What does Blasphemy mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
βλασφημίας slander 5
וּנְאָצָ֖ה contempt 2
βλασφημία slander 1
βλασφημίαν slander 1

Definitions Related to Blasphemy

G988


   1 slander, detraction, speech injurious, to another’s good name.
   2 impious and reproachful speech injurious to divine majesty.
   

H5007


   1 contempt, contumely.
   2 contempt, Blasphemy.
   

Frequency of Blasphemy (original languages)

Frequency of Blasphemy (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy
In the sense of speaking evil of God this word is found in Psalm 74:18 ; Isaiah 52:5 ; Romans 2:24 ; Revelation 13:1,6 ; 16:9,11,21 . It denotes also any kind of calumny, or evil-speaking, or abuse (1 Kings 21:10 ; Acts 13:45 ; 18:6 , etc.). Our Lord was accused of blasphemy when he claimed to be the Son of God (Matthew 26:65 ; Compare Matthew 9:3 ; Mark 2:7 ). They who deny his Messiahship blaspheme Jesus (Luke 22:65 ; John 10:36 ). Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost (Matthew 12:31,32 ; Mark 3:28,29 ; Luke 12:10 ) is regarded by some as a continued and obstinate rejection of the gospel, and hence is an unpardonable sin, simply because as long as a sinner remains in unbelief he voluntarily excludes himself from pardon. Others regard the expression as designating the sin of attributing to the power of Satan those miracles which Christ performed, or generally those works which are the result of the Spirit's agency.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Blasphemy
From the Greek according to Dr. Campbell, properly denotes calumny, detraction, reproachful or abusive language, against whomsoever it be vented. It is in Scripture applied to reproaches not aimed against God only, but man also, Romans 3:8 . Romans 14:16 . 1 Peter 4:4 . Gr. It is, however, more peculiarly restrained to evil or reproachful words offered to God. According to Linwood, blasphemy is an injury offered to God, by denying that which is due and belonging to him, or attributing to him what is not agreeable to his nature.
"Three things, " says a divine, "are essential to this crime;
1.God must be the object.
2.The words spoken or written, independent of consequences which others may derive from them, must be injurious in their nature.
3.He who commits the crime must do it knowingly. This is real blasphemy; but there is a relative blasphemy, as when a man may be guilty ignorantly by propagating opinions which dishonour God, the tendency of which he does not perceive.
A man may be guilty of this constructively: for if he speak freely against received errors , it will be construed into blasphemy."
By the English laws, blasphemies of God, as denying his being or providence, and all contumelious reproaches of Jesus Christ, &c. are offences by the common law, and punishable by fine, imprisonment, and pillory; and, by the statute law, he that denies one of the persons in the Trinity, or asserts that there are more than one God, or denies Christianity to be true, for the first offence is rendered incapable of any office; for the second, adjudged incapable of suing, being executor or guardian, receiving any gift or legacy, and to be imprisoned for years. According to the law of Scotland, blasphemy is punished with death: these laws, however, in the present age, are not enforced; the legislature thinking, perhaps, that spiritual offences should be left to be punished by the Deity rather than by human statutes.
Campbell's Prel. Dess. vol. 1: p. 395; Robinson's Script. Plea, p. 58.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy
Literally a "railing accusation" against anyone (Judges 1:9). "Evil speaking" is probably meant by it in Colossians 3:8. But it is more often used in the sense of any speech directly dishonoring God (1 Kings 21:10; 2 Samuel 12:14; Psalms 74:18; Isaiah 52:5; Romans 2:24). Stoning was the penalty, as upon the son of Shelomith, a woman of Dan, and of an Egyptian father (Leviticus 24:11); Stephen was so treated by a sudden outbreak of Jewish zeal (Acts 7:57-60). The Savior would have been stoned for the blasphemy alleged as the ground of His condemnation (Matthew 26:65; Luke 5:21; John 10:36); but the Romans, to whom He was delivered, used crucifixion.
So the fulfillment of the prophecy (contrary to what might have been expected, seeing that crucifixion was not a Jewish punishment) was brought about, "they pierced My hands and My feet" (Psalms 22:16; compare John 18:31-32; John 19:6-7). The Jews, in spite of themselves, fulfilled the prophecies to the letter (John 11:50-52). The hearer of the blasphemy rent his garment, which might never be mended, and laid his hand, putting the guilt wholly, on the offender's head. The Jews, because of Leviticus 24:16, superstitiously shrank from even naming Jehovah. In Exodus 22:28, "thou shalt not curse the gods" (elohim ) refers to disrespectful language toward magistrates. From Exodus 23:13, "make no mention of the name of other gods," they thought themselves bound to turn the idols' names into nicknames, as Baal into Bosheth, Beth-aven for Beth-el, Beel-zebul for Beel-zebub.
When the Jewish rulers, who had such numerous proofs of Jesus' Messiahship, shut their hearts against conviction, and at last stifled conscience and the light so utterly as to attribute His miracles of love, as the casting out of unclean spirits, to the help of the prince of demons, Christ pronounced that they were either committing or on the verge of committing the sin against the Holy Spirit which is forgiven neither in this world nor in the world to come, though all sin against the Son of man can be forgiven (Matthew 12:31, etc.; Mark 3:28, etc.).
None can now commit formally the same sin of attributing Jesus' miracles against Satan's kingdom to Satan's help, so evident a self contradiction that nothing short of a seared conscience, and a hardened determination to resist every spiritual impression and even malign the Spirit's work before other men, could have given birth to such a sin. But a man may commit virtually the same sin by continued malignant resistance of the gracious Spirit in one's own heart, with, at the same time, blasphemous and Satanic misrepresentation of it to others. He who has committed it is so given over to a reprobate mind as to have no pang of conscience about it, and the very fear of anyone that he has committed it is proof positive that he has not, for if he had he would have been "past feeling" (Hebrews 6:4-6; 1 John 5:16).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Blasphemy Against the Holy Ghost
See UNPARDONABLE SIN.
Webster's Dictionary - Blasphemy
(1):
(n.) An indignity offered to God in words, writing, or signs; impiously irreverent words or signs addressed to, or used in reference to, God; speaking evil of God; also, the act of claiming the attributes or prerogatives of deity.
(2):
(n.) Figuratively, of things held in high honor: Calumny; abuse; vilification.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy
is a transliteration of a Greek word meaning literally “to speak harm.” In the biblical context, blasphemy is an attitude of disrespect that finds expression in an act directed against the character of God.
Old Testament Blasphemy draws its Christian definition through the background of the Old Testament. It is significant that blasphemy reflects improper action with regard to the use of God's name. God revealed His character and invited personal relationship through the revelation of His name. Therefore, the use of God's name gave the Israelites the opportunity of personal participation with the very nature of God.
Leviticus 24:14-16 guides the Hebrew definition of blasphemy. The offense is designated as a capital crime, and the offender is to be stoned by the community. Blasphemy involves the actual pronunciation of the name of God along with an attitude of disrespect. Under the influence of this interpretation, the personal name of God (Yahweh) was withdrawn from ordinary speech and the title of Adonai (Lord) was used in its place.
Israel, at various times, was guilty of blasphemy. Specifically mentioned were the instances of the golden calf (Nehemiah 9:18 ) and the harsh treatment of the prophets (Nehemiah 9:26 ). David was accused by Nathan of making a mockery of God's commands and giving an occasion for the enemies of Israel to blaspheme—to misunderstand the true nature of God (2 Samuel 12:14 ).
The enemies of Israel blasphemed God through acts against the people of God. The Assyrians claimed that God was powerless when compared to their mighty army (2Kings 19:6,2 Kings 19:22 ; Isaiah 37:6 ,Isaiah 37:6,37:23 ). A contempt of God was shown by the Babylonians during the Exile, as they continually ridiculed God (Isaiah 52:5 ). Edom was guilty of blasphemy when it rejoiced over the fall of Jerusalem (Ezekiel 35:12 ). God responded with judgment (2 Kings 19:35-37 ) or promised judgment (Isaiah 52:6 ; Ezekiel 35:12-15 ) to defend the dignity of His name.
New Testament The New Testament broadens the concept of blasphemy to include actions against Christ and the church as the body of Christ. Jesus was regarded by the Jewish leaders as a blasphemer Himself (Mark 2:7 ). When tried by the Sanhedrin, Jesus not only claimed messianic dignity, but further claimed the supreme exalted status (Luke 22:69 ). Such a claim, according to the Sanhedrin, fit the charge of blasphemy and, therefore, deserved death (Matthew 26:65 ; Mark 14:64 ). However, according to the New Testament perspective, the real blasphemers were those who denied the messianic claims of Jesus and rejected His unity with the Father (Mark 15:29 ; Luke 22:65 ; Luke 23:39 ).
The unity of Christ and the church is recognized in the fact that persecutions against Christians are labeled as blasphemous acts (1 Timothy 1:13 ; 1 Peter 4:4 ; Revelation 2:9 ). It is also important that Christians avoid conduct that might give an occasion for blasphemy, especially in the area of attitude and speech (Ephesians 4:31 ; Colossians 3:8 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Titus 3:2 ).
The sin of blasphemy is a sin that can be forgiven. However, there is a sin of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit that cannot be forgiven ( Matthew 12:32 ; Mark 3:29 ; Luke 12:10 ). This is a state of hardness in which one consciously and willfully resists God's saving power and grace. It is a desperate condition that is beyond the situation of forgiveness because one is not able to recognize and repent of sin. Thus one wanting to repent of blasphemy against the Spirit cannot have committed the sin.
Jerry M. Henry
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Blasphemy
Definition . In English "blasphemy" denotes any utterance that insults God or Christ (or Allah, or Muhammed) and gives deeply felt offense to their followers. In several states in the United States and in Britain, blasphemy is a criminal offense, although there have been few prosecution in this century. In Islamic countries generally no distinction is made between blasphemy and heresy, so that any perceived rejection of the Prophet or his message, by Muslims or non-Muslims, is regarded as blasphemous.
The biblical concept is very different. There is no Hebrew word equivalent to the English "blasphemy, " and the Greek root blasphem- [1], which is used fifty-five times in the New Testament, has a wide meaning. In both Testaments the idea of blasphemy as something that offends the religious sensibilities of others is completely absent.
The Old Testament At least five different Hebrew verbs are translated "blaspheme" in English translations. Translators choose "blaspheme" when, for instance, the verbs "curse" ( qalal [2]), "revile" (gadap [3]), or "despise" (herep ) are used with God as the object. No special verb is reserved for cursing or insults directed at God.
However, to curse or insult God is an especially grave sin. It can be done by word or by deed. There is little distinction between the sinner who deliberately abuses the name of the Lord (Leviticus 24:10-16 ), and the one who deliberately flouts his commandments (Numbers 15:30-31 ). For both, the death penalty is prescribed. Similarly, the prayer of the Levites in Nehemiah 9 calls "awful blasphemies" all that Israelites did when they made the golden calf (9:18).
David's flagrant sin with Bathsheba may be called a blasphemy (2 Samuel 12:14 ), but a more likely translation is that David has "made the enemies of the Lord show utter contempt" (NIV ). Instead of testifying by lifestyle to the character of the Lord, David's action confirms the blasphemous belief of the nations that the Lord is no different from any other national god.
The New Testament . The Greek root blasphem- [ Mark 15:29 ; Acts 13:45 ; Ephesians 4:31 ; 1 Peter 4:4 ), or even unjust accusations (Romans 3:8 ), but it is more usually used of insults offered to God (e.g., Revelation 13:6 ; 16:9 ). Jesus is accused of blasphemy for pronouncing forgiveness and for claiming a unique relationship with God (Matthew 26:65 ; Mark 2:7 ; John 10:33 ).
Jesus picks up the Numbers 15 passage about blasphemy in his famous saying about blasphemy against the Holy Spirit ( Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-29 ; Luke 12:10 ). Numbers 15:22-31 distinguishes between unintentional sin committed in ignorance (for which forgiveness is possible), and defiant sin, called blasphemy, for which there is no forgiveness. Jesus teaches that the blasphemy for which there is no forgiveness is that against the Holy Spirit; all other blasphemies, particularly those against "the Son of Man, " may be forgiven. Insults thrown at "the Son of Man" may be forgiven because they are committed in ignorance of who he really is: his heavenly glory does not appear on earth. But to ascribe obvious manifestations of the Spirit to the devil's agency is a much more serious offense not committed in ignorance.
This downgrading of the significance of blasphemy against Christ marks an important difference between Christianity and Islam. Whereas Muslims are bound to defend the honor of the Prophet, for Christians Jesus is the one who says, "The insults of those who insult you have fallen on me" (Romans 15:3 , ; quoting Psalm 69:9 ). He deliberately accepts the vilification of others and prays for the forgiveness of those who insult him (Luke 23:34 ). In this, he sets an example for Christians to follow. According to Peter (1 Peter 2:19-25 ), they must accept insult and blasphemy without retaliation, as he did.
There is only one kind of blasphemy that Christians must resist: the blasphemy they will bring on themselves if they cause a fellow believer to stumble through the thoughtless exercise of their freedom (Romans 14:15-16 ; 1 Corinthians 10:28-30 ).
Stephen Motyer
Bibliography . I. Howard Marshall, Theology 67 (1964): 65-67; R. Simpson. Blasphemy and the Law in a Plural Society .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit
Overt, verbal, and conscious repudiation of the fact that God is at work in Jesus Christ accomplishing his designs through the power of the Holy Spirit. Exactly what is being described by this expression, found in Mark 3:29 (par. Matthew 12:32 ; Luke 12:10 ), has vexed both scholars and ordinary Christians for centuries.
Several observations are in order. First, the object of this "blasphemy" is the Holy Spirit, who is clearly distinguished in the context from Jesus Christ, the Son of Man, who may be blasphemed by someone who yet is forgiven ( Matthew 12:32 ). While the Spirit is the object, however, it is the Spirit's work in Jesus Christ that is the focus of the passage. Second, the result of this blasphemy is that the blasphemer cannot be forgiven by God. Third, the consequence of this blasphemy is eternal unforgivability. Mark calls this the "eternal sin, " a term found in modern translations; the KJV has "eternal judgment." Finally, the circumstances of Jesus' pronouncement include the attribution of his powers to demonic sources ( Mark 3:22 ).
What is this sin? Both Mark and Luke use the term "blaspheme" while Matthew has the more ordinary "speaks against, " showing that all three have in mind some kind of verbal repudiation or denunciation of the Spirit of God in the ministry of Jesus. Ancients believed in the power of words and uttering imprecations, curses, and blasphemies were taken seriously. The verb "blaspheme" means to speak abusively or insultingly of someone or something (Acts 18:6 ; Isaiah 63:7-6427 ). In the Old Testament the term was used specially for derisive language and attitudes toward the God of the covenant with Israel (2 Kings 19:4 ; 6,22 Isa 6,266:3 ; Ezekiel 35:12-13 ). The fundamental notion inherited by New Testament authors, and Jesus in particular, is expressed in Leviticus 24:15-16 : "Whoever curses (qalal [ Leviticus 24:10-23 ; for the blasphemer ).
Furthermore, the Spirit is the sign of the new age and the reception of the Spirit is the focus of hope in some Old Testament visions. Thus, 1618385436_9:11 speaks of God's covenantal faithfulness to his people, led by Moses, even when they grieved the Holy Spirit (63:10). The prayer is that God would rend his heavens and come down to his people and make his name great among the nations (64:1-2). One suspects that the advent of the Holy Spirit at the baptism of Jesus fulfills this Old Testament hope, and yet Israel remains hardened and grieves the Spirit once again (cf. 63:10; Mark 3:29 ). What we find then is double accountability: Old Testament disobedience, followed by God's promised restoration in sending the Spirit, and now once again the same rejection.
Consequently, when we come to the text of the Synoptic Gospels there is a history of interpretation and applications that prohibit anyone (Leviticus 24:15-16 ; includes the sojourner ) from denouncing the God of Israel, repudiating his claims, and insulting his honor. What Jesus claims is that a similar type of sin is being committed whenever one speaks against the Holy Spirit as revealed powerfully in his ministry. What caused stoning in the Old Testament, now incurs eternal condemnation; such a sin is unforgivable.
What are the specific symptoms of this sin? There have been many suggestions in the history of interpretation, including breaking the third commandment (Exodus 20:7 ; taking the Lord's name in vain ) or the seventh commandment (Exodus 20:14 ; adultery cf. 1 Corinthians 6:18 ), postbaptismal sins (Origen), post-Pentecost rejection of the Spirit, and the attempt to achieve meritorious righteousness before God. Others have given up on finding the meaning. While the various proposals may have some merit, it is best to examine "blasphemy against the Spirit" in the Gospels themselves to see what light they shed on what is being addressed.
The contexts of the Gospels provide the important clues. In Mark and Matthew, the context is Jesus' exorcisms by the power of God's Spirit (Matthew 12:22-24 ; cf. Mark 3:22 ). While Jesus contends that one might miss the revelation of God in his lowly person (Matthew 12:32 a), no one can miss the power of God at work in his ability to exorcize demons (Matthew 12:32 b; Mark 3:29 ). Thus, the unforgivable sin is repudiation of the work of God, seen in Jesus' powerful Acts of exorcism.
Luke puts this same saying in a slightly different context: the public acknowledgment of Jesus Christ. Jesus says it is one thing to deny him publicly; it is quite another thing to repudiate the power of the Holy Spirit (Luke 12:8-10 ). Thus, the unforgivable sin here seems to be public repudiation of the power of the Spirit in the ministry of the apostles of Jesus. What we see here is probably an application: inasmuch as it is blasphemous to reject the Spirit in the ministry of Jesus, so it is also blasphemous to reject the Spirit in the ministry of the Twelve (since they are personal agents of Jesus). After all, the Spirit purifies and enables holiness (Psalm 51:11-13 ; Ezekiel 36:25-27 ). In summary, we may confidently conclude that "blasphemy against the Spirit" is overt, even verbal, repudiation of the presence of God's Spirit in the ministry of Jesus and those whom he has sent.
After the earthly ministry and death of Christ, the emphasis on the Spirit as the object of the blasphemous words and attitudes will give way to an emphasis on Jesus Christ (cf. James 2:7 ). Hence, we find Paul's preaching of Christ crucified being repudiated; this would appear to be "blasphemy against the Spirit" as well (Acts 13:8,45 ; 14:2 ; 18:6 ; 19:13-16 ).
Blasphemy against the Spirit and apostasy are related. Apostasy, whether defined in the Calvinistic or Arminian sense, is committed by those who have had some relationship to God through Christ. Thus, apostasy is acceptance followed by repudiation of Jesus Christ (Hebrews 6:4-6 ; 10:29-39 ; 1 John 5:16-17 ); blasphemy against the Spirit is not preceded by acceptance. It describes overt repudiation before any kind of commitment is made. While we may distinguish these two sins in this manner, it also needs to be observed that the two sins amount to largely the same stance. For both involve an overt repudiation of God's work in Christ.
Scot McKnight
See also Holy Spirit ; Sin unto Death
Bibliography . C. K. Barrett, The Holy Spirit and the Gospel Tradition ; G. C. Berkouwer, Sin ; H. W. Beyer, TDNT, 1:621-25; O. Hofius, EDNT, 1:219-21; W. D. Davies and D. C. Allison, Jr., The Gospel according to Saint Matthew ; A. Richardson, An Introduction to the Theology of the New Testament ; N. Turner, Christian Words ; G. H. Twelftree, Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, pp. 75-77; H. Wä risch, W. Mundle, and C. Brown, NIDNTT, 3.340-47.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Blasphemy
BLASPHEMY . The modern use of this word is more restricted in its range than that of either the OT or the NT. 1 . In the former it is narrower in its scope than in the latter, being almost universally confined to language or deeds ( 1M Malachi 2:6 ) derogating from the honour of God and His claims to the over-lordship of men ( Leviticus 24:10-16 , cf. 1 Kings 21:10 ; 1 Kings 21:13 , 2 Kings 19:6 etc.). The contemptuous scorning of sacred places was regarded as blasphemy (see Malachi 2:6 Malachi 2:6 ; 1Ma 7:38 , cf. Acts 6:13 ), as was also the light and irresponsible utterance of the sacred Name ( Isaiah 52:6 , Ezekiel 36:20 , Deuteronomy 5:11 ), the degradation of Jehovah-worship by conformity to pagan rites ( Ezekiel 20:27 ), and the continued wilful transgression of Divine commands and despising of ‘the word of the Lord’ ( Numbers 15:30 f.). The incident of the man gathering sticks on the Sabbath seems to be a concrete example of blasphemy ( Numbers 15:32 f.).
2 . When we come to the NT, the word is found more frequently, and is employed in a manner more nearly allied to the usage of classical writings. The EV [1] has accordingly tr. [2] it often as ‘railing’ or slanderous talk generally ( Matthew 15:19 = Mark 7:22 , Ephesians 4:31 , Col 3:8 , 1 Timothy 6:4 , Judges 1:9 ), looked at, however, on its ethical and religious side. The cognate verb, too, is treated in the same way ( Mark 15:29 = Matthew 27:39 , Luke 22:65 ; Luke 23:39 , Romans 3:8 ; Rom 14:16 , 1 Corinthians 4:18 ; 1 Corinthians 10:30 , Tit 3:2 , 1 Peter 4:4 ; 1 Peter 4:14 , 2Pe 2:2 ; 2 Peter 2:10 ; 2 Peter 2:12 , Judges 1:8 ; Judges 1:10 ), as is also the derived adjective ( 2 Timothy 3:2 , 2 Peter 2:11 ).
One of the most frequent of the charges brought by the Jews against Jesus was that of blasphemy, and when we inquire into the meaning of the accusation, we find that it was the application to Himself of Divine attributes and prerogatives (Mark 2:7 = Matthew 9:3 , Mark 14:64 = Matthew 26:65 , John 10:33 ; John 10:36 ). On the other hand, the NT writers regarded the unreasoning attitude of the Jews to the claims and teaching of Jesus as blasphemous ( Mark 15:29 = Matthew 27:39 , Luke 22:65 ; Luke 23:39 , Acts 13:45 ; Acts 18:6 ). It is interesting also to notice that this is the word put by the author of the Acts into the mouth of the town-clerk of Ephesus when he was appeasing the riotous mob who were persuaded that St. Paul and his companions had insulted the local deity ( Acts 19:37 ).
3 . The legal punishment for blasphemy was death ( Leviticus 24:16 ), and so the Jews claimed the life of Jesus, as the just and lawful outcome of His words and teaching ( John 19:7 , cf. John 10:33 ; John 8:58 f.). The proto-martyr Stephen lost his life, too, on a charge of blasphemy ( Acts 6:13 ; Acts 7:58 ), when his enemies, in a violent and sudden fit of rage, forgot the limitation imposed on them as vassals of the Roman Empire (cf. John 18:31 ; see Westcott, Gospel of St. John , Additional Note in loc ). On the ‘blasphemy against the Holy Ghost,’ see art. Sin, III. 1.
J. R. Willis.
King James Dictionary - Blasphemy
BLAS'PHEMY, n. An indignity offered to God by words or writing reproachful, contemptuous or irreverent words uttered impiously against Jehovah.
Blasphemy is an injury offered to God, by denying that which is due and belonging to him, or attributing to him that which is not agreeable to his nature.
In the middle ages, blasphemy was used to denote simply the blaming or condemning of a person or thing. Among the Greeks, to blaspheme was to use words of omen, which they were careful to avoid.
1. That which derogates from the prerogatives of God. Mark 2 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy
In scripture this does not always refer to speaking evil of God, to which the word is now restricted. The same Greek word is translated 'railing' in 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Jude 9 ; and 'evil speaking' in Ephesians 4:31 , as it might well be rendered elsewhere. Blaspheming the name of the Lord was under the Jewish economy punishable by death: the son of Shelomith who had married an Egyptian, was stoned to death for this sin. Leviticus 24:11,14,23 . The blasphemy against the Holy Ghost was attributing the Lord's action of casting out demons to the agency of Satan — a sin which should not be forgiven in this age nor in the age to come. The context shows that 'the unpardonable sin' refers to this particular form of blasphemy. Matthew 12:24-32 .
CARM Theological Dictionary - Blasphemy
Speaking evil of God or denying Him some good which we should attribute to Him. Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit is stating that Jesus did his miracles by the power of the devil (Matthew 12:22-32) and is an unforgivable sin (Mark 3:28-30). Blasphemy arises out of pride (Psalms 73:9; Psa 73:11), hatred (Psalms 74:18), injustice (Isaiah 52:5), etc. Christ was mistakenly accused of blasphemy (John 10:30-33).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Blasphemy
(βλασφημία, vb. βλασφημεῖν, adj. and noun βλάσφημος; perhaps derived from βλάπτειν, ‘to injure,’ and φήμη, ‘speech’)
In ordinary usage and in Eng. law this word denotes profane, irreverent speaking against God or sacred things; but the Greek word has a wider sense, including all modes of reviling or calumniating either God or man. In 2 Timothy 3:2 the Revised Version has ‘railers’ instead of ‘blasphemers’; in Acts 13:45 m and Acts 18:6 m it gives ‘rail’ as an alternative, and in Revelation 2:9 m ‘revile.’ ‘As we be slanderously reported’ (βλασφημούμεθα, Romans 3:8); ‘why am I evil spoken of?’ (τί βλασφημοῦμαι; 1 Corinthians 10:30); ‘to speak evil of no man’ (μηδένα βλασφημεῖν, Titus 3:2); ‘those.… rail at dignities’ (δόξας βλασφημοῦσιν, Judges 1:8; cf. 2 Peter 2:10) are other examples of the use of the word with a human reference. The two meanings of βλασφημία are combined in Acts 6:11, where Stephen is accused of Speaking blasphemous words (ῥήματα βλάσφημα) against Moses and God (εἰς Μωσῆν καὶ τὸν θεόν).
According to the Levitical law the punishment for blaspheming the name of Jahweh was death by stoning (Leviticus 24:10-16); but as Roman subjects the Jews had not power to put any man to death. Though they attempted to observe the regular forms in their trial of Stephen for blasphemy, his death was not a judicial execution, but the illegal act of a solemn Sanhedrin changed by fanatical hatred into a murderous mob.
After Jesus had come to be acknowledged as the Messiah, the denial of His status and the insulting of His name were regarded by His followers as conscious or unconscious blasphemy. St. Paul recalls with shame and sorrow the time when, in this sense of the term, he not only was guilty of habitual blasphemy (τὸ πρότερον ὄντα βλάσφημον, 1 Timothy 1:13), but strove to make others blaspheme (ἠνάγκαζον βλασφημεῖν, Acts 26:11; Acts 26:11). The fortitude of those who resisted his efforts made a profound impression on his mind, and probably did more than anything else to pave the way for conversion. Like Pliny afterwards in Bithynia (Epp. x. 97), he doubtless found it was all but impossible to make men and women speak evil of their so-called Messiah-‘maledicere Christum’-or submit to any other test that would have indicated disloyalty to Him: ‘quorum nihil cogi posse dicuntur, qui sunt re verâ Christiani’ (ib.). When, on the other hand, St. Paul began to preach Jesus as His own Messiah, the blasphemies of his countrymen against that Name became his daily fare. The Jews of Pisidian Antioch ‘contradicted the things which were spoken by Paul and blasphemed’ (Acts 13:45); those of Corinth ‘opposed themselves and blasphemed’ (Acts 18:6); and the historian might have multiplied instances without end.
Blasphemy was not exclusively a Jewish and Christian conception. To the Greeks also it was a high offence βλασφημεῖν εἰς θεούς (Plato, Rep. 281 E), The majesty of the gods and the sacredness of the temples were jealously guarded. St. Paul, who reasoned against idolatry, never used opprobrious language about the religion of Greece or Rome. It was better to fight for the good than to rail at the bad. The town-clerk of Ephesus reminds his fellow-citizens, roused to fury at the bare suspicion of dishonour to Artemis, that St. Paul and his companions were no blasphemers of their goddess (οὔτε βλασφημοῦντες τὴν θεὰν ὑμῶν, Acts 19:37). Towards the cult of Caesar, which was still kept within some bounds, the Apostle always maintained the same correct attitude. But in the Apocalypse, written in the reign of Domitian, there is a startling change. That emperor, ‘probably the wickedest man who ever lived’ (Renan), was the first to demand that Divine honours should be paid to himself in his lifetime. Not content, like his predecessors, with the title Divus, he caused himself to be styled in public documents ‘Our Lord and God.’ In Asia Minor the deification of Caesar, the erection of temples in his honour, and the establishment of communes for the promotion of his worship became imperative, while the offering of incense to his statue was made the ordinary test of loyalty to the Empire. To the prophet of Ephesus all this seemed rank blasphemy, and he delivered his soul by denouncing it. He personified the Empire as the Beast whose seven heads had names of blasphemy (Revelation 13:1), to whom was given a mouth speaking great things and blasphemies (Revelation 13:5), who opened his mouth for blasphemies against God, to blaspheme His name and His tabernacle (Revelation 13:6); as the scarlet-coloured Beast who was covered all over with names of blasphemies (Revelation 17:3). That a creature called an emperor should assume the attributes of the Creator, and compel the homage of an infatuated world, was nothing less than a Satanic triumph; and whether men knew it or not, they ‘were worshipping the dragon’ (Revelation 13:4). Cf. article Emperor-Worship.
Literature.-In addition to articles on ‘Blasphemy’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , Encyclopaedia Biblica , Hastings’ Single-vol. Dictionary of the Bible , and Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics , with the literature there cited, see the relevant Commentaries, esp. Sanday-Headlam, Romans 5 (International Critical Commentary , 1902); H. B. Swete, The Apocalypse of St. John2, 1907; J. Armitage Robinson. Ephesians, 1903. See also Catholic Encyclopedia , s.v., and Roman Catholic literature cited there.
James Strahan.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Blasphemy (2)
BLASPHEMY (βλασφημία; for derivation of word see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, vol. i. p. 305a).—This word is used in the Gospels, as in other parts of the NT, for abusive speech generally, as well as for language that is insulting to God. Thus we read of ‘an evil eye, blasphemy ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 railing), pride,’ etc. (Mark 7:22), where the position of the word indicates human relations. The evil eye is followed by the evil tongue, the one by look and the other by speech expressing malignity towards a fellow-man. Two questions concerning blasphemy come up in the Gospels, viz. the teaching of Jesus Christ on the subject, and the charge of blasphemy brought against our Lord.
1. The teaching of Jesus Christ concerning blasphemy.—Using the term in the general sense, our Lord does not always formally distinguish between insulting speech with regard to God and abusive language towards men. βλασφημία in any application of it is sin. As railing against our fellow-men, it comes in a catalogue of sins together with the most heinous—‘murders, adulteries,’ etc. (Mark 7:22). In this connexion it is treated as one of the ‘evil things’ that ‘proceed from within, and defile the man.’ Thus it is taken to be the expression of a corrupt heart, and as such a defilement of the person who gives vent to it. Nevertheless it is not beyond the reach of pardon. With one exception all revilings may be forgiven (Mark 3:28-29, Matthew 12:31). The comprehensive sentence must include blasphemy against God, although that is not expressly mentioned. In Matthew 12:32 there is a reference to blasphemy against the Son of Man, and in both cases the unpardonable sin of blasphemy against the Holy Ghost is mentioned; but in neither case is there any reference to blasphemy against the Father. Perhaps the safest thing is to say that this was not in mind at the time, so that no direct pronouncement was made concerning it; and, further, it is to be observed that Trinitarian distinctions do not appear in these teachings of Jesus. Jesus is here the ‘Son of Man,’ not ‘the Son,’ i.e. of God, and the Holy Spirit is God in His manifested activity. Still, it must be implicitly contained in St. Mark’s emphatic sentence, ‘All their sins … and their blasphemies wherewith soever they shall blaspheme (ὅσα ἂν βλασφημήσωσιν).’
To ‘speak a word against the Son of Man’ is taken as one form of the blasphemy or reviling. Here, therefore, the word is not used in its relation to God. It does not stand for what we now understand by ‘blasphemy’ in our narrower sense of the word. Jesus is not here standing on the ground of His divinity, to insult which would be blasphemy in this modern sense. He is speaking of Himself as seen among men, and referring to personal insults. But, since the term ‘the Son of Man’ appears to be a veiled reference to His Messiahship, for Himself and for the enlightened among His followers He must have meant that those who insulted Him, even though He was the Christ, were not beyond pardon; cf. ‘Father, forgive them,’ etc. (Luke 23:34, om. BD*, etc.). Some doubt, however, is thrown on this reference to ‘the Son of Man’ because (1) it does not occur in the Mk. parallel passage; (2) in Mk. but not in Mt. the phrase ‘the sons of men’ occurs in an earlier part of the saying (Mark 3:28).
The nature of blasphemy against the Holy Ghost (Matthew 12:22-32, Mark 3:29, Luke 12:10) must be learnt from the context. This excludes such notions as rejection of the gospel (Iren.), denial of the divinity of Christ (Athan.), mortal sin after baptism (Origen), persistence in sin till death (August.). The form of the blasphemy is given in the words ‘because they said, He hath an unclean spirit,’ and the occasion of it was Jesus’ casting out of demons. Jesus declares that this is done ‘by the Spirit of God’ (Matthew 12:28), or ‘by the finger of God’ (Luke 11:20). To ascribe this action to Beelzebub is to be guilty of, or to approach the guilt of, blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, because it is treating the Holy Spirit as Beelzebub. Jesus did not expressly say that the scribes who put forward this Beelzebub theory of His work had actually committed this sin. He judged by thought and intention, not by outward utterance. A prejudiced, ignorant, hasty, superficial utterance of the calumny would not contain the essence of the sin. This must be a conscious, intentional insult. If one mistakes a saint for a knave, and addresses him accordingly, he is not really guilty of insulting him, for it is not actually the saint but the knave whom he has in mind. If the presence of the Holy Spirit was not recognized, there could be no blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. But when it was perceived and yet deliberately treated as evil, the action would indicate a wilful reversal of the dictates of conscience. Our Lord warns His hearers that such a sin cannot be forgiven either in the present age—the pre-Messianic, or in the age to come—the Messianic, that is, as we should say, the Christian age. The condition of such a person will be that he is guilty (ἔνοχος) of an eternal (αἰωνίου) sin (so Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 of Mark 3:29, following א BL, etc., ἁμαρτήματος; not ‘damnation,’ as in Authorized Version, after the Syrian reading ἁμαρτήματος;, A, etc.). This cannot well mean ‘a sin that persists, a fixed disposition,’ as Dr. Salmond understands it, because (1) the Greek word ἁμαρτήματος; stands for an act, not a state; (2) there is nothing in the context to indicate persistency in the blasphemy; (3) the Jewish current conception was that a sin once committed remained on the sinner till it was atoned for or forgiven. He had to bear his sin. Therefore one who was never forgiven would have to bear his sin eternally, and so would be said to have an eternal sin. Wellhausen understands it to be equivalent to eternal punishment (‘schuldig ewiger Sünde, d. i. ewiger Strafe,’ Evang. Marci, 28).
At the same time, while this must be understood as the correct exegesis of the words, the saying should be interpreted in harmony with the spirit of Christ. Now it is characteristic of legalism and the letter to make a solitary exception, depending on one external act. The Spirit of Christ is concerned with character rather than with specific deeds, and it is contrary to His spirit that one specific deed should be singled out for exclusion from mercy. Then, elsewhere, the breadth of His gospel indicates that no genuine seeker would be rejected. Therefore we must understand Him to mean either (1) that to be guilty of such a sin a man must be so hardened that he never would repent, or (2) that such a sin cannot be overlooked, forgotten, and swallowed up in the general flood of mercy. It must come up for judgment. Against (1) and for (2) is the fact that our Lord says nothing of the offender’s disposition, but only refers to the sin, its heinous character, and consequent never-to-be-denied or forgotten ill-desert. See, further, art. Unpardonable Sin.
2. The charge of blasphemy brought against Jesus Christ.—This charge was brought against our Lord on three occasions—two recorded in the Synoptics and one in the Fourth Gospel. In all of these cases the alleged blasphemy is against God, actual blasphemy in our sense of the word. The first instance is at the cure of the paralytic who had been let down through the roof (Matthew 9:3, Mark 2:7, Luke 5:21). Jesus had just said to the sufferer, ‘Thy sins are forgiven thee.’ Upon this the scribes and Pharisees who were present complained that He was speaking blasphemies because only God could forgive sins, that is to say, that He was arrogating to Himself a Divine prerogative. In His answer He distinctly claimed this right on the ground of His enigmatic title of ‘the Son of Man,’ and held it to be confirmed by His cure of the paralytic. The second occasion is that recorded by St. John, where the Jews declare that their attempt to stone Jesus was ‘for blasphemy,’ adding ‘because that thou, being a man makest thyself God’ (John 10:33). This was just after He had said, ‘I and the Father are one (ἕν).’ The third occasion is at the trial of Jesus. According to Matthew 26:65 and Mark 14:63-64 when Jesus, after being adjured by the high priest to declare if He were the Christ, declared that they would ‘see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of power and coming with the clouds of heaven,’ the high priest treated this as blasphemy, rending his garments as a token of honor at the words. Yet the claim was not for more than the Book of Enoch assigned to the Messiah. But the Messiah in that Apocalyptic book is a heavenly being. Such a being Caiaphas would understand Jesus to claim to be, and he reckoned the profession of such a claim blasphemous. This was the formal ground of the condemnation of Jesus to death by the Sanhedrin. The first charge, that of threatening to destroy the Temple and rebuild it in three days, had broken down because of the inconsistency of the witnesses. The second charge is suddenly sprung upon, Jesus by the high priest on the ground of His words at the council; and, on this account, as guilty of blasphemy, He was condemned to death, although it was useless to cite the words before Pilate, who would have dismissed the case as Gallio at Corinth dismissed what he regarded as ‘a question about words and names’ (Acts 18:15). Therefore a third charge, never mentioned in the Jewish trial,—laesae majestatis, treason against Caesar,—was concocted for use at the Roman trial.
It is to be observed that there is one common character in all these accusations of blasphemy brought against Jesus. He is never accused of direct blasphemy, speaking insulting words about God. The alleged blasphemy is indirect, in each case claiming more or less Divine rights and powers for Himself.
Lastly, it may be noted that Luke 22:65 Authorized Version has the word ‘blasphemously’ for the way in which the mockers spoke of Jesus; but Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 has ‘reviling,’ which is the evident meaning. There is no reference to our narrower sense of blasphemy as insulting the Divine; the word (ἁμαρτήματος;) is used in the common wider sense.
Literature.—S. J. Andrews, Life of Our Lord, 505–514; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, art. ‘Blasphemy’; Cremer, Bibl.-Theol. Lex. s.vv. βλασφημία, βλασφημὲω; and in particular on blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, Martensen, Christian Ethics, ii. p. 123ff.; Gloag, Exegetical Studies, p. 1 ff.; Expositor, 2nd ser. iii. [1] p. 321 ff.; A. Maclaren, Christ’s Musts, 44–54.
W. F. Adeney.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Blasphemy
I think it proper to stop at this word, as the sense and meaning of it is not so generally understood as it were to be wished; and many of God's dear children, it is to be apprehended, have their minds much exercised about it, fearing they have committed the unpardonable sin, in blasphemy against the Holy Ghost. It will not be amiss, therefore, to make an humble enquiry concerning it, looking up for the Lord the Spirit to be our Teacher.
The sin of blasphemy is peculiarly applied to those who sin against God by profaning his holy name, and speaking lightly and wantonly of his person, prefections, and attributes. The law under Moses's dispensation punished such crimes with death. (Leviticus 24:11; Lev 24:16)
This is what may be called blasphemy in general. But added to this, our Lord speaks of a peculiar branch of blasphemy against the person and work of God the Holy Ghost, as being accompanied with aggravated malignity, and in its nature unpardonable. But as if that none of his children might make a mistake concerning it, with that tenderness and grace which distinguished his character, the Lord Jesus mercifully set forth in what the peculiar degree of the sin consisted. He had been casting out devils, and the Scribes and Pharisees, with their usaul malignity, ascribed those gracious acts to the agency of the Evil Spirit. Hence, our Lord thus expressed himself, "Verily, I say unto you, all sin shall be for given unto the sons of men, and blasphemies wherewith soever they should blaspheme. But he that should blaspheme against the Holy Ghost hath never forgiveness, but is in danger of eternal damnation." And then it is added, as an explanation of the whole, and to shew in what the unpardonable sin consisted, "because they said, he hath an unclean spirit." (Mark 3:28, etc.) Here was the blasphemy, in ascribing the works of Jesus, wrought evidently the Spirit of JEHOVAH, to the agency of Satan; was blasphemy with a vengeance, and from its peculiar malignity unpardonable. And who are the persons that commit it? Surely, not they who desire to love Jesus, and to feel the gracious influences of the Holy Ghost. Their distresses and their fears are, lest they should come short of the grace of God. They are too well convinced that the Lord Jesus wrought all his miracles by his own almighty power, even to call it in question; so that in this sense, it is impossible for them to commit this unpardonable sin. They would shudder even to hear such blasphemy from the lips of others; and how then should it come from their own?
Who then were the persons to whom the Lord Jesus alluded when he thus expressed himself? Most evidently and plainly, the Scribes and Pharisees then before him. They had charged Christ with having an evil spirit, by whose influence he wrought miracles, and hence Jesus declared the sin, and shewed, at the same time, that it was totally unpardonable.
And what confirmed it more, and manifested that they were given up to a reprobate mind, was, that hardness and insensibility both of their sin and their danger. Here is another sweet and precious testimony to the timid and fearful child of God, if he would but attend to it as it really is. Your very softness of heart proves the reverse of those obdurate Pharisees. They had commited it, and were insensible and unconcerned. Your sorrow and apprehension most decidedly manifest that you have not so sinned, neither can have committed such an evil. The very different state of the different characters draws the line of distinction, and shews who are the blasphemers of the Holy Ghost, and who are not. The Lord be the teacher of his people.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Blasphemy
Blasphemy. Irreverent or insulting language fn regard to God. Matthew 26:65-66; Romans 2:24, and elsewhere. But the original words in scripture had often a wider signification, and meant evil-speaking, slander, reviling generally. Matthew 15:19; Luke 22:65, and elsewhere. The punishment prescribed by the Mosaic law for the crime of actual blasphemy was death by stoning. This we find executed on the son of Shelomith, Leviticus 24:10-16; and it was on this charge, though a false one, that our Lord and Stephen were condemned. Psalms 74:18; Acts 6:11. If Jesus had not been the Son of God, his assumption of equality with the Father would have been blasphemous. That assumption was true; but the Jews accused him of blasphemy because they knew not who he was. In regard to blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, the essence of this fearful sin seems to have been that the Jews, shutting their eyes to the proof of miracles which Christ gave, daringly attributed those good works to an unclean spirit. Mark 3:28-30. So a desperate resistance to the gracious influence of the Holy Spirit shuts up the soul to irretrievable ruin. It is not that the blood of Jesus Christ could not cleanse such a sinner, but that the man defeats the kind purpose that would lead him to it. He never applies to the fountain of unlimited virtue; and so he remains uncleansed forever.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Blaspheme, Blasphemy, Blasphemer, Blasphemous
A — 1: βλασφημία (Strong's #988 — Noun Feminine — blasphemia — blas-fay-me'-ah ) either from blax, "sluggish, stupid," or, probably, from blapto, "to injure," and pheme, "speech," (Eng. "blasphemy") is so translated thirteen times in the RV, but "railing" in Matthew 15:19 ; Mark 7:22 ; Ephesians 4:31 ; Colossians 3:8 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Jude 1:9 . The word "blasphemy" is practically confined to speech defamatory of the Divine Majesty. See Note, below. See EVIL SPEAKING , RAILING.
B — 1: βλασφημέω (Strong's #987 — Verb — blasphemeo — blas-fay-meh'-o ) "to blaspheme, rail at or revile," is used (a) in a general way, of any contumelious speech, reviling, calumniating, railing at, etc., as of those who railed at Christ, e.g., Matthew 27:39 ; Mark 15:29 ; Luke 22:65 (RV, "reviling"); Luke 23:39 ; (b) of those who speak contemptuously of God or of sacred things, e.g., Matthew 9:3 ; Mark 3:28 ; Romans 2:24 ; 1 Timothy 1:20 ; 6:1 ; Revelation 13:6 ; 16:9,11,21 ; "hath spoken blasphemy," Matthew 26:65 ; "rail at," 2 Peter 2:10 ; Jude 1:8,10 ; "railing," 2 Peter 2:12 ; "slanderously reported," Romans 3:8 ; "be evil spoken of," Romans 14:16 ; 1 Corinthians 10:30 ; 2 Peter 2:2 ; "speak evil of," Titus 3:2 ; 1 Peter 4:4 ; "being defamed," 1 Corinthians 4:13 . The verb (in the present participial form) is translated "blasphemers" in Acts 19:37 ; in Mark 2:7 , "blasphemeth," RV, for AV, "speaketh blasphemies."
There is no noun in the original representing the English "blasphemer." This is expressed either by the verb, or by the adjective blasphemos. See DEFAME , RAIL , REPORT , REVILE.
C — 1: βλάσφημος (Strong's #989 — Adjective — blasphemos — blas'-fay-mos ) "abusive, speaking evil," is translated "blasphemous," in Acts 6:11,13 ; "a blasphemer," 1 Timothy 1:13 ; "railers," 2 Timothy 3:2 , RV; "railing," 2 Peter 2:11 . See RAIL.
Note: As to Christ's teaching concerning "blasphemy" against the Holy Spirit, e.g., Matthew 12:32 , that anyone, with the evidence of the Lord's power before His eyes, should declare it to be Satanic, exhibited a condition of heart beyond Divine illumination and therefore hopeless. Divine forgiveness would be inconsistent with the moral nature of God. As to the Son of Man, in his state of humiliation, there might be misunderstanding, but not so with the Holy Spirit's power demonstrated.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Blasphemy
βλασφημια , properly denotes calumny, detraction, reproachful or abusive language, against whomsoever it be vented. That βλασφημια and its conjugates are very often applied, says Dr. Campbell, to reproaches not aimed against God, is evident from the following passages: Matthew 12:31-32 ; Matthew 27:39 ; Mark 15:29 ; Luke 22:65 ; Luke 23:39 ; Romans 3:8 ; Romans 14:16 ; 1 Corinthians 4:13 ; 1 Corinthians 10:30 ; Ephesians 4:31 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Titus 3:2 ; 1 Peter 4:14 ; Judges 1:9-10 ; Acts 6:11 ; Mark 3:28-29 ; 2 Peter 2:10-11 ; in the much greater part of which the English translators, sensible that they could admit no such application, have not used the words blaspheme or blasphemy, but rail, revile, speak evil, &c. In one of the passages quoted, a reproachful charge brought even against the devil is called κρισις βλασφημιας , Judges 1:9 ; and rendered by them, "railing accusation." The import of the word βλασφημια is maledicentia, in the largest acceptation; comprehending all sorts of verbal abuse, imprecation, reviling, and calumny. And let it be observed, that when such abuse is mentioned as uttered against God, there is probably no change made in the signification of the word: the change is only in the application; that is, in the reference to a different object. The idea conveyed in the explanation now given is always included, against whomsoever the crime be committed. In this manner every term is understood that is applicable to both God and man. Thus the meaning of the word disobey is the same, whether we speak of disobeying God or of disobeying man. The same may be said of believe, honour, fear, &c. As, therefore, the sense of the term is the same, though differently applied, what is essential to constitute the crime of detraction in the one case, is essential also in the other. But it is essential to this crime, as commonly understood, when committed by one man against another, that there be in the injurious person the will or disposition to detract from the person abused. Mere mistake in regard to character, especially when the mistake is not conceived by him who entertains it to lessen the character, nay, is supposed, however erroneously, to exalt it, is never construed by any into the crime of defamation. Now, as blasphemy is in its essence the same crime, but immensely aggravated by being committed against an object infinitely superior to man, what is fundamental to the very existence of the crime will be found in this, as in every other species which comes under the general name. There can be no blasphemy, therefore, where there is not an impious purpose to derogate from the Divine Majesty, and to alienate the minds of others from the love and reverence of God. The blasphemer is no other than the calumniator of Almighty God. To constitute the crime, it is as necessary that this species of calumny be intentional, He must be one, therefore, who by his impious talk endeavours to inspire others with the same irreverence towards the Deity, or perhaps, abhorrence of him, which he indulges in himself. And though, for the honour of human nature, it is to be hoped that very few arrive at this enormous guilt, it ought not to be dissembled, that the habitual profanation of the name and attributes of God by common swearing, is but too manifest an approach toward it. There is not an entire coincidence: the latter of these vices may be considered as resulting solely from the defect of what is good in principle and disposition; the former from the acquisition of what is evil in the extreme: but there is a close connection between them, and an insensible gradation from the one to the other. To accustom one's self to treat the Sovereign of the universe with irreverent familiarity, is the first step; malignly to arraign his attributes, and revile his providence, is the last. The first divine law published against it, "He that blasphemeth the name of the Lord," (or Jehovah, as it is in the Hebrew) "shall be put to death," Leviticus 24:16 , when considered along with the incidents that occasioned it, suggests a very atrocious offence in words, no less than abuse or imprecations vented against the Deity. For, in what way soever the crime of the man there mentioned be interpreted,—whether as committed against the true God, the God of Israel, or against any of the false gods whom his Egyptian father worshipped,—the law in the words now quoted is sufficiently explicit; and the circumstances of the story plainly show, that the words which he had used were derogatory from the Godhead, and shocking to the hearers. And if we add to this the only other memorable instance in sacred history, namely, that of Rabshakeh, it will lead us to conclude that it is solely a malignant attempt, in words, to lessen men's reverence of the true God, and, by vilifying his perfections, to prevent their placing confidence in him, which is called in Scripture blasphemy, when the word is employed to denote a sin committed directly against God. This was manifestly the attempt of Rabshakeh, when he said, "Neither let Hezekiah make you trust in the Lord," (the word is Jehovah, ) "saying, Jehovah will surely deliver us. Hath any of the gods of the nations delivered his land out of the hand of the king of Assyria? Where are the gods of Hamath and of Arpad? Where are the gods of Sepharvaim, Hena, and Iva? Have they delivered Samaria out of my hand? Who are they, among all the gods of the countries, that have delivered their country out of mine hand, that Jehovah should deliver Jerusalem out of mine hand?" 2 Kings 18:30 ; 2 Kings 18:33-35 . 2. It will naturally occur to inquire, what that is, in particular, which our Lord denominates "blasphemy against the Holy Spirit," Matthew 12:31-32 ; Acts 6:13 ; Luke 12:10 . But without entering minutely into the discussion of this question, it may suffice here to observe, that this blasphemy is certainly not of the constructive kind, but direct, manifest, and malignant. First, it is mentioned as comprehended under the same genus with abuse against men, and contradistinguished only by the object. Secondly, it is farther explained by being called speaking against in both cases: ος αν ειπη λογον κατα του ανθρωπου ,—ος δ ' αν ειπν κατα του πνευματος του αγιου . "Whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of Man."—"Whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost." The expressions are the same, in effect, in all the Evangelists who mention it, and imply such an opposition as is both intentional and malevolent. This cannot have been the case of all who disbelieved the mission of Jesus, and even decried his miracles; many of whom, we have reason to think, were afterward converted by the Apostles. But it was the wretched case of some who, instigated by worldly ambition and avarice, slandered what they knew to be the cause of God; and, against conviction, reviled his work as the operation of evil spirits. This view of the sin against the Holy Ghost is confirmed by the circumstances under which our Lord spoke. If we consider the Scripture account of this sin, nothing can be plainer than that it is to be understood of the Pharisees' imputing the miracles wrought by the power of the Holy Ghost to the power of the devil; for our Lord had just healed one possessed of a devil, and upon this the Pharisees gave this malicious turn to the miracle. This led our Saviour to discourse on the sin of blasphemy. The Pharisees were the persons charged with the crime: the sin itself manifestly consisted in ascribing what was done by the finger of God to the agency of the devil; and the reason, therefore, why our Lord pronounced it unpardonable, is plain; because, by withstanding the evidence of miracles, they resisted the strongest means of conviction, and that wilfully and malignantly; and, giving way to their passions, opprobriously treated that Holy Spirit whom they ought to have adored. From all which it will probably follow, that no person can now be guilty of the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, in the sense in which our Saviour originally intended it; but there may be sins which bear a very near resemblance to it. This appears from the case of the apostates mentioned in the Epistle to the Hebrews, to whom "no more sacrifice for sins" is said to remain; whose defection, however, is not represented so much as a direct sin against the Holy Ghost as against Christ, whom the apostate Jews blasphemed in the synagogues. It implied, however, a high offence against the Holy Spirit also, with whose gifts they had, probably, been endowed, and their conduct must be considered, if not the same sin as that committed by the Pharisees, yet as a consenting with it, and thus as placing them in nearly, if not altogether, the same desperate condition. Even apostacy in the present day, although a most aggravated and perilous offence, cannot be committed with circumstances of equal aggravation to those which were found in the case of the persons mentioned by St. Paul; and it may be laid down as certain, for the relief of those who may be tempted to think that they have committed the unpardonable sin, that their horror of it, and the trouble which the very apprehension causes them, are the sure proofs that they are mistaken. But although there may be now fearful approaches to the unpardonable offence, it is to be remembered that there may be many dangerous and fatal sins against the Holy Ghost, which are not the sin against him, which has no forgiveness.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy Against the Holy Ghost
Matthew 12:31,32 Mark 3:28 Luke 12:10 This sin was committed by the Pharisees when they, in violation of their own convictions, willfully and maliciously ascribed the miracles of the Son of God and the work of the Holy Spirit to the evil one. It is often inquired whether this was the "sin unto death" spoken of 1 John 5:16 , and whether it is committed in these days. However these questions may be answered, certain it is that when one can ridicule religion and its ordinances, when he can make sport with the work of the Holy Ghost in the human heart, when he can persist in a willful disbelief of the Gospel, and cast contempt upon Christianity and "the ministration of the Spirit," he is going to a fearful extremity of guilt, and provoking the final withdrawment of divine grace. While on the other hand the vilest blasphemer, who feels the relenting of godly sorrow for his sins, and the desire to confess them at the Savior's feet, may be sure of realizing the truth of Christ's word. "Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out."
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy
A man is guilty of blasphemy, when he speaks of God, or his attributes, injuriously; when he calumniously ascribe such qualities to him as do not belong to him, or robs him of those which do. The law sentenced blasphemers to death, Leviticus 24:12-16 . In a lower sense, men are said to be blasphemed when abused by calumnious and reviling words, 1 Kings 21:10 ; Acts 6:11 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy
in its technical English sense, signifies the speaking evil of God and in this sense it is found (Psalm 74:18 ; Isaiah 52:5 ; Romans 2:24 ) etc. But according to its derivation it may mean any species of calumny and abuse: see (1 Kings 21:10 ; Acts 18:6 ; Jude 1:9 ) etc. Blasphemy was punished by stoning, which was inflicted on the son of Shelomith. (Leviticus 24:11 ) On this charge both our Lord and St. Stephen were condemned to death by the Jews. The blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, (Matthew 12:32 ; Mark 3:28 ) consisted in attributing to the power of Satan those unquestionable miracles which Jesus performed by "the finger of God" and the power of the Holy Spirit. It is plainly such a state of wilful, determined opposition to God and the Holy Spirit that no efforts will avail to lead to repentance. Among the Jews it was a sin against God answering to treason in our times.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy
Bad or insulting language directed at a person or thing is usually referred to as a curse. When directed at God it becomes a blasphemy.
According to the law of Moses, blasphemy was an act not merely of disrespect to God but of rebellion against God. The penalty was death (Leviticus 24:10-23; 1 Kings 21:10; Acts 6:11; Acts 7:58). Israelites by nature had a reverence for the name of God, and were not as likely to speak blasphemously of God as the Gentiles were (2 Kings 19:6; 2 Kings 19:22; Psalms 74:10; Psalms 74:18). But they often acted blasphemously, as seen for example when they turned from God to serve idols (Ezekiel 20:27-28).
Jews of New Testament times accused Jesus of blasphemy because he claimed for himself powers that belonged to God only (Mark 2:7; Mark 14:61-64). This was one reason why they persecuted Jesus and his followers. They even tried to make the followers of Jesus curse him – and that really would have been blasphemy (Acts 26:11). In fact, the Jews themselves were the ones guilty of blasphemy; for in speaking evil of Jesus they were speaking evil of God (1 Timothy 1:13).
The blasphemy of the Holy Spirit was a sin that Jesus said could not be forgiven. This statement must be understood in its context. Jesus realized that many Jews did not clearly understand the nature of his messiahship, and did not know what he meant by referring to himself as ‘the Son of man’. God could forgive people’s doubts and misunderstandings about Jesus, but he would not forgive their deliberate rejection of the plain evidence that Jesus’ works were good and they originated in God. When people called God’s Spirit Satan and called good evil, they put themselves in a position where they had no way of acknowledging God’s goodness. They therefore had no way of receiving his forgiveness (Matthew 12:22-32; Mark 3:28-30).
If people today are distressed through thinking they cannot be forgiven because of some blasphemy they have spoken, they should realize that their distress is a sure sign that they have not committed the sin Jesus referred to. The sin Jesus condemned is not a rashly spoken curse, but a deliberate refusal of God; not a single act, but a persistent attitude. And so long as people stubbornly persists in that attitude they cannot be forgiven.

Sentence search

Blasphemous - ) Speaking or writing Blasphemy; uttering or exhibiting anything impiously irreverent; profane; as, a blasphemous person; containing Blasphemy; as, a blasphemous book; a blasphemous caricature
Blasphemy - Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit is stating that Jesus did his miracles by the power of the devil (Matthew 12:22-32) and is an unforgivable sin (Mark 3:28-30). Blasphemy arises out of pride (Psalms 73:9; Psa 73:11), hatred (Psalms 74:18), injustice (Isaiah 52:5), etc. Christ was mistakenly accused of Blasphemy (John 10:30-33)
Eternal Sin - See Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ...
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Unpardonable Sin - See Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ...
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Blasphemy - In English "blasphemy" denotes any utterance that insults God or Christ (or Allah, or Muhammed) and gives deeply felt offense to their followers. In several states in the United States and in Britain, Blasphemy is a criminal offense, although there have been few prosecution in this century. In Islamic countries generally no distinction is made between Blasphemy and heresy, so that any perceived rejection of the Prophet or his message, by Muslims or non-Muslims, is regarded as blasphemous. There is no Hebrew word equivalent to the English "blasphemy, " and the Greek root blasphem- [1], which is used fifty-five times in the New Testament, has a wide meaning. In both Testaments the idea of Blasphemy as something that offends the religious sensibilities of others is completely absent. ...
David's flagrant sin with Bathsheba may be called a Blasphemy (2 Samuel 12:14 ), but a more likely translation is that David has "made the enemies of the Lord show utter contempt" (NIV ). Jesus is accused of Blasphemy for pronouncing forgiveness and for claiming a unique relationship with God (Matthew 26:65 ; Mark 2:7 ; John 10:33 ). ...
Jesus picks up the Numbers 15 passage about Blasphemy in his famous saying about Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit ( Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-29 ; Luke 12:10 ). Numbers 15:22-31 distinguishes between unintentional sin committed in ignorance (for which forgiveness is possible), and defiant sin, called Blasphemy, for which there is no forgiveness. Jesus teaches that the Blasphemy for which there is no forgiveness is that against the Holy Spirit; all other blasphemies, particularly those against "the Son of Man, " may be forgiven. ...
This downgrading of the significance of Blasphemy against Christ marks an important difference between Christianity and Islam. According to Peter (1 Peter 2:19-25 ), they must accept insult and Blasphemy without retaliation, as he did. ...
There is only one kind of Blasphemy that Christians must resist: the Blasphemy they will bring on themselves if they cause a fellow believer to stumble through the thoughtless exercise of their freedom (Romans 14:15-16 ; 1 Corinthians 10:28-30 ). Blasphemy and the Law in a Plural Society
Blasphemous - Containing Blasphemy calumnious impiously irreverent or reproachful towards God
Blasphemy - ” In the biblical context, Blasphemy is an attitude of disrespect that finds expression in an act directed against the character of God. ...
Old Testament Blasphemy draws its Christian definition through the background of the Old Testament. It is significant that Blasphemy reflects improper action with regard to the use of God's name. ...
Leviticus 24:14-16 guides the Hebrew definition of Blasphemy. Blasphemy involves the actual pronunciation of the name of God along with an attitude of disrespect. ...
Israel, at various times, was guilty of Blasphemy. Edom was guilty of Blasphemy when it rejoiced over the fall of Jerusalem (Ezekiel 35:12 ). ...
New Testament The New Testament broadens the concept of Blasphemy to include actions against Christ and the church as the body of Christ. Such a claim, according to the Sanhedrin, fit the charge of Blasphemy and, therefore, deserved death (Matthew 26:65 ; Mark 14:64 ). It is also important that Christians avoid conduct that might give an occasion for Blasphemy, especially in the area of attitude and speech (Ephesians 4:31 ; Colossians 3:8 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Titus 3:2 ). ...
The sin of Blasphemy is a sin that can be forgiven. However, there is a sin of Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit that cannot be forgiven ( Matthew 12:32 ; Mark 3:29 ; Luke 12:10 ). Thus one wanting to repent of Blasphemy against the Spirit cannot have committed the sin
Rending of Garments - Tearing or pulling garments apart, often as a sign of mourning (Genesis 37:34 ; Leviticus 10:6 ; Leviticus 21:10 ; 1 Samuel 4:12 ; 2 Samuel 3:31 ), repentance (Genesis 37:29 ; Joshua 7:6 ; 2 Chronicles 34:27 ; Joel 2:13 ), or as a response to the rejection of God's plan (Numbers 14:6 ) or (perceived) Blasphemy (Matthew 26:65 ; Mark 14:63 ; Acts 14:14 ). See Blasphemy ; Mourning
Unpardonable Sin - This term is commonly applied to Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, in attributing the miracles wrought by Christ to the power of Satan. There may be many sins against the Holy Spirit, but it was this special one of Blasphemy of which the Lord said it should not be forgiven, neither in this age nor in the age to come
Blasphemy - When directed at God it becomes a Blasphemy. ...
According to the law of Moses, Blasphemy was an act not merely of disrespect to God but of rebellion against God. ...
Jews of New Testament times accused Jesus of Blasphemy because he claimed for himself powers that belonged to God only (Mark 2:7; Mark 14:61-64). They even tried to make the followers of Jesus curse him – and that really would have been Blasphemy (Acts 26:11). In fact, the Jews themselves were the ones guilty of Blasphemy; for in speaking evil of Jesus they were speaking evil of God (1 Timothy 1:13). ...
The Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit was a sin that Jesus said could not be forgiven. ...
If people today are distressed through thinking they cannot be forgiven because of some Blasphemy they have spoken, they should realize that their distress is a sure sign that they have not committed the sin Jesus referred to
Blasphemy (2) - BLASPHEMY (βλασφημία; for derivation of word see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, vol. Thus we read of ‘an evil eye, Blasphemy ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 railing), pride,’ etc. Two questions concerning Blasphemy come up in the Gospels, viz. the teaching of Jesus Christ on the subject, and the charge of Blasphemy brought against our Lord. The teaching of Jesus Christ concerning Blasphemy. The comprehensive sentence must include Blasphemy against God, although that is not expressly mentioned. In Matthew 12:32 there is a reference to Blasphemy against the Son of Man, and in both cases the unpardonable sin of Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost is mentioned; but in neither case is there any reference to Blasphemy against the Father. ’...
To ‘speak a word against the Son of Man’ is taken as one form of the Blasphemy or reviling. It does not stand for what we now understand by ‘blasphemy’ in our narrower sense of the word. Jesus is not here standing on the ground of His divinity, to insult which would be Blasphemy in this modern sense. ...
The nature of Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost (Matthew 12:22-32, Mark 3:29, Luke 12:10) must be learnt from the context. The form of the Blasphemy is given in the words ‘because they said, He hath an unclean spirit,’ and the occasion of it was Jesus’ casting out of demons. To ascribe this action to Beelzebub is to be guilty of, or to approach the guilt of, Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, because it is treating the Holy Spirit as Beelzebub. If the presence of the Holy Spirit was not recognized, there could be no Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. Salmond understands it, because (1) the Greek word ἁμαρτήματος; stands for an act, not a state; (2) there is nothing in the context to indicate persistency in the Blasphemy; (3) the Jewish current conception was that a sin once committed remained on the sinner till it was atoned for or forgiven. The charge of Blasphemy brought against Jesus Christ. In all of these cases the alleged Blasphemy is against God, actual Blasphemy in our sense of the word. John, where the Jews declare that their attempt to stone Jesus was ‘for Blasphemy,’ adding ‘because that thou, being a man makest thyself God’ (John 10:33). According to Matthew 26:65 and Mark 14:63-64 when Jesus, after being adjured by the high priest to declare if He were the Christ, declared that they would ‘see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of power and coming with the clouds of heaven,’ the high priest treated this as Blasphemy, rending his garments as a token of honor at the words. The second charge is suddenly sprung upon, Jesus by the high priest on the ground of His words at the council; and, on this account, as guilty of Blasphemy, He was condemned to death, although it was useless to cite the words before Pilate, who would have dismissed the case as Gallio at Corinth dismissed what he regarded as ‘a question about words and names’ (Acts 18:15). ...
It is to be observed that there is one common character in all these accusations of Blasphemy brought against Jesus. He is never accused of direct Blasphemy, speaking insulting words about God. The alleged Blasphemy is indirect, in each case claiming more or less Divine rights and powers for Himself. There is no reference to our narrower sense of Blasphemy as insulting the Divine; the word (ἁμαρτήματος;) is used in the common wider sense. ‘Blasphemy’; Cremer, Bibl. βλασφημία, βλασφημὲω; and in particular on Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, Martensen, Christian Ethics, ii
Blasphemy - ...
Blasphemy is an injury offered to God, by denying that which is due and belonging to him, or attributing to him that which is not agreeable to his nature. ...
In the middle ages, Blasphemy was used to denote simply the blaming or condemning of a person or thing
Blasphemy - Blasphemy. The punishment prescribed by the Mosaic law for the crime of actual Blasphemy was death by stoning. That assumption was true; but the Jews accused him of Blasphemy because they knew not who he was. In regard to Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, the essence of this fearful sin seems to have been that the Jews, shutting their eyes to the proof of miracles which Christ gave, daringly attributed those good works to an unclean spirit
Blasphemy - According to Linwood, Blasphemy is an injury offered to God, by denying that which is due and belonging to him, or attributing to him what is not agreeable to his nature. This is real Blasphemy; but there is a relative Blasphemy, as when a man may be guilty ignorantly by propagating opinions which dishonour God, the tendency of which he does not perceive. ...
A man may be guilty of this constructively: for if he speak freely against received errors , it will be construed into Blasphemy. According to the law of Scotland, Blasphemy is punished with death: these laws, however, in the present age, are not enforced; the legislature thinking, perhaps, that spiritual offences should be left to be punished by the Deity rather than by human statutes
Naboth - An Israelite at Jezreel, who declined selling his ancestral vineyard to Ahab, Leviticus 25:23,24 ; and was in consequence murdered, on a false charge of Blasphemy contrived by Jezebel the queen. Ahab took immediate possession of the coveted vineyardperhaps as being legally for forfeited to the government, construing Blasphemy as treason; or it may be, that the heirs were deterred from asserting their claim by a dread of the unscrupulous arts of Jezebel
Impiety - The principal forms of impiety are: atheism, Blasphemy, sacrilege, simony, and perjury
Evil Speaking - See Blasphemy
Blasphemy - The Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost was attributing the Lord's action of casting out demons to the agency of Satan — a sin which should not be forgiven in this age nor in the age to come. The context shows that 'the unpardonable sin' refers to this particular form of Blasphemy
Blaspheme - ) To utter Blasphemy
Holy Face, Archconfraternity of the - Established at Tours, France, 1884, through the piety of Leo Dupont, for the prevention of Blasphemy and the observance of Sunday
Archconfraternity of the Holy Face - Established at Tours, France, 1884, through the piety of Leo Dupont, for the prevention of Blasphemy and the observance of Sunday
Blasphemy - Blasphemy . The contemptuous scorning of sacred places was regarded as Blasphemy (see Malachi 2:6 Malachi 2:6 ; 1Ma 7:38 , cf. The incident of the man gathering sticks on the Sabbath seems to be a concrete example of Blasphemy ( Numbers 15:32 f. ...
One of the most frequent of the charges brought by the Jews against Jesus was that of Blasphemy, and when we inquire into the meaning of the accusation, we find that it was the application to Himself of Divine attributes and prerogatives (Mark 2:7 = Matthew 9:3 , Mark 14:64 = Matthew 26:65 , John 10:33 ; John 10:36 ). The legal punishment for Blasphemy was death ( Leviticus 24:16 ), and so the Jews claimed the life of Jesus, as the just and lawful outcome of His words and teaching ( John 19:7 , cf. The proto-martyr Stephen lost his life, too, on a charge of Blasphemy ( Acts 6:13 ; Acts 7:58 ), when his enemies, in a violent and sudden fit of rage, forgot the limitation imposed on them as vassals of the Roman Empire (cf. On the ‘blasphemy against the Holy Ghost,’ see art
Blasphemy - I think it proper to stop at this word, as the sense and meaning of it is not so generally understood as it were to be wished; and many of God's dear children, it is to be apprehended, have their minds much exercised about it, fearing they have committed the unpardonable sin, in Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost. ...
The sin of Blasphemy is peculiarly applied to those who sin against God by profaning his holy name, and speaking lightly and wantonly of his person, prefections, and attributes. (Leviticus 24:11; Lev 24:16)...
This is what may be called Blasphemy in general. But added to this, our Lord speaks of a peculiar branch of Blasphemy against the person and work of God the Holy Ghost, as being accompanied with aggravated malignity, and in its nature unpardonable. ) Here was the Blasphemy, in ascribing the works of Jesus, wrought evidently the Spirit of JEHOVAH, to the agency of Satan; was Blasphemy with a vengeance, and from its peculiar malignity unpardonable. They would shudder even to hear such Blasphemy from the lips of others; and how then should it come from their own?...
Who then were the persons to whom the Lord Jesus alluded when he thus expressed himself? Most evidently and plainly, the Scribes and Pharisees then before him
Jehovah - Hebrew text, however, represents scribe's efforts to prevent people from pronouncing the divine name by combining consonants of Yahweh and vowels of Hebrew word adonai (“Lord”) so readers would pronounce adonai rather than risk Blasphemy by improperly pronouncing divine name
Blasphemy - Blasphemy was punished by stoning, which was inflicted on the son of Shelomith. The Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, (Matthew 12:32 ; Mark 3:28 ) consisted in attributing to the power of Satan those unquestionable miracles which Jesus performed by "the finger of God" and the power of the Holy Spirit
Blasphemy - Our Lord was accused of Blasphemy when he claimed to be the Son of God (Matthew 26:65 ; Compare Matthew 9:3 ; Mark 2:7 ). Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost (Matthew 12:31,32 ; Mark 3:28,29 ; Luke 12:10 ) is regarded by some as a continued and obstinate rejection of the gospel, and hence is an unpardonable sin, simply because as long as a sinner remains in unbelief he voluntarily excludes himself from pardon
Beelzebub, - He also denounces the dreadful Blasphemy of saying that the work done by the Holy Spirit was accomplished by the influence of Satan: this Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit was the sin that should never be forgiven
Blaspheme, Blasphemy, Blasphemer, Blasphemous - "blasphemy") is so translated thirteen times in the RV, but "railing" in Matthew 15:19 ; Mark 7:22 ; Ephesians 4:31 ; Colossians 3:8 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Jude 1:9 . The word "blasphemy" is practically confined to speech defamatory of the Divine Majesty. , Matthew 9:3 ; Mark 3:28 ; Romans 2:24 ; 1 Timothy 1:20 ; 6:1 ; Revelation 13:6 ; 16:9,11,21 ; "hath spoken Blasphemy," Matthew 26:65 ; "rail at," 2 Peter 2:10 ; Jude 1:8,10 ; "railing," 2 Peter 2:12 ; "slanderously reported," Romans 3:8 ; "be evil spoken of," Romans 14:16 ; 1 Corinthians 10:30 ; 2 Peter 2:2 ; "speak evil of," Titus 3:2 ; 1 Peter 4:4 ; "being defamed," 1 Corinthians 4:13 . ...
Note: As to Christ's teaching concerning "blasphemy" against the Holy Spirit, e
Blasphemy - A man is guilty of Blasphemy, when he speaks of God, or his attributes, injuriously; when he calumniously ascribe such qualities to him as do not belong to him, or robs him of those which do
Naboth - So Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, made a wicked plan to have Naboth condemned to death on a fake charge of Blasphemy, and thus allow the king to seize upon the vineyard
Blasphemy - Though they attempted to observe the regular forms in their trial of Stephen for Blasphemy, his death was not a judicial execution, but the illegal act of a solemn Sanhedrin changed by fanatical hatred into a murderous mob. ...
After Jesus had come to be acknowledged as the Messiah, the denial of His status and the insulting of His name were regarded by His followers as conscious or unconscious Blasphemy. Paul recalls with shame and sorrow the time when, in this sense of the term, he not only was guilty of habitual Blasphemy (τὸ πρότερον ὄντα βλάσφημον, 1 Timothy 1:13), but strove to make others blaspheme (ἠνάγκαζον βλασφημεῖν, Acts 26:11; Acts 26:11). ...
Blasphemy was not exclusively a Jewish and Christian conception. To the prophet of Ephesus all this seemed rank Blasphemy, and he delivered his soul by denouncing it. He personified the Empire as the Beast whose seven heads had names of Blasphemy (Revelation 13:1), to whom was given a mouth speaking great things and blasphemies (Revelation 13:5), who opened his mouth for blasphemies against God, to blaspheme His name and His tabernacle (Revelation 13:6); as the scarlet-coloured Beast who was covered all over with names of blasphemies (Revelation 17:3). -In addition to articles on ‘Blasphemy’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , Encyclopaedia Biblica , Hastings’ Single-vol
Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit - First, the object of this "blasphemy" is the Holy Spirit, who is clearly distinguished in the context from Jesus Christ, the Son of Man, who may be blasphemed by someone who yet is forgiven ( Matthew 12:32 ). Second, the result of this Blasphemy is that the blasphemer cannot be forgiven by God. Third, the consequence of this Blasphemy is eternal unforgivability. While the various proposals may have some merit, it is best to examine "blasphemy against the Spirit" in the Gospels themselves to see what light they shed on what is being addressed. In summary, we may confidently conclude that "blasphemy against the Spirit" is overt, even verbal, repudiation of the presence of God's Spirit in the ministry of Jesus and those whom he has sent. Hence, we find Paul's preaching of Christ crucified being repudiated; this would appear to be "blasphemy against the Spirit" as well (Acts 13:8,45 ; 14:2 ; 18:6 ; 19:13-16 ). ...
Blasphemy against the Spirit and apostasy are related. Thus, apostasy is acceptance followed by repudiation of Jesus Christ (Hebrews 6:4-6 ; 10:29-39 ; 1 John 5:16-17 ); Blasphemy against the Spirit is not preceded by acceptance
Blaspheme - BLASPHE'ME, To utter Blasphemy
Shelomith - Woman of tribe of Dan whose son cursed the divine name, thus being guilty of Blasphemy
Sin - This sin, or Blasphemy, as it should rather be called, many scribes and Pharisees were guilty of, who, beholding our Lord do his miracles, affirmed that he wrought them by Beelzebub, the prince of devils, which was, in effect, calling the Holy Ghost Satan, a most horrible Blasphemy; and, as on this ground they rejected Christ, and salvation by him, their sin could certainly have no forgiveness. No one therefore could be guilty of this Blasphemy, except those who were spectators of Christ's miracles. There is, however, another view of this unpardonable offence, which deserves consideration: The sin or Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, says Bishop Tomline, is mentioned in the first three Gospels. It appears that all the three evangelists agree in representing the sin or Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost as a crime which would not be forgiven; but no one of them affirms that those who had ascribed Christ's power of casting out devils to Beelzebub, had been guilty of that sin, and in St. Mark, endeavoured to convince the Jews of their error; but so far from accusing them of having committed an unpardonable sin in what they had said concerning him, he declares that "whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him;" that is, whatever reproaches men may utter against the Son of man during his ministry, however they may calumniate the authority upon which he acts, it is still possible that hereafter they may repent and believe, and all their sins may be forgiven them; but the reviling of the Holy Ghost is described as an offence of a far more heinous nature: "The Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. But See Blasphemy
Lethargy of Soul - Comparatively few of our hearers are destroyed by outrageous and flaming vices, such as Blasphemy, theft, drunkenness, or uncleanness; but crowds of them are perishing by that deadly smoke of indifference which casts its stifling clouds of carelessness around them, and sends them asleep into everlasting destruction
Forgiveness - ...
There is only one sin for which the Father does not promise forgiveness: Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit (Mark 3:28; Matthew 12:32)
Naboth - ’ Jezebel, Ahab’s wife, by using the royal authority with the elders of the city, had Naboth accused of treason and Blasphemy, and stoned to death
Unpardonable Sin - —It is the solemn declaration of Jesus that Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit shall never be forgiven which forms our fundamental authority. And then, suddenly changing His tone as He passed from the logical weakness of His adversaries to lay His finger on their moral and spiritual fault, He uttered those memorable words in which He declared that while all other sins and blasphemies, even Blasphemy against Himself, shall be forgiven, whosoever shall blaspheme against the Holy Spirit shall never be forgiven (Matthew 12:31-32, Mark 3:28-29; cf. Now, such language regarding Jesus strikes us, first of all, as Blasphemy against the Son of Man Himself—and this it undoubtedly was. On the contrary, He declared that all Blasphemy against the Son of Man shall be forgiven. This was Blasphemy, not against Jesus only, but against the Divine Spirit that was manifested in Him. And such Blasphemy, we must remember, the Pharisees were guilty of, not once, but constantly. Their Blasphemy thus was not the hasty utterance of a moment, but a vice of their indwelling thoughts and character (Matthew 12:25); not a single act, but a habitual attitude. —The unpardonableness of such Blasphemy as this, Jesus affirms in language that can hardly be mistaken. The present age, it is said, was simply the Mosaic age or dispensation under which the Jews were living; while ‘the age to come’ was the Messianic age or Christian dispensation Our Lord’s words thus mean only that, whether men live under the Law or the Gospel, Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit is unpardonable. And when there is added, ἀλλὰ ἔνοχός ἐστιν αἰωνίου ἀμαρτήματος, it seems hardly possible to escape from the conclusion that Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit is here described as a sin for which there is no remedy. For an act may be the revelation of a state; and when the Pharisees said of Jesus, ‘He hath an unclean spirit,’ this particular piece of Blasphemy, as we have seen, was really the expression of a settled attitude of mind. But if the view taken above is the right one, there is no specific act of Blasphemy in word or deed, standing by itself, that we are entitled to think of as ‘the unpardonable sin. Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit may find expression and come to its culmination in some specific way; but essentially it is a settled attitude of mind and heart. ...
(2) But if anxious and fearful souls need to be reminded that Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit is not some mysterious sin into which a man may fall against all the promptings of his better nature, the case of the Pharisees and Jesus conveys to all a message of serious warning. Blasphemy, Forgiveness
Beelzebul - (Concerning the Jews’ accusation that Jesus cast out demons by Beelzebul, see Blasphemy
Blasphemy - Campbell, to reproaches not aimed against God, is evident from the following passages: Matthew 12:31-32 ; Matthew 27:39 ; Mark 15:29 ; Luke 22:65 ; Luke 23:39 ; Romans 3:8 ; Romans 14:16 ; Judges 1:9-10 ; 1 Corinthians 10:30 ; Ephesians 4:31 ; 1 Timothy 6:4 ; Titus 3:2 ; 1 Peter 4:14 ; 1 Corinthians 4:13 ; Acts 6:11 ; Acts 6:13 ; 2 Peter 2:10-11 ; in the much greater part of which the English translators, sensible that they could admit no such application, have not used the words blaspheme or Blasphemy, but rail, revile, speak evil, &c. Now, as Blasphemy is in its essence the same crime, but immensely aggravated by being committed against an object infinitely superior to man, what is fundamental to the very existence of the crime will be found in this, as in every other species which comes under the general name. There can be no Blasphemy, therefore, where there is not an impious purpose to derogate from the Divine Majesty, and to alienate the minds of others from the love and reverence of God. And if we add to this the only other memorable instance in sacred history, namely, that of Rabshakeh, it will lead us to conclude that it is solely a malignant attempt, in words, to lessen men's reverence of the true God, and, by vilifying his perfections, to prevent their placing confidence in him, which is called in Scripture Blasphemy, when the word is employed to denote a sin committed directly against God. It will naturally occur to inquire, what that is, in particular, which our Lord denominates "blasphemy against the Holy Spirit," Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-29 ; Luke 12:10 . But without entering minutely into the discussion of this question, it may suffice here to observe, that this Blasphemy is certainly not of the constructive kind, but direct, manifest, and malignant. This led our Saviour to discourse on the sin of Blasphemy. From all which it will probably follow, that no person can now be guilty of the Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, in the sense in which our Saviour originally intended it; but there may be sins which bear a very near resemblance to it
Shelomith - Married an Egyptian, a connection unfavourable for promotion of piety (2 Corinthians 6:14-15); their son was stoned for Blasphemy (Leviticus 24:11)
Religion, Virtue of - The sins against this virtue are Blasphemy, idolatry, divination, tempting God, superstition, and simony
Virtue of Religion - The sins against this virtue are Blasphemy, idolatry, divination, tempting God, superstition, and simony
Society of the Holy Name - The members promise to honor and reverence the Holy Name, to abstain from Blasphemy, unclean speech, and perjury, and to receive Holy Communion at least quarterly in a body
Perverting - Accordingly, the leaders of the Sanhedrin lay aside the charge of Blasphemy, which really weighed with themselves, but of which they knew Pilate could take no cognizance, and they bring Jesus before the Roman governor as a political offender, guilty of setting Himself and others in opposition to the ruling power of Rome
Rending of Garments - There were four occasions on which rending of garments was enjoined by the Jewish Law: (1) death; (2) the apostasy of a member of the family; (3) the destruction, during persecution, of a copy of the Law; (4) Blasphemy. ...
The action of Caiaphas (Matthew 26:65, Mark 14:63) is an instance of the rending of garments for Blasphemy
Rail, Railer, Railing - See Blasphemy
Sacred - In this title, sacred has no definite meaning, or it is Blasphemy
Sin Unto Death - Another view connects 1 John 5:16-17 with the Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit ( Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-30 ), but 1John says nothing about attributing the miracles of Jesus to Satan's power. Turner...
See also Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ; Sin ...
Bibliography
Trial of Jesus - Jewish religious leaders accused Jesus of Blasphemy, a capital offense under Jewish law (see Leviticus 24:16 ). For them this constituted Blasphemy. The Romans did not give the Jews the right of capital punishment for the accusation of Blasphemy. ...
The Jews knew that Pilate would laugh at their charge of Blasphemy
Baal-Zebub - It doth not appear that was worshipped at that time; but it is evident so generally known and acknowledged by this name, that the Pharisees made use of it as a well known, and in a daring Blasphemy, the miracles of the Lord Jesus to his power (See Matthew 12:24)...
Son of God - " For the Jews rightly judged that by the assumption of this title he laid claim to equality with God, and, regarding it as Blasphemy, and a breach of the first commandment, they determined to put him to death
na'Both - The usual punishment for Blasphemy was enforced: Naboth and his sons were stoned; and the blood from their wounds ran down into the waters of the tank below
Blasphemy - The Savior would have been stoned for the Blasphemy alleged as the ground of His condemnation (Matthew 26:65; Luke 5:21; John 10:36); but the Romans, to whom He was delivered, used crucifixion. The hearer of the Blasphemy rent his garment, which might never be mended, and laid his hand, putting the guilt wholly, on the offender's head
World to Come - ' The Lord declared that the Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost of attributing His miracles to the power of Satan, should not be forgiven in the present age, nor in the age to come
Stephen - In this it was with Stephen as it had been previously with our Lord, Our Lord Himself had said that He was to become the world’s temple in the future, and was condemned for Blasphemy for speaking ill words against the Temple in Jerusalem; Stephen proclaimed that Temple and Law had done their work and were to give place in time to a more spiritual temple, a more universal law, and was denounced for Blasphemy. Its members condemned him to be guilty of Blasphemy: he had justified, not denied or even softened down, his previous utterances; they rushed upon him, and, when he stated that he saw the heavens opened and Jesus standing to welcome him on the right hand of God, the vision did, in this view, but increase the Blasphemy, so they dragged him out of the city and stoned him
Blindness (2) - It is in this connexion that Jesus utters the remarkable reference to Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost as the unforgivable sin. Blasphemy. It is the meaning of the Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, a sin unforgivable, inasmuch as it does not recognize itself as sin, and thus renders impossible that repentance which is the condition of forgiveness (but see art. Blasphemy
Haeretico Comburendo - But this statute does not extend to take away or abridge the jurisdiction of Protestant archbishops, or bishops, or any other judges of any ecclesiastical courts, in cases of atheism, Blasphemy, heresy, or schism; but they may prove and punish the same, according to his majesty's ecclesiastical laws, by excommunication, deprivation, degradation, and other ecclesiastical censures, not extending to death, in such sort, and no other, as they might have done before the making of this act
Caiaphas, Joseph - The president of the Jewish council (Sanhedrim) which condemned the Lord Jesus, Caiaphas declaring Him guilty of Blasphemy
Maker - (Ecclesiastes 12:1) So again in Job, (Job 35:10) the word is plural, where is God my Makers? And yet that the church night never lose sight of the unity of the divine Essence, while thus believing in the existence of a threefold character of person in the GODHEAD, the Lord, by Moses, delivered this glorious fundamental truth in the plainest and strongest terms; "Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is one Lord!" (Deuteronomy 6:4) Oh! that these sacred, hallowed truths, were both duly and reverently considered and pondered over, agreeably to their immense sublimity, in these days of Arian and Socinian Blasphemy!...
...
Punishment - The law required that capital punishment should be inflicted for reviling a parent, Blasphemy, sabbath-breaking, witchcraft, adultery, man-stealing, idolatry, murder, etc
Implicit Faith - " What madness! what Blasphemy! For a church to demand belief of what she teaches, and a submission to what she enjoins, merely upon her assumed authority, must appear to unprejudiced minds the height of unreasonableness and spiritual despotism
Forgiveness - Jesus on one occasion referred to the deliberate rejection of him as the Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit, a sin for which there could be no forgiveness (Matthew 12:31-32; for further discussion see Blasphemy)
Moral Good - Hence there exists a distinction between moral good and evil, which has its origin in the nature of things; acts such as Blasphemy, idolatry, lying, etc
Full - ...
B — 1: γέμω (Strong's #1073 — Verb — gemo — ghem'-o ) "to be full, to be heavily laden with," was primarily used of a ship; it is chiefly used in the NT of evil contents, such as extortion and excess, Matthew 23:25 ; dead men's bones, Matthew 23:27 ; extortion and wickedness, Luke 11:39 ; cursing, Romans 3:14 ; Blasphemy, Revelation 17:3 ; abominations, Revelation 17:4 ; of Divine judgments, Revelation 15:17 ; 21:9 ; (RV, "laden," AV, "full"); of good things, Revelation 4:6,8 ; 5:8
Sanhedrim - Peter and John were also brought before it for promulgating heresy (Acts 4:1-23 ; 5:17-41 ); as was also Stephen on a charge of Blasphemy (6:12-15), and Paul for violating a temple by-law (22:30; 23:1-10)
Stephen - When Stephen preached these things, the Jews accused him of Blasphemy and brought him before their Council, the Sanhedrin (Acts 6:12-15)
Unpardonable Sin, the - See Blasphemy ; Devil ; Holy Spirit ; Sin
Good, Moral - Hence there exists a distinction between moral good and evil, which has its origin in the nature of things; acts such as Blasphemy, idolatry, lying, etc
Isaiah - " Manasseh said, that this was Blasphemy, as Moses had recorded the Lord's words, Exodus 22:20
Stephen - His mighty works and unanswerable argument roused the bitterest hostility against him, and he was brought before the Sanhedrin for trial, on the charge of Blasphemy and heresy
Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost - He is prayed to as God, Revelation 1:4,5 ; sin against him is sin against God, Acts 5:3,4 Ephesians 4:30 ; and Blasphemy against him is unpardonable, Matthew 12:31
Caiaphas - Caiaphas promptly accused him of Blasphemy
Stephen - " Then the Jews cried out, and stopped their ears as though they had heard Blasphemy, and falling on him, they drew him out of the city, and stoned him
Apostasy - Karlberg...
See also Backsliding ; Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ; Denial ...
Bibliography
Caiaphas - Failing to obtain evidence from witnesses, he adjured the prisoner to declare whether or not He was the Messiah; and on Jesus declaring He was, the pious hypocrite rent his clothes, shocked at the Blasphemy of the answer
a'Hab - Desiring to add to his pleasure-grounds at Jezreel the vineyard of his neighbor Naboth, he proposed to buy it or give land in exchange for it; and when this was refused by Naboth in accordance with the Levitical law, (Leviticus 25:23 ) a false accusation of Blasphemy was brought against him, and he was murdered, and Ahab took possession of the coveted fields
Stephen - His success resulted in the first persecution of the Church, and false witnesses were brought who accused him of Blasphemy, and of speaking against the Temple and the Law
Pilate - ...
The Jewish Council, the Sanhedrin, had earlier condemned Jesus to death for Blasphemy, but it had no power to carry out the death sentence
Proselyte - , to abstain from idolatry, Blasphemy, bloodshed, uncleaness, the eating of blood, theft, and to yield obedience to the authorities
Fool - ‘To commit folly’ is a euphemism for gross unchastity ( Deuteronomy 22:21 , Jeremiah 29:23 ); the word is used also of sacrilege ( Joshua 7:15 ), of Blasphemy ( Psalms 74:18 ), as well as of impiety in general ( Deuteronomy 32:6 , Psalms 14:1 )
Punishments - ) Death was the punishment of striking or even reviling a parent (Exodus 21:15; Exodus 21:17); Blasphemy (Leviticus 24:14; Leviticus 24:16; Leviticus 24:23); Sabbath-breaking (Numbers 15:32-36); witchcraft (Exodus 22:18); adultery (Leviticus 20:10); rape (Deuteronomy 22:25); incestuous and unnatural connection (Leviticus 20:11; Leviticus 20:14; Leviticus 20:16); man stealing (Exodus 21:16); idolatry (Leviticus 20:2)
Caiaphas - " On hearing these words, Caiaphas rent his clothes, saying, "What farther need have we of witnesses? Behold, now you have heard his Blasphemy
Denial - Karlberg...
See also Apostasy ; Backsliding ; Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ...
...
Sin - " ...
For the sin against the Holy Ghost, see Blasphemy
Profaning, Profanity - —For this form of the sin of profanation the word ‘profanity’ is usually reserved, a word that is to be distinguished from Blasphemy (wh. Blasphemy (βλασφημία = ‘evil-speaking’) is an insult offered to God’s majesty, and, in particular, a deliberate reviling of God and of Divine things. Profanity may, and often does, run into Blasphemy, but the word finds its proper application in an irreverent treatment of holy things without the motive of the scoffer. Mark 14:71), he was not guilty of intentional Blasphemy; he was in reality employing the most solemn forms of Jewish asseveration (cf
Worship - If any challenge God by claiming divine worship for themselves, they are guilty of Blasphemy (Matthew 4:9-10; Mark 2:7; Mark 14:61-64; Revelation 13:4-8; Revelation 19:20; see Blasphemy)
Excommunication - Christians were frequently subject to expulsion, which was punishment for Blasphemy or for straying from the tradition of Moses (Luke 6:22 ; John 9:22 ; John 12:42 ; John 16:2 )
Council - The confirmation and execution of a capital sentence rested with the Roman procurator, from whence they took Jesus before Pontius Pilate on a different charge from that of Blasphemy, for which the Sanhedrin condemned Him, namely, that of treason against Caesar, the only one which Pilate would have entertained
Pilate, Pontius - He removed them only when the Jews offered to die at the hands of his soldiers rather than consent to such Blasphemy
Coat (2) - Peter threw as a covering over his almost naked body when he left his fishing and came into the Master’s presence; (2) that it was the under-garments (χιτῶνες) that the high priest rent when he ‘heard the Blasphemy’ at our Lord’s trial (Mark 14:63; see Swete’s notes, in loc
Dominion - 334) points out, ‘it does not seem likely that Blasphemy against angels would be so conspicuous a sin of licentious men as to call forth this emphatic condemnation
Noah - These precepts are seven in number: the first was against the worship of idols; the second, against Blasphemy, and required to bless the name of God; the third, against murder; the fourth, against incest and all uncleanness; the fifth, against theft and rapine; the sixth required the administration of justice; the seventh was against eating flesh with life
Jezebel - " So she wrote in Ahab's name to the Jezreelite elders, and sealed the letters with his seal; and to her it was that they wrote the announcement that they had stoned Naboth for Blasphemy
Sanhedrin - The NT offers some interesting examples of the kind of matters that were brought before it: Christ appeared before it on a charge of Blasphemy ( Matthew 26:57 , John 19:7 ), Peter and John were accused before it of being false prophets and deceivers of the people ( Acts 4:5 ff. ), Stephen was condemned by it because of Blasphemy ( Nehemiah 2:18 ), and Paul was charged with transgression of the Mosaic Law ( Acts 22:30 )
Forgive, Forgave, Forgiveness - ...
As to limits to the possibility of Divine "forgiveness," see Matthew 12:32,2 nd part (see Blasphemy) and 1 John 5:16 (see DEATH)
Pardon - Ministers are said to remit sin declaratively, but not authoriatively; that is, they preach and declare that there is remission of sins in Christ; but to pretend to absolve men is the height of Blasphemy, Proverbs 30:1-33
Stone - Included under this penalty were the crimes of Blasphemy ( Mouth Lips - Paul on the mouth (Acts 23:2)-a command prompted by the apparent Blasphemy of which that organ had been guilty
Stoning - Blasphemy occupied a prominent place among the former (Leviticus 24:16; cf. But, if the occasion which led to Stephen’s being put on his defence was the accusation of Blasphemy brought against him by the witnesses (and the statement of Acts 6:13 can hardly be challenged), it is difficult to conceive of a self-constituted tribunal attempting to adjudicate upon a grave charge of the sort, involving the penalty of death, with which the supreme court of justice alone among the Jews had authority to deal. This probability is strengthened by the fact that his death was by the legal mode prescribed for the crime of Blasphemy, and that the stoning was done not by the crowd in general, but by Stephen’s accusers in the orderly Jewish way’ (A
Anoint - Antitypically, to Christ, the true high priest alone, belongs the fullness of the Spirit, which it is Blasphemy to arrogate
Oath - Blasphemy was punishable with death (Leviticus 24:11; Leviticus 24:16)
Evil-Speaking - See, further, article Blasphemy
Proselytes - "The stranger" was bound by the law of the Sabbath (Exodus 20:10; Exodus 23:12; Deuteronomy 5:14) and the Passover when he was circumcised (Exodus 12:19; Exodus 12:48), the feast of weeks (Deuteronomy 16:11), tabernacles (Deuteronomy 16:14), the day of atonement (Leviticus 16:29), prohibited marriages (Leviticus 18:26), and blood (Leviticus 17:10), and Moloch worship (Leviticus 20:2), and Blasphemy (Leviticus 24:16). The proselytes of the gate were not bound to circumcision, only to the seven precepts of Noah, namely, the six said to have been given to Adam:...
(1) against idolatry,...
(2) Blasphemy,...
(3) bloodshed,...
(4) uncleanness,...
(5) theft,...
(6) the precept of obedience to authorities, and...
(7) that given to Noah against "flesh with the blood"; but he had not the full Israelite privileges, he must not study the law nor redeem his firstborn
Parents - So, among the great, permitting their children to spend their time and their money as they please, indulging them in perpetual public diversion, and setting before them awful examples of gambling, indolence, Blasphemy, drinking, and almost every other vice; what is this but ruining their children, and "bequeathing to posterity a nuisance?" But, while we would call upon parents to exercise their authority, it must not be understood that children are to be entirely at their disposal under all circumstances, especially when they begin to think for themselves
Caiaphas (2) - According to the narrative of the Synoptists, it was to Caiaphas the ‘high priest,’ or the ‘house of Caiaphas,’ that Jesus was led, and there, at the (irregular) meeting of the Sanhedrin at daybreak (Matthew 26:59, Mark 14:55, Luke 22:66), Caiaphas presided; and it was he who brought the trial to a conclusion by declaring Jesus guilty of Blasphemy, and demanding sentence upon Him
Curse - ) and finally inflicted upon Christ Himself on the charge of Blasphemy (Mark 14:63 f
Proselyte - From Blasphemy;...
3
Son of Man - ...
When the Jewish leaders finally understood Jesus’ usage of the title (namely, that he claimed to be both the Davidic Messiah and the supernatural heavenly Messiah of Daniel 7:13-14), they accused him of Blasphemy and had him crucified (Mark 14:61-64)
Laying on of Hands - The sin of Blasphemy was viewed as so severe that all who overheard one cursing the name of the Lord laid their hands on his head prior to stoning him to death (Leviticus 24:14-16 )
Eternal Sin - Blasphemy, p
Ear - ...
The only significant act named in this literature in reference to the ear is that of those who hear Stephen declare his vision of Jesus at the right hand of God: they stop their ears, that the Blasphemy may not enter (Acts 7:57)
Excommunication - From Tertullian's "Apology" we learn, that the crimes which in his time subjected to exclusion from Christian privileges, were murder, idolatry, theft, fraud, lying, Blasphemy, adultery, fornication, and the like, and in Origen's treatise against Celsus, we are informed that such persons were expelled from the communion of the church, and lamented as lost and dead unto God; [1] but that on making confession and giving evidence of penitence, they were received back as restored to life
Punishment (2) - Such are decapitation (Mark 6:27, Matthew 14:10), drowning (Mark 9:42, Matthew 18:6), incarceration (Mark 6:17, Matthew 5:25; Matthew 18:30, Luke 23:19), and hanging (Matthew 27:5), inflicted, according to Jewish custom, only for idolatry or Blasphemy, and then only after the victim had already been put to death in some other way (Edersheim, LT [2]. Matthew 21:44 || and Matthew 23:35 ||) was imposed for many offences, including the unchastity of a betrothed maiden, idolatry, and Blasphemy
Zeal - Their zeal thus leads almost to Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, and to the Crucifixion
Genealogies - Revelation 2:9 ‘I know the Blasphemy of them which say they are Jews and they are not
Mourning (2) - The apostasy of a member of the family was the occasion of mourning as for the dead, and a Blasphemy spoken in the presence of the high priest was also a reason for a demonstration of mourning
Pre-Existence - A little later the Jews of Jerusalem attempt to stone Christ for Blasphemy
Punishments - (Exodus 21:15,17 ) ...
Blasphemy
Winter - To rebuke Blasphemy against His work. In Matthew 12:38-45 substantially the same subject is resumed, but it is now à propos of the Blasphemy of the scribes against the Holy Spirit in ascribing Jesus’ exorcisms to Beelzebub (Matthew 12:22-37), the intervening material (Matthew 12:1-21) comprising the two Sabbath incidents of Mark 2:23 to Mark 11:11-14. It is highly noteworthy that in both groups the condemnation is uttered by Jesus for rejection of the Spirit of God, which in the case of the discourse anent the Baptist is assumed to be manifest in Jesus’ message of forgiveness, in the case of the Blasphemy of the scribes in His healing power
Cherubim - (Revelation 5:9) To have set forth, therefore, these solemn representations, by type and figure, in the Jewish church, before any but JEHOVAH himself, would have been little short of Blasphemy, and consequently cherubim, before which every great day of the same was regularly observed, could emblematical only of the glorious persons of the GODHEAD
Babylon, Mystical - The Roman Catholic Church is the prominent type of Babylon, resting on the world power, and arrayed like it in its "scarlet" gauds, and ruling it by its claim of supremacy, while the beast or secular power on which it rests is "full of names of Blasphemy," which after the harlot's overthrow shall be more glaringly displayed
Desert, Wilderness - ...
In Revelation 12:1; Revelation 12:14 ‘the woman clothed with the sun’ has a place prepared for her in the wilderness, whither she flees from before the dragon, while in 17:3 the seer is carried to the wilderness to see the ‘woman sitting upon a scarlet-coloured beast, full of names of Blasphemy
God (2) - This is the passage concerning Blasphemy against the Spirit (Mark 3:29, Matthew 12:31, Luke 12:10). ...
Finally, when Jesus warned the scribes and Pharisees concerning the irremissible sin of Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, it is obvious that we cannot draw any personal distinction between this Spirit and God
Hour - They wished to kill him for violating the Sabbath and for Blasphemy (John 5:18 )
Crimes And Punishments - The offenses subject to capital punishment were: intentional homicide (Exodus 21:12 ; Leviticus 24:17 ; Numbers 35:16-21 ,Numbers 35:16-21,35:29-34 ), giving false testimony in capital cases (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ), idolatry (Exodus 20:3-5 ; Leviticus 20:1-5 ; Numbers 25:1-9 ; Deuteronomy 13:2-19 ; Deuteronomy 17:2-7 ; 1 Kings 15:11-13 ; 2 Kings 10:18-28 ), kidnapping an Israelite (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ), incest, homosexuality, and beastiality (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 20:11-17 ), rape (if the victim did not cry for help, she, too, should be executed; Deuteronomy 22:23-27 ), adultery (Leviticus 20:10-12 ; Deuteronomy 22:22 ), other sexual relations outside marriage (Leviticus 21:9 ; Deuteronomy 22:20-21 ,Deuteronomy 22:20-21,22:23-24 ), false prophecy (Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 18:20-22 ; 1 Kings 22:19-28 ; Jeremiah 26:9 ,Jeremiah 26:9,26:15-16 ; Jeremiah 28:5-9 ), magic, divination, and witchcraft (Exodus 22:18 ; Leviticus 19:26 ,Leviticus 19:26,19:31 ; Leviticus 20:6 ,Leviticus 20:6,20:27 ; Deuteronomy 18:10 ; 1Samuel 28:3,1 Samuel 28:9 ), violation of the Sabbath (Exodus 20:8-11 ; Exodus 23:12 Exodus 31:14-17 ; Exodus 34:21 ; Exodus 35:1 ;Exodus 35:1;2:1 ; Leviticus 23:3 ; Numbers 15:32-36 ; Nehemiah 13:15-22 ), Blasphemy (Leviticus 24:14-16 ,Leviticus 24:14-16,24:23 ; 1 Kings 21:13 ), cursing or striking one's parents (Exodus 21:15 ,Exodus 21:15,21:17 ), disobeying the ruling of the court of appeals (Deuteronomy 17:8-13 ), and certain crimes against the king (1 Samuel 20:31 ; 1 Samuel 22:7-19 ; 2 Samuel 12:5 ; 2 Samuel 13:30 ; 2 Samuel 15:12 ; 2Samuel 16:5-9,2 Samuel 16:21 ; 1Kings 1:21,1 Kings 1:51 ; 1 Kings 2:22-25 ; 1 Kings 12:18-19 ; 1 Kings 21:10 )
Sacrifices in the Old Testament - Deliberate crimes were not so expiable; among these were reckoned the omission of circumcision, the desecration of the Sabbath, Blasphemy, failure to celebrate the pasch, eating of blood, working or failure to fast on the Day of Atonement
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - Deliberate crimes were not so expiable; among these were reckoned the omission of circumcision, the desecration of the Sabbath, Blasphemy, failure to celebrate the pasch, eating of blood, working or failure to fast on the Day of Atonement
Monotheism - ...
While, however, this is true, and all the more so because His controversy with the Jews turned largely upon the question of His claim to equality with God, and the Blasphemy which this claim appeared to them to imply, epithets and phrases may readily be quoted from the Gospels which have no meaning except as presupposing an absolute and pure monotheism
Peter, Second, Theology of - ...
These models of judgment correspond directly to the sins of the false teachers, including audacity, insurrection, Blasphemy, immorality, indulgence, and deception (2:10b-19)
Kill, Killing - It was also enforced for sexual abuses such as adultery (Exodus 31:14-153 ; Deuteronomy 22:22 ), incest (Leviticus 20:11-17 ), sodomy (Leviticus 20:13 ), and bestiality (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 20:15-16 ), and for cultic abuses including idolatry (Leviticus 20:1-5 ; Numbers 25:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 13:6-18 ; 17:2-7 ), Blasphemy (Leviticus 24:15-16 ), profanation of the Sabbath (1618385436_97 ; Numbers 15:32-36 ), and sorcery (Exodus 22:17 ; Leviticus 20:27 )
Rabbulas, Bishop of Edessa - ), lauded Rabbûlas for his zeal in expelling the Blasphemy of Nestorius, and indicated Theodore, though guarding himself from mentioning so revered a name, as "the Cilician," from whose root this impiety proceeded
Holy Ghost - The first is taken from his being the subject of Blasphemy: "The Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men," Matthew 12:31 . This Blasphemy consisted in ascribing his miraculous works to Satan; and that he is capable of being blasphemed proves him to be as much a person as the Son; and it proves him to be divine, because it shows that he may be sinned against, and so sinned against that the blasphemer shall not be forgiven. A person he must be, or he could not be blasphemed: a divine person he must be, to constitute this Blasphemy a sin against him in the proper sense, and of so malignant a kind as to place it beyond the reach of mercy
Jude, Theology of - Jude wrote this urgent letter to counter ungodly persons who turned the grace of God into lawlessness, and by their audacious Blasphemy denied the Lord Jesus Christ
Son of God - For this they accused him of Blasphemy and in the end crucified him (Matthew 26:63-66; Philippians 2:8; John 5:18; John 10:33; John 10:36; John 19:7)
Paul - ...
Paul considered the Christians to be guilty of Blasphemy in believing in a Messiah who died on a cross; for a person who died on a cross was under God’s curse (Acts 26:11; Galatians 3:13)
Gods - If their beloved Law, to which they were constantly appealing, hesitated not to designate as ‘gods’ (אֳלהים) the judges whose partiality and injustice provoked their arraignment by God, and the solemn warning to ‘judge the weak and fatherless, do justice to the afflicted and destitute’ (Psalms 82:3), surely the charge of Blasphemy came badly from those men who recognized in this Law their final court of appeal
Son of God - The Jews thrice took up stones to kill Him for Blasphemy...
(1) in unequivocally claiming God to be peculiarly "His own Father" (idion patera ): John 5:18
Son of God - Luke excites doubt as to the identity, because he represents Him as being asked first simply if He were ‘the Christ’; but when He wound up His reply with the imposing words, ‘Hereafter shall the Son of Man sit on the right hand of the power of God,’ they proceeded, ‘Art thou, then, the Son of God?’ and the affirmative answer to this second question seems to have shocked and irritated them far more than the answer to the first, occasioning a tempest of rage and insult in all present, with a unanimous agreement that He had been guilty of Blasphemy (Luke 22:69). Holtzmann, who writes with extraordinary feeling on this subject, recently, in a review in the Theologische Literaturzcitung, declaring it to be a shame that Protestant scholars should even doubt the identity, affirms that ‘the Blasphemy can only have been found in the fact that a man belonging to the lower classes, one openly forsaken of God and going forward to a shameful death, should have dared to represent himself as the object and fulfilment of all the Divine promises given to the nation’; but the Blasphemy is far more obvious if the claim to be ‘the Son of God’ was understood to mean more than even Messiahship
Attributes of Christ - Matthew 16:16), and this led to the charge of Blasphemy (John 19:7; cf
Judah - Jacob said, that a lawgiver should not depart from between his feet until Shiloh came; and this law they proved did remain, for they contended with Pilate to enforce that law, for supposed Blasphemy in the person of Christ
Nicolaitans - Again, when writing to the church at Smyrna, he says: "I know the Blasphemy of them which say they are Jews, and are not, but are the synagogue of Satan," Revelation 2:9
John, Gospel of - They considered that his claim to be God in human form was Blasphemy, and they were determined to get rid of him (John 6:42; John 7:28-30; John 8:57-59; John 10:33; John 10:39; John 11:25; John 11:53)
Hypocrisy - ...
All this is in essential agreement with what the Synoptics say of Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost (Matthew 12:22-37, Mark 3:20-30, Luke 12:1-12). On the other hand, to follow hypocrisy is to go the road that leads to the Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost—the state of mind that has so juggled with good and evil that good has no power over it, the sin which no change of dispensation, or perhaps nothing in eternity any more than in time, can modify
Hypocrisy - ...
All this is in essential agreement with what the Synoptics say of Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost (Matthew 12:22-37, Job 34:30 Luke 12:1-12). On the other hand, to follow hypocrisy is to go the road that leads to the Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost—the state of mind that has so juggled with good and evil that good has no power over it, the sin which no change of dispensation, or perhaps nothing in eternity any more than in time, can modify
Forgiveness - Jesus spoke about Blasphemy against the Spirit for which there could be no forgiveness (Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-29 ; Luke 12:10 ). Smith...
See also Atonement ; Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ; Death of Christ ; Faith ; Repentance ...
Bibliography
Daniel - ...
The pair Daniel 4 and Daniel 5 shows God's power to humble the world power in the height of its impious arrogance; first Nebuchadnezzar, whose coming hypochondriacal exile among the beasts Daniel foretells with fidelity and tenderness; then Belshazzar, whose Blasphemy he more sternly reproves
Messiah - But when he admitted before the high priest Caiaphas that he was the Messiah, adding a statement that placed him on equality with God, he was accused of Blasphemy and condemned to death (Mark 14:61-64)
Stephen - ...
The members of the council, remembering probably the use of similar language by Jesus when on trial before them (Matthew 26:64), being at all events resolved to treat as Blasphemy Stephen's assertion of the divine exaltation of Him whom they had crucified, cried aloud, stopped their ear's (unconsciously realizing Stephen's picture of them: Acts 7:51; Psalms 58:4), ran upon him with one accord (contrast "with one accord," Acts 4:24), and cast him out of the city (as was the custom in order to put out from the midst of them such a pollution: 1 Kings 21:13; Luke 4:29; Hebrews 13:12) and stoned him, all sharing in the execution, the witnesses casting the first stones (Deuteronomy 13:9-10; Deuteronomy 17:7; John 8:7), after having stripped off the outer garments for greater ease in the bloody work, and laid them at the feet of Saul who thereby signified his consent to Stephen's execution (Acts 8:1; Acts 22:20)
Pilate - Therefore (avoiding the charge of Blasphemy) they accused Jesus of ‘forbidding tribute’ and calling himself ‘Christ, a king’ ( Luke 23:2 )
Redemption (2) - He does not hesitate to speak of the fire of Gehenna (Matthew 5:22; Matthew 5:29-30, and of God, who is able to destroy both soul and body in Gehenna (Matthew 10:28); of the worm that dieth not, and the fire that is not quenched (Mark 9:44; Mark 9:46; Mark 9:48); of the judgment, less tolerable than that upon Tyre and Sidon, or even Sodom, which awaits cities like Capernaum (Ezekiel 33:12); of a Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit which shall not be forgiven, either in this world, or in that to come (Matthew 12:31-32 ||). ), and culminates in Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit (Matthew 12:31-32 etc
Holy Spirit - Because Jesus' signs and wonders most directly reveal God's spirit at work, attribution of them to Satan puts one in jeopardy of committing an unforgivable sin (the "blasphemy against the Spirit" [3] probably equivalent to persistent and unrepentant rejection of Christ ). Blomberg...
See also Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ; God ; Holy Spirit, Gifts of ...
Bibliography
Judgment - These are some of the tests:...
Following Him (Matthew 4:18-22; Matthew 10:38; Matthew 19:28, Mark 8:34); confessing Him (Matthew 10:32, Luke 12:8); failure to appreciate His presence and work (Matthew 11:21); failure to come to Him (John 5:40); failure to believe Him (John 3:18); failure to obey Him (John 3:36); failure to honour Him (John 5:23); failure to stand with Him (Matthew 12:30); failure of right fruitage (Matthew 21:31-42; Matthew 7:16, Luke 6:44); failure in outward conduct (Matthew 22:11-13); failure to help men (Matthew 25:31-46); failure to repent (John 5:40); failure to use the gifts of God (Matthew 25:14-30); making light of His personal invitations (Matthew 22:1-7); unwillingness to hear His words (Matthew 12:41-42); unwillingness to forgive an injury (Matthew 6:15; Matthew 18:28-30); being ashamed of Him (Mark 8:38); breaking a commandment (Matthew 5:19); the spirit of our judgment on others (Matthew 12:31-32); faith or lack of it (Matthew 8:10; Matthew 9:22; Matthew 9:29; Matthew 15:28, Mark 5:34); heart unreceptive to His words (Matthew 10:14-15); hypocrisy (Matthew 23:13-36); idle words (Matthew 12:36); lip service without the heart (Matthew 15:7); selfish conceit (Matthew 6:2); wicked pride (Mark 12:38); love of darkness (Matthew 7:20); rejection of His disciples (Luke 10:10); adultery (Matthew 19:9); commercialism in worship (Matthew 21:13); Blasphemy against the Spirit (1618385436_66); loving others more than God (Matthew 10:37); hearing, seeing the Son, with belief or with failure to believe (Matthew 7:24; Matthew 13:23, John 5:24; John 6:40); the cup of cold water given to a disciple (Matthew 10:42); mercifulness (Luke 6:36); love to Christ (Luke 7:47, John 21:16); love to enemies (Luke 6:27); humble-mindedness as a child (Matthew 18:4); fidelity of service (Matthew 20:14; Matthew 24:45-51); endurance in well-doing (Matthew 24:13); doing will of God (Matthew 12:50); deeds in general (Matthew 16:27); inward thoughts and motives (Mark 7:21, Luke 5:22-23)
Goodness (Human) - The ‘good things’ and the ‘evil things’ spoken of in Matthew 12:34-35 are, of course, in themselves morally right or wrong, yet in the contest the reference is to Blasphemy, so that the element of the good or bad intent and effect con scarcely be excluded
Discourse - Of these there are a great number and variety, spoken sometimes to great multitudes, sometimes to groups, but publicly: on Blasphemy (Matthew 12:22-37, Mark 3:19-30); on Signs (Matthew 12:38-45); latter part of discourse on Eating with Unwashen Hands, and Traditions (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-23); on Signs again (Matthew 16:1-4, Mark 8:11-12); on Demons and Signs again (Luke 11:14-36); on Confession, Worldliness, Watchfulness (Luke 12); on Repentance, with parable of the Barren Fig-tree (Luke 13:1-9); on the Good Shepherd (John 10:1-18); on His Messiahship and Relations with the Father (John 10:22-38); Sabbath Healing, parables of Mustard Seed and Leaven (Luke 13:10-21); on the Salvation of the Elect (Luke 13:23-30); Lament over Jerusalem (Luke 13:34-35); on Counting the Cost of Following Him (Luke 14:25-35); reproof of the Pharisees, with parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:14-31); on the Coming of the Kingdom (Luke 17:20-37); on Prayer, with parables of the Importunate Widow, and of the Pharisee and Publican (Luke 18:1-14); the colloquies with His critics in the Temple, on His Authority, on the Tribute to Caesar, on the Resurrection, on the Great Commandment, on the Son of David (Matthew 21:23 to Matthew 22:46, Mark 11:27 to Mark 12:37, Luke 20); remarks on Belief and Unbelief (John 12:44-50)
Jacob - To his crass lies and deception, Jacob even approached Blasphemy, using God's name to bolster his cause, “Because the Lord your God granted me success” (Genesis 27:20 NRSV)
Sea - A monster dragon comes up out of the sea, as the father of cruelty and Blasphemy (Revelation 13:1; cf
Trial of Jesus - Taylor Innes, sums up his inquiry in the words: ‘A process,’ begun, continued, and apparently finished in the course of one night, commencing with witnesses against the accused who were sought for by the Judges, but whose evidence was not sustained even by them; continuing by interrogations which Hebrew law does not sanction; and ending with a demand for confession which its doctors expressly forbid; all followed, twenty-four hours too soon, by a sentence which described a claim to be the fulfiller of the hopes of Israel as Blasphemy—such a process had neither the form nor the fairness of a judicial trial. Then, after being found guilty of Blasphemy, Jesus was kept waiting till morning, and exposed meanwhile to the coarse mockery and rough play of the company (probably, for the most part, the servants of the high priest and the rest of the underlings)
Crimes And Punishments - Blasphemy , or profanation of the Divine name, is forbidden in all the codes; the penalty is death by stoning (H Martyr - Stephen was nominally charged with Blasphemy, but the proceedings were no trial in any legal sense, and, if the Sanhedrin were ever called to account for them, they doubtless pleaded that a sudden and uncontrollable tumult had occurred
Trial-at-Law - In grave matters of Blasphemy or notorions crime, the person accused might be openly denounced by ‘witnesses’ in presence of the people (cf. The bolder outlook and speech of Stephen rendered him liable to the same charge of Blasphemy as his Master had faced; but so infuriated were his judges by the aggressive tone of his defence that they hurried him out to execution without even the semblance of a formal condemnation (Acts 7:57 f
Eusebius (60), Bishop of Nicomedia - This was Blasphemy in the eyes of those who held the Divinity of the Son of God. 8) the "formulary propounded by Eusebius contained undisguised evidence of his Blasphemy; the reading of it occasioned great grief to the audience on account of the depravity of the doctrines; the writer was covered with shame and the impious writing was torn to pieces
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - He warned the religious leaders sternly that they were in danger of “blasphemy against the Spirit” by attributing the Spirit's ministry through Him to the power of the devil (Matthew 12:31 )
Moses - To impugn the Law in any way was to speak Blasphemy, not only against Moses, but even against God (cf
the Blind Leaders of the Blind - "For from within, out of the hearts of men, proceed evil thoughts, adulteries, fornication, murders, thefts, covetousness, an evil eye, Blasphemy, pride, foolishness
Job - And it is this-with his unparalleled sufferings, and with the incessant insinuations and insults of his three friends-it is all this that so racks and tortures Job's tender conscience, and so darkens and crushes his pious heart, and so embitters and exasperates, sometimes almost to rank Blasphemy, his far too many defences of himself
Simon Maccabaeus - Later writers have increased the Blasphemy of this doctrine, and said that Simon declared himself to the Samaritans as the Father, to the Jews as the Son, and to the rest of the world as the Holy Ghost
Expiation - Blasphemy, idolatry, murder, and adultery, were the "presumptuous sins" which were thus exempted; and the reason will be seen in the political relation of the people to God; for in refusing to exempt them from punishment in this world, respect was had to the order and benefit of society. Running parallel, however, with this political application of the law to the Jews as subjects of the theocracy, we see the authority of the moral law kept over them as men and creatures; and if these "presumptuous sins," of Blasphemy and idolatry, of murder and adultery, and a few others, were the only capital crimes considered politically, they were not the only capital crimes considered morally; that is, there were other crimes which would have subjected the offender to death, but for this provision of expiatory oblations
Essenes - Their sabbatarianism was extreme, and their reverence for Moses was such that they treated any disrespect to his name as Blasphemy worthy of death (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) ii
Pentateuch - This Code deals with the slaughter of animals and sacrifice ( Leviticus 17:1-16 ); forbidden sexual relations (Leviticus 18:1-30 ); relationships with neighbors (Leviticus 19:1-37 ); penalties (stoning, burning); rules for personal life of the priests (Leviticus 20:1-22:16 ); the quality of sacrifices (Leviticus 22:17-33 ); a cultic calendar (Leviticus 23:1-44 ); rules for lights in the sanctuary and the shewbread (Leviticus 24:1-9 ); Blasphemy (Leviticus 24:10-23 ); the sabbatic year and jubilee (Leviticus 25:1-55 ); blessings and curses (Leviticus 26:1-46 )
Pilate - This statement was decided to be Blasphemy, and as a result He was judged worthy of death (Leviticus 24:16)
Jesus Christ - ...
The Jewish leaders considered that Jesus’ claim to be the Son of God was Blasphemy (Mark 2:7; Matthew 20:18-19; Mark 14:61-64; John 7:25; John 7:40-44; John 8:56-59; John 11:55-57)
Restoration - The hopelessness of the Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost is summed up in the words ‘he is guilty of eternal sin’ (Mark 3:29)
Guilt (2) - Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, however it be interpreted, incurs condemnation as the unpardonable sin (Mark 3:28-29, Matthew 12:31-32)
Evil - This essay uses the term "moral evil" to include both social offenses (ethics—murder, theft) and cultic sins (those offenses aimed directly against the deityblasphemy, idolatry). For example, the same Decalogue that declares that stealing and murder are wrong likewise forbids idolatry and Blasphemy
Righteous, Righteousness - So He claims to be the Son of God (Luke 22:70 ||), and suffers condemnation for Blasphemy; as such, He is transfigured, before three of His Apostles, with the Divine glory (Matthew 17:1-8 ||)
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - "...
Their own Scriptures, in fact, forbade this (Deuteronomy 4:15-16 ), violation of which was Blasphemy
Sin - ...
Daniel Doriani...
See also Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ; Fall, the ; Guilt ...
Bibliography
Law of Moses - Blasphemy
Jesus Christ - It was difficult to get the witnesses to agree, but a charge of Blasphemy was settled on, because Jesus had claimed to be equal to God (Matthew 26:63-68 )
Sexuality, Human - Instead, they assume a theologically prior dimension whereby a crime against any human being, within or without the community, becomes a Blasphemy against him in whose image humanity was fashioned
Job - ), occasionally rising for a moment or two into confidence ( Job 16:19 , Job 19:25-27 ), but throughout maintaining his integrity, and, notwithstanding passionate utterances which seem near akin to Blasphemy ( Job 10:8-17 , Job 16:7-17 ), never wholly losing his faith in God
Apocalypse - ]'>[22] a ‘man of lawlessness’ who embodies all Blasphemy, a ‘great whore’ who incarnates all the abominations of the heathen world
Psalms (2) - The Jews are incensed at what they regard as His Blasphemy in calling Himself the Son of God
Revelation, the - Direct final judgements fall from God out of heaven, but produce only Blasphemy on the part of men
Elijah - Puffed up with the success of his war with Syria, and forgetting the Lord who had given him victory (1 Kings 20), Ahab by Jezebel's wicked hardihood, after vainly trying to get from Naboth the inheritance of his fathers, had him and his sons (2 Kings 9:26, compare Joshua 7:24) slain for falsely alleged Blasphemy, and seized his property as that of a criminal forfeited to the crown; the elders of Jezreel lending themselves to be Jezebel's ready instruments
Holy Spirit (2) - What is meant in the second form, where a word spoken against the Son of Man is contrasted with Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, is not very clear
Jesus Christ - The Jews remembered Him as charged with deceiving the people, practising magic and speaking Blasphemy, and as having been crucified; but the calumnies of the Talmud as to the circumstances of His birth appear to have been comparatively late inventions (Huldricus, Sepher Toledot Jeschua , 1705; Laible, Jesus Christus im Talmud , 1900)
Pharisees (2) - In like manner Jesus was accused of Blasphemy against God, violating His Law, and claiming to fulfil the Messianic hope
Tatianus - So long as Justin was alive, says Irenaeus, he brought out no "blasphemy"; after his death it was different
Christ in Jewish Literature - of this article) as evidence of Jewish Blasphemy
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - He added that Dioscorus had taken away his clothes and property, and compelled him to flee for his life; and he charged him, further, with adultery and Blasphemy (ib
Calvinism - And this is the decree of reprobation, which determines that God is, in no wise, the author of sin, (which, to be thought of, in Blasphemy,) but a tremendous, incomprehensible, just judge, and avenger
Neology - ...
The first step in this sorrowful gradation down to a depth of falsehood and Blasphemy, into which certainly no body of Christian ministers, so large, so learned, and influential, in any age or period of the church ever before fell, was, contempt for the authority of the divines of the Reformation, and of the subsequent age
Teaching of the Twelve Apostles - Such testing by exorcism is here manifestly forbidden, as involving, if applied to one really inspired by the Spirit of God, the risk of incurring the penalties denounced by our Lord, in words plainly here referred to, upon Blasphemy against the Holy Ghost
Originality - Havet denies that He claimed to be the Christ, and that He was tried before the Sanhedrin and condemned for Blasphemy or any religious crime
Palestine - To Israel tribute was a sacrilege, and the theatre which rose in Jerusalem a Blasphemy
Perfection (of Jesus) - The man who would not follow Him, but yet wrought cures in His name, was not to be rebuked (1618385436_99) and any Blasphemy against Him personally would be forgiven (Matthew 12:31-32)
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - 71), that Diodore and Theodore were the parents of the Blasphemy of Nestorius; to Proclus ( Ep