What does Chemosh mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
לִכְמוֹשׁ֙ the national deity of the Moabites and a god of the Ammonites. 2
וְלִכְמוֹשׁ֙ the national deity of the Moabites and a god of the Ammonites. 1
(כְמוֹשׁ֙) the national deity of the Moabites and a god of the Ammonites. 1
מִכְּמ֑וֹשׁ the national deity of the Moabites and a god of the Ammonites. 1
כְּמ֑וֹשׁ the national deity of the Moabites and a god of the Ammonites. 1
כְּמ֥וֹשׁ the national deity of the Moabites and a god of the Ammonites. 1
! כְּמ֑וֹשׁ the national deity of the Moabites and a god of the Ammonites. 1

Definitions Related to Chemosh

H3645


   1 the national deity of the Moabites and a god of the Ammonites.
      1a also identified with ‘Baal-peor’, ‘Baal-zebub’, ‘Mars’ and ‘Saturn’.
      1b worship of this god was introduced into Jerusalem by Solomon and abolished by king Josiah of Judah.
      Additional Information: Chemosh = “subduer”.
      [9]

Frequency of Chemosh (original languages)

Frequency of Chemosh (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Chemosh
CHEMOSH . The national god of the Moabites ( Numbers 21:29 ; in Judges 11:24 probably ‘Chemosh’ is a scribal or other error for ‘Milcom’ [1], who held the same position among the Ammonites). His rites seem to have included human sacrifice (cf. 2 Kings 3:27 ). It was for this ‘abomination of Moab’ that Solomon erected a temple ( 1 Kings 11:7 ), later destroyed by Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:13 ).
N. Koenig.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Chemosh
See Gods and Goddesses, Pagan
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Chemosh
The destroyer, subduer, or fish-god, the god of the Moabites (Numbers 21:29 ; Jeremiah 48:7,13,46 ). The worship of this god, "the abomination of Moab," was introduced at Jerusalem by Solomon (1 Kings 11:7 ), but was abolished by Josiah (2 Kings 23:13 ). On the "Moabite Stone" (q.v.), Mesha (2 Kings 3:5 ) ascribes his victories over the king of Israel to this god, "And Chemosh drove him before my sight."
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Chemosh
The "abomination" (i.e. idol, in Scripture's contemptuous phrase) of Moab (Numbers 21:29; Jeremiah 48:7; Jeremiah 48:13-46). Depicted on coins with sword, lance, and shield, and two torches at his side. Ammon, from its close connection with Moab, also worshipped Chemosh, but Moloch (kin) was their peculiar deity (Judges 11:24). Solomon introduced, and Josiah overthrew, Chemosh worship in Jerusalem. A black star, according to Jewish tradition, was his symbol, whether as identical with Mars or Saturn. Jerome states that Dibon was his chief seat of worship.
A black stone was the Arab symbol of him. The inscribed black stone set up at Dibon, lately discovered, is full of the Moabite king Mesha's praises of Chemosh as the giver of his martial successes against Israel. (See MOAB; DIBON.) Derived from kabash , to vanquish. Idolatry originated in appropriating to separate deities the attributes combined in the one true God. "Ashtar Chemosh," mentioned on the Moabite stone, connects the Moabite and the Phoenician worship. Ashtar is the masculine of Astarte, an androgynous god, combining the active and passive powers of nature. Chemosh required human sacrifices as god of war; Mesha, after taking Ataroth, offered all the warriors in sacrifice.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Chemosh
One of the chief gods of the Moabites and the Ammonites, the worship of which was introduced at Jerusalem by Solomon, and abolished by Josiah. Numbers 21:29 ; Judges 11:24 ; 1 Kings 11:7,33 ;
2 Kings 23:13 ; Jeremiah 48:7,13,46 . On the 'MOABITE ' STONE,q.v., this 'god' is mentioned. The king, referring to the king of Israel, says, "Chemosh drove him before my sight."
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Chemosh
Handling; stroking; taking away
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Chemosh
כמוש , an idol of the Moabites, Numbers 21:29 . The name is derived from a root which in Arabic signifies to hasten. For this reason, many believe Chemosh to be the sun, whose precipitate course might well procure it the name of swift. Some identify Chemosh with Ammon; and Macrobius shows that Ammon was the sun, whose rays were denoted by his horns. Calmet is of opinion that the god Hamanus and Apollo Chomeus, mentioned by Strabo and Ammianus Marcellinus, was Chamos, or the sun. These deities were worshipped in many parts of the east. Some, from the resemblance of the Hebrew Chamos with the Greek Comos, have thought Chamos to signify Bacchus. Jerom and most interpreters consider Chemosh and Peor as the same deity; but some think that Baal-Peor was Tammuz, or Adonis. To Chemosh Solomon erected an altar upon the Mount of Olives, 1 Kings 11:7 . As to the form of the idol Chemosh, the Scripture is silent; but if, according to Jerom, it were like Baal-Peor, it must have been of the beeve kind; as were, probably, all the Baals, though accompanied with various insignia. There can be little doubt that part of the religious services performed to Chemosh, as to Baal- Peor, consisted in revelling and drunkenness, obscenities and impurities of the grossest kinds. From Chemosh the Greeks seem to have derived their Κωμος , called by the Romans Comus, the god of feasting and revelling.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chemosh
Chemosh (kç'mŏsh), subduer. The national deity of the Moabites. Numbers 21:29; Jeremiah 48:7; Jeremiah 48:13; Jeremiah 48:46. In Judges 11:24 he also appears as the god of the Ammonites. Solomon introduced, and Josiah abolished, the worship of Chemosh at Jerusalem. 1 Kings 11:7; 2 Kings 23:13. Also related to Baal-peor, Baal-zebub, Mars, and Saturn.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Chemosh
The national god of the Moabites, and of the Ammonites, worshipped also under Solomon at Jerusalem, Numbers 21:29 ; Judges 11:24 ; 1 Kings 11:7 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ; Jeremiah 48:7 . Some erroneously identify Chemosh with Ammon.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Chemosh
Bordering Israel in the region east of the Dead Sea was the nation Moab, whose national god was Chemosh. In times of religious corruption, Israel copied Moabite religious practices (Judges 10:6; 1 Kings 11:7; 1 Kings 11:33), and in times of reformation got rid of them (2 Kings 23:13). The Moabites looked for help from Chemosh through offering child sacrifices (2 Kings 3:26-27; cf. Judges 10:6; Judges 11:30-31; Judges 11:39), but Chemosh was powerless to save them from the judgment of God (Jeremiah 48:7; Jeremiah 48:13; Jeremiah 48:46; see MOAB).

Sentence search

Chemosh - For this reason, many believe Chemosh to be the sun, whose precipitate course might well procure it the name of swift. Some identify Chemosh with Ammon; and Macrobius shows that Ammon was the sun, whose rays were denoted by his horns. Jerom and most interpreters consider Chemosh and Peor as the same deity; but some think that Baal-Peor was Tammuz, or Adonis. To Chemosh Solomon erected an altar upon the Mount of Olives, 1 Kings 11:7 . As to the form of the idol Chemosh, the Scripture is silent; but if, according to Jerom, it were like Baal-Peor, it must have been of the beeve kind; as were, probably, all the Baals, though accompanied with various insignia. There can be little doubt that part of the religious services performed to Chemosh, as to Baal- Peor, consisted in revelling and drunkenness, obscenities and impurities of the grossest kinds. From Chemosh the Greeks seem to have derived their Κωμος , called by the Romans Comus, the god of feasting and revelling
Chemosh - Bordering Israel in the region east of the Dead Sea was the nation Moab, whose national god was Chemosh. The Moabites looked for help from Chemosh through offering child sacrifices (2 Kings 3:26-27; cf. Judges 10:6; Judges 11:30-31; Judges 11:39), but Chemosh was powerless to save them from the judgment of God (Jeremiah 48:7; Jeremiah 48:13; Jeremiah 48:46; see MOAB)
Chemosh - Ammon, from its close connection with Moab, also worshipped Chemosh, but Moloch (kin) was their peculiar deity (Judges 11:24). Solomon introduced, and Josiah overthrew, Chemosh worship in Jerusalem. The inscribed black stone set up at Dibon, lately discovered, is full of the Moabite king Mesha's praises of Chemosh as the giver of his martial successes against Israel. "Ashtar Chemosh," mentioned on the Moabite stone, connects the Moabite and the Phoenician worship. Chemosh required human sacrifices as god of war; Mesha, after taking Ataroth, offered all the warriors in sacrifice
Chemosh - Chemosh (kç'mŏsh), subduer. Solomon introduced, and Josiah abolished, the worship of Chemosh at Jerusalem
Chemosh - Chemosh . The national god of the Moabites ( Numbers 21:29 ; in Judges 11:24 probably ‘Chemosh’ is a scribal or other error for ‘Milcom’ Jogbehah - Chemosh Gad ("he whose good fortune is Chemosh") the father of Mesha was a Dibonite
Chemosh - Some erroneously identify Chemosh with Ammon
Carchemish - Carchemish, or Charchemish (kär-ke'mĭsh), citadel of Chemosh
Bajith - In the Moabite stone of Dibon there is inscribed: "I Mesha, son of Chemosh god, built Beth Bamoth, for it was destroyed, and Beth Diblathaim, and Beth Baal Meon. " The peculiarity of Bajith was it had a sacred "house" or sanctuary, on the high place, to the national god Chemosh
Che'Mosh - Solomon introduced, and Josiah abolished, the worship of Chemosh at Jerusalem
Siloam, Village of - The village Κeir Silwan is at the foot of the third height of Olivet, at the spot where Solomon built the temples to Chemosh, Ashtoreth, and Milcom; "the mount of corruption," E
Car'Chemish - (fortress of Chemosh ) occupied nearly the site of the later Mabug or Hierapolis
Chemosh - The king, referring to the king of Israel, says, "Chemosh drove him before my sight
Chemosh - ), Mesha (2 Kings 3:5 ) ascribes his victories over the king of Israel to this god, "And Chemosh drove him before my sight
mo'Lech - The fire-god Molech was the tutelary deity of the children of Ammon, and essentially identical with the Moabitish Chemosh. Molech was the lord and master of the Ammonites; their country was his possession, ( Jeremiah 49:1 ) as Moab was the heritage of Chemosh; the princes of the land were the princes of Malcham
Carchemish - Fortress of Chemosh, a city on the west bank of the Euphrates (Jeremiah 46:2 ; 2 Chronicles 35:20 ), not, as was once supposed, the Circesium at the confluence of the Chebar and the Euphrates, but a city considerably higher up the river, and commanding the ordinary passage of the Euphrates; probably identical with Hierapolis
Mesha - id, a king of Moab, the son of Chemosh-Gad, a man of great wealth in flocks and herds (2 Kings 3:4 ). Reduced to despair, he ascended the wall of the city, and there, in the sight of the allied armies, offered his first-born son a sacrifice to Chemosh, the fire-god of the Moabites
Sab'Aoth, the Lord of, - " In the mouth and the mind of an ancient Hebrew, Jehovah-tsebaoth was the leader and commander of the armies of the nation, who "went forth with them" (Psalm 44:9 ) and led them to certain victory over the worshippers of Baal Chemosh
Kerioth - The latter is a stronghold to this day, and fits in with the suggestion of the passages above that Kerioth was a capital city of Moab, and the seat of the worship of Chemosh
Moloch - Moloch is spoken of in the OT as the god of the Ammonites, and is evidently the national deity, just as Chemosh is the god of Moab, and Jahweh the God of Israel, though the worship of other gods is not precluded
Baal Meon - The famous Moabite stone of Dibon mentions that as Omri made Medeba a military center for opposing Moab, so Mesha occupied Baal Meon as his center for assailing Israel; "I Mesha, son of Kamos (Chemosh), fortified Baal Meon, and I besieged and took Kiriathaim and Nebo," etc
Carchemish - ("the fort of Chemosh"), the Moabite idol
Abomination - Thus we read, (2 Kings 23:13,) that Ashtoreth was the abomination (that is the idol) of the Zidonians; Chemosh, the abomination of the Moabites; and Milcom, the abomination of the Ammonites
Moloch - This god became Chemosh among the Moabites
Kir-Hareseth - Apparently, the forces of Israel and Judah feared the power of the Moabite god, Chemosh, and gave up the victory that lay within their grasp. Jehoram and Jehoshaphat did not have faith that Yahweh would give them victory over the people of Chemosh
Milcom - ” Apparently, a form created by Hebrew scribes to slander and avoid pronouncing the name of the national god of Ammon (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:7 ), who may have been identified with Chemosh, the god of Moab
Moab, Moabites - This subjugation apparently continued during the reign of Solomon, for he had Moabitish women in his harem, and built a shrine for Chemosh, the god of Moab ( Jeremiah 48:1-47 ; 1 Kings 11:7 ). Mesha states that Omri, king of Israel, conquered Moab, and that Moab continued subject to Israel till the middle of the reign of Ahab, when Chemosh enabled him (Mesha) to win victories over Israel, which secured Moabitish independence, and which he describes in detail. , Jehoram, Ahab’s successor, undertook, with the aid of Jehoshaphat and the king of Edom, to reduce Moab once more, and almost succeeded, The country was overrun, the capital besieged and reduced to great extremity, when the king of Moab sacrificed to Chemosh his firstborn son on the city wall in sight of both armies ( 2 Kings 3:27 ). 700, received tribute from Chemosh-nadab, king of Moab ( KIB Jahaz - On the Moabite stone, King Mesha of Moab claims an Israelite king (perhaps Jehu) built Jahaz and used it as a base in his unsuccessful fight against Mesha, Chemosh, the Moabite god driving the Israelites out
Moab, Moabites - ...
Ruth was a MOABITESS, and so also were some of Solomon's wives, for whom he introduced into Jerusalem the worship of Chemosh the idol of Moab. ...
It is dedicated to Chemosh, the god of Moab, by Mesha. He admits that Chemosh was angry with his land, and that Omri king of Israel took it, and he and his son oppressed them forty years. Then Chemosh had mercy on it, and the king was able to rescue some of the cities, kill the people, and take the spoil, and he built others, of which he gives the names
Moloch - ) Ammon's god, related to Moab's god Chemosh . Milcom was related to Chemosh, which is called the god of Ammon in Judges 11:24, though elsewhere the god of Moab (Numbers 21:29). In this respect Moloch answered to Baal the Phoenician sun god, to whom also human burnt offerings were sacrificed; also to Chemosh, to whom Mesha sacrificed his son (2 Kings 3:27; Micah 6:7; Ezekiel 16:20; Ezekiel 23:39)
Ariel - " Ganneau has deciphered on the Moabite stone that the Ariel of David is mentioned as taken by Mesha, the Moabite king, at Ataroth, and dragged before the face of Chemosh at Kerioth
Mesha - " (See JEHORAM, JEHOSHAPHAT, ELISHA, ENGEDI, Chemosh, on the confederacy against Mesha and the superstitions indignation raised against Israel because of their reducing him to such desperation that he sacrificed his own son (Micah 6:7), so that the allies departed to their own land
Sihon - An Israelite poet celebrates Sihon's victory, glorifying Heshbon as the city from whence "a flame" went forth "consuming Ar of Moab," so that "Moab's sons their idol ("Chemosh") rendered fugitives, and yielded his daughters into captivity unto Sihon"! then by a sudden startling transition the poet introduces Israel's triumph in turn over Sihon
Abomination - Among the objects so described are heathen deities such as Ashtoreth (Astarte), Chemosh, Milcom, the ‘abominations’ of the Zidonians (Phœnicians), Moabites, and Ammonites respectively ( 2 Kings 23:13 ); images and other paraphernalia of the forbidden cults ( Deuteronomy 7:25 ; Deuteronomy 27:15 , and often in Ezk
Omri - In the stele of Mesha (the "Moabite stone"), which was erected in Moab about twenty or thirty years after Omri's death, it is recorded that Omri oppressed Moab till Mesha delivered the land: "Omri, king of Israel, oppressed Moab many days, for Chemosh was angry with his land
me'Sha - With 700 fighting men he made a vigorous attempt to cut his way through the beleaguering army, and when beaten back, he withdrew to the wall of his city, and there, in sight of the allied host, offered his first-born son, his successor in the kingdom, as a burnt offering to Chemosh, the ruthless fire-god of Moab
Baal Peor - Chemosh, the abomination of Moab, to whom Solomon erected an altar, 1 Kings 11:7 , is supposed to have been the same deity
Jehoram - But at the crisis of the conflict the king of Moab sacrificed his son to his god Chemosh
Michmash - The more timid of the Israelites emerged from the holes (which give Michmash its name ("hidden"); others derive it from Chemosh, marking a Moabite invasion at some time) to join in the pursuit
Mesha - With no escape possible, Mesha sacrificed his firstborn son to his god Chemosh on the city walls
Mesha - With no escape possible, Mesha sacrificed his firstborn son to his god Chemosh on the city walls
Moabites - They were gross idolaters, worshipping Chemosh and Baalpeor with obscene rites, Numbers 25:1-18 2 Kings 3:27
Ashtoreth - In the Moabite Dibon stone the male form Astar is prefixed to Chamos or Chemosh, answering to the female Astarte
Mount Olivet - But so it was, when king Solomon loved many strange wives, those illicit connexions led him into idolatry; hence we read that Solomon built an high place for Chemosh, the abomination of Moab, in the hill that is before Jerusalem, and for Moloch, the abomination of the children of Ammon
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - ...
Chemosh . Chemosh was the primary national god of the Moabites and Ammonites. The Moabites are called the "people of Chemosh" in the passage of Scripture that details the travels of the Israelites through Edom, Moab, and Ammon, (Numbers 21:21-32 ). During the reign of Solomon worship of Chemosh, along with that of other pagan gods, was established and promoted in the city of Jerusalem. Jeremiah specifically condemns the worship of Chemosh (chap
Carchemish - (cahr' cehm ihssh; fort of Chemosh ) (modern Jerablus) was an important city on the great bend of the Euphrates River
Moab - The Moabites’ chief city was Heshbon (Isaiah 16:4; Jeremiah 48:2) and their national god was Chemosh (Jeremiah 48:7; Jeremiah 48:46; see Chemosh)
Human Sacrifice - In the ninth century Mesha, king of Moab, offered his own son as a burnt offering presumably to Chemosh, national god of Moab, upon the walls of his capital while under siege by Israel and Judah (2 Kings 3:27 )
Dibon - his successors); the second (line 21-31) his public buildings; the third part (31-34) his wars against Horonaim with the help of Chemosh, "the abomination (idol) of Moab. The phrase of "Mesha" (named on the stone just as we read it 2 Kings 3:4-27), "Chemosh let me see my desire upon all my enemies," is word for word, substituting Jehovah for the idol of apostate Moab, David's phrase (Psalms 59:10)
Ashtaroth - In Moab, Astarte was the spouse of the major god, Chemosh
mo'ab - For the religion of the Moabites see Chemosh ; MOLECH ; PEOR
Nebo - The Moabite town called Nebo is mentioned in Numbers 32:3 ; Numbers 32:33 ; Numbers 33:47 , Isaiah 15:2 , Jeremiah 48:1 ; Jeremiah 48:22 , 1 Chronicles 5:8 , and also in the inscription of Mesha, who says: ‘And Chemosh said unto me, Go take Nebo against Israel
High Place - The surrounding nations had high places dedicated to Chemosh (1 Kings 11:7)Baal ( Gods, Pagan - Jephthah's reply to the Ammonites (Judges 11:24 ) refers to Chemosh as their god. Chemosh, the national god of the Moabites (Numbers 21:29 ; Jeremiah 48:46 ), thus may be identical to Molech although they are listed separately as abominations brought to Jerusalem by Solomon (1 Kings 11:7 ). Chemosh is mentioned prominently in the famous Moabite Stone. Mesha, king of Moab, probably offered up his son Chemosh (2 Kings 3:27 )
Perish - In a similar sense Moab is said “to be ruined” or laid waste: “Woe to thee, Moab! Thou art undone [4], O people of Chemosh … We have shot at them; Heshbon is perished even unto Dibon, and we have laid them waste even unto Nophah …” ( Ashtoreth - Mesha, king of Moab, dedicated his prisoners to a composite goddess ‘Ashtar-Chemosh
Priest; Priesthood - 5:5), “priests” of Baal (2 Kings 10:19), “priests” of Chemosh ( High Place - Although most high places were part of the worship of Baal, the Ammonite god Molech and the Moabite god Chemosh were also worshiped at similar high places (1 Kings 11:5-8 ; 2 Kings 23:10 )
Jehoram - ...
Failing to break through the besiegers to the king of Edom, from whom he expected least resistance, he offered his firstborn son a burnt offering to Chemosh. (See Chemosh
Moab And the Moabite Stone - Moab was represented among Solomon's wives, and the worship of Chemosh, the Moabite god, accommodated in Solomon's Jerusalem (1 Kings 11:1-8 )
Idol, Idolatry - Solomon, seduced by complaisance to his strange wives, caused temples to be erected in honor of Ashtoreth goddess of the Phoenicians, Moloch god of the Ammonites, and Chemosh god of the Moabites
Monotheism - If Israel’s early beliefs, as some contend, were henotheistic, and conceded a place and right to other national gods, as Chemosh, Molech, or Rimmon, as equal and paramount lords of their own peoples, such recognition of external divinities had long since ceased to be permissible
Solomon - These women perverted his heart in his declining age, so that he worshipped Ashtoreth, goddess of the Sidonians, Moloch, idol of the Ammonites, and Chemosh, god of the Moabites
Ebla - The tablets refer to the temples dedicated to Dagon, Ashtar, (Astarte), Kamosh (Chemosh), Rasap (Reshaph), and offerings of bread, drink, and animals
Idolatry - Each nation, however, had its own provincial Baal with a specific name or title Chemosh of Moab, Molech of Ammon, Dagon of Philistia, Hadad-Rimmon of Syria
Ebla - The tablets refer to the temples dedicated to Dagon, Ashtar, (Astarte), Kamosh (Chemosh), Rasap (Reshaph), and offerings of bread, drink, and animals
Sol'Omon - Before long the priests and prophets had to grieve over rival temples to Molech, Chemosh, Ashtaroth and forms of ritual not idolatrous only, but cruel, dark, impure
Isaac - ...
So the king of Moab sacrificed his son to Chemosh when sore pressed by Israel, Judah, and Edom (2 Kings 3:27)
Moab - Among Solomon's foreign concubines were Moabitish women, to whose god Chemosh he built "a high place on the hill before (facing) Jerusalem" (1 Kings 11:1; 1 Kings 11:7; 1 Kings 11:33), where it remained until Josiah defiled it four centuries afterward (2 Kings 23:13)
Jephthah - Ammon can only claim what his god Chemosh gives him to possess; so Israel is entitled to all that land which Jehovah gives, having dispossessed the previous owners
Jephthah - Jephthah replied that they had made no conquests in that quarter but from the Amorites; adding, "If you think you have a right to all that Chemosh, your god, hath given you, why should not we possess all that the Lord our God hath conferred on us by right of conquest?" Jephthah's reasoning availed nothing with the Ammonites; and as the latter persisted in waging war, the former collected his troops together and put himself at their head
Ammonites - Chemosh was also a god of the Ammonites
Olives, Mount of - "The mountain facing Jerusalem" (1 Kings 11:7); called "the hill of corruption" from Solomon's high places built to Chemosh and Moloch (2 Kings 23:13-14)
Priest, Priesthood - ...
Priests of foreign gods in foreign lands referred to in the Old Testament are Potiphera, Joseph's father-in-law, who was a "priest of On" in Egypt (Genesis 41:45,50 ; 46:20 ), the whole priestly organization in Egypt (Genesis 47:22,26 ), the "priests of Dagon" in Philistia (1 Samuel 5:5 ; 6:2 ), the "priests of Chemosh" in Moab (Jeremiah 48:7 ), and the "priests of Malcam" in Ammon (Jeremiah 49:3 )
Jeroboam - Then did Solomon build an high place for Chemosh, the abomination of Moab, in the hill of God that is before Jerusalem, and for Molech, the abomination of Ammon
Moab - The principal deities of the Moabites were Chemosh and Baal-peor
Revelation - As Wellhausen truly says, ‘Why did not Chemosh of Moah, for instance, develop into a God of Righteousness, and the Creator of heaven and earth?’ It is possible to give a satisfying answer to this question only by predicating a Divine revelation in the OT
Idol - The Phoenician Adon or Adonis, the Ammonite Moloch or Milcom, the Moabite Chemosh, the Assyrian and Babylonian Bel, and the Syrian Hadad, the Egyptian Ra, are essentially the same sun god