What does Coins mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
κέρματα small pieces of money 1
מֵ֝אַלְפֵ֗י a thousand. / a thousand 1
כָּֽסֶף silver 1

Definitions Related to Coins

H505


   1 a thousand.
      1a as numeral.
   2 a thousand, company.
      2a as a company of men under one leader, troops.
      

H3701


   1 silver, money.
      1a silver.
         1a1 as metal.
         1a2 as ornament.
         1a3 as colour.
      1b money, shekels, talents.
      

G2772


   1 small pieces of money, small coin, change, money.
   

Frequency of Coins (original languages)

Frequency of Coins (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Coins
COINS . See Money.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Coins
COINS.—See Money.
Webster's Dictionary - Maundy Coins
Alt. of money
Holman Bible Dictionary - Coins
are stamped metal disks issued by a government for trade and valuation. Old Testament: Genesis 23:16 ; Exodus 30:13 ; 2 Samuel 12:30 . New Testament: Matthew 20:2 ; Matthew 22:21 ; Mark 12:42 .
Before money was invented, a man might trade or swap with a neighbor something he owned for something he wanted. Because of their intrinsic value and mobility, cattle were very popular in the barter system. Such trading took place also on a grand scale. When Hiram of Tyre agreed to furnish building materials for the Temple, Solomon pledged large annual payments in wheat and olive oil (1 Kings 5:11 ). Eventually the discovery and use of metals for ornaments, implements, and weapons led to their dominating the primitive exchanges. Silver, gold, and copper in various forms, such as bars, bracelets, and the like represented wealth in addition to land, cattle, and slaves. The silver shekel, weighing about four tenths of an ounce, became the standard measure. When Abraham bought the cave of Machpelah, he “weighed out four hundred shekels of silver” (Genesis 23:16 ). At that time the shekel was a weight rather than a coin.
The talent was another weight frequently associated in the Old Testament with gold and silver. The crown that David took from the king of the Ammonites weighed one talent (2 Samuel 12:30 ). After Judah's defeat at Megiddo, the victorious pharaoh appointed a puppet king and required the Jews to pay Egypt a heavy tribute in silver and gold (2 Kings 23:33 ). Although its weight varied slightly from one country to another, the talent was approximately 75 pounds.
Determining the weight and purity of any metal was a tedious business and sometimes subject to dishonesty. To establish some standards, the first coins were minted about the same time around 650 B.C. both in Greece and in Lydia of Asia Minor. Excavations in Shechem have uncovered a Greek silver coin dating after 600 B.C., about the time the Jews were returning from Babylon to Judah. The first mention of money in the Bible appears in Ezra 2:69 , describing funds collected for rebuilding the Temple. The King James Version lists among other resources 61,000 “drams of gold,” but the RSV has “darics of gold,” (NAS, NIV, “drachmas ”) referring to a Persian gold coin. Years later, about 326 B.C., after Alexander overran the Persian Empire, Greek coinage was circulated widely in Palestine, according to archaeological research.
The Maccabean Revolt began in 167 B.C. Twenty-four years later (123 B.C.), Judea became an independent state, and about 110 B.C. the reigning high priest minted in bronze the first real Jewish coins. Only dominant political entities could produce silver coins. In accord with the Second Commandment, Jewish coins did not bear the image of any ruler, but they used symbols such as a wreath, a cornucopia, or the seven-branched lampstand of the Temple. Such symbols continued to be used by Herod and other appointed Jewish rulers after Palestine submitted to Roman domination. Many small copper coins from this early New Testament period have been discovered.
The coin most often mentioned in the Greek New Testament is the denarion , translated “penny” in the KJV and “denarius” in the RSV, NAS, NIV. It was a silver coin usually minted in Rome. It carried on one side the image of the emperor (Matthew 22:21 ), and on the reverse might be some propaganda symbol. Of course, the “penny” translation was an attempt to equate the value of an ancient coin with a familiar one of the King James era. Its value in New Testament times can be more accurately assessed by knowing the labor that the ancient coin could buy. The denarius was the daily pay for Roman soldiers and the wage of a day laborer in Palestine (Matthew 20:21 ).
Another reference to silver money occurs in Matthew 26:15 in the agreement between the high priest and Judas for betraying Jesus. Although the original text mentions only “silver” with no specific coin, scholars feel that the figure “thirty” recalls the compensation required by law for killing a slave by accident ( Exodus 21:32 ). So, Judas' pay could have been thirty silver shekels. By this time the shekel had developed from only a measure of weight to a specific coin weighing a little less than half an ounce. It is possible also that the “large money” (KJV) paid to the soldiers guarding Jesus' tomb (Matthew 28:12 ) referred to large silver coins or shekels.
A third coin mentioned in the New Testament was the one the poor widow put into the Temple treasury as Jesus watched (Mark 12:42 ). The KJV translates the original words as “two mites, which make a farthing” while the RSV reads “two copper coins, which made a penny” (NIV: “two very small copper coins, worth only a fraction of a penny.” The first noun describes the smallest Greek copper coin, ( lepta ), and the second noun translates the Greek (quadrans ) for the smallest Roman copper coin. In either case, they were the smallest coins available, but Jesus said they were greater in proportion than the other donations.
Some readers might wonder why Jesus found “changers of money sitting” in the Temple (John 2:14 ). Every male Jew was required to pay an annual head tax of half shekel to the Temple treasury (Exodus 30:13 ). At the Feast of the Passover pilgrims would come from various countries. Whatever currency they might bring, it had to be exchanged for coins that were acceptable by Jewish standards, that is, bearing no symbols violating the Second Commandment. Of course a small fee was paid to the changer.
From two parables told by Jesus we get the impression that the word “talent” had come in New Testament times to represent a large sum of money instead of just a measure of weight. In Matthew 18:24 , He told of a man who owed a certain king “ten thousand talents.” A few chapters later He described a wealthy man assigning different responsibilities to three servants. At the reckoning time he rebuked the one who had merely hidden his talent by saying that at least he could have deposited the money to let it earn interest (Matthew 25:27 ). Such a talent had been estimated to have a current value of about one thousand dollars.
William J. Fallis
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Coins
In the days before people used money in buying and selling, they usually paid for goods by exchanging other goods, such as farm produce, animals or jewellery. Later they found it more convenient to use precious metals, particularly silver, which they usually measured by weight.
Among the Israelites, the common unit of silver was the shekel, which was about sixteen grams (Genesis 23:16; Leviticus 5:15; 1 Kings 10:29; Jeremiah 32:9). Larger amounts were measured by the talent, which was about fifty kilograms (1 Kings 9:14; 1 Kings 16:24; 1 Kings 20:39). Merchants were sometimes dishonest and used extra heavy weights when weighing the buyer’s money (Leviticus 19:36; Proverbs 11:1; Amos 8:5; Micah 6:11; see WEIGHTS).
When coin money came into use, the practice of weighing money gradually died out (Ezra 2:69; Ezra 8:27). Some of the old names for weights now became names for coins (e.g. see SHEKEL). Coins were of gold, silver or copper, depending on their value (Matthew 10:9).
Money of various kinds was in use in Palestine during the New Testament era. There was official Roman money, local Jewish money, and old Greek money from the days of the former Greek Empire. The Jewish temple authorities accepted only certain kinds of money, which resulted in the practice of money-changers setting up business in the temple (Matthew 21:12).
It is not possible to give accurate present-day equivalents of the values of ancient coins, but New Testament references give an indication of the values of some coins in the first century. For example, the coin mentioned in Jesus’ story of the hired vineyard-workers, the Roman denarius, represented the wages of a labourer for one day (Matthew 20:2). The denarius is mentioned also in Matthew 22:19, Luke 10:35 and Revelation 6:6. It was the approximate equivalent of the Greek drachma (mentioned in Luke 15:8). The smallest coin in use was the Jewish lepton (referred to in the story of the poor widow; Mark 12:41-44), and more than a hundred of these were needed to equal one denarius.
The Greek stater (referred to in Matthew 17:27) was the approximate equal of the Jewish shekel, which paid the temple tax for two people (Exodus 30:13; Matthew 17:24-27). Originally the stater was a two-drachma coin, but when this coin went out of use, the name stater was given to the four-drachma coin.
One hundred drachmas (or a hundred denarii) was equal to one mina, the gold coin that the nobleman in Jesus’ parable entrusted to each of his ten servants (Luke 19:13). Sixty minas equalled one talent. The talent was not a coin, but a unit used in counting large amounts of money. It is referred to in two other parables of Jesus (Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15; see TALENT).

Sentence search

Shroffage - ) The examination of Coins, and the separation of the good from the debased. ) A money dealer's commission; also, more commonly, the examination of Coins, and the separation of the good from the debased
Farthing - See Coins
Mite - See Coins
Penny - See Coins
Coins - Coins
Coins - COINS
Pound - See Coins ; Weights and Measures
Obolary - ) Possessing only small Coins; impoverished
Diesinker - ) An engraver of dies for stamping Coins, medals, etc
Mintman - ) One skilled in coining, or in Coins; a coiner
Medalurgy - ) The art of making and striking medals and Coins
Drachma - (drach' ma) The Greek term used to refer to the silver Coins (Luke 15:8-9 ). See Coins ; Economic Life
Verbarian - ) One who Coins words
Mill-Sixpence - ) A milled sixpence; - the sixpence being one of the first English Coins milled (1561)
Rouleau - ) A little roll; a roll of Coins put up in paper, or something resembling such a roll
Joss Paper - Gold and silver paper burned by the Chinese, in the form of Coins or ingots, in worship and at funerals
Rose-Rial - ) A name of several English gold Coins struck in different reigns and having having different values; a rose noble
Sigla - , in ancient manuscripts, or on Coins, medals, etc
Schilling - ) Any one of several small German and Dutch Coins, worth from about one and a half cents to about five cents
Pyx - ) To test as to weight and fineness, as the Coins deposited in the pyx. ) A box used in the British mint as a place of deposit for certain sample Coins taken for a trial of the weight and fineness of metal before it is sent from the mint
Silver - In employing it as a medium of trade, the ancient Hebrews weighed it out, instead of having Coins. In the times of the New Testament there were Coins
Batta - ) Rate of exchange; also, the discount on uncurrent Coins
Joseph Eckhel - As a Jesuit he taught poetry and rhetoric in colleges of his Society, and also turned his attention to numismatics; and on the suppression of the Society of Jesus he became director of the imperial cabinet of ancient Coins at Vienna. By his "Doctrina nummorum veterum" (Science of Ancient Coins), published in eight volumes (1792-1798), he became the founder of the scientific numismatics of classical antiquity
Eckhel, Joseph Hilarius - As a Jesuit he taught poetry and rhetoric in colleges of his Society, and also turned his attention to numismatics; and on the suppression of the Society of Jesus he became director of the imperial cabinet of ancient Coins at Vienna. By his "Doctrina nummorum veterum" (Science of Ancient Coins), published in eight volumes (1792-1798), he became the founder of the scientific numismatics of classical antiquity
Shekel - See Coins ; Weights and Measures
Anaglyptography - ) The art of copying works in relief, or of engraving as to give the subject an embossed or raised appearance; - used in representing Coins, bas-reliefs, etc
Money - But these were not properly Coins, which are pieces of metal authoritatively issued, and bearing a stamp. As long as the Jews, after the Exile, lived under Persian rule, they used Persian Coins. These gave place to Greek Coins when Palestine came under the dominion of the Greeks (B. 331), the Coins consisting of gold, silver, and copper pieces. ), and the silver Coins tetradrachms and drachms
Money-Maker - ) One who Coins or prints money; also, a counterfeiter of money
Ruddock - ) A piece of gold money; - probably because the gold of Coins was often reddened by copper alloy
Crackaloo - A kind of gambling game consisting in pitching Coins to or towards the ceiling of a room so that they shall fall as near as possible to a certain crack in the floor
Macaranga Gum - It is used in taking impressions of Coins, medallions, etc
Patina - ) The color or incrustation which age gives to works of art; especially, the green rust which covers ancient bronzes, Coins, and medals
Antiquary - ) One devoted to the study of ancient times through their relics, as inscriptions, monuments, remains of ancient habitations, statues, Coins, manuscripts, etc
Farthing - Two different Roman brass Coins are translated by this word: one of these, the assarion, Matthew 10:29 Luke 12:6 , was worth less than a cent; the other, the kodrantes, Matthew 5:26 , was probably nearly four mills
Abrasion - ) The act of abrading, wearing, or rubbing off; the wearing away by friction; as, the abrasion of Coins
Bimetallic - ) Of or relating to, or using, a double metallic standard (as gold and silver) for a system of Coins or currency
Effigy - ) The image, likeness, or representation of a person, whether a full figure, or a part; an imitative figure; - commonly applied to sculptured likenesses, as those on monuments, or to those of the heads of princes on Coins and medals, sometimes applied to portraits
Free Coinage - In the fullest sense, the conversion of bullion (of any specified metal) into legal-tender Coins for any person who chooses to bring it to the mint; in a modified sense, such coinage when done at a fixed charge proportionate to the cost of the operation
Rix-Dollar - ) A name given to several different silver Coins of Denmark, Holland, Sweden,, NOrway, etc
Pistole - ) The name of certain gold Coins of various values formerly coined in some countries of Europe
Money - Was anciently weighed, and did not at first exist in the form of Coins. Lastly they gave this metal, a certain weight, and a certain degree of alloy, to fix its value, and to save buyers and sellers the trouble of weighing and examining the Coins. The Coins were the shekel, and a half, a third, and a quarter of a shekel. The Jewish Coins bore an almond rod and a vase of manna, but no image of any man was allowed. Many Greek and Roman Coins circulated in Judea in New Testament times. There were also money brokers who had stands in the outer court of the temple, probably to exchange foreign for Jewish Coins; and to accommodate those who wished to pay the yearly half-shekel tax, Exodus 30:15 , or to present an offering
Clipping - ) The act of cutting off, curtailing, or diminishing; the practice of clipping the edges of Coins
Farthing - " Among the Roman copper Coins current then in Palestine there was none smaller than the as or assarich ; among the Greek imperial Coins there was the quadrans (quarter of the as) and lepton , "mite," one-eighth of an as and half of a quadrans
Coinage - ) Coins; the aggregate coin of a time or place
Piece of Money - See Coins
Farthing - Two names of Coins in the New Testament are rendered in the Authorized Version by this word:
Quadrans , ( Matthew 5:26 ; Mark 12:42 ) a coin current in the time of our Lord, equivalent to three-eights of a cent; ...
The assarion , equal to one cent and a half, ( Matthew 10:29 ; Luke 12:6 )
Florin - The name is given to different Coins in different countries
Fineness - ) The proportion of pure silver or gold in jewelry, bullion, or Coins
Dan-Jaan - Baal-jaan, a Phoenician god's name, is found upon Coins
Colony - Inscriptions and Coins of Augustus are still extant, with the designation "colonia" assigned to Philippi
Try'Phon - "The Coins bear his head as Antiochus and Trypho
Raining - ) Indentation; roughening; milling, as on edges of Coins
Raining - ) Indentation; roughening; milling, as on edges of Coins
Procurator - The procurator could issue death warrants (a privilege often withheld from subject peoples) and have Coins struck in his name
Worshipper, - The first occurrence of the term in connection with Ephesus is on Coins of the age of Nero, A
Fan-Tan - ) A Chinese gambling game in which Coins or other small objects are placed upon a table, usually under a cap, and the players bet as to what remainder will be left when the sum of the counters is divided by four
Coins - To establish some standards, the first Coins were minted about the same time around 650 B. the reigning high priest minted in bronze the first real Jewish Coins. Only dominant political entities could produce silver Coins. In accord with the Second Commandment, Jewish Coins did not bear the image of any ruler, but they used symbols such as a wreath, a cornucopia, or the seven-branched lampstand of the Temple. Many small copper Coins from this early New Testament period have been discovered. It is possible also that the “large money” (KJV) paid to the soldiers guarding Jesus' tomb (Matthew 28:12 ) referred to large silver Coins or shekels. The KJV translates the original words as “two mites, which make a farthing” while the RSV reads “two copper Coins, which made a penny” (NIV: “two very small copper Coins, worth only a fraction of a penny. In either case, they were the smallest Coins available, but Jesus said they were greater in proportion than the other donations. Whatever currency they might bring, it had to be exchanged for Coins that were acceptable by Jewish standards, that is, bearing no symbols violating the Second Commandment
Money - The Assyrians, Babylonians, and Egyptians had no Coins until about b. The study of ancient coined money is interesting, showing the rise of the arts and their fall during the dark ages of priestcraft, from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries; the Coins of 400 years before Christ being superb, while those a thousand years after Christ are hardly discernible. The early Coins show, not only the likenesses of kings and emperors, but also many of the most important events of their reigns
Omega, Alpha And - The letters are often found on early Coins, rings, paintings in catacombs, in frescoes of ancient churches, and on corner-stones to designate Christ
Alpha And Omega - The letters are often found on early Coins, rings, paintings in catacombs, in frescoes of ancient churches, and on corner-stones to designate Christ
Collector - ; as, a collector of Coins
Shekel - (See also Coins; WEIGHTS
Coins - Some of the old names for weights now became names for Coins (e. Coins were of gold, silver or copper, depending on their value (Matthew 10:9). ...
It is not possible to give accurate present-day equivalents of the values of ancient Coins, but New Testament references give an indication of the values of some Coins in the first century
Lycia - Fellows brought to the British Museum interesting specimens of its Coins and ancient architecture
Dodanim - part of the Mediterranean; in Greek meaning "island of roses;" its Coins are stamped with a rose
Caster And Pollux - This accords with the Alexandrian vessel that Paul sailed in (Acts 28:11), having as the figure head or painting on the bow these deities, as they may be seen on Coins of Rhegium (where the ship touched); two youths on horseback, with conical caps, and stars above their heads
Jingle - ) To cause to give a sharp metallic sound as a little bell, or as Coins shaken together; to tinkle
Silver - Coins were first minted after 700 B. See Coins ; Gold ; Money
Talent - (See also Coins; WEIGHTS
Rhegium - By curious coincidence the figures on its extant Coins are the "twin brothers, Castor and Pollux," from whom Paul's ship was named
Anchor - The anchors used by the ancients were in shape somewhat like the modern ones, as may be seen on some of the Coins
Money - 140; and it is now generally agreed that the oldest Jewish silver Coins belong to this period. The Coins mentioned by the evangelists, and first those of silver, are the following: The stater , ( Matthew 17:24-27 ) called piece of money , was a Roman coin equal to four drachmas. The denarius , or Roman penny, as well as the Greek drachma , then of about the same weight, are spoken of as current Coins. Of copper Coins the farthing and its half, the mite , are spoken of, and these probably formed the chief native currency
Money (2) - —We propose to treat first of money in general as referred to in the Gospels, and afterwards of the definite sums or Coins which are there named. This word originally means brass, hence Coins of brass (or copper), and, as copper money circulated largely among the common people, money in general. κέρμα (John 2:15) comes from a verb meaning to cut, and means originally change or small Coins. This verse may be taken as evidence that gold as well as silver and copper Coins circulated in Palestine in the time of our Lord, although no gold coin is mentioned in the Gospels. But there were also Coins of larger size, bearing Greek names. 72), the heavier royal tetradrachms would tend to be driven out of circulation by the lighter Phœnician Coins, which, besides, as corresponding exactly to the Hebrew shekel, were in special demand in Palestine for religious purposes (see below, under ‘Didrachm’). ...
A vexed question, which cannot be held to be yet decided, is whether prior to the time of the first Jewish revolt any silver Coins had been produced in Palestine itself. Until lately it has been usual for numismatologists to assign to Simon Meccabaeus certain silver shekels and half-shekels struck on the Phœnician standard, and bearing the inscription in Hebrew, ‘Jerusalem the Holy’ (Madden, Coins of the Jews, 65–71; Head, Hist. 379–383) and others for dating these Coins rather in the time of the revolt under Nero; and the opinion seems to he making headway that at the time of our Lord, and previously, the Jews were dependent for their silver money upon foreign sources. There were the copper Coins of the Hasmonaean princes, those of the various Herods, and those which had been struck since a. Schürer holds that the Romans imposed their monetary standard more rigorously in Palestine than elsewhere, and that even the Herodian Coins followed the Roman system (HJP
Before proceeding to speak in detail of the Coins named in the Gospels, it will be well to give in tabular form the main elements of the two systems, the Greek and the Roman, which obtained concurrently in Palestine at the time of our Lord. ’ This identification enables us to assign values to those Coins which follow the Greek system. This method of ascertaining the value of the silver Coins of the Gospels does justice to the fact that, in the Roman Empire then, as in Britain now, the value of silver Coins was legally defined in terms of the gold standard. Definite sums of money and Coins mentioned in the gospels. —These may most conveniently be treated of under three heads: money of account, silver Coins, and copper Coins. ) Silver Coins. It was issued by the Imperial authority, even the Roman Senate having only the right to mint copper Coins, and could thus must appropriately be spoken of as ‘that which is Caesar’s. —This is the name of the unit of the Greek system of silver coinage, and, as such, might be applied to a great variety of Coins front different mints and of different standards. Few Coins of this denomination were issued from the Phœnician cities or from Antioch, and the city of Caesarea in Cappadocia had only recently begun to coin drachms on the Phœnician standard (of 55 grains) for use in the provinces of Syria and Cappadocia (Mommsen, op. Thus, while it is not impossible that the Coins in question may have been drachms of the Phœnician standard, they are with greater probability to be identified with the ‘Attic drachms’* Kuyunjik - Recent excavations have revealed the library of Asurbanipal and various ancient sculptures and Coins
Coin - ) To make of a definite fineness, and convert into Coins, as a mass of metal; to mint; to manufacture; as, to coin silver dollars; to coin a medal
Ninive - Recent excavations have revealed the library of Asurbanipal and various ancient sculptures and Coins
Tolerance - ) The amount which Coins, either singly or in lots, are legally allowed to vary above or below the standard of weight or fineness
Chink - ) To cause to make a sharp metallic sound, as Coins, small pieces of metal, etc
Money - (Concerning the kinds of money in use in Bible times see Coins
Crown - There were ancient Coins called "crowns
Antiquity - Antiquities comprehend all the remains of ancient times all the monuments, Coins, inscriptions, edifices, history and fragments of literature, offices, habiliments, weapons, manners, ceremonies in short, whatever respects any of the ancient nations of the earth
Money - Money in the Persian period: introduction of Coins . , but it is very improbable that any ‘coins’ reached Palestine before the fall of the Jewish State in b. The first actual Coins to reach Jerusalem were more probably those of Darius Hystaspis (b. 522 485), who struck two Coins, the daric in gold, and the siglos or siktos (from sheket ) in silver. 421) for retaining the older rendering in the sense, not of Coins, but of weights. There is, of course, no question of the Jewish community striking silver Coins of their own, this jealously guarded right being then, as always, ‘the touchstone of sovereignty. ’...
In this period, however, the wealthy commercial cities on the Phœnician seaboard Aradus, Sidon, Tyre, and others acquired the right of issuing silver Coins, which they naturally did on the native standard. These Coins have a special interest for the Bible student, from the fact that they are the numismatic representatives of ‘ the shekel of the sanctuary ,’ which is prescribed in the Priests’ Code as the monetary unit of the post-exilic community (see Leviticus 27:25 ‘all thy estimations shall be according to the shekel of the sanctuary’). 301 198) the Jews had at their command the Coins of the Ptolemaic dynasty, struck at Alexandria on the Phœnician standard, as well as those of the flourishing cities on the Mediterranean. 14, 15; Reinach, Jewish Coins , pl. ; and more fully in Madden’s Coins of the Jews the standard work on Jewish numismatics, 67 ff. Only two alternatives are possible regarding the date of these famous Coins. In this case the earliest Jewish Coins will be certain small bronze Coins struck by the above-mentioned Hyrcanus (b. ’ The title of ‘king’ first appears on bronze Coins of Alexander Jannæus ‘Jonathan the king’ who also first introduced a Greek, in addition to a Hebrew, legend. No silver Coins, it may be added, were struck by any of Simon’s successors, or even by the more powerful and wealthier Herod. Since the denarius was almost equal in weight to the Syrian-Attic drachm (§ 4) the silver unit throughout the Seleucid empire the two Coins were regarded as of equal value, and four denarii were in ordinary business the equivalent of a tetradrachm of Antioch. ...
In addition to these two imperial Coins, the system based on the Greek drachm was continued in the East, and both drachms and tetradrachms were issued from the imperial mint at Antioch. In our Lord’s day Tyre still continued to issue silver and bronze Coins, the former mainly tetradrachms or shekels on the old Phœnician standard (220 224 grs. shekel these Tyrian Coins were much in demand for the payment of the Temple tax of one half-shekel (see next §). Besides all these, the procurators issued small bronze Coins, probably the quadrans ( 1 /4 of an as), from their mint at Cæsarea, not to mention the numerous cities, such as Samaria-Sebaste, which had similar rights. ...
Passing to the copper Coins of the Gospels, we find three denominations in the original, the tepton , the kodrantes , and the assarion , rendered in Amer. There are great difficulties in the way of identifying these among the copper Coins that have come down to us (for details see Hastings’ DB Aretas - 85; the Roman Coins of Damascus end a. 40; inscriptions (at el-Hejra ) and Coins are dated in his 48th year (Cooke, l
Benvenuto Cellini - Among exquisite examples of his work are Coins executed for Paul III and Clement VII, an elaborate jeweled morse, or brooch, for a cope of the latter, and the intricately wrought golden salt-cellar of Francis I, now in the Vienna museum
Cellini, Benvenuto - Among exquisite examples of his work are Coins executed for Paul III and Clement VII, an elaborate jeweled morse, or brooch, for a cope of the latter, and the intricately wrought golden salt-cellar of Francis I, now in the Vienna museum
Moreh - "Morthia," on ancient Coins, a title of Shechem, preserves the name Moreh
Lost Coin, Parable of the - The coin lost was very small as Coins go (15 to 25 cents), but it meant much to the poor woman; hence her care in searching for it and joy at finding it
Lily - The ‘ lily work ’ ( 1 Kings 7:19 ; 1 Kings 7:22 ; 1 Kings 7:26 ) is likely to have been modelled after the lotus ( Nymphœa lotus ) itself: lotus-like flowers appear on some Jewish Coins
Banking - ...
Origins The first money was bits of metal; later Coins were struck. Many salesmen often displayed their goods on the ground, but these men always put their Coins on a table. Other banking terms and practices in the Bible include Coins, exchangers, increase or interest, extortion, creditor, and debtor
Banking - ...
Origins The first money was bits of metal; later Coins were struck. Many salesmen often displayed their goods on the ground, but these men always put their Coins on a table. Other banking terms and practices in the Bible include Coins, exchangers, increase or interest, extortion, creditor, and debtor
Horn - The "notable horn" of the "he goat" (Daniel 8:5) is Alexander the Great who on Coins is represented with horns. ) On Egyptian and Roman Coins, and in Assyrian sculptures, are figures of gods with horns, symbolical of power
Superscription - " On Roman Coins the emperor's name was inscribed, Matthew 22:20 ; Mark 12:16 ; Luke 20:24
Rhodes - The Coins bear on the obverse the head of Apollo as the sun (the proverb said the sun shone every day on Rhodes), on the reverse the rose from which Rhodes takes its name
Samaritan Pentateuch - The characters in which it is written, by being compared with ancient Coins, etc
Anti-Libanus - The Hebrew text never mentions Antilibanus; but uses the general name Libanus: and the Coins struck at Laodicea and Hierapolis, have the inscription, "cities of Libanus," though they belong rather to Antilibanus
Dragon - " For, to what could a king of Egypt be more properly compared than the crocodile? The same argument he draws from Isaiah 51:9 : "Art thou not he that hath cut Rahab, [1] and wounded the dragon?" Among the ancients the crocodile was the symbol of Egypt, and appears so on Roman Coins
Troas - For a time under the Seleucid kings of Syria, it gained its freedom, and began to strike its own Coins (examples exist from b
Latin - census, custodia, prœtorium, colonia, libertinus, centurio, legio ), or names of Roman Coins ( denarius, quadrans ), but the total number of such Latin words occurring is only about 25
Counterfeit - ) To imitate with a view to deceiving, by passing the copy for that which is original or genuine; to forge; as, to counterfeit the signature of another, Coins, notes, etc
Patara - But Patara had an early culture, its Coins date from b
Token - In coinage, tokens were Coins struck in the reign of Elizabeth in the cities of Bristol, Oxford and Worcester, and also by private persons, which were put into circulation, and upon being returned,the issuer gave the value of them in current money
Medals, Religious - Pieces of metal resembling Coins, blessed by the Church and used to increase devotion, to commemorate some religious event, to protect the wearer, or to serve as badges of pious societies
Town Clerk - An officer originally appointed to record the laws and decrees of the state, mid to read them in public; but in Asia Minor, under the Roman empire, authorized to preside over popular assemblies and submit questions to their vote, as inscriptions on marbles testify; in short, governors of single cities and districts, and named as such on the Coins; sometimes also entitled "chief priests"; a kind of state secretary
Chemosh - Depicted on Coins with sword, lance, and shield, and two torches at his side
Religious Medals - Pieces of metal resembling Coins, blessed by the Church and used to increase devotion, to commemorate some religious event, to protect the wearer, or to serve as badges of pious societies
Cross - ) The new standards were called by the name Labarum, and may be seen on the Coins of Constantine the Great and his nearer successors
Fillet - : (a) A strip of metal from which Coins are punched
Rear - Coins I place in the rear
Nebaioth - Coins are extant of the dynasty which ended A. of Palestine, is unknown to the Arab writers, yet it is on native Coins, it must therefore have been lost long before any Arab wrote on geography or history
Money - A variety of monetary systems are represented in the Bible, corresponding to the political powers that dominated the cultures represented there, from the darics named after the Persian monarch Darius (these are the first actual Coins mentioned in the Bible see 1 Chronicles 29:7 ; Ezra 8:27 ; Nehemiah 7:70-72 ) to the Coins of the Roman Empire that bore Caesar's image (Matthew 22:20-21 ). Unlike the coinage of the United States, which by law cannot bear the image of a living person, the Coins of the ancient world were more explicitly political, bearing the representation of the living monarch who sponsored the mint that produced the Coins. As Jesus affirms in Matthew 22 , Coins really belong to the person whose likeness appears on them, in contrast to God, who imprints his likeness (and hence his mark of ownership) on a living humanity (Genesis 1:27 ). ...
Although the word "money" appears frequently throughout some translations of the Old Testament, the first Coins were not produced in the ancient Near East until the seventh century b. "silver"), one must recognize that it is usually not Coins that are to be understood but refined, unminted silver. It was the term for the calibration of this weighing that gave the name of shekel [3] to the first Judean Coins whose size corresponded to a shekel weight (a little less than half an ounce). Hordes of Coins found in archaeological excavations echo the frequency with which money is described as buried in the Bible, for money is so vulnerable that there is little else one can do to protect it. Others may look with disdain upon a donation of a few copper Coins to the temple treasury, but it is not the market value of the widow's gift that Jesus finds important: "She put in everything—all she had to live on" (Mark 12:41-44 )
Magnentius, , Flavius Popilius, Emperor - His Coins, as Tillemont says (Hist
Harp - Amongst these are (1) the fact that in the Septuagint κιθάρα, or its equivalent κινύρα, is the almost invariable translation of כִּנּוֹר; (2) the evidence of Jewish Coins pointing to a decided similarity of כִּנּוֹר and κιθάρα (see F. Madden, Coins of the Jews2, 1885, pp. A picture which better illustrates the ordinary lyre is that of three Semitic captives guarded by an Assyrian warrior while they played; but perhaps the best illustration is that on the Jewish Coins mentioned above
Money Changers - Syrian silver Coins were the money of Jerusalem then, and worshipers used them to pay their Temple tax of a half shekel and to buy sacrifices for the altar
Compare - To set or bring things together in fact or in contemplation, and to examine the relations they bear to each other, with a view to ascertain their agreement or disagreement as, to compare two pieces of cloth, two tables, or Coins to compare reasons and arguments to compare pleasure with pain
Troas - Beautiful Coins of Troas are extant, the oldest bearing the head of Apollo Sminthius
Goat - " The one-horned goat is on Coins of Archclaus king of Macedon, and a pilaster of Persepolis
Levite - In Hebrews 7:11 the writer Coins a word to enable him to write of ‘the Levitical priesthood,’ as though the hallowing of the tribe were concentrated in ‘the order of Aaron’ (so Westcott, ad loc
Diana - Ancient Coins of Ephesus represent the shrine and statue of Diana, with a Greek inscription, "of the Ephesians
Piece of Silver - " ( Matthew 26:15 ; 17:3,5,6,9 ) It is difficult to ascertain what Coins are here intended
Money - ...
4: κέρμα (Strong's #2772 — Noun Neuter — kerma — ker'-mah ) primarily "a slice" (akin to keiro, "to cut short"), hence, "a small coin, change," is used in the plural in John 2:15 , "the changers' money," probably considerable heaps of small Coins
Aretas - , is known as ‘Aretas the Philhellene,’ this being the superscription of the earliest Nabataean Coins that are known. There are Damascene Coins with the figure of Tiberius down to a. ...
More Coins and inscriptions date from the time of Aretas IV
Aretas - Damascus had been a city of the Roman province, Syria; and we have Damascene Coins of Augustus and Tiberius, and afterward of Nero, etc
Change - ) Small money; the money by means of which the larger Coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due
Loan - See Borrow, Borrowing; Coins ; Ethics in the Bible; Jubilee, Year of; Justice ; Law; Poor, Widows, Orphans, Levites ; Sabbatical Year ; Slavery; Stranger ...
David Nelson Duke...
...
Mitylene - (Μιτυλήνη)...
Mitylene, or-according to the usual spelling in classical writings and on Coins-Mytilene, was the chief town in the island of Lesbos, lying on the S
King of Kings And Lord of Lords - The title ‘King of kings,’ assumed of old by the Babylonian monarchs and adopted by the Achaemenidae, is proved by Coins and inscriptions to have been laid claim to, about the beginning of the Christian era, by various other Oriental potentates, e
Forehead - However, Persian and Egyptian women often wear jewels and strings of Coins across the forehead
Crown - Other Coins bear the same name
Owl - " Αthene meridionalis on Coins of Athens: emblem of Minerva, common in Syria; grave, but not heavy
Diana - Ancient Coins of Ephesus represent the shrine and statue of Diana, with a Greek inscription, meaning "of the Ephesians," Acts 19:28,34,35
Marcia, Concubine of Commodus - The emperor's Coins displayed her figure in the garb of an Amazon, and he himself took the title Amazonius, and gave it to a month of the year
Dragon - So (Isaiah 51:9-10) the crocodile is the emblem of Egypt and its king on Coins of Augustus struck after the conquest of Egypt
Eagle - This bird was a national emblem on Persian and Roman standards, as it now is on United States' Coins
Macedonia - ...
This power was foretold by Daniel, Daniel 8:3-8 , under the symbol of a goat with one horn; and it is worthy of note that ancient Macedonian Coins still exist, bearing that national symbol
Tiberius ii., Emperor of Constantinople - 192, says that Tiberius substituted a cross on his Coins for a female figure, like Venus, which Justin introduced
Arabia - Damascene Coins of Tiberius indicate that the city was under direct Roman government till a. The fact that no Damascene Coins bearing the Emperor’s image occur in the reigns of Caligula and Claudius is in harmony with this theory (Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. From the fact that the city struck Coins with the heads of the Roman emperors, there follows doubtless its dependence on Rome and therewith its self-administration, but not its non-dependence on the Roman vassal-prince; such protectorates assumed shapes so various that these arrangements might well be compatible with each other
Fine - ) Having (such) a proportion of pure metal in its composition; as, Coins nine tenths fine
Pergamos - 3:63) was the prominent Pergamean idol (Martial); the Pergamenes on Coins are called "the principal "temple care-takers" (neokoroi ) of Asia," and their ritual is made by Pausanias a standard
Philadelphia - The region being of disintegrated lava was favourable to the vine; and the Coins bear the head of Bacchus
Thessalonica - Thessalonica was a free city, having no Roman garrison within its walls and maintaining the privilege of minting its own Coins
Bank - They changed Coins, but also took money on deposit, giving what would now seem very high interest (see articles ‘Money-Changers’ and ‘Usury’ in vols
Palm Tree - Figures of palm trees were used to ornament the Temple ( 1 Kings 6:1-38 ); at a later period they occur on Jewish Coins and in the sculpture of the ancient Jewish synagogues, notably in the recently excavated synagogue at Tell Hûm (Capernaum)
Trade And Commerce - Coins and bills. -As mediums of exchange Coins and bills were in universal use, and the system of banking had reached a very considerable development. The right of coining gold and silver in Rome was reserved to the Emperor, but the senate was authorized to issue copper and brass Coins, with the letters SC (= senatus consulto) stamped on them. The governors of senatorial provinces had the right to issue Coins, which after a. Settlements of Roman citizens outside Italy (coloniae) might, if the Imperial permission were granted, issue bronze Coins, a privilege which apparently was withdrawn about a. A number of cities and unions of cities (κοινά) in the Eastern provinces were allowed to issue Coins. Syrian Antioch and Caesarea in Cappadocia (now Kaisarieh) issued large numbers of silver Coins, and the cistophorus of republican times (cf. The senatorial Coins in the baser metals, above mentioned, were the brass sestertius (four asses), brass dupondius (two asses), the copper as, and the copper semis
Trade And Commerce - Coins and bills. -As mediums of exchange Coins and bills were in universal use, and the system of banking had reached a very considerable development. The right of coining gold and silver in Rome was reserved to the Emperor, but the senate was authorized to issue copper and brass Coins, with the letters SC (= senatus consulto) stamped on them. The governors of senatorial provinces had the right to issue Coins, which after a. Settlements of Roman citizens outside Italy (coloniae) might, if the Imperial permission were granted, issue bronze Coins, a privilege which apparently was withdrawn about a. A number of cities and unions of cities (κοινά) in the Eastern provinces were allowed to issue Coins. Syrian Antioch and Caesarea in Cappadocia (now Kaisarieh) issued large numbers of silver Coins, and the cistophorus of republican times (cf. The senatorial Coins in the baser metals, above mentioned, were the brass sestertius (four asses), brass dupondius (two asses), the copper as, and the copper semis. The discovery of various hoards of Roman Coins and articles in Northern Europe suggests that there was a trade in other commodities as well
Silver - ” Silver pieces (not Coins) were used as money: “Then Joseph commanded to fill their sacks with corn, and to restore every man’s money into his sack …” ( Gold - “Gold” even existed in the form of “coins” (Ezra 2:69)
Jovianus Flavius, Christian Emperor - The labarum again became their standard; and Jovian's Coins present, besides the ...
Olive - It is the characteristic tree of Judea on Roman Coins, Deuteronomy 8:8
Cyprus - ...
Coins and inscriptions confirm this (one on the lintel of a doorway with the name of the very officer referred to by Luke, confuting Beza's doubt)
Paphos - Excavations have proved that the Paphian shrine had the character of a Phcenician temple, with large open courts and several small chambers, and the same type of building is represented on many Coins
Isdigerdes i, King of Persia - ( Jezdedscherd, Yazdejirdus, Yezdegerdes ; Ἰσδιγέρδης and Ἰσδεγέρδης by the Greeks; in Armenian Yazgerd ; on his Coins, יזדכרתי , i
Persia - The use of minted Coins and the development of a money economy aided this identification with a larger world. The emperor's Coins were handy reminders of the power and privileges of being part of the empire
Weights And Measures - Herod the Great coined money with his name on it; and Herod Agrippa had some Coins; but after that the Coins in Palestine were Roman
Canaanites - The Phœnicians, much later, on their Coins called their land Canaan ; and two or three Greek writers testify that they called it Chna ’ (cf
Rhodes - Her Coins, with the Sun-god on the one side and the Rose on the other, are among the most beautiful in existence
Hair - The art was highly developed amongst Greek and Roman women, as may be seen from Coins, etc
Approve, Approved - " The word is used of Coins and metals in the Sept
Palm-Tree - Judea particularly is typified in several Coins of Vespasian by a desconsolate woman sitting under a palm-tree, with the inscription, JUDEA CAPTA
Change - Small Coins of money, which may be given for larger pieces
Number - That they did so in post-Babylonian times we have conclusive evidence in the Maccabaean Coins; and it is highly probable that this was the ease also in earlier times
Phoenicia - Greek and Phcenician characters sometimes appear together on Coins, while Latin was the language of government and law
Valentinianus (1) - 110–119, where is an exhaustive statement of all his legislation, together with notices of medals, Coins, etc
Rabbah - Its Coins bear the image of Astarte, and the word Heracleion from Hercules the idol which succeeded Moloch
Cross - That on which our Savior suffered, is represented on Coins and other monuments, to have been of the former kind
Shiloh (2) - ...
On the lintel over the doorway, between two wreaths of flowers, is carved a vessel shaped like a Roman amphora , so closely resembling the "pot of manna ," as found on Coins and in the ruins of the synagogue at Capernaum, that it doubtless formed part of the original building
Money - ...
Copper Coins of Herod are extant in abundance, as the "farthing" of the New Testament, a piece of brass or copper (chalkous ), with "king Herod" and an anchor; the reverse, two cornua copiae "horns of plenty," within which is a caduceus , Mercury's wand. Coins exist of the time of Judea's revolt from Rome, inscribed with "the liberty of Zion," a vine stalk, leaf, and tendril
Cry - To raise the price by proclamation as, to cry up certain Coins
Derbe - After changing hands more than once, it was ultimately added-as the inscriptions on Coins indicate-to the kingdom of Antiochus iv
Vine, Vineyard - The vine-leaf was a favourite design on Jewish Coins
Decapolis - The Coins of Gadara, Canatha, Pella, Dion, and Philadelphia use the Pompeian era
Tables of Measures Weights And Money in the Bible - ROMAN COPPER MONEY...
(New Testament period, Coins were:)...
1 lepton = 1 mite,...
about 1/8 ct
Troas - The names are found together on some Coins
Jachin And Boaz - Such free-standing pillars were a feature of Phœnician and other temples of Western Asia, the statements of Greek writers on this point being confirmed by representations on contemporary Coins
Money - Lastly, they gave this metal, by public authority, a certain mark, a certain weight, and a certain degree of alloy, to fix its value, and to save buyers and sellers the trouble of weighing and examining the Coins. The gold Coins were as follows; a shekel of gold was about fourteen and a half times the value of silver, that is, one pound seventeen shillings and five pence halfpenny
Hair - Light ornaments of metal were worn on the hair ( Isaiah 3:18 ): In modern times Coins of silver and gold are commonly worn; often a tiny bell is hung at the end of the tress
Zidon - While the oldest existing buildings date from the Middle Ages, there are many remains of great antiquity, traces of walls, hewn stones, pillars, Coins, and the reservoirs cut out of the rock
She'Chem - On Coins still extant it is called Flavia Neapolis
Water - It is a striking fact that in his review of the Levitical ordinances this writer never quotes the LXX phrase ὕδωρ ῥαντισμοῦ, ‘water of sprinkling,’ which occurs four times in Numbers 19, but Coins in its place the phrase αἷμα ῥαντισμοῦ, ‘blood of sprinkling’ (Hebrews 12:24)
Smyrna - ...
‘The crown of life’ (ὁ στέφανος τῆς ζωῆς) may have been suggested by one of the most familiar elements in the life of Smyrna, the athletic contests and the presentation of the garlands of victory; or it may be an allusion to the fact that the lovely city itself, on its mountain slope, was commonly likened to a garland, as some of its Coins prove (B
Hebrew Language - But the most decisive confirmation of this point is to be found in the ancient Hebrew Coins, which were struck before the captivity, and even previously to the revolt of the ten tribes
Arms - Neither remains of Hebrew Arms, nor representations of them in Scripture, or on vases, bronzes, mosaics, paintings, Coins, or jewels, have been preserved to us
Vine - The vine was Judaea's emblem on Maccabean Coins, and in the golden cluster over the porch of the second temple
Trajan - There are also many important inscriptions and Coins
Judas Iscariot - He followed, and, ere they could close the entrance, hurled the Coins after them into the Holy Place; then rushed away and hanged himself (Matthew 27:3-5 )
Lamb, Lamb of God - Jesus, the Lamb of God, entered the temple courts at the time for the Passover (2:13,23), made a whip out of cords, drove out the sheep and cattle, scattered the Coins of the money changers, and announced, "Destroy this temple, and I will raise it again in three days" (2:19)
Ships And Boats - In the time of Commodus a series of Coins with figures of Alexandrian corn-ships was struck to commemorate an exceptional importation of wheat from Alexandria at a time of scarcity. From the Coins and the dialogue together we get a very good idea of the ships of that time (2nd cent
Thyatira - ...
The native deities of Thyatira, as appears from inscriptions on Coins, were the male and female Tyrimnos and Boreitene, whom the Ionian settlers identified with Apollo and Artemis
Phoenice - "...
The oldest Phoenician inscribed Coins are from Tarsus
Quirinius - 2) says: ‘Now Quintilius Varus was at this time at Jerusalem, being sent to succeed Saturninus as president of Syria’; and this statement is verified by Coins of Antioch-in-Syria bearing his name with date
Samaritan Pentateuch - The Samaritan characters were used for ordinary purposes down to a late period; so the Maccabean Coins bear Samaritan inscriptions
Reccared - Reccared (the uniform spelling in Coins and inscriptions), younger son of LEOVIGILD by his first marriage
Political Conditions - With foreign policy he had nothing to do; and the right of coining was probably limited, the only known Herodian Coins being of copper. ]'>[4] Provinces; Madden, Coins of Jews; the Archœol
Sheba - In addition to the inscriptions, Coins have been found and the names of the kings whose monograms they bear have been determined
Cross - The cross to which our Saviour was fastened, and on which he died, was of the former kind; being thus represented by old monuments, Coins, and crosses
Authors of Articles - , Assistant Keeper of the Department of Coins and Medals in the British Museum, London
Shechem (1) - Vespasian named it Neapolis; Coins are extant with its name "Flavia Νeapolis "; now Nablus by corruption
Helena, Saint, Mother of Constantine the Great - The statement of Eusebius that Constantine paid his mother great honours, and caused her to be proclaimed Augusta to all the troops, and struck her image on gold Coins, is no doubt correct, but is unfortunately unaccompanied by dates (Vita Const. Silver and copper Coins are found with the name Flavia Helena Augusta , struck in her lifetime
Macedonia - A widespread religious symbol was the “Macedonian rider,” depicted on Coins of the Macedonian kings and on many tombstones
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - Letters of the Hebrew alphabet are first used to represent numbers on Coins minted in the Maccabean period (after 167 B
Priest, Christ as - Observing the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury, he praised the poor widow who put in two small Coins (Luke 21:1-4 )
Caracalla, the Nickname of m. Aurelius Severus Antoninus Bassianus - ); the abridgment, by the very late compiler Xiphilinus, of the 77th book of the contemporary historian Dion Cassius, with which the compiler seems to have incorporated fragments of other works of a like early date; the narrative written for Constantine by Lampridius Spartianus in the Historia Augusta ; laws, Coins, inscriptions (see Clinton), and especially a record in the Digest, bk i, tit
Pillar - The conical pillar standing in the court of the temple of Astarte, as represented on the Coins of Byblus, is an illustration of this higher conception
Emperor-Worship - being designated on his own Coins as Θεός Ἐπιφανής (‘the God who has appeared among men’). On Coins we find Rome and Augustus associated with Diana, Persephone, etc
Titus (Emperor) - ‘Coins’), Ithaca, N
Dead - Judea is represented on several Coins of Vespasian and Titus, as a solitary female in this very posture of sorrow and captivity, sitting upon the ground
Peraea - Indeed, the sympathy of Pompey was long remembered by them, as is attested by the numerous Coins which have been found impressed with his era
Pope - ...
The cardinal chamberlain has during the vacancy of the holy see, great authority; he Coins money with his own arms on it, lodges in the pope's apartments, and is attended by the body guards
Old Testament - (Psalm 40:7 ; Jeremiah 36:14 ; Ezekiel 2:9 ; Zechariah 5:1 ) The original character in which the text was expressed is that still preserved to us, with the exception of four letters, on the Maccabaean Coins, and having a strong affinity to the Samaritan character
Weights And Measures - (1) The relations of these weights, as usually: employed for the standard of weighing silver , and their absolute values, determined from the extant silver Coins, and confirmed from other sources, were as follows, in grains exactly and in avoirdupois weight approximately: (2) For gold a different shekel was used, probably of foreign introduction
Government - 105), and Alexander Jannæus uses the title on Coins (b
Asia Minor, Cities of - ...
The greatest city in Lydia, Sardis is remembered as the first municipality to mint Coins of silver and gold
Phoenicia, phNicians - ...
The Semitic name of the country was ‘ Canaan ’ ( Kinachchi and Kinachna in the el-Amarna tablets, and Chna on Phœnician Coins; cf
Trajanus, m. Ulpius - The ancient authorities for his reign are singularly meagre, and the dates, and even the order of many important events, have been determined only by the evidence of inscriptions and Coins
Sanhedrin - On Maccabaean Coins the Sanhedrin is called ḥeber hâ-yehûdîm, ‘representative assembly of the Jews’ (F. The name Synhedrion (Aramaized Sanhedrin), which denotes chiefly a court of justice, came into popular use under Ptolemaic rule; and, as its Hebrew equivalent, the name Ḥeber hâ-Yehûdîm appears on Hasmonaean Coins, which read: ‘Joḥannan the high priest, the head, and the Council (representative) of the Jews’ (Madden, op
Weights And Measures - ]'>[1] (talent, Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15-28) occur, but not as the names of weights; they are the designations of Coins (see Money)
Proverbs, Theology of - Whereupon he Coins his proverb: "A little sleep, a little slumber and poverty will come on you like a bandit" (vv
Ephesus - ]'>[4] ‘temple-sweeper’) of Artemis (Acts 19:35) is attested by inscriptions and Coins (W
Music - It was sometimes called שמינית , or "eight stringed," 1 Chronicles 15:21 ; Psalms 6:1 ; Psalms 12:1 ; although, as we may gather from the Coins or medals of the Maccabean age, there were some harps which were furnished with only three strings
Music And Musical Instruments - Jewish Coins of Maccabæan date furnish us with a close resemblance to the Greek kithara
Wages - It was not until the Persian period that Coins came into common use as currency
Constantinus i - Coins ), and probably by tacit consent the four restricted themselves pretty nearly to the limits which afterwards bounded the four great prefectures
Matthew, the Gospel of - This is because of Matthew's several references to Gentiles, a reference to Phoenicia and Syria, and the terms (in the Greek text) used for Coins (Matthew 17:24 ,Matthew 17:24,17:27 )
Gratianus, Emperor - The title appears indeed to some extent on Coins and inscriptions, but it is not easy to fix their date
Trade And Commerce - While it is clear that all silver in use must have come in by importation, the notices in the OT of transactions in which it would probably be employed are too scanty to permit of even a guess as to the amount in use; and though it is likely that (as in Eastern countries to this day) foreign Coins were largely in circulation, there is little authority for this supposition
Maccabees - The affairs of Syria growing ever more desperate under the succession of feeble kings, John ceased payment of the tribute which had been exacted by Antiochus, and established a brilliant court, issuing Coins as high priest and head of the Congregation of the Jews
Paul as a Student - Jerusalem stood alone, and Rome stood alone; but Tarsus engraved herself on her Coins as the Metropolis of the East, and her proud claim was not disputed
Dead Sea Scrolls - Evidence of a great fire and the presence of Roman arrowheads and Coins signal the destruction of the settlement by the Romans during the Jewish revolt in a
Sanhedrin (2) - (3) On Hasmonaean Coins הָבֶר ‘collegium,’ is associated with the reigning high priest, and presumably designates the Sanhedrin
Old Testament - The Maccabean Coins and the similar Samaritan character preserve for us the alphabetical characters in which the text was written, resembling those in use among the Phoenicians
Bethlehem - In the crowds which throng the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem at the Easter services, the women of Bethlehem, wearing a light veil descending on each side of the face, and closed across the bosom, with a low but handsome headdress composed of strings of silver Coins plaited in among the hair and hanging down below the chin as a sort of necklace,—are easily recognizable, and make a favourable impression
Palestine - It may be mentioned in passing that Coins of Chosroës are occasionally found in Palestine; and that of the early Arab domination many noteworthy buildings survive, chief of which is the glorious dome that occupies the site of the Hebrew Temple at Jerusalem
Caesarea Philippi - 146–147) that Philip built Panias, and called it Caesarea, in the reign of Tiberius, is rendered improbable by Coins which show that Caesarea had an era dating from b
Dates - This is made clear from the extant Syrian Coins of these years, which bear the heads of the Roman Emperors Tiberius and Nero and do not allude to subject rulers
Noah - A medal of Apamea, a pagan monument, in Septimius Severus' reign represented the current tradition namely, a floating ark, two persons within, two going out of it; a bird is on the ark, another flying to it with a branch; No is on some Coins: evidently borrowed from the Hebrew record
Palestine - The Coins, rude and insignificant, the oldest, being possibly of the Maccabean era, are the solitary exception
Palesti'na - The Coins form the single exception
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - ), but even on Coins (Mionnet, iv
Hosius (1), a Confessor Under Maximian - Maximianus Herculius was made Caesar in 285, and Augustus in 286, as is shewn by Coins and inscriptions (cf
Justinianus i, Emperor - Besides his effigy on Coins, we have two probably contemporary portraits among the mosaics of Ravenna—one in the apse of the church of San Vitale, built in his reign, in which he appears among a number of other figures; the other now preserved in the noble church of Sant’ Apollinare in Urbe