What does Cities mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
עָרֵ֣י excitement 47
עָרִ֥ים excitement 24
עָרֵ֥י excitement 24
עָרִ֖ים excitement 23
בְּעָרֵ֣י excitement 21
הֶעָרִ֖ים excitement 12
הֶעָרִ֣ים excitement 10
πόλεις a city. 10
הֶעָרִ֥ים excitement 9
בְּעָרֵ֥י excitement 9
הֶ֣עָרִ֔ים excitement 8
עָרִ֛ים excitement 7
עָרֵ֧י excitement 7
עָרִ֔ים excitement 7
עָרֵ֤י excitement 5
עָרִ֣ים excitement 5
πόλεων a city. 5
הֶֽעָרִים֙ excitement 5
הֶֽעָרִ֔ים excitement 4
הֶעָרִ֗ים excitement 4
עָרֵיהֶ֖ם excitement 4
עִ֖יר excitement 3
וּבְעָרֵ֣י excitement 3
עָ֣רֵיהֶ֔ם excitement 3
בְּעָרָ֔יו excitement 3
וְעָרִ֥ים excitement 3
בְּעָרֵיהֶ֑ם excitement 3
מֵהֶ֣עָרִ֔ים excitement 3
וְעָרֵ֥י excitement 3
עָרֵיהֶם֙ excitement 3
עָרִים֙ excitement 3
עָרִ֜ים excitement 3
הֶֽעָרִ֗ים excitement 3
הֶֽעָרִ֣ים excitement 3
עָרִ֤ים excitement 3
וְעָרִים֙ excitement 3
עָרֵ֛י excitement 2
וְעָרָ֔יו excitement 2
וְהֶֽעָרִ֗ים excitement 2
מֵעָרֵ֥י excitement 2
וְעָרֶ֙יהָ֙ excitement 2
עָרַ֥יִךְ excitement 2
בְּעָרֵיהֶֽם excitement 2
בֶּעָרִ֑ים excitement 2
עָרֶ֔יךָ excitement 2
בְּעָרֵ֤י excitement 2
הֶֽעָרִ֥ים excitement 2
עָרֶ֖יהָ excitement 2
עָרֵי֙ excitement 2
עָרָיו֙ excitement 2
עָרֶ֙יהָ֙ excitement 2
עִֽיר excitement 2
וְעָרֵ֣י excitement 2
שְׁעָרָ֑יו gate. 2
לְעָרֵ֣י excitement 2
מֵעָרֵ֣י excitement 2
וְהֶעָרִ֗ים excitement 2
בְּעָרֵ֨י excitement 2
עָרֵיהֶ֛ם excitement 2
בְּעָ֣רֵיהֶ֔ם excitement 2
בְּעָרֵיהֶ֗ם excitement 2
עִ֔יר excitement 1
עִ֗יר excitement 1
וְעָרֵיהֶם֙ excitement 1
הֶ֨עָרִ֜ים excitement 1
עָרֶ֥יהָ excitement 1
עָרֵ֨י excitement 1
מֵהֶעָרִ֣ים excitement 1
וְעָרֵ֖י excitement 1
וְהֵ֖נָּה they 1
וְהֶֽעָרִים֙ excitement 1
מֵעָ֣רֵיהֶ֔ם excitement 1
לֶֽעָרִ֛ים excitement 1
וְעָרֵי֙ excitement 1
בֶּעָרִ֤ים excitement 1
עָ֘רִ֤ים excitement 1
הֶעָרִ֤ים excitement 1
עָרֶ֜יהָ excitement 1
הֶעָרִים־ excitement 1
וְעָרֵיכֶ֖ם excitement 1
עָרֵיכֶ֑ם excitement 1
לֶֽעָרִים֙ excitement 1
בְּקִרְיָ֖ה city. 1
וְעָרֶ֖יהָ excitement 1
עָרַ֖י excitement 1
וְהֶעָרִ֖ים excitement 1
הֶעָרִ֛ים excitement 1
מֵעָרָ֖יו excitement 1
עִ֑יר excitement 1
הֶעָרִֽים excitement 1
הֶֽעָרִ֛ים excitement 1
לְעָרֶ֙יהָ֙ excitement 1
עָֽרֵיכֶם֙ excitement 1
וְעָרִ֖ים excitement 1
עָרֵיהֶ֑ם excitement 1
עָרֵיהֶֽם excitement 1
πόλεσιν a city. 1
עָרֵיהֶם֮ excitement 1
הֶעָרִים֙ excitement 1
בֶּעָרִֽים excitement 1
עָרֶֽיךָ excitement 1
מֵעִ֣יר excitement 1
בְּעָרָ֥יו excitement 1
עָרָ֗יו excitement 1
הֶעָרִ֡ים excitement 1
מֵֽעָרָ֖יו excitement 1
וָעִ֖יר excitement 1
בֶּעָרֵ֗ינוּ excitement 1
וְלֶעָרִ֣ים excitement 1
וְעָרֶ֖יךָ excitement 1
עָרֶ֙יךָ֙ excitement 1
וְעָרָ֕יו excitement 1
בְּעָרֶֽיהָ excitement 1
כֶּעָרִ֖ים excitement 1
וְעָרֵיהֶ֖ם excitement 1
לְעָרֵיהֶֽם excitement 1
וְהֶעָרִ֤ים excitement 1
בְּעָ֣רֵיכֶ֔ם excitement 1
וְהֶעָרִ֣ים excitement 1
עָרִ֧ים excitement 1
עִיר֙ excitement 1
מֵעָרֵ֤י excitement 1
עָ֣רֵיכֶ֔ם excitement 1
עָרֶ֗יךָ excitement 1
וּבְעָרֵ֨י excitement 1
הֶעָרִ֔ים excitement 1
וְעָרֶ֣יהָ excitement 1
לְעָרֵ֪י excitement 1
בְּעָרֵיכֶ֥ם excitement 1
בְעָרֵיהֶ֖ם excitement 1
מֵעָרֵיהֶ֖ם excitement 1
עָרֵ֖י excitement 1
עָרָ֑יו excitement 1
וּבְעָרֵ֤י excitement 1
עָרָ֖יו excitement 1
וּבְעָרָ֔יו excitement 1
כֶּֽעָרִ֛ים excitement 1
בֶּעָרִ֖ים excitement 1
עָרָ֥יו excitement 1
מֵעָרֵֽי־ excitement 1
עָ֣רֵי excitement 1
וּלְעָרֵ֤י excitement 1
עָרִֽים excitement 1
וְעָרָ֣יו excitement 1
עָרֵיכֶ֖ם excitement 1
؟ עָרֶ֑יךָ excitement 1
לֶעָרִ֑ים excitement 1
וְהֶעָרִ֧ים excitement 1

Definitions Related to Cities

H5892


   1 excitement, anguish.
      1a of terror.
   2 city, town (a place of waking, guarded).
      2a city, town.
      

G4172


   1 a city.
      1a one’s native city, the city in which one lives.
      1b the heavenly Jerusalem.
         1b1 the abode of the blessed in heaven.
         1b2 of the visible capital in the heavenly kingdom, to come down to earth after the renovation of the world by fire.
      1c the inhabitants of a city.
      

H8179


   1 gate.
      1a gate (of entrance).
      1b gate (of space inside gate, ie marketplace, public meeting place).
         1b1 city, town.
      1c gate (of palace, royal castle, temple, court of tabernacle).
      1d Heaven, Sheol (fig).
      

H7149


   1 city.
   

Frequency of Cities (original languages)

Frequency of Cities (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Bethlehem, of Noblest Cities
Hymn for Lauds on the Feast of the Epiphany. It was written by Prudentius (348-413), and has 22 translations. The English title given is by E. Caswall.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Refuge, Cities of
REFUGE, CITIES OF
1. Origin of the right of asylum . The city of refuge was the product of two primitive religious ideas that were employed to neutralize one another, the sacredness of blood or life and the sacredness of locality; both were based on the presence of the Divine in the blood and the locality. There was a community of blood or life between the god and his people that made it an unpardonable offence to slay one of his people; it mattered not whether the slayer was within or without his people, whether the deed was intentional or accidental. A wrong had been done that could be atoned for only by blood (Robertson Smith, RS [1] , [2] p. 32 ff.). On the other hand, the god chose certain places for his manifestation, and there it was customary for his people to meet and worship him. Within the precincts claimed by his presence all life was sacred, and so it came about that even a murderer, if he escaped to the haunts of a god, would be safe from those to whom he had forfeited his life, so long as he remained within their sacred limits ( ib . p. 148 f.). The murderer thus escaped the penalty of his wrong, but he remained an ineffective unit for his tribe; immediately he left the asylum of the god he was at the mercy of the avenger of blood , and so both tribe and individual were in a measure punished. This primitive usage still prevails in savage communities, and has been widened by extending the privilege of asylum to places occupied by former kings and to the graves of former rulers (Frazer, Fort. Review , 1899, pp. 650 654).
2. Development of asylum in OT . In this absolute form the right of asylum is not recognized anywhere in the OT. It is extended only to one who has without intention committed homicide ( Exodus 21:13 ). One who has treacherously sullied his hands with blood can find no refuge at the altar of God; he may be taken from it to death ( Joshua 20:7-8 ), or he may even be struck down at the altar, as was the fate of Joab ( 1 Kings 2:30-31 ; 1 Kings 2:34 ). The community came between the fugitive and the avenger of blood, and determined whether he should be handed over to death. This was likely the result of the fusion of different tribes and the necessity of recognizing one common authority. We can trace three stages of development of this right of asylum in the OT.
(1) Every altar or sanctuary in the land could extend its protection to one who had without intention taken the life of another. He had to justify his claim to protection by showing to the authorities of the sanctuary that his deed was unpremeditated. But after the fugitive had submitted satisfactory evidence, he was allowed to remain within the sacred precincts. He could not, however, return home, and had evidently to pass the remainder of his life in the refuge to which he had fled. He could not appease the avenger by money. His want of prudence must entail some punishment, and so he could not pass beyond the city boundaries without risk of death at the hands of the avenger of blood. What provision was made for his maintenance is not revealed, but very likely he had to win his subsistence by his work. Whether his family could join him in his asylum is a question that is also unanswered. This is the stage of development in Exodus 21:13-14 , 1 Kings 1:50 ; 1Ki 2:28 ; 1 Kings 2:34 . It is not at all likely that Joab’s death was brought about at the altar in Jerusalem because of some exceptional authority exercised over it by the king. Joab evidently knew he could be put to death there ( 1 Kings 2:30 ).
(2) When the provincial high places and altars were suppressed by Josiah in b.c. 621, the right of asylum there fell with them, and provision had to be made for the continuance of ancient usage on a modified basis. Very likely there was less need for it, as the power of the Crown had been growing. Cities of refuge, situated at convenient distances, were set apart for the manslayer ( Deuteronomy 19:2-7 ), and it may even be that the roads thither were specially kept and marked to make escape easy ( Deuteronomy 19:3 ; but cf. Steuernagel, Deut . p. 71 f.). The fugitive had to justify his claim to protection by showing to the elders of the city whither he had fled his innocence of murderous motives. Any one who failed to convince them of the validity of his defence was handed over to the elders of his own city, and they in turn surrendered him to the avenger of blood. Practically, then, the community administered justice, but when the death penalty was to be exacted, it was exacted not by the community, but by the avenger of blood in accordance with primitive usage ( Deuteronomy 19:12-13 ).
(3) In post-exilic times the cities of refuge established under the Deuteronomic Code remained, and the judicial procedure followed was very much the same, only the community presumably at Jerusalem and not the elders of the city of refuge (Numbers 35:12 ; Numbers 35:24-25 ) was to determine the guilt or the innocence of the fugitive. Joshua 20:4 , however, contemplates a provisional inquiry by the elders of the city before protection is granted. The law was mitigated so far that the unwitting manslayer was no longer doomed to spend all his days there but was free to return to his home on the death of the high priest of the time ( Numbers 35:25 ; Numbers 35:23 , Joshua 20:6 ). This points to the post-exilic origin of this modification. The high priest was then the only constituted authority that Jewish law could recognize.
3. Number of cities of refuge . The statements bearing on the number of the cities of refuge are conflicting ( Numbers 35:11 ; Numbers 35:13-15 , Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ; Deuteronomy 19:7-10 , Joshua 20:2 ; Exodus 21:14 ; cf. Driver, Deut . pp. 78, 233; Gray, Num . p. 469). Ultimately there were six, but at first there appear to have been only three ( Deuteronomy 19:2 ; Deuteronomy 19:7 ). They were established first in the time of Josiah when the boundaries and the population of the Jewish State would be comparatively small, and Jewish authority did not likely cross the Jordan to the east. In such conditions three cities would be ample. But when in post-exilic times the Jews covered a wider area, there would naturally be need for more cities; and so we find the number in Numbers and Joshua stated at six, and additions made to the text in Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ; Deuteronomy 19:3 to suggest that the number six had been contemplated from the beginning. These six cities were Kedesh, Shechem, and Hebron on the west, all well-known sanctuaries from early times, and Golan, Ramoth, and Bezer on the east. Of the situation of these last we know nothing definitely; even the site of Ramoth, to which reference is made elsewhere in the OT ( 1 Kings 4:13 ; 1 Kings 22:3 ff.), is a subject of doubt (see G. A. Smith, HGHL [3] p. 587; Driver, Deut . xviii, xix), but they probably shared the sacred character of the cities on the west.
J. Gilroy.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Fenced Cities
There were in Palestine (1) cities, (2) unwalled villages, and (3) villages with castles or towers (1 Chronicles 27:25 ). Cities, so called, had walls, and were thus fenced. The fortifications consisted of one or two walls, on which were towers or parapets at regular intervals (2 Chronicles 32:5 ; Jeremiah 31:38 ). Around ancient Jerusalem were three walls, on one of which were ninety towers, on the second fourteen, and on the third sixty. The tower of Hananeel, near the north-east corner of the city wall, is frequently referred to (Nehemiah 3:1 ; 12:39 ; Zechariah 14:10 ). The gateways of such cities were also fortified (Nehemiah 2:8 ; 3:3,6 ; Judges 16:2,3 ; 1 Samuel 23:7 ). The Hebrews found many fenced cities when they entered the Promised Land (Numbers 13:28 ; 32:17,34-42 ; Joshua 11:12,13 ; Judges 1:27-33 ), and we may estimate the strength of some of these cities from the fact that they were long held in possession by the Canaanites. The Jebusites, e.g., were enabled to hold possession of Jerusalem till the time of David (2 Samuel 5:6,7 ; 1 Chronicles 11:5 ).
Several of the kings of Israel and Judah distinguished themselves as fortifiers or "builders" of cities.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Cities of refuge
(Orei Miklat): In biblical times, six cities in the Land of Israel were designated as "cities of refuge." A person who accidentally killed someone found safe haven there from avenging relatives.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Treasure Cities
Store cities which the Israelites built for the Egyptians (Exodus 1:11 ). (See PITHOM .) Towns in which the treasures of the kings of Judah were kept were so designated ( 1 Chronicles 27:25 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Fortified Cities
The term “fortified city” (often “fenced city” or “defenced city” in the KJV) refers to a town with strong defenses, usually a massive wall structure and inner citadels or strongholds. In general the fortified city was a major military or administrative center for a region. Size was not so much the factor, though many of the fortified cities were large cities. Location was much more critical. The Bible contains two lists of fortified cities, one for Naphtali (Joshua 19:35-38 ), and a list of cities Rehoboam fortified for Judah (2 Chronicles 11:5-12 ). These two lists seem to include most of the walled cities within the tribal area. Among the more important cities in these lists are Hazor in Naphtali and Bethlehem, Tekoa, Hebron, Gath, and Lachish in Judah. At the end of the monarchy, Jeremiah reported that the Babylonians had conquered all the fortified cities of Judah except Lachish and Azekah (Jeremiah 34:6-7 ).
Fortified cities served a strategic function. They could guard a major highway (as did Lachish and Hazor). They could protect mountain passes (Megiddo and Taanach). They could serve as border fortresses (Arad and Hazor). Surely troops would be garrisoned in a fortified city. At times of imminent danger, much of the populace from the surrounding area might find protection in a fortified city (Jeremiah 4:5 ; Jeremiah 8:14 ).
Other closely related terms used in the Bible include chariot cities and store cities (1 Kings 9:19 ). Chariot cities were major military centers where the chariot troops were garrisoned. Store cities probably served as central supply bases for the military. Each had an important role in the defense of the nation. Chariot cities and store cities were probably also fortified cities.
Joel F. Drinkard, Jr.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Refuge, Cities of
Were six in number (Numbers 35 ). 1 . On the west of Jordan were (1) Kadesh, in Naphtali; (2) Shechem, in Mount Ephraim; (3) Hebron, in Judah. 2. On the east of Jordan were, (1) Golan, in Bashan; (2) Ramoth-Gilead, in Gad; and (3) Bezer, in Reuben. (See under each of these names.)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Refuge, Cities of
See Cities of Refuge .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Treasure-Cities
The kings of Judah had keepers of their treasures both in city and country (1 Chronicles 27:25 ) and the places where these magazines were laid up were called treasure-cities. and the buildings treasure-houses. Pharaoh compelled the Hebrews to build him treasure-cities. (Exodus 1:11 ) --McClintock and Strong. [1]
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Cities of Refuge
(See BLOOD, AVENGING OF.) Kedesh ("holy," so Jesus our city of refuge, Hebrews 6:18; Hebrews 7:26), now Kedes, 20 miles E.S.E. from Tyre. Shechem ("shoulder," upon Jesus' shoulder the government is, Isaiah 9:6), now Nablous. Hebron ("fellowship," so Christ to us, 1 Corinthians 1:9), now El-Khalil. Bezer, perhaps Bozor in the Book of Maccabees ("fortress," so is Jesus, Isaiah 32:2; Isaiah 26:1; Isaiah 26:4). Ramoth Gilead, on the site of Ez-Szalt (Ramoth ("high"), so is Jesus to us, Acts 5:31). Golan, Jaulan ("joy"; Jesus is our joy, Romans 5:11). All the 48 cities of Levi had the right of asylum. But the six of refuge were bound to entertain the involuntary manslayer gratuitously. The cities on each side of the Jordan were nearly opposite one another (Deuteronomy 19:2; Numbers 35:6; Numbers 35:13; Numbers 35:15; Joshua 20:2; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 20:9).
If manslayers had been driven out of the country as among the Greeks, they would have been exposed to the temptation of worshipping strange gods (1 Samuel 26:19). The Levitical cities were to have a space of 1,000 cubits (583 yards) beyond the city walls for pasture and other purposes (Numbers 35:4-5). The 2,000 cubits also specified mean probably the sum of the two single thousands on opposite sides of the city, exclusive of the city itself; as here shown. Clermont-Ganneau has discovered a bilingual inscription, Greek and Hebrew, "limit of Gezer" (now Tel-el-Jezer), on a horizontal slab E. of that royal Canaanite city; also a second similarly inscribed stone 1,696 yards due N.W. of the first. This proves that the sacred boundary was a square, having its four angles at the four cardinal points (Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement, Oct. 1874).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Levitical Cities
(leh viht' ih cuhl) Residence and pasture lands provided the priestly tribe of Levi in lieu of a tribal inheritance. Because of their priestly duties, the tribe of Levi did not receive any part of the land of Canaan as an inheritance (Numbers 18:20-24 ; Numbers 26:62 ; Deuteronomy 10:9 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-2 ; Joshua 18:7 ). To compensate them for this, they received the tithes of Israelites for their support (Numbers 18:21 ), and 48 cities were allotted to them from the inheritance of the other tribes. On the average, four cities from each tribe were Levitical cities. The practice of setting cities aside in this manner was a common Ancient Near Eastern practice.
The Levites were not the sole possessors or occupiers of these cities. They were simply allowed to live in them and have fields to pasture their herds. These cities did not cease to belong to the tribes within which they were located. Although six of the 48 were asylums for those guilty of manslaughter (Kedesh, Schechem, Hebron in Canaan, Bezer, Ramoth-Gilead, and Golan), Levitical cities and cities of refuge are not synonymous. See Cities of Refuge . The privilege of asylum was not extended to all 48 Levitical cities. The aim of having cities of refuge was to control blood revenge by making it possible for public justice to intervene between the slayer and the victim's avenger of blood. The cities of refuge were probably priestly cities containing important shrines. Cities of refuge also served as punitive detention centers. The slayer was not permitted to leave until the death of the high priest. This was possibly interpreted as a vicarious expiation of life by life.
Levitical cities were a series of walled cities, apart from the lands surrounding them. Unwalled suburbs and fields outside the cities remained tribal property. The Levites could not sell any open plots of land.
The legal status of Levitical houses within these cities differed from ordinary property. To prevent the dispossession of Levites, it was ordained that they might at any time redeem houses in their own cities which they had been forced by need to sell. Moreover, such a house, if not redeemed, reverted to its original Levitical owner during the year of Jubilee. See Jubilee, Year of). Pastureland belonging to Levites could not be sold (Leviticus 25:32-34 ).
Theological, political, and economic reasons led to establishing the cities. The cities formed bases of operation so that the Levites could better infiltrate each of the tribes to instruct them in God's covenant. Such bases would be most needed precisely where one finds them: in those areas least accessible to the central sanctuary. Obviously, there was also a political dimension. Certainly, the Levitical desire to secure Israel's loyalty to the Lord of the covenant would also imply a commitment to secure loyalty to the Lord's anointed, the king. There was a blending of covenant teaching and political involvement. The economic factor may have been the most significant. The list of cities describes the dispersion of the Levites who were not employed at the large sanctuaries, had no steady income, and who belonged, therefore, in the category of widows and orphans. The cities were established for men needing economic relief.
Gary D. Baldwin
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Cities of the Plain
CITIES OF THE PLAIN . See Plain [1].
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Levitical Cities
LEVITICAL CITIES. See Priests and Levites, § d.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Asia Minor, Cities of
The cities located on the Anatolian peninsula (modern-day Turkey). Cities of Asia Minor important to the New Testament accounts included Alexandria Troas, Assos, Ephesus, Miletus, Patara, Smyrna, Pergamum, Sardis, Thyatira, Philadelphia, Laodicea, Colassae, Attalia, Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, Derbe, and Tarsus. The cities figured prominently in the Apostle Paul's missionary journeys, several of the churches receiving epistles. Among the list are the “Seven Cities” of the Revelation.
Geography and History The geography of Asia Minor greatly influenced the development of settlements in the area. The region can be described as the point where “East meets West,” linking the continent of Europe with the Near East. The peninsula is a high plateau surrounded by steep mountain ranges. The mountains isolate Asia Minor from much of the outside world. Narrow passes through the mountains connect the interior with the Near East. Deep ravines cut by numerous and often navigable rivers linked the cities of the plateau with the western coastline. Cities developed in locales vital to trade and commerce, such as near the mouths of rivers and mountain passes.
The history of Asia Minor reflects the region's unstable position between the east and west. The Hittite Empire thrived in the eastern portion of the peninsula during after 2000 B.C. Exposed on the west to the Aegean Sea, the coastal area became the home to numerous Greek colonies beginning about 1200 B.C. Centered in Sardis, the Lydian Empire began to expand about 600 B.C., but was soon conquered by the Persians. Control passed to Alexander the Great about 333 B.C. Upon his death Asia Minor fell under the rule of the Seluccids. Beginning about 200 B.C. Roman control of the peninsula increased until all of Anatolia was absorbed into the Roman provincial system. At this time, “Asia” designated the provinces of only western Anatolia. Galatia, Cappadocia, and Cilicia comprised the eastern provinces, while Bitnia and Pontus bordered the Black Sea to the north. The Anatolian peninsula was probably first termed “Asia Minor” after A.D. 400.
Coastal Cities The name Troas described both the northwest region of Asia Minor as well as the port city. Located ten miles south of the site of ancient Troy, Alexandria Troas was founded as a Roman colony during the period of Augustus (27 B.C.-A.D. 14) and served as a primary port for trade passing between Asia Minor and Macedonia. Remains of the ruined city wall and a bath complex built after A.D. 100 are still visible. As with many ancient ports, the once busy harbor silted up and became unusable. Paul once set sail from Troas to Greece in response to his vision of the “Macedonian Man” ( Acts 16:11 ). On his third journey, Paul's companions embarked on a ship sailing toward the port of Assos , twenty miles south (Acts 20:13 ). A bustling port city surrounded by a wall dating to after 400 B.C., Assos featured a temple of Athena high on the acropolis overlooking the harbor. At Assos, Paul joined the ship carrying Luke and several others after journeying on foot from Troas.
Ephesus served as the primary trading center of all Asia Minor. The large port facility provided ample anchorage for ships carrying goods east from Greece and Italy, as well as for those which took to Rome the wares brought overland from Asia and the Far East. A well-laid road linked the post facilities at Ephesus with Tarsus to the east. The road approached the city from the southeast, entering a monumental gateway near the public baths. Remains of the city's immense theater, capable of seating 24,00 spectators, stand today as a reminder of the great crowd which in protest to Paul filled the seats and for several hours shouted, “Great is Diana of the Ephesians!” ( Acts 19:34 ). The city's temple honoring Diana was one of the Seven Wonders of the world. Known as the Artemision to the Greeks, the temple possessed 127 pillars 60 feet high which held up the roof of the largest all-marble structure in the Hellenistic world. The city's harbor, built around the outlet of the Cayster River, gradually filled with silt; and the site now lies some six miles away from the sea. As the chief port and city of Asia, Paul's choice of Ephesus as a center of ministry provided the perfect base from which the Gospel could be spread throughout the Roman world.
During the early period of Greek colonization, Miletus exercised extensive control over southwestern Anatolia. As a major sea-power, the city remained independent throughout the time of Lydian rule in the region. The city was able to withstand attempted incursions by the Persians until 494 B.C. Once a wealthy port for the wool industry, Miletus was a city of little significance during the New Testament era ( Acts 20:15 ).
Acts 21:1 recounts how Paul sailed for Tyre from Patara. The city served as a popular port for ships traveling eastward during the early autumn months when favorable winds made travel to Egypt and the Phoenician coast easier. The harbor sat near the outlet of the Xanthus River and was the main shipping facility of provincial Lydia.
Smyrna surrounded a well-protected harbor on the Aegean coast at the outlet of the Hermus River. Extensive trade into and out of Asia passed through the city. During the first century A.D. Smyrna reigned as one of the grandest cities of all Asia. A large temple dedicated to the Emperor Tiberius boasted the close alliance of the city with the Empire. Numerous other temples dedicated to a wide-range of Roman deities as well as scores of beautifully-adorned public buildings decorated the city.
Cities of the Interior Located fifteen miles inland overlooking the Caicus River, Pergamum contained the first temple in Asia dedicated to a Roman Emperor, Augustus, in 29 B.C. The city possessed a commanding position on a hill high above the valley. Located on the Upper Acropolis were a large theater, library, agora, palace, barracks, and altar of Zeus. The large altar area may be that referred to by John as the “throne of Satan” ( Revelation 2:13 ). The city was well-known as a center of worship for the gods Asklepios, Zeus, Demeter and Persephone, Serapis, Isis, as well as the cult of the emperor.
The greatest city in Lydia, Sardis is remembered as the first municipality to mint coins of silver and gold. Set in the fertile Hermus valley, Sardis served as the capital of the Lydian king Croesus, a name synonymous with wealth. The city fell to the Persian armies of Cyrus in 549 B.C. and to the Romans in 188 B.C. A tremendous earthquake in A.D. 17 struck Sardis, a blow from which it never fully recovered.
Following the Hermus River inland from Sardis, one reached Philadelphia , the name commemorating the brotherly love between Attalus Philadelphus and Eumenes. Founded after 200 B.C., the city was set amidst vast vineyards and led in the worship of Dionysius. The terrible earthquake of A.D. 17 was followed by dangerous tremors for the next twenty years, each one debilitating the city further. The Apostle John's reference to the giving of a “new name” (Revelation 3:12 ) may be a word-play on the proposed dedication of the city as “Neocaesarea” in honor of aid sent by Tiberius. Despite the gains by Islam in Asia Minor in later years, Philadelphia maintained a continued Christian witness across the centuries.
Journeying inland from Miletus, a traveler followed the course of the Meander River until it joined the Lycus. In the center of the valley sat Laodicea . Situated along the major east-west trade route, the city prospered greatly. As the chief city of the wealthy province of Phrygia, Laodicea boasted of a large number of banks. In 51 B.C. Cicero recounted how he stopped to cash drafts at one of the city's banks. The great wealth of Laodicea allowed it to finance its own rebuilding after a destructive earthquake in A.D. 60, refusing help from the Senate of Rome. The city was also known for clothes and carpets woven from the rich, glossy black wool raised in the valley. Laodicea served as home to a medical school renowned for production of collyrium, an eye salve. Revelation makes mention of the riches of the city, admonishing believers to seek instead spiritual gold of eternal worth, and to anoint their eyes with a spiritual salve. John's description of “white garments” to cover their nakedness contrasts the Laodicean preference for “home-grown” black wool, a symbol of worldly prosperity (Revelation 3:14-18 ).
Eleven miles south of Laodicea lay Colossae. The city was well-known as early as about 450 B.C. as a commercial center, famous for red-dyed wool. The establishment of Laodicea, however, led to the decline of Colassae's prosperity. Several remains are still visible, including a small theater on the ciyt's southeast side. The Apostle Paul never personally evangelized the city. Instead, the church was established by Epaphras during Paul's third missionary journey (Colossians 1:7 ; Colossians 4:12-13 ). Paul wrote to the church during his Roman imprisonment, complementing the work of Philemon's servant Onesimus (Colossians 4:9 ). A church built in the city during the Byzantine era was ultimately destroyed by Seljuk Turks in A.D. 1070, and the city abandoned.
Cities of Eastern Asia Minor Much of Paul's Asian ministry centered around the provinces of Galatia and Lycaonia. On his first journey, Paul and Barnabas most likely arrived by sea at Attalia , a relatively small and unimportant harbor. Moving northward from the port and crossing Pamplia, the group arrived at Antioch in the province of Galatia (Acts 13:14 ). Luke's “Antioch of Pisidia ” carried the title of Colonia Caesarea Antiocheia , a colony established in 25 B.C. upon a much earlier Hellenistic city. Antioch had been renovated by Rome to provide for the defense of Galatia. A temple to Augustus dominated the central plaza, and the official inscription telling of his victories and of achievements was displayed in the city. Wagons bearing Anatolian marble passed through Antioch on their way to ships at Ephesus to be used in the decoration of the empire.
Moving southeast from Antioch, Paul and his companions traveled to Iconium ( Acts 13:51 ). Located in a fertile, well-watered plain, Iconium supplied large amounts of fruit and grain for the surrounding provinces. Several years after Paul's visit, the Emperor Claudius allowed the town to be renamed Claudiconium in his honor, a reminder of the strong ties it shared with Rome.
Lystra lay twenty miles to the south of Iconium along the Via Sebaste. The title of Julia Felix Gemina Lustra was conferred upon this colony of Rome around 6 B.C. by Augustus. Connected by a fine road with Antioch to the west, the city honored Zeus and Hermes as patron gods. A statue dedicated to the two was discovered in the 1800's, reminiscent of the city's identification of Paul and Barnabas with the gods ( Acts 14:1 ). Timothy was a native of Lystra. The ruins of the city are today near the small Turkish town of Katyn Serai.
Derbe was situated 60 miles from Lystra at the present-day site of Kerti Huyuk. Although a large city of Lyconia, Derbe was relatively unimportant. Paul's decision to visit the city infers a large Jewish population in the region. It is possible that some believers had already advanced the Gospel to Derbe, having been earlier expelled from Iconium.
The boyhood home of the Apostle Paul, Tarsus of Cilicia lay on the eastern end of the east-west trade route beginning at Ephesus. At Tarsus, merchants had the option of going south into Syria and Palestine, or continuing across the mountains on to Zeugma and the East. The Cydnus River provided Tarsus with an outlet to the Mediterranean Sea, ten miles away. Lumber and linen were the main industries of Tarsus, but the related manufacture of goat's-hair cloth was practiced by many, including Paul. This skill served as his main source of income wherever he traveled. Tarsus also housed a university and school of philosophy, an academic atmosphere which formed the basis of Paul's latter rabbinic career.
David C. Maltsberger
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Cities of Refuge
See REFUGE.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Fenced Cities
The distinction between a "city" and a "village" in the Bible is, the former had walls. The village had sometimes a watchman's tower, where the villagers repaired when in danger. Such towers Uzziah built in the desert for the protection of husbandmen and cattle from marauding tribes (2 Chronicles 26:10). David too had "castles" (1 Chronicles 27:25). Argob in Bashan, Og's kingdom, E. of Jordan, had "three-score cities fenced with high walls, gates and bars, beside unwalled towns a great many" (Deuteronomy 3:4-5); all which Israel took. (See ARGOB.) Villages in the Hauran sometimes consist of houses joined together and the entrance closed by a gate for security against Arab marauders.
"Build" often means "fortify" (2 Chronicles 11:5-10; 2 Chronicles 16:6; 1 Kings 15:17). The defenses consisted of one or more walls with battlemented parapets and towers at intervals (2 Chronicles 32:5; Jeremiah 31:38), whereon were war engines, also a citadel or tower, the last resource of the defenders (Judges 9:46; Judges 9:51; 2 Kings 9:17; 2 Chronicles 26:9; 2 Chronicles 26:15). Ninety towers crowned the oldest of Jerusalem's three walls, fourteen the second, sixty the third (B. J., 5:4, section 2). The tower of Hananeel is mentioned Jeremiah 31:38; Zechariah 14:10; Nehemiah 3:1, where also is mentioned "the tower of Meah," "the tower of the furnaces" (Nehemiah 3:11), "the great tower that lieth out even unto the wall of Ophel" (Nehemiah 3:27). An out-work is meant by the "ditch" or "trench," possibly a wall lining the ditch (1 Kings 21:23; 2 Samuel 20:15).
"The castle" of Antonia was the citadel of Jerusalem in our Lord's time; it served also to overawe the town, the Roman soldiers occupying it (Acts 21:34). Canaan's "cities fenced up to heaven" were leading causes of the spies' and Israel's unbelieving panic (Numbers 13:28; Deuteronomy 1:28; Deuteronomy 9:1-2). These the Israelites "rebuilt," i.e. refortified (Numbers 32:17; Numbers 32:34-42). So fenced was "the stronghold of Zion" that it remained in the Jebusites' hands until David's time (2 Samuel 5:6-7). Samaria yielded to the mighty hosts of Assyria only after a three years' siege (2 Kings 17:5; 2 Kings 18:10).
Webster's Dictionary - Cities
(pl.) of City
CARM Theological Dictionary - Cities of Refuge
Six cities that were designated by Moses at the command of God as locations to which Israelites could flee in order to be safe from retribution of other Israelites for offenses committed against others. Numbers 35:9-16 gives a description of their purpose. In that culture the responsibility of retribution against a family member who had been killed or seriously injured rested on the "goel," the next of kin. The person was required to stay in the city until the death of the High Priest of that city (Numbers 35:25-28). Then he was free to return to his home and retribution was not allowed upon him. Note they typology here. When the high priest dies, the offender is set free. In other words, when Jesus our High Priest died on the cross, we sinners were set free from sin.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cities of Refuge
See Refuge
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Cities
By referring to some peculiarities in the building, fortifying, &c, of eastern cities, we shall the better understand several allusions and expressions of the Old Testament. It is evident that the walls of fortified cities were sometimes partly constructed of combustible materials; for the Prophet, denouncing the judgments of God upon Syria and other countries, declares, "I will send a fire on the wall of Gaza, which shall devour the palaces thereof," Amos 1:7 . The walls of Tyre and Rabbah seem to have been of the same perishable materials; for the Prophet adds, "I will send a fire upon the wall of Tyrus, which shall devour the palaces thereof;" and again, "I will kindle a fire in the walls of Rabbah, and it shall devour the palaces thereof with shouting in the day of battle," Amos 1:10 ; Amos 1:14 . One method of securing the gates of fortified places, among the ancients, was to cover them with thick plates of iron; a custom which is still used in the east, and seems to be of great antiquity. We learn from Pitts, that Algiers has five gates, and some of these have two, some three, other gates within them; and some of them are plated all over with thick iron. The place where the Apostle was imprisoned seems to have been secured in the same manner; for, says the inspired historian, "When they were past the first and second ward, they came unto the iron gate that leadeth unto the city; which opened to them of its own accord," Acts 12:10 . Pococke, speaking of a bridge not far from Antioch, called the iron bridge, says, there are two towers belonging to it, the gates of which are covered with iron plates; which he supposes is the reason of the name it bears. Some of their gates are plated over with brass; such are the enormous gates of the principal mosque at Damascus, formerly the church of John the Baptist. To gates like these, the Psalmist probably refers in these words: "He hath broken the gates of brass," Psalms 107:16 ; and the Prophet, in that remarkable passage, where God promises to go before Cyrus his anointed, and "break in pieces the gates of brass, and cut in sunder the bars iron," Isaiah 45:2 . But, conscious that all these precautions were insufficient for their security, the orientals employed watchmen to patrol the city during the night, to suppress any disorders in the streets, or to guard the wall against the attempts of a foreign enemy. To this custom Solomon refers in these words: "The watchmen that went about the city found me, they smote me, they wounded me; the keepers of the wall took away my veil from me,"
Song of Solomon 5:7 . This custom may be traced to a very remote antiquity; so early as the departure of Israel from the land of Egypt, the morning watch is mentioned, certainly indicating the time when the watchmen were commonly relieved. In Persia, the watchmen were obliged to indemnify those who were robbed in the streets; which accounts for the vigilance and severity which they display in the discharge of their office, and illustrates the character of watchman given to Ezekiel, and the duties he was required to perform. If the wicked perished in his iniquities without warning, the Prophet was to be accountable for his blood; but if he duly pointed out his danger, he delivered his own soul, Ezekiel 33:2 . They were also charged, as with us, to announce the progress of the night to the slumbering city: "The burden of Dumah; he calls to me out of Seir, Watchman, what of the night? watchman, what of the night? The watchman said, The morning cometh, and also the night," Isaiah 21:11 . This is confirmed by an observation of Chardin upon these words of Moses: "For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night:" that as the people of the east have no clocks, the several parts of the day and of the night, which are eight in all, are announced. In the Indies, the parts of the night are made known, as well by instruments of music, in great cities, as by the rounds of the watchmen, who, with cries and small drums, give them notice that a fourth part of the night is past. Now, as these cries awaked those who had slept all that quarter part of the night, it appeared to them but as a moment. It is evident the ancient Jews knew, by some public notice, how the night watches passed away; but, whether they simply announced the termination of the watch, or made use of trumpets, or other sonorous instruments, in making the proclamation, it may not be easy to determine; and still less what kind of chronometers the watchmen used. The probability is, that the watches were announced with the sound of a trumpet; for the Prophet Ezekiel makes it a part of the watchman's duty, at least in time of war, to blow the trumpet, and warn the people. The watchman, in a time of danger, seems to have taken his station in a tower, which was built over the gate of the city.
The fortified cities in Canaan, as in some other countries, were commonly strengthened with a citadel, to which the inhabitants fled when they found it impossible to defend the place. The whole inhabitants of Thebez, unable to resist the repeated and furious assaults of Abimelech, retired into one of these towers, and bid defiance to his rage: "But there was a strong tower within the city, and thither fled all the men and women, and all they of the city, and shut it to them, and gat them up to the top of the tower." The extraordinary strength of this tower, and the various means of defence which were accumulated within its narrow walls, may be inferred from the violence of Abimelech's attack, and its fatal issue. "And Abimelech came unto the tower, and fought against it, and went hard unto the door of the tower, to burn it with fire. And a certain woman cast a piece of a millstone upon Abimelech's head, and all to break his skull," Judges 9:52 . The city of Shechem had a tower of the same kind, into which the people retired, when the same usurper took it and sowed it with salt, Judges 9:46 . These strong towers which were built within a fortified city, were commonly placed on an eminence, to which they ascended by a flight of steps. Such was the situation of the city of David, a strong tower upon a high eminence at Jerusalem; and the manner of entrance, as described by the sacred writer: "But the gate of the fountain repaired Shallum, unto the stairs that go down from the city of David," Nehemiah 3:15 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Cities of Refuge
See REFUGE .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Cities of Refuge
Cities of Refuge. Were six Levitical cities specially chosen for refuge to the involuntary homicide until released from banishment by the death of the high priest. Numbers 35:6; Numbers 35:13; Numbers 35:15; Joshua 20:2; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 20:9. There were three on each side of Jordan. 1. Kedesh, in Galilee, 1 Chronicles 6:76. 2. Shechem, in Ephraim, Joshua 21:21; 1 Chronicles 6:67; 2 Chronicles 10:1. 3. Hebron, in Judah, Joshua 21:13; 2 Samuel 5:5; 1 Chronicles 6:55; 1 Chronicles 29:27; 2 Chronicles 11:10. 4. On the east side of Jordan—Bezer, in the tribe of Reuben, in the plains of Moab, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:36. 5. Ramoth-gilead, in the tribe of Gad, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 21:38; 1 Kings 22:3. 6. Golan, in Bashan, in the half-tribe of Manasseh, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 21:27; 1 Chronicles 6:71.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Cities
Cities. The distinction of villages from towns, and of towns from cities is not very clearly marked in Scripture. The earliest notice of city building is of Enoch by Cain, in the land of his exile. Genesis 4:17. After the confusion of tongues the descendants of Nimrod founded Babel, Erech, Accad and Calneh, in the land of Shinar, and Asshur, a branch from the same stock, built Nineveh, Rehoboth-by-the-river, Calah and Resen, the last being "a great city." The earliest description of a city, properly so called, is that of Sodom. Genesis 19:1-22. Even before the time of Abraham there were cities in Egypt, Genesis 12:14-15; Numbers 13:22, and the Israelites, during their sojourn there, were employed in building or fortifying the "treasure cities" of Pithom and Raamses. Exodus 1:11. Fenced cities, fortified with high walls, Deuteronomy 3:5, were occupied and perhaps partly rebuilt after the conquest, by the settled inhabitants of Syria on both sides of the Jordan.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Refuge, Cities of
To provide security for those who should undesignedly kill a man, the Lord commanded Moses to appoint six cities of refuge, or asylums, that any one who should thus shed blood might retire thither, and have time to prepare his defence before the judges, and that the kinsmen of the deceased might not pursue and kill him, Exodus 21:13 Numbers 35:11-34 . Of such cities there were three on each side Jordan. On the west were Kedesh of Naphtali, Shechem, and Hebron; on the east, Golan, Ramoth-Gilead, and Bezer, Joshua 20:7,8 . These cities served not only for Hebrews, but for all strangers who resided in the country, Deuteronomy 19:1-10 . The Lord also commanded that when the Hebrews should multiply and enlarge their land, they should add three other cities of refuge. But this command was never fulfilled.
The custom of blood-revenge appears to have been an institution or principle very early introduced among the nomadic oriental tribes. So firmly was this practice established among the Israelites before their entrance into the promised land, and probably also even before their sojourning in Egypt, that Moses was directed by Jehovah not to attempt to eradicate it entirely, but only to counteract and modify it by the institution of cities of refuge. The custom of avenging the blood of a member of a family or tribe upon some member of the tribe or family of the slayer, still exists in full force among the modern Bedaweens, the representatives in a certain sense of the ancient Israelites in the desert. They prefer this mode of self-vengeance. Niebuhr informs us that "the Arabs rather avenge themselves, as the law allows, upon the family of the murderer; and seek an opportunity of slaying its head, or most considerable person, whom they regard as being properly the person guilty of the crime, as it must have been committed through his negligence in watching over the conduct of those under his inspection. From this time the two families are in continual fears, till some one or other of the murderer's family be slain. No reconciliation can take place between them, and the quarrel is still occasionally renewed. There have been instances of such family feuds lasting forty years. If in the contest a man of the murdered person's family happens to fall, there can be no peace until two others of the murderer's family have been slain." How far superior to this was the Mosaic institution of cities of refuge, where the involuntary homicide might remain in peace till the death of the high-priest, and then go forth in safety, while a really guilty person did not escape punishment.
Among most of the nations of antiquity, temples, and particularly the altars within them, were regarded as proffering an asylum for fugitives from violence. Among the Hebrews we find indications of the custom on the part of the culprit of fleeing to the Lord's altar. But this was not allowed to screen the guilty from deserved punishment, Exodus 21:14 1 Kings 2:28-34 .
There is an appointed city of refuge for sinners exposed to the second death, and an altar of refuge sprinkled with atoning blood. Happy the soul that flees and is safe in Christ, ere it is overtaken by the avenging law of God.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Refuge, Cities of
Towns which, according to Jewish law, enjoyed the right of asylum, and to which anyone who had unintentionally killed another might flee and be protected from the "avenger of blood." In order to justify his claim to immunity the fugitive had to prove to the authorities that his deed was unpremeditated, and he became virtually a prisoner within the limits of the city to which he fled. The biblical cities of refuge were Cedes, Sichem, Hebron, Bosor, Ramoth in Galaad, and Gaulon in Basan (Josue 20).
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Refuges Cities of,
[1] CITIES OF REFUGE - 1019
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Fenced Cities,
i.e. cities fortified or defended. The fortifications of the cities of Palestine, thus regularly "fenced," consisted of one or more walls (sometimes of thick stones, sometimes of combustible material), crowned with battlemented parapets, having towers at regular intervals, (2 Chronicles 32:5 ; Jeremiah 31:38 ) on which in later times engines of war were placed, and watch was kept by day and night in time of war. (Judges 9:45 ; 2 Kings 9:17 ; 2 Chronicles 26:9,15 )
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Cities of Refuge,
six Levitical cities specially chosen for refuge to the involuntary homicide until released from banishment by the death of the high priest. (Numbers 35:6,13,15 ; Joshua 20:2,7,9 ) There were three on each side of Jordan.
KEDESH , in Naphtali. (1 Chronicles 6:76 )
SHECHEM , in Mount Ephraim. (Joshua 21:21 ; 1 Chronicles 6:67 ; 2 Chronicles 10:1 )
HEBRON , in Judah. (Joshua 21:13 ; 2 Samuel 5:5 ; 1 Chronicles 6:55 ; 29:27 ; 2 Chronicles 11:10 )
On the east side of Jordan - BEZER , in the tribe of Reuben, in the plains of Moab. (4:43; Joshua 20:8 ; 21:36 ) 1 Maccabees 5:26 .
RAMOTH-GILEAD, in the tribe of Gad. (4:43; Joshua 21:38 ; 1 Kings 22:3 )
GOLAN , in Bashan, in the half-tribe of Manasseh. (4:43; Joshua 21:27 ; 1 Chronicles 6:71 )
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Cities
The earliest notice in Scripture of city-building is of Enoch by Cain, in the land of his exile. (Genesis 4:17 ) After the confusion of tongues the descendants of Nimrod founded Babel, Erech, Accad and Calneh, in the land of Shinar, and Asshur, a branch from the same stock, built Nineveh, Rehoboth-by-the-river, Calah and Resen, the last being "a great city." The earliest description of a city, properly so called, is that of Sodom, (Genesis 19:1-22 ) Even before the time of Abraham there were cities in Egypt, (Genesis 12:14,15 ; Numbers 13:22 ) and the Israelites, during their sojourn there, were employed in building or fortifying the "treasure cities" of Pithom and Raamses. (Exodus 1:11 ) Fenced cities , fortified with high walls, (3:5) were occupied and perhaps partly rebuilt after the conquest, by the settled inhabitants of Syria on both sides of the Jordan.

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Refuges Cities of, - [1] Cities OF REFUGE - 1019
Fortified Cities - Size was not so much the factor, though many of the fortified Cities were large Cities. The Bible contains two lists of fortified Cities, one for Naphtali (Joshua 19:35-38 ), and a list of Cities Rehoboam fortified for Judah (2 Chronicles 11:5-12 ). These two lists seem to include most of the walled Cities within the tribal area. Among the more important Cities in these lists are Hazor in Naphtali and Bethlehem, Tekoa, Hebron, Gath, and Lachish in Judah. At the end of the monarchy, Jeremiah reported that the Babylonians had conquered all the fortified Cities of Judah except Lachish and Azekah (Jeremiah 34:6-7 ). ...
Fortified Cities served a strategic function. ...
Other closely related terms used in the Bible include chariot Cities and store Cities (1 Kings 9:19 ). Chariot Cities were major military centers where the chariot troops were garrisoned. Store Cities probably served as central supply bases for the military. Chariot Cities and store Cities were probably also fortified Cities
Cities of the Plain - Cities OF THE PLAIN . See Plain [1]
Orei miklat - "cities of refuge") In biblical times, six Cities in the Land of Israel were designated as "cities of refuge
Levitical Cities - To compensate them for this, they received the tithes of Israelites for their support (Numbers 18:21 ), and 48 Cities were allotted to them from the inheritance of the other tribes. On the average, four Cities from each tribe were Levitical Cities. The practice of setting Cities aside in this manner was a common Ancient Near Eastern practice. ...
The Levites were not the sole possessors or occupiers of these Cities. These Cities did not cease to belong to the tribes within which they were located. Although six of the 48 were asylums for those guilty of manslaughter (Kedesh, Schechem, Hebron in Canaan, Bezer, Ramoth-Gilead, and Golan), Levitical Cities and Cities of refuge are not synonymous. See Cities of Refuge . The privilege of asylum was not extended to all 48 Levitical Cities. The aim of having Cities of refuge was to control blood revenge by making it possible for public justice to intervene between the slayer and the victim's avenger of blood. The Cities of refuge were probably priestly Cities containing important shrines. Cities of refuge also served as punitive detention centers. ...
Levitical Cities were a series of walled Cities, apart from the lands surrounding them. Unwalled suburbs and fields outside the Cities remained tribal property. ...
The legal status of Levitical houses within these Cities differed from ordinary property. To prevent the dispossession of Levites, it was ordained that they might at any time redeem houses in their own Cities which they had been forced by need to sell. ...
Theological, political, and economic reasons led to establishing the Cities. The Cities formed bases of operation so that the Levites could better infiltrate each of the tribes to instruct them in God's covenant. The list of Cities describes the dispersion of the Levites who were not employed at the large sanctuaries, had no steady income, and who belonged, therefore, in the category of widows and orphans. The Cities were established for men needing economic relief
Fenced City - See Cities and Urban Life ; Fortified Cities
Kibzaim - ” One of the Levitical Cities in the tribal territory of Ephraim also designated as a city of refuge (Joshua 21:22 ). In a parallel list of Cities in Chronicles, the name Jokmeam appears (1 Chronicles 6:68 ). See Levitical Cities ; Cities of Refuge ; Jokmeam ; Jokneam
Reserve City - In the national banking system of the United States, any of certain Cities in which the national banks are required (U. The banks in certain of the reserve Cities (specifically called central reserve Cities) are required to keep their reserve on hand in cash; banks in other reserve Cities may keep half of their reserve as deposits in these banks (U
Decapolis - Decapolis (de-kăp'o-lĭs), ten Cities. The Cities were rebuilt by the Romans about b. 65; but as other Cities grew up, writers are not agreed as to the names of the ten Cities
Siddim, Vale of - Valley of the broad plains, "which is the salt sea" (Genesis 14:3,8,10 ), between Engedi and the Cities of the plain, at the south end of the Dead Sea. Here Chedorlaomer and the confederate kings overthrew the kings of Sodom and the Cities of the plain. God afterwards, on account of their wickedness, "overthrew those Cities, and all the plain, and all the inhabitants of the Cities;" and the smoke of their destruction "went up as the smoke of a furnace" (19:24-28), and was visible from Mamre, where Abraham dwelt. Some, however, contend that the "cities of the plain" were somewhere at the north of the Dead Sea
Decapolis - Ten Cities=deka, ten, and polis, a city, a district on the east and south-east of the Sea of Galilee containing "ten Cities," which were chiefly inhabited by Greeks. These Cities were Scythopolis, i. , "city of the Scythians", (ancient Bethshean, the only one of the ten Cities on the west of Jordan), Hippos, Gadara, Pella (to which the Christians fled just before the destruction of Jerusalem), Philadelphia (ancient Rabbath-ammon), Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Raphana, and Damascus. 65) they rebuilt, and endowed with certain privileges, these "ten Cities," and the province connected with them they called "Decapolis
Decapolis - Originally a league of ten Cities, Greek in population and constitution, for mutual defence against the Semitic tribes around them. The original ten Cities, as enumerated by Pliny, were Scythopolis, Pella, Dion, Gerasa, Philadelphia, Gadara, Raphana, Kanatha, Hippos, and Damascus. Other Cities joined the league from time to time. The region of Decapolis ( Matthew 4:25 , Mark 5:20 ; Mark 7:31 ) was the territory in which these Cities were situated; that is (excluding Damascus), roughly speaking, the country S
Cities of refuge - (Orei Miklat): In biblical times, six Cities in the Land of Israel were designated as "cities of refuge
Cabul - Solomon gave to Hiram a district containing 20 Cities, Cabal included. Not liking the district, Hiram said, "What, kind of Cities are these?" and called the whole from the one city Cabul, which in Phoenician means displeasing (1 Kings 9:13). From 2 Chronicles 8:2 it seems that Hiram restored the 20 Cities. part of Galilee, only in part occupied by Israel, more completely so after Hiram restored the Cities. The Cities were occupied chiefly by Canaanite pagans (2 Samuel 24:7), and were in a bad condition. " Solomon borrowed sixscore talents of gold from Hiram for his extensive buildings, and gave the 20 Cities as an equivalent
City - After the confusion of tongues, the descendants of Nimrod founded several Cities (10:10-12). Next, we have a record of the Cities of the Canaanites, Sidon, Gaza, Sodom, etc. Before the time of Abraham there were Cities in Egypt (Numbers 13:22 ). The Israelites in Egypt were employed in building the "treasure Cities" of Pithom and Raamses (Exodus 1:11 ); but it does not seem that they had any Cities of their own in Goshen (Genesis 46:34 ; 47:1-11 ). In the kingdom of Og in Bashan there were sixty "great Cities with walls," and twenty-three Cities in Gilead partly rebuilt by the tribes on the east of Jordan (Numbers 21:21,32,33,35 ; 32:1-3,34-42 ; Deuteronomy 3:4,5,14 ; 1 Kings 4:13 ). On the west of Jordan were thirty-one "royal Cities" (Joshua 12 ), besides many others spoken of in the history of Israel. ...
A city with suburbs was a city surrounded with open pasture-grounds, such as the forty-eight Cities which were given to the Levites (Numbers 35:2-7 ). There were six Cities of refuge, three on each side of Jordan, namely, Kadesh, Shechem, Hebron, on the west of Jordan; and on the east, Bezer, Ramoth-gilead, and Golan. The Cities on each side of the river were nearly opposite each other. The regulations concerning these Cities are given in Numbers 35:9-34 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-13 ; Exodus 21:12-14 . ...
Pithom and Raamses, built by the Israelites as "treasure Cities," were not places where royal treasures were kept, but were fortified towns where merchants might store their goods and transact their business in safety, or Cities in which munitions of war were stored
Decapolis - (dih cap' oh lihss) Place name meaning, “ten Cities. ” A group of Greek Cities referred to in Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 ; Mark 7:31 , originally ten in number but including more Cities at a later time. writer Pliny named the ten Cities as Damascus, Philadelphia (modern Amman), Canatha, Scythopolis, Pella, Hippos, Gadara, Dion, Raphana, and Gerasa (modern Jerash). Ptolemy, another second century writer, names eighteen Cities in the Decapolis, omitting Raphana but adding nine others. A later source mentioned fourteen Cities in the group. These Cities were scattered south and east of the Sea of Galilee. ” Matthew 4:25 adds no more to our knowledge of these Cities. ...
Traditionally the Decapolis is assumed to be a league of Cities which preserved the stronghold of Greek thought and life in Palestine and resisted the Semitic influences of the Jews. These Cities do seem to have much in common; they were centers for the spread of Greco-Roman culture and had no great love for the Jews
Shimron-Meron - (sshihm' rahn-mee' rahn) Town in list of Cities Joshua defeated (Joshua 12:20 ). Apparently a longer name of Shimron (Joshua 11:1 ), though the earliest Greek translation and some commentators see two separate Cities here
Suburbs - Pastureland around Cities that were used in common for the feeding of sheep, cattle, and other animals (Leviticus 25:34 ). See Cities and Urban Life
Decapolis - (Greek: ten Cities) ...
A district in Palestine east and south of the Sea of Galilee which took its name from the confederation of ten Cities of which it was composed; those of interest are Damascus, Gadara, and Pella
Pentapolis - Five Cities
Kir'Ioth - (two Cities ), a place in Moab the palaces of which were threatened by Amos with destruction by fire, ( Amos 2:2 ) unless indeed the word means simply "the Cities," which is probably the case also in (Jeremiah 48:4 )
Golan - One of the six Cities of refuge. It was in Bashan, and the most northerly of the three Cities of refuge east of the Jordan
Decapolis - Containing ten Cities
Refuge, Cities of - See Cities of Refuge
Kerioth - The Cities; the callings
Manslayer - See REFUGE, Cities OF
Fenced Cities - There were in Palestine (1) Cities, (2) unwalled villages, and (3) villages with castles or towers (1 Chronicles 27:25 ). Cities, so called, had walls, and were thus fenced. The gateways of such Cities were also fortified (Nehemiah 2:8 ; 3:3,6 ; Judges 16:2,3 ; 1 Samuel 23:7 ). The Hebrews found many fenced Cities when they entered the Promised Land (Numbers 13:28 ; 32:17,34-42 ; Joshua 11:12,13 ; Judges 1:27-33 ), and we may estimate the strength of some of these Cities from the fact that they were long held in possession by the Canaanites. ...
Several of the kings of Israel and Judah distinguished themselves as fortifiers or "builders" of Cities
Cabul - So Hiram called the twenty Cities Solomon gave him for his aid, in the materials he furnished him with for the building of the temple. Probably, it was one of those Cities mentioned Joshua 19:27
Avenger of Blood. - See BLOOD, REFUGE, Cities OF
Cities - Cities. The distinction of villages from towns, and of towns from Cities is not very clearly marked in Scripture. Even before the time of Abraham there were Cities in Egypt, Genesis 12:14-15; Numbers 13:22, and the Israelites, during their sojourn there, were employed in building or fortifying the "treasure Cities" of Pithom and Raamses. Fenced Cities, fortified with high walls, Deuteronomy 3:5, were occupied and perhaps partly rebuilt after the conquest, by the settled inhabitants of Syria on both sides of the Jordan
Kirjathaim - The two Cities; callings; or meetings
Blood, Avenger of - See Avenger ; Bloodguilt ; Cities of Refuge
Gomorrah - See Plain [1]
Zeboiim - One of the five Cities of the Plain ( Genesis 10:18 ; Genesis 14:2 ; Genesis 14:8 , Deuteronomy 29:23 (22), Hosea 11:8 [3]
Zoar - See Plain [1], Lot
Levitical Cities - LEVITICAL Cities
Kirjath-Arim - The city of Cities, Ezra 2:25
Kirjathhaim - Two Cities so called, Joshua 13:19
Sidon And Tyre - (ssi' dahn, teere) Phoenician Cities located on the coastal plain between the mountains of Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea (Genesis 10:15 ). Sidon and Tyre were ancient Cities, having been founded long before the Israelites entered the land of Canaan. While Sidon seems to have been the most dominant of the two Cities during the early part of their histories, Tyre assumed this role in the latter times. Both Cities were known for their maritime exploits and as centers of trade. ...
Israel had relations with the two Cities, but especially with Tyre. Under Roman rule, the two Cities were important ports of trade, but they did not enjoy the dominance they previously held. Jesus spent time in Tyre and Sidon and in contrast to the prophets' attitude toward the Cities, He contrasted them with the Jews as examples of faith ( Matthew 11:20-22 )
Sodom - See Dead Sea, Plain [1]
Manslayer - (See Cities OF REFUGE; BLOOD; BLOOD, AVENGING OF
Homicide - See Crimes, § 7 , Refuge [1]
Murder - See Crimes, § 7; Refuge [1]
Patara - (pat' uh ruh) See Asia Minor, Cities of
Royal City - Gibeon (Joshua 10:2 ) was compared in size and strength to Cities with kings, such as Ai and Jericho. Gath (1 Samuel 27:5 ) was one of five Philistine Cities ruled by kings or lords
Treasure-Cities - The kings of Judah had keepers of their treasures both in city and country (1 Chronicles 27:25 ) and the places where these magazines were laid up were called treasure-cities. Pharaoh compelled the Hebrews to build him treasure-cities
Manslayer - See Kin [1] and Refuge [2]
Asylum - See Altar, Kin [1], Refuge [2]
Dimnah - Levitical city of Zebulun, Joshua 21:35 ; but it is not mentioned in the Cities of this tribe in Joshua 19:10-16 , and in the Levitical Cities of Zebulun in 1 Chronicles 6:77 the name of RIMMON occurs, which makes it appear probable that the two names refer to the same place
Argob - On this "island" stood sixty walled Cities, ruled over by Og. These Cities were conquered by the Israelites (Deuteronomy 3:4 ; 1 Kings 4:13 ). Here "sixty walled Cities are still traceable in a space of 308 square miles. Many of the houses in the ancient Cities of Bashan are perfect, as if only finished yesterday. These ancient Cities of Bashan probably contain the very oldest specimens of domestic architecture in the world" (Porter's Giant Cities)
Han'Nathon - (gracious ), one of the Cities of Zebulun
Esh'e-an - (slope ), one of the Cities of Judah
Resen - Head of the stream; bridle, one of Nimrod's Cities (Genesis 10:12 ), "between Nineveh and Calah. " It has been supposed that the four Cities named in this verse were afterwards combined into one under the name of Nineveh (q
Provost - ) A person who is appointed to superintend, or preside over, something; the chief magistrate in some Cities and towns; as, the provost of Edinburgh or of Glasgow, answering to the mayor of other Cities; the provost of a college, answering to president; the provost or head of certain collegiate churches
Gederothaim - GEDEROTHAIM occurs in Joshua 15:36 as one of the fourteen Cities of Judah that lay in the Shephçlah. There are, however, fourteen Cities without it, and it is probable that the name has arisen by dittography from the preceding Gederah
Horem - Consecrated, one of the fenced Cities of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38 )
Zoar - One of the Cities of Canaan. In the general destruction of the Cities of the plain, Zoar was spared to afford shelter to Lot. It was situated in the same district with the four Cities of the "plain" of the Jordan, and near to Sodom
Kat'Tath - (small ), one of Cities of the tribe of Zebulun
Ham'Math - (warm springs ), one of the fortified Cities in the territory allotted to Naphtali. In the list of Levitical Cities given out of Naphtali, (Joshua 21:32 ) the name of this place seems to be given as HAMMOTH-DOR
i'Ron - (pious ), one of the Cities of Naphtali, ( Joshua 19:38 ) hitherto totally unknown
i'Ron - (pious ), one of the Cities of Naphtali, ( Joshua 19:38 ) hitherto totally unknown
Jeth'Lah - (height ), one of the Cities of the tribe of Dan
Hamath-Zobah - Both Hamath and Zobah are Cities in Syria that David controlled (2 Samuel 8:1 ). Others think the Chronicler reflects the Babylonian and Persian administrative system of his day including the two Cities in one administrative district. The Chronicler in distinction from 2 Samuel 8:1 also combines the two Cities into “Zobah-hamath” ( 1 Chronicles 18:3 REB, reflecting the literal Hebrew text)
Decapolis - A district embracing ten Cities (as its name implies). Afterthe conquest of Palestine by the Romans these Cities were rebuilt and partly colonised, having peculiar privileges. Historians are not quite agreed as to which were the ten Cities, but they are now generally held to have been Hippos, Gadara, Pella, Philadelphia, Gerasa, Dion, Canatha, Damascus, Raphana, and Scythopolis
Harmost - ) A governor or prefect appointed by the Spartans in the Cities subjugated by them
Citied - ) Containing, or covered with, Cities
Tarpelites - One of the peoples settled in the Cities of Samaria ( Ezra 4:9 ); text doubtful
e'Nam - (double spring ), one of the Cities of Judah int he Shefelah or lowland
be'Ten - (height ), one of the Cities on the border of the tribe of Asher
Kedemoth - ” One of the Levitical Cities in the tribal territory of Reuben assigned to the family of Merari (Joshua 13:18 ; Joshua 21:37 ; 1 Chronicles 6:79 ). Both of these Cities are in the same vicinity and were in existence in Abraham's day
Proseuche - But the synagogues were originally in the Cities, and were covered places; whereas, for the most part, the proseuches, were out of the Cities, and on the banks of rivers, having no covering, except, perhaps, the shade of some trees or covered galeries, Acts 16:13
Calah - One of the early Cities built by Asshur, or, probably by Nimrod, if we read 'out of the land he (Nimrod) went forth to Assyria,' as in the margin. Supposed to be connected with some of the ruins on the Tigris, from which so many monuments and inscriptions have been discovered; but Calah cannot be distinguished from the other early Cities mentioned in connection with Nimrod
Kerioth-Hezron - (kee' rih ahth-hehz rahn) Place name representing one or perhaps two Cities. KJV takes the Hebrew to refer to two Cities in Joshua 15:25 —thus, Kerioth and Hezron. If this is a reference to two Cities, Kerioth would be identified with the Kerioth of Jeremiah 48:24 ; Amos 2:2 See Kerioth
Cabul - ...
...
A district in the north-west of Galilee, near to Tyre, containing twenty Cities given to Hiram by Solomon as a reward for various services rendered to him in building the temple (1 Kings 9:13 ), and as payment of the six score talents of gold he had borrowed from him. Hiram gave the Cities this name because he was not pleased with the gift, the name signifying "good for nothing. " Hiram seems afterwards to have restored these Cities to Solomon (2 Chronicles 8:2 )
Shil'Him - (fountains ), one of the Cities in the southern portion of the tribe of Judah
ad'Amah - (red earth ), one of the "fenced Cities" of Naphtali, named between Chinnereth and Ramah
Manslayer - The Israelites had Cities of refuge for manslayers
Kirjath-Arba - ...
See Cities of Refuge
ac'Cad, - one of the Cities in the land of Shinar
Almon - Hidden, one of the sacerdotal Cities of Benjamin (Joshua 21:18 ), called also Alemeth (1 Chronicles 6:60 )
Nibshan - One of the six Cities of Judah in the midbar , "wilderness," the low district adjoining the Dead Sea
Secacah - One of Judah's six Cities in the midbar or wilderness bordering on the Dead Sea (Joshua 15:61)
Ephron, Mount - A mount on which were 'cities' on the border line of Judah
Dinaites - Colonists placed by the Assyrians in the Cities of Samaria
Gomorrah - one of the five Cities of the Pentapolis, consumed by fire, Genesis 19:24 , &c
Ben-eb'Erak - (son of lightning ), one of the Cities of the tribe of Dan, mentioned only in ( Joshua 19:45 )
en-Had'Dah - (swift fountain ), one of the Cities on the border of Issachar named next to Engannim
Middin - One of the six Cities of Judah in the "wilderness" (midbar ; Joshua 15:61, including the waste on the upper level, the cliffs, and shore of the lake). Conder (Palestine Exploration, July 1875) identifies it with Khirbet Mird, one of the six Cities of the midbar or "desert", on the edge of the Bukeia, E
Region Round About - The "circle" (hacicar ) of cultivation, wherein stood Sodom, Gomorrah, and the other three Cities. Genesis 13:10-12, "cities of the circuit" round Jordan, the low plain along the water (Genesis 19:17)
Decapolis - —A league of ten Greek Cities (ἡ Δεκάπολις) in eastern Palestine, which was probably formed at the time of Pompey’s invasion of Palestine, 64–63 b. By the Greek Cities Pompey was hailed as a deliverer from the Jewish yoke, and many towns elevated Pompey’s campaign to the dignity of an era. At first the league must have comprised just ten Cities. The formation of a confederation of Greek Cities in the midst of a Semitic population was necessary for the preservation of Hellenic civilization and culture. From the days of Alexander the Great, who sought to Hellenize the Orient by founding Greek Cities throughout the conquered lands, there were Greek Cities in Palestine. Among the Cities occupied before 198 b. Among the Cities liberated by Pompey from the Jewish yoke, Hippos, Scythopolis, and Pella are expressly named; and Gadara, which had been destroyed by the Jews, was rebuilt (BJ i. Pompey annexed these Cities to the province of Syria, but conferred upon them municipal freedom. All the Cities of the Decapolis had in the Roman period the rights of coinage and asylum, and were allowed to maintain a league for defence against their common foes. Most likely these were Jews, who formed a considerable part of the population even in Greek Cities. Hippos lay just east of the Lake, Gadara a few miles to the south-east, and in full view from the southern end; Pella and Scythopolis were not far to the south; while the other Cities of the Decapolis lay to the north-east, east, and south-east of the Lake. Our Lord visited the Jewish population of Peraea in His later ministry, but He seems never to have made a tour to the great Cities of the Decapolis. Pliny not only preserves the names of the ten Cities (HN v
Tob-Adonijah - One of the Levites sent by Jehoshaphat to teach in the Cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:8 )
ir'pe-el - (God heals ), one of the Cities of Benjamin
id'Alah - (memorial of God ), one of the Cities of the tribe of Zebulun, named between Shimron and Bethlehem
mo'Zah - (fountain ), one of the Cities in the allotment of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:26 ) only, named between hae-Cephirah and Rekem
Dil'Ean - (gourd ), one of the Cities in the lowlands of Judah
Golan - See Cities of Refuge ; Levitical Cities
Cabul - the name which Hiram, king of Tyre, gave to the twenty Cities in the land of Galilee, of which Solomon made him a present, in acknowledgment for the great services in building the temple, 1 Kings 9:31. These Cities not being agreeable to Hiram, on viewing them, he called them the land of Cabul, which in the Hebrew tongue denotes displeasing; others take it to signify binding, or adhesive, from the clayey nature of the soil
Fenced Cities, - Cities fortified or defended. The fortifications of the Cities of Palestine, thus regularly "fenced," consisted of one or more walls (sometimes of thick stones, sometimes of combustible material), crowned with battlemented parapets, having towers at regular intervals, (2 Chronicles 32:5 ; Jeremiah 31:38 ) on which in later times engines of war were placed, and watch was kept by day and night in time of war
Ayuntamiento - ) In Spain and Spanish America, a corporation or body of magistrates in Cities and towns, corresponding to mayor and aldermen
Kartah - See Levitical Cities
Ben-Hail - A prince sent by Jehoshaphat to teach in the Cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:7 )
ad'Adah - (festival or boundary ), one of the Cities in the extreme south of Judah, named with Dimonah and Kedesh
Pithom - one of the Cities that the Israelites built for Pharaoh in Egypt, during the time of their servitude, Exodus 1:11
ke'Ziz - (cut off ) , The valley of, one of the "cities" of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:21 ) and the eastern border of the tribe
zo'ar - (smallness ), one of the most ancient Cities of the land of Canaan. (Genesis 14:2,8 ) It was in intimate connection with the Cities of the "plain of Jordan" --Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah and Zeboiim, See also (Genesis 13:10 ) but not Genesis10:19 In the general destruction of the Cities of the plain Zoar was spared to afford shelter to Lot. It was situated in the same district with the four Cities already mentioned, viz. (Genesis 19:15 ; 23:27 ) The definite position of Sodom is, and probably will always be, a mystery; but there can be little doubt that the plain of the Jordan was at the north side of the Dead Sea and that the Cities of the plain must therefore have been situated there instead of at the southern end of the lake, as it is generally taken for granted they were
Expugn - ) To take by assault; to storm; to overcome; to vanquish; as, to expugn Cities; to expugn a person by arguments
e'Ther - (abundance ), one of the Cities of Judah in the low country, the Shefelah , ( Joshua 15:42 ) allotted to Simeon
Eph'Ron, Mount - The "cities of Mount Ephron" formed one of the landmarks on the northern boundary of the tribe of Judah
Brimstone - The Cities of the plain were destroyed by a rain of fire and brimstone (Genesis 19:24,25 ). In Isaiah 34:9 allusion is made to the destruction of these Cities
ta'Phon, - one of the Cities in Judea fortified by Bacchides
Salt, the City of - One of the Cities of Judah (Joshua 15:62 ), probably in the Valley of Salt, at the southern end of the Dead Sea
Shushan purim - Purim as observed on the fifteenth of Adar, instead of the fourteenth, in certain Cities (including Jerusalem) that were walled in ancient times ...
Destroyer - One who destroys, or lays waste one who kills a man, or an animal, or who ruins a country, Cities, &c
Antiochis - A concubine of Antiochus Epiphanes, who assigned to her the revenues of the two Cilician Cities, Tarsus and Mallus
ad'Mah - (earthy, fortress ), one of the "cities of the plain," always coupled with Zeboim
pa'Rah - (heifer-town ) one of the Cities in the territory allotted to Benjamin, named only in the lists of the conquest
Nib'Shan - (soft soil ) one of the six Cities of Judah, ( Joshua 15:62 ) which were in the district of the Midbar (Authorized Version "wilderness")
City - The towns and Cities of Palestine were commonly built on heights, for better security against robbers or invaders. Larger towns and Cities were often not only defended by strong outer walls, with towers and gates, but by a citadel or castle within these limits-a last resort when the rest of the city was taken, Judges 9:46,51 . The "fenced Cities" of the Jews, Deuteronomy 3:5 , were of various sizes and degrees of strength; some being surrounded by high and thick stone walls, and others by feebler ramparts, often of clay or sun-dried bricks, and sometimes combustible, Isaiah 9:10 Amos 1:7-14 . Some Cities were adorned with vast parks and gardens; this was the case with Babylon, which embraced an immense at this day to form any reliable estimate of the population of the Cities of Judea. See GATE, REFUGE, Cities OF, WATCHMEN
Gomorrah, Gomorrha - One of the five Cities of the plain, or Vale of Siddim, that revolted against Chedorlaomer, who attacked and carried away the people and the spoil. The wickedness of the Cities being exceedingly great, they were, with the exception of the small city of Zoar, destroyed by fire and brimstone from heaven. Yet, solemn and complete as was their destruction, the Lord said it would be more tolerable in the day of judgement for these Cities than for those where His mighty works had been done, and which had rejected Him. ...
It is not known where these Cities were situated, except that they were near to the Dead Sea: at its north end is now considered to be most probable
Middin - Measures, one of the six Cities "in the wilderness," on the west of the Dead Sea, mentioned along with En-gedi (Joshua 15:61 )
Admah - Admah (ăd'mah), earth or fortress, one of the five Cities in the vale of Siddim, Genesis 10:19; Genesis 14:2, destroyed with Sodom
Ben-ha'il - (son of the host, strong ), one of the princes whom King Jehoshaphat sent to teach in the Cities of Judah
Cart - A carriage with two wheels, fitted to be drawn by one horse, or by a yoke of oxen, and used in husbandry or commercial Cities for carrying heavy commodities. In America, horse-carts are used mostly in Cities, and ox-carts in the country
Cities - " The earliest description of a city, properly so called, is that of Sodom, (Genesis 19:1-22 ) Even before the time of Abraham there were Cities in Egypt, (Genesis 12:14,15 ; Numbers 13:22 ) and the Israelites, during their sojourn there, were employed in building or fortifying the "treasure Cities" of Pithom and Raamses. (Exodus 1:11 ) Fenced Cities , fortified with high walls, (3:5) were occupied and perhaps partly rebuilt after the conquest, by the settled inhabitants of Syria on both sides of the Jordan
Lycaonia - (lihc ay oh' ni uh) Roman province in the interior of Asia Minor including Cities of Lystra, Iconium, and Derbe
Achmetha - A title applied to Cities with a fortress for protecting the royal treasures (Rawlinson, in Kitto's Cyclop
Gomorrah - One of the Cities in the fruitful vale of Siddim, near the southern part of the ancient Dead Sea, miraculously blasted by God
en-ha'Zor - (fount of Hazor ), one of the fenced Cities in the inheritance of Naphtali, distinct from Hazor
ra'Phon, - a city of Gilead, 1 Maccabees 15:37 perhaps identical with Raphana, which is mentioned by Pliny as one of the Cities of the Decapolis
Remmon - Other modern translations follow the KJV in understanding two Cities: Ain and Rimmon
Raamses - One of the Cities built by the children of Israel in Egypt for Pharaoh
Toparchy - ) A small state, consisting of a few Cities or towns; a petty country governed by a toparch; as, Judea was formerly divided into ten toparchies
Chephi'Rah - (the hamlet ), one of the four Cities of the Gibeonites, ( Joshua 9:17 ) named afterwards among the towns of Benjamin
di'Naites, - (Ezra 4:9 ) the name of some of the Cuthaean colonists who were placed in the Cities of Samaria after the captivity of the ten tribes
Jiph'Tah - (whom God sets free ), one of the Cities of Judah in the maritime lowland, or Shefelah
Decapolis - A district containing ten Cities, rebuilt, colonized, and granted special privileges by Rome 65 B. Other Cities afterward receiving similar privileges cause confusion as to which are the original ten; probably Scythopolis (W
en-Rimmon - Ain and Rimmon or Remmon appear as separate Cities in the tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:32 ), settled by the tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:7 ). These two are often read as one city (Joshua 19:7 , RSV but not NRSV), but this makes the numbers of the Cities in the lists inaccurate
Colosse - A city of Phrygia, situated on a hill near the junction of the Lycus with the Meander, and not far from the Cities Hierapolis and Laodicea, Colossians 2:1 4:13,15 . With these Cities it was destroyed by an earthquake in the tenth year of Nero, about A
Beth-Anath - House of response, one of the fenced Cities of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38 )
Archiater - ) Chief physician; - a term applied, on the continent of Europe, to the first or body physician of princes and to the first physician of some Cities
Commissionnaire - ) One of a class of attendants, in some European Cities, who perform miscellaneous services for travelers
Zeboim, Zeboiim - One of the five 'cities of the plain' destroyed with Sodom and Gomorrah
Kir'Jath - (a city ), the last of the Cities enumerated as belonging to the tribe of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:28 ) probably identical with the better-known place Kirjath-jearim
Asnap'Per - (swift ), mentioned in ( Ezra 4:10 ) as the person who settled the Cutheans in the Cities of Samaria
Babylo'Nians, - the inhabitants of Babylon, a race of Shemitic origin, who were among the colonists planted in the Cities of Samaria by the conquering Assyrian
Streets - In the towns and Cities of Palestine, are supposed to have been comparatively narrow and ill graded, on account of the unevenness of their sites, and the little use of wheel-carriages. They were wider, however, than in many modern Cities, Luke 14:21 , and terminated in large public areas around the gates, Nehemiah 8:1 . They were named, like our own streets, Acts 9:11 , and often resembled the bazaars of modern eastern Cities, the shops of the same kind being in the same street and giving it its name, as the bakers' street, Nehemiah 3:31,32 ; Jeremiah 37:21 , and the valley of the cheesemongers
Bozrah - of the Dead Sea (Jeremiah 48:21-24), enumerated among the Cities of Moab. The Bozrah of Edom on the mountains (Jeremiah 49:13) and Edom's other Cities are to be "perpetual wastes"; but the Bozrah of Moab "in the plain" is to be restored "in the latter days" (Jeremiah 48:47). Others identify this Bozrah with the Roman Bostra in Bashan, 60 miles from Heshbon, containing magnificent remains; Jeremiah's including the Cities "far and near' may favor this view; but Jeremiah 48:21, "in the plain," seems to mark it among the other Moabite Cities
Hazar-Susah - Village of the horse, the same as Sansannah, one of Solomon's "chariot Cities" (Joshua 15:31 ; 2 Chronicles 1:14 ), a depot in the south border of Judah
Tob-Adoni'Jah - (Adonijah the good ), one of the Levites sent by Jehoshaphat through the Cities of Judah to teach the law to the people
Chorashan - To its citizens among the Cities of the S
el-Tekeh - (God its fear ), one of the Cities in the border of Dan, ( Joshua 19:44 ) which with its suburbs was allotted to the Kohathite Levites
Sodom - It is believed that the Cities of Sodom and Gomorrah were located near the southern end of the Dead Sea, but through earthquake activity the sea spread farther south and covered whatever remained of the ancient Cities. God determined to destroy the Cities, but Abraham asked God to withhold his judgment if ten righteous people could be found. But ten righteous people could not be found and the two Cities were destroyed. The Cities were destroyed probably through the lighting of natural gases by lightning, combined with earthquake disturbance. Jesus warned that Jews of his day, who heard his teaching and saw his mighty works yet rejected him, would receive a more severe judgment than people of those wicked Gentile Cities who had never heard of him
City - Of course, the first "cities" would be mere groups of rude dwellings, fenced round together. Special Cities furnished supplies for the king's service (1 Kings 9:19; 1 Kings 4:7; 1 Chronicles 27:25; 2 Chronicles 17:12). So, our Lord represents the different servants having the number of Cities assigned them in proportion to their faithfulness (Luke 19:17; Luke 19:19). ...
Forty-eight Cities were assigned to the Levites, of which 13 were for the family of Aaron, nine were in Judah, four were in Benjamin, and six were Cities of refuge. The streets of eastern Cities are generally narrow, seldom allowing more than two loaded camels to pass one another
Admah - One of the four Cities in the plain of Siddim, destroyed by fire from heaven and covered by the Dead Sea, Genesis 14:2 ; 19:24,25 ; Hosea 11:8
Cortes - ) The legislative assembly, composed of nobility, clergy, and representatives of Cities, which in Spain and in Portugal answers, in some measure, to the Parliament of Great Britain
Croton Bug - It is common aboard ships, and in houses in Cities, esp
Zeboim - One of the Cities of the plain
Aam - ) A Dutch and German measure of liquids, varying in different Cities, being at Amsterdam about 41 wine gallons, at Antwerp 36 1/2, at Hamburg 38 1/4
Secacah - Enclosure, one of the six Cities in the wilderness of Judah, noted for its "great cistern" (Joshua 15:61 )
Baalis - He hired Ishmael to slay Gedaliah who had been appointed governor over the Cities of Judah
Barnstormer - ) An itinerant theatrical player who plays in barns when a theatre is lacking; hence, an inferior actor, or one who plays in the country away from the larger Cities
Dinner - ) The principal meal of the day, eaten by most people about midday, but by many (especially in Cities) at a later hour
Jarmuth - JARMUTH or JARAMOTH...
This was one of the Cities of Judah, which lay in the way to Jerusalem
Beth'-Anath - (house of echo or reply ), one of the "fenced Cities" of Naphtali, named with Beth-shemesh, ( Joshua 19:38 ) from neither of them were the Canaanites expelled
Jog'Behah - (lofty ), one of the Cities on the east of Jordan which were built and fortified by the tribe of Gad when they took possession of their territory
Cinnereth - A harp, one of the "fenced Cities" of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ; Compare Deuteronomy 3:17 ). The phrase "all Cinneroth, with all the land of Naphtali" in 1 Kings 15:20 is parallel to "the store-houses of the Cities of Naphtali" (RSV marg
Gomor'Rah - (submersion ), one of the five "cities of the plain" or "vale of Siddim" that under the irrespective kings joined battle there with Chedorlaomer ( Genesis 14:2-8 ) and his allies by whom they were discomfited till Abraham came to the rescue. The geographical position of these Cities is discussed under SODOM
um'Mah - (union ), one of the Cities of the allotment of Asher
Shaveh Kiriathaim - Or "the valley of the two Cities
Decapolis - a country in Palestine, so called, because it contained ten principal Cities; some situated on the west, and some on the east side of Jordan, Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20
Sheerah - ” Female member of tribe of Ephraim who established the two Cities of Beth-horon as well as Uzzen-sherah (1 Chronicles 7:24 )
Amraphel - With three other petty kings, he made war upon the tribes around the Dead Sea, and the Cities of the plain, Genesis 14:1
Libya - Cyrene was one of its five Cities
Sec'Acah, - (thicket ), one of the six Cities of Judah which were situated in the Midbar ("wilderness"), that is, the tract bordering on the Dead Sea
Prytaneum - ) A public building in certain Greek Cities; especially, a public hall in Athens regarded as the home of the community, in which official hospitality was extended to distinguished citizens and strangers
Polemarch - In other Grecian Cities, a high military and civil officer
Leb'Aoth - (lionesses ), a town which forms one of the last group of the Cities of "the south" in the enumeration of the possessions of Judah, ( Joshua 15:32 ) probably identical with Beth-lebaoth
Mayor - In some American Cities there is a city court of which the major is chief judge
Aaronites - Thirteen Cities were assigned to them, in Judah and Benjamin, Joshua 21:13-19 ; 1 Chronicles 6:57-60
Beth-Gamul - Camel-house, a city in the "plain country" of Moab denounced by the prophet (Jeremiah 48:23 ); probably the modern Um-el-Jemal, near Bozrah, one of the deserted Cities of the Hauran
Treasure Cities - Store Cities which the Israelites built for the Egyptians (Exodus 1:11 )
Defenced - ]'>[1] of fortified Cities, and once ( Zechariah 11:2 marg
Chorashan - It is mentioned with Cities south of Hebron
Salt, City of - One of the six Cities in the wilderness that fell to the lot of Judah
Mastersinger - ) One of a class of poets which flourished in Nuremberg and some other Cities of Germany in the 15th and 16th centuries
Siddim - The vale in which were "slime pits," near the plain whereon stood the Cities of Sodom and Gomorrah
be-Esh-Terah - (house of Ashterah ), one of the two Cities allotted to the sons of Gershon out of the tribe of Manasseh beyond Jordan
Hena - One of the Cities of Mesopotamia destroyed by sennacherib (2 Kings 18:34 ; 19:13 )
Ben-Hail - ” Official under King Jehoshaphat of Judah (873-848), who sent him to help teach God's law in the Cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 17:7 )
Adamah - One of the fenced Cities in the lot of Naphtali
Dagon's House - The Beth-dagon of Joshua 15:41 was one of the Cities of the tribe of Judah, in the lowland or plain which stretches westward. ...
The Beth-dagon of Joshua 19:27 was one of the border Cities of Asher
Zeboim -
One of the "five Cities of the plain" of Sodom, generally coupled with Admah (Genesis 10:19 ; 14:2 ; Deuteronomy 29:23 ; Hosea 11:8 ). It was destroyed along with the other Cities of the plain
Pamphylia - One of the chief Cities was Perga, where John Mark left Paul and Barnabas during the first missionary journey (Acts 13:13 ). Other important Cities were the ports of Side and Attalia
ek'Ron - ( Joshua 13:3 ) Like the other Philistine Cities its situation was in the lowlands. (Joshua 15:45,46 ; Judges 1:18 ) Afterwards we find it mentioned among the Cities of Dan
Havoth-ja'ir - ( Numbers 32:41 ; 3:14) In the records of Manasseh in (Joshua 13:30 ) and 1 Chronicles 2:23 The Havoth-jair are reckoned with other districts as making up sixty "cities. ( 1 Kings 4:13 ) There is apparently some confusion in these different statements as to what the sixty Cities really consisted of
el-Tolad - (God's kindred ), one of the Cities in the south of Judah, ( Joshua 15:30 ) allotted to Simeon, (Joshua 19:4 ) and in possession of that tribe until the time of David
ke'Nath - (possession ), one of the Cities on the east of Jordan, with its "daughter-towns" (Authorized Version "villages") taken possession of by a certain Nobah, who then called it by his own name, ( Numbers 32:42 )
be-e'Roth - (wells ), one of the four Cities of the Hivites who deluded Joshua into a treaty of peace with them
Ashnah - Two Cities of Judah, both in the shephelah or low hills
Salt, City of, - the fifth of the six Cities of Judah which lay in the "wilderness
Keziz - , is mentioned among the Cities of Benjamin
Baalis - He hired Ishmael to slay Gedaliah, who was appointed by the king of Babylon governor over the Cities of Judah (Jeremiah 40:14)
Emek-Keziz - ” It is listed as one of the Cities assigned the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:21 )
Chesil - Perhaps the same as Bethul, of Simeon, within Judah's inheritance, or Bethuel (Joshua 19:4; 1 Chronicles 4:30; 1 Samuel 30:27), "Bethel" among the Cities of the extreme S
Alais, Peace of - The Edict of Nantes was renewed, an amnesty was granted, and the Cities taken from the Huguenots
Libya - of Egypt, opposite Crete, including Cyrene, the Cyrenaica pentepolitana, containing the five Cities Berenice, Arsinoe, Ptolemais, Apollonia, and Cyrene
Chiefs of Asia - "Asiarchs," the title given to certain wealthy persons annually appointed to preside over the religious festivals and games in the various Cities of proconsular Asia (Acts 19:31 )
Ziddim - Some commentators see it as copyist's repetition of “fenced Cities
Admah - One of the Cities of the plain, having its own king, linked with Zeboim (Genesis 10:19; Genesis 14:2; Genesis 14:8; Deuteronomy 29:23; Hosea 11:8)
am'Raphel - (keeper of the gods ) perhaps a Hamite king of Shinar or Babylonia, who joined the victorious incursion of the Elamite Chedorlaomer against the kings of Sodom and Gomorrah and the Cities of the plain
Jair - He took 23 Cities in Galaad, and named them, Havoth Jair, or "villages of Jair" (Number 32). Jair possessed in Galaad 30 Cities, called Havoth Jair. These Cities took their name from Jair, son of Segub, of whom Jair was probably a descendant
Pithom - Egyptian, Pa-Tum, "house of Tum," the sun-god, one of the "treasure" Cities built for Pharaoh Rameses II. Lansing) that these "store" Cities "were residence Cities, royal dwellings, such as the Pharaohs of old, the Kings of Israel, and our modern Khedives have ever loved to build, thus giving employment to the superabundant muscle of their enslaved peoples, and making a name for themselves
Iram - The names (Genesis 37:31-39) are probably those of the Cities where the "dukes" named before (Genesis 37:15-19) had their seat of government; so that we should translated "duke of Magdiel, duke of Iram," etc. Timnah and Kenaz called their Cities after their own names
Gomorrah - Submersion, one of the five Cities of the plain of Siddim (q. These Cities probably stood close together, and were near the northern extremity of what is now the Dead Sea
Calneh, Calno - Calneh is associated in Genesis 10:10 with Babylon, Erech, and Accad as the earliest Cities of Shinar. Calneh, linked with Hamath and Gath in Amos 6:2 , is probably the Kulnia (Kullani) associated with Arpad and Hadrach, Syrian Cities, in the Assyrian ‘tribute’ lists, Kullanhu now six miles from Arpad
Colony - Only Philippi is described as a colony of Rome (Acts 16:12 ), though many Cities mentioned in the New Testament were considered as such. The Cities of Corinth and Philippi were Roman colonies during the time of Caesar
Bashan-Havoth-Jair - The Bashan of the villages of Jair, the general name given to Argob by Jair, the son of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:14 ), containing sixty Cities with walls and brazen gates (Joshua 13:30 ; 1 Kings 4:13 )
Sod'om - (burning ), one of the most ancient Cities of Syria. In the midst of the garden the four Cities of Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah and Zeboim appear to have been situated. It is necessary to notice how absolutely the Cities are identified with the district. From all these passages, though much is obscure, two things seem clear:
That Sodom and the rest of the Cities of the plain of Jordan stood on the north of the Dead Sea; ...
That neither the Cities nor the district were submerged by the lake, but that the Cities were overthrown and the land spoiled, and that it may still be seen in its desolate condition. ...
The opinion long current that the five Cities were submerged in the lake, and that their remains--walls, columns and capitals--might he still discerned below the water, hardly needs refutation after the distinct statement and the constant implication of Scripture. But, ...
A more serious departure from the terms of the ancient history is exhibited in the prevalent opinion that the Cities stood at the south end of the lake. " (b) Another consideration in favor of placing the Cities at the southern end of the lake is the existence of similar names in that direction. (d) (A fourth and yet stronger argument is drawn from the fact that Abraham saw the smoke of the burning Cities from Hebron. We may suppose, however, that the actual agent in the ignition and destruction of the Cities had been of the nature of a tremendous thunder-storm accompanied by a discharge of meteoric stones, (and that these set on fire the bitumen with which the soil was saturated, and which was used in building the city. And it may be that this burning out of the soil caused the plain to sink below the level of the Dead Sea, and the waters to flow over it--if indeed Sodom and its sister Cities are really under the water
so'Rek - ( Judges 16:4 ) It was possibly nearer Gaza than any other of the chief Philistine Cities, since thither Samson was taken after his capture at Delilah's house
Kartan - Double city, a town of Naphali, assigned to the Gershonite Levites, and one of the Cities of refuge (Joshua 21:32 )
Anab - Grape-town, one of the Cities in the mountains of Judah, from which Joshua expelled the Anakim (Joshua 11:21 ; 15:50 )
Chephirah - One of Gibeon's four Cities (Joshua 9:17), afterward belonging to Benjamin (Joshua 18:26)
Aqueduct - ) A conductor, conduit, or artificial channel for conveying water, especially one for supplying large Cities with water
Minnith - (mihn' nihth) One of twenty Cities involved in Jephthah's conquest of the Ammonites (Judges 11:29-33 )
Remeth - There are two Cities of this name, one a city of Simeon, in the south, and another of Issachar
re'Sen - (bridle ), ( Genesis 10:12 ) one of the Cities built by Asshur, "between Nineveh and Calah
Tobijah - One of the Levites sent by Jehoshaphat to teach in the Cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:8 )
Beth-Arabah - One of the six Cities of Judah, situated in the Arabah or sunken valley of the Jordan and the Dead Sea; between Bethhoglah and the high land on the W
Chun - One of the Cities of Hadarezer, king of Syria
Kartan - See Levitical Cities
Perizzites - Such as dwell in villages: or perhaps, as villages are scattered buildings different from Cities, the Perizzites might mean the scattered enemies of Israel, whom the Lord would drive out before them
Hammath - One of the fenced Cities of Naphtali
Amraphel - Perhaps a Hamite king of Shinar or Babylonia, who joined the victorious incursion of the Elamite Chedorlaomer against the kings of Sodom and Gomorrah and the Cities of the plain
Sergeants - Acts 16:35 , properly Roman lictors, public servants who bore a bundle of rods, sometimes with an axe in the center, before the magistrates of Cities and colonies as insignia of their office, and who executed the sentences which their masters pronounced
Loaf - The size and price of a loaf, in large Cities, are regulated by law
ke'Rioth - (cities )
ma'Don - (strife ) one of the principal Cities of Canaan before the conquest, probably in the north
Resen - The great city "between Nineveh and Calah" one of the four Cities built by Asshur, or by Nimrod in Asshur
Grave - Among the ancient Hebrews graves were outside of Cities in the open field (Luke 7:12 ; John 11:30 ). Kings (1 Kings 2:10 ) and prophets (1 Samuel 25:1 ) were generally buried within Cities
Kiriath-Arba - ” See Levitical Cities ; Cities of Refuge ; Hebron
la'Chish - (Joshua 10:31-33 ) In the special statement that the attack lasted two days, in contradistinction to the other Cities which were taken in one (see ver. Lachish was one of the Cities fortified and garrisoned by Rehoboam after the revolt of the northern kingdom. (2 Chronicles 11:9 ) In the reign of Hezekiah it was one of the Cities taken by Sennacherib
Dagon - The upper part of his body was human, the lower half fish-like; the foremost deity of such maritime Cities as Azotus, Gaza, Ascalon, and Arvad, where temples were built in his honor
Iyim - ]'>[2] incorrectly Iim ), a town in Judah, one of the ‘uttermost Cities toward the border of Edom
Bozer - One of the three Cities of refuge E
Sarabaites - Wandering fanatics, or rather impostors, of the fourth century, who, instead of procuring a subsistence by honest industry, travelled through various Cities and provinces, and gained a maintenance by fictitious miracles, by selling relics to the multitude, and other frauds of a like nature
Beeroth - Wells, one of the four Cities of the Hivites which entered by fraud into a league with Joshua
Zer - Commentators often take Zer as a copyist's modification, repeating the Hebrew for “fenced Cities
Gazez - As other names in the list represent Cities in southern Judah occupied by the clan of Caleb, Gazez may also be a city, though nothing else is known about it
Chephirah - Village, one of the four Cities of the Gibeonitish Hivites with whom Joshua made a league (9:17)
Kab'ze-el - (gathered by God ), one of the "cities" of the tribe of Judah, ( Joshua 15:21 ) the native place of the great hero Benaiah ben-Jehoiada
e'Rech - (length ), one of the Cities of Nimrod's kingdom in the land of Shinar, ( Genesis 10:10 ) doubtless the same as Orchoe, 82 miles south and 43 east of Babylon, the modern designations of the site --Warka, Irka and Irak --bearing a considerable affinity to the original name
Raamses, Rameses - One of the treasure Cities built by the Israelites in Egypt, and the starting-point of the Exodus ( Exodus 1:11 ; Exodus 12:37 , Numbers 33:3 ; Numbers 33:5 ). The site is not quite certain, but it was probably one of the Cities called in Egyp
Calah - One of the most ancient Cities of Assyria. It has been conjectured that these four Cities mentioned in Genesis 10:11 were afterwards all united into one and called Nineveh (q
Gath - One of the five Cities of the Philistines, 1 Samuel 5:8; 1 Samuel 6:17; Amos 6:2; Micah 1:10; a stronghold of the Anakim, Joshua 11:22; home of Goliath, 1 Samuel 17:4; place whither the ark was carried, 1 Samuel 5:8; where David sought refuge, 1 Samuel 21:10-15; was strengthened by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:8; taken by Hazael of Syria, 2 Kings 12:17; probably recovered by Jehoash, 2 Kings 13:25; broken down by Uzziah, 2 Chronicles 26:6; was probably destroyed before the time of the later prophecies, as it is omitted from the list of royal Cities
Gaza - (Hebrew: the strong) ...
City in Syria, the modern Ghuzzeh, 50 miles southwest of Jerusalem, one of the oldest Cities in the world, mentioned in Genesis 10, and first occupied by the Hevites. One of the five Cities of the Philistines, who constantly molested the Jews, when Samson arose and avenged his people; Gaza was the scene of his last triumph and death (Judges 16)
Chephirah - One of the four Hivite Cities which made peace with the Hebrews; re-peopled after the Captivity, having belonged to Benjamin; called in 1Es 5:19 Caphira
Kiriath - of Kiriah , the complement of which, - jearim , seems to have fallen out in Joshua 18:28 , from its resemblance to the word for ‘cities’ which follows
Philadelphian - ) Of or pertaining to Ptolemy Philadelphus, or to one of the Cities named Philadelphia, esp
Heshbon - It was probably made over to Gad, since we meet with it among the Cities which were given to the Levites, Joshua 21:39
Erech - One of Nimrod's Cities in the plain of Shinar, Genesis 10:10
Asiar'Chae - (chief of Asia ) (Authorized Version; ( Acts 19:31 ) ), officers chosen annually by the Cities of that part of the province of Asia of which Ephesus was, under Roman government, the metropolis
Zemarite - 1400) Zemar, or Zumur, was one of the most important of the Phoenician Cities, but it afterwards almost disappears from history
Sodomite - Originally a citizen of the town of Sodom, one of the Cities of the plain near the Dead Sea (Genesis 13:12 )
Samlah - From separate Cities being assigned to most of the Edomite kings it is supposed Edom was a confederacy of tribes, and the chief city of the reigning tribe was capital of the whole
Earthquake - The wave of shock sometimes traverses half a hemisphere, destroying Cities and many thousand lives; - called also earthdin, earthquave, and earthshock
Abda - A Levite living in Jerusalem rather than in one of the levitical Cities (Nehemiah 11:17 )
Cuth, Cuthah - They inhabited the Cities of Samaria and became with others the ancestors of the Samaritans
Lycia - Of its Cities, only Patara and Myra are mentioned in the New Testament, Acts 21:1,2 ; 27:5
ca'Lah - (completion, old age ), one of the most ancient Cities of Assyria
Theatre - From the Cities of Greece proper, theatres spread all over the Greek and Roman world. The theatres were used for public meetings, as being generally the largest buildings in the Cities ( Acts 19:29 ; Acts 19:31 ; cf
Kerioth - ("closely contiguous Cities". Read together, without "and," Kerioth Hezron (Kuryetein, "the two Cities," now 10 miles S
Lees - Cities) and break their bottles" (i. the men of his Cities) (Jeremiah 48:11-12)
Ramoth-Gilead - ” One of the Cities of refuge Moses appointed for unintentional killers (Deuteronomy 4:43 ; compare Joshua 20:8 ) and Levitical Cities (Joshua 21:38 )
Mar'Eshah, - (crest of a hill ), one of the Cities of Judah in the low country. ( Joshua 15:44 ) It was one of the Cities fortified and garrisoned by Rehoboam after the rupture with the northern kingdom
Hammath - Warm springs, one of the "fenced Cities" of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 )
Sepharad - Place where the Jews were in captivity, but from whence they would be brought to possess 'the Cities of the south
Autos Sacramentales - Religious plays performed in the streets of Spanish Cities at Corpus Christi
Cabul - A name given by Hiram king of Tyre to a district in Northern Galilee containing twenty Cities, which Solomon gave him for his help in building the temple, 1 Kings 9:13 ; the term implying his dissatisfaction with the gift
Beth-ar'Abah - (house of the desert ), one of the six Cities of Judah which were situated down in the Arabah, the sunk valley of the Jordan and Dead Sea, ( Joshua 15:61 ) on the north border of the tribe
Irrigation - Commercial ships used these waterways to transport produce between outlying farms and major Cities. In larger Cities such as Gezer, Megiddo, Hazor, and Jerusalem engineers and workmen produced huge underground tunnel systems to provide the citizens with ample supplies of water. These tunnels maintained the Cities needs in times of siege. ...
New Testament During Intertestamental and New Testament times massive Roman aqueducts were built to provide fresh water for the growing Cities. Cities in the Negev developed an extensive network of dams to collect infrequent rains, allowing them to turn the desert into thriving orchards and wheat fields
Beth-Arabah - House of the desert, one of the six Cities of Judah, situated in the sunk valley of the Jordan and Dead Sea (Joshua 18:22 )
Cuthah - One of the Babylonian Cities or districts from which Shalmaneser transplanted certain colonists to Samaria (2 Kings 17:24 )
Calneh - One of the ancient Cities in the land of Shinar built by Nimrod
Pithom - One of the store-cities built bythe Israelites for the Pharaoh 'who knew not Joseph
Sequin - It was first struck at Venice about the end of the 13th century, and afterward in the other Italian Cities, and by the Levant trade was introduced into Turkey
ar'Gob - (stony ), a tract of country on the east of the Jordan, in Bashan, the kingdom of Og, containing 60 great and fortified Cities
Ramoth - In the list of these Cities in Joshua 21:28,29 Ramoth is omitted, but JARMUTH is perhaps the same place
ma'on - (habitation ), one of the Cities of the tribe of Judah, in the district of the mountains
ar'Gob - (stony ), a tract of country on the east of the Jordan, in Bashan, the kingdom of Og, containing 60 great and fortified Cities
Ash'Nah - the name of two Cities, both in the lowlands of Judah: (1) named between Zoreah and Zanoah, and therefore probably northwest of Jerusalem, (Joshua 15:33 ) and (2) between Jiptah and Nezib, and therefore to the southwest of Jerusalem
Abbot - Their monasteries being remote from Cities, and built in the farthest solitudes, they had no share in ecclesiastical affairs; but, there being among them several persons of learning, they were called out of their deserts by the bishops, and fixed in the suburbs of the Cities; and at length in the Cities themselves
Village - Thus in Mark 1:38 the word rendered ‘ towns ’ is literally ‘village-cities’ (others render ‘market-towns’), i. places which are Cities as regards population but not as regards constitutional status
Hilen - See Holon , Levitical Cities
Anak, Plural Anakim - They spread themselves over the south of Judah, the hill country, and several Cities of the Philistines
Anathoth - One of the Cities given to the priests, in Benjamin; identified by Robinson in Anata, some four miles north by east of Jerusalem, Joshua 21:18 ; 1 Chronicles 6:60
Gaulanitis - ), one of the Cities of refuge in the territory of Manasseh (Joshua 20:8 ; 21:27 ; Deuteronomy 4:43 )
Kerioth - Cities
Admah - Earth, one of the five Cities of the vale of Siddim (Genesis 10:19 )
Gederoth - When the Philistines took Gederoth with other Cities, King Ahaz (735-715 B
Spoil - Except when forbidden by God, as in the case of Jericho, it was considered a lawful prize; and it was thus the Israelites suffered when their Cities were captured by their enemies
Ashan - The Aaronic priests claimed Ashan as one of their Cities (1 Chronicles 6:59 ; called Ain in Joshua 21:16 )
Admah - One of the Cities of the Ciccar or ‘Round
Gergesenes - (See Matthew 8:28) It is more than probable, that this was the same nation as is called in the Old Testament Girgashites; one of the Cities of Canaan beyond the sea of Tiberias
Calneh - One of the original Cities of Nimrod's empire, Genesis 10:10; Amos 6:2, apparently the same with Calno, Isaiah 10:9, and Canneh, Ezekiel 27:23
Lycia - Paul visited it, and preached the gospel in its two largest Cities, Patara, Acts 21:1, and Myra, Acts 27:5
a'in - ...
One of the southernmost Cities of Judah, (Joshua 15:32 ) afterwards allotted to Simeon, (Joshua 19:7 ; 1 Chronicles 4:32 ) and given to the priests
Accad - Accad (ăk'kad), fortress, one of the four Cities in the kingdom of Nimrod
Zeboim - One of the four royal Cities in the vale of Siddim, destroyed by fire from heaven
Cuthites - They came from the land of Cush, or Cutha, in the East; their first settlement being in the Cities of the Medes, subdued by Shalmaneser and his predecessors
Calneh - Called Calno, Isaiah 10:9 and Canneh, Ezekiel 27:23 , one of Nimrod's Cities, Genesis 10:10 , and afterwards called Ctesiphon; it lay on the east bank of the Tigris opposite Seleucia, twenty miles below Bagdad
Revenger - See REFUGE, Cities OF
Proselyte - Throughout the Cities of the Roman Empire there were communities of Jews who kept the traditions of their ancestors and attended synagogues regularly. ...
Many Gentiles in these Cities, being attracted to the Jewish religion by the morally upright lives of the Jews, attended the synagogue services and kept some of the Jewish sabbath and food laws
Numbers - ...
The Hebrews prepare to depart from Mount Sinai (1-10):
the census (1-4)
some supplementary laws
last events before the departure (7-10)
From Mount Sinai to Cades (10,11-12)
Cades (13-20):
the spying of the Promised Land, revolt, and chastisement (13- 14)
revolt of Core, Dathan, and Abiron (15-17)
the waters of contradiction (20)
From Cades to the Plains of Moab (22-34):
Balaam's oracles (22-24)
idolatry and impurity (25)
new census and new laws concerning the sacrifices (26-30)
punishment of the Madianites and first division of the conquered territory (31-35)
The last chapter deals with the Levitical Cities and the Cities of refuge
Shi'Shak, - "He took the fenced Cities which [1] to Judah, and came to Jerusalem. It is a list of the countries, Cities and tribes conquered or ruled by him, or tributary to him
Walls - The outside vertical structures of houses and the fortifications surrounding Cities. In ancient times, the walls of Cities and houses were constructed of bricks made of clay mixed with reed and hardened in the sun
Dehir - A town in the mountains of Judah, Joshua 15:49, one of a group of eleven Cities to the west of Hebron. It was one of the Cities given with their "suburbs" to the priests
Treasure - The kings of Judah had also keepers of the treasures both in city and country, 1 Chronicles 27:25 ; and the places where these magazines were laid up were called treasure Cities. Pharaoh compelled the Hebrews to build him treasure Cities, or magazines
Cities of Refuge - Cities of Refuge. Were six Levitical Cities specially chosen for refuge to the involuntary homicide until released from banishment by the death of the high priest
Libya - The part adjoining Egypt was sometimes called Libya Marmarica; and that around Cyrene, Cyrenaica, from its chief city; or Pentapolitana, from its chief city; or Pentapolitana, from its five Cities, Cyrene, Apollonia, Berenice, Arsinoe, and Ptolemais. In these Cities great numbers of Jews dwelt in the time of Christ; and they, with their Libyan proselytes, resorted to Jerusalem to worship, Acts 2:10
Jirjatha'im - (the two Cities ). " ...
A town in Naphtali not mentioned in the original list of the possession allotted to the tribe, see (Joshua 19:32-39 ) but inserted in the list of Cities given to the Gershonite Levites in (1 Chronicles 6:76 ) in place of KARTAN in the parallel catalogue, Kartan being probably only a contraction thereof
Bashan - The territory was given to the half-tribe of Manasseh, with a reservation of two Cities, Golan and Be-eshterah (Ashtaroth in 1 Chronicles 6:71 ), for the Gershonite Levites ( Joshua 21:27 ). ), where were threescore great Cities with walls and brazen bars, administered for Solomon by Ben-geber of Ramoth-gilead ( 1 Kings 4:13 ). It included Salecah ( Salkhat , on the borders of the desert), Edrei ( ed-Der‘a ?), Ashtaroth (perhaps Tell Ashareh ), and Golan, one of the Cities of refuge, the name of which may be preserved in the Jaulan , the region immediately east of the Sea of Tiberias
Zoba - Its Cities Betah or Tibhath, and Berothai or Chun, yielded David "exceeding much brass
Hut - The image of Isaiah 1:8 stresses the isolation of Jerusalem, the sole survivor of the Cities of Judah ( Isaiah 1:7-9 )
Side, - It was one of the Cities addressed on behalf of the Jews by the Romans in b
Gershon - Thirteen Levitical Cities fell to the lot of the Gershonites (Joshua 21:27-33 )
Amraphel - King of Shinar, southern Chaldea, one of the confederates of Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, in a war against Sodom and Cities of the plain (Genesis 14:1,4 )
Chorazin - Named along with Bethsaida and Capernaum as one of the Cities in which our Lord's "mighty works" were done, and which was doomed to woe because of signal privileges neglected (Matthew 11:21 ; Luke 10:13 )
Nicopolis - (nih cahp' oh lihss) Place name meaning, “city of victory,” shared by many Cities in the ancient world
Jattir - It was one of the Cities to whose elders David sent of the spoil from Ziklag ( 1 Samuel 30:27 )
Inhabit - Wild beasts inhabit the forest fishes inhabit the ocean, lakes and rivers men inhabit Cities and houses
Salem - Various Cities, however, have been suggested
Drosky - a kind of victoria drawn by one or two horses, and used as a public carriage in German Cities
Achaia - Major Cities in Achaia included Sparta, Athens, and Corinth, which was the administrative center
Babel - The Hebrew name for Babylon, one of the Cities founded by Nimrod
Pagans - The term came into use after the establishment of Christianity, the Cities and great towns affording the first converts
Jair - Twenty-three Cities near Argob were called after him Havoth-jair, which see
Pithom - One of the Cities built by the children of Israel for Pharaoh in Egypt, during their servitude, Exodus 1:11
Beth-Nim'Rah - (house of leopards ) one of the fenced Cities on the east of Jordan taken and built by the tribe of Gad ( Numbers 32:36 ) and described as being in the valley beside Beth-haran
Refuge, Cities of - To provide security for those who should undesignedly kill a man, the Lord commanded Moses to appoint six Cities of refuge, or asylums, that any one who should thus shed blood might retire thither, and have time to prepare his defence before the judges, and that the kinsmen of the deceased might not pursue and kill him, Numbers 35:11-3460 1618836193_2 . Of such Cities there were three on each side Jordan. These Cities served not only for Hebrews, but for all strangers who resided in the country, Deuteronomy 19:1-10 . The Lord also commanded that when the Hebrews should multiply and enlarge their land, they should add three other Cities of refuge. So firmly was this practice established among the Israelites before their entrance into the promised land, and probably also even before their sojourning in Egypt, that Moses was directed by Jehovah not to attempt to eradicate it entirely, but only to counteract and modify it by the institution of Cities of refuge. " How far superior to this was the Mosaic institution of Cities of refuge, where the involuntary homicide might remain in peace till the death of the high-priest, and then go forth in safety, while a really guilty person did not escape punishment
Friars, Mendicant - They did wonderful work, particularly among the very poor in the most wretched localities of the Cities
Bezer -
A city of the Reubenites; one of the three Cities of refuge on the east of Jordan (Deuteronomy 4 :: 43 ; Joshua 20:8 )
Gederothaim - The list contains fourteen Cities without Gederothaim, causing several commentators to identify Gederothaim as a part of Gederah or as a copyist's duplication
Mendicant Friars - They did wonderful work, particularly among the very poor in the most wretched localities of the Cities
Tobi'Jah -
One of the Levites sent by Jehoshaphat, to teach the law in the Cities of Judah
Rehoboth (2) - One of the four Cities built by Nimrod when he went forth to Asshur: Rehoboth Ιr (i
Maon - One of the Cities of Judah, in the mountains
Erech - Named second in the list of Nimrod’s Cities ( Genesis 10:10 )
Gier Eagle - Its usefulness as the scavenger of Cities has secured for it legal protection, so that it is penal to kill it
Bezer - ' It was one of the three Cities of Refuge on the east of the Jordan
Aser - Its territory, described in Josue, included 22 Cities, one of which is the modern Acre
Asher - Its territory, described in Josue, included 22 Cities, one of which is the modern Acre
Exceeding - Cities were built an exceeding space of time before the flood
Meph'a-Ath - It was one of the Cities allotted with their suburbs to the Merarite Levites
Gath - the fifth of the Philistine Cities
Hauran - Many ruins of Cities, with Greek inscriptions, are scattered over its rugged surface
Market-Places - (Matthew 20:3 ; Mark 12:38 ; Luke 7:35 ; Acts 16:19 ) (any open place of public resort in Cities or towns where public trials and assemblies were held and goods were exposed for sale
Nahal'al, - (pasture ), one of the Cities of Zebulun, given with its "suburbs" to the Merarite Levites
Uncondemned - , "without investigating our case" (The Cities of St
House - They then for the first time inhabited Cities (Genesis 47:3 ; Exodus 12:7 ; Hebrews 11:9 ). From the earliest times the Assyrians and the Canaanites were builders of Cities. The Hebrews after the Conquest took possession of the captured Cities, and seem to have followed the methods of building that had been pursued by the Canaanites
Beth-Horon - ” Twin Cities, one higher than the other, and so called Upper and Lower Beth Horon. The chronicler preserved an even earlier tradition of a descendant of Ephraim, a woman named Sherah, building the two Cities (1 Chronicles 7:22-24 ). ) followed a prophet's advice and sent home mercenary soldiers he had hired from Israel, those soldiers fought the Cities of Judah, including Beth-horon (2 Chronicles 25:13 )
Sodom And Gomorrah - Two Cities in Palestine at the time of Abraham. Sodom and Gomorrah were among the five “cities of the valley” (Genesis 13:12 ; Genesis 19:29 ; KJV, “plain”) of Abraham's time. Despite Abraham's successful plea (Genesis 18:22-32 ) not even ten righteous men could be found in Sodom, and the Cities were judged by the Lord, then destroyed by “brimstone and fire” (Genesis 19:24 ; NIV, “burning sulfur”)
Judah Territory of - — The district assigned to the tribe of Judah in the Promised Land, with its Cities, is described in Joshua 15:1-63. This barren tract has evidently been uncultivated and uninhabited from the remotest times, for here alone, of all Palestine, are found no traces of the ruins of former Cities. An exception must be made of the fringe of the Dead Sea, where were six Cities
Architecture - , the "dwellers in tents" and the "dwellers in Cities. " To the race of Shem is attributed (Genesis 10:11,12,22 ; 11:2-9 ) the foundation of those Cities in the plain of Shinar, Babylon Nineveh and others. (Leviticus 14:34,45 ; 1 Kings 7:10 ) The peaceful reign and vast wealth of Solomon gave great impulse to architecture; for besides the temple and his other great works, he built fortresses and Cities in various places, among which Baalath and Tadmor are in all probability represented by Baalbec and Palmyra
Taanach - One of the royal Canaanite Cities, mentioned in OT always along with Megiddo . It was one of the four fortress Cities on the ‘border of Manasseh’ ( 1 Chronicles 7:29 )
Gath - One of the five royal Cities of the Philistines, and to which Goliath belonged. After Micah 1:10 we hear no more of Gath among the Cities of the Philistines: cf
Mareshah - Mareshah, father of Hebron (a person, not the city): 1 Chronicles 2:42, where the relative position of the Cities Mareshah and Hebron, and their historical relations, forbid our understanding the Cities as meant
Rimmon -
A man of Beeroth (2 Samuel 4:2 ), one of the four Gibeonite Cities. ...
...
One of the "uttermost Cities" of Judah, afterwards given to Simeon (Joshua 15:21,32 ; 19:7 ; 1 Chronicles 4:32 )
Accad - One of the Cities in the land of Shinar, with Babel, Erech, and Calneh, the beginning of Nimrod's kingdom (Genesis 10:10). Bechart fixes on a site nearer the other three Cities in the ancient Sittacene: Akker-koof, or Akker-i-Nimrond, a curious pile of ancient buildings
Cubit - Moses assigns to the Levites a thousand sacred cubits of land round about their Cities, Numbers 35:4 ; and in the next verse he gives them two thousand common ones. The opinion, however, is very probable, that the cubit varied in different districts and Cities, and at different times, &c
Christ Child Society - Its headquarters are located in Washington and there are branches of the society in important Cities throughout the United States
Burse - ) An exchange, for merchants and bankers, in the Cities of continental Europe
Kishion - See Levitical Cities ; Kedesh
Myra - (mi' ray) One of the six largest Cities of Lysia in southeastern Asia Minor located on the River Andracus about two and one half miles from the sea
Mart - It was formerly applied chiefly to markets and fairs in Cities and towns, but it has now a more extensive application
Watchman - Ancient Cities had watchmen stationed on the walls
Asiarchs - ' They were officers chosen annually by the Cities in the Roman province of Asia
a'Vim - ...
The people of Avva, among the colonists who were sent by the king of Assyria to reinhabit the depopulated Cities of Israel
Ashdod - One of the five confederate Cities of the Philistines, allotted to Judah, Joshua 15:46-47 : the chief seat of Dagon-worship, 1 Samuel 5:1-12
Society, Christ Child - Its headquarters are located in Washington and there are branches of the society in important Cities throughout the United States
Gershon - Thirteen Cities were assigned to them in northern Canaan, Joshua 21:6 ; 1 Chronicles 6:62,71
go'Lan - (circle ), a city of Bashan, (4:43) allotted out of the half tribe of Manasseh to the Levites, ( Joshua 21:27 ) and one of the three Cities of refuge east of the Jordan
Jehon'Athan - ...
One of the Levites who were sent by Jehoshaphat through the Cities of Judah, with a book of the law, to teach the people
Colony, - a designation of Philippi, in (Acts 16:12 ) After the battle of Actium, Augustus assigned to his veterans those parts of Italy which had espoused the cause of Antony, and transported many of the expelled inhabitants to Philippi, Dyrrhachium and other Cities
Ekron - The town of Ekron was one of the ‘five Cities of the Philistines’ (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17-18)
City - Bethlehem and Bethsaida, though generally classed as Cities, are spoken of as κῶμαι in John 7:42, Mark 8:23; Mark 8:26, the natural inference from which is that the words ‘city,’ ‘town,’ and ‘village,’ though having, as with us, a technical signification, were occasionally used in a looser and less precise manner. ...
In the time of our Lord, Palestine was a land of Cities. Round the Lake of Galilee there were nine Cities with not less than 15,000 inhabitants, some of them with considerably more, so that there must have been along its margin an almost unbroken chain of buildings. The blending of the Jewish with the Greek civilization must have given to these Cities a striking picturesqueness alike in manners, customs, attire, and architecture. Cities like Bethsaida and Capernaum, again, were preponderantly Jewish. The Decapolis (Matthew 4:25) consisted of a group of ten or more Cities east of the Jordan, united in a league for purposes of defence. These were Greek Cities in the province of Syria, but possessing certain civil rights, such as coinage, etc. The Cities constituting the Decapolis are variously named. To the north of Galilee again lay the Phœnician Cities of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21). The Cities of Samaria to the south occupy no large place in our Lord’s mission. Samaria was itself a beautiful city—one of the Cities rebuilt on a magnificent scale by Herod the Great owing to its strategic situation—the population being mixed, half-Greek, half-Samaritan, wholly alien, therefore, in sympathy from the Jews, alike through the Samaritan hostility and the Greek culture. Judaea, with its desolate mountain ranges, was never rich in Cities. ...
But to the Jew the city of Cities—the city that symbolized all that was highest alike in his political and religious aspirations—was Jerusalem. The Cities of Galilee owed their greatness and importance to commercial or political causes. The Twelve and the Seventy are sent to preach the gospel in Cities, and when they are persecuted in one city they are to flee to another (Matthew 10:1 ff. Jesus, after He had given instructions to the Twelve, departs to preach and to teach in their Cities (Matthew 11:1). For the history of civilization is the history of Cities. Babylon, Nineveh, Jerusalem, Athens, Rome, Alexandria, Venice, Florence, and the mediaeval Cities all mark stages in the development of the higher culture of the race
Cities of Refuge - All the 48 Cities of Levi had the right of asylum. The Cities on each side of the Jordan were nearly opposite one another (Deuteronomy 19:2; Numbers 35:6; Numbers 35:13; Numbers 35:15; Joshua 20:2; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 20:9). The Levitical Cities were to have a space of 1,000 cubits (583 yards) beyond the city walls for pasture and other purposes (Numbers 35:4-5)
Antioch - The name of two Cities in New Testament times. It was made a "free" city by Pompey, was beautified by the emperors with aqueducts, baths, and public buildings; and in Paul's time it ranked third in population, wealth and commercial activity among the Cities of the Roman empire. There were at least sixteen Cities of the name of Antioch in Syria and Asia Minor
Cun - ” The two are apparently separate Cities, Cun being northeast of Byblos and Berothai southeast of Byblos
Town Clerk - In Græco-Asiatic Cities under the Roman Empire the grammateus (tr
Chamberlains of Honor Extra Urbem - (outside the city) Instituted under Pius VI, are chosen from the clergy of Cities other than Rome, have the title monsignor, belong to the papal household, and have the same vestments, excepting the red hat, as chamberlains of honor, but as they are not able to wear this costume at all times in Rome, they are not then called monsignori, and are only Chamberlains of Honor extra urbem; their present number Isaiah 47
Fold - It was prophesied of the Cities of Ammon (Ezekiel 25:5 ), Aroer (Isaiah 17:2 ), and Judaea, that they would be folds or couching-places for flocks
Nicopolis - There were several Cities of this name
Bethgamul - Probably now Um el Jemal, "mother of a camel," one of the heretofore deserted Cities of the Hauran
Kiriathaim - "the plain of Kiriathaim," or of the two Cities) whom the Moabites dispossessed before the Exodus (Deuteronomy 2:10-11)
Ephraim, Mount - Scripture specifies that the following Cities were located in the hill country of Ephraim: Bethel (Judges 4:5 ); Gibeah (Joshua 24:33 ); Ramah (Judges 4:5 ); Shamir (Judges 10:1 ); Shechem (Joshua 20:7 ); Timnath-heres or -serah (Joshua 19:50 ; Judges 2:9 )
Worshipper, - The term neocoros became thus applied to Cities or communities which undertook the worship of particular emperors even during their lives
Tower - A tall edifice erected so watchmen could guard pastures, vineyards, and Cities
Baker's Street - It was common in ancient Cities for trades and crafts to locate near others of the same kind
Ramothgilead - This was one of the Cities of refuge
Cabul - Name given by Hiram king of Tyre to the twenty Cities in Galilee given him by Solomon, because he was displeased with them
Jehonathan - 2 Chronicles 17:8 one of the Levites sent out by Jehoshaphat with the Book of the Law to teach the people in the Cities of Judah
Hammon - By comparing this list of Levitical Cities with the one in Joshua 21 , Hammon appears to be the same as HAMMOTH-DOR (Joshua 21:32 ); and this, by the similarity of the name, appears to be the same as HAMMATH in Joshua 19:35
Lycaonia - In it were the Cities of Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, mentioned in the travels of St
Chephirah - One of the four Cities of the Gibeonites which Joshua delivered from the coalition led by the king of Jerusalem (Joshua 9:17 )
Zoar - A city on the south-east side of the Dead sea, was destined, with the other four Cities, to be consumed by fire from heaven; but at the intercession of Lot it was preserved, Genesis 14:2 ; 19:20-23,30
Ruben - Some of their Cities fell into the hands of the Moabites before the Assyrian captivity
Ecbat'Ana - Two Cities named Ecbatana seem to have existed in ancient times, one the capital of northern Media --the Media Atropatene of Strabo --the other the metropolis of the larger and more important province known as Media Magna
Admah - One of the Cities in the plains of Jordan destroyed with Sodom and
Sodom - No trace of it or of the other Cities of the plain has been discovered, so complete was their destruction. " It has been concluded, from this and from other considerations, that the Cities of the plain stood at the southern end of the Dead Sea
Rechabites - The main body of the Kenites dwelt in Cities, and adopted settled habits of life (30:29); but Jehonadab forbade his descendants to drink wine or to live in Cities
Lycia - In it were situated many great Cities, such as Patara ( Acts 21:1 ) and Myra ( Acts 27:5 ; cf. 43 on account of dissensions between its Cities, and in a
Sanballat - These Cities controlled the major highway between Jerusalem and the Mediterranean Sea. If the Holy City regained prominence, it would erode the powers of the surrounding Cities
de'Bir -
A town in the mountains of Judah, (Joshua 15:49 ) one of a group of eleven Cities to the west of Hebron. " (Joshua 15:49 ) It was one of the Cities given with their "suburbs" to the priests
Sodom - Sodom (sŏd'om), burning? The principal city in a group of Cities in the vale of Siddim, which were destroyed on account of the great wickedness of their inhabitants. There are only two possible localities for these Cities—the lower end of the lake, or the upper end of the same
Refuge - ...
Cities of refuge, among the Israelites, certain Cities appointed to secure the safety of such persons as might commit homicide without design
Watchmen - Are of as early a date as Cities, robbers, and wars, Exodus 14:24 Judges 7:19 . Jerusalem and other Cities had regular guards night and day, Song of Song of Solomon 3:1-3 5:7 , to whose hourly cries Isaiah refers in illustration of the vigilance required by God in his ministers, Isaiah 21:8,11,12 62:6
de'Bir -
A town in the mountains of Judah, (Joshua 15:49 ) one of a group of eleven Cities to the west of Hebron. " (Joshua 15:49 ) It was one of the Cities given with their "suburbs" to the priests
ke'Desh - (1 Chronicles 6:72 ) The Kadesh mentioned among the Cities whose kings were slain by Joshua, (Joshua 12:22 ) in company with Megiddo and Jokneam of Carmel, would seem to have been this city of Issachar. ...
Kedesh; also Kedesh in Galilee; and once, (Judges 4:6 ) Kedesh-naphtali, one of the fortified Cities of the tribe of Naphtali, named between Hazor and Edrei, (Joshua 19:37 ) appointed as a city of refuge, and allotted with its "suburbs" to the Gershonite Levites
Refuge - (2 Corinthians 5:5; Ephesians 1:13)...
Under this article of refuge, it will be proper to notice those Cities of refuge, which the Lord appointed under the Old Testament dispensation, as a shelter for the manslayer who unintentionally killed another, and hated him not in times past. If the reader will consult the Scriptures which relate to those Cities of refuge he will find a very ample account Numbers 35:9-34; Deuteronomy 19:1-13; Joshua 20:1-9 throughout. And when he hath read the several particulars there recorded, he will discover that those Cities of refuge were wholly intended to screen the unintentional murderer. And so exact was the law to be regarded, that on the poor fugitive's arrival at the suburbs of either of those Cities, the congregation was to proceed on the subject of enquiry; and if any malice pretense was found in the mind towards the person he had murdered, the law enjoined that he should be taken even from the altar, and put to death. ...
We are informed that the Israelites were so much interested in following up the divine commands concerning those Cities of refuge, that the magistrates once in every year made a point to examine the roads leading to those Cities from every direction, and to have them put in perfect repair, that no obstruction might be found to stop the fugitive in his flight from the avenger of blood pursuing him. " (Hebrews 6:18-19)...
There was somewhat very significant in the names of those Cities, and it is not fanciful to remark their allusion to the purpose for which they were appointed. ...
If, as we cannot but conclude from all the other parts of Scripture, that as every thing under the law typified the Lord Jesus Christ, so these Cities of refuge had an eye to him, as the only shelter for soul-murderers, then we shall find somewhat remarkable in the names of those Cities. The third name of those Cities of refuge, Kirjath-arba, which is Hebron. " (1 John 1:3)...
And the names of the three Cities on the other side of Jordan were not less striking in allusion to Christ
Kohathites - ...
After the conquest, Kohathites descended from Aaron received thirteen Cities from the tribes of Judah, Simeon, and Benjamin (Joshua 21:4 ,Joshua 21:4,21:9-19 ; 1 Chronicles 6:54-60 ). The remaining Kohathites received ten Cities from the tribes of Dan, Ephraim, and Manasseh (Joshua 21:5 ,Joshua 21:5,21:20-26 ; 1Chronicles 6:61,1 Chronicles 6:66-70 ). See Levitical Cities ; Cities of Refuge
South - ) Palmer (Desert of Exodus) notices how accurately Jeremiah 13:19 has been fulfilled, "the Cities of the South shall be shut up, and none shall open them. ...
The Cities were 29 (Joshua 15:21-32); some of the names are not of distinct Cities, but compound names. The Negeb of Judah was South of Hebron in the outposts of Judah's hills; Tel Zif, Main, and Kurmul (Carmel), ruined Cities, mark the Negeb of Caleb
Oblate Sisters of Providence - The order has houses in 25 Cities in the United States, Cuba, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, and in Africa
te'Lem -
One of the Cities in the extreme south of Judah, (Joshua 15:24 ) probably the same as Telaim
Irnahash - 1 Chronicles 4:12 lists it as a personal name in the descendants of Judah, using the device of the “Table of Nations” ( Genesis 10:1 ) and other passages of listing Cities by original ancestors in the form of a genealogy
Wall - Cities were surrounded by walls, as distinguished from "unwalled villages" (Ezekiel 38:11 ; Leviticus 25:29-34 )
Shu'Nem - (double resting-place ), one of the Cities allotted to the tribe of Issachar
Kerioth - (kee' rih ahth) Place name meaning, “cities
Hammath - One of the ‘fenced’ Cities of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:35 ), probably the same as Hammon of 1 Chronicles 6:76 and Hammoth-dor of Joshua 21:32
Zoar - One of the five Cities of the plain in the land of Canaan, and which alone survived when they fell under the judgement of God
Argob - It once contained 60 strong and fortified Cities, the ruins of many of them being still to be Been
Zephath - A Canaanitish city afterwards called Hormah, one of the "uttermost Cities of Judah southwards," afterwards assigned to Simeon, Joshua 12:14 15:30 19:4
Puteoli - Such Cities were specially sought by Jews and other foreigners, and Christians would early be living there, as St
Harlot - An abandoned woman, Proverbs 29:3 ; a type of idolatrous nations and Cities, Isaiah 1:21 Ezekiel 16:1-63 Nahum 3:4
Merari - Twelve Cities were assigned to them beyond Jordan, Joshua 21:7,34-40
Eglon - One of the five confederate Cities which attacked Gibeon, but were conquered by Joshua
Gate - This is especially true of strong, wellfortified Cities, as in the case of the first biblical appearance of the word: “And there came two angels to Sodom at even; and Lot sat in the gate of Sodom …” ( Cities there were usually strongly fortified citadels with “gates” ( Cities had to find a source of water for periods of siege, and sometimes dams were built. 28:17), are pictured as Cities with “gates. ”...
The “gates” of ancient Cities sometimes enclosed city squares or were immediately in front of squares ( Bernardine of Feltre, Blessed - Joining the Franciscans in 1456, he was ordained a priest, 1463, taught in Franciscan schools, and began his missionary labors throughout the larger Cities of Italy
Judah Upon Jordan - " The sixty Cities (Havoth-jair, Numbers 32:41 ) on the east of Jordan were reckoned as belonging to Judah, because Jair, their founder, was a Manassite only on his mother's side, but on his father's side of the tribe of Judah (1 Chronicles 2:5,21-23 )
Bela - It was the only one of the five Cities that was spared at Lot's intercession (Genesis 19:20,23 )
Golan - Exile, a city of Bashan (Deuteronomy 4:43 ), one of the three Cities of refuge east of Jordan, about 12 miles north-east of the Sea of Galilee (Joshua 20:8 )
Nicopolis - There were many ancient Cities which bore this name: three in particular have been supposed by different critics the one meant
Geder - 1 Chronicles 27:28 mentions an official from Geder, but the relationship of this Geder to that of Joshua 12:1 to the other Cities mentioned above cannot be determined
Gomorrha, Sodom And - Two Cities of the Pentapolis, utterly destroyed by "brimstone and fire from the Lord out of Heaven" (Genesis 13,18, 19), for the unnatural sins of their inhabitants
og - The Amorite king of Bashan, one of the giant warriors who ruled over sixty Cities, inhabited by a hardy and warlike race
Sewer - ) A drain or passage to carry off water and filth under ground; a subterraneous channel, particularly in Cities
Havoth-Jair - The towns of Jair are included with the 60 Cities given to Manasseh, Joshua 13:30; 1 Chronicles 2:23; but the word rendered "villages"usually means a small collection of hovels in a country place
Tiberias - It was the seat for centuries of a famous academy, and to the present day it is one of the four holy Cities
Sibmah - A city of Reuben, Numbers 32:28 ; Joshua 13:19 ; Isaiah 16:8,9 , speaks of the vines of Sibmah, which were cut down by the enemies of the Moabites; for that people had taken the city of Sibmah, Jeremiah 48:32 , and other Cities of Reuben, after this tribe had been carried into captivity by Tiglath-pileser, 2 Kings 15:29 ; 1 Chronicles 5:26
Lycaonia - Of its Cities, Iconium, Derbe, and Lystra and mentioned in the New Testament, Acts 14:6
Sodom And Gomorrha - Two Cities of the Pentapolis, utterly destroyed by "brimstone and fire from the Lord out of Heaven" (Genesis 13,18, 19), for the unnatural sins of their inhabitants
Beth-She'Mesh - (Joshua 19:22 ) ...
One of the "fenced Cities" of Naphtali
Ash'Kelon, as'Kelon - Apocrypha As'calon ( migration ), one of the five Cities of the Philistines, ( Joshua 113:3 ; 1 Samuel 6:17 ) a seaport on the Mediterranean, 10 miles north of Gaza
Jabneel - 70), it became one of the most populous Cities of Judea, and the seat of a celebrated school
Galilee - Solomon paid Hiram of Tyre twenty Cities of Galilee for the building materials Hiram supplied for the Temple and royal palace (1 Kings 9:11 ), but the Cities did not please Hiram, who called them Cabul, meaning, “like nothing” (1 Kings 9:12-13 ). The Cities may have been border villages whose ownership the two kings disputed
Streets - In some Cities a wide street encircled the city, following the line of the outer wall. During the New Testament era, Roman engineers designed Cities throughout the empire with wide, straight, and well-constructed streets, usually leading to a central plaza or temple
Market Place - ...
Herod rebuilt many of the Cities of Palestine following the Greek pattern which included open areas for public gathering (Greek: agora ). Paul went to the marketplace (Greek agora ) on his visits to Greek Cities to speak to the crowd always gathered there (Acts 17:17 )
Hiram - Solomon gave to Hiram twenty Cities in the land of Galilee, but Hiram was not pleased with them: he called them, in Aramaic CABUL,'displeasing or dirty;' and the Cities were eventually returned to Solomon
Gath - (a wine press ), one of the five royal Cities of the Philistines; ( Joshua 13:3 ; 1 Samuel 6:17 ) and the native place of the giant Goliath. (2 Kings 12:17 ; 2 Chronicles 11:8 ; 26:6 ; Amos 6:2 ) The ravages of war to which Gath was exposed appear to have destroyed it at a comparatively early period, as it is not mentioned among the other royal Cities by the later prophets
Plague - ) An acute malignant contagious fever, that often prevails in Egypt, Syria, and Turkey, and has at times visited the large Cities of Europe with frightful mortality; hence, any pestilence; as, the great London plague
Solomon's Servants - They were the descendants of the Canaanites who were reduced by Solomon to the helot state, and compelled to labor in the king's stone-quarries and in building his palaces and Cities
Habor - It joins the Euphrates at Circesium; the country adjoining abounds in mounds, the remains of Assyrian Cities
Rehoboth - " ...
...
Named among the Cities of Asshur (Genesis 10:11 )
Hazar - See Cities and Urban Life
Tirshatha - " Like the German title of consuls of free and imperial Cities, gestrenger herr
Kanah - Some of the Cities of Manasseh, however, were south of the brook Kanah (Joshua 16:9 )
Desolate - I will make the Cities of Judah desolate, without an inhabitant
Asahel - Levite sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the law in the Cities of Judah
Shilhim - One of Simeon's Cities in Joshua 19:6 Sharuhen; SHAARAIM in 1 Chronicles 4:31
Greece - Its Cities noticed in Scripture are Athens, Corinth, and Cenchrea
Achzib - a city on the coast of the Mediterranean, in the tribe of Asher, and one of the Cities out of which that tribe did not expel the inhabitants, Judges 1:31
Chorazin - (choh ray' zihn) One of the Cities Jesus censured because of the unbelief of its inhabitants (Matthew 11:21 )
Perga - It was one of the most considerable Cities in Pamphylia; and when that province was divided into two parts, this city became the metropolis of one part, and side of the other
Pharathon - Named, with Timnath and Tephon, among the Cities which Bacchides ‘strengthened with high walls, with gates and with bars’ ( 1Ma 9:60 )
Refuge, Cities of - The biblical Cities of refuge were Cedes, Sichem, Hebron, Bosor, Ramoth in Galaad, and Gaulon in Basan (Josue 20)
Ash'Dod, - (a stronghold ), ( Acts 8:40 ) one of the five confederate Cities of the Philistines situated about 30 miles from the southern frontier of Palestine, three from the Mediterranean Sea, and nearly midway between Gaza and Joppa
Beth-Jesh'Imoth - Later it was allotted to Reuben, (Joshua 12:3 ; 13:20 ) but came at last into the hands of Moab, and formed one of the Cities which were "the glory of the country
Daughter - (Genesis 24:48 ) It is used of the female inhabitants of a place or country, (Genesis 6:2 ; Luke 23:28 ) and of Cities in general, (Isaiah 10:32 ; 23:12 ) but more specifically of dependent towns or hamlets, while to the principal city the correlative "mother" is applied
Phrygia - Within its limits were the Cities of Laodicæa, Hierapolis, Colossæ, and Antioch of Pisidia
Forum - A public square in Roman Cities where markets and assemblies for judicial or political purposes were held; hence a court, a tribunal; a place of jurisdiction
Ashdod - One of the five chief Cities of the Philistines, assigned to the tribe of Judah, but never conquered by them, Joshua 13:3 ; 15:47 ; 1 Samuel 5:1 ; 6:17 ; Nehemiah 4:7
Ziklag - In the national register of Cities it is assigned to Judah ( Joshua 15:31 ) or to Simeon ( Joshua 19:5 ), and is mentioned also in the post-exilic list ( Nehemiah 11:28 )
Noph - It was one of the most ancient and important Cities of Egypt, and stood a little to the south of the modern Cairo, on the western bank of the Nile
Libnah - ...
...
One of the royal Cities of the Canaanites taken by Joshua (Joshua 10:29-32 ; 12:15 )
u'Zal - It is one of the most imposing Cities of Arabia -ED
Ahikam - God rewarded Ahikam by the honor put upon Gedaliah, his son, by Nebuchadnezzar's making him governor over the Cities of Judah, and committing Jeremiah' to him, when the Babylonians took Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40:5; Jeremiah 39:14)
Judaea Wilderness of - It seems never to have had many inhabitants, and no Cities
Shishak - " He came with an immense army, took fenced Cities, and pillaged Jerusalem and the temple
Gorres Society - It was named for Johann Joseph Gorres and has its headquarters at Bonn, although annual sessions are held in other Cities
Gezer - Gezer (gç'zer), steep place, called also Gazer, Gazara, Gazera, and Gad, a royal city of Canaan, and one of the oldest Cities of the land
Anak, Anakim - They dwelt insouthern Palestine, Hebron being especially mentioned as their city, which was given to Caleb after the Anakim had been destroyed by Joshua, except that a remnant escaped and retired to the Cities of Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod
Archelaus - He succeeded his father as Ethnarch of Idumea, Judaea, Samaria, and the maritime Cities of Palestine
Tadmor - Palmyra occupied the most favorable position on the great caravan route between the rich Cities of the East and the ports of the Mediterranean
Argob - In the region of Argob there were sixty Cities, called Bashan- havoth-Jair, which had very high walls and strong gates, without reckoning many villages and hamlets, which were not inclosed, Deuteronomy 3:4-14 ; 1 Kings 4:13
Calneh - a city in the land of Shinar, built by Nimrod, and one of the Cities mentioned Genesis 10:10 , as belonging to his kingdom
Zeboim - one of the four Cities of the Pentapolis, consumed by fire from heaven, Genesis 14:2 ; Genesis 19:24
Temple Keeper - " Coin inscriptions show that it was an honorary title given to certain Cities, especially in Asia Minor, where the cult of some god or of a deified human potentate had been established, here to Ephesus in respect of the goddess Artemis
Paddan-Aram - One of the principle Cities was Haran
Rehob - Some think there were two Cities of this name in Asher
be'la -
One of the five Cities of the plain which was spared at the intercession of Lot, and received the name of Zoar, (Genesis 14:2 ; 19:22 ) [1] ...
Son of Beor, who reigned over Edom in the city of Dinhabah, eight generations before Saul
Rehob - Two Cities assigned to Asher, one of which was allotted to the Levites, but which of the two is not known, nor can they be identified
Suburb - ...
(2) In all other instances ‘suburbs’ occurs only in connexion with the so-called Levitical Cities, as the rendering derived from the Vulg. ’ Each of the 48 Cities, according to Numbers 35:2 ff
Suburbs - It denotes the untilled ground outside a city or the “pasture land” belonging to the Cities: “For the children of Joseph were two tribes, Manasseh and Ephraim: therefore they gave no part unto the Levites in the land, save Cities to dwell in, with their suburbs for their cattle and for their substance” ( Euprepius, Bishop of Bizya - of Heraclea, might be forbidden to appoint bishops in those Cities of Thrace which were then without bishops of their own. The prayer was granted, and it was decreed that the custom of the Cities in question should be respected (Le Quien, Or
Sodom - One of the Cities of the plain, and for some time the dwellingplace of Lot, Genesis 13:10-13 14:12 . Its crimes and vices were so enormous, that God destroyed it by fire from heaven, with three neighboring Cities, Gomorrah, Zeboim, and Admah, which were as wicked as itself, Genesis 19:1-20
Redeemer - To protect the innocent from these avengers, or redeemers, God appointed Cities of refuge throughout Israel. See REFUGE, Cities OF
Heshbon - Ancient Heshbon, to be identified with present-day tell Hesban, was one of several ancient Cities situated on the rolling and fertile plateau east of the Dead Sea and north of the Arnon River (present-day Wadi Mojib). Two of the other Cities nearby, often mentioned by the biblical writers in connection with Heshbon, were Elealeh and Medeba. The agriculturally-productive region in which these Cities were located was much disputed territory during Old Testament times
Bashan-Havoth-Jair - The statement in 1 Chronicles 2:22-23, "Jair had 23 Cities in Gilead (i. the whole eastern Jordanic region) with Kenath and the towns thereof, even threescore Cities," is not at variance but in harmony with the preceding passages. The words "unto this day" do not imply a long interval between the naming and the time of Moses' address, but mark the wonderful change due to God's gift, that the giant Og's 60 fenced Cities are now become Havoth Jair! In the time of the judges, 30 were in possession of the judge Jair (Judges 10:4), so that the old name, Havoth Jair, was revived
Allotment - Judah claimed all land west of the Dead Sea from Kadesh-barnea and the wilderness of Zin to the Sorek valley, including the Cities of Beth-shemesh, Ekron, and Timnah. Benjamin included the Cities of Bethel, Jericho, and Jebus, and extended to the Jordan, while Dan reached to the Mediterranean. Cities within Zebulun and Issachar also were claimed by Manasseh
Accad - one of the four Cities built by Nimrod, the founder of the Assyrian empire. Thus it appears that Accad was contemporary with Babylon, and was one of the first four great Cities of the world. The solidity and the loftiness of this pile, unfashioned to any other purpose, bespeak it to be one of those enormous pyramidal towers which were consecrated to the Sabian worship; which, as essential to their religious rites, were probably erected in all the early Cities of the Cuthites; and, like their prototype at Babylon, answered the double purpose of altars and observatories. Here then was the site of one of these early Cities
Concentrate - ) To approach or meet in a common center; to consolidate; as, population tends to concentrate in Cities
Archelatus - He was educated with his brother Antipas at Rome, and after his father's death was placed over Judea, Idumea, and Samaria, (the Cities Gaza, and Hippo excepted,) with the title of ethnarch or tetrarch; whence he is said to reign, Matthew 2:22
Hold - Occasionally other terms are used in place of hold: fortress (2 Samuel 24:7 NIV, NRSV); hill ( Micah 4:8 NRSV, perhaps in the sense of citadel); fortified Cities ( Habakkuk 1:10 NIV); refuge ( Nahum 1:7 NIV)
Accad - One of the four Cities built in the plain of Shinar by Nimrod, founder of the Assyrian empire, Genesis 10:10
League, Lombard - The anti-imperial alliance formed by the Cities of Lombardy: Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua, Ferrara, and Verona; Vicenza, Padua, and Treviso belonging to an earlier league, with Pope Alexander III against the Emperor Frederick I
Tidal - A king of Goiim, or ‘the nations,’ who accompanied Amraphel of Shinar and Arioch of Ellasar in the expedition made by Chedorlaomer of Elam against Sodom and the Cities of the plain ( Genesis 14:1 )
Asia - The "chiefs of Asia" (Acts 19:31 ) were certain wealthy citizens who were annually elected to preside over the games and religious festivals of the several Cities to which they belonged
Seleucia - " It is said of him that "few princes have ever lived with so great a passion for the building of Cities
Catholic Educational Association - Its headquarters are in Columbus, Ohio, but meetings are held annually in various Cities, reports of which are published
Asiarchs - Officers, like the Roman aediles and Greek leitourgoi , yearly chosen by the Cities in that part of Asia of which Ephesus was metropolis, to defray the cost and to undertake all the arrangements of the national games and theatrical sacred spectacles
Hara - The accounts in 1Kings place the exile to these Cities in 722 B
Lombard League - The anti-imperial alliance formed by the Cities of Lombardy: Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua, Ferrara, and Verona; Vicenza, Padua, and Treviso belonging to an earlier league, with Pope Alexander III against the Emperor Frederick I
Cabul - Region of Cities in Galilee Solomon gave Hiram, king of Tyre, as payment for materials and services in building the Temple and the palace
Stairs - Also wells and cisterns in many Cities in Palestine would have stairs leading down to the water
Asiarchs - (ay' ssi uhrchss) A somewhat general term for public patrons and leaders named by Cities in the Roman province of Asia
Episcopal See - In early Christian times the large Cities were all episcopal sees, and later, when rural districts were able to support a bishop and his officials, sees were erected in smaller towns
Beeroth - One of the four Cities of the Hivites which deceived Joshua into making a treaty of peace
Admah - God destroyed Admah, one of “the Cities of the plains” (Genesis 19:29 ), along with Sodom and Gomorrah (Deuteronomy 29:23 )
Association, Catholic Educational - Its headquarters are in Columbus, Ohio, but meetings are held annually in various Cities, reports of which are published
Calneh - Fort, one of the four Cities founded by Nimrod (Genesis 10:10 )
Abilene - Josephus speaks of this as "Abila of Lysanias" to distinguish it from other Cities of the same name
Bithynia - In it are the two Cities of Nicaea, or Nice, and Chalcedon: both celebrated in ecclesiastical history, on account of the general councils held in them, and called after their names
Adama - one of the five Cities which were destroyed by fire from heaven, and buried under the waters of the Dead Sea, Genesis 14:2 ; Deuteronomy 29:23
Anakim - They were nearly extirpated by the Hebrews so that only a few remained afterwards in the Cities of the Philistines, Numbers 13:22; Deuteronomy 9:2; Joshua 11:21-22; Joshua 14:15; and Jeremiah 47:5, which in the Septuagint reads: "O remnant of the Anakim" that is cut off
Ashkelon - One of the five Cities of the Philistines by the sea and ten miles north of Gaza; taken by Judah, Judges 1:18; visited by Samson; Judges 14:19; and its destruction predicted in Jeremiah 47:5; Jeremiah 47:7; Amos 1:8; Zechariah 9:5; Zephaniah 2:7
Ekron - The most northerly of the five Cities of the Philistines, Joshua 13:3; in the lowlands of Judah, Joshua 15:11; conquered by Judah, Joshua 15:45; allotted to Dan, Joshua 19:43; reconquered by Samuel, 1 Samuel 5:10; 1 Samuel 7:14; again a Philistine city, 1 Samuel 17:52; 2 Kings 1:2; Jeremiah 25:20; Amos 1:8; Zechariah 9:5; now called Akir, on a hill 12 miles southeast of Joppa, a wretched village of about 50 mud hovels
Shinar - " Among its Cities were Babel (Babylon), Erech or Orech (Orchoi), Calneh or Calno (probably Niffer), and Accad
Decapolis - (From the Greek words, deka, ten, and polis, a city,) a country in Palestine, which contained ten principal Cities, on both of the Jordan, chiefly east, Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 ; 7:31
See, Episcopal - In early Christian times the large Cities were all episcopal sees, and later, when rural districts were able to support a bishop and his officials, sees were erected in smaller towns
Rehoboth-ir - One of the four Cities in Assyria built by Nimrod ( Genesis 10:11 )
Chedorlaomer - He made the Cities in the region of the Dead Sea his tributaries; and on their rebelling, he came with four allied kings and overran the whole country south and east of the Jordan
Pithom - One of the ‘treasure Cities’ built by the Israelites in Egypt ( Exodus 1:11 etc
pi-Beseth - Ezekiel 30:17 : Bubastis, one of the greatest Cities in Lower Egypt; Egyp
Educational Association Bulletin - Its headquarters are in Columbus, Ohio, but meetings are held annually in various Cities, reports of which are published
Og - (giant , literally long-necked ), an Amoritish king of Bashan, whose rule extended over sixty Cities
Micha'Iah - (2 Chronicles 13:2 ) [1] ...
One of the princes of Jehoshaphat whom he sent to teach the law of Jehovah in the Cities of Judah
Reho'Both - ...
One of the four Cities built by Asshur, or by Nimrod in Asshur, according as this difficult passage is translated
Minstrel - The Hebrew word in (2 Kings 3:15 ) properly signifies a player upon a stringed instruments like the harp or kinnor [1], whatever its precise character may have been, on which David played before Saul, (1 Samuel 16:16 ; 18:10 ; 19:9 ) and which the harlots of the great Cities used to carry with them as they walked, to attract notice
Gate -
Of Cities, as of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:13 ; Nehemiah 1:3 ; 2:3 ; 3:3 ), of Sodom (Genesis 19:1 ), of Gaza (Judges 16:3 ). At the gates of Cities courts of justice were frequently held, and hence "judges of the gate" are spoken of (Deuteronomy 16:18 ; 17:8 ; 21:19 ; 25:6,7 , etc
Magdeburg, Centuriators of - The large funds required for the collecting, assembling, and publication of the material were furnished by kings, princes, and Cities devoted to the Protestant cause. Among them were the kings of Sweden and Denmark, the dukes of Saxony, and the Cities of Augsburg and Nuremberg
Antioch - The name of two Cities mentioned in the New Testament. Few Cities have suffered greater disasters
Centuriators of Magdeburg - The large funds required for the collecting, assembling, and publication of the material were furnished by kings, princes, and Cities devoted to the Protestant cause. Among them were the kings of Sweden and Denmark, the dukes of Saxony, and the Cities of Augsburg and Nuremberg
Galatia - The invaders fought on their own capturing Cities until stopped by Antiochus I in 275 B. Did he visit Phrygian-dominated Cities or the true Galatians in the countryside? Was his letter addressed to the original territory in the north or to the Roman province with its southern additions? See Galatians
Sid'Dim - In this valley the kings of the five allied Cities of Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim and Bela seem to, have awaited the approach of the invaders. It is therefore probable that it was in the neighborhood of the "plain or circle of Jordan" in which those Cities stood
Ashdod - One of the five chief Cities of the Philistines. Uzziah broke down its wall, and built Cities near it
College - So also, the college of princes, or their deputies the college of Cities, or deputies of the Imperial Cities the college of Cardinals, or sacred college
Cisterns - And reservoirs were very common in Palestine, both in the country and in Cities. The same causes led to the erection, near all the chief Cities, of large open reservoirs for public use
Treasures - Kings were wont to store their possessions and guard what they most valued in well-fortified Cities, hence called treasure-cities, Exodus 1:11 ; 1 Chronicles 27:25 ; Ezra 5:17
Dibon - The children of Israel were not able to retain possession of the land, and in the time of Isaiah Dibon is reckoned among the Cities of Moab ( Isaiah 15:1-9 ). Perhaps it is the same as Dimonah ( Joshua 15:22 ) among the southernmost Cities of Judah
Refuge, Cities of - REFUGE, Cities OF...
1. Cities of refuge, situated at convenient distances, were set apart for the manslayer ( Deuteronomy 19:2-7 ), and it may even be that the roads thither were specially kept and marked to make escape easy ( Deuteronomy 19:3 ; but cf. ...
(3) In post-exilic times the Cities of refuge established under the Deuteronomic Code remained, and the judicial procedure followed was very much the same, only the community presumably at Jerusalem and not the elders of the city of refuge (Numbers 35:12 ; Numbers 35:24-25 ) was to determine the guilt or the innocence of the fugitive. Number of Cities of refuge . The statements bearing on the number of the Cities of refuge are conflicting ( Numbers 35:11 ; Numbers 35:13-15 , Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ; Deuteronomy 19:7-10 , Joshua 20:2 ; Joshua 20:7-8 ; cf. In such conditions three Cities would be ample. But when in post-exilic times the Jews covered a wider area, there would naturally be need for more Cities; and so we find the number in Numbers and Joshua stated at six, and additions made to the text in Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ; Deuteronomy 19:3 to suggest that the number six had been contemplated from the beginning. These six Cities were Kedesh, Shechem, and Hebron on the west, all well-known sanctuaries from early times, and Golan, Ramoth, and Bezer on the east. xviii, xix), but they probably shared the sacred character of the Cities on the west
Levite - Forty-eight Cities also were assigned to them, thirteen of which were for the priests "to dwell in", i. Nine of these Cities were in Judah, three in Naphtali, and four in each of the other tribes (Joshua 21 ). Six of the Levitical Cities were set apart as "cities of refuge" (q
Bezer - One of the Cities of refuge appointed for the manslayer to flee unto, as provided. ...
These Cities of refuge were for the manslayer to flee to for shelter. All the days his High Priest liveth no condemnation can fall upon him; and that is for ever!...
That the appointment of those Cities (which were six in number), had an eye to Christ cannot be doubted, because a provision for the manslayer, if referring only to temporal things, might have been made in a much easier and more simple way. But when we see six Cities expressly set apart for this one purpose only, and placed in certain situations convenient for the poor murderer to get most easily at; when we read so much as is said concerning it, and call to mind how much the Holy Ghost delighted in shadowing forth Christ, under the Old Testament Scripture, in type and figure; and when we observe, moreover, how very strikingly the things here marked down in the city of refuge point to the Lord Jesus Christ, we cannot hesitate to conclude, that it was thus, among a great variety of other ways, Christ was preached to the people. "...
I cannot forbear adding, what hath been always considered, by pious believers, as a farther testimony that these Cities of refuge had an eye to Christ, and were plainly typical, namely, that the name given to each became expressive of somewhat significant in relation to the Lord Jesus Christ. And is there not joy and peace in believing when the soul abounds in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost? Neither were the other three Cities appointed beyond Jordan by Joshua, less striking, when considered in reference to Christ. Into what sweet fellowship and communion doth Jesus bring all his people!...
It is a very blessed addition to this merciful design of the Lord, that he so graciously appointed the whole six Cities of refuge to suit the different situations of the people, that if they were central in the place where the manslaughter was committed, or at the remote end of their town, at each extremity there were avenues leading to the one or other of the city of refuge
Phrygia - Hierapolis was apparently once Lydian, and Laodicea Carian; but in the Roman period all the Cities of the Lycus Valley were regarded as Phrygian. Along this line the early Seleucids planted a series of Greek Cities for the defence of their Empire and the diffusion of Hellenic culture. A striking feature in the life of these Cities was the presence of Jews in large numbers. ‘The Jews also obtained honours from the kings of Asia, when they became their auxiliaries; for Seleucus Nicator made them citizens of those Cities which he built in Asia … and gave them privileges equal to those of the Macedonians and Greeks, who were the inhabitants, insomuch that these privileges continue to this very day. ...
In these Hellenistic Cities the Jews relaxed their strictness so much that the orthodox counted them degenerate. Paul found in the Cities of Phrygia numerous proselytes, whose minds proved the best soil for the seed of the evangel. on Galatians, 1899, The Cities of St
Og - His sixty fenced and walled Cities were given with Bashan and all his kingdom to the half-tribe of Manasseh
Bernardine of Siena, Saint - The fame of his eloquence spread and he gained influence over the leading Italian Cities
Arabia Deserta - It comprehends the country of the Itureans, the Ishmaelites, the people of Kedar, and others, who led a wandering life, having no Cities, houses, or fixed habitations, but wholly dwelling in tents; in modern Arabic, such are called Bedawin
Walls - In Palestine the principal Cities were protected by surrounding walls, sometimes of great size
Zebadiah - One of the Levites sent by Jehoshaphat to teach in the Cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:8 )
Erech - One of the Cities of Nimrod in the land of Shinar
Laodicea - It was one of the most important and flourishing Cities of Asia Minor
Brimstone - It was the instrument used in destroying Sodom and Gomorrah, the adjoining Cities of the plain (Genesis 19:24), for divine miracle does not supersede the use of God's existing natural agents, but moves in connection with them
Kenath - of Bashan) and Aram (the Aramaeans or Syrians) took the towns of Jair (rather Havoth Jair) from them (the Jairites) with Kenath and the towns thereof, 60 Cities," i
Street - "It is remarkable," says Porter, "that all the important Cities of Palestine and Syria Samaria, Caesarea, Gerasa, Bozrah, Damascus, Palmyra, had their 'straight streets' running through the centre of the city, and lined with stately rows of columns
Beth-Jeshimoth - Ezekiel described it as one of three frontier Cities of Moab, these being “the glory of the country” (Ezekiel 25:9 ), but one facing God's judgment
Geshur - Many scholars think Joshua 13:2 and 1 Samuel 27:8 refer to a group of southern Philistine Cities about which nothing else is known
Hanes - Ashurbanipal of Egypt also mentions Hanes in listing Egyptian Cities
Shi'Nar - ( Genesis 11:3 ) Among the Cities were Babel (Babylon), Erech or Orech (Orchoe), Calneh or Calno (probably Niffer ), and Accad, the site of which is unknown
Nethaniah - Levite sent along with Jehoshaphat's princes to teach from the book of the law of God in all the Cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 17:7-9 )
Describe - ) To represent by words written or spoken; to give an account of; to make known to others by words or signs; as, the geographer describes countries and Cities
Galilee - Galilee's fertility, invigorating climate, forests, vineyards, lakes, rivers, and prosperous Cities gave it a varied and attractive aspect
Zeboim, Valley of - Ζeboim (without the Hebrew 'Αyin ( ע ) means "gazelles"; one of the four Cities of the plain; destroyed with Sodom, Gomorrha, and Admah (Genesis 10:19; Genesis 14:2; Deuteronomy 29:23; Hosea 11:8)
Carpenter - "In the Cities the carpenters would be Greeks, and skilled workmen; the carpenter of a provincial village could only have held a very humble position, and secured a very moderate competence
Asher - The province allotted to this tribe was a maritime one, stretching along the coast from Sidon on the north to Mount Carmel on the south; including the Cities Abdon, Achshaph, Accho, Achzib, Sarepta, Sidon, and Tyre
Goshen - It contained the treasure-cities of Rameses and Pittim
Asher - A territory extending from Carmel to Lebanon, about 60 miles long and ten to twelve wide, having 22 Cities with their villages
Hazor - Cities in Judah and Benjamin, Joshua 15:23 ; Nehemiah 11:33
Cyrene - It was sometimes called PENTAPOLIS, from the five principal Cities that it contained-Cyrene, Apollonia, Arsinoe, Berenice, and Ptolemais
Og - Ashtaroth-carnaim and Edrei were his chief Cities; but there were many other walled towns, and the land was rich in flocks and herds
Siena, Bernardine of, Saint - The fame of his eloquence spread and he gained influence over the leading Italian Cities
Gib'Eon - (hill city ), one of the four , Cities of the Hivites, the inhabitants of which made a league with Joshua, ( Joshua 9:3-15 ) and thus escaped the fate of Jericho and Ai
Gomorrah - This answers to the vale of Siddim, "full of slime pits" (Genesis 14:10); and it accords with the destruction of the four Cities of the plain by fire and brimstone, and with the turning of Lot's wife into a pillar of salt. ...
Scripture does not say the Cities were immersed in the sea, but that they were destroyed by fire from heaven (Deuteronomy 29:23; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; Zephaniah 2:9; 2 Peter 2:6; Judges 1:4-7, "an example unto those that after should live ungodly"; Amos 4:11). The traditional names of Usdum, and site of Zoar, the hill of salt, said to have been Lot's wife, favor the view that the Cities lay either in or around the present southern bay. " Gomorrah was one of the five Cities of the vale of Siddim whose forces were routed by Chedorlaomer, until Abram helped them. Combining with an earthquake, the storm cast showers of ignited bitumen on the Cities, so that "the smoke of the country" was "as the smoke of a furnace," as beheld by Abraham
Shishak - ) With 1,200 chariots and 60,000 horsemen, and Lubim, Sukkiim and Cushim without number, he took Judah's Cities fortified by Rehoboam (2 Chronicles 11:5-12) and came to Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 12:2; 2 Chronicles 12:4-5; 2 Chronicles 12:9-12). ) Shishak has recorded this expedition on the wall of the great temple at Karnak; there is a list of the countries, Cities and tribes, ruled, conquered, or made tributary by him, including many Jewish names, Taanach, Rehob, Mahanaim, Gibeon, Bethhoron, Kedemoth, Aijalon, Megiddo, Ibleam, Almon, Shoco, one of Rehoboam's fenced Cities, etc. of Judah, Jerahmeelites, Rekem (Petra), and the Hagarites, are all specified;...
(1) the Levitical and Canaanite Cities are grouped together;...
(2) the Cities of Judah;...
(3) Arab tribes S
Gaza - It is one of the oldest Cities of the world (Genesis 10:19 ; Joshua 15:47 ). It was the southernmost of the five great Philistine Cities which gave each a golden emerod as a trespass-offering unto the Lord (1 Samuel 6:17 )
Chalde'a, - Cities. --Babylonia has long been celebrated for the number and antiquity of its Cities
Crete - It was at one time a very prosperous and populous island, having a "hundred Cities
Greece - ...
The Cities of Greece were the special scenes of the labours of the apostle Paul
Baalbec - It was one of the most splendid of Syrian Cities, existing from a remote antiquity
Sal'Amis - Here alone, among all the Greek Cities visited by St
Villages - Cities are often mentioned in the Old Testament with their dependent villages
Beriah - His daughters built the two Cities named Beth-horon (1 Chronicles 7:20-25 )
Barley - ) in the villages, but not in the Cities
Zeboiim - ” One of the Cities in the valley of Siddim (Genesis 14:2-3 ) at the southern end of the Dead Sea
Zoar - ” One of the Cities in the valley of Siddim, also known as Bela (Genesis 14:2 )
Barnabas, Saint - He became associated with Saint Paul, with whom he worked for the conversion of the Gentiles, and whom he accompanied to Cyprus and the Cities of Asia
Arvad - ARVAD (modern ( Ruwâd ) was the most important of the northerly Cities of Phœnicia
Antonio da Sangallo, the Younger - He filled numerous engineering commissions in various Italian Cities and cut the Pozzo di San Patrizio (Saint Patrick's Well) at Orvieto
Gomorrah - One of the five Cities in the vale of Siddim, Genesis 14:1-11; destroyed for its wickedness, Genesis 18:20; Genesis 19:24; Genesis 19:28; made a warning by Moses, Deuteronomy 29:23; Deuteronomy 32:32; referred to by Isaiah 1:9-10; by Jeremiah 23:14; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; by Amos 4:11; by Zephaniah 2:9 : by our Saviour, Matthew 10:15; Mark 6:11, A
Abelbethmaachah - It was taken with other Cities by Benhadad, 1 Kings 15:20 , and subsequently by Tiglath-pileser, 2 Kings 15:29 , when its inhabitants were carried away captive to Assyria
Tirzah - One of the 31 Cities of the Canaanites taken by Joshua, Joshua 12:24, and for 50 years the capital of the northern kingdom of Israel, until Omri built Samaria
Cistern - The reason of their being so large was, that their Cities were many of them built in elevated situations; and the rain falling only twice in the year, namely, spring and autumn, it became necessary for them to collect a quantity of water, as well for the cattle as for the people
Rameses - It was one of the Cities built by the Israelites as a treasure city, as it is translated in our Bibles; probably a store city, or, as others interpret it, a fortress
Jeshua - ...
...
A Levite appointed by Hezekiah to distribute offerings in the priestly Cities (2 Chronicles 31:15 )
Ramoth - It was one of the Cities of refuge
Orontes - Cities of the Orontes valley include Antioch (Acts 11:19 ; Acts 13:1 ), Hamath (2 Samuel 8:9 ; 2 Kings 17:24 ; 2 Chronicles 8:4 ; Isaiah 11:11 ), Qarqar, where King Ahab of Israel joined a coalition of Syrian kings warring against Shalmaneser III, and Riblah (2 Kings 23:33 ; 2Kings 25:6,2 Kings 25:21 )
Ramoth - It belonged to Gad, was assigned to the Levites, and became one of the Cities of refuge beyond Jordan, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:38
Sangalo, Antonio da, the Younger - He filled numerous engineering commissions in various Italian Cities and cut the Pozzo di San Patrizio (Saint Patrick's Well) at Orvieto
Potsherds - The ruins of many of the most ancient Cities in the world show little but such fragments of pottery covering the ground; it is usually coarse in grain, but well glazed
Dor - One of the Cities which joined Jabin against Joshua ( Joshua 11:2 ), and whose king was killed ( Joshua 12:23 )
Rehoboth - There are two places named Rahabeh, near the Euphrates, which may be these Cities
Euphrates And Tigris Rivers - Many significant Cities were located on the Euphrates, Babylon being the most important. Like the Euphrates, some significant Cities were located on its banks
Hormah - ’ It was one of ‘the uttermost Cities of Judah, towards the borders of Edom in the south,’ and is named between Chesll and Ziklag ( Joshua 15:30 ), also between Bethul (or Bethuel) and Ziklag ( Joshua 19:4 , 1 Chronicles 4:30 ), in the territory occupied by Simeon. ) that two Cities are so named
Lachish - It is enumerated among the Cities of the tribe of Judah ( Joshua 15:39 ). Lachish and Azekah were the last Cities to stand against the king of Babylon ( Jeremiah 34:7 )
Population - ‘Moreover, the Cities lie very thick, and the numerous villages are everywhere so populous, owing to the richness of the soil, that the smallest of them contains over 15,000 inhabitants. Certainly, the Galilee into which Jesus brought His gospel (Mark 1:14), with its Cities like Capernaum (Mark 1:21), its country-towns (Mark 1:38), and country-districts, was no thinly peopled tract. His presence is the signal for multitudes to assemble, and although these were naturally drawn from the Cities (cf. A motto for the Galilaean ministry might well be found in the words, ‘In those days again there was a great crowd’ (Mark 8:1), whether Jesus was in the populous Cities by the Lake or touring through the inland synagognes. Villages were more widely scattered, and, apart from the southern federation of Cities known as the Decapolis, there was a comparative lack of important towns
Hiss - ...
Other nations and Cities were also the objects of hissing: Edom (Jeremiah 49:17 ); Babylon (Jeremiah 50:13 ); Tyre (Ezekiel 27:36 ); and Nineveh (Zephaniah 2:15 )
Adullam - It was one of the Cities rebuilt and fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:7 Micah 1:15 , and was reoccupied by the Jews after the captivity, Nehemiah 11:30
Deacon, Philip the, Saint - From there he was transported by Divine power to Azotus, and preached to all the Cities until he came to Caesarea (Acts 8), where he lived with his four daughters, virgins with the gift of prophecy (Acts 21)
Nethaneel - ...
...
One of the "princes" appointed by Jehoshaphat to teach the law through the Cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 17:7 )
Rameses - After the Hebrews had built Rameses, one of the "treasure Cities," it came to be known as the "land" in which that city was built
Jair - He is described as having had thirty sons and thirty Cities
Ramoth-Gilead - It was in the region of the ill-defined border between the tribes of East Manasseh and Gad, and was one of the three Cities of refuge in Israel’s trans-Jordan territory (Joshua 20:8-9)
Shinar, the Land of - Shinar was apparently first peopled by Turanian tribes, who tilled the land and made bricks and built Cities
Rameses - After the Israelites became slaves, they were forced to help build Rameses and Pithom (Exodus 1:11 ) as store Cities for Pharaoh Rameses II
Cuth, Cuthah - One of the Cities from which Sargon brought colonists to take the place of the Israelites whom he had deported from Samaria, b
Jarmuth - It corresponds to Ramoth in 1 Chronicles 6:73 , and Remeth appears in Joshua 19:21 among the Cities of Issachar
Arch - Triumphal arches are magnificent structures at the entrance of Cities, erected to adorn a triumph and perpetuate the memory of the event
Argob - Argob was probably in the center of the fertile tableland and was famous for its strong Cities ( Deuteronomy 3:4 )
Hara - There is much to be said for the suggestion that the original text read hârç Mâdai , ‘mountains of Media,’ corresponding to the Cities of Media of the parallel passages (LXX Evangelist, Philip the, Saint - From there he was transported by Divine power to Azotus, and preached to all the Cities until he came to Caesarea (Acts 8), where he lived with his four daughters, virgins with the gift of prophecy (Acts 21)
ja'Besh - In its widest sense Gilead included the half tribe of Manasseh, (1 Chronicles 27:21 ) as well as the tribes of Gad and Reuben, (Numbers 32:1-42 ) east of the Jordan; and of the Cities of Gilead, Jabesh was the chief
Archbishop - Archbishops were not known in the east till about the year 320; and though there were some soon after this, who had the title, yet it was only a personal honour, by which the bishops of considerable Cities were distinguished
Antioch of Pisidia - There were several other Cities of the same name, sixteen in number, in Syria and Asia Minor, built by the Seleucidae, the successors of Alexander in these countries; but the above two are the only ones which it is necessary to describe as occurring in Scripture
Circuit - Samuel went around a circuit of Cities to judge Israel (1 Samuel 7:16 )
Syracuse - , was opulent and powerful, and was divided into four or five quarters or districts, which were of themselves separate Cities
Lamp - Torches and lanterns, John 18:3 , were very necessary in ancient Cities, the streets of which were never lighted
Fountain - In Oriental Cities generally public fountains are frequent
Crete, - Though exceedingly bold and mountainous, this island has very fruitful valleys, and in early times it was celebrated for its hundred Cities
Gaza - The town of Gaza, on the Mediterranean coastal plain, was one of the ‘five Cities of the Philistines’
Asher - In the division of Canaan under Joshua, this tribe received the coastal plain from Mt Carmel north to the Phoenician Cities of Tyre and Sidon (Joshua 19:24-31; Judges 5:17)
Ashdod - One of the five confederate Philistine Cities, 30 miles from the S. Ashdod had been originally assigned to Judah (Joshua 15:47), but never occupied by the Jews, nay, made a point of attack on them: not until King Uzziah was its "wall broken down and Cities built about it," i
Bashan - Golan, one of its Cities, became a "city of refuge" (Joshua 21:27 ). The Cities of Bashan were taken by Hazael (2 Kings 10:33 ), but were soon after reconquered by Jehoash (2 Kings 13:25 ), who overcame the Syrians in three battles, according to the word of Elisha (19)
Fort, Fortification - Cities of the ancient world were fortified for defensive purposes as far back as archaeological records exist. From this time until the Roman Period (the time of Christ), Cities were almost always surrounded by walls
Gate - Eastern Cities anciently were walled and had gates. The gates of Cities were carefully guarded, and closed at nightfall
Phenicia - ...
The chief Cities of Phenicia were Sidon, Tyre, Ptolemais, Ecdippe, Sarepta, Berythe, Biblos, Tripoli, Orthosia, Simira, Aradus. They formerly had possession of some Cities in Libanus: and sometimes the Greek authors comprehend all Judea under the name of Phenicia
Jephthah - "He smote them from Aroer, even till thou come to Minnith, even twenty Cities, and unto the plain of the vineyards Bela - One of the five Cities of the plain, spared at Lot's intercession, and named Zoar, "a little one" (Genesis 14:2; Genesis 19:22). of the Dead Sea, on the route to Egypt, not far from where Sodom and Gomorrah stood, according to Holland, arguing from the smoke of the burning Cities having been seen by Abraham from the neighborhood of Hebron, and also because if Sodom had been N. But Grove places the Cities of the plain N
Lycaonia - At some uncertain date a part of Lycaonia, containing fourteen Cities, of which Iconium was one, was transferred to Galatia. In Acts 16:1-4 this territory is not explicitly named, but its two Cities are mentioned by name. In Acts 18:23 the same Cities are included in the expression used
Gath - One of the five great Philistine Cities (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17). " Gath was one of the five Cities to which the Philistines carried about the ark of God (the five formed one political unity), and thereby brought on the people God's heavy visitation with emerods. , Zephaniah 2:4-5; Zechariah 9:5-6, Gath is omitted; probably it had lost by that time its place among the five primary Cities
Zidon - Zidon is one of the most ancient Cities of the world. In New Testament times Zidon (called "Sidon") was visited by Jesus, Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24; Luke 4:26, although the "coasts" of Tyre and Sidon denoted the adjacent region as well as the Cities themselves, and some think that the Saviour did not enter the Cities
Street - ’ A comparison with Mark 6:56 (ἐν ταῖς ἀγοραῖς; D reads πλατείαις) is instructive: applied to villages and country, no less than to Cities, this would seem to denote no more than ‘open spaces,’ perhaps as opposed to courtyards. Such open spaces in Cities came to be used as business centres, and were put to other uses (see especially Acts 17:17). ...
If we keep in view the smallness and the extreme irregularity of ancient Cities, as revealed by recent excavation in Palestine, it seems best to equate ῥύμη to ‘street,’ and πλατεῖα to ‘square,’ in the modern city. An exception must be made for the Apostolic Age in favour of recent Cities, built according to Graeco-Roman designs (cf
Proselyte - Proselytes were found in great numbers, not only in Judea, but in all the principal Cities of the empire
Sabbath-Day's Journey - We find the same distance given as the circumference outside the walls of the Levitical Cities to be counted as their suburbs
Tam'Muz - A festival in honor of Adonis was celebrated at Byblus in Phoenicia and in most of the Grecian Cities, and even by the Jews when they degenerated into idolatry
Makkedah - Herdsman's place, one of the royal Cities of the Canaanites (Joshua 12:16 ), near which was a cave where the five kings who had confederated against Israel sought refuge (10:10-29)
Cemetery - Anciently, none were buried in churches or churchyards: it was even unlawful to inter in Cities, and the cemeteries were without the walls
Ai -
One of the royal Cities of the Canaanites (Joshua 10:1 ; Genesis 12:8 ; 13:3 )
Zaanaim - Wanderings; the unloading of tents, so called probably from the fact of nomads in tents encamping amid the Cities and villages of that region, a place in the north-west of Lake Merom, near Kedesh, in Naphtali
Nethanel - A ‘prince’ sent by Jehoshaphat to teach in the Cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:7 )
Calah - it is said to have been founded by Nimrod, and, along with Nineveh and other Cities, to have formed part of ‘the great city
Jair - He had thirty sons, who had thirty Cities in the land of Gilead, which were also called 'HAVOTH-JAIR
Macedonia - It contained the Cities of Neapolis, Philippi, Amphipolis, Thessalonica, Apollonia, and Berea
Gaza - The chief of the five Cities of the Philistines, 60 miles southwest of Jerusalem, 3 miles from the Mediterranean, now called Ghŭzzeh
Ain - One of the Levitical Cities in the south
Achmetha - " Apparently history alludes to two Cities named Ecbatana: one associated with the ruins at Takht-i-Suleiman, 36 28' N, 47 18' E; the other identified with the modern Hamadan, 34 48' N, 48 26' E, anciently the summer residence of Persian kings, and where the records of the kingdom were apparently kept
Abdon - Probably the same as Hebron in the list of the Cities of Asher in Joshua 19:28
ja'ir - ) He had thirty sons, and possessed thirty Cities in the land of Gilead, which like those of their namesakes were called Havoth-jair
Ramoth - It was assigned for a dwelling of the Levites, and was one of the Cities of refuge beyond Jordan, Joshua 20:8 ; Joshua 21:38
Lachish - It was one of the Canaanitish Cities which was subdued by Joshua and included in Judah; fortified by Jeroboam
Pagan - This word was originally applied to the inhabitants of the country, who on the first propagation of the christian religion adhered to the worship of false gods, or refused to receive christianity, after it had been received by the inhabitants of the Cities
Paphos - PAPHOS was the name of two Cities in the W
Porters - Kept the gates of private houses and of Cities, 2 Samuel 18:26 2 Kings 7:10 Mark 13:34 John 10:3
as'Ahel - ) ...
One of the Levites in the reign of Jehoshaphat, who went throughout the Cities of Judah to instruct the people in the knowledge of the law
Ekron - The most northerly of the five Cities of the Philistines
Gath - One of the ‘five Cities of the Philistines’, Gath was famous as the home of a number of giants, the most famous of whom was Goliath (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17-18; 1 Samuel 17:4; 2 Samuel 21:18-22; see also ANAK)
Cyrene - It was the chief member of a confederacy of five neighbouring Cities; hence the district was called either Pentapolis or Cyrenaica. The first Ptolemy, ‘wishing to secure the government of Cyrene and the other Cities of Libya for himself, sent a party of Jews to inhabit them’ (Josephus, circa (about) Apion. An inscription at Berenice, one of the Cities of Cyrenaica, of prob
Levites - Forty-eight Cities, with 1000 cubits of the country surrounding, were appropriated for the residence and maintenance of the Levites. Besides these Cities, with adjacent districts, the Levites received a tithe of all produce, animal and vegetable, but of this they paid a tithe to the priests. They were divided into courses, and came up from their Cities to the sanctuary in regular rotation
Tirzah - One of the 31 Cities captured by Joshua ( Joshua 12:24 )
Market-Place - In early times markets were held at the gates of Cities, where commodities were exposed for sale (2 Kings 7:18 )
Council - The Jewish councils were the Sanhedrim, or supreme council of the nation, which had subordinate to it smaller tribunals (the "judgment," perhaps, in Matthew 5:21,22 ) in the Cities of Palestine (Matthew 10:17 ; Mark 13:9 )
Beeroth - ) One of the four Hivite Cities (the others being Gibeon, Chephirah, and Kirjath Jearim: Joshua 9:17), which obtained peace with Joshua by false pretenses
Tiberias - In later days, however, along with Jerusalem, Hebron, and Safed, Tiberias was classed by the Jews as one of their four holy Cities, renowned as seats of learning
Ramoth-Gilead - It has with probability been identified with Reimun, on the northern slope of the Jabbok, about 5 miles west of Jerash or Gerasa, one of the Cities of Decapolis
Timnah - Uzziah likely took the site as part of his conquest of Philistine Cities (2 Chronicles 26:6 )
Kiriathaim - (kihr' ih ath a ihm) Place name meaning, “double city” or “two Cities
Golan - One of the three Cities of refuge E
Morning - Among men of business in large Cities, the morning extends to the hour of dining
Village - See Agriculture ; Cities and Urban Life ; House
Zoar - Connected with the Cities of the plain, Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, and Zeboiim (Gen_13:10)
Hauran - There are many sites of ruined Cities and villages, with houses built of hard stone, some of which are in fairly good repair, but with few inhabitants
Cities of Refuge - Six Cities that were designated by Moses at the command of God as locations to which Israelites could flee in order to be safe from retribution of other Israelites for offenses committed against others
Goshen - It contained the treasure-cities Rameses and Pithom
Kirjathjearim - It was one of the four Cities included in the compact made with Gibeon
Merari, Merarites - In the land they had twelve Cities from among the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and Zebulun, including the city of Ramoth-gilead
Kirjath-Jearim - One of the four Cities of the Gibeonites, Joshua 9:17, situated on the border of Judah and Benjamin, Joshua 15:9; Joshua 18:14-15, but belonging to Judah, Joshua 15:60; Judges 18:12; was also called Baalah, Joshua 15:9-10, or Baale of Judah, 2 Samuel 6:2, or Kirjath-baal
Mer'Ari, Mer'Arites - In the division of the land by Joshua, the merarites had twelve Cities assigned to them, out of Reuben, Gad and Zebulun
Cyprus - While they continued at Salamis, they preached Jesus Christ in the Jewish synagogues; from thence they visited all the Cities of the island, preaching the Gospel
Upbraid - Then he began to upbraid the Cities wherein most of his mighty works were done - Matthew 11
Rame'Ses, - The city was one of the two store-cities built for the Pharaoh who first oppressed the children of Israel
Dog, - (Job 30:1 ) Then also, as now troops of hungry and semi-wild dogs used to wander about the fields and the streets of the Cities, devouring dead bodies and other offal, (1 Kings 14:11 ; 21:19,23 ; 22:38 ; Psalm 59:6 ) and thus became so savage and fierce and such objects of dislike that fierce and cruel enemies are poetically styled dogs in (Psalm 22:16,20 ) moreover the dog being an unclean animal, (Isaiah 66:3 ) the epithets dog, dead dog, dog's head, were used as terms of reproach or of humility in speaking of one's self
Cities of Refuge, - six Levitical Cities specially chosen for refuge to the involuntary homicide until released from banishment by the death of the high priest
Gib'Eonites, the, - the people of Gibeon, and perhaps also of the three Cities associated with Gibeon, (Joshua 9:17 ) --Hivites; and who, on the discover of the stratagem by which they had obtained the protection of the Israelites, were condemned to be perpetual bondmen, hewers of wood and drawers of water for the congregation and for the house of God and altar of Jehovah
Town Clerk - 1: γραμματεύς (Strong's #1122 — Noun Masculine — grammateus — gram-mat-yooce' ) "a writer, scribe," is used in Acts 19:35 of a state "clerk," an important official, variously designated, according to inscriptions found in Graeco-Asiatic Cities
Ashdod - Ashdod was one of the ‘five Cities of the Philistines’, the other four being Ashkelon, Ekron, Gaza and Gath (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17-18; see PHILISTIA)
Rhodes - RHODES was one of the most important and successful Cities in ancient Greece. 166 Rome declared the Carian and Lycian Cities independent, and made Delos a free port
Syria - "From the historic annals now accessible to us, the history of Syria may be divided into three periods: The first, the period when the power of the Pharaohs was dominant over the fertile fields or plains of Syria and the merchant Cities of Tyre and Sidon, and when such mighty conquerors as Thothmes III. Second, this was followed by a short period of independence, when the Jewish nation in the south was growing in power, until it reached its early zenith in the golden days of Solomon; and when Tyre and Sidon were rich Cities, sending their traders far and wide, over land and sea, as missionaries of civilization, while in the north the confederate tribes of the Hittites held back the armies of the kings of Assyria
Phoenicia - Leading Cities were Tyre, Sidon, Byblos (Gebal), and Berytos (Beirut). Alexander the Great put an end to Phoenician political power, but the great Cities retained economic power
Medeba - 8, took Mehedeba , and Israel held it forty years, till Mesha recovered it and rebuilt the Cities held by Omri and Ahab. Joram and Jehoshaphat made an unsuccessful attempt to retake these Cities ( 2 Kings 3:1-27 ), but Jeroboam II
Chald a - It was divided into Northern and Southern Chaldæa, each having four important Cities. Originally it was the district in the south of the "land of Shinar" where Nimrod built four Cities
Synagogue - " In the later periods of Jewish history synagogues were not only found in all the chief Cities and lesser towns in Syria, but in the principal Cities of the Roman empire
Gad - The principal Cities of Gad are called Cities of Gilead, Joshua 13:25
Gate - The gate and gateways of eastern Cities anciently held and still hold an important part, not only in the defence but in the public economy of the place. (Acts 14:13 ) comp 2 Kings 23:8 Regarded therefore as positions of great importance, the gates of Cities were carefully guarded, and closed at nightfall
Padilla, Juan de - In 1540 he set out with Coronado on the famous march to the Seven Cities, going as far as Quivira and the Lower Loup River in Nebraska
Juan de Padilla - In 1540 he set out with Coronado on the famous march to the Seven Cities, going as far as Quivira and the Lower Loup River in Nebraska
Resen - The last of the four Cities built by Asshur, or, according to the RV Chapel - The spread of Christianity from the Cities into the country must have early occasioned the erection of chapels for believers living at a distance from the bishop's church
Captivity, Babylonian - After each of these a large portion of the population of Jerusalem and of other Judean Cities was carried away to the banks of the Euphrates
Gath - A wine-vat, one of the five royal Cities of the Philistines (Joshua 13:3 ) on which the ark brought calamity (1 Samuel 5:8,9 ; 6:17 )
Shishak i - He took the fenced Cities and came to Jerusalem
Anathoth - The name of one of the Cities of refuge, in the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 21:18 )
Merarites - The Merarites received an allotment of twelve Cities from the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and Zebulun, including Ramoth-Gilead, a city of refuge (Joshua 21:7 ,Joshua 21:7,21:34-40 ; 1Chronicles 6:63,1 Chronicles 6:77-81 )
Lords of the Philistines - The chieftains or ‘tyrants’ of the five Philistine Cities, Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath
Sea, Molten - It was made partly or wholly of the brass, or rather copper, which was captured by David from "Tibhath and Chun, Cities of Hadarezer king of Zobah
Describe - The geographer describes countries and Cities
Golan - A city of Bashan (Deuteronomy 4:43), allotted out of Manasseh to the Levites; one of the three Cities of refuge E
Appoint - ...
These Cities were appointed for all the children of Israel
Bethshan, Bethshean - It is doubtless on the same spot as SCYTHOPOLIS, mentioned in 2 Maccabees 12:29 , and which was one of the ten Cities of Decapolis
Bozrah - Two Cities
Beth-Horon - Jerom associates it with Rama, in the remark that they were in his time, together with other noble Cities built by Solomon, only poor villages
Mushroom - ) Resembling mushrooms in rapidity of growth and shortness of duration; short-lived; ephemerial; as, mushroom Cities
Accho - It was in the territory assigned to the tribe of Asher, and one of the Cities from which they were unable to expel the Canaanites; and it is even now considered the strongest place in Palestine
Libertines - It is, however, most probable that this word denotes Jews who had been taken captive by the Romans in war, and carried to Italy; and having there been manumitted, were accustomed to visit Jerusalem in such numbers as to erect a synagogue for their particular use; as was the case with Jews from other Cities mentioned in the context
Samaria - In the time of Christ there was great hostility between the Jews and the Samaritans, which explains the episode of the Samaritan Woman, and Our Lord's command to His disciples not to enter any of their Cities (Matthew 10), and makes all the more noble the deed of the Good Samaritan
Levi - The tribe of Levi was, according to Jacob's prediction, scattered over all Israel, having no share in the Cities in the portions of other tribes
Babylonian Captivity - After each of these a large portion of the population of Jerusalem and of other Judean Cities was carried away to the banks of the Euphrates
Towers - Were erected not only in the outer walls and on the heights within Cities, Judges 9:47-49 Psalm 48:12 Luke 13:4 , but along the frontiers of a country, at points where the approach of an enemy could be descried at a distance, Judges 9:17 Isaiah 21:6-9 Ezekiel 33:2-6
cy'Prus, - Its two chief Cities were Salamis, at the east end of the island, and Paphos, at the west end
Jair - " They had possession of thirty of the sixty Cities (1 Kings 4:13 ; 1 Chronicles 2:23 ) which formed the ancient Havoth-jair
Syracuse - (Συράκουσαι, now Siragosa)...
Syracuse was situated on the east coast of Sicily, about midway between the modern Catania and Cape Passaro, and was the wealthiest and most powerful of the Greek Cities in the island. 52) calls her ‘the greatest of Greek Cities and the most beautiful of all Cities
Town-Clerk - In Cities like Ephesus, which were the headquarters of a Roman governor, the town-clerk appears to have acted also as a kind of intermediary between the proconsul (with his staff) and the municipal authorities. With the advent of the Empire the free democratic constitution of most provincial Cities was suspended. Under the Empire privileges were apt to be taken away from Cities if they were abused
Cappadocia - Cappadocia was traversed by the great road of commerce from Ephesus to the Euphrates, by the pilgrims’ route from Constantinople to Jerusalem, and by roads from the Cilician Gates to the Cities of the Euxine. Pagan Cappadocia was devoted chiefly to the cult of Ma, and the strength of its anti-Christian forces is indicated in Strabo’s description of two leading Cities, Comana and Morimene. Some of the other Cities of Cappadocia-Nyssa, Nazianzus, Tyana, Samosata-are celebrated in Church history
Levite - ...
Although Levi had no tribal area of its own, Joshua gave the Levites Cities in each of the other tribes. The number of Cities in each tribe was in proportion to the size of the tribe (Numbers 35:1-8; Exodus 38:21). There were forty-eight Levitical Cities and these were divided among four groups – the priestly Kohathites (Aaron was a Kohathite; Exodus 6:16-20), the non-priestly Kohathites, the Gershonites, and the Merarites. The Cities for the priestly group were all within easy reach of Jerusalem, where the temple was later built (Joshua 21:4-8). Among the forty-eight Cities were six Cities of refuge (Joshua 20; see CITY OF REFUGE)
Lake of Genesareth - In the time of Our Lord, vines and fig-trees and thick forests surrounded it, the nearby plains yielded rich harvests twice a year, and many Cities were situated on its shores
Levites - In lieu of land they received the tithes and also four Cities with suburban pasture lands from each of the other tribes of Israel
Erech - , "Orech"), length, or Moon-town, one of the Cities of Nimrod's kingdom in the plain of Shinar (Genesis 10:10 ); the Orchoe of the Greeks and Romans
Cathedral Schools - In Cities and towns where there was no cathedral there were similar canonicate schools under the local canons
Rameses (ra'Amses) - Among the Cities that the Israelites built was Rameses (or Ra’amses), where the buildings included a magnificent palace, large storehouses and defence fortifications (Exodus 1:8-11)
Tadmor - ) "Remains of ancient temples and palaces, surrounded by splendid colonnades of white marble, many of which are yet standing, and thousands of prostrate pillars, scattered over a large extent of space, attest the ancient magnificence of this city of palms, surpassing that of the renowned Cities of Greece and Rome
Sea, the Molten - It was made of "brass" (copper), which Solomon had taken from the captured Cities of Hadarezer, the king of Zobah (1 Chronicles 18:8 )
Memphis - Gradually, other Cities grew in importance, and Memphis was eclipsed as the seat of power
Tekoa - , Rehoboam cited Tekoa as one of the Cities whose fortifications were to be strengthened (2 Chronicles 11:5-6 )
Tro'as, - It was first built by Antigonus under the name of Antigonea Troas, and peopled with the inhabitants of some neighboring Cities
Elishama - A priest sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the Law in the Cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:8 )
Aijalon - Assigned to the Levite Kohathites, among the 48 Levitical Cities (1 Chronicles 6:69)
Queen - ) A woman eminent in power or attractions; the highest of her kind; as, a queen in society; - also used figuratively of Cities, countries, etc
Galilee, Sea of - In the time of Our Lord, vines and fig-trees and thick forests surrounded it, the nearby plains yielded rich harvests twice a year, and many Cities were situated on its shores
Bethhoron - ...
It was near these Cities that Judas Maccabaeus won his victory over Seron; and here that the Roman Cestius Gallus was signally defeated
Salem - The Cities of the plain were probably S
Argob - It had at one time 60cities, which were ruled over by Og. ' Og was conquered by Moses, and Jair of Manasseh took the fortified Cities, and it became a part of Manasseh's lot
Oven - Except in Cities where there were those who followed the trade of the baker, with built-up ovens, it was customary for every household to have its own simple oven
Jair - "He had thirty sons who rode on thirty ass-colts, and they had thirty Cities, which are called Havoth-jair, which are in Gilead
Adrammelech - The Assyrian king Sargon spread the people of Israel all over his empire and replaced them with settlers from other Cities he conquered (2 Kings 17:24 )
Gier Eagle - It is the universal scavenger of Egyptian Cities
Gershon, Gershonites - They had thirteen of the Levitical Cities
Tent - On Israel entering the land the tents gave way to houses in the Cities: as the Christian's 'tabernacle' will give place to the 'house' above
Tenderloin - Hence, in some other Cities, a district largely devoted to night amusement, or, sometimes, to vice
Gad (2) - Its chief Cities were Ramoth-gilead, Mahanaim, Heshbon, and Aroer
Hamath - Its king, Toi, blessed David for his victory over Zobah, 2 Samuel 8:9-12; Solomon extended his kingdom to Hamath, 1 Kings 8:65; 2 Chronicles 8:4, and built store-cities in that region; afterward the city and country became independent, but were again subdued by Jeroboam II
Nimrod - And "out of that land went forth Asshur," or 'he went out to Assyria,' and built Nineveh and other Cities
Megiddo, Megiddon - Later it is mentioned among the Cities from which Manasseh did not drive out the inhabitants; "the Canaanites would dwell in that land
Dispersion - Hence they were found in the Cities of Asia Minor, enjoying privileges from the Syrian kings
Genesareth, Lake of - In the time of Our Lord, vines and fig-trees and thick forests surrounded it, the nearby plains yielded rich harvests twice a year, and many Cities were situated on its shores
Debir - It was one of the Cities of the Amorites that was destroyed and its king slain
Ramah - One of the Cities of Benjamin
Paran, or el-Paran - Some Cities and cultivated grounds, however, and considerable patches of pasturelands, were anciently found in this region
Sea of Galilee - In the time of Our Lord, vines and fig-trees and thick forests surrounded it, the nearby plains yielded rich harvests twice a year, and many Cities were situated on its shores
Cyprus - Of the Cities in the island, Paphos on the western coast, and Salmis at the opposite end, are mentioned in the New Testament
Gideon or Jerubbaal - In punishing the refractory Cities Succoth and Penuel, and the fratricides Zeba and Zalmunna- in soothing the jealousy of the Ephraimites, and in declining the crown offered him by the Jews, he evinced those qualities which made him a successful judge
Ram - An engine of war, used formerly for battering and demolishing the walls of Cities called a battering-ram
Sebastian, Saint - Patron of archers and gunsmiths, and of many Cities; he is also invoked against pestilence
Smalkaldic League - The League included six German princes, among them the notorious Philip of Hesse and the Elector John of Saxony; and eleven Cities, including Strasbourg, Constance, and Bremen
Wall - Walls of stone or brick form the exterior of buildings, and they are often raised round Cities and forts as a defense against enemies
ha'Zor - ...
One of the "cities" of Judah in the extreme south, named next in order to Kedesh
Hit'Tits - 'They were then settled at the town which was afterwards, under its new name of Hebron, to become one of the most famous Cities of Palestine, and which then bore the name of Kir-jath-arba
ed'Rei -
One of the two capital Cities of Bashan, in the territory of Manasseh east of the Jordan
Jotham - He erected the high gate of the house of the Lord, and built much on Ophel; also in the mountains of Judah he built Cities, castles, and towers
Levi - Although they had no tribal territory of their own, they were given Cities in all the tribal territories (Exodus 32:28-29; Numbers 35:2; Numbers 35:8; Deuteronomy 33:8-10; see LEVITE)
Moab - The Cities of Moab were to be "desolate without any to dwell therein;" no city was to escape: Moab was to "flee away. " And the Cities of Moab have all disappeared. " And it might with equal truth have been added, that they still subsist to confirm the inspiration of the Jewish Scriptures, or to prove that the seers of Israel were the prophets of God; for the desolation of each of these very Cities was a theme of a prediction. The predicted judgment has fallen with such truth upon these Cities, and upon all the Cities of the land of Moab far and near, and they are so utterly "broken down," that even the prying curiosity of such indefatigable travellers could discover among a multiplicity of ruins only a few remains so entire as to be worthy of particular notice. Of this ancient city, as well as of Araayr, (Areor,) nothing is now remarkable but what is common to them with all the Cities of Moab, their entire desolation. "...
While the ruins of all these Cities still retain their ancient names, and are the most conspicuous amidst the wide scene of general desolation, and while each of them was in like manner particularized in the visions of the prophet, they yet formed but a small number of the Cities of Moab; and the rest are also, in similar verification of the prophecies, "desolate, without any to dwell therein. " None of the ancient Cities of Moab now remain as tenanted by men. Kerek, which neither bears any resemblance in name to any of the Cities of Moab which are mentioned as existing in the time of the Israelites, nor possesses any monuments which denote a very remote antiquity, is the only nominal town in the whole country, and, in the words of Seetzen, who visited it, "in its present ruined state it can only be called a hamlet: and the houses have only one floor. And that such numerous Cities which subsisted for many ages, some of them being built on eminences, and naturally strong; others on plains, and surrounded by the richest soil; some situated in valleys by the side of a plentiful stream; and others where art supplied the deficiencies of nature, and where immense cisterns were excavated out of the rock, and which exhibit in their ruins many monuments of ancient prosperity, and many remains easily convertible into present utility; should have all fled away, all met the same indiscriminate fate, and be all "desolate, without any to dwell therein," notwithstanding all these ancient indications of permanent durability, and their existing facilities and inducements for becoming the habitations of men, is a matter of just wonder in the present day. " The Bedouin (wandering) Arabs are now the chief and almost the only inhabitants of a country once studded with Cities. " "O ye that dwell in Moab, leave the Cities and dwell in the rock, and be like the dove that maketh her nest in the sides of the hole's mouth. " While the Cities are desolate, without any to dwell therein, the rocks are tenanted
Megiddo - One of the most important of the fortress Cities of ancient Canaan. 2000 have been uncovered, as well as the most extensive remains of successive Cities which have occupied this site for many centuries
Kiriath-Jearim - One of the Cities of the Gibeonites ( Joshua 9:17 ), occupied by the Danites ( Judges 18:12 ), on the border between Judah and Benjamin ( Joshua 15:9 ; Joshua 18:14 ). ’ On the other hand, it is far from the other Cities of the Gibeonltes ( Joshua 9:17 )
Laodicea - There were several Cities of this name, but the Scripture. And Colonel Lake observes, "There are few ancient Cities more likely than Laodicea to preserve many curious remains of antiquity beneath the surface of the soil
Galilee - The apostate emperor Julian constantly used it, and in his dying agony and rage cried out, "O Galilean, thou hast conquered!" Our Savior resided here from infancy till he was thirty years of age, and during much of his public ministry; and the Cities of his public ministry; and the Cities of Nazareth, Nain, Cana, Capernaum, with the whole region of the sea of Galilee, are sacredly endeared to all his people by the words he there spoke, and the wonders he wrought
Gate - ...
In oriental Cities there was always an open space or place adjacent to each gate, and these were at the same time the market places, and the place of justice, Genesis 23:10-18 Ruth 4:1-12 Deuteronomy 16:18 21:19 25:6,7 Proverbs 22:22 Amos 5:10,12,15 . To open it wide and high was significant of joy and welcome, as when the Savior ascended to heaven, Psalm 24:7,9 ; and the open gates of the new Jerusalem in contrast with those of earthly Cities carefully closed and guarded at nightfall, indicate the happy security of that world of light, Revelation 21:25
Megiddo - ” One of the most strategic Cities of Canaan since it guarded the main pass through the Carmel mountain range. Due to its obvious strength, it was among many Cities whose overthrow was delayed until later (Judges 1:27 ). Certainly by the time of Solomon the city was firmly Israelite, since he fortified the city (1 Kings 9:15 ), including his mighty six chambered gate which followed the pattern of his other two key fortress Cities of Hazor and Gezer
Sidon - (Σιδών, ethnic Σιδώνιοι)...
Sidon, called ‘Great Zidon’ (Joshua 11:8), was one of the maritime Cities of Phcenicia, about 25 miles N. After the coming of Alexander the Great, whom Sidon rapturously welcomed and Tyre frantically opposed, the two Cities shared the same political fortunes, being for two centuries bones of contention between the Greek kings of Syria in the north and Egypt in the south. ...
The two sister Cities now consistently advocated a policy of peace with all their neighbours
Antioch - (an' ti ahch) names two New Testament Cities one of which was home to many Diaspora Jews (Jews living outside of Palestine and maintaining their religious faith among the Gentiles) and the place where believers, many of whom were Gentiles, were first called Christians. Because so many ancient Cities were called by this name, it is often called Antioch on the Orontes (River) or Antioch of Syria. As was the case with many of the Roman Cities of the east, Antioch's patron deity was the pagan goddess Tyche or “Fortune
Samar'Itans - At the final captivity of Israel by Shalmaneser, we may conclude that the Cities of Samaria were not merely partially but wholly depopulated of their inhabitants in B. (Ivah,) (2 Kings 18:34 ) and from Hamath, and front Sepharvaim, and placed them in the Cities of Samaria instead of the children of Israel and they possessed Samaria, and dwelt in the Cities thereof. These strangers, whom we will now assume to hare been placed in "the Cities of Samaria" by Esar-haddon, were of course idolaters, and worshipped a strange medley of divinities
Sodom - —The overthrow of the ‘cities of the plain’ was, according to Hebrew traditions, a Divinely-sent catastrophe, second only to that of the Deluge. Deuteronomy 32:32, Isaiah 1:10; Isaiah 3:9, Jeremiah 23:14, Lamentations 4:6, Ezekiel 16:46-49, Wisdom of Solomon 10:6-8); and even more frequently is the devastation of the guilty Cities typical of Divine punishment. Our Lord uttered Woes against three Galilaean Cities which refused to accept His mighty works and repent (Matthew 11:20). The three Cities named are Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum
Refuge - Cities OF. In order to provide for the security of those who, without design, might happen to kill a person, in whatever manner it should be, the Lord commanded Moses to appoint six Cities of refuge, Exodus 21:18 ; Numbers 35:11 , &c, that whoever should undesignedly spill the blood of a fellow creature, might retire thither, and have time to prepare for his defence before the judges: so that the relatives of the deceased might not pursue and kill him. Of these Cities there were three on each side Jordan. These Cities were to be of easy access, and to have good roads to them, and bridges wherever there should be occasion
Levites - ...
God assigned for the habitation of the Levites forty-eight Cities, with fields, pastures, and gardens, Numbers 35:1-34 . Six of the Levitical Cities were appointed as Cities of refuge, Joshua 20:1-21:45 . After the revolt of the ten tribes, a large portion of the Levites abandoned their Cities in Israel, and dwelt in Judah, 2 Chronicles 11:12-14 13:9-11
Asia Minor, Cities of - The Cities located on the Anatolian peninsula (modern-day Turkey). Cities of Asia Minor important to the New Testament accounts included Alexandria Troas, Assos, Ephesus, Miletus, Patara, Smyrna, Pergamum, Sardis, Thyatira, Philadelphia, Laodicea, Colassae, Attalia, Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, Derbe, and Tarsus. The Cities figured prominently in the Apostle Paul's missionary journeys, several of the churches receiving epistles. Among the list are the “Seven Cities” of the Revelation. Deep ravines cut by numerous and often navigable rivers linked the Cities of the plateau with the western coastline. Cities developed in locales vital to trade and commerce, such as near the mouths of rivers and mountain passes. ...
Coastal Cities The name Troas described both the northwest region of Asia Minor as well as the port city. Smyrna reigned as one of the grandest Cities of all Asia. ...
Cities of the Interior Located fifteen miles inland overlooking the Caicus River, Pergamum contained the first temple in Asia dedicated to a Roman Emperor, Augustus, in 29 B. ...
Cities of Eastern Asia Minor Much of Paul's Asian ministry centered around the provinces of Galatia and Lycaonia
Reuben - ]'>[2] ) to have included six Cities, which appear to have formed a sort of enclave within Gadite territory. ‘The children of Reuben built Heshbon, and Elealeh, and Kiriathaim; and Nebo, and Baal-meon (their names being changed), and Sibmah: and gave other names unto the Cities which they builded. ’ The names given here must be the original names, as it is improbable that the author would allow the worshippers of Jahweh to couple with the names of their Cities the gods Nebo and Baal. Their list of Cities is increased in Joshua 13:15 ff. Three Cities elsewhere assigned to Gad and four assigned elsewhere to Moab are here given to Reuben. ), though the ‘men of Gad’ are referred to as having dwelt in Ataroth ‘from of old,’ the name of Reuben is omitted, though some of the Cities ascribed to the tribe in the genealogies are said to have been taken or rebuilt
Beth-Shemesh - ...
...
One of the fenced Cities of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:38 ), between Mount Tabor and the Jordan
Merarites - Twelve Cities with their suburbs were assigned to them (Joshua 21:7,34-40 )
Adullam - One of the royal Cities of the Canaanites, now 'Aid-el-ma (Joshua 12:15 ; 15:35 )
Anakim - Joshua finally expelled them from the land, except a remnant that found a refuge in the Cities of Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod (Joshua 11:22 )
Cappadocia - Its Cities, Nyssa, Nazianzus, Samosata, and Tyana, were noted in church history
Menahem - After becoming king, Menahem attacked and destroyed one of Israel's Cities because it resisted his rule (2 Kings 15:16 )
Jair - His 30 sons rode 30 asses, and had 30 Cities, the number to which the original Havoth Jair had grown
Macedonia - The details of his work can be studied in connection with the Cities of Macedonia visited by him
Beth-Shemesh - It was one of the Cities taken by the Philistines in the time of Ahaz ( 2 Chronicles 28:18 )
Ephron - A mountain district, containing Cities, on the border of Judah, between Nephtoah and Kiriath-jearim ( Joshua 15:9 )
Heathen (2) - ’ This word is an indication of the fact that, as a rule, country-dwellers were Christianized later than those living in towns and Cities
Judgment-Seat - Thus Jerusalem and the smaller Cities alike had their ‘thrones for judgement’ (Judges 4:5, 1 Kings 7:7, Psalms 122:5, etc
Zebadiah - A Levite sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the law in the Cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 17:8)
Differential - Differentials are also sometimes granted to Cities
Tabor - The list of Levitical Cities in Joshua 21 does not contain this name
Lamp - The lamp was commonly used to furnish artificial light, and numbers of them have been found in the ruins of Jerusalem and other Cities, some being made of terra cotta and others of glass
Anti-Libanus - The Hebrew text never mentions Antilibanus; but uses the general name Libanus: and the coins struck at Laodicea and Hierapolis, have the inscription, "cities of Libanus," though they belong rather to Antilibanus
Woe - ...
Yet in many cases the word woe is used in a fuller and more awful sense, expressing an inspired denunciation and foreshadowing of God's wrath upon sinners; as when we read, "Woe to those who build houses by unrighteousness, and Cities by blood;" woe to those who are "rebellious against God," etc
Rhodes - The city of Rhodes, at the northeast extremity of the island, was one of the most celebrated of the Greek Cities
ba'Shan - See Porter's "Giant Cities of Bashan
Zebo'im -
One of the five Cities of the "plain" or circle of Jordan
Lycao'Nia - "Cappadocia is on the east, Galatia on the north, Phrygia on the west and Cilicia on the south "Among its chief Cities are Derbe, Lystra and Iconium
Commerce - From the time that men began to live in Cities, trade, in some shape, must have been carried on to supply the town-dwellers with necessaries from foreign as well as native sources, for we find that Abraham was rich, not only in cattle, but in silver, gold and gold and silver plate and ornaments
ha'Zer, - ( Joshua 15:28 ; 19:3 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28 ) ...
HAZAR-SUSAH (village of horses ), one of the "cities" allotted to Simeon in the extreme south of the territory of Judah
Siddim, Vale of - But it is possible that the Vale of Siddim is intended to be identified with only a portion of the Dead Sea; and those who consider Sodom and the other four ‘cities of the plain’ to have been situated at the S. By other observers, however, the shallows at the southern extremity of the lake are thought to be the result of elevation rather than of submersion; and if Sodom and the other four Cities associated with it were situated at its N
Arabia Felix - It is much celebrated in modern times by reason of the Cities of Mecca and Medina being situated in it. The only general division is into those who dwell in Cities, as in Southern Arabia, and those who live in the fields and deserts
Argob (2) - of Jordan, in Bashan, in Og's kingdom, containing 60 great and fortified Cities "with walls and brazen bars"; allotted to Manasseh, and taken by Jair a chief of that tribe (Numbers 32:41). ...
Sixty walled Cities are still traceable in a space of 308 square miles
Og - An Amorite king of Bashan, ruling 60 Cities, including Ashteroth Karnaim and Edrei (Joshua 13:12; Joshua 12:4; Genesis 14:5). The rocky fastnesses, on which Og's 60 Cities were, almost impregnable, compensated by security for their inconveniences
Fenced Cities - of Jordan, had "three-score Cities fenced with high walls, gates and bars, beside unwalled towns a great many" (Deuteronomy 3:4-5); all which Israel took. Canaan's "cities fenced up to heaven" were leading causes of the spies' and Israel's unbelieving panic (Numbers 13:28; Deuteronomy 1:28; Deuteronomy 9:1-2)
Ai - In 1 Chronicles 7:28 ‘Azzah , enumerated among the Cities of Ephraim, is in many MSS ‘Ayyah , which is another form of the name. That the city was insignificant is definitely stated in Joshua 7:3 , and indicated by the fact that in the list of captured Cities it is almost the only one of which the situation is specified ( Joshua 12:9 )
Philistines - Their five Cities commanded the coast road from Egypt to Syria, and there is proof that Egypt had a strong hold on Palestine before the arrival of Joshua; but it was then declining. The five fortified Cities of the Philistines, with their 'daughters' or dependent villages, were Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Gath, and Ekron
a'Hab - See (1 Kings 18:19 ) One of Ahab's chief tastes was for splendid architecture which he showed by building an ivory house and several Cities. (1 Kings 20:1-21 ) Next year Ben-hadad again invaded Israel by way of Aphek, on the east of Jordan; yet Ahab's victory was so complete that Ben-hadad himself fell into his hands, but was released contrary to God's will, (1 Kings 20:22-34 ) on condition of restoring the Cities of Israel, and admitting Hebrew commissioners into Damascus
Gibeon - Hill-city, "one of the royal Cities, greater than Ai, and all the men thereof were mighty" (Joshua 10:2 ). A deputation of the Gibeonites, with their allies from three other Cities (Joshua 917;17 ), visited the camp at Gilgal, and by false representations induced Joshua to enter into a league with them, although the Israelites had been specially warned against any league with the inhabitants of Canaan (Exodus 23:32 ; 34:12 ; Numbers 33:55 ; Deuteronomy 7:2 ). It was completely routed, and only broken remnants of their great host found refuge in the fenced Cities. This eventful battle of Beth-horon sealed the fate of all the Cities of Southern Palestine
Troas - , Τρῳάς, which was needed to differentiate this Alexandria from the many other Cities of the same name, came to be used sometimes alone (as in Pliny, Historia Naturalis (Pliny) v. ‘It appeared to be an act of pious duty in the successors of Alexander first to found Cities which should bear his name, and afterwards those which should be called after their own. under Augustus]'>[1] ‘it has received a Roman colony, and is reckoned among celebrated Cities’ (Strabo, XIII. As a colony with the ius Italicum, and as the seaport of a fruitful country, Troas rose to the front rank among the Cities of Asia Minor
Colosse - These three Cities, says Eusebius, were destroyed by an earthquake, in the tenth of Nero, or about two years after the date of St. Of these Cities, however, Laodicea was the greatest, for it was the metropolis of Phrygia, though Colosse is said to have been a great and wealthy place. That this salutary purpose might be effectually accomplished, Paul, accompanied by Silas and Timothy, went at different times into Phrygia, and preached the Gospel in many Cities of that country with great success; but it is thought by many persons, that the Epistle to the Colossians contains internal marks of his never having been at Colosse when he wrote it. Paul had never been either at Laodicea or Colosse; but surely it is very improbable that he should have travelled twice into Phrygia for the purpose of preaching the Gospel, and not have gone either to Laodicea or Colosse, which were the two principal Cities of that country; especially as in the second journey into those parts it is said, that he "went over all the country of Gallatia and Phrygia, strengthening all the disciples;" and moreover, we know that it was the Apostle's practice to preach at the most considerable places of every district into which he went
Bashan - )...
Argob and its 60 "fenced Cities" formed the, principal part of Bashan, which had "beside unwalled towns a great many. " Ashtaroth (Beeshterah, Joshua 21:27, compare 1 Chronicles 6:71), Golan (a city of refuge, assigned with Ashtaroth to the Gershomite Levites), Edrei, Salkah, were the chief Cities. Argob in Bashan (See BASHAN-HAVOTH-JAIR), with its 60 walled and barred Cities still standing, was one of Solomon's commissariat districts (1 Kings 4:13)
Ammon - Ammon's one stronghold, Rabbah, "the city of: waters" (20 Cities are mentioned Judges 11:33, perhaps some Moabite Cities), forms a contrast to Moab's numerous towns with their "high places" (Jeremiah 48); their idol, Moloch, accordingly they worshipped in a tent, the token of nomad life, not a fixed temple or high place, such as was appropriated to the god of the more settled people Moab (Amos 5:26; Acts 7:43). Ammon seized on the Cities of Gad from which Tiglath Pileser had carried the Israelites (Jeremiah 49:1-6; Zephaniah 2:8-9)
Sennacherib - punished Sidon, made Tyre, Arad, and other Phoenician Cities, as also Edom and Ashdod, tributary. Took Ashkelon, warred with Egypt, took Libnah and Lachish on the frontier; and having made treaty with Sabacus or So (the clay seal of So found in Sennacherib's palace at Koyunjik was probably attached to this treaty), he marched against Hezekaih of Judah who had thrown off tribute and intermeddled in the politics of Philistine Cities against Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:13). Sennacherib took 46 of Judah's fenced Cities including Lachish, the storming of which, is depicted on his palace walls
Court - The Cities of Canaan were relatively small and could not contain the whole population. ...
The Book of Joshua includes Israel’s victories in Canaan’s major Cities as well as the suburbs: “Ain, Remmon, and Ether, and Ashan; four Cities and their villages …” (19:7; Greece - ...
Peloponnesus, more anciently called Pelasgia, and Argos, and now the Morea, was the southern peninsula; it included the famous Cities, Sparta, Messene, Elis, Corinth, Argos, etc. The division of Hellas, which now constitutes a great part of Livadia, included Thessaly and Epirus, with the Cities Larissa, Nicopolis, etc. Yet it was among the Greek Cities and people that chiefly labored, and with great success
Transjordan - Center stage of the biblical narrative is the hill country west of the Jordan where most of the Israelite tribes were settled and where the famous Cities of Samaria, Shechem, Jerusalem, and Hebron were sited. Main biblical Cities in the Bashan region were Ashtoroth and Karnaim (Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 12:4 ; Amos 6:13 ). Among Gileadite Cities which appear in the biblical narratives were Mizpah, Jabesh, and Ramath (Judges 10:17 ; 1 Samuel 11:1 ; 1 Samuel 31:12 ; 1 Kings 22:3 , 2 Kings 8:28 ). ...
By New Testament times, a cluster of Greco-Roman-oriented Cities with primarily Gentile populations (the so-called “Decapolis” Cities) had emerged in the northern Transjordan (earlier Bashan, Gilead, and Ammon)
City - The surprisingly large number of places in the ‘least of all lands’ which receive in Scripture the honourable designation of ‘city’ is in itself evidence that the OT ‘cities,’ like the NT ‘ships,’ must not be measured by modern standards. ...
With the exception of Cities on the sea-board, the situation of the Canaanite city was determined, as elsewhere in that old world, by two supreme considerations the presence of an adequate water-supply and the capability of easy defence against the enemy. ‘The Cities of Canaan,’ says Vincent, ‘were almost invariably perched upon a projecting spur of a mountain slope, or upon an isolated eminence in the plain: Megiddo, Gezer, Tell-es-Safy [1] not to mention the hill of the primitive Jerusalem are characteristic examples of the former site, Taanach and Lachish of the latter. ’ With this well-known fact agrees the mention of the ‘cities on their mounds’ (Joshua 11:13 RV
No city, finally, was without its sanctuary or high place , either within its own precincts, as in most Cities of note (see High Place), or on an adjoining height ( 1 Samuel 9:12 ff
Asia - Ephesus, Pergamum, and Smyrna were its principal Cities
Damascus, Syria - One of the oldest Cities in the world, and a Latin archiepiscopal titular see; also a metropolitan see for the Catholic and non-Catholic Melchite Greeks, for the Catholic Syrians, and a Maronite episcopal see
Troas - Augustus made it a Roman colony, and it became one of the greatest Cities of N
Laver - The "molten sea" was made of copper, taken from Tibhath and Chun, Cities of Hadarezer, king of Zobah (1 Chronicles 18:8 ; 1 Kings 7:23-26 )
Custom - ), who had their stations at the gates of Cities, and in the public highways, and at the place set apart for that purpose, called the "receipt of custom" (Matt
Judah - The whole southern part of Palestine fell to Judah's lot; but the tribes of Simeon and Dan possessed many Cities which at first were given to Judah
Avenger of Blood - In order that this law might be guarded against abuse, Moses appointed six Cities of refuge (Exodus 21:13 ; Numbers 35:13 ; Deuteronomy 19:1,9 )
Ajalon - It was one of the Levitical Cities given to the Kohathites (1Chronicles 6:69)
Alexandria - It was for a long period the greatest of existing Cities, for both Nineveh and Babylon had been destroyed, and Rome had not yet risen to greatness
Pool - ...
Most of the pools near the Cities were carved from stone, fed by rainwater channeled into them by channels cut in the rock
Tile - " Bricks with designs engraven on them are found still in ancient Mesopotamian Cities
Nineveh - Situated on the Tigris River in northern Mesopotamia, Nineveh was one of the great Cities of the ancient world, and became capital of the powerful Assyrian Empire (Genesis 10:11-12; 2 Kings 19:36)
Baana - His territory encompassed the great central plain with the famous Cities of Beth-shean, Taanach, and Megiddo (1 Kings 4:12 )
Colossae - The three Cities naturally formed a sphere of missionary labour for Epaphras (Epaphroditus), an inhabitant of Colossæ ( Colossians 4:12-13 ), Timothy ( Colossians 1:1 ), and others
Epaphras - The fact of his prayerful zeal for Laodicea and Hierapolis suggests his having brought the faith to these Cities also ( Colossians 4:13 )
Jahaz - Jahaz was one of the Levite Cities of Reuben belonging to the children of Merari ( Joshua 13:18 ; Joshua 21:36 (see note in RVm Storehouse, Storage City - In large Cities, certain sections of the town were designated as storage areas, with several storehouses lining the streets
Add - Thou shalt add three Cities more of refuge
Ashkelon, Askelon - One of the five principal Cities of the Philistines
Foundations - ...
Hebrews 11:10 (b) Here is a reference to the eternal character of the heavenly Jerusalem in contrast with the transient character of the Cities of the earth
Thessalonica - It was for many years called Salonika, and was one of the most important Cities in European Turkey
Archibishop - Archbishops were not known in the East till about the year 320; and though there were some soon after this who had the title, yet that was only a personal honour, by which the bishops of considerable Cities were distinguished
Six - ...
Six main Cities of refuge were sufficient for the protecting care of GOD over the murderer
Cyprus - It contained two prominent Cities, Salamis and Paphos, and 17 towns
Abi'Jah - He was successful in battle, and took several of the Cities of Israel
Hauran - It abounds, also, with many interesting remains of Cities, scattered over its surface, with Grecian inscriptions
Hiram or Huram - He provided timber and stones, together with gold to an immense amount, and received in return large supplies of corn, wine, and oil, with twenty Cities in Galilee, 1 Kings 5:1-18 2 Chronicles 2:1-18
Simon Stock, Saint - He established communities in the university Cities of Cambridge in 1248, Oxford in 1253, Paris and Bologna in 1260, and revised the Rule, making it more adaptable to European conditions
Stock, Simon, Saint - He established communities in the university Cities of Cambridge in 1248, Oxford in 1253, Paris and Bologna in 1260, and revised the Rule, making it more adaptable to European conditions
Token - In coinage, tokens were coins struck in the reign of Elizabeth in the Cities of Bristol, Oxford and Worcester, and also by private persons, which were put into circulation, and upon being returned,the issuer gave the value of them in current money
Kir'Jath-je'Arim - (the city of forests ), first mentioned as one of the four Cities of the Gibeonites, ( Joshua 9:17 ) it next occurs as one of the landmarks of the northern boundary of Judah, ch (Joshua 15:9 ) and as the point at which the western and southern boundaries of Benjamin coincided, ch
Tarachus, Also Called Victor - They were publicly examined and tortured at three principal Cities—Tarsus, Mopsuestia, and Anazarbus, where they were put to death and their relics carefully preserved
Ashkelon - It is situated in the south of Palestine on the Mediterranean coast, and in Old Testament times was one of the ‘five Cities of the Philistines’
Phoenicia, phNicians - ...
The extent of the country may be roughly determined by its chief Cities Arvad or Arados, on the island now called Ruad, eighty miles north of Sidon, Simyra, Arka, Gebal or Byblos, Biruta on the site of the modern Beyrout, Sidon, Sarepta, Tyre, Achzib, and Acco. Carmel, was the most southerly of these Cities. Their chief Cities may have been built by a previous race. ...
For some reason Sidon so excelled the other Cities in the eyes of Israelites and Greeks, that in the OT and Homer the Phœnicians are frequently called ‘Sidonians,’ even when, as in the case of Ahab’s marriage, Tyrians are really referred to (cf. 1471) he came out to the coast and conquered Arvad, the most northerly of the important Phœnician Cities (cf. Probably the same is true of the rest of Phœnicia, for in the el-Amarna letters all the Phœnician Cities were included in the Egyptian empire of Amenophis iii. In the reign of his successor Merenptah the Cities from the Lebanon to Ashbelon revolted. , records tribute from the same Cities in his 21st year ( KIB Ramah - (ray' muh) Place name meaning, “high,” applied to several Cities located on heights, especially military strongholds. From there he “judged” Israel and went on a yearly circuit to other Cities ( 1 Samuel 7:15-17 )
Priest - ...
"The priests were not distributed over the country, but lived together in certain Cities Gibeon - Chief of the four Hivite (in 2 Samuel 21 called by the general name "Amorite") Cities which obtained a league from Joshua by guile (Joshua 9). "A great city like one of the royal Cities, greater than Ai" (Joshua 10:2); "all its men were mighty
City - 3:5, where ‛ı̂yr may be a city standing in the open country (perhaps surrounded by dirt or stone ramparts for protection): “All these Cities were fenced with high walls, gates, and bars; beside unwalled towns a great many. Ancient Cities (especially larger ones) were sometimes divided into sections (quarters) by walls, in order to make it more difficult to capture them
an'Tioch - In the immediate neighborhood was Daphne the celebrated sanctuary of Apollo 2 Maccabees 4:33 ; whence the city was sometimes called Antioch by Daphne , to distinguish it from other Cities of the same name. One feature, which seems to have been characteristic of the great Syrian Cities,--a vast street with colonnades, intersecting the whole from end to end,--was added by Antiochus Epiphanes
Laodicea - -Laodicea was an important seat of commerce in the Roman province of Asia, one of three Cities in the Lycus valley which were evangelized about the same time. 13) among Phrygian Cities, while Ptolemy sets it down as Carian. Imperial funds were usually given for the restoration of Cities thus injured, and Laodicea accepted a grant from Tiberius after such a calamity, but of a later visitation Tacitus writes: ‘The same year [4] Laodicea, one of the most famous Cities of Asia, having been prostrate by an earthquake, recovered herself by her own resources (propriis opibus revaluit), and without any relief from us’ (Ann. In his third missionary tour he did not go to Ephesus by the ordinary route of commerce, which would have brought him to the Lycus Cities, but passed through ‘the upper country’ (τὰ ἀνωτερικὰ μέρη, Acts 19:1), probably by Seiblia and the Cayster valley. The truths which he proclaimed in the metropolis were quickly repeated all over the province, and especially in the Cities along the great roads
Sardis - one of the most powerful Cities of the world. One of the Cities within its sphere was Magnesia. The letter addressed by the writer of the Apocalypse to Sardis, with which, as with the other six Cities named there, he was obviously well acquainted, shows that the church at Sardis was practically dead
Hierapolis - Differing widely in history and character, these three Cities were evangelized together soon after the middle of the 1st century. The Cities of the Lycus valley no doubt received the gospel at the time of St. 84, and Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, i
Derbe - (Δέρβη)...
Derbe was one of ‘the Cities of Lycaonia’ into which Paul and Barnabas fled when driven from Iconium (Acts 14:6). All the Cities on that line had been hellenized by the Seleucids, whose task the Romans now continued. 54-56, The Cities of St
Races - In Genesis 10:1-32 , Cities are frequently classed as tribes or patriarchal personages
Ashkelon - =Askelon=Ascalon, was one of the five Cities of the Philistines (Joshua 13:3 ; 1 Samuel 6:17 )
Aroer - Isaiah 17:2 refers to this Aroer with its dependent "cities," then "forsaken" through Tiglath Pileser's having carried away the inhabitants (2 Kings 15:29)
Kedesh - ...
...
A "fenced city" of Naphtali, one of the Cities of refuge (Joshua 19:37 ; Judges 4:6 )
Sihon - He also tried to prevent the progress of the Israelites, but was utterly routed, and all his Cities and territory fell into the hands of the Israelites (Compare Numbers 21:33-35 ; Deuteronomy 3:1-14 ; Psalm 135 :: 1012-12 ; 136:17-22 )
Beersheba - It is mentioned among the "cities" given to the tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:2 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28 )
Gadarene - (gad' uh reene) A resident of Gadara, one of the Cities of Decapolis (Mark 5:1 )
Havoth-Jair - He “had thirty sons that rode on thirty ass colts, and they had thirty Cities, which are called Havoth-Jair unto this day, which are in the land of Gilead
Ekron - ) Most northerly of the five Philistine lordship Cities, farthest from the sea, to the right of the great road from Egypt northwards to Syria, in the shephelah (low country)
Town Clerk - An officer originally appointed to record the laws and decrees of the state, mid to read them in public; but in Asia Minor, under the Roman empire, authorized to preside over popular assemblies and submit questions to their vote, as inscriptions on marbles testify; in short, governors of single Cities and districts, and named as such on the coins; sometimes also entitled "chief priests"; a kind of state secretary
Mad - And being exceedingly mad against them, I persecuted them, even to strange Cities
Elamites - Its ruling Cities were Shushan (or Susa) and Ansan (or Anzan), and the earliest native rulers called themselves patesis, or ‘viceroys,’ in acknowledgment of dependence upon Babylonia
Flower - ...
Isaiah 28:1-4 (a) This is a promise from GOD that He will destroy the beauty of Israel, the Cities, villages, valleys and fields because of their evil doings
Chaldea - The land of Shinar adjoined Chaldea on the north, in which were the early Cities of Babel, Erech, Accad and Calneh
Argob - A district in the kingdom of Og, abounding in strong Cities and unwalled towns
Ashkelon - It is referred to in the story of the return of the ark ( 1 Samuel 6:17 ), and in David’s lament ( 2 Samuel 1:20 ), and with the other Philistine Cities is made an object of denunciation by various prophets
Amariah - Priest under Hezekiah responsible for distributing resources from Jerusalem Temple to priests in priestly Cities outside Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 31:15 )
Rabbah, Rabbath - It was not included in the Cities taken by the tribes on the east of the Jordan
Liberty - ) Privilege; exemption; franchise; immunity enjoyed by prescription or by grant; as, the liberties of the commercial Cities of Europe
Society of the Holy Name - In many Cities there are special branches for men of the same avocation, especially among police and firemen and post office employees
Market - In Greek AGORA, in Latin FORUM, a large open area in many ancient Cities, especially of Greece and Rome, having the public market on one side only, the other sides of the are being occupied by temples, theatres, colonnades, courts of justice, baths, and other public structures, the whole square often presenting a magnificent appearance
Pool, Pond - It is applied to great reservoirs constructed to furnish water for Cities, or for irrigation, like that at Gibeon ( 2 Samuel 2:18 ), those at Hebron ( 2 Samuel 4:12 ), and at Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 18:17 ), etc
Blood-Avenger - The law of Moses expressly forbade the acceptance of any ransom for a life thus forfeited, Numbers 35:31 ; but it interfered between an accused person and his pursuer, by providing a sanctuary-at the altar of God and in the Cities of refuge-where the accused might be safe until it was proved that he had committed the act, willfully or accidentally, Joshua 20:6,9
ha'Math - (1 Kings 4:21-24 ) The "store-cities" which Solomon "built in Hamath," (2 Chronicles 8:4 ) were perhaps staples for trade
Nethan'e-el - (1 Chronicles 26:4 ) ...
One of the princes of Judah whom Jehoshaphat sent to teach in the Cities of his kingdom
Theodoricus i., King of the Visigoths - On his accession the Visigoths held nothing in Spain, but occupied in Gaul Aquitania Secunda, the region lying, roughly speaking, between the Loire and the Garonne, with some neighbouring Cities, of which Toulouse, their capital, was the most important
Treasure, Treasury, Treasurer - ]'>[3] ‘store’) Cities’ of Exodus 1:11 (cf. 1 Kings 9:19 , 2 Chronicles 8:4 ) are Cities in which provisions were stored up (cf
Dispersion - Besides the Jews, in the several Cities there were the "devout" Gentiles who in some degree acknowledged the God of Israel. Forty years after Peter's martyrdom, Pliny, Roman governor of Pontus and Bithynia, writing to the emperor Trajan, says: "the contagion (Christianity) has seized not only Cities, but the smaller towns and country, so that the temples are nearly forsaken and the sacred rites intermitted
Murder - The Cities of refuge saved the manslayer, but not the murderer, from the blood avenger. (See Cities OF REFUGE
Seir, Mount - I will lay thy Cities waste . perpetual desolations": Burckhardt counted 40 Cities in Jebal all now desolate
Forty Martyrs, the - The emperor having ordained that the military police of the Cities should offer sacrifices, the governor called upon these forty to comply. " Their relics were carefully preserved and carried to various Cities, where many churches were built in their honour
Galilee - 'Kedesh in Galilee,' one of the Cities of refuge was in Naphtali. Solomon gave Hiram twenty Cities in Galilee
Amorites - West of the Jordan, the Amorites lived in the hills along with the Hivites, Hittites, and Jebusites (Numbers 13:29 ; Joshua 11:3 ); but specific identification of Amorite Cities cannot be certain since the term “Amorite” is used often as a very general name for all the inhabitants of Canaan, as is “Canaanite” (e. Later, two other Amorite Cities, Aijalon and Shaalbim, hindered the settlement of Dan near the Philistine border (Judges 1:34-36 )
ir-ha-Heres - In Isaiah 19:18 the name to be given in the ideal future to one of the ‘five Cities in the land of Egypt that speak the language of Canaan, and swear to Jehovah of hosts’; AV le'Vites - (Numbers 18:21,24,26 ; Nehemiah 10:37 ) Distinctness and diffusion were both to be secured by the assignment to the whole tribe of forty-eight Cities, with an outlying "suburb," (Numbers 35:2 ) of meadowland for the pasturage of their flocks and herds. The reverence of the people for them was to be heightened by the selection of six of these as Cities of refuge. ( Joshua 9:27 ) As soon as the conquerors had advanced far enough to proceed to a partition of the country, the forty-eight Cities were assigned to them. " They lived for the greater part of the year in their own Cities, and came up at fixed periods to take their turn of work. ) The revolt of the ten tribes, and the policy pursued by Jeroboam, who wished to make the priests the creatures and instruments of the king, and to establish a provincial and divided worship, caused them to leave the Cities assigned to them in the territory of Israel, and gather round the metropolis of Judah
Anakim - They were in the spies' time a terror to Israel (Numbers 13:28), but were destroyed by Joshua, except a remnant who escaped to the Philistine Cities, Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod (Joshua 11:21-22)
Aram - Various Cities in the western part of Aram gave their own names to the regions around them: as Damascus, (Aram-Dammesek,) 2 Samuel 8:6 ; Maachah, near Bashan, 1 Chronicles 19:6 ; Geshur, Joshua 12:5 2 Samuel 15:8 ; Zobah, and Beth-rehob, 2 Samuel 10:6,8
Og - His rule extended over sixty Cities, of which the two chief were Ashtaroth and Edrei ( Joshua 12:4 )
Hormah - " But Israel vowed a vow unto the Lord utterly to destroy the Cities of the Canaanites; they "banned" them, and hence the place was now called Hormah
Seventy - We read of our Lord's appointing seventy persons of a rank inferior, it should seem, to the apostles, and sending them out by two and two, before his face, with authority to teach and to preach in the Cities
Kabzeel - of Judah's Cities (Joshua 15:21)
Jehonathan - Levite King Jehoshaphat sent to teach God's law in the Cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 17:8 )
Hebron - The city was built seven years before 'Zoan in Egypt' and had been formerly called KIRJATH-ARBA It was thus one of the most ancient Cities known in the world
Street (2) - Even the main streets in Cities like Jerusalem and Cairo are often narrow and crooked, more like ‘alleys’ than ‘streets’ in our sense
Capital - ) Chief, in a political sense, as being the seat of the general government of a state or nation; as, Washington and Paris are capital Cities
Brick - They built storehouse Cities of brick in Pithom and Ramses
Theater - Herod I built numerous theaters in the Greek Cities during his reign in Palestine (37–4 B
no, no-Amon - No is a word for the best of Cities and Amon the name of the Egyptian god, Amun-Re
Lasea - It is not elsewhere mentioned by any ancient geographical or other writer, but as it was one of the smaller of the hundred Cities of the island-‘centum nobilem Cretam urbibus’ (Hor
Sennacherib - He says he captured forty-six fenced Cities, and the fortresses and villages round about them belonging to Hezekiah the Jew, and carried away 200,150 souls, and horses, mules, asses, camels, oxen, and sheep without number, etc
Zin, Wilderness of - ...
Though the wilderness of Zin does not strictly belong to Edom, yet it was connected with Edom; hence Judah's Cities are said to lie "toward the coast of Edom" (Joshua 15:21)
Communication - Connecting passage means of passing from place to place as a strait or channel between seas or lakes, a road between Cities or countries, a gallery between apartments in a house, an avenue between streets, &c
Hamath, Hemath - It was more than a hundred miles farther north than Dan, but it became tributary to Solomon and he built store Cities there
Shephelah - In Joshua 15:33-47 the shephelah contains 42 Cities with their dependent hamlets, many of them in the mountains
Accad - They had founded the great Cities of Chaldea and had attained to a high degree of culture and civilisation
Agrippa ii - Nero afterwards gave him various Cities
a'sa - (2 Chronicles 15:8 ) Besides this he fortified Cities on his frontiers, and raised an army, amounting, according to (2 Chronicles 14:8 ) to 580,000 men, a number probably exaggerated by an error of the copyist
Door - ...
Doors in the East are usually made of wood; but in the deserted Cities of Bashan doors are found cut out of stone, with a projection top and bottom which served as pivots on which the door turned
Dog - They were, and are, the scavengers of Eastern Cities
Bethsaida - Others think it unlikely that two Cities in such close neighborhood should have borne the same name
Giants - These, however, appear to have been exceptions; and if we judge from the mummies of Egypt, and from the armor and implements of the earliest antiquity, found in ancient tombs, in bogs, and in buried Cities, we should conclude that mankind never exceeded, in the average, their present stature
Ekron - Like the other Philistine Cities, it is made the subject of denunciation by Jeremiah, Amos, Zephaniah, and the anonymous prophet whose writing occupies Zechariah 9:1-17 ; Zechariah 10:1-12 ; Zechariah 11:1-17
Ben-ha'Dad - When he succeeded to the throne, Jehoash recovered the Cities which Jehoahaz had lost to the Syrians, and beat him in Aphek
Judah, Tribe of - It contained only six Cities. Nine of the Cities of Judah were assigned to the priests (Joshua 21:9-19 )
Lachish - A royal Canaanite city which joined the confederacy against Gibeon for submitting to Israel, and was taken by Joshua (Joshua 12:11; Joshua 10:3; Joshua 10:5; Joshua 10:31-32) "on the second day," which shows its strength; the other Cities were taken in one day (Joshua 10:35). His boasted success is doubtful from 2 Chronicles 32:1, "Sennacherib encamped against the fenced Cities, and thought to win them for himself"; 2 Kings 19:8; Jeremiah 34:7
Hiram - A curious episode is recounted in 1 Kings 9:10 ; 1 Kings 9:14 , according to which Solomon gave Hiram ‘twenty Cities in the land of Galilee. ’ In the parallel account ( 2 Chronicles 8:1-2 ) it is Hiram who gives Cities (the number is not specified) to Solomon
Salt (2) - The Cities of the plain, which were destroyed by "brimstone and fire from the Lord out of heaven," were near the Dead Sea. The supposition, formerly most common was that these Cities were submerged by the waters of the sea at the time of the great catastrophe—a theory which appears to be inconsistent with the geological and physical character of the region
Paphos - ‘Along the road’ between the two Cities, says Strabo (loc. ), ‘the annual processions are conducted, when a great concourse both of men and women resort thither,’ not only from New Paphos, but ‘from other Cities
Achaia - ...
The Cities which formed the famous Achaean League became the most powerful political body in Greece; and, when the Romans subdued the country (146 b. The rapid progress of the gospel in Achaia is partly explained by the fact that Judaism had already for centuries been working as a leaven in many of the Cities of Greece. Only three Achaean Cities are mentioned in the NT-Athens, Corinth, and Cenchreae-but the address of 2 Cor
Dedan - Nabonidus, king of Babylon (556-539), left control of his kingdom to his son Belshazzar and worked in Arabia for a period, controlling Dedan among other Cities
Habiru - In letters written from Palestine to Amarna in Egypt, they appear as rebels attacking Cities belonging to the pharaohs of the fourteenth century, and in one text they are further identified as former slaves who had revolted
Order de Santiago de la Espada - The order extended into Portugal, France, Italy, Hungary, and Palestine, and at one time comprised 83 commanderies, 2 Cities, 178 boroughs and villages, 200 parishes, 5 hospitals, 5 convents and 1 college; it numbered 400 knights and could muster over 1000 lances
Order of Saint James of Compostela - The order extended into Portugal, France, Italy, Hungary, and Palestine, and at one time comprised 83 commanderies, 2 Cities, 178 boroughs and villages, 200 parishes, 5 hospitals, 5 convents and 1 college; it numbered 400 knights and could muster over 1000 lances
Lydia (1) - The chief interest of Lydia for us is that it contained several very ancient and important great Cities (of the Ionian branch), Smyrna, Ephesus, Sardis, Colophon, etc
Kirjath Jearim - It was one of the four Gibeonite Cities which obtained peace with Israel by deceit (Joshua 9:17)
Thessalonica - After Alexander the Great established the Greek Empire (fourth century BC), the Greeks built many magnificent Cities
Samaritans - 677), the king of Assyria, brought from Babylon and other places and settled in the Cities of Samaria, instead of the original inhabitants whom Sargon (B
Nebuchadrezzar - He fortified it with a triple line of walls and a moat; he restored temples and Cities throughout his kingdom
Jabin - The Cities he did not burn except Hazor, which he burnt and slew its king, probably on account of some renewed hostility (Joshua 11:1-13)
Kedesh - It was also called Kedesh in Galilee and given to the Gershonite Levites as one of their Cities (Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 )
Nethaneel - Prince of Judah whom King Jehoshaphat sent out with others to teach the law of God in the Cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 17:7-9 )
Obadiah - One of five officials Jehoshaphat sent throughout the Cities of Judah to teach “the book of the law of the Lord” (2 Chronicles 17:7-9 )
Holy Childhood, Association of the - Bishop Forbin-Janson traveled and lectured in France, Belgium, and England, in the interests of this association, and in 1846 it was introduced into New Orleans and Baltimore, from which places it spread to other Cities in the United States and Canada
Beth-Horon - Solomon fortified both these Cities ( 2 Chronicles 8:5 , 1 Kings 9:17 )
Jabneel - In 2 Chronicles 26:6 it is mentioned under the name Jabneh , along with Gath and Ashdod, as one of the Cities captured from the Philistines by Uzziah
Most - Then he began to upbraid the Cities wherein most of his mighty works were done
Abide - " Sometimes by on, the sword shall abide on his Cities and in the sense of wait, by far, abide for me
Habacuc, Book of - God's assurance that whereas "the just shall live in His faith" the proud oppressor shall be destroyed, is followed by a taunting song in which the prophet represents the people pronouncing "Woes" against the rapacious violence of the Chaldeans and the dishonesty and cruelty by which the magnificence of their Cities was maintained, as well as against their idolatry
Association of the Holy Childhood - Bishop Forbin-Janson traveled and lectured in France, Belgium, and England, in the interests of this association, and in 1846 it was introduced into New Orleans and Baltimore, from which places it spread to other Cities in the United States and Canada
Gibeonites - The people of Gibeon and perhaps of the three confederate Cities — Chephirah, Beeroth, and Kirjath-jearim
Gaza - One of the five royal Cities of the Philistines
Memphis - ...
Memphis was one of the earliest Cities of Egypt, and was in the district where some of the largest works were raised
Ablution - ...
Lustration, among the Romans, was a solemn ceremony by which they purified their Cities, fields, armies, or people, after any crime or impurity
Lamp - The form of Oriental lamps was fanciful, and often elegant, of which we have numerous specimens found in the ruined Cities of the East
Zoan - When Isaiah wrote, it would appear to have been one of the chief Cities in Egypt, as he speaks of "the princes of Zoan
Tribe - However, in the distribution of lands by Joshua under the order of God, they reckoned but twelve tribes and made but twelve lots; of the tribe of Levi, being appointed to the sacred service, had no share in the distribution of the land, but received certain Cities to dwell in, with the first-fruits, tithes, and oblations of the people
Syria - Its better portions have been thickly populated from a very early period, and travellers find traces of numerous Cities wholly unknown to history
Jubilee - ...
Laws for the return of land in the year of Jubilee applied only to farming and pastoral land, not to land in walled Cities
Tarsus - ...
Tarsus is mentioned in the ‘Black Obelisk’ inscription as one of the Cities captured by the Assyrian Shalmancser about 860 b. The victories of Alexander the Great changed the face of the East, and Tarsus was one of the many Cities that were Hellenized by the Seleucids. ), and Ramsay thinks it probable that this king reconstituted Tarsus as an autonomous Greek city, and that, according to the practice of the Seleucids, he planted a colony of Jews there, giving them equal rights of citizenship (ἰσοτιμία) with the Greeks (The Cities of St. ]'>[1] 1), and it is curious to see how Tarsus, like so many other Cities, arrogated such high-sounding titles as Metropolis, Neokoros, Free, First, Fairest, Best. Ramsay, The Cities of St
Shechem - Shechem became one of the Cities of refuge, the central city of refuge for Western Palestine (Joshua 20:7 ), and here the bones of Joseph were buried (24:32). This city is mentioned in connection with our Lord's conversation with the woman of Samaria (John 4:5 ); and thus, remaining as it does to the present day, it is one of the oldest Cities of the world
Debir (1) - " They are the 31 royal Cities; these divide the country into districts which have natural boundaries, and contain severally one or more of the royal Cities
Uzzia(h) - Uzziah mounted a successful campaign against the Philistines, destroying the walls of some of their chief Cities, Gath, Jabneh, and Ashdod. To secure the caravan route along the Mediterranean coast (Via Maris), Uzziah built Cities, perhaps military outposts, in the vicinity of Ashdod and at other sites on the Philistine plain (2 Chronicles 26:6 )
Hiram - " Hiram gave Solomon for the temple cedars and firs, and gold, six score talents, according to all his desire, and Solomon in return gave Hiram 20,000 measures of wheat and 26 measures of pure oil yearly; the mercantile coast Cities being dependent on the grain and olive abounding region of Palestine (Acts 12:20 end). Solomon also gave Hiram 20 Cities in Galilee, which did not satisfy him, and which therefore he called Cabul
Avenger - ...
The human avenger is tied closely to the institutions of Cities of refuge, land ownership, and levirate marriage. Cities of refuge offered people who killed without intention or hatred a place of escape from the avenger of blood (Exodus 21:12-14 ; Numbers 35:6-34 ; Deuteronomy 4:41-43 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-13 ; Joshua 20:1-9 )
Canaan (2) - Their boundaries on this side were partially restricted by the Philistines, who held the low lands and strong Cities along the shore. It is the oldest known record of Canaanite Cities before the time of Joshua
Captivities of Israel - In the year of the world 3264, Tiglath- pileser took several Cities, and carried away captives, principally from the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh, 2 Kings 15:29 . Amos says, "And I will bring again my people Israel from their captivity: they shall build their ruined Cities and inhabit them," &c, Amos 9:14
Hebron - one of the most ancient Cities in the world; for it was built seven years before Zoan, the capital of Lower Egypt, Numbers 13:22 . Now, as the Egyptians gloried much in the antiquity of their Cities, and their country was indeed one of the first that was peopled after the dispersion of Babel, it may be from hence concluded that it was one of the most ancient
Samaria - It must, however, have been rebuilt; for in the time of Alexander Jannæus it was reckoned one of the Cities possessed by the Jews. Thus the sovereigns are called kings of Samaria as well as of Israel, 1 Kings 21:1; 2 Kings 1:1-18; 2 Kings 3:1-27; and we also read of "the Cities of Samaria
Hezeki'ah - (2 Chronicles 29:30,31 ) At the head of a repentant and united people, Hezekiah ventured to assume the aggressive against the Philistines and in a series of victories not only rewon the Cities which his father had lost, (2 Chronicles 28:18 ) but even dispossessed them of their own Cities except Gaza, (2 Kings 18:8 ) and Gath
Cities - By referring to some peculiarities in the building, fortifying, &c, of eastern Cities, we shall the better understand several allusions and expressions of the Old Testament. It is evident that the walls of fortified Cities were sometimes partly constructed of combustible materials; for the Prophet, denouncing the judgments of God upon Syria and other countries, declares, "I will send a fire on the wall of Gaza, which shall devour the palaces thereof," Amos 1:7 . In the Indies, the parts of the night are made known, as well by instruments of music, in great Cities, as by the rounds of the watchmen, who, with cries and small drums, give them notice that a fourth part of the night is past. ...
The fortified Cities in Canaan, as in some other countries, were commonly strengthened with a citadel, to which the inhabitants fled when they found it impossible to defend the place
Antioch - It ranked third, after Rome and Alexandria, in point of importance, of the Cities of the Roman empire
Amalekites - We cannot assign the place of their habitation, except in general it is apparent that they dwelt south of Palestine, between Mount Seir and the border of Egypt; and it does not appear that they possessed many Cities, though one is mentioned in 1 Samuel 15:5
Ramoth-Gilead, Ramoth in Gilead - Ramah, 5 ), was one of the Cities of refuge ( Deuteronomy 4:43 , Joshua 20:8 ), assigned to the Merarite Levites of Gad ( Joshua 21:38 , 1 Chronicles 6:80 )
Chittim - The name Chittim is applied by the Hebrew to Cyprus, of which the Cities, including Citium, its capital, were mostly Phoenician
Jehoshaphat - At first he strengthened himself against Israel, but soon afterward formed an alliance with Israel Jehoshaphat tried to put down the high places and groves in which the people of Judah burned incense, and sent the wisest Levites through the Cities and towns to instruct the people in religion
Guelphs And Ghibellines - The Cities of Italy were divided in their allegiance; Florence and Milan, for instance, being Guelph, while Siena and Pisa were Ghibelline
Galatia - Ancyra (now Angora) was their capital; Tavium and Pessinus were leading Cities
Paradise - Earthly Cities, Nineveh, Babylon, and Thebes, rested on mere force; Athens and Corinth on intellect, art, and refinement, divorced from morality; Tyre on gain; even Jerusalem on religious privileges more than on love, truth, righteousness, and holiness of heart before God
Heal - Even foreign Cities and powers can know God’s “healing” if they repent ( Sheaf - The inhabitants of the neighbouring Cities came together, to be present at the ceremony
Philippi - one of the chief Cities of Macedonia, lying on the north-west of Neapolis, and formerly called Datum or Datos, but afterward taking its name from Philip, the celebrated king of Macedon, by whom it was repaired and beautified
Libya - It was called Pentapolitana Regio by Pliny, from its five chief Cities, Berenice, Arsinoe, Ptolemais, Apollonia, and Cyrene; and Lybia Cyrenaica by Ptolemy, from Cyrene its capital
Brimstone - There is in this a manifest allusion to the overthrow of the Cities of the plain of the Jordan, by showers of ignited sulphur, to which the physical appearances of the country bear witness to this day
Manasseh - He abolished the idols he had worshipped and the diviners he had consulted; accomplished many reforms for the spiritual and material good of his kingdom; repaired the defenses of Jerusalem, enclosing with Ophel on the southeast; and strengthened the walled Cities of Judah
Crete - It is celebrated by Homer for its hundred Cities
Ghibellines, Guelphs And - The Cities of Italy were divided in their allegiance; Florence and Milan, for instance, being Guelph, while Siena and Pisa were Ghibelline
Siivanus, Bishop of Calahorra - His reply was remarkably favourable, in consequence probably of letters from people of rank and property at Calahorra, Tarazona, and neighbouring towns, which alleged in excuse for Silvanus that his were not the only irregularities, bishops having been consecrated for other Cities without the previous approval of the metropolitan
Hittites - Likewise the people of various states and Cities in Syria still called themselves Hittites (Joshua 1:4; 2 Samuel 24:6; 1 Kings 10:29; 1 Kings 11:1; 2 Kings 7:6)
Sennacherib - He accordingly led a very powerful army of at least 200,000 men into Judea, and devastated the land on every side, taking and destroying many Cities (2 Kings 18:13-16 ; Compare Isaiah 222429,24,29 , and 2 Chronicles 32:1-8 ). His own account of this invasion, as given in the Assyrian annals, is in these words: "Because Hezekiah, king of Judah, would not submit to my yoke, I came up against him, and by force of arms and by the might of my power I took forty-six of his strong fenced Cities; and of the smaller towns which were scattered about, I took and plundered a countless number
Midian - Their males and any women that knew man carnally were slain, and their Cities and castles burnt. " Though nomadic as the Bedouins they yet settled in the land of Moab, occupying Sihon's "cities" and "goodly castles," which they did not build (probably the more ancient ones in the Lejah are as old as Sihon and Midian), and retaining beeves, sheep, and asses, but not camels, which are needless and unhealthy in a settled state
Galilee, Sea of - How different it was in the days of our Lord! Then all was life and bustle along the shores; the Cities and villages that thickly studded them resounded with the hum of a busy population; while from hill-side and corn-field came the cheerful cry of shepherd and ploughman. The Cities are in ruins!" ...
This sea is chiefly of interest as associated with the public ministry of our Lord
Sargon - They also remarkably illustrate 2 Kings 17:6, that he placed the deported Israelites (in Halah, Habor, the river of Gozan, and at a later time) "in the Cities of the Medes"; for Sargon in them states he overran Media and "annexed many Median towns to Assyria. He built Cities in Media, which he peopled with captives from a distance
Negeb, - Later the land was allotted to Simeon, and its Cities are enumerated ( Joshua 19:1-9 ); later they reverted to Judah ( Joshua 15:21-32 ). Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 13:19 ) prophesied trouble as coming on the Cities of this region, but on the return from captivity they too were to participate in the blessings ( Jeremiah 32:44 , Jeremiah 33:13 )
Rhegium - For a time it held its own among the leading Cities of Magna Graecia, but in revenge for a slighted Offer of friendship it was totally destroyed by Dionysius, the tyrant of Syracuse (387 b. ’ Strabo, in the beginning of our era, speaks of it as ‘tolerably well peopled,’ and as one of three Cities founded by the Greeks in Italy-the others were Neapolis and Tarentum-that had not become barbarian, i
Pithom - One of the Cities which the children of Israel built for Pharaoh during their captivity in Egypt. "And they built for Pharaoh treasure Cities, Pithom and Ramases
Vine - ...
Deuteronomy 32:32 (a) The vine in this case refers to the wicked Cities of Sodom and Gomorrah. GOD is telling us that Israel had become so corrupt that they were more like those two wicked Cities than like His city, and their works were as evil as those of Sodom
War - Cities outside Palestine were to be offered terms of surrender before being attacked. Cities and peoples within the Promised Land were to be utterly wiped out
Mountain Range - ...
Har signifies inhabitable sites situated on hills and/or mountainsides: “And at that time came Joshua, and cut off the Anakim from the mountains, from Hebron, from Debir, from Anab, and from all the mountains of Judah, and from all the mountains of Israel: Joshua destroyed them utterly with their Cities” ( Cities in the mountains, nor unto whatsoever the Lord our God forbade us
Find - David told Abishai: “… Take thou thy lord’s servants, and pursue after him, lest he get him fenced Cities, and escape us” ( Cities
zi'Don, - From a biblical point of view this city is inferior in interest to its neighbor Tyre; though in early times Sidon was the more influential of the two Cities. (Jeremiah 25:22 ; 27:3 ) During the Persian domination Zidon seems to have attained its highest point of prosperity; and it is recorded that, toward the close of that period, it far excelled all other Phoenician Cities in wealth and importance
Phoenicia - He did not, however, deprive of autonomy the ancient Cities of Tyre and Sidon, or the recently founded Tripolis. It should not be forgotten that many Phcenicians had come to Galilee to hear Christ Himself (Mark 3:8), that He returned their visit by going into ‘the borders of Tyre and Sidon’ (Mark 7:24), and that He expressed the conviction that the people of this country could have been more easily moved to repentance than those of the most highly favoured Cities of His native land (Matthew 11:21)
Nimrod - The fourfold group of Cities which Nimrod founded in Babylonia answer to the fourfold group in Assyria. So Κiprit Αrba , "king of the four races," is an early title of the first monarchs of Babylon; Chedorlaomer appears at the head of four peoples; "king of the four regions" occurs in Nineveh inscriptions too; after Sargon's days four Cities had the pre-eminence (Rawlinson, 1:435, 438,4 47). ), son of Ismi Dagon king of Babylon, founded a temple at Kileh Shergat (Asshur); so that the Scripture account of Babylon originating the Assyrian Cities long before the Assyrian empire of the 13th century B
Damascus, Damascenes - While Tadmor and Palmyra, Baalbek and Jerash, have only a ‘glory hovering round decay,’ Damascus is still ‘the head of Syria,’ the queen of Oriental Cities. Damascus was the first of the ‘foreign Cities’ (Acts 26:11) from which the Jewish authorities resolved to root out the Nazarene heresy. Paul and his Cities, 1913, p
Chief, Chiefest, Chiefly - ...
B — 9: Ἀσιάρχης (Strong's #775 — Noun Masculine — asiarches — as-ee-ar'-khace ) "an Asiarch," was one of certain officers elected by various Cities in the province of Asia, whose function consisted in celebrating, partly at their own expense, the public games and festivals; in Acts 19:31 , RV, the word is translated "chief officers of Asia" (AV, "chief of Asia"). Ramsay, that they were "the high priests of the temples of the Imperial worship in various Cities of Asia;" further, that "the Council of the Asiarchs sat at stated periods in the great Cities alternately
Sennacherib - Hezekiah king of Judah having shaken off the yoke of the Assyrians, by which Ahaz his father had suffered under Tigloth-pileser, Sennacherib marched an army against him, and took all the strong Cities of Judah. Crossing the upper part of Mount Lebanon, he appears to have conquered Tyre and all the Cities south of it on the seacoast to Askelon. The inscription then proceeds to say, "Hezekiah king of Judah, who had not submitted to my authority, forty-six of his principal Cities, and fortresses and villages dependant upon them, of which I took no account, I captured, and carried away their spoil
Philadelphia - E to the Cities of the Lycus Valley. , ‘twelve populous Cities of Asia fell in ruins from an earthquake which happened by night, and therefore the more sudden and destructive was the calamity. Philadelphia was one of the twelve shattered Cities
Herod the Great - He was fond of splendour, and lavished great sums in rebuilding and adorning the Cities of his empire
Building - The Cities of the plain of Shinar were founded by the descendants of Shem (10:11,12,22)
Joppa - It bears the modern name of Jaffa, and exibituds all the decrepitude and squalor of Cities ruled over by the Turks
Rama - ...
...
One of the "fenced Cities" of Naphtali (Joshua 19:36 ), on a mountain slope, about seven and a half miles west-south-west of Safed, and 15 miles west of the north end of the Sea of Galilee, the present large and well-built village of Rameh
Speech - Lycaonia was a large country in the center and south of the plateau of Asia Minor; the villages retained the native language, but Cities like Lystra probably had a Seleucid tone in their laws and customs (Ramsay on Galatians)
Rabbah - The city was given up to plunder, and the people were ruthlessly put to death, and "thus did he with all the Cities of the children of Ammon
Nimrod - as the first of the ‘heroes,’ ‘a mighty hunter before the Lord,’ the ruler of four ancient Babylonian Cities, and the founder of the Assyrian Empire
Succession Uninterrupted - ) Contested elections, in almost all considerable Cities, make it very dubious which were the true bishops; and decrees of councils, rendering all those ordinations null where any sinoniacal contract, was the foundation of them, makes it impossible to prove that there is now upon earth any one person who is a legal successor of the apostles; at least according to the principles of the Romish church
Rameses - Aahmes I built Cities in the Delta, especially on the eastern quarter from whence the invading shepherds had come, and was likely as restorer of the sun (Ra ) worship to have given the name Rama to the treasure city which Israel fortified there, as he gave it also to his son
Azekah - The tribe of Judah occupied it in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:30 ), after it had been one of the last Cities to fall to Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon in 588 B
Diet - An assembly of the states or circles of the empire of Germany and of Poland a convention of princes, electors, ecclesiastical dignitaries, and representatives of free Cities, to deliberate on the affairs of the empire
Money Changers - In New Testament times regions and Cities issued their own money
Bound - Bound is applied to kingdoms, states,cities, towns, tracts of land, and to territorial jurisdiction
Abel-Beth-Maacha - Probably Abel lay in the Ard el Huleh, the marshy land which the sea of Merom drains; perhaps at Abil (Robinson, 3:372), a village on the top of a little conical hill (Porter, Giant Cities of Bashan)
Abilene - ; Porter, Giant Cities of Bashan, 352 I
Sodom - ...
Abraham could see the smoke of the burning Cities from near Hebron
Hamath - A city on the Orontes, the capital of the kingdom of Hamath, to the territory of which the border of Israel extended in the reign of Solomon ( 1 Kings 8:65 ), who is related to have built store-cities there ( 2 Chronicles 8:4 )
Sharon - It is not said that the Gadites possessed Cities in Sharon but only pastures of Sharon; these the Gadites sought for their herds as far as the Mediterranean coast
Amorites - ...
When Israel approached the promised land, they were in the east, and refused to let Israel pass; but they were overcome, their Cities taken, and the people slain, with Sihon their king
Midian, Midianites - Moses was told to make war with them, and we read that the Israelites slew all the males, burnt all their Cities and goodly castles, and afterwards put the women to death; on which occasion Balaam also was slain
Capernaum - It was joined with Chorazin and Bethsaida, in the fearful prediction of our Lord, the ruin of the Cities giving a striking fulfillment of it
Bashan - Bashan is almost literally crowded with Cities and villages, now in ruins, some supposed to date back to Joshua's conquest, corroborating the account in Scripture
Benbadad - When he succeeded to the throne, Jehoash recovered the Cities which Jehoahaz had lost to the Syrians, and beat him in Aphek
Sennacherib - "Sennacherib came up against all the fenced Cities of Judah, and took them
Smyrna - It was one of the richest and most powerful Cities of that region, and was frequented by great numbers of Jews
Type - Thus Adam and Melchizedek, the prophetic and the priestly office, manna and the brazen serpent, the smitten rock and the passage over Jordan, the Passover and the Day of Atonement, Canaan and the Cities of refuge are scriptural types of Christ
Egypt - The truth is, that this pretended succession of princes, if all of them can be supposed to have existed at all, constituted several distinct dynasties, ruling in different Cities at the same time; thus these were the kingdoms of Thebes, Thin, Memphis, and Tanis. The architecture of the early Egyptians, at least that of their Cities and dwellings, was rude and simple: they could indeed boast of little in either external elegance or internal comfort, since Herodotus informs us that men and beasts lived together. Such were the bricks which the Israelites were employed in making, and of which the Cities of Pithom and Rameses were built. Their composition was necessarily perishable, and explains why it is that no remains of the ancient Cities of Egypt are to be found. They would indeed last longer in the dry climate of this country than in any other; but even here they must gradually decay and crumble to dust, and the Cities so constructed become heaps. ' And the expression in Job 15:28 , might be illustrated by many of these deserted hovels: ‘He dwelleth in desolate Cities, and in houses which no man inhabiteth, which are ready to become heaps. They were, in fact, engaged exactly as the Israelites used to be, making bricks with straw; and for a similar purpose, to build extensive granaries for the bashaw; "treasure-cities for Pharaoh. So great, indeed, was the hatred of the Egyptians toward their oppressors, that they hailed the approach of the Macedonians, and threw open their Cities to receive them. Kindness shown to the people of Israel has never, in the providence of God, brought evil on any country; and there can be no doubt but that the encouragement given to this enterprising and commercial people, assisted very much to promote the interests of the new city, which soon became the capital of the kingdom, the centre of commerce, of science, and the arts, and one of the most flourishing and considerable Cities in the world. The pride of her power shall come down; and they shall be desolate in the midst of the countries that are desolate; and her Cities shall be in the midst of the Cities that are wasted. Egypt is surrounded by the dominions of the Turks and of the Arabs; and the prophecy is literally true which marked it in the midst of desolation: "They shall be desolate in the midst of the countries that are desolate, and her Cities shall be in the midst of the Cities that are wasted
Greece - ’ While the new order reinforced the old Hellenic elements in Asia Minor, it brought into being a vast number of Greek Cities-the conqueror himself is said to have founded seventy-in lands hitherto barbarian. There was a province of Achaia, but never of Hellas, Such Cities as Athena and Sparta were spared the humiliation of being placed under the fasces of a Roman governor and having to pay tribute to Rome. New Corinth, Caesar’s Roman colony, the least Hellenic of the Cities of Greece, became the seat of government. Many of its Cities fell into decay, vast tracts of arable land were turned into pasture or reverted to the state of Nature, and ‘Greece remained desolate for all time to come’ (Mommsen, op. The life of studious ease was to be enjoyed in the Cities of Greece as nowhere else, and Plutarch cheerfully turned back from the vulgar splendour of Imperial Rome to the quiet refinement of his native Chaeroneia. Christianity was preached in some of the leading Cities of Greece soon after the middle of the 1st cent. References to Athenians and Spartans occur in 1 Maccabees 12-14, 2 Maccabees 6:1; 2 Maccabees 9:15; a long list of Greek Cities is found in 1 Maccabees 15:23; and, according to 1 Maccabees 12:6, Jonathan the Hasmonaean greeted the Spartans as brethren and sought an alliance with them against Syria
Ammonites - On this occasion the Ammonites lost twenty Cities; and thus an end was put, after eighteen years' bondage, to the tyranny of Ammon over the Israelites beyond Jordan. Rabbah, the capital of Hanun, and the other Cities of Ammon, which resisted the progress of the conqueror, were destroyed and razed to the ground; and the inhabitants were put to death or reduced to servitude. 740, the Ammonites and Moabites took possession of the Cities belonging to these tribes, and were reproached for it by Jeremiah 49:1 . Ammon was, however, a highly productive and populous country when the Romans became masters of all the provinces of Syria; and several of the ten allied Cities, which gave name to the celebrated Decapolis, were included within its boundaries. Even when first invaded by the Saracens, this country, including Moab, was enriched by the various benefits of trade, covered with a line of forts, and possessed some strong and populous Cities. ) "At every step are to be found the vestiges of ancient Cities, the remains of many temples, public edifices, and Greek churches. ) The Cities are left desolate
Blood - The Mosaic law mitigated the severity of the law of private revenge for blood, by providing six Cities of refuge (among the 48 Levitical Cities), three on one side of Jordan, three on the other, for the involuntary homicide to flee into. ...
If the latter reached one of the six Cities, (Kedesh in Naphtali, Shechem in mount Ephraim, Hebron in the hill country of Judah, W. , were in the Cities
Tarsus - Paul, is a place about which much more might be known than is known if only the necessary money were forthcoming to excavate the ancient city in the way that Pompeii, Olympia, Pergamum, and other Cities have been excavated. In Roman times the combined Cities of Tarsus contained a large population, probably not much less than a million. ...
The history of the Maritime Plain of Cillcia was determined by the mutual rivalries of the three Cities, Mallus on the Pyramus, Adana on the Sarus, and Tarsus on the Cydnus. The site of Mallus is now unknown, as it has ceased to have any importance; but the other two Cities retain their names and some of their importance to the present day. Not only Tarsus, but a number of other Cilician Cities also were re-organized at this time, but Tarsus received the most honourable treatment. Tarsus was the capital even of the large province Cilicia, and remained that of the smaller under the Empire, which brought many blessings to the provinces and their Cities
Philistim - After the persecution of Antiochus Epiphanes, the Asmoneans took by degrees several Cities from the country of the Philistines, which they subjected. The country to the north of Gaza is very fertile; and, long after the Christian era, it possessed a very numerous population, and strongly fortified Cities. But its aspect presents some existing peculiarities, which travellers fail not to particularize, and which, in reference both to the state of the country and the fate of its different Cities, the prophets failed not to discriminate as justly as if their description had been drawn both with all the accuracy which ocular observation, and all the certainty which authenticated history, could give. ' When the prophecy was uttered, both Cities were in an equally flourishing condition; and nothing but the prescience of Heaven could pronounce on which of the two, and in what manner, the vial of its wrath should be poured out. " There is yet another city which was noted by the prophets, the very want of any information respecting which, and the absence of its name from several modern maps of Palestine, while the sites of other ruined Cities are marked, are really the best confirmation of the truth of the prophecy that could possibly be given. It was one of the chief Cities of the Philistines; but, though Gaza still subsists, and while Ashkelon and Ashdod retain their names in their ruins, the very name of Ekron is missing
Frederick ii - His desire of reestablishing the imperial power in northern Italy was opposed by a league of the Italian Cities and also by the Holy See, as it endangered the liberties of the Papal States
Jehoram - It is probable that the Moabites assumed the offensive, and took the Israelite Cities of whose capture Mesha boasts
Mortar And Pestle - in Bliss, Mound of Many Cities , 85; Bliss and Macalister, Excavations in Palestine , Plates 72, 73)
Soco, Socoh - A fortified town in the Shephçlah of Judah, mentioned in Joshua 15:35 along with Adullam and Azekah; the Philistines ( 1 Samuel 17:1 ) ‘pitched between Socoh and Azekah’: Ben-hesed, one of Solomon’s twelve officers, had charge of it ( 1 Kings 4:10 ); it was re-fortified by Rehoboam ( 2 Chronicles 11:7 ); during the reign of Ahaz it was taken, along with other prominent fortress Cities of the Shephçlah, by the Philistines
Tent - The same may be said of the forefathers of the Hebrew race; nor was it until the return into Canaan from Egypt that the Hebrews became inhabitants of Cities
Hazor - When Tiglath-pileser, the Assyrian king, invaded the land, this was one of the first Cities he captured, carrying its inhabitants captive into Assyria (2 Kings 15:29 )
Megiddo - Place of troops, originally one of the royal Cities of the Canaanites (Joshua 12:21 ), belonged to the tribe of Manasseh (Judges 1:27 ), but does not seem to have been fully occupied by the Israelites till the time of Solomon (1 Kings 4:12 ; 9:15 )
Tattlers - In the land of gossips this propensity had invaded the Church, and threatened to become (as we can well believe) troublesome to good order, as well as hurtful to the grave and restrained life which was imperative on Christian women in the relaxed moral conditions of the Cities of the Empire
ir-ha-Heres - "Five Cities shall speak the language of Canaan, and swear to the Lord of hosts
Merari - Joshua assigned them 12, Cities out of Reuben, Gad, and Zebulun (Joshua 21:7; Joshua 21:34-40)
Ahab - In the first two, which were defensive, he gained a complete victory over Ben-hadad, who fell into his hands, and was afterwards released on the condition of his restoring all the Cities of Israel he then held, and granting certain other concessions to Ahab
Debir -
One of the eleven Cities to the west of Hebron, in the highlands of Judah (Joshua 15:49 ; Judges 1:11-15 )
Ekron - (ehk' rahn) Ekron is the northernmost of the five major Philistine Cities known as the pentapolis
Taanach - ...
In the Bible, Taanach is only mentioned seven times, usually in lists such as tribal allotments (Joshua 17:11 ; 1 Chronicles 7:29 ), administrative districts (1 Kings 4:12 ), Levitical towns (Joshua 21:25 ), or conquered Cities (Joshua 12:21 ; Judges 1:27 )
Wilderness of the Wandering, - These returned with such a report of the inhabitants and their walled Cities that the people were discouraged, and began to murmur and rebel
Sama'Ria, Country of - Samaria (the city) and a few adjacent Cities or villages only represented that dominion which had once extended from Bethel to Dan northward, and from the Mediterranean to the borders of Syria and Ammon eastward
Accad - It was one of the Cities of Nimrod's kingdom (Genesis 10:10 )
Jabesh (1) - Chief of Gilead's Cities
Jaazer - of Heshbon; a castle and a large walled pool, the "sea" of Jeremiah 48:32; but Septuagint reads "the Cities of Jaazer"
Brimstone - The account of the destruction of the Cities of the Plain ( Genesis 19:24 ; Genesis 19:28 , Luke 17:29 ) states that the Lord rained upon them ‘brimstone and fire from the Lord out of heaven,’ and the most generally accepted view is that the disaster was due to an eruption of petroleum, caused by an earthquake
Laodicea - It was no doubt one of the Cities which received the ‘Epistle to the Ephesians’ ( Colossians 4:16 ), as well as the Epistle to the Colossians ( Colossians 4:16 )
Manner - The nations which thou hast removed and placed in the Cities of Samaria, know not the manner of the god of the land--2 Kings 7
Cloud - It may be figurative indicating that there will be a group or a "cloud" caught up from the different communities, Cities, and cemeteries, there being so many that they will resemble clouds
Sea - There was no river of any consequence belonging to it but the sacred river Jordan, so that Jerusalem had not, as most Cities, a garrison, or rocks, or water, to defend it, neither of maritime resources to open commerce and trade with other powers
Benhadad - Because of Israel's sin, God delivered them into the hands of this king; but eventually Ben-hadad was defeated three times and the Cities of Israel were recovered
Heaven - Jeremiah 9; Job 35 Their Cities are walled to heaven
Misanthropist - He is a man, who talks of nothing but banishing and executing, and who, because he thinks his talents are not sufficiently valued and employed by his fellow- citizens, or rather because they know his foibles, and do not choose to be subject to his caprice, talks of quitting Cities, towns, and societies, and of living in dens or deserts
England, John - His eloquence made him a popular lecturer in the great Cities of the country and in 1826 he was invited to address Congress
Aqueducts - were troughs cut out of rock or soil or pipes made of stone, leather, or bronze that were used from very early times in the Middle East to transport water from distant places into towns and Cities
Sister - 3:7) and two Cities (Sodom and Samaria; Lachish - The ruins of as many as eight Cities have been discovered, which are judged by the marks on the pottery, etc
Medes, Media - ...
The first mention of them is when Shalmaneser took Samaria and carried away the Israelites, placing some of them 'in the Cities of the Medes
Murder - Cities of refuge were appointed for involuntary manslaughter, whither the slayer might retire and continue in safety till the death of the high priest, Numbers 35:28
Nethinims - After the return from the captivity, they dwelt in the Cities appointed them, Ezra 2:17
Philip - He preached the gospel in the Cities on the coast, from Ashdod to Caesarea, where at a later period Paul and his companions were his guests for "many days," Acts 21:8-16
Tiberias - " South of the town are numerous remains of the ancient city or Cities extending for a mile and a half, nearly to the hot springs
Bethlehem - It was fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:6 , but was comparatively an unimportant place, Micah 5:1 , and is not mentioned by Joshua or Nehemiah among the Cities of Judah
Tarsus - It was the privilege of such Cities that they were governed by their own laws and magistrates, and were not subjected to tribute, to the jurisdiction of a Roman governor, nor to the power of a Roman garrison, although they acknowledged the supremacy of the Roman people, and were bound to aid them against their enemies
Rab'Bah - It was one of the Cities of the Decapolis, and became the seat of a Christian bishop
Rhodes - There are two Cities --Rhodes the capital and Lindus --and forty or fifty villages
Gadarenes', Girgesenes', Gerasenes' - "It became one of the proudest Cities of Syria
Burial, Sepulchres - (1 Kings 2:10 ; 16:6,28 ) Cities soon became populous and demanded cemeteries, (Ezekiel 39:15 ) which were placed without the walls
Bashan - This Bashan region included within it sixty Cities, the most important of which were Edrei, Ashtaroth and Golan (Deuteronomy 3:4; Joshua 12:4-5; Joshua 21:27)
Judea - Jeremiah's prophecy (Jeremiah 34:22) is fulfilled; "the Cities of Judaea" are "a desolation without inhabitant," the vine-clad terraces and grainfields have only left their traces behind, ruins alone abound, and the scenery has but little beauty
Hebron - Hebron, in the centre of this territory, became one of the three Cities of refuge established west of Jordan (Joshua 20:7-9; Joshua 21:9-13)
Damascus - One of the world’s most ancient Cities, Damascus has existed from at least the time of Abraham (Genesis 14:15)
Cyprus - Among the most important Cities were Salamis and Kition. Tyre and Sidon were the center of Phoenician trade, and the Old Testament underscores the connection between these Cities and Cyprus in several passages (Isaiah 23:1-2 , Isaiah 23:12 ; Ezekiel 27:4-9 )
Rabbah - Only Cities situated like Tyre, which was partly surrounded by water, could withstand the might of that monarch. The latter form a more energetic element than is found in most Syrian Cities, and give ‘Ammân a greater air of prosperity
Rechab - RECHABITES, the dwellers in Cities, are distinguished from the nomadic wanderers (Genesis 4:20-22); and the distinction still exists in Persia and Arabia, where the two classes are found side by side. The ascetic rule against wine, houses, sowing, and planting (Jeremiah 35), was a safeguard against the corrupting license of the Phoenician Cities and their idolatries (Amos 2:7-8; Amos 6:3-6)
Nineveh - ”...
Biblical References Nineveh is first mentioned in the Old Testament as one of the Cities established by Nimrod (Genesis 10:9-12 ). ” The rooms were embellished with 9,880 feet of sculptured reliefs, depicting Assyrian victories over enemy Cities, including the Judean city of Lachish, captured in 701 B
Solomon - Solomon fortified a number of Cities that helped provide protection to Jerusalem, built “store-cities” for stockpiling the materials required in his kingdom, and established military bases for contingents of charioteers (1 Kings 9:15-19 )
on (2) - In Isaiah 19:18, "five Cities in Egypt shall speak the language of Canaan, and swear to the Lord of hosts; one shall be called the 'city of destruction' " (Ηa-Ηeres ). The Septuagint adds On to the Cities which Israel built, i
Ashdod - (assh' dahd) One of five principal Cities of the Philistines, where the Philistines defeated Israel and captured the ark of the covenant. As one of the five chief Cities of the Philistines it stood yet to be possessed by Joshua (Joshua 13:3 ), who allocated it to the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:46-7 )
Caesarea - The Arab and the shepherd avoid the spot’ (Giant Cities, 235). Porter, The Giant Cities of Bashan, 1873, p
mo'ab - Falling back into their own country, they were followed and their Cities and farms destroyed. Over the whole region are scattered many ruins of ancient Cities; and while the country is almost bare of larger vegetation, it is still a rich pasture-ground, with occasional fields of grain
Galilee - In the OT history the tribal designations are generally used when subdivisions of the country are denoted; this is no doubt the reason why the name ‘Galilee,’ which is not a tribal name, occurs so rarely in the Hebrew Scriptures though the passage in Isaiah already quoted, as well as the references to Kedesh and other Cities ‘in Galilee’ ( Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 , 1 Kings 9:11 , 2 Kings 15:29 , 1 Chronicles 6:76 ), show that the name was familiar and employed upon occasion. The only ancient remains of Jewish synagogues are to be seen among the ruins of Galilæan Cities. Besides these there was the cultivated European class the inhabitants of the Greek Cities that surrounded the Sea of Tiberias, and the military representatives of the dominant power of Rome
Philistia - (Joshua 15:4; Joshua 15:47), a confederacy of the five Cities (originally Canaanite) Gaza (the leading one), Ashdod, Ashkelon, Gath, and Ekron (always put last). Uzziah inflicted a decisive blow on them, dismantling their Cities Gath, Ashdod, and Jahneh, and building commanding forts in their land (2 Chronicles 26:6; Amos 6:2). ...
But under the weak Ahaz the Philistines recovered, and invaded the Cities of the low country and S. 4:603) term Gaza and Ashkelon "Egyptian Cities. After the Babylonian captivity (Ezekiel 25:15-17) the Philistines vented their "old hatred" on the Jews, for which God as He foretold "executed vengeance on them with furious rebukes, and destroyed the remnant," namely, by Psammetichus, Necho (Jeremiah 25:20), and Nebuchadnezzar who overran their Cities on his way to Egypt (Jeremiah 47), and finally by Alexander the Great, as foretold (Zechariah 9:5-6, "the king shall perish from Gaza"; Alexander bound Betis the satrap to his chariot by thongs thrust through his feet, and dragged round the city; the conqueror slew 10,000, and sold the rest as slaves: Zephaniah 2:4-5)
Edom - "I have sworn by myself, saith the Lord, that Bozrah" (the strong or fortified city) "shall become a desolation, a reproach, a waste, and a curse; and all the Cities thereof shall be perpetual wastes. As in the overthrow of Sodom and Gomorrah, and the neighbour Cities thereof, saith the Lord, no man shall abide there, neither shall a son of man dwell in it,"...
Jeremiah 49:13-18 . We know that as far back as the time of Solomon, the Cities of Astioum Gaber (Ezion Geber) and Ailah (Eloth) were highly frequented marts. That the Idumeans were a populous and powerful nation long posterior to the delivery of the prophecies; that they possessed a tolerably good government, even in the estimation of Volney; that Idumea contained many Cities; and these Cities are now absolutely deserted; and that their ruins swarm with enormous scorpions; that it was a commercial nation, and possessed highly frequented marts; that it forms a shorter route than the ordinary one to India; and yet that it had not been visited by any traveller; are facts all recorded, and proved by this able but unconscious commentator. But such is Edom's desolation, that the first sentiment of astonishment on the contemplation of it is, how a wide extended region, now diversified by the strongest features of desert wildness, could ever have been adorned with Cities, or tenanted for ages by a powerful and opulent people. Its present aspect would belie its ancient history, were not that history corroborated by "the many vestiges of former cultivation," by the remains of walls and paved roads, and by the ruins of Cities still existing in this ruined country. The total cessation of its commerce; the artificial irrigation of its valleys wholly neglected; the destruction of all the Cities, and the continued spoliation of the country by the Arabs, while aught remained that they could destroy; the permanent exposure, for ages, of the soil unsheltered by its ancient groves, and unprotected by any covering from the scorching rays of the sun; the unobstructed encroachments of the desert, and of the drifted sands from the borders of the Red Sea; the consequent absorption of the water of the springs and streamlets during summer,—are causes which have all combined their baneful operation in rendering Edom "most desolate, the desolation of desolations. '" In the interior of Idumea, where the ruins of some of its ancient Cities are still visible, and in the extensive valley which reaches from the Red to the Dead Sea, the appearance of which must now be totally and sadly changed from what it was, "the whole plain presented to the view an expanse of shifting sands, whose surface was broken by innumerable undulations and low hills
Greece - Colonies provided the basis for trade; and trade, in turn, encouraged the growth of Cities since the economy was not tied to agriculture. Some of his most fruitful work was done in Greek Cities. At least five New Testament books are written to churches in Greek Cities (Philippians, 1,2Thessalonians, 1,2Corinthians)
Zebulun - There is no name corresponding to Elon in this passage, but the names of seven of the twelve Cities spoken of have been lost. Of the five Cities mentioned in Deuteronomy 19:15 Bethlehem is the only one whose site is identified with certainty. The modern Ma‘lul may represent Nahalal, one of the four Cities which, according to Joshua 21:34 f
Tiberias - Our Lord, so far as is known, never visited Tiberias, it being His custom to avoid Gentile Cities. Nevertheless the town grew with great rapidity, and, before the downfall of Jerusalem had become one of the chief Cities of Palestine. At present it is one of the four sacred Cities of the Jews in Palestine, the others being Jerusalem, Hebron, and Safed
City of Refuge - Scattered throughout the tribes of Israel were forty-eight Cities given to the Levites. Among these were six Cities known as Cities of refuge (Numbers 35:6-7)
Ebla - , during the reign of Naram-Sin of Akkad, who boasted in his military annals of capturing Armanum and Ebla, Cities in the west that never before had been captured. The Cities directly dependent upon Ebla were ruled by a king who was “son of a king” or a “judge. ” Foreign Cities under military control, such as Mari, were ruled by an Eblaite dignitary as king. Independent Cities related to Ebla either by treaty (for example, Asshur and Hama) or the payment of tribute, (for example, Akkad and Kanish) were independently ruled by local kings. ...
The historical and historical-juridical texts include royal ordinances, edicts, letters by state officials, lists of Cities in subjection to Ebla, state marriages, and international treaties including an agreement between Ebla and Asshur concerning the statutes of a commercial city
Ebla - , during the reign of Naram-Sin of Akkad, who boasted in his military annals of capturing Armanum and Ebla, Cities in the west that never before had been captured. The Cities directly dependent upon Ebla were ruled by a king who was “son of a king” or a “judge. ” Foreign Cities under military control, such as Mari, were ruled by an Eblaite dignitary as king. Independent Cities related to Ebla either by treaty (for example, Asshur and Hama) or the payment of tribute, (for example, Akkad and Kanish) were independently ruled by local kings. ...
The historical and historical-juridical texts include royal ordinances, edicts, letters by state officials, lists of Cities in subjection to Ebla, state marriages, and international treaties including an agreement between Ebla and Asshur concerning the statutes of a commercial city
Riblah - From this position the Phœnician Cities of the coast were within easy command, as also were Cœle-Syria and the kingdom of Damascus, along with the land-routes leading farther south
Heavenly City, the - To the ancient world Cities represented ordered life, security from enemies, and material prosperity
Castile - By his grant of charters to many Cities he won the title El de Los Fueros (He of the Rights)
Epistles - These are not arranged in the New Testament in the order of time as to their composition, but rather according to the rank of the Cities or places to which they were sent
Aretas - " His office was to exercise authority under the king, over the many Jews in large Cities: compare Acts 9:25
Day by Day (2) - Petersburg, and Canton, let him buy what he needs at these places! He will find at each of them, and all the other Cities which he visits, whatever things he requires
Hittites - Smith has just discovered their capital lying about half way between the mighty Cities of the Euphrates valley and those of the Nile
Philippi - ) It was named after Philip of Macedon (the father of Alexander the Great), who conquered it about 356 BC and made it into one of his strategic Cities
Geba - Some citizens of Geba lived in Michmash and other Cities in Nehemiah's day, unless the Hebrew text is read differently (REB) to mean they lived in Geba as well as the other towns (Nehemiah 11:31 )
Macedonia - 359) they played a minor part as allies of various Greek Cities having interests in the N
Schools - Beyond the schools for popular education there were higher schools or colleges scattered throughout the Cities where the Jews abounded
Trachonitis - 268–272, Giant Cities of Bashan, 24–97: Graham in Jour
Memphis - Kings and dynasties might make their principal residences in the Cities from which they sprang, but until Alexandria was founded as the capital of the Greek dynasty, no Egyptian city, except Thebes, under the New Kingdom equalled Memphis in size and importance
Kinsman - See Avenger ; Cities of Refuge ; Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer
Bashan - Its principal Cities were Ashtaroth (or Beeshterah) given to the Levites, Golan a 'city of refuge,' Edrei, and Salcah on its border
Council - Thus in Connecticut, the Cities are incorporated by the name of the The Mayor, Aldermen, Common-Council and Freemen, of the city of Hartford, New-Haven, &c
Caesarea - It was adorned with many buildings of great splendour, after the manner of the Roman Cities of the West
Band - The forces in Palestine seem to have been originally Herod’s troops, taken over by the Romans; they were recruited in the Greek Cities in or around the country, such as Caesarea, Ascalon, Sebaste
Destroy - 12:10), Cities ( Dancing - Thus, it will be recollected, "the women came out of all the Cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet King Saul, with tabrets, with joy, and with instruments of music," when he returned in triumph from the slaughter of the Philistines
Proseuchae - They make them to differ in situation; synagogues being in towns and Cities, proseuchae in the fields, and frequently by the river side
Cilicia - One of its important Cities was Tarsus, the birthplace of Paul the apostle (Acts 21:39 ; Acts 22:3 )
Sidon - Our Savior refers to both Cities, in reproaching the Jews as more highly favored and less excusable than they, Matthew 11:22
Blindness - In the Cities of Egypt, blindness is perpetuated as a contagious disease by the filthy habits of the natives
ra'Mah -
One of the Cities of the allotment of Benjamin
he'Bron - Hebron is one of the most ancient Cities in the world still existing; and in this respect it is the rival of Damascus
Laodice'a - But the preaching of the gospel at Ephesus, ( Acts 18:19 ; Acts 19:41 ) must inevitably have resulted in the formation of churches in the neighboring Cities, especially where Jews were settled; and there were Jews in Laodicea
ze'Rah - So complete was the overthrow that the Hebrews could capture and spoil the Cities around Gerah which must have been in alliance with Zerah
ga'za - (the fortified; the strong ) (properly Azzah ), one of the five chief Cities of the Philistines
Chariot, - They were first introduced by David, (2 Samuel 8:4 ) who raised and maintained a force of 1400 chariots, (1 Kings 10:25 ) by taxation on certain Cities agreeably to eastern custom in such matters
Adullam - One of the royal Cities of Canaan, afterwards part of Judah's lot
Band - The forces in Palestine seem to have been originally Herod’s troops, taken over by the Romans; they were recruited in the Greek Cities in or around the country, such as Caesarea, Ascalon, Sebaste
Joppa - it is one of the oldest Cities in the world
Valentinianus Iii - 63, 64) were issued for the other Cities of Italy and for Africa in 425, and also edicts (lib
Gath - (gath) Gath was one of the five Cities that comprised the Philistine city-state system (1 Samuel 6:17 ). In other words, Ekron, Ashdod, Ashkelon, and Gaza were, in a sense, satellite Cities of Gath
Thebes - " But both Cities date from our earliest authentic knowledge of Egyptian history. Though he saw the city when it had sunk to quite secondary importance, he confirms the tradition of its early grandeur --its circuit of 140 stadia, the size of its public edifices, the magnificence of its temples, the number of its monuments, the dimensions of its private houses, some of them four or five stories high --all giving it an air of grandeur and beauty surpassing not only all other Cities of Egypt, but of the world
Philistines - 1900, for they had then kings and considerable Cities, Genesis 20. Their land, once rich and covered with Cities and towns, is now desolate, Zephaniah 2:4-7
Elam - For many centuries previous, Elam had upon the whole been subordinate to the ruling power of Babylonia, no matter which of the great Cities west of the Tigris happened to be supreme. The splendidly defensible position of the capital contributed greatly to its independence and recuperative power, and thus Susa became a repository of much valuable spoil secured from the Babylonian Cities
Zidon - 877 Zidon, with other Phœnician Cities, submitted to the Assyrian Ashur-nazir-pal and ‘sent him presents. The decline and fall of Assyria brought a period of rest to Phœnicia, and recuperation to her Cities. ...
In the beginning of the Persian period the Phœnician Cities enjoyed practical autonomy, and a time of great material prosperity
Sidon (2) - All the Phœnician Cities seem to have known little but rivalry down to the appearance of such world-powers as Assyria, Babylonia, Persia, Greece, and Rome, which made them all, sooner or later, subject and abject. Some from Sidon were in the multitude that thronged Jesus at the Sea of Galilee (Mark 3:8), and Sidon was pronounced more excusable in the day of judgment than the more favoured Cities of Jesus’ own country and race (Matthew 11:21 f. The coast Cities and their daughter villages, however, remained utterly unconscious of their assignment, while Asher became so assimilated thereto as to retain in Israelitish history little more than a name
Colossae - ...
Colossae was one of three sister Cities which received the gospel about the same time (Colossians 4:13), Laodicea lying about 10 miles farther down the Lycus valley, and facing Hierapolis, which was picturesquely seated on a plateau 6 miles to the north. There is no indication that he ever preached in any of the Cities of the Lycus valley. Ramsay, The Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, London, 1895-97, vol
Philistines - Down to this time Philistine power was concentrated in the hands of the rulers of the five Cities of Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath. The rulers of these Cities are called by a peculiar title, which is translated ‘lords of the Philistines’ (wh. It finally passed under Roman rule, and its Cities had then an important history
Philis'Tines - (Joshua 15:2,12,45-47 ) No portion of it, however, was conquered in the lifetime of Joshua, (Joshua 13:2 ) and even after his death no permanent conquest was effected, (Judges 3:3 ) though we are informed that the three Cities of Gaza, Ashkelon and Ekron were taken. The battle on this occasion proved disastrous to the Israelites; Saul himself perished, and the Philistines penetrated across the Jordan and occupied the, forsaken Cities. --With regard to the institutions of the Philistines our information is very scanty, The five chief Cities had, as early as the days of Joshua, constituted themselves into a confederacy, restricted however, in all probability, to matters of offence and defence
Sea, the Salt, - But it must not he overlooked that the passage in question is the only one in the whole Bible to countenance the notion that the Cities of the plain were submerged; a notion which does not date earlier than the Christian era. [1] The belief which prompted the idea of some modern writers that the Dead Sea was formed by the catastrophe which overthrew the "cities of the plain" is a mere assumption. It is not only unsupported by Scripture, but is directly in the teeth of the evidence of the ground itself of the situation of those Cities, we only know that, being in the "plain of the Jordan, they must have been to the north of the lake. (It is supposed that only the southern bay of the Dead Sea was formed by the submergence of the Cities of the plain, and is still probable
Dead Sea - ...
The water now covering these ruins occupies what was formerly the vale of Siddim; a rich and fruitful valley, in which stood the five Cities, called the Cities of the plain, namely, Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim, and Bela or Zoar: the four first of which were destroyed, while the latter, being "a little city," was preserved at the intercession of Lot; to which he fled for refuge from the impending catastrophe, and where he remained in safety during its accomplishment. " The learned Frenchman inclines to adopt the idea of Professors Michaelis and Busching, that Sodom and Gomorrah were built upon a mine of bitumen; that lightning kindled the combustible mass, and that the Cities sunk in the subterraneous conflagration. Malte Brun ingeniously suggests, that the Cities might themselves have been built of bituminous stones, and thus have been set in flames by the fire of heaven
Priest - Before that time, the firstborn of each family, the fathers, the princes, the kings, were priests in their own Cities and in their own houses. God provided them houses and accommodations, by appointing forty-eight Cities, six were appointed as Cities of refuge for those who had committed casual and involuntary manslaughter. The priests had thirteen of these Cities; the others belonged to the Levites, Joshua 21:10
Jehoshaphat - To remedy the people's ignorance of the book of the law, in the third year of his reign he sent a commission of five princes, nine Levites, and two priests to go through the Cities of Judah, teaching them in it; a model for rulers as to national education (Deuteronomy 11:19-21). Jehoshaphat at first fortified the Cities of Judah and those of Ephraim taken by Asa (2 Chronicles 17:2) to secure himself against Israel. He also set judges in the several Cities, and a supreme court for references and appeals ("controversies") in Jerusalem, made up of Levites, priests, and chief fathers of Israel (the judges in the Cities were probably of the same classes). "He feared, set himself to seek Jehovah, and proclaimed a fast throughout Judah," so that "out of all the Cities they came to ask help of Jehovah
Horse - David's son, Solomon, multiplied their numbers to strengthen the defense of his country, building chariot Cities (1 Kings 9:19 )
Media - ...
The "cities of the Medes" are first mentioned in connection with the deportation of the Israelites on the destruction of Samaria (2 Kings 17:6 ; 18:11 )
Taxing - In the present instance this appears to have been done, not by the usual Roman method of enrolling persons under their place of residence, but by the Jewish method of enumerating them according to the Cities and towns with which their families were originally connected
Ashkelon - One of the five Philistine lords' Cities (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17)
Titus, Letter to - He stayed a while to help the churches through their difficulties, but he wanted to visit other Cities and countries as well
Ammonite - Jephthah waged war against them, and "took twenty Cities with a very great slaughter" (Judges 11:33 )
Lot - As a result, Lot dwelt in the Cities of the plain, making his home in Sodom
Jabbok - ...
Though now it is one vast pasture, the numerous ruins of Cities show how thickly it was once peopled
Dragon - "A habitation of dragons" expresses utter desolation, as venomous snakes abound in ruins of ancient Cities (Deuteronomy 32:33; Jeremiah 49:33; Isaiah 34:13)
Omri - To strengthen his dynasty he allied himself to Benhadad I of Damascus, surrendering Cities as the price of the alliance (1 Kings 20:34), including Ramoth Gilead (1 Kings 22:3)
Sickle - Bliss, A Mound of Many Cities, do
Smoke - The smoke of burning Babylon-Imperial Rome-resembling that of the Cities of the Plain (Genesis 19:28), is seen from afar by the kings of the earth (Revelation 18:9) and all shipmasters and mariners (Revelation 18:17 f
Lycia - Pliny says that in his time the Cities of Lycia, formerly 70 in number, had been reduced to 36 (Historia Naturalis (Pliny) v
Golden Rose - In token of special service or loyalty to the Holy See it has been conferred on churches, Cities, sovereigns, and other distinguished persons, but of recent years it has been reserved to Catholic queens, a sword being regarded as a more suitable gift for emperors, kings, and princes
Akkadian - Their ancient capital Akkad, (Agade), is mentioned in Genesis 10:10 as one of the Cities of Shinar (Mesopotamia)
Gath - Amos refers to it in terms which imply that some great calamity has befallen it ( 2 Chronicles 6:2 ); the later prophets, though they mention other Cities of the Pentapolis, are silent respecting Gath, which seems therefore to have dropped out of existence
Gate - ...
The gates of Cities were of wood cased with iron to strengthen them and prevent them being burnt with fire
Faction - ...
(1) Faction was rampant in the free Cities of Greece
Interim - On the other side, the emperor was so severe against those who refused to accept it, that he disfranchised the Cities of Magedeburg and Constance for their opposition
Philip - On coming out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught away Philip, and he was found at Azotus, and he preached in all the Cities till he came to Caesarea
Burn - 9:52), as were various Cities ( Alexan'Dria, - "For a long period Alexandria was the greatest of known Cities
Media - His successor carried away the remaining seven tribes and a half, to the same places, which are said to be "cities of the Medes, by the river of Gozan," 1 Chronicles 5:26 ; 2 Kings 17:6
Rose, Golden - In token of special service or loyalty to the Holy See it has been conferred on churches, Cities, sovereigns, and other distinguished persons, but of recent years it has been reserved to Catholic queens, a sword being regarded as a more suitable gift for emperors, kings, and princes
Macedonia - Of the Cities of Macedonia proper, there are mentioned in the New Testament, Amphipolis, Apollonia, Berea, Neapolis, Philippi, and Thessalonica
Gaza or Azzah - Judah seems to have held possession of it for a while; but in the time of the judges it was independent, and one of the five chief Cities of the Philistines, Judges 1:18 3:3 13:1 16:1-31
Corinth - Corinth thus became one of the most populous and wealthy Cities of Greece; but its riches produced pride, ostentation, effeminacy, and all the vices generally consequent on plenty
Sanhedrin - Jews in foreign Cities appear to have been amenable to this court in matters of religion, Acts 9:2
Sisters of Saint Clare - Following the example of Saint Clare, groups of women banded together in various Cities, and Cardinal Ugolino, Bishop of Ostia (later Pope Gregory IX), drew up a rule for them based on that of Saint Benedict
Second Order of Saint Francis - Following the example of Saint Clare, groups of women banded together in various Cities, and Cardinal Ugolino, Bishop of Ostia (later Pope Gregory IX), drew up a rule for them based on that of Saint Benedict
Sabeans - In Isaiah 43:3 and Psalm 72:10 , Seba is mentioned as a distant and wealthy country; in the former passage, it is connected with Egypt and Ethiopia; and Meroe was one of the most important commercial Cities of interior Africa
Dancing - Sometimes they were in honor of a conqueror, as in the case of David, 1 Samuel 18:6,7 ; when he had slain the Philistine giant, "the women came out all the Cities of Israel singing and dancing
Barnabas - They visited Cyprus and some Cities of Asia Minor, Acts 13:2-14 , and after three years returned to Antioch
Deuteronomy - To this discourse is appended a brief notice of the severing of the three Cities of refuge on the east side of the Jordan
Beth'el - (Judges 20:26-28 ; 21:4 ) Later it is named as one of the holy Cities to which Samuel went on circuit
Phil'ip the Evangelist - A brief sentence tells us that Philip continued his work as a preacher at Azotus (Ashdod) and among the other Cities that had formerly belonged to the Philistines, and, following the coast-line, came to Caesarea
Damas'Cus, - one of the most ancient and most important of the Cities of Syria
Gal'Ilee, Sea of - no less than nine very populous Cities stood on the very shores of the lake
Philemon - His conversion took place not at Colossae (Colossians 2:1), but presumably during the Apostle’s three years’ abode at Ephesus, between which town and the Cities of the Lycus (of which Colossae was one) the relations were intimate (see Lightfoot, Colossians3, 1879, p
Jotham - mountain, commonly called Zion), and Cities on Judah's mountains, and castles in the forests to protect the herds, as Uzziah had done (2 Chronicles 26:10)
Theodosius, a Monophysite Monk - of Jerusalem in the church of the Resurrection, and at once proceeded to ordain bishops for Palestine, chiefly for those Cities whose bishops had not yet returned from Chalcedon
Trophimus, 1st Bishop of Arles - Saturninus, says in effect that Trophimus arrived in Gaul with the first bishops of Tours, Paris, and other Cities in the consulate of Decius and Gratus, i
Victricius - The relics he obtained, the musical services he instituted, and the devotion—under his guidance—of the virgins and widows, caused the city, hitherto unknown, to be spoken of with reverence in distant lands, and counted among Cities famed for their sacred spots (Paulinus, Ep
Zoaras - Mennas and his synod repeated the condemnation, and Justinian banished Zoaras from Constantinople and its vicinity, and from all the chief Cities of the empire, charging him to live in solitude
Syria - ...
The foundation of Greek Cities in Syria after the time of Alexander the Great was of primary importance for the country. The rest of ancient Syria was to be found partly in the territories of numerous free Cities, and partly in petty principalities subject to Rome, while Commagene had become an independent kingdom before the time of Pompey’s conquest
Nineveh - He maintains that the ruins of Khorsabad, Keremles, Nimrud, and Konyunjik bear on their bricks distinct local titles, and that these titles are found attaching to distant Cities in the historical inscriptions. " He further claims that Assyrian writers do not consider these places to be parts of Nineveh, but distinct and separate Cities; that Calah was for a longtime the capital, while Nineveh was a provincial town; that Dur-sargina was built by Sargon—not at Nineveh, but near Nineveh; and that Scripture similarly distinguishes Calah as a place separate from Nineveh, and so far from it that there was room for a great city between them
Kin - With the abolition of the local sanctuaries by the reforms of Josiah it was necessary to appoint certain special sanctuaries, which are known as Cities of refuge (see Refuge [3]). [3] of the Odyssey , 408 ff
Take Away - A secondary meaning is “to take away, remove, take to oneself,” as when the invading kings “took away” and “took to themselves” all the movable goods of the Cities of the plain ( Cities are often “captured” in war ( High Place - The bâmâh was found in the Cities of Samaria (2 Kings 23:19)in the Cities of Judah ( Jehoshaphat - He had the advantage over Baasha, king of Israel; and he placed good garrisons in the Cities of Judah and of Ephraim, which had been conquered by his father. He built several houses in Judah in the form of towers, and fortified several Cities
Lot - When God destroyed the Cities of the plain with fire and brimstone, he delivered "just Lot" from the conflagration, according to the account of the divine historian. The priests and Levites had their Cities appointed by lot
Levites - God assigned them for their habitations forty-eight Cities, with fields, pastures, and gardens, Numbers 35. Of these thirteen were given to the priests, six of which were Cities of refuge, Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:19-20 , &c
Proselyte - It is said they did not dwell in the Cities, but only in the suburbs and the villages; but it is certain that the Jews often admitted into their Cities, not only proselytes of habitation, but also Gentiles and idolaters, as appears by the reproaches on this account, throughout the Scriptures
Macedonia - During the time of Augustus, some of the Macedonian Cities were refounded as Roman colonies: Dion, at the foot of Mount Olympus, became Colonia Julia Augusta Diensis; Philip pi , where Marc Antony had defeated the assassins of Caesar—Brutus and Cassius—was settled with Roman veterans and renamed Colonia Augusta Julia Philip pensium . 300 almost all inscriptions found in these Cities are in Latin). In the Cities of Thessalonica and Philippi, one Cabirus was venerated as the founding hero of the city. Temples for the worship of the Roman emperor were established in most Cities
Nineveh - Occupying a central position on the great highway between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean, thus uniting the East and the West, wealth flowed into it from many sources, so that it became the greatest of all ancient Cities. Other Cities which had perished, as Palmyra, Persepolis, and Thebes, had left ruins to mark their sites and tell of their former greatness; but of this city, imperial Nineveh, not a single vestige seemed to remain, and the very place on which it had stood was only matter of conjecture. Sargon has taken what remained to the Hittites; Sennacherib overcame Chaldea, and the treasures of Babylon were transferred to his coffers; Esarhaddon and Assur-bani-pal himself have pillaged Egypt and her great Cities, Sais, Memphis, and Thebes of the hundred gates
Solomon - In the country regions he rebuilt ruined Cities, established army bases, and set up Cities to store the farm produce that maintained his government (1 Kings 9:16-19). Unable to repay his debts, Solomon decided to cut off twenty Cities in northern Israel and give them to Hiram (1 Kings 9:10-11)
Ammonites - Philadelphia came to be regarded as one of the Decapolis Cities, a federation of ten Greek Cities in Palestine (Matthew 4:25 ), and was annexed with the whole Decapolis region to the Roman empire in A. ...
Philadelphia, as all of the Cities along the Via Nova, began to decline in the third century due to security problems along the Roman frontier and shifts in commercial patterns
Kir - "the Cities"), Kartah, Kartan (Joshua 21:32; Joshua 15:25; Jeremiah 48:23-24; Jeremiah 48:41; Amos 2:2)
Jeshua - ) who helped distribute food collected in tithes and offerings to the priests living in the Levitical Cities outside Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 31:15 )
Gad - It was carried into captivity at the same time as the other tribes of the northern kingdom by Tiglath-pileser (1 Chronicles 5:26 ), and in the time of (Jeremiah 49:1 ) their Cities were inhabited by the Ammonites
Hamath - Tributary to Solomon who built "store Cities" in it (2 Chronicles 8:4) as staples for the trade which passed along the Orontes valley
Mesha - The Moabite stone describes Mesha as a builder of Cities and highways
No - Nahum seems to imagine Thebes as resembling the Cities of the less remote Delta surrounded by canals, which were their chief protection; in reality it lay on both banks of the Nile, with desert bounding it on either side, and water probably played little part in its defence
Sharon - In Joshua 12:13 Lassharon is mentioned as one of the royal Cities of Canaan; as ‘the king of’ is omitted in the original, the passage may read ‘king of Aphek in the Sharon
Chariot - ...
Chariot Cities were set apart for storing the war-chariots in time of peace (2 Chronicles 1:14 )
Sennach'Erib, - It was at this time that "Sennacherib came up against all the fenced Cities of Judah, and took them
Brick - Plans of buildings, estates, and Cities were drawn on such clay tablets, a practice which illustrates the command to Ezekiel to draw a plan of Jerusalem upon a tils or clay brick (Ezekiel 4:1 , see the elaborate note by Haupt in ‘Ezekiel’ ( PB Masons - It was also common for members of the same trade to live and working in one location within the larger towns and Cities (2 Kings 18:17 ; 1 Chronicles 4:14 ; Nehemiah 11:35 ; Jeremiah 37:21 ; Matthew 27:7 ; Acts 18:3 )
Flat - What ruins kingdoms, and lays Cities flat
Heal - ...
Jeremiah 30:17 (a) This is a promise from GOD that He would repair the broken-down Cities, cause the ground to be fertile, restore the rains, and make Israel again a healthy and happy nation of people
Cnidus - In front of the city is an island, seven stadia in circuit; it rises high, in the form of a theatre, and is joined by a mole to the mainland, making Cnidus in a manner two Cities, for a great part of the inhabitants live on the island, which shelters both the harbours
Zechariah - Community leader Jehoshaphat the king sent to teach in the Cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 17:7 )
Dust - ...
Our Lord’s direction that ‘the Twelve’ should shake off the dust of the Cities that rejected their message, derived special significance from Jewish teaching
Mesha - The Moabite stone describes Mesha as a builder of Cities and highways
Hebron - One of the most ancient Cities of Canaan, being built seven years before Tanis, the capital of Lower Egypt, Numbers 13:22
Firstfruits - ...
Those offerings are also often called firstfruits, which were brought by the Israelites from devotion, to the temple, for the feast of thanksgiving, to which they invited their relations and friends, and the Levites of their Cities
Sack - This word is never, I believe, applied to the robbing of persons, or pillaging of single houses, but to the pillaging of towns and Cities and as towns are usually or often sacked, when taken by assault, the word may sometimes include the sense of taking by storm
Jehosh'Aphat - In his own kingdom Jehoshaphat ever showed himself a zealous follower of the commandments of God: he tried to put down the high places and groves in which the people of Judah burnt incense, and sent the wisest Levites through the Cities and towns to instruct the people in true morality and religion
Strength - Jehoshaphat “placed forces in all the fenced Cities of Judah, and set garrisons in the land of Judah …” (1 Kings 15:20: “Ben-hadad … sent the captains of the hosts which he had [3] against the Cities of Israel
Damascus - One of the oldest Cities in the world, being mentioned as a known city in the days of Abraham. his son continued to exercise dominion over Israel, 2 Kings 13:3-7,22 ; but Jehovah had compassion on Israel, and Joash, according to the dying prophecy of Elisha, overcame the king of Syria three times and recovered the Cities of Israel
Inn - " "There are no inns any where," says Volney, "but the Cities, and commonly the villages, have a large building called a kan or kervanserai, which serves as an asylum for all travellers. Most of the eastern Cities contain one, at least, for the reception of strangers; smaller places, called choultries, are erected by charitable persons, or munificent princes, in forests, plains, and deserts, for the accommodation of travellers
Asa - He fortified several Cities, and repaired others, encouraging his people to this labour while the kingdom was at peace; and the Lord favoured them with his protection. Benhadad accepted Asa's presents, and invaded Baasha's country, where he took several Cities belonging to the tribe of Naphtali
Assyria - Babylon is older than Nineveh; it was the beginning of Nimrod's empire, but not content with the settlements he had acquired, he invaded the country called Asshur from the son of Shem, and there founded Cities afterwards most famous. The Assyrian king, in the might of his power, subjected the ten tribes, and carried multitudes of them into the far east; he passed also like a flood over the country of Judah, taking many of the Cities throughout her territory; and in his presumptuous boldness he conceived that no earthly power could resist him, and even defied Jehovah, the God of Jacob. Assyria fell, and was never again reckoned among the nations; the very places being for long centuries unknown where her proudest Cities had stood. Cities were attacked by raising artificial mounds; the besieging armies sheltered themselves behind shields of wicker-work, and battered the defences with rams
Forest - In Isaiah 17:9 for "bough" translated "his strong Cities shall be as the leavings of woods," what the axeman leaves when he cuts down the grove (Isaiah 17:6)
Fire - ...
...
In war, fire was used in the destruction of Cities, as Jericho (Joshua 6:24 ), Ai (8:19), Hazor (11:11), Laish (Judges 18:27 ), etc
Iron - However, excavations in Philistia have uncovered no more iron implements than in Israelite Cities
Wilderness, Desert - chorbâh (from a root ‘to be waste or desolate’) is properly applied to Cities or districts once inhabited now lying waste, and is translated ‘wastes,’ ‘deserts,’ ‘desolations,’ though it is once used of the Wilderness of the Wanderings ( Isaiah 48:21 )
Sim'Eon - To Simeon was allotted a portion of land out of the territory of Judah, on its southern frontier, which contained eighteen or nineteen Cities, with their villages, spread round the venerable well of Beersheba
Corinthians, Second Epistle to the - , in Athens, Cenchrea, and other Cities in Greece
Hezekiah - This led to the invasion of Judah by Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:13-16 ), who took forty Cities, and besieged Jerusalem with mounds
Damascus - Activity, the most ancient of Oriental Cities; the capital of Syria (Isaiah 7:8 ; 17:3 ); situated about 133 miles to the north of Jerusalem
Iron - However, excavations in Philistia have uncovered no more iron implements than in Israelite Cities
Gezer - A site of 30 acres, it was one of the largest and most important Cities in Palestine from 1800 B
Seleucia - It was one of the Cities which formed the Syrian Tetrapolis, the others being Antioch, Apameia, and Laodicea
Dog - " More commonly ownerless, and banded in troops which divide Cities into so many quarters; each half-starved, ravenous troop keeps to its own quarter, and drives off any intruder; feeding on blood, dead bodies, and offal; therefore regarded as "unclean" (1 Kings 14:11; 1 Kings 16:4; 1 Kings 21:19; 1 Kings 21:23; 1 Kings 22:38; 2 Kings 9:10; 2 Kings 9:35-36)
Nippur - The several Cities in the area, except for Nippur, took turns as the seat of government and often waged war against each other for political supremacy
Sumer - Its principal Cities were Nippur, Adab, Lagash, Umma, Larsa, Erech, Ur, and Eridu, most of which were on or near the Euphrates
Jubilee, Year of - Property within walled Cities did not revert in the Year of Jubilee except for the property of the Levites, which was always redeemable
Italian Band - 7), and Blass suggests (in loco) that one of the five may have bean called the cohors Italica, as being composed of Roman citizens who had made their home in one or other of the two Cities
God, City of - In the last 12 books, he shows that the natural unity of the human race was broken by the sin of Adam, from whom in consequence sprang two kinds of men or "Cities"; the one ruled by self-love, the other by love of God
Bank - In Greek Cities the bankers sat at their tables (τράπεζα) in the market-place
Zidon, Sidon - ...
The Lord Jesus visited its coasts, and said that it should be more tolerable in the day of judgement for Tyre and Sidon than for the Cities in which He had done his mighty works
Demophilus - The churches of Constantinople, which had for forty years been in Arian hands, were now restored to the orthodox; and similarly in other Cities
Naphtali - He responded at once, and his army smote Ijon, and Dan, and Abel-maim, and all the store Cities of Naphtali
Lot - he fled first to Zoar, in which he found a temporary refuge during the destruction of the other Cities of the plain
On - This is one of the most ancient Cities of the world of which any distinct vestige can now be traced
Ahab - He built Cities, and erected an ivory palace, 1 Kings 22:39, the walls being probably inlaid with ivory, and had pleasure grounds by his house in Jezreel, which he wished to enlarge by the addition of a vineyard belonging to Naboth
Ownership - Priestly families and local shrines also owned land, especially that surrounding the levitical Cities, where the priests farmed their own fields (Joshua 21:1 )
Lot - he fled first to Zoar, in which he found a temporary refuge during the destruction of the other Cities of the plain
Captivities of the Jews - 713) is stated to have carried into Assyria 200,000 captives from the Jewish Cities which he took
Jordan - The words of Scripture here recur to us with peculiar force: 'I will make your Cities waste, and bring your sanctuaries unto desolation. And your land shall be desolate, and your Cities waste
Naphtali - No fewer than nineteen Cities are said to lie within its territory, the most of which are not found again in the OT, doubtless because the history of Israel was wrought out mainly in the regions to the south. Under the Syrian king Bir-idri (Benhadad), ‘all the land of Naphtali,’ together with certain Cities of Israel, were smitten with the sword ( 1 Kings 15:20 )
Iconium - Luke relates that the Apostles Paul and Barnabas, being persecuted at Iconium, ‘fled into the Cities of Lycaonia’ (Acts 14:6)-an expression which implies that in his view Iconium was not Lycaonian-he adheres to the popular and ignores the official geography. Ramsay, The Cities of St
Moab, Moabites - Then Chemosh had mercy on it, and the king was able to rescue some of the Cities, kill the people, and take the spoil, and he built others, of which he gives the names. Ahaziah succeeded Ahab, but it was not he that attacked Moab: his reign (called two years) and the beginning of the reign of Jehoram, would give Mesha time to strengthen himself against Israel and attack some of the outlying Cities
Captivity - 721), placing them in Halah and in Habor, and in the Cities of the Medes (2 Kings 17:3,5 ). The families thus removed were carried to distant Cities, many of them not far from the Caspian Sea, and their place was supplied by colonists from Babylon and Cuthah, etc
Music - The simpler impromptu with which the women from the Cities of Israel greeted David after the slaughter of the Philistines was apparently struck off on the spur of the moment, under the influence of the wild joy with which they welcomed their national champion. By its means battles were won, Cities conquered, mutinies quelled, diseases cured
Jubilee, the Year of - This applied to fields and houses in the country and to houses of the Levites in walled Cities; but other houses in such Cities, if not redeemed within a year from their sale, remained the perpetual property of the buyer
Diana - iii in Ramsay’s Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, Oxford, 1895). Evidence of this cult has been found in numerous Cities of Asia Minor as well as in the following places further afield: Autun, Marseilles, Rhone Mouth (France), Emporiae, Hemeroscopeum, Rhode (Spain), Epidaurus, Megalopolis, Corinth, Scillus (Greece), Neapolis (Samaria), Panticapaeum (Crimea), Rome, and Syria. of his Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, Oxford, 1895; on Artemis, see L
Abercius, Bishop of Hierapolis - , as "a testimony, brief, clear, emphatic, of the truth for which Avircius had contended—the one great figure on the Catholic side produced by the Phrygian church during this period," a man whose wide experience of men and Cities might in itself have well marked him out as such a champion. ), also Ramsay's Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia , ii. And I saw the plain of Syria and all its Cities, even Nisibis, having crossed the Euphrates, and everywhere I had fellow-worshippers (συνομήθεις, so Lightfoot and Ramsay; συνοδίτην , Zahn, referring to Paul)
Nineveh - Tacitus styles it, "Vetustissima sedes Assyriae;" [1] and Scripture informs us that Nimrod, after he had built Babel, in the land of Shinar, invaded Assyria, where he built Nineveh, and several other Cities, Genesis 10:11 . We are not, however, to imagine that all this vast enclosure was built upon: it contained great parks and extensive fields, and detached houses and buildings, like Babylon, and other great Cities of the east even at the present day, as Bussorah, &c. Beside, in the east, the materials of ancient Cities have been often employed in the building of new ones in the neighbourhood. And if the only spot that bears its name, or that can be said to be the place where it was, be indeed the site of one of the most extensive of Cities on which the sun ever shone, and which continued for many centuries to be the capital of Assyria,—the principal mounds, few in number, which show neither bricks, stones, nor other materials of building,—but are in many places overgrown with grass, and resemble the mounds left by intrenchments and fortifications of ancient Roman camps, and the appearances of other mounds and ruins less marked than even these, extending for ten miles, and widely spread, and seeming to be the wreck of former buildings,—show that Nineveh is left without one monument of royalty, without any token whatever of its splendour or wealth: that their place is not known where they were; and that it is indeed a desolation, "empty, void, and waste," its very ruins perished, and less than the wreck of what it was
Commerce - Surpluses were transported to regional marketplaces and major Cities. The Phoenician seaports of Tyre and Sidon also had their resident alien communities, adding to the cosmopolitan nature of these Cities and facilitating the transmission of culture and ideas. The economic and political importance of these trading communities is seen in Solomon's construction of storehouse Cities in Hamath (2 Chronicles 8:4 and in Ahab's negotiations with Ben-Hadad of Syria for the establishment of “market areas in Damascus” ( 1 Kings 20:34 NIV). This was also the case in the Hellenistic Cities of the Near East which had one or more agoras
Adoption - Thus, 1 Chronicles 2:21 , Machir, grandson of Joseph, and father of Gilead, Numbers 26:29 , gave his daughter to Hezron, "who took her; and was a son of sixty years," sixty years of age, "and she bare hi Segub; and Segub begat Jair, who had twenty-three Cities in the land of Gilead," Joshua 13:30 1 Kings 4:13
Sennacherib - Then Sennacherib devastated Judæa, capturing 46 Cities and 200,150 prisoners
Nethinim - Ophel and the Levite Cities were their dwelling place, and they had their own rulers (Ezra 2:70; Nehemiah 11:21)
Bithynia - For the contagion of that superstition has spread not only through Cities, but even villages and the country
Archelaus - Archelaus received Idumea, Judaea, Samaria, and the Cities Caesarea, Sebaste, Joppa, and Jerusalem, which yielded 600 talents income
Mediterranean Sea, the - Paul's work involved such Mediterranean Cities as Caesarea, Antioch, Troas, Corinth, Tyre, Sidon, Syracuse, Rome, and Ephesus
Hebron - probably Tetrapolis , or ‘Four Cities’), and it was a stronghold of the Anakim
Lachish - It was evidently one of the important Canaanite Cities of the time
Barnabas - After this Paul proposed that they should visit again the brethren in the Cities where they had preached
Hedge - ...
Luke 14:23 (b) This type represents the difficult places in our Cities and villages where it is hard to find people for the Lord, and one is quite apt to have his feelings hurt, and sometimes his body as well, he seeks to reach hearts for CHRIST in the ungodly districts of the city
Asher - ]'>[2] gives also the territorial boundaries, including the names of 22 Cities and their dependent villages, the majority of which are unidentified (Joshua 19:24-30 ; cf
Tax Taxing Taxation - There were the duties to be paid at harbors, and the gates of Cities, a poll-tax, and perhaps a kind of property tax
Sidon - or ZIDON, a celebrated city and port of Phenicia, and one of the most ancient Cities in the world; as it is supposed to have been founded by Sidon, the eldest son of Canaan, which will carry it up to above two thousand years before Christ
Timothy - He was of Derbe or Lystra, both Cities of Lycaonia, Acts 16:1 14:6
Judea - During all this time, the boundaries of the province were often varied, by the addition or abstraction of different towns and Cities
Pamphylia - But the Greek element never prevailed, and though Side and Aspendos were half-Greek Cities in the 5th cent
Say - Say to the Cities of Judah, behold your God
Judah - In Joshua 18:28 it is one of the Cities mentioned as falling to Benjamin; but in Joshua 15:63 and Judges 1:8 it is referred to Judah
Victor, Claudius Marius - Victor ( 39 ) (Victorius, Victorinus ), Claudius Marius, the author of three books in hexameter verse, containing the narrative of Genesis down to the destruction of the Cities of the Plain; author also of a letter to "Salmon," or Solomon, an abbat, in hexameter verse, on the corrupt manners of his time
Simeon - This conclusion is supported by the fact that the Cities which are assigned to Simeon in the list given in Joshua 19:1-9 re-appear elsewhere as Cities of Judah (cf
Rehoboam - ...
Therefore, the Lord "granted them some deliverance," at the same time that He gave them up to Shishak's service, who took the Jews' fenced Cities and came to Jerusalem, that they might know to their sorrow its contrast to "His service" (1618836193_2; Isaiah 47:13; 1 John 5:3; Hosea 2:7). Besides Mahalath and Maacbah, granddaughters of David, and Abihail descended from Jesse, he had 18 wives and 60 concubines; his sons, with worldly wisdom, he dispersed through the fenced Cities as their governors, and made Abijah, son of his favorite wife Maachah, his successor on the throne
Lasciviousness - 154): ‘Here the reference is probably to the dissolute life of the Herodian court, and of the Greek Cities of Galilee and the Decapolis; if δόλος characterized the Jew, his Greek neighbour was yet more terribly branded by ἀσέλγεια. ’ In 1 Peter 4:3 the word is definitely used as a general term of the ‘will of the Gentiles,’ and is evidently the licentiousness which accompanied heathen feasts and lawless idolatries, while in Jude and 2 Peter it is the typical sin of the Cities of the plain, which the libertines, under the guise of a spurious freedom, followed, and into which they inveigled others
Miletus - (Μίλητος)...
Miletus was an ancient Greek colony on the coast of Caria, and became the most flourishing of the twelve free Cities which formed the Ionian League. 28), being unquestionably the greatest of Greek Cities at the time
Ass - They ventured into Cities only when the Cities were forsaken ruins (Isaiah 32:14 )
Kill - In order to assure the rights of the manslayer, who unintentionally killed someone, the law provided for three Cities of refuge (Num. In this way the Old Testament underscores the principles of the sanctity of life and of retribution; only in the Cities of refuge is the principle of retribution suspended
Episcopacy - There were in this way gradually established, first in the towns or Cities in which the Apostles had called men to the truth, and then in the contiguous district of country, several congregations: in these pastors officiated, who were authorized by the bishop and presbytery, whose superintendence was extended, so that parochial episcopacy was insensibly but naturally changed into diocesan episcopacy; many of the presbyters sent out by the bishop residing at their churches, but nevertheless composing part of his council, and being summoned to meet with him upon important occasions. The different congregations or churches which were established in various Cities and the adjoining districts were in so far independent of each other, that the bishops and presbyters of each had the rule of their particular church, and of the churches which had sprung from it, and were entitled, by their own authority, to make such regulations as appeared to them to be requisite; and this species of independence continued for a considerable time, every bishop presiding in his congregation, and afterward in his diocess
Judges - Sigonius supposes that these elders and judges of Cities were the original constitution settled in the wilderness by Moses, upon the advice given him by Jethro, Exodus 18:21-22 , and continued by divine appointment after the settlement in the land of Canaan; whereas others imagine that the Jethronian prefectures were a peculiar constitution, suited to their condition while encamped in the wilderness, but laid aside after they came into Canaan. The lower courts of justice, in their several Cities, were held in their gates, Deuteronomy 16:15
Pontus - 63 the Romans, thinking that Polemon’s vassal kingdom had become civilized enough to be incorporated in the Empire, added part of it, including the Cities of Trapezus and Neo-Caesarea, to the province of Galatia as Pontus Polemonaicus, a name which it retained for centuries. ...
The first Cities of Pontus to receive Christianity were doubtless those of the seaboard, from which it must have rapidly spread inland
Greece, Religion And Society of - ...
Throughout the history of Greece there were important Cities: Athens, Sparta, Corinth, Argos, Pylos, Delphi, Eretria, Thebes, Pella, Olynthus, and others. Some Greek Cities ruled that a citizen must marry by the time he was thirty-five years old, or else he would be fined 100 drachmas per year. While slaves in Athens were treated better than most Cities, there were always limitations. Officials, army officers, representatives from other Cities, all joined in the parade. ...
Other Cities were important for their sanctuaries. Almost every major city had its Asclepian including Corinth, Athens, Pergammom, Cities in Cyprus, Crete, and throughout the Greek world
Gods, Pagan - ...
Old Testament Many pagan gods had their origin as gods of certain places such as Cities or regions. In Old Testament times, such gods or a combination of gods became nationalistic symbols as their Cities or regions struggled for political dominance. ...
The patron deities of the oldest Sumerian Cities became the high gods of the Mesopotamian pantheon. Gods of other Cities became prominent through political circumstance. The moon god Sin was revered in the Cities of Ur and Haran, both associated with Abraham's origins (Genesis 11:31 ). The Canaanite god Horon was evidently worshiped in the two Cities of Beth-horon (“house of Horon”). Sick persons appealed to the popular god of healing, Asclepius, by visiting special sanctuaries in certain Cities
Antiochus - It was perhaps, too, on this occasion, that Antiochus Soter made the Jews of Asia free of the Cities belonging to the Gentiles, and permitted them to live according to their own laws. He also sent Athenobius to Jerusalem to oblige Simon to restore to him Gazara and Joppa, with the citadel of Jerusalem; and to demand of him five hundred talents more, as reparation for injuries the king had suffered, and as tribute for his own Cities. Simon showed Athenobius all the lustre of his wealth and power, told him he had in his possession no place which belonged to Antiochus, and said that the Cities of Gazara and Joppa had greatly injured his people, and he would give the king for the property of them one hundred talents. After this, Antiochus thought only of reducing to his obedience those Cities which, in the beginning of his father's reign, had shaken off their subjection. Simon Maccabaeus, prince and high priest of the Jews, being treacherously murdered by Ptolemy, his son-in-law, in the castle of Docus, near Jericho, the murderer immediately sent to Antiochus Sidetes to demand troops, that he might recover for him the country and Cities of the Jews. Antiochus required that they should surrender their arms, demolish the city walls, pay tribute for Joppa and the other Cities they possessed out of Judea, and receive a garrison into Jerusalem. The Cities in which they were, privately surrendered to the Persians; and all resolved to attack, in one day, the garrisons they contained, that the troops being separated might not assist each other
Fortification And Siegecraft - At the date of the Hebrew invasion of Canaan its inhabitants were found to be in possession of ‘cities great and fenced up to heaven’ ( Deuteronomy 9:1 ; cf. The inhabited places, then as always, were of two classes, walled and unwalled ( Deuteronomy 3:5 ), the latter comprising the country villages, the former the very numerous ‘cities,’ which though small in area were ‘fenced,’ i. ’ In this article it is proposed to indicate the nature of the walls by which these Cities were fenced in OT times, and of the fortresses or ‘strong holds’ so frequently mentioned in Hebrew history, and finally, to describe the methods of attack and defence adopted by the Hebrews and their contemporaries. Their Cities were planted for the most part on an outlying spur of a mountain range, or on a more or less isolated eminence or tell . ...
The recent excavations in Palestine have shown that the fortifications of Canaanite and Hebrew Cities were built, like their houses, of sun-dried bricks, or of stone, or of both combined. At Tell el-Hesy or Lachish the lower face of the north wall ‘had been preserved by a strengthening wall on the outside, consisting of large rough stones in a parallel line about three feet away, with the intervening space filled in with pebbles’ (Bliss, A Mound of Many Cities , 29). In this work will be found detailed descriptions, with plans and illustrations, of the walls of the various Cities of Southern Palestine excavated by the Palestine Exploration Fund in 1898 1900). In addition to its walls, every ancient city of importance possessed a strongly fortified place, corresponding to the acropolis of Greek Cities, which served as a refuge from, and a last defence against, the enemy when the city itself had been stormed (cf
Joshua, Book of - " The Gibeonites and their allies from three other Cities (Joshua 9:17 ) were the only ones that made a league with Israel. Six Cities of refuge were appointed to which the man-slayer could flee. Forty-eight Cities were appointed for dwelling places for the Levites
Edom - It extended from the head of the Gulf of Akabah, the Elanitic gulf, to the foot of the Dead Sea (1 Kings 9:26 ), and contained, among other Cities, the rock-hewn Sela (q
Lazarists - In Poland, in the time of John Casimir, they were summoned to Warsaw, 1651; and later to many other Cities, so that before the Revolution Poland was one of the most flourishing provinces
Philistines - They occupied the five Cities of Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath, in the south-western corner of Canaan, which belonged to Egypt up to the closing days of the Nineteenth Dynasty
Hebron - It still exists under the same name, and is one of the most ancient Cities in the world
Midianite - Their Cities were consumed by fire, five of their kings were put to death, and the whole nation was destroyed (Joshua 13:21,22 )
Chaldea - Ur was one of the oldest and most famous of the Babylonian Cities
Elder, Eldest - , Matthew 16:21 ; 26:47 ; thirdly, those who managed public affairs in the various Cities, Luke 7:3 ; (3) in the Christian churches, those who, being raised up and qualified by the work of the Holy Spirit, were appointed to have the spiritual care of, and to exercise oversight over, the churches
Bithynia - Not only in the Cities but in the rural villages the temples were almost deserted and the sacrificial ritual interrupted
Shechem - It was one of the three Cities of refuge west of Jordan (Joshua 20:2; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:20-21; see CITY OF REFUGE)
Tobiah - A Levite employed by Jehoshaphat to teach the law in the Cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 17:8)
Ptolemies - The Ptolemies founded or refurbished several Cities in Palestine and Transjordan giving them Greek names and often endowing them with Greek features
Laodicea - Christian communities existed in all three Cities (Colossians 2:1 ; Colossians 4:13-16 ), though the one in Colossae is the best known
Gog - Where antichrist thought to find an inheritance he shall only find a grave, and that near his prototypes, the fire blasted Cities of the Dead Sea
Goshen - fortified anew) for Pharaoh Raamses and Pithom as treasure Cities (Genesis 47:11; Exodus 1:11)
Leading - ...
The leadership of religious authorities is referred to in the description of scribes and Pharisees as ‘blind guides’ or ‘blind leaders of the blind’ (Matthew 23:16; Matthew 15:14); the metaphor being based on the sight, familiar in Eastern Cities, of rows or files of blind persons each holding by the one in front
Jephthah, Jephthae - ...
The Ammonites were smitten with very great slaughter: he conquered twenty Cities, for the Lord delivered them into his hand
Among - ” The first usage of this preposition is in Genesis: “Abram dwelled in the land of Canaan, and Lot dwelled in [1] the Cities of the plain, and pitched his tent toward Sodom” (13:12)
Brimstone - And the destruction of the wicked in the end of the age will be a magnified repetition of the overthrow of the Cities of the Ghôr-the godless multitude are to be cast into the lake that burns with fire and brimstone, which is the second death (Revelation 2:18; cf
Canaanites - Tyre and Sidon, their famous Cities, were the centres of great commercial activity; and hence the name "Canaanite" came to signify a "trader" or "merchant" (Job 41:6 ; Proverbs 31:24 , lit
Albion - In Liguria (the western half of north Italy), Genoa, with some Cities of the Riviera, alone escaped
Jezreel - The great plain lying between Jezreel and Acre, called from two Cities on its border in one part, "the valley of Megiddo," 2 Chronicles 35:22 , and in its western part or branch the "plain or valley of Jezreel," afterwards Esdraelon
Vincentians - In Poland, in the time of John Casimir, they were summoned to Warsaw, 1651; and later to many other Cities, so that before the Revolution Poland was one of the most flourishing provinces
Tithe - The proceeds of this tax were devoted to the maintenance of the Levites in their respective Cities, Numbers 18:21-24
Jehoram - The Moabites under Mesha their king were utterly routed and their Cities destroyed
Edom - Bozrah and Sela, or Selah, were its chief Cities
Brimstone - And the destruction of the wicked in the end of the age will be a magnified repetition of the overthrow of the Cities of the Ghôr-the godless multitude are to be cast into the lake that burns with fire and brimstone, which is the second death (Revelation 2:18; cf
Jehoshaphat - He set up courts and appointed judges in all the chief Cities of Judah, with the chief court in Jerusalem
Maximus, Patriarch of Antioch - Peter "speciali magisterio" in the Cities of Antioch and Rome, against the erroneous teaching both of Nestorius and Eutyches, and to watch over the churches of the East generally and send him frequent tidings
Salvianus, Priest of Marseilles - 14 he refers to the crowds of Syrian merchants in all the Cities of Gaul, a fact which the discovery of Syrian, Assyrian, and other Oriental inscriptions in France has amply confirmed (cf
Hazor - It is mentioned extensively in both Egyptian and Mesopotamian records in conjunction with the other major trading Cities of the day. ...
Joshua 11:1-15 ; Joshua 12:19 relate how Jabin, king of Hazor, rallied the forces of the northern Cities of Canaan against Joshua
Manasseh - Argob, with its sixty Cities, that "ocean of basaltic rocks and boulders tossed about in the wildest confusion," lay in the midst of this territory. ...
The whole "land of Gilead" having been conquered, the two and a half tribes left their wives and families in the fortified Cities there, and accompanied the other tribes across the Jordan, and took part with them in the wars of conquest
Lot - ...
The mention of the Cities of the Jordan Valley also carries negative connotations. To add to the negative connotations that Cities have in the stories of Genesis, we are told that the people of Sodom were great sinners against the Lord (Genesis 13:13 )
Gad (1) - ), even as they took the lead above Reuben in fortifying the Cities Dibon, etc. Gad finally was carried captive by Tiglath Pileser, and Ammon seized their land and Cities (2 Kings 15:29; 1 Chronicles 5:26; Jeremiah 49:1)
Borrow - " (Genesis 46:1-7) It becomes an important question in the subject, to ask, What became of this property, improved and increased, as we may reasonably suppose it to have been, when another king arose, who knew not Joseph? Moreover, we are told, that the children, when in bondage, built treasure Cities for Pharaoh, Exodus 1:8. (Exodus 3:22)...
And might there not be somewhat typical in the thing itself, in reference to the future call (as was all along intended) of the Gentile church? I beg the reader to read that sweet passage of the prophet Isaiah 19:18-25; and see the rich promises of the call of Egypt with Assyria, when the Lord shall set up the New Testament altar, even the Lord Jesus Christ, in the midst of the land of Egypt; and five Cities shall speak the language of Canaan, even the gospel language of salvation by the blood and righteousness of the Lord Jesus Christ
Baal - ...
There were many Cities in Palestine, whose names were compounded of Baal and some other word: whether it was that the god Baal was adored in them, or that these places were looked upon as the capital Cities,— lords of their respective provinces,—is uncertain
House - ...
"The streets of eastern Cities, the better to shade them from the sun, are usually narrow, with sometimes a range of shops on each side. From whence it is, that the Cities of these countries, which in general are much inferior in bigness to those of Europe, yet are so exceedingly populous, that great numbers op people are always swept away by the plague, or any other contagious distemper. When one of these Cities is built upon level ground, we can pass from one end of it to the other, along the tops of the houses, without coming down into the street. On the sites of many ancient Cities of Syria and Babylonia only the ruins of public edifices disappeared ages ago
Lot - At length, when the judgment of God descended on the guilty Cities of the plain (Genesis 19:1-20 ), Lot was miraculously delivered
Libnah - of Palestine, taken by Joshua, though not one of the leagued Cities, because he would not leave so strong a city unsubdued in his rear, after destroying Makkedah on his way to Lachish
Dan - It included in it, among others, the Cities of Lydda, Ekron, and Joppa, which formed its northern boundary
Lydia - Many women, and among them Lydia, resorted to the place by the river Gangites or Gaggitas "where prayer was wont to be made"; possibly a proseuchee was there, "the meeting place of Jewish congregations in Greek Cities" (Winer), or "a place of prayer as opposed to a synagogue or house of prayer" (Conybeare and Howson, Life of Paul)
Goshen - (4) Both the two Cities which the Hebrews built, Rameses and Pithom, and the Hyksos capital at Zoan are key issues for settling on a date for the Exodus
Beth-Shean - Though the city is not specifically mentioned in the 1 Kings 14:25-28 account of the invasion of Shishak from Egypt, Beth-shean is listed among the Cities plundered
Evangelist - ’ And how he obtained this title is suggested when we find that immediately after Stephen’s martyrdom he went forth from Jerusalem and ‘preached the gospel’ (literally evangelized ) in Samaria, in the desert, and in all the Cities of the coast-land between Azotus and Cæsarea ( Acts 8:4-5 ; Acts 8:12 ; Acts 8:25 ; Acts 8:35 ; Acts 8:40 )
Galilee, Sea of - The Sea in the time of Christ was surrounded by a number of important Cities, each of them the centre of a cultured population
Issachar - ]'>[8] ’s lot ( Joshua 19:17-23 ) assigns to the tribe sixteen Cities and their villages, scattered throughout the eastern end of the rich Plain of Esdraelon and the Valley of Jezreel
Merari, Merarites - (2) After the settlement in Palestine, twelve Cities were assigned to them ( Joshua 21:7 ; Joshua 21:34-40 = 1 Chronicles 6:63 ; 1 Chronicles 6:77-81 )
Grecians Greeks - In Alexandria in particular a great number had settled, but in all the Cities of the West, in all the centres of trade, Jews found a home
Asherah - The principle Cities in which the objects were located were Samaria, Bethel, and Jerusalem
Samaritans - The king of Assyria had peopled the Cities by colonists from the East, they were then in Jehovah's land, but they did not fear Him, therefore He sent lions among them
Street - ” The “street” was the place for setting up bazaars: “The Cities, which my father took from thy father, I will restore; and thou shalt make streets for thee in Damascus, as my father made in Samaria” (1 Kings 20:34)
Cord - 3:4, the word is used of a “region” or “a measured area”: “… Threescore Cities, all the region of Argob, the kingdom of Og in Bashan
Tribe - For the tribe of Levi, which was appointed to the service of the tabernacle of the Lord, had no share in the distribution of the land, but only some Cities in which to dwell, and the first fruits, tithes, and oblations of the people, which was all their subsistence
Amaziah - " Amaziah, hereupon, sent back those troops; and they returning, strongly irritated against Amaziah, dispersed themselves over the Cities of Judah, from Bethoron to Samaria, killed three thousand men, and carried off a great booty, to make themselves amends for the loss of the plunder of Edom
Gibeon - The Gibeonites were descended from the Hivites, the old inhabitants of the country, and possessed four Cities: Cephirah, Beeroth, Kirjath-jearim, and Gibeon, their capital; all afterward given to Benjamin, except Kirjath- jearim, which fell to Judah
Iconium - It is the place of chief strength and importance in the central parts of Asiatic Turkey, being surrounded by a strong wall of four miles in circumference; but, as is the case with most eastern Cities, much of the enclosed space is waste
Sepulchres - Shaw says, "If we except a few persons who are buried within the precincts of some sanctuary, the rest are carried out at a small distance from their Cities and villages, where a great extent of ground is allotted for that purpose
Father - The father of Sichem, the father of Tekoah, the father of Bethlehem, &c, signify the chief persons who inhabited these Cities; he who built or rebuilt them
Benjamin - Their Cities were burnt; and there survived of the whole tribe but 600 men, for whom the oath of the Israelites rendered it difficult to provide wives when the angry passions of the nation had settled down
Lot - He fled first to Zoar, in which he found a temporary refuge during the destruction of the other Cities of the plain
Sabbath - The various states and Cities have good laws for the protection of the civil Sabbath and against its open desecration
jo'Ash - Accordingly Joash did defeat Ben-hadad three times on the field of battle, and recovered from him the Cities which Hazael had taken from Jehoahaz
Miz'Pah - It was one of the three holy Cities which Samuel visited in turn as judge of the people, (1 Samuel 7:6,16 ) the other two being Bethel and Gilgal
Josiah - These things he did not only in Judah but also in the Cities of Manasseh, Ephraim, and Simeon, even unto Naphtali
Grecians Greeks - In Alexandria in particular a great number had settled, but in all the Cities of the West, in all the centres of trade, Jews found a home
Conquest of Canaan - Joshua then launched a southern campaign which resulted in the capture of numerous Canaanite Cities (Joshua 10:1 ). However, some areas still remained outside their control, such as the heavily-populated land along the coast and several major Canaanite Cities like Jerusalem (Joshua 13:1-5 ; Joshua 15:63 ; Judges 1:1 )
Syria - Important Cities in this period included Qadesh and Ugarit. Ben-hadad responded by conquering a number of Cities and territory in the north of Israel (1 Kings 15:20 )
Moab And the Moabite Stone - ...
The chief Cities of northern Moab were Hesbon, Medeba, and Dibon. The chief Cities of Moab proper were Kir-hareseth (present-day Kerak) and a place called Ar Moab (possibly to be identified with the present-day village of Rabbah approximately nine miles northeast of Kerak)
Smyrna - Smyrna was the most ambitious of all the Cities of Asia, and her municipal self-consciousness was inordinately developed. She counted the greatest of poets one of her sons-though many other Cities questioned the claim-and built a Homereion in his honour
Goel - But in the case of unintentional murder, the man-slayer was enjoined to flee to one of the six Cities of refuge, which were appropriated for his residence. The roads to these Cities, it was enacted, should be kept in such a state that the unfortunate individual might meet with no impediment whatever in his way, Deuteronomy 19:3
Galatians, Epistle to the - They press the argument that he would not have called men of the four Cities by the name ‘Galatians,’ as these lay outside Galatia proper, and that ‘Galatians’ must mean men who are Gauls by blood and descent; also that ‘by writers speaking familiarly of the scenes in which they had themselves taken part’ popular usage rather than official is probable, and therefore to call the Christian communities in the four Cities ‘the churches of Galatia’ would be as unnatural as to speak of Pesth or (before the Italo-Austrian war) Venice as ‘the Austrian Cities’ (Lightfoot, Gal. Paul nowhere in his Epistles mentions the four Cities where such eventful things happened, except once for blame in 2 Timothy 3:11 a silence made more remarkable by the fact that in the collection of the alms he does mention ‘the churches of Galatia’ ( 1 Corinthians 16:1 ). If the four Cities are not here referred to, why were they omitted? The main argument of the N. ’ To call the inhabitants of the four Cities ‘Phrygians’ or ‘Lycaonians’ would be as discourteous as to call them ‘slaves’ or ‘barbarians
Hebron - Indeed both Cities already were inhabited long before 2000 B
Alexandria - According to his statements, also, there dwelt in his time, in Alexandria and the other Egyptian Cities, not less than a million Jews; but this would seem exaggerated
Canaanites - The leading Phœnician Cities were such commercial centres that ‘Canaanite’ afterwards became equivalent to ‘trader’ (cf
Middle Ages - If we consider the centuries it took to do this as closing just prior to the year one thousand, and then study the achievement of the four following centuries, we find that it consisted in establishing law, developing Cities, promoting culture, as W
Water - Several famous biblical Cities had pools, such as Gibeon (2 Samuel 2:13 ), Hebron (2 Samuel 4:12 ), Samaria (1 Kings 22:38 ), and Jerusalem (2 Kings 20:20 )
Vengeance - In cases of uncertainty over unintentional death, the perpetrator could find protection from the victim's surviving relatives in the Cities of refuge (Numbers 35:22-29 )
Asher, Aser - When Hezekiah proclaimed a solemn passover and sent invitations to the Cities of Israel as well as to Judah, though many laughed the messengers to scorn, divers of Asher humbled themselves and came to Jerusalem
Hittites - They inhabited the whole region between the Euphrates and Damascus, their chief Cities being Carchemish on the Euphrates, and Kadesh, now Tell Neby Mendeh, in the Orontes valley, about six miles south of the Lake of Homs
Dispersion - In the apostles' time they were found in considerable numbers in all the principal Cities
Elam - Discoveries in Elam prove Susa one of the oldest Cities in the East and its monarchs quasiindependent, while acknowledging Assyria's and Babylon's successive supremacy
Famine And Drought - The siege of Cities also resulted in famine, such as the siege of Samaria by Ben-hadad (2 Kings 6:24-25 ) and the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 25:2-3 )
False Prophet - They suffered the destruction of their Cities (Jeremiah 7:14-16 ; Jeremiah 23:39 )
Laver - Solomon's "molten sea" was made of the copper captured from Tibhath and Chun, Cities of Hadarezer king of Zobah (1 Chronicles 18:8), five cubits high, ten diameter, 30 circumference; one hand-breadth thick; containing 3,000 baths according to Chronicles, but 2,000 in Kings; 2,000 is probably correct, Chronicles reading is a transcriber's error
Ur - It may be that Harran owed its foundation to a king of Ur; at any rate the two Cities were bound together by the worship of the same deity, the closest and most enduring bond of union that existed in the ancient world
Council - ...
Their authority extended even to Jews in foreign Cities (Acts 9:2)
Gibeah - This may be the home of King Abijah's wife Maacah (2 Chronicles 13:2 ) and could be same as the place name presupposed in the list of Caleb's descendants (1 Chronicles 2:49 ), a list including city names rather than personal names, perhaps indicating the clans who originally inhabited the Cities
Gift, Giving - In the Old Testament such gifts include: the Promised Land (Genesis 12:7 )—including its successful conquest (Deuteronomy 2:36 ), possessing its Cities (Deuteronomy 6:10 ), and its spoils (Deuteronomy 20:14 ); the sabbath (Exodus 16:29 ); the promises (1 Kings 8:56 ); the covenants (2 Kings 17:15 ); the law (Exodus 24:12 ); and peace (Leviticus 26:6 )
Iconium, - Paul, who addressed it among other Cities in his Epistle to the Galatians
Build up - "God will rebuild the Cities of Judah" (Psalm 69:35 )
Rhodes - ‘With regard to harbours, roads, walls, and other buildings, it so far surpasses other Cities, that we know of none equal, much less superior to it’ (Strabo, xiv
Thessalonica - coast of Macedonia and Thrace, connecting thereby those regions with Rome, Thessalonica, with its harbour on the other hand connecting it commercially with Asia Minor, naturally took the leading place among the Cities in that quarter
Pacification - in January 1562, permitting the free exercise of the reformed religion near all the Cities and towns of the realm
Tower - The walls of ancient Oriental Cities were generally provided with towers at frequent intervals
Beth-Shemesh - ” Beth-shemesh is a name applied to four different Cities in the Old Testament
Castle - ” See Fortified Cities
Gedaliah - ), to govern the Cities of Judah and the farmers and vinedressers, who were allowed to remain in the land (Jeremiah 39:10; Jeremiah 39:14; Jeremiah 40:5-6; Jeremiah 40:11; Jeremiah 52:16)
Anathema - Similarly Israel's vow (Numbers 21:1-3): "if Thou wilt deliver this people into my hand, I will utterly destroy (Hebrew make a cheerem or anathema of) their Cities
Mesopotamia - As to (c), the southern region of Mesopotamia contained several Cities of importance
Ashkelon - (assh' kih lahn) One of five principal Cities of the Philistines (pentapolis), located on the Mediterranean coast on the trade route, Via Maris, and designated for Judah in the conquest
Ages, Middle - If we consider the centuries it took to do this as closing just prior to the year one thousand, and then study the achievement of the four following centuries, we find that it consisted in establishing law, developing Cities, promoting culture, as W
Benjamin - It contained the important Cities of Jerusalem (in its south border), Bethel, Gibeon, Ramah, etc
Captivity - These places are supposed to be in the north of Assyria; but in the above passage in Kings the words are added "and in the Cities of the Medes
Sinai - 'Ain Gadis is on the frontier of the Negeb or south country, which is now waste through neglect of the water supply, but bears traces of former cultivation arid ruins of many Cities
Sardis - 17, under the emperor Tiberius, an earthquake desolated Sardis and 11 other Cities of Asia; Rome remitted its taxes for five years, and the emperor gave a benefaction from the privy purse
Gregorius, Bishop of Merida - In this division Lusitania and Carthaginensis fell to the Alani, themselves to be shortly destroyed by the Goths under Walga (418), and Merida with its splendid buildings and Roman prestige, with all the other great Cities of S
Ai - ...
The suggestions for solving this problem are basically three: (1) the Bible contains an inaccurate or legendary story built on the earlier fame of the city; (2) the Israelites actually destroyed Bethel (not Ai), but the twin Cities (see Ezra 2:28 ; and Nehemiah 7:32 ) were considered to be the same, or (3) further archaeological evidence will reveal a different site for Ai
Amalek, Amalekites - The boundaries of the habitat of the Amalekites at this time are said to have been from Telem, one of the southern Cities of Judah ( Joshua 15:24 ), to Shur on the way to Egypt ( 1 Samuel 15:4 )
Gershon, Gershonites - (2) After the settlement in Palestine, thirteen Cities were assigned to them ( Joshua 21:6 ; 1618836193_36 = 1 Chronicles 6:62 ; 1 Chronicles 6:71-76 )
Flock - ...
In the metaphorical usage of tsô'n, the imagery of a “multitude” may apply to people: “As the holy flock, as the flock of Jerusalem in her solemn feasts; so shall the waste Cities be filled with flocks of men: and they shall know that I am the Lord” ( Book - Large libraries of this character have been round in the ruins of Nineveh, Babylon, and adjacent Cities
Sion - Richardson observes of Sion, "At the time when I visited this sacred ground, one part of it supported a crop of barley, another was undergoing the labour of the plough, and the soil turned up consisted of stones and lime mixed with earth, such as is usually met with in the foundations of ruined Cities
Caleb - Some of them, however, after making the report of the beauty and goodness of the country, which they described to be a land flowing with milk and honey, added, that the inhabitants of it were remarkable for their strength, while its Cities were large and enclosed with walls
Benjamin - It contained the important Cities of Jerusalem (in its south border), Bethel, Gibeon, Ramah, etc
Outcasts - " And agreeably to this, the prophet Isaiah was commissioned to tell the church that in that day, meaning the gospel-day, "five Cities in Egypt should speak the language of Canaan
Swallows - " Niebuhr says, "I will observe, that among the Mohammedans, not only is the kaba a refuge for the pigeons, but also on the mosques over the graves of All and Hassein, on the Dsjamea, or chief mosque, at Helle, and in other Cities, they are equally undisturbed
Alexandria - Soon after its foundation by Alexander, it became the capital of the Ptolemies and the Grecian kings reigning in Egypt, and one of the most populous and prosperous Cities of the East
Liberty - Thus we speak of the liberties of the commercial Cities of Europe
Babylonia - The Babylonian empire was founded by Nimrod twenty centuries before Christ, and then embraced the Cities Babel, Erech, Accad, and Calneh, Genesis 10:10
Pamphylia - Its chief maritime Cities-Attalia, Perga and Side-had to deal only with a limited traffic, and never rose to any great importance
All - Before proper names of countries, Cities and nations, and before collective terms, like "Israel," it signifies either "all" or "the whole," e
Egypt - Naville in 1883, was one of the Cities he built, he must have been the Pharaoh of the Oppression. that Egypt finally lost Gaza and the adjoining Cities, which were seized by the Pulista, or Philistines. He left a list of the Cities he conquered
Joshua - On this followed the law and list of the Cities of refuge ( Joshua 20:1-3 ; Joshua 20:6 a, Joshua 20:7-9 ), and a list of the Levitical Cities ( Joshua 21:1-42 ). ]'>[3] , but the list of Naphtali’s Cities ( Joshua 19:32-39 ), which is entirely different in character from the description of the other lots, may be from JE [3] , according to which ( Joshua 18:9 ) the country was distributed by Cities. ...
In the account of the Cities of refuge (ch
Dispersion - It was the bridge between the Jew and the Greek, and soon the sound of many feet speeding over it with their message of good tidings was heard; or it was the viaduct by which the living waters that went forth from Jerusalem were led to the Cities of the Roman Empire. 92a), enable us to see how much at home the Jews were in Syria, Egypt, Asia Minor, and the Greek Cities and islands, and all the data now available afford grounds for believing that they numbered at this period from three to four and a half millions, and that they formed about seven per cent of the population of the Roman Empire (Encyclopaedia Biblica i. ...
Following Jeremiah’s advice to the exiles in Babylon, they ‘sought the peace’ of the Cities they settled in, without, however, amalgamating with the other inhabitants. ...
From the founding of Alexandria and Antioch, the Jews were πολῖται (cives), but in the older Greek Cities, except those of which the constitutions were altered by Alexander or his successors (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) v. [5]: ‘The Jews in the Graeco-Asiatic Cities,’ 7th ser
Dispersion - It was the bridge between the Jew and the Greek, and soon the sound of many feet speeding over it with their message of good tidings was heard; or it was the viaduct by which the living waters that went forth from Jerusalem were led to the Cities of the Roman Empire. 92a), enable us to see how much at home the Jews were in Syria, Egypt, Asia Minor, and the Greek Cities and islands, and all the data now available afford grounds for believing that they numbered at this period from three to four and a half millions, and that they formed about seven per cent of the population of the Roman Empire (Encyclopaedia Biblica i. ...
Following Jeremiah’s advice to the exiles in Babylon, they ‘sought the peace’ of the Cities they settled in, without, however, amalgamating with the other inhabitants. ...
From the founding of Alexandria and Antioch, the Jews were πολῖται (cives), but in the older Greek Cities, except those of which the constitutions were altered by Alexander or his successors (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) v. [5]: ‘The Jews in the Graeco-Asiatic Cities,’ 7th ser
Transportation And Travel - Heavily traveled routes such as these were a factor in the founding of many Cities. They also functioned as the principle link from which branched lesser roads connecting Cities and towns in Palestine to the rest of the Near East (Proverbs 8:2-3 ). As a result, an additional journey overland was required to transport agricultural and other trade goods to and from the ports of Ezion-geber (1 Kings 9:26-28 ) on the Red Sea and the Phoenician ports of Tyre and Sidon to the Cities of Israel. Estimates of the chariot's size in this period are based on the width of ruts in the roadways in Mesopotamian and Roman Cities
Numbers, Book of - They brought back a cluster of grapes, and said that the land was fertile, but invincible with its giants and great Cities. ]'>[15] ), ( u ) Hormah is connected with hçrem ,‘ban,’ because of the vow to destroy ban the Canaanite Cities. Levitical Cities. Cities of refuge
Assyria, History And Religion of - The foundation of other Assyrian Cities, notably Calah and Nineveh, appears in Genesis 10:11-12 . these Cities were vigorously trading as far away as Cappadocia in eastern Asia Minor. He claims to have destroyed 46 walled Cities (see 2 Kings 18:13 ) and to have taken 200,150 captives. The old gods, Anu, Enlil, and Ea, were patron deities of the oldest Sumerian Cities and were each given a share of the universe as their dominion
Priest - God also provided them with houses and accommodations, by appointing them forty-eight Cities for their habitations, Numbers 35:1-3 . In the precincts of these Cities they possessed as far as a thousand cubits beyond the walls. Of these forty-eight Cities six were appointed to be Cities of refuge, for the sake of those who should commit any casual or involuntary manslaughter; the priests had thirteen of these for their share, and all the others belonged to the Levites, Joshua 21:19
Roman Empire - Towards the end of the regal period Rome joined the other Cities of Latium in a league, in which she was destined to become the predominant partner. Assistance lent by the Samnites to Greek Cities in Campania was the occasion of the second Samnite war (326-304). Conquest of Greek Cities of South Italy. -The next stage in Rome’s career of battle was carried out in connexion with the Greek Cities in the south of Italy. She gave the Cities of Italy self-government, and as far as possible incorporated them with the Roman State. ) the free and allied Cities, comprising all the rest of Italy, which had a military alliance with Rome, regulated either by foedus (formal treaty) or by lex data (a charter). The western part, having been already planted with colonies from her parent city of Tyre, fell an easy prey to her, but the rest of the island was studded with Greek Cities, which were not prepared to give up their free constitutions for the oligarchical tyranny of Semitic barbarians
Medes - ...
In Sargon's reign the ten tribes were removed to the Cities of the Medes (2 Kings 17:6). In the deciphered inscriptions he says he founded in Media Cities which he planted with colonists from other parts of his dominions
Micah, Book of - Many Cities of Judah were destroyed, and Jerusalem was unsuccessfully besieged ( 2 Kings 18-19 ). The annals of Sennacherib boast that he laid siege to 46 Cities and countless small villages
Roman Empire - In the New Testament the political condition of the provincial Cities varies. The free Cities were governed by their own magistrates, and were exempt from Roman garrisoning; as Tarsus, Antioch in Syria, Athens, Ephesus, Thessalonica
Citizenship - In it the principle is affirmed that ‘no one could be a citizen of Rome and of other Cities at the same time, while foreigners who were not Roman citizens could be on the burgess-rolls of any number of Cities’ (ed
Apollonius of Tyana - Philostratus indeed claims the authority of "the records of Cities and temples, and Apollonius's epistles to the Eleans, Delphians, Indians, and Egyptians"; but the Cities and temples are nameless
Antioch - No city perhaps, Jerusalem excepted, has experienced more frequent revolutions, or suffered more numerous and dire calamities, than Antioch; as, besides the common plagues of eastern Cities, pestilence, famine, fire, and sword, it has several times been entirely overthrown by earthquakes. ...
To distinguish it from other Cities of the same name, the capital of Syria was called Antiochia apud Daphnem, or Antioch near Daphne, a village in the neighbourhood, where was a temple dedicated to the goddess of that name; though, in truth, the chief deity of the place was Apollo, under the fable of his amorous pursuit of the nymph Daphne; and the worship was worthy of its object
Trade And Commerce - Paul especially constantly suggests a mental background of trade and commerce, only natural in one brought up in great Cities like Tarsus and Jerusalem. The great Phœnician and Syrian Cities had factories in Italian Cities like Puteoli and Rome. A number of Cities and unions of Cities (κοινά) in the Eastern provinces were allowed to issue coins. For example, various Syrian and Phœnician Cities had factories at Puteoli, Rome, Naples, Portus, Ravenna
Roman Law in the nt - In the provinces there were organized associations of Cities, having to a great extent a religious character, though having also some relation to the law. This was especially the case in Greek Cities, and above all in Asia Minor, where the people were particularly tenacious of old customs. Inscriptions of Roman date in Greek Cities show the continuance of Greek institutions (for these statements see Rackham, Acts, p. ...
On the other hand, the Romans founded colonies in various parts of the Empire, chiefly for military reasons; their inhabitants were Roman citizens, and Roman law was observed in them more strictly; the city officials were named in Roman fashion duoviri, quaestores, CEdiles, praetores (the magistrates in Greek Cities were called στρατηγοί or ἄρχοντες, and in Acts 16:20; Acts 16:22; Acts 16:35 f. Even the inhabitants of ‘free’ Cities were not Roman citizens, or ‘Romans,’ as citizens proudly and tersely called themselves (Acts 16:21, Acts 22:25 ff. The distinction was not known at Athena, but it is found in provincial Greek Cities
Captivity - ) took it, and "carried Israel away to Halah and Habor by the river Gozan, and to the Cities of the Medes" (2 Kings 17:1-6). In the monuments he expressly says that, in order to complete the subjugation of Media, he founded in it Cities which he planted with colonists from other parts of his dominions. ) carried into Assyria 200,000 from the Jewish Cities he captured (2 Kings 18:13)
Canaan - " The Canaanites had the respite of centuries, the awful example of the Cities of the plain, and the godly example of Abraham, Melchizedek, and others; but all failed to lead them to repentance. The Israelites, in approaching the Cities of the seven doomed nations, were to offer peace on condition of their emigrating forever from their own country, or else renouncing idolatry, embracing the Noachian patriarchal religion, resigning their land and nationality, and becoming slaves. THE SOUTH, or THE NEGEB, containing 29 Cities (Joshua 15:21-32), extended from mount Halak to a line from N. of the Dead Sea, had but six Cities (Joshua 15:61-62). of Lebanon, were once the home of the Hittites, Jebusites, and Amorites (Numbers 13:29); the Cities are enumerated in Joshua 15:48-60
Pagan - (Latin: paganus, villager, rustic) ...
an expression of early Christians for heathen and heathenism, since the old idolatrous beliefs and practises lingered in country places after Christianity became common in the Cities
one who does not acknowledge the true God and practises idolatry
natural religion tending to degenerate because unaided by true religion, distorting the knowledge of God and gradually accepting belief in many false gods, resting morality on uncertain principles and therefore degrading it
condition of humanity with which the Church had to struggle for a thousand years, gradually substituting in the more enlightened world a Christian civilization for what had survived of the old pagan and later Greco-Roman civilizations of more than five thousand years
Paganism - (Latin: paganus, villager, rustic) ...
an expression of early Christians for heathen and heathenism, since the old idolatrous beliefs and practises lingered in country places after Christianity became common in the Cities
one who does not acknowledge the true God and practises idolatry
natural religion tending to degenerate because unaided by true religion, distorting the knowledge of God and gradually accepting belief in many false gods, resting morality on uncertain principles and therefore degrading it
condition of humanity with which the Church had to struggle for a thousand years, gradually substituting in the more enlightened world a Christian civilization for what had survived of the old pagan and later Greco-Roman civilizations of more than five thousand years
Shiloh - Here the Israelites assembled at the completion of the conquest, and erected the Tent of Meeting; portions were assigned to the still landless tribes, and Cities to the Levites ( Joshua 18:1 etc
Tadmor - (That it is really the city of Tadmor so famous in after times that is meant, is confirmed by the equally unhistorical details given in 2 Chronicles 8:3-4 regarding the Syrian Cities of Hamath and Zobah
Water - To this time also belong many ruins of massive aqueducts, leading water to the Cities from distant sources
Joppa - , boasted of his conquest of the Cities of Palestine; Joppa is one of those named
Slander - It is a restless evil, which disturbs society; spreads dissention through Cities and countries; disunites the strictest friendship; is the source of hatred and revenge; fills wherever it enters with disturbances and confusion; and every where is an enemy to peace, comfort, and Christian good breeding
Gibeon - With an elevation of about 2400 feet Gibeon towered above most other Cities, making it easily defended
Rabbah - Ammon's chief city, its only city named in Scripture, in contrast to the more civilized Moab's numerous Cities (Deuteronomy 3:11; 2 Samuel 12:26; 2 Samuel 17:27; Jeremiah 49:2; Ezekiel 21:20)
Micah, Book of - He was from a farming village himself (Micah 1:1), and he saw that the corruption of Israel and Judah was centred in the capital Cities, Samaria and Jerusalem (Micah 1:5; Micah 6:9)
Wall - The explorations of recent years have yielded a rich store of materials for reconstructing the fashion of the walls of Cities in ancient times
Dinah - Nothing but Jehovah's special interposition saved him and them from the penalty; Genesis 35:5, "the terror of God was upon the Cities
Torch - He admits, however, that torches are used in the Cities
Beer-Sheba - ...
Archaeology has shown Beer-sheba to be the administrative center of the Negeb by uncovering its large commercial storerooms and fortifications which were superior to the lesser Cities in the area
Nile River - The many ancient Cities in this area now lie below the water table
Lycaonia - Galatian theory is to be accepted, he passed through Galatic Lycaonia four times (Acts 14:6; Acts 21; Acts 16:1; Acts 18:23); he addressed the mixed population of its Cities-Lycaonians, Greeks, and Jews-as all alike ‘Galatians’; and the Christians of Lycaonian and Phrygian Galatia, not the inhabitants of Galatia proper, are the ‘foolish Galatians’ (Galatians 3:1) about whom he was so ‘perplexed’ (Galatians 4:20)
Ahab - Contrary to the advice of the prophetic party, he treated his captive magnanimously, and concluded an alliance with him, stipulating only that the Cities formerly taken from Israel should be restored
Galatians, Epistle to the - Galatia, however, was also the name of the Roman province embracing Galatia Proper and the region to the south of it in which were Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, the Cities evangelized by Paul on his first missionary journey; many hold that the epistle was addressed to these southern churches
Army - ' Afterwards Asa had 580,000 'mighty men of valour;' and Jehoshaphat, who had waxed great exceedingly, had as many as 1,160,000 men, besides those left in the fenced Cities
Cilicia - ...
The presence of Jews in Cilicia probably dated from the time of the early Seleucids, who settled many Jewish families in their Hellenistic Cities, giving them equal rights with Macedonians and Greeks
All - Not only does it indicate that the noun modified is a plurality, but also that the unit formed by the addition of kôl includes everything in the category indicated by the noun: “All the Cities were ten with their suburbs for the families of the children of Kohath that remained” ( Chorazin - —Mentioned once only in the Gospels, Matthew 11:21 = Luke 10:13, along with Bethsaida, as one of the ‘cities’ (πόλεις) where most of Jesus’ mighty deeds were done
Ashtaroth - However, until the ancient name of Muzerib is known, and the various sites excavated, a definite determination of the location of these Cities, and even of the difference between them, must remain impossible
Exchange - Bills of exchange, drawn on persons in a foreign country, are called foreign bills of exchange the like bills, drawn on persons in different parts or Cities of the same country, are called inland bills of exchange
Shemaiah - Upon Rehoboam and his people forsaking Jehovah, and building high places, standing images, and groves, God sent Shishak of Egypt against Jerusalem; he then took all the fenced Cities, and Shemaiah told Rehoboam and his princes, "thus saith Jehovah, Ye have forsaken Me, therefore have I also left you in the hand of Shishak
Epistle to the Galatians - Galatia, however, was also the name of the Roman province embracing Galatia Proper and the region to the south of it in which were Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, the Cities evangelized by Paul on his first missionary journey; many hold that the epistle was addressed to these southern churches
Tree - ” God forbids Israel to destroy the orchards around besieged Cities: “When thou shalt besiege a city a long time, in making war against it to take it, thou shalt not destroy the trees … : for thou mayest eat of them [1] …” ( Abijah - Abijah also took the Cities of Bethel, Jeshanah and Ephrain; and Jeroboam was not able to recover strength all the days of Abijah
Complete - Thus Cities and peoples “made peace with Israel” after they agreed to Joshua’s stipulations ( Ambassage - But details apply to the case of Archelaus, who put his friends in command of Cities, and against whom the Jews sent to the emperor an embassy of fifty men (Josephus Ant
Vinyard - The postexilic hope lay in God’s blessings on the agricultural activity of His people: “And I will bring again the captivity of my people of Israel, and they shall build the waste Cities, and inhabit them; and they shall plant vineyards, and drink the wine thereof; they shall also make gardens, and eat the fruit of them” (Amos 9:14)
Barnabas - Having revisited the Cities through which they had passed, and where they had preached the Gospel, they returned to Antioch in Syria
Reserve - 5191, 5192), three fifths of which the banks not in a reserve city (which see) may keep deposited as balances in national banks that are in reserve Cities (U
Damascus - For this purpose huge caravans assemble here at intervals, and traverse, just as of old, the desert routes to remote Cities
Ptolemais - ...
In the OT it is mentioned only as one of the Cities of Asher (Judges 1:31 ), while in Acts 21:7 it occurs as the port where St
Gal'Ilee - Merrill argues for the general correctness of Josephus' estimates, who says there were 204 Cities and villages in Galilee, the smallest of which numbered 15,000 inhabitants
Jor'Dan - Still Bethshan and Jericho to the west, Gerasa, Pella and Gadara to the east of it were important Cities, and caused a good deal of traffic between the two opposite banks
Jeho'Ram - The allies pursued them with great slaughter into their own land, which they utterly ravaged and destroyed most of its Cities
Joash - This was fulfilled, Joash smote them three times and recovered the Cities of Israel that the king of Syria had taken
Archaeology And Biblical Study - Pits and trenches dug into ancient Cities often destroyed more than they revealed. One thinks, for example, of early attempts to excavate the Cities of Ur, Babylon, and Jerusalem. Interest is growing in the investigation of small villages as opposed to an almost total concentration in the past on large, “important” Cities. Not only have villages and Cities been identified, but entire kingdoms have been located. Though the claim was earlier made on inadequate basis, evidence of Cities built by the Israelites in Egypt has not actually been found. Cities on the Palestinian hill country like Shiloh, Bethel, Gibeah, Bethzur, Debir, and Hazor underwent destruction in the late Bronze Age, and poorer Cities rose on their mounds; but the destroyer and rebuilder remain unidentified. Thutmoses III won a major victory at Megiddo in 1490 of which he left a record claiming that Megiddo is worth a thousand Cities
Galilee - It had rich alluvial plains on the north and south, a belt of populous and flourishing Cities round its border, abundance of fish in its depths, and a climate that attracted both workers and pleasure-seekers to its shores. Round its shores are the ruins of at least nine ancient Cities or towns. He speaks of 204 Cities and villages (Vita, 45), the smallest of which contained above 15,000 inhabitants (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) iii. Like his father, he was fond of building and embellishing Cities
Canaanites - The Perizzites, who make one of the seven nations of the Canaanites, are supposed, by Heylin and others, to be the descendants of Sina or Sini; and it is probable, since we do not read of their abode in Cities, that they lived dispersed, and in tents, like the Sycthians, roving on both sides of the Jordan, on the hills and plains; and that they were called by that name from the Hebrew pharatz, which signifies "to disperse. Those who dwelt in the walled Cities, and who had fixed abodes, cultivated the land; and those who wandered about, as the Perizzites seem to have done, grazed cattle: so that among the Canaanites, we discover the various classes of merchants, and, consequently, mariners; of artificers, soldiers, shepherds, and husbandmen. Procopius says, they first retreated into Egypt, but advanced into Africa, where they built many Cities, and spread themselves over those vast regions which reach to the straits, preserving their old language with little alteration. "But, after all, promiscuous massacres, the burning of Cities, the laying waste of countries, are things dreadful to reflect upon
Jews - Josephus (Antiquities, xiv,7,2) quotes Strabo as saying: "Now these Jews are already in all Cities, and it is hard to find a place on the habitable earth that hath not admitted this trihe of men, and is not possessed by it. The Crusaders massacred the Jews of the various German Cities through which they passed. Subsequent crusades were occasions for further atrocities
Moab, Moabites - ...
According to the Priestly narratives, the Israelites secured at this time the territory north of the Arnon; but the narratives differ as to whether its Cities were all assigned to Reuben (so Joshua 13:16-21 ), or whether some of the most southerly (Dibon, Ataroth, and Aroer) were assigned to Gad ( Numbers 32:34 ff. The Gadites obtained some of the southern Cities, and the Reubenites some of the northern
Thyatira - Doubtless an old Lydian settlement, it retained its Lydian name, but its history begins with its refounding by Seleucus Nicator, the first of the Seleucid kings of Syria, who saw the advantage of establishing garrison Cities and centres of Greek culture throughout his dominions, which extended from Western Asia to the Indus. It lay midway between the once royal Cities of Pergamos and Sardis, but its own significance was always purely mercantile
Exodus - Exodus 1:11 says, however, that the Israelites in Egypt built the store Cities of Pithom and Raamses for Pharaoh. If one of the store Cities was named for a king by that name, the Exodus could not have happened before 1300 B
Galilee - Josephus describes Galilee as very populous, and containing two hundred and four Cities and towns. Its principal Cities were Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, Nazareth, Cana, Capernaum, Nain, Caesarea of Palestine, and Ptolemais
Hezekiah - ...
Hezekiah recovered from the Philistines all the Cities which his father Ahaz had lost, namely, of "the low country and the S. Sargon moreover removed some of the Israelites to "the Cities of the Medes"; the Scripture herein being confirmed by Assyrian monuments which mention his seizing and annexing several Median Cities, to which Assyrian policy would of course transplant distant colonists. In the first he took all Judah's fenced Cities, and Hezekiah sent saying, "I have offended; return from me, that which thou puttest upon me I will bear"; and "the king of Assyria appointed 300 talents of silver, and 30 talents of gold. "...
The monuments confirm this Scripture statement: "because Hezekiah king of Judah would not submit, I took 46 of his strong fenced Cities
Trade And Commerce - Paul especially constantly suggests a mental background of trade and commerce, only natural in one brought up in great Cities like Tarsus and Jerusalem. The great Phœnician and Syrian Cities had factories in Italian Cities like Puteoli and Rome. A number of Cities and unions of Cities (κοινά) in the Eastern provinces were allowed to issue coins. For example, various Syrian and Phœnician Cities had factories at Puteoli, Rome, Naples, Portus, Ravenna
Crete - This had already been among the Cities to whom the Romans had appealed a century before for fair treatment of their Jewish minorities (1 Maccabees 15:23 )
Chariot - This monarch is said to have organized a force of 1400 chariots ( 1 Kings 10:26 , 2 Chronicles 1:14 ), which he distributed among the principal Cities of his realm ( 1 Kings 9:19 ; 1 Kings 10:26 )
Hezekiah - Sennacherib boasted of having conquered 46 walled Cities and having taken 200,000 captives
Bethsaida - At a later period this name again came into circulation, and appears in the catalogue of Jewish Cities by Pliny
Jordan River - Many Cities of antiquity were built close to the point of juncture of the tributaries and the main river
Zebulun - The tribe had four of its Cities assigned to Mesarite Levites
Tell - ” Similarly, David made certain there were no survivors from the Philistine Cities he looted so no one would “tell” it to Achish ( Babylon, Kingdom of - Among its chief Cities may be mentioned Ur (now Mugheir or Mugayyar), on the western bank of the Euphrates; Uruk, or Erech (Genesis 10:10 ) (now Warka), between Ur and Babylon; Larsa (now Senkereh), the Ellasar of Genesis 14:1 , a little to the east of Erech; Nipur (now Niffer), south-east of Babylon; Sepharvaim (2 Kings 17:24 ), "the two Sipparas" (now Abu-Habba), considerably to the north of Babylon; and Eridu, "the good city" (now Abu-Shahrein), which lay originally on the shore of the Persian Gulf, but is now, owing to the silting up of the sand, about 100 miles distant from it
Tyre - 22), ‘were formerly, and are at present, illustrious and splendid Cities, but which of the two should be called the capital of Phœnicia is a matter of dispute among the inhabitants
Diana - ) Games were celebrated at Ephesus in her honor, and her worship was the He uniting politically Ephesus and other Cities
Levites - The Levites were not given a tribal inheritance in the Promised Land (God was their inheritance) but were placed in 48 Levitical Cities throughout the land (Numbers 18:20 ; Numbers 35:1-8 ; Joshua 13:14 ,Joshua 13:14,13:33 ; See Numbers 18:24-32 )
Lebanon - ...
In the Bible, Lebanon is celebrated in various capacities. ...
Tyre to which Ezekiel 27-28 is devoted, was one of the most famous Cities of the ancient world
Micah, Micaiah - Micaiah , one of the teachers sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the commandments of Jahweh in the Cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:7 )
Gaza - ) One of the five Philistine Cities, Mentioned in the first and latest books of Scripture, and even now exceeding Jerusalem in size
Gaza - (Γάζα)...
Gaza, the most southern of the five chief Cities of Philistia, was important as the last place of call on the road to Egypt
Harlot - In Cities upon the coast of Asia Minor immoral cults prevailed in NT times
Ishmael - He treacherously slew Gedaliah, whom the king of Babylon had made governor over the Cities of Judah, and all the Jews that were with him in Mizpah
Baal, Master - Many Cities made Baal a local god and honored him with special acts of worship: Baal-peor ( Dancing - In the Cities and in the houses of the rich, the large reception room, or the open paved court, into which all the apartments opened, was available for the purpose
Babblings - In the fermenting vat of the Greek Cities in the Apostolic as well as in the sub-Apostolic Age there were frothy, windy men who knew everything about religion except ‘the practick part’ (cf
Lollards - Mosheim informs us, that many societies of this kind are still subsisting at Cologne, and in the Cities of Flanders, though they have evidently departed from their ancient rules
Philip the Evangelist - At Azotus (Ashdod) and the Cities along the Philistine sea coast he preached all the way to Caesarea
Fame - Not only in Galilee, but in all the provinces of Palestine, and in Cities of Syria, men talked and speculated regarding a new Figure that was in their midst
Asiarch - This Diet of Asia was a body composed of a number of representatives, one or more of whom were elected by each of a number of Cities in the province
Ezekiel - From the beginning of the twenty-fifth to the end of the thirty- second chapter, the prophet foretels the conquest and ruin of many nations and Cities, which had insulted the Jews in their affliction; of the Ammonites, the Moabites, the Edomites, and Philistines; of Tyre, of Sidon, and Egypt; all of which were to be punished by the same mighty instrument of God's wrath against the wickedness of man; and in these prophecies he not only predicts events which were soon to take place, but he also describes the condition of these several countries in the remote periods of the world
Abomination - Upon this occasion the Jews, under the conduct of Barchochab, rose up in arms against the Romans, and in the war had fifty Cities demolished, nine hundred and eighty-five of their best towns destroyed, and five hundred and eighty thousand men slain by the sword; and in the end of the war, B
Dispersion - (312 280) gave the Jews rights in all the Cities founded by him in Syria and Asia ( Ant
Potter, Pottery - ]'>[5] ; Petrie’s Tell el Hesy ; Bliss’s Mound of Many Cities; Excavations in Palestine , by Bliss, Macalister, and Wünsch, etc
Jezreel (1) - The city's eastern gateway was the palace gateway, in front of which was the open space, usual in Eastern Cities, called "the mounds," where the dogs, their scavengers, devoured Jezebel's carcass
Harlot - In Cities upon the coast of Asia Minor immoral cults prevailed in NT times
Levites - ...
Forty-eight Cities were appointed them (four on the average from each tribe), including the six Cities of refuge and (of suburbs, meadow for their cattle) 1,000 cubits out from the city walls, each of the four sides being 2,000 cubits long. ) The phrase "the Levite that is within thy gates" is appropriate (Deuteronomy 14:27), for the Levites' Cities did not cease to belong to the tribes within which they lay
Babylon, History And Religion of - ...
The political and socio-economic history of Babylonia in Hammurabi's time is well known thanks to extensive collections of cuneiform tablets discovered at various Cities in Mesopotamia, especially at Mari. ...
Anu, Enlil, and Ea, were patron deities of the oldest Sumerian Cities and were each given a share of the Universe as their dominion. During the festival, statues of other gods arrived from their Cities to “visit” Marduk in Esagila
Priests And Levites - Levitical and priestly Cities . According to Numbers 35:1-8 , there were assigned to the Levites in different parts of Palestine 48 Cities with suburbs and surrounding pasture land to about 500 yards distance. This provision of Cities and land in P
This assignation of priestly Cities must therefore be regarded as a sort of historical theory, which grew partly out of some sort of provision, in land and houses in and about Jerusalem, having been actually made in the period of the Second Temple for the priests and other officers (Nehemiah 11:3 ; Nehemiah 11:21 , 1 Chronicles 9:2 ), partly because the Cities so assigned in P Manasseh - But the ‘clan’ names, Abiezer, Shechem, and the names of the Cities appended show that they were on the West. It is clear from what is said of the Cities which were in Issachar and Asher ( Joshua 17:11 ff
Samuel - )...
The Philistines restored the Cities and adjoining districts which they had taken from Israel, close up to Ekron and Gath, the Cities of the Philistines; and the effect of Israel's victory on the Amorites was they kept peace with Israel (compare Joshua 10:6; Judges 1:34-35)
Fulness of the Time - Conscious of being raised above the manifold forms of heathen superstition around them, the colonies of Jews settled in the trading Cities of foreign lands felt themselves impelled to aspire after a certain elevation of life; while the loftier moral teaching they maintained in their synagogues attracted considerable numbers of proselytes from paganism. They were the cosmopolitans of the period—inquisitive, openminded, eager to enter into all vivid interests; and in the great trading Cities in Asia Minor and along the Mediterranean shore they fostered the spirit of toleration and helped to secure full scope for the advocacy of all forms of belief
Commerce - Sometimes the caravans lodge in Cities; but when they do not, they pitch their tents so as to form an encampment; and during the night keep watch alternately for the sake of security. In the Cities there are public inns, called Chan and Carvanserai, in which the caravans are lodged without expense
Phenicia - Among the chief Phoenician Cities were Tyre and Sidon, Gebal north of Beirut, Arvad or Arados and Zemar
Taxes - The portoria were levied at harbors, piers and the gates of Cities
Levi - Levi received no land inheritance but Cities scattered through Israel (Joshua 21:1-40), and depended on tithes paid by the other tribes
Adam - Adam is not laden with the task of building temples and Cities
Hazael - The atrocities foretold (the same as in Hosea 13:16) were doubtless perpetrated by him when in Jehu's days "Jehovah cut Israel short, and Hazael smote them in all the coasts of Israel, from Jordan eastward, all . Jehoash, son of Jehoahaz, recovered from Benhadad, Hazael's son, the Cities taken by Hazael
Kohath, Kohathites - (2) After the settlement in Palestine, 23 Cities were assigned to them ( Joshua 21:4 f
Giants - The ruined Cities of Bashan are thought by many to evidence their possession formerly by giant races
Deacon - ...
It is in these Greek Cities, then, that we first find the deacon as a regular official, called to office after probation (1 Timothy 3:10 ), and standing alongside the bishop in the ministry of the Church ( Philippians 1:1 , 1 Timothy 3:1-13 )
Book - The sense of sêpher is similar to “scroll” (megillah): “Therefore go thou, and read in the roll [1] which thou hast written from my mouth, the words of the Lord in the ears of the people in the Lord’s house upon the fasting day: and also thou shalt read them in the ears of all Judah that come out of their Cities” ( Eat - 41:35 with the sense of “food supply”: “And let them gather all the food of those good years that come, and lay up corn under the hand of Pharaoh, and let them keep food in the Cities
Medes, me'Dia - We first hear of certain "cities of the Medes," in which the captive Israelites were placed by "the king of Assyria" on the destruction of Samaria, B
Captivity - Twenty years later, Shalmaneser carried away the rest of Israel, the northern kingdom, 2 Kings 17:6, and located them in distant Cities, many of them probably not far from the Caspian Sea; and their place was supplied by colonies from Babylon and Persia
Province - Each province was governed according to a definite statute, which determined the administrative procedure and defined the privileges of individual Cities in it
Reformation - His followers and all other Reformers gradually received the name Protestants, from the protest issued by the Lutheran princes and Cities against the Edict of Speyer (1529)
Phrygia - Hence this portion of Phrygia, with its Cities of Antioch and Iconium, came to be known as Phrygia Galatica
Nicopolis - (Νικόπολις, ‘City of victory’)...
In days of almost constant warfare, when many triumphs had to be commemorated, this was a favourite name for newly founded Cities
Israel - Thus Genesis 18:1-33 ; Genesis 19:1-38 the destruction of Sodom and the other Cities of the plain is a story which grew up to account for the Dead Sea, which, we now know, was produced by very different causes. Exodus 1:11 states that they were compelled to aid in building the Cities of Pithom and Raamses. Excavations have shown that these Cities were founded by Rameses ii. Traditions attach themselves to different men, why not to different Cities? Perhaps, as several scholars have suggested, another solution is more probable, that not all of the Hebrews went to Egypt. ]'>[10] document in Numbers 32:1-42 that the conquered Cities of this region were divided between the tribes of Reuben and Gad. It is usually supposed that the territory of Reuben lay to the south of that of Gad, extending from the Arnon to Elealeh, north of Heshbon; but in reality each took certain Cities in such a way that their territory interpenetrated ( Numbers 32:34 )
Trade And Commerce - But at such times as the condition of the Israelitish Cities allowed of the purchase of luxuries i. In most ancient Cities the temples served as places of security, where treasure could be stored, and this is likely to have been the case in Israelitish Cities also. After the conquests of Alexander, ghettos began to be formed in the great Hellenic Cities, and the Roman conquests soon led to colonies of Jews settling yet farther west
Maccabees - Thanks to the disturbance in the Syrian Empire, Jonathan conquered various Cities in the Maritime Plain and to the south of Judæa, re-established treaties with Rome and Sparta, and strengthened the fortifications of Jerusalem, cutting off the Syrian garrison with a high wall. Alexander carried on still more vigorously the monarchical policy of Aristobulus, and undertook the extension of Judæa by the conquest of the surrounding Cities, including those of Upper Galilee. During the latter part of his reign he was engaged in struggles with the Greek Cities of Palestine, in the siege of one of which he died, bequeathing his kingdom to his wife Alexandra, with the advice that she should make friends with the Pharisees (Jos Ministry - The Lake and its Cities,—Capernaum with others,—Nazareth, Cana, and other towns and a number of villages, the plains and mountains of populous Galilee shared in the deeds of His busy life. Other Cities of Galilee. ...
Cities and Villages of Galilee. ...
Cities and Villages
Justice - ...
( c ) In the monarchical period a further development takes place; the older system, whereby justice was administered by the elders of the Cities, is indeed still seen to be in vogue (cf. 1 Kings 21:8-13 ); but two other powers had now arisen, and both tended to diminish the power and moral influence of the elders of the Cities, so far as their judicial functions were concerned. ...
But in spite of the rise of these two new factors the king and the priesthood it must be borne in mind that the elders of the Cities still continued to carry out their judicial functions
Galilee (2) - In these two Cities was centred the chief legal administration of affairs in Galilee during the life of Christ. ‘The Cities lie very thick, and the very many villages are everywhere so populous from the richness of the soil, that the very least of them contains more than fifteen thousand inhabitants’ (Josephus BJ iii. In another place Josephus says there were 240 Cities and villages in Galilee (Life, 45), and that many of these had strong walls
Egypt - The provinces and Cities of Egypt mentioned in the Bible may, in like manner, be arranged under these three great divisions: ...
1. In this district, or adjacent to it, are mentioned also the Cities Pithom, Raamses, Pi-Beseth, and On or Helipolis. The Bible mentions here only two Cities, namely, No, or more fully No-Ammon, for which the Seventy put Diospolis, the Greek name for Thebes, the most ancient capital of Egypt, (see AMMON, or No-Ammon, or No;) and Syene, the southern city and limit of Egypt
Jude, Epistle of - Even angels were visited with eternal punishment for breaking bounds, and for fornication like that for which afterwards the Cities of the plain perished. The Epistle affords very little evidence for the locality of the readers, but Syria or the Hellenistic Cities of Palestine seem to suit the conditions
Ahab - Ahab was pre-eminent for luxurious tastes; his elaborately ornamented ivory palace (1 Kings 22:39; Amos 3:15), the many Cities he built or restored, as Jericho (then belonging to Israel, not Judah) in defiance of Joshua's curse (1 Kings 16:34), his palace and park at Jezreel (now Zerin), in the plain of Esdraelon, his beautiful residence while Samaria was the capital, all show his magnificence. ...
He was defeated and taken prisoner, but released, on condition of restoring to Ahab all the Cities of Israel which he held, and making streets for Ahab in Damascus, as his father had made in Samaria (i
Triumphs - But the song which the women of Israel chanted when they went out to meet Saul and his victorious army, after the death of Goliath, and the discomfiture of the Philistines, possesses somewhat of a different character, turning chiefly on the valorous exploits of Saul and the youthful champion of Israel: "And it came to pass, as they came, when David was returned from the slaughter of the Philistine, that the women came out of all the Cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet King Saul with tabrets, with joy, and with instruments of music: and the women answered one another as they played, and said, Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands," 1 Samuel 18:6-7 . The titles of the vanquished nations were inscribed on wooden frames; and images or representations of the conquered countries and Cities were exhibited
Samaria - But Alexander Balas, king of Syria, restored to Jonathan Maccabaeus the Cities of Lydda, Ephrem, and Ramatha, which he cut off from the country of Samaria, 1Ma_10:30 ; 1Ma_10:38 ; 1Ma_11:28 ; 1Ma_11:34 . After the death of Stephen, Acts 8:1-3 , when the disciples were dispersed through the Cities of Judea and Samaria, Philip made several converts in this city
Jesuits - ...
While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other Cities
Jesus, Company of - ...
While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other Cities
Jesus, Society of - ...
While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other Cities
Assyria - He also brought under tribute Jehu, and the Cities of Tyre and Sidon
Pentateuch - Lastly, they think they observe certain strokes in the Pentateuch which can hardly agree with Moses, who was born and bred in Egypt; as what he says of the earthly paradise, of the rivers that watered it and ran through it; of the Cities of Babylon, Erech, Resen, and Calmeh; of the gold of Pison; of the bdellium, of the stone of Sohem, or onyx stone, which was to be found in that country
Patriarchs - Usher, Pagi, De Marca, and Morinus, attribute the establishment of the grand patriarchates to the apostles themselves, who, in their opinion, according to the description of the world then given by geographers, pitched on three principal Cities in the three parts of the known world, viz
Virgin - Prophets sometimes used the word poetically, particularly in relation to nations and Cities
Roads - Paul was led to the chief Cities of his day, and found there acceptance for his message, which was carried thence by traders and others into the remote corners or the Empire
Inquisition - Accordingly, they were insulted by the multitude in many places, were driven in an ignominious manner out of some Cities, and were put to death in others; and Conrad, of Marpurg, the first German inquisitor who derived his commission from Gregory IX
Come Up, Ascend - So Israel “went up” to make war against the Moabites, who heard of the Israelites’ approach while still dwelling in their Cities (2 Kings 3:21)
Titus - The principal design of this epistle was to give instructions to Titus concerning the management of the churches in the different Cities of the island of Crete, and it was probably intended to be read publicly to the Cretans, that they might know upon what authority Titus acted
Giant - In every part of the world domestic implements and personal ornaments, many centuries old, are obtained from tombs, from bogs and mosses, or those Cities overwhelmed by volcanic eruptions, which would be ill adapted to a gigantic race of ancestors
Society of Jesus - ...
While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other Cities
Babylon - In later times it became coterminous with many other large Cities, and Herodotus ascribes to it a circuit of 55 miles
Herod - 53) from Chalcis, with the title of king, to the government of those provinces which his father at first possessed, namely, Batanea, Trachonitis, Auranitis, and Abilene, to which several other Cities were afterwards added
Maximinus ii., Emperor - From Nicomedia and the neighbouring Cities the Christians were banished by an imperial edict, issued here as elsewhere, as at the request of the citizens themselves (ix
Galatia - Averse to the life of towns and Cities, the chieftains established themselves in hill-forts (φρούριο Palestine - to the territories of the free Cities on the N. of Jordan between it and the desert, except the territory of the free Cities Poilu, Gadara, Philadelphia, was "Perea. The hills throughout Palestine are crowned with remains of fenced Cities, scarcely a town existed in the valleys. The Philistines kept their five Cities independent of, and sometimes supreme over, Israel (1 Samuel 5; 1 Samuel 21:10; 1 Samuel 27:2; 1 Kings 2:39; 2 Kings 8:2-3). Under Rome Caesarea, (now a ruin washed by the sea) and Antipatris in this region were leading Cities of the province
Abram - In those ages some Cities had been built, and the country to some extent about them cultivated; but wide spaces of unoccupied land lay between them. Others, more bold, followed the track of rivers, and the sweep of fertile valleys, and at length some built Cities and formed settlements in those distant regions; whilst others, either from attachment to their former mode of life, or from necessity, continued in their pastoral occupations, and followed the supplies afforded for their flocks by the still expanding regions of the fertile earth. Thus were laid the foundations of commerce, and thus the maritime Cities were gradually rendered opulent and powerful. The territories of the kings of the Cities of the plain were a few years afterward invaded by a confederacy of the petty kings of the Euphrates and the neighbouring countries, and Lot and his family were taken prisoners. As Abraham accompanied them toward the valley of the Jordan, the same divine person, for so he manifestly appears, announced the dreadful ruin impending over the licentious Cities among which Lot had taken up his abode
Judea - Its principal Cities were Samaria, the capital of the kingdom of Israel, north of Sichem, and equally distant from Jordan and the sea coast, afterward named Sebaste by Herod, in honour of Augustus; Jezrael, or Esdraelon, about four leagues north from Samaria; Sichem, or Sychar, called by the Romans Neapolis, eight miles south of Samaria, in a valley between the mountains Gerizim and Ebal; Bethsan, called by the Greek writers Scythopolis, about twenty miles north-east of Sichem; Caesarea of Palestine, anciently called Turris Stratonis, greatly enlarged by Herod, and long the principal city of the province, about nineteen leagues north north-west from Jerusalem; Dora, now Tartura, nine miles north from Caesarea, on the road to Tyre; Apollonia, now Arzuf, on the sea coast, twenty-two miles south of Caesarea; and Hadadrimmon, afterward called Maximianopolis, about seventeen miles eastward of Caesarea. There were Galaadites, or Gileadites, in 32 20' north latitude, now Zarca, east from Jordan, and north from the Jabbok; containing the Cities of Ramoth-Gilead, Mahanaim, Jabesh-Gilead, at the foot of Mount Gilead. Batanaea, anciently Basan, now Bitinia, in 32 25' north latitude, formerly celebrated for its oaks and pastures, was situated to the north of Galaadites, and contained the Cities of Adrea, or Edrei, Astaroth, and Bathyra. There remains to be noticed the Decapolis, or confederation of ten Cities in the last mentioned districts, which having been occupied during the Babylonish captivity by Heathen inhabitants, refused to adopt the Mosaic ritual after the restoration of the Jews, and found it necessary to unite their strength against the enterprises of the Asmonean princes
Hittites And Hivites - They conquered Kanesh and other central Cities and established their capital at Hattusas. To restore lost tin and copper supplies, he immediately extended his control over a line of Cities from Hattusas through the Cilician Gates to the Mediterranean Sea
Abraham - ...
Some fourteen years before this, while Abram was still in Chaldea, Palestine had been invaded by Chedorlaomer, King of Elam, who brought under tribute to him the five Cities in the plain to which Lot had removed. This tribute was felt by the inhabitants of these Cities to be a heavy burden, and after twelve years they revolted
Destructionists - So the Cities of Sodom and Gomorrah are said to have suffered the vengeance of an eternal fire; that is, they were so effectually consumed, or destroyed, that they could never be rebuilt; the phrase, eternal fire, signifying the irrevocable destruction of those Cities, not the degree or duration of the misery of the inhabitants who perished
Land (of Israel) - A number of laws in the Book of Deuteronomy are rooted in the land: the year of release from debt (15:1-11), appointing just judges (16:18-20), selection of a king (17:14-20), abominations of the nations (18:9-14), the Cities of refuge (19:1-13), removing landmarks (19:14), unknown murder (21:1-9), leaving a hanged man on a tree (21:22-23), divorce (24:1-4), and just weights and measurements (25:13-16). ...
Three Cities of refuge—Kedesh in Galilee, Shechem, and Kirjath Arba (Hebron)were located "in the land" (Deuteronomy 19:1-3 ), but provision was made for three more, two of which were outside the land when the territory was enlarged (Joshua 20:1-9 )
Mill - Near Ispahan, and some of the other great Cities of Persia, he saw water mills; but he did not meet with a single wind mill in the east. " When they are not impelled, as in this instance, to premature exertions by the arrival of strangers, they grind their corn in the morning at break of day: the noise of the mill is then to be heard every where, and is often so great as to rouse the inhabitants of the Cities from their slumbers; for it is well known they bake their bread every day, and commonly grind their corn as it is wanted
Colossians - By Paul's day it had lost much of its importance, perhaps due to the growth of the neighboring Cities. Extremely detrimental to all of the Cities of the region were the earthquakes which occasionally did severe damage
Judah - The priests' nine Cities were all in Judah; the Levites had no Cities in Judah (Joshua 21:9-19)
Antioch - Henceforth the city was known as a Tetrapolis, or union of four Cities (Strabo, xvi. ) about the same time as Syrian Antioch, being another of the many Cities which he called after his father Antiochus. The early Seleucid kings settled Jews in many of their Cities, and gave them the same civic rights as the Greeks, finding them to be trusty supporters and often real Hellenizers
War - Their warriors were none of those fabulous heroes or professed conquerors, whose business it was to ravage Cities and provinces, and to reduce foreign nations under their dominion, merely for the sake of governing, or purchasing a name for themselves. In the age of Moses and Joshua, the walls which surrounded Cities were elevated to no inconsiderable height, and were furnished with towers. Towers of this kind were erected, likewise, over the gates of Cities
Sun - ( 2 Chronicles 14:5 ) as existing in all the Cities of Judah as early as the reign of Asa
Titus, Epistle to - We read of several Cities having congregations in need of supervision (Titus 1:5 ), and of elders to be chosen from among those who were fathers of ‘believing’ ( i
Joshua, the Book of - ...
The allotment of the land to the different tribes, with the appointment of Cities of refuge, the provision for the Levites (13-22), and the dismissal of the eastern tribes to their homes
Joppa - ) included Judaea in the province of Syria, Joppa was one of the Cities which ‘he left in a state of freedom’ (Jos
Adonijah - One of those sent, in the third year of Jehosbaphat, to teach the Law in the Cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:7-9 )
Israel - ...
Israel when carried away were placed in Halah and in Habor by the river of Gozan (in the neighbourhood of the river Khabour, an affluent of the river Euphrates), and in the Cities of the Medes
Levi - (See Genesis 49:5-7) And the prediction of this tribe being divided in Jacob, and scattered in Israel, was literally fulfilled; for we find in the settlement in Canaan, the sons of Levi had no share in the division of the land, but only certain Cities among the other tribes
Armour - The Roman auxiliaries who garrisoned Judaea were recruited wholly from the Greek Cities of Palestine, such as Sebaste and Caesarea
Build - In like manner, Asa began with the Cities of Geba and Mizpah and “fortified” them (1 Kings 15:22)
Tithes - So, properly speaking, there were only two sorts of tithes, that which was given to the Levites and priests, and that which was applied to making feasts of charity, either in the temple of Jerusalem, or in other Cities
Baal - In the time of Ezekiel it was Moabite, one of the Cities which were the "glory of the country
Pontus - There is little doubt that the adjective Pontikos , applied to Aquila in Acts 18:2 , means that, though a Jew, he was a native of the Roman province, and it is interesting in connexion with this to mention that an inscription has recently been found referring to one Aquila at Sinope, one of the principal Cities of the Roman province Pontus
Jubilee - Houses in walled Cities were excepted; the owner might buy them back within a year, otherwise they became absolutely the purchaser's own
Paula, a Roman Lady - The bishops of the surrounding Cities were present
Theodotus, Martyr at Ancyra - The narrative shews us how quietly Christians in country districts pursued their occupations and enjoyed daily worship, while those in the Cities were suffering tortures and death, and is most valuable as illustrating the general condition of the Christians in Asia Minor during the earlier years of Diocletian's persecution
Synagogue - Throughout Asia Minor, Macedonia, Greece and its islands, in Cities such as Ephesus, Philippi, Thessalonica, Athens, and Corinth, the synagogues, being the gathering-places for Jews and ‘God-fearing’ half-proselytes (Acts 13:16; Acts 13:26; Acts 13:43; Acts 17:17), offered a sphere of activity to St. -The members of a religious community having a synagogue for its centre-and there were, as shown above, often many in the larger Cities-were called bene hakkeneseth, ‘sons of the synagogue’ (Meg. On Monday and Thursday the villagers coming to the Cities for the court or the market attended the synagogue in sufficient numbers to have a portion of the Torah read (Tôs. On week days only larger Cities had the required ‘ten men of leisure’ (baṭlânîm || Meg
Money (2) - There were also those issued by the semi-autonomous Cities of Phœnicia on the Phœnician standard of 224 grains to the tetradrachm. 36) holds that from the time of Pompey the Phœnician Cities lost the power of issuing silver money, and points out that the extant Phœnician tetradrachms never bear the names of Emperors or any other indication of Roman sway. Few coins of this denomination were issued from the Phœnician Cities or from Antioch, and the city of Caesarea in Cappadocia had only recently begun to coin drachms on the Phœnician standard (of 55 grains) for use in the provinces of Syria and Cappadocia (Mommsen, op. The only coins then current in Palestine which answered exactly to the ‘shekel of the sanctuary’—leaving out of account the shekels commonly but probably erroneously assigned to Simon Maccabaeus (see above)—were those which had for long been coined in the Phœnician Cities; and the Temple tax, along with other sacred dues, was paid in this currency
Episcopacy - It is urged that some of the churches which were formed in large Cities during the lives of the apostles, and especially that at Jerusalem, consisted of such vast numbers as could not possibly assemble at one place. The apostles seem to have taught chiefly in large Cities; they settled ministers there, who, preaching in country villages, or smaller towns, increased the number of converts: it would have been most reasonable that those new converts, which lay at a considerable distance from the large towns, should, when they grew numerous, have formed themselves into distinct churches, under the care of their proper pastors or bishops, independently of any of their neighbours; but the reverence which would naturally be paid to men who had conversed with the apostles, and perhaps some desire of influence and dominion, from which the hearts of very good men might not be entirely free, and which early began to work, (John 3:1-36
Babylon - ...
Origin Information about Babylon's origin has been lost in antiquity, but it did not rank among the leading Mesopotamian Cities before 3000 B. Among such great Cities it alone bore a Semitic name
Preach, Proclaim - ...
Matthew (9:35) and Luke (8:1) tell of Jesus proclaiming the gospel throughout Cities and villages. ...
Matthew's distinctive description (11:1) of Jesus' journey throughout the Cities teaching and proclaiming uses this term (kerysso [1]), showing the public nature of Jesus' proclamation
Genealogy - The existence of all the twelve sons of Jacob as individuals is on various grounds improbable; they represent tribes, and in many cases their ‘descendants’ are simply individual names coined to account for Cities, clans, and subdivisions of the tribes ( Genesis 46:8 , Numbers 26:1-65 ). So among the ‘sons’ of Caleb we find Cities of Judah (Hebron, Tappuah, Ziph, Gibea, etc
Nin'Eveh - Asshur, or according to the marginal reading, which is generally preferred, Nimrod is there described, ( Genesis 10:11 ) as extending his kingdom from the land of Shinar or Babylonia, in the south, to Assyria in the north and founding four Cities, of which the most famous was Nineveh. On the other hand it has been conjectured, with much probability, that these groups of mounds are not ruins of separate Cities, but of fortified royal residences, each combining palaces, temples, propylaea, gardens and parks, and having its peculiar name; and that they all formed part of one great city built and added to at different periods, sad consisting of distinct quarters scattered over a very large and frequently very distant one from the other
Tiglath-Pileser - 737 his objective was the Medes, in many of whose Cities he set up bas-reliefs with the royal image
Nebuchadnezzar - Rawlinson, "the bricks belonging perhaps to a hundred different towns and Cities in the neighbourhood of Baghdad, and I never found any other legend than that of Nebuchadnezzar, son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon
Mizpah - Mizpah with Bethel and Gilgal were the three Cities which Samuel as judge visited on circuit
Nethinim - Further, only a portion of them, like the priests, Levites, singers, and porters, dwelt in Jerusalem; the others ‘dwelt in their Cities’ ( Ezra 2:70 = Nehemiah 7:73 , 1 Chronicles 9:2 )
Scribes - " (Matthew 9:36 ) While they were to be found only in the council or in their schools, he journeyed through the Cities and villages
Sardis - ]'>[1] form Σάρδις is found in Ptolemy)...
Sardis, the capital of the kingdom of Lydia, was one of the most ancient and renowned Cities of Asia Minor
Reuben - The Dibon stone shows that Moab wrested from Reuben many Cities assigned by Joshua to them
Bread - It is to the smoke issuing from one of these, while being heated, that the smoke of the ruined Cities of the plain is compared in Genesis 19:28 (EV Galilee, Sea of - Nine Cities stood on the shores of the lake, of which only two are now inhabited, namely, Magdala, consisting of a few mud huts, and Tiberias, sadly changed from its ancient prosperity
Italy - ...
Some of the Cities of Italy-certainly Rome and Puteoli, and probably others, though there is no definite information on the point-had felt the presence of Judaism before they were offered Christianity
Jephthah - Jephthah died after judging six years, and was buried among his people, the Gileadites, in one of their Cities
Zechariah - One of Judah's princes under Jehoshaphat, sent to teach the law of Jehovah in Judah's Cities (2 Chronicles 17:7)
Ashtoreth - In Bashan, the Cities Ashtaroth or Be-eshterah and Ashteroth-karnaim presumably derived their names from the fact that various Ashtoreth-cults were located there
Nineveh - The population was large, but not densely located together as in modern Cities
Abide, Abode - ; (b) of time; it is said of believers, John 21:22,23 ; Philippians 1:25 ; 1 John 2:17 ; Christ, John 12:34 ; Hebrews 7:24 ; the Word of God, 1 Peter 1:23 ; sin, John 9:41 ; Cities, Matthew 11:23 ; Hebrews 13:14 ; bonds and afflictions, Acts 20:23 ; (c) of qualities; faith, hope, love, 1 Corinthians 13:13 ; Christ's love, John 15:10 ; afflictions, Acts 20:23 ; brotherly love, Hebrews 13:1 ; the love of God, 1 John 3:17 ; the truth, 2 John 1:2
Sycamore - To change sycamores into cedars, Isaiah 9:10 , means, to render the buildings of Cities, and the state of the nation, much more magnificent than before
Nineveh - , and of various Cities in Judea and Syria; but we discover Sennacherib's own account of his invasion of Palestine, and of the amount of tribute which king Hezekiah was forced to pay him; also pictures representing his capture of Lachish, 2 Kings 18:14 , and his officers, perhaps the railing Rabshakeh himself, presenting Jewish captives to the king, etc
Jordan - ...
At the present day, the Jordan is lost in the Dead sea; but many have supposed that in very ancient times, before the destruction of the Cities in the vale of Sodom, the Jordan passed through the Dead Sea and the vale of Siddim, and continued its course southward to the Elanitic Gulf of the Red Sea
Phoeni'ce, Phoenic'ia - (land of palm trees ) a tract of country, of which Tyre and Sidon were the principal Cities, to the north of Palestine, along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea bounded by that sea on the west, and by the mountain range of Lebanon on the east
Jezebel - She was daughter of the king-priest of the Phoenician Cities Tyre and Sidon, and set out to make Phoenician Baalism the official religion of Israel
Lebanon - It ran parallel to the coast, leaving only a narrow coastal plain for the Phoenician Cities, most important of which were Tyre and Sidon (see PHOENICIA)
Talents - His zeal and enterprise win the prince’s warm approval, and, since he has been faithful in a very little, he receives authority over ten Cities. He receives a reward proportionate to that of the other; that is, he is set over five Cities; but apparently the prince suspects that his relative failure is due not simply to his slighter capacity, but to his feebler devotion to his master’s interests. There the contrast between the one pound and the ten Cities might well be described in the terms employed in the parable of the Talents
Palestine - It forms the southern side of the Plain of Esdraelon, with the ancient fortress of Megiddo standing as one of its key Cities. ”...
Some of the most important Cities of Galilee were on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. It is thought that this area is the location of “the Cities of the Plain” (Genesis 13:12 ), Sodom and Gomorrah
Moab - The licentiousness of the neighboring Cities of the plain and Moab's origin accord with the more than common licentiousness attributed to Moab and Midian in Numbers 25. fares no better for having Jehovah for her God than the pagan who have idols, God "would open her side from the Cities on her frontiers, the glory of the country (a glorious country in richness of soil), Bethjeshimoth, Baalmeon, and Kiriathaim, unto the men of the East," i
Samaria - -Samaria originally denoted the capital of the kingdom of Israel, but the term was early applied to the kingdom itself, and in this sense ‘the king of Samaria,’ ‘the Cities of Samaria,’ ‘the mountains of Samaria’ are familiar expressions in the OT writings. The Assyrian conqueror Shalmancser (2 Kings 17:24), or, according to the inscriptions, his successor Sargon, deported from Samaria only the most influential families, which would have been those most likely to give trouble-27,000 persons in all-leaving the humbler classes in the Cities, as well as whole minor towns and villages, undisturbed
Joshua, Theology of - Insofar as God is giving this land to his people as an inheritance, the tribal allotments, as well as the Levitical Cities and the Cities of refuge, take on a covenantal character
Simeon - ...
Their villages and 18 or 19 Cities lay round the well Beersheba in Judah's extreme south. Though Cities of Simeon were among those to which David sent presents of the Amalekite spoils, and though Ziklag was David's own property, received from Achish king of the Philistines who had wrested it from Simeon (1 Samuel 27:6; 1 Samuel 30:26, etc
Alexandria - , nearly a mile wide, and about 15 miles in circumference, it was quartered-like so many of the Hellenic Cities of the period-by two colonnaded thoroughfares crossing each other at a great central square, terminating in the four principal gates, and determining the line of the other streets, so that the whole city was laid out in parallelograms. Alexandria became the greatest of Jewish Cities, the centre of Semitism as well as of Hellenism (q
Atheist - How much more that astonishing variety and multiplicity of God's works with which we are continually surrounded! Let any man survey the face of the earth, or lift up his eyes to the firmament; let him consider the nature and instincts of brute animals, and afterward look into the operations of his own mind, and will he presume to say or suppose that all the objects he meets with are nothing more than the result of unaccountable accidents and blind chance? Can he possibly conceive that such wonderful order should spring out of confusion? or that such perfect beauty should be ever formed by the fortuitous operations of unconscious, unactive particles of matter? As well, nay better, and more easily, might he suppose that an earthquake might happen to build towns and Cities; or the materials carried down by a flood fit themselves up without hands into a regular fleet. For what are towns, Cities, or fleets, in comparison of the vast and amazing fabric of the universe! In short, Atheism offers such violence to all our faculties, that it seems scarce credible it should ever really find any place in the human understanding
Jordan - The Cities Bethshan and Jericho on the W. Of the six Cities of refuge three were E
Jephthah - He smote them from Aroer to Minnith, 20 Cities, "with a very great slaughter," so that Ammon was completely subdued. of the Jordan six years, and was buried in one of the Cities of Gilead
Dan - Later Thutmose III listed Laish among the Cities conquered in his 1468 B
Greek Language - Much of this papyri was found in Egypt in the garbage heaps of some of the major Cities
Tribes - In the division of Canaan, the tribe of Levi received no allotment of its own but was given Cities within all the other tribes (Numbers 18:24; Numbers 35:1-8; see LEVITE)
Adoption - Jair inherited 23 Cities of Gilead in right of his grandmother
Ephesus - (ehf' uh ssuhss) One of the largest and most impressive Cities in the ancient world, a political, religious, and commercial center in Asia Minor
Samaria, Samaritans - and made it one of the chief Cities of his territory
Evangelist - He went from Jerusalem to preach in Samaria, was on the road to Gaza when he converted the eunuch, was afterwards at Azotus (Ashdod), ‘and passing through he preached the gospel to all the Cities, till he came to Caesarea’ (Acts 8:5; Acts 8:26; Acts 8:40)
Branch - One is that the Cities of Israel would be completely destroyed
Samuel, Second Book of - He committed his way unto the Lord, asked to which of the Cities he should go, and was content to reign in Hebron seven years and six months, until God's time was come for him to reign over the whole of the tribes
Altar - ) and history ( 1Ki 1:51 ; 1 Kings 2:28 ; see more fully, Refuge [8])
Evangelist - He went from Jerusalem to preach in Samaria, was on the road to Gaza when he converted the eunuch, was afterwards at Azotus (Ashdod), ‘and passing through he preached the gospel to all the Cities, till he came to Caesarea’ (Acts 8:5; Acts 8:26; Acts 8:40)
Eden - But it is far more probable that this change, if we may infer from the account given by Moses that the courses of all the streams remained unaltered by the flood, may have taken place at man's expulsion from the garden: when God might choose to obliterate this fair portion of his works, unfitted for any thing but the residence of innocence; and to blot at once from the face of the earth, like the guilty Cities of the plain, both the site and the memorial of man's transgression,—an awful event, which would add tenfold horrors to the punishment
Dog - Yet they had them in considerable numbers in their Cities
Sepulchre - These tombs of the Jews were sometimes beneath the surface of the ground; but were often in the side of a cliff, and multitudes of such are found near the ruins of ancient Cities, 2 Kings 23:16 Isaiah 22:16
ba'Bel - With the conquest of Cyrus commenced the decay of Babylon, which has since been a quarry from which all the tribes in the vicinity have derived the bricks with which they have built their Cities
City - ...
Larger Cities were walled, with a central fortress to provide the citizens with defence against attack (Numbers 13:28; Joshua 6:5; Judges 9:51; 2 Samuel 5:7; 1 Kings 4:13; 2 Kings 14:13)
Decapolis - The Romans gave the name Decapolis (meaning ‘ten Cities’) to an extensive region situated largely south and east of the Sea of Galilee
Punishment - (β) The inhabitants of the Cities of the Plain have been continually subjected to punishment since the period when it was first inflicted upon them in the time of Lot (Judges 1:7 RV_)
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch - Peregrinus wrote letters to all the more important Cities, forwarding these by messengers whom he appointed ( ἐχειροτόνησε ) and entitled νεκραγγέλους and νερτεροδρόμους . When journeying under guard through Asia he addressed to the Cities near places of his sojourn exhortations and epistles. of Antioch; was sent for to Rome in a time of persecution to be there judged; instructed and admonished with wonderful power all the Cities on the way, and Rome itself when he arrived; was condemned and martyred in the Roman theatre crying, Ἐγὼ τῶν θηρίων ἐκείνων ὀναίμην ; and his remains were transferred after death with great solemnity to Antioch. ...
A good deal of uncertainty remains as to the relations which the smaller congregations outside the limits of the Cities held in the Ignatian church order to the bishops of the Cities
Money - On the other hand, the great commercial Cities of Phœnicia introduced a silver shekel of 224 grains, 15 of which were equivalent to one heavy Babylonian gold shekel of 252 grains, since 252 × 13 1 /3 = 224 × 15. ’...
In this period, however, the wealthy commercial Cities on the Phœnician seaboard Aradus, Sidon, Tyre, and others acquired the right of issuing silver coins, which they naturally did on the native standard. 301 198) the Jews had at their command the coins of the Ptolemaic dynasty, struck at Alexandria on the Phœnician standard, as well as those of the flourishing Cities on the Mediterranean. Besides all these, the procurators issued small bronze coins, probably the quadrans ( 1 /4 of an as), from their mint at Cæsarea, not to mention the numerous Cities, such as Samaria-Sebaste, which had similar rights
House - At Tell el-Hesy (Lachish), for example, we find at one period house walls of ‘dark-brown clay with little straw’; at another, walls of ‘reddish-yellow clay, full of straw’ (Bliss, A Mound of Many Cities , 44). ...
The floors of the houses were in all periods made of hard beaten clay, the permanence of which to this day has proved to the excavators a precious indication of the successive occupations of the buried Cities of Palestine. The same method was adopted for the roofs of large public buildings (see Bliss, Mound of Many Cities , 91 f. Exceptions were confined to the houses of the great, and to crowded Cities like Jerusalem and Samaria
Canaan, History And Religion of - Some of the best examples of Cities indicating Semitic influences are Jericho, Megiddo, Byblos, and Ugarit. They represent correspondence between the Egyptian court at Tell el-Amarna and numerous Canaanite Cities, including Jerusalem, Megiddo, and Shechem. ...
Prior to Israel's entrance into Canaan, the country seems to have been organized around major Cities creating rather small principalities
Egypt - " Among his many structures noted on monuments and in papyri are fortifications along the canal from Goshen to the Bed Sea, and particularly at Pi-tum and Pi-rameses or Pi-ramessu; these must be the same as the treasure-cities Pithom and Rameses, built or enlarged by the Israelites for Pharaoh. " Among the most interesting ancient Cities are:(a) On or Heliopolis, "the city of the sun," ten miles northeast of Cairo, where there was an obelisk of red granite 68 feet high, and erected previous to the visit of Abraham and Sarah to the land of the Pharaohs. (b) Thebes "of the hundred gates," one of the most famous Cities of antiquity, is identified with No or No-Ammon of Scripture
Zechariah, Book of - The angel calls upon Jehovah: ‘How long wilt thou not have mercy on Jerusalem and on the Cities of Judah, against which thou hast had indignation these threescore and ten years?’ In response, assurance comes that Jehovah is displeased with the nations which are at ease, He is returned to Jerusalem, His house shall be built, His Cities shall overflow with prosperity, Zion be comforted, Jerusalem chosen
Sea - ...
This lower part is believed to cover the sites of the Cities destroyed by fire from heaven, Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, and Zeboim. The SEA OF TIBERIAS or of Galilee; the lake of Gennesareth, or of Cimmereth, Numbers 34:11 , is so called from the adjacent country, or from some of the principal Cities on its shores
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - A crowd of the people of Tours and from neighbouring Cities had been gathered together, and the all but unanimous desire was for the election of Martin. In time several Cities obtained bishops from this institution
Damascus - Finally, Jehoash, king of Israel (798-782), regained some Cities from Damascus (2 Kings 13:25 )
Italy - With the support of the Lombard League of Cities and the Normans in the south, the papacy was victorious in the first phase of the struggle
Barnabas - ...
After some stay in Antioch Paul proposed to revisit the brethren in the various Cities where they had preached
Memphis - , he thinks, built the great pyramid under God's guidance, and the Cities Salem, of which Melchizedek was shepherd priestking, and Damascus
Colosse - ...
The similarity between the three epistles written about the same date to two neighboring Cities (whereas those written at distant dates and under different circumstances have little mutual resemblance) is an undesigned coincidence and proof of genuineness
Chaldaea - The Chaldaean Cities are celebrated in Scripture: "Babel, Erech (now Warka), Accad, Calneh (Niffer)" (Genesis 10:10)
Gad - ]'>[2] gives six Cities to the Reubenites, But in Joshua 13:15 ff
Lamp - ), plate 66; Bliss, Mound of Many Cities , 87
Hosea - Judah had trusted to her fenced Cities: judgement should fall upon both
New Jerusalem - Both Cities are also viewed as women, the harlot and the bride
Ark of the Covenant - The adventures of the ark in the Cities of Ashdod, Gath, and Ekron are told to magnify the strength and glory of the Lord of the ark
Desert, Wilderness - The ‘desert’ of the Bible is rather a place without human habitations, devoid of Cities or towns, but by no means devoid of vegetation, at least for a considerable portion of the year
Antiochus - Son of the foregoing, essentially a warrior, carrying on interminable struggles both with the free Greek Cities of his own territory, to which he finally gave something like democratic rights, and with Ptolemy Philadelphus of Egypt
Fasting (2) - 4); and Josephus, speaking of the spread of Jewish customs among the Gentile Cities, mentions fasting (e
Mendicants - ...
The enthusiastic attachment to these sanctimonious beggars went so far, that, as we learn from the most authentic records, several Cities were divided or cantoned out into four parts, with a view to these four orders: the first part being assigned to the Dominicans, the second to the Franciscans, the third to the Carmelites, and the fourth to the Augustins
Army - The cohortes and alœ were recruited from the Greek Cities of Palestine, from which they derived their names, such as ‘Cohors Sebastenorum,’ or ‘Tyriorum
Keep, Watch, Guard - Joseph tells Pharaoh to appoint overseers to gather food: “And let them … lay up corn under the hand of Pharaoh, and let them keep food in the Cities” ( a'Braham - Abraham accompanied them, and is represented as an interlocutor in a dialogue with Jehovah, in which he pleaded in vain to avert the vengeance threatened to the devoted Cities of the plain
Ark of the Covenant - The Philistines, having gotten possession of the ark, carried it in triumph to one of their principal Cities, named Ashdod, and placed it in the temple of Dagon, whose image fell to the ground and was broken
Husbandry - All who were not set apart for religious duties, such as the priests and the Levites, whether inhabitants of the country, or of towns and Cities, were considered by the laws, and were, in fact, agriculturists
Nile - From the middle of August till towards the end of October, the whole land of Egypt resembles a great lake or sea, in which the towns and Cities appear as islands
Publishing - Persons and Cities who received the latter without profiting by it are specially denounced (Matthew 11:23, Luke 10:15)
Timotheus, Called Aelurus - He declared open war against the maintainers of "two natures" as being in effect Nestorianizers, and on this ground boldly broke off communion with Rome, Constantinople, and Antioch, denouncing bishops of the Alexandrian patriarchate who had accepted the formula of the council, and some of whom had held their sees before the accession of Cyril; he also sent to Cities and monasteries a prohibition to communicate with such bishops or to recognize clerics ordained by them
Babel - Arabia, and the Cities on the lower Euphrates near its mouth. " Originally "the gate of the god's" temple, whereat justice used to be ministered, Babel or Babylon was secondary in importance at first to the other Cities, Erech, Ur, and Ellasar. The remains from these two Cities date about 2000 B. ...
The ruins of ancient temples repaired by him, and Cities restored and adorned, still attest his genius, with their bricks inscribed with his name
Arabia - In Hejaz are the celebrated Cities of Mecca and Medina. Instead of being shepherds and robbers, they are fixed in towns and Cities; and live by agriculture and commerce, chiefly maritime. The kingdom of Yemen has been successively subdued by the Abyssinians, the Persians, the Sultans of Egypt, and the Turks; the holy Cities of Mecca and Medina have repeatedly bowed under a Scythian tyrant; and the Roman province of Arabia embraced the peculiar wilderness in which Ishmael and his sons must have pitched their tents in the face of their brethren. Their capital, Cordova, with the towns of Malaga, Almeria, and Murcia, produced three hundred writers; and seventy public libraries were established in the Cities of Andalusia
Priest, Priesthood - 4), (3) the idolatrous priests in the Cities of Judah and in the area surrounding Jerusalem (v. 5); (4) the priests of the high places in the Cities of Judah from Geba to Beersheba (vv
Numbers, Book of - Details follow as to the borders of the promised land; the forty-eight Cities for the Levites; and the Cities of refuge
Church - These Jews whose residence had been in the Cities of the Roman Empire were called Hellenistic because they were generally more open to the Greco-Roman culture than their Palestinian colleagues. Paul's strategy was to visit synagogues in the Cities of the Roman Empire and to proclaim Jesus as the Christ (Acts 18:5 )
Tongues, Gift of - ( e ) Something of this sort may have happened at Corinth, one of the most cosmopolitan of Cities
Building - This language was both literal, referring to their homes and Cities, and metaphorical, referring to the nation and its fortunes
Ahaz - , the Cities of the low hill country (shephelah ), Bethshemesh, Ajalon, Gederoth, Shocho, Timnah, Gimzo
Vine - 4:8, section 4) says" the ashes of the five Cities still grow in their fruits, which have a color as if they were fit to be eaten, but if you pluck them they dissolve into smoke and ashes
Travel (2) - This was purely Rabbinical, and deduced from (1) Exodus 16:29 ‘Abide ye every man in his place, let no man go out of his place on the seventh day’; (2) from the distance between the Ark and the people on the march (Joshua 3:4); and (3) from the conditions laid down as to the Cities of refuge (Numbers 35:5)
Ephesus - The town-clerk or secretary of the city appears as a person of importance, and this is exactly in accordance with what is known of municipal affairs in such Cities
Galatia - Paul had visited any other Cities in that great province
Levite - At the conquest the Levites received no tribal inheritance but were given forty-eight Cities with their pastures (Joshua 21:1-42 )
Alexander - Commerce followed the breaking down of national exclusiveness, and everywhere the Jews had their synagogues for prayer and reading of the Old Testament in the leading Cities
Mary - The modern Mejdel is a miserable village, but the ancient Magdala was a wealthy place, one of three Cities, according to the Talmud, whose tribute had to be conveyed in waggons to Jerusalem (cf
Habakkuk - The incredibility of this must be, not in the fact that the Chaldæans are the aggressors, but rather that Jerusalem, spared so long, is now to share the fate of so many other Cities
Apostolic Fathers - Christians live in the same Cities and observe many of the same customs, but they exhibit the “professedly strange character” of a “heavenly citizenship” that distinguishes them from others
Water - The same attention to the comfort of travellers is manifested in Egypt, where public buildings are set apart in some of their Cities, the business of whose inhabitants is to supply the passengers with water free of expense
Flies - The inhabitants were forced to quit these Cities, not being able to stand against the flies and gnats with which they were pestered
Pentateuch - So there was great joy in Jerusalem; for since the time of Solomon, the son of David, king of Israel, there was not the like at Jerusalem: and when all this was finished, all Israel that were present went out to the Cities of Judah, and brake the images in pieces, and cut down the groves, and threw down the high places and the altars out of all Judah and Benjamin, in Ephraim also and Manasseh, until they had utterly destroyed them all,"...
2 Chronicles 30:11 ; 2 Chronicles 31
Priest - (Exodus 23:19 ; Leviticus 2:14 ; 26:1-10) ...
On their settlement in Canaan the priestly families had thirteen Cities assigned them, with "suburbs" or pasture-grounds for their flocks
Joel - Their teeth like those "of lions" (Joel 1:6), their assailing Cities (Joel 2:6-9), and a flame of fire being their image (Joel 1:19-20; Joel 2:3; Joel 2:5), and their finally being driven eastward, westward ("the utmost sea," the Mediterranean), and southward ("a land barren," etc
Mary - The modern Mejdel is a miserable village, but the ancient Magdala was a wealthy place, one of three Cities, according to the Talmud, whose tribute had to be conveyed in waggons to Jerusalem (cf
Palestine - Of the Canaanites very extensive remains yet await the spade of the excavator in the mounds that cover the remains of the ancient Cities of Palestine. According to the older tradition preserved in Judges 1:1-36 , they entered the country without an individual leader, as a number of more or less independent tribes or clans, and effected only a partial conquest, being baffled by the superior strength of certain specified Cities. Several important tombs near Jerusalem, and elsewhere, and a large number of remains of Cities and fortresses, survive from the age of the family of Mattathias
Babylon - For, though for many centuries the site of Babylon was unknown, or the ruins of other Chaldean Cities mistaken for its remains, its true situation and present condition have been, within a few years, satisfactorily ascertained, and accurately described, by several most intelligent and enterprising travellers. " — "Her Cities are desolations. " The course of the Tigris through Babylonia, instead of being adorned with Cities, is marked with the sites of "ancient ruins. " "It is impossible," adds Major Keppel, "to behold this scene and not to be reminded how exactly the predictions of Isaiah and Jeremiah have been fulfilled, even in the appearance Babylon was doomed to present, that ‘she should never be inhabited;' that ‘the Arabian should not pitch his tent there;' that she should ‘become heaps;' that her Cities should be ‘a desolation, a dry land, and a wilderness
Acts of the Apostles - Paul than the magistrates of the ordinary Greek Cities. ’ This last title was only given (as here) to a board of magistrates in Greek Cities of the East; in Roman colonies in Italy the name was given to those who stood first on the Senate roll. ]'>[1]0 ), the presidents of the ‘Common Council’ of the province in Cities where there was a temple of Rome and the Emperor; they superintended the worship of the Emperor
Fire - ...
(γ) The only parallel to the expression Eternal Fire, used in the Synoptic Gospels to denote the future punishment of the wicked, is found in Judges 1:7, where the writer declares that the Cities of the Plain are ‘set forth as an example, suffering the vengeance (Revised Version ‘punishment’) of eternal fire’ (πῦρ αἰώνιον). According to the renderings of Authorized Version and Revised Version , which regard πυρός as grammatically depending on δἰκην, the burning of these Cities is spoken of as still persisting. ’ An alternative rendering to that of the Authorized Version and Revised Version , takes δεῖγμα with πυρός in the sense of ‘an example (or ‘testimony’) of eternal fire,’ the punishment which began with the destruction of the Cities, and still continues, fitting them to serve as such example
Fire - ...
(γ) The only parallel to the expression Eternal Fire, used in the Synoptic Gospels to denote the future punishment of the wicked, is found in Judges 1:7, where the writer declares that the Cities of the Plain are ‘set forth as an example, suffering the vengeance (Revised Version ‘punishment’) of eternal fire’ (πῦρ αἰώνιον). According to the renderings of Authorized Version and Revised Version , which regard πυρός as grammatically depending on δἰκην, the burning of these Cities is spoken of as still persisting. ’ An alternative rendering to that of the Authorized Version and Revised Version , takes δεῖγμα with πυρός in the sense of ‘an example (or ‘testimony’) of eternal fire,’ the punishment which began with the destruction of the Cities, and still continues, fitting them to serve as such example
Assur - The chief Cities were Nineveh, answering to the mounds opposite Mosul (Nebi Yunus and Koyunjik), Calah or Hulah, now Nimrud Asshur, now Kilek Sherghent; Sargina, now Khorsabad; Arbela, Arbil (G. ...
By the end of Esarhaddon's reign Hamath, Damascus, and Samaria had been absorbed, Judaea made tributary, Philistia and Idumea subjected, Babylon recovered, and Cities planted in Media
Croisade, or Crusade - Having, therefore exhorted Peter to visit the chief Cities and sovereigns of Christendom, he summoned another council at Clermont in Auvergne. they were engaged in continual hostilities with one another: the open country was become a scene of outrage and disorder: the Cities, still mean and poor, were neither guarded by walls nor protected by privileges
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - In earliest biblical times, the Hebrews followed their herds from pasture land to pasture land and water hole to water hole, though at times they lived for long periods near major Cities (Genesis 13:18 ; Genesis 20:1 ; Genesis 26:6 ; Genesis 33:19 ). Finally, as villages grew larger, and commerce between Cities and nations expanded, various trades and crafts expanded with them
Eternal Punishment - And in the larger issues the severity of judgment falls upon Cities and generations ‘exalted to heaven’ in privilege and opportunity, but doomed because of neglect (Matthew 11:20-24; Matthew 12:41-42). The mention of the Cities of the Plain (Matthew 10:15) and that of the men of Nineveh (Matthew 12:41) are too incidental and indirect to yield any determining principle
Pentateuch - "Eleazar," Aaron's son, succeeds to his father's exalted position and with Joshua divides the land (Joshua 21:1), as Numbers 34:17 ordained; the Levites discharge their duties, scattered among the tribes and having 48 Cities, as Jehovah by Moses commanded (Numbers 35:7). Cities of refuge (Joshua 20; Numbers 35:11-15; Deuteronomy 4:41-43; Deuteronomy 19:2-7)
Jude, Theology of - 6), in the evil Cities at the time of the patriarchs (v
Arabia - The people of Yemen have always lived in Cities, and practiced commerce and agriculture
Elisha - He loves the haunts of men, and resides in Cities like Dothan and Samaria
Head, Headship - Ramsey, The Cities of St
Jew, Jewess - ...
In Rome, as well as in many other Cities of the Empire, Jews obtained considerable influence, in spite of the popular aversion to them
Ate - ...
Ruth 4:1, Ruth 4:11 (a) The gate in this place is a type of the principal place of business in various Cities, but especially in the land of Israel
Live - ...
Infrequently chayyah represents a domesticated animal: “And the Cities shall they have to dwell in; and the suburbs of them shall be for their cattle, and for their goods, and for all their beasts” ( Ark - As many Cities, not in Egypt only and Boeotia, but in Cilicia, Ionia, Attica, Phthiotis, Cataonia, Syria, and Italy, were called Theba; so likewise the city Apamea was denominated Cibotus, from κιβωτος , in memory of the ark, and of the history connected with it
Alexander - ...
Having left Jerusalem, Alexander visited other Cities of Palestine, and was every where received with great testimonies of friendship and submission
Sanhedrim - Petau fixes the beginning of the sanhedrim to the period when Gabinius was governor of Judea, by whom were erected tribunals in the five Cities of Judea, namely, Jerusalem, Gadara, Amathus, Jericho, and Sephoris
Joannes (520), Monk And Author - There are recorded also visits to the Thebaid Cities of Antinous and Lycus (44, 143, 161), to the laura of Raythu (115, 116, 119) on the Red Sea shore (120, 121), and to Mount Sinai (122, 123)
Philip - Of the later connexion with Hierapolis already alluded to we have now interesting confirmation in the discovery of an inscription showing that the church there was dedicated to the memory ‘of the holy and glorious Apostle and theologian Philip’ (τοῦ ἀγίου κὲ ἑνδεξου ἀποστόλου κἑ θεολόγου Φιλίππου: see Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, i
Hermas Shepherd of - … So Clement shall send to the foreign Cities, for this is his duty. He is directed by her to write two copies of the book, after the revelation is finished, and send one to Clement that he may send it to the foreign Cities, and one to Grapte that she may instruct the widows and the orphans. Clement, whose duty is to communicate with foreign Cities, may, as we have seen, have been the bishop of Rome, while Grapte, who instructs the widows and the orphans, may have been a deaconess (Vis
Solomon - A chain of garrison and store Cities was established ( 1 Kings 9:15 ), together with a standing army which included 12,000 horsemen and 1400 chariots ( 1 Kings 4:26 , 1 Kings 10:26 ). A grant of twenty Cities in Galilee was unsatisfactory to Hiram, though he apparently paid for them ( 1 Kings 9:10-14 )
Lot - And Lot chose all the plain of Jordan, and Lot journeyed east, and Lot dwelled in the Cities of the plain, and pitched his tents toward Sodom. For Peter tells us in his Second Epistle that, when God turned the Cities of Sodom and Gomorrah into ashes, He delivered just Lot, vexed with the filthy conversation of the wicked
Economic Life - ...
Within the walled Cities and towns, most commercial activity occurred within the gate complex or its environs. Shops may have also been established within the walls of those Cities which had hollow-wall (casemate) construction
Political Conditions - Like most of the Herods, he had a passion for building; and to the quiet and well-governed city of Caesarea Philippi, near the alleged source of the Jordan, Jesus withdrew (Matthew 16:13, Mark 8:27) when the multitudes were crowding upon Him and His enemies tempting Him (Matthew 16:1); just as Bethsaida, another of Philip’s Cities, was His refuge when news reached Him of the Baptist’s death (Luke 9:10, cf. —The title of tetrarch was granted also to Antipas, whose dominions included the two districts of Galilee and Peraea, separated by the confederation of free Greek Cities known as the Decapolis
Herod - His taxation of the people to support his building activity was extensive, but he virtually rebuilt every city in the land, even constructing entire Cities from the ground up
Moses - Israel marched by Edom to Moab, and conquered Heshbon and other Cities ( Numbers 21:16-20 ; Numbers 21:24 b, Numbers 21:25 ; Numbers 21:31-32 )
Palestine - , the region of the ten Cities
Ephraim (1) - Ephraim did not extend to the sea, but had separate Cities assigned to it in Manasseh on the coast
Thessalonica - ‘He pulled down the Cities in the district of Crucis and on the Thermaic Gulf, collecting the inhabitants into one city’ (Strabo, VII
Joshua, the Book of - The people of Gibeon and its four-city league of Cities were accepted, and even became associated with Temple service (Joshua 9:3-27 )
Existence of God - "It is proved from the miraculous events which have happened in the world; such as the overflowing of the earth by a flood; the confusion of languages; the burning of Sodom and the Cities about by fire from heaven; the plagues of Egypt; the dividing of the Red Sea; raining manna from heaven, and bringing streams of water from flinty rocks; the stopping of the course of the sun, &c
War - The Israelites were not to destroy non-Canaanite Cities unless the people refused Israel’s terms of peace
Salvation - The early prophets anticipated God's salvation to be realized in the earth's renewed fruitfulness and the rebuilding of the ruined Cities of Israel (Amos 9:13-15 )
Egypt - On the road the travellers have passed through many Cities, at which a demoniac woman, a dumb bride, a leprous girl who accompanies them on their journey, and many others have been healed
Heathen - ’ The application of this word to non-Christians was long thought to be due to the fact that ‘the ancient idolatry lingered on in the rural villages and hamlets [3] after Christianity had been generally accepted in the towns and Cities of the Roman Empire’ (OED Samaria - After Shalmaneser's capture of Samaria and carrying away of Israel to Halah and Habor, and in the Cities of the Medes (2 Kings 17:5-6; 2 Kings 17:23-24), Esarhaddon or Asnapper planted "instead" men of Babylon (where Esarhaddon resided in part: 2 Chronicles 33:11), Cuthah, Ava, and Sepharvaim (Ezra 4:2-3; Ezra 4:10)
Zechariah, Book of - Zechariah 12-14 depict an end-time attack upon Jerusalem and the Cities of Judah ( Zechariah 12:1-3 ; Zechariah 14:1-3 ), an attack in which many people would be killed as God purifies His people (Zechariah 13:7-9 )
Shechem (1) - Joshua made "Shechem in Mount Ephraim" one of the six Cities of refuge (Joshua 20:7)
Judah - And surely, as it is said of Christ in one blessed Scripture, that the names of his people are all "written in the book of life," (Revelation 20:15) and in another he bids his people to "rejoice that their names are written there," (Luke 10:20) as when considering himself the shepherd of his flock, and his people the sheep of his fold, he saith that "he calleth them all by name, and leadeth them out," (John 10:3) and as the whole flocks of the mountains and of the vale, and of the Cities of Benjamin, Jerusalem, and Judah, shall all pass again under the hands of him that telleth them, (Jeremiah 33:13) surely it is not stretching the Scripture to say, that the Shebeth of Jehudah is as eminently descriptive of the greatness of his character, when speaking of this use of it, in writing, as in ruling, for sovereignty is implied in both, And the poor feeble hand that is now writing these lines, (earnestly begging forgiveness if he errs in the matter) cannot conclude this article without first saying, (and will not the reader for himself also join the petition?) Oh, that the almighty Jehudah may have graciously exercised the Shebeth of his power, and written my poor name, worthless as it is, among the millions he hath marked down in the book of life! Amen
je'Sus Christ - ...
Within his view, and his boyish excursions, were many remarkable historic places, --rivers, hills, Cities, plains, --that would keep in mind the history of his people and God's dealings with them
Alexandria - With this event, the sun of Alexandria may be said to have set: the blighting hand of Islamism was laid on it; and although the genius and the resources of such a city could not be immediately destroyed, it continued to languish until the passage by the Cape of Good Hope, in the fifteenth century, gave a new channel to the trade which for so many centuries had been its support; and at this day, Alexandria, like most eastern Cities, presents a mixed spectacle of ruins and wretchedness,—of fallen greatness and enslaved human beings
Judah, Kingdom of - ) Judah included southern Benjamin and Jerusalem the joint city of both, Simeon, and many Cities of Daniel In Abijah's and Asa's reign Judah gained parts of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 13:19; 2 Chronicles 15:8; 2 Chronicles 17:2); and after Israel's deportation to Assyria the king of Judah exercised a quasi authority in the N
Egypt - On the road the travellers have passed through many Cities, at which a demoniac woman, a dumb bride, a leprous girl who accompanies them on their journey, and many others have been healed
Proselyte (2) - The Greek-speaking Jews, who were to be found in all the great Cities of the Roman Empire, carried the Knowledge of the Mosaic Law into the midst of heathendom, and presented their faith in a form calculated to win the approval of their neighbours
Exodus, Book of - Among the Cities built by the Israelite slaves was Rameses (Genesis 15:14; 1618836194_2; see EGYPT; RAMESES)
Roads And Travel - From the scanty references to them in literature one can see that they were avoided by all respectable persons, as were the cook-shops of the Cities (‘dignitoso homini popinam ingredi notabile est,’ pseudo-Augustine, Quaestiones Veteris et Noui Testamenti CXXVII. There were also important roads linking up the chief Cities in Western Gaul. also The Cities of St
Jews - ...
About the same time, Seleucus Nicator, having built about thirty new Cities in Asia, settled in them as many Jews as he could; and Ptolemy Philadelphus, of Egypt, about 3720, bought the freedom of all the Jew slaves in Egypt. Antiochus Epiphanes, about 3834, enraged with them for rejoicing at the report of his death, and for the peculiar form of their worship, in his return from Egypt, forced his way into Jerusalem, and murdered forty thousand of them; and about two years after he ordered his troops to pillage the Cities of Judea, and murder the men, and sell the women and children for slaves. The Romans under Vespasian invaded the country, and took the Cities of Galilee, Chorazen, Bethsaida, Capernaum, &c
Paul - 45, and preached the Gospel successively at Salamis and Paphos, two Cities of the isle of Cyprus, at Perga in Pamphylia, Antioch in Pisidia, and at Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, three Cities of Lycaonia. Paul, having preached a short time at Antioch, proposed to Barnabas that they should visit the churches which they had founded in different Cities, Acts 15:36
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - ...
The banks of the Tigris were dotted by some of the most important Cities of antiquity: Nineveh, the capital of Assyria during the Assyrian Empire; Asshur, the original capital of Assyria; Opis (in the vicinity of Baghdad), the important commercial center of Neo-Babylonian and later times; Ctesihyphon, the capital of the Parthians and Sassanians; and Seleucia, capital of the Seleucid rulers of Mesopotamia. Rivers of the Aegean Coast The broken Aegean coastline boasted a series of sheltered havens and inlets that prompted Greek colonization and the establishment the great harbor Cities of the later Greek and Roman periods
Diseases - ...
Outlying regions of the empire, such as Palestine, apparently had few well-trained doctors, although little information is available concerning professional medical care outside the large Cities. Descriptions of operations have been found in ancient literature, and some old surgical tools have been found in the ruins of ancient Cities
War, Holy War - After only two Cities (Jericho and Ai) are taken they proceed north into hostile territory to Shechem. There are some tasks more difficult than capturing enemy Cities
Revelation, Theology of - When a temple was dedicated to Domitian on the western side of the marketplace in Ephesus, the leading city of Asia Minor and the first to be mentioned in John's letters to the churches, other Cities of the province followed suit in a wave of popular fervor. In the provinces, they performed religio-political rites on the emperor's behalf, honoring his effigies, which stood in temples or squares in most Cities
Achan - ACHAN OF THE TRIBE OF JUDAH WAS TAKEN...
JERICHO was one of the largest and richest Cities in all ancient Canaan. The army of Israel crossed the Jordan, entered the devoted land, besieged its Cities, and marched from victory to victory under the banners of their respective tribes; very much as a modern army is made up of companies of men compacted together under the colours and the denominations of their respective clans and nationalities
Preaching - And at other seasons again, itinerants, both princes, priests, and Levites, were sent through all the country, to carry the book of the law, and to teach in the Cities. Many of the discourses were preached in camps and courts, in streets, schools, Cities, villages; sometimes, with great composure and coolness; at other times, with vehement action and rapturous energy; sometimes, in a plain, blunt style; at other times, in all the magnificent pomp of eastern allegory
Paul - Entering the highlands, they came into the province of Galatia where they concentrated their efforts in the southern Cities of Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe. 52-57) centered in the city of Ephesus from which the gospel probably spread into the surrounding Cities such as the seven churches in Revelation (Acts 18:23-20:6 ; Revelation 2-3 )
Exile - , Tiglath-pileser captured the Cities of Naphtali (2 Kings 15:29 ) and carried away as captives the inhabitants of the tribes of Naphtali, Reuben, Gad, and the half-tribe of Manasseh (1 Chronicles 5:26 )
Reproach (2) - In Matthew 11:20 Jesus reproaches the Cities in which most of His mighty works were done, because they repented not; and in the Appendix to Mk
Herod - Precluded by his position from independent political action, he contented himself with adorning his Cities and conserving his possessions
Error - Hence the sad words with which Jesus upbraided ‘the Cities wherein most of his mighty works were done’ (Matthew 11:20-24)
Luke (2) - The rivalry between Cities was a characteristically Greek quality, which finds a parallel in the more modern rivalry between Dôle and Besançon
Assyria - Hezekiah had been tributary; but on his revolting Sennacherib took the fenced Cities of Judah, and then Hezekiah sent him the treasures of his own house and the house of the Lord
Hadrianus, Publius Aelius, Emperor - Constellations were named after him Cities dedicated to him incense burnt in his honour and the art market flooded with statues and busts representing his exceeding beauty
Fornication - The temples had their courtesans (ἱερόδουλοι; sec Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, i
Wanderings of the Israelites - They were attacked by King Arad the Canaanite, who was defeated and his Cities destroyed
Abraham - 18 we find Abraham at Hebron, where in a theophany he receives the promise of a son to be born to Sarah, and also an intimation of the doom impending over the guilty Cities of the Plain
Ecbatana - It was situated on a gentle declivity, distant twelve stadia from Mount Orontes, and was in compass one hundred and fifty stadia, and, next to Nineveh and Babylon, was one of the strongest and most beautiful Cities of the east
Bread - " In the Cities and villages of Barbary, where public ovens are established, the bread is usually leavened; but among the Bedoweens and Kabyles, as soon as the dough is kneaded, it is made into thin cakes, either to be baked immediately upon the coals, or else in a shallow earthen vessel like a frying-pan, called Tajen
Solomon - He also fortified the Cities where he had magazines of corn, wine, and oil; and those where his horses and chariots were kept
Emperor-Worship - (Ramsay) in honour of the birthday of Augustus, and is a decree of the commune of Asia, instituting the Augustan era, and ordered to be put up in all the leading Cities (Ramsay, op. ...
The proclamation of a spiritual Kingdom with a King to whom all the highest titles borne by Caesar really applied cannot but have made a strong appeal to the interest of many of the more serious in pagan Cities (cf
Solomon - )...
Among his buildings were the famous Tadmor or Palmyra in the wilderness, to carry on commerce with inland Asia, and store Cities in Hamath; Bethhoron, the Upper and the Nether, on the border toward Philistia and Egypt; Hazor and Megiddo, guarding the plain of Esdraelon; Baalath or Baalbek, etc. Solomon gave him at the end of his great buildings 20 Cities in Galilee, with which Hiram was dissatisfied
Abraham - Humanly speaking, Sodom and Gomorrah would have been destroyed, and God's heart which was so full of answer to intercessory prayer would never have been discovered, had it not been for Abraham's so friendly part performed that day both to God and to the doomed Cities of the plain. And while Abraham was seeking first his own ends and the ends of the two Cities in his persevering prayer, he was at the same time without knowing it serving God's greatest ends still more
Daniel - But the Assyrian inscriptions prove it was one of the most ancient Mesopotamian Cities, and its palace (the Memnonium is the name the Greeks give it) famous centuries before Daniel
Titus (Emperor) - His visit to other Syrian Cities was made all the more pleasant by the report of the splendid reception which his father had received in Italy
Blood - A person who killed another accidentally had six Cities to which he could flee and there establish his innocence (Joshua 20:1-9 )
Vengeance (2) - Matthew 23), that He upbraided for their unbelief the Cities where He had wrought His great miracles (Matthew 11:20 ff
Mines And Mining - However, excavation in other Philistine Cities such as Ashdod and tel Qasile (near modern Tel Aviv) give little evidence of the widespread use of iron
Love-Feast - But it is probable that even more operative was the example of the common meals of the various gilds which were a prominent feature of social life in Greek Cities
Scribes - They taught only in their schools; He through "all the Cities and villages" (Matthew 4:23; Matthew 9:35)
Athens - Rut Athens was still the most beautiful and brilliant of Cities, the home of philosophy, the shrine of art, the fountain-head of ideals
Appreciation (of Christ) - Inspite of all the enmity written there; remembering that there were those who saw in Him an ally of Beelzebub (Matthew 12:24), working with the devil’s aid; that some called Him ‘a gluttonous man, a wine-bibber, friend of publicans and sinners’ (Matthew 11:19); that lawyers, and Pharisees, and Sadducees were ever watching to trip Him (Matthew 22:15), and plotting with Herodians (Matthew 22:16) to destroy Him; that the Galilaean Cities, which should have known Him best,—Chorazin, Bethsaida, Capernaum (Matthew 11:21; Matthew 11:23), and even Nazareth,—rejected Him (Luke 4:28 f
Bethesda - Clair, Buried Cities and Bible Countries, 327–328
Honor - 17:3 kâbôd represents the more concrete idea of a fullness of things including fortified Cities, sovereignty (self-rule), and people
Diodorus, Presbyter of Antioch - Valens having forbidden the Catholics to meet within the walls of Cities, Diodorus gathered his congregation in the church in the old town S
Essenes - The Therapeutae were more rigid than the Essenes, since the latter, although they made it a practice to keep at a distance from large Cities, lived, nevertheless, in towns and villages, and practised agriculture and the arts, with the exception of those arts which were made more directly subservient to the purposes of war
Mary - An edict of Caesar Augustus having decreed, that all subjects of the empire should go to their own Cities, to register their names according to their families, Joseph and Mary, who were both of the lineage of David, went to Bethlehem, from whence sprung their family
Jerusalem - It is afterwards named among the Cities of Benjamin (Judges 19:10 ; 1 Chronicles 11:4 ); but in the time of David it was divided between Benjamin and Judah
Joab - ...
His exhortation before the battle was worthy of a better man: "be of good courage, and let us play the men for our people, and for the Cities of our God; and the Lord do that which seemeth Him good" (2 Samuel 10:12)
Peraea - 64 the Roman province of Syria was formed, and under Pompey and Gabinius the procurator the ruined Cities were rebuilt, and the Hellenistic communities regained their independence
Punishment (2) - So serious may this punishment be, that death would be a preferable alternative (Mark 9:42); and, unrestricted to individual transgressors, it may fall also both upon Cities (Matthew 10:15; Matthew 11:21; Matthew 23:38) and upon nations (Matthew 21:43-44; Matthew 23:35; Matthew 23:38)
Province - Immunity of Cities was an exceptional privilege in the Empire, belonging exclusively, or almost exclusively, to coloniae, in virtue of the fact that they, like the inhabitants of Italy, owned their soil
Jews - Seleucus Nicanor gave them the right of citizens in the Cities which he built in Asia Minor and Coelo-Syria, and even in Antioch, his capital, with privileges, which they continued to enjoy under the Romans. Beside the countries already mentioned, Abilene, which had belonged to Herod during the latter part of his life, and of which Lysanias is mentioned in Luke 3:1 , as tetrarch, and some Cities were given to Salome, the sister of Herod the Great, (A. Fadus was soon succeeded by Tiberius, and he was followed by Alexander Cumanus, Felix, and Festus; but Claudius afterward gave Trachonitis and Abilene to Agrippa, and Nero added a part of Galilee and some other Cities
Church - It may, indeed, be allowed, that some of the smaller and more insulated churches might, after the death of the Apostles and Evangelists, retain this form for some considerable time; but the larger churches, in the chief Cities, and those planted in populous neighbourhoods, had many presbyters, and, as the members multiplied, they had several separate assemblies or congregations, yet all under the same common government. And when churches were raised up in the neighbourhood of Cities, the appointment of chorepiscopi, or country bishops, and of visiting presbyters, both acting under the presbytery of the city, with the bishop at its head, is sufficiently in proof, that the ancient churches, especially the larger and more prosperous of them, existed in that form which, in modern times, we should call a religious connection, subject to a common government
Papyri And Ostraca - The tradition that had come down to us was on the whole the tradition preserved in the history of what was great the history of nations, potentates, the intellectual leaders in art, science, and religion; and that is true in great measure of the inscriptions, which for the most part owe their origin to princes, Cities, and wealthy Individuals. In ancient times the dumping grounds for rubbish and refuse were on the outskirts of the Cities, towns, and villages
Jeremiah - " Next Jehovah commanded Jeremiah to take a prophetic tour, proclaiming the covenant through the Cities of Judah, as well as in Jerusalem (1618836194_65; Jeremiah 11:6). and more summarily in Jeremiah 26:1-2; Jeremiah 26:6, at the feast of tabernacles, when the law was commanded to be read, or at either of the other two great feasts, before the people of "all the Cities of Judah," assembled for worship "in the court of Jehovah's house"; he "diminished not a word" through fear of offending
Galatians, Letter to the - ” In Acts 13:14-14:24 (first missionary journey) Paul founded churches at Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, Cities in the southern part of the Roman province
Ten Commandments - ‘thy Cities’ (see 2 )
Sol'Omon - (1 Kings 7:1 ; 2 Chronicles 8:1 ) (d) The conquest of Hamath-zobah, and the consequent foundation of Cities in the region of north Palestine after the twentieth year
Moses - They were accordingly made public slaves, and were employed in connection with his numerous buildings, especially in the erection of store-cities, temples, and palaces
Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata - Meanwhile Eusebius by slow stages reached the Danube when "the Goths were ravaging Thrace and besieging many Cities
Edom - When Israel and Judah declined Edom "broke off Israel's yoke," as Isaac had foretold, in Jehoram's reign (2 Kings 8:20-22), re-conquered their lost Cities and invaded southern Judah (2 Chronicles 28:17)
Simple, Simplicity - The upbraided Cities, with much formal religion, were yet devoted to mammon and had no real heart for God
Antiochus - garrisoned the Cities left to him
Inn - Porter, Giant Cities of Bashan,