What does Calf mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
μόσχον a tender juicy shoot. / offspring. / a calf 3
עֵ֖גֶל calf 3
עֵ֥גֶל calf 2
עֵ֣גֶל calf 2
וְעֵ֨גֶל calf 2
ἐμοσχοποίησαν to make (an image of) a calf. 1
עֶגְלֵ֣ךְ calf 1
כְּפָרָ֣ה cow 1
לְעֶגְלוֹת֙ heifer. 1
עֵ֑גֶל calf 1
הָעֵֽגֶל calf 1
הָעֵ֙גֶל֙ calf 1
עֵ֛גֶל calf 1
הָעֵ֥גֶל calf 1
הָעֵ֔גֶל calf 1
הָעֵ֨גֶל calf 1
הָעֵ֖גֶל calf 1
הָעֵ֗גֶל calf 1
וְלָעֲגָלִ֖ים calf 1
עֵֽגֶל־ calf 1
הַבָּקָר֙ cattle 1
בָּקָ֜ר cattle 1
μόσχῳ a tender juicy shoot. / offspring. / a calf 1
מִשּׁ֥וֹר ox 1

Definitions Related to Calf

H5695


   1 Calf, bull-Calf.
   

G3448


   1 a tender juicy shoot.
      1a a sprout, of a plant or tree.
   2 offspring.
      2a of men: a boy or a girl, esp.
      if fresh and delicate.
      2b of animals: a young one.
   3 a Calf, a bullock, a heifer.
   

G3447


   1 to make (an image of) a Calf.
   

H7794


   1 ox, bull, a head of cattle.
      1a for plowing, for food, as sacrifice.
      

H6510


   1 cow, heifer.
   

H5697


   1 heifer.
   

H1241


   1 cattle, herd, oxen, ox.
      1a cattle (generic pl.
      but sing.
      in form—coll).
      1b herd (particular one).
      1c head of cattle (individually).
      

Frequency of Calf (original languages)

Frequency of Calf (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Calf
Calves were commonly made use of in sacrifices, and are therefore frequently mentioned in Scripture. The "fatted calf" was regarded as the choicest of animal food; it was frequently also offered as a special sacrifice (1 Samuel 28:24 ; Amos 6:4 ; Luke 15:23 ). The words used in Jeremiah 34:18,19 , "cut the calf in twain," allude to the custom of dividing a sacrifice into two parts, between which the parties ratifying a covenant passed (Genesis 15:9,10,17,18 ). The sacrifice of the lips, i.e., priase, is called "the calves of our lips" (Hosea 14:2 , RSV, "as bullocks the offering of our lips." Compare Hebrews 13:15 ; Psalm 116:7 ; Jeremiah 33:11 ). The golden calf which Aaron made (Exodus 32:4 ) was probably a copy of the god Moloch rather than of the god Apis, the sacred ox or calf of Egypt. The Jews showed all through their history a tendency toward the Babylonian and Canaanitish idolatry rather than toward that of Egypt.
Ages after this, Jeroboam, king of Israel, set up two idol calves, one at Dan, and the other at Bethel, that he might thus prevent the ten tribes from resorting to Jerusalem for worship (1 Kings 12:28 ). These calves continued to be a snare to the people till the time of their captivity. The calf at Dan was carried away in the reign of Pekah by Tiglath-pileser, and that at Bethel ten years later, in the reign of Hoshea, by Shalmaneser (2 Kings 15:29 ; 17:33 ). This sin of Jeroboam is almost always mentioned along with his name (2 Kings 15:28 etc.).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Calf, Golden
Image of God made by Aaron at the foot of Mount Sinai, pursuant to the request of the Hebrews wearied by the protracted stay of Moses on the mountain (Exodus 32). It consisted probably of a wooden frame with plates of gold obtained from melting the jewelry worn by the Hebrews. Judging from the Hebrew word employed, its appearance was not so much that of a calf as of a young bull, connoting strength and vigor and symbolizing the principle of fertility. In the minds of the people the golden calf was not to be the formal object of their worship, but a representation of Yahweh, as is clear from Aaron's attributing to God the deliverance from Egypt, and proclaiming a feast to Yahweh. Any divine representation, however, contravened the prohibition to make any kind of images of God (Exodus 20); and particularly was the bovine figure objectionable, as the worship of that symbol was associated traditionally with scenes of obscenity. That is exactly what happened in this instance. After the secession of the ten northern tribes, Jeroboam, with a view to turn his new subjects away from the temple of Jerusalem, and at the same time to cater to their naturalistic propensities, set up golden calves at Dan and Bethel (3Kings 12). These apparently must be looked upon, like Aaron's golden calf, as representations of Yahweh. The worship carried out at their sanctuaries was likewise strongly tainted with immoral practises.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Calf-Idol
See Idol, Idolatry
Chabad Knowledge Base - Golden Calf
The: the idol made by the Jews when it appeared to them that Moses would not be coming down from Mount Sinai
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Calf Worship
(See AARON.) The Israelites "in Egypt" had served the Egyptian idols (Joshua 24:14), including the sacred living bulls Apis, Basis, and Mnevis, and sacred cows Isis and Athor; worshipped for their utility to man, and made symbols of the sun and Osiris. In fact Nature, not the personal Creator, God, was symbolized by the calf and worshipped. But Aaron's golden calf he expressly calls, "thy Elohim which brought thee up out of Egypt"; and the feast to it "a feast to Jehovah" (Exodus 32:4-8; Exodus 32:17-19). Israel too had just seen that "upon Egypt's gods Jehovah executed judgments" (Numbers 33:4). What they yearned for therefore was not the vanquished Egyptian idols, but some visible symbol of the unseen Jehovah; the cherubic emblem, the calf or ox, furnished this. So Psalms 106:20, "they changed their glory (i.e. God) into the similitude of an ox that eateth grass"; indeed the Egyptians used to offer a bottle of hay to Apis.
The rites of Mnevis' feast at Heliopolis, boisterous revelry, dancing, offerings, etc., which the Israelites were familiar with in Egypt, they transferred to Jehovah's calf image. Acts 7:40-41 marks this first stage of idolatry. The second more glaring stage surely followed: "God turned, and gave them up to worship the host of heaven" (Acts 7:42-43). Jeroboam's calves, which his exile in Egypt familiarized him with, and which he subsequently set up at Dan and Bethel similarly, were not set up to oppose Jehovah's worship, but to oppose His worship by Jeroboam's subjects at Jerusalem, lest they should thereby be alienated from him (1 Kings 12:26-29). It was notorious that it was Jehovah who delivered Israel out of Egypt; and, like Aaron, Jeroboam says of the calves, thereby identifying them with Jehovah, "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt."
Jehu's worship of the calves is markedly distinguished from the Baal worship of Ahab which he overthrew (2 Kings 10:18-29). Baal worship breaks the first commandment by having other gods besides Jehovah. The calf worship breaks the second by worshipping Jehovah with an image or symbol; Rome's sin in our days. Moreover, there was only one Apis, there were two calves answering to the two cherubim. Hence, this was the only idolatry into which Judah never fell. As having the original cherubim in the temple at Jerusalem, she did not need the copies at Dan and Bethel. The prophets of the calves regarded themselves as "prophets of Jehovah" (1 Kings 22:5-6).
Hosea denounces the calf worship, and calls Bethel Bethaven, the house of vanity, instead of the house of God (Hosea 8:5-6; Hosea 10:5-6). Kissing them was one mode of adoration (Hosea 13:2); contrast God's command," Kiss the Son, lest He be angry and ye perish" (Psalms 2:12). Tiglath Pileser carried away the calf at Daniel Shalmaneser, 10 years later, carried away that at Bethel (2 Kings 15:29; 2 Kings 17:6). In Hosea 14:2 we read "calves of our lips": instead of calves which we can no longer offer in our exile, we present praises of our lips; so Hebrews 13:15.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Golden Calf
An image of a young bull, probably constructed of wood and overlaid with gold, which the Hebrews worshiped in the wilderness and in the Northern Kingdom of Israel.
Ancient Near Eastern Background and Biblical References Living bulls were important in the religion of some regions of ancient Egypt, and bull images appear in the art and religious texts of Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, Phoenicia, and Syria. The primary references to “golden calf” in the Bible are Exodus 32:1-8 and 1 Kings 12:25-33 . The former passage records that the people summoned Aaron to make an image to go before them. The image was apparently intended to represent Yahweh, the Lord of Israel. The latter reference states that Jeroboam I constructed at Bethel and Dan two golden bulls, which were probably meant to represent the pedestals of God's throne. Interestingly, these passages are closely related to each other because they use the same terminology in the dedication of these images (Exodus 32:4 ; 1 Kings 12:28 ), and they both explore the sin of idolatry at crucial junctures in Israel's history. All other references to this subject in the Bible (Deuteronomy 9:16 ,Deuteronomy 9:16,9:21 ; 2 Kings 10:29 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 2 Chronicles 11:15 ; 2 Chronicles 13:8 ; Nehemiah 9:18 ; Psalm 106:19 ; Acts 7:41 ) have in view either the incident involving Aaron or the one involving Jeroboam I.
Theological Significance These accounts demonstrate Israel's strong conviction that God cannot be lowered to the level of pictorial representation. God, as sovereign Lord, allows no physical image of Himself, and any human effort to create such an image invites His judgment. See Aaron ; Bethel ; Bull ; Dan ; Exodus ; Jeroboam I; Moses ; Yahweh.
Robert William Prince, III
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Calf, Golden
CALF, GOLDEN . The incident of ‘the golden calf, is related in detail in Exodus 32:1-35 (cf. Deuteronomy 9:7-21 ), a chapter which belongs to the composite Prophetic source of the Pentateuch (JE [1] ). At the request of the people, who had begun to despair of Moses’ return from the mount, Aaron consented to make a god who should go before them on the journey to Canaan. From the golden ear-rings of their wives and children he fashioned an image of a young bull; this, rather than ‘calf,’ is the rendering of the Heb. word in the present connexion. The view that ‘calf is diminutive and sarcastic for bull’ is precluded by the use of the word elsewhere to denote the young but mature animal. A ‘feast to J″ [2] ’ was proclaimed for the following day, and an altar erected on which sacrifice was offered. The sequel tells of Moses’ return, of the destruction of the image, and finally of Moses’ call to his tribesmen, the sons of Levi, to prove their zeal for the pure worship of J″ [2] by taking summary vengeance on the backsliders, 3000 of whom fell by their swords.
Two to three centuries later, bull images again emerge in the history of Israel. Among the measures taken by Jeroboam I. for the consolidation of his new kingdom was one which was primarily designed to secure its independence of the rival kingdom of the South in the all-important matter of public worship. With this end in view, perhaps also with the subsidiary purpose of reconciling the priesthood of the local sanctuaries to the new order of things, Jeroboam set up two golden ‘calves,’ one at Bethel and the other at Dan, the two most important sanctuaries, geographically and historically, in his realm ( 1 Kings 12:26-33 , 2 Chronicles 11:14 f.). Of the workmanship of Jeroboam’s ‘calves,’ as of that of Aaron, it is impossible to speak with certainty. The former probably, the latter possibly (cf. Exodus 32:20 ), consisted of a wooden core overlaid with gold. The view that the Heb. term necessarily implies that the images were small, has been shown above to be groundless. It is also uncertain whether the other chief sanctuaries of the kingdom were at a later period provided with similar images, the leading passage ( Amos 8:14 ) being capable of another interpretation.
With regard to the religious significance of this action on the part of Jeroboam, it is now admitted on all hands that the bulls are to be recognized as symbols of J″ [2] . He, and He alone, was worshipped both in the wilderness (see Exodus 32:5 ‘a feast to J″ [2] ’) and at Bethel and Dan under the symbol of the golden bull. For the source of this symbolism we must not look to Egypt, as did the scholars of former days, but to the primitive religious conceptions of the Semitic stock to which the Hebrews belonged. Evidence, both literary and monumental, has accumulated in recent years, showing that among their Semitic kin the bull was associated with various deities as the symbol of vital energy and strength. Jeroboam, therefore, may be regarded as having merely given official sanction to a symbolism with which the Hebrews had been familiar, if not from time immemorial, at least since their association with the Canaanites.
A comparison of Exodus 32:8 with 1 Kings 12:28 shows that the two narratives have a literary connexion, of which more than one explanation is possible. In the opinion of most recent scholars, the author or editor of Exodus 32:1-35 has adapted the traditional material on which he worked so as to provide a polemic, in the spirit of Hosea, against the established worship of the Northern Kingdom, which is here represented as condemned in advance by J″ [2] Himself ( Exodus 32:7 f.). The attitude of Amos to this feature of the established worship at Bethel is not so evident as might have been expected, but of the attitude of Hosea there can be no doubt. It is one of profound scorn and bitter hostility (see Hosea 8:5 f., Hosea 10:5 , Hosea 13:2 the last passage gives the interesting detail that the bulls were kissed like the black stone in the Kaaba at Mecca). In the same spirit, and in harmony with the true character of the religion of J″ [2] ), as revealed through the prophets who succeeded Hosea, the Deuteronomic editor of the Books of Kings repeatedly characterizes the introduction of the bull images into the cult of J″ [2] as the sin wherewith Jeroboam made Israel to sin ( 1 Kings 14:18 ; 1 Kings 15:26 etc.).
A. R. S. Kennedy.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Calf
The young of the cow or other closely related animals. Calves were fattened in stalls to provide veal on special occasions (Genesis 18:7-8 ; 1 Samuel 28:24 ; Luke 15:23 ,Luke 15:23,15:27 ,Luke 15:27,15:30 ). Calves were also used in sacrificial settings (Leviticus 9:2-3 ; Jeremiah 34:18 ; compare Genesis 15:9-10 ). A calf symbolized the bullish Gentile armies (Psalm 68:30 ) and Egyptian mercenary soldiers (Jeremiah 46:21 ). The feet of one of the cherubim described by Ezekiel looked like those of a calf (Ezekiel 1:7 ). One of the four creatures around the throne resembled a calf (Revelation 4:7 KJV; modern translations read, “ox”). For other religious uses of the calf, see Golden Calf .
Webster's Dictionary - Tree Calf
A bright brown polished calfskin binding of books, stained with a conventional treelike design.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Golden Calf
Image of God made by Aaron at the foot of Mount Sinai, pursuant to the request of the Hebrews wearied by the protracted stay of Moses on the mountain (Exodus 32). It consisted probably of a wooden frame with plates of gold obtained from melting the jewelry worn by the Hebrews. Judging from the Hebrew word employed, its appearance was not so much that of a calf as of a young bull, connoting strength and vigor and symbolizing the principle of fertility. In the minds of the people the golden calf was not to be the formal object of their worship, but a representation of Yahweh, as is clear from Aaron's attributing to God the deliverance from Egypt, and proclaiming a feast to Yahweh. Any divine representation, however, contravened the prohibition to make any kind of images of God (Exodus 20); and particularly was the bovine figure objectionable, as the worship of that symbol was associated traditionally with scenes of obscenity. That is exactly what happened in this instance. After the secession of the ten northern tribes, Jeroboam, with a view to turn his new subjects away from the temple of Jerusalem, and at the same time to cater to their naturalistic propensities, set up golden calves at Dan and Bethel (3Kings 12). These apparently must be looked upon, like Aaron's golden calf, as representations of Yahweh. The worship carried out at their sanctuaries was likewise strongly tainted with immoral practises.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Calf
Exodus 32:4 (c) This was worshipped as an idol because it represented food to eat and work to profit thereby. It was worshiped in Egypt as a god, and Israel had been so many years there, that they turned to this false god when their hearts were not right with the true GOD.
Leviticus 9:2-3 (c) This may be taken as a type of JESUS in His youth and His humility. He was led as a lamb to the slaughter. He was a young man, and this calf is a fitting symbol of the young king.
Psalm 29:6 (c) The type in this case may represent youth, vigor, activity and a carefree life.
Jeremiah 34:18 (b) This is certainly a type of the death of CHRIST who passed through the furnace of GOD's wrath, suffered in the darkness, and yet was "the light of life." (This was called a heifer in Genesis 15:9).
Ezekiel 1:7 (a) Here we find a type of the Lord as He walked significantly, surely, certainly and with a definite plan and purpose.
Hosea 8:5 (a) The Samaritans made a calf their god. It could not and did not deliver them from their enemies, but caused GOD's wrath to fall upon them.
Hosea 14:2 (b) From this we learn that the offering of praise, thanksgiving and worship from their lips would bring joy to the heart of GOD, as though Israel offered a calf on the altar.
Malachi 4:2 (a) From this we learn that Israel's blessings under the good hand of GOD were that they were fed by the Lord, protected by the Lord, and grew greater, stronger and more useful under GOD's good hand.
Luke 15:23 (c) This represents the fullness of CHRIST's sufficiency and His ability to supply the needs of the repentant sinner.
Revelation 4:7 (b) No doubt this is a type of our Lord JESUS who served both GOD and man. See under "OX."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Calf
The young of cattle whether male or female. A calf was offered for a sin-offering for Aaron, and a calf and a lamb for a burnt-offering for the people, at the commencement of Aaron's service. Leviticus 9:2,8 .
A calf was kept by the affluent, ready for any special meal, such as was presented tender and good to the angels by Abraham, Genesis 18:7 ; which is also described as 'the fatted calf' in the parable of the Prodigal Son. Luke 15:23 . The calf or ox is used typically to represent one of the attributes of God in governmental power, namely, firm endurance. Revelation 4:7 : cf. Ezekiel 1:10 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Calf, Golden
This is described as being fashioned with a graving tool after it had been made a molten image. The ear-rings of the women, of the sons and daughters, and probably of the men, were given up for the object. The Israelites on their leaving had been amply supplied with jewels by the Egyptians and no doubt more trinkets were given to Aaron than those actually being worn. Nothing is said about the size of the calf, but a comparatively small image when on a pedestal would have been seen by the multitude. It is probable that the calf was intended as a representation of God, and would come under the second commandment rather than the first. Aaron said, "This is thy god, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt" (as it should read); and "To-morrow is a feast to Jehovah." Exodus 32:1-6 .
This form of idolatry is more specious than that of disowning God altogether and setting up an idol instead, but it is as really idolatry, and it was signally punished by God. There was the same worship in Egypt with the bull Apis, which was said to represent the god Osiris; this may have suggested the idea to the Israelites of making a calf. The same sin was repeated by Jeroboam who was afraid of his people going up to Jerusalem to worship: he set up two calves, one in Bethel and one in Dan, and proclaimed, "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt." 1 Kings 12:28-33 . Idolatry did not stop here with Israel, for they went on to worship 'all the host of heaven, and served Baal.' 2 Kings 17:16 . The above specious form of idolatry is perpetuated in Christendom in the images in the churches, and on the road-side in any Roman Catholic country.
The fact that the golden calf was burnt by Moses before it was ground to powder has given rise to a great deal of discussion. It has been suggested that the image was really formed of wood and merely covered with gold; but the account will not allow this, for it says it was 'molten,' and then shaped more perfectly by the graver. It sufficiently meets the case if we suppose that the calf was at least softened by fire, if not melted, then beaten into thin plates, before being pounded into dust and strewn into the brook. Exodus 32:20 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Calf
‘Calf’ (Acts 7:41, Hebrews 9:12; Hebrews 9:19, Revelation 4:7) should be rendered ‘ox’ or ‘steer.’ 1. The expiatory virtue of sacrifices of blood formed part of the Semitic belief from earliest times. In Leviticus 17:11 the reason given is that the life or soul of the animal is in the blood (cf. Genesis 9:4, Deuteronomy 12:23), which gives piacular efficacy to the sacrifice (see article ‘Sacrifice’ in the Bible Dictionaries). 2. The second of the four living creatures in the Apocalypse had the likeness of an ox, presumably as the symbol of strength. It was certainly for this reason that the bull was chosen as the symbol of Jahweh by Aaron (Acts 7:41) and Jeroboam (B. Duhm, Theol. der Propheten, Bonn, 1875, p. 47; A. Dillmann, Exodus, Berlin, 1880, p. 337; J. Robertson, Early Religion of Israel, Edinburgh, 1892, pp. 215-220; similarly Kuenen and Vatke). The four living creatures remind us of certain of the signs of the zodiac (bull, angel, lion, eagle), and possibly they have some connexion with that source (so Moffatt and Gunkel), Irenaeus (iii. xi. 8) associate the living creatures with the four evangelists, and holds that the ‘calf,’ signifying the priestly and sacrificial character of Jesus, is the symbol of St. Luke. These traditions continued after his time, but there was considerable variety in the application of the symbols (see Zahn, Forschungen, Erlangen, 1881-1903, ii. 257ff.; Swete, Gospel according to St. Mark 2, London, 1902, p. xxxvi ff.).
F. W. Worsley.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Calf (2)
CALF.—See Animals, p. 63b.
Webster's Dictionary - Calf
(1):
(n.) A small island near a larger; as, the Calf of Man.
(2):
(n.) A small mass of ice set free from the submerged part of a glacier or berg, and rising to the surface.
(3):
(n.) The fleshy hinder part of the leg below the knee.
(4):
(n.) The young of the cow, or of the Bovine family of quadrupeds. Also, the young of some other mammals, as of the elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, and whale.
(5):
(n.) An awkward or silly boy or young man; any silly person; a dolt.
(6):
(n.) Leather made of the skin of the calf; especially, a fine, light-colored leather used in bookbinding; as, to bind books in calf.
Webster's Dictionary - Sea Calf
The common seal.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Calf
Golden calf, which it is said Aaron made, Exodus 32:1-4, It is remarkable, that though it is expressly said, that this was but one idol, yet the children of Israel addressed it as in the plural, and said, "These are thy gods, O Israel!" Did the Israelites, in direct defiance of the divine law, make this idol to resemble, according to their gross conceptions, the true God? Wherefore, do they otherwise call it gods? Certainly, there is somewhat mysterious in it. Jeroboam, in his days, made two calves, (See 1 Kings 12:26-28)
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Calf
Calf. The young of cattle, much used in sacrifice, often stall-fed, and regarded as choice food. Genesis 18:7; 1 Samuel 28:24; Amos 6:4; Luke 15:23; Luke 15:27; Luke 15:30. Some of the Egyptian deities, as Apis and Mnevis, were honored under the symbol of a calf. There were two notable occasions on which calf-like images were set up by the Israelites for worship. The first was when Aaron, at the demand of the people, made of their golden earrings a molten calf, hollow probably, or of gold plating upon wood. After the metal was cast it was fashioned, finished or ornamented, with a graving tool. Moses, when he saw it, burnt and reduced this image to powder, cast it into the water and made the Hebrews drink it. Exodus 32:1-35. Some centuries later Jeroboam set up golden calves at Dan and Bethel, which thus became and long continued to be centres of unhallowed worship. 1 Kings 12:28-30. Some suppose it was intended to honor Jehovah by these visible symbols, or at least to mix his worship with that of idols. For example, Aaron proclaimed "a feast to the Lord," Exodus 32:5; and Jeroboam, we may fairly believe, never hoped to keep his subjects from resorting to Jerusalem, by at once setting up a god in downright opposition to Jehovah. His object was to persuade them that their worship would be as acceptable by means of his symbols as by the ceremonials of the temple. The passing between the divided parts of a calf, Jeremiah 34:18-19, has reference to an ancient mode of ratifying a covenant. Comp. Genesis 15:10; Genesis 15:17. The "calves of our lips," Hosea 14:2, leads in the R. V., "So will we render as bullocks, the offerings of our lips," that is, we will offer praise, as animals are offered in sacrifice. Hebrews 13:15. See Lamb.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Calf
עגל . The young of the ox kind. There is frequent mention in Scripture of calves, because they were made use of commonly in sacrifices. The "fatted calf," mentioned in several places, as in 1 Samuel 28:24 , and Luke 15:23 , was stall fed, with special reference to a particular festival or extraordinary sacrifice. The "calves of the lips," mentioned by Hosea 14:2 , signify the sacrifices of praise which the captives of Babylon addressed to God, being no longer in a condition to offer sacrifices in his temple. The Septuagint render it the "fruit of the lips;" and their reading is followed by the Syriac, and by the Apostle to the Hebrews 13:15 . The "golden calf" was an idol set up and worshipped by the Israelites at the foot of mount Sinai in their passage through the wilderness to the land of Canaan. Having been conducted through the wilderness by a pillar of cloud and fire, which preceded them in their marches, while Moses was receiving the divine commands that cloud covered the mountain, and they probably imagined that it would no longer be their guide; and, therefore, applied to Aaron to make for them a sacred sign or symbol, as other nations had, which might visibly represent God. With this request, preferred tumultuously, and in a menacing manner, Aaron in a moment of weakness complied. The image thus formed is supposed to have been like the Egyptian deity, Apis, which was an ox, an animal used in agriculture, and so a symbol of the God who presided over their fields, or of the productive power of the Deity. The means by which Moses reduced the golden calf to powder, so that when mixed with water he made the people drink it, in contempt, has puzzled commentators. Some understand that he did this by a chemical process, then well known, but now a secret; others, that he beat it into gold leaf, and then separated this into parts so fine, as to be easily potable; others, that he reduced it by filing. The account says, that he took the calf, burned it to powder, and mixed the powder with water; from which it is probable, as several Jewish writers have thought, that the calf was not wholly made of gold, but of wood, covered with a profusion of gold ornaments cast and fashioned for the occasion. For this reason it obtained the epithet golden, as afterward some ornaments of the temple were called, which we know were only overlaid with gold. It would in that case be enough to reduce the wood to powder in the fire, which would also blacken and deface the golden ornaments; but there is no need to suppose they were also reduced to powder. It is plain from Aaron's proclaiming a fast to Jehovah,
Exodus 32:4 , and from the worship of Jeroboam's calves being so expressly distinguished from that of Baal, 2 Kings 10:28-31 , that both Aaron and Jeroboam meant the calves they formed and set up for worship to be emblems of Jehovah. Nevertheless, the inspired Psalmist speaks of Aaron's calf with the utmost abhorrence, and declares that, by worshipping it, they forgat God their Saviour, (see 1 Corinthians 10:9 ,) who had wrought so many miracles for them, and that for this crime God threatened to destroy them, Psalms 106:19-24 ; Exodus 32:10 ; and St. Stephen calls it plainly ειδωλον , an idol, Acts 7:41 . As for Jeroboam, after he had, for political reasons, 1 Kings 12:27 , &c, made a schism in the Jewish church, and set up two calves in Dan and Bethel, as objects of worship, he is scarcely ever mentioned in Scripture but with a particular stigma set upon him: "Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin."
King James Dictionary - Calf
CALF, n.
1. The young of the cow, or of the bovine genus of quadrupeds. 2. In contempt, a dolt an ignorant, stupid person a weak or cowardly man. 3. The thick fleshy part of the leg behind so called from its protuberance. 4. The calves of the lips, in Hosea, signify the pure offerings of prayer, praise and thanks-giving.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Calf
The young of the cow, a clean animal much used in sacrifice; hence the expression, "So will we render the calves of our lips," Hosea 14:2 , meaning, we will offer as sacrifices the prayers and praises of our lips, Hebrews 13:15 . The fatted calf was considered the choicest animal food, Genesis 18:7 Amos 6:4 Luke 15:23 .
In Jeremiah 34:18 , "they cut the calf in twain, and passed between the parts thereof," there is an allusion to an ancient mode of ratifying a covenant; the parties thus signifying their willingness to be themselves cut in pieces if unfaithful, Genesis 15:9-18 .
THE GOLDEN CALF worshipped by the Jews at mount Sinai, while Moses was absent in the mount, was cast by Aaron from the earrings of the people. Its worship was attended with degrading obscenities, and was punished by the death of three thousand men.
The golden calves of Jeroboam were erected by him, one at each extreme of his kingdom, that the ten tribes might be prevented from resorting to Jerusalem to worship, and thus coalescing with the men of Judah, 1 Kings 12:26-29 . Thus the people "forgot God their Savior," and sank into gross idolatry. Jeroboam is scarcely ever mentioned in Scripture without the brand upon him, "who made Israel to sin," 2 Kings 17:21 . The prophet Hosea frequently alludes to the calf at Bethel, to the folly and guilt of its worshippers, and to the day when both idol and people should be broken in pieces by the Assyrians.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Calf
The calf was held in high esteem by the Jews as food. (1 Samuel 28:24 ; Luke 15:23 ) The molten calf prepared by Aaron for the people to worship, (Exodus 32:4 ) was probably a wooden figure laminated with gold, a process which is known to have existed in Egypt. [1]
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Calf
1: μόσχος (Strong's #3448 — Noun Masculine — moschos — mos'-khos ) primarily denotes "anything young," whether plants or the offspring of men or animals, the idea being that which is tender and delicate; hence "a calf, young bull, heifer," Luke 15:23,27,30 ; Hebrews 9:12,19 ; Revelation 4:7 .
2: μοσχοποιέω (Strong's #3447 — Verb — moschopoieo — mos-khop-oy-eh'-o ) signifies "to make a calf" (moschos, and poieo, "to make"), Acts 7:41 .

Sentence search

Eglah arufah - "calf, decapitated"); the Calf decapitated as penitence for an unsolved murder...
Calf - A Calf was offered for a sin-offering for Aaron, and a Calf and a lamb for a burnt-offering for the people, at the commencement of Aaron's service. ...
A Calf was kept by the affluent, ready for any special meal, such as was presented tender and good to the angels by Abraham, Genesis 18:7 ; which is also described as 'the fatted Calf' in the parable of the Prodigal Son. The Calf or ox is used typically to represent one of the attributes of God in governmental power, namely, firm endurance
Calf - A Calf symbolized the bullish Gentile armies (Psalm 68:30 ) and Egyptian mercenary soldiers (Jeremiah 46:21 ). The feet of one of the cherubim described by Ezekiel looked like those of a Calf (Ezekiel 1:7 ). One of the four creatures around the throne resembled a Calf (Revelation 4:7 KJV; modern translations read, “ox”). For other religious uses of the Calf, see Golden Calf
Slink - ) To cast prematurely; - said of female beasts; as, a cow that slinks her Calf. ) Produced prematurely; as, a slink Calf. a Calf brought forth before its time
Calves - ) of Calf...
Calvish - ) Like a Calf; stupid
Calf (2) - CALF
Ooze Leather - Leather made from sheep and Calf skins by mechanically forcing ooze through them; esp. Hence Ooze Calf, Ooze finish, etc
Calf - The Calf was held in high esteem by the Jews as food. (1 Samuel 28:24 ; Luke 15:23 ) The molten Calf prepared by Aaron for the people to worship, (Exodus 32:4 ) was probably a wooden figure laminated with gold, a process which is known to have existed in Egypt
Free-Martin - ) An imperfect female Calf, twinborn with a male
Scink - ) A slunk Calf
Vituline - ) Of or pertaining to a Calf or veal
Keslop - ) The stomach of a Calf, prepared for rennet
Mugget - ) The small entrails of a Calf or a hog
Veal - ) The flesh of a Calf when killed and used for food
Calfskin - ) The hide or skin of a Calf; or leather made of the skin
Astrocnemius - ) The muscle which makes the greater part of the Calf of the leg
Calf - ) A small island near a larger; as, the Calf of Man. ) Leather made of the skin of the Calf; especially, a fine, light-colored leather used in bookbinding; as, to bind books in Calf
Bossy - ) A cow or Calf; - familiarly so called
Calf - 1: μόσχος (Strong's #3448 — Noun Masculine — moschos — mos'-khos ) primarily denotes "anything young," whether plants or the offspring of men or animals, the idea being that which is tender and delicate; hence "a Calf, young bull, heifer," Luke 15:23,27,30 ; Hebrews 9:12,19 ; Revelation 4:7 . ...
2: μοσχοποιέω (Strong's #3447 — Verb — moschopoieo — mos-khop-oy-eh'-o ) signifies "to make a Calf" (moschos, and poieo, "to make"), Acts 7:41
e'Pher - (a Calf ), the second, in order, of the sons of Midian
e'Pher - (a Calf ), the second, in order, of the sons of Midian
Allantoin - ) A crystalline, transparent, colorless substance found in the allantoic liquid of the fetal Calf; - formerly called allantoic acid and amniotic acid
Bullock - It is also translated "calf" (Leviticus 9:3 ; Micah 6:6 ). It is the same word used of the "molten Calf" (Exodus 32:4,8 ) and "the golden Calf" (1 Kings 12:28 )
Fatling - ) A Calf, lamb, kid, or other young animal fattened for slaughter; a fat animal; - said of such animals as are used for food
Vell - ) The salted stomach of a Calf, used in making cheese; a rennet bag
Calf - The "fatted Calf" was regarded as the choicest of animal food; it was frequently also offered as a special sacrifice (1 Samuel 28:24 ; Amos 6:4 ; Luke 15:23 ). The words used in Jeremiah 34:18,19 , "cut the Calf in twain," allude to the custom of dividing a sacrifice into two parts, between which the parties ratifying a covenant passed (Genesis 15:9,10,17,18 ). The golden Calf which Aaron made (Exodus 32:4 ) was probably a copy of the god Moloch rather than of the god Apis, the sacred ox or Calf of Egypt. The Calf at Dan was carried away in the reign of Pekah by Tiglath-pileser, and that at Bethel ten years later, in the reign of Hoshea, by Shalmaneser (2 Kings 15:29 ; 17:33 )
Blat - ) To cry, as a Calf or sheep; to bleat; to make a senseless noise; to talk inconsiderately
Rennin - ) A milk-clotting enzyme obtained from the true stomach (abomasum) of a suckling Calf
Parchment - ) The skin of a lamb, sheep, goat, young Calf, or other animal, prepared for writing on
Calve - ) To bring forth a Calf
Bleat - ) To make the noise of, or one like that of, a sheep; to cry like a sheep or Calf
Calf - Calf. Some of the Egyptian deities, as Apis and Mnevis, were honored under the symbol of a Calf. There were two notable occasions on which Calf-like images were set up by the Israelites for worship. The first was when Aaron, at the demand of the people, made of their golden earrings a molten Calf, hollow probably, or of gold plating upon wood. The passing between the divided parts of a Calf, Jeremiah 34:18-19, has reference to an ancient mode of ratifying a covenant
Shammy - ) A soft, pliant leather, prepared originally from the skin of the chamois, but now made also from the skin of the sheep, goat, kid, deer, and Calf
Calf - The fatted Calf was considered the choicest animal food, Genesis 18:7 Amos 6:4 Luke 15:23 . ...
In Jeremiah 34:18 , "they cut the Calf in twain, and passed between the parts thereof," there is an allusion to an ancient mode of ratifying a covenant; the parties thus signifying their willingness to be themselves cut in pieces if unfaithful, Genesis 15:9-18 . ...
THE GOLDEN Calf worshipped by the Jews at mount Sinai, while Moses was absent in the mount, was cast by Aaron from the earrings of the people. The prophet Hosea frequently alludes to the Calf at Bethel, to the folly and guilt of its worshippers, and to the day when both idol and people should be broken in pieces by the Assyrians
Epher - A Calf
Exodus - the Book of: The second of the Five Books of Moses, relates the story of the Israelites' slavery in Egypt, their Exodus, the Giving of the Torah, the sin of the Golden Calf, and the construction of the Tabernacle
Rennet - ) The inner, or mucous, membrane of the fourth stomach of the Calf, or other young ruminant; also, an infusion or preparation of it, used for coagulating milk
Shemot - �names�); the Book of Exodus ...
Shemot: The second of the Five Books of Moses, relates the story of the Israelites' slavery in Egypt, their Exodus, the Giving of the Torah, the sin of the Golden Calf, and the construction of the Tabernacle
Ir - (eer) Personal name meaning, “city” or “donkey's Calf
Achilles' Tendon - ) The strong tendon formed of the united tendons of the large muscles in the Calf of the leg, an inserted into the bone of the heel; - so called from the mythological account of Achilles being held by the heel when dipped in the River Styx
Calf Worship - In fact Nature, not the personal Creator, God, was symbolized by the Calf and worshipped. But Aaron's golden Calf he expressly calls, "thy Elohim which brought thee up out of Egypt"; and the feast to it "a feast to Jehovah" (Exodus 32:4-8; Exodus 32:17-19). What they yearned for therefore was not the vanquished Egyptian idols, but some visible symbol of the unseen Jehovah; the cherubic emblem, the Calf or ox, furnished this. , which the Israelites were familiar with in Egypt, they transferred to Jehovah's Calf image. The Calf worship breaks the second by worshipping Jehovah with an image or symbol; Rome's sin in our days. ...
Hosea denounces the Calf worship, and calls Bethel Bethaven, the house of vanity, instead of the house of God (Hosea 8:5-6; Hosea 10:5-6). Tiglath Pileser carried away the Calf at Daniel Shalmaneser, 10 years later, carried away that at Bethel (2 Kings 15:29; 2 Kings 17:6)
Calf, Golden - Nothing is said about the size of the Calf, but a comparatively small image when on a pedestal would have been seen by the multitude. It is probable that the Calf was intended as a representation of God, and would come under the second commandment rather than the first. There was the same worship in Egypt with the bull Apis, which was said to represent the god Osiris; this may have suggested the idea to the Israelites of making a Calf. ...
The fact that the golden Calf was burnt by Moses before it was ground to powder has given rise to a great deal of discussion. It sufficiently meets the case if we suppose that the Calf was at least softened by fire, if not melted, then beaten into thin plates, before being pounded into dust and strewn into the brook
Calf, Golden - Judging from the Hebrew word employed, its appearance was not so much that of a Calf as of a young bull, connoting strength and vigor and symbolizing the principle of fertility. In the minds of the people the golden Calf was not to be the formal object of their worship, but a representation of Yahweh, as is clear from Aaron's attributing to God the deliverance from Egypt, and proclaiming a feast to Yahweh. These apparently must be looked upon, like Aaron's golden Calf, as representations of Yahweh
Golden Calf - Judging from the Hebrew word employed, its appearance was not so much that of a Calf as of a young bull, connoting strength and vigor and symbolizing the principle of fertility. In the minds of the people the golden Calf was not to be the formal object of their worship, but a representation of Yahweh, as is clear from Aaron's attributing to God the deliverance from Egypt, and proclaiming a feast to Yahweh. These apparently must be looked upon, like Aaron's golden Calf, as representations of Yahweh
Calf - Calf, n
Men'Ahem - His reign, which lasted ten years, is briefly recorded in ( 2 Kings 15:14-22 ) He maintained the Calf-worship of Jeroboam
Bethaven - ) In Hosea 4:15; Hosea 5:1; Hosea 10:5 Bethel, "house of God," is called Bethaven, "house of vanity", because of Jeroboam's golden Calf
Eglon - Eglon (ĕg'lon), Calf-like
Calf - The "fatted Calf," mentioned in several places, as in 1 Samuel 28:24 , and Luke 15:23 , was stall fed, with special reference to a particular festival or extraordinary sacrifice. The "golden Calf" was an idol set up and worshipped by the Israelites at the foot of mount Sinai in their passage through the wilderness to the land of Canaan. The means by which Moses reduced the golden Calf to powder, so that when mixed with water he made the people drink it, in contempt, has puzzled commentators. The account says, that he took the Calf, burned it to powder, and mixed the powder with water; from which it is probable, as several Jewish writers have thought, that the Calf was not wholly made of gold, but of wood, covered with a profusion of gold ornaments cast and fashioned for the occasion. Nevertheless, the inspired Psalmist speaks of Aaron's Calf with the utmost abhorrence, and declares that, by worshipping it, they forgat God their Saviour, (see 1 Corinthians 10:9 ,) who had wrought so many miracles for them, and that for this crime God threatened to destroy them, Psalms 106:19-24 ; Exodus 32:10 ; and St
Cow - A cow and her Calf were not to be killed on the same day (Leviticus 22:28 ; Exodus 23:19 ; Deuteronomy 22:6,7 )
Phylactery - Short portionsof the law written on strips of parchment, whichwere placed in a case made of Calf skin, and wornupon the forehead and the left arm, supposed to be in obedience to Deuteronomy 6:8 ; Deuteronomy 11:18
Abortive - Pertaining to abortion as abortive vellum, made of the skin of an abortive Calf
Calf - He was a young man, and this Calf is a fitting symbol of the young king. ...
Hosea 8:5 (a) The Samaritans made a Calf their god. ...
Hosea 14:2 (b) From this we learn that the offering of praise, thanksgiving and worship from their lips would bring joy to the heart of GOD, as though Israel offered a Calf on the altar
Horeb - Near here also the golden Calf was set up
Exodus - The most convenient division is the following: ...
events preceding the going out of Egypt (1-12)
the going out of Egypt and the journey to Mount Sinai (13-18)
the promulgation of the first instalments of the Mosaic Law (19-31)
the apostasy of the Jews (the golden Calf), reconciliation, and renewal of the Covenant (32-34)
construction of the Tabernacle (35-40)
Calf - Golden Calf, which it is said Aaron made, Exodus 32:1-4, It is remarkable, that though it is expressly said, that this was but one idol, yet the children of Israel addressed it as in the plural, and said, "These are thy gods, O Israel!" Did the Israelites, in direct defiance of the divine law, make this idol to resemble, according to their gross conceptions, the true God? Wherefore, do they otherwise call it gods? Certainly, there is somewhat mysterious in it
eg'Lon - (calf-like )
Aaron - He caused the casting of the golden Calf which the Israelites worshiped in the wilderness (Exodus 32), but at the prayer of Moses he was spared the fate of the three thousand worshipers (Deuteronomy 9)
Bethel - One of Jeroboam's two sanctuaries for the Calf worship, selected doubtless because of its religious associations (1 Kings 12-13). There the prophet from Judah foretold the overthrow of the Calf altar by Josiah. Under Ahab the Baal worship at Samaria and Jezreel drew off attention from the Calf worship at Bethel. Under Jehu, who restored the Calf worship, and Jeroboam II his great grandson, Bethel comes again into prominence (2 Kings 10:29). It was ordered by God that the votaries of the Calf worship at Bethel never dared to violate the sepulchre and title of the prophet who denounced their idol
Calf - ‘Calf’ (Acts 7:41, Hebrews 9:12; Hebrews 9:19, Revelation 4:7) should be rendered ‘ox’ or ‘steer. 8) associate the living creatures with the four evangelists, and holds that the ‘calf,’ signifying the priestly and sacrificial character of Jesus, is the symbol of St
Aven - Aven is the contemptuous term appended to stigmatize its vanity, with all its idolatrous pomp, just as Hosea 5:8 calls Bethel, where the idol Calf was set up, Bethaven
Jareb - Hosea pronounced just punishment for Israel, their “calf-god” (REB) would be carried to Babylon as tribute to “the great king” (Hosea 10:5-6 )
Manger - repheth ( Habakkuk 3:17 ) clearly means ‘stall’; marbçq is the place where the cattle are ‘tied up’ ( 1 Samuel 28:24 ; ‘fatted Calf’ = ‘calf of the stall,’ Jeremiah 46:21 , Amos 6:4 , Malachi 4:2 ); phatnç may therefore denote either the ‘manger’ or the ‘stall
Amaziah - An idolatrous priest of the golden Calf at Bethel, in the reign of Jeroboam II
Fallow Deer - Africa, the Αlkelaphus bubalis , an antelope resembling the Calf and the stag, the size of the latter
Cast Down - 15:25); Aaron claimed he “threw” gold into the fire and a golden Calf walked out ( Remphan - Grotius thinks it to have been some deity, as Rimmon; and Capellus and Hammond take this Remphan to be a king of Egypt, deified by his subjects; a late writer is of opinion, that God here refers to the idolatries to which in succeeding ages the Jews were gradually given up, after having begun to revolt in the wilderness by the sin of the golden Calf
Cooking - The proceedings on such occasions appear to have been as follows: --On the arrival of a guest, the animal, either a kid, lamb or Calf, was killed, (Genesis 18:7 ; Luke 15:23 ) its throat being cut so that the blood might be poured out, (Leviticus 7:26 ) it was then flayed, and was ready for either roasting or boiling
Beelzebul - The Jews, in ridicule, changed Baalzebub, the Ekronite "god of flies", into Beelzebul, "god of dung" (which however is zebel , as they changed Beth-el ("house of God") into Beth-aven ("house of vanity"), when the golden Calf was set up there
Jareb - "Ephraim went to the Assyrian and (Judah) sent to king Jareb," "the Calf shall be carried into Assyria
Graven Image - But there were also MOLTEN IMAGES, as the golden Calf, which was first cast and then shaped more exactly with the graving tool
Accession - Thus, the owner of a cow becomes the owner of her Calf
Knuckle - ) The kneejoint, or middle joint, of either leg of a quadruped, especially of a Calf; - formerly used of the kneejoint of a human being
Molech - The rabbins tell us that it was made of brass and placed on a brazen throne, and that the head was that of a Calf with a crown upon it
Levi - After the people of Israel sinned in the wilderness by making the molten Calf, Moses commanded the people of Levi to slaughter those who had participated in the debacle (Exodus 32:28 )
Calves, Golden - As Moses was on Mount Sinai, Aaron formed a golden Calf to use in a “feast to Yahweh” (Exodus 32:4-5 )
Calf, Golden - Calf, GOLDEN . The incident of ‘the golden Calf, is related in detail in Exodus 32:1-35 (cf. From the golden ear-rings of their wives and children he fashioned an image of a young bull; this, rather than ‘calf,’ is the rendering of the Heb. The view that ‘calf is diminutive and sarcastic for bull’ is precluded by the use of the word elsewhere to denote the young but mature animal
Amaziah - A priest of the golden Calf at Bethel, who denounced the prophet Amos to Jeroboam, and sought to banish him into Judah for his fidelity, Amos 7:10-17
Contrite - This meaning appears in the crushing of the golden Calf ( Exodus 32:20 ) or the crushing of grain during threshing (Isaiah 28:28 )
Lamb (Male) - The word gedi, “kid,” is a synonym for kebeś: “The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb [1], and the leopard shall lie down with the kid [2]; and the Calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them” ( Bethel - See Joshua 16:2; Genesis 28:19; Samuel judged there, 1 Samuel 7:16; a place of Calf-worship, 1 Kings 12:29; 2 Kings 10:29; called Beth-aven—i
Levi - This appears to have come upon Simeon; but the holy zeal of the Levites on occasion of the golden Calf procured them a remarkable blessing and distinction
Leopard - Isaiah, describing the happy reign of the Messiah, says, Isaiah 11:6 , "The leopard shall lie down with the kid, and the Calf and the young lion and the fatling together
Amazi'ah - (1 Chronicles 6:45 ) ...
Priest of the golden Calf at Bethel who endeavored to drive the prophet Amos from Israel into Judah
Hoshea (2) - " Tiglath Pileser had carried off the golden Calf from Dan, and Shahnaneser from Bethel, in his first invasion (2 Kings 15:29; Hosea 10:14). So he had not the same temptation to Calf worship as his predecessors
Iddo - Tradition identifies him with the "man of God" who denounced Jeroboam's Calf altar at Bethel (1 Kings 13), which 2 Chronicles 9:29 favors; also with Oded which resembles his name (2 Chronicles 15:1)
Asenath - The marriage into this idolatrous family seems to have borne evil fruit afterward in the idolatry of Joseph's descendants, Ephraim, and the Calf worship
Skin - ) The hide of an animal, separated from the body, whether green, dry, or tanned; especially, that of a small animal, as a Calf, sheep, or goat
Frontlets - " ...
These four pieces are fastened together, and a square formed of them, on which the Hebrew letter Shin is written; then a little square of hard Calf-skin is put at the top, out of which come two leathern strings
mo'Lech - "His face was (that) of a Calf, and his hands stretched forth like a man who opens his hands to receive (something) of his neighbor
Bull - Εgel , a Calf, properly of the first year; specially one offered in sacrifice
Pentecost - They then offered the first fruits of the wheat harvest, which was then completed; beside which, they presented at the temple seven lambs of that year, one Calf, and two rams for a burnt-offering; two lambs for a peace-offering; and a goat for a sin-offering, Leviticus 23:15-16 ; Exodus 34:22 ; Deuteronomy 16:9-10
Exodus, Book of - While Moses was in the mount the people, under the plea of not knowing what had become of Moses, requested Aaron to make them 'gods to go before' them, and the golden Calf was made. When Moses saw the Calf he broke the two tables of the law: the people had already broken the law. The Calf was destroyed and the idolaters slain
Ahab - To the Calf-worship introduced by Jeroboam he added the worship of Baal
Golden Calf - The primary references to “golden Calf” in the Bible are Exodus 32:1-8 and 1 Kings 12:25-33
Regem Melech - But many sent to Jehovah's house, not like Jacob at Bethel but as the apostate Israelites to the Calf at Bethel, with no spirit of true obedience
Heifer - " She had represented God under the Calf form (1 Kings 12:28), but it is herself who is one, refractory and untamed (Amos 4:1)
Fashion - ...
Aaron fashioned the Calf with a graving tool
Nakedness - So, after worshipping the golden Calf, the Israelites found themselves naked in the midst of their enemies
Badger - Faber, Dathe, and Rosenmuller, think that it is the seal, or sea Calf, vitulus marinus, the skin of which is both strong and pliable, and was accounted by the ancients as a most proper outer covering for tents, and was also made into shoes, as Rau has clearly shown
Dizahab - ’ The Targums see in it an allusion to the golden Calf
Samaria - Jehoram attempted a feeble and half-hearted reform, destroying Ahab’s Baal-pillar, though retaining the Calf-worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ) and the ashçrah ( 2 Kings 13:5 )
Jannes And Jambres - Later Jewish fancy ran wild on these names; according to some they were Balaam’s sons; according to others they were drowned in the Red Sea; or they were put to death, either for inciting Aaron to make the Golden Calf or at a later stage of the history
Aaron - He gave in to the demands of the people, collecting the necessary materials and supervising the making of a golden Calf. " Aaron then set up an altar and proceeded to lead the people in worshiping the Calf
Shechem (1) - ...
(2) The Bethel of the Calf was close to the palace of Jeroboam who lived in Shechem (Amos 7:13; 1 Kings 12:25). ...
(4) The southern Bethel was taken from Jeroboam by Abijah king of Judah (2 Chronicles 13:19), whereas the Calf of Bethel was not destroyed but remained standing long after (2 Kings 10:29). ...
(5) The Bethel of the Calf is mentioned in connection with Samaria (1 Kings 13:32; 2 Kings 23:19; Amos 4:1-4; Amos 5:6), and the old prophet at Bethel was of Samaria according to Josephus (2 Kings 23:18). ...
(6) The southern Bethel was the seat of a school of prophets, which is hardly consistent with its being the seat of the Calf worship (2 Kings 2:2-3)
Omri - Determined and unscrupulous he "walked in Jeroboam's sin of the Calf worship, provoking Jehovah God of Israel to anger with vanities
Joash or Jehoash - The worship of the golden Calf, however, still continued during his reign, 2 Kings 13:9-25 14:1-8 2 Chronicles 25:1-28
Tabernacle - First, after the sin of the golden Calf at Mount Sinai the “provisional” tabernacle was established outside the camp and called the “tent of meeting” (Exodus 33:7 ). After the golden Calf was made,...
God refused any longer to acknowledge Israel as His people and to dwell in their midst
Bethel - It was included in Israel after the kingdom was divided, and it became one of the seats of the worship of the golden Calf (1 Kings 12:28-33 ; 13:1 )
Book, Book of Life - "...
An anguished interchange between a wrathful Yahweh and a pleading Moses after the discovery of the golden Calf illustrates the Old Testament understanding of the Book of Life
Cocceians - Cocceius also taught, that the covenant made between God and the Jews was of the same nature as the new covenant by Jesus Christ; that the law was promulgated by Moses, not merely as a rule of obedience, but also as a representation of the covenant of grace; that when the Jews had provoked the Deity by their various transgressions, particularly by the worship of the golden Calf, the severe yoke of the ceremonial law was added as a punishment; that this yoke, which was painful in itself, became doubly so on account of its typical signification; since it admonished the Israelites from day to day of the imperfection of their state, filled them with anxiety, and was a perpetual proof that they had merited the righteous judgment of God, and could not expect, before the coming of the Messiah, the entire remission of their iniquities; that indeed good men, under the Mosaic dispensation, were, after death, made partakers of glory; but that, nevertheless, during the whole course of their lives they were far removed from that assurance of salvation, which rejoices the believer under the dispensation of the Gospel; and that their anxiety flowed from this consideration, that their sins, though they remained unpunished, were not yet pardoned; because Christ had not as yet offered himself up to make an atonement for them
Micaiah - The 400 prophets whom Ahab gathered together to "inquire the word of Jehovah" (1 Kings 22:5) were prophets of Jeroboam's symbolic Calf worship of Jehovah not of Baal. ) Jehoshaphat begged for some "prophet of Jehovah besides," unconnected with the Calf symbolism forbidden by the second commandment
Aaron - " Aaron sinfully yielded to the importunities of the people; and having ordered them to bring the pendants and the earrings of their wives and children, he melted them down, and then made a golden Calf, probably in imitation of the Egyptian Apis, an ox or Calf dedicated to Osiris. The Calf was called a golden Calf, as being highly ornamented with gold. See Calf , See PRIEST , See TYPE , See EPHOD , See BREASTPLATE , See URIM
Aaron - Yet he fell sometimes into grievous sins: he made the golden Calf at Sinai, Exodus 32:1-22 ; he joined Miriam in sedition against Moses, Numbers 12:1-16 ; and with Moses disobeyed God at Kadesh, Numbers 20:8-12
Cocceians - In consequence of this general principle, he maintained that the ten commandments were promulgated by Moses, not as a rule of obedience, but as a representation of the covenant of grace...
that when the Jews had provoked the Deity by their various transgressions, particularly by the worship of the golden Calf, the severe and servile yoke of the ceremonial law was added to the decalogue, as a punishment inflicted on them by the Supreme Being in his righteous displeasure...
that this yoke, which was painful in itself, became doubly so on account of its typical signification; since it admonished the Israelites from day to day of the imperfection and uncertainty of their state, filled them with anxiety, and was a perpetual proof that they had merited the righteous displeasure of God, and could not expect before the coming of the Messiah the entire remission of their iniquities...
that indeed good men, even under the Mosaic dispensation, were immediately after death made partakers of everlasting glory; but that they were nevertheless, during the whole course of their lives, far removed from that firm hope and assurance of salvation, which rejoices the faithful under the dispensation of the Gospel...
and that their anxiety flowed naturally from this consideration, that their sins, though they remained unpunished were not pardoned; because Christ had not as yet offered himself up a sacrifice to the Father, to make an entire atonement for them
Cattle - A woman without standing or position could have such a Calf fattened and ready to butcher (1 Samuel 28:24 ). A Calf was cut in two when a covenant agreement was made (Jeremiah 34:18-19 ). The Bible points to the day when the Calf and lion can live together in peace (Isaiah 11:7 )
Jerobo'am - He caused two golden figures of Mnevis, the sacred Calf, to be made and set up at the two extremities of his kingdom, one at Dan and the other at Bethel
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Amos - ) Like the prophet in 1 Kings 13, Amos went up from Judah to Bethel to denounce the idol Calf at the risk of his life. ...
Calf worship prevailed also at Dan, Gilgal, and Beersheba, in Judah (Amos 4:4; Amos 5:5; Amos 8:14), blended with Jehovah's worship (Amos 5:14; Amos 5:21-26); 2 Kings 17:32-33, compare Ezekiel 20:39
Idol - The first rebellion of the Hebrews centered around the golden Calf made under Aaron's leadership in the wilderness (Exodus 32:1 )
Aaron - The image he made was a golden Calf, after the form of the Egyptian Apis or Mnevis
Aaron - So, casting the responsibility on them, easy and too ready to yield to pressure from outside, and forgetting the precept, "thou shalt not follow a multitude to do evil" (Exodus 23:2), he melted, or permitted their gold to be melted in a furnace, and "fashioned it with a graving tool into a Calf. " This form was probably designed as a compromise to combine the seemingly common elements of the worship of Jehovah associated with the Calf-formed cherubim , and of the Egyptian idol-ox, Μnevis or Αpis . ...
But, the so-called "feast of the Lord" sank into gross paganness; "the people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play," "dancing" before the Calf, "naked unto their shame among their enemies"; they aroused Moses' righteous anger when he descended from the mountain, so that he broke in pieces the tables out of his hand, as a symbol of their violation of the covenant. Then he burned the Calf in the fire, ground it to powder (a process which required a considerable acquaintance with chemistry), strewed it upon the water, and made the Israelites drink of it. Aaron alleged, as an excuse, the people's being "set on mischief," and seemingly that he had only cast their gold into the fire, and that by mere chance "there came out this Calf
Evangelist (2) - The first creature is stated to have been like a lion, the second like a Calf, the third had the face of a man, the fourth was like a flying eagle. To him John is the lion, Luke the Calf, Matthew the man, and Mark the eagle (Hœr. Now the lion is Matthew, the Calf Luke, the man Mark, and the eagle John. Luke the Calf, and St
Levite - But it was not till that terrible scene in connection with the sin of the golden Calf that the tribe of Levi stood apart and began to occupy a distinct position (Exodus 32 )
Aaron - ...
Aaron, alas, had not the stability of his brother,* but at the request of the people, and apparently without a protest, made for them the golden Calf: he also built an altar before it, and made proclamation of a feast to Jehovah on the morrow
Aaron - What would the people like me to say to them on that subject? Will they crowd to hear it? How will they take it? And what will be said about what I have said after I have said it and cannot unsay it? And, in my heart of hearts, can I let them go? Shall I not tune my pulpit just a touch or, two, so as to attract this man, and so as to keep that other man from going away? Moses had his own temptations and snares that even he did not always escape and overcome; but it was the good speaker's temptation, it was the popular preacher's temptation, that led Aaron into the terrible trespass of the golden Calf. And while Aaron was Jesus Christ in type and by imputation, at the same time, and to give the uttermost reality and the uttermost intensity to that, he was himself Aaron all the time, Aaron of the golden Calf and of many other untold transgressions besides. And you may be quite sure that Aaron never slew a sacrifice for sin that he did not lay the golden Calf, and the nakedness, and the dancing, and the shame, and all the never-to-be-forgotten sin upon its bleeding head. Moses in his anger had ground the golden Calf to ashes, and had sprinkled the ashes on the waters of the brook that ran down out of the Mount of God, till all the people drank of the sin laden water. And to this day the children of Israel have a saying to this effect,-that when any terrible judgment of God, or any great remorse, or any great repentance comes upon them there is always an ounce of the ashes of the golden Calf in it. And, though they did not know it, and would not have believed it, the penitents in Israel got far more good out of their high priest's trespass in the matter of the golden Calf, than ever they got out of his broidered garments, and his silver bells, and his fair mitre upon bis head
Dance - It is mentioned as a censure on their looseness that "the people rose up to play" at Aaron's Calf festival (Exodus 32:6; 1 Corinthians 10:7), also that the Amalekites were "dancing" (1 Samuel 30:16)
Favor - Moses pleaded that God would spare Israel in spite of their sinful worship of the golden Calf (Exodus 32:11 )
Bethel - It is noteworthy that Elijah is silent regarding the Calf-worship at Bethel; and that a school of the prophets, apparently in sympathy with him, flourished there ( 2 Kings 2:2 f
Spiritualizing of the Parables - ’ Euthymius Zigabenus, whose interpretation of ‘the fatted Calf’ (Luke 15:23) as ‘the holy body of Christ’ is saved from being blasphemous only by the good monk’s simple piety, makes out that the rich man is God (τὸν φιλάνθρωπον καὶ ἀνενδεῆ θεόν); the steward, every possessor of riches, such being ‘not lords but stewards’; the steward’s dismissal, death
Foot - The Calf is sure-footed and leaves a definite imprint where it steps
je'hu - The remaining twenty-seven years of his long reign are passed over in a few words, in which two points only are material: --He did not destroy the Calf-worship of Jeroboam:-- The transjordanic tribes suffered much from the ravages of Hazael
Jezebel - A priestess and devotee of Baal and Astarte herself, she seduced Israel beyond the Calf worship (the worship of the true God under the cherub ox form, a violation of the second commandment) to Baal worship, of which whoredoms and witchcrafts were a leading part (a violation of the first)
Idolatry - This helps to explain the Calf-worship, represented as first introduced by Aaron, and at a later period established by Jeroboam i. Elijah, the stern foe of Baalism, does not denounce the Calf-worship attacked later on by Hosea. Jehu in Israel extirpates Baalism, but leaves the Calf-worship alone ( 2 Kings 10:28 f
Blasphemy - Specifically mentioned were the instances of the golden Calf (Nehemiah 9:18 ) and the harsh treatment of the prophets (Nehemiah 9:26 )
Jannes And Jambres - They were sons of Balaam, and accompanied him on his journey to Balak; they perished in the Red Sea; they were among the ‘mixed multitude’; they were killed in the matter of the golden Calf; they flew up into the air to escape the sword of Phinehas, but were brought down by the power of the Ineffable Name and slain
Idolatry - When the golden Calf was made Aaron built an altar before it, and said, "To-morrow is a feast to Jehovah;" but the people said, "These be thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt
Meats - The Jews were also forbidden to kill a cow and its Calf in the same day; or a sheep, or goat, and its young one, at the same time
Egyptians - It is supposed that it was the remembrance of this Apis that caused the Israelites to choose the form of a Calf for their golden idol; and we learn from Ezekiel 20:6-8 that Israel had fallen into idolatry when in Egypt
Animals - Similarly the fatted Calf (ὁ μόσχος ὁ σιτευτός), which appears only in the parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:23; Luke 15:27; Luke 15:30), indicates an unusual feast, made to celebrate an unusual joy. The fatted Calf is contrasted with the kid, the customary repast, which Oriental hospitality provides to this day. The elder brother complains that he has never been allowed to offer his friends the entertainment which his father is wont to provide for any chance visitor; while for the graceless prodigal is killed the fatted Calf, which is destined only for high festivals. The bulls and fatlings in the parable of the Marriage Feast, and the fatted Calf in the parable of the Returning Prodigal, alike stand for the lavish generosity of God’s love, which the Scribes and Pharisees could not appreciate, even when offered to themselves, the king’s invited guests, much less when those prodigals, the publicans and sinners, were likewise embraced therein. For the contrast between the kid and the fatted Calf see above, s. ‘fatted Calf
Jeroboam - (See Calf WORSHIP. Borrowing Aaron's words concerning his Calf, Jeroboam insinuated that his Calf worship was no new religion, but a revival of their fathers' primitive one in the desert, sanctioned by the first high priest: "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt" (Exodus 32:4; Exodus 32:8). The Calf worship, as an engine of state policy, still remained at Bethel
Benjamin - Moreover, a part of Benjamin including Bethel, the seat of Jeroboam's Calf worship, went with the ten tribes. Possibly Jeroboam's having appropriated it for the Calf worship may have helped to alienate Benjamin from him and attach Benjamin to Judah. ...
Besides the causes mentioned before, which finally united Benjamin and Judah, there was Jeroboam's setting up the Calf worship in Bethel (a Benjamite city) in rivalry of the temple of Jehovah in the joint city of Benjamin and Judah, Jerusalem (1 Kings 12:29); also Rehoboam's wise policy in dispersing his children through all Judah and Benjamin, into every" fenced city" (2 Chronicles 11:12; 2 Chronicles 11:23); also Asa's covenant with Jehovah, in which Benjamin took part (2 Chronicles 15); also the advancement of Benjamites to high posts in the army (2 Chronicles 17:17)
Moloch - The image was set within seven chapels: the first was opened to any one offering fine flour; the second to one offering turtle doves or young pigeons; the third to one offering a lamb; the fourth to one offering a ram; the fifth to one offering a Calf; the sixth to one offering an ox; the seventh to one offering his son
Blasphemy - Similarly, the prayer of the Levites in Nehemiah 9 calls "awful blasphemies" all that Israelites did when they made the golden Calf (9:18)
Levites - The tribe of Levi was appointed because it was the only tribe that stood with Moses against the people who worshiped the golden Calf (Exodus 32:25-29 ; Deuteronomy 10:6-9 )
Lebanon - Its imposing rage was emblematic of natural strength and solidarity, therefore a perfect poetic foil to the majesty of God revealed in a thunderstorm so powerful that it “maketh them to skip like a Calf” (Psalm 29:6 )
Jezreel (1) - ) God saith "I will avenge the blood of Jezreel (2 Kings 9; 2 Kings 10:11; 2 Kings 10:14) upon the house of Jehu," because the blood so shed by Jehu was not with a view to doing God's will, but to further his own ambition; this he proved by soon disobeying God when the retaining of the Calf worship seemed to him politic
Levi - ...
Moses and Aaron's faithfulness, the Levites' drawing their swords against their Israelite brethren as God's avengers of the idolatry of the golden Calf (Exodus 32:26-29), "slaying every man his brother
Camp - When the camp itself had become defiled by the golden Calf, Moses "took the tabernacle and pitched it without the camp
Millennium - "The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the Calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them
Tabernacle - Then, after a three-chapter interlude dealing with the golden Calf episode and its aftermath, chapter 35 resumes the story of the tabernacle, reporting how the complex was built. ...
The incident of the golden Calf, which is reported between the instructions for the tabernacle and its building, highlights both the significance and function of the tabernacle. The golden Calf could hardly compare to the tabernacle
Typology - He rehearsed the experiences of the people of Israel in the Exodus and in their forty years in the desert: the destruction of Pharaoh's army in the sea (Exodus 14-15 ); the eating of manna (Exodus 16:1 ); their conduct when thirsty—Rephidim—striking the rock (1 Corinthians 10:9-10 ); Kadesh—speaking to the rock (Numbers 20:1 ); sin of the gold Calf (Exodus 32:1 ); fornication with the daughters of Moab at Baal of Peor (Numbers 25:1 ); murmuring when going from Mount Hor around the land of Edom (1 Corinthians 10:7-84 ). Christians are not to desire evil things, as in the golden Calf incident, and as at Baal-Peor (1618734546_43 )
Lion - The same intimation of majesty and strength occurs in Revelation 4:7, where the Seer is taken up into heaven, and beholds the four and twenty elders about the throne, with the four living creatures, having the likeness respectively of a lion, a Calf, the face of a man, and a flying eagle (cf
Dan - recognized by setting up here one of his Calf-shrines ( 1 Kings 12:29 )
Eating - Samuel set a whole quarter of a Calf before Saul
Dan (1) - ...
This probably suggested the city Dan to Jeroboam as one of the two seats of the golden Calf worship (1 Kings 12:29)
Intercession - After the people built the golden Calf, Moses prayed for God's mercy, calling on God to remember His reputation among the nations and His promises to the patriarchs
Mines - How Moses "ground to powder" the gold Calf we know not; whether by natron, or tartaric acid, which we employ
Responsibility - Aaron would not own up to the fact that he had formed the golden Calf (Exodus 32:21-24 )
Aaron - Aaron all too easily obliged and made a Calf and apparently led in its worship
Rehoboam - Moreover, the Calf worship in northern Israel drove the Levites and many pious Israelites to the southern kingdom where Jehovah's pure worship was maintained
Dan - As an alternative to worship in Jerusalem, Dan and Bethel were fortified as border fortress/sanctuaries (1 Kings 12:29 ) with temples containing golden Calf representations of Yahweh
Tabernacles, Feast of - Its popularity induced Jeroboam to inaugurate his Bethel Calf worship with an imitation feast of tabernacles on the 15th day of the eighth month, "which he devised of his own heart" (1 Kings 12:32-33), possibly because the northern harvest was a little later, and he wished to break off Israel from the association with Judah by having a different month from the seventh, which was the legal month
Peace - Animals are paired off in a strange and wonderful way: the wolf and the lamb, the leopard with the kid, the Calf with the lion, the cow with the bear, the lion with the ox
Aaron - While Moses remained on the mountain with God, Aaron returned unto the people; and yielding through fear, or ignorance, or instability of character, to their clamour, made unto them a golden Calf, and set it up as an object of worship (Exodus 32:4 ; Psalm 106:19 )
Cherubim - ) The general representation of the cherubim was under the similitude of four living creatures: the face of a man; the face of a lion; the face of an ox, or Calf; and the face of an eagle
Leadership - Jeroboam, their first king, set up the Calf cult at Dan and Bethel. But others fared worse, for example, Elijah with Ahab and Jezebel, Amos with Jeroboam and Amaziah, priest of the Bethel Calf cult, and Jeremiah with Josiah's three reigning sons and grandson. After the golden Calf incident it was the tribe of Levi who stood out to count themselves on the Lord's side (Exodus 32:26 ), and thereafter they took the place of the firstborn (Numbers 8:14-19 )
False Worship - This mixing of the gold Calf—a symbol of Baal—with the worship of the God who delivered the Hebrews from their Egyptian bondage was false worship
Memphis - Aaron's Calf, and Jeroboam's two calves, were in part suggested by the Egyptian sacred bull, in part by the cherubim ox
Ark of the Covenant - After the sin of the golden Calf and the breaking of the original decalogue tablets, Moses made a plain box of acacia wood as a container to receive the new tables of the law
Idolatry, - until Aaron made the Calf, the embodiment of Apis and emblem of the productive power of nature
Idol - "Beth-el," the house of God, is named "Beth-aven," house of vanity, because of the Calf worship. In Exodus 32:4 "Aaron fashioned it with a graying tool (cheret ) after he had made it a golden Calf. meat; Aaron's Calf worship and Jeroboam's violated the second
Sacrifices in the Old Testament - ...
BLOODY SACRIFICES ...
Consisted in the slaying of certain animals: ram (or he-lamb, or again ewe- lamb), goat, bull (or Calf, or heifer), turtle-dove, and pigeon
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - ...
BLOODY SACRIFICES ...
Consisted in the slaying of certain animals: ram (or he-lamb, or again ewe- lamb), goat, bull (or Calf, or heifer), turtle-dove, and pigeon
Hosea - He declares throughout that a return to Jehovah is the only remedy for the evils existing and impending: the Calf worship at Bethel, established by Jeroboam, must be given up (1618734546_27; Hosea 10:5; Hosea 13:2); unrighteousness toward men, the necessary consequence of impiety towards God, must cease, or sacrifices are worthless (Hosea 4:2; Hosea 6:6, based on Samuel's original maxim, 1 Samuel 15:22)
Levite - Subsequent to the induction of Aaron and his sons into the priesthood, the entire tribe of Levi was "set apart" following the golden Calf incident (Exodus 32:26-29 )
Gospels, the - Why they were put in this order is not easy to see, for in the Revelation the lion is mentioned first, and the Calf second; though the above is the order of the faces in Ezekiel
Food - The killing of a Calf or sheep for a guest is as simple and expeditions in Modern Syria as it was in Abraham's days
Lebanon - He maketh them also to skip like a Calf; Lebanon and Sirion like a young unicorn," Psalms 29:4-6
Zabii - At these structures, they sacrifice a cock and a black Calf, and offer up incense
Gods - If, said they, their fathers had not sinned in the matter of the golden Calf, they would have been as the angels; they would neither have begotten children nor been subject to death
Feet - It may mean also that as the feet of the Calf lead it to the altar for sacrifice, so the feet of the Lord JESUS led Him to Calvary to die for us
Phylacteries - In this was inserted a parchment on which the Scripture passages, Exodus 13:1-16, Deuteronomy 6:4-9; John 7:49 had been written in four columns; the parchment was rolled and tied with white, washed hairs from a cow or Calf, usually from the tail
Music, Instruments, Dancing - The account of—Moses' return from the mountain to be confronted by the singing and dancing of the people around the golden Calf (Exodus 32:17-19 ) symbolized a condition of broken covenant. As an idolatrous act, dancing is mentioned in the golden-calf story (Exodus 32:19 ) and in the worship of Baal at Carmel (1 Kings 18:26 )
Make - He fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten Calf
Lion - Isaiah, describing the happy time of the Messiah, says, that then the Calf, and the young lion, and the fatling should lie down together; and that a little child should lead them; and that the lion should eat straw like the ox, Isaiah 11:6-7 , which is hyberbolical, and signifies the peace and happiness which the church of Christ should enjoy
Josiah - ) He fulfilled on the Bethel Calf altar the prophecy of the man of God to Jeroboam, given three centuries before, and declaring his very name (as Isaiah did that of Cyrus ages before), but respected the prophet's sepulchre (1 Kings 13)
Egypt - ) This explains their readiness to worship the golden Calf, resembling the Egyptian ox-idol, Apis (Exodus 32). ...
Geometry, mechanics, chemistry (judging from Moses' ability, acquired probably from them, to burn and grind to powder the golden Calf), astronomy (whereby Moses was able to form a calendar, Acts 7:22), and architecture massive and durable, were among Egypt's sciences. The Israelites' eating, dancing, singing, and stripping themselves at the Calf feast, were according to Egyptian usage (Exodus 32:5-25)
Moses - ...
In the affair of the Golden Calf, ( See Calf ,) the conduct of Moses showed the greatest zeal for God's honour, and a holy indignation against the sin of Aaron and the people. He then took the golden Calf, and burned it in the fire, and ground it to powder, and mixed it with water, and made the children of Israel drink of it
Luke, Gospel According to - ...
The Evangelic symbol usually ascribed by the Fathers to Luke is the Calf, though pseudo-Athanasius gives him the lion; and it is said that the Gospel has a sacrificial aspect, the Calf being the animal most commonly used for sacrifice
Animal - Of the beeve kind; a cow, bull, or Calf
God, Name of - This incident follows the account of Israel's worshiping the golden Calf, a moment in her history that prompted deep concern that a holy God would not continue with this nation but would erupt in judgment against it
Stephen - ...
(2) That in their past history from the first the same failure to recognize their true friends appeared as in their present rejection of the great Antitype Messiah and His ministers: "ye stiffnecked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the Holy Spirit, as your fathers did so do ye"; so the brethren toward Joseph, the Israelites towards Moses (Acts 7:9; Acts 7:35; Acts 7:40), and worst of all toward God, whom they forsook for a Calf and for Moloch
Hebrews - We know with what facility they adopted the adoration of the golden Calf, when they had recently been eyewitnesses of such divine wonders
Jonathan - Micah began with robbery of his own mother; her curses extorted restitution; she as a meritorious act consecrated the money for a "graven image" (pecel ) and the "molten pedestal" (massecah ) on which it stood like Aaron's Calf (Exodus 32:4), to be a representation of Jehovah; it was the forerunner of Jeroboam's calves long after and idol
Name, Names - In David’s day we find individuals, possibly members of such clans, called Eglah (‘calf’), Laish (‘lion’), Bichri (from becher , ‘a young camel’)
Idol, Idolatry - Israel, however, quickly succumbed to idolatry by worshiping a golden Calf at Mount Sinai (Exodus 32 )
Work - In an extended use this verb means to prepare a meal, a banquet, or even an offering: “And he [1] took butter, and milk, and the Calf which he had dressed, and set it before them [2] …” ( Nehemiah, Theology of - Therefore he did not forsake Israel because of the golden Calf episode (Exodus 32 )
Exodus, Book of - Impatient Israel got Aaron to build an object of worship they could see, so he made the golden Calf
Animals - Isaiah speaks of the day of the Lord in the following terms: "The wolf will live with the lamb, the leopard will lie down with the goat, the Calf and the lion and the yearling together; and a little child will lead them" ( Isaiah 11:6 )
Jehoram - Jehoram fell into Jeroboam's sin of worshipping Jehovah under the Calf symbol, which every Israelite king regarded as a political necessity, but not into his father's and mother's Baal idolatry; nay, he removed Baal's statue (2 Kings 3:2-3)
Plagues of Egypt - It is more than probable also, that some among the cattle that were destroyed were included in the idols of Egypt; for certain it is, that from the Egyptians the Israelites learnt the worship of the Calf, which afterwards they set up in the wilderness
Destroy, Destruction - When golden Calf worship broke the covenant, Israel fell under a sentence of destruction (Exodus 32:10 )
Exodus, the - A small height at the entrance of the convent valley is named as the spot from whence Aaron witnessed the feast of the golden Calf
Tabernacle - ) The sin as to the golden Calf delayed the execution of the design of the tabernacle
Covenant - A ceremony accompanied this covenant ritual—the two sides of the covenant agreement cut a Calf in two and solemnly paraded between its parts (Jeremiah 34:18 )
Joshua - On the descent Joshua heard the noise of the people shouting, and with a warrior's thought he said to Moses, "there is a noise of war in the camp"; but it was the noise of singers in the Calf worship
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - At the next stage he had a Calf killed, and they all ate of it, and again he restored the Calf to life and gave it back to its owner, and again asked the Jew where the two loaves were
Exodus, Theology of - ...
While Moses and Joshua remain on the mountain to receive the tablets of Words, the people act in rebellion by making a golden Calf for worship and leadership (32:1)
Ethics - " Standing pillars (? female figures; "Asherah" = Ishtar, the mother-goddess) and the bull-calf represented deities, and infant sacrifice was frequent
Jonath - And he said to him, Thy brother is come; and thy father hath killed the fatted Calf, because he hath received him safe and sound
Evil - Similar is the "evil" report (NIV, "distressing words") of Exodus 33:4 , in which Moses reports to the people God's displeasure at Calf-worship
Food - The ‘fatted Calf’ of Luke 15:23 will be at once recalled, also the ‘ fatlings ,’ and the ‘stalled,’ i
Animals - ...
Ox, bull, Calf, and cow are among the names for cattle in the Bible
Elisha - ...
The God-hating spirit which prevailed at Calf-worshipping Bethel betrayed itself in these boys, who insulted the prophet of Jehovah knowingly
Moses - ...
Moses after the Calf worship removed the temporary tabernacle (preparatory to the permanent one, subsequently described) outside the camp; and as he disappeared in this "tent of meeting" (rather than "tabernacle of congregation") the people wistfully gazed after him (Exodus 33:7-10)
God - This promise of God's presence became a crucial factor during the Mosaic era and was the point of contention in Exodus 33 , when Yahweh responded to the golden Calf episode by first declaring that his presence would not accompany Israel into Canaan
Barnabas, Epistle of - Paul would say that the physical descendants of Abraham were not cut off from this special relationship until they out themselves off when they refused to believe in Jesus (Romans 11), our author thinks that they were cut off long before this, as long ago as the day of Aaron’s golden Calf
Elijah - This idolatry had been introduced by Ahab and his idolatrous wife, Ethbaal's daughter Jezebel (in violation of the first, commandment), as if the past sin of Israel were not enough, and as if it were "a light thing to walk in the sins of Jeroboam," namely, the worship of Jehovah under the symbol of a Calf, in violation of the second commandment
Jews - Three thousand of them were cut off for worshipping the golden Calf; and for loathing the manna, they were punished with a month's eating of flesh, till a plague brake out among them; and for their rash belief of the ten wicked spies, and their contempt of the promised land, God had entirely destroyed them, had not Moses's prayers prevented