Kings 3:26 ), a princess's reaction to an abandoned child (Exodus 2:6 ), and the Ziphites' treatment of Saul (1 Samuel 23:21 ).
The New Testament . The intertestamental literature and the New Testament continue to speak about God as the compassionate one. God's compassion is demonstrated in his Son's ministry for and among his people (Matthew 9:36 ; Mark 6:34 ). The messianic compassion is extended to the helpless crowds (Matthew 9:36 ), the sickly masses (Matthew 14:14 ), the hungry people (Mark 8:2 ), and the blind men (Matthew 20:34 ). The waiting father (Luke 15:20 ) is filled with compassion when he sees his wayward son returning—just as God has compassion on us and accepts us when we repent and return to him.
Believers learn about compassion through example and exhortation. Imitating God and/or Christ has led many to lives of exemplary compassion. The Scriptures also exhort believers to make compassion an integral aspect of their lives (Zechariah 7:9 ; Colossians 3:12 ). Compassion needs to be nurtured and practiced or even this basic love response can grow dull and cold.
David H. Engelhart
See also Love ; Mercy
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Compassion
Is that species of affection which is excited either by the actual distress of its object, or by some impending calamity which appears inevitable. It is a benevolent sorrow for the sufferings or approaching misery of another. The etymology of the word expresses this idea with strict propriety, as it signifies suffering with the object. Hobbes makes this a mere selfish passion, and defines it as "being fear for ourselves." Hutcheson resolves it into instinct; but Dr. Butler much more properly considers it as an original distinct particular affection in human nature. It may be considered as a generic name, comprehending several other affections; as mercy, commiseration, pity. This affection, (as well as every other of our nature, ) no doubt, was wisely given us by our Creator. "Ideas of fitness, " as Saurin observes, "seldom make much impression on the bulk of mankind; it was necessary therefore to make sensibility supply the want of reflection; and by a counter-blow with which the miseries of a neighbour strike our feeling, produce a disposition in us to relieve him."
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Compassion of God
Is the infinite greatness of his mercy and love, whereby he relieves the miseries of his people. This perfection of Jehovah is conspicuously displayed in the gift of his Son, John 3:16 . the revelation of his will, Hosea 8:12 . the bounties of his providence, Psa 114: 9. the exercise of his patience, Romans 2:4 . the promise of his mercy, Psalms 78:38 . the manifestation of his presence, Matthew 18:20 . and the provision of eternal glory, 1 Peter 1:4 .
See MERCY.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Compassion (2)
COMPASSION.—See Pity.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Compassion
See Pity.
Webster's Dictionary - Compassion
(1):
(n.) Literally, suffering with another; a sensation of sorrow excited by the distress or misfortunes of another; pity; commiseration.
(2):
(v. t.) To pity.
King James Dictionary - Compassion
COMPASSION, n.
1. A suffering with another painful sympathy a sensation of sorrow excited by the distress or misfortunes of another pity commiseration. Compassion is a mixed passion, compounded of love and sorrow at least some portion of love generally attends the pain or regret, or is excited by it. Extreme distress of an enemy even changes enmity into at least temporary affection. He being full of compassion, forgave their iniquity. Psalms 78 .
His father had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him. Luke 15 .
COMPASSION, To pity.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Compassion, Merciful
A. Verb.
Râcham (רָחַם, Strong's #7355), “to have compassion, be merciful, pity.” The words from this root are found 125 times in all parts of the Old Testament. The root is also found in Assyrian, Ethiopic, and Aramaic.The verb is translated “love” once: “I will love thee, O Lord …” (Ps. 18:1). Râcham is also used in God’s promise to declare His name to Moses: “I will make all my goodness pass before thee, and I will proclaim the name of the Lord before thee; and will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy” (Exod. 33:19). So men pray: “Remember, O Lord, thy tender mercies and thy loving-kindnesses” (Ps. 25:6); and Isaiah prophesies messianic restoration: “… With great mercies will I gather thee.… But with everlasting kindness will I have mercy on thee, saith the Lord thy Redeemer” (Isa. 54:7-8). This is the heart of salvation by the suffering Servant-Messiah.
B. Nouns.
Rechem (רֶחֶם, Strong's #7358), “bowels; womb; mercy.” The first use of rechem is in its primary meaning of “womb”: “The Lord had fast closed up all the wombs of the house of Abimelech” (Gen. 20:18). The word is personified in Judg. 5:30: “Have they not divided the prey; to every man a damsel or two …?” In another figurative sense, the KJV reads in 1 Kings 3:26: “Her bowels yearned upon her son,” which the NIV translates more idiomatically: "[1] was filled with compassion for her son.” The greatest frequency is in this figurative sense of “tender love,” such as a mother has for the child she has borne.Racham (רַחֲמִים, 7356), “bowels; mercies; compassion.” This noun, always used in the plural intensive, occurs in Gen. 43:14: “And God Almighty give you mercy [2].” In Gen. 43:30, it is used of Joseph’s feelings toward Benjamin: “His bowels did yearn upon his brother.” (NIV, “He was deeply moved at the sight of his brother.”) Racham is most often used of God, as by David in 2 Sam. 24:14: “Let us fall now into the hand of the Lord; for his mercies are great.…” We have the equivalent Aramaic word in Daniel’s request to his friends: “That they would desire mercies of the God of heaven concerning this secret …” (Dan. 2:18).
The Greek version of the Old Testament racham consists chiefly of three groups of words that come into the New Testament. Eleos is the most important, and it is used to translate several Hebrew words. Mary’s song recalls the promise in Ps. 103:11, 17, where eleos translates both rechem and chesed as “mercy”: “His mercy is on them that fear him from generation to generation” (Luke 1:50). Racham is probably behind the often-heard plea: “Thou son of David, have mercy on us” (Matt. 9:27).
C. Adjective.
Rachûm (רַחוּם, Strong's #7349), “compassionate; merciful.” The adjective is used in that important proclamation of God’s name to Moses: “The Lord, The Lord God, merciful and gracious …” (Exod. 34:6, NASB, NIV, “compassionate”).
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Compassion, Compassionate
A — 1: οἰκτείρω (Strong's #3627 — Verb — oikteiro — oyk-ti'-ro ) "to have pity, a feeling of distress through the ills of others," is used of God's compassion, Romans 9:15 .
A — 2: σπλαγχνίζομαι (Strong's #4697 — Verb — splanchnizomai — splangkh-nid'-zom-ahee ) "to be moved as to one's inwards (splanchna), to be moved with compassion, to yearn with compassion," is frequently recorded of Christ towards the multitude and towards individual sufferers, Matthew 9:36 ; 14:14 ; 15:32 ; 18:27 ; 20:34 ; Mark 1:41 ; 6:34 ; 8:2 ; 9:22 (of the appeal of a father for a demon-possessed son); Luke 7:13 ; 10:33 ; of the father in the parable of the Prodigal Son, Luke 15:20 . (Moulton and Milligan consider the verb to have been coined in the Jewish dispersion).
A — 3: συμπαθέω (Strong's #4834 — Verb — sumpatheo — soom-path-eh'-o ) "to suffer with another (sun, 'with,' pascho, 'to suffer'), to be affected similarly" (Eng., "sympathy"), to have "compassion" upon, Hebrews 10:34 , of "compassionating" those in prison, is translated "be touched with" in Hebrews 4:15 , of Christ as the High Priest. See TOUCH.
A — 4: ἐλεέω (Strong's #1653 — Verb — eleeo — el-eh-eh'-o ) "to have mercy (eleos, "mercy"), to show kindness, by beneficence, or assistance," is translated "have compassion" in Matthew 18:33 (AV); Mark 5:19 ; Jude 1:22 . See MERCY.
A — 5: μετριοπαθέω (Strong's #3356 — Verb — metriopatheo — met-ree-op-ath-eh'-o ) is rendered "have compassion," in Hebrews 5:2 , AV. See BEAR , No. 13.
B — 1: οἰκτιρμός (Strong's #3628 — Noun Masculine — oiktirmos — oyk-tir-mos' ) akin to A, No. 1, is used with splanchna (see below), "the viscera, the inward parts," as the seat of emotion, the "heart," Philippians 2:1 ; Colossians 3:12 , "a heart of compassion" (AV, "bowels of mercies"). In Hebrews 10:28 it is used with choris, "without," (lit., "without compassions"). It is translated "mercies" in Romans 12:1 ; 2 Corinthians 1:3 . See MERCY.
B — 2: σπλάγχνον (Strong's #4698 — Noun Neuter — splanchnon — splangkh'-non ) always used in the plural, is suitably rendered "compassion" in the RV of Colossians 3:12 ; 1 John 3:17 ; "compassions" in Philippians 2:1 , Cp. A, No. 2. See BOWELS.
C — 1: συμπαθής (Strong's #4835 — Adjective — sumpathes — soom-path-ace' ) denotes suffering with, "compassionate," 1 Peter 3:8 , RV (AV, "having compassion"). See A, No. 3.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Compassion
To feel passion with someone, to enter sympathetically into their sorrow and pain. Compassion in English translations represents at least five Hebrew and eight Greek terms. Chamal means “to regret,” “be sorry for,” “grieve over,” or “spare someone.” Thus the rich man “refrained” (NIV) from taking his own sheep and took the poor man's ( 2 Samuel 12:4 ). Pharaoh's daughter “had pity” on the baby Moses (Exodus 2:6 ). David spared Mephibosheth for Jonathan's sake (2 Samuel 21:7 ). Often it expresses God's anger and decision no longer to show mercy and pity (Zechariah 11:6 ). Beyond this the Bible points to God's plans to again have compassion for His people (Joel 2:18 ; compare Malachi 3:17 ; Genesis 19:16 ; 2 Chronicles 36:15 ; Isaiah 63:9 ).
Chen represents what is aesthetically beautiful. It means then to possess grace and charm and to be gracious. God looked to pour out a spirit of grace or “compassion” ( Zechariah 12:10 NRSV) on His people so they would mourn for the one they pierced. Bildad told Job to “implore the compassion of the Almighty” ( Job 8:5 NAS).
Chus is an emotional expression of crying and feeling with someone who is hurting. With the emotion goes the intent to help. God could forbid Israel to have such pity ( Deuteronomy 7:16 ). God refuses to have pity on a disobedient people (Ezekiel 5:11 ). God's history had been a history of compassion in which He did not destroy His people (Ezekiel 20:17 ). God's people should pray for Him to “spare” them (Joel 2:17 ). Jonah had “compassion” (Jonah 4:10 NAS) on a plant but did not want God to have compassion on a city ( Jonah 4:11 ). Nehemiah asked for “compassion” (Nehemiah 13:22 ). Chus most often appears in Hebrew in a formula which may be translated, “Do not let your eye cry over, or have regrets over” something.
Nichum or nocham means to “be sorry for,” “regret,” “comfort,” “console.” It is more than emotion. It includes a will to change the situation. Thus God “was sorry” He made people ( Genesis 6:6 NAS). Still God acted to preserve human life ( Genesis 8:21 ), for He identifies with human weakness. In His basic nature He does not “change His mind” (1 Samuel 15:29 NAS), translating Hebrew nicham . Still Scripture describes times when Yahweh “repented” (Exodus 32:14 ; 2 Samuel 24:16 ; Jonah 3:10 as examples). In His freedom God can announce one set of plans, see the response and weakness of the people affected, and decide not to carry out the plans. Thus Hosea 11:8 concludes, “my repentings are kindled together” (KJV) or “all my compassion is aroused” (NAS). At another time God can say, “I will have no compassion” ( Hosea 13:14 NAS).
Racham is related to the Hebrew word for “womb” and expresses a mother's ( Isaiah 49:15 ) or father's (Psalm 103:13 ) love and compassion, a feeling of pity and devotion to a helpless child. It is a deep emotional feeling seeking a concrete expression of love (Genesis 43:14 ; Deuteronomy 13:17 ). This word always expresses the feeling of the superior or more powerful for the inferior or less powerful and thus never expresses human feeling for God. The word seeks to bring security to the life of the one for whom compassion is felt. The majority of Bible uses of racham have God as subject. Compare Hosea 2:4 ,Hosea 2:4,2:23 ; Zechariah 1:16 ; Zechariah 10:6 . God “has compassion on all he had made” (Psalm 145:9 ).
The New Testament builds on the Old Testament understanding of God's compassion. The central New Testament words are eleeo and splagxnizomai . The first—eleeo —is used in the Greek Old Testament to translate most of the Hebrew words listed above. It represents the emotion aroused by another person's undeserved suffering or pain. It is something an orator tries to kindle in an audience or a lawyer seeks to elicit from a judge. Jesus commanded the Pharisees to learn God's desire for compassion (Matthew 9:13 ; Matthew 12:7 ). Jesus said even slaves should practice compassion as He taught Peter about forgiveness (Matthew 18:33 ). God showed compassion in healing the demoniac (Mark 5:19 ). Christians need to show compassion to those who waver or doubt (Jude 1:22 ). God's commands for compassion from disciples finds its roots in the nature of God, who is full of compassion (Ephesians 2:4 ; 1 Peter 1:3 ). See Mercy.
Splagxnizomai is related to the Greek noun for inward parts much as Hebrew rachemim . Here is located the center of personal feelings and emotions. Before Christ's appearance the Greeks apparently did not use this word to speak of compassion and mercy, it being more closely related to courage. It is not clear when the shift in meaning to compassion occurred. Some of the apocryphal Jewish writings before Christ do use the term to mean mercy. In the parable of the unforgiving servant, the master had compassion and forgave the servant's debt (Matthew 18:27 ). The prodigal son's father had compassion on him (Luke 15:20 ). The Good Samaritan had compassion for the injured traveler (Luke 10:33 ). Jesus had compassion on the crowds (Mark 6:34 ). People needing help asked Jesus for compassion (Mark 9:22 ; compare Matthew 9:36 ; Matthew 20:34 ). Paul saw compassion as a quality expected of believers (Philippians 2:1 ; Colossians 3:12 ). Paul said he related to his readers in the compassion of Christ (Philippians 1:8 ), that is, the quality is not an achievement by the believer but a result of being in Christ. The love of God dwells only in those who are compassionate to a person in need (1 John 3:17 ; compare Ephesians 4:32 ; 1 Peter 3:8 ). Compassion finds its source in God's compassion (James 5:11 ). In compassion He has provided salvation and forgiveness (Luke 1:78 ).
Oiktiro is related to lamentation and grief for the dead and came to mean sympathetic participation in grief. Such sympathy or compassion stands ready to help the one who has suffered loss. In the Greek Old Testament translation oiktiro translates words related to chen and racham . Paul taught that God is the Father and source of compassion (2 Corinthians 1:3 ; compare James 5:11 ). He has total freedom in exercising compassion (Romans 9:15 ). Humans can sacrifice themselves for God's causes only because God has sacrificed Himself in mercy (Romans 12:1 ; compare Luke 6:36 ; Philippians 2:1 ; Colossians 3:12 ).
Sumpatheo means to suffer what someone else suffers. It came to mean to suffer with, alongside, to sympathize. Peter listed it among the basic Christian virtues ( 1 Peter 3:8 ). Having come to earth and endured all kinds of human temptations, Jesus exercises sympathy for our weaknesses (Hebrews 4:15 ). The writer of Hebrews could recall his readers' experience of having sympathy for and thus helping others imprisoned for their faith (Hebrews 10:33-34 ).
Metriopatheo refers to the ability to be moderate in emotions or passions. An Old Testament or human minister realizes personal weaknesses and thus moderates personal anger at another's weaknesses ( Hebrews 5:2 ).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Compassion
See MERCY.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Pity Compassion
The noun ‘pity’ occurs only once in the AV_ of the NT (Matthew 18:33, RV_ ‘mercy’), and once in RV_ (James 5:11). The adjective ‘pitiful’ occurs in AV_ (James 5:11; 1 Peter 3:8, RV_ ‘tender-hearted’). The Greek equivalents for these words are ἐλεεῖν (ἐλεᾶν), εὔσπλαγχνος, πολύσπλαγχνος. The word ‘compassion’ is of much more frequent occurrence, being represented in the following 21 passages of the two versions: Matthew 9:36; Matthew 14:14; Matthew 15:32; Matthew 18:27; Matthew 20:34, Mark 1:41; Mark 5:19 (RV_ ‘mercy’) Mark 6:34, Mark 8:2, Mark 9:22, Luke 7:13; Luke 10:33; Luke 15:20, Romans 9:15, Philippians 2:1 (AV_ ‘mercies’), Colossians 3:12 (AV_ ‘mercies’), Hebrews 5:2 (RV_ ‘bear gently’) Hebrews 10:28 (AV_ ‘mercy’) Hebrews 10:34, 1 John 3:17 (AV_ ‘bowels’), Judges 1:22 (RV_ ‘mercy’). The adjective form ‘compassionate’ occurs in 1 Peter 3:8 (AV_ ‘having compassion’). The Greek words corresponding to these are σπλάγχνα, σπλαγχνίζεσθαι, οἰκτείρειν, οἰκτιρμός, ἐλεεῖν (ἐλεᾶν), συμπαθής, μετριοπαθεῖν. It should be noted that the noun σπλάγχνα is found in the original with different translations in the following cases: Luke 1:78 (‘tender mercy’), 2 Corinthians 6:12 (AV_ ‘bowels,’ RV_ ‘affections’), Philippians 1:8 (AV_ ‘bowels,’ RV_ ‘tender mercies’), Philemon 1:7; Philemon 1:12; Philemon 1:20 (AV_ ‘bowels,’ RV_ ‘heart’). The noun οἰκτιρμός occurs in Romans 12:1 (‘mercies’), 2 Corinthians 1:3 (‘mercies’), the adjective οἰκτίρμων in James 5:11 (RV_ ‘merciful,’ AV_ ‘of tender mercy’). ἐλεεῖν and ἔλεος occur numerous times with the standing translation ‘to have mercy,’ ‘mercy.’ συμπαθεῖν occurs in Hebrews 4:15 (‘to be touched with the feeling of’).Of these several Greek words μετριοπαθεῖν may be left out of account, since in the one passage where it occurs (Hebrews 5:2) it has nothing to do with compassion. It signifies literally ‘to have a medium-emotion.’ While this may be in contrast to utter lack of sympathy, the context in our passage compels us to understand it in contrast to excess of indignation against sin. Hence RV_ has the correct rendering ‘who can bear gently,’ whereas AV_, ‘who can have compassion,’ translates the word as if it were equivalent to συμπαθεῖν.The other words are distinguished in their meaning as follows: σπλαγχνίζεσθαι is from σπλάγχνα = the viscera nobilia of the chest (heart, lungs, liver, spleen). This word denoted in classical Greek the seat of all violent passions, and the passions themselves, but the Hebrew øÅçÂîÄéí for which the LXX_ σπλάγχνα is the equivalent, stands only sensu bono for the seat of the tender affections and then for the affections themselves. Both in classical and in biblical Greek, therefore, σπλάγχνα covers more than ‘compassion.’ Tittmann (de Synonymis in Novo Testamento, p. 68) is quite correct in claiming this wider sense for Luke 1:78 and Colossians 3:12, where σπλάγχνα is the generic concept, which is more specifically determined by the genitives ἐλέους and οἰκτίρμων. We may add Philippians 2:1, where σπλάγχνα and οἰκτιρμοί are co-ordinated (‘bowels and mercies’). σπλάγχνα is also used in a general sense in 2 Corinthians 6:12; 2 Corinthians 7:15, Philemon 1:7; Philemon 1:12; Philemon 1:20. The verb σπλαγχνἰζεσθαι seems to be a coinage of the later Greek. It does not even occur in the LXX_ except in the active form σπλαγχνίζειν in 2 Maccabees 6:8 = ‘to eat the inwards.’ Its specific sense in the NT is that of a strong inward movement of sympathetic feeling aroused by the sight of misery. The notion of intentness upon affording relief remains in the background, much more so than in ἐλεεῖν. From this strong emotional colouring of the word is to be explained the fact that in the Gospels it does not occur in the appeals addressed by suffering persons or their friends to Jesus, except in Mark 9:22, where the critical nature of the case necessitates an appeal to the profoundest compassion of Jesus. In ordinary cases the appeal naturally employs the word in which the impulse to help is most clearly connoted, and this is ἐλεεῖν. To express the strength and inward character of the feeling the English versions often render ‘to be moved with compassion,’ but neither AV_ nor RV_ consistently (cf. the two versions in Matthew 20:34 and Mark 6:34). The verb is predicated both of God (Jesus) and of man. Its object is not merely physical but also spiritual distress (cf. Mark 6:34, Matthew 9:36 with Matthew 14:14). Ἐλεεῖν and ἔλεος are distinguished from σπλαγχνίζεσθαι by the implication of the intent to help. The same difference exists between ἐλεεῖν and οἰκτείρειν the latter being the word that in classical Greek comes closest to σπλαγχνίζεσθαι. So far as the element of feeling is concerned, both σπλαγχνίζεσθαι and οἰκτείρειν are stronger words than ἐλεεῖν. οἰκτείρειν is connected with οἴ and οἶκτος and denotes such sympathetic feeling as seeks expression in tears and lamentation. On the other hand, ἐλεεῖν, being connected with ἵλαος, ἱλάσκεσθαι, is the stronger word, so far as the impulse and readiness to afford relief require expression. A criminal begs ἔλεος of his judge, whereas hopeless suffering can be the object of οἰκτιρμός (cf. Grimm-Thayer_2, 1890, p. 203). This is, however, a valid distinction between ἐλεεῖν and οἰκτείρειν for classical Greek only. In biblical Greek it scarcely holds true that οἰκτείρειν carries no implication of the intent to help. In the LXX_ it is not seldom equivalent to ἐλεεῖν in this respect (cf. Psalms 102:13-14). For the NT οἰκτείρειν is almost a negligible quantity, the verb occurring only in Romans 9:15 (= Exodus 33:19). It is there predicated of God; the adjective occurs of men in Luke 6:36, of God in James 5:11.That ἔλεος, notwithstanding its strong practical connotation, has none the less a rich ideal content appears from its frequent equivalence to çÆñÈø, ‘lovingkindness.’ It is not bare pity aroused by the sight of misery, but has a background of antecedent love and affection. In this respect it also differs from οἰκτείρειν, which in the LXX_ stands usually for øÄçÅí. This feature is of importance soteriologically. Trench (Synonyms of the NT9, pp. 166-171) represents the ἔλεος as preceding the χάρις in the movement of the Divine mind towards the sinner, whereas in the order of manifestation the χάρις would come first. This overlooks the association of ἔλεος with çÆñÈø. The word was not colourless but had acquired from çÆñÈø the sense of pity inspired by affection. Inasmuch as the same element of affection is present in χἀρις likewise, the latter also can be said to underlie the ἔλεος (cf. Ephesians 2:4 : God is rich in ἔλεος διὰ τὴν πολλὴν ἀγαπήν). The order in the epistolary salutations (χάρις καὶ ἔλεος) is therefore not merely the order of manifestation, but also a reflex of the order in the Divine mind (1 Timothy 1:2, 2 Timothy 1:2, 2 John 1:3). As in the case of σπλαγχνίζεσθαι so with ἐλεεῖν, the exciting cause can be spiritual distress as well as physical. Heine (Synonymik des neutest. Griechisch, p. 82) observes that ἔλεος cannot have reference to sin. It would be more accurate to say that ἔλεος has no reference to sin as such, but can have reference to sin in its aspect of misery, as is proved by Matthew 5:7 (ἐλεηθήσονται, eschatologically) 18:33 (with parabolic allusion to God’s forgiveness), Romans 9:15-16; Romans 9:18; Romans 11:30-32, 2 Corinthians 4:1, 1 Timothy 1:13; 1 Timothy 1:18; 1 Peter 2:10. Particularly in the Epistle to the Hebrews the ‘sympathy’ of Christ has primary reference not to the suffering of believers in itself, but to the suffering in its moral aspect as exposing to temptation, whence also its first effect is the shielding from sin or the propitiation of sin: Hebrews 2:17-18 (‘a merciful … high priest to propitiate the sins of the people’) Hebrews 4:15-16 (‘that we may obtain mercy and grace’) Hebrews 5:8-9 (sympathetic appreciation of the nature of obedience on Christ’s part for the benefit of those who have to obey). Wherever ἔλεος is applied to spiritual salvation the aspect of sin as misery inevitably enters into the conception, and with this the further idea of the unworthiness of the recipient and the gracious character of the Divine mercy. It is perhaps different, as regards the latter element, in the miracles of the Gospels. Here the question may be raised, whether the regular translation by ‘mercy’ does not unduly suggest the moral unworthiness of those who were helped, and whether ‘pity’ would not more faithfully reproduce the associations of the original.Literature.-Cremer-Kögel, Bibl.-theol. Wörterbuch der neutest. Gräzität 10, 1912 ff., pp. 420-423; J. A. H. Tittmann, De Synonymis in Novo Testamento, 1829-32, i. 68-72; R. C. Trench, NT Synonyms9, 1880, pp. 166-171, 393; J. H. H. Schmidt, Handbuch der lat. und griech. Synonymik, 1889, pp. 750-755; G. Heine, Synonymik des neutest. Griechisch, 1898, p. 82; B. B. Warfield, ‘The Emotional Life of our Lord,’ in PriNoeton Biblical and Theological Studies, 1912, pp. 40-45.Geerhardus Vos.

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Compassion - Compassion, a form of love, is aroused within us when we are confronted with those who suffer or are vulnerable. Compassion often produces action to alleviate the suffering, but sometimes geographical distances or lack of means prevent people from acting upon their Compassionate feelings. Compassion is not a uniquely Christian response to suffering (cf. Exodus 2:6 ; Luke 10:33 ), even though Christians have unique reasons for nurturing their Compassionate dispositions. ...
The Hebrew (hamal [1], rachuwm [2]) and Greek (splanchnisomai [3]) words sometimes translated as "compassion" also bear a broader meaning such as "to show pity, " "to love, " and "to show mercy. " Other near synonyms for Compassion in English are "to be loved by, " "to show concern for, " "to be tenderhearted, " and "to act kindly. God's Compassion is freely (Exodus 33:19 ; Romans 9:15 ) and tenderly given, like a mother's (Isaiah 49:15 ) or father's (Hosea 11:8 ) Compassion for a child. Yahweh boldly declares, "I will have Compassion on whom I will have Compassion" (Exodus 33:19 ). While his Compassion can be thwarted by disobedience (Deuteronomy 13:17 ; 30:3 ; 2 Chronicles 30:9 ), there are times when his disobedient people's only hope is that his Compassion overcomes his anger (Hosea 11:8 ). Yahweh's Compassion is rooted in his covenant relationship with his people (2 Kings 13:23 ). Hope for the future (Isaiah 49:13 ; Jeremiah 12:15 ) is also rooted in God's Compassion. It is said that Compassion follows wrath (Jeremiah 12:15 ; Lamentations 3:32 ), is new each morning (Lamentations 3:22-23 ), and overcomes sin (Psalm 51:1 ; Micah 7:19 ) rather than ignoring it. ...
Since Compassionate Acts flow from Compassionate persons, we are not surprised to learn that Compassion is constitutive of God's very being (Exodus 34:6 , "The Lord, the Lord, the Compassionate and gracious God" ). God's Compassion was essential for the maintenance of the covenant and his people praised him for it continually (Psalm 78:38 ; 86:15 ; 103:13 ; 145:8 ). ...
"Compassion" is not frequently used with a human subject. The intertestamental literature and the New Testament continue to speak about God as the Compassionate one. God's Compassion is demonstrated in his Son's ministry for and among his people (Matthew 9:36 ; Mark 6:34 ). The messianic Compassion is extended to the helpless crowds (Matthew 9:36 ), the sickly masses (Matthew 14:14 ), the hungry people (Mark 8:2 ), and the blind men (Matthew 20:34 ). The waiting father (Luke 15:20 ) is filled with Compassion when he sees his wayward son returning—just as God has Compassion on us and accepts us when we repent and return to him. ...
Believers learn about Compassion through example and exhortation. Imitating God and/or Christ has led many to lives of exemplary Compassion. The Scriptures also exhort believers to make Compassion an integral aspect of their lives (Zechariah 7:9 ; Colossians 3:12 ). Compassion needs to be nurtured and practiced or even this basic love response can grow dull and cold
Compassion - Compassion, n. Compassion is a mixed passion, compounded of love and sorrow at least some portion of love generally attends the pain or regret, or is excited by it. He being full of Compassion, forgave their iniquity. ...
His father had Compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him. ...
Compassion, To pity
Tenderhearted - KJV used tenderhearted in two senses: of timidity (2 Chronicles 13:7 ) and of Compassion (Ephesians 4:32 ). See Bowels ; Compassion
Mercy - ) Compassionate treatment of the unfortunate and helpless; sometimes, favor, beneficence. ) Forbearance to inflict harm under circumstances of provocation, when one has the power to inflict it; Compassionate treatment of an offender or adversary; clemency. ) Disposition to exercise Compassion or favor; pity; Compassion; willingness to spare or to help. ) A blessing regarded as a manifestation of Compassion or favor
Compassion - Compassion in English translations represents at least five Hebrew and eight Greek terms. Beyond this the Bible points to God's plans to again have Compassion for His people (Joel 2:18 ; compare Malachi 3:17 ; Genesis 19:16 ; 2 Chronicles 36:15 ; Isaiah 63:9 ). God looked to pour out a spirit of grace or “compassion” ( Zechariah 12:10 NRSV) on His people so they would mourn for the one they pierced. Bildad told Job to “implore the Compassion of the Almighty” ( Job 8:5 NAS). God's history had been a history of Compassion in which He did not destroy His people (Ezekiel 20:17 ). Jonah had “compassion” (Jonah 4:10 NAS) on a plant but did not want God to have Compassion on a city ( Jonah 4:11 ). Nehemiah asked for “compassion” (Nehemiah 13:22 ). Thus Hosea 11:8 concludes, “my repentings are kindled together” (KJV) or “all my Compassion is aroused” (NAS). At another time God can say, “I will have no Compassion” ( Hosea 13:14 NAS). ...
Racham is related to the Hebrew word for “womb” and expresses a mother's ( Isaiah 49:15 ) or father's (Psalm 103:13 ) love and Compassion, a feeling of pity and devotion to a helpless child. The word seeks to bring security to the life of the one for whom Compassion is felt. God “has Compassion on all he had made” (Psalm 145:9 ). ...
The New Testament builds on the Old Testament understanding of God's Compassion. Jesus commanded the Pharisees to learn God's desire for Compassion (Matthew 9:13 ; Matthew 12:7 ). Jesus said even slaves should practice Compassion as He taught Peter about forgiveness (Matthew 18:33 ). God showed Compassion in healing the demoniac (Mark 5:19 ). Christians need to show Compassion to those who waver or doubt (Jude 1:22 ). God's commands for Compassion from disciples finds its roots in the nature of God, who is full of Compassion (Ephesians 2:4 ; 1 Peter 1:3 ). Before Christ's appearance the Greeks apparently did not use this word to speak of Compassion and mercy, it being more closely related to courage. It is not clear when the shift in meaning to Compassion occurred. In the parable of the unforgiving servant, the master had Compassion and forgave the servant's debt (Matthew 18:27 ). The prodigal son's father had Compassion on him (Luke 15:20 ). The Good Samaritan had Compassion for the injured traveler (Luke 10:33 ). Jesus had Compassion on the crowds (Mark 6:34 ). People needing help asked Jesus for Compassion (Mark 9:22 ; compare Matthew 9:36 ; Matthew 20:34 ). Paul saw Compassion as a quality expected of believers (Philippians 2:1 ; Colossians 3:12 ). Paul said he related to his readers in the Compassion of Christ (Philippians 1:8 ), that is, the quality is not an achievement by the believer but a result of being in Christ. The love of God dwells only in those who are Compassionate to a person in need (1 John 3:17 ; compare Ephesians 4:32 ; 1 Peter 3:8 ). Compassion finds its source in God's Compassion (James 5:11 ). In Compassion He has provided salvation and forgiveness (Luke 1:78 ). Such sympathy or Compassion stands ready to help the one who has suffered loss. Paul taught that God is the Father and source of Compassion (2 Corinthians 1:3 ; compare James 5:11 ). He has total freedom in exercising Compassion (Romans 9:15 )
Compassion - Compassion
Compassion (2) - COMPASSION
Raham - Compassion; a friend
Remordency - ) Remorse; compunction; Compassion
r.d.c. - = Religious of Divine Compassion ...
Compassionable - ) Deserving Compassion or pity; pitiable
Compassion, Compassionate - A — 1: οἰκτείρω (Strong's #3627 — Verb — oikteiro — oyk-ti'-ro ) "to have pity, a feeling of distress through the ills of others," is used of God's Compassion, Romans 9:15 . ...
A — 2: σπλαγχνίζομαι (Strong's #4697 — Verb — splanchnizomai — splangkh-nid'-zom-ahee ) "to be moved as to one's inwards (splanchna), to be moved with Compassion, to yearn with Compassion," is frequently recorded of Christ towards the multitude and towards individual sufferers, Matthew 9:36 ; 14:14 ; 15:32 ; 18:27 ; 20:34 ; Mark 1:41 ; 6:34 ; 8:2 ; 9:22 (of the appeal of a father for a demon-possessed son); Luke 7:13 ; 10:33 ; of the father in the parable of the Prodigal Son, Luke 15:20 . , "sympathy"), to have "compassion" upon, Hebrews 10:34 , of "compassionating" those in prison, is translated "be touched with" in Hebrews 4:15 , of Christ as the High Priest. ...
A — 4: ἐλεέω (Strong's #1653 — Verb — eleeo — el-eh-eh'-o ) "to have mercy (eleos, "mercy"), to show kindness, by beneficence, or assistance," is translated "have Compassion" in Matthew 18:33 (AV); Mark 5:19 ; Jude 1:22 . ...
A — 5: μετριοπαθέω (Strong's #3356 — Verb — metriopatheo — met-ree-op-ath-eh'-o ) is rendered "have Compassion," in Hebrews 5:2 , AV. 1, is used with splanchna (see below), "the viscera, the inward parts," as the seat of emotion, the "heart," Philippians 2:1 ; Colossians 3:12 , "a heart of Compassion" (AV, "bowels of mercies"). , "without Compassions"). ...
B — 2: σπλάγχνον (Strong's #4698 — Noun Neuter — splanchnon — splangkh'-non ) always used in the plural, is suitably rendered "compassion" in the RV of Colossians 3:12 ; 1 John 3:17 ; "compassions" in Philippians 2:1 , Cp. ...
C — 1: συμπαθής (Strong's #4835 — Adjective — sumpathes — soom-path-ace' ) denotes suffering with, "compassionate," 1 Peter 3:8 , RV (AV, "having Compassion")
Misericorde - ) Compassion; pity; mercy
Thirteen attributes of mercy - G-d�s boundless capacity for Compassion, especially as expressed in the granting of atonement ...
Commiseration - ) The act of commiserating; sorrow for the wants, afflictions, or distresses of another; pity; Compassion
Misery - Such a state of wretchedness, unhappiness, or calamity, as renders a person an object of Compassion
Bowels - The RV substitutes the following for the word "bowels:" "affections," 2 Corinthians 6:12 ; "affection," 2 Corinthians 7:15 ; "tender mercies," Philippians 1:8 ; 2:1 ; "a heart (of Compassion)," Colossians 3:12 ; "heart," Philemon 1:12,20 ; "hearts," Philemon 1:7 ; "compassion," 1 John 3:17 . 2, Compassion, A, No
lo-Ruhama - ("not Compassionated". ) Hosea's daughter, representing Israel, from whom Jehovah withdrew His loving Compassion
Pitiable - ) Deserving pity; wworthy of, or exciting, Compassion; miserable; lamentable; piteous; as, pitiable persons; a pitiable condition; pitiable wretchedness
Bowels - Used symbolically for deep tenderness, pity and Compassion
Ruth - ) That which causes pity or Compassion; misery; distress; a pitiful sight
Pity - ) To be Compassionate; to show pity. ) A feeling for the sufferings or distresses of another or others; sympathy with the grief or misery of another; Compassion; fellow-feeling; commiseration. ) To feel pity or Compassion for; to have sympathy with; to Compassionate; to commiserate; to have tender feelings toward (any one), awakened by a knowledge of suffering
Pitiful - ) Full of pity; tender-hearted; Compassionate; kind; merciful; sympathetic. ) Piteous; lamentable; eliciting Compassion
R. levi yitzchak of berdtichev - 1740-1809, Chassidic leader, one of the foremost disciples of the Maggid of Mezritch; renowned for his all-encompassing love and Compassion for the Jewish people and for every individual Jew ...
Compassionate - ) To have Compassion for; to pity; to commiserate; to sympathize with
Piteous - ) Evincing pity, Compassion, or sympathy; Compassionate; tender
Remorse - ) Sympathetic sorrow; pity; Compassion
ru'Hamah, - ( Hosea 2:1 ) The name if name it be, is symbolical, and is addressed to the DAUGHTERS of the people, to denote that they were still the objects of love and tender Compassion
Tiferet - (Harmony; Beauty; Compassion): (lit,
Helper - Compassion--is oftentimes a helper of evils
Remorse - Sympathetic sorrow pity Compassion
Bowels - The seat of pity or kindness hence, tenderness, Compassion, a scriptural sense
Bowels - Hence the bowels are often represented as the seat of mercy, tenderness, Compassion, etc
Bleeding - ; also, expressing anguish or Compassion
Bowel - Hence: Tenderness; Compassion
Shut, Shut up - 1: κλείω (Strong's #2808 — Verb — kleio — kli'-o ) is used (a) of things material, Matthew 6:6 ; 25:10 ; Luke 11:7 ; John 20:19,26 ; Acts 5:23 ; 21:30 ; Revelation 20:3 ; figuratively, Revelation 21:25 ; (b) metaphorically, of the Kingdom of heaven, Matthew 23:13 ; of heaven, with consequences of famine, Luke 4:25 ; Revelation 11:6 ; of Compassion, 1 John 3:17 , RV (AV, "bowels of Compassion"); of the blessings accuring from the promises of God regarding David, Revelation 3:7 ; of a door for testimony, Revelation 3:8
Mercy - Compassion for the miserable
Image of God - The image of God is generally held to mean that people contain within their nature elements that reflect God's nature: Compassion, reason, love, hate, patience, kindness, self-awareneness, etc
Mercy - It implies benevolence, tenderness, mildness, pity or Compassion, and clemency, but exercised only towards offenders. Pity Compassion manifested towards a person in distress. To be or to lie at the mercy of, to have no means of self-defense, but to be dependent for safety on the mercy or Compassion of another, or in the power of that which is irresistible as, to be at the mercy of a foe, or of the waves
Bowels - In the KJV, “bowels” is also used to refer to the sexual reproductive system (2 Samuel 16:11 ; Psalm 71:6 ) and, figuratively, to strong emotions (Job 30:27 ), especially love (Song of Song of Solomon 5:4 ) and Compassion (Colossians 3:12 )
Relent - ) To become less severe or intense; to become less hard, harsh, cruel, or the like; to soften in temper; to become more mild and tender; to feel Compassion
Blindness - The Jews were specially charged to treat the blind with Compassion and care
Evilmerodach - In his first year he had Compassion upon Jehoiachin king of Judah, who had been in prison thirty-seven years, raised him to honour, and appointed him to sit at his own table for the rest of his life
Pure - ) Separate from all heterogeneous or extraneous matter; free from mixture or combination; clean; mere; simple; unmixed; as, pure water; pure clay; pure air; pure Compassion
Rue - ) To have Compassion
Jerahmeel - (jih rah' mee ehl) Personal name meaning, “God shows Compassion
Vinegar - They gave it to Christ, not in derision, but from Compassion, to assuage his thirst
Cruel - Disposed to give pain to others, in body or mind willing or pleased to torment, vex or afflict inhuman destitute of pity, Compassion or kindness fierce ferocious savage barbarous hardhearted applied to persons or their dispositions
Feel, Feeling, Felt - ...
4: συμπαθέω (Strong's #4834 — Verb — sumpatheo — soom-path-eh'-o ) "to have a fellow-feeling for or with," is rendered "touched with the feeling of" in Hebrews 4:15 ; "have Compassion" in Hebrews 10:34 . See Compassion
Compassion, Merciful - ...
Râcham (רָחַם, Strong's #7355), “to have Compassion, be merciful, pity. 5:30: “Have they not divided the prey; to every man a damsel or two …?” In another figurative sense, the KJV reads in 1 Kings 3:26: “Her bowels yearned upon her son,” which the NIV translates more idiomatically: "[1] was filled with Compassion for her son. Racham (רַחֲמִים, 7356), “bowels; mercies; Compassion. 43:14: “And God Almighty give you mercy [2]. ...
Rachûm (רַחוּם, Strong's #7349), “compassionate; merciful. 34:6, NASB, NIV, “compassionate”)
Malchus - Possibly Luke desired to stress Jesus' Compassion in the midst of His passion (compare Luke 23:28 ,Luke 23:28,23:34 ,Luke 23:34,23:43 ) or respect shown to the high priest and his representative (compare Acts 23:4 )
Basilides, Saint - Feeling Compassion for her, he restrained the heathen rabble, and for this office received the gift of Faith
Blind - The blind are to be treated with Compassion (Leviticus 19:14 ; Deuteronomy 27:18 )
Pity - Is generally defined to be the uneasiness we feel at the unhappiness of another, prompting us to Compassionate them, with a desire of their relief. ...
See Compassion OF GOD
Goodness - Kindness favor shown acts of benevolence, Compassion or mercy
Bowels - The bowels are the seat of mercy, tenderness, and Compassion
Maintenance - But to assist a poor kinsman from Compassion, is not maintenance
Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Feasts o -
Friday in Passion Week, commemorating the sorrow of Mary during the Passion , and Death of Christ; instituted by the provincial synod of Cologne in 1413 to expiate the crimes of the iconoclast Hussites, being termed the Compassion or Transfixion; extended to the entire Church by Pope Benedict XIII in 1727
Goodness of God - Viewed generally, it is benevolence; as exercised with respect to the miseries of his creatures it is mercy, pity, Compassion, and in the case of impenitent sinners, long-suffering patience; as exercised in communicating favour on the unworthy it is grace
Pity - This word is entirely synonymous with Compassion both in OT and NT, except, perhaps, in 1 Peter 3:8 , where ‘sympathetic’ would better express the meaning of the original word (see RVm
In the parable of the Unmerciful Servant, Jesus inculcates the exercise of pity in men’s dealings with each other, and teaches the sacredness of its character by emphasizing its identity with God’s Compassion for sinners (Matthew 18:33 ; cf
Pity - —This word occurs once in the Gospels (Matthew 18:33 Authorized Version ) as translation of ἐλεέω apparently in accordance with the practice of the translators ‘that we have not ‘tied ourselves to an uniformity of phrasing or to an identity of words,’ since the same word ἐλεέω is rendered by ‘have Compassion’ in the verse immediately before, as elsewhere. In the Synoptic Gospels four different words occur which carry with them the notion of ‘pity’ or ‘compassion’: σπλαγχνίζομαι (σπλάγχνα), ἐλεέω (ἔλεος and ἐλεήμων συλλυπέομαι, and οἰκτίρμων. ...
Of these, the first three are used with reference to Jesus: (1) σπλαγχνιζομαι, ‘moved with Compassion,’ found in Matthew 9:36; Matthew 14:14; Matthew 15:32; Matthew 18:27, Mark 1:41; Mark 6:34; Mark 8:2, Luke 7:13; (2) ἐλεέω, used in Mark 5:19 by our Lord Himself to describe His own work in the cure of the demoniac, ‘and hath had Compassion on thee,’ καὶ ἠλεησεν σε; (3) συλλυαέομαι, Mark 3:5, translation ‘being grieved (for the hardness of their hearts). ’ The word occurs nowhere else in NT, but is used by Herodotus and elsewhere with the significance of having pity or Compassion (see Liddell and Scott). ...
By their usage in these passages the Synoptics plainly declare that in His manifestation of human nature our Saviour was drawn towards suffering humanity by that Divine gift of pity which has ever been regarded as one of the higher feelings: sickness, sorrow, being like tired sheep, even bodily hunger, filled Him with Compassion for the suffering ones,—while in the solitary use of συλλυπέομαι alluded to above to describe His feeling at the unwillingness of men to receive truth, we can hardly hesitate to give to the word its classical meaning of ‘pity,’ when we remember the outburst of weeping which accompanied His wail over Jerusalem (Luke 19:41). And while Himself manifesting forth pity towards men and inculcating the same feeling on His disciples, He also most clearly taught them to think of His Father in heaven as One moved with Compassion for His earthly family. The ‘tender mercy of our God’ in the Benedictus (Luke 1:78) is the thought illustrated in the parable of the Good Samaritan, who was ‘moved with Compassion’ (ἐσπλαγχνίσθη) at the sight of the wounded man (Luke 10:33); as in that of the king who forgave the debtor, being ‘moved with Compassion’ (σπλαγχνισθείς, Matthew 18:27); and even more strikingly so in the description of the father of the Prodigal, who, when he saw his son returning, ἐσπλαγχνίσθη καὶ δραμὼν ἐπέπεσεν ἐπὶ τὸν τράχηλον αὐτοῦ (Luke 15:20). ...
It is true that in speaking of God as the ‘Merciful One’ our Saviour was repeating what is a familiar thought in the OT, רַחוּם, ‘compassionate,’ is there used exclusively as an epithet of God (Deuteronomy 4:31), while in Sirach 50:19 we already find the simple רֵחוּם as a name of God (see Dalman, Words of Jesus, p. John’s Gospel we never find any word used which conveys the meaning of ‘pity’ or ‘compassion’; Christ is never described as ‘merciful’ or as ‘showing mercy,’ nor does He so speak of the Father; while even the exhortation to mercy as a duty of man to man is not found there
Mercy, Merciful - (1) meaning primarily bowels (see Genesis 43:30 , 1 Kings 3:26 ), then Compassion or yearning , occurs as noun, adjective, or verb (‘have mercy,’ ‘show mercy’), with the tr. ]'>[2] translates by ‘pity,’ ‘pitiful’ (see Psalms 103:13 , Lamentations 4:10 ), in 17 by ‘compassion. ]'>[5] ‘lovingkindness (mercy) and truth’ being the regnant qualities of His dealings with Israel and with ‘covenant’ ( Deuteronomy 7:9 , 1 Kings 8:23 , Nehemiah 1:6 ; Nehemiah 9:32 , Psalms 89:28 , Isaiah 55:8 , Daniel 9:4 ), as well as with ‘goodness’ and ‘compassion’ (above); while it is contrasted with ‘anger,’ ‘judgment,’ and ‘sacrifice’ ( Micah 7:18 , Psalms 101:1 , Hosea 6:6 ). It denotes Compassion as a temper and motive of action rather than a sentiment eleçmosynç (alms) is one of its derivatives; like ‘mercy,’ the Greek eleos regards its objects as weak or suffering, and is therefore narrower in range than the Hebrew (2) above defined. Akin to these adjectives is the verb occurring 12 times in the Synoptic Gospels, which is rendered ‘moved with Compassion’ (moved to mercy), describing the emotion stirred in the breast of Jesus e
Consolation - The Hebrew terms are closely related to the words for Compassion—nichum, nocham
Forget - But God does not “forget” His people: “Can a woman forget her suckling child, that she should not have Compassion on the son of her womb? yea, they may forget, yet will I not forget thee” ( Bartimeus - The touching narrative of his steadfast faith, and Christ's ready Compassion, should encourage all to go boldly unto Jesus
Mercy: Its Effect on the Soul - What think you, will he not entreat the gracious monarch to extend his clemency to his fellow rebels? Will not the tears stand in his eyes as he admires the difference which his sovereign's free mercy has made? Will he not be moved with emotions impossible to describe, of mingled joy and grief; pity and gratitude, wonder and Compassion? Christian, see your likeness here drawn to the life, you must surely feel ready to fall down on your knees, and cry,' Lord, why dost thou reveal thy mercy to me and not to these? Save them also, O Lord, for thy name's sake
Eyes - His eyes are also upon the wicked, and His eyes will not spare, neither will He have Compassion in the day of judgement
Bier - But the miracle, prompted by that same intense sympathy with human sorrow which He so strikingly manifested on another occasion (John 11:35), pointed to a higher and more authoritative law—that Divine eternal law of Compassion which received its freest and fullest expression for the first time in His own life, and which forms one of the most distinctive features of His Gospel
Pity Compassion - The word ‘compassion’ is of much more frequent occurrence, being represented in the following 21 passages of the two versions: Matthew 9:36; Matthew 14:14; Matthew 15:32; Matthew 18:27; Matthew 20:34, Mark 1:41; Mark 5:19 (RV_ ‘mercy’) Mark 6:34, Mark 8:2, Mark 9:22, Luke 7:13; Luke 10:33; Luke 15:20, Romans 9:15, Philippians 2:1 (AV_ ‘mercies’), Colossians 3:12 (AV_ ‘mercies’), Hebrews 5:2 (RV_ ‘bear gently’) Hebrews 10:28 (AV_ ‘mercy’) Hebrews 10:34, 1 John 3:17 (AV_ ‘bowels’), Judges 1:22 (RV_ ‘mercy’). The adjective form ‘compassionate’ occurs in 1 Peter 3:8 (AV_ ‘having Compassion’). Of these several Greek words μετριοπαθεῖν may be left out of account, since in the one passage where it occurs (Hebrews 5:2) it has nothing to do with Compassion. Hence RV_ has the correct rendering ‘who can bear gently,’ whereas AV_, ‘who can have Compassion,’ translates the word as if it were equivalent to συμπαθεῖν. Both in classical and in biblical Greek, therefore, σπλάγχνα covers more than ‘compassion. From this strong emotional colouring of the word is to be explained the fact that in the Gospels it does not occur in the appeals addressed by suffering persons or their friends to Jesus, except in Mark 9:22, where the critical nature of the case necessitates an appeal to the profoundest Compassion of Jesus. To express the strength and inward character of the feeling the English versions often render ‘to be moved with Compassion,’ but neither AV_ nor RV_ consistently (cf
Neighbor - With such tendencies, it is not surprising that legislation had to be given to Israel to encourage Compassion and justice for the non-Jew. The fundamental basis for this is that at one time Israel was also a sojourner while in Egypt; therefore, Israel is to treat its sojourners with Compassion and justice (Leviticus 19:33-34 ; Deuteronomy 10:19 ; 24:22 ). Essentially, then, the Mosaic laws demand both Compassion and justice to be guaranteed for the foreigner because God loves the sojourner (Deuteronomy 10:18 ). ...
In spite of this insistence of the law that Israel was to be kind to foreigners and treat them with Compassion and justice, the preponderance of emphasis is on the "neighborliness" to be shown to fellow members of the covenant with Israel. Thus, we are to understand the parable of the good Samaritan as addressing the issue of the "limits" of one's responsibility and we are to see Jesus saying that there are no limits; one cannot exclusively exercise Compassion or justice for one's own kind
Mill - " (See Judges 16:21)...
There is a very gracious precept in the law of Moses on the subject of grinding, which serves to shew the Lord's tender Compassion over his people
Maimed - The word is not employed in connexion with our Lord’s miracles, but only in His invitation to the blessings of the Kingdom, to which all outcast sufferers were with Divine Compassion called
Mercy - Parents love their children simply as they are their children; but if they fall into misery, love works in a way of pity and Compassion: love is turned into mercy. With regard to criminals or delinquents, it is false Compassion to suppress the salutary abmonition, and refuse to set their guilt before them, merely because the sight of it will give their conscience pain: such unseasonable tenderness in a surgeon may prove the death of his patient: this, however it may appear is not mercy, but cruelty. As it respects those who are in tribulation or misery, to be sure, every such person is an object of our Compassion; but that Compassion may be, and often is, exercised in a wrong manner
Melt - Melting with tenderness and mild Compassion
Love - Between the three Persons of the Godhead, love is unutterable full, perfect, and blissful; towards holy angels and Christians, God's love is an infinite fatherly complacency and affection; towards sinners, it is immeasurable Compassion
Mother - ...
Motherly virtues are often extolled: Compassion for children (Isaiah 49:15 ), comfort of children (Isaiah 66:13 ), and sorrow for children (Jeremiah 31:15 , quoted in Matthew 2:18 ). Jesus spoke of His Compassion for Jerusalem as being like that of a mother hen for her chicks (Matthew 23:37 )
Gracious, To Be; Show Favor - In Akkadian, the verb enenu (“to have Compassion”) is related to hinnu (“favor”), which occurs only as a proper noun. ...
The Septuagint translations are: charis (“grace; favor; graciousness; attractiveness”) and eleos (“mercy; Compassion; pity”)
Canticle of Zachary - In the tender Compassion of our God the dawn from on high shall break upon us, to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death, and to guide our feet into the way of peace
Benedictus, the - In the tender Compassion of our God the dawn from on high shall break upon us, to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death, and to guide our feet into the way of peace
Ursulines - At first, these religious did not live in community, but abode separately in their fathers' houses; and their employment was to search for the afflicted, to comfort them; for the ignorant, to instruct them; and for the poor, to relieve them; to visit the hospitals, and to attend upon the sick; in short, to be always ready to do acts of charity and Compassion
High Priest - He, as taken from among men, was one who could have Compassion on, or forbearance toward, the ignorant and the erring; for that he himself was compassed with infirmity
Zachary, Canticle of - In the tender Compassion of our God the dawn from on high shall break upon us, to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death, and to guide our feet into the way of peace
Favor - Sometimes, however, the Lord withheld his Compassion and brought judgment on his people (cf. He showed Compassion to this people and saved them from their distress (Psalm 106:4 ; Isaiah 60:10 )
Orphan - To have Compassion on the powerless, represented by the orphan, is to have the same zeal as God, who is known especially as "the helper of the fatherless" (Psalm 10:14 ), the helper of the helpless (Job 29:12 ). But they could at the same time hope for salvation, for in Yahweh "the fatherless find Compassion" (Hosea 14:4 )
Amorites - The low state of Jerusalem (Judah) by nature is described by stating her origin, her father being an Amorite and her mother a Hittite, but God in grace had Compassion upon her in her degradation, and raised her into great glory; though, alas, she was shamefully unfaithful
Mercy - The noun denotes Compassion and love, not just feelings or emotions, as expressed in tangible ways. " In both the Greek translation of the Old Testament (the LXX) and the New Testament, the term behind "mercy" is most often eleos [2] in one form or another, but oiktirmos/oiktiro [3] (compassion, pity, to show mercy) and splanchna/splagchnizomai [4] (to show mercy, to feel sympathy for) also play roles. Within the relationship, God's mercy is thus closely linked to forgiveness (Exodus 34:9 ; Numbers 14:19 ; Jeremiah 3:12 ; Daniel 9:9 ), a more basic disposition of Compassion (Deuteronomy 13:17 ) leading to forgiveness, and to the steadfast love by which God sustains the covenant and repeatedly forgives his people (Psalm 25:6 ; 40:11 ; 51:1 ; 69:16 ; 103:4 ; 119:77 ; Jeremiah 3:12 ; 16:5 ). But the fundamental factor in each act of God is mercy: God's Compassionate love for his creation that leads him to do for it what it cannot do for itself. The point is made that salvation depends utterly on God's mercy and that the salvation of the Gentiles is but another display of this mercy: "For he [2]00 says to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have Compassion on whom I have Compassion'" (9:15; quoting Exodus 33:19 ). Compassion and merciful action in behalf of those around us are the essence of spiritual living. True Christian faith produces genuine Compassion and fruit in the form of Acts of mercy toward those in need
Merciful, Mercy - ...
A — 2: οἰκτιρμός (Strong's #3628 — Noun Masculine — oiktirmos — oyk-tir-mos' ) "pity, Compassion for the ills of others," is used (a) of God, Who is "the Father of mercies," 2 Corinthians 1:3 ; His "mercies" are the ground upon which believers are to present their bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, as their reasonable service, Romans 12:1 ; under the Law he who set it at nought died without Compassion, Hebrews 10:28 ; (b) of men; believers are to feel and exhibit Compassions one toward another, Philippians 2:1 , RV "compassions," and Colossians 3:12 , RV "(a heart) of Compassion;" in these two places the word is preceded by No. of which it is quoted, is that the "mercy" and Compassion shown by God are determined by nothing external to His attributes. 1, not simply possessed of pity but actively Compassionate, is used of Christ as a High Priest, Hebrews 2:17 , and of those who are like God, Matthew 5:7 (cp. ...
C — 2: οἰκτίρμων (Strong's #3629 — Adjective — oiktirmon — oyk-tir'-mone ) "pitiful, Compassionate for the ills of others," a stronger term than No
Thieves, the Two - He looked to the man dying on the cross beside him, and saw an infinite Compassion
Move - ) To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or Compassion; to touch pathetically; to excite, as an emotion
Affection, Affected - See BOWELS , Compassion , HEART , MERCY
Mercy, Merciful - Racham /rachamim This word family consistently has the meaning of showing mercy, Compassion, or pity. This sense of a mother's Compassion for her child is found in 1 Kings 3:26 , and a similar expression describes Joseph's feelings for his brother in Genesis 43:30 . Much like the Hebrew rachamim , splagchna developed the derived sense of strong emotional feelings, particularly of Compassion and affection. The word is often used of Jesus' Compassion—for the multitudes ( Matthew 9:36 , Matthew 14:14 , Matthew 15:32 ), for the blind (Matthew 20:34 ), for a leper (Mark 1:41 ), for a possessed child (Mark 9:20-27 ), for a widow's plight (Luke 7:13 ). His parables use the term to describe the mercy of a master on his indebted servant (Matthew 18:27 ), the Compassion of a father for his prodigal son (Luke 15:20 ), and a Samaritan's pity for a wounded Jew (Luke 10:33 ). Oiktirmos This word also means “pity, mercy, Compassion” and is used together with splagchna in Colossians 3:12 , Philippians 2:1 , and James 5:11
Gentleness - Compassion prompts us to relieve their wants; forbearance prevents us from retaliating their injuries: meekness restrains our angry passions; candour our severe judgments; but gentleness corrects whatever is offensive in our manner, and, by a constant train of humane attention, studies to alleviate the burden of common misery
Jerahmeel - JERAHMEEL (‘May El have Compassion!’) 1
Mount Samaria - What unnumbered discoveries of grace have distressed sinners found in those encouraging words of Jesus! The constraint upon the Lord Jesus to go there to seek and save this sinner, the unprepared, unconscious state of her mind at the time, the tender waitings of Jesus to the hour of her arrival at the well, for he was first there, the tenderness and Compassion in all that he said and manifested towards her, his condescension in abiding with the Samaritans two whole days, and the effects wrought upon the hearts of many of the people, as well as this poor woman; these, with numberless other incidents which are found in Christ's visit to Samaria, must always make the very name interesting to the heart of a believer, and especially when the same saving grace which wrought upon this woman's mind hath taken place in ours, so that we can hold out the invitation concerning Christ to others, which she did to her countrymen: "Come, see a man which told me all things that ever I did; is not this the Christ!" (Read the whole relation, John 4:1-42
One Another or One ... Another, One ... the Other - " (4) In 1 Peter 3:8 , AV, "one of another" represents nothing in the original (the RV, "compassionate" sufficiently translates the adjective sumpathes: see Compassion , C
Hospitality - In the law Compassion to strangers is constantly enforced by the words "for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt
Sympathy - Indeed, as His whole mission was one of self-sacrifice and Compassion for the race, it is fitting that the rare instances recorded of His weeping should be for the sorrows of others—at the grave of Lazarus—and for the sufferings of Jerusalem, rather than in the Garden of Gethsemane or for His own sufferings; and that in His death-pangs His thoughts should be on the daughters of Jerusalem, on His mother, on the dying robber, and on His murderers, rather than on Himself. ) to state plainly the continuing nature of the Divine Compassion of the Son of Man: ‘We have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. It is true that ‘he had Compassion on the multitude,’ but He had also discriminating, special tenderness for erring Peter and Thomas. He had Compassion on the discomfort of His disciples. An interesting question arises on account of the persistent mention of the need for faith on the part of the recipient of His acts of Compassion, and it has been asked whether mutual sympathy was the medium of the miraculous cures. Compassion would have been wasted upon the Pharisees; stern treatment was necessary there. —The sympathy of Christ has nothing in common with a type of modern humanitarian sentiment, which is but a parody of the Divine Compassion
Timothy - ...
Paul felt that no one had any more Compassion and commitment than Timothy (Philippians 2:20-22 )
Good Samaritan, Parable of the - At once moved by Compassion, he attends to the needs of the unfortunate, then conveys him to an inn, and pays in advance for the care for the man a sum equivalent to two days wages, promising to make good on his return any further expense incurred by the innkeeper
Miser - Sometimes it is conscience, which convinces him, good man, that he hath already exceeded in Compassion and alms-giving, and done too much
Alms - With Compassion and affection, Isaiah 58:10
Tender - ) Susceptible of the softer passions, as love, Compassion, kindness; Compassionate; pitiful; anxious for another's good; easily excited to pity, forgiveness, or favor; sympathetic
Jonah - God in His Compassion Turns Away from Judgment When Any People Repent (3:1-10). God's People Should Mirror God's Compassion for All People (4:1-11)
Intercession - His prayer of Compassion is for self destroying sinners
Meet - Of vice or virtue, whether blest or curst, ...
Which meets contempt, or which Compassion first
Ecce Homo - Pilate had given over our Lord to be scourged, and had allowed his soldiers to robe and crown Him in mockery, but all the time he was anxious to save Him from death; and there was undoubtedly an appeal to the Compassion of the bystanders in the words, ‘Behold the man
Example - Here we see piety without superstition, and morality without ostentation; humility without meanness, and fortitude without temerity; patience without apathy, and Compassion without weakness; zeal without rashness, and beneficience without prodigality
Succoth - The men of Succoth, as living on this great army route between Canaan and the East, and having regard only to self and no concern for Israel's deliverance and no Compassion for the sufferings of Gideon's gallant little band, would give no bread to their brethren lest they should incur the vengeance of Midian; nay more, they added insolence to unkindness
Healing - On some occasions God may heal out of his love and Compassion, without a request from the afflicted (Matthew 14:14; Luke 4:40); on other occasions he may heal in response to the faith of the afflicted (Matthew 9:27-30; Mark 5:34; Mark 10:52; James 5:14-15)
Lamentations, Theology of - ...
God: Righteous, Angry, Compassionate . ...
No attempt is made to reconcile God's anger and God's Compassion, but Compassion is no less characteristic of God than is anger. The tradition of God as resolutely Compassionate and gentle, yet just in retribution, persists. God's Compassion and love do not fail (3:22,32). The belief in God as Compassionate gives an intimation of hope to this suffering city, its inhabitants, and its exiles (3:21)
Basilidians - ...
Hence, the Supreme God, beholding with Compassion the miserable state of rational beings, who groaned under the contest of these jarring powers, sent from heaven his son Nus, or Christ, the chief of the aions, that, joined in a substantial union with the man Jesus, he might restore the knowledge of the Supreme God, destroy the empire of those angelic natures which presided over the world, and particularly that of the arrogant leader of the Jewish people
Charity - It is not properly a single virtue; but a disposition residing in the heart as a fountain; whence all the virtues of benignity, candour, forbearance, generosity, Compassion, and liberality flow as so many native streams
Visitation - In NT ἐτισκέπτομαι is used to signify visitation in sympathy or Compassion (Matthew 25:36; Matthew 25:43, James 1:27); God’s gracious regard (Luke 1:68; Luke 1:78; Luke 7:16, Acts 15:14, Hebrews 2:6); in the sense of ‘going and seeing’ (Acts 7:23); and to imply enquiry for the purpose of selection (Acts 6:3)
Move - ...
When he saw the multitudes, he was moved with Compassion on them--Matthew 9 ...
6
Blindness - Perhaps there is no greater evidence of His Compassion and power than that seen in His willingness and ability to heal those who lived in darkness and hopelessness
Kindness - In this sense, kindness was distinct from mercy or Compassion which was more of an emotion and from grace which was not as closely associated with covenant keeping
Benevolence - ...
Such being the intensive character, the extensive character of benevolence may be observed in Christ’s Compassion on the multitudes (Mark 8:2, Matthew 14:14), namely, on each individual; and, again, in His healing every one of those around Him on a well-known occasion at Capernaum (Luke 4:40)
Milk - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:12) Perhaps both images were meant to set forth the Redeemer, in that sweetness and loveliness of character, as blending the tender affections of his heart towards his people, like the softness of milk flowing in upon the souls of his redeemed, with a fulness of pity and Compassion
Gentleness - Let believers clothe themselves "with Compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience" (Colossians 3:12 )
Ransom - Suppose some generous prince, out of Compassion to any of his captive subjects, were to abridge his pleasures, and give large sums of money to bring them out of captivity—how would the deed be applauded, and his name be idolized to all gene rations! But supposing this generous prince was to give himself for them, and exchange their persons in slavery by voluntarily surrendering up himself to such a state—what would be said of this? And yet the Lord Jesus hath done this, and infinitely more, not for friends, but enemies, not for those who loved him, but those who hated him; and not only by slavery, but by death
New; New Moon - 3:23, where châdâsh appears to mean “renewed”; just as God’s creation is renewed and refreshed, so is His Compassion and lovingkindness: “They are new every morning: great is thy faithfulness
Lamentations of Jeremiah - This book shows the Compassion and interest God has in the afflictions of His people, and that these are not lessened even when the afflictions have been brought about by Himself because of their sins. Because of His Compassions they were not consumed; and it was good to wait and hope
Zephaniah, Theology of - God is both a God of justice and holiness, exacting judgment upon those who oppose him, and also a God of love and Compassion, showing these to his faithful followers. Judah is called to abandon her practices as opponents to benefit from his Compassion
Homosexuality - This is a very complex psychological problem with many possible roots or causes, calling for both Christian Compassion on the part of God's people as well as God's redemptive power through the gospel
Fall of Man - God has thought fit to allow evil to exist in order that he may have a platform for showing his mercy, grace, and Compassion
Kindness - This is true not only in English (kindness, goodness, mercy, pity, love, grace, favor, Compassion, gentleness, tenderness, etc
Grief, Grieving - His anguished response to sin is evidenced in two main ways: divine judgment and Compassion for the sinner
Saturninus - They made the man but were too feeble to give him power to stand erect and he lay on the ground wriggling like a worm (ὡς σκώληκος οκαρίζοντος) until the Upper Power taking Compassion on him because he had been made "in Its likeness," sent a spark of life which raised him and made him live
Neighbour (2) - ’ ‘Who is my neighbour?’ asked a scribe; and Christ made answer with the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37), seeking by a picture of pure Compassion to shame him of his question. ’ He thus makes a man’s own longing for love and kindness and Compassion the measure of the treatment which he should extend to others. But this love and Compassion must not be the outcome of any selfish motive
Multitude - We read that on one occasion He had Compassion on them because they were ἐσκυλμένοι καὶ ἐρριμμένοι, as sheep not having a shepherd. Thus they will express mute misery, and a half unconscious appeal to the Divine Compassion, and they are so taken by Meyer, and Bruce in Expos, Gr. 10, as the result of His Compassion; so Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘distressed and scattered’; Authorized Version ‘they fainted,’ following Textus Receptus , which reads ἐκλελυμένοι for ἐσκυλμένοι, with very little MS support. ...
On other occasions His Compassion for the multitude led Him to heal their sick (Matthew 14:14), and to feed the 4000 (Matthew 15:32, Mark 8:2)
Giving - Once and again before His gracious acts of healing or of bounty, it is said, ‘he was moved with Compassion’ (Matthew 9:36; Matthew 15:32, Mark 6:34); and His fellow-feeling found expression in the sending forth of the Twelve, the feeding of the multitude, and in teaching. All tender ministries are the expression of a Divine Compassion, ‘the exceeding grace of God in you’ (2 Corinthians 9:14)
Anger - Imagine our secret sins all disclosed and brought to light; imagine us thus humbled and exposed; trembling under the hand of God; casting ourselves on his Compassion; crying out for mercy; imagine such a creature to talk of satisfaction and revenge; refusing to be entreated, disdaining to forgive; extreme to mark and to resent what is done amiss; imagine, I say, this, and you can hardly feign to yourself an instance of more impious and unnatural arrogance
Josiah - Those of his people who later suffered under the cruel hand of his son Jehoiakim looked back with gratitude on his Compassion and justice (2 Chronicles 35:25; Jeremiah 22:15-19)
the Prodigal Son - But, at last one day,-That is none other than my long-lost son! And when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and bad Compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed, him. ...
The very finest point in all this history full of fine points, is this,-"When he was a great way off, his father saw him, and had Compassion on him. " And there is nothing more true in our own history than just this, and nothing more blessed for us to be told than just this, that our Father also sees us when we are yet a great way off from Him, and has Compassion on us. When we are just beginning to remember that we have a Father; when we are just beginning to repent toward Him; when we are just beginning to pray to Him; when we are just beginning to believe on Him, and on His Son Jesus Christ our Saviour; when we are still at the very first beginnings of a penitent, returning, obedient, pure, and godly, life; ay, when we are yet a great way off from all these things, our Father sees us, and has Compassion on us, and comes to meet us
Hosea, Theology of - Through Hosea's life and message we see the strength of God's feeling for Israel—his Compassion (11:8), his love (11:4), and his longing to be with them (7:13). This is portrayed by Hosea with surprising force when the Lord says: "My heart is changed within me; all my Compassion is aroused" (11:8). Hosea envisioned a new betrothal (2:19) and a new relationship (1:10; 2:16) that would produce the true covenant fruit of righteousness, justice, love, Compassion, and knowledge (2:19-20)
Aaron - This is a most remarkable incident demonstrating the grace and Compassion of God
Sinners - (b) He had Compassion on them, Luke 7:47
On - Have pity or Compassion on him
Nehemiah, Theology of - The Lord is a God of forgiveness, grace, and Compassion, slow to anger and abounding in lovingkindness (9:17). He had great Compassion on Israel in the wilderness, providing for all their needs (9:27-31). Although God is Compassionate, however, he is also just and righteous. He closes his prayer by requesting success and Compassion before the king
Heal, Health - Among Jesus' motives, simple Compassion is mentioned nine timesan attitude rare when most sickness was ascribed to sin. ...
Besides demonstrating the nature of God's kingdom as health-giving, down-to-earth, and relevant to the daily problems of the whole person, and the Compassion of Jesus toward ordinary, undervalued individuals, the healing miracles left no doubt that a new power was at work in the world, and available through Christ (Luke 4:36 ; 5:17 ; 6:19 ). Yet, in spite of all Jesus' avoidance of display, "the healing Messiah" left everywhere a deep and lasting impression, still plainly visible in the Gospel records, kindling new hope for the afflicted and a strong motive of active Compassion in the church
Nahum, Theology of - It is relief and joy, however, not sadness and Compassion that are felt at this funeral. At another time, God had shown Compassion toward that city, but now is the time for the judgment of God's enemies and the salvation of his people
Prudence - When He withdrew to the desert on hearing of John’s death, the crowds followed Him; and Jesus, seeing them as sheep without a shepherd, had Compassion on them, and began to teach them (Mark 8:30-317). The emergence of a duty, an appeal from circumstances to His Compassion, is a call from the Father, and then Jesus enters upon danger secure in the Father’s guarding providence
Alms - John, however, that the principle of the responsibility of Christian men for the maintenance of their brethren is most emphatically expressed: ‘Whoso hath this world’s goods, and beholdeth his brother in need, and shutteth up his Compassion from him, how doth the love of God abide in him?’ (1 John 3:17)
Elisha - The Compassion and tenacious hope of the mother met its reward when she sought and found the man of God and pleaded for help
Hazael - Jeroboam II still further "restored the coast of Israel from the entering in of Hamath unto the sea of the plain," according to Jonah's prophecy, through the Lord's great Compassion (2 Kings 13:25; 2 Kings 14:25-27)
Courage - The emphasis which is so rightly laid upon His gentleness and Compassion tends to obscure His strength and virility
Salvation - It is to be reconciled to God, and restored to his favour, so that he will be no longer angry, terrible, and retributive, but a most kind, Compassionate, and tender Father. It is to dwell for ever in a place, where no objects of pity or Compassion, of anger or envy, of hatred or distrust, are to be found; but where all will increase the happiness of each other, by mutual love and kindness
Move, Moved, Mover, Moving, Unmovable - (5) See also Compassion , ENVY , FEAR , INDIGNATION
Mercy - The word used is ἐλεεῖν, while Christ’s twofold response is expressed by σπλαγχνισθείς, ‘moved with Compassion,’ and by His act of healing (Matthew 20:34). That is to say, the mercy of God beginning with Compassion went on to action, in the Incarnation and Atonement
Mercy - The word used is ἐλεεῖν, while Christ’s twofold response is expressed by σπλαγχνισθείς, ‘moved with Compassion,’ and by His act of healing (Matthew 20:34). That is to say, the mercy of God beginning with Compassion went on to action, in the Incarnation and Atonement
Healing, Divine - ...
On four occasions Jesus' Compassion is specially noted in connection with healing the sick: the widow of Nain with her dead son (Luke 7:13-14 )
Damascus - his son continued to exercise dominion over Israel, 2 Kings 13:3-7,22 ; but Jehovah had Compassion on Israel, and Joash, according to the dying prophecy of Elisha, overcame the king of Syria three times and recovered the cities of Israel
Paradox - In the teaching of Jesus we have unworldly simplicity united with worldly shrewdness (Matthew 7:15; Matthew 10:16-17; Matthew 16:6; Matthew 17:20, Luke 16:1-12), the universal beneficence and Compassion of God bound up with severe and inexorable justice (Matthew 5:45; Matthew 11:20-30; Matthew 18:15-35; Matthew 20:1-16; Matthew 25:14-30); we have the great and deep conceptions of life through death, joy through suffering, love through severance, peace through conflict, victory through surrender, self-realization through self-renunciation, the conquest of the world through the cross of shame (Luke 14:25-33, John 12:24-26; John 16:20; John 16:33; John 12:32)
Uniqueness - (2) Again, Christ exemplified the union of tender Compassion for the sinner with sharp intolerance for sin. He was neither moved by the depth of His Compassion to make unguarded allowances for the transgressor, nor incited by His intense repulsion against sin to lose the brother in the censor
God, Name of - I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and Compassion on whom I will have Compassion
Contribution - Yet another prophet issues a call for true justice and Compassion (Zechariah 7:9-10 )
Struggles of Soul - His dread of encouraging curiosity or wrong belief by His miracles (John 4:48) came in conflict with His desire to help and comfort; and when the Evangelists call attention to Compassion as the motive of His performing a miracle, we may conclude that there had been such a struggle of soul (Matthew 14:14; Matthew 15:32; Matthew 20:34, Mark 1:41, Luke 7:13)
Thirst - The intensity of His suffering is attested by the unwonted interference of one of the soldier-guards, who, out of Compassion for the Crucified, attempted to allay His anguish
Passion - Compassion; ...
14
Angel - First, there are the prophetic messengers: “And the Lord God of their fathers sent to them by his messengers, rising up betimes, and sending; because he had Compassion on his people, and on his dwelling place: But they mocked the messengers of God, and despised his words, and misused his prophets, until the wrath of the Lord arose against his people, till there was no remedy” ( Names of God - “As a father has Compassion on his children, so the Lord has Compassion on those who fear Him” ( Psalm 103:13 )
Scribes - " (Matthew 7:29 ) While they confined their teachings to the class of scholars, he "had Compassion on the multitudes
Backsliding - Only the mercy and Compassion of Yahweh could restore Israel to favor (Jeremiah 3:22 ; 14:7 )
Age, Old (the Aged) - Nebuchadnezzar had no Compassion on the aged or the feeble ( 2 Chronicles 36:17 )
Rehoboam - So Shishak took away the temple and the palace treasures, and the golden shields (200 larger and 300 smaller, 1 Kings 10:16-17), for which Rehoboam substituted brazen shields, to be borne by the bodyguard before him in state processions, characteristic of his vanity which comforted itself with a sham after losing the reality; but the Lord did not let Shishak destroy Rehoboam altogether, for He saw, amidst abounding evil, with His tender Compassion, some "good things in Judah
Exclusiveness - Christ’s attitude toward publicans, who are bracketed with heathen, was anything but unsympathetic; and if He felt toward heathen in the same way, they were objects not of dislike, but of the deepest Compassion
Disease - Most references to human organs are metaphorical: The heart is the seat of the will, the bowels of Compassion. But the parallel he draws lends some authority to the Compassion of those who see the sinful as victims of their own folly or viciousness, and i need of help and understanding
Widow - He healed a widow's son because of Compassion for his mother (Luke 7:11-17 ); he protested the exploitation of widows (Mark 12:40 ). ...
The early church, the messianic community, defined the essence of true religion as demonstrating Compassion to the poor and needy, in particular the widow and the orphan (James 1:27 )
Glory - The spiritual glory is revealed in the proclamation of the name of Jehovah, full of Compassion and gracious
Golden Rule - His Compassion for people is seen in his love for the aliens among Israel, pagan nations such as Nineveh, and sinful persons such as Gomer in Hosea
Remnant - Only a few would survive judgment events, basically because they repented and rested their future on the Compassion of their Lord
Energy - His boundless love and Compassion for human beings inspired Him to go about doing good
Death - People are not the helpless victims of mechanical laws, but the subjects of divine Compassion
God - In some instances, it also carries the idea of Compassion (Jeremiah 16:5 ). ...
Whereas God related to Israel with a steadfastness of love and Compassion, Israel should also relate to him with the same kind of loving loyalty. In these national crises, God is seen as a God of judgment and wrath, but in the return from exile and the restoration, the Old Testament presents him as the God of Compassion and salvation. ...
Second, God is Compassionate . God's actions to restore Judah after the exile to Babylonia would be as mighty and Compassionate as his deliverance of their ancestors from Egypt; that is, he would perform a second exodus (Isaiah 35 ; 45 ). So deep was God's Compassion for Israel and the world that he would assume the form of a servant and take on himself Israel's suffering and sin (Isaiah 53:4-6 )
Family - However, the father was also to be loving, and the divine mercy of the New Testament was based on the Compassionate Old Testament father (Psalm 103:1 ). The prophet Isaiah used the image of the mother to describe the Compassion of God (Isaiah 66:13 ). Christian family relationships called for a commitment which was based on openness and Compassion, forgiveness and understanding
Excommunication - In the conclusion of this article, however, we must add, that too great caution cannot be observed in procedures of this kind; every thing should be done with the greatest meekness, deliberation, prayer, and a deep sense of our own unworthiness; with a Compassion for the offender, and a fixed design of embracing reproving, instructing, and, if possible, restoring him to the enjoyment of the privileges he has forfeited by his conduct
Damascus - )...
Benhadad his son continued to exercise a lordship over Israel (2 Kings 13:3-7; 2 Kings 13:22) at first; but Joash, Jehoahaz' son, beat him thrice, according to Elisha's dying prophecy (2 Kings 13:14-19), for "the Lord had Compassion on His people
Church - His people are to put on, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of Compassion, kindness, lowliness, meekness, longsuffering, etc
Government - In such countries Christians can not only pray for God’s will to be done on earth, but they can actively work for those values of justice, freedom, morality, honesty and Compassion that God desires for human society (Matthew 6:10)
Philanthropy - Paul uses it of the universal Compassion of God for mankind (Titus 3:4), and St. In both cases the word is correctly used to describe the Compassion which recognizes no limitation. The evolution by which Compassion has been changed into philanthropy is so subtly described that it may easily escape the notice of the superficial reader, but to those who possess the necessary spiritual insight and enlightenment the story has all the charm of a natural development
Micah, Book of - The incomparable God of patience, mercy, Compassion, and faithfulness will forgive and renew His people (Micah 7:18-20 )
Lamentations, Book of - The hope for Judah was the Compassion of the Lord; ‘therefore let us search and try our ways and turn again to the Lord’ ( Lamentations 3:40 )
Legalism - The prophets in particular denounce preoccupation with the niceties of sacrificial ritual while inward obedience expressed in justice, Compassion, and humility is lacking (1 Samuel 15:22-23 ; Isaiah 1:10-20 ; Amos 2:6-8 ; 4:4-5 ; 5:21-24 ; Micah 6:6-8 )
Jericho - And here, too, the Compassion of the good Samaritan is doubly virtuous, from the purity of the motive which must have led to it, in a spot where no eyes were fixed on him to draw forth the performance of any duty, and from the bravery which was necessary to admit of a man's exposing himself, by such delay, to the risk of a similar fate to that from which he was endeavouring to rescue his fellow creature
Luke, Gospel of - After the appointment of twelve apostles (6:12-19), there are further teachings (6:20-49), miracles of Compassion (7:1-17), explanations to John’s disciples (7:18-35) and demonstrations of forgiveness and devotion (7:36-50)
Assumption of Moses - A king (Cyrus) has Compassion on them, and parts of the two tribes return, while the ten increase among the Gentiles in their captivity. the commission to Peter in John 21:15-17]'>[5], or who is there who will have Compassion on them, and … be their guide by the way (cf. But not only is Moses regarded as shepherd, Compassionate guide, and intercessor; in 11:16 he is described as ‘the sacred spirit who was worthy of the Lord (cf. 12:7 ‘Not for any virtue or strength of mine, but in His Compassion and long-suffering, was He pleased to call me
Womanliness - To the instances given above of the relation of Jesus to women we may add His Compassion for the widow of Nain (Luke 7:13), and His commendation of the widow’s mites (Mark 12:43-44)
Perseverance - The conclusion James draws is that "the Lord is full of Compassion and mercy" (5:11), probably basing his statement on the conclusion of the story of Job (42:10,12), where the blessing of the Lord on Job is described
Pilate - His sense of justice, Compassion, and involuntary respect for the Holy Sufferer yielded to his selfishness, worldly policy, and cynical unbelief
Gather - Qâbats is also applied to “divine deliverance”: “… The Lord thy God will turn thy captivity, and have Compassion upon thee, and will return and gather thee from all the nations, whither the Lord thy God hath scattered thee” ( God, Names of - Job and Psalms have most of the 238 occurrences of El [ Numbers 23:19 ; Deuteronomy 32:4 ), jealousy (Deuteronomy 5:9 ), and Compassion (Nehemiah 9:31 ; Psalm 86:15 ), but the root idea of "might" remains. The range of meanings include those of authority and discipline, but also those of Compassion, care, protection, and provision
Meekness (2) - When He was subjected in His own person to insult or wrong, He bore it with patience and with Compassion on those who wronged Him (1 Peter 2:23). When He hung upon the cross in agony, He was so far master of Himself and so deeply moved by Compassion for His enemies, that He found some ground for extenuating their conduct and prayed for their forgiveness
Incarnation - Human emotional characteristics accompanied the physical ones: Jesus expressed joy (John 15:11 ) and sorrow (Matthew 26:37 ); He showed Compassion (Matthew 9:36 ) and love (John 11:5 ); and He was moved to righteous indignation (Mark 3:5 )
Zechariah, Book of - God seeks justice, mercy, and Compassion (Zechariah 7:8-10 )
Mediator - And would I have it in the hands of one that is near to me? here also it is, for it is in the hands of Jesus, who is "bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh;" one who can have"compassion on the ignorant, and on them that are out of the way; seeing that he himself (in the days of his flesh) was compassed with all our sinless infirmities
Necessitarians - And they that believe all that the Scripture says on the one hand, of the eternity of future punishments, and on the other, of God's Compassion to sinners, and his solemn assurance that he desires not their death, will find the difficulty greatly increased
Calvinists - ...
For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have Compassion on whom I will have Compassion
Miracle - ...
Other important motifs include Jesus' Compassion for the needy (e. Luke highlights Jesus' Compassion for the outcasts of society (4:18; 17:11-19) and his role as a new Moses (9:28-36) and Elijah/Elisha (7:1-28)
Gentiles - The native chiefs of Canaan treat Abraham with respect; the Pharaoh who makes Joseph lord of his house calls him ‘a man in whom the spirit of God is’; the daughter of the Pharaoh of the oppression is moved with Compassion at the sight of the child Moses, and brings him up as her son; Jethro receives Moses when an exile into his family, guides him in the desert, and instructs him in the art of governing; Rahab and Ruth ‘take refuge under the wings of the God of Israel,’ and their names are in the regal genealogy; Ittai the Gittite cleaves to David, when almost all have forsaken him; the Queen of Sheba comes to hear the wisdom of Solomon; the Tyrian Hiram supplies him with materials when building the Temple, having been ‘ever a lover of David’; the widow of Zarephath, nearly destitute herself, feeds the famishing Elijah; and Naaman, the Syrian general, confesses his faith in the God of Elisha as the one true God; Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian slave, rescues Jeremiah from death, and is rewarded with a promise of personal immunity from danger; Job, an Arabian shaikh, is the lofty teacher of how ‘to suffer and be strong’; Cyrus the Persian Is the Lord’s anointed, and the deliverer of His people. -Was there present to the mind of Christ, while accomplishing the work of Him that sent Him, a purpose of salvation that included the Gentiles? Did He look beyond ‘the lost sheep of the house of Israel’ to other sheep far off from the mountains of Canaan, who had also to be sought and found? When Satan showed Him the kingdoms of the world, did He turn away from the sight of the world with the repugnance of a Jew of His time, or did the sight move Him to Compassion, and enkindle a great hope in His heart? It is not easy to see how the Christian Church can cease believing that Christ had a purpose of mercy for the world, and the expectation of subduing it unto Himself, unless she is to revise her whole doctrine of the Person of her Lord. In Luke, too, Samaritans are exhibited as excelling Jews in Compassionate and grateful love (Luke 10:38; Luke 17:16)
Sorrow, Man of Sorrows - When face to face with death, He is moved with sympathetic Compassion (Luke 7:13); He groans in spirit, is troubled, and weeps (John 11:33). He feels sorrowful Compassion over the multitude without a shepherd (Matthew 9:36, Mark 6:34)
Moses - Rather than killing the child as her father had commanded, however, the woman showed Compassion on the child, made the proper preparations, and, with the help of the baby's sister, established a procedure for adopting the baby as her own child
Miracles - On those occasions Jesus acted, it seems, purely out of Compassion (Matthew 11:5; Matthew 14:13-14; Matthew 15:32; Luke 4:40; Luke 7:11-17; John 6:1-13); though, as always, he refused to satisfy people who wanted him to perform miracles for their own selfish purposes (John 6:14-15)
Deaf And Dumb - Mark, in His Compassion for suffering humanity, in His teaching as significant by action as by word, in His sublime confidence that He had that to give, for which He looked not in vain from heaven
Mennonites - Menno was born at Witmarsum, a village in the neighbourhood of Bolswert, in Friesland, in the year 1505, and died in 1561, in the duchy of Holstein, at the country-seat of a certain nobleman, not far from the city of Oldesloe, who, moved with Compassion by the view of the perils to which Menno was exposed, and the snares that were daily laid for his ruin, took him, with certain of his associates, into his protection, and gave him an asylum
Cures - Compassion was the moving cause of many of His beneficent actions (Matthew 15:32; Matthew 20:34, Mark 8:2, Luke 7:13). And we are led to conceive in some measure the vast resources of power in the full Compassion of Him who was morally one with the Source of all love and pity
Doctrines - In particular, Jesus laid emphasis upon the Fatherhood of God, and taught His disciples to trust implicitly in the Father’s care (Matthew 6:25-34 || Luke 12:22-31), and to believe that that care extended to the very details of their daily life; while He exhorted them not only to rely upon and claim His Compassion and His forgiving love, but to imitate Him in respect of these attributes, that they might ‘be the children of their’ ‘Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust’ (Matthew 5:45; cf. He announces that He is come not to destroy but to fulfil the Law and the Prophets (Matthew 5:17), and in this connexion shows that the Law is not satisfied with the literal and formal obedience of the Pharisees, but extends to thought and motive; He warns His disciples that, except their righteousness shall exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees, they cannot enter the Kingdom of Heaven (Matthew 5:18-20); and in other passages He says that in the Day of Judgment men shall be judged so strictly that they shall give account of every idle word, and even of any neglect on their part of the law of kindness and Compassion towards their neighbours (Matthew 12:36; Matthew 25:45)
Fall, the - ...
God revealed that although his wisdom, love, goodness, integrity, sovereignty, and majesty had been assaulted by Satan and violated by Adam and Eve, in his infinite Compassion and with his unsurpassing power and authority he would destroy Satan and his dominion
Scribes - ...
They taught only their disciples; "He had Compassion on the multitudes" (Matthew 9:36)
Bethesda - ” This expression is exactly identical with Bethesda, both expressions signifying “house of mercy, or Compassion
Brother - " (1618383544_4)...
Who is the brother waxen poor, having fallen into decay, and sold away some of his possession, but our poor ruined nature; ruined by the fall, and by sin, having sold away our possession? And who is the brother to whom the precept is given, and by whom it hath been fulfilled, and is fulfilling, but the Lord Jesus Christ? Who but him could redeem our mortgaged inheritance? Who but him had a right so to do, as the nearest of all kin, and the most Compassionate of all relations? And do observe in those gracious precepts how blessedly provision is made, in this almighty Brother's obedience to this precept, for all the relations of Jesus, both Jew and Gentile; "Yea, (saith the command of JEHOVAH,) though he be a stranger, or a sojourner, that he may live with thee. And amidst all the decays and poverty of his poor brethren on earth, Jesus is looking with the same Compassion as ever on them; and they are authorized to look up for every needed relief unto him
Colossians - Life in Christ brings faithfulness and Compassion in family relationships (Colossians 3:18-4:1 )
Turn - The Lord thy God will turn thy captivity, and have Compassion upon thee
Lactantius - The tract de Irâ Dei , against the Epicureans and Stoics, is intended to prove God as capable of anger as of Compassion and mercy
Poverty (2) - ’ To take Matthew 26:11, ‘Ye have the poor always with you,’ to mean that the existence of poverty must be acquiesced in, is to forget all that was said about mercifulness and liberality by Him who, when He saw the multitudes, ‘had Compassion on them’ (Matthew 9:36; Matthew 14:14)
God - Clarke, " רחום , ROCHUM, the merciful Being, who is full of tenderness and Compassion; חנון , CHANUN, the gracious One, he whose nature is goodness itself, the loving God. ארכּ? פים , EREC APAYIM long- suffering, the Being who, because of his tenderness, is not easily irritated, but suffers long and is kind; רב , RAB, the great or mighty One: חסד , CHESED, the bountiful Being, he who is exuberant in his beneficence; אמת , EMETH, the Truth, or True One, he alone who can neither deceive nor be deceived; נצר חסד , NOTSER CHESED, the Preserver of bountifulness, he whose beneficence never ends, keeping mercy, for thousands of generations, showing Compassion and mercy while the world endures; נשא עון ופשע וחטאה , NOSE AVON VAPESHA VECHATAAH, he who bears away iniquity, transgression, and sin; properly the Redeemer, the Pardoner, the Forgiver, the Being whose prerogative it is to forgive sin, and save the soul; נקה לא ינקה NAKEH LO YINNAKEH, the righteous Judge, who distributes justice with an impartial hand; and עין פקד , PAKED AVON, &c, he who visits iniquity, he who punishes transgressors, and from whose justice no sinner can escape; the God of retributive and vindictive justice. His tender mercy, in the Compassion showed to the fallen pair; his justice, in forgiving them only in the view of a satisfaction to be hereafter offered to his justice by an innocent representative of the sinning race; his love to that race, in giving his own Son to become this Redeemer, and in the fulness of time to die for the sins of the whole world; and his holiness, in connecting with this provision for the pardon of man the means of restoring him to a sinless state, and to the obliterated image of God in which he had been created
Woman - Or God may use the Compassion of pagan royalty to preserve and nurture the savior of his own people (Pharaoh's daughter and Moses Exe 2:1-10). In another episode, the woman healed was Jewish but still illustrates Jesus' ministry of Compassion to the outcasts of society (Simon's mother-in-law [3]), as the third in a series of such miracles (cf
Redemption (2) - Yet He is the Lord God, merciful and gracious, full of Compassion and ready to forgive (1618383544_60 Matthew 20:25-28 ff. Behind all interpositions for deliverance and help, whatever the words employed, stand Jehovah’s unchanging character, His pledged word, His inflexible will to uphold the right, His Compassion for the afflicted and oppressed
Sanctify, Sanctification - It must be full of Compassion towards all needy ones, and must find a neighbour in any one requiring assistance (Luke 10:24-35). Jesus also inculcated the supreme importance of love by His rebukes of its opposites: of lack of Compassion (Matthew 18:23-35, Luke 10); of selfishness (Luke 16:19-31); of inhumanity (Matthew 25:41-45)
Elijah - Chrysostom said that Elijah learned Compassion in the house of the widow so he could be sent to his own people
Repentance (2) - ’ (2) By means of the revelation which He has given of God and the Fatherly Compassion of God toward alienated and sinning men
New Covenant - In Isaiah 54:8-10 , Yahweh promises that when he restores Zion he will never again become angry, but will have Compassion on his people
Death (2) - The Johannine account of the raising of Lazarus is indeed bound up with a more complex theological doctrine; but the Synoptic miracles, in so far as they are more than works of Compassion or exhibitions of Divine power, are indicative of the transient nature of death
Mark, the Gospel According to - why doth this generation seek after a sign?" Mark 1:41, "Jesus moved with Compassion put forth His hand" touching the leper
Covenant - ...
The Divine Being, foreseeing this, in infinite wisdom and unspeakable Compassion planned the covenant of grace; by virtue of which his people are reinstated in the blessings of purity, knowledge, and felicity, and that without a possibility of any farther defalcation
Grace - He then makes a statement that is connected with grace throughout Scripture, one that Paul will quote in the context of election in Romans 9 : "I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have Compassion on whom I will have Compassion
History - The freedom granted by the Exodus shows that God has Compassion on suffering
Clean, Unclean - ...
Jesus did not allow the laws of purity to keep him from touching lepers (Matthew 8:1-4 ; Mark 1:40-45 ; Luke 17:11-17 ), and he deliberately touched rather than healed by his word to show Compassion and to anticipate by his action the coming change in law under the new covenant
Stranger, Alien, Foreigner - It is not necessary to do more than allude to the countless forms of helpful assistance and benevolence which Christ’s Compassion for the stranger has prompted in recent times (cf
Unbelief (2) - Pleading the Compassion of Jesus instead of his own faith, he unconsciously shows a genuine faith (Gould, St
Mark, the Gospel of - Moved by Compassion, anger, frustration, mercy, and sorrow (Mark 1:41 ; Mark 3:5 ; Mark 8:17 ; Mark 14:6 ,Mark 14:6,14:33 ), Jesus ministered among His own kind
Impotence - ...
The features of the healing are: (1) The Divine Compassion expressed in our Lord’s laying His hand upon the woman as He spoke the word of hope and deliverance; (2) His profound sense that this suffering and weakness, this crouching spirit, were completely foreign to the will of God (Hebrews 7:16); and (3) His stedfast refusal to allow any pedantic Sabbath rules to stand in the way of His relief of suffering humanity
Kindness (2) - God is particularly set forth as viewing the sufferings and sorrows of men with Compassion and pity; and pity is simply kindness brought into relation to suffering and distress. 36), ‘Be ye Compassionate, as your Father is Compassionate’ (οἰκτίρμων). ‘As I have loved you’ is the Johannine counterpart (John 13:34; John 15:12) of the Synoptic ‘as your Father is Compassionate’ in the enforcement of the Law of Love
Death - Compassion for the sorrows of those bereaved is the prime motive: in the case of Lazarus, it is expressly added that the restoration was ‘for the glory of God’ ( John 11:4 ; John 11:40 )
History - The freedom granted by the Exodus shows that God has Compassion on suffering
mo'Ses - It was opened, and the cry of the child moved the princess to Compassion
God - In his mercy he may have Compassion on the weak, and in his wrath he may punish the guilty (Exodus 2:23-25; Exodus 32:9-10; James 5:4; 1 Peter 3:12)
Flood, the - He "repents"—he is sorry, moved to pity, having Compassion, suffering grief (Genesis 6:6 )
Hebrews, the Epistle to the - - The writer was at the time in prison (Hebrews 13:3; Hebrews 13:19), had been formerly imprisoned in Palestine (Hebrews 10:34, "ye had Compassion on me in my bonds
Stoics - Even pity and Compassion should be eschewed
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had Compassion on him, and went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him
Disciple (2) - Matthew tells, immediately before he records the calling of the Twelve, that when Jesus ‘saw the multitudes he was moved with Compassion for them, because they were distressed and scattered, as sheep not having a shepherd
Judas - " And the highest possible relief to the anguish of the soul under temptation, is the consciousness of the sympathy and Compassion of Christ
Parables - While Matthew reported a great many parabolic sayings, Luke contains numerous narrative parables, such as the parable of the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-8 ), the Compassionate Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37 ), and the rich fool (Luke 12:16-21 ). ...
Jesus lifted the theme to new heights and through His parables portrayed the nature of the kingdom (Mark 4:26-29 ), the grace of the kingdom (Luke 18:9-17 ), the crisis of the kingdom (Luke 12:54-56 ), and the conditions of the kingdom such as commitment (Luke 14:28-30 ), forgiveness (Matthew 18:23-35 ), and Compassion (Luke 10:25-37 )
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - Marcion's theory was that the visible creation was the work of the just God; the good God, whose abode he places in the third or highest heaven and whom apparently he acknowledged as the creator of a high immaterial universe, neither concerned Himself with mankind nor was known by them, until, taking Compassion on the misery to which they had been brought by disobedience to their Creator who was casting them into his hell, He interfered for their redemption. He took Compassion on those plagued and tortured in the fire of hell, and he sent his son to deliver them
Demon - ...
Jesus came to set Satan's captives free (Matthew 12:22-29 ; Luke 4:18-21 ), and in all of his dealing with the demonized he demonstrated Compassion for the people and authority over the spirits
Ephesians, Book of - Anger and malice must turn to love, Compassion, and forgiveness
Matthew, the Gospel of - The Compassionate Lord prays for Compassionate helpers (Matthew 9:35-38 ). Jesus placed Compassion for others over personal needs (Matthew 14:13-21 )
Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies - Jesus linked entrance into the kingdom of heaven to repentance (Matthew 4:17 ), humility (5:3; 18:1-4), witness (5:10,16; 10:32; 16:19), obedience (5:19), righteousness (5:20), Compassion (18:10,14; 23:13) and stewardship (19:23)
Love - This element of selective attachment shows itself in the fact that ἀγαπᾶν can mean ‘to be contented with,’ ‘to acquiesce in,’ ‘to put up with,’ and also in this, that ἀγαπᾶν is not used of the love of mere Compassion
Law of God - It is a matter of communion of spirit with spirit, needy souls, humbly conscious of their needs, confessing their wants and desires to One who seeth in secret, the poor in spirit hungering and thirsting after righteousness, and so convinced of their entire dependence upon the forgiveness and Compassion of the All-Merciful as to feel that for them to claim the mercy and grace of God is to bind themselves by the law of love to the duty of forgiving as they would themselves be forgiven
Aaron - Aaron's very fall would upon his recovery make him the more fit as a priest, to have Compassion on the ignorant and on them that are out of the way, for that he himself also is compassed with infirmity (Hebrews 5:2); compare the case of Peter, Luke 22:31-32
Common Life - It tends to harden the heart against Compassion and charity, to make the man self-sufficient, to give a physical delight so great as to close the eyes to that which is spiritual (cf
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - Their whole head will be waters, and their eyes one fountain of tears just at that moment when God is rising up in Compassion, and in recompense, to wipe all tears from their eyes for ever
Nabal - Finally, be ye all of one mind, having Compassion one of another, love as brethren, be pitiful, be courteous
Atonement - If it then be true, that the release of offending man from future punishment, and his restoration to the divine favour, ought, for the interests of mankind themselves, and for the instruction and caution of other beings, to be so bestowed, that no license shall be given to offence;—...
that God himself, whilst he manifests his Compassion, should not appear less just, less holy, than he really is;—that his authority should be felt to be as compelling, and that disobedience should as truly, though not unconditionally, subject us to the deserved penalty, as though no hope of forgiveness had been exhibited;—we ask, On what scheme, save that which is developed in the New Testament, are these necessary conditions provided for? Necessary they are, unless we contend for a license and an impunity which shall annul all good government in the universe, a point for which no reasonable man will contend; and if so, then we must allow that there is strong internal evidence of the truth of the doctrine of Scripture, when it makes the offer of pardon consequent only upon the securities we have before mentioned
Incarnation - He felt even strong emotions: wonder ( Mark 6:6 , Luke 7:9 ), Compassion ( Mark 8:2 , Luke 7:13 ), joy ( Luke 10:21 ), anger ( Mark 8:12 ; Mark 10:14 ); He was deeply moved ( John 11:33 , Mark 14:33 )
Marriage - Yahweh "divorced" his "unfaithful wife" (Isaiah 50:1 ; Jeremiah 3:8 ; Hosea 2:2 ), but ultimately will have Compassion and delightfully restore her to faithfulness and holiness (Isaiah 54 ; 62:4-5 ; Ezekiel 16:53-63 ; Hosea 2:14-3:1 )
Man (2) - He received ‘sinners,’ and ate with them; He dined with tax-gatherers, and spoke kindly and Compassionately to a woman of ill fame (Luke 5:27-39; Luke 19:1-10, John 8:1-11). He was often moved to Compassion by the multitudes which followed Him; they were as sheep without a shepherd; they heard Him gladly, and even tarried with Him a whole day, and that in a desert place (Mark 1:41; 1618383544_9)
Samson - He will turn again, He will have Compassion on us; He will subdue our iniquities, and Thou shalt cast all their sins into the depths of the sea
Zechariah, Theology of - Specific sins of idolatry (13:2), pride (of Assyria, 10:11), and lack of Compassion (7:9-11) are listed
Joseph - For the Lord will not cast off for ever; but, though He cause grief, yet will He have Compassion according to the multitude of His mercies
Presence (2) - John 4:23), to the illustrations from nature (Matthew 10:29), to the exhortations against anxiety (Luke 12:30-32), towards watchfulness (Luke 12:35-36), against covetousness (Luke 12:20-21), towards Compassion (Matthew 10:40-42)
Abortion - ...
In all of this it is hard to ignore the persistent call for profound Compassion and practical concern for the most vulnerable and least influential members of the community
Matthew, Theology of - As Jesus showed his Compassion for others by healing them and helping them (9:32-34), so the followers of Jesus were to do the same (10:5-8)
Jeremiah, Theology of - It includes Compassion for those marginalized and powerless, such as victims of oppression, aliens, widows, and orphans (21:12; 22:3)
Blessing (2) - 48b) to Moses; the second (‘for the land and for the food’) to Joshua, who led Israel into the land; the third (‘Blessed art Thou, O Lord, who in Thy Compassion rebuildest Jerusalem’) to king Solomon; the fourth (‘Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God … who art kind and dealest kindly with all’) to the Rabbis of Jamnia in the 2nd cent
Jacob - Still, she may forget her sucking child that she should not have Compassion on the son of her womb, yet will God not forget him
Esau - He will turn again, He will have Compassion upon us, He will subdue our iniquities; and Thou wilt cast all our sins into the depths of the sea
Jonath - O thou wicked servant, I forgave thee all that debt, because thou desiredst me: shouldest not thou also have had Compassion on thy fellow-servant, even as I had pity on thee?...
Everybody has the Book of Jonah by heart
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A number of His miracles, worked for the benefit of the young, illustrate His Compassion for their sufferings and ills
Aaron - You may rely upon it that many an Israelite whose sin had found him out had a prayer offered for him and for his case at the altar such that the penitent never knew where all the Compassion, and all the sympathy, and all the humility, and all the holiness, and all the harmlessness of his high priest came from
High Priest - "Tempted Himself in all points like as we are, yet without sin," He is able to succour the tempted (Hebrews 2:18); "touched with the feeling of our infirmities," and so having the needful qualification of a priest, that He "can have Compassion on the ignorant, and on them that are out of the way" (Hebrews 4:15; Hebrews 5:2)
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - ...
Since Jesus is Lord, he shares with the Father qualities like deity (Romans 9:5 ), preexistence (John 8:58 ), holiness (Hebrews 4:15 ), and Compassion (1 John 4:9 ), to name just a few
Miracles (2) - They arise out of the occasion—are never deliberated, unless the raising of Lazarus be an exception (John 11:4), but spring from the present practical impulse of Compassion and desire to help man, and the prompting of the Divine Spirit (John 2:4 ff
Christ in the Seventeenth Century - It is only when we read the glory of God in the face of Christ, and realize that the central and essential attributes of God are love, grace, Compassion for human frailty and need, that we can recognize the Divine and the human as one, and acknowledge in Christ the revelation of the Divine, the Word of God Incarnate
Jesus Christ - upon the thoughts; he collected human duty into two well-devised rules; he repeated these rules, and laid great stress upon them, and thereby fixed the sentiments of his followers; he excluded all regard to reputation in our devotion and alms, and, by parity of reason, in our other virtues; his instructions were delivered in a form calculated for impression; they were illustrated by parables, the choice and structure of which would have been admired in any composition whatever: he was free from the usual symptoms of enthusiasm, heat, and vehemence in devotion, austerity in institutions, and a wild particularity in the description of a future state; he was free also from the depravities of his age and country; without superstition among the most superstitious of men, yet not decrying positive distinctions or external observances, but soberly recalling them to the principle of their establishment, and to their place in the scale of human duties; there was nothing of sophistry or trifling, though amidst teachers, remarkable for nothing so much as frivolous subtilties and quibbling expositions: he was candid and liberal in his judgment of the rest of mankind, although belonging to a people who affected a separate claim to divine favour, and, in consequence of that opinion, prone to uncharitableness, partiality, and restriction; in his religion there was no scheme of building up a hierarchy, or of ministering to the views of human governments; in a word, there was every thing so grand in doctrine, and so delightful in manner, that the people might well exclaim...
Surely, never man spake like this man!" As to his example, bishop Newcome observes, "it was of the most perfect piety to God, and of the most extensive benevolence and the most tender Compassion to men
Prayer - It supposes humility, contrition, and trust, on the part of the creature; and an acknowledgment of the power and Compassion of God, and of the merit of the atonement of Christ: all which are manifestly new positions, so to speak, of the circumstances of the creature, which, upon the very principle of the objection, rationally understood, must be taken into consideration
Miracles - ...
The miracle of active Compassion necessarily flowed from His divine power and human sympathy combined in His incarnation, of which the atonement is the crown (Matthew 8:17; Isaiah 53:4)
Mark, Gospel According to - but especially the description of His human soul and spirit ( Mark 2:8 , Acts 5:1-42 ; Mark 14:36 ), His human Compassion ( Mark 1:41 ) and love ( Mark 10:21 ), and the more painful emotions which Mk
Amos, Theology of - These relationships are to be characterized by the sort of love that manifests itself in loyalty and faithfulness to him (Deuteronomy 6:4-14 ; Amos 5:4-6 ) and justice and Compassion to their neighbors (Leviticus 19:9-18 ; Amos 5:15,24 )
Religious Experience - Yet, while Jesus proclaimed faith and gratitude and Compassion to be religious virtues wherever found, and evidently preferred honest heresy to thoughtless orthodoxy, He nevertheless regarded Gentiles and Samaritans as heretics, and the Jews as the natural ‘children of the kingdom’ (Luke 8:4-150; cf. Salvation, according to the earliest Christian Gospel, is proved not by personal experience but by practical morality, a Compassionate spirit, and obedience to the inner law—this inner law being objectified in Jesus Christ when He is known (Matthew 25:14-45)
Paul - The positive ground of mercy is solely God's Compassion (Titus 3:5)
Anger (2) - His anger does not extinguish His Compassion, and if the city could be moved to repentance He would still gather her children together as a hen gathers her chickens under her wings
Jesus Christ - " His tender considerateness for His disciples after their missionary journey, and His Compassion for the fainting multitudes, outweighing all thought; of His own repose when He was weary, and when others would have been impatient of their retirement being intruded on (1 Samuel 2:10), are lovely examples of His human, and at the same time superhuman, sympathy (Hebrews 4:15)
Ideas (Leading) - None were too miserable or too lowly for His Compassion
Logos - ’ The motive of Compassion, to which the miracles are for the most part ascribed by the Synoptic writers, falls into the background
Hermas Shepherd of - This one opportunity, however, would seem to be embodied in the Shepherd himself, who was sent ‘to be with you who repent with your whole heart, and to strengthen you in the faith’ (Hebrews 12:6), and whose command to Hennas is, ‘Go, and tell all men to repent, and they shall live unto God; for the Lord in His Compassion sent me to give repentance to all, though some of them do not deserve it, for their deeds’ (Sim
Death of Christ - There was an element of moral suffering in the Compassion with which He was so often moved
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - ...
The Testament of Zebulun (‘concerning Compassion and mercy,’ β). He was Compassionate towards man and beast, hence his preservation from sickness and drowning (v
Sacrifice (2) - To imagine that Christ in these words represents the Father as requiring a ransom at His hands before He can forgive mankind, is to render His revelation of the Heavenly Father wholly inconsistent, is to give the lie to all His earlier words regarding the mercy and Compassion of God
New Jerusalem - … In his days Judah shall be saved, and Israel shall dwell safely; Jeremiah 12:15 : ‘After that I have plucked them [5] up, I will return and have Compassion on them; and I will bring them again, every man to his heritage, and every man to his land’; Ezekiel 48:30-35 f
Poet - He is touched with Compassion for those lost ones of the House of Israel who are as sheep without a shepherd (Matthew 9:36; Matthew 15:24)
Incarnation (2) - He who taught others to pray for forgiveness, and never besought it of the Divine mercy for Himself; He who proclaimed the necessity of regeneration for all men, and Himself never passed through any such phase of experience; He who in tenderest sympathy drew close to the sinner’s side, and yet always manifested a singular aloofness of spirit, and never included Himself among the objects of the Divine Compassion; He who made it His vocation to die for the remission of sins, must have been, in actual fact, sinless:—either that, or He must have been sunk in a moral darkness more profound than sin ordinarily produces, even in the worst of men
Character of Christ - Mankind: (1) lowliness; (2) considerateness; (3) Compassion; (4) forbearance and forgiveness
Confession - He who performs the office of confessor gives the penitent nine-and-thirty blows on the back with a leathern strap, repeating these words, "God, being full of Compassion, forgave their iniquity, and destroyed them not; yea, many a time turned he his anger away, and did not stir up all his wrath
Jesus Christ - ...
"He sets an example of the most perfect piety to God, and of the most extensive benevolence and the most tender Compassion to men
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - Julian and his elder half-brother Gallus, who was sick of an illness which was expected to be mortal, were alone preserved, by the Compassion or the policy of Constantius (cf
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - The master said the Bismillah—“In the name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate”—which the child at once repeated after him. ]'>[3] and we put into the hearts of those who followed him kindness and Compassion