What does Brick mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
לִלְבֹּן֙ to be white. 1
וּבִלְבֵנִ֔ים tile 1
הַלְּבֵנִ֖ים tile 1
הַלְּבֵנָה֙ tile 1
הַלְּבֵנִֽים tile 1
(בַּמַּלְבֵּ֔ן) brick mold 1
בַּמַּלְבֵּ֔ן brick mold 1
מַלְבֵּֽן brick mold 1

Definitions Related to Brick

H3843


   1 tile, Brick.
      1a Brick.
      1b tile.
      1c pavement.
      

H4404


   1 Brick mold, Brick kiln, quadrangle.
      1a Brick mould, Brick kiln.
      1b quadrangle.
      

H3835


   1 to be white.
      1a (Hiphil).
         1a1 to make white, become white, purify.
         1a2 to show whiteness, grow white.
      1b (Hithpael) to become white, be purified (ethical).
   2 (Qal) to make bricks.
   

Frequency of Brick (original languages)

Frequency of Brick (English)

Dictionary

King James Dictionary - Brick
BRICK, n. L. imbrex, a gutter-tile, from imber, a shower, which is probably a compound, of which the last syllable is from whence.
A mass of earth, chiefly clay, first moistened and made fine by grinding or treading, then formed into a long square in a mold, dried and baked or burnt in a kiln used in buildings and walls.
1. A loaf shaped like a brick. BRICK, To lay or pave with bricks.
1. To imitate or counterfeit a brick wall on plaster,by smearing it with red ocher and making the joints with an edge-tool, filling them with fine plaster.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Brick
The earliest were those used in building Babel, of clay burned in the fire. Genesis 11:3, "Let us make brick, and burn them thoroughly (margin burn them to a burning). And they had brick for stone, and slime had they for mortar." So Herodotus states that in building Babylon's walls the clay dug out of the ditch was made into bricks, being burnt in kilns. The bricks were cemented with hot bitumen (asphalt), and at every thirtieth row reeds were stuffed in. The materials were ready to their hands, clay and bitumen bubbling up from the ground. But in Assyria and Egypt the bricks are sundried, not fireburnt, though in Jeremiah 43:9 a brick kiln is mentioned in Egypt.
The Babylonian are larger than English bricks, being about 13 in. square, and 3 1/2 in. thick; more like our tiles, and often enameled with patterns (compare Ezekiel 4:1); such have been found at Nimrud. The Babylonians used to record astronomical observations on tiles. Nebuchadnezzar's buildings superseded those of his predecessors; hence, most of the Babylonian bricks bear his name m cuneiform character. The Egyptian are from 15 to 20 in. long, 7 wide, 5 thick. Those of clay from the torrent beds near the desert need no straw, and are as solid now as when put up m the reigns of the Egyptian kings before the Exodus. Those made of Nile mud need straw to prevent cracking; and frequently a layer of reeds at intervals acted as binders.
In the paintings on the tomb of Rekshara, an officer of Thothmes III (1400 B.C.), captives, distinguished from the natives by color, are represented as forced by taskmasters to make brick; the latter armed with sticks are receiving "the tale of bricks." This maybe a picture of the Israelites in their Egyptian bondage; at least it strikingly illustrates it. In Assyria artificial mounds, encased with limestone blocks, raised the superstructure 30 or 40 feet above the level of the plain. The walls of crude brick were cased with gypsum slabs to the height of 10 feet; kiln-burned bricks cased the crude bricks from the slabs to the top of the wall. The brick kiln is mentioned in David's time as in use in Israel (2 Samuel 12:31); they in Isaiah's time (Isaiah 65:3) substituted altars of brick for the unhewn stone which God commanded.
Webster's Dictionary - Brick
(1):
(n.) Bricks, collectively, as designating that kind of material; as, a load of brick; a thousand of brick.
(2):
(n.) A block or clay tempered with water, sand, etc., molded into a regular form, usually rectangular, and sun-dried, or burnt in a kiln, or in a heap or stack called a clamp.
(3):
(v. t.) To lay or pave with bricks; to surround, line, or construct with bricks.
(4):
(n.) Any oblong rectangular mass; as, a brick of maple sugar; a penny brick (of bread).
(5):
(n.) A good fellow; a merry person; as, you 're a brick.
(6):
(v. t.) To imitate or counterfeit a brick wall on, as by smearing plaster with red ocher, making the joints with an edge tool, and pointing them.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Brick
is a building material of clay, molded into rectangular shaped blocks while moist and hardened by the sun or fire, used to construct walls or pavement.
The task of brick making was hard labor. It involved digging and moving heavy clay. Clay required softening with water which was done by treading clay pits. After molding the bricks of approximately 2 by 4 by 8 inches, they were dried in the sun or in kilns, (ovens) for fire-hardened bricks. The tower of Babel (Genesis 11:3 ), made of bricks, had mortar of slime, a tar-like substance. Later, because of famine, Joseph moved his family to Egypt (Genesis 46:6 ). The twelve families multiplied greatly in 430 years. A new Pharaoh who “knew not Joseph” (Exodus 1:6-8 ) enslaved the Jews. They built storehouse cities of brick in Pithom and Ramses. Egyptian bricks were sometimes mixed with straw. When Moses confronted Pharaoh for Israel's freedom, the angered Pharaoh increased his demands of the slaves. They must produce their same brick quotas and gather their own straw. Both straw-made bricks and bricks of pure clay have been found at Pithom and Ramses. When David conquered the Ammorites, he required they make bricks (2 Samuel 12:31 ). Isaiah (Isaiah 65:3 ) condemned Israel for their pagan-like practice of offering incense on altars of brick.
Lawson Hatfield
Webster's Dictionary - Arch Brick
A wedge-shaped brick used in the building of an arch.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Brick
BRICK . The use of sun-dried bricks as building material in OT times, alongside of the more durable limestone, is attested both by the excavations and by Scripture references (see House). The process of brick-making shows the same simplicity in every age and country. Suitable clay is thoroughly moistened, and reduced to a uniform consistency by tramping and kneading ( Nahum 3:14 RV [1] ‘go into the clay, and tread the mortar’). It then passes to the brick-moulder, who places the right quantity in his mould, an open wooden frame with one of its four sides prolonged as a handle, wiping off the superfluous clay with his hand. The mould is removed and the brick left on the ground to dry in the sun. Sometimes greater consistency was given to the clay by mixing it with chopped straw and the refuse of the threshing-floor, as related in the familiar passage Exodus 5:7-19 . As regards the daily ‘tale of bricks’ there referred to, an expert moulder in Egypt to-day is said to be able to turn out no fewer than ‘about 3000 bricks’ per diem (Vigouroux, Dict. de la Bible , i. 1932). The Egyptian bricks resembled our own in shape, while those of Babylonia were generally as broad as they were long. According to Flinders Petrie, the earliest Palestine bricks followed the Babylonian pattern.
There is no evidence in OT of the making of kiln-burnt bricks, which was evidently a foreign custom to the author of Genesis 11:3 . The brickkiln of 2 Samuel 12:31 , Nahum 3:14 is really the brick-mould (so RVm [2] ). In the obscure passage Jeremiah 43:9 RV [1] has brickwork . A curious ritual use of bricks as incense-altars is mentioned in Isaiah 65:3 .
Reference may also be made to the use of clay as a writing material, which was introduced into Palestine from Babylonia, and, as we now know, continued in use in certain quarters till the time of Hezekiah at least. Plans of buildings, estates, and cities were drawn on such clay tablets, a practice which illustrates the command to Ezekiel to draw a plan of Jerusalem upon a tils or clay brick (Ezekiel 4:1 , see the elaborate note by Haupt in ‘Ezekiel’ ( PB [3]5 ), 98 ff.).
A. R. S. Kennedy.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Brick
Genesis 11:3 (c) This is a type of man-made religious programs which lack the consistency, strength and durability of the Rock of Ages. No religion of any kind that has its origin in the mind of a man or a woman will pass GOD's judgment. Salvation is of the Lord, and not of some group of men or women. Salvation is of the Jews, and therefore cannot come through any Gentile source. All false religions are as "bricks." They are designed and conceived in human minds and are not based on the Word of GOD, nor the will of GOD.
Isaiah 9:10 (b) Israel found that if their first efforts in following idols should fail, then they would devise ways and means of sinning in a more durable and lasting way.
Isaiah 65:3 (b) Here we find a picture of the wickedness of Israel. They should have made altars of stone. Stones are made by GOD. Instead of that they made altars of brick, and bricks are made by men. They substituted their own works (bricks), for and instead of GOD's works (stones). (See also Exodus 20:25).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Brick-Kiln
Probably a place where bricks were made as well as burnt. 2 Samuel 12:31 ; Jeremiah 43:9 ; Nahum 3:14 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Brick
Brick. In Scripture bricks are frequently and early mentioned, as well as the material with which they were cemented. Genesis 11:3. Both the "slime" or bitumen, and the clay of which the bricks were formed, were abundant in the Mesopotamian plain. Bricks appear to have been, in Egypt and at Nineveh, very generally sun-dried: for the Babylonian buildings they were more commonly burnt in kilns. The clay was sometimes mixed with chopped straw to increase the tenacity and compactness of the bricks; and this was the more needful when the material was the Kile mud. Exodus 1:14; Exodus 5:6-19. Egyptian bricks, with dates upon them, are sail preserved as fit for use as when they were first made. They are of a large size, varying from 14¼ to 20 inches in length; 6½ to 8¾ inches in breadth; and in thickness 4½ to 7 inches.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Brick
(Genesis 11:3 ) The brick in use among the Jews were much larger than with us, being usually from 12 to 13 inches square and 3 1/2 inches thick; they thus possess more of the character of tiles. (Ezekiel 4:1 ) The Israelites, in common with other captives, were employed by the Egyptian monarchs in making bricks and in building. (Exodus 1:14 ; 5:7 ) Egyptian bricks were not generally dried in kilns, but in the sun. That brick-kilns were known is evident from (2 Samuel 12:31 ; Jeremiah 43:9 ) When made of the Nile mud they required straw to prevent cracking. [1]

Sentence search

Brick - ) Bricks, collectively, as designating that kind of material; as, a load of Brick; a thousand of Brick. ) To lay or pave with Bricks; to surround, line, or construct with Bricks. ) Any oblong rectangular mass; as, a Brick of maple sugar; a penny Brick (of bread). ) A good fellow; a merry person; as, you 're a Brick. ) To imitate or counterfeit a Brick wall on, as by smearing plaster with red ocher, making the joints with an edge tool, and pointing them
Brick - Brick, n. A loaf shaped like a Brick. Brick, To lay or pave with Bricks. To imitate or counterfeit a Brick wall on plaster,by smearing it with red ocher and making the joints with an edge-tool, filling them with fine plaster
Brickbat - ) A piece or fragment of a Brick
Arch Brick - A wedge-shaped Brick used in the building of an arch
Coctile - ) Made by baking, or exposing to heat, as a Brick
Walls - These walls were built of stones, set in mud, or else of Brick. The choice of material varied with the locality: Lachish ( Tell el-Hesy ), for example, was almost entirely a Brick town; in Gezer Brick is the exception
Bricky - ) Full of Bricks; formed of Bricks; resembling Bricks or Brick dust
Bricked - ) of Brick...
Later - ) A Brick or tile
Bricking - ) of Brick...
Roughing-in - ) The first coat of plaster laid on Brick; also, the process of applying it
Tahapanes - A platform of Brick-work, which there is every reason to believe was the pavement at the entry of Pharaoh's palace, has been discovered at this place. Petrie, "the ceremony described by [1] took place before the chiefs of the fugitives assembled on the platform, and here Nebuchadnezzar spread his royal pavilion" (RSV, "brickwork")
Quadrel - ) A square Brick, tile, or the like
Malmbrick - ) A kind of Brick of a light brown or yellowish color, made of sand, clay, and chalk
Trumpeting - ) A channel cut behind the Brick lining of a shaft
Chimney - In architecture, a body of Brick or stone, erected in a building, containing a funnel or funnels, to convey smoke, and other volatile matter through the roof, from the hearth or fire-place, where fuel is burnt. A fireplace the lower part of the body of Brick or stone which confines and conveys smoke
Straw - Used in Brick-making (Exodus 5:7-18 )
Pucka - , of buildings, made of Brick and mortar
Brick - Genesis 11:3, "Let us make Brick, and burn them thoroughly (margin burn them to a burning). And they had Brick for stone, and slime had they for mortar. " So Herodotus states that in building Babylon's walls the clay dug out of the ditch was made into Bricks, being burnt in kilns. The Bricks were cemented with hot bitumen (asphalt), and at every thirtieth row reeds were stuffed in. But in Assyria and Egypt the Bricks are sundried, not fireburnt, though in Jeremiah 43:9 a Brick kiln is mentioned in Egypt. ...
The Babylonian are larger than English Bricks, being about 13 in. Nebuchadnezzar's buildings superseded those of his predecessors; hence, most of the Babylonian Bricks bear his name m cuneiform character. ), captives, distinguished from the natives by color, are represented as forced by taskmasters to make Brick; the latter armed with sticks are receiving "the tale of Bricks. The walls of crude Brick were cased with gypsum slabs to the height of 10 feet; kiln-burned Bricks cased the crude Bricks from the slabs to the top of the wall. The Brick kiln is mentioned in David's time as in use in Israel (2 Samuel 12:31); they in Isaiah's time (Isaiah 65:3) substituted altars of Brick for the unhewn stone which God commanded
Pavior - ) A Brick or slab used for paving
Pave - ) To lay or cover with stone, Brick, or other material, so as to make a firm, level, or convenient surface for horses, carriages, or persons on foot, to travel on; to floor with Brick, stone, or other solid material; as, to pave a street; to pave a court
Bricks - Were usually made of clay, dried and hardened in the sun, Genesis 11:3 , though Brick-kilns were sometimes used, 2 Samuel 12:31 Nahum 3:14 . The tower of Babel was constructed of Brick, cemented with bitumen. The Bricks used were often a foot square; and great numbers of them are found, both in Babylon and Egypt, impressed with some royal or priestly stamp. The principal subject of interest connected with Brick making is the fact that it was the labor in which the Hebrews in Egypt were most oppressed. On the monuments of Egypt, all the parts of this hard and ancient task-work are painted-the carrying, tempering, and molding of the clay, and the drying and pilling of the Bricks-all done by foreigners under the orders of taskmasters
Hod - A kind of tray for carrying mortar and Brick,used in Bricklaying
Brick - ...
The task of Brick making was hard labor. After molding the Bricks of approximately 2 by 4 by 8 inches, they were dried in the sun or in kilns, (ovens) for fire-hardened Bricks. The tower of Babel (Genesis 11:3 ), made of Bricks, had mortar of slime, a tar-like substance. They built storehouse cities of Brick in Pithom and Ramses. Egyptian Bricks were sometimes mixed with straw. They must produce their same Brick quotas and gather their own straw. Both straw-made Bricks and Bricks of pure clay have been found at Pithom and Ramses. When David conquered the Ammorites, he required they make Bricks (2 Samuel 12:31 ). Isaiah (Isaiah 65:3 ) condemned Israel for their pagan-like practice of offering incense on altars of Brick
Polyhalite - ) A mineral usually occurring in fibrous masses, of a Brick-red color, being tinged with iron, and consisting chiefly of the sulphates of lime, magnesia, and soda
Hod - ) A kind of wooden tray with a handle, borne on the shoulder, for carrying mortar, Brick, etc
Oven - ...
An arch of Brick or stone work, for baking bread and other things for food
Bonder - ) A bonding stone or Brick; a bondstone
Altar Steps - Of wood, stone, or Brick, extend around the altar on three sides
Testaceous - ) Having a dull red Brick color or a brownish yellow color
Steps, Altar - Of wood, stone, or Brick, extend around the altar on three sides
Kir-Har'Aseth - (brick fortress ), ( 2 Kings 3:25 ) Kir-ha'resh, ( Isaiah 16:11 ) Kir-har'es, ( Jeremiah 48:31,36 ) These four names are all applied to one place, probably KIR OF MOAB, which see
Brickkiln - Brick'KILN, n. Brick and kiln. A kiln, or furnace, in which Bricks are baked or burnt, or a pile of Bricks,laid loose, with arches underneath to receive the wood or fuel
Brick - Brick . The use of sun-dried Bricks as building material in OT times, alongside of the more durable limestone, is attested both by the excavations and by Scripture references (see House). The process of Brick-making shows the same simplicity in every age and country. It then passes to the Brick-moulder, who places the right quantity in his mould, an open wooden frame with one of its four sides prolonged as a handle, wiping off the superfluous clay with his hand. The mould is removed and the Brick left on the ground to dry in the sun. As regards the daily ‘tale of Bricks’ there referred to, an expert moulder in Egypt to-day is said to be able to turn out no fewer than ‘about 3000 Bricks’ per diem (Vigouroux, Dict. The Egyptian Bricks resembled our own in shape, while those of Babylonia were generally as broad as they were long. According to Flinders Petrie, the earliest Palestine Bricks followed the Babylonian pattern. ...
There is no evidence in OT of the making of kiln-burnt Bricks, which was evidently a foreign custom to the author of Genesis 11:3 . The Brickkiln of 2 Samuel 12:31 , Nahum 3:14 is really the Brick-mould (so RVm [1] has Brickwork . A curious ritual use of Bricks as incense-altars is mentioned in Isaiah 65:3 . Plans of buildings, estates, and cities were drawn on such clay tablets, a practice which illustrates the command to Ezekiel to draw a plan of Jerusalem upon a tils or clay Brick (Ezekiel 4:1 , see the elaborate note by Haupt in ‘Ezekiel’ ( PB Hollander - ) A very hard, semi-glazed, green or dark brown Brick, which will not absorb water; - called also, Dutch clinker
Brick - (Genesis 11:3 ) The Brick in use among the Jews were much larger than with us, being usually from 12 to 13 inches square and 3 1/2 inches thick; they thus possess more of the character of tiles. (Ezekiel 4:1 ) The Israelites, in common with other captives, were employed by the Egyptian monarchs in making Bricks and in building. (Exodus 1:14 ; 5:7 ) Egyptian Bricks were not generally dried in kilns, but in the sun. That Brick-kilns were known is evident from (2 Samuel 12:31 ; Jeremiah 43:9 ) When made of the Nile mud they required straw to prevent cracking
Ashler - ) In the United States especially, a thin facing of squared and dressed stone upon a wall of rubble or Brick
Hearth - A pavement or floor of Brick or stone in a chimney, on which a fire is made to warm a room, and from which there is a passage for the smoke to ascend
Tidal - Mentioned as Tudkhula on Arioch's Brick (see facing page 139)
Penciling - ) Lines of white or black paint drawn along a mortar joint in a Brick wall
Oven - ) A place arched over with Brick or stonework, and used for baking, heating, or drying; hence, any structure, whether fixed or portable, which may be heated for baking, drying, etc
Kiln - The term “brickkiln” is used in Nahum 3:14 , but this should probably read “brick mold” (NRSV, NAS) or “brick work” (NIV, REB), as the Bricks in Palestine were usually sun dried
Closer - ) The last stone in a horizontal course, if of a less size than the others, or a piece of Brick finishing a course
Blains - If these ashes came from the Brick-kilns where the Hebrews had toiled, the pains which the Egyptians suffered would naturally remind them of those which they had inflicted
Pavement - A floor or covering consisting of stones or Bricks, laid on the earth in such a manner as to make a hard and convenient passage as a pavement of pebbles, of Bricks, or of marble. ...
PA'VEMENT, To pave to floor with stone or Brick
Briquette - ) A block of artificial stone in the form of a Brick, used for paving; also, a molded sample of solidified cement or mortar for use as a test piece for showing the strength of the material
Brisk - ) Full of spirit of life; effervesc/ng, as liquors; sparkling; as, Brick cider
Adobe - ) Earth from which unburnt Bricks are made. ) An unburnt Brick dried in the sun; also used as an adjective, as, an adobe house, in Texas or New Mexico
Regenerator - , in which the incoming air or gas is heated by being brought into contact with masses of iron, Brick, etc
Kiln - ) A furnace for burning Bricks; a Brickkiln. ) A large stove or oven; a furnace of Brick or stone, or a heated chamber, for the purpose of hardening, burning, or drying anything; as, a kiln for baking or hardening earthen vessels; a kiln for drying grain, meal, lumber, etc
Wall - A work or structure of stone, Brick or other materials, raised to some highth, and intended for a defense or security. Walls of stone or Brick form the exterior of buildings, and they are often raised round cities and forts as a defense against enemies
Pithom - Naville has identified Pithom with Pa-Tum, "setting sun," and with Tel el-Maskhûta, where he found remarkable ruins, Brick grain-chambers, and similar evidences of a "store city
Ziggurat - The design consisted of placing smaller levels of Brick on top of larger layers
Mason - ) One whose occupation is to build with stone or Brick; also, one who prepares stone for building purposes. ) To build stonework or Brickwork about, under, in, over, etc
Kir-Haraseth - Kir-haraseth (kir'hăr'a-sĕth), Brick fortress, 2 Kings 3:25 A
Clinker - ) A kind of Brick. ) A mass composed of several Bricks run together by the action of the fire in the kiln
Masonry - ) That which is built by a mason; anything constructed of the materials used by masons, such as stone, Brick, tiles, or the like
Brickkiln - An oven, furnace, or heated enclosure used for processing Bricks by burning, firing, or drying. Some Bible students believe that sun-dried Bricks were used in Palestine; they would translate the word as “brick-mold” (see Nahum 3:14 NRSV, NAS, TEV). Others give the neutral translation “brickwork” (NIV, REB). Just as the Egyptians used the Israelites to make Bricks, so David put the Ammonites to making Bricks ( 2 Samuel 12:31 )
Tile - Ezekiel 4:1, a sun-dried "brick," the same as is translated "brick" in Genesis 11:3. " Bricks with designs engraven on them are found still in ancient Mesopotamian cities
Chimney - an upright tube or flue of Brick or stone, in most cases extending through or above the roof of the building
Erech - Apparently the necropolis of the Assyrian kings, judging from the Brick and coffins and mounds all round. Some Bricks bear the monogram "the moon," corresponding to Hebrew yareach , from whence perhaps Erech is derived
Bosh - ) One of the sloping sides of the lower part of a blast furnace; also, one of the hollow iron or Brick sides of the bed of a puddling or boiling furnace
Hearth - ) The pavement or floor of Brick, stone, or metal in a chimney, on which a fire is made; the floor of a fireplace; also, a corresponding part of a stove
Bricks - As early as Genesis 11:3 we read of Bricks being made and burnt; and in Egypt the Bricks were made with an admixture of straw. When the Israelites had to find their own straw or stubble and yet make as many Bricks per day, it is probable that but little straw was used. Some ancient Bricks have been found which had apparently no straw in them. Many of the Bricks were stamped with the name of the reigning monarch. ...
On the monuments in a tomb the process of Brick-making in Egypt is fully delineated: a task-master stands over the men with a stick in his hand, as doubtless was the case in the time of Moses. Bricks brought from Egypt vary in size, from 20 inches to 14-1/4 in. There is a Brick from Babylon in the British Museum, which bears the inscription in cuneiform characters "I am Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon, the restorer of the temples Sag-ili and Zida, the eldest son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon. Other Bricks from Chaldea are more ancient still
Tailing - ) The part of a projecting stone or Brick inserted in a wall
Heading - ) That end of a stone or Brick which is presented outward
Mortar - In Assyrian and also Egyptian Brick buildings, stubble or straw, as hair or wool among ourselves, was added to increase the tenacity
Mortar - In Assyrian and also Egyptian Brick buildings, stubble or straw, as hair or wool among ourselves, was added to increase the tenacity
Shi'Nar - It was a plain country, where Brick had to be used for stone and slime for mortar
Header - ) A Brick or stone laid with its shorter face or head in the surface of the wall
Walls - (Luke 6:48 ) ...
A feature of some parts of Solomon's buildings, as described by Josephus, corresponds remarkably to the method adopted at Nineveh of incrusting or veneering a wall of Brick or stone with slabs of a more costly material, as marble or alabaster
Tahpanhes - Jeremiah, after the murder of Gedaliah, was taken to this place, and Pharaoh had a palace built or restored there, made of Bricks In a Brick-kiln
Bed - ) The place or material in which a block or Brick is laid. ) A course of stone or Brick in a wall. ) The lower surface of a Brick, slate, or tile
Mortar - A building material, usually clay (Exodus 1:14 ; Isaiah 41:25 ; Nahum 3:14 ), though sometimes bitumen (Genesis 11:3 ; KJV “slime”), used to secure joints in Brick or stone
Arch - A concave or hollow structure of stone or Brick, supported by its own curve
Tile, Tiling - The former occurs only in Ezekiel 4:1 for ‘brick’ the usual rendering of the original. For plans of a city drawn on ‘bricks’ or ‘tablets’ of soft clay, which were afterwards baked hard, see ‘Ezekiel,’ in SBOT Straw - It was employed by the Egyptians for making Bricks, (Exodus 5:7,16 ) being chopped up and mixed with the clay to make them more compact and to prevent their cracking. [1] The ancient Egyptians reaped their corn close to the ear, and afterward cut the straw close to the ground and laid it by
Hypocrisy - In the olden times even the best rooms were usually of bare Brick or stone, damp, and moldy, but over these in great houses when the family was resident, were hung up arras or hangings of rich materials, between which and the wall persons might conceal themselves, so that literally walls had ears
Furnace - A device, generally of Brick or stone, used to heat materials to high temperatures. Rather furnaces were used to smelt ore, melt metal for casting, heat metal for forging, fire pottery or Bricks, and to make lime. The furnace of Daniel 3:1 was probably a large furnace used for smelting ore or for firing Bricks
Kirharaseth - We know that Kir is city; and Haresh is sometimes put for Brick or baked
Brick - Brick. In Scripture Bricks are frequently and early mentioned, as well as the material with which they were cemented. Both the "slime" or bitumen, and the clay of which the Bricks were formed, were abundant in the Mesopotamian plain. Bricks appear to have been, in Egypt and at Nineveh, very generally sun-dried: for the Babylonian buildings they were more commonly burnt in kilns. The clay was sometimes mixed with chopped straw to increase the tenacity and compactness of the Bricks; and this was the more needful when the material was the Kile mud. Egyptian Bricks, with dates upon them, are sail preserved as fit for use as when they were first made
Rehoboth (1) - Its site is marked by fallen masonry, seemingly a cupola roof of well cemented Brick shaped stones
Partition - ) That which divides or separates; that by which different things, or distinct parts of the same thing, are separated; separating boundary; dividing line or space; specifically, an interior wall dividing one part or apartment of a house, an inclosure, or the like, from another; as, a Brick partition; lath and plaster partitions
Morter - This is spoken of as early as Genesis 11:3 , in reference to building the tower of Babel: they used Brick for stone and slime for morter. The rigorous labour of the Israelites in Egypt was in preparing morter as well as making Bricks
Wall - ) A work or structure of stone, Brick, or other materials, raised to some height, and intended for defense or security, solid and permanent inclosing fence, as around a field, a park, a town, etc
Kick - ) A projection in a mold, to form a depression in the surface of the Brick
Lut - ) A bat, or small piece of Brick, used to fill out a course
Shushan - They extend as far as the eastern bank of the Kerah; occupying an immense space between that river and the Abzal; and, like the ruins of Ctesiphon, Babylon, and Kufa, consist of hillocks of earth and rubbish, covered with broken pieces of Brick and coloured tile. These mounds bear some resemblance to the pyramids of Babylon; with this difference, that instead of being entirely made of Brick, they are formed of clay and pieces of tile, with irregular layers of Brick and mortar, five or six feet in thickness, to serve, it should seem, as a kind of prop to the mass
Morter - Layard says the cement is so tenacious that it is almost impossible to detach one Brick from another
Tahpanhes - Pharaoh had there a "palace" being built or repaired in the prophet's time, with Bricks made of clay in a "brick kiln" at the entry
Aggregate - ) A mass, assemblage, or sum of particulars; as, a house is an aggregate of stone, Brick, timber, etc
Masons - Building craftsmen using Brick or stone. The average man built his own home of sun dried Brick on a foundation of field stones
Thief - Eastern houses, being commonly of mud or sun-dried Brick, are easily broken into; cf
Bat - ) A part of a Brick with one whole end
Procrastination - It is a snowy day, and some boys have put a few Bricks together, making a sort of square box of them; they have set up one on edge on a piece of stick, and have scattered under it a few crumbs. Here comes a robin, and he picks up a crumb or two, and while he is feeding, down comes the Brick! 'I did not wait long,' says the robin, 'but I am caught! I did not wait long, but I cannot get out! I did not wait long, but I have lost my liberty! I did not wait long, but it may be I shall lose my life!' Ah! little robin, thou shalt be a preacher to some here
Brick - All false religions are as "bricks. Instead of that they made altars of Brick, and Bricks are made by men. They substituted their own works (bricks), for and instead of GOD's works (stones)
Cutter - ) A kind of soft yellow Brick, used for facework; - so called from the facility with which it can be cut
Scour - ) To rub hard with something rough, as sand or Bristol Brick, especially for the purpose of cleaning; to clean by friction; to make clean or bright; to cleanse from grease, dirt, etc
Babel - Its ruins are supposed to be the present Birs Nimroud, six miles south-west of Hilleh, the modern Babylon: an immense mound of coarse sun-dried Bricks, laid with bitumen. It is a ruinous heap, shattered by violence, furrowed by storms, and strewn with fragments of Brick, pottery, etc. It Isaiah 190 feet high, and on the top rises an irregular tower 90 feet in circumference and 35 feet high, built of the fine Brick-with which the whole mound appears to have been faced
Pallet - ) A board on which a newly molded Brick is conveyed to the hack
Bridge - ) A structure, usually of wood, stone, Brick, or iron, erected over a river or other water course, or over a chasm, railroad, etc
Marble - 7), but the Empire effected a great change of sentiment, and Augustus boasted, not without reason, that he ‘found Rome of Brick and left it of marble’ (Suet
On - Besides enclosure walls of crude Brick and mounds of rubbish, the site of the temple is now marked by one conspicuous monument, an obelisk set up by Senwosri i
Accad - The mound which constitutes its foundation is composed of a collection of rubbish, formed from the decay of the superstructure; and consists of sandy earth, fragments of burnt Brick, pottery, and hard clay, partially vitrified. In the remains of the tower, the different layers of sun-dried Brick, of which it is composed, may be traced with great precision. These Bricks, cemented together by slime, and divided into courses varying from twelve to twenty feet in height, are separated from one another by a stratum of reeds, similar to those now growing in the marshy parts of the plain, and in a wonderful state of preservation
Straw, Stubble - Accordingly, when the Hebrews in Egypt ‘gathered stubble for straw’ ( Exodus 5:12 ), what they did was to pull up the stalks of wheat left standing in the fields and cut them up into short pieces suitable for Brick-making, instead of being allowed to procure the tibn ready to their hand from the local threshing-floors
Basket - dud) for carrying figs (Jeremiah 24:2 ), also clay to the Brick-yard (RSV, Psalm 81:6 ), and bulky articles (2 Kings 10:7 )
Babel - It was in the plain of Shinar, and made of burnt Bricks, with "slime" (probably bitumen) for mortar. It was built of burnt Bricks, each Brick being twelve inches square and four inches thick
Babel - This solid mound, which I consider, from its situation and magnitude, to be...
the remains of the Tower of Babel, (an opinion likewise adopted by...
that venerable and highly distinguished geographer, Major Rennell,) is a vast oblong square, composed of kiln-burnt and sun-dried Bricks, rising irregularly to the height of one hundred and thirty- nine feet, at the south-west; whence it slopes toward the north-east to a depth of one hundred and ten feet. The summit is an uneven flat, strewed with broken and unbroken Bricks, the perfect ones measuring thirteen inches square, by three thick. Pottery, bitumen, vitrified and petrified Brick, shells, and glass, were all equally abundant. The principal materials composing this...
ruin are, doubtless, mud Bricks baked in the sun, and mixed up with straw. It is not difficult to trace Brick work along each front, particularly at the south-west angle, which is faced by a wall, composed partly of kiln-burnt Brick, that in shape exactly resembles a watch tower or small turret. On its summit there are still considerable traces of erect building; at the western end is a circular mass of solid Brick work, sloping toward the top, and rising from a confused heap of rubbish. The chief material forming this fabric appeared similar to that composing the ruin called Akercouff, a mixture of chopped straw, with slime used as cement; and regular layers of unbroken reeds between the horizontal courses of the Bricks. The sides of the ruin exhibit hollows worn partly by the weather, but more generally formed by the Arabs, who are incessantly digging for Bricks, and hunting for antiquities
Shift - ) In building, the extent, or arrangement, of the overlapping of plank, Brick, stones, etc
Shushan - They occupy an immense space between the rivers Kerah and Abzal; and like the ruins of Ctesiphon, Babylon, and Kufa, consist of hillocks of earth and rubbish, covered with broken pieces of Brick and colored tile. They are formed of clay and pieces of tile, with irregular layers of Brick and mortar, five or six feet in thickness, to serve, as it should seem, as a kind of prop to the mass
Architecture, Byzantine - Oriental love of splendor found expression in the decoration of floor and walls with richly colored marbles and mosaics; but sculpture was devoid of high relief and the exterior was usually of plain Brick
Demand - The officers of the children of Israel-were beaten, and demanded, wherefore have ye not fulfilled your task in making Brick
Kentucky - When Right Reverend Benedict Flaget, who had visited Louisville on his missionary journey, 1792, arrived at his See at Bardstown; 1811, as the first bishop of the whole Northwest Territory he found about 10 log churches in central Kentucky, and one of Brick built at the Irish settlement of Danville on land given by Daniel McElroy
Massachusetts - The same fall a congregation of about 100 was gathered together in Boston and the building of a Brick church, under the patronage of the Holy Cross, was undertaken on the site of a former Huguenot church on School Street, by Reverend Claude de la Poterie, who had come from France
Burr - ) A clinker; a partially vitrified Brick
Temper - ) To moisten to a proper consistency and stir thoroughly, as clay for making Brick, loam for molding, etc
Eton College - The main buildings, two quadrangles, are of Brick; the Gothic chapel, of stone, with painted glass, and richly ornamented, was used as the parish church (Anglican since the Reformation) until 1854
House - ...
Abraham left Mesopotamia where he lived in houses made of mud Brick (compare Genesis 11:3 ) and became a tent dweller (Hebrews 11:9 ). In the lowlands of the Jordan Valley the houses were built of mud Brick because stone was not readily available
Ur - Now Mugheir (a ruined temple of large bitumen Bricks, which also "mugheir" means, namely, Um Mugheir "mother of bitumen"), on the right bank of the Euphrates, near its junction with the Shat el Hie from the Tigris; in Chaldaea proper. Its Bricks bear the name of the earliest monumental kings, "Urukh king of Ur"; his kingdom extended as far N. The temple is thoroughly Chaldaean in type, in stages of which two remain, of Brick partly sunburnt, partly baked, cemented with bitumen
Pitch - Bitumen pits are still found at Hit on the western bank of Euphrates; so tenacious is it "that it is almost impossible to detach one Brick from another" (Layard, Nin
Pitch - It was much used in ancient buildings in that region; and, in the ruins of Babylon, large masses of Brick work cemented with it are discovered
Hack - ) A frame or grating of various kinds; as, a frame for drying Bricks, fish, or cheese; a rack for feeding cattle; a grating in a mill race, etc. ) Unburned Brick or tile, stacked up for drying
Course - ) A continuous level range of Brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building
Burn - 11:3 in the Tower of Babel story: “Go to, let us make Brick, and burn them thoroughly
Kir - From harith "a hill" Arabic), or heres "baked clay," namely, the walls being of Brick (?)
Rome - Paul's first visit was between the restoration by Augustus, whose boast was "he had found the city of Brick and left it of marble" (Suet
Philadelphia - Curiously, a portion of a stone church wall topped with arches of Brick remains; the building must have been magnificent, and dates from Theodosius
Test - In metallurgy, a large cupel, or a vessel in the nature of a cupel, formed of wood ashes and finely powdered Brick dust, in which metals are melted for trial and refinement
Altar - This type altar was made of either mud-brick or a raised roughly shaped mound of dirt. Mud-brick was a common building material in Mesopotamia, so mud-brick altars would have appeared most likely in Mesopotamia. It might also reflect the Mesopotamian ancestry of the Hebrews, since the mud-brick was the typical building material there
Oregon - He took up his residence first at Saint Paul, where the log church had been replaced by one of Brick, and moved in 1848 to Oregon City
Louisiana - This first building, in charge of the Capuchin Father Anthony, was destroyed by a hurricane in 1722, and replaced in 1724-1725 by a Brick church on the site of the present cathedral, presided over by Father Raphael de Luxembourg
Babylon - These consist of numerous mounds, usually of Brick, deeply furrowed and decayed by time, strewn with fragments of Brick, bitumen, pottery, etc
Burn - To harden in the fire to bake or harden by heat as, to burn Bricks or a Brick kiln. The operation of burning or baking, as in Brickmaking as, they have a good burn
Babel, Tower of - Lowest is a platform of crude Brick, three feet high. The Bricks are sun-dried, and of different sizes and shapes
House - It may be of any size and composed of any materials whatever, wood, stone, Brick, &c
House - Clay in the form of Bricks, either sun-dried or, less frequently, baked in a kiln (see Brick), and stone ( Leviticus 14:40 ff. Houses built of crude Brick are the ‘houses of clay,’ the unsubstantial nature of which is emphasized in Job 4:19 f. ...
The excavations have shown that there is no uniformity, even at a given epoch, in the size of Bricks, which are both rectangular and square in shape. At Gezer a common size is a square Brick 15 inches in the side and 7 inches’ thick ( PEFSt Wash - Thus work is washed with a pale red to imitate Brick, &c
Tongues, Confusion of - The belief that the world, after the Flood, was re-populated by the progeny of a single family, speaking one language, is reconciled in the Bible with the existing diversity of tongues by a story which relates how the descendants of Noah, in the course of their wanderings, settled in the plain of Shinar, or Babylonia, and there built of Brick a city, and a tower high enough to reach heaven, as a monument to preserve their fame, and as a centre of social cohesion and union
Ur - It stood near the mouth of the Euphrates, on its western bank, and is represented by the mounds (of Bricks cemented by bitumen) of el-Mugheir, i. The illustration here given represents his cuneiform inscription, written in the Sumerian language, and stamped upon every Brick of the temple in Ur
Maryland - By 1697 Maryland could boast a Brick chapel at Saint Mary's, and frame chapels at Saint Inigoes, Port Tobacco, Newtown, Newport, Doncaster, and on the Boarman estate
Nineveh - He boasted that the materials for the palace included “fragrant cedars, cypresses, doors banded with silver and copper painted Brick,
Caesarea - ’ Since 1889, however, a few Bosnians have settled among the ruins and carried on a small trade in Brick
Sennacherib - He embanked with Brick the Tigris, restored the aqueducts of Nineveh, and repaired a second palace at Nineveh on the mound of Nebi Yunns
Moloch - In 2 Samuel 12:31 for the Hebrew margin reading malbeen , "brick-kiln," the Hebrew text has Μalkeen , "David led through Malkan," i
Nahum - The overflowing river, it is said, caused a breach in the sun-dried Brick walls
Nail - These nails they do not drive into the walls with a hammer or mallet, but fix them there when the house is building; for if the walls are of Brick, they are too hard, or if they consist of clay, too soft and mouldering, to admit the action of the hammer
Jericho - He also traced in this place for a short distance a mud Brick wall in situ, which he supposes to be the very wall that fell before the trumpets of Joshua
Nile - The burnt Brick still lower, on which he laid stress, was itself enough to have confuted him, for burnt Brick was first introduced into Egypt under Rome (see Quarterly Revue, April, 1859)
Adam - No Brick mold is given
Gate - square, lined round with tiles, with a Brick to cover them above and containing small baked clay idols with lynx head and human body, or human head and lion's body, probably like the teraphim, from Arabic tarf "a boundary," and akin to the Persian "telifin" talismans
Damasus, Pope - He "removed the earth, widened the passages, so as to make them more serviceable for the crowd of pilgrims, constructed flights of stairs leading to the more illustrious shrines, and adorned the chambers with marbles, opening shafts to admit air and light where practicable, and supporting the friable tufa walls and galleries wherever it was necessary with arches of Brick and stone work
Book - Plates of lead or copper, the bark of trees, Brick, stone, and wood, were originally employed to engrave such things and documents upon as men desired to transmit to posterity, Deuteronomy 27:2,3 Job 19:23,24 . Inscriptions were also made on tiles and Bricks, which were afterwards hardened by fire
Augustus - His boast that he had found Rome made of Brick and left it made of marble probably means no more than that he faced the (regular) Brick core of buildings with marble slabs, but he certainly spent vast sums on building
Altar - Four materials are recorded as being used in altars: stone, earth, metal, and Brick
Fortification And Siegecraft - The walls, of crude Brick or stone, with which art supplemented nature, followed the contours of the ridge, the rock itself being frequently cut away to form artificial scarps, on the top of which the city wall was built. ...
The recent excavations in Palestine have shown that the fortifications of Canaanite and Hebrew cities were built, like their houses, of sun-dried Bricks, or of stone, or of both combined. When Brick was the chief material it was usual to begin with one or more foundation courses of stone as a protection against damp. After the introduction of the hattering-ram (§ 6 ) it was necessary to increase the resistance of Brick walls by a revetment or facing of stone, or less frequently of kiln-burnt Bricks, more especially in the lower part of the wall. At Tell es-Safi, again perhaps the ancient Gath the lower part of the city wall ‘shows external and internal facings of rubble with a packing of earth and small field stones,’ while the upper part had been built of large mud Bricks (Bliss and Macalister, Excavations in Palestine , 30 to be cited in the sequel as BM. The Egyptians used a long pole, with a metal point shaped like a spear-head, which was not swung but worked by hand, and could only be effective, therefore, against walls of crude Brick (see illustr. Here we see the massive battering-rams detaching the stones or Bricks from an angle of the wall, while the defenders, by means of a grappling-chain, are attempting to drag the ram from its covering tower
Babylon - They were built of Brick, cemented with bitumen instead of mortar; and were encompassed by a broad and deep ditch, lined with the same materials, as were also the banks of the river in its course through the city: the inhabitants descending to the water by steps through the smaller brazen gates before mentioned. That it was at some former period in a far different state, is evident from the number of canals by which it is traversed, now dry and neglected; and the quantity of heaps of earth covered with fragments of Brick and broken tiles, which are seen in every direction, the indisputable traces of former population. " On the opposite bank of the Tigris, where Ctesiphon its rival stood, beside fragments of walls and broken masses of Brick work, and remains of vast structures encumbered with heaps of earth, there is one magnificent monument of antiquity "in a remarkably perfect state of preservation," "a large and noble pile of building, the front of which presents to view a wall three hundred feet in length, adorned with four rows of arched recesses, with a central arch, in span eighty-six feet, and above a hundred feet high, supported by walls sixteen feet thick, and leading to a hall which extends to the depth of a hundred and fifty-six feet," the width of the building. "The whole face of the country," observes Rich, "is covered with vestiges of building, in some places consisting of Brick walls surprisingly fresh, in others, merely a vast succession of mounds of rubbish, of such indeterminate figures, variety, and extent, as to involve the person who should have formed any theory in inextricable confusion. All its grandeur is departed; all its treasures have been spoiled; all its excellence has utterly vanished; the very heaps are searched for Bricks, when nothing else can be found; even these are not left, wherever they can be taken away; and Babylon has for ages been "a quarry above ground," ready to the hand of every successive despoiler. "The ground is extremely soft, and tiresome to walk over, and appears completely exhausted of all its building materials; nothing now is left, save one towering hill, the earth of which is mixed with fragments of broken Brick, red varnished pottery, tile, bitumen, mortar, glass, shells, and pieces of mother of pearl,"—worthless fragments, of no value to the poorest. " While the workmen "cast her up as heaps" while excavating for Bricks, that they may "take" them "from thence," and that "nothing may be left;" they labour more than trebly in the fulfilment of prophecy: for the numerous and deep excavations form pools of water, on the overflowing of the Euphrates, and, annually filled, they are not dried up throughout the year. Instead of taking the Bricks from thence, the shepherd might very readily erect a defence from wild beasts, and make a fold for his flock amidst the heaps of Babylon; and the Arab who fearlessly traverses it by day, might pitch his tent by night
Babylon, History And Religion of - It could be entered through eight gates, the most famous of which was the northern Ishtar Gate, used in the annual New Year Festival and decorated with reliefs of dragons and bulls in enameled Brick. The road to this gate was bordered by high walls decorated by lions in glazed Brick behind which were defensive citadels
Dwelling - The dwellings of the poor in oriental lands are generally mere huts of mud or sun-burnt Bricks. The house of varied materials—wood, dried mud, Brick, stone, etc. Bricks, kiln-burnt, were probably also used. There were no chimneys; that so called, Hosea 13:3, was but a hole; indeed there were ordinarily no fires except in a kitchen, where, on a kind of Brick platform, places were provided for cooking
Chaldaea - An arid waste, with great mounds of rubbish and Brick here and there, all that is left of that "glory of kingdoms," now extends where once, by a perfect network of canals for irrigation, a teeming population was supplied abundantly from the rich soil with grain and wine
Set - ) A stone, commonly of granite, shaped like a short Brick and usually somewhat larger than one, used for street paving
Dish - It seems that this was a custom of late introduction into the Passover rite, and that it was intended to enrich the meaning of the feast by a symbolic reference to the Brick-making period of Israel’s Egyptian bondage (see art
Nebuchadnezzar - The Bricks taken from this mound are of fine quality, and are all stamped with the name of Nebuchadnezzar. In the corners of this longruined edifice, recently explored were found cylinders with arrowhead inscriptions, in the name of Nebuchadnezzar, which inform us that the building was named "The Stages of the Seven Spheres of Borsippa;" that it had been in a dilapidated condition; and that, moved by Merodach his god, he had reconstructed it with Bricks enriched with lapis lazuli, "without changing its site or destroying its foundation platform. Every Brick yet taken from it bears the impress of Nebuchadnezzar
Rome - What one sees is great masses of Brickwork, with arched roofs. The Bricks are square, and very thin as compared with those of to-day. In the heyday of their existence all these shabby Brick buildings were encased in marble. There is a well-known saying of Augustus that he found Rome built of Brick and left it made of marble. On seeing these ruins it occurred to the present writer that what was meant by this saying was simply that he had covered Brick buildings with marble. Thirty-six pillars of Brick covered with marble surrounded the central nave, and into this nave the galleries in the upper story opened
Assur - , rebuilt, and a century later Shalmaneser, one of whose Brick inscriptions G. The cuneiform writing is rapidly punched on moist clay, and so naturally took its rise in Babylonia, where they used "brick for stone" (Genesis 11:3), and passed thence to Assyria, where chiseling characters on rock is not so easy. Their alabaster quarries furnished a material better than the Babylonian Bricks for portraying scenes
Sign - Ezekiel, likewise, illustrated the coming siege of Jerusalem using a Brick, earth, and a plate (Ezekiel 4:1-3 )
Rome, - The boast of Augustus is well known, "that he found the city of Brick, and left it of marble
Babel - He says in the inscription, "the house of the earth's base (the basement substructure), the most ancient monument of Babylon I built and finished; I exalted its head with Bricks covered with copper . A deep wide moat of water surrounded the wall, the 30 lower courses of Bricks were wattled with reeds, and the whole cemented with hot asphalt from Is (Hit). The principal are three of unbaked Brickwork; Babil, the Kasr or palace, and a high mound now surmounted by the tomb of Amram ibn Alb; two parallel lines of rampart, on the E. Rawlinson found by excavation the tower consisted of seven stages of Brickwork on an earthen platform three feet high, each stage of different color. high, the Bricks black with bitumen, probably devoted to Saturn; the second stage 230 ft. high, orange Bricks, devoted probably to Jupiter; the third, 188 ft. high, red Bricks, probably devoted to Mars; the fourth, 146 ft. It was originally coated with fine burnt Brick; all the inscribed Bricks bear the name of Nebuchadnezzar, who rebuilt it. The pale yellow burnt Bricks are stamped with Nebuchadnezzar's name and titles; "Nebuchadnezzar, son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon. " The enameled Bricks found bear traces of figures, confirming Ctesias' statement that the walls represented hunting scenes in bright colors. ...
The Amram mound is the ancient palace, as old as Babylon itself; its Bricks containing the names of kings before Nebuchadnezzar; that king mentions it in his inscriptions. The inscription of the Bricks with Neriglissar's name marks him as the founder of the lesser palace. With only "brick for stone," and at first only "slime for mortar," the Babylonians by the forced labor of multitudes erected monuments of genius so vast as to be still among the wonders of the world. Writing had begun, for the Bricks are stamped with their kings' names. The Bricks, rudely molded and of various sizes, are some kiln-burned, others sun-dried; buttresses support their buildings: mortar is unknown, clay and bitumen being substituted. of 6 Babylonian kings 87 - 538 Urukh is mentioned earliest on the monuments after Nimrod; his Bricks are the lowest down and the rudest in make. His palace with threefold enclosure, plated pillars, enameled Brick, and hanging gardens, was celebrated throughout the civilized world. ...
The ruins of ancient temples repaired by him, and cities restored and adorned, still attest his genius, with their Bricks inscribed with his name
Nebuchadnezzar - ' Though long dead, King Nebuchadnezzar still speaks in the Book of Daniel, and on a thousand cylinders in the British Museum; and, as on every page of Daniel, so on every Brick of Babylon, he that runs may read this evening's text:-'Those that walk in pride the King of heaven is able to abase. Nebuchadnezzar's Bricks were made of clay; whereas the Bricks of your nursery-Nebuchadnezzar are made of wood. '...
But, with alt that, I see in my own children every day a far worse kind of pride than any that the big child Nebuchadnezzar shows either in the Book of Daniel, or on the Bricks of Babylon. And if Nebuchadnezzar had not built every single street of it, this, at any rate, he could say, that he had found Babylon a city of Brick and had made it a city of marble
Ecbatana - The sides and summit are covered with large remnants of ruined walls of a great thickness, and also of towers, the materials of which were sun dried Bricks. In the centre was the Jewish tomb; a square building of Brick, of a mosque- like form, with a rather elongated dome at the top
Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata - 4), a woman charged with Arian passion hurled at Eusebius a Brick, which fell upon his head, and wounded him fatally
Babylon - The innermost, about 22 feet thick, was made of sun-dried mud-brick. Beyond this by 39 feet was a second slightly thicker wall of baked Bricks. Outside this wall was another some 10 feet thick of baked Bricks forming the scarp of a moat perhaps as wide as 330 feet. Each of these walls was lined with 60 lions, symbols of Ishtar, molded of Bricks of blue ceramic and having red or yellow manes. On the earlier gate are still visible alternate rows of some 150 bulls and dragons, symbols of Adad and Marduk, in plain molded Bricks. The latest gate was colorfully decorated with similar animals, now of Bricks glazed a vivid blue with the animals alternately yellow and white. The inner core of unbaked Bricks was enclosed in a shell of baked Bricks 49 feet thick
Nin'Eveh - Unlike the vast masses of Brick masonry which mark the site of Babylon, they showed externally no signs of artificial construction, except perhaps here and there the traces of a rude wall of sun-dried Bricks. --The Assyrian edifices were so nearly alike in general plan, construction an decoration that one description will suffice for all, They were built upon artificial mounds or platforms, varying in height, but generally from 30 to 50 feet above the level of the surrounding country, and solidly constructed of regular layers of sun-dried Bricks, as at Nimroud, or consisting merely of earth and rubbish heaped up, as at Kouyunjik. Although only the general plan of the ground-floor can now be traced, it is evident that the palaces had several stories built of wood and sun-dried Bricks, which, when the building was deserted and allowed to fall to decay, gradually buried the lower chambers with their ruins, and protected the sculptured slabs from the effects of the weather. --The ruins of Nineveh have furnished a vast collection of inscriptions partly carved on marble or stone slabs and partly impressed upon Bricks anti upon clay cylinders, or sixsided and eight-sided prisms, barrels and tablets, which, used for the purpose when still moist, were afterward baked in a furnace or kilo. These inscribed Bricks are of the greatest value in restoring the royal dynasties
Nahum - The time to prepare for the siege is past, adds the prophet, with his sarcastic appeal, ‘Tread the mortar, lay hold of the Brick-mould
House - Brick is also used. But the houses of the people in the East in general are very bad constructions, consisting of mud walls, reeds, and rushes; whence they become apt illustrations of the fragility of human life, Job 4:19 ; and as mud, pebbles, and slime, or at best unburnt Bricks are used informing the walls, the expression, "digging through houses," Job 24:16 Matthew 6:19 24:14 , is easily accounted for; as is the behavior of Ezekiel, Ezekiel 12:5 , who dug through such a wall in the sight of the people; whereby, as may be imagined, he did little injury to his house; notwithstanding which, the symbol was very expressive to the beholders
Nineveh - angle of the city, which was swept away; and the water pouring into the city "dissolved" the palace foundation platform, of sundried Bricks. "Bellush, Pudil, and Ivalush" are inscribed on Bricks at Kileh Sherghat, 1350-1270 B. The plaster above the alabaster wainscoting was ornamented with figures; the pavement was of alabaster or flat kiln-burnt Bricks resting on bitumen and fine sand. There may have been an upper story of sun-dried Bricks and wood, for there are no stone or marble columns or burnt Brick remains. Clay cylinders pierced through so as to turn round and present their sides to the reader, Bricks, and slabs are the materials inscribed on
House - In places where stone is plentiful all houses are built of that material; otherwise only the very rich men’s houses are of stone and all others are built of sun-dried Bricks (sometimes of kiln-dried Bricks, which are more expensive), or even of mud set in layers, each layer being left to dry hard before the next layer is placed on the top of it. The sun-dried Bricks are made simply of clay with which chopped straw is mixed (Exodus 5:7), and are set to dry in the sun for a few days before they are wanted for the building. Thus Brick-making and house-building go on together on the same ground
Moab - Their capital city was situated on that river, and was called Ar or Areopolis, or Ariol of Moab, or Rabbah Moab, that is, the capital of Moab, or Kirharesh, that is, a city with Brick walls
Joshua - Born about the time when Moses fled to Midian, he endured in youth the slave labour amidst Egyptian Brick kilns
Ezekiel, Theology of - Among these actions was a pretend siege of Jerusalem, with a Brick serving as the city (4:1-5:4)
Passover - Some say it was thickened to the consistency of mortar to commemorate Israel's Brick-making hardships in Egypt
Egypt - The materials of their structure were Bricks of clay, bound together with chopped straw, and baked in the sun. Such were the Bricks which the Israelites were employed in making, and of which the cities of Pithom and Rameses were built. Jowett, speaking of Tentyra, "built of unburnt Brick, crumbling into ruins, and giving place to new habitations, have raised the earth, in some parts, nearly to the level of the summit of the temple. The Israelites laboured in making Bricks, not in forming stones such as the pyramids are constructed with; and a passage in Mr. Jowett saw at one place the people making Bricks, with straw cut into small pieces, and mingled with the clay, to bind it. Hence it is, that when villages built of these Bricks fall into rubbish, which is often the case, the roads are full of small particles of straws, extremely offensive to the eyes in a high wind. They were, in fact, engaged exactly as the Israelites used to be, making Bricks with straw; and for a similar purpose, to build extensive granaries for the bashaw; "treasure-cities for Pharaoh
Palestine - Brick made of the loam and stubble being the material of the houses, these have been washed away by rains, so that the ancient villages have left few traces
Law - Then was the Jewish law promulgated to a nation, who, to mere human judgment, might have appeared incapable of inventing or receiving such a high degree of intellectual and moral improvement; for they had been long enslaved to the Egyptians, the authors and supporters of the grossest idolatry; they had been weighed down by the severest bondage, perpetually harassed by the most incessant manual labours; for the Egyptians "made their lives bitter with hard bondage, in mortar, and in Brick, and in all manner of service in the field," Exodus 1:14