What does Castle mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
אַרְמֽוֹן citadel 1

Definitions Related to Castle

H759


   1 citadel, palace, fortress.
   

Frequency of Castle (original languages)

Frequency of Castle (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Castle-Guard
(1):
(n.) The guard or defense of a castle.
(2):
(n.) A feudal tenure, obliging the tenant to perform service within the realm, without limitation of time.
(3):
(n.) A tax or imposition an a dwelling within a certain distance of a castle, for the purpose of maintaining watch and ward in it; castle-ward.
Webster's Dictionary - Castle
(1):
(v. i.) To move the castle to the square next to king, and then the king around the castle to the square next beyond it, for the purpose of covering the king.
(2):
(n.) A piece, made to represent a castle, used in the game of chess; a rook.
(3):
(n.) Any strong, imposing, and stately mansion.
(4):
(n.) A fortified residence, especially that of a prince or nobleman; a fortress.
(5):
(n.) A small tower, as on a ship, or an elephant's back.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Castle
CASTLE . 1 . In Genesis 25:16 , Numbers 31:10 , 1 Chronicles 6:54 , an obsolete, if not erroneous, rendering in AV [1] of a word denoting a nomad ‘encampment’ (so RV [2] ).
2 . In 1 Chronicles 11:5 ; 1 Chronicles 11:7 AV [1] speaks of the ‘castle’ of Zion, the citadel or acropolis of the Jebusite city, but RV [2] renders as in 2 Samuel 5:7 ; 2 Samuel 5:9 ‘ stronghold .’ A different word ( birah ) is used of the castle or fort which in Nehemiah’s day defended the Temple ( Nehemiah 2:8 ; Nehemiah 7:2 ), and of the fortified royal residence of the Persian kings at Susa ( Nehemiah 1:1 , Esther 1:2 etc.; RV [2] ‘palace,’ marg. ‘castle’). The fortress in Jerusalem to which the authors of the books of Maccabees and Josephus give the name of Acra, is termed ‘the castle’ in 2Ma 4:27 ; 2Ma 5:5 ; 2Ma 10:20 AV [1] , where RV [2] has throughout ‘citadel’ (so also 1Ma 1:33 and elsewhere). See, further. City, Fortification and Siegecraft, § 4.
A. R. S. Kennedy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lulworth Castle
Dorsetshire, England, built in 1588 and in possession of the Weld family since then. When the Trappists were driven out of France during the Revolution they were received, 1794, in Lulworth Castle, which was built on the site of a former Cistercian monastery confiscated by Henry VIII, and remained there for some years until the foundation of Mount Melleray in Brittany. John Carroll, the first bishop in the United States was consecrated in the chapel of the castle, 1790. The castle was destroyed by fire, 1929.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Castle of Hadrian
A huge circular edifice in Rome, 230 feet in diameter, built by Emperor Hadrian for his tomb in 136, and later converted into a citadel. It is connected with the Vatican quarter by the Bridge of San Angelo, also the work of Hadrian, and formerly contained the Archive of San Angelo founded by Pope Sixtus IV, Pope Leo X, and Pope Clement VIII to preserve the most important documents and titles of possession of the Roman Curia. Transferred to the Vatican in 1798, the collection is still kept separate under the name of Archive of the Castle.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Castle of Sant' Angelo
A huge circular edifice in Rome, 230 feet in diameter, built by Emperor Hadrian for his tomb in 136, and later converted into a citadel. It is connected with the Vatican quarter by the Bridge of San Angelo, also the work of Hadrian, and formerly contained the Archive of San Angelo founded by Pope Sixtus IV, Pope Leo X, and Pope Clement VIII to preserve the most important documents and titles of possession of the Roman Curia. Transferred to the Vatican in 1798, the collection is still kept separate under the name of Archive of the Castle.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Castle, Lulworth
Dorsetshire, England, built in 1588 and in possession of the Weld family since then. When the Trappists were driven out of France during the Revolution they were received, 1794, in Lulworth Castle, which was built on the site of a former Cistercian monastery confiscated by Henry VIII, and remained there for some years until the foundation of Mount Melleray in Brittany. John Carroll, the first bishop in the United States was consecrated in the chapel of the castle, 1790. The castle was destroyed by fire, 1929.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Castle
Proverbs 18:19 (b) This figure describes the position and resentful arguments of an unsaved person whose heart has been hardened through mistreatment and unwise dealings.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Castle
KJV translation for six Hebrew and one Greek word. NAS uses “castle” only for one Hebrew term in 2 Kings 15:25 and Proverbs 18:19 . RSV uses castle in Proverbs 18:19 and for a different Hebrew term in Nehemiah 7:2 . NIV does not use “castle.” See Fortified Cities .
Armon refers to the large, fortified home of the king, often translated palace or citadel ( 1 Kings 16:18 ). The term apparently referred to the massive masonry structures connected with the defense of the palace and possibly of the homes of other leading citizens (Amos 6:8 ; compare Amos 1:4 ). Apparently they served as storehouses for royal treasures and goods taken in battle (Amos 3:10 ). Israel prayed for peace in her fortress, but no fortress gave security from God's anger (Isaiah 25:2 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Hosea 8:14 ). God promised to rebuild the fortified palaces of His people (Jeremiah 30:18 ). The palaces should witness to God's strength (Psalm 48:3 ,Psalms 48:3,48:13-14 ). The wisdom teacher knew a more stubborn defense system than castles—that of humans (Proverbs 18:19 ).
Birah is a late loan word from Accadian and refers to the fortified acropolis, usually built at the highest and most easily defensible part of a city ( Nehemiah 1:1 ; Esther 1:2 ). It referred to the fortress near the Temple in the rebuilt Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:8 ). A military commander ruled the fortress (Nehemiah 7:2 ). The Chronicler used the term for Solomon's Temple (1Chronicles 29:1,1 Chronicles 29:19 ) and used the term in the plural to describe Jehoshaphat's and Jotham's building (2 Chronicles 17:12 ; 2 Chronicles 27:4 ).
Tirah refers to a stone wall used for protection around a camp of tents ( Genesis 25:16 ; Numbers 31:10 ; Psalm 69:25 ; Ezekiel 25:4 ). Compare 1 Chronicles 6:54 ; Ezekiel 46:23 .
Migdal is a defense tower which may stand alone in the countryside as a watchtower ( 1 Chronicles 27:25 ). They were also used to protect vineyards and other crops (Isaiah 5:2 ). A famous migdal crowned one area of Shechem or served as a military outpost for Shechem ( Judges 9:46-49 ). See 2Chronicles 26:9-10,2 Chronicles 26:15 ). Battle axes were used to break down such towers (Ezekiel 26:9 ).
Matsad and metsudah are closely connected to the Canaanite or Jebusite city of Jerusalem that David conquered (2Samuel 5:7, 2 Samuel 5:9 ; 1Chronicles 11:5,1 Chronicles 11:7 ). The metsudah of Zion was probably a military citadel protecting the southeastern hill of Jerusalem, that part Israel called, “city of David.” See Judges 6:2 ; 1 Samuel 23:14 ).
The basic biblical lesson is that Yahweh is our stronghold, refuge, and fortress (Psalm 18:2 ; Psalm 31:3 ).
Parembole is the Greek term for a fortified camp and designated the Roman army barracks or headquarters in Jerusalem ( Acts 21:34 ; Acts 22:24 ; Acts 23:10 ). Hebrews refers to Old Testament offerings burned outside the camp, comparing this to the place of Jesus' suffering and inviting Christians to be willing to suffer outside the camp, accepting disgrace as did Jesus (Hebrews 13:11-13 ). Compare Revelation 20:9 .
Trent C. Butler
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hadrian, Castle of
A huge circular edifice in Rome, 230 feet in diameter, built by Emperor Hadrian for his tomb in 136, and later converted into a citadel. It is connected with the Vatican quarter by the Bridge of San Angelo, also the work of Hadrian, and formerly contained the Archive of San Angelo founded by Pope Sixtus IV, Pope Leo X, and Pope Clement VIII to preserve the most important documents and titles of possession of the Roman Curia. Transferred to the Vatican in 1798, the collection is still kept separate under the name of Archive of the Castle.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Castle
The word παρεμβολή, translated ‘castle’ six times in Acts, meant in the Macedonian dialect an encampment, and in the Septuagint it is used for the camp of the Israelites in the desert (Exodus 29:14, etc.). In the vivid narrative of St. Paul’s arrest in Jerusalem (Acts 21:22) it probably denotes the barracks of the Roman soldiers who were stationed at the castle of Antonia, though the Revised Version as well as the Authorized Version identifies it with the castle itself.
The history of this fort goes back to the time of Nehemiah, who speaks of procuring ‘timber to make beams for the castle (the Bîrah) which appertains to the house’ (2:8; cf. 7:2). Probably on the same site John Hyrcanus, high priest from 135 to 105 b.c., built the Hasmonaean castle which Josephus calls ‘Baris’ (Ant. xv. xi. 4; Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) i. xxi. 1). ‘When Herod became king, he rebuilt that castle, which was very conveniently situated, in a magnificent manner, and because he was a friend of Antonius, he called it by the name of Antonia’ (Ant. xviii. iv. 3). Situated at the corner of the north and west cloisters of the Temple, it commanded, especially from its lofty S.E. tower, a view of the whole sacred precincts, while two staircases (ἀναβαθμοί, Acts 21:35, καταβἀσεις, Jos. Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) v. v. 8) led down from it to the cloisters; and in the Roman period the soldiers of the cohort (σπεῖρα), which was always stationed in the city, ‘went several ways among the cloisters, with their arms, on the Jewish festivals, in order to keep watch over the people’ (Jos. loc. cit.).
The narrator of St. Paul’s arrest was evidently well acquainted with this locality, and he graphically reproduces the details of the scene. News of a Temple riot-no uncommon occurrence-came up (ἀνέβη φἀσις) to the commander of the cohort (χιλίαρχος, ‘military tribune’ Revised Version margin), who at once took soldiers and ran down (κατέδραμεν) to the fanatical crowd, probably just in time to prevent bloodshed (Acts 21:31-32). As St. Paul was about to be conducted up one of the staircases leading to the barracks, he was swept off his feet by the rising human tide, and had literally to be carried out of danger by the soldiers; but, recovering himself on the upper steps, he asked and obtained permission to address the baffled and still raging crowd, who turned a sea of angry faces upon him from below. His beckoning hand and his Aramaic speech secured a temporary silence, which enabled him to tell his vast audience the story of his conversion, but he could not get beyond the fatal word ‘Gentiles’ (Acts 22:21), and, leaving behind him a yelling mob, he was marched into the barracks. Fort Antonia was for some days his place of confinement. Hither came his nephew with a message which saved him from falling into the hands of fanatical conspirators (Acts 23:16), and here Christ Himself seemed to stand by him with words of good cheer (Acts 23:11). From the castle he was taken by night to Antipatris, and thence to Caesarea (Acts 23:31-33).
Literature.-T. Lewin, Life and Epistles of St. Paul3, 1875, ii. 135ff.; Conybeare-Howson, Life and Epistles of St. Paul, 1856, ii. 311ff.; H.A. A. Kennedy, Source of NT Greek, 1895, p. 15; articles ‘Castle’ and ‘Jerusalem’ in Encyclopaedia Biblica , ‘Castle’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) .
James Strahan.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Castle
A military fortress (1 Chronicles 11:7 ), also probably a kind of tower used by the priests for making known anything discovered at a distance (1 Chronicles 6:54 ). Castles are also mentioned (Genesis 25:16 ) as a kind of watch-tower, from which shepherds kept watch over their flocks by night. The "castle" into which the chief captain commanded Paul to be brought was the quarters of the Roman soldiers in the fortress of Antonia (so called by Herod after his patron Mark Antony), which was close to the north-west corner of the temple (Acts 21:34 ), which it commanded.
King James Dictionary - Castle
CASTLE, n.
1. A house fortified for defense against an enemy a fortress. The term seems to include the house and the walls or other works around it. In old writers, the word is used for a town or village fortified. 2. The house or mansion of a nobleman or prince. 3. In a ship, there are two parts called by this name the forecastle, a short deck in the fore part of the ship, above the upper deck and the hindcastle, at the stern. Castle in the air, a visionary project a scheme that has no solid foundation.
CASTLE, In the game of chess, to cover the king with a castle, by a certain move.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sant' Angelo, Castle of
A huge circular edifice in Rome, 230 feet in diameter, built by Emperor Hadrian for his tomb in 136, and later converted into a citadel. It is connected with the Vatican quarter by the Bridge of San Angelo, also the work of Hadrian, and formerly contained the Archive of San Angelo founded by Pope Sixtus IV, Pope Leo X, and Pope Clement VIII to preserve the most important documents and titles of possession of the Roman Curia. Transferred to the Vatican in 1798, the collection is still kept separate under the name of Archive of the Castle.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Castle
[1]
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Castle
* For CASTLE see ARMY (No. 3)

Sentence search

Castled - ) of Castle...
(2):...
(a. ) Having a Castle or Castles; supporting a Castle; as, a Castled height or crag. ) Fortified; turreted; as, Castled walls
Castling - ) of Castle...
(3):...
(n. ) A compound move of the king and Castle. See Castle, v
Uncastle - ) To take a Castle from; to turn out of a Castle
Castellany - ) The lordship of a Castle; the extent of land and jurisdiction appertaining to a Castle
Morro - ) A round hill or point of land; hence, Morro Castle, a Castle on a hill
Castle-Guard - ) The guard or defense of a Castle. ) A tax or imposition an a dwelling within a certain distance of a Castle, for the purpose of maintaining watch and ward in it; Castle-ward
Castellated - ) Furnished with turrets and battlements, like a Castle; built in the style of a Castle
Castle - Castle, n. In a ship, there are two parts called by this name the forecastle, a short deck in the fore part of the ship, above the upper deck and the hindcastle, at the stern. Castle in the air, a visionary project a scheme that has no solid foundation. ...
Castle, In the game of chess, to cover the king with a Castle, by a certain move
Castlet - ) A small Castle
Chatelet - ) A little Castle
Castle - ) To move the Castle to the square next to king, and then the king around the Castle to the square next beyond it, for the purpose of covering the king. ) A piece, made to represent a Castle, used in the game of chess; a rook
Lulworth Castle - When the Trappists were driven out of France during the Revolution they were received, 1794, in Lulworth Castle, which was built on the site of a former Cistercian monastery confiscated by Henry VIII, and remained there for some years until the foundation of Mount Melleray in Brittany. John Carroll, the first bishop in the United States was consecrated in the chapel of the Castle, 1790. The Castle was destroyed by fire, 1929
Castle, Lulworth - When the Trappists were driven out of France during the Revolution they were received, 1794, in Lulworth Castle, which was built on the site of a former Cistercian monastery confiscated by Henry VIII, and remained there for some years until the foundation of Mount Melleray in Brittany. John Carroll, the first bishop in the United States was consecrated in the chapel of the Castle, 1790. The Castle was destroyed by fire, 1929
Bailey - ) The outer wall of a feudal Castle. ) The space immediately within the outer wall of a Castle or fortress
Castlery - ) The government of a Castle
Castle - * For Castle see ARMY (No
Castellan - ) A governor or warden of a Castle
Castellation - ) The act of making into a Castle
Citadel - See Castle
Castle - Castle . ]'>[1] speaks of the ‘castle’ of Zion, the citadel or acropolis of the Jebusite city, but RV Gabbatha - 5) implies that the temple was near the Castle of Antonia, and ( Castle. Therefore, Pilate's hall, which was part of the palace, was near the Castle. 8, it appears a pavement was near the Castle; therefore it was near Pilate's hall
Boyer - ) A Flemish sloop with a Castle at each end
Anto'Nia - (from Marc Antony ) (a square stone fortress or Castle adjoining the northwest corner of the temple area at Jerusalem. From the stairs of this Castle Paul addressed the multitude who had assaulted him ( Acts 21:31-40 ) --ED
Daydream - ) A vain fancy speculation; a reverie; a Castle in the air; unfounded hope
Air-Built - ) Erected in the air; having no solid foundation; chimerical; as, an air-built Castle
Decadency - "The old Castle, where the family lived in their decadence
Johannisberger - ) A fine white wine produced on the estate of Schloss (or Castle) Johannisberg, on the Rhine
Enchanted - ) Under the power of enchantment; possessed or exercised by enchanters; as, an enchanted Castle
David, Tower of - Doubtless part of the Castle in Zion, wherein armour was stored: it is mentioned only symbolically in Song of Solomon 4:4
Burggrave - ) Originally, one appointed to the command of a burg (fortress or Castle); but the title afterward became hereditary, with a domain attached
Antemural - ) An outwork of a strong, high wall, with turrets, in front of the gateway (as of an old Castle), for defending the entrance
Echauguette - See Castle
Donjon - ) The chief tower, also called the keep; a massive tower in ancient Castles, forming the strongest part of the fortifications. of Castle
Tanist - ) In Ireland, a lord or proprietor of a tract of land or of a Castle, elected by a family, under the system of tanistry
Base-Court - ) The secondary, inferior, or rear courtyard of a large house; the outer court of a Castle
Castle - The word παρεμβολή, translated ‘castle’ six times in Acts, meant in the Macedonian dialect an encampment, and in the Septuagint it is used for the camp of the Israelites in the desert (Exodus 29:14, etc. Paul’s arrest in Jerusalem (Acts 21:22) it probably denotes the barracks of the Roman soldiers who were stationed at the Castle of Antonia, though the Revised Version as well as the Authorized Version identifies it with the Castle itself. ...
The history of this fort goes back to the time of Nehemiah, who speaks of procuring ‘timber to make beams for the Castle (the Bîrah) which appertains to the house’ (2:8; Castle which Josephus calls ‘Baris’ (Ant. ‘When Herod became king, he rebuilt that Castle, which was very conveniently situated, in a magnificent manner, and because he was a friend of Antonius, he called it by the name of Antonia’ (Ant. From the Castle he was taken by night to Antipatris, and thence to Caesarea (Acts 23:31-33). 15; articles ‘Castle’ and ‘Jerusalem’ in Encyclopaedia Biblica , ‘Castle’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols)
Alcayde - ) A commander of a Castle or fortress among the Spaniards, Portuguese, and Moors
Moat - ) A deep trench around the rampart of a Castle or other fortified place, sometimes filled with water; a ditch
Canossa - A Castle of Matilda, Countess of Tuscany, 12 miles from Reggio, where Henry IV of Germany did penance in presence of Pope Gregory VII (January 1077). Canossa is now in ruins, the Castle-well and "gate of penance" alone remain
Antonia - It is called "the Castle" (Acts 21:34,37 ). From the stairs of this Castle Paul delivered his famous speech to the multitude in the area below (Acts 22:1-21 )
Dungeon - ) A close, dark prison, common/, under ground, as if the lower apartments of the donjon or keep of a Castle, these being used as prisons
Slander: to be Despised - One of our ancient nobility had inscribed over his Castle gate these words, which we commend to all persons who are thin-skinned in the matter of private gossip or public opinion
Fortress - ) A fortified place; a large and permanent fortification, sometimes including a town; a fort; a Castle; a stronghold; a place of defense or security
Chateau - ) A Castle or a fortress in France
Besiege - To lay siege to to beleaguer to beset, or surround with armed forces, for the purpose of compelling to surrender, either by famine or by violent attacks as, to besiege a Castle or city
Bastile Bastille - ) "The Bastille", formerly a Castle or fortress in Paris, used as a prison, especially for political offenders; hence, a rhetorical name for a prison
Beaufort, Henry Plantagenet - 1377-1447) Cardinal, Bishop of Winchester, born Beaufort Castle, Anjou, France; died Winchester, England
Drawbridge - ) A bridge of which either the whole or a part is made to be raised up, let down, or drawn or turned aside, to admit or hinder communication at pleasure, as before the gate of a town or Castle, or over a navigable river or canal
Bluebeard - ) The hero of a mediaeval French nursery legend, who, leaving home, enjoined his young wife not to open a certain room in his Castle
Macae'Rus, - a Castle of the Herods on the southern border of their Perean dominions, nine miles east of the northern end of the Dead Sea
Frangipani, Lando Dei - Cardinal Hugo captured him in his Castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the monastery of La Cava
Innocent Iii, Anti-Pope - Cardinal Hugo captured him in his Castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the monastery of La Cava
Lando Dei Frangipani - Cardinal Hugo captured him in his Castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the monastery of La Cava
Fastness - ) A fast place; a stronghold; a fortress or fort; a secure retreat; a Castle; as, the enemy retired to their fastnesses in the mountains
Wich - ) A street; a village; a Castle; a dwelling; a place of work, or exercise of authority; - now obsolete except in composition; as, bailiwick, Warwick, Greenwick
Fort - A fortified place usually, a small fortified place a place surrounded with a ditch, rampart, and parapet, or with palisades, stockades, or other means of defense also, any building or place fortified for security against an enemy a Castle
Barbacan - ) A tower or advanced work defending the entrance to a Castle or city, as at a gate or bridge
John Xiv, Pope - After the death of Otto, the pope was incarcerated by the antipope, Boniface VII, in the Castle of Sant' Angelo where he died, possibly by violence
Campanora, Peter - After the death of Otto, the pope was incarcerated by the antipope, Boniface VII, in the Castle of Sant' Angelo where he died, possibly by violence
Hierapolis - , "Cotton Castle", from the white appearance of the cliffs at the base of which the ruins are found
Forecastle - ) A short upper deck forward, formerly raised like a Castle, to command an enemy's decks
Fortress - Any fortified place a fort a Castle a strong hold a place of defense or security
Sligo, Ireland - In early times it was a walled town with a Castle for protection (1242)
Machaerus - John the Baptist was probably cast into the prison connected with this Castle by Herod Antipas, whom he had reproved for his adulterous marriage with Herodias. This Castle stood "starkly bold and clear" 3,860 feet above the Dead Sea, and 2,546 above the Mediterranean
Gilbert, Rosa Mulholland - She was a contributor to numerous magazines among them the "Irish Monthly"; and was the author of several novels including "A Fair Emigrant," "Banshee Castle," "Hetty Grey," "Cynthia's Bonnet Shop," "Father Tim," and "Fair Noreen"; and of a collection of poems, "Spirit and Dust
Antipatris - Here are the remains of a large Castle of the Crusaders, probably to be identified with Mirabel
Thyatira - It is called by that people Ak-hisar, or White Castle
Rosa Gilbert - She was a contributor to numerous magazines among them the "Irish Monthly"; and was the author of several novels including "A Fair Emigrant," "Banshee Castle," "Hetty Grey," "Cynthia's Bonnet Shop," "Father Tim," and "Fair Noreen"; and of a collection of poems, "Spirit and Dust
Stair - These were probably the steps leading down from the Castle of Antonia to the Temple
Bailiff - ) Originally, a person put in charge of something especially, a chief officer, magistrate, or keeper, as of a county, town, hundred, or Castle; one to whom power/ of custody or care are intrusted
Ashdod - Ashdod (ăsh'dŏd), stronghold, Castle
Machicolation - of Battlement and Castle
Military Order of Aviz - 1146;the Castle of Aviz was their headquarters
Order of Aviz - 1146;the Castle of Aviz was their headquarters
Capable - ) Possessing ability, qualification, or susceptibility; having capacity; of sufficient size or strength; as, a room capable of holding a large number; a Castle capable of resisting a long assault
Aviz, Military Order of - 1146;the Castle of Aviz was their headquarters
Caesarea Philippi - It is now called Banias, 33 15' N, 35 41' E , a small village, with the remains of an ancient Castle and other ruins, amid beautiful scenery
Thyatira - , "white Castle
Antonia - It was "the Castle" from which soldiers came down to rescue Paul from the Jews in the temple; and from its stairs he addressed the multitude, Acts 21:31-40
Battering-Ram - A long and solid beam, armed at one end with a metallic ram's-head, was suspended by the middle, and swung violently and repeatedly against the walls of a city or Castle, till a breach was made
Herodias - For this he was "cast into prison," in the Castle probably of Machaerus (q
Rehob - It is now supposed to be represented by the Castle of Hunin, south-west of Dan, on the road from Hamath into Coele-Syria
Arundell, Thomas 1584 - During the absence of her husband, in the spring of 1643, she defended Wardour Castle for eight days with 25 men against a Parliamentary force of 1300
David, City of - This was the name afterwards given to the Castle and royal palace on Mount Zion, as distinguished from Jerusalem generally (1 Kings 3:1 ; 8:1 ), It was on the south-west side of Jerusalem, opposite the temple mount, with which it was connected by a bridge over the Tyropoeon valley
John de Feckenham - 1515;died Wisbech Castle, 1585
Margaret Pole, Blessed - Martyr, Countess of Salisbury, born Castle Farley, near Bath, England, 1473;died East Smithfield Green, 1541
John Xiii, Pope - Upon his election to the Holy See, he was imprisoned in the Castle of Sant' Angelo by the Italian nobles who resented the fact that he was the choice of Emperor Otto I
Castle of Hadrian - Transferred to the Vatican in 1798, the collection is still kept separate under the name of Archive of the Castle
Castle of Sant' Angelo - Transferred to the Vatican in 1798, the collection is still kept separate under the name of Archive of the Castle
John Howman - 1515;died Wisbech Castle, 1585
Howman, John - 1515;died Wisbech Castle, 1585
Hadrian, Castle of - Transferred to the Vatican in 1798, the collection is still kept separate under the name of Archive of the Castle
Salcah - above the surrounding ground, an offshoot from the Bashan mountains, is a strong Castle on the edge of the Euphrates desert, commanding a view of any foe who might approach, almost a day's journey off
Antique - ) Made in imitation of antiquity; as, the antique style of Thomson's "Castle of Indolence
Castle - Castles are also mentioned (Genesis 25:16 ) as a kind of watch-tower, from which shepherds kept watch over their flocks by night. The "castle" into which the chief captain commanded Paul to be brought was the quarters of the Roman soldiers in the fortress of Antonia (so called by Herod after his patron Mark Antony), which was close to the north-west corner of the temple (Acts 21:34 ), which it commanded
Punon - Seetzen heard of a ruined Castle, Fenan (3:17)
Bozrah - This is a village of about fifty houses, on a hill crowned by a small Castle
Sant' Angelo, Castle of - Transferred to the Vatican in 1798, the collection is still kept separate under the name of Archive of the Castle
Laodicea - It is now a deserted place, called by the Turks Eski-hissar or "old Castle
Palace - This term represents several Hebrew words, and may signify Castle, fortress, the king's residence, or any large building
Rook - ) One of the four pieces placed on the corner squares of the board; a Castle
Hierapolis - The white front of the cliffs, above which the city lay, has given it its present name of Pamluke-kaleh, the Cotton Castle
Keep - ) That which keeps or protects; a stronghold; a fortress; a Castle; specifically, the strongest and securest part of a Castle, often used as a place of residence by the lord of the Castle, especially during a siege; the donjon. of Castle
Bury - ) A manor house; a Castle
Beaufort, Pierre Roger de - Born in 1331 in the Castle of Maumont, Limoges, France as Pierre Roger de Beaufort; died Rome, Italy
Gregory xi, Pope - Born in 1331 in the Castle of Maumont, Limoges, France as Pierre Roger de Beaufort; died Rome, Italy
Garrison - A fort, Castle or fortified town, furnished with troops to defend it
Decay - ) Gradual failure of health, strength, soundness, prosperity, or of any species of excellence or perfection; tendency toward dissolution or extinction; corruption; rottenness; decline; deterioration; as, the decay of the body; the decay of virtue; the decay of the Roman empire; a Castle in decay
Oliver Plunket - During the renewed persecmion of the Irish Church, Plunket was arrested, 1679, and imprisoned in Dublin Castle
Hyacinth, Saint 17 Aug - (Greek: purple) ...
Confessor, apostle of the North, born Castle of Lanka, Kamin, Silesia, Poland, 1185; died Krakow, Poland, 1257
Saint Malo, France - Fortified seaport in Ille-et-Vilaine, western France, situated on a granite island communicating with the mainland by a causeway, "Sillon," famous for its cathedral (12th century) and Castle (15th century)
Hedwig, Saint - Widow, Duchess of Silesia, born Andechs Castle, Bavaria, 1174; died Trebnitz, 1243
Bethany - One of our modern travellers tells us, that, at the entrance into it, there is an old ruin, called the Castle of Lazarus, supposed to have been the mansion house where he and his sisters resided. At the bottom of a descent, not far from the Castle, you see his sepulchre, which the Turks hold in great veneration, and use it for an oratory, or place for prayer
Edinburgh, Scotland - The town grew up around the Castle of Malcolm Canmore and his wife, Saint Margaret, who died there in 1093
Edwin's Burgh - The town grew up around the Castle of Malcolm Canmore and his wife, Saint Margaret, who died there in 1093
John o'Reilly - Poet, novelist, and editor, born Douth Castle, Drogheda, Ireland, June 28, 1844; died Hull, Massachusetts, August 10, 1890
o'Reilly, John Boyle - Poet, novelist, and editor, born Douth Castle, Drogheda, Ireland, June 28, 1844; died Hull, Massachusetts, August 10, 1890
Anacletus ii - Emperor Lothair accompanied the true pope to Rome but his opponent entrenched himself in the Castle Sant' Angelo and Innocent was forced to flee to Pisa
Maury, Jean Siffrein - He was suspended by the pope and during the Hundred Days was confined in the Castle of Sant' Angelo, but Consalvi secured his release and brought about a reconciliation with the pope, which he did not long survive
Jean Maury - He was suspended by the pope and during the Hundred Days was confined in the Castle of Sant' Angelo, but Consalvi secured his release and brought about a reconciliation with the pope, which he did not long survive
Gate - A large door which gives entrance into a walled city, a Castle, a temple, palace or other large edifice
Domenis, Marco Antonio de - He finally came into conflict with the Inquisition, was declared a relapsed heretic, and was confined in the Castle of Sant' Angelo, where he died
Marco Antonio de Dominis - He finally came into conflict with the Inquisition, was declared a relapsed heretic, and was confined in the Castle of Sant' Angelo, where he died
Delaware - Jesuits from Bohemia Manor in Maryland established the Apoquiniminck Mission in New Castle County some time before 1750, sending a priest monthly to attend the five or six Catholic families of the vicinity
Hall - ) The chief room in a Castle or manor house, and in early times the only public room, serving as the place of gathering for the lord's family with the retainers and servants, also for cooking and eating
Amber - The Arabic word is rendered by Castle, amber, a marine fish, a shield made of skins, crocus and fimus
Peel - ) A small tower, fort, or Castle; a keep
Elath - The site of Elath, the Ailah and Ælana of the Greeks and Romans, now consists of nothing but extensive mounds of rubbish, near the Castle and village of Akabah
ha'Zor - (castle )
Castle - NAS uses “castle” only for one Hebrew term in 2 Kings 15:25 and Proverbs 18:19 . RSV uses Castle in Proverbs 18:19 and for a different Hebrew term in Nehemiah 7:2 . NIV does not use “castle. The wisdom teacher knew a more stubborn defense system than Castles—that of humans (Proverbs 18:19 )
Johann Pestalozzi - He studied law and took up farming, but was a poor business man, and, after a period of dire poverty, became a schoolmaster at Stanz, 1798, opening a school with normal school attached, at the Castle of Burgdorf, 1799, which he transferred successively to Münchenbuchsee and Yverdun
Ancient - ) Old; that has been of long duration; of long standing; of great age; as, an ancient forest; an ancient Castle
Tema - ...
Teyma, a small town, preserves the name (Themme in Ptolemy 5:19, section 6); commanded by the Castle El Ablak of a Jew Samuel (A. Compare Genesis 25:15, "sons of Ishmael, by their towns and Castles. " The Hebrew however for "castles" may mean "hamlets"; see Speaker's Commentary, Numbers 31:10; from tor "a row," namely, of rude dwellings, of stones piled one on another and covered with tent cloths, like the devars in Algeria
Bury - It signifies a house, habitation or Castle, and is retained in many names of places, as in Shrewsbury, Danbury, Aldermanbury
Pergamos - A large Castle in ruins stands on the highest of three mountains, which environ the town, and many remains of the ancient city still exist
Patmos - Its principal port is a deep bay on the northeast side; the town lying on a high and steep hill, the summit of which is crowned by the old and Castle-like monastery of St
Military Order of Calatrava - The name is derived from that of a Castle recovered from the Moslems by King Alfonso of Castile in 1147
Isabella i - Queen of Castile, born Madrigtti de las Altas Torres, 1451; died Castle of La Mota, Medina del Campo (Valladolid), Spain, 1504
Isabella the Catholic - Queen of Castile, born Madrigtti de las Altas Torres, 1451; died Castle of La Mota, Medina del Campo (Valladolid), Spain, 1504
Calatrava, Military Order of - The name is derived from that of a Castle recovered from the Moslems by King Alfonso of Castile in 1147
Catholic, Isabella the - Queen of Castile, born Madrigtti de las Altas Torres, 1451; died Castle of La Mota, Medina del Campo (Valladolid), Spain, 1504
Caesarea Philippi - Under the ancient Castle of the Crusaders a copious stream issued from a cave, now much choked with fallen fragments of rock, where was the shrine of Pan
Habsburgs - The name was taken from the Castle of Habsburg built on the Aar River in Aargau, Switzerland, by Werner, Bishop of Strasbourg in 1020
Halicarnassus - ‘fortress’), from the Castle of St
Laodicea - It is now in ruins, and the place is called Eskihissar, or the old Castle
Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint - (1090-1153) Confessor, abbot, Doctor of the Church, born Castle Fontaines, near Dijon, France; died Clairvaux, France
Bozrah - Now El-busaireh, containing about 50 houses and a Castle on a hill, in the mountain district S
Brass - Keil and Delitzsch translate, "iron and brass shall be thy Castle" min'al ); Asher's dwellings were to be impregnable as if of iron and brass
Maria of Jesus - Hers was a pious family, and all of them eventually entered religious life in 1618 - her father and brothers became Franciscan brothers, Mary, her mother and sister became Franciscan nuns, the Castle was converted into a convent, and all the family's wealth was given to the poor. ...
Born April 2, 1602 in her family Castle at Agreda, Spain ...
Died May 24, 1665 in Ágreda, Soria, Spain of natural causes; body incorrupt ...
Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Sister Mary, contact...
MM
Gerizim - Anderson within the ruin called "the Castle" excavated the foundations and piers of an octagonal church, probably that built by Justinian. The church and Castle were built on a rough platform of stones without mortar, including the so-called "twelve stones
Agreda, Maria de - Hers was a pious family, and all of them eventually entered religious life in 1618 - her father and brothers became Franciscan brothers, Mary, her mother and sister became Franciscan nuns, the Castle was converted into a convent, and all the family's wealth was given to the poor. ...
Born April 2, 1602 in her family Castle at Agreda, Spain ...
Died May 24, 1665 in Ágreda, Soria, Spain of natural causes; body incorrupt ...
Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Sister Mary, contact...
MM
Kirjath Jearim - Now Kuryet el Enab, "the city of grapes," on the right bank of a long wady, with a fine old church, stone houses grouped round two or three Castle-like houses, the hereditary residences of the family of Abu Ghaush, a marauding chief, amidst olive groves and terraced slopes
Hierapolis - The water is strongly impregnated with alum, and the calcareous deposit which it forms explains the modern name Pambuk-Kalessi (Cotton Castle)
Mary Stuart - A new rebellion broke out thereupon; Mary was imprisoned in Lochleven Castle, but escaped, and after her followers had been defeated at Langside, 1568, fled to England, where she was imprisoned for life by Elizabeth
Jabneel - At the time of the Crusades the Castle Ibelin stood on the site
Antipatris - The crusaders' Castle of Mirabel was built on the foundations of an older edifice; at its foot are the largest springs in Palestine
Piece - ) A Castle; a fortified building
Army - It also denoted a Castle or barracks, Acts 21:34,37 ; 22:24 ; 23:10,16,32
Stuart, Mary - A new rebellion broke out thereupon; Mary was imprisoned in Lochleven Castle, but escaped, and after her followers had been defeated at Langside, 1568, fled to England, where she was imprisoned for life by Elizabeth
Salome - John the Baptist, at that time a prisoner in the dungeons underneath the Castle, was at her request beheaded by order of Herod, and his head given to the damsel in a charger, "and the damsel gave it to her mother," whose revengeful spirit was thus gratified
Guelphs And Ghibellines - The names originated in Germany during the rivalry between the, house of Welf (Bavaria) and the house of Hohenstaufen, whose ancestral Castle was Waiblingen in Swabia
Ghibellines, Guelphs And - The names originated in Germany during the rivalry between the, house of Welf (Bavaria) and the house of Hohenstaufen, whose ancestral Castle was Waiblingen in Swabia
Loyola, Ignatius, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Society of Jesus, born Loyola Castle, Guipuzcoa, Spain, 1491; died Rome, Italy, 1556
Ignatius Loyola, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Society of Jesus, born Loyola Castle, Guipuzcoa, Spain, 1491; died Rome, Italy, 1556
Gerizim - Other ruins of less interest are to be seen on the mountain-top, such as the remains of a Castle and a Byzantine church
Thyati'ra, - (The present name of the city is ak-Hissar ("white Castle")
Tekoa - Now Teku'a; within sight of "the Frank mountain," the site of Herod's Castle, formerly Bethhaccerem; broken columns, heaps of bevelled stones, cisterns,and square foundations of houses, mark the site which is on a broad topped hill, with the remains of a square tower at the N
Jaazer - of Heshbon; a Castle and a large walled pool, the "sea" of Jeremiah 48:32; but Septuagint reads "the cities of Jaazer"
Tiberias - The walls are little more than heaps of ruins, the Castle is much shattered, and the place has an aspect of extreme wretchedness and filth
Praetorium - More can be said in favour of Pilate’s occupation of the Castle of Antonia, which stood to the north-west of the Temple area. The arguments in favour of his adoption of the Castle as his residence have been accepted, amongst recent commentators, by Westcott (on John 18) and Swete (on Mark 15:16); but, on the other hand, Herod’s palace has been preferred by Schürer, Edersheim, Sir C
Praetorium - More can be said in favour of Pilate’s occupation of the Castle of Antonia, which stood to the north-west of the Temple area. The arguments in favour of his adoption of the Castle as his residence have been accepted, amongst recent commentators, by Westcott (on John 18) and Swete (on Mark 15:16); but, on the other hand, Herod’s palace has been preferred by Schürer, Edersheim, Sir C
Bail - ) The outer wall of a feudal Castle
Hans Holbein the Younger - In Windsor Castle is a most valuable collection of his drawings
Reginald Pole - Born in 1500 at Stourton Castle, Staffordshire, England; died at Lambeth Palace in 1558
City - Larger towns and cities were often not only defended by strong outer walls, with towers and gates, but by a citadel or Castle within these limits-a last resort when the rest of the city was taken, Judges 9:46,51
Tiberias - The principal objects of interest are the ruins of a large Castle (possibly Herodian), a very ancient synagogue, and half an hour’s journey to the south the hot springs of Emmaus (the Hammath of Joshua 19:35 ), mentioned by Josephus and Pliny
Hananiah - Governor of ‘the Castle,’ who, together with Hanani, was appointed by Nehemiah to the ‘charge over Jerusalem’ ( Nehemiah 7:2 )
Worth - The Castle is worth defending
Francis Xavier, Saint - Confessor, apostle of the Indies and of Japan, born Castle of Xavier, near Sanguesa, Navarre, Spain, 1506; died Island of Sancian, near the coast of China, 1552
Fenced Cities - David too had "castles" (1 Chronicles 27:25). ...
"The Castle" of Antonia was the citadel of Jerusalem in our Lord's time; it served also to overawe the town, the Roman soldiers occupying it (Acts 21:34)
Pergamos - ) built a beautiful city round an impregnable Castle on "the pine-coned rock
Penuel - Penuel is mentioned also in the history of Gideon, as a place with a strong tower or Castle which Gideon destroyed ( Judges 8:8-9 ; Judges 8:17 ); it may be inferred from this passage that Penuel was a little E
Martin Luther - He withdrew to Wartburg Castle for a year. Luther was interred in the Wittenberg Castle church
Luther, Martin - He withdrew to Wartburg Castle for a year. Luther was interred in the Wittenberg Castle church
Holy Grail, the - To the first class belong: the poetic "Conte del Graal" of Chrestien de Troyes (1180-1240) in which the Grail (not explained) has no religious character and the hero is Percival; "Parzival" by Wolfram von Eschenbach (1205-1215), based on the work of the French Guiot (Kyot), which conceives of the Grail as guarded in a Castle by a special order of knights, Templeisen, who are nourished by its miraculous food-giving power; the Welsh folk-tales or the "Mabinogion" (13th century); and the English poem "Sir Percyvelle" (15th century)
Nicetius, Archbaptist of Treves - For his own defence he built a Castle on a lofty hill overlooking the Mosel
Doors - ...
Psalm 24:7 (a) This is a figure of Heaven as though it were a Castle of magnificent structure into which entrance is made by doors, as was the case in ancient history. The doors of many of those Castles lifted straight up into the air to permit the proper persons to enter
Festus, Porcius - Festus sided with Agrippa against the Jews as to the high wall they built to prevent Agrippa seeing from his dining room in the palace into the temple court, for it hindered the Roman guard also from seeing the temple from the Castle of Antonia during the great feasts
Asher - having a land flowing with oil: Job 29:6), "his shoes" (but Keil translates Castle, min'al ; Maurer, bolt, i
Bar - ) A gatehouse of a Castle or fortified town
Tiberias - There are the ruins of a once imposing Castle at the N. But Castle, walls, and houses were seriously damaged by the earthquakes of 30th Oct
John the Baptist - He was shut up in the Castle of Machaerus (q
Palace - Pilate's residence has been identified with the Castle of Antonia, which was occupied by the regular garrison
Pledge - (Deuteronomy 24:10) Every man's house is his Castle; to enter it therefore is a violation of all right, and especially to enter it in order to oppress
Hold - ) A place of security; a fortified place; a fort; a Castle; - often called a stronghold
Hebron - He describes it as situated on the slope of a mountain, and having a strong Castle
Palace - Modern translations are again divided on the translation of aule: Castle (NRSV); homestead (NAS); house (NIV, TEV); palace (REB, RSV)
City - Every city of any importance, and in particular every royal city, had its Castle , citadel, or acropolis, as the excavations show, to which the inhabitants might flee as a last defence. Indeed the common term for city ( ‘ir ) is often used in this restricted sense; thus the ‘ stronghold of Zion’ is re-named ‘David’s Castle’ or citadel ( 2 Samuel 5:7 , AV John Carroll - He was consecrated in the chapel of Thomas Weld at Lulworth Castle, England, August 15, 1790, by the Right Reverend Charles Walmesley, Vicar Apostolic of London
Carroll, John - He was consecrated in the chapel of Thomas Weld at Lulworth Castle, England, August 15, 1790, by the Right Reverend Charles Walmesley, Vicar Apostolic of London
Smyrna - Traces of it may be seen in descending from the northern gateway of the Castle
Caesarea - ...
The great Castle (Shubeibeh) built partly in the earliest ages still remains the most striking fortress in Palestine
Prison - The prison into which John the Baptist was thrown (Matthew 14:3 ; Matthew 14:10 ) is said by Josephus to have been in the Castle of Machærus
Fortification And Siegecraft - ), the Castle in Tirzah ( 1 Kings 16:18 RV [7] in 2 Samuel 5:9 terms ‘the fort ,’ and in 1 Chronicles 11:5 ‘the Castle of Zion . ); and the Castle of Antonia , on the site of the earlier ‘castle’ of Nehemiah’s day ( Nehemiah 2:8 ; Nehemiah 7:2 RV [1] ), and itself the ‘castle’ of Acts 21:34 ; Acts 22:24 etc. ), the ‘strong holds’ fortified and provisioned by Rehoboam ( 2 Chronicles 11:11 ), the ‘castles and towers’ built by Jotham ( 2 Chronicles 27:4 ), and many more. Sellin laid bare several forts, among them the now famous ‘castle of Ishtar-Washshur,’ in which was found ‘the first Palestinian library yet discovered,’ in the shape of a series of cuneiform tablets containing this prince’s correspondence with neighbouring chiefs
Hierapolis - The white terrace now bears the fanciful name of ‘Cotton Castle’ (Pambuk-Kalessi)
Pavement - In Jerusalem the garrison occupied the Castle of Antonia, within which would be the tribunal used in cases of military discipline, but probably not for the hearing of Jewish complaints and causes
Lion - Over the grave of Bobby Burns in the Castle at Dumfernlin in Scotland there is a wooden canopy upheld by four posts
Pilate, Pontius - After his trial before the Sanhedrin, Jesus was brought to the Roman procurator, Pilate, who had come up to Jerusalem as usual to preserve order during the Passover, and was now residing, perhaps, in the Castle of Antonia, or it may be in Herod's palace
Damascus - The principal public buildings are, the Castle, which is about three hundred and forty paces in length; the hospital, a charitable establishment for the reception of strangers, composing a large quadrangle lined with a colonnade, and roofed in small domes covered with lead; and the mosque, the entrance of which is supported by four large columns of red granite; the apartments in it are numerous and magnificent, and the top is covered with a cupola ornamented with two minarets
Anitipas - John the Baptist exclaiming against this incest, was seized by order of Antipas, and imprisoned in the Castle of Machaerus
Jerusalem - "David took the Castle of Zion, which is the city of David. " "And David dwelt in the Castle, therefore they called it the city of David. We can point to the spot where the Castle of Antonia stood, and thus fix the eastern terminus of the 'second wall. The lower portion of the so-called 'Castle of David' belongs to the time of Herod, if not to an earlier period
Jerusalem - quarter of the city, running up to Antonia, the Castle situated at the N. The fore-court of Antonia must therefore have projected some distance into the present Ḥaram area, and the rock on which the Castle stood, while scarped on the other three sides, must on the S. In Herod the Great’s time the Castle was re-built on a grand scale and strongly fortified. it is evident that the Temple area was at a lower level than the Castle, for stairs led down to the court. By cutting down the cloisters a barricade could be erected to prevent entrance to the Temple courts from the Castle, as was done by the Jews in the time of Florus (a
Quarter - He magnified his own clemency, now they were at his mercy, to offer them quarter for their lives, if they would give up the Castle
Keep - The crown of Stephanus, first king of Hungary,was always kept in the Castle of Vicegrade. A place of confinement in old Castles,the dungeon
Carmel - The ruins of the Castle (Kasr el Birkeh) are still visible, of great strength, with the large beveled masonry characteristic of Jewish architecture
Ethelbert, King of Kent - He also built at "Hrof's Castle," i
Zidon - The fortress, Kal‘at el-Bahr , ‘Castle of the Sea,’ dating from the 13th cent
Antonius - Anthony retired by degrees farther and farther from his native village, fixing his abode first in a tomb, afterwards in a ruined Castle near the Nile
Army - corner of the Temple area (see Castle)
Prison - (1) As the result of the riot in the Temple, set on foot by the fanatical Jews of Asia, he was consigned for a time to the barracks (παρεμβολή, AV_ and RV_ ‘castle’) connected with the fortress Antonia (Acts 21:34), the scene of St
Manaen (2) - There is much to indicate that the lonely ministry in the Castle of Machaerus was not barren of results
Damascus - The mosque just mentioned, a mediæval Castle, and part of the ancient walls, are the principal relics
England - ...
Ecclesiastically the country is governed by the archdioceses of ...
Birmingham Liverpool Southwark Westminster and the dioceses of ...
Arundel and Brighton Brentwood Clifton East Anglia Hallam Hexham and Newcastle Lancaster Leeds Middlesbrough Northampton Nottingham Plymouth Portsmouth Salford Shrewsbury See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy. Wiltshire Bishop's Castle, Shropshire Bishop's Caundle, Dorsetshire Bishop's Cleeve, Gloucestershire Bishop's Fonthlil, Wiltshire Bishop's Frome, Worceswrshire Bishop's Hull, Somersetshire Bishop's Itchington, W...
Hold - A fortified place a fort a Castle often called a strong hold
Philistia - Keratiya in the Philistine country, at the edge of the Negeb or "south country," and now called "castle of the Fenish," i
Temple - The Castle of Antonia, from which, by a secret passageway, the Roman soldiery could be led down into the temple area to preserve order—as notably to rescue Paul, Acts 21:31-32—was situated upon the northwestern corner of the outer cloister, and had four towers with a large interior space
Nineveh - " And the village of Nunia, opposite Mosul, in its name, and the tradition of the natives, ascertains the site of the ancient city, which was near the Castle of Arbela, according to Tacitus, so celebrated for the decisive victory of Alexander the Great over the Persians there; the site of which is ascertained by the village of Arbil, about ten German miles to the east of Nunia, according to Niebuhr's map
Jerusalem - The Castle of Antonia, in our Lord's time, rose above all other buildings in the city, and was protected by the keep in its S. ) The name, which means "the filling," originated probably in the fact that this Castle filled or completed the fortification of the city of David
Manichees - ...
However, the oriental writers cited by D'Herbelot and Hyde, tell us that Manes, after having been protected in a singular manner by Hormizdas, who succeeded Sapor in the Persian throne, but who was not able to defend him, at length, against the united hatred of the Christians, the Magi, the Jews, and the Pagans, was shut up in a strong Castle, to serve him as a refuge against those who persecuted him on account of his doctrine
Jerusalem - An embattled wall, fortified with towers, and a Gothic Castle, encompasses the city all round; excluding, however, part of Mount Zion, which it formerly enclosed. In the western quarter, and in the centre of the city, the houses stand very close; but, in the eastern part, along the brook Kedron, you perceive vacant spaces; among the rest, that which surrounds the mosque erected on the ruins of the temple, and the nearly deserted spot where once stood the Castle of Antonia and the second palace of Herod
Croisade, or Crusade - In pursuit of these chimerical projects, they sold at low prices their ancient Castles and inheritances, which had now lost all value in their eyes. The eighth croisade, in 1279, was headed by the same prince, who made himself master of the port and Castle of Carthage in Africa; but dying a short time after, he left his army in a very ill condition
Gennesaret, Land of - 395–397), and as leading up to a fort or Castle known as Kal’at ibn Ma’an, and still on to the village of Hattin
War - In later times, the temple itself was used as a Castle. We find, even to this day, that the circular edifices of this sort, which are still erected in the solitudes of Arabia Felix, bear their ancient name of Castles or towers
Political Conditions - The new troops destined for the garrison of Jerusalem were ordered not, as before, to leave at Caesarea the medallions of the Emperor that were attached to the military standards, but to proceed in full equipment to their quarters in the Castle of Antonia
John the Baptist - Herod, incensed at this freedom, ordered him into custody, in the Castle of Machoerus; and he was ultimately put to death
Antiochus - Simon Maccabaeus, prince and high priest of the Jews, being treacherously murdered by Ptolemy, his son-in-law, in the Castle of Docus, near Jericho, the murderer immediately sent to Antiochus Sidetes to demand troops, that he might recover for him the country and cities of the Jews
Golgotha - The Castle seems to have been itself a part of the outer ramparts on the north-east, with the north wall of the temple area stretching from it to the east and the second city wall to the north-west
Herod - Thereupon he erected the Castle of Antonia, near the temple, to overawe the disaffected
Caesarea Philippi - 3), and here the Crusaders built a Castle, the ruins of which still stand some fifteen hundred feet above the town, and about a mile and a quarter to the east (Kula’t Subeibeh)
Temple - one concealed passage led to the Castle Antonia, the fortress commanding the temple
Methodists - They then began to visit the sick in different parts of the town, and the prisoners also, who were confined in the Castle
Messiah - The Jews flocked in great numbers to the Castle where he was a prisoner; not only those that were near, but from Poland, Germany, Leghorn, Venice, and other places: they received Sabatai's blessing, and promises of advancement
Reformation - During the confinement of Luther in a Castle near Warburg, the reformation advanced rapidly; almost every city in Saxony embracing the Lutheran opinions
Jerusalem (2) - It is supposed by some authorities that the pool itself did not exist at the period of Christ’s ministry, but as a defence to the Temple enclosure and to the neighbouring Castle of Antonia (wh
Methodists, Protestant - They then began to visit the sick in different parts of the town, and the prisoners also, who were confined in the Castle