What does Bread mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἄρτον food composed of flour mixed with water and baked. 36
לֶ֣חֶם bread 18
לָֽחֶם bread 17
לֶ֥חֶם bread 16
לֶ֖חֶם bread 16
לֶ֔חֶם bread 15
לָ֑חֶם bread 10
לֶ֙חֶם֙ bread 9
לֶ֤חֶם bread 9
ἄρτος food composed of flour mixed with water and baked. 8
וְלֶ֥חֶם bread 6
ἀζύμων unfermented 6
ἄρτους food composed of flour mixed with water and baked. 6
לֶ֚חֶם bread 5
לֶ֛חֶם bread 5
ἄρτων food composed of flour mixed with water and baked. 5
הַלֶּ֖חֶם bread 5
לֶ֜חֶם bread 5
מַצּ֖וֹת unleavened (bread 4
לַחְמְךָ֖ bread 4
ἄρτου food composed of flour mixed with water and baked. 4
הַמַּצּ֖וֹת unleavened (bread 3
הַלֶּ֔חֶם bread 3
הַמַּצּ֛וֹת unleavened (bread 3
לֶ֧חֶם bread 3
בַּלֶּ֣חֶם bread 2
לֶחֶם֒ bread 2
לֶ֑חֶם bread 2
הַמַּצּ֔וֹת unleavened (bread 2
הַלֶּ֗חֶם bread 2
וְלֶ֤חֶם bread 2
לַחְמֶ֔ךָ bread 2
וְלֶ֖חֶם bread 2
ἄρτῳ food composed of flour mixed with water and baked. 2
מַצּ֥וֹת unleavened (bread 2
לַלֶּ֙חֶם֙ bread 2
הַמַּצּוֹת֮ unleavened (bread 2
מַצּוֹת֙ unleavened (bread 2
לַחְמִי֙ bread 2
מַצֹּ֑ת unleavened (bread 2
בַּלֶּ֙חֶם֙ bread 2
לַחְמְכֶם֙ bread 2
לֶ֭חֶם bread 2
מַצּֽוֹת unleavened (bread 2
חָמֵ֗ץ the thing leavened 2
לֶ֗חֶם bread 2
מַצּ֣וֹת unleavened (bread 2
לַחְמוֹ֙ bread 2
מָע֔וֹג cake. 1
הַמַּצּֽוֹת unleavened (bread 1
לַחְמִ֑י bread 1
וְ֝לֶ֗חֶם bread 1
לַחְמִֽי bread 1
בְֽלַחֲמִ֑י bread 1
לָ֥חֶם bread 1
לֶ֝֗חֶם bread 1
מִלַּחְמ֣וֹ bread 1
לַחְמְךָ֗ bread 1
כַּלֶּ֣חֶם bread 1
וּמַצּ֥וֹת unleavened (bread 1
קֹ֑דֶשׁ apartness 1
וּבַמַּצּ֑וֹת unleavened (bread 1
מַצּ֗וֹת unleavened (bread 1
הַמַּצּ֑וֹת unleavened (bread 1
עֻגֽוֹת disc or cake (of bread). 1
הַפָּנִים֙ face. 1
יִפְרְס֥וּ to divide 1
פִּתֵּ֖ךְ fragment 1
מַצּ֤וֹת unleavened (bread 1
מִלֶּ֣חֶם bread 1
מַצּ֑וֹת unleavened (bread 1
הַמַּצּוֹת֙ unleavened (bread 1
מַצּ֔וֹת unleavened (bread 1
הַמַּצּ֜וֹת unleavened (bread 1
מַצּ֛וֹת unleavened (bread 1
מַצּ֜וֹת unleavened (bread 1
הַמַּצּוֹת֒ unleavened (bread 1
וּמַצּ֔וֹת unleavened (bread 1
בַּלֶּ֖חֶם bread 1
לַחְמֽוֹ bread 1
לַחְמֵ֖נוּ bread 1
הַלֶּ֙חֶם֙ bread 1
לַלָּ֑חֶם bread 1
לֶחֶם֩ bread 1
לַחְמָ֖ם bread 1
לְלָ֑חֶם bread 1
לַחְמָם֙ bread 1
וְלֶ֣חֶם bread 1
הַלֶּ֤חֶם bread 1
(וְהַלֶּ֤חֶם) bread 1
חֹרִ֖י white bread 1
בַּלָּ֑חֶם bread 1
חָמֵ֖ץ the thing leavened 1
חָמֵֽץ the thing leavened 1
חָמֵ֔ץ the thing leavened 1
וְ֝דָרְשׁ֗וּ to resort to 1
וּדְגַן־ wheat 1
לֶ֖חֶם‪‬‪‬ to eat 1
ἄρτοι food composed of flour mixed with water and baked. 1
ἀζύμοις unfermented 1
וָלֶ֧חֶם bread 1
לַחְמ֑וֹ bread 1
וְ֠לֶחֶם bread 1
לַלֶּ֣חֶם bread 1
בְּלֶ֤חֶם bread 1
וּבַלָּ֑חֶם bread 1
לַחְמְכֶ֖ם bread 1
לֶ֨חֶם bread 1
וְלֶחֶם֩ bread 1
לַחְמֵ֔נוּ bread 1
؟ לָֽחֶם bread 1
לַחְמֵ֗נוּ bread 1
וְלַחְמֶ֗ךָ bread 1
הַלֶּ֨חֶם bread 1
וְלַלֶּ֥חֶם bread 1
הַלֶּ֛חֶם bread 1
؟ לֶ֔חֶם bread 1
ἄζυμα unfermented 1
לַחְמ֣וֹ bread 1
וְלֶ֙חֶם֙ bread 1
בְּלַחְמ֖וֹ bread 1
לַחְמָ֣ם bread 1
כְּלֶ֤חֶם bread 1
שְׂעֹרִ֔ים barley. 1

Definitions Related to Bread

G740


   1 food composed of flour mixed with water and baked.
      1a the Israelites made it in the form of an oblong or round cake, as thick as one’s thumb, and as large as a plate or platter hence it was not to be cut but broken.
      1b loaves were consecrated to the Lord.
      1c of the Bread used at the love-feasts and at the Lord’s Table.
   2 food of any kind.
   

H3899


   1 Bread, food, grain.
      1a Bread.
         1a1 Bread.
         1a2 Bread-corn.
      1b food (in general).
      

G106


   1 unfermented, free from leaven or yeast.
      1a of the unleavened loaves used in the paschal feast of the Jews.
      1b metaph.
      free from faults or the “leaven of iniquity”.
      

H4682


   1 unleavened (Bread, cake), without leaven.
   .
   

H2557


   1 the thing leavened, leaven.
   

H1875


   1 to resort to, seek, seek with care, enquire, require.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to resort to, frequent (a place), (tread a place).
         1a2 to consult, enquire of, seek.
            1a2a of God.
            1a2b of heathen gods, necromancers.
         1a3 to seek deity in prayer and worship.
            1a3a God.
            1a3b heathen deities.
         1a4 to seek (with a demand), demand, require.
         1a5 to investigate, enquire.
         1a6 to ask for, require, demand.
         1a7 to practice, study, follow, seek with application.
         1a8 to seek with care, care for.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to allow oneself to be enquired of, consulted (only of God).
         1b2 to be sought, be sought out.
         1b3 to be required (of blood).
         

H1715


   1 wheat, cereal, grain, corn.
   

H6595


   1 fragment, bit, morsel (of Bread), piece.
   

H8184


   1 barley.
      1a barley (of the plant).
      1b barley (of the meal or grain).
      

H6440


   1 face.
      1a face, faces.
      1b presence, person.
      1c face (of seraphim or cherubim).
      1d face (of animals).
      1e face, surface (of ground).
      1f as adv of loc/temp.
         1f1 before and behind, toward, in front of, forward, formerly, from beforetime, before.
      1g with prep.
         1g1 in front of, before, to the front of, in the presence of, in the face of, at the face or front of, from the presence of, from before, from before the face of.
         

H4580


   1 cake.
   

H398


   1 to eat, devour, burn up, feed.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to eat (human subject).
         1a2 to eat, devour (of beasts and birds).
         1a3 to devour, consume (of fire).
         1a4 to devour, slay (of sword).
         1a5 to devour, consume, destroy (inanimate subjects—ie, pestilence, drought).
         1a6 to devour (of oppression).
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be eaten (by men).
         1b2 to be devoured, consumed (of fire).
         1b3 to be wasted, destroyed (of flesh).
      1c (Pual).
         1c1 to cause to eat, feed with.
         1c2 to cause to devour.
      1d (Hiphil).
         1d1 to feed.
         1d2 to cause to eat.
      1e (Piel). 1e1 consume.
         

H5692


   1 disc or cake (of Bread).
      1a cake of hot stones (cake baked on hot stones).
      

H6536


   1 to divide, break in two.
      1a (Qal) to break, break up.
      1b (Hiphil) to be divided (of hoofs).
      

H2751


   1 white Bread, cake.
   2 (TWOT) Horite, Hori.
   

Frequency of Bread (original languages)

Frequency of Bread (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Daily Bread
(Greek: artos epiousious, translated in the Vulgate as panem nostrum supersubstantialem in Matthew 6, and panem nostrum quotidianum, in Luke 11)
Term used in the fourth petition uf the Our Father. Among the Hebrews bread was the principal article of food, thus signifying all the physical necessities of life. Therefore it is for these above all we ask God in this petition. Many of the Fathers of the Church (Saints Cyprian, Hilary, Ambrose, Jerome, Peter Chrysologus, and Augustine) and some later exegetes think the word "bread" refers to the necessities of our spiritual life, e.g., the word of God, all the aids to salvation, and, especially, the Holy Eucharist. The textual rendition may admit two interpretations of "daily":
(1) that which must be taken each day
(2) necessary for life, supersubstantial.
Both renditions mean "bread needed daily," and "bread necessary for life."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Liturgical Use of Bread
In Christian liturgy, bread (wheaten) is used chiefly as an element of the Eucharistic Sacrifice. There are also, however, several other uses amongst which are the following.
(1) Formerly popes and bishops sent blessed bread to their priests to symbolize union.
(2) At the Offertory, in the rite of consecration of a bishop, or canonization of a saint, two loaves are presented to the celebrant.
(3) Little loaves or cakes were formerly blessed, and sent by bishops and priests to others in sign of fraternal affection.
(4) Bread blessed at the Offertory is distributed to the faithful (see antidoron eulogia).
(5) Bread brought by the faithful is blessed at the Sunday parochial Mass. The custom is common among the French who call the bread pain benit.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Life, Bread of
The Eucharist, the Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, contained really and substantially under the appearances of bread and wine. It is called bread from the matter from which it is confected and as bread, i.e.,food in general, keeps the life in the body, so the Holy Eucharist increases the spiritual life of the soul (John 6).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Unleavened Bread
UNLEAVENED BREAD . See Bread, Leaven, Passover.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Shew-Bread,
(Exodus 25:30 ; 35:13 ; 39:36 ) etc. literally "bread of the face" or "faces." Shew-bread was unleavened bread placed upon a table which stood in the sanctuary together with the seven-branched candlestick and the altar of incense. See (Exodus 25:23-30 ) for description of this table. Every Sabbath twelve newly baked loaves, representing the twelve tribes of Israel, were put on it in two rows, six in each, and sprinkled with incense, where they remained till the following Sabbath. Then they were replaced by twelve new ones, the incense was burned, and they were eaten by the priests in the holy place, out of which they might not be removed, The title "bread of the face" seems to indicate that bread through which God is seen, that is, with the participation of which the seeing of God is bound up, or through the participation of which man attains the sight of God whence it follows that we have not to think of bread merely as such as the means of nourishing the bodily life, but as spiritual food as a means of appropriating and retaining that life which consists In seeing the face of God.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Bread
Among the Jews was generally made of wheat (Exodus 29:2 ; Judges 6:19 ), though also sometimes of other grains (Genesis 14:18 ; Judges 7:13 ). Parched grain was sometimes used for food without any other preparation (Ruth 2:14 ). Bread was prepared by kneading in wooden bowls or "kneading troughs" (Genesis 18:6 ; Exodus 12:34 ; Jeremiah 7:18 ). The dough was mixed with leaven and made into thin cakes, round or oval, and then baked. The bread eaten at the Passover was always unleavened (Exodus 12:15-20 ; Deuteronomy 16:3 ). In the towns there were public ovens, which were much made use of for baking bread; there were also bakers by trade (Hosea 7:4 ; Jeremiah 37:21 ). Their ovens were not unlike those of modern times. But sometimes the bread was baked by being placed on the ground that had been heated by a fire, and by covering it with the embers (1 Kings 19:6 ). This was probably the mode in which Sarah prepared bread on the occasion referred to in Genesis 18:6 .
In Leviticus 2 there is an account of the different kinds of bread and cakes used by the Jews. (See BAKE .)
The shew-bread (q.v.) consisted of twelve loaves of unleavened bread prepared and presented hot on the golden table every Sabbath. They were square or oblong, and represented the twelve tribes of Israel. The old loaves were removed every Sabbath, and were to be eaten only by the priests in the court of the sanctuary ( Exodus 25:30 ; Leviticus 24:8 ; 1 Samuel 21:1-6 ; Matthew 12:4 ).
The word bread is used figuratively in such expressions as "bread of sorrows" (Psalm 127:2 ), "bread of tears" (80:5), i.e., sorrow and tears are like one's daily bread, they form so great a part in life. The bread of "wickedness" (Proverbs 4:17 ) and "of deceit" (20:17) denote in like manner that wickedness and deceit are a part of the daily life.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Bread
First undoubtedly mentioned in Genesis 18:6. The best being made of wheat; the inferior of barley, used by the poor, and in scarcity (John 6:9; John 6:13; Revelation 4:6; 2 Kings 4:38; 2 Kings 4:42). An ephah or "three measures" was the amount of meal required for a single baking, answering to the size of the oven (Matthew 13:33). The mistress of the house and even a king's daughter did not think baking beneath them (2 Samuel 13:8). Besides there were public bakers (Hosea 7:4), and in Jerusalem a street tenanted by bakers (Jeremiah 37:21); Nehemiah mentions "the tower of the furnaces," or ovens (Nehemiah 3:11; Nehemiah 12:38). Their loaf was thinner in shape and crisper than ours, from whence comes the phrase, not cutting, but breaking bread (Matthew 14:19; Acts 20:7; Acts 20:11). Exodus 12:34 implies the small size of their kneading troughs, for they were "bound up in their clothes (the outer garment, a large square cloth) upon their shoulders."
As bread was made in thin cakes it soon became dry, as the Gibeonites alleged as to their bread (Joshua 9:12), and so fresh bread was usually baked every day, which usage gives point to "give us day by day our daily bread" (Luke 11:3). When the kneading was completed leaven was added; but when time was short unleavened cakes were hastily baked, as is the present Bedouin usage; termed in Exodus 12:8-20 matsowt , i.e. pure loaves, having no leaven, which ferments the dough and so produces corruption, and is therefore symbol of mortal corruption (1 Corinthians 5:8); therefore excluded from the Passover, as also to commemorate the haste of Israel's departure. Leaven was similarly excluded from sacrifices (Leviticus 2:11).
The leavened dough was sometimes exposed to a moderate heat all night while the baker slept: Hosea 7:4-6; "as an oven heated by the baker who ceaseth from raising (rather, heating) after he hath kneaded the dough, until it be leavened; for they have made ready their heart like an oven, whiles they lie in wait ... their baker sleepeth all the night; in the morning it burneth as a flaming fire." Their heart was like an oven first heated by Satan, then left to burn with the pent up fire of their corrupt passions. Like the baker sleeping at night, Satan rests secure that at the first opportunity the hidden fires will break forth, ready to execute whatever evil he suggests. The bread was divided into round cakes, or "loaves," three of which sufficed for one person's meal (Luke 11:5). "Bread of affliction" or "adversity" would be a quantity less than this (1 Kings 22:27; Isaiah 30:20). Oil was sometimes mixed with the flour.
There were also cakes of finer flour, called "heart cakes" (as our "cordial" is derived from cor , "the heart"), a heart strengthening pastry (2 Samuel 13:8-10 margin), a pancake, possibly with stimulant seeds in it, quickly made; such as Tamar prepared and shook out (not "poured" as a liquid) from the pan, for Amnon. The loaves used to be taken to the oven in a basket upon the head (Genesis 40:16), which exactly accords with Egyptian usage, men carrying burdens on their heads, women on their shoulders. The variety of Egyptian confectionery is evident from the monuments still extant. The "white baskets" may mean "baskets of white bread."
The oven of each house was a stone or metal jar, heated inwardly, often with dried "grass" (illustrating Matthew 6:30). When the fire burned down the cakes were applied inwardly or outwardly. Cakes were sometimes baked on heated stones, or between layers of dung, the slow burning of which adapts it for baking (Ezekiel 4:15). They needed to be turned in baking, like Scotch oatcakes. Hosea 7:8, "Ephraim is a cake not turned": burnt on one side, unbaked on the other, the fire spoiling, not penetrating it; so religious professors, outwardly warm, inwardly cold; on one side overdone, on the other not vitally influenced at all; Jehus professing great "zeal for the Lord," really zealous for themselves.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Bread
Lechem (לֶחֶם, Strong's #3899), “bread; meal; food; fruit.” This word has cognates in Ugaritic, Syriac, Aramaic, Phoenician, and Arabic. Lechem occurs about 297 times and at every period of biblical Hebrew. This noun refers to “bread,” as distinguished from meat. The diet of the early Hebrews ordinarily consisted of bread, meat, and liquids: “And he humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know; that he might make thee know that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord …” (Deut. 8:3). “Bread” was baked in loaves: “And it shall come to pass, that every one that is left in thine house shall come and crouch to him for a piece of silver and a morsel of bread …” (1 Sam. 2:36). Even when used by itself, lechem can signify a “loaf of bread”: “… They will salute thee, and give thee two loaves of bread …” (1 Sam. 10:4). In this usage, the word ialways preceded by a number. “Bread” was also baked in cakes (2 Sam. 6:19).A “bit of bread” is a term for a modest meal. So Abraham said to his three guests, “Let a little water, I pray you, be fetched … and I will fetch a morsel of bread, and comfort ye your hearts …” (Gen. 18:4-5). In Judg. 13:15-1660 lechem represents an entire meal: “… Saul said unto Jonathan his son, Wherefore cometh not the son of Jesse to meat, neither yesterday, nor today?” Thus, “to make bread” may actually mean “to prepare a meal”: “A feast is made for laughter, and wine maketh merry …” (Eccl. 10:19). The “staff of bread” is the “support of life”: “And when I have broken the staff of your bread, ten women shall bake your bread in one oven, and they shall deliver you your bread again by weight: and ye shall eat, and not be satisfied” (Lev. 26:26). The Bible refers to the “bread of the face” or “the bread of the Presence,” which was the bread constantly set before God in the holy place of the tabernacle or temple: “And thou shalt set upon the table showbread before me always” (Exod. 25:30).
In several passages, lechem represents the grain from which “bread” is made: “And the seven years of dearth began to come, according as Joseph had said: and the dearth was in all the lands; but in all the land of Egypt there was bread” (Gen. 41:54). The meaning “grain” is very clear in 2 Kings 18:32: “Until I come and take you away to a land like your own land, a land of corn and wine, a land of bread and vineyards.…”
Lechem can represent food in general. In Gen. 3:19 (the first biblical occurrence), it signifies the entire diet: “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread.…” This nuance may include meat, as it does in 1618455281_7: “And Manoah said unto the angel of the Lord, I pray thee, let us detain thee, until we shall have made ready a kid for thee. And the angel of the Lord said unto Manoah, Though thou detain me, I will not eat of thy bread.…” In 1 Sam. 14:24, 28, lechem includes honey, and in Prov. 27:27 goat’s milk.
Lechem may also represent “food” for animals: “He giveth to the beast his food, and to the young ravens which cry” (Ps. 147:9; cf. Prov. 6:8). Flesh and grain offered to God are called “the bread of God”: “… For the offerings of the Lord made by fire, and the bread of their God, they do offer …” (Lev. 21:6; cf. 22:13).
There are several special or figurative uses of lechem! The “bread” of wickedness is “food” gained by wickedness: “For [1] eat the bread of wickedness, and drink the wine of violence” (Prov. 4:17). Compare the “bread” or “food” gained by deceit (Prov. 20:17) and lies (23:3). Thus, in Prov. 31:27 the good wife “looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness”—i.e., unearned food. The “bread of my portion” is the food that one earns (Prov. 30:8).
Figuratively, men are the “food” or prey for their enemies: “Only rebel not ye against the Lord, neither fear ye the people of the land; for they are bread for us …” (Num. 14:9). The Psalmist in his grief says his tears are his “food” (Ps. 42:3). Evil deeds are likened to food: "[2] meat in his bowels is turned, it is the gall of asps within him” (Job 20:14). In Jer. 11:19, lechem represents “fruit from a tree” and is a figure of a man and his offspring: “… And I knew not that they had devised devices against me, saying, Let us destroy the tree with the fruit thereof, and let us cut him off from the land of the living, that his name may be no more remembered.”
Matstsâh (מַצָּה, Strong's #4682), “unleavened bread.” This noun occurs 54 times, all but 14 of them in the Pentateuch. The rest of the occurrences are in prose narratives or in Ezekiel’s discussion of the new temple (Ezek. 45:21). In the ancient Orient, household bread was prepared by adding fermented dough to the kneading trough and working it through the fresh dough. Hastily made bread omitted the fermented (leavened) dough: Lot “made them a feast, and did bake unleavened bread, and they did eat” (Gen. 19:3). In this case, the word represents bread hastily prepared for unexpected guests. The feasts of Israel often involved the use of unleavened bread, perhaps because of the relationship between fermentation, rotting, and death (Lev. 2:4ff.), or because unleavened bread reminded Jews of the hasty departure from Egypt and the rigors of the wilderness march.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Bread of the Presence
(bread of the faces ) In Exodus 25:30 , the Lord's instructions concerning the paraphernalia of worship include a provision that bread be kept always on a table set before the Holy of Holies. This bread was called the bread of presence, or shewbread. The literal meaning of the Hebrew expression is “bread of the face.” It consisted of twelve loaves of presumably unleavened bread, and it was replaced each sabbath. See Temple; 1 Corinthians 11:17-32 ).
James A. Brooks
Holman Bible Dictionary - Unleavened Bread
Bread baked without using leaven, a substance such as yeast which produces fermentation in dough. Unleavened bread was often served to guests (Genesis 19:3 ; Judges 6:19 ; 1 Samuel 28:24 ). The eating of unleavened bread took on special significance through the Feast of Unleavened Bread celebrated in connection with Passover (Exodus 12:8 ,Exodus 12:8,12:15 ,Exodus 12:15,12:20 ; Exodus 13:3 ,Exodus 13:3,13:6-7 ). See Exodus ; Festivals ; Passover .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Bread, Bread of Presence
Bread was the essential food of the ancient Israelites. Indeed, the very word "bread" could be used generically for any kind of food. Meat was eaten by peasants only at festival occasions, and other foods supplemented bread. As the mainstay of life, bread came to be a primary metaphor for life and sustenance.
Bread in the Bible functions as a social bond. The giving of bread to another is a major element of hospitality and serves as a sign of respect and concern (Genesis 14:18 ; 18:6 ; 19:3 ; Exodus 12:14-20 ; Ruth 2:14 ; 1 Samuel 25:18 ; 28:24 ; 2 Samuel 16:1-2 ). Conversely, to take someone's bread and then turn against that person is to commit a heinous offense of ingratitude and betrayal, as in the case of Judas Iscariot (Deuteronomy 23:4 ; John 13:18-30 ).
Metaphorically, eating the "bread of idleness" is to indulge oneself without doing one's household duty (Proverbs 31:27 ). Also, bread can symbolize a financial investment (Ecclesiastes 11:1 ).
The ritual and theological texts of the Bible often refer to bread. It played a role in the consecration of the Aaronic priests (Exodus 29:2-3 ). Bread was also used as part of an offering of thanksgiving to God (Leviticus 7:12-13 ). Of particular importance in Israel's worship is unleavened bread. In the first Passover, the eating of unleavened bread typified the haste of Israel's departure from Egypt (Exodus 12:8-11 ), although there are already indications that leaven is associated with the pervasive influence of evil (Psalm 41:9 ). So important was this concept that a special festival of unleavened bread was instituted (Leviticus 23:6 ).
The association of leaven with evil underlines the fact that bread or leaven can represent temptation, false teaching, or materialism. Human life is not sustained by bread alone (physical provision), but requires the spiritual provision of the Word of God (Deuteronomy 8:3 ; Job 23:12 ). This concept enabled Jesus to reject the temptations of Satan (Matthew 4:3-4 ; Luke 4:3-4 ), and also underlies the practice of fasting, that is, refraining from eating bread during periods of intense focus on an encounter with God (Exodus 34:28 ; Deuteronomy 9:9 ; 2 Samuel 3:35 ). In Matthew 16:5-12 , leaven represents the doctrine of the Sadducees and Pharisees.
More positively, bread frequently stands for God's provision for his people. The practice of setting the bread of the Presence before God expresses this concept. Every Sabbath the priests put twelve loaves of bread on the table of the bread of the Presence in the temple (Exodus 25:23-30 ; 35:13 ; 39:36 ; Leviticus 24:5-9 ). In contrast to the religious ideas of the surrounding nations, the Bible does not imply that the bread was meant as food for God (Psalm 50:12-15 ). Instead, the bread was placed before Yahweh as a token of gratitude for his provision for his people. For Jesus, David's eating of the bread of the Presence suggests that human need can at times overrule ritual prohibition (1 Samuel 21:4-6 ; Mark 2:26 ).
The manna in the wilderness is the quintessential example of bread as a provision of God. The Israelites were to gather just enough for each day and not hoard, since they needed to learn to depend on God for each day's supply (Exodus 16:4-5 ). Similarly, the Christian prays for "daily" bread (Matthew 6:11 ). Such provision spares one from the dangers of both poverty and wealth (Proverbs 30:8 ). Jesus teaches that God feeds his people as a father does his children (Matthew 7:9 ), and dramatically illustrates this truth in the miraculous feeding of the crowds (Matthew 14:15-21 ; 15:32-38 ). The disciples were thus not to be concerned about where they would obtain bread when they went out to serve God (Luke 9:3 ; cf. Psalm 37:25 ). At the same time, the Christian is not to rely on the charity of the church for bread but earn it (2 Thessalonians 3:12 ). The failure of the bread supply is a mark of judgment (Leviticus 26:26 ; Lamentations 1:11 ; 2:12 ; 4:4 ; 5:6 ; Amos 4:6 ).
The New Testament uses bread as a rich theological metaphor. As God supplies bread, so he will also supply righteousness to his people (2 Corinthians 9:10 ). Above all, Jesus himself is the bread of life; he is the sustenance from God that gives eternal life (John 6:25-59 ). Christians thus partake of Christ's body in the bread of the Lord's Supper. In this, they remember his sacrificial death and celebrate the eternal life he supplies (Matthew 26:26-29 ). After the resurrection, Jesus' eating of bread with the disciples was a token of his victory over death (Luke 24:30,35 ; John 21:13 ), and Christians after that met on the first of the week for the breaking of bread (Acts 20:7 ).
Duane A. Garrett
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Breaking of Bread
See Lord's Supper, the
Chabad Knowledge Base - Show Bread
The bread offered on the sacred table in the Sanctuary each week, described in Leviticus 24:5-9.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Unleavened Bread
See Passover.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Unleavened Bread (2)
UNLEAVENED BREAD.—See Passover.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Bread
BREAD . The pre-eminence of bread in the dietary of the Hebrews is shown by the frequent use in OT, from Genesis 3:19 onwards, of ‘bread’ for food in general. It was made chiefly from wheat and barley, occasionally mixed, more especially in times of scarcity, with other ingredients ( Ezekiel 4:9 ; see Food). Barley was in earlier times the main breadstuff of the peasantry ( Judges 7:13 ) and poorer classes generally ( John 6:13 , cf. Jos [1] BJ V. x. 2).
The first step in bread-making, after thoroughly sifting and cleaning the grain, was to reduce it to flour by rubbing, pounding, or grinding (cf. Numbers 11:8 ). In the first process, not yet extinct in Egypt for certain grains, the grain was rubbed between two stones, the ‘corn-rubbers’ or ‘corn-grinders,’ of which numerous specimens have been found at Lachish and Gezer ( PEFSt [2] , 1902, 326; 1903, 118; cf. Erman, Egypt . 180 for illust. of actual use). For the other two processes see Mortar and Mill respectively. Three qualities of flour are distinguished a coarser sort got by the use of the pestle and mortar, the ‘beaten (RV [3] ‘bruised’ corn’ of Leviticus 2:14 ; Leviticus 2:16 , ordinary flour or ‘meal,’ and the ‘fine meal’ for honoured guests ( Genesis 18:6 ) or ‘fine flour’ for a king’s kitchen ( 1 Kings 4:22 ) and the ritual meal-offerings.
The flour was then mixed with water and kneaded in the wooden basin or kneading-trough ( Exodus 8:3 ; Exodus 12:34 ). In a case of urgency the dough was at once made into cakes and fired. These unleavened cakes were termed mazzoth and were alone permitted for the altar and during Passover and the immediately following Feast of Unleavened Cakes ( Mazzoth ). On ordinary occasions, however, a small lump of yesterday’s baking, which had been reserved for the purpose, was broken down and mixed with to-day’s ‘batch.’ The whole was then set aside for a few hours till thoroughly leavened (see Leaven).
Three modes of firing bread are found in OT, as in the East at the present day. ( a ) The first is represented by Elijah’s ‘cake baken on the hot stones’ ( 1 Kings 19:5 RVm [4] ). A few flat stones are gathered together, and a fire lighted upon them. When the stones are sufficiently heated, the embers are raked aside, the cakes are laid on the stones and covered with the embers. After a little the ashes are again removed, the cake is turned ( Hosea 7:8 ) and once more covered. Presently the cake is ready. ( b ) In Syria and Arabia today a convex iron plate is much used, especially among the Bedouin. It is placed over a small fire-pit with the convex side uppermost, on which the cakes of dough are laid and fired. The Hebrew ‘baking-pan’ ( Leviticus 2:5 ; Leviticus 7:9 RV [3] ) must have resembled this species of iron ‘girdle.’ ( c ) The settled population, however, chiefly made use of one or other of the various kinds of oven, then as now called tannur . In one form, which may be termed the bowl-oven, since it consists of a large clay bowl inverted, with a movable lid, the heat is applied by heaping cattle dung, etc., on the outside . The cakes are baked on the heated stones covered by the oven. In other parts of the country the jar-oven is used. This is really a large earthenware jar which is heated by fuel, consisting of stubble ( Malachi 4:1 ), grass ( Matthew 6:30 ), dry twigs ( 1 Kings 17:12 ) and the like, placed in the bottom of the jar. When the latter is thoroughly heated, the cakes are applied to the inside walls. From this type was developed the pit-oven, which was formed partly in the ground, partly built up of clay and plastered throughout, narrowing from the bottom upwards. Many of these pit-ovens have been discovered in the recent excavations. It is to the smoke issuing from one of these, while being heated, that the smoke of the ruined cities of the plain is compared in Genesis 19:28 (EV [6] furnace , and often unnecessary rendering for ‘oven’). Such no doubt were the ovens of the professional bakers in the street named after them in Jerusalem ( Jeremiah 37:21 ).
Bread-making was at all times the special charge of the women of the household. Even when, as we have just seen, baking became a recognized industry, a large part of the baker’s work had been, as now in the East, merely to fire the bread baked by the women at home.
A considerable variety of bakemeats ( Genesis 40:17 , lit. ‘food, the work of the baker’) is met with in OT, but only in a few cases is it possible to identify their nature or form. The ordinary cake the loaf of OT and NT was round and fairly thick; such at least was the rolling ‘cake of barley bread’ of Judges 7:13 . These cakes were always broken by the hand, never cut. A cake frequently used for ritual purposes ( Exodus 29:2 and often) seems, from its name, to have been pierced with holes like the modern Passover-cakes. The precise nature of the cracknels of 1 Kings 14:3 (Amer. RV [3] ‘cakes’) is unknown. The wafer , often named in ritual passages (cf. also Exodus 16:31 ), was evidently a very thin species of cake. For what may be called the pastry of the Hebrews, the curious in these matters are referred to the art. ‘Bakemeats’ in the Encyc. Bibl . col. 460 f.
A. R. S. Kennedy.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Loaf, Loaves of Bread
See Bread .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Unleavened Bread, Feast of
See Feasts and Festivals of Israel
King James Dictionary - Bread
BREAD, n. bred. Gr. anything esculent. If the word signifies food in general, or that which is eaten, probably it is the Heb. and Ch., from barah, to eat or feed.
1. A mass of dough, made by moistening and kneading the flour or meal of some species of grain, and baked in an oven, or pan. 2. Food in general. In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread.
Genesis 3
Give us this day our daily bread. Lord's Prayer.
3. Support of like in general maintenance. Is the reward of virtue, bread?
Bee-bread. See Bee.
Ship-bread, bread for ships hard biscuits.
Cassada-bread. See Cassada.
BREAD, To spread. Not used.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Bread
Round wafers of wheaten bread, unleavened in the Latin, Maronite, and Armenian Rites, used as one of the Eucharistic elements.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bread
Constantly referred to as the sustenance of man, though animal food may be included, and thus it stands for 'food' in general. Genesis 3:19 ; Ruth 1:6 ; Psalm 41:9 . Bread was made of wheaten flour, or of wheat and barley mixed, or by the poor of barley only. It was generally made in thin cakes which could be baked very quickly when a visitor arrived. Genesis 18:6 ; Genesis 19:3 ; 1 Samuel 28:24 . It was usually leavened by a piece of old dough in a state of fermentation. See LEAVEN.
UNLEAVENED BREAD was to be eaten with certain of the offerings, Leviticus 6:16,17 ; and for the seven days' feast connected with the Passover, often referred to as 'the Feast of Unleavened Bread,' Exodus 34:18 ; 2 Chronicles 8:13 ; Luke 22:1 ; 1 Corinthians 5:8 ; a symbol that all evil must be put away in order to keep the feast.
The Lord Jesus called Himself the BREAD OF GOD, the bread that came down from heaven, THE BREAD OF LIFE, the living bread, of which if any man ate he should live for ever: He said "He that eateth me shall live by me." He is the spiritual food that sustains the new life. John 6:31-58 . This was typified in Israel by the SHOWBREAD, the twelve loaves placed upon the table in the holy place, new every sabbath day: it was holy and was eaten by the priests only. Leviticus 24:5-9 . It is literally 'face or presence bread;' Exodus 25:30 ; and 'bread of arrangement' or 'ordering,' as in the margin of 1 Chronicles 9:32 ; and in the N.T. 'bread of presentation.' Matthew 12:4 ; Hebrews 9:2 . It typified the nourishment that God would provide for Israel in Christ, as well as the ordering of the twelve tribes before Him; in them was the administration of God's bounty through Christ for the earth, as Christ is now the sustainment for the Christian.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Bread
Genesis 49:20 (b) Here we find a figure of the profitable and useful things which occupy the life of this man. He took unto himself only those things which would make him worthwhile and useful. In our day we would say that he did not spend his time reading trash, watching worldly pictures, or gossiping with his neighbors. He was busy learning a multitude of interesting and profitable things which would be useful in his daily life.
Numbers 14:9 (a) We are to learn here that the enemies of Israel would be easily whipped and would be consumed as bread is consumed by the hungry man.
Judges 7:13 (b) This cake of barley bread represents Gideon who, though weak and lacking in military skill, would win a great victory for Israel and for GOD.
1 Samuel 10:3 (c) Probably in this passage the Lord is referring to King Saul, that all his needs will be met by the Father, the Son and the Spirit which are represented by the three loaves. We know that CHRIST is the bread of life. We also understand that both the Father and the Spirit meet the heart hunger of the one who belongs to them. Certainly three loaves were more than Saul could eat at one meal, and he would have enough left over for future needs. It is a beautiful picture of the sufficiency that we find in the triune GOD.
Psalm 80:5 (a) There are those who feed upon their sorrows. They continue to weep over former griefs. They meditate on their afflictions and talk about them to others. Because of Israel's disobedience, He permitted them to have plenty of tears, and plenty of cause for tears. They would not have GOD's comforting care.
Proverbs 9:17 (b) This is probably a type of some sin or sins which at first seem pleasant and satisfying but afterwards result in punishment. (See also Proverbs 20:17).
Proverbs 31:27 (b) This probably represents those who think that it is sweet, good and profitable to sit around doing nothing. They are lazy and useless. GOD condemns this form of life.
Ecclesiastes 11:1 (b) Here the figure is used to represent good desires, acts and words. As these are given out to the needy, a full reward will return to the one who is so doing even though it may be after a long time. The waters represent all kinds of people. As we do good to others the blessing will return upon our own heads in the coming days.
Isaiah 30:20 (a) GOD makes trouble and sorrow to be like a loaf of bread. It must be eaten. We must partake of it as we journey through life. GOD sees that we have this loaf, and plenty of it. It should strengthen our faith, increase our confidence in GOD, and keep us from seeking to build a nest in any earthly tree.
Isaiah 55:2 (a) The things that most people seek for and think that they will be satisfied when they obtain them, find that these are not bread at all, but only look like bread. CHRIST is the bread of GOD, nothing outside of Him, nothing that omits Him, can ever satisfy the need of the human heart and life. GOD the Father provides in the triune GOD that which is needed by the triune man, his body, soul and spirit. This truth is illustrated by the Lord JESUS in Luke 11:11.
Luke 11:3 (b) This must primarily refer to the physical bread which we eat, and which must be given to us through the kindness, wisdom and goodness of GOD. It may also refer to every other ministry from heaven which we need for the many exigencies that arise in our lives from day to day.
Luke 11:11 (a) In our prayers we often ask for that which we think is good for us and will be a blessing to us. We go by the sight of our eyes and the reasonings of our minds in deciding what is best for us. The gracious Father in Heaven, however, knows exactly the condition and the character of that for which we ask. In some cases He sees that the thing we request is like a stone. It would not harm us, nor hurt us, but it would be of no value whatever to us. We could not eat it, we could not use it, we would not be blessed by it. For this reason, He has to say "no" to our request.
John 6:33 (a) Throughout this chapter bread is typical of the Lord JESUS Himself. When He is received by faith into the heart, soul and life of a believer, He satisfies, gratifies, strengthens, blesses and gives life more abundant to those who feed upon Him and rejoice in His love and grace. It is not enough just to know about CHRIST, nor even to believe all that may be read about Him. The baker would die of starvation in the midst of his breads, cakes and pies if he did not eat them. It is the personal appropriation of the Lord JESUS that conveys and imparts eternal life to the soul.
1 Corinthians 10:17 (a) This bread as a loaf represents the true Church of GOD on earth. As the loaf contains many grains (no one knows how many), so the Church contains many members, and no one knows how many. It is true, however, that the loaves contain nothing but wheat. No sand or cinders are there, no sticks or stones will be found there. GOD's true Church contains only true believers, saints of GOD. Man's churches contain all kinds of grain, and other substances. Gamblers, saloon keepers, liquor dealers, tobacco slaves, thieves, murderers, and all kinds of hypocrites may be found in man's organizations. GOD's true Church, however, contains, as members, only those who belong to JESUS CHRIST by faith.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Bread
BREAD.—In Syria and Palestine there are certain shrines and groves that have been preserved undisturbed through times of political change, and are to-day venerated by all the religions of the country. Such also has been the unchanged history of bread in Bible lands. It is to-day practically what it has always been with regard to (1) the materials of which it is made, (2) the way in which it is prepared, (3) its importance and use as an article of food, and (4) the symbolism and sanctity suggested by its value.
1. Materials.—Bread is usually made of wheat flour, the wheat of the Syrian plains being remarkable for its nutritious quality. An inferior and cheaper kind of bread is also made from barley flour, and less frequently the meal of Indian corn is used.
2. Modes of preparation.—The most primitive way is that of making a hollow in the ground, burning twigs, thorn-bushes, thistles and dry grass upon it, and then laying the flat cakes of dough upon the hot ashes. These loaves are about seven inches in diameter and from half an inch to an inch in thickness. The upper surface is frequently studded with seeds of Indian corn, and they are generally turned in the process of baking (Hosea 7:8). They are ‘cakes upon the hearth’ (Genesis 18:6), ‘baken upon the coals’ (1 Kings 17:12-13). Such probably were the barley loaves brought to Christ at the feeding of the five thousand (John 6:9; John 6:13). Out of this custom, prevailing among the pastoral tribes and the poorest of the peasantry, were developed several improved methods made possible by more civilized conditions of life. (a) Large smooth pebbles were laid over the hollow in the ground, and when the fire had been kept up for a sufficient time, the ashes were removed and the loaves were laid upon the hot stones.—(b) Thinner cakes of both leavened and unleavened bread were made upon a flat pan or convex griddle. These are now made especially at times of religious festival, and are coated on the upper surface with olive oil and sprinkled with aromatic seeds. They recall the ‘oiled bread’ of Leviticus 8:26, and the ‘wafers anointed with oil’ of Exodus 29:2 and Leviticus 2:4.—(c) The cavity for the fire is deepened, and a cylindrical hole about the size of half a flour barrel is made of stone and lime with a facing of plaster. The pebbles are still left at the bottom for the better preservation of the heat, and the same fuel is applied till the oven has been sufficiently heated. The dough is then rolled out into broad thin cakes, and each disc, after being still further distended by being passed with a quick rotatory motion between the hands of the female baker, is laid on a convex cushion or pad, and is thus transferred evenly to the hot wall of the cavity. In a moment it is fired, and as it begins to peel off it is lifted and laid above the others at her side.—(d) The most developed form is that of the public oven in the village or town. Here features of the more primitive types still survive, but the cavity now becomes a low vaulted recess about twelve feet in length, and the pebbles are changed into a pavement of smoothed and squared stones. On it wood and lighter fuel of thorns are burnt, and the glowing ashes are finally brushed to each side of the vault. When the oven has been thus prepared the discs of dough are laid in rows upon long thin boards like canoe paddles, and are inserted by these into the oven, and by a quick jerk of the arm slipped off and placed upon the hot pavement to be fired. These loaves, when fired, are about an inch in thickness and about eight inches in diameter, and when newly baked are soft and flexible.
3. Use and importance of bread.—In the West bread is eaten more or less along with the other articles of food that chiefly constitute the meal; but in the East those other articles are rather eaten along with bread, and are regarded as merely accessory to it. When the farmer, carpenter, blacksmith or mason leaves the house for the day’s labour, or the messenger or muleteer sets out on his journey, he wraps his other articles of food in the thin loaves of home-made bread. In the case of loaves fired in the public oven, these, owing to the glutinous adhesiveness and elasticity of the dough, and the sudden formation within them of vapour on the hot pavement, pull out into air-tight balls. They can then be opened a little at one side, and the loaf thus forms a natural pouch enclosing the meat, cheese, raisins or olives to be eaten with it by the labourer. As the loaf thus literally includes everything, so bread represents generally the food of man. A great exclusion was expressed in ‘Man shall not live by bread alone’ (Luke 4:4). In the miraculous feeding of the multitude (Matthew 14:15 ff. ||) it was enough to provide them with bread. It was three loaves of bread that the man asked from his neighbour to put before his guest (Luke 11:5). Two would have been sufficient for his actual needs; but even in such an emergency a third loaf was required to represent that superabundant something which as a touch of grace, often passing into tyrannical imposition, so deeply affects Oriental social life.
In the act of eating, Oriental bread is broken or torn apart by the hand. This is easily done with the bread of the public oven, as it can be separated into two thin layers. The thin home-made bread is named both in Hebrew and Arabic from its thinness, and is translated ‘wafer’ in Exodus 29:23, Leviticus 8:26, Numbers 6:19, 1 Chronicles 23:29 ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885). Such bread is called רָקיק (râkîk; Arab. [1] markûk, from warak, ‘foliage,’ ‘paper’). At a meal a small piece of such bread is torn off, and with the ease and skill of long habit is folded over at the end held in the hand. It thus makes a spoon, which is eaten along with whatever is lifted by it out of the common dish. This is the dipping in the dish (Matthew 26:23), and is accomplished without allowing the contents of the dish to be touched by the fingers or by anything that has previously been in contact with the lips of those who sit at meat.
4. Symbolism and sanctity of bread.—In a land where communication with other sources of supply was difficult, everything depended upon the local wheat and barley harvest. As this in turn depended upon the rain in its season, which was beyond the control of the sower, a special sanctity attached itself to what was peculiarly a gift of God, and a reminder of His continual and often undeserved care (Matthew 5:45). To the disciples of Jesus, ‘Give us this day our daily bread’ would seem a very natural petition. An Oriental seeing a scrap of bread on the road will usually lift it up and throw it to a street dog, or place it in a crevice of the wall or on a tree branch where the birds may find it. It should not be trodden under foot in the common dust. Thus the most familiar article of food, so constantly in the hands of all, both rich and poor, and used alike by the evil and the good, had in it an element of mystery and nobility as having been touched by the unseen Giver of all good. How deeply this feeling of reverence possessed the mind of the Lord Jesus is evidenced by the fact that He was recognized in the breaking of bread (Luke 24:35).
In the social customs of the East, the giving and receiving of bread has always been the principal factor in establishing a bond of peace between the host and the guest at his table. It was a gravely unnatural offence to violate that law of hospitality. Of this offence Judas Iscariot was guilty at the Last Supper.
In travelling through Palestine and partaking of the hospitality of the peasantry, one may notice in the bread the indentations of the pebbles, and small patches of grey ash, with here and there an inlaid attachment of singed grass or charred thorn, the result of the simple baking process. It is bread, however, the best that the poor can give, and it is given with gladness and the dignity of a high duty towards the guest. When Christ sent forth His disciples to tell of His approach, He charged them to take no bread with them (Mark 6:8). It would have been a serious discourtesy to have set aside as unlit for their use that which was offered to them willingly by their own people, and would have hindered the reception of the good tidings of the Kingdom.
To the crowd that selfishly followed Christ the giving of bread as by Moses was the sordid summary of Messianic hope (John 6:31). God’s gift of natural food to His people enters into the praises of the Magnificat (Luke 1:53). When Christ called Himself ‘the bread of life’ (John 6:35), He could confidently appeal to all the endeared and sacred associations connected in the East with the meaning and use of bread. In the initiation of the Passover, and in its commemoration afterwards, bread was regarded by the Israelites as the most general and effective symbol of their life in Egypt. In the initiation of the new covenant also the same humble article of food was adopted at the Lord’s Supper, to be, with wine, the token of fellowship between Himself and His Church, and the symbol among His disciples of the Communion of Saints. The use of a symbol so familiar and accessible to all, and so representative of common life, seems to suggest that to the mind of Christ some realized and visible communion among the members of His Church was possible and to be expected.
G. M. Mackie.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Daily Bread
DAILY BREAD.—See Lord’s Prayer.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Breaking of Bread
See Love-Feast, Eucharist.
Webster's Dictionary - Bread
(1):
(n.) An article of food made from flour or meal by moistening, kneading, and baking.
(2):
(n.) Food; sustenance; support of life, in general.
(3):
(a.) To spread.
(4):
(v. t.) To cover with bread crumbs, preparatory to cooking; as, breaded cutlets.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Unleavened Bread, Feast of
See PASSOVER.
Webster's Dictionary - Raham Bread
Bread made of unbolted wheat flour.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Bread
Sometimes bread is spoken of in Scripture in the common acceptation of it, as the staff of natural life, but more frequently it is used in figure, by way of allusion to the Lord Jesus and the life in him. Jesus calls himself "the living bread, and the bread of God;" to intimate, that as the natural man is sustained day by day, life kept up and preserved by receiving the common bread for the body, so the spiritual life in Jesus is wholly supported by communications from Jesus, and life in Jesus. "Whosoever eateth of him shall live for ever." (John 6:32-58)
The shew bread of the Old Testament was of Christ. It consisted of twelve loaves made without leaven, to intimate that there is nothing leavened in Christ. The shew bread was placed new upon the golden altar. Christ is our New Testament altar; and all offerings must be offered upon the golden altar of his mediatorial nature. The shew bread was placed there every Sabbath. Christ is our Sabbath, and the rest the wherewith the Lord causeth "the weary to rest, and their refreshing." (See Exodus 25:30; Isaiah 28:12; Psalms 116:7; Matthew 11:28) It may not be improper to add, that the term shew bread meant the bread of faces; and, probably, it was so called, because offered in the presence of the Lord, and placed before him on the table. The Israelites called all their loaves by the name of Huggath.
The unleavened bread of the passover, there is particular mention made of it, Exodus 12:8. And concerning leavened bread, with which the blood of the sacrifice was never to be offered, what a beautiful type was this of the untainted, pure offering of the body of Jesus Christ, once for all. No altar but that of earth, (because the earth is the Lord's,) was to be made for offering. If but a tool was lifted up upon the altar of earth, or stone, the whole was polluted. (Exodus 23:18; Exo 20:24-25) And is it not the same now in the believer's offerings in Jesus? When in commemoration of the Lord's supper we partake of the bread and wine, as tokens of the body and blood of Christ, would it not be a pollution to leaven this solemn service with any thing of ours? Is not Christ all and in all?
Webster's Dictionary - Monkey-Bread
(n.) The fruit of the Adansonia digitata; also, the tree. See Adansonia.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bread
Bread (bred). Genesis 14:18. The bread of the better class of Jews was generally made of wheat; barley and other grains were sometimes used. Judges 7:13. The materials were prepared as in modern times in the East. The process of kneading it was performed in kneading-troughs, Genesis 18:6; Exodus 12:34; Jeremiah 7:18, or wooden bowls, such as the Arabians use at this day for a like purpose. It has been supposed by some that the kneading was done upon a circular piece of leather, such as is now used in Persia, and which would be more properly called a kneading-bag, as it draws up like a knapsack. Either of the utensils would be easily transported. Very simple leaven was used in the dough. The loaves were shaped like a plate, and, when leavened, were ordinarily of the thickness of one's little finger. The unleavened bread was very thin, and was broken, not cut. Lamentations 4:4; Matthew 14:19; Matthew 15:36; Matthew 26:26. It has been said that the thickness or thinness of the loaves was regulated by the time they were to be kept; that which was to be kept longest being made thick, that it might retain its moisture. This is contrary to modern philosophy on this subject, as we see in the manufacture of ship bread For the mode of baking see Oven. The term bread is often used for food or provisions in general.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Bread
a term which in Scripture is used, as by us, frequently for food in general; but is also often found in its proper sense. Sparing in the use of flesh, like all the nations of the east, the chosen people usually satisfied their hunger with bread, and quenched their thirst in the running stream. Their bread was generally made of wheat or barley, or lentiles and beans. Bread of wheat flour, as being the most excellent, was preferred: barley bread was used only in times of scarcity and distress. So mean and contemptible, in the estimation of the numerous and well-appointed armies of Midian, was Gideon, with his handful of undisciplined militia, that he seems to have been compared to bread of this inferior quality, which may account for the ready interpretation of the dream of the Midianite respecting him: "And when Gideon was come, behold, there was a man that told a dream unto his fellow, and said, Behold, I dreamed a dream, and lo, a cake of barley bread tumbled into the host of Midian, and came unto a tent and smote it that it fell, and overturned it, that the tent lay along. And his fellow answered and said, This is nothing else save the sword of Gideon, the son of Joash, a man of Israel; for into his hand hath God delivered Midian, and all the host." In the cities and villages of Barbary, where public ovens are established, the bread is usually leavened; but among the Bedoweens and Kabyles, as soon as the dough is kneaded, it is made into thin cakes, either to be baked immediately upon the coals, or else in a shallow earthen vessel like a frying-pan, called Tajen. Such were the unleavened cakes which we so frequently read of in Scripture; and those also which Sarah made quickly upon the hearth. These last are about an inch thick; and, being commonly prepared in woody countries, are used all along the shores of the Black Sea, from the Palus Maeotis to the Caspian, in Chaldea and Mesopotamia, except in towns. A fire is made in the middle of the room: and when the bread is ready for baking, a corner of the hearth is swept, the bread is laid upon it, and covered with ashes and embers; in a quarter of an hour, they turn it. Sometimes they use small convex plates of iron, which are most common in Persia, and among the nomadic tribes, as being the easiest way of baking, and done with the least expense; for the bread is extremely thin, and soon prepared. The oven is also used in every part of Asia: it is made in the ground, four or five feet deep, and three in diameter, well plastered with mortar. When it is hot, they place the bread (which is commonly long, and not thicker than a finger) against the sides: it is baked in a moment. Ovens, Chardin apprehends, were not used in Canaan in the patriarchal age: all the bread of that time was baked upon a plate, or under the ashes; and he supposes, what is nearly self-evident, that the cakes which Sarah baked on the hearth were of the last sort, and that the shew bread was of the same kind. The Arabs about Mount Carmel use a great strong pitcher, in which they kindle a fire; and when it is heated, they mix meal and water, which they apply with the hollow of their hands to the outside of the pitcher; and this extremely soft paste, spreading itself, is baked in an instant. The heat of the pitcher having dried up all the moisture, the bread comes on as thin as our wafers; and the operation is so speedily performed, that in a very little time a sufficient quantity is made. But their best sort of bread they bake, either by heating an oven, or a large pitcher full of little smooth shining flints, upon which they lay the dough, spread out in the form of a thin broad cake. Sometimes they use a shallow earthen vessel, resembling a frying pan, which seems to be the pan mentioned by Moses, in which the meat-offering was baked. This vessel, Dr. Shaw informs us, serves both for baking and frying; for the bagreah of the people of Barbary differs not much from our pancakes; only, instead of rubbing the pan in which they fry them with butter, they rub it with soap, to make them like a honey-comb. If these accounts of the Arab stone pitcher, the pan, and the iron hearth or copper plate, be attended to, it will not be difficult to understand the laws of Moses in the second chapter of Leviticus: they will be found to answer perfectly well to the description which he gives us of the different ways of preparing the meat-offerings. As the Hebrews made their bread thin, in the form of little flat cakes, they did not cut it with a knife, but broke it; which gave use to the expression, breaking bread, so frequent in Scripture.
The Arabians and other eastern people, among whom wood is scarce, often bake their bread between two fires made of cow dung, which burns slowly, and bakes the bread very leisurely. The crumb of it is very good, if it be eaten the same day; but the crust is black and burnt, and retains a smell of the materials that were used in baking it. This may serve to explain a passage in Ezekiel 4:9-13 . The straits of a siege and the scarcity of fuel were thus intimated to the Prophet. During the whole octave of the passover, the Hebrews use only unleavened bread, as a memorial that at the time of their departure out of Egypt they wanted leisure to bake leavened bread; and, having left the country with precipitation, they were content to bake bread which was not leavened, Exodus 12:8 . The practice of the Jews at this day, with relation to the use of unleavened bread, is as follows: They forbid to eat, or have in their houses, or in any place belonging to them, either leavened bread or any thing else that is leavened. That they may the better observe this rule, they search into all the corners of the house with scrupulous exactness for all bread or paste, or any thing that is leavened. After they have thus well cleansed their houses, they whiten them, and furnish them with kitchen and table utensils, all new, and with others which are to be used only on that day. If they are movables, which have served only for something else, and are made of metal, they have them polished, and put into the fire, to take away all the impurity which they may have contracted by touching any thing leavened. All this is done on the thirteenth day of Nisan, or on the vigil of the feast of the passover, which begins with the fifteenth of the same month, or the fourteenth day in the evening; for the Hebrews reckon their days from one evening to another. On the fourteenth of Nisan, at eleven o'clock, they burn the common bread, to show that the prohibition of eating leavened bread is then commenced; and this action is attended with words, whereby the master of the house declares that he has no longer any thing leavened in his keeping; that, at least, he believes so. In allusion to this practice, we are commanded to "purge out the old leaven;" by which "malice and wickedness" are intended; and to feed only on the "unleavened bread of sincerity and truth."
2. SHEW BREAD, or, according to the Hebrews, the bread of faces, was bread offered every Sabbath day upon the golden table in the holy place, Exodus 25:30 . The Hebrews affirm that these loaves were square, and had four sides, and were covered with leaves of gold. They were twelve in number, according to the number of the twelve tribes, in whose names they were offered. Every loaf was composed of two assarons of flour, which make about five pints and one-tenth. These loaves were unleavened. They were presented hot every Sabbath day, the old ones being taken away and eaten by the priests only. This offering was accompanied with salt and frankincense, and even with wine, according to some commentators. The Scripture mentions only salt and incense; but it is presumed that wine was added, because it was not wanting in other sacrifices and offerings. It is believed that these loaves were placed one upon another, in two piles of six each; and that between every loaf were two thin plates of gold, folded back in a semicircle the whole length of them, to admit air, and to prevent the loaves from growing mouldy. These golden plates, thus turned in, were supported at their extremities by two golden forks, which rested on the ground. The twelve loaves, because they stood before the Lord, were called לחם הפנים , αρτοι προθεσεως , or ενωπιοι , the bread of faces, or of the presence; and are therefore denominated in our English translation the shew bread. Since part of the frankincense put upon the bread was to be burnt on the altar for a memorial, even an offering made by fire unto the Lord; and since Aaron and his sons were to eat it in the holy place, Leviticus 24:5-9 , it is probable that this bread typified Christ, first presented as a sacrifice to Jehovah, and then becoming spiritual food to such as in and through him are spiritual priests to God, even his Father, Revelation 1:6 ; Revelation 5:10 ; Revelation 20:6 ; 1 Peter 2:5 . It appears, from some places in Scripture, (see Exodus 29:32 , and Numbers 6:15 :) that there was always near the altar a basket full of bread, in order to be offered together with the ordinary sacrifices.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Baking Bread
Abraham directed Sarah to bake cakes upon the hearth, for the use of the strangers who had visited him, Genesis 18:6 . Elijah requests the same of the widow of Zarephath, 1 Kings 17:13 , Amnon the son of David requests Tamar his sister to come and make cakes in his sight, that he might eat at her hand, 2 Samuel 13:6 . These and other allusions to the preparation of bread will be explained by referring to eastern customs. Rauwolff observes that travellers frequently bake bread in the deserts of Arabia, on the ground heated for that purpose by fire, covering their cakes of bread with ashes and coals, and turning them several times till they are enough. The eastern bread is made in small thin cakes, and is generally eaten new. Sometimes it was however made to keep several days, as the shew bread; and a sort of rusks, or bread for travelling, Joshua 9:12 . The eastern ladies of rank often prepare cakes, pastry, &c, in their own apartments.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Bread
1: ἄρτος (Strong's #740 — Noun Masculine — artos — ar'-tos ) "bread" (perhaps derived from aro, "to fit together," or from a root ar---, "the earth"), signifies (a) "a small loaf or cake," composed of flour and water, and baked, in shape either oblong or round, and about as thick as the thumb; these were not cut, but broken and were consecrated to the Lord every Sabbath and called the "shewbread" (loaves of presentation), Matthew 12:4 ; when the "shewbread" was reinstituted by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:32 ) a poll-tax of 1/3 shekel was laid on the Jews, Matthew 17:24 ; (b) "the loaf at the Lord's Supper," e.g., Matthew 26:26 ("Jesus took a loaf," RV, marg.); the breaking of "bread" became the name for this institution, Acts 2:42 ; 20:7 ; 1 Corinthians 10:16 ; 11:23 ; (c) "bread of any kind," Matthew 16:11 ; (d) metaphorically, "of Christ as the Bread of God, and of Life," John 6:33,35 ; (e) "food in general," the necessities for the sustenance of life, Matthew 6:11 ; 2 Corinthians 9:10 , etc.
2: ἄζυμος (Strong's #106 — Adjective — azumos — ad'-zoo-mos ) denotes "unleavened bread," i.e., without any process of fermentation; hence, metaphorically, "of a holy, spiritual condition," 1 Corinthians 5:7 , and of "sincerity and truth" (1 Corinthians 5:8 ). With the article it signifies the feast of unleavened bread, Matthew 26:17 ; Mark 14:1,12 ; Luke 22:1,7 ; Acts 12:3 ; 20:6 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Bread
A word which in Scripture is often put for food in general, Genesis 3:19 18:5 28:20 Exodus 2:20 Leviticus 11:3 . Manna is called bread from heaven, Exodus 16:4 . Bread, in the proper and literal sense, usually means cakes made of wheaten flour; barely being used chiefly by the poor and for feeding horses. The wheat was ground daily, in small stone mills; the flour was made into dough in a wooden trough, and subsequently leavened, Exodus 12:34 Hosea 7:4 . It was then made into cakes, and baked.
The ancient Hebrews had several ways of baking bread: of baking bread: they often baked it under the ashes upon the earth, upon round copper or iron plates, or in pans or stoves made on purpose. The Arabians and other oriental nations, among whom wood is scarce, often bake their bread between two fires made of cow-dung, which burns slowly. The bread is good, if eaten the same day, but the crust is black and burnt, and retains a smell of the fuel used in baking it. This explains Ezekiel 4:9,15 .
The Hebrews, in common with other eastern people, had a kind of oven, (tannoor,) which is like a large pitcher, open at top, in which they made a fire. When it was well heated, they mingled flour in water, and this paste they applied to the outside of the pitcher. Such bread is baked in an instant, and is taken off in thin, fine pieces, like our wafers, Leviticus 2:1-16 . Bread was also baked in cavities sunk in the ground, or the floor of the tent, and well lined with compost or cement. A tire was built on the floor of this oven; and the sides being sufficiently heated, thin cakes were adroitly stuck upon towns there were public ovens, and bakers by trade, Jeremiah 37:21 Hosea 7:4 .
As the Hebrews generally made their bread thin, and in the form of flat cakes, or wafers, they did not cut it with a knife, but broke it, Lamentations 4:4 , which gave rise to that expression so usual in Scripture, of "breaking bread," to signify eating, sitting down to table, taking a repast. In the institution of the Lord's supper, our Savior broke the bread which he had consecrated; whence "to break bread," and "breaking of bread," in the New Testament are used for celebrating the Lord's supper. See under EATING .
SHOWBREAD, Heb. Bread of presence, was bread offered every Sabbath-day to God on the golden table which stood in the holy place, Exodus 25:30 ; twelve cakes of unleavened bread, offered with salt and frankincense, Leviticus 2:13 24:5-9 . The show-bread could be lawfully eaten by none but the priests; nevertheless, David having received some of these loaves from the high-priest Abimelech, ate of them without scruple in his necessity, 1 Samuel 21:1-6 ; and our Savior quotes his example to justify the disciples, who had bruised ears of corn, and were eating them on the Sabbath-day. Matthew 12:1 - 4 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Passover And Feast of Unleavened Bread
PASSOVER AND FEAST OF UNLEAVENED BREAD
1. OT references
(1) Law and Ezekiel . The allusions in Exodus 34:25 ; Exodus 23:16 are so dubious that they can hardly give any sure ground on which to base a consideration of the Passover festival. The first certain reference to the feast is in Exodus 12:21-27 . (This is probably an older account than Exodus 12:1-13 , and differs from it in details.) We find that ‘the passover’ is assumed as known, and possibly it is the feast referred to in Exodus 3:16 ; Exodus 7:16 etc. The characteristic features of the feast in Exodus 12:21-27 are: ( a ) a lamb is to be slain and its blood sprinkled on the lintel and side-posts of the houses; ( b ) the cause for this observance is found in the slaughter of the Egyptian firstborn.
In Deuteronomy 16:1-8 the Passover is directed to be observed in the month Abib (April), in commemoration of the Exodus from Egypt. The sacrifice is not to be offered in private dwellings, but ‘in the place which Jehovah shall choose to place his name there.’ With the Passover meal, and during seven days, no leavened bread was to be eaten. None of the flesh was to be left till morning. After the meal the worshippers were to go to their homes; the seventh day was to be a solemn assembly, and this period ( Deuteronomy 16:9 ) was treated as opening the 7 weeks’ ‘joy of harvest,’ commencing from Abib, when the corn would be coming into ear. We may notice here: ( a ) the Passover is regarded as part of the Feast of Unleavened Bread ( Mazzoth ), the two being apparently blended into one; ( b ) the sacrifice, though composed of individual sacrifices, is to be offered only at the Temple in Jerusalem; ( c ) the offering may be taken from flock or herd.
In Ezekiel 45:21-24 the date is precisely assigned as 14th Abib. The feast lasts 7 days, and unleavened bread only is to be eaten. The prince is to offer a bullock as a sin-offering for himself and the people, and a he-goat on each of the 7 days, as well as 7 bullocks and 7 rams daily, with other offerings of meal and oil. All takes place at the central sanctuary; there is no mention of a lamb, and the Passover is part of the Unleavened Bread festival.
Leviticus 23:5-14 ordains the Passover for the evening of 14th Abib. The Feast of Unleavened Bread is treated separately; it lasts 7 days, a holy convocation is to be held on the 1st and 7th days; and ‘on the morrow after the sabbath’ a sheaf of new corn is to be waved before the Lord, a he-lamb is to be offered as a burnt-offering with other offerings; and till this is done, no bread or parched corn or green ears may be eaten.
According to Exodus 12:1-13 , the current month of the Exodus is to be regarded as the 1st month of the year. On the 10th day a lamb or a kid is to be taken for each family or combination of families, according to their size. It is to be slain at even on the 14th, and the lintel is to be stained with its blood. It is to be roasted intact, and eaten with unleavened bread and bitter herbs . Nothing of it is to remain till morning. It is to be eaten in haste, the partakers prepared as for a journey; it is a sign of the Lord’s ‘pass-over.’
Exodus 12:43-49 forbids any foreigner or hired servant or sojourner to eat the Passover unless he first submits to circumcision.
Numbers 9:1-14 deals with a case recorded as arising on the first anniversary of the Exodus. It is declared that anybody who is unclean may celebrate the Passover on the 14th day of the 2nd month.
In Numbers 28:15-25 the Passover is distinguished from the Feast of Unleavened Bread. The 1st and 7th days of the latter are to be days of holy convocation. On each of the 7 days two bullocks, a ram, and 7 lambs (with special offerings of meal and oil) are to be sacrificed, and a goat for a sin-offering.
(2) Historical and Prophetical books . No certain reference is found previous to the date of the discovery of Deuteronomy. Most of the allusions in the prophets are quite general in scope (cf. Hosea 2:11 ; Hosea 9:5 ; Hosea 12:9-10 , Amos 5:21 ; Amos 8:10 ). The observance in 2 Kings 23:21-23 is stated to have conformed to the regulations of Deuteronomy 16:1-22 and to have been novel in character. 2 Chronicles 30:1-27 , 2 Chronicles 35:1-19 perhaps reflects the later usages of the writer’s own age. Of post-exilic witnesses Ezra 6:19-22 may be quoted, where the priests and Levites play the prominent part in the sacrifice, and the Feast of Unleavened Bread is distinguished from the Passover.
Many of the Passover rites are undoubtedly very ancient; but Deuteronomy tends to emphasize the historical connexion of the festival with the Exodus. The various regulations and allusions in the OT are not consistent with each other, and different ideas were probably associated with the feast at different periods of the national history. Thus Ezk. lays most stress on its aim as a collective piacular sacrifice. It is likely that the feast was observed during the Exile, and that its commemorative significance was then made more emphatic. This would explain the underlying conception of the account in the Priestly Code. But the Chronicler shows preference for the Deuteronomic version, perhaps owing to the growing centralization of worship at one sanctuary in his time.
2. Origin and primitive significance. The Passover was in all probability an institution already existing when the Jewish legislation was codified, but taken up and transformed by the Legislator. ( a ) The most widely accepted theory is that it was in origin the shepherd’s offering of the first-fruits from his flocks, the slaughter of the Egyptian firstborn being Pharaoh’s punishment for hindering this observance. On this theory, later tradition would then have altered the sequence, and have regarded the slaughter of the Egyptians as the reason why the Israelites should offer the firstborn of their flocks. And, finally, the connexion with the pastoral sacrifice would have been forgotten, and the Passover would be treated as instituted in order to save the firstborn of Israel. ( b ) Another theory finds the central idea of the Passover in the piacular notion. The sacrifice would be offered as a substitute for the firstborn of man, and this conception is a common constituent of primitive spring festivals. ( c ) Other theories regard the observance as originating from domestic sacrifice to avert harm in times of pestilence, or from an ancient solemnization of a threshold covenant, when Jehovah was welcomed into a private dwelling.
It is quite possible that all these theories represent different parts of the truth. The Passover appears to date from very early times, and may have amalgamated features from an entire series of festivals. Thus it combines the notions of sin-offering (the sprinkling of the blood), of burnt-offering (the victim being roasted intact), and of peace-offering (the victim being eaten by the worshippers). Other noticeable features are: its date at the vernal equinox, the fact that the sacrifices were mostly or entirely of firstborn, and that an old tradition connected it with the Israelites’ desire for a religious pilgrimage, which eventually led to the Exodus (cf. Exodus 5:1-3 ). This variety of character suggests the inference that the Passover is the complex amalgamation of different feasts, in which these different elements existed separately. Its association with the Feast of Unleavened Bread is probably accidental, due to contiguity in time. The latter is plainly an agricultural festival, and falls into line with the feasts of Pentecost and Tabernacles.
3. Post-exilic observances. The Samaritans continue to observe the detailed ordinances of Exodus 12:1-51 . But the Jews learned in time to disregard some of the details, as applicable only to the first or Egyptian Passover. Such details were the choice of the lamb on the 10th day, its slaughter at home, the sprinkling of the blood on the house-door, the admission of the unclean, the posture and attire of the partakers, etc. Various alterations and elaborations were introduced. The month Adar was devoted to a thorough purification of lands and houses, sepulchres being whitened, roads and bridges repaired. On the evening of 13th Abib all leaven was sought out. On the 14th the Passover was offered by indiscriminate companies of 10 to 20 people. It was slain in relays at the Temple, and the blood thrown before the altar by the priests. The lambs were then dressed, and the fat offered, while the Levites chanted the Hallel ( Psalms 113:1-9 ; Psalms 114:1-8 ; Psalms 115:1-18 ; Psalms 116:1-19 ; Psalms 117:1-2 ; Psalms 118:1-29 ). The lambs were taken home and roasted; each of the guests brought 4 cups of red wine , and the meal was eaten with bitter herbs and unleavened cakes . The posture at the meal was recumbent (as a token, according to the Pharisees, of the rest which God had given to His people). A blessing was said over the first cup (perhaps implied in Luke 22:17 ff.). Then followed the washing of hands and offering a prayer. At the second cup came the son’s question as to the significance of the feast, and the father’s explanation. This was succeeded by the singing of Psalms 113:1-9 ; Psalms 114:1-8 . Grace was said over the third cup, and with the fourth came the singing of Psalms 115:1-18 ; Psalms 116:1-19 ; Psalms 117:1-2 ; Psalms 118:1-29 . Large numbers assembled at Jerusalem for this feast, and such occasions were always carefully supervised by the Romans for fear of insurrection. Hence perhaps would come the custom of releasing a selected prisoner; but we have no hint of the origin of the custom.
A. W. F. Blunt.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Bread
The preparation of bread as an article of food dates from a very early period. (Genesis 18:6 ) The corn or grain employed was of various sorts. The best bread was made of wheat, but "barley" and spelt were also used. (John 6:9,13 ; Isaiah 28:25 ) The process of making bread was as follows: the flour was first mixed with water or milk; it was then kneaded with the hands (in Egypt with the feet also) in a small wooden bowl or "kneading-trough" until it became dough. (Exodus 12:34,39 ; 2 Samuel 13:3 ; Jeremiah 7:18 ) When the kneading was completed, leaven was generally added [1]; but when the time for preparation was short, it was omitted, and unleavened cakes, hastily baked, were eaten as is still the prevalent custom among the Bedouins. ( (Genesis 18:6 ; 19:3 ; Exodus 12:39 ; Judges 6:19 ; 1 Samuel 28:24 ) The leavened mass was allowed to stand for some time, (Matthew 13:33 ; Luke 13:21 ) the dough was then divided into round cakes, (Exodus 29:23 ; Judges 7:13 ; 8:5 ; 1 Samuel 10:3 ; Proverbs 6:26 ) not unlike flat stones in shape and appearance, (Matthew 7:9 ) comp. Matthew 4:8 About a span in diameter and a finger's breadth in thickness. In the towns where professional bakers resided, there were no doubt fixed ovens, in shape and size resembling those in use among ourselves; but more usually each household poured a portable oven, consisting of a stone or metal jar, about three feet high which was heated inwardly with wood, ( 1 Kings 17:12 ; Isaiah 44:15 ; Jeremiah 7:18 ) or dried grass and flower-stalks. (Matthew 6:30 )
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Wafer Bread
(See UNLEAVENED BREAD.)
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Bread
To people in Bible times, bread was a basic part of the daily food. In everyday speech they often spoke of food in general as bread (Psalms 37:25; Proverbs 31:27; Ecclesiastes 9:7; Isaiah 30:20; Matthew 6:11; 2 Thessalonians 3:8). (For details concerning the common bread of the people see FOOD. For the use of leaven in bread and for its symbolism in Israelite religion see LEAVEN; PASSOVER. For the meaning of the ‘presence bread’ in the tabernacle see TABERNACLE.)
Manna, that unusual food that God provided for the Israelites on their journey from Egypt to Canaan, was known as ‘bread from heaven’ (Exodus 16:4; John 6:31; see MANNA). Jesus spoke of this bread as a picture of himself, the true bread from heaven. He came from God as God’s provision for the world’s spiritually needy people. He alone can bring salvation, and he alone can guarantee believers victory over death (John 6:32-40). This provision of salvation through Jesus is possible only because Jesus gave himself in sacrifice. By accepting the benefits of this sacrifice for themselves by faith, people can have eternal life (John 6:48-58).
Jesus also used literal bread as a symbol of his sacrifice. He told his disciples to eat bread and drink wine together, as a remembrance of him and as an expression of their unity with him and with one another (Matthew 26:26-29; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 11:23-26; see FELLOWSHIP; LORD’S SUPPER).

Sentence search

Bread - Bread, n. In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat Bread. ...
Genesis 3 ...
Give us this day our daily Bread. Is the reward of virtue, Bread? ...
Bee-bread. ...
Ship-bread, Bread for ships hard biscuits. ...
Cassada-bread. ...
Bread, To spread
Bread of the Presence - (bread of the faces ) In Exodus 25:30 , the Lord's instructions concerning the paraphernalia of worship include a provision that Bread be kept always on a table set before the Holy of Holies. This Bread was called the Bread of presence, or shewbread. The literal meaning of the Hebrew expression is “bread of the face. ” It consisted of twelve loaves of presumably unleavened Bread, and it was replaced each sabbath
Unleavened Bread - UNLEAVENED Bread . See Bread, Leaven, Passover
Panivorous - ) Eating Bread; subsisting on Bread
Manchet - ) Fine white Bread; a loaf of fine Bread
Bread, Bread of Presence - Bread was the essential food of the ancient Israelites. Indeed, the very word "bread" could be used generically for any kind of food. Meat was eaten by peasants only at festival occasions, and other foods supplemented Bread. As the mainstay of life, Bread came to be a primary metaphor for life and sustenance. ...
Bread in the Bible functions as a social bond. The giving of Bread to another is a major element of hospitality and serves as a sign of respect and concern (Genesis 14:18 ; 18:6 ; 19:3 ; Deuteronomy 23:4 ; Ruth 2:14 ; 1 Samuel 25:18 ; 28:24 ; 2 Samuel 16:1-2 ). Conversely, to take someone's Bread and then turn against that person is to commit a heinous offense of ingratitude and betrayal, as in the case of Judas Iscariot (Psalm 41:9 ; John 13:18-30 ). ...
Metaphorically, eating the "bread of idleness" is to indulge oneself without doing one's household duty (Proverbs 31:27 ). Also, Bread can symbolize a financial investment (Ecclesiastes 11:1 ). ...
The ritual and theological texts of the Bible often refer to Bread. Bread was also used as part of an offering of thanksgiving to God (Leviticus 7:12-13 ). Of particular importance in Israel's worship is unleavened Bread. In the first Passover, the eating of unleavened Bread typified the haste of Israel's departure from Egypt (Exodus 12:8-11 ), although there are already indications that leaven is associated with the pervasive influence of evil (Exodus 12:14-20 ). So important was this concept that a special festival of unleavened Bread was instituted (Leviticus 23:6 ). ...
The association of leaven with evil underlines the fact that Bread or leaven can represent temptation, false teaching, or materialism. Human life is not sustained by Bread alone (physical provision), but requires the spiritual provision of the Word of God (Deuteronomy 8:3 ; Job 23:12 ). This concept enabled Jesus to reject the temptations of Satan (Matthew 4:3-4 ; Luke 4:3-4 ), and also underlies the practice of fasting, that is, refraining from eating Bread during periods of intense focus on an encounter with God (Exodus 34:28 ; Deuteronomy 9:9 ; 2 Samuel 3:35 ). ...
More positively, Bread frequently stands for God's provision for his people. The practice of setting the Bread of the Presence before God expresses this concept. Every Sabbath the priests put twelve loaves of Bread on the table of the Bread of the Presence in the temple (Exodus 25:23-30 ; 35:13 ; 39:36 ; Leviticus 24:5-9 ). In contrast to the religious ideas of the surrounding nations, the Bible does not imply that the Bread was meant as food for God (Psalm 50:12-15 ). Instead, the Bread was placed before Yahweh as a token of gratitude for his provision for his people. For Jesus, David's eating of the Bread of the Presence suggests that human need can at times overrule ritual prohibition (1 Samuel 21:4-6 ; Mark 2:26 ). ...
The manna in the wilderness is the quintessential example of Bread as a provision of God. Similarly, the Christian prays for "daily" Bread (Matthew 6:11 ). The disciples were thus not to be concerned about where they would obtain Bread when they went out to serve God (Luke 9:3 ; cf. At the same time, the Christian is not to rely on the charity of the church for Bread but earn it (2 Thessalonians 3:12 ). The failure of the Bread supply is a mark of judgment (Leviticus 26:26 ; Lamentations 1:11 ; 2:12 ; 4:4 ; 5:6 ; Amos 4:6 ). ...
The New Testament uses Bread as a rich theological metaphor. As God supplies Bread, so he will also supply righteousness to his people (2 Corinthians 9:10 ). Above all, Jesus himself is the Bread of life; he is the sustenance from God that gives eternal life (Proverbs 30:8 ). Christians thus partake of Christ's body in the Bread of the Lord's Supper. After the resurrection, Jesus' eating of Bread with the disciples was a token of his victory over death (Luke 24:30,35 ; John 21:13 ), and Christians after that met on the first of the week for the breaking of Bread (Acts 20:7 )
Panary - ) Of or pertaining to Bread or to Breadmaking. ) A storehouse for Bread
Bread - Lechem (לֶחֶם, Strong's #3899), “bread; meal; food; fruit. This noun refers to “bread,” as distinguished from meat. The diet of the early Hebrews ordinarily consisted of Bread, meat, and liquids: “And he humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know; that he might make thee know that man doth not live by Bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord …” ( Bread …” ( Bread”: “… They will salute thee, and give thee two loaves of Bread …” ( Bread” is a term for a modest meal. So Abraham said to his three guests, “Let a little water, I pray you, be fetched … and I will fetch a morsel of Bread, and comfort ye your hearts …” ( Bread” may actually mean “to prepare a meal”: “A feast is made for laughter, and wine maketh merry …” ( Bread” is the “support of life”: “And when I have broken the staff of your Bread, ten women shall bake your Bread in one oven, and they shall deliver you your Bread again by weight: and ye shall eat, and not be satisfied” ( Bread of the Presence,” which was the Bread constantly set before God in the holy place of the tabernacle or temple: “And thou shalt set upon the table showbread before me always” ( Bread” (2 Kings 18:32: “Until I come and take you away to a land like your own land, a land of corn and wine, a land of Bread and vineyards. 3:19 (the first biblical occurrence), it signifies the entire diet: “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat Bread. And the angel of the Lord said unto Manoah, Though thou detain me, I will not eat of thy Bread. Flesh and grain offered to God are called “the Bread of God”: “… For the offerings of the Lord made by fire, and the Bread of their God, they do offer …” ( Bread of wickedness, and drink the wine of violence” ( the good wife “looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the Bread of idleness”—i. The “bread of my portion” is the food that one earns ( Bread for us …” ( Bread. In the ancient Orient, household Bread was prepared by adding fermented dough to the kneading trough and working it through the fresh dough. Hastily made Bread omitted the fermented (leavened) dough: Lot “made them a feast, and did bake unleavened Bread, and they did eat” ( Bread hastily prepared for unexpected guests. The feasts of Israel often involved the use of unleavened Bread, perhaps because of the relationship between fermentation, rotting, and death ( Bread reminded Jews of the hasty departure from Egypt and the rigors of the wilderness march
Bread - Bread was prepared by kneading in wooden bowls or "kneading troughs" (Genesis 18:6 ; Exodus 12:34 ; Jeremiah 7:18 ). The Bread eaten at the Passover was always unleavened (Exodus 12:15-20 ; Deuteronomy 16:3 ). In the towns there were public ovens, which were much made use of for baking Bread; there were also bakers by trade (Hosea 7:4 ; Jeremiah 37:21 ). But sometimes the Bread was baked by being placed on the ground that had been heated by a fire, and by covering it with the embers (1 Kings 19:6 ). This was probably the mode in which Sarah prepared Bread on the occasion referred to in Genesis 18:6 . ...
In Leviticus 2 there is an account of the different kinds of Bread and cakes used by the Jews. ) ...
The shew-bread (q. ) consisted of twelve loaves of unleavened Bread prepared and presented hot on the golden table every Sabbath. ...
The word Bread is used figuratively in such expressions as "bread of sorrows" (Psalm 127:2 ), "bread of tears" (80:5), i. , sorrow and tears are like one's daily Bread, they form so great a part in life. The Bread of "wickedness" (Proverbs 4:17 ) and "of deceit" (20:17) denote in like manner that wickedness and deceit are a part of the daily life
Unleavened Bread - Bread baked without using leaven, a substance such as yeast which produces fermentation in dough. Unleavened Bread was often served to guests (Genesis 19:3 ; Judges 6:19 ; 1 Samuel 28:24 ). The eating of unleavened Bread took on special significance through the Feast of Unleavened Bread celebrated in connection with Passover (Exodus 12:8 ,Exodus 12:8,12:15 ,Exodus 12:15,12:20 ; Exodus 13:3 ,Exodus 13:3,13:6-7 )
Baking - The Old Testament speaks most often of the baking of Bread and cakes, which were the main part of the meal for Hebrews and Canaanites alike (Genesis 19:3 ; Exodus 12:39 ; Leviticus 26:26 ; 1 Kings 17:12-13 ; Isaiah 44:15 ). The Bread of the presence (Leviticus 24:5 ) and other offerings (Leviticus 2:4-6 ) were also baked. See Bread ; Bread of the Presence ; Cooking and Heating ; Food and Meals in the Bible; Kneading, Kneading Bowl
Bread - To people in Bible times, Bread was a basic part of the daily food. In everyday speech they often spoke of food in general as Bread (Psalms 37:25; Proverbs 31:27; Ecclesiastes 9:7; Isaiah 30:20; Matthew 6:11; 2 Thessalonians 3:8). (For details concerning the common Bread of the people see FOOD. For the use of leaven in Bread and for its symbolism in Israelite religion see LEAVEN; PASSOVER. For the meaning of the ‘presence Bread’ in the tabernacle see TABERNACLE. )...
Manna, that unusual food that God provided for the Israelites on their journey from Egypt to Canaan, was known as ‘bread from heaven’ (Exodus 16:4; John 6:31; see MANNA). Jesus spoke of this Bread as a picture of himself, the true Bread from heaven. ...
Jesus also used literal Bread as a symbol of his sacrifice. He told his disciples to eat Bread and drink wine together, as a remembrance of him and as an expression of their unity with him and with one another (Matthew 26:26-29; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 11:23-26; see FELLOWSHIP; LORD’S SUPPER)
Crumb - ) A small fragment or piece; especially, a small piece of Bread or other food, broken or cut off. ) The soft part of Bread. ) To break into crumbs or small pieces with the fingers; as, to crumb Bread
Rusk - ) A kind of light, soft Bread made with yeast and eggs, often toasted or crisped in an oven; or, a kind of sweetened biscuit. ) A kind of light, hard cake or Bread, as for stores. ) Bread or cake which has been made brown and crisp, and afterwards grated, or pulverized in a mortar
Charlotte - ) A kind of pie or pudding made by lining a dish with slices of Bread, and filling it with Bread soaked in milk, and baked
Liturgical Use of Bread - In Christian liturgy, Bread (wheaten) is used chiefly as an element of the Eucharistic Sacrifice. ...
(1) Formerly popes and bishops sent blessed Bread to their priests to symbolize union.
(4) Bread blessed at the Offertory is distributed to the faithful (see antidoron eulogia).
(5) Bread brought by the faithful is blessed at the Sunday parochial Mass. The custom is common among the French who call the Bread pain benit
Life, Bread of - The Eucharist, the Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, contained really and substantially under the appearances of Bread and wine. It is called Bread from the matter from which it is confected and as Bread, i
Bread - Manna is called Bread from heaven, Exodus 16:4 . Bread, in the proper and literal sense, usually means cakes made of wheaten flour; barely being used chiefly by the poor and for feeding horses. ...
The ancient Hebrews had several ways of baking Bread: of baking Bread: they often baked it under the ashes upon the earth, upon round copper or iron plates, or in pans or stoves made on purpose. The Arabians and other oriental nations, among whom wood is scarce, often bake their Bread between two fires made of cow-dung, which burns slowly. The Bread is good, if eaten the same day, but the crust is black and burnt, and retains a smell of the fuel used in baking it. Such Bread is baked in an instant, and is taken off in thin, fine pieces, like our wafers, Leviticus 2:1-16 . Bread was also baked in cavities sunk in the ground, or the floor of the tent, and well lined with compost or cement. ...
As the Hebrews generally made their Bread thin, and in the form of flat cakes, or wafers, they did not cut it with a knife, but broke it, Lamentations 4:4 , which gave rise to that expression so usual in Scripture, of "breaking Bread," to signify eating, sitting down to table, taking a repast. In the institution of the Lord's supper, our Savior broke the Bread which he had consecrated; whence "to break Bread," and "breaking of Bread," in the New Testament are used for celebrating the Lord's supper. ...
SHOWBREAD, Heb. Bread of presence, was Bread offered every Sabbath-day to God on the golden table which stood in the holy place, Exodus 25:30 ; twelve cakes of unleavened Bread, offered with salt and frankincense, Leviticus 2:13 24:5-9 . The show-bread could be lawfully eaten by none but the priests; nevertheless, David having received some of these loaves from the high-priest Abimelech, ate of them without scruple in his necessity, 1 Samuel 21:1-6 ; and our Savior quotes his example to justify the disciples, who had bruised ears of corn, and were eating them on the Sabbath-day
Cake - A term referring more to the shape of a loaf of Bread (flat and round) than to the type of batter or dough used to make the loaf. See Bread
Sop - In eastern lands where our table utensils are unknown, the meat, with the broth, is brought upon the table in a large dish, and is eaten usually by means of pieces of Bread clipped into the common dish. The Bread so dipped is called. "It was such a piece of Bread a sop dipped in broth that Jesus gave to Judas, (John 13:26 ) and again, in Matthew 26:23 It is said "he that dippeth his hand with me in the dish," i. to make a sop by dipping a piece of Bread into the central dish
Manna - On the morrow they followed Him across the sea to Capernaum, hoping that He would feed them again in some supernatural way, and suggesting the giving of Bread from heaven as a suitable sign in confirmation of His high claims. Would not the prophet of Nazareth imitate the great lawgiver, who gave their fathers Bread from heaven? Jesus turns their thoughts away from Moses to God: ‘It was not Moses that gave you the Bread out of heaven, but my Father giveth you the true Bread out of heaven. ’ As God gave the fathers literal Bread from heaven, so now He is giving to their children spiritual food that nourishes the soul eternally. ‘I am the Bread of life; he that cometh to me shall not hunger, and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. ‘I am the living Bread that cometh down out of heaven: if any man eat of this Bread, he shall live for ever; yea, and the Bread which I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world’ (John 6:51)
Manna - On the morrow they followed Him across the sea to Capernaum, hoping that He would feed them again in some supernatural way, and suggesting the giving of Bread from heaven as a suitable sign in confirmation of His high claims. Would not the prophet of Nazareth imitate the great lawgiver, who gave their fathers Bread from heaven? Jesus turns their thoughts away from Moses to God: ‘It was not Moses that gave you the Bread out of heaven, but my Father giveth you the true Bread out of heaven. ’ As God gave the fathers literal Bread from heaven, so now He is giving to their children spiritual food that nourishes the soul eternally. ‘I am the Bread of life; he that cometh to me shall not hunger, and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. ‘I am the living Bread that cometh down out of heaven: if any man eat of this Bread, he shall live for ever; yea, and the Bread which I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world’ (John 6:51)
Artoklasia - (Greek: artos, Bread; klao, break) ...
Concluding service of Vespers in the Greek Church, in which five loaves of Bread, a measure of wine, and a measure of oil are incensed and blessed
Baking Bread - These and other allusions to the preparation of Bread will be explained by referring to eastern customs. Rauwolff observes that travellers frequently bake Bread in the deserts of Arabia, on the ground heated for that purpose by fire, covering their cakes of Bread with ashes and coals, and turning them several times till they are enough. The eastern Bread is made in small thin cakes, and is generally eaten new. Sometimes it was however made to keep several days, as the shew Bread; and a sort of rusks, or Bread for travelling, Joshua 9:12
Bread - Sometimes Bread is spoken of in Scripture in the common acceptation of it, as the staff of natural life, but more frequently it is used in figure, by way of allusion to the Lord Jesus and the life in him. Jesus calls himself "the living Bread, and the Bread of God;" to intimate, that as the natural man is sustained day by day, life kept up and preserved by receiving the common Bread for the body, so the spiritual life in Jesus is wholly supported by communications from Jesus, and life in Jesus. " (John 6:32-58)...
The shew Bread of the Old Testament was of Christ. The shew Bread was placed new upon the golden altar. The shew Bread was placed there every Sabbath. " (See Exodus 25:30; Isaiah 28:12; Psalms 116:7; Matthew 11:28) It may not be improper to add, that the term shew Bread meant the Bread of faces; and, probably, it was so called, because offered in the presence of the Lord, and placed before him on the table. ...
The unleavened Bread of the passover, there is particular mention made of it, Exodus 12:8. And concerning leavened Bread, with which the blood of the sacrifice was never to be offered, what a beautiful type was this of the untainted, pure offering of the body of Jesus Christ, once for all. (Exodus 23:18; Exo 20:24-25) And is it not the same now in the believer's offerings in Jesus? When in commemoration of the Lord's supper we partake of the Bread and wine, as tokens of the body and blood of Christ, would it not be a pollution to leaven this solemn service with any thing of ours? Is not Christ all and in all?...
Impanation - (Latin: in, in; panis, Bread) ...
A word coined, like Incarnation, to express the heretical opinion that as Our Lord is God in the flesh, Incarnate, so in the Holy Eucharist He is God in the Bread, without change of the substance of the Bread into His substance
Eucharistic Elements - These are Bread and wine mixed with a little water. The Bread must be purely of wheaten flour and recently made. In the Latin rite, the Bread is unleavened, i
Elements, Eucharistic - These are Bread and wine mixed with a little water. The Bread must be purely of wheaten flour and recently made. In the Latin rite, the Bread is unleavened, i
Bread - Bread was made of wheaten flour, or of wheat and barley mixed, or by the poor of barley only. ...
UNLEAVENED Bread was to be eaten with certain of the offerings, Leviticus 6:16,17 ; and for the seven days' feast connected with the Passover, often referred to as 'the Feast of Unleavened Bread,' Exodus 34:18 ; 2 Chronicles 8:13 ; Luke 22:1 ; 1 Corinthians 5:8 ; a symbol that all evil must be put away in order to keep the feast. ...
The Lord Jesus called Himself the Bread OF GOD, the Bread that came down from heaven, THE Bread OF LIFE, the living Bread, of which if any man ate he should live for ever: He said "He that eateth me shall live by me. This was typified in Israel by the SHOWBREAD, the twelve loaves placed upon the table in the holy place, new every sabbath day: it was holy and was eaten by the priests only. It is literally 'face or presence Bread;' Exodus 25:30 ; and 'bread of arrangement' or 'ordering,' as in the margin of 1 Chronicles 9:32 ; and in the N. 'bread of presentation
Manna - Deuteronomy 8:3 (a) This Bread is a type of CHRIST, the living Bread. He is the living Bread which sustains the lives of GOD's people. ...
Revelation 2:17 (a) This Bread is a type of some sort of unseen and unknown blessings which are given by GOD for the blessing of His people when they live victorious lives for Him
Sippet - ) A small sop; a small, thin piece of toasted Bread soaked in milk, broth, or the like; a small piece of toasted or fried Bread cut into some special shape and used for garnishing
Shewbread - , "presence Bread"); 1 Chronicles 9:32 (marg. , "bread of ordering"); Numbers 4:7 : called "hallowed Bread" (RSV, "holy Bread") in 1 Samuel 21:1-6 . This Bread consisted of twelve loaves made of the finest flour. The table for the Bread was made of acacia wood, 3 feet long, 18 inches broad, and 2 feet 3 inches high
Shew-Bread, - literally "bread of the face" or "faces. " Shew-bread was unleavened Bread placed upon a table which stood in the sanctuary together with the seven-branched candlestick and the altar of incense. Then they were replaced by twelve new ones, the incense was burned, and they were eaten by the priests in the holy place, out of which they might not be removed, The title "bread of the face" seems to indicate that Bread through which God is seen, that is, with the participation of which the seeing of God is bound up, or through the participation of which man attains the sight of God whence it follows that we have not to think of Bread merely as such as the means of nourishing the bodily life, but as spiritual food as a means of appropriating and retaining that life which consists In seeing the face of God
Millet - It is used partly green as fodder, and partly in the ripe grain for Bread, etc. Ezekiel 4:9 , received an order from the Lord to make himself Bread with a mixture of wheat, barley, beans, lentiles, and millet. "Durra," says Niebuhr, "is a kind of millet, made into Bread with camel's milk, oil, butter, etc, and is almost the only food eaten by the common people of Arabia Felix. I found it so disagreeable, that I would willingly have preferred plain barley Bread
Loaf, Loaves of Bread - See Bread
Showbread, - See Bread
Flour - See Bread
Shewbread, Showbread - See Bread
Cake - See Bread
Oven - See Bread
Sop - A morsel of Bread (John 13:26 ; Compare Ruth 2:14 ). Our Lord took a piece of unleavened Bread, and dipping it into the broth of bitter herbs at the Paschal meal, gave it to Judas
Oven - See Bread
Azyme - ) Unleavened Bread
Cake - See Bread
Cracknels - See Bread
Beth-Lehem - House of Bread
Loaf - See Bread
Payn - ) Bread
Baking - See Bread
Wafer Bread - (See UNLEAVENED Bread
Leaven - The common Bread of Old Testament times was made with leaven. Such Bread was acceptable as wave offerings for the priests and as loaves to accompany the peace offerings (Leviticus 7:11-13 ; Leviticus 23:17 ). However, Bread made with leaven or honey, both associated with the process of fermentation and thus a source of corruption, was never to be used as offerings to be burned on the alter (Leviticus 2:11-12 ). Unleavened Bread was also prepared in times of haste (1 Samuel 18:24 ) and was required for the Feast of Unleavened Bread which was celebrated in conjunction with the Passover festival (Leviticus 23:4-8 ). This unleavened Bread, or Bread of affliction, reminded the Israelites of their hasty departure from Egypt and warned them against corruptive influences (Exodus 12:14-20 )
Shewbread - The old Bread was then eaten by the priests (Leviticus 24:5-9 ). David requested the Bread for his hungry men as they fled from King Saul (1 Samuel 21:4-6 ). See Bread of the Presence
Shewbread - The old Bread was then eaten by the priests (Leviticus 24:5-9 ). David requested the Bread for his hungry men as they fled from King Saul (1 Samuel 21:4-6 ). See Bread of the Presence
Sop - KJV translation of psomion meaning a small piece of Bread that could be dipped in a dish or wine. Most translators today use “morsel” (NAS) or “piece of Bread” (NIV, NRSV). Today in Bible lands a host honors a guest by dipping a piece of Bread into the sauce of the main dish and handing it to the guest. Although Judas accepted the Bread signifying friendship, John said, “Satan entered into him” (John 13:27 )
Wafer - See Bread, end
Unleavened Bread (2) - UNLEAVENED Bread
Lahmi - My Bread; my war
Lahmam - Their Bread; their war
Loaf - * For LOAF see Bread ...
Bakemeats, Baker - See Bread
Table - See Bread , and EATING
Daily Bread - DAILY Bread
Matzah - unleavened Bread eaten on Passover ...
Bethlehem - (Joshua 17:7) The name means, house of Bread; from Beth, house; and lechem, or lehem Bread. It was beautifully significant of Christ, who was from everlasting appointed to be born there, (Micah 5:2) and was, and is, and ever will be, the Bread of life, and the living Bread to his people; of which whosoever eateth shall live for ever! Lord! I would say with the disciples, evermore give me this Bread. (Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:1-6) The Holy Ghost evidently had Jesus in view in that sweet history of Ruth, when the certain man, Eli-melech, representing our whole nature, left Bethlehem the land of Bread, for the Moab of the world; and when with his children Mahlon and Chillon, sickness and disease overtook him and all his posterity. (Ruth 1:1) David's cry for the waters of Bethlehem, (see 2 Samuel 23:15-17) hath always been considered as typical of the soul's thirst for Jesus, the Bread of life
Loaves - (See Bread
Breadless - ) Without Bread; destitute of food
Og - A cake; Bread baked in ashes
Raham Bread - Bread made of unbolted wheat flour
Unleavened - * For UNLEAVENED see Bread , No
Flour - See Bread, Food, § 2 , Mill
Paune - ) A kind of Bread
Wheaten - ) Made of wheat; as, wheaten Bread
Jashubilehem - (juh sshyoo' bi-lee' hehm) Personal name meaning “Jashubites of Bread” or “she returns for Bread
Daily Bread - Among the Hebrews Bread was the principal article of food, thus signifying all the physical necessities of life. Many of the Fathers of the Church (Saints Cyprian, Hilary, Ambrose, Jerome, Peter Chrysologus, and Augustine) and some later exegetes think the word "bread" refers to the necessities of our spiritual life, e.
Both renditions mean "bread needed daily," and "bread necessary for life
Eulogy - Eulogia, a term made use of in reference to the consecrated Bread. When the Greeks have cut a loaf or piece of Bread to consecrate it, they break the rest into little bits, and distribute it among the persons who have not yet communicated, or send it to persons that are absent: and these pieces of Bread are what they call eulogies. " The Latin church has had something like eulogies for a great many ages; and thence arose the use of their holy Bread
Hamotzi - Who brings forth"); blessing recited over Bread...
Panification - ) The act or process of making Bread
Therf - ) Not fermented; unleavened; - said of Bread, loaves, etc
Unleavened - ) Not leavened; containing no leaven; as, unleavened Bread
Wheaten - Made of wheat as wheaten Bread
Bread - Sparing in the use of flesh, like all the nations of the east, the chosen people usually satisfied their hunger with Bread, and quenched their thirst in the running stream. Their Bread was generally made of wheat or barley, or lentiles and beans. Bread of wheat flour, as being the most excellent, was preferred: barley Bread was used only in times of scarcity and distress. So mean and contemptible, in the estimation of the numerous and well-appointed armies of Midian, was Gideon, with his handful of undisciplined militia, that he seems to have been compared to Bread of this inferior quality, which may account for the ready interpretation of the dream of the Midianite respecting him: "And when Gideon was come, behold, there was a man that told a dream unto his fellow, and said, Behold, I dreamed a dream, and lo, a cake of barley Bread tumbled into the host of Midian, and came unto a tent and smote it that it fell, and overturned it, that the tent lay along. " In the cities and villages of Barbary, where public ovens are established, the Bread is usually leavened; but among the Bedoweens and Kabyles, as soon as the dough is kneaded, it is made into thin cakes, either to be baked immediately upon the coals, or else in a shallow earthen vessel like a frying-pan, called Tajen. A fire is made in the middle of the room: and when the Bread is ready for baking, a corner of the hearth is swept, the Bread is laid upon it, and covered with ashes and embers; in a quarter of an hour, they turn it. Sometimes they use small convex plates of iron, which are most common in Persia, and among the nomadic tribes, as being the easiest way of baking, and done with the least expense; for the Bread is extremely thin, and soon prepared. When it is hot, they place the Bread (which is commonly long, and not thicker than a finger) against the sides: it is baked in a moment. Ovens, Chardin apprehends, were not used in Canaan in the patriarchal age: all the Bread of that time was baked upon a plate, or under the ashes; and he supposes, what is nearly self-evident, that the cakes which Sarah baked on the hearth were of the last sort, and that the shew Bread was of the same kind. The heat of the pitcher having dried up all the moisture, the Bread comes on as thin as our wafers; and the operation is so speedily performed, that in a very little time a sufficient quantity is made. But their best sort of Bread they bake, either by heating an oven, or a large pitcher full of little smooth shining flints, upon which they lay the dough, spread out in the form of a thin broad cake. As the Hebrews made their Bread thin, in the form of little flat cakes, they did not cut it with a knife, but broke it; which gave use to the expression, breaking Bread, so frequent in Scripture. ...
The Arabians and other eastern people, among whom wood is scarce, often bake their Bread between two fires made of cow dung, which burns slowly, and bakes the Bread very leisurely. During the whole octave of the passover, the Hebrews use only unleavened Bread, as a memorial that at the time of their departure out of Egypt they wanted leisure to bake leavened Bread; and, having left the country with precipitation, they were content to bake Bread which was not leavened, Exodus 12:8 . The practice of the Jews at this day, with relation to the use of unleavened Bread, is as follows: They forbid to eat, or have in their houses, or in any place belonging to them, either leavened Bread or any thing else that is leavened. That they may the better observe this rule, they search into all the corners of the house with scrupulous exactness for all Bread or paste, or any thing that is leavened. On the fourteenth of Nisan, at eleven o'clock, they burn the common Bread, to show that the prohibition of eating leavened Bread is then commenced; and this action is attended with words, whereby the master of the house declares that he has no longer any thing leavened in his keeping; that, at least, he believes so. In allusion to this practice, we are commanded to "purge out the old leaven;" by which "malice and wickedness" are intended; and to feed only on the "unleavened Bread of sincerity and truth. SHEW Bread, or, according to the Hebrews, the Bread of faces, was Bread offered every Sabbath day upon the golden table in the holy place, Exodus 25:30 . The twelve loaves, because they stood before the Lord, were called לחם הפנים , αρτοι προθεσεως , or ενωπιοι , the Bread of faces, or of the presence; and are therefore denominated in our English translation the shew Bread. Since part of the frankincense put upon the Bread was to be burnt on the altar for a memorial, even an offering made by fire unto the Lord; and since Aaron and his sons were to eat it in the holy place, Leviticus 24:5-9 , it is probable that this Bread typified Christ, first presented as a sacrifice to Jehovah, and then becoming spiritual food to such as in and through him are spiritual priests to God, even his Father, Revelation 1:6 ; Revelation 5:10 ; Revelation 20:6 ; 1 Peter 2:5 . It appears, from some places in Scripture, (see Exodus 29:32 , and Numbers 6:15 :) that there was always near the altar a basket full of Bread, in order to be offered together with the ordinary sacrifices
Bread - 1: ἄρτος (Strong's #740 — Noun Masculine — artos — ar'-tos ) "bread" (perhaps derived from aro, "to fit together," or from a root ar---, "the earth"), signifies (a) "a small loaf or cake," composed of flour and water, and baked, in shape either oblong or round, and about as thick as the thumb; these were not cut, but broken and were consecrated to the Lord every Sabbath and called the "shewbread" (loaves of presentation), Matthew 12:4 ; when the "shewbread" was reinstituted by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:32 ) a poll-tax of 1/3 shekel was laid on the Jews, Matthew 17:24 ; (b) "the loaf at the Lord's Supper," e. ); the breaking of "bread" became the name for this institution, Acts 2:42 ; 20:7 ; 1 Corinthians 10:16 ; 11:23 ; (c) "bread of any kind," Matthew 16:11 ; (d) metaphorically, "of Christ as the Bread of God, and of Life," John 6:33,35 ; (e) "food in general," the necessities for the sustenance of life, Matthew 6:11 ; 2 Corinthians 9:10 , etc. ...
2: ἄζυμος (Strong's #106 — Adjective — azumos — ad'-zoo-mos ) denotes "unleavened Bread," i. With the article it signifies the feast of unleavened Bread, Matthew 26:17 ; Mark 14:1,12 ; Luke 22:1,7 ; Acts 12:3 ; 20:6
Grace after meals - The blessings of thanksgiving after a meal that included Bread ...
Breadstuff - ) Grain, flour, or meal of which Bread is made
Carene - ) A fast of forty days on Bread and water
Consubstantiation - A tenet of the Lutheran church, with regard to the manner of the change made in the Bread and wine in the Eucharist. The divines of that profession maintain that, after consecration, the body and blood of our Saviour are substantially present, together with the substance of the Bread and wine, which is called consubstantiation, or impanation
Carob - John's Bread; - called also carob tree. John's Bread, carob bean, and algaroba bean
Real Presence - In the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist after the consecration of the Bread and wine, our Lord Jesus Christ, True God and True Man, is truly, really, substantially, and abidingly contained under the species of these sensible things, i. ,bread and wine
Baker - One whose occupation is to bake Bread, biscuit, &c
Clapcake - ) Oatmeal cake or Bread clapped or beaten till it is thin
Breadcorn - Corn of grain of which Bread is made, as wheat, rye, etc
Leaven - The Hebrews were forbidden by the law to eat leavened Bread, or a food with leaven in it, during the seven days of the passover, Exodus 12:15-19 ; Leviticus 2:11 . But on other occasions they might offer leavened Bread or honey. Paul, 1 Corinthians 5:7-8 , expresses his desire that the faithful should celebrate the Christian passover with unleavened Bread; which, figuratively, signifies sincerity and truth. In this he teaches us two things; first, that the law which obliged the Jews to a literal observance of the passover is no longer in force; and, secondly, that by unleavened Bread, truth and purity of heart were denoted. The same Apostle alludes to the ceremony used at the passover, when he says, "A little leaven leaveneth the whole lump;" that is, a small portion of leaven, in a quantity of Bread or paste, corrupts the whole, and renders it unclean
Shewbread - * Note: The phrase rendered "the shewbread" is formed by the combination of the nouns prothesis, "a setting forth" (pro, "before," tithemi, "to place") and artos, "a loaf" (in the plural), each with the article, Matthew 12:4 ; Mark 2:26 ; Luke 6:4 , lit. , "bread of the face," Exodus 25:30 , i. Isaiah 63:9 with Exodus 33:14,15 ); "the Bread of ordering," 1 Chronicles 9:32 , marg. In Numbers 4:7 it is called "the continual Bread;" in 1 Samuel 21:4,6 , "holy Bread" (AV, "hallowed"). of 1 Kings 7:48 , it is called "the Bread of the offering" (prosphora, "a bearing towards"). The showbread was partaken of by the priests, as representatives of the nation. Priesthood now being coextensive with all who belong to Christ, 1 Peter 2:5,9 , He, the Living Bread, is the nourishment of all, and where He is, there, representatively, they are
Cake - They described their Bread as "mouldy;" but the Hebrew word Nikuddim , Here used, ought rather to be rendered "hard as biscuit. The ordinary Bread, when kept for a few days, became dry and excessively hard. The Gibeonites pointed to this hardness of their Bread as an evidence that they had come a long journey. ...
We read also of honey-cakes (Exodus 16:31 ), "cakes of figs" (1 Samuel 25:18 ), "cake" as denoting a whole piece of Bread (1 Kings 17:12 ), and "a [1] cake of barley Bread" (Judges 7:13 ). In Leviticus 2 is a list of the different kinds of Bread and cakes which were fit for offerings
Dough - Flour or meal mixed with liquid, usually water but sometimes olive oil as well, which is baked as Bread. See Bread
Pantry - ) An apartment or closet in which Bread and other provisions are kept
Croustade - ) Bread baked in a mold, and scooped out, to serve minces upon
Us - ...
Give us this day our daily Bread
Birkat hamazon - Grace after meals, the blessings of thanksgiving after a meal that included Bread ...
Chupatty - ) A kind of griddlecake of unleavened Bread, used among the natives of India
Aleberry - ) A beverage, formerly made by boiling ale with spice, sugar, and sops of Bread
Portpane - ) A cloth for carrying Bread, so as not to touch it with the hands
Payndemain - ) The finest and whitest Bread made in the Middle Ages; - called also paynemain, payman
Scouse - Bread scouse contains no meat; lobscouse contains meat, etc
Toaster - ) A kitchen utensil for toasting Bread, cheese, etc
Marchpane - ) A kind of sweet Bread or biscuit; a cake of pounded almonds and sugar
Milksop - ) A piece of Bread sopped in milk; figuratively, an effeminate or weak-minded person
Lobscouse - ) A combination of meat with vegetables, Bread, etc
Loaves of Proposition - (Latin: panes propositionis) ...
The expression might perhaps be better rendered "loaves set forth"; it is also found under the forms "holy" or "hallowed Bread," or "bread of the presence" (1 Kings 21), "continual Bread" (Numbers 4: Hebrew version). It refers to twelve loaves of unleavened Bread, made each of two-tenths of an epha (four-fifths of a peck) of the finest flour, set in two piles (Leviticus 24) upon an altar-like table placed along the north wall of the holy place (3Kings 7)
Shewbread - (Latin: panes propositionis) ...
The expression might perhaps be better rendered "loaves set forth"; it is also found under the forms "holy" or "hallowed Bread," or "bread of the presence" (1 Kings 21), "continual Bread" (Numbers 4: Hebrew version). It refers to twelve loaves of unleavened Bread, made each of two-tenths of an epha (four-fifths of a peck) of the finest flour, set in two piles (Leviticus 24) upon an altar-like table placed along the north wall of the holy place (3Kings 7)
Bakery - ) The place for baking Bread; a bakehouse
Matzoth - ) A cake of unleavened Bread eaten by the Jews at the feast of the Passover
Salpicon - ) Chopped meat, Bread, etc
Leaven - In ordinary cases, in the preparation of the household Bread, the lump of dough, above referred to, was either broken down into the water in the kneading trough (see Bread) before the fresh flour was added, or it might be ‘hid’ in the latter and kneaded along with it, as in the parable, Matthew 13:33 . The Bread made from dough thus prepared was ‘leavened Bread’ ( Exodus 12:16 and oft. ]'>[1] ‘unleavened Bread’). ...
The prohibition of leavened Bread during the continuance of this Feast, including the Passover, is probably another illustration of conservatism in ritual, the nomadic ancestors of the Hebrews, like the Bedouin of the present day, having made their Bread without leaven. ]'>[2] although admitted when the Bread was to be eaten by the priests (Leviticus 7:13 ; Leviticus 23:17 ) is to be explained, like the similar exclusion of honey, from the standpoint that fermentation implied a process of corruption in the dough
Crouton - ) Bread cut in various forms, and fried lightly in butter or oil, to garnish hashes, etc
Elements - The Bread and the wine in the Holy Communion, and thewater in Holy Baptism are so-called
Ainpain - ) Bread-gainer; - a term applied in the Middle Ages to the sword of a hired soldier
Hard-Tack - ) A name given by soldiers and sailors to a kind of hard biscuit or sea Bread
Crummy - ) Soft, as the crumb of Bread is; not crusty
Aleuronat - ) Flour made of aleurone, used as a substitute for ordinary flour in preparing Bread for diabetic persons
Show bread - The Bread offered on the sacred table in the Sanctuary each week, described in Leviticus 24:5-9
Ratin - ) The brown crust formed upon a gratinated dish; also, dish itself, as crusts Bread, game, or poultry
Pantler - ) The servant or officer, in a great family, who has charge of the Bread and the pantry
White-Pot - ) A kind of food made of milk or cream, eggs, sugar, Bread, etc
Mouldy - ) Overgrown with, or containing, mold; as, moldy cheese or Bread
Salmis - ) A ragout of partly roasted game stewed with sauce, wine, Bread, and condiments suited to provoke appetite
Bread - Bread (bred). The Bread of the better class of Jews was generally made of wheat; barley and other grains were sometimes used. The unleavened Bread was very thin, and was broken, not cut. This is contrary to modern philosophy on this subject, as we see in the manufacture of ship Bread For the mode of baking see Oven. The term Bread is often used for food or provisions in general
Mouldy - Of the Gibeonites it is said that "all the Bread of their provision was dry and mouldy" (Joshua 9:5,12 ). The meaning is that the Bread of the Gibeonites had become dry and hard, hard as biscuits, and thus was an evidence of the length of the journey they had travelled
Panade - ) Bread boiled in water to the consistence of pulp, and sweetened or flavored
Leaven - It had a practical use in making Bread and a symbolic significance in religious rituals. When making leavened Bread, they mixed this fermented portion with dough, so that when the dough was baked in the oven the Bread would rise (Matthew 13:33; 1 Corinthians 5:6). Leavened Bread was light and rounded, unleavened Bread heavy and flat. An easier way of making leaven for future batches of Bread was to remove a small piece of leavened dough before baking and leaving it stand till it too fermented. During the week after the Passover escape, the people had no time to bake their Bread leavened. Each year from that time on, the people were to hold a symbolic re-enactment of the Passover along with a week-long Feast of Unleavened Bread. However, leavened Bread, representing the ordinary food of the people, was presented to God at the Feast of Harvest, as an expression of gratitude to him for their daily food (Leviticus 23:15-20). Leavened Bread offered with the peace offering was not burnt on the altar, but eaten in the meal that followed (Leviticus 7:11-14)
Loaf - —The Eastern loaf is not at all like the Bread in use among ourselves. They are baked usually on a convex girdle, very often on the implement which is used for roasting coffee—hence the name ‘girdle Bread. Such without doubt would be the kind of Bread baked by the children of Israel in their desert wanderings. Even where other kinds of Bread are used, this is still highly relished. , were of this kind, inasmuch as such Bread is almost always carried on a journey, and by workmen, because of its keeping properties. Bread of this kind is found only in towns where there are public ovens. Bread
Bake - The duty of preparing Bread was usually, in ancient times, committed to the females or the slaves of the family (Genesis 18:6 ; Leviticus 26:26 ; 1 Samuel 8:13 ); but at a later period we find a class of public bakers mentioned (Hosea 7:4,6 ; Jeremiah 37:21 ). The Bread was generally in the form of long or round cakes (Exodus 29:23 ; 1 Samuel 2:36 ), of a thinness that rendered them easily broken (Isaiah 58:7 ; Matthew 14:19 ; 26:26 ; Acts 20:11 ). (See Bread
Brewis - ) Bread soaked in broth, drippings of roast meat, milk, or water and butter
Altar Bread - Round wafers of wheaten Bread, unleavened in the Latin, Maronite, and Armenian Rites, used as one of the Eucharistic elements
Challah - "bread loaf"); a) a tithe of dough for the Kohen; (b) a braided loaf baked in honor of Shabbat ...
Arpotyrites - A Christian sect in the primitive church, who celebrated the Eucharist with Bread and cheese. The word is derived from "bread" and "cheese
Oven - A devise used for baking food, especially Bread (Leviticus 2:4 ; Exodus 8:3 ). Bread was baked by either placing the dough against the oven walls or upon the heated pebbles
Bread - BREAD. Such also has been the unchanged history of Bread in Bible lands. —Bread is usually made of wheat flour, the wheat of the Syrian plains being remarkable for its nutritious quality. An inferior and cheaper kind of Bread is also made from barley flour, and less frequently the meal of Indian corn is used. —(b) Thinner cakes of both leavened and unleavened Bread were made upon a flat pan or convex griddle. They recall the ‘oiled Bread’ of Leviticus 8:26, and the ‘wafers anointed with oil’ of Exodus 29:2 and Leviticus 2:4. Use and importance of Bread. —In the West Bread is eaten more or less along with the other articles of food that chiefly constitute the meal; but in the East those other articles are rather eaten along with Bread, and are regarded as merely accessory to it. When the farmer, carpenter, blacksmith or mason leaves the house for the day’s labour, or the messenger or muleteer sets out on his journey, he wraps his other articles of food in the thin loaves of home-made Bread. As the loaf thus literally includes everything, so Bread represents generally the food of man. A great exclusion was expressed in ‘Man shall not live by Bread alone’ (Luke 4:4). ||) it was enough to provide them with Bread. It was three loaves of Bread that the man asked from his neighbour to put before his guest (Luke 11:5). ...
In the act of eating, Oriental Bread is broken or torn apart by the hand. This is easily done with the Bread of the public oven, as it can be separated into two thin layers. The thin home-made Bread is named both in Hebrew and Arabic from its thinness, and is translated ‘wafer’ in Exodus 29:23, Leviticus 8:26, Numbers 6:19, 1 Chronicles 23:29 ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885). Such Bread is called רָקיק (râkîk; Arab. At a meal a small piece of such Bread is torn off, and with the ease and skill of long habit is folded over at the end held in the hand. Symbolism and sanctity of Bread. To the disciples of Jesus, ‘Give us this day our daily Bread’ would seem a very natural petition. An Oriental seeing a scrap of Bread on the road will usually lift it up and throw it to a street dog, or place it in a crevice of the wall or on a tree branch where the birds may find it. How deeply this feeling of reverence possessed the mind of the Lord Jesus is evidenced by the fact that He was recognized in the breaking of Bread (Luke 24:35). ...
In the social customs of the East, the giving and receiving of Bread has always been the principal factor in establishing a bond of peace between the host and the guest at his table. ...
In travelling through Palestine and partaking of the hospitality of the peasantry, one may notice in the Bread the indentations of the pebbles, and small patches of grey ash, with here and there an inlaid attachment of singed grass or charred thorn, the result of the simple baking process. It is Bread, however, the best that the poor can give, and it is given with gladness and the dignity of a high duty towards the guest. When Christ sent forth His disciples to tell of His approach, He charged them to take no Bread with them (Mark 6:8). ...
To the crowd that selfishly followed Christ the giving of Bread as by Moses was the sordid summary of Messianic hope (John 6:31). When Christ called Himself ‘the Bread of life’ (John 6:35), He could confidently appeal to all the endeared and sacred associations connected in the East with the meaning and use of Bread. In the initiation of the Passover, and in its commemoration afterwards, Bread was regarded by the Israelites as the most general and effective symbol of their life in Egypt
Johnnycake - ) A kind of Bread made of the meal of maize (Indian corn), mixed with water or milk, etc
Pandowdy - ) A deep pie or pudding made of baked apples, or of sliced Bread and apples baked together, with no bottom crust
Flour - Fine-crushed and sifted grain used in making Bread (Exodus 29:2 ; 1 Samuel 28:24 ), often translated as fine or choice flour. Typically meal, which was ground course from the whole kernels of grain together with the bran, was used to make Bread (Leviticus 2:16 ; 1 Kings 17:12 ). Fine flour was a luxury item (2 Kings 7:1 ; Ezekiel 16:13 ; Revelation 18:13 ) such as might be baked as Bread for an honored guest (Genesis 18:6 ; 1 Samuel 28:24 )
Showbread - ) Bread of exhibition; loaves to set before God; - the term used in translating the various phrases used in the Hebrew and Greek to designate the loaves of Bread which the priest of the week placed before the Lord on the golden table in the sanctuary
Pumpernickel - ) A sort of Bread, made of unbolted rye, which forms the chief food of the Westphalian peasants
Sauce Aux Hatelets - A sauce (such as egg and Bread crumbs) used for covering bits of meat, small birds, or fish, strung on skewers for frying
Shewbread - In the holy place of the temple or tabernacle was the shewbread (Hebrews 9:2), lit. In the Septuagint rendering of Exodus 40:23 the loaves are called ἄρτοι τῆς προθέσεως; other names were ‘the continual Bread,’ ‘the presence-bread,’ ‘holy Bread. ’ Every Sabbath day the shewbread, unleavened (Josephus, Ant. 6), and fresh from the oven, was placed, in two piles of six loaves each, on a table of cedar-wood, in front of the entrance to ‘the most holy place,’ and the stale Bread was eaten within the sacred precincts. Instructions as to the composition, setting forth, and consumption of the Bread are given in Leviticus 24:5-9. The ritual is attested from an early date (1 Samuel 21:6), and was no doubt a survival from a primitive cultus in which the shewbread was regarded as the food of the deity, like the lectisternia of the Romans; but this idea was ‘too crude to subsist without modification beyond the savage state of society’ (W. 229), and, when more spiritual thoughts of the Divine nature prevailed, the shewbread was retained merely εἰς ἀνάμνησιν (Leviticus 24:7)-i. as a reminder of man’s dependence upon God for the gift of daily Bread. Kennedy, article ‘Shewbread’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols)
Baker - ) One whose business it is to bake Bread, biscuit, etc
Host, Sacred - (Latin: hostia, victim) ...
The Bread after the Act of Consecration, when it has been changed into the Body of Christ, Victim of the Sacrifice
Millet - MILLET (probably Panicum miliaceum or perhaps Andropogon sorghum ) is mentioned in Ezekiel 4:9 (only) as an ingredient in Bread
Sacred Host - (Latin: hostia, victim) ...
The Bread after the Act of Consecration, when it has been changed into the Body of Christ, Victim of the Sacrifice
Shewbread - Shewbread. Unleavened Bread offered every Sabbath on the golden table in the holy place, made into twelve cakes, according to the twelve tribes of Israel, and placed in two piles or rows. The old cakes remained till replaced by the new and hence the name "continual Bread
Toast - ) To dry and brown by the heat of a fire; as, to toast Bread. ) Bread dried and browned before a fire, usually in slices; also, a kind of food prepared by putting slices of toasted Bread into milk, gravy, etc
Agnetz - (Latin, agnus, lamb) Slavonic word for the square portion of Bread cut from the first loaf in preparation for Mass, according to the Greek Rite
Baalshalisha - Unknown place from which a man brought to Elisha Bread of the firstfruits, when there was a dearth in the land
Canape - ) A slice or piece of Bread fried in butter or oil, on which anchovies, mushrooms, etc
Netilat yadayim - "washing of the hands"); the ritual washing of the hands upon rising in the morning, before eating Bread, etc
Biscuit - ) A small loaf or cake of Bread, raised and shortened, or made light with soda or baking powder. ) A kind of unraised Bread, of many varieties, plain, sweet, or fancy, formed into flat cakes, and bakes hard; as, ship biscuit
Bake - To heat, dry and harden, as in an oven or furnace, or under coals of fire to dress and prepare for food, in a close place heated as, to bake Bread. To be baked to dry and harden in heat as, the Bread bakes, the ground bakes in a hot sun
Confarreation - ) A form of marriage among the Romans, in which an offering of Bread was made, in presence of the high priest and at least ten witnesses
Transubstantiate - ) To change, as the sacramental elements, Bread and wine, into the flesh and blood of Christ
Dika - ) A kind of food, made from the almondlike seeds of the Irvingia Barteri, much used by natives of the west coast of Africa; - called also dika Bread
Daily - Some would derive the word from epi, "upon," and eimi, "to be," as if to signify "(bread) present," i. , sufficient Bread, but this formation is questionable. The same objection applies to the conjecture, that it is derived from epi, and ousia, and signifies "(bread) for sustenance. " The more probable derivation is from epi, and eimi, "to go," (bread) for going on, i. , for the morrow and after, or (bread) coming (for us). , the prayer is to be for Bread that suffices for this day and next, so that the mind may conform to Christ's warning against anxiety for the morrow
Loaf - These particular loaves of Bread represent godly, human efforts for the glory of the Lord. The loaves of Bread that represent CHRIST have no leaven in them whatever, but these loaves that represent us and our own human offerings did have leaven. CHRIST only is the pure Bread of life. We come before GOD presenting as our sacrifice the Lord JESUS in His perfect beauty after He came through the furnace and became to us the Bread of life. ...
1 Samuel 10:4 (c) In that Saul was given two loaves of the Bread, it may indicate that he was to have a double portion now, both as a king and as a prophet. It may teach us also that those who have Bread should share it with others. One of the men gave nearly all the Bread he had. Each Christian should have plenty of Bread for all whom he meets - biscuits for the children, loaves for the grown folks, soft Bread for those who cannot chew, hard rolls for those who wish something upon which to exercise their thoughts. The Christian should go forth to the day's work with his Bread basket filled for the hungry. He realizes that he needs Bread for this hungry man. He will therefore give to the seeking Christian all the living Bread that is needed for the seeking sinner. This is a symbol of the whole church of GOD which is like a loaf of Bread
Cherubic Hymn - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the altar
Cherubikon - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the altar
Hymn, Cherubic - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the altar
Assamar - ) The peculiar bitter substance, soft or liquid, and of a yellow color, produced when meat, Bread, gum, sugar, starch, and the like, are roasted till they turn brown
Barm - ) Foam rising upon beer, or other malt liquors, when fermenting, and used as leaven in making Bread and in brewing; yeast
Oven - ...
An arch of brick or stone work, for baking Bread and other things for food
Kneading-Trough - See Bread, House, § 9
Wheat - ) A cereal grass (Triticum vulgare) and its grain, which furnishes a white flour for Bread, and, next to rice, is the grain most largely used by the human race
Taxer - ) One of two officers chosen yearly to regulate the assize of Bread, and to see the true gauge of weights and measures is observed
Species, Sacred - (Latin: species, appearance) ...
The Bread and wine after the consecration by which they are changed into the Body and Blood of Christ, retaining only the appearances of what they were formerly
Sacred Species - (Latin: species, appearance) ...
The Bread and wine after the consecration by which they are changed into the Body and Blood of Christ, retaining only the appearances of what they were formerly
Bethlehem - ) In the Ethiopic church, a small building attached to a church edifice, in which the Bread for the eucharist is made
Tommy - ) Bread, - generally a penny roll; the supply of food carried by workmen as their daily allowance
Dough - ) Paste of Bread; a soft mass of moistened flour or meal, kneaded or unkneaded, but not yet baked; as, to knead dough
Millet - Millet makes a poor quality Bread and is normally mixed with other grains (Ezekiel 4:9 )
Dough - Paste of Bread a mass composed of flour or meal moistened and kneaded, but not baked
Cribble - ) Coarse; as, cribble Bread
Shewbread - "Bread of the faces" or "presence" of God (Exodus 25:30). "Bread of ordering" (1 Chronicles 9:32). "The continual Bread" (Numbers 4:7). "Hallowed Bread" (1 Samuel 21:4-6; Matthew 12:4; Hebrews 9:2 "the shewbread," Greek "bread of setting forth". ) The table was of acacia or "shittim wood," two cubits long, one broad, one and a half high, overlaid with pure gold, with a golden crown to the border round about, to hinder any Bread falling off (but see below); Exodus 25:23-30. The border was to be "of a handbreadth"; so in the sculpture on Titus' Arch the slave's hand that holds the table is just the Breadth of the border. The 12 cakes of unleavened Bread, arranged in two piles, with a golden cup of frankincense on each (Josephus Bread was removed from the table on the Sabbath. Bahr thinks the loaves symbolized the Holy One in His sanctuary as the Bread of life to His people (John 6:35; John 6:47-51; Matthew 4:4; Deuteronomy 8:3). Still, on their presenting themselves before Him in the Bread symbol, He feeds them represented by their priests. As they are a Bread offering to Him, so He gives Himself as the Bread to feed them. In 2 Chronicles 4:8; 2 Chronicles 4:19, ten tables are mentioned "whereon the shewbread was set," i. " These were for the drink offering which accompanied every meat offering, for the shewbread was a true meat offering. "The Bread of the face" on the table in the sanctuary symbolizes that man is admitted to God's holy table and presence, seeing and being nourished by God in the person of Christ, the Bread of life. The frankincense always on the shewbread, and consumed when the Bread was to be eaten, symbolized that prayer must ever accompany self dedication, and that the fame of love must kindle prayer when we are about to hold communion with and to be nourished by Him
Eucharist - The elements of the communion supper in Christian Churches where the Bread and wine are consumed as a representation of the sacrifice of Christ
Tuckahoe - Called also Indian Bread, and Indian loaf
Shewbread - SHEWBREAD . In one of the oldest historical documents preserved in the OT we find, in a passage telling of David’s flight from Saul, the first mention of an offering in the shape of ‘holy Bread,’ which was presented to J″ [3] as ‘shewbread’ a rendering due to Tindale, who adds the note, ‘shewbrede, because it was alway in the presence and sight of the Lorde’ (cf. 1 Samuel 21:6 , which ends literally thus: ‘the presence-bread, that was taken from the presence of J″ [3] ‘shewbread’) and is to be explained by the arrangement of the loaves in two piles (see below and cf. ...
After its first historical mention in connexion with the sanctuary of Nob, where it was periodically renewed at what intervals is not stated the presence-bread is next met with in the Temple of Solomon. Here was an ‘altar of cedar’ (1 Kings 6:20 ), which modern scholars regard as an altar for the presentation of the offering of the shewbread. It stood, according to the restored text, in front of the dĕbîr , or Most Holy Place, and it is to be identified with ‘the table whereupon the shewbread was,’ mentioned in 1 Kings 7:48 in a section of later date (see, for the composite text of these chapters, the authorities cited in art. ...
The table of shewbread to be provided for the Tabernacle of P [9] ); those removed were eaten by the priests alone within the sanctuary precincts, the shewbread being among ‘the most holy of the offerings of the Lord’ ( Leviticus 24:9 ). ...
As regards the original significance of the shewbread offering there can be no doubt. unleavened, Bread on the altars of various deities (see Zimmern’s list in KAT Fractio Panis - The breaking of Bread was the climax of the ritual in early liturgies. Its scriptural basis is Luke 24; the Apostles at Emmaus recognized Our Lord when He blessed and broke the Bread
Panis, Fractio - The breaking of Bread was the climax of the ritual in early liturgies. Its scriptural basis is Luke 24; the Apostles at Emmaus recognized Our Lord when He blessed and broke the Bread
Bake - ) To prepare, as food, by cooking in a dry heat, either in an oven or under coals, or on heated stone or metal; as, to bake Bread, meat, apples. ) To be baked; to become dry and hard in heat; as, the Bread bakes; the ground bakes in the hot sun
Eucharist - (Greek: eucharistia, thanksgiving) ...
The sacrament and sacrifice of the New Law in which Christ the Lord is Himself present, offered, and received under the species of Bread and wine. The Catholic Church teaches that ...
"in the Eucharist, the Body and Blood of the God-man are really, truly, substantially, and abidingly present together with His Soul and Divinity for the nourishment of souls, by reason of the Transubstantiation of the Bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ, which takes place in the unbloody sacrifice of the New Testament, i,e
Scanty - ) Somewhat less than is needed; insufficient; scant; as, a scanty supply of words; a scanty supply of Bread
Consubstantiation - ) The actual, substantial presence of the body of Christ with the Bread and wine of the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; impanation; - opposed to transubstantiation
Theology: Ought Not to be Petrified Scripture - Proclaimed without tenderness, and argued without affection, the gospel from such men rather resembles a missile from a catapult than Bread from a Father's table. To turn stones into Bread was a temptation of our Master, but how many of his servants yield readily to the far worse temptation to turn Bread into stone! Go thy way, metaphysical divine, to the stone-yard, and break granite for McAdam, but stand not in the way of loving spirits who would feed the family of God with living Bread
Bannock - ) A kind of cake or Bread, in shape flat and roundish, commonly made of oatmeal or barley meal and baked on an iron plate, or griddle; - used in Scotland and the northern counties of England
Beans, - It grows plentifully in Palestine, and is eaten with rice or mixed with wheat and barley in making Bread for the poor
Impanation - a term used by divines to signify the opinion of the Lutherans with regard to the eucharist, who believe that the species of Bread and wine remain together with the body of our Saviour after consecration
Ramequin - , formed in a mold, or served on Bread
Millet, - Small seeds used as an ingredient in coarse Bread or in pottage
Transubstantiation - ) The doctrine held by Roman Catholics, that the Bread and wine in the Mass is converted into the body and blood of Christ; - distinguished from consubstantiation, and impanation
Anaphora - (Greek: offering, sacrifice) ...
In the Greek Rite: ...
(1) part of the service which corresponds to Latin Canon of the Mass; ...
(2) offering of Eucharistic Bread; ...
(3) aer (veil); ...
(4) procession in which offerings are brought to the altar
Mahlon - In such seasons there is always a famine, not perhaps of Bread and water, but a famine to the soul in not hearing the word of the Lord. (Amos 8:11) In this state this house in Israel left Bethlehem-Judah, the land of Bread, and the Bread of JEHUDAH, (for so Bethlehem-Judah means) and went to sojourn in Moab
Agatha, Saint - Her popular veneration was of very early date; her name occurs in the prayer, "Nobis quoque peccatoribus," in the Canon of the Mass, and in some places Bread is blessed after the Consecration of the Mass on her feast and called Agatha Bread
Consubstantiation - Luther denied that the elements were changed after consecration, and therefore taught that the Bread and wine indeed remain; but that together with them, there is present the substance of the body of Christ, which is literally received by communicants. As in red-hot iron it may be said two distinct substances, iron and fire, are united, so is the body of Christ joined with the Bread
Caudle - ) A kind of warm drink for sick persons, being a mixture of wine with eggs, Bread, sugar, and spices
Poultice - ) A soft composition, as of Bread, bran, or a mucilaginous substance, to be applied to sores, inflamed parts of the body, etc
Antidoron - A name given by the Greeks to the consecrated Bread; out of which the middle part, marked with the cross, wherein the consecration resides, being taken away by the priest, the remainder is distributed after mass to the poor
Artotyrite - ) One of a sect in the primitive church, who celebrated the Lord's Supper with Bread and cheese, alleging that the first oblations of men not only of the fruit of the earth, but of their flocks
Baking - ) The quantity baked at once; a batch; as, a baking of Bread
Quartern - ) A loaf of Bread weighing about four pounds; - called also quartern loaf
Food, Angels' - Psalm 78:24 speaks of 'the corn of heaven,' and Psalm 78:25 is better translated "man did eat the Bread of 'the mighty:' he sent them food to the full
Eucharist - ) The sacrament of the Lord's Supper; the solemn act of ceremony of commemorating the death of Christ, in the use of Bread and wine, as the appointed emblems; the communion
Bethlehem - the house of food or Bread
Continually - Thou shalt eat Bread at my table continually
Knead - To work and press ingredients into a mass, usually with the hands particularly, to work into a well mixed mass the materials of Bread, cake or paste as, to knead dough
Bread - ) To cover with Bread crumbs, preparatory to cooking; as, Breaded cutlets
Daily - ...
Give us this day our daily Bread
Loaf - A mass of Bread when baked
Crumb - 1: ψιχίον (Strong's #5589 — Noun Neuter — psichion — psikh-ee'-on ) "a small morsel," a diminutive of psix, "a bit, or crumb;" of Bread or meat, it is used in Matthew 15:27 ; Mark 7:28 ; some mss
Meat Meats - , "bread;" 1 Samuel 20:5; 1 Samuel 20:34; 2 Samuel 3:35, R. , "bread," and elsewhere, or for what is allowed to be eaten, proper for sustenance, Genesis 1:29-30; Genesis 9:3, where the R
Beans - An ingredient in Ezekiel's (Ezekiel 4:9) Bread for 390 days, during his representative siege of Jerusalem
Hogmanay - ) The old name, in Scotland, for the last day of the year, on which children go about singing, and receive a dole of Bread or cakes; also, the entertainment given on that day to a visitor, or the gift given to an applicant
Batch - ) The quantity of Bread baked at one time
Paten - ) The place on which the consecrated Bread is placed in the Eucharist, or on which the host is placed during the Mass
Mass - This ceremony is symbolically carried out by the priest and involves Consecration where the Bread and wine are changed into the body and blood of Jesus
Barley - The Hebrews frequently used barley Bread, 2 Samuel 1:27 ; 2 Kings 4:42 ; John 6:9
Shewbread (2) - SHEWBREAD, ‘bread of the face or presence’ (lehem pânîm), was placed on a special table in the Holy Place, in the presence of God. The Bread was originally designed for the god to eat, but, of course, this early notion did not persist; the Bread, however, was still held to imply the presence of God, and His acceptance of the worship rendered to Him. ...
Shewbread is mentioned in the Gospels on only one occasion, Matthew 12:4 || Mark 2:26 and Luke 6:4. There was no Bread at hand except the shewbread, which, after lying on the table for the week, had been replaced by fresh Bread. The Bread is described as ‘holy. ’ There is no hint in the passage that David did an unlawful thing in eating the Bread. Before giving the men the Bread, he asked if they were ‘clean. The statement is in accord with the Jewish law of His day, which can be traced back to a provision of the Priests’ Code from post-exilic times (Leviticus 24:9), which says that the shewbread was for the priests, and must be eaten by them in the Holy Place. ‘Shewbread’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible and in the JE Cyclamen - It is also called sow Bread, because hogs are said to eat the corms
Asterisk - (Greek: asteriskos, diminutive of aster, star) ...
A utensil used in the Greek Rite, made of two silver or gold curved bands crossing each other to form a double arch, and placed over the blessed Bread in the early part of Mass, to prevent contact with the veil
Barley - Barley flour was used to make Bread (Judges 7:13 ; Ezekiel 4:12 ) and was the kind of Bread Jesus used to feed the multitude (John 6:9 ,John 6:9,6:13 )
Sin, Desert of - And here again they murmured for "the Bread and the flesh-pots of Egypt. To perpetuate the memorial of "this Bread from heaven" to future generations, a pot of manna, which was preserved fresh, by a standing miracle, was ordered to be laid up beside the ark of the covenant, in the sanctuary, Exodus 16
Manna - The miraculous "bread of heaven" (Psalm 78:24 ) that God provided for the Israelites while he led them through the Red Sea on dry ground and into the Wilderness of Sin (Exodus 16 ). ...
The purpose of the manna was to test Israel's faith, to humble them, and to teach them that one "does not live on Bread alone but on every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord" (Deuteronomy 8:3,16 ). A hungry Jesus used this quote to refuse Satan's suggestion that he turn stones into Bread (Matthew 4:4 ). But Jesus wanted his disciples to seek for the Bread of heaven that gives life to the world, instead of physical Bread to satisfy their appetites. When they asked, "From now on give us this Bread, " he answered, "I am the Bread of life" (vv
Barley - Among the Jews it was used for making Bread (Ezekiel 4:9), and it seems to have been the principal food of the poorer classes (Ruth 2:17; Ruth 3:15, 1 Kings 4:22, John 6:9). This is confirmed by Judges 7:13, where a cake of barley-bread is the symbol of an army of peasants, and is also in accordance with modern usage. Thomson says: ‘Barley Bread is only eaten by the poor and the unfortunate. Nothing is more common than for these people, at this day, to complain that their oppressors have left them nothing but barley Bread to eat’ (Land and Book Corsned - ) The morsel of execration; a species of ordeal consisting in the eating of a piece of Bread consecrated by imprecation
Importunity - In Luke 11:8 importunity results in a favorable response to a midnight request for Bread (KJV, RSV)
Pottage - Jacob served pottage and Bread to the famished Esau in return for the birthright (Genesis 25:29-34 )
Lahmam - (lah' mab) Place name meaning “food” or “bread
Pan - The iron plates that were laid on the small ovens, and on which Bread and cakes were baked, are probably alluded to
Raised - ) Leavened; made with leaven, or yeast; - used of Bread, cake, etc
Eucharistic Symbols - They are emblems of the Blessed Sacrament, the Body and Blood of Christ under the appearance of Bread and wine
Eucharist, Symbols of the - They are emblems of the Blessed Sacrament, the Body and Blood of Christ under the appearance of Bread and wine
Loaf - ) Any thick lump, mass, or cake; especially, a large regularly shaped or molded mass, as of Bread, sugar, or cake
Symbols, Eucharistic - They are emblems of the Blessed Sacrament, the Body and Blood of Christ under the appearance of Bread and wine
Symbols of the Eucharist - They are emblems of the Blessed Sacrament, the Body and Blood of Christ under the appearance of Bread and wine
Lord's Supper - The table was set out with the Passover lamb, unleavened Bread, bitter herbs, and a sauce of dates, figs, raisins, and vinegar (charoseth ), symbolizing their service in mortar in Egypt. Then the head broke one of the two cakes of unleavened Bread and gave thanks over it. All then took portions of the Bread and dipped them in the charoseth and ate them. " Also the dipping of the sop or Bread morsel (John 13:26). Also Christ's thanksgiving consecration of the Bread (Luke 22:19). ...
He does not partake of the subsequent cup and Bread, which He gives to His disciples as the new Supper to supersede the old Passover. ...
As to the "breaking of Bread" (Luke 24:30-35; Acts 2:42), neither of the two disciples at Emmaus were present at the institution of the Lord's supper, so that the meal there cannot refer to it, which disposes of Rome's argument for administration with Bread only; He as master took the lead in the blessing over the Bread. Similarly the "breaking of Bread at (their) house" of meeting (as distinguished from "in the temple," not "from house to house": Acts 2:42; Acts 2:46; Acts 20:7; Acts 20:11) refers primarily to the Christian meals of loving fellowship (called agapais , 2 Peter 2:13, where the Sinaiticus manuscript reads as the KJV: "with their own deceivings," but the Vaticanus manuscript, the Vulgate and the Syriac versions have: "in their own lovefeasts"; Judges 1:12 has: "in your feasts of charity," (agapais ). ...
The Holy Communion was at first regularly connected with these lovefeasts; "the breaking of Bread," with the customary thanksgiving blessing of the master of the feast, referred not to the eucharist consecration but to the lovefeast, as Acts 27:35 proves, where the eucharist is out of the question, and where simply as a devout Jew Paul gave thanks before "breaking Bread" and eating. From it the Bread and wine for the eucharist were taken. The two separate elements, His Body and His Blood, were severed in His death; so the Bread and the wine are separate in the Lord's supper. "As often as ye eat this Bread and drink this cup, ye do show the Lord's death until He come"; ye announce it publicly, katangellete (not dramatically represent, much less really exhibit), publicly professing severally the Lord died for me. In 1 Corinthians 10:15-16, "the cup," or wine in it, is not said to be the blood but "the communion of the blood of Christ"; "the Bread is the communion (joint participation) of the body," etc. If the Bread were changed into the body, where is the sign of the sacrament? Romanists eat Christ in remembrance of Himself. Breaking the Bread cannot be breaking His body, for Scripture saith "not a bone of Him shall be broken. " Christ Himself calls the elements still "bread" and "wine" even after consecration (1 Corinthians 11:26)
Flesh Pot - The murmuring of the Israelites against Moses (Exodus 16:3 ) included the exaggerated claim that they customarily relaxed by the flesh pots in Egypt and had more than enough Bread
Bull Brier - Pseudo-China) growing from New Jersey to the Gulf of Mexico, which has very large tuberous and farinaceous rootstocks, formerly used by the Indians for a sort of Bread, and by the negroes as an ingredient in making beer; - called also bamboo brier and China brier
Cocket - ) A measure for Bread
Raven - When Elijah was concealed by the brook Cherith, God commanded the ravens to bring him "bread and flesh in the morning, and Bread and flesh in the evening" (1 Kings 17:3-6 )
Wheat - Wheat was used to make Bread and was also parched (Leviticus 23:14 ). See Agriculture ; Bread ; Harvest ; Plants in the Bible
Egg - Luke 11:12 (b) The teaching in this passage concerning the Bread, the fish and the eggs is the same in all three. He sees the round brown stone, and it looks quite like the loaf of Bread his mother has taken from the oven
Manual Acts - Therubric reads, "(a) Here the Priest is to take the Paten into hishands, (b) And here to break the Bread, (c) And here to lay hishand upon all the Bread, (d) Here he is to take the Cup into hishands, (e) And here he is to lay his hand upon every vesselin which there is any Wine to be consecrated
Lord's Supper - (1 Corinthians 11:20 ), called also "the Lord's table" (10:21), "communion," "cup of blessing" (10:16), and "breaking of Bread" (Acts 2:42 ). The elements used to represent Christ's body and blood are Bread and wine. The kind of Bread, whether leavened or unleavened, is not specified. Christ used unleavened Bread simply because it was at that moment on the paschal table
Table - The Table of the Lord, the Table of Shew-bread, the Tables of the Law given to Moses on Mount Sinai, are all of them very different to each other, both in their office and design. The Bread and the wine, and the salt of the Covenant, (See Leviticus 2:13) and this constantly burning, and the perfumes always shedding forth their fragrancy: what could be more expressive of the Lord Jesus, and his rich and costly salvation? He is himself the living Bread, and not only the salt of the covenant, but the whole of the covenant. Lord grant that when thy people sit at thy table, they may have to say, "the cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? the Bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ?" (1 Corinthians 10:16)...
Quarantines - Water, Bread, and salt once a day was the only nourishment permitted
Beans - They formed a constituent in the Bread ( Ezekiel 4:9 ) was commanded to make, as they were in general much used as an article of diet
Nitre - The Egyptians use it in Bread and for soap; also, it is said, mixed with vinegar as a cure for toothache
Sandwich - ) Two pieces of Bread and butter with a thin slice of meat, cheese, or the like, between them
Spelt - Egyptians made Bread from it
Alascani - A sect of Anti-Lutherans in the sixteenth century, whose distinguished tenet, besides their denying baptism, is said to have been this, that the words, "This is my body, " in the institution of the Eucharist, are not to be understood of the Bread, but of the whole action or celebration of the supper
Emmaus - A village sixty furlongs (that is seven miles and a half,) north of Jerusalem, rendered memorable in being the place to which the two disciples walked on the day of our Lord's resurrection, and where he made himself known unto them, in breaking of Bread, and blessing it
Knead - , to work, as by repeated pressure with the knuckles, into a well mixed mass, as the materials of Bread, cake, etc
Millet, - When green it is used as fodder, and for Bread when ripe
Bread - Their loaf was thinner in shape and crisper than ours, from whence comes the phrase, not cutting, but breaking Bread (Matthew 14:19; Acts 20:7; Acts 20:11). "...
As Bread was made in thin cakes it soon became dry, as the Gibeonites alleged as to their Bread (Joshua 9:12), and so fresh Bread was usually baked every day, which usage gives point to "give us day by day our daily Bread" (Luke 11:3). The Bread was divided into round cakes, or "loaves," three of which sufficed for one person's meal (Luke 11:5). "Bread of affliction" or "adversity" would be a quantity less than this (1 Kings 22:27; Isaiah 30:20). The "white baskets" may mean "baskets of white Bread
Oven - ...
The Bible references to the baking of Bread correspond to the three principal methods now employed in Palestine. It is to make a slight hollow in the ground at the tent door, and burn upon it dry grass or twigs until sufficient hot ash is made for the baking of the Bread cakes (Genesis 18:6, 1 Kings 17:12; 1 Kings 19:6). The hollow is deepened a little more, and covered with large pebbles in order to retain the heat, and the Bread is either laid upon these after the ashes have been brushed aside, or, without removal of the ashes, the Bread is laid upon a convex metal disc or griddle slightly raised above the fire-place. As each loaf, about a foot and a half in diameter and of wafer-like thinness, is rapidly fired, it is placed upon the pile of Bread on her other side. This is the ordinary oven for home-made Bread in the villages, the tannûr of the OT and the simpler form of the klibănos of the NT. In the warning of Leviticus 26:26, the predicted scarcity of fuel and flour would be such that ten women in one cluster or section of the village houses, instead of using in turn the same oven for their separate households, would have to unite their little stock of flour to make a baking to be done by one of them, and then receive by weight the share of Bread belonging to each. The pebbles of the primitive form are represented by a pavement of squared stone along the length and Breadth of the semi-cylindrical vault. The hot ashes are then brushed off and banked up on each side, and the Bread is laid on this cleared space of the hot stone pavement (Isaiah 44:19, Jeremiah 37:21)
Coarse - ) Large in bulk, or composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture; gross; thick; rough; - opposed to fine; as, coarse sand; coarse thread; coarse cloth; coarse Bread
Shive - ) A slice; as, a shive of Bread
Acolyte - His chief duties are to arrange the elements on the Credence, tolight the candles, receive the offerings and present them, andalso the Bread, Wine and water, to the Priest at the proper timein the Celebration
Lord's Supper - Called also "the breaking of Bread," Acts 2:42 20:7 , and the communion of the body and blood of Christ, 1 Corinthians 10:16 , is one of the two simple ordinances of the Christian church; instituted by our Savior in the most affecting circumstances on the Passover night in which he was betrayed, to be observed by his followers until his second coming. Bread and wine, the symbols of his body broken and his blood shed for our redemption, are to be tasted by each communicant, to keep in mind that great sacrifice, the foundation of all out hopes and the strongest motive to a holy and devoted life. The dogma of the Romish church, that the Bread is changed into the very body and soul of Christ, which the priest offers anew in sacrifice, is contrary to the Scripture and to all the senses, as it is also to commonsense
Affliction: Making us Long For Heaven - We had traversed the Great Aletsch Glacier, and were very hungry when we reached the mountain tarn half-way between the Bel Alp and the hotel at the foot of the AEggischorn; there a peasant undertook to descend the mountain, and bring us Bread and milk. It was a very Marah to us when he brought us back milk too sour for us to drink, and Bread black as a coal, too hard to bite, and sour as the curds
Common - Thus common Bread was contrasted with the Bread of the Presence (1 Samuel 21:4 ); the common journey was contrasted with the military campaign for which David and his men would need to be consecrated (1 Samuel 21:5 )
Intinctio Panis - (Latin: intingere, to dip; panis, Bread) ...
A practise in the early Church of dipping the Consecrated Host in the Precious Blood, in order to communicate by receiving both Sacred Species
Offertory - (Latin: offero, to offer up) ...
that part of the Mass in which the unconsecrated Bread and wine are offered to God; the oblation itself
the prayers that accompany this offering
the verse or antiphon that forms a part of the proper of the Mass which is sung by the choir while the priest is making the offering
Consecration, Prayer of - , and by which the Bread and the Wine become the Body and theBlood of Christ
Algaroba - John's Bread
Lehem - (leh' hehm) Place name meaning “bread” or “food
Bethlehem - Ruth 1:1 (c) From Bethlehem to Moab represents the backsliding of a child of GOD who leaves the "House of Bread" (which is the meaning of the word), the place where GOD blesses, and travels back into the world to enjoy the things that strangers have to offer
Maslin - ) Composed of different sorts; as, maslin Bread, which is made of rye mixed with a little wheat
Wafer - A thin cake or leaf as a wafer of Bread given by the Romanists in the Eucharist
Wheat - A plant of the genus Triticum, and the seed of the plant, which furnishes a white flour for Bread, and next to rice, is the grain most generally used by the human race
Paten - The plate, made of precious metal, on which the Bread isconsecrated at the Holy Communion and from which it is administeredto the communicants
Manna - (man' naw) Grainlike substance, considered to be food from heaven, which sustained the Israelites in the wilderness and foreshadowed Christ, the true Bread from heaven. ...
New Testament Jesus assured the Jews that He, and not the wilderness food, was the true Bread from heaven which conferred eternal life on those who partook of it (John 6:30-58 )
Baker - In Jerusalem there was apparently a part devoted to the bakers, for Jeremiah was to have a piece of Bread out of the Bakers' street (or Bazaar, as it would now be expressed in the East) as long as the Bread lasted
Oven - The Bread was made into thin cakes which were baked by being stuck to the sides of the oven, or placed on a cover at the top. There are many instances in scripture where on the arrival of a visitor Bread had to be kneaded and baked for them
Continuity - 4:7, the word is used with “bread,” literally meaning “the Bread of continuity” (NASB, “the continual Bread”) or the Bread that is “always there. ” In its first occurrence, tâmı̂yd represents “uninterrupted action”: “And thou shalt set upon the table showbread before me always” ( Dish - Each dips a "sop" or piece of Bread in the dish, and takes up therewith a portion of meat or other contents of the dish
Jashubi-Lehem - The Jewish doctors explained the name in this verse as "Naomi and Ruth" who returned from "Moab" to Bread (lechem ) or Bethlehem; the "ancient things" or "words" answer to the book of Ruth which records concerning them
Husks - Tradition makes it the Baptist's food in the wilderness; from whence it is called also John's Bread
Ahim'Elech - He gave David the shew Bread to eat, and the sword of Goliath; and for so doing was put to death, with his whole house, by Saul's order
Passover, the - The table was spread with the paschal lamb, unleavened Bread, bitter herbs, and a dish of thick sauce (said to signify the mortar with which they made bricks in Egypt). " He then spoke of the unleavened Bread, and repeated Psalm 113 and Psalm 114 , concluding with a prayer. The governor broke one of the cakes of unleavened Bread, and gave thanks. As an ending of the supper they all took a piece of Bread and some of the bitter herbs, dipped them in the sauce, and ate them. ...
Connected with the Passover is the FEAST OF UNLEAVENED Bread. This feast was intimately connected with the Passover: "Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness: but with the unleavened Bread of sincerity and truth. " The unleavened Bread sets forth that sense of grace, through faith, in the Christian, in which, apart from influences of the flesh and old associations, he can be habitually in the appreciation of, and in communion with the sacrifice of Christ, so that his whole life is consistent therewith. ...
It appears evident that the term 'passover' was also applied to the Feast of Unleavened Bread, as in Deuteronomy 16:2 : "Thou shalt therefore sacrifice the passover unto the Lord thy God, of the flock and the herd
Lord's Supper - They had looked on the Bread and the wine as memorials of the deliverance from Egypt. The words "This is my body" gave to the unleavened Bread a new character. (John 6:32-58 ) and they were thus taught to see in the Bread that was broken the witness of the closest possible union and incorporation with their Lord. Luke, in the Acts, describes the baptized members of the Church as continuing steadfast in or to the teaching of the apostles, in fellowship with them and with each other, and in breaking of Bread and in prayers. ( Acts 2:42 ) We can scarcely doubt that this implies that the chief actual meal of each day was one in which they met as brothers, and which was either preceded or followed by the more solemn commemorative acts of the breaking of the Bread and the drinking of the cup. At some time, before or after the meal of which they partook as such, the Bread and the wine would be given with some special form of words or acts, to indicate its character. --The Lord's Supper is a reminder of the leading truths of the gospel: (1) Salvation, like this Bread, is the gift of God's love. (9) By this meal our daily Bread is sanctified. Why did Christ ordain Bread to be used in the Lord's Supper, and not a lamb ? Canon Walsham How replies, "Because the types and shadows were to cease when the real Sacrifice was come. " (Then, the Lamb being sacrificed once for all, what is needed is to teach the world that Christ is now the Bread of life. Perhaps also it was because Bread was more easily provided, and fitted thus more easily to be a part of the universal ordinance
Rizpah - (rihz' puh) Personal name meaning, “glowing coals” or “bread heated over coals or ashes
Pap - ) A soft food for infants, made of Bread boiled or softtened in milk or water
Meat - , animal muscle; as, a breakfast of Bread and fruit without meat
Six Points of Ritual - (3) TheEucharistic Vestments, (4) Wafer Bread
Leaven - As making it and leavening Bread with it took time, unleavened Bread was used in sudden emergencies (Genesis 18:6; Genesis 19:3). Leaven reminded Israel of the haste with which they fled from Egypt, and of their sufferings, which answer to the insipidity of unleavened Bread, "the Bread of affliction. " In Amos 4:5 the leavened Bread was "with the sacrifice of thanksgiving of the peace offerings," not with burnt offerings of animals on the altar
Feasts - The first mentioned is the Sabbath, and if this is counted as one, by considering the Passover and the feast of unleavened Bread as one there are seven in all — the perfect number. If the Sabbath is not included, as that was a weekly festival, being the rest of God, and on which the others were founded, then the Passover and the feast of unleavened Bread may be counted as two, and still there are seven. Feast of Unleavened Bread. } the feast," that is, of...
unleavened Bread. These times were at the Feast of Unleavened Bread (no doubt including the Passover); the Feast of Weeks, or of Harvest; and the Feast of Tabernacles, or 'of Ingathering
Crust - ) The hard exterior or surface of Bread, in distinction from the soft part or crumb; or a piece of Bread grown dry or hard
Serpentinians - It is said they had a live serpent, which they kept in a kind of cage: at certain times they opened the cage-door, and called the serpent: the animal came out, and, mounting upon the table, twined itself about some loaves of Bread. This Bread they broke, and distributed it to the company; and this they called their Eucharist
Sop - John 13:26 , a small portion of Bread, dipped in sauce, wine, or some other liquid at table, Ruth 2:14 . Their Bread, which is extremely thin, tearing and folding up like a sheet of paper, is used for rolling together a large mouthful, or sopping up the fluid and vegetables
Bread - ...
Numbers 14:9 (a) We are to learn here that the enemies of Israel would be easily whipped and would be consumed as Bread is consumed by the hungry man. ...
Judges 7:13 (b) This cake of barley Bread represents Gideon who, though weak and lacking in military skill, would win a great victory for Israel and for GOD. We know that CHRIST is the Bread of life. ...
Isaiah 30:20 (a) GOD makes trouble and sorrow to be like a loaf of Bread. ...
Isaiah 55:2 (a) The things that most people seek for and think that they will be satisfied when they obtain them, find that these are not Bread at all, but only look like Bread. CHRIST is the Bread of GOD, nothing outside of Him, nothing that omits Him, can ever satisfy the need of the human heart and life. ...
Luke 11:3 (b) This must primarily refer to the physical Bread which we eat, and which must be given to us through the kindness, wisdom and goodness of GOD. ...
John 6:33 (a) Throughout this chapter Bread is typical of the Lord JESUS Himself. The baker would die of starvation in the midst of his Breads, cakes and pies if he did not eat them. ...
1 Corinthians 10:17 (a) This Bread as a loaf represents the true Church of GOD on earth
Oblation - (Latin: oblatum, offering) ...
The offering of the altar Bread about to be consecrated
Fishes, Loaves And - Gospel narrative of the miraculous multiplication of five loaves of Bread and two fishes to feed the five thousand who had been attracted by the words and miracles of Christ to follow Him into the desert, or mountain as Saint John styles it (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Loaves And Fishes - Gospel narrative of the miraculous multiplication of five loaves of Bread and two fishes to feed the five thousand who had been attracted by the words and miracles of Christ to follow Him into the desert, or mountain as Saint John styles it (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Tenth Deal - The recovered leper, to complete his purification, was required to bring a trespass, a sin, and a burnt offering, and to present a meal offering, a tenth deal or an omer of flour for each, with oil to make it into Bread or cakes (Leviticus 14:10,21 ; Compare Exodus 16:36 ; 29:40 )
Unleavened - 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a) Since the word is used to describe the Bread in which there is no fermenting yeast, so now it is used to describe the church in which there are no ungodly sinners, none of the Devil's children, but only those who have been washed in the Blood of the Lamb, made pure and beautiful in CHRIST
Melchisedech - He came to meet Abram after his victory over Chodorlahomor and his allies (Genesis 14), and on this occasion brought forth Bread and wine, blessed Abram, thanked God for the victory, and received tithes of all the spoils. The "bringing forth Bread and wine" is interpreted by all the Fathers and Catholic commentators as offering a sacrifice to God, because the phrase which follows, "he was priest of the Most High God," seems to give the motive why he brought forth Bread and wine
Melchizedek - He came to meet Abram after his victory over Chodorlahomor and his allies (Genesis 14), and on this occasion brought forth Bread and wine, blessed Abram, thanked God for the victory, and received tithes of all the spoils. The "bringing forth Bread and wine" is interpreted by all the Fathers and Catholic commentators as offering a sacrifice to God, because the phrase which follows, "he was priest of the Most High God," seems to give the motive why he brought forth Bread and wine
Barley - In Judges 7:13 Gideon hears himself compared to a cake of barley Bread: he would not have heard this had he not been afraid, Judges 7:10 ; but it the more showed him whose hand must give the victory. Israel is charged with having polluted God among His people for "handfuls of barley and for pieces of Bread," Ezekiel 13:19 ; as it says elsewhere, they had sold themselves for nought. Such loaves are still the Bread of the poorest in Palestine
Bread - The preparation of Bread as an article of food dates from a very early period. The best Bread was made of wheat, but "barley" and spelt were also used. (John 6:9,13 ; Isaiah 28:25 ) The process of making Bread was as follows: the flour was first mixed with water or milk; it was then kneaded with the hands (in Egypt with the feet also) in a small wooden bowl or "kneading-trough" until it became dough. Matthew 4:8 About a span in diameter and a finger's Breadth in thickness
Dish - Judas dipped his hand with a "sop" or piece of Bread in the same dish with our Lord, thereby indicating friendly intimacy (Matthew 26:23 )
Cummin - It is used to flavour dishes, and, more particularly, Bread; in flavour and appearance it resembles carraway; it has long been credited with medicinal properties; it certainly is a carminative
Baker's Street - Zedekiah promised Jeremiah, whom he had imprisoned, that he would have food for as long as Bread was available on baker's street (Jeremiah 37:21 )
Pannier - ) A Bread basket; also, a wicker basket (used commonly in pairs) for carrying fruit or other things on a horse or an ass...
(2):...
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Thanks - 2 Corinthians 9 ...
He took Bread and gave thanks to God
Bitter Herbs - The Israelites were commanded to eat the Paschal lamb "with unleavened Bread and with bitter herbs
Meat - Their ingredients, flour and oil, were the chief vegetable foods of Israel; so in them the Israelite offered his daily Bread to the Lord, but in a manner distinct from the merely dedicatory first fruits of grain and Bread (compare 1 Chronicles 29:10-14; Deuteronomy 26:5-11). If even the earthly life is not nourished merely by the daily Bread but by the divine grace which blesses the food as means of preserving life, much less can the spiritual life be nourished by earthly food, but only by the spiritual food which a man partakes of by the Spirit of God from the true Bread of life, the word of God. As oil symbolizes the Spirit as the principle of all spiritual life, so Bread from the seed of the field symbolizes the word of God (Luke 8:11; Deuteronomy 8:3). ...
"The prayer to God, Give us this day our daily Bread, is accompanied by the demand on God's part, Give Me today My daily Bread
Mill - " (Deuteronomy 24:6) In what a very sweet and engaging point of view doth this represent the Lord! And when the precept is heightened in relation to spiritual Bread, with what affection may the poor look unto Jesus, the Bread of life, concerning it!...
Anthony of Padua, Saint - Alms given to obtain his intercession is known as "Saint Anthony's Bread. Emblems: Bread, apparition of the Infant Jesus, book, lily
Millet - It has been supposed that the dochan means what is now called in the east durra; which, according to Niebuhr, is a sort of millet, and when made into bad Bread with camel's milk, oil, butter, or grease, is almost the only food which is eaten by the common people in Arabia Felix. "I found it so disagreeable," says he, "that I should willingly have preferred plain barley Bread to it
Loan - That which is lent any thing furnished for temporary use to a person at his request, on the express or implied condition that the specific thing shall be returned, or its equivalent in kind, but without compensation for the use as a loan of a book or of Bread. LOAN, ...
To lend to deliver to another for temporary use, on condition that the thing shall be returned, as a book or to deliver for use, on condition that an equivalent in kind shall be returned, as Bread or to deliver for temporary use, on condition that an equivalent in kind shall be returned, with a compensation for the use, as in the case of money at interest
Leeks - The poor in Egypt eat them raw with Bread, and as sauce to roast meat
Preacher: Must Feed the People - Fromthe deck of an Austrian gunboat we threw into the Lago Garda a succession of little pieces of Bread, and presently small fishes came in shoals, till there seemed to be, as the old proverb puts it, more fish than water
Wafer - ) A thin cake or piece of Bread (commonly unleavened, circular, and stamped with a crucifix or with the sacred monogram) used in the Eucharist, as in the Roman Catholic Church
Tray - ) A small trough or wooden vessel, sometimes scooped out of a block of wood, for various domestic uses, as in making Bread, chopping meat, etc
Communion - ...
The particular act of fellowship with Christ where Christians share together in a token or symbolic ‘meal’ of Bread and wine is commonly called Holy Communion, or the Lord’s Supper (1 Corinthians 10:16-17)
Lord's Supper, the - eucharistein/eulogein) and the Eucharistic Assembly (synaxis); from its Jewish-Christian origins, it is the Breaking of Bread and the Memorial of the Lord's passion and resurrection; in patristic development, it is the Holy Sacrifice because it mysteriously makes present the one, unique sacrifice of Christ and includes the church's offering; also it is the Holy and Divine Liturgy because the whole worship of the church finds its center in the celebration of this Sacred Mystery. Within the liturgy it is called the Bread of angels and Bread from heaven and the medicine of immortality. Further, we assume that the words of institution were said by Jesus within the Passover, when the head of the family prayed over the unleavened Bread before the main meal and over the third cup of wine after the main meal. The unleavened Bread now stands as a symbol of his body and the wine of "the cup of blessing" as a symbol of his blood. ...
The disciples did not eat the flesh of Christ by taking the Bread and they did not drink his blood in taking the wine. In the Lord's Supper, which emerges from the Passover, the Bread and wine represent the atoning sacrifice of Christ Jesus as the true paschal lamb. Neither the slain lamb nor the Bread and wine contain in and of themselves any efficacy. ...
Further, since the Bread and wine symbolize the sacrifice of Christ on the cross, to be invited to partake of them is a great privilege. In their breaking of Bread they knew the presence of the same Lord who had dined with them during the forty days. However, the slaughtered lamb no longer had any part in the meal for its central position had now been taken by the Bread and the wine. ...
In 5:6-8 Paul refers to Christ, "our Passover lamb" who has been sacrificed, and writes: "Therefore let us keep the Festival with the Bread of sincerity and truth. Also evident in this passage is a particular emphasis on the actual Bread and wine: they are the actual means of sharing in the body and blood of Christ, but they are not equated with that body and blood. " Paul could mean that to treat the sacramental Bread and wine like any other food is sinful; or he could mean that the abuses at the common meal by the Corinthians reveals that they do not appreciate the true nature of the body of Christ (as the communion and fellowship of believers in Christ). ...
After the feeding of the multitude (6:1-15), Jesus spoke of himself as the "bread of life" or "the Bread of God" that comes down from heaven to give life to the world (vv. Then he identified this Bread with his flesh, which is eaten (lit. (Some scholars see the latter as an addition by a redactor, but the passage can also be seen as a natural climax to the teaching on the Bread of life. Third, the early church encountered the vital presence of Jesus Christ not in the Bread and wine as such but in his presence in their midst and in their hearts
Passover - At even of the 14th day of the first month (Nisan) the Passover was to be celebrated, and on the 15th day commenced the seven days' feast of unleavened Bread. The term "Passover" is strictly applicable only to the meal of the paschal lamb, and the feast of unleavened Bread was celebrated on the 15th onward for seven days to the. At sunset of the 14th day the 15th began, and with it the feast of unleavened Bread. Everybody present partook of the lamb, the bitter herbs, and the unleavened Bread, and care was taken that no bone was broken. Then followed the feast of unleavened Bread, occupying seven days, the first and last or which were peculiarly holy, like the Sabbath
Berengarians - A denomination, in the eleventh century, which adhered to the opinions of Berengarius, who asserted that the Bread and wine in the Lord's Supper are not really and essentially, but figuratively changed into the body and blood of Christ
Camaldolites - On Sundays and Thursdays they fed on herbs, and the rest of the week only on Bread and water
Wave Offerings - The first-fruits, a sheaf of barley, offered at the feast of Pentecost (Leviticus 23:17-20 ), and wheat-bread, the first-fruits of the second harvest, offered at the Passover (10-14), were wave-offerings
Adansonia - digitata, the baobab or monkey-bread of Africa and India, and A
Ark of the Covenant Person - A title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary to signify her Divine motherhood, that as the ark of old, made of incorruptible wood and adorned with pure gold, contained the precious treasures of the Divine law and the manna from heaven, so she, the true ark, bore within her not merely the law but the Lawgiver, not merely the Divine presence as manifested over the ark of the covenant, but the Divine One Himself, and the Living Bread from heaven
Midnight - You are supposed to have the Bread of Life to give to him in his deep distress
Crouch - Every one that is left in thine house shall come and crouch to him for a piece of Bread
Eucharist - We are told that ‘they continued stedfastly in the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, in the breaking of Bread (τῇ κλάσει τοῦ ἄρτου) and the prayers’ (Acts 2:42), Further, we read that ‘Day by day continuing stedfastly with one accord in the temple, and breaking Bread (κλῶντες ἄρτον) at home, they partook of food with gladness and singleness of heart, praising God and having favour with all the people’ (Acts 2:46-47). The latter passage contrasts their breaking of Bread at home with their attendance at the Temple-worship, But the passage may be no more than a general description of the life of the community-that it was cheerful and social. ]'>[1] ...
It is true that it is impossible to prove any connexion between the ‘breaking of the Bread’ of Acts 2:42 and the Last Supper. The evidence is not sufficient to lead to any certain conclusions; but on the whole it seems to point to the germ of the later conception being contained in these earliest ‘breakings of Bread. ’ Whether the ‘breaking of Bread’ denotes the common meal, or a particular action at the common meal, is again not clear, Batiffol† [5] that the parallelism between the Lord’s Cup and the cup of libation at a heathen sacrifice was closer than that between the eating of a piece of Bread and anything that took place there. It may be for this reason that the cup is mentioned before the Bread. Or it may be merely that the Bread is put second because St. But in any case it is misleading to regard 1 Corinthians 10:16 as having any real connexion with a tradition of the cup having preceded the Bread at the Last Supper. ‘Because there is one Bread, we who are many are one body, because we all partake of that one Bread’ (1 Corinthians 10:17). The Bread since it has been broken, and the cup since it has been blessed, have assumed special characters. The ‘breaking of the Bread’ in the primitive community at Jerusalem did not carry with it all the ideas which were associated with the Eucharist at Corinth. It is tempting to bring into line with this the ‘breaking of the Bread’ in the Acts, and to suppose that there too there was no thought of the Last Supper. For the writer of the Acts has no occasion to speak of the ideas which Christians associated with the ‘breaking of the Bread. But exactly the same consideration applies to the ‘breaking of the Bread’ at Jerusalem. But the facts ate beat accounted for by the hypothesis that the ‘breaking of Bread’ was from the beginning a religions rite associated with a social meal, in which Christians commemorated the Last Supper of our Lord with His apostles. But, when that was understood, then the rite of the ‘breaking of the Bread’ was bound to be seen by Christians to have the significance which St
the Lord's Supper - Acts refers to this worship event as the “breaking of Bread” (Acts 2:42 ,Acts 2:42,2:46 ; Acts 20:7 ). “Eucharist” (from the blessing pronounced over the Bread and wine) underlines Christ's sacrificial death as a cause for thanksgiving to God
Blessing - In Matthew and Mark the Lord took Bread, and 'blessed. ' In Luke and in 1 Corinthians 11:24 He took Bread and 'gave thanks
Offering - The Bread offered for the altar was without leaven; for leaven was never offered on the altar, nor with the sacrifices, Leviticus 2:11-12 . But they might make presents of common Bread to the priests and ministers of the temple. Those who offered only oblations of Bread or of meal offered also oil, incense, salt, and wine, which were in a manner their seasoning. ...
In some cases the law required only offerings of corn or Bread, as when they offered the first fruits of harvest, whether offered solemnly by the nation, or as the devotion of private persons
Lauda Sion Salvatorem - The one given in Britt is by Monsignor Henry; the tenth verse reads: ...
When at last the Bread is broken,...
Doubt not what the Lord hath spoken:...
In each part the same love token,...
The same Christ, our hearts adore:...
For no power the Thing divideth -...
'Tis the symbols He provideth,...
While the Saviour still abideth...
Undiminished as before
Rooted - As our hearts and minds are filled with the Scriptures, we feed on the Bread of Life, we drink the Living Water, and we grow in our knowledge of the Lord
Lentils, - They were also used in a time of scarcity, and among the poor, as an ingredient of their Bread
Abimelech - It was the name also of one of the sons of Gideon, who became a judge of Israel, Judges 9; and of the Jewish high-priest, who gave Goliah's sword, which had been deposited in the tabernacle, and part of the shew Bread to David, at the time this prince was flying from Saul, 1 Samuel 21:1
Institution, Words of - ) Toeffect a valid Sacrament there must be the unfailing use of ourLord's own words in instituting the Blessed Sacrament, the elementsof Bread and wine, and a duly appointed Priesthood
Bread - Bread . The pre-eminence of Bread in the dietary of the Hebrews is shown by the frequent use in OT, from Genesis 3:19 onwards, of ‘bread’ for food in general. Barley was in earlier times the main Breadstuff of the peasantry ( Judges 7:13 ) and poorer classes generally ( John 6:13 , cf. ...
The first step in Bread-making, after thoroughly sifting and cleaning the grain, was to reduce it to flour by rubbing, pounding, or grinding (cf. ...
Three modes of firing Bread are found in OT, as in the East at the present day. ...
Bread-making was at all times the special charge of the women of the household. Even when, as we have just seen, baking became a recognized industry, a large part of the baker’s work had been, as now in the East, merely to fire the Bread baked by the women at home. The ordinary cake the loaf of OT and NT was round and fairly thick; such at least was the rolling ‘cake of barley Bread’ of Judges 7:13
Liturgy, Maronite - They use a round Host of unleavened Bread, as in the Roman Rite
Maronite Liturgy - They use a round Host of unleavened Bread, as in the Roman Rite
Christian Workers For Fellowship - Its most important tenets are "believers' baptism by immersion, the washing of saints' feet, and the use of water and unleavened Bread in the Lord's Supper
Lahmi - (lah' mi) Personal name meaning “my Bread” or perhaps an abbreviated form of Bethlehemite
Eat - ) To chew and swallow as food; to devour; - said especially of food not liquid; as, to eat Bread
Troas - On one occasion he abode there seven days, and raised Eutychus to life when, the disciples having come together 'to break Bread,' Paul preached till midnight
Eat - ) To chew and swallow as food; to devour; - said especially of food not liquid; as, to eat Bread
Wine - ...
Bread and wine, in the Lords supper, are symbols of the body and blood of Christ
Lord's Day, the - Scripture says very little concerning this day; but that little seems to indicate that the divinely-inspired apostles, by their practice and by their precepts, marked the first day of the week as a day for meeting together to break Bread, for communicating and receiving instruction, for laying up offerings in store for charitable purposes, for occupation in holy thought and prayer
Day - "Give us day by day our daily Bread" (Luke 11:3); i. , Bread for the day as it comes (epiousion arton )
Therapeutae - They lived only on Bread and water, and accustomed themselves to fasting. They then celebrated a simple love-feast, consisting of Bread with salt and hyssop; theosophical discussions were held, and the hymns which they had from their old traditions were sung; and mystical dances, bearing reference to the wonderful works of God with the fathers of their people, were continued, amidst choral songs, to a late hour in the night
Manna - " It is described in Psalm 78:24,25 as "the corn of heaven" and "the Bread of the mighty," RV text and AV marg. The Lord speaks of it as being typical of Himself, the true Bread from Heaven, imparting eternal life and sustenance to those who by faith partake spiritually of Him, John 6:31-35
Face - The word pânı̂ym, then, is used to identify the Bread that was kept in the holy place. The KJV translates it as “the showbread,” while the NASB renders “the Bread of the Presence” ( Bread was always kept in the presence of God
Pentecost, Feast of - The offering of a barley-sheaf during the Feast of Unleavened Bread opened the reaping season, which lasted officially for 49 days, a week of weeks. In Leviticus 23:11 the terminus a quo is given as the day after the Sabbath during the Feast of Unleavened Bread. In Christ’s time the Jews understood this to mean 16th Nisan, treating the first day of Unleavened Bread as a Sabbath, since it was a day of holy convocation. But some theorists maintained that the Sabbath referred to was the ordinary Sabbath during the days of Unleavened Bread, whenever it chanced to fall. The objection to this view was that if 14th or 21st Nisan was a Sabbath, the sheaf-waving would occur outside the Unleavened Bread festival, of which it certainly appears to form a part. Under the old dispensation Pentecost had been distinctly connected with the Feast of Unleavened Bread
Lord's Supper - Luke calls it the breaking of Bread, referring to part of the meal as a shortened title for the whole (Acts 2:46; Acts 20:7). Another name, the Eucharist (from the Greek word for ‘thanksgiving’), refers to Jesus’ act of giving thanks for the Bread and wine (Mark 14:23; Isaiah 53:4-688). ) During the meal Jesus took some of the Bread and wine from the table and passed each in turn among his disciples, inviting them to eat and drink. The Bread and wine were symbols of his body and blood, which he was to offer on the cross as a sacrifice for the forgiveness of sins (Matthew 26:26-28; cf. When that day comes, Bread and wine will no longer be necessary. Christians demonstrate their unity in Christ as they share in the same Bread and the same wine. ...
Eating Bread and drinking wine together in the Lord’s Supper is more than just a remembrance of Christ’s suffering and death
Bethlehem - (Hebrew: house of Bread) ...
(1) Bethlehem of Zebulon (Josiah 19), a small town 7 miles northwest of Nazareth
Imposition of Hands - In the Mass the priest holds his hands over the Bread and wine just before the consecration
Abib - The seven days from the fifteenth to the twenty-first inclusive, were "the feast of unleavened Bread," closing with a solemn convocation, Exodus 12:1-13:22
Lily of Quito - She possessed the gift of ecstatic prayer, was endowed with supernatural powers, frequently working miracles and foretelling the future, and was divinely sustained by the daily reception of the Holy Eucharist, as she took no other food save an ounce of Bread weekly
Cummin - " "It is used as a spice, both bruised, to mix with Bread, and also boiled, in the various messes and stews which compose an Oriental banquet
Husks - John’s Bread’ is given to these pods, from a tradition that these, and not locusts, composed the food of St
Mary Anne de Paredes, Blessed - She possessed the gift of ecstatic prayer, was endowed with supernatural powers, frequently working miracles and foretelling the future, and was divinely sustained by the daily reception of the Holy Eucharist, as she took no other food save an ounce of Bread weekly
Hands, Imposition of - In the Mass the priest holds his hands over the Bread and wine just before the consecration
Deny - To refuse to grant as, we asked for Bread, and the man denied us
Nob - It was visited by David when he fled from Saul, and he and his followers ate the hallowed Bread
Lentiles - Sometimes lentiles, in seasons of scarcity, and by the poor, were employed for making Bread
Pan - Pans were used for baking Bread for family use (2 Samuel 13:9 ) or as an offering (Leviticus 2:5 ; Leviticus 6:21 ; 1 Chronicles 23:29 )
Germaine Cousin, Saint - Her only food was Bread and water, her bed a litter of vine branches; she was noted for her intense devotion to Our Lady and the Blessed Sacrament
Vinegar - It was an unpleasant drink (Psalm 69:21 ), though some sopped Bread in it (Ruth 2:14 ); some see this as the common Near Eastern chick-pea paste called chimmuts . ...
Vinegar was most commonly used as a seasoning for food or as a condiment on Bread (Ruth 2:14 )
Fight - ...
In folk etymology, lâcham is often connected with lechem, the Hebrew term for “bread,” on the contention that wars are fought for Bread
Feasts - There were three main annual festivals: Passover-Unleavened Bread and Pentecost-Harvest at the beginning of the year, and Tabernacles-Ingatherings in the middle of the year. ...
Passover and Unleavened Bread...
God decreed that the month during which the Israelites escaped from bondage in Egypt should be the first month of their religious year (Exodus 12:2). ) In the middle of the month the people kept the Passover, followed by the week-long Feast of Unleavened Bread (Leviticus 23:5-8; Mark 14:1). The accompanying Feast of Unleavened Bread recalled the people’s hasty departure from Egypt when they had to make their Bread without leaven (yeast), cooking as they travelled in order to save time (Exodus 12:8; Exodus 12:34; Exodus 12:39). Therefore, on the third day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, they presented the first sheaf of reaped barley to God. ...
Feast of Harvest (Pentecost)...
After the Feast of Unleavened Bread, the people returned home and for the next six weeks were busy harvesting, first the barley and then the wheat. At the end of the wheat harvest they showed their thanks to God for their food by presenting to him two loaves of Bread such as they would eat in their normal meals
Lord's Table, the; the Lord's Supper - In this passage the expression appears to be synonymous with the Bread, the wine being spoken of as the cup of the Lord. " The cup is the fellowship of the blood of Christ, the Bread is the fellowship of the body of Christ, and to this fellowship every believer is bound to be faithful. ...
The expression 'the Lord's supper' is found in 1 Corinthians 11:20 , and is in connection with the remembrance of the Lord in the breaking of Bread and drinking the cup by the saints as in assembly
Leaven - A — 1: ζύμη (Strong's #2219 — Noun Feminine — zume — dzoo'-may ) "leaven, sour dough, in a high state of fermentation," was used in general in making Bread. The Israelites were forbidden to use "leaven" for seven days at the time of Passover, that they might be reminded that the Lord brought them out of Egypt "in haste," Deuteronomy 16:3 , with Exodus 12:11 ; the unleavened Bread, insipid in taste, reminding them, too, of their afflictions, and of the need of self-judgment, is called "the Bread of affliction
Friend at Midnight - In spite of the lateness of the hour he goes to a neighbor and asks for the loan of some loaves of Bread
Husk - John's Bread,' owing to the tradition that John the Baptist used its fruit in the desert
Cheat - ) Wheat, or Bread made from wheat
Onion - He is the Bread of Life
Adam - Of the roots, the Indians made a kind of Bread
Massalians - From those words of our Lord, "Labour not for the meat that perisheth, " it is said, that they concluded they ought not to do any work to bet their Bread
Yeast - ) The foam, or troth (top yeast), or the sediment (bottom yeast), of beer or other in fermentation, which contains the yeast plant or its spores, and under certain conditions produces fermentation in saccharine or farinaceous substances; a preparation used for raising dough for Bread or cakes, and making it light and puffy; barm; ferment
Lentils - Lentil Bread is eaten by the poor of Egypt
Eating - Besides the common use of this word, it is employed symbolically for to 'consume, destroy:' they "eat up my people as they eat Bread. To eat together of the same Bread or food is a token of friendship
Real Presence - Underthe outward form of Bread and Wine we have the Scriptural warrantto believe that the Body and the Blood of Christ are given, takenand received verily and indeed by the faithful in the Lord's Supper,to the strengthening and refreshing of their souls,—as declared inthe Church Catechism and the Twenty-eighth Article of Religion. This being theattitude of the Church, it will be our wisdom to say of thisMystery:...
  "Christ was the Word that spake it;   He took the Bread and brake it,   And what that Word did make it,   That I believe and take it
Leaven - In the great solemnity of the Passover the Jews were bidden to eat unleavened Bread (Exodus 12,13, 34; Numbers 12; Deuteronomy 16)
Host - They pay adoration to the host upon a false presumption that the elements are no longer Bread and wine, but transubstantiated into the real body and blood of Christ
Sacrament - The Bread and wine in the Lord's Supper are considered sacraments in that they are visible manifestations of the covenant promise of our Lord: "In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, 'This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you
Barley - It is still used by the poor for making Bread ( Judges 7:13 , John 6:9 ; John 6:13 etc
Altar - The altar of incense; some also call the table for shew Bread an altar, but improperly, Exodus 20:24-25
Gelasius i, Pope Saint - Gelasius insisted on the primacy of the bishops of Rome, banished the festival of Lupercalia, and ordered communion to be received under two forms, Bread and wine
Tares - If left to mingle with the Bread, it occasions dizziness, and often acts as an emetic
Water - " Water, therefore, is theessential element of Holy Baptism, just as the Bread and wine arethe elements in the Holy Communion
Enough - Genesis 24 ...
How many hired servants of my father have Bread enough, and to spare. But in elegant discourse or composition, it always follows the noun, to which it refers as, Bread enough money enough
Consumed, To Be - Jeremiah was given Bread daily until “all the Bread in the city [2] spent [3]” ( Leaven - This was early used in the fermentation of Bread. It was strictly forbidden to be burnt in any offering made by fire (Leviticus 2:11 ); but in the peace offering, besides the unleavened cakes and wafers, the offerer was to present leavened Bread, which was to be eaten
Lord's Supper - " There is so general an agreement among them all, that it will only be necessary to recite the words of one of them: "Now, when the even was come, he sat down with the twelve," to eat the passover which had been prepared by his direction; "and as they were eating, Jesus took Bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat: this is my body. Every one brought an offering proportioned to his ability; these offerings were chiefly of Bread and wine; and the priests appropriated as much as was necessary for the administration of the Eucharist. At those feasts they partook of Bread and wine in a serious and devout manner, after a solemn blessing or thanksgiving to God for his manifold mercies. The former deliverance was typical of the latter; and instead of keeping the Jewish passover, which was now to be abrogated, they were to commemorate Christ, their passover, who was sacrificed for them; the Bread broken was to represent his body offered upon the cross; and the wine poured out was to represent his blood, which was shed for the salvation of men. It is to be partaken of by all who look for remission of sins by the death of Christ; we are not only to cherish that trust in our minds, and express it in our devotions, but we are to give an outward proof of our reliance upon the merits of his passion as the means of our salvation, by eating that Bread, and drinking that wine, which are typical representations of the body and blood of Christ, "who by his one oblation of himself once offered, made a full, perfect, and sufficient sacrifice, oblation, and satisfaction for the sins of the whole world
Living (2) - When we take home the truth of His self-humbling love for our sake, and assimilate it to ourselves as the Bread we eat, we receive into our souls the true life that cannot die (cf. ...
(3) As applied to Water and Bread in the Fourth Gospel: John 4:10-11 ὕδωρ ζῶν; John 7:38 ποταμοὶ ὕδατος ζῶντος; John 6:51 ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ἄρτος ὁ ζῶν. Christ does not call Himself ‘the Living water,’ as He calls Himself ‘the Living Bread. —Two things—the manna and the Bread of the miracle which He had just wrought—were present to our Lord’s mind when He preached at Capernaum, and also to the minds of His hearers. ’ This led Jesus to set forth the difference between the manna and ‘the true Bread from heaven’ (John 6:32). Inasmuch as the manna was sent down from above, and was continually renewed, it was a type of the true Bread. But that Bread it was not, being simply a provision which was made for a special purpose, and which lasted only until that purpose had been fulfilled (cf. The Bread of the miracle was intended for ‘a sign’ (John 6:26), which they had not had faith to discern (John 6:36), that He could supply them with the true Bread of the soul. Mark, 127b), it was ‘a sign’ that should have led them to believe that He could give them the true Bread. But they had sought Him at Capernaum, not hungering for this Bread, but hankering after more earthly good, like that which they had already received. Accordingly, Jesus spoke of the Bread of the miracle as ‘the meat which perisheth,’ and contrasted it with ‘the meat which endureth unto eternal life’ (John 6:27). These distinctions of the Bread of the miracle as well as the manna from the true Bread of the soul are important and vital, and they assist us to lay hold of our Lord’s meaning when He said, ‘I am the living Bread. As ‘living water’ is water that never ceases to gush forth, so ‘living Bread’ is Bread that Jesus never ceases to multiply for the supply of our spiritual wants,—bread, therefore, by which our spiritual sustenance is perpetually renewed (cf. It is Bread in ever-multiplying, unmeasured store, that can never be exhausted by the famishing. As Jesus speaks of ‘giving’ this Bread (John 6:27), it must mean, in the first instance, the same thing as the better water which He also spoke of ‘giving,’ namely, His word. But He not only speaks of ‘giving’ Bread, He also says, ‘I am the living Bread
Fenestbella - Also an excavation about two or three feet deep and one foot wide, covered with a stone slab, to receive the water from the washing of the priest's hands and the water used for washing the palls, purifiers, and corporals; also the Bread crumbs, cotton, etc
Milanese Rite - Some notable peculiarities are: a procession with the oblations of Bread and wine before the Offertory; the litany chanted by the deacon; the Creed said after the Offertory
Inconsistency: Glossed Over - the idlest jesting and absurdity, and then to pass off the whole entertainment respectably by singing the doxology, or pronouncing the benediction; the religion being to the foolery, in the proportion of the Bread to the sack in Falstaff's reckoning
Lord's Supper - Church fathers began to call the occasion the “Eucharist” (that is, “Thanksgiving”) from the blessing pronounced over the Bread and wine after about A
Beans - In Ezekiel 4:9 we read of beans as being mixed with barley, lentils, millet, and fitches to make Bread
Ambrosian Rite - Some notable peculiarities are: a procession with the oblations of Bread and wine before the Offertory; the litany chanted by the deacon; the Creed said after the Offertory
Cake - Exodus 12:39 (c) CHRIST is thus pictured as One in whom there is no sin and of whom we may eat as the Bread of GOD
Means of Grace - The Bread and wine in the Lord's Supper are considered sacraments in that they are visible manifestations of the covenant promise of our Lord: "In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, 'This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you
Jacobites - They consecrate unleavened Bread at the eucharist, and are against confession, believing that it is not of divine institution
Ton - ) A certain weight or quantity of merchandise, with reference to transportation as freight; as, six hundred weight of ship Bread in casks, seven hundred weight in bags, eight hundred weight in bulk; ten bushels of potatoes; eight sacks, or ten barrels, of flour; forty cubic feet of rough, or fifty cubic feet of hewn, timber, etc
Thalassicon - Also an excavation about two or three feet deep and one foot wide, covered with a stone slab, to receive the water from the washing of the priest's hands and the water used for washing the palls, purifiers, and corporals; also the Bread crumbs, cotton, etc
Sacrarium - Also an excavation about two or three feet deep and one foot wide, covered with a stone slab, to receive the water from the washing of the priest's hands and the water used for washing the palls, purifiers, and corporals; also the Bread crumbs, cotton, etc
Rite, Ambrosian - Some notable peculiarities are: a procession with the oblations of Bread and wine before the Offertory; the litany chanted by the deacon; the Creed said after the Offertory
Rite, Milanese - Some notable peculiarities are: a procession with the oblations of Bread and wine before the Offertory; the litany chanted by the deacon; the Creed said after the Offertory
Word: Ways of Treating it - A critic dissects it, raises a mountain of debate about the structure of the whole, and relation of its parts; and when he is done with his argument, he is done; to him the letter is dead ; he neither lives on it himself, nor spreads it for the good of his neighbours; he neither eats nor sows, The disciple of Jesus, hungering for righteousness, takes the seed whole; it is Bread for to-day's hunger, and seed for to-morrow's supply
Passover And Feast of Unleavened Bread - PASSOVER AND FEAST OF UNLEAVENED Bread...
1. ’ With the Passover meal, and during seven days, no leavened Bread was to be eaten. We may notice here: ( a ) the Passover is regarded as part of the Feast of Unleavened Bread ( Mazzoth ), the two being apparently blended into one; ( b ) the sacrifice, though composed of individual sacrifices, is to be offered only at the Temple in Jerusalem; ( c ) the offering may be taken from flock or herd. The feast lasts 7 days, and unleavened Bread only is to be eaten. All takes place at the central sanctuary; there is no mention of a lamb, and the Passover is part of the Unleavened Bread festival. The Feast of Unleavened Bread is treated separately; it lasts 7 days, a holy convocation is to be held on the 1st and 7th days; and ‘on the morrow after the sabbath’ a sheaf of new corn is to be waved before the Lord, a he-lamb is to be offered as a burnt-offering with other offerings; and till this is done, no Bread or parched corn or green ears may be eaten. It is to be roasted intact, and eaten with unleavened Bread and bitter herbs . ...
In Numbers 28:15-25 the Passover is distinguished from the Feast of Unleavened Bread. Of post-exilic witnesses Ezra 6:19-22 may be quoted, where the priests and Levites play the prominent part in the sacrifice, and the Feast of Unleavened Bread is distinguished from the Passover. Its association with the Feast of Unleavened Bread is probably accidental, due to contiguity in time
Barley - Cereals and the art of converting them into Bread were probably God's direct gift to man from the first. ...
The people in Palestine still complain that their oppressors leave them nothing but barley Bread to eat (Thomson's Land and Book, p
the Last Supper - The first three Gospels picture Christ's death in the symbols of the broken Bread (“This is my body which is given for you” Luke 22:19 ) and the outpoured wine (“This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins” Matthew 26:28 ). In John, foot washing replaces the “breaking of Bread” as the picture of Christ's humble acceptance of His servant role (John 13:4-20 ), anticipating His death on the cross which made cleansing from sin and fellowship with Him possible (John 13:8 ,John 13:8,13:10 )
Bottle - Hence, when it is said, (Genesis 21:14) that Abraham rose up early in the morning, and took Bread and a bottle of water, and gave it unto Hagar, putting it on her shoulder, we may suppose, that this was not only a large skin for a bottle, but as it was put on her shoulder, it was somewhat cumbersome and heavy. ...
When the men of Gibeon acted wisely with Joshua, as if coming from afar country, we are told, that they not only produced their Bread mouldy, but their bottles rent, and patched together, which they said, were new when they left their own country
Cue - ) A small portion of Bread or beer; the quantity bought with a farthing or half farthing
Brick - ) Any oblong rectangular mass; as, a brick of maple sugar; a penny brick (of Bread)
Kiln - The Hebrew word, tannur , is used to refer to both the oven used in the home for baking Bread and the large pottery kiln
Fitches - ]'>[1] ‘black cummin,’ the seeds of the aromatic herb Nigella sativa , commonly used to-day in Palestine as a condiment, especially on the top of loaves of Bread
Gallican Rite - The Bread and wine for the sacrifice were brought in amidst great ceremony
Communion - It is the breaking of Bread (Acts 2:42; Act 2:46) and a time to give thanks (Luke 22:17; Luk 22:19)
Offering - That which is presented in divine service an animal or a portion of Bread or corn, or of gold and silver, or other valuable articles, presented to God as an atonement for sin, or as a return of thanks for his favors, or for other religious purpose a sacrifice an oblation
Rite, Gallican - The Bread and wine for the sacrifice were brought in amidst great ceremony
Barley - , who used it for baking into Bread chiefly among the poor, (Judges 7:13 ; 2 Kings 4:42 ; John 6:9,13 ) and as fodder for horses
Temptation of Jesus - ”...
The first temptation was to turn into Bread the flat stones of the desert, which looked much like the flat round loaves of Middle Eastern Bread. Jesus replied in the words of Deuteronomy 8:3 that “man does not live on Bread alone but on every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord” (NIV). ...
The force of the temptation experiences in Matthew is to be a Bread messiah, a spectacular messiah, and a compromising messiah. When Jesus refused to continue to be a Bread messiah, the crowds left Him (John 6:25-68 )
Eating - When they sit down to table, the master of the house, or the chief person in the company, taking Bread, breaks it, but does not wholly separate it; then, putting his hand on it, he recites this blessing: "Blessed be thou, O Lord our God, the King of the world, who producest the Bread of the earth. " Having distributed the Bread among the guests, he takes the vessel of wine in his right hand, saying, "Blessed art thou, O Lord our God, King of the world, who hast produced the fruit of the vine. They take care that, after meals, there shall be a piece of Bread remaining on the table; the master of the house orders a glass to be washed, fills it with wine, and, elevating it, says," Let us bless Him of whose benefits we have been partaking:" the rest answer, "Blessed be He who has heaped his favours on us, and by his goodness has now fed us. This is expressed: in Luke 7:33 , by his neither eating "bread," nor drinking "wine
Symbol - ...
The Lord's Supper employs the ordinary elements of Bread and wine to picture Christ's broken body and His blood shed for humanity's sin. ...
While the cross, the water, the Bread, and wine are symbols at the center of Christian faith and practice, they are not the only symbols. Jesus used symbolic language in talking about Himself and His relationship to persons: Bread of life, Light of the world, Good Shepherd, Water of life, and the Door
Passover - On the fourteenth day of this month, between the two evenings, (See EVENING,) they were to kill the paschal lamb, and to abstain from leavened Bread. The day following, being the fifteenth, reckoned from six o'clock of the preceding evening, was the grand feast of the Passover, which continues seven days, usually called "the days of unleavened Bread," or "the Passover," Luke 22:1 ; but only the first and the seventh day were peculiarly solemn, Leviticus 23:5-8 Numbers 28:16,17 Matthew 26:17 . The lamb was to be roasted entire, and eaten the same night, with unleavened Bread and bitter herbs; not a bone of it was to be broken; and all that was not eaten was to be consumed by fire, Exodus 12:1-51 John 19:36 . Besides the private family festival, there were public and national sacrifices offered on each of the seven days of unleavened Bread, Numbers 28:19 . After a second cup, with a second washing of hands, an unleavened cake was broken and distributed, and a blessing pronounced upon the Giver of Bread. ...
As to the Christian Passover, the Lord's supper, it was instituted by Christ when, at the last Passover supper he ate with his apostles, he gave them a symbol of his body to eat, and a symbol of his blood to drink, under the form of Bread and wine; prefiguring that he should give up his body to the Jews and to death
Beggars - The Psalmist said that during the whole of his life he had not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging Bread, Psalm 37:25 ; whereas of a wicked one, typical of Judas, it is said, "Let his children be continually vagabonds and beg," Psalm 109:10 ; but in bringing in strength and salvation Jehovah "lifteth up the beggar from the dunghill, to set them among princes," 1 Samuel 2:8
Ask - ) To request or petition; - usually followed by for; as, to ask for Bread
Ahimelech - ” See 1 Samuel 21:1-15 ), Bread placed in the sanctuary and reserved for priests to eat (Exodus 25:30 ; Exodus 35:13 ; Leviticus 24:5-9 )
Kohath, Kohathites - The Kohathites carried the 'most holy things' of the tabernacle — the ark, table of show Bread, golden altar, etc
Roch, Saint - Emblems: angel, dog, Bread
Dionysus - Later still, the worship, under Assyrian and Babylonian influence, took the form of mysteries, like that of Demeter, the goddess of Bread
Penny - " Thus, "two hundred shillings' worth of Bread would not suffice," Mark 6:37 ; "he took out two francs and gave them to the host," Luke 10:35
Offertory, the - That portion of the Communion service during whichthe alms of the people, and the Bread and the Wine are receivedand solemnly presented on the Altar
Lord's Prayer - ...
Matthew 6:11 (5) Our daily (?) Bread give us to-day. ]'>[5]...
Luke 11:3 (5) Our daily (?) Bread give us day by day. ‘bread constant of the day,’ in Lk. ‘bread constant of every day’; in Lk. has ‘bread of our need today,’ in Lk. ‘bread of our need daily. ’ The Syriac rendering ‘constant’ comes from the first derivation; the second derivation permits their other rendering ‘of our need,’ Bread ‘ adapted to our human substance . ’ In either case ‘bread’ may be taken in an earthly or a heavenly sense. If we adopt the derivation from ienai ‘to come,’ the Bread epiousios will be (i) whatsoever is needed for the coming day, to be sought in daily morning prayer ‘give us to-day’; (ii) whatsoever is needed for the coming days of life. The petition becomes a prayer for the presence of Him who has revealed Himself as ‘the Bread
Marriage-Feasts - The most honoured guests sit nearest, others behind; and all in eating dip their hand into the one smoking mound, pieces of the thin Bread, bent together, serving for spoons when necessary. Water is poured on the hands before eating; and this is repeated when the meal closes, the fingers having first been wiped on pieces of Bread, which, after serving the same purpose as table-napkins with us, are thrown on the ground to be eaten by any dog that may have stolen in from the streets through the ever-open door, or picked up by those outside when gathered and tossed out to them (Matthew 15:27 ; Mark 7:28 )
Firstborn - Bread of the “first fruits” was Bread made of the first harvest grain, presented to God at Pentecost ( Ashes - The Psalmist, in great sorrow, says poetically, he had "eaten ashes as it were Bread, Psalms 102:9 ; that is, he sat on ashes, he threw ashes on his head; and his food, his Bread, was sprinkled with the ashes wherewith he was himself covered
Food - Bread was the principal food. The wandering Arabs live much upon a coarse black Bread
Eating - None of the company begin to eat until that the governor or master of the feast hath broken Bread, and craved a blessing. The words were "Blessed be thou, O Lord, our God, the King of the world, for it is thou who produceth the Bread of the earth. There is always reserved a portion of Bread after their meals, which is suffered to remain on the table. Was not this with an eye to Christ, the Bread of life? (John 6:48) A cup is usually washed at the close of the entertainment, and is filled with wine, when the governor or master of the feast saith, elevating it to the view of the whole company, "Let us bless him, of whose benefits we have been partaking
Ephratah - As Bethlehem means "house of Bread," so Ephraim "fruitful," the region abounding in grain
Assay - ) Examination and determination; test; as, an assay of Bread or wine
Host, Elevation of the - The most ancient mention of the Elevation is found in the synodal statutes of Eudes de Sully, Bishop of Paris (1196-1208), who introduced this practise, to protest against the erroneous opinion that the change of the Bread into the Body of Christ was complete only after the Consecration of the chalice
Shewbread - The shewbread was placed on the golden table of the sanctuary every Sabbath. The Hebrews called them Lechem Panahim, the Bread of faces: probably from being thus presented before the face of the Lord
Lord's Day, the - It was the day on which the disciples commonly came together for the express purpose of breaking Bread, Acts 20:7 ; and though no legal enactment is given concerning it, it is a day specially regarded by Christians
Leaven - Leaven was forbidden in the Hebrews during the seven days of the Passover, in memory of what their ancestors did when they went out of Egypt, they being then obliged to carry unleavened meal with them, and to make Bread in haste, the Egyptians pressing them to be gone, Exodus 12:15,19
Elevation of the Host - The most ancient mention of the Elevation is found in the synodal statutes of Eudes de Sully, Bishop of Paris (1196-1208), who introduced this practise, to protest against the erroneous opinion that the change of the Bread into the Body of Christ was complete only after the Consecration of the chalice
Transubstantiation - The questions, however, what was the nature of that presence? and what were the physical consequences as to the Bread and the wine? however much we may conceive these points to have been involved in the opinion actually held, or the language actually used, seem not to have been for a long period much agitated, or, at all events, not authoritatively decided, although the Roman Catholic writers gladly and triumphantly bring forward the expressions that were so often used from the earliest age, in support of the tenet which their church at length espoused. Pascasius Radbert, a monk, and afterward abbot of Corbey in Picardy, published a treatise concerning the sacrament of the body and blood of Christ, in which he did not hesitate to maintain the following most extraordinary positions: "That after the consecration of the Bread and wine in the Lord's Supper, nothing remained of these symbols but the outward form or figure, under which the body and blood of Christ were really and locally present; and that this body so present was the identical body that had been born of the Virgin Mary, had suffered on the cross, and had been raised from the dead. Among these was the celebrated Johannes Scotus, who laid the axe to the root of the tree, and, shaking off all that figurative language which had been so sadly abused, distinctly and powerfully stated, that the Bread and wine used in the eucharist were the signs or symbols of the absent body and blood of Christ. About the commencement of the century, he began to inculcate that the Bread and wine of the eucharist were not truly and actually, but only figuratively, and by similitude, the body and blood of Christ; and a doctrine so rational obtained many adherents in France, Italy, and England. At one synod held at Rome, under the immediate eye of the pope, the fathers of whom it consisted so successfully alarmed Berenger, that, not having sufficient vigour of mind to stand firm against their cruelty, he confessed that he had been in error, and subscribed the following declaration composed by one of the cardinals: "The Bread and wine which are placed on the altar are, after consecration, not merely a sacrament, symbol, or figure, but even the true body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is handled by the hands of the priests, and broken and chewed by the teeth of the faithful. He declared that he saw no warrant for believing that the Bread and wine were actually changed into the body and blood of Christ; but he adhered to the literal import of our Saviour's words, teaching that his body and blood were received, and that they were in some incomprehensible manner conjoined or united with the Bread and wine. It is quite evident, that although this system got rid of one difficulty by leaving the testimony of the senses as to the Bread and wine unchallenged, yet it is just as incomprehensible as the other, assumes as a fact what the senses cannot discern, and involves in it difficulties equally repugnant to the plainest dictates of reason. Powerful accordingly as most deservedly was his ascendency, and great as was the veneration with which he was contemplated, he was upon this point happily opposed; his colleague, the celebrated Carlostadt, openly avowing, that when our Lord said of the Bread, "This is my body," he pointed to his own person, and thus taught that the Bread was merely the sign or emblem of it. The discussion, however, which he had commenced, stimulated others to the consideration of the subject, and led Zuinglius, who had previously often meditated upon it, and OEcolampadius, two of the most distinguished reformers, to submit to the public the doctrine, that the Bread and wine are only symbols of Christ's body and blood, but that the body of our Lord was in heaven, to which after his resurrection he had ascended. At the commencement of the controversy respecting the eucharist among the defenders of the Protestant faith, there seem to have been only two opinions, that of Luther, asserting that the body and blood of Christ were actually with the Bread and wine, and that of Zuinglius, OEcolampadius, and Bucer, that the Bread and wine were the emblems or signs of Christ's body and blood, no other advantage being derived from partaking of them than the moral effect naturally resulting from the commemoration of an event so awful and so deeply interesting as the crucifixion of our Redeemer. We most assuredly believe that the Bread which we break is the communion of Christ's body, and the cup which we bless is the communion of his blood; so that we confess and undoubtedly believe, that the faithful in the right use of the Lord's table so do eat the body and drink the blood of the Lord Jesus, that he remaineth in them and they in him; yea, that they are so made flesh of his flesh, and bones of his bones, that as the eternal Godhead hath given to the flesh of Christ Jesus life and immortality, so doth Christ Jesus's flesh and blood, eaten and drunken by us, give to us the same prerogatives. In it the compilers declare, that "the outward elements in the sacrament of the Lord's Supper duly set apart to the uses ordained by Christ, have such relation to him crucified, as that truly, yet sacramentally only, they are sometimes called by the name of the things they represent; namely the body and blood of Christ, albeit in substance and nature they still remain truly and only Bread and wine, as they were before. " Then after most powerfully exposing the absurdity of transubstantiation, representing it as repugnant not to Scripture alone, but to reason and common sense, they proceed: "Worthy receivers, outwardly partaking of the visible elements in this sacrament, do then also inwardly by faith, really and indeed, yet not carnally and corporally, but spiritually, receive and feed upon Christ crucified, and all benefits of his death: the body and blood of Christ being then not corporally or carnally in, with, or under the Bread and wine, yet as really but spiritually present to the faith of believers in that ordinance, as the elements themselves are to their outward senses. In the thirty-nine articles, the present creed of the English church, it is said of this ordinance: "The supper of the Lord is not only a sign of the love that Christians ought to have among themselves one to another, but rather it is a sacrament of our redemption by Christ's death; insomuch that to such as rightly, worthily, and with faith receive the same, the Bread which we break is a partaking of the body of Christ, and likewise the cup is a partaking of the blood of Christ
Declaration, Royal - do solemnly and sincerely in the presence of God, profess, testify, and declare, that I do believe that in the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper there is not any Transubstantiation of the elements of Bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ at or after the consecration thereof by any person whatsoever; and that the invocation or adoration of the Virgin Mary or any other Saint, and the Sacrifice of the Mass, as they are now used in the Church of Rome, are superstitious and idolatrous" ...
Canon of the Mass - The most solemn part of the Mass in which the Sacrificial Act proper takes place, the Consecration and change of the Bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ
Affliction: Awakening Gratitude - Discontented persons need a course of the Bread of adversity and the water of affliction, to cure them of the wretched habit of murmuring
Evil Merodach - When Evil Merodach mounted the throne therefore he brought him out of prison, changed his prison garments, and set his throne above the throne of the kings with him in Babylon, and "Jehoiachin did continually eat Bread before him all the days of his life" (Jeremiah 52:31-34)
Hanukkah - He made a new sacrificial altar and holy vessels, burned incense on the incense altar, lit the lampstands to give light to the Temple, placed Bread on the table, and hung new curtains
Famine - Amos 8:11 (a) This is symbolical of the lack of the Word of GOD as the Bread of Life
Dinner - In general, however, a light meal is eaten about the middle of the day, consisting of Bread, olives, fruit, leben (sour curded milk), cheese, etc
Peel - ) A spadelike implement, variously used, as for removing loaves of Bread from a baker's oven; also, a T-shaped implement used by printers and bookbinders for hanging wet sheets of paper on lines or poles to dry
Lord (2) - "On the first day of the week when the disciples came together to break Bread, Paul preached unto them
Lord (2) - "On the first day of the week when the disciples came together to break Bread, Paul preached unto them
Leaven - All leaven was prohibited in meat-offerings, Leviticus 2:11; Leviticus 7:12; Leviticus 8:2; Numbers 6:15, and specially in the paschal feast of the Hebrews, Exodus 12:3; Exodus 12:19-20; whence this was often called "the feast of unleavened Bread
Lord (2) - "On the first day of the week when the disciples came together to break Bread, Paul preached unto them
Royal Declaration - do solemnly and sincerely in the presence of God, profess, testify, and declare, that I do believe that in the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper there is not any Transubstantiation of the elements of Bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ at or after the consecration thereof by any person whatsoever; and that the invocation or adoration of the Virgin Mary or any other Saint, and the Sacrifice of the Mass, as they are now used in the Church of Rome, are superstitious and idolatrous" ...
Serapion, Penitent of Alexandria - No argument, however, for communion in one kind can be drawn from this, as doubtless the Bread had been dipped in the Eucharistic wine, according to Eastern fashion (see Bingham's Antiq
Bethlehem - Beth-lehem, signifying 'house of Bread,' is a very appropriate name for a place whence the Saviour should proceed as a man — He who was the living Bread that came down from heaven
Passover - They made their Bread without yeast (leaven), to save time waiting for the dough to rise. ...
Following the Passover, and joined to it, was the seven-day Feast of Unleavened Bread. This reminded them that, having been saved through the Passover, they had fled from Egypt hastily, cooking unleavened Bread as they travelled (Exodus 12:33-34; Exodus 12:39). (Concerning the offerings made at the Feast of Unleavened Bread see FEASTS. Among the additions to the meal was a cup of wine, for which the head of the household offered a prayer of thanks (or blessing; 1 Corinthians 10:16), and which he passed around among the participants, both before and after the eating of unleavened Bread (Mark 14:22-24; Luke 22:15-20)
Leaven - Whether lodged in sour dough (leaven) or collected free out of fermenting vats (compressed yeast), they cause the same effect when introduced into Bread sponge. At the present time leaven is not so much used for the lightening of Bread as yeast, because it is apt to impart to Bread a sour taste and a disagreeable odour. Diastase is present, of course, in wheat-flour, and when the conditions of moisture and temperature are supplied, as in a gently heated Bread sponge, it effects the same conversion as under natural conditions in the germinating grain. ’...
The week which began with the Passover is called ‘the days of unleavened Bread’ (Matthew 26:17, Mark 14:1; Mark 14:12, Luke 22:1; Luke 22:7), from the practice enjoined in Exodus 23:15, Leviticus 23:6, Deuteronomy 16:3-4; Deuteronomy 16:8
Supper - "He took Bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave it unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me. He took the Bread which was then on the table, and the wine, of which some had been used in sending round the cup of thanksgiving; and by saying, "This is my body, this is my blood, do this in remembrance of me," he declared to his Apostles that this was the representation of his death by which he wished them to commemorate that event. "As often as ye eat this Bread, and drink this cup, ye do show the Lord's death till he come. Luke, "Jesus, when he took the Bread, gave thanks;" and his disciples in all ages, when they receive the Bread, keep a feast of thanksgiving
Leaven - Whether lodged in sour dough (leaven) or collected free out of fermenting vats (compressed yeast), they cause the same effect when introduced into Bread sponge. At the present time leaven is not so much used for the lightening of Bread as yeast, because it is apt to impart to Bread a sour taste and a disagreeable odour. Diastase is present, of course, in wheat-flour, and when the conditions of moisture and temperature are supplied, as in a gently heated Bread sponge, it effects the same conversion as under natural conditions in the germinating grain. ’...
The week which began with the Passover is called ‘the days of unleavened Bread’ (Matthew 26:17, Mark 14:1; Mark 14:12, Luke 22:1; Luke 22:7), from the practice enjoined in Exodus 23:15, Leviticus 23:6, Deuteronomy 16:3-4; Deuteronomy 16:8
Lord's Supper (ii) - Thus it supplied the starting-point for the conversation with the multitude, in which our Lord identified ‘the Bread out of heaven that is genuine,’ which ‘the Father giveth,’ with Himself as ‘the Bread of God which cometh down out of heaven, and giveth life unto the world,’ ‘the Bread of life,’ ‘the Bread which cometh down out of heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die,’ ‘the living Bread which came down out of heaven’ and further declared, ‘the Bread which I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world’ (John 6:32-51). This is the Bread which came down out of heaven’; ‘He that eateth this Bread shall live for ever’ (John 6:52-58). As such it suggests (α) a real spiritual participation on the part of the communicant in the human nature of Christ by the power of the Holy Ghost, and a consequent union with His Divine Person; (β) connexion with His death, indicated in the words ‘the Bread which I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world,’ and with His resurrection, indicated by the references to ‘the Bread of life’ and ‘the living Bread. It records our Lord’s words with reference to the Bread: ‘This is my body, which is for you: this do as my memorial’; and with reference to the cup: ‘This cup is the new covenant in my blood: this do, as oft as ye drink it, as my memorial. Viewed in connexion with the introductory words ‘took Bread,’ ‘He brake it and said,’ it cannot reasonably be understood to denote Bread in general or anything else except the actual pieces of Bread which our Lord gave as He spoke. the Bread which our Lord gave to His disciples) and the predicate (‘my body’) are viewed as identical. It must be remembered that (α) the idea of communion with God by means of a sacred meal was familiar, as in many religious rites outside Judaism, so also in the literature and the religion which were well known to the disciples, as shown in the Levitical peace-offerings with the threefold division into the portion for God, the portion for the priest, and the portion for the worshipper (Leviticus 3; Leviticus 7:29-34); the Bread and wine brought forth by Melchizedek, the ‘priest of God Most High’ (Genesis 14:18); the eating of the lamb in the Passover (Exodus 12); the meal of Moses and Aaron, Nadab and Abihu, and seventy of the elders in the presence of God (Exodus 24:1-11); the prophecy by Isaiah of the feast to be made by the Lord of hosts (Isaiah 25:6); and the invitations to a meal evidently of profound spiritual significance given by the personified ‘Wisdom’ of the Sapiential books (Proverbs 9:1-5, Sirach 24:19-21). ’ To adopt either of them involves putting aside the cumulative argument which has already been briefly detailed; the main argument by which they have been supported is the supposed merely metaphorical character of certain phrases, alleged to be parallel, in which our Lord described Himself as ‘the Bread of life’ (John 6:35; John 6:41; John Joh_6:48), ‘the living Bread’ (John 6:51), ‘the light of the world’ (John 8:12, John 9:5), ‘the door of the sheep’ (John 10:7-8), ‘the good shepherd’ (John 10:11; John 10:14), ‘the way’ (John 14:6), ‘the true vine’ (1 Corinthians 11:24-25,; John 15:5). Similarly, in spiritual reality the Bread which He gives in the Holy Communion is His body. ’ The words in connexion with the species of Bread are the same as those in 1 Corinthians 11:24, already discussed, and do not need further comment, except to notice that Mark does not add ‘which is for you: this do as my memorial
First-Fruits - ...
...
That at the feast of Pentecost two loaves of leavened Bread, made from the new flour, were to be waved in like manner (Leviticus 23:15,17 ; Numbers 28:26 )
Disorderly - ...
C — 1: ἀτακτέω (Strong's #812 — Verb — atakteo — at-ak-teh'-o ) signifies "to be out of rank, out of one's place, undisciplined, to behave disorderly:" in the military sense, "to break rank;" negatively in 2 Thessalonians 3:7 , of the example set by the Apostle and his fellow missionaries, in working for their Bread while they were at Thessalonica so as not to burden the saints
Birthright - Esau forfeited his birthright to his brother Jacob for the sake of a meal of lentil stew and Bread (Genesis 25:29-34 )
Scallop - ) To bake in scallop shells or dishes; to prepare with crumbs of Bread or cracker, and bake
Alway - Mephibosheth shall eat Bread alway at my table
Always - Mephibosheth shall eat Bread alway at my table
Borrow - To take from another by request and consent, with a view to use the thing taken for a time, and return it, or if the thing taken is to be consumed or transferred in the use, then to return an equivalent in kind as, to borrow a book, a sum of money,or a loaf of Bread
Jehoiachin - 561, he was released from prison and exalted above the other captive kings, and he ate Bread before the king all the days of his life
Cummin - Cummin was used by the Jews as a condiment, and also for flavouring Bread
Hire - ...
They have hired out themselves for Bread
Genevieve, Saint - Emblems: Bread, keys, herd, candle
Raven - That the carnivorous ravens should bring flesh as well as Bread to Elijah shows God's miraculous power; He caused them to feed His servant
Wander - ...
He wandereth abroad for Bread
Septuagesima - but with the unleavened Bread of sincerity and truth
Theodosius of Syria - He was an object of reverence even to the Isaurian banditti, who on several predatory inroads left his monastic settlement uninjured, only requesting Bread and his prayers
Barley - The Hebrews, however, frequently used barley Bread, as we find by several passages of Scripture: for example, David's friends brought to him in his flight wheat, barley, flour, &c, 2 Samuel 17:28 . ...
So the false prophets are charged with seducing the people for handfuls of barley, and morsels of Bread, Ezekiel 13:19
Food - Bread was the principal food; preparations of corn were, however, common. The Hebrews used a great variety of articles, John 21:5, to give a relish to Bread
Lord's Prayer, the - ...
Give us this day our Bread for the morrow...
Give us each day our Bread for the morrow ...
Give us this day our Bread for the morrow ...
And forgive us our debts as we also have forgiven our debtors;...
And forgive us our sins for we ourselves forgive every one who is indebted to us;...
And forgive us our debt as we also forgive our debtors;...
And cause us to go not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. The first, “Give us our Bread,” is akin to the first benediction of grace at mealtime. “Give us our Bread for the morrow” (RSV note to Matthew 6:11 ) may refer to the gift of manna to be renewed at the shift of the ages. 90) said: “He who serves God up to the last day of his death, will satisfy himself with Bread, namely the Bread of the world to come” (Genesis Rabbah 82). It also refers to the Bread necessary for daily life in this world as Luke 11:3 indicates: “Give us day by day. ...
The Lord's Prayer in the New Testament is a community's prayer: “Our Father,” “Give us our Bread,” Forgive us our debts,” “as we forgive our debtors,” “Cause us ,” “Deliver us
Eucharist - It is found in Ignatius and the Didache , and is based upon the eucharistia or giving of thanks with which our Lord set apart the Bread and wine at the Last Supper as memorials of Himself ( Matthew 26:27 , John 6:52-58 ; Luke 22:19 , 1 Corinthians 11:24 ). The breaking of (the) Bread ( Acts 2:42 ; Acts 2:46 ) probably refers to the Eucharist (cf. 22 As they were eating, he took Bread, and when he had blessed, he brake it, and gave to them, and said. 26 As they were eating, Jesus took Bread, and blessed, and brake it; and he gave to the disciples, and said, Take, eat: this is my body. 19 And he took Bread, and when he had given thanks, he brake it, and gave to them, saying, This is my body Manna - In the margin of the Bible it is called Man-hu, (Exodus 16:15) meaning the Bread with which the Lord fed. And Christians ought not to be less earnest in defence of the same precious truth, since the manna of the Old Testament was but typical and figurative of the Bread of life under the New. Jesus was all along thus represented to Israel; and was then, and is now, the living Bread, by faith, with which the Lord feeds all the true Israel
Love-Feast - ]'>[2] In Acts 2:42 we read that the converts ‘continued stedfastly in the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, in the breaking of Bread and the prayers. ’ In Acts 2:46 we read that ‘day by day, continuing stedfastly with one accord in the temple, and breaking Bread at home, they did take their food with gladness and singleness of heart. ‘Breaking Bread’ may refer only to the Eucharist; and the reference to the taking of food may be merely an expression denoting their joyous manner of life. ]'>[4] seems more probable-that the breaking of Bread was accompanied by a meal. The ‘breaking of the Bread’ is an unusual phrase, and as it seems clear that in Corinth the Eucharist took place during or at the end of a supper, so it probably did in Jerusalem. In Acts 20:7-11 we read that at Troas on the first day of the week the Christians were gathered together to break Bread. Paul spoke to them till midnight, broke Bread and tasted it. Here the object of the meeting was the breaking of Bread
Lord's Supper - It is called the Lord's Supper, because it was first instituted in the evening, and at the close of the Passover supper; and because we therein feed upon Christ, the Bread of life, Romans 3:20 . As to the nature of this ordinance, we may observe, that, in participating of the Bread and wine, we do not consider it as expiatory, but, ...
1. It seems to be quite an indifferent thing, what Bread is used in this ordinance, or what coloured wine, for Christ took that which was readiest. The eating of the Bread and drinking of the wine being always connected in Christ's example, they ought never to be separated: wherever one is given, the other should not be withheld. This Bread and wine are not changed into the real body and blood of Christ, but are only emblems thereof
Furnace - tannur, oven for baking Bread (Genesis 15:17 ; Isaiah 31:9 ; Nehemiah 3:11 )
Wheat - The wheat of Palestine is mostly of the bearded varieties; it is not only eaten as Bread, but also boiled, unground, to make the peasant’s dish burghul , which is in turn pounded with meat in a mortar (cf
Oven - ...
Heated stones, or sand heated by a fire heaped over it, and also flat irons pans, all served as ovens for the preparation of Bread
Husk - John's Bread" and "locust tree
Fishing, the Art of - He twice miraculously fed multitudes with fish and Bread (Matthew 14:19 ; 15:36 )
Schewenkfeldians - such as this Bread which is broken and consumed; a true and real food, which nourisheth, satisfieth, and delighteth the soul
If - ...
If thou art the son of God, command that these stones be made Bread
Horse - 47:17: “And they brought their cattle unto Joseph: and Joseph gave them Bread in exchange for horses, and for the flocks, and for the cattle of the herds, and for the asses
Window - Till he has windows on his Bread and butter
Will of Man: Adverse to the Gospel - The destitute waifs and strays of the streets of London find out the night refuge and ask for shelter; they cluster round our workhouse doors like sparrows under the eaves of a building on a rainy day; they piteously crave for lodging and a crust of Bread; yet crowds of poor benighted spirits, when the house of mercy is lighted up, and the invitation is plainly written in bold letters, 'Whosoever will, let him turn in hither,' will not come, but prove the truth of Watts's verse: ...
'Thousands make a wretched choice, And rather starve than come
Manna - They now no longer needed the "bread of the wilderness. ...
Our Lord refers to the manna when he calls himself the "true Bread from heaven" (John 6:31-35 ; 4851-51 )
Temptations, the Lord's - To make stones into Bread to satisfy His hunger would not have been waiting on God: man's true path is to live by every word of God, to be dependent upon Him in his circumstances. The first temptation is remarkable, as showing that Satan knew whom he was addressing, or he would not have suggested so striking a miracle as making stones into Bread
First-Fruits - There was also another sort of first-fruits paid to God, Numbers 15:19-20 , when the Bread in every family was kneaded, a portion of it was set apart, and given to the priest or Levite of the place. This is one of the three precepts peculiar to the women; because they generally made the Bread
Lord's Day, the - Similarly, Luke notes that when Paul arrived at Troas near the end of his third missionary journey, the church gathered together to break Bread "on the first day of the week" (Acts 20:6-7 ). Whether their breaking of Bread in their homes was a daily or weekly occurrence he does not specify, but the former seems more likely (Acts 2:46 ). Luke records that the Christians at Troas came together to break Bread, which may well denote a meal that included the Lord's Supper (cf. The Didache makes explicit the connection between the breaking of Bread and the Lord's Supper on the Lord's Day but says little else concerning the meeting, apart from mentioning the practice of confession of sin (14:1). Next, the congregation rises for prayer, following which the Bread and wine are brought in for the Lord's Supper. After prayers and thanksgivings by the president and a congregational "Amen, " the deacons distribute the Bread and wine to those who are present (and then carry some to those who are absent)
Mass - Missa, in the church of Rome, the office or prayers used at the celebration of the eucharist; or, in other words, consecrating the Bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ, and offering them, so transubstantiated, as an expiatory sacrifice for the quick and the dead. Mass of the presanctified (missa praesanctificatorum) is a mass peculiar to the Greek church, in which there is no consecration of the elements; but, after singing some hymns, they receive the Bread and wine which were before consecrated. The priest counts upon his fingers, the days of the ensuing week on which it is to be celebrated, and cuts off as many pieces of Bread at the altar as he is to say masses; and after having consecrated them, steeps them in wine, and puts them in a box; out of which, upon every occasion, he takes some of it with a spoon, and, putting it on a dish, sets it on the altar
Cooking And Heating - ...
In patriarchal times food consisted basically of Bread, milk products, meat, and honey. It took longer to penetrate the dough than if fresh yeast was used, but that was reserved for the time following the festival of Unleavened Bread, and the normal method was just as certain. The cakes of Bread were then placed on the inside of the cone at the top, away from the flames. The cooking resulted in different shapes of Bread. ) Jeremiah received a Bread ration from the local bakery while he was in prison (Jeremiah 37:21 ). ...
The basic food to go with the Bread was vegetable soup prepared from beans, green vegetables, and herbs. It was eaten by forming a scoop with a piece of Bread, and dipping it in the central pot. Some of these plants were uncooked and were used to eat with Bread or as a salad. The housewife sometimes boiled up the juice to make a simple grape jelly or jam, which was spread on the Bread
Idle - According to Hebrew wisdom, the ideal woman “eateth not the Bread of idleness” (Proverbs 31:27 ), but is an industrious, working woman who helps provide for the financial needs of her family (Proverbs 31:16 ,Proverbs 31:16,31:24 )
Poor - ...
B — 1: πένης (Strong's #3993 — Adjective — penes — pen'-ace ) "a laborer "(akin to penomai, "to work for one's daily Bread"), is translated "poor" in 2 Corinthians 9:9
Eucharist - After this followed mutual salutations of the minister and people; and then the bishop or presbyter, having sanctified the elements by a solemn benediction, broke the Bread, and delivered it to the deacon, who distributed it to the communicants, and after that the cup
Melchizedek - ...
Old Testament When Abraham returned from the Valley of Siddim where he defeated Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, and the kings aligned with Kedorlaomer, Melchizedek greeted Abraham with Bread and wine
Preparation Day - ...
The Feast of Passover was immediately followed by the holy convocation of the Feast of Unleavened Bread (Leviticus 23:1-7 )
Priests: Superstitious Reverence of - ' ...
How few steps would land Tractarians in the same degradation! Their priests are the channels of grace to them, from them they receive regeneration and absolution, and from their hands they receive the god of Bread whom they adore and eat
Husks - The pods are from 6 to 10 inches in length and 1 in Breadth. John’s Bread,’ this name having been given to them by the monks of Palestine or by ‘pious pilgrims’ (Thomson, LB First-Fruits - All the males were to present themselves three times in the year before God, and these occasions were arranged at the times of ingathering of the barley (at the Feast of Unleavened Bread); of wheat (at the Feast of Weeks); and of the vintage (at the Feast of Tabernacles)
Elimelech - The certain man, there spoken of, going down from Bethlehem-judah, the land of Bread, to sojourn in Moab, the city of destruction, becomes no unapt representation of our first father, who, like the Samaritan our Lord describes, going down from Jerusalem, the holy city, to Jericho, the cursed city, fell among thieves
Wither - ...
Physical “drying up” can involve Bread ( Frog - To find such places full of frogs when they came to heat them in order to bake their Bread, and to see frogs in the beds where they sought repose, must have been both disgusting and distressing in the extreme
Famine - Famine is sometimes used in a figurative sense; as when a worse destitution is described than that of Bread, a sorer thirst than that for water—even a famine of the divine word, a thirst because the living streams of mercy flow out no more
Care - They shall eat Bread by weight and with care
Husks - The tree is called by the Germans, Johannisbrodaum, that is, "John's-bread-tree," because John the Baptist was supposed to have lived on it fruit
Paulus, Saint Called Thebaeus - The ravens are said to have brought him Bread, and two lions dug his grave (ib
Bowing - ...
Breaking of the Bread—One of the New Testament Names for the HOLYCOMMUNION (which see) and one of the four marks of the Church'sunbroken continuity
Ordeals - Among the ordeals were: ...
the duel, the outcome of which was looked upon as the judgment of God
the cross, before which the accuser and the accused stood with outstretched arms, and the first to let fall his arms was defeated
the hot iron, in which ordeal the accused must walk a certain distance carrying a red-hot iron in his hands, or he must walk barefooted over red-hot ploughshares, and if he remained uninjured his innocence was established
cold water, into which the accused with arms and legs bound was cast, and if he floated upon the water, he was declared not guilty
the blessed morsel, consisting of a piece of cheese and Bread which the accused must swallow, if he was to have his innocence established
the suspended loaf, a loaf of Bread, through which a stick of wood was passed and placed in an opening made in another piece of wood, so that it could turn, and a person was considered guilty if it turned from west to east
the examen in mensuris (Latin: trial by ballot), seldom practised, an ordeal probably decided by lot or by the measuring of the accused by a stick of determined length
bleeding, in which ordeal, a person suspected of murder was forced to look upon the wounds of the victim, and if these began to bleed afresh, his guilt was supposed to have been proven
The Christian missionaries and Churchmen generally were somewhat tolerant of the ordeals, excepting the duel
Manna - The Lord Jesus accepted the manna as a type of himself—the living Bread which came down from heaven. "For the Bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven and giveth life unto the world
Anoint - When unleavened Bread is “tempered with oil” in Bread
Pitcher - ‘According to Jewish usage, on the evening of the 13th [1], before the stars appeared in heaven, every father of a family was to go to the well to draw pure water, with which the unleavened Bread was kneaded. ...
There is, however, presumptive evidence that the pitcher was being used in the preparation of the unleavened Bread, the making of which, together with the putting away of leaven from the houses, was part of the work in which many hundreds in Jerusalem (Josephus BJ vi
Feasts - Thus the 7th was the sacred month, the feasts of Unleavened Bread and Tabernacles each lasted for 7 days, Pentecost was 49 days after the Feast of Unleavened Bread, Passover and Tabernacles each began on the 14th day of their respective months, and there were 7 days of holy convocation in the year. The Passover , followed immediately by the Feast of Unleavened Bread . The Passover festival is probably of great antiquity, but the Feast of Unleavened Bread, being agricultural in character, can scarcely have existed before the Israelites entered Canaan
Fasting - "...
But God, while not discountenancing outward acts of sorrow expressive of inward penitence, declares, "is not this the fast that I have chosen? to loose the bands of wickedness, to undo the heavy burdens, and to let the oppressed go free, and that ye break every yoke? Is it not to deal the Bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the poor that are cast out to thy house? when thou seest thy naked that thou cover him, and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh?" (Isaiah 58:4-7. Daniel's (Daniel 10:3) mode of fasting was, "I ate no pleasant Bread," i. "I ate unleavened Bread, even the Bread of affliction" (Deuteronomy 16:3), "neither came flesh nor wine in my mouth
Joseph - In the exaltation of Joseph at the right hand of Pharaoh, and all the famished country coming to him for Bread, we behold a lovely type, indeed, of our Almighty Joseph exalted at the right hand of God, and dispensing blessings of grace and mercy in the living Bread, which is himself, to a famished world. ...
In the going down of Israel into Egypt with all his house, constrained by famine to seek Bread-what a striking portrait is here also drawn of the true Israel of God, constrained by the famine of soul to seek to Jesus for supply. And though like the brethren of Joseph, little do we at first know, that the Lord of the country is our brother, though in the first awakenings of spiritual want the Governor may seem with us, as Joseph did to them, to speak roughly; yet when the whole comes to be opened tour view, and Jesus is indeed discovered to be Lord of all the land, how, like Joseph's brethren, are we immediately made glad, and eat and drink at his table with him, forgetting all past sorrow in present joy, and partaking of that "bread of life, of which whosoever eateth shall live forever!" Such, among many other striking particularities, are the incidents in the history of the patriarch Joseph, which are highly typical of Christ
Children And Dogs - Jesus at first refuses because it is God's will that the Jews, as the chosen people, must first be served the Bread of the children of the household, i
Coal - ]'>[1] see Bread)
Children, Communion of - Yet in danger of death they may receive, if they are able to distinguish the Holy Eucharist from ordinary Bread and reverently adore it
Fraternity - instituted the arch-fraternity of charity, which distributes Bread every Sunday among the poor, and gives portions to forty poor girls on the feast of St
Profession: the Vanity of Mere - Yet such must be the life of the man who professes to feed on the Bread of heaven and knows not its sustaining virtues, who boasts of drinking the water of life and has never sipped that heavenly stream
Eating And Drinking - See Bread, Cup, Fasting, Food, Lord’s Supper, Meals, Wine
Grain of Wheat - Saint Ignatius of Antioch applied this parable to himself, just before being thrown to the lions, in the beautiful words "I am the wheat of Christ, I shall be ground between the teeth of beasts, that I may become clean Bread
Raven - Besides, if any human beings brought the prophet Bread and flesh, so they might also water
Table - They feed on the Living Bread, and drink the Living Water, and their hearts are satisfied
Asher - Hence, Jacob, when adying, declared that "the Bread of Asher should be fat
Melchisedec, Melchizedek - Melchisedec brought forth Bread and wine, and blessed Abraham, and Abraham gave to him tithes of all
Rise Up Early - 127:2 gives some interesting advice while using this word: “It is vain for you to rise up early, to sit up late, to eat the Bread of sorrows: for so he giveth his beloved sleep
Abi'Athar - ) Abiathar was the only one of the all the sons of Ahimelech the high priest who escaped the slaughter inflicted upon his father's house by Saul, in revenge for his father's house by Saul, in revenge of his having inquired of the Lord for David and given him the shew-bread to eat
Leek - The inhabitants are very fond of eating it raw, as sauce for their roasted meat; and the poor people eat it raw with their Bread, especially for breakfast
Year - The feast of unleavened Bread, in the same month, from the 15th to 21st, inclusive
Observe - ...
Ye shall observe the feast of unleavened Bread
Rain - ...
Then said the Lord to Moses, behold I will rain Bread from heaven for you
Lend - To grant a thing to be used, on the condition that its equivalent in kind shall be returned as, to lend a sum of money, or a loaf of Bread
Same - ...
The Lord Jesus, the same night in which he was betrayed, took Bread
Asher - Jacob (Genesis 49:20) prophesied: "out of Asher his Bread shall be fat (the fat that comes from him shall be his own Bread, so fruitful shall be his soil) and he shall yield royal dainties:" fulfilled when Solomon thence supplied King Hiram's household with wheat and oil (1 Kings 5:11)
Philip the Apostle - ...
To Philip Jesus put the question concerning the crowd faint with hunger, "from whence shall we buy Bread that these may eat? to prove Philip (so Deuteronomy 8:2; Matthew 4:4) for Jesus Himself knew what lie would do" (John 6:5-9). Philip failed, on being tested, through unbelief; "two hundred pennyworth of Bread is not sufficient for them that every one of them may take a little" (Numbers 11:21-22). Philip was probably the one whose duty was to provide for the daily sustenance of the twelve; or rather Luke's (Luke 9:10) notice that the desert where Jesus fed the multitude "was belonging to Bethsaida" gives us the key to the query being put to Philip; he belonged to Bethsaida (John 1:44): who then was so likely as Philip to know where Bread was to be got? An undesigned coincidence and mark of genuineness
Passover - The following is what God ordained concerning the passover: the month of the coming out of Egypt was after this to be the first month of the sacred or ecclesiastical year; and the fourteenth day of this month, between the two evenings, that is, between the sun's decline and its setting, or rather, according to our reckoning, between three o'clock in the afternoon and six in the evening, at the equinox, they were to kill the paschal lamb, and to abstain from leavened Bread. They were to eat the lamb the same night, roasted, with unleavened Bread, and a sallad of wild lettuces, or bitter herbs. During the whole eight days of the passover no leavened Bread was to be used
Hospitality - In the caravans, I have often seen with pleasure a mule-driver press those who passed to partake of his repast; and though the majority politely excused themselves, he gave, with an air of satisfaction, to those who would accept of it, a portion of his little meal of Bread and dates; and I was not a little surprised when I saw, in Turkey, rich Turks withdraw themselves into corners, to avoid inviting those who might otherwise have sat at table with them. Niebuhr says, "When a Bedaween sheik eats Bread with strangers, they may trust his fidelity and depend on his protection. " This brings to recollection the complaint of the psalmist, Psalm 41:9 , penetrated with the deep ingratitude of one whom he describes as having been his own familiar friend, in whom he trusted, "who did eat of my Bread, even he hath lifted up his heel against me
Sincere, Sincerely, Sincerity - 3 denotes "sincerity, purity;" it is described metaphorically in 1 Corinthians 5:8 as "unleavened (bread);" in 2 Corinthians 1:12 , "sincerity (of God)," RV, AV, "(godly) sincerity," it describes a quality possessed by God, as that which is to characterize the conduct of believers; in 2 Corinthians 2:17 it is used of the rightful ministry of the Scriptures
First Fruits - When Bread was kneaded in a family, a portion of it was set apart, and given to the priest or Levite who dwelt in the place
Transubstantiation - The conversion or change of the substance of the Bread and wine in the eucharist into the body and blood of Jesus Christ, which the Romish church suppose to be wrought by the consecration of the priest
Basket - sal, a twig or osier) for holding Bread (Genesis 40:16 ; Exodus 29:3,23 ; Leviticus 8:2,26,31 ; Numbers 6:15,17,19 )
Hungary, Elizabeth of, Saint - Emblems: alms, flowers, Bread, the poor, a pitcher
Assize - Specifically: (1) A statute regulating the weight, measure, and proportions of ingredients and the price of articles sold in the market; as, the assize of Bread and other provisions; (2) A statute fixing the standard of weights and measures
Jethro - " He also took a burnt offering and sacrifices for God: and Aaron and all the elders of Israel came to eat Bread with him before God
Ark - In Him there dwelt the law of GOD perfectly, the priesthood of GOD fully, and the Bread of GOD abundantly
Behind - Another adverbial usage has a temporal emphasis that can mean “afterwards”: “And I will fetch a morsel of Bread, and comfort ye your hearts; after that ye shall pass on …” ( Oven - "Who teaseth from raising (rather from heating it meeir ) after he hath kneaded the dough until it be leavened:" he omits to feed it only during the short time of the fermentation of the Bread
Heavy - ) Not raised or made light; as, heavy Bread
Slice - ) A thin, broad piece cut off; as, a slice of bacon; a slice of cheese; a slice of Bread
Elizabeth of Hungary, Saint - Emblems: alms, flowers, Bread, the poor, a pitcher
Ahimelech - He therefore went to Nob, to the high priest Ahimelech, who gave him the shew Bread, and the sword of Goliath
Passover - It is called also the "feast of unleavened Bread" (Exodus 23:15 ; Mark 14:1 ; Acts 12:3 ), because during its celebration no leavened Bread was to be eaten or even kept in the household (Exodus 12:15 )
Pledge - " (Deuteronomy 24:6) By these the man grinds his daily Bread, and therefore he will starve if the implements for providing his food be taken from him. And in a spiritual sense how much higher the argument runs! Take not away the means and ordinances of worship, by the use of which, under the blessing of God, the Bread of life is administered to him
Street - Craftsmen plied their trade on certain “streets” named after the guild—for example, the Bakers’ Street: “Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison, and that they should give him daily a piece of Bread out of the bakers’ street, until all the Bread in the city were spent” ( Fitches - ...
Pliny says it is of use in bakehouses, pistrinis, and that it affords a grateful seasoning to the Bread. The Jewish rabbins also mention the seeds among condiments, and mixed with Bread
Eat, Eat With, Eating - 7, where the single phrase "to break Bread" is used, refers to the Lord's Supper. In the former verse the phrase "the breaking of Bread," unaccompanied by any word about taking food, clearly stands for the Lord's Supper; whereas in ver. 46 the phrase "breaking Bread at home" is immediately explained by "they did take their food," indicating their ordinary meals. ...
B — 2: προσφάγιον (Strong's #4371 — Noun Neuter — prosphagion — pros-fag'-ee-on ) primarily "a dainty or relish" (especially cooked fish), to be eaten with Bread (pros, "to," and A, No
Famine - How very solemn are the words of the Lord, by the prophet, on this subject, Amos 8:11-12 "Behold, the days come, saith the Lord God, that I will send a famine in the land, not a famine of Bread, nor a thirst for water, but of hearing the words of the Lord. " What an awful sentence is this! And by as much as the soul is infinitely more important in value than the body, by so much must be the famine of living Bread here threatened. Oh, for Jesus, the living Bread, to feed his people with true understanding and knowledge!...
Queen of Heaven - In Arabia, cakes were offered to the goddess of the evening-star and to the sun-god; and the Israelites offered Bread and cakes to Jahweh (see ‘Meal-offering’ and ‘Shewbread’ in art
Melchizedek - Melchizedek, or Melchisedec (mel-kĭz'-e-dĕk), the Greek form in the New Testament (king of righteousness), is mentioned in Genesis 14:18-20 as king of Salem and priest of the Most High God, meeting Abram in the valley of Shaveh, bringing out Bread and wine to him, blessing him, and receiving tithes from him; in Psalms 110:4, where Messiah is described as a priest "after the order of Melchizedek;" and finally, in Hebrews 5:6-7, where the typical relations between Melchizedek and Christ are defined, both being priests without belonging to the Levitical tribe, superior to Abram, of unknown beginning and end, and kings of righteousness and peace
God, Presence of - The Real Presence of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament is the existence of Christ's Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity wherever there are the appearances of consecrated Bread and Wine
Corrupt - Spoiled tainted vitiated unsound as corrupt air, or Bread
Ashtaroth - Her temples generally accompanied those of the sun; and while bloody sacrifices of human victims were offered to Baal, Bread, liquors, and perfumes were presented to Astarte
Seven - Their great feasts of unleavened Bread and of tabernacles were observed for seven days; the number of animals in many of their sacrifices was limited to seven
Bethlehem - (behth' lih hehm) Place name meaning, “house of Bread,” “fighting,” or “Lahamu” [1]. The popular understanding is that the name, beth lehem, means “house of Bread
Love Feast - “The breaking of Bread” in Acts 2:42 is most likely a reference to a special remembrance of Jesus' last supper with His disciples, but the allusion ( Acts 2:46 ) to their taking of food “with gladness and singleness of heart” implies that a social meal was connected in some way with this celebration. The host would pronounce a blessing (a thanksgiving to God), break the Bread, and distribute it among the participants
Love Feast - “The breaking of Bread” in Acts 2:42 is most likely a reference to a special remembrance of Jesus' last supper with His disciples, but the allusion ( Acts 2:46 ) to their taking of food “with gladness and singleness of heart” implies that a social meal was connected in some way with this celebration. The host would pronounce a blessing (a thanksgiving to God), break the Bread, and distribute it among the participants
Pass'Over, - (Strictly speaking the Passover only applied to the paschal supper and the feast of unleavened Bread followed, which was celebrated to the 21st. Unleavened Bread and bitter herbs were to be eaten with the flesh. Besides the private family festival, there were public and national sacrifices offered each of the seven days of unleavened Bread. The unleavened Bread was handed round next and afterward the lamb was placed on the table in front of the head of the family. (2) The unleavened Bread ranks next in importance to the paschal lamb. We are warranted in concluding that unleavened Bread had a peculiar sacrificial character, according to the law
Consecration - After this came the sermon, then the sacrament, which the bishop consecrated and administered in the following manner:...
As he approached the altar, he made five or six low bows; and coming up to the side of it, where the Bread and wine were covered, he bowed seven times. Then, after reading many prayers, he came near the Bread, and, gently lifting up the corner of the napkin, beheld it; and immediately letting fall the napkin, he retreated hastily a step or two, and made three low obeisances: his lordship then advanced, and, having uncovered the Bread, bowed three times as before
Eating, Mode of - The first meal was usually light, consisting of milk, cheese, Bread, or fruits, and eaten at various hours from early morning to the middle of the forenoon. The food consisted of flesh, fish, or fowls, butter, honey, Bread, and fruits. Each person took a portion from the dish either with his thumb and fingers, or with the help of a small piece of thin Bread
Order, Carthusian - They observe an almost perpetual silence and complete abstinence from meat, with a fast once a week on Bread and water
Carthusian Order - They observe an almost perpetual silence and complete abstinence from meat, with a fast once a week on Bread and water
Bohemian Brethren - They consecrated leavened Bread
Hypocrisy (2) - There was, however, a sort of crockery jingle in the sound, like the ring of a huge Bread or milk pan, such as our country friends use so abundantly; and I came to the very correct conclusion that I had found a very well got-up hypocrite in the shop window
Hypocrisy (2) - There was, however, a sort of crockery jingle in the sound, like the ring of a huge Bread or milk pan, such as our country friends use so abundantly; and I came to the very correct conclusion that I had found a very well got-up hypocrite in the shop window
Dung - Animal dung was used as fuel when it was mixed with straw and dried to a suitable state for heating the simple Bread ovens
Fitches - Even in the case of the "bread grain" which needs to be "bruised" or threshed with the grain drag or trodden out by cattle, "He will not always be threshing it"; for "because" translated "but" (compare 1618455281_4)
Eat - Who eat up my people as they eat Bread
Candlestick - One of beaten gold was made by Moses, Exodus 25:31-32 , and put into the tabernacle in the holy place, over against the table of shew Bread
Abib - On the seven succeeding days they celebrated the feast of unleavened Bread, on the last of which days they held a solemn convocation, Exodus 12:13
Leaven - The most prominent idea associated with leaven in connection with the corruption which it had undergone,a nd which it communicated to Bread in the process of fermentation
Like - He is like to die of hunger in the place where he is, for there is no more Bread
Beth'Lehem - (house of Bread )
Petrus, a Solitary - After visiting the holy places at Jerusalem and Palestine, he settled at Antioch, living in an empty tomb on Bread and water, and keeping a strict fast every other day
Sacrifices in the Old Testament - They consisted of toasted ears of corn or shelled grain, and of the finest wheaten flour, both together with oil and incense, and also unleavened Bread. All Bread offered at the sanctuary had to be unleavened, except that made of the first-fruits and presented at the Pentecost, and the Bread offered with thanksgiving-sacrifices; even these were not brought to the altar but went to the priests. Oil entered into the preparation of the Bread; some also was burned with the other gifts on the altar; wine was poured out as a libation before the altar
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - They consisted of toasted ears of corn or shelled grain, and of the finest wheaten flour, both together with oil and incense, and also unleavened Bread. All Bread offered at the sanctuary had to be unleavened, except that made of the first-fruits and presented at the Pentecost, and the Bread offered with thanksgiving-sacrifices; even these were not brought to the altar but went to the priests. Oil entered into the preparation of the Bread; some also was burned with the other gifts on the altar; wine was poured out as a libation before the altar
Water - In the sacred Scriptures, Bread and water are commonly mentioned as the chief supports of human life; and to provide a sufficient quantity of water, to prepare it for use, and to deal it out to the thirsty, are among the principal cares of an oriental householder, The Moabites and Ammonites are reproached for not meeting the Israelites with Bread and water; that is, with proper refreshments, Deuteronomy 33:4 . Nabal says in an insulting manner to David's messengers, "Shall I then take my Bread and my water, and my flesh that I have killed for my shearers, and give it unto men whom I know not whence they be?" 1 Samuel 25:11 . Buckingham and his party Bread and water, while on horseback, without even being solicited to do so; and when they halted to accept it, both compliments and blessings were mutually interchanged, "Here, as in every other part of Nubia," says Burckhardt, "the thirsty traveller finds, at short distances, water jars placed by the road side under a low roof
Altar - One, called the altar of incense; another, the altar of burnt offerings; and the third, the altar, or table of shew-bread
Herd - The Arabs say, "sweet provender is as Bread to camels, salted provender as confectionery
Manner - The Bread is in a manner common
Holy Communion - The reception of the Holy Eucharist, in which Christ the Lord Himself is contained under the species of Bread and wine
Great Supper - As Jesus had just mentioned the reward in store for good done unselfishly at the resurrection of the just, a man exclaimed: "Blessed is he that shall eat Bread in the Kingdom of God
Fellowship, - Thus in 1 Corinthians 10:16 , "The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? The Bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ?" There is an allusion to the peace offering in 1 Corinthians 10:18 to show that those who ate the sacrifice were partakers of, had communion with, the altar; hence to eat things offered to idols would be to have fellowship with demons
Obadiah - He feared the Lord greatly, and had the boldness, in spite of Ahab and Jezebel, to hide a hundred of the prophets of Jehovah, and feed them with Bread and water, when Jezebel was cutting off the prophets
Foot - Hence we daily pray, "give us this day our daily Bread, and forgive us our trespasses as," etc
Eastern Church - The Eastern Church accepts the first seven ecumenical councils (and is hence styled only schismatic, not heretical, by the Roman Catholic Church), has as its creed the Niceno-Constantinopolitan (without the later addition of the filioque, which, with the doctrine it represents, the church decisively rejects), baptizes infants with trine immersion, makes confirmation follow immediately upon baptism, administers the Communion in both kinds (using leavened Bread) and to infants as well as adults, permits its secular clergy to marry before ordination and to keep their wives afterward, but not to marry a second time, selects its bishops from the monastic clergy only, recognizes the offices of bishop, priest, and deacon as the three necessary degrees of orders, venerates relics and icons, and has an elaborate ritual
Bee - It is called bee Bread, and is the food of the larvae or young
Certain - All men, from our first father, have left Bethlehem-judah, the land of Bread, for so the name means; and Jerusalem, the holy city; and by going down to the Moabs and the Jerichos of the world, have fallen among thieves, and been left more than half dead by the great enemy of souls
Mould - ) To knead; as, to mold dough or Bread
Kid - No people in the world is more straitened than the Abyssinians with respect to the necessaries of life: a little juwarry Bread, a small quantity of fish, an adequate supply of goat's and camel's milk, and a kid on very particular occasions, constitute the whole of their subsistence
Bethlehem - Bethlehem (bĕth'le-hem), house of Bread
Bethlehem - House of Bread, ...
1
Pentecost - These first fruits consisted in two loaves of leavened Bread, of five pints of meal each, Leviticus 23:17
Names Titles And Offices of Christ - ...
Bread of life, John 6:35. ...
Living Bread, John 6:31
Supper (2) - At less formal suppers the food was cut into small pieces and put into large dishes, from which the guests took them with their lingers and conveyed them to flat cakes of Bread which served as plates, where they pulled them to pieces before conveying them to their mouths. Pieces of the Bread were used as spoons for dipping gravy from the common dish
Love Feast - The ‘breaking of Bread from house to house’ ( Acts 2:46 ) probably included both under the title ‘the Lord’s Supper’ ( 1 Corinthians 11:20 ). ’...
The food consisted of Bread, fish, and vegetables
Mass - As He offered up His death while consecrating the Bread and wine, the priest also, acting in remembrance of Him, offers up His death at the consecration of the Mass. He is mystically slain in the separate consecration of Bread and wine; the offering is perfected in the Communion of the priest
Abomination - 43:32 (the first occurrence): “… The Egyptians might not eat Bread with the Hebrews; for that is an abomination unto the Egyptians. ” To the Egyptians, eating Bread with foreigners was repulsive because of their cultural or social differences (cf
Corn - And these lessons from the corn in the records of the Lord’s ministry may be greatly extended as we recall what He said about the sowing of the corn (parable of the Sower) and its reaping (the Tares and the Wheat); how He saw in the white fields a vision of a great spiritual harvest only waiting to be gathered (John 4:35); how at Capernaum He turned the people’s minds from the barley Bread of the previous day’s miracle to think of Himself as the Bread of Life (John 6); and said of the broken loaf at the Last Supper, ‘Take, eat, this is my body
Sacrifice - 31:54: “Then Jacob offered sacrifice upon the mount, and called his brethren to eat Bread: and they did eat Bread, and tarried all night in the mount
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - BEING the first-born son in His mother's house, it would fall to the Holy Child Jesus to perform the part laid down for the first-born son in the feast of unleavened Bread. And thus it was that after Joseph had struck the lintel and the two doorposts with the blood that was in the basin, and after the whole family had hurriedly eaten each a portion of the pascal lamb, and a piece of the unleavened Bread, at that appointed moment the eldest son of the house came forward and said, Father, what mean you by this service? What mean you by the blood, and the unleavened Bread, and the bitter herbs? And Joseph would say, It is the Lord's passover, because He passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when He smote the Egyptians and delivered our houses. Till He came to be of more understanding about the feast of unleavened Bread than all His teachers: and understood both the blood, and the Bread, and the bitter herbs, far better than all the ancients. And the great haste that the unleavened Bread signified, was enough for His imagination and His mind and His heart as long as He was a child. He remembered that day her three measures of meal, and the way that she took to turn that raw meal into wholesome and palatable Bread. Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump? Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened Bread of sincerity and truth
Food - Parched corn and Bread with a light sour wine furnished the midday meal of Boaz’s reapers ( Ruth 2:14 ). The chief use, however, to which wheat and barley were put was to supply the household with Bread (wh. Barley Bread ( Judges 7:13 , John 6:9 ; John 6:13 ) was the usual Bread, indeed the principal food, of the poorer classes. (For details of Bread-making, see Bread. Lentils and beans were occasionally ground to make Bread ( Ezekiel 4:9 ). Such pickled olives were, and still are, used as a relish with Bread by rich and poor alike. ’ Of these the greyish-white seeds of the coriander are named in Exodus 16:31 , Numbers 11:7 ; these are still used in the East as a spice in Bread-making and to flavour sweetmeats. ]'>[7] ) are sprinkled on Bread like caraway seeds among ourselves. The bakers, for example, who gave their name to a street in Jerusalem ( Jeremiah 37:21 ), not only fired the dough prepared in private houses, as at the present day, but, doubtless, baked and sold Bread to the public, as did their successors in the first and second centuries (see Mishna, passim )
Break, Breaker, Breaking, Brake - A — 1: κλάω (Strong's #2806 — Verb — klao | klazo — klah'-o ) "to break, to break off pieces," is used of "breaking Bread," (a) of the Lord's act in providing for people, Matthew 14:19 ; 15:36 ; Mark 8:6,19 ; (b) of the "breaking of Bread" in the Lord's Supper, Matthew 26:26 ; Mark 14:22 ; Luke 22:19 ; Acts 20:7 ; 1 Corinthians 10:16 ; 11:24 ; (c) of an ordinary meal, Acts 2:46 ; 20:11 ; 27:35 ; (d) of the Lord's act in giving evidence of His resurrection, Luke 24:30 . 1), is used in Luke 24:35 ; Acts 2:42 , of the "breaking" of Bread
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - The major festivals of Old Testament Israel were, in calendar order, Passover, Unleavened Bread, Firstfruits, the Feast of Weeks (Pentecost), the Feast of Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, and the Feast of Booths (Tabernacles or Ingathering). They also prepared bitter herbs and Bread without yeast. In passing the Bread to the disciples and telling them that it was his body and that they should eat of it, Jesus was perhaps presenting himself as the Passover lamb. ...
The Feast of Unleavened Bread . The Feast of Unleavened Bread lasted for one week and followed immediately after Passover. For that week, the Israelites not only ate no Bread with yeast, but they also removed all yeast from their homes. ...
In the context of the exodus, eating Bread without yeast signified the haste of their preparation to depart. The latter text explicitly draws a link between the Christian's relationship with Christ and the details of the Passover and Festival of Unleavened Bread. Also, just as Israel was to remove all yeast from their homes during the subsequent Feast of Unleavened Bread, Christians should avoid contamination by expelling immoral members from their congregations. ...
Some biblical references to yeast, however, make no allusion to the Feast of Unleavened Bread and do not use yeast as a symbol of evil. "...
The offering of firstfruits described in Leviticus 23:9-14 occurred in conjunction with the Feast of Unleavened Bread and focused on the barley harvest, but there was also an offering of firstfruits associated with the Feast of Weeks ( Numbers 28:26-31 ) in celebration of the wheat harvest. Exodus 23:14-19 refers to the Feast of Weeks when it links the "Feast of the Harvest" to the Feast of Unleavened Bread and to the Feast of Ingathering (Booths) as the three major agricultural festivals of Israel (see Deuteronomy 16:16 ; Hebrews 3:1-59 )
Basket - of open work, or rather 'baskets of white Bread') baskets on my head
Meals - The Hebrews took a light meal in the forenoon, consisting of Bread, milk, cheese, etc
Full - A — 1: πλήρης (Strong's #4134 — Adjective — pleres — play'-race ) denotes "full," (a) in the sense of "being filled," materially, Matthew 14:20 ; 15:37 ; Mark 8:19 (said of baskets "full" of Bread crumbs); of leprosy, Luke 5:12 ; spiritually, of the Holy Spirit, Luke 4:1 ; Acts 6:3 ; 7:55 ; 11:24 ; grace and truth, John 1:14 ; faith, Acts 6:5 ; grace and power, Acts 6:8 ; of the effects of spiritual life and qualities, seen in good works, Acts 9:36 ; in an evil sense, of guile and villany, Acts 13:10 ; wrath, Acts 19:28 ; (b) in the sense of "being complete," "full corn in the ear," Mark 4:28 ; of a reward hereafter, 2 John 1:8
Bushel - Although the definite article is probably generic (‘the bushel,’ so Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885), the measure which would lend itself naturally to our Lord’s illustration, and that to which He actually referred, was the Hebrew seah measure used by the housewife in preparing the daily Bread
Table - Ritual tables A table for the Bread of the presence formed part of the furnishings for both the tabernacle (1618455281_79 ; Exodus 26:35 ; Leviticus 24:5-7 ) and Temple (1 Kings 7:48 )
Salt - So in the present day, "to eat Bread and salt together" is an expression for a league of mutual amity
Ebed-Melech - He might have spoken privately to the king, as being over the king's harem (Nubians being chosen for that office to the present day), but Ebed-melech "went forth out of the king's house to the gate of Benjamin," and there spoke publicly to the king, "these men have done evil in all that they have done to Jeremiah whom they have cast into the dungeon, and he is like to die for hunger in the place where he is, for there is no more Bread in the city
Eutychus - Then he went upstairs, broke Bread, and continued speaking till morning
Ask - To request or petition, followed by for as, ask for Bread or without for
Copper - ” This word refers to the metal ore: “A land wherein thou shalt eat Bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack any thing in it; a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig [1]” ( Satisfied, To Be - In its first occurrence in the Old Testament text, śâba‛ expresses the idea of “being filled, sated”: “… When the Lord shall give you in the evening flesh to eat, and in the morning Bread to the full …” ( Melchiz'Edek - (king of righteousness ), king of Salem and priest of the most high God, who met Abram in the valley of Shaveh, which is the king's valley, bought out Bread and wine, blessed him, and received tithes from him
Hospitality - " The Oriental respect for the covenant of Bread and salt, or salt alone, certainly sprang from the high regard in which hospitality was held
Firstfruits - These included the Feast of Unleavened Bread (Leviticus 23:10-11), the Feast of Harvest, or Pentecost (Leviticus 23:15-17), and the Feast of Tabernacles, or Ingatherings (Exodus 23:16; Leviticus 23:39)
Paulus of Asia - These were burst into to admit the "synodite" clergy bearing the consecrated Bread, of which the inmates were compelled to partake, though it was necessary in some cases to bind their hands and force it into their mouths
Blessing (2) - ...
The Benediction over Bread, which is recited before the meal begins, and which may have been known to our Lord, runs: ‘Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe, who bringeth forth Bread from the earth. ‘In these cases blessing the Bread must be understood as “blessing God the giver of the Bread” ’ (Westcott), in accordance with the Jewish usage illustrated above (§ 3). to Bread at Last Supper), and Luke 24:30. to the Bread at the Last Supper), John 6:11; John 6:23 (of feeding of the five thousand), of thanksgiving over the cup at the Last Supper, Mark 14:23 || Matthew 26:27 and Luke 22:17. It thus appears that the predominant idea in the Gospel usage of such expressions as ‘blessing the Bread’ is not so much that of sanctification or consecration as of thanksgiving to God for the gift
Banquets - After dinner the hands were wiped in a cloth, after a servant had poured water on them (compare Elisha's office for Elijah, 2 Kings 3:11), or were wiped on pieces of Bread, which were then thrown to the household dogs (which illustrates Matthew 15:27). ...
"To eat Bread" includes drinking
Face - In the tabernacle, the “shewbread” (KJV) or “Bread of the Presence” (RSV), was a local manifestation of the presence of God. The literal Hebrew reads “bread of the faces. See Glory ; Shewbread ; Presence; Eye
Face - To ‘behold the face’ of God may be used either literally of appearing before His presence in the sanctuary or elsewhere ( Genesis 32:30 [3], Exodus 33:11 , Psalms 42:2 ; the ‘shew-bread’ is ‘the Bread of the face or presence’), or with a more spiritual reference to the inward reality of communion which lies behind ( Psalms 17:15 ); so ‘seeking the face’ of God ( Psalms 24:6 ; Psalms 27:8 )
Festivals - Not only were the festivals as a whole arranged with reference to the cycle of the week (Sabbath), two of them (the feast of unleavened Bread and the feast of tabernacles) lasted for seven days each. ...
The Passover was also called the feast of unleavened Bread (Exodus 23:15 ; Deuteronomy 16:16 ) because only unleavened Bread was eaten during the seven days immediately following Passover (Exodus 12:15-20 ; Exodus 13:6-8 ; Deuteronomy 16:3-8 ). Unleavened Bread reflected the fact that the people had no time to put leaven in their Bread before their hasty departure from Egypt. They could not be eaten until after this ceremony (Leviticus 23:14 ; Joshua 5:10-11 ), and none of this Bread was placed on the altar because of the leaven content
Manna - The Arabs, after boiling and straining, use it as honey with Bread. ...
(4) Its properties were distinct; it could be ground and baked as meal, it was not a mere condiment but nutritious as Bread. ...
(4) It was ground in the mill, as Christ was "bruised" for us to become our "bread of life
Altar - ...
The principal altars among the Jews were those of incense, of burnt- offering, and the altar or table for the shew Bread. The altar or table of shew Bread was of shittim wood also, covered with plates of gold, and had a border round it adorned with sculpture. This table stood in the sanctum sanctorum, [1] and upon it were placed the loaves of shew Bread
Passover - Exodus 12:1-14 directs as to the Passover before the Exodus, Exodus 12:15-20 as to the seven days' "feast of unleavened Bread" (leaven symbolising corruption, as setting the dough in fermentation; excluded therefore from sacrifices, Leviticus 2:11). ...
The sacrifice (for Jehovah calls it "My sacrifice": Exodus 23:15-18; Exodus 34:25) came first; then, on the ground of that, the seven days' feast of unleavened Bread to show they walked in the strength of the pure Bread of a new life, in fellowship with Jehovah. Eaten with unleavened Bread (1 Corinthians 5:7-8) and bitter herbs (repentance Zechariah 12:10). after the day of holy convocation) to be presented before eating Bread or parched grain in the promised land (Joshua 5:11). If Luke 6:1 mean "the first Sabbath after the second day of unleavened Bread," the day on which the firstfruit sheaf was offered, from whence they counted 50 days to Pentecost, it will be an undesigned coincidence that the disciples should be walking through fields of standing grain at that season, and that the minds of the Pharisees and of Jesus should be turned to the subject of grain at that time (Blunt, Undesigned Coincidences, 22). " The lamb was at the first Passover selected on the tenth day of the month (not so subsequently: Luke 22:7-9; Mark 14:12-16); the blood was sprinkled on the lintels and side-posts; the hyssop was used; the meal was eaten in haste; and only for a day was unleavened Bread abstained from. The modern Jews use dry thin biscuits as unleavened Bread; a shoulder of lamb thoroughly roasted, instead of a whole one; a boiled egg, symbolizing wholeness; sweet sauce to represent the sort of work in Egypt; a vessel of salt and water (representing the Red Sea) into which they dip their bitter herbs; a cup of wine stands all the night on the table for Elijah (Malachi 4:5); before filling the guests' cups a fourth time an interval of dead silence follows, and the door is opened to admit him. The purging away of leaven from the house, and the not eating leavened Bread, is emphatically enforced under penalty of cutting off (Exodus 12:15-20; Exodus 13:7). Again, John 13:29, "buy those things that we have need of against the feast," refers to the chagigah provisions for the seven days of unleavened Bread
Communion - In what way may the cup and the Bread be said to be a communion? They may either be a symbol for communion or may constitute a communion by sacramental influence. Now the question is: Is it the common supper which constitutes the communion, or are we to think of the particular elements, Bread and wine, as producing the communion? We shall try to find an answer by noting some analogies from the comparative history of religions. ...
Now, when we turn to 1 Corinthians 10:16 again, we see clearly that it is not the Bread and the wine that constitute sacramental communion by themselves; nor is communion the partaking of Christ’s material body and blood. Bread and wine in relation to body and blood were given by tradition, but, as far as performing a sacramental communion is concerned, they represent only the common meal, which brings men into communion with the Lord, who through His death entered upon a heavenly existence
Meals - ]'>[1] ) by eating a morsel of Bread the ‘morning morsel’ as it is called in the Talmud with some simple relish, such as a few olives; but this was in no sense a meal. ‘A servant plowing or keeping sheep’ or harvesting would make his midday meal of Bread soaked in light wine with a handful of parched corn ( Ruth 2:14 ), or of ‘pottage and Bread broken into a bowl’ (Bel 33), or of Bread and boiled fish ( John 21:13 ). Bread, we know, was usually served in shallow wicker baskets ( Exodus 29:23 ). ]'>[1] , Matthew 26:23 ), knives and forks being, of course, unknown at table, while the more liquid parts were secured, as at the present day, by using pieces of thin wafer-like Bread as improvised spoons, or simply by dipping a morsel of Bread, the sop of John 13:26 , into the dish
Worship - ) for the Supper of the Lord, the breaking of Bread, in which, at first, the Eucharist was combined with the Agape or ‘Love Feast’ (Judges 1:12; cf. Putting together the scattered hints in the Epistles along with the references in Clement of Rome and Justin Martyr, we may suppose that it followed a service such as that described above and that it always included the following elements: a prayer of thanksgiving (Luke 22:19, 1 Corinthians 11:24; 1 Corinthians 14:16, 1 Timothy 2:1); the blessing of the Bread and wine, with the recital of the words of Institution (1 Corinthians 10:16, Matthew 26:26-28, Mark 14:22-24, Luke 22:19-20, 1 Corinthians 11:23);* prayers, remembering Christ’s death (Luke 22:19, 1 Corinthians 11:23; 1 Corinthians 11:25-26); the people eat and drink the consecrated Bread and wine (Matthew 26:26-27, Mark 14:22-23, 1 Corinthians 11:28-29). ...
‘Every Sunday of the Lord, having assembled together, break Bread and give thanks, having confessed your sins, that your sacrifice be pure’ (xiv. But for the broken (bread): We give thanks to thee, our Father, for the life and knowledge which thou hast shown us through thy servant Jesus. As this broken Bread was scattered over the mountains, and has been gathered together and made one, so may thy Church be gathered from the ends of the earth into thy kingdom; for thine is the glory and the power through Jesus Christ for ever. Bread and a cup of wine mingled with water are then brought to the president of the brethren: and he, taking them, gives praise and glory to the Father of the Universe, through the Name of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, and offers thanks at considerable length for our being counted worthy to receive these things at His hands. ” … And when the president has given thanks and all the people have expressed their assent, those who are called by us deacons give each of those present the Bread and wine mixed with water, over which the thanksgiving was pronounced, and they carry away a portion to those who are not present. For we do not receive these [4] as common Bread and common drink, but in like manner as Jesus Christ our Saviour, having been made flesh by the word of God, bad both flesh and blood for our salvation, so likewise have we been taught that the food which is blessed by the prayer of the word which comes from Him, and from which our blood and flesh are nourished by transmutation, is the flesh and blood of that Jesus who was made flesh
Lord's Supper. (i.) - But Judas entered into a conspiracy with the chief priests apparently two days before ‘the Passover and the feast of unleavened Bread’ (Mark 14:1; Mark 14:10-11). Ignorant of this accomplished treachery, the other disciples, observing that Jesus has as yet made no arrangement for the celebration of the feast, say unto Him ‘on the first day of unleavened Bread, when they sacrificed the Passover, Where wilt thou that we go and make ready that thou mayest eat the Passover?’ (Mark 14:12). Many features of the meal also suggest the Passover,—the family group with Jesus presiding, the prayers of thanksgiving, the cups (Luke 22:17; Luke 22:20), the breaking of the Bread, the solemn demeanour, the exposition, the conclusion with a hymn. It would appear that, according to contemporary Jewish practice, Passover, the 14th Nisan, was spoken of as the beginning of the feast Maẓẓoth, though originally Unleavened Bread began on 15th Nisan (Wellhausen, Evangelium Marci, 115; Schürer, ThLZ
Mk...
And as they were eating He took Bread and when He had blessed...
Mt...
And as they were eating Jesus took Bread and blessed...
Lk...
And He took Bread and when He had given thanks...
1 Co...
In the night in which He was betrayed the Lord Jesus took Bread and when He had given thanks...
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He brake it and gave to them and said, Take ye this is my body...
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And brake it and He gave to the disciples and said, Take eat this is my body...
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He brake it and gave to them saying this is ray body which is given for you...
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He brake it and said this is my body which is for you...
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This do in remembrance of me
Leviathan - " The king of Egypt is symbolized by the "dragons" and "leviathan" (compare Ezekiel 32:2; Ezekiel 29:3); he and his host at their overthrow in the Red Sea became a spoil to Israel (compare "bread for us," Numbers 14:9) "in the wilderness
Lutheran - The chief doctrines of Lutheranism, which are summarized in six "Confessions" are: ...
acceptance of the Apostles', Nicene, and Athanasian Creeds
the authority of the Scriptures as the rule of faith
justification by faith alone
"consubstantiation" or the real, corporeal presence of Christ in and with the substance of the Bread and wine at the time of the celebration of the Lord's Supper
Following Luther's teaching on private judgment, their formularies are variously interpreted, and wide divergence is found, ranging from strict orthodoxy to the extremes of rationalism
Lutheranism - The chief doctrines of Lutheranism, which are summarized in six "Confessions" are: ...
acceptance of the Apostles', Nicene, and Athanasian Creeds
the authority of the Scriptures as the rule of faith
justification by faith alone
"consubstantiation" or the real, corporeal presence of Christ in and with the substance of the Bread and wine at the time of the celebration of the Lord's Supper
Following Luther's teaching on private judgment, their formularies are variously interpreted, and wide divergence is found, ranging from strict orthodoxy to the extremes of rationalism
Banquet - ...
Typical foods served at banquets were fish, Bread, olives, various kinds of vegetables, cheeses, honey, dates, and figs
Basket - It was large and flat like the Roman canistrum , and, like it, was used for carrying Bread ( Genesis 40:16 ff
Priest, Priesthood - " Nothing is said of his offering sacrifices, but he brought forth Bread and wine, and blessed Abraham
Capernaum - It was in this building that our Lord gave the well-known discourse in John 6 ; and it was not without a certain strange feeling that on turning over a large block we found the pot of manna engraved on its face, and remembered the words, 'I am that Bread of life: your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead
Prince - Also Israel had her “princes” (“rulers”): “… On the sixth day they gathered twice as much Bread, two omers for one man: and all the rulers of the congregation came and told Moses” ( Cleopas - While they were at table, Jesus took Bread, blessed it, brake, and gave it to them, and by this action their eyes were opened, and they knew him
Melchizedek - When Abram returned from the slaughter of the Assyrians, in his way to Hebron, he was met at Shaveh, or King's Dale, afterward the valley of Jehoshaphat, between Jerusalem and Mount Olivet, by Melchizedek, king of Salem, the most ancient quarter of Jerusalem, a priest of the most high God, who gave him Bread and wine, and blessed him in the name of the "most high God, Creator of heaven and earth;" to whom Abram in return piously gave tithes, or the tenth part of all the spoils as an offering to God, Hebrews 7:2
Much - " (5) The adjective tosoutos, "so great, so much," is translated "so much (bread)," in Matthew 15:33 , plural, RV, "so many (loaves);" in the genitive case, of price, in Acts 5:8 , "for so much;" in the dative case, of degree, in Hebrews 1:4 , RV, "by so much" (AV, "so much"); so in Hebrews 10:25 ; in Hebrews 7:22 "by so much" translates the phrase kata tosouto; in Revelation 18:7 , "so much
Incense - One ingredient of the incense, frankincense, was also burnt with the cereal offering, and was placed on the sacred Bread that was kept inside the tabernacle (Exodus 30:34; Leviticus 6:15; Leviticus 24:7)
Gift - ‘Ask, and it shall be given’ (Matthew 7:7); ‘Everyone that asketh receiveth’ (Luke 11:10), and not only ‘daily Bread’ (Matthew 6:11, Luke 11:3), but ‘whatsoever’ is asked (John 15:16; John 16:23). To His own He is the Living Water (John 4:14), the Bread of Life (John 6:51)
Gideon - He was still faint-hearted and therefore went to listen, and there he heard himself compared to 'a cake of barley Bread,' but that God would deliver Midian into his hand. The conquest was complete, and the men of Succoth and Penuel were punished for not aiding Gideon with Bread when he was faint
Caesarius, Bishop of Chrysostom - It contains a celebrated passage illlustrating the doctrine of the two distinct natures in the one person of Jesus Christ by reference to the holy Eucharist, in which he speaks of the nature of Bread as remaining in that which by the sanctifying grace of God is freed from the appellation of Bread and thought worthy to be called the body of the Lord
Meals - (Genesis 43:34 ; Ruth 2:14 ; 1 Samuel 1:4 ) A piece of Bread was held between the thumb and two fingers of the right hand, and was dipped either into a bowl of melted grease (in which case it was termed "a sop,") (John 13:26 ) or into the dish of meat, whence a piece was conveyed to the mouth between the layers of Bread
Body - -The words, ‘This is my body,’ applied by Jesus to the broken Bread of the Supper (Matthew 26:26, Mark 14:22, Luke 22:19), are repeated by St. And the Apostle not only repeats the Lord’s words in their historical connexion, but himself describes the sacramental Bread as being Christ’s body. ‘The Bread which we break,’ he writes, ‘is it not a communion of the body of Christ?’ (1 Corinthians 10:16). In like manner he says that whosoever shall eat the Bread of the Lord unworthily shall be guilty of the body of the Lord (1 Corinthians 11:27), and that a participant of the Supper eats and drinks judgment unto himself ‘if he discern not the body’ (1 Corinthians 11:29). There are wide differences of opinion among Christians as to the full significance of this identification of the Bread of the Lord’s Supper with the body of the Lord Himself. But whatever further meanings may be seen in it, and even under theories of a Real Presence, which is something other and more than a purely spiritual presence, the Bread which Jesus broke at the Last Supper was, in the first place, a symbol of His own body of flesh and blood which was yielded to death in a sacrifice of love
Elijah - He obeyed, and God sent ravens to him morning and evening, which brought him flesh and Bread. "And the orebim furnished him Bread or flesh in the morning, and Bread or flesh in the evening. " But as there were probably several of them, some might furnish Bread and others flesh, as it happened; so that a little from each formed his solitary but satisfactory meal. At the city gate he met with a widow woman gathering sticks, from whom he desired a little water, adding, "Bring me, I pray thee, also a morsel of Bread. " She answered, "As the Lord liveth, I have no Bread, but only a handful of meal, and a little oil in a cruse; and I am gathering some sticks, that I may dress it for me and my son, that we may eat it, and die
Benediction - The meal commenced with a benediction and with the breaking of Bread. Whoever broke the Bread also spoke the benediction. During one meal several benedictions might be pronounced, referring to the various articles of food separately (for the ordinary formulas used in blessing Bread and wine, see Blessing). The reference in every case to the breaking of Bread is noteworthy. ’ The statement in Luke 24:30 that the risen Christ was recognized in the breaking of Bread seems to imply that the disciples were familiar with the manner in which He acted on such occasions, and that there was something peculiar or characteristic in the procedure which He followed
Benediction - The meal commenced with a benediction and with the breaking of Bread. Whoever broke the Bread also spoke the benediction. During one meal several benedictions might be pronounced, referring to the various articles of food separately (for the ordinary formulas used in blessing Bread and wine, see Blessing). The reference in every case to the breaking of Bread is noteworthy. ’ The statement in Luke 24:30 that the risen Christ was recognized in the breaking of Bread seems to imply that the disciples were familiar with the manner in which He acted on such occasions, and that there was something peculiar or characteristic in the procedure which He followed
Eternal Life (2) - ...
This heavenly kind of life in Christ, conceived as a present experience of salvation, is further confirmed and illustrated by what Jesus said of Himself as ‘the Bread of life’ and the giver of the water that springs up into eternal life. Jesus declares that He is ‘the Bread of life,’ which ‘giveth life unto the world. ’ ‘I am the living Bread which came down out of heaven: if any man eat of this Bread, he shall live for ever: yea, and the Bread which I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world. ’ ‘He that eateth this Bread shall live for ever. Of this living Bread the believer now partakes, and ‘hath eternal life’ (John 6:47; John 6:54)
Bethlehem - House of Bread
Face - In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat Bread
Family (Jewish) - Among the duties of the wife, apart from the maternal charge of the family, was the daily preparation of the Bread (Matthew 24:41), and the carrying of water from the village fountain (John 4:7)
Chamber - " (Matthew 13:10-11) But still more perhaps, chambers is meant, the sweet and intimate communion into which Jesus brings his people, and of which no eye sees, no heart is privy, but him to whom the Lord gives that Bread in secret
Gilead - Jesus himself is their food and their pasture, "their munition of rocks, where their Bread is given and their water sure; where they lie down in safety, and none shall make them afraid
Libation - ...
These libations consisted in offerings of Bread, wine, and salt
Vinegar - Boaz told Ruth that she might come and dip her Bread in vinegar with his people
Firstfruits - ...
There was, besides this, another sort of firstfruits paid to God, Numbers 15:19,21 Nehemiah 10:37 : when the Bread in the family was kneaded, a portion of it was set apart, and given to the priest or Levite of the place; if there were no priest or Levite, it was cast into the oven and there consumed
Ishmael - " Influenced by a divine admonition, Abraham dismissed Hagar and her son with no more than a skin of water and some Bread
Governor - It appears from (Ezra 6:8 ) that these governors were intrusted with the collection of the king's taxes; and from (Nehemiah 5:18 ; 12:26 ) that they were supported by a contribution levied upon the people, which was technically termed "the Bread of the governor" comp
Paulus Edessenus - of Perrha, against certain sectarians who refused the use of Bread, water, and wine, except in the Eucharist
Possession (2) - This he mentions to explain why the Pharisees and scribes came to ask Jesus, ‘Why walk thy disciples not according to the tradition of the elders, but eat Bread with unwashen hands?’ thus giving Jesus occasion to apply to them the prophecy of Isaiah, ‘This people honoureth me with their lips, but their heart is far from me,’ and otherwise exposing and rebuking their ‘hypocrisy
Meals - Israel ate Bread or manna in the morning, flesh in the evening (Exodus 16:12); the Passover supper in the evening confirms this. A Bread sop held between the thumb and two fingers was dipped into the melted grease in a bowl, or into a dish of meat, and a piece taken out
Poverty (2) - Mark (Mark 6:37 ‘Shall we buy two hundred pennyworth of Bread?’ cf. Prayer for temporal wants is to be for ‘daily Bread’ (‘bread of the coming day’ or ‘bread of sufficiency,’ ἄρτος ἐπιούσιος; see Lord’s Prayer) alone (Matthew 6:11, Luke 11:3)
Lord's Prayer (ii) - For the prayer for Bread naturally suggests the request of the child to the Father, the prayer for forgiveness the petition of the subject to the King, and the prayer for deliverance from the Tempter the cry of one who feels in the presence of the world’s evil his utter dependence upon the strong and holy will of his Master and Lord. —‘Give us this day our daily (ἐπιούσιον) Bread. The prayer is not to be spiritualized, with most of the Fathers, into a request for the Bread of Life; it is literal Bread, Bread for bodily sustenance, that Jesus means us to ask for. In the morning the petition would run, according to its original form, ‘Give us this day our Bread,’ while in the evening there would be substituted, ‘Give us our Bread for the coming day. ’s ‘day by day,’ which obviates any inappropriateness in asking at night for the Bread of the day. It teaches us when we ask for Bread, or forgiveness, or guidance and deliverance, to bear the needs of others along with our own on our hearts before God, and to remember that the unspeakable privilege of intercession is of the very essence of Christian prayer
Passover (ii. in Relation to Lord's Supper). - ’...
(3) A further ground of objection is found in the fact that Jesus draws no parallels between the Paschal meal and the Christian sacrament, and in particular that, when He is choosing a symbol to represent His body, He takes a loaf of Bread for the purpose, and not a portion of the roasted lamb. For, unless Jesus was altogether lacking in this respect, He must have foreseen, as clearly as we can see today, that the broken loaf of Bread was infinitely better suited than a piece of the Jewish Paschal lamb to serve to the Church of the future as the symbol of His sacrifice of love. But if, on the other hand, it was at the close of a Passover meal that Jesus broke the Bread and gave it to His disciples, saying, ‘This is my body for you,’ the analogy between the slain lamb and the broken Bread can hardly be mistaken. (1 Corinthians 11:24-25, Luke 22:19), a number of critical scholars have concluded that Jesus never spoke the words, ‘This do in remembrance of me’; that He had no thought of instituting a rite for perpetual celebration by the Church; and that His purpose in breaking the Bread and passing the wine was merely to bid His disciples a solemn farewell, to set before them a striking parable in action, or at most to point them forward to the hope of a glad reunion in the heavenly Kingdom (Jülicher, Theol. Paul, ‘even Christ’ (1 Corinthians 5:7); and he tells us that as often as we eat the Bread and drink the cup, we ‘proclaim the Lord’s death till he come’ (1 Corinthians 11:26)
Banquet - The hands of the guests were usually cleaned by being rubbed on Bread, the crumbs of which fell to the ground, and were the portion for dogs (Matthew 15:27 ; Luke 16:21 )
Proselyte - Besides these laws, however, they were required to abstain from work on the Sabbath, and to refrain from the use of leavened Bread during the time of the Passover
Kohathites - ...
When the Israelites returned from the Exile, some of the Kohathites were placed in charge of preparing the show Bread every sabbath (1 Chronicles 9:32 )
Bethlehem - BETHLEHEM (‘house of Bread’ or, according to some, ‘of the god Lakhmu’)
Fat - The lesson for us is that if we would give out that which brings joy, gladness and help to others, we must ourselves feed on the Living Bread, and drink the Living Water
Abiathar - He is mentioned in Mark 2:25-26 ‘Have ye never read what David did, when he had need, and was an hungred, he, and they that were with him? How he went into the house of God in the days of Abiathar the high priest, and did eat the shewbread?’ The Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885, however, translates, ‘when Abiathar was high priest. ’ The reference is evidently to 1 Samuel 21, where, according to the Hebrew text, Ahimelech gives David the sacred Bread
Heavy - Not raised by leaven or fermentation not light clammy as heavy Bread
Alabaster - ‘Man shall not live by Bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God
Honey - Thus Irby and Mangles, in their Travels, relate, "They gave us some honey and butter together, with Bread to dip in it, Narsah desiring one of his men to mix the two ingredients for us, as we were awkward at it
Food - The Hebrews used a great variety of articles, (John 21:5 ) to give a relish to Bread
Stranger - He is to eat unleavened Bread during Passover week ( Exodus 12:19 ; Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread are now blended), and, if circumcised (not otherwise), to keep the full Passover itself
Symbol - Various actions and relationships are symbolically indicated, such as the giving of the hand (compact), foot on the neck (conquest), bored ear (perpetual servitude), washing of the hands (innocence), bared or outstretched arm (energy), gnashing of teeth (disappointment and remorse), shaking the head (contempt and disapproval), averted face (angry repudiation), Bread (hospitality), cross (suffering of Christ, and suffering for Him). Water, Bread and wine, as the material elements in Baptism and the Lord’s Supper, are the symbols of those Sacraments
Exodus, Book of - God gave them Bread from heaven, typical of the heavenly grace in Christ, the Bread of life, to sustain the believer in life to God, during the wilderness
Mephibosheth - He had been for a considerable time living in obscurity with Machir in Lodebar beyond Jordan, near Mahanaim, his uncle Ishbosheth's seat of government, when David through Ziba heard of him, and for the sake of Jonathan, and his promise respecting Jonathan's seed (1 Samuel 20:15; 1 Samuel 20:42), restored to him all the land of Saul and admitted him to eat Bread at his table at Jerusalem continually. Seventeen years subsequently, in Absalom's rebellion, Ziba rendered important service to David by meeting him as he crossed Olivet, with two strong "he donkeys" (chamor ) ready saddled for the king's use, Bread, raisins, fruits, and wine
Manna - Moses immediately answers the question, and says, "This is the Bread which the Lord hath given you to eat. The whole history of the giving the manna is evidently miraculous; and the manna was truly "bread from heaven," as sent by special interposition of God
For - "And Joseph gave them Bread in exchange for horses, and for flocks, and for the cattle of the herds " that is, according to the original, he gave them Bread against horses like the Gr. Buy us and our land for Bread
Passover - hammaẓẓôth (‘the unleavened Bread,’ Exodus 12:17), a brief form of reference to ḥag hammaẓẓôth (‘the feast of the unleavened Bread,’ Exodus 23:15). -Twice in the Acts (Acts 12:3; Acts 20:6) we have ‘the days of unleavened Bread’ referred to as a note of time. Men spoke naturally of ‘the days of the unleavened Bread’ as a significant point in the calendar, just as we speak of ‘after Christmas’ or ‘at Christmas. The festival commences with a sanctification; then comes the first cup of wine; the aphiḳomen (half a maẓẓah, which is reserved to be eaten at the close) is set aside; the question is asked, ‘Why is this night distinguished from all other nights?’ to which a long response is given; this is followed by the first part of Hallel (Psalms 113, 114), the second cup of wine, washing of the hands; the unleavened Bread (maẓẓôth) is eaten with bitter herbs (horse-radish); next comes Hillel’s ceremony (eating a piece of horse-radish placed between two pieces of unleavened Bread); the aphiḳomen is eaten, grape after meals is said with considerable additions; then there is the third cup of wine and the opening of the door; Hallel is resumed (Psalms 115-118); Psalms 136 is recited with large expansions, followed by the fourth cup of wine and prayer for the Divine acceptance of the service; ‘Adir hu’, an impassioned song praying for the rebuilding of the Temple, brings all to a close. Even though still marking events by ‘the days of unleavened Bread’ (Acts 12:3), they might well invest the season with a new significance as time went on, and associate it with a new commemoration. He gives to the Paschal lamb and to the unleavened Bread a meaning of which his forefathers never dreamed. In Acts 2:42 the κλάσις τοῦ ἄρτου, ‘the breaking of the Bread,’ suggests a distinctive custom of the first disciples. 511) is very decided as to this relation, and even goes so far as to venture the opinion that the broken Bread was none other than the aphiḳomen or unleavened cake eaten at the close of the meal
Tabernacle - The former was the holy place , or first tabernacle , ( Hebrews 9:2 ) containing the golden candlestick on one side, the table of shew-bread opposite, and between them in the centre the altar of incense. " (Hebrews 10:19,20 ) The holy place was only entered by the priests daily, to offer incense at the time of morning and evening prayer, and to renew the lights on the golden candlesticks; and on the sabbath, to remove the old shew-bread, and to place the new upon the table. The first sanctuary contained three objects: the altar of incense in the centre, so as to be directly in front of the ark of the covenant ( 1 Kings 6:22 ) the table of shew-bread on its right or north side, and the golden candlestick on the left or south side. [2] ...
In the holy of holies, within the veil, and shrouded in darkness, there was but one object, the ark of the covenant, containing the two tables of stone, inscribed with the Ten Commandments. (8) Having entered the holy place, we find the three great means and helps to true living, --the candlestick, the light of God's truth; the shew-bread, teaching that the soul must have its spiritual food and live in communion with God; and the altar of incense, the symbol of prayer
Galilee - In Galilee our Lord delivered the Sermon on The Mount, and the discourses on 'The Bread of Life,' on 'Purity,' on 'Forgiveness,' and on 'Humility
Rellyanists - They are not observers of ordinances, such as water-baptism and the sacrament; professing to believe only in one baptism, which they call an immersion of the mind or conscience into truth by the teaching of the Spirit of God; and by the same Spirit they are enabled to feed on Christ as the Bread of life, professing that in and with Jesus they possess all things
Much - Return as much Bread as you borrowed
Rending of Garments - In the case of a member of the family becoming apostate the clothes were rent as for his death, and the mourners sat for one hour on the ground and ate Bread and ashes
Milk - Butter and cheese were known among the ancients (1 Samuel 17:18 ) as well as curdled, sour milk which still forms, after Bread, the chief food of the poorer classes in Arabia and Syria
Andrew - Andrew had his faults too; he shared in the disciples' unbelief when Jesus tried their faith, "Whence shall we buy Bread that these (5000) may eat?" (John 6)
Mill-Stone - The upper stone has near the circumference a wooden peg a little over two handbreadths in height, and when the stone is being turned by two women (Matthew 24:41), sitting on opposite sides of it, each grasps the peg continuously with one hand and alternately draws it to herself and pushes it away. The sound of the hand-mill grinding the flour for the daily Bread was suggestive of home life under conditions of peace and prosperity, and its cessation betokened turmoil and distress (Ecclesiastes 12:3-4, Jeremiah 25:10-11)
Element - ) The Bread and wine used in the eucharist or Lord's supper
Succoth - The men of Succoth, as living on this great army route between Canaan and the East, and having regard only to self and no concern for Israel's deliverance and no compassion for the sufferings of Gideon's gallant little band, would give no Bread to their brethren lest they should incur the vengeance of Midian; nay more, they added insolence to unkindness
Fish - He fed the multitudes with fish as well as Bread (Matthew 14:19; Matthew 15:36)
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Bath, Bathing - Nothing is more impressive at Oberammergan than the threefold journey of the Christus round the company—so it is represented—ministering to the disciples (1) the feet-washing, (2) the Bread, (3) the cup
Burn - To scorch to affect by heat as, to burn the clothes or the legs by the fire to burn meat or Bread in cookery
Woman - They were chiefly engaged in domestic duties, Proverbs 31:1-31 ; among which were grinding flour, baking Bread, making cloth, needle work, etc
Manna - They use it like honey or butter with their unleavened Bread, but never make it into cakes or eat it by itself
Germanus, Saint, Bishop of Auxerre - His wife became to him as a sister; he distributed his property to the poor; he became a severe ascetic, and, as his biographer Constantius says, a "persecutor of his body," abstaining from salt, oil, and even from vegetables, from wine, excepting a small quantity much diluted on Christmas Day or Easter Day, and from wheat Bread, instead of which he ate barley Bread with a preliminary taste of ashes ( cinerem praelibavit )
Eusebius of Alexandria, a Writer of Sermons - He depicts vividly the extravagance of Alexandrian wealth; the splendid houses glistening with marble, beds and carpets wrought with gold and pearls, horses with golden bridles and saddles, the crowds of servants of various classes—some to attend the great man when he rides out, some to manage his lands or his house, building, or his kitchen, some to fan him at his meals, to keep the house quiet during his slumber:—the varieties of white Bread, the pheasants, geese, peacocks, hares, etc. ) He blames those who do not communicate when a priest, known to be of bad life, is the celebrant; for "God turneth not away, and the Bread becomes the Body
Sayings (Unwritten) - For James had taken an oath that he would not eat Bread from that hour in which he had drunk the cup of the Lord, until he should see him rising from them that sleep. ” And again, a little farther on, “Bring me, saith the Lord, a table and Bread. ” And there follows immediately: “He took the Bread, and blessed, and brake, and gave to James the Just, and said to him, ‘My brother, eat thy Bread, inasmuch as the Son of Man hath risen from them that sleep’ ” (de Vir
Discern, Discerner, Discernment - 3, below, in Luke 12:56 ), and in 1 Corinthians 11:29 , with reference to partaking of the Bread and the cup of the Lord's Supper unworthily, by not "discerning" or discriminating what they represent; in ver
Deacon - The deacons baptized new converts, distributed the Bread and wine of the Lord's supper (Justin Martyr, Apol
Trinity - But Archbishop Tillotson has shown, by the most convincing arguments imaginable, that transubstantiation includes, the most palpable contradictions; and that we have the evidence of our eyes, feeling, and taste, that what we receive in the Lord's supper is Bread, and not the body of a man; whereas we have the testimony of our eyes alone, that the words "This is my body, " are at all in the Scriptures
Manna - He did not need to make food fall from heaven, for he himself was the true Bread from heaven (John 6:31-35)
Flesh - That interpretation which causes men to try to turn Bread into the physical body of JESUS is utterly false, is an invention of the Devil, and is being used throughout the world to deceive the ungodly
Manger - It is to be hoped, that in Bethlehem, whose very name means the land of Bread, there was sufficient provision of this kind for, the Lord of life and glory
Firstfruits - At Pentecost, 50 days later, two loaves of wheaten Bread (Leviticus 23)
Stranger - Though tolerated they must not violate the fundamental laws by blaspheming Jehovah, breaking the sabbath by work, eating leavened Bread at the Passover, infringing the marriage laws, worshipping Moloch, or eating blood (Leviticus 24:16; Leviticus 18:26; Leviticus 20:2; Leviticus 17:10; Leviticus 17:15; Exodus 20:10; Exodus 12:19)
Adam - " The ground was then cursed for Adam's sake: in sorrow he should eat of it all his life: thorns and thistles should be produced, and in the sweat of his face he should eat Bread
Part - The ark, altars, and table of the Bread of the Presence were carried by staves passed through rings attached to these articles: “And thou shalt put the staves into the rings by the sides of the ark, that the ark may be borne with them” ( Sign - ...
A reminding token is represented by 'ôth: “And it [3] shall be for a sign unto thee upon thine hand, and for a memorial between thine eyes, that the Lord’s law may be in thy mouth …” ( Wine - ” Such “wine” was commonly drunk for refreshment: “And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth Bread and wine …” ( Adam - " The ground was then cursed for Adam's sake: in sorrow he should eat of it all his life: thorns and thistles should be produced, and in the sweat of his face he should eat Bread
James, the Lord's Brother - Jesus accordingly appeared to him first and took Bread and blessed and brake, saying, ‘My brother, eat thy Bread, for the Son of Man is risen from them that sleep
Holy - Because of their function as intermediaries between God and Israel and because of their proximity to the temple, they were dedicated by God to the office of priest: “They shall be holy unto their God, and not profane the name of their God: for the offerings of the Lord made by fire, and the Bread of their God, they do offer: therefore they shall be holy. Thou shalt sanctify him therefore; for he offereth the Bread of thy God: he shall be holy unto thee: for I the Lord, which sanctify you, am holy” ( Lord's Prayer (i) - Another reading of Marcion is ‘thy Bread’ for ‘our’; whether he read the second clause of the fifth petition we do not know, the sixth (and last with him) had the form καὶ μὴ ἄφες ἡμᾶς εἰσενεχθῆναι εἰς πειρασμόν. ‘our continual Bread,’ in Luke Syr [11] cur sin and Acts of Thomas ‘the continual Bread’ (לחמא אמינא); the same tradition seems to be followed by the cotidianus of the Latin, the sinteinan of the Gothic, especially by לחמנו חמירי of Shemtob ben Shafrut, with which cf. Numbers 4:7 לֶחֶם הַתָּמִיר ‘the continual Bread. How the Peshitta (Rabula?) came to translate ‘the Bread of our need,’ לחמא דסונקנן, is not quite clear, while the translation ‘our Bread of richness’ in the Syro-Palestinian version rests on confusion with περιούσιος
Body (2) - —On the night in which He was betrayed, Jesus, in instituting the sacrament of the Supper, said of the Bread which He took and broke and gave to His disciples, ‘This is my body’ (ταῦτό ἐστι τὸ σῶμά μου: Matthew 26:26, Mark 14:22, Luke 22:19, 1 Corinthians 11:24). Paul, writing to the Corinthians, says of the Bread which is broken at the Supper, ‘Is it not the communion of the body of Christ?’ (1 Corinthians 10:16); while in the same Epistle he describes the person who eats the sacramental Bread unworthily as ‘guilty of the body of the Lord’ (1 Corinthians 11:27), and says that a man eats and drinks judgment unto himself ‘if he discern not the body’ (1 Corinthians 11:29). But whatever its further meanings may be, there can be little doubt that primarily the broken Bread of the Supper is a symbol of the crucified body of Christ. But as the word σῶμα denotes the body as an organism, while ‘flesh’ (σάρξ) applies only to the substance of the body, and as σάρξ is never employed elsewhere in the NT to describe the sacramental Bread, it is unlikely either that Jesus would use σάρξ with this intention, or that the author of the Gospel would have failed to use σῶμα, the ordinary sacramental term, if it had been his intention to represent our Lord as furnishing in the Capernaum discourse a prophetic announcement of the institution of the Supper
Cup - And even though the institution took place at the close of an ordinary meal, the Bread and the cup were accompanied with the due Jewish graces (Matthew 26:26 f. As with the Bread eo with the cup, St. —(1) From the first the common usage in administration no doubt gave the cup after the Bread, in accordance with the order observed in Mark, Matthew, and Paul. , and traces the use of Bread and water (but see, in reply, Zahn, ‘Brod u. administering to the people the Bread dipped in the wine
the Disobedient Prophet - And how Jeroboam's hand was withered that moment; how it was healed immediately at the intercession of the man of God; how Jeroboam invited the prophet to come home with him to eat and to drink and to get a reward; and how the prophet answered the king that be had the command of the Lord neither to eat Bread nor to drink water in that polluted land, but to return home to Judah as soon as he had delivered his prophetic burden-all that is to be read in the thirteenth chapter of First Kings. ' But the man of God said to the king, 'If thou wilt give me half thine house, I will not go in with thee, neither will I eat Bread nor drink water with thee. 'Come home with me and eat Bread. ' 'I may not eat Bread, nor drink water by the word of the Lord,' said the man of God. So the man of God rose and went back and did eat Bread and drink water
Exodus - Here, probably the modern el-Markha, the supply of Bread they had brought with them out of Egypt failed. They began to "murmur" for want of Bread. God "heard their murmurings" and gave them quails and manna, "bread from heaven" (Exodus 16:4-36 )
Hussites - Civil war and the destructive forces of the Hussites ravaged Bohemia for over fifteen years, but finally peace was obtained by the Compactata of Basle, 1433, which permitted Communion under both forms to those who had reached the age of discretion and were in the state of grace, under these conditions: that the Hussites confess that the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ was contained whole and entire both under the form of Bread and under that of wine, and that they retract the statement that communion under both forms is necessary for salvation
Mourning - ...
So Aaron in the case of Nadab and Abihu (Leviticus 10:2-6); Ezekiel for his wife (Ezekiel 24:16-18); "the Bread of men" is that usually brought to mourners by friends in sympathy
Wages - , as contrasted with Bread
Bag - Saul's bag was empty of Bread when he went to meet Samuel (1 Samuel 9:7 ), and David collected stones in his shepherd's bag when confronting Goliath (1Samuel 17:40,1 Samuel 17:49 )
Sin Offering - ...
A tabernacle was erected at every space of 2,000 cubits, to evade the law of the Sabbath day's journey, for they led the scape-goat out on the Sabbath; after eating Bread and drinking water the conductor of the goat could go on to the next tabernacle; ten stages were thus made between Seek and Jerusalem, in all six and a half miles to el Muntar, from whence the conductor caught the first sight of the great desert
Raise - ) To cause to rise, as by the effect of leaven; to make light and spongy, as Bread
Tare - If the seeds remain mixed with the meal, they occasion dizziness to those who eat of the Bread
Sabbath - The sacrifices of the temple were doubled; the shew-bread was changed; the inner court of the temple was opened for solemn services: the prophets and the Levites took the occasion for imparting religious instruction to the people
Utraquists - Civil war and the destructive forces of the Hussites ravaged Bohemia for over fifteen years, but finally peace was obtained by the Compactata of Basle, 1433, which permitted Communion under both forms to those who had reached the age of discretion and were in the state of grace, under these conditions: that the Hussites confess that the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ was contained whole and entire both under the form of Bread and under that of wine, and that they retract the statement that communion under both forms is necessary for salvation
Josiah - ...
In the eighteenth year of Josiah, the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread were kept
Platter - It is placed on the large tray, and into it each one at the table dips with a small scoop of thin Bread torn from one of the loaves at his side, and thus lifts out the required mouthful of food
Burial - Ezekiel 24:17, "Eat not the Bread of men," i. the Bread or viands, as well as "the cup of consolation," which men usually bring mourners in token of sympathy
Antonius - Here he remained some 20 years, shut up for months at a time with only Bread and water (the Bread of the country is said to be good for keeping), and issuing forth only to instruct the multitudes who flocked to see and hear him; at other times communication was prevented by a huge stone at the entrance
Passover - When this is over, and the time of the evening service being come, all the household enter on prayer, which when finished they proceed to the feast of unleavened Bread, with some portion of a lamb, and bitter herbs. And his servant, the apostle, seems to have had the same views of his Master's gracious design in this particular when he saith, "For as often as ye eat this Bread and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he comes
Last Supper - Luke—the retention, or omission, of the mention of a second cup, and the order of the Bread and the Cup in the Institution;‡ [4] Now the Passover was slain late in the afternoon of the 14th Nisan, and some hours earlier leaven was put out of the houses, in preparation for the ‘days of unleavened Bread,’ which, strictly speaking, began with the eating of the lamb in the early hours of 15th Nisan. * Altar - The table of showbread, for which see Bread . It stood in the Holy place; not in the Holy of Holies, but before it, between the golden candlestick and the table of showbread, and the priests burned incense upon it every morning and evening
Imagery - Images are also used to teach who Jesus the Christ is: word (John 1:1 ); light (John 8:12 ); Bread and wine (Matthew 26:26-29 ); vine (John 15:1 ); the way (John 14:6 )
Asher, Aser - ...
When Jacob called his sons about him to tell them what should befall them in the last days, he said of Asher, "Out of Asher his Bread shall be fat, and he shall yield royal dainties
Celebrate, Celebration - " It is also known as the Feast of Unleavened Bread, because "it was on this very day that I brought your divisions out of Egypt
Therapeutae - They abstained from wine, and their ordinary food was Bread and herbs
Manna - Christ as the living Bread is typified by manna ( John 6:31 ff
Tabernacle - The holy place contained three things: first, a table on which was placed the shewbread, the Bread of the presence (Exodus 25:23-30), second, a golden lampstand (Exodus 25:31-40) and third, an altar of incense (Exodus 30:1-7)
Tiberias, Sea of - howbeit there came other boats from Tiberias, nigh unto the place where they did eat Bread
Fill - Whence should we have so much Bread in the wilderness, as to fill so great a multitude? Matthew 15
Gedaliah - So Ishmael, in violation of the sacred rights of hospitality and taking advantage of the opportunity, while eating Gedaliah's "bread" at Mizpah, smote him two months after his appointment (compare Psalms 41:9)
Pithom - (See Judges 4:1-24 and Judges 5:1-31) The mother of Sisera gave this unintentional testimony to the good housewifery of our mothers in Israel, when, looking out at a window to watch for the coming of her son in triumph, she cried out,"Have they not divided the preys to every man a damsel or two; to Sisera a prey of divers colours, a prey of divers colours of needlework, of divers colours of needlework on both sides, meet for the necks of them that take the spoil?" (Judges 5:30) Here we see that the daughters of Israel, as their fathers before them, ate not the Bread of idleness, for their divers colours of needlework manifested their industry
Build - ...
There must be:...
...
a place for meals, the dining room, for we must feed on the Bread of life
Fast, Fasting - In the fourth month, corresponding to the 'breaking up' of Jerusalem, when there was no Bread for the people
Man - "Man shall not live by Bread alone
Return - In the first occurrence of this verb God told Adam that he and Eve would “eat Bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return” ( Dorotheus (10), Bishop of Thessalonica - Two days before the arrival of the legates, Dorotheus baptized more than 2,000 people, and distributed the Eucharistic Bread in large baskets, so that multitudes could keep it by them
Can, May - 43:32: “… The Egyptians might not eat Bread with the Hebrews; for that is an abomination unto the Egyptians” (KJV, RSV, NIV, NASB, “could not”)
Mass - MISSA, in the church of Rome, the office of prayers used at the celebration of the eucharist; or, in other words, the consecrating the Bread and wine so that it is transubstantiated into the body and blood of Christ, and offer them as an expiatory sacrifice for the quick and the dead
Life - His life abhorreth Bread
Taste - To perceive by means of the tongue to have a certain sensation in consequence of something applied to the tongue, the organ of taste as, to taste Bread to taste wine to taste a sweet or an acid
Use - Use is of two kinds that which employs a thing, without destroying it or its form, as the use of a book or of a farm or it is the employment of a thing which destroys or wastes it, as the use of Bread for provision the use of water for turning a mill
Home, at Home - ) at home;" (c) with the preposition kata, "down," Acts 2:46 , "(breaking Bread) at home," RV (AV, "from house to house"); so in Acts 5:42 (AV, "in every house")
Priest - The priests, all of them with their bodies washed, and clad in their appropriate dress, assembled before the altar, where a bullock, two rams, unleavened Bread, and wafers of two kinds in baskets, were in readiness. Certain parts of the sacrifice, namely, the fat, the kidneys, the haunches, the caul above the liver, and the right shoulder, also one cake of unleavened Bread, a cake of oiled Bread, and a wafer, were placed by Moses upon the hands of the priests, that they might offer them to God. According to Josephus it was a hand's Breadth in width, woven in such a manner as to exhibit the appearance of scales, and ornamented with embroidered flowers in purple, dark blue, scarlet, and white. They kept a perpetual fire burning upon the altar of burnt-sacrifices, and in the lamps of the golden candlestick that was in the sanctuary; they prepared the loaves of shew Bread, baked them, and changed them every Sabbath day
Crimes And Punishments - ...
The offenses that make one liable to being “cut off” are: the men of Israel who are uncircumcised (Genesis 17:14 ; compare Exodus 4:24 ; Joshua 5:2-9 ), eating leavened Bread during the feast of unleavened Bread (Exodus 12:15 ,Exodus 12:15,12:19 ), trying to copy or using the holy anointing oil on outsiders (Exodus 30:33 ), profaning the Sabbath (Exodus 31:14 ), partaking of sacrifices in an unclean state (Leviticus 7:20-21 ,Leviticus 7:20-21,7:25 ; Leviticus 19:8 ; compare 1 Samuel 2:33 ), eating blood (Leviticus 7:27 ; Leviticus 17:10 ,Leviticus 17:10,17:14 ), offering sacrifices in a place other than the tabernacle (Leviticus 17:3-4 ,Leviticus 17:3-4,17:8-9 ), certain sexual offenses (Leviticus 18:29 ; Leviticus 20:17-18 ), child sacrifices to Molech (Leviticus 20:1 ,Leviticus 20:1,3:1 ,Leviticus 3:1,5:1 ), consulting wizards or mediums (Leviticus 20:6 ; Micah 5:12 ), approaching holy things in an unclean state (Leviticus 22:3 ; Numbers 19:13 ,Numbers 19:13,19:20 ), improperly observing the Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:29<
Fellowship - He described the cup as “communion of the blood of Christ,” and the Bread as “communion” of the body of Christ ( 1 Corinthians 10:16 ). ...
Immediately after Paul spoke of “fellowship” with Christ through participation in the Lord's Supper (1 Corinthians 10:16 ), he said, “since there is one Bread, we who are many are one body” (1 Corinthians 10:17 NAS)
Lord's Day - 120), where we read that on the day called Sunday the Christians met together, out of both city and country, and held a religious service at which first the writings of Apostles and Prophets were read; then the president preached; after which common prayers were said; and when these were ended, Bread and wine were brought to the president, who uttered prayers and thanksgivings, to which the people said, ‘Amen’; all present then participated in the Eucharist, the deacons carrying it to the absent. Thus it is clear that the early Church continued the Apostolic custom ( Acts 20:7 ) of celebrating the Lord’s Supper every Lord’s Day a custom so wide-spread as to enable Chrysostom to call Sunday dies panis , or ‘the day of Bread
Food - ...
Bread, dibs (thickened grape juice) (possibly meant in Genesis 43:11; Ezekiel 27:17, honey dibash ), coagulated sour milk, leban, butter, rice, and a little mutton, are the food in winter; cheese and fruits are added in summer. Sour wine ("vinegar") was used to dip the Bread in; or else the gravy, broth, or melted fat of flesh meat; this illustrates the "dipping the sop in the common dish" (John 13:26, etc
Dish - ...
One thing seems to emerge clearly from the fourfold account, there was but one τρύβλιον on the table, and each one dipped his Bread into it as he ate (see O. Into the sauce pieces of unleavened Bread and bitter herbs were dipped and handed round by the chief person of the assembled party, which was evidently preliminary to the general partaking of the dish (cf
Tabernacles, Feast of - It was the Jewish harvest-home, when all the year’s produce of corn, wine, and oil had been gathered in; though no special offering of the earth’s fruits was made, as was done at the Feasts of Unleavened Bread and Pentecost
Feast - This is not the Lord's Supper, nor the Passover, but has reference to the continuous life of the believer as a festival or holy-day (see AV, margin), in freedom from "the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened Bread of sincerity and truth
Hezekiah, King of Judah - Such was the joy that after the seven days of unleavened Bread they kept other seven days with gladness
Genovefa, Patron Saint of Paris And of France - From her 15th to her 50th year she ate but twice a week, and then only Bread of barley or beans
Exchange - ...
Joseph gave them Bread in exchange for horses
Malachi - The answer is that they brought to the Lord that which was torn, the lame, and the sick, and had offered polluted Bread upon Jehovah's altar: in effect saying, "The table of the Lord is polluted; and the fruit thereof, even his meat, is contemptible
Rephidim - While the Israelites were encamped at Rephidim, on the western side of Horeb, the mount of God, Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, who lived in that neighbourhood, and was priest and prince of Midian, came to visit him, with his wife Zipporah, and his two sons, Eleazar and Gershom, who had accompanied him part of the way to Egypt, but returned home again; and they rejoiced with him "for all the goodness which the Lord had done for Israel, whom he had delivered out of the hand of the Egyptians;" and upon this occasion, Jethro, as "a priest of the most high God," of the order of Melchizedek, "offered a burnt-offering and sacrifices of thanksgiving to God, at which Aaron and all the elders of Israel ate Bread with Jethro before God," by a repetition of the eucharistic feast upon a sacrifice which Melchizedek formerly administered to Abraham, Genesis 14:18 ; 1618455281_86
Tabernacle - There were ten curtains, twenty-eight cubits long, and four in Breadth. The whole length of the tabernacle was thirty-two cubits, that is, about fifty feet; and the Breadth twelve cubits, or nineteen feet. The court was a place a hundred cubits long, and fifty in Breadth, inclosed by twenty columns, each of them twenty cubits high, and ten in Breadth, covered with silver, and standing on copper bases, five cubits distant from each other, between which there were curtains drawn, and fastened with hooks. In the tabernacle was the ark of the covenant, the table of shew Bread, the golden candlestick, and the altar of incense; and in the court opposite to the entrance of the tabernacle, or holy place, stood the altar of burnt- offerings, and the laver or bason for the use of the priests
Wayfaring Men - Buckingham in his "Travels among the Arab Tribes," says, "A foot passenger could make his way at little or no expense, as travellers and wayfarers of every description halt at the sheikh's dwelling, where, whatever may be the rank or condition of the stranger, before any questions are asked him as to where he comes from, or whither he is going, coffee is served to him from a large pot always on the fire; and a meal of Bread, milk, oil, honey, or butter, is set before him, for which no payment is ever demanded or even expected by the host, who, in this manner, feeds at least twenty persons on an average every day in the year from his own purse; at least, I could not learn that he was remunerated in any manner for this expenditure, though it is considered as a necessary consequence of his situation, as chief of the community, that he should maintain this ancient practice of hospitality to strangers
Scorpion - " We find them again united in the commission of our Lord to his disciples, Luke 10:19 , "I give you power to tread upon serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy;" and in his directions concerning the duty of prayer, Luke 11:11-12 , "If a son shall ask Bread of any of you that is a father, will he give him a stone? or if he shall ask an egg, will he offer him a scorpion?"...
The scorpion is contrasted with an egg, on account of the oval shape of its body
Manna - It fell every morning, with the dew, about the camp of the Israelites, and in so great quantities during the whole forty years of their journey in the wilderness, that it was sufficient to serve the entire multitude instead of Bread, Exodus 16:35 Deuteronomy 29:5,6 Joshua 5:12
Fellowship - The act of believers in eating Bread and drinking wine in the Lord’s Supper is an act of fellowship with Christ, for it is a spiritual sharing in his body and blood
Plants in the Bible - ...
Cereal Grains for Bread Well-to-do citizens made Bread primarily from wheat, but the poor man had to make do with coarse barley (2 Kings 4:42 ; John 6:9 ). ...
Wheat (emmer wheat Triticum dicoccum ; Bread wheat T. See Bread
Roman Catholics - That in the mass, or public service, there is offered unto God a true and propitiatory sacrifice for the quick and dead; and that in the sacrament of the eucharist, under the forms of Bread and wine, are really and substantially present the body and blood, together with the soul and divinity, of our Lord Jesus Christ; and that there is a conversion made of the whole substance of the Bread into his body, and of the wine into his blood, which is called transubstantiation; according to our Lord's words to his disciples, "This is my body," &c, Matthew 26:26 ; wherefore it becomes with them an object of adoration. Farther: it is a matter of discipline, not of doctrine, in the Roman church, that the laity receive the eucharist in one kind, that is, in Bread only. I profess, likewise, that in the mass, is offered to God a true,...
proper, and propitiatory sacrifice for the living and the dead; and that in the most holy sacrament of the eucharist there is truly, really, and substantially the body and blood, together with the soul and divinity, of our Lord Jesus Christ; and that there is made a conversion of the whole substance of the Bread into the body, and of the whole substance of the wine into the blood, which conversion the Catholic church calls transubstantiation
Sign - The eating of unleavened Bread at Passover (Exodus 13:9 ) and the redemption of the first-born (Exodus 13:16 ) are reminders of God's liberation of Israel. Though the just-fed crowd saw Jesus' feeding of the five thousand (John 6:2-13 ) as a sign that Jesus was a prophet (John 6:14 ), the sign points to Jesus as the life-giving Bread which alone can satisfy (John 6:35 )
Martinus, Bishop of Dumium - The observance of calends, the propitiation of mice and moths by presents of Bread and cloth, auguries, the observance of the New Year on Jan. 1 instead of on the March equinox, when in the beginning God "divided the light from the darkness" by an equal division, the burning of wax tapers at stones, trees, streams, and crossways, the adornment of tables, the pouring of corn over the log on the hearth, the placing of wine and Bread in the wells, the invocation of Minerva by the women at their spinning, the worship of Venus, the incantation of medicinal herbs, divination by birds and by sneezing, are all denounced as pagan superstitions, offensive to God and dangerous to him who practises them
Offerings, the - Leaven, which always signifies what is human and hence evil (for if the human element is introduced into and works in the things of God it is evil), might never be burnt on the altar to God, nor be in any of the offerings except in one special form of the meat offering (Leviticus 23:16-21 ), and in the Bread accompanying a peace offering. These were God's portions, literally His Bread. ...
The peace offering was accompanied by a meat offering, namely, unleavened cakes mingled with oil, and unleavened wafers anointed with oil; together with leavened Bread. Thus at the consecration of Aaron and his sons, the fat, the fat tail, the caul, the kidneys, and the right shoulder of the ram, together with one loaf of Bread, one cake of oiled Bread, and one wafer, were placed in the hands of Aaron, and in the hands of his sons, to wave them for a wave offering before the Lord, and then they were burnt on the altar for a burnt offering
Cry - The people cried to Pharaoh for Bread
Zebulun - They contributed with Issachar and Naphtali "bread on asses, camels, mules, and oxen; meat, meal, cakes of figs, bunches of raisins, wine, oil, oxen, and sheep abundantly," to entertain David's adherents (1 Chronicles 12:40; contrast Psalms 12:2)
Fool, Foolishness, And Folly - ...
The simple-minded fool is encouraged to change in Proverbs 9:4-6 : “Whoso is simple, let him turn in hither: as for him that wanteth understanding, she [1] saith to him, Come, eat of my Bread, and drink of the wine which I have mingled
Levites - The Levites assisted the priests in their responsibilities (Numbers 3:5-9 ; Numbers 16:9 ) by preparing grain offerings and the show Bread, by purifying all the holy instruments used in the Temple, by singing praises to the Lord at the time of the morning and evening offerings, by assisting the priests with burnt offerings on sabbaths and feast days, and by being in charge of the Temple precinct and the chambers of the priests (1 Chronicles 6:31-48 ; 1Chronicles 23:1-13,1 Chronicles 23:24-32 ; 1 Chronicles 25:1-6 ; 2 Chronicles 29:12-19 )
Man - 1 Corinthians 10 ...
It is written,man shall not live by Bread alone
Ishmael - This was grievous to Abraham, but God, having approved the suggestion, he rose early in the morning, and providing them with some Bread and a bottle of water he sent them away
Cleopas - It is a too rigid interpretation which regards the breaking of the Bread here as a celebration of the Eucharist; rather it was an ordinary meal at which the Stranger, who had so impressed them on the road, was put in the place of honour
Idolatry - The veneration which the Papists pay to the Virgin Mary, and other saints and angels, and to the Bread in the sacrament, the cross, relics, and images, lays a foundation for the Protestants to charge them with idolatry, though they deny the charge
Elisha - " And the Lord, when speaking in promises to his people, saith, "He" (Exodus 23:25-26) "shall bless thy Bread and thy water, and I will take sickness away from the midst of thee
High - The emphasis here is on divine supremacy rather than divine exclusiveness: “And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth Bread and wine: and he was the priest of the most high God” [3] ( Bless - " At the family feasts also, and especially that of the passover, both wine and Bread were in this solemn and religious manner distributed, and God was blessed, and his mercies acknowledged
Hospitality - The women bake Bread; the master slays a ‘sacrifice,’ usually a lamb, kid, or sheep, which is forthwith dressed, cooked, and served with the Bread. When he has eaten of the host’s Bread, the two are at once bound as brothers for mutual help and protection
Vine, Allegory of the - ), on the analogy of the true light (John 1:9), and the true Bread (John 6:32-35), understands it as meaning the vine which may be called so in truth, and does not merely bear the name and appearance of such. But in the case of the true light and the true Bread we can understand the force of the adjective in this sense, as light and Bread are metaphors which we are in the habit of employing in a spiritual reference, and it is proper to emphasize the fact that, for the illumination and nourishment of the spiritual life, a higher light and Bread than the natural are necessary
Mephibosheth - And David said unto him, Fear not, for I will surely show thee kindness for Jonathan, thy father's sake, and will restore thee all the lands of Saul thy father, and thou shalt eat Bread at my table continually. And when David was a little past the top of the hill, behold, Ziba, the servant of Mephibosheth, met David with a couple of asses saddled, and upon them two hundred loaves of Bread, and an hundred bunches of raisins, and an hundred of summer fruits, and a bottle of wine. And the king said to Ziba, What meanest thou by these? And Ziba said, The asses be for the king's household to ride on, and the Bread and the summer fruits for the young men to eat, and the wine that such as be faint in the wilderness may drink. Four hundred years before, just at the same place, when the inhabitants of Gibeon heard what Joshua had done to Jericho and to Ai, they did work wilily, and went and made as if they had been ambassadors, and took old sacks upon their asses, and wine bottles old and rent and bound up, and old shoes and clouted upon their feet, and old garments upon them, and all the Bread of their provisions was dry and mouldy
Greek Church - Towards the middle of the eleventh century, Michael Cerularius, patriarch of Constantinople, opposed the Latins, with respect to their making use of unleavened Bread in the eucharist, their observation of the sabbath, and fasting on Saturday, charging them with living in communion with the Jews. They believe the doctrine of consubstantiation, or the union of the body of Christ with the sacrament Bread
Communion - The verse ought to read, ‘And they continued stedfastly in the apostles’ teaching and the communion , in the breaking of Bread and the prayers. In the great central rite of their faith this common participation in Christ, and above all in His death and its fruits, was visibly set forth: the cup of blessing was a communion of the blood of Christ; the broken Bread a communion of the body of Christ ( 1 Corinthians 10:16 )
Worship - ...
The Psalms with expressions of lament, confession, thanksgiving, praise, teaching, and celebration show the Breadth of Old Testament worship. The early Christian meetings seem to have been joyful occasions for teaching, prophesying, singing, praying, reading apostolic letters, and the “breaking of Bread” in the Lord's Supper (Acts 2:42 ,Acts 2:42,2:46 ; 1 Corinthians 14:26 ; Ephesians 5:19-20 ; Colossians 3:16 ; Exodus 23:17,23 ). According to the New Testament, the presence of Christ is especially manifest in the breaking of the Bread at the Lord's Supper (compare Luke 24:28-32 ,Luke 24:28-32,24:35 )
Remember, Remembrance - Luke connects the command with the word over the Bread and Paul with both the word over the Bread and the word over the cup
Zedekiah - " Zedekiah showed his sense of Jeremiah's faithfulness by ordering Bread to be given him out of the bakers' street until all the Bread in the city was spent (Proverbs 28:23; Psalms 37:19)
Fertility Cult - ...
The Israelites' sacred calendar celebrated the same seasons as their neighbors (barley harvests feast of unleavened Bread; wheat harvests Pentecost; fruit harvests booths)
Communion (1) - In the ninth century the communion was still received by the laity in both kinds, or rather the species of Bread was dipped in the wine, as is owned by the Romanists themselves
Tabernacle - ...
The center of attention in the wilderness narratives is the tabernacle with rich decorations, curtains, Bread of the presence, ark, lights, and altar
Lord's Day - Here Paul joined the Christians of Troas on the evening of the first day of the week for the breaking of Bread (probably a reference to the Lord's Supper)
Courtesy - ...
There are two instances where Jesus seems to fail in the matter of courtesy—in His reply to His mother, ‘Woman, what have I to do with thee?’ (John 2:4), and in His reply to the Syro-Phœnician woman, ‘Let the children first be filled: for it is not meet to take the children’s Bread, and to cast it unto the dogs’ (Matthew 15:26 || Mark 7:27)
Roll - ) A kind of shortened raised biscuit or Bread, often rolled or doubled upon itself
Nose - ” God cursed Adam saying: “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat Bread, till thou return unto the ground …” ( Tabernacle - And so the tabernacle was an oblong square or rectangle, 30 cubits (45 feet or perhaps 50 feet) long, ten cubits in Breadth and in height. The inner apartment or most holy place was a cube of ten cubits, the outer apartment 20 cubits in length and ten in Breadth. — In the most holy place, which the high priest alone entered, was the ark of the covenant; in the holy place, where the priests ministered—to the north the table of shew-bread, to the south the golden candlestick, in the centre the altar of incense. Hangings fastened to the pillars formed three sides and part of the fourth: on the east the Breadth of four pillars was reserved for a central entrance, where was an embroidered curtain suspended from the four pillars
Salt - The baron had already attended him half way down the stair case, when stopping, and turning briskly to one of his domestics, "Bring me directly," said he, "some Bread and salt
Need, Needs, Needful - , Proverbs 12:9 , "lacking (bread)
Sacrifice - ...
THE SACRIFICIAL GIFT ...
Since sacrifice is part of the external worship of God, the gift to be offered to Him must be a physical substance: something material, sensible, living (as an animal), or non-living (as Bread or wine)
Synagogue - The ground of the application of this term in such a way, is as follows: the word פרנם is, without doubt, derived from the Greek word πυρνος , "bread," or "a fragment of Bread;" and, as it is used in the Targums, it corresponds to the Hebrew verb רעה , "to feed. Prayer succeeded, which was followed by the commemoration of the Saviour's death in the breaking and distribution of Bread
Exodus - The last plague introduces directions for the Passover, the feast of unleavened Bread, the sanctification of the firstborn; and the annual Passover ( Exodus 12:1-20 ; Exodus 12:28 ; Exodus 12:40-51 , Exodus 13:1 f. The escape is hurried ( Exodus 12:29-34 ; Exodus 12:37-39 ), and so a historical meaning is attached to the use of unleavened Bread ( Exodus 13:3-16 [based on J Elisha - The other miracle was the increase of the Bread so that a hundred men were supplied from twenty loaves, or cakes, and there was some left: similar to the Lord feeding the multitudes when He was on earth. The army was then smitten with blindness, led to Samaria, fed with Bread and water, and dismissed to their master with the wonderful tale
Bethlehem - ("house of Bread"), i
Capernaum - If Jesus' discourse at Capernaum (John 6:31-32) was delivered in the synagogue of what is now Tell Hum, how appropriate is the Jews' reference to the manna, and His reply, "My Father giveth you the true Bread from heaven
Funeral, Rites - It needs only to be observed, that, after the funeral service, they kiss the crucifix, and salute the mouth and forehead of the deceased; after which, each of the company eats a bit of Bread, and drinks a glass of wine in the church, wishing the soul a good repose, and the afflicted family all consolations
Micaiah - in the prison, feed him with Bread and water of affliction (in more severe imprisonment than before) until I come in peace
Hagar - wandered with her child (15 years was childhood when human life was so long, he was old enough to "mock") in the wilderness of Beersheba; the water was spent in the bottle, and she cast him, soon worn out as a growing lad, under a shrub, having previously led him by the hand (for Genesis 21:14 means that Abraham put the Bread and bottle, but not also the child, "on her shoulder"; so Genesis 21:18, "hold him in thine hand"
Olive - They are universally eaten by the fellahîn with Bread sometimes the oil is eaten instead, much as butter is used in our home lands
Tithes - Jacob after his Bethel vision vowed a tenth of all that God gave him, should God be with and keep him, and give him Bread and raiment, and bring him again to his father's house in peace (Genesis 28:20-22)
Troas - On a third visit he ‘tarried sevendays,’ on the last of which-a Sunday-he took no sleep, but preached till midnight, breaking Bread, and talking ‘till break of day,’ knowing that his ship was waiting him in the harbour (Acts 20:6-12)
Bring - To fetch to bear, convey or lead from a distant to a nearer place, or to a person as, bring me a book from the shelf bring me a morsel of Bread
Boldness - Clement’s words are a good illustration; ‘The good workman takes with boldness the Bread which is the reward of labour, but the slothful and the indolent dare not meat the eye of their employer’ (1 Clem
Get - We get a book or a loaf of Bread by borrowing, we do not acquire it but we get or acquire an estate
Vessel - 4:9), beverage (Ruth 2:9), or Bread ( Light - ) Well leavened; not heavy; as, light Bread
Inn - The keeper of this kan gives the traveller the key and a mat, and he provides himself the rest; he must therefore carry with him his bed, his kitchen utensils, and even his provisions, for frequently not even Bread is to be found in the villages
Light - ) Well leavened; not heavy; as, light Bread
Zedeki'ah - The Bread had for long been consumed, (Jeremiah 38:9 ) and all the terrible expedients had been tried to which the wretched inhabitants of a besieged town are forced to resort in such cases
Hezekiah - ...
After this, Hezekiah arranged a great Feast of Passover and Unleavened Bread (2 Chronicles 30:1-12)
John, the Gospel of - The Bread and the wine are not mentioned at the last supper. They are the “children of God” ( John 1:12 ), whose life is sustained by living water and the Bread of life
Mill - ' They were preparing flour to make our Bread, as it is always customary in the country when strangers arrive. " When they are not impelled, as in this instance, to premature exertions by the arrival of strangers, they grind their corn in the morning at break of day: the noise of the mill is then to be heard every where, and is often so great as to rouse the inhabitants of the cities from their slumbers; for it is well known they bake their Bread every day, and commonly grind their corn as it is wanted
Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies - God provided the Israelites with "bread from heaven" during their wilderness trek (Exodus 16:4 ). Nevertheless, "Our Father who is in heaven" gives daily Bread (Matthew 6:11 ) and "good gifts to those who ask him" (Matthew 7:11 ). The Son uniquely preexisted with the Father in glory (17:5), "come down from heaven" (6:38), was "the Bread from heaven" (6:32; see 6:41,50, 51,58) entered into heaven (1 Peter 3:22 ), and ascended far above all the heavens (Ephesians 4:10 )
Names of Our Lord - ...
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT ...
Almighty Word, Wisdom of Solomon 18:15
Brightness of Eternal Light, Wisdom of Solomon 7:26
Child, Isaiah 9:6
Counsellor, Isaiah 9:6
Desire of Eternal Hills, Genesis 49:26
Desired of all nations, Aggeus 2:8
Emmanuel, Isaiah 7:14
Expectation of nations, Genesis
Father of World to Come, Isaiah
God the Mighty, Isaiah 9:6
Holy One of Israel, Isaiah 43:3
Holy One, Psalms 15:10
Just Branch, Jeremiah 23:5
Just, Isaiah 45:8
King of Glory, Psalms 23:7
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 9:7
Lord Our Just One, Jeremiah 23:6
Man of Sorrows, Isaiah 53:3
Man, Michah 5:5
My Just One, Isaiah 41:10
Orient, Zachariah 6:12
Prince of Peace, Isaiah 9:6
Root of Jesse, Isaiah 11:10
Ruler of the Earth, Isaiah 16:1
Sun of Justice, Malachi 4:2
Wonderful, Isaiah 9:6
USED BY HIMSELF ...
Bread of Life, John 6:35
Door, John 10:9
Good Shepherd, John 10:11
Life, John 11:25
Light of the World, Song of Solomon 18:15
Lord, John 13:13
Master, John 13:13
Resurrection and Life, John 11:25
Son of Man, Matthew 8:2O
Son, John 5:22
Vine, John 15:1
Way, Truth, and Life, John 14:6
USED BY THE APOSTLES and EVANGELISTS ...
Advocate, 1 John 2:1
Almighty, Apocalypse 1:8
Alpha and Omega, Apocalypse 1:8
Amen, Apocalypse 3:14
Author and Finisher of Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Author of Life, Acts 3:15
Beginning and End, Apocalypse 1:8
Blessed God, Mark 14:61
Child Jesus, Luke 2:43
Christ Jesus, 1 Timothy 1:1
Christ, Matthrew 1:18
Corner-Stone, Epheisans 2:21
Day Star, 2 Peter 1:19
Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Faithful Witness, Apocalypse 1:5
First and Last, Apocalypse 1:17
First Born from the Dead, Apocalypse 1:5
Galitean, Matthew 26:69
God of the Jews, Romans 3:29
Great Pastor, Hebrews 13:20
He that is to come, Hebrews 10:37
Head, Ephesians 4:15
High Priest, Hebrews 2:17
Jesus Christ the Just, 1 John 2:1
Jesus, Matthew 27:17
Key of David, Apocalypse 3:7
King of Kings, Apocalypse 19:16
Lamb of God, John 1:29
Life Eternal, 1 John 1:2
Lion of the Tribe of Juda, Apocalypse 5:5
Living Stone, 1 Peter 2:4
Lord Jesus Christ, Acts 10:48
Lord of All, Galatians 4:1
Lord of Lords, Apocalypse 19:16
Lord Our God, Apocalypse 4:11
Mediator, Hebrews 9:15
Messias, John 1:41 (passim)
Only Begotten of the Father, John 1:14
Our Lord Jesus Ghrist, Romans 1:4
Pascha Nostrum, 1 Corinthians 5:7
Power of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Priest, Hebrews 8:4
Prince of the kings of the earth, Apocalypse 1:5
Rabbi, John 1:18
Rock of Scandal, Romans 9:33
Root of David, Apocalypse 5:6
Saviour of the world, John 4:42
Saviour, Luke 2:11
Son of David, Mark 12:86
Son of God, Matthew 8:29
Son of Joseph, Luke 3:23
Son of the Living God, Matthew 16:16
Star of the morning, Apocalypse 2:23
Stone of stumbling, 1 Peter 2:8
Stone, Matthew 21:42
Teacher, John 3:2
That which was from the beginning, 1 John 1:1
Victim, Ephesians 5:2
Wisdom of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Word, John 1:1
Word of God, Apocalypse 19:13
Word of Life, 1 John 1:1
USED BY OTHERS ...
Adonai, O Antiphons
Angel in the liturgy of the Mass
Captain of our salvation, Ephiphany, Matins
Captain of the Martyrs, Octain of Saint Stephen, Matins
Carpenter's Son, Matthew 13:55
Christ our King, First Wednesday in Advent, Matins
Christ the Lord, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Eagle, Saint Maximus, Homily 42
Eternal, Christmas Day, Lauds
Eternal Word of God made Flesh, Ember Saturday in Advent, Martins
Glory of Thy people Israel, Luke 2:32
God of God, title in Gloria
God our Saviour, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
God the Son, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Great Prophet, First Sunday in Advent, Lauds
Heavenly Bridegroom, Epiphany, Lauds
Holy, Luke 1:35
Holy One of God, Luke 4
King of all the earth, Second Monday in Advent, Vespers
King of Angel Hosts above, Circumcision, Matins
King of Heaven, Christmas Day, Matins
King of Israel, Mark 15:32
King of Righteousness, Third Thursday in Advent, Matins
King of the Gentiles, O Antiphons
King of the Jews, Matthew 2:2
King Peaceful, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
Light to the revelation of the Gentiles, Luke 2:32
Light of Light, title in Gloria
Lord of Angels, Eve of Epiphany, Matins
Lord Our King, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Lawgiver, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Saviour, Circumcision, Matins
Lord that shall rule, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord the King, Ephiphany, Matins
Lord the Ruler, Second Sunday in Advent, Matins
Mines - "As for the earth's surface, out of it cometh Bread" by tillage; "while under it fire (i
Jachin And Boaz - 1 Kings 7:41-42 , 2 Chronicles 3:15-17 ; 2 Chronicles 4:12-13 and Jeremiah 52:21-23 = 2 Kings 25:17 ), recent scholars have restored the text of the primary passage somewhat as follows: ...
And he cast the two pillars of bronze for the porch of the temple; 18 cubits was the height of the one pillar, and a line of 12 cubits could compass it about, and its thickness was 4 finger Bread the (for it was) hollow Sop - Edersheim says, ‘Mark the definite article—not “a sop” ’), hold that it was a specific sop, used at the Passover supper in the time of Christ, which consisted of a piece of the flesh of the Paschal lamb, a piece of unleavened Bread, and some bitter herbs, all wrapped together and dipped in the harôseth—a sauce made of raisins, dates, and other fruits, mixed with vinegar—and then passed round to the company by the host
Peace - 41:9, “Yea, mine own familiar friend [3], in whom I trusted, which did eat of my Bread, hath lifted up his heel against me” (cf
Stretch Out - Maṭṭeh is also used in the phrase “the staff of Bread,” of staves around which loaves are suspended to keep them from mice ( Eucherius, Saint, Bishop of Lyons - the law was given in the wilderness and the chosen race fed with Bread from heaven) and to the sanction given to retirement by the examples of Moses, Elijah, St
Live - 2 Corinthians 12:10 ; 1 Corinthians 5:5 ; (j) Bread, figurative of the Lord Jesus, John 6:51 ; (k) a stone, figurative of the Lord Jesus, 1 Peter 2:4 ; (l) water, figurative of the Holy Spirit, John 4:10 ; 7:38 ; (m) a sacrifice, figurative of the believer, Romans 12:1 ; (n) stones, figurative of the believer, 1 Peter 2:5 ; (o) the oracles, logion, Acts 7:38 , and word, logos, Hebrews 4:12 ; 1 Peter 1:23 , of God; (p) the physical life of men, 1 Thessalonians 4:15 ; 1 Corinthians 15:52-544 ; Acts 25:24 ; Romans 14:9 ; Philippians 1:21 (in the infinitive mood used as a noun, with the article, 'living'),22; 1 Peter 4:5 ; (q) the maintenance of physical life, Matthew 4:4 ; 1 Corinthians 9:14 ; (r) the duration of physical life, Hebrews 2:15 ; (s) the enjoyment of physical life, 1 Thessalonians 3:8 ; (t) the recovery of physical life from the power of disease, Mark 5:23 ; John 4:50 ; (u) the recovery of physical life from the power of death, Matthew 9:18 ; Acts 9:41 ; Revelation 20:5 ; (v) the course, conduct, and character of men, (1) good, Acts 26:5 ; 2 Timothy 3:12 ; Titus 2:12 ; (2) evil, Luke 15:13 ; Romans 6:2 ; 8:13 ; 2 Corinthians 5:15 ; Colossians 3:7 ; (3) undefined, Romans 7:9 ; 14:7 ; Galatians 2:14 ; (w) restoration after alienation, Luke 15:32
Mourning - "Their sacrifices shall be unto them as the Bread of mourners: all that eat thereof shall be polluted," Hosea 9:4
Theodotus, Martyr at Ancyra - Theodotus supplied the Christians with Bread and wine free from pollution
Gelasius (1) i, Bishop of Rome - ...
The treatise de Duabus Naturis, arguing against the Eutychian position that the union of the human and divine natures in Christ implies the absorption of the human into the divine, adduces the Eucharist as the image, similitude, and representation of the same mystery, the point being that as, after consecration, the natural substance of the Bread and wine remains unchanged, so the human nature of Christ remained unchanged notwithstanding its union with divinity. His words are "The sacraments of the body and blood of Christ which we take are a divine thing, inasmuch as through them we are made partakers of the divine nature; and yet the substance or nature of Bread and wine ceases not to be
Tabernacle - ...
The tabernacle thus described stood in an open space or court of an oblong form, one hundred cubits in length, and fifty in Breadth, situated due east and west, Exodus 27:18 . ...
In the Holy Place to which none but priests were admitted, Hebrews 9:6 , were three objects worthy of notice: namely, the altar of incense, the table for the show-bread, and the candlestick for the showbread, and the candlestick for the lights, all of which have been described in their respective places. On the north side of the altar of incense, that is, on the right hand of the priest as he entered, stood the table for the show-bread, Exodus 26:35 40:22,23 ; and on the south side of the Holy Place, the golden candlestick, Exodus 25:31-39
Haggai - (Holy flesh of sacrifice sanctifies the skirt in which it is carried, but cannot sanctify anything beyond, as Bread: Leviticus 6:27
Melchizedek - Described as king of Salem and priest of God Most High ( ‘El ‘Elyôn ), who met Abraham on his return from the slaughter of Chedorlaomer and his allies, refreshed him and his servants with Bread and wine, blessed him, and received from him a tenth of the spoil he had taken ( Genesis 14:18-20 )
Spices - Cummin (Cuminum cyminum ) This seed was used as a spice in Bread
Presence of God - Inside the place of worship, the Bread of the Presence reminded Israel of God's nearness (2 Chronicles 4:19 )
Amos - , want of Bread (Amos 4:6); "the excellency of Jacob" (Amos 6:8; Amos 8:7); "the high places of Isaac" (Amos 7:9), "the house of Isaac" (Amos 7:16); "he that createth the wind" (Amos 4:13)
Galilee, Sea of - Its length is about 13 miles, its Breadth is about five or six. The fish are now taken with a hand net jerked round the fish by the fisher, usually naked, along the shore (John 21:7); or else crumbs of Bread mixed with bichloride of mercury are scattered to poison the fish, and the floating dead bodies are picked up for the Tiberias market (Porter, Handbook, p
Humour - Would a father, for example, offer a hungry child a stone instead of Bread, a snake instead of a fish, a scorpion instead of an egg (Matthew 7:9-10, Luke 11:11-12)? The Pharisee, He says, is like a man who cleans the outside of his cup and forgets that he drinks from the inside (Matthew 23:26)
Canaan, Land of - ...
God Himself describes the land as "a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills; a land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and fig trees, and pomegranates; a land of oil olive and honey; a land wherein thou shalt eat Bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack anything in it; a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig brass
Maronites - They communicate in unleavened Bread: and the laity have hitherto partaken in both kinds, though the practice of communicating in one has of late been getting footing, having been introduced by little and little
Type - THE MANNA given by God from heaven to the Israelites — type of heavenly grace for wilderness circumstances set forth in Christ who was the true Bread come down from heaven
Sycamore - This sort of tree is pretty common in Egypt; the people, for the greater part, live upon its fruit, and think themselves well regaled when they have a piece of Bread, a couple of sycamore figs, and a pitcher of water
Out - We are out of Bread corn
Phar'Isees, - Such were their washings before they could eat Bread, and the special minuteness with which the forms of this washing were prescribed; their bathing when they returned from the market; their washing of cups, pots, brazen vessels, etc
Locust - After having been roasted a little upon the iron plate on which Bread is baked, they are dried in the sun, and then put into large sacks, with the mixture of a little salt. ’ ‘They are roasted and eaten as butter upon loaves of Bread,’ says Van-Lennep (p. They are beaten to a powder, which is mixed with flour and water, made into little cakes, and used as a substitute for Bread when flour is scarce
Paul as an Evangelical Mystic - Ere ever we are aware we ourselves are mystics already as soon as we begin to read in John about the Living Bread, and the True Vine; and in Paul about the Head of the Church and His indwelling in us. "I am the Bread of life: he that cometh to Me shall never hunger; and he that believeth in Me shall never thirst. This is the Bread that cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof and not die
Joseph - And they took him and cast him into a pit, and then they sat down to eat Bread. Is that another subtlety of Moses? Does Moses insinuate that Joseph's brothers had never till now sat down to eat Bread in entire peace since the day that Joseph began to dream? With all their faults, Joseph would have been eating Bread at that moment with the patriarchs but for his spotted coat and his irrepressible dreams
Locust - After having been roasted a little upon the iron plate on which Bread is baked, they are dried in the sun, and then put into large sacks, with the mixture of a little salt. ’ ‘They are roasted and eaten as butter upon loaves of Bread,’ says Van-Lennep (p. They are beaten to a powder, which is mixed with flour and water, made into little cakes, and used as a substitute for Bread when flour is scarce
Passover (i.) - It was succeeded by the days of Unleavened Bread, which sometimes gave a name to the whole festival (Luke 22:1). And Thou hast given us, O Jehovah our God, in love the solemn days for joy, and the festival and appointed seasons for gladness; and this feast of unleavened Bread, the season of our freedom, a holy convocation, the memorial of our departure from Egypt. After this, the president explained the significance of the Passover-lamb, of the bitter herbs, and of the unleavened Bread
Moab - "...
Israel's request for a passage through Edom and Moab, and liberty to purchase Bread and water, was refused (Judges 11:17; Numbers 20:14-21). In Israel's circuitous march round the two kingdoms they at last, when it suited their own selfish ends and when they could not prevent Israel's march, sold them Bread and water (Deuteronomy 2:28-29; Deuteronomy 23:3-4)
Leviticus - Also of importance in the tabernacle was the Bread which symbolized the relationship between God and ancient Israel and reminded the people that God gives the gift of food. In the spring came Passover and unleavened Bread, reminders of the Exodus from Egypt
Salt - He tells us, that one of those people, willing to assure him of the seriousness of his promise to him, and that he would certainly fulfil it, called to a servant to bring him Bread and salt; as soon as it was brought, he took a little of the salt between his fingers, and looking very gravely, he put it on a morsel of the Bread and ate it, assuring me that now I might rely on his promise
Day - Prayer is offered for daily Bread (1618455281_1-34 )
Resurrection of Christ - They touched him (Matthew 28:9 ; Luke 24:39 ; John 20:27 ), and he ate Bread with them (Luke 24:42,43 ; John 21:12,13 )
Abounding - ‘How many hired servants of my father’s have Bread enough and to spare’ [1] with ‘the grace of God, which is by one man, Jesus Christ, hath abounded unto many’ [2], and many other passages
Tiberias - The only reference to the city in the NT is John 6:23, in which it is stated that ‘there came boats from Tiberias unto the place where they ate the Bread after the Lord had given thanks’ (cf
Oil - ...
Oil was used as a commodity of trade or personal income, for various kinds of common daily consumption (as part of the Bread diet in tabernacle grain offerings, as fuel for lamps in the tabernacle, or homes, as a lubricant for one's hair and skin, sometimes with a special sense of honor, as an aromatic substance, as a medication, or in healing contexts, for royal and religious ritual procedures (see below), and in figurative expressions (e
Land - ...
'Erets sometimes bears a political connotation and represents both a given political territory and the people who live there: “And there was no Bread in all the land; for the famine was very sore, so that the land of Egypt and all the land of Canaan fainted by reason of the famine” ( Hand - The Jews say, they were obliged to give the hand to the Egyptians and Assyrians, that they might procure Bread, 2Ma_13:22 ; that is, to surrender to them, to submit
Charge, Chargeable - ...
A — 5: ὀψώνιον (Strong's #3800 — Noun Neuter — opsonion — op-so'-nee-on ) from opson, "meat," and oneomai, "to buy," primarily signified whatever is brought to be eaten with Bread, provisions, supplies for an army, soldier's pay, "charges," 1 Corinthians 9:7 , of the service of a soldier
Teaching of the Twelve Apostles - In the form in the Didaché we notice that: (1) the benediction of the cup precedes that of the Bread (see Luk_22:17-19). (2) The broken Bread has the technical name τὸ κλάσμα. (4) The benedictory prayer contains a petition that as the broken Bread had been scattered on the mountains and had been brought together and made one so might the church be collected together from the ends of the earth. If such a one wishes to settle among them he must work at a handicraft or employ himself in some other way; but if he wants to eat the Bread of idleness he is one who makes merchandise of Christ (χριστέμπορός ἐστιν). directs Christians to come together each Lord's Day to break Bread and give thanks having confessed their sins in order that their sacrifice may be pure
Pentecost - It is a colourless name, and, unlike ‘Passover or Unleavened Bread’ and ‘Tabernacles or Booths,’ it reveals nothing as to the nature of the festival itself. 5: ‘on the second day of unleavened Bread, which is the sixteenth day of the month. The Law at any rate was very explicit: ‘Three times in a year shall all thy males appear before the Lord thy God in the place which he shall choose; in the feast of unleavened Bread, and in the feast of weeks, and in the feast of tabernacles’ (Deuteronomy 16:16). Passover marked the beginning of harvest; Tabernacles celebrated the very crown and consummation of the year, when all the fruits of the earth had at length been gathered in; but Pentecost was a brief pause of joy and thankfulness for the close of harvest proper and the gathered store of ‘bread that strengtheneth man’s heart
Omnipresence - ’ Luther was immovable in his belief that the consecrated Bread is in some sense the body of Christ. He had repudiated the Romanist dogma that the particles of the Bread are transmuted into substantial particles of the veritable flesh and blood of Christ, and therefore it remained to him to contend that the body and blood of Christ are ‘in, with, and under’ the Bread and the wine. The body of Christ is present everywhere, especially in the consecrated Bread, and thus can be literally manducated by those who partake of the Lord’s Supper
Pentecost - It is a colourless name, and, unlike ‘Passover or Unleavened Bread’ and ‘Tabernacles or Booths,’ it reveals nothing as to the nature of the festival itself. 5: ‘on the second day of unleavened Bread, which is the sixteenth day of the month. The Law at any rate was very explicit: ‘Three times in a year shall all thy males appear before the Lord thy God in the place which he shall choose; in the feast of unleavened Bread, and in the feast of weeks, and in the feast of tabernacles’ (Deuteronomy 16:16). Passover marked the beginning of harvest; Tabernacles celebrated the very crown and consummation of the year, when all the fruits of the earth had at length been gathered in; but Pentecost was a brief pause of joy and thankfulness for the close of harvest proper and the gathered store of ‘bread that strengtheneth man’s heart
Joseph - In his absence (the narrative with the artlessness of truth never explains why Reuben was absent at the crisis; a forger would have carefully made all plain) they strip off his coat of many colors (type of the human body with its manifold perfections which the Father "prepared" the Son, and which His unnatural brethren stripped Him of: Hebrews 10:5; Philippians 2:6-8); and while he was in the pit "eat Bread" (Proverbs 30:20; compare John 18:28; Zechariah 9:11). His interpretation of their dreams, the vine with three branches and the pressing the grape juice into Pharaoh's cup, and the three baskets of white Bread (the Egyptians being noted for their fancy Bread and pastry) out the uppermost of which the birds ate, came to pass; Pharaoh restored the chief cupbearer, and decapitated the chief baker. Compare the Antitype (John 6:35) occupying the mediatorial throne with the Father's delegated tower, giving the Bread of life first to His own brethren the Jews
Priest - ...
When the tabernacle was completed, and Aaron and his sons were made priests, Moses by Jehovah's command performed the priestly functions of setting the shewbread, lighting the lamps, burning incense, and offering the daily sacrifice (Exodus 40:23-29; 1618455281_28). Finally, Moses "filled their hands" with three kinds of Bread used in ordinary life, unleavened cakes, cakes of oil Bread, and oiled wafers (Leviticus 8:2; Leviticus 8:26; Exodus 29:2-3; Exodus 29:23), put on the fat and right shoulder, and putting his own hands under their hands (so the Jewish tradition) made them wave the whole mass to and fro, expressing the nation's praise and thanksgiving, testified by its gifts. ...
(6) Perquisites: firstfruits of oil, wine, and wheat, the shewbread, flesh and Bread offerings, the heave shoulder and wave breast (Numbers 18:8-14; Leviticus 6:26; Leviticus 6:29; Leviticus 7:6-10; Leviticus 10:12-15)
Ahithophel - I do not like to listen to all the names you would have called Ahithophel and Eliam had they still remained in David's service, and had they still eaten David's Bread, with Bathsheba in David's bed and with her husband in his grave. I have eaten David's Bread when he had plenty, Ahithophel should have said, and he shall come to Giloh now and eat my Bread
Jonathan - 'Yea, mine own familiar friend,' David said, but not of thee, 'in whom I trusted, which did eat of my Bread, hath lifted up his heel against me. The water is the seal of God's covenant in baptism; and the Bread and the wine in the supper. In the Bread and in the wine, Christ and all the benefits of the new covenant are represented, sealed, and applied to believers
Popery - With regard to the eucharist, in particular, we may here observe, that the church of Rome holds the doctrine of trasubstantiation; the necessity of paying divine worship to Christ under the form of the consecrated Bread or host; the propitiatory sacrifice of the mass, according to their ideas of which, Christ is truly and properly offered as a sacrifice as often as the priest says mass; it practises, likewise, solitary mass, in which the priest alone, who consecrates, communicates, and allows communion only in one kind, viz. the Bread of the laity
Profaning, Profanity - * Nazarite - In concluding his term of days he offered a sin offering, a burnt offering (implying whole self dedication), and a peace offering (thanksgiving) with unleavened Bread
Sychar - (a) Shechem could certainly be roughly described as ‘near’ Jacob’s ground, and the disciples who went to ‘the city’ to buy Bread were away during the whole of the conversation, that is, for some considerable time
Sabbath - Among the religious exercises of the Sabbath were the offering of sacrifices and the renewing of the ‘presence Bread’ in the tabernacle (Leviticus 24:5-9; Numbers 28:9-10)
Jews in the New Testament - The Jews questioned His statements about the Temple (John 2:20 ) and were scandalized at His claim to be the Bread from heaven (John 6:41 )
Truth - ...
In Paul's discussion of the relationship of Christians to truth, we find the same Old Testament emphasis: “Therefore, let us celebrate the festival, not with the old yeast, the yeast of malice and evil, but with the unleavened Bread of sincerity and truth” (1 Corinthians 5:8 NRSV)
Chaldaea - Strabo says it yielded Bread, wine, honey, ropes, and fuel equal to charcoal
Goodness - He also, as his Master, would show the winning charm of the visibly good—the goodness embodied in a life rather than in doctrines only—that which in Christ could say to the world, ‘I am the Bread of life’ (John 6:35; John 6:48), ‘I am the way, the truth, and the life’ (John 14:6), and ‘I am the light of the world’ (John 8:12, John 9:5), the witness of which is described by St
Break - To take away as, to break the whole staff of Bread
Day - as sons who abstain from doing evil (1 Thessalonians 5:5; 1 Thessalonians 5:8, Romans 13:13); a day of fuller knowledge (2 Peter 1:19); and, lastly, the somewhat enigmatical passage, ‘Give us this day (σήμερον) our daily (τὸν ἐπιούσιον) Bread’ (Matthew 6:11, Luke 11:3); the latter expression (see art
Plagues of Egypt - The land swarmed with them: they were in their bedchambers, their ovens, and their Bread pans
Angels - " In Psalm 78:25 it is abbir, 'mighty:' "every one did eat the Bread of the mighty" margin
Call - 2:20, “that he may eat Bread,” KJV)
Sow - The Egyptians told Joseph: “Buy us and our land for Bread, and we and our land will be servants unto Pharaoh: and give us seed, that we may live, and not die, that the land be not desolate” ( Greek Church - " They administer the Lord's Supper in both kinds, dipping the Bread in the cup of wine, in which a small portion of warm water is also inserted
Harvest - They carried water and provisions with them; for Boaz invited her to come and drink of the water which the young men had drawn; and at meal-time, to eat of the Bread, and dip her morsel in the vinegar
Ravels - A writer, indeed, in the Memoirs of Literature, for April, 1710, endeavours to show, from many authors, that there was in the country of Bethschan, in Decapolis, by the brook Cherith or Carith, a little town called Aorabi or Orbo, Judges 7:25 : Isaiah 10:6 ; and he therefore explains the word orebim, which, in 1 Kings 17:4 , we translate "ravens," of the inhabitants of that village, some of whom, he contends, daily carried Bread and flesh to Elijah, who had retired to and lay in a cave in the neighbourhood
Wells And Springs - The custom of demanding pay for water of the traveler is still found in some parts of the East; while in many other towns a place is provided where cold water and sometimes Bread are offered gratuitously to the stranger, at the expense of the village, or as an act of charity by the benevolent, Mark 9:41
Gospels, Apocryphal - For James had taken an oath that he would not eat Bread from that hour in which he had drunk the cup of the Lord, until he should see Him rising from that sleep. ” ’...
‘And again, a little farther on: “Bring me, saith the Lord, a table and Bread. ” And there follows immediately: “He took the Bread, and blessed, and brake, and gave to James the Just, and said to him. My brother, eat thy Bread, inasmuch as the Son of Man hath risen from them that sleep” ’ (Jerome, de Vir
Sacrifice And Offering - Barley beer, mixed beer, milk, and wine also were placed before the deities, as well as loaves of Bread. As part of the meal, various kinds of Bread were offered (and ultimately kept by the priest)
Judas - And so unconscious were the rest of the disciples who the traitor was, when the Lord at the table intimated that one of them should betray him, that they were exceeding sorrowful, and began to say unto him every one, Lord, is it I? And when the Lord to the enquiry of Judas declared that he was the person, there is nothing said of his departure, but that the Lord proceeded to bless the Bread and the cup, and said, "Drink ye all of it. " And what is much to the point in respect to the question now under consideration, this evangelist, in his statement of this memorable transaction, represents the Lord as proceeding to the supper, and giving both the Bread and the cup to them before he intimated the presence of the traitor
Ananias And Sapphira - Keep a place for me at the Table, and I will join you there in good time in breaking of Bread and in prayers. ' And the young men came in and found her dead, and they buried Ananias and Sapphira in Aceldama, next back-breadth to Judas Iscariot, the proprietor of the place. And if Thou wilt give me Bread to eat, and raiment to put on, and a wife and children in Jerusalem, then the Lord shall be my God, and the God of my household
Multitude - At other times we read that, attracted by His teaching and His miracles, ‘all the city was gathered together at the door’ (Mark 1:33); ‘they came from every quarter’ (Mark 1:45); their attendance was so persistent that Jesus and the disciples ‘could not so much as eat Bread’ (Mark 3:20); it was necessary to address them from the boat (Matthew 13:2); they brought their sick and maimed to Him (Matthew 15:31, Mark 1:32); they pressed upon Him and heard the word of God (Luke 5:1); and their rapt attention to His preaching, even during the last days at Jerusalem, is described by St. ||); the section dealing with the Bread of Life (John 6:24 f
Wealth - He showed that He desired that all should have a sufficiency, by bidding all, rich and poor alike, pray for ‘daily Bread
Supper - Originally it seems to have been their custom to come together on the first day of the week to break Bread together (Acts 20:7)
Incense - The altar of incense was more closely connected with the holiest place than the other things in the holy place, the shewbread table and the candlestick. Their worship, as yet imperfect but sincere, is "pure" in comparison with your "polluted Bread" (Malachi 1:7; Malachi 1:12-15; Acts 10:34-35; Acts 17:23; Romans 2:14-15; Romans 2:27-29)
Sabbath - Paul preaching at Troas, when the disciples came to break Bread
Blessing And Cursing - Both of these concepts are fundamental to understanding Isaiah's emphasis on God's Word: “For as the rain cometh down, and the snow from heaven, and returneth not thither, but watereth the earth, and maketh it bring forth and bud, that it may give seed to the sower, and Bread to the eater: so shall my word be that goeth forth out of my mouth: it shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I send it” (1618455281_43 ; cf
Nazirite - The fat was then salted and burned on the altar, and the breast and the foreleg were eaten by the priests, who also ate the waved cake and the boiled shoulder; the rest of the Bread and meat belonged to the offerer (Maimonides, Hilchoth Maase ha-Corbanoth , ix
Unclean And Clean - "Holy flesh" (that of a sacrifice) makes holy the skirt in which it is carried; but that "skirt" cannot impart its sanctity to anything beyond, as Bread (Leviticus 6:27), implying a sacrifice cannot make holy the disobedient
Galilee - "Fat Bread" and "royal dainties" are his, grain, wine, milk, butter, from his uplands and valleys (Genesis 49:20; Deuteronomy 33:24-25)
Proverbs, Book of - Wisdom is established: she has her house, her food, her Bread, and her wine
World - The Son of God is the "Savior of the world" (John 4:42 ; 1 John 4:14 ), giving life to it as the "bread of life" (John 6:33,51 )
Field - There are now, as there were of old, numerous fields in Palestine where ‘the lilies’ and many other flowers grow in gorgeous profusion without human care or culture, and where ‘the grass of the field,’ including fibrous weeds as well as shortlived flowers, when dried by the tropical sun, are still gathered as fuel, and used to heat ovens for baking Bread (cf
Apostolic Fathers - From there he also sent a letter to the church at Rome begging them not to intercede on his behalf with the Emperor since he desired to be “ground by the teeth of wild beasts” so as to become “pure Bread of Christ
Way - ...
In other passages derek refers to the action or process of “taking a journey”: “And to his father he sent after this manner; ten asses laden with the good things of Egypt, and ten she asses laden with corn and Bread and meat for his father by the way [5]” ( Water - “Water” of oppression or affliction is so designated because it is drunk in prison: “Put this fellow in the prison, and feed him with Bread of affliction and with water of affliction, until I come in peace” (1 Kings 22:27)
Messiah - 1500, and pulled down his own oven, promising, his brethren that they should bake their Bread in the holy land next year
Type - It was an emblem of the true Bread of life, which came down from heaven, John 6:39
Pentateuch - "Nevertheless," says the sacred narrative, "divers of Asher and Manasseh and of Zebulun humbled themselves and came to Jerusalem; and there assembled at Jerusalem much people, to keep the feast of unleavened Bread in the second month, a very great congregation; and they killed the passover, and the priests and Levites stood in their places after their manner, according to the law of Moses, the man of God
Waldenses - Waldo was rich, and distributed his wealth among the poor, and with it the Bread of life, which endeared him to the lower classes; and it was probably the great increase of these pious people, in consequence of his exertions, which brought upon them the horrible crusade in the next century
Locust - After having been roasted a little upon the iron plate on which Bread is baked, they are dried in the sun, and then put into large sacks, with the mixture of a little salt
Priest - (Numbers 31:25-47 ) ...
Of the shew-bread, the flesh of the burnt offerings, peace offerings, trespass offerings, (Leviticus 6:26,29 ; 7:6-10 ; Numbers 18:8-14 ) and in particular the heave-shoulder and the wave-breast
Idol, Idolatry - In the Lord’s Supper, those who eat the Bread and drink the wine are united together with Christ, spiritually sharing in him
Sacraments - Both are referred to by implication in a manner exactly analogous in the parallel discourses of the Fourth Gospel on the New Birth and the Bread of Life (John 3, 6). But the references which do occur are of a sort which may be said to offer their actual infrequency as additional constructive proof, and to leave no manner of doubt that sacramental rites were from the first an integral part of the Christian ‘way,’ that baptism was invariably enjoined upon converts to the faith, and that the ‘breaking of Bread,’ which at least comprised the Eucharist in its germinal form, was one (Acts 20:6-7, 1 Corinthians 11:20) if not absolutely the chief purpose of Christian gatherings for worship. The term ‘breaking of Bread’ in Acts 2:42; Acts 2:46; Acts 20:7 may refer to the Agape as well as to the Lord’s Supper; its reference to the latter, however, is not less obvious, but, on the contrary, more obvious, than its reference to the former
Individualism - With our present concentration on material well-being, the end of competition would be almost the end of individuality; but if our real life were less lived by Bread alone, if our true individuality were dependent on higher concerns, we might come to cultivate together the soil of the earth and enjoy together all it produces as much in common as we use the air that moves on its surface and the water that comes down its hills, and we should then be enabled to accept many of Christ’s commands as literal which we can only now live with as figures of speech. But if they are temptations of His work, the temptation to provide a kingdom with fulness of Bread and to rule by accepting the methods of force in the State and of display in the Church, we see how He could be touched in His deepest interests. In view of all this, it cannot be questioned that the aristocrat in his peasant’s dress, digging his Bread out of the earth, and living as if the social revolution had come, in the high conviction that the Divine way is personal surrender and not social supervision, represents Christ’s attitude better than the respectable persons who meantime take all the present system of competition will give, while they wait for salvation from the action of the State
James - Being His elders, they went on one occasion to "lay hold on Him," saying that He was "beside Himself"; as He was so pressed by multitudes that He and His disciples "could not so much as eat Bread," His cousin brethren thought they would restrain what seemed to them mad zeal (Mark 3:20-21; Mark 3:31-33). The spurious " Gospel according to the Hebrew" says "James swore he would not eat Bread from the hour that he drank the cup of the Lord until he should see Him risen again
the Prodigal Son - Now what chance, in the midst of a mighty famine, had a prodigal son who had already wasted all his substance with riotous living? What hope was there for him? What could a penniless spendthrift do? Till, covered with rags, and with all his bones staring till they could be counted, he threw himself upon a citizen of that country, and said:-'Only give me one crust-of-bread and water, and I will do anything you like to command me. It is in the very Bread they eat
Christ - ...
The Bread of life and living Bread, John 6:48; Joh 6:51
Night (2) - Such annoyances would be encountered by the host in the parable, who, coming to beg Bread, arrived at midnight after stumbling through the narrow streets of the village (Luke 11:5 etc. ...
After the Resurrection, night was falling when Jesus revealed Himself to the two at Emmaus in the breaking of the Bread (Luke 24:31)
Sabbath - It was to be a sacred pause in the ordinary labor which man earns his Bread the curse the fall was to be suspended for one and, having spent that day in joyful remembrance of God's mercies, man had a fresh start in his course of labor
Body of Christ - Jesus' body is represented by the Bread of the Eucharist ( 1 Corinthians 10:16-17 ; 11:29 ?) so that those who share the single loaf of communion constitute a single body; their actions demonstrate both corporate inclusion into Christ and their membership in the Christian community that Christ's death brought into existence
Union - Thus in Acts 2:42; Acts 20:7, 1 Corinthians 10:16-17, it is assumed that heart-union with Christ and with one another went along with the outward expression of that union, in their partaking of the same significant Bread
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - Yet the crowds that surrounded Jesus often repeated Israel's sin at the exodus, by gobbling up the Bread Jesus multiplied and enjoying his miracles without expressing gratitude (John 6:22-24 )
Care - [5] 224; Moore, God is Love, 82; Allon, Indwelling Christ, 110; Zahn, Bread and Salt from the Word of God, 287
Agriculture - ...
How were cereals cultivated? Grain crops were the staple food of rich and poor alike, although the poor may have had to consume barley Bread rather than the more palatable wheat
Abercius, Bishop of Hierapolis - Faith) gave to the friends to eat continually, having excellent wine, giving the mixed cup with Bread
Dropsy - Luke alone of the Evangelists tells of Jesus being invited to partake of the hospitality of the Pharisees and of His accepting their invitations on three different occasions: ‘to eat’ (Luke 7:36), ‘to breakfast’ (Luke 11:37), ‘to eat Bread’ (Luke 14:1)
Poor (Person), Weak (Person) - 16:3 the shewbread is termed the Bread of “affliction” because it is a physical reminder of sin, the cause of “affliction” ( Statute, Ordinance - 12:14), Unleavened Bread ( Live - 8:3, “man doth not live by Bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord doth man live
Sabbath - They placed on the golden table new loaves of showbread, and took away the old ones, Leviticus 24:8 . ...
The "preparation of the Sabbath" was the Friday before; for as it was forbidden to make a fire, to bake Bread, or to dress victuals, on the Sabbath-day, they provided on the Friday every thing needful for their sustenance on the Sabbath, Mark 15:42 Matthew 27:62 John 19:14,31,42
Ecclesiastes, Book of - Exhortations are given to cast 'bread' and 'sow seed' on all occasions and in all places: all will not be lost
Food - They mixed it with flour in preparing Breads and cakes, and used it as a cooking fat for a variety of foods (Exodus 29:2; Leviticus 2:4; Leviticus 2:14-16; 1 Kings 17:12-14; see OIL). Cereal crops were important, mainly because the people obtained from them the flour to make the Breads and cakes that were their staple diet (Genesis 18:6; Genesis 21:14; Genesis 26:12; Genesis 37:7; Genesis 42:2; Exodus 29:23; 2 Kings 4:42; Ezekiel 4:9; John 6:9). The price of grain, or the price of the Bread made from it, was an indication of economic conditions in the land (2 Kings 7:1; Revelation 6:6). People made various sorts of cakes and Breads
Philip - For at the feeding of the Five Thousand in the wilderness it was to Philip that Jesus addressed the question, ‘Whence are we to buy Bread, that these may eat?’ (John 6:5)
John, Theology of - He offers overwhelming messianic gifts that exploit images intrinsic in the Jewish setting in the narrative (wine, wisdom, water, healing, Bread, light, life). Sometimes this gift is placed in metaphor, such as "living water" (4:14) or "living Bread" (6:33); in each instance it means a faithful consumption of who Jesus is and what he offers. " Thus in 6:51b Jesus says, "This Bread is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world
Offering - ” This word is found in the literature of ancient Ugarit in the term, “bread of offering,” as well as in all periods of Hebrew. Such offerings, or contributions, sometimes were of grain or grain products: “Besides the cakes, he shall offer for his offering leavened Bread with the sacrifice of thanksgiving of his peace offerings. The same sacrifice was mandated, for each day of the Passover-Unleavened Bread feast ( Temple - In all its dimensions, length, Breadth and height, the sanctuary itself was exactly double the size of the tabernacle, the ground plan measuring 80 cubits by 40, while that of the tabernacle was 40 by 20, and the height of the temple being 30 cubits, while that of the tabernacle was 15. In the holy place, besides the altar of incense, which was made of cedar overlaid with gold there were seven golden candlesticks in stead of one, and the table of shew-bread was replaced by ten golden tables, bearing, besides the shew Bread, the innumerable golden vessels for the service of the sanctuary. and the Breadth thereof three-score cubits, with three rows of great stones, and a row of new timber. The Breadth of the centre aisle was 95 feet of the side aisles, 30 from centre to centre of the pillars; their height 50 feet, and that of the centre aisle 100 feet. The width of the facade was also augmented by wings or shoulders projecting 20 cubits each way, making the whole Breadth 100 cubits, or equal to the length
Presence (2) - He speaks of His own presence as living water, heavenly Bread, light and life to a needy world (John 4:14; John 6:48; John 8:12; John 11:25). It must find it in the water of Baptism, in the Bread and wine of Communion, in the act of ordination, in the relies of saints, in the tombs of the martyrs, in the heart of monasteries, and in the walls of consecrated cathedrals
Palestine - Its average Breadth was about 60 miles from the Mediterranean on the west to beyond the Jordan. " Western Palestine, on the south of Gaza, is only about 40 miles in Breadth from the Mediterranean to the Dead Sea, narrowing gradually toward the north, where it is only 20 miles from the sea-coast to the Jordan. Moses describes it as "a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills; a land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and fig trees, and pomegranates; a land of oil olive, and honey; a land wherein thou shalt not eat Bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack any thing in it; a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig brass" (Deuteronomy 8:7-9 )
Drink - This drinking of the water of life is parallel to eating the Bread of life (John 6:27,50-51 )
Baptism, Christian - As in the Supper a small amount of Bread and wine used in this ordinance exhibits in symbol the great work of Christ, so in Baptism the work of the Holy Spirit is fully seen in the water poured or sprinkled on the person in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost
Body - The joining with the body of Christ does not occur magically through Bread, but historically through the realization of the presence of the suffering and death of Jesus
Jehoiachin - Now he cut the gold off (not "cut in pieces," 2 Kings 24:13) the larger vessels which were plated, the altar of burnt offering, the table of shewbread, and the ark, so that at the third conquest of Jerusalem under Zedekiah there were only the large brazen vessels of the court remaining, beside a few gold and silver basins and firepans (2 Kings 25:13-17). ...
Jehoiachin wore prison garments for 36 years, until at the death of Nebuchadnezzar, having been for a time sharer of his imprisonment (Jeremiah 52:31-34), "in the 12th month, the 25th day of the month (in 2 Kings 25:27 'the 27th,' the day when the decree for his elevation, given on the 25th, was carried into effect) lifted up the head of Jehoiachin (compare Genesis 40:13-20; Psalms 3:3; Psalms 27:6), and brought him forth out of prison, and spoke kindly unto him, and set his throne above the throne of the kings that were with him in Babylon, and changed his prison garments (for royal robes; compare Zechariah 3:1-5; Luke 15:22), and he did continually eat Bread before him all the days of his life (compare 2 Samuel 9:13); and there was a continual diet given him of the king of Babylon, every day its portion (compare margin 1 Kings 8:59) until the day of his death
Heathen - Here, however, the severity of the words, ‘It is not meet to take the children’s Bread and cast it to the dogs’ (Mark 7:27), is intentionally mitigated by the use of the diminutive κυνάρια, which is just ‘doggies’ in our language-no word of scorn, but one of affection and tenderness
Elijah - He forthwith retired from the public eye, and was miraculously cared for at the brook Cherith, being fed with Bread and flesh morning and evening by ravens
Faithfulness - Paul wrote to the Thessalonians that all must work with quietness and eat their own Bread, and that none must leave their common work and live in idleness (2 Thessalonians 3)
Abraham - He refused to take even a thread of the spoil from the king of Sodom: he would not be made rich from such a source; but he was blessed by Melchisedec, king of Salem, the priest of the most high God, who brought forth Bread and wine: to whom Abraham gave tenths of all
Mediator - "Thus saith God the Lord, he that created the heavens and stretched them out, he that spread forth the earth, and that which cometh out of it, he that giveth Bread unto the people upon it, and spirit to them that walk therein, I the Lord have called thee in righteousness, and will hold thine hand, and will keep thee, and give thee for a covenant to the people, for a light to the Gentiles, to open the blind eyes, to bring out the prisoners from the prison, and them that sit in darkness out of the prison house
Elijah - He forthwith retired from the public eye, and was miraculously cared for at the brook Cherith, being fed with Bread and flesh morning and evening by ravens
Philaster, Bishop of Brixia - 154) that the ravens brought flesh as well as Bread to Elijah who surely would never have used animal food
Sacrifice (2) - ’ In the Sacrament thus instituted there is a twofold reference to the ritual of the Jews—(1) to the Passover, in the breaking of Bread, the symbol of His broken body; (2) to the sacrifice of the covenant at Sinai, to which the giving of the cup with the words—‘This is my blood of the new covenant’ clearly alludes. Our Lord, then, in the institution of the Bread expressed the thought that His life given up to death is to be appropriated by His followers, that it may become their life, that it may set them free from the bondage of sin, and make them free servants and sons of God. He is the Bread of Life, the Living Water, that giveth life to men (John 6:1-71; John 7:37-38; John 3:10-15); He is the Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25); but that this πνεῦμα ζωοποιοῦν may act with completed power, it must pass through death to larger life
Samaria, Samaritans - Regarding their food, we read: Let no man eat the Bread of the Cuthaeans: for he that eateth their Bread is as he that eateth swine’s flesh’ (M. 4); and the unleavened Bread of the Cuthaeans is permitted (Bab
Christ in Art - , and represent two baskets of Bread, each containing a glass cup of wine and resting upon a fish. However, the Dove (at first a symbol of peace) and the Ship (which represented the Church), the Lyre (a symbol of Orpheus, see below) and the Anchor of hope (see also under ‘Cross’) are not direct symbols of Christ; nor, except by way of the Eucharist, are they representations of Bread, wine, or the grape. Thus the first representations of the Cross are very indirect; the cross-marks on the round Eucharistic loaves, which are found as early as the 2nd cent, (on a sarcophagus in the Catacomb of Priscilla), merely represent the folding up of the corners of the Bread to make it round
Church, the - The other biblical sacrament is the Lord's Supper, variously called "communion" (1 Corinthians 10:16 ), "eucharist" (the prayer of thanks offered before partaking of the elements Matthew 26:27 ; 1 Corinthians 11:24 ), and the "breaking of the Bread" (Acts 2:42 ; 20:7 ). He equated his body with the Bread of affliction and his blood, which was to be shed on the cross, with the cup of redemption
Time - In the nature of the case, of such festivals in the New Testament the Passover (‘the days of unleavened Bread,’ ἡμέραι τῶν ἀζύμων, Acts 12:3; Acts 20:6, πάσχα, Acts 12:4) stands prominent. It was the day on which the Christians assembled together for the observance of their services (the ‘breaking of Bread,’ mutual exhortation, taking up collections for the needs of their brethren, Acts 20:7, 1 Corinthians 16:2)
Truth - ‘Let us keep the feast not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened Bread of sincerity and truth’ (1 Corinthians 5:8)
Priest, Christ as - A feast followed on that first day, during which Aaron and his sons ate the meat of the ram with unleavened Bread (Exodus 29:32 )
Hunger - ‘If thou art the Son of God, command that these stones become Bread’ (Matthew 4:3, cf
Liberty (2) - The disciple must hold himself entirely at liberty from the things of the world for the world’s sake; he must stand ‘with loins girded about and lamp burning’ (Luke 12:35), unhindered by multitudinous possessions (Luke 12:15), not anxious as to the lesser matters of clothing, food, and shelter (Matthew 6:25, Luke 12:22), taking ‘no Bread, no wallet, no money,’ whereon he may come to depend too much (Luke 9:3; Luke 10:4, Matthew 10:9, Mark 6:8)
Jesus Christ - After an interval of some months the twelve returned, and with them he retired to the Sea of Galilee, fed the 5000, walked on the water, and delivered his sermon on the Bread or life, John 6:1-71, in the synagogue at Capernaum
Thessalonians, Epistles to the - He commands the disorderly to work, so as to eat their own Bread
Caracalla, the Nickname of m. Aurelius Severus Antoninus Bassianus - Every citizen resident in the capital was entitled to receive every month, at a cheap rate—the indigent quite gratuitously—a certain amount of corn or Bread
Tabernacle - ]'>[7] ‘shittim’) the only wood employed in the construction of the Tabernacle 5 cubits in length and Breadth, and 3 in height, overlaid with what must, for reasons of transport, have been a comparatively thin sheathing of bronze. ’ In virtue of their greater size, they overlap the curtains of the latter, their Breadth of 30 cubits exactly sufficing for the height and width of the dwelling (10 + 10 + 10 cubits). ) in length, Breadth, and height, enclosed on all four sides and on the roof by the curtains and their cherubim. Coming now to the furniture of the dwelling, and proceeding as before from without inwards, we find the holy place provided with three articles of furniture: ( a ) the table of shewbread, or, more precisely, presence-bread ( Exodus 25:23-30 , Exodus 37:10-16 ); ( b ) the so-called golden candlestick, in reality a seven-branched lampstand ( Exodus 25:31-40 , Exodus 37:17-24 ) ( c ) the altar of incense ( Exodus 30:1-7 , Exodus 37:25-28 ). ...
( a ) The table of shewbread , or presence-table ( Numbers 4:7 ), is a low table or wooden stand overlaid with pure gold, 1 1 /2 cubits in height. The legs are connected by a narrow binding-rail, one hand-breadth wide, the ‘border’ of Exodus 25:25 , to which are attached four golden rings to receive the staves by which the table is to be carried on the march. Of these the golden ‘ dishes ’ are the salvers on which the loaves of the presence-bread (see Shewbread) were displayed; the ‘ spoons ’ are rather cups for frankincense ( Leviticus 24:7 ); the flagons’ (AV Abraham - How you would neither eat Bread nor drink water. If there is a famine of Bread and water where corn and wine had been promised and expected; or if the laughters and the shouts of baptized children are silent where they would have been as the voices of God's angels to you,-what then? Then thy God will descend into thine heart, and He will ask: Am I not more to thee than sons and daughters? Is My love not better to thee than corn and wine? Am I, and My salvation, and that city of Mine which hath foundations, not more to be desired by thee than all else that I could give thee? Till you will find it in your bereaved and broken heart to say to Him henceforth and continually, Whom have I in heaven but Thee? And there is none upon earth that I desire beside Thee
Organization (2) - The sea might be full of fish, but fishers were needful (Luke 5:10); the fields were ripe unto harvest, but labourers must be found for the reaping (Matthew 9:37, Luke 10:2); the broadest community will need the power of exercising discipline, even to the extent of excommunicating if that will make the wrong-doer feel the distance between his present and his best self (Matthew 18:17); the tree must have visible form if it is to shelter men in its branches (Matthew 13:32, Luke 13:19), though its vital force may be a hidden mystery, permeating, as it does, the whole body, as the leaven does the Bread (Matthew 13:33, Luke 13:21). Here were held gatherings for common prayer, for the breaking of Bread, for Apostolic teaching and fellowship (Acts 2:42), and for the moral edification of those present
Property (2) - If the fowls of the air are provided for and the lilies of the field are arrayed in glory in the way of their nature through the providence of God, so also will men be provided for in the way of their nature, which is declared in the words, ‘In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat Bread’ (Genesis 3:19). For the willingness of a father to give Bread to his son is taken as an illustration of the willingness of God to hear and answer the prayers of His people
Containers And Vessels - At sometime in this period people learned to bake their pottery the same way they did their Bread: in an oven
Ebla - The tablets refer to the temples dedicated to Dagon, Ashtar, (Astarte), Kamosh (Chemosh), Rasap (Reshaph), and offerings of Bread, drink, and animals
Holiness - ), the flesh of a sacrifice ( Haggai 2:12 ), the incense ( Exodus 30:36 ), the table ( Exodus 30:27 ), the shew-bread ( 1 Samuel 21:6 ), the candlestick ( Exodus 30:27 ), the ark ( Exodus 30:26 , 2 Chronicles 35:3 ), and the anointing oil ( Exodus 30:25 )
Renunciation - Our prayer should be for ‘daily Bread’ or the satisfaction of necessary requirements
Draw - To take from an over as, to draw Bread
Vessels And Utensils - ...
A special bowl-like trough was used for kneading dough in Bread making (Exodus 8:3 ; Exodus 12:34 ; Deuteronomy 28:5 ,Deuteronomy 28:5,28:17 )
Hospitality - Identifying himself with the symbolic elements of the Passover meal, Jesus associated his body with the Bread of affliction that was offered to all who were hungry and needy, and he associated his blood with the third cup of wine, the cup of redemption
Hearing - ‘This is an hard saying,’ said many of the disciples after Jesus had spoken of Himself as the Bread which came down from heaven, ‘who can hear it?’ (John 6:60)
Altar - Wine was offered along with animal and Bread sacrifices
Fish, Fisher, Fishing - Matthew 7:10), in which the commonest foods are enumerated: Bread, fish, eggs
Hunneric, King of the Vandals. - They were expelled from the town with nothing but the clothes they had on, and were obliged to beg their Bread
Dead - This allusion is perhaps revolved in the charge which Ezekiel received when his wife died, to abstain from the customary forms of mourning: "Forbear to cry; make no mourning for the dead; bind the tire of thy head upon thee, and put on thy shoes upon thy feet, and cover not thy lips, and eat not the Bread of men,"...
Ezekiel 24:17
Ebla - The tablets refer to the temples dedicated to Dagon, Ashtar, (Astarte), Kamosh (Chemosh), Rasap (Reshaph), and offerings of Bread, drink, and animals
Education - ]'>[3] ), on which he wrote ‘with a pointed style or metal instrument, very much as if one wrote on thickly buttered Bread with a small stiletto
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - On the other hand, the writer of the Fourth Gospel omits the genealogy and the birth from a virgin, because it could be of no interest to him to prove that Jesus (or rather Joseph) was descended from king David, and the Incarnation of the Logos is a far grander conception than a miraculous birth by the operation of the Holy Ghost; he omits the Baptism of Jesus, of which notwithstanding he shows knowledge, because, again, the true Baptism is the Incarnation of the Logos in Jesus, and also partly, perhaps, because he is anxious to discountenance the Adoptionist views of the Person of Christ which were prevalent at the time when he wrote; he omits the Temptation, because it is no part of his plan to exhibit Jesus as experiencing any temptation or weakness; he omits the Transfiguration, because in his view the whole life of Christ on earth is a manifestation of His glory, not by visible light but to the spiritual eye; he omits the institution of the Eucharist, because he has already given his sacramental doctrine in his discourse about the Bread of Life (John 6:26 ff. 6 and the discourse on the Bread of Life which follows it. Again and again he puts the key in the lock—in such solemn utterances as ‘I am the Bread of Life—the Light of the World—the Resurrection and the Life
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - The food of his monks was limited to one meal a day of Bread, water, and herbs, and he allowed sleep only till midnight, when all rose for prayer ( Ep. He had but one outer and one inner garment; he slept in a hair shirt, his bed was the ground; he took little sleep, no bath; the sun was his fire, his food Bread and water, his drink the running stream (Greg. He gave his own personal ministrations to the wretched, and while he fed their bodies he was careful to nourish their souls with the Bread of life (Greg
Wisdom of Solomon - Thus in Deuteronomy 8:3 the lesson of the manna is said to have been ‘that man does not live by Bread alone, but by every utterance of the mouth of God’-an obscure proposition, since the manna is repeatedly called ‘bread’; and even if it be admitted that the Deuteronomist does not allow it that title (29:6), the ‘utterance of the mouth of God’ is far from clear
Bethlehem - Bethlehem (בֵּית לֶחָם ‘house of Bread’) of Zebulun, Joshua 19:15. The names by which it has been known for millenniums, and is still known, are expressive of the fertility of the place—-lehcm, ‘house of Bread,’ and -Lahm, ‘house of flesh
Temptation - The desire of the people for healing (John 4:48) and Bread (John 6:28), the demand of His enemies for a sign (Matthew 16:1), the attempt to make Him a king (John 6:15), may be regarded as illustrations of the three kinds of temptation recorded
Edom - In both accounts Israel offered to pay for provisions, and did so at last on Edom's eastern side, whereas they and Moab ought to have "met (Israel as their brother) with Bread and water" (Deuteronomy 23:4)
Stone - In the one case, Jesus is tempted to use His miraculous powers to turn the stones that lie about Him on the rough mountain-side into loaves of Bread wherewith to satisfy His hunger (Matthew 4:2-4, Luke 4:2-4)
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - Led in by Peter Paul sat at the same Lord's table, and ate the same Bread, and drank the same wine, with both old and young communicants, who had not yet put off their garments of mourning because of Paul
Discourse - (Matthew 13:1-53, Mark 4:1-34, Luke 8:4-16); discourse in the synagogue at Capernaum on the Bread of Life (John 6:22-65); colloquy in the Temple on His Mission (John 7, 8); second great group of parables, the Lost Sheep, etc
Money - Wherefore do ye weigh money for that which is not Bread?" Amos 8:5 , represents the merchants as encouraging one another to make the ephah small, wherewith to sell, and the shekel great, wherewith to buy, and to falsify the balances by deceit
Commerce - He also mentions the bakers' street as the principal area of production and supply of Bread in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:21 )
Temptation - The desire of the people for healing (John 4:48) and Bread (John 6:28), the demand of His enemies for a sign (Matthew 16:1), the attempt to make Him a king (John 6:15), may be regarded as illustrations of the three kinds of temptation recorded
Miracles - Another class shows His control over nature: creating wine out of water (John 2); feeding 5,000 and 4,000 with Bread multiplied manifold (Matthew 14:16; Matthew 15:36); passing unseen through a crowd, setting aside natural laws (Luke 4:30); giving draughts of fish when the fishermen had caught none (Luke 5:4; John 21:6); stilling the storm (Matthew 8:26); walking on the sea (Matthew 14:25), God's attribute, Job 9:8; transfiguring His countenance (Matthew 17:1); directing the fish with the tribute shekel to Peter, and Peter to the fish (Matthew 17:27). His gestures, laying hands on the patient, anointing the blind eyes with clay, putting His finger into the deaf ear and touching the dumb tongue, creating much Bread out of little not out of nothing, condescending to use means though in themselves wholly inadequate, all are tokens of His identifying Himself with us men, signs of His person at once human and divine and of His redeeming and sympathizing work for us
Immortality - Here our Lord, after the miracle of the loaves, and evidently, in the mind of the author of the Gospel, explaining the significance of the miracle, claims that He is the living Bread come down from heaven. Those who eat of this Bread live for ever
Atonement - He sets Himself forth in the discourse at Capernaum as the Bread of Life, in terms which imply the surrender of His body to death for the life of the world ( John 6:32 ff. Here Christ declares that His body, symbolized by the broken Bread, and His blood, symbolized by the poured-out wine, are given for His disciples for the remission of sins and the making of a New Covenant, and they are invited to eat and drink of the spiritual food thus provided ( Matthew 26:26 ff
Jesus Christ - He who nourished crowds with Bread Would not one meal unto Himself afford O wonderful the wonders left undone, And scarce less wonderful than those He wrought!...
O self restraint passing all human thought, To have all power and be as having none! O self denying love, which felt alone For needs of others, never for His own! The next temptation in the spiritual order (Matthew gives probably the chronological order) was, Satan tried to dazzle Him, by a bright vision of the world's pomps "in a moment of time," to take the kingdoms of the world at his hands (as "delivered" to him, owing to man's fall) without the cross, on condition of one act of homage to him "the prince of this world. The assault against man's threefold nature, the body (the lack of Bread), the soul (craving for worldly lordship without the cross), and the spirit (the temptation on the temple pinnacle), failed in His case
Proverbs - The harvest began in April, early enough sometimes for the unleavened Bread of the Passover to be baked with new flour (Orig. ‘It is not right,’ says Jesus, quoting an apt proverb, ‘to take the children’s Bread and cast it to the whelps
Benjamin - Rachel's second son, the only son of Jacob born in Palestine (Genesis 35:16-19), on the road between Betheland Bethlehem Ephrath, near the latter (Genesis 48:7) (probably "the fertile", from parah , corresponding to the town's other name, Bethlehem, "bread-house
Jesus Christ - John portrays Jesus as the Water of life (John 4:14 ); the Bread of life (John 6:41 ); the Light (John 8:12 ); the Door (John 10:7 ); the Good Shepherd (John 10:11 ); the Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25 ); the Way, the Truth, the Life (John 14:6 )
Tithes - The scathing irony of his question, ‘did I commit a sin in debasing myself [7] in order you might be raised up?’ is followed by the startling emphasis of his expressions (note the collocation δωρεὰν τὸ τοῦ θεοῦ εὐαγγέλιον, and his use of the military terms ἐσύλησα, ὀψώνιον, 2 Corinthians 11:7 f
Fulfillment - In his teachings, Jesus employed the typological approach to contrast the temporality of the wilderness manna with the permanent quality of the sustenance that he, as the living Bread, could offer (John 6:32-35 )
Pilgrimage - The penance varies according to the circumstances of the penitent; during the continuance of which (which is sometimes three, six, or nine days) he subsists on oatmeal, sometimes made into Bread
Sabbath - In the sanctuary the morning and evening sacrifices were doubled, the shewbread was changed, and each of David's 24 courses of priests and Levites began duty on the Sabbath. The 12 loaves of shewbread representing the offerings of the 12 tribes symbolized the good works which they should render to Jehovah; diligence in His service receiving fresh quickening on the day of rest and holy convocation before Him. ) The early church met to break Bread on the first day (Acts 20:7); it was the day for laying by of alms for the poor (1 Corinthians 16:2)
Feasts - ...
From it the Bread and wine were taken for the Eucharist
Docetism - It occurs here in the form "If Christ were without flesh and blood, of what sort of flesh and blood are the Bread and wine, the images (εἰκόνας ) with which He commanded that the memorial of Him should be made?" (cf
Prophets - Their food was chiefly pottage of herbs, unless when the people sent them some better provision, as Bread, parched corn, honey, dried fruits, and the like, 1 Kings 14:3 ; 2 Kings 4:38-39 ; 2 Kings 4:42
Peter - (1) In the synagogue of Capernaum, after the feeding of the five thousand at Bethsaida, Jesus delivered His discourse on the Bread of Life, full of hard sayings designed to test the faith of His disciples by shattering their Jewish dream of a worldly Messiah, a temporal King of Israel, a restorer of the ancient monarchy (John 6:22-65 )
Elisha - ...
(8) Feeding multitudes with Bread for the body, and the Bread of life for the soul
Ideas (Leading) - He contemplates the life of the average man toiling for his daily Bread and filled with anxiety lest that Bread should fail
Jesus Christ - Third, at the miraculous feeding of the five thousand and the subsequent sermon in Capernaum reflecting on that event, Jesus offers himself as the essence of the kingdom, as the Bread come down from heaven and a new manna in a new wilderness (Matthew 14:13-21 ; John 6:1-69 ). ...
On Thursday night Jesus ate a Passover meal with his followers and established a communal ceremony for them that consisted of a participation in his coming death, concretized in the partaking of Bread and wine
Lord's Day - May not his action in this particular instance, indeed, have directly led to the institution of a collection for the poor on the Lord’s Day, and especially in association with ‘the breaking of Bread’? It may be added that, as St. ...
(d) Very possibly the sacramental meal (‘breaking of Bread’) was the earliest distinctive feature in the Christian observance of the Lord’s Day, the other exercises of prayer, reading, etc
Terah - The Lord thy God, so sang the call and the promise in Abram's hopeful heart-The Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills; a land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and fig trees, and pomegranates; a land of oil olive and honey; a land wherein thou shalt eat Bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack anything in it; a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig brass. We have given the hand to Egypt, and to Assyria that we may have Bread. What were Babylon, and Nineveh, and Damascus, and Salem, and all Egypt, to this western world and to this nineteenth century after Christ! What were all the science of Chaldea, and all the lore of Egypt, but the merest rudiments and first elements of that splendid sunshine of all manner of truth and opportunity which floods around us from our youth up! And as we are led on from school to school; and from author to author; and from preacher to preacher; and from one stage of intellectual and spiritual migration and growth to another; to what a stature, to what a Breadth, and to what a height of faith, and knowledge, and love, and all manner of grace and truth may we not attain
Announcements of Death - He explains that He is the Bread of heaven, the true manna, the spiritual Messiah. Thus will it be possible for men to make spiritual appropriation of Christ as the living Bread
John, the Gospel by - The Son of man was the true Bread from heaven, and the work of God was that people should believe on Him. "If any one shall have eaten of this Bread he shall live for ever
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - Proverbs 24:17 ‘Rejoice not when thine enemy falleth, and let not thy heart be glad when he is overthrown’; Proverbs 24:29 ‘Say not, I will do so to him as he has done to me, I will render to the man according to his work’; Proverbs 20:22 ‘Say not thou, I will recompense evil; wait on the Lord, and he will save thee’; Proverbs 25:21 ‘If thine enemy be hungry, give him Bread to eat; and if he be thirsty, give him water to drink’; Exodus 23:4-5 ‘If thou meet thine enemy’s ox or his ass going astray, thou shalt surely bring it back to him again. The same may be said of the following, ‘But that the scripture may be fulfilled, He that eateth my Bread lifted up his heel against me’ (John 13:18); ‘But this Cometh to pass that the word may be fulfilled that is written in their law, They hated me without a cause’ (John 15:25), i
Mary, the Virgin - Crowds so thronged Him that lie had no time even "to eat Bread
Exodus, Book of - This tenth plague became the setting for Israel's central religious celebration, that of Passover and Unleavened Bread in which Israel reenacted the Exodus from Egypt and rejoiced at God's supreme act of salvation for His people (Exodus 5-13 )
Jehoram - Much less those taken not in open battle, but by a device, combined with mental blindness sent by God), and caused him instead to set Bread and water, "great provision" (2 Kings 6:22-23), before them, and then to send them home, the effect being that love melted the enemy's heart, and Syrian "bands" (i
Ishmael - See ISAAC on Ishmael's expulsion for "mocking," and (See HAGAR on Ishmael being called a "child," or "lad" (Genesis 25:14-15; Genesis 25:17), being at the time 15 or 16; the Bread and bottle, but not the child, were "put on her shoulder
Salutations - There is then brought to the presiding brother Bread and a cup of wine’ (Justin Martyr, Apol
Wealth (2) - The same truth is implied in the petition, ‘Give us this day our daily Bread’ (Matthew 6:11, Luke 11:3), and in the sayings: ‘If God so clothe the grass of the field, which to-day is and to-morrow is cast into the oven, shall he not much more clothe you, O ye of little faith?’ (Matthew 6:30, Luke 12:28); ‘Your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things
Messiah - Still more expressions of the messianic task were given in the time of Moses; consider the pillar of fire (Christ is the light), manna (Christ is the living Bread), the water from the rock (Christ is living water and the rock), and the lifted-up bronze serpent (Christ is the lifted-up One who gives life)
Hosanna - It is not as if the Evangelists had transferred the unleavened Bread of the Passover to the Feast of Tabernacles
Impotence - ...
(b) Of the state or condition, manner or circumstance, range or sphere in which a person is or acts: (α) state or condition (Matthew 4:16 ‘the people which sat in darkness,’ Luke 1:75 ‘serve him in holiness and righteousness,’ John 4:23 ‘worship in spirit and truth,’ Matthew 21:22 ‘ask in prayer’); (β) manner (Matthew 13:3 ‘in parables’); (γ) occasion (Matthew 22:15 ‘ensnare him in talk,’ Luke 23:31 ‘if they do this in the green tree,’ Luke 24:35 ‘in the breaking of Bread’); (δ) surrounding accompaniment (Matthew 6:29 ‘Solomon in all his glory,’ Matthew 16:28 ‘coming in his kingdom,’ Matthew 16:27 ‘in the glory of his Father’); (ε) range or sphere (John 8:21 ‘die in your sins,’ Mark 1:15 ‘believe in the gospel’ will also belong to this head, unless we admit that this is an exceptional use of πιστεύω with ἐν
Keeping - For instance, we read that when the Pharisees and scribes asked Jesus why His disciples walked not according to the tradition of the elders, but ate their Bread with defiled hands, He replied, ‘Full well do ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep (τηρέω) your tradition’ (Mark 7:9)
Epicureans - For drink they had water with a small quantity of wine on occasion, and for food barley Bread
Games - The motto of the age was ‘bread and races’ (panis et circenses), and coupled with this was the cry: ‘The Christians to the lions l’ (Christiani ad leones)
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - And he loads the man at the door with an armful of his best Bread
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - And at such times of temptation, Satan would say to Him-'If thou be the Son of God, command these stones to become Bread, and command the wayside streams to run with wine and milk
the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses - O light-hearted students, go and make your piece of Bread in some much safer calling
Family (Jesus) - , quoting the Gospel of the Hebrews) James swore that he would neither eat Bread nor drink wine till the Lord rose from the dead
Manichees - The elect were obliged to rigorous and entire abstinence from flesh, eggs, milk, fish, wine, all intoxicating drink, wedlock, and all amorous gratifications; and to live in a state of the severest penury, nourishing their emaciated bodies with Bread, herbs, pulse and melons, and depriving themselves of all the comforts that arise from the moderate indulgence of natural passions, and also from a variety of innocent and agreeable pursuits
Matthew - They had all supped with Matthew before, but that was the first night for many years that any man with any good name to lose had broken Bread at the publican's table
Idolatry - ...
The veneration which the Papists pay to the Virgin Mary, and other saints and angels, and to the Bread in the sacrament, the cross, relics, and images, affords ground for the Protestants to charge them with being idolaters, though they deny that they are so
Banquet - The Jews regularly washed their hands and their feet before dinner; they considered this ceremony as essential, which discovers the reason of their astonishment, when they observed the disciples of Christ sit down at table without having observed this ceremony: "Why do thy disciples transgress the tradition of the elders? for they wash not their hands when they eat Bread," Matthew 15:2
David - ...
The love of Jonathan and David is beautiful, but Jonathan could not protect David from the hatred of Saul, and David resorted to the priest, who gave him the hallowed Bread. God's anointed one was rejected and the showbread was considered common
Baptism - ), the fulfilment of the type; but in Hebrews 9:24 it is used conversely, as it often is in Christian antiquity when the Eucharistic Bread and wine are called the antitype of our Lord’s body and blood, e
Monnica - She had been used to bring oblations of vegetables, Bread, and wine to the shrines of the African martyrs, and began the like practice at Milan
Elijah - of Jordan (or else, as many think, the wady Kelt near Jericho), beyond Ahab's reach, where the ravens miraculously fed him with "bread and flesh in the morning . Bread and flesh in the evening
Time - The NT takes over the latter word, and makes a Greek noun of it, whilst to the Christian and to the Christian Church, the first day of the week becomes the important day, instead of the seventh, and is for Christians the day of gathering together ‘to break Bread’ ( Acts 20:7 ), and of making collections for the needs of the faithful ( 1 Corinthians 16:2 ), and also wins for itself the name of ‘the Lord’s day’ ( Revelation 1:10 )
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - Ironically, the first intimation after the baptism that He was more than simply “Jesus of Nazareth” came not from His family or friends nor from the religious leaders of Israel, but from the devil!...
Twice the devil challenged him: “If thou be the Son of God, command this stone that it be made Bread” (Luke 4:3 ), and (on the pinnacle of the Temple in Jerusalem), “If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down from hence” (Luke 4:9 )
Luke, the Gospel According to - ...
Luke's account of the Lord's Supper, making an interval between His giving the Bread and the cup to the disciples, accords most with Paul's in 1 Corinthians 11:23, which that apostle says he received directly from the Lord Jesus
Tares - It is absolutely necessary to avoid the mingling of the kernels of the darnel and the wheat, lest the Bread be poisoned
Atonement - ...
The Breadth of the use of the concept in the Old Testament is striking. At Luke 22:19-20 , Jesus asserts that both the Bread and the wine symbolize the fact that his death would be "for you" (huper humon [ Matthew 26:28 )
Priest, Priesthood - , purification procedures, preparing the showbread and other grain offerings, leading in the praising of the Lord through song, special responsibilities for festival burnt offerings, etc. Weekly responsibilities included replacing the twelve cakes of the "bread of presence" on the table in the tent of meeting each sabbath (Leviticus 24:5-9 ; cf
Tabernacle - On the right is a table with twelve loaves of Bread on it
Abraham - Melchizedek, one of the only native princes who still served Jehovah, and was at once king and priest, blessed Abraham in the name of the Most High God, possessor of heaven and earth, and blessed God in Abraham's name, by a beautiful reciprocation of blessing, and ministered to him Bread and wine; and Abraham "gave him tithes of all
Prayer - Foremost stand the three petitions for hallowing God's name, God's kingdom coming, God's will being done below as above; then our four needs, for Bread for body and soul, for forgiveness producing a forgiving spirit in ourselves, or not being led into temptation, and for deliverance from evil. ...
(3) Prayer "set in order" ("direct," 'atak ), as the wood upon the altar, the shewbread on the table (Psalms 5:1-3; Genesis 22:9)
Divination - , the sacramental Bread is called ‘the medicine of immortality,’ φάρμακον ἀθανασίας
Barzillai - A couple of asses saddled as they used to saddle them at Rogelim and Lodebar could carry two hundred loaves of Bread, and a hundred bunches of raisins, and a hundred of summer fruits and a bottle of wine
Daniel - Calvin says that when Daniel and his three companions got far enough away from the royal table they would both eat flesh with pleasant Bread, and would drink wine also in the wayside inns of Babylon, just as they had done when they were at home in Jerusalem
Parables - At the last supper as He broke the Bread and poured the wine, He enacted with miniparables the loving sacrifice of Calvary
Passion Week - simply has it that the day of unleavened Bread ‘came’ (Luke 22:7)
Providence - Such petitions as ‘Give us this day our daily Bread’ (Matthew 6:11), and ‘Lead us not into temptation’ (Matthew 6:13), would be mere hypocrisies apart from an assured trust in the loving providence of our Father in heaven
John, the Gospel According to - genuine, aleethinos ) God, the Word, the only-begotten Son, love, to manifest, to be begotten or born of God, pass from death, the Paraclete or Comforter, flesh, spirit, above, beneath, the living water, the Bread of life
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - ; "The Bread of Carefulness ," xxxiv. He describes himself as living very moderately on Bread and vegetables (Ep
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch - 28) mentions how a Christian martyr said, "I am the Bread-corn of Christ, to be ground by the teeth of beasts that I may be found pure Bread"—words found in Ignat
Perfection (of Jesus) - One suggestion was to turn stones into Bread. To the heart of Jesus His countrymen’s need of Bread and of help to a better social state would always be present
Covenant - The Bread of the altar also symbolized Israel's everlasting covenant (Leviticus 24:8 )
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - Baking Bread was a frequent task performed in the Hebrew home long before it evolved into a specialized trade
Galilee - It was ‘a land of wheat and barley, and vines and fig trees and pomegranates; a land of oil olives and honey; a land wherein thou shalt eat Bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack any thing in it’ (1618455281_31)
House - ’ The oven is a hole in the floor; the fire, of dried manure, is kindled at the bottom; and the sides are made of hardened clay, to which the flaps of dough adhere until they are baked and ready to be hooked out as Bread
Metaphors - ...
Notwithstanding the marked difference in vocabulary, style, and thought found in the various Gospels, they all agree, when reporting the speeches of Jesus, in putting a metaphorical spiritual meaning into even the simplest words, such as ‘sheep-fold,’ ‘door,’ ‘key,’ ‘lamp,’ ‘bread,’ ‘water,’ ‘fish,’ ‘life,’ ‘birth,’ ‘travail, ‘death,’ ‘love,’ ‘hell’ (γέεννα), ‘paradise,’ etc
Call, Calling - ‘Hence,’ it adds, ‘ “calling” came to be applied to the various means of Bread-winning
the Man Who Cast Seed Into the Round And it Grew up he Knew Not How - He confidently promises himself and other people both sweet and strengthening Bread to eat immediately out of his harvest
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - When you load them with honours, and banquet them with praises, they make ashes their Bread and tears their drink
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - And not thorns only, but even good things in their own places, if they are allowed in your corn-field, they will leave you little Bread for yourself and for your children, and little seed corn for next spring
Wealth - His followers should have special concern for the poor (Luke 14:7-24 ), give generously of their resources (Matthew 5:42 ) even when they are meager (Mark 12:43-44 ), and be content with their daily Bread (Matthew 6:11 )
Fig-Tree - 35b, last lines) suggests only that at a later season the unripe fruit was sometimes used as a condiment ‘with Bread
Nabal - The-Joy-of-her-father,-for that was the name of the sheep-master's beautiful bride,-was also the joy of her bridegroom, till he sent two hundred loaves of Bread, and two bottles of wine, and five sheep ready dressed, and five measures of parched corn, and an hundred clusters of raisins, and two hundred cakes of figs to Adullam, so that every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, ate and drank and said, Let the God of Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah, and Jacob and Rachel be the God of that great man in Maon and Abigail his bride
Moab - God ordained that the Moabites should not enter into the congregation of his people, because they had the inhumanity to refuse the Israelites a passage through their country, nor would they supply them with Bread and water in their necessity
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - His food was barley Bread and greens. newly baked Bread on trays appeared
Witness (2) - Zahn, Bread and Salt from the Word of God, 185; T
Baptism - ), the fulfilment of the type; but in Hebrews 9:24 it is used conversely, as it often is in Christian antiquity when the Eucharistic Bread and wine are called the antitype of our Lord’s body and blood, e
Friendship - —(c) The irresponsible type is described in Luke 11:5-8, where the householder is so comfortably settled in bed that he refuses to rise and give Bread to a friend, who is unexpectedly called upon to show a greater service to his friend
Games - At first, they had no other nourishment than dried figs, nuts, soft cheese, and a gross heavy sort of Bread called μαζα ; they were absolutely forbidden the use of wine, and enjoined continence
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - where the writer speaks (19, 93) of "offering the sacrifice of Bread and wine," he is made to say "the sacrifice of Christ's body and blood"; and a passage is cut out altogether where he argues that if it be dangerous to transfer to private uses the consecrated vessels "which contain not the Lord's real body, but the mystery of His body," how much more to profane the vessels of our own body which God has prepared for His dwelling-place
Matthew, the Gospel According to - ...
QUOTATIONS IN MATTHEW Matthew 1:23 "Behold, a virgin" Isaiah 7:14 Matthew 2:6 "Thou Bethlehem" Micah 5:2 Matthew 2:15 "Out of Egypt" Hosea 11:1 Matthew 2:18 "In Rama a voice" Jeremiah 31:15 Matthew 3:3 "The voice of one crying" Isaiah 40:3 Matthew 4:4 "Man shall not live by Bread" Deuteronomy 8:3 Matthew 4:6 "He shall give His angels charge" Psalms 91:11-12 Matthew 4:7 "Thou shalt not tempt " Deuteronomy 6:16 Matthew 4:10 "Thou shalt worship the Lord" Deuteronomy 6:13 Matthew 4:15-16 "The land of Zabulon" Isaiah 9:1-2 Matthew 5:5 "Blessed are the meek: they shall Psalms 37:11 inherit the earth" Matthew 5:21 "Thou shalt not kill" Exodus 20:13 Matthew 5:27 "Thou shalt not commit adultery" Matthew 12:18-210 Matthew 5:31 "Give her a writing of divorcement" Deuteronomy 24:1 Matthew 5:33 "Thou shalt not forswear"...
Deuteronomy 23:23; Leviticus 19:12 Matthew 5:38 "An eye for an eye" Exodus 21:24 Matthew 5:43 "Love thy neighbor
Mission - ‘The Saviour of the world’ (John 4:42) has grace and power wherewith to meet the needs which belong to every man in every age and country; for He is the Light (John 1:9, John 8:12, John 9:5, John 12:46), the Water (John 4:10, John 7:37), the Bread (John 6:35; John 6:48-51), the Life (John 11:25, John 14:6)
Baptism - Owen observes, that it no where signifies to dip, but as denoting a mode or, and in order to washing or cleansing: and, according to others, the mode of use is only the ceremonial part of a positive institute; just as in the supper of the Lord, the time of the day, the number and posture of communicants, the quality and quantity of Bread and wine, are circumstances not accounted essential by any party of Christians
Faith - As His teaching advanced, it appeared that He required an unparalleled faith in Himself along with His message, that the Kingdom of God He speaks of centres in His Person, that in fact He is ‘the word’ of God He brings, He is the light and life whose coming He announces, ‘the Bread from heaven’ that He has to give to a famished world ( John 6:33 ff; John 8:12 ; John 11:25 ; John 14:6 etc
Miracle - Feeding the five thousand recalls the manna in the wilderness and sets up Jesus' Bread of life discourse (John 6:1-15,25-59 )
Influence - His great assertions that He was the Bread of Life and the Light of the world (John 6:35; John 6:48; John 8:12; John 9:5), aroused great opposition and lost Him many friends
Children of God - Only those who trust God can pray ‘Give us our daily Bread,’ and can limit their desires for material good to such humble bounds
Zechariah, the Book of - Zechariah 11 foretells the destruction of the second temple and Jewish polity for the rejection of Messiah (Zechariah 11:4; Zechariah 11:7, the "flock" doomed to slaughter by Rome, whom Messiah "fed," but they rejected Him "the Bread of life"
Dress (2) - This is known as the u‘bb or ‘bosom,’ and in this are carried many things; for example, the Bread and olives for the midday meal, the seed or corn for sowing (Luke 6:38), or, in the case of a shepherd, a newborn lamb or kid (cf
Jeremiah - He who has-I will not say a full sensibility of the evil of sin, for he would go mad if he had-but a true beginning of such sensibility, he has the making of a true minister of Jesus Christ in him; otherwise he has not, and should at once go to make his Bread in some more lawful calling
Jacob - Jacob dreamed that night because Rebekah had neither a Bible nor a Pilgrim's Progress, nor a hymn-book, to put into his scrip beside his Bread and his dates and his oil
Esau - Then Jacob gave Esau Bread and pottage of lentils, and he did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way
David - in His Services - For, instead of refusing to rise up and eat Bread with the elders of his house, David was never in a happier frame of mind than he was all that night
Division of the Earth - The Egyptians were masters of their persons and property, till they sold them to Pharaoh for Bread; and then their servitude amounted to no more than the fifth part of the produce of the country, as an annual tax payable to the king
Christ, Christology - Already seeds are being sown and are taking root, Bread is rising, the reign of God is inaugurated, the banquet has already begun as converted sinners begin to feast at the gracious Messiah's table, and all will be brought to fulfillment at the end of the age
Jacob - ...
Recognizing God's manifestation as sanctifying the spot, he made his stony pillow into a pillar, consecrated with oil (See BETHEL), and taking up God's word he vowed that as surely as God would fulfill His promises (he asked no more than "bread and raiment") Jehovah should be his God, and of all that God gave he would surely give a tenth to Him; not waiting until he should be rich to do so, but while still poor; a pattern to us (compare Genesis 32:10)
Ideal - The petition for daily Bread is enshrined in the very heart of the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:10-11). Yet while His moral ideal takes not only a social form, but one of universal Breadth, He always taught that it must be through making its power felt in the individual heart that the Kingdom of God would be realized upon earth
Unity (2) - It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that this ‘one thing’ is, spiritually, the Kingdom which His Incarnation brings among us (Luke 17:21); representatively, the Society which He builds (Matthew 16:18), to which by His institution the one Baptism (Ephesians 4:5) admits, and which the one Bread (1 Corinthians 10:17) shows
Ebionism And Ebionites - Gen_18:8) which contradicted their view; they refused to taste wine and communicated with unleavened Bread and water
Eli - What! not know the Lord, and they born and brought up within the very precincts of the Lord's house! Were not the first sounds they heard the praises of God in His sanctuary? Were not the first sights they saw their father in his robes beside the altar with all the tables, and the Bread, and the sacrifices, and the incense round about him? And yet, there it is in black and white; there it is in blood and tears-'The sons of Eli were sons of Belial; they knew not the Lord
Prayer (2) - He looked up to heaven before breaking the Bread at the feeding of the 5000 (Matthew 14:19, John 16:23-24 Luke 9:16)
Type - Genesis 2:24), Christian baptism by the passage of the Red Sea (1 Corinthians 10:1-2), the Bread and wine of the Lord’s Supper by the manna and water of the wilderness (Psalms 110:4), and Christ Himself by the rock from which the water flowed (1 Corinthians 10:4)
Sanctify, Sanctification - John 1:4-5; John 1:9; John 3:19); to be the living water (Matthew 5:8 John 4:14); to be the Bread of God come down from heaven to feed the world (John 6:32-35; John 6:47-58)
Righteousness - He who furnishes the sower with seed and with Bread to eat will supply seed for you and multiply it; he will increase the crop of your charities (τὰ γενήματα τῆς δικαιοσύνης ὑμῶν)
Sanctification - Apart from what Christ has done, the exercise of eating Bread and drinking wine would be common
Money (2) - In Mark 6:37 = John 6:7 the disciples estimate that it would seed Bread to the value of at least 200 denarii (£8) to provide for the five thousand
Jeremiah - Zedekiah committed him to the court of the prison (the open space occupied by the guard, Jeremiah 32:2, where his friends had access to him: Jeremiah 32:12; Jeremiah 37:12-21), and commanded Bread to be supplied to him until all in the city was spent (Psalms 37:19; Isaiah 33:16)
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - Then after breaking of Bread—there is no mention of wine—the apostle commands Byrrhus (the name occurs in the Ignatian epistles as that of an Ephesine deacon) to follow him with two companions, bringing spades with them
Thecla - Paul with Onesiphorus and his family on their way to Daphne had taken refuge in a tomb where he continued in prayer for Thecla and sent one of the lads back to lconium to sell his outer garment and buy Bread
Mark, Gospel According to - ), the questions about the dulness of the disciples when they forgot to take Bread ( Mark 8:17 f. ) The reference to the shewbread ( Mark 2:26 , ‘it is not lawful’) suggests that the Temple still stood when Mark wrote
Education in Bible Times - Specific examples of community education include: the three great pilgrimage festivals (Unleavened Bread, Weeks, and Tabernacles Deuteronomy 16:16 ; cf
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - They tell us of a few who cavilled at the substitution of Bread for bloody sacrifices in the Christian oblation (i
Animals - ‘It is not right,’ said the Master, ‘to take the children’s Bread and cast it to dogs
Abstinence - The artist or the scientist may forget to take food, in the intensity of his application to his work; or any great emotion like sorrow may make one ‘forget to take Bread
Joshua - Wordsworth has two such boys:...
Never did worthier lads break English Bread:The finest Sunday that the autumn saw,With all its mealy cluster of ripe nuts,Could never keep those boys away from church,Or tempt them to one hour of Sabbath breach,Leonard and James!And as such boys rise to he young men they are already promising pillars in the house of their fathers' God. And their old shoes, and old bottles, and old Bread, and their wily speeches, and other fine fetches completely circumvented Joshua, till he made a covenant of peace with a cruel, corrupt, and accursed people that he had been armed and ordained and commanded to sweep off the face of the earth
Baptism - It nowhere signifies to dip, but in denoting a mode of, and in order to, washing or cleansing; and the mode or use is only the ceremonial part of a positive institute; just as in the Lord's Supper, the time of day, the number and posture of the communicants, the quantity and quality of Bread and wine, are circumstances not accounted essential by any part of Christians
Novatianus And Novatianism - A few obscure Phrygian bishops, however, convened a synod at Pazum or Pazacoma, and agreed to celebrate the same day as that on which the Jews keep the Feast of Unleavened Bread
Priest (2) - (4) The reference to the shewbread as eaten by the priests only (Mark 2:26). The gift of Bread and wine to Abraham had, of course, nothing essentially priestly in it
David - ) By the lie he gained his immediate object, the 12 shewbread loaves just removed from the table to make place for the new Bread on the sabbath, and also Goliath's sword wrapped up in cloth behind the high priest's own ephod (shoulder dress), so precious a dedicatory offering was it deemed
Offerings And Sacrifices - The "bread of presence" placed on the table before the Lord in the Holy Place every Sabbath was also conceived of as a "grain offering" (Leviticus 24:5-9 )
Grace - When Gideon actually brings the offering that he has prepared, God shows his grace beyond what Gideon has asked by giving him instructions on where to place it and how to arrange it, then creating a supernatural fire that consumes the meat and the Bread
Gospels (2) - In the previous chapter (1 Corinthians 10:16) and in 1 Corinthians 14:16 we have allusions to the words of institution which have always been used in the blessing of the Bread and wine
Luke, Gospel According to - In the account of the Eucharist (according to the true text) he puts the administration of the Cup before that of the Bread (Luke 22:17-19), following in all probability a local liturgical usage of which several traces remain
Hermas Shepherd of - In this case he is commanded, not to abstain entirely from food, but to take Bread and water
Calendar, the Christian - ’ The Didache speaks of the synaxis on the Lord’s Day, and uses the pleonastic phrase κατὰ κυριακὴν Κυρίου συναχθέντες; the purpose of the synaxis was that the Christians might break Bread and celebrate the Eucharist, having confessed their sins that their sacrifice might be pure (§ 14)
Complacency - In His discourse on the Bread of Life (ch
John, Gospel of - But it is in the same record that the characteristic ‘glory’ of His miracles is most fully brought out; in it the loftiest claims are made not only for the Master by a disciple, but by the Lord for Himself as the Light of the World, the Bread from Heaven, the only true Shepherd of men, Himself the Resurrection and the Life
Work - Will Jesus use his power to make Bread from stones in order to satisfy his own hunger? Will he push God to the test to be recognized as his unique messenger? Will he seek power illegitimately to accomplish his mission? The answers are negative
Palestine - wherein thou shalt eat Bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack anything in it; whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig brass" (Deuteronomy 8:7-9). The Breadth at Gaza from the Mediterranean to the Dead Sea is 48 geographical miles; at the Litany, from the coast to Jordan is 20 miles; the average is 34 geographical or 40 English miles. The length of country under dominion in Solomon's days was probably 170 miles, the Breadth 90, the area 12,000 or 13,000 square miles
Ordination - But the same thing is true of the water in baptism and the Bread and wine in the Eucharist
Julius (5), Bishop of Rome - using milk, or the expressed juice of grapes, instead of wine; administering the Bread dipped in the wine, after the manner of the Greeks at the present day; and using a linen cloth soaked in must, reserved through the year and moistened with water, for each celebration
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - Paul's own practice as mentioned 1Co_9:27? He also asks Augustine to explain why our Lord was and was not recognized by the women and disciples on the Day of Resurrection how He came to be known by the latter in the "breaking of Bread"; what did He mean by bidding Mary not touch Him until after His ascension (Joh_20:17)? He supposes He meant that He was to be touched by faith hereafter though not then by the hand
Egypt - are Bread for us" (Numbers 14:9)
Holy Spirit (2) - It must be spiritual (in the complete Christian sense) in its nature—not based on Bread; spiritual in its methods—not appealing to miracles which only dazzle the senses or confound the mind; and spiritual in its resources—not deriving any of its strength from alliance with Satan, from borrowing the help of the evil which wields such vast power among men, or from recognizing that it has a relative or temporary right to exist
Mental Characteristics - It was His own most positive experience not to ‘live by Bread alone,’ but to satisfy the needs of His nature with food and drink that were spiritual (John 4:13-14; John 4:34)
Socialism - The prayer for daily Bread asks that all may have the necessities of material life, and this again involves far-reaching social considerations
Messiah - In the year 1500, Rabbi Lemlem, a German Jew of Austria, declared himself a forerunner of the Messiah, and pulled down his own oven, promising his brethren that they should bake their Bread in the Holy Land next year
Persecution - Ahab’s policy may seem to suggest Breadth of mind, whilst Elijah’s attitude betokens theological narrowness; but in this case the narrow way was the way of life, whilst the broad way was also the way of death. The latter received their reward in royal bounties, but Micaiah’s message secured for him the Bread-and-water diet of the jail (1 Kings 22:27)
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - his eating the shew-bread, and, according to Mk
Reformation - At this time an alteration in the established forms of worship was first ventured upon at Wittemberg, by abolishing the celebration of private masses, and by giving the cup as well as the Bread to the laity in the Lord's supper
Law (2) - All this apparatus of piety demanded leisure to master and perform, such leisure as no man with his daily Bread to earn could command; hence arose a morality unfitted for the normal human life
Ambrosius of Milan - He argues for the daily reception of the Eucharist from the prayer, Give us this day our daily Bread ( de Sacr
Christ in the Early Church - To Justin Martyr, the Eucharist, the conditions of receiving which are belief, baptism, and a life according to the commandments of Christ, is not common Bread and common drink, but the flesh and blood of the incarnate Jesus, by which our blood and flesh are nourished (1 Apol
Christ in the Middle Ages - They were unable to find satisfaction in the Church doctrine of the transubstantiation of the Bread and the wine into the body and the blood of Christ as the form in which Christ may be enjoyed, but yearned for a spiritual union with Christ, the transubstantiation of the believer by an ecstatic exaltation into a mystical union with Christ
Church (2) - Membership implies adherence to their teaching and fellowship, with ‘the breaking of Bread’ and common prayer as a bond of union (Acts 2:42)
Lutherans - The Calvinists hold, on the contrary, that Jesus Christ is only spiritually present in the ordinance, by the external signs of Bread and wine
Egypt - The assertion that to eat Bread with the Hebrews was an abomination to the Egyptians ( Genesis 43:32 ) has not yet been satisfactorily explained
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - 14) he had baptism with water, anointing with oil, a mixture of milk and honey was given to the newly baptized, and sacramental Bread represented the Saviour's Body
Palestine - His three temptations were an epitome of the nation’s temptations—‘to act like men’ for Bread, or for fame, or for power