What does Coal mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
גַּחֶ֣לֶת coal 1
רִצְפָּ֑ה pavement. / glowing stone or coal 1

Definitions Related to Coal

H1513


   1 Coal, burning Coal, coals of fire, hot coals.
   

H7531


   1 pavement.
   2 glowing stone or Coal, live Coal.
   

Frequency of Coal (original languages)

Frequency of Coal (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Canal Coal
See Cannel coal.
Webster's Dictionary - Candle Coal
See Cannel coal.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Coal
COAL . Mineral coal was unknown in Bible times. Wherever ‘coal’ (or ‘coals’) is mentioned, therefore, we must in the great majority of cases understand wood or charcoal. Several species of wood used for heating purposes are named in Isaiah 44:14-16 , to which Psalms 120:4 adds ‘coals of broom’ (RVm [1] ). In two cases, however, the ‘live coal’ of Isaiah’s vision ( Isaiah 6:6 ) and the ‘coals’ on which was ‘a cake haken’ for Elijah ( 1 Kings 19:6 ), the Heb. word denotes a hot stone (so RVm [1] see Bread). The charcoal was generally burned in a brasier ( Jeremiah 36:22 ff. RV [3] , AV [4] ‘hearth’) or chafing-dish, the ‘pan of fire’ of Zechariah 12:6 RV [3] . See, further, House, § 7 .
Coal, or rather charcoal, supplies several Scripture metaphors, the most interesting of which is illustrated by the expression of the wise woman of Tekoa, ‘thus shall they quench my coal that is left’ (2 Samuel 14:7 ). By this she means, as shown by the following words, the death of her son and the extinction of her family, an idea elsewhere expressed as a putting out of one’s lamp ( Proverbs 13:9 ).
A. R. S. Kennedy.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Coal
pecham , "a black coal," and gachelath , "burning coals." Proverbs 26:21; "as coals (fuel) are to burning coals," etc.; so we speak of quarrelsome men "adding fuel to the flame." "Coals of fire" in 2 Samuel 22:9; 2 Samuel 22:13, represent the lightning of God's wrath. In Proverbs 25:22, "heap coals of fire upon thine enemy's head" (Romans 12:20), the meaning is, melt him into burning shame at his own unworthy hatred, and love for thee who hast overcome his evil with thy good. Either he shall be like metals melted by fire or like clay hardened by it. In Psalms 120:4 "coals of juniper" rather burning brands of broom, retamim . The Arabs regard the retem (broom) the best firewood.
As their slanders burnt like coals on fire, so, by righteous retribution in kind, God will give them hot coals. Psalms 140:10; Psalms 18:12-13; compare the same image of the tongue, James 3:6. In 2 Samuel 14:7 "they shall quench my coal that is left," i.e., extinguish the only surviving light of my home, my only son. In Isaiah 6:6 and 1 Kings 19:6 the "coals" are in the Hebrew (rezeph ) hot stones, on which cakes were baked and flesh cooked. In Habakkuk 3:5 (resheph ) "burning coals" poetically and figuratively express "burning diseases," as the parallel "pestilence" shows; also compare Deuteronomy 32:24; Psalms 91:6. In Lamentations 4:8 translate as margin darker than blackness." Mineral coal protrudes through the strata to the surface of parts of Lebanon, at Cornale, eight miles from Beirut, the coal seams are three feet thick; but it seems not to have been anciently known as fuel. Charcoal is what is meant by "coal."
Webster's Dictionary - Bovey Coal
A kind of mineral coal, or brown lignite, burning with a weak flame, and generally a disagreeable odor; - found at Bovey Tracey, Devonshire, England. It is of geological age of the oolite, and not of the true coal era.
Webster's Dictionary - Coal Works
A place where coal is dug, including the machinery for raising the coal.
Webster's Dictionary - Coal Tar
A thick, black, tarry liquid, obtained by the distillation of bituminous coal in the manufacture of illuminating gas; used for making printer's ink, black varnish, etc. It is a complex mixture from which many substances have been obtained, especially hydrocarbons of the benzene or aromatic series.
Webster's Dictionary - Caking Coal
See Coal.
Webster's Dictionary - Coal-Black
(a.) As black as coal; jet black; very black.
Webster's Dictionary - Coal-Meter
(n.) A licensed or official coal measurer in London. See Meter.
Webster's Dictionary - Coal-Whipper
(n.) One who raises coal out of the hold of a ship.
Webster's Dictionary - Coal
(1):
(v. t.) To supply with coal; as, to coal a steamer.
(2):
(n.) A thoroughly charred, and extinguished or still ignited, fragment from wood or other combustible substance; charcoal.
(3):
(v. i.) To take in coal; as, the steamer coaled at Southampton.
(4):
(n.) A black, or brownish black, solid, combustible substance, dug from beds or veins in the earth to be used for fuel, and consisting, like charcoal, mainly of carbon, but more compact, and often affording, when heated, a large amount of volatile matter.
(5):
(v. t.) To burn to charcoal; to char.
(6):
(v. t.) To mark or delineate with charcoal.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Coal
It is by no means certain that the Hebrews were acquainted with mineral coal, although it is found in Syria. Their common fuel was dried dung of animals and wood charcoal. Two different words are found in Hebrew to denote coal, both occurring in Proverbs 26:21 , "As coal [1] is to burning coal [2]." The latter of these words is used in Job 41:21 ; Proverbs 6:28 ; Isaiah 44:19 . The words "live coal" in Isaiah 6:6 are more correctly "glowing stone." In Lamentations 4:8 the expression "blacker than a coal" is literally rendered in the margin of the Revised Version "darker than blackness." "Coals of fire" ( 2 Samuel 22:9,13 ; Psalm 18:8,12,13 , etc.) is an expression used metaphorically for lightnings proceeding from God. A false tongue is compared to "coals of juniper" (Psalm 120:4 ; James 3:6 ). "Heaping coals of fire on the head" symbolizes overcoming evil with good. The words of Paul (Romans 12:20 ) are equivalent to saying, "By charity and kindness thou shalt soften down his enmity as surely as heaping coals on the fire fuses the metal in the crucible."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Coal
Mineral coal is now known to exist in the Lebanon range, but was unknown in Biblical times. Fires were seldom needed for warmth, and were as a rule used only for the cooking of food: the fire named in John 18:18 was in the night; food was cooked by charcoal or by warming the ovens with any vegetable refuse. The coal generally referred to in the O.T. was charcoal; but other words are used which imply the hot or glowing stones on which cakes were cooked. 1 Kings 19:6 ; Song of Solomon 8:6 ; Isaiah 6:6 ; Habakkuk 3:5 .
Heaping coals of fire on an enemy's head by kindness (Proverbs 25:21,22 ; Romans 12:20 ) becomes a test to him (as metal is tested by the fire), the kindness shown him will either bring about contrition and friendship, or harden him yet the more.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Coal
Psalm 120:4 (b) The evil words of hostile enemies are compared to coals that burn and hurt when they strike.
Proverbs 6:23 (b) This is a figure to describe the fact that those who live in sin are defiled and hurt by sin even as those who walk upon coals are burned by them.
Isaiah 6:6 (b) The purging power of a live coal which destroys germs and corruption is here used to illustrate the effect of the Lord Himself in touching human life to purge, cleanse, and blot out the sins.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Coal
COAL.—This word occurs in the Gospels only in John 18:18; John 21:9 (Gr. in both ἁνθρακιά, meaning properly ‘a brazier filled with lighted charcoal’). As a mineral, coal does not exist in Palestine except in the Wâdy Hummanâ in the Lebanon, and was mined there only during the rule of Muhammad Ali about 1834 (Thomson, The Land and the Book, 1886, iii. 193). The rendering ‘coal’ must be taken as = ‘charcoal.’ Both in ancient and in modern times, the latter substance, prepared from native timber, has been the common fuel of the East. The destruction of the forests of Palestine and Syria may be assigned as the main reason for the absence of timbered gables, and the universal prevalence, instead, of brickwork cupola roofs, and also for the wretched substitutes for fuel now employed by the natives, such as sun-dried cakes of chaff and dung, etc. The charred roots of the desert broom (rôthem, see Psalms 120:4) make an excellent fuel, and are much in demand in Cairo (Tristram, Nat. Hist. of Bible, 1889, p. 360).
The geological survey of Palestine reveals its uniformly cretaceous formation, extending from the Lebanon ranges to the plateau of Hebron. The earlier rocks of the carboniferous period, if they do exist there at all under the subsequent strata, are buried at quite inaccessible depths. Traces of carboniferous outcrop, but destitute of carbonaceous deposits, have been found in the sandstone of the southern desert and the limestone of the Wâdy Nasb.
Literature.—W. M. Thomson, The Land and the Book, 1886, iii. 193; Tristram, Nat. Hist. of Bible, 1889, p. 360; Conder, Tent Work in Pal. [1] ii. 326; Hull, Mount Seir, etc., 1889, p. 194; Gesenius, Thesaurus, p. 280; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, article ‘Coal.’
P. Henderson Aitken.
King James Dictionary - Coal
COAL, n.
1. A piece of wood, or other combustible substance, ignited, burning, or charred. When burning or ignited, it is called a live coal, or burning coal, or coal of fire. When the fire is extinct, it is called charcoal. 2. In the language of chimists, any substance containing oil, which has been exposed to a fire in a close vessel, so that its volatile matter is expelled, and it can sustain a red heat without further decomposition. 3. In mineralogy, a solid, opake, inflammable substance, found in the earth, and by way of distinction called fossil coal. It is divided by recent mineralogists into three species, anthracite or glance coal, black or bituminous coal, and brown coal or lignite under which are included many varieties, such as cannel coal, bovey coal, jet, &c. COAL,
1. To burn to coal, or charcoal to char. 2. To mark or delineate with charcoal.
Webster's Dictionary - Sea Coal
Coal brought by sea; - a name by which mineral coal was formerly designated in the south of England, in distinction from charcoal, which was brought by land.
Webster's Dictionary - Day-Coal
(n.) The upper stratum of coal, as nearest the light or surface.
Webster's Dictionary - Kennel Coal
See Cannel coal.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Coal
Charred wood used for fuel. See Cooking. The altar of sacrifice burned coals (Leviticus 16:12 ), as did the blacksmith's fire (Isaiah 44:12 ) and the baker's (Isaiah 44:19 ). Coals provided heat for refining metal (Ezekiel 24:11 ). Burning coals became a symbol of divine judgment, apparently representing God coming to earth and causing volcanoes to erupt and throw burning coals on His enemies (Psalm 18:13 ).
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Coal
Usually in Scripture, charcoal, or the embers of fire. Mineral coal is now procured in mount Lebanon, eight hours from Beirut; but we have no certainty that it was known and used by the Jews. The following passages are those which most strongly suggest this substance, 2 Samuel 22:9,13 ; Job 41:21 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Coal
The first and most frequent use of the word rendered coal is a live ember, burning fuel. (Proverbs 26:21 ) In (2 Samuel 22:9,13 ) "coals of fire" are put metaphorically for the lightnings proceeding from God. (Psalm 18:8,12,13 ; 140:10 ) In (Proverbs 26:21 ) fuel not yet lighted is clearly signified. The fuel meant in the above passage is probably charcoal, and not coal in our sense of the word.

Sentence search

Lignite - ) Mineral Coal retaining the texture of the wood from which it was formed, and burning with an empyreumatic odor. It is of more recent origin than the anthracite and bituminous Coal of the proper Coal series. Called also brown Coal, wood Coal
Coal - Coal, n. When burning or ignited, it is called a live Coal, or burning Coal, or Coal of fire. When the fire is extinct, it is called charcoal. In mineralogy, a solid, opake, inflammable substance, found in the earth, and by way of distinction called fossil Coal. It is divided by recent mineralogists into three species, anthracite or glance Coal, black or bituminous Coal, and brown Coal or lignite under which are included many varieties, such as cannel Coal, bovey Coal, jet, &c. Coal, ...
1. To burn to Coal, or charcoal to char. To mark or delineate with charcoal
Coaly - ) Pertaining to, or resembling, Coal; containing Coal; of the nature of Coal
Anthracite - ) A hard, compact variety of mineral Coal, of high luster, differing from bituminous Coal in containing little or no bitumen, in consequence of which it burns with a nearly non luminous flame. Also called glance Coal and blind Coal
Xylanthrax - ) Wood Coal, or charcoal; - so called in distinction from mineral Coal
Coal Works - A place where Coal is dug, including the machinery for raising the Coal
Underclay - ) A stratum of clay lying beneath a Coal bed, often containing the roots of Coal plants, especially the Stigmaria
Anthracosis - ) A chronic lung disease, common among Coal miners, due to the inhalation of Coal dust; - called also collier's lung and miner's phthisis
Sea Coal - Coal brought by sea; - a name by which mineral Coal was formerly designated in the south of England, in distinction from charcoal, which was brought by land
Coal - It is by no means certain that the Hebrews were acquainted with mineral Coal, although it is found in Syria. Their common fuel was dried dung of animals and wood charcoal. Two different words are found in Hebrew to denote Coal, both occurring in Proverbs 26:21 , "As Coal [1] is to burning Coal Hod - ) A utensil for holding Coal; a Coal scuttle
Colly - ) The black grime or soot of Coal. ) To render black or dark, as of with Coal smut; to begrime
Corf - ) A wooden frame, sled, or low-wheeled wagon, to convey Coal or ore in the mines. ) A large basket used in carrying or hoisting Coal or ore
Caking Coal - See Coal
Bovey Coal - A kind of mineral Coal, or brown lignite, burning with a weak flame, and generally a disagreeable odor; - found at Bovey Tracey, Devonshire, England. It is of geological age of the oolite, and not of the true Coal era
Canal Coal - See Cannel Coal
Candle Coal - See Cannel Coal
Rezeph - Pavement; burning Coal
Kennel Coal - See Cannel Coal
Rizpah - Bed; extension; a Coal
Atrous - ) Coal-black; very black
Coaled - ) of Coal...
Brasier - See Coal and Firepan
Cinder - ) A hot Coal without flame; an ember. ) Partly burned or vitrified Coal, or other combustible, in which fire is extinct
Coaling - ) of Coal...
Lead - ) A live Coal
Lead - ) A live Coal
Carboniferous - ) Producing or containing carbon or Coal
Anthracomancy - ) Divination by inspecting a burning Coal
Empyrical - ) Containing the combustible principle of Coal
Coal - Coal . Mineral Coal was unknown in Bible times. Wherever ‘coal’ (or ‘coals’) is mentioned, therefore, we must in the great majority of cases understand wood or charcoal. Several species of wood used for heating purposes are named in Isaiah 44:14-16 , to which Psalms 120:4 adds ‘coals of broom’ (RVm
Coal, or rather charcoal, supplies several Scripture metaphors, the most interesting of which is illustrated by the expression of the wise woman of Tekoa, ‘thus shall they quench my Coal that is left’ (2 Samuel 14:7 )
Culm - ) Mineral Coal that is not bituminous; anthracite, especially when found in small masses. ) The waste of the Pennsylvania anthracite mines, consisting of fine Coal, dust, etc
Sloam - ) A layer of earth between Coal seams
Coal-Black - ) As black as Coal; jet black; very black
Leed - ) A live or glowing Coal; a glede
Leed - ) A live or glowing Coal; a glede
Poldway - ) A kind of coarse bagging, - used for Coal sacks
Alleghany - Pertaining to or designating a subdivision of the Pennsylvanian Coal measure
Coal-Meter - ) A licensed or official Coal measurer in London
Screenings - ) The refuse left after screening sand, Coal, ashes, etc
Kyanol - ) A base obtained from Coal tar
Coal - ) To supply with Coal; as, to Coal a steamer. ) A thoroughly charred, and extinguished or still ignited, fragment from wood or other combustible substance; charcoal. ) To take in Coal; as, the steamer Coaled at Southampton. ) A black, or brownish black, solid, combustible substance, dug from beds or veins in the earth to be used for fuel, and consisting, like charcoal, mainly of carbon, but more compact, and often affording, when heated, a large amount of volatile matter. ) To burn to charcoal; to char. ) To mark or delineate with charcoal
Coal-Whipper - ) One who raises Coal out of the hold of a ship
Hogger - ) A stocking without a foot, worn by Coal miners at work
Day-Coal - ) The upper stratum of Coal, as nearest the light or surface
Fitter - ) A Coal broker who conducts the sales between the owner of a Coal pit and the shipper
Claggy - ) Adhesive; - said of a roof in a mine to which Coal clings
Eikosylene - ) A liquid hydrocarbon, C20H38, of the acetylene series, obtained from brown Coal
Metage - ) Measurement, especially of Coal
Leucoline - ) A nitrogenous organic base from Coal tar, and identical with quinoline
Butty - ) One who mines by contract, at so much per ton of Coal or ore
Chark - ) To burn to a Coal; to char. ) Charcoal; a cinder
Holing - ) Undercutting in a bed of Coal, in order to bring down the upper mass
Brettice - ) The wooden boarding used in supporting the roofs and walls of Coal mines
Coalpit - ) A pit where Coal is dug. ) A place where charcoal is made
Pitchwork - ) The work of a Coal miner who is paid by a share of his product
Thallene - ) A hydrocarbon obtained from Coal-tar residues, and remarkable for its intense yellowish green fluorescence
Carbuncle - " When held up to the sun, this gem shines like a burning Coal, a dark-red glowing Coal, and hence is called "carbunculus", i. , a little Coal
Culmiferous - ) Containing, or abounding in, culm or glance Coal
Anthraconite - ) A Coal-black marble, usually emitting a fetid smell when rubbed; - called also stinkstone and swinestone
Jinny Road - An inclined road in a Coal mine, on which loaded cars descend by gravity, drawing up empty ones
Byard - ) A piece of leather crossing the breast, used by the men who drag sledges in Coal mines
Retinite - ) An inflammable mineral resin, usually of a yellowish brown color, found in roundish masses, sometimes with Coal
Methanometer - ) An instrument, resembling a eudiometer, to detect the presence and amount of methane, as in Coal mines
Breeze - ) Refuse Coal, Coal ashes, and cinders, used in the burning of bricks. ) Refuse left in the process of making coke or burning charcoal
Coal - The first and most frequent use of the word rendered Coal is a live ember, burning fuel. (Proverbs 26:21 ) In (2 Samuel 22:9,13 ) "coals of fire" are put metaphorically for the lightnings proceeding from God. The fuel meant in the above passage is probably charcoal, and not Coal in our sense of the word
Phenanthrene - ) A complex hydrocarbon, C14H10, found in Coal tar, and obtained as a white crystalline substance with a bluish fluorescence
Corb - ) A basket used in Coal mines, etc
Corallin - ) A yellow Coal-tar dyestuff which probably consists chiefly of rosolic acid
Cologne Earth - An earth of a deep brown color, containing more vegetable than mineral matter; an earthy variety of lignite, or brown Coal
Bord - ) The face of Coal parallel to the natural fissures
Asterophyllite - ) A fossil plant from the Coal formations of Europe and America, now regarded as the branchlets and foliage of calamites
Picene - ) A hydrocarbon (C/H/) extracted from the pitchy residue of Coal tar and petroleum as a bluish fluorescent crystalline substance
Pseudo-Cumene - ) A hydrocarbon of the aromatic series, metameric with mesitylene and cumene, found in Coal tar, and obtained as a colorless liquid
Dan - ) A small truck or sledge used in Coal mines
Eosaurus - ) An extinct marine reptile from the Coal measures of Nova Scotia; - so named because supposed to be of the earliest known reptiles
Photogen - It is obtained by distilling Coal, paraffin, etc
Fluoranthene - ) A white crystalline hydrocarbon C/H/, of a complex structure, found as one ingrdient of the higher boiling portion of Coal tar
Pyrene - ) One of the less volatile hydrocarbons of Coal tar, obtained as a white crystalline substance, C16H10
Asoscope - ) An apparatus for detecting the presence of any dangerous gas, from a gas leak in a Coal mine or a dwelling house
Lede - ) A live Coal
Coom - ) Soot; Coal dust; refuse matter, as the dirty grease which comes from axle boxes, or the refuse at the mouth of an oven
Heugh - ) A shaft in a Coal pit; a hollow in a quarry
Haulabout - ) A bargelike vessel with steel hull, large hatchways, and Coal transporters, for Coaling war vessels from its own hold or from other colliers
Dechen, Ernst Heinrich Karl Van - Made disinguished research on Westphalian and northern European Coal deposits
Carbolic - ) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid derived from Coal tar and other sources; as, carbolic acid (called also phenic acid, and phenol)
Mellite - ) A mineral of a honey color, found in brown Coal, and partly the result of vegetable decomposition; honeystone
Julian Woods - Priest, made distinguished research on the geology of South Australia and investigated the Coal and mineral resources of the East
Anthracene Oil - A heavy green oil (partially solidifying on cooling), which distills over from Coal tar at a temperature above 270�
Coalfish - ) The pollock; - called also, Coalsey, colemie, colmey, Coal whiting, etc
Woods, Julian Edmund Tenison - Priest, made distinguished research on the geology of South Australia and investigated the Coal and mineral resources of the East
Cryptidine - ) One of the quinoline bases, obtained from Coal tar as an oily liquid, C11H11N; also, any one of several substances metameric with, and resembling, cryptidine proper
Basin - ) An isolated or circumscribed formation, particularly where the strata dip inward, on all sides, toward a center; - especially applied to the Coal formations, called Coal basins or Coal fields
Fluorene - It occurs in the higher boiling products of Coal tar, and is obtained artificially
Coal - pecham , "a black Coal," and gachelath , "burning Coals. " Proverbs 26:21; "as Coals (fuel) are to burning Coals," etc. " "Coals of fire" in 2 Samuel 22:9; 2 Samuel 22:13, represent the lightning of God's wrath. In Proverbs 25:22, "heap Coals of fire upon thine enemy's head" (Romans 12:20), the meaning is, melt him into burning shame at his own unworthy hatred, and love for thee who hast overcome his evil with thy good. In Psalms 120:4 "coals of juniper" rather burning brands of broom, retamim . ...
As their slanders burnt like Coals on fire, so, by righteous retribution in kind, God will give them hot Coals. In 2 Samuel 14:7 "they shall quench my Coal that is left," i. In Isaiah 6:6 and 1 Kings 19:6 the "coals" are in the Hebrew (rezeph ) hot stones, on which cakes were baked and flesh cooked. In Habakkuk 3:5 (resheph ) "burning Coals" poetically and figuratively express "burning diseases," as the parallel "pestilence" shows; also compare Deuteronomy 32:24; Psalms 91:6. " Mineral Coal protrudes through the strata to the surface of parts of Lebanon, at Cornale, eight miles from Beirut, the Coal seams are three feet thick; but it seems not to have been anciently known as fuel. Charcoal is what is meant by "coal
Collidine - ) One of a class of organic bases, C8H11N, usually pungent oily liquids, belonging to the pyridine series, and obtained from bone oil, Coal tar, naphtha, and certain alkaloids
Propylene - It occurs in Coal gas, and is produced artificially in various ways
Viridine - ) A greenish, oily, nitrogenous hydrocarbon, C12H19N7, obtained from Coal tar, and probably consisting of a mixture of several metameric compounds which are higher derivatives of the base pyridine
Obbing - ) The refuse thrown back into the excavation after removing the Coal
Anthracene - C6H4, which accompanies naphthalene in the last stages of the distillation of Coal tar
Parvoline - ) A liquid base, C/H/N, of the pyridine group, found in Coal tar; also, any one of the series of isometric substances of which it is the type
Ribbed - ) Intercalated with slate; - said of a seam of Coal
Heaver - ) One who, or that which, heaves or lifts; a laborer employed on docks in handling freight; as, a Coal heaver
Thill - ) The floor of a Coal mine
Paraffine - ) A white waxy substance, resembling spermaceti, tasteless and odorless, and obtained from Coal tar, wood tar, petroleum, etc. It was formerly regarded as a definite compound, but is now known to be a complex mixture of several higher hydrocarbons of the methane or marsh-gas series; hence, by extension, any substance, whether solid, liquid, or gaseous, of the same chemical series; thus Coal gas and kerosene consist largely of paraffins
Chaldron - Now used exclusively for Coal and coke
Phlorone - ) A yellow crystalline substance having a peculiar unpleasant odor, resembling the quinones, and obtained from beechwood tar and Coal tar, as also by the oxidation of xylidine; - called also xyloquinone
Rubidine - ) A nitrogenous base homologous with pyridine, obtained from Coal tar as an oily liquid, C11H17N; also, any one of the group od metameric compounds of which rubidine is the type
Lorry - ) A small cart or wagon, as those used on the tramways in mines to carry Coal or rubbish; also, a barrow or truck for shifting baggage, as at railway stations
Chrysene - ) One of the higher aromatic hydrocarbons of Coal tar, allied to naphthalene and anthracene
Carburetor - ) An apparatus in which Coal gas, hydrogen, or air is passed through or over a volatile hydrocarbon, in order to confer or increase illuminating power
Viewer - ) The superintendent of a Coal mine
Bude Light - A light in which high illuminating power is obtained by introducing a jet of oxygen gas or of common air into the center of a flame fed with Coal gas or with oil
Picoline - ) Any one of three isometric bases (C6H7N) related to pyridine, and obtained from bone oil, acrolein ammonia, and Coal-tar naphtha, as colorless mobile liquids of strong odor; - called also methyl pyridine
Shipment - ) The act or process of shipping; as, he was engaged in the shipment of Coal for London; an active shipment of wheat from the West
Toluene - CH3, of the aromatic series, homologous with benzene, and obtained as a light mobile colorless liquid, by distilling tolu balsam, Coal tar, etc
Naphtha - ) One of several volatile inflammable liquids obtained by the distillation of certain carbonaceous materials and resembling the naphtha from petroleum; as, Boghead naphtha, from Boghead Coal (obtained at Boghead, Scotland); crude naphtha, or light oil, from Coal tar; wood naphtha, from wood, etc
Cresol - They are obtained from Coal tar and wood tar, and are colorless, oily liquids or solids
Fuchsine - ) Aniline red; an artificial Coal-tar dyestuff, of a metallic green color superficially, resembling cantharides, but when dissolved forming a brilliant dark red
Whipper - ) One who raises Coal or merchandise with a tackle from a chip's hold
Oxyhydrogen Light - Coal gas (producing the oxygas light), or the vapor of ether (oxyether light) or methylated spirit (oxyspirit light), may be substituted for hydrogen
Slack - ) Small Coal; also, Coal dust; culm
Conveyor - , one for conveying grain, Coal, etc
Asoline - ) A highly volatile mixture of fluid hydrocarbons, obtained from petroleum, as also by the distillation of bituminous Coal
Coridine - ) A colorless or yellowish oil, C10H15N, of a leathery odor, occuring in Coal tar, Dippel's oil, tobacco smoke, etc
Perseverance - A poor woman had a supply of Coal laid at her door by a charitable neighbour. I said to the child, 'Do you expect to get all that Coal in with that little shovel?' She was quite confused at my question, but her answer was very striking, 'Yes, sir, if I work long enough
Firepan - ), for removing charcoal, and probably ashes also, from the altar of burnt-offering. ), the firepans or Coal-pans were of various sizes, there given, and were each furnished with a long or a short handle. ...
When used to hold live charcoal for the burning of incense the Coal-pan becomes a censer (Leviticus 10:1 ; Leviticus 16:12 etc. See Coal; House, § 7
Fault - ) In Coal seams, Coal rendered worthless by impurities in the seam; as, slate fault, dirt fault, etc. ; as, the Coal beds are badly faulted
Coal - COAL. in both ἁνθρακιά, meaning properly ‘a brazier filled with lighted charcoal’). As a mineral, Coal does not exist in Palestine except in the Wâdy Hummanâ in the Lebanon, and was mined there only during the rule of Muhammad Ali about 1834 (Thomson, The Land and the Book, 1886, iii. The rendering ‘coal’ must be taken as = ‘charcoal. 280; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, article ‘Coal
Coke - ) Mineral Coal charred, or depriver of its bitumen, sulphur, or other volatile matter by roasting in a kiln or oven, or by distillation, as in gas works
Calamite - ) A fossil plant of the Coal formation, having the general form of plants of the modern Equiseta (the Horsetail or Scouring Rush family) but sometimes attaining the height of trees, and having the stem more or less woody within
Heptane - Specifically, a colorless liquid, found as a constituent of petroleum, in the tar oil of cannel Coal, etc
Emerald - Josephus, however, and the Seventy make it a gem like a burning Coal-the Indian ruby
Coal Tar - A thick, black, tarry liquid, obtained by the distillation of bituminous Coal in the manufacture of illuminating gas; used for making printer's ink, black varnish, etc
Cobble - ) Cob Coal
Bin - ) A box, frame, crib, or inclosed place, used as a receptacle for any commodity; as, a corn bin; a wine bin; a Coal bin
Press Cake - A cake of compressed substance, as: in gunpowder manufacture, the cake resulting from compressing the meal powder; in the treatment of Coal tar, the pressed product at various stages of the process; or, in beet-sugar manufacture, the vegetable residue after the sugar juice has been expressed
Ember - ) A lighted Coal, smoldering amid ashes; - used chiefly in the plural, to signify mingled Coals and ashes; the smoldering remains of a fire
Naphthalene - ) A white crystalline aromatic hydrocarbon, C10H8, analogous to benzene, and obtained by the distillation of certain bituminous materials, such as the heavy oil of Coal tar
Bin - ) A box, frame, crib, or inclosed place, used as a receptacle for any commodity; as, a corn bin; a wine bin; a Coal bin
Pica - ) A vitiated appetite that craves what is unfit for food, as chalk, ashes, Coal, etc
Kerosene - , and hence called also Coal oil
Armored Cruiser - A man-of-war carrying a large Coal supply, and more or less protected from the enemy's shot by iron or steel armor
Benzene - ) A volatile, very inflammable liquid, C6H6, contained in the naphtha produced by the destructive distillation of Coal, from which it is separated by fractional distillation
Briquette - ) A block of compacted Coal dust, or peat, etc
Clump - ) The compressed clay of Coal strata
Xylene - ) Any of a group of three metameric hydrocarbons of the aromatic series, found in Coal and wood tar, and so named because found in crude wood spirit
Firing - ) Fuel; firewood or Coal
Vend - ) The total sales of Coal from a colliery
Quinoline - ) A nitrogenous base, C9H7N obtained as a pungent colorless liquid by the distillation of alkaloids, bones, Coal tar, etc
Meter - See Coal-meter
Coal - Usually in Scripture, charcoal, or the embers of fire. Mineral Coal is now procured in mount Lebanon, eight hours from Beirut; but we have no certainty that it was known and used by the Jews
Charcoal - , Coal made by charring wood in a kiln, retort, etc. ) Finely prepared charcoal in small sticks, used as a drawing implement
Drummond Light - A very intense light, produced by turning two streams of gas, one oxygen and the other hydrogen, or Coal gas, in a state of ignition, upon a ball of lime; or a stream of oxygen gas through a flame of alcohol upon a ball or disk of lime; - called also oxycalcium light, or lime light
Tar - ) A thick, black, viscous liquid obtained by the distillation of wood, Coal, etc
Fuel - ) Any matter used to produce heat by burning; that which feeds fire; combustible matter used for fires, as wood, Coal, peat, etc
Coal - Mineral Coal is now known to exist in the Lebanon range, but was unknown in Biblical times. Fires were seldom needed for warmth, and were as a rule used only for the cooking of food: the fire named in John 18:18 was in the night; food was cooked by charcoal or by warming the ovens with any vegetable refuse. The Coal generally referred to in the O. was charcoal; but other words are used which imply the hot or glowing stones on which cakes were cooked. ...
Heaping Coals of fire on an enemy's head by kindness (Proverbs 25:21,22 ; Romans 12:20 ) becomes a test to him (as metal is tested by the fire), the kindness shown him will either bring about contrition and friendship, or harden him yet the more
Firepan - It was probably a metallic cinder-basin used for the purpose of carrying live Coal for burning incense, and of carrying away the snuff in trimming the lamps
Emerald - The name given to this stone in the New Testament Greek is smaragdos, which means "live Coal
Pyridine - ) A nitrogenous base, C5H5N, obtained from the distillation of bone oil or Coal tar, and by the decomposition of certain alkaloids, as a colorless liquid with a peculiar pungent odor
Putter - ) Specifically, one who pushes the small wagons in a Coal mine, and the like
Laramie Group - It contains beds of lignite, often valuable for Coal, and is hence also called the lignitic group
Rosecrans, William Starke - Military strategist, inventor, Coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and U
William Rosecrans - Military strategist, inventor, Coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and U
Scuttle - ) A wide-mouthed vessel for holding Coal: a Coal hod
Breaker - ) Specifically: A machine for breaking rocks, or for breaking Coal at the mines; also, the building in which such a machine is placed
Rezeph - (ree' zehf) Place name meaning, “glowing Coal
Pyrrol - ) A nitrogenous base found in Coal tar, bone oil, and other distillates of organic substances, and also produced synthetically as a colorless liquid, C4H5N, having on odor like that of chloroform
Sigillaria - ) A genus of fossil trees principally found in the Coal formation; - so named from the seallike leaf scars in vertical rows on the surface
Fuel - Any matter which serves as aliment to fire that which feeds fire combustible matter, as wood, Coal, peat, &c
Output - ) The amount of Coal or ore put out from one or more mines, or the quantity of material produced by, or turned out from, one or more furnaces or mills, in a given time
Carbuncle - (in English "a little Coal," "a bright red gem"): eqedach , boreqeth , the former in Isaiah 54:12 from qadach "to burn," the latter from baraq "to flash
Fuel - Wood or charcoal is much used still in all the towns of Syria and Egypt. (See Coal
Brat - ) A thin bed of Coal mixed with pyrites or carbonate of lime
Emerald - it is σμάραγδος, which signifies 'live Coal,' and is supposed to refer to some stone with prismatic crystals
Char - ) To reduce to Coal or carbon by exposure to heat; to reduce to charcoal; to burn to a cinder
Clinker - ) Scoria or vitrified incombustible matter, formed in a grate or furnace where anthracite Coal in used; vitrified or burnt matter ejected from a volcano; slag
Aniline - It is a colorless, oily liquid, originally obtained from indigo by distillation, but now largely manufactured from Coal tar or nitrobenzene as a base from which many brilliant dyes are made
Shovel - ) An implement consisting of a broad scoop, or more or less hollow blade, with a handle, used for lifting and throwing earth, Coal, grain, or other loose substances
Ashes - The earthy particles of combustible substances remaining after combustion as of wood or Coal
Winning - ) The portion of a Coal field out for working
Rizpah - Rizpah (rĭz'pah), a Coal, a hot stone for baking
Bunker - ) A large bin or similar receptacle; as, a Coal bunker
Miner - ; one engaged in the business of getting ore, Coal, or precious stones, out of the earth; one who digs military mines; as, armies have sappers and miners
Coals - (ἄνθρακες, prumae)...
The Coal of the Bible is charcoal. The knowledge of the process of preparing charcoal from timber dates from a remote period. True Coal is not found in Syria except in one part of Lebanon, where it was mined for a short time about 1834 (C. Pieces of charcoal in process of combustion were called ‘coals of fire’ (ἄνθρακες πυρός = גַּחֲלֵי אֵשׁ), and glowing Coals heaped upon the head became a figure for the burning sense of shame which an enemy feels when he receives a return of good for the evil he has done (Romans 12:20 || Proverbs 25:21-22). ), that the ‘coals of fire’ are Divine judgments which will fall on the sinner’s head if he hardens his heart against persevering love, is impossible
Newbattle Abbey - 1140,by Saint David of Scotland, was a filiation of Melrose and possessed valuable Coal mines
Abbey, Newbattle - 1140,by Saint David of Scotland, was a filiation of Melrose and possessed valuable Coal mines
Screen - ) To pass, as Coal, gravel, ashes, etc. ) A long, coarse riddle or sieve, sometimes a revolving perforated cylinder, used to separate the coarser from the finer parts, as of Coal, sand, gravel, and the like
Keel - ) A barge or lighter, used on the Type for carrying Coal from Newcastle; also, a barge load of Coal, twenty-one tons, four cwt
Bring - ) To produce in exchange; to sell for; to fetch; as, what does Coal bring per ton?...
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Fossil - ) Dug out of the earth; as, fossil Coal; fossil salt
Coal - Psalm 120:4 (b) The evil words of hostile enemies are compared to Coals that burn and hurt when they strike. ...
Proverbs 6:23 (b) This is a figure to describe the fact that those who live in sin are defiled and hurt by sin even as those who walk upon Coals are burned by them. ...
Isaiah 6:6 (b) The purging power of a live Coal which destroys germs and corruption is here used to illustrate the effect of the Lord Himself in touching human life to purge, cleanse, and blot out the sins
Lamp - ...
Lamp of safety, or safety lamp, a lamp for lighting Coal mines, without exposing workmen to the explosion of inflammable air
Damp - ) A gaseous product, formed in Coal mines, old wells, pints, etc
Dresser - ) A kind of pick for shaping large Coal
Coals - 1: ἄνθραξ (Strong's #440 — Adjective — antrax — anth'-rax ) "a burning Coal" (cp. , "anthracite,") is used in the plural in Romans 12:20 , metaphorically in a proverbial expression, "thou shalt heap Coals of fire on his head" (from Proverbs 25:22 ), signifying retribution by kindness, i. 1, is "a heap of burning Coals, or a charcoal fire," John 18:18 ; 21:9
Transformations of Grace - A short time ago the manufacturers of lighting gas were puzzled to know how to dispose of the Coal-tar left in the retorts. You eat a bit of delicious confectionery, happily unconscious that the exquisite taste which you enjoy so keenly comes from Coal-tar; you buy at the druggist's a tiny phial of what is labelled 'Otto of Roses,' little dreaming that the delicious perfume is wafted, not from 'the fields of Araby,' but from the foul gas retort
Asphaltum - Artificial asphalt is prepared from Coal tar, lime, sand, etc
Distillation - ) The separation of the volatile parts of a substance from the more fixed; specifically, the operation of driving off gas or vapor from volatile liquids or solids, by heat in a retort or still, and the condensation of the products as far as possible by a cool receiver, alembic, or condenser; rectification; vaporization; condensation; as, the distillation of illuminating gas and Coal, of alcohol from sour mash, or of boric acid in steam
Seam - In mines, a vein or stratum of metal, ore, Coal and the like
Shearing - ) The process of making a vertical side cutting in working into a face of Coal
Trimmer - ) An apparatus used for piling the Coal in gradually increasing piles made by building up at the point of the cone or top of the prism
Tram - ) A four-wheeled truck running on rails, and used in a mine, as for carrying Coal or ore
Win - ) To extract, as ore or Coal
Rib - ) Solid Coal on the side of a gallery; solid ore in a vein. ) An elongated pillar of ore or Coal left as a support
Mine - ) A pit or excavation in the earth, from which metallic ores, precious stones, Coal, or other mineral substances are taken by digging; - distinguished from the pits from which stones for architectural purposes are taken, and which are called quarries. ) To dig a mine or pit in the earth; to get ore, metals, Coal, or precious stones, out of the earth; to dig in the earth for minerals; to dig a passage or cavity under anything in order to overthrow it by explosives or otherwise
Wale - ) To choose; to select; specifically (Mining), to pick out the refuse of (coal) by hand, in order to clean it
Bucket - ) A vessel (as a tub or scoop) for hoisting and conveying Coal, ore, grain, etc
Dump - ) To put or throw down with more or less of violence; hence, to unload from a cart by tilting it; as, to dump sand, Coal, etc
Roof - ) The surface or bed of rock immediately overlying a bed of Coal or a flat vein
Heap - ) To throw or lay in a heap; to make a heap of; to pile; as, to heap stones; - often with up; as, to heap up earth; or with on; as, to heap on wood or Coal
Pit - ) A large hole in the ground from which material is dug or quarried; as, a stone pit; a gravel pit; or in which material is made by burning; as, a lime pit; a charcoal pit. ) The shaft of a Coal mine; a Coal pit
Pit - ) A large hole in the ground from which material is dug or quarried; as, a stone pit; a gravel pit; or in which material is made by burning; as, a lime pit; a charcoal pit. ) The shaft of a Coal mine; a Coal pit
Affliction: Making us Long For Heaven - It was a very Marah to us when he brought us back milk too sour for us to drink, and bread black as a Coal, too hard to bite, and sour as the curds
Purpose: Unity of - His one gloomy apartment was never brightened with Coal, candle, or the countenance of a visitor, and he never ate a morsel at his own expense
Fuel - Numerous types of fuel are mentioned in Scripture: wood (Isaiah 44:14-16 ); charcoal (Jeremiah 36:22 ; John 18:18 ); shrubs (Psalm 120:4 ); thorn bushes (Ecclesiastes 7:6 ; Nahum 1:10 ); grass (Matthew 6:30 ); weeds (Matthew 13:40 ); vines (Ezekiel 15:4 ,Ezekiel 15:4,15:6 ); branch trimmings (John 15:6 ); animal or even human dung (Ezekiel 4:12 ); and the blood-stained clothing of fallen warriors (Isaiah 9:5 ). Coal was not known to the Hebrews
Carbuncle - When held up to the sun, it loses its deep tinge, and becomes of the color of burning Coal
Facing - ) A powdered substance, as charcoal, bituminous Coal, ect
Fuel - ‘food’]'>[1] of fire’ ( Isaiah 9:5 ; Isaiah 9:19 ) in use among the Hebrews was undoubtedly wood, either in its natural state or, among the wealthier classes, as charcoal (see Coal)
Duty - ) The efficiency of an engine, especially a steam pumping engine, as measured by work done by a certain quantity of fuel; usually, the number of pounds of water lifted one foot by one bushel of Coal (94 lbs
Heap - To throw or lay in a heap to pile as, to heap stones often with up as, to heap up earth or with on as, to heap on wood or Coal
Tub - ) A box or bucket in which Coal or ore is sent up a shaft; - so called by miners
Cog - ) One of the rough pillars of stone or Coal left to support the roof of a mine
Incense - It is sprinkled upon a glowing Coal in a covered vessel called a censer, and emits a fragrant smoke
Seam - ) A thin layer or stratum; a narrow vein between two thicker strata; as, a seam of Coal
Consume - Fire consumes wood, Coal, stubble animals consume flesh and vegetables
Carbuncle - ברקת , Exodus 28:17 ; Exodus 39:10 ; Ezekiel 28:13 ; and ανθρεξ , Ecclesiastes 32:5; Tob_13:17 ; a very elegant and rare gem, known to the ancients by the name ανθραξ , or Coal, because, when held up before the sun, it appears like a piece of bright burning charcoal: the name carbunculus has the same meaning
Log - ) A record and tabulated statement of the work done by an engine, as of a steamship, of the Coal consumed, and of other items relating to the performance of machinery during a given time
Clamp - ) A mass of bricks heaped up to be burned; or of ore for roasting, or of Coal for coking
Cat - It is employed in the Coal and timber trade
Breast - ) The face of a Coal working
Crimp - ) A Coal broker
Andalusia, Spain - The valleys and plains grow oranges, olives, sugarcane, wheat, corn, and other grains; the mountains produce lead, silver, copper, mercury and Coal
Damp - These are often known to exist in wells, which continue long covered and not used, and in mines and Coal-pits and sometimes they issue from the old lavas of volcanoes
Quarry - We generally apply the word mine to the pit from which are taken metals and Coal from quarries are taken stones for building, as marble, freestone, slate, &c
Feed - ) To fill the wants of; to supply with that which is used or wasted; as, springs feed ponds; the hopper feeds the mill; to feed a furnace with Coal. ) The supply of material to a machine, as water to a steam boiler, Coal to a furnace, or grain to a run of stones
Slime, - It is usually found of a black or brownish-black color, externally not unlike Coal, but it varies in a consistency from a bright, pitchy condition, with a conchoidal fracture, to thick, viscid masses of mineral tar
Cob - ) A lump or piece of anything, usually of a somewhat large size, as of Coal, or stone
Pocket - ) A bin for storing Coal, grain, etc
Rizpah - Coal; hot stone, the daughter of Aiah, and one of Saul's concubines
Seraphim - ' In Isaiah 6:2-7 (the plural) the seraphim are exalted beings, but the only actions recorded there are that one brought a live Coal from off the altar and laid it upon the prophet's mouth, and said, "Thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged
Gomer - (goh' muhr) Personal name meaning, “complete, enough,” or “burning Coal
Panel - ) One of the districts divided by pillars of extra size, into which a mine is laid off in one system of extracting Coal
Bank - ) A deposit of ore or Coal, worked by excavations above water level. ) The face of the Coal at which miners are working
Black - ) Destitute of light, or incapable of reflecting it; of the color of soot or Coal; of the darkest or a very dark color, the opposite of white; characterized by such a color; as, black cloth; black hair or eyes
Censer - The priest filled the censer with live Coal from the sacred fire on the altar of burnt-offering, and having carried it into the sanctuary, there threw upon the burning Coals the sweet incense (Leviticus 16:12,13 ), which sent up a cloud of smoke, filling the apartment with fragrance
Wax - ) A substance, somewhat resembling wax, found in connection with certain deposits of rock salt and Coal; - called also mineral wax, and ozocerite
Bore - This is a method of discovering veins of ore and Coal without opening a mine
Coming to Christ: as a Sinner (2) - In one of the Coal-pits of the north, while a considerable number of the miners were dawn below, the top of the pit fell in, and the shaft was completely blocked up
Live - ) Being in a state of ignition; burning; having active properties; as, a live Coal; live embers
Burn - One of the śârâphim ministered to Isaiah by bringing a glowing Coal from the altar
Lip - Isaiah’s “lips” were ritually cleansed by the burning Coal ( Float - ) A Coal cart
Nazarites - The prophet Jeremiah speaks of them in his Book of Lamentations in a very affecting manner: "Her Nazarites (saith he) were purer than snow, they were whiter than milk, they were more ruddy in body than rubies, their polishing was of sapphire, their visage is blacker than a Coal, they are not not known in the streets
Bed - ) A layer or seam, or a horizontal stratum between layers; as, a bed of Coal, iron, etc. ) A mass or heap of anything arranged like a bed; as, a bed of ashes or Coals
Flush - ) To fill underground spaces, especially in Coal mines, with material carried by water, which, after drainage, constitutes a compact mass
Burn - To expel the volatile parts and reduce to charcoal by fire as, to burn wood into Coal
Quarter - ) The fourth of a ton in weight, or eight bushels of grain; as, a quarter of wheat; also, the fourth part of a chaldron of Coal
Seraphim - ...
Besides praising God they are secondly the medium of imparting spiritual fire from God to His prophet; when Isaiah laments alike his own and the people's uncleanness of lips, in contrast to the seraphim chanting in alternate responses with pure lips God's praises, and (Isaiah 6:5-7) with a deep sense of the unfitness of his own lips to speak God's message to the people, one of the seraphim flew with a live Coal which he took from off the altar of burnt offering in the temple court, the fire on it being that which God at first had kindled (Leviticus 9:24), and laid it upon Isaiah's mouth, saying, "lo, this hath touched thy lips, and thine iniquity is taken away and thy sin purged
Shoot - ) An inclined plane, either artificial or natural, down which timber, Coal, etc
Drop - ) A machine for lowering heavy weights, as packages, Coal wagons, etc
In - It denotes a state of being mixed, as sugar in tea or combined, as carbonic acid in Coal, or latent heat in air
Name - ”...
This word is sometimes a synonym for “memory” or “reputation” (that which remains): “… And so they shall quench my Coal which is left, and shall not leave to my husband neither name nor remainder upon the earth” ( Measure - ) Beds or strata; as, Coal measures; lead measures
Eye - ) They also tinge the inside of their eyelids Coal-black with kochel, a coloring material prepared from lead ore
Family - In capital cases, where revenge was desired, the entire clan might be taken: “And, behold, the whole family is risen against thine handmaid, and they said, Deliver him that smote his brother, that we may kill him, for the life of his brother whom he slew; and we will destroy the heir also: and so they shall quench my Coal which is left, and shall not leave to my husband neither name nor remainder upon the earth” ( Divination - The divining rod, which is mentioned in Scripture, is still in some repute in the north of England, though its application is now confined principally to the discovery of veins of lead ore, seams of Coal, or springs
Live - Containing fire ignited not extinct as a live Coal
Wing - The seraphim flew with the live Coal to Isaiah
Mouth Lips - Isaiah’s lips were purged of their uncleanness by the Coal from the altar (Isaiah 6:6-7); with this we may compare the command of the high priest to smite St
Break - ) To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or Coal; to break a lock
Atone - During his vision-call experience, Isaiah’s lips were touched with a Coal of fire taken from the altar by one of the seraphim
Act of Faith - On this a great shout is raised; and the cry is, "Let the dogs' beards be made!" which is done by thrusting flaming furzes fastened to long poles against their faces, till their faces are burnt to a Coal, which is accompanied with the loudest acclamations of joy
Book - The ink was prepared with lampblack Coal of ivory, various gums, etc
Tree - Thus the heat of manure, and the artificial heat of Coal fires in stoves, are found to supply the place of the sun
Iniquity - This meaning is also most basic to the word chatta’t, “sin,” in the Old Testament, and for this reason the words chatta’t and ‛âvôn are virtually synonymous; “Lo, this [3] hath touched thy [1] lips; and thine iniquity [5] is taken away, and thy sin [6] purged” ( Zedekiah - The terrible concomitants of a siege soon followed (Jeremiah 38:9), so that mothers boiled and ate the flesh of their own infants (Lamentations 4:5; Lamentations 4:8; Lamentations 4:10) and the visage of their nobles was blacker than Coal, their skin clave to their bones and became withered
Dead Sea - It is probable that there are subterraneous fires, that throw up this bitumen at the bottom of the sea, where it may form itself into a mass, which may be broken by the motion of the water occasioned by high winds; and it is very remarkable, that the stone called the stone of Moses, found about two or three leagues from the sea, which burns like a Coal, and turns only to a white stone, and not to ashes, has the same smell, when burnt, as this pitch; so that it is probable, a stratum of the stone under the Dead Sea is one part of the matter that feeds the subterraneous fires, and that this bitumen boils up out of it
Achan - ...
The eagle that stole a piece of sacred flesh from the altar brought home a smouldering Coal with it that kindled up afterwards and burned up both her whole nest and all her young ones. Drop that stolen flesh! There is a Coal in it that shall never be quenched
Creation - Then the carboniferous, with the Coal measures above, testifying to an uniformly high temperature (since Coal is found in far N
Sea - Sulphur is likewise found on the shores and a kind of stone or Coal, called Musca by the Arabs, which on being rubbed exhales an intolerable odor. King upon hot Coals, a strong stench of sulphur issued from it, and it soon began to blaze
Solomon - Thousands have been my sins, and ten thousand my transgressions; but Thy sanctifications have remained with me, and my heart, through Thy grace, hath been an unquenched Coal upon Thy altar
Serpent - They have a kind of beard hanging from their lower jaw, their aspect is frightful, their cry loud and shrill, their crest bright yellow, and they have a protuberance on their heads, as the colour of a burning Coal
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - 114); although a follower of Chrysostom he shews an Alexandrian tendency to far-fetched and fantastic interpretation as when he explains the live Coal and the tongs in Isa_6:7 to represent the divine essence and the flesh of Christ (i
House - Wood was the chief fuel (see Coal), supplemented by withered vegetation of all sorts ( Matthew 6:30 ), and
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - However, the seraphim took a live Coal from the altar and touched Isaiah's lips, thereby purging his sins and iniquities (vv