What does Bethsaida mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
βηθσαϊδά a small fishing village on the west shore of Lake Gennesaret 4
βηθσαϊδάν a small fishing village on the west shore of Lake Gennesaret 2
βηθσαϊδὰ a small fishing village on the west shore of Lake Gennesaret 1

Definitions Related to Bethsaida

G966


   1 a small fishing village on the west shore of Lake Gennesaret, home of Andrew, Peter, Philip and John.
   2 a village in lower Gaulanitis on the eastern shore of Lake Gennesaret, not far from where the Jordan empties into it.
   Additional Information: Bethsaida = “house of fish”.
   

Frequency of Bethsaida (original languages)

Frequency of Bethsaida (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Bethsaida
(Hebrew: house of fishing)
City, east of the Jordan, on Lake Genesareth, Palestine. Nearby occurred the miracles of the loaves and fishes (Luke 9) and the restoration of sight to the blind man (Mark 8).
City, home of Saint Peter the Apostle, Saint Andrew the Apostle, and Saint Philip (John 1:12), possibly west of the Jordan or else identical with (1).
Pool in Jerusalem (John 5), where Our Lord cured a man "eight and thirty years under his infirmity."
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida
BETHSAIDA . A place on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, whither Christ went after feeding the five thousand ( Mark 6:45 , cf. Luke 9:10 ), and where He healed a blind man ( Mark 8:22 ); the home of Philip, Andrew, and Peter ( John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ). It was denounced by Christ for unbelief ( Matthew 11:21 , Luke 10:13 ). The town was advanced by Philip the tetrarch from a village to the dignity of a city, and named Julias, in honour of Cæsar’s daughter. The situation is disputed, and, indeed, authorities differ as to whether or not there were two places of the same name, one east, one west of the Jordan. Et-Tell , on the northern shore of the sea, east of the Jordan, is generally identified with Bethsaida Julias: those who consider that the narrative of the crossings of the Lake ( Mark 6:45 ) requires another site west of the Jordan, seek it usually at ’Ain et-Tabigha near Khan Minyeh. The latest writers, however, seem inclined to regard the hypothetical second Bethsaida as unnecessary (see Sanday, Sacred Sites of the Gospels , p. 41), and to regard et-Tell as the scene of all the incidents recorded about the town.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Bethsaida
a city whose name in Hebrew imports a place of fishing or of hunting, and for both of these exercises it was well situated. As it belonged to the tribe of Naphtali, it was in a country remarkable for plenty of deer; and as it lay on the north end of the lake Gennesareth, just where the river Jordan runs into it, it became the residence of fishermen. Three of the Apostles, Philip, Andrew, and Peter, were born in this city. It is not mentioned in the Old Testament, though it frequently occurs in the New: the reason is, that it was but a village, as Josephus tells us, till Philip the tetrarch enlarged it, making it a magnificent city, and gave it the name of Julias, out of respect to Julia, the daughter of Augustus Caesar.
The evangelists speak of Bethsaida; and yet it then possessed that name no longer: it was enlarged and beautified nearly at the same time as Caesarea, and called Julias. Thus was it called in the days of our Lord, and so would the sacred historians have been accustomed to call it. But if they knew nothing of this, what shall we say of their age? In other respects they evince the most accurate knowledge of the circumstances of the time. The solution is, that, though Philip had exalted it to the rank of a city, to which he gave the name of Julias, yet, not long afterward, this Julia, in whose honour the city received its name, was banished from the country by her own father. The deeply wounded honour of Augustus was even anxious that the world might forget that she was his daughter. Tiberius, whose wife she had been, consigned the unfortunate princess, after the death of Augustus, to the most abject poverty, under which she sank without assistance. Thus adulation must under two reigns have suppressed a name, from which otherwise the city might have wished to derive benefit to itself; and for some time it was called by its ancient name Bethsaida instead of Julias. At a later period this name again came into circulation, and appears in the catalogue of Jewish cities by Pliny. By such incidents, which are so easily overlooked, and the knowledge of which is afterward lost, do those who are really acquainted with an age disclose their authenticity. "But it is strange," some one will say, "that John reckons this Bethsaida, or Julias, where he was born, in Galilee, John 12:21 . Should he not know to what province his birthplace belonged?" Philip only governed the eastern districts by the sea of Tiberias; but Galilee was the portion of his brother Antipas. Bethsaida or Julias could therefore not have been built by Philip, as the case is; or it did not belong to Galilee, as John alleges. In fact, such an error were sufficient to prove that this Gospel was not written by John. Julias, however, was situated in Gaulonitis, which district was, for deep political reasons, divided from Galilee; but the ordinary language of the time asserted its own opinion, and still reckoned the Gaulonitish province in Galilee. When, therefore, John does the same, he proves, that the peculiarity of those days was not unknown to him; for he expresses himself after the ordinary manner of the period. Thus Josephus informs us of Judas the Gaulonite from Gamala, and also calls him in the following chapters, the Galilean; and then in another work he applies the same expression to him; from whence we may be convinced that the custom of those days paid respect to a more ancient division of the country, and bade defiance, in the present case, to the then existing political geography. Is it possible that historians who, as it is evident from such examples, discover throughout so nice a knowledge of geographical arrangements and local and even temporary circumstances, should have written at a time when the theatre of events was unknown to them, when not only their native country was destroyed, but their nation scattered, and the national existence of the Jews extinguished and extirpated? On the contrary, all this is in proof that they wrote at the very period which they profess, and it also proves the usual antiquity assigned to the Gospels.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Bethsaida
House of fish.
A town in Galilee, on the west side of the sea of Tiberias, in the "land of Gennesaret." It was the native place of Peter, Andrew, and Philip, and was frequently resorted to by Jesus (Mark 6:45 ; John 1:44 ; 12:21 ). It is supposed to have been at the modern 'Ain Tabighah, a bay to the north of Gennesaret.
A city near which Christ fed 5,000 (Luke 9:10 ; Compare John 6:17 ; Matthew 14:15-21 ), and where the blind man had his sight restored (Mark 8:22 ), on the east side of the lake, two miles up the Jordan. It stood within the region of Gaulonitis, and was enlarged by Philip the tetrarch, who called it "Julias," after the emperor's daughter. Or, as some have supposed, there may have been but one Bethsaida built on both sides of the lake, near where the Jordan enters it. Now the ruins et-Tel.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Bethsaida
("house of fish".) A city of Galilee, W. of and close to the sea of Tiberias, in the land of Gennesareth (Mark 6:45-53; John 6:16-17; John 1:44; John 12:21). Andrew, Peter, and Philip belonged to it, Near Capernaum and Chorazin (Matthew 11:21; Luke 10:13). When Jesus fed the 5,000 on the N.E. of the lake, they entered into a boat to cross to Bethsaida (Mark 6:45), while John says" they went over the sea toward Capernaum." Being driven out of their course, Jesus came to them walking on the sea; they landed in Gennesaret and went to Capernaum; so that Bethsaida must have been near Capernaum.
In Luke 9:10-17 another Bethsaida, at the scene of feeding the 5,000, is mentioned (though the Curetonian Syriac and later Sinaitic omit it), which must have been therefore N.E. of the lake; the same as Julias, called from the emperor's daughter Julia. The miracle was wrought in a lonely "desert place," on a rising ground at the back of the town, covered with much "green grass" (Mark 6:39). In Mark 8:10-22 a Bethsaida on the E. side of the lake in Gaulonitis (now Jaulan) is alluded to; for Jesus passed by ship from Dalmanutha on the W. side "to the other side," i.e. to the E. side. Thus, Caesarea Philippi is mentioned presently after, Bethsaida being on the road to it; and the mount of the transfiguration, part of the Hermon range, above the source of the Jordan (Mark 9:2-3); the snow of Hermon suggested the image, "His raiment became white as snow."
Holman Bible Dictionary - Bethsaida
(behth ssay' ih duh) Place name meaning, “house of fish.” The home of Andrew, Peter, and Philip (John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ), located on the northeast side of the Sea of Galilee. This town was rebuilt under Philip the tetrarch, one of Herod the Great's sons, who named it Julius in honor of the Emperor Augustus' daughter. Near here Jesus fed the 5,000 (Luke 9:10 ) and healed a blind man (Mark 8:22 ). Jesus pronounced judgment upon Bethsaida for its lack of response to His message and miracles (Matthew 11:21 ; Luke 10:13 ). The site of Bethsaida has yet to be identified archaeologically. Some scholars do propose two sites named Bethsaida: The one northeast of the Sea of Galilee, as already discussed; and another, west of the Sea of Galilee, close to Capernaum. This postulation is based on Mark 6:45 , where following the feeding of the 5,000 outside Bethsaida, Jesus tells His disciples to sail to Bethsaida. However, there is no contemporary mention of two Bethsaidas, and the Mark 6:1 text can just as easily refer to a short trip to the known city of Bethsaida-Julias as to an unknown town.
William Vermillion
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Bethsaida
House of fruits
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bethsaida
This name signifies 'house of fish.'
1. BETHSAIDA OF GALILEE, a town from whence came Philip, Andrew, and Peter, John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ; and against which the Lord pronounced a 'woe' because it had not repented at His mighty works. Matthew 11:21 ; Luke 10:13 . After the Lord had fed the 5,000 on the east of Jordan He sent His disciples to Bethsaida on the western shore. Mark 6:45 . It was near the shore on the west of the Sea of Galilee, in the same locality as Capernaum and Chorazin: there are ruins in the district, but its exact situation cannot be identified.
2. BETHSAIDA JULIAS, a town near the N.E. corner of the same lake. A blind man was cured there, Mark 8:22 ; and near to it the 5,000 were fed, Luke 9:10-17 : also related in Matthew 14:13-21 ; Mark 6:31-44 ; John 6:1-14 . It was called 'Julias,' because Philip the tetrarch enlarged the town, giving it the above name in honour of Julia, daughter of Augustus. It is identified by some with et Tell, 32 54' N, 35 37' E . A few rude houses and heaps of stones are all that mark the spot. (The context of the above passages shows that the events recorded could not have taken place at or near the Bethsaida on the west of the lake.)
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida
Bethsaida (bĕth'sâ'i-dah), home, of fishing. A city of Galilee, near Capernaum. John 12:21; Matthew 11:21. Some writers urge that there were two Bethsaidas, since the desert place where the 5000 were fed belonged to "the city called Bethsaida," Luke 9:10, while after the miracle the disciples were to go before him unto the other side to Bethsaida, Mark 6:45, which it is said could not refer to the same town. If there were two towns of this name, the first one was in Galilee on the west side of the lake, and 2. Bethsaida Julias, in Gaulanitis, on the eastern bank of the Jordan, near its entrance into the lake. Others think it unlikely that two cities in such close neighborhood should have borne the same name. Hence Dr. W. M. Thomson supposes that there was but one Bethsaida, which was built on both sides of the Jordan, and places the site at Abu-Zany, where the Jordan empties into the Lake of Galilee. The Sinaitic manuscript omits "belonging to a city called Bethsaida" in Luke 9:1-62; Luke 10:1-42; hence, Wilson agrees that there is no necessity for two Bethsaidas. The eastern city was beautified by Philip the tetrarch, and called Bethsaida Julias (in honor of a daughter of the emperor Augustus), perhaps to distinguish it from the western Bethsaida, in Galilee.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Bethsaida
Place of fishing, 1. A city in Galilee, on the western shore of the lake of Gennesareth, a little north of Capernaum; it was the birthplace of the apostles Philip, Andrew, and Peter, and was often visited by our Lord, Matthew 11:21 ; Mark 6:45 ; 8:22 .
2. A city in Gaulonitis, north of the same lake, and east of the Jordan. Near this place Christ fed the five thousand. It lay on a gentle hill near the Jordan separated from the sea of Galilee by a plain three miles wide, of surpassing fertility, Luke 9:10 . Compare Matthew 14:13-22 ; Mark 6:31-45 . This town was enlarged by Philip, tetrarch of that region, Luke 3:1 , and called Julias in honor of Julia, the daughter of Augustus. It is now little but ruins.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Bethsaida
Bethsaida was an important town on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee (Mark 6:45). It was a base for fishermen who worked the rich fishing grounds of the lake. Among those fishermen were the brothers Andrew and Peter, who became two of Jesus’ disciples. Another disciple, Philip, was also from Bethsaida (John 1:44).
On one occasion Jesus healed a blind man in Bethsaida (Mark 8:22), and on another occasion he miraculously fed five thousand people not far from Bethsaida (Luke 9:10-17). The people of Bethsaida, however, like the people of nearby Capernaum and Chorazin, stubbornly refused to accept the evidence that this Jesus was God’s promised Messiah. Such a refusal only guaranteed for them a more severe judgment (Matthew 11:21-24).

Sentence search

Bethsaida - Bethsaida (bĕth'sâ'i-dah), home, of fishing. Some writers urge that there were two Bethsaidas, since the desert place where the 5000 were fed belonged to "the city called Bethsaida," Luke 9:10, while after the miracle the disciples were to go before him unto the other side to Bethsaida, Mark 6:45, which it is said could not refer to the same town. Bethsaida Julias, in Gaulanitis, on the eastern bank of the Jordan, near its entrance into the lake. Thomson supposes that there was but one Bethsaida, which was built on both sides of the Jordan, and places the site at Abu-Zany, where the Jordan empties into the Lake of Galilee. The Sinaitic manuscript omits "belonging to a city called Bethsaida" in Luke 9:1-62; Luke 10:1-42; hence, Wilson agrees that there is no necessity for two Bethsaidas. The eastern city was beautified by Philip the tetrarch, and called Bethsaida Julias (in honor of a daughter of the emperor Augustus), perhaps to distinguish it from the western Bethsaida, in Galilee
Bethsaida - Bethsaida was an important town on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee (Mark 6:45). Another disciple, Philip, was also from Bethsaida (John 1:44). ...
On one occasion Jesus healed a blind man in Bethsaida (Mark 8:22), and on another occasion he miraculously fed five thousand people not far from Bethsaida (Luke 9:10-17). The people of Bethsaida, however, like the people of nearby Capernaum and Chorazin, stubbornly refused to accept the evidence that this Jesus was God’s promised Messiah
Bethsaida - Jesus pronounced judgment upon Bethsaida for its lack of response to His message and miracles (Matthew 11:21 ; Luke 10:13 ). The site of Bethsaida has yet to be identified archaeologically. Some scholars do propose two sites named Bethsaida: The one northeast of the Sea of Galilee, as already discussed; and another, west of the Sea of Galilee, close to Capernaum. This postulation is based on Mark 6:45 , where following the feeding of the 5,000 outside Bethsaida, Jesus tells His disciples to sail to Bethsaida. However, there is no contemporary mention of two Bethsaidas, and the Mark 6:1 text can just as easily refer to a short trip to the known city of Bethsaida-Julias as to an unknown town
Bethsa'Ida - By comparing the narratives in ( Mark 6:31-53 ) and Luke 9:10-17 It appears certain that the Bethsaida at which the five thousand were fed must have been a second place of the same name on the east of the lake. (But in reality "there is but one Bethsaida, that known on our maps at Bethsaida Julias. The fact is that Bethsaida was a village on both sides of the Jordan as it enters the sea of Galilee on the north, so that the western part of the village was in Galilee and the eastern portion in Gaulonitis, part of the tetrarchy of Philip. This eastern portion was built up into a beautiful city by Herod Philip, and named by him Bethsaida Julias , after Julia the daughter of the Roman emperor Tiberius Caesar
Bethsaida - of the lake, they entered into a boat to cross to Bethsaida (Mark 6:45), while John says" they went over the sea toward Capernaum. " Being driven out of their course, Jesus came to them walking on the sea; they landed in Gennesaret and went to Capernaum; so that Bethsaida must have been near Capernaum. ...
In Luke 9:10-17 another Bethsaida, at the scene of feeding the 5,000, is mentioned (though the Curetonian Syriac and later Sinaitic omit it), which must have been therefore N. In Mark 8:10-22 a Bethsaida on the E. Thus, Caesarea Philippi is mentioned presently after, Bethsaida being on the road to it; and the mount of the transfiguration, part of the Hermon range, above the source of the Jordan (Mark 9:2-3); the snow of Hermon suggested the image, "His raiment became white as snow
Bethsaida - Bethsaida OF GALILEE, a town from whence came Philip, Andrew, and Peter, John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ; and against which the Lord pronounced a 'woe' because it had not repented at His mighty works. After the Lord had fed the 5,000 on the east of Jordan He sent His disciples to Bethsaida on the western shore. Bethsaida JULIAS, a town near the N. (The context of the above passages shows that the events recorded could not have taken place at or near the Bethsaida on the west of the lake
Bethsaida - Bethsaida . Et-Tell , on the northern shore of the sea, east of the Jordan, is generally identified with Bethsaida Julias: those who consider that the narrative of the crossings of the Lake ( Mark 6:45 ) requires another site west of the Jordan, seek it usually at ’Ain et-Tabigha near Khan Minyeh. The latest writers, however, seem inclined to regard the hypothetical second Bethsaida as unnecessary (see Sanday, Sacred Sites of the Gospels , p
Chorazin - The woe was also pronounced on Bethsaida and Capernaum
Gaulanitis - It lay to the east of the Lake of Galilee, and included among its towns Bethsaida-Julias (Mark 8:22 ) and Seleucia
Andrew - He belonged to Bethsaida of Galilee ( John 1:44 ), the harbour-town of Capernaum (see Bethsaida), and was a fisherman on the lake in company with Simon ( Matthew 4:18 = Mark 1:16 ), whose home he also shared ( Mark 1:29 )
Chorazin - Named along with Bethsaida and Capernaum as one of the cities in which our Lord's "mighty works" were done, and which was doomed to woe because of signal privileges neglected (Matthew 11:21 ; Luke 10:13 )
Chorazin - With Capernaum and Bethsaida doomed to "woe," because of neglected spiritual privileges
Gennesaret - It was a lovely and exceedingly fertile region; in it probably lay Capernaum and Bethsaida of Galilee, places often visited by our Lord
Capernaum - Another lakeside town, Bethsaida, was close by (Mark 6:43-45; John 6:13; John 6:17; for map see Bethsaida)
Chorazin - A town in Galilee, near to Capernaum and Bethsaida, on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee
Apostle, Philip the - Native of Bethsaida on Lake Genesareth, like Peter and Andrew
Capernaum - Capernaum and Bethsaida. The three places, Capernaum, Chorazin, and Bethsaida, must all be taken together, and they must in any case be not far from the Plain of Gennesaret. The present article is written in the belief that Capernaum is Tell Hûm (which is the view of the majority of scholars), and that Bethsaida was the port (now called el-‘Araj), on the Lake, of Bethsaida Julias (et-Tell). Across the Jordan a little way back from its mouth, is et-Tell, which is now generally held to mark the site of Bethsaida Julias. Chorazin is certainly Kerâzeh, and Bethsaida Julias, built by the tetrarch Philip, is pretty certainly et-Tell. Capernaum was a place where tolls were collected (Mark 2:14 ||), and it is thought that this would be more natural on the main caravan road: but a place of the size of Tell Hûm must in any case have had its tolls, and there was certainly a road along the north end of the Lake leading to Bethsaida Julias (Guthe). Capernaum and Bethsaida. —The two questions of Capernaum and Bethsaida are so closely connected, that a word should be added upon the latter. The only Bethsaida in these parts known to general history is that of which we have just spoken as located at et-Tell to the east of the Jordan. It has often been thought necessary to postulate a second Bethsaida, which is most commonly placed at the bay of et-Tâbigha. (a) In John 12:21, the Bethsaida of the Gospels is described as ‘Bethsaida of Galilee,’ whereas Bethsaida Julias was, strictly speaking, in Gaulanitis (BJ ii. (b) The phrase εἱς τὸ πέραν in Mark 6:45 seems to imply that Bethsaida was on the opposite side of the Lake to the scene of the Feeding of the Five Thousand. These reasons are, however, insufficient to warrant the invention of a second Bethsaida so near to the first, and itself so wholly hypothetical. 1, 6); and the geographer Ptolemaeus speaks of Bethsaida Julias as ‘in Galilee,’ just as St. Political boundaries were so shifting, and the adjustments of territory in these little principalities were so constantly changed, that a loose use of terms grew up, and the more familiar names were apt to displace the less familiar, (b) The phrase εἱς τὸ πέραν cannot be pressed; it might be used of an oblique course from any one point on the shore of the Lake to any other: Josephus (Vita, § 59) uses διεπεραιώθην of taking ship from Tiberias to Taricheae, which are on the same side of the Lake, and very little farther from each other than Bethsaida from the scene of the miracle. ) makes him first come to Capernaum, then to Bethsaida, then to Corazaim, ubi Dominus daemoniacos curavit, where there is an evident confusion between Chorazin and Gerasa (mod
an'Drew - He was of Bethsaida, and had been a disciple of John the Baptist, leaving him to follow our Lord
Zebedee - He probably lived at Bethsaida
Zeb'Edee - (Matthew 27:56 ; Mark 15:40 ) He probably lived either at Bethsaida or in its immediate neighborhood
Andrew - One of the twelve apostles, was of Bethsaida, and the brother of Peter, John 1:40,44
Bethsaida - ...
The evangelists speak of Bethsaida; and yet it then possessed that name no longer: it was enlarged and beautified nearly at the same time as Caesarea, and called Julias. Thus adulation must under two reigns have suppressed a name, from which otherwise the city might have wished to derive benefit to itself; and for some time it was called by its ancient name Bethsaida instead of Julias. "But it is strange," some one will say, "that John reckons this Bethsaida, or Julias, where he was born, in Galilee, John 12:21 . Bethsaida or Julias could therefore not have been built by Philip, as the case is; or it did not belong to Galilee, as John alleges
Bethsaida - Or, as some have supposed, there may have been but one Bethsaida built on both sides of the lake, near where the Jordan enters it
Andrew - He was of Bethsaida, and became one of the disciples of John the Baptist, at whose word he followed Jesus, and afterwards brought his brother Simon
Bethesda - Some ancient manuscripts name it Bethzatha or Bethsaida
Galilee, Sea of - ; then, coming southward, was Bethsaida of Galilee, with the plain of Gennesaret (or Chinnereth) near; then Magdala, Dalmanutha and Tiberias on the west
Woe - We find the expression, "Woe is me!" that is, Alas for my sufferings! And, "Woe to the women with child, and those who give suck!" that is, Alas for their redoubled sufferings in times of distress! If in the denunciatory language of Christ, we should read, "Alas for thee, Chorazin! Alas for thee, Bethsaida!" we should do not injustice to the general sentiments of the passage
Naph'Tali - (In the division of the kingdom Naphtali belonged to the kingdom of Israel, and later was a part of Galilee, bordering on the northwestern pert of the Sea of Galilee, and including Capernaum and Bethsaida
Fish - Two of the villages on the shores of the Sea of Galilee derived their names from their fisheries, Bethsaida (the "house of fish") on the east and on the west
Andrew, Saint - (Greek: manly) ...
Apostle (died 60), born Bethsaida, Galilee; died Patrre, Achaia
Andrew - Native of Bethsaida, brother of Simon Peter, and a fisherman: he became one of the twelve apostles
Philip (st.) And st. James' Day - Philip wasa native of Bethsaida, a town bordering on the Sea of Tiberias andwas one of the first of our Lord's disciples and was His constantcompanion and follower
Bethesda - " It is also called "Bethsaida" and "Beth-zatha" (John 5:2 , RSV marg
Belong - He went into a desert place belonging to Bethsaida
Philip the Apostle - Of Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter ("by dwelling", apo ; but of Capernaum "by birth", ek ; Greswell): John 1:44-45. Philip was probably the one whose duty was to provide for the daily sustenance of the twelve; or rather Luke's (Luke 9:10) notice that the desert where Jesus fed the multitude "was belonging to Bethsaida" gives us the key to the query being put to Philip; he belonged to Bethsaida (John 1:44): who then was so likely as Philip to know where bread was to be got? An undesigned coincidence and mark of genuineness
Andrew - He was of Bethsaida in Galilee (John 1:44 ), and was the brother of Simon Peter (Matthew 4:18 ; 10:2 )
Philip - From Bethsaida, he led his brother Nathanael to Jesus (John 1:43-51 )
Mat'Thew - His home was at Capernaum His business was the collection of dues and customs from persons and goods crossing the Sea of Galilee, or passing along the great Damascus road which ran along the shore between Bethsaida, Julius and Capernaum
Andrew, Feast of Saint - Andrew was of Bethsaida in Galileeand the brother of St
Philip - One of the apostles, a native of Bethsaida; he had been a disciple of John the Baptist
Galilee, Sea of - The other lake towns of importance were Bethsaida, which means “the fishing place”, and Tiberias, a Gentile city constructed by Herod Antipas when Jesus was a young man
Capernaum - It was joined with Chorazin and Bethsaida, in the fearful prediction of our Lord, the ruin of the cities giving a striking fulfillment of it
Philip - )...
Philip the apostle came from the fishing town of Bethsaida on the shore of Lake Galilee
Spitting, Spittle - Three occasions are recorded on which Christ made use of His spittle in the work of healing: with a deaf and dumb man in the Decapolis (Mark 7:33), when He touched the tongue of the afflicted with moisture from His own mouth; with a blind man at Bethsaida (Mark 8:23), when He ‘spat upon his eyes’; and with one born blind, at Jerusalem (John 9:6-7), when He made clay of the spittle and anointed the eyes of the blind
Andrew - an Apostle of Jesus Christ, a native of Bethsaida, and the brother of Peter
Philip - the Apostle, was a native of Bethsaida in Galilee
Philip - The Apostle, a native of Bethsaida, a disciple at first of John the Baptist, and one of the twelve who were earliest called to follow Christ, Matthew 10:3 John 1:43-48 Acts 1:13
Phil'ip - (lover of horses ) the apostle was of Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter, ( John 1:44 ) and apparently was among the Galilean peasants of that district who flocked to hear the preaching of the Baptist
Chorazin - —Mentioned once only in the Gospels, Matthew 11:21 = Luke 10:13, along with Bethsaida, as one of the ‘cities’ (πόλεις) where most of Jesus’ mighty deeds were done
Galilee - The noted mountains of Galilee were Carmel, Gilboa, and Tabor; the towns were Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum
Philip - One of the twelve apostles: he was a native of Bethsaida
Philip -
One of the twelve apostles; a native of Bethsaida, "the city of Andrew and Peter" (John 1:44 )
Andrew - A fisherman of Bethsaida at the lake of Gennesareth, son of Jonas
Galilee - It included the towns of Nain, Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Magdala, Dalmanutha, Bethsaida, Chorazin, and Capernaum
Simon Peter - (Greek: petra, rock) ...
Peter, originally Simon, son of Jona, was a fisherman of Bethsaida, a town on Lake Genesareth
James - James was of Bethsaida in Galilee, and left his earthly occupation to follow Christ, Mark 1:29,20
Galilee, Sea of - ...
The apostles were trying to reach Bethsaida on the western coast, when the gale from. " Bethsaida Julias, the city of Andrew and Peter, lay on the E
Merom, Waters of - This reaches the lake Tiberias near Bethsaida, and constitutes "the waters of Merom," for Josephus ( Galilee, Sea of - Such were Tiberias, Bethsaida, Capernaum, Chorazin, Magdala, and others
John - He was one, probably the younger, of the sons of Zebedee (Matthew 4:21 ) and Salome (Matthew 27:56 ; Compare Mark 15:40 ), and was born at Bethsaida
Fish, Fisher, Fishing - There, on the shore of el-Batiha lay Bethsaida-Julias; and, if there were two Bethsaidas (a much controverted question; see artt. Bethsaida and Capernaum), the second was at et-Tabigha or in its vicinity. Now Bethsaida means ‘house of fish,’ ‘fishery
Capernaum - The populace apparently did not accept His messianic role because they fell under the same condemnation as Chorazin and Bethsaida for failing to repent (Matthew 11:20-24 )
John the Apostle - The son of Zebedee and Salome, of Bethsaida
Peter - He belonged to Bethsaida ( John 1:44 ), probably the fisher-quarter of Capernaum (Bethsaida = ‘Fisher-home’). (1) In the synagogue of Capernaum, after the feeding of the five thousand at Bethsaida, Jesus delivered His discourse on the Bread of Life, full of hard sayings designed to test the faith of His disciples by shattering their Jewish dream of a worldly Messiah, a temporal King of Israel, a restorer of the ancient monarchy (John 6:22-65 )
Philip - And the fact that it is expressly mentioned that Philip, like these men, belonged to Bethsaida, would seem to point to a certain amount of friendship as having already existed between them, while his Greek name (a peculiarity which among the Apostles he shared with Andrew) makes it at least possible that he himself was originally of Greek descent. This accords entirely with what we know of the mixed Gentile population of Bethsaida
Peter - " He was a son of Jonas (John, so read the best manuscripts), a brother of Andrew, probably a native of Bethsaida in Galilee
Peter - He and his brother, Andrew, came from Bethsaida (John 1:44 ) and were Galilean fishermen (Mark 1:16 ; Luke 5:2-3 ; John 21:3 ), in partnership with the sons of Zebedee, James and John (Luke 5:10 )
Herod - He built a new city on the site of Paneas, near the sources of the Jordan, which he called Cæsarea Philippi, Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27, and raised Bethsaida to the rank of a city under the title of Julias, and died there a
Christ, Miracles of - ...
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS ...
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life
Miracles of Christ - ...
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS ...
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life
Sodom - The three cities named are Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum
Peter - He was of Bethsaida, and was the son of Jonas, a fisherman, which occupation he also followed
Roads - Skirting the shores of the Sea of Galilee, it crossed the Jordan near Bethsaida, and went over a spur of the Anti-Libanus, and then east by north to Damascus
Bethesda - 589): ‘But farther in the city are twin fish-pools having five porches which are called Bethsaida. : ‘Bethsaida, peculiar for being a double lake, of which one pool is for the most part filled by winter rains, the other is discoloured by reddish waters
City - Bethlehem and Bethsaida, though generally classed as cities, are spoken of as κῶμαι in John 7:42, Mark 8:23; Mark 8:26, the natural inference from which is that the words ‘city,’ ‘town,’ and ‘village,’ though having, as with us, a technical signification, were occasionally used in a looser and less precise manner. Cities like Bethsaida and Capernaum, again, were preponderantly Jewish
Naphtali - (For other features of the region see Bethsaida; CAPERNAUM; CHINNERETH; GALILEE; HAZOR
Andrew - Andrew was a native of Bethsaida (John 1:44), but afterwards shared the same house (Mark 1:29) at Capernaum (Mark 1:21) with his better known brother Simon Peter
Judea - Its principal towns were Capernaum, at the northern extremity of the lake of Gennesareth; Bethsaida, a considerable village a few leagues south of Capernaum; Cinnereth, south of Bethsaida, rebuilt by Herod Antipas, and named Tiberias; Tarichaea, a considerable town at the efflux of the river Jordan from the sea of Tiberias, thirty stadia south from the town of Tiberias; Nazareth, two leagues north-west of Mount Tabor, and equally distant from the lake of Gennesareth and the sea coast; Arbela, six miles west of Nazareth; Sepphoris, or Dio-Caesarea, now Sefouri, a large and well fortified town, about five leagues north north-west of Mount Tabor; Zabulon, a strong and populous place, sixty stadia south-east of Ptolemais; Acre, or Accon, seven miles north from the promontory of Carmel, afterward enlarged and called Ptolemais by Ptolemy I, of Egypt, and in the time of the crusades distinguished by the name of Acre, the last city possessed by the Christians in Syria, and was taken and destroyed by the Sultan Serapha, of Egypt, in 1291; Kedes, or Cydissus, a Levitical city at the foot of Mount Panium, twenty miles south-east of Tyre; Dan, originally Laish, on the north boundary of the Holy Land, about thirty miles south- east of Sidon; Paneas, near to Dan, or, according to some, only a different name for the same place, was repaired by Philip, son of Herod the Great, and by him named Caesarea, in honour of Augustus, with the addition of Philippi, to distinguish it from the other town of the same name in Samaria; Jotapata, the strongest town in Galilee, about four leagues north north-east of Dio-Caesarea; and Japha and Gischala, two other fortified places in the same district. Gaulonitis, a narrow strip of land between Batanaea and the shore of the sea of Tiberias, stretching northward to Mount Hermon, and containing Gamala, a strong town near the southern extremity of the sea of Tiberias; Argob, between this sea and Mount Hippos; Julias, supposed to be the same as Chorazin, and by others to be Bethsaida; and Seleuca, a fortified place on the east border of Lacus Samochonitis
Sight - The blind man of Bethsaida (Mark 8:22-26) was treated similarly
Cosmopolitanism - , Luke 13:29 ‘many shall come from the east and the west … but the sons of the kingdom shall be cast forth’; and Matthew 11:21, Romans 11:11-12 where the unrepentant Bethsaida and Chorazin are contrasted with Tyre and Sidon)
Blindness (2) - ...
Jesus leads the blind man out of the village (Bethsaida), and, having spit upon his eyes, touches them
James - He was of Bethsaida, in Galilee, and left all to follow Christ
pe'Ter - Peter did not live, as a mere laboring man, in a hut by the seaside, but first at Bethsaida, and afterward in a house at Capernaum belonging to himself or his mother-in-law, which must have been rather a large one, since he received in it not only our Lord and his fellow disciples, but multitudes who were attracted by the miracles and preaching of Jesus
Caesarea Philippi - ’s order it follows the feeding of the five thousand in the neighbourhood of Bethsaida. According to Mark 8:22; Mark 8:27, it was from Bethsaida that Jesus went into the villages of Caesarea, and in John 6:68 ff. Returning to Galilee, He feeds the four thousand, refuses the request of the Pharisees and Sadducees for a sign from heaven, with its evident Messianic implication, warns His disciples against the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees (so Matthew 16:6; Mark 8:15 has ‘Pharisees and Herod’), heals a blind man near Bethsaida (Mark 8:22 ff
Galilee - Its principal cities were Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, Nazareth, Cana, Capernaum, Nain, Caesarea of Palestine, and Ptolemais
Feeding the Multitudes - fixes it at Bethsaida Julias (see Capernaum)
Dalmanutha - Wellhausen has no doubt that it must be sought on the eastern shore, in the neighbourhood of Bethsaida (Mark 8:22), if this town itself did not belong to it
Peter - ...
Peter and Jesus...
The son of a man named John (or Jonah) (Matthew 16:17; John 1:42; John 21:15), Peter came from Bethsaida on the shore of Lake Galilee (John 1:44)
Reproach (2) - Matthew 4:13); Chorazin and Bethsaida had shared with it in the fullest manifestations of His power and grace
Jordan - Leaving the cave of Panion, it crosses the bogs and fens of the lake Semichonitis; and after a course of fifteen miles, passes under the city of Julius, the ancient Bethsaida; then expands into a beautiful sheet of water, named the lake of Gennesareth; and, after flowing a long way through the desert, empties itself into the lake Asphaltites, or the Dead Sea
Appreciation (of Christ) - Inspite of all the enmity written there; remembering that there were those who saw in Him an ally of Beelzebub (Matthew 12:24), working with the devil’s aid; that some called Him ‘a gluttonous man, a wine-bibber, friend of publicans and sinners’ (Matthew 11:19); that lawyers, and Pharisees, and Sadducees were ever watching to trip Him (Matthew 22:15), and plotting with Herodians (Matthew 22:16) to destroy Him; that the Galilaean cities, which should have known Him best,—Chorazin, Bethsaida, Capernaum (Matthew 11:21; Matthew 11:23), and even Nazareth,—rejected Him (Luke 4:28 f
Dead - " Our Lord alludes to the same custom, in that denunciation: "Wo unto thee, Chorazin! wo unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon
Peter - ) Of Bethsaida on the sea of Galilee. He lived first at Bethsaida, then in Capernaum, in a house either his own or his mother-in-law's, large enough to receive Christ and his fellow apostles and some of the multitude who thronged about Him
Peter - His native town was Bethsaida, on the western coast of the Sea of Galilee, to which also Philip belonged
Judgment, Day of - He himself had a similar message for the people of Chorazin and Bethsaida: It will be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon on judgment day than for them (Matthew 11:22 ; Luke 10:14 )
Jordan - Jordan enters Gennesareth two miles below the ancient city Julias or Bethsaida of Gaulonitis on the E
Nathanael - Philip, like Nathanael, was a Galilaean, the one of Bethsaida, time other of Cana (John 21:2): they were therefore neighbours, and evidently friends
John the Apostle - Youngest of the twelve, probably of Bethsaida upon the sea of Galilee (John 1:44; Luke 5:10), the town of their partners Simon and Andrew
Touch - By a touch, recorded in its stronger form of grasp or imposition of hands, He healed one deaf and dumb (Mark 7:33), the blind man at Bethsaida (Mark 8:22-26), a woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13:13), the epileptic lad (Mark 9:27), many divers diseases (Mark 6:5), and the dead daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9:25)
Peter - the great Apostle of the circumcision, was the son of Jona, and born at Bethsaida, a town situated on the western shore of the lake of Gennesareth, but in what particular year we are not informed, John 1:42-43
Galilee - These are Chorazin, Capernaum, Magdala, Tiberias, Taricheae, Hippos, Gamala, Gergesa, and Bethsaida
Apostle - Their names were, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James the greater, the son of Zebedee; and John his brother, who was the beloved disciple; Philip of Bethsaida; Bartholomew; Thomas, called Didymus, as having a twin brother; Matthew or Levi, who had been a publican; James, the son of Alpheus, called James the less; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, and who was also called Judas or Jude, the brother of James; Simon, the Canaanite, so called, as some have thought, because he was a native of Cana, or, as Dr
Man (2) - There was woe to come upon Chorazin and Bethsaida
Palestine - The towns around the lake testify to this fact: Bethsaida means “fishing place,” and Tarichea is from a Greek term meaning “preserved fish
Peter (2) - The place of his birth was probably Bethsaida (John 1:44)
Political Conditions - Like most of the Herods, he had a passion for building; and to the quiet and well-governed city of Caesarea Philippi, near the alleged source of the Jordan, Jesus withdrew (Matthew 16:13, Mark 8:27) when the multitudes were crowding upon Him and His enemies tempting Him (Matthew 16:1); just as Bethsaida, another of Philip’s cities, was His refuge when news reached Him of the Baptist’s death (Luke 9:10, cf
Gospel - The exorcisms and other miracles were evidence to Roman Christians being victimized by evil that Jesus could deliver them just as He delivered the demoniac or healed the blind man at Bethsaida (Mark 5:1-20 ; Mark 8:22-26 )
Jerusalem - The healing of the lame man at the pool of Bethsaida is also recorded in John (chap
Cures - The daughter of Jairus was ordered rest and food, and the blind man at Bethsaida was only by degrees restored to perfect sight
John the Apostle - John was a son of Zebedee, a master-fisherman in good position, plying his craft in one of the towns on the Lake of Galilee, possibly Bethsaida
John the Baptist - ...
JOHN THE EVANGELIST was a native of Bethsaida, in Galilee, son of Zebedee and Salome, by profession a fisherman
Prayer (2) - And there is also the mountain-top near Bethsaida (Mark 6:46), and that other which was the scene of the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:1, Mark 9:2, Luke 9:28), and which St
Mark, Gospel According to - ), of the blind man at Bethsaida ( Mark 8:22 f
Herod - He died at Julius, the city which he raised Bethsaida into, A
Boyhood - The oral teaching at home, the reading in school, and the hearing in the synagogue,—all had a share in producing that knowledge of the Jewish Bible which, as we see in the Gospels, was possessed even by working men like the fishers of Bethsaida (Luke 9:54 etc
John (the Apostle) - John’s home was in Galilee (probably at Bethsaida), where his father, Zebedee, a man apparently of means (Mark 1:20), was busy as a fisherman on the Lake
Jews - The Romans under Vespasian invaded the country, and took the cities of Galilee, Chorazen, Bethsaida, Capernaum, &c
Apostles - On the way Philip encountered his friend Nathanael, who lived in the village of Cana, at no great distance from his own home at Bethsaida, and informed him of the discovery of the Messiah, in the person of Jesus of Nazareth