What does Cock mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Cock
"Cockcrowing" was the third watch of the four watches introduced by the Romans. (See WATCHES.) The Jews originally had but three. The first ended at 9, the second at 12, the third or" cockcrowing" at 3, and the fourth at 6 o'clock a.m. (Mark 13:35). The second cockcrowing (Mark 14:72), which marked Peter's third denial of Jesus, was probably at the beginning of the fourth watch between 3 and 4 in the morning, not long before the first day dawn, just when our Lord was being led bound to Caiaphas across the court where Peter was standing. The Mishna, states that "cocks were not bred at Jerusalem because of the holy things."
But Peter could easily hear their shrill crow on mount Olivet, only a half-mile off from where he was in the porch of the high priest's palace, in the stillness of night. Moreover, the restriction could only apply to the Jews, not to the Romans who used fowl for food. The first crowing being fainter in the distance did not awaken his slumbering conscience; but the second with its loud sound was the crowing which alone is recorded by Matthew (Matthew 26:34), Luke (Luke 22:34), and John (John 13:38), being that which roused him to remember bitterly his Lord's neglected warning.
Webster's Dictionary - Cock-a-Hoop
(a.) Boastful; defiant; exulting. Also used adverbially.
Webster's Dictionary - Cock-Brained
(a.) Giddy; rash.
Webster's Dictionary - Cock-Padle
(n.) See Lumpfish.
Webster's Dictionary - Cock
(1):
(v. t.) To set on one side in a pert or jaunty manner.
(2):
(v. t.) To turn (the eye) obliquely and partially close its lid, as an expression of derision or insinuation.
(3):
(v. t.) To set erect; to turn up.
(4):
(n.) The indicator of a balance.
(5):
(n.) The notch of an arrow or crossbow.
(6):
(n.) The hammer in the lock of a firearm.
(7):
(v. t.) To draw the hammer of (a firearm) fully back and set it for firing.
(8):
(v. t.) To shape, as a hat, by turning up the brim.
(9):
(v. i.) To strut; to swagger; to look big, pert, or menacing.
(10):
(v. i.) To draw back the hammer of a firearm, and set it for firing.
(11):
(v. t.) To put into cocks or heaps, as hay.
(12):
(n.) A small boat.
(13):
(n.) A corruption or disguise of the word God, used in oaths.
(14):
(n.) The style of gnomon of a dial.
(15):
(n.) A faucet or valve.
(16):
(n.) The crow of a cock, esp. the first crow in the morning; cockcrow.
(17):
(n.) A chief man; a leader or master.
(18):
(n.) A vane in the shape of a cock; a weathercock.
(19):
(n.) The male of birds, particularly of gallinaceous or domestic fowls.
(20):
(n.) The bridge piece which affords a bearing for the pivot of a balance in a clock or watch.
(21):
(n.) A small concial pile of hay.
(22):
(n.) The act of cocking; also, the turn so given; as, a cock of the eyes; to give a hat a saucy cock.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Cock
COCK . Matthew 26:34 ; Matthew 26:74 , Mark 13:35 ; Mark 14:30 ; Mark 14:72 , Luke 22:34 ; Luke 22:60-61 , John 13:30 ; John 18:27 . Cocks and hens were probably unknown in Palestine until from two to three centuries before Christ’s time. In the famous painted tomb at Marissa (see Mareshah), a work of about b.c. 200, we have the cock depicted. Cocks and hens were introduced from Persia. The absence of express mention of then from the Law, and the fact that it is a ‘clean’ bird, have made it possible for the Jews for many centuries to sacrifice, these birds on the eve of the Day of Atonement a cock for each male and a hen for each female in the household. Talmudic tradition finds references to the cock in Isaiah 22:17 , Job 38:36 , and Proverbs 30:31 , but all these are very doubtful. The ‘ cock-crowing ’ was the name of the 3rd watch of the night, just before the dawn, in the time of our Lord. During this time the cocks crow at irregular intervals.
E. W. G. Masterman.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Cock-Crowing
In our Lord's time the Jews had adopted the Greek and Roman division of the night into four watches, each consisting of three hours, the first beginning at six o'clock in the evening (Luke 12:38 ; Matthew 14:25 ; Mark 6:48 ). But the ancient division, known as the first and second cock-crowing, was still retained. The cock usually crows several times soon after midnight (this is the first crowing), and again at the dawn of day (and this is the second crowing). Mark mentions (14:30) the two cock-crowings. (Matthew 26:34 ) alludes to that only which was emphatically the cock-crowing, viz, the second.
Webster's Dictionary - Air Cock
A faucet to allow escape of air.
Webster's Dictionary - Dandy-Cock
(n. fem.) Alt. of Dandy-hen
Webster's Dictionary - Sea Cock
(1):
In a steamship, a cock or valve close to the vessel's side, for closing a pipe which communicates with the sea.
(2):
The black-bellied plover.
(3):
A gurnard, as the European red gurnard (Trigla pini).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Cock
Mentioned only in connection with the denial of Peter, Matthew 26:34,74,75 ; and with the 'cock crowing,' a division of time at which the Lord may come, Mark 13:35 : this corresponds to the third watch of the night, and would be about 3 o'clock, A.M.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Cock-Crowing
COCK-CROWING (ἀλεκτοροφωνία).—The word occurs only in Mark 13:35, where it is evidently used to designate the third of four parts into which the night was divided—‘at even, or at midnight, or at the cock-crowing, or in the morning.’ In OT times there were only three watches in the night—the first, the middle, and the last; but by the time of Christ the Roman division into four watches had become common, though it had not altogether superseded the threefold division of the Jews. The night was reckoned, roughly speaking, from our 6 p.m. to 6 a.m., and these twelve hours were divided into four watches of three hours each. Jerome says: ‘Nox in quatuor vigilias dividitur, quae singulae trium horarum spatio supputantur’ (Ep. cxl. 8). The cock-crowing in Mark 13:35 thus refers to the third watch of the night, between the hours of 12 and 3.
Although the noun ‘cock-crowing’ occurs only once in the NT, each of the four Evangelists records the fact that on the night of the betrayal Jesus forewarned Peter that before the cock crew he should thrice deny his Lord, and each of them also records a crowing of the cock immediately after the denial (Matthew 26:34; Matthew 26:74-75, Luke 22:34; Luke 22:60-61, John 13:38; John 18:27). In St. Mark we have the variations—all the more significant because of the writer’s commonly acknowledged dependence upon the Petrine tradition—that Jesus said to Peter, ‘Before the cock crow twice, thou shalt deny me thrice’; and in correspondence with this a record of two distinct cock-crowings (Mark 14:66-7240; Mark 14:68; Mark 14:72).
Attempts have been made to distinguish between these two cock-crowings in St. Mark as occurring at definite seasons of the night, the one about midnight and the other at the first approach of dawn, just before the commencement of the fourth or morning watch, and to define the second of the two as the gallicinium proper, and consequently the only one of which the other three Evangelists take notice. No doubt it is true that in the most distinctive sense of the word ‘the cock-crowing,’ as an indication of time, refers to the breaking of the dawn; thus in the Talmud it is prescribed that at cock-crow the benediction shall be used: ‘Praised be Thou, O God, the Lord of the world, that givest understanding to the cock to distinguish between day and night.’ But as a matter of fact cocks crow during the night, in the East as elsewhere, at irregular times from midnight onward; and the narrative of 1618394544_5 does not suggest that there was an interval of anything like three hours between the first cock-crowing and the second. The probability is that Jesus meant no more than this, that before Peter himself had twice heard the cock crow he should thrice have been guilty of his great denial. And if we accept St. Mark’s narrative as embodying Peter’s own account of the incident, it will seem natural that the disciple to whom the warning was directly addressed, and on whom it would make the deepest impression, should distinguish between two separate cock-crowings where others thought only of the last.
There is no mention of the cock in the Mosaic law, and the supposed allusion to the breed in 1 Kings 4:23 (בַּרבּרִים, translated ‘fatted fowls’ both in Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885) is very doubtful. It may be that Solomon had imported these birds from the East; but, on the other hand, the fact that in the Talmudical literature the cock is always called by the name tarnĕgôl (חַּרְנִנּוֹל), suggests rather that it was introduced into Palestine from Babylonia.* [1] But while the domestic fowl was quite familiar to the Jews of our Lord’s time, both the Mishna and the Midrash state that, so long as the Temple stood, the breeding or keeping of cocks in Jerusalem was forbidden, on the ground that by scratching in the earth they dug up unclean things, thus spreading the contagion of Levitical uncleanness, and even contaminating the sacrifices of the altar. On this ground exception has sometimes been taken, especially from Jewish sources, to the statements of the Evangelists as to the crowing of the cock in Jerusalem on the night before the crucifixion. But if such an ordinance existed, it is very unlikely that it could be strictly enforced in a city like Jerusalem, with a large and mixed population. In particular, we must remember that cock-fighting was one of the favourite sports of the Romans; and the Roman soldiers of the garrison would concern themselves very little about any Jewish prohibition of this kind.
Literature.—Grimm-Thayer, Lexicon, s.v. ἀλεκτοροφωνία; Smith’s Lat.-English Dict. s.v. ‘Vigilia’; Meyer’s Commentary on Matthew; Lange’s Life of Christ; Andrews, Life of our Lord upon the Earth, p. 521; Encyc. Bibl. and Jewish Encyclopedia, articles ‘Cock’ and ‘Day’; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, articles ‘Cock’ and ‘Time,’ cf. Extra Vol. p. 477 f.
J. C. Lambert.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Cock
COCK.—See Animals, p. 64a, and following article.
King James Dictionary - Cock
COCK, n.
1. The male of birds, particularly of gallinaceous or domestic fowls, which having no appropriate or distinctive name, are called dunghill fowls or barn-door fowls. 2. A weather-cock a vane in shape of a cock. It is usually called a weather-cock. 3. A spout an instrument to draw out or discharge liquor from a cask, vat or pipe so named from its projection. 4. The projecting corner of a hat. 5. A small conical pile of hay, so shaped for shedding rain called in England a cop. When hay is dry and rolled together for carting, the heaps are not generally called cocks, at least not in New England. A large conical pile is called a stack. 6. The style or gnomon of a dial. 7. The needle of a balance. 8. The piece which covers the balance in a clock or watch. 9. The notch of an arrow. 10. The part of a musket or other fire arm, to which a flint is attached, and which, being impelled by a spring, strikes fire, and opens the pan at the same time. 11. A small boat. It is now called a cock-boat, which is tautology, as cock itself is a bot. 12. A leader a chief man. Sir Andrew is the cock of the club.
13. Cock-crowing the time when cocks crow in the morning. Cock a hoop, or cock on the hoop, a phrase denoting triumph triumphant exulting.
Cock and a bull, a phrase denoting tedious trifling stories.
COCK,
1. To set erect to turn up as, to cock the nose or ears. 2. To set the brim of a hat so as to make sharp corners or points or to set up with an air of pertness. 3. To make up hay in small conical piles. 4. To set or draw back the cock of a gun, in order to fire. COCK,
1. To hold up the head to strut to look big, pert, or menacing. 2. To train or use fighting cocks. 3. To cocker.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Cock
A large gallinule (Gallicrex cristatus) native of Australia, India, and the East Indies. In the breeding season the male is black and has a fleshy red caruncle, or horn, on the top of its head. Called also kora.
Webster's Dictionary - Rease Cock
Alt. of cup
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cock
Though this bird is too well known to need any account being given of him, yet being rendered so memorable in Scripture, from the circumstance of the apostle Peter's denial of Christ, I cannot pass it by without remarking, in allusion to that striking event, how slender the means which the Lord is pleased sometimes to make use of, to answer the most important purposes! The crowing of a cock is enough, in the Lord's hand, to accomplish the Lord's design. No one but Peter understood what the crowing of this cock meant; but to him it became more powerful than the sound of thunder. Such are the slenderest events in common life, when the Lord commissions them to be his messengers! Some of the Fathers have drawn a resemblance between the crowing of the cock, and the ministry of God's word. For as Peter heard the first crowing of the cock without the least emotion, so do men hear the word of God, when unaccompanied with grace, untouched and unconcerned. But when that word of God is sent home to the heart, by the powerful conviction of the Spirit of God, like the eye of Jesus which looked upon Peter, as the cock crew the second time, then the word is rendered effectual, and, like Peter, the sinner is led forth to weep bitterly. (Luke 22:61)
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Cock, Cock-Crowing
1: ἀλέκτωρ (Strong's #220 — Noun Masculine — alektor — al-ek'-tore ) "a cock," perhaps connected with a Hebrew phrase for the oncoming of the light, is found in the passages concerning Peter's denial of the Lord, Matthew 26:34,74,75 ; Mark 14:30,68,72 ; Luke 22:34,60,61 ; John 13:38 ; 18:27 .
2: ἀλεκτοροφωνία (Strong's #219 — Noun Feminine — alektorophonia — al-ek-tor-of-o-nee'-ah ) denotes "cock-crowing" (alketor, and phone, "a sound"), Mark 13:35 . There were two "cock-crowings," one after midnight, the other before dawn. In these watches the Jews followed the Roman method of dividing the night. The first "cock-crowing" was at the third watch of the night. That is the one mentioned in Mark 13:35 . Mark mentions both; see Mark 14:30 . The latter, the second, is that referred to in the other Gospels and is mentioned especially as "the cock-crowing."
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Cock
αλεκτωρ , a well known domestic fowl. Some derive the Greek name from α , and λεκτρον , a bed, because the crowing of cocks rouses men from their beds; but Mr. Parkhurst asks, "May not this name be as properly deduced from the Hebrew אור הלכת , the coming of the light, of which this ‘bird of dawning,' as Shakspeare calls him, gives such remarkable notice, and for doing which he was, among the Heathen, sacred to the sun, who in Homer is himself called αλεκτωρ ?" In Matthew 26:34 , our Lord is represented as saying, that before cock-crow, Peter should deny him thrice; so Luke 22:34 , and John 13:39. But according to Mark 14:30 , he says, "Before the cock crow twice thou shalt deny me thrice." These texts may be very satisfactorily reconciled, by observing, that ancient authors, both Greek and Latin, mention two cock- crowings, the one of which was soon after midnight, the other about three o'clock in the morning; and this latter being most noticed by men as the signal of their approaching labours, was called by way of eminence, the cock-crowing; and to this alone, Matthew, giving the general sense of our Saviour's warning to Peter, refers; but Mark, recording his very words, mentions the two cock-crowings.
The rabbies tell us that cocks were not permitted to be kept in Jerusalem on account of the holiness of the place; and that for this reason some modern Jews cavil against this declaration of the Evangelists; but the cock is not among the birds prohibited in the law of Moses. If there was any restraint in the use and domestication of the animal, it must have been an arbitrary practice of the Jews, and could not have been binding on foreigners, of whom many resided at Jerusalem as officers or traders. Strangers would not be willing to forego an innocent kind of food in compliance with a conquered people; and the trafficking spirit of the Jews would induce them to supply aliens, if it did not expressly contradict the letter of their law. This is sufficient to account for fowl of this kind being there, even admitting a customary restraint. The celebrated Reland admits that it was not allowed to breed cocks in the city, but that the Jews were not prohibited from buying them to eat, and that therefore the cock mentioned in the Gospel might be in the house of a Jew who designed to kill it for his own table; or may have been kept in the precincts of Pilate, or of a Roman officer or soldier.
During the time of our Saviour, the night was divided into four watches, a fourth watch having been introduced among the Jews from the Romans, who derived it from the Greeks. The second and third watches are mentioned in Luke 12:38 ; the fourth, in Matthew 14:25 ; and the four are all distinctly mentioned in Mark 13:35 : "Watch, therefore; for ye know not when the master of the house cometh; at even," οψε , or the late watch, "or at midnight," μεσονυκτιου , "or at the cock-crowing," αλεκτοροφωνιας , "or in the morning," πρωι , the early watch. Here, the first watch was at even, and continued from six till nine; the second commenced at nine, and ended at twelve, or midnight; the third watch, called by the Romans gallicinium, lasted from twelve to three; and the morning watch closed at six.
Webster's Dictionary - Try Cock
A cock for withdrawing a small quantity of liquid, as for testing.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Cock
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Cock-Crowing
The third watch of the night, in the time of Christ. See HOUR.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Cock
(Matthew 26:34 ; Mark 13:35 ; 14:30 ) etc. The domestic cock and hen were early known to the ancient Greeks and Romans, and as no mention is made in the Old Testament of these birds, and no figures of them occur on the Egyptian monuments, they probably came into Judea with the Romans, who, as is well known, prized these birds both as articles of food and for cock-fighting.

Sentence search

Cock - Cock, n. A weather-cock a vane in shape of a Cock. It is usually called a weather-cock. When hay is dry and rolled together for carting, the heaps are not generally called Cocks, at least not in New England. It is now called a Cock-boat, which is tautology, as Cock itself is a bot. Sir Andrew is the Cock of the club. Cock-crowing the time when Cocks crow in the morning. Cock a hoop, or Cock on the hoop, a phrase denoting triumph triumphant exulting. ...
Cock and a bull, a phrase denoting tedious trifling stories. ...
Cock, ...
1. To set erect to turn up as, to Cock the nose or ears. To set or draw back the Cock of a gun, in order to fire. Cock, ...
1. To train or use fighting Cocks. To Cocker
Cock-Crowing - But the ancient division, known as the first and second Cock-crowing, was still retained. The Cock usually crows several times soon after midnight (this is the first crowing), and again at the dawn of day (and this is the second crowing). Mark mentions (14:30) the two Cock-crowings. (Matthew 26:34 ) alludes to that only which was emphatically the Cock-crowing, viz, the second
Cock, Cock-Crowing - 1: ἀλέκτωρ (Strong's #220 — Noun Masculine — alektor — al-ek'-tore ) "a Cock," perhaps connected with a Hebrew phrase for the oncoming of the light, is found in the passages concerning Peter's denial of the Lord, Matthew 26:34,74,75 ; Mark 14:30,68,72 ; Luke 22:34,60,61 ; John 13:38 ; 18:27 . ...
2: ἀλεκτοροφωνία (Strong's #219 — Noun Feminine — alektorophonia — al-ek-tor-of-o-nee'-ah ) denotes "cock-crowing" (alketor, and phone, "a sound"), Mark 13:35 . There were two "cock-crowings," one after midnight, the other before dawn. The first "cock-crowing" was at the third watch of the night. The latter, the second, is that referred to in the other Gospels and is mentioned especially as "the Cock-crowing
Uncock - ) To deprive of its Cocked shape, as a hat, etc. ) To let down the Cock of, as a firearm. ) To open or spread from a Cock or heap, as hay
Hev - See Cock
Treadfowl - ) A Cock
Cockerel - ) A young Cock
Paisano - ) The chaparral Cock
Cocked - ) of Cock...
Cock-Crowing - COCK-CROWING (ἀλεκτοροφωνία). —The word occurs only in Mark 13:35, where it is evidently used to designate the third of four parts into which the night was divided—‘at even, or at midnight, or at the Cock-crowing, or in the morning. The Cock-crowing in Mark 13:35 thus refers to the third watch of the night, between the hours of 12 and 3. ...
Although the noun ‘cock-crowing’ occurs only once in the NT, each of the four Evangelists records the fact that on the night of the betrayal Jesus forewarned Peter that before the Cock crew he should thrice deny his Lord, and each of them also records a crowing of the Cock immediately after the denial (Matthew 26:34; Matthew 26:74-75, Luke 22:34; Luke 22:60-61, John 13:38; John 18:27). Mark we have the variations—all the more significant because of the writer’s commonly acknowledged dependence upon the Petrine tradition—that Jesus said to Peter, ‘Before the Cock crow twice, thou shalt deny me thrice’; and in correspondence with this a record of two distinct Cock-crowings (Mark 14:30; Mark 14:68; Mark 14:72). ...
Attempts have been made to distinguish between these two Cock-crowings in St. No doubt it is true that in the most distinctive sense of the word ‘the Cock-crowing,’ as an indication of time, refers to the breaking of the dawn; thus in the Talmud it is prescribed that at Cock-crow the benediction shall be used: ‘Praised be Thou, O God, the Lord of the world, that givest understanding to the Cock to distinguish between day and night. ’ But as a matter of fact Cocks crow during the night, in the East as elsewhere, at irregular times from midnight onward; and the narrative of Mark 14:66-72 does not suggest that there was an interval of anything like three hours between the first Cock-crowing and the second. The probability is that Jesus meant no more than this, that before Peter himself had twice heard the Cock crow he should thrice have been guilty of his great denial. Mark’s narrative as embodying Peter’s own account of the incident, it will seem natural that the disciple to whom the warning was directly addressed, and on whom it would make the deepest impression, should distinguish between two separate Cock-crowings where others thought only of the last. ...
There is no mention of the Cock in the Mosaic law, and the supposed allusion to the breed in 1 Kings 4:23 (בַּרבּרִים, translated ‘fatted fowls’ both in Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885) is very doubtful. It may be that Solomon had imported these birds from the East; but, on the other hand, the fact that in the Talmudical literature the Cock is always called by the name tarnĕgôl (חַּרְנִנּוֹל), suggests rather that it was introduced into Palestine from Babylonia. * [1] But while the domestic fowl was quite familiar to the Jews of our Lord’s time, both the Mishna and the Midrash state that, so long as the Temple stood, the breeding or keeping of Cocks in Jerusalem was forbidden, on the ground that by scratching in the earth they dug up unclean things, thus spreading the contagion of Levitical uncleanness, and even contaminating the sacrifices of the altar. On this ground exception has sometimes been taken, especially from Jewish sources, to the statements of the Evangelists as to the crowing of the Cock in Jerusalem on the night before the crucifixion. In particular, we must remember that Cock-fighting was one of the favourite sports of the Romans; and the Roman soldiers of the garrison would concern themselves very little about any Jewish prohibition of this kind. and Jewish Encyclopedia, articles ‘Cock’ and ‘Day’; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, articles ‘Cock’ and ‘Time,’ cf
Obbler - ) A turkey Cock; a bubbling Jock
Obble - ) To make a noise like that of a turkey Cock. ) To utter (a sound) like a turkey Cock
Cock - COCK
Roostcock - ) The male of the domestic fowl; a Cock
Rooster - ) The male of the domestic fowl; a Cock
Orcock - ) The moor Cock, or red grouse
Cock - Cock . Cocks and hens were probably unknown in Palestine until from two to three centuries before Christ’s time. 200, we have the Cock depicted. Cocks and hens were introduced from Persia. The absence of express mention of then from the Law, and the fact that it is a ‘clean’ bird, have made it possible for the Jews for many centuries to sacrifice, these birds on the eve of the Day of Atonement a Cock for each male and a hen for each female in the household. Talmudic tradition finds references to the Cock in Isaiah 22:17 , Job 38:36 , and Proverbs 30:31 , but all these are very doubtful. The ‘ Cock-crowing ’ was the name of the 3rd watch of the night, just before the dawn, in the time of our Lord. During this time the Cocks crow at irregular intervals
Bibcock - ) A Cock or faucet having a bent down nozzle
Cocking - ) Cockfighting. ) of Cock...
Try Cock - A Cock for withdrawing a small quantity of liquid, as for testing
Halfcock - ) To set the Cock of (a firearm) at the first notch
Chanticleer - ) A Cock, so called from the clearness or loudness of his voice in crowing
Four-Way - ) Allowing passage in either of four directions; as, a four-way Cock, or valve
Rupicola - ) A genus of beautiful South American passerine birds, including the Cock of the rock
Cock - Though this bird is too well known to need any account being given of him, yet being rendered so memorable in Scripture, from the circumstance of the apostle Peter's denial of Christ, I cannot pass it by without remarking, in allusion to that striking event, how slender the means which the Lord is pleased sometimes to make use of, to answer the most important purposes! The crowing of a Cock is enough, in the Lord's hand, to accomplish the Lord's design. No one but Peter understood what the crowing of this Cock meant; but to him it became more powerful than the sound of thunder. Such are the slenderest events in common life, when the Lord commissions them to be his messengers! Some of the Fathers have drawn a resemblance between the crowing of the Cock, and the ministry of God's word. For as Peter heard the first crowing of the Cock without the least emotion, so do men hear the word of God, when unaccompanied with grace, untouched and unconcerned. But when that word of God is sent home to the heart, by the powerful conviction of the Spirit of God, like the eye of Jesus which looked upon Peter, as the Cock crew the second time, then the word is rendered effectual, and, like Peter, the sinner is led forth to weep bitterly
Cock - The domestic Cock and hen were early known to the ancient Greeks and Romans, and as no mention is made in the Old Testament of these birds, and no figures of them occur on the Egyptian monuments, they probably came into Judea with the Romans, who, as is well known, prized these birds both as articles of food and for Cock-fighting
Greyhound - Modern translations read “strutting Cock” or rooster
Three-Way - ) Connected with, or serving to connect, three channels or pipes; as, a three-way Cock or valve
Two-Way - ) Serving to connect at will one pipe or channel with either of two others; as, a two-way Cock
Skitty - ) A rail; as, the water rail (called also skitty Cock, and skitty coot); the spotted crake (Porzana maruetta), and the moor hen
Heeler - ) A Cock that strikes well with his heels or spurs
Blow-Off - ) as, a blow-off Cock or pipe
Capercally - ) A species of grouse (Tetrao uragallus) of large size and fine flavor, found in northern Europe and formerly in Scotland; - called also Cock of the woods
Capon - ) A castrated Cock, esp
Alectryomancy - ) Divination by means of a Cock and grains of corn placed on the letters of the alphabet, the letters being put together in the order in which the grains were eaten
Nab - ) The Cock of a gunlock
Cock - Some derive the Greek name from α , and λεκτρον , a bed, because the crowing of Cocks rouses men from their beds; but Mr. Parkhurst asks, "May not this name be as properly deduced from the Hebrew אור הלכת , the coming of the light, of which this ‘bird of dawning,' as Shakspeare calls him, gives such remarkable notice, and for doing which he was, among the Heathen, sacred to the sun, who in Homer is himself called αλεκτωρ ?" In Matthew 26:34 , our Lord is represented as saying, that before Cock-crow, Peter should deny him thrice; so Luke 22:34 , and John 13:39. But according to Mark 14:30 , he says, "Before the Cock crow twice thou shalt deny me thrice. " These texts may be very satisfactorily reconciled, by observing, that ancient authors, both Greek and Latin, mention two Cock- crowings, the one of which was soon after midnight, the other about three o'clock in the morning; and this latter being most noticed by men as the signal of their approaching labours, was called by way of eminence, the Cock-crowing; and to this alone, Matthew, giving the general sense of our Saviour's warning to Peter, refers; but Mark, recording his very words, mentions the two Cock-crowings. ...
The rabbies tell us that Cocks were not permitted to be kept in Jerusalem on account of the holiness of the place; and that for this reason some modern Jews cavil against this declaration of the Evangelists; but the Cock is not among the birds prohibited in the law of Moses. The celebrated Reland admits that it was not allowed to breed Cocks in the city, but that the Jews were not prohibited from buying them to eat, and that therefore the Cock mentioned in the Gospel might be in the house of a Jew who designed to kill it for his own table; or may have been kept in the precincts of Pilate, or of a Roman officer or soldier. The second and third watches are mentioned in Luke 12:38 ; the fourth, in Matthew 14:25 ; and the four are all distinctly mentioned in Mark 13:35 : "Watch, therefore; for ye know not when the master of the house cometh; at even," οψε , or the late watch, "or at midnight," μεσονυκτιου , "or at the Cock-crowing," αλεκτοροφωνιας , "or in the morning," πρωι , the early watch
Sea Cock - (1):...
In a steamship, a Cock or valve close to the vessel's side, for closing a pipe which communicates with the sea
Crow - ) The cry of the Cock. ) To make the shrill sound characteristic of a Cock, either in joy, gayety, or defiance
Cock - ) To put into Cocks or heaps, as hay. ) The crow of a Cock, esp. the first crow in the morning; Cockcrow. ) A vane in the shape of a Cock; a weathercock. ) The act of Cocking; also, the turn so given; as, a Cock of the eyes; to give a hat a saucy Cock
Thrice - Before the Cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice
Cock - Mentioned only in connection with the denial of Peter, Matthew 26:34,74,75 ; and with the 'cock crowing,' a division of time at which the Lord may come, Mark 13:35 : this corresponds to the third watch of the night, and would be about 3 o'clock, A
Crow - The voice of the Cock. To cry or make a noise as a Cock, in joy, gaiety or defiance
Blue Hen State - It is said, though the story lacks proof, to have taken its origin from the insistence of a Delaware Revolutionary captain, named Caldwell, that no Cock could be truly game unless the mother was a blue hen, whence Blue Hen's Chickens came to be a nickname for the people of Delaware
Fowl - ) Any domesticated bird used as food, as a hen, turkey, duck; in a more restricted sense, the common domestic Cock or hen (Gallus domesticus)
Trigger - ) A piece, as a lever, which is connected with a catch or detent as a means of releasing it; especially (Firearms), the part of a lock which is moved by the finger to release the Cock and discharge the piece
Nergal - The Jewish rabbins fancied that this idol was figured by a Cock
Gallant - gallus, a Cock
Lumpfish - Called also lumpsucker, Cock-paddle, sea owl
Greyhound - and Vulgate versions render it "cock
Faucet - , from a pipe, cask, or other vessel, in such quantities as may be desired; - called also tap, and Cock
Weathercock - ) To supply with a weathercock; to serve as a weathercock for. ) A vane, or weather vane; - so called because originally often in the figure of a Cock, turning on the top of a spire with the wind, and showing its direction
Coxcomb - ) A name given to several plants of different genera, but particularly to Celosia cristata, or garden Cockscomb. Same as Cockscomb. ) A strip of red cloth notched like the comb of a Cock, which licensed jesters formerly wore in their caps
Day - Before the Captivity the Jews divided the night into three watches, (1) from sunset to midnight (Lamentations 2:19 ); (2) from midnight till the Cock-crowing (Judges 7:19 ); and (3) from the Cock-crowing till sunrise (Exodus 14:24 )
Conduit - A pipe or Cock for drawing off liquor
Watches, Night - They were sometimes called evening, midnight, Cock-crowing and morning
Hackle - ) One of the peculiar, long, narrow feathers on the neck of fowls, most noticeable on the Cock, - often used in making artificial flies; hence, any feather so used
Hammer - ) That part of a gunlock which strikes the percussion cap, or firing pin; the Cock; formerly, however, a piece of steel covering the pan of a flintlock musket and struck by the flint of the Cock to ignite the priming
Cockle - CockLE, n. ...
CockLE, n. A young Cock. CockLE, or t
Cockcrowing - Cockcrowing. The last two watches were both of them called "cock-crowings," because Cocks usually crowed in that space of time. We have no evidence in support of the Rabbinical opinion that Cocks were not permitted to be kept in Jerusalem on account of the holiness of the place
Watches of the Night - The original division of the night was into three watches—"the beginning of the watches," from sunset to 10 o'clock, Lamentations 2:19; "the middle watch," from 10 to 2 o'clock, Judges 7:19; and "the morning watch," from 2 o'clock to sunrise, Exodus 14:24; 1 Samuel 11:11—but after the captivity the Jews adopted the custom of Rome and Greece, which divided the twelve hours of the night into four watches, beginning with 6 in the afternoon—"even," from 6 to 9 o'clock; "midnight," from 9 to 12; "cock-crowing," from 12 to 3; and "morning," from 3 to 6
Watches of Night - After the establishment of the Roman supremacy, the number of watches was increased to four, which were described either according to their numerical order, as in the case of the "fourth watch," (Matthew 14:25 ) or by the terms "even," "midnight," "cock-crowing" and "morning
Cup - (1):...
A Cock or cup containing grease, to serve as a lubricator
Beetle - They have various names, as the may-bug, the dorr-beetle, the Cock-chaffer, the tumble-dung, the elephant-beetle,&c
Crest - ) A tuft, or other excrescence or natural ornament, growing on an animal's head; the comb of a Cock; the swelling on the head of a serpent; the lengthened feathers of the crown or nape of bird, etc
Birds in Symbolism -
The peacock, believed incorruptible, represents immortality, and in later art, pride.
The Cock is the emblem of Saint Peter the Apostle, and sometimes of vigilance
Heel - ...
HEEL, To arm a Cock
Partridge - Κore') is from Hebrew "call," referring to the call of the Cock bird, as German rebhuhn is from rufen "to call
Symbolism, Birds in -
The peacock, believed incorruptible, represents immortality, and in later art, pride.
The Cock is the emblem of Saint Peter the Apostle, and sometimes of vigilance
Hours - But after the Jews became subject to the Romans, they adopted the Roman manner of dividing the night into four watches, namely, the evening, or first quarter, after sunset; the midnight; Cock-crowing, or third quarter, from midnight on; and the morning, or fourth quarter, including the dawn, Matthew 14:25 Mark 6:48 13:35 Luke 12:48
Day - The second was denominated the middle watch, and continued from midnight till the crowing of the Cock. The Cock crowing, from twelve to three. See Cock
Comb - ) The naked fleshy crest or caruncle on the upper part of the bill or hood of a Cock or other bird. ) The thumbpiece of the hammer of a gunlock, by which it may be Cocked
Unite - The spur of a young Cock grafted into the comb, will unite and grow
Ostrich - ]'>[1] ‘peacocks,’ RV Feather - ) To tread, as a Cock
Heel - ) To arm with a gaff, as a Cock for fighting
Morning - ’ The Roman division of the night into four ‘watches,’ extending from six o’clock to six o’clock, is brought into striking view in Mark 13:35, where ὀψέ (in the evening), μεσονύκτιον, (at midnight), and ἀλεκτοροφωνίας (at Cock-crowing), are given in connexion and contrast with πρωῑ̔ (in the morning)
Anchor - ...
The anchor a Cock bill, is when it is suspended perpendicularly from the cat head, ready to be let go
Simon Peter - Emblems: a boat, keys, and a Cock
Birds - Among the birds specifically named in the RSV translation of the Bible are: Cock (Proverbs 30:31 ; Matthew 26:34 ,Matthew 26:34,26:74-75 ; Mark 14:30 ,Mark 14:30,14:72 ; Luke 22:34 ,Luke 22:34,22:60-61 ; John 13:38 ; John 18:27 ), carrion vulture (Leviticus 11:18 ; 1 Kings 17:4-69 ), crane (Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), dove/turtledove (Genesis 8:8-12 ; Isaiah 38:14 ; Leviticus 20:25 ; Matthew 3:16 ; Matthew 10:16 ; Luke 2:24 ; John 1:32 ), eagle (Exodus 19:4 ; Leviticus 11:13 ; Genesis 8:8-12 ; Deuteronomy 32:11 ; Job 9:26 ; Job 39:27-30 ; Psalm 103:5 ; Proverbs 30:19 ; Jeremiah 4:13 ; Jeremiah 49:16 ,Jeremiah 49:16,49:22 ), falcon (Leviticus 11:14 ; Job 28:7 ), hawk (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:12-18 ; Job 39:26 ), hen (Matthew 23:37 ; Luke 13:34 ), heron (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 ), kite (Leviticus 11:14 ; Deuteronomy 14:13 ), osprey (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ), ostrich (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ; Job 30:29 ; Job 39:13-18 ; Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Isaiah 43:20 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ; Lamentations 4:3 ; Micah 1:8 ), owl (Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ), partridge (1 Samuel 26:20 ; Jeremiah 17:11 ), peacock (1 Kings 10:22 ; 2 Chronicles 9:21 ), pelican (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ), pigeon (Genesis 15:9 ; Leviticus 1:14 ; Leviticus 5:7 ; Leviticus 12:8 ; Leviticus 14:22 ; Luke 2:24 ; John 2:14 ), quail (Exodus 16:13 ; Numbers 11:31-32 ; Psalm 105:40 ), raven (Genesis 8:7 ; Leviticus 11:15 ; Matthew 6:25-26 ; 1 Kings 17:4-6 ; Proverbs 30:17 ; Luke 12:24 ), sea gull (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ), sparrow (Psalm 84:3 ; Matthew 10:29 ,Matthew 10:29,10:31 ; Luke 12:6-7 ), stork (Leviticus 11:19 ; Job 39:27-286 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), swallow (Psalm 84:3 ; Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), vulture (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ), and water hen (Leviticus 11:18 ; Ezekiel 39:17-204 ). ...
Cock The crowing of the Cock is probably the most well-known bird sound in the Bible. All of the New Testament references to the Cock (except the mention of “cockcrow” in Mark 13:35 ) relate to Peter's denial of Christ. Jesus warned Peter that before the Cock crowed twice, Peter would deny Him three times (Mark 14:30 )
Night (2) - The disciples must guard against a surprise: ‘for ye know not when the Lord cometh, whether at even, or at midnight, or at Cock-crowing, or in the morning; lest coming suddenly he find you sleeping’ (Mark 13:35). ...
The watches of the night are indicated in Mark 13:35 : evening (ὀψία)—midnight—cock-crowing—full morning. It was at eventide, for example, that Jesus sat down with His disciples; before ‘cock-crowing’ Peter denied Him; and in the ‘morning’ Jesus was carried away to Pilate. It was at Cock-crowing that Peter remembered his Master’s warning, and wept bitterly
Serpent - ]'>[10] ‘cockatrice,’ RV Day - The time of incense, and of Cock-crowing (wh
Zabii - At these structures, they sacrifice a Cock and a black calf, and offer up incense
Mark, Gospel According to - Also the Second Evangelist alone relates the two Cock-crowings ( Mark 14:30 ; Mark 14:68 ; Mark 14:72 ), though the state of the text suggests that perhaps originally only one was mentioned in Mk. It is hard to see why a later writer should have omitted one Cock-crowing and it is suggested that therefore our Mk. Mark, if he wrote after the others, should have added a Cock-crowing
Animals - Poultry were kept in Palestine in the time of our Lord, as is clear from the references to the Cock (ἀλέκτωρ) and the hen (ὄρνις). If we except the mention of Cock-crow (see sep. ) in Mark 13:35, the Cock appears only in the story of Peter’s denial, and our Lord’s prediction of it (Matthew 26:34; Matthew 26:74 f
Denial - The sound of Cock-crow, announcing the approaeh of dawn, was a painful reminder that he had proved lacking in genuine fidelity, and false to the pledges so recently given
Call, Called, Calling - , "phone"), is used of the crowing of a Cock, e
Tears - Peter wept tears of bitter shame when the sound of the Cock-crowing brought home to him his sin in denying the Master on the night of betrayal (Mark 14:72 and parallels)
Egypt - ), Joseph and Mary with the Child set out for Egypt at Cock-crow, and reach a great city and temple with an idol to whose shrine the other idols of Egypt send gifts
Egypt - ), Joseph and Mary with the Child set out for Egypt at Cock-crow, and reach a great city and temple with an idol to whose shrine the other idols of Egypt send gifts
Reproach (2) - Was there not a more piercing reproach in His voice when He said to the traitor, ‘Judas, with a kiss dost thou betray the Son of Man?’ (Luke 22:48); and in His eyes when, as the Cock crew, He turned and looked upon Peter (Luke 22:60-61)?...
2
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - And both at the Cock-crowing, and at Calvary, Peter and Paul wept so sore that Mary herself, and Mary Magdalene, did not weep like it
Alexander the Coppersmith - But, the wind working round and setting strongly in another direction, the coppersmith himself also instantly obeyed the law of the weather-cock he had fashioned with his own hands and had fastened on the roof of his workshop; for, as his copper creature did, so did he before the variable skies of those unsettled days
Nicodemus - And then, as He shook hands with Nicodemus just as the Cock was crowing in Martha's garden, Jesus said to Nicodemus, with a look and with a manner that the old ruler never forgot, "But he that doeth good cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest that they are wrought in God
Confession (of Christ) - Mark 14:30, Luke 22:34, John 21:15-179), in the look He cast upon him when the crowing of the Cock recalled that warning to his mind (Luke 22:61), in the Apostle’s bitter tears as he remembered and thought upon the word of the Lord (Matthew 26:75, Mark 14:72, Luke 22:61-62), and in the thrice-repeated ‘Lovest thou me?’ (1618394544_43) recalling the threefold transgression
Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs - at mid-day, when the heat is intense, and from sunset to Cock-crowing (cf
Physician - To the divinity there was the sacrifice of a goat or ram, a Cock or hen, accompanied by fervent prayer for succour
Lord's Day - A crowd of people (‘all who could possibly be there’) gathers at the church doors ‘before Cock-crow’ when the doors are first opened, then streams into the church, which is lit up by a large number of lamps (luminaria infinita)
Christ in Art - ...
Two emblems of immortality, the Peacock (from the fabled indestructibility of its flesh) and the Phœnix, rising from its ashes, were early used as types of Christ. The Instruments of the Passion, so common still in decorative art, are the Crown of Thorns, the Nails, the Coat and Dice, the Scourges, Pillar, Ladder and Sponge, the Five Wounds, Hammer, Pincers; to which are sometimes added the Sword and Staff, Lantern, Thirty Pieces and Cock, the Pierced Heart, and the Vernicle or Napkin of Veronica, and the Superscription INRI. The peacock and the phœnix, symbols of immortality, and thus of Christ triumphing over death, as well as the dolphin, carrier of souls to the Isles of the Blessed, were other pagan types that continued in use among the Christians
Poet - Peter with the two crowings of the Cock (Mark 14:30)? But some of the images are themselves complex