What does Ceremony mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
וּכְמִשְׁפָּט֖וֹ judgment 1

Definitions Related to Ceremony

H4941


   1 judgment, justice, ordinance.
      1a judgment.
         1a1 act of deciding a case.
         1a2 place, court, seat of judgment.
         1a3 process, procedure, litigation (before judges).
         1a4 case, cause (presented for judgment).
         1a5 sentence, decision (of judgment).
         1a6 execution (of judgment).
         1a7 time (of judgment).
      1b justice, right, rectitude (attributes of God or man).
      1c ordinance.
      1d decision (in law).
      1e right, privilege, due (legal).
      1f proper, fitting, measure, fitness, custom, manner, plan.
      

Frequency of Ceremony (original languages)

Frequency of Ceremony (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Ceremony
(1):
(n.) Behavior regulated by strict etiquette; a formal method of performing acts of civility; forms of civility prescribed by custom or authority.
(2):
(n.) A ceremonial symbols; an emblem, as a crown, scepter, garland, etc.
(3):
(n.) A sign or prodigy; a portent.
(4):
(n.) Ar act or series of acts, often of a symbolical character, prescribed by law, custom, or authority, in the conduct of important matters, as in the performance of religious duties, the transaction of affairs of state, and the celebration of notable events; as, the ceremony of crowning a sovereign; the ceremonies observed in consecrating a church; marriage and baptismal ceremonies.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ceremony
An external act, gesture, or movement that accompanies the prayers and public exercise of Divine worship.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Ceremony
An assemblage of several actions, forms, and circumstances, and solemn. Applied to religious services, it signifies the external rites and manner wherein the ministers of religion perform their sacred functions. In 1646, M. Ponce published a history of ancient ceremonies, tracing the rise, growth, and introduction of each rite into the church, and its gradual advancement to superstition. Many of them were borrowed from Judaism, but more from paganism. Dr. Middleton has given a fine discourse on the conformity between the pagan and popish ceremonies, which he exemplifies in the use of incense, holy water, lamps and candles before the shrines of saints, voltive gifts round the shrines of the deceased, &c. In fact, the altars, images, crosses, processions, miracles, and legends, nay, even the very hierarchy, pontificate, religious orders, &c. of the present Romans, he shows, are all copied from their heathen ancestors.
An ample and magnificent representation in figures of the religious ceremonies and customs of all nations in the world, designed by Picart, is added, with historical explanations, and many curious dissertations. It has been a question, whether we ought to use such rites and ceremonies which are merely of human appointment. On one side it has been observed that we ought not. Christ alone is King in his church: he hath instituted such ordinances and forms of worship as he hath judged fit and necessary; and to add to them seems, at least, to carry in it an imputation on his wisdom and authority, and hath this unanswerable objection to it, that it opens the door to a thousand innovations (as the history of the church of Rome hath sufficiently shown, ) which are not only indifferent in themselves, but highly absurd, and extremely detrimental to religion.
That the ceremonies were numerous under the Old Testament dispensation is no argument; for, say they.
1.We respect Jewish ceremonies, because God hath not appointed them.
2.The Jewish ceremonies were established by the universal consent of the nation; human ceremonies are not so.
3.The former were fit and proper for the purposes for which they were appointed; but the latter are often the contrary.
4.The institutor of the Jewish ceremonies provided for the expense of it; but no provision is made by God to support human ceremonies, or what he has not appointed.
These arguments seem very powerful; but on the other side of it has been observed, that the desire of reducing religious worship to the greatest possible simplicity, however rational it may appear in itself, and abstractedly considered, will be considerably moderated in such as bestow a moment's attention upon the imperfection and infirmities of human nature in its present state. Mankind, generally speaking, have too little elevation of mind to be much affected with those forms and methods of worship in which there is nothing striking to the outward senses.
The great difficulty here lies in determining the length which it is prudent to go in the accommodation of religious ceremonies to human infirmity; and the grand point is to fix a medium in which a due regard may be shown to the senses and imagination, without violating the dictates of right reason, or tarnishing the purity of true religion. It has been said, that the Romish church has gone too far in its condescension to the infirmities of mankind; and this is what the ablest defenders of its motley worship have alleged in its behalf. But this observation is not just; the church of Rome has not so much accommodated itself to human weakness, as it has abused that weakness, by taking occasion from it to establish an endless variety of ridiculous ceremonies, destructive of true religion, and only adapted to promote the riches and despotism of the clergy, and to keep the multitude still hood-winked in their ignorance and superstition. How far a just antipathy to the church puppet-shows of the Papists has unjustly driven some Protestant churches into the opposite extreme, is a matter that certainly deserves a serious consideration.
See Dr. Stennett's Ser. on Conformity to the World; Robinson's Sermon on Ceremonies; Booth's Essay on the Kingdom of Christ; Mosheim's Ecclesiastical History; with Mac Laine's Note, vol. 1: p. 203, quarto edit. Jones's Works, vol. 4, p. 267.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ceremony
an assemblage of several actions, forms, and circumstances, serving to render a thing magnificent and solemn. Applied to religious services, it signifies the external rites and manner in which the ministers of religion perform their sacred functions, and direct or lead the worship of the people. In 1646, M. Ponce published a history of ancient ceremonies, showing the rise, growth, and introduction of each rite into the church, and its gradual advancement to superstition. Many of them were borrowed from Judaism, but more from Paganism. In all religions adapted to the nature of man there must be some positive institutions for fixing the mind upon spiritual objects, and counteracting that influence of material things upon habits and pursuits which is, and must be, constantly exerted. Without such institutions, religion might be preserved, indeed, by a few of superior understanding and of strong powers of reflection; but among mankind in general all trace of it would soon be lost. When the end for which they are appointed is kept in view, and the simple examples of the New Testament are observed, they are of vast importance to the production both of pious feelings and of virtuous conduct; but there has constantly been a propensity in the human race to mistake the means for the end, and to consider themselves as moral and religious, when they scrupulously observe what was intended to produce morality and religion. The reason is obvious: ceremonial observances can be performed without any great sacrifice of propensities and vices; they are palpable; when they are observed by men who, in the tenor of public life, do not act immorally, they are regarded by others as indicating high attainments in virtue; and through that self-deceit which so wonderfully misleads the reason, and inclines it to minister to the passions which it should restrain, men have themselves become persuaded that their acknowledgment of divine authority, implied in their respect to the ritual which that authority is conceived to have sanctioned, may be taken as a proof that they have nothing to apprehend from the violation of the law under which they are placed. But, whatever be the causes of this, the fact itself is established by the most extensive and the most incontrovertible evidence. We find it, indeed, wherever mankind have had notions of superior power, and of their obligation to yield obedience to the will of the supreme Being.
Under the system of polytheism which prevailed in the most enlightened nations previous to the publication of Christianity, this was carried so far, that the connection between religion and morality was in a great degree dissolved, rites and ceremonies, sacrifices and oblations, were all that it was thought requisite to observe; when these were carefully performed, there was no hesitation in ascribing piety to the persons who did perform them, however deficient they might be in virtuous and pious dispositions. Even under the Mosaical dispensation, proceeding as it did, immediately from heaven, and adapted, as in infinite wisdom it was, to the situation of those to whom it was given, the same evil early began to be experienced; and although it was lamented and exposed by the prophets, and the most enlightened men among the Jews, it was so far from being eradicated, that it continued to acquire strength, till it was exhibited in all its magnitude in the character prevalent among the Pharisees at the period of Christ's manifestation. With this highly popular and revered class of men, religion was either merely a matter of ceremony, or was employed, for base and interested purposes, to cast a veil of sanctity over their actions. They said long prayers, but it was for a show; they gave alms, but it was after they had sounded a trumpet, that the eye of man might be fixed upon their beneficence; and, as to the point now under review, they were most strikingly described by our Saviour, when he said of them, "They pay tithe of mint, and anise, and cummin, but they neglect the weightier matters of the law, justice, and mercy, and truth." The Christian religion not only expressly guards against an evil which had become so prevalent, but its whole spirit is at variance with it, its own ceremonial observances being few, and obviously emblematical of whatever is excellent and holy. But still the Gospel finds human nature as other religions found it; and ecclesiastical history, even from the earliest periods, shows with what astonishing perverseness, and with what wonderful ingenuity, men departed from the simplicity of Christianity, and substituted in its room the most childish, and often the most pernicious, practices and observances. The power of godliness was lost in forms; and the innovations of a profane will-worship became almost innumerable. The effect was, that men regarded God as less concerned with the moral conduct of his creatures, than with the quantum of service they performed in his temples; and religion and morals were so disjoined, that one became the substitute for the other, to the universal corruption of the Christian world.

Sentence search

Chupah - "canopy"); (a) the canopy under which a wedding Ceremony is solemnized; (b) the wedding Ceremony ...
Punctilio - ) A nice point of exactness in conduct, Ceremony, or proceeding; particularity or exactness in forms; as, the punctilios of a public Ceremony
Maundy - ) The Ceremony of washing the feet of the poor on Maundy Thursday. ) The alms distributed in connection with this Ceremony or on Maundy Thursday
Ceremonies - ) of Ceremony...
Mass - In Catholicism, a reenactment of the sacrifice of Christ on the cross in a Ceremony performed by a priest. This Ceremony is symbolically carried out by the priest and involves Consecration where the bread and wine are changed into the body and blood of Jesus
Ceremonialism - ) Adherence to external rites; fondness for Ceremony
Rite - A solemn act of religion; an external Ceremony. (...
See Ceremony
Badeken - �covering�); veiling of the bride before the wedding Ceremony...
Consecration - ) The act or Ceremony of consecrating; the state of being consecrated; dedication
Wedding - ) Nuptial Ceremony; nuptial festivities; marriage; nuptials
Water drawing celebrations, the: - Celebration accompanying the water libation Ceremony on Sukkot in Temple times, recalled today by Sukkot celebrations
Aufruf - The Ceremony wherein a groom is called up to the Torah on the Shabbat before his wedding
Baptistry - The place in which the Ceremony of baptism is performed. It consisted of an ante-room, where the adult persons to be baptized made their confession of faith; and an inner room, where the Ceremony of baptism was performed
Puncto - ) A nice point of form or Ceremony
Chamberlains, Privy - (Active) Compose the College of Masters of Pontifical Ceremony, and are at present nine in number (five monsignori and four supernumeraries)
Besamim - "spices") Spices or other aromatic plant or fruit used during the Havdalah Ceremony marking the close of Shabbat ...
Purification - A Ceremony which consists in cleansing any thing from pollution or defilement
Kaparot - "atonements"); atonement Ceremony performed before Yom Kippur, traditionally while holding a fowl, fish or money which is then given to charity ...
Wedding - Marriage nuptials nuptial Ceremony nuptial festivities
Ordination - In Christianity it is the Ceremony of consecration to ministry
Asperges - ) The service or Ceremony of sprinkling with holy water
Laying on of Hands - The Ceremony by which one is ordained to theSacred Ministry by the Bishop, and by which he administers the Riteof Confirmation, (See IMPOSITION OF HANDS
Awl - A boring instrument, named only in connexion with the Ceremony whereby a slave was bound to perpetual servitude ( Exodus 21:6 , Deuteronomy 15:17 )
Simchat beit hashoeivah - �the rejoicing of the place of the water-drawing�); celebration accompanying the water libation Ceremony on Sukkot in Temple times, recalled today by Sukkot celebrations
Exorcism - (Greek: ex, out; horkizo, solemnly command ) ...
The act or Ceremony of driving out demons from possessed persons, places, or things, or of protecting them from the influence of evil spirits. The Roman Ritual contains the Ceremony of Exorcism proper
Christen - ...
(3) To name in some Ceremony analogous to Baptism; hence, to name
Installation - (Latin: installare, to put into a stall) ...
Investing with an office; the Ceremony of inducting a cleric into his office; putting a thing in position for use
Bucentaur - ) The state barge of Venice, used by the doge in the Ceremony of espousing the Adriatic
Chalitzah - "taking off"); a Ceremony whereby the widow of a childless husband is released by the brother of the deceased, thus permitting her to remarry somebody else
Holy Water - or a liturgical Ceremony
Salam - ) A salutation or compliment of Ceremony in the east by word or act; an obeisance, performed by bowing very low and placing the right palm on the forehead
Bridal - ) A nuptial festival or Ceremony; a marriage
Lavabo - (Latin: I will wash) ...
Ceremony of washing the hands of the celebrant after the Offertory of Mass, named from the first word of the portIon of Psalms 25 which is recited
Obsequy - ) The last duty or service to a person, rendered after his death; hence, a rite or Ceremony pertaining to burial; - now used only in the plural
Gregorian Water - A holy water used in the Ceremony of the consecration of a church
Water, Gregorian - A holy water used in the Ceremony of the consecration of a church
Water of Consecration - A holy water used in the Ceremony of the consecration of a church
Dedication - a religious Ceremony, whereby any person or thing was set apart to the service of God, and the purposes of religion
Rite - ) The act of performing divine or solemn service, as established by law, precept, or custom; a formal act of religion or other solemn duty; a solemn observance; a Ceremony; as, the rites of freemasonry
Accolade - ) A Ceremony formerly used in conferring knighthood, consisting am embrace, and a slight blow on the shoulders with the flat blade of a sword
Baptism - ) The act of baptizing; the application of water to a person, as a sacrament or religious Ceremony, by which he is initiated into the visible church of Christ
Augury - ) A rite, Ceremony, or observation of an augur
Circumcise - CIRCUMCISE, To cut off the prepuce or foreskin of males a Ceremony or rite in the Jewish and Mohammedan religions
Ladiator - ) Originally, a swordplayer; hence, one who fought with weapons in public, either on the occasion of a funeral Ceremony, or in the arena, for public amusement
Liturgical Use of Rings - ...
(3) Conferring the ring is part of the marriage Ceremony, symbolizing union
Eucharist - ) The sacrament of the Lord's Supper; the solemn act of Ceremony of commemorating the death of Christ, in the use of bread and wine, as the appointed emblems; the communion
Chat - To talk in a familiar manner to talk without form or Ceremony
Effrontes - This Ceremony served them instead of baptism
Dress Coat - It is worn on occasions of Ceremony
Downright - ) In plain terms; without Ceremony
Espousal - ) The act of espousing or betrothing; especially, in the plural, betrothal; plighting of the troths; a contract of marriage; sometimes, the marriage Ceremony
Precise - ) Strictly adhering or conforming to rule; very nice or exact; punctilious in conduct or Ceremony; formal; ceremonious
Conge - ) The act of taking leave; parting Ceremony; farewell; also, dismissal
Gittith - It may represent a musical instrument resembling a Spanish guitar, a musical tune, or a rite or Ceremony as part of a festival
Miniamin - A priest who took part in the Ceremony of the dedication of the walls ( Nehemiah 12:41 )
Hashabneiah - Levite who led worship in Nehemiah's covenant Ceremony in which people reaffirmed their commitment to obey God (Nehemiah 9:5 )
Decency - ) The quality or state of being decent, suitable, or becoming, in words or behavior; propriety of form in social intercourse, in actions, or in discourse; proper formality; becoming Ceremony; seemliness; hence, freedom from obscenity or indecorum; modesty
Consecration - The act or Ceremony of separating form a common to a sacred use, or of devoting and dedicating a person or thing to the service and worship of God, by certain rites or solemnities. Canonization the act of translating into heaven, and enrolling or numbering among the saints or gods the Ceremony of the apotheosis of an emperor
Palace - ) The residence of a sovereign, including the lodgings of high officers of state, and rooms for business, as well as halls for Ceremony and reception
Illuminati (1) - The name was occasioned by a Ceremony in the baptism of adults, which consisted in putting a lighted taper in the hand of the person baptized, as a symbol of the faith and grace he had received in the sacrament
Bells, Blessing of - The long and solemn Ceremony, which may be performed only by a bishop, or a priest especially designated, consists of washing the bell with holy water, anointing it with the oil of the infirm without, and chrism within, and offering prayers that these sacramentals of the Church may, at the sound of the bell, put the demon to flight, protect from storms, and call the faithful to prayer. The fuming censer is then placed under the bell, that the smoke may fill the cavity, and the Ceremony is concluded with the reading of the Gospel concerning Martha and Mary
Altar, Stripping of the - A Ceremony which takes place on Holy Thursday symbolizing the moment in the Passion of Christ when He was stripped of His garments by the Jews
Decent - ) Suitable in words, behavior, dress, or Ceremony; becoming; fit; decorous; proper; seemly; as, decent conduct; decent language
Leave - Farewell adieu Ceremony of departure a formal parting of friends used chiefly in the phrase to take leave
Master of Arts - Academic degree higher than that of Bachelor, conferred in medieval universities at a Ceremony known as the "Inceptio," or beginning of actual teaching, whence originated the modern term "commencement
Baptism - The application of water to a person, as a sacrament or religious Ceremony, by which he is initiated into the visible church of Christ
Familiarity - ) The state of being familiar; intimate and frequent converse, or association; unconstrained intercourse; freedom from Ceremony and constraint; intimacy; as, to live in remarkable familiarity
Asperges - The Ceremony takes its name from the first word, in Latin, of a verse of the 50th Psalm, recited and sung: "Thou shalt sprinkle me with hyssop," etc
Arts, Master of - Academic degree higher than that of Bachelor, conferred in medieval universities at a Ceremony known as the "Inceptio," or beginning of actual teaching, whence originated the modern term "commencement
Investiture - The account of this Ceremony may be seen at large in Mosheim's Ecclesiastica History, cent
Ordinance - ) An established rite or Ceremony
Accolade - (Latin: ad collum, to the neck) Ceremony used in conferring knighthood, either by a kiss, or by a slight blow on the neck, the second form being still used in England; also, a form of salutation and farewell used in some countries by clerics or religious, like the peace salutation among the clergy at solemn Mass
Laying on of Hands - This "formed at an early period a part of the Ceremony observed on the appointment and consecration of persons to high and holy undertakings;" (and in the Christian Church was especially used in setting apart men to the ministry and to other holy offices
Jeffersonian Simplicity - The absence of pomp or display which Jefferson aimed at in his administration as President (1801-1809), eschewing display or Ceremony tending to distinguish the President from the people, as in going to the capital on horseback and with no escort, the abolition of court etiquette and the weekly levee, refusal to recognize titles of honor, etc
Ebal - Mountain near Shechem on which Moses set up the curse for the covenant Ceremony (Deuteronomy 11:29 ; Deuteronomy 27:13 ). Joshua carried out the covenant Ceremony on Ebal and Gerazim (Joshua 8:30-35 ; compare Joshua 24:1-27 ), building an altar on Ebal
Salute - ) A sign, token, or Ceremony, expressing good will, compliment, or respect, as a kiss, a bow, etc. ) Hence, to give a sign of good will; to compliment by an act or Ceremony, as a kiss, a bow, etc
New Fire, Blessed of - A Ceremony of Holy Saturday
Bride - But the name is applied to a woman at the marriage festival, before she is married, as well as after the Ceremony
Incantation - The term also denotes the manual act or Ceremony performed in connection with the oral rite
Shoshannim - It may be the title of a melody, a flower used in a Ceremony seeking a word from God, designation of a love song later expanded in meaning, or indication of a six-stringed instrument
Veneration of the Cross - There is a special Ceremony on Good Friday called Adoration of the Cross
Espouse - The espousal was a Ceremony of betrothing, a formal agreement between the parties then coming under obligation for the purpose of marriage
Ephpheta - (imperative of Aramaic verb, to open) ...
A Ceremony which is a part of the administration of Baptism
Confirmation - In Catholicism, a Ceremony performed by a bishop that is supposed to strengthen a person and enable him to resist sin
Red Heifer - The function of the red heifer Ceremony was production of ash for the water used to remove ritual impurity contracted through contact with a corpse, bones, or a grave (Numbers 19:1 ). Hebrews 9:14 uses the image of the red heifer Ceremony to picture Christ's cleansing believers of the effect of “dead works
Commination - " This discipline, in after ages, degenerated in the church of Rome into a formal confession of sins upon Ash Wednesday, and the empty Ceremony of sprinkling ashes upon the head of the people. Our reformers wisely rejected this Ceremony as mere shadow and show; and substituted this office in its room, which is A denunciation of God's anger and judgment against sinners; that the people, being apprised of God's wrath and indignation against their sins, might not, through want of discipline to the church, be encouraged to pursue them
Mixed Religion - Such a marriage is valid if performed by proper authority, but it requires a dispensation, which is given only after the signing of promises by the non-Catholic party, pledging non-interference with the religion of the Catholic, rearing the children in the Catholic faith, and only one Ceremony of marriage, before a priest
Religion, Mixed - Such a marriage is valid if performed by proper authority, but it requires a dispensation, which is given only after the signing of promises by the non-Catholic party, pledging non-interference with the religion of the Catholic, rearing the children in the Catholic faith, and only one Ceremony of marriage, before a priest
Sponsors - Latin: sponsor, surety, godparent ...
A person of either sex who speaks for the one to be baptized during the Ceremony and after Baptism assumes spiritual guardianship over the subject; see also godparents
Dedication - A religious Ceremony, whereby any person or thing is solemnly consecrated, or set apart to the service of God and the purposes of religion
Wed - ) To take for husband or for wife by a formal Ceremony; to marry; to espouse
Observance - ) An act, Ceremony, or rite, as of worship or respect; especially, a customary act or service of attention; a form; a practice; a rite; a custom
Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament - The Ceremony in which the priest removes the Sacred Host from the tabernacle and places it on the altar for the adoration of the faithful. The Ceremony was properly introduced in the 14th century, under the influence of the newly established feast of Corpus Christi, and its frequency in the 15th century caused the development of the present code of rules
Disparity of Worship - Unless by dispensation, such a marriage is null; and for the granting of the said dispensation the signing of certain promises is required, pledging non-interference with the religion of the Catholic party and with the Catholic baptism and training of the children, and also that no Ceremony will take place except that before a Catholic priest
Magna, Cappa - (Latin: great cape) A cope or robe worn by cardinals and bishops on occasions of Ceremony, which may be described as a glorified cappa choralis
Cappa Magna - (Latin: great cape) A cope or robe worn by cardinals and bishops on occasions of Ceremony, which may be described as a glorified cappa choralis
Ceremonial - ) Relating to Ceremony, or external rite; ritual; according to the forms of established rites
Church-Yard - If a church-yard which has been thus consecrated shall afterwards be polluted by any indecent notion, or profaned by the burial of an infidel, an heretic, an excommunicated or unbaptized person, it must be reconciled; and the Ceremony of the reconciliation is performed with the same solemnity as that of the consecration! ...
See CONSECRATION
Funeral - , the Ceremony or solemnization of interment; obsequies; burial; - formerly used in the plural
Reception - of receiving visitors; entertainment; hence, an occasion or Ceremony of receiving guests; as, a hearty reception; an elaborate reception
Sacrament - ) The oath of allegiance taken by Roman soldiers; hence, a sacred Ceremony used to impress an obligation; a solemn oath-taking; an oath
Banns of Marriage - The term "Banns of Marriage,"means, therefore, the publication of intended marriages, and arepublished for three Sundays before the event, in the Church wherethe Ceremony is to take place
Imposition of Hands - they are not agreed, however, as to the propriety of this Ceremony. Imposition of hands was a Jewish Ceremony, introduced not by any divine authority, but by custom; it being the practice among those people, whenever they prayed to God for any person, to lay their hands on his head. Our Saviour observed the same custom, both when he conferred his blessing on children, and when he healed the sick, adding prayer to the Ceremony
Jubilee - The chief Ceremony is the opening at the beginning, and the closing at the end; of the "holy doors" in each of the basilicas the pilgrims visit in Rome, two of them being Saint Peter's and Saint John Lateran. This Ceremony symbolizes the right of sanctuary, which goes back to pagan times and which was actually then observed on the site of the Lateran
Canopy - word is becoming naturalized in English to denote the canopy under which a Jewish bridegroom and bride stand while the wedding Ceremony is being performed
Baptize - More generally the Ceremony is performed by sprinkling water on the face of a person, whether an infant or an adult,and in the case of an infant,by giving him a name, in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, which is called Christening
Breeding - By way of eminence, manners knowledge of Ceremony deportment or behavior in the external offices and decorums of social life
Ordain - ) To invest with ministerial or sacerdotal functions; to introduce into the office of the Christian ministry, by the laying on of hands, or other forms; to set apart by the Ceremony of ordination
Dedication - A religious Ceremony by which any person, place, or thing was devoted to a holy purpose
Betrothal - Unfortunately there is little positive information concerning the Ceremony of betrothal in NT times proper. The OT betrothal Ceremony perpetuated in a conventional fashion the recollection of the time when a woman was purchased from her family. So, too, it is impossible to describe with any great precision the betrothal Ceremony, but it certainly included the payment of some sum (ôhar; in addition to above references, see 1 Samuel 18:25), and the making of a betrothal contract (either voce, Ezekiel 16:8, or in writing) by the prospective bridegroom. We know nothing of any formal Ceremony or of the use of a ring (unless [1] it may be in Genesis 24:58). At present the wedding Ceremony among orthodox Jews combines the two elements of the two older ceremonies. It is interesting to note that the conventionalizing of the môhar is evidenced in the words which are now used for the Ceremony of betrothal: קדנשׁין ‘consecration,’ אירושׂין ‘betrothal,’ שׁדבין ‘compact,’ הנאיס ‘conditions. Thus the Ceremony of betrothal in NT times probably involved the following acts: (1) A contract drawn up by the parents or by the ‘friend of the bridegroom. Strictly speaking, there was no religious Ceremony connected with the act, but if a priest were present he doubtless pronounced some benediction which was subsequently elaborated into that used by later orthodox Judaism. The status of the man and woman was now, as in Hebrew times, practically the same as that of married persons, although it was now generally customary for the wedding Ceremony proper to be celebrated at the expiration of a year in the case of a virgin, and in thirty days in the case of a widow. As in the older times, separation of betrothed persons demanded a divorce, and there seems to have been no reason why they should not live together as man and wife without a subsequent wedding Ceremony. After the formal betrothal (μνηστεύειν, Matthew 1:18, Luke 1:27; Luke 2:5) they are reported to have lived together without a second, or wedding, Ceremony
Exterior - ) Outward or external deportment, form, or Ceremony; visible act; as, the exteriors of religion
Adoration of the Cross - A Ceremony of Good Friday
Lappeth - When Gideon's army came to the water side, some drank of it with the hand quickly, to be ready without delay to follow Gideon; while the thousands of fainthearted, that were sent away, stooped down to drink with so much tardiness and Ceremony as to show that then- hearts were not with Gideon in his contemplated enterprise
Function - ) A religious Ceremony, esp. ) A public or social Ceremony or gathering; a festivity or entertainment, esp
Benediction - And when at length the primitive simplicity of the Christian worship began to give way to Ceremony, they added the sign of the cross, which was made with the same hand as before, only elevated or extended. Benediction is also used for an ecclesiastical Ceremony, whereby a thing is rendered sacred or venerable. In general, these benedictions are performed by aspersions of holy water, signs of the cross, and prayers suitable to the nature of the Ceremony
Liturgy, Peace in - In word and Ceremony jt oocurs frequently, particularly at Holy Mass, in the Canon, in prayers six times, and twice in action as the priest drops the particle of the Host into the chalice, and as he gives the kiss of peace to the deacon, who in turn passes it on to the assisting clergy
Marcian - In 450 he married Empress Pulcheria and was crowned by the Patriarch of Constantinople, the first instance of the Christian Ceremony of coronation
Self-Righteousness: Ruin of Many - A gentleman in our late civil wars,' says Cowley, 'when his quarters were beaten up by the enemy, was taken prisoner, and lost his life afterwards, only by staying to put on a band, and adjust his periwig: he would escape like a person of quality, or not at all, and died the noble martyr of Ceremony and gentility
Chat - ) To talk in a light and familiar manner; to converse without form or Ceremony; to gossip
Tonsure - ) The first Ceremony used for devoting a person to the service of God and the church; the first degree of the clericate, given by a bishop, abbot, or cardinal priest, consisting in cutting off the hair from a circular space at the back of the head, with prayers and benedictions; hence, entrance or admission into minor orders
Ablution - ...
Lustration, among the Romans, was a solemn Ceremony by which they purified their cities, fields, armies, or people, after any crime or impurity. There was scarcely any action performed, at the beginning and end of which some Ceremony was not required to purify themselves and appease the gods
Imposition of Hands - However, Christians are not agreed as to the propriety of this Ceremony; nor do they all consider it as an essential part of ordination. ...
Imposition of hands was a Jewish Ceremony, introduced, not by any divine authority, but by custom; it being the practice among that people, whenever they prayed to God for any person, to lay their hands on his head. But this Ceremony of laying on of hands is now restrained, by custom, chiefly to that imposition which is practised at the ordination of ministers
Ceremony - ) Ar act or series of acts, often of a symbolical character, prescribed by law, custom, or authority, in the conduct of important matters, as in the performance of religious duties, the transaction of affairs of state, and the celebration of notable events; as, the Ceremony of crowning a sovereign; the ceremonies observed in consecrating a church; marriage and baptismal ceremonies
Carbonari - The initiation Ceremony for mastership involved a blasphemous imitation of Christ's Passion
Ceremonial - A book containing the order of religious Ceremony and solemn worship prescribed for ecclesiastical functions
Dean - ) The chief or senior of a company on occasion of Ceremony; as, the dean of the diplomatic corps; - so called by courtesy
Formality - ) Compliance with formal or conventional rules; Ceremony; conventionality
Baptists, Regular - They are strict in admission to the Lord's Supper, practising close communion, and for the most part observing the Ceremony of foot-washing
Sacred - ) Set apart by solemn religious Ceremony; especially, in a good sense, made holy; set apart to religious use; consecrated; not profane or common; as, a sacred place; a sacred day; sacred service
Regular Baptists - They are strict in admission to the Lord's Supper, practising close communion, and for the most part observing the Ceremony of foot-washing
Ordinance - Established rite or Ceremony
Religious, Clothing of - During the Ceremony the aspirant withdraws for the robing, the different articles of the habit having been blessed by the bishop
Adoption - Adoption of arms, an ancient Ceremony of presenting arms to one for his merit or valor, which laid the person under an obligation to defend the giver. ...
Adoption by baptism is the spiritual affinity which is contracted by god-fathers and god-children, in the Ceremony of baptism
Ordain - They had to have confidence that those appointed possessed the God-given gifts for the tasks, and they expressed that confidence through the Ceremony of laying on hands (Acts 6:6; 1 Timothy 4:14; 1 Timothy 5:22; see LAYING ON OF HANDS)
Ablution - A Ceremony in use among the ancients, and still practised in several parts of the world
Judaism - The principal sects among the Jews were the Pharisees, who placed religion in external Ceremony; the Sadducees, who were remarkable for their incredulity; and the Essenes, who were distinguished for their austere sanctity
Leprosy - If it was not, the person carried out a cleansing Ceremony and returned to normal life in the community. If they were healed, they had to go to the priest and carry out a cleansing Ceremony before they could join in religious activities again (Matthew 8:1-4). ...
The cleansing Ceremony lasted eight days
Godfather - It is the duty of sponsors to make a profession of faith during the baptismal Ceremony for the one to be baptized, when necessary; and thereafter, to assume perpetual guardianship over the baptized and instruct them in the obligations of the Christian life, to insure fulfillment of baptismal vows
Tahapanes - Petrie, "the Ceremony described by Altars, Consecration of - The Ceremony consists in placing in the stone-covered cavity in the center of the altar-table, near the front edge, relics of two canonized martyrs and three grains of incense, anointing the altar with holy oils, incensing it, burning incense upon it, and celebrating Mass upon it
Godmother - It is the duty of sponsors to make a profession of faith during the baptismal Ceremony for the one to be baptized, when necessary; and thereafter, to assume perpetual guardianship over the baptized and instruct them in the obligations of the Christian life, to insure fulfillment of baptismal vows
Godparents - It is the duty of sponsors to make a profession of faith during the baptismal Ceremony for the one to be baptized, when necessary; and thereafter, to assume perpetual guardianship over the baptized and instruct them in the obligations of the Christian life, to insure fulfillment of baptismal vows
Corban - Among Mohammedans, a Ceremony performed at the foot of mount Arrarat in Arabia, near Mecca
Salute - The salutations of the Jews were usually of a religious character—at least, in form—and were attended with much Ceremony, as they are to this day among the orientals
Sureties - It is the duty of sponsors to make a profession of faith during the baptismal Ceremony for the one to be baptized, when necessary; and thereafter, to assume perpetual guardianship over the baptized and instruct them in the obligations of the Christian life, to insure fulfillment of baptismal vows
Lights on the Altar - ) In addition to what isset forth in the article to which the reader is referred, wereproduce from Wheatley on the Prayer Book the following: "Amongother ornaments of the Church were two lights enjoined by theInjunctions of King Edward VI to be set upon the Altar as asignificant Ceremony to represent the Light which Christ's Gospelbrought into the world
Canonization - A Ceremony in the Romish church, by which persons deceased are ranked in the catalogue of the saints. By the Ceremony of canonization it appears that this rite of the modern Romans has something in it very like the apotheosis or deification of the ancient Romans, and in all probability takes it rise from it; at least, several ceremonies of the same nature are conspicuous in both
Audience - Admittance to a hearing public reception to an interview a Ceremony observed in courts, or by official characters, when ambassadors or applicants to men in office are permitted to appear and state their business in person
Gallican Rite - The bread and wine for the sacrifice were brought in amidst great Ceremony
Rite, Gallican - The bread and wine for the sacrifice were brought in amidst great Ceremony
Jubilee - ) A church solemnity or Ceremony celebrated at Rome, at stated intervals, originally of one hundred years, but latterly of twenty-five; a plenary and extraordinary indulgence grated by the sovereign pontiff to the universal church
Jubilee - ) A church solemnity or Ceremony celebrated at Rome, at stated intervals, originally of one hundred years, but latterly of twenty-five; a plenary and extraordinary indulgence grated by the sovereign pontiff to the universal church
Exorcism - The Ceremony is performed at the lower end of the church, towards the door. " The Romanists likewise exorcise houses and other places supposed to be haunted by unclean spirits; and the Ceremony is much the same with that for a person possessed
Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament - In the more solemn form of this Ceremony the officiating priest is vested in surplice, stole, and cope. , "Laudate Dominum" is sung at the conclusion of the Ceremony
Visit - We ought not to visit for pleasure or Ceremony on the sabbath. The act of going to see another, or of calling at his house a waiting on as a visit of civility or respect a visit of Ceremony a short visit a long visit a pleasant visit
Fesch, Joseph - He induced Pius VII to crown Napoleon in Paris, and was present at the Ceremony
Rehoboam - While at Shechem for his crowning Ceremony as king over Israel (1 Kings 12:1 ), the people asked Rehoboam if he would remove some of the tax burden and labor laws which his father had placed on them
Religion - The Old Testament cult or "religious service" (threeskeia ) was Ceremony and ritual; the New Testament religious service consists in acts of mercy, love, and holiness
Nadab - He participated in the covenant Ceremony when the agreement was presented to the people (Exodus 24:1 )
Host, Elevation of the - The Ceremony in the Mass according to the Roman Rite wherein, immediately after the Consecration of the Host, the celebrant raises It high enough to be seen and adored by the congregation
Absolution - It is also the Ceremony of prayers for the departed immediately after the Mass of Requiem
Nadab - He participated in the covenant Ceremony when the agreement was presented to the people (Exodus 24:1 )
Elevation of the Host - The Ceremony in the Mass according to the Roman Rite wherein, immediately after the Consecration of the Host, the celebrant raises It high enough to be seen and adored by the congregation
Ring - It is placed on the fourthfinger of the woman's left hand, and the ancient Ceremony of doingso was to place it first on the thumb at the Name of the firstPerson of the Trinity; on the next finger, at the Name of the Son;on the third at the Name of the Holy Ghost, and then on the fourthfinger, and leaving it there at the word "Amen
Knock - "Though Orientals are very jealous of their privacy, they never knock when about to enter your room, but walk in without warning or Ceremony
Atad - of Jordan, as Jerome identifies it with Beth Hogla (the house of gyratory dances, or movements attendant on the funeral Ceremony), known to lie between the Jordan and Jericho
Eliakim - In Nehemiah 12:41 a priest of this name is mentioned as one among those who assisted at the Ceremony of the dedication of the wall
Marry - ) To unite in wedlock or matrimony; to perform the Ceremony of joining, as a man and a woman, for life; to constitute (a man and a woman) husband and wife according to the laws or customs of the place
Windows - It is only during the celebration of some zeenah, or public festival, that these houses and their latticed windows are left open; for this being a time of great liberty, repelling, and extravagance, each family is ambitious of adorning both the inside and outside of their houses with the richest part of their furniture; while crowds of both sexes, dressed out in their best apparel, and laying aside all Ceremony and restraint, go in and out where they please
Ring - In its liturgical use the nuptial ring blessed was the marriage Ceremony, and worn on the fourth finger, is emblematic of the conjugal fidelity
Unction - They anointed both their kings and high priests at the Ceremony of their inauguration. ) But since those extraordinary gifts are ceased, as being, no longer necessary for the confirmation of the Gospel, of course there is no warrant now for using that Ceremony
Anointing - In Old Testament times, a common practice was to appoint priests, kings, and sometimes prophets to their positions by the Ceremony of anointing. Originally, such anointing was a physical Ceremony, but because of this spiritual significance, people began to use the word ‘anoint’ solely in a spiritual or metaphorical sense
Nazarites - And if by chance any one should have died in their presence, they began again the whole Ceremony of their consecration and Nazariteship...
This Ceremony generally lasted eight days, sometimes a month, and sometimes their whole lives. James the Less, with the other brethren, said to him (Acts 21:23-24 , ) that to quiet the minds of the converted Jews, who had been informed that he every where preached up the entire abolition of the law of Moses, he ought to join himself to four of the faithful who had a vow of Nazariteship upon them, and contribute to the charge of the Ceremony at the shaving of their heads; by which the new converts would perceive that he continued to keep the law, and that what they had heard of him was not true
Lima, Peru - A great cross which is now illuminated nightly was recently unveiled on the top of Saint Cristobal in a truly Catholic Ceremony at which the President of Peru presided
Salutation - ...
Salutations in the East being often very lengthy and of mere Ceremony, may well account for those sent in haste being told to salute no one by the way
Wait - ) To attend on; to accompany; especially, to attend with Ceremony or respect
Issachar - After the entrance into the Promised Land, this tribe was one of the six which stood on Gerizim during the Ceremony of the blessing and cursing (Deuteronomy 27:12 )
Joshua the Son of Jehozadak - When, in anticipation of this Messiah, the Jews conducted a coronation Ceremony, the person they should have crowned was Zerubbabel, for he was not only governor but also a Davidic prince in the line of the Messiah (Matthew 1:6; Matthew 1:12; Matthew 1:16). The Ceremony emphasized that the joint rule of Joshua and Zerubbabel, the priest and the prince, foreshadowed the rule of the priest-king Messiah (Zechariah 6:9-14)
Visit - ) The act of visiting, or going to see a person or thing; a brief stay of business, friendship, Ceremony, curiosity, or the like, usually longer than a call; as, a visit of civility or respect; a visit to Saratoga; the visit of a physician
Maundy Thursday - This was followed by the washing of the feet, called the Mandatum from the words of the first antiphon sung during the Ceremony, which is not now universally performed, when the principal priest of the church assisted by the deacon and subdeacon washed the feet of twelve poor men in imitation of Christ, who washed the feet of the twelve Apostles
Christians of st Thomas - baptism, orders, and the Eucharist; they make no use of holy oils in the administration of baptism, but after the Ceremony, anoint the infant with an unction composed of oil and walnuts, without any benediction
Holy Thursday - This was followed by the washing of the feet, called the Mandatum from the words of the first antiphon sung during the Ceremony, which is not now universally performed, when the principal priest of the church assisted by the deacon and subdeacon washed the feet of twelve poor men in imitation of Christ, who washed the feet of the twelve Apostles
Procession - A Ceremony in the Romish church, consisting of a formal march of the clergy and people, putting up prayers, &c
Lamentation - When a young person dies unmarried, part of the Ceremony of mourning is a form of marriage (see art
Court - Common Israelites, who were desirous of offering sacrifices, were at liberty to bring their victims as far as the inner part of the court; but they could not pass a certain line of separation, which divided it into two; and they withdrew as soon as they had delivered their sacrifices and offerings to the priests, or had made their confession with the Ceremony of laying their hands upon the head of the victim, if it were a sin-offering
Thursday, Holy - This was followed by the washing of the feet, called the Mandatum from the words of the first antiphon sung during the Ceremony, which is not now universally performed, when the principal priest of the church assisted by the deacon and subdeacon washed the feet of twelve poor men in imitation of Christ, who washed the feet of the twelve Apostles
Thursday, Maundy - This was followed by the washing of the feet, called the Mandatum from the words of the first antiphon sung during the Ceremony, which is not now universally performed, when the principal priest of the church assisted by the deacon and subdeacon washed the feet of twelve poor men in imitation of Christ, who washed the feet of the twelve Apostles
Thursday, Sheer - This was followed by the washing of the feet, called the Mandatum from the words of the first antiphon sung during the Ceremony, which is not now universally performed, when the principal priest of the church assisted by the deacon and subdeacon washed the feet of twelve poor men in imitation of Christ, who washed the feet of the twelve Apostles
Shear Thursday - This was followed by the washing of the feet, called the Mandatum from the words of the first antiphon sung during the Ceremony, which is not now universally performed, when the principal priest of the church assisted by the deacon and subdeacon washed the feet of twelve poor men in imitation of Christ, who washed the feet of the twelve Apostles
Beard - , of the beard was performed with much Ceremony by persons of wealth and rank (Psalm 133:2 ) The removal of the beard was a part of the ceremonial treatment proper to a leper
Jubilee - Jubilee, in a more modern sense, denotes a grand church solemnity or Ceremony, celebrated at Rome, wherein the pope grants a plenary indulgence to all sinners; at least to as many as visit the churches of St. In 1640, the Jesuits celebrated a solemn jubilee at Rome, that being the centenary, or hundredth year from their institution; and the same Ceremony was observed in all their houses throughout the world
Dioceses, Cardinalitial - , the bishops of Ostia in the 4th century consecrated the pope, the Bishop of Albano in the 6th century recited the second prayer in the consecration Ceremony, the Bishop of Porto the third, and probably as early as the 11th century they had the right of participating in the election of the pope
Dioceses, Suburbicarian - , the bishops of Ostia in the 4th century consecrated the pope, the Bishop of Albano in the 6th century recited the second prayer in the consecration Ceremony, the Bishop of Porto the third, and probably as early as the 11th century they had the right of participating in the election of the pope
Cardinalitial Dioceses - , the bishops of Ostia in the 4th century consecrated the pope, the Bishop of Albano in the 6th century recited the second prayer in the consecration Ceremony, the Bishop of Porto the third, and probably as early as the 11th century they had the right of participating in the election of the pope
Malchijah - A priest who took part in the Ceremony of dedicating the wall ( Nehemiah 12:42 )
Priests: Superstitious Reverence of - A writer on the manners and customs of India, says:: 'I was informed that vast numbers of Shoodras drink the water in which a Brahmin has dipped his foot, and abstain from food in the morning till this Ceremony be over
Leaven - The same Apostle alludes to the Ceremony used at the passover, when he says, "A little leaven leaveneth the whole lump;" that is, a small portion of leaven, in a quantity of bread or paste, corrupts the whole, and renders it unclean
Ear - The Ceremony took place at his master's door, and was the mark of servitude and bondage
Cup - In a proper sense, it signifies a common cup, of horn, or some precious metal, Genesis 40:13 44:2 1 Kings 7:26 , such as is used for drinking out of at meals; or a cup of Ceremony, used at solemn and religious meals-as at the Passover, when the father of the family pronounced certain blessings over the cup, and having tasted it, passed it round to the company and his whole family, who partook of it, 1 Corinthians 10:16
Suburbicarian Dioceses - , the bishops of Ostia in the 4th century consecrated the pope, the Bishop of Albano in the 6th century recited the second prayer in the consecration Ceremony, the Bishop of Porto the third, and probably as early as the 11th century they had the right of participating in the election of the pope
House of God - Hence, if Jacob consecratedwith the Ceremony of unction the place where God made His covenantwith him, and said of it, 'This is none other but the House of God,and this is the Gate of Heaven'; so should our churches be set apartand consecrated with sacred ceremonies making them holy to the Lord
Day of Atonement - The Ceremony began with the sacrifice of a young bull as a sin offering for the priest and his family (Leviticus 16:3 ,Leviticus 16:3,16:6 ). Following the Ceremony, the priest again bathed and put on his usual garments (Leviticus 16:23-24 )
Chalice - Chalices are blessed by a bishop, who anoints them with holy chrism, a Ceremony which goes back to the time of Saint Gregory the Great (590-604)
Raskolnik - " the Judaizers; the Molokane, who refuse to recognize civil authority or to take oaths; the Dukhobortsy, or Dukhobors, who are communistic, marry without Ceremony, and believe that Christ was human, but that his soul reappears at intervals in living men; the Khlysty, who countenance anthropolatory, are ascetics, practice continual self-flagellation, and reject marriage; the Skoptsy, who practice castration; and a section of the Bezpopovtsy, or priestless sect, which disbelieve in prayers for the Czar and in marriage
Confirmation - The act or Ceremony of laying on of hands, in the admission of baptized person to the enjoyment of Christian privileges
Imposition of Hands - The Ceremony must have been most solemn and affecting, as related Numbers 27:15-23
Hosanna - The scene is one of triumph, as Israel’s king enters the temple for a public Ceremony of praise to God for a recent victory in battle
Zerubbabel - When the Israelites held a symbolic coronation Ceremony during the rebuilding of the temple, they were careful to avoid any suggestion of treason. They therefore placed the crown on Joshua instead of on Zerubbabel; but the words used in the Ceremony referred to Zerubbabel
Belgium - The constitution proclaimed freedom of worship, of the press, and of education, and the civilmarriage Ceremony became obligatory
Impose - To lay on, as hands in the Ceremony of ordination, or of confirmation
Betrothed - They considered it a breach of the divine command not to marry; and hence, the betrothing, or being betrothed, was a Ceremony long used before the marriage was intended to be consummated: and, indeed, sometimes there was a great lapse of time between the one and the other
Tabernacles Feast of - This Ceremony is said to have been founded on Isaiah 12:3; and was probably a memorial of the abundant supply of water which God afforded to the Hebrews during their wanderings in the wilderness
Child Birth - It was the custom at a very ancient period, for the father, while music in the mean while was heard to sound, to clasp the new born child to his bosom, and by this Ceremony was understood to declare it to be his own, Genesis 50:23 ; Job 3:12 ; Psalms 22:11
Religious Profession - The Ceremony of profession is described in the Pontificale Romanum
Anoint - ...
When we hear of the anointing of the Jewish kings, we are to understand by it the same as their inauguration; inasmuch as anointing was the principal Ceremony on such an occasion, 2 Samuel 2:4 ; 2 Samuel 5:3 . The Ceremony of regal anointing needed not to be repeated in every instance of succession to the throne, because the unction which the first one who held the sceptre in any particular line of princes had received was supposed to suffice for the succeeding incumbents in the same descent
Adoration - The Ceremony, which the Greeks called προσκυνειν , Conon refused to perform to Artaxerxes, and Callisthenes to Alexander the Great, as reputing it impious and unlawful. ...
Adoration is also used in the court of Rome, in the Ceremony of kissing the pope's feet. Peter's church; the Ceremony is described at large by Guicciardin
Anointing - Anointing was then used, and is still, medicinally, Mark 6:13 James 5:14 ; but the miraculous cures thus wrought by the apostles furnish no warrant for the Ceremony just before death called "extreme unction
Azure Vestments - In Colombia blue vestments were used by special privilege on the occasion of the Coronation of Our Lady of Chiquinquira at Bogota, to which city the statue was brought for the Ceremony
Form - Ceremony as, it is a mere matter of form
Espoused - ESPOUSED, ESPOUSALS...
This term is well known among the Hebrews, in the Ceremony of their marriages
Sheaf - The inhabitants of the neighbouring cities came together, to be present at the Ceremony
Tabernacles - On the eighth day they performed this Ceremony oftener, and with greater solemnity, than upon the other days of the feast
Vestments, Azure - In Colombia blue vestments were used by special privilege on the occasion of the Coronation of Our Lady of Chiquinquira at Bogota, to which city the statue was brought for the Ceremony
Vestments, Blue - In Colombia blue vestments were used by special privilege on the occasion of the Coronation of Our Lady of Chiquinquira at Bogota, to which city the statue was brought for the Ceremony
Triumph - Among the ancient Romans, a pompous Ceremony performed in honor of a victorious general, who was allowed to enter the city crowned, originally with laurel, but in later times with gold, bearing a truncheon in one hand and a branch of laurel in the other, riding in a chariot drawn by two white horses, and followed by the kings, princes and generals whom he had vanquished, loaded with chains and insulted by mimics and buffoons
Molech - Another view sees an original fire Ceremony dedicating, but not harming children, that later was transformed into a burnt-offering Ceremony
Purification (2) - In the first Ceremony, on the conclusion of which the leper was admitted to the camp, though not to his tent, two living birds were taken. ...
The Ceremony is akin to that of the laying of the sins of the people upon the head of the scapegoat, which was then sent away into the wilderness (Leviticus 16:21). By a similar Ceremony, an Arab widow who is about to remarry makes a bird fly away with the uncleanness of her widowhood (W. ...
The second part of the Ceremony took place eight days after the first part. In the Ceremony itself, the hands were held over a basin while water was poured over them
Works - We read of 'dead works': acts of mere Ceremony, and the religious efforts of the flesh (the flesh profiteth nothing)
Dorothea, Virgin Martyr - On her festival there is a Ceremony of blessing roses and apples
Rehoboam - ...
Aware that the northern tribes were dissatisfied with the Jerusalem government, Rehoboam tried to hold their allegiance by going north to Shechem for his coronation Ceremony (1 Kings 12:1)
Azazel - The belief that sin, disease, and the like can be removed by being transferred to living creatures, beasts or birds, is not confined to the Semitic races, and has its analogy in Hebrew ritual, in the Ceremony of the cleansing of the leper ( Leviticus 14:53 )
Argentina - The civilmarriage Ceremony, established in 1888, is obligatory
Feast - A Ceremony of feasting joy and thanksgiving on stated days, in commemoration of some great event, or in honor of some distinguished personage an anniversary, periodical or stated celebration of some event a festival as on occasion of the games in Greece, and the feast of the passover, the feast of Pentecost, and the feast of tabernacles among the Jews
Henry iv, King - The reasons approved were lack of necessary dispensations (the Ceremony had been performed by the Cardinal of Bourbon, before the dispensations necessary because of difference in religion were granted) and want of consent of one of the parties (Margaret claimed that she had never consented to the contract and had been forced by her brother, Charles IX)
Agapae - The kiss of charity, with which the Ceremony used to end, was no longer given between different sexes; and it was expressly forbidden to have any beds or couches for the convenience of those who should be disposed to eat more at their ease
Adoration - The practice of adoration may be said to be still subsisting in England, in the Ceremony of kissing the king's or queen's hand, and in serving them at table, both being performed kneeling on one knee
Murder - " This Ceremony may inform us how much horror they conceived at the crime of murder; and it shows their fear that God might avenge it on the whole country; which was supposed to contract pollution by the blood spilt in it, unless it were expiated, and avenged on him who had occasioned it, if he could be discovered
Nethinims - This number was but small in regard to the offices that were imposed on them; so that we find them afterward instituting a solemnity called Xylophoria, in which the people carried wood to the temple with great Ceremony, to keep up the fire on the altar of burnt sacrifices
Laying on of Hands - The notion of separation for an uncommon purpose probably also lies behind the imposition of hands on the Levites during their Ceremony of consecration (Numbers 8:5-15 ) and behind Moses' imposition of hands on Joshua during the ritual in which he was designated as Moses' successor (Numbers 27:18-23 ; cf. The gesture was included in the Ceremony that separated seven gifted men from the rest of the early Jerusalem church for the task of overseeing the distribution of food to those in need (Acts 6:3-6 )
Ceremonies of Baptism - The Ceremony of the Ephpheta takes place, i
Feast - In a religious sense is a Ceremony of feasting and thanksgiving
Bride - Ezekiel 16:8-14 describes bride, her attire, and the wedding Ceremony
Exercise - ) The performance of an office, a Ceremony, or a religious duty
Forehead - Maurice, speaking of the religious rites of the Hindoos, says, Before they can enter the great pagoda, an indispensable Ceremony takes place, which can only be performed by the hand of a brahmin; and that is, the impression of their foreheads with the tiluk, or mark of different colours, as they may belong either to the sect of Veeshnu, or Seeva
Baptism, Ceremonies of - The Ceremony of the Ephpheta takes place, i
Murder - If a corpse were found in the open fields, and the murderer could not be discovered, the town nearest to the spot was obliged to purge itself by a solemn Ceremony, lest it should become liable to the judgments of God, Deuteronomy 21:1-9
Wait - To attend to go to see to visit on business or for Ceremony
Nehemiah - An added arrangement before the dedication Ceremony was to increase Jerusalem’s security by increasing its population. Ezra and Nehemiah then led the people in an impressive dedication Ceremony (12:27-13:3)
Throne - is used for that magnificent seat on which sovereign princes usually sit to receive the homage of their subjects, or to give audience to ambassadors; where they appear with pomp and Ceremony, and from whence they dispense justice; in a word, the throne, the sceptre, the crown, are the ordinary symbols of royalty and regal authority. Thus Bruce, in his Travels, says, "The next remarkable Ceremony in which these two nations (of Persia and Abyssinia) agreed is that of adoration, inviolably observed in Abyssinia to this day, as often as you enter the sovereign's presence
Firstborn - 1 Samuel 1:28); from what has been said above, this Ceremony must be regarded as the fulfilling in spirit of the primitive act of literally devoting (sacrificing) the firstborn son to the Deity. This part of the Ceremony corresponds to Luke 2:22-23; Luke 2:27-28. ]'>[8] This Ceremony corresponds to Luke 2:24. Leviticus 12:4, Numbers 18:16),** Jurisdiction, Hierarchy of - First tonsure is not an order; it is an ecclesiastical Ceremony by which a person is made a cleric and is made eligible to receive Orders
Witness - Among people with whom writing is not common the evidence of a transaction is given by some tangible memorial or significant Ceremony: Abraham gave seven ewe-lambs to Abimelech as an evidence of his property in the well of Beersheba
Dress - Splendid clothes habit of Ceremony as a full dress
Golden Rose - In the heart of the principal rose is a small covered cup in which musk and balsam are placed at the annual solemn blessing, the same rose being used at this Ceremony until given away
Hierarchy of Jurisdiction - First tonsure is not an order; it is an ecclesiastical Ceremony by which a person is made a cleric and is made eligible to receive Orders
Master - (h) The director of a number of persons performing a Ceremony or sharing a feast
Circumcision - The Jews have always been very exact in observing this Ceremony, and it appears that they did not neglect it when in Egypt, Joshua 5:1-9
Rose, Golden - In the heart of the principal rose is a small covered cup in which musk and balsam are placed at the annual solemn blessing, the same rose being used at this Ceremony until given away
Dancing - In the religious dance, the timbrel was used to direct the Ceremony, and some one led, whom the rest followed with measured step and devotional songs; thus Miriam led the women of Israel, Exodus 15:20,21 , and king David the men, 2 Samuel 6:14 Psalm 150:4
Perpetuus, Saint, Archbaptist of Tours - Of the new one which replaced it at 550 paces from the city, and to which the saint's body was translated with great Ceremony ( c
Marriage - " It is areligious Ceremony and is sacramental in character. Everyceremony should be solemnized by the Church and lifted above thelevel of a real estate transaction
Aichmalotarch - The princes of the captivity resided at Babylon, where they were installed with great Ceremony, held courts of justice, &c, and were set over the eastern Jews, or those settled in Babylon, Chaldaea, Assyria, and Persia. The Ceremony closed with new acclamations, and prayers to God that, under the new prince, he would be pleased to put an end to their calamities
Proselyte - The first dwelt in the land of Israel, or even out of that country, and, without obliging themselves to circumcision, or to any other Ceremony of the law, feared and worshipped the true God, observing the rules imposed on Noah. Each of them, by means of this, received, as it were, a new birth, so that those who were their parents before were no longer regarded as such after this Ceremony, and those who before were slaves now became free
Marriage, Marry - A — 1: γάμος (Strong's #1062 — Noun Masculine — gamos — gam'-os ) "a marriage, wedding," or "wedding feast," is used to denote (a) the Ceremony and its proceedings, including the "marriage feast," John 2:1,2 ; of the "marriage Ceremony" only, figuratively, Revelation 19:7 , as distinct from the "marriage feast" (v
Baptism For the Dead - Chrysostom says, this was practiced among the Marcionites with a great deal of ridiculous Ceremony, which he thus describes:...
After any catechumen was dead, they hid a living man under the bed of the deceased; then, coming to the dead man, they asked him whether he would receive baptism; and he making no answer, the other answered for him, and said he would be baptized in his stead; and so they baptized the living for the dead
Deacon - The seven were set apart for their task in a Ceremony in which the apostles “laid their hands on them” ( Acts 6:6 ). This Ceremony may reflect the origin of later ordination practice
Marriage - On this the Scriptures are silent; but though Michaelis has shown that the priests under the law were not appointed to celebrate marriage; yet in the practice of the modern Jews it is a religious Ceremony, the chief rabbi of the synagogue being present, and prayers being appointed for the occasion. This renders it probable that the character of the Ceremony under the law, from the most ancient times, was a religious one. That the Ceremony should be confined to the clergy of an established church, is a different consideration. But the following extract, from a journal which I kept at Smyrna, presents a parallel case: "The Armenian brides are veiled during the marriage Ceremony; and hence deceptions have occurred, in regard to the person chosen for wife. The whole party then proceeded to the Armenian church, where the bishop was waiting to receive them; and there the Ceremony was completed
Mount, Mountain - (3) They were used as platforms , for addressing large crowds of people, as in the famous Ceremony at Ebal and Gerizim ( Joshua 8:30 ff
Elder - They are chosen from among the people, and are received publicly with some degree of Ceremony
Incense - God threatened him with death upon failing to perform this Ceremony, Leviticus 16:13
Expiation - The Ceremony of the scapegoat also took place on this day
Anointing, - Anointing was the principal and divinely-appointed Ceremony in the inauguration of the Jewish Kings
Pen'Tecost, - The whole Ceremony was the completion of that dedication of the harvest to God as its giver, and to whom both the land and the people were holy, which was begun by the offering of the wave-sheaf at the Passover
Day of Atonement - An earlier and simpler form of the Ceremony is prescribed in Ezekiel 45:18-20. The more important parts of the Ceremony were, briefly, as follows:—...
(a) The high priest procured and brought before the Tent a bullock as a sin-offering for himself, and two goats upon which lots were cast, one being destined as a sin-offering for the people, and the other to be ‘for Azazel. The great spiritual truths typified by this Ceremony are to a certain extent drawn out in Hebrews 9:7-14; Hebrews 9:21-28; Hebrews 10:19-22. ...
(e) And this truth was foreshadowed in the Jewish atonement not only by the fasting of the people, but in the Ceremony which formed the centre and kernel of it all. Again, the return of the high priest to the people in the outer court at the close of the Ceremony recalls the words of Hebrews 9:28, ‘a second time without sin shall he appear to them that wait for him
Dancing - On some occasions young ladies, dressed in their best clothing, danced in a bride-choosing Ceremony (Judges 21:1 )
Unclean Meats - Hence, when that Ceremony was changed we find that this was the very symbol selected to instruct St
Germanus, Bishop of Paris - Vincent; and in 754 his body was removed with great Ceremony into the church itself, in the presence of Pippin and his son Charles the Great, then a child
Jubilee - "...
The word jubilee, in a more modern sense, denotes a grand church solemnity or Ceremony celebrated at Rome, in which the pope grants a plenary indulgence to all sinners; at least, to as many as visit the churches of St
Sandals - This Ceremony is coincident with certain customs among the Turks
Goat - ...
While I am upon this subject of the goat, it may not be unacceptable to the pious reader, to say a few words on the very striking Ceremony appointed by the Lord of the scape goat on the great day of atonement. I need not describe the Ceremony itself, for the reader will find a full account thereof, Leviticus 16:1-34
Bride - Marriage contracts seem to have been made in the primitive ages with little Ceremony. Into this chamber the bridegroom was accustomed to go with his bride, that he might talk with her more familiarly; which was considered as a Ceremony of confirmation to the wedlock. Ten or twelve months commonly intervened between the Ceremony of espousals and the marriage: during this interval, the espoused wife continued with her parents, that she might provide herself with nuptial ornaments suitable to her station. These words seem to refer to the Ceremony of espousals; the following, to the subsequent marriage: "And after a time he returned to take her,"...
Judges 14:8 . The marriage Ceremony was commonly performed in a garden, or in the open air; the bride was placed under a canopy, supported by four youths, and adorned with jewels according to the rank of the married persons; all the company crying out with joyful acclamations, "Blessed be he that cometh!" It was anciently the custom, at the conclusion of the Ceremony, for the father and mother and kindred of the woman, to pray for a blessing upon the parties
Ordinance - Moses led a covenant renewal Ceremony in which he explained the commandments, ordinances, and statutes of the Law
Sandals - The loosing of a shoe of one who refused to marry the widow of his deceased brother, and spitting upon the owner's face, was a Ceremony prescribed in the Jewish law, Deuteronomy 25:7-10
Samuel - That man was Saul, whom Samuel anointed in a brief private Ceremony (1 Samuel 9:15-16; 1 Samuel 10:1). Saul was chosen (1 Samuel 10:17-25) and, after leading Israel to victory in his first battle, was crowned king in a national Ceremony at Gilgal (1 Samuel 11:12-15)
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - ...
While the "sacred assembly" to which Joel called the people (2:15-16) may have been simply an ad hoc Ceremony of mourning, it is in some ways reminiscent (albeit ironically) of the day of Pentecost. This was not a Ceremony to be taken lightly. "...
The Ceremony took place on the tenth day of the seventh month (Tishri 10) and is rich with symbolism. Briefly, the details of the Ceremony are as follows. ...
Aspects of the symbolism of the Ceremony are fairly transparent in meaning. By bathing at the end of the Ceremony, he removed the holiness from himself before returning to the community. ...
The real heart of the Ceremony, however, and the real point of controversy, is in sacrifice of one goat and the release of the scapegoat. First, what is the meaning of the goat "for azazel [5]"? Second, what does this Ceremony say about the Israelite concept of atonement?...
Several interpretations of the goat for azazel [5] have been proposed
Marriage (i.) - Ceremony of marriage. Then those who had merely come to do honour by joining in the procession returned to their houses, and the relatives and invited guests passed in to the wedding Ceremony and festivity. In all the lands of their dispersion the Jews still apply this name, huppah, to the richly embroidered canopy under which the contracting parties stand during the marriage Ceremony
Ebal - " The Scripture, at first view, seems to intimate that there were six tribes upon one mountain, and six on the other; but beside that it is by no means probable that the tribes of the Israelites, who were so numerous, should be able to stand on the summits of these two mountains, it would not have been possible for them to have seen the Ceremony, nor to have heard the blessings and curses in order to answer them
Ephod - And David, in the Ceremony of removing the ark from the house of Obed-edom to Jerusalem, was girt with a linen ephod, 2 Samuel 6:14
Mourning Customs - It is now an event that has to be announced as quickly and publicly as possible, and a loss which love has to deplore with passionate abandonment and an accumulation of conventional Ceremony. In addition to the successive outbursts of grief by members of the family, who have to be comforted and pleaded with and led away from the prostrate figure of the dead, the sustained Ceremony of mourning is attended to by the neighbours
Elder - The reference to laying on of hands in 1 Timothy 4:14 , as well as the analogous Ceremony in commissioning the seven (Acts 6:6 ), seems to indicate that the church did make formal recognition of their function, or office. With the possible exception of 1 Timothy 4:14 , however, none of the references to such ceremonies contain any implication that the Ceremony gave the recipient any special status or power
Rab - The later rabbies tell us, this title was conferred with a good deal of Ceremony. The next Ceremony in the creation of a rabbi was the imposition of hands on him by the delegates of the sanhedrim, practised in imitation of Moses's ordaining Joshua by this rite, to succeed him in his office, Numbers 27:18 ; Deuteronomy 34:9
Feasts - They still celebrated it in the time of Jesus (John 7:2), and had introduced into it a water-pouring Ceremony. Jesus referred to this Ceremony when he addressed the people on the final day of the feast, offering to satisfy the spiritual needs of all who came to him for help (John 7:37-39)
Levite - ...
In a dedication Ceremony involving cleansing rituals and sacrificial offerings, Moses and Aaron presented the Levites to God for his service (Numbers 8:5-13). Leaders of the people also took part in the Ceremony, to indicate symbolically that the Levites were the people’s representatives (Numbers 8:9-10)
Celebrate, Celebration - When they asked, "What does this Ceremony mean to you?" they were taught that "It is the Passover sacrifice to the Lord, who passed over the houses of the Israelites
Nazarite - But it seems to have been allowable for persons at a distance to cut the hair, which was to be brought up to Jerusalem, where the Ceremony was completed
Firstborn - Within Israel, the tribe of Levi represented the firstborn of the nation in its worship Ceremony (Numbers 3:40-41 ; Numbers 8:18 )
Directory - The substance of it is as follows:...
It forbids all salutations and civil Ceremony in the churches;...
the reading the scriptures in the congregation is declared to be part of the pastoral office;...
all the canonical books of the old and New Testament (but not of the Apocrypha) are to be publicly read in the vulgar tongue: how large a portion is to be read at once, is left to the minister, who has likewise the liberty of expounding, when he judges it necessary
Heifer, Red - ...
The widespread deaths in the camp owing to Korah's rebellion and its sequel suggested the enactment of a Ceremony presently after, relieving the people of the dread of further penalty because of the defilement contracted by the presence of so many corpses, the sad evidences of sin's awful penalty, and perpetually teaching them to look forward to a deeper purgation by a greater atonement
Thigh - ) It is remarkable however, that we do not, after these striking instances, meet with a like Ceremony among the Israelites, of swearing by putting the hand under the thigh, though there is smiting, in token of shame and sorrow
Sprinkling - (1 Peter 1:2)...
It may not be amiss to add that such was the custom in the eastern world in the article of sprinkling, that great part of their salutations and welcomes were manifested by this Ceremony
Hand - The Ceremony of putting the fight hand on the New Testament in the administration of oaths, and the ordinary salutation of friends, by the shaking of the hand, are proofs in point
Upper Room - Here, likewise, their splendour, being at the top of the house, is enjoyed by the poor Greeks with more retirement, and less chance of molestation from the intrusion of Turks: here, when the professors of the college waited upon me to pay their respects, they were received in Ceremony, and sat at the window
Moloch - Some are of opinion that they contented themselves with making their children leap over a fire sacred to Moloch, by which they consecrated them to some false deity: and by this lustration purified them; this being a usual Ceremony among the Heathens on other occasions
Aaron - Before he died, however, there was a public Ceremony to appoint Eleazar, Aaron’s eldest surviving son, as the replacement high priest (Numbers 20:22-29)
Sacrifices in the Old Testament - The rite of these sacrifices contained two special features, the first of which was the remarkable Ceremony of the "wave" and "heave," which the Talmud describes as follows: the priest, after cutting off the breast and right shoulder of the victim, placed the breast on the hands of the offerer, then, putting his own bands under those of this person, moved them backward and forward (wave) in token of the reciprocity in giving and receiving between God and the offerer. The same Ceremony was then performed with the right shoulder, except that the motion of the hands (heave) was upward and downward
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - The rite of these sacrifices contained two special features, the first of which was the remarkable Ceremony of the "wave" and "heave," which the Talmud describes as follows: the priest, after cutting off the breast and right shoulder of the victim, placed the breast on the hands of the offerer, then, putting his own bands under those of this person, moved them backward and forward (wave) in token of the reciprocity in giving and receiving between God and the offerer. The same Ceremony was then performed with the right shoulder, except that the motion of the hands (heave) was upward and downward
Napoleon i - At the coronation ceremonies in Notre Dame, 1804, Napoleon crowned himself and the empress, although Pope Pius VII had been induced to officiate, on condition that Napoleon should previously go through a religious Ceremony with Josephine de Beauharnais, the widow he had civilly married, 1798
Mass -
As High Mass is the norm for all Masses, incense Ceremony is part of the Common before the Introit, before and after the Gospel, at the Offertory and Consecration
Foot - The same or other commentaries should be consulted for later imitations of the Ceremony (cf
Living - The word of God is living because, being God’s, it is instinct with His own life; the way into the holy place because it is real and efficacious, as contrasted with the mere Ceremony of entrance into the earthly sanctuary; the Christian hope because it is the result of a Divine begetting, and is therefore lasting and certain of fruition as human hopes are not; the heavenly fountains because they are ever ‘springing up unto eternal life’ (cf
Form - ) Show without substance; empty, outside appearance; vain, trivial, or conventional Ceremony; conventionality; formality; as, a matter of mere form
Christ - The names of Messiah and Christ were originally derived from the Ceremony of anointing, by which the kings and the high priests of God's people, and sometimes the prophets, 1 Kings 19:16 , were consecrated and admitted to the exercise of their functions; for all these functions were accounted holy among the Israelites
Form - ) Show without substance; empty, outside appearance; vain, trivial, or conventional Ceremony; conventionality; formality; as, a matter of mere form
Anointing - Anointing was the principal and divinely appointed Ceremony in the inauguration of the Jewish kings
Exodus - It was preceded by God’s judgment on Egypt through a number of plagues (Exodus 1; Exodus 2; Exodus 3; Exodus 4; Exodus 5; Exodus 6; Exodus 7; Exodus 8; Exodus 9; Exodus 10; Exodus 11; see PLAGUE); it came about through the decisive judgment on Passover night and the subsequent crossing of the Red Sea (Exodus 12; Exodus 13; Exodus 14; Exodus 15; see PASSOVER; RED SEA); and it was followed by the covenant Ceremony at Mt Sinai, where God formally established Israel as his people (Exodus 16; Exodus 17; Exodus 18; Exodus 19; Exodus 20; Exodus 21; Exodus 22; Exodus 23; Exodus 24; see COVENANT)
James the Brother of Jesus - They therefore suggested that Paul demonstrate his respect for the Jewish law by joining in a temple Ceremony
Deuteronomy, the Book of - Moses, knowing that Israel's future hung on their obedience and commitment to God, led the people in a covenant renewal Ceremony. The present form of Deuteronomy emphasizes the words of Moses, not the details of the covenant renewal Ceremony. No doubt Joshua used the materials of Deuteronomy when he led Israel in a covenant renewal Ceremony at Shechem (Deuteronomy 1:3 )
Covenant - Did biblical writers borrow the idea of the covenant and its integral elements from pagan sources when the Old Testament was written—elements such as a self-presentation of the suzerain and his activities, including those done on behalf of the vassals, statements of intent, stipulations, and assurances of well-being if obedient and of curses if disobedient? The legal covenants included provisions for continuity, with emphasis on the suzerain's claim to vassals' children, and were confirmed by an oath or a special ratification Ceremony, like the cutting in half of an ox or cow or the sharing of a meal as the conclusion of the act of covenanting. When God saw all that he had done, he confirmed, not by expressing an oath or performing a ratifying Ceremony, but by declaring all to be very good (Genesis 1:31 ). A covenant ratification Ceremony was performed in a vision to Abram in which the blessing of peace for Abram and a curse (punishment) was pronounced on those enslaving covenantal seed (15:12-21). ...
The third stage in the process of Yahweh's renewing and confirming of the covenant he had made previously with Adam, Noah, and the patriarchs was the actual ratification Ceremony (24:4b-18). The Ceremony consisted of the building of an altar to serve as the actual intimate meeting place of Yahweh and the people. " The climactic point of the Ceremony followed; the people were sprinkled by the blood of the covenant. The whole Ceremony ended with Yahweh displaying himself in his majesty, splendor, grandeur, and awesomeness as a consuming fire (24:17)
Marriage - The nuptials were often celebrated with great pomp and Ceremony, and with protracted feasting and rejoicing. The actual Ceremony of marriage was very simple, consisting of little more than the reading of the marriage contract, Proverbs 2:17 Malachi 2:14 , and the nuptial blessing invoked by the friends, Genesis 24:60 Ruth 4:11,12
Aaron - He and the firstborn son of each generation of his lineage were dedicated in a special anointing Ceremony to officiate before God and on behalf of God's people as high priests
Fortunatus, Bishop of Poictiers - He also composed Lives of the saints, theological treatises, and hymns, including the famous Vexilla Regis , composed for a religious Ceremony at Poictiers
Oil (Olive) - (1549) provides for the NT Ceremony, ‘if the sicke person desyre to be annoynted
Hosanna - Among the Jews, however, the word came to designate not alone the cry, but also the of palms, myrtle, or willow which on their joyous feast of Tabernacles, and especially on its seventh day, the people were accustomed—for the Law did not enjoin this Ceremony—to carry in procession with the priests to the fountain of Shiloah and thence again to the Temple, where these ‘hosannas’ were piled up and beaten against the altar. It is only with ‘Hosanna’ as a cry that we are here concerned; but we cannot forget that when, in honour of our Lord, the multitude raised the cry, they ‘took branches of palm trees’ (John 12:13) as well; and therefore, besides expounding the meaning of the cry, we must consider how a Ceremony customary at the feast of Tabernacles came to be adopted, popularly, on an occasion when the worshippers were assembling at Jerusalem to celebrate a feast of a widely different character, that of the Passover. On the contrary, it was neither unprecedented nor unnatural; and the fact that it was not a legally prescribed but only a popular Ceremony, left them quite free to use it when they thought fit
Banquet - The first Ceremony, after the guests arrived at the house of entertainment, was the salutation performed by the master of the house, or one appointed in his place. The Jews regularly washed their hands and their feet before dinner; they considered this Ceremony as essential, which discovers the reason of their astonishment, when they observed the disciples of Christ sit down at table without having observed this Ceremony: "Why do thy disciples transgress the tradition of the elders? for they wash not their hands when they eat bread," Matthew 15:2
Marriage - (2) The betrothal was of a more formal and binding nature than our ‘engagement’; among the Arabs it is the only legal Ceremony connected with a marriage. According to the Mishna, the later Ceremony of betrothal consisted in payment of a piece of money, or a gift, or the conveyance of a writing, in presence of two witnesses. The first Ceremony was the wedding procession ( Psalms 45:15 , 1Ma 9:37 ), which may be a relic of ‘marriage by capture,’ the bridegroom’s friends ( Matthew 9:15 , John 3:29 ; cf. There is nowhere any hint of a religious Ceremony , though marriage was regarded with great reverence as symbolizing the union of God with Israel ( ib . Psalms 19:5 speaks of his exultant ‘coming forth’ on the following morning; ‘the chamber’ can hardly refer there to the ‘canopy’ under which in modern weddings the pair stand during the Ceremony, though this has no doubt been evolved from the old tent
Atonement, Day of - On his return through the Holy Place a similar Ceremony was performed ( Leviticus 16:33 , cf. By this Ceremony these sins were conceived as not only symbolically but actually transferred to the head of the goat ( Leviticus 16:21 f
Hand - Proverbs 17 ...
Putting the hand under the thigh, was an ancient Ceremony used in swearing. Job 40 ...
The laying on of hands, was also a Ceremony used in consecrating one to office
New York, State of - Garaconthie was baptized with great Ceremony at Quebec in 1669, receiving the name of Daniel
Saul, King of Israel - An official crowning Ceremony followed in due course (1 Samuel 11:14-15)
Trump Trumpet - ...
Thus the trumpet, which was so closely connected with Jewish Ceremony in war and religion, acquired definitely Christian associations in the Apostolic Age
Caesarea - Upon this occasion, that the Ceremony might be rendered illustrious, by a degree of profusion unknown in any former instance, Herod assembled the most skilful musicians, wrestlers, and gladiators, from all parts of the world
Meals - On state occasions more Ceremony was used, and the meal was enlivened in various ways
Levites - The consecration of Levites was without much Ceremony
Passover - This last part of the Ceremony was but little observed; at least, it was of no obligation after that night when they came out of Egypt
Hospitality - As we were at the table, there came by a stranger, wearing a whit turban, who after have saluted the company, sat himself down to the table without Ceremony, ate with us during some time, and then went away, repeating several times the name of God
Levites - The consecration of Levites was without much Ceremony
Baptism - ]'>[1] , neither is the verb with which it is connected ever used of an initiatory Ceremony. ‘plunged in calamity’); and ( c ) most commonly in the technical sense of a religious Ceremony of initiation. Baptism was a Ceremony of initiation by which the baptized not only were admitted members of the visible society of the disciples of Christ, but also received the solemn attestation of the consequences of their faith
Priest - David himself sacrificed, (at least the text expresses it so,) at the Ceremony of bringing the ark to Jerusalem, and at the floor of Araunah, 2 Samuel 6:13 . This Ceremony was called "filling the hands," expressions which accordingly in a number of passages mean the same as consecrating, Exodus 32:29 ; Leviticus 16:32 ; 1 Chronicles 29:5 . This Ceremony, which continued for eight days, for ever separated the priests from all the other Israelites, not excepting the Levites; so that there was subsequently no need of any farther consecration, neither for themselves nor their posterity, Exodus 29:35-37 ; Leviticus 10:7 ; Romans 1:1 ; Ephesians 3:3 ; Acts 13:2-3
Solomon - To make this Ceremony the more August, Solomon chose for it the eighth day of the seventh month of the holy year, which was the first of the civil year, and answered to our October. The Ceremony of the dedication lasted seven days, at the end of which began the feast of tabernacles, which continued seven days longer; so that the people continued at Jerusalem fourteen or fifteen days, from the eighth to the twenty-second of the seventh month
Burial - This Ceremony was never omitted by the Hebrews when any mournful, event happened, and was performed in the following manner: they took a knife, and holding the blade downward, gave the upper garment a cut in the right side, and rent it a hand's breadth. They began the Ceremony with the stridulous voices of old women, who strove, by their doleful modulations, to extort grief from those that were present
Funeral, Rites - Psalmody, or singing of psalms, was the great Ceremony used in all funeral processions among the ancient Christians
Uncleanness - The Ceremony was carried out forty days after the birth of a male child and eighty days after the birth of a female child (Leviticus 12; cf
Laying on of Hands - This Ceremony, of frequent occurrence in both OT and NT, is a piece of natural symbolism with the central idea that through physical contact the person performing it identifies himself with the other in the presence of God
Bring - Also, to introduce to practice, as to bring up a fashion or Ceremony also, to cause to advance near, as to bring up forces, or the body of reserve also, to bear or convey upwards
Ceremony - With this highly popular and revered class of men, religion was either merely a matter of Ceremony, or was employed, for base and interested purposes, to cast a veil of sanctity over their actions
Eating - The present Jews, before they sit down to table, carefully wash their hands: they speak of this Ceremony as essential and obligatory
Sacrament - Protestants generally teach that there are two sacraments of the Gospel, Baptism and the Lord's Supper, and the others "have no visible sign of Ceremony ordained by God
Deuteronomy - He brought the Ceremony, and his leadership of Israel, to a fitting close by announcing prophetic blessings on each of Israel’s twelve tribes (32:48-33:29)
Joshua, Book of - Before he died, Joshua called Israel’s leaders to assemble for another covenant renewal Ceremony
Blood - ...
In Deuteronomy 21:1-9 , we read of an elaborate Ceremony by elders concerning a person murdered in the fields near their city. ...
Almost as dramatic as the Passover was the Ceremony at the dedication of the covenant treaty at Sinai between Yahweh and His covenant people, the Israelites (Exodus 24:1-8 )
Messiah - Israelites of Old Testament times anointed kings, priests, and sometimes prophets to their positions by the Ceremony of anointing. In this Ceremony a special anointing oil was poured over the head of the person as a sign that he now had the right, and the responsibility, to perform the duties that his position required (Exodus 28:41; 1 Kings 1:39; 1 Kings 19:16; see ANOINTING)
Covenant - ...
God confirmed his promise to Abraham by a covenant Ceremony. It is also called the Sinaitic covenant, after Mt Sinai, where the Ceremony took place
Covenant - A Ceremony accompanied this covenant ritual—the two sides of the covenant agreement cut a calf in two and solemnly paraded between its parts (Jeremiah 34:18 ). He symbolized this promise through an ancient covenant Ceremony (compare Jeremiah 34:1 ), known from other cultures also, in which animals are cut and covenant participants pass through. The people accepted this responsibility in a solemn Ceremony in which covenant law was read from the “book of the covenant” and “the blood of the covenant” was sprinkled on the altar and on the people (Exodus 24:3-8 )
Symbol - The Ceremony of purification is not purity
Consecration - A rite or Ceremony of dedicating things or persons to the service of God
Greetings - His honour (sharaf), in all matters of Ceremony, is very delicate and brittle, but strangely tough in things of greater moment
Levi - We have the account, Num 3They were subordinate to the priests, and their consecration to their offices was not with so much Ceremony, (see Numbers 7:5-7) nevertheless they were all of one tribe, (see 2 Chronicles 29:34) Their provision was noble
Anabaptists - The English and Dutch Baptists do not consider the word as at all applicable to their sect; because those persons whom they baptize they consider as never having been baptized before, although they have undergone what they term the Ceremony of sprinkling in their infancy
Baal - Temples were erected to Baal in Judah, 1 Kings 16:32, and be was worshipped with much Ceremony
Olives, Mount of - The second Ceremony referred to was the burning of the red heifer
Passover - It was replaced by a new remembrance Ceremony, the Lord’s Supper (Matthew 26:17-30; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 11:23-26; see LORD’S SUPPER)
Jehoahaz - "to whom it is requited"; a second "Shallum," son of Jabesh, who reigned only one mouth in Samaria (2 Kings 15:13), instead of Shalom, "peaceful," like Solomon: bitter irony! The popular party set great hopes upon him (Jeremiah 22:10-12), as though he would deliver the kingdom from Pharaoh Necho, and "anointed" him with extraordinary Ceremony to compensate for his defective title to the throne
Levi - ‘Filling up of the hand’ (translated ‘consecrated’ in Judges 17:6 ; Judges 17:12 ) may refer to a Ceremony of induction into the priestly office, the principal act of which was the solemn placing of the god (or other religious symbol) in the hands of the future officiant at the shrine
Concubine - And there was this farther distinction between the lawful wife, and the concubine, there was no religious Ceremony used at the taking of a concubine; whereas, the lawful wife was usually betrothed to her husband before marriage, and sometimes, from the very childhood of the respective parties
Priest; Priesthood - 8 describe the sevenday consecration Ceremony of Aaron and his sons
Anointing - The use of anointing in religious Ceremony was very varied
Atonement - The Ceremony of the scapegoat also took place on this day
Baptism - from the Greek word βαπτιζω , is a rite or Ceremony by which persons are initiated into the profession of the Christian religion; or, it is the appointed mode by which a person assumes the profession of Christianity, or is admitted to a participation of the privileges belonging to the disciples of Christ. This Ceremony is performed by immersion in the oriental churches. The practice of the western churches is, to sprinkle the water on the head or face of the person to be baptized, except in the church of Milan, in whose ritual it is ordered, that the head of the infant be plunged three times into the water; the minister at the same time pronouncing the words, "I baptize thee in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost;" importing that by this Ceremony the person baptized is received among the professors of that religion which God, the Father of all, revealed to mankind by the ministry of his Son, and confirmed by the miracles of his Spirit. The Quakers assert, that water baptism was never intended to continue in the church of Christ any longer than while Jewish prejudices made such an external Ceremony necessary
Marriage - ...
No formal religious Ceremony attended the wedding; but a blessing was pronounced, and a "covenant of God" entered into (Ezekiel 16:8; Malachi 2:14; Proverbs 2:17; Genesis 24:60; Ruth 4:11-12). The essential part of the Ceremony was the removal of the bride from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or his father
Pilgrimage - The running between Safa and Meriva is also performed seven times, partly with a slow pace, and partly running; for they walk gravely till they come to a place between two pillars; and there they run, and afterwards walk again, sometimes looking back, and sometimes stoping, like one who had lost something, to represent Hagar seeking water for her son; for the Ceremony is said to be as ancient as her time. ...
The Ceremony being over, on the same day, the tenth of Dhu'lhajja, the pilgrims slay their victims in the said valley of Mina, of which they and their friends eat part, and the rest is given to the poor
Lucianus, a Famous Satirist - The multitude was tossed about from religion to religion, from Ceremony to Ceremony, from rite to rite, in the vain hope that among so many supernatural powers some might lead men rightly to safety and happiness
Marriage - At the marriage Ceremony the bride removed from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or bis father
Covenant - ” This use apparently comes from the Ceremony described in Baal - There, as they make fires on the tops of hills, every member of the family is made to pass though the fire; as they reckon this Ceremony necessary to ensure good fortune through the succeeding year
Hand - To fill one's hands, is to take possession of the priesthood, to perform the functions of that office; because in this Ceremony, those parts of the victim which were to be offered, were put into the hand of the newly created priest, Judges 17:5 ; Judges 17:12 ; 1 Kings 13:33
Boyhood - 6): ‘When a child is twelve years and one day old, his oaths are tested; when he is thirteen years and a day, they are valid without further Ceremony. He was therefore called a ‘son of the Law’ (bar-mizvâh), or a ‘son of the Precept,’ and the Ceremony in which he was recognized as such by the community was naturally regarded as important and interesting. ]'>[11] ...
Opinions differ as to how much of the Law and the Precepts a boy was bound to observe before this Ceremony. In olden days the obligation to attend the feasts at Jerusalem perhaps became binding after this Ceremony
Circumcision - ...
The Jews have always been very exact in observing this Ceremony, and it appears that they did not neglect it when in Egypt. Those who assert that the Phenicians were circumcised, mean, probably, the Samaritans; for we know, from other authority, that the Phenicians did not observe this Ceremony. Circumcision is likewise the Ceremony of initiation into the Mohammedan religion
Red Heifer - The priest’s share in the Ceremony was confined to the sprinkling of some of the blood ‘toward the front of the tent of meeting’ ( Numbers 8:4 RV Sabbatical Year - A public Ceremony took place which signified his acceptance of the position in perpetuity
Tabernacles, the Feast of - These were the Ceremony of pouring out some water of the pool of Siloam and the display of some great lights in the court of the women
Kiss - ...
It may not be amiss, for the better apprehension of the subject, to look over the Scripture a little for particular instances of this Ceremony, that we may remark the diversity
Excommunication - It is a custom with the patriarch of Jerusalem annually to excommunicate the pope and the church of Rome; on which occasion, together with a great deal of idle Ceremony, he drives a nail into the ground with a hammer, as a mark of malediction
Ark of the Covenant - ...
Recent scholarship has suggested that on coronation occasions or annually at a festival of enthronement this ark Ceremony was reenacted
a'Braham - After this the thrice-repeated promise that his descendants should become a mighty nation and possess the land in which he was a stranger was confirmed with all the solemnity of a religious Ceremony
Passover - And the Ceremony generally commenceth in every family by the first-born observing fasting, by way of reference to the destruction of the first-born in Egypt
Gilgal - The significance of this mass Ceremony was that circumcision was the sign of the covenant under which Israel inherited the land (Joshua 5:2-9)
Sacrifice And Offering - The animal was decapitated and the priest, in turn, used the body in the purification Ceremony. After an elaborate Ceremony that culminated in the sacrifice of the bull, its hide was dipped in and rubbed with two separate mixtures and then used to cover the kettledrum
Sanhedrin - 4), and he was admitted by the Ceremony of the laying on of hands
Solomon - ...
Solomon’s love for lavish religious Ceremony also led him into trouble (1 Kings 3:3-4), but his request for wisdom won God’s approval (1 Kings 3:5-14)
Blessing And Cursing - Central to the covenant renewal Ceremony was the blessing (Deuteronomy 28:3-6 )
High Priest (2) - Immediately after the Return the office was a religious one, the secular power being in the hands of the ‘prince’; for, great as was the emphasis in the new community upon law and Ceremony, there seems to have been an equal emphasis upon the hoped for restoration of the State to a dignified and independent position
Alaric - That pope Innocent assented to this public Ceremony rests only on the authority of the heathen Zosimus (v
Firstborn - ...
The redemption of the first-born among the children of Israel, was usually observed with great Ceremony
Clean, To Be - Anyone who appeared before Him in ritual and Ceremony with “hands … full of blood” ( Sacrament - It is a Latin word; and, agreeably to its derivation, it was applied by the early writers of the western church to any Ceremony of our holy religion, especially if it were figurative or mystical
Priest - [1] The Ceremony of their consecration is described in HIGH PRIEST - 1986 ( Exodus 29:1 ; Leviticus 8:1 )
Presbyterians - This being the case, the dispute which has been so warmly agitated concerning the validity of Presbyterian ordination may be soon decided; for if the Ceremony of ordination be at all essential, it is obvious that such a Ceremony performed by presbyters must be valid, as there is no higher order of ecclesiastics in the church by whom it can be performed. Being solemnly engaged to use their utmost endeavours for the suppression of vice and the cherishing of piety and virtue, and to exercise discipline faithfully and diligently, the minister, in the presence of the congregation, sets them apart to their office by solemn prayer; and concludes the Ceremony, which is sometimes called ordination, with exhorting both elders and people to their respective duties
Presbyterians - This being the case, the dispute which has been so warmly agitated concerning the validity of Presbyterian ordination may be soon decided; for if the Ceremony of ordination be at all essential, it is obvious that such a Ceremony performed by presbyters must be valid, as there is no higher order of ecclesiastics in the church by whom it can be performed. Being solemnly engaged to use their utmost endeavours for the suppression of vice and the cherishing of piety and virtue, and to exercise discipline faithfully and diligently, the minister, in the presence of the congregation, sets them apart to their office by solemn prayer; and concludes the Ceremony, which is sometimes called ordination, with exhorting both elders and people to their respective duties
Expiation - None of these could be considered in the light of fines for offences, since they were offered for no particular persons, and must be considered, therefore, unless resolved into an unmeaning Ceremony, piacular and vicarious. The circumstances of this Ceremony, whereby atonement was to be made "for all the sins" of the whole Jewish people, are so strikingly significant, that they deserve a particular detail. For it is to be remarked, that the Ceremony of the scape-goat is not a distinct one: it is a continuation of the process, and is evidently the concluding part and symbolical consummation of the sin offering: so that the transfer of the iniquities of the people upon the head of the scape-goat, and the bearing them away into the wilderness, manifestly imply, that the atonement effected by the sacrifice of the sin offering consisted in the transfer and consequent removal of those iniquities. Shall we account for it by saying that sacrifices were offered for the benefit of the worshipper, but exclude the notion of expiation? But here we are obliged to confine the benefit to reconciliation and the taking away of sins, and that by the appointed means of the shedding of blood, and the presentation of blood in the holy place, accompanied by the expressive Ceremony of imposition of hands upon the head of the victim; the import of which act is fixed, beyond all controversy, by the priests confessing over that victim the sins of all the people, and at the same time imprecating upon its head the vengeance due to them, Leviticus 16:21
Offices in the New Testament - ...
Apostles , commissioned by Christ Himself, and prophets, whose gifts were directly and immediately from God, did not receive any additional commissioning Ceremony from the church
Ark - Bishop Pococke has preserved three specimens of ancient sculpture, in which this Ceremony is displayed
Ordination - ...
The reformed held the call of the people the only thing essential to the validity of the ministry; and teach, that ordination is only a Ceremony, which renders the call more August and authentic
Baptism - Christian baptism is a Ceremony commanded by Jesus, by which Christians make a public confession that they have repented of their sins and committed themselves in faith to Jesus as their Saviour and Lord (Matthew 28:19; Acts 2:38; Acts 2:41; Acts 9:18; Acts 10:47-48; Acts 18:8; Romans 10:9)
Bible - His intention was to lead them to a new homeland in Canaan, but first he took them to Mt Sinai, where they formally became God’s people in a covenant Ceremony
Offerings And Sacrifices - " The word for "sacrifice" ( zebah ) first occurs in Genesis 31:54 in the covenant-making Ceremony between Jacob and Laban: "He [2] offered a sacrifice there in the hill country and invited his relatives to a meal" (cf. , Mount Ebal) and offer burnt and peace offerings there as part of the initial covenant Ceremony in the land (Deuteronomy 27:5-7 ). At least part of the purpose of this Ceremony appears to have been to lay claim to the land that the Lord had promised Abram long before when he first entered the land and built an altar in the same general location, near Shechem (Genesis 12:6-7 )
Moses - ...
A solemn Ceremony sealed the covenant (Exodus 24:1 f
Leper - The Ceremony of restoration was therefore twofold
Marriage - ...
Both the bridegroom and the bride wore special clothes for the wedding Ceremony and the associated festivities (Isaiah 61:10; Jeremiah 2:32; Revelation 19:7-8; Revelation 21:2)
Cross - Imbert, the prior of Gascony, was severely prosecuted in 1683, for telling the people, that, in the Ceremony of adoring the cross, practised in that church on Good Friday, they were not to adore the wood, but Christ, who was crucified on it
King, Kingship - It was normal for the elders of the nation to make a covenant with the king (2 Samuel 5:3 ; 2 Kings 11:17 ) in which the rights and duties of the king were recorded and deposited in the sanctuary—possibly at the time of the anointment Ceremony (1 Samuel 10:25 )
Blood - It could not but be that a Ceremony, the meaning of which was so deeply embedded in the religions experience of the race, and which was so well fitted to symbolize the solemn consecration to mutual obligations, should find its significance completely expressed in the blood of Christ through which God would reunite Himself in even more spiritual bonds to the lives of Christ’s followers
Marriage - " (24:1; Matthew 1:19 ) The essence of the marriage Ceremony consisted in the removal of the bride from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or his father
Blood - It could not but be that a Ceremony, the meaning of which was so deeply embedded in the religions experience of the race, and which was so well fitted to symbolize the solemn consecration to mutual obligations, should find its significance completely expressed in the blood of Christ through which God would reunite Himself in even more spiritual bonds to the lives of Christ’s followers
King - The coronation Ceremony was the occasion when God formally adopted the king and anointed him for the task of ruling his people (2 Samuel 7:14-16; Psalms 2:7; Psalms 20:6; Psalms 45:7; Psalms 89:3-4; Psalms 89:26-29)
Baptism - The Ceremony of washing, or the application of water to a person, in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, by which he is initiated into the visible church. ...
Baptism has been supposed by many learned persons to have had its origin from the Jewish church; in which, they maintain, it was the practice, long before Christ's time, to baptize proselytes or converts to their faith, as part of the Ceremony of their admission
Clean And Unclean - Leviticus 16:1-34 , where the two notions are united in one Ceremony). This was sprinkled over the unclean person on the third and seventh days, and the priest and attendants who performed the Ceremony were themselves defiled by it till evening, and needed purification (cf
Priest, Christ as - The Messiah is told to sit at Yahweh's right hand, assuming the Ceremony of royal enthronement to kingly power, but in the very presence of God (v
Moses - Moses Acts on behalf of God at the covenant ratification Ceremony (Exodus 24:6-8 ) and thereafter is the recipient of instructions concerning the building of a sacred national shrine known as the tabernacle
Abraham - In its present form it narrates the renewal to Abraham of the two great promises on which his faith rested the promise of a seed and of the land of Canaan and the confirmation of the latter by an impressive Ceremony in which God entered into a covenant with the patriarch
Armies - The last Ceremony, previous to an engagement, was the sounding of the sacred trumpets by the priests, Numbers 10:9-10 ; 2 Chronicles 13:12-14 ; 1Ma_3:54
Joseph (2) - Before the marriage Ceremony Mary was ‘found with child of the Holy Ghost,’ but the angelic annunciation to her was not made known to Joseph
Sacrifice - The characteristic Ceremony in the peace offering was the eating of the flesh by the sacrificer
New Creation - To base one's boast on one's confidence in the rite of circumcision or one's refusal to be circumcised amounted to reliance on "the flesh, " or in this case on a Ceremony or ritual
Promise - This proposition was ratified in a formal Ceremony at Sinai (Exodus 24:3-8 ), and thereafter the sons of Jacob became the chosen people of God
Bason - But there was another observance, not of Ceremony but of courtesy and comfort (Luke 7:44), in which each might have acted as host or as servant to the other if the spirit of love had ruled in their hearts
Redeem - The connection of all of the rituals with kâphar peaks in the complex Ceremony of the annual Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur), as described in detail in Lev
High Priest - He figures in the narrative of Numbers 16:1 where the offering of incense is affirmed as the exclusive prerogative of the priests and in the red heifer Ceremony ( Numbers 19:1 )
Guilt - This natural instinct was developed and guided in the Levitical institutions by formal Ceremony and religious rite, which were calculated to deepen still further the feeling of guilt and fear of Divine wrath
Marriage - In the heathen world, though the marriage Ceremony was in some sort a sacred act, the marriage itself was looked on as an easily-broken contract which either party might dissolve at will. The betrothal, having been accomplished by crowning with garlands and with some Ceremony (Edersheim, loc
Joshua, Theology of - 7); the erection of an altar east of the Jordan in order to remember the lordship of Israel's God (22:26- 27); and the establishment of a memorial stone at Shechem after the Ceremony of covenant renewal (24:26-27)
Stoning - ...
(c) There is no reason to question the reality of the scene depicted in the narrative, in which, after the utterance that excited the fury of the hearers (‘Behold, I see the heavens opened, and the Son of man standing on the right hand of God’), the court was at once transformed into an infuriated mob, and hurried the alleged blasphemer, now judged out of his own mouth, without further Ceremony to the place of execution (Acts 7:57 f
Carpocrates, Philospher - ) that this was a baptismal Ceremony intended to represent the "baptism with fire," predicted of our Lord by the Baptist
Plagues, the Ten, - The sixth plague, produced by the ashes scattered toward heaven in conformity with an ancient Egyptian rite, as if an invocation of the sun-god, continued the warfare of Jehovah upon Egyptian idolatry; the religious Ceremony which was employed to invoke blessing brought disease
House - ), after which came the Ceremony of the laying of the foundation stone , the ‘ corner stone of sure foundation’ of Isaiah 28:16 (see, further, Corner-Stone). ...
Here by anticipation may be taken the rite of the formal dedication of a private house, which is attested by Deuteronomy 20:5 , although the references in Hebrew literature to the actual Ceremony are confined to sacred and public buildings ( Leviticus 8:10 ff
Pentecost - ’ The brief Ceremony closes with Psalms 67 and a prayer that ‘the temple may be speedily rebuilt in our days,’ and, with still the backward look, ‘there we will serve Thee with awe, as in the days of old, and as in ancient years. But all could count from ‘the morrow after the sabbath’ from the second day of Maẓẓôth, when the Ceremony of waving the omer (of barley) took place
Ordination - Whatever was the significance of the Ceremony in Acts 13:1-3 (see below, 8), the choice of Barnabas and Saul was made by the Holy Ghost-no doubt through the utterance of a Christian prophet. -In considering the present subject we must necessarily touch on the meaning of the Ceremony in Acts 13:1-3, when these two great missionaries were sent out on their first evangelistic journey
Pentecost - ’ The brief Ceremony closes with Psalms 67 and a prayer that ‘the temple may be speedily rebuilt in our days,’ and, with still the backward look, ‘there we will serve Thee with awe, as in the days of old, and as in ancient years. But all could count from ‘the morrow after the sabbath’ from the second day of Maẓẓôth, when the Ceremony of waving the omer (of barley) took place
Festivals - They could not be eaten until after this Ceremony (Leviticus 23:14 ; Joshua 5:10-11 ), and none of this bread was placed on the altar because of the leaven content
Exodus, Book of - God gave the Ten Commandments and other laws central to the covenant (Exodus 19-23 ), and then confirmed the covenant in a mysterious Ceremony (Exodus 24:1 )
Baptism - It is probable that the problem is insoluble with our present knowledge, and that the reference is to some Ceremony in the then baptismal rite at Corinth of which we hear no more, but not to vicarious baptism (see Plummer in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i
Infancy - The Presentation of the infant Jesus involved at the same time the ancient Ceremony of the Redemption of the firstborn son, as the reference to Exodus 13:2; Exodus 13:15 shows
Independents - Their worship is conducted in a decent, plain, and simple manner, without the ostentation of form and the vain pomp of Ceremony
Sanctify - The priests performed the actual consecration Ceremony while an individual decided that something he owned was to be given to God: “… King David did dedicate [4] unto the Lord …” ( Law (2) - The hands were held with the lingers up, so that the uncleanness might be washed down from them; and for the Ceremony to be effectual it was necessary that the water should run down to the wrist (though we should probably not translate πυγμῇ, Mark 7:3, ‘to the wrist’; see Swete, ad loc. No mention is made here of any violation of the tradition on the part of Jesus Himself; though in Luke 11:38 we are told that the Pharisee, at whose house Jesus was eating, was surprised that He neglected this Ceremony
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - The Ceremony was witnessed by a vast multitude, assembled to listen to the inaugural sermon of one of whose eloquence they had heard so much. Towards the latter part of 398, not long after Chrysostom had taken possession of his see, the relics of some anonymous martyrs were translated by night with great Ceremony to the martyry of St
Temple - ...
How would God's presence in the covenant community and Ceremony be evident? Inevitably certain symbols were necessary (despite the aniconic nature of Mosaic Yahwism Exodus 20:4 )
Roman Catholics - The Ceremony of blessing bells is, by the Catholics, called christening them, because the name of some saint is ascribed to them, by virtue of whose invocation they are presented, in order that they may obtain his favour and protection
Night (2) - In Palestine, as in all Eastern lands, the marriage Ceremony was celebrated after nightfall; lamps and torches were always the accompaniment of weddings (cf
Greece, Religion And Society of - Animal sacrifice completed the Ceremony
Music, Instruments, Dancing - The sound of the trumpets introduced Temple Ceremony and sacrifice, the trumpet itself being counted among the sacred Temple utensils ( 2 Kings 12:13 ; Numbers 31:6 )
Temple - The dedication of the temple was the grandest Ceremony ever performed under the Mosaic dispensation
Baptism - It is probable that the problem is insoluble with our present knowledge, and that the reference is to some Ceremony in the then baptismal rite at Corinth of which we hear no more, but not to vicarious baptism (see Plummer in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i
Presence (2) - With them the Divine Man Jesus, separated from every Ceremony, doctrine, or dream, vouches for the inward presence of God to the soul that believes
Church, the - At the parousia, the official wedding Ceremony will take place and, with it, the eternal union of Christ and his wife will be actualized (Revelation 19:7-9 ; 21:1-2 )
Leadership - Their ordination Ceremony was repeated on seven successive dayssurely an indication to all that they were specially set apart for their priestly ministry
Hypocrisy - The extreme bitterness of the Judaistic party was nourished by that external view of religion which could regard a Ceremony as essential, and hatred as if it were godliness
Messiah - ???????? was a term applied pre-eminently to the king, who was designated to office by the Ceremony of anointing (1Sa_9:16; 1Sa_10:1, 2Ki_9:2-3; 2Ki_9:6)
Christ, Christology - ...
Various groups of individuals in the Old Testament were recipients of a Ceremony involving anointing with oil
Hypocrisy - The extreme bitterness of the Judaistic party was nourished by that external view of religion which could regard a Ceremony as essential, and hatred as if it were godliness
Deuteronomy, Theology of - ...
The permanency of the covenant relationship is implied by the command that Israel, once in the land of promise, should undertake covenant renewal at Mount Ebal, a Ceremony centered on the very words of the covenant text being composed by Moses (27:1-7)
Unity (2) - It was a unity in moral obedience, but not a uniformity in Ceremony or custom: each Church ordered its own liturgy, and determined its own ritual and usage; wide differences might exist in practices, e
Prayer - Jahweh wanted more than mere ritual and Ceremony, notwithstanding Israel's elected status
Lord's Supper. (i.) - Paul, who, he thinks, was the real originator of the rite, having ‘turned a pagan Ceremony to Christian use’ in a moment of ecstasy under the influence of what he had seen of the Greek mysteries in Corinth
David - Thither he brought up the ark with great Ceremony ( 2 Samuel 6:1 ff
Serpent - In the orgies of Bacchus, the persons who partook of the Ceremony, used to carry serpents in their hands, and with horrid screams call upon Eva! Eva! Eva being, according to the writer just mentioned, the same as epha, or opha, which the Greeks rendered ophis, and by it denoted a serpent, and containing no allusion to Eve, as above conjectured
Temple (2) - This Ceremony took place in the Court of the Women, as the presence of Mary and Anna shows; it was a simple one,‡ Government - The transition to a theocratic commonwealth occurred at a covenant-renewal Ceremony (Joshua 8:30-35 ), in which an expanded form of the covenant, including stipulations from Deuteronomy, was accepted
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - The prophet Isaiah recognizes his own anointing (to preach good news to poor, Isaiah 61:1 ) and that of Cyrus, king of Persia (to "subdue nations, 45:1), apparently as coming directly from the Lord without the usual Ceremony of initiation
Barnabas, Epistle of - This view of the matter is made good partly by shewing that, side by side with the institutions of Israel, there were many passages of the Prophets in which God even condemned in strong language the outward Ceremony, whether sacrifice, or fasting, or circumcision, or the temple worship (cc
Passover - Therefore in Deuteronomy 16:9 the direction is "seven weeks shalt thou number unto thee from such time as thou beginnest to put the sickle to the grain," namely, at the Passover when the wave sheaf was offered, the Ceremony from which the feast of weeks was measured
Priests And Levites - These local priests were required to superintend the ancient primitive Ceremony connected with the retention of a slave after 6 years’ service ( Exodus 21:6 ), decide suits, impose fines and the like ( Exodus 21:22 , Exodus 22:9 ; Exodus 22:9 )
Law - Matthew 9:13; Matthew 12:7), while he is silent regarding all outward service and Ceremony
Preaching - Old Latimer, in a coarse frieze gown, trudged afoot, his Testament hanging at one end of his leathern girdle, and his spectacles at the other, and without Ceremony instructed the people in rustic style from a hollow tree; while the courtly Ridley in satin and fur taught the same principles in the cathedral of the metropolis
Elisha - At the same time he sent much gold, silver, and the rich raiments (lebush , robe of Ceremony) of Damascus; as though "God's gift may be purchased with money" (Acts 8:20)
Quakers - The naming of children is without Ceremony
Persecution - If any one refused to consent to the least Ceremony in worship, he was cast into prison, where many of the most excellent men in the land perished
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - After Saul led Israel to victory over the Ammonites (1 Samuel 11:1-13 ) Samuel called for an assembly at Gilgal, where he presided in the inauguration of Saul's reign at a public Ceremony of covenant renewal (1 Samuel 11:14-12:25 )
Jesus Christ - ...
On Thursday night Jesus ate a Passover meal with his followers and established a communal Ceremony for them that consisted of a participation in his coming death, concretized in the partaking of bread and wine
John the Baptist - It was essentially an ethical rite, and thus very different from an outward Ceremony to which some value could be attached apart from the moral and spiritual condition of the recipient
Beatitude - But the word is unduly restricted in its significance when it is used as a synonym for beatification,—a Roman Catholic Ceremony wherein an inferior degree of canonization is conferred on a deceased person
Book - If any person gave a book to a religious house, he believed that so valuable a donation merited eternal salvation, and he offered it on the altar with great Ceremony
Abram - Hence, after Abraham had performed this part of the Ceremony, the symbol of the Almighty's presence, "a smoking furnace, and a burning lamp, passed between the pieces," Genesis 15:18 , and so both parties ratified the covenant
Augustus (2) - With great Ceremony was observed the centenary of the city, for which Horace prepared his well-known ode, as the inscription found in the Tiber in 1871 so strikingly confirms (‘carmen composuit Q
Augustine - He also affirmed that the virtue of baptism is not in the water; that the ministers of Christ perform the external Ceremony, but that Christ accompanies it with invisible grace; that baptism is common to all, whilst grace is not so; and that the same external rite may be death to some, and life to others
Passover - The festival commences with a sanctification; then comes the first cup of wine; the aphiḳomen (half a maẓẓah, which is reserved to be eaten at the close) is set aside; the question is asked, ‘Why is this night distinguished from all other nights?’ to which a long response is given; this is followed by the first part of Hallel (Psalms 113, 114), the second cup of wine, washing of the hands; the unleavened bread (maẓẓôth) is eaten with bitter herbs (horse-radish); next comes Hillel’s Ceremony (eating a piece of horse-radish placed between two pieces of unleavened bread); the aphiḳomen is eaten, grape after meals is said with considerable additions; then there is the third cup of wine and the opening of the door; Hallel is resumed (Psalms 115-118); Psalms 136 is recited with large expansions, followed by the fourth cup of wine and prayer for the Divine acceptance of the service; ‘Adir hu’, an impassioned song praying for the rebuilding of the Temple, brings all to a close
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - It was this, we are told (Matthew 3:15), that led Him to undergo the Ceremony of baptism at the hands of John, as it was this also that on more than one occasion made Him quote the great spiritual commandments of the Law as containing within themselves the secret of eternal life
Jerusalem - From the opposite side of the valley, I was witness to the Ceremony of parading a corpse round the mosque of Omar, and then bringing it forth for burial
Confession - In the Jewish Ceremony of annual expiation, the high priest confessed in general his own sins, the sins of other ministers of the temple, and those of all the people