What does Canaan mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
כְּנָ֑עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 26
כְּנָֽעַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 20
כְּנַ֔עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 20
כְּנַ֖עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 4
כְּנַ֙עַן֙ the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 3
וּכְנָֽעַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 2
כְנַ֖עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 2
כְנַ֔עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 2
χανάαν the land of Canaan. 2
כְנָֽעַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 2
וּכְנַ֗עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 2
: כְּנָ֑עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 1
--כְּנַ֔עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 1
כְּנַעַן֒ the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 1
כְּנָ֔עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 1
כְּנַ֗עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 1
כְּנַ֡עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 1
כְנָ֑עַן the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine. / the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua. / merchant 1

Definitions Related to Canaan

H3667


   1 the 4th son of Ham and the progenitor of the Phoenicians and of the various nations who peopled the seacoast of Palestine.
   2 the land west of the Jordan peopled by the descendants of Canaan and subsequently conquered by the Israelites under Joshua.
   3 merchant, trader.
   Additional Information: Canaan = “lowland”.
   

G5477


   1 the land of Canaan.
   2 in a narrower sense: the part of Palestine lying west of the Jordan.
   3 in a wider sense: all of Palestine.
   Additional Information: Canaan = “lowland”.
   

Frequency of Canaan (original languages)

Frequency of Canaan (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Conquest of Canaan
The Book of Joshua and the first chapter of the book of Judges describe the conquest of Canaan, which resulted in Israel's settlement in the land of promise.
Historical Setting The Israelite conquest came at a time when Egyptian control of Canaan was weakened. Historians have not been able to pinpoint the time when the conquest of Canaan occurred. The difficulty lies in the fact that the date of the Exodus is uncertain. Scholars have proposed quite a number of dates for this important event. The most commonly accepted period for the Exodus is around 1280 B.C. Such a date would place the conquest at about 1240-1190 B.C. Other scholars prefer to date the Exodus around 1445 B.C., which would suggest that the conquest occurred about 1400-1350 B.C.
While it is not possible to be definitive about the date of the conquest, it is possible to draw some general conclusions regarding the situation of Canaan in the approximate time frame of the conquest. Shortly after 1500 B.C., Egypt subdued Canaan. Canaanite society operated according to a feudal system whereby the kings of city states paid tribute to their Egyptian overlords. The city states were numerous in the heavily-populated Palestinian coastal plain; the mountainous regions were lightly populated. From about 1400 B.C. onward, Egyptian control of Canaan weakened, opening the land up for possible invasion by an outside force.
Joshua's Strategy Joshua led a three-campaign invasion of Canaan. At the close of the wilderness wanderings the Israelites arrived on the plains of Moab in the Transjordan (“beyond the Jordan”). There they subdued two local kings, Sihon and Og (Numbers 21:21-35 ). Some of the Israelite tribes—Reuben, Gad, and half of the tribe of Manasseh—chose to settle in this newly conquered territory (Numbers 32:1 ).
After Moses died, Joshua became the new leader of the Israelites. As God instructed him, Joshua led the people across the Jordan River into Canaan. The crossing was made possible by a supernatural separation of the water of the Jordan (Joshua 3-4 ). After crossing the river the Israelites camped at Gilgal. From there Joshua led the first military campaign against the Canaanites in the sparsely-populated central highlands, northwest of the Dead Sea. The initial object of the attack was the ancient stronghold of Jericho. The Israelite force marched around the city once a day for six days. On the seventh day they marched around it seven times, then blasted trumpets and shouted. In response the walls of Jericho collapsed, allowing the invaders to destroy the city (Joshua 6:1 ).
The Israelites then attempted to conquer the nearby city of Ai, where they met with their first defeat. The reason for the failure was that Achan, one of the Israelite soldiers, had kept some booty from the invasion of Jericho—an action which violated God's orders to destroy everything in the city. After Achan was executed, the Israelites were able to destroy Ai (Joshua 7-8 ).
Not all of the Canaanites tried to resist Israel's invasion. One group, the Gibeonites, avoided destruction by deceiving the Israelites into making a covenant of peace with them (Joshua 9:1 ). Alarmed by the defection of the Gibeonites to Israel, a group of southern Canaanite kings, led by Adoni-zedek of Jerusalem, formed a coalition against the invading force. The kings threatened to attack the Gibeonites, causing Joshua to come to the defense of his new allies. Because of supernatural intervention, the Israelites were able to defeat the coalition. Joshua then launched a southern campaign which resulted in the capture of numerous Canaanite cities (Joshua 10:1 ).
Joshua's third and last military campaign was in northern Canaan. In that region King Jabin of Hazor formed a coalition of neighboring kings to battle with the Israelites. Joshua made a surprise attack upon them at the waters of Merom, utterly defeating his foe (Joshua 11:1-15 ).
The invasion of Canaan met with phenomenal success; large portions of the land fell to the Israelites (Joshua 11:16-12:24 ). However, some areas still remained outside their control, such as the heavily-populated land along the coast and several major Canaanite cities like Jerusalem (Joshua 13:1-5 ; Joshua 15:63 ; Judges 1:1 ). The Israelites struggled for centuries to control these areas.
Israelite Settlement The Israelite tribes slowly settled Canaan without completely removing the native population. Even though some sections of the land remained to be conquered, God instructed Joshua to apportion Canaan to the tribes which had not yet received territory (Joshua 13:7 ). Following the land allotments, Israel began to occupy its territory. Judges 1:1 describes the settlement as a slow process whereby individual tribes struggled to remove the Canaanites. In the final analysis the tribes had limited success in driving out the native population ( Judges 1:1 ). As a result, Israel was plagued for centuries by the infiltration of Canaanite elements into its religion (Judges 2:1-5 ).
Conquest Reconstructions Scholars have proposed varying models for understanding the conquest of Canaan. The previous description of the nature of the conquest and settlement presents a traditional, harmonizing approach to the interpretation of the biblical material. Some scholars have proposed other interpretive models. One is the immigration model, which assumes that there was no real conquest of Canaan but that peoples of diverse origins gradually immigrated into the area after 1300 B.C. They eventually took control of the city states and became the nation of Israel. The difficulty with this model is that it ignores the general biblical picture of God constituting the nation of Israel in the desert and leading them to invade the Promised Land.
Other scholars have put forth a revolt model for understanding the nature of the conquest. This approach suggests that there was no major invasion of Canaan from an outside force but simply the immigration of a small group of people who inspired a revolt of the Canaanite peasants. The result was the overthrow of the feudal city-state kings and the emergence of what became the Israelite nation. This interpretation of the conquest diverges from the biblical record in its claim that the bulk of the population of Israel was made up of former Canaanite peasants. It also reveals a tendency to read back into Israelite history modern Marxist theory about the struggle between classes. The best approach to understanding the conquest of Canaan is one which is rooted in the biblical materials. See Achan ; Ai ; Exodus ; Gilgal ; Jericho ; Joshua .
Bob R. Ellis
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Canaan, Land of
(Semitic: kana, to bow down; hence, lowlands)
Term applied in a limited sense by biblical writers to the northern coast of modern Palestine, or Phenicia; or to the lowland of the Philistines on the southern coast. They identify it more generally with the whole of Western Palestine, including the mountainous districts occupied by the Amorrhites, and enclosed within the generally accepted boundaries of 33 degrees 18 minutes north latitude. On the north, 30 degrees 33 minutes north latitude on the south, the Mediterranean on the west, and the Dead Sea and lower course of the Jordan on the east. According to British surveyors its maximum area was about 9,700 square miles. Among the famous places in what constituted the former country of Chanaan are Jerusalem, the Holy City; Bethlehem, the birthplace of Our Lord; Nazareth, the scene of His private life; Joppe, Hebron, Gaza, and Bersabee. The land has numerous brooks and fountains, fine pasturages, and a most fertile region in the valley of the Jordan. Its famous mountains are Carmel, Gelboe, and Thabor.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Canaan
See Land (of Israel)
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Canaan
The son of Ham, Noah's son. From him sprang the Canaanites. (Genesis 9:18)
Canaan (2)
The land of promise; the glory of all lands. (Ezekiel 20:6) So called, not only on account of its fertility and loveliness in point of situation, but more eminently, in having the special presence of the Lord and his ordinances. And as the temple, and all the services of the temple, were so many types of the Lord Jesus, Canaan might well be called the land of promise, with an eye to Him.
It is well worthy our observation, that while, among all the early writers, both sacred and profane, the very blessed state of Palestine, or Canaan, for we name it by either, extending both the sacred river Jordan as a country, is continually described; later travellers speak of it as a dry, and inhospitable place. Moses, and all patriarchs, Ezekiel; and all the prophets, are praises of Canaan, and all describe it as a land "flowing with milk and honey." A land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and fig trees, and pomegranates. A land of oil, olive and honey; of brooks, and fountains, and depths, that spring out of valleys and hills. "A land" (said Moses) "whose very stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig brass." See Deuteronomy 8:7-9, etc. Ezekiel 20:6; Eze 20:15.
And among profane historians of antiquity we find the like testimonies to those of Holy Writ. Hecat‘us, who lived at the time of Alexander the Great, and who wrote in the reign of Ptolemy, describes Palestine as a most fruitful province. And Pliny speaks of it in a degree of enthusiasm. Jordan was to his view a beautiful river, and the banks of it fruitful to an excess. He describes the palm trees, and the balm of Judah, and the city of Jerusalem, as most lovely indeed!
Modern travellers, however, have given a very different account. The provinces are said by most of them to be barren and unfruitful, and Jerusalem itself to be but a poor city. From these different statements the pious reader will, without my suggestion, feel his mind, I should hope, led to that beautiful observation of the Psalmist, and indeed, to the whole of the many blessed things to the same amount, as are said in that Psalm; "A fruitful land the Lord turneth into barrenness, for the wickedness of them that dwell therein." (Psalms 107:43)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Canaan
From Ham came four main races; Cush (Ethiopia), Mizraim (Egypt), Phut (Nubia), and Canaan (originally before Abraham extending from Hamath in the N. to Gaza in the S.), comprising six chief tribes, the Hittites, Hivites, Amorites, Jebusites, Perizzites, and Girgashites; to which the Canaanites (in the narrow sense) being added make up the mystic number seven. Ten are specified in Genesis 15:19-21, including some on E. of Jordan and S. of Palestine. The four Hamitic races occupied a continuous tract comprising the Nile valley, Palestine, S. Arabia, Babylonia, and Kissia. The Phoenicians were Semitic (from Shem), but the Canaanites preceded them in Palestine and Lower Syria. Sidon, Area, Arvad, and Zemara or Simra (Genesis 15:19-21) originally were Canaanite; afterward they fell under the Phoenicians, who were immigrants into Syria from the shores of the Persian gulf, peaceable traffickers, skillful in navigation and the arts, and unwar-like except by sea.
With these the Israelites were on friendly terms; but with the Canaanites fierce and war-like, having chariots of iron, Israel was commanded never to be at peace, but utterly to root them out; not however the Arvadite. Arkite, Sinite, Zemarite, and Hamathite. The Semitic names Melchizedek, Hamer, Sisera, Salem, Ephrath are doubtless not the original Canaanite names, but their Hebraized forms. Ham, disliking his father's piety, exposed Noah's nakedness (when overtaken in the fault of intoxication) to his brethren. Contrast Shem and Japhet's conduct (compare 1 Corinthians 13:6 and 1 Peter 4:8). Noah's prophetic curse was therefore to reach him in the person of Canaan his son (the sorest point to a parent), on whom the curse is thrice pronounced. His sin was to be his punishment; Canaan should be as undutiful to him as he had been to his father Noah.
In Ham's sin lies the stain of the whole Hamitic race, sexual profligacy, of which Sodom and Gomorrah furnish an awful example. Canaan probably shared in and prompted his father's guilt toward Noah; for Noah's "younger son" probably means his "grandson" (Genesis 9:24), and the curse being pronounced upon Canaan, not Ham, implies Canaan's leading guilt, being the first to expose to Ham Noah's shame. Canaan's name also suggested his doom, from kaanah , "to stoop." Ham named his son from the abject obedience which he required, though he did not render it himself (Hengstenberg). So Canaan was to be "servant of servants," i.e. the most abject slave; such his race became to Israel (1 Kings 9:20-21). Canaan more than any other of Ham's race came in contact with and obstructed Shem and Japhet in respect to the blessings foretold to them.
The Hamitic descent of Canaan was formerly questioned, but is now proved by the monuments. The ancients represent the Canaanites as having moved from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean. Mythology connects the Phoenicians' ancestors Agenor and Phoenix with Belus and Babylon, also with Egyptus, Danaus (the Ethiop), and Libya. The Canaanites acquired the Semitic tongue through Semitic and Hamitic races intermingling. Their civilization and worship was Hamite. The Shemites were pastoral nomads, like Seth's race; the Hamites, like Cain's race were city builders, mercantile, and progressive in a civilization of a corrupt kind. Contrast Israel and the Ishmaelite Arabs with the Hamitic Egypt, Babylon, Sidon, etc. The Canaanites were Scythic or Hamite. Inscriptions represent the Khatta or Hittites as the dominant Scythic race, which gave way slowly before the Aramaean Jews and the Phoenician immigrants.
Some think Canaan means "lowland", from Hebrew kana , "to depress." In Ezekiel 17:4; Isaiah 23:8; Hosea 12:7, Canaan is taken in the secondary sense," merchant," because the Hebrew bears that sense; but that was not the original sense. The iniquity of the Amorites was great in Abraham's time, but was "not yet full" (Genesis 15:16). In spite of the awful warning given by the doom of Sodom and Gomorrah, Canaanite profligacy at last became a reproach to humanity; and the righteous Ruler of the world required that the land originally set apart for Shem, and where Jehovah was to be blessed as the God of Shem (Genesis 9:26), should be wrested from "the families of the Canaanites spread abroad," and encroaching beyond their divinely assigned limits (Genesis 10:18). The Hamite races, originally the most brilliant and enlightened (Egypt, Babylon, Canaan), had the greatest tendency to degenerate, because the most disinclined to true religion, the great preserver of men.
The races of Japhet tend to expand and improve, those of Shem to remain stationary. Procopius, Belisarius' secretary, confirms the Scripture account, of the expulsion of the Canaanites, for he mentions a monument in Tigitina (Tangiers) with the inscription, "We are exiles from before the face of Joshua the robber." Rabbi Samuel ben Nachman says: "Joshua. sent three letters to the Canaanites, before the Israelites invaded it, proposing three things: Let those who choose to fly, fly; let those who choose peace, enter into treaty; let those who choose war, take up arms. In consequence, the Girgashites, fearing the power of God, fled away into Africa; the Gibeonites entered into league, and continued inhabitants of Israel; the 31 kings made war and fell." So the Talmud states, says Selden, the Africans claimed part of Israel's land from Alexander the Great, as part of their paternal possession.
It is an undesigned coincidence that the Girgashites are never named (except in Joshua 24:11, the recapitulation) as having fought against Israel in the detailed account of the wars. They are enumerated in Joshua 24:11 in the general list, probably as having been originally arrayed against Israel (and some may have in the beginning joined those who actually "fought"), but they withdrew early from the conflict; hence elsewhere always the expression is "the Lord cast out the Girgashite," "He will drive out the Girgashite" (Deuteronomy 7:1; Joshua 3:10; compare Genesis 15:21; Nehemiah 9:8). The warnings given to Israel against defiling themselves with the abominations of the previous occupiers of Canaan show that the Israelites were not ruthless invaders, but the divinely appointed instruments to purge the land of transgressors hopelessly depraved.
Leviticus 18:24; "Defile not yourselves in any of these things, for in all these the nations are defiled that I cast out before you, and the land itself vomiteth out her inhabitants." The Canaanites had the respite of centuries, the awful example of the cities of the plain, and the godly example of Abraham, Melchizedek, and others; but all failed to lead them to repentance. The Israelites, in approaching the cities of the seven doomed nations, were to offer peace on condition of their emigrating forever from their own country, or else renouncing idolatry, embracing the Noachian patriarchal religion, resigning their land and nationality, and becoming slaves. But "there was not a city that made peace with the children of Israel save the Hivites, the inhabitants of Gibeon; all other they took in battle. For it was of the Lord to harden their hearts that they might come against Israel in battle, that He might destroy them utterly and that they might have no favor, but that He might destroy them" (Joshua 11:18-20).
All admit that the execution of the law's sentence on a condemned criminal is a duty, not a crime. That God may permit the innocent to suffer with the guilty is credible, because He does constantly in fact and daily experience permit it. The guilty parent often entails on the innocent offspring shame, disease, and suffering. A future life and the completion of the whole moral scheme at the righteous judgment will clear up all such seeming anomalies. The Israelites with reluctance executed the divine justice. So far was the extermination from being the effect of bloodthirstiness, that as soon as the terror of immediate punishment was withdrawn they neglected God's command by sparing the remnant of the Canaanites. The extermination of idolatry and its attendant pollution was God's object. Thus even a Hebrew city that apostatized to idolatry was to be exterminated (Deuteronomy 13).
The Israelites by being made the instruments of exterminating the idolatrous Canaanites were made to feel Jehovah's power to make man the instrument of punishing idolatry, and so were impressed with a salutary terror, preparing them for being governed without further miraculous interposition. Their constitution, encouraging agriculture, prohibiting horses, and requiring their attendance at the one house of God thrice a year, checked the spirit of conquest which otherwise the subjugation of Canaan might have engendered. Humanity and mercy breathe through the Mosaic law (Exodus 23:4-5; Exodus 23:9; Exodus 23:11; Exodus 22:22-24). (See Graves, Pentateuch.) The Canaanites' first settlement in Palestine was on the Mediterranean, in the region of Tyre and Sidon; thence they spread throughout the land.
A great branch of the Hittites in the valley of the Orontes is mentioned in inscriptions concerning the wars of Egypt with Assyria. (See EGYPT.) In Genesis 12:6 "the Canaanite was then in the land" is no gloss (as if it meant the Canaanite was STILL in the land), nor proof of the Pentateuch's composition after Israel had driven them out, but implies that the aboriginal peoples (compare Genesis 14:5-7) were by this time dispossessed, and the Canaanite settlers ALREADY in the land (compare Genesis 13:7). Canaan is in Scripture made the type of the heavenly land of rest and inheritance (Hebrews 4:1-11). We must win it only under the heavenly Joshua, Jesus the Captain of our salvation, and by faith, the victory that overcomes the world and extirpates sin, self, and Satan (1 John 4:4-5; 1 John 5:4-5).
The new heaven and earth, purged of all them that offend, shall be the portion of those who, like Caleb and Joshua, have previously in faith trodden the earth occupied by the ungodly, of whom the Canaanites are the type. The lowland especially was the country of the Canaanites; the plains between the Mediterranean on one side, and the hills of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim on the other; the shephelah , or low hills of Philistia, on the S.; the plain of Sharon and seashore between Jaffa and Carmel; that of Esdraelon, or Jezreel, behind the bay of Acta; that of Phoenicia containing Tyre and Sidon (Joshua 13:2-4). The Jordan valley, Arabah, now the Ghor, reaches from the sea of Chinneroth, or Galilee, to the S. of the Dead Sea, 120 miles, with a breadth from eight to 14; this, the most sunken region in Palestine, also was occupied by the Canaanite; Amalek occupied the S. region between Egypt and Palestine.
So too, Genesis 10:18-20, the border of the Canaanites was the seashore from Sidon on the N. to Gaza on the S., and on the E. the Jordan valley to Sodom, Gomorrah, and Lasha (Callirhoe) by the Dead Sea. The Amorites occupied the mountainous country between (Joshua 11:3; Numbers 13:29). The chariots of iron could be used in the Canaanites' plains, but not in the mountains. So we find them in the upper Jordan valley at Bethshean, Esdraelon (Jezreel), Taanach, Ibleam, Megiddo, the Sharon plain, Dor, the Phoenician Accho and Sidon (Joshua 17:16; Zechariah 9:9-10; Judges 4:3. Canaan in the larger sense is used for the whole country. The Arabah, reaching from the foot of mount Hermon to the gulf of Akabah, is the most remarkable depression on the earth.
The Jordan, rising in the slopes of Hermon, spreads out in the waters of Merom 126 feet above the level of the ocean; after ten miles' swift descent it enters the sea of Chinneroth, 650 feet below the ocean. From this the gorge holds the average breadth of ten miles, the river at last losing itself in the Dead Sea, the surface of which is 1,312 feet below the sea level, and the depth 1,300 feet below the surface. The ascent of Akrabbim (scorpions, Joshua 15:3) or else mount Halak, a range of low cliffs, crosses the valley eight miles S. of the Dead Sea; thence the valley at a greater height gradually leads to Akabah. The plain or circle of Jordan on which Sodom and Gomorrah stood was probably, according to Grove, at the N. cud of the Dead Sea, but (See GOMORRAH.) Grove states there are no clear traces of volcanic action there, nor in the Holy Land or near it, except in the Leja, or Argob.
God's promise to Abraham was, "Unto thy seed have I given this land from the river of Egypt unto the great river the river Euphrates, the Kenites, the Kenezites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaims, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites" (Genesis 15:18-21). "The river (nahar ) of Egypt" is the Nile, or Sihor, here representing (according to Grove) Egypt in general, as "Euphrates" represents Assyria (compare Isaiah 8:7-8). The Israelite kingdom even in Solomon's time did not literally reach to the Nile. The truth seems to be, his kingdom is but the type of the Israelite kingdom to come (Acts 1:6), when Messiah her Prince shall be manifested (1 Kings 4:21; 2 Chronicles 9:26; compare Ezekiel 48; Psalms 72:8; Numbers 34:5). "The border shall fetch a compass from Azmon unto the river (nachal ) of Egypt."
The nachal , or brook, here is distinct from nahar above. The brook is generally thought to be the wady el Arish, the S.W. bound of the Holy Land. So also Joshua 15:4. But Joshua 13:3 expressly mentions Sihor, "the black turbid river," Nile, as the ultimately appointed border; this extended dominion twice foretold (for the simple language in histories as Genesis and Joshua hardly sanctions Grove's view that the river represents merely Egypt, in general), and so accurately defining the limits, awaits Israel in the last days (Isaiah 2:11; Judges 1:19). In Exodus 23:31, "I will set thy bounds from the Red Sea even unto the sea of the Philistines (the Mediterranean), and from the desert (Paran and Shur) to the river" (Euphrates), the immediate territory of Israel in the Old Testament is assigned. So Deuteronomy 11:24; Joshua 1:4.
Solomon accordingly possessed Tiphsah, the old ford of Euphrates on the N., and on the S. Ezion Geber and Elath, the Edomite ports of the Red Sea. In Numbers 34:1-12 the bounds of Canaan W. of Jordan are given from "the entrance of Hamath" between Lebanon and Antilebanon on the N., to Edom on the S. In Deuteronomy 1:7 the natural divisions are given, THE PLAIN, THE HILLS, THE VALE, THE SOUTH, THE SEASIDE; THE WILDERNESS also is mentioned (Joshua 12:8), and the SPRINGS OF PISGAH (Deuteronomy 3:17). Thus there are in all seven physical divisions. THE SOUTH, or THE NEGEB, containing 29 cities (Joshua 15:21-32), extended from mount Halak to a line from N.E. to S.W., a dry and thirsty land (Psalms 126:4), liable to whirlwinds (Isaiah 21:1; Isaiah 30:6).
The WILDERNESS (midbar ) of Judah, N.W. of the Dead Sea, had but six cities (Joshua 15:61-62). The Hills (har ), from the WILDERNESS to the S. of Lebanon, were once the home of the Hittites, Jebusites, and Amorites (Numbers 13:29); the cities are enumerated in Joshua 15:48-60. The hill country abounds in traces of terraces which once kept up the soil on the side of the gray limestone, for tillage and vines. Also marks of forests, which must have caused there to be then much more of fertilizing rain than now. The fertility improves continually as one goes northward, and the valleys and uplands of Galilee are beautiful, and the slopes of Carmel park-like.
THE VALLEY, or LOW HILLS (shephelah ), is the fertile region between the HIGHER HILLS and the coast, from Carmel to Gaza; including Philistia on the S. and the beautiful plain of Sharon from Joppa to Carmel on the N. Part of the shephelah was called Goshen, from its resembling in fertility the old Goshen at the mouth of the Nile (Joshua 10:41; Joshua 11:16); it perhaps contained Beersheba. THE SEA COAST is that N. of Carmel between Lebanon and the sea. The portion N. of Accho Israel never gained, but S. of Accho David gained by the conquest of the Philistines (Judges 1:31). THE PLAIN or CHAMPAIGN (the Arabah, Joshua 18:18, i.e. "the sterile place ") originally (Deuteronomy 2:8, where "the plain" is the ARABAH; compare Deuteronomy 1:1) comprehended the whole valley from Lebanon to the gulf of Akabah. The Arabs call its N. part the Jordan valley, the Ghor, and the part S. of the Holy Land wady el Arabah.
The SPRINGS OF (ASHDOTH) PISGAH may represent the peculiarly fertile circle round the head of the Dead Sea, on both sides of the Jordan (compare Joshua 10:40; Joshua 12:3; Joshua 12:8; Deuteronomy 3:17; Deuteronomy 4:9). The land, as receiving its blessings so evidently by the gift of God, not as Egypt by the labor of man, and as being so continually by its narrowness within view of the desert, was well calculated to raise Israel's heart in gratitude to her divine Benefactor. It lay midway between the oldest world kingdoms, on one side Egypt and Ethiopia, on the other Babylon, Assyria, and India; then it had close by the Phoenicians, the great traffickers by sea, and the Ishmaelites the chief inland traders. So that though separated as a people dwelling alone, (Numbers 23:9) on the N. by mountains, by the desert on one hand, and by an almost harborless sea on the other, from too close contact with idolatrous neighbors, it yet could act, with a powerful influence, through many openings, on the whole world, if only it was faithful to its high calling.
"Instead of casting the seed of godliness on the swamps, God took in a little ground to be His seed plot. When His gracious purpose was answered, He broke down the wall of separation, and the field is now the world (Matthew 13:38)." The long valley between the ranges of Lebanon, the valley of El Bukaa, leading to "the entering in of (i.e. to Palestine by) Hamath," opened out Palestine on the N. Roman roads, and the harbor made at Caesarea, at the exact time when it was required, made avenues for the gospel to go forth from Judaea into all lands. Tristram remarks, What has been observed of the physical geography of Palestine holds equally true of its fauna and flora. No spot on earth could have been selected which could have better supplied the writers of the book, intended to instruct the men of every climate, with illustrations familiar cue or other of them to dwellers in every region.
Ganneau derives the modern fellaheen from the Canaanites, arguing from their language, manners, customs, and superstitious, and the analogy which there is between Joshua's invasion and that of Caliph Omar. This view explains those prophecies which speak of those ancient nations existing in the last days and being then destroyed by God (Isaiah 11:14; Jeremiah 48; 49; Daniel 11:41). The Israelite invaders as shepherds could not at once have become agriculturists, but would compel the subject Canaanites to until for them the land. The "places" (maqowm ) which God commanded Israel to destroy, where the Canaanites "served their gods upon the high mountains, and hills, and under every green tree" (Deuteronomy 12:2), exactly answer to the fellaheen 's Arabic makam (the same word as in Deuteronomy) in Palestine, or Mussulman kubbehs with little white topped cupolas dotted over the hills. Their fetishism also for certain isolated trees marks the site of the Canaanite worship which God forbade; an oath on their local sanctuary is far more binding to them than on the name of God.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canaan
CANAAN . See next art.; Ham, Palestine.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Canaan, History And Religion of
The territory between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River reaching from the brook of Egypt to the area around Ugarit in Syria or to the Euphrates. This represents descriptions in Near Eastern documents and in the Old Testament. Apparently, Canaan meant different things at different times. Numbers 13:29 limits Canaanites to those who “dwell by the sea and by the coast of Jordan.” Compare Joshua 11:3 . Israel was aware of the larger “Promised Land” of Canaan (Genesis 15:18 ; Exodus 23:21 ; Numbers 13:21 ; Deuteronomy 1:7 ; 1 Kings 4:21 ; etc.) Israel's basic land reached only from “Dan to Beersheba” (2Samuel 24:2-8,2 Samuel 24:15 ; 2 Kings 4:25 ). At times Israel included land east of Jordan (2 Samuel 24:5-6 ). At times the land of Gilead was contrasted to the land of Canaan (Joshua 22:9 ). After the conquest, Israel knew “there remaineth yet very much land to be possessed” (Joshua 13:1 ). Canaan thus extended beyond the normal borders of Israel, yet did not include land east of the Jordan. At times land of Canaanites and land of Amorites are identical. Whatever the land was called, it exercised extraordinary influence as the land bridge between Mesopotamia and Egypt and between the Mediterranean and the Red Sea.
History The word Canaan is not a Semitic name, although its appearance about 2300 B.C. in the Ebla texts attests to its antiquity. Because of the final “n,” it has been conjectured to be a Hurrian form. Quite probably the name was derived from a merchant designation; certainly Canaanite was ultimately equated in the biblical text with “trader” or “merchant” (Zechariah 14:21 ). Isaiah 23:8 uses Canaanites as a common noun meaning “merchants” or traders as the aristocracy to Tyre in the prophet's day. Similar association may be found in passages such as Hosea 12:7-8 ; Ezekiel 17:4 ; Zephaniah 1:11 . Canaan's identity as merchants probably goes back to a time when Canaan was limited to the area of Phoenicia, the rather small and narrow country along the seacoast of Canaan. Phoenicia was particularly known for a special purple dye produced from crushed mollusks. This product was shipped throughout the Mediterranean world. The word Canaan may be related to the special colored dye.
The biblical genealogical references are not particularly helpful in clarifying our understanding of Canaan. According to Genesis 9:18 and Genesis 10:6 , Canaan was a son of Ham, one of the three sons of Noah. Genesis 10:15-20 clarifies the implications of this Hamitic descent in the sons of Canaan: Sidon, Heth, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgasites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Si-nites, the Arvadites, and Zemarites, and the Hamathites. All of these peoples are charactizerized by being generally within the Egyptian sphere of influence.
Settlement within the land of Canaan is attested from Paleolithic times. Further, a Semitic presence in the area is evidenced at least by 3000 B.C. Some of the best examples of cities indicating Semitic influences are Jericho, Megiddo, Byblos, and Ugarit.
The best attested period in Canaanite history is the Bronze Age (ca. 3200-1200 B.C.). During the Old Kingdom (ca. 2600-2200 B.C.), Egypt's power extended as far northward as Ugarit. From recoveries at several sites including Byblos and Ugarit, it is clear that Egypt controlled the area during the period of the Twelfth Dynasty. 1990-1790 B.C.). From this general time period come the Egyptian Execration Texts which list peoples and princes of the area who owe their allegiance to Egypt. Egyptian control over Canaan waned, being withdrawn about 1800.
Canaan had to contend with other aggressors besides Egypt. Approximately 2000 B.C., the Amorites invaded the area, having migrated via the Fertile Crescent from the southern Mesopotamian Valley. In addition, the Canaanites were beset by the Hyksos, who controlled Egypt from 1720 until 1570. Hurrians and Hittites also sought control of Canaan. The mingling of so many cultural influences still resulted in a rather unified culture.
When the Egyptians were able to expel the Hyksos in the sixteenth century, the Egyptians were able to extend their power over Canaan. Again, however, Egyptian power weakened. By 1400, a number of small, established nations in the area struggled with each other. From the fourteenth century the Amarna Letters are derived. These are approximately 350 letters written in cuneiform Akkadian. They represent correspondence between the Egyptian court at Tell el-Amarna and numerous Canaanite cities, including Jerusalem, Megiddo, and Shechem. These letters indicate the unrest characteristic of these Canaanite principalities socially and politically.
Prior to Israel's entrance into Canaan, the country seems to have been organized around major cities creating rather small principalities. There was apparently no attempt to organize centrally for defense, thus making possible the success the Israelites enjoyed in the thirteenth century and the parallel success of the Philistines in the twelfth century. The biblical evidence is scant for any type of concerted Canaanite aggression against the Israelites. Stories in the book of Joshua (Genesis 9:1-2 ; Genesis 10:1-5 ) indicate that in emergency situations the independent city-state kings formed defense coalitions, but no one had power to unite all Canaan against Israel. In the Book of Judges only one Judge, namely Deborah (Judges 4-5 ), is depicted as having fought against the Canaanites. Rather than struggling with each other after the conquest, the Canaanites and Israelites gradually melded together, a phenomenon essentially completed by the end of David's rule.
The most significant finds have been the cuneiform tablets discovered in the royal library and/or temple in Ugarit. These tablets date from ca. 1400 B.C., near the final fall of Ugarit in ca. 1200 B.C. Their portrayal of the deities and religious perspectives represent Canaanite thought between 2000,1500 B.C.
The Pantheon A pantheon of deities was worshiped at Ugarit. On the one hand, each deity had a clear duty assignment, while on the other hand considerable fluidity flowed in deity perception. The role(s) of any given deity might be assumed by another.
El was acknowledged as the titular head of the pantheon. As king of the gods, he was both the creator god and a fertility god. He had earlier been more strongly associated with fertility than was true in the fourteenth century, although he was still depicted in the form of a bull. El lived at some distance from Ugarit upon a mountain (Mt. Saphon) located to the north.
El was joined by Athirat, apparently his wife, who is represented in the Old Testament as Asherah, with both feminine (Asheroth) and masculine (Asherim) plurals. Athirat was acknowledged as the mother of the deities, having given birth to some seventy gods and goddesses. Thus, she was predominately a fertility goddess and designated “creatress of the gods.”
Baal was the chief god in the popular worship of the people. Baal means “master” or “lord” and could refer to any one of the numerous Baalim (Baals) who had authority in various locations. The Ugaritic Baal, however, referred to the ultimate Baal!
Whereas El was located at some distance from the people, Baal was easily accessible. Baal statues have been recovered. These depict Baal wearing a conical hat with horns that conveys the strength and fertility associated with bull imagery. In his right hand Baal holds a club that represents his military strength as well as thunder. In his left hand he grasps a stylized lightening bolt which symbolizes his role as a storm god. He is sometimes portrayed as seated on a throne, indicating his authority as king of gods.
Baal was joined in his task by Anat, represented in the Bible as Anath. She was portrayed as both sister and consort of Baal. In her role she was both goddess of love, the perpetual virgin, and the goddess of warfare, whose exploits in Baal's behalf were sometimes remarkably cruel.
As Baal gradually supplanted El, many of the prerogatives earlier associated with El were naturally transferred to Baal. The biblical text derives from the period when this symbolic struggle between the deities had in essence been accomplished. Thus in the Bible Baal is often depicted with Asherah (i.e., Athirat) rather than Anath (i.e., Anat), as in Judges 3:7 (NIV).
Two additional gods fulfilled important roles in the popular mythology. Mot was the god of death and sterility. (In the Hebrew language the word for death is also mot.) Mot was associated with death, whether that refers to the seasonal cycle of vegetation, the sabbatical understanding of a seventh year of agricultural rest, or in some fashion to the individual's death. Mot was clearly understood as a power capable of rendering impotent Baal's regenerative powers.
Yam was called both “Prince River” and “Judge River.” (Again, the Hebrew word for sea is Yam.) In the Ugaritic texts Yam was the chaotic god of the sea, capable of turning cosmos into chaos. The people of Ugarit, like their Mesopotamian counterparts (and unlike the Egyptians), apparently recognized both their dependency upon as well as the dangers associated with water. Cultically, the fear of chaos overcoming cosmos was represented in Baal's struggle with Yam.
This sampling of some of the more important members of the pantheon indicates that the Uga-ritic schema, and thus that of the Canaanites in general, offered abundant options for worship. The mode of worship was tied especially to procreative sympathetic magic. The sexual union of god and goddess assured the fertility of mankind, the animals, and the larger world of nature. Crucial for this mode of worship was the worshiper's possibility to assist the process via sympathetic magic. In the temple a male priest or devotee fulfilled the god role, and the female priestess or devotee fulfilled the goddess role. These two individuals became for the moment as god and goddess. In sympathetic magic, humans ordain when and how the god and goddess act. This mode of human arrogance undergirded the tower of Babel story in Genesis 11:1 . Practically all ancient worship structures operated from such a fertility-sympathetic magic orientation. The Israelites encountered this thought pattern when they entered Canaan. It took many centuries (note King Josiah's removal from the Jerusalem Temple about 621 B.C. of the vessels made for Baal and Asherah as well as the houses of the male cult prostitutes — 2 Kings 23:1 ) for Israel in daily practice of popular religion to resist Canaanite practices. The teachings of inspired leaders and the actual practice of religion often stood in stark contrast.
Canaanite Mythology The seven tablets upon which the Ugaritic mythological material was found is often mutilated, frequently making difficult an assured rendering of the material.
The mythology apparently centered around three primary exploits of Baal. Through these events he established himself as the god of supreme power within the pantheon, built the palace or temple which he merited by virtue of his victory over Yam, and in the third scenario struggled with, succumbed to, and ultimately escaped from the clutches of Mot.
El is portrayed as having been unashamedly afraid of Yam, this chaotic god of the sea. In fact, El was so frightened that he hid beneath his throne, fearful himself to encounter Yam but encouraging anyone to come forward who would confront this agent of chaos. Eventually, following some negotiations having to do with his role if successful against Yam, Baal stepped forward and proceeded to engage Yam. Baal was successful, bringing Yam under control by dividing him and thus making helpful an otherwise destructive, chaotic force. By this act Baal demonstrated himself worthy of exaltation.
The second mythological sequence emphasized that Baal was now worthy of his own palace or temple. Given the cyclic view of reality and the recurring danger posed by Yam, it is understandable that Baal did not want any windows in his palace. After all, the threat of chaotic flooding would surely occur again, for such recurrence is characteristic of mythological thought. Eventually Baal was convinced otherwise. Anat secured El's permission to build the palace, and the master craftsmen erected the structure. Baal opened the completed palace to all the pantheon for a type of sacred meal. During the meal, Baal opened one of the windows and bellowed out the window, surely understood as an indication of thunder's origin, given Baal's association as god of the storm.
All should be well, but Baal had one more enemy to confront, Mot. According to the mythology, the two met in battle. Baal was defeated, being consigned thereby to the nether world. When Baal was separated from Anat, sterility reigned on earth. The wadis dried up, and Anat anxiously searched for Baal. While she could not find Baal, one day she chanced upon Mot. She had with her a blade with which she cut Mot into many pieces, which pieces she then sifted, with the remains being scattered across the ground, probably an allusion to some type of grain festival. Regardless, this action by Anat enabled Baal to escape from his confinement. Rapidly thereafter, fertility returned! Thus the full cycle has been traversed, whether the intent be the annual cycle experienced in the world of nature, the seven-year sabbatical cycle, or perhaps the human birth-to-death cycle. What is transparent is the cyclic nature of the highly sensual, sympathetic magic worship. The Israelites were forced to contend with this mythology upon their entrance to Canaan. They faced a worship structure which had proved itself successful in the view of the Canaanites. Apparently, the Israelites had to offer in exchange a non-agrarian wilderness God who had no record of success in agriculture!
Old Testament Relationships The Israelites settling into Canaan were not impervious to their surroundings. In the Ancient Near East people assumed that as a people migrated from one area to another they would take over the gods and religion of the new area in which they settled. At the least, they would incorporate the new religion into their own old religious structure. After all, these gods and goddesses had demonstrated their capability in meeting the inhabitants' needs. For the Israelites the most natural thing would have been to embrace Baalism, although perhaps not to the exclusion of Yahwism.
Strong argument can be made that a type of Yahwism — Baalism synthesis gradually established itself, particularly in the Northern Kingdom. During the period of Joshua and the Judges, a cultural struggle was waged which had to do more with the conflict between wilderness (Israelite) and agrarian (Canaanite) cultural motifs than between Yahweh and Baal. As earlier indicated, in the Book of Judges only one Judge, Deborah, is depicted as fighting directly against the Canaanites. Another judge could be called Jerabaal (Judges 6:32 ), having a father with an altar to Baal (Judges 6:25 ). Without leadership Israel worshipped Baal-berith (“Baal of the covenant”) mixing Baalism with the covenant of Yahweh (Judges 8:33 ).
The early monarchical period demonstrates the same type of syncretistic behavior. Saul assuredly did not struggle to eliminate Baalism, and he even named a son Eshbaal (“man of Baal,” 1 Chronicles 8:33 ). Jonathan had a son, Merib-baal (1 Chronicles 8:34 ). In like manner David named a son Beeliada (“Baal knows,” 1 Chronicles 14:7 ). Solomon was even more of a syncretist. Solomon's crowning glory, the Temple, was designed and built by Canaanite architects. In such an atmosphere lines of demarcation were loosely drawn. Solomon's politically-motivated marriages brought many other gods and their worship into Jerusalem (2 Kings 11:1-8 ).
Following Solomon's death and the disruption of the United Monarchy, the identity crisis continued in both north and south, but not as much in the south as in the north. Judah was the base for worship of Yahweh and the site of the Jerusalem Temple. In addition, Judah was geographically isolated from the northern Canaanite area where Baalism was more regularly practiced.
In Israel, however, the initial king, Jeroboam I (922-901 B.C.), erected rival shrines to the Jerusalem Temple at Dan and Bethel. These shrines, in the shape of bulls, are viewed by most scholars as being associated in some fashion with Baalism (recall that both El and Baal could be represented in the form of a bull). Regardless, the adherence to Jeroboam's shrines was for the biblical writers the mark of apostasy for Israel's kings.
During the Omrid Dynasty, Ahab (869-850 B.C.) married Jezebel, a princess from Tyre, as a sign of the diplomatic relationship between Israel and Tyre. Jezebel brought the clearest infusion of Baalism into Israel. Amidst the building of a Baal temple in the capital city of Samaria and the persecution of Yahweh's prophets, the prophet Elijah emerged on the scene. In a classical story of cultural confrontation, Elijah encouraged a contest atop Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18-19 ). On the one hand, the contest was an attempt to determine which deity could give the life-giving rain. On the other hand, it had a much greater significance. It clarified that a person must worship either Yahweh or Baal. It was not possible to worship both, for Yahweh demanded exclusive allegiance.
The struggle Elijah initiated with this either-Yahweh-or-Baal imperative, King Jehu (842-815) carried forward politically. Religiously, in the Northern Kingdom, Hosea gave voice to the anti-Baalistic message.
In the South, two kings led the anti-Baalistic struggle. Hezekiah (715-687 B.C.) is remembered as a reforming king (2 Chronicles 29-31 ), Josiah (640-609 B.C.) was the reformer par excellence.
Judah also had its vocal prophetic spokesmen against Baalism. Isaiah about 740-700 addressed the issue. Jeremiah from 615 B.C. onwards issued the strongest denunciation of Baalism.
The Baalistic Canaanites influenced Israel in many ways: Temple construction, sacrificial rituals, the high places, a rejection of any sexual motif as a worship instrument (Deuteronomy 23:17-18 ), and a lessening of the purely mythical with a concomitant emphasis upon the historical happening as with Yahweh's splitting of the sea (Yam Suph) rather than a struggle with a mythological Yam(Exodus 14-15 ).
It is too easy for the biblical interpreter to focus on the numerous ways that Israel found the Canaanite religion to be offensive. In some cases, such as the use of sex in worship, the level of antipathy witnessed in the Old Testament may not always have characterized Israel's actual practice, as prophetic denouncements like Hosea's show. The marked hostility. Deuteronomy 20:16-18 ) which clamored for the wholesale destruction of the Canaanites came from inspired religious leaders who did not represent the majority of Israel's population. A priest could call a prophet to leave the king's place of worship (Amos 7:12-13 ). The prophet could command people not to go to traditional worship places (Amos 5:5 ).
In summary the Israelites did not settle into a cultural vacuum upon entering Canaan. They encountered a people with a proud history and a thriving religion. Historically speaking, that encounter could potentially have led to the elimination of Yahwism. It did not. Rather, a long historical process led to the eventual elimination of baalism and other elements of Canaanite religion. Israel's battle with Canaanite religion gave new dimensions and depth to Israel's faith. The biblical record affirms that Yahweh, the Lord of history, has used the reality of historical encounter as a means to bring biblical religion to its mature development as revealed in the full canon of Scripture. See Amorites ; Anath ; Asherah ; Baal ; El ; Elijah ; Israel ; Phoenicia ; Ugarit .
Frank E. Eakin, Jr.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Canaan
Genesis 17:8 (c) This describes this country and compares it to the life of victory which should be the portion of every believer. In Canaan, the Lord gave rich possessions and fought all their battles for them. Many Christians stop at Jabesh-Gilead and never cross over Jordan to the land of grapes, figs, olives and victory. Canaan is called in several Scriptures the land that floweth with milk and honey. It probably represents typically the victorious life of the happy, radiant, conquering Christian. This person lives in constant fellowship with the living GOD and Father, has conscious communion with CHRIST JESUS, and receives daily blessings from the Holy Spirit. He has crossed over Jordan out of the desert into the life more abundant, the life that is life indeed.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Canaan
Son of Ham and grandson of Noah. Genesis 9:18-27 . Of Canaan Noah said, "Cursed be Canaan; a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren," and then is added that he shall be the servant of Shem and of Japheth. It may seem strange that Noah did not curse Ham personally who had not respected his father; but doubtless it was God who, in His government, led Noah, in giving forth the prophecy respecting his three sons in the new world, to visit the conduct of Ham upon his son. God had already blessed Ham along with Noah and had made a covenant with him, how then could he lead Noah to curse him? Genesis 9:1,8 . Besides, we do not find that all Ham's sons became the servants of Shem; upon Canaan only the curse fell. It was Nimrod, Ham's descendant, who founded the great kingdoms of the East, and we do not read of them being tributary to Israel as Canaan was. God, in the wisdom of His government, led Noah to pronounce the curse upon Canaan, in strong contrast with the blessing of Jehovah upon Shem, which was fulfilled in Israel.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Canaan, Land of
The land possessed by the descendants of Canaan, the son of Ham, which was until recently called PALESTINE. The whole of it was promised to Abraham, and a further territory was also promised 'from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates.' Genesis 15:18 ; Genesis 17:8 . The word used here thrice for 'river' is nahar, which is not applicable to a winter stream, so that 'river of Egypt' doubtless refers to the most easterly branch of the Nile, called Pelusiac. These limits of Abraham's promised possession are on the S.W. and N.E.; the Mediterranean being the western limit, the eastern being undefined; but the 'river Euphrates' boundary must be on the north part of that river, which indeed was reached by Solomon at Tiphsah (about 35 50' N, 39 E). 1 Kings 4:24 .
In Numbers 34:5-8 directions are given as to the boundaries of the land to be then possessed by the tribes, and here a different word is used for 'river' ( nachal ) in 'river of Egypt.' This word signifies 'brook in a valley,' and cannot refer to the Nile; indeed the places also mentioned are more in the latitude of the wady called el Arish, 31 5' N, near to the ancient city Rhinocolura. This is not so far south as the country over which Solomon had dominion, which extended to Ezion-geber on the gulf of Akaba. In Numbers 34:9-11 the north border is also given, and though some of the places cannot be traced, it is yet clear that the border did not extend as far as was possessed under Solomon, who anticipated for the moment the possession which will yet be inherited by Israel under Christ. 'From Dan to Beersheba' became the common way of describing the whole of Canaan. This comprised about 150 miles from north to south. In Deuteronomy 1:7 the borders are named as between 'the mount of the Amorites,' near the Dead Sea on the south, to 'Lebanon and the river Euphrates' on the north.
The land is declared to be like no other country on earth, presenting as it does in so small a compass such diversity of surface; some parts being fruitful plains; other parts rugged rocks and spacious caves, and mountains with their sides covered with vineyards. One part is 1200 feet below the level of the sea, with a tropical atmosphere; its highest part 9000 feet above the sea, with an Alpine temperature. In some places it is a garden of flowers; in others an arid desert. See SEASONS.
The land of Canaan may be described as having four zones: by the Mediterranean Sea a plain runs from north to south, much wider in the south thanin the north; it is broken into by Mount Carmel running across it. Parallel with the plain is a zone of hill country from Lebanon to the south, varying in height, and with some mountains. To the east of this is the valley in which runs the Jordan with the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea. To the east of the Jordan valley is another range of hill country, which declines into the desert on its east. In the west, south of Aijalon, 31 51' N, is a district called the Shephelah. It is distinct from the plain by the sea coast, and distinct from the hill country. It is sometimes described as low hills or 'the lowland.' It was the part where the Israelites were so often attacked by the Philistines.
God Himself describes the land as "a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills; a land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and fig trees, and pomegranates; a land of oil olive and honey; a land wherein thou shalt eat bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack anything in it; a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig brass." Deuteronomy 8:7-9 . Universal testimony is given to the great productiveness of the soil if it were properly cultivated; but under the judgement of God and the misrule of man comparatively little has been produced until the State of Israel was founded in the twentieth century.
Ruins of former greatness abound everywhere showing how the judgements predicted by God have been fulfilled; but it is well to remember that the predictions as to future blessing will as certainly be fulfilled as were those as to judgements. It will yet be 'the holy land,' Zechariah 2:12 ; 'Immanuel's land,' Isaiah 8:8 ; for it is 'the land of promise,' Hebrews 11:9 . It is called CHANAAN in Acts 7:11 ; Acts 13:19 .
It is estimated that there are now 4.8 million Jews in Israel [1], many are resorting thither, but, alas, in unbelief. There were only 100,000,100 years ago. There are other ethnic groups in Israel, as well as Gaza and Jordan, particularly Palestinian Muslims who were defeated by Israel in the war of 1948. The Palestinians number about 3.6 million of which 0.9 million are in Israel itself.
The name Palestine is often now used as synonymous with Canaan, but in the scripture that term and 'Palestina' refer to the land of the Philistines, the narrow border on the sea coast in the south of Canaan. Exodus 15:14 ; Isaiah 14:29,31 ; Joel 3:4 .
The land on the west of the Jordan and some portions on the east have been surveyed, firstly by the officers of the Palestine Exploration Fund, which has been the means, as far as their judgement goes, of identifying many Biblical sites. Their map enabled the longitude and latitude of the principal places being given in this work. The modern State of Israel has ensured that much is now known of the geography of the country.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Canaan
(Authorized Version Chanaan, Acts 7:11; Acts 13:19)
In the NT Palestine is referred to as ‘the Land’ or ‘the Land of Israel’ (Matthew 2:20). The old designation ‘Canaan’ is used by St. Stephen, in making reference to the famine which sent Jacob’s sons into Egypt; and by St. Paul at Antioch when referring to the destroying of the Canaanites and the giving of the Land of Promise to Israel.
J. W. Duncan.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Canaan
The fourth son of Ham (Genesis 10:6 ). His descendants were under a curse in consequence of the transgression of his father (9:22-27). His eldest son, Zidon, was the father of the Sidonians and Phoenicians. He had eleven sons, who were the founders of as many tribes (10:15-18).
The country which derived its name from the preceding. The name as first used by the Phoenicians denoted only the maritime plain on which Sidon was built. But in the time of Moses and Joshua it denoted the whole country to the west of the Jordan and the Dead Sea (Deuteronomy 11:30 ). In Joshua 5:12 the LXX. read, "land of the Phoenicians," instead of "land of Canaan." The name signifies "the lowlands," as distinguished from the land of Gilead on the east of Jordan, which was a mountainous district. The extent and boundaries of Canaan are fully set forth in different parts of Scripture ( Genesis 10:19 ; 17:8 ; Numbers 13:29 ; 34:8 ). (See CANAANITES, PALESTINE .)
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Canaan
Merchant; trader; or that humbles and subdues
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Canaan, the Language of
Mentioned in Isaiah 19:18 , denotes the language spoken by the Jews resident in Palestine. The language of the Canaanites and of the Hebrews was substantially the same. This is seen from the fragments of the Phoenician language which still survive, which show the closest analogy to the Hebrew. Yet the subject of the language of the "Canaanites" is very obscure. The cuneiform writing of Babylon, as well as the Babylonian language, was taught in the Canaanitish schools, and the clay tablets of Babylonian literature were stored in the Canaanitish libraries. Even the Babylonian divinities were borrowed by the Canaanites.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Canaan; Canaanite
Kena‛an (כְּנַעַן, Strong's #3667), “Canaan”; kena‛anı̂y (כְּנַעֲנִי, Strong's #3669), “Canaanite; merchant.” “Canaan” is used 9 times as the name of a person and 80 times as a place name. “Canaanite” occurs 72 times of the descendants of “Canaan,” the inhabitants of the land of Canaan. Most occurrences of these words are in Genesis through Judges, but they are scattered throughout the Old Testament.“Canaan” is first used of a person in Gen. 9:18: “… and Ham is the father of Canaan” (cf. Gen. 10:6). After a listing of the nations descended from “Canaan,” Gen. 10:18-19 adds: “… and afterward were the families of the Canaanites spread abroad. And the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza; as thou goest, unto Sodom, and Gomorrah,.…” “Canaan” is the land west of the Jordan, as in Num. 33:51: “When ye are passed over Jordan into the land of Canaan” (cf. Josh. 22:9- 11). At the call of God, Abram “… went forth to go into the land of Canaan; and into the land of Canaan they came.… And the Canaanite was then in the land” (Gen. 12:5-6). Later God promised Abram: “Unto thy seed have I given this land, … [1] the Canaanites …” (Gen. 15:18-20; cf. Exod. 3:8, 17; Josh. 3:10).“Canaanite” is a general term for all the descendants of “Canaan”: “When the Lord thy God shall bring thee into the land whither thou goest to possess it, and hath cast out many nations before thee … the Canaanites …” (Deut. 7:1). It is interchanged with Amorite in Gen. 15:16: “… for the iniquity of the Amorites is not yet full” (cf. Josh. 24:15, 18).
“Canaanite” is also used in the specific sense of one of the peoples of Canaan: “… and the Canaanites dwell by the sea, and by the coast of Jordan” (Num. 13:29; cf. Josh. 5:1; 2 Sam. 24:7). As these peoples were traders, “Canaanite” is a symbol for “merchant” in Prov. 31:24 and Job 41:6 and notably, in speaking of the sins of Israel, Hosea says, “He is a merchant, the balances of deceit are in his hand …” (Hos. 7:12; cf. Zeph. 1:11).
Gen. 9:25-27 stamps a theological significance on “Canaan” from the beginning: “Cursed be Canaan; a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren.… Blessed be the Lord God of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant. And God shall enlarge Japheth … and Canaan shall be his servant.” Noah prophetically placed this curse on “Canaan” because his father had stared at Noah’s nakedness and reported it grossly to his brothers. Ham’s sin, deeply rooted in his youngest son, is observable in the Canaanites in the succeeding history. Leviticus 18 gives a long list of sexual perversions that were forbidden to Israel prefaced by the statement: “… and after the doings of the land of Canaan, whither I bring you, shall ye not do …” (Lev. 18:3). The list is followed by a warning: “Defile not ye yourselves in any of these things: for in all these the nations are defiled which I cast out before you” (Lev. 18:24).
The command to destroy the “Canaanites” was very specific: “… thou shalt smite them, and utterly destroy them.… ye shall destroy their altars, and break down their images.… For thou art a holy people unto the Lord thy God …” (Deut. 7:2-6). But too often the house of David and Judah “built them high places, and images, and groves, on every high hill, and under every green tree. And there were also sodomites in the land: and they did according to all the abominations of the nations which the Lord cast out before the children of Israel” (1 Kings 14:23-24; cf. 2 Kings 16:3-4; 21:1- 15). The nations were the “Canaanites”; thus “Canaanite” became synonymous with religious and moral perversions of every kind.
This fact is reflected in Zech. 14:21: “… and in that day there shall be no more the Canaanite in the house of the Lord of hosts.” A “Canaanite” was not permitted to enter the tabernacle or temple; no longer would one of God’s people who practiced the abominations of the “Canaanites” enter the house of the Lord.
This prophecy speaks of the last days and will be fulfilled in the New Jerusalem, according to Rev. 21:27: “And there shall in no wise enter into it any thing that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh abomination, or maketh a lie …” (cf. Rev. 22:15).
These two words occur in Acts 7:11 and 13:19 in the New Testament.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Canaan (2)
Canaan, land of (kâ'nan or kâ'na-an). Genesis 12:5. The country inhabited by the posterity of Canaan (a son of Ham and grandson of Noah), who were hence called Canaanites. God promised this land to the children of Israel, the posterity of Abraham, as their possession. Exodus 6:4; Leviticus 25:38. The boundaries of Canaan were Mount Lebanon on the north, the wilderness of Arabia on the south, and the Arabian desert on the east. On the west their possessions extended at some points to the margin of the Mediterranean. Their boundaries on this side were partially restricted by the Philistines, who held the low lands and strong cities along the shore. Genesis 10:19. Besides the possessions of the Israelites, the land of Canaan embraced Phœnicia on the north and Philistia on the southwest. Zephaniah 2:5. The land of Canaan was called the land of Israel, 1 Samuel 13:19, because it was occupied by the descendants of Jacob or Israel; the holy land, Zechariah 2:12; the land of promise, Hebrews 11:9, because it was promised to Abraham and his posterity as their possession; the land of Judah, Jeremiah 39:10, because Judah was the leading tribe; the land of the Hebrews, Genesis 40:15, or the descendants of Eber, an ancestor of Abraham. The modern name of Palestine, or the land of the Philistines, was originally applied to the region lying along the coast of the Mediterranean, southwest of the Land of Promise, but in its present usage denotes the whole country bounded by the Jordan on the east the Mediterranean on the west, Arabia on the south, and Lebanon on the north. Previous to its conquest by Joshua, Canaan was peopled by several tribes, as Hittites, Jebusites, Amorites, Girgasites, Hivites, Perizzites, and four others, all early known as Canaanites. Genesis 10:15-19. Later, "Canaanites" appears to designate a separate tribe, and the land was inhabited by them and six other tribes. Canaan was the country for which Terah started, Genesis 11:31; Abram dwelt in it; it was promised to him for a possession. Genesis 12:5; Genesis 12:8, etc.; Isaac, Jacob, and the patriarchs made their home there. Genesis 26:1-35; Genesis 27:1-46; Genesis 28:1-22; Genesis 29:1-35; Genesis 30:1-43; Genesis 31:1-55; Genesis 32:1-32; Genesis 33:1-20; Genesis 34:1-31; Genesis 35:1-29; Genesis 36:1-43. It was left by Jacob because of the famine; searched by the twelve spies, Numbers 13:2; Viewed by Moses, Deuteronomy 32:49; conquered by Joshua, Joshua 11:23; divided by lot among the twelve tribes, Joshua 13:7; a king of the country was slain by Deborah and Barak, Judges 4:24. In the temple at Karnak, in Egypt, a triple list of 118 or 119 towns of Canaan has lately been discovered, which is believed to be a record of an Egyptian conquest of the land by Thothmes HI. previous to that by Joshua. It is the oldest known record of Canaanite cities before the time of Joshua. For later history see Palestine.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Canaan
Canaan, low region, merchant, servant? The fourth son of Ham. Genesis 9:18; 1 Chronicles 1:8. On occasion of his irreverent conduct, a prophetic curse was denounced by Noah on Ham's posterity through Canaan. Genesis 9:25-27. We know not how for this took effect on Canaan personally: it had its fulfillment in his descendants, only because it was deserved and drawn down upon them by their sins. Canaan was the father of the nations who peopled Palestine, west of the Jordan. Genesis 10:6; Genesis 10:15-18; 1 Chronicles 1:13-16.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Canaan
the son of Ham. The Hebrews believe that Canaan, having first discovered Noah's nakedness, told his father Ham; and that Noah, when he awoke, having understood what had passed, cursed Canaan, the first author of the offence. Others are of opinion that Ham was punished in his son Canaan, Genesis 9:25 . For though Canaan is mentioned, Ham is not exempted from the malediction; on the contrary, he suffers more from it, since parents are more affected with their children's misfortunes than with their own; especially if the evils have been inflicted through some fault or folly of theirs. Some have thought that Canaan may be put elliptically for the father of Canaan, that is, Ham, as it is rendered in the Arabic and Septuagint translations.
The posterity of Canaan was numerous. His eldest son, Sidon, founded the city of Sidon, and was father of the Sidonians and Phenicians. Canaan had ten other sons, who were fathers of as many tribes, dwelling in Palestine and Syria; namely, the Hittites, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgasites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hemathites. It is believed that Canaan lived and died in Palestine, which from him was called the land of Canaan. Notwithstanding the curse is directed against Canaan the son, and not against Ham the father, it is often supposed that all the posterity of Ham were placed under the malediction, "Cursed be Canaan; a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren."
But the true reason why Canaan only was mentioned probably is, that the curse was in fact restricted to the posterity of Canaan. It is true that many Africans, descendants of other branches of Ham's family, have been largely and cruelly enslaved, but so have other tribes in different parts of the world. There is certainly no proof that the negro race were ever placed under this malediction. Had they been included in it, this would neither have justified their oppressors, nor proved that Christianity is not designed to remove the evil of slavery. But Canaan alone, in his descendants, is cursed, and Ham only in that branch of his posterity. It follows that the subjugation of the Canaanitish races to Israel fulfils the prophecy. To them it was limited, and with them it expired. Part of the seven nations of the Canaanites were made slaves to the Israelites, when they took possession of their land; and the remainder by Solomon.
CANAAN, LAND OF. In the map it presents the appearance of a narrow slip of country, extending along the eastern coast of the Mediterranean; from which, to the river Jordan, the utmost width does not exceed fifty miles. This river was the eastern boundary of the land of Canaan, or Palestine, properly so called, which derived its name from the Philistines or Palestines originally inhabiting the coast. To three of the twelve tribes, however, Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, portions of territory were assigned on the eastern side of the river, which were afterward extended by the subjugation of the neighbouring nations. The territory of Tyre and Sidon was its ancient border on the north-west; the range of the Libanus and Anti-libanus forms a natural boundary on the north and north-east; while in the south it is pressed upon by the Syrian and Arabian deserts. Within this circumscribed district, such were the physical advantages of the soil and climate, there existed, in the happiest periods of the Jewish nation, an immense population. The kingdom of David and Solomon, however, extended far beyond these narrow limits. In a north-eastern direction, it was bounded only by the river Euphrates, and included a considerable part of Syria. It is stated that Solomon had dominion over all the region on the western side of the Euphrates, from Thiphsah, or Thapsacus, on that river, in latitude 25 20', to Azzah, or Gaza. "Tadmore in the wilderness," (Palmyra,) which the Jewish monarch is stated to have built, (that is, either founded or fortified,) is considerably to the north-east of Damascus, being only a day's journey from the Euphrates; and Hamath, the Epiphania of the Greeks, (still called Hamah,) in the territory belonging, to which city Solomon had several "store cities," is seated on the Orontes, in latitude 34
45' N. On the east and south-east, the kingdom of Solomon was extended by the conquest of the country of Moab, that of the Ammonites, and Edom; and tracts which were either inhabited or pastured by the Israelites, lay still farther eastward. Maon, which belonged to the tribe of Judah, and was situated in or near the desert of Paran, is described by Abulfeda as the farthest city of Syria toward Arabia, being two days' journey beyond Zoar. In the time of David, the people of Israel, women and children included, amounted, on the lowest computation, to five millions; beside the tributary Canaanites, and other conquered nations.
The vast resources of the country, and the power of the Jewish monarch, may be estimated not only by the consideration in which he was held by the contemporary sovereigns of Egypt, Tyre, and Assyria, but by the strength of the several kingdoms into which the dominions of David were subsequently divided. Damascus revolted during the reign of Solomon, and shook off the Jewish yoke. At his death, ten of the tribes revolted under Jeroboam, and the country became divided into the two rival kingdoms of Judah and Israel, having for their capitals Jerusalem and Samaria. The kingdom of Israel fell before the Assyrian conqueror, in the year B.C. 721, after it had subsisted about two hundred and fifty years. That of Judah survived about one hundred and thirty years, Judea being finally subdued and laid waste by Nebuchadnezzar, and the temple burned B.C. 588. Idumea was conquered a few years after. From this period till the aera of Alexander the Great, Palestine remained subject to the Chaldean, Median, and Persian dynasties. At his death, Judea fell under the dominion of the kings of Syria, and, with some short and troubled intervals, remained subject either to the kings of Syria or of Egypt, till John Hyrcanus shook off the Syrian yoke, and assumed the diadem, B.C. 130. The Asmonean dynasty, which united, in the person of the monarch, the functions of king and pontiff, though tributary to Roman conquerors, lasted one hundred and twenty-six years, till the kingdom was given by Anthony to Herod the Great, of an Idumean family, B.C. 39.
2. At the time of the Christian aera, Palestine was divided into five provinces; Judea, Samaria, Galilee, Perea, and Idumea. On the death of Herod, Archelaus, his eldest son, succeeded to the government of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea, with the title of tetrarch; Galilee being assigned to Herod Antipas; and Perea, or the country beyond Jordan, to the third brother, Philip. But in less than ten years the dominions of Archelaus became annexed, on his disgrace, to the Roman province of Syria; and Judea was thenceforth governed by Roman procurators. Jerusalem, after its final destruction by Titus, A.D. 71, remained desolate and almost uninhabited, till the emperor Hadrian colonized it, and erected temples to Jupiter and Venus on its site. The empress Helena, in the fourth century, set the example of repairing in pilgrimage to the Holy Land, to visit the scenes consecrated by the Gospel narrative; and the country became enriched by the crowds of devotees who flocked there. In the beginning of the seventh century, it was overrun by the Saracens, who held it till Jerusalem was taken by the crusaders in the twelfth. The Latin kingdom of Jerusalem continued for about eighty years, during which the Holy Land streamed continually with Christian and Saracen blood. In 1187, Judea was conquered by the illustrious Saladin, on the decline of whose kingdom it passed through various revolutions, and at length, in 1317, was finally swallowed up in the Turkish empire.
Palestine is now distributed into pashalics. That of Acre or Akka extends from Djebail nearly to Jaffa; that of Gaza comprehends Jaffa and the adjacent plains; and these two being now united, all the coast is under the jurisdiction of the pasha of Acre. Jerusalem, Hebron, Nablous, Tiberias, and in fact, the greater part of Palestine, are included in the pashalic of Damascus, now held in conjunction with that of Aleppo; which renders the present pasha, in effect, the viceroy of Syria. Though both pashas continue to be dutiful subjects to the Grand Seignior in appearance, and annually transmit considerable sums to Constantinople to insure the yearly renewal of their office, they are to be considered as tributaries, rather than subjects of the Porte; and it is supposed to be the religious supremacy of the Sultan, as caliph and vicar of Mohammed, more than any apprehension of his power, which prevents them from declaring themselves independent. The reverence shown for the firmauns of the Porte throughout Syria attests the strong hold which the Sultan maintains, in this character, on the Turkish population. The pashas of Egypt and Bagdad are attached to the Turkish sovereign by the same ecclesiastical tie, which alone has kept the ill- compacted and feeble empire from crumbling to ruin.
3. A few additional remarks upon the topography and climate will tend to elucidate the force of many of those parts of Scripture which contain allusions to these topics. Dr. E. D. Clarke, after stating his resolve to make the Scriptures his only guide throughout this interesting territory, says, "The delight afforded by the internal evidences of truth, in every instance where their fidelity of description was proved by a comparison of existing documents, surpassed even all we had anticipated. Such extraordinary instances of coincidence even with the customs of the country as they are now exhibited, and so many wonderful examples of illustration afforded by contrasting the simple narrative with the appearances presented, made us only regret the shortness of our time, and the limited sphere of our abilities for the comparison." Judea is beautifully diversified with hills and plains— hills now barren and gloomy, but once cultivated to their summits, and smiling in the variety of their produce, chiefly the olive and the vine; and plains, over which the Bedouin now roves to collect a scanty herbage for his cattle, but once yielding an abundance of which the inhabitants of a northern climate can form no idea. Rich in its soil; glowing in the sunshine of an almost perpetual summer; and abounding in scenery of the grandest, as well as of the most beautiful kind; this happy country was indeed a land which the Lord had blessed: but Mohammedan sloth and despotism, as the instruments employed to execute the curse of Heaven, have converted it into a waste of rock and desert, with the exception of some few spots, which remain to attest the veracity of the accounts formerly given of it.
The hills of Judea frequently rise into mountains; the most considerable of which are those of Lebanon and Hermon, on the north; those which surround the sea of Galilee, and the Dead Sea, also attain a respectable elevation. The other mountains of note are, Carmel, Tabor, Ebal, and Gerizim, and the mountains of Gilboa, Gilead, and Abarim; with the summits of the latter, Nebo and Pisgah: a description of which will be found under their respective heads. Many of the hills and rocks abound in caverns, the refuge of the distressed, or the resorts of robbers.
4. From the paucity of rain which falls in Judea, and the heat and dryness of the atmosphere for the greater part of the year, it possesses but few rivers; and as these, have all their rise within its boundaries, their course is short, and their size inconsiderable: the principal is the Jordan, which runs about a hundred miles. The other remarkable streams are, the Arnon, the Jabbok, the Kishon, the Kedron, the Besor, the Sorek, and the stream called the river of Egypt. These, also, will be found described under their respective heads. This country was once adorned with woods and forests: as we read of the forest of cedars in Lebanon, the forest of oaks in Bashan, the forest or wood of Ephraim, and the forest of Hareth in the tribe of Judah. Of these, the woods of Bashan alone remain; the rest have been swept away by the ravages of time and of armies, and by the gradual consumption of the inhabitants, whose indolence and ignorance have prevented their planting others.
5. There are no volcanoes now existing in Judea or its vicinity: nor is mention made of any in history, although volcanic traces are found in many parts on its eastern side, as they are also in the mountains of Edom on the south, the Djebel Shera and Hesma, as noticed by Burckhardt. There can be no doubt that many of the sacred writers were familiarly acquainted with the phenomena of volcanoes; whence it may be inferred that they were presented to their observation at no great distance, and from which they drew some of their sublimest imagery. Mr. Horne has adduced the following instances: "The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt, and the earth is burned at his presence. His fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him," Nahum 1:5-6 . "Behold, the Lord cometh forth out of his place, and will come down and tread upon the high places of the earth. And the mountains shall be molten under him, and the valleys shall be cleft as wax before the fire, and as the waters that are poured down a steep place," Micah 1:3-4 . "O that thou wouldest rend the heavens, that thou wouldest come down, that the mountains might flow down at thy presence. As when the melting fire burneth, the fire causeth the waters to boil, to make thy name known to thine adversaries, that the nations may tremble at thy presence. When thou didst terrible things which we looked not for, thou camest down, the mountains flowed down at thy presence," Isaiah 64:1-3 .
6. The climate of Judea, from the southern latitude of the country, is necessarily warm. The cold of winter is, indeed, sometimes greater than in European climates situated some degrees farther to the north; but it is of short duration, and the general character of the climate is that of heat. Both heat and cold are, however, tempered by the nature of the surface; the winter being scarcely felt in the valleys, while in the summer the heat is almost insupportable; and, on the contrary, in the more elevated parts, during the winter months, or rather weeks, frosts frequently occur, and snow sometimes falls, while the air in summer is comparatively cool and refreshing. Many winters pass without either snow or frost; and in the coldest weather which ever occurs, the sun in the middle of the day is generally warm, and often hot; so that the pain of cold is in reality but little felt, and the poor who cannot afford fires may enjoy, during several hours of the day, the more genial and invigorating influence of the sun. This is the ordinary character of the winters; though in some years, as will be seen presently, the cold is more severely felt during the short time that it prevails, which is never more than two months, and more frequently not so much as one. Toward the end of November, or beginning of December, domestic fires become agreeable. It was at this time that Jehoiakim, king of Judah, is represented by Jeremiah as sitting in his winter house, with a fire burning on the hearth before him, Jeremiah 36:22 . The same luxury, though frequently by no means necessary, is used by the wealthy till the end of March.
7. Rain only falls during the autumn, winter, and spring, when it sometimes descends with great violence: the greatest quantity, and that which properly constitutes the rainy season, happening between the autumnal equinox, or somewhat later, and the beginning of December; during which period, heavy clouds often obscure the sky, and several days of violent rain sometimes succeed each other with winds. This is what in Scripture is termed the early or the former rain. Showers continue to fall at uncertain intervals, with some cloudy but more fair weather, till toward the vernal equinox, when they become again more frequent and copious till the middle of April. These are the latter rains, Joel 2:23 . From this time to the end of May, showers come on at irregular intervals, gradually decreasing as the season advances; the sky being for the most part serene, and the temperature of the air agreeable though sometimes acquiring a high degree of heat. From the end of May, or beginning of June, to the end of September, or middle of October, scarce a drop of rain falls, the sky being constantly unclouded, and the heat generally oppressive. During this period, the inhabitants commonly sleep on the tops of their houses. The storms, especially in the autumn, are preceded by short but violent gusts of wind, which, from the surface of a parched soil, raise great clouds of dust; which explains what is meant by, "Ye shall not see wind," 2 Kings 3:7 . The continuation of the same passage likewise implies, that such circumscribed whirlwinds were generally considered as the precursors of rain; a circumstance likewise alluded to by Solomon, who says, "Whoso boasteth himself of a false gift, is like clouds and wind without rain,"
Proverbs 25:14 . Another prognostic of an approaching storm is a small cloud rising in the west, and increasing until it overspreads the whole heavens. Such was the cloud, "like a man's hand," which appeared to Elijah, on Mount Carmel; which spread "till the heaven was black with clouds and wind, and there was a great rain," 1 Kings 18:44 . To this phenomenon, and the certainty of the prognostic, our Saviour alludes: "When ye see a cloud" (or the cloud, την ν εφελην ) "rise out of the west, straightway ye say, There cometh a shower; and so it is," Luke 12:54 . The same appearance is noticed by Homer;—
‘Ως δ ' οτ ' απο σκοπιης ειδεν νεφος αιπολος ανηρ
‘Ερχομενον κατα ποντον υπο Ζεφυροιο ιωης ,
Τω δε τ ', ανευθεν εοντι , μελαντερον , ηυτι πισσα ,
Φαινετ ' ιον κατα ποντον , αγει δε τε λαιλαπα πολλην ,
‘Ριγεσεν τε ιδων . κ .τ .λ .
Il. lib. v. 275.
"Slow from the main the heavy vapours rise, Spread in dim streams, and sail along the skies, Till black as night the swelling tempest shows, The cloud condensing as the west wind blows. He dreads the impending storm," &c.
POPE.
Hail frequently falls in the winter and spring in very heavy, storms, and with hailstones of an enormous size. Dr. Russel says that he has seen some at Aleppo which measured two inches in diameter; but sometimes they are found to consist of irregularly shaped pieces, weighing near three ounces. The copious dew forms another peculiarity of this climate, frequently alluded to in Scripture: so copious, indeed, is it sometimes, as to resemble small rain, and to supply the wants of superficial vegetation. Mr.
Maundrell, when travelling near Mount Hermon, says, "We were instructed by experience what the Psalmist means by ‘the dew of Hermon,' Psalms 133:3 ; our tents being as wet with it, as if it had rained all night."
8. The seasons are often adverted to in Scripture, under the terms "seed time and harvest." The former, for wheat, is about the middle of October to the middle or end of November: barley is put into the ground two and sometimes three months later. The wheat harvest commences about the twentieth of May, and early in June the whole is off the ground. The barley harvest, it is to be observed, is generally a fortnight earlier. A survey of the astonishing produce of this country, and of the manner in which its most rocky, and, to appearance, insuperably sterile parts, are made to yield to the wants of man, will be sufficient to refute the objections raised by skeptical writers against the possibility of its furnishing subsistence to the multitude of its former inhabitants recorded in Scripture. Dr. Clarke, when travelling from Napolose to Jerusalem, relates, "The road was mountainous, rocky, and full of loose stones; yet the cultivation was every where marvellous: it afforded one of the most striking pictures of human industry which it is possible to behold. The limestone rocks and stony valleys of Judea were entirely covered with plantations of figs, vines, and olive trees: not a single spot seemed to be neglected. The hills, from their bases to their upmost summits, were entirely covered with gardens: all of these were free from weeds, and in the highest state of agricultural perfection. Even the sides of the most barren mountains had been rendered fertile, by being divided into terraces, like steps rising one above another, whereon soil had been accumulated with astonishing labour. Among the standing crops, we noticed millet, cotton, linseed, and tobacco, and occasionally small fields of barley. A sight of this territory can alone convey any adequate idea of its surprising produce: it is truly the Eden of the east, rejoicing, in the abundance of its wealth. Under a wine and a beneficent government, the produce of the Holy Land would exceed all calculation. Its perennial harvest; the salubrity of its air; its limpid springs; its rivers, lakes, and matchless plains; its hills and dales;—all these, added to the serenity of its climate, prove this land to be indeed ‘a field which the Lord hath blessed: God hath given it of the dew of heaven, and the fatness of the earth, and plenty of corn and wine.'" An oriental's ideas of fertility differ, however, from ours; for to him, plantations of figs, vines, and olives, with which the limestone rocks of Judea were once covered, would suggest the same associations of plenty and opulence that are called up in the mind of an Englishman by rich tracts of corn land. The land of Canaan is characterized as flowing with milk and honey; and it still answers to this description; for it contains extensive pasture lands of the richest quality, and the rocky country is covered with aromatic plants, yielding to the wild bees, who hive in the hollow of the rocks, such abundance of honey as to supply the poorer classes with an article of food. Honey from the rocks is repeatedly referred to in the Scriptures, as a delicious food, and an emblem of plenty, 1 Samuel 14:25 ; Psalms 81:16 . Dates are another important article of consumption; and the neighbourhood of Judea was famous for its numerous palm trees, which are found springing up from chance-sown kernels in the midst of the most arid districts. When to these wild productions we add the oil extracted from the olive, so essential an article to an oriental, we shall be at no loss to account for the ancient fertility of the most barren districts of Judea, or for the adequacy of the soil to the support of so numerous a population, notwithstanding the comparatively small proportion of arable land. There is no reason to doubt, however, that corn and rice would be imported by the Tyrian merchants; which the Israelites would have no difficulty in exchanging for the produce of the olive ground and the vineyard, or for their flocks and herds.
Delicious wine is still produced in some districts, and the valleys bear plentiful crops of tobacco, wheat, barley, and millet. Tacitus compares both the climate and the soil, indeed, to those of Italy; and he particularly specifies the palm tree and balsam tree as productions which gave the country an advantage over his own. Among other indigenous productions may be enumerated the cedar and other varieties of the pine, the cypress, the oak, the sycamore, the mulberry tree, the fig tree, the willow, the turpentine tree, the acacia, the aspen, the arbutus, the myrtle, the almond tree, the tamarisk, the oleander, the peach tree, the chaste tree, the carob or locust tree, the oskar, the doom, the mustard plant, the aloe, the citron, the apple, the pomegranate, and many flowering shrubs. The country about Jericho was celebrated for its balsam, as well as for its palm trees; and two plantations of it existed during the last war between the Jews and the Romans for which both parties fought desperately. But Gilead appears to have been the country in which it chiefly abounded: hence the name, "balm of Gilead." Since the country has fallen under the Turkish dominion, it has ceased to be cultivated in Palestine, but is still found in Arabia. Other indigenous productions have either disappeared or are now confined to circumscribed districts. Iron is found in the mountain range of Libanus, and silk is produced in abundance in the plains of Samaria.
9. The grand distinction of Canaan, however, is, that it was the only part of the earth made, by divine institution, a type of heaven. So it was exhibited to Abraham, and also to the Jews. It pointed to the eternal rest which the spiritual seed of the father of the faithful were to enjoy after the pilgrimage of life; its holy city was the figure of the "Jerusalem above;" and Zion, with its solemn and joyful services, represented that "hill of the Lord" to which the redeemed shall come with songs, and everlasting joy upon their heads; where they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall fly away.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Canaan
1. The son of Ham, and grandson of Noah, Genesis 9:18 . His numerous posterity seem to have occupied Zidon first, and thence spread into Syria and Canaan, Genesis 10:15-19 1 Chronicles 1:13-16 . The Jews believe that he was implicated with his father in the dishonor done to Noah, Genesis 9:20-27 , which was the occasion of the curse under which he and his posterity suffered, Joshua 9:23,27 2 Chronicles 8:7,8 2 . The land peopled by Canaan and his posterity, and afterwards given to the Hebrews. This country has at different periods been called by various names, either from its inhabitants or some circumstances connected with its history. (1.) "The land of Canaan," from Canaan, the son of Ham, who divided it among his sons, each of whom became the head of a numerous tribe, and ultimately of a distinct people, Genesis 10:15-20 11:31 . This did not at first include any land east of the Jordan. (2.) "The land of Promise," Hebrews 11:9 , from the promise given to Abraham, that his posterity should possess it, Genesis 12:7 13:15 . These being termed Hebrews, Genesis 40:15 ; and (4.) "The land of Israel," from the Israelites, or posterity of Jacob, having settled there. This name is of frequent occurrence in the Old Testament. It comprehends all that tract of ground on each side of the Jordan, which God gave for an inheritance to the Hebrews. At a later age, this term was often restricted to the territory of the ten tribes, Ezekiel 27:17 . (5.) "The land of Judah." This at first comprised only the region which was allotted to the tribe of Judah. After the separation of the ten tribes, the land which belonged to Judah and Benjamin, who formed a separate kingdom, was distinguished by the appellation of "the land of Judah," or Judea; which latter name the whole country retained during the existence of the second temple, and under the dominion of the Romans. (6.) "The Holy Land." This name appears to have been used by the Hebrews after the Babylonish captivity, Zechariah 2:13 . (7.) "Palestine," Exodus 15:14 , a name derived from the Philistines, who migrated from Egypt, and having expelled the aboriginal inhabitants, settled on the borders of the Mediterranean. Their name was subsequently given to the whole country, though they in fact possessed only a small part of it. By heathen writers, the Holy Land has been variously termed Palestine, Syria, and Phoenicia.
Canaan was bounded on the west by the Mediterranean Sea, north by mount Lebanon and Syria, east by Arabia Deserta; and south by Edom and the desert of Zin and Paran. Its extreme length was about one hundred and eighty miles, and its average width about sixty-five. Its general form and dimensions Coleman has well compared to those of the state of New Hampshire. At the period of David, vast tributary regions were for a time annexed to the Holy Land. These included the bordering nations on the east, far into Arabia Deserta; thence north to Tipsah on the Euphrates, with all Syria between Lebanon and the Euphrates. On the south it included Edom, and reached the Red sea at Ezion-geber.
The land of Canaan has been variously divided. Under Joshua it was apportioned out to the twelve tribes. Under Rehoboam it was divided into the two kingdoms of Israel and Judah. It afterwards fell into the hands of the Babylonians, the Greeks, the Syrians, and the Romans. During the time of our Savior, it was under the dominion of the last-mentioned people, and was divided into five provinces: Galilee, Samaria, Judea, Peraea, and Idumaea. Peraea was again divided into seven cantons; Abilene, Trachonitis, Iturea, Gaulonitis, Batanaea, Peraea, and Decapolis. At present, Palestine is subject to the sultan of Turkey, under whom the pashas of Acre and Gaza govern the seacoast and the pasha of Damascus the interior of the country.
The surface of the land of Canaan is beautifully diversified with mountains and plains, rivers and valleys. The principal mountains are Lebanon, Carmel, Tabor, Gilead, Herman, the mount of Olives, etc. The plain of the Mediterranean, of Esdraelon, and of Jericho, are celebrated as the scenes of many important events. The chief streams are the Jordan, the Arnon, the Sihor, the Jabbok, and the Kishon. The lake of Tiberias or Sea of Galilee, and lake Merom. These are elsewhere described, each in its own place.
The general features of the country may here be briefly described. The northern boundary is at the lofty mountains of Lebanon and Hermon, some peaks of which are ten thousand feet high. Around the base of mount Hermon are the various sources of the Jordan. This river, passing through lake Merom and the sea of Galilee, flows south with innumerable windings into the Dead sea. Its valley is deeply sunk, and from its source to the Dead sea it has a descent of two thousand feet. The country between the Jordan valley and the Mediterranean Sea is in general an elevated tableland, broken up by many hills and by numerous deep valleys through which the wintry torrents flow into Jordan and the sea. The tableland of Galilee may be nine hundred or one thousand feet above the Mediterranean. In lower Galilee we find the great and beautiful plain of Esdraelon, extending from mount Carmel and Acre on the west to Tabor and Gilboa, and even to the Jordan on the east. From this plain the land again rises towards the south; mount Gerizim being 2,300 feet, Jerusalem 2,400, and Hebron 2,600 above the sea. On the seacoast, below mount Carmel, a fertile plain is found; towards the south it becomes gradually wider, and expands at last into the great dessert of Paran. From this plain of the seacoast the ascent to the high land of the interior is by a succession of natural terraces; while the descent to the Jordan, the Dead Sea, and Edom, is abrupt and precipitous. The country beyond the Jordan is mountainous; a rich grazing land, with many fertile valleys. Still farther east is the high and desolate plateau of Arabia Deserta.
The soil and climate of Canaan were highly favorable. The heat was not extreme in the deep riverbeds, and on the seacoast; and the climate was in general mild and healthful. The variations of sunshine, clouds, and rain, which with us extend throughout the year, are in Palestine confined chiefly to the winter or rainy season. The autumnal rains usually commence in the latter part of October, and soon after the first showers wheat and barley are sowed. Rain falls more heavily in December; and continues, though with less frequency, until April. From May to October no rain falls. The cold of winter is not severe, and the ground does not freeze. Snows a foot or more deep sometimes occur, and there are frequent hailstorms in winter. The barley harvest is about a fortnight earlier than the wheat, and both are earlier than the wheat, and both are earlier in the plains than on the high land; altogether the grain harvest extends from April to June. In this month and October the heat is great; the ground becomes dry up; and all nature, animate and inanimate, looks forward with longing for the return of the rainy season.
The soil of Canaan was highly productive. The prevailing rock is a chalky limestone, abounding in caverns. It readily formed, and was covered with, a rich mould, which produced, in the various elevations and climates so remarkably grouped together in that small region of the world, an unequalled variety of the fruits of the ground. Olives, figs, vines, and pomegranates grew in abundance; the hills were clothed with flocks and herds, and the valleys were covered with corn. The land of promise was currently described as "flowing with milk and honey." Yet the glowing description given by Moses, Deuteronomy 8:7-9 , and the statements of history as to the vast population formerly occupying it, are in striking contrast with its present aspect of barrenness and desolation. The curse brought down by the unbelief of the Jews still blights their unhappy land. Long ages of warfare and misrule have despoiled and depopulated it. Its hills, once terraced to the summit, and covered with luxuriant grain, vines, olives, and figs, are now bare rocks. Its early and latter rains, once preserved in reservoirs, and conducted by winding channels to water the ground in the season of drought, now flow off unheeded to the sea. The land, stripped of its forests, lies open to the sun-which now scorches where it once fertilized. And yet some parts of Palestine still show an astonishing fertility; and wherever the soil is cultivated, it yields a hundred fold. Indian corn grows there eleven feet high, and grapes are still produced that almost rival the clusters of Eshcol. Intelligent travellers agree in confirming the statements of Scripture as to its ancient fertility. See HEBREWS , JUDEA .
CONQUEST OF CANAAN. Various arguments have been adduced to justify the conquest of Canaan, and the extermination of its inhabitants by the Israelites; as, that the land had been allotted to Shem and his sons after the flood, and the sons of Ham were usurpers; that they first assaulted to the Jews; that Abraham had taken possession of the land ages before; that the Canaanites were akin to the Egyptians, and implicated in their guilt and punishment as oppressors of the Hebrews. Whatever justice there may be in any of these reasons, they are not those which the Bible assigns. The only true warrant of the Jews was, the special command of the Lord of all. They were impressively taught that the wickedness of those nations was the reason of their punishment, which the forbearance of God had long delayed, and which was designed as a warning to them and all mankind against idolatry and its kindred sins. It was these sins the Jews were to abhor and exterminate; they were to act as agents of God's justice, and not for the gratification of their own avarice, anger, or lust, the spoil and the captives being all devoted to destruction. The narrative of the conquest is given in Numbers 1:1-4:49 Joshua 1:1-24:33 Judges 1:1-36 . The Canaanites were not wholly destroyed. Many of them escaped to other lands; and fragments of almost all the nations remained in Judea, subject to the Israelites, but snares to their feet and thorns in their sides. It must be observed also, that full notice was previously given them to quit their forfeited possessions; a solemn writ of ejectment had been issued by the great Proprietor, and if they resisted, they incurred the consequences.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Canaan

Sentence search

Girgashites - (See Canaan) Joshua 24:11. Sprung from the fifth sea of Canaan (Genesis 10:16)
Canaanite - ) A Native or inhabitant of the land of Canaan, esp. a member of any of the tribes who inhabited Canaan at the time of the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. ) A descendant of Canaan, the son of Ham, and grandson of Noah
Canaan - Canaan, low region, merchant, servant? The fourth son of Ham. On occasion of his irreverent conduct, a prophetic curse was denounced by Noah on Ham's posterity through Canaan. We know not how for this took effect on Canaan personally: it had its fulfillment in his descendants, only because it was deserved and drawn down upon them by their sins. Canaan was the father of the nations who peopled Palestine, west of the Jordan
Hazor - Before Israel’s conquest of Canaan, Hazor was the chief city of the far northern region of Canaan. When the armies of Israel entered Canaan under Joshua, they conquered Hazor and burnt it (Joshua 11:1; Joshua 11:10-11). In the division of Canaan that followed, Hazor fell within the tribal area of Naphtali (Joshua 19:32; Joshua 19:36)
Joshua - ” Led the battle against Amalek; was one of the ten spies dispatched to reconnoiter the Land of Canaan. Succeeded Moses as leader of the Israelites and led the nation into Canaan. ...
Joshua, the book of: The book of Tanach relating the history of the Israelites from their entry into Canaan until Joshua's passing (1273-1245 BCE)
Chanaan - See Canaan
Seacons - See Canaan ...
Summer - See Canaan
Winter - See Canaan
Palestine - See Canaan 2...
Girgasites, Girgashites - A people established early in Canaan, the origin of whom is not known, except that they were descended from Canaan
Plain - See Canaan, and OAK
Canaan; Canaanite - Kena‛an (כְּנַעַן, Strong's #3667), “Canaan”; kena‛anı̂y (כְּנַעֲנִי, Strong's #3669), “Canaanite; merchant. ” “Canaan” is used 9 times as the name of a person and 80 times as a place name. “Canaanite” occurs 72 times of the descendants of “Canaan,” the inhabitants of the land of Canaan. “Canaan” is first used of a person in Canaan” (cf. After a listing of the nations descended from “Canaan,” Canaanites spread abroad. And the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza; as thou goest, unto Sodom, and Gomorrah,. …” “Canaan” is the land west of the Jordan, as in Canaan” (cf. At the call of God, Abram “… went forth to go into the land of Canaan; and into the land of Canaan they came. … And the Canaanite was then in the land” ( Canaanites …” ( Canaanites …” ( Canaan: “… and the Canaanites dwell by the sea, and by the coast of Jordan” ( stamps a theological significance on “Canaan” from the beginning: “Cursed be Canaan; a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren. … Blessed be the Lord God of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant. And God shall enlarge Japheth … and Canaan shall be his servant. ” Noah prophetically placed this curse on “Canaan” because his father had stared at Noah’s nakedness and reported it grossly to his brothers. Ham’s sin, deeply rooted in his youngest son, is observable in the Canaanites in the succeeding history. Leviticus 18 gives a long list of sexual perversions that were forbidden to Israel prefaced by the statement: “… and after the doings of the land of Canaan, whither I bring you, shall ye not do …” ( Canaanite in the house of the Lord of hosts. ” A “Canaanite” was not permitted to enter the tabernacle or temple; no longer would one of God’s people who practiced the abominations of the “Canaanites” enter the house of the Lord
Canaan - Canaan
Girgashite - ” One of the list of original tribal groups inhabiting Canaan, traced back to Canaan, son of Ham and grandson of Noah (Genesis 10:16 ). Nothing else is known of them except the existence of various groups in Palestine at the time of the conquest fits information from the Amarna letters and other Near Eastern sources about the independent nature of the various city-states in Canaan before Israel entered
Tzelofechad - After he died in the desert, his daughters successfully petitioned to be awarded his portion in the Land of Canaan. Some say he was killed by the Amalekites and the Canaanites among those who -- after the Spies catastrophe -- attempted to go to Canaan on their own
Zelophehad - After he died in the desert, his daughters successfully petitioned to be awarded his portion in the Land of Canaan. Some say he was killed by the Amalekites and the Canaanites among those who -- after the Spies catastrophe -- attempted to go to Canaan on their own
Canaanitish - ) Of or pertaining to Canaan or the Canaanites
Chanaan - Same as Canaan
Canaan - Of Canaan Noah said, "Cursed be Canaan; a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren," and then is added that he shall be the servant of Shem and of Japheth. Besides, we do not find that all Ham's sons became the servants of Shem; upon Canaan only the curse fell. It was Nimrod, Ham's descendant, who founded the great kingdoms of the East, and we do not read of them being tributary to Israel as Canaan was. God, in the wisdom of His government, led Noah to pronounce the curse upon Canaan, in strong contrast with the blessing of Jehovah upon Shem, which was fulfilled in Israel
Baalim - See Baal ; Canaan
Kadmonites - ancient inhabitants of the land of Canaan, whose habitation was beyond Jordan, to the east of Phenicia, Genesis 15:19 . The Kadmonites were descended from Canaan, the son of Ham
Elidad - Son of Chislon; represented Benjamin in dividing Canaan (Numbers 34:21
hi'Vites - (villagers ) , The, descendants --the six in order-- of Canaan the son of Ham. ( Genesis 10:17 ; 1 Chronicles 1:15 ) We first encounter the actual people of the Hivites at the time of Jacob's return to Canaan. (Genesis 34:2 ) We next meet with the Hivites during the conquest of Canaan
Chanaan - (chay' nuhuhn) KJV form of Canaan in Acts 7:11 ; Acts 13:19
Palestina, Palestine - The Hebrew word, Pelesheth, occurs but four times, and did not allude to the whole of the land of Canaan, as the name Palestine is now applied; but was restricted to part of the coast of the Mediterranean, occupied by the Philistines. In Exodus 15:14,15 , Palestina, Edom, and Moab are mentioned, and then 'all the inhabitants of Canaan. See Canaan and SYRIA
Girgashite - Dwelling in clayey soil, the descendants of the fifth son of Canaan (Genesis 10:16 ), one of the original tribes inhabiting the land of Canaan before the time of the Israelites (Genesis 15:21 ; Deuteronomy 7:1 )
Shiphtan - Judicial, an Ephraimite prince at the time of the division of Canaan (Numbers 34:24 )
Chislon - Father of Elidad, prince of Benjamin, chosen to help in dividing Canaan (Numbers 34:21)
Shihor - Dark, (1 Chronicles 13:5 ), the southwestern boundary of Canaan, the Wady el-'Arish
Nahbi - Hidden, one of the twelve spies sent out to explore the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:14 )
Gad'di - (fortunate ), son of Susi; the Manassite spy sent by Moses to explore Canaan
Ahihud - Prince of Asher; assisted Joshua and Eleazar in dividing Canaan (Numbers 34:27)
Pentapolis - A league of five Philistine city-states which banded together to oppose the Israelite occupation of Canaan
ho'Ham - (whom Jehovah impels ), king of Hebron at the time of the conquest of Canaan
Ham'Athite, the, - one of the families descended from Canaan, named last in the list
Broad Place - Related is the phrase applied to Canaan, “large land” which would appear to denote Canaan—the Promised Land—as a place of deliverance (Judges 18:10 ; but see Isaiah 22:18 )
Harosheth of the Gentiles - a city supposed to be situated near Hazor, in the northern parts of Canaan, called afterward Upper Galilee, or Galilee of the Gentiles, for the same reason that this place probably obtained that title, namely, from being less inhabited by Jews, and being near the great resorts of the Gentiles, Tyre and Sidon. This is said to have been the residence of Sisera, the general of the armies of Jabin, king of Canaan, who reigned at Hazor
Zin - A desert on the south border of Canaan, and the west of Edom, Numbers 34:1-4 . It formed part of the great wilderness of Paran, Numbers 13:26 ; and in its north-east corner was Kadesh-barnea, memorable for the death of Miriam, the mission of the twelve spies into Canaan, the murmuring of the Israelites, the rock flowing with water, and the unholy passion of Moses, Numbers 13:21 20:1-13 27:14
Rephaites - (rehf' ay itess) NIV alternate translation for the Hebrew Rephaim when applied to the pre-Israelite inhabitants of Canaan
Nahbi - ” Naphtali's representative among the twelve spies sent to survey Canaan (Numbers 13:14 )...
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Yehoshua - The book of Tanach relating the history of the Israelites from their entry into Canaan until Joshua's passing (1273-1245 BCE)
Hamathite - (hay' muhth ite) Citizen of Hamath and originally descended from Canaan, son of Ham, son of Noah (Genesis 10:18 )
Raphu - ” Father of the Benjaminite representative among the twelve spies sent to survey Canaan (Numbers 13:9 )
Hivites - Hivites, Land of the (hî'vîtes), A region in Canaan, along the coast of the Mediterranean, peopled by some of the descendants of Canaan, the son of Ham. On Jacob's return to Canaan, Shechem was in possession of the Hivites, Hamor the Hivite being the "prince of the land
Avim, or Avites - Descendants of Canaan, Genesis 10:17 , who occupied a portion of the coast of Palestine from Gaza towards the river of Egypt, but were expelled and almost destroyed by invading Philistines or Caphtorim, before the time of Moses, Deuteronomy 2:23 . They are conjectured to have been the same people with the Hivites, of whom traces were found in various parts of Canaan, Genesis 34:2 Joshua 9:7 11:3
Ziphron - An unknown point on the northern frontier of Canaan ( Numbers 34:9 f
Arvadite - Family name of one of the sons of Canaan
Beer-Lahai-Roi - Wells of him living, and seeing me, on the southwest border of Canaan, where Hagar was visited by an angel, Genesis 16:14
ma'Chi - (decrease ), the father of Geuel the Gadite, who went with Caleb and Joshua to spy out the land of Canaan
pi'Ram - (like a wild ass; fleet ) the Amorite king of Jarmuth at the time of Joshua's conquest of Canaan
Sodi - ” Father of Gaddiel of Zebulun, one of the spies Moses sent to spy out Canaan (Numbers 13:10 )
Eli'Dad - (whom God loves ), the man chosen to represent the tribe of Benjamin in the division of the land of Canaan
Har'Osheth - (workmanship ) "of the Gentiles" so called from the mixed races that inhabited it --a city in the north of the land of Canaan, supposed to have stood on the west coast of the lake Merom from which the Jordan issues forth in one unbroken stream. It was the residence of Sisera captain of Jabin king of Canaan, ( Judges 4:2 ) and it was the point to which the victorious Israelites under Barak pursued the discomfited host and chariots of the second potentate of that name
Ham - Progenitor of Canaan
Gemalli - ” Spy who represented tribe of Dan in searching out the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:12 )
Chenaanah - Feminine of Canaan
Cham - Progenitor of Canaan
Ahlab - City in Canaan, the inhabitants of which Asher failed to drive out
Vophsi - Nahbi was one of the spies Moses sent into Canaan
Zedad - The northern border of Canaan (Numbers 34:8 ; Ezekiel 47:15 )
Gaddiel - ” Spy from tribe of Zebulun Moses sent to examine Canaan, the land to be conquered (Numbers 13:10 )
Sinite - A tribe of Canaan (Genesis 10:17)
Bered - Place in the south of Canaan near to which was the well Lahai-roi
Gaddi - ” Spy from the tribe of Manasseh sent by Moses to examine the land of Canaan prior to Israel's conquest (Numbers 13:11 )
Chis'Lon - (confidence ), father of Elidad, the prince of the tribe of Benjamin chosen to assist in the division of the land of Canaan among the tribes
Kenizzites - an ancient people of Canaan, whose land God promised to the descendants of Abraham, Genesis 15:19
Zin - (zihn) Rocky desert area through which Israel passed en route from Egypt to Canaan (Numbers 20:1 ; Numbers 27:14 ; Numbers 33:36 ). The wilderness of Zin, stretching from Kadesh-barnea to the Dead Sea, formed part of the southern border of Canaan and later Judah (Numbers 34:3-4 ; Joshua 15:1 ,Joshua 15:1,15:3 )
Ham - The impiety revealed in his conduct towards his father, drew upon him, or rather, according to the Bible statement, on his son Canaan, a prophetic malediction, Genesis 9:20-27 . Ham was the father of Cush, Mizraim, Phut, and Canaan, that is, the ancestor of the Canaanites, Southern Arabians, Ethiopians, Egyptians, and the Africans in general, Genesis 10:6-20
Ziphron - ” Site on the northern border of Canaan, near Hazar-enan (Numbers 34:9 )
Canaan (2) - Canaan, land of (kâ'nan or kâ'na-an). The country inhabited by the posterity of Canaan (a son of Ham and grandson of Noah), who were hence called Canaanites. The boundaries of Canaan were Mount Lebanon on the north, the wilderness of Arabia on the south, and the Arabian desert on the east. Besides the possessions of the Israelites, the land of Canaan embraced Phœnicia on the north and Philistia on the southwest. The land of Canaan was called the land of Israel, 1 Samuel 13:19, because it was occupied by the descendants of Jacob or Israel; the holy land, Zechariah 2:12; the land of promise, Hebrews 11:9, because it was promised to Abraham and his posterity as their possession; the land of Judah, Jeremiah 39:10, because Judah was the leading tribe; the land of the Hebrews, Genesis 40:15, or the descendants of Eber, an ancestor of Abraham. Previous to its conquest by Joshua, Canaan was peopled by several tribes, as Hittites, Jebusites, Amorites, Girgasites, Hivites, Perizzites, and four others, all early known as Canaanites. Later, "Canaanites" appears to designate a separate tribe, and the land was inhabited by them and six other tribes. Canaan was the country for which Terah started, Genesis 11:31; Abram dwelt in it; it was promised to him for a possession. In the temple at Karnak, in Egypt, a triple list of 118 or 119 towns of Canaan has lately been discovered, which is believed to be a record of an Egyptian conquest of the land by Thothmes HI. It is the oldest known record of Canaanite cities before the time of Joshua
Caleb - Although brought up a slave in Egypt, Caleb proved himself a responsible leader once the people of Israel began to organize themselves on the journey to Canaan. ...
On the journey to Canaan...
When Moses chose twelve representatives (one from each tribe) to go to Canaan and spy out the land, Caleb was the person chosen from the tribe of Judah (Numbers 13:2; Numbers 13:6; Numbers 13:17-20). ...
The spies returned with a report that although Canaan was a fertile land, its inhabitants were fearsome, particularly the giant people of Anak who lived in the region of Hebron (Numbers 13:21-29; see ANAK). ...
God responded to the people’s rebellion by announcing that, since they did not want to enter Canaan, they would have their wish. ...
When, forty years later, a new generation had grown up and the people were about to enter Canaan, Moses appointed one leader from each of the twelve tribes to assist the new leader Joshua and the high priest Eleazar in the division of the land. ...
Life in Canaan...
After several years of battle, Canaan belonged to Israel and was divided between the twelve tribes. Groups of unconquered Canaanites were still scattered throughout the country, but each Israelite tribe was responsible for overcoming the enemies within its territory (Joshua 13:1-7; cf
Chushan-Rishathaim - , "Mesopotamia") more than once, long before the Exodus, and that at the time they were written the king of Aram-naharaim was still intriguing in Canaan. corresponds with the Israelitish occupation of Canaan, it is probable that the Egyptian monuments refer to the oppression of the Israelites by Chushan-rishathaim. Canaan was still regarded as a province of Egypt, so that, in attacking it Chushan-rishathaim would have been considered to be attacking Egypt
Conquest of Canaan - The Book of Joshua and the first chapter of the book of Judges describe the conquest of Canaan, which resulted in Israel's settlement in the land of promise. ...
Historical Setting The Israelite conquest came at a time when Egyptian control of Canaan was weakened. Historians have not been able to pinpoint the time when the conquest of Canaan occurred. ...
While it is not possible to be definitive about the date of the conquest, it is possible to draw some general conclusions regarding the situation of Canaan in the approximate time frame of the conquest. , Egypt subdued Canaan. Canaanite society operated according to a feudal system whereby the kings of city states paid tribute to their Egyptian overlords. onward, Egyptian control of Canaan weakened, opening the land up for possible invasion by an outside force. ...
Joshua's Strategy Joshua led a three-campaign invasion of Canaan. As God instructed him, Joshua led the people across the Jordan River into Canaan. From there Joshua led the first military campaign against the Canaanites in the sparsely-populated central highlands, northwest of the Dead Sea. ...
Not all of the Canaanites tried to resist Israel's invasion. Alarmed by the defection of the Gibeonites to Israel, a group of southern Canaanite kings, led by Adoni-zedek of Jerusalem, formed a coalition against the invading force. Joshua then launched a southern campaign which resulted in the capture of numerous Canaanite cities (Joshua 10:1 ). ...
Joshua's third and last military campaign was in northern Canaan. ...
The invasion of Canaan met with phenomenal success; large portions of the land fell to the Israelites (Joshua 11:16-12:24 ). However, some areas still remained outside their control, such as the heavily-populated land along the coast and several major Canaanite cities like Jerusalem (Joshua 13:1-5 ; Joshua 15:63 ; Judges 1:1 ). ...
Israelite Settlement The Israelite tribes slowly settled Canaan without completely removing the native population. Even though some sections of the land remained to be conquered, God instructed Joshua to apportion Canaan to the tribes which had not yet received territory (Joshua 13:7 ). Judges 1:1 describes the settlement as a slow process whereby individual tribes struggled to remove the Canaanites. As a result, Israel was plagued for centuries by the infiltration of Canaanite elements into its religion (Judges 2:1-5 ). ...
Conquest Reconstructions Scholars have proposed varying models for understanding the conquest of Canaan. One is the immigration model, which assumes that there was no real conquest of Canaan but that peoples of diverse origins gradually immigrated into the area after 1300 B. This approach suggests that there was no major invasion of Canaan from an outside force but simply the immigration of a small group of people who inspired a revolt of the Canaanite peasants. This interpretation of the conquest diverges from the biblical record in its claim that the bulk of the population of Israel was made up of former Canaanite peasants. The best approach to understanding the conquest of Canaan is one which is rooted in the biblical materials
Susi - ” The father of Gaddi, one of the spies Moses sent from the wilderness of Paran to spy out the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:11 )
Heth - In the genealogical tables of ( Genesis 10:15 ) and 1 Chronicles 1:13 Heth is a son of Canaan
Jephunneh -
The father of Caleb, who was Joshua's companion in exploring Canaan (Numbers 13:6 ), a Kenezite (Joshua 14:14 )
Arkite - Tribe descended from Canaan, son of Ham; it probably resided in Arca, in the north of Phoenicia, about 15 miles north of Tripoli, now called Tell Arka
Joshua the Son of Nun - He became Moses’ chief assistant on the journey from Egypt to Canaan and, when Moses died, became Israel’s new leader and led the people into Canaan. ...
When Moses sent representatives from the twelve tribes to spy out Canaan, Joshua was the representative from the tribe of Ephraim. Only he and Caleb, the representative from the tribe of Judah, believed that God could give Israel victory over the Canaanites. ...
Conqueror of Canaan...
Forty years later, when the new generation was ready to enter Canaan, Moses appointed Joshua as his divinely chosen successor (Numbers 27:18-22; Deuteronomy 31:14; Deuteronomy 34:9). Joshua would direct the conquest of Canaan and, with Eleazar the high priest, oversee the division of the land among Israel’s tribes (Numbers 34:17; Deuteronomy 1:38; Deuteronomy 3:28; Deuteronomy 31:23). He organized the people and sought out information for the advance into Canaan (Joshua 1:10-11; Joshua 2:1); he ensured that people and priests carried out the rituals God required of them (Joshua 3:7-13; Joshua 5:2-3); and he submitted totally to God’s directions (Joshua 5:13-15). The book of Joshua records how Israel crossed the Jordan River, conquered Canaan and divided the land among its tribes (see JOSHUA, BOOK OF). ...
The entire operation for the conquest and division of Canaan showed Joshua’s courage, faith, obedience and honesty (Joshua 6:15-16; Hebrews 11:30). From this victory Joshua went on to conquer all southern Canaan (Joshua 10:28-43), and then northern Canaan (Joshua 11:1-15). ...
A godly administrator...
After the conquest of Canaan, the Israelite tribes settled in their respective areas (Joshua 14:1). But Joshua had constantly to remind the individual tribes to drive out the Canaanites from the scattered areas they still occupied (Joshua 13:1; Joshua 17:16-18; Joshua 18:3)
Rephaim - Prior to Israel’s conquest of Canaan, the Rephaim were scattered over a wide area on both sides of the Jordan. They were one of many groups who were to be destroyed when Israel took possession of Canaan (Genesis 14:5; Genesis 15:20; Deuteronomy 2:9-11; Deuteronomy 2:19-21)
Heber (2) - The Kenites migrated with the children of Judah into the wilderness of Judah at the time of the conquest of Canaan (Judges 1:16). They had accompanied Israel to Canaan at Moses' request (Numbers 10:29, etc
Galeed - ) Apparently Nahor's family originally spoke Syriac, and Abraham and his family acquired Hebrew in Canaan, where the Hebrew was indigenous when he first settled there, the Hamitic Canaanites having learned it from an earlier Semitic race. The memorial heap marked the crisis in Jacob's life when he became severed from his Syrian kindred, and henceforth a sojourner in, and heir of, Canaan
Perizzites - Genesis 15:20 , ancient inhabitants of Palestine, who had mingled with the Canaanites, or were themselves descendants of Canaan. They appear to have dwelt in the center of Canaan, Genesis 34. In several places of Scripture, the Canaanites and Perizzites are mentioned as the chief people of the country; as in the time of Abraham and Lot, Genesis 13:7 . See CanaanITES
Kenites - This group had apparently mingled with the ancient Kenite people (who were among the early inhabitants of Canaan) and so were referred to as both Kenites and Midianites (Genesis 15:19; Exodus 2:15-21; Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11). The Israelites allowed the Kenite in-laws of Moses, and their descendants, to live among them in Canaan, and at times showed a special concern for them (Judges 1:16; 1 Samuel 15:6; 1 Samuel 30:26-29; 1 Chronicles 2:55; Nehemiah 3:14)
Pannag - Grotius identifies with Phoenice or Canaan (Ezekiel 27:17)
Moreh, Plain of - ' It was near Shechem, where Abram first pitched his tent on entering Canaan, and where the Lord appeared to him
Pisgah - Here Moses climbed to view the land of Canaan; and here he died
Canaanites - The descendants of Canaan. Their first habitation was in the land of Canaan, where they multiplied extremely, and by trade and war acquired great riches, and sent out colonies all over the islands and coasts of the Mediterranean. The Joshua 11:3 , where it is related that they, along with the united forces of northern Canaan, were defeated by Joshua. At a later period, they spread themselves out over all the mountainous country which forms the southeastern part of Canaan, and which was called from them the "mountain of the Amorites," and afterwards the "mountain of Judea," ...
Deuteronomy 1:19,20 Numbers 13:29 Joshua 11:3 . After the Israelites entered Canaan, the Hittites seem to have moved farther northward. The Genesis 13:7 , they dwelt with the Canaanites, between Bethel and Ai; and according to Genesis 34:30 , in the vicinity of Shechem. ...
Besides these seven tribes, there were several others of the same parentage, dwelling north of Canaan. There were also several other tribes of diverse origin within the bounds of Canaan, destroyed by the Israelites; such as the Anakim, the Amalekites, and the Rephaim of giants
Heth - Second son of Canaan, from whom descended the HITTITES, q
Gir'Gashites - (dwelling on a clayey soil ) , The, one of the nations who were in possession of Canaan east of the Sea of Galilee before the entrance thither of the children of Israel
Pal-ti-el - ( Numbers 34:26 ) He was one of the twelve appointed to divide the land of Canaan among the tribes west of Jordan
Heth - Son of Canaan, Ham's son; from whence sprung the Hittites, occupying the hill country of Judah near Hebron. But the race enlarged its borders so that they with the Amorites represent all Canaan (Joshua 1:4; Ezekiel 16:3, "thy father was an Amorite, thy mother an Hittite"
Desert - Other deserts particularly mentioned, are "that great and terrible wilderness" in Arabia Petraea, south of Canaan, Numbers 21:20 ; also the region between Canaan and the Euphrates, Exodus 23:31 Deuteronomy 11:24
Elizaphan - Prince of Zebulun, appointed by Moses to take part in apportioning Canaan (Numbers 34:25)
Kemuel - ...
...
Son of Shiphtan, appointed on behalf of the tribe of Ephraim to partition the land of Canaan (Numbers 34:24 )
Hazar-Addar - A place on the southern border of Canaan, west of Kadesh-barnea ( Numbers 34:4 )
Mearah - Place in the north of Canaan, mentioned by Joshua as a boundary of the land that had not then been possessed: it is called in the margin 'the cave
Bene-ja'Akan - (sons of Jaakan ), a tribe who gave their name to certain wells in the desert which formed one of the halting-places of the Israelites on their journey to Canaan
Joshua, Book of - The subject of the book of Joshua is the conquest and division of the land of Canaan. Moses, who had led the people for the previous forty years, died before the people entered Canaan (his death having been recorded in the final chapter of the previous book, Deuteronomy). ...
Although it outlines the conquest of Canaan, the book of Joshua does not give a detailed record of events. The battle for Canaan lasted a long time (Joshua 11:18), at least five years (Joshua 14:7; Joshua 14:10), yet some of the more extensive battle campaigns are passed over in a few verses. )...
Summary of contents...
Chapters 1 to 5 deal with Israel’s entry into Canaan. Only after the leaders dealt with the sin, did Israel make further advances into central Canaan (8:1-29). The people then reaffirmed their obedience to the covenant by which God had given Canaan to them (8:30-35). ...
Having split Canaan by their drive through the central region, the Israelites then conquered the south (9:1-10:43) and the north (11:1-15). The summary that follows emphasizes again that Israel’s occupation of Canaan was in fulfilment of God’s promises (11:16-12:24). )...
With Canaan now the possession of Israel, Joshua, together with the high priest and the tribal leaders, began the task of dividing the land between the twelve tribes. The area west of Jordan (Canaan itself) was divided between nine and a half tribes; the other two and a half tribes (Reuben, Gad and half of Manasseh) received their inheritance in the land east of Jordan that Israel had conquered in the time of Moses (13:1-14:5)
Heth - Dread, a descendant of Canaan, and the ancestor of the Hittites (Genesis 10:18 ; Deuteronomy 7:1 ), who dwelt in the vicinity of Hebron (Genesis 23:3,7 )
Nahaliel - ) A station of Israel toward the close of their journey to Canaan (Numbers 21:19), N
Spies - Spies, The: Twelve men--one from each tribe--were chosen to spy the Land of Canaan, to determine how best to capture it
Terah - The father of Abraham, who left Ur to go to Canaan, but died at Haran, in Mesopotamia
Kad'Monites - (Orientals ) , The, a people named in ( Genesis 15:19 ) only; one of the nations who at that time occupied the land (Canaan) promised to the descendants of Abram
ma'Don - (strife ) one of the principal cities of Canaan before the conquest, probably in the north
Zem'Arite, the, - one of the Hamite tribes who in the genealogical table of (Genesis 10:18 ) and 1 Chronicles 1:16 Are represented as "sons of Canaan
Arkites - Descendants of Canaan, of the Zidonian branch, who settled a town, called Arka, at the northwest foot of Mount Lebanon, Genesis 10:17 ; 1 Chronicles 1:15
Ain - Also of a place in the north of Canaan, Numbers 34:11
Zemarites - Sons of Canaan (Genesis 10:18)
Moloch - ) The fire god of the Ammonites in Canaan, to whom human sacrifices were offered; Molech
Amorites - Their descent to Canaan may be traced back to 2100-1800 when their settlement in the hill country helped to set the stage for the revelation of God through Israel. ...
Abraham assisted Mamre the Amorite in recovering his land from four powerful kings (Genesis 14:1 ), but later the Amorites were a formidable obstacle to the Israelites' conquest and settlement of Canaan. Sihon and Og, two Amorite kings, resisted the Israelites' march to Canaan as they approached east of the Jordan (Numbers 21:21-35 ); but after the Israelite victory here, Gad, Reuben and half of Manasseh settled in the conquered area. West of the Jordan, the Amorites lived in the hills along with the Hivites, Hittites, and Jebusites (Numbers 13:29 ; Joshua 11:3 ); but specific identification of Amorite cities cannot be certain since the term “Amorite” is used often as a very general name for all the inhabitants of Canaan, as is “Canaanite” (e. Five city-states in south Canaan formed an alliance instigated by the king of Jerusalem (Jebus, Jebusites) and intimidated an ally of Joshua, i. See also Canaan, History and Religion of ; Jebusites ; Babylon ; Syria ; Sihon
Heth - Son of Canaan, great grandson of Noah, and original ancestor of the Hittites, some of the original inhabitants of Palestine (Genesis 10:15 )
Daughters of zelophehad - These righteous women approached Moses, requesting to receive their father�s portion in the Land of Canaan
Jebus - the son of Canaan, Genesis 10:16 , and father of the people of Palestine called Jebusites
Naha'Liel - (torrents of God ), one of the halting-places of Israel in the latter part of their progress to Canaan
Caleb - One of the twelve spies sent to Canaan to reconnoiter the land
Shihor - frontier of Canaan. The black alluvium might well be counted as the boundary of Canaan: but elsewhere the boundary is the ‘Brook’ (or ‘River’) of Egypt, i
Merneptah - The stele praises Merneptah's conquest of Canaan, Ashkelon, Gezer, Yanoam, and Israel, Israel being marked as a people rather than a geographical place. The stele shows that a people Israel existed in Canaan no later than 1207 B
Canaan - In Canaan, the Lord gave rich possessions and fought all their battles for them. Canaan is called in several Scriptures the land that floweth with milk and honey
Ham - The son of Noah, known for his irreverence to his father, Genesis 9:22, and as the parent of Cush, Migraim, Phut, and Canaan, Genesis 10:6, who became the founders of large nations. Canaan was the ancestor of the Phœnicians and other tribes inhabiting Palestine
ca'Naanites, the, - ...
In (Genesis 10:18-20 ) the seats of the Canaanite tribe are given as on the seashore and in the Jordan valley; comp. (Joshua 11:3 ) ...
Applied as a general name to the non-Israelite inhabitants of the land, as we have already seen was the case with "Canaan. " Instances of this are, (Genesis 12:6 ; Numbers 21:3 ) The Canaanites were descendants of Canaan. The Canaanites were probably given to commerce; and thus the name became probably in later times an occasional synonym for a merchant
Anak - Anak was a Canaanite whose descendants (called Anakim, plural of Anak) were giants. They lived in the south of Canaan in the hill country around Hebron. Because of the great size and fearsome appearance of the Anakim, the Israelites saw them as an obstacle to the conquest of Canaan
Pul - Pul (pŭl), lord? The first king of Assyria who invaded Canaan, and by a present of 1000 talents of silver, equivalent to nearly $2,000,000 in our day, was prevailed on by Menahem to withdraw his troops and recognize the title of that wicked usurper
Ahihud - Chief of the tribe of Asher; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan among the tribe (Numbers 34:27 )
Shemu'el -
A commissioner appointed from the tribe of Simeon to divide the land of Canaan
Arvad - It is related to Canaan in the family of nations (Genesis 10:18 )
Orpah - She wept at parting from her mother-in-law, but she returned to Moab when Naomi with Ruth came to Canaan
Hazeroth - Here they remained a week or more, Numbers 12:1 - 16 ; and their next station recorded was near Kades-barnea, on the borders of Canaan, Numbers 12:16 13:26 Deuteronomy 1:19-21
Ebal - The mountains Ebal and Gerizim were in central Canaan and stood opposite each other on either side of the town of Shechem
Kadesh-Barnea - They consider the latter of them as situated on the western side of Mount Hor, toward the land of Canaan, and thus confound it with that Kadesh in the land of the Philistines, where Abraham sojourned, Genesis 16:13 ; Genesis 20:1 . But that it lay on the east side of Mount Hor, is evident; for why should Moses send messengers from Kadesh to the king of Edom, requesting permission to pass through his territories in the way to Canaan, if they were already at the verge of Palestine Numbers 20:14 ? This application, however, was necessary if his territories were situated between Canaan and the Israelites
Amalekites - They were a race of wild desert nomads who were scattered in an area extending from the far south of Canaan across the Sinai peninsular. Because of this, God commanded that when the people of Israel were established in Canaan they were to wipe out the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8-16; Deuteronomy 25:17-19). ...
In the meantime the Amalekites continued to attack the Israelites, both before they entered Canaan and after they had settled there (Numbers 14:45; Judges 3:13; Judges 6:3; Judges 6:33; Judges 10:12)
Ham - ) Canaan , and not Hâm, appears to be Noah’s son, for it is he who is cursed ( Genesis 9:20-27 ). The purpose of the story is to explain the subjugation of the people represented under the name ‘Canaan’ to the people represented under the names ‘Shem’ and ‘Japheth. ’ To combine the two traditions a redactor has added the words, ‘and Hâm is the father of Canaan’ in Genesis 9:18 , and ‘Hâm the father of’ in Genesis 9:22 . of it (Cush), the Libyans (Put), and ‘ Canaan ’ (see Canaanites). ) In the second tradition Shem, Japheth, and Canaan stand not for large divisions of the world, but for certain much smaller divisions within the limits of Palestine . ‘Canaan’ (in the other tradition, Genesis 10:19 ) inhabited the coast lands on the W
Diblath - Place in the north of Canaan, conjectured by some to be the same as RIBLAH, but only by supposing an error of the copyist, D (ד) being written for R (ר)
Palestine - Palestine, taken in later usage in a more general sense, signifies the whole country of Canaan, as well beyond as on this side of the Jordan; though frequently it is restricted to the country on this side that river; so that in later times the words Judea and Palestine were synonymous. See Canaan
Hittites - Hittites (hĭt'tîtes), The tribe or nation descended from Heth, the son of Canaan. They were inhabitants of Canaan in the time of Abraham. Indeed, they had spread so extensively, that Canaan, or at least the northern part of it, was called the "land of the Hittites. These representations may be taken not unfairly to figure the old Hittites of Canaan
Hadad - See Canaan; Ugarit
Sisera - Military leader of Jabin, king of Canaan (Judges 4:2 ) who was killed by Heber's wife, Jael (Judges 4:21 )
Numbers - The main points include: the consecration of the Levites and the Kohanim, the Spies' trip to Canaan, Korah's mutiny, Balaam's attempt to curse the Israelites, and the Israelites’ war against Midian
Luz - City of the Canaanites, afterwards called BETHEL, q. City in the land of the Hittites, built by the man who had betrayed the city in Canaan, and who called it after the same name
Heth - the father of the Hittites, was the eldest son of Canaan, Genesis 10:15 , and dwelt southward of the promised land, probably about Hebron
Sisera - Military leader of Jabin, king of Canaan (Judges 4:2 ) who was killed by Heber's wife, Jael (Judges 4:21 )
ar'Vad - In agreement with this is the mention of "the Arvadite, in ( Genesis 10:18 ) and 1 Chronicles 1:16 As a son of Canaan, with Zidon, Hamath an other northern localities
Taanach - A province in Canaan
Abel-Mizraim - The place where Joseph and his company halted seven days in passing from Egypt to Canaan to bury Jacob
Heber - He resided in the northern part of Canaan, and seems to have been a man of note in his day
Dagon - Ugaritic commerce carried his cult into Canaan when Canaan was still a part of the Egyptian empire. When the Philistines conquered the coastal region of Canaan, they adopted Dagon as their chief deity
Kadesh - A place on the southern frontier of Canaan. Spies were sent into the land of Canaan. At the end of 40 years they encamped again at Kadesh for a march to Canaan
Kenizzite - They are not mentioned among the original inhabitants of Canaan (Exodus 3:8 ; Joshua 3:10 ), and probably they inhabited some part of Arabia, in the confines of Syria
Arvad - They were descendants of Canaan, Genesis 10:18 ; 1 Chronicles 1:16 ; and were noted mariners, Ezekiel 27:8,11
Anak, Plural Anakim - The Hebrew spies were terrified at their sight, Numbers 13:33 ; but in the conquest of Canaan they were destroyed or expelled, Joshua 11:22 ; 15:14 ; Judges 1:20
Phut - Phut is placed between Egypt and Canaan in Genesis 10:6 , and elsewhere we find the people of Phut described as mercenaries in the armies of Egypt and Tyre (Jeremiah 46:9 ; Ezekiel 30:5 ; 27:10 )
Perizzites - ” One of the groups of people who opposed the Israelite occupation of Canaan (Joshua 9:1-2 ). The name implies that the Perizzites probably dwelled in the open country while the Canaanites walled up their encampments
Lasha - A point on the original border of Canaan (Genesis 10:19 )
Gergesenes - (See Matthew 8:28) It is more than probable, that this was the same nation as is called in the Old Testament Girgashites; one of the cities of Canaan beyond the sea of Tiberias
Apocalypse - Its purpose is setforth by Bishop Wordsworth as follows: "The Apocalypse is a manualof consolation to the Church in her pilgrimage through this worldto the heavenly Canaan of her rest
Ham - One of Noah's three sons: he was father of Cush, Mizraim, Phut, and Canaan. Nothing personally is known of Ham except his disrespectful behaviour when his father was intoxicated, and which drew down the curse of Noah on Canaan. Some suppose these to have been a colony from Egypt; others judge them to have been Canaanitish nomads
Avims - a people descended from Hevus, the son of Canaan. His name, Cadmus, comes from the Hebrew Kedem, "the east," because he came from the eastern parts of the land of Canaan
Palestine - Palestine, taken in a more general sense, signifies the whole country of Canaan, the whole land of promise, as well beyond as on this side Jordan, though pretty frequently it is restrained to the country on this side that river; so that in later times the words Judea and Palestine were synonymous. See Canaan
Abel-Mizraim - ) The threshingfloor of Atad; so called by the Canaanites, because it was the chief scene of the funeral laments of Joseph and his Egyptian retinue for Jacob (Genesis 50:4-11). Moses, taking Canaan as the central standpoint of the whole history, uses the phrase "beyond Jordan" for east of it. The same route by which Joseph was led captive was, in the striking providence of God, that which they took to do honor to his deceased father, being the longer and more public way from Egypt to Canaan. of Jordan; but Genesis 50:13 plainly shows it was not till after the mourning at Abel-Mizraim that "Jacob's sons carried him into the land of Canaan
Hittites - ...
However, the Hittites most often mentioned in the Bible are not those of the ancient Hittite Empire in the north, but those of smaller tribal groups in Canaan. They were probably the descendants of migrants from earlier Hittite kingdoms, and formed one of the many tribal groups that occupied Canaan before the conquering Israelites drove them out (Genesis 15:20; Exodus 3:8; Exodus 23:28; Deuteronomy 7:1; Joshua 3:10; Ezra 9:1). ...
The main area where the Hittites of Canaan lived was the central mountain region. The Hittites were among the many Canaanite groups whom Solomon used as slaves in his building programs (1 Kings 9:20-21)
Kadesh-Barnea - Moses sent out the twelve spies into Canaan from Kadesh-Barnea (Numbers 13:3-21 ,Numbers 13:3-21,13:26 ) The Hebrews also attempted their abortive southern penetration into Canaan from there (Numbers 13:26 ; Numbers 14:40-45 ). Ein el-Qudeirat is located on the crossroads of two major roads of antiquity—the road from Edom to Egypt and the road from the Red Sea to the Negev and southern Canaan, later southern Judah. Likewise, the location of Kadesh-Barnea along the north-south road may explain the rationale for attempting the invasion of Canaan at Arad, since Arad lay north of Kadesh-Barnea on that road
Eshcol - A valley in the land of Canaan
Halak - Smooth; bald, a hill at the southern extremity of Canaan (Joshua 11:17 )
Heth - A ‘son’ of Canaan, Genesis 10:15 (J Hepher - A place in ancient Canaan, whose king was conquered by Israel (Joshua 12:17), W
Akrabbim - ” The “ascent of Akrabbim” lies southwest of the Dead Sea forming the southern border of Canaan (Numbers 34:4 ; Joshua 15:3 ; Judges 1:36 )
Adah - One of the wives of Esau, daughter of Elon the Hittite and thus 'a daughter of Canaan:' she bare to Esau his first-born son Eliphaz, who became the father of seven of the dukes of Edom
Dor - Ancient royal city of Canaan, on the most southern border of the coast of Phoenicia
Harosheth of the Gentiles - A city in the north of Canaan, the residence of Sisera, Judges 4:2 ; Judges 13:1-25 ; 16:1-31
Bamidbar - The main points include: the consecration of the Levites and the Kohanim, the Spies' trip to Canaan, Korah's mutiny, Balaam's attempt to curse the Israelites, and the Israelites� war against Midian
Buk'ki - (Ezra 7:4 ) ...
Son of Jogli, prince of the tribe of Dan, one of the ten men chosen to apportion the land of Canaan between the tribes
Amorites - They intermarried so widely with the original Canaanites that it became common practice to use the words ‘Canaanite’ and ‘Amorite’ interchangeably as names for the whole mixed population of Canaan (Genesis 15:16; Joshua 24:15; Joshua 24:18). Because most of the original Canaanites were descendants of Ham, the Amorites who later became Canaanites could regard both Ham and Shem as their ancestors (Genesis 10:1; Genesis 10:6; Genesis 10:15-16). Nevertheless, some Amorite tribal groups in Canaan maintained their distinct identity, as did other tribal groups (1 Kings 9:20-217; Exodus 13:5; Exodus 23:23; Joshua 9:1; Joshua 12:8). ...
Israel and the Amorites...
Prior to Israel’s migration from Egypt to Canaan, the Amorite king Sihon had conquered all the Ammonite and Moabite territory east of the Jordan River as far south as the Arnon River. in Canaan) likewise lost their territory to the conquering Israelites (Joshua 5:1; Joshua 10:5; Joshua 11:1-8). But their name survived as a general term for all the former inhabitants of Canaan (1 Kings 21:26; 2 Kings 21:11; cf
Paran - ) Refugees at times escaped to Paran, and the people of Israel camped there on their way from Egypt to Canaan (Genesis 21:21; Numbers 10:12; Numbers 13:25-26; 1 Kings 11:17-18)
je'Thro - ) On account if his local knowledge he was entreated to remain with the Israelites throughout their journey to Canaan
Hivites - a people descended from Canaan, Genesis 10:17
Hormah - Destruction, Numbers 21:1-3 ; also called Zephath; a city in the extreme south of Canaan, near which the rebellious Hebrews were defeated, in the second year after leaving Egypt, Numbers 14:45 ; it was afterwards laid waste, Judges 1:16,17
Aaron - Died in the desert, shortly before the Israelites entered Canaan
ca'Naan - ) ...
The name "Canaan" is sometimes employed for the country itself
Kem'Uel - ) ...
The son of Shiptan, and prince of the tribe of Ephraim; one of the twelve men appointed by Moses to divide the land of Canaan
Harosheth of the Gentiles - Sisera, captain of Jabin II king of Canaan, resided there (Judges 4:2). Joshua (Joshua 11:6; Joshua 11:10) had 150 years before routed the confederate kings of northern Canaan, headed by Jabin I, at the waters of Merom, the first occasion of Israel's having to encounter "chariots and horses. After the defeat by Barak, Hazor and Harosheth and northern Canaan remained permanently in Israel's hand
Shechem - The ancient town of Shechem lay between Mt Gerizim and Mt Ebal in central Canaan (Deuteronomy 27:12-13; Judges 9:7). It was the first recorded camping place of Abraham when he came to Canaan from Haran (Genesis 12:4-6). )...
Abraham’s grandson, Jacob, upon returning to Canaan from Paddan-aram, bought land in Shechem and settled there with his family and flocks (Genesis 33:18-19). ...
After the conquest of Canaan, the people of Israel gathered at Shechem to confirm the covenant. ...
In the division of Canaan among the Israelites, Shechem fell within the tribal allotment of Ephraim, but was set apart for the Levites
ur of the Chaldees, - UR OF THE CHALDEES , whence Abraham set out upon his journey to Canaan ( Genesis 11:28-31 ; Genesis 15:7 , Nehemiah 9:7 ), is usually identified with the well-known city of Uru in southern Babylonia, the site of which is marked by the mounds of Muqayyar. ...
The identification has not been universally accepted, since from the narrative in Genesis 11:1-32 it would appear that Harran was passed on the journey from Ur of the Chaldees to Canaan; hence, too, the traditional identification of the place with Urfa , the Gr
Josh'ua, Book of - The book may be regarded as consisting of three parts:
The conquest of Canaan; chs. ...
The partition of Canaan; chs
Jabin - The biblical writer referred to him as “King of Canaan,” a title representing his strong power in the northern part of the country, but a title kings of the other Canaanite city states probably would have strongly contested, since Canaan lacked political unity in that period
Judaea - A name applied to that part of Canaan occupied by those who returned after the Assyrian and Babylonian captivities, The word first occurs, Daniel 6:13 (A. " In a wider and more improper sense "Judæa" was sometimes applied to the whole country of the Canaanites, its ancient inhabitants, and even in the gospels we read of the coasts of Judæa "beyond Jordan. See Canaan, Palestine, and Judah
Canaan - read, "land of the Phoenicians," instead of "land of Canaan. The extent and boundaries of Canaan are fully set forth in different parts of Scripture ( Genesis 10:19 ; 17:8 ; Numbers 13:29 ; 34:8 ). (See CanaanITES, PALESTINE
Moses - He was a type himself of the law which he was commissioned to deliver; for as he was not permitted to enter into the promised land, so he thereby represented that the law could not bring God's people into Canaan, and consequently not into heaven, of which Canaan was a type
Amorites - the descendants of Amori, or Haemorri, or Amorrhaeus, Genesis 10:16 , the fourth son of Canaan, whose first possessions were in the mountains of Judea, among the other families of Canaan: but, growing strong above their fellows, and impatient of confinement within the narrow boundaries of their native district, they passed the Jordan, and extended their conquests over the finest provinces of Moab and Ammon; seizing and maintaining possession of that extensive and almost insulated portion of country included between the rivers Jordan, Jabbok, and Arnon
Rephaim - The Rephaim were the ancient giants of the land of Canaan. Also in the time of Joshua there were some of their descendants in the land of Canaan, Joshua 17; Joshua 15
Moreh - The halting place of Abram after his entrance into the land of Canaan
Kemuel - The son of Shiphtan and representative of Ephraim in the division of Canaan among the tribes of Israel (Numbers 34:24 )
Lot - He accompanied Abraham on his journey to Canaan and on his subsequent travels
Canaanite - The word here does not, however, mean a descendant of Canaan, but is a translation, or rather almost a transliteration, of the Syriac word Kanenyeh (RSV rendered "Cananaen"), which designates the Jewish sect of the Zealots
Kenizzites - An ancient people of Canaan, whose land God promised to the descendants of Abraham, Genesis 15:19 . They appear to have mingled with other Canaanites, and lost their distinctive name before the time of Joshua
Gershon - Thirteen cities were assigned to them in northern Canaan, Joshua 21:6 ; 1 Chronicles 6:62,71
Jordan - The Jordan River, which formed the boundary along the eastern side of the land of Canaan, rose in the region of Mt Hermon in the north and finished in the Dead Sea in the south
Ekron - It had a history of conflict with Israel from the time that Israel first entered Canaan
Leah - She accompanied Jacob into Canaan, and died there before the time of the going down into Egypt (Genesis 31 ), and was buried in the cave of Machpelah (49:31)
Haran - Abram left it to enter Canaan
Canaanite, the - Used to designate Simon Zelotes, one of the twelve apostles; this name Κανανίτης, Canaanite, is not the same as that of an inhabitant of Canaan, which in the LXX is Καναναῖος
Canaan - The old designation ‘Canaan’ is used by St. Paul at Antioch when referring to the destroying of the Canaanites and the giving of the Land of Promise to Israel
Emims - ancient inhabitants of the land of Canaan, beyond Jordan, who were defeated by Chedorlaomer and his allies, Genesis 14:5
Palti - Benjamin's representative among the twelve spies sent to survey Canaan (Numbers 13:9 )
Jabin - A powerful king in the time of Joshua, at Hazor in the north of Canaan
Avraham avinu - G-d commanded him to travel from his Mesopotamian homeland to Canaan, where He bequeathed the land to his descendants in the Covenant between the Parts
Carrying Away - ...
B — 1: μετοικίζω (Strong's #3351 — Verb — metoikizo — met-oy-kid'-zo ) akin to A, is used of the removal of Abraham into Canaan, Acts 7:4 , and of the carrying into Babylon, 7:43
Megiddo - The town of Megiddo in northern Canaan fell to Israel at the time of Joshua’s conquest, though the local inhabitants were not totally destroyed. In the division of Canaan among Israel’s tribes, Megiddo came within the tribal allotment of Issachar. The neighbouring tribe of Manasseh was more powerful and took over the town, claiming it could drive out the remaining Canaanites, but it was not able to (Joshua 12:7; Joshua 12:21; Joshua 17:11; Judges 1:27)
Jebusites - The Jebusites were descended from Canaan, the grandson of Noah, and were one of the native peoples of the land of Canaan
Canaan - From him sprang the Canaanites. (Genesis 9:18)...
Canaan (2)...
The land of promise; the glory of all lands. And as the temple, and all the services of the temple, were so many types of the Lord Jesus, Canaan might well be called the land of promise, with an eye to Him. ...
It is well worthy our observation, that while, among all the early writers, both sacred and profane, the very blessed state of Palestine, or Canaan, for we name it by either, extending both the sacred river Jordan as a country, is continually described; later travellers speak of it as a dry, and inhospitable place. Moses, and all patriarchs, Ezekiel; and all the prophets, are praises of Canaan, and all describe it as a land "flowing with milk and honey
Rahab - When Joshua sent two spies to survey Jericho in anticipation of the Israelites’ impending invasion of Canaan, they stayed at her inn. When the Canaanites got wind of the spies whereabouts, she hid them on her rooftop and sent the Canaanites on a wild goose chase
Rithmah - Rithmah is a descriptive epithet, from the broom abounding there; probably applied to the encampment in this neighborhood in the first march toward Canaan, to distinguish it from the second encampment in the same district, but not the same spot, in the 40th year (Numbers 33:36-38; Numbers 13:21-26)
Heber (1) - The father of Peleg and ancestor of Abraham (Genesis 10:24; Genesis 10:25); marking that Arphaxad's descendants were now crossing over or beyond the great rivers on their way to Mesopotamia and thence to Canaan
Mahanaim - It should seem to be a place of some importance when the Israelites were in possession of Canaan, for lsh-Bosheth, Saul's son, made it the metropolis of his kingdom, (see 2 Samuel 2:8-9
Zoar - One of the five cities of the plain in the land of Canaan, and which alone survived when they fell under the judgement of God
Merari - The youngest of Levi's three sons, born in Canaan, and head of a family of the Levites, Genesis 46:11 ; Exodus 6:16 ; Numbers 3:17 ; 1 Chronicles 6:1
Bukki - Son of Jogli, and prince of Dan, one of the ten chosen to divide Canaan among the tribes (Numbers 34:22)
Galeed - Probably Nahor's family originally spoke Aramaic, and Abraham and his descendants learned Hebrew, a kindred dialect, in the land of Canaan
Jaakan - " Probably Israel visited the two places twice: on the first march toward Canaan, from Mosera to Benejaakan (Numbers 33:31); the reverse order in Deuteronomy 10:6, the 40th year, when the march was differently directed
Padan Aram - Aram expresses the highland of Syria, contrasted with the lowland of Canaan
Taanach, Tanach - Ancient Canaanite city: its king was slain by Joshua, but the inhabitants were not driven out. The kings of Canaan under Sisera fought there against Deborah and Barak, but were overcome
Joseph the Son of Jacob - ...
God had promised Canaan to Abraham and his descendants, but those descendants would be able to take possession of it only when they had sufficient numbers to do so. Although, after Joseph’s death, they suffered a period of slavery, in due course they left Egypt and took possession of Canaan (cf. ...
From Canaan to Egypt...
Joseph was Jacob’s eleventh son but, being Rachel’s firstborn, he soon became Jacob’s favourite (Genesis 30:22-24; Genesis 33:1-7). He then sent wagons to Canaan to bring Jacob and all his family to Egypt (Genesis 45; Genesis 46; Acts 7:11-14). ...
Joseph lived over ninety years in Egypt, but he still believed that Canaan was the land his people would one day possess. Before he died he showed his faith in God’s promises by leaving instructions that when the people of Israel eventually moved to Canaan, they take his remains with them (Genesis 50:22-26; Exodus 13:19; Hebrews 11:22)
Canaanites, the - The descendants of Canaan the son of Ham, of whom the Jubusites, the Amorites, the Girgashites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hamathites were branches. They were "spread abroad, and the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza: as thou goest unto Sodom and Gomorrha, and Admah, and Zeboim, even unto Lasha. In Genesis 15:18-21 , where the land promised to Abram extends to the river Euphrates, there are ten nations mentioned: the Kenites, the Kenizzites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaims, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites. Here and elsewhere the Canaanites are only one people of many; whereas in other places the term Canaanite appears to include any of the inhabitants of Canaan, as in Joshua 17:12,13 ; Nehemiah 9:24 ; Obadiah 20 ; Zechariah 14:21
Ham - To the Cushites, or children of his eldest son, Cush, were allotted the hot southern regions of Asia, along the coasts of the Persian Gulf, Susiana or Chusistan, Arabia, &c; to the sons of Canaan, Palestine and Syria; to the sons of Misraim, Egypt and Libya, in Africa. The Hamites, in general, like the Canaanites of old, were a sea-faring race, and sooner arrived at civilization and the luxuries of life than their simpler pastoral and agricultural brethren of the other two families. See Canaan
Jabin -
A king of Hazor, at the time of the entrance of Israel into Canaan (Joshua 11:1-14 ), whose overthrow and that of the northern chief with whom he had entered into a confederacy against Joshua was the crowning act in the conquest of the land (11:21-23; comp 14:6-15). Here for the first time the Israelites encountered the iron chariots and horses of the Canaanites. ...
...
Another king of Hazor, called "the king of Canaan," who overpowered the Israelites of the north one hundred and sixty years after Joshua's death, and for twenty years held them in painful subjection. They never needed to fight another battle with the Canaanites (Judges 5:31 )
Joshua - Leader of Israelites who first took control of Promised Land of Canaan. He was also one of the twelve spies Moses sent to investigate Canaan (Numbers 13:8 ). Of all the adults alive at that time, only the two of them were allowed to live to enter the land of Canaan (Numbers 14:28-30 ,Numbers 14:28-30,14:38 ). ...
Joshua was at the helm of the nation during the conquest and the distribution and settlement of Canaan
Hebrew - Shem is called "the father of all the children of Eber," as Ham is called "father of Canaan. " The Hebrew and Canaanites were often brought, into contact, and exhibited the respective characteristics of the Shemites and the Hamites. In Canaan he and his descendants acquired Hebrew from the Hamitic Canaanites, who in their turn had acquired it from an earlier Semitic race. The sense of Genesis 10:21 is: as in Genesis 10:6-20 the three Hamite settlements are mentioned, Babylon, Egypt, Canaan, so next the Shemite races are spoken of as commencing at the most easterly point of the Hamites, namely, Babylon and the Euphrates. The name Hebrew, applied to them in relation to the surrounding tribes already long settled in Canaan, continued to be their name among foreigners; whereas "Israelite" was their name among themselves (Genesis 39:14; Genesis 39:17; Genesis 43:32; 1 Samuel 4:6; 1 Samuel 4:9)
Hobab - ), and should be rendered "brother-in-law," as in the RSV His descendants followed Israel to Canaan (Numbers 10:29 ), and at first pitched their tents near Jericho, but afterwards settled in the south in the borders of Arad (Judges 1:8-11,16 )
Perizzites - The Perizzites were one of many Canaanite groups that occupied Canaan before the Israelites drove them out (Genesis 13:7; Genesis 15:20; Exodus 3:8; Deuteronomy 7:1; Joshua 3:10)
Gittaim - ” City to which people of Beeroth fled after Israel entered Canaan
Talmai - One of three Anakim (giant, pre-Israelite inhabitants of Canaan) residing in Hebron (Numbers 13:22 )
Lasharon - ” Listed as one of towns whose king Joshua killed in conquering Canaan (Joshua 12:18 )
Hornet - God promised to send these insects before the Israelites to drive out the inhabitants of the land of Canaan
Jabin - King of Hazor, a northern district of Canaan
Jacob - He returned to Canaan but lived his final years in Egypt, where he went to be with his son Joseph, viceroy of Egypt
Amraphel - ” King of Shinar or Babylon who joined a coalition to defeat Sodom and Gomorrah, then other kings in Canaan and the Dead Sea area
Issachar - The tribe of Issachar had its portion in one of the best parts of the land of Canaan, along the great plain or valley of Jezreel, with the half tribe of Manasseh to the south, that of Zebulun to the north, the Mediterranean to the west, and Jordan, with the extremity of the sea of Tiberias, to the east
Abraham - G-d commanded him to travel from his Mesopotamian homeland to Canaan, where He bequeathed the land to his descendants in the Covenant between the Parts
Avrohom - G-d commanded him to travel from his Mesopotamian homeland to Canaan, where He bequeathed the land to his descendants in the Covenant between the Parts
Sis'Era -
Captain of the army of Jabin king of Canaan, who reigned in Hazor. (Ezra 2:53 ; Nehemiah 7:55 ) It doubtless tells of Canaanite captives devoted to the lowest offices of the temple
Pisgah - This was the peak from which Moses viewed the land of Canaan before he died (Deuteronomy 3:27; Deuteronomy 32:49; Deuteronomy 34:1; see ABARIM)
Ammiel -
One of the twelve spies sent by Moses to search the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:12 )
Rephidim - (rehf' ih dihm) Site in the wilderness where the Hebrews stopped on their way to Canaan just prior to reaching Sinai (Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 19:2 )
Terah - He intended to continue from Haran into Canaan, but died in Mesopotamia at the age of 205 (Genesis 11:32 )
el-Elohe-Israel - By it he implied that Jehovah, who was Abram's God, is also his God, as He had shown by bringing him safe back to Canaan as his inheritance
Baali - Even though baal was a common word for lord or husband, Israel could not use it because it reminded them too easily of Baal, the Canaanite god. See Baal ; Canaan
Bukki - Son of Jogli, a prince of the tribe of Dan, and one of the ten men entrusted with the task of dividing the land of Canaan among the tribes of Israel ( Numbers 34:22 )
Moab - Canaan or Palestine was GOD's country, and all other countries were heathen countries
Zamzummims - They dwelt where Ammon, having dislodged them, afterward dwelt when Israel invaded Canaan
Gezer - Gezer (gç'zer), steep place, called also Gazer, Gazara, Gazera, and Gad, a royal city of Canaan, and one of the oldest cities of the land
Eshcol - Also the valley or brook of Eshcol was that in which the Hebrew messengers, who went to spy the land of Canaan, cut a bunch of grapes so large that it was as much as two men could carry
Libnah - A city of Canaan, in the lowland of Judah, was taken by Joshua, Joshua 10:29-32; Joshua 10:39; Joshua 12:15, and assigned to the priests, Joshua 15:42; Joshua 21:13; 1 Chronicles 6:57; revolted against Joram, 2 Kings 8:22; 2 Chronicles 21:10; was besieged by Sennacherib, 2 Kings 19:8; Isaiah 37:8
Paddan-Aram - ” The land from where Abraham journeyed to Canaan
Rephidim - (rehf' ih dihm) Site in the wilderness where the Hebrews stopped on their way to Canaan just prior to reaching Sinai (Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 19:2 )
Riblah - A city of Syria, in the country of Hamath, at the north-east extremity of Canaan, Numbers 34:11
Booty - Within the limits of Canaan no captives were to be made, (20:14,16) beyond these limits, in case of warlike resistance, all the women and children were to be made captives, and the men put to death
Sinai - ...
For about one year the people of Israel camped at Mt Sinai, organizing themselves for the new life that lay ahead in Canaan (Exodus 19:1; Numbers 10:11). But because of their disobedience, they took about forty years to reach Canaan. It was this new generation that entered Canaan (Numbers 1:19; Numbers 10:12; Numbers 14:31-34; Numbers 26:63-65)
Rachel - This made Rachel so angry that when Jacob and his family left Paddan-aram for Canaan, she took her father’s idols with her. Laban never regained his idols, but Jacob made sure that Rachel did not keep them once the family entered Canaan (Genesis 31:34-35; Genesis 35:1-4). ...
Rachel died when giving birth to Benjamin, the only son of Jacob born in Canaan
Canaanites - The descendants of Canaan, the son of Ham. This group was very numerous, and broken up into a great many peoples, as we can judge from the list of nations (Genesis 10 ), the 'sons of Canaan. The "Canaanites," as distinguished from the Amalekites, the Anakim, and the Rephaim, were "dwellers in the lowlands" (Numbers 13:29 ), the great plains and valleys, the richest and most important parts of Palestine. Tyre and Sidon, their famous cities, were the centres of great commercial activity; and hence the name "Canaanite" came to signify a "trader" or "merchant" (Job 41:6 ; Proverbs 31:24 , lit. "Canaanites;" Compare Zephaniah 1:11 ; Ezekiel 17:4 ). The name "Canaanite" is also sometimes used to designate the non-Israelite inhabitants of the land in general (Genesis 12:6 ; Numbers 21:3 ; Judges 1:10 ). ...
The Israelites, when they were led to the Promised Land, were commanded utterly to destroy the descendants of Canaan then possessing it (Exodus 23:23 ; Numbers 33:52,53 ; Deuteronomy 20:16,17 ). Even after the return from captivity survivors of five of the Canaanitish tribes were still found in the land. ...
In the Tell-el-Amarna tablets Canaan is found under the forms of Kinakhna and Kinakhkhi. Under the name of Kanana the Canaanites appear on Egyptian monuments, wearing a coat of mail and helmet, and distinguished by the use of spear and javelin and the battle-axe. By race the Canaanites were Semitic
Foreigner - ...
When the Israelites migrated from Egypt to Canaan, many foreigners were among them (Exodus 12:38). In Canaan more foreigners were among them, because of the Israelites’ failure to wipe out the local people (Joshua 17:12; Judges 3:5). (Concerning the specific reasons for exterminating the Canaanites see Canaan. The land of Canaan belonged to God and the Israelites were like foreign visitors, or pilgrims – people whom God allowed to live for a time in his land
Gibeon - ” This “great city” (Joshua 10:2 ) played a significant role in Old Testament history—especially during the conquest of Canaan. Archaeology has demonstrated that the city was a thriving industrial area which made it a primary community in Canaan. Originally, the city was assigned to the tribe of Benjamin following Israel's victory in Canaan (Joshua 18:25 ) and made a city for Levites (Joshua 21:17 ). Its first major appearance in Israel's history involved the conquest of Canaan. ...
See Canaan; David ; Joshua
Booty - In Canaan all that breathed were to be destroyed (Deuteronomy 20 :: 16 ). The "pictures and images" of the Canaanites were to be destroyed also (Numbers 33:52 )
Habitation - (See Psalm 132:5,13 ; Ephesians 2:22 , of Canaan, Jerusalem, and the temple as God's habitation
Hivites - At the time of Jacob's return to Canaan, Hamor the Hivite was the "prince of the land" (Genesis 24:2-28 )
Captain - In Hebrews 2:10, (Greek "Prince leader of their salvation,") the antitypical Joshua who leads us into the heavenly Canaan
Chedorlaomer - He had subdued the five kings near the Dead Sea, some 700 miles across the desert, or 1000 by the Euphrates and traversing the land of Canaan
Ain - A place, or probably a fountain, and one of the landmarks on the eastern boundary of Canaan
Barak - God summoned him, by means of Deborah the prophetess, to release Israel from the yoke of Jabin king of Canaan
Numbers Book of - 14, contains an account of the journey from Sinai to the borders of Canaan. 13, 14, the spies are mentioned by name, and a most interesting description is given of their discoveries in Canaan, their return to the camp, and the treatment they received
am'Orite, the am'Orites - (dwellers on the summits, mountaineers ), one of the chief nations who possessed the land of Canaan before its conquest by the Israelites. As dwelling on the elevated portions of the country, they are contrasted with the Canaanites, who were the dwellers in the lowlands; and the two thus formed the main broad divisions of the Holy Land, ( Numbers 13:29 ) and see (14:7; 1:7,20) "Mountain of the Amorites;" (1:44; Joshua 5:1 ; 10:6 ; 11:3 ) They first occupied the barren heights west of the Dead Sea, at the place called afterwards Engedi. (4:49) After the conquest of Canaan nothing of importance is heard of the Amorites in the Bible
Jacob - Before Jacob left Canaan, God graciously confirmed the promise given to Abraham, and assured Jacob that one day he would return to Canaan (Genesis 28:10-22). ...
A changed man...
As he headed for Canaan, Jacob knew that if he was to live in safety he would have to put things right with Esau. ...
Jacob then crossed the Jordan into Canaan, where he demonstrated his faith in God’s promises by buying a piece of land. As if to emphasize that this occupancy of Canaan was by God’s grace alone, the writer of Genesis includes two shameful stories that show the unworthiness of Jacob’s family to receive God’s blessings (Genesis 34; Genesis 38). The only son of Jacob to be born in Canaan was the youngest, Benjamin (Genesis 35:16-26). By insisting that his sons bury him in Canaan, he expressed his faith that Canaan would become the land of his descendants (Genesis 47:29-31; Genesis 49:28-33; cf
Bethel - When Abraham entered Canaan, one of his main camping places was near Bethel, in the hill country west of the lower Jordan. ...
In those days the town was known by its Canaanite name, Luz. ...
Bethel, along with other towns and villages of central Canaan, fell to Israel at the time of Joshua’s conquest. When Canaan was divided among Israel’s tribes, Bethel was on the border between Ephraim and Benjamin
Riblah - An ancient city in the northeastern frontier of Canaan
Igal - Spy representing tribe of Issachar whom Moses sent to investigate the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:7 )
Ethan - Ezrahite may indicate Ethan was at home in Canaan before Israel entered, though this is uncertain
Nut - Sent as a present to Joseph in Egypt from Jacob in Canaan (Genesis 43:11)
Taanath Shiloh - Hengstenberg also identifies it with Shiloh ("rest" after Canaan was subdued; the Jerusalem Talmud, Megillah i. , identifies Tanhath Shiloh with Shiloh), making Taanath the old Canaanite name and Shiloh the new Hebrew name
Salmon - Or else (Maurer) Canaan had the same snowy appearance, covered over With the corpses of the slain, as Salmon when its trees were cut down by Abimelech changed its dark color for a white one
Paran - The wilderness on the south of Canaan and west of Edom
Zaphon - It was probably a center of worship of the god Baal-zaphon in the days of Canaanite supremacy before the Gadites took over. Mountain viewed as home of the gods in Canaanite thought, perhaps referred to in Psalm 48:2 (NIV), Isaiah 14:13 (NRSV), and Job 26:7 (NRSV), showing Yahweh controls what Canaan thought their gods possessed
Everlasting - I will give thee, and thy seed after thee, the land of Canaan, for an everlasting possession
Achor - The valley of trouble was the door through which Israel entered Canaan first; and again through the valley of trouble would the Lord lead his ransomed people to peace and rest
Leah - She willingly accompanied Jacob into Canaan, Genesis 31:1-55; and there she died, when, is not stated, but it was before the family of Israel went down into Egypt, and she was buried in the cave of Machpelah
Zoar - One of the cities of Canaan
Hazor - A chief city of northern Canaan, whose king Jabin, at the head of an allied host, was defeated by Joshua, Joshua 11:1-13
Makke'Dah - (place of shepherds ), a place memorable in the annals of the conquest of Canaan as the scene of the execution by Joshua of the five confederate kings, ( Joshua 10:10-50 ) who had hidden themselves in a cave at this place. (It was a royal city of the Canaanites, in the plains of Judah
na'Hor - He married Milcah, the daughter of his brother Haran; and when Abraham and Lot migrated to Canaan, Nahor remained behind in the land of his birth, on the eastern side of the Euphrates
Bethshan (Bethshean) - ) When the Israelites first settled in Canaan, they could not conquer Bethshan completely
Penuel - ) The men of Penuel, like those of Succoth, as living on the great army route between Canaan and the East, would not help Gideon through fear of Midian's vengeance. , their usual route along the course of the Jabbok, where they would have a level way and grass and water, down to the Damieh ford of the Jordan, and so into Canaan). Four miles above "Canaan's ford" are two conical hills called "hills of gold" (Dhahab) from the yellow sandstone; one is on one side, the other on the other side, of the stream
Beersheba - Among these were the main north-south route from Canaan to Egypt, and the main west-east route from the Philistine coast to Edom (Genesis 46:1-6; 2 Kings 3:8). )...
After Israel’s settlement in Canaan, the people of Israel commonly thought of Beersheba as the southernmost town of the occupied territory
Canaan, History And Religion of - Apparently, Canaan meant different things at different times. Numbers 13:29 limits Canaanites to those who “dwell by the sea and by the coast of Jordan. Israel was aware of the larger “Promised Land” of Canaan (Genesis 15:18 ; Exodus 23:21 ; Numbers 13:21 ; Deuteronomy 1:7 ; 1 Kings 4:21 ; etc. At times the land of Gilead was contrasted to the land of Canaan (Joshua 22:9 ). Canaan thus extended beyond the normal borders of Israel, yet did not include land east of the Jordan. At times land of Canaanites and land of Amorites are identical. ...
History The word Canaan is not a Semitic name, although its appearance about 2300 B. Quite probably the name was derived from a merchant designation; certainly Canaanite was ultimately equated in the biblical text with “trader” or “merchant” (Zechariah 14:21 ). Isaiah 23:8 uses Canaanites as a common noun meaning “merchants” or traders as the aristocracy to Tyre in the prophet's day. Canaan's identity as merchants probably goes back to a time when Canaan was limited to the area of Phoenicia, the rather small and narrow country along the seacoast of Canaan. The word Canaan may be related to the special colored dye. ...
The biblical genealogical references are not particularly helpful in clarifying our understanding of Canaan. According to Genesis 9:18 and Genesis 10:6 , Canaan was a son of Ham, one of the three sons of Noah. Genesis 10:15-20 clarifies the implications of this Hamitic descent in the sons of Canaan: Sidon, Heth, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgasites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Si-nites, the Arvadites, and Zemarites, and the Hamathites. ...
Settlement within the land of Canaan is attested from Paleolithic times. ...
The best attested period in Canaanite history is the Bronze Age (ca. Egyptian control over Canaan waned, being withdrawn about 1800. ...
Canaan had to contend with other aggressors besides Egypt. In addition, the Canaanites were beset by the Hyksos, who controlled Egypt from 1720 until 1570. Hurrians and Hittites also sought control of Canaan. ...
When the Egyptians were able to expel the Hyksos in the sixteenth century, the Egyptians were able to extend their power over Canaan. They represent correspondence between the Egyptian court at Tell el-Amarna and numerous Canaanite cities, including Jerusalem, Megiddo, and Shechem. These letters indicate the unrest characteristic of these Canaanite principalities socially and politically. ...
Prior to Israel's entrance into Canaan, the country seems to have been organized around major cities creating rather small principalities. The biblical evidence is scant for any type of concerted Canaanite aggression against the Israelites. Stories in the book of Joshua (Genesis 9:1-2 ; Genesis 10:1-5 ) indicate that in emergency situations the independent city-state kings formed defense coalitions, but no one had power to unite all Canaan against Israel. In the Book of Judges only one Judge, namely Deborah (Judges 4-5 ), is depicted as having fought against the Canaanites. Rather than struggling with each other after the conquest, the Canaanites and Israelites gradually melded together, a phenomenon essentially completed by the end of David's rule. Their portrayal of the deities and religious perspectives represent Canaanite thought between 2000,1500 B. ...
This sampling of some of the more important members of the pantheon indicates that the Uga-ritic schema, and thus that of the Canaanites in general, offered abundant options for worship. The Israelites encountered this thought pattern when they entered Canaan. of the vessels made for Baal and Asherah as well as the houses of the male cult prostitutes — 2 Kings 23:1 ) for Israel in daily practice of popular religion to resist Canaanite practices. ...
Canaanite Mythology The seven tablets upon which the Ugaritic mythological material was found is often mutilated, frequently making difficult an assured rendering of the material. The Israelites were forced to contend with this mythology upon their entrance to Canaan. They faced a worship structure which had proved itself successful in the view of the Canaanites. Apparently, the Israelites had to offer in exchange a non-agrarian wilderness God who had no record of success in agriculture!...
Old Testament Relationships The Israelites settling into Canaan were not impervious to their surroundings. During the period of Joshua and the Judges, a cultural struggle was waged which had to do more with the conflict between wilderness (Israelite) and agrarian (Canaanite) cultural motifs than between Yahweh and Baal. As earlier indicated, in the Book of Judges only one Judge, Deborah, is depicted as fighting directly against the Canaanites. Solomon's crowning glory, the Temple, was designed and built by Canaanite architects. In addition, Judah was geographically isolated from the northern Canaanite area where Baalism was more regularly practiced. ...
The Baalistic Canaanites influenced Israel in many ways: Temple construction, sacrificial rituals, the high places, a rejection of any sexual motif as a worship instrument (Deuteronomy 23:17-18 ), and a lessening of the purely mythical with a concomitant emphasis upon the historical happening as with Yahweh's splitting of the sea (Yam Suph) rather than a struggle with a mythological Yam(Exodus 14-15 ). ...
It is too easy for the biblical interpreter to focus on the numerous ways that Israel found the Canaanite religion to be offensive. Deuteronomy 20:16-18 ) which clamored for the wholesale destruction of the Canaanites came from inspired religious leaders who did not represent the majority of Israel's population. ...
In summary the Israelites did not settle into a cultural vacuum upon entering Canaan. Rather, a long historical process led to the eventual elimination of baalism and other elements of Canaanite religion. Israel's battle with Canaanite religion gave new dimensions and depth to Israel's faith
Canaanites - CanaanITES . ]'>[3] document ( Numbers 13:29 ) says that the Canaanites dwell by the sea, and the Amorites in the mountains. All the writers unite in calling Palestine the land of Canaan. The Phœnicians, much later, on their coins called their land Canaan ; and two or three Greek writers testify that they called it Chna ’ (cf. : that Canaan means ‘lowland,’ and was applied to the seacoast of Palestine, as opposed to the central range and the Lebanons. If this view were correct, the Canaanites would have received their name after settling in the coast-land. Probably ‘Canaanite’ was a tribal name, and the people gave their name to the land (cf. It appears from Deuteronomy 3:9 that the language of the Canaanites differed only dialectically from that of the Amorites. Probably the Canaanites were a later wave of Amorites. In Isaiah 19:18 Hebrew is called ‘the language of Canaan,’ a statement which is substantiated by the Moabite Stone, the Phœnician inscriptions, and the Hebrew idioms in the el-Amarna tablets. It appears from the latter that the Canaanites had given their name to the country before b. ...
In Judges 1:1-36 we are told of many Canaanites whom Israel did not at first conquer. The coming of the Philistines pushed the Canaanites out of the maritime plain south of Mt. Carmel, so that ultimately the Phœnicians were the only pure Canaanites left. The leading Phœnician cities were such commercial centres that ‘Canaanite’ afterwards became equivalent to ‘trader’ (cf
Hobab - Moreover, Hobab is not Jethro (Exodus 18:27), for Jethro left the Israelites for his own land Midian before they reached Sinai, whereas Hobab accompanied them and settled in Canaan (Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11). He is no longer in the Egypt of the world in spirit, nor is he yet in the heavenly Canaan; he is on the way, and has no doubt of the end (2 Timothy 1:12). " The Kenite complied, and in due time shared in Israel's blessing in Canaan. If we suffer with Israel in the wilderness, we shall reign with Israel in Canaan (2 Timothy 2:12; Luke 22:28-29)
Iram - The Horites were probably not finally destroyed immediately after Esau's settlement in their land, if we judge by the analogy of the conquest of Canaan (Deuteronomy 2:12; Deuteronomy 2:22)
Shem - Noah foretold his preeminence over Canaan (9:23-27)
Horse - For a long period after their settlement in Canaan the Israelites made no use of horses, according to the prohibition, Deuteronomy 17:16
Ham - The curse pronounced by Noah against Ham, properly against Canaan his fourth son, was accomplished when the Jews subsequently exterminated the Canaanites
Iim - Canaan (Joshua 15:29)
Kiriath-Jearim - Prior to Israel’s conquest of Canaan, the inhabitants of Kiriath-jearim were known as Gibeonites, after the name of a more important town in the region (Joshua 9:3; 1 Samuel 7:1-24; see GIBEON)
Gibeath-Haaraloth - Joshua used...
traditional flint stone knives rather than more modern metal ones to circumcise the Israelite generation about to conquer Canaan
Jabin - A Canaanite king who reigned in Hazor, a place near the Waters of Merom, not far from Kedesh. In another account ( Joshua 11:1-9 ) of this episode the victory of the two tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali is represented as a conquest of the whole of northern Canaan by Joshua
Jebus - The ancient name of Jerusalem among the Canaanites, Judges 19:10-11; 1 Chronicles 11:4-5; probably derived from a descendant of Canaan the son of Ham
Calebephratah - That Hezron could have died there (though it is not at all known where the place was) has been thought an impossibility, for was he not with the Israelites living in Egypt? Yes, but at least in the time of Joseph, he and others may have visited Canaan, and on one of his visits have died there, and thus the place have come to be named after his son and his son's wife ? 1 Chronicles 2:19
Spies - According to Numbers 13:2, Moses sent the spies into Canaan at the command of God; but according to Deuteronomy 1:22 at the suggestion of the people
Iron - The natural wealth in iron of the soil of Canaan is indicated by describing it as "a land whose stones are iron
Zarethan - ” The River Jordan backed up and Israel passed over into Canaan on dry ground near there (Joshua 3:16 )
Eleazar - He entered into the land of Canaan with Joshua, and is supposed to have lived there upward of twenty years
Amorites - A Syrian tribe descended from Canaan, and among the most formidable of the tribes with whom the Israelites contended
Issachar - ...
The TRIBE OF ISSACHAR numbered fifty-four thousand men in the desert, and on entering Canaan was the third in population, Numbers 1:28 26:25
Sabbatical Year - God appointed the observance of the Sabbatical year, to preserve the remembrance of the creation of the world; to enforce the acknowledgment of his sovereign authority over all things, particularly over the land of Canaan, which he had given to the Hebrews; and to inculcate humanity on his people, by commanding that they should resign to servants, to the poor, to strangers and to brutes, the produce of the fields, of their vineyards, and of their gardens
Hivites - Among the many tribal groups that occupied Canaan before the Israelites dispossessed them were the people known as Hivites (Genesis 10:15-17; Exodus 3:8; Exodus 23:28; Deuteronomy 7:1; Joshua 3:10). They were among the many Canaanite tribal peoples used as slaves in Solomon’s building programs (1 Kings 9:20-21). Like other Canaanite groups they were eventually absorbed into Israel
Hormah - Capital of a Canaanite tribe in S. After Israel's unbelief, consequent on the spies' report, and subsequent presumptuous advance toward Canaan, in defiance of the Lord who no longer would go with them since they had refused to go when He invited them, the Amalekites from the hill "smote them and discomfited them even unto Hormah" Then followed the wandering in the wilderness for 38 years. frontier of Canaan, the pass by which Israel probably ascended from the Et Tih desert and the Arabah. ...
The Canaanites reoccupied the place and restored it under the old name Zephath. Not until northern Canaan was subdued did Israel reach it again in the extreme S
Building - They probably adopted the kind of architecture for their dwellings which they found already existing when they entered Canaan (Deuteronomy 6:10 ; Numbers 13:19 ). ...
The Israelites were by occupation shepherds and dwellers in tents (Genesis 47:3 ); but from the time of their entering Canaan they became dwellers in towns, and in houses built of the native limestone of Palestine
Banner - When the Israelites left Sinai for the land of Canaan, they marched under the banner of four major tribes: Judah, Reuben, Ephraim, and Dan (Numbers 10:1 ). In Isaiah 49:22 God's upraised hand is a signal (“ nes ”) for the nations to bring the sons of the exiles home to the land of Canaan
Kadesh Barnea - ...
Probably the encampment at Rithmah was during Israel's first march toward Canaan; that at Kadesh was in the same locality, though on a different spot, 38 years afterward, in the 40th year, when they were about entering Canaan. , 70 miles from Mount Hor and 60 from Mount Seir; but Kadesh was only one march from Mount Hor (Numbers 20:16; Numbers 20:22; Numbers 33:37), "on the edge of Edom," "on its uttermost border"; on low ground (whereas El Ain is on high ground) from whence the spies "go up" to Canaan. At the first encampment Israel stayed probably for months; they waited for the spies 40 days (Numbers 13:25); Moses and the tabernacle remained (Numbers 14:44), while the people vainly tried to reverse God's sentence and to occupy Canaan (Deuteronomy 1:34-46): "ye abode in Kadesh many days" (a long indefinite time). ), and unbelief ("ye believed Me not, to sanctify Me") in the goodness of God to an unworthy people, dishonoured God, and he and Aaron were adjudged the penalty of not entering Canaan (Numbers 20:12-13; compare Psalms 106:32-33)
Nahor - A correspondence was maintained between the family of Abraham in Canaan and the relatives in the old ancestral home at Haran till the time of Jacob
Pisgah - God allowed Moses to view the Promised Land from the heights of Pisgah (Deuteronomy 34:1 ) but would not let him cross into Canaan
Asher - On entering Canaan his tribe was the fifth in order, numbering fifty-three thousand four hundred. How much of the Phoenician coast was included is uncertain, Joshua 19:25,28 ; but the Asherites were unable to expel the Canaanites, and dwelt in part among them, Judges 1:31,32
Adoni-Zedek - King of Jerusalem at the time of the invasion of Canaan by the Israelites under Joshua
Paran - It extended from Mount Sinai on the south, to the southern border of the land of Canaan on the north; having the desert of Shur, with its subdivisions, the deserts of Etham and Sin, on the west, and the eastern branch of the Red Sea, the desert of Zin and Mount Seir, on the east
Rain - ( See Canaan
Laban - The elder branch of Abram's family remained at Haran, in Mesopotamia, when Abraham removed to the land of Canaan
an'Akim - (long-necked ), a race of giants, descendants of Arba, ( Joshua 15:13 ; 21:11 ) dwelling in the southern part of Canaan, and particularly at Hebron, which from their progenitor received the name of "city of Arba
Asher - In the division of Canaan under Joshua, this tribe received the coastal plain from Mt Carmel north to the Phoenician cities of Tyre and Sidon (Joshua 19:24-31; Judges 5:17). ...
Like the other Israelite tribes, Asher did not drive out the local Canaanites, who still occupied a number of towns and districts
Canaan - His numerous posterity seem to have occupied Zidon first, and thence spread into Syria and Canaan, Genesis 10:15-19 1 Chronicles 1:13-16 . The land peopled by Canaan and his posterity, and afterwards given to the Hebrews. ) "The land of Canaan," from Canaan, the son of Ham, who divided it among his sons, each of whom became the head of a numerous tribe, and ultimately of a distinct people, Genesis 10:15-20 11:31 . ...
Canaan was bounded on the west by the Mediterranean Sea, north by mount Lebanon and Syria, east by Arabia Deserta; and south by Edom and the desert of Zin and Paran. ...
The land of Canaan has been variously divided. ...
The surface of the land of Canaan is beautifully diversified with mountains and plains, rivers and valleys. ...
The soil and climate of Canaan were highly favorable. ...
The soil of Canaan was highly productive. ...
CONQUEST OF Canaan. Various arguments have been adduced to justify the conquest of Canaan, and the extermination of its inhabitants by the Israelites; as, that the land had been allotted to Shem and his sons after the flood, and the sons of Ham were usurpers; that they first assaulted to the Jews; that Abraham had taken possession of the land ages before; that the Canaanites were akin to the Egyptians, and implicated in their guilt and punishment as oppressors of the Hebrews. The Canaanites were not wholly destroyed
Ham - Ham is called Canaan in the prediction, and declared to be a servant of servants. When Joshua conquered Canaan this was literally accomplished
Hebron - Hebron was a very old settlement in the south of Canaan. It was situated at the point where two main highways crossed, the north-south route from central Canaan to Egypt, and the east-west route from the Dead Sea to the Mediterranean coast (for map see PALESTINE)
Lot - When Abraham and his household moved from Mesopotamia into Canaan, his nephew Lot went with him. He also went with Abraham into Egypt, and then back into Canaan (Genesis 11:26-31; Genesis 12:1-5; Genesis 12:10; Genesis 13:1)
Hebrew Language - ...
When Abraham entered Canaan it is obvious that he found the language of its inhabitants closely allied to his own. (Isaiah 19:18 ) calls it "the language of Canaan. " Whether this language, as seen in the earliest books of the Old Testament, was the very dialect which Abraham brought with him into Canaan, or whether it was the common tongue of the Canaanitish nations which he only adopted, is uncertain; probably the latter opinion is the correct one
Succoth - of tell Der'ala is the ford of the Jabbok, "Mashra'a Canaan," i. Canaan's crossing. ...
The route into Canaan which the nomadic tribes, as Midian, always took ("the way of them that dwell in tents," Judges 8:11) was along the course of the Jabbok and so across Jordan opposite Bethshean, thence spreading over the Esdraelon plain. The men of Succoth, as living on this great army route between Canaan and the East, and having regard only to self and no concern for Israel's deliverance and no compassion for the sufferings of Gideon's gallant little band, would give no bread to their brethren lest they should incur the vengeance of Midian; nay more, they added insolence to unkindness
Inheritance - The possession of the land of Canaan was commonly regarded as the inheritance of the whole people. Consequently the inheritance of Canaan was not entirely devoid of the idea of succession. But the extermination of the Canaanites was never effected; and although the conquest was achieved only by the most strenuous effort, yet the Israelites were so strongly impressed with a vivid sense of Jehovah’s intervention on their behalf, that to subsequent generations it seemed as if they had entered into the labours of others, not in any sense whatever by their own power, but solely by Jehovah’s grace. The inheritance of Canaan signified the secure possession of the land, as the gift of God to His people. As Israel became increasingly conscious of its mission in , and began dimly to apprehend its mission to , the world, the peaceful and secure possession of Canaan seemed an indispensable condition of that self-development which was itself the necessary prelude to a more universal mission. Over and over again it seemed as if Jerusalem must succumb to the hordes of barbarian invaders, and as if the last remnant of Canaan must be irretrievably lost; but the prophets persistently declared that the land should not be lost; they realized the impossibility of Israel’s ever realizing her true vocation, unless, at any rate for some centuries, she preserved her national independence; and the latter would, of course, be wholly unthinkable without territorial security. The career of Israel, as a nation, the influence, even the existence, of its religion, would he endangered by the dispossession of Canaan; moreover, it was recognized that as long as the people remained true to Jehovah, He on His part would remain true to them, and would not suffer them to be dispossessed, but would make them dwell securely in their own land, in order that they might establish on their side those conditions of righteousness and justice which represented the national obligations, if Jehovah’s covenant with them was to be maintained. The possession of the land, the inheritance of Canaan, symbolized the people’s living in covenant with their God, and all those spiritual blessings which flowed from such a covenant. As every Jew regarded himself as an inheritor of the land of Canaan, so also is each Christian an inheritor of the Kingdom of heaven. Accordingly Canaan is the Holy Land, and Jehovah’s own inheritance; and Messiah when incarnate ‘came to His own country, and His own people received Him not. ’ ( b ) The Jews also recognized that the possession of Canaan had value only in so far as it assured them of the free exercise of their religion, and all other spiritual blessings
Kadmonite - They probably inhabited the Syro-Arabian desert between Palestine-Syria and the Euphrates—which is to say, areas to the east of Canaan
Negeb - The Israelites wandered in the Negeb after a futile attempt to enter Canaan (Numbers 14:44-45 )
Succoth - Jacob dwelt there upon his return to Canaan (Genesis 33:17 )
Hivites - One of the races found early in Palestine: they were descendants of Ham through Canaan
Abel-Misraim - On this occasion the funeral procession was, at the command of Joseph, attended by "all the elders of Egypt, and all the servants of Pharaoh, and all his house, and the house of his brethren, chariots and horsemen, a very great company;" an affecting proof, as it has been remarked, of Joseph's simplicity and singleness of heart, which allowed him to give to the great men of Egypt, over whom he bore absolute rule, an opportunity of observing his own comparatively humble origin, by leading them in attendance upon his father's corpse to the valleys of Canaan, the modest cradle of his race, and to their simple burial places
Sin, Desert of - " So the Lord gave them quails for a day, and manna for forty years, till they came to the borders of Canaan
Then - And the Canaanite was then in the land. Genesis 12 ...
That is, when Abram migrated and came into Canaan
Jeb'Usites - (descendants of Jebus ) , The, were descended from the third son of Canaan
di'Nah - ) She accompanied her father from Mesopotamia to Canaan, and, having ventured among the inhabitants, was violated by Shechem the son of Hamor, the chieftain of the territory in which her father had settled
Laban - Others, such as Abraham and Lot, moved south into Canaan (Genesis 11:31-32; Genesis 12:1-5)
Canaanites - the posterity of Canaan by his eleven sons, who are supposed to have settled in the land of Canaan, soon after the dispersion of Babel. Five of these are known to have dwelt in the land of Canaan; viz. Heth, Jebus, Hemor or Amor, Girgashi, and Hevi or Hivi; and these, together with their father Canaan, became the heads of so many nations. Sina or Sini was another son of Canaan, whose settlement is not so precisely ascertained; but some authors infer, from the affinity of the names, that the Desert of Sin, and Mount Sinai, were the places of his abode, and that they were so called from him. The Hittites inhabited the country about Hebron, as far as Beersheba, and the brook Besor, reckoned by Moses the southern limits of Canaan. The Perizzites, who make one of the seven nations of the Canaanites, are supposed, by Heylin and others, to be the descendants of Sina or Sini; and it is probable, since we do not read of their abode in cities, that they lived dispersed, and in tents, like the Sycthians, roving on both sides of the Jordan, on the hills and plains; and that they were called by that name from the Hebrew pharatz, which signifies "to disperse. " The Canaanites dwelt in the midst of all, and were surrounded by the rest. The learned have not absolutely determined whether the nations proceeding from Canaan's other six sons should be reckoned among the inhabitants of the land of Canaan. As to the customs, manners, arts, sciences, and language of the seven nations that inhabited the land of Canaan, they must, from the situation they severally occupied, have been very different. ) The colonies which Cadmus carried to Thebes in Baeotia, and his brother Cilix into Cilicia, are said to have proceeded from the stock of Canaan. Sicily, Sardinia, Malta, Cyprus, Corfu, Majorca, Minorca, Gades, and Ebutris, are supposed to have been peopled by the Canaanites. The other Canaanites, whose situation was inland, were employed partly in pasturage, and partly in tillage, and they were also well skilled in the exercise of arms. Those who dwelt in the walled cities, and who had fixed abodes, cultivated the land; and those who wandered about, as the Perizzites seem to have done, grazed cattle: so that among the Canaanites, we discover the various classes of merchants, and, consequently, mariners; of artificers, soldiers, shepherds, and husbandmen. Their religion, at least in part, seems to have been preserved pure till the days of Abraham, who acknowledged Melchisedek to be priest of the most high God; and Melchisedek was, without doubt, a Canaanite, or, at least, dwelt at that time in Canaan in high esteem and veneration. "The Canaanites," says Mr. When the measure of the idolatries and abominations of the Canaanites was filled up, God delivered their country into the hands of the Israelites, who conquered it under Joshua. However, they resisted with obstinate valour, and kept Joshua employed six years from the time of his passing the river Jordan, and entering Canaan, in the year B. In the time of Athanasius, the Africans still said they were descended from the Canaanites; and when asked their origin, they answered, "Canani. " It is agreed, that the Punic tongue was nearly the same as the Canaanitish or Hebrew. On the rigorous treatment of the nations of Canaan by the Israelites, to which infidels have taken so many exceptions, the following remarks of Paley are a sufficient reply: The first thing to be observed is, that the nations of Canaan were destroyed for their wickedness. Now the facts disclosed in this passage sufficiently testify, that the Canaanites were a wicked people; that detestable practices were general among them, and even habitual; that it was for these enormities the nations of Canaan were destroyed. The objection, therefore, is not to the Canaanitish nations being destroyed; (for when their national wickedness is considered, and when that is expressly stated as the cause of their destruction, the dispensation, however severe, will not be questioned;) but the objection is solely to the manner of destroying them. This being the actual persuasion which then prevailed in the world, no matter whether well or ill founded, how were the neighbouring nations, for whose admonition this dreadful example was intended, how were they to be convinced of the supreme power of the God of Israel above the pretended gods of other nations; and of the righteous character of Jehovah, that is, of his abhorrence of the vices which prevailed in the land of Canaan? How, I say, were they to be convinced so well, or at all indeed, as by enabling the Israelites, whose God he was known and acknowledged to be, to conquer under his banner, and drive out before them, those who resisted the execution of that commission with which the Israelites declared themselves to be invested, namely, the expulsion and extermination of the Canaanitish nations? This convinced surrounding countries, and all who were observers or spectators of what passed, first, that the God of Israel was a real God; secondly that the gods which other nations worshipped were either no gods, or had no power against the God of Israel; and thirdly, that it was he, and he alone, who possessed both the power and the will, to punish, to destroy, and to exterminate from before his face, both nations and individuals, who gave themselves up to the crimes and wickedness for which the Canaanites were notorious. "...
In reading the Old Testament account, therefore, of the Jewish wars and conquests in Canaan, and the terrible destruction brought upon the inhabitants thereof, we are always to remember that we are reading the execution of a dreadful but just sentence, pronounced by Jehovah against the intolerable and incorrigible crimes of these nations; that they were intended to be made an example to the whole world of God's avenging wrath against sins, which, if they had been suffered to continue, might have polluted the whole ancient world, and which could only be checked by the signal and public overthrow of nations notoriously addicted to them, and so addicted as even to have incorporated them into their religion and their public institutions; and that the Israelites were mere instruments in the hands of a righteous Providence for effecting the extirpation of a people, of whom it was necessary to make a public example to the rest of mankind; that this extermination, which might have been accomplished by a pestilence, by fire, by earthquakes, was appointed to be done by the hands of the Israelites, as being the clearest and most intelligible method of displaying the power and the righteousness of the God of Israel; his power over the pretended gods of other nations; and his righteous indignation against the crimes into which they were fallen
te'Rah - We learn from it simply that he was an idolater, (Joshua 24:2 ) that he dwelt beyond the Euphrates in Ur of the Chaldees, (Genesis 11:28 ) and that in the southwesterly migration, which from some unexplained cause he undertook in his old age, he went with his son Abram, his daughter-in-law Sarai, and his grandson Lot, "to go into the land of Canaan, and they came unto Haran, and dwelt there
Terah - Terah afterwards migrated with Abraham (probably his youngest son) and Lot (his grandson), together with their families, from Ur, intending to go with them to Canaan; but he tarried at Haran, where he spent the remainder of his days, and died at the age of two hundred and five years (Genesis 11:24-32 ; Joshua 24:2 )
Hauran (1) - Only in Ezekiel 47:16 ; Ezekiel 47:18 is the name mentioned, and there as the ideal border of Canaan on the east
Jehozadak - ) It is suggestive that the names of the last king and of the representative of the high priesthood in the captivity both express that the suspension of the throne and of the priesthood was Jehovah's righteous judgment for Judah's sins; moreover Joshua or Jeshua, who restored the temple altar, expresses salvation; as the former Joshua led the hitherto homeless Israelites into Canaan their inheritance; and as Jesus, the Antitype, saves us from our sins and leads us into the heavenly rest
Perizzites - They are several times the only people named along with the Canaanites. It is not known definitely in what part of Canaan they were originally located, but by Joshua 17:14-18 it was probably near Manasseh's lot on the west
Perizzite - One of the ten doomed tribes of Canaan (Genesis 15:19-21). The Canaanite and Perizzite are joined in Genesis 13:7
Abelmizraim - ' This would seem to place the seven days' mourning on the east of Jordan, before the body was carried into Canaan, for interment: cf. The inhabitants of the land being called Canaanites also points to the west; and it is remarkable that Jerome uses a similar expression in 'trans-Jordanem,' and then states that ATAD, which is the same place, was between the Jordan and Jericho
Zido'Nians, - They were among the nations of Canaan; left to give the Israelites practice in the art of war, (Judges 3:3 ) and colonies of them appear to have spread up into the hill country from Lebanon to Misrephothmaim, (Joshua 13:4,6 ) whence in later times they hewed cedar trees for David and Solomon
Ed - ]'>[1] in Joshua 22:11 , by a translation of doubtful admissibility, ‘in the forefront of the land of Canaan, on the side that pertaineth to the children of Israel
Ger'Izim - (cutters ), a limestone mountain, 2855 feet high (800 feet above the valley at its foot), in Ephraim, near Shechem (Sychar), from which the blessings were read to the Israelites on entering Canaan
Hittites - Descended from Cheth or Heth, second son of Canaan. Canaan toward Egypt, so the Hittites in the N
Phoenicia - (fee ni' cih uh) Place name meaning, “purple” or “crimson,” translation of Hebrew “Canaan,” land of purple. ...
Culture Phoenician religion was akin to that of the Canaanites, featuring fertility rites of Baal. See Canaan
Table of Nations - The descendants of Ham (Genesis 10:6-20 ) were located especially in the regions of North Africa and the coastal regions of Canaan and Syria. See Assyria; Babylon ; Canaan; Habiru ; Israel ; Mesopotamia ; Semites
Sidon - In the Old Testament Genesis 49:13 , and is believed to have been founded by Zidon, the eldest son of Canaan, Genesis 10:15 49:13 . Upon the division of Canaan among the tribes by Joshua, Great Zidon fell to the lot of Asher, Joshua 11:8 19:28 ; but that tribe never succeeded in obtaining possession, Judges 1:31 3:3 10:12
Esau - Moreover, in the case of Isaac’s firstborn, it included headship of God’s chosen people and the right to possess the land of Canaan. When Jacob returned to Canaan after twenty years, Esau went to meet him
Dan - In the original division of Canaan, Dan received its tribal portion on the Philistine coast between Judah and Ephraim (Joshua 19:40-48; Judges 5:17; Judges 13:1-2; Judges 14:1; Judges 16:23; for map see TRIBES). The place they decided upon was Laish, located in the fertile region of the Jordan headwaters in the far north of Canaan
Ed - half Manasseh built an altar at the boundary of (literally, in the fore part of, not as KJV over against) Canaan, by the gelilot (circles, i. In the phrase, "in the fore part," or "front of Canaan," the Ghor or sunken land along the Jordan on its W. side may be meant by "Canaan," as the Arabs there still call themselves Ghawarni (Conder). Or else "Canaan" may be used of the whole country of the nine and a half tribes, the Jordan valley being excepted; the altar Ed being in front of the country of the nine and a half tribes (Keil and Delitzsch)
Moreh - Abram's first halting place in Canaan, near Shechem and Ebal and Gerizim mountains (Genesis 12:6); here he erected his first altar
Omnipotence - God's power is revealed in God's creating and sustaining the universe (Psalm 65:6 ; Jeremiah 32:17 ; Hebrews 1:3 ), in God's deliverance of Israel from Pharaoh's forces (Exodus 15:1-18 ), in the conquest of Canaan (Deuteronomy 3:21-24 ), in the incarnation (Luke 1:35 ), in Christ's death on the cross (1 Corinthians 1:17-18 , 1 Corinthians 1:23-24 ), and in the ongoing ministry of the church (1 Corinthians 2:5 ; Ephesians 3:20 )
Girgashites - ]'>[2] ], Joshua 3:10 ; Jos 24:11 , 1 Chronicles 1:14 , Nehemiah 9:8 ), affords no indication of their position, or to what branch of the Canaanites they belonged, except in two instances, namely, Genesis 10:16 , where the ‘Girgashite’ is given as the name of the fifth son of Canaan; and Joshua 24:11 , where the Girgashites would seem to have inhabited the tract on the west of Jordan, the Israelites having been obliged to cross over that river in order to fight the men of Jericho, among whom were the Girgashites
Shuthelah - The affair with the men of Gath (Joshua 7:20-27; Joshua 8:13) was probably after Israel's settlement in Canaan; and Ephraim and Shuthelah mean the individuals of their descendants who represented them as heads of the tribe or family
Haran - Terah died there, Genesis 11:31-32; Abram and Lot moved to Canaan, Genesis 12:4, while Nahor remained at Haran, which was called the city of Nahor
Jezreel - This is the largest, and at the same time the most fertile, plain in the land of Canaan; and is called, by way of eminence, the Great Plain
Deborah - The nurse of Rebekah, and her companion into Canaan
Heshbon - The Amorites in turn lost it to the Israelites just before their attack on Canaan (Numbers 21:25-26; Deuteronomy 3:2)
Lot - Thus the lot was used at the division of the land of Canaan among the serveral tribes (Numbers 26:55 ; 34:13 ), at the detection of Achan (Joshua 7:14,18 ), the election of Saul to be king (1 Samuel 10:20,21 ), the distribution of the priestly offices of the temple service (1 Chronicles 24:3,5,19 ; Luke 1:9 ), and over the two goats at the feast of Atonement (Leviticus 16:8 ). On the death of his father, he was left in charge of his grandfather Terah (31), after whose death he accompanied his uncle Abraham into Canaan (12:5), thence into Egypt (10), and back again to Canaan (13:1)
Amorites - A people descended from Emer, the fourth son of Canaan, Genesis 10:16 . The name Amorite is often taken in Scripture for Canaanite in general, Genesis 15:16 Amos 2:9 . See CanaanITES . " Ezekiel 16:3 , God reminds the Jews that they were naturally no more worthy of divine favor than the worst of the heathen Canaanites
Shem - In the other tradition ( Genesis 9:20-27 ) ‘Shem’ stands for a people in Palestine the Hebrews, or some portion of them with whom ‘Japheth’ lived in close conjunction, and to whom ‘Canaan’ was subjugated
Judah - ...
Soon after the sale of Joseph to the Ishmaelites, Judah went to reside at Adullam, where he married a woman of Canaan
Ed - " This great altar stood probably on the east side of the Jordan, in the land of Gilead, "over against the land of Canaan
Atad - ) A trodden space for threshing, beyond Jordan, where Joseph and his brethren and the Egyptian retinue made for seven days "great and very sore lamentation" over the body of Jacob, whence the Canaanites called the place Abel Mizraim, "the mourning of the Egyptians. " Canaan being the central standpoint of the sacred history, the E. The Canaanites, "the inhabitants of the land," were on the W
Lasha - limit of Canaan = Callirhoe, famed for warm springs, E. Wilton (Imperial Dictionary) suggests that (See LAISH at the Jordan's sources is Lasha, for the Canaanites probably had no settlement E. , which Laish is (Genesis 10:19); the spies found the Canaanites dwelling "by the side of the Jordan" (Numbers 13:29), probably therefore at its sources at Laish. Laish moreover was connected with Canaanite Sidon, though far from it (Judges 18:7; Judges 18:28)
Roe - Israel ate the gazelle in the wilderness, and the flesh of flocks and herds only when offered in sacrifice; but in Canaan they might eat the flesh, "even as the gazelle" (Deuteronomy 12:15; Deuteronomy 12:22); Isaac's venison was front it (Genesis 27)
Caleb - ” Caleb the son of Jephunneh, was one of the twelve spies sent by Moses to reconnoiter the territory of Canaan (Numbers 13:6 )
Moreh - Abraham's first encampment in the land of Canaan was at Moreh
Gerar - On the southern border of Canaan, near Gaza and Beersheba (Genesis 10:19; Genesis 20:1; Genesis 26:1-26)
Census - ...
Another census was made just before the entrance into Canaan, when the number was found to be 601,730, showing thus a small decrease (Numbers 26:51 )
Washing of Regeneration - ...
The words "saved us by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost," show that there is a present escape and deliverance from the world and its course, and an entrance into those things which characterise the world to come, of which the Holy Ghost is now the revealer and power, even as Israel escaped from Egypt and its shame through the Red Sea, and anticipated Canaan in their song of praise
Hamath - It was founded by a son of Canaan, Genesis 10:18; Numbers 34:8, and was situated in the valley of the Orontes
Honey - Canaan is described as a land "flowing with milk and honey
Amalekite - Israel won the initial battle (Exodus 17:8-16 ), but later was driven back into the Sinai wilderness by a coalition of Amalekites and Canaanites (Numbers 14:39-45 ). Fighting continued after Israel settled in Canaan
Heber - But others have suggested, with greater probability, that Abraham and his family were thus called, because they came from the other side of the Euphrates into Canaan; Heber signifying in the Hebrew language one that passes, or, a passage, that is, of the river Euphrates. Such were Abraham and his family among the Canaanites; and his posterity, learning and using the language of the country, still retained the appellation originally given them, even when they became possessors and settled inhabitants
Chinnereth - It formed the eastern border of Canaan, the Promised Land (Numbers 34:11 ), marking the western boundary of the tribe of Gad (Joshua 13:27 )
Jebusites - In the list of the descendants of Noah (Genesis 10:1 ) the Jebusites are traced through the line of Ham and Canaan and are listed alongside other clans such as the Amorites and Girgashites
Deborah - The nurse of Rebekah, whom she accompanied from Aram into Canaan, Genesis 24:1-67
Laban - When the prosperity of the one family and the jealousy of the other rendered peace impossible, Jacob, at the command of God, secretly departed, to go to Canaan
Iron - He compares the bondage in Egypt to a furnace for smelting iron, and speaks of the iron ore of Canaan, Deuteronomy 3:11 4:20 8:9
Win - --Who thus shall Canaan win
Hit'Tits - (descendans of Heth ) , The, the nation descended from Cheth (Authorized Version HETH ), the second son of Canaan. (Genesis 23:19 ; 25:9 ) When the Israelites entered the promised land, we find the Hittites taking part against the invader, in equal alliance with the other Canaanite tribes
Ham - The sons of Ham are stated, to have been "Cush and Mizraim and Phut and Canaan
Sword - The sword used by the Israelites in the conquest of Canaan probably was the long-bladed, curved sword (Joshua 6:21 ). ...
The Sea Peoples introduced to Canaan the two-edged long sword made of iron
Jael - Canaan where his brethren had settled at the conquest of Canaan by Joshua, had encamped under the oaks named the "oaks of the wanderers" (KJV "plain of Zaanaim," Judges 4:11), near Kedesh Naphtali in the N
Fountain - The natural bursting of waters from the ground, which drank of the rain of heaven (Deuteronomy 8:7; Deuteronomy 11:11), would on Israel's entrance into Canaan form a striking contrast to Egypt watered from below "with the foot," i. Canaan as a mountainous country depended for its crops on the rain from above, without which in the late autumn to quicken the newly sown seed, and in the spring to swell the grain, the harvest would fail
Allotment - ...
The allotment of the land of Canaan to the tribes of Israel is recorded in Numbers 32:1 and Joshua 13-19 . Asher inhabited the northernmost corner of Canaan, claiming much seacoast and reaching as far as Sidon the Great
Wilderness - ...
Typically the wilderness was outside Canaan, and stands in contrast to it. Canaan is figuratively a heavenly position and conflict, corresponding with the need of the armour of Ephesians 6:11 , to stand against the wiles of the devil
Joshua - He was also one of the twelve who were sent on by Moses to explore the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:16,17 ), and only he and Caleb gave an encouraging report. Having thus subdued the Canaanites, Joshua divided the land among the tribes, Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim being assigned to himself as his own inheritance. " ...
Joshua has been regarded as a type of Christ (Hebrews 4:8 ) in the following particulars: (1) In the name common to both; (2) Joshua brings the people into the possession of the Promised Land, as Jesus brings his people to the heavenly Canaan; and (3) as Joshua succeeded Moses, so the Gospel succeeds the Law. Alike in bringing the people into Canaan, in his wars, and in the distribution of the land among the tribes, from the miraculous crossing of Jordan and taking of Jericho to his last address, he was the embodiment of his new name, 'Jehovah is help
Paran - Paran comprises one third of the peninsula which lies between Egypt and Canaan, the eastern half of the limestone plateau which forms the center of the peninsula. by southern Canaan; on the W. The Zin (not Sin) wilderness, Canaan's (Numbers 34:3) immediate boundary, was its N. ) In 1 Samuel 25:1-2 the southern parts of Canaan are called Paran
Wanderings in the Wilderness - The shortest, most northerly, route along the Mediterranean shoreline was not taken because of a possible encounter with Egyptian military guarding oasis forts or returning from regular incursions and punitive raids in Canaan (Exodus 13:17 ). When that generation of military died, the camp of Israel again was mobilized for the assault on Canaan. Their attempt to enter Canaan from the south was stopped by the king of Arad, and so a very difficult detour southward to the head of the Gulf of Aqaba and northeastward around Edomite and Moabite lands (Numbers 20:14 ; Deuteronomy 2:1 ) brought them finally to Mount Nebo overlooking the Jordan Valley north of the Dead Sea. Many scholars therefore conclude that Numbers 33:1 is a combined compilation of place names that are related to pre-Mosaic infiltration from Egypt to Canaan by way of the King's Highway, the place along the second route around Edomite-Moabite territory followed by the Moses/Joshua-led contingent and all those places visited by the Israelites during those 38 punitive years of desert wanderings when like the nomads of every generation they sought water and pasturage for their flocks within that hostile arid environment of the Sinai
Canaan, Land of - The land possessed by the descendants of Canaan, the son of Ham, which was until recently called PALESTINE. 'From Dan to Beersheba' became the common way of describing the whole of Canaan. ...
The land of Canaan may be described as having four zones: by the Mediterranean Sea a plain runs from north to south, much wider in the south thanin the north; it is broken into by Mount Carmel running across it. ...
The name Palestine is often now used as synonymous with Canaan, but in the scripture that term and 'Palestina' refer to the land of the Philistines, the narrow border on the sea coast in the south of Canaan
Canaan - From Ham came four main races; Cush (Ethiopia), Mizraim (Egypt), Phut (Nubia), and Canaan (originally before Abraham extending from Hamath in the N. ), comprising six chief tribes, the Hittites, Hivites, Amorites, Jebusites, Perizzites, and Girgashites; to which the Canaanites (in the narrow sense) being added make up the mystic number seven. The Phoenicians were Semitic (from Shem), but the Canaanites preceded them in Palestine and Lower Syria. Sidon, Area, Arvad, and Zemara or Simra (Genesis 15:19-21) originally were Canaanite; afterward they fell under the Phoenicians, who were immigrants into Syria from the shores of the Persian gulf, peaceable traffickers, skillful in navigation and the arts, and unwar-like except by sea. ...
With these the Israelites were on friendly terms; but with the Canaanites fierce and war-like, having chariots of iron, Israel was commanded never to be at peace, but utterly to root them out; not however the Arvadite. The Semitic names Melchizedek, Hamer, Sisera, Salem, Ephrath are doubtless not the original Canaanite names, but their Hebraized forms. Noah's prophetic curse was therefore to reach him in the person of Canaan his son (the sorest point to a parent), on whom the curse is thrice pronounced. His sin was to be his punishment; Canaan should be as undutiful to him as he had been to his father Noah. Canaan probably shared in and prompted his father's guilt toward Noah; for Noah's "younger son" probably means his "grandson" (Genesis 9:24), and the curse being pronounced upon Canaan, not Ham, implies Canaan's leading guilt, being the first to expose to Ham Noah's shame. Canaan's name also suggested his doom, from kaanah , "to stoop. So Canaan was to be "servant of servants," i. Canaan more than any other of Ham's race came in contact with and obstructed Shem and Japhet in respect to the blessings foretold to them. ...
The Hamitic descent of Canaan was formerly questioned, but is now proved by the monuments. The ancients represent the Canaanites as having moved from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean. The Canaanites acquired the Semitic tongue through Semitic and Hamitic races intermingling. The Canaanites were Scythic or Hamite. ...
Some think Canaan means "lowland", from Hebrew kana , "to depress. " In Ezekiel 17:4; Isaiah 23:8; Hosea 12:7, Canaan is taken in the secondary sense," merchant," because the Hebrew bears that sense; but that was not the original sense. In spite of the awful warning given by the doom of Sodom and Gomorrah, Canaanite profligacy at last became a reproach to humanity; and the righteous Ruler of the world required that the land originally set apart for Shem, and where Jehovah was to be blessed as the God of Shem (Genesis 9:26), should be wrested from "the families of the Canaanites spread abroad," and encroaching beyond their divinely assigned limits (Genesis 10:18). The Hamite races, originally the most brilliant and enlightened (Egypt, Babylon, Canaan), had the greatest tendency to degenerate, because the most disinclined to true religion, the great preserver of men. Procopius, Belisarius' secretary, confirms the Scripture account, of the expulsion of the Canaanites, for he mentions a monument in Tigitina (Tangiers) with the inscription, "We are exiles from before the face of Joshua the robber. sent three letters to the Canaanites, before the Israelites invaded it, proposing three things: Let those who choose to fly, fly; let those who choose peace, enter into treaty; let those who choose war, take up arms. The warnings given to Israel against defiling themselves with the abominations of the previous occupiers of Canaan show that the Israelites were not ruthless invaders, but the divinely appointed instruments to purge the land of transgressors hopelessly depraved. " The Canaanites had the respite of centuries, the awful example of the cities of the plain, and the godly example of Abraham, Melchizedek, and others; but all failed to lead them to repentance. So far was the extermination from being the effect of bloodthirstiness, that as soon as the terror of immediate punishment was withdrawn they neglected God's command by sparing the remnant of the Canaanites. ...
The Israelites by being made the instruments of exterminating the idolatrous Canaanites were made to feel Jehovah's power to make man the instrument of punishing idolatry, and so were impressed with a salutary terror, preparing them for being governed without further miraculous interposition. Their constitution, encouraging agriculture, prohibiting horses, and requiring their attendance at the one house of God thrice a year, checked the spirit of conquest which otherwise the subjugation of Canaan might have engendered. ) The Canaanites' first settlement in Palestine was on the Mediterranean, in the region of Tyre and Sidon; thence they spread throughout the land. ) In Genesis 12:6 "the Canaanite was then in the land" is no gloss (as if it meant the Canaanite was STILL in the land), nor proof of the Pentateuch's composition after Israel had driven them out, but implies that the aboriginal peoples (compare Genesis 14:5-7) were by this time dispossessed, and the Canaanite settlers ALREADY in the land (compare Genesis 13:7). Canaan is in Scripture made the type of the heavenly land of rest and inheritance (Hebrews 4:1-11). ...
The new heaven and earth, purged of all them that offend, shall be the portion of those who, like Caleb and Joshua, have previously in faith trodden the earth occupied by the ungodly, of whom the Canaanites are the type. The lowland especially was the country of the Canaanites; the plains between the Mediterranean on one side, and the hills of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim on the other; the shephelah , or low hills of Philistia, on the S. of the Dead Sea, 120 miles, with a breadth from eight to 14; this, the most sunken region in Palestine, also was occupied by the Canaanite; Amalek occupied the S. ...
So too, Genesis 10:18-20, the border of the Canaanites was the seashore from Sidon on the N. The chariots of iron could be used in the Canaanites' plains, but not in the mountains. Canaan in the larger sense is used for the whole country. ...
God's promise to Abraham was, "Unto thy seed have I given this land from the river of Egypt unto the great river the river Euphrates, the Kenites, the Kenezites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaims, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites" (Genesis 15:18-21). In Numbers 34:1-12 the bounds of Canaan W. ...
Ganneau derives the modern fellaheen from the Canaanites, arguing from their language, manners, customs, and superstitious, and the analogy which there is between Joshua's invasion and that of Caliph Omar. The Israelite invaders as shepherds could not at once have become agriculturists, but would compel the subject Canaanites to until for them the land. The "places" (maqowm ) which God commanded Israel to destroy, where the Canaanites "served their gods upon the high mountains, and hills, and under every green tree" (Deuteronomy 12:2), exactly answer to the fellaheen 's Arabic makam (the same word as in Deuteronomy) in Palestine, or Mussulman kubbehs with little white topped cupolas dotted over the hills. Their fetishism also for certain isolated trees marks the site of the Canaanite worship which God forbade; an oath on their local sanctuary is far more binding to them than on the name of God
Sihon - A king of the Amorites at the time of the conquest of Canaan
Samaritan Pentateuch - Thus Exodus 12:40 in the Samaritan reads, "Now the sojourning of the children of Israel and of their fathers which they had dwelt in the land of Canaan and in Egypt was four hundred and thirty years" (Compare Galatians 3:17 )
Eshcol - A wady in southern Canaan, somewhere in the vinebearing district (miles of hill sides and valleys covered with small stone heaps for training vines) between Hebron (Genesis 13:18; Genesis 14:13) and Kadesh, but nearer Kadesh (Ain-el-Gadis) on the northern frontier of the peninsula, the Negeb or the "south
Beer - Tradition made this the last appearance of the water that "followed" the people before their entrance into Canaan; compare 1 Corinthians 10:4
Nebo (1) - Also the Mount of Moab, from which Moses viewed Canaan (Deuteronomy 32:49; Deuteronomy 34:1)
Earnest of the Spirit: the Pledge of Heaven - The Spirit's work of comfort and sanctification is a part of heaven's covenant blessings, a turf from the soil of Canaan, a twig from the tree of life, the key to mansions in the skies
Mesopotamia - At times in antiquity the culture of Mesopotamia dominated an even larger area, spreading east into Elam and Media, north into Asia Minor, and following the fertile cresent into Canaan and Egypt
Miriam - ...
Miriam died in the wilderness between Egypt and Canaan
Lebo-Hamath - Whatever its precise location, Lebo-hamath represented the northern boundary of Canaan promised to Israel (Numbers 13:21 ; compare Ezekiel 48:1 ), not conquered by Joshua (Joshua 13:5 ; Judges 3:3 ), controlled by David (1 Chronicles 13:5 ) and Solomon (1 Kings 8:65 ), and restored to Israel by Jeroboam II about 793-753 B
Calves, Golden - The bull was used to represent many gods in the Ancient Near East, particularly Amon-Re in Egypt and El and Baal in Canaan
Shoshannim - SHUSHAN EDUTH (Psalm 60) is "the lily of testimony"; God's promise (Genesis 49; Deuteronomy 33; Numbers 24:17-19) of Canaan to Israel (Numbers 24:6) is His lovely testimony, of which the assurance was already given in a partial deliverance (Numbers 24:4-5)
Alliance - On the Israelites entering into Canaan they were forbidden to make any league with the people of the land, they were not to show them any mercy, nor to make any marriages with them, Deuteronomy 7:2,3 ; and later, when Joshua was about to die, he said to them, that with the nations that were still left they were to make no marriages, nor to go in unto them
ai, Hai - Royal city of Canaan
Habakkuk - The promise of the Messiah is confirmed; the overruling providence of God is asserted; and the concluding prayer, or rather hymn, recounts the wonders which God had wrought for his people, when he led them from Egypt into Canaan, and expresses the most perfect confidence in the fulfilment of his promises
Nethinim - Given, or consecrated, a term first applied to the Levites, Numbers 8:19 ; but after the settlement in Canaan, to servants dedicated to the service of the tabernacle and temple, to perform the most laborious offices, as carrying of wood and water. At first the Gibeonites were destined to this station, Judges 9:27 ; afterwards, other Canaanites who surrendered themselves, and whose lives were spared
mo'Reh - The oak of Moreh was the first recorded halting-place of Abram after his entrance into the land of Canaan
la'Ban - ) The elder branch of the family remained at Haran, Mesopotamia, when Abraham removed to the land of Canaan, and it is there that we first meet with Laban, as taking the leading part in the betrothal of his sister Rebekah to her cousin Isaac
Chariot - When the Israelites entered Canaan under Joshua, they were successful in conquering the hill country, but had difficulty in conquering the plains. The reason for this was that the local Canaanites were well equipped with chariots (Joshua 11:4; Joshua 17:16; Judges 1:19; Judges 4:13; 1 Samuel 13:5)
Lot - Terah had intended to travel to Canaan, but stayed in Haran instead (Genesis 11:31 ). When Abraham left Haran for Canaan, he was accompanied by Lot and Lot's household (Genesis 12:5 ). ...
After traveling throughout Canaan and into Egypt, Abraham and Lot finally settled between Bethel and Ai, about ten miles north of Jerusalem (Genesis 13:3 ). This detail not only recalls Abraham's nearly disastrous journey to Egypt to avoid the famine in Canaan (Genesis 12:10-20 ) but also foreshadows the journey that Jacob and his family would later make (Genesis 42-50 )—a journey that did have disastrous consequences (Exodus 1:8-14 ). One is also reminded that Terah gave up his pilgrimage to Canaan to settle in the city of Haran (Genesis 11:31 )
Ham - ancestor) of Cush (Ethiopia), Mizraim (See EGYPT), Phut (Libya), and Canaan. Ham is supposed to be youngest of Noah's sons from Genesis 9:24, but "younger (Hebrew: little) son" there probably means Noah's grandson, namely, Canaan, not Ham
Beriah - In Joshua 13:2-3 the Sihor, or (Pelusiac branch of) the Nile, is the boundary between Egypt and Canaan; and in Genesis 46:34 the pastoral population in Goshen being an "abomination to the Egyptians," Goshen must have been regarded as non-Egyptian, but a kind of border land between the two countries, Egypt and Canaan
Simeon - ...
When Canaan was divided among the twelve tribes, Simeon did not receive an independent tribal area of its own. It received part of the area of Judah (since Judah’s area was too large for it) in the south of Canaan
Ishmael - He was born at Mamre, when Abraham was eighty-six years of age, eleven years after his arrival in Canaan (16:3; 21:5). ) Ishmael settled in the land of Paran, a region lying between Canaan and the mountains of Sinai; and "God was with him, and he became a great archer" ( Genesis 21:9-21 )
Jericho - Its first mention in the Bible concerns events about 1240 BC, when the Israelites under Joshua approached Canaan from the plains of Moab, crossed the Jordan River and conquered Jericho in their first battle in Canaan (Numbers 22:1; Joshua 2; Joshua 3; Joshua 4; Joshua 5; Joshua 6)
Tribes of Israel - Joseph is younger than the others because it entered and settled in Canaan later than Simeon, Levi, and Judah, etc. The order of arrangement, it would therefore seem, depended upon the author’s view of the time of a tribe’s respective settlement or origin in Canaan. Dan and Naphtali, Gad and Asher the Canaanite tribes of the concubines who were admitted to union with the other tribes owe their position also to these principles. Excluding Benjamin, who was born in Canaan, and the four tribes descended from the concubines, there remain only seven as extra-Canaanitish. It is possible that the tribes which entered Canaan under Reuben’s leadership, or during his supremacy, were classed under Leah, while those which followed under the lead of Joseph were classed under Rachel
Isaac - The promises were that God would make Isaac’s descendants into a people for himself, that he would give them Canaan as their homeland, and that through them he would bring blessing to the whole world (Genesis 22:15-18). ...
In seeking a wife for Isaac, Abraham insisted that she come not from the Canaanites (who were under God’s judgment) but from his relatives in Paddan-aram. Since Isaac himself was not to leave the land promised to him (Canaan), Abraham sent his most senior servant to find the wife for him (Genesis 24:2-6). ...
When a famine hit Canaan, Isaac proved his faith and his obedience by refusing to flee to Egypt (Genesis 26:1-5)
Canaan - The Hebrews believe that Canaan, having first discovered Noah's nakedness, told his father Ham; and that Noah, when he awoke, having understood what had passed, cursed Canaan, the first author of the offence. Others are of opinion that Ham was punished in his son Canaan, Genesis 9:25 . For though Canaan is mentioned, Ham is not exempted from the malediction; on the contrary, he suffers more from it, since parents are more affected with their children's misfortunes than with their own; especially if the evils have been inflicted through some fault or folly of theirs. Some have thought that Canaan may be put elliptically for the father of Canaan, that is, Ham, as it is rendered in the Arabic and Septuagint translations. ...
The posterity of Canaan was numerous. Canaan had ten other sons, who were fathers of as many tribes, dwelling in Palestine and Syria; namely, the Hittites, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgasites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hemathites. It is believed that Canaan lived and died in Palestine, which from him was called the land of Canaan. Notwithstanding the curse is directed against Canaan the son, and not against Ham the father, it is often supposed that all the posterity of Ham were placed under the malediction, "Cursed be Canaan; a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren. "...
But the true reason why Canaan only was mentioned probably is, that the curse was in fact restricted to the posterity of Canaan. But Canaan alone, in his descendants, is cursed, and Ham only in that branch of his posterity. It follows that the subjugation of the Canaanitish races to Israel fulfils the prophecy. Part of the seven nations of the Canaanites were made slaves to the Israelites, when they took possession of their land; and the remainder by Solomon. ...
Canaan, LAND OF. This river was the eastern boundary of the land of Canaan, or Palestine, properly so called, which derived its name from the Philistines or Palestines originally inhabiting the coast. In the time of David, the people of Israel, women and children included, amounted, on the lowest computation, to five millions; beside the tributary Canaanites, and other conquered nations. The land of Canaan is characterized as flowing with milk and honey; and it still answers to this description; for it contains extensive pasture lands of the richest quality, and the rocky country is covered with aromatic plants, yielding to the wild bees, who hive in the hollow of the rocks, such abundance of honey as to supply the poorer classes with an article of food. The grand distinction of Canaan, however, is, that it was the only part of the earth made, by divine institution, a type of heaven
Hormah - ” City marking the limit of the Canaanite rout of the Israelites after the failed Israelite attempt to invade Canaan that followed the report of the twelve spies (Numbers 14:45 )
Nephilim - The other notice is Numbers 13:33 , where the name is applied to men of gigaotic stature seen by the spies among the natives of Canaan
Shechinah - It is probable that after the entrance into Canaan this glory-cloud settled in the tabernacle upon the ark of the covenant in the most holy place
Lot (2) - Early used to decide an issue; so in choosing each of the two goats on the day of atonement (two inscribed tablets of boxwood were the lots used according to Joma 3:9 (?)), Leviticus 16:8, and in assigning the inheritances in Canaan (Numbers 26:55; Numbers 34:13), in selecting men for an expedition (Judges 1:1; Judges 20:10), in electing a king (1 Samuel 10:20), in detecting the guilty (1 Samuel 14:41-42), in selecting an apostle (Acts 1:26), as formerly priests' offices among the 16 of Eleazar's family and the eight of Ithamar (1 Chronicles 24:3; 1 Chronicles 24:5; 1 Chronicles 24:19; Luke 1:9), in apportioning spoil (Obadiah 1:11; Joel 3:3), in dividing Jesus' garments (Matthew 27:35; Psalms 22:18)
Zebulun, Tribe of - Numbered at Sinai (Numbers 1:31 ) and before entering Canaan (26:27). It was one of the tribes which did not drive out the Canaanites, but only made them tributary (Judges 1:30 )
Maacah - son of Nahor, Abraham's brother (Genesis 22:24 ); this Maacah perhaps gave his name to the Aramean kingdom west of Basham and southwest of Mount Hermon; the residents of this kingdom, the Maachathites (ma a thites), were not driven out during the Israelite conquest of Canaan (Joshua 13:13 )
Stars - It is one of many miracles that attest to the power of our God and is similar to the pillar of fire used to demonstrate God's presence and might to the children of Israel as they made their way to the land of Canaan
Jebusites - A race of people, descendants of Canaan, son of Ham, living in Palestine when the land was promised to Abraham
Forehead - ...
Ezekiel 16:12 (a) A picture of the loveliness and the beauty which GOD put on Israel when He gave them to be the head of the nations, and placed them in Canaan which He calls the glory of all lands
Hazor - It was taken and burnt by Joshua; rebuilt and allotted to Naphtali, but was retaken by a second Jabin, king of Canaan, who was defeated by Deborah and Barak
Embalming - When Jacob died in Egypt, "Joseph commanded his servants, the physicians, to embalm his father, for burial in Canaan
Nehushtan - We find, by what is said of Hezekiah's destroying it, that the Israelites had preserved it, and brought it with them into Canaan
Caleb - Of all the twelve, Caleb and Joshua acted the part of true and faithful men; and they only, of all the grown men of Israel, were permitted to enter Canaan, Numbers 14:6-24,38 26:65
Beer-Sheba - Robinson found its site at Bir-es-Seba, on the border of the great desert south of Canaan-the ruins of a small straggling city, and two deep stone wells of excellent water, surrounded by stone troughs, and bearing the marks of great antiquity
ko'Rah - (Genesis 36:5,14,18 ; 1 Chronicles 1:35 ) He was born in Canaan before Esau migrated to Mount Seir, (Genesis 36:5-9 ) and was one of the "dukes" of Edom
Earthquake - The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, the stopping of the Jordan River at the time of Israel’s entrance into Canaan, and the collapse of the walls of Jericho may all have involved earthquake activity
Ashkelon - ...
At the time of Joshua’s invasion of Canaan, the Israelites captured Ashkelon (Judges 1:18), but the Philistines soon regained it
Meribah - " So Jehovah excluded Moses and Aaron from entering Canaan, for not "sanctifying" Him (Numbers 20:1-13). This repetition of the miracle disproves the notion from 1 Corinthians 10:4 that the stream literally "followed" them from Rephidim (Exodus 17) to Canaan; all that is meant is a supply of water from time to time was provided naturally or miraculously, so that they never perished from thirst (so Exodus 15:24-25; Numbers 21:16)
Divination - Diviners also abounded among the aborigines of Canaan and the Philistines (Isaiah 2:6 ; 1 Samuel 28 ). The land of Canaan was divided by lot (Numbers 26:55,56 ); Achan's guilt was detected (Joshua 7:16-19 ), Saul was elected king (1 Samuel 10:20,21 ), and Matthias chosen to the apostleship, by the solem lot (Acts 1:26 )
Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - ...
1151...
1608...
Canaan entered. ...
1280...
Settlement in Canaan under Joshua
Achan - ) Israel entered Canaan to take possession of land desecrated by its previous tenants, not as a mere selfish spoil, but for God's glory. The spoil of Jericho was the firstfruits of Canaan, sacred to Jehovah; Achan's sacrilegious covetousness in appropriating it needed to be checked at the outset, lest the sin spreading should mar the end for which Canaan was given to Israel
Haran - " A celebrated city of Western Asia, now Harran, where Abram remained, after he left Ur of the Chaldees, till his father Terah died (Genesis 11:31,32 ), when he continued his journey into the land of Canaan
Nebo - Israel captured the area around Mount Nebo as they marched toward Canaan
Caleb - As an individual , he appears as one of the spies who were sent to ‘spy out the land’ of Canaan
Creation, the New - Still, while in the body he is not entirely free from contact with the old creation: the wilderness life is a part of christian life, as well as Canaan and its conflicts
Gibeon - They were descendants, it is probable, from the Hivites; that is, of the nations of Canaan whom the Lord would drive out before Israel
Mount Gerizim - This mount lay on the other side Jordan towards the way of the going down of the sun in Canaan
Caleb - The son of Jephunneh, one of the twelve spies sent by Moses to Canaan
Mamre - In Genesis 23:19 , it is said, that "Abraham buried Sarah in the cave of the field of Machpelah, before Mamre: the same is Hebron in the land of Canaan
Olive Tree - Canaan much abounded with olives
Beer-Sheba - In the often-quoted "from Dan even to Beersheba," Judges 2:1, it represents the southern boundary of Canaan, as San the northern
Famine - Two are mentioned as occurring in Canaan in the days of Abraham and Isaac, compelling those patriarchs to remove to Egypt and to Gerar
Wilderness - Wilderness, The, in which the Israelites spent 40 years, between Egypt and Canaan, is called sometimes the "great and terrible wilderness" by way of eminence
Kadesh or Kadesh-Barnea - At the first visit the mission and return of the twelve spies took place, the rebellion of the people, and their presumptuous effort to enter Canaan by the pass Zephath, immediately north of Kadesh, Numbers 13:1-14:45
Rephaim - In the time of Joshua, some of their descendants dwelt in the land of Canaan, Joshua 12:4 17:15 , and we hear of them in David's time, in the city of Gath, 1 Chronicles 20:4-6
ca'Leb - ) ...
Son of Jephunneh, one of the twelve spies sent by Moses to Canaan
ha'Math - The Hamathites were a Hamitic race, and are included among the descendants of Canaan
Barak - Incited by Deborah the prophetess to deliver Israel from the yoke of Jabin II, king of northern Canaan, of which Hazor, on lake Merom (now Hulah), was the capital. Heretofore, foes without, Mesopotamia and Moab, had chastised Israel; but now their sin provokes God to raise an oppressor within their own borders, Canaan itself! Jabin seduced them into idolatry, besides oppressing them (Judges 5:8)
Canaanitish - CANAANITISH. —The Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 rendering of Χαναναία (Authorized Version ‘of Canaan’) in Matthew 15:22 (only here in NT). A Canaanite, signifying properly ‘dweller in the lowland,’ is used in a wider or a narrower meaning in the OT, Canaan being a name applied either to the strip of seacoast from Gaza to Sidon, or, more loosely, to the whole possession of Israel, or that part which lay west of Jordan (Genesis 10:19; cf. The LXX Septuagint renders Canaanite (בְּנַעֲנִי) indifferently by Φοίνιξ and Χαναναῖος (Exodus 6:15, Joshua 5:1, Numbers 13:29, (Numbers 13:30), Judges 1:30-33, while in Exodus 16:35 and Joshua 5:12 we find אָרָץ כְנַעַן translation by μέρος τῆς Φοινίκης and χώρα τῶν Φοινίκων. These coast inhabitants being the great traders of the old world, ‘Canaanite’ or ‘Phœnician’ was often used simply to mean ‘a merchant’ (Isaiah 23:8 [1], and cf. ...
The woman who came to our Lord was a ‘Canaanite’ in the sense that she belonged to the stock of the old Phœnicians of Syria termed ‘Syro-phœnician’ to distinguish them from those of Africa
Bee - Serid, or Seriad, means "the land of the hive;" and Canaan was celebrated as "a land flowing with milk and honey. " The Amorites, it appears, were the most bitter adversaries to Israel of all the nations of Canaan
Genesis - He promised to make from Abraham a nation, to make that nation his people, and to give them Canaan as a national homeland. ...
After God announced to Abraham his promise of blessing (11:27-12:3), Abraham and his household moved into Canaan. ...
Jacob moved from Canaan to Mesopotamia to obtain a wife among his parents’ relatives. He then left to settle again in Canaan (28:10-31:55)
Hittites And Hivites - Non-Semitic minorities within the population of Canaan who frequently became involved in the affairs of the Israelites. ...
Hittite and Hivite peoples of Indo-European origin, identified within the population of Canaan (as “sons” of Canaan) in the Table of Nations (Genesis 10:15 ,Genesis 10:15,10:17 ), seemingly infiltrated from their cultural and political centers in the north and settled throughout Palestine. ...
Hittites in the Bible Hittites appear among the ethnic groups living in urban enclaves or as individuals in Canaan interacting with the Israelites from patriarchal times to the end of the monarchy (Genesis 15:20 ; Deuteronomy 7:1 ; Judges 3:5 ). As a significant segment of the Canaan's population, these “children of Heth” permanently became identified as “sons” of Canaan (Genesis 10:15 ). In Canaan, the Hittites established a claim on the southern hill country, especially the Hebron area. Moses' listing of the inhabitants of the Promised Land included the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Hivites, and Jebusites (Exodus 13:5 ), a situation that was confirmed by the twelve spies sent to explore the land. They reported that Amalekites occupied the Negev, the Hittites, the Jebusites, and Amorites lived in the hill country, and the Canaanites were concentrated along the Mediterranean coast and the Jordan Valley (Numbers 13:29 ; Joshua 11:3 ); thus the Hittites were doomed to displacement by the infiltrating and invading Hebrews (Exodus 3:8 ,Exodus 3:8,3:17 ; Exodus 23:23 ; Exodus 33:2 ; etc. ...
Devastation and pressures from the west by the Phrygians and the Sea Peoples brought another Hittite population to Canaan about 1200 B
Land (of Israel) - Just before the children of Israel entered the land of Canaan, Moses reiterated the Law as recorded in the Book of Deuteronomy. Numbers 34:1-5 sets forth the southern borders of the land of Canaan. When God described the land of Canaan to Moses, he used the term "milk and honey" to imply the bountifulness of the land (Exodus 3:8,17 ; 13:5 ; 33:3 ; Leviticus 20:24 ). When the twelve spies returned from the land of Canaan, they recounted their adventures and characterized the land as "flowing with milk and honey" (Numbers 13:27 ; 14:8 ). ...
When Israel entered the land of Canaan, the hill country was uninhabited and covered with natural forests and thickets. The Canaanites lived in the valleys and cultivated them (Joshua 17:16 ). The twelve spies returning from their trip into the land of Canaan carried the bounty of the summer harvestgrapes, pomegranates, and figsfrom the cultivated Valley of Eshkol (Numbers 13:23 ). Just before the children of Israel entered the land, Moses contrasted the land of Canaan with Egypt
Anakim - of Canaan
Admiration - They are men wondered at, (Zechariah 3:8) In this sense, the Lord Jesus admired and praised, it may be said, by the notice he took of it, the faith of the centurion, and the faith of the woman of Canaan
Aram - In contrast to Canaan, the lowland bordering on the Mediterranean
Armageddon - The plain of Esdraelon, the great Old Testament battle field between Israel and the various enemies of Jehovah's people: the scene of Barak's victory over Canaan, and Gideon's over Midian (Judges 4; 5; 7), the scene also of Saul's death and Israel's defeat before the Philistines (1 Samuel 31), and of Josiah's death in battle with Pharaoh Necho (2 Kings 23:29-30)
Embalming - The embalming of these two patriarchs testifies both to their importance in the community and to plans to remove their bodies for burial in Canaan ( Genesis 50:13 ; Exodus 13:19 )
Rest - The "rest" in Hebrews 4:8 is katapausis ; Hebrew noach , "rest from weariness": as the ark rested on Ararat after its tossings; as Israel, under Joshua, rested from war in Canaan
Semite - Northwest Semitic involves Hebrew, Aramaic, Syria, Phoenician, Samaritan, Palmyrene, Nabatean, Canaanite, Moabite. See Languages of the Bible ; Assyria; Babylon ; Canaan
Sabbath Day's Journey - Scholars have surmised that the expression came from God's instruction to the children of Israel as they prepared to cross the Jordan into Canaan (Joshua 3:4 )
Rasshopper - Numbers 13:33 (a) These spies felt weak and insignificant when they compared themselves with the giants and considered the power of these mighty men in Canaan
Dagon - of Nablus), indicate an existence of his cult in Phœnicia and Canaan
Zin, Wilderness of - The wilderness of Zin formed the immediate boundary of Canaan (Numbers 13:21; Numbers 34:3), and comprised also the whole rugged mountain region S
Tribes - But in dividing Canaan there were only twelve, since the family of Levi was assigned to the Lord's service and had no separate lot or share in the division of the promised land
Simeon - Before entering Canaan, the tribe of Simeon had become the lowest of the tribes in point of number
Israelites - See Canaan , HEBREWS , and JUDAH
Gad - Only nine and a half of Israel’s twelve tribes settled in the area commonly known as Canaan (i
Philistines - They are, however, not noticed among the Canaanitish tribes mentioned in the Pentateuch. They occupied the five cities of Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath, in the south-western corner of Canaan, which belonged to Egypt up to the closing days of the Nineteenth Dynasty. It would therefore appear that they were not of the Semitic race, though after their establishment in Canaan they adopted the Semitic language of the country
Presence of God - The cloud and fire symbolized the presence of God leading on the journey to Canaan. It led the people in the journey to Canaan and into battle (Joshua 3:1-6 )
Hebrew - Abraham was bidden to leave his country and his kindred and to go into the land of Canaan, and the word Hebrew is not employed until Abraham had left his country and was in the land of Canaan
Hagar - After ten years' residence in the land of Canaan, Abram, by the persuasion of his wife, who had been barren heretofore, and now despaired of bearing children herself when she was seventy-five years old, took, as a second wife, or concubine, her handmaid, Hagar, an Egyptian. They call her in eminency, Mother Hagar, and maintain that she was Abraham's lawful wife; the mother of Ishmael, his eldest son; who, as such, possessed Arabia, which very much exceeds, say they, both in extent and riches, the land of Canaan, which was given to his younger son Isaac
Hebrew Language - Called "the language of Canaan" (Isaiah 19:18), as distinguished from that of Egypt; "the Jewish" as distinguished from Aramean (2 Kings 18:26; 2 Kings 18:28). , the Ethiopic between the Hebrew and Arabic, the Hebrew, and kindred Phoenician or Canaanite. There may be a Hamitic element in Hebrew, considering that the Canaanites who spoke it when Abram entered Canaan were Hamites; even though they probably acquired it from earlier Semitic occupants of Canaan, they would infuse a Hamitic element themselves
Hazor - These dimensions make Hazor the largest city in ancient Canaan. Canaanites occupied Hazor until Joshua destroyed it. ...
Joshua 11:1-15 ; Joshua 12:19 relate how Jabin, king of Hazor, rallied the forces of the northern cities of Canaan against Joshua. Hazor was “the head of all those kingdoms” ( Joshua 11:10 ), that is, it was the dominant city-state of the Canaanite kingdoms. Joshua defeated the Canaanite forces, slew the leaders, including Jabin, and burned the city of Hazor. The size and location of the city of Hazor, as well as references to it in other ancient literature, would indicate that Hazor probably controlled a vast portion of Canaan. In Judges 4:1 we again find a Jabin as king of Canaan ruling from Hazor. The Canaanite dynasty of Jabin maintained or regained control with one or more kings named Jabin. Two layers of Israelite occupation of Hazor between the destruction of the Canaanite city by Joshua and the rebuilding of the city by Solomon show merely semi-nomadic Israelite encampments, evidenced by tent or hut foundation rings, cooking pits, and storage pits. The Solomonic city was much smaller than the Canaanite city
Honey - Canaan was a "land flowing with milk and honey" (Exodus 3:8 )
Habiru - About the only possible relationship is that the Hebrews might have included some Habiru from Egypt or Canaan
Sickle - In Palestine the flint sickle goes back to the later Stone age (Vincent, Canaan d’après t’exploration récente , 388 ff
Brass - It was afterwards carried by the Jews into Canaan, and preserved by them till the time of Hezekiah, who caused it to be at length destroyed because it began to be viewed by the people with superstitious reverence (2 Kings 18:4 )
Giants - They inhabited the land of Canaan prior to Israel's conquest
Chariots - and were introduced into Canaan and Egypt by the Hyksos about 1800-1600 B
Goliath - Now Moses records the spies' report (Numbers 13:32-33) of Canaan, "there we saw the giants, the sons of Anak, which came of the giants; and we were in our own sight as grasshoppers
Shem - Shem is specially blessed: "Blessed be Jehovah, the God of Shem, and Canaan shall be his servant
Phut - advancing northwards, Cush (Ethiopia), Mizraim, Phut (a dependency of Egypt), Canaan (Jeremiah 46:9; Ezekiel 30:5; Nahum 3:9; Isaiah 66:9 where "Phut" should be read for "Pul")
Depart - Indeed, the word is used almost 90 times in the Book of Numbers alone, since this book records the “journeying” of the people of Israel from Sinai to Canaan
Endor - Bryant derives Endor from En-Ador, signifying fons pythonis, "the fountain of light," or oracle of the god Ador: which oracle was probably founded by the Canaanites, and had never been totally suppressed. That many such oracles existed in Canaan, is evident from the number which Saul himself is said to have suppressed; and such a one, with its Pythia, was this at Endor
Gilgal - A celebrated place between the Jordan and Jericho, where the Israelites first encamped, after the passage of that river; where also they were circumcised, and kept their first Passover in Canaan, Joshua 4:19 5:9,10
Tribe - In the division made by Joshua of the land of Canaan, Reuben, Gad, and half of Manasseh had their lot beyond Jordan, east; all the other tribes, and the remaining half of Manasseh had their distribution on this side the river, west
Reuben - It was the ninth of the tribes in the order of population when they entered Canaan, Numbers 1:21 26:7
Camp, Encampments - These terms usually refer to the movements of the Israelites between Egypt and Canaan; and many passages of the Levitical law relate to things done "within" or "without the camp
Ephraim - The portion of Ephraim was large and central, and embraced some of the most fertile land in all Canaan
Elea'Zar - (Numbers 26:3 ) After the conquest of Canaan by Joshua he took part in the distribution of the land
Jethro - Reuel's name, from Εl ("God"), implies he too was a God-worshipping priest-prince of his tribe, though the majority of the tribe bordering on the Hamite Canaan were idolaters (Exodus 2:16)
Bible - He chose Abraham, a man from Mesopotamia, promising to make of him a nation, to give that nation the land of Canaan as a homeland, and to use that nation as his channel of blessing to the world. His intention was to lead them to a new homeland in Canaan, but first he took them to Mt Sinai, where they formally became God’s people in a covenant ceremony. ...
The book of Numbers takes its name from two census that Moses conducted in preparation for the move into Canaan. But the people rebelled against God, and their entrance into Canaan was delayed forty years as a punishment. When the time drew near to enter Canaan, Moses repeated, and in some ways expanded and up-dated, the law for the new generation
Asherah - (uh sshee' rah) A fertility goddess, the mother of Baal, whose worship was concentrated in Syria and Canaan and the wooden object that represented her. Other religious writings from the Ancient Near East indicate that “Asherah” was the Hebrew name for an Amorite or Canaanite goddess who was worshiped in various parts of the Ancient Near East. Asherah was the fertility goddess of the Phoenicians and Canaanites. ” See Canaan
Rest - It is promised to Israel in Canaan ( Exodus 33:14 , Deuteronomy 3:20 ), and Zion is the resting-place of J″ Snake - ...
On the journey from Egypt to Canaan, God punished his rebellious people with a plague of desert snakes whose bite produced burning pains and even death
El - (ehl) One of several words for God found in biblical Hebrew and the name of the high god among the Canaanites. See Canaan
Taanach - ) An old city of Canaan
Melchizedek - One Jewish tradition considers him to be a survivor of the Deluge, the patriarch Shem, and thus entitled by his very age to bless the father of the faithful, and by his position as ruler of Canaan to confer his rights to Abram
Hittites - The descendants of Heth, a son of Canaan, and hence descendants of Ham: a numerous race who inhabited Palestine
zo'ar - (smallness ), one of the most ancient cities of the land of Canaan
Balaam - When the Hebrews were journeying to Canaan, Balak king of Moab, sent for Balaam, to curse the Hebrew armies
Eleazar - Eleazar entered Canaan, and, in conjunction with Joshua, divided it among the tribes
Dan - The tribe of Dan was second only to that of Judah in numbers before entering Canaan, Numbers 1:39 26:43
Gerizim - The world has beheld few scenes more awful and suggestive than when, having conquered Canaan, all the Israelites were summoned to this place, and six tribes were stationed on mount Gerizim to pronounce blessings on those who should obey God's law, and the other six on Mount Ebal to denounce curses on those who should break it; while all the people solemnly said, Deuteronomy 11:29 27:12-26 28:1-68
ha'Gar - (flight ), an Egyptian woman, the handmaid or slave of Sarah, ( Genesis 16:1 ) whom the latter gave as a concubine to Abraham, after he had dwelt ten years in the land of Canaan and had no children by Sarah
Eleazar - God directed also that Joshua and Eleazar together were to be in charge of the work of dividing Canaan between Israel’s twelve tribes (Numbers 34:17; cf
Bread - )...
Manna, that unusual food that God provided for the Israelites on their journey from Egypt to Canaan, was known as ‘bread from heaven’ (Exodus 16:4; John 6:31; see MANNA)
Hebron - ...
Four centuries later, when Moses sent the twelve spies into Canaan, the tribe of Anak lived in Hebron. Therefore, the date may indicate that it was rebuilt by the Hyksos at that time, or it may specify when Hebron became a Canaanite city. After the Israelite conquest of Canaan, Hebron was given to Caleb ( Joshua 14:9-13 )
Megiddo - ” One of the most strategic cities of Canaan since it guarded the main pass through the Carmel mountain range. Deborah and Barak fought the Canaanites and their leaders King Jabin and Sisera near the “waters of Megiddo,” possibly the wadi Qina running through the surrounding hills (Judges 5:19 ). Where Israel was initially frustrated during their conquest of Canaan is exactly where they will be victorious with Christ in the end (Revelation 16:16 )
Baal - (bay' uhl) Lord of Canaanite religion and seen in the thunderstorms, Baal was worshiped as the god who provided fertility. “Baal” occurs in the Old Testament as a noun meaning, “lord, owner, possessor, or husband,” and as a proper noun referring to the supreme god of the Canaanites, and often to the name of a man. The noun appears in a number of compound forms which are proper names for locations where Canaanite deities were worshiped, such as Baal-peor (Numbers 25:5 ; 2 Kings 21:2-165 ; Psalm 106:28 ; Hosea 9:10 ), Baal-hermon (Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), and Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 ). ...
Baal Worship in Canaan Baal worship revolved around two themes that represented the conception of Baal his worshipers held. See Canaan
Levitical Cities - Because of their priestly duties, the tribe of Levi did not receive any part of the land of Canaan as an inheritance (Numbers 18:20-24 ; Numbers 26:62 ; Deuteronomy 10:9 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-2 ; Joshua 18:7 ). Although six of the 48 were asylums for those guilty of manslaughter (Kedesh, Schechem, Hebron in Canaan, Bezer, Ramoth-Gilead, and Golan), Levitical cities and cities of refuge are not synonymous
Cananaean - ]'>[1] , and modern scholars generally) or Canaanite (Authorized Version, following the TR Caleb - the son of Jephunneh, of the tribe of Judah, was one of those who accompanied Joshua, when he was deputed by Moses to view the land of Canaan, which the Lord had promised them for an inheritance, Numbers 13. Moses, having fervently interceded for them, the Lord graciously heard his prayer; but though he was pleased not to destroy them immediately, he protested with an oath, that none of those who had murmured against him should see the land of Canaan, but that they should all die in the wilderness
Inheritance - The inheritance was tied up with the family’s portion of land originally allotted to it in Canaan (1 Kings 21:3-4; Micah 2:2). ...
Israel in the Old Testament...
When Canaan was divided among Israel’s twelve tribes, each tribal area was known as the inheritance of that tribe (Joshua 15:20; Joshua 16:8; Joshua 18:2)
Stephen - His speech is not the unconnected narrative that many suppose, but a covert argument which carries his hearers unconsciously along with him until at the close he unveils the drift of the whole, namely, to show:...
(1) That in Israel's past history God's revelation of Himself was not confined to the holy land and the temple, that Abraham had enjoyed God's revelations in Mesopotamia, Haran, and Canaan before he possessed a foot of the promised land; so also Israel and Moses in the strange land of Egypt, and in Midian and Sinai, which was therefore "holy ground" (Acts 7:33), and in the wilderness 40 years. Also he combines, as substantially one for his immediate object, the two statements (Genesis 15:16), "after that they shall come here (to Canaan) again," and Exodus 3:12, "ye shall serve God upon this mountain" (Horeb), by Acts 7:7, "after that they shall come forth and serve Me in this place" (Canaan). ...
Israel's being brought forth to worship Jehovah in Horeb, and subsequent worshipping Him in Canaan their inheritance, were but different stages in the same deliverance, not needing to be distinguished for Stephen's purpose. ...
The burials and purchases were virtually one so far as his purpose was concerned, namely, to show the faith of the patriarchs and their interest in Canaan when to the eye of sense all seemed against the fulfillment of God's promise; Stephen hereby implying that, however visionary Jesus' and His people's prospects might seem, yet they are as certain as were the patriarchs' prospects when their only possession in Canaan was a tomb
Asherah - In several places Asherah must be recognized as the name of a Canaanite deity. These references, it must be allowed, are not all of equal value for the critical historian and some of our foremost authorities have hitherto declined to admit the existence of a Canaanite goddess Asherah, regarding the name as a mere literary personification of the asherah or sacred pole (see § 3), or as due to a confusion with Astarte (cf. ...
The relation, as to name, history, and attributes, of this early Canaanite goddess to the powerful Semitic deity named Ishtar by the Babylonians, and Ashtart (OT ‘Ashtoreth’) by the Phœnicians, is still obscure (see KAT
When the Hebrews occupied Canaan, the local sanctuaries became seats of the worship of J″ Amalekites - a people whose country adjoined the southern border of the land of Canaan, in the north-western part of Arabia Petraea. But we do not find that the Edomites, who had this ground for a hatred to the Jews, made any attempt to molest them, nor that Moses ever reproaches the Amalekites for attacking the Israelites as their brethren; nor do we ever find in Scripture that the Amalekites joined with the Edomites, but always with the Canaanites and the Philistines. The Amalekites probably knew that the Israelites were advancing to take possession of the land of Canaan, and resolved to frustrate the purposes of God in this respect. It is remarkable, that most authors make Saul's pursuit of the Amalekites to commence from the lower Euphrates, instead of from the southern border of the land of Canaan
Arad - ...
The Arad of Numbers 21:1-3 (probably Tel Malhata) was a Canaanite city about eleven miles west southwest of Beersheba. Its king attacked the Israelites as they were moving on to Canaan after the wilderness wandering
Moab - In the Plains of Moab, opposite Jericho (Numbers 22:1 ; 26:63 ; Joshua 13:32 ), the children of Israel had their last encampment before they entered the land of Canaan
Engedi - The four kings of whom Chedorlaomer was chief attacked the Amorites here, and were in turn attacked by the five kings of Canaan in the adjoining vale of Siddim
Ephod - Father of Hanniel, head of Manasseh, assisted Joshua and Eleazar in apportioning Canaan (Numbers 34:23)
Sheep - After settling down in Canaan, the Israelites, on the whole, belonged to this latter category (Deuteronomy 7:13; 1 Samuel 17:15; 1 Samuel 25:2)
Kenites - They sustained afterwards friendly relations with the Israelites when settled in Canaan (Judges 4:11,17-21 ; 1 Samuel 27:10 ; 30:29 )
Booty - Within Canaan no captives were to be made; all that breathed were to be destroyed (Deuteronomy 20:14; Deuteronomy 20:16); but outside, if resistance were offered, the women and children were to be made captives, the men slain
Gad - At the conclusion of the period of wilderness wandering, when the Israelites were preparing to occupy Canaan, the tribe of Gad requested permission, along with the tribe of Reuben and half the tribe of Manasseh, to settle east of the Jordan
Sidon And Tyre - Sidon and Tyre were ancient cities, having been founded long before the Israelites entered the land of Canaan
Congregation - After the conquest of Canaan, the people were assembled only on occasions of the highest national importance (Judges 20 ; 2 Chronicles 30:5 ; 34:29 ; 1 Samuel 10:17 ; 1618528389_13 ; 1 Kings 12:20 ; 2 Kings 11:19 ; 21:24 ; 23:30 )
Jesus - Joshua the son of Nun, who led Israel into Canaan; referred to by Stephen in his speech before the council (Acts 7:45) and by the writer to the Hebrews (Hebrews 4:8)
Honey - The land of Canaan represents that place in the Christian's life wherein by utter consecration he begins to receive his richest blessings from the living Lord on the throne
Barak - He was called by Deborah the prophetess (who judged Israel at that time) to collect from the tribes of Naphtali and Zebulon 10,000 men that God might deliver into his hand Sisera, the captain of the army of Jabin, king of Canaan, who had 900 chariots of iron, and who had mightily oppressed the children of Israel twenty years. The Canaanites being smitten, Sisera left his chariot and fled for refuge to the house of Heber the Kenite, where he was killed by Jael, Heber's wife
Hamath - The Hamathite is mentioned last of the sons of Canaan in the table of nations ( Genesis 10:18 , 1 Chronicles 1:16 )
Giant - At times the term Rephaim applies to any people in Canaan who were of great stature
Amorites - A people descended from Canaan, son of Ham. Being the most dominant and the most corrupt people or tribe they sometimes represent the Canaanites generally
Type - Thus Adam and Melchizedek, the prophetic and the priestly office, manna and the brazen serpent, the smitten rock and the passage over Jordan, the Passover and the Day of Atonement, Canaan and the cities of refuge are scriptural types of Christ
be-er'-Sheba, - According to the first, the well was dug by Abraham, and the name given to Judah, ( Joshua 15:28 ) and then to Simeon, (Joshua 19:2 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28 ) In the often-quoted "from Dan even unto Beersheba," (Judges 20:1 ) it represents the southern boundary of Canaan, as Dan the northern
Earth - has 'earth,' the 'land' only, or the land of Canaan, may be intended; the context must be studied in each case
Architecture - From the time of the occupation of Canaan they became dwellers in towns and in houses of stone
Jesus - Joshua the son of Nun, who led Israel into Canaan; referred to by Stephen in his speech before the council (Acts 7:45) and by the writer to the Hebrews (Hebrews 4:8)
Haran - Terah and his son Abram and his family dwelt there on their way from Ur of the Chaldees to Canaan ( Genesis 11:31 ; Genesis 12:4-5 ; cf
Dead Sea - Inland lake at the end of the Jordan Valley on the southeastern border of Canaan with no outlets for water it receives; known in the Bible as Salt Sea, Sea of the Plain, and Eastern Sea
Honey - Honey was so ample in Canaan that the land there was described as a land “flowing with milk and honey” (Exodus 3:8 )
Tent - The same may be said of the forefathers of the Hebrew race; nor was it until the return into Canaan from Egypt that the Hebrews became inhabitants of cities
Hazor -
A stronghold of the Canaanites in the mountains north of Lake Merom (Joshua 11:1-5 ). Joshua gained a signal victory, which virtually completed his conquest of Canaan (11:10-13). This city was, however, afterwards rebuilt by the Canaanites, and was ruled by a king with the same hereditary name of Jabin
Army - From the time of their entering the land of Canaan to the time of the kings, the Israelites made little progress in military affairs, although often engaged in warfare
ir-ha-Heres - "Five cities shall speak the language of Canaan, and swear to the Lord of hosts
Barley - Canaan was "a land of wheat and barley" (Deuteronomy 8:8)
Gilgal - Here they kept their first Passover in the land of Canaan (5:10) and renewed the rite of circumcision, and so "rolled away the reproach" of their Egyptian slavery
Treaty - ...
God warned the Israelites of Moses’ time that when they entered Canaan, they were not to make treaties with the former people of the land, but destroy them. In this way Israel would avoid the possibility of moral and religious corruption through adopting Canaanite practices (Exodus 34:12-16)
Spies - When the Israelites reached Kadesh for the first time, and were encamped there, Moses selected twelve spies from among the chiefs of the divisions of the tribes, and sent them forth to spy the land of Canaan (Numbers 13 ), and to bring back to him a report of its actual condition
Fountain - ” The goodness of Canaan was seen in its abundant water supply, “a land with flowing streams, with springs and underground waters welling up in valleys and hills” (Deuteronomy 8:7 NRSV)
Power - God revealed His power by miraculously delivering Israel from Egyptian slavery (Exodus 4:21 ; Exodus 9:16 ; Exodus 15:6 ; Exodus 32:11 ) and in the conquest of Canaan (Psalm 111:6 )
Elder - After the settlement in Canaan they were named "elders of Israel" or "of the land" (1 Samuel 4:3; 1 Kings 20:7) or "of the tribes" (Deuteronomy 31:28) or "of the city," (Deuteronomy 19:12, compare Deuteronomy 16:18; Ruth 4:9; Ruth 4:11)
Yale, Valley - See Canaan
Fence - ...
Isaiah 5:2 (a) This figure represents the protection that GOD gave to Israel when he brought them into the land of Canaan and put His fear upon the nations round about so that they could develop themselves into a mighty kingdom
Jael - ...
Great indignation has been expressed at this act of Jael, and even Christians have blamed her severely; but it was foretold that Jehovah would "sell Sisera into the hand of a woman;" and immediately after the deed, it is added, "So God subdued on that day Jabin the king of Canaan before the children of Israel
Asherah - 'Ăshêrâh refers to a cultic object representing the presence of the Canaanite goddess Asherah. The Canaanites believed that 'ăshêrâh ruled the sea, was the mother of all the gods including Baal, and sometimes was his deadly enemy. Apparently, the mythology of Canaan maintained that 'ăshêrâh was the consort of Baal, who had displaced El as their highest god
Gog - ]'>[1] ’s intervention, upon the mountains of Canaan
Wars - The principal wars recorded in scripture are, however, different: they are those of Israel in taking possession of Canaan for Jehovah as the Lord's host, and in maintaining their position in His land, for which they had divine instruction
Chariot - Jabin, king of Canaan, it is said, had nine hundred chariots of iron, and mightily oppressed the children of Israel
Divide - The word châlaq is also important in the description of the “dividing” of the land of Canaan among the various tribes and clans ( Rest, Remain - ” Thus, God “allowed” the pagan nations “to remain” in Canaan during Joshua’s lifetime ( Ephraim - The territory of Ephraim lay in the centre of Canaan, south of Manasseh and north of Benjamin and Dan, extending from the Jordan to the Mediterranean Sea
Kenites - From the story of Jethro, who is expressly said to be a Midianite, they appear to have retained the worship of the true God among them; for which, and their kindness to the Israelites when passing their country, they were spared in the general destruction of the nations bordering on Canaan
Hamath - The name occurs in Genesis 10:18 , as the seat of a Canaanitish tribe; and it is often mentioned as the northern limits of Canaan in its widest extent, Numbers 13:21 ; Joshua 13:5 ; Judges 3:3
Isaac - Most of his life was spent in the southern part of Canaan and its vicinity
Merom - Near this lake Joshua defeated the kings of Northern Canaan, Joshua 11:1-8
am'Mon - The hatred in which the Ammonites were held by Israel is stated to have arisen partly from their denial of assistance, (23:4) to the Israelites on their approach to Canaan
Burial, Sepulchres - ...
The precedent of Jacob's and Joseph's remains being returned to the land of Canaan was followed, in wish at least, by every pious Jew
Jew - "The Jews' language" signifies both the Hebrew (2 Kings 18:26) and the Aramaic Hebrew acquired in the captivity (Nehemiah 13:24), "the language (lip) of Canaan" (Isaiah 19:18)
Tabernacle - in Hebrew, אהל , in Greek, σκηνη , a word which properly signifies a tent, but is particularly applied by the Hebrews to a kind of building in the form of a tent, set up by the express command of God, for the performance of religious worship, sacrifices, &c, during the journeyings of the Israelites in the wilderness; and after their settlement in the land of Canaan made use of for the same purpose, till the temple was built in Jerusalem. ...
The tabernacle was brought into the land of Canaan by Joshua, and set up at Gilgal
Gilgal - Here they kept the first Passoverin Canaan (Joshua 5:10). And the rule of divine grace is first to give, then to require; so first He showed His grace to Abraham by leading him to Canaan and giving the promises, then enjoined circumcision; also He did not give the law to Israel at Sinai until first He had redeemed them from Egypt, and thereby made them willing to promise obedience. The circumcision at Gilgal was a practical restoration of the covenant, and a pledge of their now receiving Canaan
Judges - Sigonius supposes that these elders and judges of cities were the original constitution settled in the wilderness by Moses, upon the advice given him by Jethro, Exodus 18:21-22 , and continued by divine appointment after the settlement in the land of Canaan; whereas others imagine that the Jethronian prefectures were a peculiar constitution, suited to their condition while encamped in the wilderness, but laid aside after they came into Canaan. Some have supposed that it was the same that afterward became famous under the appellation of sanhedrim; but others conceive the institution of the seventy elders to have been only temporary, for the assistance of Moses in the government, before the settlement in the land of Canaan; and that the sanhedrim was first set up in the time of the Maccabees
Deuteronomy, the Book of - It claims to be the words of Moses addressed to Israel on the eve of their entry into Canaan. ...
Now Israel was poised on the borders of Canaan ready to enter and to possess the Land of Promise. Israel's obedience was imperative if they were to expect to possess the land of Canaan. These are not laws to be used in the courts to decide legal cases, but instructions for life in the land of Canaan. “Beyond the Jordan,” a common phrase used for the territory east of that river, gives the perspective of a writer within the land of Canaan. Moses had led Israel to the borders of Canaan nearly forty years before, but in rebellion and unbelief the people turned back into the wilderness
Phoenice - The native name was Canaan, "lowland," in contrast to Aram "the highland," Syria. The woman in Matthew 15:22 said to be "of Canaan" in Mark 7:26 is called "Syrophoenician. The language is Semitic (from Shem), and was acquired by the Hamitic settlers in Canaan from the original Semitic occupants; it probably has a Hamitic element too (these Semitics were related by common Noachic descent to the Hamites, hence the languages too are related). Carthage was a Phoenician colony; Plautus in the Poenulus (5:1) preserves a Carthaginian passage; Phoenician is close related to Hebrew which Abram found spoken in Canaan already (compare Abimelech "father of a king," Melchizedek "king of righteousness. Abram originally spoke the language of Ur of the Chaldees, Aramaic, as did Laban (Apion 1:17-18; Genesis 31:47); but soon his descendants, as Jacob, spoke the Canaanite or Phoenician Hebrew as their own tongue, compare Deuteronomy 26:5. Accho (Acre), a capital harbor, assigned to Asher, was not occupied by that tribe (Judges 1:31); but remained in the Canaanites' possession
Palestine - Palestine is the name commonly used for the land that in ancient times was known as Canaan. When the Israelites first occupied Canaan, they met some of their strongest opposition from the Philistines, the people from whom Palestine takes its name (see Canaan; PHILISTIA)
Shem - ...
Noah's words after Shem's dutifulness in covering his father's shame, in filial reverence, with Japheth (compare the blessing, Exodus 20:12), "blessed be Jehovah, the God of Shem, and Canaan shall be his servant," not only bless God for putting the pious feeling into his heart, but prophesy that Jehovah should be especially the God of Shem, which was fulfilled in choosing Abraham and Israel his descendants as God's peculiar people. Aryan races subsequently occupied the places respectively assigned them by Providence in Canaan and elsewhere; but the Semitics were probably (as the Semitic Melchizedek exemplifies) in Canaan originally, and the Hamite Canaanites acquired their language
Mahanaim - ) A place on the Jabbok so-called by Jacob from the two angelic hosts which appeared to him when returning from Padan Aram to Canaan
Zidon - It received its name from the "first-born" of Canaan, the grandson of Noah (Genesis 10:15,19 )
Reuben - ...
When the Israelites conquered and divided Canaan in the time of Joshua, the tribes of Reuben, Gad and half of Manasseh settled east of the Jordan River in territory taken from the Amorites (Numbers 21:11-35; Joshua 13:8-12)
Firstfruits - Not only were the Israelites to be mindful that the land of Canaan was the Lord's possession and that they had only the rights of tenants (Leviticus 25:23 ), but they were also to be aware that the fertility of Canaan's soil was not due to one of the Baals but rather to the Lord's gift of grace
Rahab - ...
A woman in Jericho...
Before Joshua opened his attack on Canaan, he sent two men to spy out the first city they would meet, Jericho
Melchizedek - When Abraham was returning from victory over a group of invaders, he was met by Melchizedek, the ruler of the Canaanite city-state of Salem. ...
Several centuries later, when the nation Israel had settled in Canaan, David conquered Jerusalem and made it his national capital
Languages of the Bible - ...
Characteristics of Hebrew Hebrew is a Semitic language related to Phoenician and the dialects of ancient Canaan
Attain - ...
Canaan he now attains
Baal, Baalim - The chief male god of the Phoenicians and the Canaanites, as ASHTORETH was the chief female goddess. Balaam's advice was only too successful, the women of Canaan being the snare that led to idolatry
Pharaoh - This Pharaoh captured and burntthe city of Gezer in Canaan, and gave the site to his daughter
Fear - God says that he will send his fear before his people, to terrify and destroy the inhabitants of Canaan
Dan - 2, The territory in Canaan allotted to Dan was on the seacoast, west of Benjamin and between Ephraim and Judah
Gil'Gal - Joshua 4:3 Where also they kept the first passover in the land of Canaan ch
he'Bron - It was a well-known town when Abraham entered Canaan, 3800 years ago
Adullam - One of the royal cities of Canaan, afterwards part of Judah's lot
Horse - The Hebrews in the patriarchal age, as a pastoral race, did not stand in need of the services Of the horse, and for a long period after their settlement in Canaan they dispensed with it, partly in consequence of the hilly nature of the country, which only admitted of the use of chariots in certain localities, (Judges 1:19 ) and partly in consequence to the prohibition in (17:16) which would be held to apply at all periods
Abraham - Returning to Canaan rich in flocks and herds, he left Lot to dwell in the fertile valley of the lower Jordan, and pitched his own tents in Mamre, Genesis 13:1-18 . As the ancestor of Christ, in whom all the nations are blessed, and as the father of all believers, the covenant is abundantly fulfilled to him: his seed are as the stars of heaven and with them he shall inherit the heavenly Canaan
Beersheba - The dispensation of the promise, which began with Abraham's call from Ur to Canaan, ended on the last night of the sojourn of his grandson Israel in Canaan
Ananias - The common fund which the first disciples voluntarily brought was a kind of firstfruits to the Lord in entering on possession of the spiritual Canaan, as Jericho's spoil was a firstfruit to Jehovah of the earthly Canaan
Philistines - A celebrated people, who inhabited the southern seacoast of Canaan, which from them took the name of Philistia, Psalm 60:8 108:9 , or Palestine. They are not enumerated among the nations devoted to extermination with the seed of Canaan
Inheritance - The land of Canaan was bequeathed to him and his descendants as an eternal possession (Genesis 12:7 ). ...
From the promise of Canaan as Israel's inheritance came other aspects of the concept. The initial promise to Abraham of the land of Canaan ( Hebrews 11:8 ) is broadened to include "the world" (Romans 4:13 )
Pharaoh - Thothmes III broke the confederacy of the allied kings of all the regions between Euphrates and the Mediterranean, just 17 years before Israel's invasion of Canaan, thus providentially preparing the way for an easy conquest of Canaan; this accounts for the terror of Midian and Moab at Israel's approach (Numbers 22:3-4), and the "sorrow and trembling which took hold on the inhabitants of Palestina and Canaan" (Exodus 15:14-16)
War - ...
Instructions for Israel...
According to God’s plan for Israel, the conquest of Canaan was not merely for political or material gain, but had a moral and religious purpose. God had given the Canaanites time to repent but they had consistently refused. The destruction of the Canaanites along with their idols, and at times their animals and possessions, was also of significance in God’s purposes for Israel. It helped to protect Israel from the corrupt religion, moral filth and physical disease that characterized life throughout Canaan (Deuteronomy 7:1-2; Deuteronomy 7:16; Deuteronomy 7:25-26; Deuteronomy 20:16-18). ...
This policy of total destruction applied only to Israel’s conquest of Canaan. The Israelites were not to destroy non-Canaanite cities unless the people refused Israel’s terms of peace. ...
The Old Testament record...
In the early days of their settlement in Canaan, the Israelites enjoyed a fairly peaceful existence and saw no need for a regular army
Heir Heritage Inheritance - This is especially the case when Israel is regarded as the ‘heir’ of the land of Canaan; succession to the Canaanites is not prominent in the idea of this inheritance, for Israel inherited from God, not from the people of the land. In this sense κληρονομία is nearly equivalent to ‘the promise’; it, is a free gift from God-a fact emphasized in Acts 7:5, where Canaan is spoken of, and 20:32, where the ‘Christian promises are in question. We can trace in the OT (see Sanday-Headlam on Romans 8:17) the transitions of meaning, from the simple possession of Canaan to the permanent and assured possession, then to the secure possession won by Messiah, and so to all Messianic blessings. But it is obvious that where κληρονόμος is used of Israel’s inheritance in Canaan, or metaphorically of the Jewish and Christian promises of salvation (below, 3), the idea of succession must pass into the background, for the Heavenly Father does not die; and this fact causes the difficulty in the otherwise more natural interpretation of διαθήκη as a ‘testament’ or ‘will. The words are also used literally in the NT of Canaan as the land of Promise; cf. The reference in Romans 4:13 can hardly be to the possession of Canaan, which would not be called ‘the world’ (see also (d) below). In the sense of the ‘Messianic hope’ (as in the more literal sense of the possession of Canaan) the words ‘inheritance’ and ‘promise’ become almost identical, as in Galatians 3:18, Hebrews 6:17
Joshua - Canaan, on Procopius' inscription in Mauritania confirming the historical facts). (See Canaan. He was Hoshea only ("he will save") up to his noble witness after spying Canaan. Joshua inflicted the first decisive blow on the doomed nations; this was an earnest to him of the subsequent conquest of Canaan. ...
Sent to spy out Canaan as representing Ephraim; Caleb represented Judah. Israel often disliked destroying all; but God's command required utter extermination of the Canaanites (Joshua 10:40). The slackness of Israel in taking possession of the promised land and destroying the Canaanites was the drawback to the completeness of Joshua's work (Joshua 18:3); after their long nomadic life the people were slow in settling down in separate homes; fear of the foes' attack too made them shrink from the trouble of defending themselves severally: a root of bitterness left which bore deadly fruit under the judges. Again he gathered all the tribes with their heads and officers to Shechem, as being the place where Abram received God's first promise of the land after his migration into Canaan (Genesis 12:6-7); more especially because here Jacob on his return from Mesopotamia settled, and removed his household's strange gods (Genesis 33:19; Genesis 35:2-4), just as Joshua now wished Israel to renew the covenant binding them to renunciation of all idols. Moses representing the law could not bring Israel into Canaan; that was reserved for Joshua
Hyksos - ) large numbers of Asiatics, mostly Semites like the Hebrew patriarchs, migrated into the Nile Delta of northern Egypt from Canaan
Mesopotamia - part of the whole; the whole Syrian "highland" was Aram, in contradistinction from Canaan "the lowland
Eleazar - He took part in dividing Canaan (Joshua 14:1)
King - There were thirty-one kings in Canaan (Joshua 12:9,24 ), whom Joshua subdued
Lot - He was born in Ur, and went with Abraham to Haran, and thence to Canaan
Megiddo - One of the most important of the fortress cities of ancient Canaan. Though nominally belonging to Manasseh ( Joshua 17:12 ; Joshua 17:18 , Judges 1:27-28 ), the Canaanites remained in possession. Near the ‘waters of Megiddo’ the Canaanites under Sisera were defeated by Barak and Deborah ( Judges 5:18-21 )
Weather - ...
When they settled in Canaan, the Israelites found that the Canaanite gods were also regarded as gods of nature
Sickle - Vincent, Canaan, d’après l’exploration récente, Paris, 1907, p
Dragon - The "waters" represent peoples, nations and tongues, all of whom GOD subdued before His people who were marching to Canaan
Ather - Isaiah 5:2 (b) In this way the Lord tells us that when He established Israel in their new land of Canaan, He destroyed the enemies, He removed the opposition, and He gave them the land prepared for their use
Ruth, Book of - ...
Ruth is mentioned in Matthew 1:5 , and in her and in Rahab we have a Moabitess and a woman of Canaan in the genealogy of Christ
Jacob - He escaped from the angry pursuit of Laban, from a meeting with Esau, and from the vengeance of the Canaanites provoked by the murder of Shechem; and in each of these three emergencies he was aided and strengthened by the interposition of God, and in sign of the grace won by a night of wrestling with God his name was changed at Jabbok into Israel. His body was embalmed, carried with great care and pomp into the land of Canaan, and deposited with his fathers, and his wife Leah, in the cave of Machpelah
Alien - The patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) were aliens in Canaan, but owned large material resources (Genesis 20:1 ; Genesis 26:3 ; Genesis 32:5 )
Snare - ...
Exodus 34:12 (a) The nations of Canaan had ways of pleasure and sin that would attract the Israelites and soon Israel would be caught in that trap and begin to live as the natives live
Lip - Śâphâh with the meaning of human language occurs in the phrase “the language of Canaan” ( Alien - The patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) were aliens in Canaan, but owned large material resources (Genesis 20:1 ; Genesis 26:3 ; Genesis 32:5 )
Gaza or Azzah - Now Ghuzzeh, an ancient city in the southwest corner of Canaan, Genesis 10:19 , belonging to the Avim, Deuteronomy 2:23 , and afterwards to the Philistines
re'Chab - In (1 Chronicles 2:55 ) the house of Rechab is identified with a section of the Kenites, a Midianitish tribe who came into Canaan with the Israelites, and retained their nomadic habits
Beth'el - If we are to accept the precise definition of ( Genesis 12:8 ) the name of Bethel would appear to have existed at this spot even before the arrival of Abram in Canaan
Ethiopia - During Israel’s journey from Egypt to Canaan, Moses married an Ethiopian woman, probably after his first wife had died (Numbers 12:1)
Ishmael - ...
Many of the tribal peoples who grew up in the region around Canaan were descended from Ishmael (Genesis 25:12-18)
Naphtali - At the borders of Canaan the tribe of Naphtali had fallen to 45,400 (Numbers 26:48-50). ...
Barak with 10,000 men of Naphtali, at Deborah's call, fought and delivered Israel from Jabin of Canaan. Naphtali failed to drive out the Canaanites (Judges 1:33)
Lot - He accompanied his uncle from Ur to Haran, and from thence to Canaan; a proof of their mutual attachment, and similarity of principles respecting the true religion. With Abraham he descended into Egypt, and afterward returned with him into Canaan: but the multiplicity of their flocks, and still more the quarrels of their servants, rendered a friendly separation necessary
Numbers, the Book of - It narrates Israel's stay in the desert from the law giving at Sinai (Leviticus 27:34) to their mustering in Moab's plains before entering Canaan. The parts are four:...
(1) Preparations for breaking up the camp at Sinai to march to Canaan (Numbers 1 - 10:10). ...
(2) March from Sinai to Canaan's border; repulse by the Amorites (Numbers 10:11-14:45). The tabernacle and Moses remained at Kadesh on the first occasion, while Israel attempted to occupy Canaan too late (Numbers 14:44). Aaron's death occurred in the first day of the fifth month of the 40th year (Numbers 33:38), the first encampment in the final march to Canaan (Numbers 20:22). The very inconsistency seeming between Numbers 4:3; Numbers 4:23; Numbers 4:30, fixing the Levites' limit of age to 30, and Numbers 8:24 appointing the age 25 (the reason being, the 30 was temporary, the number of able-bodied Levites between 30 and 50 sufficing for the conveyance of the tabernacle in the wilderness; but, when Israel was in Canaan, the larger number afforded by the earlier limit 25 to 50 was required: David enlarged the number, as the needs of the sanctuary service required, by reducing the age for entrance to 20 (1618528390_95), younger men being able then for the work, carrying the tabernacle being no longer needed). The lambs were slain, as at the first institution, in groups of families in private, not at the sanctuary door as subsequently in Canaan (Numbers 9:3; Numbers 9:12; Deuteronomy 16)
Genesis, Theology of - It is a divine call that first takes Abraham away from his homes in Ur and Haran to Canaan (12:1-5). He obeys, goes to Canaan, and there builds altars to Yahweh his God. God identifies himself, then rejects the suggestion that Eliezer of Damascus might be Abraham's heir, and promises Abraham many descendants and the land of Canaan. God again identifies himself to Abraham and again promises many offspring and the possession of Canaan. Finally, for Israel in Egypt, this story had a kind of eschatology in the promise that they would one day inherit the land of Canaan. After the conquest of Canaan it is not Genesis but the exodus event that stands at the center of Israelite theology
Exodus - , the words are, "The sojourning of the children of Israel which they sojourned in Egypt and in the land of Canaan was four hundred and thirty years;" and the Samaritan version reads, "The sojourning of the children of Israel and of their fathers which they sojourned in the land of Canaan and in the land of Egypt was four hundred and thirty years. Those who adopt the longer term reckon thus: ...
| Years | | From the descent of Jacob into Egypt to the | death of Joseph 71 | | From the death of Joseph to the birth of | Moses 278 | | From the birth of Moses to his flight into | Midian 40 | | From the flight of Moses to his return into | Egypt 40 | | From the return of Moses to the Exodus 1 | | 430 ...
Others contend for the shorter period of two hundred and fifteen years, holding that the period of four hundred and thirty years comprehends the years from the entrance of Abraham into Canaan (see LXX. They reckon thus: ...
| Years | | From Abraham's arrival in Canaan to Isaac's | birth 25 | | From Isaac's birth to that of his twin sons | Esau and Jacob 60 | | From Jacob's birth to the going down into | Egypt 130 | | (215) | | From Jacob's going down into Egypt to the | death of Joseph 71 | | From death of Joseph to the birth of Moses 64 | | From birth of Moses to the Exodus 80 | | In all
Abraham - ]'>[2] opens with the Divine call to Abraham, in obedience to which he separates himself from his kindred and migrates to Canaan ( Genesis 12:1-8 ). ...
Arrived in Canaan, Abraham builds altars at Shechem, where he receives the first promise of the land, and Bethel, where the separation from Lot takes place; after which Abraham resumes his southern journey and takes up his abode at Hebron (ch. In its present form it narrates the renewal to Abraham of the two great promises on which his faith rested the promise of a seed and of the land of Canaan and the confirmation of the latter by an impressive ceremony in which God entered into a covenant with the patriarch. ]'>[1] , and was evidently of importance to that writer as a guarantee of Israel’s perpetual tenure of the land of Canaan
Earth, Land - ...
Theological Questions Regarding Erets To whom did the land of Canaan belong? Who was to own and use the land?...
According to Joel 2:18-19 , the land of Canaan belonged to Yahweh. God promised Abraham that He would establish His covenant with Abraham and with his descendants as an everlasting covenant; all the “land of Canaan” was to be for an everlasting possession (Genesis 17:8-9 )
Shechem - A Canaanite prince, at the town of the same name, who abducted Dinah the daughter of Jacob, and was soon afterwards treacherously slain, with many of his people, by Simeon and Levi, Genesis 34:1-31 . A city of central Canaan, between the mountains Gerizim and Ebal, thirty-four miles north of Jerusalem; called also Sychar and Sychem, Acts 7:16 . It is first mentioned in the history of Abraham, who here erected his first altar in Canaan, and took possession of the country in the name of Jehovah, Genesis 12:6 33:18,19 35:4 . After the conquest of Canaan it became a Levitical city of refuge in Ephraim, and a gathering-place of the tribes, Joshua 20:7 21:21 24:1,25 Judges 9:1-57
Bethel - It was originally the royal Canaanite city of Luz (Genesis 28:19 ). When Abram entered Canaan he formed his second encampment between Bethel and Hai (Genesis 12:8 ); and on his return from Egypt he came back to it, and again "called upon the name of the Lord" (13:4)
Benjamin - At the entrance into Canaan it counted 45,600 warriors
Naphtali, Tribe of - The region around Kedesh, one of its towns, was originally called Galil, a name afterwards given to the whole northern division of Canaan
Sharon - In Joshua 12:13 Lassharon is mentioned as one of the royal cities of Canaan; as ‘the king of’ is omitted in the original, the passage may read ‘king of Aphek in the Sharon
Chariot - The Canaanites in the valleys of Palestine had chariots of iron (Joshua 17:18 ; Judges 1:19 ). Jabin, the king of Canaan, had 900 chariots (Judges 4:3 ); and in Saul's time the Philistines had 30,000
Ur - was the land of Haran's nativity, (Genesis 11:28 ) the place from which Terah and Abraham started "to go into the land of Canaan
Jebus - In Genesis 10:15-16 the Jebusite stands third of Canaan's descendants, between Heth (Hittites) and the Amorite, the position which the race retained subsequently. In the enumeration of the ten races occupying Canaan the Jebusites stand last (Genesis 15:21)
Memorial - No biblical book utilizes this motif more fully than Deuteronomy, where God exhorted the people to remember him, the exodus, and the wilderness experience in order to prepare themselves for the conquest of Canaan
Earnest - Thus in Genesis 24:22; Genesis 24:53 the earrings and the bracelets given by Eliezer to Rebecca are tokens of the wealth of his master and evidence of a comfortable home in Canaan
Shechem - The first city of Canaan visited by Abram, Genesis 12:6 , where it is called SICHEM
ja'Cob - He escaped from the angry pursuit of Laban, from a meeting with Esau, and from the vengeance of the Canaanites provoked by the murder of Shechem; and in each of these three emergencies he was aided and strengthened by the interposition of God, and in sign of the grace won by a night of wrestling with God his name was changed at Jabbok into Israel. His body was embalmed, carried with great care and pomp into the land of Canaan, and deposited with his fathers, and his wife Leah, in the cave of Machpelah
Mount Nebo - The Pisgah view which Moses had of the land of Canaan from this mount, must have been from special assistance from the Lord
Jericho - It was the first city in Canaan taken by Joshua, who being miraculously aided by the downfall of its walls, totally destroyed it, sparing only Rahab and her household, and pronounced a curse upon the person who should ever rebuild it, which was more than five hundred years afterwards fulfilled on Hiel, Joshua 6:26 1 Kings 16:34
Hebron - One of the most ancient cities of Canaan, being built seven years before Tanis, the capital of Lower Egypt, Numbers 13:22 . Under Joshua and Caleb the Israelites conquered it from the Canaanites and Anakim, and it was afterwards made a Levitical city of refuge, Joshua 14:13-15 15:13 21:11,13 Judges 1:10,20
Josh'ua - (Exodus 17:9 ) Soon afterward he was one of the twelve chiefs who were sent, (Numbers 13:17 ) to explore the land of Canaan, and one of the two, ch. A miracle made the fall of Jericho more terrible to the Canaanites. He defeated the Canaanites under Jabin king of Hazor
Num'Bers, - ( Numbers 1:1 ; Numbers 10:10 )
The journey from Sinai to the borders of Canaan
Gibeon - A deputation of the Gibeonites, with their allies from three other cities (Joshua 917;17 ), visited the camp at Gilgal, and by false representations induced Joshua to enter into a league with them, although the Israelites had been specially warned against any league with the inhabitants of Canaan (Exodus 23:32 ; 34:12 ; Numbers 33:55 ; Deuteronomy 7:2 ). " The kings of southern Canaan entered into a confederacy against Gibeon (because it had entered into a league with Joshua) under the leadership of Adoni-zedec, king of Jerusalem, and marched upon Gibeon with the view of taking possession of it
Blessedness - While some like Abel, Seth, Noah, and the patriarchs regain blessedness, others like Cain (Genesis 4:11 ) and Canaan (Genesis 9:25 ) fall under God's disfavor. Canaan is given as a land of inheritance to Israel and military conquest and physical prosperity follow (1 Kings 4:20 )
Joshua - It contains an account of the conquest and division of the land of Canaan, the renewal of the covenant with the Israelites, and the death of Joshua. In the first verse of the fifth chapter, the author speaks of himself as being one of those who had passed into Canaan: "And it came to pass when all the kings of the Amorites, which were on the side of Jordan westward, and all the kings of the Canaanites, which were by the sea, heard that the Lord had dried up the waters of Jordan from before the children of Israel, until we were passed over, that their heart melted
Giant - The Rephaim and the Perizzites are connected as old inhabitants of Canaan. We may reasonably understand that the gigantic nations of Canaan were above the average size of other people, with instances among them of several families of gigantic stature
War - See AMALEKITES and Canaan . ...
By this scourge, subsequently to the conquest of Canaan, God chastised both his own rebellious people and the corrupt and oppressive idolaters around them
Deuteronomy - After receiving the law at Mt Sinai, Israel spent almost forty years in the wilderness region between Sinai and Canaan. In his sovereign grace, God chose Israel to be his people, and promised them Canaan for a national homeland (Deuteronomy 7:7; Deuteronomy 8:1; Deuteronomy 9:4-5)
Copper - Besides the usual promised bounty of Canaan, Deuteronomy said it would include “a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills you can dig copper” (Deuteronomy 8:9 RSV; Compare NAS, NIV)
Eli - This was the first time since the settlement of Israel in Canaan that the ark had been removed from the sanctuary
Citizenship - Even when Israel resided in Canaan, the people were to recognize that the land was God's and that they were merely aliens (tosabim ) in it (Leviticus 25:23 ; 1 Chronicles 29:15 ; Psalm 39:12 ; 119:19 )
Simon -
One of the twelve apostles, called the Canaanite (Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:18 ). This word "Canaanite" does not mean a native of Canaan, but is derived from the Syriac word Kanean or Kaneniah, which was the name of a Jewish sect
Moses - By a succession of miracles, which God wrought by his hand, Moses brought the Hebrews out of Egypt, and through the wilderness, unto the borders of Canaan
Honey - The appreciation of honey by the Hebrews from the earliest times, and its abundance in Canaan, are evident from the oft-recurring description of that country as a ‘land flowing with milk and honey’ ( Exodus 3:8 ; Exodus 3:17 onwards)
Angel of the Lord - The commander of the Lord's army commissions Joshua to undertake the Lord's battles for Canaan, just as Moses had been commissioned to confront Pharaoh (Joshua 5:13-15 ; cf
Noah - Ham in turn received a curse for his descendant: Canaan
Kadesh - The conquest of Joshua reached thus far ( Joshua 10:41 ): It was therefore on the line, running from the Ascent of Akrabbim to the Brook of Egypt, which marked the southern frontier of Canaan ( Numbers 34:4 , Joshua 15:3 )
Handmaid - ]'>[1] amtu, seems to have been a common Semitic designation of a female slave in Canaan and the neighbouring countries
Flax - It was grown in Canaan before Joshua's (Joshua 2:6) conquest; the stalks were dried on the flat roofs by exposure to the sun's heat; later the drying was done in ovens
Zidon, Sidon - Eldest son of Canaan, son of Ham, and the city in Phoenicia founded by his descendants
Lot - He removed with the rest of his kindred to Charran, and again subsequently with Abraham and Sarai to Canaan
Camp - ) There were forty-one encampments, from their first in the month of March, at Rameses, in the land of Goshen, in Egypt, and in the wilderness, until they reached the land of Canaan
Ammon Ammonites Children of Ammon - The hatred in which the Ammonites were held by Israel is stated to have arisen partly from their opposition, or, rather, their denial of assistance, Deuteronomy 23:4-5, to the Israelites on their approach to Canaan
Elder - After the settlement in Canaan the ‘elders’ still possessed much weight ( 1Sa 4:3 ; 1 Samuel 8:4 ; 1 Samuel 15:30 , 2Sa 3:17 ; 2 Samuel 5:3 ; 2 Samuel 17:14 f
Jacob - On the border of Canaan the angels of God met him, and the God of angels wrestled with him, yielded him the blessing, and gave him the honored name of Israel
Lot - He removed with the rest of his kindred to Charran, and again subsequently with Abraham and Sarai to Canaan
Circumcision - God had made a covenant with Abraham to be his God, to give him a multitude of descendants who would be his special people, and to give those people Canaan as their homeland. But during Israel’s years in the wilderness between Egypt and Canaan, the people failed to circumcise their new-born children
Judges, Book of - Judges relates important episodes in the period of Israel's settlement in Canaan between the death of Joshua and the advent of Samuel. Deborah (and Barak) deliver from the Canaanites (Judges 4:1-5:31 ). ...
The Book of Judges presents a selective and theologically oriented account of the settlement of Israel in the land of Canaan in the centuries following the initial entry under Joshua. The campaigns under Joshua meant that the Canaanite population could not deny Israel entrance into the land. Also, the southern Negev, which has been sparsely or not at all inhabited by the Canaanite population, exhibits the same pattern. Gradually, over the course of several centuries, Israel became stronger; and the Canaanite peoples became absorbed into Israel, until, under David, Israel controlled all the land of Canaan and even beyond
Agriculture - ...
How did the agriculture of Egypt differ from that of Canaan? The essential difference between Egyptian and Canaanite agriculture was that Canaan depended on rainfall (Deuteronomy 11:11 ), while Egypt depended on the River Nile and its annual flood (Amos 8:8 ). In other words, Canaan was a rain-fed agriculture, while Egypt used irrigation agriculture
Chronology of the Biblical Period - Following the wilderness-wandering period of forty years, the conquest of Canaan began about 1250 B. ) mounted a campaign against Canaan in the fifth year of his reign (about 1220). Thus by that date, the people Israel were a recognized group in Canaan
Philistim - The Philistines, it is probable, continued with their progenitors in Egypt until they were sufficiently numerous and powerful to stretch themselves along the coast of Canaan; doubtless by driving out that portion of the family of Ham. It is certain that, in the time of Abraham, the Canaanites were in possession of the rest of the land, to which they gave their name: but the extreme south of Philistia, or Palestine, was even then possessed by the Philistines, whose king, Abimelech, reigned at Gerar. The time of their coming to Palestine is unknown; but they had been long in Canaan when Abraham came thither, in the year of the world 2083. They were not of the cursed seed of Canaan. —O Canaan, the land of the Philistines, I will even destroy thee, that there shall be no inhabitant; and the sea coast shall be dwellings and cottages for shepherds, and folds for flocks," Zephaniah 2:4-6
Numbers, Book of - of Canaan, as far as Hebron only. They were commanded to go by the Red Sea, whereupon they suddenly repented, and made an attack upon the Amalekites and Canaanites, but were repulsed with loss. ]'>[3] , the spies, whose names are given, went through the whole of Canaan unmolested. ]'>[15] ), ( u ) Hormah is connected with hçrem ,‘ban,’ because of the vow to destroy ban the Canaanite cities. The section appears to be misplaced, for it is difficult to understand why the Israelites should have turned away from Canaan immediately after such a striking victory. Laws relative to the settlement in Canaan, viz. Destruction of Canaanitish objects of worship, and division of land by lot. The boundaries of Canaan
Chronology - It must be an ancient error of transcribers, because 40 years elapsed from the Exodus to the death of Moses, Joshua was for more than seven years Israel's leader in Canaan, Israel's servitude and the rule of the judges to Eli's death occupied 430 years, thence to Saul's accession was more than 20 years, Saul's reign was 40 years, David's reign was 40 years, Solomon's reign, before the temple's foundation, was 3 years; i. Therefore, there is no greater strain put on the words by supposing the 400 includes the sojourn in Canaan. ...
Thus, there will be 172 years, besides the interval between Joseph's generation dying and the oppression, and between the beginning of the oppression and the birth of Moses; which may be reasonably set down as 215 in all; which, added to the 215 in Canaan, will yield the 430 years. ...
Another note of time is furnished by Paul (Acts 13:19-21): "after that (the division of Canaan) He; gave judges about the space of 450 years until Samuel"; or rather, as the three oldest manuscripts - the Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, and Alexandrinus manuscripts, "He distributed their land to them for an inheritance, about 450 years. ...
Jephthah makes 300 years elapse between his time and Joshua's division of Canaan (Judges 11:26)
Ephraim, the Tribe of - From the settlement of Canaan till the time of David and Solomon, Ephraim had held the place of honour among the tribes
Samson - In the days between Israel’s entrance into Canaan and the establishment of the kingdom, the Israelites were often oppressed by other peoples of the region
Cuttings - , 2:658,681; compare Ezekiel 8:14), the neighbors of Israel in Canaan, not the Egyptians from whose land Israel had come, practiced these self cuttings, expressive of excited feeling
Moab - When the Hebrews advanced to Canaan, they did not enter the territory of Moab proper, Deuteronomy 2:9; Judges 11:18; but there was always a great antipathy between the two peoples, which arose from Balaam having seduced the Hebrews to sin by the daughters of Moab
Mediterranean Sea, the - ...
For the Hebrews, the Great Sea served as the western border for the land of Canaan (Numbers 34:6 ) and the territory of Judah (Joshua 15:12 )
Japheth - If "younger son" in Genesis 9:24 is Canaan not Ham, the invariable order of the names represents also the order of their ages," Shem, Ham, and Japheth" Shem's genealogy is put last, being traced from Genesis 10:21 onwards uninterruptedly as the line of Messiah
Jacob's Well - ...
The patriarchs had never want of pasture in Canaan, but often difficulties as to water (Genesis 21:25-30; Genesis 26:13-15; Genesis 26:18-22)
Manna - To commemorate this wonderful miracle a golden pot was provided, Exodus 16:33; Hebrews 9:4, and an omer (or one man's portion) of the manna put up for preservation and placed in or near the ark, that succeeding generations might see with their own eyes the very substance on which their fathers were miraculously fed in their long and perilous journeyings from Egypt to Canaan
Lachish - It was evidently one of the important Canaanite cities of the time. The rich and varied finds represent almost all of the periods, but the chief interest for the student of the Bible centers on the periods beginning with the time of the Hebrew invasion of Canaan
High Place - There were such places in Canaan before the Israelites entered it, which they were told to destroy
Sidon - or ZIDON, a celebrated city and port of Phenicia, and one of the most ancient cities in the world; as it is supposed to have been founded by Sidon, the eldest son of Canaan, which will carry it up to above two thousand years before Christ
Zidon - The person after whom it is named was the "first-born" of Canaan, the grandson of Noah
Judea - In the general division of Canaan among the tribes, the southeast part fell to the lot of the tribe of Judah
Manna - The most important passages of the Old Testament on this topic are the following: ( Exodus 16:14-36 ; Numbers 11:7-9 ; 11:5,16; Joshua 5:12 ; Psalm 78:24 ; 25 ) From these passages we learn that the manna came every morning except the Sabbath, in the form of a small round seed resembling the hear frost that it must be gathered early, before the sun became so hot as to melt it; that it must be gathered every day except the Sabbath; that the attempt to lay aside for a succeeding day, except on the clay immediately preceding the Sabbath, failed by the substance becoming wormy and offensive; that it was prepared for food by grinding and baking; that its taste was like fresh oil, and like wafers made with honey, equally agreeable to all palates; that the whole nation, of at least 2,000,000, subsisted upon it for forty years; that it suddenly ceased when they first got the new corn of the land of Canaan; and that it was always regarded as a miraculous gift directly from God, and not as a product of nature
Reuben - At the Sinai census (Genesis 42:22; Numbers 2:11) Reuben numbered 46,500 men above 20 years of age, fit for service, and was sixth on the list: at the borders of Canaan (Numbers 26:7) - 43,730. of Jordan to help in the conquest of Canaan; subsequently they erected an altar shaped like the tabernacle altar, W
Palestine - Originally denoted only the sea-coast of the land of Canaan inhabited by the Philistines (Exodus 15:14 ; Isaiah 14:29,31 ; Joel 3:4 ), and in this sense exclusively the Hebrew name Pelesheth (rendered "Philistia" in Psalm 60:8 ; 83:7 ; 87:4 ; 108:9 ) occurs in the Old Testament. It is also called "the holy land" (Zechariah 2:12 ), the "land of Jehovah" (Hosea 9:3 ; Psalm 85:1 ), the "land of promise" (Hebrews 11:9 ), because promised to Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ; 24:7 ), the "land of Canaan" (Genesis 12:5 ), the "land of Israel" (1 Samuel 13:19 ), and the "land of Judah" (Isaiah 19:17 ). ...
From an early period the land was inhabited by the descendants of Canaan, who retained possession of the whole land "from Sidon to Gaza" till the time of the conquest by Joshua, when it was occupied by the twelve tribes
Exodus, Book of - ...
Message of the book...
God had promised that from the descendants of Abraham he would make a nation that would in a special sense be his people, and he would give them Canaan as their national homeland (Genesis 12:1-3; Genesis 13:14-16; Genesis 17:6-8; Genesis 22:17-18). Genesis 15:13; Exodus 12:41), till the time approached when they would be strong enough to move north and conquer Canaan. The book of Numbers goes on to record how the people, after almost one year at Sinai, resumed their journey to Canaan (cf
Sarah - From Mesopotamia God directed Abraham and Sarah into Canaan, the land that he promised would be Israel’s eventual homeland (Genesis 12:1; Genesis 12:5-8)
Dan (2) - ...
But its ordinary name was even then Lasha or Laish, the north-eastern bound of Canaan, as Sodom was the southwestern bound (Genesis 10:19)
Manna - God’s provision of the manna ceased once the people arrived in Canaan (Joshua 5:12)
Ordinance - With the defeat of Og of Bashan and Sihon of Heshbon, Israel was poised on the east bank of the Jordan to enter Canaan
Joshua - He was one of the twelve spies who were sent, Numbers 13:17, to explore the land of Canaan, and one of the two, Numbers 14:6, who gave an encouraging report of their journey. The miraculous fall of Jericho terrified the Canaanites. He defeated the Canaanites under Jabin king of Hazor, In six years six tribes, with 31 petty chiefs, were conquered
Rahab - ...
She was one of the inhabitants of Canaan, a Gentile, an alien, and by nature an enemy to the commonwealth of Israel, "without hope, and without God in the world
Among - ” The first usage of this preposition is in Genesis: “Abram dwelled in the land of Canaan, and Lot dwelled in [1] the cities of the plain, and pitched his tent toward Sodom” (13:12)
Amorites - From Deuteronomy 3:9 it appears that their language differed only dialectically from Canaanite, which was Hebrew. They were accordingly of the same race as the Canaanites. ]'>[3] document, on the other hand, regards the Canaanites (wh. This kingdom was overcome by the Israelites when they invaded Canaan
Baal (1) - With a similar meaning, it is applied to numerous Canaanitish local deities (pl. ...
So great a predilection for cults of such a nature was shown by the Israelites, from the time of their entrance into Canaan until the fall of the monarchy, that Jabweh was given this title. A confusion, however, of Jahweh and the Canaanitish deities seems to have taken place, to avoid which, Hosea ( Hosea 2:16-17 ) demands that Jahweh be no longer called Ba‘ali (‘my Baal’), but ’Ishi (‘my husband’). Under the influence of such prophecies the Israelites abandoned the use of Baal for Jahweh , and in later times developed so great an antipathy to this word that later revisers substituted bôsheth (‘shameful thing’), not only wherever Ba’al occurred for the Canaanitish deities ( Hosea 9:10 , Jeremiah 3:24 ; Jeremiah 11:13 ), but also, forgetful of its former application to Jahweh, in some of the above names (see Ishbosheth), supposing them to allude to local gods
Genealogy - The promise of the land of Canaan to the seed of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob successively, and the separation of the Israelites from the Gentile world; the expectation of Messiah as to spring from the tribe of Judah; the exclusively hereditary priesthood of Aaron with its dignity and emoluments; the long succession of kings in the line of David; and the whole division and occupations of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, occupation of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, families and houses of fathers, gave a deeper importance to the science of genealogy among the Jews than perhaps any other nation
Foreigner - Abram and his family, the founders of the Israelite nation, obeyed the call of God to emigrate to this land, leaving Mesopotamia to become resident aliens in Canaan (12:10; 20:1; 23:4). They must live in hope and faith, praying for the invasion of the kingdom and waiting patiently for the gift of a new Canaan, a new Eden, where they can reside with their God (Revelation 21-22 )
Hebrews - These facts have led to the conjecture that the name ‘Hebrews’ was originally given to the race of Abraham by their Canaanite neighbours, and that this name continued to be the designation of the race by outsiders all through their history, just as the Magyars are known as ‘Hungarians’ by other nations of Europe. This theory, which has generally been accepted by the Rabbis, carries with it the implication that the name was originally given by the original inhabitants of Canaan to the Hebrew immigrants. ) discusses fully the meaning and etymology of the term, and rejects the view that the name was given by outsiders to the people on their entry into Canaan
Gad (1) - Like Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, of the tribes they two alone remained shepherds still after the intervening centuries since Jacob left Canaan for Egypt. of Jordan for their possession (Numbers 32), as suited for their "multitude of cattle," but accompanied the nine tribes and a half across Jordan to war with the Canaanites; and only after their conquest and the apportionment of the whole land to their brethren "at the doorway of the tabernacle of the congregation in Shiloh, before Jehovah" (Joshua 19:51; Joshua 22:1-8), were they dismissed "to their tents (for still they led a half nomadic life) and the land of their possession. , he according to his stipulation to Moses went at the head of the tribes to conquer Canaan W
Canaan - The land of Canaan took its name from Canaan the son of Ham, who in turn was a son of Noah (Genesis 10:1; Genesis 10:6)
Terah - AND TERAH TOOK ABRAM HIS SON TO GO INTO THE LAND OF Canaan...
THE first Jew was a Gentile. How Enoch would have walked with God in Ur of the Chaldees, and in Haran, and in Canaan, and in Egypt, and back again in Canaan, confessing, all the time, that he was a stranger and a pilgrim with God on the earth! How Enoch would have told and would have taught his children after him that without faith it is impossible to please God! How he would have gone before them and shown them the way to come to God, believing that He is, and that He is a rewarder of them that diligently seek Him! But the divine will was in a strait betwixt two in Enoch's case. Nay, I know not that we would ever have had Abram, or would ever have heard his name, unless his humble-hearted, youthful-hearted, brave-hearted and believing-hearted old father had taken his chosen son by the hand, and his chosen son's wife, and had said, Yes, my son Abram, and my daughter Sarai, yes, let us set out at once for the land of Canaan. And Terah took Abram his son and Sarai his daughter-in-law, his son Abram's wife, and he went forth with them from Ur of the Chaldees, to go into the land of Canaan. And so was it with Edwards's first father in his re-migration out of Egypt back to Canaan. He came back to Canaan very rich in cattle, in silver, and in gold. Abram was filled with good things as he came back to Canaan, which had now recovered from her famine
Tribes of Israel, the - Eleven of the twelve sons were born at Haran, while the twelfth, Benjamin was born after Jacob returned to Canaan. As the tribes approached the land of Canaan and allotments were made to each tribe, the tribe of Reuben along with Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh occupied the Transjordan, that is the highland plateau region east of the Jordan River (Joshua 13:8-31 ); compare Joshua 19:1-9 : 1-5,33-42 ). During the years of famine as the sons of Jacob traveled back and forth between Egypt and Canaan, Simeon was held hostage by Joseph at one point ( Genesis 42:24 ). ...
In the journey from Egypt to Canaan, Judah has the lead position (Numbers 2:9 ). During the journey from Mount Sinai to Canaan the tribe of Issachar followed the tribe of Judah, that is, it was a part of the first cluster of tribes located on the east side of the tabernacle (Numbers 2:5 ). For instance there may have been a time during the tribal period when the people of Issachar served as slaves in the forced labor projects of their neighbors, the Canaanites. During the period that the tribes were settling in the land of Canaan, Zebulun apparently went beyond the call of duty in providing support
Wilderness of the Wanderings - ...
Rithmah (from retem the "broom" abounding there) designates the encampment during the first march toward Canaan (Numbers 33:18); Kadesh the second encampment, in the same district though not on the same spot, in the 40th year (Numbers 33:36-38); N. Israel's course first was straight for Canaan; so the believer's, under first impressions, is direct toward heaven. Then follows a miserable, irregular course, at one time toward Canaan, then back toward the Egypt of the world or to the Sinai of legalism; a spiritual blank, marked only by the Sabbath breaking case and the Korah rebellion against spiritual authority. If the backslider return to Kadesh, weeping there for his provocations (Deuteronomy 1:45), Jesus, the antitypical Joshua, will still bring him to the heavenly Canaan, though by a more trying way and with sore temptations, even at the hour of death, as Israel suffered from Baal-peor at the verge of Jordan (Numbers 25:1). In a steep on the edge of the plateau is Ain Gadis (Kadesh according to Palmer, the starting point of the 40 years' wandering and again after it their starting point to Mount Hor and Canaan)
Joseph - He was a child of probably six years of age when his father returned from Haran to Canaan and took up his residence in the old patriarchal town of Hebron. Thus "Joseph gathered up all the money that was in the land of Egypt, and in the land of Canaan, for the corn which they bought. ...
Jacob at length died, and in fulfilment of a promise which he had exacted, Joseph went up to Canaan to bury his father in "the field of Ephron the Hittite" (Genesis 47:29-31 ; 50:1-14 )
Genealogy - ...
The promise of Canaan, Israel's separation from the Gentiles, the prophecy of Messiah's descent from Judah, the hereditary priesthood in Aaron's family, and the limitation of ministerial offices to Levi, the promises to David's seed, and the division of Canaan by tribes and families, all combined to make Israel more careful of genealogies than: any other nation. According to their genealogical divisions they encamped, marched, made offerings, and selected the spies; hereby Achan was detected, and Saul chosen as king; hereby Canaan was allotted
Agriculture - While the patriarchs were in Canaan, they led a pastoral life, and little attended to tillage; Isaac and Jacob indeed tilled at times (Genesis 26:12; Genesis 37:7), but the herdsmen strove with Isaac for his wells not for his crops. The recurrence of famines and intercourse with Egypt taught the Canaanites subsequently to attend more to tillage, so that by the time of the spies who brought samples of the land's produce from Eshcol much progress had been made (Deuteronomy 8:8; Numbers 13:23). ...
On the other hand, when they became a nation, occupying Canaan, their agriculture learned in Egypt made them a self subsisting nation, independent of external supplies, and so less open to external corrupting influences. The Israelites cleared away most of the wood which they found in Canaan (Joshua 17:18), and seem to have had a scanty supply, as they imported but little; compare such extreme expedients for getting wood for sacrifice as in 1 Samuel 6:14; 2 Samuel 24:22; 1 Kings 19:21; dung and hay fuel heated their ovens (Ezekiel 4:12; Ezekiel 4:15; Matthew 6:30)
Host of Heaven - ” The people of Israel drew comparisons between their God and the gods of Canaan and Babylonia
Milk - "...
I must not dismiss our attention to this article until that I have first yet farther remarked, that God's promise of Canaan to his people of, old was under the same type of bringing them into a land "which is the glory of all lands, a land flowing with milk and honey
Passover - ...
There is recorded only one celebration of this feast between the Exodus and the entrance into Canaan, namely, that mentioned in Numbers 9:5
Josiah - The high places were essentially Canaanite worship centers that had been taken over by Israel. The Asherah were cult objects associated with the worship of Baal, the fertility god of Canaan
Iron (2) - Canaan is described as "a land whose stones are iron" (Deuteronomy 8:9)
Megiddo - It was assigned to Manasseh, though within Issachar's limit, but they failed to drive out the Canaanites, and could only make them tributary (Joshua 17:11-12-13; Judges 1:27-28; Judges 5:19). "The kings of Canaan (Jabin and Sisera his captain) fought in Taanach by the waters of Megiddo" (namely, Kishon, or else a copious stream flowing down into Kishon) with Deborah and Barak
Hebron - Well known at Abram's entrance into Canaan, 3,780 years ago (Genesis 42:18)
Bronze Serpent - The people were in the wilderness after their refusal to obey God by entering the land of Canaan. )...
Archaeological evidence from Mesopotamian and, more importantly, Canaanite sites reveals that the crawling serpent was a symbol of the fertility of the soil. It was widespread in the classical Canaanite cult. ...
If the cultic serpent retained in Israel the significance it had in other ancient Middle Eastern cults, and there is no cogent argument for assuming otherwise, it was a Canaanite symbol used to depict the Lord's power of fertility
Amorite (the) - " The fourth son of Canaan, Ham's son. As the Amorites, Hittites, and Jehusites were the highlanders, so were the Canaanites the lowlanders, by the sea W. As the Amorites (highlanders) were the most powerful, the other Canaanites (even lowlanders) were sometimes called by their name. ...
Thus Mature in Hebron, of Genesis 13:18, is the "Amorite" in Genesis 14:13; "Hittite" in Genesis 23; "Canaanite" in Judges 1:10. No traces appear of any distinctive government, worship, or customs, different from the other Canaanite nations. ...
The Amorite name Senir (not Shenir) for mount Hermon (Deuteronomy 3:9) is mentioned; but this may be the Canaanite term, as distinguished from the Hebrew "Hermon" (lofty peak) and the Phoenician "Sirion" (glittering as a breast-plate; senir too means a breast-plate, from a root, "clatter," the snowy round top glittering like a breast-plate)
Brother - 9:25, 'âch clearly signifies “relative”: “Cursed be Canaan; a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren
Tare - " Might not the Chaldee word זונין , and the Greek word ζιζανιον , come from the psalmist's זנאּ?זן , which might have signified a "mixture" of grain of any kind, and be here used to point out the mixing bastard or degenerate wheat among the good seed-wheat? Mintert says, that "it is a kind of plant, not unlike corn or wheat, having at first the same sort of stalk, and the same viridity, but bringing forth no fruit, at least none good:" and he adds, from John Melchior, "ζιζανιον does not signify every weed in general which grows among corn, but a particular seed, known in Canaan, which was not unlike wheat, but, being put into the ground, degenerated, and assumed another nature and form
Hebron - Arba was the father of Anak; and from Anak the giants, called Anakim, took their name, who were still dwelling at Hebron when Joshua conquered the land of Canaan
Gibeon - Three days after the Gibeonites had surrendered to the Hebrews, the kings of Canaan being informed of it, five of them came and besieged the city of Gibeon. Afterward, those of the Canaanites who were subdued, and had their lives spared, were added to the Gibeonites
Seir - These people were driven out from their country by the Edomites, or the children of Esau, who dwelt there in their stead, and were in possession of this region when the Israelites passed by in their passage from Egypt to the land of Canaan
Kings - Beside, we find in Joshua, that almost every town in Canaan had its king; and we know that the territories of these towns must have been very inconsiderable, Joshua 12:9-24
Benjamin - The greatest misfortune that ever befel the tribe occurred not very long after the settlement in Canaan
Lot - He removed with the rest of his kindred to Haran, and again subsequently with Abraham and Sarai to Canaan
Balaam - At the time of Israel’s migration to Canaan, the Moabite king Balak, fearing the Israelites, sent to Mesopotamia asking the soothsayer Balaam to come and put a curse on them
Abimelech - ...
Among the Philistines...
After the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, Abraham and Sarah moved through the south of Canaan and settled in the Philistine district of Gerar
Aram - ...
Abraham later moved to Canaan, but the rest of his relatives remained in Aram (Genesis 12:1; Genesis 12:4-5)
Manna - ...
(5) It was found not merely where it still is, but Israel's whole way to Canaan (and not merely for a month or two each year, but all the year round). Israel subsisted on it for 40 years; it suddenly ceased when they got the first new grain of Canaan
Syria - Excavations at the latter yielded alphabetic cuneiform tablets in Ugaritic (a language similar to Hebrew) which have shed much light on the nature of Canaanite religion. See Archaeology; Canaan; Ugarit . ” See Canaan; Gods, Pagan
City - In his recent work, Canaan d’après l’exploration récente (1907), the Dominican scholar, Father Vincent, has prepared plans on a uniform scale of the various sites excavated (see op. From these the modest proportions of an ancient Canaanite or Hebrew city may be best realized. ...
With the exception of cities on the sea-board, the situation of the Canaanite city was determined, as elsewhere in that old world, by two supreme considerations the presence of an adequate water-supply and the capability of easy defence against the enemy. ‘The cities of Canaan,’ says Vincent, ‘were almost invariably perched upon a projecting spur of a mountain slope, or upon an isolated eminence in the plain: Megiddo, Gezer, Tell-es-Safy [1] not to mention the hill of the primitive Jerusalem are characteristic examples of the former site, Taanach and Lachish of the latter. ...
In the internal affairs of the city the king in Canaanite days was supreme. With due religious rites, too, the city had been founded in far-off Canaanite, or even, as we now know, in pre-Canaanite days, when the foundation sacrifice claimed its human victim (see House, § 3 )
Manasseh, Tribe of - Half the tribe lived in Canaan (the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea) and the other half lived in the area east of Jordan (Joshua 22:7). In all there were nine and a half tribes in Canaan and two and a half east of Jordan
Monotheism - ...
In contrast to the call for strict commitment to the Lord alone, to a kind of divine jealousy that would tolerate no commitments from the people to gods other than the Lord, even though other gods might tempt the Lord's people with offers of power, the people among whom Israel lived in the early years of occupation in Canaan believed in numerous gods whose activities influenced their lives. Principal among the gods of the Canaanite pantheon were the great father figure, El; the younger hero, Baal; the adversary against order in the created land, Yam; the consort for Baal, Anat; and the ruler of Sheol, the place of the dead, Mot. In the Canaanite story about the various events involving these gods, Baal and his consort were primarily responsible for the success or failure of the agriculture in the social structure of Canaan. The cult for the Canaanite farmers sought to stimulate the fertility of the divine couple, and thus the fertility of the land, by participating in fertility rituals at central sanctuaries called high places
Sidon (2) - In the ideal distribution of Canaan recorded in Joshua the lot of Asher would seem to have included about all of Phœnicia, extending ‘even unto great Sidon’ (Joshua 19:28). Matthew 15:22 And, behold, a woman of Canaan came out of the same coasts, etc. And, behold, a Canaanitish woman came out from those borders, etc
jo'Seph - ( Genesis 41:54-57 ) [1] After the famine had lasted for a time, apparently two years, Joseph gathered up all the money that was found in the land of Egypt and in the land of Canaan, for the corn which they brought, and brought it into Pharaoh's house, (Genesis 47:13,14 ) and when the money was exhausted, all the cattle, and finally all the land except that of the priests, and apparently, as a consequence, the Egyptians themselves. On the death of Jacob in Egypt Joseph carried him to Canaan, and laid him in the cave of Machpelah, the burying-place of his fathers
Gilgal - When Israel under Joshua crossed the Jordan to conquer Canaan, the first place they came to was Gilgal. ...
Israel’s entrance into Canaan was the beginning of a new way of life, and Joshua set up a memorial at Gilgal to mark the occasion (Joshua 4:20)
Succoth - A place first mentioned in Genesis 33:17 , where it is said to have been so called because Jacob, on his return from Haran to Canaan, halting at it after his wrestling with the angel at Penuel, built there ‘booths’ (Heb
Divination - In Mesopotamia, Anatolia, Egypt, and Canaan, people communicated with their deities by means of divination, both on a personal and public level
Sun - The Hebrews must have been well acquainted with the idolatrous worship of the sun during the captivity in Egypt, both from the contiguity of On, the chief seat of the worship of the sun, as implied in the name itself (On being the equivalent of the Hebrew Bethshemesh, "house of the sun") (Jeremiah 43:13 ) and also from the connection between Joseph and Potipherah("he who belongs to Ela") the priest of On, (Genesis 41:45 ) After their removal to Canaan, the Hebrews came in contact with various forms of idolatry which originated in the worship of the sun; such as the Baal of the Phoenicians, the Molech or Milcom of the Ammonites, and the Hadad of the Syrians
Dispersion - The following table shows how the different families were dispersed: ...
| - Japheth | - Gomer | Cimmerians, Armenians | - Magog | Caucasians, Scythians | - Madal | Medes and Persian tribes | - Javan | - Elishah | Greeks | - Tarshish | Etruscans, Romans | - Chittim | Cyprians, Macedonians | - Dodanim | Rhodians | - Tubal | Tibareni, Tartars | - Mechech | Moschi, Muscovites | - Tiras | Thracians | | - Shem | - Elam | Persian tribes | - Asshur | Assyrian | - Arphaxad | - Abraham | - Isaac | - Jacob | Hebrews | - Esau | Edomites | - Ishmael | Mingled with Arab tribes | - Lud | Lydians | - Aram | Syrians | | - Ham | - Cush | Ethiopans | - Mizrain | Egyptians | - Phut | Lybians, Mauritanians | - Canaan | Canaanites, Phoenicians ...
Prostitution - It may be that most prostitutes in Israel were foreign or Canaanite women. ...
The term cult prostitution is frequently used to refer to certain practices in Canaanite fertility cults, including the cult of Baal. Hosea also attacked the Israelite attraction to the fertility religion of Canaan as harlotry
Jehonadab - ) Rechab, father of Jehonadab, belonged to the Kenites connected with Israel through Moses' marriage; these (Heber and Jael) with Israel entered Canaan, and shared their inheritance, though remaining nomads in tents, some in the far N
Mount Sinai - The Amalekites lived in Canaan proper (Numbers 14:42-45 ) and would not, it is claimed, have met the Israelites in the Sinaitic peninsula
Har-Magedon - The primary reference, no doubt, would be to Israel’s victory ‘by the waters of Megiddo’ over the kings of Canaan (Judges 5:19), which might be taken as typical of the triumph of God and His Kingdom over the hostile world-powers; but the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan at the eastern extremity of the plain (1 Samuel 31:1), the disastrous struggle of Josiah on the same field against Pharaohnecoh (2 Kings 23:29, 2 Chronicles 35:22), and Zechariah’s reference to ‘the mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon’ (Zechariah 12:11), would heighten the suggestion of a great day of overthrow and destruction
Sidon - ...
‘Sidonian’ was originally an ethnic name like ‘Hittite,’ Sidon and Heth being named together as sons of Canaan in Genesis 10:15
Jordan - In one sense, indeed, that is, in so far as it was the eastern boundary of the land of Canaan, it was the eastern boundary of the promised land
Deborah - It is a song of victory, sung in memory of Israel’s triumph (under the leadership of Deborah and Barak) over Sisera and the kings of Canaan
Pithom - I mean when Jobin, king of Canaan, ruled with an iron rod over Israel
Rams Horns - Moses, as a type of the law he was the minister of, could not bring the children of God into Canaan
Abraham - God called Abram to migrate to Canaan, assuring him that he would father a vast nation
Nation - 4:38 gôyim specifically describes the early inhabitants of Canaan prior to the Israelite conquest
Outcasts - " And agreeably to this, the prophet Isaiah was commissioned to tell the church that in that day, meaning the gospel-day, "five cities in Egypt should speak the language of Canaan
ka'Desh, ka'Desh-Bar'ne-a - ) This place, the scene of Miriam's death, was the farthest point which the Israelites reached in their direct road to Canaan; it was also that whence the spies were sent, and where, on their return, the people broke out into murmuring, upon which their strictly penal term of wandering began
House - Israel’s conquest of Canaan under Joshua led to a new way of life for the Israelite people. ...
The Israelites built some of these houses themselves, but others they took over from the Canaanites
Abraham - Passing along the valley of the Jabbok, in the land of Canaan, he formed his first encampment at Sichem (Genesis 12:6 ), in the vale or oak-grove of Moreh, between Ebal on the north and Gerizim on the south. He returned to Canaan richer than when he left it, "in cattle, in silver, and in gold" (Genesis 12:8 ; 13:2 . At the age of 175 years, 100 years after he had first entered the land of Canaan, he died, and was buried in the old family burying-place at Machpelah (Genesis 25:7-10 )
Education - ’...
As to the educational attainments of the Hebrews before the conquest of Canaan, it is useless to speculate. On their settlement in Canaan, however, they were brought into contact with a civilization which for two thousand years or more had been under the influence of Babylonia and in a less degree of Egypt. The language of Babylonia, with its complicated system of wedge-writing, had for long been the medium of communication not only between the rulers of the petty states of Canaan and the great powers outside its borders, but even, as we now know from Sellin’s discoveries at Taanach, between these rulers themselves
Judah - The tribe outnumbered all the others under Moses: 74,600 at Sinai (Numbers 1:26-27); :76,500 before entering Canaan (Numbers 26:22); outnumbering Dan at Sinai by 11,900. Again after the division of the land Judah was called by God to be the vanguard of the army warring with the Canaanites (Judges 1:1-2). "...
Judah stopped with his friend Hirah, an Adullamite, and there married a Canaanitess, Shuah's daughter (Bath-Shua), by whom he had sons, Er, Onan, and Shelah. The three sons born in Canaan accompanied Judah to Egypt on his removal there (Exodus 1:2). ...
(1) "The south" (Negeb); the southernmost district of Canaan, the pasture lands between the hills and the desert; a portion of this was ceded to Simeon (Joshua 15:20-32; Joshua 19:1-9). ...
Judah and Simeon followed up the conquest (Judges 1:9; Judges 1:19-20), occupying the mountain and the graingrowing Philistine tract, with Gaza, Askelon, and Ekron, but unable to drive out the Canaanites from the valley (Emek) where their chariots gave the latter the advantage (Judges 1:19), but in Judges 1:9 "valley" is shephelah , rather the low hilly region between the mountain and the plain
Egypt - Successive Eighteenth Dynasty pharaohs made military campaigns into Canaan and against the Mitannian kingdom of Mesopotamia, creating an empire which reached the Euphrates River. They especially illuminate the turbulent situation in Canaan, a century prior to the Israelite invasion. ) reestablished Egyptian control in Canaan and campaigned against the Hittites, who had taken Egyptian territory in North Syria during the Amarna Age. commemorates Merneptah's victory over a Libyan invasion and concludes with a poetic account of a campaign in Canaan
High Place, Sanctuary - The holy places which figure so conspicuously in the stories of the patriarchs are in many cases tree-sanctuaries of immemorial antiquity, such as ‘the terebinth of Moreh,’ at Shechem, under which Abram is said to have built his first altar in Canaan ( Genesis 12:6 f. In taking over from the Canaanites the high places at which they worshipped Baal and Astarte, the Hebrews made little or no change in their appearance and appointments. By these, indeed, the history of some of the ‘holy places’ of Canaan has been carried back to the later Stone Age. ; Vincent, Canaan d’après l’exploration récente , 1907, 92 ff. , and whose descendants, variously named Canaanites and Amorites, were in turn partly displaced by, partly incorporated with, the Hebrews. As the Hebrews gradually became masters of Canaan, the high places at which the local Baals and Astartes had been worshipped became, as we have seen, the legitimate sanctuaries of J″ Exodus, the - ...
Jacob and Joseph on their deathbeds had charged that their bodies should be buried in Canaan (Genesis 1. ), thereby impressing on their descendants that Egypt was only a place of sojourn, that they should look forward to Canaan as their inheritance and home. Instead of the direct way to Canaan by Philistia on the S. As Moses' 40 years sojourn in the wilderness trained him for being their leader there, so their 40 years in it trained them for the conflicts in Canaan
Abraham - The alphabetical Hebrew system is Phoenician, and was probably brought by Abraham to Canaan, where it became modified. Nicolaus of Damascus ascribed to him the conquest of Damascus on his way to Canaan. Scripture records nothing further than that his chief servant was Eliezer of Damascus; he pursued Chedorlaomer to Hobah, on the left of Damascus, subsequently (Genesis 14:15), Abraham entered Canaan along the valley of the Jabbok, and encamped first in the rich Moreh valley, near Sichem, between mounts Ebal and Gerizim. The unfriendly attitude of the Canaanites induced him next to move to the mountain country between Bethel and Ai, where also he built an altar to Jehovah, whose worship was fast passing into oblivion in the world. ...
Hence he passes into direct covenant relation with God, confirmed by the sign of the burning lamp (compare Isaiah 62:1) passing between the divided pieces of a heifer, she goat, and ram, and accompanied by the revelation that his posterity are to be afflicted in a foreign land 400 years, then to come forth and conquer Canaan when the iniquity of the Amorites shall be full. ...
His care that he and his should be utterly separated from idolatry appears in his strict charge to Eliezer as to the choice of Isaac's wife, not to take a Canaanite woman nor yet to bring his son back to Abraham's original home
Korah - A duke of Edom, born in Canaan before Esau migrated to Mount Seir. With studied profanity they describe Egypt as that which God had described Canaan to be
Jacob - He then set out with his family and property "to go to Isaac his father in the land of Canaan" (Genesis 31 ). While journeying from Bethel to Ephrath (the Canaanitish name of Bethlehem), Rachel died in giving birth to her second son Benjamin (35:16-20), fifteen or sixteen years after the birth of Joseph. His body was embalmed and carried with great pomp into the land of Canaan, and buried beside his wife Leah in the cave of Machpelah, according to his dying charge
Judges, Book of - Between Israel’s conquest of Canaan and the setting up of the monarchy, there was a period of about two hundred years known as the period of the judges. They had failed to carry out God’s instructions to destroy the Canaanite people left in the land after Joshua’s conquest (Deuteronomy 7:2-4; Deuteronomy 9:5; Judges 1:21; Judges 1:27-36). The result was that the Israelites followed the false religious practices of the Canaanites. ...
In judgment God used the Canaanites, along with people from neighbouring lands, to oppress Israel (Joshua 23:4-5; Joshua 23:12-13; Judges 2:11-15; Judges 2:20-23). Canaan itself)
Farming - )...
Flocks and herds...
Only after the Israelites settled in Canaan did they became crop farmers and fruit growers. Abraham, Isaac and Jacob had moved around from place to place with their animals (Genesis 13:1-7; Genesis 26:14-22; Genesis 33:13), the family of Jacob had kept flocks and herds in Egypt (Amos 8:2), and the people of Moses’ time had brought animals with them when they left Egypt for Canaan (Exodus 12:38; 1618528390_98)
Division of the Earth - ...
And this furnishes an additional proof of the justice of the expulsion of the Canaanites, as usurpers, by the Israelites, the rightful possessors of the land of Palestine, under Moses, Joshua, and their successors, when the original grant was renewed to Abraham, Genesis 15:13-21 . And the knowledge of this divine decree may satisfactorily account for the panic terror with which the devoted nations of Canaan were struck at the miraculous passage of the Red Sea by the Israelites, and approach to their confines, so finely described by Moses:—...
"The nations shall hear [2] and tremble, Sorrow shall seize the inhabitants of Palestine. Then shall the dukes of Edom be amazed, Dismay shall possess the princes of Moab, ...
The inhabitants of Canaan shall melt away: Fear and terror shall fall upon them, ...
By the greatness of thine arm they shall be petrified, Till thy people pass over [3] O Lord, ...
Till the people pass over, whom thou hast redeemed. " In this curious and valuable geographical chart, Armenia, the cradle of the human race, was allotted to Japheth, by right of primogeniture; and Samaria and Babel to the sons of Shem; the usurpation of these regions, therefore, by Nimrod, and of Palestine by Canaan, was in violation of the divine decree. ) Canaan has been noticed already; and the original extent of the land of Canaan is carefully marked by Moses. Of Canaan's sons, Sidon, the eldest, occupied the north-west corner, and built the town of that name, so early celebrated for her luxury and commerce in Scripture, Judges 18:7 ; 1 Kings 5:6 ; and by Homer, who calls the Sidonians, πολυδαιδαλοι , skilled in many arts. Beyond the Jebusites, were settled the Emorites, or Amorites, Numbers 13:29 , who extended themselves beyond Jordan, and were the most powerful of the Canaanite tribes, Genesis 15:16 ; Numbers 21:21 , until they were destroyed by Moses and Joshua, with the rest of the devoted nations of Canaan's family
House - His descendants apparently lived in tents until the time of Joshua, when they captured Canaan and began to build houses like the Canaanites
Rebekah - , however, the motive of the journey is that he might take a wife from the family of his mother, in contrast to Esau, who had grieved his parents by taking a wife from among the Canaanites ( Genesis 26:34-35 ). The death and burial of Deborah, the nurse of Rebekah, who had followed her from Haran ( Genesis 24:59 ), are reported to have taken place after Jacob had returned to Canaan ( Genesis 35:8 )
Burial - " Thus the patriarch became the owner of a part of the land of Canaan, the only part he ever possessed
Joppa - ...
When Canaan was conquered, the tribe of Dan received Joppa; but it never came firmly into Hebrew hands
Shepherd - ...
After the Israelites took possession of Canaan, the shepherds among them settled down more or less permanently with their flocks
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - "Armageddon" in Revelation 16:16 corresponds: from har "a mountain", and Megiddo "the valley of Jezreel", the great battle field of Canaan, where godly Josiah fell before Pharaoh Necho
Chaos - En route to Canaan, God cared for Israel in a howling wilderness waste (Deuteronomy 32:10 )
Circumcision - It was observed always afterwards among the tribes of israel, although it is not expressly mentioned from the time of the settlement in Canaan till the time of Christ, about 1,450 years
Immanuel - In Numbers 14:9 Joshua and Caleb had urged the Israelites to acknowledge that the Lord was with them and to begin the conquest of Canaan, but just like Ahaz the people chose the path of unbelief with its tragic consequences
Heir - The land of Canaan, again, was promised to Abraham and his seed (Genesis 13:14-15)
on (2) - In Isaiah 19:18, "five cities in Egypt shall speak the language of Canaan, and swear to the Lord of hosts; one shall be called the 'city of destruction' " (Ηa-Ηeres )
Manna - It was altogether miraculous: for this food began to fall from heaven from the time the Israelites arrived in the wilderness of Zin, which was the sixteenth day of the second month after their departure from Egypt, until that they came to Canaan, during the pilgrimage of forty years
Sidon - Sidon is called (Genesis 10:15) the firstborn of Canaan, and "great Sidon" or the metropolis (Joshua 11:8). Sidonians is the generic name of the Phoenicians or Canaanites (Joshua 13:6; Judges 18:7); in Judges 18:28 Laish is said to be "far from Sidon," whereas Tyre, 20 miles nearer, would have been specified if it had then been a city of leading importance
Shiloh (2) - The ark, which had been at Gilgal during the conquest of Canaan, was removed on the completion of the conquest to Shiloh where it remained from Joshua's closing days to Samuel's (Joshua 18:1-10; Judges 18:31; 1 Samuel 4:3)
Handicraft - After the establishment of the Jews in Canaan, the occupation of a smith became a distinct employment
Come - ” Abram and his family “came” to the land of Canaan ( Court - The cities of Canaan were relatively small and could not contain the whole population. ...
The Book of Joshua includes Israel’s victories in Canaan’s major cities as well as the suburbs: “Ain, Remmon, and Ether, and Ashan; four cities and their villages …” (19:7; Manasseh - He did evil in the sight of the Lord; worshipped the idols of the land of Canaan; rebuilt the high places that his father Hezekiah had destroyed; set up altars to Baal; and planted groves to false gods. He raised altars to the whole host of heaven, in the courts of God's house; made his son pass through the fire in honour of Moloch; was addicted to magic, divinations, auguries, and other superstitions; set up the idol Astarte in the house of God; finally, he involved his people in all the abomination of the idolatrous nations to that degree, that Israel committed more wickedness than the Canaanites, whom the Lord had driven out before them
Naaman - The Syrian had found the efficacy of Israel's sacred stream of Jordan, and he concluded that the earth of Canaan was as sacred also
Calf - The "golden calf" was an idol set up and worshipped by the Israelites at the foot of mount Sinai in their passage through the wilderness to the land of Canaan
Edom, Edomites - ...
Before the conquest of Canaan, Edom is said to have refused to let Israel pass through his territory (1 Kings 22:47-48 ; Numbers 20:21 )
mo'ab - After the conquest of Canaan the relations of Moab with Israel were of a mixed character, sometimes warlike and sometimes peaceable
Jor'Dan - In one sense indeed, that is, in so far as it was the eastern boundary of the land of Canaan, it was the eastern boundary of the promised land
Exodus - After giving them his law, God directed them to the new homeland he had promised them in Canaan
Jacob - Jacob became the bearer of God's promises and the inheritor of Canaan. ...
Descent to Egypt When severe famine gripped Canaan, Jacob and his sons set out for Egypt. He always seemed to be running from someone or something—from Esau, from Laban, or from famine in Canaan
Patriarchs, the - Abram was 75 at the time, and responded to God's call to migrate to Canaan, where he would become the founder of a great nation. ...
As Abram moved along the trading routes leading to Shechem, Bethel, and the Hebron area and mingled with the pagan Canaanites, God's promise that the childless Sarai would bear a son could only be accepted by faith. Before his death Abraham gave gifts to his concubine's sons, and sent them away from Canaan. Jacob resided in Canaan thereafter, and only left when a famine overtook the land
Esau - Isaac too erred through carnal partiality, which he sought to stimulate by eating his favorite's venison, determining to give to Esau the blessing in spite of the original divine intimation, "the elder shall serve the younger," and in spite of Esau's actual sale of the birthright to Jacob, and though Esau had shown his unworthiness of it by taking when he was forty years of age two Hittite wives from among the corrupt Canaanites, to his father's and mother's grief. It was not however until after his father's death that he permanently left Canaan, according to Isaac's blessing, to Jacob, his wives and family then first accompanying him (Genesis 35:29; Genesis 36:6). He carried away all his substance from Canaan there, to take full possession of Seir and drive out its original inhabitants
Tools - Iron only came into use in Canaan around 1200 B. The earliest plowshares were of bronze which was only slowly replaced by iron following the Israelite settlement of Canaan. Sickles consisting of several serrated flint segments fitted into a shaft of bone or hollowed out wood were typical of the Canaanite culture
Samaritan Pentateuch - To His honour I have written this holy law at the entrance of the tabernacle of testimony on Mount Gerizim, Beth El, in the 13th year of taking possession of Canaan . Canaan and
Jacob - ...
Having left Canaan in guilt, now on his return Jacob must re-enter it with deep searchings of heart and wrestlings with God for the recovery of that sinless faith which he had forfeited by deceit and which lays hold of the covenant. " Next Jacob came to Succoth, then crossed Jordan, and near Shechem bought his only possession in Canaan, the field whereon he tented, from the children of Hamer, Shechem's father, for 100 kesita, i. Undue intercourse with the Canaanites around ended in Dinah's fall and the cruel retribution by Simeon and Levi, which so imperiled his position among the surrounding Canaanites, and which so deeply affected him (Genesis 33:17; Genesis 33:19; Genesis 34; Genesis 49:5-6). Leaving Canaan as a family, Israel returned as a nation. His faith in "bowing on his bed" after Joseph promised to bury him in Canaan (Genesis 47:29-30) consisted in his confidence of God's giving Canaan to his seed, and he therefore earnestly desired to be buried there
Abram - Palestine was then inhabited by the Canaanites, from whom it was called Canaan. Abraham, leading his tribe, first settled at Sechem, a valley between the mountains Ebal and Gerizim, where God appeared to him and promised to give him the land of Canaan, and where, as in other places in which he remained any time, he built an altar to the Lord. After the famine Abraham returned to Canaan, and pitched his tents between Bethel and Hai, where he had previously raised an altar. On his return, passing near Salem, supposed to be the city afterward called Jerusalem, he was blessed by its king Melchizedec, who was priest of the most high God; so that the knowledge and worship of Jehovah had not quite departed at that time from the Canaanitish nations. Paul, he lived in tents in preference to settling in the land of Canaan, though it had been given to him for a possession, in order that he might thus proclaim his faith in the eternal inheritance of which Canaan was a type; and in bearing this testimony, his example was followed by Isaac and Jacob, the "heirs with him of the same promise," who also thus "confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims," and that "they looked" for a continuing and eternal city in heaven. Paul expressly distinguishes between the fleshly and the spiritual seed of Abraham; to the latter of which, in their ultimate and highest sense, the promises of increase as the stars of heaven, and the sands of the sea shore, are to be referred, as also the promise of the heavenly Canaan
Laban (2) - ...
When Abraham emigrated to Canaan the part of the family to which Laban belonged remained in Haran (Genesis 27:43; Genesis 29:1 ff)
Caleb - He and Oshea or Joshua, alone of the twelve, on returning from Canaan to Kadesh Barnea, encouraged the people when dispirited by the other spies: "Let us go up at once, and possess the land (he does not for a moment doubt Israel's ability; not Let us try; success is certain, the Lord being on our side), for we are well able to overcome it" (Numbers 13:30)
Moloch - The old Canaanite "Moloch" is always written with the article the Moloch; to him children were sacrificed in Topher in the valley of the children of Hinnom. unto the idols of Canaan" (compare 2 Chronicles 28:3; Jeremiah 19:5)
Babylon, Kingdom of - " In the epoch of the Kassite dynasty, however, Canaan passed into the hands of Egypt
Euphrates - (See Canaan
Gath - Prior to the coming of the Israelites, Gath was a Canaanite city occupied by the Anakim, a group known for their large stature (Joshua 11:21-22 ). During the conquest of Canaan, Joshua and the Israelites apparently did not take the sites of Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod (Joshua 11:22 )
Nebo - Mount Nebo is the traditional site of Moses’ view of Canaan ( Deuteronomy 34:1 f
Harlot - No sooner were they settled in Canaan than the purity both of their morality and their religion was endangered by the contaminating influence of Semitic rites, in which the consecrated harlot (kĕdçshâh) played no small part
Ishmael - At first he was located in the wilderness of Beer-sheba and afterwards at Paran, a region between Canaan and mount Sinai
Baal, Master - Baal was a common name given to the god of fertility in Canaan. In the Canaanite city of Ugarit, Baal was especially recognized as the god of fertility. The Old Testament records that Baal was “the god” of the Canaanites
Nakedness - In its first biblical appearance ‛ervâh implies shameful exposure: “And Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father
Mother - The woman through whom a nation originated is called its “mother”; she is the first or tribal “mother,” an ancestress: “Thus saith the Lord God unto Jerusalem; Thy birth and thy nativity is of the land of Canaan; thy father was an Amorite, and thy mother a Hittite” ( Noah - ...
Noah pronounced a blessing on Shem and Japheth: Jehovah's name is connected with Shem, while Japheth, head of the Gentiles, is enlarged providentially by God ; a curse is pronounced on Canaan
Bashan - or BASAN, one of the most fertile cantons of Canaan, which was bounded on the west by the river Jordan, on the east by the mountains of Gilead, on the south by the brook of Jabbok, and on the north by the land of Geshur
Noah - ...
Noah pronounced a blessing on Shem and Japheth: Jehovah's name is connected with Shem, while Japheth, head of the Gentiles, is enlarged providentially by God ; a curse is pronounced on Canaan
King, Kings - These remarks will remove the surprise which some persons have felt at seeing that so small a country as Canaan contained thirty-one kings who were conquered, Joshua 12:9-24 , besides many who no doubt escaped the arms of Joshua
Handicraft - ( Genesis 4:22 ) After the establishment of the Jews in Canaan, the occupation of a smith became recognized as a distinct employment- (1 Samuel 13:19 ) The smith's work and its results are often mentioned in Scripture
Jericho - It was the most important city in the Jordan valley (Numbers 22:1 ; 34:15 ), and the strongest fortress in all the land of Canaan
Harlot - No sooner were they settled in Canaan than the purity both of their morality and their religion was endangered by the contaminating influence of Semitic rites, in which the consecrated harlot (kĕdçshâh) played no small part
Pottery in Bible Times - Canaan also maintained extensive trade connections with Aegean and northeastern Mediterranean powers. That deterioration becomes more evident during the Late Bronze IIb (about 1300-1200) as Egypt's Nineteenth Dynasty established a firmer control over the affairs of the economy and urban centers of Canaan. ) The Iron Age basically runs from the conquest of Canaan to the demise of the Judean Kingdom and usually is divided into two distinct periods. Iron Age I (1200-925) pottery from the settlement to the division of the kingdom begins with a continuation of Late Bronze traditions, as Israel borrowed industrial techniques from the local Canaanite population
Jacob - To Jacob is promised Canaan, a well-watered land of fields and vineyards ( Deuteronomy 11:14 ; Deuteronomy 33:28 ), with sovereignty over its peoples, even those who were ‘brethren’ or descended from the same ancestry as Israel ( Genesis 19:37 f. Thereupon Laban returned home; and Jacob continued his journey to Canaan, and was met by the angels of God ( Genesis 32:1 ), as if to congratulate and welcome him as he approached the Land of Promise. According to the one, the transaction was personal, and involved a fulfilment by Shechem of a certain unspecified condition; according to the other, the entire clan was involved on either side, and the story is that of the danger of the absorption of Israel by the local Canaanites and its avoidance through the interposition of Simeon and Levi. Jacob lived in Egypt seventeen years ( Genesis 47:28 ), at the close of which, feeling death to be nigh, he extracted a pledge from Joseph to bury him in Canaan, and adopted his two grandsons, placing the younger first in anticipation of the pre-eminence of the tribe that would descend from him ( Genesis 48:19 , Hebrews 11:21 ). His body was embalmed, convoyed to Canaan by a great procession according to the Egyptian custom, and buried in the cave of Machpeiah near Hebron ( Genesis 50:13 )
Joshua, the Book of - ...
Contents The Book of Joshua tells the story of a significant Bible event, the conquest of the land of Canaan. However, numerous passages (Joshua 13:13 ; Joshua 15:63 ; Joshua 16:10 ; Joshua 17:12-13 , Joshua 17:16-18 ) agree with the Book of Judges to show that it was up to the individual clans to root out the many pockets of Canaanite resistance still scattered throughout the land. Rahab, the Canaanite prostitute, was accepted, along with her family, as a part of the covenant community (Joshua 2:9-13 ; Joshua 6:22-23 ,Joshua 6:22-23,6:25 ). Its teaching is that the Lord allowed his people to conquer the land of Canaan, to take possession of the area He had promised to the patriarchs. The iniquity of the Amorites (Canaanites) was at last full (Joshua 7:1-268 )
King, Kingship - Kings were of three basic kinds in the Ancient Near East: (1) kings of great nations often identified with a god (for example, in Assyria, Babylon, and Egypt); (2) kings from a military elite who had taken control of a local population by force (for example, Canaanite city kings); and (3) kings who arose from tribal or clan-oriented groups whose election to or inheritance of the kingship was determined in part by the people's will (for example, Israel, Edom, Moab, and Ammon). ...
As Israel became more settled in Canaan, the old tribal institutions of leadership began to dissolve (see, for example, 1 Samuel 8:3 ). ...
The significant thing about Saul's leadership is that for the first time after settlement in Canaan, Israel had a permanent national military leader. The Canaanite population of Palestine was subject to the king
Fertility Cult - See Asherah ; Ashtoroth; Baal ; Canaan, History and Religion of ; Dagon ; Diana ; Gods, Pagan ; High Place ; Prostitution ; Tammuz ; Ugarit
Resurrection - This can only be fulfilled by Abraham rising and, in integrity of parts, inheriting the antitypical Canaan
Rest - Neither then nor at the entry into Canaan under Joshua was the Divine idea of rest realized
Wilderness - ...
The prophets felt that most of Israel's religious troubles began with the settlement of Canaan and apostasy to Canaanite idolatry, but they also looked forward to a renewed pilgrimage in the wilderness (Hosea 2:14-15 ; Hosea 9:10 , compare Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Jeremiah 2:2-3 ; Jeremiah 31:2-3 )
Mill, Millstone - Vincent in his Canaan d’après l’exptoration récente (405, fig
Power - Likewise God had warned His people against pride in taking the land of Canaan: “And thou say in thine heart, My power [2] and the might of mine hand hath gotten me this wealth
Tabernacle - It was carried by the Israelites into Canaan, and there set up, possibly first at Gilgal, then, when the land was subdued, at Shiloh, Joshua 18:1, and also at Bethel, perhaps afterwards at Nob, and then at Gibeon
Foot - ...
It is said that the land of Canaan is not like Egypt, "where thou sowedst thy seed, and wateredst it with thy foot," Deuteronomy 11:10
Passover - The paschal lamb therefore prefigured the offering of the spotless Son of God, the appointed propitiation for the sins of the whole world; by virtue of which, when received by faith, we are delivered from the bondage of guilt and misery; and nourished with strength for our heavenly journey to that land of rest, of which Canaan, as early as the days of Abraham, became the divinely instituted figure
Justice - In the land of Canaan, local magistrates were appointed for every city and village; and these were instructed to cooperate with the priests, as being all together under the theocracy, the actual government of Jehovah, the supreme Judge of Israel, Deuteronomy 16:18 17:8-10 19:17 21:16
Captivity - Both Judah and Israel being removed from "the lot of their inheritance" in Canaan, and dispersed among strangers, the various tribes would naturally amalgamate with each other, the envy of Judah and Ephraim would depart, and the memory of Abraham, Moses, and David would revive, Ezra 6:16,17 8:35 Ezekiel 37:26-28
Pentecost, Feast of - The festival was held at the central sanctuary ( Deuteronomy 16:11 ), whither the people were expected to repair for the celebration; it cannot, therefore, have existed before the settlement in Canaan
Leviticus - ...
Features of the book...
God had brought the people of Israel out of Egypt and set them on their way to Canaan, all according to the covenant promises he had given to Abraham
Promise - Reference is often made (a) to the great fundamental promises given to Abraham, relating to the birth of Isaac, the blessing of his descendants, and the inheritance of the land of Canaan (e
Edom - The Israelites of Moses’ time wanted to use this road on their journey to Canaan, but Edom and Moab refused permission, forcing the Israelites to detour around the borders (Numbers 20:14-21; Numbers 21:10-13; Numbers 21:21-26; Numbers 33:35-37; Judges 11:15-24)
Israel - Thus the sons of Ham were Cush (Nubia), Mizraim (Egypt), Put (East Africa?), and Canaan. ( b ) Others, such as the traditions of Abraham’s connexion with various shrines, and the stories of Jacob and his sons, were developed in the land of Canaan, ( c ) Still others were learned from the Canaanites. ) Israel, as will appear later, was a name of a part of the tribes before they entered Canaan. The latter name must have been learned from the Canaanites. In most cases where a tradition has blended two elements, one of these was learned from the Canaanites. Jacob-Israel (Jacob, as shown above, is of Canaanitish origin; Israel was the name of the confederated clans) represents the nation Israel itself. The name Benjamin means ‘sons of the south,’ or ‘southerners’: the Benjamites are probably the ‘southerners’ of the tribe of Ephraim, and were gradually separated from that tribe after the conquest of Canaan. The conquest of Canaan . ]'>[1] distinctly states ( Judges 1:1-36 ) that the conquest was not complete, but that two lines of fortresses, remaining in the possession of the Canaanites, cut the Israelitish territory into three sections. Taanach, Ibleam, and Beth-shean, and gave the Canaanites control of the great plain of Jezreel. ]'>[1] further tells us distinctly that not all the Canaanites were driven out, but that the Canaanites and the Hebrews lived together. Later, he says, Israel made slaves of the Canaanites. This latter statement is perhaps true for those Canaanites who held out in these fortresses, but reasons will be given later for believing that by intermarriage a gradual fusion between Canaanites and Israelites took place. ) Probably they allied themselves with the other tribes when the latter entered Canaan
Sarah - Chaldea, and Canaan, and Egypt; Hagar and Ishmael; the promise of Isaac, and then the birth, the circumcision, the sacrifice, and the deliverance of Isaac; all the trials and all the triumphs of his father's and his mother's faith; all their falls; all their victories; all God's promises, and all His wonderful and adorable providences in their so exercised lives; all their attainments in truth and in obedience; and then, to crown all, the complete fulfilment of God's so long delayed promise-all that, and much more that has not been told-it all arose out of this, that Sarah had no child. You would fain have Hagar and her fatherless boy back in Egypt, and your tent in Canaan the abode of peace and love and honour it was at the beginning. Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right?...
Hagar had not come from Ur of the Chaldees with the immigration, neither had she been bought by Abraham in Canaan. He was in Egypt, He was in Canaan, He was in Mamre, and He appeared at Shur
Transportation And Travel - Jacob's sons carried their grain purchases from Egypt to Canaan on donkey back (Genesis 42:26 ); Jesse sent David and a donkey loaded with provisions to Saul's court (1 Samuel 16:20 ); and Nehemiah became incensed when he saw Judeans transporting grain on donkeys during the sabbath (Nehemiah 13:15 ). In the patriarchal period, Joseph sent carts to Canaan to carry his father and the households of his brothers to Goshen (1 Kings 18:16 ). ...
Once the people had settled into Canaan, carts became an everyday aid to farmers who had to transport sheaves of grain to the threshing floor (Amos 2:13 )
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - The people of Israel had been settled in the promised land for only a brief time before their attention turned to the deities of the Canaanites. Evidence from Ugaritic mythologies and other texts suggests that the term refers to both the Canaanite goddess and cultic objects facilitating her worship. ...
That Baal and Asherah are mentioned together in several Old Testament passages suggests that the Canaanites and other peoples considered Asherah to be an important "high deity" along with Baal. Their endorsement of and participation in the worship of these Canaanite deities is the most extreme of any incidents related in Scripture concerning Israelite rulers who adopted the worship of these gods. ...
Asherah was one of the three chief consort-goddesses within the Canaanite pantheon, along with Astarte (or Ashtaroth) and Anath. The Canaanite myths associated El with the source of fresh water, located in the distant west or north. ...
The most shocking endorsement of Israel's buying into Canaanite religion was the construction of a temple for the worship of Baal at Samaria. ) Canaanite religion was appropriated by the people of Judah from Geba to Beer-sheba (2 Kings 16:4-14 ). Manasseh added various aspects of Canaanite (a carved image of Asherah, 2 Kings 21:7 ) and other religions to the city of Jerusalem. Josiah later cleansed Jerusalem of the excesses of Canaanite worship (2 Kings 23 ). ...
The Israelites had been warned before settling the land of Canaan about established religious worship sites, particularly the "high places" taken over intact during the conquest. "...
Several Canaanite high places were appropriated by Israel's religious leaders early in the settlement, including Bethel (Judges 1:22-26 ), Shiloh (1 Samuel 1:1-18 ), and Gibeah (1 Samuel 13:1-4 ). Her worship attracted the Israelites shortly after their settlement in Canaan. Baalthe most significant male deity of the Canaanitesand his consort Asherah were the most alluring deities confronting Israel in the promised land following the conquest. The details and activity suggest that the Canaanite goddess Astarte was the deity motivating the people in Jerusalem to such frenzied worship activity. Albright, Archaeology and the Religion of Israel ; idem, From the Stone Age to Christianity ; idem, History, Archaeology and Christian Humanism ; idem, Yahweh and the Gods of Canaan ; W
Sepulchre - The aboriginal cave-dwellers in Canaan, however, seem to have disposed of their dead by cremation (cf. The limestone rocks of Canaan yielded to their desire for a permanent place of abode. It was there that Abram first settled when he came into Canaan; there he built an altar to Jahweh (Genesis 12:6-7); and it is only reasonable to suppose that he also purchased the ground on which it stood; otherwise it would have been exposed to desecration and destruction
Issachar - Pleasant serfdom, however suitable to Canaanites, was unworthy of Israelites, called of God to rule not serve (Deuteronomy 20:11; 1 Kings 9:21; Isaiah 10:27). Barak would not be likely to desert the fastnesses of Tabor and march 15 miles over the boggy plain to attack the Canaanites strongly placed on the sides of the low hills at Taanach. of Kishon, to which those Canaanites who went through the swamps fled. ...
Paltiel, Israel's representative, was divinely appointed to take part in dividing Canaan (Numbers 34:26). In Canaan Issachar's proximity to Zebulun continued
Philistia - ...
At Israel's invasion of Canaan they had advanced N. (Joshua 15:4; Joshua 15:47), a confederacy of the five cities (originally Canaanite) Gaza (the leading one), Ashdod, Ashkelon, Gath, and Ekron (always put last). The term "Canaan" ("merchant") applied to the Philistine land (Zephaniah 2:5) proves its commercial character
Joseph - By and by he hears that he is sick, and hastens to visit him; he receives his blessing; watches his death bed; embalms his body; mourns for him threescore and ten days; and then carries him, as he had desired, into Canaan to bury him, taking with him, as an escort to do him honour, "all the elders of Israel, and all the servants of Pharaoh, and all his house, and the house of his brethren, chariots, and horsemen, a very great company. It is not the constancy with which the son's strong affection for his father had lived through an interval of twenty years' absence, and, what is more, through the temptation of sudden promotion to the highest estate;—it is not the noble- minded frankness with which he still acknowledges his kindred, and makes a way for them, "shepherds" as they were, to the throne of Pharaoh himself;—it is not the simplicity and singleness of heart which allow him to give all the first-born of Egypt, men over whom he bore absolute rule, an opportunity of observing his own comparatively humble origin, by leading them in attendance upon his father's corpse to the valleys of Canaan and the modest cradle of his race;—it is not, in a word, the grace, but the identity of Joseph's character, the light in which it is exhibited by himself, and the light in which it is regarded by his brethren, to which I now point as stamping it with marks of reality not to be gainsayed
Bethlehem - ...
After the conquest of Canaan it bears the name Bethlehem Judah; distinguishing it from Bethlehem in Zebulun (Joshua 19:15-16; now Beit-lahm, six miles W
Lot (1) - Accompanied Abram to Charan, then to Canaan (Genesis 12:4-5), then, in the famine, to Egypt
Tithes - This constant income from the tithes was payment for their work and compensation for their lack of a separate tribal area in Canaan (Numbers 18:21-24)
Calf, Golden - At the request of the people, who had begun to despair of Moses’ return from the mount, Aaron consented to make a god who should go before them on the journey to Canaan. Jeroboam, therefore, may be regarded as having merely given official sanction to a symbolism with which the Hebrews had been familiar, if not from time immemorial, at least since their association with the Canaanites
Rest - Canaan is actually called "the resting place Obedience - This response meant leaving Ur of the Chaldees, a highly developed city, to go to the unknown, unfamiliar land that God would show to himthe land of Canaan
Amalekites - The Amalekites are mentioned with the Canaanites as having discomfited Israel at Hormah, on the borders of Canaan, permitted by God because of Israel's unbelief as to the spies' report, and then presumption in going up to possess the land in spite of Moses' warning and the non-accompaniment of the ark (Numbers 14:43-45)
Genesis, Book of - Jacob blesses his twelve sons, dies, and is buried in Canaan; and Joseph, before he died, being sure that God would visit them and bring them out of the land, bade them carry up his bones from Egypt
Pass Over - Abram “passed through” Canaan as far as Mamre; he did not go out of the land (cf
Sojourn, Dwell - In the land of Canaan the possession of land was limited to members or descendants of the original tribal members
Inherit - ” The RSV “possess” translates more appropriately here, since the land of Canaan was not literally an inheritance in the usual sense of the word, but a possession, that which was due her, through God’s direct intervention
Wine - The vine being natural to the soil of Canaan and its vicinity, wine was much used as a beverage, especially at festivals, Esther 1:7 5:6 Daniel 5:1-4 John 2:3
Moses - ...
The northern people of Midian through contact with Canaan were already idolaters. ...
Nothing short of divine interposition could have enabled Moses to lead an unwarlike people of serfs out of a powerful nation like Egypt, to give them the law with their acceptance of it though so contrary to their corrupt inclinations, to keep them together for 40 years in the wilderness, and finally to lead them to their conquest of the eastern part of Canaan. Again Moses with undoubting assurance of success on the borders of Canaan tells Israel "go up and possess the land" (Deuteronomy 1:20-21). Moses, instead of animating them to enter Canaan, now will neither suffer them to proceed, nor yet to return to Egypt; they must march and counter-march in the wilderness for 40 years until every adult but two shall have perished; but their little ones, who they said should be a prey, God will bring in. The sustenance of 600,000 men besides women and children, 40 years, in a comparative desert could only be by miracle; as the Pentateuch records, they were fed with manna from heaven until they ate the grain of Canaan, on the morrow after which the manna ceased (Exodus 16; 2 Corinthians 3:13-14)
God - So when God offers Abraham the land of Canaan, it is his right to give it because he created the world. ...
The gods of Canaan represented natural forces; there was no clear dividing line between nature and the divine. As a rule, the Canaanite deities were named by the place where they were worshiped, but in this personal form, the God of the patriarchs is revealed as an omnipresent God who is involved in history and the lives of those whom he chooses. This promise of God's presence became a crucial factor during the Mosaic era and was the point of contention in Exodus 33 , when Yahweh responded to the golden calf episode by first declaring that his presence would not accompany Israel into Canaan. Moses thereupon pleaded with God to go personally with them, or otherwise not take them into Canaan at all. ...
The Book of Judges operates on the thesis that Joshua tried to carry out the commandment to destroy the Canaanites, but the period of the judges operated by a new principle, allowing the Canaanites to remain in the land in order to test Israel's resolve to follow the Lord (Judges 2:20-23 ). ...
Yet we must admit that the command to wage war against the Canaanites and God's involvement in such wars pose a challenge to Old Testament theology. Another dimension of the command to exterminate the Canaanites is that they posed a threat to Israel's faith (Exodus 23:23-33 ; Numbers 33:50-56 ; Deuteronomy 7:1-6 ; Judges 2:2 ). Even in the time of Abraham, the Lord noted that the iniquity of the Amorites (Canaanites) was not yet full (Genesis 15:16 ). ...
Thus, God's presence was critical to the success of the conquest of Canaan
Israel, History of - Abraham and his wife, Sarah, however, traveled onward to Canaan, where ultimately they established their home. Through this period the generation that departed Egypt died, Yahweh's judgment upon them because they refused to believe that the God of deliverance could also lead them into Canaan. The Settlement (Joshua 1–24 ; Judges 1–16 ) Eventually, however, they entered Canaan via the tranjordanian area. The Book of Joshua records the settlement of the Israelites into Canaan, first in mid-country, then in the south, and finally in the north. Perhaps the central issue during this period resulted from the emergence of overt Baalism with the clarification that Yahwism could not coexist with Baalism, the worship surrounding the indigenous Canaanite god of fertility, Baal
Containers And Vessels - A very distinctive pottery, Abydos ware, named for the site in Upper Egypt where it was first discovered, was imported from Canaan to Egypt. Philistine ware is an amalgamation of Mycenaean types with clear influences from Egypt and Canaan
Idolatry - (1) When, after the Exodus, the Israelites settled in Canaan among idolatrous peoples, they were far from having a pure monotheism (cf. The tribes had at first to act independently, and in some cases were unable to dislodge the Canaanites ( Judges 1:1-36 ). ( a ) Thus, on Israel’s settling in Canaan, the existing shrines, whether natural (hills, trees, wells each understood to have its own tutelary baal or lord) or artificial (altars, stone pillars, wooden poles), would be quite innocently used for the worship of J″ Rain - Moses, the man of God, prepared the minds of the people for those blessings in Canaan, as to kens of divine favour, by putting the people in mind of their past labour in Egypt. Moses prepares Israel, therefore, for the Lord's special blessing over them in this particular when they get into Canaan
Exodus - Their exodus in many particulars well illustrates the state of Christ's church in the wilderness of this world, until her arrival in the heavenly Canaan. ...
Breaking up at this time from Sinai, they marched northwards through the desert of Paran, or perhaps along the eastern arm of the Red Sea and north through El-Arabah, to Kadesh-barnea, near the southeast border of Canaan. This was refused; and Israel, feeling too weak to penetrate into Palestine from the south, in face of the powerful tribes of Canaanites dwelling there, was compelled to take the southern passage around Edom, Numbers 21:4
Deuteronomy, the Book of - Now when Israel was to enter Canaan, their permanent abode, they needed to be reminded of much of the law which they but partially knew or applied, and to have under divine sanction, besides the religious ordinances of the previous books, supplementary enactments, civil and political, for their settled organization. The Canaanite 'ashteroth hatsion , "offspring of the flocks. The relaxation granted in Deuteronomy 12:15 as to killing in all their gates, whereas in Leviticus 17:3-4, the victim even for ordinary eating must be killed at the door of the tabernacle, is precisely what we might expect when Israel was on the verge of entering Canaan, which they were at the time of the delivering of Deuteronomy. Many circumstances which would naturally be noticed on the eve of Israel's entrance into Canaan occur for the first time in Moses' last address
Judges, the Book of - Judges 1, Israel's relations to Canaan, geographical and political, what the several tribes and houses achieved, or otherwise, in conquering the land; Judges 2 - 3:6, Israel's relations religiously to the Lord, this second portion tells us the reason of Israel's failure to drive out the Canaanite remnant and of their falling under oppressors, namely, apostasy; Jehovah leaving those nations in order to prove Israel whether they would obey Him. A time "when there was no king in Israel" (Judges 19:1), before Samson's days (compare Judges 13:25 margin with Judges 18:12); also before Jabin, 150 years after Joshua, had established a strong Canaanite kingdom in the N. The mention of the Canaanite chariots accords with the Egyptian accounts which make the Cheta chariots their main strength. Intermarriages with pagan neighbours, Gentile associations, the beauty of the Canaanite women, the pomp, gaiety, and voluptuousness of their rites, the hope of learning the future by idolatrous divination, superstitious fears of the alleged gods of the locality where they settled, inclined Israel to add to Jehovah's worship the pagan idolatries (for they had too strong proofs of the divine law to renounce it wholly). The servitudes increase in length successively for the most part: Chushan Rishathaim 8 years, Eglon 18, Jabin 20; also in the humiliation...
(1) a distant king,...
(2) a neighbouring king,...
(3) a king in Canaan itself. Jabin disarmed (as in 1 Samuel 13:22 the Philistines are stated to have done) and brought them into union with Canaan by constraining them to worship his idols (Judges 4:3; Judges 5:8). Tyre is not mentioned, but Zidon oppressed Israel (Judges 10:12), and was the protector to whom the neighbouring Canaanites looked up (Judges 18:7). Again the Spirit links Judges with the books of Samuel and Kings which follow; thus Judges 1:28; Judges 1:30; Judges 1:33; Judges 1:35 accords with the tributary condition subsequently of the Canaanite remnant under Solomon (1 Kings 9:18-22)
Symbol - The journey to Canaan supplied Passover, manna, rock, redemption, better country, rest
Benjamin - ]'>[5] gives Canaan as his native land. Within it lay Bethel (elsewhere assigned to Ephraim), Ophrah, Geba, Gibeon, Ramab, Mizpeh, Gibeah, all primitive seats of Canaanitish worship and important centres in the cultus of Israel (cf
Fasting - The 9th, and not the 7th or 10th, was the prescribed day, because tradition placed on the 9th the announcement that the Israelites were not to enter Canaan, and the destruction of the Second Temple
Firstborn - The dedication of the firstborn of men and beasts was probably a primitive nomadic custom, and therefore earlier than the offering of first-fruits, which could not arise until the Israelites had settled into agricultural life in Canaan
Judah - There he met with Bath-shua, a Canaanitess, whom he took to wife. Er’s widow, Tamar, a Canaanitess also, it seems, posing by the wayside as a hierodule, enticed Judah to intercourse with her, and of her the twin sons Perez and Zerah were born to Judah. Hirah is a Canaanite clan; Er and Onan stand for two other clans which became united to Judah, but early disappeared; the other three continued to exist as constituents of Judah. In the Song of Deborah Judah is not even mentioned, because ‘it was not yet made up by the fusion of Israelite, Canaanite, Edomite, and Arabic elements,’ as Stade ( GVI Levi - (See Genesis 49:5-7) And the prediction of this tribe being divided in Jacob, and scattered in Israel, was literally fulfilled; for we find in the settlement in Canaan, the sons of Levi had no share in the division of the land, but only certain cities among the other tribes
Root - This has already happened to the seven nations of Canaan
Famine - ...
Famines of OT times are recalled: (1) in Egypt and Canaan (Acts 7:11); (2) in Israel (James 5:17-18, the absence of rain implying Tack of earth’s fruit; cf
Heritage - Canaan is all along described as the heritage the Lord had designed for Israel
Perish - So God told Israel “to utterly destroy” (“bring to non-existence”) the false gods of Canaan: “… [1] destroy all their pictures and [2] destroy all their molten images …” ( King - We also find references to kings in all the countries bordering on Canaan Syria, Moab, Ammon, Egypt, etc. The settlement of the people of Israel in Canaan, and the change from a nomadic to an agricultural life, laid the incomers open to ever fresh attacks from new adventurers
Deborah - So Jael's act showed real faith in the case of God's controversy with the godless Canaanites. "...
"The kings of Canaan took no gain of money," i
Army - At the Exodus the number of soldiers was 600,000 (Exodus 12:37), at the borders of Canaan 601,730; under David, 1,300,000 men capable of service, namely, 800,000 for Israel, 500,000 for Judah (2 Samuel 24:9), but in 1 Chronicles 21:5-6 it is 1,570,000; namely, 1,100,000 for Israel, and 470,000 for Judah
Passover - )...
Once the Israelites arrived in Canaan, they were to celebrate the Passover only at the central place of worship
Ebal - Here first in Canaan Abraham rested, and built an altar to Jehovah who appeared unto him (Genesis 12:6-7). ...
"The Canaanites" are mentioned in Deuteronomy 11:30, as in Genesis 12:6, as then already in the land, which originally was held by a Semitic race, but was afterward taken by the Hamitic Canaanites whose original seat was near the Red Sea, from whence they migrated northwards
Feasts - The Passover festival is probably of great antiquity, but the Feast of Unleavened Bread, being agricultural in character, can scarcely have existed before the Israelites entered Canaan
ir-ha-Heres - In Isaiah 19:18 the name to be given in the ideal future to one of the ‘five cities in the land of Egypt that speak the language of Canaan, and swear to Jehovah of hosts’; AV Slave/Servant - Canaan, Aram, Assyria, Babylonia, and Persia had fewer slaves because it proved less expensive to hire free persons
Sanctification - Also the land of Canaan (Exodus 15:13 ), as well as Jerusalem (Isaiah 11:9 ), was holy to the Lord and was not to be polluted by sinful conduct (Leviticus 18:27-28 )
Presence of God - As the Israelites prepared to enter Canaan, Moses told them they stood in God's presence (Deuteronomy 29:15 )
Profane - ...
Will the reader indulge me with humbly offering one thought more on this subject? We find by the law that the fruits of the trees in Canaan were prohibited for three years, and the reason given was, that they were uncircumcised; but that then in the fourth year, after a circumcision had taken place, all the fruit was declared holy unto the Lord; and the fifth year the fruits were deemed profane for use
Israel in Egypt - " The Samaritan Pentateuch and the LXX add the words "and of their fathers in the land of Canaan;" but these words are not in the Arabic, Syriac, or Vulgate versions; and may therefore have been added to meet the apparent difficulty
Ark - It certainly played an important part in the wanderings ( Numbers 10:33 ff; Numbers 14:44 ), and in the conquest of Canaan ( Joshua 3:3 ff; Joshua 6:6 f
Promise - The possession of Canaan, the growth of the nation, universal blessing through the race, are examples of promises of which the patriarchs did not receive the outward fulness ( Hebrews 11:18 )
Phoeni'ce, Phoenic'ia - The native name of Phoenicia was Kenaan (Canaan) or Kna , signifying lowland, so named in contrast to the ad joining Aram, i. , that the Phoenicians were of the same race as the Canaanites
Abarim - Israel camped on the Plains of Moab while making final preparations to cross Jordan and conquer Canaan
Oil - OIL (שָׁמֶן, ἔλαιον), by which we are to understand olive oil, was from the very earliest times one of the main products of Palestine, for already in days prior to the Hebrew settlement, Canaan was ‘a land of oil olives’ (Deuteronomy 8:8)
Lot - When the terrible famine fell on Canaan, Abraham took Lot down to Egypt with him; and after the famine passed off, Lot returned to the land of promise with his chastened uncle. Abraham, though the older man, and the man, moreover, with all the title-deeds to all the land of Canaan in his hands, put all that wholly aside and placed himself on an equality with his dependent nephew; placed himself under Lot, indeed, and gave him his choice. As the cruel kings hurried Lot up the Jordan with a rope round his neck, how that chastised saint vomited up Sodom and all her works, and how he cursed himself as the greatest fool in all the land of Canaan
Pentateuch - Guidance of a rebellious people through the great and terrible wilderness marks Numbers 10-21 ; and preparations for going over Jordan and conquering Canaan are the major topics of Numbers 22:1Deuteronomy 22:1—34:1 . ...
The Deuteronomic Code (Deuteronomy 12-26 ) is part of Moses' address to the twelve tribes just before they crossed the Jordan to go into Canaan. Other post-Mosaic references are to Dan (Genesis 14:14 ; compare Joshua 19:47 ; Genesis 11:1 ), and the conquest of Canaan (Deuteronomy 2:12 )
Joshua, Theology of - ...
Holy War and the Extermination of the Canaanites . How could a loving God allow such a slaughter, not only of the idolatrous Canaanites but also of their innocent children? Appeals to the sovereignty of God and his wrathful judgment may be made but the question persists as to the apparent wantonness of the destruction. Does this imply that such an option was always open to those who would renounce idolatry and submit themselves to Israel and to Israel's God? Although the Israelites seem reluctant to allow any who live in Canaan to survive (9:7) and the Gibeonites are saved only by deceit, it remains true that we are never told of any Canaanites who confessed the lordship of Israel's God and who subsequently were put to death. The witness of the Canaanite presence and occupation of parts of the land is not negated by the affirmation that all of God's promises were fulfilled (21:43-45). In addition, they occur in notes of how the enemies of Israel hear of the Israelite victories and how their courage melts (5:1); how God's presence with Joshua leads to his fame spreading throughout the land (6:27); and how the armies of Canaan learn of God's Acts but still refuse to accept God's sovereignty and signify this by perpetrating war against Israel (9:1-2; 10:1-5; 11:1-5)
Idol, Idolatry - ...
In Canaan Israel was influenced to worship Baal and other deities. Perhaps it was the fact that the Canaanites, who controlled all of the fertile valleys, offered their fertility cult religion as an explanation for greater productivity to the Hebrews, who had to settle for the less productive hills, or it may have been the emphasis upon sexuality that eventually seduced Israel to the worship of idols. ...
Among the most severe commands were the instructions to destroy the inhabitants of Canaan because they served idols (Deuteronomy 7:16 ). ...
Moral degradation was most pronounced in the act of child sacrifice, but included all of the immorality of the Canaanite fertility cult like the male and female prostitutes at cult sanctuaries. Cross, Canaanite Myth and Hebrew Epic ; D
Feasts - Joshua especially observed this feast after the settlement in Canaan (as incidentally comes out in Nehemiah 8:17). The feast of tabernacles points on to the antitypical Canaan, the everlasting inheritance, of which the Holy Spirit is the "earnest" (Ephesians 1:13-14; Hebrews 4:8-9)
Phoenicia, phNicians - ...
The Semitic name of the country was ‘ Canaan ’ ( Kinachchi and Kinachna in the el-Amarna tablets, and Chna on Phœnician coins; cf. Canaanites). Scholars now suppose that this refers really to the Persian Gulf, and that the Canaanites , of whom the Phœnicians were a part, came from North Arabia by way of the shore of the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates valley. Perhaps the Canaanites were the last wave of Amorites (wh. Phœnicia was probably included in the revolt, for in the poem written to celebrate the re-subjugation of these lands, we read: ‘Plundered is Canaan with every evil’ (Breasted, Records , iii
Dan - When the Israelites entered Canaan, the tribe of Dan received land on the western coast. ...
The city was formerly named Laish (Judges 18:7 or Leshem in Joshua 19:47 ) when occupied by the Canaanites
High Place - An elevated site, usually found on the top of a mountain or hill; most high places were Canaanite places of pagan worship. ...
God's Hatred of the High Places When the Israelites came into the land of Canaan, they were ordered to destroy the high places of the people who lived in the land (Exodus 23:24 ; Exodus 34:13 ; Numbers 33:52 ; Deuteronomy 7:5 ; Deuteronomy 12:3 ) lest the Israelites be tempted to worship the Canaanite false gods and accept their immoral behavior
Covenant - Moses by "covenant" means one giving the heavenly inheritance (typified by Canaan) after the testator's death, which was represented by the sacrificial blood he sprinkled
Tribes - In the division of Canaan, the tribe of Levi received no allotment of its own but was given cities within all the other tribes (Numbers 18:24; Numbers 35:1-8; see LEVITE)
Tabernacles, Feast of - " Isaiah 11 refers to the future restoration of Israel; the feast of tabernacles connected with chapter 12 doubtless will have its antitype in their restored possession of and rest in Canaan, after their long dispersion; just as the other two great feasts, Passover and Pentecost, have their antitype respectively in Christ's sacrifice for us, and in His writing His new law on our hearts at Pentecost
Rahab (1) - God made the truth bring the conviction to her mind that Israel would conquer Canaan, and that "Jehovah Israel's God is God in heaven above and in earth beneath
Naphtali - The tribe descended from him settled in the north of Canaan, and together with the neighbouring tribe of Zebulun occupied much of the region later known as Galilee
Tithe, Tithing - ...
Tithes were awarded to the Levites for their priestly service because they would not receive land in Canaan (Numbers 18:19-21 )
Chronology - ...
TOTAL 4004...
The 430 years of Exodus 12:40 arein the above taken to mean the sojourn in Canaan and in Egypt, the latter being 215 years; this agrees with Galatians 3:17 , and with the Israelites being brought out in the fourth generation Genesis 15:16
Borrow - (Exodus 3:22)...
And might there not be somewhat typical in the thing itself, in reference to the future call (as was all along intended) of the Gentile church? I beg the reader to read that sweet passage of the prophet Isaiah 19:18-25; and see the rich promises of the call of Egypt with Assyria, when the Lord shall set up the New Testament altar, even the Lord Jesus Christ, in the midst of the land of Egypt; and five cities shall speak the language of Canaan, even the gospel language of salvation by the blood and righteousness of the Lord Jesus Christ
Land - ...
'Erets sometimes bears a political connotation and represents both a given political territory and the people who live there: “And there was no bread in all the land; for the famine was very sore, so that the land of Egypt and all the land of Canaan fainted by reason of the famine” ( Baal - Canaanite and Phoenician gods were known as Baals, or Baalim (the plural form of Baal in Hebrew; Judges 2:11; Judges 10:10; 1 Kings 16:31). When the Israelites entered Canaan and found that the local people believed every piece of land had a god as its ‘owner’, baal developed a particular use as a proper noun
Israel - God promised Abraham that he would make from him a nation, that he would give that nation the land of Canaan as a homeland, and that through it blessing would come to people worldwide (Genesis 12:1-3; Genesis 13:14-17; Genesis 15:18-21; Genesis 22:17-18)
Judges - ...
Regard to locality modified the genealogical principle of selection upon Israel's entrance into Canaan (Deuteronomy 16:18)
Arnon - ...
When the Israelites under Moses were moving north towards Canaan, they conquered the Amorites and seized their territory (Numbers 21:24)
House - The history of human habitation in Palestine goes back to the undated spaces of the palæolithic or early stone age (see especially the important chapter on ‘Prehistoric Archæology’ in Vincent, Canaan d’après l’exploration récente , 1907, pp. The excavations and discoveries, of the last few years in particular, have introduced us to the pre-historic inhabitants whom the Semitic invaders, loosely termed Canaanites or Amorites, found in occupation of the country somewhere in the third millennium before our era ( circa b. But it is not with these, or with the tents in which the patriarchs and their descendants lived before the conquest of Canaan, that this article has to deal, but with the houses of clay and stone which were built and occupied after that epoch. ...
The Canaanite houses, which the Hebrews inherited (Deuteronomy 6:10 ) and copied, are now known to have been arranged on similar lines (see the diagram of a typical Canaanite house in Gezer, restored by Mr. It is now certain that the Canaanites, and the Hebrews after them, were wont to consecrate the foundation of a new building by a human sacrifice . ; Vincent, Canaan , 50 f. The walls of Canaanite and Hebrew houses were for the most part, as we have seen, of crude brick or stone. The ancient houses of Canaan, like their modern representatives, had flat roofs , supported by stout wooden beams laid from wall to wall
Circumcision - The third stipulation in God's covenant with the patriarch, was the gift to Abraham and to his seed of "the land of Canaan," in which the temporal promise was manifestly but the type of the higher promise of a heavenly inheritance. This covenant with Abraham, therefore, although it respected a natural seed, Isaac, from whom a numerous progeny was to spring; and an earthly inheritance provided for this issue, the land of Canaan; and a special covenant relation with the descendants of Isaac, through the line of Jacob, to whom Jehovah was to be "a God," visibly and specially, and they a visible and "peculiar people;" yet was, under all these temporal, earthly, and external advantages, but a higher and spiritual grace embodying itself under these circumstances, as types of a dispensation of salvation and eternal life, to all who should follow the faith of Abraham, whose justification before God was the pattern of the justification of every man, whether Jew or Gentile, in all ages. The Mosaic edition of the covenant not only guaranteed the land of Canaan, but the peculiarity of the Israelites, as the people and visible church of God to the exclusion of others, except by proselytism
Jacob - The patriarch, perceiving that his dissolution was near, sent for Joseph, and bound him by a solemn promise to bury him with his fathers in Canaan. After a general mourning of seventy days, he solicited the king's permission to go with the remains of Jacob into Canaan, to which Pharaoh consented; and with Joseph went up all the state officers and principal nobility of Egypt, so that when they came to the place of interment, the Canaanites were astonished, and said, "This is a grievous mourning to the Egyptians," Genesis 50:1-11
Victory - The Lord will go with the Israelites in their conquest of Canaan
Manasseh (1) - ...
Manasseh here resumes his place as firstborn (his having two portions of Canaan, one on each side of Jordan, being also a kind of privilege of the firstborn), probably as having been foremost in the conquest of Gilead, the most impregnable portion of Palestine, as Lejah (asylum) the modern name of Argob implies; their inheritance was northern Gilead, Argob, and Bashan (Numbers 32:39-42; Deuteronomy 3:4; Deuteronomy 3:13-15; Joshua 17:1). The western half of Manasseh failed for long to dispossess completely the Canaanites (Judges 1:27; Joshua 17:11-12). ...
On their complaining that but one portion had been allotted to them, and that the Canaanite chariots prevented their occupying the Esdraelon and Jordan plains, Joshua advised them to go into the wooded mountain, probably Carmel
False Worship - ” See Canaan, Religion and History of; Worship
Burial - The burial place of Sarah, Abraham, Isaac, Rebekah, Leah, and Jacob, in the field of Machpelah (Genesis 23), bought by Abraham from Ephron the Hittite, and the field bought by Jacob from Shechem's father, Hamor, where Joseph's bones were buried (Joshua 24:32), were the only fixed possessions the patriarchs had in Canaan, and the sole purchases they made there
Damascus - Abraham entering Canaan by way of Damascus there obtained Eliezer as his retainer
Tabernacle - It was a prefabricated shrine that the people of Israel took with them on their journey to Canaan and set up at camps along the way
Philistines, the - (fihl ihss' teeness) One of the rival groups the Israelites encountered as they settled the land of Canaan. Ashtoreth, the fertility goddess of the Canaanites, was most likely adopted by the Philistines
Exaltation - As early as the time of Balaam, when Israel was about to conquer Canaan, God announced that their kingdom would be exalted (Numbers 24:7 )
Ark of the Covenant - The ark was the most important object within the tabernacle of the desert period, though its relationship to the tabernacle was discontinued sometime after the conquest of Canaan
Desert, Wilderness - ...
The best-known desert of the Bible is the Wilderness of Sinai, where the tribes of Israel wandered before settling in Canaan
Wisdom - This is evident in the Lord's redemptive Acts of bringing Israel out of Egypt and giving them the land of Canaan
a'Braham - On the death of his father, Abram, then in the 75th year of his age, with Sarai and Lot, pursued his course to the land of Canaan, whither he was directed by divine command, ( Genesis 12:5 ) when he received the general promise that he should become the founder of a great nation, and that all the families of the earth should be blessed in him
Cities - ...
The fortified cities in Canaan, as in some other countries, were commonly strengthened with a citadel, to which the inhabitants fled when they found it impossible to defend the place
Hebrew Language - It appears, moreover, that the Chaldee, and not the Hebrew, was the language of Abraham's country, and of his kindred, Genesis 24:4 ; Genesis 31:46-47 ; and it is probable that Abraham's native language was Chaldee, and that the Hebrew was the language of the Canaanites, which Abraham and his posterity learned by travelling among them. As the patriarchs disused the true Hebrew dialect, it is manifest that they had conformed to the speech of Canaan; and that this conformity was complete, is proved by the identity between all the remains of Canaanitish names
Husbandry - Springs, therefore, fountains, and rivulets, were held in as much honour and worth by husbandmen as by shepherds, Joshua 15:9 ; Judges 1:15 ; and we accordingly find that the land of Canaan was extolled for those fountains of water of which Egypt was destitute The soil was enriched, also, in addition to the method just mentioned, by means of ashes; to which the straw, the stubble, the husks, the brambles, and grass, that overspread the land during the sabbatical year, were reduced by fire
Isaac - But he allows his father to choose for him a suitable partner in life; and Rebekah was selected from among his own kindred, in preference to the daughters of Canaan, in the midst of whom he dwelt. He sent Jacob into Mesopotamia, there to take a wife of his own family, Genesis 28:1-2 , and to prevent his marrying among the Canaanites as his brother Esau had done
Colors - The peoples of Crete, Phoenicia, and Canaan produced the dye from mollusks taken from the Mediterranean Sea
Philis'Tines - --The Philistines must have settled in the land of Canaan before the time of Abraham; for they are noticed in his day as a pastoral tribe in the neighborhood of Gerur. The territory of the Philistines having been once occupied by the Canaanites, formed a portion of the promised land, and was assigned the tribe of Judah
Feasts - )...
Once the Israelites had settled in Canaan, the festival became an occasion to acknowledge God’s care in giving them their grain harvest
Ephraim - ...
Good territory...
The tribe of Ephraim received as its inheritance possibly the best part of Canaan (cf
Jericho - From a root "fragrance," or "the moon" (yareach ), being the seat of Canaanite moon worship, or "broad" from its being in a plain bounded by the Jordan. Jericho's men, cattle, and booty were all put under the ban, as being the first town of Canaan which the Lord had given them
Hebrews, Letter to the - He leads his people to a better rest than the rest that Joshua led Israel to in Canaan
Levite - ...
Duties concerning the tabernacle...
After helping to construct the tabernacle (Exodus 38:21), the Levites had the duty of setting up, taking down, maintaining and transporting the tabernacle on the journey to Canaan (Numbers 1:50-51)
Jabbok - Before Joshua’s conquest of Canaan, the area north of the Jabbok was controlled by the Amorite king Og
Jews - ...
On their entrance into Canaan, God ordered them to cut off every idolatrous Canaanite; but they spared vast numbers of them, who enticed them to wickedness, and were sometimes God's rod to punish them. When Alexander was in Canaan, about 3670, he confirmed to them all their privileges; and, having built Alexandria, he settled vast numbers of them there. In Egypt, Canaan, and Syria, the croisaders still harassed them. Jews, number and dispersion of...
They are looked upon to be as numerous at present as they were formerly in the land of Canaan
Numbers, Book of - The journey from Sinai to the borders of Canaan; Numbers 10 — Numbers 14 . In further rebellion they said they would go up into the land, but they were smitten by the Amalekites and Canaanites. He is told to speak to the rock, with the rod of priestly grace in his hand, but he smites the rock as with his own rod of judgement, and calls the people rebels: for this failure he is forbidden to lead the people into Canaan. ...
Numbers 21 : Arad and the Canaanites are smitten
Hebrew - Rather, it is known as “the language (literally, lip) of Canaan” (Isaiah 19:18 ) or as “Judean” (NAS), that is the language of Judah (Nehemiah 13:24 ; Isaiah 36:11 ). This linguistic group is referred to commonly as Canaanite, although some prefer not to call Ugaritic a Canaanite dialect
Obadiah - ...
Expanding southward, westward, eastward, and northward, they shall acquire additionally Edom, Philistia, and northern Canaan to Zarephath (Sarepta near Sidon)
Nazirite - The vine stood for the culture and civilization of Canaan, and was specially associated with the worship of the nature-gods
Book(s) - ...
The Books of Joshua Joshua wrote one book detailing the allotment of Canaan to the Israelite tribes (Joshua 18:9 ) and a book similar to the “Book of the Covenant” listed above (Joshua 24:25-26 )
Tribulation - The famine caused the inhabitants of Egypt and Canaan great tribulation (Acts 7:11)
Calendars - In Phoenicia, Canaan, and Israel, however, the fall date was chosen, probably for the reason that harvesting marked the end of one agricultural cycle and prepared for the next. These names reflected the presence of one or another dominating cultural influence, first that of the Canaanites, then that of Mesopotamia. ...
The earliest practice was to use the Canaanite month-names, of which four survive in the Bible: Abib (March-April); Ziv (April-May); Ethanim (September-October); and Bul (October-November) (Exodus 13:4 ; Exodus 23:15 ; Exodus 34:18 ; 1Kings 6:1,1 Kings 6:37-38 ; 1 Kings 8:3 ). The other Canaanite months are known from Phoenician inscriptions
Stephen - Secondly, there is the suggestion that since God was worshipped acceptably long before temple or even tabernacle (after which the Temple was modelled, the tabernacle itself being but a copy of the heavenly tabernacle seen on the mount) was built, and again since God was acceptably worshipped in spots far removed from the Land of Canaan, and Solomon, at the very moment of building the Temple, declared that God dwells not in ‘houses made with hands’ (Acts 7:48), it is at least possible that God may be worshipped, and worshipped acceptably, elsewhere than in the Temple
Aaron - He was consequently forbidden to enter Canaan, and died on Mt
People - By the time of the conquest we read only of the “people” (‛am) of Israel entering the land of Canaan and inheriting it ( Heaven - Instead of the land of Canaan, we have heaven; for the earthly Jerusalem, we have the heavenly, the city of the living God; in place of the congregation of Israel after the flesh, we have the general assembly and church of the first-born, that is, all true believers "made perfect;" for just men in the imperfect state of the old dispensation, we have just men made perfect in evangelical knowledge and holiness; instead of Moses, the mediator of the old covenant, we have Jesus the Mediator of the new and everlasting covenant; and instead of the blood of slaughtered animals, which was sprinkled upon the Israelites, the tabernacle, and all the vessels of the sanctuary, to make a typical atonement, we have the blood of the Son of God, which was shed for the remission of the sins of the whole world; that blood which doth not, like the blood of Abel, call for vengeance but for mercy, which hath made peace between heaven and earth, effected the true and complete atonement for sin, and which therefore communicates peace to the conscience of every sinner that believes the Gospel
Jericho - Jericho was the first city in Canaan taken by Joshua, Joshua 2:1-2 , &c
Wells - " So important was the successful operation of sinking a well in Canaan, that the sacred historian remarks in another passage: "And it came to pass the same day, (that Isaac and Abimelech had concluded their treaty,) that Isaac's servants came and told him concerning the well which they had digged, and said unto him, We have found water; and he called it Shebah, (the oath,) therefore the name of the city is Beershebah unto this day," Genesis 26:33
Priest - (Exodus 23:19 ; Leviticus 2:14 ; 26:1-10) ...
On their settlement in Canaan the priestly families had thirteen cities assigned them, with "suburbs" or pasture-grounds for their flocks
Idol, Idolatry - The period of captivity broke the people’s association with the idols of Canaan, and when the Jews later returned from captivity, idolatry ceased to be a major problem (Ezekiel 36:22-29; Ezekiel 37:23; Hosea 2:16-19)
Palestine - There is no ancient geographical term covering the whole region now known as Palestine: the different provinces Canaan, Judah, Israel, Moab, Edom, etc. These were the people known to Bible students as Canaanites or Amorites . 2800 2500, according to the opinions of various chronologists) are not infrequently found in excavations, which speak of close intercourse between the Canaanites and the civilization of the Nile valley. Of the Canaanites very extensive remains yet await the spade of the excavator in the mounds that cover the remains of the ancient cities of Palestine. The modern peasantry of the country closely resemble the ancient Canaanites in physical character, to judge from the remains of the latter that excavation has revealed; indeed, in all probability the substratum of the population has remained unchanged in racial affinities throughout the vicissitudes that the country has suffered. ) were led as a solid whole under a single leader (Joshua) to the complete conquest of Canaan this is the account of the Book of Joshua. And lastly, we cannot doubt that an extensive Canaanite occupation remained in the towns expressly mentioned in Judges 1:1-36 , as those from which the various tribes ‘drave not out’ their original inhabitants. So far as we can infer from excavation an inference thoroughly confirmed by a consideration of the barbarous history of the Judges the effect of the Israelite entrance into Canaan was a retrogression in civilization, from which the country took centuries to recover. We may, however, pause to notice that, as in the case of the Canaanites, many remains of the Israelite dominion await the excavator in such towns as lay within Israelite territory; and the Siloam Tunnel epigraph, and one or two of minor importance, promise the welcome addition of a few inscriptions
Archaeology And Biblical Study - ...
Students of the Bible are particularly interested in the archaeology of ancient Canaan and its adjacent regions. ...
A brief history of archaeology The work of archaeologists in the biblical world in general, and in ancient Canaan in particular, can be divided into three over-lapping periods. See Canaan. Here is clear evidence that Israelites were in the land of Canaan by no later than the thirteenth century B
Fortification And Siegecraft - At the date of the Hebrew invasion of Canaan its inhabitants were found to be in possession of ‘cities great and fenced up to heaven’ ( Deuteronomy 9:1 ; cf. ...
The Semitic invaders, who appeared in Canaan about the middle of the third millennium, were able with their tools of bronze to carry the art of fortification far beyond this primitive stage. ...
The recent excavations in Palestine have shown that the fortifications of Canaanite and Hebrew cities were built, like their houses, of sun-dried bricks, or of stone, or of both combined. No Canaanite city wall, however, has yet been found intact, and we can only calculate roughly from the breadth what the height may have been in any particular case. 3000), with the tracing of an elaborate fortress, shows that the early Babylonians were expert fortress builders, the oldest actual remains of a Canaanite fortress are those discovered by Schumacher on the site of Megiddo in 1904, and dated by him between b. An excellent résumé, with plans and photographs, both of the Taanach and the Megiddo fortresses, is given by Father Vincent in his Canaan d’après l’exploration récente , pp
Covenant - God promised to give the land of Canaan to Abraham's descendants after a long sojourn to a foreign land. God renewed the covenant with His people, making explicit His covenant promise to conquer miraculously the land of Canaan promised to Abraham (Exodus 34:1 ; note Exodus 34:10 )
Jews, Judaism - He was born in Paddan Aram before Jacob returned to Canaan (Genesis 35:23 ). ...
Later, Judah moves west to Adullam, away from the Jacob clan, where he married a Canaanite woman. The tribal contingent led by Judah was first in the line of march through the wilderness (Numbers 2:3-9 ), and Caleb of Judah joined Joshua, of the tribe of Ephraim, in bringing back a good report about the trip of the twelve spies into Canaan. He moved away from his kindred into Canaanite territory and married a Canaanite woman (Genesis 38:2 )
Wealth - En route to Canaan, however, God very clearly places stipulations on the accumulation of wealth; manna and quail were to be collected so that no one had too little or too much (Exodus 16:16-18 ; quoted in 2 Corinthians 8:15 ). It promises Canaan as a land of abundant resources that the Israelites may enjoy so long as they obey God's laws (Numbers 13:27 ; 14:8 ; Deuteronomy 6:3 )
Cloud, Cloud of the Lord - ...
The pillar of cloud motif-set forth in the exodus account and expanded in the prophetic announcements of a new exodus after the Babylonian exile-encompasses a rich complex of theological meanings and functions: guidance/leading (of Israel out of Egypt and through the wilderness to Canaan, Exodus 13:21 ; Numbers 14:14 ; Nehemiah 9:12 ; Psalm 78:14 ); a signal for movement (breaking and setting up camp, Exodus 40:36-37 ; Numbers 9:17-23 ); protection from danger (as a barrier of darkness between Israel and the Egyptians, Exodus 14:19-20 ); the sustained, immediate, personal presence of Yahweh/the angel of the Lord (Exodus 13:22 ; 14:19,24 ; 40:38 ; Numbers 9:15-16 ); an agency of summons (to battle, Numbers 10:34-35 ; and to worship, Exodus 33:10 ); both a concealment and manifestation of divine glory (Exodus 16:10 ; 19:9,16 ; 20:21 ; 24:15-18 ; 34:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:11 ; 5:22 ); the place of propositional revelation (as an oracular cloud, Exodus 33:9 ; Psalm 99:7 ); the dwelling place/throne of divinity (over the tabernacle, Numbers 9:18,22 ; 10:11 ; and in particular, over the mercy seat, Leviticus 16:2 ); the locus of cultic theophany (for the investiture of the seventy elders and Joshua, Numbers 11:25 ; Deuteronomy 31:15 ; for the inauguration of the tabernacle, Exodus 40:34-35 ); shade/protection from the sun or storm (Numbers 10:34 ; Psalm 105:39 ; Isaiah 4:5 ); illumination (as a pillar of fire by night, Exodus 14:20 ; Numbers 9:15 ); and an agency of legal investigation and/or executive judgment (against Israel's enemies, Exodus 14:24 ; and against rebels within Israel, Numbers 12:5,10 ; 16:42 )
Oil - Oil in this fresh state is distinguished in OT from the refined and purified product; the former is yitshâr , so frequently named along with ‘new wine’ or must ( tîrôsh , see Wine, § 1 ) and corn as one of the chief products of Canaan; the latter is always shemen , but the distinction is not observed in our versions
Statute, Ordinance - ...
In non-religious usage, the word $%% refers to the customs of the nations: “After the doings of the land of Egypt, wherein ye dwelt, shall ye not do: and after the doings of the land of Canaan, whither I bring you, shall ye not do: neither shall ye walk in their ordinances” ( Joshua, the Book of - ...
The slackness of Israel to extirpate the accursed Canaanites was also a cause of non-immediate possession (Joshua 11:16; Joshua 11:23; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 12:10-12; compare Joshua 15:63; Joshua 16:10; Joshua 17:1; Joshua 17:16; Joshua 18:1; Joshua 18:3; Joshua 19:51). ...
The spies sent from Shittim to Jericho (the key of Canaan) on the same day as Joshua gave this charge to Israel had to hide three days after leaving Jericho, so that they could not have returned until the evening of the fourth day after they were sent (Joshua 2:22). The only Phoenicians mentioned are the Sidonians, reckoned with the Canaanites as doomed to destruction; but in David's time Tyre takes the lead of Sidon, and is in treaty with David (Joshua 13:4-6; 2 Samuel 5:11)
Food - The Israelites, before they entered Canaan, received instruction in farming, so that they might gain the best results from their crops and orchards
Ammon - ...
In the days before Israel’s migration to Canaan, the Ammonites were pushed further east, away from the Jordan, by the Amorites
Judges (1) - Just as the titie ‘Kings’ denotes that the book contains an account of the doings of the various kings who ruled over Israel and Judah, so the title ‘Judges’ is given to the book because it describes the exploits of the different champions who were the chieftains of various sections of Israelites from the time of the entry into Canaan up to the time of Samuel. This section ( 1:1 2:5) serves as a kind of Introduction to the book, and certainly cannot have belonged originally to it; ‘the whole character of Judges 1:1 to Judges 2:5 gives evidence that it was not composed for the place, but is an extract from an older history of the Israelite occupation of Canaan’ (Moore, p. At some early period there was a confederacy among some of the tribes of Israel, formed for the purpose of combating the Canaanites; the confederates are victorious; the different tribes who took part in the battle return home, and (presumably) each tribe preserves its own account of what happened; for generations these different accounts are handed down orally; ultimately some are lost, others are written down; two are finally preserved and incorporated into a collection of tribal traditions, i. Speaking generally, then, the various parts of the book may be assigned as follows: Judges 1:1 to Judges 2:5 , though added by a later compiler, contains fragments, probably themselves from different sources, of some early accounts of the first warlike encounters between Israelite tribes and Canaanites. ...
Judges 3:7-11 , the story of Othniel, shows too clearly the hand of the ‘Deuteronomic’ redactor for it to be regarded as authentic history; whether Othniel is an historical person or not, the mention of the king of Mesopotamia in the passage, as having so far conquered Canaan as to subjugate the Israelite tribes in the south, is sufficient justification for questioning the historicity of the section. 9, the story of Abimelech, is one of the oldest portions of the book, and contains for the most part genuine history; it gives an instructive glimpse of the relations between Canaanites and Israelites now brought side by side; ‘the Canaanite town Shechem, subject to Jerubbaal of Ophrah; his balf-Canaanite son Abimelech, who naturally belongs to his mother’s people; the successful appeal to blood, which is “thicker than water,” by which he becomes king of Shechem, ruling over the neighbouring Israelites also; the interloper Gaal, and his kinsmen, who settle in Shechem and Instigate insurrection against Abimelech by skilfully appealing to the pride of the Shechemite aristocracy all help us better than anything else in the book to realize the situation in this period’ (Moore)
Palesti'na -
During the patriarchal period, the conquest and the age of the Judges and also where those early periods are referred to in the later literature (as) (Psalm 105:11 ) it is spoken of as "Canaan," or more frequently "the land of Canaan," meaning thereby the country west of the Jordan, as opposed to "the land of Gilead. This is the land of Canaan which was bestowed on Abraham, --the covenanted home of his descendants. Of planted trees large shrubs the first in importance is the vine, which is most abundantly cultivated all over the country, and produces, as in the time of the Canaanites, enormous bunches of grapes
Joshua - His subsequent history belongs to the story of the conquest of Canaan (see following article). The historical foundation for making the hero of Ephraim into the conqueror of all Canaan is absent. He brought out certain features in connexion with the passage of Jordan the fear inspired in the Canaanites, the presence of the 2 1 / 2 tribes, the exaltation of Joshua by Jahweh (Joshua 2:10 f
Moses - Caleb alone encouraged the people, and he alone was allowed to enter Canaan ( Numbers 13:17 b, Numbers 13:18 b, Numbers 13:27 Numbers 13:27 a, Numbers 13:30-31 Numbers 13:30-31 , Numbers 14:1 b, Exodus 33:12 ; 1618528390_78 ; Numbers 14:31 ). The Canaanites were defeated at Hormah (perh
Ephraim (1) - But at the eve of entering Canaan Ephraim had decreased to 32,500, while Manasseh had increased to 52,700; and at the conquest Ephraim was fewest in numbers after Simeon (22,200)
Number - The 42 months answer to Israel's 42 sojournings in the desert (Numbers 33:1-50), contrasted with the sabbatic rest of Canaan. Satan mimics the "divine" seven (Proverbs 6:16; Proverbs 26:25): Mary Magdalene's seven devils (Mark 16:9; Luke 8:2); the unclean spirit returning with seven (Matthew 12:45); the seven Canaanite nations subdued by Israel (Deuteronomy 7:1; Acts 13:19); the dragon with seven heads and s
Retaliation - The lex talionis must have been part of the most primitive Semitic law, as it was current in almost identical words in Babylon and Canaan
Moses - The first period ended with his flight from Egypt to Midian (Acts 7:23-29), the second with his return from Midian to liberate his people from Egyptian power (Acts 7:30-36; Exodus 7:7), and the third with his death just before Israel entered Canaan (Deuteronomy 34:7)
Rock - Those who celebrate mass will be shut out of the promised land, as Moses was shut out of Canaan
Moses - The fact of the two dispensations being entirely different furnishes the reason why Moses was not allowed to enter into Canaan
Shechem (1) - ...
Here first in Canaan God appeared to Abraham (Genesis 12:6), and here he pitched his tent and built an altar under the oak or terebinth (not "plain") of Moreh; here too Jacob re-entered the promised land (Genesis 33:18-19), and "bought a parcel of a field where he had spread his tent," from the children of Hamor, Shechem's father, and bequeathed it subsequently to Joseph (Genesis 48:22; Joshua 24:32; John 4:5); a dwelling place, whereas Abraham's only purchase was a burial place. Jacob dug it deep into the rocky ground, its position indicating it was dug by one who could not rely for water on the springs so near in the valley (Ain Balata and Defneh), the Canaanites being their owners
Abraham - Abraham at first only partially obeyed the call: he left Ur and went to dwell at Haran, in Mesopotamia (Charran in Acts 7:4 ), but with his father and kindred; and did not enter Canaan until the death of his father. He was so careful that Isaac should not marry one of the daughters of the Canaanites that he sent his servant (Eliezer perhaps) to his own kindred to seek a bride for Isaac, being convinced that God would send His angel and prosper the mission, which resulted in Rebecca being the wife of Isaac
Deliver - Nâthan is used especially in a military and judicial sense, meaning “to give over one’s power or control,” or to grant victory to someone; so Moses said God would “give” the kings of Canaan into Israel’s hands ( Almsgiving - Again, by His own example, in the case of the woman of Canaan (Matthew 15:21-28), He cuts off another unworthy motive, too often active in our so-called almsgiving, the wish to get rid of a beggar’s importunity; while, both in the case of this woman and of her with the issue of blood (Matthew 9:20, Mark 5:25, Luke 8:43), He shows by His own example that true kindness is not indiscriminate, but takes the most careful account, not so much of the immediate and material, as of the ultimate and spiritual benefit which may be done, by its assistance, to the afflicted or the needy
King - ...
Establishment of Israel’s monarchy...
In the early days of Israel’s settlement in Canaan, there was no monarchy and no central government
Text, Versions, And Languages of ot - 800), and to the language spoken in Canaan before (as well as after) the Hebrew invasion, known in part from the Canaanite glosses in the Tell el-Amarna tablets ( c
Other languages besides Aramaic contributed to the vocabulary of Hebrew: Assyrian , indirectly through the Canaanites from the earliest times to an extent not easily to be defined, and later directly; Persian , after the Persian conquest of Babylon in 538; Greek , after the time of Alexander (332 b
Gentiles - The native chiefs of Canaan treat Abraham with respect; the Pharaoh who makes Joseph lord of his house calls him ‘a man in whom the spirit of God is’; the daughter of the Pharaoh of the oppression is moved with compassion at the sight of the child Moses, and brings him up as her son; Jethro receives Moses when an exile into his family, guides him in the desert, and instructs him in the art of governing; Rahab and Ruth ‘take refuge under the wings of the God of Israel,’ and their names are in the regal genealogy; Ittai the Gittite cleaves to David, when almost all have forsaken him; the Queen of Sheba comes to hear the wisdom of Solomon; the Tyrian Hiram supplies him with materials when building the Temple, having been ‘ever a lover of David’; the widow of Zarephath, nearly destitute herself, feeds the famishing Elijah; and Naaman, the Syrian general, confesses his faith in the God of Elisha as the one true God; Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian slave, rescues Jeremiah from death, and is rewarded with a promise of personal immunity from danger; Job, an Arabian shaikh, is the lofty teacher of how ‘to suffer and be strong’; Cyrus the Persian Is the Lord’s anointed, and the deliverer of His people. -Was there present to the mind of Christ, while accomplishing the work of Him that sent Him, a purpose of salvation that included the Gentiles? Did He look beyond ‘the lost sheep of the house of Israel’ to other sheep far off from the mountains of Canaan, who had also to be sought and found? When Satan showed Him the kingdoms of the world, did He turn away from the sight of the world with the repugnance of a Jew of His time, or did the sight move Him to compassion, and enkindle a great hope in His heart? It is not easy to see how the Christian Church can cease believing that Christ had a purpose of mercy for the world, and the expectation of subduing it unto Himself, unless she is to revise her whole doctrine of the Person of her Lord
Joseph - The severity of the famine in Canaan led Jacob to send all his sons except Benjamin ( Genesis 42:4 ) to buy corn in Egypt. He is said to have survived to the age of 110 ( Genesis 50:22 ), and to have left injunctions that his body should be conveyed to Canaan when Israel was restored
Tyre - At the conquest of Canaan, Joshua assigned the Tyrian territory to Asher, though it was perhaps never occupied ( Joshua 19:29 , but cf
Mission(s) - He healed the daughter of “a woman of Canaan” and praised the woman for her faith (Matthew 15:21-29 )
Bread - Ovens, Chardin apprehends, were not used in Canaan in the patriarchal age: all the bread of that time was baked upon a plate, or under the ashes; and he supposes, what is nearly self-evident, that the cakes which Sarah baked on the hearth were of the last sort, and that the shew bread was of the same kind
Jordan - As the cave Panion lies at the foot of Mount Lebanon, in the northern extremity of Canaan, and the lake Asphaltites extends to the southern extremity, the river Jordan pursues its course through the whole extent of the country from north to south. If it did not in ancient times annually overflow its banks, the majesty of God in dividing its waters to make way for Joshua and the armies of Israel, was certainly the more striking to the Canaanites; who, when they looked upon themselves as defended in an extraordinary manner by the casual swelling of the river, its breadth and rapidity being both so extremely increased, yet, found it in these circumstances part asunder, and leave a way on dry land for the people of Jehovah
Pillar - ...
( c ) The third and most important class of mazzçbâhs comprises the pillar-stones which stood beside the altar at every Canaanite sanctuary (see High Place). That the local sanctuaries, in most cases taken over from the Canaanites, at which the Hebrews worshipped J″ [8], 102 115; Benzinger, Heb. It now remains to deal with a question which may be thus formulated, What significance did the Canaanites, and the Hebrews after them, attach to these mazzçbâhs , and what place did they hold in the ancient cult? This question can hardly be approached without a reference to the still unsolved problem of the religious significance of ‘standing stones’ all the world over. In Genesis 28:1-22 it is admitted that we have a later adaptation of a Canaanite temple myth, which explained the origin of the sanctuary at Bethel, and especially the sanctity attaching to the original beth-el , i. ]'>[3] regarded the Canaanite mazzçbâhs in this light from the first
Gods, Pagan - After the political rise of Babylon, Marduk was considered the chief god and was given the epithet Bel (equivalent to the Canaanite term Baal), meaning “lord” ( Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ; Jeremiah 51:44 ). Ishtar (the Canaanite Astarte/Ashtaroth) was goddess of the morning and evening star. Also associated with fertility was the storm god Adad, the Canaanite Hadad. ...
Canaanite Gods The gods of the Canaanites made the greatest impact on the Israelites. While many of these are related to Mesopotamian gods, Canaanite religion was not well understood until the discovery of religious texts in the 1920s at the Syrian city of Ugarit. See Canaan. ...
The chief god of the Canaanite pantheon was called El, the generic Semitic word for “god. While the Hebrew word baal was not in itself considered pagan, perhaps its use as a divine title in Canaanite religion is behind God's rejection of the appellation Baali, “my master” (Hosea 2:16-17 ). The fertility aspects of the Canaanite gods was an inviting snare to the Israelites. New to farming and having just settled in Canaan after a generation of nomadic life in the desert, the Israelites were particularly tempted to serve the gods said to control the fertility of that land. Indeed, Jeroboam's golden calves at Dan and Bethel may have been an attempt to identify Yahweh of Israel with the Baal of the Canaanite elements of the kingdom and to combine their traditions. The Canaanite god Horon was evidently worshiped in the two cities of Beth-horon (“house of Horon”)
Egypt - Canaan and Syria were subdued, as well as Cyprus, and the boundaries of the Egyptian Empire were fixed at the Euphrates. He surrounded himself with officials and courtiers of Asiatic, and more especially Canaanitish, extraction; but the native party succeeded eventually in overthrowing the government, the capital of Khu-n-Aten was destroyed, and the foreigners were driven out of the country, those that remained being reduced to serfdom. ...
The Nineteenth Dynasty soon afterwards came to an end; Egypt was distracted by civil war; and for a short time a Canaanite, Arisu, ruled over it
Ark of the Covenant - The antitype, Messiah, goes before His redeemed, exploring their way through the wilderness, making clear passage through death's waters into the heavenly Canaan
Ebla - It has similarities to Ugaritic, Phoenician, and Hebrew; but because it is more than one thousand years earlier, it has been classified as “palaeo (old)-Canaanite. In fact, about 80 percent of the texts were written in Sumerian and only 20 percent in palaeo-Canaanite. “Dagon of Canaan” mentioned at Ebla is similar to the biblical title “Dagon of the Philistines” and suggests that the ethnic designation “Canaanite” may be much older than previously had been believed
Unbelief - The mere entrance into Canaan under Joshua was no true fulfilment of the promise, for ‘if Israel had believed they would have entered in, the Rest would have been appropriated, and God’s gracious design satisfied, and a Rest would have been no more “left” for others’ (A
Mines And Mining - The Bible describes Canaan as a land “whose stones are iron and from whose hills you may mine copper” (Deuteronomy 8:9 NRSV)
Serve - ” This root is used widely in Semitic and Canaanite languages. 9:25: “… A servant of servants shall he [4] be unto his brethren,” meaning “the lowest of slaves” (NIV)
Habits - In Canaan, persons of distinction were dressed in fine linen of Egypt; and according to some authors, in silk, and rich cloth, shaded with the choicest colours, or, as the Vulgate calls it, with feathered work, embroidered with gold
Ebla - It has similarities to Ugaritic, Phoenician, and Hebrew; but because it is more than one thousand years earlier, it has been classified as “palaeo (old)-Canaanite. In fact, about 80 percent of the texts were written in Sumerian and only 20 percent in palaeo-Canaanite. “Dagon of Canaan” mentioned at Ebla is similar to the biblical title “Dagon of the Philistines” and suggests that the ethnic designation “Canaanite” may be much older than previously had been believed
Covenant - In his sovereign will God chose one man, Abraham, promising him a multitude of descendants who would become a nation, receive Canaan as their homeland, and be God’s channel of blessing to the world (Genesis 12:1-3; Genesis 15:18-21; Genesis 17:2-8; Acts 3:25)
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - Throughout pre-exilic times there was a struggle in Israel between the pure worship of Jehovah alone as inculcated by the great prophets, and the worship of ‘other gods,’ such as the local Canaanitish Baalim and idols in the homes of the people. This occurs in the arrangements for the conquest of Canaan ( Judges 1:1 ), in the campaign against the Benjamites ( Judges 20:27 ), in David’s uncertainty after the death of Saul ( 2 Samuel 2:1 ), and in war ( 2 Samuel 5:19 ; 2 Samuel 5:23 ). (4) In dividing the land of Canaan ( Numbers 26:55 ; Numbers 33:54 ; Numbers 34:13 , Joshua 21:4 ; Joshua 21:6 ; Joshua 21:8 )
Government of the Hebrews - Accordingly, the land of Canaan, which was destined to be occupied by them, was declared to be the land of Jehovah, of which he was to be the king, and the Hebrews merely the hereditary occupants. If the same question should be put in respect to Joshua, the answer would be, that he was not properly the successor of Moses, and that, so far from being the ruler of the state, he was designated by the ruler to sustain the subordinate office of military leader of the Israelites in their conquest of the land of Canaan
Divorce - Although Deuteronomy 7:1-4 commands Israelites not to make covenants or to intermarry with the people in Canaan when they enter that land, this principle is not normative since the Old Testament permits marriage to believing foreigners (cf
Captivity - Besides minor captivities six under the judges, namely, that by Chushan-rishathaim, Eglon, the Philistines, Jabin of Canaan, Midian, Ammon (Judges 3; Judges 4; Judges 6; Judges 10), and that by Hazael of Syria (2 Kings 10:32), there were three great captivities
Ugarit - An important city in Syria whose excavation has provided tablets giving the closest primary evidence available for reconstructing the Canaanite religion Israel faced. For the student of the Bible, the religious and mythological texts present a rather full picture of Canaanite religious practice and belief already known from the Bible. See Canaan. ...
The Religious Texts The poetic mythological texts and poetic legends have elicited the greatest interest because of the information they provide about Canaanite religion. In addition to these acts, in actual practice the Canaanites employed sacred prostitution and other imitative practices to restore fertility to the world. In any case these texts, together with other artifacts, provide a more complete picture of Canaanite religious practice which proved such a temptation to the Israelites (compare the Book of Judges) and against which the prophets protested
Edom - Esau, with his 400 armed men (Genesis 32:6), commenced driving out the Horites, and permanently settled in mount Seir after his father's death, yielding Canaan to Jacob, in accordance with his father's blessing
Names of God - He was the chief God in the Canaanite pantheon. See Canaan. ” Canaanites at Ugarit also worshiped god as El-Elyon. ...
El-Berith “God of the Covenant” ( Judges 9:46 ) transforms the Canaanite Baal Berith (Judges 8:33 ) to show God alone makes and keeps covenant. ...
Other Names Baal This was the chief god of the Canaanite pantheon
Corinthians, Epistles to the - He kept under his body, lest he should be rejected, as the Israelites were, many of whom, he proceeds to show in the next chapter, had never reached Canaan
Genealogy - We gather that the Calebites (‘dog-tribe’) were a related but alien clan, which entered into friendly relations with Judah at the time of the conquest of Canaan, and perhaps took the lead in the invasion
Shepherds - The patriarch Jacob, though he was the son of a shepherd prince, kept the flocks of Laban, his maternal uncle; and his own sons followed the same business, both in Mesopotamia, and after his return to the land of Canaan
Weights And Measures - The following, however, seem the most probable conclusions: First, that three cubits were used in the times of the Hebrew monarchy, namely : (1) The cubit of a man, (3:11) or the common cubit of Canaan (in contradistinction to the Mosaic cubit) of the Chaldean standard; (2) The old Mosaic or legal cubit , a handbreadth larger than the first, and agreeing with the smaller Egyptian cubit; (3) The new cubit , which was still larger, and agreed with the larger Egyptian cubit, of about 20
Hosea, Theology of - Turning away from God they took the fruits of the land and offered them to pagan idols, eventually attributing the source of these blessings to the gods of Canaan (2:8; 11:1)
Sea - The Apostle’s point is that ancient Israel started well; all were protected and guided by the cloud; all were safely brought through the sea; all were sealed as by a baptism into trustful allegiance to Moses as their deliverer; yet in the end all except two failed to enter Canaan
Government - This would be true for the period after the conquest of Canaan
King, Christ as - The central theme of the covenant God made with Abraham was the promise that the land of Canaan would be "an everlasting possession" to him and his descendants (Genesis 17:8 )
Sabbath - Moses, the law's representative, could not lead Israel into Canaan
the Woman With the Issue of Blood - Even if this woman had come on a very much better errand than she did come; and with a far better kind of faith and love; even had she come as David and Paul and Luther came all their days; she would only have gone home to a more horrible pit in her own heart than ever, and to a more corrupt and abominable and burdensome body of death than ever, and to a loneliness that the happiest home in Canaan could not have comforted; to a lifelong death indeed, of which her twelve years' issue of blood was but a far off and feeble emblem
Simeon - Judah and Simeon joined together in the conquest of southern Canaan (Judges 1:3; Judges 1:17). The Simeonites "found the Μeunim " (not as KJV, 1 Chronicles 4:41, "habitations") there besides the Hamites (whether Egyptians, Cushites, or Canaanites). The Canaanitess mother of Shaul (Genesis 46:10) and the Horite father of Shaphat the spy from Simeon (Numbers 13:5) indicate the laxness of Simeon in marriage connections, from whence sprang his paganish degeneracy. Called "the Canaanite" (not the nation, but Κananaios , in Chaldee equivalent to the Greek Ζeelotees ; "zealot," Matthew 10:4; Mark 3:18)
Fall - Descent of water a cascade a cataract a rush of water down a steep place usually in the plural sometimes in the singular as the falls of Niagara, or the Mohawk the fall of the Hoosatonuc at Canaan
Work - The Israelites were strongly commanded not to imitate the grossly immoral behavior of the Canaanites and the surrounding nations: “After the doings of the land of Egypt, wherein ye dwelt, shall ye not do: and after the doings of the land of Canaan, whither I bring you, shall ye not do: neither shall ye walk in their ordinances” ( Pharaoh - In the inscription the name of the Israelites has no determinative of 'country' or 'district' attached to it, as is the case with all the other names (Canaan, Ashkelon, Gezer, Khar or Southern Palestine, etc
Spinning And Weaving - 1904, 324), it can no longer be doubted that this form of the upright loom was also in use in Palestine, even as far back as the later Stone Age (Vincent, Canaan d’après l’exploration récente , 405)
Death, Mortality - Only he and Sarah were buried in Canaan (Genesis 23:19 ; 25:9 )
Balaam - It is an undesigned propriety, which marks the truth of Scripture, that it represents Balak of Moab, the descendant of Lot, as having recourse to a diviner of the land from which Lot came when he accompanied Abraham to Canaan
Jerusalem - The earliest recorded name of Jerusalem is Urushalim and means “foundation of Shalem,” a Canaanite god of twilight. After the Hebrews entered Canaan under Joshua, the king of Jerusalem, Adoni-zedek fought them
Daniel, the Book of - National miracles in Egypt, the wilderness, and Canaan marked the beginning of the theocracy or outwardly manifested kingdom of God
Census - A new census was taken 38 years afterwards in the plains of Moab (Numbers 26) for the division of Canaan among the tribes according to their families (Numbers 33:54)
Education (2) - One much discussed quaestio theologicalis was, ‘Are they few that are being saved?’ Some Rabbis held that ‘all Israel would have a portion in the world to come’; others, that as only two of all that came out of Egypt entered into the land of Canaan, so would it be in the days of the Messiah
Dwelling - After leaving Egypt, the Israelites inhabited tents in the wilderness; so that it was not till they occupied Canaan that they were domiciled in houses properly so called
Eternity - So it is applied to the Jewish priesthood; to the Mosaic ordinances; to the possession of the land of Canaan; to the hills and mountains; to the earth, &c
Ammonites - Before the Israelites entered Canaan, the Amorites conquered a great part of the country belonging to the Ammonites and Moabites; but it was retaken by Moses, and divided between the tribes of Gad and Reuben
Law - ...
God’s covenant with Israel...
In his grace God made a covenant with Abraham to make his descendants into a great nation and to give them Canaan as their national homeland (Genesis 17:1-8)
Covenant - Joshua and the Gibeonites bound themselves, by oath, to live in peace together (Joshua 9:15 ), although Yahweh commanded that Israel was not to bind themselves to the people living in the land of Canaan (Deuteronomy 7:2 ; Judges 2:2 ). This continuity would be worked out particularly with Shem, blessed by Yahweh to serve as the builder of the tent that even Ham's offspring, Canaan, would enter
Law - This had been manifested in the appointment of the land of Canaan for the future settlement of the chosen people on the first covenant which God entered into with the Patriarch Abraham; in the prophecy, that for four hundred years they should be afflicted in Egypt, and afterward be thence delivered; in the increase of their nation, under circumstances of extreme oppression, and their supernatural deliverance from that oppression. ...
Thus, on a review of the topics we have discussed, it appears that the Jewish law promulgated the great principles of moral duty in the decalogue, with a solemnity suited to their high preeminence; that it enjoined love to God with the most unceasing solicitude, and love to our neighbour, as extensively and forcibly, as the peculiar design of the Jewish economy, and the peculiar character of the Jewish people, would permit; that it impressed the deepest conviction of God's requiring, not mere external observances, but heart-felt piety, well regulated desires, and active benevolence; that it taught sacrifice could not obtain pardon without repentance, or repentance without reformation and restitution; that it described circumcision itself, and, by consequence, every other legal rite, as designed to typify and inculcate internal holiness, which alone could render men acceptable to God; that it represented the love of God as designed to act as a practical principle, stimulating to the constant and sincere cultivation of purity, mercy, and truth; and that it enforced all these principles and precepts by sanctions the most likely to operate powerfully on minds unaccustomed to abstract speculations and remote views, even by temporal rewards and punishments; the assurance of which was confirmed from the immediate experience of similar rewards and punishments, dispensed to their enemies and to themselves by that supernatural Power which had delivered the Hebrew nation out of Egypt, conducted them through the wilderness, planted them in the land of Canaan, regulated their government, distributed their possessions, and to which alone they could look to obtain new blessings, or secure those already enjoyed
Persecution - In the period which succeeded the settlement of the Israelites in Canaan the people adopted the gods and the religious observances of the original inhabitants of the land. They opposed the popular tendency to worship the gods, and imitate the religion, of Canaan, as it indicated disloyalty to Jahweh
Tabernacle - (Numbers 11:24,25 ; 12:4 ; 14:10 ; 16:19,42 ; 20:6 ; 27:2 ; 31:14) "During the conquest of Canaan the tabernacle at first moved from place to place, (Joshua 4:19 ; 8:30-35 ; 9:6 ; 10:15 ) was finally located at Shiloh
Time, Meaning of - The Israelites were unique in the ancient world in their belief that God had not made them with the land of Canaan, like the Egyptians with the Nile, but had brought them as strangers to settle in a land that was not theirs (Genesis 12:1-3 ) through a mighty act at the commencement of their existence as a people
Tongues, Confusion of - (See GENERATION; on the connection of Canaan with HEBREW. )...
This is a trace of the original unity of races so distinct, subsequently, as the Hamitic Canaanites and the Semitic Hebrew
Tabernacle - "House" (bet ) applies to the tabernacle when fixed in Canaan, Israel's inheritance; originally appearing in Beth-el; finally designating the church of the New Testament (1 Timothy 3:15
Justice - From the time of the settlement in Canaan, however, and onwards, when city life had developed, there is plenty of information on the subject
Mission - And an angel, which could well be a Christophany, is sent by God to protect the people in their wilderness wanderings and powerfully fight on their behalf in the conquest of Canaan (Exodus 23:20-33 ; 33:2 )
Wages - Abram obeys the divine call, leaving Mesopotamia for Canaan, but requires a sign that the promise is to be fulfilled. Israel thrives and is prosperous in the land, but there is the constant temptation to assume that the fertility deities of the Canaanites are the ones responsible for making the land productive and the population numerous
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - , opposition to any continuing Canaanite high places). The writer elevates the opposition to the Canaanite cults to a central position in the Yahwistic faith. The author is not writing a history of Israel, but primarily a theological and somewhat didactic interpretation of Israel's history, with the religious struggle of Israel and Canaan as a central focus. Cross, Canaanite Myth and Hebrew Epic ; S
Joel, Theology of - ...
It is true that Joel does not dwell on specific great Acts of God in the past associated with the patriarchs, the bondage in Egypt, the exodus, the theophany at Mount Sinai, and the conquest of Canaan
God - Exemplifications of the divine mercy are traced from age to age, in his establishing his own worship among men, and remitting the punishment of individual and national offences in answer to prayer offered from penitent hearts, and in dependence upon the typified or actually offered universal sacrifice:—of his condescension, in stooping to the cases of individuals; in his dispensations both of providence and grace, by showing respect to the poor and humble; and, principally, by the incarnation of God in the form of a servant, admitting men into familiar and friendly intercourse with himself, and then entering into heaven to be their patron and advocate, until they should be received into the same glory, "and so be for ever with the Lord:"—of his strictly righteous government, in the destruction of the old world, the cities of the plain, the nations of Canaan, and all ancient states, upon their "filling up the measure of their iniquities;" and, to show that "he will by no means clear the guilty;" in the numerous and severe punishments inflicted even upon the chosen seed of Abraham, because of their transgressions:—of his long-suffering, in frequent warnings, delays, and corrective judgments inflicted upon individuals and nations, before sentence of utter excision and destruction:—of faithfulness and truth, in the fulfilment of promises, often many ages after they were given, as in the promises to Abraham respecting the possession of the land of Canaan by his seed, and in all the "promises made to the fathers" respecting the advent, vicarious death, and illustrious offices of the "Christ," the Saviour of the world:—of his immutability, in the constant and unchanging laws and principles of his government, which remain to this day precisely the same, in every thing universal, as when first promulgated, and have been the rule of his conduct in all places as well as through all time:—of his prescience of future events, manifested by the predictions of Scripture:— and of the depth and stability of his counsel, as illustrated in that plan and purpose of bringing back a revolted world to obedience and felicity, which we find steadily kept in view in the Scriptural history of the acts of God in former ages; which is still the end toward which all his dispensations bend, however wide and mysterious their sweep; and which they will finally accomplish, as we learn from the prophetic history of the future, contained in the Old and New Testaments
Nehemiah - of Canaan return, filling the wadies and gladdening the parched country); they that sow in tears shall reap in joy
Baptism - ...
Their sin delayed the kingdom's manifestation, just as their unbelief in the wilderness caused the 40 years of delay in entering into their inheritance in Canaan
Meals - The next step was the introduction of seats, which would naturally follow upon the change from nomadic to agricultural life after the conquest of Canaan
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - ...
When Israel entered into Canaan, the Hebrews moved toward a settled existence
Pentateuch - No league with Canaan (Joshua 9; Numbers 18:8-19)
Job - That it was composed before Abraham's migration to Canaan, may also be inferred from its silence respecting the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, and the other cities of the plain, which were still nearer to Idumea, where the scene is laid
Abel - When Abraham went into Canaan at the command of God, and upon the promise that that country should become the inheritance of his descendants, he showed his faith by taking possession of it for them in anticipation, and his residence there indicated the kind of promise which he had received
Solomon - The subjugation of the Canaanites was completed ( 1 Kings 9:20 ). ]'>[2] over the Baal worship of Canaan, and of His exaltation as supreme God of the nation
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Judges 5:1 stands as musical witness to Israel's victory over Jabin, the king of Canaan
Unbelief - The meaning is, We Christians are favoured with the good news of the heavenly rest, as well as Israel in the wilderness were with the good news of the earthly rest in Canaan; but the word which they heard concerning that rest did not profit them, because they did not believe it
Insects - They were recognized for their venomous stings and were God's instruments for driving Israel's enemies out of Canaan
Homosexuality - There may be a connection here to two additional references to sexual sins involving one's father (Leviticus 18:7 ; Deuteronomy 23:1 ), since Ham is the father of Canaan, the nation traditionally associated with same-gender sex and whose impure practices are condemned in detail in the context of these references
Antichrist - The myth appears to have belonged to the common stock of Semitic ideas, and must have become familiar to the Hebrews from their earliest settlement in Canaan, if indeed it was not part of the ancestral tradition carried with them from their original Aramaean home
Agriculture - A pastoral age, it is true, preceded the agricultural, and the patriarchs are represented, for the most part, as herdsmen rather than cultivators (Genesis 37:12; Genesis 47:3); and even as late as the beginning of the settlement in Canaan, the trans-Jordanic tribes are said to have had a great multitude of cattle (Numbers 32:1). Prior to that time, however, agriculture was highly developed among the Canaanites (Deuteronomy 8:8); and it may have been from the conquered race that they acquired it
Palestine - Various terms have been used to designate that small but significant land known in the early Old Testament era as “Canaan” (Genesis 12:5 ) and often referred to as the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 9:28 )
Passover (i.) - There was the observance at the time of the Exodus, in the second year after coming out of Egypt (Numbers 9:5), at the entry into Canaan (Joshua 5:10-11)
Trade And Commerce - The products of Canaan were in the main agricultural, horticultural, and pastoral, and some of these could be exported . The housewife of Proverbs 31:1-31 not only makes her own clothes, but sells some to the ‘ Canaanite ’ or pedlar; and in 1 Chronicles 4:21 there is mention of a Jewish family that owned a byssus-factory. The use of the word ‘Canaanite’ for pedlar has been noticed
Ham - And the sons of Noah that went forth of the ark were Shem, Ham, and Japheth; and Ham is the father of Canaan
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - when the eastern frontier of the Egyptian province of Canaan followed the Jordan. In biblical history it is best known for its role in the Barak-Deborah victory over the Canaanite forces of Sisera (Judges 4-5 ) and Elijah's contest with the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:40 )
War, Holy War - ...
Israel is forbidden to make an alliance with Canaanites or to give any quarter to them (Exodus 23:32-33 ; 34:12-15 ). Simon and Levi are rebuked for their slaughter of Canaanites at Shechem (Genesis 34 ; 49:5-7 ). ...
In Genesis 38 Judah leaves his brethren to stay with a Canaanite named Hirah who becomes his friend (vv. Later both he and his son marry Canaanite girls. In the period of Solomon when all the Canaanite strongholds are under the authority of Israel, the Canaanites are not killed but are put to forced labor (Hosea 5:10 ). Leviticus 18 mentions the depraved state of Canaanite society at this time. ...
Deuteronomy 20:16-18 indicates the Canaanites were to be killed that they may not "teach you to follow all the detestable things they do in worshiping their gods. " It is a fact attested by archaeological finding that the immorality mentioned in Leviticus 18 was an integral part of Canaanite worship. One piece of literature depicts the head of the Canaanite pantheon bearing two children by a man's wives. This story celebrates the birth of two Canaanite gods called Shachar and Shalim. ...
Practices of Jezebel, Ahab's wife from Sidon, shows what happens when just one Canaanite occupies a place of authority. Jezebel grew up in a context where she heard about a Canaanite goddess smashing a young man's skull because she wanted his bow. If Canaanites had been allowed to survive unbridled, they would have slowly and painfully killed their own selves. ...
It does not seem to have ever been God's purpose to slaughter all the Canaanites at once. Exodus 23:29-30 , however, indicates it was God's original purpose to drive the Canaanites out "little by little" so the land would not become desolate and wild animals multiply against them. Judges 3:1-4 informs us that Canaanites were left to test the Israelites and to keep them militarily alert. What is seen in Joshua is the rapid crushing of Canaanite capability of being an offensive threat. Joshua categorically denied that the land of Canaan was won with their own sword and bow (Joshua 24:12 )
Immorality, Sexual - ...
In the patriarchal age, homosexuality was a prominent part of Canaanite culture, as the incident involving Lot in Sodom illustrates (Genesis 19:1-9 ). But if the Israelites lapse into the immoral ways of nations such as Egypt and Canaan, they will be punished. The Canaanites regarded their male and female cultic prostitutes as "holy persons, " meaning that they were dedicated specifically to the service of a god or goddess, not that they were exemplars of moral purity in society
Jerusalem - ...
Jerusalem was established as a Canaanite city by the Chalcolithic period (ca. ...
The archaeological investigation of Jerusalem is hampered by continued occupation; thus, even though no evidence exists for the sanctity of the site in Canaanite thought, human nature supports the assumption that the city had a religious center. Theologically, the Canaanite city of Shalem has become the biblical city of Shalom, Peace. At the time of the Israelite occupation of Canaan, Jerusalem was known as Jebus, a shortened expression for "City of the Jebusites. " The poet has drawn on Canaanite imagery to enhance praise of the Lord
Hebrews, Epistle to the - The rest now is neither that of creation nor that of Canaan, but one still future, into which those enter who believe
Achan - ACHAN OF THE TRIBE OF JUDAH WAS TAKEN...
JERICHO was one of the largest and richest cities in all ancient Canaan
Egypt - Among the various other allusions to Egypt in the Bible are those to its fertility and productions, Genesis 13:10; Exodus 16:3; Numbers 11:5; to its mode of irrigation as compared with the greater advantages of Canaan, which had rain and was watered by natural streams, Deuteronomy 11:10; its commerce with Israel and the people of western Asia, Genesis 37:25; Genesis 37:36; 1 Kings 10:28-29; Ezekiel 27:7; its armies equipped with chariots and horses, Exodus 14:7; Isaiah 31:1; its learned men and its priests, Genesis 41:8; Genesis 47:22; Exodus 7:11; 1 Kings 4:30; its practice of embalming the dead, Genesis 50:3; its aversion to shepherds, and its sacrifices of cattle, Genesis 46:34; Exodus 8:26; how its people should be admitted into the Jewish Church, Deuteronomy 23:7-8; the warnings to Israel against any alliance with the Egyptians, Isaiah 30:2; Isaiah 36:6; Ezekiel 17:15; Ezekiel 29:6; and to the towns of the country
Pronunciation of Proper Names - The first syllables of Canaan, Pharaoh, Balaam, must have the â as in fate or fair
Deuteronomy, Theology of - He who supplied manna in the desert could and would provide all his people's needs in Canaan
Canon of the Old Testament - The provincial governors of Canaan about b
Offerings, the - In the land of Canaan a drink offering was to be joined to the sweet savour oblations
Red Sea - It is also a sublime prophecy, foretelling the powerful effect of this tremendous judgment on the neighbouring nations of Edom, Moab, Palestine, and Canaan, the future settlement of the Israelites in the promised land; and the erection of the temple and sanctuary on Mount Zion, and the perpetuity of the dominion and worship of God
Plagues of Egypt - By this, his minute, but mighty army, God afterward drove out some of the devoted nations of Canaan before Joshua, Exodus 23:28 ; Deuteronomy 7:20 ; Joshua 24:12
Sabbath - God appointed the observation of the sabbatical year, to preserve the remembrance of the creation of the world, to enforce the acknowledgment of his sovereign authority over all things, and in particular over the land of Canaan, which he had given to the Israelites, by delivering up the fruits to the poor and the stranger
Egypt - The Tell Amarna Tablets (to be spoken of presently) reveal that Canaan was subject to Egypt before the Israelites entered the land
Synagogue (2) - Buber, 129b) connect it with the primitive times after the settlement in Canaan
Marriage - They are forbidden with the inhabitants of Canaan ( Exodus 34:16 , Deuteronomy 7:3 ), but tolerated with Moabites and Egyptians ( Deuteronomy 23:7 )
Evil - God will remove them from Canaan (Leviticus 26:6 ), but will send them again to destroy rebellious Jerusalem (Ezekiel 5:17 ; cf. ...
To "be evil in someone's eyes, " or "to displease someone" can describe a woman slave who does not please her master (Exodus 21:8 ) and Esau's Canaanite (Hittite) wives who displeased Isaac (Genesis 28:8 )
Type - ), in the course of which a further contrast is drawn between the good tidings preached to the Israelites in the wilderness and the word of the Christian gospel (Hebrews 4:2)-the promised rest of Canaan being used as symbolic of the rest that remains for the people of God (Hebrews 4:9)
Food - ]'>[2] ) had their successors in Canaan
Government - When Canaan was conquered, the various tribes settled in the territories that God had allotted to them through Moses (Numbers 34:2-15 ), and built small settlements. ...
With the passing of strong leadership at the death of Joshua and the increasing influence of pagan Canaanite customs on Israelite life, the covenant fell into disrepute and the elders lost control of their communities
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - Apart from small variations of little interest, there is nothing to notice in the names from David to Adam, except the insertion in Luke 3:36 of a second Canaan in agreement with the LXX Septuagint of Genesis 10:24
Bethlehem - ]'>[2] ‘When I came from Padan,’ said Jacob on his deathbed, recounting to Joseph in Egypt his chequered history, ‘Rachel died by me in the land of Canaan in the way, when yet there was but a little way to come unto Ephrath: and I buried her there in the way of Ephrath; the same is Bethlehem’ (Genesis 48:7; cf
Adam - And then, by the time he takes his pen in hand to tell us all this, Moses himself has been banished out of Canaan for his sin, and is waiting for death in the wilderness
Jesus Christ - Jesus was always more accessible than His disciples, they all rebuked the parents who brought their infants for Him to bless (Luke 18:15-17), they all would have sent the woman of Canaan away
Sanhedrin - 4), capital punishment wag pronounced and executed by the Little Sanhedrin of twenty-three in the various provinces or tribes, but the tribunal of seventy-one in the Temple of Jerusalem was the only body vested with power and authority (1) to pronounce a verdict in a process affecting a tribe, a false prophet, or the high priest; (2) to declare war against a nation not belonging to ancient Canaan or Amalek; (3) to extend the character of holiness to additional parts of the Temple, or of Jerusalem; (4) to appoint Sanhedrin over the tribes; (5) to execute judgment against a city that had lapsed into idolatry
God - 165) perhaps to have been originally the name of a Canaanite deity, but applied to the true God. Traces of ‘Totemism,’ or belief in the blood relationship of a tribe and a natural object, such as an animal, treated as the protector of the tribe, have been found in the worship of Jahweh under the form of a molten bull ( 1 Kings 12:28 ; but this was doubtless derived from the Canaanites), and in the avoidance of unclean animals. The religion of the Canaanites was a nature-worship; their deities were personified forces of nature, though called ‘Lord’ or ‘Lady’ ( Baal, Baalah ) of the place where they were venerated (Guthe, EBi Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - He had led and preserved them through the wilderness period, and then renewed the covenant on the plains of Moab, at the point of transition between the leadership of Moses and that of Joshua, just prior to Israel's entrance into the land of Canaan
Offerings And Sacrifices - According to the earthen altar law in Exodus 20:24-26 and the many references to such altars in the early history of Israel as a nation in the land of Canaan, the Lord clearly intended that the Israelites perpetuate the practice of building solitary altars and worshiping at them even after the tabernacle altar existed
Slave, Slavery - ) Incidentally he comments more suo on the fact that the term ‘servus’ first appears in Scripture in the strange Genesis story of the curse of Canaan (Genesis 9:25)-a source whence, curiously enough, many a Christian owner of negro slaves in modern times has derived ‘flattering unction’ in defence of his position
Complacency - Similarly, He expressed delight in that of the Woman of Canaan (Matthew 15:28)
Palestine - (See Canaan for the physical divisions, etc. ...
By this Joshua drove the Canaanites to the plains; the Philistines went up to Michmash, and fled back past Ajalon. Unlike ordinary conquests, the Israelite conquerors took the hills, but the conquered Canaanites kept the plains where their chariots could maneuver (Judges 1:19-35). ...
The Canaanites held Dor (Judges 1:27) and Gezer until Pharaoh took it and gave it to his daughter, Solomon's wife (1 Kings 9:16)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - Canaan, Amalek, Cappadocia, the Hittites, and Ham shall perish. He foretells Jacob’s conquest of the Canaanites (vii. He performed feats of strength, and slew Canaanite kings at Shechem and Hazor (ii. He describes the storming of various Canaanite towns (v. 1-8), Er and Onan’s sin and death, the evil result of his [8] Canaanite marriage (x
Egypt - The hilly Canaan, in its continued dependence on heaven for rain, was the emblem of the world of grace upon which "the eyes of the Lord are always," as contrasted with Egypt, emblem of the world of nature, which has its supply from below and depends on human ingenuity
Law - It is possible that the original code may have been promulgated at Sinai; but if so, it has received considerable expansions to suit the agricultural requirements, which first became part of Israel’s daily life in the early years of the occupation of Canaan
Josephus - the conquest of Canaan under Joshua and the Judges; VI
Messiah - This day was a solemn day of fasting among the Jews, formerly in memory of the burning of the temple by the Chaldees: several other sad things happened in this month, as the Jews observe; that then, and upon the same day, the second temple was destroyed; and that in this month it was decreed in the wilderness that the Israelites should not enter into Canaan, &c
Passover - ...
One feature of the celebration on the second night of the Passover carries us back uninterruptedly to the primitive times when the Jews were settled in Canaan and were an agricultural people