What does Commandments mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἐντολὰς an order 12
מִצְוֺתֶֽיךָ commandment. 6
מִצְוֺת֙ commandment. 6
מִצְוֺ֣ת commandment. 5
מִצְוֺ֖ת commandment. 4
מִצְוֺתַ֔י commandment. 4
מִצְוֺתָ֔יו commandment. 4
מִצְוֺתַ֖י commandment. 4
מִצְוֺתָיו֙ commandment. 4
מִצְוֺתָֽיו commandment. 3
מִצְוֺתַ֣י commandment. 3
וּמִצְוֺתַ֔י commandment. 3
מִצְוֺתֶ֔יךָ commandment. 3
ἐντολαῖς an order 3
ἐντολάς an order 3
ἐντολῶν an order 3
מִצְוֺתַ֥י commandment. 2
מִצְוֺ֤ת commandment. 2
מִצְוֺתָ֣יו commandment. 2
מִמִּצְוֺתֶֽיךָ commandment. 2
מִצְוֺתֶ֥יךָ commandment. 2
הַמִּצְוֺ֖ת commandment. 2
מִצְוֺת־ commandment. 2
(מִצְוֺתָ֖יו) commandment. 2
מִצְוֺתָ֖יו commandment. 2
מִצְוֺתָ֤יו commandment. 2
הַמִּצְוֺ֗ת commandment. 2
מִצְוֺתָ֥יו commandment. 2
מִמִּצְוֺ֧ת commandment. 1
! לְמִצְוֺתָ֑י commandment. 1
מִצְוֺ֧ת commandment. 1
מִצְוֺת֩ commandment. 1
וּמִצְוֺ֖ת commandment. 1
ἐντάλματα a precept. 1
לְמִצְוֺתֶ֙יךָ֙ commandment. 1
מִצְוֺתָ֑י commandment. 1
הַמִּצְוֺ֞ת commandment. 1
בְּ֝מִצְוֺתָ֗יו commandment. 1
בְּמִצְוֺתֶ֗יךָ commandment. 1
מִ֭צְוֺתֶיךָ commandment. 1
בְמִצְוֺתֶ֣יךָ commandment. 1
וּמִצְוֺתָ֥יו commandment. 1
וּ֝מִצְוֺתַ֗י commandment. 1
עֹשֵׂיהֶ֑ם to do 1
פִ֝קֻּדָ֗יו precept 1
צִוָּ֧ה to command 1
מִצְוֺתֶ֑יךָ commandment. 1
מִצְוֺ֣ת ׀ commandment. 1
וְהַמִּצְוָ֔ה commandment. 1
מִצְוֺתָ֜יו commandment. 1
ἐντολαὶ an order 1
ἐντολὰς» an order 1
דְּבָרַ֖י speech 1
הַדְּבָרִ֔ים speech 1
הַדְּבָרִ֑ים speech 1
הַדְּבָרִֽים speech 1
וְחֻקָּיו֙ statute 1
מִצְוֺתַ֜י commandment. 1
וּבְמִצְוֺתָ֖יו commandment. 1
וּמִצְוֺתָ֖יו commandment. 1
מִצְוֺתָֽי commandment. 1
מִצְוָתְךָ֖ commandment. 1
מִמִּצְוֺתֶ֖יךָ commandment. 1
וּמִצְוֺתָ֛יו commandment. 1
הַמִּצְוָ֔ה commandment. 1
מִצְוֺתָו֙‪‬‪‬ commandment. 1
מִצְוֺתָ֗יו commandment. 1
(מִצְוֺתָֽי) commandment. 1
הַמִּצְוָ֛ה commandment. 1
וּמִצְוֺתָיו֮ commandment. 1
לְמִצְוֺתָ֔יו commandment. 1
וַיְצַוֵּ֕ם to command 1

Definitions Related to Commandments

G1785


   1 an order, command, charge, precept, injunction.
      1a that which is prescribed to one by reason of his office.
   2 a commandment.
      2a a prescribed rule in accordance with which a thing is done.
         2a1 a precept relating to lineage, of the Mosaic precept concerning the priesthood.
         2a2 ethically used of the Commandments in the Mosaic law or Jewish tradition.
         

H4687


   1 commandment.
      1a commandment (of man).
      1b the commandment (of God).
      1c commandment (of code of wisdom).
      

H1697


   1 speech, word, speaking, thing.
      1a speech.
      1b saying, utterance.
      1c word, words.
      1d business, occupation, acts, matter, case, something, manner (by extension).
      

H6490


   1 precept, statute.
   

H6213


   1 to do, fashion, accomplish, make.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to do, work, make, produce.
            1a1a to do.
            1a1b to work.
            1a1c to deal (with).
            1a1d to act, act with effect, effect.
         1a2 to make.
            1a2a to make.
            1a2b to produce.
            1a2c to prepare.
            1a2d to make (an offering).
            1a2e to attend to, put in order.
            1a2f to observe, celebrate.
            1a2g to acquire (property).
            1a2h to appoint, ordain, institute.
            1a2i to bring about.
            1a2j to use.
            1a2k to spend, pass.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be done.
         1b2 to be made.
         1b3 to be produced.
         1b4 to be offered.
         1b5 to be observed.
         1b6 to be used.
      1c (Pual) to be made.
   2 (Piel) to press, squeeze.
   

H2706


   1 statute, ordinance, limit, something prescribed, due.
      1a prescribed task.
      1b prescribed portion.
      1c action prescribed (for oneself), resolve.
      1d prescribed due.
      1e prescribed limit, boundary.
      1f enactment, decree, ordinance.
         1f1 specific decree.
         1f2 law in general.
      1g enactments, statutes.
         1g1 conditions.
         1g2 enactments.
         1g3 decrees.
         1g4 civil enactments prescribed by God.
         

G1778


   1 a precept.
   

H6680


   1 to command, charge, give orders, lay charge, give charge to, order.
      1a (Piel).
         1a1 to lay charge upon.
         1a2 to give charge to, give command to.
         1a3 to give charge unto.
         1a4 to give charge over, appoint.
         1a5 to give charge, command.
         1a6 to charge, command.
         1a7 to charge, commission.
         1a8 to command, appoint, ordain (of divine act).
      1b (Pual) to be commanded.
      

Frequency of Commandments (original languages)

Frequency of Commandments (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ten Commandments
TEN COMMANDMENTS
1. The traditional history of the Decalogue . The ‘ten words’ were, according to Exodus 20:1-26 , proclaimed vocally by God on Mt. Sinai, and written by Him on two stones, and given to Moses ( Exodus 24:12 ; Exodus 31:13 ; Exodus 32:15-16 ; cf. Deuteronomy 5:22 ; Deuteronomy 9:10-11 ). When these were broken by Moses on his descent from the mount ( Exodus 32:19 , Deuteronomy 9:17 ), he was commanded to prepare two fresh stones like the first, on which God re-wrote the ‘ten words’ ( Exodus 34:4 ; Exodus 34:28 , Deuteronomy 10:2 ; Deuteronomy 10:4 ). This is clearly the meaning of Ex. as the text now stands. But many critics think that Exodus 10:28 b originally referred not to the ‘ten words’ of Exodus 20:1-26 , but to the laws of Exodus 34:11-26 , and that these laws were J [1] ’s version of the Decalogue. It must suffice to say here that if, as on the whole seems likely, Exodus 34:28 b refers to our Decalogue, we must distinguish the command to write the covenant laws in Exodus 34:27 , and the words ‘he wrote’ in Exodus 34:28 b, in which case the subject of the latter will be God, as required by Exodus 34:1 . The two stones were immediately placed in the ark, which had been prepared by Moses specially for that purpose ( Deuteronomy 10:1-5 [2] ]). There they were believed to have permanently remained ( 1 Kings 8:9 , Deuteronomy 10:5 ) until the ark was, according to Rabbinical tradition, hidden by Jeremiah, when Jerusalem was finally taken by Nehuchadrezzar.
2. The documentary history of the Decalogue . A comparison of the Decalogue in Exodus 20:1-26 with that of Deuteronomy 5:1-33 renders it probable that both are later recensions of a much shorter original. The phrases peculiar to Deuteronomy 5:1-33 are in most cases obviously characteristic of D [3] , and must be regarded as later expansions. Such are ‘as the Lord thy God commanded thee’ in the 4th and 5th ‘word,’ and ‘that it may go well with thee’ in the 5th. In the last commandment the first two clauses are transposed, and a more appropriate word (‘desire’) is used for coveting a neighbour’s wife. Here evidently we have also a later correction. Curiously enough Exodus 20:1-26 , while thus generally more primitive than Deut., shows signs of an even later recension. The reason for keeping the Sabbath, God’s rest after creation, is clearly based on Genesis 2:1-3 , which belongs to the post-exilic Priestly Code (P [4] ). The question is further complicated by the fact that several phrases in what is common to Exodus 20:1-26 and Deut. are of a distinctly Deuteronomic character, as ‘that is within thy gates’ in the 4th commandment, ‘that thy days may be long’ ‘upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee’ in the 5th. We see, then, that the Decalogue of Ex. is in all probability the result of a double revision (a Deuteronomic and a Priestly) of a much more simple original. It has been suggested that originally all the commandments consisted of a single clause, and that the name ‘word’ could be more naturally applied to such. In favour of this view, beyond what has been already said, it is argued that this short form would he more suitable for inscription on stone.
3. How were the ‘ten words’ divided ? The question turns on the beginning and the end of the Decalogue. Are what we know as the First and Second, and again what we know as the Tenth, one or two commandments? The arrangement which treats the First and Second as one, and the Tenth as two, is that of the Massoretic Hebrew text both in Ex. and Dt., and was that of the whole Western Church from the time of St. Augustine to the Reformation, and is still that of the Roman and Lutheran Churches. Moreover, it may seem to have some support from the Deuteronomic version of the Tenth Commandment. Our present arrangement, however, is that of the early Jewish and early Christian Churches, and seems on the whole more probable in itself. A wife, being regarded as a chattel, would naturally come under the general prohibition against coveting a neighbour’s goods. If, as already suggested, the original form of the commandment was a single clause, it would have run, ‘Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s house’ (see 8 (x.)).
4. The contents of each table . If, as suggested, the original commandments were single clauses, it is most natural to suppose that they were evenly divided between the two tables five in each. This view is adopted without hesitation by Philo, and it is not contradicted by our Lord’s division of the Law into the love of God and the love of one’s neighbour. It would be difficult to class parents in the category of neighbour, whereas the reverence due to them was by the ancients regarded as a specially sacred obligation, and was included, by both Greeks and Romans at any rate, under the notion of piety.
5. Order of the Decalogue . The Hebrew texts of Exodus 20:1-26 and Deuteronomy 5:1-33 agree in the order murder, adultery, theft as the subjects of the 6th, 7th, and 8th Commandments. The LXX [5] (best MSS) in Ex. have the order adultery, theft, murder; in Dt. adultery, murder, theft. This last is borne out by Romans 13:9 and by Philo, and may possibly have been original.
6. Mosaic origin of the Decalogue . The chief difficulty arises out of the Second Commandment. There can be little doubt that from primitive times the Israelites were monolatrous, worshipping J″ [6] as their national God. But it is argued that this does not appear to have prevented them from recognizing to some extent inferior divine beings, such as those represented by teraphim , or even from representing their God under visible symbols. Thus in Judges 17:3 we find Micah making an image of Jahweh, without any disapproval by the writer. David himself had teraphim in his house ( 1 Samuel 19:13-16 ); Isaiah speaks of a pillar as a natural and suitable symbol of worship ( Isaiah 19:19 ); Hosea classes pillar, ephod, and teraphim with sacrifices as means of worship, of which Israel would be deprived for a while as a punishment ( Hosea 3:4 ). The frequent condemnation of ashçroth (sacred tree-images, AV [7] ‘groves’) suggests that they too were common features of Semitic worship, and not confined to the worship of heathen gods. But it may reasonably be doubted whether these religious symbols were always regarded as themselves objects of worship, though tending to become so. Again, it may well have been the case that under the deteriorating Influences of surrounding Semitic worship, the people, without generally worshipping heathen gods, failed to reach the high ideal of their traditional religion and worship. We may fairly say, then, that the Decalogue in its earliest form, if not actually Mosaic, represents in all probability the earliest religious tradition of Israel.
7. Object of the Decalogue . Looking from a Christian point of view, we are apt to regard the Decalogue as at any rate an incomplete code of religion and morality. More probably the ‘ten words’ should be regarded as a few easily remembered rules necessary for a half-civilized agricultural people, who owed allegiance to a national God, and were required to live at peace with each other. They stand evidently in close relation to the Book of the Covenant ( Exodus 21:1-36 ; Exodus 22:1-31 ; Exodus 23:1-33 ), of which they may be regarded as either a summary or the kernel. With one exception (the Fifth, see below, 8 (v.)) they are, like most rules given to children, of a negative character ‘thou shalt not,’ etc.
8. Interpretation of the Decalogue . There are a few obscure phrases, or other matters which call for comment.
(i.) ‘before me’ may mean either ‘in my presence,’ condemning the eclectic worship of many gods, or ‘in preference to me.’ Neither interpretation would necessarily exclude the belief that other gods were suitable objects of worship for other peoples (cf. Judges 11:24 ).
(ii.) ‘the water under the earth.’ The Israelites conceived of the sea as extending under the whole land (hence the springs). This, being in their view the larger part, might be used to express the whole. Fish and other marine animals are, of course, intended.
‘unto thousands,’ better ‘a thousand generations,’ as in RVm [8] . The punishment by God of children for the faults of parents was felt to be a moral difficulty, and was denied by Ezekiel (ch. 18). Similar action by judicial authorities was forbidden by Deut. (Deuteronomy 24:16 ; cf. 2 Kings 14:6 ). But the words show that if evil actions influence for evil the descendants of the evil-doer either by heredity or by imitation, the influence of good actions for good is far more potent.
(iii.) ‘Thou … in vain,’ i.e. ‘for falsehood.’ This may mean ‘Thou shalt not perjure thyself’ or ‘Thou shalt not swear and then not keep thy oath.’ The latter seems to be the current Jewish interpretation (see Matthew 5:33 ). Philo takes it in both senses.
(iv.) ‘within thy gates,’ i.e. ‘thy cities’ (see 2 ).
‘for in six days,’ etc. We find in OT three distinct reasons for the observance of the Sabbath. (1) The oldest is that of the Book of the Covenant in Exodus 23:12 , ‘that thine ox and thine ass may have rest, and the son of thine handmaid and the stranger may be refreshed.’ In Exodus 20:1-26 and Deuteronomy 5:1-33 the rest of the domestic animals and servants appears as part of the injunction itself. (2) In Deuteronomy 5:1-33 there is added as a secondary purpose, ‘that thy manservant and thy maidservant may rest as well as thou’; whereas the chief purpose of the observaoce is as a commemoration of the Exodus. (3) Exodus 20:1-26 , revised after the Exile at or after the time that the Priestly Code was published, bases the observance on the Sabbatical rest of God after the Creation ( Genesis 2:1-3 P [4] ).
(v.) ‘Honour thy Father,’ etc. It is not improbable that this commandment has been modified in form, and was originally negative like all the rest, and referred like them to a prohibited action rather than to a correct feeling, as, very possibly,’ Thou shalt not smite,’ etc. (cf. Exodus 21:15 ; Exodus 21:17 ). At a later time such an outrage would have been hardly contemplated, and would naturally have given way to the present commandment. The word ‘honour’ seems, according to current Jewish teaching (see Lightfoot on Matthew 15:5 ), to have specially included feeding and clothing, and Christ assumes rather than inculcates as new this application of the commandment. The Rabbinical teachers had encouraged men in evading a recognized law by their quibbles.
(x.) ‘Thou shalt not … house.’ Deut. transposes the first two clauses, and reads ‘desire’ with wife. The teaching of Exodus 20:1-26 is, beyond question, relatively the earliest. The wife was originally regarded as one of the chattels, though undoubtedly the most important chattel, of the house, or general establishment.
On the Decalogue in the NT see art. Law (in nt).
F. H. Woods.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Ten Commandments
The popular name in this, as in so many instances,is not that of Scripture. There we have the "TEN WORDS," (Exodus 34:28 ; 4:13; 10:4) the "COVENANT ," Ex., Deuteronomy 11 . cc.; (1 Kings 8:21 ; 2 Chronicles 6:11 ) etc., or, very often as the solemn attestation of the divine will, the "TESTIMONY." (Exodus 25:16,21 ; 31:18 ) etc. The circumstances in which the Ten great Words were first given to the people surrounded them with an awe which attached to no other precept. In the midst of the cloud and the darkness and the flashing lightning and the fiery smoke and the thunder like the voice of a trumpet, Moses was called to Mount Sinai to receive the law without which the people would cease to be a holy nation. ( Exodus 19:20 ) Here, as elsewhere, Scripture unites two facts which men separate. God, and not man was speaking to the Israelites in those terrors, and yet, in the language of later inspired teachers, other instrumentality was not excluded. No other words were proclaimed in like manner. And the record was as exceptional as the original revelation. Of no other words could it be said that they were written as these were written, engraved on the Tables of Stone, not as originating in man's contrivance or sagacity, but by the power of the Eternal Spirit, by the "finger of God." (Exodus 31:18 ; 32:16 ) The number Ten was, we can hardly doubt, itself significant to Moses and the Israelites. The received symbol, then and at all times, of completeness, it taught the people that the law of Jehovah was perfect. (Psalm 19:7 ) The term "Commandments" had come into use in the time of Christ. (Luke 18:20 ) Their division into two tables is not only expressly mentioned but the stress is upon the two leaves no doubt that the distinction was important, and that answered to that summary of the law which was made both by Moses and by Christ into two precepts; so that the first table contained Duties to God , and the second, Duties to our Neighbor . There are three principal divisions of the two tables:
That of the Roman Catholic Church, making the first table contain three commandments and the second the other seven.
The familiar division, referring the first four to our duty toward God and the six remaining to our duty toward man.
The division recognized by the old Jewish writers, Josephus and Philo, which places five commandments in each table. It has been maintained that the law of filial duty, being a close consequence of God's fatherly relation to us, maybe referred to the first table. But this is to place human parents on a level with God, and, by purity of reasoning the Sixth Commandment might be added to the first table, as murder is the destruction of God's image in man. Far more reasonable is the view which regards the authority of parents as heading the second table, as the earthly reflex of that authority of the Father of his people and of all men which heads the first, and as the first principle of the whole law of love to our neighbor; because we are all brethren and the family is, for good and ill the model of the state. "The Decalogue differs from all the other legislation of Moses: (1) It was proclaimed by God himself in a most public and solemn manner. (2) It was given under circumstances of most appalling majesty and sublimity. (3) It was written by the finger of God on two tables of stone. (5:22) (4) It differed from any and all other laws given to Israel in that it was comprehensive and general rather than specific and particular. (6) It was complete, being one finished whole to which nothing was to be added, from which nothing was ever taken away. (6) The law of the Ten Commandments was honored by Jesus Christ as embodying the substance of the law of God enjoined upon man. (7) It can scarcely be doubted that Jesus had his eye specially if not exclusively on this law, (5:18) as one never to be repealed from which not one jot or tittle should ever pass away. (8) It is marked by wonderful simplicity and brevity such a contrast to our human legislation, our British statute-book for instance, which it would need an elephant to carry and an OEdipus to interpret."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Commandments, the Ten
(Exodus 34:28 ; Deuteronomy 10:4 , marg. "ten words") i.e., the Decalogue (q.v.), is a summary of the immutable moral law. These commandments were first given in their written form to the people of Israel when they were encamped at Sinai, about fifty days after they came out of Egypt (Exodus 19:10-25 ). They were written by the finger of God on two tables of stone. The first tables were broken by Moses when he brought them down from the mount (32:19), being thrown by him on the ground. At the command of God he took up into the mount two other tables, and God wrote on them "the words that were on the first tables" (34:1). These tables were afterwards placed in the ark of the covenant (Deuteronomy 10:5 ; 1 Kings 8:9 ). Their subsequent history is unknown. They are as a whole called "the covenant" (Deuteronomy 4:13 ), and "the tables of the covenant" (9:9,11; Hebrews 9:4 ), and "the testimony." They are obviously "ten" in number, but their division is not fixed, hence different methods of numbering them have been adopted. The Jews make the "Preface" one of the commandments, and then combine the first and second. The Roman Catholics and Lutherans combine the first and second and divide the tenth into two. The Jews and Josephus divide them equally. The Lutherans and Roman Catholics refer three commandments to the first table and seven to the second. The Greek and Reformed Churches refer four to the first and six to the second table. The Samaritans add to the second that Gerizim is the mount of worship. (See LAW .)
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Commandments, the Ten
(See DECALOGUE.)
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ten Commandments
See LAW.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ten Commandments
See Law, Ten Commandments, Torah .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Commandments
COMMANDMENTS . See Ten Commandments.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Law, Ten Commandments, Torah
Law refers both to the revelation of the will of God in the Old Testament and to the later elaboration on the law referred to as the “traditions of the elders” in the New Testament (for example, Mark 7:5 ).
Law is one of the primary concepts in the Bible. The specific translation of the term law is varied. It may be used for a commandment, a word, a decree, a judgment, a custom, or a prohibition. The first five books of the Bible (the Pentateuch) are known as books of the Law because they are based on the commandments which God revealed to Moses.
The Hebrew term most frequently translated “law” in the Old Testament is torah , used more than 200 times. The central idea of torah is that of instruction received from a superior authority on how to live. Torah in the Old Testament came to mean the way of life for faithful Israelites. The Torah is more than just “laws”; it includes the story of God's dealing with humankind and with Israel.
The concept of torah is closely linked to that of covenant in the Old Testament. The covenant agreement between God and His people at Mount Sinai provided the foundation for all of Israel's laws. God, the deliverer of the Israelites from Egypt, set forth His instructions for His people. They were to obey God's laws because of what He had done for them in saving them from Egypt ( Exodus 20:2 ). The laws found in Exodus, Deuteronomy, Numbers, and Leviticus cover all areas of community life. The Torah is a gift of God to His people. Obeying the Torah would result in His blessing (Exodus 19:5-6 ). Following the Law would provide for the health and wholeness of the covenant community. The Ten Commandments are a summary of the Law (Exodus 20:2-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:6-21 ).
Later development in Israel's history gave an expanded meaning to torah . By New Testament times torah meant not only the Old Testament Scriptures (the written Law), but also the oral law (unwritten law) of Israel as well. The religious leaders developed in applying the written Law to new life situations. This oral law is sometimes referred to as “the tradition of the elders” in the New Testament (compare Matthew 15:2 ; Mark 7:5 ; Galatians 1:14 ).
Two kinds of laws can be found in the Old Testament. First are broad categorical laws which set forth general principles. These laws do not specify how they are to be enforced or what penalties are to be invoked. The Ten Commandments are representative of this kind of law. They are basic policy statements for life in a covenant community with God.
Second are case laws. These laws often begin with an “if” or a “when,” usually deal with very specific situations. Many times they indicate a punishment for breaking the law (e.g., Exodus 21:2-3 ,Exodus 21:2-3,21:4 ; Exodus 22:1-2 ,Exodus 22:1-2,22:4-5 ,Exodus 22:4-5,22:25 ).
The Ten Commandments are prohibitions (except for Commandments 4,5 in Exodus 20:8-11 ,Exodus 20:8-11,20:12 ). These ten laws define negatively the heart of the covenant relationship between God and Israel. The first four Commandments are related to one's relationship with God. The next six Commandments have to do with human relationships. It is important to note that right relationships with others follow being rightly related to God. Being rightly related to God compels one towards right relationships to one's neighbors. Here one can see the wonderful balance that is maintained in the Law. Duties to God and to other human beings are not separated.
The Ten Commandments were not given only for the Hebrew people but are abiding laws for all people. Some of the laws of the Bible seem to apply only to specific times, places, and persons, but the Ten Commandments have an abiding quality about them. They convey duties for everyone and reveal to us the basic morality required by God. While the Ten Commandments have universal validity, they are truly significant only when persons are committed to the God behind them. What makes the Ten Commandments unique is the character of the God who gave them. Without God, the Commandments lose their distinctiveness.
Jesus certainly knew the Law and often referred to it. It is possible to say that Jesus was both a critic of the Law and a supporter of it. He was critical of the law of one means “the tradition of the elders” or the oral laws that had grown up around the written Law. The enemies of Jesus frequently accused Him of violating the Law. It is clear that keeping the letter of the Law had become more important to some of the Jews than the purpose behind the Law.
On several occasions Jesus set His own teachings over against those of the elders (Matthew 5:21-6:48 ). The Pharisees accused Jesus and His disciples of not following the law with regard to “unclean” things (Matthew 15:1-20 ), and they accused Him of eating with tax-gatherers and sinners (Matthew 9:11 ). Jesus' greatest conflict came over the sabbath. He rejected their interpretation of the sabbath Law and said that the Son of man is Lord of the sabbath (Matthew 12:8 ); that the sabbath was made for man and not man for the sabbath (Mark 2:27 ); and He taught that it was permissible to do good on the sabbath (Mark 3:4 ).
Jesus inaugurated a new era in which the Law as understood by the Jews of His day would no longer be the guiding principle for the Kingdom of God (Luke 16:16 ). Nevertheless, Jesus claimed not to have come to destroy the Law, but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17-20 ). That is, Jesus moved the understanding of the Law from its external, legalistic meaning to its spiritual one. Moving from outward observance to inward motivation and intention is Jesus' concern (Matthew 5:21-22 ,Matthew 5:21-22,5:27-28 ). He pushes the Law out to its ultimate meaning (thus filling it full). In this sense Jesus affirmed the heart and the spirit of the Law. He moved to a deeper level of meaning, to the spirit behind the Law which God had intended from the beginning.
Jesus did not give us a new law. When Jesus was asked which commandment is the greatest, He said, “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul and with all thy mind,” (Matthew 22:36-37 ). Jesus said the second commandment is like the first, “Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself” (Matthew 22:39 ). Then He said, “On these two commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets” (Matthew 22:40 ). Incredibly, Jesus summed up the whole Law and the teaching of the prophets with these two commandments. Behind all of the Law had stood these two great principles of love for God and neighbor. It is important for us to remember that love can never be adequately portrayed in rules or in teachings. It can be seen in the life, death, and resurrection of our Lord. The commandments to love had been there all along; Jesus simply emphasized them in a way that would forever change how we should look at them.
Paul had a lifelong struggle with the Law. By the term “law,” Paul meant the Law of God as contained in the Old Testament. He also spoke of a kind of natural law which existed in human beings (Romans 7:23 ,Romans 7:23,7:25 ). The “law of sin” meant conduct determined by sin. Paul also used law in this sense when he referred to the “law of faith”—that is, conduct determined by faith in God (Romans 3:27-28 ).
Paul's attitude toward the Mosaic Law can be summarized under several main points. First of all, he recognized that the Law had been given for a good purpose; it was holy, just and good (Romans 7:12 ,Romans 7:12,7:14 ; 1 Timothy 1:8 ). The demands of the Law were not evil, but had the effect of pointing out the sin of human beings (Romans 7:7 ). Because of man's sinfulness, the Law became a curse instead of a blessing (Galatians 3:10-13 ).
Second, Paul believed the Law was given for a good purpose, but it could not save (Galatians 3:11 ; Romans 3:20 ). If persons were to become children of God, it would be by means other than keeping the Law. The third theme we find in Paul is that Christ freed us from the requirements of the Law by His death and resurrection (Romans 8:3-4 ). Therefore, Christ has become the end of the Law for Christians (Romans 10:4 ), and it is faith that saves and not Law (Ephesians 2:8-9 ).
Paul, like Jesus, saw the Law fulfilled in the command to love (Romans 13:8 ; Galatians 5:13 ). Only with the aid of the Spirit of God can we meet the requirement to love which fulfills the Law (Galatians 5:16 ; Romans 8:1 ). Paul saw the Law as no longer to be viewed legalistically. Nevertheless, it is still the revelation of God, and it helps us to understand the nature of our life in Christ (Romans 8:3 ; Romans 13:8-10 ; Galatians 3:24 ).
D. Glenn Saul
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Ten Commandments
The portion of Scripture known as the "Ten Commandments" (Exodus 20:3-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:7-21 ) is a key segment of the Sinai covenant, which was entered into by God and the people of Israel. This covenant was modeled on the political treaties of that day between a great king and a subject people. In these treaties the king offered certain benefits and, in turn, called for certain behaviors from the people. All these treaties followed the same basic format, which the Sinai covenant, both in Exodus and in its restatement in Deuteronomy, also adheres to closely.
In both Exodus and Deuteronomy, the Ten Commandments are a brief summary of the more detailed covenantal requirements that follow them. These requirements relate to the whole of life: ceremonial, civil, and moral. Many of the commands are very similar to those found in the law codes that have been discovered in the ancient Near East. But it is very significant that the biblical commands have been placed in the context of covenant. In the rest of the ancient law codes, the commands are simply presented as givens, dropped from heaven by the gods. There is no real motive for obeying the commands except the avoidance of punishment. But in the Old Testament, the inclusion of the laws within the covenant puts the motivation on a whole new level. Why should I treat my fellow Israelites in a certain way? Because God has said that is the way in which I can express my covenant loyalty to him. Thus obedience is an expression of grateful appreciation for what God has done for us and what we know he will do. Ethics is not about what will advance one's self-interest, but about maintaining an all-important relationship with God.
A further implication of putting the commandments in the covenant context is the aspect of character. It is apparent from a study of the ancient treaties that many of the stipulations that the kings put upon subject peoples were an expression of the various kings' characters and preferences. Thus, the carrying out of the biblical commandments is a means of learning and replicating the character of God. It is here that the continuing significance of the Ten Commandments is found: they reveal the character and will of the unchanging Creator of the universe. Thus, even though the Sinai covenant is not binding on Christians, the moral truths revealed in it are.
A final important implication of the covenant form is especially significant for the Ten Commandments. In the ancient law codes, the laws are always stated in terms of cases ("If such and such infraction occurs, then such and such a punishment shall be meted out"). There are no statements of absolute prohibition. It is easy to understand why this is the case. A polytheistic setting cannot know of an absolute right or wrong. What is right for one god will be wrong for another. But in the political treaties, since there was only one king to whom the covenanters were professing loyalty, that king could indeed make absolute prohibitions. Thus it is in the biblical covenant that the One God can summarize his stipulations for his people in a series of absolute statements, the Ten Commandments. This shows that the succeeding commands, many of which are stated in terms of cases, are nevertheless based on principles inherent in God's creation, and not simply situationally derived attempts to promote social harmony.
One of the features that marks the Ten Commandments is also typical of the stipulations as a whole. That is the wholistic character of the subject matter. Social behavior and religious behavior are treated together. This is not found elsewhere in the ancient Near East. There is mythological and ritual material, and there are social prescriptions, but the two are never related. The Old Testament insists that the ways in which we treat each other are inseparable from our relationship to God. Ethics are a religious matter, and worship of the true God is the foundation of all nonmanipulative ethics. Thus the first four commandments are primarily in relation to God while the remaining six have to do with human relationships. But it is clear that the four cannot be separated from the six, nor vice-versa.
Although the commandments are, with the exception of the fifth, all prohibitive, they are not negative. They speak about love: love of God and love of others. But what is it to love? If it were necessary to prescribe every loving act and attitude, there would not be enough books in the world. What the commands do is to define the parameters beyond which love cannot exist. This much is then clear: if I love my neighbor I will not steal what belongs to him.
The first commandment is typical of the covenantal stipulations: no other king, or in this case, god, is to be recognized. This feature of the covenants was a marvelous tool for beginning to teach the truth of monotheism. Instead of going into philosophical arguments about unity and origins, God merely tells his people that if they wish to be in covenant with him, they must refuse to recognize any other god. Eventually, having accepted this stipulation and having sought to live it out, they would be in a position to accept Isaiah's insistence that there are no other gods (46:9).
The second command has no analogue in the ancient Near Eastern covenants, but its truth was just as vital as the first for God's education of his people. Around the world, religions that have arisen from human reflection agree upon one fundamental principle: the unseen, divine realm is one with, continuous with, the visible world of nature. Above everything else, this principle suggests that it is possible to manipulate the divine world and to appropriate its power through manipulation of the visible world. In short, it pretends to make it possible for humans to take control of their destinies. This principle is everywhere expressed through the practice of idolatry. By making the god or goddess in the shape of something in nature, preferably a human shape, we both express our conviction about reality and create a mechanism for influencing that god or goddess.
Unfortunately, according to the Bible, that principle is absolutely wrong. The one God is not continuous with the natural world, or with anything in it. He created the world and everything in it as something other than himself. To be sure, he is everywhere present in the world, and no part of it can escape his power. But he is not the world and cannot be manipulated by means of any activity in the world.
How is God to teach his people a truth that is at odds with everything they have learned for four hundred years, and at odds with everything the fallen human heart wants to believe? Once again, he does not enter into a philosophical argument. He simply makes it a requirement for a covenantal relationship with himself that they never try to make an idol of him. As with monotheism, when they have lived with the requirement long enough, they will eventually be ready to draw the right conclusions about God's transcendent nature (Isaiah 40:21-26 ).
The third commandment also strikes at the magical view of reality. Because of the principle of continuity, it was common to believe that a person's name was identical with the person himself or herself. Thus, simply by invoking a powerful person's name, and especially a god's name, in connection with something that one wanted to happen, it was possible to make the thing happen. God says that this is a vain, or empty, use of his name. It is an attempt to use his power without submitting to him, or living in trusting relation with him.
Instead of emptying God of significance by an attempt to use his name magically for our own ends, we are called upon to "hallow" his name, that is, to show the true perfection of his character and power by the quality of our lives (Leviticus 22:31-33 ). We cannot manipulate him, but through faith and trust we can receive power from him to live lives of integrity, purity, and love.
The fourth commandment is the only one of the ten that has to do with matters of worship. There is no absolute statement given with regard to worship practices, such as sacrifices, or festivals, or clean and unclean food. Those matters had to do with a particular era, and would serve their purpose and pass away. What this one summary statement regarding worship does treat is a matter of underlying attitude. What does our use of time say about our estimate of who supplies our needs? When we work seven days a week we surely say that our needs are met through our efforts alone. But the commandment requires persons to stop their work one day out of seven and to remind themselves that it is God who supplies our needs every day of the week (Deuteronomy 5:12-15 ). Furthermore, if God rested after his labors, who are we that we think we can outdo God (Exodus 20:9-11 )? The manner or way a Sabbath is kept is not important, but it is important that we consciously set aside one day in seven, filling it with worshipful rest, to remind ourselves to whom all our time belongs.
The fifth commandment is transitional. From one point of view it is the first of the commandments to deal with human relations. But from another point of view it continues the theme of acceptance of dependence that is at the heart of the fourth command. To honor one's parents is fundamental to any healthy personality. It is the best antidote to the foolish arrogance of "the self-made man." It recognizes that someone else gave me life and took care of me when I could not take care of myself. On the other hand, honor implies honesty. It is impossible to honor someone whom we constantly blame for our faults and failures. To honor them recognizes their faults and failures, and forgives. The person who refuses to honor his parents cuts himself off from his roots and almost certainly from his posterity. If a culture is to survive "long in the land" (Exodus 20:12 ) it must have a glad connection between the generations.
The five remaining commands all have to do with the self in relation to others. As noted above, they specify where the limits are beyond which healthy relations become impossible. We may not abuse the physical life, the sexual life, the possessions, or the reputation of those around us if we are to remain in covenant with God. Nor dare we allow ourselves to think that if we were just in someone else's shoes, enjoying what they possess, we would be happy. These brief statements, hardly more than fifty words in English, speak volumes about the character of the God who made them. They also explain some of the high value that has been put on individual worth in Western thought. To God, the boundaries around an individual's life are sacred. The insistence that all persons are to be able to hold their physical life, their sexual fidelity, their possessions, and their reputation inviolate shows that no one is a faceless molecule in some larger entity. Each one is a distinctive combination of these features, which comprise his or her identity, and they must be guarded for each person.
If we claim to be in relationship with God, we must see persons in the same way he does. Their lives are not ours to take for our purposes. Human sexuality is to be expressed in heterosexual commitment and we may not do anything that would lead someone to break those commitments. There is a boundary drawn around a person's possessions, and we may not cross that boundary to satisfy our own desires. A person's reputation is an extension of himself or herself, and we may not violate it, particularly to make ourselves look better.
What is involved here is a statement about dependence upon God. Those who depend upon themselves make themselves the center of the universe; they have broken the first two commandments. For such persons, anything is permissible in the attempt to supply their needs. Others are either enemies or slaves, in any case to be dominated, used up, and cast aside. But obviously if humans are to live together in any kind of harmony these rapacious instincts must be moderated in some way. Thus human laws. But God seeks to strike at the heart of the issue. If persons can ever realize that they are not the suppliers of their needs, but that God is, and surrender those needs to him, then ethics will move to a new plane.
Some of these commands deserve further comment. As several modern versions indicate, the King James Version's "Thou shalt not kill" is too broad to convey the sense of the Hebrew of the sixth command. The word used is harag [1], which does not refer to killing in general, but to the premeditated murder of one person by another. Thus, it is not proper to build a case against war or capital punishment upon the basis of this verse. These activities may indeed be condemned on biblical grounds, but this verse should only be a tertiary part of the evidence.
It is significant that all of the sexual sins that the Bible prohibits are summarized by the command against adultery. There are very important implications to be drawn from this fact. The clearest is that sexuality is to be expressed only in the context of heterosexual fidelity. It is for this reason that all other expressions of sexuality are condemned in Leviticus 18,20 and elsewhere. Without diminishing the seriousness of those aberrations, it is apparent that the most serious sexual sin is to break faith with one's spouse and the spouse of another, a breach of covenant.
The ninth commandment continues the emphasis upon ethical relationships. The command does not confine itself to prohibiting the telling of untruths, but speaks particularly about telling untruths concerning others. Congratulating oneself upon one's honesty is to miss the point of the commandment. Integrity is not for oneself, but for the sake of others; it is that they may live in security, knowing that we will treasure their reputation above our own.
The tenth command is in some ways merely a continuation of the previous four concerning love of one's neighbor. To love one's neighbor is to refuse to surrender to the sin of envy. It is to rejoice in the neighbor's good fortune, knowing that one's own fortune is in the good hands of God. In this sense it is the climax of the previous four commands. They only spoke about not abusing the neighbor. This one speaks about a deeper issue: guarding those springs of desire from which the abuses would arise. If we are to keep the commands not to abuse our neighbors, it will be because we have made a prior surrender of all our wants and needs to the covenant God.
It is at this point that the command begins to assume a larger function than merely the fifth of a series on nonabuse of neighbors. The Pentateuch, if not the entire Bible, is clear that the root of all evil is the human attempt to meet our needs for ourselves. From Genesis 3 on the issue is the same: Will we allow God to satisfy our desires in his way, or will we insist on trying to satisfy them in our own strength? This is where idolatry comes from; it is an attempt to manipulate the divine in order to satisfy the human desires for power, security, comfort, and pleasure. Thus it is that Paul makes the remarkable identification of covetousness with idolatry ( Ephesians 5:5 ; see also Isaiah 57:13-17 , where the same connection is implied ).
The covenant is designed as a teaching device: there is only one God who is not a part of this world; he is utterly holy, just, and faithful, and it is he who supplies our needs not we ourselves. Knowing that fact, we do not have to see others as rivals and enemies; instead we can treasure their individuality as God does. But if we give assent to all that and then succumb to the sin of covetousness, believing that happiness consists in getting hold of something that we have seen in the possession of another, we will have missed the whole point of God's instruction and be in dire peril of falling back into the very pit from which we have been lifted.
John N. Oswalt
See also Exodus, Theology of ; Israel
Bibliography . W. Barclay, The Ten Commandments for Today ; J. Davidman, Smoke on the Mountain ; W. Harrelson, The Ten Commandments and Human Rights ; G. von Rad, Old Testament Theology .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Commandments, the Ten
These have a special place as having been written on the tables of stone by 'the finger of God.' Exodus 31:18 . Deuteronomy 10:4 margin reads 'the ten words,' and they are often referred to as the DECALOGUE. They are also called 'the words of the covenant,' in Exodus 34:28 . It was after hearing these ten commandments rehearsed by Moses that the Israelites said to him, "Go thou near, and hear all that the Lord our God shall say; and speak thou unto us all that the Lord our God shall speak unto thee; and we will hear it and do it." Deuteronomy 5:27 . The two stones are also called the 'tables of the testimony,' Exodus 34:29 , and they were laid up in the ark of the covenant, Exodus 40:20 ; 1 Kings 8:9 ; Hebrews 9:4 ; over which were the two cherubim as guardians of God's rights together with the mercy-seat.
The giving of the two stones to Israel by God (who, though gracious and merciful, would by no means clear the guilty,) amid a measure of glory is referred to by Paul, when he describes the commandments written in letters thereon as 'the ministration of death;' in contrast to which he speaks of the glory of the ministration of the Spirit (that is, of Christ, for the Lord is that Spirit), and of the ministration of righteousness: it is the story of man's failure, and of God's righteousness available to the believer through Christ. 2 Corinthians 3:7-11 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Commandments
COMMANDMENTS.—As commandments (ἐντολαί) Jesus recognizes (1) the injunctions of the Decalogue, (2) certain other requirements of similar ethical character laid down in the Law. In one instance (Mark 10:5) the Mosaic regulation for divorce is quoted as a ‘commandment,’ but its temporary provisional nature is clearly indicated. ‘This commandment,’ given for a time in view of special circumstances, is implicitly contrasted with the true and abiding ἐντολαί. In the case of a purely ritual ordinance the term προσέταξεν is used (Matthew 8:4, Mark 1:44, Luke 5:14).
The main passages in which our Lord defines His attitude to the commandments are: (1) the exposition in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:17-48); (2) the criticism of Pharisaic tradition (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-23; cf. also Matthew 23); (3) the reply to the rich young ruler (Matthew 19:17-21, Mark 10:19; Mark 10:21, Luke 18:20-22); (4) the dialogue with the lawyer (Matthew 22:35-40, Mark 12:28-34, Luke 10:25-37). The treatment of the Sabbath commandment (Mark 2:24-27, Luke 6:1-10; Luke 13:10-16) will have to be considered under Law and Sabbath.
It is assumed by Jesus that the commandments were given directly by God, and as such they are contrasted with the ‘traditions of men’ (Matthew 15:6, Mark 7:8-9). This assumption of their Divine origin determines His whole attitude towards them. As ordained by God they are valid for all time and authoritative; the keeping of them is the necessary condition of eternal life (Matthew 19:17, Mark 10:19); men will take rank in the Kingdom of Heaven according to their obedience to the commandments (Matthew 5:19). It is objected to the Pharisees as their chief offence that they have perverted and overlaid with tradition the commandments of God (Matthew 15:3, Mark 7:7).
In view, then, of the Divine origin of the commandments, Jesus accepts them as the eternal basis of morality. His own ethic is presented not as something new, but as a truer and more inward interpretation of the existing Law. It has been maintained (most notably in recent times by Tolstoi) that Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount enacts an entirely new moral code,—five new laws in contrast to those ordained ‘in old time.’ This, however, is opposed to His own declaration, ‘I came not to destroy but to fulfil.’ The authority which He claims for Himself is not an authority to originate laws, but to explain more fully in their Divine intention those already laid down by God. ‘It was said to them of old time,—I say unto you,’ implies an opposition not of the Decalogue and the new Christian code, but of the ancient interpretation of the Decalogue and the Christian interpretation. Where the men of old time stopped short with the letter, Jesus unfolds the inward principle which must henceforth be accepted as the true aim of the commandment. ‘Thou shalt not kill’ prohibits anger, scorn, contention. ‘Thou shalt not commit adultery’ demands chastity of heart as well as of outward act. The law that forbids false swearing requires in the last resort abstinence from all oaths, and perfect simplicity and truthfulness. The case is somewhat different with the two remaining rules which are subjected to criticism (‘an eye for an eye,’ ‘thou shalt love thy neighbour and hate thine enemy’). Here our Lord indeed appears to set new laws of His own over against the imperfect maxims of the ancient morality. But He is still emphasizing what He conceives to be the real drift of the Divine legislation, in contrast to the false and limited constructions which men had placed upon it.
The ethical teaching of Jesus is thus based on the Divinely given commandments. It claims to be nothing more than a ‘fulfilment,’ a reinterpretation of them in the light of their inward spirit and purpose. At the same time, they are so transformed by this unfolding of their ultimate intention, as to result in a code of morality which is radically new. This is recognized in the Fourth Gospel, where the originality of the Christian law is brought into clear prominence (see art. New Commandment). It remains to consider how Jesus, while accepting the commandments, replaced them in effect by a new ethic, different in character as well as wider in range. The process by which He thus transformed them can be traced, with sufficient distinctness, in the Synoptic teaching.
(1) The Moral Law is freed from its association with outward ritual. Jesus does not definitely abrogate the ritual ordinances (‘ye ought not to leave the other undone,’ Matthew 23:23), but He makes the distinction plain between these and the higher obligations, justice, mercy, and faith. He subordinates the law of the Sabbath to the requirements of duty and humanity (Mark 2:27, Luke 6:9; Luke 13:15-16); He confronts the formal piety of His time with the Divine demand as stated by Hosea: ‘I will have mercy and not sacrifice’ (Matthew 9:13; Matthew 12:7); He challenges the whole system of rules concerning meat and drink by His great principle, ‘that which cometh out, not that which goeth in, defileth a man’ (Matthew 15:11, Mark 7:15). This principle, applied to its full extent, meant the abolition of the Levitical law.
(2) In a similar manner the ‘traditions’ which had gathered around the Law and obscured its genuine meaning are swept away. The ethical teaching of Jesus is directed, in the first place, to restoring the commandments to their original simplicity and purity. In the glosses and corollaries with which Pharisaic ingenuity had overlaid them, He sees an attempt to narrow the scope and weaken the full stringency of the Divine law. He instances the casuistry which made it possible to evade a strict obedience to the command, ‘Honour thy father and mother’ (Matthew 15:5-6, Mark 7:10-13). As against such trifling with the law of God, He insists on an honest acceptance of it in its plain and literal meaning. The ten thousand commandments into which the Decalogue had been divided and subdivided are to give place again to the simple ten.
(3) Not only is the Moral Law restored to its original purity, but it is simplified still further. While accepting the commandments as all given by God, Jesus recognizes that they are of different grades of importance. When the young ruler asked Him which of them were life-giving, He singles out the more distinctively ethical: ‘Do not commit adultery, do not kill, do not steal, do not bear false witness, defraud not, honour thy father and mother’ (Mark 10:18-19, Matthew 19:18-19, Luke 18:20). So the question of the lawyer, ‘Which is the great commandment?’ is admitted by Jesus to be a just one. It is significant that in His answer to it He does not quote from the Decalogue itself, but from Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18. He thus indicates that it is not the formal enactments which are sacred and binding, but the grand principles that lie behind them. Those sayings extraneous to the Decalogue, which yet lay bare its essential meaning, are ‘greater’ than any of the set commandments.
(4) The two requirements thus singled out are declared to be not only the greatest, but the sum and substance of all the others. The Law in its multiplicity runs back to the two root-demands of love to God and love to men. Of these two, Jesus insists on the former as ‘the first and great commandment.’ The duty of love to God is at once the highest duty required of man, and that which determines the right performance of all the rest. In this sense we must explain the words that follow: ‘The second is like to it’ (Matthew 22:37-39, Mark 12:29-31). Its ‘likeness’ does not consist merely in its similar largeness of scope or in its similar emphasis on love, but in its essential identity with the other commandment. The love to man which it demands is the outward expression, the evidence and effect of love to God (cf. Galatians 5:6 ‘Faith that worketh by love’; 1 John 4:20 ‘He that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen?’). Thus in our Lord’s summary of the Law we have more than a resolution of the Ten Commandments into two, corresponding broadly to the two divisions of the Decalogue. We have a clear indication that even those two are ultimately reducible to one.
(5) In this ‘summary’ the Moral Law, however simplified and purified, is still presented under the form of outward enactment. The early Catholic Church so accepted it, and set the nova lex imposed by Jesus on a similar footing with the Law of Moses. Jesus Himself, however, passed wholly beyond the idea of an outward statutory law. His demand is for an inward disposition so attempered to the will of God that it yields a spontaneous obedience. This demand is implicit in the ‘summary,’ couched though it is in the terms of formal enactment. It says nothing of particular moral actions, and insists solely on love, the inward frame of mind in which all right conduct has its source and motive: ‘A good man out of the good treasure of his heart bringeth forth that which is good’ (Luke 6:45); ‘Either make the tree good and his fruit good, or else make the tree corrupt and his fruit corrupt’ (Matthew 12:33). The ultimate aim of our Lord’s ethical teaching is to produce a morality which will be independent of outward ordinance, and arise spontaneously out of the pure heart.
Thus the Decalogue, which in appearance is only revised and expounded, is virtually superseded by Christ. He bases morality on a new principle of inward harmony with God’s will, and discards the whole idea involved in the term ‘commandment.’ It follows that in three essential respects His ethic differs from that which found its highest expression in the Decalogue. (a) Its demands are positive as distinguished from the old system of prohibitory rule. The Rabbinical precept, ‘Do not to another what would be painful to yourself,’ is adopted with a simple change that alters its whole character (Matthew 7:12). Where there is an inward impulse to goodness, it will manifest itself in active love towards men, in positive obedience to the will of God. (b) The ethic of Jesus makes an absolute demand in contrast to the limited requirements of the ancient Law. The chief purpose of the exposition in the Sermon on the Mount is to illustrate and enforce this difference. ‘I say unto you, Refrain not only from the forbidden act, but from evil looks and thoughts. Obey the Moral Law without condition or reservation. Be perfect as your Father in heaven is perfect’ (cf. the ‘seventy times seven’ of Matthew 18:22). This absolute demand is likewise involved in the substitution of an inward spirit for a statutory law. The moral task is no longer outwardly prescribed for us, and makes an infinite claim on our willing obedience. (c) As opposed to the Decalogue with its hard and fast requirements, the teaching of Jesus imposes a ‘law of liberty.’ The moral life, springing from the inward disposition, is self-determined. It possesses in itself a power of right judgment which makes it independent of any outward direction. It originates its own rules of action, and adapts them with an endless flexibility to all changing circumstances and times.
Our Lord’s ‘fulfilment’ of the ancient Law has thus its outcome in a new morality which cannot be separated from His gospel as a whole. What He demands in the last resort is a change of nature such as can be effected only by faith in Him and possession of His spirit. The ultimate bearing of His criticism of the commandments is well indicated in the words of Luther: ‘Habito Christo facile condemus leges et omnia recte judicabimus. Immo novos decalogos faciemus, qui clariores erunt quam Mosis decalogus, sicut facies Christi clarior est quam facies Mosis.’ See also Ethics.
Literature.—The various Commentaries (in their section on the Sermon on the Mount), e.g. Holtzmann (1901), J. Weiss in Meyer’s Com. (1901); Loisy, Le discours sur la montagne (1903); also articles on same subject in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, Extra Vol. (1904) [1], and Encyc. Bibl. (1903); Weizsacker, Das Apost. Zeitalter (English translation 1897), i. 35 ff.; Pfleiderer, Das Urchristenthum (1887), 489–501; Wernle, Die Anfänge unserer Religion (1901), 23–69; Herrmann, Ethik (1901), 124–140; Harnack, Das Wesen des Christenthums, 45 ff.; Bruce, Apologetics (1895), 346 ff.; Holtzmann, Neutest. Theologie (1897), 130–160. To these may be added Tolstoi’s My Religion, and The Spirit of Christ’s Teaching; also books of popular or homiletical character, such as Horton, Commandments of Jesus; Gore, Sermon on the Mount; Dykes, Manifesto of the King.
E. F. Scott.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Ten Commandments
the Ten Commandments
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ten Commandments
See COMMANDMENTS
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ten Commandments
Ten Commandments, the. Deuteronomy 4:13. Or, more exactly, the Ten Words. Exodus 34:28, margin; Deuteronomy 10:4, margin. They were proclaimed from Sinai, amid mighty thunderings and lightnings, Exodus 20:1-22, and were graven on tablets of stone by the finger of God. Exodus 31:18; Exodus 32:15-16; Exodus 34:1; Exodus 34:28. Ten was a significant number, the symbol of completeness; and in these ten words was comprised that moral law to which obedience forever was to be paid. On these, summed up as our Lord summed them up, hung all the law and the prophets. Matthew 22:36-40. There were two tables, the commandments of the one more especially respecting God, those of the other, man. These are usually divided into four and six. Perhaps they might better be distributed into five and five. The honor to parents enjoined by the fifth commandment is based on the service due to God, the Father of his people. Paul, enumerating those which respect our neighbor, includes but the last five. Romans 13:9.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Commandments, Ten
See Ten Commandments .
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Ten Commandments
(See DECALOGUE.)

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Commandments - Commandments . See Ten Commandments
Taryag - �613� The number of Biblical precepts, consisting of 248 positive Commandments and 365 negative Commandments...
Ten Commandments - See Commandments...
Command, Commandment - ...
The Commandments were for Israel's good (Deuteronomy 10:13 ) since God's covenant love was lasting for those who kept them (Exodus 20:6 ; Deuteronomy 7:9 ). Purification (sin ) offerings were required to atone for "inadvertent" violations of Commandments (Leviticus 4 Num 15:22-31 ). ...
God's Commandments can be kept (Deuteronomy 30:11-14 ). The godly love, learn, and believe in God's Commandments, for they contain precious, enlightening truth that makes one wise (Psalm 19:8 ; 119:47-48,66 , 73,98 , 151 ). The wise follow godly commands as a guiding light (Proverbs 6:23 ), and keep God's Commandments in view of impending judgment. ...
The observant wore as a reminder tassels symbolic of keeping God's Commandments (Numbers 15:38-40 ). ...
Those who hope in salvation keep God's Commandments (Psalm 119:166 ), for keeping the Commandments is essential for "righteousness, " that is, a right personal relationship with God. ...
Old Testament Commandments are not directly binding for Christians. Nonetheless, keeping the Commandments remains imperative. Christian teaching viewed ethically can sometimes be described as "the sacred Commandments" or "the command given by our Lord" (2 Peter 2:21 ; 3:2 ) and Christians are "those who obey God's Commandments" (Revelation 12:17 ; 14:12 ), especially the command of faith in Christ and love of brother (John 13:34 ; 1 John 2:7-8 ; 3:23 ; 4:21 ; 2 John 4-6 ). Conversely, whoever does not keep God's Commandments has not come to know God ( Job 23:12 ). Love of God is expressed by keeping his Commandments (1 John 5:2-3 ). ...
The Commandments, although just and holy, are used by the sin nature to bring about spiritual death (Romans 7:8-13 ). But through Jesus' atonement, humans are pardoned and the enmity between Jews and Gentiles created by the Old Testament Commandments is removed (Ephesians 2:15 ), perhaps by abrogating the ceremonial aspects of the law and by empowering Gentile Christians to obey the law of Christ. Sprinkle...
See also Decrees ; Law ; Requirement ; Statute ; Ten Commandments ...
Bibliography
Mitzvot - �commandments�); one of the Torah�s 613Divine Commandments; a good deed or religious precept; according to Chassidut, the word mitzvah stems from the root tzavta, attachment, the mitzvah creating a bond between G-d who commands and man who performs
Decalogue - See Ten Commandments
Decalog - See Ten Commandments ...
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Ten commandments - the Ten Commandments ...
Commandments, Ten - See Ten Commandments
Asseret hadibrot - the Ten Commandments ...
Decalogue - See Ten Commandments
Decalogue - See Commandments, THE TEN
Ten Commandments - See Law, Ten Commandments, Torah
Decalogue - The name given by the Greek fathers to the ten Commandments; "the ten words," as the original is more literally rendered (Exodus 20:3-17 ). These Commandments were at first written on two stone slabs (31:18), which were broken by Moses throwing them down on the ground (32:19). These Commandments have been divided since the days of Origen the Greek father, as they stand in the Confession of all the Reformed Churches except the Lutheran. The division adopted by Luther, and which has ever since been received in the Lutheran Church, makes the first two Commandments one, and the third the second, and so on to the last, which is divided into two. (See Commandments
Decalogue - The ten principal Commandments, Exodus 20:3-17 , from the Greek words deka, ten, and logos, word. The usual division of the Ten Commandments among Protestants is that which Josephus tells us was employed by the Jews in his day
Thief - See Crimes and Punishment; Law, Ten Commandments, Torah
Theft - See Crimes and Punishment; Ethics ; Law, Ten Commandments, Torah
Decalogue - The name given to the Ten Commandments and derived fromthe Greek word, dekalogos, meaning the Ten Words or discourses. They are divided into two tables; the first four Commandments setforth our duty towards God, and the last six our duty towards man. The reading of the Ten Commandments in the Communion Office ispeculiar to our Liturgy and were added in the year 1552, togetherwith the response after each commandment, "Lord, have mercy upon usand incline our hearts to keep this law. " While the Commandmentswere originally introduced to our Liturgy as a warning and safeguardagainst the lawlessness of extreme Puritans, they are, nevertheless,helpful to all as a preparation for the right reception of the HolyCommunion; leading the congregation to an examination of their"lives and conversation by the rule of God's Commandments. To the Commandments is added our Lord's Summaryof the Law, which may be read at the discretion of the Minister
Golden Rule - The first and second Commandments, love of God and love of one's neighbor
Rule, Golden - The first and second Commandments, love of God and love of one's neighbor
Decalogue - The ten Commandments given by God to Moses. The ten Commandments were engraved by God on two tables of stone. The Jews, by way of eminence, call these Commandments the ten words, from whence they had afterwards the name of decalogue; but they joined the first and second into one, and divided the last into two
Anochi - �I am�); the first word of the Ten Commandments, a reference to G-d�s essence...
Sefer hamitzvot - "book of the Commandments"); text authored by the Rambam for the purpose of defining the 613 mitzvot...
Decalogue - The Ten Commandments found in Exodus 20:1-26
Decalogue - ) The Ten Commandments or precepts given by God to Moses on Mount Sinai, and originally written on two tables of stone
Commandment - 26:5, where mitsvâh is synonymous with choq (“statute”) and torah (“law”): “Because that Abraham obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my Commandments, my statutes, and my laws. ” In the Pentateuch, God is always the Giver of the mitsvâh “All the Commandments which I command thee this day shall ye observe to do, that ye may live, and multiply, and go in and possess the land which the Lord sware unto your fathers. And thou shalt remember all the way which the Lord thy God led thee these forty years in the wilderness, to humble thee, and to prove thee, to know what was in thine heart, whether thou wouldest keep his Commandments, or no” ( Commandments were given in thhearing of the Israelites ( Commandments of God. ”...
Outside the Pentateuch, “commandments” are given by kings (
1 Kings 2:43), fathers ( Bulls - Popish, are letters called apostolic by the Canonists, strengthened with a leaden seal, and containing in them the decrees and Commandments of the pope
Decalogue - the ten principal Commandments, Exodus 20:1 , &c, from the Greek δεκα ten, and λογοι words
Decalogue - (Greek: deka, ten; logos, word) ...
An extra-biblical term which is a literal translation of the phrase "ten words" (Exodus 34); it designates the Ten Commandments which God imposed on His people in the desert of Sinai. Christ resolves the Decalogue into two great Commandments, love of God and of one's neighbor
Diligently - ...
Ye shall diligently keep the Commandments of the Lord your God
Fringes - that ye may look upon it and remember all the Commandments of the Lord and do them. Each tassel had a thread of deep blue, marking the heavenly origin of the Commandments of which it was to remind them. The zizith on the sky-blue thread would be constantly before the Israelites' eyes, in order that, reminded thereby continually of God's Commandments they might not turn their feet to the seductions of the world (Proverbs 4:25-26; Proverbs 3:3; Revelation 19:8)
Moral Theology - Its field is the Commandments of God, of the Church, and of every lawful authority, hence, all our duties towards God, our neighbor, and self
Mishpatim - "judgments") Rational Commandments, one of the three categories of mitzvot
Theology, Moral - Its field is the Commandments of God, of the Church, and of every lawful authority, hence, all our duties towards God, our neighbor, and self
Mitzvah; mitzvot - �commandment�); one of the Torah�s 613Divine Commandments; a good deed or religious precept; according to Chassidut, the word mitzvah stems from the root tzavta, attachment, the mitzvah creating a bond between G-d who commands and man who performs
Baal teshuvah - �master of return�); a person who turns to G d in repentance, after willful or unknowing transgression of the Torah�s Commandments; a Jew of secular or not fully observant background who has decided to undertake full Torah observance ...
Fringes - They were prescribed by God (Number 15), and served as reminders of His Commandments
Baptismal Grace - Sanctifying grace conferred in Baptism, inasmuch as it gives the recipient a right to special help from God to enable him to observe the Commandments and so follow Christ worthily
Ribband of Blue - This was to be worn by the Israelites on the borders of their garments that they might look upon it, and remember the Commandments of Jehovah, and do them
Elisabeth - She is described as being, with her husband, a person of piety, "walking in all the Commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless
Commandments, the Ten - These Commandments were first given in their written form to the people of Israel when they were encamped at Sinai, about fifty days after they came out of Egypt (Exodus 19:10-25 ). The Jews make the "Preface" one of the Commandments, and then combine the first and second. The Lutherans and Roman Catholics refer three Commandments to the first table and seven to the second
Commandment - Paul, make reference to a tradition of authoritative Divine Commandments, and indeed they themselves lay down a number of precepts designed to serve as guides for the moral judgment of Christians (ἐντολαί, δόγματα, παραγγελίαι, παραδόσεις, etc. Commandments of the Mosaic Law. -We have in the first place those Commandments of the Mosaic Law, or of the OT, which are regarded as of Divine authority not only by the Jewish-Christian apostles, but also by St. Of the laws of Moses, the Decalogue, as we might expect, is assigned a position of peculiar importance; it forms the fundamental law of the Old Dispensation (2 Corinthians 3:3 : ‘tables of stone’), and is therefore always cited when the leading Commandments are under consideration (Romans 13:9, James 2:11). James take into account only the Commandments of the second table, asserting that the whole Law is summed up in the command to love one’s neighbour (Galatians 5:14, Romans 13:8 f. It is impossible to decide whether the Jewish, the Eastern and Reformed, or the Roman Catholic and Lutheran arrangement of the Commandments is followed here. Paul, is involved in the abrogation of ‘the law of Commandments’ (Ephesians 2:15), as is evident from what is said regarding the law of the Sabbath, the obligatory character of which, according to Romans 14:5, Galatians 4:9 f. James 2:11; in all these passages, however, the reference is to Commandments which justify themselves to the Christian consciousness). he applies the OT Commandments to the Messianic era in an allegorical or typological sonse; thus 1 Corinthians 9:9 (maintenance of Christian teachers) = Deuteronomy 25:4, 1 Corinthians 9:13=Numbers 18:8, 1 Corinthians 5:7 f. Commandments of God and Jesus. -(1) The Commandments of God frequently referred to in the Epistles of John and in Rev. the Pauline usage, 1 Corinthians 7:19) should doubtless be regarded as the OT Commandments in the NT acceptation (i. ...
(2) Apart from this the apostolic Epistles refer but seldom to the Commandments of Jesus. In James, 1 Peter, Hebrews, and Revelation we meet with no utterance of the earthly Jesus, while 1 and 2 John allude to His Commandments only in general terms (1 John 2:3 f, 1 John 3:23 [2]; cf. Nor will it surprise us to find that the Pauline Epistles likewise contain but few references to the Commandments of the Lord. Paul draws between what the Lord did and did not command shows that he had an accurate knowledge of the Lord’s words-just as he also distinguishes between his own precepts and the Lord’s Commandments. The Commandments of Jesus are frequently cited also by the Apostolic Fathers; cf. Commandments of the apostles. -From the Commandments of Jesus appealed to by the apostles it is an easy transition to those of the apostles themselves (cf. 2 Peter 3:2); it should be noted, however, that the term ἐντολαί is restricted to the Commandments of God and Jesus, while the apostolic ‘commandments’ are denoted by other terms: δόγματα (Acts 16:4), παραγγελίαι (1 Thessalonians 4:2; cf
Ten Commandments - Ten Commandments, the. There were two tables, the Commandments of the one more especially respecting God, those of the other, man
Christian Perfection - When the young man asked Our Lord what he should do to be saved, the answer was explicit: ...
"Keep the Commandments
Astray - ...
Psalm 119:176 (a) Here we see the sinner's path which is not along the path of GOD's righteousness nor according to His Commandments
Religious Perfection - When the young man asked Our Lord what he should do to be saved, the answer was explicit: ...
"Keep the Commandments
Testimony - ...
This word refers to the Ten Commandments as a solemn divine charge or duty. In particular, it represents those Commandments as written on the tablets and existing as a reminder and “testimony” of Israel’s relationship and responsibility to God: “And he gave unto Moses, when he had made an end of communing with him upon Mount Sinai, two tables of testimony, tables of stone, written with the finger of God” ( Commandments, and his judgments, and his testimonies …” (1 Kings 2:3)
Law, Ten Commandments, Torah - The first five books of the Bible (the Pentateuch) are known as books of the Law because they are based on the Commandments which God revealed to Moses. The Ten Commandments are a summary of the Law (Exodus 20:2-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:6-21 ). The Ten Commandments are representative of this kind of law. ...
The Ten Commandments are prohibitions (except for Commandments 4,5 in Exodus 20:8-11 ,Exodus 20:8-11,20:12 ). The first four Commandments are related to one's relationship with God. The next six Commandments have to do with human relationships. ...
The Ten Commandments were not given only for the Hebrew people but are abiding laws for all people. Some of the laws of the Bible seem to apply only to specific times, places, and persons, but the Ten Commandments have an abiding quality about them. While the Ten Commandments have universal validity, they are truly significant only when persons are committed to the God behind them. What makes the Ten Commandments unique is the character of the God who gave them. Without God, the Commandments lose their distinctiveness. Then He said, “On these two Commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets” (Matthew 22:40 ). Incredibly, Jesus summed up the whole Law and the teaching of the prophets with these two Commandments. The Commandments to love had been there all along; Jesus simply emphasized them in a way that would forever change how we should look at them
Commandment - By way of eminence, a precept of the decalogue, or moral law, written on tables of stone, at Mount Sinai one of the ten Commandments
Evangelical Counsels - " (Matthew 10) Or this the narrowest interpretation must be, that one ruling his life by the love of worldly goods is outside the way of salvation; to be in it one must be ready to keep the Commandments at any cost. And come follow me" (Matthew 19) Since to keep the Commandments suffices for salvation, the call to perfection is generaily of counsel only
Catechism of Saint Peter Canisius - The division of the subject-matter is as follows: Faith (Apostles' Creed); Hope and Prayer (Lord's Prayer, Hail Mary); Charity and the Commandments of God and the Church; the Sacraments; Christian Justice, i
Catechism, Westminster - Both contain an exposition of the Ten Commandments and of the Lord's Prayer
Mint - Our Savior does not censure this exactness, but complains, that while they were so precise in these lesser matters, they neglected the essential Commandments of the law-making their punctiliousness about easy and external duties an excuse for disregarding their obligations to love God supremely, to be regenerated in heart, and just and beneficent in life
Saint Peter Canisius, Catechism of - The division of the subject-matter is as follows: Faith (Apostles' Creed); Hope and Prayer (Lord's Prayer, Hail Mary); Charity and the Commandments of God and the Church; the Sacraments; Christian Justice, i
Westminster Catechism - Both contain an exposition of the Ten Commandments and of the Lord's Prayer
Shema - The Shema became for the people of God a confession of faith by which they acknowledged the one true God and His Commandments for them
Elisabeth - Like her husband, Elisabeth was "righteous before God, walking in all the Commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless
Ark - In it Moses placed the two tables of stone containing the ten Commandments
Testimony - The two tables of stone on which the law or ten Commandments were written, which were witnesses of that covenant made between God and his people, and testified what it was that God had required of them, have the same title, Exodus 25:16 ; Exodus 25:21 ; Exodus 31:18
Shema - The Shema became for the people of God a confession of faith by which they acknowledged the one true God and His Commandments for them
Frontlets - ) "If you shall hearken diligently unto my Commandments," etc. This they do in obedience to the words of Moses: "These Commandments shall be for a sign unto thee upon thy hand, and for a memorial between thine eyes
Finger of God - The finger of God writing the Ten Commandments illustrated God's giving the law without any mediation (Exodus 31:18 ; Deuteronomy 9:10 )
Bones - As the surgeon must sometimes break a bone to save a patient lameness for life, so God breaks that He may heal Self will and self righteousness must be broken, that we may run the way of God's Commandments
Vain - We are warned not to take God's name in vain (as though it were nothing) in the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1 : 7 ; Deuteronomy 5:11 )
Idol, Idolatry - Idolatry is denounced by God at the beginning of the Ten Commandments and is considered a form of spiritual fornication
Commandments - COMMANDMENTS. —As Commandments (ἐντολαί) Jesus recognizes (1) the injunctions of the Decalogue, (2) certain other requirements of similar ethical character laid down in the Law. ...
The main passages in which our Lord defines His attitude to the Commandments are: (1) the exposition in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:17-48); (2) the criticism of Pharisaic tradition (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-23; cf. ...
It is assumed by Jesus that the Commandments were given directly by God, and as such they are contrasted with the ‘traditions of men’ (Matthew 15:6, Mark 7:8-9). As ordained by God they are valid for all time and authoritative; the keeping of them is the necessary condition of eternal life (Matthew 19:17, Mark 10:19); men will take rank in the Kingdom of Heaven according to their obedience to the Commandments (Matthew 5:19). It is objected to the Pharisees as their chief offence that they have perverted and overlaid with tradition the Commandments of God (Matthew 15:3, Mark 7:7). ...
In view, then, of the Divine origin of the Commandments, Jesus accepts them as the eternal basis of morality. ...
The ethical teaching of Jesus is thus based on the Divinely given Commandments. It remains to consider how Jesus, while accepting the Commandments, replaced them in effect by a new ethic, different in character as well as wider in range. The ethical teaching of Jesus is directed, in the first place, to restoring the Commandments to their original simplicity and purity. The ten thousand Commandments into which the Decalogue had been divided and subdivided are to give place again to the simple ten. While accepting the Commandments as all given by God, Jesus recognizes that they are of different grades of importance. Those sayings extraneous to the Decalogue, which yet lay bare its essential meaning, are ‘greater’ than any of the set Commandments. Thus in our Lord’s summary of the Law we have more than a resolution of the Ten Commandments into two, corresponding broadly to the two divisions of the Decalogue. The ultimate bearing of His criticism of the Commandments is well indicated in the words of Luther: ‘Habito Christo facile condemus leges et omnia recte judicabimus. To these may be added Tolstoi’s My Religion, and The Spirit of Christ’s Teaching; also books of popular or homiletical character, such as Horton, Commandments of Jesus; Gore, Sermon on the Mount; Dykes, Manifesto of the King
Tradition - The Jewish leaders taught human traditions as if they were God’s Commandments; worse still, they rejected the genuine Commandments of God in order to keep their traditions (Mark 7:7-13; cf
Hem of Garment - , translated" add to the fringes of the borders a thread of blue," that "looking on it they might remember all the Commandments of the Lord, and do them. " The blue symbolized the heavenly origin of the Commandments
Frontlets - "If you shall hearken diligently unto my Commandments," &c, Deuteronomy 11:13-21 . This they do in obedience to these words of Moses: "These Commandments shall be for a sign unto thee upon thine hand, and for a memorial between thine eyes. They who believe their use to be binding, observe, that the text of Moses speaks as positively of this as of other precepts; he requires the Commandments of God to be written on the doors of houses, as a sign on their hands, and as an ornament on their foreheads, Exodus 13:16 . If there be any obligation to write these Commandments on their doors, as the text intimates, there is the same for writing them on their hands and foreheads
Discerning of Spirits - Acts 5:1-11; Acts 8:28; 1 Corinthians 14:23,37: "if any man think himself to be a prophet or spiritual, let him acknowledge that the things that I write unto you are the Commandments of the Lord
Reverence - In Scripture, reverence is paid: to father and mother (Leviticus 19:3 ; Hebrews 12:9 ); to God (1Kings 18:3,1 Kings 18:12 ; Hebrews 12:28 ); to God's sanctuary (Leviticus 19:30 ; Leviticus 26:2 ); and to God's Commandments (Psalm 119:48 )
Chain - ...
Revelation 20:1 (b) GOD's Commandments restrict, prohibit, and defeat Satan and are compared to links that form a chain for his utter punishment
Hold - 1: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) translated "hold" in Acts 4:3 , AV, "prison" in Acts 5:18 (RV, "ward"), signifies (a) "a watching, guarding;" hence, "imprisonment, ward" (from tereo, "to watch, keep"); the RV, has "ward" in both places; (b) "a keeping," as a Commandments, 1 Corinthians 7:19
Ordinances - —In the English versions of the Gospels this word occurs only once, Luke 1:6, where the parents of John the Baptist are described as ‘walking in all the Commandments (ἐντολαῖς) and ordinances (δικαιώμασι) of the Lord blameless
Commandments, the Ten - It was after hearing these ten Commandments rehearsed by Moses that the Israelites said to him, "Go thou near, and hear all that the Lord our God shall say; and speak thou unto us all that the Lord our God shall speak unto thee; and we will hear it and do it. ...
The giving of the two stones to Israel by God (who, though gracious and merciful, would by no means clear the guilty,) amid a measure of glory is referred to by Paul, when he describes the Commandments written in letters thereon as 'the ministration of death;' in contrast to which he speaks of the glory of the ministration of the Spirit (that is, of Christ, for the Lord is that Spirit), and of the ministration of righteousness: it is the story of man's failure, and of God's righteousness available to the believer through Christ
Commandment - 2, marks more especially "the thing commanded, a commission;" in Matthew 15:9 ; Mark 7:7 ; Colossians 2:22 , RV, "precepts," AV, "commandments. (2) In Revelation 22:14 the RV, "wash their robes" (for AV, "do His Commandments") follows the most authentic mss
Conclusion - Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter fear God, and keep his Commandments for this is the whole of man
Mint - Christ reproved them because that, while they were so precise in these lesser matters, they neglected the more essential Commandments of the law, and substituted observances, frivolous and insignificant, in the place of justice, mercy, and truth
Sentences, Book of the - The first book treats of God and the Trinity, Providence, predestination, and evil; the second, or creation, the angels, the fall, grace, and sin; the third, of the Incarnation, Redemption, the virtues, and Commandments; the fourth, of the Sacraments and the four last things
Contain - (2) In Ephesians 2:15 "the law of Commandments contained in ordinances" is, lit. , "the law of Commandments in ordinances
Frontlet - Both are called phylacteries, meaning conservatories (of God's Commandments) or safeguards (against evil influences)
Covenant - the two tablets of stone of the 10 Commandments)
Tradition, - Or it may be from man, as was the tradition of the elders of Israel, which was strongly denounced by the Lord, and declared to be a subverting of the Commandments of God
Tephillim - Both are called phylacteries, meaning conservatories (of God's Commandments) or safeguards (against evil influences)
Murder - ...
The prohibition against murder is found in the Ten Commandments, the heart of Hebrew law (Exodus 20:13 ; Matthew 5:21-225 ). See Image of God , Ten Commandments
Tables of the Law - Those that were given to Moses upon Mount Sinai were written by the finger of God, and contained the decalogue or ten Commandments of the law, as they are rehearsed in Exodus 20. Some think that the same ten Commandments were written on each of the two tables, others that the ten were divided, and only five on one table, and five on the other
Keeping - I judge him not’ (John 12:47); and (b) obey, in such passages as that in which the rich young ruler is reported as having said with reference to the Commandments cited by Jesus, ‘All these things have I kept (φυλάσσω) from my youth up’ (Matthew 19:20 Authorized Version , cf. ‘commandments’). ) The phrase ‘keeping Christ’s Commandments’ refers to ‘the observance of definite precepts’ (Westcott, ib. ’ He that ‘keeps Christ’s Commandments’ is he who recognizes their supremacy over his will, and seeks to regulate his inward and his outward life by them. To slight the obligations which Christ imposes, to look upon the principles of conduct which He enjoins on men as subject to qualification and as mere alternatives to other possible and perhaps more congenial maxims, or, their authority being acknowledged, to limit one’s conformity to them to an external and superficial obedience, an obedience that is only a travesty of active Christian discipleship—that is the attitude to Christ which is described when it has to be said of a man that he ‘keeps not’ His Commandments. ‘To keep Christ’s Commandments’ is to own Him as the sole sovereign of one’s life, and to bring one’s whole self—mind and will and heart—into captivity to the obedience of Christ (cf. ...
Love for Christ is described by Him as being the condition that ensures both belief in His word or words (John 14:23-24), and obedience to His Commandments (John 14:15); and obedience to His Commandments, on the other hand (John 14:21), is described by Him as being the evidence that bears witness to the reality of that love. Similarly with obedience to His Commandments Christ connects this promise, ‘If ye keep my Commandments, ye shall abide in my love; even as I … abide in my Father’s love’ (John 15:10); and with the love to Him that is borne witness to by obedience to His Commandments, this other: ‘He that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself unto him’ (John 14:21). of ‘keeping his word,’ and ‘keeping his Commandments’; ‘I know him, and keep his word’ (John 8:55); ‘I have kept my Father’s Commandments, and abide in his love’ (John 15:10)
Any - ...
If a soul shall sin against any of the Commandments
Faithful - That sweet passage delivered to the church by Moses, is a most decided proof of it: "Know, therefore, that the Lord thy God, he is God; the faithful God, which keepeth covenant and mercy with the that love him and keep his Commandments to a thousand generations
Phylactery - " In the NT it denotes a prayer fillet, "a phylactery," a small strip of parchment, with portions of the Law written on it; it was fastened by a leather strap either to the forehead or to the left arm over against the heart, to remind the wearer of the duty of keeping the Commandments of God in the head and in the heart; cp
Discretion, Years of - " The phrase "years of discretion"is defined in the Rubric at the end of The Catechism, as follows,"So soon as children are come to a competent age and can say theCreed, the Lord's Prayer and the Ten Commandments, and can answerthe other questions of this Short Catechism, they shall be broughtto the Bishop
Rechabites - Jeremiah contrasted their faithfulness to the Commandments of their ancestor with the faithlessness of the people of Judah to the Lord
Tradition - Paul refers to "traditions" which he commands to be held fast, being as binding as any Commandments delivered in any other way
Carnal - Priests had always served on the basis of Commandments written to meet fleshly needs. It consisted of Commandments for the old order dealing with external matters until Christ came to deal with the spiritual matters of eternal redemption, sanctification, cleansing, and eternal life
Hang(ed) - ...
Matthew 22:40 (a) By this type the Lord is telling us that all of GOD's plans for men and His purposes depend upon the two great Commandments which He mentions
Ecclesiastes - The design of this book is to show the vanity of all sublunary things; and from a review of the whole, the author draws this pertinent conclusion, "Fear God, and keep his Commandments, for this is the whole of man;"—his whole wisdom, interest, and happiness, as well as his whole duty
Washing - '" To neglect to do this had come to be regarded as a great sin, a sin equal to the breach of any of the ten Commandments
Moreh - ...
At Moreh God pronounced the blessing and curse on Israel regarding their keeping the Commandments (Deuteronomy 11:26-30 )
Hem of the Garment - All the Israelites were to wear on the border of their garment a riband of blue (the colour of heaven) that they might look upon it and remember the Commandments and be holy unto God: typical of the walk of the Christian as being heavenly in its character, not according to this world, but according to the good and perfect and acceptable will of God
Pelagianism - Pelagius said we are able to keep the Commandments of God because God has given us the ability
Ecclesiastes - It is a discourse upon the true wisdom; with many isolated precepts, illustrated from his own unexampled experience and from the most sagacious observation of the course of life; the whole demonstrating the vanity of all earthly good, and showing that there is a better life to come, and that the only true wisdom is to "fear God and keep his Commandments
e'Bal, Mount, - a mount in the promised land, on which the Israelites were to "put" the curse which should fall upon them if they disobeyed the Commandments of Jehovah
Ten Commandments - (Psalm 19:7 ) The term "Commandments" had come into use in the time of Christ. There are three principal divisions of the two tables:
That of the Roman Catholic Church, making the first table contain three Commandments and the second the other seven. ...
The division recognized by the old Jewish writers, Josephus and Philo, which places five Commandments in each table. (6) The law of the Ten Commandments was honored by Jesus Christ as embodying the substance of the law of God enjoined upon man
Ark of the Covenant - Inside of the Ark were the tablets of the Ten Commandments, a jar of manna, and Aaron's Rod that budded (Hebrews 9:4)
Wander - O let me not wander from they Commandments
Whole - Fear God and keep his Commandments, for this is the whole duty of man
Ten Commandments - The portion of Scripture known as the "Ten Commandments" (Exodus 20:3-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:7-21 ) is a key segment of the Sinai covenant, which was entered into by God and the people of Israel. ...
In both Exodus and Deuteronomy, the Ten Commandments are a brief summary of the more detailed covenantal requirements that follow them. ...
A further implication of putting the Commandments in the covenant context is the aspect of character. Thus, the carrying out of the biblical Commandments is a means of learning and replicating the character of God. It is here that the continuing significance of the Ten Commandments is found: they reveal the character and will of the unchanging Creator of the universe. ...
A final important implication of the covenant form is especially significant for the Ten Commandments. Thus it is in the biblical covenant that the One God can summarize his stipulations for his people in a series of absolute statements, the Ten Commandments. ...
One of the features that marks the Ten Commandments is also typical of the stipulations as a whole. Thus the first four Commandments are primarily in relation to God while the remaining six have to do with human relationships. ...
Although the Commandments are, with the exception of the fifth, all prohibitive, they are not negative. From one point of view it is the first of the Commandments to deal with human relations. Those who depend upon themselves make themselves the center of the universe; they have broken the first two Commandments. Barclay, The Ten Commandments for Today ; J. Harrelson, The Ten Commandments and Human Rights ; G
Faithful, - The Commandments and testimonies of God are called faithful
Law - Also called testimony, Commandments, statutes, precepts, judgments, the Word, and words
Way - The Commandments, worship, prayer, holiness, repentance, all have an ethical side and are even ethical in essence. The proof of love is keeping the Commandments
Way - ...
Since the way of God led to true life and true enjoyment, that ‘way’ may have meant God’s will and God’s Commandments (Job 21:14; Psalms 37:23-24; Psalms 119:27; Psalms 119:37; Jeremiah 5:4; Matthew 22:16; Romans 11:33; Revelation 15:3)
Impute - The law of conscience existed, but that is not in view in the passage, which deals with the fact of external Commandments given by God
Law - (See Commandments
Hardeneth - ...
Proverbs 28:14 (a) The man who refuses GOD's Word, and rejects His Commandments is warned by the Lord
Scribes - It is also applied to those who wrote and explained the scriptures: thus Ezra was "a ready scribe in the law," even "a scribe of the words of the Commandments of the Lord," though he was also a priest
Ordinance - Moses led a covenant renewal ceremony in which he explained the Commandments, ordinances, and statutes of the Law. The apostle Paul states that the work of Christ has abolished the law of Commandments and ordinances (Ephesians 2:15 )
Repentance - Evangelical repentance consists of (1) a true sense of one's own guilt and sinfulness; (2) an apprehension of God's mercy in Christ; (3) an actual hatred of sin ( Psalm 119:128 ; Job 42:5,6 ; 2 co 7:10 ) and turning from it to God; and (4) a persistent endeavour after a holy life in a walking with God in the way of his Commandments
Mosiac Law - The moral law, or ten Commandments, for instance, was delivered on the top of the mountain, in the face of the whole world, as being of universal influence, and obligatory on all mankind
Yhwh - Reverence for the divine name led to the practice of avoiding its use lest one run afoul of Commandments such as Exodus 20:7 or Leviticus 24:16
Lime - The use of it was for plaster or cement, the first mention of which is in Deuteronomy 27, where Moses directed the elders of the people, saying, "Keep all the Commandments which I command you this day
Truth - ...
The “truth” of God's Commandments grows out of the fact of God and His truth (faithfulness or reliability). The great confession given by Ezra after the Jews returned from bondage in Babylon emphasized God's nature as truth (faithfulness) in what He did in creation, election, redemption, and the giving of the law: “You came down also upon Mount Sinai, and spoke with them from heaven and gave them right ordinances and true laws, good statutes and Commandments, and you made known your holy sabbath to them and gave them Commandments and statutes and a law through your servant Moses” (Nehemiah 9:13-14 NRSV). ...
The truth of God is reflected not only in His Commandments; it is to be reflected in human life generally
Robbery - The basic biblical law concerning robbery is the prohibition of the Ten Commandments, “Thou shall not steal” (Exodus 20:15 ; Deuteronomy 5:19 )
Covetousness - In the Ten Commandments it is put under the ban along with murder, adultery, theft, and slander ( Exodus 20:17 , Deuteronomy 5:21 )
Sit (Downsitting) - The rulers and the people must obey the Commandments of that church
Follow, Follower - It meant keeping the Commandments (Deuteronomy 33:3-4 ; 1 Kings 14:8 ) and obeying the prophetic word (Daniel 9:10 ). ...
New Testament believers were exhorted to follow the Lord's Commandments (2 John 6 ) and sound doctrine (1 Timothy 4:6 ; 2 Timothy 1:13 ), much like the Israelites were told to observe the Law
Acceptance - This included ethical actions (Ten Commandments) as well as sacrifices (Leviticus). ...
Jesus summarized the law and the prophets in the two great Commandments (Matthew 22:37-40 ) and held them up as the requirements for eternal life (Luke 10:25-28 )
Law - The civil laws, Acts 23:2 24:6 , were for the government of the Jews as a nation, and included the Ten Commandments. It was more fully taught to the Hebrews, especially at Mount Sinai, in the Ten Commandments, and is summed up by Christ in loving God supremely and our neighbor as ourselves, Matthew 22:37-40
Covetousness - ...
Covetousness, therefore, is basic to the Commandments against murder, adultery, stealing, and lying
Catechism - Itwas afterwards gradually enlarged, the Commandments being given infull in 1552; the section on the Two Sacraments was added in 1604,and the "Duty towards my neighbor" was revised in 1662
Congregation - These assemblies were convened for the purpose of engaging in solemn religious services (Exodus 12:27 ; Numbers 25:6 ; Joel 2:15 ), or of receiving new Commandments (Exodus 19:7,8 )
Middle Wall - (3) The “fence” consisting of detailed Commandments and oral interpretations erected around the law by its interpreters to ensure its faithful observation
Sina, Sinai - Moses and the elders went up into the mountain, and Moses there received the Ten Commandments written on two stones
Infirmity - Nothing can be called a sin of infirmity which is contrary to the express letter of any of the Commandments
Deuteronomy - The third part of Deuteronomy 27:1 to Deuteronomy 30:20, opens with the joint command of Moses and the elders to keep all the Commandments, and, when they had crossed the Jordan, to write them upon the great plastered stones they were ordered to set up with appropriate ceremonies
Teach - In vain they worship me, teaching for doctrines the Commandments of men
Write - The ten Commandments were written with the finger of God on tables of stone
Law of Christ - In some instances Jesus sharpens Commandments (Matthew 5:17-48 ) and in others considers them obsolete (Mark 7:17-19 ). On one occasion, having been asked to identify the greatest commandment, Jesus concurs with the Jewish wisdom of his time (Mark 12:32-33 ) that the greatest Commandments are to love God supremely and to love one's neighbor as oneself (Mark 12:28-31 )
Zacharias - ) Of the course of Abia or Abijah, eighth of the 24 (Luke 1:68-804); walking with Elizabeth his wife "in all the Commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless. The same as the sire of Jehoiada; Joash ungratefully forgetting that he owed his throne to Jehoiada slew Zacharias for his faithful reproof: "Why transgress ye the Commandments of Jehovah, that ye cannot prosper? because ye have forsaken Jehovah, He hath also forsaken you
Tradition (2) - The expression used in this passage is, ‘I will give thee the tables of stone, and the law, and the Commandments, which I have written, that thou mayest keep them. ’ The ‘tables of stone’ were understood to mean the Ten Commandments; ‘the law,’ the written prescriptions of the Pentateuch; ‘the Commandments,’ the Mishna; ‘which I have written,’ the prophets and Hagiographa; ‘that thou mayest teach them,’ the Talmud (Berakh. He saw in it a means of transgressing the Commandments of God
Statute, Ordinance - ” It is not easy to distinguish between these synonyms, as they are often found in conjunction with each other: “Ye shall diligently keep the Commandments [6] of the Lord your God, and his testimonies [7], and his statutes [1], which he hath commanded thee” ( Commandments [6], my statutes [3], and my laws [5]” ( Commandments [6], and his judgments [13], and his statutes [14], which I command thee this day” ( Commandments [6], always” ( Covenant - 12:4) and “observe carefully” all the Commandments of the “covenant” ( Commandments … shall ye observe to do, that ye may live, and multiply, and go in and possess the land which the Lord sware unto your fathers” ( Commandments … , to perform the words of this covenant that were written in this book” (2 Kings 23:3)
Fear - ...
The filial fear of God is a holy affection, or gracious habit, wrought in the soul by God, Jeremiah 32:40 , whereby it is inclined and enabled to obey all God's Commandments, even the most difficult, Genesis 22:12 ; Ecclesiastes 12:13 ; and to hate and avoid evil, Nehemiah 5:15 ; Proverbs 8:13 ; Proverbs 15:6
Join - ...
Should we again break thy Commandments, and join in affinity with the people of these abominations? Ezra 9
Covet - ...
Among the Ten Commandments is one that forbids covetousness
Table - The ten Commandments were written on two tables of stone. A division of the ten Commandments as the first and second tables
Ten Commandments - TEN Commandments...
1. It has been suggested that originally all the Commandments consisted of a single clause, and that the name ‘word’ could be more naturally applied to such. Are what we know as the First and Second, and again what we know as the Tenth, one or two Commandments? The arrangement which treats the First and Second as one, and the Tenth as two, is that of the Massoretic Hebrew text both in Ex. If, as suggested, the original Commandments were single clauses, it is most natural to suppose that they were evenly divided between the two tables five in each. The Hebrew texts of Exodus 20:1-26 and Deuteronomy 5:1-33 agree in the order murder, adultery, theft as the subjects of the 6th, 7th, and 8th Commandments
Way - ( c ) Of the way of Jehovah, His creative power ( Job 26:14 ), His moral rule and Commandments ( Job 21:14 , Psalms 18:30 , Proverbs 8:32 )
Table - Paul contrasts the tables of stone on which the Ten Commandments were written by the ‘finger of God’ with the tables that are not of stone but are ‘hearts of flesh,’ whereon the Holy Spirit writes the laws of the New Covenant (2 Corinthians 3:3)
Faithful - The faithful God keeps His covenant, and the faithful people keep His Commandments
Cabbalists - The rule of faith, and the standard of indissoluble duty, were made flexible and weak as the spider's web, and the Commandments of God were rendered void
Stone - The most obvious example is the writing of the Ten Commandments on stone by the Spirit of God when Moses went up on Mount Sinai
Least - 1: ἐλάχιστος (Strong's #1646 — — elachistos — el-akh'-is-tos ) "least," is a superlative degree formed from the word elachus, "little," the place of which was taken by mikros (the comparative degree being elasson, "less"); it is used of (a) size, James 3:4 ; (b) amount; of the management of affairs, Luke 16:10 (twice); 19:17, "very little;" (c) importance, 1 Corinthians 6:2 , "smallest (matters);" (d) authority: of Commandments, Matthew 5:19 ; (e) estimation, as to persons, Matthew 5:19 (2nd part); 25:40,45; 1 Corinthians 15:9 ; as to a town, Matthew 2:6 ; as to activities or operations, Luke 12:26 ; 1 Corinthians 4:3 , "a very small thing
Letters - Thus, Blessed is the man who feareth the Lord, ...
Who delighteth greatly in his Commandments
Office - The Lord's prayer, the ten Commandments and the creed, is a very good office for children if they are not fitted for more regular offices
Adultery - This was forbidden in the ten Commandments; but neither there nor anywhere else is the sin defined
Feel - Whoso keepeth the Commandments shall feel no evil thing
Book, Book of Life - He used writing to communicate directly in specific instances, such as the Ten Commandments and at Balthasar's feast
Jehosh'Aphat - In his own kingdom Jehoshaphat ever showed himself a zealous follower of the Commandments of God: he tried to put down the high places and groves in which the people of Judah burnt incense, and sent the wisest Levites through the cities and towns to instruct the people in true morality and religion
Witness - ...
The law of Israel...
When God established his covenant with Israel at Mt Sinai, he gave the Ten Commandments as the basis of the covenant requirements laid upon his people. The two tablets of stone containing the Ten Commandments were a witness, or testimony, to God’s demands and to Israel’s acceptance of them (Exodus 24:3; Exodus 24:12)
Logia - In particular the Ten Words (English ‘Ten Commandments’) are called by Philo τὰ δἑκα λόλια (ed. In Papias the λόγια are made equivalent to ‘the Commandments (ἐντολαί) delivered by the Lord to the faith,’ and stand in contrast with ‘alien Commandments’ (ἀλλότριαι ἐντολαί) of heretical teachers, and the ‘loquacity sought by the multitude’ (οὐχ ὥσπερ οἱ πολλοὶ τοῖς τὰ πολλὰ λἑγουσιν ἔχαιρον). For Papias these precepts are ‘commandments delivered by the Lord to the faith’ (ἐντολαὶ τῄ πίστει δεδομέναι), and hence comparable with ‘the oracles of God committed to Israel’ (ἐπιστεύθησαν τὰ λόγια τοῦ θεοῦ, Romans 3:2); but he refers to just the same precepts as λόγοι, when in a connected clause he declares that Peter had no design of making a syntagma of the ‘sayings’ (οὐχ ὥσπερ σύνταξιν τῶν κυριακῶν ποιούμενος λόγων). Papias is defining his authority for ‘the Commandments given by the Lord to the faith. As regards the ‘commandments’ which Papias sought to hear and to expound as ‘oracles,’ the fragment states as a tradition (probably from the same authority, ‘John the Elder, who gave that regarding Mark) that ‘Matthew made a compend (συνετάξατο v. It was more complete, and afforded a systematic, not necessarily chronological, arrangement of the Lord’s words (σύνταξιν τῶν τοῦ κυρἰου λόγων, συνέταξεν τὰ λόγια, οὐ μέντοι τάξει) serviceable to those in search of the ‘commandments given by the Lord to the faith. The two fragments are parts of a single tradition, and the general point of view is that of a church to which the Gospel was primarily a new Torah, wherein the object of system (τάξις) is completeness in presenting ‘the Commandments given to the faith
Cocceians - In consequence of this general principle, he maintained that the ten Commandments were promulgated by Moses, not as a rule of obedience, but as a representation of the covenant of grace...
that when the Jews had provoked the Deity by their various transgressions, particularly by the worship of the golden calf, the severe and servile yoke of the ceremonial law was added to the decalogue, as a punishment inflicted on them by the Supreme Being in his righteous displeasure...
that this yoke, which was painful in itself, became doubly so on account of its typical signification; since it admonished the Israelites from day to day of the imperfection and uncertainty of their state, filled them with anxiety, and was a perpetual proof that they had merited the righteous displeasure of God, and could not expect before the coming of the Messiah the entire remission of their iniquities...
that indeed good men, even under the Mosaic dispensation, were immediately after death made partakers of everlasting glory; but that they were nevertheless, during the whole course of their lives, far removed from that firm hope and assurance of salvation, which rejoices the faithful under the dispensation of the Gospel...
and that their anxiety flowed naturally from this consideration, that their sins, though they remained unpunished were not pardoned; because Christ had not as yet offered himself up a sacrifice to the Father, to make an entire atonement for them
Mountain - There God gave the Law including the Ten Commandments to Moses
Requirement - ...
Abraham by faith fulfilled God's requirements (Genesis 26:5 ), Zecharias and Elizabeth were righteous, keeping all the Lord's Commandments and requirements (Luke 1:6 )
Bands - ...
Psalm 2:3 (a) This is typical of the restraining laws and Commandments of GOD wherein He curbs and retards the evil passions and cruel powers of wicked men
Leviticus - ...
Then follow promises and warnings to the people regarding obedience to these Commandments, closing with a section on vows
New - He said these two Commandments fulfilled the Law and the Prophets
Brazen Serpent - Numbers 16:4-12 , in which are these remarkable words:—"They were admonished, having a sign of salvation," that is, the brazen serpent, "to put them in remembrance of the Commandments of thy law
Eden - The last chapters of the Bible restore to our view a more glorious and enduring Paradise: "Blessed are they that do his Commandments, that they may have right to the tree of life
Judgment - The righteous statutes and Commandments of God are called his judgments
Proselyte - His teachers, who now acted as his sponsors, repeated the great Commandments of the law
Backsliding - Condition that results from spiritual apathy or disregard for the things of God, whether on the part of an individual or a group bound by a prior covenantal pledge of commitment to uphold the doctrine and Commandments of the Lord. To varying degrees, depending on the extent of neglect of God and his Commandments, the spiritually wayward experience a season of estrangement and abandonment from God and his people
Law of Moses - The heading of the ten Commandments is "I am the Lord thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage," and this could apply only to the Israelites. ' The law engraven on stones (the ten Commandments) is called "the ministration of death ," not the law of life to a Christian
Exodus, Theology of - After the covenant Commandments and ordinances are presented, the covenant is established with blood sprinkled on the people (24:8). A survey of the Ten Words or Commandments (20:1-17) and the "Book of the Covenant" (20:22-23:33) indicates that God's instructions cover both vertical and horizontal dimensions, involving both correct attitudes and actions toward God and toward humanity. The Commandments assume God's holiness. In light of who God is, Israel is to be "a holy nation" (19:6), obeying the Commandments and ordinances (see Leviticus and the word, "holy"). Psalm 78,106 recount what God did in the Book of Exodus and how Israel knew the Commandments, but failed to obey. Michael Hagan...
See also Covenant ; Egypt ; Moses ; Ten Commandments ...
Bibliography
Vine, Allegory of the - Some take it as the keeping of His Commandments (John 15:10), and the practice of that righteousness whereby the soundness of the tree is proved (Matthew 7:16; Matthew 7:20-21), while others think specially of that Apostolic work which is to fall to the disciples (so Bruce, Training of the Twelve, p. As Christ abides in the love of the Father by keeping His Commandments, so will the disciples abide in the love of the Son if they keep His Commandments (John 15:9-10). On the other hand, it may be pointed out that while the phrase occurs in John 15:9 as an injunction, it is repeated in John 15:10 as a promise, conditional on our keeping Christ’s Commandments. to keep His Commandments, corresponds to the ‘abide in me’ of John 15:4. Here, therefore, the promise which is held forth to those who keep the Commandments, i
Lawlessness - The Commandments are necessary to eternal life (Luke 18:20)
Sabbath - The Sabbath was soon after definitely enacted in the ten Commandments, Exodus 20:8-11 , and reference is there made to God having rested on the seventh day after the work of creation as the basis of the institution
End - ...
The end of the Commandments is charity
Frontlets - " (Deuteronomy 6:4-5) And the fourth was taken from Deuteronomy 11:13-21 "If thou shalt hearken diligently unto my Commandments," etc
Law - "The ten Commandments" (Hebrew words, Exodus 34:28) are frequently called "the testimony," namely, of Jehovah against all who should transgress (Deuteronomy 31:26-27). ...
As the seventh and eighth forbid acts of adultery and theft, so the tenth forbids the desire and so seals the inner spirituality of all the Commandments of the second table. Love to God is expressly taught in the second commandment, "mercy to thousands in them that love Me and keep My Commandments. Special sanctions are attached to the second, third, fourth, and fifth Commandments. merits of a future life; (2) he does use as a sanction God's declaration that He visits the iniquity of the fathers upon the children to the third and fourth generation of them that fear Him, and shows mercy unto thousands (to the thousandth generation) of them that love Him and keep His Commandments" (Exodus 20:5-6)
Obedience (2) - —If we test this by the Ten Commandments as substantially embracing the whole moral law, we find His obedience complete. He says in one place, ‘If ye keep my Commandments, ye shall abide in my love’ (John 15:10); but when we ask what the Commandments of Jesus are, we find few which, in the form in which they are given, have direct application to the conditions of modern life. He refers to the Ten Commandments when the young man asks what he shall do to inherit eternal life (Matthew 19:16); but when the young man is not satisfied, He gives him a test which was not in any of the Commandments nor of any general application to men, ‘Go, sell, and give to the poor’ (Matthew 19:21)
Exodus, Book of - God gave the Ten Commandments and other laws central to the covenant (Exodus 19-23 ), and then confirmed the covenant in a mysterious ceremony (Exodus 15:1-21 ). This way centered on life guided by the Ten Commandments. ...
God expected His people to live the way of holiness, the way of the Ten Commandments. The Ten Commandments are God's covenant ground rules for life with Him (Exodus 20:1-17 )
Law - It may be used of Commandments or instructions in general, whether given by God, civil administrators, teachers or parents (Luke 2:21-24; Exodus 18:20; Proverbs 3:1; Matthew 22:36-400; see also GOVERNMENT). The ten Commandments were the principles by which the nation was to live, and formed the basis on which all Israel’s other laws were built (Exodus 20:1-17). ...
As Jesus demonstrated his love for the Father by keeping the Father’s Commandments, so those who truly love Jesus will keep his Commandments (John 14:15; John 14:21; John 15:10; 1 John 2:3-4; 1 John 2:7; 1 John 5:3)
Lamentations of Jeremiah - Then he adds that Jehovah in these dealings was righteous, for they had rebelled against His Commandments
Let - Followed by the first and third persons, it expresses desire or wish hence it is used in prayer and entreaty to superiors, and to those who have us in their power as, let me not wander from thy Commandments
Oil - It is God the Holy Ghost who is uniformly represented, in his divine influences and gifts, by the figure and emblem of the holy oil and the ointment; for as oil hath numberless operations to soften, to take off rust, to counteract poison, to give cheerfulness to the countenance, and to facilitate actions in the limbs when benumbed and grown hard; so the blessed influences of the Holy Ghost, by his divine anointings, soften our hearts, take off the rust of ignorance in our minds, expel the poison of sin and corruption, and not only raiseth up the drooping spirits, by administering to our hearts the oil of joy and gladness, but causeth us "to run the way of God's Commandments when the Lord hath set our heart at liberty
Sermon on the Mount - During the Roman Catholic church's history in the Middle Ages, only those living within the monastery were held responsible for keeping the ethics of the sermon; everyone else was bound only to keep the Ten Commandments. Martin Luther proposed the doctrine of the two kingdoms: Christians in their private lives were bound to keep the ethical standards of the sermon, but in their public and professional lives were bound only to keep the standards of the Ten Commandments
Monotheism - To support the accuracy of this statement, they examine the central text in the Old Testament for defining Israel's belief about God: the Ten Commandments. It asserts that, even though the other gods exist, the people who follow the Mosaic...
Commandments shall not embrace any of those other gods as gods who compete for the loyalty of the people
Ark of the Covenant - names the original container for the Ten Commandments and the central symbol of God's presence with the people of Israel. The word “covenant” in the name defines the ark from its original purpose as a container for the stone tablets upon which the Ten Commandments (sometimes called the “testimony”) were inscribed
Say, Speak, Answer - 2:1: “My son, if thou wilt receive my words, and hide my Commandments with thee
Temptation - ” In Deuteronomy 8:2 Moses said: “God led thee these forty years in the wilderness, to humble thee, and to prove ( nsh ) thee, to know what was in thine heart, whether thou wouldest keep his Commandments, or no
Tabernacle - In the Holy of Holies was the ark of the covenant which contained the Ten Commandments (Exodus 25:16)
Fringes - ]'>[12] ’s chosen people, to walk in His law and to keep all His Commandments
Sabbath - Both reports of the Ten Commandments stated that the Sabbath belonged to the Lord
Spiritualizing of the Parables - Paul; the debtor who owed 100 baths of oil, the Gentiles, ‘qui magna indigebant misericordia Dei’; the debtor who owed 100 cors of wheat, the Jewish people, ‘which had been nourished by the wheat of God’s Commandments
Liturgy - Some alterations were made in it, which consisted in adding the general confession and absolution, and the communion to begin with the ten Commandments
Law - Doing the Commandments of the Lord is the fruit of the divine nature: they are therefore both law and liberty
Phylacteries - The command ought doubtless to be understood metaphorically, as a charge to remember it, to meditate upon it, to have it as it were continually before their eyes, and to conduct their lives by it; as when Solomon says, concerning the Commandments of God in general, "Bind them about thy neck, write them upon the table of thy heart," Proverbs 3:1 ; Proverbs 3:3 ; Proverbs 6:21
Liturgy - Some alterations were made in it, which consisted in adding the general confession and absolution, and the communion service, to begin with the Commandments
Idolatry - ...
The first and second Commandments are directed against idolatry of every form
Number - many) ways, (28:25) ...
Ten as a preferential number is exemplified in the Ten Commandments and the law of tithe
Wash - , "nets," Luke 5:2 (some texts have apopluno); of "garments," figuratively, Revelation 7:14 ; 22:14 (in the best texts; the AV translates those which have the verb poieo, "to do," followed by tas entolas autou, "His Commandments")
Walk - The Christian is to walk in newness of life, Romans 6:4 , after the spirit, Romans 8:4 , in honesty, Romans 13:13 , by faith, 2 Corinthians 5:7 , in good works, Ephesians 2:10 , in love, Ephesians 5:2 , in wisdom, Colossians 4:5 , in truth, 2 John 1:4 , after the Commandments of the Lord, 2 John 1:6
Ecclesiastes, the Book of - The theme is the vanity of all human pursuits when made the chief end, and the consequent wisdom of making the fear of God and His Commandments our main aim. This is "the conclusion of the whole" discussion, that man's wisdom and "whole duty" is to "fear God and keep His Commandments" (Ecclesiastes 12:13-14), and meanwhile to use in joyful and serene sobriety, and not abuse, life's present passing goods (1618484054_13). Man's way to escape from the vanity that attends his work, however successful it seem for a time, is to "fear God," and to make His Commandments the end of all our work; also to acquiesce patiently, cheerfully, and contentedly in all God's dispensations, however trying and dark (Ecclesiastes 2:24; Ecclesiastes 3:12-13; Ecclesiastes 3:22; Ecclesiastes 5:17; Ecclesiastes 8:15; Ecclesiastes 9:7)
John, First Epistle of - The test of the knowledge of God is keeping His Commandments, and the love of God is perfected in him who keeps His word. ...
1 John 5 gives a test whereby believers may know that they love God's children, namely, when they love God and keep His Commandments
Leviticus - The division into Decalogues is frequent throughout the Mosaic code, based no doubt upon the model of the Ten Commandments, each subject being set forth in ten ordinances, as Bertheau has observed (for details see his Commentary). The appendix however is an integral part of the whole, as is marked by its ending with the same formula, "these are the Commandments," etc
Formalism - Yet the latter element also was involved, and is emphasized by his repeatedly contrasting both circumcision and un-circumcision with the inward essence and ethical manifestation of Christianity-‘a new creature’ (Galatians 6:15), ‘faith that worketh by love’ (Galatians 5:6), ‘keeping the Commandments of God’ (1 Corinthians 7:19). John is occupied with the exposure of intellectual formalism (for though the Gnostic tenets, against which it is directed, are regarded as the rankest heterodoxy, the principle is the same), To imagine that we ‘know God,’ while not keeping His Commandments (James 2:4-6), or that we are ‘in the light,’ while hating our brother (James 2:9); to credit ourselves with ‘knowing Christ’ in whom is no sin, while continuing in the practice of sin (James 3:6), is to stand convicted of being a ‘liar
Ahijah - ...
Though blind with age he detected her, and announced that as Jeroboam had utterly failed in the one condition of continuance in the kingdom rent from David's house, which his former prophecy had laid down, namely, to keep God's Commandments heartily as David did, Jeroboam's house should be taken away "as dung"; but that in reward for the good there was found in Abijah toward God, he alone should have an honorable burial (compare Isaiah 57:1-2), but that "Jehovah would smite Israel as a reed shaken in the water, and root up and scatter Israel beyond the river," Euphrates
Fable - They are ‘Jewish,’ ‘the Commandments of men’ ( Titus 1:14 ), and the ‘genealogies’ are connected with ‘fightings about law’ ( Titus 3:9 )
Testimony - The ten words are—testimonies, way, law, Commandments, precepts, word, judgments, truth, (or faithfulness) statutes, and righteousness
Ark - As such, the ark contained the memorials of God's great redemptive acts—the tablets upon which were inscribed the Ten Commandments, an omer or two quarts of manna, and Aaron's rod
Frontlets - Boys at 13 years and one day become "sons of the Commandments" and wear them
Love to God - Universal of all his attributes, Commandments, ordinances, &c
Complete - ” God demanded total obedience from His people: “Let [5] heart therefore be perfect with the Lord our God, to walk in his statutes, and to keep his Commandments …” (1 Kings 8:61)
Power - But this Almighty One has originated innumerable subordinate powers, and some of these are possessed of ability to perform acts contrary to the will and Commandments of the Creator
Law - The reason given for the proposal (Acts 15:21 : ‘For Moses from generations of old hath in every city them that preach him, being read in the synagogues every Sabbath’) probably means simply that the four prohibitions in question-which formed the kernel of the so-called Noachian Commandments, and correspond to the laws for proselytes-had come to be so impressed upon the minds of the Jews that they could not countenance any disobedience to them if their intercourse with their Gentile brethren in the Church was to be unconstrained. James’s conception of the substance of the Law likewise shows the influence of Jesus, as he ranks the law of love to one’s neighbour above the others (James 2:8), and, generally, urges the pre-eminence of the Commandments enjoining love and mercy (James 2:1-13; James 2:15 f. The Law, in short, contains a judicial system, in that it determines the relation between man and God by man’s obedience to, or transgression of, the Divine Commandments. By ‘works of the law,’ however, he means, not simply the externally legal actions in which the heart is not implicated, but no less the morally irreproachable fulfilment of the Commandments, which claim the obedience of the soul as well as of the body, and forbid sinful desire as well as sinful action-just as, indeed, the requirement of the whole Law is summed up in the Commandments of love (Romans 13:9 f. The Law as a whole consists of particular Commandments of a statutory nature (τὸν νόμον τῶν ἐντολῶν ἐν δόγμασι, Ephesians 2:15; cf
Covenant - Israel easily occupied the position of authority in the treaty and subjected the Gibeonites to temple service, but still this violated God's Commandments (Joshua 9:1 ; compare Judges 2:2 ). While Moses climbed the mountain and stayed in God's presence to receive the Ten Commandments, the people worshiped golden calves (Exodus 32:1 ). Again, covenant with Israel involved Israel's pledge to make no other covenants (Exodus 34:12 ,Exodus 34:12,34:15 ; Deuteronomy 7:2 ) and God's Commandments as His expectations of a covenant people (Exodus 34:27-28 ; Deuteronomy 4:13 ). See Ten Commandments
Law - These Commandments represent the minimum moral and religious requirements for those in covenant relationship with God. The topical units of chapters 12-25 are arranged according to the order of the Ten Commandments. " The Commandments are given to a people who are already "saved" (Exodus 20:2 ) through a covenant relationship based on God's gracious love and despite Israel's lack of merit (Deuteronomy 7:7-9 ; 9:4-6 ). Christ has abolished in his flesh the Commandments and regulations that separated Jew from Gentile (Ephesians 2:15 )
Motives - This corresponds to the climax of the Ten Commandments, which, unlike the preceding forbidden actions, prohibits an attitude: "You shall not covet" (Exodus 20:17 ). Meier...
See also Ethics ; Heart ; Ten Commandments ...
Bibliography
Corban - He accuses the Pharisees of attaching too much value to the tradition of the elders, so as even in some cases to set aside in their favour the plain moral Commandments of God. One may say to him: If thou hadst known that thou wast transgressing such Commandments as these, “Thou shalt not take vengeance nor bear a grudge”; “Thou shalt not hate thy brother in thy heart”; “Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself” [2]6; “Thy brother shall live with thee” [5],—wouldst thou have made the vow? Perhaps thy brother may become poor, and thou (because of thy rash vow) wilt not be able to support him
Fruit (2) - It is our responsibility to ‘abide in Him’ by keeping His Commandments. The branches which draw most sustenance from the vine are the most productive, so the soul which keeps most faithfully the Lord’s Commandments abides the most in His love and is most fruitful
Perfection (Human) - On these two Commandments hung the whole Law and the Prophets (Matthew 22:37-40). He who kept these two Commandments was perfectly obedient
Sadducees - They were concerned only with the Commandments actually written in the law of Moses
Swedenborgians - and, in opposition thereto, maintains that man is possessed of free will in spiritual things; that salvation is not attainable without repentance, that is, abstaining from evils, because they are sins against God, and living a life of charity and faith, according to the Commandments; that man, immediately on his decease, rises again in a spiritual body, which was enclosed in his material body; and that in this spiritual body he lives as a man to eternity, either in heaven or in hell, according to the quality of his past life
Blasphemy - There is little distinction between the sinner who deliberately abuses the name of the Lord (Leviticus 24:10-16 ), and the one who deliberately flouts his Commandments (Numbers 15:30-31 )
Nehemiah - He was a good organizer and leader, but more importantly he was a man of prayer who trusted God, feared God and obeyed his Commandments (Nehemiah 1:4; Nehemiah 2:4; Nehemiah 4:20; Nehemiah 5:15; Nehemiah 6:11; Nehemiah 7:2; Nehemiah 13:17; Nehemiah 13:25; Nehemiah 13:30)
Micah, Micaiah - Micaiah , one of the teachers sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the Commandments of Jahweh in the cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:7 )
Sinners - Thus it seems to indicate the distinction between the righteousness of the Law-burdened Jew and his more ignorant brethren, who, not knowing the Law and therefore continually trespassing its Commandments, were deemed ‘accursed
False Witness - Originally it dealt, not with lying in general, but with lying against one’s neighbour, perhaps because this is the most frequent form of falsehood (see Dale, Ten Commandments, p
Reward - But in the Johannine writings, along with the idea of life, we have that of keeping Christ’s Commandments. ‘He that hath my Commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that loveth me: and he that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself unto him’ (John 14:21); ‘if ye keep my Commandments, ye shall abide in my love’ (John 15:10); ‘ye are my friends, if ye do the things which I command you’ (John 15:14)
Ethics - The major example is the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:6-21 ). They were not intended to be permanent Commandments. A few observations may help in interpreting these Ten Commandments. Practically every one of the Ten Commandments is raised in the most amazing nineteenth chapter of Leviticus
Fear - To fear the Lord is one of the ways by which Israel expresses its obedience and loyalty to Yahweh and to His divine requirements: “And now, Israel, what doth the Lord thy God require of thee, but to fear the Lord thy God, to walk in all his ways, and to love him, and to serve the Lord thy God with all thy heart and with all thy soul, to keep the Commandments of the Lord and his statutes, which I command thee this day for thy good?” (Deuteronomy 10:12-13 ; compare Deuteronomy 6:24-25 ; Deuteronomy 10:20 ; Deuteronomy 13:4 ). ...
The “God-fearers” The “God-fearers” were those who were faithful to God and obeyed His Commandments (Job 1:1 ; Psalm 25:14 ; Psalm 33:18 )
Charities - Charity, in this sense, is the fulfilment of one of the two great Commandments which Christ formulated as containing all of God's revealed will for man (Matthew 22)
Border - ...
In the Mosaic Law they were evidently intended to be, as to the more spiritually minded doubtless they were, simply reminders of the obligations resting upon Jehovah’s people to walk in this law and to keep all His Commandments (Numbers 15:39-40)
Altar - Immediately after giving the Ten Commandments, the Lord requested that this altar be built at once
Faithfulness - His Commandments are an expression of his “faithfulness” ( Watch - ...
This word often refers to divine obligation or service in general, a non-cultic obligation: “Because that Abraham obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my Commandments, my statutes, and my laws” ( Strong, To Be - 11:8 in the context of the covenant: “Therefore shall ye keep all the Commandments which I command you this day, that ye may be strong, and go in and possess the land
Transgress - This emphasis is especially prominent in Amos 2:4: “For three transgressions of Judah, and for four, I will not turn away the punishment thereof; because they have despised the law of the Lord, and have not kept his Commandments, and their lies caused them to err, after the which their fathers have walked
Immorality, Sexual - Holiness demands adherence to certain stringent rules regarding worship and general conduct, but also requires a complete commitment of will and motive to the Lord's Commandments. God had chosen the covenant nation to be an illustration to pagan society of how individuals can become as holy as God through implicit faith in him and continuous obedience to his Commandments. Enactments of this kind are unique in the ancient world, and only serve to demonstrate the seriousness of God's intent to foster a people that can indeed have spiritual fellowship with their Lord because they reflect his holy and pure nature as they walk in the way of his Commandments. These "Ten Commandments, " as they are styled, contain certain injunctions of a moral character dealing with adultery, theft, false witness, and covetous behavior (Exodus 20:14-19 )
Mark, John - ...
Christian love healed the breach, for in Colossians 4:10 Paul implies his restored confidence in Mark ("touching whom ye received Commandments, if he come unto you receive him
Bind - This Scripture refers to man-made Commandments such as abound in false religions, particularly in Romanism
Deuteronomy - For Israel the basic principles were in the form of ten Commandments (4:44-5:33)
Obedience - For while inferiors have many duties towards their superiors, amongst the rest there is one duty in particular, that they are required to obey their Commandments
Woman - ...
The subordination of woman appears more clearly in a close reading the Ten Commandments. The Commandments are addressed to men, a fact evidenced by the use of masculine pronouns. The Ten Commandments cite a son's duty to honor both his father and mother (Exodus 20:12 )
Law of God - In doing this He practically ignored the distinctions of the scribes between greater and lesser Commandments of the Law, and between the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms (or ‘the Writings’), and insisted upon the authority of Scripture as the word of God. Jesus defends His disciples by turning the tables upon the Pharisees, whom He taxes with setting their traditions above the express Commandments of God Himself, and with neglecting in the interest of mere technicalities the weightier matters of the Law (cf. So far from repudiating as a mere matter of Pharisaic casuistry the question often agitated among the scribes as to whether there were any Commandments which in themselves summed up the teaching of the whole Law, He was ready to discuss such questions with them; and when, in response to His definition of love to God and one’s neighbour as the essential commandment of the Law, a scribe commended His answer, and said that such love was ‘more than all whole burnt-offerings and sacrifices,’ He declared that he was not far from the Kingdom of God (Mark 12:28-34)
Roman Catholics - "...
Such is the avowed and accredited faith of the church of Rome; but it seems a most extraordinary circumstance, that, while this church has so enlarged the creed, it has reduced the number of the Commandments, omitting altogether the second, "Thou shalt not make unto thee a graven image," &c. And then, to prevent alarm, as every body must know there should be ten Commandments, the last is divided into two, to make up the number. Lastly, in Butler's Catechism, the eighth edition, printed at Dublin in 1811, and sanctioned by four Roman Catholic archbishops, the Commandments stand literally as follows:...
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Exodus, Book of - " The ten Commandments and various laws followed until Exodus 24 when the covenant was ratified by blood and inaugurated
Thirst - The common physical wants of struggling humanity afford opportunities of service in the sacred cause outlined by the two great Commandments of the Law (Matthew 22:36 ff
Hilkiah - all the essential parts, "the Commandments, statutes, and rights," without the reasons and exhortations, narratives, etc
Zeal - To remember God’s zeal frees His ever-presence from all savour of spying (Psalms 139), and His Commandments from the nature of arbitrary exactions (Deuteronomy 32:47, Ezekiel 18:23)
Responsibility - If they did, he would punish the children for the idolatry of the fathers "to the third and fourth generation of those who hate me, " but he would show "love to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my Commandments" (Exodus 20:5 ; Deuteronomy 5:9 )
Zacchaeus - So, his desire was not merely from curiosity; as in the case of the young ruler, desire for "eternal life" entered into his wish to see the Saviour, but unlike the rich young ruler he had no self-complacent thought, "all the Commandments I have kept from my youth up"; sense of sin and need on the contrary were uppermost in his mind, as the sequel shows
Stone - ...
Exodus 24:12 (c) The Commandments were on stone, not on rubber, which would bend or stretch
Covenant - As a "vassal" he was given Commandments, laws, orders, regulations, requirements, and decrees (26:4). First the ten Commandments were spoken; these were inclusive principles governing all aspects of kingdom living. The interrelatedness of the Commandments demonstrated how integrated faithful, obedient, covenant people would find kingdom life to be. ...
The speaking of the ten Commandments was followed by explication and application. The ratification of the covenant was finalized by Yahweh writing the ten Commandments on tablets of stone and giving them to Moses
Scribes - The first step was taken toward annulling the Commandments of God for the sake of their own traditions
Ezra - A "ready scribe in the law of Moses" (Ezra 7:6; Ezra 7:11-12); "a scribe of the words of the Commandments of the Lord and of His statutes to Israel"; "a scribe of the law of the God of heaven"; "priest"; a worthy descendant of Hilkiah the priest under Josiah, who "found the book of the law in the house of the Lord" (2 Chronicles 34:14-15); son or descendant of Seraiah (not the high priest
Humour - Similarly, to ask the rich young ruler if he had kept the Commandments, ‘Thou shall not kill,’ etc
Fear - But if, conscious of demerit, they cry to Him for mercy, their sins are forgiven, and’ henceforth they live as in His sight, recognizing that to fear God and keep His Commandments is the whole duty of man
Light, Noun, And Verb, Lighten - ...
"Apart from natural phenomena, light is used in Scripture of (a) the glory of God's dwelling-place, 1 Timothy 6:16 ; (b) the nature of God, 1 John 1:5 ; (c) the impartiality of God, James 1:17 ; (d) the favor of God, Psalm 4:6 ; of the King, Proverbs 16:15 ; of an influential man, Job 29:24 ; (e) God, as the illuminator of His people, Isaiah 60:19,20 ; (f) the Lord Jesus as the illuminator of men, John 1:4,5,9 ; 3:19 ; 8:12 ; 9:5 ; 12:35,36,46 ; Acts 13:47 ; (g) the illuminating power of the Scriptures, Psalm 119:105 ; and of the judgments and Commandments of God, Isaiah 51:4 ; Proverbs 6:23 , cp
Promise - ‘His every word of grace’ is a promise; even His Commandments are assurances of grace, conditional only upon men’s willingness to obey
Keep - To practice to do or perform to obey to observe in practice not to neglect or violate as, to keep the laws, statutes or Commandments of God
Fear - But if, conscious of demerit, they cry to Him for mercy, their sins are forgiven, and’ henceforth they live as in His sight, recognizing that to fear God and keep His Commandments is the whole duty of man
Ecclesiastes, Theology of - And although the translation of verses 9-12 of the epilogue may be disputed, no one doubts the last two verses of the epilogue turn for the first time to a clear and ringing statement of the right way to go:...
Now all has been heard; br here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his Commandments, for this is the whole duty of man. It advocates a "right relationship" with God (fear God) that manifests itself in an obedient lifestyle (keep his Commandments ) and cites the coming judgment as a motive. We are to "fear God, " obey his Commandments, and look for the coming judgment
Circumcision - What was fundamentally important in God's sight was being a "new creation" (Galatians 6:15 ) and keeping God's Commandments (1 Corinthians 7:19 ), apart from which circumcision or uncircumcision are meaningless, and allowing faith to work through love (Galatians 5:6 )
Abounding - 2 Corinthians 9:8); and, as ‘they had received’ of him how they might walk and ‘to please God,’ they were exhorted to ‘abound more and more’ (1 Thessalonians 4:1), and that especially because they knew what Commandments ‘had been given them by the Lord Jesus’ (1 Thessalonians 4:2)
Liberality - The complete bestowal of earthly possessions on the poor, accompanied by ‘taking up the cross’ and following Christ, which is required of the rich young ruler in addition to the observance of the Commandments (Matthew 19:21, Mark 10:21, Luke 18:22), is not necessarily a rule of universal obligation, but evidently intended to meet this special case; underlying it is the idea, never absent from our Lord’s teaching as to the use of wealth, that wealth is a trust from God, and to be renounced when it becomes a hindrance to spiritual life
Inspiration - Paul also, when writing on the question of marriage, makes a distinction between what he wrote as his judgement, and what he wrote as Commandments of the Lord
Bless - ...
The Lord’s “blessing” rests on those who are faithful to Him: “A blessing, if ye obey the Commandments of the Lord your God, which I command you this day …” ( Love - ...
"Christian love has God for its primary object, and expresses itself first of all in implicit obedience to His Commandments, John 14:15,21,23 ; 15:10 ; 1 John 2:5 ; 5:3 ; 2 John 1:6
Break, Breaker, Breaking, Brake - , of "breaking" Commandments, not only infringing them, but loosing the force of them, rendering them not binding, Matthew 5:19 ; John 5:18 ; of "breaking" the Law of Moses, John 7:23 ; Scripture, John 10:35 ; of the "breaking up" of a ship, Acts 27:41 ; of the "breaking down" of the middle wall of partition, Ephesians 2:14 ; of the marriage tie, 1 Corinthians 7:27
Poverty - the Ten Commandments, Exodus 20:1-17 , and the ‘Book of the Covenant,’ Exodus 20:23 to Exodus 23:33 ) the few references that do occur ( e
Pelagianism And Pelagius - Tidings of such a fresh outbreak came in 414 from Sicily, where one Hilary wrote to him that some Christians at Syracuse were asserting that man can be without sin and easily keep the Commandments of God, if he will; that an unbaptized infant overtaken by death cannot possibly perish deservedly, as he is born without sin. These were that a rich man cannot enter the kingdom of God unless he sell all he has, arid that it cannot avail him to keep the Commandments of God if he still retains and uses his riches. Orosius said that Pelagius, according to his own confession, had taught that man can be without sin and can easily keep the Commandments of God, if he will. The bishop quoted the scriptural instances of Abraham, who was bidden "to walk before God and be perfect," and of Zacharias and Elizabeth, who were described as "walking in all the Commandments and ordinances of the law blameless," as affording a primâ facie justification of Pelagius, and argued, If Pelagius said that man could fulfil the commands of God without the aid of God, his doctrine would be wicked and worthy of condemnation, but as he maintained that man could be free from sin not without the aid of God, to deny this position would be to deny the efficacy of divine grace. Granting that the synods of Jerusalem and Diospolis might have been justified in the acquittal of Pelagius on the ground of his explanations, evasions, and disclaimers of responsibility for some of the positions alleged, they called attention to the continued prevalence of doctrines which affirmed the sufficiency of nature for the avoidance of sin and fulfilment of the Commandments of God (thus virtually superseding the need of divine grace), and which denied the necessity of baptism in the case of infants, as the way of obtaining deliverance from
Ethics - Morality is under Divine protection: are not the tables of the Law in the Ark that occupies the most sacred place in Jehovah’s shrine ( Exodus 40:20 , Deuteronomy 10:5 , 1 Kings 8:9 , Hebrews 9:4 )? The Commandments, instead of being arbitrary, are the outflowings of the character of God. The Decalogue, which is an outline of the demands made by the Covenant on Israel, requires in its early clauses faith, reverence, and service; then ( Exodus 20:1-26 , Commandments 5 to 9) the duty of man to man is set forth as part of man’s duty to Jehovah, for Moses and all the prophets declare that God is pleased or displeased by our behaviour to one another. The Tenth Commandment, penetrating as it does to the inward life, should be taken as a reminder that all Commandments are to be read in the spirit and not in the letter alone ( Leviticus 19:17-18 , Deuteronomy 6:5-6 , Psalms 139:1-24 , Matthew 5:1-161 )
Kings, 1 And 2 - Deuteronomy 28:1-14 describes the blessings that will belong to Israel if they obey God's Commandments. ...
Insistence on the Worship of the One True God in the Temple of Jerusalem The Commandments found in Deuteronomy with which the author of 1,2Kings was especially concerned were the commands that only God be worshiped and that God be worshiped in Jerusalem alone (Deuteronomy 12-13 )
Truth - It has a sanctifying force ( John 17:17-19 ); it ensures the keeping of the Commandments ( 1 John 2:4 ) and the life of Christian love ( 1 John 3:18 f
Bible, Inspiration of the - The plainest passage is Exodus 20 , in which the Ten Commandments are recorded; we later learn (31:18; 32:15-16) that they were written on two tablets of stone, "inscribed on both sides, front and back
Idolatry - So deep-rooted was the Jewish hatred of idolatry, and so general had been the condemnation of the practice, that our Lord found no reason for insistence upon the generally accepted Commandments on the subject
Treasure - ‘What lack I yet?’ the man had said, even after asserting that he had kept the Commandments from his youth up
Wisdom - The closing admonition of Ecclesiastes, only implied in the main body of the book, is to "Fear God and keep his Commandments, for this is the whole duty of man" (12:13)
Jansenists - Some of God's Commandments are impossible to be observed by the righteous, even though they endeavour with all their power to accomplish them
Keep, Watch, Guard - 26:5 the word refers to an “obligation”: “Because that Abraham obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my Commandments, my statutes, and my laws
Idolatry, - The first and second Commandments are directed against idolatry of every form
Law - The moral law is summarily contained in the decalogue or ten Commandments, written by the finger of God on two tables of stone, and delivered to Moses on mount Sinai
Oneness - In anticipation of such troublous times, Christ makes oneness a main burden of His last prayer with His disciples (John 17:11; John 17:21-26), as He makes mutual love the sum of His closing Commandments (John 15:9-13)
Authority in Religion - On these two Commandments hangeth the whole law and the prophets. (a) Thus the preceptive portions of the OT, though mediated by ‘Moses and the prophets,’ are really ‘the Commandments of God. For not only does our Lord represent God as ‘Lord of the conscience,’ but with equal emphasis and great explicitness He teaches that ‘God alone is Lord of the conscience, and hath left it free from the doctrines and Commandments of men which are in anything contrary to His word, or beside it in matters of’ religious truth and duty. ...
Indeed, at the beginning of His Galilaean ministry, our Lord is careful to disclaim, even for Himself, either purpose or authority to disannul any of God’s Commandments
Law - In this sense the Apostle speaks of "the law of Commandments contained in ordinances. ...
It is an obvious, but it is not therefore a less important remark, that to the Jewish religion we owe that admirable summary of moral duty, contained in the ten Commandments. In this extensive interpretation of the Commandments, we are warranted, not merely by the deductions of reason, but by the letter of the law itself. ...
But the Jewish religion promoted the interests of moral virtue, not merely by the positive injunctions of the decalogue; it also inculcated clearly and authoritatively the two great principles on which all piety and virtue depend, and which our blessed Lord recognised as the Commandments on which hang the law and the prophets,—the principles of love to God and love to our neighbour
Abstain, Abstinence - God's moral law, characterized in the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20 ), expects his people to abstain from whatever he identifies as evil or out of bounds
Light - While light is not itself divine, it is often used metaphorically for life (Psalm 56:13 ), salvation (Isaiah 9:2 ), the Commandments (Proverbs 6:23 ), and the divine presence of God (Exodus 10:23 )
Keep, Keeping - "the keeping (ones);" it is used of the "keeping" power of God the Father and Christ, exercised over His people, John 17:11,12,15 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:23 , "preserved;" 1 John 5:18 , where "He that was begotten of God," RV, is said of Christ as the Keeper ("keepeth him," RV, for AV, "keepeth himself"); Jude 1:1 , RV, "kept for Jesus Christ" (AV, "preserved in Jesus Christ"); Revelation 3:10 ; of their inheritance, 1 Peter 1:4 ("reserved"); of judicial reservation by God in view of future doom, 2 Peter 2:4,9,17 ; 3:7 ; Jude 1:6,13 ; of "keeping" the faith, 2 Timothy 4:7 ; the unity of the Spirit, Ephesians 4:3 ; oneself, 2 Corinthians 11:9 ; 1 Timothy 5:22 ; James 1:27 ; figuratively, one's garments, Revelation 16:15 ; (b) "to observe, to give heed to," as of keeping Commandments, etc
New Commandment - Horton, The Commandments of Jesus, 319; F
Evil - Cultic values are addressed in the first four of the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:3-11 ; Deuteronomy 5:7-15 ) and by the first of Jesus' "Great Commandments" (Matthew 22:37-40 ; Mark 12:30 ; Luke 10:27 ; cf. Deuteronomy 6:5 ); ethics are considered in the last six of the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:12-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:16-21 ) and by the second "Great Commandment" (Leviticus 19:18 )
Law of Moses - There must necessarily have been, before the law, Commandments and revelations of a fragmentary character, under which Israel had hitherto grown up. (22:18,19) A fuller consideration of the tables of the Ten Commandments is given elsewhere. [1] III
Pentateuch - Also Exodus 24:4, "Moses wrote all the words of Jehovah"; (1 Samuel 4:21-22) "Jehovah said unto Moses, Write thou these words" distinguished from Exodus 34:28, "He (Jehovah) wrote upon the tables the words of the covenant, the ten Commandments" (Exodus 34:1). Hezekiah kept the Commandments which Jehovah commanded Moses (2 Kings 18:4; 2 Kings 18:6)
Apostle - ...
Paul requires the Corinthians to acknowledge that the things which he wrote were the Lord's Commandments (1 Corinthians 14:37)
Justice - Justice is required to be present with the sacrificial system (Amos 5:21-24 ; Micah 6:6-8 ; Isaiah 58:1-10 ; Matthew 5:23-24 ), fasting (Deuteronomy 24:13 ), tithing (Matthew 23:23 ), obedience to the other Commandments (Matthew 19:16-21 ), or the presence of the Temple of God (Jeremiah 7:1-7 )
Zacharias - They were righteous not only in the sight of men but of God, and blameless in their care to observe all His Commandments and ordinances; but notwithstanding this, and the promise of God by Jeremiah (Jeremiah 33:18), and their eager desire, and Zacharias’ lifelong prayer (Luke 1:18), their union was not blessed with offspring
Lie, Lying - The Mosaic Law, summarized in the Ten Commandments, presents the bearing of false witness as a malicious sin against one's fellow man (Exodus 20:16 ; Deuteronomy 5:20 ; 19:18-19 ; cf
Self-Examination - ‘Do you notice how many times our Saviour says: “If ye love me, keep my Commandments”? It is as if a child should rush passionately to its mother and throw its little arms round her neck, and say convulsively, “O mother! I do love you so!” “Well, my dear child, if you do, why are you not a better child?” ’ (H
Numbers as Symbols - Exodus 7 — Exodus 12 The ten Commandments
Sabbath - ...
The REENACTMENT of the Sabbath on Mount Sinai, among the Commandments of the Moral Law, was also designed not for the Jews alone, but for all whom should receive the word of God, and ultimately for all mankind
Ecclesiastes, Book of - "The whole of man " (not his duty, but the one thing for man, the one principle of life), is to "fear God and keep his Commandments
Phylacteries - At the laying of the hand phylactery—‘Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe, who hast sanctified us by Thy Commandments, and has commanded us to lay the Tephillin
Ideas (Leading) - Our Lord did not issue Commandments like those of the old Law. Commandments which classify actions, forbidding some and enjoining others, however necessary they may be for purposes of moral education, have always this defect, that they are sure, sooner or later, to come into conflict, and so give rise to perplexity and to casuistry. It includes all the Commandments (Matthew 22:37-39, Mark 12:30 ff
God - God instituted an agent (priesthood) to serve as an intermediary of reconciliation between himself and Israel, a place (tabernacle) where he and Israel should meet each other in worship, and a means (sacrificial system) that provided the formal expression of Israel's and the individual's desire to do God's will and to live in obedience to his Commandments. " This "trustworthiness" or "loyalty" that characterized God is set down in the ethical centerpiece of the law, the Ten Commandments, where God declares that he will show hesed "to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my Commandments" (Exodus 20:6 )
Hermas Shepherd of - -The book is divided up into five Visions, twelve Mandates or Commandments, and ten Similitudes or Parables. Hermas at first fails to recognize him as the being to whom he was delivered, but on recognition proceeds to write down the Commandments and the Parables dictated by the Shepherd. The purport of the concluding Parable is an exhortation to Hermas to keep the Shepherd’s Commandments and to publish them to others
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - For I did not, like the generality, take pleasure in those who have much to say, but in those who teach the truth; nor in those who relate their strange Commandments, but in those who record such as were given from the Lord to the Faith and come from the Truth itself. Strong asceticism was a feature of some of the earliest Gnostic sects; and their Commandments, "Touch not, taste not, handle not," may well have been "the strange Commandments" to which Papias refers
Pentateuch - The Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1 : 2-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:6-21 ) are frequently called law, but they are not law in the technical sense because no penalties or sanctions are connected with them. Apodictic refers to those authoritative, unconditional laws such as the Ten Commandments which begin, “Thou shalt not,” “You shall,” or laws calling for the death penalty
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - From such he must have derived his explanation (49 205) why the Commandments are ten—"secundum mysterium nominis Jesu Christi quod est in litera iota id est perfectionis indicio" (see also i 23). (49 205) he follows Origen's division of the Commandments making "Honour thy father and mother" the fifth and (p
Joshua, the Book of - God's rest, Commandments, and blessing unify His people (Joshua 22:1-6 )
Ecclesiastes, Book of - The first point is summarized by the editor at the end of the book: “Fear God, and keep his Commandments: for this is the whole duty of man” (Ecclesiastes 12:13 )
Heart - When Moses says, "these Commandments are to be upon your hearts" (Deuteronomy 6:6 ), he commands his hearers to remain conscious of them
Punishment - ...
See also Eternal Punishment ; Judgment ; Ten Commandments ...
Bibliography
Persecution - The Bible teaches that those who follow Christ and God's Word and who practice his Commandments will be persecuted
Moses - God also called Moses up into the mount, dictated to him the law, gave him the ten Commandments written on stone by the finger of God, and showed him the pattern of the tabernacle
Faithfulness - -The apostolic writers agree with the general biblical teaching in ascribing faithfulness to God as ‘keeping covenant and mercy with them that love him and keep his Commandments to a thousand generations’ (Deuteronomy 7:9)
Wise, Skilled - 119:98 chakam means “to make wise”: “Thou through thy Commandments hast made me wiser than mine enemies: for they are ever with me
Almsgiving - And, of course, our almsgiving, like all our works, is to be done in subjection to the two Commandments which are the standing law of His kingdom, that we love the Lord our God with all our heart and all our mind, and that we love our neighbour as ourself (Matthew 22:37 ff
Perfection - When the man came to Christ with his eager question about ‘eternal life,’ though he could claim to have kept all the Commandments from his youth, he is bidden, if he would be ‘perfect,’ strip himself of all worldly possessions and follow Christ; doubtless because only through such sacrifice could he come to discern and attain the moral realities revealed by simple dependence on God ( Matthew 19:21 ; cf
John the Baptist - Son of Zacharias (of the course of Abijah, 1 Chronicles 24:10) and Elisabeth (of the daughters of Aaron), who both "walked in all the Commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless
Law - Stylistic peculiarities, as well as other considerations, seem to show that these latter are subsequent editorial additions, and that originally the Decalogue contained no more than the actual Commandments, without note or explanation. No final solution has yet been reached; but we may hold with confidence that the traditional account of the Decalogue is correct, and that the Ten Commandments in their original and shorter form were promulgated by Moses himself. Thus Jesus asserted, in accordance with views already advanced among the scribes, that ‘the whole law and the prophets hang on the two Commandments’ of love to God and to our neighbour ( Matthew 22:34-40 , Luke 10:25-37 ) the parable of the Good Samaritan gives to the second command an unprecedented scope
Ethics - The ground of the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:6-21 ) is what God has already done for Israel. White...
See also Deuteronomy, Theology of ; Jesus Christ ; Law ; Salvation ; Sanctification ; Sermon on the Mount ; Ten Commandments ...
Bibliography
Justice (2) - Hence the just or righteous (δίκαιος) man is represented as walking ‘in all the Commandments of the Lord blameless’ (Luke 1:6), and of these the first and greatest is, ‘Thou shalt love the Lord with all thy heart’ (Matthew 22:37). The Christian law of justice is embodied in the Golden Rule, ‘All things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them’ (Matthew 7:12); and also in the second of the great Commandments, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself’ (Mark 12:31)
Dress - The ends had a fringe, and upon it a blue or purple riband, which continually being before their eyes, with its heavenly hue, would be a remembrance to them that they should "remember all the Lord's Commandments" (Numbers 15:38)
Pharisees - Pharisees "follow the guidance of that which their doctrine has selected and transmitted as good, attaching the chief importance to the observance of those Commandments which it has seen fit to dictate to them" ( Ant 18
Moses - ...
Dramatic though the crossing of the Re(e)d Sea is for the destiny of the Hebrews, the peak of Moses' career is attained on Mount Sinai, when God appears to him and delivers the celebrated Ten Commandments as the basis of Israel's covenant law
Interpretation - Paul still held the Law and the Commandments to be holy, righteous, and good (Romans 7:12), and he repeatedly affirmed that these things were written ‘for our sake’ (Romans 4:23 f
Sinai - We gave ourselves up to the impressions of the awful scene; and read with a feeling which will never be forgotten the sublime account of the transaction and the Commandments there promulgated, in the original words as recorded by the great Hebrew legislator
Hezekiah - Of his faithfulness it is written (2 Kings 18:5) "he trusted in the Lord God of Israel, so that after him was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor any that were before him, for he clave to the Lord, and departed not from following Him but kept His Commandments. Hezekiah also provided for the maintenance of the priests and Levites by commanding the payment of tithes; he ordered also their courses of service, and "in every work that he began in the service of the house of God, and in the law, and in the Commandments, to seek his God, he did it with all his heart and prospered": a good motto for Christians (Colossians 3:23)
Union With God - Again, ‘They only who fear the Lord and keep his Commandments have life with God; but as to those who keep not his Commandments, there is no life in them’ (Mand
Solomon - Jehovah chose Solomon of all David's sons to be his successor, and promised to be his father, and to establish his kingdom for ever, if he were constant to His Commandments (1 Chronicles 28:5-6-7). Again Ecclesiastes is probably the result of his melancholy, but penitent, retrospect of the past; "all is vanity and vexation of spirit": it is not vanity, but wisdom as well as our whole duty, to "fear God and keep His Commandments
Sabbath - If it were so, its obligation is precisely the same, in all cases where God himself has not relaxed it; and if a positive precept only, it has surely a special eminence given to it, by being placed in the list of the ten Commandments, and being capable, with them, of an epitome which resolves them into the love of God and our neighbour. ...
Another explicit proof that the law of the ten Commandments, and, consequently, the law of the Sabbath, is obligatory upon Christians, is found in the answer of the Apostle to an objection to the doctrine of justification by faith: "Do we then make void the law through faith?"...
Romans 3:31 ; which is equivalent to asking, Does Christianity teach that the law is no longer obligatory on Christians, because it teaches that no man can be justified by it? To this he answers, in the most solemn form of expression, "God forbid; yea, we establish the law
Ark of the Covenant - ...
The outward keeping taught symbolically the moral and spiritual keeping of God's Commandments
Idolatry - There is good reason for thinking that the Second of the Ten Commandments is not in its earliest form; and it is probable that Exodus 34:10-28 (from the document J Land (of Israel) - Nonetheless, the people were reminded to diligently obey God's Commandments and to love the Lord (Deuteronomy 11:12-15 )
Freedom - also Exodus 20:2 ; as the introduction to the Ten Commandments )
Abiding - Those who in this dutiful and affectionate temper keep the Commandments are raised by Christ from the base of bond service to the height of friendship
Claim - Rabbinical rules so far supersede the Commandments of God that Christ can be condemned as an enemy to religion (Matthew 23:13-39, Mark 3:10; Mark 7:5; Mark 7:9; Mark 10:5; Mark 11:17, Luke 13:14)
Serve - 6:13), or “… hearken diligently unto my Commandments which I command you this day, to love the Lord your God, and to serve him …” ( Reconciliation - " "Having abolished in" or by "his flesh the enmity, even the law of Commandments
Abiding - Those who in this dutiful and affectionate temper keep the Commandments are raised by Christ from the base of bond service to the height of friendship
Christ in the Early Church - ‘Jesus Christ’ is ‘our inseparable life’ (Ephesians 3); true Christians are ‘arrayed from head to foot in the Commandments of Jesus Christ’ (ib. To Justin Martyr, the Eucharist, the conditions of receiving which are belief, baptism, and a life according to the Commandments of Christ, is not common bread and common drink, but the flesh and blood of the incarnate Jesus, by which our blood and flesh are nourished (1 Apol. Beloved, attend to the Commandments of the Lord
Inspiration - ...
The promise of Jesus, then, implies, according to the plain construction of the words, that the Apostles, in executing their commission, were not to be left wholly to their natural powers, but were to be assisted by that illumination and direction of the Spirit which the nature of the commission required; and we may learn the sense which our Lord had of the importance and effect of this promise from one circumstance, that he never makes any distinction between his own words and those of his Apostles, but places the doctrines and Commandments which they were to deliver upon a footing with those which he had spoken: "He that heareth you, heareth me; and he that despiseth you, despiseth me; and he that despiseth me, despiseth him that sent me," Luke 10:16 . But they demanded from all who had received the faith of Christ submission to the doctrines and Commandments of his Apostles, as the inspired messengers of Heaven. "If any man think himself to be a prophet, or spiritual, let him acknowledge that the things that I write unto you are the Commandments of the Lord," 1 Corinthians 14:37 ; that is, Let no eminence of spiritual gifts be set up in opposition to the authority of the Apostles, or as implying any dispensation from submitting to it
Life - Those shall ‘live’ who keep the Commandments. His spirit is not to act on them from the outside, through set Commandments, but inwardly and spontaneously
Lord's Prayer, the - ”...
Just as it was a practice of Jewish teachers to reduce the many Commandments to one or two (compare Mark 12:28-34 ), so it was often the case that Jewish teachers would give synopses of the Eighteen Benedictions (Babylonian Talmud, Berakoth , 29a)
Judgment - The great first and second Commandments in the law which our Lord enunciated to the lawyer (Matthew 22:37-39) are in the nature of a judgment, for men know whether or not they have been kept
Elijah - The king was indicted for infringing on two of the ten Commandments that were recognized as the basis for society: murder and forcible appropriation, both capital offenses
Names of God - The Ten Commandments prohibited the violation of God's name (Exodus 20:7 ; Deuteronomy 5:11 )
New Covenant - Because of their disobedience, the members of the covenant of the forefathers came under the wrath of God, which culminated in the exile; in contrast God made a covenant forever with the remnant who held fast to the Commandments, revealing to them the hidden things in which Israel went astray (3:10-14)
Simple, Simplicity - Horton, The Commandments of Jesus (1898), 63; Phillips Brooks, New Starts in Life (1896), 158; S
Mammon - Horton, Commandments of Jesus, p
Law - ...
Notes: (1) In Galatians 5:3 , the statement that to receive circumcision constitutes a man a debtor to do "the whole Law," views the "Law" as made up of separate commands, each essential to the whole, and predicates the unity of the "Law;" in Galatians 5:14 , the statement that "the whole law" is fulfilled in the one commandment concerning love, views the separate Commandments as combined to make a complete "law
Lord's Prayer (ii) - This is the prayer of active rather than of passive obedience, an obedience like that of God’s angels who excel in strength and do His Commandments. As the Commandments of the moral law are all gathered up in the two tables of duty to God and to man, so the petitions of the gospel are all represented in the two divisions of this little prayer
Deuteronomy, the Book of - It shows the Ten Commandments as the center of the covenant relationship for believers
Sayings (Unwritten) - ) has:...
‘For this cause, if we do these things, the Lord said, “Though ye be gathered together with me in my bosom, and do not my Commandments, I will cast you away, and will say unto you, ‘Depart from me, I know you not whence ye are, ye workers of iniquity
Walk (2) - It is used in the same sense as περιπατεῖν (4) in Luke 1:6 (‘walking in all the Commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless’); cf
Leviticus - Follow the Commandments of the Lord (Leviticus 18:1-20:27 )
Gospels (2) - It is not that Jesus Christ is important and significant to the historian as the originator and promulgator of a singularly lofty code of morals, but rather that in the days of Caesar Augustus, ‘the eternal life which was with the Father was manifested unto us’ (1 John 1:2); and from that life so manifested certain new Commandments of love resulted as a necessary consequence, and ‘old Commandments which we had from the beginning’ (1 John 2:7) awoke into new life, and put on a strength which they had not had before
John, the Gospel by - They were to keep His Commandments, if they loved Him. " The disciples were to abide in His love, keeping His Commandments
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - —Jesus found in the OT not only the ideal of a life, but also Commandments, moral and ritual, by which this ideal was to be realized. He also referred to the Ten Commandments as specific directions for conduct (Matthew 15:4, Mark 7:10 a; Matthew 19:18-19 a, Mark 10:19, Luke 18:20)
Nehemiah, Theology of - Their manner of praise and worship goes back to the Commandments of David and Solomon
Canon of the New Testament - are the Commandments of the Lord
Salvation - Here salvation involves the gift of a new heart of flesh and new spirit, which will finally empower his people to keep the Commandments, after which comes habitation in the land
Mind/Reason - It is with the mind that one chooses to accept God and obey his Commandments, or to reject him and rebel against him
Profaning, Profanity - Dale, Ten Commandments, p
Ethics (2) - But we also find explicit remonstrances against the ‘traditions of the elders’ so dear to the scribes (Mark 7:5; Mark 7:9; Mark 7:13); He characterizes them summarily as the ‘prescriptions’ (Authorized and Revised Versions ‘tradition’) of men (Mark 7:8), thus contrasting them with the Commandments of God. Now the principle enunciated by Jesus cuts the ground from under all the particular Commandments of the ceremonial law
John (the Apostle) - For I did not, like the multitude, take pleasure in those that speak much, but in those that speak the truth; not in those that relate strange Commandments, but in those that deliver the Commandments given by the Lord to faith and springing from the truth itself
Moses - And when Moses drew nigh, and saw their proceedings, his anger waxed hot, and he cast away the tables of the covenant, or stone tablets on which were engraven the ten Commandments by the finger of God himself, and brake them beneath the mount, in the presence of the people; in token that the covenant between God and them was now rescinded on his part, in consequence of their transgression. ...
When the Lord had pardoned the people, and taken them again into favour, he commanded Moses to hew two tablets of stone, like the former which were broken, and to present them to him on the top of the mount; and on these the Lord wrote again the ten Commandments, for a renewal of the covenant between him and his people
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - The Ten Commandments, the Sermon on the Mount, James, and 1John present a harmonious voice for what constitutes godly character
Bible, Authority of the - In Exodus this narrative leads to the giving of the law on Sinai, and alongside the Ten Commandments, written by the finger of God, we read the mass of first-person instruction that became the basis of the civil and ceremonial practice of the Hebrews
Tabernacle - [2] ...
In the holy of holies, within the veil, and shrouded in darkness, there was but one object, the ark of the covenant, containing the two tables of stone, inscribed with the Ten Commandments
Revelation, Idea of - His lengthy interviews with God are followed by the giving of the law, the most sustained and formal example of the divine speech in Holy Scripture which offers usin the Ten Commandments, but also in the whole of the extensive Mosaic legislationthe paradigm of divine speech issuing in divine writingof, precisely, inscripturation
Tabernacle - Aaron's rod represents the delivering grace of God, both in the exodus events and in God's selection of the priests as mediators; the manna represents God's sustaining grace; and the tablets of the Ten Commandments summarize the terms of the relationship
Joy (2) - The clear declaration of His Commandments is to effect the purpose of their partaking in His own joy of obedience, and to secure the permanence and completeness of their own glad following of the Divine will (John 15:11)
Moses - ), and that nothing is to be enforced according to the letter which killeth (2 Corinthians 3:5), the regulative canon being that the external statutes, ‘the Commandments in ordinances’ (Ephesians 2:15), are merely the shadow of things to come, while the body is Christ’s (Colossians 2:17)-whence it follows that the outward regulations of the Law are to be applied in a typological (or allegorical) way
Knowledge - Those who keep the Commandments of God come to a growing knowledge (1 John 2:3), and only those in whom love is abiding really possess this Divine knowledge (1 John 4:7)
Church Government - Christ left a small body of disciples under the direction of the apostles, with a charge to convert the world; but He gave nothing which can be called either a constitution or a code, and He explained the Commandments as giving principles, not rules
Numbers, Book of - The book closes with instruction as to the inheritance of daughters, so that the position belonging to each tribe should remain as allotted; ending with the words, "These are the Commandments and the judgements which the Lord commanded by the hand of Moses unto the children of Israel in the plains of Moab by Jordan near Jericho
Divination - In the Didache among other Commandments are these, ‘thou shalt not practise magic, thou shalt not use enchantments,’ οὐ μαγεύσεις, οὐ φαρμακεύσεις (ii
Independents - this well-meaning reformer, perceiving the defects that reigned in the discipline of Brown, and in the spirit and temper of his followers, employed his zeal and diligence in correcting them, and in new-modelling the society in such a manner, as to render it less odious to his adversaries, and less liable to the just censure of those true Christians who look upon charity as the end of the Commandments
Sanctify - ” A related meaning of the word appears in the Ten Commandments: “Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy” ( Parables - Daniel 4:1 proclaims the divine sovereignty over the secular kingdoms, and the Ten Commandments require full obedience to God
Praise - ’...
Ignatius also writes to the Philadelphians (ad Philippians 1) of their bishop as ‘attuned in harmony with the Commandments, as a lyre with its strings
John, the Epistles of - Confession and consequent forgiveness of sins, through Christ's propitiation for the world and advocacy for believers, are a necessary preliminary; a further step is positive keeping God's Commandments, the sum of which is love as contrasted with hatred, the sum of disobedience
Sanctification, Sanctify - , 1 John 5:20 , setting forth union with Christ through the indwelling Spirit as the spring of a new, eternal life for the man, in the strength of which God’s Commandments are kept in love, sin and fear are cast out, and the world is overcome
Deuteronomy, the Book of - The second discourse begins with the Ten Commandments, the basis of the law, and develops and applies the first table; next declares special statutes as to:...
(1) religion,...
(2) administration of justice and public officers,...
(3) private and social duties
Matthew, the Gospel of - He stressed the importance of His Commandments in Matthew 5:19 ; emphasized the authoritative nature of His teachings by declaring: “But I say unto you” (Matthew 5:22 ,Matthew 5:22,5:28 ,Matthew 5:28,5:32 ,Matthew 5:32,5:39 ,Matthew 5:39,5:44 ); and was recognized by the crowds as a Teacher with authority (Matthew 7:28-29 )
Testimony - ...
Concerning God's special revelation of himself to Old Testament Israel, the Ten Commandments are called the Testimony (Exodus 31:8 ); as the revelation of God's legislation, they testify to his person and work and to his expectations for Israel
Commission - On all the members of His Church it is incumbent to be diligent scholars in the school of Christ, learning obedience to His Commandments from those appointed as teachers
Common Life - He speaks of least Commandments, the breaking of which does not exclude from the kingdom (Matthew 5:19); and which He accounts the greater and which the less is manifested by His saying—‘First be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift’ (Matthew 5:24)
Sanballat - But why multiply many words about this plain matter? It is all contained long ago in the two old Commandments-to love our neighbour as ourselves, and to love God with all our mind, and heart, and strength, and will
Inspiration - Thus, Paul (1 Corinthians 14:37), "if any man think himself a prophet, let him acknowledge that the things that I write unto you are the Commandments of the Lord
Sin - Though there are numerous echoes of the older conception that the keeping of God’s Commandments is one side of a bargain which conditions men’s happiness and prosperity ( Deuteronomy 4:24 ; Deuteronomy 4:40 , Deuteronomy 6:15 ), yet we observe a lofty range of thought bringing in its train truer ideas of sin and guilt
Man (2) - The best way for them to show that they were His friends was by keeping His Commandments (John 15:14)
Games - Like the Grecian combatants, the Christian must "abstain from fleshly lusts," and "walk in all the statutes and Commandments of the Lord, blameless
Passover (i.) - Blessed art Thou, Jehovah our God, King of the Universe, who hast chosen us from among all people, and exalted us from among all languages, sanctified us with Thy Commandments
Bible - ...
The Bible, with its old law of the Ten Commandments, gives the most perfect manifestation of the divine character and requirements from man, and this at a time when the human legislator, Moses, had just come from a nation sunk in the most debasing pollution and superstition
Number - There are ten sephiroth or primary emanations from God, one original sephira , and three derivative triads; there are twelve channels of Divine grace; 613 Commandments, etc
War, Holy War - Ahab grew up in a society where the Ten Commandments were an important standard
Matthew, Theology of - And this baptism was the prelude to a life of obedience to all the Commandments of Jesus (28:20), surely an allusion in part to the Sermon on the Mount
Jeremiah, Theology of - Back of the indictments of adultery (lusty stallions, each neighing for another man's wife, 5:8; 3:2-3; 7:9), stealing, and murder (7:9), lie the Ten Commandments
Justification - 7); it is maintained by performance of good works, keeping the Commandments of God and the Church, resulting in an increase of justification (ch
Word - The Ten Commandments were called "the word of the covenant" (Exodus 34:27-28 ); all of God's revelation to Moses was called "the words [8] of the law" (Deuteronomy 28:58 ; 31:24 ; Joshua 8:34 ; 2 Kings 22:13 ), "word of the Lord" (2 Chronicles 34:21 ), and "word of truth" (Psalm 119:43 )
Worship - baptised]'>[3] person, and for all others in every place, that we may be counted worthy, now that we have learned the truth, by our works also to be found good citizens and keepers of the Commandments, so that we may be saved with an everlasting salvation
Children - He has left us no Commandments, no declarations, not even exhortations on the subject
Christian Life - The difference between Pauline morality and the morality of the Judaizers who were found all over the Greek-speaking world, lay in the fact that Gentile Christianity formed an independent ethic, while the ethic of the Jewish Christian ‘merely looked like an addition to the Commandments, an ennobling and purifying of the rule of the pious, law-abiding Jew’ (see Weizsäcker, ii
Doctrines - Further, it occurs in the Gospels only in those passages (Matthew 15:9, Mark 7:7) in which Jesus accuses the scribes of ‘teaching for doctrines the Commandments of men,’ and quotes against them the Septuagint rendering of Isaiah 29:13
Ebionism And Ebionites - Had any one else fulfilled the Commandments of the Law he would have been the Christ
John the Baptist - He again alludes to the words of our Saviour, "A new commandment," &c, as in 1 John 2:7 , and recommends love, which is manifested by observance of the Commandments
Wisdom of Solomon - 9 ‘knowing what is pleasing in thine eyes, and straight [3] in thy Commandments,’ v
Righteous, Righteousness - Matthew (Matthew 22:40), Christ adds the words, ‘on these two Commandments hang all the law and the prophets’ (words almost repeated in Matthew 7:12 and presupposed in Galatians 5:14 and Romans 13:8)
Sanctify, Sanctification - The young ruler could be perfect if he would keep the Commandments (Matthew 19:21), and the lawyer could inherit eternal life in the same way (Luke 10:28)
Righteousness - ‘this is the book of the Commandments of God, and the law that endureth for ever; all they that hold it fast are to live, but such as leave it shall die’), but the present writer translates as above in order to suggest St
Sin - 4:27: “And if any one of the common people sin through ignorance, while he doeth somewhat against any of the Commandments of the Lord concerning things which ought not to be done, and be guilty
Papyri And Ostraca - ...
Beginning then with Biblical MSS, and first of all MSS of the Hebrew Bible, we have in the Nash Papyrus a very ancient copy of the Ten Commandments
Education in Bible Times - Moses summarized the basic components of this covenant obedience in his farewell address to the Israelites as loving God, walking in his ways, and keeping his Commandments, statutes, and ordinances (Deuteronomy 30:16 )
Hell - And there shall the Most High say to the nations that are raised from the dead, See ye and understand whom ye have denied, or whom ye have not served, or whose Commandments ye have despised
Justification (2) - ’ The conception is further carried out into detail in that the Law is regarded atomically as the sum of the Commandments it contains (cf
Inspiration - Immediately upon giving utterance to this saying He Himself proceeds to repeal Commandments of the Law, substituting for them His own better principles, and thus showing that what He had in view was not Scripture as Scripture
Oracle - The psalmist David enumerates their excellent properties under various epithets; such as the law of the Lord, his testimony, his statutes, his Commandments, his judgments, &c
Jesus Christ - " Then followed the scribes' accusation of the woman from the law, but He who wrote on stone that law of Commandments now writes with His finger on the ground (the law of mercy), showing the power of silence to shame the petulant into self recollection, the censorious into self condemnation
Hell - And there shall the Most High say to the nations that are raised from the dead, See ye and understand whom ye have denied, or whom ye have not served, or whose Commandments ye have despised
Biblical Theology - This instruction, epitomized by the Decalogue or Ten Commandments, does not set aside, but rather, gives a vehicle for living within the Abrahamic covenant
Religion (2) - Keeping the Commandments is consummated in following Him (Mark 10:21), i
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - The Lord told Moses that he would be present in the space above the lid of the ark between the two cherubim, and from this place he would give Moses Commandments for Israel (v
Sin - To be forgetful of God in one’s thoughts, to be neglectful of piety and worship towards God, is as much sin as to disregard and defy God’s Commandments
Lord's Day - ) points out that no one belonging to the circle of Jewish Christians would think of relaxing one of Moses’ Commandments; and, even if already in apostolic times Sunday came to be observed, none could think that the Sabbath commandment would be fulfilled through a Sabbath-like observance of another day instead of the observance of the Sabbath itself
Barnabas, Epistle of - Only two Commandments are quoted from the Decalogue-the third and the seventh
Pentecost - Every evening at prayers in the synagogue the counting duly takes place, with the addition of the formula: ‘Blessed art Thou, O Lord, King of the universe, who hast sanctified us by Thy Commandments, and hast given us command concerning the counting of the Omer
Pentecost - Every evening at prayers in the synagogue the counting duly takes place, with the addition of the formula: ‘Blessed art Thou, O Lord, King of the universe, who hast sanctified us by Thy Commandments, and hast given us command concerning the counting of the Omer
Text, Versions, And Languages of ot - ; and it contains the Ten Commandments and Deuteronomy 6:4 f
Elijah - He hurls back on the king himself the charge of being, like another Achan, the troubler of Israel; "I have not, troubled Israel, but thou and thy father's house, in that ye have spoken the Commandments of Jehovah, and thou hast followed Baalim
Mental Characteristics - In His hands all the old negative Commandments were transformed into positive ideals; and all were summed up in the one great ideal of loving God and one’s neighbour (Mark 12:29-31), which was i
Apocrypha - The way to attain wisdom is to keep the Law—...
‘If thou desire wisdom, keep the Commandments,...
And the Lord shall give her unto thee freely’ (Sirach 1:26)
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - It was this, we are told (Matthew 3:15), that led Him to undergo the ceremony of baptism at the hands of John, as it was this also that on more than one occasion made Him quote the great spiritual Commandments of the Law as containing within themselves the secret of eternal life
Tatianus - "We reject everything," he says, "which rests upon human opinion; we obey the Commandments of God and follow the law of the Father of immortality
Gnosticism - Then came the theory that this subordinate being was the God of the Jews to which nation he had issued many Commandments that were not good though overruled by the Supreme so as to carry out His ends
John, Gospel of (Critical) - For I take no pleasure, as do the many, in those who have so very much to say, but in those who teach the truth: nor in those who relate Commandments foreign (to the mind of the Lord), but in those (who record) such as were given to the faith by the Lord, and found on the truth itself
Law (2) - Paul quotes one of the Ten Commandments (Romans 7:7)
Hermas, Known as the Shepherd - >From this shepherd he receives, for his instruction and that of the church, the "Commandments," which form the second, and the "Similitudes," which form the third part of the work
Confession - To own and profess the truths of Christ, and to obey his Commandments, in spite of opposition and danger from enemies,...
Matthew 10:32