What does Burden mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
מַשָּׂ֖א load 14
βάρος heaviness 3
מַשָּׂ֥א load 3
מַשָּׂ֗א load 2
לְמַשָּֽׂא load 2
מַשָּׂ֤א load 2
κατενάρκησα to cause to grow numb or torpid. / to be torpid 2
מִסֵּ֣בֶל load 1
לִסְבֹּ֔ל to bear 1
וְיִסְתַּבֵּ֣ל to bear 1
וְנָשְׂא֖וּ to lift 1
מַשָּׂא֙ load 1
סֻבֳּלוֹ֙ burden 1
וְסֻ֨בֳּל֔וֹ burden 1
מַשְׂאֵ֥ת uprising 1
מַשָּׂאָ֑ה the uplifted 1
כְּמַשָּׂ֥א load 1
בְּמַשָּׂ֣א load 1
מַשָּׂ֛א load 1
סֻבֳּל֗וֹ burden 1
נִגְעוֹ֙ stroke 1
הַמַּשָּׂ֥א load 1
מַשָּׂ֑א load 1
נִכְבַּ֖ד to be heavy 1
κατεβάρησα to press down by an imposing weight. 1
καταναρκήσω to cause to grow numb or torpid. / to be torpid 1
ὑποζυγίου under the yoke. / a beast of burden 1
φορτίζετε to place a burden upon 1
φορτίον a burden 1
יְהָבְךָ֮ burden 1
כָבֵ֖ד heavy 1
הַמַּשָּׂ֣א load 1
הַמַּשָּׂ֖א load 1
לְמַשָּׂ֔א load 1
מַשָּׂא֔וֹ load 1
הַמַּשָּׂ֤א load 1
הַמַּשָׂא֙‪‬‪‬ load 1
מִמַּשָּׂ֖א load 1
ἐπιβαρῆσαί to put a burden upon 1
הַסַּבָּלִ֗ים burden-bearer. 1

Definitions Related to Burden

H4853


   1 load, bearing, tribute, Burden, lifting.
      1a load, Burden.
      1b lifting, uplifting, that to which the soul lifts itself up.
      1c bearing, carrying.
      1d tribute, that which is carried or brought or borne.
   2 utterance, oracle, Burden.
   3 a son of Ishmael.
   Additional Information: Massa = “Burden”.
   

G922


   1 heaviness, weight, Burden, trouble.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 3591, ogkos; and 5413, phortion.
   See entry 5819 for comparison of synonyms.
   

G2655


   1 to cause to grow numb or torpid.
   2 to be torpid, inactive, to be to the detriment of one.
   3 to weigh heavily upon, be burdensome to.
   

G2599


   1 to press down by an imposing weight.
   2 to weigh down.
   3 metaph.
   to Burden.
   

H3515


   1 heavy, great.
      1a heavy.
      1b massive, abundant, numerous.
      1c heavy, dull.
      1d hard, difficult, burdensome.
      1e very oppressive, numerous, rich.
      

H5447


   1 load, Burden.
   

H3053


   1 Burden, lot (that which is given).
   

H4864


   1 uprising, utterance, Burden, portion, uplifting.
      1a that which rises, uprising, uplifting, signal, rising.
      1b utterance, oracle.
      1c Burden.
      1d portion, present, largesse, gift, contribution, offering, tribute.
      

G5412


   1 to place a Burden upon, to load.
   2 metaph.
   to load one with a Burden (of rites and unwarranted precepts).
   

G5413


   1 a Burden, load.
      1a of the freight or lading of a ship.
   2 metaph.
      2a of burdensome rites.
      2b of the obligations Christ lays upon his followers, and styles a “Burden” by way of the contrast to the precepts of the Pharisees, the observance of which was most oppressive.
      2c faults of the conscience which oppress the soul.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 922, baros; and 3591, ogkos.
      See entry 5819 for comparison of synonyms.
      

G5268


   1 under the yoke.
   2 a beast of Burden, an ass.
      2a the ass was the common animal used by the Orientals on journey and for carrying burdens.
      

H5449


   1 Burden-bearer.
   

H5448


   1 Burden, load.
   

H5061


   1 stroke, plague, disease, mark, plague spot.
      1a stroke, wound.
      1b stroke (metaphorical of disease).
      1c mark (of leprosy).
      

H3513


   1 to be heavy, be weighty, be grievous, be hard, be rich, be honourable, be glorious, be burdensome, be honoured.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to be heavy.
         1a2 to be heavy, be insensible, be dull.
         1a3 to be honoured.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be made heavy, be honoured, enjoy honour, be made abundant.
         1b2 to get oneself glory or honour, gain glory.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to make heavy, make dull, make insensible.
         1c2 to make honourable, honour, glorify.
      1d (Pual) to be made honourable, be honoured.
      1e (Hiphil). 1e1 to make heavy. 1e2 to make heavy, make dull, make unresponsive. 1e3 to cause to be honoured.
      1f (Hithpael).
         1f1 to make oneself heavy, make oneself dense, make oneself numerous.
         1f2 to honour oneself.
         

H5445


   1 to bear, bear a load, drag oneself along.
      1a (Qal) to bear (a load).
      1b (Pual) laden (participle).
      1c (Hithpael) to make oneself a Burden, drag oneself along.
      

H5375


   1 to lift, bear up, carry, take.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to lift, lift up.
         1a2 to bear, carry, support, sustain, endure.
         1a3 to take, take away, carry off, forgive.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be lifted up, be exalted.
         1b2 to lift oneself up, rise up.
         1b3 to be borne, be carried.
         1b4 to be taken away, be carried off, be swept away.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to lift up, exalt, support, aid, assist.
         1c2 to desire, long (fig.
         ).
         1c3 to carry, bear continuously.
         1c4 to take, take away.
      1d (Hithpael) to lift oneself up, exalt oneself.
      1e (Hiphil). 1e1 to cause one to bear (iniquity). 1e2 to cause to bring, have brought.
         

H4858


   1 the uplifted, uplifting.
   

G1912


   1 to put a Burden upon, to load.
   2 to be burdensome.
   

Frequency of Burden (original languages)

Frequency of Burden (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Burden
A load of any kind (Exodus 23:5 ).
A severe task (Exodus 2:11 ).
A difficult duty, requiring effort (Exodus 18:22 ).
A prophecy of a calamitous or disastrous nature (Isaiah 13:1 ; 17:1 ; Habakkuk 1:1 , etc.).
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Burden
In the Old Testament the English word "burden" is translated from the Hebrew word massa [ Exodus 23:5 ). In Numbers 4:15 it is used of the items the sons of Kohath carried as they moved the tabernacle from place to place in the wilderness. Another kind of burden is described in Numbers 11:11,17 , where Moses is bearing the burden of the people and the Lord tells him to gather the seventy elders so that "they will help you carry the burden of the people." In that instance, the burden is not physical but psychological and spiritual. David uses the word in the same way when he is leaving Jerusalem and says to Hushai, "If you go with me, you will be a burden to me" (2 Samuel 15:33 ). Job asks God if he has become a burden to him (7:20).
The same Hebrew word is used in reference to a prophetic utterance describing a threat or punishment on a nation or people. Isaiah uses the term in chapters 13 through 23. Ezekiel, Jeremiah, and Zechariah all have similar sections. Recent translations have tended to render the word "oracle" instead of "burden." The basic concept seems to be that Israel's sinful actions have caused God to be burdened. Therefore, in righteousness he is compelled to judge them.
In the New Testament phortion [1], the Greek word used for burden, denotes the troubles of this life. In Matthew 23:4 Jesus describes the heavy burdens the Pharisees laid upon the people "but they themselves are not willing to lift a finger to move them." Obviously this is a burden of legalism. This same Greek word is used to describe a man's load of imperfections and sins in Galatians 6:5 . Jesus uses the same word to describe his burden in Matthew 11:30 : "My yoke is easy and my burden is light." The reason for having a light burden is described in the previous verse: "I am gentle and humble in heart." Burdens will come in this life but they will be light if we have Jesus' approach to life.
Another Greek word, baros [2] is also used in Galatians 6:2 to describe our Christian responsibility.
Alan N. Winkler
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Godliness: no Burden to True Saints
The Princess Elizabeth carried the crown for her sister in the procession at Mary's coronation, and• complained to Noailles of its great weight. 'Be patient,' was the adroit answer, 'it will seem lighter when on your own head.' The outward forms of godliness are as burdensome to an unregenerate man as was the crown to the princess; but let him be born again and so made a possessor of the good things of divine grace, and they will sit easily enough upon his head, as his glory and delight.
Webster's Dictionary - Burden
(1):
(n.) The proportion of ore and flux to fuel, in the charge of a blast furnace.
(2):
(n.) The tops or heads of stream-work which lie over the stream of tin.
(3):
(n.) The capacity of a vessel, or the weight of cargo that she will carry; as, a ship of a hundred tons burden.
(4):
(v. t.) To encumber with weight (literal or figurative); to lay a heavy load upon; to load.
(5):
(n.) A fixed quantity of certain commodities; as, a burden of gad steel, 120 pounds.
(6):
(n.) A birth.
(7):
(n.) The verse repeated in a song, or the return of the theme at the end of each stanza; the chorus; refrain. Hence: That which is often repeated or which is dwelt upon; the main topic; as, the burden of a prayer.
(8):
(n.) The drone of a bagpipe.
(9):
(n.) A club.
(10):
(n.) That which is borne with labor or difficulty; that which is grievous, wearisome, or oppressive.
(11):
(v. t.) To oppress with anything grievous or trying; to overload; as, to burden a nation with taxes.
(12):
(v. t.) To impose, as a load or burden; to lay or place as a burden (something heavy or objectionable).
(13):
(n.) That which is borne or carried; a load.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Burden
BURDEN . The word so rendered in the OT is derived from a root which means to ‘lift’ or ‘carry.’ It has the two senses of an actual burden and a prophetic utterance. Instances of the former are 2 Kings 5:17 , Nehemiah 13:19 , Numbers 4:15 . Related usages are frequent; in Isaiah 22:25 the word suggests the pressure of something hanging on a peg, in Numbers 11:11 the responsibility and in Hosea 8:10 the privilege of government, in Psalms 38:4 the responsibility for sin. The second sense is that of a solemn utterance, and the marginal alternative ‘oracle’ ( Isaiah 14:28 et al .) is to he preferred. It was customary to explain this use of the word as due to the threatening character of the utterance; but many of the utterances are not threatening (cf. Zechariah 12:1-14 ; Zechariah 9:1 ; Zechariah 9:9-17 ; in Proverbs 30:1 ; Proverbs 31:1 RV [1] puts ‘oracle’ in the text and ‘burden’ in the margin), and the word-play in Jeremiah 23:33 ff. involves a reproof of the men who were disposed to regard the oracle of God as literally a burden. Most utterances of the prophets, moreover, were of necessity from their occasion minatory. ‘Burden’ in this second usage denotes simply something taken up solemnly upon the lips, both weighty in itself and weighty in its communication. It is not used of merely human utterances, but always carries with it the suggestion of Divine inspiration, actual or falsely assumed ( Lamentations 2:14 ).
In the NT, Acts 21:3 is an instance of the literal use. The figures are easy. The word is used for the ordinances of the Law as interpreted by the Pharisees ( Matthew 23:4 , Luke 11:46 ), for the prohibitions of the Apostolic decree ( Acts 15:28 ; cf. Revelation 2:24 ), for the pressure and load of life ( Matthew 20:12 ), for an exacting or even legitimate charge upon others ( 2 Corinthians 11:9 ; 2 Corinthians 12:13 f.), for the imagined difficulties of following Christ ( Matthew 11:30 ). Two other kinds of burdens with their right treatment are contrasted. Other men’s errors and sorrows must be shared in sympathy ( Galatians 6:2 ); though in the service of Christ there can be no transfer of obligations, but each man must carry his own kit and do his own duty ( Galatians 6:5 ).
R. W. Moss.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Burden
Besides the common use of this word, it occurs at the commencement of several prophecies; as 'The burden of Babylon,' 'the burden of Moab.' Isaiah 13:1 ; Isaiah 15:1 ; etc. The learned are not agreed as to the force of massa in such places: its natural meaning would be 'a judgement that lies heavy on the people;' but some take its meaning to be 'an oracle or sentence pronounced against them.' The word occurs also in Jeremiah 23:33-38 , where it is 'the burden of the Lord.' The false prophets were not to use this expression, as if they had a message from God. If they did, it should bring judgement upon them. The same word is translated 'prophecy' in Proverbs 30:1 ; Proverbs 31:1 .
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Burden
Genesis 49:14 (a) This beautiful metaphor presents the believer as a bearer of the sorrows and griefs of others. One burden is the load that the Christian has for the glory of GOD and His work; the other is the burden He has for man's need of salvation and relief. He couches down to show His perfect willingness to bear these loads, and to have this yoke put upon his neck. He is described as being strong because the Spirit of GOD gives the strength necessary bearing both of these burdens. Perhaps this is also a beautiful illustration of the Lord JESUS. He too bowed down to bear the burden of GOD's relationship to the people and the relationship of the people to GOD. He bore GOD's righteous character and revealed GOD's judgments while He made provision for man's terrible need because of his sins.
Numbers 4:15-19 (c) This was a God-given load to bear for the glory of the Lord. Some burdens are liabilities - some are assets.
Deuteronomy 1:12 (b) Moses thus describes the great weight of responsibility that was upon him because of the problems connected with the tremendous host he was leading to the promised land.
Psalm 38:4 (b) The word is used to describe the load of sin which crushed David's spirit.
Psalm 55:22 (b) This is a description of any weight of grief or sorrow, any distressing problem or situation which should be brought to the Lord for His sustaining grace and power. (See also Ecclesiastes 12:5).
Psalm 81:6 (b) This is a beautiful way of saying that GOD sometimes leaves the load of grief, sorrow and trouble which weighs down the heart and spirit, but removes the person from under the weight of it. In this case, the burden was left but the person was removed from it, and became a singing, rejoicing believer even though the burden remained. This is one of the three ways in which the Lord relieves His distressed children. As an example, we may think of the father and mother who have an afflicted child. There is no way of removing that burden, but GOD does provide that the hearts of the parents may be radiant, happy and trustful even though the sorrow remains.
Isaiah 9:4 (b) Here we find that GOD delivers His people from the grievous yoke of the enemy so that they may be free to serve Him.
Isaiah 15:1 (a) Here the burden is the sad story of GOD's judgments upon Moab. Frequently when GOD told of the punishment He was preparing to mete out to the enemy, the story is described as a "burden." (See Isaiah 17:1; Isaiah 19:1; Isaiah 21:1, Isaiah 21:11, Isaiah 21:13; Isaiah 22:1, Isaiah 22:25; Isaiah 23:1; Isaiah 30:6).
Isaiah 46:1-2 (b) Probably the Lord is telling us that the sins, sorrows and sufferings of these wicked people were like a heavy load on the hearts and the lives of every living thing in the land.
Jeremiah 23:33 (b) The question is asked concerning what message there is from the Lord about punishment and retribution. (See also vss. Jeremiah 23:36 and Jeremiah 23:38).
Lamentations 2:14 (b) The word is used here to describe the false information given by false prophets to bring fear upon the people.
Ezekiel 12:10 (b) Here is a message concerning punishment and judgment against the leaders of Israel. (See also Hosea 8:10; Nahum 1:1; Zechariah 12:1; Malachi 1:1).
Matthew 23:4 (b) The word is used in this case concerning religious laws, rules and programs formulated by false religions and forced upon the worshippers in that faith. (See also Luke 11:46).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Burden
BURDEN.—Both in Christ’s discourse against the Pharisees (Matthew 23:4, Luke 11:46) and in His saying, ‘Come unto me,’ etc. (Matthew 11:28; Matthew 11:30), the ‘burden’ (φορτἰον) is that of the legal and Pharisaic ordinances of such a minute and exacting kind that they became intolerable and crushed out real heart-religion. ‘My burden,’ Christ says, ‘is light’ in comparison with these; for I put men under the law of love, which is a law of liberty. With loving, gracious hearts, My disciples become a law unto themselves. The new law is written on the fleshy I tables of the heart. St. Peter, in Acts 15:10, speaks of the traditional legal observances as a yoke which ‘neither ye nor your fathers were able to bear,’ while faith in Christ can purify the heart and make strict rules for outward conduct unnecessary. In Matthew 11:30 Jesus gives utterance to the germ at least of the Pauline idea of a new spirit of life in Christ Jesus, setting free from condemnation. While, in the first instance, Christ meant by ‘burden’ the Pharisaic ordinances, the truth would become ever deeper to His disciples, till they understood the full contrast between the fulfilment of legal precepts through painful effort, and the joyous service of a living God and Father, growing into pervading holiness of character.
The ‘burden (βάρος)* [1] of the day and the heat,’ in the parable of the Labourers (Matthew 20:12) is a description of toil which strains and wearies. In the interpretation of the parable, if any stress were laid on this detail, it might be the long and conscientious fulfilment of duty in the Christian life, which, though it must receive recognition in the end, gives no claim on God as one who rewards of debt, nor allows the worker to glory over another who has been less richly furnished with opportunity.
Literature.—On the ‘burden’ of Matthew 11:28-30 ref. may be made to Expos. Times, iii. [2] p. 348 ff., xi. [3]. p. 101 ff.
David M. W. Laird.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Burden
Burden. Is often used figuratively, to denote afflictions, failings, sins, Psalms 38:4; Psalms 55:22; Galatians 6:2; services under the law, Matthew 23:4; official responsibilities, Exodus 18:22; Deuteronomy 1:12; and especially prophetic massages, not always of a threatening character. Isaiah 19:1. In this last sense the Hebrew word may be rendered "oracle." "divine declaration," or "prophecy," as in Proverbs 30:1; Proverbs 31:1. See Jeremiah 23:33-40.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Burden, Burdened, Burdensome
A — 1: βάρος (Strong's #922 — — baros — bar'-os ) denotes "a weight, anything pressing on one physically," Matthew 20:12 , or "that makes a demand on one's resources," whether material, 1 Thessalonians 2:6 (to be burdensome), or spiritual, Galatians 6:2 ; Revelation 2:24 , or religious, Acts 15:28 . In one place it metaphorically describes the future state of believers as "an eternal weight of glory," 2 Corinthians 4:17 . See WEIGHT.
A — 2: φορτίον (Strong's #5413 — Noun Neuter — phortion — for-tee'-on ) lit., "something carried" (from phero, "to bear"), is always used metaphorically (except in Acts 27:10 , of the lading of a ship); of that which, though "light," is involved in discipleship of Christ, Matthew 11:30 ; of tasks imposed by the scribes, Pharisees and lawyers, Matthew 23:4 ; Luke 11:46 ; of that which will be the result, at the judgment-seat of Christ, of each believer's work, Galatians 6:5 .
Note: The difference between phortion and baros is, that phortion is simply "something to be borne," without reference to its weight, but baros always suggests what is "heavy or burdensome." Thus Christ speaks of His "burden" (phortion) as "light;" here baros would be inappropriate; but the "burden" of a transgressor is baros, "heavy." Contrast baros in Galatians 6:2 , with phortion in Galatians 6:5 .
A — 3: γόμος (Strong's #1117 — Noun Masculine — gomos — gom'-os ) from a root gem---, signifying "full, or heavy," seen in gemo, "to be full," gemizo, "to fill," Lat. gemo, "to groan," denotes "the lading of freight of a ship," Acts 21:3 , or "merchandise conveyed in a ship," and so "merchandise in general," Revelation 18:11,12 . See MERCHANDISE.
B — 1: βαρέω (Strong's #916 — Verb — bareo — bar-eh'-o ) akin to A, No. 1, is used of the effect of drowsiness, "were heavy," Matthew 26:43 ; Mark 14:40 ; Luke 9:32 ; of the effects of gluttony, Luke 21:34 ("overcharged"); of the believer's present physical state in the body, 2 Corinthians 5:4 ; of persecution, 2 Corinthians 1:8 ; of a charge upon material resources, 1 Timothy 5:16 (RV). See CHARGE , HEAVY PRESS.
B — 2: ἐπιβαρέω (Strong's #1912 — Verb — epibareo — ep-ee-bar-eh'-o ) epi, "upon" (intensive), "to burden heavily," is said of material RV, "burden," AV, "be chargeable to;" of the effect of spiritual admonition and discipline, 2 Corinthians 2:5 , RV, "press heavily," AV, "overcharge." See CHARGEABLE , PRESS.
B — 3: καταβαρέω (Strong's #2599 — Verb — katabareo — kat-ab-ar-eh'-o ) "to weigh down" (kata, "down"), "overload," is used of material charges, in 2 Corinthians 12:16 .
B — 4: καταναρκάω (Strong's #2655 — Verb — katanarkao — kat-an-ar-kah'-o ) "to be a burden, to be burdensome," primarily signifies "to be numbed or torpid, to grow stiff" (narke is the "torpedo or cramp fish," which benumbs anyone who touches it); hence, "to be idle to the detriment of another person" (like a useless limb), 2 Corinthians 11:9 ; 12:13,14 . See CHARGEABLE.
Note: For thlipsis, "distress, affliction," "burdened" (AV of 2 Corinthians 8:13 ) see AFFLICTION , B. No. 4.
C — 1: ἀβαρής (Strong's #4 — Adjective — abares — ab-ar-ace' ) "without weight" (a, negative, and baros, "see" A, No. 1), is used in 2 Corinthians 11:9 , lit. "I kept myself burdensomeless."
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Burden
A weight or load, on body or soul; often used figuratively, to denote afflictions, failings, sins, Psalm 38:4 55:22 Galatians 6:2 ; services under law, Matthew 23:4 ; official responsibilities, Exodus 18:22 Deuteronomy 1:12 ; and especially prophetic messages, not always of a threatening character, Isaiah 19:1 . In this last sense the Hebrew word may be rendered "oracle," "divine declaration," or "prophecy," as in Proverbs 31:31,1 .
King James Dictionary - Burden
BURD'EN, n. burd'n written also burthen. L. fero,or porto.
1. That which is borne or carried a load. Hence, 2. That which is borne with labor or difficulty that which is grievous, wearisome or oppressive. 3. A birth. 4. The verse repeated in a song, or the return of the theme at the end of each verse the chorus so called from the application of this word to the drone or base, and the pipe or string which plays it, in an instrument. A chord which is to be divided, to perform the intervals of music,when open and undivided, is also called the burden. 5. In common language, that which is often repeated a subject on which one dwells. 6. A fixed quantity of certain commodities as a burden of gad steel, 120 pounds. 7. The contents of a ship the quantity or number of tons, a vessel will carry as a ship of a hundred tons burden. 8. A club. Not in use. BURD'EN, burd'n. To load to lay on a heavy load to incumber with weight. Hence,
1. To oppress with any thing grievous as, to burden a nation with taxes. 2. To surcharge as, to burden the memory.

Sentence search

Issachar - Genesis 49:14 (c) He is a type of the Lord JESUS bearing GOD's Burden for man and man's Burden for sin, thus making it possible for man to rest. Also a type of the Christian who bears GOD's Burden for the lost and man's Burden in his need of rest and redemption
Unburden - ) To throw off, as a Burden; to unload. ) To relieve from a Burden
Burden - In the Old Testament the English word "burden" is translated from the Hebrew word massa [ Exodus 23:5 ). Another kind of Burden is described in Numbers 11:11,17 , where Moses is bearing the Burden of the people and the Lord tells him to gather the seventy elders so that "they will help you carry the Burden of the people. " In that instance, the Burden is not physical but psychological and spiritual. David uses the word in the same way when he is leaving Jerusalem and says to Hushai, "If you go with me, you will be a Burden to me" (2 Samuel 15:33 ). Job asks God if he has become a Burden to him (7:20). Recent translations have tended to render the word "oracle" instead of "burden. " The basic concept seems to be that Israel's sinful actions have caused God to be Burdened. ...
In the New Testament phortion [1], the Greek word used for Burden, denotes the troubles of this life. In Matthew 23:4 Jesus describes the heavy Burdens the Pharisees laid upon the people "but they themselves are not willing to lift a finger to move them. " Obviously this is a Burden of legalism. Jesus uses the same word to describe his Burden in Matthew 11:30 : "My yoke is easy and my Burden is light. " The reason for having a light Burden is described in the previous verse: "I am gentle and humble in heart. " Burdens will come in this life but they will be light if we have Jesus' approach to life
Lading - Loading charging with a Burden or freight throwing or dipping out. That which constitutes a load or cargo freight Burden as the lading of a ship
Disburden - ) To rid of a Burden; to free from a load borne or from something oppressive; to unload; to disencumber; to relieve. ) To relieve one's self of a Burden; to ease the mind
Mesha - Burden; salvation
Lading - 1: φορτίον (Strong's #5413 — Noun Neuter — phortion — for-tee'-on ) "a Burden, load" (a diminutive of phortos, "a load," from phero, "to bear"), is used of the cargo of a ship, Acts 27:10 , "lading," (some mss. See Burden , A, No
Burthen - ) See Burden
Burdened - ) of Burden...
Onus - ) A Burden; an obligation
Burdening - ) of Burden...
Onerate - ) To load; to Burden
Onerary - ) Fitted for, or carrying, a Burden
Burden - ) The capacity of a vessel, or the weight of cargo that she will carry; as, a ship of a hundred tons Burden. ) A fixed quantity of certain commodities; as, a Burden of gad steel, 120 pounds. Hence: That which is often repeated or which is dwelt upon; the main topic; as, the Burden of a prayer. ) To oppress with anything grievous or trying; to overload; as, to Burden a nation with taxes. ) To impose, as a load or Burden; to lay or place as a Burden (something heavy or objectionable)
Jument - ) A beast; especially, a beast of Burden
Holcad - ) A large ship of Burden, in ancient Greece
Exonerative - ) Freeing from a Burden or obligation; tending to exonerate
Bondage - 1 Corinthians 7:15 (a) This refers to the Burden of trying to observe a course of conduct when it is really unnecessary to do so. ...
Galatians 5:1 (a) Here we see the Burden of trying to keep the law to be saved when there is always a conscious knowledge that it is being broken
Burden - A chord which is to be divided, to perform the intervals of music,when open and undivided, is also called the Burden. A fixed quantity of certain commodities as a Burden of gad steel, 120 pounds. The contents of a ship the quantity or number of tons, a vessel will carry as a ship of a hundred tons Burden. To oppress with any thing grievous as, to Burden a nation with taxes. To surcharge as, to Burden the memory
Unfraught - ) Removed, as a Burden; unloaded. ) Not fraught; not Burdened
Thrack - ) To load or Burden; as, to thrack a man with property
Laden - Loaded charged with a Burden or freight. Oppressed Burdened
Imposed - Laid on, as a tax,burden, duty or penalty enjoined
Mesha - The name hath been thought to signify Burden
Overcharge - ) To charge or load too heavily; to Burden; to oppress; to cloy. ) An excessive load or Burden
Colstaff - ) A staff by means of which a Burden is borne by two persons on their shoulders
Accloy - ) To fill to satiety; to stuff full; to clog; to overload; to Burden
Load - Maśśâ' (מַשָּׂא, Strong's #4853), “load; Burden; tribute; delight. ...
The word means that which is borne by a man, an ass, a mule, or a camel: “If thou see the ass of him that hateth thee lying under his Burden, and wouldest forbear to help him …” ( Burden they are too heavy for me” ( Burdensome, a hardship. Moses asked God: “… Wherefore have I not found favor in thy sight, that thou layest the Burden of all this people upon me?” ( Burden and an oracle
Fardel - ) A bundle or little pack; hence, a Burden
Hamal - ) In Turkey and other Oriental countries, a porter or Burden bearer; specif
Dildo - ) A Burden in popular songs
Dedanim - People mentioned in the 'burden upon Arabia
Burden - Besides the common use of this word, it occurs at the commencement of several prophecies; as 'The Burden of Babylon,' 'the Burden of Moab. ' The word occurs also in Jeremiah 23:33-38 , where it is 'the Burden of the Lord
Cumbrance - That which obstructs, retards, or renders motion or action difficult and toilsome Burden encumbrance hindrance oppressive load embarrassment
Ulla - (uhl' luh) Personal name meaning, “burden” or “yoke
Undersong - ) The Burden of a song; the chorus; the refrain
Burden - BURDEN. (Matthew 11:28; Matthew 11:30), the ‘burden’ (φορτἰον) is that of the legal and Pharisaic ordinances of such a minute and exacting kind that they became intolerable and crushed out real heart-religion. ‘My Burden,’ Christ says, ‘is light’ in comparison with these; for I put men under the law of love, which is a law of liberty. While, in the first instance, Christ meant by ‘burden’ the Pharisaic ordinances, the truth would become ever deeper to His disciples, till they understood the full contrast between the fulfilment of legal precepts through painful effort, and the joyous service of a living God and Father, growing into pervading holiness of character. ...
The ‘burden (βάρος)* Loading - ) A load; cargo; Burden
Giant - Emblem in art associated with Saint Christopher by reason of his supposed gigantic stature; possibly figuratively, symbolic of the excessive weight of his Burden, Christ
Encumbrance - ) That which encumbers; a Burden which impedes action, or renders it difficult and laborious; a clog; an impediment
Unlade - To unload to remove, as a load or Burden
Fraught - ) To freight; to load; to Burden; to fill; to crowd
Bourdon - See Burden (of a song
Amasiah - Burden of (i
Lading - ) That which lades or constitutes a load or cargo; freight; Burden; as, the lading of a ship
Mas'sa - (burden ), a son of Ishmael
Lighten - ) To make less Burdensome or afflictive; to alleviate; as, to lighten the cares of life or the Burden of grief. ) To make lighter, or less heavy; to reduce in weight; to relieve of part of a load or Burden; as, to lighten a ship by unloading; to lighten a load or Burden
Holding - The Burden or chorus of a song
Blanket Clause - A clause, as in a blanket mortgage or policy, that includes a group or class of things, rather than a number mentioned individually and having the Burden, loss, or the like, apportioned among them
Fading - ) An Irish dance; also, the Burden of a song
Warrandice - ) The obligation by which a person, conveying a subject or a right, is bound to uphold that subject or right against every claim, challenge, or Burden arising from circumstances prior to the conveyance; warranty
Ketch - ) An almost obsolete form of vessel, with a mainmast and a mizzenmast, - usually from one hundred to two hundred and fifty tons Burden
Grievousness - Oppressiveness weight that gives pain or distress as the grievousness of a Burden
Ritornello - ) A short return or repetition; a concluding symphony to an air, often consisting of the Burden of the song
Carriage - In the Bible, usually means the baggage which formed the Burden of a man of beast, Acts 21:15
Exemption - ) The act of exempting; the state of being exempt; freedom from any charge, Burden, evil, etc
Unlade - ) To unload; to remove, or to have removed, as a load or a Burden; to discharge
Llama - It was formerly much used as a beast of Burden in the Andes
Carriage - ) A wheeled vehicle carrying a fixed Burden, as a gun carriage. ) That which is carried; Burden; baggage
Ton - ) Forty cubic feet of space, being the unit of measurement of the Burden, or carrying capacity, of a vessel; as a vessel of 300 tons Burden
Tax - ) A disagreeable or Burdensome duty or charge; as, a heavy tax on time or health. ) A charge or Burden laid upon persons or property for the support of a government. ) To subject to the payment of a tax or taxes; to impose a tax upon; to lay a Burden upon; especially, to exact money from for the support of government. ) A charge, especially a pecuniary Burden which is imposed by authority
Relieve - ) To free, wholly or partly, from any Burden, trial, evil, distress, or the like; to give ease, comfort, or consolation to; to give aid, help, or succor to; to support, strengthen, or deliver; as, to relieve a besieged town. ) To release from a post, station, or duty; to put another in place of, or to take the place of, in the bearing of any Burden, or discharge of any duty. ) To ease of any imposition, Burden, wrong, or oppression, by judicial or legislative interposition, as by the removal of a grievance, by indemnification for losses, or the like; to right. ) To raise or remove, as anything which depresses, weighs down, or crushes; to render less Burdensome or afflicting; to alleviate; to abate; to mitigate; to lessen; as, to relieve pain; to relieve the wants of the poor
Burden - One Burden is the load that the Christian has for the glory of GOD and His work; the other is the Burden He has for man's need of salvation and relief. He is described as being strong because the Spirit of GOD gives the strength necessary bearing both of these Burdens. He too bowed down to bear the Burden of GOD's relationship to the people and the relationship of the people to GOD. Some Burdens are liabilities - some are assets. In this case, the Burden was left but the person was removed from it, and became a singing, rejoicing believer even though the Burden remained. There is no way of removing that Burden, but GOD does provide that the hearts of the parents may be radiant, happy and trustful even though the sorrow remains. ...
Isaiah 15:1 (a) Here the Burden is the sad story of GOD's judgments upon Moab. Frequently when GOD told of the punishment He was preparing to mete out to the enemy, the story is described as a "burden
Cadge - ) To carry, as a Burden
Holding - ) The Burden or chorus of a song
Burden - Burden . ’ It has the two senses of an actual Burden and a prophetic utterance. ]'>[1] puts ‘oracle’ in the text and ‘burden’ in the margin), and the word-play in Jeremiah 23:33 ff. involves a reproof of the men who were disposed to regard the oracle of God as literally a Burden. ‘Burden’ in this second usage denotes simply something taken up solemnly upon the lips, both weighty in itself and weighty in its communication. Two other kinds of Burdens with their right treatment are contrasted
Amasa - Amasa (ăm'a-sah), Burden
Rehoboam - While at Shechem for his crowning ceremony as king over Israel (1 Kings 12:1 ), the people asked Rehoboam if he would remove some of the tax Burden and labor laws which his father had placed on them. Instead of taking the advice of the older men, he acted on the counsel of those who wanted to increase further the Burden
Encumber - ) To impede the motion or action of, as with a Burden; to retard with something superfluous; to weigh down; to obstruct or embarrass; as, his movements were encumbered by his mantle; his mind is encumbered with useless learning
Weigh, Weight, Weighty, Weightier - A — 1: βαρέω (Strong's #916 — Verb — bareo — bar-eh'-o ) "to weigh down," is so rendered in 2 Corinthians 1:8 , RV; see Burden , B, No. See Burden , A, No
Dromedary - It is a common beast of Burden in Egypt, Syria, and the neighboring countries
Midst - ) Hence, figuratively, the condition of being surrounded or beset; the press; the Burden; as, in the midst of official duties; in the midst of secular affairs
Amasa - Burden
Allege - ) To alleviate; to lighten, as a Burden or a trouble
Refrain - ) The Burden of a song; a phrase or verse which recurs at the end of each of the separate stanzas or divisions of a poetic composition
Oppress - To load or Burden with unreasonable impositions to treat with unjust severity, rigor or hardship as, to oppress a nation with taxes or contributions to oppress one by compelling him to perform unreasonable service. To overpower to overburden as, to be oppressed with grief
Dumah - The place mentioned in the "burden" of the prophet (Isaiah 21:11 ) is Edom or Idumea
Cast - Someone has said, "Take your Burden baggage to GOD's depot, and check it
Carriage - Amos 5:26 ) are now 'lifted up as loads' to be carried on beasts of Burden
Thick - ...
1 Kings 12:10 (b) This type is used by Rehoboam to describe the great increase of tax Burden and other Burdens which he intended to impose upon Israel
Burden - Burden
Overcharge - To Burden
Shoulder - To give or lend the shoulder for the bearing of a Burden, signifies to submit to servitude. And Isaiah 10:27 , comforting Israel with the promise of deliverance from Assyria, says, "His Burden shall be taken away from off thy shoulder
Lighten - To make lighter to reduce in weight to make less heavy as, to lighten a ship by unloading to lighten a load or Burden. To alleviate to make less Burdensome or afflictive as, to lighten the cares of life to lighten the Burden of grief
Burden, Burdened, Burdensome - A — 1: βάρος (Strong's #922 — — baros — bar'-os ) denotes "a weight, anything pressing on one physically," Matthew 20:12 , or "that makes a demand on one's resources," whether material, 1 Thessalonians 2:6 (to be Burdensome), or spiritual, Galatians 6:2 ; Revelation 2:24 , or religious, Acts 15:28 . ...
Note: The difference between phortion and baros is, that phortion is simply "something to be borne," without reference to its weight, but baros always suggests what is "heavy or Burdensome. " Thus Christ speaks of His "burden" (phortion) as "light;" here baros would be inappropriate; but the "burden" of a transgressor is baros, "heavy. ...
B — 2: ἐπιβαρέω (Strong's #1912 — Verb — epibareo — ep-ee-bar-eh'-o ) epi, "upon" (intensive), "to Burden heavily," is said of material RV, "burden," AV, "be chargeable to;" of the effect of spiritual admonition and discipline, 2 Corinthians 2:5 , RV, "press heavily," AV, "overcharge. ...
B — 4: καταναρκάω (Strong's #2655 — Verb — katanarkao — kat-an-ar-kah'-o ) "to be a Burden, to be Burdensome," primarily signifies "to be numbed or torpid, to grow stiff" (narke is the "torpedo or cramp fish," which benumbs anyone who touches it); hence, "to be idle to the detriment of another person" (like a useless limb), 2 Corinthians 11:9 ; 12:13,14 . ...
Note: For thlipsis, "distress, affliction," "burdened" (AV of 2 Corinthians 8:13 ) see AFFLICTION , B. "I kept myself Burdensomeless
Innocent ix, Pope - Previous to his election he had been Bishop of Nicastro, nuncio to Venice, and cardinal-priest, and had borne the Burden of papal administration during the reign of Gregory XIV
Ballet - ) A light part song, or madrigal, with a fa la Burden or chorus, - most common with the Elizabethan madrigal composers
Parbuckle - ) A kind of purchase for hoisting or lowering a cylindrical Burden, as a cask
Carriages - The load or Burden of man or beast; baggage, Isaiah 10:28 : or mat on which anything is carried, 1 Samuel 17:22
Refrain - The Burden of a song a kind of musical repetition
Load - ) That which Burdens, oppresses, or grieves the mind or spirits; as, a load of care. ) A Burden; that which is laid on or put in anything for conveyance; that which is borne or sustained; a weight; as, a heavy load. ) To lay a load or Burden on or in, as on a horse or in a cart; to charge with a load, as a gun; to furnish with a lading or cargo, as a ship; hence, to add weight to, so as to oppress or embarrass; to heap upon
Ass - The tame or domestic ass is patient to stupidity, and carries a heavy Burden
Tonnage - ) The cubical content or Burden of a vessel, or vessels, in tons; or, the amount of weight which one or several vessels may carry
Inn - Cattle and beasts of Burden could be sheltered there, and this word must thereby be distinguished from No
World: a Huge Desert - Some are at rest because they never look beyond the borders of the church, but those whose sympathies reach to all humanity will have to carry a life-long 'burden of the Lord
Privilege - ) A peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor; a right or immunity not enjoyed by others or by all; special enjoyment of a good, or exemption from an evil or Burden; a prerogative; advantage; franchise
Dumah - Isaiah 21:11 (a) The meaning of this word is "the Burden of silence
Beast - Any four footed animal, which may be used for labor, food or sport distinguished from fowls, insects, fishes and man as beasts of Burden, beasts of the chase, beasts of the forest
Hypocrisy - Hypocrisy is the necessary Burden of villainy
Carriage - In Isaiah 46:1 (RSV, "the things that ye carried about") the word means a load for a beast of Burden
Lade - To load to put on or in, as a Burden or freight
am'Asa - (a Burden )
Amasa - (uh may' ssawee) Personal name meaning, “burden” or “bear a Burden
Massa - (mass' ssuh) Hebrew term meaning “burden
Borne - They made their religious life a Burden and a grief instead of a joy and a blessing
Unload - ) To discharge or remove, as a load or a Burden; as, to unload the cargo of a vessel. ) To take the load from; to discharge of a load or cargo; to disburden; as, to unload a ship; to unload a beast
Light, Lighten - A — 1: ἐλαφρός (Strong's #1645 — Adjective — elaphros — el-af-ros' ) "light in weight, easy to bear," is used of the Burden imparted by Christ, Matthew 11:30 ; of affliction, 2 Corinthians 4:17
Task - Burdensome employment. To Burden with some employment to require to perform
el'Iphaz - On him falls the main Burden of the argument, that God's retribution in this world is perfect and certain, and that consequently suffering must be a proof of previous sin
Load - A Burden that which is laid on or put in any thing for conveyance. Any heavy Burden a large quantity borne or sustained. To lay on a Burden to put on or in something to be carried, or as much as can be carried as, to load a camel or a horse to load a cart or wagon
Amasai - (uh massh' awee) Personal name meaning, “burden bearer
Nahum, Book of - To console his people he foretells the fall of Ninive, hence the title, "Burden of Ninive," a book of vision
Lindisfarne Gospels - , my yoke is sweet and my Burden is light (Matthew 11)
Atlas - ) One who sustains a great Burden
Relieve - To free, wholly or partially, from pain, grief, want, anxiety, care, toil, trouble, Burden, oppression or any thing that is considered to be an evil to ease of any thing that pains the body or distresses the mind. To right to ease of any Burden, wrong or oppression by judicial or legislative interposition, by the removal of a grievance, by indemnification for losses and the like
Publican - In New Testament times these taxes were paid to the Romans, and hence were regarded by the Jews as a very heavy Burden, and hence also the collectors of taxes, who were frequently Jews, were hated, and were usually spoken of in very opprobrious terms
Contrite - This word signifies beaten or bruised, as with hard blows, or an heaver Burden; and so in Scripture language imports one whose heart is broken and wounded for sin, on opposition to the heart of stone, Is
Agur - Called "the prophecy;" rather "the weighty utterance" (Hebrew massa ), "burden
Acquit - ) To set free, release or discharge from an obligation, duty, liability, Burden, or from an accusation or charge; - now followed by of before the charge, formerly by from; as, the jury acquitted the prisoner; we acquit a man of evil intentions
Amos - Amos (â'mos), Burden
Hushai - David suggested that if he went with him he would be a Burden to him; but that he might do him important service if he should remain in Absalom's suite as an adviser
Shoulder - ) To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the Burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. ) The flesh and muscles connected with the shoulder joint; the upper part of the back; that part of the human frame on which it is most easy to carry a heavy Burden; - often used in the plural
Chasuble - Putting it on the priest says: ...
"Lord, who didst say, My yoke is sweet and My Burden light, grant that I may so bear it as to obtain Thy grace
Abasement: to be Rejoiced in - When Latimer resigned his bishopric, Foxe tells us that as he put off his rochet from his shoulders he gave a skip on the floor for joy, 'feeling his shoulders so light at being discharged of such a Burden
Heaviness - Weight Burden oppression as, the heaviness of taxes
a'Mos - (burden ), native of Tekoa in Judah, about six miles south of Bethlehem, originally a shepherd and dresser of sycamore trees, who was called by God s Spirit to be a prophet, although not trained in any of the regular prophetic schools
Discharge - ) To relieve of a charge, load, or Burden; to empty of a load or cargo; to unburden; to unload; as, to discharge a vessel. ) To put forth, or remove, as a charge or Burden; to take out, as that with which anything is loaded or filled; as, to discharge a cargo. ) To throw off or deliver a load, charge, or Burden; to unload; to emit or give vent to fluid or other contents; as, the water pipe discharges freely. ) The act of discharging; the act of relieving of a charge or load; removal of a load or Burden; unloading; as, the discharge of a ship; discharge of a cargo
Countenance - ...
Proverbs 15:13 (c) Here is indicated that the Burden has been lifted from the soul and the heart has been made glad
Beneath - Under lower in place, with something directly over or on, as to place a cushion beneath one often with the sense of pressure or oppression, as to sink beneath a Burden, in a literal sense
Share - He bears his share of the Burden
Ass - Genesis 49:14 (a) Here we have a type of the consecrated believer who is willing to be a Burden bearer for GOD and for man. He bears the Burdens of GOD's people, and carries them to GOD. He bears the Burden of GOD's message, and carries it to the people. Certainly He is our Burden bearer; he bears the Burden of our relationship to GOD, and also our relationship to other people. He too sees that rest is good, and calls on us to cast every Burden upon Him, so that we may be free ourselves to carry the Burdens of others
Clog - ) To Burden; to trammel; to embarrass; to perplex
Exempt - ) Free, or released, from some liability to which others are subject; excepted from the operation or Burden of some law; released; free; clear; privileged; - (with from): not subject to; not liable to; as, goods exempt from execution; a person exempt from jury service
Carriage - That which is carried Burden as baggage, vessels, furniture, &c
Crush - ) To oppress or Burden grievously
Prayer: Its Power Against Satan - Such was the power of her prayer, that the demon dropped his Burden at once, and there it lies, an indisputable proof that the devil IS no match for old ladies who know how to invoke the aid of heaven
Cast Down - 55:22: “Cast thy Burden upon the Lord
Earth - Naaman asked for two mules' Burden of earth (2 Kings 5:17 ), under the superstitious notion that Jehovah, like the gods of the heathen, could be acceptably worshipped only on his own soil
Lade, Laden - " See Burden
ke'Dar - The "glory of Kedar" is recorded by the prophet Isaiah, (Isaiah 21:13-17 ) in the Burden upon Arabia; and its importance may also be inferred from the "princes of Kedar" mentioned by Ezekiel, (Ezekiel 27:21 ) as well as the pastoral character of the tribe
Carry - ) To have or hold as a Burden, while moving from place to place; to have upon or about one's person; to bear; as, to carry a wound; to carry an unborn child. ) To bear the charges or Burden of holding or having, as stocks, merchandise, etc
Last - ) A load; a heavy Burden; hence, a certain weight or measure, generally estimated at 4,000 lbs. ) The Burden of a ship; a cargo
Disorderly - ...
C — 1: ἀτακτέω (Strong's #812 — Verb — atakteo — at-ak-teh'-o ) signifies "to be out of rank, out of one's place, undisciplined, to behave disorderly:" in the military sense, "to break rank;" negatively in 2 Thessalonians 3:7 , of the example set by the Apostle and his fellow missionaries, in working for their bread while they were at Thessalonica so as not to Burden the saints
Pelican - Then it flies away inland with its Burden, for which purpose it is provided with enormous wings
Sighing - In the first, the healing of the deaf and dumb man, our Lord felt the Burden of the disease which He was about to cure
Weight - Pressure Burden as the weight of grief weight of care weight of business weight of government
the - The fig tree putteth forth her green figs the almond tree shall flourish the grasshopper shall be a Burden
Thyatira - I will put upon you none other Burden (save abstinence from and protestation against these abominations: this the seducers regarded as an intolerable Burden, see Matthew 11:30); but that which ye have hold fast until I come
Congregation - "...
Moses selected 70 elders by God's appointment to share the Burden of government with him (Numbers 11:16)
Nebo (2) - is prostrate, "a Burden to the weary beast" of the conqueror who carried the idol away; so far was Nebo from saving Babylon (Isaiah 46:1; 1 Samuel 5:3-4; Psalms 20:8)
Earth - Naaman desired to have two mules' Burden of earth of the Holy Land ('Εretz Ιsrael ), whether for an altar or other sacred purpose (Exodus 20:24), a half-paganish nation that God would accept devotions in connection with that soil rather than with any other
Rasshopper - ...
Ecclesiastes 12:5 (b) The aged person cannot endure the slightest Burden
Woman - It was the Burden of the nation, as it still is
Issachar - He is, indeed, "the rest wherewith he causeth the weary to rest" from the Burden
Release - Liberation from care, pain or any Burden
Moment - , 'light Burden,' the adjective elaphron, "light,' being used as a noun) of (our) affliction
Oppression - The sense of this oppression could not exist without an earnest desire to be rid of the Burden, and it was this desire that was a sign of a tendency towards a higher life
Heavy - ) Not easy to bear; Burdensome; oppressive; hard to endure or accomplish; hence, grievous, afflictive; as, heavy yokes, expenses, undertakings, trials, news, etc. ) Laden with that which is weighty; encumbered; Burdened; bowed down, either with an actual Burden, or with care, grief, pain, disappointment
Impose - To lay on to set on to lay on, as a Burden, tax, toll, duty or penalty. God imposes no Burdens on men which they are unable to bear
Charge - To lead or Burden to throw on or impose that which oppresses as, to charge the stomach with indigestible food or to lay on, or to fill, without oppressing as, to charge the memory with rules and precepts to charge the mid with facts. That which is laid on or in in a general sense, any load or Burden. Imposition on land or estate rent, tax, or whatever constitutes a Burden or duty
Beast - This word is used of flocks or herds of grazing animals (Exodus 22:5 ; Numbers 20:4,8,11 ; Psalm 78:48 ); of beasts of Burden (Genesis 45:17 ); of eatable beasts (Proverbs 9:2 ); and of swift beasts or dromedaries (Isaiah 60:6 )
Balances - Job 6:2 (b) Job is indicating that GOD knows just how heavy each Burden is and each sorrow
Easy - Not heavy or Burdensome. My yoke is easy, and my Burden light
Shift - ) To change the place of; to move or remove from one place to another; as, to shift a Burden from one shoulder to another; to shift the blame
Heavy, Heaviness - See Burden
Camel - The camel was early used both for riding and as a beast of Burden (Genesis 24:64 ; 37:25 ), and in war (1 Samuel 30:17 ; Isaiah 21:7 ). Benhadad of Damascus also sent a present to Elisha, "forty camels' Burden" (2 Kings 8:9 )
Gift - The mode of presentation was with as much parade as possible: the presents were conveyed by the hands of servants (Judges 3:18 ), or still better, on the backs of beasts of Burden (2 Kings 8:9 )
Sorrow, Sorrowful - ...
C — 2: ἄλυπος (Strong's #253 — Adjective — alupos — al-oo-pot'-er-os ) denotes "free from grief" (a, negative, lupe, "grief"), comparative degree in Philippians 2:28 , "less sorrowful," their joy would mean the removal of a Burden from his heart
Weight - ) Hence, pressure; Burden; as, the weight of care or business
Saddle - ) Hence: To fix as a charge or Burden upon; to load; to encumber; as, to saddle a town with the expense of bridges and highways
Herd - (32:14; 2 Samuel 17:29 ) The agricultural and general usefulness of the ox in ploughing, threshing, and as a beast of Burden, (1 Chronicles 12:40 ; Isaiah 46:1 ) made a slaughtering of him seem wasteful
Condition - ) To invest with, or limit by, conditions; to Burden or qualify by a condition; to impose or be imposed as the condition of
Wind - winds are frequent; blowing from the deserts, their dry heat causes the furniture to crack, and makes life a Burden ( Hosea 13:15 )
Bands - ...
(IV) The bands tying the yoke to the neck of a beast of Burden is the image of the captivity in which Jerusalem and Israel have been held, and from which Christ shall free them at His glorious coming (Ezekiel 34:27; Isaiah 28:22; Isaiah 52:2); also the captivity to Satan of the spiritual Israel, from which Christ releases us
Heaven: to be Shut Out of at Last - On one occasion the Burden of the Lord pressed upon his servant with more than ordinary severity, and anxious to deliver it and clear his soul, he detained his hearers a little beyond the time, and consequently had to hurry to the chapel
Herd - The full grown ox was seldom slaughtered, being more useful for plowing, threshing, and carrying Burdens. Isaiah 30:24, "clean (chamits , 'salted') provender," or well fermented maslin, composed of grain, beans, vetches, hay, and salt, which beasts of Burden in the East relish
Wheel - ) The Burden or refrain of a song
Labor - ) To be oppressed with difficulties or disease; to do one's work under conditions which make it especially hard, wearisome; to move slowly, as against opposition, or under a Burden; to be Burdened; - often with under, and formerly with of
Pack - A Burden or load as a pack of sorrows
Ox - ; as beasts of Burden, (1 Chronicles 12:40 ) their flesh was eaten, (14:4; 1 Kings 1:9 ) etc
Zechariah - It consists of two Burdens. ...
The first Burden (ch. ...
The second Burden (ch
Charge - ) To lay on or impose, as a load, tax, or Burden; to load; to fill. ) Whatever constitutes a Burden on property, as rents, taxes, lines, etc
Camel - dromedarius is kept chiefly for Burden-bearing, and enormous are the loads of corn, wood, charcoal, stone, furniture, etc. The special adaptation of the camel to its surroundings lies in its compound stomach, two compartments of which, the rumen and the reticulum , are especially constructed for the storage of a reserve supply of water; its hump, which though useful to man for attachment of Burdens and saddles, is primarily a reserve store of fat; and its wonderful fibrous padded feet adapted to the softest sandy soil. The camel is thus able to go longer without food and drink than any other Burden-bearing animal, and is able to traverse deserts quite unadapted to the slender foot of the horse and the ass
Naaman - " And it should seem the two mules Burden of earth, he begged permission to take home with him to Syria, were intended after each renewed instance of bowing in the house of Rimmon, to be used by way of cleansing from their sin. I do not decide upon the subject, but as we know from historians that the sprinkling of earth where no water was immediately at hand, was occasionally used in the Eastern countries, in their religious services in the stead of water, it is probable, this might be the object Naaman had in view, in craving the indulgence of carrying home two mules' Burden with him
Ass - Beast of Burden and wild animal to KJV but translated, “donkey” in most modern translations. athon is a female animal used for riding ( Genesis 49:11 ; Numbers 22:21-33 ; Judges 5:10 ; 2 Kings 4:22 ) and as a beast of Burden (Genesis 45:23 ). It was both a riding animal (Genesis 22:3 ) and a beast of Burden (Genesis 42:26 ), which could be used for plowing (Deuteronomy 22:10 , which forbids yoking an ass with an ox)
Minister - On his back he bears a Burden of water, and in his hand a rack of bottles containing essences to flavour the draught if needed, and glasses to hold the cooling liquid. The present specimen of water-dealers is a poor old man bent sideways, by the weight of his daily Burden. At our call he stops immediately, glad to drop his Burden on the ground, and smiling in prospect of a customer. How forcibly it calls to our mind the Saviour's favourite imagery, in which he compares the grace which he bestows on all who diligently seek it, to 'living water;' and how much that old man is like the faithful preacher of the word, who, having filled his vessel at the well, wears himself out by continually bearing the Burden of the Lord, and crying, 'Water! water!' amid crowds of sinners, who must drink or die
Scribe - Life under them became a Burden; they themselves sought to evade certain of their own precepts, Matthew 23:16 ,ff
Gentleness - Compassion prompts us to relieve their wants; forbearance prevents us from retaliating their injuries: meekness restrains our angry passions; candour our severe judgments; but gentleness corrects whatever is offensive in our manner, and, by a constant train of humane attention, studies to alleviate the Burden of common misery
Release - ) Relief from care, pain, or any Burden. ) To relieve from something that confines, Burdens, or oppresses, as from pain, trouble, obligation, penalty
Sit - ) To lie, rest, or bear; to press or weigh; - with on; as, a weight or Burden sits lightly upon him
Naaman - He asked for two mules' Burden of Canaan's earth, no doubt with the thought of making an altar therewith
Stones - In Zechariah 12:3 "I will make Jerusalem a Burdensome stone . all that Burden themselves with it shall be cut to pieces," alluding to the custom of testing youths' strength by lifting a massive stone (Matthew 21:44). The Jews "fell" on Messiah "the rock of offense and were broken"; the rock shall fall on antichrist who "burdens himself with it" by his assault on the restored Jews, and "grind him to powder" (Zechariah 13; 14)
Medes - Isaiah begins the relation at Isaiah 13:1-22 with the Burden of Babylon, and the subject continues, in respect to Israel's deliverance from Babylon, through that add the following chapter Isaiah 14:1-32
he'Brews, Epistle to the - The magnificent national temple might be put against the Hebrew Christian; and even if this affliction were not often laid upon him, yet there was a secret Burden which he bore within him, the knowledge that the end of all the beauty and awfulness of Zion was rapidly approaching
Lift - ) To move in a direction opposite to that of gravitation; to raise; to elevate; to bring up from a lower place to a higher; to upheave; sometimes implying a continued support or holding in the higher place; - said of material things; as, to lift the foot or the hand; to lift a chair or a Burden
Upon - Denoting resting, as a Burden
na'Hum - The subject of the prophecy is, in accordance with the superscription, "the Burden of Nineveh," the destruction of which he predicts
Porter - —The English word ‘porter’ is ambiguous, meaning ‘burden-bearer’ as well as ‘door-keeper
Moabite - ...
During the one hundred and fifty years which followed the defeat of the Moabites, after the death of Ahab (see Isaiah 15:1 ) delivered his "burden of Moab," predicting the coming of judgment on that land (Compare 2 Kings 17:3 ; 18:9 ; 1 Chronicles 5:25,26 )
Horse - Throughout the OT up to the Exile they appear only as war-horses; the ass, the mule, and the camel were the beasts for riding and Burden-bearing
Meekness - As the meek and gentle one, he accepted the Burden of sin on behalf of repentant sinners
Watch - ...
As to the general attitude or frame of mind in which the Church is bidden by her Lord to look for His coming, the Burden of His teaching is that ours must be the steadfast, active readiness of dutiful, trusty servants, who are not afraid of being caught idle or in mischief, when the Master appears and reveals His welcome, though awful presence
Valley - ...
Isaiah 22:1 (c) This probably represents the feelings of the prophet when he was depressed in spirit, and felt quite crushed beneath the Burden of Israel's future
Benjamin - As the soul of Rachel was departing from her body, she named her child Ben-oni; and the margin of our Bibles hath thought it proper to mark it with some degree of emphasis; the son of my sorrow, from Ben, son; and On, grief or Burden; and the pronoun I, makes it personal, my sorrow
Nail - For it should be observed, that there is nothing said of the vessels hanging upon this nail in a sure place being separated from the nail, or being injured by the nail's removal and the nail's being cut off, for the prophet adds, "that the Burden that was upon it shall be cut off;" and what is this Burden but the sins of Christ's people, "which he bore in his own body on the tree when he died, the just for the unjust, to bring us to God!" (1 Peter 3:18) "He was wounded for their transgressions, and was cut off out of the land of the living; for the transgressions of my people (saith the Holy Ghost by this same prophet) was he stricken
Bear - ...
1: βαστάζω (Strong's #941 — Verb — bastazo — bas-tad'-zo ) signifies "to support as a Burden. " It is used with the meaning (a) "to take up," as in picking up anything, stones, John 10:31 ; (b) "to carry" something, Matthew 3:11 ; Mark 14:13 ; Luke 7:14 ; 22:10 ; Acts 3:2 ; 21:35 ; Revelation 17:7 ; "to carry" on one's person, Luke 10:4 ; Galatians 6:17 ; in one's body, Luke 11:27 ; "to bear" a name in testimony, Acts 9:15 ; metaphorically, of a root "bearing" branches, Romans 11:18 ; (c) "to bear" a Burden, whether physically, as of the cross, John 19:17 , or metaphorically in respect of sufferings endured in the cause of Christ, Luke 14:27 ; Revelation 2:3 ; it is said of physical endurance, Matthew 20:12 ; of sufferings "borne" on behalf of others, Matthew 8:17 ; Romans 15:1 ; Galatians 6:2 ; of spiritual truths not able to be "borne," John 16:12 ; of the refusal to endure evil men, Revelation 2:2 ; of religious regulations imposed on others, Acts 15:10 ; of the Burden of the sentence of God to be executed in due time, Galatians 5:10 ; of the effect at the judgment seat of Christ, to be "borne" by the believer for failure in the matter of discharging the obligations of discipleship, Galatians 6:5 ; (d) to "bear" by way of carrying off, John 12:6 ; 20:15
Bear - ...
1: βαστάζω (Strong's #941 — Verb — bastazo — bas-tad'-zo ) signifies "to support as a Burden. " It is used with the meaning (a) "to take up," as in picking up anything, stones, John 10:31 ; (b) "to carry" something, Matthew 3:11 ; Mark 14:13 ; Luke 7:14 ; 22:10 ; Acts 3:2 ; 21:35 ; Revelation 17:7 ; "to carry" on one's person, Luke 10:4 ; Galatians 6:17 ; in one's body, Luke 11:27 ; "to bear" a name in testimony, Acts 9:15 ; metaphorically, of a root "bearing" branches, Romans 11:18 ; (c) "to bear" a Burden, whether physically, as of the cross, John 19:17 , or metaphorically in respect of sufferings endured in the cause of Christ, Luke 14:27 ; Revelation 2:3 ; it is said of physical endurance, Matthew 20:12 ; of sufferings "borne" on behalf of others, Matthew 8:17 ; Romans 15:1 ; Galatians 6:2 ; of spiritual truths not able to be "borne," John 16:12 ; of the refusal to endure evil men, Revelation 2:2 ; of religious regulations imposed on others, Acts 15:10 ; of the Burden of the sentence of God to be executed in due time, Galatians 5:10 ; of the effect at the judgment seat of Christ, to be "borne" by the believer for failure in the matter of discharging the obligations of discipleship, Galatians 6:5 ; (d) to "bear" by way of carrying off, John 12:6 ; 20:15
Light - A light Burden for a camel, may be insupportable to a horse. Not Burdensome easy to be lifted, borne or carried by physical strength as a light Burden, weight or load. To lighten to ease of a Burden
Elder - Seventy also were selected from the whole number to bear with Moses the Burden of the people (Numbers 11:16,17 )
Taxes - The Burden of taxation contributed to the rebellion following Solomon's death (1 Kings 12:1 )
Ill - He is able to sustain the Burden
Shoulder - Exodus 28:12 (c) By this is represented the strength and power of GOD upon which rests all the Burdens and cares of the people of GOD. It may mean also that they offer the shoulder to Him that He may put His Burdens on them. ...
Nehemiah 9:29 (b) Here is a graphic picture of the fact that Israel refused to bear GOD's Burdens, and to do His work. He may leave the affliction in the body or in the home, or in the business, but delivers His child from the Burden of it, so that he can sing and be a radiant Christian while under the difficulty
Light - ) Not heavily Burdened; not deeply laden; not sufficiently ballasted; as, the ship returned light. ) To lighten; to ease of a Burden; to take off. ) Not Burdensome; easy to be lifted, borne, or carried by physical strength; as, a light Burden, or load
Gifts - In oriental countries, the presents which are made to kings and princes are to this day, carried on beasts of Burden, are attended with a body of men, and are escorted with much pomp. It matters not how light or how small the present may be, it must either be carried on the back of a beast of Burden, or by a man, who must support it with both his hands, Judges 3:18 ; 2 Kings 8:9
Light - ) Not heavily Burdened; not deeply laden; not sufficiently ballasted; as, the ship returned light. ) To lighten; to ease of a Burden; to take off. ) Not Burdensome; easy to be lifted, borne, or carried by physical strength; as, a light Burden, or load
Naaman - ’ On Elisha’s refusing the gift offered to him, Naaman asks for two mules’ Burden of Israelitish soil upon which to worship the God of Israel; this is in entire accordance with the ideas of the time that a god of a country cannot be worshipped properly excepting upon his own soil (cf
ox, Oxen, Herd, Cattle - In 1 Chronicles 12:40 oxen are also mentioned as Burden-bearers
Eli, Eli, Lama Sabachthani - Obviously Jesus felt deserted as He bore the Burden of human sin and suffered the agony of crucifixion
Italian Band - ...
‘The whole Burden of proof, therefore, rests with those who maintain that a Cohort which was in Syria before Groaning - Not creation’s physical sufferings under the bondage of corruption, but her ‘earnest expectation’ of deliverance from it, creates the sense of almost intolerable strain; the ‘firstfruits of the Spirit’ for the moment intensify the Burden of the flesh; the deepest groanings of the saint arise from his sense of exile, from his ‘longing to be clothed upon with his habitation from heaven’ (2 Corinthians 5:2)
Mount (And Forms) - ...
Isaiah 40:4 (a) By this delightful figure the Lord is encouraging us to know that He will remove obstacles and hindrances in the Christian's life so as to make His yoke easy and His Burden light in the service which we render
Camel - They are used for riding as well as for beasts of Burden, a lighter breed being used for riding and for carrying the mails
Draught - ) The act of moving loads by drawing, as by beasts of Burden, and the like
Beast - " In Scripture it signifies, (a) a "beast" of Burden, Luke 10:34 ; Acts 23:24 , (b) "beasts" of any sort, apart from those signified by thereion (see above), 1 Corinthians 15:39 ; Revelation 18:13 , (c) animals for slaughter; this meaning is not found in the NT, but is very frequent in the Sept
Bloodguilt - Those who called for the crucifixion accepted the Burden of bloodguilt for themselves and their children (Matthew 27:25 )
Much - More than enough a heavy service or Burden
Eldad - Moses' Burden of responsibility
Amos - (meaning not clear; perhaps "a Burden") ...
Third among the Minor Prophets, a subject of the Kingdom of Juda, born Thecua, 6 miles south of Bethlehem
Assembly - 13:1-2,3 (RSV), “all the assembly of Israel” asked Rehoboam to ease the tax Burden imposed by Solomon
Free - ) Exempt; clear; released; liberated; not encumbered or troubled with; as, free from pain; free from a Burden; - followed by from, or, rarely, by of
Amos - One might graphically describe the prophet Amos as a “burden bearer. ” He carried a heavy Burden for his people. Or, from another perspective, his people were a Burden he carried
Bear - ) To suffer, as in carrying a Burden
Liberty - Jesus already teaches that His yoke is easy and His Burden light; this because He inculcates meekness and lowliness of heart a spirit like His own ( Matthew 11:29-30 )
Lawlessness - The revelation of the guiding principle summing up the Law renders light a Burden which the Pharisees made heavy (Luke 11:46)
Couch - To stoop to bend the body or back to lower in reverence, or to bend under labor, pain, or a Burden. Issachar is a strong ass, couching down between two Burdens
Beast - It signifies simply an irrational animal (2 Peter 2:12); a beast of Burden (Acts 23:24); an animal used for food (Revelation 18:13), or for sacrifice (Hebrews 13:11); or it is used as symbolizing Nature in its highest forms of nobility, strength, wisdom, and swiftness (Revelation 4:6 ff
Zechariah, the Book of - (2) The second section is entitled "The Burden of the word of Jehovah for Israel
Save - ...
Essentially the word means “to remove or seek to remove someone from a Burden, oppression, or danger. 2:17 (the first appearance of this verb) yâsha‛ signifies to remove someone from a Burden or job: “… Moses stood up and helped them, and watered their flock
Widow - In course of time these pensioners became an excessive Burden on the finances of the Church
Rehoboam - The Burden of taxation to which they had been subjected during Solomon's reign was very oppressive, and therefore the people assembled at Shechem and demanded from the king an alleviation of their Burdens
Travail - ...
Ecclesiastes 1:13 (a) Solomon seems to indicate that all kinds of labor and investigation are a Burden to men. It was most Burdensome and difficult, as he indicates by using the word travail
Isa'Iah, Book of - 13-23 contain chiefly a collection of utterances, each of which is styled a "burden," fore-telling the doom of Babylon, Philistia, Moab, Ethiopia, Egypt and Tyre. 24-27 form one prophecy, essentially connected with the preceding ten "burdens," chs
Bind, Binding - ...
6: δεσμεύω (Strong's #1195 — Verb — desmeuo — des-myoo'-o ) signifies "to put in fetters or any kind of bond," Luke 8:29 ; Acts 22:4 , or "to bind a Burden upon a person," Matthew 23:4
Grasshopper - But it is rendered grasshopper, in Ecclesiastes 12:5 , where Solomon, describing the infelicities of old age, says, "The grasshopper shall be a Burden
Noah - The words of his father Lamech at his birth (Genesis 5:29 ) have been regarded as in a sense prophetical, designating Noah as a type of Him who is the true "rest and comfort" of men under the Burden of life ( Sabbath - The OT regulations were developed and systematized to such an extent that they became a Burden upon the people (who otherwise rejoiced in the rest provided) and a byword for absurd extravagance
Dance - forming the Burden of the song, accompanied the dance (Exodus 32:18-19; 1 Samuel 18:7; 1 Samuel 21:11)
Glory - ) Thus it can refer to a heavy Burden (Exodus 18:18 ; Psalm 38:4 ; compare more idiomatic uses in Genesis 12:10 ; Genesis 47:4 ; Exodus 4:10 ; Exodus 7:14 )
Directory - In dividing the text, the minister is to regard the order of the matter more than that of the words: he is not to Burden the memory of his audience with too many divisions, nor perplex their understanding with logical phrases and terms of arts: he is not to start unnecessary objections; and he is to be very sparing in citations from ecclesiastical or other human writers, ancient or modern, &c
Discharge - To free from any load or Burden to throw off or exonerate as, discharge of business
Free - Not encumbered with as free from a Burden
Hang - ...
Life hangs upon me and becomes a Burden
Law - ...
The LAW OF LIBERTY, James 1:25 ; James 2:12 , implies that, the nature being congruous, the things enjoined, instead of being a Burden, are a pleasure
Antinomians - " "It is but the voice of a lying spirit in the hearts of believers, that saith they have yet sin wasting their consciences, and lying as a Burden too heavy for them to bear
Almond Tree - ...
The hoary head is beautifully compared by Solomon to the almond tree, covered in the earliest days of spring with its snow white flowers, before a single leaf has budded: "The almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a Burden, and desire shall fail," Ecclesiastes 12:5
Lay - ) To impose, as a Burden, suffering, or punishment; to assess, as a tax; as, to lay a tax on land
Cross - Our Savior was loaded with his cross, and as he sunk under the Burden, Simon the Cyrenian was constrained to bear it after him and with him, Mark 15:21
Oracles - This difference occurs because the Hebrew words translated “oracle” may also be translated as “burden,” “saying,” “word,” etc. Jeremiah 23:33-34 makes a play on a Hebrew word which may be translated either “burden” or “oracle. ” The NAS uses “oracle,” but the NRSV and KJV use “burden
Care - It can be seen that care to the point of Burden is intended
Nail - cut down and fall, and the Burden that was upon it shall be cut off," i
Micah, Book of - The farmers then had to rent back their land from their new masters, thereby increasing the farmers’ Burden even more
Honest - The Burden of the social-reform prophets of the OT is repeated in the denunciations of the unscrupulously rich-‘Behold, the hire of the labourers, who mowed your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth out’ (James 5:4)
Pack - ) A number or quantity equal to the contents of a pack; hence, a multitude; a Burden
Gennadius (11) Massiliensis, Presbyter of Marseilles - He recommends weekly reception of the Eucharist by all not under the Burden of mortal sin
Ass - Little colts of very tender age trot beside their mothers, and soon have small Burdens put on them. The young asses in the Bible are all apparently old enough for riding or Burden-bearing
Tongue - The association in Isaiah of God’s appearance in judgment with smoke and fire gave rise to a fine literary description of the Lord’s anger: “Behold, the name of the Lord cometh from far, burning with his anger, and the Burden thereof is heavy: his lips are full of indignation, and his tongue as a devouring fire” ( Rephidim - By his advice, which also was approved by the Lord, Moses, to relieve himself from the fatigue of administering justice to the people, the whole day, from morning until evening, instituted inferior judges or magistrates over thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, as his deputies, who were to relieve him from the Burden of judging the smaller causes, but to refer the greater or more difficult to Moses, for his decision
Camel - " The chief use of the camel has always been as a beast of Burden, and for performing journeys across the deserts
Crucifixion - Then the "accursed tree" with its living human Burden was slowly heaved up and the end fixed firmly in a hole in the ground
Sabbath - (5:15) The words added in Deuteronomy are a special motive for the joy with which the Sabbath should be celebrated and for the kindness which extended its blessings to the slave and the beast of Burden as well as to the master: "that thy man servant and thy maidservant may rest as well as thought. Hence, too, the stress constantly laid on permitting the servant and beast of Burden to share the rest which selfishness would grudge to them. Some of these prohibitions were fantastic and arbitrary, in the number of those "heavy Burdens and grievous to be borne" while the latter expounders of the law "laid on men's shoulders
English Martyrs - , 1537-1538
Brown, James, Benedictine, 1640-1651
Brown, William, Venerable, layman, 1604
Browne, Humphrey, Jesuit
Brownel, Thomas, Brigittine laybrother
Brushford, James, priest, 1593
Buckley, John, Saint
Budge, Lucy, lay person, 1587-88
Bullaker, Thomas, Blessed
Burden, Edward, Venerable, priest, 1538
Burraby, William, priest, 1537
Buxton, Christopher, Venerable, priest, died Canterbury, 1588
Cadwallador, Roger, Blessed
Campion, Edmund, Blessed
Cannon, Edmund, priest, 1640-1651
Cansfield, Brian, Venerable, Jesuit, 1643
Carew, Sir Nicholas, 1538
Carey, John, Blessed
Carter, William, Blessed
Catheriok, Edmund, Venerable, priest, 1642
Chalmar, John
Chalmer, Isabel, lay person
Chaplain, William, layman, 1584
Chedsey, William, priest, 1561
Claxton (Clarkson), James, Venerable, priest, 1588
Clayton, James, priest, 1588
Clitherow, Margaret, Saint
Cockerell, James, prior of Guisborough, 1537
Coe, William, monk, 1537
Cole, Henry, priest, 1579-1580
Coleman, Edward, Blessed
Coleman, Walter, Franciscan, 1645
Collier, Laurence, Franciscan, 1590
Collins, John, priest, 1584
Comberford, Henry, priest, 1584
Constable, Benedict, Benedictine, 1683
Constable, John, died York gaol, 1581
Constable, Robert, layman, 1537
Cook, Lawrence, O
Spiritual - In the NT it is used as follows: (a) the angelic hosts, lower than God but higher in the scale of being than man in his natural state, are 'spiritual hosts,' Ephesians 6:12 ; (b) things that have their origin with God, and which, therefore, are in harmony with His character, as His law is, are 'spiritual,' Romans 7:14 ; (c) 'spiritual' is prefixed to the material type in order to indicate that what the type sets forth, not the type itself, is intended, 1 Corinthians 10:3,4 ; (d) the purposes of God revealed in the gospel by the Holy Spirit, 1 Corinthians 2:13 , and the words in which that revelation is expressed, are 'spiritual,' 1 Corinthians 2:13 , matching, or combining, spiritual things with spiritual words [1]; 'spiritual songs' are songs of which the Burden is the things revealed by the Spirit, Ephesians 5:19 ; Colossians 3:16 ; 'spiritual wisdom and understanding' is wisdom in, and understanding of, those things, Colossians 1:9 ; (e) men in Christ who walk so as to please God are 'spiritual,' Galatians 6:1 ; 1 Corinthians 2:13 [2],15; 3:1; 14:37; (f) the whole company of those who believe in Christ is a 'spiritual house,' 1 Peter 2:5 ; (g) the blessings that accrue to regenerate men at this present time are called 'spiritualities,' Romans 15:27 ; 1 Corinthians 9:11 ; 'spiritual blessings,' Ephesians 1:3 ; 'spiritual gifts,' Romans 1:11 ; (h) the activities Godward of regenerate men are 'spiritual sacrifices,' 1 Peter 2:5 ; their appointed activities in the churches are also called 'spiritual gifts,' lit
Scribes - The scribes then forced the Jewish people to obey these laws, till the whole lawkeeping system became a heavy Burden (Matthew 15:1-9; Matthew 23:2-4; see TRADITION)
French Prophets - The Burden of their prophecies was, Amend your lives; repent ye: the end of all things draws nigh! The hills rebounded with their loud cries for mercy, and imprecations against the priests, the church, the pope, and against the anti-christian dominion, with predictions of the approaching fall of popery
Martyrs, English - , 1537-1538
Brown, James, Benedictine, 1640-1651
Brown, William, Venerable, layman, 1604
Browne, Humphrey, Jesuit
Brownel, Thomas, Brigittine laybrother
Brushford, James, priest, 1593
Buckley, John, Saint
Budge, Lucy, lay person, 1587-88
Bullaker, Thomas, Blessed
Burden, Edward, Venerable, priest, 1538
Burraby, William, priest, 1537
Buxton, Christopher, Venerable, priest, died Canterbury, 1588
Cadwallador, Roger, Blessed
Campion, Edmund, Blessed
Cannon, Edmund, priest, 1640-1651
Cansfield, Brian, Venerable, Jesuit, 1643
Carew, Sir Nicholas, 1538
Carey, John, Blessed
Carter, William, Blessed
Catheriok, Edmund, Venerable, priest, 1642
Chalmar, John
Chalmer, Isabel, lay person
Chaplain, William, layman, 1584
Chedsey, William, priest, 1561
Claxton (Clarkson), James, Venerable, priest, 1588
Clayton, James, priest, 1588
Clitherow, Margaret, Saint
Cockerell, James, prior of Guisborough, 1537
Coe, William, monk, 1537
Cole, Henry, priest, 1579-1580
Coleman, Edward, Blessed
Coleman, Walter, Franciscan, 1645
Collier, Laurence, Franciscan, 1590
Collins, John, priest, 1584
Comberford, Henry, priest, 1584
Constable, Benedict, Benedictine, 1683
Constable, John, died York gaol, 1581
Constable, Robert, layman, 1537
Cook, Lawrence, O
Labour - That he might be no Burden to others, he willingly worked overtime (‘night and day,’ 1 Thessalonians 2:9)
Horse - Asses, mules, and camels were the beasts used by the Jews in common life, both for riding and Burden-bearing
Naaman - He also requested the prophet, that he might have two mules' load of earth to carry home with him from the land of Israel, most probably intending to build an altar with it in his own country; which seems, indeed, to be implied in the reason with which he enforces his request: "Shall there not, I pray thee, be given to thy servant two mules' Burden of earth; for thy servant will henceforth offer neither burnt-offering nor sacrifice to other gods but unto Jehovah
Camel - Carrier, A beast of Burden very common in the East, where it is called "the land-ship," and "the carrier of the desert
Seven Words, the - The two next words, ‘My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?’ (Matthew 27:46, Mark 15:34), and ‘I thirst’ (John 19:28), were spoken in the darkness; nature is wrapped in gloom as the God-man, bearing the Burden and the curse of sin that is not His own, reveals to us something of the mystery of suffering. ’—This first word was probably spoken when the soldiers were driving the nails into His hands and feet, and were about to lift up the cross with its sacred Burden and plant it in the ground. The word of victory is followed by the word of rest—rest after the Burden and heat of the day
Taxes - The kingdom, with centralized government and greater magnificence, involved of course, a larger expenditure, and therefore a heavier taxation, The chief Burdens appear to have been-- (1) A tithe of the produce both of the soil and of live stock. (Amos 7:1 ) At times, too, in the history of both the kingdoms there were special Burdens. The influence of Ezra secured for the whole ecclesiastical order, from the priests down to the Nethinim, an immunity from all three ( Ezra 7:24 ) but the Burden pressed heavily on the great body of the people
Priesthood of the Believer - ...
(2) We are also urged to confess our sins to one another and to bear one another's Burden
Repose - The words of Jesus, however, teach that to take His yoke and bear His Burden, to live and serve as He teaches and as He lived and served Himself, will itself be ἀνάπαυσις as compared with other modes of living and serving, the yoke of which is never to be resumed
Kohath, Kohathites - (1) During the desert wanderings the Kohathites were on the south side of the Tent ( Numbers 3:30 ), and they carried the screen of the sanctuary and its furniture, after it had been prepared for travel by the greatest of all the descendants of Kohath Aaron and his sons ( Numbers 3:31 , Numbers 3:27 , Numbers 10:21 ); they were privileged to carry their Burden upon their shoulders ( Numbers 7:9 ), instead of in waggons, as the Gershonites and Merarites; they were superintended by Eleazar, Aaron’s son ( Numbers 4:16 )
Rest (And Forms) - That kind of rest is the portion of those who lay their Burdens at the feet of the Lord, and leave them there. The Lord Himself takes the Burden, blots out the sins, removes the hindrances, and gives us freedom
Book - Nahum’s prophecy begins with this introduction: “The Burden of Nineveh
Bear - To support to sustain as, to bear a weight or Burden. Hebrews 9 ...
To bear the infirmities of the weak, to bear one another's Burdens, is to be charitable towards their faults, to sympathize with them, and to aid them in distress
Animals - The beasts of Burden in Palestine in the time of our Lord were the ass and the camel. ...
A general term for ‘beast of Burden’ occurs in the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:34 κτῆνος). In Revelation 18:13 ‘beasts of Burden’ are distinguished from horses. Paul to Caesarea; in the NT therefore κτῆνος is clearly some ‘beast of Burden’ which is not a horse. The finer breeds are regularly used for riding, while the commoner breeds draw the plough and carry Burdens. ‘The ass is still the most universal of all beasts of Burden in Bible lands’ (Post, in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible)
Reproach (2) - The Apostle, however, transfers the words to Christ, and makes them describe how He bore the Burden of reproach for others, and so serve to give point to an exhortation against self-pleasing. ’ The writer’s idea appears to be, not only that by identifying himself with his despised people Moses took upon himself a Burden of contempt and suffering resembling that which was afterwards borne by Christ on our behalf, but that he had Christ prophetically in view—saw Him afar off, even as Father Abraham did (John 8:56), and was strengthened by the vision to run his own race with patience (cf
Slave, Slavery (2) - Even thieves were not to be reduced to a state of permanent slavery; and while the disorganization of trade due to a strict observance of the Sabbatic law of Deuteronomy 15:1-11 was prevented by Hillel’s statute of Prosbol, which made registered debts always recoverable, other means were adopted of freeing poor Jews from the Burden of their mortgages than that of their reduction to actual servitude. The solution of the Pharisees was that the slave himself, and not the master, must be held responsible, as the slave was capable of reasoning, and not to be classed with beasts of Burden
Caracalla, the Nickname of m. Aurelius Severus Antoninus Bassianus - But Augustus laid a tax on citizens from which aliens were exempt, a tax which made the franchise in many cases a Burden to be declined rather than a boon to be coveted, a duty of five per cent. Caracalla, by raising the provincials to the franchise, did not free them from the tribute they owed before, but imposed this additional Burden, which he doubled in amount, and which involved the odious intrusion of the tax-gatherer in seasons of domestic bereavement
Teach - This Burden, plus the legalism of Roman law, forms the background of the New Testament tradition of law, especially as Paul struggles with it in his Letter to the church at Rome
Tithes - The result was that by the time of Jesus, they had made the tithing system a heavy Burden on the Jewish people
Beast - " Βeir means either collectively all cattle (Exodus 22:4; Psalms 78:48) or specially beasts of Burden (Genesis 45:17)
Tithes - ...
Maimonides denies a third tithe (which would be an excessive Burden) and represents the seceded tithe of the third and sixth years as shared between the poor and the Levites
Get - ...
To get clear, to disengage one's self to be released, as from confinement, obligation or Burden also, to be freed from danger or embarrassment
Inn - These houses of reception are always built without the precincts of towns, and consist of four wings round a square court, which serves by way of enclosure for the beasts of Burden
Lie - ...
To lie hard or heavy, to press to oppress to Burden
Honor - Used in a negative but extended sense, the word depicts sin as a yoke ever pressing down upon one: “For mine iniquities are gone over mine head: as a heavy Burden they are too heavy for me” ( Burden which weighs down one’s body (or some part of it) so that one is either disabled or unable to function successfully
Faith - It is that state of mind in which a poor sinner, conscious of his sin, flees from his guilty self to Christ his Saviour, and rolls over the Burden of all his sins on him
Habakkuk - ...
The opening phrase (Habakkuk 1:1) describes his prophecy as "the Burden which," etc
Ass - " "Balsam was rebuked for his iniquity, the voiceless beast of Burden (ass) speaking with man's voice forbade the madness of the prophet" (2 Peter 2:16)
Lost - There were those who, with the advantage of wealth, or, if wealth were denied them, with praiseworthy self-denial, contrived to satisfy the demands of the Law; and, on a platform infinitely lower, stood those who had neither the will nor the means to bear so heavy and so doleful a Burden
Music - The three kinds are alluded to in (Job 21:12 ) On the banks of the Red Sea Moses and the children of Israel sang their triumphal song of deliverance from the hosts of Egypt; and Miriam, in celebration of the same event, exercised one of her functions as a prophetess by leading a procession of the women of the camp, chanting in chorus the Burden of the song of Moses
Rehoboam - In his reign Ephraim's gathering jealousy of a rival (Judges 8:1; Judges 12:1) came to a crisis, the steps to which were the severance of Israel under Ishbosheth (2 Samuel 2) from Judah under David; the removal of the political capital from Shechem, and the seat of national worship from Shiloh to Jerusalem; and finally Solomon's heavy taxation for great national and monarchical buildings, and Rehoboam's injudicious reply to the petition for lightening the Burden
Amos - ("a Burden"
Manger - ’ If the κατάλυμα was like a modern Eastern khan, and if the φάτνη belonged to it (see below), Mary and Joseph went to one of the stalls for cattle and beasts of Burden within the outside wall, and there the babe was born
Captives - ...
It is to this deplorable condition of a captive that the Apostle refers, in that pathetic exclamation, "O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?" Who shall rescue me, miserable captive as I am, from this continual Burden of sin which I carry about with me; and which is cumbersome and odious, as a dead carcass bound to a living body, to be dragged along with it wherever it goes?...
Phar'Isees, - ...
While it was the aim of Jesus to call men to the law of God itself as the supreme guide of life, the Pharisees, upon the Pretence of maintaining it intact, multiplied minute precepts and distinctions to such an extent that the whole life of the Israelite was hemmed in and Burdened on every side by instructions so numerous and trifling that the law was almost if not wholly lost sight of. ; their fastings twice in the week, (Luke 18:12 ) were their tithing; (Matthew 23:23 ) and such, finally, were those minute and vexatious extensions of the law of the Sabbath, which must have converted God's gracious ordinance of the Sabbath's rest into a Burden and a pain
Glory - The root may be seen in Isaiah 1:4 , ‘a people heavy with the Burden of iniquity
Land - A further variation of this nuance refers to the actual soil itself: “Shall there not then, I pray thee, be given to thy servant two mules’ Burden of earth [3]?” (2 Kings 5:17)
Charge, Chargeable - (3) The following are translated by the verb "to charge or to be chargeable" in the AV, but differently in the RV, and will be found under the word Burden: bareo, B, No
Grape - In other parts of Syria, also, I have seen grapes of such an extraordinary size, that a bunch of them would be a sufficient Burden for one man
Guilt - Guilt is a Burden ( Psalm 38:4 ) that creates anxiety (Psalm 38:18 )
Vision(s) - Sometimes a prophetic sermon is introduced as a Burden (or "oracle, " massa, )
Nahum (2) - "The Burden of Nineveh
False Worship - After the Syrian commander was cured of his leprosy, he requested a “two mules' Burden” of dirt from Israel to take with him to Syria so that he could worship the true God
Sabbath - The Sabbath was intended to ease their Burden, not increase it (Matthew 12:1-8; Matthew 23:4)
Elder - As the task of governing Israel grew in complexity, part of the Burden was transferred from Moses to a council of seventy elders (Numbers 11:16-17 )
Treasure - In addressing the words to the rich young man, our Lord was treating a particular case, the case of one whose spiritual aspirations were crushed beneath the Burden of his wealth
Break - To break the back, to strain or dislocate the vertebers with too heavy a Burden also, to disable one's fortune
Mendicants - But when it became generally known that they had such a peculiar place in the esteem and protection of the rulers of the church, their number grew to such an enormous and unwieldy multitude, and swarmed so prodigiously in all the European provinces, that they became a Burden, not only to the people, but to the church itself
Acts of the Apostles - In their decision they could say, "It seemed good to the Holy Ghost, and to us, to lay upon you no greater Burden than these necessary things: that ye abstain from meats offered to idols, and from blood, and from things strangled, and from fornication: from which if ye keep yourselves ye shall do well
Cities - They were also charged, as with us, to announce the progress of the night to the slumbering city: "The Burden of Dumah; he calls to me out of Seir, Watchman, what of the night? watchman, what of the night? The watchman said, The morning cometh, and also the night," Isaiah 21:11
Husbandry - Barley, mixed with broken straw, affords the fodder for beasts of Burden, which is called בליל
Assurance - ...
An assurance, therefore, that the sins which are felt to "be a Burden intolerable" are forgiven, and that the ground of that apprehension of future punishment which causes the penitent to " bewail his manifold sins," is taken away by restoration to the favour of the offended God, must be allowed, or nothing would be more incongruous and impossible than the comfort, the peace the rejoicing of spirit, which in the Scriptures are attributed to believers
Balaam - He had difficulty in undertaking the task, and he found, whenever he essayed to curse Israel, that the Lord had forbidden him to do so, and that his Burden must be blessing instead
Oneness - In anticipation of such troublous times, Christ makes oneness a main Burden of His last prayer with His disciples (John 17:11; John 17:21-26), as He makes mutual love the sum of His closing commandments (John 15:9-13)
Day of Atonement - Its blood was shed for the atonement of the people, and, at the same time, it took upon itself the Burden of their sins in order to carry it away. ’ The verb seems to contain the double thought of ‘offering up’ and ‘taking up upon oneself’ as a Burden; cf
the Importunate Widow - Who is your adversary? Who makes your life a Burden to you? Who persecutes and oppresses and impoverishes your soul day and night continually? Against whom is it that you, almost demented, cry without ceasing, Avenge you of your adversary? Sin is the spot of God's children. O sin! O sin! How thou hast persecuted my soul down to the ground! How thou hast robbed and desolated my soul! How thou hast made my life a Burden to me! How thou hast driven me sometimes beside myself with thy cruel and bitter bondage! How my soul sometimes seeks death to escape from thee! O thou foul and cruel tyrant, I will surely be revenged upon thee yet!...
And He spake this parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray
Barzillai - Then come the two chapters about the successful battle; after which, when David sets out to return to Jerusalem, the sacred writer takes up the noble name of Barzillai again in this fine passage: 'And Barzillai the Gileadite came down from Rogelim, and went over Jordan with the king, to conduct him over Jordan, And the king said to Barzillai, Come thou over with me, and I will feed thee with me in Jerusalem, And Barzillai said unto the king, How long have I to live that I should go up with the king to Jerusalem? I am this day fourscore years old, and can I discern between good and evil? Can thy servant taste what I eat or what I drink? Can I hear any more the voice of singing men and singing women? Wherefore, then, should thy servant be yet a Burden to my lord the king? Thy servant will go a little way over the Jordan with the king; and why should the king recompense it me with such a reward? Let thy servant, I pray thee, turn back again, that I may die in mine own city, and be buried by the grave of my father and my mother. My time is past to be eating and drinking as they will eat and drink in Jerusalem when God sends back their king to his people, I would be a Burden to myself and to the king's servants
le'Vites - (Numbers 4:22-26 ) (3) The heavier Burden of the boards, bars and pillars of the tabernacle fell on the sons of Merari. The submission of the Gibeonites enabled him to relieve the tribe-divisions of Gershon and Merari of the most Burdensome of their duties
Lord's Day - This He did by showing that their tradition told how David broke the letter of its regulation and yet was guiltless ( Luke 6:3 ); how charity and common sense led men to break their own rules ( Luke 13:15 ); how the Sabbath was granted to man as a blessing and not laid on him as a Burden ( Mark 2:27 ); and how He as Son of Man, fulfilling ideal manhood, was its Lord ( Mark 2:28 ); but while our Lord thus purified the Sabbath, there is no proof that He abolished it
Travel (2) - Persons of rank rode on mules (2 Samuel 13:29, 1 Kings 1:33), while the ass was more usually kept as a beast of Burden
Crucifixion - If it was only the patibulum that Jesus carried, the probable failure of His strength by the way, leading to the incident of Simon the Cyrenian ( Matthew 27:32 ||), must be attributed not to the weight of His Burden, but to sheer physical exhaustion aggravated by loss of blood through scourging, as well as to the anguish that pressed upon His soul
High Priest (2) - As the work wrought by Him for men surpassed that of the high priest, so the terminology of the older dispensation is insufficient, and breaks down under the Burden of the description
Refuge - And it is no violence to the expression to make application of this word to him whose government was declared to be upon his shoulder, Isaiah 9:6 line of the old writers, Raphelius, makes a very striking observation concerning this expression of the government being said to be upon Christ's shoulder; because said he we carry Burdens on our shoulders, therefore Christ is said to carry his. And this he did when he became the Almighty Burden-bearer of the sins of his people
Zechariah, Prophecy of - Here the 'burden' is announced, God's vengeance that will come upon the nations in order that Israel may have possession of Syria. The nations that molest God's earthly people will find Jerusalem a Burden that will crush them
Jews - Under his successors, David and Solomon, the nation reached the height of its glory; but Solomon's building activities, and his luxurious mode of life gradually increased taxation till it became oppressive and when Roboam, his son and successor, refused to lighten the Burden, the ten northern tribes revolted, and formed the Kingdom of Israel; the two southern tribes, however, remained faithful to David's house, and formed the Kingdom of Juda
Cattle - ...
Beir is a general term including beasts of Burden ( Genesis 45:17 ) who graze in a field (Exodus 22:5 )
Comfort - (c) The common Burden of life was lightened for the Christian believer in the consciousness of the Divine love
Dionysius (3), Bishop of Corinth - , a man highly commended by Eusebius for piety, orthodoxy, and learning, not to impose on the brethren too heavy a Burden of chastity, but to regard the weakness of the many
Ark - Hales proves the ark to have been of the Burden of forty-two thousand four hundred and thirteen tons; and asks, "Can we doubt of its being sufficient to contain eight persons, and about two hundred or two hundred and fifty pair of four-footed animals, (a number to which, according to M
Lay - To impose, as evil, Burden, or punishment
Praise - This is downright hypocrisy, and the whole Burden of the moral teaching of the Bible, and especially of Christ, is against hypocrisy
Grace - When the people of Israel complain at having only manna and not any meat, Moses cries out to the Lord in an apparently sincere state of vexation at the Burden of judging this entire people by himself: "I cannot carry all these people by myself; the Burden is too heavy for me. Without questioning his integrity or his strength of character, God immediately gives Moses a solution to his problem by appointing seventy of the elders of Israel to help him carry the Burden of the people, "so that you will not have to carry it alone" (v
Work - Work was regarded as a dreary Burden. Work has been transformed into something demonic, as Israel groans under the backbreaking Burden of manual labor. The labor of the law is a back-breaking Burden as opposed to the work that Jesus offers (Matthew 11:28-30 )
Humiliation of Christ - It was not to Him an honour to be enjoyed; it was a Burden to be borne. ]'>[1] It was the Burden of the Messianic task that made Him, beyond all men, a man of sorrows
False Prophet - Rather than having a "burden" from the Lord, they themselves were another Burdenboth to the Lord and to the misled people!...
The Theology of the False Prophets
Cross - After this manner, we find Christ was compelled to bear his cross; and as he sunk under the Burden, Simon the Cyrenian was constrained to bear it after him and with him
Judaizing - to the, or in the article in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ; but the superiority of Christ over Judaism is its main Burden, and the Epistle is pregnant with the difficulties of Christianity confronted with Judaizing teachers
Blood - This restraint, than which nothing can be more express, was also, under the new covenant, enjoined upon believing Gentiles, as "a Burden" which "it seemed necessary to the Holy Spirit to impose upon them," Acts 15:28-29
Commerce - Accordingly, frequent mention is made of public roads, fords, bridges, and beasts of Burden; also of ships for the transportation of property, of weights, measures, and coin, both in the oldest books of the Bible, and in the most ancient profane histories
Court Systems - The Burden of proof lay with the defendant
Amphilochius, Archbishop of Iconium - He is also invited by Basil to assist in the administration of his own diocese of Caesarea, which has become too great a Burden for him, prostrated as he now is by a succession of maladies ( Ep
Prophets, the - It may be premised that the Burden of the prophets Obadiah, Jonah, and Nahum has special reference to Edom and to Nineveh, that is, to peoples that were always hostile to Israel
Evil - Christian faith need not Burden itself with this load of Jewish beliefs
Eagle - ...
[And as the king of birds, and tawny, armour-bearer of the Thunderer, cherishes with anxious care his unfledged, and as yet feeble young, and gratifies their appetite with rich prey: presently, when their downy wings have increased in strength, a milder air calls them forth, with expanded plumage he invites them, and receives them hesitating on his back, and sustains them on his shoulders, and with easy flight is borne over the fields, fearing for his Burden, and yet with a moderated effort trying the rowing of their wings, and furling with his pinions his curved sails, he glides through the low regions beneath the clouds
Parable - Such was the parable value of contrast between the behaviour of Israel towards God and the common seotiment of family relationship, and even the grateful instincts of the beasts of Burden ( Isaiah 1:2 , Isaiah 1:3 ). Its appearance had been the chief Burden of prophecy, and its expansion and attendant blessing to humanity had been dwelt upon as the recompense for the travail of Zion
Philanthropy - There was thus added to the length and breadth of universal love the height and depth of sacrifice, and these two elements wrought powerfully in the instinctive love of man until the neediness of each became the common Burden of all, and philanthropy became a part of the spiritual equipment of men. But we can see that that which gives them the sanction of law, that which comes into every social reform that has any promise of permanence or of helpfulness, is just that with which Christ filled the hearts of His followers as He sent them forth on their simpler mission:—all endowment is but a trust; ‘freely ye have received, freely give’ (Matthew 10:8); there is no limit in love; the neediness of each is the common Burden of all. Himself the very law which He promulgated, until in after days the appeal might be made to the Christian Church that its members should bear one another’s Burdens, since only thus could they fulfil that Law which Christ was (οὑτῶς ἀναπληρώσατε τὸν νόμον τοῦ Χριστοῦ, Galatians 6:2). Here, if anywhere, the universality of love will be seen; when the missionary breaks every tie that makes the sweetness of his life, to carry the Burdens of...
‘Sullen peoples, half devil and half child,’...
he reveals the intensest manifestation of that love whose Divine note is sacrifice
Temple - For him, as for every other Jewish Christian in Jerusalem, the Law, without distinction of moral and ceremonial precepts, was ‘ordained of angels’; in his view the nation’s treatment of its prophets and its Messiah was the supreme proof that the Law had not been kept; and the Burden of his preaching was a call to Jerusalem not to close her Temple and abolish her ritual, but to take the lead in a national repentance for a broken Law
Abraham - This tribute was felt by the inhabitants of these cities to be a heavy Burden, and after twelve years they revolted
Uniqueness - To what prophet or leader of the race beside have we any warrant for imputing such a conception of personal vocation? Surely it must be admitted that in His sense of the prerogative and the Burden of mediation Christ makes a class by Himself; He has no peer or companion
Creation - Paul pictured that the whole of creation “groaneth and travaileth” under the Burden of human sin (Romans 8:22 )
Repentance (2) - Hence the Burden of His message was God and righteousness
Forgiveness - The Burden of the prophetic exhortations, ‘Turn ye, turn ye, why will ye die?’ ( Ezekiel 33:11 ; cf
King - The idea was never lost sight of that the office was instituted for the good of the nation, and that it ought to be a help, not a Burden, to the people at large
Imitation - The Son came into this world that we might know Him, and has obeyed God’s will under our own conditions, in their extremest and most Burden some type
Marks Stigmata - Galatians 5:10) the word is used in connexion with the bearing of Burdens, and probably means ‘bear as a Burden’ in Galatians 6:17
Guilt - ]'>[1] ‘iniquities,’ Leviticus 16:22 ) and the punishment of the nation, shadows forth clearly and unmistakably the nature of the Burden laid on Jesus, as the Son of Man
Twelve - Massa: Burden. The unrighteous are constantly Burdened for they have no one to lift the load and no means of getting rid of their sins
Pre-Eminence - In these chapters Jesus is represented as Saviour and Lord, and, as such, worthy of our utmost devotion (Acts 16:31; Colossians 3:11; Acts 20:35; Acts 26:18); as the Christ, the Burden and goal of prophecy and the Hope of Israel (Acts 17:3, Acts 18:5, Acts 24:14, Acts 26:6-7; Acts 26:22, Acts 28:20; Acts 28:23); as Judge of the world (Acts 17:31), and even as God (Acts 20:28 text of אB)
Animals - ASS The ass or donkey was a common beast of Burden in biblical times and was similar to donkeys of today but larger. A larger animal than the European ass of today, this animal was used for riding (Numbers 22:21 ; Judges 5:10 ), as a beast of Burden (1 Samuel 16:20 ), and for agricultural work (Deuteronomy 22:10 ). It was used to transport Burdens or passengers. They were used as war animals, for riding, and for carrying Burdens (2 Kings 5:17 ). They were especially good for moving heavy Burdens in mountainous areas, being better than the horse, ass, or camel. They were often yoked in pairs to do farm work and were used to transport Burdens
Moab - ...
A century and a half later, in Isaiah's "burden of Moab" (Isaiah 15-16) Moab appears possessing places which it had held in the beginning N
Sabbath - The carrying of a Burden or bringing it by Jerusalem's gates was prohibited (Jeremiah 17:22 )
Proselyte - With the fall of the Temple sacrifice lapsed, though at first it was made a Burden on the proselyte to lay aside enough to pay for the sacrifice, should the Temple again be restored; but even this demand was in course of time allowed to lapse, as the prospect of restoration vanished
Power - So rich is the provision for its subjects, that even the cry of hunger becomes a feast, and to bear a Burden and cross with Christ is an immediate Paradise
Zechariah, Book of - The title ‘burden of the word of Jehovah’ is very unusual, occurring elsewhere only in Zechariah 12:1 and Malachi 1:1
Seventy (2) - ]'>[6] (3) In each case the Burden of the message was ‘Peace’ and the ‘Kingdom of God
Keeping - That the disciples’ faith in God as Father might be characterized by assurance, is the Burden of Christ’s prayer (see Westcott, ad loc
Silence - He passed through the ordinary phases of childhood, boyhood, youth, and attained the maturity of manhood before He took up the Burden of His brief career
Good - As a Pharisee he had felt the Burden and the bondage of the Law, and groaned under its judgment, but he had discovered its impotence, and so for him the Christian good included the end of the Law (Galatians 4:21-31; Galatians 5:1), for Christian morality is not legal-the observance of the letter-but spiritual-the expression of the new life found in Christ (2 Corinthians 3:1-11)
Death - the Burden of Ezekiel 18:1-32 , ‘the soul that sinneth it shall die,’ with the correlative promise of life: similarly Proverbs 15:10
Commandment - Revelation 2:24 the phrase ‘cast upon you none other Burden’ with Acts 15:28), and which the Apostle, not only according to Acts 16:4, but also in Romans 16:17; 1 Corinthians 10:14-33, expressly urges upon Gentile Christians
Sanctification - It is a Burden which must be removed, a barrier to be broken down, if sanctification is to be realized in the individual experience, and man is to be at peace with God. Such a far-reaching and comprehensive Burden of guilt can be removed only through a perfect sacrifice, the sacrifice of Him who is both priest and victim
John Epistles of - -(a) The Burden of that message is that God is Light. The Burden of his message is that God is Light (1 John 1:5), and the reiteration of this in negative form is probably aimed at the view that the Father of all is unknowable or that know ledge of Him is the monopoly of a ‘pneumatic’ minority
Justice - It is an ever-recurring Burden in the Prophetical writings that justice is thwarted through bribery: ‘Every one loveth gifts and followeth after rewards’ ( Isaiah 1:23 ; see, further, Isaiah 5:7 ; Isaiah 5:20 ; Isaiah 5:23 , Micah 3:11 ; Micah 7:3 , Ezekiel 18:8 ; Ezekiel 22:12 etc
Life - Such is the Burden of the Wisdom books, when they speak of ‘finding life,’ and describe wisdom as a ‘tree of life’ ( Proverbs 3:18 ; Proverbs 8:35 )
Luke, Gospel of - ...
With the early church tradition unanimously ascribing the Third Gospel to Luke, the Burden of proof is on those who argue against Lukan authorship
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - What do you think would be the thoughts of the half-dead Jew as he saw his own temple-kinsmen passing by on the other side, and then saw this dog of a Samaritan leaping off his mule? What would he think and say all night as he saw this excommunicated Samaritan lighting the candle to pour oil and wine into his wounds and watching all night at his bedside? That Samaritan mule hobbling down the Jericho-pass with that half-dead Burden on its back always reminds me of Samuel Johnson hobbling along to Bolt Court with the half-dead streetwalker on his back and laying her down on old Mrs
the Labourer With the Evil Eye - No other husbandman could afford to pay for one hour's work in the evening of the day as much as he pays for the Burden and heat of the whole day
Numbers, Book of - Moses' heart failed him; the Burden was greater than he could bear, and he asked God to kill him
Virgin Virginity - Even the deaconesses are not required to be unmarried (1 Timothy 3:11); and, as we saw above, the younger widows are to marry again so that they may not be a Burden on the Church funds, and so as to save them from sexual temptation
Reality - The distress and suffering that are in the world (Matthew 4:23; Matthew 12:15), the mysteries of Providence (Luke 13:1-4, John 9:3), the value and needs of the soul (Matthew 16:26-27, Luke 12:20-21), the curse of sin (Matthew 18:8-9, Luke 13:3, John 8:24), the certainty of retribution (Matthew 18:6; Matthew 23:33, Mark 9:43-48), the necessity of spiritual renewal (Matthew 9:17, John 3:3-7), the Burden of responsibility (Matthew 11:20-24; Matthew 23:14, Luke 10:13-16), the imperative obligations of duty (John 9:4), the supreme authority of God (Matthew 7:29 John 4:34; John 10:29),—on all these Jesus kept His eye fixed with an intensity of vision and purpose that was never relaxed from the beginning to the end of His career
Unpardonable Sin - ’ The phrase, in fact, is as erroneous as it is unscriptural, though the common use of it has helped to load thousands of sensitive souls with a Burden of intolerable pain
Woe - ...
The lawyers are then condemned for amplifying the written Law with their intolerably Burdensome enactments, which they contrive to evade themselves, while so rigorous in exacting obedience to them from others (Luke 11:46); for their zeal in the erection and adornment of the tombs of the prophets, which, in bitter irony, is pronounced to be a sign of their continuing the work of the murderers of the prophets (Luke 11:47-48; Wendt, i. But this is as impossible as to remove the Burden, ‘Tiberio imperitante, supplicio adfectus erat,’ from the heart of mankind
Corinthians, Second Epistle to - We may best start by noticing that the Epistle was clearly written when the Apostle was Burdened by some great anxiety, perhaps physical, but assuredly spiritual ( 2 Corinthians 11:28 ). ’ The Epistle is thus noteworthy for its remarkable revelation of the inner life of the Apostle as he faced his enemies, pleaded with his friends, bore the Burden of the care of all the Churches, and lived in fellowship and communion with His unseen Lord and Master
Eternal Punishment - —This is the Burden of much of the teaching of Jesus
Crucifixion - ]'>[4] Thus Burdened and tormented, Jesus went His sorrowful way from the Praetorium till He reached the gate of the city (Matthew 27:32); and there His strength failed, and He could go no farther. The soldiers relieved Him of His Burden, and, impressing Simon of Cyrene, laid it on his shoulders
the Disobedient Prophet - And how Jeroboam's hand was withered that moment; how it was healed immediately at the intercession of the man of God; how Jeroboam invited the prophet to come home with him to eat and to drink and to get a reward; and how the prophet answered the king that be had the command of the Lord neither to eat bread nor to drink water in that polluted land, but to return home to Judah as soon as he had delivered his prophetic Burden-all that is to be read in the thirteenth chapter of First Kings
Paul's Great Heaviness And Continual Sorrow of Heart - "How, now, good friend, whither away after this Burdened manner? A Burdened manner indeed, as ever I think poor creature had. Hast thou a wife and children? Yes; but I am so laden with this Burden, that I cannot take that pleasure in them as I once thought I would
Wealth - They should pay their taxes (Romans 13:6-7 ) and work diligently, avoiding idleness so as not to be a financial Burden to anyone else (1 Thessalonians 4:11 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:6-15 )
Agony - He so identified Himself with sinful mankind, that He shared its struggle, bore its Burden, felt its shame
Dionysius, Pseudo-Areopagita - God the centre towards which all tend and at the same time the all-embracing circumference within which all are included; the constant streaming forth from Him like rays from the visible sun of divine influences whereby men are purified illumined and drawn upwards to Himself; man's powerlessness to know the real nature and being of God while yet he may be drawn near to Him in the mystic communion of a loving faith: such is very briefly the Burden of the Dionysian strain
Obedience (2) - There is evidence in these passages, taken as a whole, and regarded as containing the concurrent and consistent Evangelical idea of the death of Christ, that to Christ the Burden of death consisted partly in its physical pain, from which One shrank who possessed the instinct of life among other human qualities (see Humanity of Christ), but still more as something unbecoming to the pure and holy Son of God, associated, as it was in human history, with the idea of sin and condemnation
Inspiration - " The prophets preface their prophecies with "thus saith the Lord," "the Burden (weighty utterance) of the word of the Lord" (Zechariah 9:1; Zechariah 12:1; Malachi 1:1)
Insects - It is mentioned in Ecclesiastes 12:5 as being a “burden
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - Instead of declaring the fact that, after examination made, they had acquitted Ibas, they made pitiful excuses as to their inability to arrive at the truth from the distance of the place of trial to Edessa, and endeavoured to shift the Burden by saying that an investigation had subsequently been held at Edessa itself, which had received the approbation of the emperor, and that the wisest course for the council would be to inquire what was the decision there
Ecclesiastes, Theology of - In the darkness of a life that has no ultimate meaning, seize upon the temporal pleasures that lighten the Burden
Marriage - The husband, however, must accept the Burden of making the final choice in times of disagreement, although seldom should this be needed
Meekness (2) - Amid outward conditions which are hard and oppressive, they who like Jesus are ‘meek and lowly of heart,’ who bow before God with a profound sense of His infinitely wise and perfect will, find ‘rest unto their souls’; they are freed from that inward restiveness and discontent which aggravate the outward Burden and wear away the strength
Spirit - the Burden of the heavenly message ὁ υἱός μου ὁ ἀγαπητός, and the implied doubt repeated in the Temptation εἰ υἱὸς εἶ τοῦ θεοῦ, as well as the part played by the Spirit in each of these incidents, Matthew 3:16; Matthew 4:1 ff
Gifts - In fact, this is the Burden of the Apostle’s teaching in 1 Corinthians 14, following on the exhortation to ‘covet earnestly “the greater charisms” ’ (1 Corinthians 12:31), and the noble hymn (1 Corinthians 13) which sets forth love as ‘a still more excellent way’ in that it transcends all the χαρίσματα and is the real foundation of the Church
Coming to Christ - But it goes beyond that, as the whole ministry of Christ shows, to all those on whom the Burdens of life press heavily, and especially to those who are being borne down by the weight of sin. … For my yoke is easy, and my Burden is light
Agriculture - —The sheaves thus prepared were carried to the threshing-floor on the backs of men or of beasts of Burden, such as donkeys, horses, or camels
Passover (i.) - If the sacrifice fell on a Sabbath, the first and second divisions stayed in appointed parts of the Temple until the whole of the victims had been sacrificed, that they might not profane the Sabbath by bearing a Burden
Talmud - The following outline of a Haggadic passage from the Yerushalmi will serve as an example; It is intended as a rebuke to ‘Scandal-mongers,’ and a text ( Deuteronomy 1:12 ) is taken as a starting-point, namely, ‘ How can I myself alone bear your cumbrance and your Burden and your strife? ’ It then continues: ‘How did our forefathers worry Moses with their cumbrances? In that they were constantly slandering him, and imputing evil intentions to him in everything that he did
Diseases - ...
Sterility was a great Burden in biblical times
Tribes of Israel, the - Because the blessing of Jacob speaks of Issachar as a beast of Burden and as “a slave at forced labor” ( Genesis 49:14-15 NRSV), the tribe of Issachar may have faced a variety of hardships
Ethics - Everyone is to bear his own Burden ( Romans 14:4 , Galatians 6:5 ), and must answer for himself to the Judge of all men ( 2 Corinthians 5:10 ); but he is not isolated
Leadership - Moses selected seventy of them to be specially endued with God's Spirit to help share the Burden of the people (Numbers 11:16-17 )
Elect, Election - Luke not only gives the Burden of the conversation between Jesus and His heavenly visitants; he also implies that Jesus was there informed in detail of the character of the death which He was about to suffer (συνελάλουν αὐτῳ … ἑλεγον την ἔξοδον αὑτοῦ, Luke 9:30 f
Lord's Prayer (i) - without strophical arrangement, seeing in ‘as in heaven, so on earth’ the common Burden for the first triplet of single clauses; see § 421
Self-Control - In Gethsemane the sacred anguish transcends analysis, for the vicarious Passion was begun; but if any influence of fear or regret or intolerable Burden (Luke 22:40) is to be acknowledged, the shrinking is quickly mastered, and the Saviour goes forth calmly to die (Matthew 26:45 f
Sarah - ...
Now, in God's mercy, is there any Hagar here? Is there any outcast here? Is there any soul of man or woman ready to perish here? Who can tell who is here? Where would such be found if not here? Is not this the house of God? Does this house not stand on the wayside to Shur? Has this house not been Beer-lahai-roi to many who were in far greater straits, and under far greater guilt, than ever Hagar was? Many have said of this house, Thou God seest me! Many have come up to this house with a secret Burden
Achan - For, what is the fall of Jericho to them in that tent when it has cost them the life of their husband, their father, and their master? When the door of that tent is suddenly lifted, and the face of a corpse comes in, takes a spade, and buries a strange Burden in the earth in the midst of the astounded tent
Esau - It has often been pointed out what a mercy it is that God keeps our own future, and the future of our families, to Himself; and does not Burden, and entangle, and tempt us with a knowledge that we are not able to bear
Manicheans - Likewise their theory about the creation of the material part of man determined their view of the Incarnation, which they regarded as wholly Docetic; if a material body was a prison and a Burden to the spirit of man, Christ could scarcely voluntarily imprison His divine Spirit in the same
Unity (2) - to the Churches of Asia deal with conditions of corruption, moral and doctrinal; but there is no thought of self-segregation as the duty of the faithful, even where deeds that Christ hates are tolerated (Revelation 2:6); He lays no other Burden on His servants but to hold fast (Revelation 2:24-25)
Universalism (2) - He rejects, as lacking Divine authority, that tradition (Matthew 15:3-9 ||) by means of which the Pharisees, morally the most earnest among the Jews, safeguarded the OT law and applied it to new details, at the cost of making it ever more and more a Burden
Guilt (2) - Acts 17:30, Romans 3:24-25), the removal of a Burden (Romans 2:15 ἔνοχοι δουλείας, cf
Oath - Any exceptions to this strongly exclusive phrase must bear the Burden of proof, and to apply it strictly in the meantime is the only natural course, and the precise reverse of ‘hair-splitting’ (T
Organization (2) - ), but anticipate the Burden of the cross (Luke 14:27), submit to be ‘hated of all men for my sake (Matthew 10:22), fearlessly enduring persecution even unto death (v
Evil - ...
The Teacher in Ecclesiastes calls the disappointing pursuit of wisdom a "heavy Burden" (1:13) and repeats the words in 4:8 to describe the unfruitfulness of materialism
Sanctify, Sanctification - Learning of Jesus, we may become meek and lowly in heart; yoked with Him under the yoke which He wears and which He graciously invites us to share, we may hear our Burden easily
Government - For nomadic people to be compelled to live according to strict and detailed regulations, some of which were similar to Hammurabi's enactments, was a severe discipline in itself that proved to be a sore Burden, even in later sedentary times
Conscience - Similarly, when a conscience is said to be ‘good’ or ‘pure’ or ‘void of offence,’ the reference is to the sense of peace and moral harmony with God and man which comes to one who has loyally obeyed the dictates of the Moral Law; while an uncleansed or evil conscience is one on which there rests the Burden and pain of sin that is unatoned for and unforgiven
Sin - ...
Other scholars believe that the term implies a “painful Burden or difficulty”—i. ” The Aramaic ‛âmâl means “make” or “do,” with no necessary connotation of Burdensome labor
Absolution - The testimony of men who are spiritually minded and in communion with God is felt to have an authority such that great relief is given to souls by the Church’s absolution, and great Burden imposed by its refusal
Prayer - " Sin is a Burden, of which confession unloads the soul
Old Testament - But the Burden of proof rests on the authority of the Scriptures, as represented by the Septuagint
Elisha - Naaman desires to take away two mules Burden of earth, wherewith to make an altar to Jehovah of the holy land, a sensible memorial to remind him perpetually in his pagan country of Jehovah' s past favor bestowed on him in Israel (compare Joshua 4:20-21, and the mediaeval campo santos)
Regeneration (2) - This is the Burden of our Lord’s teaching in such passages as Matthew 16:24 ff
Religion (2) - On the contrary, it is the main Burden of the prophets
Noah - The Hebrew teebah is the same as Moses' ark of bulrushes (Exodus 2:3): an Egyptian word for a "chest" or "coffer," fitted for Burden not for sailing, being without mast, sail, or rudder
John the Baptist - But if John’s words of protest (Matthew 3:14) imply that even in the baptism of Christ the cleansing aspect of the rite was in view, was it not proper that the ‘Lamb of God’ (John 1:29; John 1:36), who had no sense of personal guilt, nothing to repent of or confess, should even now begin to bear upon His heart the Burden of the sins of others, even as on a coming day He was to bear them ‘in his own body on the tree’ (1 Peter 2:24)?...
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Jeremiah - So long it took this great prophet to accept with full acquiescence the Burden laid upon him
Apocalypse - The apocalyptist of truly prophetic spirit has his eye fixed on God and his own time; and, while he uses what, abstractly considered, seems a cumbrous and partly alien literary form, he does so not to exercise a literary gift but to convey a message, the urgency of which lies on his spirit as a ‘burden’ of the Lord
Mahometanism - Paul, that the Gospel of Jesus Christ had for ever freed mankind from the intolerable Burden of ceremonial observances
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - If thou see the ass of him that hateth thee lying under his Burden, and wouldest forbear to help him, thou shalt surely help with him’; 1 Samuel 24:4-8 the example of David in sparing the life of Saul when he had him in his power; also the similar instance of Elisha in sparing the Syrians (2 Kings 6:22); Psalms 7:5 b (4b) ‘Yea, I have delivered him that without cause was mine adversary
Trial-at-Law - The Burden of proof rested, as a rule, on the pursuer; but the judge was allowed a wide discretion, subject only to the instructions given in the formula
Canon of the New Testament - the small Epistle of Jude; but they throw the Burden of proof on those who would disturb the Canon by a serious proposal to eject any of its contents; and in fact no such proposal as distinct from critical questions of the dates, authorship, historicity, etc
Forgiveness (2) - Down even to the very close of His short ministry on earth the rudimentary spiritual intelligence of the Apostles was unequal to carrying the full Burden of the gospel as they afterwards understood it
Koran - His throne is extended over heaven and earth, and the preservation of both is to him no Burden
Law - And in the hymn of thanksgiving on the miraculous escape of the Israelites at the Red Sea, this is its Burden: "Who is like unto thee, O Lord, among the gods? who is like unto thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?" Exodus 15:11
Moses - But the king not only refused, but increased the Burdens of the people, Exodus 5:1-19 ; and the people murmured, and hearkened not unto Moses, when he repeated from the Lord his assurances of deliverance and protection, for anguish of spirit, and for cruel bondage, Exodus 5:20-23 ; Exodus 6:1-9 . Samuel and Eli assign a part of their paternal authority to their sons, and permit them even to abuse it; but the sons of Moses, in the wilderness, are only the simple servants of the tabernacle; like all the other sons of Kohath, if they even dare to raise the veil which covers the sacred furniture, the Burden, of which they carry, death is denounced against them
Persecution - The Burden of early prophecy was ‘Israel for Jahweh’ and ‘Jahweh for Israel
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - It was not only that His methods possessed the charm of novelty, but that they enabled the people to feel that for the first time their Scriptures had become a new and living book, which no longer pressed upon their souls like a heavy Burden, but itself enabled them to bear life’s greatest loads
Pharisees (2) - The Burden of the one led to greater expectation of the appearance of the other
Rome - All we can say is that there is mention of a rex, of iouxmenta, ‘beasts of Burden,’ and of a kalator, ‘public servant’; the words sakros esed (= sacer sit, ‘let so-and-so be sacred’) occur also
Incarnation (2) - Its most strenuous exponents toiled at what they knew was a hopeless task, and though they carried their Burden nobly, their hearts were pierced with the sorrow of their failure
Law (2) - Moreover, the heavier the Burden grew, the greater grew the temptation to find a literal fulfilment which should be an escape from the spirit
Augustinus, Aurelius - Conscience shamed him that after ten years of study he was still carrying a Burden which men wearied by no research had already cast aside
Christ in Reformation Theology - ‘To remove from us the Burden of sin, death, hell, and the devil, and to vanquish their power, and to bring again righteousness, life, and salvation, are the works neither of men nor of angels, but only of the One, Eternal, Divine Majesty, the Creator of heaven and earth. ...
Jesus Christ was for Luther the mirror of the fatherly heart of God, and therefore was God; God Himself was the only Comforter who could bring rest to the human soul Burdened by sin and grief; and the Holy Spirit was God
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - He himself tells us plaintively how he would gladly have fled these business worries, but felt it his duty to share the Burden with his father ( Carm
Babylon - The Burden of Babylon, which Isaiah the son of Amos did see: "The noise of a multitude in the mountains, like as of a great people: a tumultuous noise of the kingdoms of nations gathered together: the Lord of Hosts mustereth the host of the battle
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - ...
In the spring of 351 Constantius felt himself forced by the Burden of empire to take a colleague, and Gallus was appointed Caesar. His internal government, particularly as lightening public Burdens, was equally popular
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - Finding that the severity of the state imposts caused many to throw up their farms, leaving the civil authorities to make good their deficiency, a liability they were seeking to avoid by flight, he wrote to the empress Pulcheria, entreating her to lighten so intolerable a Burden ( Ep